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Sample records for acupuncture fear scale

  1. Acupuncture

    MedlinePlus

    Acupuncture has been practiced in China and other Asian countries for thousands of years. Acupuncture involves stimulating specific points on the body. This ... functions of the body. Research has shown that acupuncture reduces nausea and vomiting after surgery and chemotherapy. ...

  2. Acupuncture-brain interactions as hypothesized by mood scale recordings.

    PubMed

    Acker, Helmut; Schmidt-Rathjens, Claudia; Acker, Till; Fandrey, Joachim; Ehleben, Wilhelm

    2015-09-01

    Mood expressions encompassing positive scales like "activity, elation, contemplation, calmness" and negative scales like "anger, excitement, depression, fatigue" were applied for introducing a new tool to assess the effects of acupuncture on brain structures. Traditional acupuncture points defined in the literature for their effects on task negative and task positive brain structures were applied to chronic disease patients supposed to have dominant negative mood scales. Burn-out syndrome (n=10) and female chronic pain patients (n=22) showed a significant improvement on positive mood scales and a decline in negative mood scales after 10 acupuncture sessions. We observed a direct effect of acupuncture on brain structures in 5 burn-out syndrome patients showing an immediate, fast suppression of unusual slow high amplitude EEG waves in response to acupuncture needle rotation. These EEG waves described here for the first time in awake patients disappeared after 10 sessions but gradually returned after 1-1.5 years without acupuncture. This was accompanied with deterioration of positive mood scales and a return to negative mood scales. Both male (n=16) and female chronic pain patients reported a significant decrease of pain intensity after 10 sessions. Female patients only, however, showed a linear correlation between initial pain intensity and pain relief as well as a linear correlation between changes in pain intensity and mood scales accompanied by a drop of their heart rate during the acupuncture sessions. We hypothesized that mood scale recordings are a sensitive and specific new tool to reveal individual acupuncture-brain interaction. PMID:26025590

  3. Acupuncture

    MedlinePlus

    Acupuncture has been practiced in China and other Asian countries for thousands of years. Acupuncture involves stimulating specific points on the body. This is most often done by inserting thin needles ...

  4. Acupuncture

    MedlinePlus

    ... it is best to check with your insurance company to find out if all or part of your acupuncture treatment will be covered. If your insurance does not cover acupuncture, you can talk to your acupuncturist about their fees and possible discounts if you are a student. Some college or ...

  5. Why do we fear death? The construction and validation of the Reasons for Death Fear Scale.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed M

    2002-10-01

    Previous research has disclosed different meanings of death, varieties of death anxiety, and hundreds of factors extracted from the uni- and multi-dimensional death anxiety scales. However, there have been no empirical studies to elucidate the reasons for death fear. The Reasons for Death Fear Scale (RDFS) was constructed and validated. It consists of 18 brief items, with good reliabilities ( > .8). Four factors of the RDFS were labeled Fear of Pain and Punishment, Fear of Losing Worldly Involvements, Religious Transgressions and Failures, and Parting from Loved Ones. A high-loaded factor was extracted in which the RDFS's loading was .45, while the loadings of the scales of death anxiety, death depression, and death obsession ranged between .8 and .9. Of interest is that the correlation between the RDFS and death anxiety was higher than that with general anxiety. No gender-differences were detected with college students. It is important to note that the findings of this study were only researched through Arabic and mainly Muslim college students. The generalizability of the present results to other populations would seem to merit further investigation. PMID:12243198

  6. The Koala Fear Questionnaire: a standardized self-report scale for assessing fears and fearfulness in pre-school and primary school children.

    PubMed

    Muris, Peter; Meesters, Cor; Mayer, Birgit; Bogie, Nicole; Luijten, Monique; Geebelen, Elke; Bessems, Judith; Smit, Carelijn

    2003-05-01

    The Koala Fear Questionnaire (KFQ) is a standardized self-report scale for assessing fears and fearfulness in children aged between 4 and 12 years. The current article presents six studies which examined the reliability and validity of the KFQ. Study 1 (N=108) demonstrated that the visual fear scales of Koala bears as employed in the KFQ are highly comparable to the standard 3-point scales that are used in other childhood fear measures. Study 2 (N=163) provided support for the convergent validity of the KFQ in a sample of 8- to 14-year-old children. That is, the scale correlated substantially with alternative measures of childhood fear and anxiety. Study 3 (N=189) showed that the KFQ possesses good internal consistency and test-retest stability in a group of 8- to 11-year-old children. The results of Studies 4 (N=129) and 5 (N=176) indicated that the KFQ is suitable for children aged 4 to 6 years and demonstrated that the psychometric properties of the scale in younger children are highly similar to those obtained in older children. Study 6 (N=926) showed that the factor structure of the KFQ was theoretically meaningful: although the data clearly pointed in the direction of one factor of general fearfulness, spurs of the commonly found five-factor solution of childhood fear were found in the KFQ. Altogether, the KFQ seems to be a valuable addition to the instrumentarium of clinicians and researchers who are working with fearful and anxious children. PMID:12711267

  7. The Development and Initial Validation of a Scale to Measure Social Fear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raulin, Michael L.; Wee, Jennifer L.

    1984-01-01

    Developed a true-false scale to measure social fear, using procedures to maximize reliability and minimize response set bias (N=910). Interviews with selected subjects (N=44) confirmed that the scale measures social fear, and the scale was found to correlate with previously developed schizotypy scales (N=252). (Author/JAC)

  8. Evaluation of treatment related fear using a newly developed fear scale for children: “Fear assessment picture scale” and its association with physiological response

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Nishidha; Tiwari, Shilpi; Thakur, Ruchi; Agrawal, Nikita; Shashikiran, N. D.; Singla, Shilpy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Dental treatment is usually a poignant phenomenon for children. Projective scales are preferred over psychometric scales to recognize it, and to obtain the self-report from children. Aims: The aims were to evaluate treatment related fear using a newly developed fear scale for children, fear assessment picture scale (FAPS), and anxiety with colored version of modified facial affective scale (MFAS) - three faces along with physiologic responses (pulse rate and oxygen saturation) obtained by pulse oximeter before and during pulpectomy procedure. Settings and Design: Total, 60 children of age 6–8 years who were visiting the dental hospital for the first time and needed pulpectomy treatment were selected. Children selected were of sound physical, physiological, and mental condition. Two projective scales were used; one to assess fear - FAPS and to assess anxiety – colored version of MFAS - three faces. These were co-related with the physiological responses (oxygen saturation and pulse rate) of children obtained by pulse oximeter before and during the pulpectomy procedure. Statistical Analysis Used: Shapiro–Wilk test, McNemar's test, Wilcoxon signed ranks test, Kruskal–Wallis test, Mann–Whitney test were applied in the study. Results: The physiological responses showed association with FAPS and MFAS though not significant. However, oxygen saturation with MFAS showed a significant change between “no anxiety” and “some anxiety” as quantified by Kruskal–Wallis test value 6.287, P = 0.043 (<0.05) before pulpectomy procedure. Conclusions: The FAPS can prove to be a pragmatic tool in spotting the fear among young children. This test is easy and fast to apply on children and reduces the chair-side time. PMID:26321830

  9. Psychometric Evaluation of the Fear of Positive Evaluation Scale in Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Justin W.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Goldin, Philippe R.; Gross, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The Fear of Positive Evaluation Scale (FPES; J. W. Weeks, R. G. Heimberg, & T. L. Rodebaugh, 2008) was designed to assess fear of positive evaluation, a proposed cognitive component of social anxiety. Although previous findings on the psychometric properties of the FPES have been highly encouraging, only 1 previous study has examined the…

  10. Measuring Evaluation Fears in Adolescence: Psychometric Validation of the Portuguese Versions of the Fear of Positive Evaluation Scale and the Specific Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vagos, Paula; Salvador, Maria do Céu; Rijo, Daniel; Santos, Isabel M.; Weeks, Justin W.; Heimberg, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Modified measures of Fear of Negative Evaluation and Fear of Positive Evaluation were examined among Portuguese adolescents. These measures demonstrated replicable factor structure, internal consistency, and positive relationships with social anxiety and avoidance. Gender differences were found. Implications for evaluation and intervention are…

  11. Development of a New Fear of Hypoglycemia Scale: FH-15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anarte Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Caballero, Francisco Felix; Ruiz de Adana, Maria Soledad; Rondan, Rosa Maria; Carreira, Monica; Dominguez-Lopez, Marta; Machado, Alberto; Gonzalo-Marin, Montserrat; Tapia, Maria Jose; Valdes, Sergio; Gonzalez-Romero, Stella; Soriguer, Federico C.

    2011-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse event associated with insulin treatment in diabetes. The consequences of hypoglycemia can be quite aversive and potentially life threatening. The physical sequelae provide ample reason for patients to fear hypoglycemia and avoid episodes. For these reasons, our purpose in this study was to develop a new…

  12. Fear of Femininity Scale (FOFS): Men's Gender Role Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, James M.; And Others

    One unified aspect of men's gender role conflict is the fear of femininity, which can produce six conflicts: restrictive emotionality; homophobia; socialized control, power, and competition; restrictive affectionate behavior; obsession with achievement and success; and health care problems. To measure these constructs 85 items were generated from…

  13. Ever-present threats from information technology: the Cyber-Paranoia and Fear Scale

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Oliver J.; Stevenson, Caroline; Freedman, Fleur

    2014-01-01

    Delusions involving technology, and specifically the internet, are increasingly common, and fear-reality statistics suggest computer-related fears are very widespread. These fears form a continuum from the widely understandable and realistic to the unrealistic, and frankly paranoid. The present study investigated the validity of this construct in a non-clinical population by constructing a novel self-report measure. The new Cyber-Paranoia and Fear Scale aims to measure the perception of information technology-related threats originating from or enabled by computers, smartphones, social networks, and digital surveillance. Psychometric properties of the new Cyber-Paranoia and Fear Scale are reported alongside an established measure of suspiciousness and paranoia in 181 participants including a sub-group of fifty information technology professionals. Exploratory factor analysis suggested the presence of two, related, dimensions that we term cyber-paranoia and cyber-fear. Both sub-scales were internally consistent and produced a normal distribution of scores. The relationships of the sub-scales with age, gender, trait paranoia, digital literacy, and digital inclusion are supportive of construct validity. The distinctiveness of ‘cyber-paranoia’ from general trait paranoia appears to mirror the clinical distinctiveness of ‘internet’ and other technology-fuelled delusions. Knowledge provision to increase technological proficiency and awareness may bring about a reduction in cyber-paranoia. PMID:25505431

  14. Ever-present threats from information technology: the Cyber-Paranoia and Fear Scale.

    PubMed

    Mason, Oliver J; Stevenson, Caroline; Freedman, Fleur

    2014-01-01

    Delusions involving technology, and specifically the internet, are increasingly common, and fear-reality statistics suggest computer-related fears are very widespread. These fears form a continuum from the widely understandable and realistic to the unrealistic, and frankly paranoid. The present study investigated the validity of this construct in a non-clinical population by constructing a novel self-report measure. The new Cyber-Paranoia and Fear Scale aims to measure the perception of information technology-related threats originating from or enabled by computers, smartphones, social networks, and digital surveillance. Psychometric properties of the new Cyber-Paranoia and Fear Scale are reported alongside an established measure of suspiciousness and paranoia in 181 participants including a sub-group of fifty information technology professionals. Exploratory factor analysis suggested the presence of two, related, dimensions that we term cyber-paranoia and cyber-fear. Both sub-scales were internally consistent and produced a normal distribution of scores. The relationships of the sub-scales with age, gender, trait paranoia, digital literacy, and digital inclusion are supportive of construct validity. The distinctiveness of 'cyber-paranoia' from general trait paranoia appears to mirror the clinical distinctiveness of 'internet' and other technology-fuelled delusions. Knowledge provision to increase technological proficiency and awareness may bring about a reduction in cyber-paranoia. PMID:25505431

  15. Assessing Fear in Patients with Cervical Pain: Development and Validation of the Pictorial Fear of Activity Scale – Cervical (PFActS-C)

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Dennis C.; Robinson, James P.; Sherman, Jeffrey J.; Burwinkle, Tasha; Swanson, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    The fear avoidance model (FAM) postulates that fear of pain or reinjury is a risk factor for persistent pain and disability, because it leads to avoidance of physical activity. Research on the FAM has not yielded consistent results, which may be attributed to the model itself, but could also be a product of the way fear of movement is assessed. Studies of the FAM have measured fear using verbal scales consisting of items that are often vague and have only an indirect relationship with fear. This study reports on the development of a Pictorial Fear of Activity Scale – Cervical (PFActS-C). The instrument consists of a set of photographs depicting movements in which 4 factors that determine biomechanical demands on the neck are systematically varied - Direction of Movement, Arm Position, Weight Bearing, and Extremity of Movement. Patients (n = 355) who had been involved in motor vehicle collisions with minimal symptoms (n = 143) and moderate to severe symptoms (n = 212) rated their fear of engaging in a set of activities depicted in the PFActS-C. Based on a principle components analysis, a 19-item measure was developed. Internal consistency (alpha = .98), stability over time (n = 44, IntraClass Correlation = .72), and construct validity were all good to excellent. The results indicate that the PFActS-C may be a useful tool for assessing fear of movement in patients with cervical pain. Research is needed to confirm the factor structure of the PFActS-C and to assess the generalizability of the results to other samples with neck pain. PMID:18417291

  16. Spanish Adaptation of the Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomas-Sabado, Joaquin; Limonero, Joaquin; Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    The Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale (CL-FODS) consists of 4 subscales: Death of Self, Dying of Self, Death of Others, and Dying of Others. The aim of this study was to develop a Spanish version of the CL-FODS and to explore its psychometric properties. The revised version of the scale was translated into Spanish from English. Then, the back…

  17. Empirical Validation and Psychometric Evaluation of the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale in Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Justin W.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Fresco, David M.; Hart, Trevor A.; Turk, Cynthia L.; Schneier, Franklin R.; Liebowitz, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    The Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (BFNE; M. R. Leary, 1983a) is often used to assess fear of negative evaluation, the core feature of social anxiety disorder. However, few studies have examined its psychometric properties in large samples of socially anxious patients. Although the BFNE yields a single total score, confirmatory factor…

  18. Effectiveness of acupuncture and bee venom acupuncture in idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seung-Yeon; Shim, So-Ra; Rhee, Hak Young; Park, Hi-Joon; Jung, Woo-Sang; Moon, Sang-Kwan; Park, Jung-Mi; Ko, Chang-Nam; Cho, Ki-Ho; Park, Seong-Uk

    2012-09-01

    This study aimed to explore the effectiveness of both acupuncture and bee venom acupuncture as adjuvant therapies for idiopathic Parkinson's disease. We recruited 43 adults with idiopathic Parkinson's disease who had been on a stable dose of antiparkinsonian medication for at least 1 month. They were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: acupuncture, bee venom acupuncture, or control. All participants were assessed using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Berg Balance Scale, and the time and number of steps required to walk 30 m. Treatment groups underwent stimulation of 10 acupuncture points using acupuncture or bee venom acupuncture twice a week for 8 weeks. The initial assessment was repeated at the completion of treatment. The control group did not receive any treatment. Participants in the bee venom acupuncture group showed significant improvement on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (total score, as well as parts II and III individually), the Berg Balance Scale, and the 30 m walking time. When compared to the control group, the bee venom acupuncture group experienced significantly greater improvement on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. In the acupuncture group, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (part III and total scores) and the Beck Depression Inventory showed significant improvement. The control group showed no significant changes in any outcome after 8 weeks. In this pilot study, both acupuncture and bee venom acupuncture showed promising results as adjuvant therapies for Parkinson's disease. PMID:22632852

  19. Cross-national measure of fear-based xenophobia: development of a cumulative scale.

    PubMed

    van der Veer, Kees; Ommundsen, Reidar; Yakushko, Oksana; Higler, Laurens

    2011-08-01

    To apply a Mokken Scale Procedure in developing a hierarchical cross-national scale to measure xenophobia, a pool of 30 xenophobia-related items was collected from several sources and modified using established unidimensional criteria. The survey was administered to 608 undergraduate students in the USA, 193 undergraduate students in The Netherlands, and 303 undergraduate students in Norway. 14 items measuring perceived threat or fear and meeting the criteria of the Stereotype Content Model were selected for further analysis. A separate item analysis and, subsequently, Mokken Scale Procedure yielded a cumulative scale with the same five items for each of the three samples. The items and the total scale met criteria for homogeneity in all samples with H > .40. PMID:22049645

  20. Psychometric Evaluation of the Fear of Positive Evaluation Scale in Patients With Social Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, Justin W.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Goldin, Philippe R.; Gross, James J.

    2014-01-01

    The Fear of Positive Evaluation Scale (FPES; Weeks, Heimberg, & Rodebaugh, 2008) was designed to assess fear of positive evaluation, a proposed cognitive component of social anxiety. Although previous findings on the psychometric properties of the FPES have been highly encouraging, only one previous study has examined the psychometric profile of the FPES in a sample of patients with social anxiety disorder (Fergus et al., 2009). The primary purpose of the present study was to conduct a large multi-site examination of the psychometric profile of the FPES among patients with a principal diagnosis of social anxiety disorder (n = 226; generalized subtype: 97.8%). Responses of non-anxious control participants (n = 42) were also examined. The factorial validity, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct validity, and treatment sensitivity of the FPES were strongly supported by our findings. Furthermore, an FPES cutoff score was identified for distinguishing levels of fear of positive evaluation characteristic of patients with social anxiety disorder from those characteristic of the control group. Results provide additional support for the psychometric properties of the FPES in clinical samples. PMID:21966932

  1. The Fear-avoidance Components Scale (FACS): Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a New Measure of Pain-related Fear Avoidance.

    PubMed

    Neblett, Randy; Mayer, Tom G; Hartzell, Meredith M; Williams, Mark J; Gatchel, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Pain-related fear avoidance (FA), a common problem for patients with painful medical conditions, involves pain-related catastrophizing cognitions, hypervigilance, and avoidance behaviors, which can ultimately lead to decreased functioning, depression, and disability. Several patient-reported instruments have been developed to measure FA, but they have been criticized for limited construct validity, inadequate item specificity, lack of cutoff scores, and missing important FA components. The Fear-Avoidance Components Scale (FACS) is a new patient-reported measure designed to comprehensively evaluate FA in patients with painful medical conditions. It combines important components of FA found in prior FA scales, while trying to correct some of their deficiencies, within a framework of the most current FA model. Psychometric evaluation of the FACS found high internal consistency (α = 0.92) and high test/retest reliability (r = 0.90-0.94, P < 0.01). FACS scores differentiated between 2 separate chronic pain patient samples and a nonpatient comparison group. When clinically relevant severity levels were created, FACS severity scores were highly associated with FA-related patient-reported psychosocial and objective lifting performance variables. These results suggest that the FACS is a psychometrically strong and reliable measure that can help healthcare providers assess FA-related barriers to function and recovery. PMID:26228238

  2. Dynamic competition between large-scale functional networks differentiates fear conditioning and extinction in humans.

    PubMed

    Marstaller, Lars; Burianová, Hana; Reutens, David C

    2016-07-01

    The high evolutionary value of learning when to respond to threats or when to inhibit previously learned associations after changing threat contingencies is reflected in dedicated networks in the animal and human brain. Recent evidence further suggests that adaptive learning may be dependent on the dynamic interaction of meta-stable functional brain networks. However, it is still unclear which functional brain networks compete with each other to facilitate associative learning and how changes in threat contingencies affect this competition. The aim of this study was to assess the dynamic competition between large-scale networks related to associative learning in the human brain by combining a repeated differential conditioning and extinction paradigm with independent component analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging data. The results (i) identify three task-related networks involved in initial and sustained conditioning as well as extinction, and demonstrate that (ii) the two main networks that underlie sustained conditioning and extinction are anti-correlated with each other and (iii) the dynamic competition between these two networks is modulated in response to changes in associative contingencies. These findings provide novel evidence for the view that dynamic competition between large-scale functional networks differentiates fear conditioning from extinction learning in the healthy brain and suggest that dysfunctional network dynamics might contribute to learning-related neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27079532

  3. [Acupuncture and stress].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cisong; Zhu Yihui; Wei, Qin; Kou, Jun; Wen, Peipei

    2015-04-01

    The relationship between acupuncture and stress is discussed from three aspects, including is it possible for acupuncture stimulation to be a stressor, whether acupuncture will start stress reaction, and whether acupuncture effects contain some stress factors. It is believed that correct acupuncture manipulation will not cause stress response, however, under some circumstances, such as inaccurate manipulation, improper treatment or patients who are very nervous but do not receive effective intervention, acupuncture is likely to cause stress response. Acupuncture-induced stress response is totally different from acupuncture anti-stress. The possible stress factors in acupuncture effect are explored, which can provide a new angle for the research on action mechanism of acupuncture. From the view of stress to review acupuncture treatment, there are three enlightenments: emphasizing on communication between doctors and patients, avoiding over-pursuit of deqi and focusing on analysis of the body constitution. PMID:26054156

  4. Dynamic functional connectivity analysis of Taichong (LR3) acupuncture effects in various brain regions.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wenjuan; Yan, Bin; He, Hongjian; Tong, Li; Li, Jianxin

    2012-02-25

    The present study conducted a multi-scale dynamic functional connectivity analysis to evaluate dynamic behavior of acupuncture at Taichong (LR3) and sham acupoints surrounding Taichong. Results showed differences in wavelet transform coherence characteristic curves in the declive, precuneus, postcentral gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, and occipital lobe between acupuncture at Taichong and acupuncture at sham acupoints. The differences in characteristic curves revealed that the specific effect of acupuncture existed during the post-acupuncture rest state and lasted for 5 minutes. PMID:25774188

  5. Acupuncture for Vascular Dementia: A Pragmatic Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Guang-Xia; Li, Qian-Qian; Yang, Bo-Feng; Liu, Yan; Guan, Li-Ping; Wu, Meng-Meng; Wang, Lin-Peng; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    In this trial, patients who agreed to random assignment were allocated to a randomized acupuncture group (R-acupuncture group) or control group. Those who declined randomization were assigned to a nonrandomized acupuncture group (NR-acupuncture group). Patients in the R-acupuncture group and NR-acupuncture group received up to 21 acupuncture sessions during a period of 6 weeks plus routine care, while the control group received routine care alone. Cognitive function, activities of daily living, and quality of life were assessed by mini-mental state examination (MMSE), Activities of Daily Living Scale (ADL), and dementia quality of life questionnaire (DEMQOL), respectively. All the data were collected at baseline, after 6-week treatment, and after 4-week follow-up. No significant differences of MMSE scores were observed among the three groups but pooled-acupuncture group had significant higher score than control group. Compared to control group, ADL score significantly decreased in NR-acupuncture group and pooled-acupuncture group. For DEMQOL scores, no significant differences were observed among the three groups, as well as between pooled-acupuncture group and control group. Additional acupuncture to routine care may have beneficial effects on the improvements of cognitive status and activities of daily living but have limited efficacy on health-related quality of life in VaD patients. PMID:26495416

  6. Agoraphobia: Fear of Fear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musetto, Andrew P.

    1984-01-01

    Agoraphobia is a complex phobia in which individuals react with intense anxiety to certain stress situations. Basically, agoraphobics live in fear of becoming afraid. Describes the psychotherapeutic treatment that helps agoraphobics to become more self-sufficient and to face their fears by understanding themselves better. (CS)

  7. Psychometric properties of the brief version of the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale in a Turkish sample.

    PubMed

    Koydemir, Selda; Demir, Ayhan

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to report initial data on the psychometric properties of the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale. The scale was applied to a nonclinical sample of 250 (137 women, 113 men) Turkish undergraduate students selected randomly from Middle East Technical University. Their mean age was 20.4 yr. (SD= 1.9). The factor structure of the Turkish version, its criterion validity, and internal reliability coefficients were assessed. Although maximum likelihood factor analysis initially indicated that the scale had only one factor, a forced two-factor solution accounted for more variance (61%) in scale scores than a single factor. The straightforward items loaded on the first factor, and the reverse-coded items loaded on the second factor. The total score was significantly positively correlated with scores on the Revised Cheek and Buss Shyness Scale and significantly negatively correlated with scores on the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Factor 1 (straightforward items) correlated more highly with both Shyness and Self-esteem than Factor 2 (reverse-coded items). Internal consistency estimate was .94 for the Total scores, .91 for the Factor 1 (straightforward items), and .87 for the Factor 2 (reverse-coded items). No sex differences were evident for Fear of Negative Evaluation. PMID:17688107

  8. Acupuncture: In Depth

    MedlinePlus

    ... more information on traditional Chinese medicine . What the Science Says About the Effectiveness of Acupuncture Results from ... in some degree of pain relief. What the Science Says About Safety and Side Effects of Acupuncture ...

  9. [Impacts of numerology on acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Wu, Changqiu; Wu, Xueyi

    2016-04-01

    Numerology has a long history in China and has the profound impacts on every academic field in TCM, with acupuncture involved. In this paper, the impacts on acupuncture were discussed in different aspects such as the numbers of meridians, the length of meridian, the time taboo of acupuncture, acupuncture manipulation and time acupuncture. It was found that numerology had laid the critical impact on acupuncture and had the profound imprint nowadays. It is of great significance to study the numerology theory in its impacts on acupuncture, in the exploration on the theories behind acupuncture as well as the comprehensive understanding of acupuncture. PMID:27352509

  10. Psychometric evaluation of the Concerns of Social Reprisal Scale: Further explicating the roots of fear of positive evaluation.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Justin W; Menatti, Andrew R; Howell, Ashley N

    2015-12-01

    Fear of positive evaluation (FPE) has been proposed to be an important feature of social anxiety disorder (SAD) and to be rooted, at least partly, in concerns of social reprisal due to positive impressions. In order to formally test this hypothesis, the Concerns of Social Reprisal Scale (CSRS) was developed. The purpose of the present series of studies was to examine the psychometric profile of the CSRS across several independent samples including: a large (n=981) undergraduate sample; a clinical sample of individuals diagnosed with social anxiety disorder (n=27), and a demographically-matched subsample of healthy control participants (n=24). The factorial validity, internal consistency, and construct validity of the CSRS were examined. Results across both studies provided support for the psychometric profile of the CSRS. The implications of concerns of social reprisal for the assessment of social anxiety symptoms, theoretical models of fear of evaluation and SAD, and their potential clinical utility with regard to treating SAD are discussed. PMID:26414155

  11. Objective Measurement of Fear of Success and Fear of Failure: A Factor Analytic Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadd, Susan; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Fear of success and failure scales were administered. Scores were intercorrelated. Results indicated fear of success is not unidimensional. Measures of fear of success and fear of failure were highly related. Stable orthogonal factors were obtained: fear of success, test anxiety, sex-role-related attitudes, neurotic insecurity, and the value of…

  12. Brief version of the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale - Straightforward Items (BFNE-S): psychometric properties in a Spanish population.

    PubMed

    Pitarch, María José Gallego

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Brief version of the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale - Straightforward Items (BFNE-S) in a non-clinical Spanish population. Rodebaugh et al. (2004) recommend the use of this scale composed of 8 straightforwardly-worded items, instead of the 12-item version of the BFNE. The sample consisted of 542 undergraduate students, 71.3% of whom were women and 28.7% were men; the mean age was 21.71 (4.78) years. Exploratory factor analysis produced one factor which accounted for 51.28% of variance. The internal consistency of the scale was alpha = .89. The BFNE-S correlated with the Social Avoidance and Distress Scale (r = .44), the Personal Report of Confidence as Speaker Modified (r = .44), the Public Speaking Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (r = -.38) and both subscales of the Self-Statements during Public Speaking (SSPS-P r = -.22; SSPS-N r = .53). ANOVAs revealed significant differences in the BFNE-S amongst a non-clinical population, persons suffering from specific social phobia, non-generalized social phobia and generalized social phobia. PMID:20977045

  13. Tongue acupuncture in treatment of post-stroke dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Haiyan; Ma, Benxu; Gao, Xia; Gao, Huanmin

    2015-01-01

    Tongue acupuncture is a technique that treats illness through acupuncture applied to the tongue. This study was designed to assess its therapeutic effects in the treatment of post-stroke dysphagia. A clinical control study was conducted with randomly selected 180 patients with post-stroke dysphagia. The patients were assigned into 2 groups: 90 in the Tongue acupuncture group received tongue acupuncture on the basis of conventional medication, 90 in the conventional acupuncture group received acupuncture on the neck and wrist. Acupoints in the tongue are Juanquan (EX-HN10) (at the midpoint of dorsal raphe of the tongue) and Haiquan (EX-HN11) (Sublingual frenulum midpoint). Acupoits on the body are Fengchi (GB20) and Neiguan (PC6). The effective rate, the national institutes of health stroke scale (NIHSS), TV X-ray fluoroscopy swallowing function (VFSS), the incidence rate of pneumonia were used to evaluate the efficacy after 4 weeks treatment. The NIHSS and VFSS of tongue acupuncture group were improved significantly than that of the conventional group (P < 0.01, respectively). The incidence rate of pneumonia decreased (P < 0. 01). The effective rate of the tongue acupuncture group was higher than that of conventional group (96.67% vs. 66.67%, P < 0. 01). On the basis of the conventional medication, tongue acupuncture would effectively improve the swallow functions, decrease the neurological deficit and reduce the incidence of pneumonia in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. PMID:26550374

  14. Auricular Acupuncture with Laser

    PubMed Central

    Bahr, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Auricular acupuncture is a method which has been successfully used in various fields of medicine especially in the treatment of pain relief. The introduction of lasers especially low-level lasers into medicine brought besides the already existing stimulation with needles and electricity an additional technique to auricular acupuncture. This literature research looks at the historical background, the development and the anatomical and neurological aspects of auricular acupuncture in general and auricular laser acupuncture in detail. Preliminary scientific findings on auricular acupuncture with laser have been described in detail and discussed critically in this review article. The results of the studies have shown evidence of the effect of auricular laser acupuncture. However, a comparison of these studies was impossible due to their different study designs. The most important technical as well as study parameters were described in detail in order to give more sufficient evidence and to improve the quality of future studies. PMID:23935695

  15. Acupuncture for acute hordeolum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ke; Wang, Xue; Guo, Menghu; Wieland, L. Susan; Shen, Xueyong; Lao, Lixing

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The objective of this review is to determine the effects and, when possible, the safety of acupuncture for the treatment of acute hordeola, in comparison to no specific treatment (e.g., observation), sham acupuncture, or other active treatments. Acupuncture as an adjuvant to another treatment also will be compared to that treatment alone. PMID:25214814

  16. Acupuncture in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Brittner, Mindy; Le Pertel, Noemie; Gold, Melanie A

    2016-06-01

    There has been extensive research on the use of acupuncture in adults with a wide array of conditions. Much less research has been conducted on the use of acupuncture in children. In this article, we review the history and philosophy of acupuncture, and the literature on its effectiveness and safety in children and adolescents, giving special attention to the pediatric and adolescent conditions that have been most studied in high-quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs). PMID:26867822

  17. More Information From Fewer Questions: The Factor Structure and Item Properties of the Original and Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Woods, Carol M.; Thissen, David M.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Chambless, Dianne L.; Rapee, Ronald M.

    2004-01-01

    Statistical methods designed for categorical data were used to perform confirmatory factor analyses and item response theory (IRT) analyses of the Fear of Negative Evaluation scale (FNE; D. Watson & R. Friend, 1969) and the Brief FNE (BFNE; M. R. Leary, 1983). Results suggested that a 2-factor model fit the data better for both the FNE and the…

  18. Acupuncture for peripheral joint osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Manheimer, Eric; Cheng, Ke; Linde, Klaus; Lao, Lixing; Yoo, Junghee; Wieland, Susan; van der Windt, Daniëlle AWM; Berman, Brian M; Bouter, Lex M

    2011-01-01

    Background Peripheral joint osteoarthritis is a major cause of pain and functional limitation. Few treatments are safe and effective. Objectives To assess the effects of acupuncture for treating peripheral joint osteoarthritis. Search strategy We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 1), MEDLINE, and EMBASE (both through December 2007), and scanned reference lists of articles. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing needle acupuncture with a sham, another active treatment, or a waiting list control group in people with osteoarthritis of the knee, hip, or hand. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. We calculated standardized mean differences using the differences in improvements between groups. Main results Sixteen trials involving 3498 people were included. Twelve of the RCTs included only people with OA of the knee, 3 only OA of the hip, and 1 a mix of people with OA of the hip and/or knee. In comparison with a sham control, acupuncture showed statistically significant, short-term improvements in osteoarthritis pain (standardized mean difference -0.28, 95% confidence interval -0.45 to -0.11; 0.9 point greater improvement than sham on 20 point scale; absolute percent change 4.59%; relative percent change 10.32%; 9 trials; 1835 participants) and function (-0.28, -0.46 to -0.09; 2.7 point greater improvement on 68 point scale; absolute percent change 3.97%; relative percent change 8.63%); however, these pooled short-term benefits did not meet our predefined thresholds for clinical relevance (i.e. 1.3 points for pain; 3.57 points for function) and there was substantial statistical heterogeneity. Additionally, restriction to sham-controlled trials using shams judged most likely to adequately blind participants to treatment assignment (which were also the same shams judged most

  19. Examination of the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale-Version 2 and the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale-Straightforward Items Factor Structure in a Sample of U.S. College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Liu; Lowe, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the factor structure of the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation-Straightforward Items (BFNE-S) and the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation-Version 2 (BFNE-II) among 151 college students from the United States. Results indicated that the BFNE-S and the BFNE-II scores demonstrated excellent internal consistency reliability.…

  20. [ZHU Lian's New Acupuncture Academic System and acupuncture science initialization].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujian; Zhang, Lijian

    2015-11-01

    Acupuncture scientization was a consensus of most of acupuncture scholars who had long-term perspectives in the 20th century, among them Ms. ZHULian was the important one. Ms. ZHU Lian built a systemic new acupuncture" academic structure in practice and theory aspects. At the same time, as the main architect of Institute of Acupuncture-moxibustion of China Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Ms. ZHU Lian was the first one who began to carry out the acupuncture clinical trail and laboratory experiment in modern way, which meant "acupuncture therapy" was transformed into "acupuncture science" by Ms. ZHULian's endeavor. PMID:26939349

  1. Acupuncture as an Adjunct Treatment for Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Toral, Livia Gabriela; Verdín-Terán, Silvia Leticia; Orozco-Suárez, Eunice Sonia; López-Ramírez, Patricia; Pineda-Carranza, Antonio; Basulto-Sosa, Patricio Guillermo; Reyes-Campos, Primo F.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Primary dysmenorrhea occurs 40%–50% in women of reproductive age. Acupuncture may assist treatment of menstrual pain. Objective This study compared the effects of the acupuncture program Chongmai, or Thoroughfare Vessel (TV), to sham acupuncture on primary dysmenorrhea. Methods The current authors selected 3 groups of 10 patients each with primary dysmenorrhea for this comparative, prospective longitudinal study. The first group was treated at the TV points, the second group underwent sham acupuncture, and the third group (control) did not receive any kind of acupuncture. All groups were allowed to use steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Menstrual pain was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The results were analyzed using a Student's-t test in GraphPad Prism 5.0. Acupuncture needles were applied at the following TV acupuncture points: (1) Gongsun (SP 4); (2) Qichong (ST30); (3) Neiguan (PC 6); and (4) Baihuanshu (BL 30), the metameric action point of the pelvic area. Electrical stimulation was applied through each needle at 120 Hz for 40 minutes. Results TV acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and/or NSAIDs substantially reduced pain in all 10 patients in each respective group (100%). TV acupuncture treatment reduced the symptoms of primary dysmenorrhea, and symptoms were reduced for at least 6 months. Application of needles at simulated points away from the TV acupuncture program did not reduce pain significantly. Conclusions TV acupuncture treatment can reduce the symptoms of primary dysmenorrhea, and the effect can last for 6 months. PMID:24761179

  2. Is sham laser a valid control for acupuncture trials?

    PubMed

    Irnich, Dominik; Salih, Norbert; Offenbächer, Martin; Fleckenstein, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Methodological problems of acupuncture trials focus on adequate placebo controls. In this trial we evaluated the use of sham laser acupuncture as a control procedure. Thirty-four healthy volunteers received verum laser (invisible infrared laser emission and red light, 45 s and 1 J per point) and sham laser (red light) treatment at three acupuncture points (LI4, LU7 and LR3) in a randomized, double-blinded, cross-over design. The main outcome measure was the ratio of correct to incorrect ratings of treatment immediately after each session. The secondary outcome measure was the occurrence of deqi-like sensations at the acupuncture points and their intensity on a 10-fold visual analog scale (VAS; 10 being the strongest sensible sensation). We pooled the results of three former trials to evaluate the credibility of sham laser acupuncture when compared to needle acupuncture. Fifteen out of 34 (44%) healthy volunteers (age: 28 ± 10.7 years) identified the used laser device after the first session and 14 (41%) after the second session. Hence, both treatments were undistinguishable (P = .26). Deqi-like sensations occurred in 46% of active laser (2.34 VAS) and in 49.0% of sham laser beams (2.49 VAS). The credibility of sham laser was not different from needle acupuncture. Sham laser acupuncture can serve as a valid placebo control in laser acupuncture studies. Due to similar credibility and the lack of sensory input on the peripheral nervous system, sham laser acupuncture can also serve as a sham control for acupuncture trials, in order to evaluate needling effects per se. PMID:21772922

  3. Is Sham Laser a Valid Control for Acupuncture Trials?

    PubMed Central

    Irnich, Dominik; Salih, Norbert; Offenbächer, Martin; Fleckenstein, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Methodological problems of acupuncture trials focus on adequate placebo controls. In this trial we evaluated the use of sham laser acupuncture as a control procedure. Thirty-four healthy volunteers received verum laser (invisible infrared laser emission and red light, 45 s and 1 J per point) and sham laser (red light) treatment at three acupuncture points (LI4, LU7 and LR3) in a randomized, double-blinded, cross-over design. The main outcome measure was the ratio of correct to incorrect ratings of treatment immediately after each session. The secondary outcome measure was the occurrence of deqi-like sensations at the acupuncture points and their intensity on a 10-fold visual analog scale (VAS; 10 being the strongest sensible sensation). We pooled the results of three former trials to evaluate the credibility of sham laser acupuncture when compared to needle acupuncture. Fifteen out of 34 (44%) healthy volunteers (age: 28 ± 10.7 years) identified the used laser device after the first session and 14 (41%) after the second session. Hence, both treatments were undistinguishable (P = .26). Deqi-like sensations occurred in 46% of active laser (2.34 VAS) and in 49.0% of sham laser beams (2.49 VAS). The credibility of sham laser was not different from needle acupuncture. Sham laser acupuncture can serve as a valid placebo control in laser acupuncture studies. Due to similar credibility and the lack of sensory input on the peripheral nervous system, sham laser acupuncture can also serve as a sham control for acupuncture trials, in order to evaluate needling effects per se. PMID:21772922

  4. Acupuncture for Pediatric Pain

    PubMed Central

    Golianu, Brenda; Yeh, Ann Ming; Brooks, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a growing problem in children, with prevalence as high as 30.8%. Acupuncture has been found to be useful in many chronic pain conditions, and may be of clinical value in a multidisciplinary treatment program. The basic principles of acupuncture are reviewed, as well as studies exploring basic mechanisms of acupuncture and clinical efficacy. Conditions commonly treated in the pediatric pain clinic, including headache, abdominal pain, fibromyalgia, juvenile arthritis, complex regional pain syndrome, cancer pain, as well as perioperative pain studies are reviewed and discussed. Areas in need of further research are identified, and procedural aspects of acupuncture practice and safety studies are reviewed. Acupuncture can be an effective adjuvant in the care of pediatric patients with painful conditions, both in a chronic and an acute setting. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, as well as trials of comparative effectiveness are needed. PMID:27417472

  5. Fear Memory.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Ivan; Furini, Cristiane R G; Myskiw, Jociane C

    2016-04-01

    Fear memory is the best-studied form of memory. It was thoroughly investigated in the past 60 years mostly using two classical conditioning procedures (contextual fear conditioning and fear conditioning to a tone) and one instrumental procedure (one-trial inhibitory avoidance). Fear memory is formed in the hippocampus (contextual conditioning and inhibitory avoidance), in the basolateral amygdala (inhibitory avoidance), and in the lateral amygdala (conditioning to a tone). The circuitry involves, in addition, the pre- and infralimbic ventromedial prefrontal cortex, the central amygdala subnuclei, and the dentate gyrus. Fear learning models, notably inhibitory avoidance, have also been very useful for the analysis of the biochemical mechanisms of memory consolidation as a whole. These studies have capitalized on in vitro observations on long-term potentiation and other kinds of plasticity. The effect of a very large number of drugs on fear learning has been intensively studied, often as a prelude to the investigation of effects on anxiety. The extinction of fear learning involves to an extent a reversal of the flow of information in the mentioned structures and is used in the therapy of posttraumatic stress disorder and fear memories in general. PMID:26983799

  6. Acupuncture sensation during ultrasound guided acupuncture needling

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jongbae J.; Akazawa, Margeaux; Ahn, Jaeki; Beckman-Harned, Selena; Lin, Feng-Chang; Lee, Kwangjae; Fine, Jason; Davis, Robert T; Langevin, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Background Although acupuncture sensation (also known as de qi) is a cornerstone of traditional acupuncture therapy, most research has accepted the traditional method of defining acupuncture sensation only through subjective patient reports rather than on any quantifiable physiological basis. Purpose To preliminarily investigate the frequency of key sensations experienced while needling to specific, quantifiable tissue levels (TLs) guided by ultrasound (US) imaging. Methods Five participants received needling at two acupuncture points and two control points at four TLs. US scans were used to determine when each TL was reached. Each volunteer completed 32 sets of modified Southampton Needle Sensation Questionnaires. Part one of the study tested sensations experienced at each TL and part two compared the effect of oscillation alone versus oscillation + rotation. Results In all volunteers, the frequency of pricking, sharp sensations was significantly greater in shallower TLs than deeper (p=0.007); the frequency of sensations described as deep, dull and heavy, as spreading, and as electric shocks was significantly greater in deeper TLs than shallower (p=0.002). Sensations experienced did not significantly differ between real and control points within each of three TLs (p>0.05) except TL 4 (p=0.006). The introduction of needle rotation significantly increased deep, dull, heavy sensations, but not pricking and sharp sensations; within each level, the spectrum of sensation experienced during both oscillation + rotation and oscillation alone did not significantly differ between acupuncture and control points. Conclusion The preliminary study indicates a strong connection between acupuncture sensation and both tissue depth and needle rotation. Furthermore, the new methodology has been proven feasible. A further study with an objective measurement is warranted. PMID:21642648

  7. [Discussion on acupuncture treatment amount].

    PubMed

    Wu, Song; Liang, Fengxia; Wang, Hua; Li, Jia

    2015-05-01

    The amount of acupuncture treatment refers to the sum of acupuncture effects during the treatment. From the factors that constitutes the amount of acupuncture treatment, including the numbers of needling, the size of acupuncture instruments, the depth of acupuncture, the manipulation, the retained time of needle, etc., and combined with teaching and clinical experience, it is believed that the amount of acupuncture treatment is closely related with clinical efficacy, besides, moderate amount of acupuncture treatment is a key factor to improve acupuncture efficacy and guarantee the safety of acupuncture. The basic principles of regular treatment amount are arrival of qi and being moderate, indicating the retained time of needle, treatment frequency and course should be based on individual condition, time, location and disease. PMID:26255521

  8. Acupuncture for the treatment of tinnitus: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has frequently been used to treat tinnitus, and acupuncture is a particularly popular option. The objective of this review was to assess the evidence concerning the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for tinnitus. Methods Fourteen databases were searched from the dates of their creation to July 4th, 2012. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were included if acupuncture was used as the sole treatment. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the risk of bias. Results A total of 9 RCTs met all the inclusion criteria. Their methodological quality was mostly poor. Five RCTs compared the effectiveness of acupuncture or electroacupuncture with sham acupuncture for treating tinnitus. The results failed to show statistically significant improvements. Two RCTs compared a short one-time scalp acupuncture treatment with the use of penetrating sham acupuncture at non-acupoints in achieving subjective symptom relief on a visual analog scale; these RCTs demonstrated significant positive effects with scalp acupuncture. Two RCTs compared acupuncture with conventional drug treatments. One of these RCTs demonstrated that acupuncture had statistically significant effects on the response rate in patients with nervous tinnitus, but the other RCT did not demonstrate significant effects in patients with senile tinnitus. Conclusions The number, size and quality of the RCTs on the effectiveness of acupuncture for the treatment of tinnitus are not sufficient for drawing definitive conclusions. Further rigorous RCTs that overcome the many limitations of the current evidence are warranted. PMID:22805113

  9. Auricular complication of acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, J G

    1987-03-11

    Auricular chondritis occurred in a patient following a course of auricular acupuncture administered to help the patient give up smoking. Despite immediate treatment the condition pursued a long course resulting in considerable morbidity and some deformity of the ear. Twenty months after presentation the ear is not completely stable. Acupuncture should be considered a form of penetrating trauma which may induce perichondritis or chondritis in the auricle. PMID:3452023

  10. Neurotic Fear of Success, Fear of Failure and Need Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boardman, Susan K.; And Others

    Neurotic fear of success is conceptually connected to achievement motivation and achievement related conflicts. To investigate the relationship between individuals identified as success-fearers, or failure-fearers, and those high in achievement motivation, 426 college students completed Cohen's Fear of Success Scale, Mandler-Sarason's Test Anxiety…

  11. Measuring Co-Presence and Social Presence in Virtual Environments - Psychometric Construction of a German Scale for a Fear of Public Speaking Scenario.

    PubMed

    Poeschl, Sandra; Doering, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) applications use high levels of fidelity in order to produce high levels of presence and thereby elicit an emotional response for the user (like fear for phobia treatment). State of research shows mixed results for the correlation between anxiety and presence in virtual reality exposure, with differing results depending on specific anxiety disorders. A positive correlation for anxiety and presence for social anxiety disorder is not proven up to now. One reason might be that plausibility of the simulation, namely including key triggers for social anxiety (for example verbal and non-verbal behavior of virtual agents that reflects potentially negative human evaluation) might not be acknowledged in current presence questionnaires. A German scale for measuring co-presence and social presence for virtual reality (VR) fear of public speaking scenarios was developed based on a translation and adaption of existing co-presence and social presence questionnaires. A sample of N = 151 students rated co-presence and social presence after using a fear of public speaking application. Four correlated factors were derived by item- and principle axis factor analysis (Promax rotation), representing the presenter's reaction to virtual agents, the reactions of the virtual agents as perceived by the presenter, impression of interaction possibilities, and (co-)presence of other people in the virtual environment. The scale developed can be used as a starting point for future research and test construction for VR applications with a social context. PMID:26799880

  12. Can Acupuncture Ease Severe Constipation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Constipation? 'Electroacupuncture' led to symptom relief even 12 weeks after treatment, study finds To use the sharing ... type of acupuncture, new research suggests. After eight weeks of treatment with electroacupuncture -- acupuncture involving electrical stimulation -- ...

  13. [History of acupuncture in Iran].

    PubMed

    Bai, Xinghua

    2015-10-01

    Iran is the neighbor of western China, and is a key transport junction on ancient Silk Road. The medical communication between China and Iran dates back to the 10th century, however, according to current evidences, it is indicated that acupuncture has not been introduced to Iran until the early 1970s. Unfortunately over the last 40 years, the acupuncture in Iran has not presented great development. The history of acupuncture development in Iran implies that geographical advantage and personnel exchanges are not essential to the international exchange of acupuncture, while language and cultural background may hinder the spread of acupuncture in foreign countries. PMID:26790220

  14. Imaging study on acupuncture points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Liu, C. L.; Dang, R. S.; Ando, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Chen, H. S.; Ding, G. H.

    2009-09-01

    The topographic structures of acupuncture points were investigated by using the synchrotron radiation based Dark Field Image (DFI) method. Four following acupuncture points were studied: Sanyinjiao, Neiguan, Zusanli and Tianshu. We have found that at acupuncture point regions there exists the accumulation of micro-vessels. The images taken in the surrounding tissue out of the acupuncture points do not show such kind of structure. It is the first time to reveal directly the specific structure of acupuncture points by X-ray imaging.

  15. Music acupuncture stimulation method.

    PubMed

    Brătilă, F; Moldovan, C

    2007-01-01

    Harmonic Medicine is the model using the theory that the body rhythms synchronize to an outer rhythm applied for therapeutic purpose, can restores the energy balance in acupuncture channels and organs and the condition of well-being. The purpose of this scientific work was to demonstrate the role played by harmonic sounds in the stimulation of the Lung (LU) Meridian (Shoutaiyin Feijing) and of the Kidney (KI) Meridian (Zushaoyin Shenjing). It was used an original method that included: measurement and electronic sound stimulation of the Meridian Entry Point, measurement of Meridian Exit Point, computer data processing, bio feed-back adjustment of the music stimulation parameters. After data processing, it was found that the sound stimulation of the Lung Meridian Frequency is optimal between 122 Hz and 128 Hz, with an average of 124 Hz (87% of the subjects) and for Kidney Meridian from 118 Hz to 121 Hz, with an average of 120 Hz (67% of the subjects). The acupuncture stimulation was more intense for female subjects (> 7%) than for the male ones. We preliminarily consider that an informational resonance phenomenon can be developed between the acupuncture music stimulation frequency and the cellular dipole frequency, being a really "resonant frequency signature" of an acupoint. The harmonic generation and the electronic excitation or low-excitation status of an acupuncture point may be considered as a resonance mechanism. By this kind of acupunctural stimulation, a symphony may act and play a healer role. PMID:18767418

  16. Thalamic Fear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emanuel, Ricky

    2004-01-01

    This paper suggests that some neuroscience concepts particularly concerned with brain pathways in trauma and fear, as well as the neurobiology of emotion, provide an additional vertex to the psychoanalytic understanding of patients' material. The role of the body has been neglected in psychoanalytic thought and formulations in favour of purely…

  17. Fears and phobias (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Common simple phobias are those involving animals or insects, a fear of high places, a fear of lightning, a fear of flying, or other fears. These are very common in young children, and do not represent an abnormality.

  18. Perioperative Acupuncture and Related Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Chernyak, Grigory V.; Sessler, Daniel I.

    2005-01-01

    Acupuncture and related techniques are increasingly practiced in conventional medical settings, and the number of patients willing to use these techniques is increasing. Despite more than 30 years of research, the exact mechanism of action and efficacy of acupuncture have not been established. Furthermore, most aspects of acupuncture have yet to be adequately tested. There thus remains considerable controversy about the role of acupuncture in clinical medicine. Acupuncture apparently does not reduce volatile anesthetic requirement by a clinically important amount. However, preoperative sedation seems to be a promising application of acupuncture in perioperative settings. Acupuncture may be effective for postoperative pain relief but requires a high level of expertise by the acupuncture practitioner. Acupuncture and related techniques can be used for treatment and prophylaxis of postoperative nausea and vomiting in routine clinical practice in combination with, or as an alternative to, conventional antiemetics when administered before induction of general anesthesia. Summary Statement: The use of acupuncture for perioperative analgesia, nausea and vomiting, sedation, anesthesia, and complications is reviewed. PMID:15851892

  19. Acupuncture for lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow): study protocol for a randomized, practitioner-assessor blinded, controlled pilot clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lateral epicondylitis is the most frequent cause of pain around the elbow joint. It causes pain in the region of the elbow joint and results in dysfunction of the elbow and deterioration of the quality of life. The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of ipsilateral acupuncture, contralateral acupuncture and sham acupuncture on lateral epicondylitis. Methods/design Forty-five subjects with lateral epicondylitis will be randomized into three groups: the ipsilateral acupuncture group, contralateral acupuncture group and the sham acupuncture group. The inclusion criteria will be as follows: (1) age between 19 and 65 years with pain due to one-sided lateral epicondylitis that persisted for at least four weeks, (2) with tenderness on pressure limited to regions around the elbow joint, (3) complaining of pain during resistive extension of the middle finger or the wrist, (4) with average pain of NRS 4 or higher during the last one week at a screening visit and (5) voluntarily agree to this study and sign a written consent. Acupuncture treatment will be given 10 times in total for 4 weeks to all groups. Follow up observations will be conducted after the completion of the treatment, 8 weeks and 12 weeks after the random assignment. Ipsilateral acupuncture group and contralateral acupuncture group will receive acupuncture on LI4, TE5, LI10, LI11, LU5, LI12 and two Ashi points. The sham acupuncture group will receive treatment on acupuncture points not related to the lateral epicondylitis using a non-invasive method. The needles will be maintained for 20 minutes. The primary outcome will be differences in the visual analogue scale (VAS) for elbow pain between the groups. The secondary outcome will be differences in patient-rated tennis elbow evaluation (PRTEE), pain-free/maximum grip strength (Dynamometer), pressure pain threshold, clinically relevant improvement, patient global assessment, and the EQ-5D. The data will be analyzed with the paired t

  20. Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale-Brief (BFNE) and the BFNE-Straightforward for Middle School Students

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jia; Zhang, Chunyu; Li, Yadan; Xue, Song; Zhang, Jinfu

    2015-01-01

    Background The 12-item brief version of the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (BFNE) is one of the most widely used instruments to assess fear of negative evaluation. Recent evidence strongly supports the version composed of 8 straightforward items (BFNE-S), which possessesstronger psychometric properties. The purpose of the current study is to examine the psychometric prop-erties of the Chinese versions of the BFNE and BFNE-S for middle school students. Methodology A total of 1009 middle school students were recruited in this study. The BFNE, the BFNE-S, the Friedman-Bendas Text Anxiety Scale (FBTAS), and the Social Anxiety Scale (SAS) were administered to 497 participants, and 52 participants were re-tested after four weeks. The BFNE, the BFNE-S, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), and the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (BIDR) wereadministered to 492 participants. The BFNE and BFNE-S significantly cor-related with all the scales, supporting their convergent, divergent and concurrent validity. Principal Findings The Cronbach's alpha of the BFNE (BFNE-S) was 0.864 (0.867) with 497 par-ticipants and 0.886 (0.844) with 492 participants, and the test-retest reliability coefficient was 0.791 (0.855) (ICC). Although the EFA identified a two-factor solution in which the 8 straightfor-ward items loaded on one factor and the 4 reversed items loaded on the other, the CFA, using a random intercept model to control the wording effect, supported a unidimensional factor struc-ture of the BFNE. Both EFA and CFA supported the unidimensional assumption of the BFNE-S. The correlations of the BFNE and BFNE-S were 0.929 and 0.952 in two samples. Conclusions The Chinese versions of the BFNE and BFNE-S demonstrate adequate psychometric properties for assessing fear of negative evaluation. The results support their use among the Chinese middle school students. Considering its greater parsimony and excellent reliability and validity, the BFNE-S is a better tool. PMID

  1. Acupuncture and moxibustion for stress-related disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Acupuncture and moxibustion, which medical doctors are licensed by the government of Japan to perform, can improve the psychological relationship between doctors and patients, especially when it is disturbed by a “game”, a dysfunctional interpersonal interaction that is repeated unintentionally. This advantage is due to the essential properties of acupuncture and moxibustion. Acupuncture and moxibustion are helpful in treating somatoform disorders, especially musculoskeletal symptoms. In Japan, a holistic acupuncture and moxibustion therapy called Sawada-style has been developed. This is based on fundamental meridian points that are considered to have effects on central, autonomic nervous, immune, metabolic, and endocrine systems to regulate the whole body balance. In addition, some of the fundamental points have effects on Qi, blood, and water patterns associated with major depression, generalized anxiety disorder, eating disorders, and somatoform disorders. The fixed protocol of Sawada-style would be suitable for large-scale, randomized, controlled studies in the future. Recent systematic reviews indicate that electroacupuncture would be a useful addition to antidepressant therapy for some symptoms accompanying fibromyalgia. Acupuncture and moxibustion are also recommended for irritable bowel syndrome, instead of Western drug therapy. Surprisingly, the dorsal prefrontal cerebral cortex, which is associated with a method of scalp acupuncture applied for gastrointestinal disorders, has been found to be activated in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. It is quite possible that regulation of this cortical area is related to the effect of scalp acupuncture. This acupuncture method can be effective not only for irritable bowel syndrome but also for other stress-related gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:24456818

  2. Influence of Acupuncture Stimulation on Cerebral Network in Functional Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Siyuan; Zeng, Fang; Liu, Jixin; Zheng, Hui; Huang, Wenjing; Liu, Ting; Chen, Dashuai; Qin, Wei; Gong, Qiyong; Tian, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture is a commonly used therapy for treating functional diarrhea (FD), although there is limited knowledge on the mechanism. The objectives of this study were to investigate the differences in brain activities elicited by acupuncture between FD patients and healthy controls (HC) so as to explore the possible mechanism. Eighteen FD patients and eighteen HC received 10 sessions of acupuncture treatment at ST25 acupoints. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans were, respectively, performed before and after acupuncture. The defecation frequency, Bristol stool form scale (SBFS), and MOS 36-item Short Healthy Survey (SF-36) were employed to evaluate the clinical efficacy. After acupuncture, the FD patients showed a significant decrease in defecation frequency and BSFS score. The regional homogeneity (ReHo) map showed a decrease in the paracentral lobule and postcentral gyrus, and an increase in the angular gyrus, insula, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and precuneus in the FD group. Moreover, the changes in ReHo values in the ACC were correlated with the reduction in defecation frequency. Decreasing functional connectivity among the ACC, insula, thalamus, and orbital frontal cortex only existed in the FD group. Conclusively, acupuncture alleviated defecation frequency and improved stool formation in FD patients. The efficacy might result from the regulation of the homeostasis afferent processing network. PMID:24459533

  3. Psychometric assessment of scales measuring HIV public stigma, drug-use public stigma and fear of HIV infection among young adolescents and their parents

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Toan; Liu, Hongjie; Li, Jian; Nield, Jennifer; Lu, Zhouping

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and assess measurement instruments that accurately measure the levels of stigma among individuals with a primarily collectivist culture. A cross-sectional study was conducted among middle school students and their parents or guardians in a rural area of China. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to examine and determine the latent factors of the sub-scales of stigma respectively among students and their parents. Factor analyses identified three sub-scales: HIV public stigma (7 items), drug-use public stigma (9 items), and fear of HIV infection (7 items). There were no items with cross-loading onto multiple factors, supporting the distinctness of the constructs that these scales were meant to measure. Goodness of fit indices indicated that a three-factor solution fit the data at an acceptable level in the student sample (χ2/degree ratio = 1.98, CFI = 0.92, RMSEA = 0.055, SRMR = 0.057) and in the parent sample (χ2/degree ratio = 1.95, CFI = 0.91, RMSEA = 0.06, SRMR = 0.059). Reliability of the three scales was excellent (Cronbach’s alpha: 0.78–0.92 for students; 0.80–0.94 for parents or guardians) and stable across split samples and for the data as a whole. The scales are brief and suitable for use in developing countries where the collectivist culture prevails. PMID:21756072

  4. Acupuncture-induced haemothorax: a rare iatrogenic complication of acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Karavis, Miltiades Y; Argyra, Erifili; Segredos, Venieris; Yiallouroy, Aneza; Giokas, Georgios; Theodosopoulos, Thedosios

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports a rare iatrogenic complication of acupuncture-induced haemothorax and comments on the importance and need for special education of physicians and physiotherapists in order to apply safe and effective acupuncture treatment. A 37-year-old healthy woman had a session of acupuncture treatments for neck and right upper thoracic non-specific musculoskeletal pain, after which she gradually developed dyspnoea and chest discomfort. After some delay while trying other treatment, she was eventually transferred to the emergency department where a chest X-ray revealed a right pneumothorax and fluid collection. She was admitted to hospital and a chest tube inserted into the right hemithorax (under ultrasound guidance) drained 800 mL of bloody fluid (haematocrit (Hct) 17.8%) in 24 h and 1200 mL over the following 3 days. Her blood Hct fell from 39.0% to 30.8% and haemoglobin from 12.7 to 10.3 g/dL. The patient recovered completely and was discharged after 9 days of hospitalisation. When dyspnoea, chest pain and discomfort occur during or after an acupuncture treatment, the possibility of secondary (traumatic) pneumo- or haemopneumothorax should be considered and the patient should remain under careful observation (watchful waiting) for at least 48 h. To maximise the safety of acupuncture, specific training should be given for the safe use of acupuncture points of the anterior and posterior thoracic wall using dry needling, trigger point acupuncture or other advanced acupuncture techniques. PMID:25791844

  5. Acupuncture for acute stroke: study protocol for a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acupuncture has been widely used as a treatment for stroke in China for more than 3,000 years. However, previous research has not yet shown that acupuncture is effective as a stroke treatment. We report a protocol for a multicenter, randomized, controlled, and outcome assessor-blind trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture on acute ischemic stroke. Methods/Design In a prospective trial involving three hospitals in the Zhejiang Province (China) 250 patients with a recent (less than 1 week previous) episode of ischemic stroke will be included. Patients will be randomized into two groups: an acupuncture group given scalp acupuncture and electroacupuncture, and a control group given no acupuncture. Eighteen treatment sessions will be performed over a three-week period. The primary outcome will be measured by changes in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at the one, three, and four-week follow-up. Secondary outcome measures will be: 1) the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale for motor function; 2) the mini-mental state examination and Montreal cognitive assessment for cognitive function; 3) the video-fluoroscopic swallowing study for swallowing ability; and 4) the incidence of adverse events. Discussion This trial is expected to clarify whether or not acupuncture is effective for acute stroke. It will also show if acupuncture can improve motor, cognitive, or swallowing function. Trial registration Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR-TRC-12001971. PMID:24908241

  6. Monitoring changes of optical attenuation coefficients of acupuncture points during laser acupuncture by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Yang, Hongqin; Wang, Yuhua; Zheng, Liqin; Xie, Shusen

    2010-11-01

    The physical properties of acupuncture point were important to discover the mechanism of acupuncture meridian. In this paper, we used an optical coherence tomography to monitor in vivo the changes of optical attenuation coefficients of Hegu acupuncture point and non-acupuncture point during laser irradiation on Yangxi acupuncture point. The optical attenuation coefficients of Hegu acupuncture point and non-acupuncture point were obtained by fitting the raw data according to the Beer-Lambert's law. The experimental results showed that the optical attenuation coefficient of Hegu acupuncture point decreased during the laser acupuncture, in contrast to a barely changed result in that of non-acupuncture point. The significant change of optical attenuation coefficient of Hegu acupuncture point indicated that there was a correlation between Hegu and Yangxi acupuncture points to some extent.

  7. Auricular perichondritis secondary to acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Davis, O; Powell, W

    1985-11-01

    Auricular perichondritis developed in a patient following acupuncture to the pinna. Poor response to high-dose antibiotics necessitated open drainage. The underlying cartilage was uninvolved, and minimal deformity ensued. Acupuncture must be considered a form of penetrating trauma that may induce a perichondritis or chondritis in the auricle. PMID:4051870

  8. Actigraph Evaluation of Acupuncture for Treating Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingzhe; Li, Mao; Wang, Qiudong; Kwak, Shin; Jiang, Wenfei; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of acupuncture in patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) by actigraph recordings. Among the 38 patients with RLS enrolled, 31 (M = 12, F = 19; mean age, 47.2 ± 9.7 years old) completed the study. Patients were treated with either standard acupuncture (n = 15) or randomized acupuncture (n = 16) in a single-blind manner for 6 weeks. Changes in nocturnal activity (NA) and early sleep activity (ESA) between week 0 (baseline), week 2, week 4, and week 6 were assessed using leg actigraph recordings, the International Restless Legs Syndrome Rating Scale (IRLSRS), and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Standard but not randomized acupuncture reduced the abnormal leg activity of NA and ESA significantly in week 2, week 4, and week 6 based on the changes in the clinical scores for IRLSRS and ESS in week 4 and week 6 compared with the baseline. No side effects were observed. The results indicate that standard acupuncture might improve the abnormal leg activity in RLS patients and thus is a potentially suitable integrative treatment for long-term use. PMID:25763089

  9. Propane fear

    SciTech Connect

    Begley, R.

    1992-02-12

    A minor feature of a Congressional energy bill is causing consternation for a number of propane-consuming chemical companies. The firms are fighting the bill`s inclusion of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) on a list of alternative fuels that can be used to meet its urban fleet vehicles requirements. The firms fear that this added use would drive up the price of propane-an LPG-for homeowners, farmers, and themselves. Speaking for the Propane Consumers Coalition, a Dow Chemical spokesman says 7.7 million households use propane, as does agriculture, and current demand is such that December saw a 23-year low in US inventories. The US depends on imports of propane, he says, and about half the propane sold in the US is derived from the refining of oil, much of which is also imported. Adding demand for vehicle fuel would drive up imports and process, the spokesman says, thereby damaging all users, including the petrochemical industry.

  10. Fear of Fear and the Anxiety Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambless, Dianne L.

    The fear of fear present in agoraphobics can be broken down into a fear of the body sensations associated with the panic attacks that plague agoraphobics and maladaptive thoughts about the possible consequences of panic. In a retrospective examination of clinical files, 32 agoraphobic patients were compared to 36 patients with simple social…

  11. Efficacy and safety of acupuncture for chronic dizziness: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dizziness is one of the most challenging symptoms in medicine. No medication for dizziness in current use has well-established curative or prophylactic value or is suitable for long-term palliative use. Unconventional remedies, such as acupuncture, should be considered and scientifically evaluated. However, there has been relatively little evidence in randomized controlled clinical trials on acupuncture to treat chronic dizziness. The aim of our study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in patients with dizziness. Methods/Design This trial is a randomized, single-blind, controlled study. A total of 80 participants will be randomly assigned to two treatment groups receiving acupuncture and sham acupuncture treatment, respectively, for 4 weeks. The primary outcome measures are the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and the Vertigo Symptom Scale (VSS). Treatment will be conducted over a period of 4 weeks, at a frequency of two sessions per week. The assessment is at baseline (before treatment initiation), 4 weeks after the first acupuncture session, and 8 weeks after the first acupuncture session. Discussion The results from this study will provide clinical evidence on the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in patients with chronic dizziness. Trial registration International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number Register: ISRCTN52695239 PMID:24330810

  12. Acupuncture in the postoperative setting for breast cancer patients: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Mallory, Molly J; Croghan, Katrina A; Sandhu, Nicole P; Lemaine, Valerie; Degnim, Amy C; Bauer, Brent A; Cha, Stephen S; Croghan, Ivana T

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture is used to treat a variety of symptoms and conditions associated with cancer and cancer treatments. The present study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of providing acupuncture in the hospital setting for breast cancer patients and to evaluate the short-term effect of acupuncture on stress, anxiety, and pain. This was an open label study conducted at Mayo Clinic Hospital, Methodist and Saint Marys Campus, Rochester, Minnesota. A total of 20 adult breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy and/or breast reconstruction were recruited and offered daily acupuncture intervention beginning postoperative day 1 and continuing for the duration of the hospital stay. Outcome measures included the Symptom Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and Satisfaction Question and Was-it-Worth-it (WIWI) Questionnaire. It was found that acupuncture is a feasible option for postoperative breast cancer patients. In addition, it can significantly decrease the levels of anxiety (p = 0.0065), tension/muscular discomfort (p < 0.001) and pain (p = 0.023). The association between acupuncture and relaxation was found to be statistically borderline (p = 0.053). This feasibility study showed that acupuncture can be integrated into a busy postsurgical clinical practice. These results also suggest that acupuncture may be an important intervention in the postoperative setting for breast cancer patients. PMID:25682785

  13. Efficacy of Acupuncture in Reducing Preoperative Anxiety: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hyojeong; Bae, Hyunsu; Min, Byung-Il; Cho, Seunghun

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acupuncture has been shown to reduce preoperative anxiety in several previous randomized controlled trials (RCTs). In order to assess the preoperative anxiolytic efficacy of acupuncture therapy, this study conducted a meta-analysis of an array of appropriate studies. Methods. Four electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and CINAHL) were searched up to February 2014. In the meta-analysis data were included from RCT studies in which groups receiving preoperative acupuncture treatment were compared with control groups receiving a placebo for anxiety. Results. Fourteen publications (N = 1,034) were included. Six publications, using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-State (STAI-S), reported that acupuncture interventions led to greater reductions in preoperative anxiety relative to sham acupuncture (mean difference = 5.63, P < .00001, 95% CI [4.14, 7.11]). Further eight publications, employing visual analogue scales (VAS), also indicated significant differences in preoperative anxiety amelioration between acupuncture and sham acupuncture (mean difference = 19.23, P < .00001, 95% CI [16.34, 22.12]). Conclusions. Acupuncture therapy aiming at reducing preoperative anxiety has a statistically significant effect relative to placebo or nontreatment conditions. Well-designed and rigorous studies that employ large sample sizes are necessary to corroborate this finding. PMID:25254059

  14. Can Acupuncture Treatment Be Double-Blinded? An Evaluation of Double-Blind Acupuncture Treatment of Postoperative Pain

    PubMed Central

    Vase, Lene; Baram, Sara; Takakura, Nobuari; Takayama, Miho; Yajima, Hiroyoshi; Kawase, Akiko; Schuster, Lars; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Schou, Søren; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Zachariae, Robert; Svensson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Blinding protects against bias but the success of blinding is seldom assessed and reported in clinical trials including studies of acupuncture where blinding represents a major challenge. Recently, needles with the potential for double-blinding were developed, so we tested if acupuncture can be double-blinded in a randomized study of sixty-seven patients with acute pain ≥ 3 (0-10 scale following third molar removal) who received active acupuncture with a penetrating needle or placebo acupuncture with a non-penetrating needle. To test if acupuncture was administered double-blind, patients and acupuncturists were asked about perceived treatment allocation at the end of the study. To test if there were clues which led to identification of the treatment, deep dull pain associated with needle application and rotation (termed “de qi” in East Asian medicine), and patients’ pain levels were assessed. Perceived treatment allocation depended on actual group allocation (p < 0.015) for both patients and acupuncturists, indicating that the needles were not successful in double-blinding. Up to 68% of patients and 83% of acupuncturists correctly identified the treatment, but for patients the distribution was not far from 50/50. Also, there was a significant interaction between actual or perceived treatment and the experience of de qi (p = 0.027), suggesting that the experience of de qi and possible non-verbal clues contributed to correct identification of the treatment. Yet, of the patients who perceived the treatment as active or placebo, 50% and 23%, respectively, reported de qi. Patients’ acute pain levels did not influence the perceived treatment. In conclusion, acupuncture treatment was not fully double-blinded which is similar to observations in pharmacological studies. Still, the non-penetrating needle is the only needle that allows some degree of practitioner blinding. The study raises questions about alternatives to double-blind randomized clinical trials in

  15. Auricular Acupuncture and Vagal Regulation

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Wang, Xiaoyu; Shi, Hong; Shang, Hongyan; Li, Liang; Jing, Xianghong; Zhu, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Auricular acupuncture has been utilized in the treatment of diseases for thousands of years. Dr. Paul Nogier firstly originated the concept of an inverted fetus map on the external ear. In the present study, the relationship between the auricular acupuncture and the vagal regulation has been reviewed. It has been shown that auricular acupuncture plays a role in vagal activity of autonomic functions of cardiovascular, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems. Mechanism studies suggested that afferent projections from especially the auricular branch of the vagus nerve (ABVN) to the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) form the anatomical basis for the vagal regulation of auricular acupuncture. Therefore, we proposed the “auriculovagal afferent pathway” (AVAP): both the autonomic and the central nervous system could be modified by auricular vagal stimulation via projections from the ABVN to the NTS. Auricular acupuncture is also proposed to prevent neurodegenerative diseases via vagal regulation. There is a controversy on the specificity and the efficacy of auricular acupoints for treating diseases. More clinical RCT trials on auricular acupuncture and experimental studies on the mechanism of auricular acupuncture should be further investigated. PMID:23304215

  16. Acupuncture therapy for drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Motlagh, Farid Esmaeili; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Rashid, Rusdi Abd; Seghatoleslam, Tahereh; Habil, Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture therapy has been used to treat substance abuse. This study aims to review experimental studies examining the effects of acupuncture on addiction. Research and review articles on acupuncture treatment of substance abuse published between January 2000 and September 2014 were searched using the databases ISI Web of Science Core Collection and EBSCO's MEDLINE Complete. Clinical trial studies on the efficacy of acupuncture therapy for substance abuse were classified according to substance (cocaine, opioid, nicotine, and alcohol), and their treatment protocols, assessments, and findings were examined. A total of 119 studies were identified, of which 85 research articles addressed the efficacy of acupuncture for treating addiction. There were substantial variations in study protocols, particularly regarding treatment duration, frequency of electroacupuncture, duration of stimulation, and choice of acupoints. Contradictory results, intergroup differences, variation in sample sizes, and acupuncture placebo effects made it difficult to evaluate acupuncture effectiveness in drug addiction treatment. This review also identified a lack of rigorous study design, such as control of confounding variables by incorporating sham controls, sufficient sample sizes, reliable assessments, and adequately replicated experiments. PMID:27053944

  17. Simulated annealing model of acupuncture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Charles; Szu, Harold

    2015-05-01

    The growth control singularity model suggests that acupuncture points (acupoints) originate from organizers in embryogenesis. Organizers are singular points in growth control. Acupuncture can cause perturbation of a system with effects similar to simulated annealing. In clinical trial, the goal of a treatment is to relieve certain disorder which corresponds to reaching certain local optimum in simulated annealing. The self-organizing effect of the system is limited and related to the person's general health and age. Perturbation at acupoints can lead a stronger local excitation (analogous to higher annealing temperature) compared to perturbation at non-singular points (placebo control points). Such difference diminishes as the number of perturbed points increases due to the wider distribution of the limited self-organizing activity. This model explains the following facts from systematic reviews of acupuncture trials: 1. Properly chosen single acupoint treatment for certain disorder can lead to highly repeatable efficacy above placebo 2. When multiple acupoints are used, the result can be highly repeatable if the patients are relatively healthy and young but are usually mixed if the patients are old, frail and have multiple disorders at the same time as the number of local optima or comorbidities increases. 3. As number of acupoints used increases, the efficacy difference between sham and real acupuncture often diminishes. It predicted that the efficacy of acupuncture is negatively correlated to the disease chronicity, severity and patient's age. This is the first biological - physical model of acupuncture which can predict and guide clinical acupuncture research.

  18. Acupuncture, psyche and the placebo response.

    PubMed

    Enck, Paul; Klosterhalfen, Sibylle; Zipfel, Stephan

    2010-10-28

    With growing use of acupuncture treatment in various clinical conditions, the question has been posed whether the reported effects reflect specific mechanisms of acupuncture or whether they represent placebo responses, as they often are similar in effect size and resemble similarities to placebo analgesia and its mechanisms. We reviewed the available literature for different placebos (sham procedures) used to control the acupuncture effects, for moderators and potential biases in respective clinical trials, and for central and peripheral mechanisms involved that would allow differentiation of placebo effects from acupuncture and sham acupuncture effects. While the evidence is still limited, it seems that biological differences exist between a placebo response, e.g. in placebo analgesia, and analgesic response during acupunture that does not occur with sham acupuncture. It seems advisable that clinical trials should include potential biomarkers of acupuncture, e.g. measures of the autonomic nervous system function to verify that acupuncture and sham acupuncture are different despite similar clinical effects. PMID:20359961

  19. NOTE: Do acupuncture points exist?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xinyi; Liu, Chenglin; Dang, Ruishan; Huang, Yuying; He, Wei; Ding, Guanghong

    2009-05-01

    We used synchrotron x-ray fluorescence analysis to probe the distribution of four chemical elements in and around acupuncture points, two located in the forearm and two in the lower leg. Three of the four acupuncture points showed significantly elevated concentrations of elements Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn in relation to levels in the surrounding tissue, with similar elevation ratios for Cu and Fe. The mapped distribution of these elements implies that each acupuncture point seems to be elliptical with the long axis along the meridian.

  20. Acupuncture-induced haemothorax: a rare iatrogenic complication of acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Karavis, Miltiades Y; Argyra, Erifili; Segredos, Venieris; Yiallouroy, Aneza; Giokas, Georgios; Theodosopoulos, Thedosios

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports a rare iatrogenic complication of acupuncture-induced haemothorax and comments on the importance and need for special education of physicians and physiotherapists in order to apply safe and effective acupuncture treatment. A 37-year-old healthy woman had a session of acupuncture treatments for neck and right upper thoracic non-specific musculoskeletal pain, after which she gradually developed dyspnoea and chest discomfort. After some delay while trying other treatment, she was eventually transferred to the emergency department where a chest X-ray revealed a right pneumothorax and fluid collection. She was admitted to hospital and a chest tube inserted into the right hemithorax (under ultrasound guidance) drained 800 mL of bloody fluid (haematocrit (Hct) 17.8%) in 24 h and 1200 mL over the following 3 days. Her blood Hct fell from 39.0% to 30.8% and haemoglobin from 12.7 to 10.3 g/dL. The patient recovered completely and was discharged after 9 days of hospitalisation. When dyspnoea, chest pain and discomfort occur during or after an acupuncture treatment, the possibility of secondary (traumatic) pneumo- or haemopneumothorax should be considered and the patient should remain under careful observation (watchful waiting) for at least 48 h. To maximise the safety of acupuncture, specific training should be given for the safe use of acupuncture points of the anterior and posterior thoracic wall using dry needling, trigger point acupuncture or other advanced acupuncture techniques. PMID:25791844

  1. Acupuncture for dyspnea in advanced cancer: a randomized, placebo-controlled pilot trial [ISRCTN89462491

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J; Feinstein, Marc B; Deng, Gary E; Cassileth, Barrie R

    2005-01-01

    Background Dyspnea, or shortness of breath, is a common symptom in patients with advanced cancer. Pharmacologic management is of proven benefit, but it does not help all patients. Preliminary data suggest that acupuncture can relieve dyspnea in a variety of populations, including cancer patients. We conducted a pilot study (ISRCTN89462491) preparatory to a fully powered randomized, placebo-controlled trial to determine whether acupuncture reduces dyspnea in patients with lung or breast cancer. Methods The study sample was comprised of forty-seven patients with lung or breast cancer presenting with dyspnea. Patients receiving symptomatic treatments were not excluded as long as no changes in management were planned during the trial. Patients were randomized to receive a single session of true or placebo acupuncture in addition to their existing dyspnea treatments. Semi-permanent acupuncture "studs" were then inserted: patients applied pressure to these studs twice a day to provide ongoing stimulation to acupuncture points. The subjective sensation of dyspnea was assessed with a 0 – 10 numerical rating scale immediately before and after acupuncture treatment and daily for a week thereafter. Results All but two of 47 randomized patients provided follow-up data. Dyspnea scores were slightly higher for patients receiving true versus placebo acupuncture, for both the period immediately following acupuncture treatment and for the daily one week follow-up (differences between means of 0.34, 95% C.I. -0.33, 1.02 and 0.56, 95% C.I. -0.39, 1.51). The 95% confidence interval excludes the prespecified minimum clinically significant difference of a 20% greater improvement in dyspnea for patients receiving acupuncture. Conclusion The acupuncture technique used in this trial is unlikely to have effects on dyspnea importantly larger than placebo for patients with advanced cancer. PMID:16109163

  2. Acupuncture effect on neurosensory deafness.

    PubMed

    Yarnell, S K; Waylonis, G W; Rink, T L

    1976-04-01

    Bilateral neurosensory deafness offers a unique opportunity to study the effects of acupuncture objectively. By treating only one ear, and using audiometric evaluation techniques instead of subjective evaluations of hearing, an analysis of any achieved improvement seemed feasible. Only patients with well documented bilateral nerve deafness were accepted into the program. A baseline audiogram with speech discrimination and puretone air and bone conduction thresholds was obtained prior to treatment. Thirty-eight patients underwent ten consecutive acupuncture treatments on one ear only, with the other ear serving as a control. After the course of acupuncture, the audiometrics were repeated by the same audiologist. There was no significant increase in hearing after acupuncture therapy. PMID:1083725

  3. Acupuncture: A Useful Treatment Modality

    PubMed Central

    Rapson, Linda M.

    1984-01-01

    Scientists have established that acupuncture's effects have a neurophysiological explanation. The procedure can be used to relieve musculoskeletal and facial pain, to treat allergies, headache, anxiety and depression, and to help rehabilitate addicted patients. The response rate is high, especially in patients with musculoskeletal pain or headaches. Clinical outcomes in a large Toronto acupuncture practice have consistently shown that about 80% of patients respond to acupuncture. The incidence of complications and side effects is low. The anatomical approach to this procedure is easily learned and can be incorporated into family practice. Failure to achieve the expected results from acupuncture should raise suspicions that the working diagnosis is incorrect and lead to further investigation. PMID:21283497

  4. Information biology of laser acupuncture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jian-Ling; Liu, Timon C.; Li, Cheng-Zhang; Liu, Song-Hao

    2003-12-01

    Laser acupuncture as an alternative, noninvasive, painless and cost-effective therapy is widely used for acute and chronic pain, nausea, circulatory functions, and mood-related behavioral disorders. It was suggested one of the pathways mediated laser acupuncture was from laser biomodulation on acupuncture point cells to autonomic nervous subsystems through meridian. As laser irradiation used for acupuncture is red or infra red, we put forward the following model: at dose 1(100-3 J/m2), the irradiation activates parasympathetic nervous subsystem (PSN); at dose 2(103-5 J/m2), the irradiation activates sympathetic nervous subsystem (SN); at dose 3(105-6 J/m2), the irradiation activates PSN; and at dose 4(106-7 J/m2), the irradiation activates SN. This model was verified by its successful applications.

  5. Neurobiology of Acupuncture: Toward CAM

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    It has long been accepted that acupuncture, puncturing and scraping needles at certain points on the body, can have analgesic and anesthetic effects, as well as therapeutic effects in the treatment of various diseases. This therapy, including acupuncture anesthesia, has drawn the attention of many investigators and become a research subject of international interest around the world. Numerous studies have demonstrated that the nervous system, neurotransmitters, endogenous substances and Jingluo (meridians) may respond to needling stimulation and electrical acupuncture. An abundance of information has now accumulated concerning the neurobiological mechanisms of acupuncture, in relation to both neural pathways and neurotransmitters/hormonal factors that mediate autonomic regulation, pain relief and other therapeutics. Early studies demonstrated that the analgesic effects of electroacupuncture (EA) are mediated by opioid peptides in the periaqueductal gray. Recent evidence shows that nitric oxide plays an important role in mediating the cardiovascular responses to EA stimulation through the gracile nucleus-thalamic pathway. Other substances, including serotonin, catecholamines, inorganic chemicals and amino acids such as glutamate and α-aminobutyric acid (GABA), are proposed to mediate certain cardiovascular and analgesic effects of acupuncture, but at present their role is poorly understood. The increased interest in acupuncture health care has led to an ever-growing number of investigators pursuing research in the processes of the sense of needling touch, transduction of needling stimulation signals, stimulation parameters and placebos. In this Review, the evidence and understanding of the neurobiological processes of acupuncture research have been summarized with an emphasis on recent developments of nitric oxide mediating acupuncture signals through the dorsal medulla-thalamic pathways. PMID:15257325

  6. Acupuncture: From Ancient Practice to Modern Science

    MedlinePlus

    ... Section CAM Acupuncture From Ancient Practice to Modern Science Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... of Progress / Acupuncture From Ancient Practice to Modern Science / Low Back Pain and CAM / Time to Talk / ...

  7. Acupuncture for patients with mild hypertension: study protocol of an open-label multicenter randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies using acupuncture to treat essential hypertension have been carried out. However, whether acupuncture is efficacious for hypertension is still controversial. Therefore, this trial aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for patients with mild hypertension. Methods/Design This is a large scale, open-label, multicenter, randomized controlled clinical trial with four parallel arms. We will recruit 428 hypertensive patients with systolic blood pressure (SBP) between 140 and 159 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) between 90 and 99 mmHg. The participants will be randomly assigned to four different groups (three acupuncture groups and one waiting list group) (1).The affected meridian acupuncture group (n = 107) is treated with acupoints on the affected meridians (2).The non-affected meridian acupuncture group (n = 107) is treated with acupoints on the non-affected meridians (3).The invasive sham acupuncture group (n = 107) is provided with sham acupoints treatment (4).The waiting-list group (n = 107) is not offered any intervention until they complete the trial. Each patient allocated to acupuncture groups will receive 18 sessions of acupuncture treatment over 6 weeks. This trial will be conducted in 11 hospitals in China. The primary endpoint is the change in average 24-hSBP before and 6 weeks after randomization. The secondary endpoints are average SBP and average DBP during the daytime and night-time, and 36-Item Short Form Survey (SF-36), and so on. Discussion This is the first large scale, multicenter, randomized, sham controlled trial of acupuncture for essential hypertension in China. It may clarify the efficacy of acupuncture as a treatment for mild hypertension. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01701726 PMID:24216113

  8. Acupuncture for the Treatment of Spasticity After Stroke: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Park, Si-Woon; Yi, Sook-Hee; Lee, Jung Ah; Hwang, Pil Woo; Yoo, Hyun Cheol; Kang, Kyoung Sook

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Acupuncture has been suggested as a treatment for spasticity in patients with stroke. The available literature was reviewed in an effort to assess its efficacy in this situation. Methods: Randomized trials assessing the effects of acupuncture for the treatment of spasticity after stroke were identified by searching the Cochrane Library, PubMed, ProQuest, EBSCOhost, SCOPUS, CINAHL, EMBASE, Alternative Medicine Database, and Chinese and Korean medical literature databases. Two reviewers independently extracted data on study characteristics, patient characteristics, and spasticity outcomes. Results: Eight trials with 399 patients met all the inclusion criteria. Compared with controls without acupuncture, acupuncture had no effect on improving clinical outcomes (as measured by validated instruments such as the Modified Ashworth Scale) or physiologic outcomes (assessed by measures such as the H-reflex/M-response [H/M] ratio at the end of the treatment period). H/M ratios did decrease significantly immediately after the first acupuncture treatment. Methodologic quality of all evaluated trials was considered inadequate. Conclusions: The effect of acupuncture for spasticity in patients with stroke remains uncertain, primarily because of the poor quality of the available studies. Larger and more methodologically sound trials are needed to definitively confirm or refute any effect of acupuncture as a treatment for spasticity after stroke. PMID:25192034

  9. Acupuncture for Spasticity after Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Junghee; Lee, Euiju; Kim, Hyun Jung; Ahn, Hyeong Sik

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to determine how effective acupuncture or electroacupuncture (acupuncture with electrical stimulation) is in treating poststroke patients with spasticity. We searched publications in Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library in English, 19 accredited journals in Korean, and the China Integrated Knowledge Resources Database in Chinese through to July 30, 2013. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with no language restrictions that compared the effects of acupuncture or electroacupuncture with usual care or placebo acupuncture. The two investigators assessed the risk of bias and statistical analyses were performed. Three RCTs in English, 1 in Korean, and 1 in Chinese were included. Assessments were performed primarily with the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS). Meta-analysis showed that acupuncture or electroacupuncture significantly decreased spasticity after stroke. A subgroup analysis showed that acupuncture significantly decreased wrist, knee, and elbow spasticity in poststroke patients. Heterogeneity could be explained by the differences in control, acupoints, and the duration after stroke occurrence. In conclusion, acupuncture could be effective in decreasing spasticity after stroke, but long-term studies are needed to determine the longevity of treatment effects. PMID:25628750

  10. 21 CFR 880.5580 - Acupuncture needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... in 21 CFR 801.109, (2) Device material biocompatibility, and (3) Device sterility. ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acupuncture needle. 880.5580 Section 880.5580 Food... § 880.5580 Acupuncture needle. (a) Identification. An acupuncture needle is a device intended to...

  11. 21 CFR 880.5580 - Acupuncture needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... in 21 CFR 801.109, (2) Device material biocompatibility, and (3) Device sterility. ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acupuncture needle. 880.5580 Section 880.5580 Food... § 880.5580 Acupuncture needle. (a) Identification. An acupuncture needle is a device intended to...

  12. 21 CFR 880.5580 - Acupuncture needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... in 21 CFR 801.109, (2) Device material biocompatibility, and (3) Device sterility. ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acupuncture needle. 880.5580 Section 880.5580 Food... § 880.5580 Acupuncture needle. (a) Identification. An acupuncture needle is a device intended to...

  13. 21 CFR 880.5580 - Acupuncture needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... in 21 CFR 801.109, (2) Device material biocompatibility, and (3) Device sterility. ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acupuncture needle. 880.5580 Section 880.5580 Food... § 880.5580 Acupuncture needle. (a) Identification. An acupuncture needle is a device intended to...

  14. Acupuncture-Related Pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Hampton, David A; Kaneko, Robert T; Simeon, Erika; Moren, Alexis; Rowell, Susan; Watters, Jennifer M

    2014-08-01

    Background: Acupuncture-related pneumothorax (PTX) is a poorly reported complication of thoracic needling. Recent Chinese literature reviews cited PTXs as the most common adverse outcome. Because of delayed presentation, this complication is thought to be underrecognized by acupuncturists and is largely addressed by hospital and emergency room personnel. The goal of this case study was to demonstrate common risk factors for a PTX, the mechanisms for its development, and protocols to use if one is suspected. Case: A 43-year-old, athletic female with chronic neck pain that was poorly managed with oral medications sought an alternative intervention for pain control. Her treatment plan consisted of weekly acupuncture sessions in the prone and supine positions targeting points along the Bladder, Gall Bladder, and Small Intestine meridians, as well as the right scapular Ah Shi point. She also received infrared lamp therapy. The aim of this approach was to help the patient achieve subjective pain reduction and increased range of motion. Results: One hour after her third treatment session, this patient experienced pleuritic chest pain and dyspnea. She was transported to a local Level-1 trauma center by emergency medical services and was diagnosed with a right-sided PTX. Conclusions: The acupoints addressed, a practitioner's knowledge of variations in anatomy, and a patient's body habitus and medical history are risk factors for PTX development. A patient's initial presentation does not predict future outcome. A benign presentation can evolve into a potentially life-threatening cardiovascular collapse. When PTX is suspected, discussing it with the patient and facilitating appropriate evaluation and intervention by a tertiary-care facility is warranted. PMID:25184016

  15. Utility of fear severity and individual resilience scoring as a surge capacity, triage management tool during large-scale, bio-event disasters.

    PubMed

    Bracha, H Stefan; Burkle, Frederick M

    2006-01-01

    Threats of bioterrorism and emerging infectious disease pandemics may result in fear-related consequences. If left undetected and untreated, fear-based signs and symptoms may be extremely debilitating and lead to chronic problems with a risk of permanent damage to the brain's locus coeruleus and stress response circuits. The triage management of susceptible, exposed, and infectious victims seeking care must be sensitive and specific enough to identify individuals with excessive levels of fear in order to address the nuances of fear-based symptoms at the initial point of contact. These acute conditions, which include hyper-vigilant fear, are managed best by timely and effective information, rapid evaluation, and possibly medications that uniquely address the locus-coeruleus-driven noradrenalin over-activation. It is recommended that a Fear and Resilience (FR) Checklist be included as an essential triage tool to identify those most at risk. The use of this checklist facilitates an enhanced capacity to respond to limitations brought about by surge capacity requirements. Whereas the utility of such a checklist is evident, predictive validity studies will be required. In addition to identifying individuals who are emotionally, medically, and socially hypo-resilient, the FR Checklist simultaneously identifies individuals who are hyper-resilient and can be asked to volunteer, and thus, rapidly expand the surge capacity. PMID:17297897

  16. Is acupuncture efficacious therapy in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jin; Jeon, Beom S

    2014-06-15

    This review aims to assess the evidences from recent clinical studies regarding the efficacy of acupuncture on Parkinson's disease. Relevant literatures were searched from 13 databases under the condition "published between 2000 and 2012" with language restrictions. Eleven studies were indentified including 6 randomized clinical trials (RCTs), 4 uncontrolled open label studies, and 1 crossover trial. The number of trials, and their total sample size were not enough to prove the favorable effects of acupuncture. Five studies failed to report proper diagnostic criteria for enrollment. Two of the 6 RCTs did not include the randomization methods and whether the assessors were blinded. Drop-outs were unreported or insufficiently reported in 2 trials. Three RCTs compared the effects of acupuncture with placebo acupuncture. Two of these trials failed to show superiority of acupuncture. One RCT showed beneficial effects of constitutional acupuncture, but not needle acupuncture. Three RCTs that assessed the effects of acupuncture adjunctive to conventional drugs reported beneficial effects of acupuncture. The placebo response to acupuncture was not excluded, because there was no control acupuncture group in these studies. Two uncontrolled studies showed significant positive effects of acupuncture, while other two uncontrolled trials failed. There were no recognized validated acupuncture treatment protocols and a lack of consensus on the location of acupoints. Safety and tolerability were reported only in 5 studies. No study evaluated the long-lasting effect of acupuncture following cessation of the treatment. To date, the evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture for treating Parkinson's disease is not convincing. There are needs for further studies with improved methodological quality. PMID:24798223

  17. A clinical study of integrating acupuncture and Western medicine in treating patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang-Pey; Chang, Ching-Mao; Shiu, Jing-Huei; Chiu, Jen-Hwey; Wu, Ta-Peng; Yang, Jen-Lin; Kung, Yen-Ying; Chen, Fun-Jou; Chern, Chang-Ming; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2015-01-01

    Complementary therapy with acupuncture for Parkinson's disease (PD) has been studied for quite a long time, but the effectiveness of the treatment still remains unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the integrated effects of acupuncture treatment in PD patients who received western medicine. In the short-term acupuncture treatment study, 20 patients received acupuncture therapy twice a week in acupoints DU 20, GB 20, LI 11, LI 10, LI 4, GB 31, ST 32, GB 34 and GB 38 along with western medicine for 18 weeks, and 20 controlled patients received western medicine only. In the long-term acupuncture treatment, 13 patients received acupuncture treatment twice a week for 36 weeks. The outcome parameters include Unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Beck Depression Inventory-Version 2 (BDI-II), and WHO quality of life (WHOQOL). In the short-term clinical trial, a higher percentage of patients in the acupuncture group had score improvement in UPDRS total scores (55% vs. 15%, p = 0.019), sub-score of mind, behavior and mood (85% vs. 25%, p < 0.001), activity of daily living (65% vs. 15%, p = 0.003), mobility (40% vs. 15%, p = 0.155) and complication of treatment (75% vs. 15%, p < 0.001), BDI-II score (85% vs. 35%, p = 0.003), and WHOQOL score (65% vs. 15%, p = 0.003) when compared to control group at the end of the 18 weeks' follow up. After 36 weeks of long-term acupuncture treatment, the mean UPDRS total scores and sub-score of mentation, behavior and mood, sub-score of complications of therapy and BDI-II score decreased significantly when compared to the pretreatment baseline. In conclusion, acupuncture treatment had integrated effects in reducing symptoms and signs of mind, behavior, mood, complications of therapy and depression in PD patients who received Western medicine. PMID:25967661

  18. Fear in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    Fear is powerful and pervasive in English schools and central to many education discourses. However, it has received very little "focussed" attention in the education literature, despite the increasing interest afforded to it in other disciplines. Understanding how fear works is extremely important as fear and wellbeing are inextricably linked.…

  19. Increasing Fears in Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taddeo, Danielle

    This study involved a survey based on a preliminary poll asking children in a Bronx (New York) classroom (N=26) to list their fears. Many children have fears at all levels of severity. The general perception seems to be that in recent years children are more stressed and less equipped to handle fear. The initial poll revealed that children's fears…

  20. Review of Clinical Applications of Scalp Acupuncture for Paralysis: An Excerpt From Chinese Scalp Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Linda Lingzhi

    2012-01-01

    Chinese scalp acupuncture is a contemporary acupuncture technique integrating traditional Chinese needling methods with Western medical knowledge of representative areas of the cerebral cortex. It has been proven to be a most effective technique for treating acute and chronic central nervous system disorders. Scalp acupuncture often produces remarkable results with just a few needles and usually brings about immediate improvement, sometimes taking only several seconds to a minute. Acupuncture, a therapeutic technique of Oriental Medicine, can be traced back more than 2500 years. Throughout its long history, acupuncture has evolved as its own unique traditional medicine. By embracing newly developed knowledge and technology, the profession continues to create additional methods of treatment. Techniques such as electrical and laser acupuncture and even new acupuncture points are currently being developed. We believe scalp acupuncture, which integrates Western medicine with Traditional Chinese Medicine, to be the most significant development that Chinese acupuncture has made in the past 60 years. PMID:24278807

  1. Effectiveness of Traditional Chinese Acupuncture versus Sham Acupuncture: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Carlos, Luís; da Cruz, Lóris Aparecida Prado; Leopoldo, Vanessa Cristina; de Campos, Fabrício Ribeiro; de Almeida, Ana Maria; Silveira, Renata Cristina de Campos Pereira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify and synthesize the evidence from randomized clinical trials that tested the effectiveness of traditional Chinese acupuncture in relation to sham acupuncture for the treatment of hot flashes in menopausal women with breast cancer. Method: systematic review guided by the recommendations of the Cochrane Collaboration. Citations were searched in the following databases: MEDLINE via PubMed, Web of Science, CENTRAL, CINAHL, and LILACS. A combination of the following keywords was used: breast neoplasm, acupuncture, acupuncture therapy, acupuncture points, placebos, sham treatment, hot flashes, hot flushes, menopause, climacteric, and vasomotor symptoms. Results: a total of 272 studies were identified, five of which were selected and analyzed. Slight superiority of traditional acupuncture compared with sham acupuncture was observed; however, there were no strong statistical associations. Conclusions: the evidence gathered was not sufficient to affirm the effectiveness of traditional acupuncture compared with sham acupuncture. PMID:27533271

  2. Training Psychiatry Addiction Fellows in Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Serafini, Kelly; Bryant, Katurah; Ikomi, Jolomi; LaPaglia, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acupuncture has been studied as an adjunct for addictions treatment. Because many hospitals, outpatient clinics, and facilities are integrating acupuncture treatment, it is important that psychiatrists remain informed about this treatment. This manuscript describes the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) protocol and its inclusion as part of the curriculum for psychiatry addictions fellows. Methods Psychiatry and psychology fellows completed the NADA training (N = 20) and reported on their satisfaction with the training. Results Overall, participants stated that they found the training beneficial and many were integrating acupuncture within their current practice. Conclusions Results support the acceptability of acupuncture training among psychiatry fellows in this program. PMID:26048457

  3. Acupuncture and women’s health: an overview of the role of acupuncture and its clinical management in women’s reproductive health

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Suzanne; Smith, Caroline A; Possamai-Inesedy, Alphia; Bensoussan, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Background Acupuncture and other modalities of Chinese/East Asian medicine have been used to treat women’s health for many centuries. Gynecology specialties focus particularly on menstrual and reproductive disorders. Both the adoption of the use of acupuncture outside Asia, and the incorporation of scientific analysis in Asia have challenged biomedical conceptions of what can be achieved with this treatment method. The scale of research activity in relation to acupuncture and women’s health has increased over the last 20 years. Objective This review aims to explore the research evidence in relation to acupuncture use for women’s reproductive disorders, focusing on both clinical findings and experimental research on acupuncture’s mechanisms of action in relation to women’s health. Methods A narrative literature search was undertaken using searches of electronic databases and manual searches of journals and textbooks. The search included all literature published prior to June 2013. The literature was assessed as to the nature of the study it was reporting and findings synthesized into a commentary. Results For acupuncture’s mechanism of action the search resulted in 114 relevant documents; in relation to clinical reports on the use of acupuncture for women’s health 204 documents were found and assessed. Conclusion There is preliminary data indicating acupuncture may improve menstrual health and coping for women experiencing delays falling pregnant. There is experimental data showing that acupuncture can influence female reproductive functioning, although the actual mechanisms involved are not yet clarified. Further well-conducted clinical research would benefit our understanding of the usefulness of acupuncture to women’s health. PMID:24669195

  4. Gagging and Associations with Dental Care-Related Fear, Fear of Pain, and Beliefs about Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Cameron L.; Shulman, Grant P.; Crout, Richard J.; McNeil, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Gagging is a behavioral response that interferes with oral health care and has been suggested to relate to dental care-related fear. Little is known, however, about the epidemiology of gagging during dental treatment. Methods To explore this phenomenon, 478 participants were recruited from the waiting area of an oral diagnosis clinic. Participants completed the Dental Fear Survey, the Short Form-Fear of Pain Questionnaire, Dental Beliefs Scale, and a demographics questionnaire that included items about problems with gagging. Results Over half of the participants reported gagging on at least one occasion during dental visits, with 7.5% almost always, or always gagging. With higher frequency of problems with gagging, patients were more likely to have greater levels of dental care-related fear, fear of pain, and more negative beliefs of dental professionals and dental treatment. Further, participants who gagged more readily had greater dental care-related fear than other gaggers. Conclusion Gagging in the dental clinic is a prevalent problem, and dental care-related fear and fear of pain are associated with more frequent gagging. Clinical Implications Given the prevalence of patients reporting problem gagging, it may be helpful for providers to assess for this barrier to treatment. By targeting dental care-related fear, fear of pain, and negative beliefs about dental care in patients who often gag in the clinic, gagging may be reduced in frequency or intensity, potentially making treatment more comfortable for patients and easier for dental care providers. PMID:24789238

  5. Ear acupuncture using semi-permanent needles: acceptability, prospects and problems in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Umeh, B

    1988-01-01

    Ear acupuncture performed with indwelling auricular semi-permanent (ASP) needles, was used for the treatment of musculoskeletal pain and stiffness in 55 Nigerians. The male patients were initially reluctant to have an ASP needle stuck in their auricle, because they feared that the needle would attract embarrassing comments. No female objected to the use of these needles. The longest time an ASP needle remained in situ was 28 days (in a male), while the shortest time was 2 days. There was no associated ear lobe infection or scarification. All seventeen patients with acute torticollis had significant relief of pain and stiffness within 24 hours, scoring less than 25% (residual pain) on the visual analogue scale (VAS). Contrary to speculation auriculo acutherapy using the indwelling needles is acceptable to the Nigerian (male and female). The tropical weather does not necessarily predispose to infection at the site of needle, insertion, provided the area is kept dry. The technique is useful for the relief of musculoskeletal pain and stiffness, and permits the patient to continue self acutherapy at home without the need to return to the clinic. However, these needles are disposable and have to be imported. There is therefore the problem of availability. PMID:3218633

  6. Narrative Review of Perioperative Acupuncture for Clinicians.

    PubMed

    Gliedt, Jordan A; Daniels, Clinton J; Wuollet, Adam

    2015-10-01

    Acupuncture is one of the oldest forms of the natural healing arts. The exact mechanisms of action are unknown at this time; however, current theories to explain the benefits experienced after acupuncture include Traditional Chinese Medicine and Western medicine concepts. Acupuncture may improve the quality of perioperative care and reduce associated complications. Perioperative acupuncture is apparently effective in reducing preoperative anxiety, postoperative nausea and vomiting, and postoperative pain. The Pericardium-6 (P-6; Nei Guan), Yintang (Extra 1), and Shenmen acupuncture points are the most studied and effective acupuncture points in reducing preoperative anxiety, postoperative nausea and vomiting, and postoperative pain experiences. Intraoperatively administered acupuncture may reduce immunosuppression in patients and lessen intraoperative anesthetic requirements, although the clinical usefulness of acupuncture in the intraoperative period remains inconclusive. Perioperative acupuncture is a promising intervention, but additional studies are needed to further understand and define acupuncture's role throughout the perioperative period and determine its clinical usefulness. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief clinical review concerning acupuncture and its application for common issues that occur in the perioperative period. PMID:26433805

  7. [Considerations about Acupuncture Treatment during Menstruation].

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying; Zhang, Hong

    2016-04-01

    A dispute about whether women are suitable to receive acupuncture treatment in the period of menstruation has existed for many years. There are some reports about acupuncture treatment induced abnormal menstruation in women experiencing menstruation. However, according to long-term clinical practice and current development of acupuncture therapy, the authors of the present paper hold that there are no absolute contradictions for acupuncture treatment of women during menstruation. Additionally, acupuncture induced menstrual disorder has no enough data support of large size example clinical trials. The key points of acupuncture administration for women during menstruation are: (1) reasonable selection of acupoints prescriptions, and (2) appropriate acupuncture needle manipulations, particularly avoiding strong stimulation. PMID:27323450

  8. [To finish with fear of dental care].

    PubMed

    Bohl, J B; Bracconi, M; Herve, C; Pirnay, P

    2015-06-01

    The patient facing the dentist knows fear, anxiety. The symbolism of the mouth and teeth from childhood is an entirely specific nature of the human body. The terrifying image of dental treatment and dentist that has long been stigmatized through painting, literature, theater and cinema can change today. Many therapeutic options to the management of anxiety in dental phobia; anesthesia, conscious sedation, combined with a soothing cabinet, a caring dentist, targeted use of medications or milder alternative methods; homeopathy, herbal medicine, acupuncture, psychotherapy, places the patient's interests at the center of the caregiving relationship. But this treatment panel is also offered him the difficulty of the choice. This exercise without systematization, according to the patient with competence and kindness. Some patients may be sent or processed in collaboration with other health professionals. PMID:26934774

  9. Acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine for survivors of torture and refugee trauma: a descriptive report.

    PubMed

    Highfield, Ellen Silver; Lama, Puja; Grodin, Michael A; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Crosby, Sondra S

    2012-06-01

    Refugees with trauma histories are a difficult medical population to treat. Acupuncture care has gained acceptance in many mainstream hospitals in the United States, but research on acupuncture and refugee populations is limited. Herein, we report our experiences with 50 refugees (total acupuncture treatments = 425) at a major tertiary teaching hospital. Patients often reported extreme trauma including physical torture, rape and witnessing the same in family members. Patients represented 13 different countries, with about half the patients being Somali. The primary complaint of all patients was pain (100%). Using the Wong-Baker Faces Pain scale, 56% patients reported pain decreases. Patient acceptance of acupuncture was high. We provide three case histories as illustrative examples. Further research is warranted. PMID:22005843

  10. Atrial fibrillation cardioversion following acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Dilber, Dario; Čerkez-Habek, Jasna; Barić, Hrvoje; Gradišer, Marina

    2015-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia and it is an independent risk for serious events. Acupuncture has been growing in popularity in the West, and there are reports of its benefits in treating AF. We report a 57-year-old man who was admitted after having an allergic reaction to amiodarone administered to treat paroxysmal AF with fast ventricular response. Cardioversion with intravenous propafenone was uneventful. Before an attempt of electric cardioversion, he was treated with acupuncture as additional therapy to peroral propafenone. After acupuncture treatment consisting of 10 treatments during 30 days period, both immediate cardioversion to sinus rhythm and no paroxysmal AF during 30 days period were recorded. PMID:26593171

  11. Atrial fibrillation cardioversion following acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Dilber, Dario; Čerkez-Habek, Jasna; Barić, Hrvoje; Gradišer, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia and it is an independent risk for serious events. Acupuncture has been growing in popularity in the West, and there are reports of its benefits in treating AF. We report a 57-year-old man who was admitted after having an allergic reaction to amiodarone administered to treat paroxysmal AF with fast ventricular response. Cardioversion with intravenous propafenone was uneventful. Before an attempt of electric cardioversion, he was treated with acupuncture as additional therapy to peroral propafenone. After acupuncture treatment consisting of 10 treatments during 30 days period, both immediate cardioversion to sinus rhythm and no paroxysmal AF during 30 days period were recorded. PMID:26593171

  12. Acupuncture stimulation and neuroendocrine regulation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jung-Sheng; Zeng, Bai-Yun; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture has been used to treat different conditions for at least 3000 years in China and has gained increasing acceptance worldwide. The acupuncture needle inserted into the muscle layer at the acupoint produces the so-called obtaining qi sensation that causes the excitation of A-δ and C-fibers of the muscle tissue, resulting in afferent signals. The afferent signals pass through the dorsal horn cells of the spinal cord ascending to the brain, such as the hypothalamus, enhancing the release of neuropeptides and hormones, and these afferent signals in the spinal segment may innervate the visceral organ, inducing effect on visceral function. Here, we reviewed the effect of acupuncture stimulation on neuropeptides and hormones, including β-endorphin, serotonin, oxytocin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, corticotrophin-releasing hormone, cholecystokinin, and acetylcholine, as well as insulin sensitivity, immunomodulation (anti-inflammation), and autonomic nerve activity. PMID:24215920

  13. Prospective Tests on Biological Models of Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The biological effects of acupuncture include the regulation of a variety of neurohumoral factors and growth control factors. In science, models or hypotheses with confirmed predictions are considered more convincing than models solely based on retrospective explanations. Literature review showed that two biological models of acupuncture have been prospectively tested with independently confirmed predictions: The neurophysiology model on the long-term effects of acupuncture emphasizes the trophic and anti-inflammatory effects of acupuncture. Its prediction on the peripheral effect of endorphin in acupuncture has been confirmed. The growth control model encompasses the neurophysiology model and suggests that a macroscopic growth control system originates from a network of organizers in embryogenesis. The activity of the growth control system is important in the formation, maintenance and regulation of all the physiological systems. Several phenomena of acupuncture such as the distribution of auricular acupuncture points, the long-term effects of acupuncture and the effect of multimodal non-specific stimulation at acupuncture points are consistent with the growth control model. The following predictions of the growth control model have been independently confirmed by research results in both acupuncture and conventional biomedical sciences: (i) Acupuncture has extensive growth control effects. (ii) Singular point and separatrix exist in morphogenesis. (iii) Organizers have high electric conductance, high current density and high density of gap junctions. (iv) A high density of gap junctions is distributed as separatrices or boundaries at body surface after early embryogenesis. (v) Many acupuncture points are located at transition points or boundaries between different body domains or muscles, coinciding with the connective tissue planes. (vi) Some morphogens and organizers continue to function after embryogenesis. Current acupuncture research suggests a convergence

  14. Qualitative Analysis of Emotions: Fear and Thrill.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Ralf C

    2016-01-01

    persists only during the most intense concentration. For events long enough to differentiate time within the events, fear and thrill can arise and fade in different fine-scale sequences. PMID:27559323

  15. Qualitative Analysis of Emotions: Fear and Thrill

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Ralf C.

    2016-01-01

    persists only during the most intense concentration. For events long enough to differentiate time within the events, fear and thrill can arise and fade in different fine-scale sequences. PMID:27559323

  16. Acupuncture: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Mittelman, Michele

    2014-01-01

    During the past 40 years, acupuncture, a therapeutic technique of oriental medicine, has become more and more popular, evolving into one of the most utilized forms of complementary integrative medicine interventions in the United States. In fact, more than 10 million acupuncture treatments are administered annually in the United States alone.1 Its rise in popularity, particularly in the West, can be attributed in part to its effectiveness for pain relief and in part to the fact that scientific studies have begun to prove its efficacy. PMID:25105069

  17. Is sham acupuncture as effective as traditional Chinese acupuncture? It's too early to say.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Li; Chu, Qin; Wang, Shu; Lai, Hilary; Xie, Bing-Bing

    2016-07-01

    Many clinical trials and experimental studies claim that sham acupuncture is as effective as traditional Chinese acupuncture. However, these studies have no standard sham acupuncture control and many other factors can affect the clinical effect. These factors include needle retention time, treatment frequency, and the total number of treatments needed for satisfactory results, and all can change the clinical effect. The majority of existing acupuncture treatment studies do not consider these factors and lack standard dosage criteria. Therefore, it is still too early to conclude that sham acupuncture is as effective as traditional Chinese acupuncture. This article investigates the factors that influence the curative effect of acupuncture as to help set a standard for acupuncture studies in the future. PMID:27081001

  18. Physical Therapists' Views and Experiences of Pregnancy-Related Low Back Pain and the Role of Acupuncture: Qualitative Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Bartlam, Bernadette; Bishop, Annette; Holden, Melanie A.; Barlas, Panos; Foster, Nadine E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Low back pain is often accepted as a “normal” part of pregnancy. Despite research suggesting that quality of life for women who are pregnant is adversely affected, most are advised to self-manage. Although the use of acupuncture for the management of persistent nonspecific low back pain has been recommended in recent UK national guidelines, its use in the management of pregnancy-related low back pain remains limited. Objectives This study aimed to explore the perceptions and experiences of physical therapists involved in treating women who are pregnant and have low back pain with the objective of informing the pretrial training program for a pilot randomized trial (Evaluating Acupuncture and Standard care for pregnant womEn with Back pain [EASE Back]). Design A qualitative phenomenological method with purposive sampling was used in the study. Methods Three focus groups and 3 individual semistructured interviews were undertaken, and an iterative exploratory thematic analysis was performed. To ensure transparency of the research process and the decisions made, an audit trail was created. Results Twenty-one physical therapists participated, and emergent issues included: a lack of experience in treating pregnancy-related complaints, mixed messages from previous acupuncture education, a mistrust of the current evidence for acupuncture safety and effectiveness, and personal and professional fear of causing harm. Conclusions The findings suggest that UK physical therapists are reluctant to use acupuncture in the management of pregnancy-related low back pain. The explanations for these findings include perceived lack of knowledge and confidence, as well as a pervasive professional culture of caution, particularly fears of inducing early labor and of litigation. These findings have been key to informing the content of the training program for physical therapists delivering acupuncture within the pilot EASE Back trial. PMID:25929530

  19. Fear Extinction in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-hui; Knapska, Ewelina; Orsini, Caitlin A.; Rabinak, Christine A.; Zimmerman, Joshua M.; Maren, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Pavlovian conditioning paradigms have become important model systems for understanding the neuroscience of behavior. In particular, studies of the extinction of Pavlovian fear responses are yielding important information about the neural substrates of anxiety disorders in humans. These studies are germane to understanding the neural mechanisms underlying behavioral interventions that suppress fear, including exposure therapy. This chapter described detailed behavioral protocols for examining the nature and properties of fear extinction in laboratory rodents. PMID:19340814

  20. [The effect of acupuncture in dysmenorrhea].

    PubMed

    Tsenov, D

    1996-01-01

    The author assumed the task study the effect of treatment dysmenorrhoea by acupuncture. Object of the study were 48 women in reproductive age divided in 2 groups: 1st group--24 women with primary dysmenorrhoea, 2nd group--24 women with secondary dysmenorrhoea. Acupuncture treatment included acupuncture points: LI4, SP6, 10, S30, 36 CV2, 3, CX5, 6, B20, 23 applied via torment method for 30 min. RESULTS. In the 1st group effect was very well after one course of 2-4 acupuncture procedures before menstruation. In the 2nd group effect was satisfactory in 50% of the cases after two courses acupuncture treatment. In conclusion effect of acupuncture treatment on dysmenorrhoea depend on its kind--primary dysmenorrhoea is influenced very well, while secondary dysmenorrhoea is influenced satisfactory. PMID:9045554

  1. Photoacoustic imaging of cerebral hypoperfusion during acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Chen, B. Z.; Yang, J. G.; Wu, D.; Zeng, D. W.; Yi, Y.; Yang, N.; Jiang, H. B.

    2015-01-01

    Using acupuncture to treat cerebral hypoperfusion is a hot topic. However, there is a lack of effective tools to clarify the therapeutic effect of acupuncture on cerebral hypoperfusion. Here, we show in a mouse model of cerebral hypoperfusion that photoacoustic tomography (PAT) can noninvasively image cerebral vasculature and track total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration changes in cerebral hypoperfusion with acupuncture stimulation on the YangLingQuan (GB34) point. We measured the changes of HbT concentration and found that the HbT concentration in hypoperfusion regions was clearly lower than that in the control regions when the acupuncture was absent; however, it was significantly increased when the acupuncture was implemented on the GB34 point. We also observed the increase of vessel size and the generation of new vessels in cerebral hypoperfusion during acupuncture. Laser speckle imaging (LSI) was employed to validate some of the PAT findings. PMID:26417495

  2. Clinical acupuncture research in the West.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianze; Xu, Shifen; Lao, Lixing

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, acupuncture has rapidly become part of mainstream medicine in the West, where new developments in acupuncture clinical research show extensive progress in evaluating the efficacy and safety of the modality in many categories of disease, especially in pain conditions. Although challenges and difficulties remain, the acupuncture research community has matured and its past experience may lead to even better methods and more innovative research. PMID:21695617

  3. Acupuncture in Osgood-Schlatter disease.

    PubMed

    Morris, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of acupuncture in the management of knee pain in Osgood-Schlatter disease. Manual and electroacupuncture were used. The patient responded well to acupuncture and found it effective in relieving his knee pain. Acupuncture should be considered in Osgood-Schlatter disease, both to manage the pain and to limit the need to take oral analgaesics for a prolonged period. PMID:27277583

  4. Personal Fear of Death and Grief in Bereaved Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Peter; Cacciatore, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    The study explored the relation of fear of death (Multidimensional Fear of Death Scale) to maternal grief (Perinatal Grief Scale-33) following miscarriage, stillbirth, neonatal death, or infant/child death. The 400 women participants were recruited from the website, e-mail lists, and parent groups of an organization that supports bereaved parents.…

  5. Acupuncture for Erectile Dysfunction: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaoming; Zhou, Jing; Qin, Zongshi; Liu, Zhishun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acupuncture is increasingly used to treat patients with erectile dysfunction (ED), and our systematic review aimed to evaluate the current evidence for the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in treating ED. Methods. An electronic search was conducted in eight databases to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture for treating erectile dysfunction that were published in English and Chinese. The Cochrane Risk of Bias tool was used to assess the risk of bias. Results. Three RCTs with a total of 183 participants met the inclusion criteria. One trial showed the beneficial effects of acupuncture compared with sham acupuncture while the others did not. One trial suggested that acupuncture combined with psychological therapy was superior to psychological therapy alone. However, the overall methodological and reporting quality of the studies was low. The safety of acupuncture for ED was unclear because there were too few reports on this topic. Conclusion. The available evidence supporting that acupuncture alone improves ED was insufficient and the available studies failed to show the specific therapeutic effect of acupuncture. Future well-designed and rigorous RCTs with a large sample size are required. This trial is registered with CRD42014013575. PMID:26885501

  6. Faith and Fear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, Paul D.

    2005-01-01

    People are living in times when fear often trumps all other emotions. The ability to increase trust between people by diminishing the fear they feel toward each other can be the key to a happy and successful life. Many of the controversies seen in schools over curriculum are really about protecting personal values. The irony in this is that people…

  7. The Biology of Fear

    PubMed Central

    Adolphs, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Each of us has felt afraid, and we can all recognize fear in many animal species. Yet there is no consensus in the scientific study of fear. Some argue that “fear” is a psychological construct rather than discoverable through scientific investigation. Others argue that the term “fear” cannot properly be applied to animals because we cannot know whether they feel afraid. Studies in rodents show that there are highly specific brain circuits for fear, whereas findings from human neuroimaging seem to make the opposite claim. Here I review the field and urge three approaches that could reconcile the debates. For one, we need a broadly comparative approach that would identify core components of fear conserved across phylogeny. This also pushes us towards the second point of emphasis: an ecological theory of fear that is essentially functional. Finally, we should aim even to incorporate the conscious experience of being afraid, reinvigorating the study of feelings across species. PMID:23347946

  8. Acupuncture Sample Injection for Microchip Capillary Electrophoresis and Electrokinetic Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ji Won; Hahn, Jong Hoon

    2016-05-01

    A simple nanoliter-scale injection technique was developed for polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices to form the well-defined sample plugs in microfluidic channels. Sample injection was achieved by performing acupuncture on a channel with a needle and applying external pressure to a syringe. This technique allowed us to achieve reproducible injection of a 3-nL segment into a microchannel for PDMS microchip-based capillary electrophoresis (CE). Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC) with bead packing were successfully performed by applying a single potential in the most simplified straight channel. The advantages of this acupuncture injection over the electrokinetic injection in microchip CE include capability of minimizing sample loss and voltage control hardware, capability of serial injections of different sample solutions into a same microchannel, capability of injecting sample plugs into any position of a microchannel, independence on sample solutions during the loading step, and ease in making microchips due to the straight channel, etc. PMID:27056036

  9. [Supplementing the international acupuncture and moxibustion in bilingual teaching of Acupuncture and Moxibustion Science].

    PubMed

    Tian, Kaiyu; Ma, Qiaolin; Ren, Shan; Liu, Fang

    2016-04-01

    Bilingual teaching is a innovative method of higher education of China to gear the need of the world. Acupuncture and Moxibustion, a higher international TCM course, has been the model of bilingual teaching in many colleges and universities of TCM successively. To meet the aim and original intention of bilingual education in China, we have supplemented international acupuncture and moxibustion in teaching program for many years. The related contents about acupuncture and moxibustion of World Health Organization (WHO) and International Standardization Organization(ISO) have been added into the chapters of introduction, meridians and acupoints, the technology of acupuncture and moxibustion, the therapy of acupuncture and moxibustion. Teaching international acupuncture and moxibustion not only enlarges the international perspective of students, but also makes them more interested in learning Acupuncture and Moxibustion with a bigger sense of mission. PMID:27352508

  10. Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy improves dysphagia after brainstem stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun-hong; Bian, Jin-ling; Meng, Zhi-hong; Meng, Li-na; Ren, Xue-song; Wang, Zhi-lin; Guo, Xiao-yan; Shi, Xue-min

    2016-01-01

    Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy has been shown to effectively treat dysphagia after stroke-based pseudobulbar paralysis. We presumed that this therapy would be effective for dysphagia after bulbar paralysis in patients with brainstem infarction. Sixty-four patients with dysphagia following brainstem infarction were recruited and divided into a medulla oblongata infarction group (n = 22), a midbrain and pons infarction group (n = 16), and a multiple cerebral infarction group (n = 26) according to their magnetic resonance imaging results. All patients received Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture for 28 days. The main acupoints were Neiguan (PC6), Renzhong (DU26), Sanyinjiao (SP6), Fengchi (GB20), Wangu (GB12), and Yifeng (SJ17). Furthermore, the posterior pharyngeal wall was pricked. Before and after treatment, patient swallowing functions were evaluated with the Kubota Water Test, Fujishima Ichiro Rating Scale, and the Standard Swallowing Assessment. The Barthel Index was also used to evaluate their quality of life. Results showed that after 28 days of treatment, scores on the Kubota Water Test and Standard Swallowing Assessment had decreased, but scores on the Fujishima Ichiro Rating Scale and Barthel Index had increased in each group. The total efficacy rate was 92.2% after treatment, and was most obvious in patients with medulla oblongata infarction (95.9%). These findings suggest that Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy can repair the connection of upper motor neurons to the medulla oblongata motor nucleus, promote the recovery of brainstem infarction, and improve patient's swallowing ability and quality of life. PMID:27073382

  11. Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy improves dysphagia after brainstem stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Hong; Bian, Jin-Ling; Meng, Zhi-Hong; Meng, Li-Na; Ren, Xue-Song; Wang, Zhi-Lin; Guo, Xiao-Yan; Shi, Xue-Min

    2016-02-01

    Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy has been shown to effectively treat dysphagia after stroke-based pseudobulbar paralysis. We presumed that this therapy would be effective for dysphagia after bulbar paralysis in patients with brainstem infarction. Sixty-four patients with dysphagia following brainstem infarction were recruited and divided into a medulla oblongata infarction group (n = 22), a midbrain and pons infarction group (n = 16), and a multiple cerebral infarction group (n = 26) according to their magnetic resonance imaging results. All patients received Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture for 28 days. The main acupoints were Neiguan (PC6), Renzhong (DU26), Sanyinjiao (SP6), Fengchi (GB20), Wangu (GB12), and Yifeng (SJ17). Furthermore, the posterior pharyngeal wall was pricked. Before and after treatment, patient swallowing functions were evaluated with the Kubota Water Test, Fujishima Ichiro Rating Scale, and the Standard Swallowing Assessment. The Barthel Index was also used to evaluate their quality of life. Results showed that after 28 days of treatment, scores on the Kubota Water Test and Standard Swallowing Assessment had decreased, but scores on the Fujishima Ichiro Rating Scale and Barthel Index had increased in each group. The total efficacy rate was 92.2% after treatment, and was most obvious in patients with medulla oblongata infarction (95.9%). These findings suggest that Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy can repair the connection of upper motor neurons to the medulla oblongata motor nucleus, promote the recovery of brainstem infarction, and improve patient's swallowing ability and quality of life. PMID:27073382

  12. Could Acupuncture Be Useful in the Treatment of Temporomandibular Dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Grillo, Cássia Maria; Canales, Giancarlo De la Torre; Wada, Ronaldo Seichi; Alves, Marcelo Corrêa; Barbosa, Célia Marisa Rizzatti; Berzin, Fausto; de Sousa, Maria da Luz Rosário

    2015-08-01

    In this study, the effects of acupuncture in comparison with flat occlusal plane appliance were evaluated in patient with myogenic temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). The sample consisted of 40 women with TMD and unbalanced energy predominance of Yang Liver Ascension, selected using the Renying and Cunkou pulses, randomly divided into two groups: acupuncture and splint. The effect of treatments on the masseter and anterior temporal muscles was evaluated after 4 weeks of treatment, by means of electromyographic activity (root mean square) and pain pressure threshold. Pain intensity was measured using the visual analog scale, and range of mouth opening was evaluated using a millimeter ruler. All evaluations were performed at the beginning and end of the treatment. Visual analog scale score was reduced equally in the two groups (p < 0001), and the increase in range of mouth opening was significant in both groups. A significant difference was detected only in pain pressure threshold of the left masseter in the acupuncture group (p < 0.05). Only root mean square in the at rest position of the right temporal muscle diminished in the final stage of the splint group (p < 0.05). Both treatments reduced the pain intensity of myogenic TMD in the short term and may be considered strategies for control of chronic pain related to TMD. PMID:26276455

  13. Acupuncture Treatment of Lateral Elbow Pain: A Nonrandomized Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan-Song; Gadau, Marcus; Zhang, Guo-Xue; Liu, Hao; Wang, Fu-Chun; Zaslawski, Christopher; Li, Tie; Tan, Yuan-Sheng; Berle, Christine; Li, Wei-Hong; Bangrazi, Sergio; Liguori, Stefano; Zhang, Shi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    In planning for a large-scale multicenter trial to evaluate the effect of acupuncture for the treatment of lateral elbow pain, a pilot study was conducted. This was a prospective, investigator- and patient-blinded, nonrandomized, placebo controlled trial. Subjects were evaluated at baseline, before fourth, seventh, and ninth treatment, and at a two-week posttreatment follow-up. The treatment group received unilateral acupuncture at LI 10 and LI 11 at the affected side with manual needle manipulation; the control group received sham-laser acupuncture at the same acupoints. Measures included (i) disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) questionnaire, (ii) pain-free grip strength (PFGS), and (iii) a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain. Significant differences in DASH score, PFGS, and VAS between treatment and control group were found at the ninth treatment (n = 20 for each group, P < 0.05). Only DASH showed significant differences compared to the control for all the measurement time points after treatment commenced and appears to be a sensitive and appropriate primary outcome measure for the future multisite trial. Results from this pilot study provided relevant information about treatment efficacy, credibility of control treatment, and sensitivity of different outcome measures for the planning of the future trial. PMID:27006679

  14. Laser Acupuncture for Postoperative Pain Management in Cats

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Virgínia I.; Cassu, Renata N.; Nascimento, Felipe F.; Tavares, Rafaela C. P.; Crociolli, Giulliane C.; Guilhen, Rafael C.; Nicácio, Gabriel M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate laser acupuncture as an adjuvant for postoperative pain management in cats. Twenty cats, undergoing ovariohysterectomy, were sedated with intramuscular (IM) ketamine (5 mg kg−1), midazolam (0.5 mg kg−1), and tramadol (2 mg kg−1). Prior to induction of anaesthesia, the subjects were randomly distributed into two groups of 10 cats: Laser: bilateral stomach 36 and spleen 6 acupoints were stimulated with infrared laser; Control: no acupuncture was applied. Anaesthesia was induced using intravenous propofol (4 mg kg−1) and maintained with isoflurane. Postoperative analgesia was evaluated by a blinded assessor for 24 h following extubation using the Dynamic Interactive Visual Analogue Scale and Multidimensional Composite Pain Scale. Rescue analgesia was provided with IM tramadol (2 mg kg−1), and the pain scores were reassessed 30 min after the rescue intervention. If the analgesia remained insufficient, meloxicam (0.2 mg kg−1 IM, single dose) was administered. Data were analyzed using t-tests, the Mann-Whitney test, and the Friedman test (P < 0.05). The pain scores did not differ between groups. However, postoperative supplemental analgesia was required by significantly more cats in the Control (5/10) compared with the Laser group (1/10) (P = 0.038). Laser acupuncture reduced postoperative analgesic requirements in cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy. PMID:26170879

  15. Acupuncture-Related Modulation of Pain-Associated Brain Networks During Electrical Pain Stimulation: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyung-Eun; Gizewski, Elke R.; Wen, Ming; Rampp, Thomas; Gasser, Thomas; Dobos, Gustav J.; Forsting, Michael; Musial, Frauke

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Findings of existing functional MRI (fMRI) studies on the neural mechanisms that mediate effects of acupuncture analgesia are inconsistent. This study analyzes the effects of manual acupuncture on pain ratings and brain activation in response to experimental, electrical pain stimuli. Design: Fourteen healthy volunteers were examined by using a 1.5-T MRI scanner. The intensity of pain stimuli was adjusted to individual pain ratings on a numeric rating scale. Baseline fMRI was performed during electrical pain stimulation in a blocked design. For the second session, manual acupuncture with repeated stimulation was performed on contralateral acupoints—large intestine 4, liver 3, and stomach 36—before imaging. After imaging, subjective pain ratings and ratings of the de qi sensation were assessed. Results: Compared with baseline, volunteers showed modulated brain activity under pain conditions in the cingulate gyrus, insula, primary somatosensory cortex, and prefrontal areas after the acupuncture session. In accordance with the literature, anterior insular and prefrontal activity seemed to be correlated with acupuncture treatment. Conclusion: This study supports the existence of analgesic acupuncture effects that outlast the needling period. Pain-associated brain areas were modulated in direct response to a preceding acupuncture treatment. PMID:25389905

  16. Short-Term Effect of Laser Acupuncture on Lower Back Pain: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae-Young; Ku, Boncho; Kim, Jaeuk U.; Lee, Yu Jung; Kang, Jae Hui; Heo, Hyun; Choi, Hyo-Joon; Lee, Jun-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. This trial was performed to investigate the efficacy of laser acupuncture for the alleviation of lower back pain. Methods. This was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Fifty-six participants were randomly assigned to either the laser acupuncture group (n = 28) or the sham laser acupuncture group (n = 28). Participants in both groups received three treatment sessions over the course of one week. Thirteen acupuncture points were selected. The visual analogue scale for pain, pressure pain threshold, Patient Global Impression of Change, and Euro-Quality-of-Life Five Dimensions questionnaire (Korean version) were used to evaluate the effect of laser acupuncture treatment on lower back pain. Results. There were no significant differences in any outcome between the two groups, although the participants in both groups showed a significant improvement in each assessed parameter relative to the baseline values. Conclusion. Although there was no significant difference in outcomes between the two groups, the results suggest that laser acupuncture can provide effective pain alleviation and can be considered an option for relief from lower back pain. Further studies using long-term intervention, a larger sample size, and rigorous methodology are required to clarify the effect of laser acupuncture on lower back pain. PMID:26516333

  17. Describing Acupuncture: A New Challenge for Technical Communicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karanikas, Marianthe

    1997-01-01

    Considers acupuncture as an increasingly popular alternative medical therapy, but difficult to describe in technical communication. Notes that traditional Chinese medical explanations of acupuncture are unscientific, and that scientific explanations of acupuncture are inconclusive. Finds that technical communicators must translate acupuncture for…

  18. Fear of falling in older adults: comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Jung, Dukyoo

    2008-12-01

    Fear of falling has been reported in a high percentage of community-dwelling elderly who both do and don't have a history of falling. The aims of this review are to: (a) elucidate the definition of fear of falling; (b) clarify measurements of fear of falling based on its definition; and (c) describe the risk factors for fear of falling. Despite the importance of the percentage and the consequences of fear of falling, its definition is still vague and warrants clarification. Based on a literature review, major fear of falling measurements involve the evaluation of fear of falling and use of a fall efficacy scale. Using a correct definition of fear of falling, nurses working close with older adults need to identify the different definitions of fear of falling and fall efficacy scale. In addition, nurses who work closely with older adults should encourage them to increase or maintain modifiable factors by maximizing their basic health status and enhancing their physical activity to decrease fear of falling. PMID:25029959

  19. 21 CFR 880.5580 - Acupuncture needle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acupuncture needle. 880.5580 Section 880.5580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5580 Acupuncture needle....

  20. Impedance analysis of acupuncture points and pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplan, Michal; Kukučka, Marek; Ondrejkovičová, Alena

    2011-12-01

    Investigation of impedance characteristics of acupuncture points from acoustic to radio frequency range is addressed. Discernment and localization of acupuncture points in initial single subject study was unsuccessfully attempted by impedance map technique. Vector impedance analyses determined possible resonant zones in MHz region.

  1. Acupuncture and regulation of gastrointestinal function.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; He, Tian; Xu, Qian; Li, Zhe; Liu, Yan; Li, Fang; Yang, Bo-Feng; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2015-07-21

    In China, acupuncture has been considered an effective method for treating gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction diseases for thousands of years. In fact, acupuncture has gained progressive acceptance from both practitioners and patients worldwide. However, the therapeutic effects and underlying mechanisms in treating GI dysfunction have not yet been established due to a lack of systematic and comprehensive review articles. Therefore, the aim of this review is to discuss the efficacy of acupuncture as a treatment for GI dysfunction and the associated underlying mechanisms. A search of PubMed was conducted for articles that were published over the past 10 years using the terms "acupuncture", "gastrointestine", and other relevant keywords. In the following review, we describe the effect and underlying mechanisms of acupuncture on GI function from the perspectives of GI motility, visceral sensitivity, the GI barrier, and the brain-gut axis. The dual regulatory effects of acupuncture may manifest by promoting gastric peristalsis in subjects with low initial gastric motility, and suppressing peristalsis in subjects with active initial motility. In addition, the regulation of acupuncture on gastric motility may be intensity-dependent. Our findings suggest that further studies are needed to investigate the effects and more systematic mechanisms in treating GI dysfunction, and to promote the application of acupuncture for the treatment of GI diseases. PMID:26217082

  2. [Discussion on the therapeutic method of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Wu, Yao

    2010-05-01

    Based on the theory of TCM and acupuncture and moxibustion, the importance of acupuncture-moxibustion, the difference and correlation between TCM and acupuncture-moxibustion, and classification of therapeutic method of acup-mox are discussed. The six methods of acupuncture-moxibustion are proposed as warming method, emmenagogue, reinforcing method, reducing method, adjusting method and ascending method to enrich the therapeutic theory of acupuncture and moxibustion. PMID:20518183

  3. Acupuncture for the Treatment of Opiate Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chan, Yuan-Yu; Chen, Yi-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Acupuncture is an accepted treatment worldwide for various clinical conditions, and the effects of acupuncture on opiate addiction have been investigated in many clinical trials. The present review systematically analyzed data from randomized clinical trials published in Chinese and English since 1970. We found that the majority agreed on the efficacy of acupuncture as a strategy for the treatment of opiate addiction. However, some of the methods in several included trials have been criticized for their poor quality. This review summarizes the quality of the study design, the types of acupuncture applied, the commonly selected acupoints or sites of the body, the effectiveness of the treatment, and the possible mechanism underlying the effectiveness of acupuncture in these trials. PMID:22474521

  4. Pediatric Acupuncture: A Review of Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaou, Colette D.; Belmont, Katharine A.; Katz, Aaron R.; Benaron, Daniel M.; Yu, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Practiced in China for more than 2000 years, acupuncture has recently gained increased attention in the United States as an alternative treatment approach for a variety of medical conditions. Despite its growing prevalence and anecdotal reports of success among pediatric populations, few empirically based studies have assessed the efficacy of acupuncture for children and adolescents. This article presents a review of the current literature, including a systematic appraisal of the methodological value of each study and a discussion of potential benefits and adverse effects of acupuncture. While acupuncture holds great promise as a treatment modality for diverse pediatric conditions, a significant amount of additional research is necessary to establish an empirical basis for the incorporation of acupuncture into standard care. PMID:18955306

  5. Acupuncture research is part of my life.

    PubMed

    Han, Ji-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Acupuncture has been used in China for more than 3,000 years. Although the clinical application of acupuncture is very popular, its mechanisms of action are still unclear. Beginning in the middle of the 20th century, a boost of research on acupuncture emerged in China, and I was one of the researchers involved in this episode. With the help of modern neuroscience, the mechanisms of acupuncture for pain management have been unraveled at least partly. This article describes my decision as a young medical graduate to devote my life to research on acupuncture and pain medicine; it has since been my life's journey-one full of challenges and happiness, pitfalls and achievements. PMID:19638141

  6. Acupuncture in the treatment of renal colic.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y H; Lee, W C; Chen, M T; Huang, J K; Chung, C; Chang, L S

    1992-01-01

    A prospective randomized study was performed to compare the effect of acupuncture and intramuscular Avafortan injection in the treatment of renal colic. Our results showed that acupuncture is as effective in relieving renal colic as Avafortan but it had a more rapid analgesic onset (3.14 +/- 2.88 minutes versus 15.44 +/- 7.55 minutes, p less than 0.05). Of the patients in the Avafortan group 7 (43.8%) had side effects, including skin rash in 3, tachycardia in 2, drowsiness in 1 and facial flush in 1. No side effects were noted in the acupuncture group. During 2 hours of observation acupuncture and Avafortan seemed to be ineffective in promoting stone passage. However, patients receiving Avafortan treatment were more likely to have paralytic ileus. In summary, acupuncture can be a good alternative for the treatment of renal colic. PMID:1729516

  7. Patients’ preconceptions of acupuncture: a qualitative study exploring the decisions patients make when seeking acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Like any other form of healthcare, acupuncture takes place in a particular context which can enhance or diminish treatment outcomes (i.e. can produce contextual effects). Patients’ expectations of acupuncture might be an important component of contextual effects, but we know relatively little about the origins and nature of patients’ expectations or wider preconceptions about acupuncture. Our aim was to identify the processes the underpin patients’ decisions to try acupuncture and thus begin to tease out the origins and nature of patients’ preconceptions. Methods One-off semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive, varied sample of 35 adults who had tried acupuncture for various conditions. Interviews explored people’s experiences of acupuncture treatment and techniques from framework and inductive thematic analysis were used to relate the data to the research question. Results We identified four distinct processes within participants’ accounts of deciding to try acupuncture: establishing a need for treatment, establishing a need for a new treatment, deciding to try acupuncture, and finding an acupuncturist. Family, friends and health care professionals played a role in these processes, providing support, advice, and increasing people’s general familiarity with acupuncture. When they came to their first acupuncture appointment, participants had hopes, concerns, and occasionally concrete expectations as to the nature of acupuncture treatment and its likely effects. Conclusions Existing theories of how context influences health outcomes could be expanded to better reflect the psychological components identified here, such as hope, desire, optimism and open-mindedness. Future research on the context of acupuncture should consider these elements of the pre-treatment context in addition to more established components such as expectations. There appears to be a need for accessible (i.e. well-disseminated), credible, and

  8. Treatment of Lymphedema with Saam Acupuncture in Patients with Breast Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Young Ju; Kwon, Hyo Jung; Park, Young Sun; Kwon, Oh Chang; Shin, Im Hee

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Lymphedema is a troublesome complication affecting quality of life (QoL) in many women after breast-cancer treatment. Recent studies have suggested that acupuncture can reduce symptoms of lymphedema in breast-cancer survivors. Objectives: This was a pilot study. It was designed to assess the feasibility and the safety of acupuncture with the Saam acupuncture method for treating lymphedema in Korean patients after surgical therapy for breast cancer. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective, single-arm, observational pilot study using before and after measurements. The study was conducted at the East-West Medical Center at the Daegu Catholic University Medical Center, in Daegu, Korea. The subjects were 9 patients with breast cancer who presented with lymphedema of the upper limb ipsilateral to surgery. Saam acupuncture was administered 3 times per week for 6 consecutive weeks, for 30±5 minutes at each session.The primary outcome measure was severity of lymphedema as assessed by stages of lymphedema, a visual analogue scale (VAS), and by circumferential measurements of the upper extremity. The secondary outcome measure was QoL, which was assessed by a self-administered questionnaire using the Short Form–36 questionnaire. Results: Acupuncture reduced severity of lymphedema significantly, as assessed by the VAS (P<0.001) as well as by circumferential measurements of the upper extremity. Four weeks after the final treatment, symptoms were not aggravated. SF-36 scores remained significant for health status at the end of treatment. Conclusions: The Saam acupuncture method appeared to provide reduction of lymphedema among women after they had undergone surgery for breast cancer. A randomized, controlled prospective study with a larger sample size is required to clarify the role of acupuncture for managing lymphedema in patients with breast cancer. PMID:26155321

  9. Acupuncture and burning mouth syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sardella, Andrea; Lodi, Giovanni; Tarozzi, Marco; Varoni, Elena; Franchini, Roberto; Carrassi, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic condition most common in middle-aged and elderly women, with prevalence rates in the general population ranging from 0.5% to 5%. Defined by the International Headache Society as "an intraoral burning sensation for which no medical or dental cause can be found," BMS is considered a form of neuropathic pain. The management of BMS remains unsatisfactory. In this pilot study, we investigated the use of acupuncture in a small group of BMS patients. The study group, after 4 refusals, was composed of 10 BMS patients (9 females and 1 male; mean age, 65.2 years; range, from 48 to 80 years; mean duration of BMS, 2.6 years; SD ± 0.8 years). Oral pain/burning sensation (primary outcome) was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Health-related quality of life (secondary outcome) was measured using the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Acupuncture treatment lasted 8 weeks and consisted of 20 sessions. Patients reported a mean reduction in pain of 0.99 points on the VAS (max 2.1-min 0.1), which, although slight, was statistically significant (Wilcoxon test P < 0.009). No significant improvement in the overall score for quality of life was observed, although subjects receiving acupuncture treatment seemed better able cope with their oral symptoms. PMID:23336607

  10. Nuclear fear revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2010-10-01

    In 1988 the science historian Spencer Weart published a groundbreaking book called Nuclear Fear: A History of Images, which examined visions of radiation damage and nuclear disaster in newspapers, television, film, literature, advertisements and popular culture.

  11. The Fears of Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamber, James H.

    1974-01-01

    This study investigated the self-reported fears and some personality characteristics of a sample of 1112 adolescents ranging in age from 12 to 18 years (attending grammar and secondary schools in Northern Ireland). (CS)

  12. Addressing fear, fighting complacency.

    PubMed

    Pergam, S A

    2015-10-01

    Nature has us wired instinctively to be cautious of things that are unknown or unfamiliar. Children may fear the dark, but even as adults we remain afraid of things that go bump in the night. PMID:26095023

  13. Fear: The Teachers' Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agne, Karen

    1996-01-01

    Looks at the effects of fear in the classroom and offers suggestions for teachers in dealing with the issue: self-acceptance, other-orientation, trust, patience, self-awareness, and journal writing. (JOW)

  14. Parent Perceptions of Children's Fears.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Elizabeth A.; Borgers, Sherry

    1988-01-01

    Examined fears of fifth grade students and ways in which their parents perceived the fears. Responses from 66 students and 47 parents suggest that children have more fears than parents think they have. Children reported concerns over accidents, nuclear war, and death, while parents expected children to have more fears about scary movies, the dark,…

  15. Fear of pain potentiates nocebo hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Aslaksen, Per M; Lyby, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    Nocebo hyperalgesia has received sparse experimental attention compared to placebo analgesia. The aim of the present study was to investigate if personality traits and fear of pain could predict experimental nocebo hyperalgesia. One hundred and eleven healthy volunteers (76 females) participated in an experimental study in which personality traits and fear of pain were measured prior to induction of thermal heat pain. Personality traits were measured by the Big-Five Inventory-10. Fear of pain was measured by the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III. Heat pain was induced by a PC-controlled thermode. Pain was measured by a computerized visual analog scale. Stress levels during the experiment were measured by numerical rating scales. The participants were randomized to a Nocebo group or to a no-treatment Natural History group. The results revealed that pain and stress levels were significantly higher in the Nocebo group after nocebo treatment. Mediation analysis showed that higher levels of the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III factor "fear of medical pain" significantly increased stress levels after nocebo treatment and that higher stress levels were associated with increased nocebo hyperalgesic responses. There were no significant associations between any of the personality factors and the nocebo hyperalgesic effect. The results from the present study suggest that dispositional fear of pain might be a useful predictor for nocebo hyperalgesia and emotional states concomitant with expectations of increased pain. Furthermore, measurement of traits that are specific to pain experience is probably better suited for prediction of nocebo hyperalgesic responses compared to broad measures of personality. PMID:26491370

  16. Fear of pain potentiates nocebo hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Aslaksen, Per M; Lyby, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    Nocebo hyperalgesia has received sparse experimental attention compared to placebo analgesia. The aim of the present study was to investigate if personality traits and fear of pain could predict experimental nocebo hyperalgesia. One hundred and eleven healthy volunteers (76 females) participated in an experimental study in which personality traits and fear of pain were measured prior to induction of thermal heat pain. Personality traits were measured by the Big-Five Inventory-10. Fear of pain was measured by the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III. Heat pain was induced by a PC-controlled thermode. Pain was measured by a computerized visual analog scale. Stress levels during the experiment were measured by numerical rating scales. The participants were randomized to a Nocebo group or to a no-treatment Natural History group. The results revealed that pain and stress levels were significantly higher in the Nocebo group after nocebo treatment. Mediation analysis showed that higher levels of the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III factor “fear of medical pain” significantly increased stress levels after nocebo treatment and that higher stress levels were associated with increased nocebo hyperalgesic responses. There were no significant associations between any of the personality factors and the nocebo hyperalgesic effect. The results from the present study suggest that dispositional fear of pain might be a useful predictor for nocebo hyperalgesia and emotional states concomitant with expectations of increased pain. Furthermore, measurement of traits that are specific to pain experience is probably better suited for prediction of nocebo hyperalgesic responses compared to broad measures of personality. PMID:26491370

  17. Acupuncture for Poststroke Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sook-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To summarize and evaluate evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture in relieving poststroke shoulder pain. Methods. Seven databases were searched without language restrictions. All randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of acupuncture for poststroke shoulder pain compared with controls were included. Assessments were performed primarily with the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), and effective rates. Results. In all, 188 potentially relevant articles were identified; 12 were randomized controlled trials that met our inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis showed that acupuncture combined with rehabilitation treatment appeared to be more effective than rehabilitation treatment alone for poststroke shoulder pain, as assessed by VAS (weighted mean difference, 1.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20–2.54; <0.001); FMA (weighted mean difference, 8.70; 95% CI, 6.58–10.82; P < 0.001); and effective rate (RR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.18–1.47; P < 0.001). Conclusions. Although there is some evidence for an effect of acupuncture on poststroke shoulder pain, the results are inconclusive. Further studies with more subjects and a rigorous study design are needed to confirm the role of acupuncture in the treatment of poststroke shoulder pain. PMID:27547224

  18. The Brain Effects of Laser Acupuncture in Depressed Individuals: An fMRI Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Quah-Smith, Im; Wen, Wei; Chen, Xiaohua; Williams, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The 2010 Cochrane Collaboration Review reported laser acupuncture as being effective in depression. The treatment was on LR 8, LR 14, CV 14, and HT 7 over 12 sessions within a 2-month period. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the biological plausibility of low-intensity laser acupuncture as an antidepressant treatment. Design Randomized stimulation with a fiber-optic infrared laser on these acupoints and KI 3 acupoint. We used a blocked design, alternating laser and placebo laser/rest blocks, while the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI response was recorded from the whole brain on a 3T MRI scanner. Setting This study took place at the research institute. Subjects Ten subjects were studied, as confirmed by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D17). Intervention Low-intensity laser acupuncture. Main outcome measures Significant brain patterns for each acupoint greater than the other acupoints and placebo. Results Each acupoint laser stimulation condition resulted in a different activation size and pattern of neural activity. Regions with significantly increased activation and deactivation compared to placebo included fronto-limbic-striatal brain regions. There was no significant activation or deactivation with KI 3. Blinding was afforded with the block design and the infrared laser. Conclusions There is positive biological evidence to support the empirical evidence for laser acupuncture in the treatment of depression. With its minimal adverse effect profile and ease of application, laser acupuncture should be included in depression management strategies.

  19. Acupuncture and regulation of gastrointestinal function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; He, Tian; Xu, Qian; Li, Zhe; Liu, Yan; Li, Fang; Yang, Bo-Feng; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    In China, acupuncture has been considered an effective method for treating gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction diseases for thousands of years. In fact, acupuncture has gained progressive acceptance from both practitioners and patients worldwide. However, the therapeutic effects and underlying mechanisms in treating GI dysfunction have not yet been established due to a lack of systematic and comprehensive review articles. Therefore, the aim of this review is to discuss the efficacy of acupuncture as a treatment for GI dysfunction and the associated underlying mechanisms. A search of PubMed was conducted for articles that were published over the past 10 years using the terms “acupuncture”, “gastrointestine”, and other relevant keywords. In the following review, we describe the effect and underlying mechanisms of acupuncture on GI function from the perspectives of GI motility, visceral sensitivity, the GI barrier, and the brain-gut axis. The dual regulatory effects of acupuncture may manifest by promoting gastric peristalsis in subjects with low initial gastric motility, and suppressing peristalsis in subjects with active initial motility. In addition, the regulation of acupuncture on gastric motility may be intensity-dependent. Our findings suggest that further studies are needed to investigate the effects and more systematic mechanisms in treating GI dysfunction, and to promote the application of acupuncture for the treatment of GI diseases. PMID:26217082

  20. Acupuncture to Reduce HIV-Associated Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Barbara; Keithley, Joyce K.; Johnson, Angela; Fogg, Louis; Adeyemi, Oluwatoyin; Sha, Beverly E.; Snell, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. HIV infection is associated with systemic inflammation that can increase risk for cardiovascular events. Acupuncture has been shown to have immunomodulatory effects and to improve symptoms in persons with inflammatory conditions. Objective. To test the anti-inflammatory effects of an acupuncture protocol that targets the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAIP), a neural mechanism whose activation has been shown to reduce the release of proinflammatory cytokines, in persons with HIV-associated inflammation. Design, Setting, Participants, and Interventions. Double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted in an outpatient clinic located in a medically underserved urban neighborhood. Twenty-five clinically-stable HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral therapy were randomized to receive once weekly CAIP-based acupuncture or sham acupuncture. Main Outcome Measures. Outcomes included plasma concentrations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein and D-dimer and fasting lipids. Results. Twenty-five participants completed the protocol (treatment group n = 12, control group n = 13). No adverse events related to the acupuncture protocol were observed. Compared to baseline values, the two groups did not significantly differ in any outcome measures at the end of the acupuncture protocol. Conclusions. CAIP-based acupuncture did not favorably modulate inflammatory or lipid parameters. Additional studies are warranted of CAIP-based protocols of different frequencies/durations. PMID:25922615

  1. [The origin of pediatric acupuncture technique: beginnings and historical background of pediatric acupuncture practitioners].

    PubMed

    Nagano, Hitoshi; Takaoka, Yutaka

    2010-09-01

    Pediatric acupuncture for infants in Japan has its own special method. There is no specialized literature about it that was published before the 20th century and it has not been investigated systematically. To elucidate the history of pediatric acupuncture, we investigated fragmented information on pediatric acupuncture written in the medical literature published before the Meiji Restoration and articles on traditional Japanese medicine (Kampo) and acupuncture published after the Meiji Restoration. We analyzed the history of Japanese pediatric acupuncture from the viewpoints of the acupuncture needles and the methods. As a result, we found that pediatricians used fragments of broken pottery for the treatment in the 1650's. This finding suggests that the present pediatric acupuncture needles originated from "ho-shin" which was used for the treatment of "oketsu" for infants (in ancient China) and that the present pediatric acupressure technique was derived from the pediatric acupressure by using friction with small stones. In addition, our analysis suggests that the integration of the edged pediatric acupuncture needles and the acupressure-like technique correlates with the "Regulations for Acupuncture and Moxibustion clinics" published by the Ministry of Home Affairs in Japan and enforced in 1912. PMID:21560321

  2. Developing methods for acupuncture research: rationale for and design of a pilot study evaluating the efficacy of acupuncture for chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Karen J; Cherkin, Daniel C

    2003-01-01

    Rigorously evaluating acupuncture and other complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies presents researches with many challenges. The failure to satisfactorily address these challenges has resulted in poorly designed studies, which yield findings that are difficult to interpret. Despite the publication of more than 10 randomized trials evaluating acupuncture as a treatment for chronic low back pain, the efficacy and effectiveness of acupuncture for this common problem remain unclear. We discuss the rationale for and design of a five-arm randomized controlled pilot clinical trial that addresses the major methodological shortcomings of previous studies (e.g., poorly justified treatment and control groups and lack of masking) and that lays the groundwork for a full scale trial evaluating acupuncture as a treatment for chronic low back pain. Although development and pilot testing of these design features required substantial time and resources, we believe that this investment in rigorous groundwork is essential to ensure that full-scale trials evaluating CAM treatments produce valid and interpretable results. PMID:14526711

  3. Acupuncture for analgesia in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Fry, Lindsey M; Neary, Susan M; Sharrock, Joseph; Rychel, Jessica K

    2014-06-01

    Acupuncture for analgesia is growing rapidly in popularity with veterinarians and pet owners. This article summarizes the mechanisms of analgesia derived from acupuncture and reviews current literature on the topic. Areas covered include the local effects at area of needle insertion, systemic effects secondary to circulating neurotransmitters and changes in cell signaling, central nervous system effects including the brain and spinal cord, and myofascial trigger point and pathology treatment. Clinical applications are discussed and suggested in each section. When used by appropriately trained professionals, acupuncture offers a compelling and safe method for pain management in our veterinary patients and should be strongly considered as a part of multimodal pain management plans. PMID:25454374

  4. SELF-CONSTRUAL AND THE FEAR OF DEATH.

    PubMed

    Lester, David

    2015-10-01

    Orehek, Sasota, Kruglanski, Dechesne, and Ridgeway (2014 ) reported that priming students with self-construals (reading paragraphs focusing on the self vs others) increased their general fear of death. The Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale measures the fear of death of the self separately from the fear of death of others, and so it was predicted that priming students with self-construals would affect only the fear of death of self. Using a sample of 64 female and 27 male undergraduate students (M age = 20.5 yr., SD = 1.6), an attempt was made to replicate Orehek's finding, having the students read the same paragraphs used by Orehek, et al. prior to completing the fear of death scale. Scores on the Collett-Lester scale for the fears of death of self, dying of self, death of others, and dying of others were not affected by self-construal priming, thereby not replicating the effect of self-construing on the fear of death nor the present hypothesis. PMID:26444833

  5. Emetophobia: A fear of vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Faye, Abhijeet D.; Gawande, Sushil; Tadke, Rahul; Kirpekar, Vivek C.; Bhave, Sudhir H.

    2013-01-01

    Emetophobia is an intense, irrational fear of vomiting including fear of feeling nausea, seeing or hearing another person vomit, or seeing vomitus itself. It may occur at any age and we need to understand its symptomatology. We report a case of emetophobic child whose fear of vomiting started after an attack of acute appendicitis. In the initial stage, fear was limited to vomiting, later it became generalized to a fear of seeing the vomitus, worries that parents may suffer vomiting, fear of vomiting in public places followed by avoiding social activities. Patient improved on short course of anti-anxiety drugs and Graded Exposure Therapy. PMID:24459314

  6. Emetophobia: A fear of vomiting.

    PubMed

    Faye, Abhijeet D; Gawande, Sushil; Tadke, Rahul; Kirpekar, Vivek C; Bhave, Sudhir H

    2013-10-01

    Emetophobia is an intense, irrational fear of vomiting including fear of feeling nausea, seeing or hearing another person vomit, or seeing vomitus itself. It may occur at any age and we need to understand its symptomatology. We report a case of emetophobic child whose fear of vomiting started after an attack of acute appendicitis. In the initial stage, fear was limited to vomiting, later it became generalized to a fear of seeing the vomitus, worries that parents may suffer vomiting, fear of vomiting in public places followed by avoiding social activities. Patient improved on short course of anti-anxiety drugs and Graded Exposure Therapy. PMID:24459314

  7. New policies, old fears

    SciTech Connect

    Afheldt, H. )

    1988-09-01

    The new European consensus concerning nuclear weapons is that flexible response is dead. If it is replaced by nonoffensive strategies, Europe could gain independence, but some fear the prospect of the strong German state that might emerge. However, since German economic power is feared at least as much as German military might, nonoffensive defense must be seen as only one precondition for a more independent European policy. The key question for both Germanys is, what policies will free other European powers from the old fear of German dominance, so that they will be able to act in a common European interest Solving this problem would stabilize Europe and remove the dangerous superpower confrontation. This would finally free the American people from being hostages to every major conflict arising the Europe.

  8. Acupuncture for Treating Aromatase Inhibitor–Related Arthralgia in Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Tsai-Ju; Liu, Chia-Yu; Chang, Yi-Fang; Fang, Ching-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Acupuncture has been used as a complementary medical treatment for arthralgia and other types of pain. The objective of this review is to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of arthralgia in patients with breast cancer who were treated with aromatase inhibitors (AIs). Methods: A literature search was performed, without language restrictions, of 10 databases from their inception through February 2014. The literature reviewed included randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and clinical trials that compared real versus sham acupuncture for the treatment of AI-related musculoskeletal symptoms (AIMSS). The methodologic quality of these trials was assessed by using the modified Jadad Quality Scale. Meta-analytic software (RevMan 5.0) was used to analyze the data. Results: Five To compare the effects of real versus sham acupuncture, five RCTs were assessed by meta-analysis and quality analysis. Three of the RCTs reported favorable effects with regard to use of acupuncture in reducing pain and joint-related symptoms, while the other two RCTs did not. The meta-analysis showed trends toward reduced pain and stiffness in patients given acupuncture compared with those who received sham treatment (n=82; pain, mean difference: −2.07 [95% confidence interval (CI), −4.72 to 0.57]; p=0.12; stiffness, mean difference: −86.10 [95% CI, −249.11 to 76.92]; p=0.30), although these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Acupuncture has been reported as a safe and promising treatment for AIMSS, but the present analysis indicated that the effects were not statistically significant. Other outcome measurements, such as imaging studies, would be worth including in future studies to further confirm the efficacy of acupuncture in AIMSS. PMID:25915433

  9. Effectiveness comparison between Thai traditional massage and Chinese acupuncture for myofascial back pain in Thai military personnel: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Kumnerddee, Wipoo

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this randomized comparative study was to provide preliminary data of comparative effectiveness of Thai traditional massage (TTM) and Chinese acupuncture for the treatment of myofascial back pain in young military personnel. Eighteen Thai military personnel, aged ranging from 20-40 years were randomly divided into TTM and acupuncture groups. Each group received 5 sessions of massage or acupuncture during a 10-day period. The Thai version McGill Pain Questionnaire, 100-mm, visual analog scale (VAS) and summation of pain threshold in each trigger point measured by pressure algometer were assessed at day 0, 3, 8 and 10. At the end of treatment protocols, McGill scores decreased significantly in TTM and acupuncture groups (p = 0.024 and 0.002, respectively). VAS also decreased significantly (p = 0.029 and 0.003, respectively). However, the pain pressure threshold increased significantly in the acupuncture group but not in the TTM group (p = 0.006 and 0.08, respectively). When outcomes were compared between the two groups, no significant difference was found in the VAS (p = 0.115) and pain pressure threshold (p = 0.116), whereas the acupuncture group showed significantly lower McGill scores than the TTM group (p = 0.039). In conclusion, five sessions of Thai traditional massage and Chinese acupuncture were effective for the treatment of myofascial back pain in young Thai military personnel. Significant effects in both groups begin after the first session. Acupuncture is more effective than Thai traditional massage when affective aspect is also evaluated. PMID:21299184

  10. Efficacy and Safety of Acupuncture for Acute Low Back Pain in Emergency Department: A Pilot Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yen-Ting; Chiu, Chih-Wen; Chang, Chin-Fu; Lee, Tsung-Chieh; Chen, Chia-Yun; Chang, Shun-Chang; Lee, Chia-Ying; Lo, Lun-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common complaints in the emergency department (ED). There are several research articles providing evidence for acupuncture for treating chronic LBP but few about treating acute LBP. This study assessed the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of acute LBP in the ED. Materials and methods. A clinical pilot cohort study was conducted. 60 participants, recruited in the ED, were divided into experimental and control groups with 1 dropout during the study. Life-threatening conditions or severe neurological defects were excluded. The experimental group (n = 45) received a series of fixed points of acupuncture. The control group (n = 14) received sham acupuncture by pasting seed-patches near acupoints. Back pain was measured using the visual analog scale (VAS) at three time points: baseline and immediately after and 3 days after intervention as the primary outcome. The secondary outcomes were heart rate variability (HRV) and adverse events. Results. The VAS demonstrated a significant decrease (P value <0.001) for the experimental group after 15 minutes of acupuncture. The variation in HRV showed no significant difference in either group. No adverse event was reported. Conclusion. Acupuncture might provide immediate effect in reducing the pain of acute LBP safely. PMID:26346626

  11. Sharp-Hook Acupuncture (Feng Gou Zhen) for Patients with Periarthritis of Shoulder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Laixi; Wang, Haijun; Cao, Yuxia; Yan, Ping; Jin, Xiaofei; Nie, Peirui; Wang, Chaojian; Li, Rangqian; Zhang, Chunlong; Yang, Mingxiao; Yang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The Feng Gou Zhen (sharp-hook acupuncture) as a traditional form of ancient acupuncture is said to be particularly effective for managing periarthritis of shoulder. We conducted this randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of Feng Gou Zhen as an add-on compared to conventional analgesics for patients with PAS. 132 patients were randomly assigned in a 1 : 1 ratio to either a acupuncture group receiving sharp-hook acupuncture plus acupoint injection with conventional analgesics or a control group. Patients from both groups were evaluated at week 0 (baseline), week 1, and week 4. The primary outcome measure was the change from baseline shoulder pain, measured by Visual Analogue Scale at 7 days after treatment. Secondary outcome measures include the (i) function of shoulder joint and (ii) McGill pain questionnaire. The results showed that patients in acupuncture group had better pain relief and function recovery compared with control group (P < 0.05) at 1 week after treatment. Moreover, there were statistical differences between two groups in VAS and shoulder joint function and McGill pain questionnaire at 4 weeks after treatment (P < 0.05). Therefore, the sharp-hook acupuncture helps to relieve the pain and restore the shoulder function for patients with periarthritis of shoulder. PMID:26640496

  12. Cultural Effects on the Expression of Some Fears by Chinese and British Female Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Louise T.

    2004-01-01

    To compare the culturally acquired aspects of fears in two different cultures, the author gave an augmented version of the I. M. Marks and A. M. Mathews Fear Scale (1979) to 50 female students in China and 49 female students in England. When the rank ordering of the fears measured in both groups was compared, the author found a high positive…

  13. Outpatient Heroin Detoxification with Acupuncture and Staplepuncture

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Forest S.

    1976-01-01

    Eighteen heroin addicts were treated as outpatients with acupuncture, electrical stimulation and staplepuncture. Results of treatment were compared with results in two similar groups of 18 persons in whom detoxification was carried out using methadone and propoxyphene napsylate. Withdrawal symptoms were relieved for about two hours in most of the patients after a treatment episode of acupuncture and electrical stimulation. Staplepuncture, which is the manipulation by hand of a surgical staple implanted in the concha of the ear, was reported to relieve withdrawal symptoms at least partially in approximately 40 percent of subjects. In only one person of the group treated with acupuncture or staplepuncture was complete detoxification achieved, compared with 13 and 10 persons, respectively, in the methadone and propoxyphene napsylate groups (p<.001). Use of acupuncture and staplepuncture in outpatient clinics may be limited unless techniques can be found that will relieve withdrawal symptoms for a longer period than that observed in this study. PMID:1086037

  14. Acupuncture Treatment for Deafness: An Eyewitness Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimizu, Hiroshi

    1974-01-01

    It is reported that a professor of otolaryngology in Japan found no evidence that acupuncture improved sensorineural hearing impairment during observations of education and medical treatment of aurally handicapped children in mainland China. (MC)

  15. Acupuncture for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Manheimer, Eric; Cheng, Ke; Wieland, L. Susan; Min, Li Shih; Shen, Xueyong; Berman, Brian M; Lao, Lixing

    2013-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common, costly, and difficult to treat disorder that impairs health-related quality of life and work productivity. Evidence-based treatment guidelines have been unable to provide guidance on the effects of acupuncture for IBS because the only previous systematic review included only small, heterogeneous and methodologically unsound trials. Objectives The primary objectives were to assess the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for treating IBS. Search methods MEDLINE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health, and the Chinese databases Sino-Med, CNKI, and VIP were searched through November 2011. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared acupuncture with sham acupuncture, other active treatments, or no (specific) treatment, and RCTs that evaluated acupuncture as an adjuvant to another treatment, in adults with IBS were included. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data. We extracted data for the outcomes overall IBS symptom severity and health-related quality of life. For dichotomous data (e.g. the IBS Adequate Relief Question), we calculated a pooled relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for substantial improvement in symptom severity after treatment. For continuous data (e.g. the IBS Severity Scoring System), we calculated the standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% CI in post-treatment scores between groups. Main results Seventeen RCTs (1806 participants) were included. Five RCTs compared acupuncture versus sham acupuncture. The risk of bias in these studies was low.We found no evidence of an improvement with acupuncture relative to sham (placebo) acupuncture for symptom severity (SMD-0.11, 95%CI −0.35 to 0.13; 4 RCTs; 281 patients) or quality of life (SMD = −0.03, 95%CI −0.27 to 0.22; 3 RCTs; 253 patients). Sensitivity analyses based on study

  16. Isolated median sensory neuropathy after acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Ho; Hyun, Jung Keun; Lee, Seong Jae

    2008-12-01

    A 47-year-old left-handed man presented with pain and numbness in his left thumb and index finger after acupuncture treatment on an acupoint in his left wrist. A technique of herbal acupuncture, involving the use of a needle coated with apricot seed extract, was used. Median nerve conduction study showed an absence of sensory nerve action potential in the left index finger, whereas the results were normal in all other fingers. The radial and ulnar nerves in the left thumb and ring finger, respectively, showed no abnormality. Infrared thermography of the left index finger showed severe hypothermia. The patient was diagnosed as having an isolated injury to the sensory nerve fibers of the median nerve innervating the index finger. This is the first case report of complications from an herbal acupuncture treatment, and it highlights the possibility of focal peripheral nerve injury caused by acupuncture. PMID:19061751

  17. The Role of Acupuncture in Assisted Reproductive Technology

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Cui Hong; Zhang, Ming Min; Huang, Guang Ying; Wang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide reliable evidence by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis for evaluating the role of acupuncture in assisted reproductive technology. All randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of acupuncture, including manual, electrical, and laser acupuncture (LA) techniques, on the clinical pregnancy rate (CPR) and live birth rate (LBR) of in vitro fertilization (IVF) or artificial insemination were included. The controlled groups consisted of no acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups. The sham acupuncture included sham acupuncture at acupoints, sham acupuncture at non- or inappropriate points, sham LA, and adhesive tapes. Twenty-three trials (a total of 5598 participants) were included in this paper. The pooled CPR from all acupuncture groups was significantly higher than that from all controlled groups, whereas the LBR was not significantly different between the two groups. However, the results were quite distinct when the type of control and/or different acupuncture times were examined in a sensitivity analysis. The results mainly indicate that acupuncture, especially around the time of the controlled ovarian hyperstimulation, improves pregnancy outcomes in women undergoing IVF. More positive effects from acupuncture in IVF can be expected if a more individualized acupuncture programs are used. PMID:22811747

  18. Treating angina pectoris by acupuncture therapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lixian; Xu, Hao; Gao, Wei; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Dominic P

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture therapy on PC 6 (Neiguan) has a therapeutic effect on cardiac and chest ailments including angina pectoris. Additional beneficial acupuncture points are PC 4 (Ximen), HT 7 (Shenmen point), PC 7 (Daling point), PC 5 (Jianshi point), PC 3 (Quze point), CV 17 (Danzhong point), CV 6 (Qihai point), BL 15 (Xinshu point), L 20 (Pishu point), BL 17 (Geshu point), BL23 (Shenshu point), BL18 (Ganshu point), HT 5 (Tongli point), and ST36 (Zusanli point). Acupuncture not only quickly relieve the symptoms of acute angina pectoris, but also improve nitroglycerine's therapeutic effects. Therefore, it is an efficient simple therapeutic method used for emergency and for regular angina treatment. Review of studies on acupuncture therapy has shown effectiveness were between 80% to 96.2% that are almost as effective as conventional drug regimen. When compared with conventional medical treatment, the acupuncture therapy shows the obvious advantage of lacking, adverse side effects commonly associated with the Western anti-anginal drugs such as 1) Nitroglycerine (headache--63% with nitroglycerine patch and 50% with spray; syncope--4%; and dizziness--8% with patch; hypotension--4% with patch; and increased angina 2% with patch). 2) Isosorbide mononitrate (dizziness--3 to 5%; nausea/vomiting--2 to 4% and other reactions including hypotension, and syncope even with small doses). 3) Propranolol (bradycardia, chest pain, hypotension, worsening of AV conduction disturbance, Raynaud's syndrome, mental depression, hyperglycemia, etc.). Many conventional anti-anginal medications cause inter-drug reactions with other medications the patients taking for other diseases. Whereas, acupuncture therapy does not pose such an interference with patient's medications. Nevertheless, surgery is still the treatment of choice when acupuncture or conventional drug therapy fails. Combination of conventional drug therapy and acupuncture would considerably decrease the frequency and the required dosage

  19. [Acupuncture in the HNO-area].

    PubMed

    Gleditsch, J

    2009-12-01

    For ENT specialists it is good to become familiar with the basics of acupuncture, as in our times this method of treatment has been spread and accepted worldwide. Modern pain research has succeeded in scientific exploring and verifying acupuncture effects. Any medical specialist having understood the facts and implications of acupuncture as laid out in this paper, may take the chance to try and put acupuncture into practice in his/her daily work. One of the challenges of doctors nowadays is the increase of functional disorders, of myofascial pain syndromes, of patients' general ill-feeling of health. Particularly in pain management, as regards to the considerable toxic by-effects of long-term prescribed analgetics, there is a need of gentle therapies such as acupuncture, free from side-effects. It is the patients who demand alternative concepts. For ENT-doctors running a busy office, microsystem acupuncture in particular may be recommended. Inserting a couple of needles at the auricle, or injecting a few drops into the oral mucosa is a quick action which in most cases will provide beneficial results. PMID:20027537

  20. [History of World Federation of Acupuncture-Moxibustion Societies].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Cai; Deng, Liang-Yue; Liu, Bao-Yan

    2014-12-01

    The history of the World Federation of Acupuncture-Moxibustion Societies (WFAS) was reviewed through summarizing the background and process of the establishment of WFAS. The establishment background was explained in different aspects, named the recovery of acupuncture-Moxibustion in the world, the successive setup of world acupuncture-Moxibustion organizations, the divergences of International Association of Acupuncture-Moxibustion, striding forward of China reform and opening policy as well as the attention of the World Health Organization (WHO), etc. The establishment of WFAS was introduced on the proposal from eight countries, the important time of the development of acupuncture and moxibustion in China, 1984, divergences and consensus as well as the final phase. The official establishment of WFAS represents the global benefits of acupuncture-Moxibustion colleagues. It is the international organization of acupuncture and moxibustion, contributing to the promotion of acupuncture and moxibustion in the world. PMID:25876363

  1. Acupuncture May Slow Pre-Dementia Memory Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Health, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Acupuncture Dementia Memory Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Acupuncture ...

  2. Acupuncture in ancient China: how important was it really?

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Hanjo

    2013-01-01

    Although acupuncture theory is a fundamental part of the Huangdi Neijing, the clinical application of the needle therapy in ancient China was always a limited one. From early times there have been warnings that acupuncture might do harm. In books like Zhang Zhongjing's Shanghanlun it plays only a marginal role. Among the 400 emperors in Chinese history, acupuncture was hardly ever applied. After Xu Dachun called acupuncture a "lost tradition" in 1757, the abolition of acupuncture and moxibustion from the Imperial Medical Academy in 1822 was a radical, but consequent act. When traditional Chinese medicine was revived after 1954, the "New Acupuncture" was completely different from what it had been in ancient China. The conclusion, however, is a positive one: The best time acupuncture ever had was not the Song dynasty or Yuan dynasty, but is now - and the future of acupuncture does not lie in old scripts, but in ourselves. PMID:23464646

  3. Acupuncture May Ease Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_157996.html Acupuncture May Ease Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Patients Italian trial finds ... News) -- Acupuncture can help alleviate the often-debilitating hot flashes that afflict many breast cancer patients, new ...

  4. Adverse effects of acupuncture. Which are clinically significant?

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ainee; Bui, Luke; Mills, Edward

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review potentially serious adverse events associated with acupuncture. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Studies in the medical literature primarily provide level II evidence from retrospective reviews, case reports, and prospective surveys of practitioners. MAIN MESSAGE: Both the general public and physicians are becoming more interested in the ancient Chinese medical practice of acupuncture. This paper discusses the basic philosophy of acupuncture and describes adverse events that might be associated with acupuncture treatment. Some events, such as nausea and syncope, can be mild and transient, but rare events, such as septicemia and hepatitis C infection, can be fatal. As the role of acupuncture in today's multidisciplinary clinics increases, the complications of acupuncture, although infrequent, cannot be overlooked. CONCLUSION: Responsible clinicians practising acupuncture and seeing patients who use acupuncture should be aware of the adverse events associated with it. PMID:12943357

  5. The Research of Acupuncture Effective Biomolecules: Retrospect and Prospect

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Lei-Miao; Xu, Yu-Dong; Lui, Yan-Yan; Ran, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture is an effective, safe and convenient therapy that has been applied for 2,500 years. The acupuncture researches have obtained significant improvement with the technical support of the life sciences and the studies of acupuncture have in turn accelerated the development of biomedical science. The effects of acupuncture influence important physiopathologic and biological activities, including gene expression, protein-protein interactions, and other biological processes. Cerebrospinal fluid, serum, organs, and tissues are reported to be carriers of the biomolecules of the effects of acupuncture. The paper summarized the progress of acupuncture effective biomolecules researches and found that biomolecules play important roles in the mechanism of acupuncture. With the development of omics technologies and translational medicine, the acupuncture research will meet both opportunities and challenges. PMID:24302967

  6. Acupuncture is a feasible treatment for post-thoracotomy pain: results of a prospective pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J; Rusch, Valerie W; Malhotra, Vivek T; Downey, Robert J; Cassileth, Barrie R

    2006-01-01

    Background Thoracotomy is associated with severe pain that may persist for years. Acupuncture is a complementary therapy with a proven role in pain control. A randomized trial showed that acupuncture was effective in controlling pain after abdominal surgery, but the efficacy of this technique for the treatment of thoracotomy pain has not been established. We developed a novel technique for convenient application of acupuncture to patients undergoing thoracotomy, and in a Phase II trial evaluated the safety of this intervention and the feasibility of doing a randomized trial. Methods Adult patients scheduled for unilateral thoracotomy with preoperative epidural catheter placement received acupuncture immediately prior to surgery. Eighteen semi-permanent intradermal needles were inserted on either side of the spine, and four were inserted in the legs and auricles. Needles were removed after four weeks. Using a numerical rating scale, pain was measured on the first five postoperative days. After discharge, pain was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory at 7, 30, 60 and 90 days. Results Thirty-six patients were treated with acupuncture. Of these, 25, 23, and 22 patients provided data at 30, 60, and 90 days, respectively. The intervention was well tolerated by patients with only one minor and transient adverse event of skin ulceration. Conclusion The rate of data completion met our predefined criterion for determining a randomized trial to be feasible (at least 75% of patients tolerated the intervention and provided evaluable data). This novel intervention is acceptable to patients undergoing thoracotomy and does not interfere with standard preoperative care. There was no evidence of important adverse events. We are now testing the hypothesis that acupuncture significantly adds to standard perioperative pain management in a randomized trial. PMID:16672065

  7. Effects of acupuncture treatment on depression insomnia: a study protocol of a multicenter randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background More than 70% of patients with depression who see their doctors experience insomnia. Insomnia treatment is a very important link for depression treatment. Furthermore, antidepression treatment is also important for depression insomnia. In acupuncture, LU-7 (Lie Que) and KID-6 (Zhao Hai), which are two of the eight confluence points in meridian theory, are used as main points. An embedded needle technique is used, alternately, at two groups of points to consolidate the treatment effect. These two groups of points are BL-15 (Xin Shu) with BL-23 (Shen Shu) and BL-19 (Dan Shu) with N-HN-54 (An Mian). The effectiveness of these optimized acupuncture formulas is well proven in the practice by our senior acupuncturists in Guangdong Provincial Hospital of TCM. This study has been designed to examine whether this set of optimized clinical formulas is able to increase the clinical efficacy of depression insomnia treatment. Methods/design In this randomized controlled multicenter trial, all the eligible participants are diagnosed with depression insomnia. All participants are randomly assigned to one of two groups in a ratio of 1:1 and receive either conventional acupuncture treatment or optimized acupuncture treatment. Patients are evaluated using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index(PSQI)and the Hamilton rating scale(HAMD) for depression. The use of antidepression and hypnotics drugs is also considered. Results are obtained at the start of treatment, 1 and 2 months after treatment has begun, and at the end of treatment. The entire duration of the study will be approximately 36 months. Discussion A high quality of trial methodologies is utilized in the study, and the results may provide better evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for depression insomnia. The optimized acupuncture formula has potential benefits in increasing the efficacy of treating depression insomnia. Trial registration The trial was registered in Chinese Clinical Trial

  8. An Updated Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy and Safety of Acupuncture Treatment for Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Zhang, Hong; Meng, Shu-qing; Qian, Hai-zhou

    2014-01-01

    Background Ischemic stroke is the second most common cause of death and the primary cause of disability throughout the world. Acupuncture is frequently advocated as an adjunct treatment during stroke rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to update the clinical efficacy and safety of acupuncture for cerebral infarction. Methods Randomized controlled trials (RCT) on acupuncture treating cerebral infarction were searched from the following databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CNKI, CMB and VIP from inception to October 2013. The data of RCTs meeting the inclusive criteria were extracted according to Cochrane methods. The meta-analyses were conducted using Rev Man 5.0 software. Results A total of 25 trials involving 2224 patients were included. The results of this meta-analysis showed that the groups receiving acupuncture (observation group) were superior to the comparison groups (control group), with significant differences in the Clinical Efficacy Rates [OR = 4.04, 95%CI (2.93, 5.57), P<0.001], Fugl-Meyer Assessment [MD = 11.22, 95%CI (7.62, 14.82), P<0.001], Barthel Index Score [MD = 12.84, 95%CI (9.85, 15.82), P<0.001], and Neurological Deficit Score [MD = −2.71, 95% CI (−3.84, −1.94), P<0.001]. Three trials reported minor adverse events. Conclusion Current evidence provisionally demonstrates that acupuncture treatment is superior to either non-acupuncture or conventional therapy for cerebral infarction. Despite this conclusion, given the often low quality of the available trials, further large scale RCTs of better quality are still needed. PMID:25438041

  9. Effects of laser acupuncture on blood perfusion rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-ju; Zeng, Chang-chun; Liu, Han-ping; Liu, Song-hao; Liu, Liang-gang

    2006-09-01

    Based on Pennes equation, the influences of the intensity and the impulse frequency of laser acupuncture on the point tissues' blood flow perfusion rate are discussed. We find that the blood perfusion rate of point tissue increases with the intensity of laser acupuncture increasing. After impulse laser acupuncture the point tissue blood perfusion rate increase little, but after continuum laser acupuncture the point tissues blood perfusion rate increase much.

  10. Acupuncture versus Sham Acupuncture for Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shaun Wen Huey; Liong, Men Long; Yuen, Kah Hay; Leong, Wing Seng; Chee, Christopher; Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Choong, Weng Pho; Wu, Yue; Khan, Nurzalina; Choong, Wooi Long; Yap, Hin Wai; Krieger, John N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) afflicts 2–10% of adult men. Available therapies offer little or no proven benefit. Because acupuncture represents an attractive “natural” therapy, we compared the efficacy of acupuncture to sham acupuncture for CP/CPPS Methods Participants met US National Institutes of Health (NIH) consensus criteria for CP/CPPS, aged ≥ 20 years old, with total score ≥ 15 on the NIH-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) and symptoms for at least 3 of the preceding 6 months were randomized 1:1 to acupuncture or sham acupuncture. Treatment consisted of twice weekly 30-minute sessions for 10 weeks (20 sessions total), without needle stimulation, herbs or adjuvants. The primary response criterion was a six-point decrease from baseline to week 10 in NIH-CPSI total score (range 0–43). Results Thirty-two (73%) of 44 participants responded in the acupuncture group compared to 21 (47%) of 45 sham group participants (relative risk [RR] 1.81, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3–3.1, p=0.02,). Long-term responses 24 weeks after completing therapy without additional treatment occurred in 14 (32%) of 44 acupuncture group participants and in 6 (13%) of 45 sham group participants (RR 2.39, 95% CI, 1.0–5.6, p=0.04). Conclusion After 10 weeks of treatment, acupuncture proved almost twice as likely as sham to improve CP/CPPS symptoms. Participants receiving acupuncture were 2.4 fold more likely to experience long-term benefit than participants receiving sham acupuncture. PMID:18187077

  11. Fear conditioning to subliminal fear relevant and non fear relevant stimuli.

    PubMed

    Lipp, Ottmar V; Kempnich, Clare; Jee, Sang Hoon; Arnold, Derek H

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that conscious visual awareness is not a prerequisite for human fear learning. For instance, humans can learn to be fearful of subliminal fear relevant images--images depicting stimuli thought to have been fear relevant in our evolutionary context, such as snakes, spiders, and angry human faces. Such stimuli could have a privileged status in relation to manipulations used to suppress usually salient images from awareness, possibly due to the existence of a designated sub-cortical 'fear module'. Here we assess this proposition, and find it wanting. We use binocular masking to suppress awareness of images of snakes and wallabies (particularly cute, non-threatening marsupials). We find that subliminal presentations of both classes of image can induce differential fear conditioning. These data show that learning, as indexed by fear conditioning, is neither contingent on conscious visual awareness nor on subliminal conditional stimuli being fear relevant. PMID:25198514

  12. Acupuncture therapy for the symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shulman, Lisa M; Wen, X; Weiner, William J; Bateman, Dinorah; Minagar, Alireza; Duncan, Robert; Konefal, Janet

    2002-07-01

    Interest in alternative medical treatments, including acupuncture, is increasing. Alternative treatments must be subjected to the same objective standards as all medical treatments. A non-blinded pilot study of the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of acupuncture (ACUPX) for the symptoms of (PD) was performed. Twenty PD patients (mean age, 68 years; disease duration, 8.5 years; Hoehn and Yahr [H&Y] stage, 2.2; Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score [UPDRS], 38.7) each received acupuncture treatments by a licensed acupuncturist. All patients were treated with two acupuncture treatment sessions per week. The first seven patients received 10 treatments and the last 13 patients 16 treatments. Patients were evaluated before and after ACUPX with the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP); UPDRS; H & Y; Schwab and England (S & E); Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI); Beck Depression Inventory (BDI); quantitative motor tests, including timed evaluations of arm pronation supination movements, finger dexterity, finger movements between two fixed measured points, and the stand-walk-sit test; and a patient questionnaire designed for the study. Following ACUPX, there were no significant changes in the UPDRS, H&Y, S&E, BAI, BDI, quantitative motor tests, total SIP or the two SIP Dimension scores. Analysis of the 12 SIP categories not corrected for multiple comparisons revealed a post-ACUPX improvement in the sleep and rest category only (P = 0.03). On the patient questionnaire, 85% of patients reported subjective improvement of individual symptoms including tremor, walking, handwriting, slowness, pain, sleep, depression, and anxiety. There were no adverse effects. ACUPX therapy is safe and well tolerated in PD patients. A range of PD and behavioral scales failed to show improvement following ACUPX other than sleep benefit, although patients reported other discrete symptomatic improvements. A broad battery of tests in PD patients suggested that ACUPX resulted in improvement of sleep and

  13. The sum of all fears: conceptual challenges with measuring fear of cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Costa, Daniel S J; Smith, Allan Ben; Fardell, Joanna E

    2016-01-01

    Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is increasingly recognised as a major concern for people with cancer once active treatment is completed. Several instruments have been designed to assess FCR; however, no gold standard has emerged. Many instruments conceptualise FCR as a multidimensional construct. However, this potentially conflates FCR as an outcome with its antecedents and consequences. This is problematic when an aggregate of distinct dimensions is calculated, as is commonly recommended. For example, the total score on the Fear of Cancer Recurrence Inventory is an aggregate of items from seven sub-scales: triggers, severity, psychological distress, coping strategies, functioning impairments, insight and reassurance. Similarly, the total score on the Fear of Progression Questionnaire is an aggregate of affective reaction, partnership/family, work and loss of autonomy. Arguably, the severity and affective reaction domains represent fear, and the other sub-scales represent related concepts, rather than "dimensions" of FCR. The total score represents a combination of concepts whose meaning is unclear. The same total score could be produced by patients with very different experiences, and patients with the same level of fear could have very different total scores. Therefore, we argue that although the level of FCR may be determined by a complex network of antecedents and modifiers and have variable consequences, FCR itself may be a simple concept, which can be assessed using a smaller number of items. Conceptual clarity in its research infancy should prevent FCR becoming a construct that is vaguely operationalised and interpreted. PMID:26377307

  14. Fear of holes.

    PubMed

    Cole, Geoff G; Wilkins, Arnold J

    2013-10-01

    Phobias are usually described as irrational and persistent fears of certain objects or situations, and causes of such fears are difficult to identify. We describe an unusual but common phobia (trypophobia), hitherto unreported in the scientific literature, in which sufferers are averse to images of holes. We performed a spectral analysis on a variety of images that induce trypophobia and found that the stimuli had a spectral composition typically associated with uncomfortable visual images, namely, high-contrast energy at midrange spatial frequencies. Critically, we found that a range of potentially dangerous animals also possess this spectral characteristic. We argue that although sufferers are not conscious of the association, the phobia arises in part because the inducing stimuli share basic visual characteristics with dangerous organisms, characteristics that are low level and easily computed, and therefore facilitate a rapid nonconscious response. PMID:23982244

  15. The Politics of Fear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    In the aftermath of the school shootings in Newtown, Connecticut this past December, people experienced the world around them as less safe--understandably so. In response to such a tragic event, there is a degree of fear instilled in all people that for many was at its peak in the New Year as they prepared to send their children back to school.…

  16. Effect of Acupuncture on Pain and Quality of Life in Patients with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Case Series Study.

    PubMed

    Hadianfard, Mohammad J; Aminlari, Ali; Daneshian, Arghavan; Safarpour, Ali R

    2016-08-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a major cause of debilitation in adults, and acupuncture is a recommended treatment. We assessed the effect of acupuncture on pain and quality of life in patients with LSS. Twenty-four patients with LSS who had symptoms of neurogenic claudication were randomly selected and underwent 10 sessions of acupuncture. Pain and quality of life were evaluated before and immediately after the intervention and 6 weeks later using a visual analogue scale and Short Form-36 Health Survey. Paired t tests and repeated measure tests were used to analyze the data. The mean age of the patients was 48.2 ± 10.8 years. The mean visual analogue scale scores before and immediately after intervention (7.9 ± 1.3 and 4.3 ± 2.1) were statistically different (p < 0.001), as was the mean score (3.08 ± 2.3) 6 weeks later (p = 0.01). Five aspects of the Short Form-36 Health Survey score were associated with significant improvements immediately after acupuncture (p < 0.05). Comparisons of the scores before and 6 weeks after intervention showed significant improvements in emotions, vitality, general health, bodily pain, and physical well-being. Therefore, acupuncture had a significant short-term effect on pain and quality of life in patients with LSS. PMID:27555222

  17. Establishing an animal model for National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) auricular acupuncture protocol.

    PubMed

    Kattalai Kailasam, Vasanth; Anand, Preeti; Melyan, Zara

    2016-06-15

    The use of opioids in the treatment of chronic pain has increased dramatically in the past few decades making them one of the most commonly prescribed medications in the US. However, long-term use of opioids is limited by development of tolerance (decreased antinociceptive efficacy) and opioid-induced hyperalgesia - paradoxical sensitization to noxious (hyperalgesia) and non-noxious (allodynia) stimuli. Novel adjunctive therapies are needed to increase the efficacy and prolong the duration of action of opioids in chronic pain treatment. Acupuncture is often used as an adjunct therapy for the treatment of symptoms induced by non-clinical use of opioids. The National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) auricular acupuncture protocol is the most common form of acupuncture treatment for substance abuse. The standardized, easy to use and virtually painless procedure make it an attractive complementary treatment option for patients suffering from opioid-induced adverse effects. Clinical trials designed to test the efficacy of the NADA protocol yielded contradictory results. The mechanism by which NADA acupuncture could serve as a successful treatment remains unknown. Therefore, establishing an animal model of NADA acupuncture can provide a tool for investigating the efficacy and cellular mechanisms of NADA treatment. Previous studies have shown that repeated morphine administration in rodents can produce locomotor sensitization and reduce analgesic potency of a challenge dose of morphine, indicating development of morphine tolerance. Here we show that NADA acupuncture treatment can both reduce morphine-induced locomotor sensitization and prevent the development of morphine tolerance in rats, thus validating a new model for NADA acupuncture studies. Our data provides support for evidence-based use of NADA acupuncture as a new adjunctive approach that can potentially improve the side-effect profile of morphine and other prescription opioids. PMID:27155456

  18. Perception of acupuncture among users and nonusers: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kara; Siu, Judy Yuen-Man; Fung, Timothy K F

    2016-01-01

    This study uses a qualitative methodology to examine the perception of acupuncture among users and nonusers. Altogether 37 participants, age 35 or older, were interviewed. Participants' perception of advantages and disadvantages of adopting acupuncture, and their criteria in selecting acupuncturists, were collected. Results found that among the user group, acupuncture was perceived as being effective, having little side effects, and generating lasting impact. Among nonusers, acupuncture was perceived as lacking a clinical base, high risk, and nonstandardized. Nonusers had less confidence in acupuncture than biomedicine. Participants relied on social communication and the practitioner's professional qualifications in choosing acupuncturists. Marketing implications are discussed. PMID:26950540

  19. Ear Acupuncture in European Traditional Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Firenzuoli, Fabio

    2007-01-01

    Auricular acupuncture is a diagnostic and treatment system based on normalizing the body's dysfunction through stimulation of definite points on the ear. Rudimentary forms of acupuncture which probably arose during the Stone Age have survived in many parts of the world right down to present day. It was used in the ancient Egypt, Rome, Greece and all the Mediterranean area. It is a microacupuncture technique similar to reflexology, and was first described in France in 1950 by Paul Nogier who is considered the Father of modern ear acupuncture. It was speculated that the technique works because groups of pluripotent cells contain information from the whole organism and create regional organization centers representing different parts of the body. Nevertheless stimulation of a reflex point in the ear seems relieve symptoms of distant pathologies. Modern research is confirming the efficacy of ear acupuncture for analgesia and anxiety related disease, while tobacco dependence and other substance abuse still need confirmation. Actually main methodological problems with auricular acupuncture are that exist too many maps with little agreement regarding point location in the ear, and that the correspondence or reflex systems does not correlated with modern knowledge of anatomy and physiology. PMID:18227925

  20. The Role of Acupuncture in Pain Management.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shilpadevi; Sen, Sudipta; Bral, Matthew; Reddy, Shanthi; Bradley, Kevin K; Cornett, Elyse M; Fox, Charles J; Kaye, Alan David

    2016-03-01

    Acupuncture is a traditional Chinese practice of medicine that has gained popularity in Western culture and around the world. It involves the insertion of thin needles into the skin to stimulate nerves, muscles, and connective tissues throughout the body with the goal of alleviating pain, tension, and stress. More broadly, acupuncture is actually a family of different procedures. Conceptually, it is believed to stimulate the body's meridians, or energy-carrying channels, in an attempt to correct imbalances and to restore health. These benefits are thought to be derived from the proximity of acupoints with nerves through intracellular calcium ions. This lesson outlines a brief history of acupuncture and how it may be used to treat various types of physical and emotional pain and specific conditions, including overactive bladder and psoriasis. Acupuncture has been demonstrated to enhance endogenous opiates, such as dynorphin, endorphin, encephalin, and release corticosteroids, relieving pain and enhancing the healing process. There are associated risks; however, serious side effects are rare. When compared to traditional methods of pain management, more studies are warranted in order to establish the efficacy of acupuncture and its place in pain management. PMID:26896946

  1. Empirical study on human acupuncture point network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Shen, Dan; Chang, Hui; He, Da-Ren

    2007-03-01

    Chinese medical theory is ancient and profound, however is confined by qualitative and faint understanding. The effect of Chinese acupuncture in clinical practice is unique and effective, and the human acupuncture points play a mysterious and special role, however there is no modern scientific understanding on human acupuncture points until today. For this reason, we attend to use complex network theory, one of the frontiers in the statistical physics, for describing the human acupuncture points and their connections. In the network nodes are defined as the acupuncture points, two nodes are connected by an edge when they are used for a medical treatment of a common disease. A disease is defined as an act. Some statistical properties have been obtained. The results certify that the degree distribution, act degree distribution, and the dependence of the clustering coefficient on both of them obey SPL distribution function, which show a function interpolating between a power law and an exponential decay. The results may be helpful for understanding Chinese medical theory.

  2. Fear of Negative Evaluation Moderates the Effect of Subliminal Fear Priming on Rejection of Unfair Offers in the Ultimatum Game.

    PubMed

    Takagishi, Haruto; Fujii, Takayuki; Nishina, Kuniyuki; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the tendency to fear negative evaluation moderates the effect of fear emotion on the rejection of unfair offers in the ultimatum game (UG). A photograph of a fearful face or landscape was displayed subliminally (i.e., for 10 ms) before the proposer's offer in the UG was presented to participants. We used the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (FNES) to measure participants' anxiety regarding negative evaluations from others. Results showed a significant interaction between FNES and condition (fearful face vs. landscape) in relation to the rejection of an unfair offer. Furthermore, the mean rejection rate of an unfair offer was significantly higher in the fearful face condition relative to that in the landscape condition among participants whose FNES scores were higher than the median; however, this difference was not observed in participants whose FNES scores were lower than the median. These results suggest that fear of negative evaluation moderates the effect of subliminal fear priming on the rejection of unfair offers in the UG, and that negative emotion induced by unconscious stimuli enhances rejection of these unfair offers. PMID:27549022

  3. Fear of Negative Evaluation Moderates the Effect of Subliminal Fear Priming on Rejection of Unfair Offers in the Ultimatum Game

    PubMed Central

    Takagishi, Haruto; Fujii, Takayuki; Nishina, Kuniyuki; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the tendency to fear negative evaluation moderates the effect of fear emotion on the rejection of unfair offers in the ultimatum game (UG). A photograph of a fearful face or landscape was displayed subliminally (i.e., for 10 ms) before the proposer’s offer in the UG was presented to participants. We used the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (FNES) to measure participants’ anxiety regarding negative evaluations from others. Results showed a significant interaction between FNES and condition (fearful face vs. landscape) in relation to the rejection of an unfair offer. Furthermore, the mean rejection rate of an unfair offer was significantly higher in the fearful face condition relative to that in the landscape condition among participants whose FNES scores were higher than the median; however, this difference was not observed in participants whose FNES scores were lower than the median. These results suggest that fear of negative evaluation moderates the effect of subliminal fear priming on the rejection of unfair offers in the UG, and that negative emotion induced by unconscious stimuli enhances rejection of these unfair offers. PMID:27549022

  4. Unanticipated Insights into Biomedicine from the Study of Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Hammerschlag, Richard; Coeytaux, Remy R.; Davis, Robert T.; Harris, Richard E.; Kong, Jiang-Ti; Langevin, Helene M.; Lao, Lixing; Milley, Ryan J.; Napadow, Vitaly; Schnyer, Rosa N.; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Witt, Claudia M.; Wayne, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Research into acupuncture has had ripple effects beyond the field of acupuncture. This paper identifies five exemplars to illustrate that there is tangible evidence of the way insights gleaned from acupuncture research have informed biomedical research, practice, or policy. The first exemplar documents how early research into acupuncture analgesia has expanded into neuroimaging research, broadening physiologic understanding and treatment of chronic pain. The second describes how the acupuncture needle has become a tool to enhance biomedical knowledge of connective tissue. The third exemplar, which illustrates use of a modified acupuncture needle as a sham device, focuses on emergent understanding of placebo effects and, in turn, on insights into therapeutic encounters in treatments unrelated to acupuncture. The fourth exemplar documents that two medical devices now in widespread use were inspired by acupuncture: transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators for pain control and antinausea wrist bands. The final exemplar describes how pragmatic clinical trial designs applied in acupuncture research have informed current general interest in comparative effectiveness research. In conclusion, these exemplars of unanticipated outcomes of acupuncture research comprise an additional rationale for continued support of basic and clinical research evaluating acupuncture and other under-researched therapies. PMID:26745452

  5. Unanticipated Insights into Biomedicine from the Study of Acupuncture.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, Hugh; Hammerschlag, Richard; Coeytaux, Remy R; Davis, Robert T; Harris, Richard E; Kong, Jiang-Ti; Langevin, Helene M; Lao, Lixing; Milley, Ryan J; Napadow, Vitaly; Schnyer, Rosa N; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Witt, Claudia M; Wayne, Peter M

    2016-02-01

    Research into acupuncture has had ripple effects beyond the field of acupuncture. This paper identifies five exemplars to illustrate that there is tangible evidence of the way insights gleaned from acupuncture research have informed biomedical research, practice, or policy. The first exemplar documents how early research into acupuncture analgesia has expanded into neuroimaging research, broadening physiologic understanding and treatment of chronic pain. The second describes how the acupuncture needle has become a tool to enhance biomedical knowledge of connective tissue. The third exemplar, which illustrates use of a modified acupuncture needle as a sham device, focuses on emergent understanding of placebo effects and, in turn, on insights into therapeutic encounters in treatments unrelated to acupuncture. The fourth exemplar documents that two medical devices now in widespread use were inspired by acupuncture: transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators for pain control and antinausea wrist bands. The final exemplar describes how pragmatic clinical trial designs applied in acupuncture research have informed current general interest in comparative effectiveness research. In conclusion, these exemplars of unanticipated outcomes of acupuncture research comprise an additional rationale for continued support of basic and clinical research evaluating acupuncture and other under-researched therapies. PMID:26745452

  6. Acupuncture Anesthesia and Analgesia for Clinical Acute Pain in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Acupuncture anesthesia has been practiced in China since about 1960. In Japan, Hyodo reported 30 cases of acupuncture anesthesia in 1972. However, from around 1980, the direction of acupuncture investigations turned from anesthesia to analgesia. Acupuncture analgesia is presently considered a way to activate the body's endogenous analgesic system. Recently, with the rise of acupuncture as one of the most well known CAM therapies, acupuncture or moxibustion treatment has been reported for both acute and chronic pain. Even so, few clinical reports and original articles have been reported in Japan. This review illustrates how acupuncture is being used in Japan for acute pain such as surgical operations, post- operative pain (POP), neuropathic pain, pain associated with teeth extractions and after the extraction of impacted wisdom teeth. PMID:18604250

  7. Acupuncture for chronic knee pain: a protocol for an updated systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinhong; Yue, Jinhuan; Sun, Zhongren; Lu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for patients with chronic knee pain. Methods and analysis MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTERAL, CINAHL and four Chinese medical databases will be searched from their inception to present. We will also manually retrieve eligible studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in which acupuncture is assessed as the sole treatment or as an adjunct treatment for chronic knee pain will be included. The primary outcome of our analysis is pain measured by the visual analogue scale (VAS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale or the 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes will include the quality of life, measured by the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) and adverse events. Two researchers will conduct the study selection, data extraction and quality assessment independently. Any disagreement will be resolved through discussion with a third reviewer. The Cochrane risk-of-bias criteria and the Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) checklist will be used to assess the methodological quality of the trials. Dissemination This systematic review will assess the current evidence on acupuncture therapy for chronic knee pain. It uses aggregated published data instead of individual patient data and does not require an ethical board review and approval. The findings will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and disseminated in conference presentations. It will provide the latest analysis of the currently available evidence for acupuncture treating chronic knee pain. Trial registration number CRD42014015514. PMID:26911581

  8. Dental fear and alexithymia among adults in Finland.

    PubMed

    Pohjola, Vesa; Mattila, Aino K; Joukamaa, Matti; Lahti, Satu

    2011-07-01

    population sample, controlling for age, gender, education and marital status as well as depressive and anxiety disorders. An additional aim was to evaluate whether gender modified this association. MATERIAL AND METHODS. The two-stage stratified cluster sample (n = 8028) represented the Finnish population aged 30 years and older. Participants (n = 5241) answered the question 'How afraid are you of visiting a dentist?' They also filled out the 20-Item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), which included three sub-scales, i.e. difficulties in identifying feelings (DIF), difficulties in describing feelings (DDF) and externally oriented thinking (EOT). Anxiety and depressive disorders were assessed with a standardized structured psychiatric interview according to DSM-IV criteria. To evaluate the association between dental fear and alexithymia, multiple logistic regression analyses were performed, adjusting simultaneously for the effects of possible confounding variables. RESULTS. Gender modified the association between dental fear and alexithymia. Among women, those reporting higher scores for TAS-20, DIF and EOT sub-scale scores were more likely to have high dental fear than were those reporting lower scores. Among men no such association was observed. Those participants who reported high DDF sub-scale scores were more likely to have high dental fear than were those reporting lower scores. CONCLUSIONS. Alexithymics are more likely to have high dental fear than non-alexithymics are. The findings support the suggestion that some people with dental fear may have internal personality vulnerability to anxiety disorders. PMID:21294672

  9. An anxious profession in an age of fear.

    PubMed

    Lakeman, R

    2006-08-01

    This paper proposes that some practices and trends in mental health care may be considered as defensive responses to collective anxiety and fear. On a larger scale similar dynamics occur around fear of terrorism. Collectively and individually we are pulled by the defensive forces and dynamics associated with anxiety. This can in part explain the polarization that occurs around issues of definition and response to mental illness. Fear and anxiety push services towards simplistic viewpoints and futile practices. The capacity to view things from the perspective of others, embracing explanatory and therapeutic pluralism and adopting a humble attitude, may be helpful in enabling anxiety to be channelled productively. PMID:16867123

  10. Effects of fear factors in disease propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yubo; Xiao, Gaoxi; Wong, Limsoon; Fu, Xiuju; Ma, Stefan; Hiang Cheng, Tee

    2011-09-01

    Upon an outbreak of a dangerous infectious disease, people generally tend to reduce their contacts with others in fear of getting infected. Such typical actions apparently help slow down the spreading of infection. Thanks to today's broad public media coverage, the fear factor may even contribute to preventing an outbreak from happening. We are motivated to study such effects by adopting a complex network approach. First we evaluate the simple case where connections between individuals are randomly removed due to the fear factor. Then we consider a different case where each individual keeps at least a few connections after contact reduction. Such a case is arguably more realistic since people may choose to keep a few social contacts, e.g., with their family members and closest friends, at any cost. Finally, a study is conducted on the case where connection removals are carried out dynamically while the infection is spreading out. Analytical and simulation results show that the fear factor may not easily prevent an epidemic outbreak from happening in scale-free networks. However, it significantly reduces the fraction of the nodes ever getting infected during the outbreak.

  11. Characterization of Deqi Sensation and Acupuncture Effect

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xing-Yue; Shi, Guang-Xia; Li, Qian-Qian; Zhang, Zhen-Hua; Xu, Qian; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture stimulation elicits deqi, a composite of unique sensations. According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), deqi experienced by patients is often described as suan (aching or soreness), ma (numbness or tingling), zhang (fullness, distention, or pressure), and zhong (heaviness) and is felt by the acupuncturists (needle grasping) as tense, tight, and full. It is believed that deqi may be an important variable in the studies of the mechanism and efficacy of acupuncture treatment. In recent years, great efforts have been made to understand deqi, which include a couple of questionnaires to qualify and quantify deqi sensations, neuroimaging studies of deqi and acupuncture, physiological mechanisms of deqi, and the relation between deqi and clinical efficacy. However, many problems need to be resolved, and more researches are required to be made in the future. PMID:23864884

  12. Coming to terms with fear

    PubMed Central

    LeDoux, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    The brain mechanisms of fear have been studied extensively using Pavlovian fear conditioning, a procedure that allows exploration of how the brain learns about and later detects and responds to threats. However, mechanisms that detect and respond to threats are not the same as those that give rise to conscious fear. This is an important distinction because symptoms based on conscious and nonconscious processes may be vulnerable to different predisposing factors and may also be treatable with different approaches in people who suffer from uncontrolled fear or anxiety. A conception of so-called fear conditioning in terms of circuits that operate nonconsciously, but that indirectly contribute to conscious fear, is proposed as way forward. PMID:24501122

  13. Animal models of fear relapse.

    PubMed

    Goode, Travis D; Maren, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Whereas fear memories are rapidly acquired and enduring over time, extinction memories are slow to form and are susceptible to disruption. Consequently, behavioral therapies that involve extinction learning (e.g., exposure therapy) often produce only temporary suppression of fear and anxiety. This review focuses on the factors that are known to influence the relapse of extinguished fear. Several phenomena associated with the return of fear after extinction are discussed, including renewal, spontaneous recovery, reacquisition, and reinstatement. Additionally, this review describes recent work, which has focused on the role of psychological stress in the relapse of extinguished fear. Recent developments in behavioral and pharmacological research are examined in light of treatment of pathological fear in humans. PMID:25225304

  14. Comparison of Body, Auricular, and Abdominal Acupuncture Treatments for Insomnia Differentiated as Internal Harassment of Phlegm-Heat Syndrome: An Orthogonal Design

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yue; Han, Ying; Li, Xin; Fang, Yi-gong; Liu, Zhao-hui; Zhou, Wen-na; Zhou, Jin-cao; Wu, Zhong-chao; Yang, Jin-hong; Li, Shao-yuan; Meng, Fan-ying; Xu, Wei-wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To identify the optimum treatment protocol for insomnia among auricular, body, and abdominal needling methods. Methods. A three-factor (3 needling protocols) and three-level experimental scheme was designed based on orthogonal method. 54 patients of insomnia differentiated as internal harassment of phlegm-heat syndrome were given two courses of acupuncture treatment (each with 20 times of acupuncture). The therapeutic effects were evaluated by comparing the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) scores, and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA) scores of patients before treatment, after one course of treatment, and after two courses of treatment as well as one month after treatment. Results. Body, auricular, and abdominal acupuncture treatments all alleviated symptoms of insomnia, depression, and anxiety, but body and auricular acupuncture had stronger therapeutic effects. Conclusions. Body acupuncture at basic points shall be given priority in protocol selection for insomnia. The second-best choice is auricular acupuncture with basic points combined with points based on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) theories. Abdominal needling with very quick effect can be an alternative protocol with basic points combined with syndrome differentiation points. PMID:26640498

  15. Comparison of Body, Auricular, and Abdominal Acupuncture Treatments for Insomnia Differentiated as Internal Harassment of Phlegm-Heat Syndrome: An Orthogonal Design.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yue; Han, Ying; Li, Xin; Fang, Yi-Gong; Liu, Zhao-Hui; Zhou, Wen-Na; Zhou, Jin-Cao; Wu, Zhong-Chao; Yang, Jin-Hong; Li, Shao-Yuan; Meng, Fan-Ying; Xu, Wei-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To identify the optimum treatment protocol for insomnia among auricular, body, and abdominal needling methods. Methods. A three-factor (3 needling protocols) and three-level experimental scheme was designed based on orthogonal method. 54 patients of insomnia differentiated as internal harassment of phlegm-heat syndrome were given two courses of acupuncture treatment (each with 20 times of acupuncture). The therapeutic effects were evaluated by comparing the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) scores, and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA) scores of patients before treatment, after one course of treatment, and after two courses of treatment as well as one month after treatment. Results. Body, auricular, and abdominal acupuncture treatments all alleviated symptoms of insomnia, depression, and anxiety, but body and auricular acupuncture had stronger therapeutic effects. Conclusions. Body acupuncture at basic points shall be given priority in protocol selection for insomnia. The second-best choice is auricular acupuncture with basic points combined with points based on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) theories. Abdominal needling with very quick effect can be an alternative protocol with basic points combined with syndrome differentiation points. PMID:26640498

  16. Acupuncture practice acts: a profession's growing pains.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Steven H; Hardy, Mary L; McCuaig, Shauna; Carr, Clifford R; Sarkisyan, Arax

    2015-01-01

    State legislation that authorizes any healthcare profession is known as the Practice Act. In order for a profession to establish a recognizable national presence and be integrated into mainstream medicine, all the state Practice Acts must evidence consistency. The extent to which state Practice Acts fail to exhibit consistency can inhibit the ability of the profession to grow and become successful. We looked at the histories of other health professions, along with the 45 acupuncture Practice Acts in the USA, in order to understand the time worn paths that lead to integration in the mainstream and how the acupuncture profession might benefit. PMID:25847764

  17. Stochastic resonance in feedforward acupuncture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Ying-Mei; Wang, Jiang; Men, Cong; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xi-Le; Yu, Hai-Tao; Chan, Wai-Lok

    2014-10-01

    Effects of noises and some other network properties on the weak signal propagation are studied systematically in feedforward acupuncture networks (FFN) based on FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model. It is found that noises with medium intensity can enhance signal propagation and this effect can be further increased by the feedforward network structure. Resonant properties in the noisy network can also be altered by several network parameters, such as heterogeneity, synapse features, and feedback connections. These results may also provide a novel potential explanation for the propagation of acupuncture signal.

  18. Distribution and temperatures in odontology acupuncture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Ricardo; Creus, Mariano; Gallego Lluesma, Eliseo

    2000-03-01

    Acupuncture has been recognized by W.H.O. in 1989. It admits this therapy and accepts more than forty point on the external ear. After making thermograms to Odontology patients treated with acupuncture, we were able to compare the temperature distribution maps and we found that they were quasi repetitive in the same zones on several patients for a specific illness. We made this technique available to different patients that lack good irrigation on face and neck with the aim to establish patterns.

  19. Acupuncture for Limb Conditions: Pinpointing the Evidence.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Acupuncture therapies include a range of interventions and are commonly used for managing musculoskeletal disorders of the extremities; however, their use is still controversial. A study published in the June 2016 issue of JOSPT conducted a systematic review of randomized clinical trials on the effectiveness of various acupuncture therapies for any musculoskeletal condition affecting the limbs. Importantly, the review critically appraised the quality of the evidence to reveal risks of bias. In this Perspectives for Practice, the authors explain the impact of their findings for clinicians treating patients with such musculoskeletal conditions. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(6):430. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0502. PMID:27245489

  20. Origins of common fears: effects on severity, anxiety responses and memories of onset.

    PubMed

    Withers, R D; Deane, F P

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was twofold: First, to test Rachman's (1976) theory (Behaviour Research and Therapy, 14, 125-131) which predicts that "directly" conditioned fears will differ from "indirectly" conditioned fears in magnitude and anxiety response patterns. Secondly, to explore validity issues related to the questionnaire methodology typically used in fear acquisition research. The questionnaire comprised 3 anxiety scales and 3 fear-onset questions used in prior research, a specifically developed 36-item fear list and 2 validity-check items. One hundred and ninety-one Ss completed the questionnaire. After selecting and rank-ordering 10 fears from the fear list, Ss answered questionnaire items for their first- and then their tenth-ranked fear. Results failed to confirm Rachman's predictions: A significantly greater proportion of Ss ascribed highly-feared and moderately-feared situations or things to direct conditioning. In addition, differential anxiety response patterns were not present for different levels of fear. However, results supported the prediction that direct-conditioning ascriptions would be endorsed with greater certainty. The findings suggest that direct-conditioning experiences may be more memorable than indirect-conditioning events. The theoretical and methodological implications of the findings are discussed. It is suggested that future research either employ methodologies more suited to investigating causal relationships or that Rachman's (1976) theory be blended with an attributional account of fear acquisition. PMID:7487850

  1. Acupuncture treatment of dysmenorrhea resistant to conventional medical treatment.

    PubMed

    Iorno, V; Burani, R; Bianchini, B; Minelli, E; Martinelli, F; Ciatto, S

    2008-06-01

    We evaluated the effect of acupuncture on NSAID resistant dysmenorrhea related pain [measured according to Visual Analogue Scale (VAS)] in 15 consecutive patients. Pain was measured at baseline (T1), mid treatment (T2), end of treatment (T3) and 3 (T4) and 6 months (T5) after the end of treatment. Substantial reduction of pain and NSAID assumption was observed in 13 of 15 patients (87%). Pain intensity was significantly reduced with respect to baseline (average VAS = 8.5), by 64, 72, 60 or 53% at T2, T3, T4 or T5. Greater reduction of pain was observed for primary as compared with secondary dysmenorrhea. Average pain duration at baseline (2.6 days) was significantly reduced by 62, 69, 54 or 54% at T2, T3, T4 or T5. Average NSAID use was significantly reduced by 63, 74, 58 or 58% at T2, T3, T4 or T5, respectively, and ceased totally in 7 patients, still asymptomatic 6 months after treatment. Our findings suggest that acupuncture may be indicated to treat dysmenorrhea related pain, in particular in those subjects in whom NSAID or oral contraceptives are contraindicated or refused. PMID:18604253

  2. Analyzing the proximity to cover in a landscape of fear: a new approach applied to fine-scale habitat use by rabbits facing feral cat predation on Kerguelen archipelago.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Pierrick; Lauzeral, Christine; Chamaillé-Jammes, Simon; Yoccoz, Nigel G; Pontier, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Although proximity to cover has been routinely considered as an explanatory variable in studies investigating prey behavioral adjustments to predation pressure, the way it shapes risk perception still remains equivocal. This paradox arises from both the ambivalent nature of cover as potentially both obstructive and protective, making its impact on risk perception complex and context-dependent, and from the choice of the proxy used to measure proximity to cover in the field, which leads to an incomplete picture of the landscape of fear experienced by the prey. Here, we study a simple predator-prey-habitat system, i.e., rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus facing feral cat Felis catus predation on Kerguelen archipelago. We assess how cover shapes risk perception in prey and develop an easily implementable field method to improve the estimation of proximity to cover. In contrast to protocols considering the "distance to nearest cover", we focus on the overall "area to cover". We show that fine-scale habitat use by rabbits is clearly related to our measure, in accordance with our hypothesis of higher risk in patches with smaller area to cover in this predator-prey-habitat system. In contrast, classical measures of proximity to cover are not retained in the best predictive models of habitat use. The use of this new approach, together with a more in-depth consideration of contrasting properties of cover, could help to better understand the role of this complex yet decisive parameter for predator-prey ecology. PMID:26989615

  3. Analyzing the proximity to cover in a landscape of fear: a new approach applied to fine-scale habitat use by rabbits facing feral cat predation on Kerguelen archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Lauzeral, Christine; Chamaillé-Jammes, Simon; Yoccoz, Nigel G.; Pontier, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Although proximity to cover has been routinely considered as an explanatory variable in studies investigating prey behavioral adjustments to predation pressure, the way it shapes risk perception still remains equivocal. This paradox arises from both the ambivalent nature of cover as potentially both obstructive and protective, making its impact on risk perception complex and context-dependent, and from the choice of the proxy used to measure proximity to cover in the field, which leads to an incomplete picture of the landscape of fear experienced by the prey. Here, we study a simple predator-prey-habitat system, i.e., rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus facing feral cat Felis catus predation on Kerguelen archipelago. We assess how cover shapes risk perception in prey and develop an easily implementable field method to improve the estimation of proximity to cover. In contrast to protocols considering the “distance to nearest cover”, we focus on the overall “area to cover”. We show that fine-scale habitat use by rabbits is clearly related to our measure, in accordance with our hypothesis of higher risk in patches with smaller area to cover in this predator-prey-habitat system. In contrast, classical measures of proximity to cover are not retained in the best predictive models of habitat use. The use of this new approach, together with a more in-depth consideration of contrasting properties of cover, could help to better understand the role of this complex yet decisive parameter for predator-prey ecology. PMID:26989615

  4. Fear of fat and the dream process: a correlational investigation.

    PubMed

    Kroth, J; Yoneda, D; Hammond, A

    1998-12-01

    Dream characteristics of 27 women from a graduate counseling program were correlated with the Goldfarb Fear of Fat Scale. Significant positive correlations were obtained for scores with recurrent nightmares (.38) and dreaming one is dreaming (.40). An inverse relationship was noted between sexual content of dreams and scores for fear of fat (-.41). Results were discussed in terms of associations among dissociation, body image, and the dream process. PMID:10079715

  5. Review of Research Shows, Overall, Acupuncture Did Not Increase Pregnancy Rates with IVF

    MedlinePlus

    ... Y Z Review of Research Shows, Overall, Acupuncture Did Not Increase Pregnancy Rates With IVF Share: An ... in vitro fertilization (IVF) found that, overall, acupuncture did not increase pregnancy rates. However, acupuncture did seem ...

  6. The cost of fear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    What should parents do when they detect indications of more predators nearby that might eat their babies? This scenario is commonly faced by parents in the wild, and the consequences are important. The number of offspring that organisms produce has a major influence on fitness and, when averaged across a population, affects whether this population will increase or decrease. Offspring production thus has critical implications for evolution via fitness, and ecology and conservation via demography. On page 1398 of this issue, Zanette et al. (1) show that the fear of predation can, by itself, strongly affect the number of offspring produced over an annual cycle by song sparrows (see the figure).

  7. Acupuncture for musculoskeletal pain: A meta-analysis and meta-regression of sham-controlled randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qi-Ling; Wang, Peng; Liu, Liang; Sun, Fu; Cai, Yong-Song; Wu, Wen-Tao; Ye, Mao-Lin; Ma, Jiang-Tao; Xu, Bang-Bang; Zhang, Yin-Gang

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this systematic review were to study the analgesic effect of real acupuncture and to explore whether sham acupuncture (SA) type is related to the estimated effect of real acupuncture for musculoskeletal pain. Five databases were searched. The outcome was pain or disability immediately (≤1 week) following an intervention. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Meta-regression was used to explore possible sources of heterogeneity. Sixty-three studies (6382 individuals) were included. Eight condition types were included. The pooled effect size was moderate for pain relief (59 trials, 4980 individuals, SMD -0.61, 95% CI -0.76 to -0.47; P < 0.001) and large for disability improvement (31 trials, 4876 individuals, -0.77, -1.05 to -0.49; P < 0.001). In a univariate meta-regression model, sham needle location and/or depth could explain most or all heterogeneities for some conditions (e.g., shoulder pain, low back pain, osteoarthritis, myofascial pain, and fibromyalgia); however, the interactions between subgroups via these covariates were not significant (P < 0.05). Our review provided low-quality evidence that real acupuncture has a moderate effect (approximate 12-point reduction on the 100-mm visual analogue scale) on musculoskeletal pain. SA type did not appear to be related to the estimated effect of real acupuncture. PMID:27471137

  8. Acupuncture for musculoskeletal pain: A meta-analysis and meta-regression of sham-controlled randomized clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qi-ling; Wang, Peng; Liu, Liang; Sun, Fu; Cai, Yong-song; Wu, Wen-tao; Ye, Mao-lin; Ma, Jiang-tao; Xu, Bang-bang; Zhang, Yin-gang

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this systematic review were to study the analgesic effect of real acupuncture and to explore whether sham acupuncture (SA) type is related to the estimated effect of real acupuncture for musculoskeletal pain. Five databases were searched. The outcome was pain or disability immediately (≤1 week) following an intervention. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Meta-regression was used to explore possible sources of heterogeneity. Sixty-three studies (6382 individuals) were included. Eight condition types were included. The pooled effect size was moderate for pain relief (59 trials, 4980 individuals, SMD −0.61, 95% CI −0.76 to −0.47; P < 0.001) and large for disability improvement (31 trials, 4876 individuals, −0.77, −1.05 to −0.49; P < 0.001). In a univariate meta-regression model, sham needle location and/or depth could explain most or all heterogeneities for some conditions (e.g., shoulder pain, low back pain, osteoarthritis, myofascial pain, and fibromyalgia); however, the interactions between subgroups via these covariates were not significant (P < 0.05). Our review provided low-quality evidence that real acupuncture has a moderate effect (approximate 12-point reduction on the 100-mm visual analogue scale) on musculoskeletal pain. SA type did not appear to be related to the estimated effect of real acupuncture. PMID:27471137

  9. Counseling Persons with a Fear of AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruhn, John G.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the increasing incidence of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) which has created a societal fear of AIDS that, in turn, has raised the level of fear and anxiety in individuals prone to fear responses. Discusses fear accentuated by AIDS and guidelines for counseling people exhibiting this fear. (Author/ABL)

  10. Acupuncture in Uganda: A Research Letter on the Integration of Acupuncture With Conventional Biomedical Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Kathia; Mandell, Richard; Knowlton, Janelle; Romeo, Melissa J.

    2014-01-01

    The PanAfrican Acupuncture Project (PAAP) was created in 2001 and is a volunteer-based not-for-profit training organization. It encourages community empowerment and wellness through training local healthcare providers how to use simple, effective acupuncture protocols to treat the symptoms of HIV/ AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and other chronic conditions. A manual explains the theory of acupuncture and the techniques associated with it in clear and simple terms with specific acupuncture protocols associated with the signs and symptoms of illnesses commonly seen in Uganda. PAAP maintains contact with the trainees to provide ongoing support through: (1) three week-long meetings per year, (2) ongoing contact with the PAAP local coordinator, and (3) electronic communications including email, text messaging, and Facebook communication. A primary focus is to help integrate acupuncture into the local context and current public-health system. This is accomplished by working with local governmental and nongovernmental agencies and healthcare facilities to improve access to and effectiveness of care through collaboration with Western and traditional healthcare modalities. The integration of acupuncture and other traditional complementary and alternative medicines (TCAMs) in the international public health sector at the level of local health workers can increase access to treatment in a sustainable manner while also building the confidence and self-worth of the public health-care practitioners. PMID:25105080

  11. Acupuncture in Uganda: a research letter on the integration of acupuncture with conventional biomedical treatments.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, Kathia; Mandell, Richard; Knowlton, Janelle; Romeo, Melissa J; Conboy, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    The PanAfrican Acupuncture Project (PAAP) was created in 2001 and is a volunteer-based not-for-profit training organization. It encourages community empowerment and wellness through training local healthcare providers how to use simple, effective acupuncture protocols to treat the symptoms of HIV/ AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and other chronic conditions. A manual explains the theory of acupuncture and the techniques associated with it in clear and simple terms with specific acupuncture protocols associated with the signs and symptoms of illnesses commonly seen in Uganda. PAAP maintains contact with the trainees to provide ongoing support through: (1) three week-long meetings per year, (2) ongoing contact with the PAAP local coordinator, and (3) electronic communications including email, text messaging, and Facebook communication. A primary focus is to help integrate acupuncture into the local context and current public-health system. This is accomplished by working with local governmental and nongovernmental agencies and healthcare facilities to improve access to and effectiveness of care through collaboration with Western and traditional healthcare modalities. The integration of acupuncture and other traditional complementary and alternative medicines (TCAMs) in the international public health sector at the level of local health workers can increase access to treatment in a sustainable manner while also building the confidence and self-worth of the public health-care practitioners. PMID:25105080

  12. Exploring Fear: Rousseau, Dewey, and Freire on Fear and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Andrea; Stengel, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Fear is not the first feature of educational experience associated with the best-known progressive educational theorists--Jean-Jacques Rousseau, John Dewey, and Paolo Freire. But each of these important thinkers did, in fact, have something substantive to say about how fear functions in the processes of learning and growth. Andrea English and…

  13. War on fear

    PubMed Central

    Burney, Ian

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the processes through which civilian fear was turned into a practicable investigative object in the inter-war period and the opening stages of the Second World War, and how it was invested with significance at the level of science and of public policy. Its focus is on a single historical actor, Solly Zuckerman, and on his early war work for the Ministry of Home Security-funded Extra Mural Unit based in Oxford’s Department of Anatomy (OEMU). It examines the process by which Zuckerman forged a working relationship with fear in the 1930s, and how he translated this work to questions of home front anxiety in his role as an operational research officer. In doing so it demonstrates the persistent work applied to the problem: by highlighting it as an ongoing research project, and suggesting links between seemingly disparate research objects (e.g. the phenomenon of ‘blast’ exposure as physical and physiological trauma), the article aims to show how civilian ‘nerve’ emerged from within a highly specific analytical and operational matrix which itself had complex foundations. PMID:23626409

  14. Laser acupuncture in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Luciano Ambrosio; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Guerra; Guimarães, Josemar Parreira; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; De Paula, Marcos Vinicius Queiroz

    2013-11-01

    A prospective, double-blind, randomized, and placebo-controlled trial was conducted in patients with chronic temporomandibular disorder (TMD) to check the analgesic efficacy of infrared low-power GaAlAs diode laser applied to acupuncture points. Forty female subjects, ranging in age from 20 to 40 years, with diagnoses of chronic myofascial pain and arthralgia were randomly allocated to two groups: an experimental group (EG) who received the laser acupuncture as adjunct to reversible occlusal splint therapy and a control group (CG) who received a placebo laser associated with occlusal splint therapy. Both approaches were applied once a week for 3 months. Laser acupuncture was defined by the following parameters: 50-mW continuous radiation for 90 s to acupoints ST6, SI19, GB20, GB43, LI4, LR3, NT3, and EX-HN3; defining 4.5-J energy; 1250-W/cm(2) density point; and 112.5-J/cm(2) total density. The outcome measurements included a symptom evolution assessment carried out by checking spontaneous and palpation pain intensity, which was indicated on a visual analog scale (VAS). All evaluations were made by an assessor who was blind to the treatment. The symptom reduction was significant in both groups (EG: VAS = 0, n = 20; CG: VAS between 2 and 4, n = 18). The measurements showed significantly faster and lower pain intensity values in the EG (p ≤ 0.002), where there was a higher proportion of patients with remission of symptoms related to the action of laser acupuncture. For patients in whom conservative treatment was adopted, the laser acupuncture is a secure, noninvasive, and effective treatment modality because it improves the chronic pain associated with TMD and has no side effects. PMID:23380907

  15. Colonoscopy, pain and fears: Is it an indissoluble trinomial?

    PubMed

    Trevisani, Lucio; Zelante, Angelo; Sartori, Sergio

    2014-06-16

    Colonoscopy is the reference method in the secondary prevention, diagnosis and, in some cases, treatment of colorectal cancer. It can often cause pain associated with embarrassment, anxiety, and physical and emotional discomfort. Pain intensity is influenced by a lot of factors, and there is a strict relationship among pain, pain perception, and mind. Several methods can be used to break the trinomial colonoscopy, pain and fear. Sedoanalgesia is recommended by several guidelines. If no sedation is offered, the patient must accept a higher chance of unacceptable discomfort and the endoscopist a lower chance of completing the procedure because of patient discomfort. Other non-pharmacologic methods such as acupuncture, music, and hydrocolonoscopy can be used as alternatives to pharmacologic sedoanalgesia. Furthermore, new endoscopic technologies such as variable-stiffness colonoscopes and ultrathin colonoscopes, or the use of carbon dioxide instead of air for colon insufflation, can reduce the pain caused by colonoscopy. In the future, technical improvements such as wireless capsules or robotic probes, will probably enable to overcome the present concept of colonoscopy, avoiding the use of traditional endoscopes. However, at present the poor attention paid by endoscopists to the pain and discomfort caused by colonoscopy can not be justified. There are several methods to reduce pain and anxiety and to break the trinomial colonoscopy, pain and fear. We must use them. PMID:24932374

  16. Colonoscopy, pain and fears: Is it an indissoluble trinomial?

    PubMed Central

    Trevisani, Lucio; Zelante, Angelo; Sartori, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Colonoscopy is the reference method in the secondary prevention, diagnosis and, in some cases, treatment of colorectal cancer. It can often cause pain associated with embarrassment, anxiety, and physical and emotional discomfort. Pain intensity is influenced by a lot of factors, and there is a strict relationship among pain, pain perception, and mind. Several methods can be used to break the trinomial colonoscopy, pain and fear. Sedoanalgesia is recommended by several guidelines. If no sedation is offered, the patient must accept a higher chance of unacceptable discomfort and the endoscopist a lower chance of completing the procedure because of patient discomfort. Other non-pharmacologic methods such as acupuncture, music, and hydrocolonoscopy can be used as alternatives to pharmacologic sedoanalgesia. Furthermore, new endoscopic technologies such as variable-stiffness colonoscopes and ultrathin colonoscopes, or the use of carbon dioxide instead of air for colon insufflation, can reduce the pain caused by colonoscopy. In the future, technical improvements such as wireless capsules or robotic probes, will probably enable to overcome the present concept of colonoscopy, avoiding the use of traditional endoscopes. However, at present the poor attention paid by endoscopists to the pain and discomfort caused by colonoscopy can not be justified. There are several methods to reduce pain and anxiety and to break the trinomial colonoscopy, pain and fear. We must use them. PMID:24932374

  17. Pain-Related Fear: A Critical Review of the Related Measures

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, M.; Grimby-Ekman, A.; Verbunt, J.; Simmonds, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: In regards to pain-related fear, this study aimed to: (1) identify existing measures and review their measurement properties, and (2) identify the optimum measure for specific constructs of fear-avoidance, pain-related fear, fear of movement, and kinesiophobia. Design: Systematic literature search for instruments designed to measure fear of pain in patients with persistent musculoskeletal pain. Psychometric properties were evaluated by adjusted Wind criteria. Results: Five questionnaires (Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ), Fear-Avoidance of Pain Scale (FAPS), Fear of Pain Questionnaire (FPQ), Pain and Anxiety Symptoms Scale (PASS), and the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK)) were included in the review. The main findings were that for most questionnaires, there was no underlying conceptual model to support the questionnaire's construct. Psychometric properties were evaluated by diverse methods, which complicated comparisons of different versions of the same questionnaires. Construct validity and responsiveness was generally not supported and/or untested. Conclusion: The weak construct validity implies that no measure can currently identify who is fearful. The lack of evidence for responsiveness restricts the current use of the instruments to identify clinically relevant change from treatment. Finally, more theoretically driven research is needed to support the construct and thus the measurement of pain-related fear. PMID:22191022

  18. Acupuncture and Its Role in Modern Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, Andrew J.

    1974-01-01

    Although both the philosophic and physiologic basis of acupuncture seems fanciful to Western medical thinking, the results obtained in the treatment of certain disease states cannot be lightly dismissed. Its use in the induction of surgical analgesia may have immediate application for Western Medicine. Its mechanism of action is a complete enigma, but information accumulated from research in hypnosis, visceral learning and, most important, the physiology of pain perception may contain clues to the pathophysiologic principles involved. The fact that many disorders for which acupuncture therapy is useful are thought to have a large psychosomatic component only serves to reinforce the Eastern concept of inseparability of mind and body. A great deal of attention is being given to this concept in the current medical literature. In order to define the role of acupuncture in modern medical practice, a more scientific approach in both clinical and basic research is necessary. If acupuncture can be proved safe and efficacious in the treatment of certain diseases, lack of knowledge regarding its mechanism of action should not delay its incorporation into our medical armamentarium. PMID:4590887

  19. Acupuncture for Lateral Epicondylitis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hongzhi; Fan, Huaying; Chen, Jiao; Yang, Mingxiao; Yi, Xuebing; Dai, Guogang; Chen, Junrong; Tang, Liugang; Rong, Haibo; Wu, Junhua; Liang, Fanrong

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This systematic review aimed to assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for lateral epicondylitis (LE). Methods. Seven databases and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal were searched to identify relevant studies. The data were extracted and assessed by two independent authors, and Review Manager Software (V.5.3) was used for data synthesis with effect estimate presented as standard mean difference (SMD) and mean difference (MD) with a 95% confidence interval. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) was used to assess the level of evidence. Results. Four RCTs with 309 participants were included with poor methodological quality. Participants who received acupuncture and acupuncture plus moxibustion with material insulation were likely to have an improvement in elbow functional status and/or myodynamia. The overall quality rated by GRADE was from very low to low. Two studies reported that the needle pain would be the main reason for the dropout. Conclusion. For the small number of included studies with poor methodological quality, no firm conclusion can be drawn regarding the effect of acupuncture of elbow functional status and myodynamia for LE. This trial is registered with CRD42015016199. PMID:26843886

  20. Dry needling versus acupuncture: the ongoing debate.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kehua; Ma, Yan; Brogan, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    Although Western medical acupuncture (WMA) is commonly practised in the UK, a particular approach called dry needling (DN) is becoming increasingly popular in other countries. The legitimacy of the use of DN by conventional non-physician healthcare professionals is questioned by acupuncturists. This article describes the ongoing debate over the practice of DN between physical therapists and acupuncturists, with a particular emphasis on the USA. DN and acupuncture share many similarities but may differ in certain aspects. Currently, little information is available from the literature regarding the relationship between the two needling techniques. Through reviewing their origins, theory, and practice, we found that DN and acupuncture overlap in terms of needling technique with solid filiform needles as well as some fundamental theories. Both WMA and DN are based on modern biomedical understandings of the human body, although DN arguably represents only one subcategory of WMA. The increasing volume of research into needling therapy explains its growing popularity in the musculoskeletal field including sports medicine. To resolve the debate over DN practice, we call for the establishment of a regulatory body to accredit DN courses and a formal, comprehensive educational component and training for healthcare professionals who are not physicians or acupuncturists. Because of the close relationship between DN and acupuncture, collaboration rather than dispute between acupuncturists and other healthcare professionals should be encouraged with respect to education, research, and practice for the benefit of patients with musculoskeletal conditions who require needling therapy. PMID:26546163

  1. Acupuncture laser in treating headache pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smesny, Dunja B.

    1990-09-01

    Cervicoocipital headache observed in 112 patient were treated, half of them with acupuncture, and other 50% with He-e laser (con tinuous emission- lo mW, 633nm: IEC). With this treatment was also combined an exercise program ne cesary for the mobilisation of functionaly blocked vertebral segment.

  2. A new diode laser acupuncture therapy apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengwei; Huang, Zhen; Li, Dongyu; Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2006-06-01

    Since the first laser-needles acupuncture apparatus was introduced in therapy, this kind of apparatus has been well used in laser biomedicine as its non-invasive, pain- free, non-bacterium, and safetool. The laser acupuncture apparatus in this paper is based on single-chip microcomputer and associated by semiconductor laser technology. The function like traditional moxibustion including reinforcing and reducing is implemented by applying chaos method to control the duty cycle of moxibustion signal, and the traditional lifting and thrusting of acupuncture is implemented by changing power output of the diode laser. The radiator element of diode laser is made and the drive circuit is designed. And chaos mathematic model is used to produce deterministic class stochastic signal to avoid the body adaptability. This function covers the shortages of continuous irradiation or that of simple disciplinary stimulate signal, which is controlled by some simple electronic circuit and become easily adjusted by human body. The realization of reinforcing and reducing of moxibustion is technological innovation in traditional acupuncture coming true in engineering.

  3. Acupuncture for Lateral Epicondylitis: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hongzhi; Fan, Huaying; Chen, Jiao; Yang, Mingxiao; Yi, Xuebing; Dai, Guogang; Chen, Junrong; Tang, Liugang; Rong, Haibo; Wu, Junhua; Liang, Fanrong

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This systematic review aimed to assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for lateral epicondylitis (LE). Methods. Seven databases and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal were searched to identify relevant studies. The data were extracted and assessed by two independent authors, and Review Manager Software (V.5.3) was used for data synthesis with effect estimate presented as standard mean difference (SMD) and mean difference (MD) with a 95% confidence interval. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) was used to assess the level of evidence. Results. Four RCTs with 309 participants were included with poor methodological quality. Participants who received acupuncture and acupuncture plus moxibustion with material insulation were likely to have an improvement in elbow functional status and/or myodynamia. The overall quality rated by GRADE was from very low to low. Two studies reported that the needle pain would be the main reason for the dropout. Conclusion. For the small number of included studies with poor methodological quality, no firm conclusion can be drawn regarding the effect of acupuncture of elbow functional status and myodynamia for LE. This trial is registered with CRD42015016199. PMID:26843886

  4. Fear in the Principal's Office

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romaneck, Greg M.

    2006-01-01

    Fear and anxiety are emotions that principals must learn to overcome if they are to be effective leaders. This article provides some observations and suggestions that can help principals understand and cope with fear on the job. (Contains 3 online resources.)

  5. The learning of fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Furini, Cristiane; Myskiw, Jociane; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2014-11-01

    Recent work on the extinction of fear-motivated learning places emphasis on its putative circuitry and on its modulation. Extinction is the learned inhibition of retrieval of previously acquired responses. Fear extinction is used as a major component of exposure therapy in the treatment of fear memories such as those of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It is initiated and maintained by interactions between the hippocampus, basolateral amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex, which involve feedback regulation of the latter by the other two areas. Fear extinction depends on NMDA receptor activation. It is positively modulated by d-serine acting on the glycine site of NMDA receptors and blocked by AP5 (2-amino-5-phosphono propionate) in the three structures. In addition, histamine acting on H2 receptors and endocannabinoids acting on CB1 receptors in the three brain areas mentioned, and muscarinic cholinergic fibers from the medial septum to hippocampal CA1 positively modulate fear extinction. Importantly, fear extinction can be made state-dependent on circulating epinephrine, which may play a role in situations of stress. Exposure to a novel experience can strongly enhance the consolidation of fear extinction through a synaptic tagging and capture mechanism; this may be useful in the therapy of states caused by fear memory like PTSD. PMID:25452113

  6. Immunization against social fear learning.

    PubMed

    Golkar, Armita; Olsson, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Social fear learning offers an efficient way to transmit information about potential threats; little is known, however, about the learning processes that counteract the social transmission of fear. In three separate experiments, we found that safety information transmitted from another individual (i.e., demonstrator) during preexposure prevented subsequent observational fear learning (Experiments 1-3), and this effect was maintained in a new context involving direct threat confrontation (Experiment 3). This protection from observational fear learning was specific to conditions in which information about both safety and danger was transmitted from the same demonstrator (Experiments 2-3) and was unaffected by increasing the number of the safety demonstrators (Experiment 3). Collectively, these findings demonstrate that observational preexposure can limit social transmission of fear. Future research is needed to better understand the conditions under which such effects generalize across individual demonstrators. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27077756

  7. Bioelectrical homeostasis as a component of acupuncture mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zukauskas, G; Dapsys, K

    1991-01-01

    Low frequency electrical current and super-high frequency electromagnetic field were applied to acupuncture points of stomach meridian in dogs. The stimulation effect on Bioelectrical potentials of 5 acupuncture points of stomach, spleen, liver, kidney, small intestine meridians and non-acupuncture skin zones was studied in conditions of blocked autonomic ganglia or neuro-muscular junctions of the dog. The influence of ganglioblockading and myorelaxating drugs on Bioelectrical potentials of acupuncture points was also researched. The results are discussed from the neurohumoural and bioelectrical hypotheses points of view. The conclusion that both mechanisms of acupuncture supplement each other is drawn. The principle of bioelectrical homeostasis as a component of acupuncture mechanism is proposed. Bioelectrical homeostasis along with other kinds of homeostasis forms a system of first level homeostats which is united into second level homeostat by the autonomic nervous system. PMID:1685620

  8. Functional Connectivity Modulation by Acupuncture in Patients with Bell's Palsy

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaoxuan; Hu, Sheng; Li, Chuanfu; Xu, Chunsheng; Kan, Hongxing; Xue, Qiuju; Qiu, Bensheng

    2016-01-01

    Bell's palsy (BP), an acute unilateral facial paralysis, is frequently treated with acupuncture in many countries. However, the mechanism of treatment is not clear so far. In order to explore the potential mechanism, 22 healthy volunteers and 17 BP patients with different clinical duration were recruited. The resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans were conducted before and after acupuncture at LI4 (Hegu), respectively. By comparing BP-induced functional connectivity (FC) changes with acupuncture-induced FC changes in the patients, the abnormal increased FC that could be reduced by acupuncture was selected. The FC strength of the selected FC at various stages was analyzed subsequently. Our results show that FC modulation of acupuncture is specific and consistent with the tendency of recovery. Therefore, we propose that FC modulation by acupuncture may be beneficial to recovery from the disease. PMID:27293461

  9. Acupuncture: History from the Yellow Emperor to Modern Anesthesia Practice.

    PubMed

    Faircloth, Amanda

    2015-08-01

    Acupuncture and acupressure are components of Oriental medicine that have been in existence for thousands of years. These practices have transcended from Asia into Western culture. In the context of anesthesia practice, acupuncture and acupressure have demonstrated clinical usefulness in the perioperative setting. Acupuncture and acupressure can successfully decrease preoperative anxiety, decrease intraoperative anesthetic requirements, assuage postoperative pain, decrease the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting, and support chronic pain management. PMID:26390748

  10. Acupuncture for chronic pain: individual patient data meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J.; Cronin, Angel M.; Maschino, Alexandra C.; Lewith, George; MacPherson, Hugh; Victor, Norbert; Foster, Nadine E.; Sherman, Karen J.; Witt, Claudia M.; Linde, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Background Although acupuncture is widely used for chronic pain, there remains considerable controversy as to its value. We aimed to determine the effect size of acupuncture for four chronic pain conditions: back and neck pain, osteoarthritis, chronic headache, and shoulder pain. Methods We conducted a systematic review to identify randomized trials of acupuncture for chronic pain where allocation concealment was determined unambiguously to be adequate. Individual patient data meta-analyses were conducted using data from 29 of 31 eligible trials, with a total of 17,922 patients analyzed. Results In the primary analysis including all eligible trials, acupuncture was superior to both sham and no acupuncture control for each pain condition (all p<0.001). After exclusion of an outlying set of trials that strongly favored acupuncture, the effect sizes were similar across pain conditions. Patients receiving acupuncture had less pain, with scores 0.23 (95% C.I. 0.13, 0.33), 0.16 (95% C.I. 0.07, 0.25) and 0.15 (95% C.I. 0.07, 0.24) standard deviations lower than sham controls for back and neck pain, osteoarthritis, and chronic headache respectively; the effect sizes in comparison to no acupuncture controls were 0.55 (95% C.I. 0.51, 0.58), 0.57 (95% C.I. 0.50, 0.64) and 0.42 (95% C.I. 0.37, 0.46). These results were robust to a variety of sensitivity analyses, including those related to publication bias. Conclusions Acupuncture is effective for the treatment of chronic pain and is therefore a reasonable referral option. Significant differences between true and sham acupuncture indicate that acupuncture is more than a placebo. However, these differences are relatively modest, suggesting that factors in addition to the specific effects of needling are important contributors to the therapeutic effects of acupuncture. PMID:22965186

  11. Getting inside acupuncture trials - Exploring intervention theory and rationale

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acupuncture can be described as a complex intervention. In reports of clinical trials the mechanism of acupuncture (that is, the process by which change is effected) is often left unstated or not known. This is problematic in assisting understanding of how acupuncture might work and in drawing together evidence on the potential benefits of acupuncture. Our aim was to aid the identification of the assumed mechanisms underlying the acupuncture interventions in clinical trials by developing an analytical framework to differentiate two contrasting approaches to acupuncture (traditional acupuncture and Western medical acupuncture). Methods Based on the principles of realist review, an analytical framework to differentiate these two contrasting approaches was developed. In order to see how useful the framework was in uncovering the theoretical rationale, it was applied to a set of trials of acupuncture for fatigue and vasomotor symptoms, identified from a wider literature review of acupuncture and early stage breast cancer. Results When examined for the degree to which a study demonstrated adherence to a theoretical model, two of the fourteen selected studies could be considered TA, five MA, with the remaining seven not fitting into any recognisable model. When examined by symptom, five of the nine vasomotor studies, all from one group of researchers, are arguably in the MA category, and two a TA model; in contrast, none of the five fatigue studies could be classed as either MA or TA and all studies had a weak rationale for the chosen treatment for fatigue. Conclusion Our application of the framework to the selected studies suggests that it is a useful tool to help uncover the therapeutic rationale of acupuncture interventions in clinical trials, for distinguishing between TA and MA approaches and for exploring issues of model validity. English language acupuncture trials frequently fail to report enough detail relating to the intervention. We advocate using

  12. Do Learners Fear More than Fear Itself: The Role of Fear in Law Students Educational Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, Jeffrey; O'Neil, Jennifer; Grimes, Ashley; Bryson, Laura

    2014-01-01

    While previous research has examined the various relationships between fear and learning in K-12 academic settings, the relationship is surprisingly unexplored amongst law students. Using a descriptive qualitative approach, we examine the role fear plays in law students' learning experiences. Through a series of semi-structured interviews a few…

  13. Acupuncture in acute herpes zoster pain therapy (ACUZoster) – design and protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Fleckenstein, Johannes; Kramer, Sybille; Hoffrogge, Philipp; Thoma, Sarah; Lang, Philip M; Lehmeyer, Lukas; Schober, Gabriel M; Pfab, Florian; Ring, Johannes; Weisenseel, Peter; Schotten, Klaus J; Mansmann, Ulrich; Irnich, Dominik

    2009-01-01

    Background Acute herpes zoster is a prevalent condition. One of its major symptoms is pain, which can highly influence patient's quality of life. Pain therapy is limited. Acupuncture is supposed to soften neuropathic pain conditions and might therefore act as a therapeutic alternative. Objective of the present study is to investigate whether a 4 week semi-standardised acupuncture is non-inferior to sham laser acupuncture and the anticonvulsive drug gabapentine in the treatment of pain associated with herpes zoster. Methods/Design Three-armed, randomised, placebo-controlled trial with a total follow-up time of 6 months. Up to estimated 336 patients (interim analyses) with acute herpes zoster pain (VAS > 30 mm) will be randomised to one of three groups (a) semi-standardised acupuncture (168 patients); (b) gabapentine with individualised dosage between 900–3600 mg/d (84 patients); (c) sham laser acupuncture. Intervention takes place over 4 weeks, all patients will receive analgesic therapy (non-opioid analgesics: metamizol or paracetamol and opioids: tramadol or morphine). Therapy phase includes 4 weeks in which group (a) and (c) consist of 12 sessions per patient, (b) visits depend on patients needs. Main outcome measure is to assess the alteration of pain intensity before and 1 week after treatment sessions (visual analogue scale VAS 0–100 mm). Secondary outcome measure are: alteration of pain intensity and frequency of pain attacks; alteration of different aspects of pain evaluated by standardised pain questionnaires (NPI, PDI, SES); effects on quality of life (SF 36); analgesic demand; alteration of sensoric perception by systematic quantitative sensory testing (QST); incidence of postherpetic neuralgia; side effects and cost effectiveness. Credibility of treatments will be assessed. Discussion This study is the first large-scale randomised placebo controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture compared to gabapentine and sham treatment and will

  14. Acupuncture: Emerging evidence for its use as an analgesic (Review)

    PubMed Central

    GAO, PENG; GAO, XI; FU, TAIRAN; XU, DAN; WEN, QINGPING

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture is an ancient Chinese technique, developed over >3,000 years, in which ʻacupointsʼ are stimulated with the aim of treating various diseases. A number of previous studies have indicated that acupuncture may play a role in inducing analgesia. Acupuncture-induced analgesia has been hypothesized to act on various parts of the central nervous system, including the spinal cord, brain stem, cerebral ganglia and cerebral cortex. The mechanisms underlying the effects of acupuncture have been purported to include neurohumors and neurotransmitters, such as opioids and γ-aminobutyric acid, signaling pathways and the immune response, which are all involved in the induction of analgesia. PMID:26136861

  15. Effect of acupuncture on disorders of musculoskeletal system in Nigerians.

    PubMed

    Ene, E E; Odia, G I

    1983-01-01

    Acupuncture was offered to patients with lesions affecting the locomotor system. These patients had received conventional physiotherapy treatment with limited success. The lesions treated by acupuncture were hemiplegia, low back pain, frozen shoulder, dropped foot, Sciatica, and arthritis of the knee and hip. Response to acupuncture was excellent in the more acute conditions of low back pain and frozen shoulder, where six treatment sessions were required for complete recovery. The more chronic conditions required many more treatment sessions and the improvement recorded was significant, though not complete. It was concluded that acupuncture has a valuable role to play in a physiotherapy department. PMID:6660198

  16. [Study on force feedback of acupuncture at Fengchi (GB 20)].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Wang, Fu-Bo; Guo, Hai-Dong; Shao, Shui-Jin; Miao, Peng; Zhang, Qi; Guo, Chun-Xia; Mou, Fang-Fang; Yan, Zhen-Guo

    2013-10-01

    Acupuncture manipulations on Fengchi (GB 20) of famous doctors were taken through force feedback device, then the data was input into a digitized virtual human. Virtual Fengchi (GB 20) acupuncture force feedback simulation system was built through the virtual reality technology to achieve one-to-one high simulative manipulation effect for acupuncture students. The interaction force of the needle body and human tissues was analyzed during the acupuncture process on the 3D digital human integrated with information of Fengchi (GB 20) according to the physical characteristics of the tissues under this point. The mechanical model which is used to imitate the stress received by the body of the needle was established, and transmitted truly to the operator by the force feedback device. Thus, Fengchi (GB 20) virtual acupuncture force feedback simulation was preliminary established, and the sense of touch could be reproduced lively on the visualized virtual acupuncture human. It is held that Fengchi (GB 20) acupuncture force feedback research is a preliminary exploration for virtual acupuncture that integrated with the information of visual, tactile and force feedback. And it also provided a dynamic one-to-one simulation approach for acupuncture teaching. PMID:24377234

  17. Necrotising fasciitis after acupuncture treatment in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Glas, Ariene Wypkjen; Jüttner, Anna M F M; Kooter, Albertus Jozef

    2016-01-01

    A 42-year old male with no significant medical history was admitted to our hospital with a painful, red, swollen right arm and fever. The rash and swelling had started in the cubital fossa. 7 days earlier, needles had been placed exactly at that site during an acupuncture treatment. After deterioration of his condition, surgical exploration of the arm revealed necrotising fasciitis. Although acupuncture is a relatively safe intervention, serious complications do occur. Necrotising fasciitis after acupuncture has been described in immunocompromised patients. To the best of our knowledge this is the first immunocompetent patient with necrotising fasciitis and toxic shock, caused by acupuncture. PMID:27413025

  18. [Acupuncture--propagated indications beyond pain-relief therapy].

    PubMed

    Hakimi, R

    2009-03-01

    Acupuncture originates from China and has developed out of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Since the 1970s acupuncture has been carried out more and more in Germany - especially within the context of pain-relief therapy. Acupuncture is more or less considered to be a medically necessary measure in the case of chronic knee or back pains and of chronic headaches, even if the German Acupuncture Trials (GERAC) leave some issues regarding its effectiveness unresolved. Less known is the fact that acupuncture is not only used for pain-relief therapy, but that a lot more indications have emerged over the last 20 years. Acupuncture is increasingly used for the treatment of allergies, asthma bronchial, addictions, tinnitus, but also to stimulate pregnancy and against adipositas, neurodermitis and a lot of other diseases. The available statistics state that acupuncture is used in appr. 20% of all cases for indications apart from pain-relief therapy. There are about 150 indications for which acupuncture is used as a therapy. However, for the majority of the apparent indications no proof is available in the sense of medical studies of an acceptable scientific level. Very often acupuncture has mild side-effects and rather rarely serious side-effects or health hazards. Patients are fequently not informed about them sufficiently. PMID:19370841

  19. A Randomized Exploratory Study to Evaluate Two Acupuncture Methods for the Treatment of Headaches Associated with Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bellanti, Dawn M.; Paat, Charmagne F.; Boyd, Courtney C.; Duncan, Alaine; Price, Ashley; Zhang, Weimin; French, Louis M.; Chae, Heechin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Headaches are prevalent among Service members with traumatic brain injury (TBI); 80% report chronic or recurrent headache. Evidence for nonpharmacologic treatments, such as acupuncture, are needed. Objective: The aim of this research was to determine if two types of acupuncture (auricular acupuncture [AA] and traditional Chinese acupuncture [TCA]) were feasible and more effective than usual care (UC) alone for TBI–related headache. Materials and Methods: Design: This was a three-armed, parallel, randomized exploratory study. Setting: The research took place at three military treatment facilities in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area. Patients: The subjects were previously deployed Service members (18–69 years old) with mild-to-moderate TBI and headaches. Intervention: The interventions explored were UC alone or with the addition of AA or TCA. Outcome Measures: The primary outcome was the Headache Impact Test (HIT). Secondary outcomes were the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Post-Traumatic Stress Checklist, Symptom Checklist-90-R, Medical Outcome Study Quality of Life (QoL), Beck Depression Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics, and expectancy of outcome and acupuncture efficacy. Results: Mean HIT scores decreased in the AA and TCA groups but increased slightly in the UC-only group from baseline to week 6 [AA, −10.2% (−6.4 points); TCA, −4.6% (−2.9 points); UC, +0.8% (+0.6 points)]. Both acupuncture groups had sizable decreases in NRS (Pain Best), compared to UC (TCA versus UC: P = 0.0008, d = 1.70; AA versus UC: P = 0.0127, d = 1.6). No statistically significant results were found for any other secondary outcome measures. Conclusions: Both AA and TCA improved headache-related QoL more than UC did in Service members with TBI. PMID:27458496

  20. Fear and its implications for stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, I.; Ahlgren, P. T. H.; Jensen, M. H.; Donangelo, R.; Sneppen, K.

    2007-05-01

    The value of stocks, indices and other assets, are examples of stochastic processes with unpredictable dynamics. In this paper, we discuss asymmetries in short term price movements that can not be associated with a long term positive trend. These empirical asymmetries predict that stock index drops are more common on a relatively short time scale than the corresponding raises. We present several empirical examples of such asymmetries. Furthermore, a simple model featuring occasional short periods of synchronized dropping prices for all stocks constituting the index is introduced with the aim of explaining these facts. The collective negative price movements are imagined triggered by external factors in our society, as well as internal to the economy, that create fear of the future among investors. This is parameterized by a “fear factor” defining the frequency of synchronized events. It is demonstrated that such a simple fear factor model can reproduce several empirical facts concerning index asymmetries. It is also pointed out that in its simplest form, the model has certain shortcomings.

  1. The successful treatment of pain associated with scar tissue using acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Fang, Sheng

    2014-10-01

    In this case report, a 48-year-old female who had suffered severe scar pain for 3 months was treated with acupuncture using the Wei Ci technique (surrounding the dragon). Scar tissue usually forms after deep trauma, such as piercings, burns, and surgery, to the dermis. In Chinese Medicine, scar tissue causes local Qi and blood stagnation which lead to pain. The Wei Ci technique (surrounding the dragon) and distal points Hegu-LI-4, Taichong-LIV-3, Zusanli-ST-36 were used. The patient received a total of eight treatments in 5 weeks. The scar pain decreased from 7 to 1 or 2 on a Likert scale of 0-10, with 0 being no pain and 10 being the worst pain. Acupuncture may have a good short-term pain-relieving effect on scar pain but its long-term scar-pain-relieving effects are still unclear. PMID:25441952

  2. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Special Acupuncture Technique for Pain after Thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Gary; Rusch, Valerie; Vickers, Andrew; Malhortra, Vivek; Ginex, Pamela; Downey, Robert; Bains, Manjit; Park, Bernard; Rizk, Nabil; Flores, Raja; Yeung, Simon; Cassileth, Barrie

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine whether an acupuncture technique specially developed for a surgical oncology population (intervention) reduces pain or analgesic use after thoracotomy compared to a sham acupuncture technique (control). Methods One hundred and sixty two cancer patients undergoing thoracotomy were randomized to group A) preoperative implantation of small intradermal needles which were retained for 4 weeks or B) preoperative placement of sham needles at the same schedule. Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) of pain and total opioid use we evaluated during the in-patient stay; Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and Medication Quantification Scale (MQS) were evaluated after discharge up to 3 months after the surgery. Results The principal analysis, a comparison of BPI pain intensity scores at the 30 day follow-up, showed no significant difference between the intervention and control group. Pain scores were marginally higher in the intervention group 0.05 (95% C.I.: 0.74, -0.64; p=0.9). There were also no statistically significant differences between groups for secondary endpoints, including chronic pain assessments at 60 and 90 days, in-patient pain, and medication use in hospital and after discharge. Conclusion A special acupuncture technique as provided in this study did not reduce pain or use of pain medication after thoracotomy more than a sham technique. PMID:19114190

  3. Acupuncture for Chronic Pain in Japan: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kitakoji, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Many Japanese reports of acupuncture and moxibustion for chronic pain are not listed in medical databases such as Medline. Therefore, they are not easily accessible to researchers outside of Japan. To complement existing reviews of acupuncture and moxibustion for chronic pain and to provide more detailed discussion and analysis, we did a literature search using ‘Igaku Chuo Zasshi Wed’ (Japana Centra Revuo Medicina) and ‘Citation Information by National Institute of Information’ covering the period 1978–2006. Original articles and case reports of acupuncture and moxibustion treatment of chronic pain were included. Animal studies, surveys, and news articles were excluded. Two independent reviewers extracted data from located articles in a pre-defined structured way, and assessed the likelihood of causality in each case. We located 57 papers written in Japanese (20 full papers, 37 case reports). Conditions examined were headache (12 trials), chronic low back pain (9 trials), rheumatoid arthritis (8 trials), temporomandibular dysfunction (8 trials), katakori (8 trials) and others (12 trials). While 23 were described as clinical control trials (CCTs), 11 employed a quasi-random method. Applying the 5-point Jadad quality assessment scoring system, the mean score was 1.5 ± 1.3 (SD). Eleven (52%) of the CCTs were conducted to determine a more effective procedure for acupuncture; these compared a certain type of acupuncture with another type of acupuncture or specific additional points. In particular, the trigger point acupuncture was widely used to treat chronic low back pain in Japan. Many reports of chronic pain treatment by acupuncture and moxibustion are listed in Japanese databases. From the data, we conclude that there is limited evidence that acupuncture is more effective than no treatment, and inconclusive evidence that trigger point acupuncture is more effective than placebo, sham acupuncture or standard care. PMID:18227910

  4. Fear rises among Iranian physicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacey, James

    2011-01-01

    Academics in Iran have been left in a state of fear following the murder in Tehran last November of nuclear physicist Majid Shahriari and the attempted assassination of another nuclear researcher, Fereydoon Abbasi.

  5. Panic Disorder: When Fear Overwhelms

    MedlinePlus

    ... for several minutes or longer. These are called panic attacks . Panic attacks are characterized by a fear of disaster or ... also have a strong physical reaction during a panic attack. It may feel like having a heart attack. ...

  6. Unusual Fears in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Calhoun, Susan L.; Aggarwal, Richa; Baker, Courtney; Mathapati, Santosh; Molitoris, Sarah; Mayes, Rebecca D.

    2013-01-01

    Unusual fears have long been recognized as common in autism, but little research exists. In our sample of 1033 children with autism, unusual fears were reported by parents of 421 (41%) of the children, representing 92 different fears. Many additional children had common childhood fears (e.g., dogs, bugs, and the dark). More than half of children…

  7. Examining the Fears of Gifted Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tippey, Jacalyn G.; Burnham, Joy J.

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have considered the fears of gifted children. Using the American Fear Survey Schedule for Children (FSSC-AM; Burnham, 1995), a modified version of the Australian Fear Survey Schedule for Children-II (Gullone & King, 1992, 1993), this study focused on the fears of 287 gifted children ages 7-10. This study is a first step in developing…

  8. Genes, Fears, Phobias, and Phobic Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Gregory

    1990-01-01

    Surveyed literature on genetics and fears and phobias to determine what might be heritable. Found, for ordinary fears among the general population, heredity appears to contribute mainly to a trait of general fearfulness and may be a major reason for the strong intercorrelation among different fears. Found evidence of little environmental…

  9. Fear, the School Organization, and Teacher Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley, Sharon; Glasman, Naftaly S.

    2008-01-01

    Fear can be conceptualized differently as experienced by those inside and outside the school organization. Internally, participants respond to fear in a politics of maintenance aimed toward protection against anticipated job loss(es). This article examines internal organizational participants' fear, with particular attention to teachers' fear of…

  10. Efficacy of acupuncture for chronic knee pain: protocol for a randomised controlled trial using a Zelen design

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic knee pain is a common and disabling condition in people over 50 years of age, with knee joint osteoarthritis being a major cause. Acupuncture is a popular form of complementary and alternative medicine for treating pain and dysfunction associated with musculoskeletal conditions. This pragmatic Zelen-design randomised controlled trial is investigating the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of needle and laser acupuncture, administered by medical practitioners, in people with chronic knee pain. Methods/Design Two hundred and eighty two people aged over 50 years with chronic knee pain have been recruited from metropolitan Melbourne and regional Victoria, Australia. Participants originally consented to participate in a longitudinal natural history study but were then covertly randomised into one of four treatment groups. One group continued as originally consented (ie natural history group) and received no acupuncture treatment. The other three were treatment groups: i) laser acupuncture, ii) sham laser or, iii) needle acupuncture. Acupuncture treatments used a combined Western and Traditional Chinese Medicine style, were delivered by general practitioners and comprised 8–12 visits over 12 weeks. Follow-up is currently ongoing. The primary outcomes are pain measured by an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS) and self-reported physical function measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster (WOMAC) Universities Osteoarthritis Index subscale at the completion of treatment at 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes include quality of life, global rating of change scores and additional measures of pain (other NRS and WOMAC subscale) and physical function (NRS). Additional parameters include a range of psychosocial measures in order to evaluate potential relationships with acupuncture treatment outcomes. Relative cost-effectiveness will be determined from health service usage and outcome data. Follow-up assessments will also occur at 12 months. Discussion The

  11. Acupuncture Therapy for Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin-chang; Xu, Xiu-ping; Xu, Wen-tao; Hou, Wen-zhen; Cheng, Ying-ying; Li, Chang-xi; Ni, Guang-xia

    2015-01-01

    and small sample sizes, large-scale RCTs are required to confirm the current findings regarding acupuncture therapy for SSHL. PMID:25919000

  12. Safety of Acupuncture and Pharmacopuncture in 80,523 Musculoskeletal Disorder Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Me-Riong; Shin, Joon-Shik; Lee, Jinho; Lee, Yoon Jae; Ahn, Yong-Jun; Park, Ki Byung; Lee, Hwa Dong; Lee, Yoonmi; Kim, Sung Geun; Ha, In-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the range and frequency of significant adverse events (AEs) in use of pharmacopuncture and acupuncture using large-scale, single-center safety data as evidence supporting safety of acupuncture with pharmacopuncture, used extensively in Asia, is scarce. Status reports (nurse records in ambulatory and inpatient care units, and administrative event records) as a part of an internal audit at a Korean Medicine hospital specializing in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders, patient complaints filed through the hospital website, and medical records of patients visiting from December, 2010 (inception of internal audit) to October, 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. A total 80,523 patients (5966 inpatients and 74,557 outpatients) visited during this period. Inpatients received an average 31.9 ± 20.7 acupuncture, 23.0 ± 15.6 pharmacopuncture, and 15.4 ± 11.3 bee venom pharmacopuncture sessions, and outpatients were administered 8.2 ± 12.2 acupuncture, 7.8 ± 11.5 pharmacopuncture, and 10.0 ± 12.3 bee venom sessions, respectively. AEs associated with acupuncture/pharmacopuncture were forgotten needle (n = 47), hypersensitivity to bee venom (n = 37), presyncopic episode (n = 4), pneumothorax (n = 4), and infection (n = 2). Most cases were mild requiring little or no additional intervention and leaving no sequelae. Although serious AEs including infection (n = 2) and anaphylaxis associated with bee venom treatment (n = 3) were also reported, incidence was rare at 0.002% in infection and 0.019% in anaphylaxis. Incidence of AEs associated with acupuncture/pharmacopuncture treatment was low, and most cases were not serious. Still, however rare, avoidable AEs can and should be prevented through education and corrective action. Further prospective studies on the effect of error reduction strategies on incidence of adverse effects are warranted. PMID:27149503

  13. Acupuncture assisted local anesthesia for penile surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Zaid, Uwais X.; Hsieh, Cheng-Hsing; Huang, Sheng-Jean

    2013-01-01

    Although the mechanism of acupuncture for analgesia is not fully elucidated, a combination of acupuncture and several methods of topical blocks for local anesthesia has been effective to patients with indications for penile surgeries on ambulatory basis. We sought to review this unique clinical application since 1998. To summarize practice-based medical literature contingent this unique application and, in contrast, the commonly agreed either general or spinal anesthesia concerning those surgeries on this most sensitive organ—the delicate penis. From July 1998 to July 2013, total of 1,481 males underwent penile surgeries with specific topical nerve blockage in addition to acupuncture in which the acupoints of Hegu (LI4), Shou San Li (LI10), Quchi (LI11), and either Waiguan (TE5) or Neiguan (PC6) were routinely used. Careful anesthetic block of the paired dorsal nerve in the penile hilum associated with a peripenile infiltration was categorized to method I which is sufficient to anesthetize the penile structures for varied penile surgeries including 993 men of penile venous stripping surgeries, 336 cases of penile corporoplasty, 8 males of urethroplasty, 7 patients of vaso-vasostomy, 6 men of penile arterial reconstruction and 3 surgeries of penectomy. Whereas the bilateral cavernous nerve block and crural blockage were indispensably added up for anesthetizing the sinusoids of the corpora cavernosa (CC) for penile implant of varied model. It was allocated to method II and had been applied in 125 males. A further topical injection of the medial low abdominal region made it possible for implanting a three-piece model in three males. Thus recent discoveries and better understanding of the penile anatomy had been meaningful in the development and improvement of specific nerve blockade techniques for penile surgeries in particularly adding up with acupuncture techniques, while minimizing anesthetic adverse effects and resulting in a rapid return to daily activity with

  14. Perforators, the Underlying Anatomy of Acupuncture Points.

    PubMed

    Zhi Wei, Ding; Yu, Shi; Yongqiang, Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Context • As a critical concept in acupuncture, acupuncture points, or acupoints for short, are currently believed to be 3-dimensional structures composed of skin, muscles, tendons, nerves, blood vessels, lymph nodes, and other special tissues. No known specific tissue or organ has been confirmed to be an acupoint. However, from a microsurgeon's point of view, a special vascular structure exists around each acupoint (ie, perforators or arterioles of 0.3-1.5 mm that pierce deeply through the fascia). Objective • The current research team investigated the theory that perforators are the anatomical basis of acupoints. Design • A reference list of acupoints and of perforators near the acupoints was proposed, and the distributions were analyzed. Using the World Health Organization (WHO) list, "Standard Acupuncture Point Locations in the Western Pacific Region," 2 experienced acupuncturists identified the needling depth and angle as well as verified the acupoint locations. Perforators with amplitudes of 1 cm or more were identified by 3 veteran microsurgeons. Setting • The study was carried out in an osteopathic research center at the 89th Hospital of the People's Liberation Army, in Weifang, Shandong, China. From October 2013 to October 2014, patients who required skin flap transplantation were enrolled for observation. Outcome Measures • To evaluate the theory, the current research team observed subcutaneous perforating points in flap donor sites and operative incision areas and compared those points with the acupoints located by acupuncturists. Results • The perforators and acupoints were found to be closely correlated. Several distribution patterns of acupoints and perforators have emerged and further confirmed the research team's theory. Conclusions • The hypothesis could facilitate theoretical understanding of the mechanism and essence of acupuncture. PMID:27228269

  15. Computerized Dental Injection Fear Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, L.J.; Leroux, B.G.; Ruff, P.A.; Coldwell, S.E.

    2013-01-01

    One in four adults reports a clinically significant fear of dental injections, leading many to avoid dental care. While systematic desensitization is the most common therapeutic method for treating specific phobias such as fear of dental injections, lack of access to trained therapists, as well as dentists’ lack of training and time in providing such a therapy, means that most fearful individuals are not able to receive the therapy needed to be able to receive necessary dental treatment. Computer Assisted Relaxation Learning (CARL) is a self-paced computerized treatment based on systematic desensitization for dental injection fear. This multicenter, block-randomized, dentist-blind, parallel-group study conducted in 8 sites in the United States compared CARL with an informational pamphlet in reducing fear of dental injections. Participants completing CARL reported significantly greater reduction in self-reported general and injection-specific dental anxiety measures compared with control individuals (p < .001). Twice as many CARL participants (35.3%) as controls (17.6%) opted to receive a dental injection after the intervention, although this was not statistically significant. CARL, therefore, led to significant changes in self-reported fear in study participants, but no significant differences in the proportion of participants having a dental injection (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00609648). PMID:23690352

  16. [Science of Acupuncture and Moxibustion should include standards related to acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Tian, Kaiyu

    2016-03-01

    The development of Science of Acupuncture and Moxibustion should be in accord with the trend of standardization and internationalization of the science of acupuncture and moxibustion. Based on the arrangement of chapters and sections in the textbook, 29 national standards, 6 standards or guidelines made by World Health Or- ganization(WHO) and 1 standard out of International Standardization Organization (ISO) are classified and intro- duced. It is suggested that the above contents should be considered as the evidence when the textbook is reedited. Also, it is proposed that humanization should be supplemented and the newest research findings should be traced. PMID:27344845

  17. Provision of Auricular Acupuncture and Acupressure in a University Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyola-Santiago, Tamara; Knopf, Rachel; Robin, Tracy; Harvey, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Auricular acupuncture using the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) protocol stimulates 5 points in each ear--the Shen Men, sympathetic nervous system, liver, kidney, and lung. This protocol is also known as Acu Detox, and has been used for recovery in community-based settings and drug use treatment programs. It has also been…

  18. Research on nonlinear feature of electrical resistance of acupuncture points.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jianzi; Mao, Huijuan; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Lina; Liu, Sheng; Shen, Xueyong

    2012-01-01

    A highly sensitive volt-ampere characteristics detecting system was applied to measure the volt-ampere curves of nine acupuncture points, LU9, HT7, LI4, PC6, ST36, SP6, KI3, LR3, and SP3, and corresponding nonacupuncture points bilaterally from 42 healthy volunteers. Electric currents intensity was increased from 0 μA to 20 μA and then returned to 0 μA again. The results showed that the volt-ampere curves of acupuncture points had nonlinear property and magnetic hysteresis-like feature. On all acupuncture point spots, the volt-ampere areas of the increasing phase were significantly larger than that of the decreasing phase (P < 0.01). The volt-ampere areas of ten acupuncture point spots were significantly smaller than those of the corresponding nonacupuncture point spots when intensity was increase (P < 0.05 ~ P < 0.001). And when intensity was decrease, eleven acupuncture point spots showed the same property as above (P < 0.05 ~ P < 0.001), while two acupuncture point spots showed opposite phenomenon in which the areas of two acupuncture point spots were larger than those of the corresponding nonacupuncture point spots (P < 0.05 ~ P < 0.01). These results show that the phenomenon of low skin resistance does not exist to all acupuncture points. PMID:23346191

  19. Acupuncture for Improving Chronic Back Pain, Osteoarthritis and Headache

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Karen J.; Coeytaux, Remy R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To conduct a critical review of the literature on acupuncture for chronic back pain, osteoarthritis and headache. Methods Review of meta-analyses, systematic reviews and some well-conducted, recent studies. Results Overall, acupuncture appears superior to no treatment or usual care for persons with chronic back pain, osteoarthritis, or headache. However, these findings vary depending on the specific outcome and the follow-up period. The magnitude of the effect varies, but is consistent with a small to moderate effect size in most cases. Moreover, acupuncture is not clearly superior to sham acupuncture, although the latter is a controversial control group. Acupuncture has a favorable safety profile, with relatively few side effects and serious ones quite rare. Limited evidence suggests that acupuncture is a cost effective treatment. Conclusions The evidence suggests that acupuncture is a reasonable therapeutic option, but not the clear therapy of choice for any of these conditions. Acupuncture may be especially valuable for patients who prefer it to other options or are concerned about using analgesic medications. PMID:20445762

  20. Cape Fear: an outdoor hillslope laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauro, Flavia; Petroselli, Andrea; Fiori, Aldo; Romano, Nunzio; Rulli, Maria Cristina; Porfiri, Maurizio; Palladino, Mario; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological processes occurring at the hillslope scale highly influence the response of natural catchments. However, modelling hillslope dynamics is often extremely challenging, and conceptualizations may be inadequate to simulate such complex processes. Towards this aim, field experiments on natural and artificial catchments have proved highly beneficial. In this work, we present Cape Fear, an ad hoc designed experimental plot whereby traditional and new measurement systems are integrated for improved comprehension of hillslope processes. This outdoor hillslope laboratory hosts diverse sensing apparatuses, spanning from a system of rainfall simulators, a v-notch weir for input and output fluxes analysis, sophisticated instrumentation for continuous measurements of surface and subsurface water and soil transport, to innovative image-based setups to remotely sense surface waters. We demonstrate the potential of such a versatile and thoroughly instrumented outdoor laboratory through a proof-of-concept experiment conducted during a natural rainfall event. The response of the plot to the storm is reconstructed based on continuous monitoring of input and output fluxes. Further, an innovative tracer-based approach involving the use of fluorescent particles is utilized to remotely investigate the onset of overland flow from captured images. Insight from experimental observations is utilized to identify the physical phenomena governing the response of the hillslope to the precipitation event. Cape Fear is a powerful resource for the hydrological community and this small scale experimental observatory is expected to provide diverse and innovative observations to advance current knowledge on hydrological processes at the hillslope scale.

  1. The Study of Personal Constructs of Death and Fear of Death among Taiwanese Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Shu Ching; Chen, Shih-Fen

    2009-01-01

    This study administered an open-ended questionnaire about death and the Multidimensional Fear of Death Scale (MODS) to explore the relationships between personal constructs about death and fears of death among Taiwanese adolescents. The sample included 329 adolescents in junior and senior high school grades 7 to 12. A coding manual was used to…

  2. Predictors of Fear of Death and Self-Mortality: An Atlantic Canadian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Trinda L.; Smith, Steven M.

    2008-01-01

    This research was undertaken to explore gender, religiosity, perceived time-left-to-live and the interactions between these variables as predictors of fear of death in 144 Atlantic Canadian students using the Multidimensional Fear of Death Scale (MFODS). Predictions about cause, age, marital status, and place of death were also derived from the…

  3. Raynaud's phenomenon, cytokines and acupuncture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Omole, Folashade S; Lin, James S; Chu, Tehching; Sow, Charles M; Flood, Anthony; Powell, Michael David

    2012-06-01

    A 30-year-old African-American woman diagnosed in 2006 with primary Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) was seen in the clinic in 2010 and the diagnosis confirmed excluding underlying disorders. Acupuncture was administered bilaterally at the LI4 Hegu acupuncture points for 5 min twice weekly for 2 months, which resulted in improvement in pain severity, joint stiffness and the colour of her fingers and toes. The literature reveals that acupuncture is effective in improving pain severity and joint stiffness in RP. The patient's serum proinflammatory cytokines were compared with those from an ongoing study in our institution and the results indicated that acupuncture therapy might be anti-inflammatory. Acupuncture is relatively safe and should be considered as an alternative treatment or non-pharmacological therapy for pain associated with RP. PMID:22516031

  4. [Professor GAO Yuchun's experience of acupuncture for headache].

    PubMed

    Cui, Linhua; Xing, Xiao; Xue, Weihua; Wang, Yanjun; Xu, Cejun; Xuc, Jun; Gao, Yuchun; Kang, Suobin

    2015-12-01

    As one of the important founders of GAO's acupuncture academic school in YanZhao area, Professor GAO Yuchun 's experience of acupuncture for headache is summarized in this paper. In the opinion of Professor GAO, the treatment of headache should focus on eliminating evil and relieving pain, and the syndrome differentiation should be based on meridian differentiation, especially on three yang meridians of foot as well as liver meridian and kidney meridian. In the acupoint prescription, attention should be placed on strengthening the spleen and stomach. The midnight-midday ebb flow acupuncture is advocated. The combination between acupuncture order and movement of qi is emphasized. In the manipulation, the role of pressing hand, the stimulation during reinforcing and reducing methods, and needle-retention time are important. The breathing reinforcing and reducing method of acupuncture are also advocated. PMID:26964181

  5. [Chinese medicine and acupuncture in the treatment of AIDS].

    PubMed

    Sommers, B

    1995-01-01

    Acupuncture, a therapeutic Chinese practice, may reduce fever, activate the immune system, and stimulate white blood cells. Scientists feel acupuncture encourages the production of natural hormones, called endorphins, which reduce pain, promote sleep and regulate body systems. Endorphins can be produced by massages, acupuncture and the body's natural activity. Medicinal plants, herbs, vitamins and minerals help the body maintain a healthy balance. Acupuncture is done with tiny sterile needles, placed painlessly in the skin and left there from several seconds to almost an hour. AIDS patients who experience pain, coughing, weight loss, or gland inflammation respond well to acupuncture and herbal medications. The Chinese believe that people with sleeping problems or depression have a lack of equilibrium of the heart. An acupuncturist would treat the heart with points near the wrist and ear. This treatment also assists alcohol and drug addiction, improving health and reducing the desire for the drug. PMID:11363371

  6. Interaction and efficacy of Keigai-rengyo-to extract and acupuncture in male patients with acne vulgaris: A study protocol for a randomized controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In consideration of patients seeking to use traditional Chinese medicine, an evidence-based potentiality for safe and effective use of herbal medicine and acupuncture in treatment of acne vulgaris has been suggested. However, despite common use of a combination of herbal medicine and acupuncture in clinical practice, the current level of evidence is insufficient to draw a conclusion for an interaction and efficacy of herbal medicine and acupuncture. Therefore, considering these methodological flaws, this study was designed to assess the interaction and efficacy of an available herbal medicine, Keigai-rengyo-to extract (KRTE), and acupuncture for treatment of acne using the 2 × 2 factorial design and the feasibility of a large clinical trial. Methods/Design A randomized, assessor single blinded, 2 × 2 factorial pilot trial will be conducted. Forty four participants with acne vulgaris will be randomized into one of four groups: waiting list group (WL), KRTE only group (KO), acupuncture only group (AO), and KRTE and acupuncture combined treatment group (KA). After randomization, a total of 8 sessions of acupuncture treatment will be performed twice a week in the AO- and KA groups, respectively. Patients in the KO- and KA groups will be prescribed KRTE 3 times a day at a dose of 7.4 g after meals for 4 weeks. The following outcome measurements will be used in examination of subjects: the mean percentage change and the count change of inflammatory and non-inflammatory acne lesions, the Skindex 29, visual analogue scale (VAS) and investigator global assessment (IGA) from baseline to the end of the trial. Trial Registration The trial is registered with the Clinical Research Information Service (CRiS), Republic of Korea: KCT0000071. PMID:21418585

  7. Auricular acupuncture for primary care treatment of low back pain and posterior pelvic pain in pregnancy: study protocol for a multicentre randomised placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background About 45% of all pregnant women suffer low back pain and/or pelvic girdle pain (LBPGP). This study seeks to evaluate the effect of auricular acupuncture on LBPGP compared with placebo auricular acupuncture and with standard obstetric care in the field of primary health care. Methods and design This study will be a four-parallel-arm, multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled trial. A total of 212 pregnant women (24 to 36 weeks’ gestation), aged at least 17 years, with LBPGP, will be randomly assigned to the verum auricular acupuncture plus standard obstetric care group (VAAc), to the non-specific auricular acupuncture plus standard obstetric care group (NSAAc), to the non-specific placebo auricular acupuncture plus standard obstetric care group (PAAc), or the standard obstetric care group (SOC). The VAAc, NSAAc, and PAAc groups will receive treatment at three auricular acupuncture points (specific points for the VAAc group or non-specific ones for the NSAAc and PAAc groups), once a week for 2 weeks; the SOC group will receive only standard obstetric care during the same period. The primary outcome will be the reduction in pain intensity, according to the visual analogue scale (iVAS), at 2 weeks after the start of treatment. The secondary outcomes will be functional status with respect to LBPGP (according to the Roland-Morris disability questionnaire), health-related quality of life (SF12) at 2 weeks after the start of treatment, and iVAS at 12 and 48 weeks postpartum. Discussion This trial will implement a high-quality methodology and may provide evidence for the efficacy, safety, and specificity of auricular acupuncture as a treatment for pregnant women with LBPGP. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN41033073 (date 20/03/2014). PMID:25027493

  8. The Effectiveness of Individualized Acupuncture Protocols in the Treatment of Gulf War Illness: A Pragmatic Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Conboy, Lisa; Gerke, Travis; Hsu, Kai-Yin; St John, Meredith; Goldstein, Marc; Schnyer, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Background Gulf War Illness is a Complex Medical Illness characterized by multiple symptoms, including fatigue, sleep and mood disturbances, cognitive dysfunction, and musculoskeletal pain affecting veterans of the first Gulf War. No standard of care treatment exists. Methods This pragmatic Randomized Clinical Trial tested the effects of individualized acupuncture treatments offered in extant acupuncture practices in the community; practitioners had at least 5 years of experience plus additional training provided by the study. Veterans with diagnosed symptoms of Gulf War Illness were randomized to either six months of biweekly acupuncture treatments (group 1, n = 52) or 2 months of waitlist followed by weekly acupuncture treatments (group 2, n = 52). Measurements were taken at baseline, 2, 4 and 6 months. The primary outcome is the SF-36 physical component scale score (SF-36P) and the secondary outcome is the McGill Pain scale. Results Of the 104 subjects who underwent randomization, 85 completed the protocol (82%). A clinically and statistically significant average improvement of 9.4 points (p = 0.03) in the SF-36P was observed for group 1 at month 6 compared to group 2, adjusting for baseline pain. The secondary outcome of McGill pain index produced similar results; at 6 months, group 1 was estimated to experience a reduction of approximately 3.6 points (p = 0.04) compared to group 2. Conclusions Individualized acupuncture treatment of sufficient dose appears to offer significant relief of physical disability and pain for veterans with Gulf War Illness. This work was supported by the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs through the Gulf War Illness Research Program under Award No. W81XWH-09-2-0064. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions and recommendations are those of the author and are not necessarily endorsed by the Department of Defense. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01305811 PMID:27031099

  9. Patient education integrated with acupuncture for relief of cancer-related fatigue randomized controlled feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a prominent clinical problem. There are calls for multi-modal interventions. Methods We assessed the feasibility of delivering patient education integrated with acupuncture for relief of CRF in a pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) with breast cancer survivors using usual care as control. Social cognitive and integrative medicine theories guided integration of patient education with acupuncture into a coherent treatment protocol. The intervention consisted of two parts. First, patients were taught to improve self-care by optimizing exercise routines, improving nutrition, implementing some additional evidence-based cognitive behavioral techniques such as stress management in four weekly 50-minute sessions. Second, patients received eight weekly 50-minute acupuncture sessions. The pre-specified primary outcome, CRF, was assessed with the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI). Secondary outcomes included three dimensions of cognitive impairment assessed with the FACT-COGv2. Results Due to difficulties in recruitment, we tried several methods that led to the development of a tailored recruitment strategy: we enlisted oncologists into the core research team and recruited patients completing treatment from oncology waiting rooms. Compared to usual care control, the intervention was associated with a 2.38-point decline in fatigue as measured by the BFI (90% Confidence Interval from 0.586 to 5.014; p <0.10). Outcomes associated with cognitive dysfunction were not statistically significant. Conclusions Patient education integrated with acupuncture had a very promising effect that warrants conducting a larger RCT to confirm findings. An effective recruitment strategy will be essential for the successful execution of a larger-scale trial. Trial registration NCT00646633 PMID:21703001

  10. An innovative acupuncture treatment for primary dysmenorrhea: a randomized cross-over pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Christine M.; Abercrombie, Priscilla D.; Gomolak, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objective Dysmenorrhea is highly prevalent among adolescent women and a major cause of activity restriction. Standard pharmaceuticals used to treat dysmenorrhea are not effective for all women and have side effects that limit their use. Our study objective was to examine feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effects of acupuncture point injection of vitamin K1 as an alternative treatment for primary dysmenorrhea among US women. Methods/Design We conducted a pilot study using a crossover trial design. Women with primary dysmenorrhea were randomized to receive vitamin K1 injection in the Spleen-6 acupuncture point at the start of menstruation followed by saline in a non-acupuncture point after two months, or the reverse order of treatments. Setting/Participants The study was conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area among women 18 and 25 years of age diagnosed with primary dysmenorrhea; fourteen women completed all study visits. Primary Outcome Measure Dysmenorrhea pain intensity was measured using a 0–10 numeric rating scale before and after injections. Results Women had an average 2.5 point decrease in pain after vitamin K1 injection in Spleen-6 (p < 0.001) compared with a 1.8 point decrease after saline (p < 0.001). Change scores of vitamin K1 compared with saline injection approached statistical significance (p < 0.10). Intensity and duration of menstrual symptoms measured by the Cox Retrospective Symptom Score also decreased following injections. After participating, 94% would still agree to go through with the injection therapy and 77% reported they would come every month were the treatment available. Conclusions Findings suggest high acceptability of acupuncture point injection of vitamin K1 as treatment for primary dysmenorrhea among young women in San Francisco. Pain decreased with both treatments, with a trend toward greater pain reduction for vitamin K1/Spleen-6 injection. This is consistent with outcomes from the Obstetrics & Gynecology

  11. Effect of a single acupuncture treatment on surgical wound healing in dogs: a randomized, single blinded, controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of acupuncture on wound healing after soft tissue or orthopaedic surgery in dogs. Methods 29 dogs were submitted to soft tissue and/or orthopaedic surgeries. Five dogs had two surgical wounds each, so there were totally 34 wounds in the study. All owners received instructions for post operative care as well as antibiotic and pain treatment. The dogs were randomly assigned to treatment or control groups. Treated dogs received one dry needle acupuncture treatment right after surgery and the control group received no such treatment. A veterinary surgeon that was blinded to the treatment, evaluated the wounds at three and seven days after surgery in regard to oedema (scale 0-3), scabs (yes/no), exudate (yes/no), hematoma (yes/no), dermatitis (yes/no), and aspect of the wound (dry/humid). Results There was no significant difference between the treatment and control groups in the variables evaluated three and seven days after surgery. However, oedema reduced significantly in the group treated with acupuncture at seven days compared to three days after surgery, possibly due the fact that there was more oedema in the treatment group at day three (although this difference was nor significant between groups). Conclusions The use of a single acupuncture treatment right after surgery in dogs did not appear to have any beneficial effects in surgical wound healing. PMID:20950467

  12. Battlefield acupuncture: Opening the door for acupuncture in Department of Defense/Veteran's Administration health care.

    PubMed

    Walker, Patricia Hinton; Pock, Arnyce; Ling, Catherine G; Kwon, Kyung Nancy; Vaughan, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Battlefield acupuncture is a unique auricular acupuncture procedure which is being used in a number of military medical facilities throughout the Department of Defense (DoD). It has been used with anecdotal published positive impact with warriors experiencing polytrauma, post-traumatic stress disorder, and traumatic brain injury. It has also been effectively used to treat warriors with muscle and back pain from carrying heavy combat equipment in austere environments. This article highlights the history within the DoD related to the need for nonpharmacologic/opioid pain management across the continuum of care from combat situations, during evacuation, and throughout recovery and rehabilitation. The article describes the history of auricular acupuncture and details implementation procedures. Training is necessary and partially funded through DoD and Veteran's Administration (VA) internal Joint Incentive Funds grants between the DoD and the VA for multidisciplinary teams as part of a larger initiative related to the recommendations from the DoD Army Surgeon General's Pain Management Task Force. Finally, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences School of Medicine and Graduate School of Nursing faculty members present how this interdisciplinary training is currently being integrated into both schools for physicians and advanced practice nurses at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Current and future research challenges and progress related to the use of acupuncture are also presented. PMID:27601311

  13. Memory-emotional interactions as revealed by fear generalization in animal-fearful individuals.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Bruno; Schlimm, Mike; Hermann, Christiane

    2005-06-01

    Discriminative fear learning and fear generalization were examined in animal-fearful individuals and in control participants. Electrical shocks were administered contingent upon discriminative pictures of spiders or snakes, respectively, in a generalization-after-discrimination paradigm. Neither discriminative fear learning nor extinction was affected by the individual fear status of the animal categories. Novel feared stimuli, which resembled discriminative stimuli, were treated as more shock predictive than novel non-feared stimuli during generalization testing. Neither preparedness theory nor selective sensitization theory was capable to account for these observations. The findings are commensurable with the hypothesis that phobic fear interferes with the retrieval of memory traces. PMID:15814082

  14. The Brain Circuitry Mediating Antipruritic Effects of Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Napadow, Vitaly; Li, Ang; Loggia, Marco L.; Kim, Jieun; Schalock, Peter C.; Lerner, Ethan; Tran, Thanh-Nga; Ring, Johannes; Rosen, Bruce R.; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Pfab, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Itch is an aversive sensory experience and while systemic therapies, such as acupuncture, have shown promise in alleviating itch in patients suffering from chronic itch, their antipruritic mechanisms are unknown. As several lines of evidence implicate brain-focused mechanisms, we applied functional magnetic resonance imaging and our validated temperature-modulation itch model to evaluate the underlying brain circuitry supporting allergen-induced itch reduction in atopic dermatitis patients by acupuncture, antihistamine, and respective placebo treatments. Brain response to allergen itch demonstrated phase dependency. During an increasing itch phase, activation was localized in anterior insula and striatum, regions associated with salience/interoception and motivation processing. Once itch reached peak plateau, robust activation was noted in prefrontal cognitive and premotor areas. Acupuncture reduced itch and itch-evoked activation in the insula, putamen, and premotor and prefrontal cortical areas. Neither itch sensation nor itch-evoked brain response was altered following antihistamine or placebo acupuncture. Greater itch reduction following acupuncture was associated with greater reduction in putamen response, a region implicated in motivation and habitual behavior underlying the urge to scratch, specifically implicating this region in acupuncture's antipruritic effects. Understanding brain circuitry underlying itch reduction following acupuncture and related neuromodulatory therapies will significantly impact the development and applicability of novel therapies to reduce an itch. PMID:23222890

  15. A Modern Clinical Approach of the Traditional Korean Saam Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Park, Manyong; Kim, Sungchul

    2015-01-01

    Saam acupuncture is one of the original therapeutic modalities representing traditional Korean medicine. It was originally described in a manuscript that is estimated to be published at some point between 1644 and 1742, in the middle of the Cho Sun dynasty, by a Korean Buddhist monk whose name is unknown. The principle of combining five shu points is based on the theory of Nan-jing. The treatment and diagnosis concepts in Saam acupuncture were mainly influenced by Dongeuibogam and Chimgoogyeong-heombang. The basic characteristic of combining five shu points in Saam acupuncture is the selection of the tonification and sedation points along the self-meridian and other meridians based on creation and governor relationships. Saam acupuncture clinical studies have mainly focused on musculoskeletal pain and autonomic nervous system regulation. From a neurophysiological perspective, Saam acupuncture, which involves five shu points as the main treatment aspect, has the advantage of increasing parasympathetic nerve activation and adjusting the balance of the autonomic nervous system. Inserting a needle into the skin layer while considering the respiratory phase and stimulating the needle gently and lightly could maximize the effect of Saam acupuncture. The specific Saam acupuncture prescribed should be identified on the basis of the neurobiological perspective. PMID:26539231

  16. Was acupuncture developed by Han Dynasty Chinese anatomists?

    PubMed

    Shaw, Vivien; Mclennan, Amy K

    2016-05-01

    Anatomical dissection has begun to reveal striking similarities between gross anatomical structures and the system of nomenclature used in traditional Chinese acupuncture. This paper argues that acupuncture point nomenclature is rooted in systematic anatomical investigation of cadaveric specimens, and that acupuncture points and meridians are purposefully named to reflect observable physical form. Two types of evidence are compared: observations of physical structures based on anatomical dissection, and translation and analysis of original Chinese texts. Evidence is contextualized through in-depth practical understanding of acupuncture. Points designated as tian (heavenly/superior), xia (below/inferior), liao (bone-hole), fei (flying), wei (bend), and xi (mountain stream/ravine) are investigated. These acupuncture point names: (a) specify position; (b) reflect function and/or form; (c) indicate homologous structures; (d) mark unusual structures; and/or (e) describe the physical appearance of a deep (dissected) structure by likening it to a homologous everyday object. Results raise intriguing possibilities for developing an understanding of acupuncture points and meridians firmly based in the material and functional anatomy of the human body. Such an understanding has the potential to open new fields of thought about functional anatomy. It also has implications for future investigations into the mechanisms of acupuncture, and gives some insights into the possible origins of this iconic area of Chinese medicine. Anat Rec, 299:643-659, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26861920

  17. Acupuncture for Low Back Pain: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lizhou; Skinner, Margot; McDonough, Suzanne; Mabire, Leon; Baxter, George David

    2015-01-01

    Objective. As evidence of the effectiveness of acupuncture for low back pain (LBP) is inconsistent, we aimed to critically appraise the evidence from relevant systematic reviews. Methods. Systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) concerning acupuncture and LBP were searched in seven databases. Internal validity and external validity of systematic reviews were assessed. Systematic reviews were categorized and high quality reviews assigned greater weightings. Conclusions were generated from a narrative synthesis of the outcomes of subgroup comparisons. Results. Sixteen systematic reviews were appraised. Overall, the methodological quality was low and external validity weak. For acute LBP, evidence that acupuncture has a more favorable effect than sham acupuncture in relieving pain was inconsistent; it had a similar effect on improving function. For chronic LBP, evidence consistently demonstrated that acupuncture provides short-term clinically relevant benefits for pain relief and functional improvement compared with no treatment or acupuncture plus another conventional intervention. Conclusion. Systematic reviews of variable quality showed that acupuncture, either used in isolation or as an adjunct to conventional therapy, provides short-term improvements in pain and function for chronic LBP. More efforts are needed to improve both internal and external validity of systematic reviews and RCTs in this area. PMID:25821485

  18. Visualized Characterization for Cerebral Response of Acupuncture Deqi: Paradox Underway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming-Xiao; Zeng, Fang; Wu, Xi; Chen, Jiao; Liu, Yan-Qin; Feng, Yue; Liang, Fan-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture as an oriental natural healing therapy with prolonged history has been extensively utilized in the management of great numbers of disorders. Deqi, a renowned acupuncture needling sensation, is profoundly regarded as the predictor and also the prerequisite of a preferable acupuncture treatment efficacy. Till now, there is still no consistency being reached towards the mechanism of acupuncture Deqi as a result of the discrepancy for publicly acknowledged evidence. Recent visualized research on Deqi using modern technologies has demonstrated possible central mechanism towards it. However, there is a conspicuous paradox underway in the research of cerebral response to acupuncture Deqi. This paper provided a view of up-to-date studies using visualized tools to characterize the brain response to acupuncture Deqi, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). The paradox was extruded to highlight certain reasons from a TCM view. It is hypothesized that acupoints located at different dermal sites, state of participant, and needling manipulation can all contribute to the current paradox. Hence, further studies on acupuncture Deqi should pay more attention to the strategy of experiment design with generalized measurement, valid sham control methods, and more to subjects in diseased condition. PMID:23935686

  19. A Modern Clinical Approach of the Traditional Korean Saam Acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Park, Manyong; Kim, Sungchul

    2015-01-01

    Saam acupuncture is one of the original therapeutic modalities representing traditional Korean medicine. It was originally described in a manuscript that is estimated to be published at some point between 1644 and 1742, in the middle of the Cho Sun dynasty, by a Korean Buddhist monk whose name is unknown. The principle of combining five shu points is based on the theory of Nan-jing. The treatment and diagnosis concepts in Saam acupuncture were mainly influenced by Dongeuibogam and Chimgoogyeong-heombang. The basic characteristic of combining five shu points in Saam acupuncture is the selection of the tonification and sedation points along the self-meridian and other meridians based on creation and governor relationships. Saam acupuncture clinical studies have mainly focused on musculoskeletal pain and autonomic nervous system regulation. From a neurophysiological perspective, Saam acupuncture, which involves five shu points as the main treatment aspect, has the advantage of increasing parasympathetic nerve activation and adjusting the balance of the autonomic nervous system. Inserting a needle into the skin layer while considering the respiratory phase and stimulating the needle gently and lightly could maximize the effect of Saam acupuncture. The specific Saam acupuncture prescribed should be identified on the basis of the neurobiological perspective. PMID:26539231

  20. Fear of heights in infants?

    PubMed Central

    Adolph, Karen E.; Kretch, Kari S.; LoBue, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Based largely on the famous “visual cliff” paradigm, conventional wisdom is that crawling infants avoid crossing the brink of a dangerous drop-off because they are afraid of heights. However, recent research suggests that the conventional wisdom is wrong. Avoidance and fear are conflated, and there is no compelling evidence to support fear of heights in human infants. Infants avoid crawling or walking over an impossibly high drop-off because they perceive affordances for locomotion—the relations between their own bodies and skills and the relevant properties of the environment that make an action such as descent possible or impossible. PMID:25267874

  1. [Story life CHENG Dan-an's, works and his achievements on acupuncture and moxibustion science].

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiang; Cai, Yue

    2011-05-01

    Mr. CHENG Dan-an, who devoted himself to the renaissance of the course of modern Chinese acupuncture, the establishment of acupuncture education unit, correspondence education, acupuncture personnel fostering and publication of periodicals on acupuncture, has great contribution to the academic exchanges and popularization of acupuncture. Mr. CHENG has completed over 10 articles and more than 20 works and translations. According to him, mechanism on meridians, collaterals, acupoints and acupuncture techniques were explored with the promotion on application of "Shen" and "qi" in clinic. Pulse and tongue diagnosis as well as acupuncture treatment were supplemented into Shanghanlun (Treatise on Febrile Diseases). And great importance was attached on the scientific validity and practicability. His professional ethics and dedication are worth to be learned by all medical workers nowadays. His acupuncture theories and academic achievements still inspire us today, which are also taken as the origin for the innovation and development of modern acupuncture science. PMID:21692305

  2. The Fear of Art and the Art of Fear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Stephanie A.

    2012-01-01

    Prospective teachers often walk into my course, Arts in the Elementary Classroom, carrying a guarded consciousness that constrains unencumbered artistic exploration. My responsibility as their instructor is to question mantras that reflect insecurity in process and make pedagogical use of their fears. Through studying the nature of these fears…

  3. Elites and Panic: More to Fear than Fear Itself

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Lee; Chess, Caron

    2008-01-01

    Attributions of panic are almost exclusively directed at members of the general public. Here, we inquire into the relationships between elites and panic. We review current research and theorizing about panic, including problems of identifying when it has occurred. We propose three relationships: elites fearing panic, elites causing panic and…

  4. Counterconditioned Fear Responses Exhibit Greater Renewal than Extinguished Fear Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Nathan M.; Leung, Hiu T.; Westbrook, R. Frederick

    2016-01-01

    This series of experiments used rats to compare counterconditioning and extinction of conditioned fear responses (freezing) with respect to the effects of a context shift. In each experiment, a stimulus was paired with shock in context A, extinguished or counterconditioned through pairings with sucrose in context B, and then tested for renewal…

  5. Appraisal of dental anxiety and fear questionnaires: a review.

    PubMed

    Schuurs, A H; Hoogstraten, J

    1993-12-01

    This article reviews and assesses six dental anxiety and fear questionnaires. The construct aimed at by the questionnaires, the data collected, their reliability, validity and normative scores are considered. Some attention is given to the correlations between the questionnaires, their ambiguity, the presence of manuals, and whether the questionnaires tap the three segments distinguishable on theoretical ground in dental anxiety/fear. All questionnaires are open to criticism. In the final assessment Kleinknecht's Dental Fear Survey is preferred to Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale. The latter, however, appears useful in getting a quick impression of anxiety and in evaluative studies. Three recently developed questionnaires, Stouthard's Dental Anxiety Inventory, Weiner's Fear Questionnaire and Morin's Adolescents' Fear of Dental Treatment Cognitive Inventory are considered promising, but for the last two instruments more data, in particular with regard to their validity, are needed. It is concluded that in dental anxiety research more than one questionnaire should be used and that it may be worthwhile to include other, non-anxiety questionnaires as well. PMID:8306609

  6. Examining Race/Ethnicity and Fears of Children and Adolescents in the United States: Differences between White, African American, and Hispanic Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnham, Joy J.; Lomax, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    The American Fear Survey Schedule for Children (FSSC-AM; J. J. Burnham, 1995, 2005) has been used to measure fears of children and adolescents. The FSSC-AM is based on the 2nd revision of a psychometrically sound and well-known fear scale (i.e., FSSC-II; E. Gullone & N. J. King, 1992). In this study, age and gender differences, fear intensity…

  7. Provision of auricular acupuncture and acupressure in a university setting.

    PubMed

    Oyola-Santiago, Tamara; Knopf, Rachel; Robin, Tracy; Harvey, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Auricular acupuncture using the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) protocol stimulates 5 points in each ear--the Shen Men, sympathetic nervous system, liver, kidney, and lung. This protocol is also known as Acu Detox, and has been used for recovery in community-based settings and drug use treatment programs. It has also been proven to be effective in alleviating stress and enhancing a general sense of well-being. This article describes the auricular acupuncture and acupressure program developed for a university setting and its use as a tool to enhance harm reduction and mental health services. PMID:24010498

  8. Research on relation between cortical functional section and acupuncture point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuwang; Li, Chunhua; Liang, Guozhuang; Wang, Shuhai

    2008-02-01

    The application of the infrared imaging using in the brain cognition and the acupuncture is introduced. Acupuncturing a certain point of the healthy experimental cats, observing the responds of the cerebral cortical temperature by using of infrared imaging, and researching the corresponding relation between the acupuncture points with the active sections of the cerebral cortex, so the effect of the acupuncture is obtained. The theory of the refreshment and induce resuscitation pinprick is approved. The method of the "refreshment and induce resuscitation pinprick" can promote the metabolize renovation, improve the living function and increase the healing rate. However, the relations between the points and the cortical functional sections have not the last word still. After removing the skulls on the head, full of the cerebral cortex of a cat are exposed. Observing the infrared imaging and measuring the temperatures of the visual cerebral cortex during the process of acupuncturing the points to judge the activation position. During the process of acupuncture, the trend of the rising temperature on cerebral cortex is primary in terms of the phenomena in the infrared pictures. The cortical hemogram variety is measured in terms of the infrared pictures and the temperature values, so the characteristic curve of the temperature for a corresponding position on the cerebral cortex and the acupuncture point can be obtained. When the acupuncture point is changed, the position where temperature varied on cerebral cortex is different correspondingly. The variety in the cortical functional sections is corresponding to the result of the acupuncture point in terms of the imaging and the temperatures. The experimental results accord with the theoretic model, so they validate the correctness of the "refreshment and induce resuscitation pinprick". According to the experimental results, we know that the variety of a cortical functional section is corresponding to a special acupuncture

  9. [Application of the word Bentai in acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin

    2015-11-01

    By retrieval and analysis of literature, the origin and connotation of the word Bentai were stated. In the early twentieth century, one Japanese scholar introduced the word into acupuncture-moxibustion. It was mostly used to explore the mechanism of acupuncture-moxibustion and acupoints through scientific research. One Chinese scholar introduced the connotation into acupuncture and moxibustion in 1940, and it was mainly expressed the essence. Professor ZHU Bing systematically discussed Bentai of acupoints from a scientific point of view. The knowledge of acupoints, however, is diverse, and there is different cognition due to multiple perspectives. Acupoints may not have unique Bentai. PMID:26939346

  10. The Fragrant Power of Collective Fear

    PubMed Central

    Harb, Roa; Taulor, Jane R.

    2015-01-01

    Fear is a well-characterized biological response to threatening or stressful situations in humans and other social animals. Importantly, fearful stimuli in the natural environment are likely to be encountered concurrently by a group of animals. The modulation of fear acquisition and fear memory by a group as opposed to an individual experience, however, remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate a robust reduction in fear memory to an aversive event undertaken in a group despite similar fear learning between individually- and group-conditioned rats. This reduction persists outside the group confines, appears to be a direct outcome of group cognizance and is counteracted by loss of olfactory signaling among the group members. These results show that a group experience of fear can be protective and suggest that distinct neural pathways from those classically studied in individuals modulate collective fear memories. PMID:25945800

  11. Blindness Biggest Fear for Many Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160254.html Blindness Biggest Fear for Many Americans Losing vision would ... 4, 2016 THURSDAY, Aug. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Blindness is what many Americans fear most, a new ...

  12. The fragrant power of collective fear.

    PubMed

    Harb, Roa; Taylor, Jane R; Taulor, Jane R

    2015-01-01

    Fear is a well-characterized biological response to threatening or stressful situations in humans and other social animals. Importantly, fearful stimuli in the natural environment are likely to be encountered concurrently by a group of animals. The modulation of fear acquisition and fear memory by a group as opposed to an individual experience, however, remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate a robust reduction in fear memory to an aversive event undertaken in a group despite similar fear learning between individually- and group-conditioned rats. This reduction persists outside the group confines, appears to be a direct outcome of group cognizance and is counteracted by loss of olfactory signaling among the group members. These results show that a group experience of fear can be protective and suggest that distinct neural pathways from those classically studied in individuals modulate collective fear memories. PMID:25945800

  13. Traditional Chinese Acupuncture and Placebo (Sham) Acupuncture Are Differentiated by Their Effects on μ-Opioid Receptors (MORs)

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Richard E.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Scott, David J.; Napadow, Vitaly; Gracely, Richard H.; Clauw, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    Controversy remains regarding the mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia. A prevailing theory, largely unproven in humans, is that it involves the activation of endogenous opioid antinociceptive systems and μ-opioid receptors (MORs). This is also a neurotransmitter system that mediates the effects of placebo-induced analgesia. This overlap in potential mechanisms may explain the lack of differentiation between traditional acupuncture and either non-traditional or sham acupuncture in multiple controlled clinical trials. We compared both short- and long-term effects of traditional Chinese acupuncture (TA) versus sham acupuncture (SA) treatment on in vivo MOR binding availability in chronic pain patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia (FM). Patients were randomized to receive either TA or SA treatment over the course of four weeks. Positron emission tomography (PET) with 11C-carfentanil was performed once during the first treatment session and then repeated a month later following the eighth treatment. Acupuncture therapy evoked short-term increases in MOR binding potential, in multiple pain and sensory processing regions including the cingulate (dorsal and subgenual), insula, caudate, thalamus, and amygdala. Acupuncture therapy also evoked long-term increases in MOR binding potential in some of the same structures including the cingulate (dorsal and perigenual), caudate, and amygdala. These short- and long-term effects were absent in the sham group where small reductions were observed, an effect more consistent with previous placebo PET studies. Long-term increases in MOR BP following TA were also associated with greater reductions in clinical pain. These findings suggest that divergent MOR processes may mediate clinically relevant analgesic effects for acupuncture and sham acupuncture. PMID:19501658

  14. Do Men Really Fear Nurturing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakemore, Judith E. O.; And Others

    Despite recent research showing men capable of nurturing behavior, most men remain reluctant to care for children. Some researchers have suggested that men are fearful of nurturing as a result of traditional sex role socialization while others have suggested an increased role of external factors in explaining the lack of men in child care (pay,…

  15. [Professor He Pu-ren: the founder of Santong method of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-peng; Xie, Xin-cai; He, Chang; Cheng, Hai-ying; Xu, Chun-yang; Wang, Jing-xi; Zhang, Xin-yue; Wang, Gui-ling; He, Xiao-jing

    2009-02-01

    Professor He Pu-ren, the founder of Santong method of acupuncture and moxibustion, is a well known acupuncturist at home and abroad. His main contributions include combined martial arts and Chinese medicine, showing obvious therapeutic effect; taking part in establishment of The Department of Acupuncture, Beijing Chinese Medicine Hospital; creating Santong method of acupuncture and moxibustion; advocating fire needle therapy; writing medical books and teaching students; advocating the culture of acupuncture; making the metal model of acupuncture and moxibustion, and others. His achievements have become an important part of acupuncture and moxibustion science. PMID:19391541

  16. Acupuncture and physical exercise for affective symptoms and health-related quality of life in polycystic ovary syndrome: secondary analysis from a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have symptoms of depression and anxiety and impaired health related quality of life (HRQoL). Here we test the post-hoc hypothesis that acupuncture and exercise improve depression and anxiety symptoms and HRQoL in PCOS women. Methods Seventy-two PCOS women were randomly assigned to 16 weeks of 1) acupuncture (n = 28); 2) exercise (n = 29); or 3) no intervention (control) (n = 15). Outcome measures included: change in Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-S), Brief Scale for Anxiety (BSA-S), Swedish Short-Form 36 (SF-36), and PCOS Questionnaire (PCOSQ) scores from baseline to after 16-week intervention, and to 16-week post-intervention follow-up. Results A reduction in MADRS-S and BSA-S from baseline to 16-weeks post-intervention follow-up was observed for the acupuncture group. The SF-36 domains role physical, energy/vitality, general health perception and the mental component of summary scores improved in the acupuncture group after intervention and at follow-up. Within the exercise group the role physical decreased after treatment, while physical functioning and general health perception scores increased at follow-up. The emotion domain in the PCOSQ improved after 16-weeks of intervention within all three groups, and at follow-up in acupuncture and exercise groups. At follow-up, improvement in the infertility domain was observed within the exercise group. Conclusion There was a modest improvement in depression and anxiety scores in women treated with acupuncture, and improved HRQoL scores were noted in both intervention groups. While not a primary focus of the trial, these data suggest continued investigation of mental health outcomes in women treated for PCOS. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00484705 PMID:23763822

  17. Promoting positive motherhood among nulliparous pregnant women with an intense fear of childbirth: RCT intervention.

    PubMed

    Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Read, Sanna; Rouhe, Hanna; Halmesmäki, Erja; Toivanen, Riikka Maria; Tokola, Maiju Ilona; Saisto, Terhi

    2012-05-01

    This RCT intervention among nulliparous pregnant women with an intense fear of childbirth sought to promote preparedness for childbirth and to enhance positive parenting. Pregnant women (n = 8,611) filled in a 'fear of childbirth' questionnaire. Nulliparous women with severe fear of childbirth (n = 355) were randomized into intervention (n = 131; 41 refused) and control (n = 224) groups. They rated themselves on a preparedness scale in middle and late pregnancy, and on a motherhood scale three months after childbirth. The intervention included six psycho-education group sessions during pregnancy and one after childbirth. This intervention increased the mothers' preparedness for childbirth, which predicted an increase in positive motherhood. PMID:21963681

  18. 33 CFR 165.530 - Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC. 165.530 Section 165.530 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.530 Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC. (a) Location. The following area...

  19. 33 CFR 165.530 - Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC. 165.530 Section 165.530 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.530 Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC. (a) Location. The following area...

  20. 33 CFR 165.530 - Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC. 165.530 Section 165.530 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.530 Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC. (a) Location. The following area...

  1. 33 CFR 165.530 - Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC. 165.530 Section 165.530 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.530 Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC. (a) Location. The following area...

  2. 33 CFR 165.530 - Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC. 165.530 Section 165.530 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.530 Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC. (a) Location. The following area...

  3. Different Mechanisms of Fear Extinction Dependent on Length of Time since Fear Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Michael; Myers, Karyn M.; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2006-01-01

    Fear extinction is defined as a decline in conditioned fear responses (CRs) following nonreinforced exposure to a feared conditioned stimulus (CS). Behavioral evidence indicates that extinction is a form of inhibitory learning: Extinguished fear responses reappear with the passage of time (spontaneous recovery), a shift of context (renewal), and…

  4. Fears of American Children Following Terrorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnham, Joy J.; Hooper, Lisa M.

    2008-01-01

    Two months after 9/11, the fears of children and adolescents in Grades 2-12 were examined utilizing the American Fear Survey Schedule for Children and Adolescents (FSSC-AM). Fear intensity scores and age and gender differences are reported. Terrorist-related content on the FSSC-AM (e.g., terrorist attacks, our country being invading by enemies)…

  5. Gun Attitudes and Fear of Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Linda; Weeks, Kyle; Murphy, Marie Mackay

    1997-01-01

    Using three studies, examined the relationship between attitudes toward guns and fear of crime. Findings indicate a connection between fear of crime and attitudes toward guns: people higher in fear of crime favored gun control. Results also established a relationship between stereotypical beliefs about gun victims and support for gun control. (RJM)

  6. Women's Fear of Crime: A Rural Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Jo; Panelli, Ruth; Kraack, Anna

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines women's experience of fear of crime in rural areas. It argues that much existing research on issues of gender, fear and safety have focused on urban areas and that as a result we know relatively little about women's experience of fear in a rural context. As well as arguing that we need to redress the balance and respond to the…

  7. 75 FR 7312 - No FEAR Act Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ... No FEAR Act Notice Summary: 5 CFR part 724.202 requires that each Federal agency provide notice to... notice in the Federal Register. No FEAR Act Notice On May 15, 2002, Congress enacted the Notification and Federal Employee Antidiscrimination and Retaliation Act of 2002, which is now known as the No FEAR...

  8. 76 FR 14439 - No FEAR Act Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... TRANSPARENCY BOARD No FEAR Act Notice AGENCY: Recovery Accountability and Transparency Board. ACTION: Notice... and Retaliation Act (No FEAR Act or Act), as implemented by Office of Personnel Management (OPM... No FEAR Act. See Public Law 107-174, codified at 5 U.S.C. 2301 note. One purpose of the Act is...

  9. Preschool Fears: Longitudinal Sequence and Cohort Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Thomas W.; James, Rebecca Smoak

    1985-01-01

    Using longitudinal data gathered between 1966 and 1981, parent-reported fears of 49 university preschool children were examined with particular attention given to age changes and sex differences. Categories of types of fears reported by Jersild and Holmes (1933) determined a substantial increase in preschool children's fears of the dark, being…

  10. Teasing apart quality and validity in systematic reviews: an example from acupuncture trials in chronic neck and back pain.

    PubMed

    Smith, L A; Oldman, A D; McQuay, H J; Moore, R A

    2000-05-01

    The objectives of the study were (1) to carry out a systematic review to assess the analgesic efficacy and the adverse effects of acupuncture compared with placebo for back and neck pain and (2) to develop a new tool, the Oxford Pain Validity Scale (OPVS), to measure validity of findings from randomized controlled trials (RCTs), and to enable ranking of trial findings according to validity within qualitative reviews. Published RCTs (of acupuncture at both traditional and non-traditional points) were identified from systematic searching of bibliographic databases (e.g. MEDLINE) and reference lists of retrieved reports. Pain outcome data were extracted with preference given to standardized outcomes such as pain intensity. Information on adverse effects was also extracted. All included trials were scored using a five-item 0-16 point validity scale (OPVS). The individual RCTs were ranked according to their OPVS score to enable more weight to be placed on the trials of greater validity when drawing an overall conclusion about the efficacy of acupuncture for relieving neck and back pain. Statistical analyses were carried out on the OPVS scores to assess the relationship between trial finding (positive or negative) and validity. Thirteen RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Five trials concluded that acupuncture was effective, and eight concluded that it was not effective for relieving back or neck pain. There was no obvious difference between the findings of trials using traditional and non-traditional points. Using the new OPVS scale, the validity scores of the included trials ranged from 4 to 14. There was no significant relationship between OPVS score and trial finding (positive versus negative). Authors' conclusions did not always agree with their data. We drew our own conclusions (positive/negative) based on the data presented in the reports. Re-analysis using our conclusions showed a significant relationship between OPVS score and trial finding, with higher validity

  11. Electronic publishing and Acupuncture in Medicine.

    PubMed

    White, Adrian

    2006-09-01

    The internet has fundamentally altered scientific publishing; this article discusses current models and how they affect this journal. The greatest innovation is a new range of open access journals published only on the internet, aimed at rapid publication and universal access. In most cases authors pay a publication charge for the overhead costs of the journal. Journals that are published by professional organisations primarily for their members have some functions other than publishing research, including clinical articles, conference reports and news items. A small number of these journals are permitting open access to their research reports. Commercial science publishing still exists, where profit for shareholders provides motivation in addition to the desire to spread knowledge for the benefit of all. A range of electronic databases now exists that offer various levels of listing and searching. Some databases provide direct links to journal articles, such as the LinkOut scheme in PubMed. Acupuncture in Medicine will continue to publish in paper format; all research articles will be available on open access, but non-subscribers will need to pay for certain other articles for the first 12 months after publication. All Acupuncture in Medicine articles will in future be included in the LinkOut scheme, and be presented to the databases electronically. PMID:17013359

  12. Beliefs underlying pain-related fear and how they evolve: a qualitative investigation in people with chronic back pain and high pain-related fear

    PubMed Central

    Bunzli, Samantha; Smith, Anne; Schütze, Robert; O'Sullivan, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The fear-avoidance model describes how the belief that pain is a sign of damage leads to pain-related fear and avoidance. But other beliefs may also trigger the fear and avoidance responses described by the model. Experts have called for the next generation of fear avoidance research to explore what beliefs underlie pain-related fear and how they evolve. We have previously described damage beliefs and suffering/functional loss beliefs underlying high pain-related fear in a sample of individuals with chronic back pain. The aim of this study is to identify common and differential factors associated with the beliefs in this sample. Design A qualitative study employing semistructured interviews. Setting Musculoskeletal clinics in Western Australia. Participants 36 individuals with chronic back pain and high scores on the Tampa Scale (mean 47/68). Results The overarching theme was a pain experience that did not make sense to the participants. The experience of pain as unpredictable, uncontrollable and intense made it threatening. Attempting to make sense of the threatening pain, participants with damage beliefs drew on past personal experiences of pain, societal beliefs, and sought diagnostic certainty. Met with diagnostic uncertainty, or diagnoses of an underlying pathology that could not be fixed, they were left fearful of damage and confused about how to ‘fix’ it. Participants with suffering/functional loss beliefs drew on past personal experiences of pain and sought help from healthcare professionals to control their pain. Failed treatments and the repeated failure to achieve functional goals left them unable to make ‘sensible’ decisions of what to do about their pain. Conclusions The findings raise the suggestion that sense-making processes may be implicated in the fear-avoidance model. Future research is needed to explore whether fear reduction may be enhanced by considering beliefs underlying fear and providing targeted intervention to help

  13. Holistic medicine not "torture": performing acupuncture in Galway, Ireland.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kevin Taylor

    2010-07-01

    This article examines how the aesthetic design of clinics and interactive discourse and rituals construct the social reality of acupuncture sessions as a form of holistic medical therapy. Verbal and nonverbal interactions create an appealing medical environment but also help prevent the emergence of undesired counter-realities (e.g., pain, biomedical intervention). Based on observations of acupuncture sessions conducted in Galway, Ireland, I illustrate how ambiance and aesthetic elements of clinics create a complex medico-cultural environment that balances oppositional associations (Western/non-Western, exoticism/convention, medical alterity/medical professionalism). Patients interviewed continually referred to acupuncture as a natural and non-invasive form of medical treatment. This suggests that interpersonal discourse and aesthetic design play key roles in how patients define acupuncture treatment, and that these ephemeral agents may also influence how patients come to define efficacy. PMID:20694891

  14. [Single-acupoint electroacupuncture based on traditional acupuncture becomes true].

    PubMed

    Liu, Tang-Yi; Yang, Hua-Yuan; Gao, Ming; Xu, Gang; Tang, Wen-Chao

    2010-10-01

    [ In current clinical acupuncture practice, many exiting problems including changes in the treated region, simultaneous covering two meridians of the two stimulating electrodes (acupuncture needles), inability to realize the reinforcing-reducing functions of the traditional acupuncture, etc. during application of electroacupuncture (EA) could be found, which may affect the therapeutic results or lead to failure in playing EA's functions. For this reason, the authors of the present paper put forward a concept of "single acupoint EA". Base on the design of "double electrodes of two acupuncture needles" of the conventional EA therapeutic apparatus, a "single acupoint EA therapy" was put forward and a single acupoint EA electronic apparatus (stimulating needle electrode) was manufactured. It not only realizes single acupoint stimulation, but also corresponds to the features of traditional EA therapy, avoiding some problems in currently-used EA therapy. It may be helpful to raising clinical therapeutic effect. PMID:21235069

  15. The systems, holograms and theory of micro-acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Dale, R A

    1999-01-01

    Although acupuncture has been practiced for more than 5,000 years, micro-acupuncture is a recent concept. In the mid-1950s, Nogier discovered that the ear may be utilized as a diagnostic and therapeutic system for the entire body. He explored the topology of acupoints on the ear, observing that it is reiterative of the anatomy. Micro-acupuncture extends these principles to other parts of the body, for example, the foot, hand, nose, and even the orbit of the eye. The development, systems, theory, clinical uses and holograms of micro-acupuncture are reviewed. It is suggested that the holographic paradigm may even have implications for the evolution of a new scientific, social and personal consciousness. PMID:10729973

  16. Acupuncture for episodic cluster headache: a trigeminal approach.

    PubMed

    Hayhoe, Simon

    2016-02-01

    Following evidence that acupuncture is clinically feasible and cost-effective in the treatment of headache, the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommends acupuncture as prophylactic treatment for migraine and tension headache. There has thus been expectation that other forms of headache should benefit also. Unfortunately, acupuncture has not generally been successful for cluster headache. This may be due to acupuncturists approaching the problem as one of severe migraine. In fact, cluster headache is classed as a trigeminal autonomic cephalgia. In this case report, episodic cluster headache is treated in the same way as has been shown effective for trigeminal neuralgia. Acupuncture is applied to the contralateral side at points appropriate for stimulating branches of the trigeminal nerve. Thus, ST2 is used for the infraorbital nerve, BL2 and Yuyao for the supratrochlear and supraorbital nerves, and Taiyang for the temporal branch of the zygomatic nerve. PMID:26846705

  17. National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diplomates Diplomates Home Diplomate Benefits Recertification PDA Search Engine State Licensure Consumers Consumers Home Diplomate of Acupuncture ... Asked Questions PDA Program PDA Home PDA Search Engine State Licensure Info Regulatory Affairs State Licensure Requirements ...

  18. The modulation of brain functional connectivity with manual acupuncture in healthy subjects: An electroencephalograph case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Han, Chun-Xiao; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xi-Le; Li, Nuo

    2013-02-01

    Manual acupuncture is widely used for pain relief and stress control. Previous studies on acupuncture have shown its modulatory effects on the functional connectivity associated with one or a few preselected brain regions. To investigate how manual acupuncture modulates the organization of functional networks at a whole-brain level, we acupuncture at ST36 of a right leg to obtain electroencephalograph (EEG) signals. By coherence estimation, we determine the synchronizations between all pairwise combinations of EEG channels in three acupuncture states. The resulting synchronization matrices are converted into functional networks by applying a threshold, and the clustering coefficients and path lengths are computed as a function of threshold. The results show that acupuncture can increase functional connections and synchronizations between different brain areas. For a wide range of thresholds, the clustering coefficient during acupuncture and post-acupuncture period is higher than that during the pre-acupuncture control period, whereas the characteristic path length is shorter. We provide further support for the presence of “small-world" network characteristics in functional networks by using acupuncture. These preliminary results highlight the beneficial modulations of functional connectivity by manual acupuncture, which could contribute to the understanding of the effects of acupuncture on the entire brain, as well as the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying acupuncture. Moreover, the proposed method may be a useful approach to the further investigation of the complexity of patterns of interrelations between EEG channels.

  19. Recognizing Student Fear: The Elephant in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bledsoe, T. Scott; Baskin, Janice J.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding fear, its causes, and its impact on students can be important for educators who seek ways to help students manage their fears. This paper explores common types of student fears such as performance-based anxiety, fear of failure, fear of being laughed at, and cultural components of fear that impact learning. The cognitive, emotional,…

  20. Acupuncture for ankle sprain: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ankle sprain is one of the most frequently encountered musculoskeletal injuries; however, the efficacy of acupuncture in treating ankle sprains remains uncertain. We therefore performed a systematic review to evaluate the evidence regarding acupuncture for ankle sprains. Methods We searched 15 data sources and two trial registries up to February 2012. Randomized controlled trials of acupuncture were included if they involved patients with ankle sprains and reported outcomes of symptom improvement, including pain. A Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool was used. Risk ratio (RR) or mean difference (MD) was calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in a random effects model. Subgroup analyses were performed based on acupuncture type, grade of sprain, and control type. Sensitivity analyses were also performed with respect to risk of bias, sample size, and outcomes reported. Results Seventeen trials involving 1820 participants were included. Trial quality was generally poor, with just three reporting adequate methods of randomization and only one a method of allocation concealment. Significantly more participants in acupuncture groups reported global symptom improvement compared with no acupuncture groups (RR of symptoms persisting with acupuncture = 0.56, 95% CI 0.42–0.77). However, this is probably an overestimate due to the heterogeneity (I2 = 51%) and high risk of bias of the included studies. Acupuncture as an add-on treatment also improved global symptoms compared with other treatments only, without significant variability (RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.51–0.73, I2 = 1%). The benefit of acupuncture remained significant when the analysis was limited to two studies with a low risk of bias. Acupuncture was more effective than various controls in relieving pain, facilitating return to normal activity, and promoting quality of life, but these analyses were based on only a small number of studies. Acupuncture did not appear to be associated with

  1. Acupuncture: An Alternative Therapy in Dentistry and Its Possible Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kiran, Ravi A.; Yalamanchal, Samatha; Kumar, Vijay A.; Goli, Suresh; Vashist, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Traditional Chinese acupuncture has a history of more than 2500 years and is one of the best-known complementary and alternative therapies. Acupuncture stimulates the nervous system and alters the processing and perception of pain signals and also releases natural painkillers, such as endorphins and serotonin in the nervous system. Acupuncture's successful use for various dental conditions has been proven. Thus, it is important for the dental clinicians to be familiar with the applications of acupuncture for dental disorders. Objective: One aim of this article is to review related articles in the literature that have focused on acupuncture and its applications in dentistry. Another aim is to provide a quick sketch of acupuncture use in dentistry for dental clinicians. Materials and Methods: A detailed search was performed to identify systematic reviews and research articles, using PUBMED and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Language was restricted to English. Key search terms were acupuncture in dentistry, myofacial pain, temporomandibular disorders, xerostomia, dental pain and gag reflex. Results: All of the current the authors independently extracted data for analysis and review. Two independent reviewers screened the titles and abstracts of all the articles for eligibility. When the reviewers noted that an abstract or title of an article indicated that the article was potentially useful, full copies were retrieved. Ultimately, 40 articles underwent full-text review. Conclusions: The research to date certainly offers valid applications of acupuncture in dentistry. Meanwhile, practical strategies with the highest success rates are needed to use in further interventions. PMID:25538815

  2. The Reasons for Using Acupuncture for Pain Relief

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Roghyeh; Heidarnia, Mohamad Ali; Zagheri Tafreshi, Mansoure; Rassouli, Maryam; Soori, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acupuncture has recently received considerable attention around the world due to its cost-effectiveness, few side effects, and well-established analgesic properties. Objectives: The present study aimed to identify the factors that might lead to using acupuncture for pain relief. Patients and Methods: This qualitative study was conducted using conventional content analysis method. The study population included eight patients and six highly experienced acupuncturists, who were able to express their opinion and were willing to take part in the study. The inclusion criteria for patients were being under treatment with acupuncture for pain relief or a history of treatment during the last year and age > 18 years. All highly trained acupuncturists with minimum of one-year active experience were included. The data were collected via semi-structured in-depth interviews. Categories were extracted through inductive analysis and codes and eventually, themes emerged. Data rigor was assured by data collection triangulation, participants’ variety, and external and members’ check. Results: Initially, 1311 primary codes were extracted, then the related codes were divided into 127 subcategories according to their similarities, and after reduction and integration process, 16 categories were developed from subcategories and eventually five themes were determined, including conventional medicine limitation, efficacy of acupuncture, external promoters, internal promoters, and acupuncture inhibitors. Conclusions: The important factors that affect choosing acupuncture for pain relief included conventional medicine limitations, external promoters, internal promoters, acupuncture efficacy, and acupuncture inhibitors. More interest can be drawn to this technique by basic planning to enhance some of the underlying factors and eliminate obstacles to its further applicability. PMID:25593727

  3. [Siebold and Ishizaka Sotetsu's contribution to the reception of acupuncture in nineteenth century Europe: a comparative research based on the acupuncture manuscripts in the Siebold collection].

    PubMed

    Mathias, Vigouroux; Machi, Senjuro

    2011-09-01

    This article examines Siebold and his relations with the Tokugawa shogunate acupuncture doctor Ishizaka Sotetsu, based on both Western and Japanese primary sources. It is well known that Siebold's contribution to a better understanding of Oriental medicine in Europe was limited to his interest in Japanese acupuncture, particularly Ishizaka Sotetsu's acupuncture. However, past research on this subject has only relied either on documents written in Dutch by Siebold's disciples or on Ishizaka Sotetsu's writings on acupuncture, therefore making it impossible to match the Dutch translations with the original Japanese manuscripts. This article brings new insights in Siebold's study on Ishizaka's acupuncture, investigating from a comparative point of view documents held by Leiden University, Leiden National Museum of Ethnology, Ruhr-Universittät Bochum, Toyo Bunko Library and the Ishizaka family's collection. The second part of the article analyzes also how Siebold's interest in Ishizaka Sotetsu's acupuncture differs from Rhyne's and Kaempfer's interest in Japanese acupuncture PMID:22397110

  4. Sleep Ameliorating Effects of Acupuncture in a Psychiatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Peggy; van Luijtelaar, Gilles; van den Noort, Maurits; Lim, Sabina; Egger, Jos; Coenen, Anton

    2013-01-01

    The interest of psychiatric patients for complementary medicine, such as acupuncture, is stable, but effect studies in psychiatry remain scarce. In this pilot study, the effects of 3 months of acupuncture treatment on sleep were evaluated and compared between a group of patients with schizophrenia (n = 16) and a group with depression (n = 16). Healthy controls were included in order to establish reference values (n = 8). Patients with schizophrenia and depression were randomly assigned to either a waiting list or a treatment condition. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory was completed before and after the acupuncture treatment (individualized and according to traditional Chinese medicine principles) or the waiting list condition. Both acupuncture groups showed significant lower scores on the sleep inventory, which was not the case for the waiting list condition. Moreover, it was found that the effectiveness of the acupuncture treatment was higher in the patients with schizophrenia than in the patients with depression. Acupuncture seems able to improve sleep in this convenient sample of patients with long-lasting psychiatric problems and may be a suitable and cost-effective add-on treatment for this group, particularly if conducted group-wise. PMID:23781273

  5. Cortical Activation Patterns of Bodily Attention triggered by Acupuncture Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Won-Mo; Lee, In-Seon; Wallraven, Christian; Ryu, Yeon-Hee; Park, Hi-Joon; Chae, Younbyoung

    2015-01-01

    We investigated commonalities and differences in brain responses to enhanced bodily attention around acupuncture points with and without stimulation. Fourteen participants received acupuncture needles at both PC6 and HT7 acupoints in the left hand. To enhance bodily attention to acupoints, participants responded to the locations of stimulations in a two-alternative forced choice task. Two fMRI scans were taken in a block design: session 1 labeled with manual stimulation (genuine stimulation) and session 2 labeled with electro-acupuncture (pseudo-stimulation). To compare cortical activation patterns, data were analyzed using the Freesurfer software package. Both genuine-and pseudo-stimulation resulted in brain activations in the insula, anterior cingulate cortex, secondary somatosensory cortex, superior parietal cortex, and brain deactivation in the medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, inferior parietal cortex, and the parahippocampus. Genuine acupuncture stimulation exhibited greater brain activation in the posterior insula, posterior operculum and the caudal part of the anterior cingulate cortex, compared with pseudo-stimulation. We demonstrated that enhanced bodily attention triggered by genuine acupuncture stimulation can activate the salience network and deactivate the default mode network regardless of the type of stimulation. The component of enhanced attention to a certain part of the body is significant in the brain response to acupuncture stimulation. PMID:26211895

  6. Adverse Events of Acupuncture: A Systematic Review of Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shifen; Wang, Lizhen; Cooper, Emily; Zhang, Ming; Manheimer, Eric; Berman, Brian; Shen, Xueyong; Lao, Lixing

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture, moxibustion, and cupping, important in traditional Eastern medicine, are increasingly used in the West. Their widening acceptance demands continual safety assessment. This review, a sequel to one our team published 10 years ago, is an evaluation of the frequency and severity of adverse events (AEs) reported for acupuncture, moxibustion, and cupping between 2000 and 2011. Relevant English-language reports in six databases were identified and assessed by two reviewers. During this 12-year period, 117 reports of 308 AEs from 25 countries and regions were associated with acupuncture (294 cases), moxibustion (4 cases), or cupping (10 cases). Country of occurrence, patient's sex and age, and outcome were extracted. Infections, mycobacterial, staphylococcal, and others, were the main complication of acupuncture. In the previous review, we found the main source of infection to be hepatitis, caused by reusable needles. In this review, we found the majority of infections to be bacterial, caused by skin contact at acupoint sites; we found no cases of hepatitis. Although the route of infection had changed, infections were still the major complication of acupuncture. Clearly, guidelines such as Clean Needle Technique must be followed in order to minimize acupuncture AEs. PMID:23573135

  7. Effect of acupuncture on sleep quality and hyperarousal state in patients with primary insomnia: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing; Huang, Wei; Tang, Chu-ying; Wang, Gui-Ling; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Lin-peng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Primary insomnia (PI) is commonly defined as a state of having disturbed daytime activities due to poor night-time sleep quality. Studies have demonstrated that it is a disorder of 24 h hyperarousal, expressed in terms of physiological, cognitive and cortical activation. Acupuncture is considered to be beneficial to restore the normal sleep–wake cycle. The aim of the trial is to assess the therapeutic effects of acupuncture on sleep quality and hyperarousal state in patients with PI. Methods and analysis This study is a randomised, patient-assessor-blinded, sham controlled trial. –88 eligible patients with PI will be randomised in a ratio of 1:1 to the intervention group (real acupuncture) and control group (sham acupuncture, superficial insertion at irrelevant acupuncture points). Acupuncture intervention will be given to all participants three times a week for 4 weeks, followed up for 8 weeks. The primary outcome measures are the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Hyperarousal scale (HAS). The secondary outcomes are Fatigue scale-14 (FS-14), polysomnography (PSG), heart rate variability (HRV) and Morning Salivary Cortisol Level (MSCL). Outcomes will be evaluated at baseline, post-treatment period and 8 weeks follow-up. All main analyses will be carried out on the basis of the intention-to-treat principle. Ethics/dissemination This protocol has been approved by the Medical Ethical Committee of Beijing Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital (Beijing TCM Hospital) on 5 January 2015. The permission number is 2014BL-056-02. The study will present data concerning the clinical effects of treating primary insomnia with acupuncture. The results will help to demonstrate if acupuncture is an effective therapy for improving sleep quality in association with a decreased hyperarousal level as a possible underlying mechanism. The findings from this study will be shared with the healthcare professionals, general public and relevant organisations

  8. Medial prefrontal cortex stimulation modulates the processing of conditioned fear

    PubMed Central

    Guhn, Anne; Dresler, Thomas; Andreatta, Marta; Müller, Laura D.; Hahn, Tim; Tupak, Sara V.; Polak, Thomas; Deckert, Jürgen; Herrmann, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    The extinction of conditioned fear depends on an efficient interplay between the amygdala and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). In rats, high-frequency electrical mPFC stimulation has been shown to improve extinction by means of a reduction of amygdala activity. However, so far it is unclear whether stimulation of homologues regions in humans might have similar beneficial effects. Healthy volunteers received one session of either active or sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) covering the mPFC while undergoing a 2-day fear conditioning and extinction paradigm. Repetitive TMS was applied offline after fear acquisition in which one of two faces (CS+ but not CS−) was associated with an aversive scream (UCS). Immediate extinction learning (day 1) and extinction recall (day 2) were conducted without UCS delivery. Conditioned responses (CR) were assessed in a multimodal approach using fear-potentiated startle (FPS), skin conductance responses (SCR), functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), and self-report scales. Consistent with the hypothesis of a modulated processing of conditioned fear after high-frequency rTMS, the active group showed a reduced CS+/CS− discrimination during extinction learning as evident in FPS as well as in SCR and arousal ratings. FPS responses to CS+ further showed a linear decrement throughout both extinction sessions. This study describes the first experimental approach of influencing conditioned fear by using rTMS and can thus be a basis for future studies investigating a complementation of mPFC stimulation to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). PMID:24600362

  9. Dental Fear among Medical and Dental Undergraduates

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, H.; Razak, I. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht's Dental Fear Survey (DFS) questionnaire. Methods. Kleinknecht's DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates' of the University of Malaya. Results. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%). However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%). Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P = 0.004). “Heart beats faster” and “muscle being tensed” were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. “Drill” and “anesthetic needle” were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Conclusion. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services. PMID:25386615

  10. Retrieving fear memories, as time goes by….

    PubMed

    Do Monte, F H; Quirk, G J; Li, B; Penzo, M A

    2016-08-01

    Research in fear conditioning has provided a comprehensive picture of the neuronal circuit underlying the formation of fear memories. In contrast, our understanding of the retrieval of fear memories is much more limited. This disparity may stem from the fact that fear memories are not rigid, but reorganize over time. To bring some clarity and raise awareness about the time-dependent dynamics of retrieval circuits, we review current evidence on the neuronal circuitry participating in fear memory retrieval at both early and late time points following auditory fear conditioning. We focus on the temporal recruitment of the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT) for the retrieval and maintenance of fear memories. Finally, we speculate as to why retrieval circuits change with time, and consider the functional strategy of recruiting structures not previously considered as part of the retrieval circuit. PMID:27217148

  11. Prefrontal neuronal circuits of contextual fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Rozeske, R R; Valerio, S; Chaudun, F; Herry, C

    2015-01-01

    Over the past years, numerous studies have provided a clear understanding of the neuronal circuits and mechanisms involved in the formation, expression and extinction phases of conditioned cued fear memories. Yet, despite a strong clinical interest, a detailed understanding of these memory phases for contextual fear memories is still missing. Besides the well-known role of the hippocampus in encoding contextual fear behavior, growing evidence indicates that specific regions of the medial prefrontal cortex differentially regulate contextual fear acquisition and storage in both animals and humans that ultimately leads to expression of contextual fear memories. In this review, we provide a detailed description of the recent literature on the role of distinct prefrontal subregions in contextual fear behavior and provide a working model of the neuronal circuits involved in the acquisition, expression and generalization of contextual fear memories. PMID:25287656

  12. The intergenerational transmission of fear of failure.

    PubMed

    Elliot, Andrew J; Thrash, Todd M

    2004-08-01

    The intergenerational transmission of fear of failure was examined in two studies with undergraduates and their parents. Parent-undergraduate concordance in fear of failure was documented for mothers and fathers, controlling for parents' and undergraduate's impression management and self-deceptive enhancement response tendencies. Love withdrawal was validated as a mediator of parent-undergraduate concordance in fear of failure for mothers but not for fathers. Mothers' and fathers' fear of failure was also a positive predictor of undergraduate's adoption of performance-avoidance goals in the classroom, and undergraduate's fear of failure was shown to mediate this relationship. Fathers' fear of failure was also a negative predictor of undergraduate's mastery goal adoption, and this relationship was likewise mediated by undergraduate's fear of failure. The results are discussed in terms of the reorienting of positive, appetitive achievement motivation toward negative, aversive achievement motivation. PMID:15257781

  13. Enhanced Discriminative Fear Learning of Phobia-Irrelevant Stimuli in Spider-Fearful Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Mosig, Carina; Merz, Christian J.; Mohr, Cornelia; Adolph, Dirk; Wolf, Oliver T.; Schneider, Silvia; Margraf, Jürgen; Zlomuzica, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Avoidance is considered as a central hallmark of all anxiety disorders. The acquisition and expression of avoidance, which leads to the maintenance and exacerbation of pathological fear is closely linked to Pavlovian and operant conditioning processes. Changes in conditionability might represent a key feature of all anxiety disorders but the exact nature of these alterations might vary across different disorders. To date, no information is available on specific changes in conditionability for disorder-irrelevant stimuli in specific phobia (SP). The first aim of this study was to investigate changes in fear acquisition and extinction in spider-fearful individuals as compared to non-fearful participants by using the de novo fear conditioning paradigm. Secondly, we aimed to determine whether differences in the magnitude of context-dependent fear retrieval exist between spider-fearful and non-fearful individuals. Our findings point to an enhanced fear discrimination in spider-fearful individuals as compared to non-fearful individuals at both the physiological and subjective level. The enhanced fear discrimination in spider-fearful individuals was neither mediated by increased state anxiety, depression, nor stress tension. Spider-fearful individuals displayed no changes in extinction learning and/or fear retrieval. Surprisingly, we found no evidence for context-dependent modulation of fear retrieval in either group. Here, we provide first evidence that spider-fearful individuals show an enhanced discriminative fear learning of phobia-irrelevant (de novo) stimuli. Our findings provide novel insights into the role of fear acquisition and expression for the development and maintenance of maladaptive responses in the course of SP. PMID:25324745

  14. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM): Acupuncture From Ancient Practice to Modern Science

    MedlinePlus

    ... Section CAM Acupuncture From Ancient Practice to Modern Science Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... others feel relaxed. Acupuncture is used for a wide range of conditions, from arthritis and low back ...

  15. Thailand's fear of AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Sivaraman, S

    1995-07-01

    Because of a terrorist incident against Bangkok's Relief Center for HIV/AIDS Carriers, it is feared that a rising intolerance is occurring in Thailand. Such fears are damaging efforts to help those with HIV/AIDS. Misconceptions about the nature of HIV/AIDS continue to dominate Thai society. The Thai government is particularly worried that an overemphasis on HIV/AIDS will hurt tourism. According to the Population and Community Development Association, Thai people are infected with HIV at the rate of 500 per day and treatment costs may exceed $170 million a year by the year 2000. Unfortunately, the lack of nongovernmental institutions (other than Buddhist monasteries) and the lack of positive response from other Thai social institutions is driving relatives and friends to take care of the afflicted, and the terrorist attack shows that many Thai people are still unprepared for the challenge. PMID:11362731

  16. Acupuncture Alleviated the Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease including Pain, Depression, and Autonomic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Iseki, Chifumi; Furuta, Taiga; Suzuki, Masao; Koyama, Shingo; Suzuki, Keiji; Suzuki, Tomoko; Kaneko, Akiyo

    2014-01-01

    A woman started to feel intractable pain on her lower legs when she was 76. At the age of 78, she was diagnosed as having Parkinson's disease (PD). The leg pain was suspected to be a symptom of PD after eliminating other causes. The patient also suffered from nonmotor symptoms, depression, anxiety, hot flashes, and paroxysmal sweating. Though the patient had received pharmacotherapy including levodopa for 5 years, she still suffered from the nonmotor symptoms and was referred to our department. We treated her with acupuncture based on the Chinese traditional medicine and electroacupuncture five times per week. After the 2-week treatment, the assessment for the symptoms was as follows; visual analogue scale (VAS) score of the leg pain was 16 mm (70 mm, before), Hamilton's rating scales for depression (HAM-D) score was 9 (18, before), timed 3 m Up and Go took 20 steps in 30 sec (24 steps in 38 sec, before), and the Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) Part 1 score was 13 (21, before). Autonomic symptoms, hot flashes and paroxysmal sweating, were also alleviated. Acupuncture may be a good treatment modality for nonmotor symptoms in PD. PMID:25628905

  17. Acupuncture point injection treatment of primary dysmenorrhoea: a randomised, double blind, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Wade, C; Wang, L; Zhao, W J; Cardini, F; Kronenberg, F; Gui, S Q; Ying, Z; Zhao, N Q; Chao, M T; Yu, J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine if injection of vitamin K3 in an acupuncture point is optimal for the treatment of primary dysmenorrhoea, when compared with 2 other injection treatments. Setting A Menstrual Disorder Centre at a public hospital in Shanghai, China. Participants Chinese women aged 14–25 years with severe primary dysmenorrhoea for at least 6 months not relieved by any other treatment were recruited. Exclusion criteria were the use of oral contraceptives, intrauterine devices or anticoagulant drugs, pregnancy, history of abdominal surgery, participation in other therapies for pain and diagnosis of secondary dysmenorrhoea. Eighty patients with primary dysmenorrhoea, as defined on a 4-grade scale, completed the study. Two patients withdrew after randomisation. Interventions A double-blind, double-dummy, randomised controlled trial compared vitamin K3 acupuncture point injection to saline acupuncture point injection and vitamin K3 deep muscle injection. Patients in each group received 3 injections at a single treatment visit. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome was the difference in subjective perception of pain as measured by an 11 unit Numeric Rating Scale (NRS). Secondary measurements were Cox Pain Intensity and Duration scales and the consumption of analgesic tablets before and after treatment and during 6 following cycles. Results Patients in all 3 groups experienced pain relief from the injection treatments. Differences in NRS measured mean pain scores between the 2 active control groups were less than 1 unit (−0.71, CI −1.37 to −0.05) and not significant, but the differences in average scores between the treatment hypothesised to be optimal and both active control groups (1.11, CI 0.45 to 1.78) and (1.82, CI 1.45 to 2.49) were statistically significant in adjusted mixed-effects models. Menstrual distress and use of analgesics were diminished for 6 months post-treatment. Conclusions Acupuncture point injection of

  18. Dental fear and sense of coherence among 18-yr-old adolescents in Finland.

    PubMed

    Jaakkola, Sirkka; Rautava, Päivi; Saarinen, Maiju; Lahti, Satu; Mattila, Marja-Leena; Suominen, Sakari; Räihä, Hannele; Aromaa, Minna; Honkinen, Päivi-Leena; Sillanpää, Matti

    2013-06-01

    The aim was to investigate whether dental fear was associated with the sense of coherence (SOC) among 18-yr-old adolescents (n = 777). Cross-sectional data from a prospective cohort of a random sample of families from Finland and their first-born children were used. Dental fear was measured using the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale and categorized as high dental fear for scores of 19-25 and as no to moderate dental fear for scores of 5-18. Sense of coherence was measured using a 13-item version of Antonovsky's Sense of Coherence Questionnaire, dichotomized as scores 13-63 for weak SOC and as scores of 64-91 for strong SOC. Gender and education were included as background factors in the logistic regression analyses. The prevalence of high dental fear was 8%. Those reporting high dental fear reported more often a weaker SOC than did those with no to moderate dental fear (69% vs. 31%, OR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.4-4.4), also when adjusted for gender and education (OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.2-3.9). According to the theory of salutogenesis, as proposed by Antonovsky, SOC is a resource instrument especially in situations of tension or strain and hence a strong SOC might protect against high dental fear. PMID:23659257

  19. A comparison of the level of fear of death among students and nursing professionals in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Mondragón-Sánchez, Edna Johana; Cordero, Erika Alejandra Torre; Espinoza, María de Lourdes Morales; Landeros-Olvera, Erick Alberto

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to compare the level of fear of death in nursing students and professionals. METHOD: this was a comparative-transversal study examining 643 nursing students and professionals from a third-level institution. A random sampling method was employed, and the sample size was calculated by power analysis. The study was developed during three stages: the first stage consisted of the application of a pilot test, the second stage involved the recruitment of the participants, and the third stage measured the participants' responses on the Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale. RESULTS: the average fear of death was moderate-high (-X=3.19±0.55), and the highest score was observed for the fear of the death of others (-X=3.52±0.20). Significant differences in the perceptions of fear of death were observed among the students of the first three years (p<.05). However, no significant differences were observed among the first- and fourth-year students and professionals (p>.05). CONCLUSIONS: it is possible that first-year students exhibit a reduced fear of death because they have not had the experience of hospital practice. Students in their second and third year may have a greater fear of death because they have cared for terminal patients. However, it appears that greater confidence is acquired over time, and thus fourth-year students and professionals exhibit less fear of death than second- and third-year students (p<.05). PMID:26039304

  20. Proteomic response to acupuncture treatment in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xinsheng; Wang, Jiayou; Nabar, Neel R; Pan, Sanqiang; Tang, Chunzhi; Huang, Yong; Hao, Mufeng; Yang, Zhonghua; Ma, Chunmei; Zhang, Jin; Chew, Helen; He, Zhenquan; Yang, Junjun; Su, Baogui; Zhang, Jian; Liang, Jun; Sneed, Kevin B; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Previous animal and clinical studies have shown that acupuncture is an effective alternative treatment in the management of hypertension, but the mechanism is unclear. This study investigated the proteomic response in the nervous system to treatment at the Taichong (LR3) acupoint in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Unanesthetized rats were subject to 5-min daily acupuncture treatment for 7 days. Blood pressure was monitored over 7 days. After euthanasia on the 7(th) day, rat medullas were dissected, homogenized, and subject to 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF analysis. The results indicate that blood pressure stabilized after the 5th day of acupuncture, and compared with non-acupoint treatment, Taichong-acupunctured rat's systolic pressure was reduced significantly (P<0.01), though not enough to bring blood pressure down to normal levels. The different treatment groups also showed differential protein expression: the 2D images revealed 571 ± 15 proteins in normal SD rats' medulla, 576 ± 31 proteins in SHR's medulla, 597 ± 44 proteins in medulla of SHR after acupuncturing Taichong, and 616 ± 18 proteins in medulla of SHR after acupuncturing non-acupoint. In the medulla of Taichong group, compared with non-acupoint group, seven proteins were down-regulated: heat shock protein-90, synapsin-1, pyruvate kinase isozyme, NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin-2, protein kinase C inhibitor protein 1, ubiquitin hydrolase isozyme L1, and myelin basic protein. Six proteins were up-regulated: glutamate dehydrogenase 1, aldehyde dehydrogenase 2, glutathione S-transferase M5, Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor 1, DJ-1 protein and superoxide dismutase. The altered expression of several proteins by acupuncture has been confirmed by ELISA, Western blot and qRT-PCR assays. The results indicate an increase in antioxidant enzymes in the medulla of the SHRs subject to acupuncture, which may provide partial explanation for the antihypertensive effect of acupuncture. Further

  1. Internet use by the socially fearful: addiction or therapy?

    PubMed

    Campbell, Andrew J; Cumming, Steven R; Hughes, Ian

    2006-02-01

    The Internet has often been argued to have adverse psychological consequences, such as depression or anxiety symptoms, among "over-users." The present study offers an alternative understanding, suggesting the Internet may be used as a forum for expanding social networks and consequently enhancing the chance of meaningful relationships, self-confidence, social abilities, and social support. An online sample of 188 people was recruited over the Internet, while paper and pencil tests were administered to an offline sample group of 27 undergraduate university students, who were regular Internet users. Subjects completed the Zung Depression Scale (ZDS), Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS), Eysenck Personality Questionnaire?Revised Short Scale (EPQ-R Short), Fear of Negative Evaluation (FNE) scale, Internet Use Questionnaire (IUQ), and an Internet Effects Questionnaire (IEQ). Results suggested that there was no relationship between time spent online and depression, anxiety, or social fearfulness. Those who primarily used the Internet for online chat believed that the Internet is psychologically beneficial to them, but also believed that frequent Internet users are lonely and that the Internet can be addictive. It is argued that "chat" users who are socially fearful may be using the Internet as a form of low-risk social approach and an opportunity to rehearse social behavior and communication skills, which, may help them improve interaction with offline, face-to-face, social environments. PMID:16497120

  2. From Peripheral to Central: The Role of ERK Signaling Pathway in Acupuncture Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Yeun; Park, Jongbae J.; Jeon, Songhee; Doo, Ah-Reum; Kim, Seung-Nam; Lee, Hyangsook; Chae, Younbyoung; Maixner, William; Lee, Hyejung; Park, Hi-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Despite accumulating evidence of the clinical effectiveness of acupuncture, its mechanism remains largely unclear. We assume that molecular signaling around the acupuncture needled area is essential for initiating the effect of acupuncture. To determine possible bio-candidates involved in the mechanisms of acupuncture and investigate the role of such bio-candidates in the analgesic effects of acupuncture, we conducted 2 stepwise experiments. First, a genome-wide microarray of the isolated skin layer at the GB34-equivalent acupoint of C57BL/6 mice 1 hour after acupuncture found that a total of 236 genes had changed and that extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) activation was the most prominent bio-candidate. Second, in mouse pain models using formalin and complete Freund adjuvant, we found that acupuncture attenuated the nociceptive behavior and the mechanical allodynia; these effects were blocked when ERK cascade was interrupted by the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor U0126 (.8 μg/μL). Based on these results, we suggest that ERK phosphorylation following acupuncture needling is a biochemical hallmark initiating the effect of acupuncture including analgesia. Perspective This article presents the novel evidence of the local molecular signaling in acupuncture analgesia by demonstrating that ERK activation in the skin layer contributes to the analgesic effect of acupuncture in a mouse pain model. This work improves our understanding of the scientific basis underlying acupuncture analgesia. PMID:24524846

  3. Automatic fall detectors and the fear of falling.

    PubMed

    Brownsell, Simon; Hawley, Mark S

    2004-01-01

    We studied the effect of automatic fall detection units on the fear of falling. Participants were community alarm users living in the community aged over 75 years or those aged 60-74 years who had experienced a fall in the previous six months. Of those approached, 31% consented to take part; the main reason given for potential participants declining involvement was that they were happy with the technology they already had. Subjects were assigned to a control group (n = 21) or intervention group (n = 34) based on age, the number of self-reported falls in the previous six months and their score on the self-administered Falls Efficacy Scale (FES), which measures fear of falling on a scale of 0-100, with higher scores indicating less fear. The monitoring period lasted a mean of 17 weeks (SD 3.1). There was no significant difference between the intervention and control groups in their mean ratings of fear of falls (40.3 vs 37.5, difference 2.8, 95% CI 6.2 to 11.8), health-related quality of life or morale. Differences in fear of falling between an intervention subgroup who wore their detector at least occasionally (62%) and those who did not (38%) suggested that some people may benefit from a fall detector while others may lose confidence if they are provided with one. Most users who wore their detectors at least occasionally felt more confident and independent and considered that the detector improved their safety. PMID:15494083

  4. Bloodcurdling movies and measures of coagulation: Fear Factor crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Banne; Scheres, Luuk J J; Lijfering, Willem M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess whether, as has been hypothesised since medieval times, acute fear can curdle blood. Design Crossover trial. Setting Main meeting room of Leiden University’s Department of Clinical Epidemiology, the Netherlands, converted to a makeshift cinema. Participants 24 healthy volunteers aged ≤30 years recruited among students, alumni, and employees of the Leiden University Medical Center: 14 were assigned to watch a frightening (horror) movie followed by a non-threatening (educational) movie and 10 to watch the movies in reverse order. The movies were viewed more than a week apart at the same time of day and both lasted approximately 90 minutes. Main outcome measures The primary outcome measures were markers, or “fear factors” of coagulation activity: blood coagulant factor VIII, D-dimer, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, and prothrombin fragments 1+2. The secondary outcome was participant reported fear experienced during each movie using a visual analogue fear scale. Results All participants completed the study. The horror movie was perceived to be more frightening than the educational movie on a visual analogue fear scale (mean difference 5.4, 95% confidence interval 4.7 to 6.1). The difference in factor VIII levels before and after watching the movies was higher for the horror movie than for the educational movie (mean difference of differences 11.1 IU/dL (111 IU/L), 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 21.0 IU/dL). The effect of either movie on levels of thrombin-antithrombin complexes, D-dimer, and prothrombin fragments 1+2 did not differ. Conclusion Frightening (in this case, horror) movies are associated with an increase of blood coagulant factor VIII without actual thrombin formation in young and healthy adults. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02601053. PMID:26673787

  5. Fear patterns: a new approach to designing road safety advertisements.

    PubMed

    Algie, Jennifer; Rossiter, John R

    2010-01-01

    This research studies fear patterns within fear appeal anti-speeding television commercials. A pattern of fear is the sequence of fear arousal and fear reduction, if any, that is felt by the viewing audience when exposed to a fear appeal advertisement. Many road safety advertisers use fear appeals, such as "shock" advertising, that result in fear arousal, leaving the viewer feeling extremely tense. The moment-to-moment reactions of young drivers to 12 road safety commercials are gauged using a dynamic, temporal measure of fear. The fear patterns generated from each ad are analyzed and a new perspective on creating fear appeal road safety advertisements, with an emphasis on fear-relief, fear-partial relief, and fear-only patterns, is discussed. PMID:20945245

  6. The Shadow of Physical Harm? Examining the Unique and Gendered Relationship Between Fear of Murder Versus Fear of Sexual Assault on Fear of Violent Crime.

    PubMed

    Riggs, Samantha; Cook, Carrie L

    2015-09-01

    The shadow hypothesis regarding the impact of fear of sexual assault on fear of violent crime suggests that female fear of crime is characterized by concern about sexual assault as a contemporaneous victimization event during a violent crime event. Recent research has found that other types of crime, namely physical assault, may also be feared as a contemporaneous offense. We know of no research that has examined the unique impact of fear of murder versus fear of sexual assault on fear of violent crime. There is also a lack of research that explores how these two types of fear uniquely affect men and women. In addition to gender, we examine factors that have been suggested in previous research to correlate with fear of crime: race, victimization, vicarious victimization, and perceived risk. Through survey methodology, this research examines the unique relationship between both fear of murder and fear of sexual assault and fear of three types of violent crime for men and women. Results suggest differences in how fear of murder and fear of sexual assault are related to fear of other types of violence for men and women. Specifically, fear of murder is important in estimating male fear of robbery and aggravated assault. However, fear of sexual assault is almost as important as fear of murder for men in estimating fear of home invasion. Similarly, for women, fear of sexual assault and fear of murder both are significant factors associated with fear of violent crime, and differences between the levels of significance are marginal. This study is a first to examine whether murder may also be feared as a contemporaneous offense. The results are informative in identifying what drives fear of crime, particularly violent crime, for both men and women. Avenues for future research are discussed. PMID:25381276

  7. Determining the focus of driving fears.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J E; Deane, F P; Podd, J V

    2000-01-01

    Fear of driving has been recognized as a complex diagnostic entity. Studies on flying phobia have drawn similar conclusions, although increasing clarity has been gained through research that indicates that there may be subtypes of flying phobia based on the focus of fear. However, it is unclear if similar subtypes exist for fear of driving. The aim of the present study was to conduct a preliminary investigation of driving fear subtypes and to clarify further whether there were differences between driving-fearful respondents who had been in a motor vehicle accident (MVA) and those who had not. Eighty-five driving-fearful, media-recruited respondents completed a questionnaire that assessed anxiety, avoidance, and concerns related to their driving fears. The sample had high expectations of negative events while driving. There were no significant differences between those who had experienced an MVA and those who had not on various measures of fear severity. Cluster analysis revealed two main foci of fear, one characterized by danger expectancies and the other based on anxiety expectancies and unpleasant driving situations. This emphasizes the importance of assessing both internal and external foci of fear. Although this finding is consistent with the results obtained for flying phobia, more research is required to replicate and extend these results and to develop and evaluate differential treatment programs. PMID:11095540

  8. Retention of perceptual generalization of fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Pappens, Meike; Schroijen, Mathias; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Diest, Ilse

    2015-12-01

    Fear reduction obtained during a fear extinction procedure can generalize from the extinction stimulus to other perceptually similar stimuli. Perceptual generalization of fear extinction typically follows a perceptual gradient, with increasing levels of fear reduction the more a stimulus resembles the extinction stimulus. The current study aimed to investigate whether perceptual generalization of fear extinction can be observed also after a retention interval of 24h. Fear was acquired to three geometrical figures of different sizes (CS(+), CS1(+) and CS2(+)) by consistently pairing them with a short-lasting suffocation experience (US). Three other geometrical figures that were never followed by the US served as control stimuli (CS(-), CS1(-), CS2(-)). Next, only the CS(+) was extinguished by presenting it in the absence of the US. One day later, fear responses to all stimuli were assessed without any US-presentation. Outcome measures included startle blink EMG, skin conductance, US expectancy, respiratory rate and tidal volume. On day 2 spontaneous recovery of fear was observed in US expectancy and tidal volume, but not in the other outcomes. Evidence for the retention of fear extinction generalization was present in US expectancy and skin conductance, but a perceptual gradient in the retention of generalized fear extinction could not be observed. PMID:25623628

  9. Memory suppression trades prolonged fear and sleep-dependent fear plasticity for the avoidance of current fear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuriyama, Kenichi; Honma, Motoyasu; Yoshiike, Takuya; Kim, Yoshiharu

    2013-07-01

    Sleep deprivation immediately following an aversive event reduces fear by preventing memory consolidation during homeostatic sleep. This suggests that acute insomnia might act prophylactically against the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) even though it is also a possible risk factor for PTSD. We examined total sleep deprivation and memory suppression to evaluate the effects of these interventions on subsequent aversive memory formation and fear conditioning. Active suppression of aversive memory impaired retention of event memory. However, although the remembered fear was more reduced in sleep-deprived than sleep-control subjects, suppressed fear increased, and seemed to abandon the sleep-dependent plasticity of fear. Active memory suppression, which provides a psychological model for Freud's ego defense mechanism, enhances fear and casts doubt on the potential of acute insomnia as a prophylactic measure against PTSD. Our findings bring into question the role of sleep in aversive-memory consolidation in clinical PTSD pathophysiology.

  10. Glucocorticoids reduce phobic fear in humans

    PubMed Central

    Soravia, Leila M.; Heinrichs, Markus; Aerni, Amanda; Maroni, Caroline; Schelling, Gustav; Ehlert, Ulrike; Roozendaal, Benno; de Quervain, Dominique J.-F.

    2006-01-01

    Phobias are characterized by excessive fear, cued by the presence or anticipation of a fearful situation. Whereas it is well established that glucocorticoids are released in fearful situations, it is not known whether these hormones, in turn, modulate perceived fear. As extensive evidence indicates that elevated glucocorticoid levels impair the retrieval of emotionally arousing information, they might also inhibit retrieval of fear memory associated with phobia and, thereby, reduce phobic fear. Here, we investigated whether acutely administrated glucocorticoids reduced phobic fear in two double-blind, placebo-controlled studies in 40 subjects with social phobia and 20 subjects with spider phobia. In the social phobia study, cortisone (25 mg) administered orally 1 h before a socio-evaluative stressor significantly reduced self-reported fear during the anticipation, exposure, and recovery phase of the stressor. Moreover, the stress-induced release of cortisol in placebo-treated subjects correlated negatively with fear ratings, suggesting that endogenously released cortisol in the context of a phobic situation buffers fear symptoms. In the spider phobia study, repeated oral administration of cortisol (10 mg), but not placebo, 1 h before exposure to a spider photograph induced a progressive reduction of stimulus-induced fear. This effect was maintained when subjects were exposed to the stimulus again 2 days after the last cortisol administration, suggesting that cortisol may also have facilitated the extinction of phobic fear. Cortisol treatment did not reduce general, phobia-unrelated anxiety. In conclusion, the present findings in two distinct types of phobias indicate that glucocorticoid administration reduces phobic fear. PMID:16567641

  11. The Timing of Acupuncture Stimulation Does Not Influence Anesthetic Requirement

    PubMed Central

    Chernyak, Grigory; Sengupta, Papiya; Lenhardt, Rainer; Liem, Edwin; Doufas, Anthony G.; Sessler, Daniel I.; Akça, Ozan

    2005-01-01

    Studies suggest that acupuncture is more effective when induced before induction of general anesthesia than afterwards. We tested the hypothesis that electro-acupuncture initiated 30 minutes before induction reduces anesthetic requirement more than acupuncture initiated after induction. Seven volunteers were each anesthetized with desflurane on 3 study days. Needles were inserted percutaneously at 4 acupuncture points thought to produce analgesia in the upper abdominal area and provide generalized sedative and analgesic effects: Zusanli (St36), Sanyinjiao (Sp6), Liangqiu (St34), and Hegu (LI4). Needles were stimulated at 2-Hz and 10-Hz, with frequencies alternating at two-second intervals. On Preinduction day, electro-acupuncture was started 30 minutes before induction of anesthesia and maintained throughout the study. On At-induction day, needles were positioned before induction of anesthesia, but electro-acupuncture stimulation was not initiated until after induction. On Control day, electrodes were positioned near the acupoints, but needles were not inserted. Noxious electrical stimulation was administered via 25-G needles on the upper abdomen (70 mA, 100 Hz, 10 seconds). Desflurane concentration was increased 0.5% when movement occurred and decreased 0.5% when it did not. These up-and-down sequences continued until volunteers crossed from movement to no-movement 4 times. The P50 of logistic regression identified desflurane requirement. Desflurane requirement was similar on the Control (5.2±0.6%, mean±SD), Preinduction (5.0±0.8%), and At-induction (4.7±0.3%, P=0.125) days. This type of acupuncture is thus unlikely to facilitate general anesthesia or decrease the need for anesthetic drugs. PMID:15673863

  12. Living in Fear of Your Child's Pain: The Parent Fear of Pain Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Laura E.; Smith, Allison; Kaczynski, Karen; Basch, Molly

    2015-01-01

    Fear and avoidance have been consistently associated with poor pain-related outcomes in children. In the context of the pediatric pain experience, parent distress and behaviors can be highly influential. The current study validated the Parent Fear of Pain Questionnaire (PFOPQ) to assess a parent's fears and avoidance behaviors associated with their child's pain. Using the PFOPQ in conjunction with measures of parent and child pain-related variables, we tested the Interpersonal Fear Avoidance Model (IFAM). The sample comprised of 321 parents and their child with chronic or new-onset pain who presented to a multidisciplinary outpatient pain clinic. An exploratory factor analysis yielded a 4-factor structure for the PFOPQ consisting of Fear of Pain, Fear of Movement, Fear of School, and Avoidance. As hypothesized, Fear of Pain was most closely related to parent pain catastrophizing and child fear of pain, while Avoidance was most closely related to parent protective behaviors and child avoidance of activities. In testing the IFAM, parent behavior contributed directly and indirectly to child avoidance while parent fear and catastrophizing contributed indirectly to child avoidance through parent behavior and child fear and catastrophizing, in turn, influencing child functional disability levels. The current study provides the first measure of parent pain-related fears and avoidance behaviors and evaluates the theorized IFAM. These results underscore the important influence of parents on child pain-related outcomes and puts forth a psychometrically sound measure to assess parent fear and avoidance in the context of their child's pain. PMID:25630026

  13. Fear, excitement, and financial risk-taking.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chan Jean; Andrade, Eduardo B

    2015-01-01

    Can fear trigger risk-taking? In this paper, we assess whether fear can be reinterpreted as a state of excitement as a result of contextual cues and promote, rather than discourage, risk-taking. In a laboratory experiment, the participants' emotional states were induced (fear vs. control), followed by a purportedly unrelated financial task. The task was framed as either a stock market investment or an exciting casino game. Our results showed that incidental fear (vs. control) induced risk-averse behaviour when the task was framed as a stock investment decision. However, fear encouraged risk-taking when the very same task was framed as an exciting casino game. The impact of fear on risk-taking was partially mediated by the excitement felt during the financial task. PMID:24661027

  14. Laser Acupuncture Therapy in Patients with Treatment-Resistant Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yu-Chiang; Tseng, Ying-Jung; Hung, I-Ling; Hsu, Sheng-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical effects of laser acupuncture therapy for temporomandibular disorders (TMD) after ineffective previous treatments. Methods A retrospective observational study was conducted in 29 treatment-resistant TMD patients (25 women, 4 men; age range, 17–67 years). Subjects were treated 3 times per week for 4 weeks with the Handylaser Trion (GaAlAs laser diode, 810 nm, 150 mW, pulsed waves), which delivered 0.375 J of energy (5 s) to ST7, ST6, and LI4 and 3 J (40 s) to each Ashi point, 7.5–26.25 J/cm2 in total. The visual analog scale (VAS) and maximal mouth opening (MMO) were evaluated before and after treatment. Results VAS analysis showed that the patients were free of pain at rest (endpoint) after 5.90±6.08 sessions of laser acupuncture for acute TMD and after 16.21±17.98 sessions for chronic TMD. The VAS score on palpation of the temporomandibular joint reduced to 0.30±0.67 for patients with acute TMD (p = 0.005) and to 0.47±0.84 for those with chronic TMD (p<0.001). The MMO significantly increased in patients with acute TMD (7.80±5.43 mm, p = 0.008) and in patients with chronic TMD (15.58±7.87 mm, p<0.001). Conclusions Our study shows that laser acupuncture therapy improves the symptoms of treatment-resistant TMD. Further studies with a more appropriate design, involving long-term follow-up examinations in a larger patient sample, are needed to evaluate its efficacy. PMID:25329855

  15. Risk of Bias Tool in Systematic Reviews/Meta-Analyses of Acupuncture in Chinese Journals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yali; Yang, Shengping; Dai, Junjie; Xu, Yongteng; Zhang, Rui; Jiang, Huaili; Yan, Xianxia; Yang, Kehu

    2011-01-01

    Background Use of a risk of bias (ROB) tool has been encouraged and advocated to reviewers writing systematic reviews (SRs) and meta-analyses (MAs). Selective outcome reporting and other sources of bias are included in the Cochrane ROB tool. It is important to know how this specific tool for assessing ROB has been applied since its release. Our objectives were to evaluate whether and to what extent the new Cochrane ROB tool has been used in Chinese journal papers of acupuncture. Methods We searched CBM, TCM database, CJFD, CSJD, and the Wanfang Database from inception to March 2011. Two reviewers independently selected SRs that primarily focused on acupuncture and moxibustion, from which the data was extracted and analyzed. Results A total of 836 SRs were identified from the search, of which, 105 were included and four are awaiting assessment. Thirty-six of the 105 SRs were published before release of the Cochrane ROB tool (up to 2009). Most used the Cochrane Handbook 4.2 or Jadad's scale for risk or quality assessment. From 2009 to March 2011 69 SRs were identified. While “risk of bias” was reported for approximately two-thirds of SRs, only two SRs mentioned use of a “risk of bias tool” in their assessment. Only 5.8% (4/69) of reviews reported information on all six domains which are involved in the ROB tool. A risk of bias graph/summary figure was provided in 2.9% (2/69) of reviews. Most SRs gave information about sequence generation, allocation concealment, blindness, and incomplete outcome data, however, few reviews (5.8%; 4/69) described selective reporting or other potential sources of bias. Conclusions The Cochrane “risk of bias” tool has not been used in all SRs/MAs of acupuncture published in Chinese Journals after 2008. When the ROB tool was used, reporting of relevant information was often incomplete. PMID:22174772

  16. Fear Conditioned Responses and PTSD Symptoms in Children: Sex Differences in Fear-Related Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Gamwell, Kaitlyn; Nylocks, Maria; Cross, Dorthie; Bradley, Bekh; Norrholm, Seth D.

    2016-01-01

    Fear conditioning studies in adults have found that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with heightened fear responses and impaired discrimination. The objective of the current study was to examine the association between PTSD symptoms and fear conditioned responses in children from a highly traumatized urban population. Children between 8 and 13 years old participated in a fear conditioning study in addition to providing information about their trauma history and PTSD symptoms. Results showed that females showed less discrimination between danger and safety signals during conditioning compared to age-matched males. In boys, intrusive symptoms were predictive of fear responses, even after controlling for trauma exposure. However, in girls, conditioned fear to the danger cue was predictive of self-blame and fear of repeated trauma. This study suggests there are early sex differences in the patterns of fear conditioning and that these sex differences may translate to differential risk for trauma-related psychopathology. PMID:26011240

  17. Fear conditioned responses and PTSD symptoms in children: Sex differences in fear-related symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gamwell, Kaitlyn; Nylocks, Maria; Cross, Dorthie; Bradley, Bekh; Norrholm, Seth D; Jovanovic, Tanja

    2015-11-01

    Fear conditioning studies in adults have found that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with heightened fear responses and impaired discrimination. The objective of the current study was to examine the association between PTSD symptoms and fear conditioned responses in children from a highly traumatized urban population. Children between 8 and 13 years old participated in a fear conditioning study in addition to providing information about their trauma history and PTSD symptoms. Results showed that females showed less discrimination between danger and safety signals during conditioning compared to age-matched males. In boys, intrusive symptoms were predictive of fear responses, even after controlling for trauma exposure. However, in girls, conditioned fear to the danger cue was predictive of self-blame and fear of repeated trauma. This study suggests there are early sex differences in the patterns of fear conditioning and that these sex differences may translate to differential risk for trauma-related psychopathology. PMID:26011240

  18. Fear-relevant illusory correlations in different fears and anxiety disorders: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wiemer, Julian; Pauli, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Fearful individuals often overestimate the relationship between fear-relevant stimuli and aversive consequences. Such fear-relevant illusory correlations (ICs) might be involved in the maintenance of anxiety disorders. In this literature review, we found clear evidence that ICs are present and enhanced in fear of animals. We also revealed some evidence for ICs related to fear of flying, social anxiety, contamination fear, panic disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder, but with considerably less clarity. Fear-relevant ICs seem to be best explained by both a priori expectancies and biased encoding of the experienced associations. Studies to date suggest that one important biased encoding process is the enhanced aversiveness/salience of fear-relevant outcomes. Future studies may improve insight by developing more reliable IC measures and testing the effect of encoding processes on treatment outcomes. PMID:27454587

  19. Effect of laser acupuncture versus traditional acupuncture in neck pain of cervical spondylosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kharbotly, Ahmed M.; El-Gendy, Alyaa A.; Mohammed, Mouchira A.; El-Masry, Manal R.; Daoud, Eitedal M.; Hassan, Nagwa; Abdel-Wahab, Khaled G.; Helmy, Ghada; Mostafa, Taymour

    2014-02-01

    This prospective cohort study aimed to compare the efficiency of laser versus traditional acupuncture in treating cervical spondylosis (CS) pain. Forty female patients were randomized into two equal groups that received 3 sessions / week for 4 weeks. Group A received needle acupuncture therapy with electrical stimulation for 20 min at standard acupoints, ear points and Ashi point on the average 3 points. Group B received low level laser therapy (LLLT) acupuncture at the same acupoints. The results demonstrated that tenderness disappeared in 65% of patients in group A and 75% of patients in group B with improved percentage of 85.5% and 89.2%. Pain on VAS related to direction of motion at 6 directions was improved in all cases where with improvement percentage 76.45% and 85.88%. Pain on VAS at rest was improved in all patients with improvement percentage of 80.41% and 84.28%. NDIQ score improved in all patients with improvement percentage of 69.78% and 73.77%. Follow up of VAS after 6 months from the last session revealed persistent improvement in 55% of patients of group A vs 80% of patients of group B. Mean serum TNF-α was decreased in 85% of patients of group A vs 95% of patients of group B where serum beta endorphins was increased in all patients. It is concluded that both modes of treatment for CS gave improvement regarding pain intensity, disability and quality of life being more evident in LLLT followed for 6 months supported with improved serum TNFα and beta endorphin.

  20. The needle and the lancet: acupuncture in Britain, 1683-2000.

    PubMed

    Bivins, R

    2001-06-01

    Although commonly regarded as a late twentieth century phenomenon, acupuncture use in Britain has a surprisingly long history, beginning with its seventeenth century transmission from China and Japan. Acupuncture was in use in the great hospitals of Paris before a second stage of transmission and translation brought it to nineteenth century Britain. Acupuncture's first wave of popularity and its results in British medical practice can be examined through examples drawn from the Lancet, the BMJ and other medical periodicals. This historical transmission of acupuncture to the UK can be fruitfully compared to its modern analogue, and historical patterns of acupuncture use can be compared with those displayed in contemporary Britain. PMID:11471579

  1. WHO and the development of acupuncture nomenclature: overcoming a Tower of Babel.

    PubMed

    Akerele, O

    1991-01-01

    At present, WHO does not have an official policy on acupuncture. The Organization's policies are usually developed after a debate has taken place on a particular health issue. There has not yet been a debate on acupuncture. This paper reviews WHO's efforts to produce a standard acupuncture nomenclature as a first step towards ensuring that a debate on acupuncture takes place in an atmosphere of greater understanding of the contribution that acupuncture can make in the delivery of health care. Activities that the programme for traditional medicine hopes to implement in the coming years are outlined. PMID:1897496

  2. Fear, Trust, and Negotiating Safety

    PubMed Central

    Epperson, Matthew W.; Platais, Ingrida; Valera, Pamela; Barbieri, Raye; Gilbert, Louisa; El-Bassel, Nabila

    2010-01-01

    Through in-depth interviews, this study examined the relational context of sexual HIV risk for 10 Black women aged 18–30 who were defendants in a community court setting. A qualitative data analysis identified themes of actual and feared intimate partner violence (IPV) and the expectations of demonstrating trust in a relationship as obstacles to negotiating the use of condoms. The findings speak to the broader structural factors and consequences of IPV and drug use. The article discusses the implications for HIV prevention for Black women who are involved in the criminal justice system. PMID:20445827

  3. Scales

    MedlinePlus

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Eczema , ringworm , and psoriasis ...

  4. [AMYGDALA: NEUROANATOMY AND NEUROPHYSIOLOGY OF FEAR].

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, E A; Krasnoshchekova, E I; Vesselkin, N P; Kharazova, A D

    2015-01-01

    This work describes neuroanatomical and neurophysiological mechanisms of Pavlovian fear conditioning, focusing on contributions of the amygdala, a subcortical nuclear group, to control of conditioned fear responses. The mechanisms of synaptic plasticity at projections to the amygdala and within amygdala were shown to mediate the formation and retention of fear memory. This work reviews current data on anatomical organization of the amygdala, as well as its afferent and efferent projections, in respect to the role of the amygdala in auditory fear conditioning during which acoustic signals serve as the conditioned stimulus. PMID:26983275

  5. Neurobehavioral mechanisms of human fear generalization

    PubMed Central

    Dunsmoor, Joseph E.; Prince, Steven E.; Murty, Vishnu P.; Kragel, Philip A.; LaBar, Kevin S.

    2011-01-01

    While much research has elucidated the neurobiology of fear learning, the neural systems supporting the generalization of learned fear are unknown. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we show that regions involved in the acquisition of fear support the generalization of fear to stimuli that are similar to a learned threat, but vary in fear intensity value. Behaviorally, subjects retrospectively misidentified a learned threat as a more intense stimulus and expressed greater skin conductance responses (SCR) to generalized stimuli of high intensity. Brain activity related to intensity-based fear generalization was observed in the striatum, insula, thalamus/periacqueductal gray, and subgenual cingulate cortex. The psychophysiological expression of generalized fear correlated with amygdala activity, and connectivity between the amygdala and extrastriate visual cortex was correlated with individual differences in trait anxiety. These findings reveal the brain regions and functional networks involved in flexibly responding to stimuli that resemble a learned threat. These regions may comprise an intensity-based fear generalization circuit that underlies retrospective biases in threat value estimation and overgeneralization of fear in anxiety disorders. PMID:21256233

  6. Immediate extinction promotes the return of fear.

    PubMed

    Merz, Christian J; Hamacher-Dang, Tanja C; Wolf, Oliver T

    2016-05-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that immediate extinction is less effective than delayed extinction in attenuating the return of fear. This line of fear conditioning research impacts the proposed onset of psychological interventions after threatening situations. In the present study, forty healthy men were investigated in a differential fear conditioning paradigm with fear acquisition in context A, extinction in context B, followed by retrieval testing in both contexts 24h later to test fear renewal. Differently coloured lights served as conditioned stimuli (CS): two CS (CS+) were paired with an electrical stimulation that served as unconditioned stimulus, the third CS was never paired (CS-). Extinction took place immediately after fear acquisition or 24h later. One CS+ was extinguished whereas the second CS+ remained unextinguished to control for different time intervals between fear acquisition and retrieval testing. Immediate extinction led to larger skin conductance responses during fear retrieval to both the extinguished and unextinguished CS relative to the CS-, indicating a stronger return of fear compared to delayed extinction. Taken together, immediate extinction is less potent than delayed extinction and is associated with a stronger renewal effect. Thus, the time-point of psychological interventions relative to the offset of threatening situations needs to be carefully considered to prevent relapses. PMID:26995309

  7. Current status of acupuncture and moxibustion in China.

    PubMed

    Lim, Min Yee; Huang, Jian; Zhao, Baixiao; Ha, Lue

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture and moxibustion are more integrated in the Chinese healthcare system than in the national healthcare systems of other countries. Development of acupuncture and moxibustion in China is making progress in this field. For overseas researchers, this commentary offers perspectives on the current status of acupuncture and moxibustion in China and examines relevant opportunities and challenges in healthcare reforms. There has been a steady increase in the number of undergraduates and postgraduates studying acupuncture and moxibustion in Chinese Medicine (CM) universities in China over the past decade. The legislation of CM physicians that was established in 1999 and the launch of continuing medical education in CM in 2002 have ensured the basic competency of practitioners. The Chinese Government has also shown support for CM development by increasing investment in related fields of research and administration. New challenges have emerged as the healthcare landscape in China has evolved over the past decade. It is important to harness the potential of acupuncture and moxibustion to create a value-driven healthcare system that meets the health needs of a rapidly aging society. PMID:27408616

  8. In vivo Monitoring of Serotonin by Nanomaterial Functionalized Acupuncture Needle.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Tao; Tang, Li-Na; Ning, Yong; Shu, Qing; Liang, Feng-Xia; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture treatment is amazing but controversial. Up to now, the mechanism of treating diseases by acupuncture and moxibustion is still unclear, especially the occurrence of the molecular events in local acupoints. Herein, we report an extremely stable microsensor by modifying carbon nanotube (CNT) to the tip surface of acupuncture needle and applying this CNT-modified acupuncture needle for real time monitoring of serotonin (5-HT) in vivo. To stabilize CNT modification on the needle tip surface, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)(PEDOT) was employed as glue water to stick CNT on the needle. The detection limit of the CNT-modified needle was found to be approximately 50 nM and 78 nM in the PBS and the cell medium, respectively. In addition, the needle showed good selectivity to some inflammatory mediators and some electroactive molecules. For the first time, the CNT-modified needle could be directly probed into rat body for real time monitoring of 5-HT in vivo, showing a great potential for better understanding the mechanism of acupuncture treatment. PMID:27301303

  9. In vivo Monitoring of Serotonin by Nanomaterial Functionalized Acupuncture Needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Tao; Tang, Li-Na; Ning, Yong; Shu, Qing; Liang, Feng-Xia; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Acupuncture treatment is amazing but controversial. Up to now, the mechanism of treating diseases by acupuncture and moxibustion is still unclear, especially the occurrence of the molecular events in local acupoints. Herein, we report an extremely stable microsensor by modifying carbon nanotube (CNT) to the tip surface of acupuncture needle and applying this CNT-modified acupuncture needle for real time monitoring of serotonin (5-HT) in vivo. To stabilize CNT modification on the needle tip surface, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)(PEDOT) was employed as glue water to stick CNT on the needle. The detection limit of the CNT-modified needle was found to be approximately 50 nM and 78 nM in the PBS and the cell medium, respectively. In addition, the needle showed good selectivity to some inflammatory mediators and some electroactive molecules. For the first time, the CNT-modified needle could be directly probed into rat body for real time monitoring of 5-HT in vivo, showing a great potential for better understanding the mechanism of acupuncture treatment.

  10. In vivo Monitoring of Serotonin by Nanomaterial Functionalized Acupuncture Needle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Tao; Tang, Li-Na; Ning, Yong; Shu, Qing; Liang, Feng-Xia; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture treatment is amazing but controversial. Up to now, the mechanism of treating diseases by acupuncture and moxibustion is still unclear, especially the occurrence of the molecular events in local acupoints. Herein, we report an extremely stable microsensor by modifying carbon nanotube (CNT) to the tip surface of acupuncture needle and applying this CNT-modified acupuncture needle for real time monitoring of serotonin (5-HT) in vivo. To stabilize CNT modification on the needle tip surface, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)(PEDOT) was employed as glue water to stick CNT on the needle. The detection limit of the CNT-modified needle was found to be approximately 50 nM and 78 nM in the PBS and the cell medium, respectively. In addition, the needle showed good selectivity to some inflammatory mediators and some electroactive molecules. For the first time, the CNT-modified needle could be directly probed into rat body for real time monitoring of 5-HT in vivo, showing a great potential for better understanding the mechanism of acupuncture treatment. PMID:27301303

  11. [Development of Researches on Acupuncture Treatment of Peripheral Nerve Injury].

    PubMed

    Tao, Xing; Ma, Tie-ming

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a common clinical disease. Acupuncture therapy has been demonstrated to be effective in improving nerve injury in clinical practice, but its underlying mechanisms in prompting tissue repair basically remain unknown. In the present paper, the authors reviewed some descriptions of traditional Chinese medicine on peripheral nerve injury and treatment, and recent development of researches on acupuncture treatment of it in both clinical practice and animal studies. Clinical trials demonstrated that acupuncture treatment can relieve nerve injury induced pain, ameliorate both sensory and motor functions. Experimental studies showed that acupuncture stimulation may promote nerve repair by reducing desquamation of medullary sheath of nerve fibers, inhibiting apoptosis of nerve cells, and up-regulating expression of myelin basic protein, Slit-1 protein and gene, etc. In addition, acupuncture intervention may also improve the microenvironment of neural regeneration including increase of the proliferation and differentiation of Schwann cells and release of various types of neurotrophic factors. However, its mechanisms underlying accelerating rehabilitation of peripheral nerve injury need being researched further. PMID:27141630

  12. [Profound meaning of acupuncture taboos in Internal Classic based on the fault of reinforcing and reducing technique by mind conduction of acupuncture therapy].

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuge; Wang, Feng; Qin, Yuheng; Li, Li; Li, Mei

    2016-05-01

    By analyzing the acupuncture taboos in Neijing (Internal Classic) on clinical application of mind conduction of acupuncture therapy in going against the actual situation, astronomy and others, it is found that the relevant acupuncture taboo implies many subtle mysteries of human body, qi, mind and astronomy, which have not been discovered yet in modern science and are very significant in qi protection. In Neijing, the acupuncture physicians have been highly required in the mind treatment, in which, accurately regulating qi circulation is the target in the treatment. The mind conduction is used for qi circulation to accomplish accurately the reinforcing or reducing in the deficiency or excess condition. All of the taboos are provided to normalize the accuracy of reinforcing and reducing technique of acupuncture therapy and avoid the damage of qi in human body. Hence, those taboos must be obeyed so as to prevent from serious consequence and ensure the safety of this acupuncture therapy. PMID:27509623

  13. Deqi Is Double-Faced: The Acupuncture Practitioner's and the Subject's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Chang Shik; Chae, Younbyeong; Kang, O-Seok; Kim, Seung-Tae; Hahm, Dae-Hyun; Park, Ji-Yeun; Lee, Hyejung; Park, Hi-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Background. While therapeutic acupuncture perception (deqi) has recently been investigated only for the subject's perception, classical acupuncture discussed acupuncture perception for both the practitioner and the subject. The aim of this study was to explore the practitioner's and the subject's acupuncture perception during acupuncture. Methods. Explorative crossover study to quantitatively document acupuncture perception of both the practitioner and the subject. Eighty-one participants acted as a practitioner or a subject. The practitioner's and the subject's acupuncture perceptions were collected using self-report type checklists. Acupuncture needles were inserted to LI4 or ST36, adopting a four-phase method: insertion into shallow, middle, and deep depths, followed by twirling manipulation. Pain, transmission, dullness, and soreness feelings of the subject and thick, tangled, solid, and empty feelings of the practitioner were analyzed for their correlation. Results. The practitioner's and the subject's perception showed a significant correlation. Acupuncture perception varied over four phases of needling, with a tendency to be rated higher when inserted deep. Perception for LI4 was generally higher than those for ST36. Conclusion. The practitioner's acupuncture perception was successfully documented and analyzed in relation to the subject's acupuncture perception and different needling conditions. PMID:26689128

  14. Acupuncture for the Treatment of Oculomotor Paralysis: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Jia-Qi; Li, Wei; Yang, Qi; Li, Bao-lin; Meng, Qing-Gang; Liu, Yu-fu

    2016-01-01

    This study consisted of a single centre randomised controlled trial with two parallel arms: an acupuncture group (n = 20) with 27 affected eyes and a sham group (n = 20) with 23 affected eyes. Participants in the acupuncture group received acupuncture treatment once daily, three times weekly for four weeks. Participants assigned to the control group received sham acupuncture, the same protocol as that used for the acupuncture group but without insertion of needles into the skin. The primary outcome measure was the cervical range of motion (CROM) score. Secondary outcome measures were the palpebral fissure size, response rate, and adverse events. All 40 participants completed the study. In the comparison of acupuncture and sham acupuncture, a significant difference was observed between acupuncture and sham acupuncture in CROM score (21.37 ± 15.16 and 32.21 ± 19.54, resp.) (P < 0.05) and palpebral fissure size (7.19 ± 2.94 and 5.41 ± 2.45, resp.) (P < 0.05). Response rate was also significantly different in the acupuncture group (P < 0.05). No adverse events were reported in both groups in this study. In summary, it was demonstrated that acupuncture had a feasibility positive effect on oculomotor paralysis. PMID:27313646

  15. Fear conditioning induced by interpersonal conflicts in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Tada, Mitsuhiro; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Takaki; Konishi, Mika; Umeda, Satoshi; Terasawa, Yuri; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Mimura, Masaru; Miyazaki, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    Psychophysiological markers have been focused to investigate the psychopathology of psychiatric disorders and personality subtypes. In order to understand neurobiological mechanisms underlying these conditions, fear-conditioning model has been widely used. However, simple aversive stimuli are too simplistic to understand mechanisms because most patients with psychiatric disorders are affected by social stressors. The objective of this study was to test the feasibility of a newly-designed conditioning experiment using a stimulus to cause interpersonal conflicts and examine associations between personality traits and response to that stimulus. Twenty-nine healthy individuals underwent the fear conditioning and extinction experiments in response to three types of stimuli: a simple aversive sound, disgusting pictures, and pictures of an actors' face with unpleasant verbal messages that were designed to cause interpersonal conflicts. Conditioned response was quantified by the skin conductance response (SCR). Correlations between the SCR changes, and personality traits measured by the Zanarini Rating Scale for Borderline Personality Disorder (ZAN-BPD) and Revised NEO Personality Inventory were explored. The interpersonal conflict stimulus resulted in successful conditioning, which was subsequently extinguished, in a similar manner as the other two stimuli. Moreover, a greater degree of conditioned response to the interpersonal conflict stimulus correlated with a higher ZAN-BPD total score. Fear conditioning and extinction can be successfully achieved, using interpersonal conflicts as a stimulus. Given that conditioned fear caused by the interpersonal conflicts is likely associated with borderline personality traits, this paradigm could contribute to further understanding of underlying mechanisms of interpersonal fear implicated in borderline personality disorder. PMID:25978817

  16. An Empirical Taxonomy of Youths' Fears: Cluster Analysis of the American Fear Survey Schedule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnham, Joy J.; Schaefer, Barbara A.; Giesen, Judy

    2006-01-01

    Fears profiles among children and adolescents were explored using the Fear Survey Schedule for Children-American version (FSSC-AM; J.J. Burnham, 1995, 2005). Eight cluster profiles were identified via multistage Euclidean grouping and supported by homogeneity coefficients and replication. Four clusters reflected overall level of fears (i.e., very…

  17. The Children's Fear Expression and Research Survey: (Children's F.E.A.R.S.).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Michael H.

    The Children's Fear Expression and Research Survey (Children's F.E.A.R.S.) is a new self-report measure of fear suitable for children in grades two through six. The survey is designed to meet current psychometric standards and to be useful in both clinical and research settings. Originally 200 test items were drawn from existing measures; from the…

  18. Hippocampal Structural Plasticity Accompanies the Resulting Contextual Fear Memory Following Stress and Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giachero, Marcelo; Calfa, Gaston D.; Molina, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    The present research investigated the resulting contextual fear memory and structural plasticity changes in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) following stress and fear conditioning. This combination enhanced fear retention and increased the number of total and mature dendritic spines in DH. Intra-basolateral amygdala (BLA) infusion of midazolam prior to…

  19. Forming Competing Fear Learning and Extinction Memories in Adolescence Makes Fear Difficult to Inhibit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Kathryn D.; Richardson, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Fear inhibition is markedly impaired in adolescent rodents and humans. The present experiments investigated whether this impairment is critically determined by the animal's age at the time of fear learning or their age at fear extinction. Male rats (n = 170) were tested for extinction retention after conditioning and extinction at different ages.…

  20. Conditioned Fear Extinction and Reinstatement in a Human Fear-Potentiated Startle Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norrholm, Seth D.; Jovanovic, Tanja; Vervliet, Bram; Myers, Karyn M.; Davis, Michael; Rothbaum, Barbara O.; Duncan, Erica J.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze fear extinction and reinstatement in humans using fear-potentiated startle. Participants were fear conditioned using a simple discrimination procedure with colored lights as the conditioned stimuli (CSs) and an airblast to the throat as the unconditioned stimulus (US). Participants were extinguished 24 h…

  1. Generalization of Conditioned Fear along a Dimension of Increasing Fear Intensity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunsmoor, Joseph E.; Mitroff, Stephen R.; LaBar, Kevin S.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the extent to which fear generalization in humans is determined by the amount of fear intensity in nonconditioned stimuli relative to a perceptually similar conditioned stimulus. Stimuli consisted of graded emotionally expressive faces of the same identity morphed between neutral and fearful endpoints. Two…

  2. The Effects of Positive or Neutral Communication during Acupuncture for Relaxing Effects: A Sham-Controlled Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rosén, Annelie; Lekander, Mats; Jensen, Karin; Sachs, Lisbeth; Petrovic, Predrag; Ingvar, Martin; Enblom, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The link between patient-clinician communication and its effect on clinical outcomes is an important clinical issue that is yet to be elucidated. Objective. Investigating if communication type (positive or neutral) about the expected treatment outcome affected (i) participants' expectations and (ii) short-term relaxation effects in response to genuine or sham acupuncture and investigating if expectations were related to outcome. Methods. Healthy volunteers (n = 243, mean age of 42) were randomized to one treatment with genuine or sham acupuncture. Within groups, participants were randomized to positive or neutral communication, regarding expected treatment effects. Visual Analogue Scales (0–100 millimeters) were used to measure treatment expectations and relaxation, directly before and after treatment. Results. Participants in the positive communication group reported higher treatment expectancy, compared to the neutral communication group (md 12 versus 6 mm, p = 0.002). There was no difference in relaxation effects between acupuncture groups or between communication groups. Participants with high baseline expectancy perceived greater improvement in relaxation, compared to participants with low baseline levels (md 27 versus 15 mm, p = 0.022). Conclusion. Our data highlights the importance of expectations for treatment outcome and demonstrates that expectations can be effectively manipulated using a standardized protocol that in future research may be implemented in clinical trials. PMID:26981138

  3. Warm Needling Therapy and Acupuncture at Meridian-Sinew Sites Based on the Meridian-Sinew Theory: Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong; Nie, Wenbin; Sun, Yuxiu; Li, Sinuo; Yang, Su; Meng, Fanying; Zhang, Liping; Wang, Fang; Huang, Shixi

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of warm needling acupuncture at meridian-sinew sites based on the meridian-sinew theory in the treatment of hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) after stroke. In total, 124 subjects were randomized into a treatment group and control group. In the treatment group, warm needling therapy and acupuncture at meridian-sinew sites based on the meridian-sinew theory were performed. In the control group, usual care therapy was applied. The visual analog scale (VAS) score, range of motion (ROM), and Barthel index (BI) were used to evaluate treatment effectiveness. At 2 weeks of treatment, the VAS score, ROM, and BI had obviously changed from baseline in the two groups (P < 0.01). The changes in the VAS score and ROM in the treatment group were significantly greater than those in the control group (P < 0.01). At the 3-month follow-up after treatment, the changes in the treatment group were significantly greater than those in the control group (P < 0.01). This study indicates that warm needling therapy with acupuncture at meridian-sinew sites based on the meridian-sinew theory is effective for HSP. PMID:26495023

  4. Mediators, Receptors, and Signalling Pathways in the Anti-Inflammatory and Antihyperalgesic Effects of Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, John L.; Cripps, Allan W.; Smith, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture has been used for millennia to treat allergic diseases including both intermittent rhinitis and persistent rhinitis. Besides the research on the efficacy and safety of acupuncture treatment for allergic rhinitis, research has also investigated how acupuncture might modulate immune function to exert anti-inflammatory effects. A proposed model has previously hypothesized that acupuncture might downregulate proinflammatory neuropeptides, proinflammatory cytokines, and neurotrophins, modulating transient receptor potential vallinoid (TRPV1), a G-protein coupled receptor which plays a central role in allergic rhinitis. Recent research has been largely supportive of this model. New advances in research include the discovery of a novel cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway activated by acupuncture. A chemokine-mediated proliferation of opioid-containing macrophages in inflamed tissues, in response to acupuncture, has also been demonstrated for the first time. Further research on the complex cross talk between receptors during inflammation is also helping to elucidate the mediators and signalling pathways activated by acupuncture. PMID:26339274

  5. Laser acupuncture induced specific cerebral cortical and subcortical activations in humans.

    PubMed

    Siedentopf, Christian M; Koppelstaetter, Florian; Haala, Ilka Anna; Haid, Veronika; Rhomberg, Paul; Ischebeck, Anja; Buchberger, Waltraud; Felber, Stephan; Schlager, Andreas; Golaszewski, Stefan M

    2005-09-01

    As recent studies demonstrated, acupuncture can elicit activity in specific brain areas. This study aims to explore further the central effect using laser acupuncture. We investigated the cerebral effects of laser acupuncture at both acupoints GB43 with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). As a control condition the laser was mounted at the same acupoints but without application of laser stimulation. The group results showed significant brain activations within the thalamus, nucleus subthalamicus, nucleus ruber, the brainstem, and the Brodmann areas 40 and 22 for the acupuncture condition. No significant brain activations were observed within the placebo condition. The activations we observed were laser acupuncture-specific and predominantly ipsilateral. This supports the assumption that acupuncture is mediated by meridians, since meridians do not cross to the other side. Furthermore, we could show that laser acupuncture allows one to design a pure placebo condition. PMID:15990948

  6. Fear of Pain Mediates the Association between MC1R Genotype and Dental Fear.

    PubMed

    Randall, C L; McNeil, D W; Shaffer, J R; Crout, R J; Weyant, R J; Marazita, M L

    2016-09-01

    Fear of pain is experienced in acute and chronic pain populations, as well as in the general population, and it affects numerous aspects of the orofacial pain experience, including pain intensity, pain-related disability, and pain behavior (e.g., avoidance). A related but separate construct-dental fear-is also experienced in the general population, and it influences dental treatment-seeking behavior and oral and systemic health. Minimal work has addressed the role of genetics in the etiologies of fear of pain and dental fear. Limited available data suggest that variants of the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene may predict greater levels of dental fear. The MC1R gene also may be etiologically important for fear of pain. This study aimed to replicate the finding that MC1R variant status predicts dental fear and to determine, for the first time, whether MC1R variant status predicts fear of pain. Participants were 817 Caucasian participants (62.5% female; mean ± SD age: 34.7 ± 8.7 y) taking part in a cross-sectional project that identified determinants of oral diseases at the community, family, and individual levels. Participants were genotyped for single-nucleotide polymorphisms on MC1R and completed self-report measures of fear of pain and dental fear. Presence of MC1R variant alleles predicted higher levels of dental fear and fear of pain. Importantly, fear of pain mediated the relation between MC1R variant status and dental fear (B = 1.60, 95% confidence interval: 0.281 to 3.056). MC1R variants may influence orofacial pain perception and, in turn, predispose individuals to develop fears about pain. Such fears influence the pain experience and associated pain behaviors, as well as fears about dental treatment. This study provides support for genetic contributions to the development/maintenance of fear of pain and dental fear, and it offers directions for future research to identify potential targets for intervention in the treatment of fear of pain and dental

  7. Conditioned fear modulates visual selection.

    PubMed

    Mulckhuyse, Manon; Crombez, Geert; Van der Stigchel, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    Eye movements reflect the dynamic interplay between top-down- and bottom-up-driven processes. For example, when we voluntarily move our eyes across the visual field, salient visual stimuli in the environment may capture our attention, our eyes, or modulate the trajectory of an eye movement. Previous research has shown that the behavioral relevance of a salient stimulus modulates these processes. This study investigated whether a stimulus signaling an aversive event modulates saccadic behavior. Using a differential fear-conditioning procedure, we presented a threatening (conditional stimulus: CS+) and a nonthreatening stimulus distractor (CS-) during an oculomotor selection task. The results show that short-latency saccades deviated more strongly toward the CS+ than toward the CS- distractor, whereas long-latency saccades deviated more strongly away from the CS+ than from the CS- distractor. Moreover, the CS+ distractor captured the eyes more often than the CS- distractor. Together, these results demonstrate that conditioned fear has a direct and immediate influence on visual selection. The findings are interpreted in terms of a neurobiological model of emotional visual processing. PMID:23356561

  8. As Acupressure Decreases Pain, Acupuncture May Improve Some Aspects of Quality of Life for Women with Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Abaraogu, Ukachukwu Okoroafor; Tabansi-Ochuogu, Chidinma Samantha

    2015-10-01

    Primary dysmenorrhea is the most common gynecological symptom reported by women and constitutes a high health, social, and economic burden. Chemotherapies, along with their side effects, have not yielded satisfactory outcomes. Alternative nonpharmacological interventions, including acupuncture and acupressure, have been advocated, but evidence regarding their beneficial effect is inconclusive. This study sought to obtain evidence on the effectiveness of acupuncture and acupressure interventions. Twelve electronic databases were searched by using menstrual pain intensity and quality of life as primary and secondary outcomes, respectively, with the PEDro guideline for quality appraisal. Data unsuitable for a meta-analysis were reported as descriptive data. The search yielded 38 citations, from which eight studies were systematically reviewed, four of the eight being eligible for meta-analysis. The systematic review showed moderate methodological quality with a mean of 6.1 out of 10 on the PEDro quality scale. Acupressure showed evidence of pain relief while acupuncture improved both the mental and the physical components of quality of life. In conclusion, physiotherapists should consider using acupuncture and acupressure to treat primary dysmenorrhea, but a need exists for higher quality, randomized, blinded, sham-controlled trials with adequate sample sizes to establish clearly the effects of these modalities. PMID:26433798

  9. Durable fear memories require PSD-95.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, P J; Pinard, C R; Camp, M C; Feyder, M; Sah, A; Bergstrom, H C; Graybeal, C; Liu, Y; Schlüter, O M; Grant, S G; Singewald, N; Xu, W; Holmes, A

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic fear memories are highly durable but also dynamic, undergoing repeated reactivation and rehearsal over time. Although overly persistent fear memories underlie anxiety disorders, such as posttraumatic stress disorder, the key neural and molecular mechanisms underlying fear memory durability remain unclear. Postsynaptic density 95 (PSD-95) is a synaptic protein regulating glutamate receptor anchoring, synaptic stability and certain types of memory. Using a loss-of-function mutant mouse lacking the guanylate kinase domain of PSD-95 (PSD-95(GK)), we analyzed the contribution of PSD-95 to fear memory formation and retrieval, and sought to identify the neural basis of PSD-95-mediated memory maintenance using ex vivo immediate-early gene mapping, in vivo neuronal recordings and viral-mediated knockdown (KD) approaches. We show that PSD-95 is dispensable for the formation and expression of recent fear memories, but essential for the formation of precise and flexible fear memories and for the maintenance of memories at remote time points. The failure of PSD-95(GK) mice to retrieve remote cued fear memory was associated with hypoactivation of the infralimbic (IL) cortex (but not the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) or prelimbic cortex), reduced IL single-unit firing and bursting, and attenuated IL gamma and theta oscillations. Adeno-associated virus-mediated PSD-95 KD in the IL, but not the ACC, was sufficient to impair recent fear extinction and remote fear memory, and remodel IL dendritic spines. Collectively, these data identify PSD-95 in the IL as a critical mechanism supporting the durability of fear memories over time. These preclinical findings have implications for developing novel approaches to treating trauma-based anxiety disorders that target the weakening of overly persistent fear memories. PMID:25510511

  10. Reduced fear-recognition sensitivity following acute buprenorphine administration in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ipser, Jonathan C; Terburg, David; Syal, Supriya; Phillips, Nicole; Solms, Mark; Panksepp, Jaak; Malcolm-Smith, Susan; Thomas, Kevin; Stein, Dan J; van Honk, Jack

    2013-01-01

    In rodents, the endogenous opioid system has been implicated in emotion regulation, and in the reduction of fear in particular. In humans, while there is evidence that the opioid antagonist naloxone acutely enhances the acquisition of conditioned fear, there are no corresponding data on the effect of opioid agonists in moderating responses to fear. We investigated whether a single 0.2mg administration of the mu-opioid agonist buprenorphine would decrease fear sensitivity with an emotion-recognition paradigm. Healthy human subjects participated in a randomized placebo-controlled within-subject design, in which they performed a dynamic emotion recognition task 120min after administration of buprenorphine and placebo. In the recognition task, basic emotional expressions were morphed between their full expression and neutral in 2% steps, and presented as dynamic video-clips with final frames of different emotional intensity for each trial, which allows for a fine-grained measurement of emotion sensitivity. Additionally, visual analog scales were used to investigate acute effects of buprenorphine on mood. Compared to placebo, buprenorphine resulted in a significant reduction in the sensitivity for recognizing fearful facial expressions exclusively. Our data demonstrate, for the first time in humans, that acute up-regulation of the opioid system reduces fear recognition sensitivity. Moreover, the absence of an effect of buprenorphine on mood provides evidence of a direct influence of opioids upon the core fear system in the human brain. PMID:22651957

  11. Lumbar spine osteomyelitis and epidural abscess formation secondary to acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Godhania, Vinesh

    2016-01-01

    A 39-year-old male with no previous medical history presented with abdominal and low back pain. Based on clinical and radiological findings he was diagnosed with L1/L2 osteomyelitis and epidural abscess. Further history taking revealed recent use of acupuncture for treatment of mechanical back pain. The patient was treated conservatively with an extended course of antibiotics, monitored with repeat MRI scans and had a full recovery with no neurological deficit. This is the first reported case of epidural abscess formation and osteomyelitis after acupuncture in the UK. As acupuncture becomes more commonly used in western countries, it is important to be aware of this rare but serious complication. PMID:26976275

  12. Effects of Acupuncture on Sensory Perception: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Baeumler, Petra I.; Fleckenstein, Johannes; Takayama, Shin; Simang, Michael; Seki, Takashi; Irnich, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Background The effect of acupuncture on sensory perception has never been systematically reviewed; although, studies on acupuncture mechanisms are frequently based on the idea that changes in sensory thresholds reflect its effect on the nervous system. Methods Pubmed, EMBASE and Scopus were screened for studies investigating the effect of acupuncture on thermal or mechanical detection or pain thresholds in humans published in English or German. A meta-analysis of high quality studies was performed. Results Out of 3007 identified articles 85 were included. Sixty five studies showed that acupuncture affects at least one sensory threshold. Most studies assessed the pressure pain threshold of which 80% reported an increase after acupuncture. Significant short- and long-term effects on the pressure pain threshold in pain patients were revealed by two meta-analyses including four and two high quality studies, respectively. In over 60% of studies, acupuncture reduced sensitivity to noxious thermal stimuli, but measuring methods might influence results. Few but consistent data indicate that acupuncture reduces pin-prick like pain but not mechanical detection. Results on thermal detection are heterogeneous. Sensory threshold changes were equally frequent reported after manual acupuncture as after electroacupuncture. Among 48 sham-controlled studies, 25 showed stronger effects on sensory thresholds through verum than through sham acupuncture, but in 9 studies significant threshold changes were also observed after sham acupuncture. Overall, there is a lack of high quality acupuncture studies applying comprehensive assessments of sensory perception. Conclusions Our findings indicate that acupuncture affects sensory perception. Results are most compelling for the pressure pain threshold, especially in pain conditions associated with tenderness. Sham acupuncture can also cause such effects. Future studies should incorporate comprehensive, standardized assessments of sensory

  13. Plasticity of Fear and Safety Neurons of the Amygdala in Response to Fear Extinction

    PubMed Central

    Sangha, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Fear inhibition learning induces plasticity and remodeling of circuits within the amygdala. Most studies examine these changes in nondiscriminative fear conditioning paradigms. Using a discriminative fear, safety, and reward conditioning task, Sangha et al. (2013) have previously reported several neural microcircuits within the basal amygdala (BA) which discriminate among these cues, including a subpopulation of neurons responding selectively to a safety cue and not a fear cue. Here, the hypothesis that these “safety” neurons isolated during discriminative conditioning are biased to become fear cue responsive as a result of extinction, when fear behavior diminishes, was tested. Although 41% of “safety” neurons became fear cue responsive as a result of extinction, the data revealed that there was no bias for these neurons to become preferentially responsive during fear extinction compared to the other identified subgroups. In addition to the plasticity seen in the “safety” neurons, 44% of neurons unresponsive to either the fear cue or safety cue during discriminative conditioning became fear cue responsive during extinction. Together these emergent responses to the fear cue as a result of extinction support the hypothesis that new learning underlies extinction. In contrast, 47% of neurons responsive to the fear cue during discriminative conditioning became unresponsive to the fear cue during extinction. These findings are consistent with a suppression of neural responding mediated by inhibitory learning, or, potentially, by direct unlearning. Together, the data support extinction as an active process involving both gains and losses of responses to the fear cue and suggests the final output of the integrated BA circuit in influencing fear behavior is a balance of excitation and inhibition, and perhaps reversal of learning-induced changes. PMID:26733838

  14. The meridian system and mechanism of acupuncture: a comparative review. Part 3: Mechanisms of acupuncture therapies.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shyang

    2013-06-01

    The human body is a hierarchical organism containing many levels of mutually interacting oscillatory systems. From the viewpoint of traditional Chinese medicine, health is a state of harmony emergent from the interactions of these systems and disease is a state of discord. Hence, human diseases are considered as disturbed functions rather than changed structures. Indeed, the change from normal to abnormal structure may be beneficent rather than maleficent. For example, when one kidney becomes twice the normal size following the destruction of the other kidney, it is good and not bad for us because we might be dead otherwise. Therefore, in Part 3 of this three-part series, emphasis is mainly laid on the acupuncture mechanisms of treating disturbed physiological functions rather than disordered structures. At first, the basic tenets of conventional neuroscience and cardiology are reevaluated so that clear understanding of how nervous and cardiovascular systems work together can be obtained. Then, the general principles of diagnosis and treatment in traditional Chinese medicine from the integrative perspective of complex dynamic systems are proposed. Finally, mechanisms of acupuncture therapies for treating 14 different categories of disorders will be elucidated via the magneto-electric inductive effects of the meridian system. PMID:23915848

  15. Desynchrony of fear in phobic exposure.

    PubMed

    van Duinen, M A; Schruers, K R J; Griez, E J L

    2010-05-01

    Intuitively, phobic exposure would seem to be a very stressful experience. However, it is not clear whether the characteristic feature of a classic stress response, activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, is present in phobic fear. Some instances of phobic fear have been found to be accompanied by robust increases in cortisol, whereas in other instances a dissociation between subjective-behavioural arousal and the HPA-axis has been found. The latter is referred to as desynchrony of fear. The aim of the current study was to test the hypothesis that phobic fear is similar to normal fear and, as such, is accompanied by a robust increase in cortisol values. In all, 16 spider phobic subjects and 16 healthy controls participated in the study. During and following a standardised stepwise exposure paradigm, saliva samples were collected for cortisol determination. In contrast to the controls, the spider phobics reacted with a strong fear reaction to the spiders. However, cortisol levels remained unaffected. The phobic response did not resemble the classic 'fight or flight' response. Some suggest that the HPA-axis response has become extinguished in modern man. Yet, it is possible that phobic fear is not a derivative of an ancient fear but rather a separate entity that relies on other neuroendocrinological systems. PMID:19074540

  16. Women's Fear of Violence in the Wilderness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Tobin; Potter, Tom G.

    1999-01-01

    Seven female students in an outdoor-recreation program were interviewed to determine how fear of violence affects experienced female wilderness travelers. The themes that emerged were stereotypes about sexual assaults, situation and trip location, and alcohol consumption. The difference between real fear and false perceptions is discussed, along…

  17. Multidimensional Treatment of Fear of Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoelter, Jon W.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a multidimensional conception of fear of death and provides subscales for measuring suggested dimensions (fear of the dying process, of the dead, of being destroyed, for significant others, of the unknown, of conscious death, for body after death, and of premature death). Evidence for construct validity is provided. (Author/BEF)

  18. Self-Directed Learning: Exploring the Fears.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricard, Virginia B.

    Many degree programs for adults include a self-directed learning component to offer learners the opportunity to use mature skills in a flexible learning environment. Problems with making the self-directed component work may be the learning setting, learner attitudes, and fears of both skilled and less skilled adult learners. Some learner fears are…

  19. Methylphenidate Enhances Extinction of Contextual Fear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Antony D.; Cunningham, Christopher L.; Lattal, K. Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH, Ritalin) is a norepinephrine and dopamine transporter blocker that is widely used in humans for treatment of attention deficit disorder and narcolepsy. Although there is some evidence that targeted microinjections of MPH may enhance fear acquisition, little is known about the effect of MPH on fear extinction. Here, we show…

  20. Neuroticism Modifies Psychophysiological Responses to Fearful Films

    PubMed Central

    Reynaud, Emmanuelle; El Khoury-Malhame, Myriam; Rossier, Jérôme; Blin, Olivier; Khalfa, Stéphanie

    2012-01-01

    Background Neuroticism is a personality component frequently found in anxious and depressive psychiatric disorders. The influence of neuroticism on negative emotions could be due to its action on stimuli related to fear and sadness, but this remains debated. Our goal was thus to better understand the impact of neuroticism through verbal and physiological assessment in response to stimuli inducing fear and sadness as compared to another negative emotion (disgust). Methods Fifteen low neurotic and 18 high neurotic subjects were assessed on an emotional attending task by using film excerpts inducing fear, disgust, and sadness. We recorded skin conductance response (SCR) and corrugator muscle activity (frowning) as indices of emotional expression. Results SCR was larger in high neurotic subjects than in low neurotics for fear relative to sadness and disgust. Moreover, corrugator activity and SCR were larger in high than in low neurotic subjects when fear was induced. Conclusion After decades of evidence that individuals higher in neuroticism experience more intense emotional reactions to even minor stressors, our results indicate that they show greater SCR and expressive reactivity specifically to stimuli evoking fear rather than to those inducing sadness or disgust. Fear processing seems mainly under the influence of neuroticism. This modulation of autonomic activity by neurotics in response to threat/fear may explain their increased vulnerability to anxious psychopathologies such as PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder). PMID:22479326

  1. The Old English Language of Fear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Erik A.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the development of the Old English vocabulary for fear under the influence of the Latinate discourse of Christian doctrine. The first chapter arranges the Old English words for fear into etymologically organized families and describes their incidence and usage across attested corpus of Old English, using the Dictionary…

  2. Helping Students Cope with Fears and Crises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walz, Garry R., Ed.; Bleuer, Jeanne C., Ed.

    This document consists of two modules extracted from a six-module larger work. Module 1 presents six articles on the topic of "helping students to cope with fears and crises." Module 2 contains 17 articles on "programs and practices for helping students cope with fears and crises." Article titles and authors are as follows: (1) "Worries of…

  3. 76 FR 25665 - No Fear Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ... COMMISSION No Fear Act AGENCY: American Battle Monuments Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The American... notification obligation under the Notification and Federal Employees Antidiscrimination and Retaliation Act (No... Retaliation Act of 2002,'' which is now known as the No FEAR Act. See Public Law 107-174, codified at 5...

  4. Effects of acupuncture in bronchial asthma: preliminary communication.

    PubMed Central

    Dias, P L; Subramaniam, S; Lionel, N D

    1982-01-01

    Twenty patients randomly assigned to an experimental and a control group participated in a double blind study to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture in bronchial asthma, using the peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) as an index of bronchial patency. All patients in the control group showed a significant improvement in their PEFR while only 3 patients in the treated group showed an improvement. A subjective improvement and a reduction in drug dosages were observed in both groups. It is concluded that acupuncture has a placebo effect in bronchial asthma. PMID:7040659

  5. Is acupuncture effective in the treatment of pain in endometriosis?

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Iréne; Lundeberg, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Endometriosis is a multifactorial, estrogen-dependent, inflammatory gynecological condition – often with long-lasting visceral pelvic pain of different origin, and infertility among women. Current management options for patients’ are often inadequate, with side effects for many for whom acupuncture techniques could be an alternative. Earlier studies have discussed the efficacy of acupuncture, but not its methodological aspects. Objectives To summarize the documented clinical effects of acupuncture on rated visceral pelvic endometriosis-related pain, and associated variables among individuals, within and between studied groups, and to discuss the methodological treatment aspects. Methods Published full text clinical studies, case reports, and observational studies with abstracts written in English were searched by using the keywords “Acupuncture and Endometriosis” in databases such as PubMed, Web of Science, and CINAHL. The reporting guidelines, Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture was used for the methodological report. Results Three studies were found including 99 women, 13–40 years old, with diagnosed endometriosis. The studies were different in research design, needle stimulation techniques, and evaluation instruments. Methodological similarities were seven to12 needle insertions per subject/session, and 15–25 minutes of needle retention time. The needles were placed in lower back/pelvic-abdominal area, in the shank, feet, and hands. Treatment numbers varied from nine to 16 and patients received one to two treatments per week. Similarity in reported treatment effects in the quoted studies, irrespective of research design or treatment technique, was reported decrease of rated pain intensity. Discussion Meta-analysis is the standard procedure for the evaluation of evidence of treatment effects, ie, on a group level, usually without analysis of the individual responses even with obvious spread in the

  6. Acupuncture anesthesia in thymectomy on myasthenia gravis patients.

    PubMed

    Dong, S T; Nguyen, V T; Nguyen, V T; Vu, T A; Pham, M H

    1988-01-01

    Thymectomy is often successful as treatment for the autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis. One complication of the operation on such patients is respiratory difficulty especially post-operatively, due to interference with the already disturbed transmission of signals along damaged nerve-endings. Acupuncture anesthesia offers a solution to that problem. In this series of 90 patients, the results of operation under conventional general anesthesia were compared with those under acupuncture anesthesia. It was found that patients in the latter group suffered fewer complications. PMID:2898196

  7. Acupuncture - An effective tool in the management of gag reflex

    PubMed Central

    Anand, M. Vijay; Rai, Rathika; Bettie, Nirmal F.; Ramachandiran, Hari; Solomon; Praveena, Subramaniyam

    2015-01-01

    Gagging is of great concern to the dentist as it is a serious impediment during the execution of various dental procedures. The etiology of gagging is multifactorial, and several suggestions have been offered to arrest this reflex, some of which are nonsustainable and does not show the immediate result. Acupuncture has been successfully employed as an adjunct to local anesthesia in dental extractions, pain management and also in the symptomatic management of temporomandibular joint disorders. The author highlights the application of acupuncture in the management of patients with gag reflex during dental procedures and its benefits are reported. PMID:26538942

  8. Auricular Acupuncture for Pain Relief after Ambulatory Knee Arthroscopy—A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Auricular acupuncture (AA) is effective in treating various pain conditions, but there have been no analyses of AA for the treatment of pain after ambulatory knee surgery. We assessed the range of analgesic requirements under AA after ambulatory knee arthroscopy. Twenty patients randomly received a true AA procedure (Lung, Shenmen and Knee points) or sham procedure (three non-acupuncture points on the auricular helix) before ambulatory knee arthroscopy. Permanent press AA needles were retained in situ for one day after surgery. Post-operative pain was treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory ibuprofen, and weak oral opioid tramadol was used for rescue analgesic medication. The quantity of post-operative analgesics and pain intensity were used to assess the effect of AA. The incidence of analgesia-related side effects, time to discharge from the anesthesia recovery room, heart rate and blood pressure were also recorded. Ibuprofen consumption after surgery in the AA group was lower than in the control group: median 500 versus 800 mg, P = 0.043. Pain intensity on a 100 mm visual analogue scale for pain measurement and other parameters were similar in both groups. Thus AA might be useful in reducing the post-operative analgesic requirement after ambulatory knee arthroscopy. PMID:15937559

  9. Predicting aversive events and terminating fear in the mouse anterior cingulate cortex during trace fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Steenland, Hendrik W; Li, Xiang-Yao; Zhuo, Min

    2012-01-18

    A variety of studies have implicated the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in fear, including permanent storage of fear memory. Recent pharmacological and genetic studies indicate that early synaptic plasticity in the ACC may also contribute to certain forms of fear memory at early time points. However, no study has directly examined the possible changes in neuronal activity of ACC neurons in freely behaving mice during early learning. In the present study, we examined the neural responses of the ACC during trace fear conditioning. We found that ACC putative pyramidal and nonpyramidal neurons were involved in the termination of fear behavior ("un-freezing"), and the spike activity of these neurons was reduced during freezing. Some of the neurons were also found to acquire un-freezing locked activity and change their tuning. The results implicate the ACC neurons in fear learning and controlling the abolition of fear behavior. We also show that the ACC is important for making cue-related fear memory associations in the trace fear paradigm as measured with tone-evoked potentials and single-unit activity. Collectively, our findings indicate that the ACC is involved in predicting future aversive events and terminating fear during trace fear. PMID:22262906

  10. Remembering the Object You Fear: Brain Potentials during Recognition of Spiders in Spider-Fearful Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Michalowski, Jaroslaw M.; Weymar, Mathias; Hamm, Alfons O.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we investigated long-term memory for unpleasant, neutral and spider pictures in 15 spider-fearful and 15 non-fearful control individuals using behavioral and electrophysiological measures. During the initial (incidental) encoding, pictures were passively viewed in three separate blocks and were subsequently rated for valence and arousal. A recognition memory task was performed one week later in which old and new unpleasant, neutral and spider pictures were presented. Replicating previous results, we found enhanced memory performance and higher confidence ratings for unpleasant when compared to neutral materials in both animal fearful individuals and controls. When compared to controls high animal fearful individuals also showed a tendency towards better memory accuracy and significantly higher confidence during recognition of spider pictures, suggesting that memory of objects prompting specific fear is also facilitated in fearful individuals. In line, spider-fearful but not control participants responded with larger ERP positivity for correctly recognized old when compared to correctly rejected new spider pictures, thus showing the same effects in the neural signature of emotional memory for feared objects that were already discovered for other emotional materials. The increased fear memory for phobic materials observed in the present study in spider-fearful individuals might result in an enhanced fear response and reinforce negative beliefs aggravating anxiety symptomatology and hindering recovery. PMID:25296032

  11. Remembering the object you fear: brain potentials during recognition of spiders in spider-fearful individuals.

    PubMed

    Michalowski, Jaroslaw M; Weymar, Mathias; Hamm, Alfons O

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we investigated long-term memory for unpleasant, neutral and spider pictures in 15 spider-fearful and 15 non-fearful control individuals using behavioral and electrophysiological measures. During the initial (incidental) encoding, pictures were passively viewed in three separate blocks and were subsequently rated for valence and arousal. A recognition memory task was performed one week later in which old and new unpleasant, neutral and spider pictures were presented. Replicating previous results, we found enhanced memory performance and higher confidence ratings for unpleasant when compared to neutral materials in both animal fearful individuals and controls. When compared to controls high animal fearful individuals also showed a tendency towards better memory accuracy and significantly higher confidence during recognition of spider pictures, suggesting that memory of objects prompting specific fear is also facilitated in fearful individuals. In line, spider-fearful but not control participants responded with larger ERP positivity for correctly recognized old when compared to correctly rejected new spider pictures, thus showing the same effects in the neural signature of emotional memory for feared objects that were already discovered for other emotional materials. The increased fear memory for phobic materials observed in the present study in spider-fearful individuals might result in an enhanced fear response and reinforce negative beliefs aggravating anxiety symptomatology and hindering recovery. PMID:25296032

  12. Introducing fear of crime to risk research.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jonathan

    2006-02-01

    This article introduces the fear of crime to risk research, noting a number of areas for future interdisciplinary study. First, the article analyzes both the career of the concept of fear of crime and the politics of fear. Second, it considers research and theory on the psychology of risk, particularly the interplay between emotion and cognition, and what might be called the risk as image perspective. Third, the article speculates how people learn about risk and suggests how to customize a social amplification of risk framework to fear of crime. Finally, the article advances the argument that fear of crime may be an individual response to community social order and a generalized attitude toward the moral trajectory of society. Each of these areas of discussion has implications for future theoretical developments within risk research; each highlights how risk research can contribute to the social scientific understanding of an important issue of the day. PMID:16492196

  13. Paternal Fears of Childbirth: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Suzanne; Hunter, Lauren P.; Bormann, Jill R.; Sobo, Elisa J.

    2009-01-01

    To date, most studies on paternal childbirth fears have been exploratory or descriptive, conducted outside of the United States, and focused mainly on White, first-time fathers. Identified fears include harm to the mother or newborn, partner pain, feelings of helplessness, lack of knowledge, and fear of high-risk intervention. Fathers often report that childbirth classes are not helpful and, in some cases, even increase their fears. Some fathers view birth as traumatic, changing their perception of and relationship with their partner. Fathers also voice the need for more information and for reassurance that they are doing the right things for their partner during childbirth. This article summarizes the research findings on paternal childbirth fears and recommends topics for future study. PMID:20808424

  14. The fear survey schedule for children-revised (FSSC-HI): ethnocultural variations in children's fearfulness.

    PubMed

    Shore, G N; Rapport, M D

    1998-01-01

    A revised Fear Survey Schedule for Children was used to examine the structure and developmental pattern of fearfulness in an ethnoculturally diverse sample of 385 Hawaii schoolchildren aged 7 to 16 years. The instrument's psychometric properties compared favorably with previous versions of the FSSC, and a 7-factor solution provided the best conceptual fit for the data. Six factors were similar to those described in previous versions of the FSSC, whereas the seventh was unique, reflecting children's social conformity fears. Between-group comparisons revealed significantly less fearfulness in children of Caucasian than of Asian, Filipino, and Hawaiian ethnocultural backgrounds. Gender and age differences were similar to previous reports in finding greater fearfulness in girl than boys, and in younger than older children on most factors. Results corroborate previous reports concerning gender and age trajectories of fearfulness and indicate that culture may mediate the expression of fears in culturally diverse populations. PMID:9801963

  15. The meridian system and mechanism of acupuncture--a comparative review. Part 2: mechanism of acupuncture analgesia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shyang

    2013-03-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), pain is never merely a sign of discomfort. It is usually an integral part of a particular disease or physiological malfunction. Thus pain should not be treated in isolation since it will disappear as soon as its cause is identified and removed. Hence, in this Part 2 of a three-part series, initially, clinical pathologies in modern medicine and TCM are compared. Then, the pain pathophysiologies of these two schools of thought are reviewed. In addition, certain unique features of acupuncture effects that any valid mechanism must account for are outlined. Finally, various mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia are reviewed. One plausible mechanism based on the meridian system of Part 1, i.e., the chaotic wave theory of fractal continuum in terms of the neurovascular network, is also proposed. It contends that the injury current due to acupuncture at an acupoint will trigger electromagnetic inductive effects so that the impedances of correlated neurovascular bundles are drastically changed. Two consequent scenarios are possible. (1) If the impedance of the meridian hugely mismatches with that of the brain after acupuncture, then the traveling wave of pain signal will be largely reflected back and only partially transmitted to the brain, hence pain relief can be achieved. (2) If the impedance of the meridian entirely matches that of the pain source after acupuncture, then the pain source would appear to be nonexistent to the brain, hence analgesia can be achieved. The former mechanism can be used to explain the relief for chronic pain and the latter one for acute pain. It is believed that the proposed mechanisms via match or mismatch of the impedances can explain how the acupuncture works not only in the treatment of pain, but also in various other therapies of Part 3. PMID:23548213

  16. Pain-related fear and avoidance of physical exertion following delayed-onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Trost, Zina; France, Christopher R; Thomas, James S

    2011-07-01

    The current study examined the relationship between pain-related fear, physical performance, and pain-related interference in the context of experimentally induced pain to the lower back. Thirty healthy participants completed a test of maximal trunk strength before and after induction of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) to the trunk extensors. Pain-related fear (Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia and Pain Anxiety Symptom Scale) was assessed prior to DOMS induction, and measures of current pain and pain-related interference with life activities were obtained 1 day after DOMS induction. As predicted, pain-related fear was not related to strength production prior to DOMS induction. However, following DOMS induction, pain-related fear predicted reduced maximal strength production, individual decrement in maximal strength performance, and increased pain-related interference in life activities. Current pain intensity and anthropometric factors did not contribute significantly to these outcome measures. To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify the impact of pain-related fear on physical performance among a healthy group of individuals following experimental acute low back injury. The findings extend previous research on psychological variables and simulated injury, and suggest that pain-related fear may be an important vulnerability factor in development of disability following acute pain experience. PMID:21419575

  17. The study of personal constructs of death and fear of death among Taiwanese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu Ching; Chen, Shih-Fen

    2009-11-01

    This study administered an open-ended questionnaire about death and the Multidimensional Fear of Death Scale (MFODS) to explore the relationships between personal constructs about death and fears of death among Taiwanese adolescents. The sample included 329 adolescents in junior and senior high school grades 7 to 12. A coding manual was used to conduct content analysis of death constructs in paragraphs about death written by respondents, and the MFODS was used to measure fear of death. The results revealed that concepts and fears about death differed significantly according to grade, gender, religion, death-related experiences, and death-related discussions in the family. Constructs regarding negative emotional states, as well as low levels of attachment, emerged as significant predictors of the seven MFODS subscales. Generalization of these results to other populations merits further investigation. PMID:19877367

  18. Equal pain—Unequal fear response: enhanced susceptibility of tooth pain to fear conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Michael L.; de Matos, Nuno M. P.; Brügger, Mike; Ettlin, Dominik A.; Lukic, Nenad; Cheetham, Marcus; Jäncke, Lutz; Lutz, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Experimental fear conditioning in humans is widely used as a model to investigate the neural basis of fear learning and to unravel the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders. It has been observed that fear conditioning depends on stimulus salience and subject vulnerability to fear. It is further known that the prevalence of dental-related fear and phobia is exceedingly high in the population. Dental phobia is unique as no other body part is associated with a specific phobia. Therefore, we hypothesized that painful dental stimuli exhibit an enhanced susceptibility to fear conditioning when comparing to equal perceived stimuli applied to other body sites. Differential susceptibility to pain-related fear was investigated by analyzing responses to an unconditioned stimulus (UCS) applied to the right maxillary canine (UCS-c) vs. the right tibia (UCS-t). For fear conditioning, UCS-c and USC-t consisted of painful electric stimuli, carefully matched at both application sites for equal intensity and quality perception. UCSs were paired to simple geometrical forms which served as conditioned stimuli (CS+). Unpaired CS+ were presented for eliciting and analyzing conditioned fear responses. Outcome parameter were (1) skin conductance changes and (2) time-dependent brain activity (BOLD responses) in fear-related brain regions such as the amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, insula, thalamus, orbitofrontal cortex, and medial prefrontal cortex. A preferential susceptibility of dental pain to fear conditioning was observed, reflected by heightened skin conductance responses and enhanced time-dependent brain activity (BOLD responses) in the fear network. For the first time, this study demonstrates fear-related neurobiological mechanisms that point toward a superior conditionability of tooth pain. Beside traumatic dental experiences our results offer novel evidence that might explain the high prevalence of dental-related fears in the population. PMID:25100974

  19. A New Type of Signaling Pathways as Pilomotor Lines along Skin for Transmitting Acupuncture Signals to Produce Acupuncture Effects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Yuan

    2015-06-30

    In our previous study, we observed a linear system consisted of sympathetic endings in the arrector pili muscles (AP muscles) along the rat skin termed sympathetic substance lines, or SSLs. After shaving the hair of the rats, the first wave of hair re-growth was not evenly distributed, but followed specific hair loop lines (HLLs). The patterns of HLL and SSL correspond with each other and also with the "Meridians" described in Chinese traditional medicine (CTM). Here I investigated in rabbits and rats whether the acupuncture signals are transmitted via the SSL/HLL, and whether the acupuncture analgesia (AA) is dependent on any peripheral mechanism. Firstly, when acupuncture was operated or phenylephrine, an agonist for α receptor, was injected into the dermis at an acupoint, a pilomotor line occurred. The course of the pilomotor line coincided with the SSL/HLL. When the skin was incised or regitin, an antagonist for α receptor, was injected into the dermis, the pilomotor line did not cross the site of incision or injection. These results directly demonstrated the process of transmission of acupuncture signals involving the pilomotor line and the sympathetic. Secondly, AA produced by acupuncture at an acupoint was significantly blocked when the skin was incised or regitin was injected into the dermis along the SSL/HLL or the Meridians. [corrected]. These results suggest that the factor that blocked the pilomotor line also blocked the AA and the pilomotor line related to the AA. Lastly, noradrenaline was shown to be released from the skin along the Meridian line after acupuncture; when phenylephrine was injected into an acupoint, AA was strongly simulated. All these results indicate that: 1. the transmission pathway of acupuncture signals exists in the skin, just as the Meridians described in the CTM; 2. these pathways are the SSLs/HLLs and the pilomotor lines; and 3. the pilomotor line is just for the transmission of acupuncture signals and the transmission is

  20. [False dissemination of "treatment of hemorrhoids by acupuncture of Kongzui (LU 6)" and its unfavorable influence on modern acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Huang, You-min; Huang, Long-xiang

    2011-10-01

    "Treatment of hemorrhoids by acupuncture of Kongzui (LU 6)" has been considered to be an example of new discovery in current clinical acupuncture practice and has produced a significant influence on domestic and foreign textbooks of acupuncturology and the health care of the people. After comprehensively analyzing this known saying, it was found that the so-called "new discovery" which has been inherited for decades of years is in fact derived from incorrect dissemination, being lack of evidence of both literature and clinical practice. PMID:22073892

  1. Hypothalamus-Related Resting Brain Network Underlying Short-Term Acupuncture Treatment in Primary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongyan; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Wang, Kai; Huang, Shuhua; Cao, Qingtian; Wang, Hong; Liang, Yuhong; Shi, Chuanying; Li, Mengyuan; Ha, Tingting; Ai, Lin; Li, Shaowu; Ma, Jun; Wei, Wenjuan; You, Youbo; Liu, Zhenyu; Tian, Jie; Bai, Lijun

    2013-01-01

    The present study attempted to explore modulated hypothalamus-seeded resting brain network underlying the cardiovascular system in primary hypertensive patients after short-term acupuncture treatment. Thirty right-handed patients (14 male) were divided randomly into acupuncture and control groups. The acupuncture group received a continuous five-day acupuncture treatment and undertook three resting-state fMRI scans and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) as well as SF-36 questionnaires before, after, and one month after acupuncture treatment. The control group undertook fMRI scans and 24-hour ABPM. For verum acupuncture, average blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) decreased after treatment but showed no statistical differences. There were no significant differences in BP and HR between the acupuncture and control groups. Notably, SF-36 indicated that bodily pain (P = 0.005) decreased and vitality (P = 0.036) increased after acupuncture compared to the baseline. The hypothalamus-related brain network showed increased functional connectivity with the medulla, brainstem, cerebellum, limbic system, thalamus, and frontal lobes. In conclusion, short-term acupuncture did not decrease BP significantly but appeared to improve body pain and vitality. Acupuncture may regulate the cardiovascular system through a complicated brain network from the cortical level, the hypothalamus, and the brainstem. PMID:23781269

  2. Is acupuncture no more than a placebo? Extensive discussion required about possible bias

    PubMed Central

    DENG, SHIZHE; ZHAO, XIAOFENG; DU, RONG; HE, SI; WEN, YAN; HUANG, LINGHUI; TIAN, GUANG; ZHANG, CHAO; MENG, ZHIHONG; SHI, XUEMIN

    2015-01-01

    Numerous randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture have been conducted in recent years. The results of several studies implied that acupuncture was only a powerful placebo; however, certain studies demonstrated that verum acupuncture had a greater effect than placebo and the mechanisms between a verum acupuncture group and a placebo/sham group were different. Researchers attempted to investigate the inherent factors that may potentially influence the results of trials. Certain problems observed in acupuncture RCTs also occurred in RCTs in other fields, including insufficient sample size, high dropout rates, inadequate follow-up and randomization. The study of acupuncture is so complex that specific methodological challenges are raised, which are frequently overlooked, including sham interventions, blinding, powerful placebo effects (even stronger than an inert pill) and variations in acupuncture administration. The aforementioned problems may contribute to bias, and researchers systematically attempt to solve these problems. The present review aimed to suggest techniques to design high-quality studies, minimize the placebo effect and optimize acupuncture administration in acupuncture studies. If these problems are addressed, then the results of acupuncture studies may be different. PMID:26622473

  3. Fear of Movement Is Related to Trunk Stiffness in Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Karayannis, Nicholas V.; Smeets, Rob J. E. M.; van den Hoorn, Wolbert; Hodges, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Psychological features have been related to trunk muscle activation patterns in low back pain (LBP). We hypothesised higher pain-related fear would relate to changes in trunk mechanical properties, such as higher trunk stiffness. Objectives To evaluate the relationship between trunk mechanical properties and psychological features in people with recurrent LBP. Methods The relationship between pain-related fear (Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, TSK; Photograph Series of Daily Activities, PHODA-SeV; Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire, FABQ; Pain Catastrophizing Scale, PCS) and trunk mechanical properties (estimated from the response of the trunk to a sudden sagittal plane forwards or backwards perturbation by unpredictable release of a load) was explored in a case-controlled study of 14 LBP participants. Regression analysis (r2) tested the linear relationships between pain-related fear and trunk mechanical properties (trunk stiffness and damping). Mechanical properties were also compared with t-tests between groups based on stratification according to high/low scores based on median values for each psychological measure. Results Fear of movement (TSK) was positively associated with trunk stiffness (but not damping) in response to a forward perturbation (r2 = 0.33, P = 0.03), but not backward perturbation (r2 = 0.22, P = 0.09). Other pain-related fear constructs (PHODA-SeV, FABQ, PCS) were not associated with trunk stiffness or damping. Trunk stiffness was greater for individuals with high kinesiophobia (TSK) for forward (P = 0.03) perturbations, and greater with forward perturbation for those with high fear avoidance scores (FABQ-W, P = 0.01). Conclusions Fear of movement is positively (but weakly) associated with trunk stiffness. This provides preliminary support an interaction between biological and psychological features of LBP, suggesting this condition may be best understood if these domains are not considered in isolation

  4. Do men lie on fear surveys?

    PubMed

    Pierce, K A; Kirkpatrick, D R

    1992-07-01

    The likelihood that males equivocate in their ratings of common fears was evaluated. A fear survey was given to 30 female and 26 male college students in a classroom setting. A second fear survey which contained duplicate items from the first was administered to the same students in a laboratory setting prior to watching videotaped scenes of fish, rats, mice and a shorter roller coaster ride. Before the second survey was given, the students received instructions which implied that their truthfulness could be independently evaluated through changes in their heart rate while they watched the videotape. Changes in the averaged fear ratings for the three high-fear items shown in the videotaped scenes were compared between males and females across the two survey conditions. Males' ratings of rats, mice, and roller coasters increased markedly from the first survey to the second, while fear ratings by females did not change. These results are consistent with the idea that the expression of fear by men is affected by conformation to the traditional male gender role. PMID:1616477

  5. Olfactory instruction for fear: neural system analysis

    PubMed Central

    Canteras, Newton S.; Pavesi, Eloisa; Carobrez, Antonio P.

    2015-01-01

    Different types of predator odors engage elements of the hypothalamic predator-responsive circuit, which has been largely investigated in studies using cat odor exposure. Studies using cat odor have led to detailed mapping of the neural sites involved in innate and contextual fear responses. Here, we reviewed three lines of work examining the dynamics of the neural systems that organize innate and learned fear responses to cat odor. In the first section, we explored the neural systems involved in innate fear responses and in the acquisition and expression of fear conditioning to cat odor, with a particular emphasis on the role of the dorsal premammillary nucleus (PMd) and the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (PAGdl), which are key sites that influence innate fear and contextual conditioning. In the second section, we reviewed how chemical stimulation of the PMd and PAGdl may serve as a useful unconditioned stimulus in an olfactory fear conditioning paradigm; these experiments provide an interesting perspective for the understanding of learned fear to predator odor. Finally, in the third section, we explored the fact that neutral odors that acquire an aversive valence in a shock-paired conditioning paradigm may mimic predator odor and mobilize elements of the hypothalamic predator-responsive circuit. PMID:26300721

  6. Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis, Fear Generalization, and Stress.

    PubMed

    Besnard, Antoine; Sahay, Amar

    2016-01-01

    The generalization of fear is an adaptive, behavioral, and physiological response to the likelihood of threat in the environment. In contrast, the overgeneralization of fear, a cardinal feature of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), manifests as inappropriate, uncontrollable expression of fear in neutral and safe environments. Overgeneralization of fear stems from impaired discrimination of safe from aversive environments or discernment of unlikely threats from those that are highly probable. In addition, the time-dependent erosion of episodic details of traumatic memories might contribute to their generalization. Understanding the neural mechanisms underlying the overgeneralization of fear will guide development of novel therapeutic strategies to combat PTSD. Here, we conceptualize generalization of fear in terms of resolution of interference between similar memories. We propose a role for a fundamental encoding mechanism, pattern separation, in the dentate gyrus (DG)-CA3 circuit in resolving interference between ambiguous or uncertain threats and in preserving episodic content of remote aversive memories in hippocampal-cortical networks. We invoke cellular-, circuit-, and systems-based mechanisms by which adult-born dentate granule cells (DGCs) modulate pattern separation to influence resolution of interference and maintain precision of remote aversive memories. We discuss evidence for how these mechanisms are affected by stress, a risk factor for PTSD, to increase memory interference and decrease precision. Using this scaffold we ideate strategies to curb overgeneralization of fear in PTSD. PMID:26068726

  7. Fear of pain and defensive activation.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Margaret M; Silakowski, Tammy; Lang, Peter J

    2008-07-01

    Fear of pain and its relationship to dental fear was investigated by measuring autonomic reactions (skin conductance and heart rate) in individuals reporting high and low dental fear when in the presence of a cue that threatened the presentation of electric shock ("threat") or not ("safe"). Acoustic startle probes were also presented during both threat and safe periods, and the reflexive eye blink, the skin conductance response, and cardiac changes to the startle probe measured. All participants reacted with greater defensive reactivity, including potentiated startle blinks, heightened skin conductance, and cardiac deceleration in the context of threat, compared to safe, cues. Individuals reporting high dental fear were significantly more reactive during threat periods, compared to low fear individuals, showing larger blink reflexes and heightened electrodermal activity, as well as heightened autonomic responses to the startle probe itself. Individual differences in defensive reactivity persisted even after participants received a single mild shock halfway through the experiment. The data indicate that threat of shock elicits heightened defensive reactivity in those reporting high dental fear, consistent with the hypothesis that fear of potentially painful events may be a potent mediator of the anxiety involved in anticipated medical and dental treatment. PMID:17904289

  8. Retrieval and Reconsolidation Accounts of Fear Extinction

    PubMed Central

    Ponnusamy, Ravikumar; Zhuravka, Irina; Poulos, Andrew M.; Shobe, Justin; Merjanian, Michael; Huang, Jeannie; Wolvek, David; O’Neill, Pia-Kelsey; Fanselow, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Extinction is the primary mode for the treatment of anxiety disorders. However, extinction memories are prone to relapse. For example, fear is likely to return when a prolonged time period intervenes between extinction and a subsequent encounter with the fear-provoking stimulus (spontaneous recovery). Therefore there is considerable interest in the development of procedures that strengthen extinction and to prevent such recovery of fear. We contrasted two procedures in rats that have been reported to cause such deepened extinction. One where extinction begins before the initial consolidation of fear memory begins (immediate extinction) and another where extinction begins after a brief exposure to the consolidated fear stimulus. The latter is thought to open a period of memory vulnerability similar to that which occurs during initial consolidation (reconsolidation update). We also included a standard extinction treatment and a control procedure that reversed the brief exposure and extinction phases. Spontaneous recovery was only found with the standard extinction treatment. In a separate experiment we tested fear shortly after extinction (i.e., within 6 h). All extinction procedures, except reconsolidation update reduced fear at this short-term test. The findings suggest that strengthened extinction can result from alteration in both retrieval and consolidation processes. PMID:27242459

  9. Modeling fear-conditioned bradycardia in humans.

    PubMed

    Castegnetti, Giuseppe; Tzovara, Athina; Staib, Matthias; Paulus, Philipp C; Hofer, Nicolas; Bach, Dominik R

    2016-06-01

    Across species, cued fear conditioning is a common experimental paradigm to investigate aversive Pavlovian learning. While fear-conditioned stimuli (CS+) elicit overt behavior in many mammals, this is not the case in humans. Typically, autonomic nervous system activity is used to quantify fear memory in humans, measured by skin conductance responses (SCR). Here, we investigate whether heart period responses (HPR) evoked by the CS, often observed in humans and small mammals, are suitable to complement SCR as an index of fear memory in humans. We analyze four datasets involving delay and trace conditioning, in which heart beats are identified via electrocardiogram or pulse oximetry, to show that fear-conditioned heart rate deceleration (bradycardia) is elicited and robustly distinguishes CS+ from CS-. We then develop a psychophysiological model (PsPM) of fear-conditioned HPR. This PsPM is inverted to yield estimates of autonomic input into the heart. We show that the sensitivity to distinguish CS+ and CS- (predictive validity) is higher for model-based estimates than peak-scoring analysis, and compare this with SCR. Our work provides a novel tool to investigate fear memory in humans that allows direct comparison between species. PMID:26950648

  10. Prefrontal NMDA receptors expressed in excitatory neurons control fear discrimination and fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Philip A; Corches, Alex; Lovelace, Jonathan W; Westbrook, Kevin B; Mendoza, Michael; Korzus, Edward

    2015-03-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are critically involved in various learning mechanisms including modulation of fear memory, brain development and brain disorders. While NMDARs mediate opposite effects on medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) interneurons and excitatory neurons, NMDAR antagonists trigger profound cortical activation. The objectives of the present study were to determine the involvement of NMDARs expressed specifically in excitatory neurons in mPFC-dependent adaptive behaviors, specifically fear discrimination and fear extinction. To achieve this, we tested mice with locally deleted Grin1 gene encoding the obligatory NR1 subunit of the NMDAR from prefrontal CamKIIα positive neurons for their ability to distinguish frequency modulated (FM) tones in fear discrimination test. We demonstrated that NMDAR-dependent signaling in the mPFC is critical for effective fear discrimination following initial generalization of conditioned fear. While mice with deficient NMDARs in prefrontal excitatory neurons maintain normal responses to a dangerous fear-conditioned stimulus, they exhibit abnormal generalization decrement. These studies provide evidence that NMDAR-dependent neural signaling in the mPFC is a component of a neural mechanism for disambiguating the meaning of fear signals and supports discriminative fear learning by retaining proper gating information, viz. both dangerous and harmless cues. We also found that selective deletion of NMDARs from excitatory neurons in the mPFC leads to a deficit in fear extinction of auditory conditioned stimuli. These studies suggest that prefrontal NMDARs expressed in excitatory neurons are involved in adaptive behavior. PMID:25615540

  11. Spontaneous brain activity following fear reminder of fear conditioning by using resting-state functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Pan; Zheng, Yong; Feng, Tingyong

    2015-01-01

    Although disrupting reconsolidation may be a promising approach to attenuate or erase the expression of fear memory, it is not clear how the neural state following fear reminder contribute to the following fear extinction. To address this question, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) to measure spontaneous neuronal activity and functional connectivity (RSFC) following fear reminder. Some brain regions such as dorsal anterior cingulate (dACC) and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) showed increased amplitude of LFF (ALFF) in the fear reminder group than the no reminder group following fear reminder. More importantly, there was much stronger functional connectivity between the amygdala and vmPFC in the fear reminder group than those in the no reminder group. These findings suggest that the strong functional connectivity between vmPFC and amygdala following a fear reminder could serve as a key role in the followed-up fear extinction stages, which may contribute to the erasing of fear memory. PMID:26576733

  12. Acupuncture in Practice: Investigating Acupuncturists' Approach to Treating Infantile Colic

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Infantile colic is common, but no safe and effective conventional treatment exists. The use of acupuncture has increased despite weak evidence. This practitioner survey explores and discusses how infantile colic is regarded and treated in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). The study is based on personal communication with 24 acupuncturists from nine countries. These acupuncturists specialize in pediatric acupuncture and represent different styles of acupuncture. Their experiences are discussed and related to relevant books and articles. Informants claimed good results when treating infants with colic. The TCM patterns commonly described by informants matched the textbooks to a great extent. The most common syndromes were “stagnation of food” and “Spleen Qi Xu.” Regarding treatment, some informants followed the teachers' and the textbook authors' advice on differentiated treatment according to syndrome. The points used most often were LI4, ST36, and Sifeng. Other informants treated all infants alike in one single point, LI4. The results demonstrate the diversity of TCM. The use of acupuncture for infantile colic presents an interesting option, but further research is needed in order to optimize the effects and protect infants from unnecessary or less effective treatment. PMID:24324513

  13. [Development of Researches on Scalp Acupuncture for Ischemic Stroke].

    PubMed

    Tian, Liang; Wang, Jin-hai; Sun, Run-jie; Zhang, Xing-hua; Yuan, Bo; Du, Xiao-zheng

    2016-02-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the commonly met diseases in clinical practice nowadays. Acupuncture therapy is widly used in the treatment of sequela of ischemic stroke in China and its mechanisms have been extensively studied in recen years. In the present paper, the authors focus on the development of studies on the mechanism of scalp acupuncture therapy in the treatment of ischemic stroke. Results indicate that scalp acupuncture intervention can 1) improve cerebral blood circulation to promote regional energy metabolism, 2) up-regulate expression of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), etc., possibly promoting proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in the focal cerebral cortex and hippocampus, 3) reduce contents of excitatory amino acid and increase level of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to lower neurogenic toxicity, and relieve cerebral injury, 4) ease cerebral vascular immunoinflammatory reactions, 5) regulate blood lipid metabolism to resist cerebral free radical damage, and 6) inhibit cerebral cortical apoptosis. However, these results only revealed very limited intrinsic mechanisms of scalp acupuncture in improving ischemic stroke. Further studies using comprehensive techniques of multi-disciplines as molecular biology, electrophysiology, etc. are definitely needed. PMID:27141629

  14. Acupuncture: could it become everyday practice in oncology?

    PubMed Central

    Kilian-Kita, Aneta; Konopka, Kamil; Krzemieniecki, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture is a complementary and alternative medical treatment (CAM) which is increasingly used in the care of cancer patients. Traditionally derived from Chinese medicine, nowadays it is becoming a part of evidence-based oncology. The use of acupuncture in these patients has been recommended by the American Cancer Society (ACS) for the treatment of side effects associated with conventional cancer therapy and cancer-related ailments. A growing body of evidence supports the use of acupuncture in the treatment of cancer-induced pain and chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting. Also other indications, such as xerostomia, fatigue, hot flashes, anxiety and peripheral neuropathy, are being constantly evaluated. This article summarizes the most important discoveries related to the possible usefulness of this method in contemporary oncology. Emphasis is placed on the results of randomized controlled trials with an adequate level of evidence. However, explanation of the mechanisms responsible for these effects requires confirmation in further studies with an adequate level of evidence. In future, acupuncture may become an interesting and valuable addition to conventional medicine. PMID:27358589

  15. [Research on acupuncture for throat diseases in Qing Dynasty].

    PubMed

    Ji, Zheng-han; Zu, Na

    2012-06-01

    The accurate acupoint and application of acupuncture for throat diseases described in Zheng Mei-jian's book Chonglou Yuyao (Jade key to the secluded chamber) is clarified through exploration on recordings of the relative acupuncture skills in medical literatures of the mid-Qing Dynasty. It is found that the so called open-the-wind-way-acupuncture includes at least two groups of acupoints on the hand and the head, they are applied respectively for light and severe cases of sore-throat. Together with the third group of points which is used for the extremely severe cases, the three groups of points are all classified into the concept of qi-acupuncture. Although the composition of acupoints and process of application are different in recordings of various medical literatures in same periods, the treating principles are all focused on "opening the passage for elimination of the wind so as to remove the pathogenic wind-heat and promote blood circulation". PMID:22741274

  16. Efficacy of various methods of sterilization of acupuncture needles.

    PubMed

    Sisco, V; Winters, L L; Zange, L L; Brennan, P C

    1988-04-01

    The iatrogenic transmission of hepatitis B virus by inadequately sterilized acupuncture needles recently has been reported. Because some licensed chiropractors use acupuncture as a therapeutic modality, we have evaluated sterilization methods for these needles, which would be adaptable for use in a chiropractic office. Dry heat, boiling water, pressurized steam, sodium hypochlorite, and 70% alcohol were compared with a glass bead dry heat sterilizer originally developed for dental instruments. Presterilized acupuncture needles were contaminated with Bacillus stearothermophilus, Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus epidermidis and sterilized for intervals ranging from 5 sec to 30 min. The needles were then cultured to determine the efficacy of the sterilization regimen. Seventy percent alcohol was ineffective as a sterilization method. In terms of both time and convenience, the glass bead apparatus was the most efficient of the remaining methods tested. B. stearothermophilus-contaminated acupuncture needles were sterilized within 10 sec of exposure to preheated glass beads. Less than 10 sec exposure killed E. coli and S. epidermidis. A significant advantage of the glass bead sterilizer over the other methods was the absence of physical damage to the needles. PMID:3290376

  17. Acupuncture for Detoxification in Treatment of Opioid Addiction.

    PubMed

    Wu, S Ly; Leung, A Wn; Yew, D Tw

    2016-06-01

    Opioid is a popular drug of abuse and addiction. We evaluated acupuncture as a non-pharmacological treatment with a focus on managing withdrawal symptoms. Electrical stimulation at a low frequency (2 Hz) accelerates endorphin and encephalin production. High-frequency stimulation (100 Hz) up-regulates the dynorphin level that in turn suppresses withdrawal at the spinal level. The effect of 100-Hz electroacupuncture may be associated with brain-derived neurotrophic factor activation at the ventral tegmental area, down-regulation of cAMP response element-binding protein, and enhanced dynorphin synthesis in the spinal cord, periaqueductal grey, and hypothalamus. Clinical trials of acupuncture for the management of different withdrawal symptoms were reviewed. The potential of acupuncture to allay opioid-associated depression and anxiety, and its possible use as an adjuvant treatment were evident. A lack of effect was indicated for opioid craving. Most studies were hampered by inadequate reporting details and heterogeneity, thus future well-designed studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of acupuncture in opioid addiction treatment. PMID:27377488

  18. Systematic Review of Acupuncture for Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zongshi; Wu, Jiani; Zhou, Jing; Liu, Zhishun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acupuncture is a promising therapy for relieving symptoms in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), which affects >15% of adult men worldwide. The aim of the study was to assess the effects and safety of the use of acupuncture for CP/CPPS. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, Web of Science, CBM, CNKI, Wang-Fang Database, JCRM, and CiNii were searched from their inception through 30 November 2015. Grey literature databases and websites were also searched. No language limits were applied. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with CP/CPPS treated by acupuncture were included. Two reviewers extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of RCTs using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tools, respectively. Seven trials were included, involving 471 participants. The result of meta-analysis indicated that compared with sham acupuncture (MD: −6.09 [95%CI: −8.12 to −5.68]) and medicine (Levofloxacinand, Ibuprofen, and Tamsulosin) (MD: −4.57 [95%CI: −7.58 to −1.56]), acupuncture was more effective at decreasing the total NIH-CPSI score. Real acupuncture was superior to sham acupuncture in improving symptoms (pain, voiding) and quality of life (Qof) domain subscores. Compared to sham acupuncture and medicine, acupuncture appears to be more effective at improving the global assessment. Two trials found that there is no significant difference between acupuncture and sham acupuncture in decreasing the IPSS score. Acupuncture failed to show more favorable effects in improving both symptoms and the Qof domain compared with medicine. Overall, current evidence supports acupuncture as an effective treatment for CP/CPPS-induced symptoms, particularly in relieving pain. Based on the meta-analysis, acupuncture is superior to sham acupuncture in improving symptoms and Qof. Acupuncture might be similar to medicine (Levofloxacinand, Ibuprofen, and Tamsulosin) in its long-term effects, but evidence was limited due to high ROB among included trials as well as

  19. Impact of Psychological Interventions on Reducing Anxiety, Fear and the Need for Sedation in Children Undergoing Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Viggiano, Maria Pia; Giganti, Fiorenza; Rossi, Arianna; Di Feo, Daniele; Vagnoli, Laura; Calcagno, Giovanna; Defilippi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Children undergoing magnetic resonance imaging examination frequently experience anxiety and fear before and during the scanning. The aim of the present study was to assess: i) whether and to what extent psychological interventions might reduce anxiety and fear levels; ii) whether the intervention is related to a decrease in the need for sedation. The interventions consisted of three activities: a clown show, dog interaction and live music. The emotional status (anxiety and fear) of the children was evaluated before and after the activities through a rating scale questionnaire. The results showed that the activities had high effectiveness in reducing the level of anxiety and fear and decreased the need for sedation in the experimental group compared to the control group. This approach proved to be a positive patient experience, helping to alleviate children’s anxiety and fear, decreasing the need for sedation, and was cost-effective. PMID:25918624

  20. Dental fear among university students: implications for pharmacological research.

    PubMed Central

    Kaakko, T.; Milgrom, P.; Coldwell, S. E.; Getz, T.; Weinstein, P.; Ramsay, D. S.

    1998-01-01

    University students are often subjects in randomized clinical trials involving anxiolytic and analgesic medications used during clinical dental and medical procedures. The purpose of this study was to describe a typical university student population available for research by using data from a mail survey. Subjects were 350 students chosen randomly from all enrolled, full-time, traditional students on the main campus at the University of Washington in Seattle, WA. The aim was to determine the extent and nature of dental anxiety in this population. In addition, the relationships between subject willingness to receive dental injections and general and mental health and medical avoidance and medical fears were examined. The Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) was used to measure dental anxiety. Dental anxiety was prevalent in this population; 19% of students reported high rates of dental fear. Thirteen percent of students had never had a dental injection. Students with no experience with dental injections were more reluctant than those with experience to receive an injection if one were needed. DAS scores were correlated with injection reluctance. Students who were reluctant to go ahead with a dental injection also reported poorer general and mental health than those who were less reluctant. These students also reported higher medical avoidance and medical anxiety scores. University students provide a rich source of potential subjects for clinical research. The student population, like the community at large, contains people with high levels of dental and medical fear. PMID:10356434

  1. Mechanism of acupuncture regulating visceral sensation and mobility.

    PubMed

    Rong, Peijing; Zhu, Bing; Li, Yuqing; Gao, Xinyan; Ben, Hui; Li, Yanhua; Li, Liang; He, Wei; Liu, Rupeng; Yu, Lingling

    2011-06-01

    Chinese ancient medical scientists have long focused on the internal and external contacts between acupoints on the surface of the body and the viscera. The Miraculous Pivot (it is one of the earliest medical classics in China) stated, "Twelve regular channels belong to the zang-fu organs internally, and connect to the extremities and joints externally." Traditional Chinese medicine considers acupoints as defined areas where the Qi of viscera and meridians are transfused. These include the reaction points of visceral diseases on the body surface as well as the acupuncture trigger points that promote the flow of Qi and blood, and regulate visceral function. Chinese ancient medical scientists classified the specificity of the main acupoints in the body based on the meridian doctrine, which has been instructing clinical application for about 2000 years. Laws on the domino effect of acupoints have mainly focused on conclusions to clinical experiences. Indications of some acupoints exceed the practical paradigm since the excessive extension occurred during theory derivation. The current research direction on acupuncture focuses on three aspects: the effectiveness of acupuncture and moxibustion; the relevances and associations between meridians and viscera; and the physical and chemical properties and relevant physical basis of acupoints. The relevance between meridians and viscera is the central theory in the meridian doctrine, and acupoints are regarded as an important link in the relationship between meridians and viscera. Specific relationships between acupoints and target organs exist. Stimulating different acupoints on the body surface can help deal with different diseases, especially visceral diseases. In addition, acupoints have a dual function of reflecting and treating visceral diseases. There is no systemic research available on acupoint specificity, despite current knowledge and clinical experiences, which results in a weak foundation for acupuncture theory

  2. Attitudes to evidence in acupuncture: an interview study.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Kirsten

    2012-08-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine is increasing in the Western world. However, there is no clear evidence of effect of alternative therapies. Moreover, there is no consensus between practitioners and researchers as to the right way of assessing the efficacy of alternative therapies. To investigate practitioners' perspective on evidence and ways of assessing efficacy twelve in-depth interviews were conducted in Denmark with acupuncturists, including physicians practising acupuncture, acupuncturists with a health-related background, and acupuncturists without a health-related background. Two themes predominated the study, first, the interviewees' general reflections on how it is possible to establish knowledge about an effect of acupuncture; and second the interviewees' reflections on the use of randomized controlled trials in acupuncture, including obstacles and alternatives to conducting randomized controlled trials. Further, two conceptions of what constitutes evidence were identified: a biomedical conception and an experience-based conception. Most interviewees were sceptical about the use of randomized controlled trials in acupuncture. Two reasons, especially, were given for this scepticism. First, practical and instrumental reasons concerning the specific elements of the randomized controlled trial or relating to limited resources; and second, value-based reasons are concerning the nature of acupuncture. However, the interviewees were really opposed only to a certain kind of randomized controlled trial, the so-called explanatory trial. They would actually welcome a pragmatic trial. The study gives valuable insight into an under explored field and provide a platform for further investigation, and a better informed discussion of the subject. PMID:21479773

  3. What is being stimulated in acupuncture: evaluation of the existence of a specific substrate.

    PubMed

    Chan, S H

    1984-01-01

    This review surveys the available publications from within and without China on the question of "What is being stimulated in acupuncture?" Although a definite answer is not yet forthcoming, indirect evidence is available to afford a few speculations. By far, the most convincing results indicate that expression of acupuncture effects definitely involves the nervous system. Answers to how acupuncture is linked to the nervous system, however, are still equivocal. On one extreme, acupuncture is equated to direct nerve stimulation. On the other, circumstantial evidence from biophysical, physiologic and pathologic approaches implicates some form of specificity for the acupuncture points, although no well-defined anatomic entity is available. It is proposed that an open-minded attitude towards acupuncture is essential for establishing the valid aspects of this practice. PMID:6328387

  4. The History of Liquid Ear Acupuncture and the Current Scientific State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This short review article presents a current overview of existing publications and scientific results regarding liquid (ear) acupuncture. The injection of liquids into defined acupuncture points of the ear is not a method commonly used in the Western world. The term liquid acupuncture has different definitions, which makes understanding each definition and differentiating one from the other difficult. General terms like pharmacopuncture, homeosiniatry, and liquid acupuncture, which all describe the method of injecting different kinds of drugs into a defined body acupuncture point, are used. This article presents the history of liquid acupuncture, as well as the current scientific state of the art, from the point of view of two European researchers. Some articles are discussed and a few practical examples are presented. PMID:27386143

  5. [Introduction and analysis on acupuncture education and qualification examination system in U.S.A].

    PubMed

    Lu, Cong; He, Wei; Zhao, Ying-Kai

    2013-12-01

    Based on research of the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (ACAOM), the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM) and the related public websites of acupuncture educational institutions, the first hand information was studied, summarized and sorted on the status quo of the educational qualification or the relative authentication of education programs of ACAOM as well as the status of professional qualification and examination of NCCAOM. The education curriculum of the Master degree of Acupuncture, Master degree of Oriental Medicine Science as well as the Doctor degree of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine were also introduced in this article including student enrollment and graduation in recent years. The developing tendency of the federal unified acupuncture education, management, professional qualification and examination system of U. S. A. were discussed and analyzed as well. PMID:24617248

  6. The History of Liquid Ear Acupuncture and the Current Scientific State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Litscher, Daniela; Litscher, Gerhard

    2016-06-01

    This short review article presents a current overview of existing publications and scientific results regarding liquid (ear) acupuncture. The injection of liquids into defined acupuncture points of the ear is not a method commonly used in the Western world. The term liquid acupuncture has different definitions, which makes understanding each definition and differentiating one from the other difficult. General terms like pharmacopuncture, homeosiniatry, and liquid acupuncture, which all describe the method of injecting different kinds of drugs into a defined body acupuncture point, are used. This article presents the history of liquid acupuncture, as well as the current scientific state of the art, from the point of view of two European researchers. Some articles are discussed and a few practical examples are presented. PMID:27386143

  7. [Development of acupuncture manipulator and its application in animal shock model].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haowei; Zhu, Xunsheng; Wang, Zhenhong; Wang, Xiangrui

    2008-08-01

    We have developed a mini acupuncture manipulator, which can simulate the traditional needling therapy and can inquired about the acu-related physical parameters which could not be quantitatively studied in the past. For example, we can control the depth, velocity, angle, angular velocity, frequency and interval time of acupuncture. The experimental study on Sprague-Dawley rat's acute hemorrhagic shock model was conducted to compare the curative effect of acupuncture manipulator versus that of electroacupuncture. This experiment demonstrated that the acupuncture manipulator can imitate hand acupuncture in security and can produce the effect similar to that of electroacupuncture. So this mini acupuncture manipulator can be of applications in research, teaching and clinical treatment. PMID:18788283

  8. Design and study of deep laser acupuncture stimulator of modulation and multibeam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Haitao; Wang, Qingguo; Xing, Qian; Li, Fangzheng; Cheng, Dongan

    2002-04-01

    The laser acupuncture stimulation has been applied extensively to replace the acupuncture needles. But the laser is transmitted to the acupoint through the skin, so the curative effect of the laser irradiation on an acupoint from cuticle is limited. We have developed the deep laser acupuncture stimulator of modulation and multibeam. The laser beam (such as He-Ne, LD, etc.) is turned into the modulated waveform. The modulated laser beam can simulate the customary acupuncture way such as twirling and rotating, etc. The laser beam is split into 3-8 beams by the means of optical shunt. After that they enter into laser acupuncture pins separately through the optical fiber joiners. The laser beam and pins can give simultaneously the stimulation in the depths of 3-8 acupoints. It has been proved by the clinical practice that the deep laser acupuncture has the notable efficiency for the apoplexy and sequelae of apoplexy, sciatica, rheumatoid arthritis, etc.

  9. Blinded by fear? Prior exposure to fearful faces enhances attentional processing of task-irrelevant stimuli.

    PubMed

    Berggren, Nick; Derakshan, Nazanin

    2013-01-01

    Threatening information has been shown to both capture attention and enhance sensory processing. Recent evidence has also suggested that exposure to fearful stimuli may enhance perceptual processing of subsequently presented information, as well as increase attentional capacity. However, these results are inconsistent with other findings that fearful stimuli reduce task-irrelevant distraction and improve selective attention. Here, we investigated the effect of prior exposure to fearful faces on performance in the Eriksen flanker task. Across experiments, fearful cues led to increased task-irrelevant distraction for items positioned across visual space, in contrast to other emotional expressions and inverted face items, and under conditions of attentional load. Findings support the view that fearful images enhance attentional capacity, allowing one to attend to as much visual information as possible when danger is implied. Conflicting findings on the effect of fear and selective attention are discussed. PMID:23510073

  10. Fear expression and return of fear following threat instruction with or without direct contingency experience.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Gaëtan; Kuhn, Manuel; Raes, An K; Kalisch, Raffael; De Houwer, Jan; Lonsdorf, Tina B

    2016-08-01

    Prior research showed that mere instructions about the contingency between a conditioned stimulus (CS) and an unconditioned stimulus (US) can generate fear reactions to the CS. Little is known, however, about the extent to which actual CS-US contingency experience adds anything beyond the effect of contingency instructions. Our results extend previous studies on this topic in that it included fear potentiated startle as an additional dependent variable and examined return of fear (ROF) following reinstatement. We observed that CS-US pairings can enhance fear reactions beyond the effect of contingency instructions. Moreover, for all measures of fear, instructions elicited immediate fear reactions that could not be completely overridden by subsequent situational safety information. Finally, ROF following reinstatement for instructed CS+s was unaffected by actual experience. In summary, our results demonstrate the power of contingency instructions and reveal the additional impact of actual experience of CS-US pairings. PMID:25966279

  11. Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2009-01-01

    The common approach to scaling, according to Christopher Dede, a professor of learning technologies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, is to jump in and say, "Let's go out and find more money, recruit more participants, hire more people. Let's just keep doing the same thing, bigger and bigger." That, he observes, "tends to fail, and fail…

  12. Fear learning circuitry is biased toward generalization of fear associations in posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Morey, R A; Dunsmoor, J E; Haswell, C C; Brown, V M; Vora, A; Weiner, J; Stjepanovic, D; Wagner, H R; LaBar, K S

    2015-01-01

    Fear conditioning is an established model for investigating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, symptom triggers may vaguely resemble the initial traumatic event, differing on a variety of sensory and affective dimensions. We extended the fear-conditioning model to assess generalization of conditioned fear on fear processing neurocircuitry in PTSD. Military veterans (n=67) consisting of PTSD (n=32) and trauma-exposed comparison (n=35) groups underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during fear conditioning to a low fear-expressing face while a neutral face was explicitly unreinforced. Stimuli that varied along a neutral-to-fearful continuum were presented before conditioning to assess baseline responses, and after conditioning to assess experience-dependent changes in neural activity. Compared with trauma-exposed controls, PTSD patients exhibited greater post-study memory distortion of the fear-conditioned stimulus toward the stimulus expressing the highest fear intensity. PTSD patients exhibited biased neural activation toward high-intensity stimuli in fusiform gyrus (P<0.02), insula (P<0.001), primary visual cortex (P<0.05), locus coeruleus (P<0.04), thalamus (P<0.01), and at the trend level in inferior frontal gyrus (P=0.07). All regions except fusiform were moderated by childhood trauma. Amygdala-calcarine (P=0.01) and amygdala-thalamus (P=0.06) functional connectivity selectively increased in PTSD patients for high-intensity stimuli after conditioning. In contrast, amygdala-ventromedial prefrontal cortex (P=0.04) connectivity selectively increased in trauma-exposed controls compared with PTSD patients for low-intensity stimuli after conditioning, representing safety learning. In summary, fear generalization in PTSD is biased toward stimuli with higher emotional intensity than the original conditioned-fear stimulus. Functional brain differences provide a putative neurobiological model for fear generalization whereby PTSD symptoms are triggered

  13. Effects of attention manipulations on motivated attention to feared and nonfeared negative distracters in spider fear

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background When people view emotional and neutral pictures, the emotional pictures capture more attention than do neutral pictures. In support, studies with event-related potentials have shown that the early posterior negativity (EPN) and the late positive potential (LPP) to emotional versus neutral pictures are enhanced when pictures are attended. However, this motivated attention decreases when voluntary attention is directed away from the pictures. Most previous studies included only generally emotional pictures of either negative or positive valence. Because people with spider fear report intense fear of spiders, we examined whether directing attention away from emotional pictures at fixation decreases motivated attention less strongly for spiders than for generally negative distracters. Results We recorded event-related potentials from 128 channels to study whether manipulations of attention (i.e., spatial attention and perceptual load) decrease the EPN and the LPP to emotional distracters less strongly for spiders than for fear-irrelevant negative pictures in people with spider fear. Results confirmed that the EPN and the LPP to spiders (vs. neutral pictures) were particularly enhanced in participants with spider fear compared to participants without spider fear. When attention was directed away from the pictures, the EPN and the LPP to spiders (vs. neutral pictures) decreased similarly in fearful and nonfearful participants. Further, in fearful participants, the decrease in the EPN and the LPP was similar for spiders and for fear-irrelevant negative pictures. Conclusions Our findings suggest that for people with spider fear, directing attention away from emotional pictures at fixation decreases motivated attention to these distracters similarly for spiders as for fear-irrelevant negative pictures. These findings imply that attention to spiders in spider fear does not exceed the level of attention expected from the spider pictures’ high arousal and negative

  14. Acupuncture inhibits vagal gastric acid secretion stimulated by sham feeding in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Lux, G; Hagel, J; Bäcker, P; Bäcker, G; Vogl, R; Ruppin, H; Domschke, S; Domschke, W

    1994-08-01

    In a prospective randomised study, the effect of acupuncture on sham feeding stimulated gastric acid secretion was investigated. In eight healthy volunteers (five men, three women, mean (SEM) age 26.3 (4.7) years) various methods of acupuncture were performed. Apart from the sham procedure, the acupuncture was performed at the classic acupuncture points. Electroacupuncture reduced gastric acid secretion expressed as median (range) significantly during the first 30 minute period to 1.6 (0-5.2) mmol compared with 3.8 (2.3-14.5) mmol (p < 0.05) during control period (sham feeding without acupuncture). Inhibition of gastric acid secretion by electroacupuncture was also significant during the second 30 minute period (0.2 (0-5.6) v 3.6 (0.3-9.1) mmol; p < 0.05) and for peak acid output (0.8 (0.2-5.1) v 7.6 (3.4-12.1) mmol; p < 0.05). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation also resulted in significant reduction of gastric acid secretion during the first 30 minute period (1.0 (0-3.6) mmol v 3.8 (2.3-14.5) mmol; p < 0.05), and peak acid output (3.6 (1.2-12.0) v 7.6 (3.4-12.1) mmol; p < 0.05). The classic needle acupuncture, laser acupuncture, and sham acupuncture had no significant effect on gastric acid secretion. This study shows firstly that in healthy volunteers, only the versions of acupuncture using more pronounced stimulation (electroacupuncture, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation), but not those with only mild stimulation of the nerves (classic needle acupuncture, laser acupuncture), and secondly only acupuncture performed at defined points lead to significant reduction in gastric acid secretion. PMID:7926899

  15. Acupuncture inhibits vagal gastric acid secretion stimulated by sham feeding in healthy subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Lux, G; Hagel, J; Bäcker, P; Bäcker, G; Vogl, R; Ruppin, H; Domschke, S; Domschke, W

    1994-01-01

    In a prospective randomised study, the effect of acupuncture on sham feeding stimulated gastric acid secretion was investigated. In eight healthy volunteers (five men, three women, mean (SEM) age 26.3 (4.7) years) various methods of acupuncture were performed. Apart from the sham procedure, the acupuncture was performed at the classic acupuncture points. Electroacupuncture reduced gastric acid secretion expressed as median (range) significantly during the first 30 minute period to 1.6 (0-5.2) mmol compared with 3.8 (2.3-14.5) mmol (p < 0.05) during control period (sham feeding without acupuncture). Inhibition of gastric acid secretion by electroacupuncture was also significant during the second 30 minute period (0.2 (0-5.6) v 3.6 (0.3-9.1) mmol; p < 0.05) and for peak acid output (0.8 (0.2-5.1) v 7.6 (3.4-12.1) mmol; p < 0.05). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation also resulted in significant reduction of gastric acid secretion during the first 30 minute period (1.0 (0-3.6) mmol v 3.8 (2.3-14.5) mmol; p < 0.05), and peak acid output (3.6 (1.2-12.0) v 7.6 (3.4-12.1) mmol; p < 0.05). The classic needle acupuncture, laser acupuncture, and sham acupuncture had no significant effect on gastric acid secretion. This study shows firstly that in healthy volunteers, only the versions of acupuncture using more pronounced stimulation (electroacupuncture, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation), but not those with only mild stimulation of the nerves (classic needle acupuncture, laser acupuncture), and secondly only acupuncture performed at defined points lead to significant reduction in gastric acid secretion. PMID:7926899

  16. How large are the nonspecific effects of acupuncture? A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background While several recent large randomized trials found clinically relevant effects of acupuncture over no treatment or routine care, blinded trials comparing acupuncture to sham interventions often reported only minor or no differences. This raises the question whether (sham) acupuncture is associated with particularly potent nonspecific effects. We aimed to investigate the size of nonspecific effects associated with acupuncture interventions. Methods MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials and reference lists were searched up to April 2010 to identify randomized trials of acupuncture for any condition, including both sham and no acupuncture control groups. Data were extracted by one reviewer and verified by a second. Pooled standardized mean differences were calculated using a random effects model with the inverse variance method. Results Thirty-seven trials with a total of 5754 patients met the inclusion criteria. The included studies varied strongly regarding patients, interventions, outcome measures, methodological quality and effect sizes reported. Among the 32 trials reporting a continuous outcome measure, the random effects standardized mean difference between sham acupuncture and no acupuncture groups was -0.45 (95% confidence interval, -0.57, -0.34; I2 = 54%; Egger's test for funnel plot asymmetry, P = 0.25). Trials with larger effects of sham over no acupuncture reported smaller effects of acupuncture over sham intervention than trials with smaller nonspecific effects (β = -0.39, P = 0.029). Conclusions Sham acupuncture interventions are often associated with moderately large nonspecific effects which could make it difficult to detect small additional specific effects. Compared to inert placebo interventions, effects associated with sham acupuncture might be larger, which would have considerable implications for the design and interpretation of clinical trials. PMID:21092261

  17. Neural correlates of fear-induced sympathetic response associated with the peripheral temperature change rate.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Tanabe, Hiroki C; Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Koike, Takahiko; Yamazaki, Mika; Sudo, Nobuyuki; Sadato, Norihiro

    2016-07-01

    Activation of the sympathetic nervous system is essential for coping with environmental stressors such as fearful stimuli. Recent human imaging studies demonstrated that activity in some cortical regions, such as the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and anterior insula cortex (aIC), is related to sympathetic activity. However, little is known about the functional brain connectivity related to sympathetic response to fearful stimuli. The participants were 32 healthy, right-handed volunteers. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to examine brain activity when watching horror and control movies. Fingertip temperature was taken during the scanning as a measure of sympathetic response. The movies were watched a second time, and the degree of fear (9-point Likert-type scale) was evaluated every three seconds. The brain activity of the ACC, bilateral aIC, and bilateral anterior prefrontal cortex (aPFC) was correlated with the change rate of fingertip temperature, with or without fearful stimuli. Functional connectivity analysis revealed significantly greater positive functional connectivity between the amygdala and the ACC and between the amygdala and the aIC when watching the horror movie than when watching the control movie. Whole-brain psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) analysis revealed that the functional connectivity between the left amygdala and the ACC was modulated according to the fear rating. Our results indicate that the increased functional connectivity between the left amygdala and the ACC represents a sympathetic response to fearful stimuli. PMID:27107469

  18. The history of nuclear fear

    SciTech Connect

    Weart, S.

    1993-04-01

    The history of military and civilian nuclear energy is not only a matter of hard technology, politics, and economics. Our thinking about bombs and reactors is also affected by images with a curious and sometimes overwhelming power. Weird rays that can transform flesh or create monsters, the atom-powered marvels of a future uptopia, the mad scientist who plots to destroy the world: all have an influence on the way people think. Already decades before scientists had discovered how to exploit nuclear energy, a web of interconnected symbols was fully formed in the public mind. These images can be traced back to primitive imagery and, still deeper, into common human experiences, but they were often connected specifically to nuclear energy by nuclear scientists themselves. After the actual development of nuclear technology, a variety of groups used the old symbolism for their propaganda. Since nuclear energy was the most impressive case of the application of the arcane mysteries of science by modern technological authorities, it came to stand for all that people hoped, and still more what they feared, from such authorities.

  19. Psychology: Fear and hope in climate messages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Paul C.

    2012-08-01

    Scientists often expect fear of climate change and its impacts to motivate public support of climate policies. A study suggests that climate change deniers don't respond to this, but that positive appeals can change their views.

  20. Children's Fears in the Classroom Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Suzanne Bennett

    1979-01-01

    Fears common to the classroom setting are discussed, including school phobia, social withdrawal, and test anxiety. Incidence data, theoretical explanations, and treatment research are reviewed, and directions for future research are suggested. (Author/MH)

  1. Driving-related fear: a review.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Joanne; Deane, Frank; Podd, John

    2002-06-01

    This article reviews the research on driving-related fear (DRF). Until recently, research has concentrated almost exclusively on the effect of motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) on subsequent levels of DRF. However, recent findings have suggested that MVAs are not solely responsible for this fear reaction, and that non-MVA driving fear can be just as strong. Studies of the broader driving-fearful population have encountered difficulty with diagnostic conceptualisation of DRF, although some have investigated a possible typology of DRF. Driving skill has been a neglected issue in the DRF research, and may prove to be a useful part of assessment and remediation of this potentially debilitating problem. Issues of definitional inconsistency are highlighted, and suggestions are made for several directions that future research might profitably take. PMID:12113199

  2. Neural circuits: Interacting interneurons regulate fear learning.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Takaaki; Johansen, Joshua P

    2014-08-01

    A recent study has found that, during associative fear learning, different sensory stimuli activate subsets of inhibitory interneurons in distinct ways to dynamically regulate glutamatergic neural activity and behavioral memory formation. PMID:25093560

  3. 'Staff fear raising the alarm on FGM'.

    PubMed

    2014-06-01

    Nurses can play a vital role in eradicating female genital mutilation--but some may be afraid to report it for fear of being seen as culturally insensitive, says a senior nurse academic. PMID:24866635

  4. Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... wouldn't dream of going near the neighbor's dog. continue Signs of Anxiety Typical childhood fears change ... after having an unpleasant experience, such as a dog bite or an accident. Separation anxiety is common ...

  5. Part 2: Fear of contagion, fear of intimacy.

    PubMed

    Botnick, M R

    2000-01-01

    In this second part of the trilogy, I review the concepts of panic, the Theory of Cognitive Dissonance, and how internally inconsistent opinions and attitudes can be made consistent (or consonant). The theory explains, in some measure, how AIDS has been socialized into our thinking about identity, and goes beyond a medical condition. The pervasive identification of gay men with HIV and AIDS has resulted for many in an over-identification with fears of contagion and on a societal level in a fear of all gays as pools of contagion. The conversion of dissonance to consonance has taken many forms; within the gay community it has resulted in the rejection of the "100% safe-100% of the time" safe-sex message, and the adoption (for many) of a new form of deviant label-someone who is not in conformity with the social norm of gay community sexual behavior. However, we shall see that this so-called norm is a sham-that many gay men do not, as a rule, practice safe(r) sex on a consistent basis. This information indicates that the educational efforts of the last decade have at best lost their potency, and at worst were less than efficacious to begin with. The dissonant messages have also informed both the construction of the gay community and its interpretation of what it means to be gay. The result has been a tri-lateral perception of HIV and AIDS as either a medical, political or a social phenomenon. This fragmented understanding has exacerbated the already polarized ASOs and GSOs in that each has determined its ideology based on a particular interpretation of HIV and AIDS. This polarization has been operationalized by the GSOs and ASOs primarily in the manner by which they define their target markets, and more importantly, in the manner by which they exclude certain gays from participation. At the extreme, some gay men feel entirely left out of the community, and are consequently unable to convert their dissonance regarding being gay into consonance, if only by developing

  6. A Study of Fears in Elementary School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moracco, John C.; Camilleri, Jack

    1983-01-01

    Investigated fears of 121 third graders who completed a checklist of 25 items. Results showed girls were generally more fearful than boys. Loss of parents was the principal source of fear. Fears of natural phenomena (tornados and storms) and of animals resulted in the most consistency. (JAC)

  7. Fears in Visually Impaired and Normally Sighted Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Neville J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Administered Revised Fear Survey Schedule for Children to 129 visually impaired children and 129 normally sighted children to determine whether visually impaired subjects reported greater fear. Found the two groups did not significantly differ on overall level of fearfulness, although sighted children expressed greater levels on fear of failure…

  8. Social Modulation of Associative Fear Learning by Pheromone Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredy, Timothy W.; Barad, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Mice communicate through visual, vocal, and olfactory cues that influence innate, nonassociative behavior. We here report that exposure to a recently fear-conditioned familiar mouse impairs acquisition of conditioned fear and facilitates fear extinction, effects mimicked by both an olfactory chemosignal emitted by a recently fear-conditioned…

  9. Lightning-Strike Disaster: Effects on Children's Fears and Worries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollinger, Stephen J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compares fears of lightning-strike victims (N=29) with matched control children (N=58), using fear reports from children and their mothers. Differences between samples were most pronounced for child-reported fears. Correspondence between mothers' and children's reports of intense storm-related fears was markedly larger in the lightning sample than…

  10. Confident Kids: Helping Your Child Cope with Fear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Janet

    Noting that parents need to recognize that fears are a normal part of a child's development and that a child must be helped to deal with them, this book provides a very practical approach to fear reduction in a user-friendly form. The first part of the book, for parents, discusses: (1) definitions of fear and fear symptoms in children; (2) the…

  11. Social Factors That Predict Fear of Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Jonathan S.; Thomas, Jessica; Jones, Stevy; Mahoney, Lauren; Dukes, Kristina; Treadway, Jodi

    2016-01-01

    Fear of academic success is ultimately a fear of social exclusion. Therefore, various forms of social inclusion may alleviate this fear. Three studies tested the hypothesis that social inclusion variables negatively predict fear of success. In Study 1, middle and high school students (n = 129) completed surveys of parental involvement, parental…

  12. The Relationship between Fearfulness, GABA+, and Fear-Related BOLD Responses in the Insula

    PubMed Central

    Lipp, Ilona; Evans, C. John; Lewis, Caroline; Murphy, Kevin; Wise, Richard G.; Caseras, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA plays a crucial role in anxiety and fear, but its relationship to brain activation during fear reactions is not clear. Previous studies suggest that GABA agonists lead to an attenuation of emotion-processing related BOLD signals in the insula. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between GABA concentration and fear-related BOLD responses in this region. In 44 female participants with different levels of fearfulness, GABA concentration in the left insula was measured using a GABA+ MRS acquisition during rest; additionally, BOLD signals were obtained during performance of a fear provocation paradigm. Fearfulness was not associated with GABA+ in the left insula, but could predict fear-related BOLD responses in a cluster in the left anterior insula. The BOLD signal change in this cluster did not correlate with GABA+ concentration. However, we found a significant positive correlation between GABA+ concentration and fear-related BOLD responses in a different cluster that included parts of the left insula, amygdala and putamen. Our findings indicate that low insular GABA concentration is not a predisposition for fearfulness, and that several factors influence whether a correlation between GABA and BOLD can be found. PMID:25811453

  13. The Effect of Disgust and Fear Modeling on Children’s Disgust and Fear for Animals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Disgust is a protective emotion associated with certain types of animal fears. Given that a primary function of disgust is to protect against harm, increasing children’s disgust-related beliefs for animals may affect how threatening they think animals are and their avoidance of them. One way that children’s disgust beliefs for animals might change is via vicarious learning: by observing others responding to the animal with disgust. In Experiment 1, children (ages 7–10 years) were presented with images of novel animals together with adult faces expressing disgust. Children’s fear beliefs and avoidance preferences increased for these disgust-paired animals compared with unpaired control animals. Experiment 2 used the same procedure and compared disgust vicarious learning with vicarious learning with fear faces. Children’s fear beliefs and avoidance preferences for animals again increased as a result of disgust vicarious learning, and animals seen with disgust or fear faces were also rated more disgusting than control animals. The relationship between increased fear beliefs and avoidance preferences for animals was mediated by disgust for the animals. The experiments demonstrate that children can learn to believe that animals are disgusting and threatening after observing an adult responding with disgust toward them. The findings also suggest a bidirectional relationship between fear and disgust with fear-related vicarious learning leading to increased disgust for animals and disgust-related vicarious learning leading to increased fear and avoidance. PMID:24955571

  14. Zinc transporter 3 is involved in learned fear and extinction, but not in innate fear.

    PubMed

    Martel, Guillaume; Hevi, Charles; Friebely, Olivia; Baybutt, Trevor; Shumyatsky, Gleb P

    2010-11-01

    Synaptically released Zn²+ is a potential modulator of neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity in fear-conditioning pathways. Zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) knock-out (KO) mice are well suited to test the role of zinc in learned fear, because ZnT3 is colocalized with synaptic zinc, responsible for its transport to synaptic vesicles, highly enriched in the amygdala-associated neural circuitry, and ZnT3 KO mice lack Zn²+ in synaptic vesicles. However, earlier work reported no deficiency in fear memory in ZnT3 KO mice, which is surprising based on the effects of Zn²+ on amygdala synaptic plasticity. We therefore reexamined ZnT3 KO mice in various tasks for learned and innate fear. The mutants were deficient in a weak fear-conditioning protocol using single tone-shock pairing but showed normal memory when a stronger, five-pairing protocol was used. ZnT3 KO mice were deficient in memory when a tone was presented as complex auditory information in a discontinuous fashion. Moreover, ZnT3 KO mice showed abnormality in trace fear conditioning and in fear extinction. By contrast, ZnT3 KO mice had normal anxiety. Thus, ZnT3 is involved in associative fear memory and extinction, but not in innate fear, consistent with the role of synaptic zinc in amygdala synaptic plasticity. PMID:21036893

  15. The effect of acupuncture on leukocyte levels in peripheral blood is modified by aspirin.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Vilchis, José Federico; Barrera-Escorcia, Eduardo; Fregoso-Padilla, Martha

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown that acupuncture can modify circulating levels of subpopulations of leukocytes. There have been few investigations on the effect of acupuncture on prostaglandins metabolism. Aspirin is capable of inhibiting the metabolism of prostaglandins and to produce several pharmacological effects. The objective of this study was to determine whether prior administration of aspirin could modify the action of acupuncture on levels of circulating leukocytes. Fourteen healthy males (age: 19-23 years) were recruited from a university student population. This study was a placebo-controlled, prospective, cross-over design. Subjects were randomly assigned into A or B groups. Group A received aspirin 500 mg and group B placebo, after 1 week of a washout period, group A received placebo and group B aspirin. Subjects were given acupuncture with manual needling in GV14 (Dazhui) acupoint 2 hr after receiving medication. The needle was stimulated for 10 sec and was kept in place for 5 min. Leukocytes and their subpopulations were quantified in blood samples taken immediately before and 2 hr after acupuncture treatment. In each subject pre-acupuncture values were compared to those post-acupuncture. The results showed that acupuncture significantly increased overall leukocytes (p=0.006) and neutrophils (p<0.001). Aspirin partially inhibited these effects. The data suggest that the effect of acupuncture on leukocytes may be related to levels of prostaglandins. PMID:22128425

  16. Integration of acupuncture into conventional medicine from health professionals' perspective: A thematic synthesis of qualitative studies.

    PubMed

    García-Escamilla, Esther; Rodríguez-Martín, Beatriz; Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente

    2016-03-01

    Acupuncture is a prominent Complementary Medicine. Although health professionals' conceptions of acupuncture may affect its utilisation and integration within conventional medicine, these aspects have not been well studied. The aim of this review was to analyse the integration of acupuncture into conventional medicine from the perspective of health professionals. We conducted a systematic review and a thematic synthesis of qualitative studies that analysed the integration of acupuncture into conventional medicine grounded in participants' perspectives. A systematic search was undertaken in PubMed, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library Plus, Scopus and CINAHL. This review included 18 articles: 6 analysed the viewpoint of physicians, 3 of nurses and 9 comprised different health-related professionals. Most of these studies included healthcare professionals practising acupuncture and took place in sites where the relation between acupuncture and biomedicine is favourable. The most used research techniques were convenience sampling, semi-structured interviews and interpretative approach. The holistic approach of acupuncture and its lack of adverse effects were highlighted by the analysed studies. This led to health professionals encouraging its integration into conventional medicine. The main obstacles perceived for the integration were lack of knowledge and institutional support. In general, acupuncture has been adapted to the biomedical model (often practised in an unsystematic and individual manner), and it is conceived as a supplement of Western medicine. 'Working together' and overcoming the biomedical model are recognised by the participants as key conditions for successful integration of acupuncture. PMID:25788323

  17. Characteristics analysis of acupuncture electroencephalograph based on mutual information Lempel—Ziv complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xi-Liu; Wang, Jiang; Han, Chun-Xiao; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xi-Le; Bian, Hong-Rui

    2012-02-01

    As a convenient approach to the characterization of cerebral cortex electrical information, electroencephalograph (EEG) has potential clinical application in monitoring the acupuncture effects. In this paper, a method composed of the mutual information method and Lempel—Ziv complexity method (MILZC) is proposed to investigate the effects of acupuncture on the complexity of information exchanges between different brain regions based on EEGs. In the experiments, eight subjects are manually acupunctured at ‘Zusanli’ acupuncture point (ST-36) with different frequencies (i.e., 50, 100, 150, and 200 times/min) and the EEGs are recorded simultaneously. First, MILZC values are compared in general. Then average brain connections are used to quantify the effectiveness of acupuncture under the above four frequencies. Finally, significance index P values are used to study the spatiality of the acupuncture effect on the brain. Three main findings are obtained: (i) MILZC values increase during the acupuncture; (ii) manual acupunctures (MAs) with 100 times/min and 150 times/min are more effective than with 50 times/min and 200 times/min; (iii) contralateral hemisphere activation is more prominent than ipsilateral hemisphere's. All these findings suggest that acupuncture contributes to the increase of brain information exchange complexity and the MILZC method can successfully describe these changes.

  18. Cardiovascular Response to Manual Acupuncture Needle Stimulation among Apparently Healthy Nigerian Adults.

    PubMed

    Sokunbi, Ganiyu; Maduagwu, Stanley; Jaiyeola, Olabode; Gambo, Hassan; Blasu, Cephas

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated experience with acupuncture needle stimulation of apparently healthy adult Nigerians and the responses of the systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure, heart rate (HR), and rate pressure products (RPP) to acupuncture at both real acupuncture points relevant to the treatment of cardiovascular disorder and sham acupuncture points not relevant to the treatment of cardiovascular disorder. Seventy-eight participants were randomly placed into three groups: the real acupuncture group (RAG); the sham acupuncture group (SAG); and the control group, with 26 participants per group. Data were collected preintervention, 15 minutes into acupuncture stimulation, postintervention, and 15 minutes after intervention. Changes (postintervention - preintervention scores) in the SBP, HR, and RPP were statistically lower in the RAG than in the SAG. Changes in the DBP showed a significant difference between the SAG and the RAG (p > 0.05). Findings from this study showed that among apparently healthy Nigerian adults, acupuncture needle stimulation at acupoints relevant to cardiovascular disorders was more effective than sham intervention in reducing the SBP, HR, and RPP. Participants reported heaviness, numbness, and increasing pain, but no dizziness, fainting and/or life-threatening side effects, during and after the acupuncture needle stimulation. PMID:27342888

  19. Managing acute withdrawal syndrome on patients with heroin and morphine addiction by acupuncture therapy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Po-kuang; Lu, Gabriel P; Lu, Dominic P; Lu, D P; Lu, Winston I

    2004-01-01

    Though there are articles and case reports about using acupuncture to detoxify and to break the narcotic addiction, few articles describe in the West about using acupuncture therapy to treat the emergence of acute withdrawal symptom due to heroin, opium, or morphine. Most often the method of treatment are using the methadone or benzodiazepine and phenoziazine drugs this article describes many years of clinical experience with non-drug approach to treat the acute withdrawal symptoms with acupuncture therapy. Unlike the drug approach, which usually has side effects, there is no adverse effect with acupuncture therapy. PMID:15807100

  20. Acupuncture and Immune Function in Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome: A Randomized, Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shaun Wen Huey; Liong, Men Long; Yuen, Kah Hay; Krieger, John N

    2014-01-01

    Objective The immune system has been implicated as one mechanism underlying the benefits of acupuncture therapy. Evidence suggests that acupuncture can ameliorate symptoms of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), but the association between clinical response and the immune system has not been investigated. Design/Setting We investigated 12 CP/CPPS patients participating in a prospective randomized clinical trial comparing acupuncture versus sham acupuncture for effects on cellular immunity. Blood samples were taken before the first needling and after the last of 20 treatment sessions (week 10). Patients also completed questionnaires examining their CP/CPPS symptoms and mood status at the baseline and end of study visits. Results At the end of study 8 of 12 participants (67%) were classified as treatment responders, 4 participants each from the acupuncture and sham groups. The acupuncture group averaged a 5% increase in natural killer cell levels compared to corresponding sham (-13%; p=0.03). Similarly, patients randomized to acupuncture reported a reduction in other white blood cell parameters examined, supporting the possibility that immunity might be important in the pathophysiology of CP/CPPS. Conclusions The specific effect of acupuncture on CP/CPPS remains unclear. Further research is warranted to examine the mechanisms by which acupuncture therapy may improve clinical symptoms in patients with CP/CPPS. PMID:25453515