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Sample records for acute alcoholic hepatitis

  1. Acute Legionella pneumophila infection masquerading as acute alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Jonathan Michael; Chan, Julian; Reid, Angeline Louise; Tan, Chistopher

    2013-01-01

    A middle-aged man had deteriorated rapidly in hospital after being misdiagnosed with acute alcoholic hepatitis. Acute Legionnaires disease (Legionellosis) was subsequently diagnosed on rapid antigen urinary testing and further confirmed serologically. This led to appropriate antibiotic treatment and complete clinical resolution. Physicians caring for patients with alcohol-related liver disease should consider Legionella pneumophila in their differential diagnosis even with a paucity of respiratory symptoms. PMID:23355576

  2. Immune dysfunction in acute alcoholic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Dhanda, Ashwin D; Collins, Peter L

    2015-11-14

    Acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH) is a serious complication of alcohol misuse and has high short term mortality. It is a clinical syndrome characterised by jaundice and coagulopathy in a patient with a history of recent heavy alcohol use and is associated with profound immune dysfunction with a primed but ineffective immune response against pathogens. Here, we review the current knowledge of the pathogenesis and immune defects of AAH and identify areas requiring further study. Alcohol activates the immune system primarily through the disruption of gut tight junction integrity allowing the escape of pathogen-associated molecular particles (PAMPs) into the portal venous system. PAMPs stimulate cells expressing toll-like receptors (mainly myeloid derived cells) and initiate a network of intercellular signalling by secretion of many soluble mediators including cytokines and chemokines. The latter coordinates the infiltration of neutrophils, monocytes and T cells and results in hepatic stellate cell activation, cellular damage and hepatocyte death by necrosis or apoptosis. On the converse of this immune activation is the growing evidence of impaired microbial defence. Neutrophils have reduced phagocytic capacity and oxidative burst and there is recent evidence that T cell exhaustion plays a role in this. PMID:26576079

  3. Immune dysfunction in acute alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dhanda, Ashwin D; Collins, Peter L

    2015-01-01

    Acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH) is a serious complication of alcohol misuse and has high short term mortality. It is a clinical syndrome characterised by jaundice and coagulopathy in a patient with a history of recent heavy alcohol use and is associated with profound immune dysfunction with a primed but ineffective immune response against pathogens. Here, we review the current knowledge of the pathogenesis and immune defects of AAH and identify areas requiring further study. Alcohol activates the immune system primarily through the disruption of gut tight junction integrity allowing the escape of pathogen-associated molecular particles (PAMPs) into the portal venous system. PAMPs stimulate cells expressing toll-like receptors (mainly myeloid derived cells) and initiate a network of intercellular signalling by secretion of many soluble mediators including cytokines and chemokines. The latter coordinates the infiltration of neutrophils, monocytes and T cells and results in hepatic stellate cell activation, cellular damage and hepatocyte death by necrosis or apoptosis. On the converse of this immune activation is the growing evidence of impaired microbial defence. Neutrophils have reduced phagocytic capacity and oxidative burst and there is recent evidence that T cell exhaustion plays a role in this. PMID:26576079

  4. Pharmacotherapy of acute alcoholic hepatitis in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Rouabhia, Samir; Addolorato, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Severe alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is an acute form of alcohol induced liver disease with a poor prognosis that is seen in the patients who consume large quantities of alcohol. The diagnosis of AH is based on the appropriate alcohol intake history and is supported with clinical and histological features, and several scoring systems. Glucocorticoids are the mainstay for treating severe AH with pentoxifylline used as an alternative to steroids in addition to total alcohol abstinence. Liver transplantation is a possible therapeutic option for severe AH. Among the anti-craving medications able to improve abstinence rate, baclofen seems to be effective and safe in the alcoholic patients affected by severe liver damage. PMID:24605014

  5. Update on Alcoholic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Torok, Natalie J.

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is one of the most prevalent liver diseases worldwide, and a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic hepatitis is a severe form of liver injury in patients with alcohol abuse, can present as an acute on chronic liver failure associated with a rapid decline in liver synthetic function, and consequent increase in mortality. Despite therapy, about 30%–50% of patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis eventually die. The pathogenic pathways that lead to the development of alcoholic hepatitis are complex and involve oxidative stress, gut dysbiosis, and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune system with injury to the parenchymal cells and activation of hepatic stellate cells. As accepted treatment approaches are currently limited, a better understanding of the pathophysiology would be required to generate new approaches that improve outcomes. This review focuses on recent advances in the diagnosis, pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis and novel treatment strategies. PMID:26540078

  6. Early liver transplantation for patients with acute alcoholic hepatitis: public views and the effects on organ donation.

    PubMed

    Stroh, G; Rosell, T; Dong, F; Forster, J

    2015-06-01

    Patients with severe acute alcoholic hepatitis may not survive to fulfill the standard 6 months of abstinence and counseling prior to transplantation. A prospective study demonstrated that early liver transplantation in such patients improved 2 year survival from 23% to 71% and only 3 of 26 patients returned to drinking after 1140 days; graft function was unaffected. Nonetheless, this treatment protocol may raise public concerns and affect organ donation rates. A total of 503 participants took a survey made available at an online crowdsourcing marketplace. The survey measured attitudes on liver transplantation generally and early transplantation for this patient population, in addition to measuring responses to nine vignettes describing fictional candidates. The majority of respondents (81.5%, n?=?410) was at least neutral toward early transplantation for these patients; only a minority (26.3%) indicated that transplantation in any vignette would make them hesitant to donate their organs. Middle-aged patients with good social support and financial stability were viewed most favorably (p?acute alcoholic hepatitis may not be as controversial to the public as previously thought. PMID:25707427

  7. The hepatic-arterial/portal-venous scintiangiogram in alcoholic hepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.; Sakimura, I.; Siegel, M.E.; Harley, H.; Lee, K.

    1984-01-01

    This study was designed to identify abnormalities in the hepatic-arterial/portal-venous scintiangiogram (SA) in alcoholic hepatitis (AH). SA's were performed in 35 patients with acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH), 8; acute alcoholic hepatitis superimposed on cirrhosis (A/C), 14; and cirrhosis (C), 13. Posterior flows were done with a bolus of 10 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid with computer time-activity curves over the liver and left kidney. Curves were analyzed for per cent of hepatic arterial (HA) and portal venous contribution using the slope ratio method. Hepatic arterialization was estimated from the angle of the HA component of the curve. Reversal of the relative contribution of the hepatic and portal components of total flow were seen in all groups. Although quite severe in AH, the degree of reversal could not be used to differentiate among the groups. The average HA angle in AAH was 48.3 +- 8.1, in A/C 41.5 +- 10.6, and in C 30.4 +- 12.1. In reviewing the data of only those in the acute clinical phase of AH and not the recovery phase (1 AAH, 3 A/C) and those without other causes of alteration in hepatic arterialization (1 hepatoma, 1 portalcaval shunt, 6 renal failure), the average HA angle in AAH was 50.1 +- 6.6, 45.4 +- 8.2 in A/C, and 23.2 +- 4.2 in C. In 6 with renal failure (2 C, 2AAH, 2 A/C) the HA angle ws 52.7 +- 5.7. In all cases cirrhosis could be differentiated from both A/C (P=.05) and AAH (P<.01) using the HA angle. In absence of renal failure, portal shunt, or hepatoma, P was <.01 in both comparisons.

  8. Acute alcohol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Vonghia, Luisa; Leggio, Lorenzo; Ferrulli, Anna; Bertini, Marco; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Addolorato, Giovanni

    2008-12-01

    Acute alcohol intoxication is a clinically harmful condition that usually follows the ingestion of a large amount of alcohol. Clinical manifestations are heterogeneous and involve different organs and apparatuses, with behavioral, cardiac, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, neurological, and metabolic effects. The management of an intoxicated patient occurs mainly in the emergency department and is aimed at stabilizing the clinical condition of the patient, depending on his/her clinical presentation. One specific drug that is useful in the treatment of acute alcohol intoxication is metadoxine, which is able to accelerate ethanol excretion. In patients presenting an acute alcohol intoxication, alcohol-related disorders should be detected so that the patient can be directed to an alcohol treatment unit, where a personalized, specific treatment can be established. PMID:19046719

  9. Advances in alcoholic liver disease: An update on alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Randy; Liu, Andy; Perumpail, Ryan B; Wong, Robert J; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis is a pro-inflammatory chronic liver disease that is associated with high short-term morbidity and mortality (25%-35% in one month) in the setting of chronic alcohol use. Histopathology is notable for micro- and macrovesicular steatosis, acute inflammation with neutrophil infiltration, hepatocellular necrosis, perivenular and perisinusoidal fibrosis, and Mallory hyaline bodies found in ballooned hepatocytes. Other findings include the characteristic eosinophilic fibrillar material (Mallory’s hyaline bodies) found in ballooned hepatocytes. The presence of focal intense lobular infiltration of neutrophils is what typically distinguishes alcoholic hepatitis from other forms of hepatitis, in which the inflammatory infiltrate is primarily composed of mononuclear cells. Management consists of a multidisciplinary approach including alcohol cessation, fluid and electrolyte correction, treatment of alcohol withdrawal, and pharmacological therapy based on the severity of the disease. Pharmacological treatment for severe alcoholic hepatitis, as defined by Maddrey’s discriminant factor ? 32, consists of either prednisolone or pentoxifylline for a period of four weeks. The body of evidence for corticosteroids has been greater than pentoxifylline, although there are higher risks of complications. Recently head-to-head trials between corticosteroids and pentoxifylline have been performed, which again suggests that corticosteroids should strongly be considered over pentoxifylline. PMID:26576078

  10. The hepatoprotective effect of aqueous extracts of Penthorum chinense Pursh against acute alcohol-induced liver injury is associated with ameliorating hepatic steatosis and reducing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi-Wei; Jiang, Yun; Zhang, Da-Yong; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Hu, Yuan-Jia; Li, Peng; Su, Huanxing; Wan, Jian-Bo

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of Penthorum chinense Pursh (PCP), a health food and folk medicine, against acute alcohol-induced liver injury and further to elucidate its probable mechanisms. Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with an aqueous extract of PCP (5.2 and 10.3 g per kg BW) once daily for 7 consecutive days prior to ethanol gavage (4.7 g kg(-1)) every 12 h for a total of three doses. Pretreatment with PCP significantly decreased the elevations of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and hepatic triglyceride after the last ethanol administration. PCP suppressed the elevation of the malondialdehyde (MDA) level, restored the glutathione (GSH) level and enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in both the serum and liver, which were associated with the inhibition of hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1). In addition, alcohol exposure markedly induced the lipolysis of white adipose tissue (WAT) through up-regulating protein expressions of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (p-HSL), and enhancing the fatty acid uptake capacity in the liver by elevated hepatic CD36 expression, which were attenuated by PCP treatment. These data demonstrated that pre-treatment with PCP protected against acute ethanol-induced liver injury, possibly by reducing CYP2E1-dependent oxidative stress and ameliorating dysfunctional WAT derived-fatty acid influx to the liver. Our findings suggest that PCP might be a promising agent for the prevention of acute alcohol-induced liver injury. PMID:25820653

  11. Acute hepatitis after amiodarone infusion

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Paulo; Dias, Adelaide; Gonçalves, Helena; Albuquerque, Aníbal; Gama, Vasco

    2015-01-01

    Acute hepatitis is a very rare, but potentially fatal, adverse effect of intravenous amiodarone. We present a case of an 88-year-old man with history of ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and severely depressed left ventricular function that was admitted to our coronary care unit with diagnosis of decompensated heart failure and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. A few hours after the beginning of intravenous amiodarone he developed an acute hepatitis. There was a completely recovery within the next days after amiodarone withdrawn and other causes of acute hepatitis have been ruled out. This case highlights the need for close monitoring of hepatic function during amiodarone infusion in order to identify any potential hepatotoxicity and prevent a fatal outcome. Oral amiodarone is, apparently, a safe option in these patients. PMID:26488027

  12. Acute hepatitis after amiodarone infusion.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Paulo; Dias, Adelaide; Gonçalves, Helena; Albuquerque, Aníbal; Gama, Vasco

    2015-10-16

    Acute hepatitis is a very rare, but potentially fatal, adverse effect of intravenous amiodarone. We present a case of an 88-year-old man with history of ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and severely depressed left ventricular function that was admitted to our coronary care unit with diagnosis of decompensated heart failure and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. A few hours after the beginning of intravenous amiodarone he developed an acute hepatitis. There was a completely recovery within the next days after amiodarone withdrawn and other causes of acute hepatitis have been ruled out. This case highlights the need for close monitoring of hepatic function during amiodarone infusion in order to identify any potential hepatotoxicity and prevent a fatal outcome. Oral amiodarone is, apparently, a safe option in these patients. PMID:26488027

  13. [The catalase inhibitor aminotriazole alleviates acute alcoholic liver injury].

    PubMed

    Ai, Qing; Ge, Pu; Dai, Jie; Liang, Tian-Cai; Yang, Qing; Lin, Ling; Zhang, Li

    2015-02-25

    In this study, the effects of catalase (CAT) inhibitor aminotriazole (ATZ) on alcohol-induced acute liver injury were investigated to explore the potential roles of CAT in alcoholic liver injury. Acute liver injury was induced by intraperitoneal injection of alcohol in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, and various doses of ATZ (100-400 mg/kg) or vehicle were administered intraperitoneally at 30 min before alcohol exposure. After 24 h of alcohol exposure, the levels of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in plasma were determined. The degree of hepatic histopathological abnormality was observed by HE staining. The activity of hepatic CAT, hydrogen peroxide (H?O?) level and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in liver tissue were measured by corresponding kits. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in plasma were determined by ELISA method. The results showed that treatment with ATZ dose-dependently suppressed the elevation of ALT, AST and LDH levels induced by alcohol exposure, and that ATZ alleviated alcohol-induced histopathological alterations. Furthermore, ATZ inhibited the activity of CAT, reduced hepatic levels of H?O?and MDA in alcohol exposed rats. ATZ also decreased the levels of plasma TNF-? and IL-6 in rats with alcohol exposure. These results indicated that ATZ attenuated alcohol-induced acute liver injury in rats, suggesting that CAT might play important pathological roles in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver injury. PMID:25672632

  14. Acute Hepatic Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Bissell, D. Montgomery; Wang, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The porphyrias comprise a set of diseases, each representing an individual defect in one of the eight enzymes mediating the pathway of heme synthesis. The diseases are genetically distinct but have in common the overproduction of heme precursors. In the case of the acute (neurologic) porphyrias, the cause of symptoms appears to be overproduction of a neurotoxic precursor. For the cutaneous porphyrias, it is photosensitizing porphyrins. Some types have both acute and cutaneous manifestations. The clinical presentation of acute porphyria consists of abdominal pain, nausea, and occasionally seizures. Only a small minority of those who carry a mutation for acute porphyria have pain attacks. The triggers for an acute attack encompass certain medications and severely decreased caloric intake. The propensity of females to acute attacks has been linked to internal changes in ovarian physiology. Symptoms are accompanied by large increases in delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen in plasma and urine. Treatment of an acute attack centers initially on pain relief and elimination of inducing factors such as medications; glucose is administered to reverse the fasting state. The only specific treatment is administration of intravenous hemin. An important goal of treatment is preventing progression of the symptoms to a neurological crisis. Patients who progress despite hemin administration have undergone liver transplantation with complete resolution of symptoms. A current issue is the unavailability of a rapid test for urine porphobilinogen in the urgent-care setting. PMID:26357631

  15. Alcoholic Hepatitis: Steroids vs. Pentoxifylline

    PubMed Central

    Smart, Laura; Gobejishvili, Leila; Crittenden, Neil; Barve, Shirish; McClain, Craig J.

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) remains a major cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality in the United States and is actually increasing in certain areas of Europe. Thus, there is a pressing need for new therapies/approaches. Major barriers for reducing morbidity, mortality, and costs of care include: lack of translational animal and human studies of new therapies for AH; limited trials of combination therapies in AH targeted at specific disease mechanisms (e.g., gut permeability, cytokines, oxidative stress); limited studies on non-invasive, non-mortality end points; few studies on mechanisms of steroid non-responsiveness; and inadequate prognostic indicators, to name only a few. In spite of these gaps, we have made major advances in understanding mechanisms for AH and appropriate therapies for AH. This article reviews mechanisms and rationale for use of steroids and pentoxifylline in AH and future directions in therapy. PMID:23750115

  16. Acute cytomegalovirus hepatitis in an immunocompetent host

    PubMed Central

    Sy, Alexander M; Omobomi, Olabimpe; Lenox, Theodore; Bergasa, Nora V

    2013-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman presented with a 1-week history of recurrent fevers and joint pains accompanied by abdominal and low back discomfort. She has a history of hypoparathyroidism and is on calcium supplements. Physical examination revealed fever and tachycardia. The rest of the examination was normal. Laboratory tests showed newly increased transaminase activity. Serum bilirubin and prothrombin time were normal. She was admitted for evaluation of acute hepatitis. Serology for hepatitis A, B, C and HIV were negative. Her serum acetaminophen and alcohol were undetected. Abdominal imaging was normal. Cultures were sterile. Additional tests for uncommon viral hepatitis included herpes simplex virus, cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus. Liver biopsy revealed non-specific inflammation. Subsequently, cytomegalovirus serology showed an IgM positive and negative IgG titre. Cytomegalovirus DNA qualitative PCR was also positive. No antiviral medication was given. She continued to have intermittent daily fever but reported no associated symptoms. She was discharged 9?days after admission in stable condition per her request with the advice to follow-up in the clinic in 1?week. Her serum hepatic profile returned to normal and she reported no more episodes of fever. Repeated titres of cytomegalovirus serology showed seroconversion. PMID:24275336

  17. [Hepatic pseudotumor in acute fascioliasis].

    PubMed

    Castillo Contreras, Ofelia Brisaida; Frisancho Velarde, Oscar

    2013-03-01

    We report a 61-year-old woman who was hospitalized because of abdominal pain in the right upper quadrant related to a liver tumor (ultrasound and tomographic findings). A collection of blood was obtained by a biopsy and there were no tumor cells. With the suspicion of acute fascioliasis (liver stage), due to severe eosinophilia and recent travel to endemic area of Fasciola hepatica, arc II and ELISA Fas 2 we carried out and were positive. Parasitological stool examinations were negative. During hospitalization a hepatic subcapsular hematoma presented as a complication and the patient developed fever because of cholangiolitic microabscesses in the left hepatic lobe. Percutaneous drainage was performed and positive cultures of secretions were obtained She received antibiotic coverage with vancomycin and imipenem. Treatment for Fasciola hepatica was initiated with nitaxozanida but it was discontinued due to oral intolerance. Later, she received a single dose of 250 mg triclabendazole with clinical and laboratory improvement. We presented this case because it is an unusual pseudotumoral presentation in acute hepatic fascioliasis. This parasitic disease is an emerging zoonosis in Perú. PMID:23650836

  18. Hepatic encephalopathy in alcoholic cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Roger F

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a serious neuropsychiatric complication of cirrhosis in alcoholic patients that is characterized clinically by personality changes, sleep abnormalities, and impaired motor coordination, as well as cognitive dysfunction progressing to stupor and coma. Procedures used for diagnosis and grading of HE include neurologic assessment, electroencephalography, psychometric testing, and use of the critical flicker frequency test. Neuropathologically, HE in cirrhosis is principally a disorder of neuroglia characterized by Alzheimer type II astrocytosis and activation of microglia. However, thalamic and cerebellar neuronal pathologies have been noted as well as lesions to globus pallidus and substantia nigra, leading to a condition known as "parkinsonism in cirrhosis." Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to account for the pathogenesis of HE in cirrhosis, including the neurotoxic actions of ammonia and manganese (normally removed via the hepatobiliary route), impaired brain energy metabolism, central proinflammatory mechanisms, and alterations of both excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. Treatment of HE in cirrhosis continues to rely on ammonia-lowering strategies such as lactulose, antibiotics, probiotics and l-ornithine l-aspartate with nutritional management consisting of adequate (but not excessive) dietary protein and vitamin B1 supplements. l-DOPA may improve parkinsonian symptoms. Liver transplantation leads to recovery of central nervous system function in the majority of cases. PMID:25307598

  19. Acute Alcohol Consumption, Alcohol Outlets, and Gun Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Branas, Charles C.; Richmond, Therese S.; Ten Have, Thomas R.; Wiebe, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    A case–control study of 149 intentionally self-inflicted gun injury cases (including completed gun suicides) and 302 population-based controls was conducted from 2003 to 2006 in a major US city. Two focal independent variables, acute alcohol consumption and alcohol outlet availability, were measured. Conditional logistic regression was adjusted for confounding variables. Gun suicide risk to individuals in areas of high alcohol outlet availability was less than the gun suicide risk they incurred from acute alcohol consumption, especially to excess. This corroborates prior work but also uncovers new information about the relationships between acute alcohol consumption, alcohol outlets, and gun suicide. Study limitations and implications are discussed. PMID:21929327

  20. Hepatic glutathione content in patients with alcoholic and non alcoholic liver diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Altomare, E.; Vendemiale, G.; Albano, O.

    1988-01-01

    Reduced and oxidized hepatic glutathione was evaluated during alcoholic and non alcoholic liver injury. We studied 35 chronic alcoholics, 20 patients with non alcoholic liver diseases, 15 control subjects. Hepatic glutathione was measured in liver biopsies and correlated with histology and laboratory tests. Alcoholic and non alcoholic patients exhibited a significant decrease of hepatic glutathione compared to control subjects. Oxidized glutathione was significantly higher in the two groups of patients compared to controls. The decreased hepatic glutathione level in patients with alcoholic and non alcoholic liver diseases may represent a contributing factor of liver injury and may enhance the risk of toxicity in these patients.

  1. Extracorporeal liver support in severe alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Parés, Albert; Mas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    The severity of alcoholic hepatitis (AH) which may coexist with cirrhosis varies greatly, from asymptomatic forms which are detected in alcoholic patients without any sign of liver disease, except laboratory abnormalities, to severe forms characterised by deep jaundice, ascites, hepatic encephalopathy and low prothrombin index. In hospitalized patients the mortality could be as high as 75%. The elevated number of therapeutic proposals reported for more than forty years reveals the lack of efficacy of a particular modality. Even in the most favorable trials, the survival is already very poor and in some cases related to the development of renal failure or hepatorenal syndrome. There are some motivating reports concerning albumin dialysis as a support treatment in patients with severe AH, either alone or in combination with other pharmacological therapies. The favorable effects of albumin dialysis in patients with severe AH suggest that the procedure used alone or in combination with other therapies may have a role in this clinical condition. This will be particularly relevant to offer an alternative therapy in these patients, thus being a potential bridge to recovery or to be listed for liver transplantation. PMID:25009371

  2. Extracorporeal liver support in severe alcoholic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Parés, Albert; Mas, Antoni

    2014-07-01

    The severity of alcoholic hepatitis (AH) which may coexist with cirrhosis varies greatly, from asymptomatic forms which are detected in alcoholic patients without any sign of liver disease, except laboratory abnormalities, to severe forms characterised by deep jaundice, ascites, hepatic encephalopathy and low prothrombin index. In hospitalized patients the mortality could be as high as 75%. The elevated number of therapeutic proposals reported for more than forty years reveals the lack of efficacy of a particular modality. Even in the most favorable trials, the survival is already very poor and in some cases related to the development of renal failure or hepatorenal syndrome. There are some motivating reports concerning albumin dialysis as a support treatment in patients with severe AH, either alone or in combination with other pharmacological therapies. The favorable effects of albumin dialysis in patients with severe AH suggest that the procedure used alone or in combination with other therapies may have a role in this clinical condition. This will be particularly relevant to offer an alternative therapy in these patients, thus being a potential bridge to recovery or to be listed for liver transplantation. PMID:25009371

  3. Hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for the virus that causes it; for example, hepatitis A, hepatitis B or hepatitis C. Drug or alcohol ... not, it can be treated with drugs. Sometimes hepatitis lasts a lifetime. Vaccines can help prevent some viral forms.

  4. Blood culture-positive infections in patients with alcoholic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Wernlund, Pernille Glahn; Støy, Sidsel; Lemming, Lars; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Sandahl, Thomas Damgaard

    2014-12-01

    Acute alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is a life-threatening disease and its course is often determined by infections. However, the pattern of pathogens has not been studied. We examined the microbiological pathogens that caused blood-borne infection in patients with AH. We included 32 AH patients without infection at inclusion. Patients were followed for 1 month and their infection status was recorded based on clinical records, radiologic exams and cultures of different secreta. Nine patients (28%) developed blood culture-positive infections. The agents were of heterogeneous aetiology and came from various sites of infection. Candida species accounted for three of these infections (33%). Five patients (16%) died, two of which had positive blood cultures. A high fraction was invasively infected by a heterogeneous spectrum of microbes including yeasts and commensal bacteria. This may reflect the severe immune impairment of AH and suggests thorough infection screening and an immediate broad-spectrum antibiotic approach if infection is suspected. PMID:25290580

  5. An outbreak of refrigerant-induced acute hepatitis in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Kan, Y M; Lau, C F; Chan, W C; Chan, W S; Tung, Y M; Loo, C K

    2014-12-01

    We report a cluster of acute hepatitis in five air-conditioning maintenance workers following accidental exposure to 2,2-dichloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane (HCFC-123). They presented to us with complaints of feverishness, generalised malaise, and epigastric discomfort. Their blood biochemistry tests were compatible with acute hepatitis. Viral hepatitis serology, tests for autoimmune hepatitis, and analyses for drugs and alcohol consumption were all negative. No focal hepatic lesion was detected by ultrasound imaging. Percutaneous liver biopsy samples were taken from two of them. The patients were managed with supportive treatment. All had spontaneous, but slow, recovery. Their liver function tests returned to normal after 4 months and their outcomes were favourable. Physicians should be aware of this occupational disease entity. PMID:25488036

  6. Combination therapy: New hope for alcoholic hepatitis?

    PubMed

    Gao, Bin; Shah, Vijay H

    2015-09-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is a severe form of alcoholic liver disease with high mortality. The pathogenesis of AH is not fully understood, but it is generally believed that inflammation is a key factor leading to liver failure in AH. Steroids, which have broad immunosuppressive effects, have been used for the treatment of AH over the last forty years. Steroids elicit modest improvement in short-term survival rate in patients with severe AH, but also cause severe side effects. Several specific inflammatory targets (e.g., IL-1, LPS, and gut microbiota) are currently under investigation for the treatment of AH with the goal to obviate or reduce steroid administration. In addition to inflammation, impaired liver regeneration is another major cause of liver failure in AH, which deteriorates further after steroid treatment because inflammation plays a key role in promoting liver repair. Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is a promising drug for the treatment of AH because of its hepatoprotective and anti-fibrotic functions and relatively few known side effects. In addition, IL-22 treatment also ameliorates bacterial infection and kidney injury, two major complications associated with severe AH. IL-22 is currently under investigation in preclinical and clinical studies and may hold great promise for AH by providing more beneficial effects and fewer side effects than current therapies. PMID:26193867

  7. Liver transplantation for acute hepatic failure

    PubMed Central

    Castaldo, Eric T.

    2006-01-01

    There are numerous causes of acute hepatic failure (AHF). Cerebral edema, coagulopathy, renal failure, metabolic disturbances and infection are the main clinical sequelae. Patients with AHF should be stabilized when first encountered and transferred to the nearest liver transplant center, as AHF progresses quickly and is often fatal. There are few adequate medical interventions and care of patients with AHF is supportive until spontaneous recovery ensues. If recovery does not appear to occur, most causes of AHF are well accepted indications for liver transplantation. PMID:18333235

  8. Validation of AshTest as a Non-Invasive Alternative to Transjugular Liver Biopsy in Patients with Suspected Severe Acute Alcoholic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rudler, Marika; Mouri, Sarah; Charlotte, Frederic; Cluzel, Philippe; Ngo, Yen; Munteanu, Mona; Lebray, Pascal; Ratziu, Vlad; Thabut, Dominique; Poynard, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims According to guidelines, the histological diagnosis of severe alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) can require liver biopsy if a specific treatment is needed. The blood test AshTest (BioPredictive, Paris, France) has been initially validated for the non-invasive diagnosis of ASH in a large population of heavy drinkers. The aim was to validate the AshTest accuracy in the specific context of use of patients with suspected severe ASH, in order to reduce the need for transjugular biopsy before deciding treatment. Methods The reference was liver biopsy, performed using the transjugular route, classified according to its histological severity as none, minimal, moderate or severe. Biopsies were assessed by the same experienced pathologist, blinded to simultaneous AshTest results. Results A total of 123 patients with severe clinical ASH (recent jaundice and Maddrey function greater or equal to 32) were included, all had cirrhosis and 80% had EASL histological definition of ASH. 95% of patients received prednisolone; and the 2-year mortality was 63%. The high AshTest performance was confirmed both for the binary outcome [AUROC = 0.803 (95%CI 0.684–0.881)] significantly higher than the AST/ALT AUROC [0.603 (0.462–0.714); P<0.001], and for the severity of ASH-score system by the Obuchowski measures for [mean (SE) 0.902 (0.017) vs. AST/ALT 0.833 (0.023); P = 0.01], as well as for the diagnosis and severity of ballooning, PMN and Mallory bodies. According to attributability of discordances, AshTest had a 2–7% risk of 2 grades misclassification. Conclusion These results confirmed the diagnostic performance of AshTest in cirrhotic patients with severe clinical ASH, in the specific context of use of corticosteroid treatment. AshTest is an appropriate non-invasive alternative to transjugular liver biopsy. PMID:26252713

  9. Alcoholic hepatitis: The pivotal role of Kupffer cells

    PubMed Central

    Suraweera, Duminda B; Weeratunga, Ashley N; Hu, Robert W; Pandol, Stephen J; Hu, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Kupffer cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis (AH). It is believed that alcohol increases the gut permeability that results in raised levels of serum endotoxins containing lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS binds to LPS-binding proteins and presents it to a membrane glycoprotein called CD14, which then activates Kupffer cells via a receptor called toll-like receptor 4. This endotoxin mediated activation of Kupffer cells plays an important role in the inflammatory process resulting in alcoholic hepatitis. There is no effective treatment for AH, although notable progress has been made over the last decade in understanding the underlying mechanism of alcoholic hepatitis. We specifically review the current research on the role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of AH and the treatment strategies. We suggest that the imbalance between the pro-inflammatory and the anti-inflammatory process as well as the increased production of reactive oxygen species eventually lead to hepatocyte injury, the final event of alcoholic hepatitis. PMID:26600966

  10. Alcoholic hepatitis: The pivotal role of Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Suraweera, Duminda B; Weeratunga, Ashley N; Hu, Robert W; Pandol, Stephen J; Hu, Richard

    2015-11-15

    Kupffer cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis (AH). It is believed that alcohol increases the gut permeability that results in raised levels of serum endotoxins containing lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS binds to LPS-binding proteins and presents it to a membrane glycoprotein called CD14, which then activates Kupffer cells via a receptor called toll-like receptor 4. This endotoxin mediated activation of Kupffer cells plays an important role in the inflammatory process resulting in alcoholic hepatitis. There is no effective treatment for AH, although notable progress has been made over the last decade in understanding the underlying mechanism of alcoholic hepatitis. We specifically review the current research on the role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of AH and the treatment strategies. We suggest that the imbalance between the pro-inflammatory and the anti-inflammatory process as well as the increased production of reactive oxygen species eventually lead to hepatocyte injury, the final event of alcoholic hepatitis. PMID:26600966

  11. Hepatitis C, Innate Immunity and Alcohol: Friends or Foes?

    PubMed Central

    Osna, Natalia A.; Ganesan, Murali; Kharbanda, Kusum K.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C and alcohol are the most widespread causes of liver disease worldwide. Approximately 80% of patients with a history of hepatitis C and alcohol abuse develop chronic liver injury. Alcohol consumption in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients exacerbates liver disease leading to rapid progression of fibrosis, cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatocytes are the main sites of HCV-infection and ethanol metabolism, both of which generate oxidative stress. Oxidative stress levels affect HCV replication and innate immunity, resulting in a greater susceptibility for HCV-infection and virus spread in the alcoholic patients. In this review paper, we analyze the effects of ethanol metabolism and other factors on HCV replication. In addition, we illustrate the mechanisms of how HCV hijacks innate immunity and how ethanol exposure regulates this process. We also clarify the effects of HCV and ethanol metabolism on interferon signaling—a crucial point for activation of anti-viral genes to protect cells from virus—and the role that HCV- and ethanol-induced impairments play in adaptive immunity which is necessary for recognition of virally-infected hepatocytes. In conclusion, ethanol exposure potentiates the suppressive effects of HCV on innate immunity, which activates viral spread in the liver and finally, leads to impairments in adaptive immunity. The dysregulation of immune response results in impaired elimination of HCV-infected cells, viral persistence, progressive liver damage and establishment of chronic infection that worsens the outcomes of chronic hepatitis C in alcoholic patients. PMID:25664450

  12. Acute and chronic ethanol consumption differentially impact pathways limiting hepatic protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Karinch, Anne M.; Martin, Jonathan H.; Vary, Thomas C.

    2008-01-01

    This review identifies the various pathways responsible for modulating hepatic protein synthesis following acute and chronic alcohol intoxication and describes the mechanism(s) responsible for these changes. Alcohol intoxication induces a defect in global protein synthetic rates that is localized to impaired translation of mRNA at the level of peptide-chain initiation. Translation initiation is regulated at two steps: formation of the 43S preinitiation complex [controlled by eukaryotic initiation factors 2 (eIF2) and 2B (eIF2B)] and the binding of mRNA to the 40S ribosome (controlled by the eIF4F complex). To date, alcohol-induced alterations in eIF2 and eIF2B content and activity are best investigated. Ethanol decreases eIF2B activity when ingested either acutely or chronically. The reduced eIF2B activity most likely is a consequence of twofold increased phosphorylation of the ?-subunit of eIF2 on Ser51 following acute intoxication. The increase in eIF2? phosphorylation after chronic alcohol consumption is the same as that induced by acute ethanol intoxication, and protein synthesis is not further reduced by long-term alcohol ingestion despite additional reduced expression of initiation factors and elongation factors. eIF2? phosphorylation alone appears sufficient to maximally inhibit hepatic protein synthesis. Indeed, pretreatment with Salubrinal, an inhibitor of eIF2?(P) phosphatase, before ethanol treatment does not further inhibit protein synthesis or increase eIF2? phosphorylation, suggesting that acute ethanol intoxication causes maximal eIF2? phosphorylation elevation and hepatic protein synthesis inhibition. Ethanol-induced inhibition of hepatic protein synthesis is not rapidly reversed by cessation of ethanol consumption. In conclusion, sustained eIF2? phosphorylation is a hallmark of excessive alcohol intake leading to inhibition of protein synthesis. Enhanced phosphorylation of eIF2? represents a unique response of liver to alcohol intoxication, because the ethanol-induced elevation of eIF2?(P) is not observed in skeletal muscle or heart. PMID:18334613

  13. In vitro and in vivo models of acute alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Dolganiuc, Angela; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2009-03-14

    Alcohol abuse is a global problem due to the financial burden on society and the healthcare system. While the harmful health effects of chronic alcohol abuse are well established, more recent data suggest that acute alcohol consumption also affects human wellbeing. Thus, there is a need for research models in order to fully understand the effect of acute alcohol abuse on different body systems and organs. The present manuscript summarizes the interdisciplinary advantages and disadvantages of currently available human and non-human models of acute alcohol abuse, and identifies their suitability for biomedical research. PMID:19291816

  14. Hepatic folate metabolism in the chronic alcoholic monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, T.; Romero, J.J.; Watson, J.E.; Gong, E.J.; Halsted, C.H.

    1981-05-01

    To assess the role of altered hepatic folate metabolism in the pathogenesis of the folate deficiency of chronic alcoholism, the hepatic metabolism of a tracer dose of /sup 3/H-PteGlu was compared in monkeys given 50% of energy as ethanol for 2 years and in control monkeys. Long-term ethanol feeding resulted in mild hepatic injury, with a significant decrease in hepatic folate levels. Chromatographic studies of liver biopsies obtained after the tracer dose indicated that the processes of reduction, methylation, and formylation of reduced folate and the synthesis of polyglutamyl folates were not affected by long-term ethanol feeding. Hepatic tritium levels were significantly decreased in the ethanol-fed group. These studies suggest that the decrease in hepatic folate levels observed after long-term ethanol ingestion is due to a decrease in hepatic folate levels observed after long-term ethanol ingestion is due to a decreased ability to retain folates in the liver, whereas reduction and further metabolism of folates is not affected.

  15. Establishment of a hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension model by hepatic arterial perfusion with 80% alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; He, Fu-Liang; Liu, Fu-Quan; Yue, Zhen-Dong; Zhao, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the feasibility and safety of establishing a porcine hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension model by hepatic arterial perfusion with 80% alcohol. METHODS: Twenty-one healthy Guizhou miniature pigs were randomly divided into three experimental groups and three control groups. The pigs in the three experimental groups were subjected to hepatic arterial perfusion with 7, 12 and 17 mL of 80% alcohol, respectively, while those in the three control groups underwent hepatic arterial perfusion with 7, 12 and 17 mL of saline, respectively. Hepatic arteriography and direct portal phlebography were performed on all animals before and after perfusion, and the portal venous pressure and diameter were measured before perfusion, immediately after perfusion, and at 2, 4 and 6 wk after perfusion. The following procedures were performed at different time points: routine blood sampling, blood biochemistry, blood coagulation and blood ammonia tests before surgery, and at 2, 4 and 6 wk after surgery; hepatic biopsy before surgery, within 6 h after surgery, and at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 wk after surgery; abdominal enhanced computed tomography examination before surgery and at 6 wk after surgery; autopsy and multi-point sampling of various liver lobes for histological examination at 6 wk after surgery. RESULTS: In experimental group 1, different degrees of hepatic fibrosis were observed, and one pig developed hepatic cirrhosis. In experimental group 2, there were cases of hepatic cirrhosis, different degrees of increased portal venous pressure, and intrahepatic portal venous bypass, but neither extrahepatic portal-systemic bypass circulation nor death occurred. In experimental group 3, two animals died and three animals developed hepatic cirrhosis, and different degrees of increased portal venous pressure and intrahepatic portal venous bypass were also observed, but there was no extrahepatic portal-systemic bypass circulation. CONCLUSION: It is feasible to establish an animal model of hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension by hepatic arterial perfusion with 80% alcohol, however, the safety of this model depends on a suitable perfusion dose. PMID:26327762

  16. Dopamine in models of alcoholic acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Karanjia, N D; Widdison, A L; Lutrin, F J; Reber, H A

    1994-01-01

    Acute oedematous pancreatitis and acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis were studied using the low pressure duct perfusion models of alcoholic pancreatitis in cats. After creating either form over 24 hours, each pancreas was histologically graded and assigned an inflammatory score (0-16; absent-severe). Urinary trypsinogen activation peptide concentrations were also used as a measure of severity. Using the model of acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis, it was previously shown that low dose dopamine (5 micrograms/kg.m) reduced the inflammatory score at 24 hours and that this effect was mediated by a reduction in pancreatic microvascular permeability acting via dopaminergic and beta adrenergic receptors. Further studies were conducted and are reported here. In experiment 1 different doses of dopamine in established alcoholic acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis were studied. In group 1 control cats (no dopamine), the inflammatory score was 10.5 (interquartile range (IQR)4). In groups 2, 3, and 4, haemorrhagic pancreatitis was induced. Twelve hours later dopamine was infused for six hours, in the doses of 2 micrograms/kg.min, 5 micrograms/kg.min, and 50 micrograms/kg.min respectively. The inflammatory score in group 2 was 7 (IQR 0.5, p < 0.05 v group 1), in group 3 it was 7 (IQR 2, p < 0.05 v group 1), and in group 4 it was 7 (IQR 4, p < 0.05 v group 1). This was matched by significantly lower levels of urinary tripsinogen activation peptide at 24 hours. In experiment 2 (group 5) we tried to reduce microvascular permeability further by combining dopamine with antihistamines, but there was no improvement in the inflammatory score. As oedematous pancreatitis is the commoner and milder form of acute pancreatitis in clinical practice, in experiment 3 we looked at the effect of dopamine in this model. In group 6 control cats (no treatment), the inflammatory score was 7 (IQR 3, p < 0.05 v group 1). In group 7 cats given dopamine (5 micrograms/kg.min for six hours) from 12 hours after the onset of actue oedematous pancreatitis, the inflammatory score was reduced to 4(IQR 2, p < 0.05 v group 6). This was matched by a significant reduction in the 24 hour urinary tripsin activation peptide concentration. PMID:8174995

  17. Inhibitory Effects of Pretreatment with Radon on Acute Alcohol-Induced Hepatopathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Toyota, Teruaki; Kataoka, Takahiro; Nishiyama, Yuichi; Taguchi, Takehito; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that radon inhalation activates antioxidative functions in the liver and inhibits carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatopathy in mice. In addition, it has been reported that reactive oxygen species contribute to alcohol-induced hepatopathy. In this study, we examined the inhibitory effects of radon inhalation on acute alcohol-induced hepatopathy in mice. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to intraperitoneal injection of 50% alcohol (5?g/kg bodyweight) after inhaling approximately 4000?Bq/m3 radon for 24?h. Alcohol administration significantly increased the activities of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT) in serum, and the levels of triglyceride and lipid peroxide in the liver, suggesting acute alcohol-induced hepatopathy. Radon inhalation activated antioxidative functions in the liver. Furthermore, pretreatment with radon inhibited the depression of hepatic functions and antioxidative functions. These findings suggested that radon inhalation activated antioxidative functions in the liver and inhibited acute alcohol-induced hepatopathy in mice. PMID:23213269

  18. Serum Fibronectin Levels in Acute and Chronic Viral Hepatitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    ERTURK, Ayse; CURE, Erkan; OZKURT, Zulal; PARLAK, Emine; CURE, Medine Cumhur

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the serum fibronectin (FN) levels and liver enzyme activities in patients with acute hepatitis (A, B, C) and chronic viral hepatitis (B, C); determine whether the virus types correlated with disease severity; and assess whether FN could be used as a marker of virus type or disease severity in patients. Methods: A total of 60 subjects were enrolled in the study, including 20 patients with acute hepatitis (A, B, C), 20 with chronic hepatitis (B, C), and 20 healthy controls. Serum fibronectin (FN), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), and albumin were measured in all patients from blood samples. Results: Serum FN levels were significantly lower in acute (122.9 ?g/mL (SD 43.1), P < 0.001) and chronic hepatitis patients (135.7 ?g/mL (SD 46.0), P < 0 .001) compared to controls 221.4 ?g/mL (SD 32.5). A negative correlation was found between serum FN and AST (r2 = 0.528, P < 0.001), ALT (r2 = 0.425, P < 0.001), and GGT (r2 = 0.339, P < 0.001). Additionally, high serum GGT levels (? = –0.375, P = 0.010), and low serum albumin levels (? = –0.305, P = 0.008) were associated with low serum FN levels. Conclusion: Serum FN levels were lower in both acute and chronic hepatitis patients, and an inverse relationship between serum FN and serum AST, ALT, and GGT levels was found. A decrease in serum FN levels may indicate hepatitis severity as AST and ALT represent hepatocyte damage. PMID:24639609

  19. Role of osteopontin in hepatic neutrophil infiltration during alcoholic steatohepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, Udayan M.; Banerjee, Atrayee; McRee, Rachel; Wellberg, Elizabeth; Ramaiah, Shashi K. . E-mail: sramaiah@cvm.tamu.edu

    2005-08-22

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a major complication of heavy alcohol (EtOH) drinking and is characterized by three progressive stages of pathology: steatosis, steatohepatitis, and fibrosis/cirrhosis. Alcoholic steatosis (AS) is the initial stage of ALD and consists of fat accumulation in the liver accompanied by minimal liver injury. AS is known to render the hepatocytes increasingly sensitive to toxicants such as bacterial endotoxin (LPS). Alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH), the second and rate-limiting step in the progression of ALD, is characterized by hepatic fat accumulation, neutrophil infiltration, and neutrophil-mediated parenchymal injury. However, the pathogenesis of ASH is poorly defined. It has been theorized that the pathogenesis of ASH involves interaction of increased circulating levels of LPS with hepatocytes being rendered highly sensitive to LPS due to heavy EtOH consumption. We hypothesize that osteopontin (OPN), a matricellular protein (MCP), plays an important role in the hepatic neutrophil recruitment due to its enhanced expression during the early phase of ALD (AS and ASH). To study the role of OPN in the pathogenesis of ASH, we induced AS in male Sprague-Dawley rats by feeding EtOH-containing Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet for 6 weeks. AS rats experienced extensive fat accumulation and minimal liver injury. Moderate induction in OPN was observed in AS group. ASH was induced by feeding male Sprague-Dawley rats EtOH-containing Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet for 6 weeks followed by LPS injection. The ASH rats had substantial neutrophil infiltration, coagulative oncotic necrosis, and developed higher liver injury. Significant increases in the hepatic and circulating levels of OPN was observed in the ASH rats. Higher levels of the active, thrombin-cleaved form of OPN in the liver in ASH group correlated remarkably with hepatic neutrophil infiltration. Finally, correlative studies between OPN and hepatic neutrophil infiltration was corroborated in a simple rat peritoneal model where enhanced peritoneal fluid neutrophil infiltration was noted in rats injected OPN intraperitoneally. Taken together these data indicate that OPN expression induced during ASH may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of ASH by stimulating neutrophil transmigration.

  20. The Altered Hepatic Tubulin Code in Alcoholic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Groebner, Jennifer L; Tuma, Pamela L

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that lead to the progression of alcoholic liver disease have been actively examined for decades. Because the hepatic microtubule cytoskeleton supports innumerable cellular processes, it has been the focus of many such mechanistic studies. It has long been appreciated that ?-tubulin is a major target for modification by highly reactive ethanol metabolites and reactive oxygen species. It is also now apparent that alcohol exposure induces post-translational modifications that are part of the natural repertoire, mainly acetylation. In this review, the modifications of the "tubulin code" are described as well as those adducts by ethanol metabolites. The potential cellular consequences of microtubule modification are described with a focus on alcohol-induced defects in protein trafficking and enhanced steatosis. Possible mechanisms that can explain hepatic dysfunction are described and how this relates to the onset of liver injury is discussed. Finally, we propose that agents that alter the cellular acetylation state may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for treating liver disease. PMID:26393662

  1. The Altered Hepatic Tubulin Code in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Groebner, Jennifer L.; Tuma, Pamela L.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that lead to the progression of alcoholic liver disease have been actively examined for decades. Because the hepatic microtubule cytoskeleton supports innumerable cellular processes, it has been the focus of many such mechanistic studies. It has long been appreciated that ?-tubulin is a major target for modification by highly reactive ethanol metabolites and reactive oxygen species. It is also now apparent that alcohol exposure induces post-translational modifications that are part of the natural repertoire, mainly acetylation. In this review, the modifications of the “tubulin code” are described as well as those adducts by ethanol metabolites. The potential cellular consequences of microtubule modification are described with a focus on alcohol-induced defects in protein trafficking and enhanced steatosis. Possible mechanisms that can explain hepatic dysfunction are described and how this relates to the onset of liver injury is discussed. Finally, we propose that agents that alter the cellular acetylation state may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for treating liver disease. PMID:26393662

  2. Alcohol Induced Hepatic Degeneration in a Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Dong-Hyung; Lee, Eun-Joo; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Mi; Min, Chang-Woo; Kang, Kyung-Ku; Lee, Myeong-Mi; Kim, Sang-Hyeob; Sung, Soo-Eun; Hwang, Meeyul; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has become a major public health issue. It is prevalent in most countries. HCV infection frequently begins without clinical symptoms, before progressing to persistent viremia, chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the majority of patients (70% to 80%). Alcohol is an independent cofactor that accelerates the development of HCC in chronic hepatitis C patients. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate ethanol-induced hepatic changes in HCV core-Tg mice and mutant core Tg mice. Wild type (NTG), core wild-Tg mice (TG-K), mutant core 116-Tg mice (TG-116) and mutant core 99-Tg mice (TG-99) were used in this investigation. All groups were given drinking water with 10% ethanol and 5% sucrose for 13 weeks. To observe liver morphological changes, we performed histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations. Histopathologically, NTG, TG-K and TG-116 mice showed moderate centrilobular necrosis, while severe centrilobular necrosis and hepatocyte dissociation were observed in TG-99 mice with increasing lymphocyte infiltration and piecemeal necrosis. In all groups, a small amount of collagen fiber was found, principally in portal areas. None of the mice were found to have myofibroblasts based on immunohistochemical staining specific for ?-SMA. CYP2E1-positive cells were clearly detected in the centrilobular area in all groups. In the TG-99 mice, we also observed cells positive for CK8/18, TGF-?1 and phosphorylated (p)-Smad2/3 and p21 around the necrotic hepatocytes in the centrilobular area (p < 0.01). Based on our data, alcohol intake induced piecemeal necrosis and hepatocyte dissociation in the TG-99 mice. These phenomena involved activation of the TGF-?1/p-Smad2/3/p21 signaling pathway in hepatocytes. Data from this study will be useful for elucidating the association between alcohol intake and HCV infection. PMID:24608925

  3. Lipocalin-2 serum levels are increased in acute hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Roth, G A; Nickl, S; Lebherz-Eichinger, D; Schmidt, E M; Ankersmit, H J; Faybik, P; Hetz, H; Krenn, C G

    2013-01-01

    Lipocalin-2 (LCN-2), which is expressed in immunocytes as well as hepatocytes, is upregulated in cells under stress from infection or inflammation with increase in serum levels. We sought to investigate the relevance of LCN-2 in the setting of acute hepatic failure, particularly when addressed with the molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS). We measured serum LCN-2 concentrations with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 8 patients with acute-on-chronic-liver failure (ACLF) and acute liver failure (ALF) who were treated with MARS. The controls were 14 patients with stable chronic hepatic failure (CHF). LCN-2 was determined immediately before and after the first MARS session. Baseline LCN-2 serum concentrations were significantly increased among ACLF and ALF patients as compared with CHF (P = .004 and P = .0086, respectively). There was no significant difference between the ALF and ACLF group. Moreover, serum LCN-2 levels did not change significantly during the MARS treatment. Serum LCN-2 levels, therefore, may be useful to discern acute from chronic hepatic failure and to monitor the course as well as the severity of the disease. PMID:23375308

  4. Neurologic Disorders in Immunocompetent Patients with Autochthonous Acute Hepatitis E

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, H. Blasco; Cintas, P.; Abravanel, F.; Gérolami, R.; d'Alteroche, L.; Raynal, J.-N.; Alric, L.; Dupuis, E.; Prudhomme, L.; Vaucher, E.; Couzigou, P.; Liversain, J.-M.; Bureau, C.; Vinel, J.-P.; Kamar, N.; Izopet, J.

    2015-01-01

    Neurologic disorders, mainly Guillain-Barré syndrome and Parsonage–Turner syndrome (PTS), have been described in patients with hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in industrialized and developing countries. We report a wider range of neurologic disorders in nonimmunocompromised patients with acute HEV infection. Data from 15 French immunocompetent patients with acute HEV infection and neurologic disorders were retrospectively recorded from January 2006 through June 2013. The disorders could be divided into 4 main entities: mononeuritis multiplex, PTS, meningoradiculitis, and acute demyelinating neuropathy. HEV infection was treated with ribavirin in 3 patients (for PTS or mononeuritis multiplex). One patient was treated with corticosteroids (for mononeuropathy multiplex), and 5 others received intravenous immunoglobulin (for PTS, meningoradiculitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, or Miller Fisher syndrome). We conclude that pleiotropic neurologic disorders are seen in HEV-infected immunocompetent patients. Patients with acute neurologic manifestations and aminotransferase abnormalities should be screened for HEV infection. PMID:26490255

  5. [Forensic medical diagnostics of acute and chronic alcohol intoxication].

    PubMed

    Pigolkin, Iu I; Morozov, Iu E; Mamedov, V K

    2012-01-01

    The principal characteristics and results of experimental studies on the problem of acute and chronic alcohol intoxication are presented. The mechanisms of toxic action of ethanol and acetaldehyde are considered with special reference to the comprehensive qualitative estimation of these toxicants and their pathomorphological effects in the target organs. The influence of ethanol-oxidizing enzyme systems in the brain on the development of alcohol tolerance is illustrated. The mechanisms of hormonal regulation via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in the case of exogenous alcoholemia are considered. The dependence of pathological morphological changes in the brain, hypophysis, and adrenal glands on the stage and severity of alcoholic intoxication has been elucidated. Criteria for the morphological and histochemical evaluation of the degree of alcohol-induced lesions and the severity of abstinence syndrome have been developed. The role of alcohol effects in tanatogenesis associated with alcohol-induced diseases is discussed. PMID:22567953

  6. Chronic alcohol consumption has a biphasic effect on hepatic retinoid loss.

    PubMed

    Clugston, Robin D; Huang, Li-Shin; Blaner, William S

    2015-09-01

    The alcohol-induced depletion of hepatic retinoid stores correlates with the progression of liver injury; however, the mechanisms underlying alcohol's effects have not been fully elucidated. Our goal was to gain a mechanistic understanding of alcohol-induced hepatic retinoid depletion. Wild-type and mutant mice were continuously fed alcohol through Lieber-DeCarli liquid diets, with matched control animals pair fed an isocaloric alcohol-free diet to ensure equal nutrient and calorie intake between groups. A systematic analysis of tissue retinol and retinyl ester levels was performed with HPLC, complemented by gene and protein expression analyses. Our results delineated 2 phases of alcohol-induced depletion of hepatic retinoid. Initially, ?15% of hepatic retinoid content was mobilized from the liver, causing extrahepatic tissue retinoid levels to increase. Subsequently, there was a precipitous drop in hepatic retinoid content (>60%), without further retinoid accumulation in the periphery. Follow-up studies in mutant mice revealed roles for RBP, CRBP1, and CD36 in retinoid mobilization and extrahepatic retinoid uptake, as well as a role for CYP2E1 in the catabolism of hepatic retinoid. In summary, alcohol has a biphasic effect on hepatic retinoid stores, characterized by an initial phase of rapid mobilization to extrahepatic tissues followed by extensive catabolism within the liver. PMID:25985802

  7. Hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... AAP Find a Pediatrician Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions ... which type. Treatment In most cases, no specific therapy is given for acute hepatitis. The child’s own ...

  8. CCL20 mediates lipopolysaccharide induced liver injury and is a potential driver of inflammation and fibrosis in alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Affò, Silvia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Rodrigo-Torres, Daniel; Altamirano, José; Blaya, Delia; Dapito, Dianne H; Millán, Cristina; Coll, Mar; Caviglia, Jorge M; Arroyo, Vicente; Caballería, Juan; Schwabe, Robert F; Ginès, Pere; Bataller, Ramón; Sancho-Bru, Pau

    2014-01-01

    Objective Chemokines are known to play an important role in the pathophysiology of alcoholic hepatitis (AH), a form of acute-on-chronic liver injury frequently mediated by gut derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In our study, we hypothesise that chemokine CCL20, one of the most upregulated chemokines in patients with AH, is implicated in the pathogenesis of AH by mediating LPS induced liver injury. Design CCL20 gene expression and serum levels and their correlation with disease severity were assessed in patients with AH. Cellular sources of CCL20 and its biological effects were evaluated in vitro and in vivo in chronic, acute and acute-on-chronic experimental models of carbon tetrachloride and LPS induced liver injury. RNA interference technology was used to knockdown CCL20 in vivo. Results CCL20 hepatic and serum levels were increased in patients with AH and correlated with the degree of fibrosis, portal hypertension, endotoxaemia, disease severity scores and short term mortality. Moreover, CCL20 expression was increased in animal models of liver injury and particularly under acute-on-chronic conditions. Macrophages and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) were identified as the main CCL20 producing cell types. Silencing CCL20 in vivo reduced LPS induced aspartate aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase serum levels and hepatic proinflammatory and profibrogenic genes. CCL20 induced proinflammatory and profibrogenic effects in cultured primary HSCs. Conclusions Our results suggest that CCL20 upregulation is strongly associated with LPS and may not only represent a new potential biomarker to predict outcome in patients with AH but also an important mediator linking hepatic inflammation, injury and fibrosis in AH. PMID:24415562

  9. Protective effects of maslinic acid against alcohol-induced acute liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Sheng-lei; Yang, Hui-ting; Lee, Hsiang-lin; Yin, Mei-chin

    2014-12-01

    Protective effects of maslinic acid (MA) at 10, 15 or 20?mg/kg body weight/day against alcohol-induced acute hepatotoxicity in mice were examined. Mice were administrated by MA for 3 weeks, and followed by alcohol treatment. Results showed that MA pre-intake at three doses resulted in its accumulation in the liver; and dose-dependently lowered cytochrome P450 2E1 activity and protein expression at 23.5-51.2% and 21.4-62.3%, respectively (P?<0.05). MA pre-intake decreased subsequent alcohol-induced reactive oxygen species, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 production; retained glutathione content; maintained catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities; and declined cyclooxygenase-2 and total nitric oxide synthase activities in the liver (P?<0.05). Furthermore, MA pre-intake suppressed 17.3-51.7% nuclear factor kappa (NF-?)B p50, 23.5-58.8% NF-?B p65, 25.6-62.4% p-p38 and 24.1-63.0% p-JNK expression in the liver (P?<0.05). Histological data indicated that MA intake at test doses attenuated hepatic inflammatory infiltrate. These findings support that maslinic acid is a potent preventive agent against acute alcoholic liver disease. PMID:25301236

  10. A case of brucellosis presenting with acute hepatitis and bicytopenia.

    PubMed

    Denk, Affan; Ozden, Mehmet

    2015-06-01

    Although liver involvement is frequently seen in brucellosis, acute hepatitis is a rare clinical entity. In its progress, haematological findings are non-specific and vary in respect to severity. In this paper, we present a case of brucellosis with acute hepatitis and bicytopenia without anaemia. A 19-year-old man presented with a 2-week history of fever, sweating, low back and leg pain, lassitude, loss appetite, nausea and vomiting. He gave a history of raw milk ingestion and animal contact. Physical examination showed signs of icteric skin and sclera, tenderness in the right hypochondriac region and hepatosplenomegaly. On admission to hospital, laboratory tests showed WBC 3500/mmc (polymorphs 63% and lymphocytes 33%), haemoglobin 13.8 g/dL, platelet 89000/mmc, erythrocyte sedimentation rate 19 mm/h, and C-reactive protein 21.7 mg/dL (N<0.8 mg/dL). Biochemical tests were as follows: AST 771 U/L, ALT 471 U/L, ALP 355 U/L, GGT 432 U/L, total bilirubin 2.61 mg/dL, direct bilirubin 1.45 mg/dL and albumin 3.7 g/dL. Viral hepatitis markers were found to be negative (HBsAg, anti-HBc total, anti-HBc IgM, anti-HAV IgM, and anti-HCV). Blood culture grew Brucella melitensis. Leukopenia and thrombocytopenia returned to normal levels at the 7th and 14th day of his admission, respectively. Liver function tests improved at the 28th day. Treatment of the brucellosis was performed with antibiotics (tetracycline 500 mg orally four times daily for 6 weeks and streptomycin 1 g IM once daily for 21 days). Finally, a case of brucellosis with acute hepatitis and bicytopenia was treated with a successful outcome. In conclusion, we suggest that due consideration be taken of bicytopenia/pancytopenia and acute hepatitis in brucellosis cases in Turkey, an endemic region. PMID:26110300

  11. Redox regulation of hepatitis C in nonalcoholic and alcoholic liver

    E-print Network

    Seronello, Scott; Sheikh, Muhammad Y.; Choi, Jinah

    2007-01-01

    borne non-A, non-B viral hepatitis genome. Science 244(than hepatitis B virus (HBV) [27], which also causes viralviral effects on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), has been shown to negatively regulate hepatitis B

  12. Acute Ethanol Effects on Brain Activation in Low-and High-Level Responders to Alcohol

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    Acute Ethanol Effects on Brain Activation in Low- and High-Level Responders to Alcohol Ryan S. Trim of response (LR) to alcohol is an important endophenotype associ- ated with an increased risk of alcoholism to alcohol. This study examined whether LR group effects on neural activity varied as a function of acute

  13. Maltol, a Food Flavoring Agent, Attenuates Acute Alcohol-Induced Oxidative Damage in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ye; Xu, Qi; Hu, Jiang-ning; Han, Xin-yue; Li, Wei; Zhao, Li-chun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of maltol, a food-flavoring agent, on alcohol-induced acute oxidative damage in mice. Maltol used in this study was isolated from red ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A Meyer) and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry. For hepatoprotective activity in vivo, pretreatment with maltol (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg; 15 days) drastically prevented the elevated activities of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and triglyceride (TG) in serum and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), interleukin-1? (IL-1?) in liver tissue (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, the levels of hepatic antioxidant, such as catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were elevated by maltol pretreatment, compared to the alcohol group (p < 0.05). Histopathological examination revealed that maltol pretreatment significantly inhibited alcohol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis and fatty degeneration. Interestingly, pretreatment of maltol effectively relieved alcohol-induced oxidative damage in a dose-dependent manner. Maltol appeared to possess promising anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory capacities. It was suggested that the hepatoprotective effect exhibited by maltol on alcohol-induced liver oxidative injury may be due to its potent antioxidant properties. PMID:25608939

  14. Protective effects of C-phycocyanin on alcohol-induced acute liver injury in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Dong; Liu, Bing; Luan, Xiying; Sun, Junyan; Liu, Nana; Qin, Song; Du, Zhenning

    2015-08-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption leads to liver disease. Extensive evidence suggests that C-phycocyanin (C-PC), a chromophore phycocyanobilin derived from Spirulina platensis, exerts protective effects against chemical-induced organ damage. In this study, we investigated whether C-PC could protect against ethanol-induced acute liver injury. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (CHOL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), liver homogenate malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) content were measured, and pathological examination of liver sections were examined. C-PC showed obvious inhibitory effects on serum ALT, AST, TG, CHOL, LDL and MDA, and SOD content significantly increased in the liver. The structure of hepatic lobules was clear, liver sinus returned to normal, and liver cell cords were arranged in neat rows. Cloudiness, swelling, inflammatory cell infiltration and spotty necrosis of liver cells were significantly reduced. Therefore, C-PC can significantly protect against ethanol-induced acute liver injury.

  15. Efficacy of metadoxine in the management of acute alcohol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Díaz Martínez, M C L R; Díaz Martínez, A; Villamil Salcedo, V; Cruz Fuentes, C

    2002-01-01

    This randomized, open-label study evaluated the efficacy of 300 mg metadoxine (given intravenously) added to standard treatment compared with standard treatment alone in managing the physical and psychological signs of acute alcohol intoxication. Fifty-two acutely intoxicated patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups and followed during a 2-h period. Changes in clinical symptoms, degree of intoxication, and blood alcohol level were monitored. More patients receiving metadoxine in addition to standard therapy significantly improved by at least one degree of intoxication (one clinical category) compared with those receiving standard treatment alone (76.9% versus 42.3%, respectively). Metadoxine-treated patients also exhibited a significantly greater decrease in blood alcohol concentration compared with those receiving standard treatment alone (-105.4 +/- 61.5 mg/dl versus -60.1 +/- 38.6 mg/dl, respectively). Metadoxine improved the clinical signs of acute alcohol intoxication and accelerated alcohol clearance from the blood, thus supporting existing data. In contrast to previous data, these effects were concurrent but independent. No adverse effects were observed with metadoxine therapy. PMID:11921498

  16. Acute hepatitis A in a young returning traveler from Kenya despite immunization before departure.

    PubMed

    Senn, Nicolas; Genton, Blaise

    2009-01-01

    Aluminum-adsorbed hepatitis A vaccines are known to be highly efficient. We present here the case of a patient who was immunized against hepatitis A before leaving for Kenya and who contracted an acute symptomatic hepatitis A during travel. PMID:19192136

  17. Recent epidemiological and clinical features of acute hepatitis B in a single center of China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaohong; Fu, Chengtao; Liu, Jia; Shan, Lei; Liu, Chenglin

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was to investigate the epidemiological and clinical features of acute hepatitis B. Methods: A retrospective study of 177 acute hepatitis B patients with an average age of 36.03 years and range of 7-62 years was conducted from Jan 2005 to Feb 2011. The epidemiological and clinical parameters were investigated. The serological markers and biochemical tests were examined. Results: 76.84% (n = 136) patients were icteric type, while 23.16% (n = 41) were non-icteric type. Other clinical manifestations for acute hepatitis patients included fatigue (82.49%), gastrointestinal symptoms (66.10%), yellowish discoloration of skin and sclera, fever (31.07%), rash 10 (5.65%), joint pain (2.82%) and headache (1.69%). One case presented with acute renal failure associated with acute hepatitis B. Nine cases suffered from fulminant hepatitis. After treatment, hepatic function was significantly improved (P < 0.05). For serological markers, 54 (30.51%) and 119 (67.23%) patients had HBsAg and HBV-DNA seroconversion respectively. Four deaths occurred due to the severe complications associated by acute infection of HBV during half a year period follow up. Conclusions: Adult males with occupation of workers and farmers are the high-risk population of acute hepatitis B in China. Several complications associated with acute hepatitis B should be noticed.

  18. Chronic Hepatitis B with Spontaneous Severe Acute Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wei-Lun; Sun, Wei-Chi; Cheng, Jin-Shiung

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major global health problem with an estimated 400 million HBV carriers worldwide. In the natural history of chronic hepatitis B (CHB), spontaneous acute exacerbation (AE) is not uncommon, with a cumulative incidence of 10%–30% every year. While exacerbations can be mild, some patients may develop hepatic decompensation and even die. The underlying pathogenesis is possibly related to the activation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated immune response against HBV. An upsurge of serum HBV DNA usually precedes the rise of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and bilirubin. Whether antiviral treatment can benefit CHB with severe AE remains controversial, but early nucleos(t)ide analogues treatment seemed to be associated with an improved outcome. There has been no randomized study that compared the effects of different nucleos(t)ide analogues (NA) in the setting of CHB with severe AE. However, potent NAs with good resistance profiles are recommended. In this review, we summarized current knowledge regarding the natural history, pathogenetic mechanisms, and therapeutic options of CHB with severe AE. PMID:26703566

  19. Erythropoietic and hepatic porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Gross, U; Hoffmann, G F; Doss, M O

    2000-11-01

    Porphyrias are divided into erythropoietic and hepatic manifestations. Erythropoietic porphyrias are characterized by cutaneous symptoms and appear in early childhood. Erythropoietic protoporphyria is complicated by cholestatic liver cirrhosis and progressive hepatic failure in 10%, of patients. Acute hepatic porphyrias (delta-aminolaevulinic acid dehydratase deficiency porphyria, acute intermittent porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria and variegate porphyria) are characterized by variable extrahepatic gastrointestinal, neurological-psychiatric and cardiovascular manifestations requiring early diagnosis to avoid life-threatening complications. Acute hepatic porphyrias are pharmacogenetic and molecular regulatory diseases (without porphyrin accumulation) mainly induced by drugs, sex hormones, fasting or alcohol. The disease process depends on the derepression of hepatic delta-aminolaevulinic acid synthase following haem depletion. In contrast to the acute porphyrias, nonacute, chronic hepatic porphyrias such as porphyria cutanea tarda are porphyrin accumulation disorders leading to cutaneous symptoms associated with liver disease, especially caused by alcohol or viral hepatitis. Alcohol, oestrogens, haemodialysis, hepatitis C and AIDS are triggering factors. Porphyria cutanea tarda is the most common porphyria, followed by acute intermittent porphyria and erythropoietic protoporphyria. The molecular genetics of the porphyrias is very heterogenous. Nearly every family has its own mutation. The mutations identified account for the corresponding enzymatic deficiencies, which may remain clinically silent throughout life. Thus, the recognition of the overt disorder with extrahepatic manifestations depends on the demonstration of biochemical abnormalities due to these primary defects and compensatory hepatic overexpression of hepatic delta-aminolaevulinic acid synthase in the acute porphyrias. Consequently, haem precursors are synthesized in excess. The increased metabolites upstream of the enzymatic defect are excreted into urine and faeces. The diagnosis is based on their evaluation. Primary enzymatic or molecular analyses are noncontributary and may be misleading. Acute polysymptomatic exacerbations accompany a high excretory constellation of porphyrin precursors delta-aminolaevulinic acid and porphobilinogen. Homozygous or compound heterozygous variants of acute hepatic porphyrias may already manifest in childhood. PMID:11117426

  20. An Epidemiologic Investigation of a Case of Acute Hepatitis E.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Souvik; Rivera, Elenita M; Engle, Ronald E; Nguyen, Hanh T; Schechterly, Cathy A; Alter, Harvey J; Liang, T Jake; Purcell, Robert H; Hoofnagle, Jay H; Ghany, Marc G

    2015-11-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is considered a zoonotic infection in developed nations. A case of acute hepatitis E in a researcher following a scalpel injury while working on a pig prompted a seroepidemiologic study to identify potential modes of transmission and determine the seroprevalence of HEV among animal handlers at the institute. Sera from personnel (n = 64) in two animal facilities and age/sex-matched blood donors (n = 63) as controls were tested for IgG anti-HEV and, if positive, for IgM anti-HEV and HEV RNA. Sera and stool from pigs aged 6 to 12 weeks from the breeding farm and older pigs from animal facilities were tested similarly. The median age of personnel was 36 years, 74% were white, 56% were male, and 74% had direct exposure to pigs. The prevalence of anti-HEV was 3.1% among personnel compared to 3.2% among blood donors; none were positive for IgM anti-HEV or HEV RNA. IgG anti-HEV was detected in sera from 10% of pigs aged 6 to 8 weeks, 80% aged 10 weeks, 100% aged 12 weeks, and 76% aged >12 weeks. HEV RNA was detected in stool but not sera from three 12-week-old pigs. Sequencing revealed HEV genotype 3 with ?10% difference between the patient and pig sequences. Parenteral transmission is a potential mode of acute HEV infection. The low and similar seroprevalence of anti-HEV between the at-risk group and age-matched blood donors suggests low transmission risk with universal precautions among animal handlers. PMID:26338861

  1. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePLUS

    ... certain medicines can also cause hepatitis. Less commonly, viral infections such as mononucleosis or cytomegalovirus can cause hepatitis. There are 2 main kinds of hepatitis: acute hepatitis (short-lived) and chronic hepatitis (lasting at least 6 months). Most people ...

  2. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePLUS

    ... certain medicines can also cause hepatitis. Less commonly, viral infections such as mononucleosis or cytomegalovirus can cause hepatitis. There are 2 main kinds of hepatitis: acute hepatitis (short-lived) and chronic hepatitis (lasting at least 6 months). Most people ...

  3. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePLUS

    ... certain medicines can also cause hepatitis. Less commonly, viral infections such as mononucleosis or cytomegalovirus can cause hepatitis. There are 2 main kinds of hepatitis: acute hepatitis (short-lived) and chronic hepatitis (lasting at least 6 months). Most people ...

  4. Cytochrome P450 2E1 inhibition prevents hepatic carcinogenesis induced by diethylnitrosamine in alcohol-fed rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic alcohol ingestion increases hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), which is associated with hepatocarcinogenesis. We investigated whether treatment with chlormethiazole (CMZ), a CYP2E1 inhibitor, protects against alcohol-associated hepatic carcinogenesis in rats. Rats were fed either an ethan...

  5. Perihepatic nodes detected by point-of-care ultrasound in acute hepatitis and acute-on-chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Feng, I Che; Wang, Szu Jen; Sheu, Ming Jen; Koay, Lok-Beng; Lin, Ching Yih; Ho, Chung Han; Sun, Chi Shu; Kuo, Hsing Tao

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the manifestations of perihepatic lymph nodes during the episode of acute hepatitis flare by point-of-care ultrasonography. METHODS: One hundred and seventy-six patients with an episode of acute hepatitis flare (ALT value > 5 × upper normal limit) were enrolled retrospectively. Diagnosis of etiology of the acute hepatitis flare was based on chart records and serological and virological assays. The patients were categorized into two groups (viral origin and non-viral origin) and further defined into ten subgroups according to the etiologies. An ultrasonograpy was performed within 2 h to 72 h (median, 8 h). The maximum size of each noticeable lymph node was measured. Correlation between clinical parameters and nodal manifestations was analyzed RESULTS: Enlarged lymph nodes (width ? 5mm) were noticeable in 110 (62.5%) patients, mostly in acute on chronic hepatitis B (54.5%). The viral group had a higher prevalence rate (89/110 = 80.9%) and larger nodal size (median, 7 mm) than those of the non-viral group (21/66 = 31.8%; median, 0 mm) (P < 0.001 for both). Meanwhile, there were significant differences in the nodal size between acute and chronic viral groups (P < 0.01), and between acute hepatitis A and non-hepatitis A viral groups (P < 0.001). In logistical regression analysis, the nodal width still showed strong significance in multivariate analysis (P < 0.0001) to stratify the two groups. The area under the curve of ROC was 0.805, with a sensitivity of 80.9%, a specificity of 68.2%, positive predictive value of 80.92%, negative predictive value of 68.18%, and an accuracy of 76.14%. CONCLUSION: Point-of-care ultrasonography to detect perihepatic nodal change is valuable for clarifying the etiologies in an episode of acute hepatitis flare. PMID:26640338

  6. Gas in Hepatic Portal Veins with Gastric Massive Dilatation and Pneumatosis in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mushtaq, Nadeem; Pateria, Vibhor; Ahmad, Imtiyaz; Kulshreshtha, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    Gas in portal veins is a rare phenomenon observed secondary to bowel ischaemia and necrosis. A young girl with history of pica ingestion presented with acute abdomen with huge distension. Investigation revealed air in hepatic portal veins, air within stomach wall, and massive distension of stomach secondary to acute pancreatitis. Successful conservative treatment confirmed the current concept that all cases of hepatic portal venous gas do not warrant immediate surgical intervention. PMID:26557565

  7. Genetic variation in IL28B and treatment-induced clearance of hepatitis C virus in HIV-positive patients with acute and chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Nattermann, Jacob; Vogel, Martin; Nischalke, Hans Dieter; Danta, Mark; Mauss, Stefan; Stellbrink, Hans-Jörg; Baumgarten, Axel; Mayr, Christoph; Bruno, Raffaele; Tural, Cristina; Klausen, Gerd; Clotet, Bonaventura; Naumann, Uwe; Lutz, Thomas; Rausch, Michael; Schewe, Knud; Bienek, Bernhard; Haerter, Georg; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Rockstroh, Juergen K; Spengler, Ulrich

    2011-03-01

    Recently, a IL28B (rs 12979860) gene polymorphism was identified as a predictor for response to hepatitis C virus-specific treatment in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-uninfected and -infected patients with chronic hepatitis C. In an analysis of HIV-infected patients with acute hepatitis C, we found that the IL28B genotype was associated with serum levels of hepatitis C virus RNA, g-GT, and CD4 cell count. In contrast to HIV-infected patients with chronic hepatitis C, the IL28B genotype was not significantly associated with treatment response rates in patients with acute hepatitis C. Thus, effects of the IL28B single-nucleotide polymorphism may differ in HIV-infected patients with chronic and acute hepatitis C. PMID:21257738

  8. Acute alcohol toxicity and withdrawal in the emergency room and medical admissions unit.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Marsha Y

    2015-10-01

    Alcohol-related hospital attendances and admissions continue to escalate despite a fall in alcohol consumption levels in the UK population overall. People with alcohol-related problems pose a significant and often disproportionate burden on acute medical services as their management is often complex and challenging. This article focuses on the management of alcohol intoxication, with particular emphasis on aggressive and possibly violent behaviour; alcohol withdrawal; fitting; and the prevention and treatment of Wernicke's encephalopathy. PMID:26430192

  9. Clinical features and outcome of acute hepatitis B in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of pregnancy on the clinical course of acute hepatitis B (AHB) is still largely unclear, mainly because most studies have not included matched controls. This study was conducted to investigate the clinical features and outcome of AHB in pregnancy using matched controls. Methods Consecutive AHB inpatients who were admitted to Jinan Infectious Disease Hospital, Jinan, between January 2006 and December 2010 were evaluated and followed. Demographic data, clinical manifestations, and results of laboratory tests were compared between pregnant patients and age and sex matched non-pregnant patients at admission, discharge, and final follow-up. Results A total of 618 AHB inpatients were identified during the study period. 22 pregnant patients and 87 age and sex matched non-pregnant patients were enrolled in this study. Prodromal fever was less common (0% vs. 20.7%, P?=?0.02), serum alanine aminotransferase levels were significantly lower, and HBsAg?>?250 IU/mL rate and serum bilirubin levels were significantly higher in pregnant patients than in non-pregnant patients. After a mean (range) of 7(5.2-8.3) months follow-up, 18.2% pregnant patients and 4.6% non-pregnant patients were still HBsAg positive (P?=?0.03). For pregnant patients, the relative risk (95% confidence interval) of HBsAg positive at the end of follow-up was 4.6 (1.1-20.2). The median (95% confidence interval) days of HBsAg seroclearance form disease onset in pregnant and non-pregnant patients were 145.0 (110.5-179.5) and 80.0 (62.6-97.4), respectively. Conclusions The HBsAg loss and seroconversion were delayed and lower in pregnant patients. Pregnancy might be a possible risk of chronicity following acute HBV infection. PMID:24993389

  10. Ligustrazine prevents alcohol-induced liver injury by attenuating hepatic steatosis and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chunfeng; Xu, Wenxuan; Zhang, Feng; Jin, Huanhuan; Chen, Qin; Chen, Lianyun; Shao, Jiangjuan; Wu, Li; Lu, Yin; Zheng, Shizhong

    2015-12-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a major etiology of liver diseases, causing heavy health burdens personally and socially. Ligustrazine has been widely used in China due to its extensive pharmacological activities. However, the role of ligustrazine in ALD treatment remains unclear. Thus, this study is aimed to make up this gap and further uncover the potential mechanisms. The present work demonstrated that compared with the alcohol feeding group, ligustrazine-treated groups showed a clear decrease in aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and lactate dehydrogenase activities in serum, and a great improvement in liver histology. Additionally, ligustrazine reduced the number of foci containing CD45 positive cells and the expression of proteins associated with hepatic inflammation, apoptosis, and fibrosis. Further, ligustrazine obviously abolished alcohol-induced hepatic steatosis and hyperlipidemia. In addition, ligustrazine reversed alcohol-induced overexpression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c and fatty acid synthase, and inhibition of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 in liver. Ligustrazine also ameliorated alcohol-induced increases in reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde levels, and decreases in glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione reductase content in liver. Finally, chronic alcohol feeding inhibited the hepatic expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) at both mRNA and protein levels. Ligustrazine promoted Nrf2 expression and nuclear translocation in a dose-dependent manner. Collectively, for the first time, the present study demonstrated that ligustrazine remarkably improved chronic alcohol-induced liver injury by attenuating hepatic steatosis and oxidative stress. Further, Nrf2 activation might be requisite for ligustrazine to exert its protective effects. PMID:26459052

  11. [Physical diseases in alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Takase, Kojiro

    2015-09-01

    Rapid excessive alcohol drinking frequently causes disturbance of consciousness due to head trauma, brain edema, hypoglycemia, hyponatremia, hepatic coma and so on, provoked by acute alcohol intoxication. Rapid differential diagnosis and management are extremely important to save a life. On the other hands, the chronic users of alcohol so called alcoholism has many kinds of physical diseases such as liver diseases (i.e., fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, alcoholic liver cirrhosis and miscellaneous liver disease), diabetes mellitus, injury to happen in drunkenness, pancreas disease (i.e., acute and chronic pancreatitis and deterioration of chronic pancreatitis), gastrontestinal diseases (i.e., gastroduodenal ulcer), and so on. Enough attention should be paid to above mentioned diseases, otherwise they would turn worse more with continuation and increase in quantity of the alcohol. It should be born in its mind that the excessive drinking becomes the weapon threatening life. PMID:26394519

  12. Alcohol alters hepatic FoxO1, p53, and mitochondrial SIRT5 deacetylation function

    SciTech Connect

    Lieber, Charles S. Leo, Maria Anna; Wang, Xiaolei; DeCarli, Leonore M.

    2008-08-22

    Chronic alcohol consumption affects the gene expression of a NAD-dependent deacetylase Sirtuis 1 (SIRT1) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} coactivator1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}). Our aim was to verify that it also alters the forkhead (FoxO1) and p53 transcription factor proteins, critical in the hepatic response to oxidative stress and regulated by SIRT1 through its deacetylating capacity. Accordingly, rats were pair-fed the Lieber-DeCarli alcohol-containing liquid diets for 28 days. Alcohol increased hepatic mRNA expression of FoxO1 (p = 0.003) and p53 (p = 0.001) while corresponding protein levels remained unchanged. However phospho-FoxO1 and phospho-Akt (protein kinase) were both decreased by alcohol consumption (p = 0.04 and p = 0.02, respectively) while hepatic p53 was found hyperacetylated (p = 0.017). Furthermore, mitochondrial SIRT5 was reduced (p = 0.0025), and PGC-1{alpha} hyperacetylated (p = 0.027), establishing their role in protein modification. Thus, alcohol consumption disrupts nuclear-mitochondrial interactions by post-translation protein modifications, which contribute to alteration of mitochondrial biogenesis through the newly discovered reduction of SIRT5.

  13. Influence of acute viral hepatitis on phenytoin kinetics and protein binding.

    PubMed

    Blaschke, T F; Meffin, P J; Melmon, K L; Rowland, M

    1975-06-01

    Patients with liver disease are thought to have abnormal responses to drugs metabolized by the liver, although supportive evidence is sparse. The influence of acute viral hepatitis on the pharmacokinetics and protein binding of phenytoin (DPH) was examined in 5 patients. A longitudinal study design was used so that each patient acted as his own control. DPH clearance was unaffected by acute viral hepatitits over theconcentration range studie, but the percentage of unboudn DPH increased by an average of nearly one-third during acute viral hepatitis. A small decline in serum albumin concentration and elevated serum bilirubin levels may be responsible for the alterations in protein bindig. These results indicate that acute inflammatory liver disease has complex and perhaps paradoxical effects on durg disposition. Clinical and laboratory observations including plasma durg concentrations, still provide the best means for adjusting dosage regimens in patients with fluctuating hepatic function. PMID:1139859

  14. Shifting hepatitis B virus genotypes of acute hepatitis B patients in northeast Japan.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Jun; Kondo, Yasuteru; Umetsu, Teruyuki; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Miura, Masahito; Mano, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Tomoo; Obara, Noriyuki; Niitsuma, Hirofumi; Kogure, Takayuki; Nakagome, Yu; Kimura, Osamu; Iwata, Tomoaki; Morosawa, Tatsuki; Fujisaka, Yasuyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that acute hepatitis B (AHB) patients with genotype A HBV (HBV/A) have been increasing since the 1990s in metropolitan areas in Japan. However, little is known about the trends of HBV genotypes in AHB patients in northeast Japan where genotype B HBV (HBV/B) prevails more than in other areas. In this study, we aimed to clarify the changes in the HBV genotypes and clinical characteristics of AHB patients in this area. HBV genotypes were determined by direct sequencing (n?=?125) or enzyme immunoassay (n?=?9) using serum samples from AHB patients including fulminant hepatitis in 1987-2014. Among 134 patients, 26 (19%), 33 (25%), and 75 (56%) patients were infected with HBV of genotypes A, B, and C, respectively. HBV/A emerged from 2001 and the percentage was increased gradually up to 48% in 2010-2014, whereas HBV/B was reduced from 40% in 1987-1994 to 10% in 2010-2014. Phylogenetic analysis showed that three major subgenotype A2 strains had come into this area serially. The levels of HBV DNA and prothrombin time were higher in HBV/A patients than other genotypes. This study could not show significant difference in the HBsAg-positive period among genotypes nor the effect of nucleoside analogues to shorten the HBsAg-positive period. A higher level of initial HBV DNA was associated with late disappearance of HBsAg. In conclusion, the percentage of HBV/A in AHB patients has been increasing in northeast Japan since 2001, which is later than metropolitan areas, whereas that of HBV/B is decreasing. J. Med. Virol. 88:69-78, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26113372

  15. Acute Effects of Alcohol on Intrusive Memory Development and Viewpoint Dependence in Spatial

    E-print Network

    Burgess, Neil

    Acute Effects of Alcohol on Intrusive Memory Development and Viewpoint Dependence in Spatial Memory the effect of alcohol on intrusive memories and, concurrently, on egocentric and allocentric spatial memory effect of alcohol on intrusive memories and on same/shifted-view recognition support a dual

  16. Acute cholestatic hepatitis a virus infection presenting with hemolytic anemia and renal failure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lapp, Robert T; Rochling, Fedja

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus is the most common acute viral hepatitis worldwide with approximately 1.5 million cases annually. Hepatitis A virus infection in general is self-limited. In rare cases, hepatitis A virus infection may cause renal failure, hemolytic anemia, and/or cholestasis. We report the first case of acute cholestatic hepatitis A virus infection complicated by hemolytic anemia, and renal failure in one patient. A 42-year-old Caucasian male presented with cholestasis, hemolytic anemia and renal failure after consuming street tacos in Central and South America while on a business trip. His protracted course required corticosteroid therapy, multiple sessions of plasma exchange, and numerous units of packed red blood cells. This case demonstrates the importance of vaccination in high-risk adults. A prompt diagnosis of acute hepatitis A virus infection is essential, as uncommon presentations may delay diagnosis leading to permanent morbidity and potentially death in fulminant cases. We also demonstrate the efficacy of treatment of cholestatic hepatitis A virus infection, hemolytic anemia, and renal failure with corticosteroids and plasma exchange. PMID:25431704

  17. Genetic Variation in IL28B and Treatment-induced Clearance of Hepatitis C Virus in HIV-Positive Patients With Acute and Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Martin; Nischalke, Hans Dieter; Danta, Mark; Mauss, Stefan; Stellbrink, Hans-Jörg; Baumgarten, Axel; Mayr, Christoph; Bruno, Raffaele; Tural, Cristina; Klausen, Gerd; Clotet, Bonaventura; Naumann, Uwe; Lutz, Thomas; Rausch, Michael; Schewe, Knud; Bienek, Bernhard; Haerter, Georg; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Rockstroh, Juergen K.; Spengler, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a IL28B (rs 12979860) gene polymorphism was identified as a predictor for response to hepatits C virus–specific treatment in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–uninfected and –infected patients with chronic hepatitis C. In an analysis of HIV-infected patients with acute hepatitis C, we found that the IL28B genotype was associated with serum levels of hepatitis C virus RNA, g-GT, and CD4 cell count. In contrast to HIV-infected patients with chronic hepatitis C, the IL28B genotype was not significantly associated with treatment response rates in patients with acute hepatitis C. Thus, effects of the IL28B single-nucleotide polymorphism may differ in HIV-infected patients with chronic and acute hepatitis C. PMID:21257738

  18. Effect of Liverubin™ on hepatic biochemical profile in patients of alcoholic liver disease: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Nanda, V; Gupta, V; Sharma, S N; Pasricha, A; Karmakar, A Kumar; Patel, A; Bhatt, V M; Kantroo, B L; Kumar, B; Paul, N K Ketar; Attam, R

    2014-12-01

    Liverubin™ is an available drug in the Indian market that contains silymarin, the major active complex extracted from the medicinal plant milk thistle (Silybum marianum L.). The study retrospectively tracked and analyzed the data of 602 patients, out of which 230 were alcohol induced; 131 with alcohol-induced liver damage (ALD), 13 with liver cirrhosis, and 86 with fatty liver; to assess the effects of water soluble Silymarin (Liverubin™) on important hepatic biochemical parameters. The data was collected from 32 major cities treated by 72 physicians across India who were observed for the specified treatment duration of 11 months. Data was analyzed by using descriptive statistics. At the end of the treatment the hepatic biochemical profile was appreciably improved: the mean % of change in the levels of important hepatic biochemical parameters was observed as follows: total bilirubin 63.48% (direct bilirubin: 64.96%; indirect bilirubin: 61.63%). The serum SGOT and SGPT changed at a mean % of 65.43 and 69.31 respectively while serum alkaline phosphatase was changed at a mean % rate of 39.81. Liverubin™ proved to be safe & well-tolerated among the studied population and no significant treatment related adverse events were reported during the study. Liverubin™ treatment is found to bring about effective lowering of abnormally elevated hepatic biochemical parameters. Liverubin™, water soluble active Silymarin, in the popularly prescribed doses of 140-mg tid is observed to be a promising safe and effective drug in cases of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:26076375

  19. Acute thrombocytopenia: An uncommon complication occurring following transarterial chemoembolization in a patient with neuroendocrine hepatic metastases

    PubMed Central

    XIE, PINGKUN; YUAN, ZHENG

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are a group of carcinomas that secrete various polypeptides with hormonal activity. A significant percentage of patients already have hepatic metastases at the time of initial diagnosis, and 80–90% of these tumors are inoperable at the time of presentation. Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the preferred approach for the management of neuroendocrine hepatic metastases. Although the technique is relatively safe, it is associated with several complications. The present study reported the case of a patient with neuroendocrine hepatic metastases who developed acute thrombocytopenia following TACE. To the best of our knowledge, acute thrombocytopenia occurring after TACE in a patient with neuroendocrine hepatic metastases has not been previously reported. In the present study, the hypothetical etiopathogenetic mechanisms were also discussed. PMID:26171007

  20. Acute hepatitis induced by a Chinese herbal product Qibao Meiran Wan: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyan; Qu, Caihong; He, Qiong; Chen, Wenying; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Xiaoqi; Liu, Yuxing; Tang, Yongbo

    2015-01-01

    Qibao Meiran Wan is a Chinese herbal product sold as a therapy for tonifying the liver and kidney, dizziness, premature graying of hair, backache, constipation, and night sweats. It is widely available in Chinese pharmacies and drugstores and is sold without prescription. We describe a case of acute liver injury in a 26-year-old Chinese man who developed symptomatic hepatitis 1 month after starting Qibao Meiran Wan. There was no evidence of viral hepatitis, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, autoimmune hepatitis, or Budd-Chiari syndrome. The liver injury slowly resolved over 20 days after discontinuing the herbal product. Herbal toxicity was later confirmed by a liver biopsy. Qibao Meiran Wan contains a mixture of several plants including Polygonum multiflorum, which was previously associated with hepatotoxicity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of hepatotoxicity by Qibao Meiran Wan. Clinicians treating patients with acute hepatitis of unclear etiology should pay attention to the consumption of Qibao Meiran Wan. PMID:26379995

  1. The effects of acute alcohol administration on the human brain: Insights from neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Bjork, James M.; Gilman, Jodi M.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last quarter century, researchers have peered into the living human brain to develop and refine mechanistic accounts of alcohol-induced behavior, as well as neurobiological mechanisms for development and maintenance of addiction. These in vivo neuroimaging studies generally show that acute alcohol administration affects brain structures implicated in motivation and behavior control, and that chronic intoxication is correlated with structural and functional abnormalities in these same structures, where some elements of these decrements normalize with extended sobriety. In this review, we will summarize recent findings about acute human brain responses to alcohol using neuroimaging techniques, and how they might explain behavioral effects of alcohol intoxication. We then briefly address how chronic alcohol intoxication (as inferred from cross-sectional differences between various drinking populations and controls) may yield individual brain differences between drinking subjects that may confound interpretation of acute alcohol administration effects. PMID:23978384

  2. Progenitor cell expansion and impaired hepatocyte regeneration in explanted livers from alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dubuquoy, Laurent; Louvet, Alexandre; Lassailly, Guillaume; Truant, Stéphanie; Boleslawski, Emmanuel; Artru, Florent; Maggiotto, François; Gantier, Emilie; Buob, David; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Cannesson, Amélie; Dharancy, Sébastien; Moreno, Christophe; Pruvot, François-René; Bataller, Ramon; Mathurin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Objective In alcoholic hepatitis (AH), development of targeted therapies is crucial and requires improved knowledge of cellular and molecular drivers in liver dysfunction. The unique opportunity of using explanted livers from patients with AH having undergone salvage liver transplantation allowed to perform more in-depth molecular translational studies. Design We studied liver explants from patients with AH submitted to salvage transplantation (n=16), from patients with alcoholic cirrhosis without AH (n=12) and fragments of normal livers (n=16). Hepatic cytokine content was quantified. Hepatocyte function and proliferation and the presence of hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, western blot or quantitative PCR. Mitochondrial morphology was evaluated by electron microscopy. Results Livers from patients with AH showed decreased cytokine levels involved in liver regeneration (tumour necrosis factor ? and interleukin-6), as well as a virtual absence of markers of hepatocyte proliferation compared with alcoholic cirrhosis and normal livers. Electron microscopy revealed obvious mitochondrial abnormalities in AH hepatocytes. Importantly, livers from patients with AH showed substantial accumulation of HPCs that, unexpectedly, differentiate only into biliary cells. AH livers predominantly express laminin (extracellular matrix protein favouring cholangiocyte differentiation); consequently, HPC expansion is inefficient at yielding mature hepatocytes. Conclusions AH not responding to medical therapy is associated with lack of expression of cytokines involved in liver regeneration and profound mitochondrial damage along with lack of proliferative hepatocytes. Expansion of HPCs is inefficient to yield mature hepatocytes. Manoeuvres aimed at promoting differentiation of HPCs into mature hepatocytes should be tested in AH. PMID:25731872

  3. Pancreatic injury in hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient deer mice after subchronic exposure to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Kondraganti, Shakuntala; Wu Hai; Boor, Paul J.; Ansari, G.A. Shakeel

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatitis caused by activation of digestive zymogens in the exocrine pancreas is a serious chronic health problem in alcoholic patients. However, mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis remains obscure due to lack of a suitable animal model. Earlier, we reported pancreatic injury and substantial increases in endogenous formation of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-deficient (ADH{sup -}) deer mice fed 4% ethanol. To understand the mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis, we evaluated dose-dependent metabolism of ethanol and related pancreatic injury in ADH{sup -} and hepatic ADH-normal (ADH{sup +}) deer mice fed 1%, 2% or 3.5% ethanol via Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet daily for 2 months. Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was remarkably increased and the concentration was {approx} 1.5-fold greater in ADH{sup -} vs. ADH{sup +} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. At the end of the experiment, remarkable increases in pancreatic FAEEs and significant pancreatic injury indicated by the presence of prominent perinuclear space, pyknotic nuclei, apoptotic bodies and dilation of glandular ER were found only in ADH{sup -} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. This pancreatic injury was further supported by increased plasma lipase and pancreatic cathepsin B (a lysosomal hydrolase capable of activating trypsinogen), trypsinogen activation peptide (by-product of trypsinogen activation process) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (endoplasmic reticulum stress marker). These findings suggest that ADH-deficiency and high alcohol levels in the body are the key factors in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury. Therefore, determining how this early stage of pancreatic injury advances to inflammation stage could be important for understanding the mechanism(s) of alcoholic pancreatitis.

  4. Risk factors and prognosis of hepatic acute GvHD after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Arai, Y; Kanda, J; Nakasone, H; Kondo, T; Uchida, N; Fukuda, T; Ohashi, K; Kaida, K; Iwato, K; Eto, T; Kanda, Y; Nakamae, H; Nagamura-Inoue, T; Morishima, Y; Hirokawa, M; Atsuta, Y; Murata, M

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic acute GvHD (aGvHD) is associated with high mortality owing to poor response to immunosuppressive therapy. The pathogenesis of hepatic aGvHD differs from that of other lesions, and specific risk factors related to pre-transplant liver conditions should be determined. We conducted a cohort study by using a Japanese transplant registry database (N=8378). Of these subjects, 1.5% had hepatitis C virus Ab (HCV-Ab) and 9.4% had liver dysfunction (elevated transaminase or bilirubin levels) before hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). After HCT, the cumulative incidence of hepatic aGvHD was 6.7%. On multivariate analyses, HCV-Ab positivity (hazard ratio (HR), 1.93; P=0.02) and pre-transplant liver dysfunction (HR, 1.85; P<0.01), as well as advanced HCT risk, unrelated donors, HLA mismatch and cyclosporine as GvHD prophylaxis, were significant risk factors for hepatic aGvHD, whereas hepatitis B virus surface Ag was not. Hepatic aGvHD was a significant risk factor for low overall survival and high transplant-related mortality in all aGvHD grades (P<0.01). This study is the first to show the relationship between pre-transplant liver conditions and hepatic aGvHD. A prospective study is awaited to validate the results of this study and establish a new strategy especially for high-risk patients. PMID:26367230

  5. [Herpes simplex virus type 2 fulminant hepatitis after umbilical cord blood transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Mitsuhiro; Ishiwata, Kazuya; Sugio, Takeshi; Kaji, Daisuke; Ota, Hikari; Tsuji, Masanori; Yamamoto, Hisashi; Yamamoto, Go; Asano-Mori, Yuki; Uchida, Naoyuki; Izutsu, Koji; Taniguchi, Shuichi

    2014-06-01

    This report describes a 41-year-old patient, who developed herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2)-hepatitis after umbilical cord blood transplantation (CBT). The patient had received allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from an unrelated donor for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) not in remission. AML relapsed 18 months after the first transplantation, and CBT was performed. AML relapsed again 5 months later and the patient was given chemotherapy. Although there was no active chronic graft-versus-host disease, liver dysfunction appeared, and one week later, progressed to acute liver failure. Viral screening of blood by PCR including hepatitis B and C viruses, human immunodeficiency virus, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus type 1 and HSV-2 revealed elevation of HSV-2 (2.34 × 10? copies/ml). We diagnosed the patient as having HSV-2 acute hepatitis, and initiated treatment with antiviral drugs (acyclovir, foscarnet) and plasma exchange. However, liver functions deteriorated rapidly, and the patient died on day 6 after the onset of acute liver failure. Although HSV hepatitis is very rare after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, it is rapidly progressive and associated with a high mortality rate. Thus, early diagnosis with prompt antiviral intervention is recommended. PMID:24975337

  6. Use of iron colloid-enhanced MRI for study of acute radiation-induced hepatic injury

    SciTech Connect

    Suto, Yuji; Ametani, Masaki; Kato, Takashi; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Kamba, Masayuki; Sugihara, Syuji; Ohta, Yoshio

    1996-03-01

    We present a case with acute radiation-induced hepatic injury using chondroitin sulfate iron colloid (CSIC)-enhanced MRI. Uptake of CSIC was decreased in the irradiated portion of the liver. CSIC-enhanced MRI is useful for obtaining information on the function of the reticuloendothelial system and demarcates between irradiated and nonirradiated zones. 18 refs., 3 figs

  7. HEPATIC AND RENAL ASSESSMENT OF ACUTE EXPOSURE TO INHALED EPICHLOROHYDRIN: TOXICOLOGICAL EVALUATION AND EXPOSURE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine the hepatic and enal effects of acute exposure to inhaled epichlorohydrin (ECH), male F-344 rats were exposed either to 0 or to 100 ppm ECH by inhalation for 4 hours. epatic and renal toxicity-were assessed at the termination of exposure and on the first, second and ...

  8. Effect of acute and repeated chlordimeform treatment on rat hepatic microsomal drug metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Budris, D M; Yim, G K; Carlson, G P; Schnell, R C

    1983-08-01

    The effect of chlordimeform (CDM) treatment on the hepatic microsomal drug metabolizing enzymes was examined in male and female rats following either acute or repeated treatment. After acute administration of chlordimeform (100 mg/kg, i.p., 1 hour before killing) differential effects were observed in various parameters of the hepatic microsomal mixed function oxidase system with significant decreases in ethylmorphine metabolism, cytochrome P-450 content, NADPH cytochrome c reductase, and in the spectral binding of hexobarbital and aniline while no changes were found in the metabolism of aniline or p-nitroanisole. Durations of zoxazolamine-induced paralysis and pentobarbital-induced hypnosis were increased significantly after acute CDM administration. Following repeated administration of CDM (75 mg/kg, i.p., for 4 days) to adult male rats, a decrease was observed in zoxazolamine-induced paralysis time while pentobarbital-induced hypnosis was not altered. Metabolism studies using isolated hepatic microsomal fractions showed a decreased rate of biotransformation of ethylmorphine and aniline while the activity of p-nitroanisole O-demethylase was not changed. No differences were found in cytochrome P-450 levels whereas microsomal spectral binding of hexobarbital was reduced while that of aniline was not affected. Following acute or repeated administration of CDM to adult female rats, decreases in the hepatic microsomal metabolism of aniline, but not ethylmorphine or p-nitroanisole, were observed. Addition of CDM to microsomal suspensions yielded a Type I binding curve. PMID:6623550

  9. Functional biomarkers for the acute effects of alcohol on the central nervous system in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Zoethout, Remco W M; Delgado, Wilson L; Ippel, Annelies E; Dahan, Albert; van Gerven, Joop M A

    2011-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) effects of acute alcohol administration have been frequently assessed. Such studies often use a wide range of methods to study each of these effects. Unfortunately, the sensitivity of these tests has not completely been ascertained. A literature search was performed to recognize the most useful tests (or biomarkers) for identifying the acute CNS effects of alcohol in healthy volunteers. All tests were grouped in clusters and functional domains. Afterwards, the effect of alcohol administration on these tests was scored as improvement, impairment or as no effect. Furthermore, dose–response relationships were established. A total number of 218 studies, describing 342 different tests (or test variants) were evaluated. Alcohol affected a wide range of CNS domains. Divided attention, focused attention, visuo-motor control and scales of feeling high and of subjective drug effects were identified as the most sensitive functional biomarkers for the acute CNS effects of alcohol. The large number of CNS tests that are used to determine the effects of alcohol interferes with the identification of the most sensitive ones and of drug–response relationships. Our results may be helpful in selecting rational biomarkers for studies investigating the acute CNS effects of alcohol or for future alcohol- interaction studies. PMID:21284693

  10. High Dose Lycopene Supplementation Increases Hepatic Cytochrome P4502E1 Protein and Inflammation in Alcohol-Fed Rats12

    PubMed Central

    Veeramachaneni, Sudipta; Ausman, Lynne M.; Choi, Sang Woon; Russell, Robert M.; Wang, Xiang-Dong

    2008-01-01

    Recent in vitro evidence suggests that the antioxidant lycopene can prevent alcohol-induced oxidative stress and inflammation. However, knowledge of possible interactions in vivo between escalating doses of lycopene and chronic alcohol ingestion are lacking. In this study, we investigated potential interactions between alcohol ingestion and lycopene supplementation and their effect on hepatic lycopene concentration, cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1) induction, and inflammation. Fischer 344 rats (6 groups, n = 10 per group) were fed either a liquid ethanol Lieber-DeCarli diet or a control diet (isocaloric maltodextrin substituted for ethanol) with or without lycopene supplementation at 2 doses (1.1 or 3.3 mg·kg body weight?1·d?1) for 11 wk. Plasma and hepatic concentrations of lycopene isomers were assessed by HPLC analysis. We examined expressions of hepatic CYP2E1 and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF?) and the incidence of hepatic inflammatory foci. Both plasma and hepatic lycopene concentrations were greater in alcohol-fed rats than in control rats supplemented with identical doses of lycopene. In contrast, alcohol-fed rats had a lower percentage of lycopene cis isomers in the plasma and the liver compared with control rats fed the same dose of lycopene. Notably, lycopene supplementation at the higher dose significantly induced hepatic CYP2E1 protein, TNF? mRNA, and the incidence of inflammatory foci in the alcohol-fed rats but not in the control rats. These data indicate an interaction between chronic alcohol ingestion and lycopene supplementation and suggest a need for caution among individuals consuming high amounts of both alcohol and lycopene. PMID:18567756

  11. Acute Hepatitis C Virus in an HIV Clinic: A Screening Strategy, Risk Factors, and Perception of Risk

    PubMed Central

    DeLong, A.K.; Maynard, M.A.; Chapman, S.; Gholam, P.; Blackard, J.T.; Rich, J.; Mayer, K.H.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is being acquired undetected among HIV-infected individuals. A practical way to regularly screen HIV-infected patients for acute HCV irrespective of perceived risk or symptoms is needed. We piloted implementation of an acute HCV screening strategy using routine HIV clinical care schedules and the least costly blood tests, in a Rhode Island HIV care center. Study participants had ongoing HCV risk, completed questionnaires encompassing risk behaviors and perception of risk, and were screened with quarterly alanine aminotransferase (ALT). ALT rise triggered HCV RNA testing, with pooled rather than individual specimen HCV RNA testing for underinsured participants. Participants were primarily older, college-educated men who have sex with men (MSM) with history of sexually transmitted infection other than HIV. One of 58 participants developed acute HCV in 50 person–years of observation for an annual incidence of 2.0% per year (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.05–11.1%). The majority (54%) of MSM did not perceive that traumatic sexual and drug practices they were engaging in put them at risk for HCV. Unprotected sex often occurred under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Self-reported HCV risk and participation in several risk behaviors declined during the study. It was possible to collect frequent ALTs in a busy HIV clinic with 71% of total projected ALTs obtained and 88% of participants having at least one ALT during the 9-month follow-up period. All instances of ALT rise led to reflexive HCV RNA testing. Tracking quarterly ALT for elevation to systematically prompt HCV RNA testing before seroconversion is a promising approach to screen for acute HCV in a real-world HIV clinical setting. PMID:21859307

  12. A Snapshot of the Hepatic Transcriptome: Ad Libitum Alcohol Intake Suppresses Expression of Cholesterol Synthesis Genes in Alcohol-Preferring (P) Rats

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Jonathon D.; Sherrill, Jeremy B.; Morello, Gabriella M.; San Miguel, Phillip J.; Ding, Zhenming; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Liang, Tiebing; Muir, William M.; Lumeng, Lawrence; Lossie, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    Research is uncovering the genetic and biochemical effects of consuming large quantities of alcohol. One prime example is the J- or U-shaped relationship between the levels of alcohol consumption and the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Moderate alcohol consumption in humans (about 30 g ethanol/d) is associated with reduced risk of coronary heart disease, while abstinence and heavier alcohol intake is linked to increased risk. However, the hepatic consequences of moderate alcohol drinking are largely unknown. Previous data from alcohol-preferring (P) rats showed that chronic consumption does not produce significant hepatic steatosis in this well-established model. Therefore, free-choice alcohol drinking in P rats may mimic low risk or nonhazardous drinking in humans, and chronic exposure in P animals can illuminate the molecular underpinnings of free-choice drinking in the liver. To address this gap, we captured the global, steady-state liver transcriptome following a 23 week free-choice, moderate alcohol consumption regimen (?7.43 g ethanol/kg/day) in inbred alcohol-preferring (iP10a) rats. Chronic consumption led to down-regulation of nine genes in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, including HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting step for cholesterol synthesis. These findings corroborate our phenotypic analyses, which indicate that this paradigm produced animals whose hepatic triglyceride levels, cholesterol levels and liver histology were indistinguishable from controls. These findings explain, at least in part, the J- or U-shaped relationship between cardiovascular risk and alcohol intake, and provide outstanding candidates for future studies aimed at understanding the mechanisms that underlie the salutary cardiovascular benefits of chronic low risk and nonhazardous alcohol intake. PMID:25542004

  13. A snapshot of the hepatic transcriptome: ad libitum alcohol intake suppresses expression of cholesterol synthesis genes in alcohol-preferring (P) rats.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jonathon D; Sherrill, Jeremy B; Morello, Gabriella M; San Miguel, Phillip J; Ding, Zhenming; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Liang, Tiebing; Muir, William M; Lumeng, Lawrence; Lossie, Amy C

    2014-01-01

    Research is uncovering the genetic and biochemical effects of consuming large quantities of alcohol. One prime example is the J- or U-shaped relationship between the levels of alcohol consumption and the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Moderate alcohol consumption in humans (about 30 g ethanol/d) is associated with reduced risk of coronary heart disease, while abstinence and heavier alcohol intake is linked to increased risk. However, the hepatic consequences of moderate alcohol drinking are largely unknown. Previous data from alcohol-preferring (P) rats showed that chronic consumption does not produce significant hepatic steatosis in this well-established model. Therefore, free-choice alcohol drinking in P rats may mimic low risk or nonhazardous drinking in humans, and chronic exposure in P animals can illuminate the molecular underpinnings of free-choice drinking in the liver. To address this gap, we captured the global, steady-state liver transcriptome following a 23 week free-choice, moderate alcohol consumption regimen (? 7.43 g ethanol/kg/day) in inbred alcohol-preferring (iP10a) rats. Chronic consumption led to down-regulation of nine genes in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, including HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting step for cholesterol synthesis. These findings corroborate our phenotypic analyses, which indicate that this paradigm produced animals whose hepatic triglyceride levels, cholesterol levels and liver histology were indistinguishable from controls. These findings explain, at least in part, the J- or U-shaped relationship between cardiovascular risk and alcohol intake, and provide outstanding candidates for future studies aimed at understanding the mechanisms that underlie the salutary cardiovascular benefits of chronic low risk and nonhazardous alcohol intake. PMID:25542004

  14. Communicating about Alcohol Consumption to Nonharmful Drinkers with Hepatitis C: Patient and Provider Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Blixen, Carol E.; Webster, Noah J.; Hund, Andrew J.; Perzynski, Adam T.; Kanuch, Stephanie W.; Stoller, Eleanor Palo; McCormick, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Abstaining from alcohol consumption is generally recommended for patients with Hepatitis C (HCV). However, mixed research findings coupled with a lack of consistent guidelines on alcohol consumption and HCV may influence what healthcare providers tell their HCV patients about drinking. This may be more problematic when advising nonharmful drinkers with HCV, a population for whom consumption would not be a problem in the absence of their HCV diagnosis. Objective This study explores what healthcare providers advise their HCV patients who are drinking alcohol at nonharmful levels about alcohol use and what these patients actually hear. Design We conducted separate focus groups and interviews about alcohol use and HCV with nonharmful drinkers with HCV (N?=?50) and healthcare providers (N?=?14) at a metropolitan teaching hospital. All focus groups and interviews were audio-taped, transcribed, and analyzed using NVivo, a qualitative data management and analysis program. Results We found similar themes about HCV and alcohol consumption (stop completely, occasional drink is ok, cut down, and provision of mixed/ambiguous messages), reported by both providers and patients. Patient respondents who reported hearing “stop completely” were more likely to have had their last medical visit at the gastroenterology (GI) clinic as opposed to the internal medicine (IM) clinic. Furthermore, IM providers were more likely to give their recommendations in “medical language” than were GI providers. Conclusions To make the best health-related decisions about their disease, HCV patients need consistent information about alcohol consumption. Departments of Internal Medicine can increase provider knowledge about HCV and alcohol use by providing more education and training on HCV. PMID:18172739

  15. Systematic review of the pharmacological treatment of alcohol use disorders in individuals infected with hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Alexis; Brissette, Suzanne; Jutras-Aswad, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Treating alcohol use disorders (AUD) is critical in individuals suffering from hepatitis C infection (HCV). Aside from psychosocial interventions, pharmacological treatment is effective for decreasing alcohol consumption and promoting abstinence. However, unique factors belonging to HCV-infected individuals, such as baseline hepatic vulnerability and possible ongoing hepatitis C treatment, complicate AUD drug therapy. The goal of this review is to systematically identify, summarize, and evaluate the existing evidence on the pharmacological management of AUD in HCV-infected individuals. MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for English- and French-language articles published from 1993 to December 2013. The search criteria focused on clinical trials and observational studies assessing the efficacy and/or safety of pharmacological management of AUD in patients infected with HCV. Of 421 identified studies, three were included for analysis. Two were observational studies assessing the safety of disulfiram. One was a randomized controlled trial assessing the efficacy and safety of baclofen. There is paucity of data regarding the efficacy and safety of pharmacological treatment of AUD in HCV-infected individuals, with studies being small series and showing significant heterogeneity. No strong recommendations can be made based on the current studies as to which pharmacological option should be preferred in this sub-population. PMID:25928362

  16. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Host Factors Modulated during Acute Hepatitis E Virus Infection in the Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Rogée, Sophie; Le Gall, Morgane; Chafey, Philippe; Bouquet, Jérôme; Cordonnier, Nathalie; Frederici, Christian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes acute enterically transmitted hepatitis. In industrialized countries, it is a zoonotic disease, with swine being the major reservoir of human HEV contamination. The occurrence and severity of the disease are variable, with clinical symptoms ranging from asymptomatic to self-limiting acute hepatitis, chronic infection, or fulminant hepatitis. In the absence of a robust cell culture system or small-animal models, the HEV life cycle and pathological process remain unclear. To characterize HEV pathogenesis and virulence mechanisms, a quantitative proteomic analysis was carried out to identify cellular factors and pathways modulated during acute infection of swine. Three groups of pigs were inoculated with three different strains of swine HEV to evaluate the possible role of viral determinants in pathogenesis. Liver samples were analyzed by a differential proteomic approach, two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis, and 61 modulated proteins were identified by mass spectroscopy. The results obtained show that the three HEV strains replicate similarly in swine and that they modulate several cellular pathways, suggesting that HEV impairs several cellular processes, which can account for the various types of disease expression. Several proteins, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K, apolipoprotein E, and prohibitin, known to be involved in other viral life cycles, were upregulated in HEV-infected livers. Some differences were observed between the three strains, suggesting that HEV's genetic variability may induce variations in pathogenesis. This comparative analysis of the liver proteome modulated during infection with three different strains of HEV genotype 3 provides an important basis for further investigations on the factors involved in HEV replication and the mechanism of HEV pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is responsible for acute hepatitis, with clinical symptoms ranging from asymptomatic to self-limiting acute hepatitis, chronic infection, or fulminant hepatitis. In industrialized countries, HEV is considered an emerging zoonotic disease, with swine being the principal reservoir for human contamination. The viral and cellular factors involved in the replication and/or pathogenesis of HEV are still not fully known. Here we report that several cellular pathways involved in cholesterol and lipid metabolism or cell survival were modulated during HEV infection in the swine model. Moreover, we observed a difference between the different swine strains, suggesting that HEV's genetic variability could play a role in pathogenesis. We also identified some proteins known to be involved in other viral cycles. Our study provides insight into the mechanisms modulated during HEV infection and constitutes a useful reference for future work on HEV pathogenesis and virulence. PMID:25320303

  17. Hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... attacking the liver Infections from viruses (such as hepatitis A, hepatitis B, or hepatitis C), bacteria, or parasites ... the liver damage and any illnesses you have. Hepatitis A, for example, is most often short-term and ...

  18. Leptin administration restores the altered adipose and hepatic expression of aquaglyceroporins improving the non-alcoholic fatty liver of ob/ob mice

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Amaia; Moreno, Natalia R.; Balaguer, Inmaculada; Méndez-Giménez, Leire; Becerril, Sara; Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Portincasa, Piero; Calamita, Giuseppe; Soveral, Graça; Malagón, María M.; Frühbeck, Gema

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol is an important metabolite for the control of lipid accumulation in white adipose tissue (WAT) and liver. We aimed to investigate whether exogenous administration of leptin improves features of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice via the regulation of AQP3 and AQP7 (glycerol channels mediating glycerol efflux in adipocytes) and AQP9 (aquaglyceroporin facilitating glycerol influx in hepatocytes). Twelve-week-old male wild type and ob/ob mice were divided in three groups as follows: control, leptin-treated (1?mg/kg/d) and pair-fed. Leptin deficiency was associated with obesity and NAFLD exhibiting an AQP3 and AQP7 increase in WAT, without changes in hepatic AQP9. Adipose Aqp3 and hepatic Aqp9 transcripts positively correlated with markers of adiposity and hepatic steatosis. Chronic leptin administration (4-weeks) was associated with improved body weight, whole-body adiposity, and hepatosteatosis of ob/ob mice and to a down-regulation of AQP3, AQP7 in WAT and an up-regulation of hepatic AQP9. Acute leptin stimulation in vitro (4-h) induced the mobilization of aquaglyceroporins towards lipid droplets (AQP3) and the plasma membrane (AQP7) in murine adipocytes. Our results show that leptin restores the coordinated regulation of fat-specific AQP7 and liver-specific AQP9, a step which might prevent lipid overaccumulation in WAT and liver in obesity. PMID:26159457

  19. [Change in the biogenic amine content in rats in acute and chronic alcohol poisoning].

    PubMed

    Naimova, T G

    1978-01-01

    In Wister line rats subject to determination were the epinphrine, norepinephrine, DOPA, dophamine, serotonin conents and monaminoxidase activity in the blood, liver and brain in acute alcohol poisoning. Acute alcohol poisoning did not produce any substantial changes in the content of biogenic amines in the blood, liver and brain of the rats. With chronic poisoning the content of catecholamines, serotonin increased while the monaminoxidase activity in the study organs declined, this bearing witness to the effect of alcohol on the metabolism of biogenic amines. PMID:564288

  20. CONTRASTING BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF ACUTE NICOTINE AND CHRONIC SMOKING IN DETOXIFIED ALCOHOLICS

    PubMed Central

    Boissoneault, Jeff; Gilbertson, Rebecca; Prather, Robert; Nixon, Sara Jo

    2011-01-01

    Background Current literature suggests that acute nicotine administration provides a compensatory mechanism by which alcoholics might alleviate attentional deficits. In contrast, chronic smoking is increasingly recognized as negatively affecting neurobehavioral integrity. These opposing effects have not been simultaneously examined. Thus, we sought to a) extend previous work by exploring the effects of acute nicotine effects on vigilance components of attention and replicate previous findings suggesting that treatment-seeking alcoholics experience benefit to a greater extent than do other groups; and b) to examine the impact of chronic smoking on these tasks and across subgroups. Methods Substance abusing participants (N=86) were recruited and subgrouped on the basis of dependency criteria as either alcoholics, alcoholics with co-morbid stimulant dependence, or stimulant dependent individuals. Groups of cigarette-smoking (N=17) and non-smoking (N=22) community controls were recruited as comparison groups. Smoking subjects were assigned a placebo, low, or high dose nicotine patch in a double-blind placebo controlled fashion. Non-smoking controls were administered either a placebo or low dose. Testing occurred after dose stabilization. Results General linear models indicated greater sensitivity to acute nicotine administration among alcoholics than other groups when controlling for the effect of intensity of smoking history, as reflected by pack-years. Pack-years correlated negatively with performance measures in alcoholics but not stimulant abusing subgroups or smoking controls. Finally, regression analyses demonstrated that pack-years predicted poorer performance only for the alcoholic subgroup. Conclusions These results support previous work finding a compensatory effect of acute nicotine administration on attentional performance in alcoholics and reinforce the consideration of recent nicotine use as a confound in neurocognitive studies of alcoholics. Of particular interest is the finding that smoking history as reflected in pack-years predicted poorer performance, but only among alcoholics. Further systematic study of these opposing effects among alcoholics and other groups using a broader array of tasks is needed. PMID:21855223

  1. A Rare Case of Paclitaxel and/or Trastuzumab Induced Acute Hepatic Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mandaliya, Hiren; Baghi, Pinky; Prawira, Amy; George, Mathew K.

    2015-01-01

    Paclitaxel induced mild derangement of liver functions including bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, and AST has been infrequently noticed in clinical trials. Contrary to Paclitaxel, hepatocellular injury, hepatitis, and liver tenderness are common laboratory and clinical findings with Trastuzumab. However, hepatic failure/necrosis secondary to Paclitaxel or Trastuzumab has never been reported in literature. A 62-year-old lady, previously healthy, was treated with adjuvant therapy for left breast stage II, high grade invasive ductal carcinoma which was node negative, oestrogen receptor negative, progesterone receptor positive, and HER2 receptor positive. After modified radical mastectomy and axillary clearance, she finished four cycles of Doxorubicin/Cyclophosphamide chemotherapy and then commenced on Paclitaxel/Trastuzumab combination chemotherapy. Within twelve hours of first dose of Paclitaxel/Trastuzumab therapy, patient required hospital admission for acute onset respiratory failure. Patient died within 36 hours of therapy and autopsy was suggestive of acute hepatic necrosis without any other significant findings. Detailed investigations were not carried out as event was quick with rapid deterioration. There was no history of prior liver pathology/injury and preliminary investigations for major organ involvement were unremarkable. As per our knowledge, Paclitaxel and/or Trastuzumab induced acute hepatic necrosis has never been reported in literature before, hence difficult to predict.

  2. Static and dynamic prognostic factors for hepatitis-B-related acute-on-chronic liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jung Min; Sohn, Won; Cho, Ju Yeon; Pyo, Jeung Hui; Choi, Kyu; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyeok; Koh, Kwang Chul; Paik, Seung Woon; Yoo, Byung Chul

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Hepatitis-B-related acute-on-chronic liver failure has a poor prognosis. However, the advent of potent oral antiviral agents means that some patients can now recover with medical treatment. We aimed to identify the prognostic factors for hepatitis-B-related acute-on-chronic liver failure including the initial as well as the dynamically changing clinical parameters during admission. Methods Sixty-seven patients were retrospectively enrolled from 2003 to 2012 at Samsung Medical Center. The patients were classified into three categories: Recovery group (n=23), Liver transplantation group (n=28), and Death group (n=16). The Liver transplantation and Death groups were combined into an Unfavorable prognosis group. We analyzed the prognostic factors including the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores determined at 3-day intervals. Results A multivariable analysis showed that the unfavorable prognostic factors were a high initial MELD score (?28) (odds ratio [OR] =6.64, p=0.015), moderate-to-severe ascites at admission (OR=6.71, P=0.012), and the aggravation of hepatic encephalopathy during hospitalization (?grade III) (OR=15.41, P=0.013). Compared with the baseline level, significant reductions in the MELD scores were observed on the 7th day after admission in the Recovery group (P=0.016). Conclusions Dynamic changes in clinical parameters during admission are useful prognostic factors for hepatitis-B-related acute-on-chronic liver failure. PMID:26523268

  3. Acute binge alcohol administration reverses sleep-wake cycle in Sprague Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rishi; Bradshaw, Kevin; Sahota, Pradeep; Thakkar, Mahesh M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Binge alcohol drinking is amongst the most common pattern of alcohol consumption in our society. Binge alcohol consumption has serious negative consequence on mental and physical health. Although alcohol consumption is known to have profound impact on sleep, it is yet unknown as to how binge alcohol affects/alters sleep-wakefulness. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of acute binge alcohol administration on sleep-wakefulness. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the study. Under standard aseptic surgical conditions, rats (N=7) were implanted with sleep recording electrodes. After post-operative recovery and habituation, baseline sleep-wakefulness was recorded. Subsequently, rats were exposed to binge alcohol treatment as follows: One hour before light onset, a priming dose of 5 g/Kg of alcohol was administered followed by two subsequent doses (adjusted based on the intoxication level of the rat) approximately 8 hours apart. Sleep-wakefulness was continuously recorded for three days post-binge. Results Acute binge alcohol administration had no significant effect on sleep-wakefulness on post-binge Day 1. However, on post-binge Day 2, after blood alcohol concentration was zero, sleep disruptions were observed manifested by a reversal of sleep-wakefulness as evident from insomnia-like symptoms (significant increase in wakefulness; significant reduction in NREM sleep) during the normal sleep (light) period and excessive sleep (significant increase in NREM sleep) during the normal active (dark) period similar to excessive daytime sleepiness in humans. All sleep-wakefulness changes were normalized on day 3 post-binge. Conclusions Alcohol hangover is defined as the presence of unpleasant symptoms that peak when blood alcohol concentration is zero. Our results suggest that the reversal of sleep-wakefulness accompanies alcohol hangover after binge alcohol administration. PMID:24930893

  4. Euforia-induced acute hepatitis in a patient with scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Encarnación, Esther; Ríos, Grissel; Muñoz-Mirabal, Angel; Vilá, Luis M

    2012-01-01

    Euforia, a supplement containing a variety of natural ingredients, is widely used as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory formula. It is not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and its side effects are unknown. We report a 45-year-old woman with limited systemic sclerosis who presented with jaundice and marked elevation of serum transaminases. One month before, she started taking Euforia juice. A liver biopsy disclosed submassive hepatocellular necrosis with histopathological changes consistent with toxic hepatitis. The patient's symptoms resolved with cessation of Euforia. Six months later, she persisted with abnormal liver function tests, but these resolved 18 months after discontinuation of Euforia. The mechanism by which Euforia causes liver injury is unknown. Some ingredients contained in this supplement (green tea, Aloe vera, noni and goji) are linked to hepatic injury. To our knowledge, this is the first report of hepatotoxicity associated with Euforia. PMID:23257938

  5. Euforia-induced acute hepatitis in a patient with scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Encarnación, Esther; Ríos, Grissel; Muñoz-Mirabal, Angel; Vilá, Luis M

    2012-01-01

    Euforia, a supplement containing a variety of natural ingredients, is widely used as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory formula. It is not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and its side effects are unknown. We report a 45-year-old woman with limited systemic sclerosis who presented with jaundice and marked elevation of serum transaminases. One month before, she started taking Euforia juice. A liver biopsy disclosed submassive hepatocellular necrosis with histopathological changes consistent with toxic hepatitis. The patient's symptoms resolved with cessation of Euforia. Six months later, she persisted with abnormal liver function tests, but these resolved 18?months after discontinuation of Euforia. The mechanism by which Euforia causes liver injury is unknown. Some ingredients contained in this supplement (green tea, Aloe vera, noni and goji) are linked to hepatic injury. To our knowledge, this is the first report of hepatotoxicity associated with Euforia. PMID:23257938

  6. Histamine protects against the acute phase of experimentally-induced hepatic ischemia/re-perfusion.

    PubMed

    El-Mahdy, Nageh A; El-Sisi, Alaa E; Dewidar, Bedair I; El-Desouky, Karima I

    2013-01-01

    Histamine, involved in many inflammatory reactions and immune responses, is reported to suppress--via H4R stimulation--injury concomitant with the late phase of warm hepatic ischemia/re-perfusion (I/R). The current study investigated the possible effects of histamine on the acute phase of hepatic I/R injury, and the possible underlying mechanisms like oxidative stress and release of inflammatory cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? nd interleukin [IL]-12). Rats were divided into naïve, sham-operated, and I/R groups. The I/R group was divided into sub-groups and pre-treated with histaminergic ligands before induction of ischemia. Anesthetized rats were subjected to warm ischemia for 30 min by occlusion of the portal vein and hepatic artery, then re-perfused for 90 min. Rats in the control I/R group showed significant increases in hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA), TNF?, and IL-12 contents, and in plasma alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) levels, along with significant decreases in hepatic reduced glutathione (GSH) content and marked diffuse histopathologic damage. Pre-treatment with histamine resulted in significant mitigation of each of these end-points. The protective effect of histamine was not antagonized by pre-treatment with mepyramine (H1R antagonist) or ranitidine (H2R antagonist) and completely reversed by pre-treatment with thioperamide (H3R and H4R antagonist). In addition, the histamine protective effect was mimicked by pre-treatment of rats with clozapine (H4R agonist). These observations strongly suggested that histamine has a protective effect against hepatic I/R-mediated tissue injury during the acute phase, and this effect was mediated through an H4R stimulation that led to a decrease in IL-12 and TNF? production--outcomes that consequently decreased localized oxidative stress and afforded hepatic protection in general. PMID:22793375

  7. Plasma alpha-lipoprotein pattern and LCAT activity in acute viral hepatitis in children.

    PubMed

    Avgerinos, A; Thalassinos, N; Skliros, P; Yalouris, A; Vrettos, J; Arapakis, G

    1984-01-01

    The alpha-lipoprotein (a-Lp) electrophoretic pattern on agarose gel was studied serially in 65 children with acute viral hepatitis. In seven cases the high-density lipoprotein fractions (HDL) were also separated by ultracentrifugation and studied in relation to lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase activity (LCAT) during the acute phase and recovery. The a-Lp band was initially absent on electrophoresis in 36 cases and never appeared in 3 of the children who died. In those who survived a-Lp reappeared with clinical improvement even before a definite increase in S-ASAT and bilirubin was evident. In the seven children in whom it was measured LCAT activity ranged during the acute phase from 17.4 to 57 nmol h-1 ml-1. In patients with initially 'normal' LCAT activity (group I, no. = 3) HDL was normal both in amount and composition. In patients with 'low' LCAT (group II, no. = 4) HDL was reduced and of abnormal composition. In both groups the a-Lp band was absent or considerably reduced on electrophoresis. In the latter group LCAT activity increased significantly on recovery, as did the amount of HDL which became normal in composition. These results suggest that in acute viral hepatitis in children changes in composition and concentration of HDL depend on the degree of hepatic functional disturbance, as judged by plasma LCAT activity. Nevertheless, it appears that HDL electrophoretic behaviour may be abnormal during the early stage of the disease while plasma LCAT activity is not significantly affected. PMID:6710081

  8. Cannabidiol Rescues Acute Hepatic Toxicity and Seizure Induced by Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Vilela, Luciano Rezende; Gomides, Lindisley Ferreira; David, Bruna Araújo; Antunes, Maísa Mota; Diniz, Ariane Barros; Moreira, Fabrício de Araújo; Menezes, Gustavo Batista

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine is a commonly abused illicit drug that causes significant morbidity and mortality. The most severe and common complications are seizures, ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction, and acute liver injury. Here, we demonstrated that acute cocaine intoxication promoted seizure along with acute liver damage in mice, with intense inflammatory infiltrate. Considering the protective role of the endocannabinoid system against cell toxicity, we hypothesized that treatment with an anandamide hydrolysis inhibitor, URB597, or with a phytocannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), protects against cocaine toxicity. URB597 (1.0?mg/kg) abolished cocaine-induced seizure, yet it did not protect against acute liver injury. Using confocal liver intravital microscopy, we observed that CBD (30?mg/kg) reduced acute liver inflammation and damage induced by cocaine and prevented associated seizure. Additionally, we showed that previous liver damage induced by another hepatotoxic drug (acetaminophen) increased seizure and lethality induced by cocaine intoxication, linking hepatotoxicity to seizure dynamics. These findings suggest that activation of cannabinoid system may have protective actions on both liver and brain induced by cocaine, minimizing inflammatory injury promoted by cocaine, supporting its further clinical application in the treatment of cocaine abuse. PMID:25999668

  9. Extraordinary cause of acute gastric dilatation and hepatic portal venous gas: Chronic use of synthetic cannabinoid

    PubMed Central

    Sevinc, Mert Mahsuni; Kinaci, Erdem; Bayrak, Savas; Yardimci, Aytul Hande; Cakar, Ekrem; Bekta?, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Addiction to synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) is a growing social and health problem worldwide. Chronic use of SCs may cause adverse effects in the gastrointestinal system. We describe a very rare case of acute gastric dilatation (AGD) and hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG), with findings of acute abdomen resulting from chronic use of a SC, Bonzai. AGD and HPVG were detected by computerized tomography examination. Patchy mucosal ischemia was seen in endoscopic examination. Despite the findings of an acute abdomen, a non-surgical approach with nasogastric decompression, antibiotic therapy, and close radiologic and endoscopic follow-up was preferred in the presented case. Clinical and radiologic findings decreased dramatically on the first day, and endoscopic findings gradually disappeared over 7 d. In conclusion, this case shows that chronic use of a SC may cause AGD and accompanying HPVG, which can be managed non-surgically despite the findings of acute abdomen. PMID:26457032

  10. DNA-binding antibodies and hepatitis B markers in acute and chronic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kingham, J G; Rassam, S; Ganguly, N; Mcguire, M J; Nasrat, B; Holgate, S T; Triger, D R; Wright, R

    1978-01-01

    A Farr technique has been used to assay antibodies to double-stranded DNA in the serum of patients with acute and chronic liver disease and carriers of HBsAg from the United Kingdom and Iraq. These antibodies were found in all groups from both countries. The highest levels were found in chronic active hepatitis and cirrhosis. In the Iraqi patients there was a strongly positive correlation between DNA-binding antibody levels and the presence of hepatitis B markers but not with disease activity. In the patients from the United Kingdom there was little correlation with disease activity and none with autoantibodies. Ninety-five per cent of asymptomatic carriers of HBsAG had elevated DNA-binding antibodies. It is suggested that hepatitis B-specific DNA might be one trigger to DNA antibody formation, though in liver disease a variety of factors are clearly operative. PMID:309808

  11. Semen Hoveniae extract protects against acute alcohol-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Du, Jian; He, Da; Sun, Lian-Na; Han, Ting; Zhang, Hong; Qin, Lu-Ping; Rahman, Khalid

    2010-08-01

    The protective effects of Semen Hoveniae extract (SHE) from Hovenia dulcis Thunb. (Rhamnaceae) on acute alcohol-induced liver injury were investigated in vivo using mice as test models. In the present study, SHE (150, 300, 600 mg/kg/day) was given to mice by intragastric administration for 4 days. Mice were gavaged with 60% ethanol 10 mL/kg after the last dose of extract. Six hours after alcohol administration, liver injury was evaluated by biochemical examination. Lipid peroxidation and the activity of antioxidants were measured by spectrophotometric methods. In mice, administration of SHE significantly decreased the activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) in serum. Administration of SHE also protected against alcohol-induced alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) elevation in mice. Concurrently, there was an augmentation in the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and glutathione (GSH), and it also facilitated alcohol metabolism. Acute toxicity tests showed that a single dose of oral SHE up to 22 g/kg did not result in any death or toxic side effects in mice during 14 days' observation. These results demonstrate that SHE could protect against acute alcohol-induced liver injury without any toxic side effects. Therefore, Semen Hoveniae has potential for the development of a clinically useful agent which could protect the liver from alcohol-induced injury. PMID:20673184

  12. The Clinical Course of Cirrhosis Patients Hospitalized for Acute Hepatic Deterioration: A Prospective Bicentric Study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu; Yan, Huadong; Zhou, Zhibo; Fang, Hong; Li, Jiawei; Ye, Honghua; Sun, Wenjie; Zhou, Wenhong; Ye, Jingfen; Yang, Qiao; Yang, Ying; Hu, Yaoren; Chen, Zhi; Sheng, Jifang

    2015-11-01

    Patients with cirrhosis are vulnerable to acute hepatic insults and are more likely to develop rapid hepatic deterioration. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical course of patients with cirrhosis and hospitalized for acute hepatic deterioration (AHD).This is a prospective study involving 163 patients with cirrhosis and AHD. The occurrence of organ failures, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and infections during hospital stay were recorded and the relationship between organ failure and death or SIRS/infection was subsequently analyzed.Of 163 patients, 35 did not develop any organ failure during in-hospital follow-ups (90-day mortality: 0%); 84 had intrahepatic organ failures (IH-OFs, defined by liver and/or coagulation failure) (90-day mortality: 22.0%); and 44 patients developed extra-hepatic organ failures (EH-OFs, defined by kidney, cerebral, circulation, and respiratory failure) on the basis of IH-OF with a 90-day mortality of 90.9%. On multivariable analysis by a Cox proportion hazard model, age, WBC, presence of IH-OF, and EH-OF all predicted 90-day death. A logistic regression analysis identified SIRS being associated with the development of EH-OF. Furthermore, IH-OF at admission and infections occurred during the hospital stay were shown to be another 2 potential risk factors.The clinical course of cirrhosis patients with acute hepatic injury was characterized by 3 consecutive stages (AHD, IH-OF, and EH-OF), which provided a clear risk stratification. The PIRO criteria provided an accurate frame for prognostication of those patients. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome may be a target for blocking the progression to the EH-OF stage. PMID:26632701

  13. Metadoxine in the treatment of acute and chronic alcoholism: a review.

    PubMed

    Addolorato, G; Ancona, C; Capristo, E; Gasbarrini, G

    2003-01-01

    Alcohol abuse and alcoholism are responsible for a wide variety of medical problems. The pharmaco-therapeutic aspect of alcoholism includes the use of drugs, with different actions and objectives. Among them, metadoxine seems to be of interest. Metadoxine is able to accelerate the elimination of alcohol from the blood and tissues, to help restore the functional structure of the liver and to relieve neuro-psychological disorders associated with alcohol intoxication. Metadoxine also seems to be safe; in more than 15 years of post-marketing surveillance only minor aspecific and reversible events were monitored in patients exposed to the treatment. In this review the preclinical and clinical results obtained using metadoxine in acute and chronic alcohol intoxication are reported. PMID:14611722

  14. Acute Thrombocytopenia: An Unusual Complication Occurring After Drug-Eluting Microspheres Transcatheter Hepatic Chemoembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Poggi, Guido; Quaretti, Pietro; Montagna, Benedetta Sottotetti, Federico Tagliaferri, Barbara Pozzi, Emma Amatu, Alessio Pagella, Chiara; Bernardo, Giovanni

    2011-02-15

    Image-guided transcatheter hepatic chemoembolization (TACE) is accepted worldwide as an effective treatment for patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma and liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumors, colorectal carcinomas, and uveal melanomas. Although the technique is relatively safe, it has been associated with several complications. We report the cases of two patients with colorectal liver metastases who developed acute thrombocytopenia a few hours after TACE. To our knowledge, acute thrombocytopenia occurring after TACE with drug-eluting microspheres has not yet been reported. Here we discuss the hypothetical etiopathogenetic mechanisms.

  15. Acute alcohol response phenotype in heavy social drinkers is robust and reproducible

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Daniel J.O.; Palmeri, Michael D.; King, Andrea C.

    2014-01-01

    Background In three previously published works (Brumback et al., 2007; King et al., 2011a; Roche and King 2010), our group characterized acute alcohol responses in a large group of young, heavy binge drinkers (n = 104) across a variety of subjective, eye tracking, and psychometric performance measures. Methods The primary goal of the current study was to directly replicate prior findings of alcohol response in heavy social drinkers in a second independent cohort (n = 104) using identical methodology. A secondary goal was to examine the effects of family history of alcohol use disorders on acute alcohol response in both samples. Participants attended two randomized laboratory sessions in which they consumed 0.8 g/kg alcohol or a taste-masked placebo. At preand post-drink time points, participants completed subjective scales, psychomotor performance and eye movement tasks, and provided salivary samples for cortisol determination. Results Results showed that the second cohort of heavy drinkers exhibited a nearly identical pattern of alcohol responses to the original cohort, including sensitivity to alcohol’s stimulating and hedonically rewarding effects during the rising BrAC limb, increases sedation during the declining BrAC limb, a lack of cortisol response, and psychomotor and eye tracking impairment that was most evident at peak BrAC. The magnitude and temporal pattern of these acute effects of alcohol in the second cohort were similar to the first cohort across all measures, with the exception of three eye movement measures: pro- and anti-saccade accuracy and anti-saccade velocity. Family history of alcohol use disorders did not affect alcohol response in the first cohort and this was replicated in the second cohort. Conclusions In sum, in two independent samples, we have demonstrated that heavy social drinkers display a consistent and reliable sensitivity to alcohol’s subjective effects and impairment of eye tracking and psychomotor performance, which is not affected by family history status. This acute alcohol response phenotype in heavy, frequent binge drinkers appears to be robust and reproducible. PMID:24117681

  16. Linoleic Acid Induced Acute Hepatitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bilal, Mohammad; Patel, Yogesh; Burkitt, Micheal; Babich, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Several dietary supplements used for weight loss have been reported to cause hepatotoxicity. Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) is a dietary supplement that has been shown to cause reduction in body fat mass. Here, we present the first case of CLA induced acute hepatitis in the United States and only the third case in the worldwide literature along with a brief review of the literature. PMID:26240766

  17. [Acute renal failure, intravascular hemolysis and toxic hepatitis caused by repeated use of rifampicin (case report)].

    PubMed

    Sefer, S; Ivanusa, M; Kes, P; Ratkovi?-Gusi?, I; Vasilj, D

    1999-01-01

    We report the case of a 57-year-old man treated with interrupted rifampicin therapy for urinary tract tuberculosis who experienced acute renal failure, intravascular hemolysis and toxic hepatitis. This combined adverse reactions are rare. Supportive treatment with dialysis and withdrawal of rifampicin result with complete recovery. Interrupted and intermittent therapy with rifampicin should be avoided and noncompliant patients should be given alternative treatment when possible. PMID:10437356

  18. Acute viral hepatitis E presenting with haemolytic anaemia and acute renal failure in a patient with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Laxmikant Ramkumarsingh; Aggarwal, Amitesh; Jain, Piyush; Rajpal, Surender; Agarwal, Mukul P

    2015-10-01

    The association of acute hepatitis E viral (HEV) infection with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency leading to extensive intravascular haemolysis is a very rare clinical entity. Here we discuss such a patient, who presented with acute HEV illness, developed severe intravascular haemolysis and unusually high levels of bilirubin, complicated by acute renal failure (ARF), and was later on found to have a deficiency of G6PD. The patient recovered completely with haemodialysis and supportive management. PMID:25500531

  19. Cytochrome P450 2E1 inhibition prevents hepatic carcinogenesis induced by diethylnitrosamine in alcohol-fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qinyuan; Lian, Fuzhi; Chavez, Pollyanna R.G.; Chung, Jayong; Ling, Wenhua; Qin, Hua; Seitz, Helmut K.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic alcohol ingestion increases hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), which is associated with hepatocarcinogenesis. We investigated whether treatment with chlormethiazole (CMZ), a CYP2E1 inhibitor, protects against alcohol-associated hepatic carcinogenesis in rats. Rats were fed either an ethanol liquid diet or a non-ethanol liquid diet, with or without CMZ for one and ten months. A single intraperitoneal injection of diethylnitrosamine (DEN, 20 mg/kg) was given to initiate hepatic carcinogenesis. CYP2E1 expression, inflammatory proteins, cell proliferation, protein-bound 4-HNE, etheno-DNA adducts, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), retinoid concentrations, and hepatic carcinogenesis were examined. Ethanol feeding for 1 month with DEN resulted in significantly increased hepatic CYP2E1 levels and increased nuclear accumulation of NF-?B protein and TNF-? expression, which were associated with increased cyclin D1 expression and p-GST positive altered hepatic foci. All of these changes induced by ethanol feeding were significantly inhibited by the one month CMZ treatment. At 10-months of treatment, hepatocellular adenomas were detected in ethanol-fed rats only, but neither in control rats nor in animals receiving ethanol and CMZ. The 8-OHdG formation was found to be significantly increased in ethanol fed animals and normalized with CMZ treatment. In addition, alcohol-reduced hepatic retinol and retinoic acid concentrations were restored by CMZ treatment to normal levels in the rats at 10 months of treatment. These data demonstrate that the inhibition of ethanol-induced CYP2E1 as a key pathogenic factor can counteract the tumor-promoting action of ethanol by decreasing TNF-? expression, NF-?B activation, and oxidative DNA damage as well as restoring normal hepatic levels of retinoic acid in DEN-treated rats. PMID:23543859

  20. Alcohol-induced defects in hepatic transcytosis may be explained by impaired dynein function.

    PubMed

    Groebner, Jennifer L; Fernandez, David J; Tuma, Dean J; Tuma, Pamela L

    2014-12-01

    Alcoholic liver disease has been clinically well described, but the molecular mechanisms leading to hepatotoxicity have not been fully elucidated. Previously, we determined that microtubules are hyperacetylated and more stable in ethanol-treated WIF-B cells, VL-17A cells, liver slices, and in livers from ethanol-fed rats. From our recent studies, we believe that these modifications can explain alcohol-induced defects in microtubule motor-dependent protein trafficking including nuclear translocation of a subset of transcription factors. Since cytoplasmic dynein/dynactin is known to mediate both microtubule-dependent translocation and basolateral to apical/canalicular transcytosis, we predicted that transcytosis is impaired in ethanol-treated hepatic cells. We monitored transcytosis of three classes of newly synthesized canalicular proteins in polarized, hepatic WIF-B cells, an emerging model system for the study of liver disease. As predicted, canalicular delivery of all proteins tested was impaired in ethanol-treated cells. Unlike in control cells, transcytosing proteins were observed in discrete sub-canalicular puncta en route to the canalicular surface that aligned along acetylated microtubules. We further determined that the stalled transcytosing proteins colocalized with dynein/dynactin in treated cells. No changes in vesicle association were observed for either dynein or dynactin in ethanol-treated cells, but significantly enhanced dynein binding to microtubules was observed. From these results, we propose that enhanced dynein binding to microtubules in ethanol-treated cells leads to decreased motor processivity resulting in vesicle stalling and in impaired canalicular delivery. Our studies also importantly indicate that modulating cellular acetylation levels with clinically tolerated deacetylase agonists may be a novel therapeutic strategy for treating alcoholic liver disease. PMID:25148871

  1. Activation of farnesoid X receptor attenuates hepatic injury in a murine model of alcoholic liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Weibin; Institutes of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 ; Zhu, Bo; Peng, Xiaomin; Zhou, Meiling; Jia, Dongwei; Gu, Jianxin; Institutes of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. •Activation of FXR attenuated alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis. •Activation of FXR attenuated cholestasis and oxidative stress in mouse liver. -- Abstract: Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a common cause of advanced liver disease, and considered as a major risk factor of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic cholestasis is a pathophysiological feature observed in all stages of ALD. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, and plays an essential role in the regulation of bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the role of FXR in the pathogenesis and progression of ALD remains largely unknown. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet or an isocaloric control diet. We used a specific agonist of FXR WAY-362450 to study the effect of pharmacological activation of FXR in alcoholic liver disease. In this study, we demonstrated that FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. Activation of FXR by specific agonist WAY-362450 protected mice from the development of ALD. We also found that WAY-362450 treatment rescued FXR activity, suppressed ethanol-induced Cyp2e1 up-regulation and attenuated oxidative stress in liver. Our results highlight a key role of FXR in the modulation of ALD development, and propose specific FXR agonists for the treatment of ALD patients.

  2. Hepatic steatosis depresses alpha-1-antitrypsin levels in human and rat acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Du, Jianjun; Yu, Pengfei; Bai, Bin; Zhao, Zhanwei; Wang, Shiqi; Zhu, Junjie; Feng, Quanxin; Gao, Yun; Zhao, Qingchuan; Liu, Chaoxu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis (HS) can exacerbate acute pancreatitis (AP). This study aimed to investigate the relation between ?1-antitrypsin (AAT) and acute pancreatitis when patients have HS. Using proteomic profiling, we identified 18 differently expressed proteins pots in the serum of rats with or without HS after surgical establishment of AP. AAT was found to be one of the significantly down-regulated proteins. AAT levels were significantly lower in hepatic steatosis acute pancreatitis (HSAP) than in non-HSAP (NHSAP) (P?acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE-II) scores were negatively correlated with serum AAT levels (r?=?-0.85, P?

  3. Hepatic steatosis depresses alpha-1-antitrypsin levels in human and rat acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Du, Jianjun; Yu, Pengfei; Bai, Bin; Zhao, Zhanwei; Wang, Shiqi; Zhu, Junjie; Feng, Quanxin; Gao, Yun; Zhao, Qingchuan; Liu, Chaoxu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis (HS) can exacerbate acute pancreatitis (AP). This study aimed to investigate the relation between ?1-antitrypsin (AAT) and acute pancreatitis when patients have HS. Using proteomic profiling, we identified 18 differently expressed proteins pots in the serum of rats with or without HS after surgical establishment of AP. AAT was found to be one of the significantly down-regulated proteins. AAT levels were significantly lower in hepatic steatosis acute pancreatitis (HSAP) than in non-HSAP (NHSAP) (P?acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE-II) scores were negatively correlated with serum AAT levels (r?=??0.85, P?

  4. Chronic alcohol intake up-regulates hepatic expressions of carotenoid cleavage enzymes and peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptors in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Excessive and chronic alcohol intake leads to a lower hepatic vitamin A status by interfering with vitamin A metabolism.Dietary provitamin A carotenoids can be converted into vitamin A mainly by carotenoid 15,15’-monooxygenase 1 (CMO1) and, to a lesser degree, carotenoid 9910’-monooxygenase 2 (CMO2)...

  5. Virological Characteristics of Acute Hepatitis B in Eastern India: Critical Differences with Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Neelakshi; Pal, Ananya; Das, Dipanwita; Saha, Debraj; Biswas, Avik; Bandopadhayay, Bhaswati; Chakraborti, Mandira; Ghosh, Mrinmoy; Chakravarty, Runu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) manifests high genetic variability and is classifiable into ten genotypes (A-J). HBV infection can lead to variable clinical outcomes, ranging from self-limiting acute hepatitis to active chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The present study characterizes HBV strains circulating among patients with acute (AHB) and chronic HBV infection (CHB). Among a total of 653 HBsAg positive cases, 40 manifested acute infection. After sequencing the surface(S), basal core promoter/pre-core(BCP/PC) and the X gene regions, phylogenetic tree was constructed using MEGA4 by neighbor-joining method. Statistical robustness was established with bootstrap analysis. Nucleotide diversity was determined by Shannon entropy per site using the Entropy program of the Los Alamos National Laboratories. Analyses of acute patients revealed that HBV/D2 is the major circulating sub-genotype and commonly associated with sexual promiscuity and the age group between15-30 years. Comparison of AHB and CHB patients revealed that HBeAg positivity, ALT levels and genotype D were significantly high in AHB, whereas CHB patients were predominantly male, had a high viral load, and were commonly associated with genotype C. The frequencies of mutations in the S, BCP/PC, and X gene were low in AHB as compared to CHB. Drug resistant mutations were not detectable in the polymerase gene of AHB. Average nucleotide diversity in AHB was considerably low as compared to CHB. Further, the highest average ?H (average difference in entropy between chronic and acute infection) was observed in the BCP/PC region implying that this region was most vulnerable to mutations upon HBV persistence, especially in case of genotype C. Additionally, among all substitutions, the A1762T and G1764A BCP mutations were the strongest indicators of chronicity. In conclusion, the study exhibits a general portrait of HBV strains circulating among acute hepatitis B patients in Eastern India and their intricate differences with chronic patients which should be useful from the clinical point of view. PMID:26571502

  6. Hepatitis A complicated with acute renal failure and high hepatocyte growth factor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Oe, Shinji; Shibata, Michihiko; Miyagawa, Koichiro; Honma, Yuichi; Hiura, Masaaki; Abe, Shintaro; Harada, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    A 58-year-old man was admitted to our hospital. Laboratory data showed severe liver injury and that the patient was positive for immunoglobulin M anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) antibodies. He was also complicated with severe renal dysfunction and had an extremely high level of serum hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Therefore, he was diagnosed with severe acute liver failure with acute renal failure (ARF) caused by HAV infection. Prognosis was expected to be poor because of complications by ARF and high serum HGF. However, liver and renal functions both improved rapidly without intensive treatment, and he was subsequently discharged from our hospital on the 21st hospital day. Although complication with ARF and high levels of serum HGF are both important factors predicting poor prognosis in acute liver failure patients, the present case achieved a favorable outcome. Endogenous HGF might play an important role as a regenerative effector in injured livers and kidneys. PMID:26327776

  7. Two sides of one coin: massive hepatic necrosis and progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Hong-Lei; Cai, Xiaobo; Yuan, Xiaodong; Liebe, Roman; Dooley, Steven; Li, Hai; Wang, Tai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Massive hepatic necrosis is a key event underlying acute liver failure, a serious clinical syndrome with high mortality. Massive hepatic necrosis in acute liver failure has unique pathophysiological characteristics including extremely rapid parenchymal cell death and removal. On the other hand, massive necrosis rapidly induces the activation of liver progenitor cells, the so-called “second pathway of liver regeneration.” The final clinical outcome of acute liver failure depends on whether liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration can efficiently restore parenchymal mass and function within a short time. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding massive hepatic necrosis and liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in patients with acute liver failure, the two sides of one coin. PMID:26136687

  8. Characterization of Acute and Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Osiowy, Carla; Giles, Elizabeth; Trubnikov, Max; Choudhri, Yogesh; Andonov, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Objective The prevalence and distribution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes in Canada is not known. Genotypic analysis may contribute to a better understanding of HBV strain distribution and transmission risk. Methods HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) positive samples of acute (n = 152) and chronic (n = 1533) HBV submitted for strain analysis or reference genotype testing between 2006 and 2012 were analyzed. The HBsAg coding region was amplified to determine the HBV genotype by INNO-LiPA assay or sequence analysis. Single and multivariate analyses were used to describe genotypes’ associations with known demographic and behavioral risk factors for 126 linked cases of acute HBV. Results Nine genotypes were detected (A to I), including mixed infections. Genotype C (HBV/C) dominated within chronic infections while HBV/D and A prevailed among acute HBV cases. History of incarceration and residing with a chronic HBV carrier or injection drug user were the most frequently reported risks for acute HBV infection. Over time, HBV/A increased among both acute and chronic infections, and HBV/C and HBV/D decreased among chronic infections. Conclusion Chronic and acute HBV genotypes in Canada differ in the relative distribution and their associations with known risk factors, suggesting different routes of transmission and clinical progression of infection. PMID:26406309

  9. Alcohol increases circulatory disease mortality in Russia: acute and chronic effects or misattribution of cause?

    PubMed Central

    Leon, David A; Shkolnikov, Vladimir M; McKee, Martin; Kiryanov, Nikolay; Andreev, Evgueny

    2010-01-01

    Background There is a consensus that the large fluctuations in mortality seen in Russia in the past two decades can be attributed to trends in alcohol consumption. However, the precise mechanisms linking alcohol to mortality from circulatory disease remain unclear. It has recently been argued that a substantial number of such deaths currently ascribed to cardiovascular disorders are misclassified cases of acute alcohol poisoning. Methods Analysis of routine mortality data and of a case–control study of mortality among working-age (25–54 years) men occurring in the Russian city of Izhevsk, west of the Ural mountains, 2003–05. Interviews were carried out with proxy informants for both the dead cases (N?=?1750) and the controls (N?=?1750) selected at random from a population register. Mortality was analysed according to indicators of alcohol problems. Results Hazardous drinking was associated with an increased risk of death from circulatory diseases as a whole [odds ratio (OR)?=?4.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.23, 5.31] adjusted for age, smoking and education. The association with alcoholic cardiomyopathy was particularly strong (OR?=?15.7, 95% CI 9.5, 25.9). Although there was no association with deaths from myocardial infarction (MI; OR?=?1.17, 95% CI 0.59, 2.32), there was a strong association with the aggregate of all other ischaemic heart disease (IHD; OR?=?4.04, 95% CI 2.79, 5.84). Stronger associations for each of these causes (other than MI) were seen with whether or not the man had drunk very heavily in the previous week. However, associations also remained when analyses were restricted to subjects with no evidence of recent heavy drinking, suggesting that misclassification of acute alcohol poisonings is unlikely to explain these overall associations. Conclusion Taken as a whole, the available evidence suggests that the positive association of alcohol with increased cardiovascular disease mortality may be best explained as being the result of a combination of chronic and acute alcohol consumption resulting in alcohol-related cardiac disorders, especially cardiomyopathy, rather than being due to misclassification of acute alcohol poisoning. Further work is required to understand the mechanisms underlying the link between heavy alcohol consumption and deaths classified as being due to IHD (other than MI). PMID:20591986

  10. Differences in Acute Alcohol-Induced Behavioral Responses Among Zebrafish Populations

    E-print Network

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    Differences in Acute Alcohol-Induced Behavioral Responses Among Zebrafish Populations Robert Gerlai, Fahad Ahmad, and Sonal Prajapati Background: With the arsenal of genetic tools available for zebrafish developmental disorders to cancer. Interest in the behavior and brain function of zebrafish is also increasing

  11. Acute Alcohol Effects on Repetition Priming and Word Recognition Memory with Equivalent Memory Cues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Suchismita; Bates, Marsha E.

    2006-01-01

    Acute alcohol intoxication effects on memory were examined using a recollection-based word recognition memory task and a repetition priming task of memory for the same information without explicit reference to the study context. Memory cues were equivalent across tasks; encoding was manipulated by varying the frequency of occurrence (FOC) of words…

  12. Acute Hepatic Insulin Resistance Contributes to Hyperglycemia in Rats Following Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiali; Liu, Baoshan; Han, Hui; Yuan, Qiuhuan; Xue, Mengyang; Xu, Feng; Chen, Yuguo

    2015-01-01

    Although hyperglycemia is common in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI), the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Insulin signaling plays a key role in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. In this study, we test the hypothesis that rapid alteration of insulin signaling pathways could be a potential contributor to acute hyperglycemia after MI. Male rats were used to produce MI by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Plasma glucose and insulin levels were significantly higher in MI rats than those in controls. Insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) was reduced significantly in the liver tissue of MI rats compared with controls, followed by decreased attachment of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) p85 subunit with IRS1 and Akt phosphorylation. However, insulin-stimulated signaling was not altered significantly in skeletal muscle after MI. The relative mRNA levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and G6Pase were slightly higher in the liver tissue of MI rats than those in controls. Rosiglitazone (ROSI) markedly restored hepatic insulin signaling, inhibited gluconeogenesis and reduced plasma glucose levels in MI rats. Insulin resistance develops rapidly in liver but not skeletal muscle after MI, which contributes to acute hyperglycemia. Therapy aimed at potentiating hepatic insulin signaling may be beneficial for MI-induced hyperglycemia. PMID:25730774

  13. Acute Hepatic Insulin Resistance Contributes to Hyperglycemia in Rats Following Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiali; Liu, Baoshan; Han, Hui; Yuan, Qiuhuan; Xue, Mengyang; Xu, Feng; Chen, Yuguo

    2015-01-01

    Although hyperglycemia is common in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI), the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Insulin signaling plays a key role in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. In this study, we test the hypothesis that rapid alteration of insulin signaling pathways could be a potential contributor to acute hyperglycemia after MI. Male rats were used to produce MI by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Plasma glucose and insulin levels were significantly higher in MI rats than those in controls. Insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) was reduced significantly in the liver tissue of MI rats compared with controls, followed by decreased attachment of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) p85 subunit with IRS1 and Akt phosphorylation. However, insulin-stimulated signaling was not altered significantly in skeletal muscle after MI. The relative mRNA levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and G6Pase were slightly higher in the liver tissue of MI rats than those in controls. Rosiglitazone (ROSI) markedly restored hepatic insulin signaling, inhibited gluconeogenesis and reduced plasma glucose levels in MI rats. Insulin resistance develops rapidly in liver but not skeletal muscle after MI, which contributes to acute hyperglycemia. Therapy aimed at potentiating hepatic insulin signaling may be beneficial for MI-induced hyperglycemia. PMID:25730774

  14. Altered benzodiazepine receptor sensitivity in alcoholism: a study with fMRI and acute lorazepam challenge.

    PubMed

    Schlösser, Ralf G M; Gesierich, Thomas; Wagner, Gerd; Bolz, Matthias; Gründer, Gerhard; Dielentheis, Thomas F; Scherb, Claudius; Stoeter, Peter

    2007-04-15

    Previous studies suggested altered sensitivity of the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor system in alcoholic patients. Expanding on these findings, the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study aimed to assess whether a differential modulation of cognitive brain activation by an acute GABAergic drug challenge could be detected in patients with alcoholism. Eight detoxified male patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for alcohol dependence and nine healthy male control subjects were studied with fMRI while performing a 2-back working memory task. The fMRI scans were performed 1 h after intravenous administration of saline and again 1 h after 0.03 mg/kg lorazepam I.V. After saline, a task x group interaction effect with higher task activation in alcoholic patients in the left cerebellum and the right prefrontal cortex emerged. Additionally, a differential task x drug x group interaction was identified in the right cerebellum with more pronounced reduction in cognitive activation after lorazepam in the patient group. A significant correlation between lorazepam sensitivity and duration of alcohol dependence was detected. The present findings are in line with previous studies suggesting disrupted prefrontal-cerebellar activation with potential compensatory hyperactivation of the compromised brain networks in alcoholism. Moreover, the results suggest enhanced responsivity to an acute GABAergic challenge in the right cerebellum with disease-related disruption of cerebellar functional integrity. PMID:17337165

  15. Acute withdrawal, protracted abstinence and negative affect in alcoholism: Are they linked?

    PubMed Central

    Heilig, M.; Egli, M.; Crabbe, J.C.; Becker, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    The role of withdrawal-related phenomena in development and maintenance of alcohol addiction remains under debate. A “self-medication” framework postulates that emotional changes are induced by a history of alcohol use, persist into abstinence, and are a major factor in maintaining alcoholism. This view initially focused on negative emotional states during early withdrawal: these are pronounced, occur in the vast majority of alcohol dependent patients, and are characterized by depressed mood and elevated anxiety. This concept lost popularity with the realization that, in most patients, these symptoms abate over 3 – 6 weeks of abstinence, while relapse risk persists long beyond this period. More recently, animal data have established that a prolonged history of alcohol dependence induces more subtle neuroadaptations. These confer altered emotional processing that persists long into protracted abstinence. The resulting behavioral phenotype is characterized by excessive voluntary alcohol intake and increased behavioral sensitivity to stress. Emerging human data support the clinical relevance of negative emotionality for protracted abstinence and relapse. These developments prompt a series of research questions: 1) Are processes observed during acute withdrawal, while transient in nature, mechanistically related to those that remain during protracted abstinence? 2) Is susceptibility to negative emotionality in acute withdrawal in part due to heritable factors, similar to what animal models have indicated for susceptibility to physical aspects of withdrawal? 3) To what extent is susceptibility to negative affect that persists into protracted abstinence heritable? PMID:20148778

  16. The microbiota regulates susceptibility to Fas-mediated acute hepatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Celaj, Stela; Gleeson, Michael W.; Deng, Jie; O'Toole, George A.; Hampton, Thomas H.; Toft, Martin F.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Sogin, Mitchell L.; Putra, Juan; Suriawinata, Arief A.; Gorham, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Whereas a significant role for intestinal microbiota in affecting the pathogenesis and progression of chronic hepatic diseases is well documented, the contribution of the intestinal flora to acute liver injury has not been extensively addressed. Elucidating the influence of the intestinal microbiota on acute liver inflammation would be important for better understanding the transition from acute injury to chronic liver disease. Using the Concanavalin A (ConA)-induced liver injury model in laboratory mice, we show that the severity of acute hepatic damage varies greatly among genetically identical mice raised in different environments and harboring distinct microbiota. Through reconstitution of germ-free (GF) mice, and the co-housing of conventional mice, we provide direct evidence that manipulation of the intestinal flora alters susceptibility to ConA-induced liver injury. Through deep sequencing of the fecal microbiome, we observe that the relative abundance of Ruminococcaceae, a Gram(+) family within the class Clostridia, but distinct from segmented filamentous bacteria, is positively associated with the degree of liver damage. Searching for the underlying mechanism(s) that regulate susceptibility to ConA, we provide evidence that the extent of liver injury following triggering of the death receptor Fas varies greatly as a function of the microbiota. We demonstrate that the extent of Fas induced liver injury increases in GF mice after microbiota reconstitution, and decreases in conventionally raised mice following reduction of intestinal bacterial load, by antibiotic treatment. We also show that the regulation of sensitivity to Fas induced liver injury is dependent upon the Toll-Like Receptor signaling molecule MyD88. Conclusion The status and composition of the intestinal microbiota determine the susceptibility to ConA-induced acute liver injury. The microbiota acts as a rheostat, actively modulating the extent of liver damage in response to Fas triggering. PMID:25068658

  17. The microbiota regulates susceptibility to Fas-mediated acute hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Celaj, Stela; Gleeson, Michael W; Deng, Jie; O'Toole, George A; Hampton, Thomas H; Toft, Martin F; Morrison, Hilary G; Sogin, Mitchell L; Putra, Juan; Suriawinata, Arief A; Gorham, James D

    2014-09-01

    Whereas a significant role for intestinal microbiota in affecting the pathogenesis and progression of chronic hepatic diseases is well documented, the contribution of the intestinal flora to acute liver injury has not been extensively addressed. Elucidating the influence of the intestinal microbiota on acute liver inflammation would be important for better understanding the transition from acute injury to chronic liver disease. Using the Concanavalin A (ConA)-induced liver injury model in laboratory mice, we show that the severity of acute hepatic damage varies greatly among genetically identical mice raised in different environments and harboring distinct microbiota. Through reconstitution of germ-free (GF) mice, and the co-housing of conventional mice, we provide direct evidence that manipulation of the intestinal flora alters susceptibility to ConA-induced liver injury. Through deep sequencing of the fecal microbiome, we observe that the relative abundance of Ruminococcaceae, a Gram(+) family within the class Clostridia, but distinct from segmented filamentous bacteria, is positively associated with the degree of liver damage. Searching for the underlying mechanism(s) that regulate susceptibility to ConA, we provide evidence that the extent of liver injury following triggering of the death receptor Fas varies greatly as a function of the microbiota. We demonstrate that the extent of Fas-induced liver injury increases in GF mice after microbiota reconstitution, and decreases in conventionally raised mice following reduction in intestinal bacterial load, by antibiotic treatment. We also show that the regulation of sensitivity to Fas-induced liver injury is dependent upon the toll-like receptor signaling molecule MyD88. In conclusion, the status and composition of the intestinal microbiota determine the susceptibility to ConA-induced acute liver injury. The microbiota acts as a rheostat, actively modulating the extent of liver damage in response to Fas triggering. PMID:25068658

  18. Biopsy-proven drug-induced tubulointerstitial nephritis in a patient with acute kidney injury and alcoholic severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Wakako; Mori, Takayasu; Nagahama, Kiyotaka; Tamura, Teiichi

    2013-01-01

    We report a 49-year-old man with alcoholic severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) complicated by drug-induced acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (DI-AIN). Oliguria persisted and became anuric again on day 17 despite improvement of pancreatitis. He presented rash, fever and eosinophilia from day 20. Renal biopsy was performed for dialysis-dependent acute kidney injury (AKI), DI-AIN was revealed, and prompt use of corticosteroids fully restored his renal function. This diagnosis might be missed because it is difficult to perform renal biopsy in such a clinical situation. If the patient's general condition allows, renal biopsy should be performed and reversible AKI must be distinguished from many cases of irreversible AKI complicated by SAP. This is the first report of biopsy-proven DI-AIN associated with SAP, suggesting the importance of biopsy for distinguishing DI-AIN in persisting AKI of SAP. PMID:23645698

  19. A case of thyroid storm complicated by acute hepatitis due to propylthiouracil treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Nazhri; Sze, Candy; Waterhouse, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Summary A 57-year-old female presented 17 days after treatment with radioactive iodine (RAI) for difficult-to-control hyperthyroidism. She was febrile, had a sinus tachycardia, and was clinically thyrotoxic. Her thyroid function tests showed a suppressed TSH <0.02?mU/l, with free thyroxine (FT4) >75?pmol/l and total triiodothyronine (TT3) 6.0?nmol/l. She was diagnosed with thyroid storm and was managed with i.v. fluids, propylthiouracil (PTU) 200?mg four times a day, prednisolone 30?mg once daily and propanolol 10?mg three times a day. She gradually improved over 2 weeks and was discharged home on PTU with ? blockade. On clinic review 10 days later, it was noted that, although she was starting to feel better, she had grossly abnormal liver function (alanine transaminase (ALT) 852?U/l, bilirubin 46??mol/l, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) 303?U/l, international normalized ratio (INR) 0.9, platelets 195×109/l). She was still mildly thyrotoxic (TSH <0.02?mU/l, FT4 31?pmol/l, TT3 1.3?nmol/l). She was diagnosed with acute hepatitis secondary to treatment with PTU. Ultrasound showed mild hepatic steatosis. PTU was stopped and she was managed with fluids and prednisolone 60?mg once daily and continued ? blockade. Her liver function gradually improved over 10 days (bilirubin 9??mol/l, ALT 164?U/l, ALP 195?U/l, INR 0.9, platelets 323×109/l) with conservative management and had normalised by clinic review 3 weeks later. This case highlights the potentially fatal, but rare, complications associated with both RAI and PTU, namely, thyroid storm and acute hepatitis respectively. Learning points Thyroid storm is an important, albeit rare, endocrinological emergency.Thyroid storm following RAI treatment is extremely rare.Management is with i.v. fluids, ? blockade, anti-thyroid drugs and steroids.High dose glucocorticoid steroids can block the peripheral conversion of T4 to active T3.Liver dysfunction, acute hepatitis and potential hepatic failure are significant adverse drug reactions known to occur with PTU treatment. Supervising clinicians should be vigilant for evidence of this developing and intervene accordingly.Clinicians need to be aware of possible interactions between regular paracetamol use and PTU in predisposing to liver impairment. PMID:26279851

  20. Novel Management of Acute or Secondary Biliary Liver Conditions Using Hepatically Differentiated Human Dental Pulp Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ishkitiev, Nikolay; Imai, Toshio; Tanaka, Tomoko; Fushimi, Naho; Mitev, Vanyo; Okada, Mio; Tominaga, Noriko; Ono, Sachie; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The current definitive treatment for acute or chronic liver condition, that is, cirrhosis, is liver transplantation from a limited number of donors, which might cause complications after donation. Hence, bone marrow stem cell transplantation has been developed, but the risk of carcinogenesis remains. We have recently developed a protocol for hepatic differentiation of CD117+ stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED). In the present study, we examine whether SHED hepatically differentiated (hd) in vitro could be used to treat acute liver injury (ALI) and secondary biliary cirrhosis. The CD117+ cell fraction was magnetically separated from SHED and then differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro. The cells were transplanted into rats with either ALI or induced secondary biliary cirrhosis. Engraftment of human liver cells was determined immunohistochemically and by in situ hybridization. Recovery of liver function was examined by means of histochemical and serological tests. Livers of transplanted animals were strongly positive for human immunohistochemical factors, and in situ hybridization confirmed engraftment of human hepatocytes. The tests for recovery of liver function confirmed the presence of human hepatic markers in the animals' blood serum and lack of fibrosis and functional integration of transplanted human cells into livers. No evidence of malignancy was found. We show that in vitro hdSHED engraft morphologically and functionally into the livers of rats having acute injury or secondary biliary cirrhosis. SHED are readily accessible adult stem cells, capable of proliferating in large numbers before differentiating in vitro. This makes SHED an appropriate and safe stem cell source for regenerative medicine. PMID:25234861

  1. Hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from a hepatitis A infection, that person has immunity to the virus, meaning he or she will ... from the disease and may develop a natural immunity to future hepatitis B infections. But some people ...

  2. Metadoxine improves the three- and six-month survival rates in patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Higuera-de la Tijera, Fátima; Servín-Caamaño, Alfredo I; Serralde-Zúñiga, Aurora E; Cruz-Herrera, Javier; Pérez-Torres, Eduardo; Abdo-Francis, Juan M; Salas-Gordillo, Francisco; Pérez-Hernández, José L

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of metadoxine (MTD) on the 3- and 6-mo survival of patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis (AH). METHODS: This study was an open-label clinical trial, performed at the “Hospital General de México, Dr. Eduardo Liceaga”. We randomized 135 patients who met the criteria for severe AH into the following groups: 35 patients received prednisone (PDN) 40 mg/d, 35 patients received PDN+MTD 500 mg three times daily, 33 patients received pentoxifylline (PTX) 400 mg three times daily, and 32 patients received PTX+MTD 500 mg three times daily. The duration of the treatment for all of the groups was 30 d. RESULTS: In the groups treated with the MTD, the survival rate was higher at 3 mo (PTX+MTD 59.4% vs PTX 33.3%, P = 0.04; PDN+MTD 68.6% vs PDN 20%, P = 0.0001) and at 6 mo (PTX+MTD 50% vs PTX 18.2%, P = 0.01; PDN+MTD 48.6% vs PDN 20%, P = 0.003) than in the groups not treated with MTD. A relapse in alcohol intake was the primary independent factor predicting mortality at 6 mo. The patients receiving MTD maintained greater abstinence than those who did not receive it (74.5% vs 59.4%, P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: MTD improves the 3- and 6-mo survival rates in patients with severe AH. Alcohol abstinence is a key factor for survival in these patients. The patients who received the combination therapy with MTD were more likely to maintain abstinence than those who received monotherapy with either PDN or PTX. PMID:25945012

  3. Acute Psychotic Symptoms due to Benzydamine Hydrochloride Abuse with Alcohol.

    PubMed

    Acar, Yahya Ayhan; Kalkan, Mustafa; Cetin, R?dvan; Cevik, Erdem; C?nar, Orhan

    2014-01-01

    Benzydamine hydrochloride is a locally acting nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Benzydamine hydrochloride overdose can cause stimulation of central nervous system, hallucinations, and psychosis. We presented a young man with psychotic symptoms due to benzydamine hydrochloride abuse. He received a total dose of 1000?mg benzydamine hydrochloride with alcohol for its hallucinative effects. Misuse of benzydamine hydrochloride must be considered in differential diagnosis of first-episode psychosis and physicians should consider possibility of abuse in prescribing. PMID:25343054

  4. Acute Psychotic Symptoms due to Benzydamine Hydrochloride Abuse with Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Yahya Ayhan; Kalkan, Mustafa; Çetin, R?dvan; Çevik, Erdem; Ç?nar, Orhan

    2014-01-01

    Benzydamine hydrochloride is a locally acting nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Benzydamine hydrochloride overdose can cause stimulation of central nervous system, hallucinations, and psychosis. We presented a young man with psychotic symptoms due to benzydamine hydrochloride abuse. He received a total dose of 1000?mg benzydamine hydrochloride with alcohol for its hallucinative effects. Misuse of benzydamine hydrochloride must be considered in differential diagnosis of first-episode psychosis and physicians should consider possibility of abuse in prescribing. PMID:25343054

  5. Differential Effects of Acute Alcohol on Prepulse Inhibition and Event-Related Potentials in Adolescent and Adult Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pian, Jerry P.; Criado, Jose R.; Ehlers, Cindy L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated that adolescent and adult rats show differential sensitivity to many of the acute effects of alcohol. We recently reported evidence of developmental differences in the effects of acute alcohol on the cortical electroencephalogram (EEG). However, it is unclear whether developmental differences are also observed in other neurophysiological and neurobehavioral measurements known to be sensitive to alcohol exposure. The present study determined the age-related effects of acute alcohol on behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) responses to acoustic startle (AS) and prepulse inhibition (PPI). Methods Male adolescent and adult Wistar rats were implanted with cortical recording electrodes. The effects of acute alcohol (0.0, 0.75, and 1.5 g/kg) on behavioral and ERP responses to AS and PPI were assessed. Results Acute alcohol (0.75 and 1.5 g/kg) significantly reduced the behavioral and electrophysiological response to AS in adolescent and adult rats. Both 0.75 and 1.5 g/kg alcohol significantly enhanced the behavioral response to PPI in adolescent, but not in adult rats. During prepulse+pulse trials, 1.5 g/kg alcohol significantly increased the N10 pulse response in the adolescent frontal cortex. Acute alcohol (0.75 and 1.5 g/kg) also increased the N1 ERP pulse response to prepulse stimuli in frontal and parietal cortices in adult rats, but not in adolescent rats. Conclusions These data suggest that alcohol’s effect on behavioral and electrophysiological indices of AS do not differ between adults and adolescents whereas developmental stage does appear to significantly modify alcohol influenced response to PPI. PMID:18828807

  6. Severe acute hepatitis related to hydroxychloroquine in a woman with mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Giner Galvañ, Vicente; Oltra, María Rosa; Rueda, Diego; Esteban, María José; Redón, Josep

    2007-06-01

    Antimalarial drugs are used for the control of mild manifestations of autoimmune diseases due to their low toxicity. Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), a alpha-hydroxylated derivative of chloroquine, is usually preferred because of its higher tolerability. Mild and unspecific gastrointestinal symptoms are the main secondary effects related to HCQ use. Less than 1% of subjects show liver enzyme increase, although the percentage can be as high as 50% in subjects with chronic liver disease. A woman with mixed connective tissue disease who developed a reversible acute hepatitis shortly after the initiation of low-dose HCQ is presented. Two previous cases of patients with acute liver failure have previously been published. All three cases have been reported in the absence of previous liver disease. It seems to be a dose-dependent, idiosyncratic, and molecule-specific toxic effect and must be considered, taking into account the potential bad prognosis. PMID:16575495

  7. Initial sensitivity, acute tolerance and alcohol consumption in four inbred strains of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Khanna, J.M.; Kalant, H.; Sharma, H.; Le, A.D. )

    1989-02-09

    Initial sensitivity to ethanol (2g/kg, i.p.) was determined in a jumping test in separated groups of spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats as well as in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) and Dahl salt-resistant (SR) rats. Acute tolerance was studied in the same strains, by measuring the response to a second dose (0.7 g/kg) as soon as they had recovered from the first. One week later, voluntary consumption of ethanol was studied in all groups. SH rats were found to be more sensitive than WKY, but there was no difference in acute tolerance development between these two strains. SH rats, however, drank significantly more alcohol than the WKY in both the two-bottle choice paradigm and the limited access model. Similarly, SS rats drank significantly more alcohol than the SR rats, although SS rats were found to be more sensitive to ethanol than SR. There was again no difference in acute tolerance development between these two strains. These observations suggest that difference in alcohol consumption in these strains cannot be accounted for by significant differences in acute tolerance or in initial sensitivity to ethanol.

  8. Assessing candidacy for acute hepatitis C treatment among active young injection drug users: a case-series report.

    PubMed

    Asher, Alice; Lum, Paula J; Page, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Treatment for acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has significantly better outcomes than treatment for chronic infection. The short window of the acute period poses challenges for young injection drug users (IDU), who are at highest risk of HCV infection, to demonstrate treatment candidacy. We recruited patients with acute HCV from a prospective cohort study to examine clinical and behavioral issues related to treatment candidacy. We report on outcomes and how nursing case management affected candidacy. All five acutely-infected participants reported daily drug use at baseline. All established primary care and decreased their drug use. None received treatment for their acute infection; one was treated within 12 months of infection. Establishing treatment candidacy for young IDU in the acute phase involves various health domains. An acute infection's short period poses many challenges to establishing candidacy, but it is a window of opportunity to engage young IDU in health care. PMID:21497111

  9. Assessing Candidacy for Acute Hepatitis C Treatment Among Active Young Injection Drug Users: A Case-Series Report

    PubMed Central

    Asher, Alice; Lum, Paula J.; Page, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    Treatment for acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has significantly better outcomes than treatment for chronic infection. The short window of the acute period poses challenges for young injection drug users (IDU), who are at highest risk of HCV infection, to demonstrate treatment candidacy. We recruited patients with acute HCV from a prospective cohort study to examine clinical and behavioral issues related to treatment candidacy. We report on outcomes and how nursing case management affected candidacy. All 5 acutely-infected participants reported daily drug use at baseline. All established primary care and decreased their drug use. None received treatment for their acute infection; one was treated within 12 months of infection. . Establishing treatment candidacy for young IDU in the acute phase involves various health domains. Acute infection's short period poses many challenges to establishing candidacy, but it is a window of opportunity to engage young IDU in health care. PMID:21497111

  10. Imatinib-induced Severe Hepatitis in a 9-Year-old Girl With Philadelphia Chromosome-positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryoko; Kobayashi, Chie; Sakai, Aiko; Fukushima, Hiroko; Tagawa, Manabu; Satomi, Kaishi; Nanmoku, Toru; Sumazaki, Ryo; Fukushima, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Imatinib mesylate has dramatically improved the outcome of children with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph* ALL) and is now included as first-line therapy. Uncommon adverse effects of this drug for pediatric use, however, are largely unknown. We report the first case of a 9-year-old child who developed severe acute hepatitis with grade 4 transaminases and bilirubin elevation during imatinib treatment for Ph* ALL. Liver biopsy showed extensive lobular and pericentral necrosis of hepatocytes. Liver function recovered after discontinuing imatinib with a 4-week prednisolone. Extensive hepatic necrosis should be considered not only in adults but also in children under imatinib administration. PMID:25929609

  11. Behavioral economic analysis of stress effects on acute motivation for alcohol.

    PubMed

    Owens, Max M; Ray, Lara A; MacKillop, James

    2015-01-01

    Due to issues of definition and measurement, the heavy emphasis on subjective craving in the measurement of acute motivation for alcohol and other drugs remains controversial. Behavioral economic approaches have increasingly been applied to better understand acute drug motivation, particularly using demand curve modeling via purchase tasks to characterize the perceived reinforcing value of the drug. This approach has focused on using putatively more objective indices of motivation, such as units of consumption, monetary expenditure, and price sensitivity. To extend this line of research, the current study used an alcohol purchase task to determine if, compared to a neutral induction, a personalized stress induction would increase alcohol demand in a sample of heavy drinkers. The stress induction significantly increased multiple measures of the reinforcing value of alcohol to the individual, including consumption at zero price (intensity), the maximum total amount of money spent on alcohol (Omax), the first price where consumption was reduced to zero (breakpoint), and the general responsiveness of consumption to increases in price (elasticity). These measures correlated only modestly with craving and mood. Self-reported income was largely unrelated to demand but moderated the influence of stress on Omax. Moderation based on CRH-BP genotype (rs10055255) was present for Omax, with T allele homozygotes exhibiting more pronounced increases in response to stress. These results provide further support for a behavioral economic approach to measuring acute drug motivation. The findings also highlight the potential relevance of income and genetic factors in understanding state effects on the perceived reinforcing value of alcohol. PMID:25413719

  12. Acute Increase in Hepatic Arterial Flow During TIPS Identified by Intravascular Flow Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Radeleff, Boris Sommer, Christof-Matthias; Heye, Tobias; Lopez-Benitez, Ruben; Sauer, Peter; Schmidt, Jan; Kauczor, Haus-Ulrich; Richter, Goetz Martin

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate alterations of hepatic arterial flow during transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt (TIPS) applying intravascular Doppler sonography. This prospective monocenter study included 25 patients with liver cirrhosis (alcohol induced [n = 19], chronic hepatitis associated [n = 3], primary biliary cirrhosis associated [n = 1], and cryptogenic [n = 2]) successfully treated with TIPS. All patients underwent intravascular hepatic arterial flow measurements during TIPS using an endoluminal flow sensor. The average arterial peak velocity (APV) and the maximum arterial peak velocity (MPV) were registered. Twenty-two patients (88%) showed increased APV, one patient (4%) showed unaffected APV, and two patients (8%) showed decreased APV after TIPS. The average portosystemic pressure gradient decreased significantly, from 22.0 {+-} 5.1 mmHg before TIPS to 11.0 {+-} 4.1 mmHg after TIPS (-50.0%; p < 0.0001). The average APV increased significantly, from 41.9 {+-} 17.8 cm/s before TIPS to 60.7 {+-} 19.0 cm/s after TIPS (+44.9%; p < 0.0001). The average MPV increased significantly, from 90.8 {+-} 31.7 cm/s before TIPS to 112.6 {+-} 34.9 cm/s after TIPS (+24.0%; p = 0.0002). These changes in perfusion set in within seconds after TIPS tract formation in all the patients with increased APV. We conclude that TIPS-induced portosystemic decompression leads to a significant increase in hepatic arterial flow. The changes occurred within seconds, suggesting a reflex-like mechanism.

  13. Early warning and clinical outcome prediction of acute-on-chronic hepatitis B liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, En-Qiang; Zeng, Fan; Zhou, Ling-Yun; Tang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) associated acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is an increasingly recognized fatal liver disease encompassing a severe acute exacerbation of liver function in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Despite the introduction of an artificial liver support system and antiviral therapy, the short-term prognosis of HBV-ACLF is still extremely poor unless emergency liver transplantation is performed. In such a situation, stopping or slowing the progression of CHB to ACLF at an early stage is the most effective way of reducing the morbidity and mortality of HBV-ACLF. It is well-known that the occurrence and progression of HBV-ACLF is associated with many factors, and the outcomes of HBV-ACLF patients can be significantly improved if timely and appropriate interventions are provided. In this review, we highlight recent developments in early warning and clinical outcome prediction in patients with HBV-ACLF and provide an outlook for future research in this field. PMID:26576085

  14. Effect of acute and repeated selenium treatment on hepatic monooxygenase enzyme activity in male rats.

    PubMed

    Schnell, R C; Early, J L; Deimling, M J; Merrick, B A; Davies, M H

    1983-06-01

    The effect of sodium selenite administered acutely or repeatedly on the biochemical components of the hepatic microsomal monooxygenase enzyme system was examined in male rats. 72 h following acute administration of selenium (2.4 mg Se/kg, i.p.), there was a significant decrease in ethylmorphine-N-demethylase activity and cytochrome P-450 levels but no change in aniline hydroxylase or NADPH cytochrome c reductase activity. Following repeated administration of selenite in the drinking water (1, 2, or 4 ppm Se) for 30 days, there was no alteration in any of the parameters measured. Following the in vitro additions of selenite to microsomes obtained from untreated rats, ethylmorphine-N-demethylase and aniline hydroxylase activities were inhibited at selenium concentrations of 10(-4) M or greater, but the inhibition achieved was less than 50%. No alterations in cytochrome P-450 levels were observed. These results indicate that selenium is a rather weak, indirect, and substrate-specific inhibitor of the hepatic monooxygenase enzyme system. PMID:6414110

  15. Alcohol concentration determines the type of atrial arrhythmia induced in a porcine model of acute alcoholic intoxication.

    PubMed

    Anadon, M J; Almendral, J; González, P; Zaballos, M; Delcan, J L; De Guevara, J L

    1996-11-01

    Alcohol abuse has long been suspected clinically to cause paroxysmal atrial tachyarrhythmias. However, such a relationship has never been conclusively proven, partly due to the lack of experimental evidence. Although atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common atrial arrhythmia attributed to acute alcoholic ingestion, atrial flutter has occasionally been noted. We analyzed the possible role of alcohol in initiation and/or maintenance of a variety of atrial tachyarrhythmias in a closed-chest porcine model. Nine pigs underwent nine endocardial right atrial stimulation protocols (RASP) at baseline and 17 RASPs after increasing doses of ethanol (first infusion 1,230 mg/kg, second infusion 870 mg/kg) by means of one multipolar catheter advanced under heavy sedation from the femoral vein. Each RASP included 1, 2, and 3 extrastimuli, and rapid pacing at 5 times diastolic threshold. Venous ethanol concentrations were measured (HPGC method) every 10 minutes and at the time of arrhythmia induction. Atrial tachyarrhythmias were induced in 4 of 9 baseline RASPs, and lasted for a mean of 21 seconds, and in 16 of 17 RASPs after alcohol lasting for a mean of 357 seconds. Only fibrillation was observed at the baseline RASP. The atrial tachyarrhythmias induced after alcohol were AF in 11 RASPs and atrial flutter in 5 RASPs (in 5 animals). The mean venous ethanol concentration at the time of the longest arrhythmia induced for each RASP were 200 +/- 89 mg/dL for RASP inducing fibrillation and 292 +/- 40 mg/dL for RASP inducing flutter (P < 0.05). Flutter tended to be sustained (> 1 minute in duration) more often than fibrillation (4 of 5 flutter vs 2 of 11 fibrillation P < 0.05). In three experiments, atrial flutter persisted for > 10 minutes and was terminated by overdrive atrial pacing. We concluded: (1) in this closed-chest porcine model, an ethanol infusion facilitates a variety of atrial arrhythmias related to the ethanol concentration; (2) flutter tended to be sustained, and its termination by overdrive pacing suggests the possibility of an alcohol induced reentrant mechanism; and (3) the higher concentration required for atrial flutter, exceeding that usually seen in humans, may help to explain the rarity of atrial flutter in clinical alcohol intoxication. PMID:8945078

  16. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    Lupoid hepatitis; Chronic acute liver disease ... This form of hepatitis is an autoimmune disease . The body's immune system cannot tell the difference between healthy body tissue and harmful, outside ...

  17. Effects of Acute Alcohol Consumption in Older and Younger Adults: Perceived Impairment Versus Psychomotor Performance*

    PubMed Central

    Gilbertson, Rebecca; Ceballos, Natalie A.; Prather, Robert; Nixon, Sara Jo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Perceived impairment and psychomotor performance following acute alcohol administration in older (ages 50-74, n = 42; 22 male) and younger (ages 25-35, n = 26; 12 male) adults were investigated in this study. Method: Double-blind, placebo-controlled alcohol administration techniques were designed to produce peak levels of breath alcohol concentration consistent with an episode of social drinking (40 mg/100 ml). Behavioral measures (Trail Making Test, Forms A and B), as well as measures of self-reported perceived intoxication and impairment, were administered on the ascending and descending limbs at common time points after beverage ingestion. Results: Results indicated that psychomotor performance differences did not parallel self-reported levels of perceived impairment. Relative to younger adults, older adults exhibited performance deficits on the ascending limb while simultaneously reporting less perceived impairment. Conversely, on the descending limb, older adults who received alcohol reported more perceived impairment than did those who received placebo, although psychomotor performance between these two groups of older drinkers did not differ. For younger participants, a moderate dose of alcohol facilitated performance on the ascending limb; however, these differences were not reflected on the descending limb. Conclusions: These results reinforce the common knowledge that self-reported measures may not provide an accurate reflection of performance outcomes and, importantly, that older adults may be impaired even under a moderate dose of alcohol, although they may not be aware (i.e., report) of this impairment. PMID:19261236

  18. Curcumin prevents the non-alcoholic fatty hepatitis via mitochondria protection and apoptosis reduction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Long; lv, Yisong; Yao, Huixiang; Yin, Li; Shang, Jianhui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Non-alcoholic fatty hepatitis (NASH) is highly prevalent, mitochondria damage is the main pathophysiological characteristic of NASH. However, treatment for mitochondria damage is rarely reported. Methods: NASH model was established in rats, the protective effects of curcumin were evaluated by histological observation; structure and function assessments of mitochondria; and apoptotic genes expression. Results: NASH rats treated with curcumin displayed relatively slight liver damage when compared with NASH livers. The average mitochondrial length and width of NASH (12.0 ± 3.2 and 5.1 ± 1.1 micrometers) were significantly longer than that of normal (6.2 ± 2.1 and 2.1 ± 1.5 micrometers) and NASH treated with curcumin (7.4 ± 1.2 and 3.2 ± 1.5 micrometers) rats. The average malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxy nonyl alcohol (HNE) levels in liver homogenates of NASH rats (4.23 ± 0.22 and 19.23 ± 2.3 nmol/Ml) were significantly higher than these in normal (1.32 ± 0.12 and 3.52 ± 0.43 nmol/mL) and NASH treated with curcumin (1.74 ± 0.11 and 4.66 ± 0.99 nmol/mL) rats. The expression levels of CytC, Casp3 and Casp8 of the NASH livers were significantly higher than normal and NASH treated with curcumin rats livers. Conclusion: Our data demonstrated that curcumin prevents the NASH by mitochondria protection and apoptosis reduction and provided a possible novel treatment for NASH. PMID:26617882

  19. Dietary saturated fatty acids reduce hepatic lipid accumulation but induce fibrotic change in alcohol-fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Ling; Peng, Hsiang-Chi; Wang, Xiang-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Background In this study, we evaluated the influence of an ethanol-containing diet with high saturated fatty acids (SFAs) on alcoholic liver disease (ALD) in rats. Methods Male Wistar rats weighing about 160 g were divided into four groups: an ethanol (E) group fed an ethanol-containing liquid diet with 36% total calories as fat (corn oil, olive oil and safflower oil); a control (C) group pair-fed an isoenergetic diet without ethanol; an ethanol with saturated fat (EHS) group fed an ethanol-containing diet which contained 40% total calories as fat (90% lard); and a control with saturated fat (CHS) group fed an isoenergetic diet without ethanol, which contained 40% total calories as fat. Results After 8 weeks of treatment, the liver weight and plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities in E and EHS groups were significantly higher than those of C group. Significantly higher scores of inflammation, necrosis, and fatty changes were found in E group, whereas significantly higher scores of necrosis, bile duct hyperplasia, and fibrosis were found in EHS group. Although significantly lower plasma adiponectin concentrations were observed in both E and EHS groups, compared to C group, plasma adiponectin in EHS group was significantly higher than that in E group. There was no change in hepatic peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-? expression between E and C groups, and rats in EHS group showed a significantly elevated level compared to the other groups. A lower hepatic sirtuins (SIRT)-1 level was found in E group, but it did not reach statistical significance. Moreover, the highest plasma TGF-?1 level was found in EHS group. Compared to C group, the hepatic reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio and thiobarbituric acid (TBA)-reactive substance level were significantly increased in E and EHS groups; however, there was no significant difference between E and EHS groups. Significantly increased hepatic CYP2E1 expression was observed in both E and EHS groups, while at the same time, hepatic CYP2E1 in EHS group was the highest among all groups. The hepatic tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?, interleukin (IL)-1?, IL-6, and IL-10 concentrations in the E group were significantly higher than those in C group, whereas the hepatic IL-6 and IL-10 concentrations in ES group were significantly lower than those of E group. Conclusions These results suggested that dietary saturated fats may inhibit hepatic fat accumulation and induce hepatic fibrosis in rats under chronic alcohol intake. PMID:26151057

  20. A Herbal Composition of Semen Hoveniae, Radix Puerariae, and Fructus Schisandrae Shows Potent Protective Effects on Acute Alcoholic Intoxication in Rodent Models

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jie; Guo, Yu; Li, Lu-yi; Hu, Hang; Qu, Xin-lan; Sun, Xi-zhen; Liu, Sheng-hua; Wang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    This study is designed to evaluate the effects of a herbal composition of Semen Hoveniae, Radix Puerariae and Fructus Schisandrae (SRF) against acute alcoholic intoxication. The animals were treated with SRF extract (SRFE) for 14 days, and ethanol was conducted subsequent to the final treatment. The effects of SRFE on righting reflex, inebriety rates, kinetic parameters of blood ethanol and acetaldehyde were determined. In addition; levels of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), the activities of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), selected antioxidative enzymes, and the contents of malonaldehyde (MDA) were measured. SRFE-pretreated rodents exhibited lower rates of intoxication, longer times to loss of righting reflex, and shortened times to recovery of righting reflex than in controls. The peak concentrations and area under the time-concentration curves were lower in the pretreated animals than in controls, which corresponded to higher levels of ADH and ALDH in both gastrointestines and livers of the SRFE-treated animals. The activities of CYP2E1 were lower in SRFE-pretreated animals, which also exhibited higher activities of some antioxidant enzymes and lower hepatic MDA levels. These findings suggest that the anti-inebriation effects of SRFE may involve inhibition of ethanol absorption, promotion of ethanol metabolism, and enhancing hepatic anti-oxidative functions. PMID:23118795

  1. Acute multiple focal neuropathies and delayed postanoxic encephalopathy after alcohol intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Che; Yang, Hsiu-Chun; Chen, Yao-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Acute-onset alcohol-associated neuropathy is only occasionally reported, and delayed postanoxic encephalopathy is rare. Here, we report a male who developed acute multiple focal neuropathies and later delayed postanoxic encephalopathy after alcohol intoxication. He had hypoxia and rhabdomyolysis, presenting with acute renal failure initially, and cardiopulmonary support, including mechanical ventilation, led to improvement of the patient at the acute stage. He suffered from bilateral hand numbness and mild weakness of the right lower limb thereafter. Nerve-conduction study revealed no pickup of compound muscle action potential or sensory nerve action potential in the bilateral ulnar nerve, but showed attenuated amplitude of compound muscle action potential in the right femoral nerve. Multiple focal neuropathies were suspected, and he received outpatient rehabilitation after being discharged. However, the patient developed gradual onset of weakness in four limbs and cognitive impairment 23 days after the hypoxia event. Brain computed tomography showed low attenuation over bilateral globus pallidus, and brain magnetic resonance imaging disclosed diffuse increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery in bilateral white matter. He was admitted again under the impression of delayed postanoxic brain injury. Supportive treatment and active rehabilitation were given. He had gradual improvement in motor and functional status after rehabilitation. He could walk with festinating gait under supervision, and needed only minimal assistance in performing activities of daily living approximately 1 year later. PMID:26229472

  2. Patterns of Hepatitis C Virus RNA Levels during Acute Infection: The InC3 Study

    PubMed Central

    Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Grady, Bart; Page, Kimberly; Kim, Arthur Y.; McGovern, Barbara H.; Cox, Andrea L.; Rice, Thomas M.; Sacks-Davis, Rachel; Bruneau, Julie; Morris, Meghan; Amin, Janaki; Schinkel, Janke; Applegate, Tanya; Maher, Lisa; Hellard, Margaret; Lloyd, Andrew R.; Prins, Maria; Dore, Gregory J.; Grebely, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding the patterns of HCV RNA levels during acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection provides insights into immunopathogenesis and is important for vaccine design. This study evaluated patterns of HCV RNA levels and associated factors among individuals with acute infection. Methods Data were from an international collaboration of nine prospective cohorts of acute HCV (InC3 Study). Participants with well-characterized acute HCV infection (detected within three months post-infection and interval between the peak and subsequent HCV RNA levels?120 days) were categorised by a priori-defined patterns of HCV RNA levels: i) spontaneous clearance, ii) partial viral control with persistence (?1 log IU/mL decline in HCV RNA levels following peak) and iii) viral plateau with persistence (increase or <1 log IU/mL decline in HCV RNA levels following peak). Factors associated with HCV RNA patterns were assessed using multinomial logistic regression. Results Among 643 individuals with acute HCV, 162 with well-characterized acute HCV were identified: spontaneous clearance (32%), partial viral control with persistence (27%), and viral plateau with persistence (41%). HCV RNA levels reached a high viraemic phase within two months following infection, with higher levels in the spontaneous clearance and partial viral control groups, compared to the viral plateau group (median: 6.0, 6.2, 5.3 log IU/mL, respectively; P=0.018). In the two groups with persistence, Interferon lambda 3 (IFNL3) CC genotype was independently associated with partial viral control compared to viral plateau (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 2.75; 95%CI: 1.08, 7.02). In the two groups with viral control, female sex was independently associated with spontaneous clearance compared to partial viral control (AOR: 2.86; 95%CI: 1.04, 7.83). Conclusions Among individuals with acute HCV, a spectrum of HCV RNA patterns is evident. IFNL3 CC genotype is associated with initial viral control, while female sex is associated with ultimate spontaneous clearance. PMID:25837807

  3. Acute Liver Injury Induces Nucleocytoplasmic Redistribution of Hepatic Methionine Metabolism Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Miguel; Garrido, Francisco; Pérez-Miguelsanz, Juliana; Pacheco, María; Partearroyo, Teresa; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The discovery of methionine metabolism enzymes in the cell nucleus, together with their association with key nuclear processes, suggested a putative relationship between alterations in their subcellular distribution and disease. Results: Using the rat model of d-galactosamine intoxication, severe changes in hepatic steady-state mRNA levels were found; the largest decreases corresponded to enzymes exhibiting the highest expression in normal tissue. Cytoplasmic protein levels, activities, and metabolite concentrations suffered more moderate changes following a similar trend. Interestingly, galactosamine treatment induced hepatic nuclear accumulation of methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) ?1 and S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase tetramers, their active assemblies. In fact, galactosamine-treated livers showed enhanced nuclear MAT activity. Acetaminophen (APAP) intoxication mimicked most galactosamine effects on hepatic MAT?1, including accumulation of nuclear tetramers. H35 cells that overexpress tagged-MAT?1 reproduced the subcellular distribution observed in liver, and the changes induced by galactosamine and APAP that were also observed upon glutathione depletion by buthionine sulfoximine. The H35 nuclear accumulation of tagged-MAT?1 induced by these agents correlated with decreased glutathione reduced form/glutathione oxidized form ratios and was prevented by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and glutathione ethyl ester. However, the changes in epigenetic modifications associated with tagged-MAT?1 nuclear accumulation were only prevented by NAC in galactosamine-treated cells. Innovation: Cytoplasmic and nuclear changes in proteins that regulate the methylation index follow opposite trends in acute liver injury, their nuclear accumulation showing potential as disease marker. Conclusion: Altogether these results demonstrate galactosamine- and APAP-induced nuclear accumulation of methionine metabolism enzymes as active oligomers and unveil the implication of redox-dependent mechanisms in the control of MAT?1 subcellular distribution. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2541–2554. PMID:24124652

  4. An overview of animal models for investigating the pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies in acute hepatic failure

    PubMed Central

    Tuñón, María Jesús; Alvarez, Marcelino; Culebras, Jesús M; González-Gallego, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Acute hepatic failure (AHF) is a severe liver injury accompanied by hepatic encephalopathy which causes multiorgan failure with an extremely high mortality rate, even if intensive care is provided. Management of severe AHF continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. Liver transplantation has been shown to be the most effective therapy, but the procedure is limited by shortage of donor organs. Although a number of clinical trials testing different liver assist devices are under way, these systems alone have no significant effect on patient survival and are only regarded as a useful approach to bridge patients with AHF to liver transplantation. As a result, reproducible experimental animal models resembling the clinical conditions are still needed. The three main approaches used to create an animal model for AHF are: surgical procedures, toxic liver injury and infective procedures. Most common models are based on surgical techniques (total/partial hepatectomy, complete/transient devascularization) or the use of hepatotoxic drugs (acetaminophen, galactosamine, thioacetamide, and others), and very few satisfactory viral models are available. We have recently developed a viral model of AHF by means of the inoculation of rabbits with the virus of rabbit hemorrhagic disease. This model displays biochemical and histological characteristics, and clinical features that resemble those in human AHF. In the present article an overview is given of the most widely used animal models of AHF, and their main advantages and disadvantages are reviewed. PMID:19575487

  5. Acute Sickle Hepatic Crisis after Liver Transplantation in a Patient with Hb SC Disease.

    PubMed

    Gillis, J H; Satapathy, S K; Parsa, L; Sylvestre, P B; Dbouk, N

    2015-01-01

    Acute sickle hepatic crisis (ASHC) has been observed in approximately 10% of patients with sickle cell disease. It occurs predominantly in patients with homozygous (Hb SS) sickle cell anemia and to a lesser degree in patients with Hb SC disease, sickle cell trait, and Hb S beta thalassemia. Patients commonly present with jaundice, right upper quadrant pain, nausea, low-grade fever, tender hepatomegaly, and mild to moderate elevations in serum AST, ALT, and bilirubin. We describe the case of a patient with a history of hemoglobin SC disease and cirrhosis caused by hepatitis C presenting approximately 1 year after liver transplantation with an ASHC. The diagnosis was confirmed by liver biopsy. Our patient was treated with RBC exchange transfusions, IV hydration, and analgesia and made a complete recovery. Only a limited number of patients with sickle cell disease have received liver transplants, and, to our knowledge, this is the first case of ASHC after transplantation in a patient with Hb SC disease. PMID:25789194

  6. Peginterferon alfa related psoriasis in a patient with acute hepatitis C and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dag, Muhammed Sait; Oztürk, Zeynel Abidin; Y?lmaz, Nimet; Cam, Hakan; Kaday?fç?, Abdurrahman

    2013-09-01

    The Interferon (IFN) which is the standard treatment for Hepatitis C, may cause a lot of side effects including dermatological anomalies. This paper presents a psoriasis case which occurred in relation with the treatment of acute hepatitis C (AHC) with peginterferon alfa (peg-IFN-?). A 60-year-old male patient came to the hospital with symptoms of high liver enzymes. The patient with history of a recent operation showed anti-HCV(+), HCVRNA 3.5 million IU/mL and HCV genotype 1b in the tests. Without any other etiological factors found in the patient, we started a treatment of peg-IFN?-2b with the diagnosis of AHC. After 3 weeks, psoriatic plaques were observed in various parts of the body. Antiviral treatment of the patient was concluded within 6 months. His psoriasis treatment initially commenced with local agents followed by phototherapy. Permanent viral response was seen in the patient and his lesions recovered rapidly after the antipsoriatic and antiviral treatment. Psoriasis and other autoimmune diseases should be considered even though they are encountered rarely,and the patients should be informed of the possible risks before planning treatment with peg-IFN-?. PMID:23912615

  7. Effect of hepatocyte apoptosis induced by TNF-? on acute severe hepatitis in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Guo Qing; Zhou, Xia Qiu; Yu, Hong; Xie, Qing; Zhao, Guo Ming; Wang, Bin; Guo, Qing; Xiang, Yue Qin; Liao, Dan

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of hepatocyte apoptosis and necrosis induced by TNF-? on the pathogenesis of acute severe hepatitis (ASH). METHODS: The model of ASH was prepared in D-galactosamine (GalN) sensitized BALB/c mice by injection of either endotoxin (ET) or tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?). Morphological changes of apoptotic hepatocytes were studied by both light and electron microscope and in site end labeling method (ISEL). Molecular biological changes of DNA ladder were observed by electrophoresis of extract from liver tissues. Biochemical changes were measured by alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartic aminotransferase (AST) and TNF-?. The relation between apoptosis and necrosis was evaluated simultaneously. RESULTS: The sequence of hepatocyte apoptosis, necrosis, and final death from ASH was observed both in GalN/ET and GalN/TNF-? group. Apoptosis was prominent at 3.5 h and 6 h after injection of inducer, while necrosis became dominant at 9 h after challenge. The appearance of apoptosis was earlier in GalN/TNF-? group than that in GalN/ET group. Pretreatment of mice with antiTNF IgG1 may completely prevent the liver injury induced by GalN/ET. CONCLUSION: TNF-? can cause liver damage by inducing hepatic apoptosis and necrosis in mice with endotoxemia. PMID:11819675

  8. Effects of stress, acute alcohol treatment, or both on pre-pulse inhibition in high- and low-alcohol preferring mice.

    PubMed

    Powers, M S; Chester, J A

    2014-03-01

    Pre-pulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (PPI) is a measure of sensorimotor gating frequently used to assess information processing in both humans and rodents. Both alcohol and stress exposure can modulate PPI, making it possible to assess how stress and alcohol interact to influence information processing. Humans with an increased genetic risk for alcoholism are more reactive to stressful situations compared to those without a family history, and alcohol may have stress-dampening effects for those with high genetic risk. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of stress, acute alcohol exposure, or both on PPI in male and female mice selectively bred for high- (HAP2) and low- (LAP2) alcohol preference. Experiment 1 assessed the effects of various doses of acute alcohol on PPI. Experiments 2 and 3 assessed the effect of 10 days of restraint stress on subsequent PPI tested at 30 min (Experiment 2) or 24 h (Experiment 3) following the termination of stress exposure. Experiment 3 also examined the effects of acute alcohol treatment (0.75 g/kg) on PPI in mice previously exposed to stress or no stress. Results indicate that 0.75 and 1.0 g/kg doses of alcohol increased PPI in HAP2 but not LAP2 mice. When PPI was tested 30 min after stress exposure, stressed HAP2 mice showed a trend toward decreased PPI and stressed LAP2 mice showed a trend toward increased PPI. The combination of stress and alcohol treatment did not alter PPI in either line 24 h following the termination of stress exposure, suggesting that alcohol does not ameliorate the effect of stress on PPI. Stressed LAP2 mice had increased basal circulating corticosterone on the final stress exposure day compared to non-stressed LAP2 mice, and no difference was found between stressed and non-stressed HAP2 mice. The results suggest that high genetic risk for alcoholism may be related to increased sensitivity to alcohol and stress effects on PPI, and this sensitivity could signify an endophenotype for increased genetic risk to develop alcoholism. PMID:24507876

  9. Ghrelin reduces liver impairment in a model of concanavalin A-induced acute hepatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yuqing; Wang, Jianbo; Yu, Fujun; Cheng, Jian; Li, Huanqing; Guo, Chuanyong; Fan, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Ghrelin is a 28-amino-acid gut hormone that was first discovered as a potent growth hormone secretagogue. Recently, it has been shown to exert a strong anti-inflammatory effect. The purpose of the study reported here was to explore the effect and mechanism of ghrelin on concanavalin (Con) A-induced acute hepatitis. Methods Balb/C mice were divided into four groups: normal control (NC) (mice injected with vehicle [saline]); Con A (25 mg/kg); Con A + 10 ?g/kg ghrelin; and Con A + 50 ?g/kg ghrelin (1 hour before Con A injection). Pro-inflammatory cytokine levels were detected. Protein levels of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K); phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt); caspase 3, 8, and 9; and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) were also detected. Perifosine (25 mM) (an Akt inhibitor) was used to investigate whether the protective effect of ghrelin was interrupted by an Akt inhibitor. Protein levels of p-AKT; Bcl-2; Bax; and caspase 3, 8, and 9 were also detected. Results Aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and pathological damage were significantly ameliorated by ghrelin pretreatment in Con A-induced hepatitis. Inflammatory cytokines were significantly reduced by ghrelin pretreatment. Bcl-2; Bax; and caspase 3, 8, and 9 expression were also clearly affected by ghrelin pretreatment, compared with the Con A-treated group. However, the Akt kinase inhibitor reversed the decrease of Bax and caspase 3, 8, 9, and reduced the protein level of p-Akt and Bcl-2. Ghrelin activated the PI3K/Akt/Bcl-2 pathway and inhibited activation of autophagy. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that ghrelin attenuates Con A-induced acute immune hepatitis by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway and inhibiting the process of autophagy, which might be related to inhibition of inflammatory cytokine release, and prevention of hepatocyte apoptosis. These effects could be interrupted by an Akt kinase inhibitor. PMID:26451091

  10. The effect of acute alcohol intoxication on gut wall integrity in healthy male volunteers; a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    de Jong, W J; Cleveringa, A M; Greijdanus, B; Meyer, P; Heineman, E; Hulscher, J B

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the effect of acute alcohol consumption on enterocytes. Chronic alcohol consumption has been known to induce a decrease in gut wall integrity in actively drinking alcoholics and patients with alcohol-induced liver disease. Data on the extent of the damage induced by acute alcohol consumption in healthy human beings is scarce. Studies show that heavy incidental alcohol consumption is a growing problem in modern society. Data on this matter may provide insights into the consequences of this behavior for healthy individuals. In a randomized clinical trial in crossover design, 15 healthy volunteers consumed water one day and alcohol the other. One blood sample was collected pre-consumption, five every hour post-consumption, and one after 24 h. Intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) was used as a marker for enterocyte damage. Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) were used as markers for hepatocyte damage. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) and soluble CD14 (sCD14) were used as a measure of translocation. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) was used to assess the acute inflammatory response to endotoxemia. Alcohol consumption caused a significant increase in serum I- and L-FABP levels, compared to water consumption. Levels increased directly post-consumption and decreased to normal levels within 4 h. LBP, sCD14, and IL-6 levels were not significantly higher in the alcohol group. Moderate acute alcohol consumption immediately damages the enterocyte but does not seem to cause endotoxemia. PMID:25559494

  11. Systemic Inflammatory Response and Serum Lipopolysaccharide Levels Predict Multiple Organ Failure and Death in Alcoholic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Michelena, Javier; Altamirano, José; Abraldes, Juan G.; Affò, Silvia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Dominguez, Marlene; García-Pagán, Juan Carlos; Fernández, Javier; Arroyo, Vicente; Ginès, Pere; Louvet, Alexandre; Mathurin, Philippe; Mehal, Wajahat Z.; Caballería, Juan; Bataller, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) frequently progresses to multiple organ failure (MOF) and death. However, the driving factors are largely unknown. At admission, patients with AH often show criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) even in the absence of an infection. We hypothesize that the presence of SIRS may predispose to MOF and death. To test this hypothesis, we studied a cohort including 162 patients with biopsy-proven AH. The presence of SIRS and infections was assessed in all patients, and multivariate analyses identified variables independently associated with MOF and 90-day mortality. At admission, 32 (19.8%) patients were diagnosed with a bacterial infection, while 75 (46.3%) fulfilled SIRS criteria; 58 patients (35.8%) developed MOF during hospitalization. Short-term mortality was significantly higher among patients who developed MOF (62.1% versus 3.8%, P <0.001). The presence of SIRS was a major predictor of MOF (odds ratio = 2.69, P=0.025) and strongly correlated with mortality. Importantly, the course of patients with SIRS with and without infection was similar in terms of MOF development and short-term mortality. Finally, we sought to identify serum markers that differentiate SIRS with and without infection. We studied serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, and lipopolysaccharide at admission. All of them predicted mortality. Procalcitonin, but not high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, serum levels identified those patients with SIRS and infection. Lipopolysaccharide serum levels predicted MOF and the response to prednisolone. Conclusion In the presence or absence of infections, SIRS is a major determinant of MOF and mortality in AH, and the mechanisms involved in the development of SIRS should be investigated; procalcitonin serum levels can help to identify patients with infection, and lipopolysaccharide levels may help to predict mortality and the response to steroids. PMID:25761863

  12. Marked protection against acute renal and hepatic injury after nitrited myoglobin + tin protoporphyrin administration.

    PubMed

    Zager, Richard A

    2015-11-01

    The phenomenon known as renal "ischemic preconditioning," whereby an initial ischemic insult induces resistance against subsequent kidney damage, has been well established in the experimental literature. However, a clinically applicable way to safely recapitulate this state has not been defined. We hypothesized that a unique combination of agents (nitrited myoglobin [N-Mgb] + tin protoporphyrin [SnPP]) can achieve these ends safely and synergistically, increasing cytoprotective proteins (eg, heme oxygenase 1 [HO-1], interleukin 10 [IL-10], and haptoglobin) in kidney cells. To test this hypothesis, CD-1 mice received 1 mg of N-Mgb and 1 ?mol of SnPP, either alone or in combination. Renal cortical HO-1, haptoglobin, and IL-10 gene expressions (messenger RNA [mRNA], protein levels) were determined 4 and 18 hours later. Cytoresistance to 3 forms of acute kidney injury (AKI; glycerol-induced rhabdomyolysis, maleate nephrotoxicity, and postischemic AKI progression to chronic kidney disease [CKD]) was assessed. To ascertain whether cytoresistance might emerge in extrarenal organs, hepatic HO-1, IL-10, and haptoglobin levels were also measured, and resistance to 25 minutes of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury and hepatotoxicity (intraperitoneal glycerol injection) was sought. N-Mgb + SnPP induced additive or synergistic increases in renal HO-1, haptoglobin, and IL-10 mRNA and protein levels (up to 20-fold) without inducing any apparent renal or extrarenal damage. After 18 hours of post-treatment, marked or complete protection against glycerol-induced AKI, maleate-induced AKI, and postischemic AKI progression to CKD had emerged. Combined N-Mgb + SnPP was more protective than either agent alone (assessed in glycerol model). N-Mgb + SnPP also upregulated cytoprotective pathways in liver and induced marked protection against both hepatic ischemia-reperfusion and toxic liver damage. In conclusion, we posit that "preconditioning" with combined administration of N-Mgb + SnPP represents a promising approach for protecting against diverse forms of renal and nonrenal (hepatic) forms of tissue damage. PMID:26117289

  13. Hepatic lipid peroxidation: caused by acute drug intoxication, prevented by liposomal glutathione.

    PubMed

    Wendel, A

    1983-01-01

    Acute intoxication of mice with high doses of paracetamol (acetaminophen, 4-hydroxyacetanilide) led to a dose-dependent lipid peroxidation (LPO) measured in vivo by ethane exhalation and in vitro by malondialdehyde formation and glutathione depletion. Induction of microsomal enzymes enhanced LPO, inhibition of the monooxygenase systems totally suppressed it. Other drugs activated in phase I, i.e., furosemide, ethylmorphine or aminopyrine acted similarly if the phase II conjugation to glutathione was paralysed by glutathione depletion with diethylmaleate. The concept of lipid peroxidation being an early causal event in hepatocellular destruction was further examined experimentally: 1) Animals with alimentary selenium deficiency lacking liver selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase activity were much more susceptible to paracetamol-induced liver necrosis and LPO. 2) Normally fed animals were totally resistant when pretreated by intravenous liposomally entrapped glutathione. Administration of free glutathione led to a similar increase in hepatic glutathione content but the animals were much less protected. 3) Isolated perfused mouse liver released quantitatively similar amounts of ethane upon perfusion of paracetamol. The hydrocarbon evolution was reversible and preceded cell disintegration monitored by release of lactate dehydrogenase. 4) The few human data available indicate that man has a much lower activity of hydroperoxide metabolizing enzymes and much less glutathione. The results suggest an involvement of lipid peroxidation in acute chemical primary lesions. A general pathogenic mechanism for liver injury cannot be derived at present from the data available. PMID:6678834

  14. Dietary fat sources differentially modulate intestinal barrier and hepatic inflammation in alcohol-induced liver injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wei; Li, Qiong; Xie, Guoxiang; Sun, Xiuhua; Tan, Xiaobing; Sun, Xinguo; Jia, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Endotoxemia is a causal factor in the development of alcoholic liver injury. The present study aimed at determining the interactions of ethanol with different fat sources at the gut-liver axis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pair fed control or ethanol liquid diet for 8 wk. The liquid diets were based on a modified Lieber-DeCarli formula, with 30% total calories derived from corn oil (rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids). To test the effects of saturated fats, corn oil in the ethanol diet was replaced by either cocoa butter (CB, rich in long-chain saturated fatty acids) or medium-chain triglycerides (MCT, exclusively medium-chain saturated fatty acids). Ethanol feeding increased hepatic lipid accumulation and inflammatory cell infiltration and perturbed hepatic and serum metabolite profiles. Ethanol feeding with CB or MCT alleviated ethanol-induced liver injury and attenuated ethanol-induced metabolic perturbation. Both CB and MCT also normalized ethanol-induced hepatic macrophage activation, cytokine expression, and neutrophil infiltration. Ethanol feeding elevated serum endotoxin level, which was normalized by MCT but not CB. In accordance, ethanol-induced downregulations of intestinal occludin and zonula occludens-1 were normalized by MCT but not CB. However, CB normalized ethanol-increased hepatic endotoxin level in association with upregulation of an endotoxin detoxifying enzyme, argininosuccinate synthase 1 (ASS1). Knockdown ASS1 in H4IIEC3 cells resulted in impaired endotoxin clearance and upregulated cytokine expression. These data demonstrate that the protection of saturated fats against alcohol-induced liver injury occur via different actions at the gut-liver axis and are chain length dependent. PMID:24113767

  15. Necro-inflammatory response of pancreatic acinar cells in the pathogenesis of acute alcoholic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, H; Werner, J; Bergmann, F; Whitcomb, D C; Büchler, M W; Fortunato, F

    2013-01-01

    The role of pancreatic acinar cells in initiating necro-inflammatory responses during the early onset of alcoholic acute pancreatitis (AP) has not been fully evaluated. We investigated the ability of acinar cells to generate pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, including inflammasome-associated IL-18/caspase-1, and evaluated acinar cell necrosis in an animal model of AP and human samples. Rats were fed either an ethanol-containing or control diet for 14 weeks and killed 3 or 24?h after a single lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. Inflammasome components and necro-inflammation were evaluated in acinar cells by immunofluorescence (IF), histology, and biochemical approaches. Alcohol exposure enhanced acinar cell-specific production of TNF?, IL-6, MCP-1 and IL-10, as early as 3?h after LPS, whereas IL-18 and caspase-1 were evident 24?h later. Alcohol enhanced LPS-induced TNF? expression, whereas blockade of LPS signaling diminished TNF? production in vitro, indicating that the response of pancreatic acinar cells to LPS is similar to that of immune cells. Similar results were observed from acinar cells in samples from patients with acute/recurrent pancreatitis. Although morphologic examination of sub-clinical AP showed no visible signs of necrosis, early loss of pancreatic HMGB1 and increased systemic levels of HMGB1 and LDH were observed, indicating that this strong systemic inflammatory response is associated with little pancreatic necrosis. These results suggest that TLR-4-positive acinar cells respond to LPS by activating the inflammasome and producing pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators during the development of mild, sub-clinical AP, and that these effects are exacerbated by alcohol injury. PMID:24091659

  16. Surviving a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture complicated by an acute superior vena cava and thoracic compartment syndromes.

    PubMed

    Parra, Michael W; Rodas, Edgar B; Bartnik, Jakub P; Puente, Ivan

    2011-07-01

    We describe the first reported survivor of a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture complicated by acute superior vena cava (SVCS) and thoracic compartment syndromes (TCS). A thirty one year old male was involved in a boating accident. The patient was diagnosed with a grade IV liver laceration, which was initially managed with both angio-embolization and open surgical repair. Exactly one month from admission, the patient presented with an abrupt cardiac arrest, which was further complicated by a SVCS and TCS. The SVCS was managed with bilateral thoracostomies which revealed a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture into the right chest cavity. The TCS was managed with a decompressive thoraco-abdominal incision. The patient survived and is now leading a normal life. Our success was largely due to an integrated trauma system of physicians, nurses and technicians that prompted the early recognition of two potentially life threatening complications of a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture. PMID:21887041

  17. Greater hepatic vulnerability after alcohol intake in African Americans compared with Caucasians: a population-based study.

    PubMed Central

    Stranges, Saverio; Freudenheim, Jo L.; Muti, Paola; Farinaro, Eduardo; Russell, Marcia; Nochajski, Thomas H.; Trevisan, Maurizio

    2004-01-01

    AIMS OF THE STUDY: In the last 40 years, African Americans have experienced higher age-adjusted liver cirrhosis mortality rates than whites. Alcohol use has been hypothesized to be the likely determinant of this disparity in liver disease mortality. This study was aimed at evaluating racial variations in common biomarkers of liver injury, such as gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), aspartate amino transferase (AST) and alanine amino transferase (ALT), by categories of drinking status and levels of current alcohol use. METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis of a general population sample of 3304 residents of Erie and Niagara counties in New York State, 35-80 years of age and free from known hepatic disease, stratified by racial group (African-American and white). RESULTS: Concentrations of GGT were higher for African-Americans than for whites in all categories of drinking status (lifetime abstainers, former and current drinkers) after adjustment for potential confounders (age, sex, education, smoking, and body mass index). However, differences in enzyme mean values between the two racial groups were consistently larger among current drinkers than for either lifetime abstainers or former drinkers. In analyses based on tertiles of alcohol consumption in the last 30 days, differences in GGT mean values between the two races tended to amplify with increasing amounts of consumption. CONCLUSIONS: These findings seem to support the hypothesis of greater sensitivity to alcohol-induced hepatotoxicity among African-Americans than for whites. PMID:15481746

  18. Disruption of the Circadian Clock in Mice Increases Intestinal Permeability and Promotes Alcohol-Induced Hepatic Pathology and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Christopher B.; Shaikh, Maliha; Cavanaugh, Kate; Tang, Yueming; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Song, Shiwen

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock orchestrates temporal patterns of physiology and behavior relative to the environmental light:dark cycle by generating and organizing transcriptional and biochemical rhythms in cells and tissues throughout the body. Circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate the physiology and function of the gastrointestinal tract. Disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier enables the translocation of proinflammatory bacterial products, such as endotoxin, across the intestinal wall and into systemic circulation; a process that has been linked to pathologic inflammatory states associated with metabolic, hepatic, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases – many of which are commonly reported in shift workers. Here we report, for the first time, that circadian disorganization, using independent genetic and environmental strategies, increases permeability of the intestinal epithelial barrier (i.e., gut leakiness) in mice. Utilizing chronic alcohol consumption as a well-established model of induced intestinal hyperpermeability, we also found that both genetic and environmental circadian disruption promote alcohol-induced gut leakiness, endotoxemia and steatohepatitis, possibly through a mechanism involving the tight junction protein occludin. Circadian organization thus appears critical for the maintenance of intestinal barrier integrity, especially in the context of injurious agents, such as alcohol. Circadian disruption may therefore represent a previously unrecognized risk factor underlying the susceptibility to or development of alcoholic liver disease, as well as other conditions associated with intestinal hyperpermeability and an endotoxin-triggered inflammatory state. PMID:23825629

  19. Antibody responses to Hepatitis B and measles-mumps-rubella vaccines in children who received chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Simone Santana; Araujo, Gustavo Santos; Faro, Gustavo Baptista de Almeida; da Cruz-Silva, Lana Luíza; Araújo-Melo, Carlos André; Cipolotti, Rosana

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate viral vaccine antibody levels in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after chemotherapy and after vaccine booster doses. Methods Antibody levels against hepatitis B, rubella, measles and mumps vaccine antigens were evaluated in 33 children after completing chemotherapy (before and after vaccine booster doses) and the results were compared to the data of 33 healthy children matched for gender, age and social class. Results After chemotherapy, 75.9%, 67.9%, 59.3% and 51.7% of the patients showed low antibody titers that would be unlikely to protect against exposure to measles, rubella, hepatitis B and mumps, respectively. After receiving a vaccine booster dose for these antigens the patients had high antibody levels consistent with potential protection against measles, mumps and hepatitis B, but not against rubella. Conclusion Extra doses of measles-mumps-rubella plus hepatitis B vaccines are recommended in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients submitted to treatment after hematologic recovery. After this, viral vaccine antibody levels should be verified to define the individual's protective status. PMID:23049440

  20. Alcohol

    MedlinePLUS

    If you are like many Americans, you drink alcohol at least occasionally. For many people, moderate drinking ... risky. Heavy drinking can lead to alcoholism and alcohol abuse, as well as injuries, liver disease, heart ...

  1. Hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... fever, fatigue, lack of appetite, nausea, jaundice and dark urine.These symptoms can last up to five ... fever, fatigue, lack of appetite, nausea, jaundice and dark urine. Acute symptoms can last several months, during ...

  2. Gender Differences in Acute Alcohol Effects on Self-Regulation of Arousal in Response to Emotional and Alcohol-Related Picture Cues

    PubMed Central

    Udo, Tomoko; Bates, Marsha E.; Mun, Eun Young; Vaschillo, Evgeny G.; Vaschillo, Bronya; Lehrer, Paul; Ray, Suchismita

    2010-01-01

    Basic mechanisms through which men and women self-regulate arousal have received little attention in human experimental addiction research although stress-response-dampening and craving theories suggest an important role of emotional arousal in motivating alcohol use. This study examined gender differences in the effects of acute alcohol intoxication on psychophysiological and self-reported arousal in response to emotionally negative, positive, and neutral, and alcohol-related, picture cues. Thirty-six social drinkers (16 women) were randomly assigned to an alcohol, placebo, or control beverage group, and exposed to picture cues every 10 s (0.1 Hz presentation frequency). Psychophysiological arousal was assessed via a 0.1-Hz heart rate variability (HRV) index. A statistically significant beverage group-by-gender interaction effect on psychophysiological, but not self-reported, arousal was found. 0.1-Hz HRV responses to picture cues were suppressed by alcohol only in men. This gender-specific suppression pattern did not differ significantly across picture cue types. There were no significant gender differences in the placebo or control group. Greater dampening of arousal by alcohol intoxication in men, compared to women, may contribute to men's greater tendency to use alcohol to cope with stress. PMID:19586136

  3. Effect of intestinal microbiota alteration on hepatic damage in rats with acute rejection after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yirui; Chen, Huazhong; Zhu, Biao; Qin, Nan; Chen, Yunbo; Li, Zhengfeng; Deng, Min; Jiang, Haiyin; Xu, Xiangfei; Yang, Jiezuan; Ruan, Bing; Li, Lanjuan

    2014-11-01

    The previous studies all focus on the effect of probiotics and antibiotics on infection after liver transplantation. Here, we focus on the effect of gut microbiota alteration caused by probiotics and antibiotics on hepatic damage after allograft liver transplantation. Brown-Norway rats received saline, probiotics, or antibiotics via daily gavage for 3 weeks. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) was carried out after 1 week of gavage. Alteration of the intestinal microbiota, liver function and histopathology, serum and liver cytokines, and T cells in peripheral blood and Peyer's patch were evaluated. Distinct segregation of fecal bacterial diversity was observed in the probiotic group and antibiotic group when compared with the allograft group. As for diversity of intestinal mucosal microbiota and pathology of intestine at 2 weeks after OLT, antibiotics and probiotics had a significant effect on ileum and colon. The population of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium in the probiotic group was significantly greater than the antibiotic group and the allograft group. The liver injury was significantly reduced in the antibiotic group and the probiotic group compared with the allograft group. The CD4/CD8 and Treg cells in Peyer's patch were decreased in the antibiotic group. The intestinal Treg cell and serum and liver TGF-? were increased markedly while CD4/CD8 ratio was significantly decreased in the probiotic group. It suggested that probiotics mediate their beneficial effects through increase of Treg cells and TGF-? and deduction of CD4/CD8 in rats with acute rejection (AR) after OLT. PMID:25004996

  4. Protection of Gastrointestinal Mucosa from Acute Heavy Alcohol Consumption: The Effect of Berberine and Its Correlation with TLR2, 4/IL1?-TNF? Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Du, Feng; Chai, Yu-Shuang; Jiang, Jing-Fei; Wang, Yu-Gang; Yu, Xuan; Yan, Xiao-Jin; Xing, Dong-Ming; Du, Li-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to confirm the protective effect of berberine (BBR) on gastrointestinal injury caused by acute heavy alcohol exposure, an effect that has not been reported previously. Our research details how BBR protects against gastrointestinal injuries from acute alcohol exposure using both in vivo and in vitro experiments. Acute high alcohol concentrations lead to obvious damage to the gastrointestinal mucosa, resulting in necrosis of the intestinal mucosa. Oral administration of BBR was able to significantly reduce this alcohol-induced damage, inhibit increases of alcohol-induced TNF? and IL-1? expression in gastrointestinal mucosa as well as their upstream signals TLR2 and TLR4, and regulate cytokines that modulate tight junctions. Alcohol consumption is a popular human social behavior worldwide, and the present study reports a comprehensive mechanism by which BBR protects against gastrointestinal injuries from alcohol stress, providing people with a novel application of BBR. PMID:26226164

  5. CHRONIC ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION HAS BIPHASIC EFFECTS ON HEPATIC INSULIN SIGNALING DEPENDENT ON DOSE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiological studies have shown paradoxical biphasic effects of alcohol on health. Moderate drinkers have lower overall mortality than teetotalers or than heavy drinkers. There are protective effects of low levels of alcohol consumption (less than one drink day) on diabetes risk and other chroni...

  6. The effects of acute alcohol exposure on the response properties of neurons in visual cortex area 17 of cats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bo; Xia Jing; Li Guangxing; Zhou Yifeng

    2010-03-15

    Physiological and behavioral studies have demonstrated that a number of visual functions such as visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and motion perception can be impaired by acute alcohol exposure. The orientation- and direction-selective responses of cells in primary visual cortex are thought to participate in the perception of form and motion. To investigate how orientation selectivity and direction selectivity of neurons are influenced by acute alcohol exposure in vivo, we used the extracellular single-unit recording technique to examine the response properties of neurons in primary visual cortex (A17) of adult cats. We found that alcohol reduces spontaneous activity, visual evoked unit responses, the signal-to-noise ratio, and orientation selectivity of A17 cells. In addition, small but detectable changes in both the preferred orientation/direction and the bandwidth of the orientation tuning curve of strongly orientation-biased A17 cells were observed after acute alcohol administration. Our findings may provide physiological evidence for some alcohol-related deficits in visual function observed in behavioral studies.

  7. Dietary tomato powder inhibits alcohol-induced hepatic injury by suppressing cytochrome p450 2E1 induction in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Stice, Camilla P; Liu, Chun; Aizawa, Koichi; Greenberg, Andrew S; Ausman, Lynne M; Wang, Xiang-Dong

    2015-04-15

    Chronic and excessive alcohol consumption leads to the development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and greatly increases the risk of liver cancer. Induction of the cytochrome p450 2E1 (CYP2E1) enzyme by chronic and excessive alcohol intake is known to play a role in the pathogenesis of ALD. High intake of tomatoes, rich in the carotenoid lycopene, is associated with a decreased risk of chronic disease. We investigated the effects of whole tomato (tomato powder, TP), partial tomato (tomato extract, TE), and purified lycopene (LYC) against ALD development in rats. Of the three supplements, only TP reduced the severity of alcohol-induced steatosis, hepatic inflammatory foci, and CYP2E1 protein levels. TE had no effect on these outcomes and LYC greatly increased inflammatory foci in alcohol-fed rats. To further support the protective effect of TP against ALD, TP was supplemented in a carcinogen (diethylnitrosamine, DEN)-initiated alcohol-promoted mouse model. In addition to reduced steatosis and inflammatory foci, TP abolished the presence of preneoplastic foci of altered hepatocytes in DEN-injected mice fed alcohol. These reductions were associated with decreased hepatic CYP2E1 protein levels, restored levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? and downstream gene expression, decreased inflammatory gene expression, and reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress markers. These data provide strong evidence for TP as an effective whole food prevention strategy against ALD. PMID:25592162

  8. 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-?-D-ribofuranoside-attenuates LPS/D-Gal-induced acute hepatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Ai, Qing; Lin, Ling; Gong, Xianqiong; Ge, Pu; Che, Qian; Wan, Jingyuan; Wen, Aiqing; Zhang, Li

    2015-10-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mediated energy-sensing signals play important roles in reprogramming the expression of inflammatory genes. In the present study, the potential effects of the AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4?- carboxamide-1-?-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR) were investigated in a mouse model with LPS/D-Gal-induced acute hepatitis. Our experimental data indicated that treatment with AICAR suppressed the elevation of plasma aminotransferases and alleviated the histopathological abnormalities in mice exposed to LPS/D-Gal. Treatment with AICAR also inhibited the LPS/D-Gal-induced up-regulation of TNF-?, NO and myeloperoxidase. In addition, the LPS/D-Gal-induced expression of pro-apoptotic factor Bax, cleavage of caspase-3, elevation of hepatic caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9 activities and induction of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nucleotide nick-end labeling-positive cells were all suppressed by AICAR. These results suggested that the AMPK activator AICAR could attenuate LPS/D-Gal-induced acute hepatitis, which implies that AMPK might become a novel target for the treatment of inflammation-based liver disorders. PMID:25979627

  9. Inhibition of hepatic mixed-function oxidase enzymes in mice by acute and chronic treatment with selenium.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, M; Sasaki, M; Koiwai, K; Ozaki, M; Takayanagi, Y; Sasaki, K

    1992-08-01

    The effect of selenium administered acutely or chronically on the hepatic microsomal drug-metabolizing system has been investigated in mice. After 72 h following acute administration of selenium (7.5 mg/kg, i.p.), there was a significant inhibition of the activities of aminopyrine (AM) N-demethylase and ethylmorphine (EM) N-demethylase, and cytochrome P-450 levels but no change in the activities of aniline (AN) hydroxylase, 7-ethoxycoumarin (EC) O-deethylase, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-cytochrome c reductase and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-ferricyanide reductase, and cytochrome b5 content. Chronic administration of selenium in the drinking water (1 or 2 ppm selenium) for 12 weeks, resulted in no alteration in any of the parameters measured. However, significant decreases in activities of AM N-demethylase and AN hydroxylase, and cytochrome P-450 levels were detected in animals given higher doses of selenium (4 or 8 ppm selenium). Following the in vitro additions of selenium to hepatic microsomes obtained from untreated mice, selenium inhibited the AM N-demethylase, AN hydroxylase and 7-EC O-deethylase in a concentration-dependent manner, but no alteration in NADPH-cytochrome c reductase and cytochrome P-450 levels was observed. These results indicate that selenium is a specific from inhibitor of hepatic monooxygenase. PMID:1479537

  10. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of the canine pancreas: applications to acute alcoholic pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Janes, N.; Clemens, J.A.; Glickson, J.D.; Cameron, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The first nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of the canine pancreas is described. Both in-vivo, ex-vivo protocols and NMR observables are discussed. The stability of the ex-vivo preparation based on the NMR observables is established for at least four hours. The spectra obtained from the in-vivo and ex-vivo preparations exhibited similar metabolite ratios, further validating the model. Metabolite levels were unchanged by a 50% increase in perfusion rate. Only trace amounts of phosphocreatine were observed either in the intact gland or in extracts. Acute alcoholic pancreatitis was mimicked by free fatty acid infusion. Injury resulted in hyperamylasemia, edema (weight gain), increased hematocrit and perfusion pressure, and depressed levels of high energy phosphates.

  11. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis as an Extrahepatic Manifestation of Acute Anicteric Hepatitis A Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zis, Panagiotis; Kontogeorgi, Elli; Karakalos, Dimitrios; Pavlopoulou, Despoina; Sevastianos, Vassilios A.

    2012-01-01

    Among the many infective causes of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), viral hepatitis has been regarded as a rare associated condition. We report the case of a 31-year-old woman presenting with CVT associated with hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection, outlining probable pathogenic mechanisms. We suggest that hepatitis A serological markers should be routinely included in the investigation of cerebral venous thrombosis of unknown etiology, in nonvaccinated patients with risk factors of a recent HAV exposure. PMID:22934203

  12. Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caliguri, Joseph P., Ed.

    This extensive annotated bibliography provides a compilation of documents retreived from a computerized search of the ERIC, Social Science Citation Index, and Med-Line databases on the topic of alcoholism. The materials address the following areas of concern: (1) attitudes toward alcohol users and abusers; (2) characteristics of alcoholics and…

  13. Alcohol

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Digestive System How the Body Works Main Page Alcohol KidsHealth > Kids > Staying Healthy > Being Good to My Body > Alcohol Print A A A Text Size What's in ... fun." "It's cool. Everybody drinks, right?" Wrong. Drinking alcohol is dangerous for kids and teens and sometimes ...

  14. Endovascular Treatment of Acute Arterial Hemorrhage in Trauma Patients Using Ethylene Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer (Onyx)

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Wille, R. Heiss, P.; Herold, T.; Jung, E. M. Schreyer, A. G. Hamer, O. W. Rennert, J. Hoffstetter, P. Stroszczynski, C.; Zorger, N.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to determine the feasibility and efficacy of endovascular embolization with liquid embolic agent ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (Onyx) in patients with acute traumatic arterial bleeding. Methods: This is a retrospective review of 13 patients (9 men and 4 women; mean age 45 years) with severe trauma who underwent embolotherapy using Onyx from November 2003 to February 2009. Bleeding was located in the pelvis (5 patients), kidney (3 patients), mesenteric region (2 patients), retroperitoneal space (2 patients), neck (1 patient), and thigh (1 patient). In three cases (23.1%), Onyx was used in conjunction with coils. We evaluate the technical and clinical success, procedural and embolization time, occurrence of rebleeding, and embolotherapy-related complications, such as necrosis or migration of Onyx into nontarget vessels. Results: In all patients, embolotherapy was technically and clinically successful on the first attempt. Control of bleeding could be reached with a mean time of 19 (range, 4-63) min after correct placement of the microcatheter in the feeding artery. No recurrent bleeding was detected. No unintended necrosis or migration of Onyx into a nontarget region was observed. During the follow-up period, three patients (23.1%) died due to severe intracranial hemorrhage, cardiac arrest, and sepsis. Conclusions: Transcatheter embolization with new liquid embolic agent Onyx is technically feasible and effective in trauma patients with acute arterial hemorrhage.

  15. Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Nathani, Milankumar; Jabeen, Shahgufta; Yazdani, Ijlal; Mouton, Charles D.; Bailey, Rahn K.; Mahr, Mona; Pate, Rebecca J.; Riley, Wayne J.

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is a major public health problem in the United States as well as around the world. The significant role that alcohol plays in suicidality is well known and accepted in the scientific community. The use of alcohol does not necessarily lead to suicide, but through its action and effects, alcohol is an important proximal risk factor for suicidal behavior. There is very little data showing how and why alcohol exerts such tremendous influence and “lubricates the gears” to propel the act of committing suicide. This article will elucidate the complex relationship between alcohol and suicide and how alcohol use can lead to suicide. The article also describes how alcohol affects brain neurophysiology in regards to suicidal behavior. PMID:23440995

  16. Modulation of Intestinal Barrier and Bacterial Endotoxin Production Contributes to the Beneficial Effect of Nicotinic Acid on Alcohol-Induced Endotoxemia and Hepatic Inflammation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wei; Li, Qiong; Zhang, Wenliang; Sun, Qian; Sun, Xinguo; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption causes nicotinic acid deficiency. The present study was undertaken to determine whether dietary nicotinic acid supplementation provides beneficial effects on alcohol-induced endotoxin signaling and the possible mechanisms at the gut-liver axis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pair-fed the Lieber-DeCarli liquid diets containing ethanol or isocaloric maltose dextrin for eight weeks, with or without dietary supplementation with 750 mg/liter nicotinic acid. Chronic alcohol feeding elevated the plasma endotoxin level and activated hepatic endotoxin signaling cascade, which were attenuated by nicotinic acid supplementation. Alcohol consumption remarkably decreased the mRNA levels of claudin-1, claudin-5, and ZO-1 in the distal intestine, whereas nicotinic acid significantly up-regulated these genes. The concentrations of endotoxin, ethanol, and acetaldehyde in the intestinal contents were increased by alcohol exposure, and niacin supplementation reduced the intestinal endotoxin and acetaldehyde levels. Nicotinic acid supplementation upregulated the intestinal genes involved in aldehyde detoxification via transcriptional regulation. These results demonstrate that modulation of the intestinal barrier function and bacterial endotoxin production accounts for the inhibitory effects of nicotinic acid on alcohol-induced endotoxemia and hepatic inflammation. PMID:26501337

  17. Modulation of Intestinal Barrier and Bacterial Endotoxin Production Contributes to the Beneficial Effect of Nicotinic Acid on Alcohol-Induced Endotoxemia and Hepatic Inflammation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wei; Li, Qiong; Zhang, Wenliang; Sun, Qian; Sun, Xinguo; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption causes nicotinic acid deficiency. The present study was undertaken to determine whether dietary nicotinic acid supplementation provides beneficial effects on alcohol-induced endotoxin signaling and the possible mechanisms at the gut-liver axis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pair-fed the Lieber-DeCarli liquid diets containing ethanol or isocaloric maltose dextrin for eight weeks, with or without dietary supplementation with 750 mg/liter nicotinic acid. Chronic alcohol feeding elevated the plasma endotoxin level and activated hepatic endotoxin signaling cascade, which were attenuated by nicotinic acid supplementation. Alcohol consumption remarkably decreased the mRNA levels of claudin-1, claudin-5, and ZO-1 in the distal intestine, whereas nicotinic acid significantly up-regulated these genes. The concentrations of endotoxin, ethanol, and acetaldehyde in the intestinal contents were increased by alcohol exposure, and niacin supplementation reduced the intestinal endotoxin and acetaldehyde levels. Nicotinic acid supplementation upregulated the intestinal genes involved in aldehyde detoxification via transcriptional regulation. These results demonstrate that modulation of the intestinal barrier function and bacterial endotoxin production accounts for the inhibitory effects of nicotinic acid on alcohol-induced endotoxemia and hepatic inflammation. PMID:26501337

  18. Alcoholic liver disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Liver disease due to alcohol; Cirrhosis or hepatitis - alcoholic; Laennec's cirrhosis ... Alcoholic liver disease occurs after years of heavy drinking. The heavy drinking could be every day, or just a ...

  19. Acute alcohol exposure, acidemia or glutamine administration impacts amino acid homeostasis in ovine maternal and fetal plasma

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, Shannon E.; Sawant, Onkar B.; Lunde, Emilie R.; Wu, Guoyao; Cudd, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a significant problem in human reproductive medicine. Maternal alcohol administration alters maternal amino acid homeostasis and results in acidemia in both mother and fetus, causing fetal growth restriction. We hypothesized that administration of glutamine, which increases renal ammoniagenesis to regulate acid-base balance, may provide an intervention strategy. This hypothesis was tested using sheep as an animal model. On day 115 of gestation, ewes were anesthetized and aseptic surgery was performed to insert catheters into the fetal abdominal aorta as well as the maternal abdominal aorta and vena cava. On day 128 of gestation, ewes received intravenous administration of saline, alcohol [1.75 g/kg body weight (BW)/h], a bolus of 30 mg glutamine/kg BW, alcohol + a bolus of 30 mg glutamine/kg BW, a bolus of 100 mg glutamine/kg BW, alcohol + a bolus of 100 mg glutamine/kg BW, or received CO2 administration to induce acidemia independent of alcohol. Blood samples were obtained simultaneously from the mother and the fetus at times 0 and 60 min (the time of peak blood alcohol concentration) of the study. Administration of alcohol to pregnant ewes led to a reduction in concentrations of glutamine and related amino acids in plasma by 21–30%. An acute administration of glutamine to ewes, concurrent with alcohol administration, improved the profile of most amino acids (including citrulline and arginine) in maternal and fetal plasma. We suggest that glutamine may have a protective effect against alcohol-induced metabolic disorders and FAS in the ovine model. PMID:23315157

  20. Acute Effects of Moderate Alcohol on Psychomotor, Set Shifting, and Working Memory Function in Older and Younger Social Drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Boissoneault, Jeff; Sklar, Alfredo; Prather, Robert; Nixon, Sara Jo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Despite substantial attention being paid to the health benefits of moderate alcohol intake as a lifestyle, the acute effects of alcohol on psychomotor and working memory function in older adults are poorly understood. Method: The effects of low to moderate doses of alcohol on neurobehavioral function were investigated in 39 older (55–70 years; 15 men) and 51 younger (25–35 years; 31 men) social drinkers. Subjects received one of three randomly assigned doses (placebo, .04 g/dl, or .065 g/dl target breath alcohol concentration). After beverage consumption, they completed the Trail Making Test Parts A and B and a working memory task requiring participants to determine whether probe stimuli were novel or had been presented in a preceding set of cue stimuli. Efficiency of working memory task performance was derived from accuracy and reaction time measures. Results: Alcohol was associated with poorer Trail Making Test Part B performance for older subjects. Working memory task results suggested an Age × Dose interaction for performance efficiency, with older but not younger adults demonstrating alcohol-related change. Directionality of change and whether effects on accuracy or reaction time drove the change depended on the novelty of probe stimuli. Conclusions: This study replicates previous research indicating increased susceptibility of older adults to moderate alcohol-induced psychomotor and set-shifting impairment and suggests such susceptibility extends to working memory performance. Further research using additional tasks and assessing other neuropsychological domains is needed. PMID:25208205

  1. Application of an alcohol clamp paradigm to examine inhibitory control, subjective responses, and acute tolerance in late adolescence.

    PubMed

    Hendershot, Christian S; Wardell, Jeffrey D; Strang, Nicole M; Markovich, Mike S D; Claus, Eric D; Ramchandani, Vijay A

    2015-06-01

    Individual differences in acute alcohol effects on cognitive control and subjective responses--and acute tolerance to these effects--are implicated in the risk for heavy drinking and alcohol-related harms. Few studies have examined these effects in drinkers under age 21. Additionally, studies of acute tolerance typically involve bolus oral alcohol administration, such that estimates of tolerance are confounded with blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limb. The current study examined cognitive control and subjective responses in young heavy drinkers (n = 88; M = 19.8 years old, SD = 0.8) during a single-session alcohol clamp protocol. Participants completed an intravenous alcohol session comprising an ascending limb (0 to 80 mg% in 20 min) and a BAC plateau (80 mg% for 80 min). Serial assessments included a cued go/no-go task and measures of stimulation, sedation, and craving. Relevant individual difference factors (attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder [ADHD] symptoms and sensation seeking) were examined as moderators. Multilevel modeling demonstrated that response inhibition worsened following initial rise in BAC and showed increasing impairment during the BAC plateau. ADHD symptoms and sensation seeking moderated this effect. Significant within-person associations between stimulation and craving were evident on the ascending limb only. Participants with higher ADHD symptoms reported steeper increases in stimulation during the ascending limb. These findings provide initial information about subjective and behavioral responses during pseudoconstant BAC, and potential moderators of these outcomes, in late adolescence. Additional studies with placebo-controlled designs are necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:26053322

  2. Physicochemical properties, antioxidant activities and protective effect against acute ethanol-induced hepatic injury in mice of foxtail millet (Setaria italica) bran oil.

    PubMed

    Pang, Min; He, Shujian; Wang, Lu; Cao, Xinmin; Cao, Lili; Jiang, Shaotong

    2014-08-01

    This study was designed to investigate physicochemical characterization of the oil extracted from foxtail millet bran (FMBO), and the antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects against acute ethanol-induced hepatic injury in mice. GC-MS analysis revealed that unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) account for 83.76% of the total fatty acids; in particular, the linoleic acid (C18:2) is the predominant polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), and the compounds of squalene and six phytosterols (or phytostanols) were identified in unsaponifiable matter of FMBO. The antioxidant activity examination of FMBO in vitro showed highly ferric-reducing antioxidant power and scavenging effects against DPPH· and HO· radicals. Furthermore, the protective effect of FMBO against acute hepatic injuries induced by ethanol was verified in mice. In this, intragastric administration with different dosages of FMBO in mice ahead of acute ethanol administration could observably antagonize the ethanol-induced increases in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), triglyceride (TG), and the hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, respectively, along with enhanced hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels relative to the control. Hepatic histological changes were also observed and confirmed that FMBO is capable of attenuating ethanol-induced hepatic injury. PMID:24909671

  3. Hepatic decompensation in the absence of obvious precipitants: the potential role of cytomegalovirus infection/reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Rosi, Silvia; Poretto, Valentina; Cavallin, Marta; Angeli, Paolo; Amodio, Piero; Sattin, Andrea; Montagnese, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Details of two patients with alcohol-related and mixed aetiology cirrhosis who developed acute-on-chronic liver failure/hepatic decompensation with no obvious precipitants are reported. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection or reactivation was diagnosed in both, and required treatment with ganciclovir in one. Both returned to baseline hepatic function and remain well. Physicians should be alert to the possibility that CMV might cause or contribute to hepatic decompensation in patients with cirrhosis, even if they are not severely immunocompromised, and especially if they are alcohol misusers. PMID:26629358

  4. Hepatic decompensation in the absence of obvious precipitants: the potential role of cytomegalovirus infection/reactivation.

    PubMed

    Rosi, Silvia; Poretto, Valentina; Cavallin, Marta; Angeli, Paolo; Amodio, Piero; Sattin, Andrea; Montagnese, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Details of two patients with alcohol-related and mixed aetiology cirrhosis who developed acute-on-chronic liver failure/hepatic decompensation with no obvious precipitants are reported. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection or reactivation was diagnosed in both, and required treatment with ganciclovir in one. Both returned to baseline hepatic function and remain well. Physicians should be alert to the possibility that CMV might cause or contribute to hepatic decompensation in patients with cirrhosis, even if they are not severely immunocompromised, and especially if they are alcohol misusers. PMID:26629358

  5. Brief motivational intervention for adolescents treated in emergency departments for acute alcohol intoxication – a randomized-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol misuse among youth is a major public health concern and numbers of adolescents admitted to the emergency department for acute alcoholic intoxication in Germany are recently growing. The emergency setting offers an opportunity to reach at-risk alcohol consuming adolescents and provide brief interventions in a potential “teachable moment”. However, studies on brief interventions targeting adolescents in emergency care are scarce and little is known about their effectiveness when delivered immediately following hospitalization for acute alcohol intoxication. In this protocol we present the HaLT-Hamburg trial evaluating a brief motivational intervention for adolescents treated in the emergency department after an episode of acute alcoholic intoxication. Methods The trial design is a parallel two-arm cluster randomized-controlled trial with follow-up assessment after 3 and 6 months. N?=?312 participants aged 17 years and younger will be recruited Fridays to Sundays in 6 pediatric clinics over a period of 30 months. Intervention condition is a manual-based brief motivational intervention with a telephone booster after 6 weeks and a manual-guided intervention for caregivers which will be compared to treatment as usual. Primary outcomes are reduction in binge drinking episodes, quantity of alcohol use on a typical drinking day and alcohol-related problems. Secondary outcome is further treatment seeking. Linear mixed models adjusted for baseline differences will be conducted according to intention-to-treat (ITT) and completers (per-protocol) principles to examine intervention effects. We also examine quantitative and qualitative process data on feasibility, intervention delivery, implementation and receipt from intervention providers, receivers and regular emergency department staff. Discussion The study has a number of strengths. First, a rigorous evaluation of HaLT-Hamburg is timely because variations of the HaLT project are widely used in Germany. Second, prior research has not targeted adolescents in the presumed teachable moment following acute alcohol intoxication. Third, we included a comprehensive process evaluation to raise external validity. Fourth, the study involved important stakeholders from the start to set up organizational structures for implementation and maintaining project impact. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN31234060 (April 30th 2012). PMID:24975110

  6. An experience with plasma exchange treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a case with fulminant hepatitis related to L-asparaginase.

    PubMed

    Bilgir, Oktay; Calan, Mehmet; Bilgir, Ferda; Cagliyan, Gulsum; Arslan, Oyku

    2013-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a malignant disorder resulting from the clonal proliferation of lymphoid precursors with arrested maturation. L-asparaginase is commonly used in combination chemotherapy of both pediatric and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemias. The most commonly encountered side effects of L-asparaginase are hypersensitivity reactions like pyrexia, urticaria, skin rash, and respiratory distress. There are also other side effects like anaphylaxis, coagulopathy, pancreatitis, thrombosis, and hepatic toxicity. Plasmapheresis can sometimes be appropriate to manage an overdose of drugs that circulate in the plasma compartment. We have reported plasmapheresis treatment of fulminant hepatitis in a patient with ALL after L-asparaginase treatment. PMID:23871581

  7. [Alcohol].

    PubMed

    Zima, T

    1996-07-14

    Alcohol is one of the most widely used addictive substances. It can be assumed that everybody encounters alcohol--ethanol in various forms and concentrations in the course of their lives. A global and social problem of our civilization is alcohol consumption which has a rising trend. Since 1989 the consumption of alcoholic beverages is rising and the mean annual consumption of concentrated ethanol per head is cea 10 litres. In ethanol abuse the organism is damaged not only by ethanol alone but in particular by substances formed during its metabolism. Its detailed knowledge is essential for the knowledge and investigations of the metabolic and toxic effect of ethanol on the organism. Ingested alcohol is in 90-98% eliminated from the organism by three known metabolic pathways: 1-alcohol dehydrogenase, 2-the microsomal ethanol oxidizing system and 3-catalase. Alcohol is a frequent important risk factor of serious "diseases of civilization" such as IHD, hypertension, osteoporosis, neoplastic diseases. Cirrhosis of the liver and chronic pancreatitis are the well known diseases associated with alcohol ingestion and also their most frequent cause. It is impossible to list all organs and diseases which develop as a result of alcohol consumption. It is important to realize that regular and "relatively" small amounts in the long run damage the organism and may be even fatal. PMID:8925547

  8. Gentiana manshurica Kitagawa prevents acetaminophen-induced acute hepatic injury in mice via inhibiting JNK/ERK MAPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ai-Yan; Lian, Li-Hua; Jiang, Ying-Zi; Wu, Yan-Ling; Nan, Ji-Xing

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the in vivo hepatoprotective effects and mechanisms of Gentiana manshurica Kitagawa (GM) in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury in mice. METHODS: GM (200, 150 or 50 mg/kg body weight) or N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC; 300 mg/kg body weight) was administrated orally with a single dose 2 h prior to APAP (300 mg/kg body weight) injection in mice. RESULTS: APAP treatment significantly depleted hepatic glutathione (GSH), increased serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and malonyldialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal levels, and decreased hepatic activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). However, the pretreatment of GM significantly alleviated APAP-induced oxidative stress by increasing GSH content, decreasing serum ALT, AST and MDA, and retaining the activity of GSH-px and SOD in the liver. Furthermore, GM pretreatment can inhibit caspase-3 activation and phosphorylation of c-Jun-NH2-terminal protein kinase 2 (JNK1/2) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). GM also remarkably attenuated hepatocyte apoptosis confirmed by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end-labeling method. CONCLUSION: Hepatoprotective effects of GM against APAP-induced acute toxicity are mediated either by preventing the decline of hepatic antioxidant status or its direct anti-apoptosis capacity. These results support that GM is a potent hepatoprotective agent. PMID:20082487

  9. Effect of alcohol on hepatic receptor of high density lipoproteins (HDL)

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, R.C.; Miller, B.M. V.A. Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN )

    1991-03-11

    Moderate alcohol intake has been shown to increase HDL cholesterol and proteins. The seemingly protective effect' of moderate alcohol drinking against cardiovascular diseases has been attributed to an increase in serum HDL. In this study, the authors show that a receptor for HDL is present in rat liver. Rat liver membrane was prepared by stepwise ultracentrifugation. Apo Al was iodinated using {sup 125}I-NaI and IODO-beads. HDL was labeled by incubating with {sup 125}I-apo Al then refloated be centrifugation. Binding of {sup 125}I-HDL to rat liver membrane reached equilibrium by 2-3 h and was saturable at 37C. The binding was inhibited 80% by excess unlabeled HDL, but was inhibited only 25% by excess LDL. It could also be inhibited by preincubating HDL with anti-apo Al or anti-apo E antisera but not with anti-apo AIV or control sera. The binding affinity of HDL to the liver membrane of rats fed alcohol for 5 wk was 50% that of their pair-fed controls. Thus a decrease in the binding of HDL to liver membrane due to alcohol-drinking may result in a slower clearance of HDL by the liver and consequently a higher HDL concentration in the serum.

  10. Hepatic and Nephric NRF2 Pathway Up-Regulation, an Early Antioxidant Response, in Acute Arsenic-Exposed Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinlong; Duan, Xiaoxu; Dong, Dandan; Zhang, Yang; Li, Wei; Zhao, Lu; Nie, Huifang; Sun, Guifan; Li, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs), a proven human carcinogen, damages biological systems through multiple mechanisms, one of them being reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. NRF2 is a redox-sensitive transcription factor that positively regulates the genes of encoding antioxidant and detoxification enzymes to neutralize ROS. Although NRF2 pathway activation by iAs has been reported in various cell types, however, the experimental data in vivo are very limited and not fully elucidated in humans. The present investigation aimed to explore the hepatic and nephric NRF2 pathway upregulation in acute arsenic-exposed mice in vivo. Our results showed 10 mg/kg NaAsO? elevated the NRF2 protein and increased the transcription of Nrf2 mRNA, as well as up-regulated NRF2 downstream targets HO-1, GST and GCLC time- and dose-dependently both in the liver and kidney. Acute NaAsO? exposure also resulted in obvious imbalance of oxidative redox status represented by the increase of GSH and MDA, and the decrease of T-AOC. The present investigation reveals that hepatic and nephric NRF2 pathway expression is an early antioxidant defensive response upon iAs exposure. A better knowledge about the NRF2 pathway involvment in the cellular response against arsenic could help improve the strategies for reducing the cellular toxicity related to this metalloid. PMID:26473898

  11. Hepatic and Nephric NRF2 Pathway Up-Regulation, an Early Antioxidant Response, in Acute Arsenic-Exposed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinlong; Duan, Xiaoxu; Dong, Dandan; Zhang, Yang; Li, Wei; Zhao, Lu; Nie, Huifang; Sun, Guifan; Li, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs), a proven human carcinogen, damages biological systems through multiple mechanisms, one of them being reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. NRF2 is a redox-sensitive transcription factor that positively regulates the genes of encoding antioxidant and detoxification enzymes to neutralize ROS. Although NRF2 pathway activation by iAs has been reported in various cell types, however, the experimental data in vivo are very limited and not fully elucidated in humans. The present investigation aimed to explore the hepatic and nephric NRF2 pathway upregulation in acute arsenic-exposed mice in vivo. Our results showed 10 mg/kg NaAsO2 elevated the NRF2 protein and increased the transcription of Nrf2 mRNA, as well as up-regulated NRF2 downstream targets HO-1, GST and GCLC time- and dose-dependently both in the liver and kidney. Acute NaAsO2 exposure also resulted in obvious imbalance of oxidative redox status represented by the increase of GSH and MDA, and the decrease of T-AOC. The present investigation reveals that hepatic and nephric NRF2 pathway expression is an early antioxidant defensive response upon iAs exposure. A better knowledge about the NRF2 pathway involvment in the cellular response against arsenic could help improve the strategies for reducing the cellular toxicity related to this metalloid. PMID:26473898

  12. Protective Effect of Baccharis trimera Extract on Acute Hepatic Injury in a Model of Inflammation Induced by Acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    Pádua, Bruno da Cruz; Rossoni Júnior, Joamyr Victor; de Brito Magalhães, Cíntia Lopes; Chaves, Míriam Martins; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Pedrosa, Maria Lucia; de Souza, Gustavo Henrique Bianco; Brandão, Geraldo Célio; Rodrigues, Ivanildes Vasconcelos; Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Costa, Daniela Caldeira

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acetaminophen (APAP) is a commonly used analgesic and antipyretic. When administered in high doses, APAP is a clinical problem in the US and Europe, often resulting in severe liver injury and potentially acute liver failure. Studies have demonstrated that antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents effectively protect against the acute hepatotoxicity induced by APAP overdose. Methods. The present study attempted to investigate the protective effect of B. trimera against APAP-induced hepatic damage in rats. The liver-function markers ALT and AST, biomarkers of oxidative stress, antioxidant parameters, and histopathological changes were examined. Results. The pretreatment with B. trimera attenuated serum activities of ALT and AST that were enhanced by administration of APAP. Furthermore, pretreatment with the extract decreases the activity of the enzyme SOD and increases the activity of catalase and the concentration of total glutathione. Histopathological analysis confirmed the alleviation of liver damage and reduced lesions caused by APAP. Conclusions. The hepatoprotective action of B. trimera extract may rely on its effect on reducing the oxidative stress caused by APAP-induced hepatic damage in a rat model. General Significance. These results make the extract of B. trimera a potential candidate drug capable of protecting the liver against damage caused by APAP overdose. PMID:25435714

  13. How CAGE, RAPS4-QF, and AUDIT Can Help Practitioners for Patients Admitted with Acute Alcohol Intoxication in Emergency Departments?

    PubMed Central

    Brousse, Georges; Arnaud, Benjamin; Geneste, Julie; Pereira, Bruno; De Chazeron, Ingrid; Teissedre, Frederique; Perrier, Christophe; Schwan, Raymund; Malet, Laurent; Schmidt, Jeannot; Llorca, Pierre Michel; Cherpitel, Cheryl J.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To help clinicians to identify the severity of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) from optimal thresholds found for recommended scales. Especially, taking account of the high prevalence of alcohol dependence among patients admitted to the emergency department (ED) for acute alcohol intoxication (AAI), we propose to define thresholds of severity of dependence based on the AUDIT score. Methods: All patients admitted to the ED with AAI (blood alcohol level >0.8?g/L), in a 2-month period, were assessed using the CAGE, RAPS-QF, and AUDIT, with the alcohol dependence/abuse section of the mini international neuropsychiatric interview (MINI) used as the gold standard. To explore the relation between the AUDIT and the MINI the sum of the positive items on the MINI (dependence) as a quantitative variable and as an ordinal parameter were analyzed. From the threshold score found for each scale we proposed intervals of severity of AUDs. Results: The mean age of the sample (122 males, 42 females) was 46?years. Approximately 12% of the patients were identified with alcohol abuse and 78% with dependence (DSM-IV). Cut points were determined for the AUDIT in order to distinguish mild and moderate dependence from severe dependence. A strategy of intervention based on levels of severity of AUD was proposed. Conclusion: Different thresholds proposed for the CAGE, RAPS4-QF, and AUDIT could be used to guide the choice of intervention for a patient: brief intervention, brief negotiation interviewing, or longer more intensive motivational intervention. PMID:25009509

  14. Hepatic scavenger receptor BI is associated with type 2 diabetes but unrelated to human and murine non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Rein-Fischboeck, Lisa; Krautbauer, Sabrina; Eisinger, Kristina; Pohl, Rebekka; Meier, Elisabeth M; Weiss, Thomas S; Buechler, Christa

    2015-11-13

    Scavenger receptor, class B type I (SR-BI) is a physiologically relevant regulator of high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. Low HDL is a common feature of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Here, hepatic SR-BI expression was analyzed in human and murine NAFLD. In primary human hepatocytes NAFLD relevant factors like inflammatory cytokines, lipopolysaccharide and TGF-? did not affect SR-BI protein. Similarly, oleate and palmitate had no effect. The adipokines chemerin, adiponectin, leptin and omentin did not regulate SR-BI expression. Accordingly, hepatic SR-BI was not changed in human and murine fatty liver and non-alcoholic steatohepatits. SR-BI was higher in type 2 diabetes patients but not in those with hypercholesterolemia. The current study indicates a minor if any role of SR-BI in human and murine NAFLD. PMID:26431876

  15. Nrf2 pathway activation contributes to anti-fibrosis effects of ginsenoside Rg1 in a rat model of alcohol- and CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-ping; Gao, Yan; Chu, Shi-feng; Zhang, Zhao; Xia, Cong-yuan; Mou, Zheng; Song, Xiu-yun; He, Wen-bin; Guo, Xiao-feng; Chen, Nai-hong

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the anti-fibrosis effects of ginsenoside Rg1 on alcohol- and CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats and to explore the mechanisms of the effects. Methods: Rats were given 6% alcohol in water and injected with CCl4 (2 mL/kg, sc) twice a week for 8 weeks. Rg1 (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg per day, po) was administered in the last 2 weeks. Hepatic fibrosis was determined by measuring serum biochemical parameters, HE staining, Masson's trichromic staining, and hydroxyproline and ?-SMA immunohistochemical staining of liver tissues. The activities of antioxidant enzymes, lipid peroxidation, and Nrf2 signaling pathway-related proteins (Nrf2, Ho-1 and Nqo1) in liver tissues were analyzed. Cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) of rats were prepared for in vitro studies. Results: In the alcohol- and CCl4-treated rats, Rg1 administration dose-dependently suppressed the marked increases of serum ALT, AST, LDH and ALP levels, inhibited liver inflammation and HSC activation and reduced liver fibrosis scores. Rg1 significantly increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GSH-Px and CAT) and reduced MDA levels in liver tissues. Furthermore, Rg1 significantly increased the expression and nuclear translocation of Nrf2 that regulated the expression of many antioxidant enzymes. Treatment of the cultured HSCs with Rg1 (1 ?mol/L) induced Nrf2 translocation, and suppressed CCl4-induced cell proliferation, reversed CCl4- induced changes in MDA, GPX, PCIII and HA contents in the supernatant fluid and ?-SMA expression in the cells. Knockdown of Nrf2 gene diminished these actions of Rg1 in CCl4-treated HSCs in vitro. Conclusion: Rg1 exerts protective effects in a rat model of alcohol- and CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis via promoting the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and expression of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:24976156

  16. Acute steatohepatitis, due to extreme metabolic dysregulation, as the first presentation of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Kranidiotis, Georgios; Angelidi, Angeliki; Sevdalis, Emmanouel; Telios, Thomas-Nikolaos; Gougoutsi, Alexandra; Melidonis, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a slowly progressive chronic disease, with a high prevalence among obese, dyslipidemic or diabetic people, commonly presented as an asymptomatic mild elevation of serum aminotransferases. We report a patient who experienced an acute form of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, as the first manifestation of NAFLD, due to exacerbation of pre-existing metabolic disorders by an extremely unhealthy lifestyle. A 50-year old, obese, diabetic man presented with a one-week history of jaundice and malaise. Analysis revealed elevated liver enzymes, bilirubin, lipids, and glucose. Based on patient’s history, physical examination, laboratory results, and imaging findings, acute non-alcoholic steatohepatitis was established as a diagnosis of exclusion. The patient was started on a low-calorie diet free of carbohydrates and fats, in combination with insulin. A dramatic improvement of clinical and laboratory parameters was observed. In the context of extreme metabolic dysregulation, induced by unhealthy diet, NAFLD may present as an acute steatohepatitis. PMID:24765505

  17. Diagnosis of alcoholic cirrhosis with the right-to-left hepatic lobe ratio: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Shreiner, D.P.; Barlai-Kovach, M.

    1981-02-01

    Since scans of cirrhotic livers commonly show a reduction in size and colloid uptake of the right lobe, a quantitative measure of uptake was made using a minicomputer to determine total counts in regions of interest defined over each lobe. Right-to-left ratios were then compared in 103 patients. For normal paitents the mean ratio +- 1 s.d. was 2.85 +- 0.65, and the mean for patients with known cirrhosis was 1.08 +- 0.33. Patients with other liver diseases had ratios similar to the normal group. The normal range of the right-to-left lobe ratio was 1.55 to 4.15. The sensitivity of the ratio for alcoholic cirrhosis was 85.7% and the specificity was 100% in this patient population. The right-to-left lobe ratio was more sensitive and specific for alcoholic cirrhosis than any other criterion tested. An hypothesis is described to explain these results.

  18. Combination of Alcohol and Fructose Exacerbates Metabolic Imbalance in Terms of Hepatic Damage, Dyslipidemia, and Insulin Resistance in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Schultze, Frank Christian; Wilting, Jörg; Mihm, Sabine; Raddatz, Dirk; Ramadori, Giuliano

    2014-01-01

    Although both alcohol and fructose are particularly steatogenic, their long-term effect in the development of a metabolic syndrome has not been studied in vivo. Consumption of fructose generally leads to obesity, whereas ethanol can induce liver damage in the absence of overweight. Here, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed ad libitum for 28 days on five diets: chow (control), liquid Lieber-DeCarli (LDC) diet, LDC +30%J of ethanol (L-Et) or fructose (L-Fr), and LDC combined with 30%J ethanol and 30%J fructose (L-EF). Body weight (BW) and liver weight (LW) were measured. Blood and liver samples were harvested and subjected to biochemical tests, histopathological examinations, and RT-PCR. Alcohol-containing diets substantially reduced the food intake and BW (?3rd week), whereas fructose-fed animals had higher LW than controls (P<0.05). Additionally, leukocytes, plasma AST and leptin levels were the highest in the fructose-administered rats. Compared to the chow and LDC diets, the L-EF diet significantly elevated blood glucose, insulin, and total-cholesterol levels (also vs. the L-Et group). The albumin and Quick-test levels were the lowest, whereas ALT activity was the highest in the L-EF group. Moreover, the L-EF diet aggravated plasma triglyceride and reduced HDL-cholesterol levels more than 2.7-fold compared to the sum of the effects of the L-Et and L-Fr diets. The decreased hepatic insulin clearance in the L-EF group vs. control and LDC groups was reflected by a significantly decreased C-peptide:insulin ratio. All diets except the control caused hepatosteatosis, as evidenced by Nile red and H&E staining. Hepatic transcription of insulin receptor substrate-1/2 was mainly suppressed by the L-Fr and L-EF diets. The L-EF diet did not enhance the mitochondrial ?-oxidation of fatty acids (Cpt1? and Ppar-? expressions) compared to the L-Et or L-Fr diet. Together, our data provide evidence for the coaction of ethanol and fructose with a high-fat-diet on dyslipidemia and insulin resistance-accompanied liver damage. PMID:25101998

  19. The Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Teneligliptin Attenuates Hepatic Lipogenesis via AMPK Activation in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Model Mice.

    PubMed

    Ideta, Takayasu; Shirakami, Yohei; Miyazaki, Tsuneyuki; Kochi, Takahiro; Sakai, Hiroyasu; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Shimizu, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is strongly associated with metabolic syndrome, is increasingly a major cause of hepatic disorder. Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors, anti-diabetic agents, are expected to be effective for the treatment of NAFLD. In the present study, we established a novel NAFLD model mouse using monosodium glutamate (MSG) and a high-fat diet (HFD) and investigated the effects of a DPP-4 inhibitor, teneligliptin, on the progression of NAFLD. Male MSG/HFD-treated mice were divided into two groups, one of which received teneligliptin in drinking water. Administration of MSG and HFD caused mice to develop severe fatty changes in the liver, but teneligliptin treatment improved hepatic steatosis and inflammation, as evaluated by the NAFLD activity score. Serum alanine aminotransferase and intrahepatic triglyceride levels were significantly decreased in teneligliptin-treated mice (p < 0.05). Hepatic mRNA levels of the genes involved in de novo lipogenesis were significantly downregulated by teneligliptin (p < 0.05). Moreover, teneligliptin increased hepatic expression levels of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) protein. These findings suggest that teneligliptin attenuates lipogenesis in the liver by activating AMPK and downregulating the expression of genes involved in lipogenesis. DPP-4 inhibitors may be effective for the treatment of NAFLD and may be able to prevent its progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:26670228

  20. The Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Teneligliptin Attenuates Hepatic Lipogenesis via AMPK Activation in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ideta, Takayasu; Shirakami, Yohei; Miyazaki, Tsuneyuki; Kochi, Takahiro; Sakai, Hiroyasu; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Shimizu, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is strongly associated with metabolic syndrome, is increasingly a major cause of hepatic disorder. Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors, anti-diabetic agents, are expected to be effective for the treatment of NAFLD. In the present study, we established a novel NAFLD model mouse using monosodium glutamate (MSG) and a high-fat diet (HFD) and investigated the effects of a DPP-4 inhibitor, teneligliptin, on the progression of NAFLD. Male MSG/HFD-treated mice were divided into two groups, one of which received teneligliptin in drinking water. Administration of MSG and HFD caused mice to develop severe fatty changes in the liver, but teneligliptin treatment improved hepatic steatosis and inflammation, as evaluated by the NAFLD activity score. Serum alanine aminotransferase and intrahepatic triglyceride levels were significantly decreased in teneligliptin-treated mice (p < 0.05). Hepatic mRNA levels of the genes involved in de novo lipogenesis were significantly downregulated by teneligliptin (p < 0.05). Moreover, teneligliptin increased hepatic expression levels of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) protein. These findings suggest that teneligliptin attenuates lipogenesis in the liver by activating AMPK and downregulating the expression of genes involved in lipogenesis. DPP-4 inhibitors may be effective for the treatment of NAFLD and may be able to prevent its progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:26670228

  1. Therapeutic Role of Ursolic Acid on Ameliorating Hepatic Steatosis and Improving Metabolic Disorders in High-Fat Diet-Induced Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Rats

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanyu; Wang, Yemei; Sun, Zongxiang; Guo, Fuchuan; Li, Xiaoxia; Meng, Man; Li, Ying; Sun, Changhao

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most prevalent liver diseases around the world, and is closely associated with obesity, diabetes, and insulin resistance. Ursolic acid (UA), an ubiquitous triterpenoid with multifold biological roles, is distributed in various plants. This study was conducted to investigate the therapeutic effect and potential mechanisms of UA against hepatic steatosis in a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) rat model. Methodology/Principal Findings Obese NAFLD model was established in Sprague-Dawley rats by 8-week HFD feeding. Therapeutic role of UA was evaluated using 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5% UA-supplemented diet for another 6 weeks. The results from both morphologic and histological detections indicated that UA significantly reversed HFD-induced hepatic steatosis and liver injury. Besides, hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-? was markedly up-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels by UA. Knocking down PPAR-? significantly inhibited the anti-steatosis role of UA in vitro. HFD-induced adverse changes in the key genes, which participated in hepatic lipid metabolism, were also alleviated by UA treatment. Furthermore, UA significantly ameliorated HFD-induced metabolic disorders, including insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrated that UA effectively ameliorated HFD-induced hepatic steatosis through a PPAR-? involved pathway, via improving key enzymes in the controlling of lipids metabolism. The metabolic disorders were accordingly improved with the decrease of hepatic steatosis. Thereby, UA could be a promising candidate for the treatment of NAFLD. PMID:24489777

  2. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant promotes intestinal barrier function, balances Treg and TH17 cells and ameliorates hepatic injury in a mouse model of chronic-binge alcohol feeding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui-Cong; Xu, Lan-Man; Du, Shan-Jie; Huang, Si-Si; Wu, He; Dong, Jia-Jia; Huang, Jian-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Feng, Wen-Ke; Chen, Yong-Ping

    2016-01-22

    Impaired intestinal barrier function plays a critical role in alcohol-induced hepatic injury, and the subsequent excessive absorbed endotoxin and bacterial translocation activate the immune response that aggravates the liver injury. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant (LGG-s) has been suggested to improve intestinal barrier function and alleviate the liver injury induced by chronic and binge alcohol consumption, but the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. In this study, chronic-binge alcohol fed model was used to determine the effects of LGG-s on the prevention of alcoholic liver disease in C57BL/6 mice and investigate underlying mechanisms. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli diet containing 5% alcohol for 10 days, and one dose of alcohol was gavaged on Day 11. In one group, LGG-s was supplemented along with alcohol. Control mice were fed isocaloric diet. Nine hours later the mice were sacrificed for analysis. Chronic-binge alcohol exposure induced an elevation in liver enzymes, steatosis and morphology changes, while LGG-s supplementation attenuated these changes. Treatment with LGG-s significantly improved intestinal barrier function reflected by increased mRNA expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins and villus-crypt histology in ileum, and decreased Escherichia coli (E. coli) protein level in liver. Importantly, flow cytometry analysis showed that alcohol reduced Treg cell population while increased TH17 cell population as well as IL-17 secretion, which was reversed by LGG-s administration. In conclusion, our findings indicate that LGG-s is effective in preventing chronic-binge alcohol exposure-induced liver injury and shed a light on the importance of the balance of Treg and TH17 cells in the role of LGG-s application. PMID:26617183

  3. Current management of alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Singal, Ashwani K; Jampana, Sarat C

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease accounts for significant economic burden with second most common cause for liver transplantation in the US. Although alcohol abstinence is most crucial, morbidity and mortality occur amongst those with continuing alcohol intake and with established end stage liver disease due to lack of specific treatment modalities to manage this disease. Patients with severe acute alcoholic hepatitis, a distinct subset of alcoholic liver disease have a potential for mortality in about 25% within about 1 month despite treatment with available specific agents such as corticosteroids and/or pentoxifylline. Hence, there is clear need for newer and better treatment options to manage these patients. In this article, potential emerging newer targets to manage this disease are discussed including intestinal decontamination, caspase inhibitors, antioxidants, and interlukins. In the background of encouraging emerging data (retrospective data from the UNOS database and data from a case matched prospective French study) on the beneficial effects of liver transplantation amongst patients with alcoholic hepatitis who are non-responders to current medical treatments, this article would also deal controversies surrounding the role and use of liver transplantation in patients with alcoholic hepatitis. Issues such as rule of 6 months of abstinence, ethical issues, and shortage of donor organs will be debated. PMID:25323125

  4. Inhibition of diethylnitrosamine-initiated alcohol-promoted hepatic inflammation and precancerous lesions by flavonoid luteolin is associated with increased sirtuin 1 activity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Rafacho, Bruna Paola Murino; Stice, Camilla Peach; Liu, Chun; Greenberg, Andrew S.; Ausman, Lynne M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic and excessive alcohol consumption is an established risk for hepatic inflammation and carcinogenesis. Luteolin is one of the most common flavonoids present in plants and has potential beneficial effects against cancer. In this study, we examined the effect and potential mechanisms of luteolin supplementation in a carcinogen initiated alcohol-promoted pre-neoplastic liver lesion mouse model. Methods C57BL/6 mice were injected with diethylnitrosamine (DEN) [i.p. 25 mg/kg of body weight (BW)] at 14 days of age. At 8 weeks of age mice were group pair-fed with Lieber-DeCarli liquid control diet or alcoholic diet [ethanol (EtOH) diet, 27% total energy from ethanol] and supplemented with a dose of 30 mg luteolin/kg BW per day for 21 days. Results DEN-injected mice fed EtOH diet displayed a significant induction of pre-neoplastic lesions, a marker associated with presence of steatosis and inflammation. Dietary luteolin significantly reduced the severity and incidence of hepatic inflammatory foci and steatosis in DEN-injected mice fed EtOH diet, as well the presence of preneoplastic lesions. There was no difference on hepatic protein levels of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) among all groups; however, luteolin supplementation significantly reversed alcohol-reduced SIRT1 activity assessed by the ratio of acetylated and total forkhead box protein O1 (FoXO1) and SIRT1 target proliferator-activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1 alpha (PGC1?). Conclusions Dietary intake of luteolin prevents alcohol promoted pre-neoplastic lesions, potentially mediated by SIRT1 signaling pathway. PMID:26005679

  5. Differences between male and female cyclists' performances under the acute influence of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Benno; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie; Schwender, Holger; Mindiashvili, Nona; Daldrup, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    To examine the effects of alcohol regarding the fitness required to ride a bicycle, practical cycling tests, accompanied by medical examinations, were carried out at different blood alcohol concentrations. Seventy-eight persons were included in the trials (41 males, 37 females). Eighty-three evaluable trials were obtained. Men committed less coordinative driving faults with comparable blood alcohol concentrations. Single highly alcoholized men were able to safely ride their bicycle; however, each of the female test persons had at least one severe driving fault at blood alcohol levels above 1.43 g/kg. Women tended to exhibit signs of alcoholization in the medical examination reports earlier than men. PMID:25833169

  6. Association of Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy with Hepatic Encephalopathy in Hepatitis B Virus-related Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhao-Ni; Zuo, Yong-Qing; Hu, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is an important neuropsychiatry complication of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). PPI therapy may increase the intestinal bacterial overgrowth and infections. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess whether PPI use in ACLF is associated with HE. Patients and Methods: A retrospective case-control study was performed. Fifty five admitted patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related ACLF complicated by Stage II-IV HE developed after admission between January 2008 and December 2012 were matched (by sex, age, and MELD score) with comparable HBV-related ACLF patients (n = 110) who did not develop this complication during hospitalization. We excluded combined HE upon admission and other neurological disorders in patients with ACLF. Univariate and multivariate analyses of 30 variables (laboratory examination, predisposition, treatment, etc.) before the occurrence of HE were carried out to identify the factors predictive of HE. Results: In univariate analysis, patients with HE in ACLF had a significantly higher rate of PPI use (89.1%) compared with non-HE (63.6%, P = 0.001). In addition, clinical and standard laboratory variables were significantly different between the two groups regarding the infection rate, hyponatremia, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Arginine Hydrochloride use and Lactulose use. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the combined effects of the variables with HE as the outcome. HE in ACLF was associated with hyponatremia (odds ratio (OR) = 6. 318, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2. 803-14.241; P = 0. 000), PPI use was independently associated with HE (OR = 4. 392, CI = 1. 604-12.031; P = 0. 004), and lactulose use was protective (OR = 0. 294, CI = 0. 136-0.675; P = 0. 003). Conclusions: The occurrence of HE is associated with hyponatremia and PPI use in patients with ACLF. PMID:24748895

  7. Alcohol

    MedlinePLUS

    ... created when grains, fruits, or vegetables are fermented . Fermentation is a process that uses yeast or bacteria ... change the sugars in the food into alcohol. Fermentation is used to produce many necessary items — everything ...

  8. Alcohol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schibeci, Renato

    1996-01-01

    Describes the manufacturing of ethanol, the effects of ethanol on the body, the composition of alcoholic drinks, and some properties of ethanol. Presents some classroom experiments using ethanol. (JRH)

  9. Influence of aliphatic alcohols on the hepatic response to halogenated olefins.

    PubMed Central

    Cornish, H H; Barth, M L; Ling, B

    1977-01-01

    The role of alcohols in potentiating the toxicity of halogenated hydrocarbon solvents has been reviewed. The toxicity of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform can be markedly potentiated by prior treatment with ethanol or phenobarbital. Trichloroethylene toxicity may also be potentiated by ethanol ingestion. Prior ethanol ingestion acts by altering biochemical parameters that result in an increased response to subsequent solvent exposure. Simultaneous exposure to both ethanol and trichloroethylene allows for competitive substrate inhibition of metabolism since these compounds share several common enzymatic pathways. Thus the toxic response to multiple exposures varies depending upon the time sequence and the comparative levels of the individual components. Phenobarbital apparently potentiates solvent toxocity by induction of the microsomal mixed function oxidase system. Ethanol, either on a chronic or single dose basis, also has the ability to stimulate this enzyme system. Although alteration of the microsomal mixed function oxidase system by chronic ethanol ingestion may play an important role in potentiation of solvent toxicity, the potentiation seen following a single dose of ethanol cannot be fully accounted for by the known effects of ethanol on the mixed function oxidase system. In addition to ethanol a large number of other alcohols will markedly potentiate the hepatotoxic response to solvents such as carbon tetrachloride and chloroform. The mechanisms involved in such potentiation are not known at the present time. PMID:612439

  10. A differential role for neuropeptides in acute and chronic adaptive responses to alcohol: behavioural and genetic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Philippa; Mould, Richard; Dillon, James; Glautier, Steven; Andrianakis, Ioannis; James, Christopher; Pugh, Amanda; Holden-Dye, Lindy; O'Connor, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Prolonged alcohol consumption in humans followed by abstinence precipitates a withdrawal syndrome consisting of anxiety, agitation and in severe cases, seizures. Withdrawal is relieved by a low dose of alcohol, a negative reinforcement that contributes to alcohol dependency. This phenomenon of 'withdrawal relief' provides evidence of an ethanol-induced adaptation which resets the balance of signalling in neural circuits. We have used this as a criterion to distinguish between direct and indirect ethanol-induced adaptive behavioural responses in C. elegans with the goal of investigating the genetic basis of ethanol-induced neural plasticity. The paradigm employs a 'food race assay' which tests sensorimotor performance of animals acutely and chronically treated with ethanol. We describe a multifaceted C. elegans 'withdrawal syndrome'. One feature, decrease reversal frequency is not relieved by a low dose of ethanol and most likely results from an indirect adaptation to ethanol caused by inhibition of feeding and a food-deprived behavioural state. However another aspect, an aberrant behaviour consisting of spontaneous deep body bends, did show withdrawal relief and therefore we suggest this is the expression of ethanol-induced plasticity. The potassium channel, slo-1, which is a candidate ethanol effector in C. elegans, is not required for the responses described here. However a mutant deficient in neuropeptides, egl-3, is resistant to withdrawal (although it still exhibits acute responses to ethanol). This dependence on neuropeptides does not involve the NPY-like receptor npr-1, previously implicated in C. elegans ethanol withdrawal. Therefore other neuropeptide pathways mediate this effect. These data resonate with mammalian studies which report involvement of a number of neuropeptides in chronic responses to alcohol including corticotrophin-releasing-factor (CRF), opioids, tachykinins as well as NPY. This suggests an evolutionarily conserved role for neuropeptides in ethanol-induced plasticity and opens the way for a genetic analysis of the effects of alcohol on a simple model system. PMID:20454655

  11. Interferon lambda 3 genotype predicts hepatitis C virus RNA levels in early acute infection among people who inject drugs: The InC3 Study

    PubMed Central

    Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Grady, Bart; Page, Kimberly; Kim, Arthur Y.; McGovern, Barbara H.; Cox, Andrea L.; Rice, Thomas M.; Sacks-Davis, Rachel; Bruneau, Julie; Morris, Meghan; Amin, Janaki; Schinkel, Janke; Applegate, Tanya; Maher, Lisa; Hellard, Margaret; Lloyd, Andrew R.; Prins, Maria; Geskus, Ronald B; Dore, Gregory J.; Grebely, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA level in acute HCV infection is predictive of spontaneous clearance. This study assessed factors associated with HCV RNA levels during early acute infection among people who inject drugs with well-defined acute HCV infection. Study design Data were from International Collaboration of Incident HIV and Hepatitis C in Injecting Cohorts (InC3) Study, an international collaboration of nine prospective cohorts studying acute HCV infection. Individuals with available HCV RNA levels during early acute infection (first two months following infection) were included. The distribution of HCV RNA levels during early acute infection were compared by selected host and virological factors. Results A total of 195 individuals were included. Median HCV RNA levels were significantly higher among individuals with interferon lambda 3 (IFNL3, formerly called IL28B) CC genotype compared to those with TT/CT genotype (6.28 vs. 5.39 log IU/mL, respectively; P=0.01). IFNL3 CC genotype was also associated with top tertile HCV RNA levels (?6.3 IU/mL; vs. TT/CT genotype; adjusted Odds Ratio: 4.28; 95%CI: 2.01, 9.10; P<0.01). Conclusions This study indicates that IFNL3 CC genotype predicts higher HCV RNA levels in early acute HCV infection. PMID:25256151

  12. Acute hepatitis A in an elderly patient after care worker travel to high endemicity country

    PubMed Central

    Aasheim, Erlend T; Seymour, Martin; Balogun, Koye; Ngui, Siew-Lin; Williams, Chris J; Shankar, Ananda Giri

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is considered one of the most important vaccine-preventable diseases in travelers. HAV spreads from person to person via the fecal-oral route and gives rise to an estimated 1.4 million cases worldwide each year. In developing countries with poor sanitary conditions people tend to be infected during childhood and have few symptoms, whereas in developed countries with good sanitary conditions fewer people develop immunity during childhood. This leads to susceptible populations of adults, who are also more prone to severe complications. Here we describe two confirmed cases of hepatitis A associated with a nursing home. The index case was a care worker who had recently traveled to a high-endemicity country, and the second case was a resident at the nursing home where the index case worked. Both cases had an identical genotype IIIA strain, consistent with a transmission event. Current policy does not include a requirement for hepatitis A vaccine in care workers who travel to high endemicity countries despite the fact that infected care workers can potentially spread the disease to elderly patients and other groups at risk of severe complications from HAV infection. We suggest that employers should consider hepatitis A vaccine upon employment; particularly in care workers who plan to visit areas where HAV is known to be endemic. PMID:23880980

  13. Acute Gastric Dilatation: A Transient Cause of Hepatic Portal Venous Gas—Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Allaparthi, Satya B.; Anand, Curuchi P.

    2013-01-01

    Gastric pneumatosis (GP) and hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG) have typically been thought of as an ominous radiological sign associated with a grave prognosis, and the observation of HPVG on plain abdominal radiography, ultrasonography, or computed tomography is viewed as a significant finding. It is often associated with severe or potentially lethal conditions warranting urgent diagnosis and possible surgical intervention. Early studies of HPVG based on plain abdominal radiography found an associated mortality rate of 75% primarily due to ischemic bowel. However, modern abdominal computed tomography (CT) has resulted in the detection of HPVG in an increased proportion of nonfatal and benign conditions. We report a nonfatal case of HPVG in a patient with Noonan's syndrome due to acute gastric dilatation in the setting of gastric outlet obstruction caused by a congenital band that is extremely rare in adults. PMID:23819076

  14. Acute hepatitis B caused by a vaccine-escape HBV strain in vaccinated subject: sequence analysis and therapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Luongo, Monica; Critelli, Rosina; Grottola, Antonella; Gitto, Stefano; Bernabucci, Veronica; Bevini, Mirco; Vecchi, Chiara; Montagnani, Giuliano; Villa, Erica

    2015-01-01

    HBV vaccine contains the 'a' determinant region, the major immune-target of antibodies (anti-HBs). Failure of immunization may be caused by vaccine-induced or spontaneous 'a' determinant surface gene mutants. Here, we evaluate the possible lack of protection by HBV vaccine, describing the case of an acute hepatitis B diagnosed in a 55-year-old Caucasian male unpaid blood donor, vaccinated against HBV. Sequencing data for preS-S region revealed multiple point mutations. Of all the substitutions found, Q129H, located in the "a" determinant region of HBsAg, can alter antigenicity, leading to mutants. This mutant may cause vaccine failure especially when associated with high viremia of infecting source. PMID:25542480

  15. A recent epidemiological cluster of acute hepatitis B genotype F1b infection in a restricted geographical area of Italy.

    PubMed

    Pollicita, M; Alteri, C; Bellocchi, M C; Armenia, D; Carioti, L; Salpini, R; Colagrossi, L; Battisti, A; Aragri, M; Fabeni, L; Mariani, R; Dalessandro, M; Ranelli, A; Paoloni, M; Parruti, G; Perno, C F; Svicher, V

    2015-12-01

    In this study, by phylogenetic analysis, we identified an epidemiological cluster involving eight individuals diagnosed with acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection related to unprotected sexual intercourse in a restricted area of central Italy (time period: 2011-2014). Notably, these patients (six of eight Italians) were infected by subgenotype F1b, which is not commonly found in western countries. Ultra-deep pyrosequencing confirmed a superimposable composition of HBV quasi-species in these patients. Despite the availability of effective vaccination, this study highlights the importance of not underestimating the risk of HBV infection, of continuing to set up surveillance programmes for HBV infection, and of investigating the pathogenetic potential of these atypical genotypes. PMID:26260987

  16. Acute treatment with pyrrolo(1,4)benzodiazepine antitumor antibiotics alters in vitro hepatic drug metabolizing activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, J E; Lubawy, W C

    1983-09-01

    The pyrrolo(1,4)benzodiazepine antitumor antibiotic, anthramycin, shares a number of toxicities with the widely used anticancer agent adriamycin. We investigated whether acute doses of anthramycin and the structurally related compounds, sibiromycin and tomaymycin, would depress P-450-dependent drug biotransformations as has been reported for adriamycin. Alterations in drug metabolism rates were determined in rats using 50 and 75% of the approximate 7-day LD50 determined in mice. 4 days post dosing ethylmorphine demethylase and aniline hydroxylase activities in liver 9000 g supernatant were depressed from 26 to 76%. Tomaymycin lowered drug metabolism in a dose-related manner, while sibiromycin produced the greatest amount of depression. Like adriamycin, the pyrrolo(1,4)benzodiazepines possess the ability to depress hepatic drug metabolism and therefore may affect the disposition of compounds with which they are co-administered. PMID:6689384

  17. Role of IL28B Gene Polymorphism and Cell-Mediated Immunity in Spontaneous Resolution of Acute Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Spada, Enea; Amoroso, Pietro; Taliani, Gloria; Zuccaro, Ornella; Chiriacò, Piergiorgio; Maio, Patrizia; Maio, Giuseppe; Esposito, Maria Luisa; Mariano, Corrado; Rinaldi, Roberto; Bellissima, Pietro; Tosti, Maria Elena; Del Porto, Paola; Francavilla, Ruggiero; Mellace, Vincenzo; Garbuglia, Anna Rosa; Folgori, Antonella; Mele, Alfonso; Buonocore, Salvatore; Lettieri, Gennaro; Pierri, Paola; Cosco, Lucio; Ferraro, Teresa; Scognamiglio, Paola; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Baldi, Ubaldo; Montesano, Franco; Audino, Giulia; De Stefano, Caterina; Caterini, Antonio; Cuccia, Mario; Girelli, Gabriella; Perrone, Paola; Laurenti, Luca; Piccolella, Enza; Scotta, Cristiano; Cortese, Riccardo; Nicosia, Alfredo; Vitelli, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Background.?A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs12979860) near the IL28B gene has been associated with spontaneous and treatment-induced hepatitis C virus clearance. We investigated predictors of spontaneous disease resolution in a cohort of patients with acute hepatitis C (AHC), analyzing epidemiological, clinical and virological parameters together with IL28B.rs12979860 genotypes and cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Methods.?Fifty-six symptomatic AHC patients were enrolled and followed prospectively. CMI was measured in 31 patients at multiple time points by interferon-? enzyme-linked immunospot assay and was correlated to the IL28B.rs12979860 SNP. Results.?Eighteen patients had a self-limiting AHC that was associated with female sex (P = .028), older age (P = .018), alanine aminotransferase level >1000 U/L (P = .027), total bilirubin level >7 mg/dL (P = .036), and IL28B.rs12979860 genotype CC (P = .030). In multivariate analysis, only CC genotype was independently associated with self-limiting AHC (odds ratio, 5.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.1–26.5). Patients with the CC genotype with self-limiting AHC had a stronger (P = .02) and broader (P = .013) CMI than patients with the CT genotype with chronically evolving AHC. In patients with chronically evolving disease, CC genotype was associated with a broader CMI compared to CT genotype (P = .028). A negative CMI was more frequently associated with CT genotype among persistently infected patients (P = .043) and with persistent infection among CT patients (P = .033). Conclusions.?Self-limiting AHC was independently associated with CC genotype. The correlation between IL28B.rs12979860 genotypes and CMI is suggestive of a possible important role of CMI in favoring hepatitis C virus clearance in CC patients. PMID:23784926

  18. IL-22 modulates gut epithelial and immune barrier functions following acute alcohol exposure and burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Rendon, Juan L.; Li, Xiaoling; Akhtar, Suhail; Choudhry, Mashkoor A.

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)–22 maintains gut epithelial integrity and expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) Reg3? and Reg3?. Our laboratory has shown that acute alcohol/ethanol (EtOH) exposure prior to burn injury results in increased gut permeability, intestinal T cell suppression and enhanced bacterial translocation. Herein, we determined the effect of combined EtOH intoxication and burn injury on intestinal levels of IL-22 as well as Reg3? and Reg3? expression. We further examined whether in vivo restitution of IL-22 restores gut permeability, Reg3? and Reg3? levels, and bacterial load (e.g. gut bacterial growth) within the intestine following EtOH and burn injury. Male mice, ~25g, were gavaged with EtOH (2.9 mg/kg) prior to receiving a ~12.5% total body surface area full thickness burn. Mice were immediately treated with saline control or IL-22 (1 mg/kg) by i.p. injection. One day post injury, there was a significant decrease in intestinal IL-22, Reg3? and Reg3? expression along with an increase in intestinal permeability and gut bacterial load following EtOH combined with burn injury, as compared to sham injury. Treatment with IL-22 normalized Reg3? and Reg3? expression, and attenuated the increase in intestinal permeability following EtOH and burn injury. Qualitatively, IL-22 treatment reduced the bacterial load in nearly half of mice receiving EtOH combined with burn injury. Our data indicate that IL-22 maintains gut epithelial and immune barrier integrity following EtOH and burn injury; thus, the IL-22/AMP pathway may provide a therapeutic target for the treatment of patients who sustain burn injury under the influence of EtOH. PMID:23143063

  19. Protective Effect of Danhong Injection on Acute Hepatic Failure Induced by Lipopolysaccharide and D-Galactosamine in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Gao, Li-Na; Cui, Yuan-Lu; Jiang, Heng-Li

    2014-01-01

    Acute hepatic failure (AHF), which leads to an extremely high mortality rate, has become the focus of attention in clinic. In this study, Danhong injection (DHI) was investigated to evaluate the preventive and protective effect on AHF induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and D-galactosamine (GalN) in mice. For AHF induction, ICR mice were intraperitoneally injected with D-GalN (700?mg/kg) and LPS (20??g/kg). DHI was administrated twice, at 12 and 1?h, respectively, before D-GalN/LPS injection. After stimulation with D-GalN/LPS for 1 and 6?h, serum and livers were collected for analysis. We found that mice administrated with DHI displayed a higher survival rate, lower serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total bilirubin (TBil), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?. DHI inhibited the elevations of hepatic lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde), caspase-8 activity, and mRNA expression levels of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1? and interleukin-6) increased by D-GalN/LPS in the liver. Furthermore, liver histopathological analysis indicated that the DHI group showed markedly fewer apoptotic (TUNEL positive) cells and less pathological changes than those in the AHF model group. These results provide a novel insight into the pharmacological actions of DHI as a potential candidate for treating AHF. PMID:24772178

  20. Protective effect of danhong injection on acute hepatic failure induced by lipopolysaccharide and d-galactosamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Gao, Li-Na; Cui, Yuan-Lu; Jiang, Heng-Li

    2014-01-01

    Acute hepatic failure (AHF), which leads to an extremely high mortality rate, has become the focus of attention in clinic. In this study, Danhong injection (DHI) was investigated to evaluate the preventive and protective effect on AHF induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and D-galactosamine (GalN) in mice. For AHF induction, ICR mice were intraperitoneally injected with D-GalN (700?mg/kg) and LPS (20? ? g/kg). DHI was administrated twice, at 12 and 1?h, respectively, before D-GalN/LPS injection. After stimulation with D-GalN/LPS for 1 and 6?h, serum and livers were collected for analysis. We found that mice administrated with DHI displayed a higher survival rate, lower serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total bilirubin (TBil), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)- ? . DHI inhibited the elevations of hepatic lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde), caspase-8 activity, and mRNA expression levels of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1 ? and interleukin-6) increased by D-GalN/LPS in the liver. Furthermore, liver histopathological analysis indicated that the DHI group showed markedly fewer apoptotic (TUNEL positive) cells and less pathological changes than those in the AHF model group. These results provide a novel insight into the pharmacological actions of DHI as a potential candidate for treating AHF. PMID:24772178

  1. Risk Factors for Acute Hepatitis A Infection in Korea in 2007 and 2009: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Joo Youn; Ki, Moran; Jang, Hye Lim; Park, Hee Suk; Son, Hyun Jin; Bae, Si Hyun; Kang, Jin Han; Jun, Dae Won; Lee, Jin-Woo; Hong, Young Jin; Kim, Young Seok; Kim, Chang-Hwi; Chang, U Im; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Yang, Hyeon Woong; Kim, Hong Soo; Park, Kyeong Bae; Hwang, Jae Seok; Heo, Jeong; Kim, In Hee; Kim, Jung Soo; Cheon, Gab Jin

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the risk factors associated with acute hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection in the Korean population. Participants were recruited from five referral hospitals across the country in 2007 and from 11 hospitals in 2009. Patients with positive anti-HAV IgM antibody tests became the case group, while patients treated for non-contagious diseases at the same hospitals were recruited as controls. A total of 222 and 548 case-control pairs were studied in the 2007 and 2009 surveys, respectively. Data from the surveys were analyzed jointly. In a multivariate analysis, sharing the household with HAV-infected family members (OR, 6.32; 95% CI, 1.4-29.6), contact with other HAV-infected individuals (OR, 4.73; 95% CI, 2.4-9.4), overseas travel in 2007 (OR, 19.93; 95% CI, 2.3-174.4), consumption of raw shellfish (OR, 2.51; 95% CI, 1.8-3.5), drinking bottled water (OR, 1.64; 95% CI, 1.3-8.4), and occupation that involve handling food (OR, 3.30; 95% CI, 1.3-8.4) increased the risk of HAV infection. Avoiding contact with HAV-infected individuals and avoiding raw foods eating could help minimize the risk of hepatitis A infection. Immunization must be beneficial to individuals who handle food ingredients occupationally or travel overseas to HAV-endemic areas. PMID:23772157

  2. Severe Aplastic Anemia following Acute Hepatitis from Toxic Liver Injury: Literature Review and Case Report of a Successful Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Kamran; Sarwar, Usman; Khallafi, Hicham

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis associated aplastic anemia (HAAA) is a rare syndrome in which severe aplastic anemia (SAA) complicates the recovery of acute hepatitis (AH). HAAA is described to occur with AH caused by viral infections and also with idiopathic cases of AH and no clear etiology of liver injury. Clinically, AH can be mild to fulminant and transient to persistent and precedes the onset SAA. It is assumed that immunologic dysregulation following AH leads to the development of SAA. Several observations have been made to elucidate the immune mediated injury mechanisms, ensuing from liver injury and progressing to trigger bone marrow failure with the involvement of activated lymphocytes and severe T-cell imbalance. HAAA has a very poor outcome and often requires bone marrow transplant (BMT). The findings of immune related myeloid injury implied the use of immunosuppressive therapy (IST) and led to improved survival from HAAA. We report a case of young male who presented with AH resulting from the intake of muscle building protein supplements and anabolic steroids. The liver injury slowly resolved with supportive care and after 4 months of attack of AH, he developed SAA. He was treated with IST with successful outcome without the need for a BMT. PMID:25587471

  3. Acute Use of Alcohol and Methods of Suicide in a US National Sample

    PubMed Central

    Conner, Kenneth R.; Huguet, Nathalie; Caetano, Raul; Giesbrecht, Norman; McFarland, Bentson H.; Nolte, Kurt B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We explored age, gender, and racial/ethnic differences with alcohol use and firearms, hanging or asphyxiation, and poisoning methods of suicide. Methods. We analyzed data for 37?993 suicide decedents aged 18 years and older from the 2005–2010 National Violent Death Reporting System database. Multinomial logistic regressions examined associations of method with alcohol use defined by blood alcohol content. Two-way interactions tested the effects of age, gender, and race/ethnicity on the associations between alcohol use and method of suicide. Results. Alcohol was present among decedents who used the 3 leading methods of suicide: firearm (35.0%), hanging (36.8%), and poisoning (32.7%). Two-way interaction tests suggested that in young and middle adulthood, individuals were more likely to drink alcohol when they used a firearm or hanging (compared with poisoning), but in older adulthood, the reverse was true, with alcohol use more likely with poisoning. Interaction tests also suggested that Asians and Pacific Islanders were most likely to use alcohol in poisonings and that Blacks were least likely to use alcohol in hangings. Conclusions. The results suggested that alcohol use before suicide was influenced by several factors, including age, race/ethnicity, and suicide method. PMID:23678938

  4. Dormant Masculinity: Moderating Effects of Acute Alcohol Intoxication on the Relation Between Male Role Norms and Antigay Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Ruschelle M.; Parrott, Dominic J.

    2014-01-01

    Acute alcohol intoxication was examined as a moderator of the association between men’s adherence to traditional gender norms and aggression towards a gay male. Participants were 164 heterosexual drinking men between the ages of 21–30. Participants completed a battery of questionnaires that included a measure of adherence to male role norms (i.e., status, toughness, antifemininity), were randomly assigned to consume an alcohol or no-alcohol control beverage, and completed the Taylor Aggression Paradigm in which electric shocks were administered to, and received from, a fictitious gay or heterosexual male opponent. Results indicated a greater adherence to both the toughness (? = .50, p = .002) and antifeminine (? = .37, p = .023) norms predicted high levels of aggression towards a gay man only among participants who were intoxicated. This interaction effect was not detected for the status norm. Consistent with previous research, findings suggest that adherence to the toughness norm does not increase sober men’s risk of aggression toward gay men. However, this is the first study to demonstrate that alcohol intoxication may activate concepts of toughness, and thus influence men to act in line with this facet of the masculine concept. Importantly, these data support the view that men’s adherence to various dimensions of masculinity may be dormant in some contexts, only to be activated, and subsequently demonstrated, in other contexts. PMID:25750591

  5. Acute hepatitis C virus infection in young adult injection drug users: a prospective study of incident infection, resolution and reinfection

    PubMed Central

    Page, Kimberly; Hahn, Judith A.; Evans, Jennifer; Shiboski, Stephen; Lum, Paula; Delwart, Eric; Tobler, Leslie; Andrews, William; Avanesyan, Lia; Cooper, Stewart; Busch, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, clearance and reinfection are best studied in injection drug users (IDU) who have the highest incidence and are representative of most infections. Methods A prospective cohort of HCV negative young IDU was followed from 2000 to 2007, to identify acute and incident HCV and prospectively study infection outcomes. Results Among 1,191 young IDU screened, 731 (61.4%) were HCV negative, and 520 (71.1%) were enrolled into follow-up. Cumulative HCV incidence was 26.7 per 100 person years of observation (PYO) (95% CI, 21.5, 31.6). 95 (70.4%) of 135 acute/incident HCV infections were followed; 21% cleared HCV. Women had a significantly higher incidence of viral clearance compared to men (age-adjusted relative hazard 2.91, 95% CI, 1.68, 5.03) and also showed a significantly faster rate of early HCV viremia decline. Estimated reinfection rate was 24.6 per 100 PYO (95% CI, 11.7, 51.6). Among seven individuals, multiple episodes of HCV reinfection and re-clearance were observed. Conclusions In this large sample of young IDU, females show demonstrative differences in their rates of viral clearance and kinetics of early viral decline. Recurring reinfection and re-clearance suggest possible protection against persistent infection. These results should inform HCV clinical care and vaccine development. PMID:19764883

  6. Differential Regulation of TGF-?/Smad Signaling in Hepatic Stellate Cells between Acute and Chronic Liver Injuries.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Katsunori; Matsuzaki, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that regulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation by fibrogenic transforming growth factor (TGF)-? and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signals involves different mechanisms in acute and chronic liver injuries, even though hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are the principal effecter in both cases. As a result of chronic liver damage, HSC undergo progressive activation to become myofibroblasts (MFB)-like cells. Our current review will discuss the differential regulation of TGF-? signaling between HSC and MFB in vitro and in vivo. Smad proteins, which convey signals from TGF-? receptors to the nucleus, have intermediate linker regions between conserved Mad-homology (MH) 1 and MH2 domains. TGF-? type I receptor and Ras-associated kinases differentially phosphorylate Smad2 and Smad3 to create COOH-terminally (C), linker (L), or dually (L/C) phosphorylated (p) isoforms. After acute liver injury, TGF-? and PDGF synergistically promote collagen synthesis in the activated HSC via pSmad2L/C and pSmad3L/C pathways. To avoid unlimited ECM deposition, Smad7 induced by TGF-? negatively regulates the fibrogenic TGF-? signaling. In contrast, TGF-? and PDGF can transmit the fibrogenic pSmad2L/C and mitogenic pSmad3L signals in MFB throughout chronic liver injury, because Smad7 cannot be induced by the pSmad3L pathway. This lack of Smad7 induction might lead to constitutive fibrogenesis in MFB, which eventually develop into accelerated liver fibrosis. PMID:22457652

  7. A rare cause of acute mesenteric ischemia: JAK2 positivity and chronic active hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Baykan, Mehmet; Gündo?an, Kür?at; Aky?ld?z, H?z?r Yakup; Yurci, Mustafa Alper

    2014-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome occurs as a result of insufficiency in the total length of the small intestine to provide adequate supply of nutrients. Seventy-five percent of cases are due to massive intestinal resection. A 35-year-old male complaining of abdominal pain was admitted to the gastroenterology department. A CT scan was performed, showing total occlusion of the portal vein and superior mesenteric vein. During the operation, widespread edema and necrosis of the small intestine were found. The necrotic segments of the small intestine were resected. The spleen was larger than normal and, in some parts, infarcts were evident, thus asplenectomy was also performed during surgery. A second-look procedure was performed 24 hours later, and an additional 10 cm jejunal resection and anastomosis was performed. His further evaluations revealed myeloproliferative disease and chronic active hepatitis B leading to thrombosis. Essential thrombocytosis and portal vein thrombosis are common in hepatitis B infection. Patients with complaints of abdominal pain in the context of essential thrombocytosis and hepatitis B should be handled with caution as they are at risk of developing portal vein thrombosis. PMID:25931880

  8. A rare cause of acute mesenteric ischemia: JAK2 positivity and chronic active hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Baykan, Mehmet; Gündo?an, Kür?at; Aky?ld?z, H?z?r Yakup; Yurci, Mustafa Alper

    2014-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome occurs as a result of insufficiency in the total length of the small intestine to provide adequate supply of nutrients. Seventy-five percent of cases are due to massive intestinal resection. A 35-year-old male complaining of abdominal pain was admitted to the gastroenterology department. A CT scan was performed, showing total occlusion of the portal vein and superior mesenteric vein. During the operation, widespread edema and necrosis of the small intestine were found. The necrotic segments of the small intestine were resected. The spleen was larger than normal and, in some parts, infarcts were evident, thus asplenectomy was also performed during surgery. A second-look procedure was performed 24 hours later, and an additional 10 cm jejunal resection and anastomosis was performed. His further evaluations revealed myeloproliferative disease and chronic active hepatitis B leading to thrombosis. Essential thrombocytosis and portal vein thrombosis are common in hepatitis B infection. Patients with complaints of abdominal pain in the context of essential thrombocytosis and hepatitis B should be handled with caution as they are at risk of developing portal vein thrombosis. PMID:25931880

  9. Acute hepatitis after starting pinaverium bromide in a patient taking mirtazapine.

    PubMed

    Tak, Sandeep; Tak, Shubhanjali

    2014-01-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with chronic abdominal pain. He had been evaluated extensively in the recent past undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, colonoscopy and CT scan of the abdomen with normal results. The provisional diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome was performed and pinaverium bromide was started. The patient had pre-existing hypertension, a major depressive disorder and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. He had been taking nebivolol and pantoprazole for several years and mirtazapine for the last 1 year. The patient developed nausea, vomiting and anorexia after 5 days of starting pinaverium bromide. Investigations revealed marked elevation of liver enzymes and bilirubin. He was negative for HIV, HBSAg, anti-hepatitis C virus, IgM for hepatitis A virus, hepatitis E virus, antinuclear antibody and antimitochondrial antibody. An ultrasound showed mild hepatomegaly with hypoechoic echo texture; the rest of scan was normal. Pinaverium and mirtazapine were stopped immediately. The patient was treated symptomatically and his liver profile returned to normal after 4 weeks. PMID:25015163

  10. Protective Effects of Pretreatment with Oleanolic Acid in Rats in the Acute Phase of Hepatic Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury: Role of the PI3K/Akt Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Bo; Hua, Fuzhou; Chen, Jie; Xu, Zeping; Sun, Hongbin; Qian, Yanning

    2014-01-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA) has been used to treat liver disorders, but whether it can attenuate hepatic ischemia-reperfusion- (IR-) associated liver dysfunction remains unexplored. In the present study, 160 male Sprague-Dawley rats were equally divided into five groups: group SH received neither hepatic IR nor drugs; group IR received hepatic IR without drugs; group CM and group OA received 0.5% sodium carboxymethylcellulose and 100?mg/kg OA, intragastrically, once a day for seven days before the hepatic IR, respectively; on the basis of treatment in group OA, group OA+wortmannin further received 15??g/kg of PI3K inhibitor wortmannin, intraperitoneally, 30?min before the hepatic IR. Then each group was equally divided into four subgroups according to four time points (preoperation, 0?h, 3?h, and 6?h after reperfusion). Serum ALT activity, IL-1? concentration, and hepatic phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, and GSK-3? protein expression were serially studied. We found that OA pretreatment improved histological status and decreased serum ALT and IL-1? levels. It also increased p-PI3K, p-Akt, and p-GSK-3? protein expression at all the four time points. Prophylactic wortmannin partially reversed OA's protective effects. The data indicate that OA pretreatment protects liver from IR injury during the acute phase partially through PI3K/Akt-mediated inactivation of GSK-3?. PMID:24829521

  11. Risk factors for mortality in patients with alcoholic hepatitis and assessment of prognostic models: A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jack XQ; Ross, Erin; Borman, Meredith A; Zimmer, Scott; Kaplan, Gilaad G; Heitman, Steven J; Swain, Mark G; Burak, Kelly; Quan, Hude; Myers, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is associated with a substantial risk for short-term mortality. OBJECTIVES: To identify prognostic factors and validate well-known prognostic models in a Canadian population of patients hospitalized for AH. METHODS: In the present retrospective study, patients hospitalized for AH in Calgary, Alberta, between January 2008 and August 2012 were included. Stepwise logistic regression models identified independent risk factors for 90-day mortality, and the discrimination of prognostic models (Model for End-stage Liver Disease [MELD] and Maddrey discriminant function [DF]) were examined using areas under the ROC curves. RESULTS: A total of 122 patients with AH were hospitalized during the study period; the median age was 49 years (interquartile range [IQR] 42 to 55 years) and 60% were men. Median MELD score and Maddrey DF on admission were 21 (IQR 18 to 24) and 45 (IQR 26 to 62), respectively. Seventy-three percent of patients received corticosteroids and/or pentoxifylline, and the 90-day mortality was 17%. Independent predictors of mortality included older age, female sex, international normalized ratio, MELD score and Maddrey DF (all P<0.05). For discrimination of 90-day mortality, the areas under the ROC curves of the prognostic models (MELD 0.64; Maddrey DF 0.68) were similar (P>0.05). At optimal cut-offs of ?22 for MELD score and ?37 for Maddrey DF, both models excluded death with high certainty (negative predictive values 90% and 96%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: In patients hospitalized for AH, well-known prognostic models can be used to predict 90-day mortality, particularly to identify patients with a low risk for death. PMID:25855876

  12. Improvement of Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Acute Hepatic Failure by Transplantation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells without Reprogramming Factor c-Myc

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hua-Ming; Liao, Yi-Wen; Chiang, Chih-Hung; Chen, Yi-Jen; Lai, Ying-Hsiu; Chang, Yuh-Lih; Chen, Hen-Li; Jeng, Shaw-Yeu; Hsieh, Jung-Hung; Peng, Chi-Hsien; Li, Hsin-Yang; Chien, Yueh; Chen, Szu-Yu; Chen, Liang-Kung; Huo, Teh-Ia

    2012-01-01

    The only curative treatment for hepatic failure is liver transplantation. Unfortunately, this treatment has several major limitations, as for example donor organ shortage. A previous report demonstrated that transplantation of induced pluripotent stem cells without reprogramming factor c-Myc (3-genes iPSCs) attenuates thioacetamide-induced hepatic failure with minimal incidence of tumorigenicity. In this study, we investigated whether 3-genes iPSC transplantation is capable of rescuing carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced fulminant hepatic failure and hepatic encephalopathy in mice. Firstly, we demonstrated that 3-genes iPSCs possess the capacity to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells (iPSC-Heps) that exhibit biological functions and express various hepatic specific markers. 3-genes iPSCs also exhibited several antioxidant enzymes that prevented CCl4-induced reactive oxygen species production and cell death. Intraperitoneal transplantation of either 3-genes iPSCs or 3-genes iPSC-Heps significantly reduced hepatic necrotic areas, improved hepatic functions, and survival rate in CCl4-treated mice. CCl4-induced hepatic encephalopathy was also improved by 3-genes iPSC transplantation. Hoechst staining confirmed the successful engraftment of both 3-genes iPSCs and 3-genes iPSC-Heps, indicating the homing properties of these cells. The most pronounced hepatoprotective effect of iPSCs appeared to originate from the highest antioxidant activity of 3-gene iPSCs among all transplanted cells. In summary, our findings demonstrated that 3-genes iPSCs serve as an available cell source for the treatment of an experimental model of acute liver diseases. PMID:22489170

  13. Characterisation of peripheral blood mononuclear cell microRNA in hepatitis B-related acute-on-chronic liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wenchao; Xin, Jiaojiao; Jiang, Longyan; Zhou, Qian; Wu, Tianzhou; Shi, Dongyan; Lin, Biaoyang; Li, Lanjuan; Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B-related acute-on-chronic liver failure (HBV-ACLF) is a life-threatening condition and the mechanisms of its development and progression remain unclear. The aim of this study was to define the characteristics of peripheral blood mononuclear cell microRNAs in patients with HBV-ACLF. In this study, novel microRNA (miRNA) biomarkers of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in patients with HBV-ACLF were characterised by high-throughput sequencing and validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The results showed 78 miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed in patients with HBV-ACLF compared to patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and healthy controls. Among patients with HBV-ACLF, 17 dysregulated miRNAs increased or decreased more than 4-fold, of which eight miRNAs had higher expression levels than median level. qRT-PCR validation demonstrated that six miRNAs (hsa-miR-21-5p, hsa-miR-34c-5p, hsa-miR-143-3p, hsa-miR-143-5p, hsa-miR-374a-3p and hsa-miR-542-3p) may be useful as novel biomarkers for the diagnosis of HBV-ACLF. Five novel miRNAs (L-miR-1~5) were detected and two (L-miR-1 and L-miR-3) were significantly differentially expressed in patients with HBV-ACLF. Conclusions: The miRNA expression profile of PBMCs is altered in patients with HBV-ACLF, and a signature of six miRNAs may be a promising biomarker for HBV-ACLF progression. PMID:26267843

  14. A novel hypothesis for an alkaline phosphatase 'rescue' mechanism in the hepatic acute phase immune response.

    PubMed

    Pike, Adrianne F; Kramer, Nynke I; Blaauboer, Bas J; Seinen, Willem; Brands, Ruud

    2013-12-01

    The liver isoform of the enzyme alkaline phosphatase (AP) has been used classically as a serum biomarker for hepatic disease states such as hepatitis, steatosis, cirrhosis, drug-induced liver injury, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Recent studies have demonstrated a more general anti-inflammatory role for AP, as it is capable of dephosphorylating potentially deleterious molecules such as nucleotide phosphates, the pathogenic endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the contact clotting pathway activator polyphosphate (polyP), thereby reducing inflammation and coagulopathy systemically. Yet the mechanism underlying the observed increase in liver AP levels in circulation during inflammatory insults is largely unknown. This paper hypothesizes an immunological role for AP in the liver and the potential of this system for damping generalized inflammation along with a wide range of ancillary pathologies. Based on the provided framework, a mechanism is proposed in which AP undergoes transcytosis in hepatocytes from the canalicular membrane to the sinusoidal membrane during inflammation and the enzyme's expression is upregulated as a result. Through a tightly controlled, nucleotide-stimulated negative feedback process, AP is transported in this model as an immune complex with immunoglobulin G by the asialoglycoprotein receptor through the cell and secreted into the serum, likely using the receptor's State 1 pathway. The subsequent dephosphorylation of inflammatory stimuli by AP and uptake of the circulating immune complex by endothelial cells and macrophages may lead to decreased inflammation and coagulopathy while providing an early upstream signal for the induction of a number of anti-inflammatory gene products, including AP itself. PMID:23899605

  15. Magnetic hydroxyapatite nanoworms for magnetic resonance diagnosis of acute hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yun-Jun; Dong, Liang; Lu, Yang; Zhang, Le-Cheng; An, Duo; Gao, Huai-Ling; Yang, Dong-Mei; Hu, Wen; Sui, Cong; Xu, Wei-Ping; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic non-metallic biomaterials, including the silicon frustule of a unicellular diatom, the carbonate shell of a mollusk and the calcium skeleton of the vertebrate, which are the main constituent part of an organism, serve as the supportive and protective components of soft tissue. Among them, hydroxyapatite, which primarily makes up the enamel and bone, is widely used in tissue engineering. Recently, the inorganic nonmetallic biomaterials, especially the applications of hydroxyapatites have attracted great attention. Herein, we report a novel synthesis method of magnetic functionalized hydroxyapatite nanocomposites. By simply tuning the ratios of reactants, a series of hydroxyapatite-Fe3O4 worm-shaped nanocomposites (HAP-ION nanoworms) are obtained. In addition, layer-by-layer surface modifications with chitosan (CH) and sodium alginate (SA) were employed to improve the solubility and biocompatibility, and low cytotoxicity and no hemolysis were observed. With the increase of iron oxide nanocrystals, the magnetic properties of the magnetic assembled nanoworms were enhanced, which resulted in better performance of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Owing to the intravenous injection of HAP-ION nanoworms, the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of hepatic MR imaging in vivo was enhanced obviously, which should be beneficial for hepatic injury grading and further therapeutic treatment. PMID:26694026

  16. Effects of acute doses of prosocial drugs methamphetamine and alcohol on plasma oxytocin levels.

    PubMed

    Bershad, Anya K; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Seiden, Jacob A; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-06-01

    Many drugs, including alcohol and stimulants, demonstrably increase sociability and verbal interaction and are recreationally consumed in social settings. One drug, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy), seems to produce its prosocial effects by increasing plasma oxytocin levels, and the oxytocin system has been implicated in responses to several other drugs of abuse. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of 2 other "social" drugs on plasma oxytocin levels--methamphetamine and alcohol. Based on their shared capacity to enhance sociability, we hypothesized that both methamphetamine and alcohol would increase plasma oxytocin levels. In study 1, 11 healthy adult volunteers attended 3 sessions during which they received methamphetamine (10 mg or 20 mg) or placebo under double-blind conditions. Subjective drug effects, cardiovascular effects, and plasma oxytocin levels were measured at regular intervals throughout the sessions. In study 2, 8 healthy adult volunteers attended a single session during which they received 1 beverage containing placebo, and then a beverage containing alcohol (0.8 g/kg). Subjective effects, breath alcohol levels, and plasma oxytocin levels were measured at regular intervals. Both methamphetamine and alcohol produced their expected physiological and subjective effects, but neither of these drugs increased plasma oxytocin levels. The neurobiological mechanisms mediating the prosocial effects of drugs such as alcohol and methamphetamine remain to be identified. PMID:25853370

  17. Acute Alcohol Consumption Impairs Controlled but Not Automatic Processes in a Psychophysical Pointing Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Kevin; Timney, Brian; Goodale, Melvyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the effects of alcohol consumption on controlled and automatic cognitive processes. Such studies have shown that alcohol impairs performance on tasks requiring conscious, intentional control, while leaving automatic performance relatively intact. Here, we sought to extend these findings to aspects of visuomotor control by investigating the effects of alcohol in a visuomotor pointing paradigm that allowed us to separate the influence of controlled and automatic processes. Six male participants were assigned to an experimental “correction” condition in which they were instructed to point at a visual target as quickly and accurately as possible. On a small percentage of trials, the target “jumped” to a new location. On these trials, the participants’ task was to amend their movement such that they pointed to the new target location. A second group of 6 participants were assigned to a “countermanding” condition, in which they were instructed to terminate their movements upon detection of target “jumps”. In both the correction and countermanding conditions, participants served as their own controls, taking part in alcohol and no-alcohol conditions on separate days. Alcohol had no effect on participants’ ability to correct movements “in flight”, but impaired the ability to withhold such automatic corrections. Our data support the notion that alcohol selectively impairs controlled processes in the visuomotor domain. PMID:23861934

  18. Acute disinhibiting effects of alcohol as a factor in risky driving behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fillmore, Mark T.; Blackburn, Jaime S.; Harrison, Emily L. R.

    2008-01-01

    Automobile crash reports show that up to 40% of fatal crashes in the United States involve alcohol and that younger drivers are over-represented. Alcohol use among young drivers is associated with impulsive and risky driving behaviors, such as speeding, which could contribute to their over-representation in alcohol-related crash statistics. Recent laboratory studies show that alcohol increases impulsive behaviors by impairing the drinker’s ability to inhibit inappropriate actions and that this effect can be exacerbated in conflict situations where the expression and inhibition of behavior are equally motivating. The present study tested the hypothesis that this response conflict might also intensify the disruptive effects of alcohol on driving performance. Fourteen subjects performed a simulated driving and a cued go/no-go task that measured their inhibitory control. Conflict was motivated in these tasks by providing equal monetary incentives for slow, careful behavior (e.g., slow driving, inhibiting impulses) and for quick, abrupt behavior (fast driving, disinhibition). Subjects were tested under two alcohol doses (0.65 g/kg and a placebo) that were administered twice: when conflict was present and when conflict was absent. Alcohol interacted with conflict to impair inhibitory control and to increase risky and impaired driving behavior on the drive task. Also, individuals whose inhibitory control was most impaired by alcohol displayed the poorest driving performance under the drug. The study demonstrates potentially serious disruptions to driving performance as a function of alcohol intoxication and response conflict, and points to inhibitory control as an important underlying mechanism. PMID:18325693

  19. Dissociation between exercise-induced reduction in liver fat and changes in hepatic and peripheral glucose homoeostasis in obese patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cuthbertson, Daniel J; Shojaee-Moradie, Fariba; Sprung, Victoria S; Jones, Helen; Pugh, Christopher J A; Richardson, Paul; Kemp, Graham J; Barrett, Mark; Jackson, Nicola C; Thomas, E Louise; Bell, Jimmy D; Umpleby, A Margot

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with multi-organ (hepatic, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue) insulin resistance (IR). Exercise is an effective treatment for lowering liver fat but its effect on IR in NAFLD is unknown. We aimed to determine whether supervised exercise in NAFLD would reduce liver fat and improve hepatic and peripheral (skeletal muscle and adipose tissue) insulin sensitivity. Sixty nine NAFLD patients were randomized to 16 weeks exercise supervision (n=38) or counselling (n=31) without dietary modification. All participants underwent MRI/spectroscopy to assess changes in body fat and in liver and skeletal muscle triglyceride, before and following exercise/counselling. To quantify changes in hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity, a pre-determined subset (n=12 per group) underwent a two-stage hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp pre- and post-intervention. Results are shown as mean [95% confidence interval (CI)]. Fifty participants (30 exercise, 20 counselling), 51 years (IQR 40, 56), body mass index (BMI) 31 kg/m(2) (IQR 29, 35) with baseline liver fat/water % of 18.8% (IQR 10.7, 34.6) completed the study (12/12 exercise and 7/12 counselling completed the clamp studies). Supervised exercise mediated a greater reduction in liver fat/water percentage than counselling [? mean change 4.7% (0.01, 9.4); P<0.05], which correlated with the change in cardiorespiratory fitness (r=-0.34, P=0.0173). With exercise, peripheral insulin sensitivity significantly increased (following high-dose insulin) despite no significant change in hepatic glucose production (HGP; following low-dose insulin); no changes were observed in the control group. Although supervised exercise effectively reduced liver fat, improving peripheral IR in NAFLD, the reduction in liver fat was insufficient to improve hepatic IR. PMID:26424731

  20. Endovascular Treatment of Pseudoaneurysm of the Common Hepatic Artery with Intra-aneurysmal Glue (N-Butyl 2-Cyanoacrylate) Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Ashwin Banait, Swati; Babhad, Sudeep; Kanchankar, Niraj; Nimade, Pradeep; Panchal, Chintan

    2007-09-15

    A 40-year-old man, a chronic alcoholic, presented with acute epigastric pain. Selective celiac arteriography showed a pseudoaneurysm arising from the common hepatic artery. We hereby describe a technical innovation where complete pseudoaneurysm exclusion was seen after intra-aneurysmal N-butyl 2-cyanoacrylate (glue) injection with preservation of antegrade hepatic arterial flow and conclude that intra-aneurysmal liquid injection may have potential as a therapeutic option to reconstruct a defective vessel wall and thereby maintain the antegrade flow.

  1. Endoscopic transgastric debridement and drainage for splenic necrosis following an acute episode in chronic alcoholic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Binek, J; Fretz, C; Meyenberger, C

    2006-06-01

    Management of the complications and sequelae of acute and chronic pancreatitis is a clinical challenge. We report a case of successful transgastric drainage of splenic necrosis after occlusion of the splenic vessels during an acute episode in chronic pancreatitis. PMID:16802272

  2. Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Acute and Chronic Effects of Methylprednisolone on Hepatic Urea Cycle Genes in Rats*

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Anasuya; DuBois, Debra C.; Almon, Richard R.; Snyder, Grayson H.; Jusko, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Corticosteroids (CS) regulate many enzymes at both mRNA and protein levels. This study used microarrays to broadly assess regulation of various genes related to the greater urea cycle and employs pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling to quantitatively analyze and compare the temporal profiles of these genes during acute and chronic exposure to methylprednisolone (MPL). One group of adrenalectomized male Wistar rats received an intravenous bolus dose (50 mg/kg) of MPL, whereas a second group received MPL by a subcutaneous infusion (Alzet osmotic pumps) at a rate of 0.3 mg/kg/hr for seven days. The rats were sacrificed at various time points over 72 hours (acute) or 168 hours (chronic) and livers were harvested. Total RNA was extracted and Affymetrix® gene chips (RG_U34A for acute and RAE 230A for chronic) were used to identify genes regulated by CS. Besides five primary urea cycle enzymes, many other genes related to the urea cycle showed substantial changes in mRNA expression. Some genes that were simply up- or down-regulated after acute MPL showed complex biphasic patterns upon chronic infusion indicating involvement of secondary regulation. For the simplest patterns, indirect response models were used to describe the nuclear steroid-bound receptor mediated increase or decrease in gene transcription (e.g. tyrosine aminotransferase, glucocorticoid receptor). For the biphasic profiles, involvement of a secondary biosignal was assumed (e.g. ornithine decarboxylase, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) and more complex models were derived. Microarrays were used successfully to explore CS effects on various urea cycle enzyme genes. PD models presented in this report describe testable hypotheses regarding molecular mechanisms and quantitatively characterize the direct or indirect regulation of various genes by CS. PMID:19787073

  3. Shear Wave Elastography for Assessment of Steatohepatitis and Hepatic Fibrosis in Rat Models of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bo-Kyeong; Lee, Seung Soo; Cheong, Hyunhee; Hong, Seung Mo; Jang, Kiseok; Lee, Moon-Gyu

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate shear wave elastography (SWE) as a method for determining the severity of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the stage of hepatic fibrosis, as well as the major determinants of liver elasticity among the various histologic and biomolecular changes associated with NAFLD. Rat NAFLD models with various degrees of NAFLD severity were created and imaged using SWE. The explanted livers were subjected to histopathologic evaluation and RNA expression analysis. Among the histologic and biomolecular findings, the fibrosis stage and the collagen RNA level were significant independent factors associated with liver elasticity (p < 0.001). Liver elasticity was effective in detecting non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and in determining fibrosis stage, and the corresponding areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.963 and 0.927-0.997, respectively. In conclusion, SWE is a potential non-invasive method for the detection of NASH and staging of hepatic fibrosis in patients with NAFLD. PMID:26349582

  4. Hypothyroidism minimizes the effects of acute hepatic failure caused by endoplasmic reticulum stress and redox environment alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Blas-Valdivia, Vanessa; Cano-Europa, Edgar; Martinez-Perez, Yoalli; Lezama-Palacios, Ruth; Franco-Colin, Margarita; Ortiz-Butron, Rocio

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if a protective effect from hypothyroidism in acute liver failure resulted from reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress and changes to the redox environment. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided in four groups: (1) euthyroid (sham surgery), (2) hypothyroid, (3) euthyroid (sham surgery)+thioacetamide and (4) hypothyroid+thioacetamide. Hypothyroidism was confirmed two weeks after thyroidectomy, and thioacetamide (TAA) (400mg/kg, ip) was administrated to the appropriate groups for three days with supportive therapy. Grades of encephalopathy in all animals were determined using behavioral tests. Animals were decapitated and their blood was obtained to assess liver function. The liver was dissected: the left lobe was used for histology and the right lobe was frozen for biochemical assays. Body weight, rectal temperature and T4 concentration were lower in hypothyroid groups. When measurements of oxidative stress markers, redox environment, ?-glutamylcysteine synthetase and glutathione-S-transferase were determined, we observed that hypothyroid animals with TAA compensated better with oxidative damage than euthyroid animals treated with TAA. Furthermore, we measured reduced expressions of GADD34, caspase-12 and GRP78 and subsequently less hypothyroidism-induced cellular damage in hypothyroid animals. We conclude that hypothyroidism protects against hepatic damage caused by TAA because it reduces endoplasmic reticulum stress and changes to the redox environment. PMID:26238033

  5. The antioxidant activity of chondroitin-4-sulphate, in carbon tetrachloride-induced acute hepatitis in mice, involves NF-?B and caspase activation

    PubMed Central

    Campo, G M; Avenoso, A; Campo, S; Nastasi, G; Traina, P; D'Ascola, A; Rugolo, C A; Calatroni, A

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Reactive oxygen species (ROC) are the main causes of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced acute liver injury. Chondroitin-4-sulphate (C4S) is known to inhibit lipid peroxidation through antioxidant mechanisms. Activation of nuclear factor (NF)-?B and caspases may strongly intensify inflammation and cell damage, in addition to that directly exerted by ROS. We investigated whether treatment with C4S, besides exerting antioxidant activity, was able to modulate NF-?B and apoptosis activation in CCl4-induced liver injury in mice. Experimental approach: Acute hepatitis was induced in mice by an i.p. injection of CCl4. Varying doses of C4S were administered i.p. 1?h before, 6 and 12?h after CCl4 injection. 24?h after CCl4 injection, the mice were killed for biochemical and histological analysis. Key results: CCl4 injection produced: marked elevation of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase; hepatic membrane lipid peroxidation, assayed by 8-isoprostane levels; and depletion of reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase. CCl4 also decreased NF-?B translocation and IkB?, and increased gene expression of mRNA and protein of metalloproteases (MMP)-2 and -9, and of pro- and cleaved forms of caspases-3 and -7. There was also increased liver polymorphonuclear infiltration, evaluated by elastase assay, and hepatic cell disruption. C4S treatment inhibited lipid peroxidation; blocked NF-?B activation and IkB? protein loss; decreased mRNA and proteins for MMPs and caspases; restored endogenous antioxidants; limited hepatic polymorphonuclear accumulation and tissue damage. Conclusions and implications: As antioxidants may inhibit NF-?B and caspase activation, we hypothesize that treatment with C4S was able to inhibit NF-?B and apoptosis activation in hepatic injury. PMID:18724385

  6. Alcohol and Hepatitis C

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Benefits Home Apply for VA Care Apply Online Application Process Veteran Eligibility Active Duty Families of Veterans Women Veterans Determine Costs Copays Means Test Health Insurance Make a Payment Annual Income Thresholds Non-VA Care Purchased Care ...

  7. High Dose Lycopene Supplementation Increases Hepatic CYP2E1 Protein and Inflammation in Alcohol-Fed Rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent in vitro evidence suggests that the antioxidant lycopene can prevent alcohol induced oxidative stress and inflammation. However, in vivo knowledge of possible interactions between escalating doses of lycopene and chronic alcohol ingestion are lacking. In the present study, we investigated p...

  8. Pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy and brain edema in acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Roger F

    2015-03-01

    Neuropathologic investigations in acute liver failure (ALF) reveal significant alterations to neuroglia consisting of swelling of astrocytes leading to cytotoxic brain edema and intracranial hypertension as well as activation of microglia indicative of a central neuroinflammatory response. Increased arterial ammonia concentrations in patients with ALF are predictors of patients at risk for the development of brain herniation. Molecular and spectroscopic techniques in ALF reveal alterations in expression of an array of genes coding for neuroglial proteins involved in cell volume regulation and mitochondrial function as well as in the transport of neurotransmitter amino acids and in the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Liver-brain pro-inflammatory signaling mechanisms involving transduction of systemically-derived cytokines, ammonia neurotoxicity and exposure to increased brain lactate have been proposed. Mild hypothermia and N-Acetyl cysteine have both hepato-protective and neuro-protective properties in ALF. Potentially effective anti-inflammatory agents aimed at control of encephalopathy and brain edema in ALF include etanercept and the antibiotic minocycline, a potent inhibitor of microglial activation. Translation of these potentially-interesting findings to the clinic is anxiously awaited. PMID:26041966

  9. Vitamin C Deficiency of Korean Homeless Patients Visiting to Emergency Department with Acute Alcohol Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Vitamins are essential micronutrients for maintenance of tissue functions. Vitamin deficiency is one of the most serious and common health problems among both chronic alcoholics and the homeless. However, the vitamin-level statuses of such people have been little studied. We evaluated the actual vitamin statuses of alcoholic homeless patients who visited an emergency department (ED). In this study the blood levels of vitamins B1, B12, B6, and C of 217 alcoholic homeless patients were evaluated retrospectively in a single urban teaching hospital ED. Vitamin C deficiency was observed in 84.3% of the patients. The vitamin B1, B12, and B6 deficiency rates, meanwhile, were 2.3%, 2.3%, and 23.5%, respectively. Comparing the admitted patients with those who were discharged, only the vitamin C level was lower. (P=0.003) In fact, the patients' vitamin C levels were markedly diminished, vitamin C replacement therapy for homeless patients should be considered in EDs. PMID:26713065

  10. Acute Alcohol Intoxication and Suicide Among U.S. Ethnic/Racial Groups: Findings from the National Violent Death Reporting System

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Raul; Kaplan, Mark S.; Huguet, Nathalie; McFarland, Bentson H.; Conner, Kenneth; Giesbrecht, Norman; Nolte, Kurt B.

    2012-01-01

    Background To assess the prevalence and sociodemographic correlates of suicide involving acute alcohol intoxication among U.S. ethnic minorities. Methods Data were derived from the restricted 2003–2009 National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS). The study focused on the sociodemographic and toxicological information of 59,384 male and female suicide decedents for 16 states of the U.S. Acute alcohol intoxication was defined as having a blood alcohol content (BAC) ? 0.08 g/dl. Overall, 76% of decedents were tested for the presence of alcohol. Results The proportion of suicide decedents with a positive BAC ranged from 47% among American Indians/Alaska Natives (AIs/ANs) to 23% among Asians/Pacific Islanders (PIs). Average BAC was highest among AIs/ANs. Among those who were tested for BAC, the proportion of decedents legally intoxicated prior to suicide was: Blacks, 15%; AIs/ANs, 36%; Asians/PIs, 13%; Hispanics, 28%. Bivariate associations showed that most suicide decedents who were legally intoxicated were male, younger than 30 years of age, with a high school education, not married, non-veterans, lived in metropolitan areas, and used a firearm to complete suicide. However, with the exception of Whites, most of these associations became not statistically significant in multivariate analysis. Conclusions Alcohol use and legal intoxication prior to completing suicide are common among U.S. ethnic groups, especially among males and those who are younger than 30 years of age. The AI/AN group had the highest mean BAC, the highest rate of legal intoxication and decedents who were particularly young. Suicide prevention strategies should address alcohol use as a risk factor. Alcohol problems prevention strategies should focus on suicide as a consequence of alcohol use, especially among AI/AN youth and young adults. PMID:23384174

  11. Manifestations of Perihepatic Lymph Nodes in Acute Flare of Chronic Hepatitis B: Association with HBeAg Status and with HBeAg Seroconversion

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Yen-Ling; Sun, Chi-Shu; Chung, Kun-Ming; Lin, Yu-Min; Feng, I-Che; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Koay, Lok-Beng; Lin, Ching-Yih; Ho, Chung-Han; Kuo, Hsing-Tao

    2015-01-01

    It has been observed that enlargement of perihepatic lymph nodes may be seen in patients with chronic hepatitis B, particularly during acute flares of CHB. We hypothesized that there may be a correlation between the nodal change patterns in CHB patients with acute flare and HBeAg status. Perihepatic lymph node sizes of 87 patients with acute flares of CHB were documented, with a median follow up of 43 months. Patients were separated into 3 groups, HBeAg-positive with HBe seroconversion (group 1), HBeAg-positive without HBe seroconversion (group 2), and HBeAg-negative (group 3). Group 1 has the highest incidence of enlarged lymph nodes (92.3%) compared with group 2 (75.8%) and group 3 (46.8%) (p = 0.003). And if nodal width at acute flare was > 8mm and interval change of nodal width was >3mm, the incidence of HBeAg seroconversion will be 75% (p<0.001). Conclusion Larger perihepatic lymph nodes are seen in CHB acute flare patients with positive HBeAg and the magnitude of nodal width change may predict HBeAg seroconversion at recovery. PMID:25689069

  12. Full-length genome characterization and genetic relatedness analysis of hepatitis A virus outbreak strains associated with acute liver failure among children.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Gilberto; Forbi, Joseph C; Xia, Guo-Liang; Fonseca-Ford, Maureen; Vazquez, Roberto; Khudyakov, Yury E; Montiel, Sonia; Waterman, Steve; Alpuche, Celia; Gonçalves Rossi, Livia Maria; Luna, Norma

    2014-02-01

    Clinical infection by hepatitis A virus (HAV) is generally self-limited but in some cases can progress to liver failure. Here, an HAV outbreak investigation among children with acute liver failure in a highly endemic country is presented. In addition, a sensitive method for HAV whole genome amplification and sequencing suitable for analysis of clinical samples is described. In this setting, two fatal cases attributed to acute liver failure and two asymptomatic cases living in the same household were identified. In a second household, one HAV case was observed with jaundice which resolved spontaneously. Partial molecular characterization showed that both households were infected by HAV subtype IA; however, the infecting strains in the two households were different. The HAV outbreak strains recovered from all cases grouped together within cluster IA1, which contains closely related HAV strains from the United States commonly associated with international travelers. Full-genome HAV sequences obtained from the household with the acute liver failure cases were related (genetic distances ranging from 0.01% to 0.04%), indicating a common-source infection. Interestingly, the strain recovered from the asymptomatic household contact was nearly identical to the strain causing acute liver failure. The whole genome sequence from the case in the second household was distinctly different from the strains associated with acute liver failure. Thus, infection with almost identical HAV strains resulted in drastically different clinical outcomes. PMID:24243548

  13. In vivo ethanol elimination in man, monkey and rat: A lack of relationship between the ethanol metabolism and the hepatic activities of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Zorzano, A. ); Herrera, E. )

    1990-01-01

    The in vivo ethanol elimination in human subjects, monkeys and rats was investigated after an oral ethanol dosage. After 0.4 g. ethanol/kg of body weight, ethanol elimination was much slower in human subjects than in monkeys. In order to detect a rise in monkey plasma ethanol concentrations as early as observed in human subjects, ethanol had to be administered at a dose of 3 g/kg body weight. Ethanol metabolism in rats was also much faster than in human subjects. However, human liver showed higher alcohol dehydrogenase activity and higher low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase activity than rat liver. Thus, our data suggest a lack of relationship between hepatic ethanol-metabolizing activities and the in vivo ethanol elimination rate.

  14. Indirect Effects of Acute Alcohol Intoxication on Sexual Risk-Taking: The Roles of Subjective and Physiological Sexual Arousal

    PubMed Central

    George, William H.; Davis, Kelly Cue; Norris, Jeanette; Heiman, Julia R.; Stoner, Susan A.; Schacht, Rebecca L.; Hendershot, Christian S.; Kajumulo, Kelly F.

    2011-01-01

    Three experiments supported the idea that alcohol fosters sexual risk-taking in men and women, in part, through its effects on sexual arousal. In Experiment 1, increasing alcohol dosage (target blood alcohol levels of .00, .04, .08%) heightened men’s and women’s risk-taking intentions. Alcohol’s effect was indirect via increased subjective sexual arousal; also, men exhibited greater risk-taking than women. In Experiment 2, an extended dosage range (target blood alcohol levels of .00, .06, .08, .10%) heightened men’s risk-taking intentions. Alcohol’s effect again was indirect via subjective arousal. Physiological sexual arousal, which was unaffected by alcohol, increased risk-taking via increased subjective arousal. In Experiment 3, alcohol increased women’s risk-taking indirectly via subjective arousal, but alcohol-attenuated physiological arousal had no effect on risk-taking. Implications for alcohol myopia theory and prevention interventions are discussed. PMID:18431618

  15. Lycium barbarum polysaccharides therapeutically improve hepatic functions in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis rats and cellular steatosis model

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jia; Xing, Feiyue; Huo, Jie; Fung, Man Lung; Liong, Emily C.; Ching, Yick Pang; Xu, Aimin; Chang, Raymond Chuen Chung; So, Kwok Fai; Tipoe, George L.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the possible therapeutic effects and active components of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) on a high fat diet-induced NASH rat model. We induced NASH in a rat model by voluntary oral feeding with a high-fat diet ad libitum for 8 weeks. After 8 weeks, 1?mg/kg LBP was orally administered for another 4 weeks with a high-fat diet. When compared with NASH rats treated for 12 weeks, therapeutic LBP treatment for 4 weeks during 12 weeks of NASH induction showed ameliorative effects on: (1) increased body and wet liver weights; (2) insulin resistance and glucose metabolic dysfunction; (3) elevated level of serum aminotransferases; (4) fat accumulation in the liver and increased serum free fatty acid (FFA) level; (5) hepatic fibrosis; (6) hepatic oxidative stress; (7) hepatic inflammatory response; and (8) hepatic apoptosis. These improvements were partially through the modulation of transcription factor NF-?B, MAPK pathways and the autophagic process. In a palmitate acid-induced rat hepatocyte steatosis cell–based model, we also demonstrated that l-arabinose and ?-carotene partially accounted for the beneficial effects of LBP on the hepatocytes. In conclusion, LBP possesses a variety of hepato-protective properties which make it a potent supplementary therapeutic agent against NASH in future clinical trials. PMID:24998389

  16. Oral clindamycin causing acute cholestatic hepatitis without ductopenia: a brief review of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury and a case report

    PubMed Central

    Moole, Harsha; Ahmed, Zohair; Saxena, Nibha; Puli, Srinivas R.; Dhillon, Sonu

    2015-01-01

    Clindamycin is a lincosamide antibiotic active against most of the anaerobes, protozoans, and Gram-positive bacteria, including community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Its use has increased greatly in the recent past due to wide spectrum of activity and good bioavailability in oral form. Close to 20% of the patients taking clindamycin experience diarrhea as the most common side effect. Hepatotoxicity is a rare side effect. Systemic clindamycin therapy has been linked to two forms of hepatotoxicity: transient serum aminotransferase elevation and an acute idiosyncratic liver injury that occurs 1–3 weeks after starting therapy. This article is a case report of oral clindamycin induced acute symptomatic cholestatic hepatitis and a brief review of the topic. PMID:26486111

  17. LPSF/GQ-02 Inhibits the Development of Hepatic Steatosis and Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)

    PubMed Central

    Soares e Silva, Amanda Karolina; de Oliveira Cipriano Torres, Dilênia; dos Santos Gomes, Fabiana Oliveira; dos Santos Silva, Bruna; Lima Ribeiro, Edlene; Costa Oliveira, Amanda; dos Santos, Laise Aline Martins; de Lima, Maria do Carmo Alves; Pitta, Ivan da Rocha; Peixoto, Christina Alves

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) defines a wide spectrum of liver diseases that extends from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Although the pathogenesis of NAFLD remains undefined, it is recognized that insulin resistance is present in almost all patients who develop this disease. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) act as an insulin sensitizer and have been used in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes and other insulin-resistant conditions, including NAFLD. Hence, therapy of NAFLD with insulin-sensitizing drugs should ideally improve the key hepatic histological changes, while also reducing cardiometabolic and cancer risks. Controversially, TZDs are associated with the development of cardiovascular events and liver problems. Therefore, there is a need for the development of new therapeutic strategies to improve liver function in patients with chronic liver diseases. The aim of the present study was to assess the therapeutic effects of LPSF/GQ-02 on the liver of LDLR-/- mice after a high-fat diet. Eighty male mice were divided into 4 groups and two different experiments: 1-received a standard diet; 2-fed with a high-fat diet (HFD); 3–HFD+pioglitazone; 4–HFD+LPSF/GQ-02. The experiments were conducted for 10 or 12 weeks and in the last two or four weeks respectively, the drugs were administered daily by gavage. The results obtained with an NAFLD murine model indicated that LPSF/GQ-02 was effective in improving the hepatic architecture, decreasing fat accumulation, reducing the amount of collagen, decreasing inflammation by reducing IL-6, iNOS, COX-2 and F4 / 80, and increasing the protein expression of I?B?, cytoplasmic NF?B-65, eNOS and IRS-1 in mice LDLR -/-. These results suggest a direct action by LPSF/GQ-02 on the factors that affect inflammation, insulin resistance and fat accumulation in the liver of these animals. Further studies are being conducted in our laboratory to investigate the possible mechanism of action of LPSF/GQ-02 on hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:25875942

  18. Dioscin alleviates alcoholic liver fibrosis by attenuating hepatic stellate cell activation via the TLR4/MyD88/NF-?B signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Xu, Youwei; Han, Xu; Yin, Lianhong; Xu, Lina; Qi, Yan; Zhao, Yanyan; Liu, Kexin; Peng, Jinyong

    2015-01-01

    The present work aimed to investigate the activities and underlying mechanisms of dioscin against alcoholic liver fibrosis (ALF). In vivo liver fibrosis in mice was induced by an alcoholic liquid diet, and in vitro studies were performed on activated HSC-T6 and LX2 cells treated with lipopolysaccharide. Our results showed that dioscin significantly attenuated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation, improved collagen accumulation, and attenuated inflammation through down-regulating the levels of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-? by decreasing Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 expression both in vivo and in vitro. TLR4 overexpression was also decreased by dioscin, leading to the markedly down-regulated levels of MyD88, NF-?B, transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1), ?-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA) and type I collagen (COL1A1) in cultured HSCs. Suppression of cellular MyD88 by ST2825 or abrogation of NF-?B by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate eliminated the inhibitory effects of dioscin on the levels of TGF-?1, ?-SMA and COL1A1. In a word, dioscin exhibited potent effects against ALF via altering TLR4/MyD88/NF-?B signaling pathway, which provided novel insights into the mechanisms of this compound as an antifibrogenic candidate for the treatment of ALF in the future. PMID:26655640

  19. Dioscin alleviates alcoholic liver fibrosis by attenuating hepatic stellate cell activation via the TLR4/MyD88/NF-?B signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Xu, Youwei; Han, Xu; Yin, Lianhong; Xu, Lina; Qi, Yan; Zhao, Yanyan; Liu, Kexin; Peng, Jinyong

    2015-01-01

    The present work aimed to investigate the activities and underlying mechanisms of dioscin against alcoholic liver fibrosis (ALF). In vivo liver fibrosis in mice was induced by an alcoholic liquid diet, and in vitro studies were performed on activated HSC-T6 and LX2 cells treated with lipopolysaccharide. Our results showed that dioscin significantly attenuated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation, improved collagen accumulation, and attenuated inflammation through down-regulating the levels of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-? by decreasing Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 expression both in vivo and in vitro. TLR4 overexpression was also decreased by dioscin, leading to the markedly down-regulated levels of MyD88, NF-?B, transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1), ?-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA) and type I collagen (COL1A1) in cultured HSCs. Suppression of cellular MyD88 by ST2825 or abrogation of NF-?B by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate eliminated the inhibitory effects of dioscin on the levels of TGF-?1, ?-SMA and COL1A1. In a word, dioscin exhibited potent effects against ALF via altering TLR4/MyD88/NF-?B signaling pathway, which provided novel insights into the mechanisms of this compound as an antifibrogenic candidate for the treatment of ALF in the future. PMID:26655640

  20. Transmitted/Founder Viruses Rapidly Escape from CD8+ T Cell Responses in Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bull, Rowena A.; Leung, Preston; Gaudieri, Silvana; Deshpande, Pooja; Cameron, Barbara; Walker, Melanie; Chopra, Abha; Lloyd, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The interaction between hepatitis C virus (HCV) and cellular immune responses during very early infection is critical for disease outcome. To date, the impact of antigen-specific cellular immune responses on the evolution of the viral population establishing infection and on potential escape has not been studied. Understanding these early host-virus dynamics is important for the development of a preventative vaccine. Three subjects who were followed longitudinally from the detection of viremia preseroconversion until disease outcome were analyzed. The evolution of transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses was undertaken using deep sequencing. CD8+ T cell responses were measured via enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) assay using HLA class I-restricted T/F epitopes. T/F viruses were rapidly extinguished in all subjects associated with either viral clearance (n = 1) or replacement with viral variants leading to establishment of chronic infection (n = 2). CD8+ T cell responses against 11 T/F epitopes were detectable by 33 to 44 days postinfection, and 5 of these epitopes had not previously been reported. These responses declined rapidly in those who became chronically infected and were maintained in the subject who cleared infection. Higher-magnitude CD8+ T cell responses were associated with rapid development of immune escape variants at a rate of up to 0.1 per day. Rapid escape from CD8+ T cell responses has been quantified for the first time in the early phase of primary HCV infection. These rapid escape dynamics were associated with higher-magnitude CD8+ T cell responses. These findings raise questions regarding optimal selection of immunogens for HCV vaccine development and suggest that detailed analysis of individual epitopes may be required. IMPORTANCE A major limitation in our detailed understanding of the role of immune response in HCV clearance has been the lack of data on very early primary infection when the transmitted viral variants successfully establish the acute infection. This study was made possible through the availability of specimens from a unique cohort of asymptomatic primary infection cases in whom the first available viremic samples were collected approximately 3 weeks postinfection and at regular intervals thereafter. The study included detailed examination of both the evolution of the viral population and the host cellular immune responses against the T/F viruses. The findings here provide the first evidence of host cellular responses targeting T/F variants and imposing a strong selective force toward viral escape. The results of this study provide useful insight on how virus escapes the host response and consequently on future analysis of vaccine-induced immunity. PMID:25740982

  1. Hepatitis E virus: do locally acquired infections in Australia necessitate laboratory testing in acute hepatitis patients with no overseas travel history?

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Ashish C.; Faddy, Helen M.; Flower, Robert L. P.; Seed, Clive R.; Keller, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is emerging as a global public health threat. Water-borne HEV outbreaks are common in developing countries and are associated with genotypes 1 and 2. In industrialised countries, sporadic cases of zoonotic transmission associated with genotypes 3 and 4 are increasingly being reported. Transfusion- and transplantation-transmitted HEV have been documented, although ingestion of contaminated food is thought to be the major transmission route. Severe disease is possible and chronic hepatitis infection occurs in solid-organ-transplant recipients and in patients with immunosuppressive disorders. In Australia, HEV cases are mainly travellers returning from disease endemic countries. Indeed, there are few reported cases of locally acquired HEV. Pigs in Australia have been shown to be infected with HEV, which indicates the possibility of zoonotic transmission. The extent of locally acquired infection is not known, however it may be greater than expected and may necessitate laboratory testing in patients reporting no overseas travel. PMID:25560836

  2. Protective effects of protostemonine on LPS/GalN-induced acute liver failure: Roles of increased hepatic expression of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhuo; Yue, Ling; Zhao, Wenhao; Yang, Xinzhou; Shu, Guangwen

    2015-12-01

    Here, we explored protective effects of protostemonine (PSN), on mouse acute liver failure induced by lipopolysaccharide/d-galactosamine (LPS/GalN). PSN dose-dependently declined LPS/GalN-induced lethality of mice as well as increase of ALT/AST activities in their serum. Hepatoprotective effects of PSN were also supported by liver histopathological examinations. After LPS/GalN treatment, severe oxidative stresses in the liver could be detected by boosted MDA and ROS as well as decreased GSH. Moreover, hepatic expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-?, IL-1? and IL-6, were sharply elevated. These symptoms were dose-dependently ameliorated by PSN. Mechanistically, PSN promoted the transcription and translation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in hepatocytes and liver Kupffer cells. Nrf2 is a master transcription factor contributing to the expression of HO-1. PSN elevated Nrf2 nuclear accumulation and enhanced Nrf2/HO-1 promoter interaction. Suppressing enzyme activity of HO-1 by co-treating mice with HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP abolished protective effects of PSN. ZnPP also abrogated alleviative impacts of PSN on LPS/GalN-mediated hepatic oxidative stresses and inflammatory responses. Finally, we showed that PSN exhibited undetectable toxic effects on vital organs of mice. Our findings suggested that PSN is able to attenuate LPS/GalN-induced acute liver failure and upregulating HO-1 expression is implicated in its hepatoprotective activity. PMID:26363973

  3. Trouble with Bleeding: Risk Factors for Acute Hepatitis C among HIV-Positive Gay Men from Germany—A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Axel J.; Rockstroh, Jürgen K.; Vogel, Martin; An der Heiden, Matthias; Baillot, Armin; Krznaric, Ivanka; Radun, Doris

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To identify risk factors for hepatitis C among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM), focusing on potential sexual, nosocomial, and other non-sexual determinants. Background Outbreaks of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections among HIV-positive MSM have been reported by clinicians in post-industrialized countries since 2000. The sexual acquisition of HCV by gay men who are HIV positive is not, however, fully understood. Methods Between 2006 and 2008, a case-control study was embedded into a behavioural survey of MSM in Germany. Cases were HIV-positive and acutely HCV-co-infected, with no history of injection drug use. HIV-positive MSM without known HCV infection, matched for age group, served as controls. The HCV-serostatus of controls was assessed by serological testing of dried blood specimens. Univariable and multivariable regression analyses were used to identify factors independently associated with HCV-co-infection. Results 34 cases and 67 controls were included. Sex-associated rectal bleeding, receptive fisting and snorting cocaine/amphetamines, combined with group sex, were independently associated with case status. Among cases, surgical interventions overlapped with sex-associated rectal bleeding. Conclusions Sexual practices leading to rectal bleeding, and snorting drugs in settings of increased HCV-prevalence are risk factors for acute hepatitis C. We suggest that sharing snorting equipment as well as sharing sexual partners might be modes of sexual transmission. Condoms and gloves may not provide adequate protection if they are contaminated with blood. Public health interventions for HIV-positive gay men should address the role of blood in sexual risk behaviour. Further research is needed into the interplay of proctosurgery and sex-associated rectal bleeding. PMID:21408083

  4. Acute Alcohol Consumption and Secondary Psychopathic Traits Increase Ratings of the Attractiveness and Health of Ethnic Ingroup Faces but Not Outgroup Faces

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Ian J.; Gillespie, Steven M.; Leverton, Monica; Llewellyn, Victoria; Neale, Emily; Stevenson, Isobel

    2015-01-01

    Studies have consistently shown that both consumption of acute amounts of alcohol and elevated antisocial psychopathic traits are associated with an impaired ability for prepotent response inhibition. This may manifest as a reduced ability to inhibit prepotent race biased responses. Here, we tested the effects of acute alcohol consumption, and elevated antisocial psychopathic traits, on judgments of the attractiveness and health of ethnic ingroup and outgroup faces. In the first study, we show that following acute alcohol consumption, at a dose that is sufficient to result in impaired performance on tests of executive function, Caucasian participants judged White faces to be more attractive and healthier compared to when sober. However, this effect did not extend to Black faces. A similar effect was found in a second study involving sober Caucasian participants where secondary psychopathic traits were related to an intergroup bias in the ratings of attractiveness for White versus Black faces. These results are discussed in terms of a model which postulates that poor prefrontal functioning leads to increases in ingroup liking as a result of impaired abilities for prepotent response inhibition. PMID:25745403

  5. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... get viral hepatitis vaccines? How long do the hepatitis A and B vaccines protect you? Is it safe ... of viral hepatitis in the United States are hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. This fact sheet ...

  6. The Difference between Anxiolytic and Anxiogenic Effects Induced by Acute and Chronic Alcohol Exposure and Changes in Associative Learning and Memory Based on Color Preference and the Cause of Parkinson-Like Behaviors in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Chen, Di; Sun, Ming-Zhu; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Dong-Yan; Feng, Xi-Zeng

    2015-01-01

    We describe an interdisciplinary comparison of the effects of acute and chronic alcohol exposure in terms of their disturbance of light, dark and color preferences and the occurrence of Parkinson-like behavior in zebrafish through computer visual tracking, data mining, and behavioral and physiological analyses. We found that zebrafish in anxiolytic and anxious states, which are induced by acute and chronic repeated alcohol exposure, respectively, display distinct emotional reactions in light/dark preference tests as well as distinct learning and memory abilities in color-enhanced conditional place preference (CPP) tests. Additionally, compared with the chronic alcohol (1.0%) treatment, acute alcohol exposure had a significant, dose-dependent effect on anxiety, learning and memory (color preference) as well as locomotive activities. Acute exposure doses (0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5%) generated an “inverted V” dose-dependent pattern in all of the behavioral parameters, with 1.0% having the greatest effect, while the chronic treatment had a moderate effect. Furthermore, by measuring locomotive activity, learning and memory performance, the number of dopaminergic neurons, tyrosine hydroxylase expression, and the change in the photoreceptors in the retina, we found that acute and chronic alcohol exposure induced varying degrees of Parkinson-like symptoms in zebrafish. Taken together, these results illuminated the behavioral and physiological mechanisms underlying the changes associated with learning and memory and the cause of potential Parkinson-like behaviors in zebrafish due to acute and chronic alcohol exposure. PMID:26558894

  7. Drinks like a fish: Using zebrafish to understand alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, Deanna L.; Passeri, Mike; Sadler, Kirsten C.

    2010-01-01

    Steatosis is the most common consequence of acute alcohol abuse, such as occurs during a drinking binge. Acute alcohol induced steatosis may predispose to more severe hepatic disease. We have developed a model of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) in zebrafish larvae to provide a system in which the genes and pathways that contribute to steatosis can be rapidly identified. Zebrafish larvae represent an attractive vertebrate model for studying acute ALD because they possess the pathways to metabolize alcohol, the liver is mature by 4 days post-fertilization (dpf), and alcohol can be simply added to their water. Exposing 4 dpf zebrafish larvae to 2% ethanol (EtOH) for 32 hours achieves ~80 mM intracellular EtOH and upregulation of hepatic cyp2e1, sod and bip, indicating that EtOH is metabolized and provokes oxidative stress. EtOH-treated larvae develop ALD as demonstrated by hepatomegaly and steatosis. Increased lipogenesis driven by the sterol response element binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors is essential for steatosis associated with chronic alcohol ingestion but it has not been determined if the same pathway is essential for steatosis following a drinking binge. We report that several Srebp target genes are induced in the liver of zebrafish exposed to EtOH. We used fish which harbor a mutation in the gene encoding the membrane bound transcription factor protease 1 (mbtps1; also called site-1 protease) and embryos in which the Srebp cleavage activating protein (scap) is knocked down to determine the requirement of this pathway in acute ALD. We find that both means of blocking Srebp activation prevents steatosis in response to 2% EtOH. Moreover, this is accompanied by the failure to activate several Srebp target genes in response to alcohol. We conclude that Srebps are required for steatosis in response to acute alcohol exposure. Moreover, these data highlight the utility of zebrafish as a useful new vertebrate model to study ALD. PMID:21284674

  8. Drinks like a fish: using zebrafish to understand alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Howarth, Deanna L; Passeri, Mike; Sadler, Kirsten C

    2011-05-01

    Steatosis is the most common consequence of acute alcohol abuse, such as occurs during a drinking binge. Acute alcohol induced steatosis may predispose to more severe hepatic disease. We have developed a model of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) in zebrafish larvae to provide a system in which the genes and pathways that contribute to steatosis can be rapidly identified. Zebrafish larvae represent an attractive vertebrate model for studying acute ALD because they possess the pathways to metabolize alcohol, the liver is mature by 4 days post-fertilization (dpf), and alcohol can be simply added to their water. Exposing 4 dpf zebrafish larvae to 2% ethanol (EtOH) for 32 hours achieves ?80 mM intracellular EtOH and upregulation of hepatic cyp2e1, sod, and bip, indicating that EtOH is metabolized and provokes oxidative stress. EtOH-treated larvae develop ALD as demonstrated by hepatomegaly and steatosis. Increased lipogenesis driven by the sterol response element binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors is essential for steatosis associated with chronic alcohol ingestion but it has not been determined if the same pathway is essential for steatosis following a drinking binge. We report that several Srebp target genes are induced in the liver of zebrafish exposed to EtOH. We used fish which harbor a mutation in the gene encoding the membrane bound transcription factor protease 1 (mbtps1; also called site-1 protease) and embryos in which the Srebp cleavage activating protein (scap) is knocked down to determine the requirement of this pathway in acute ALD. We find that both means of blocking Srebp activation prevents steatosis in response to 2% EtOH. Moreover, this is accompanied by the failure to activate several Srebp target genes in response to alcohol. We conclude that Srebps are required for steatosis in response to acute alcohol exposure. Moreover, these data highlight the utility of zebrafish as a useful new vertebrate model to study ALD. PMID:21284674

  9. Preliminary characterization, antioxidant activity in vitro and hepatoprotective effect on acute alcohol-induced liver injury in mice of polysaccharides from the peduncles of Hovenia dulcis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingchun; Zhu, Peilei; Jiang, Changxing; Ma, Liping; Zhang, Zhanjun; Zeng, Xiaoxiong

    2012-09-01

    The fresh fleshy peduncles of Hovenia dulcis have been used as a food supplement and traditional herbal medicine for the treatment of liver diseases and alcoholic poisoning for more than a millennium. The objectives of the present study, therefore, were to determine the antioxidant activity of polysaccharides from the peduncles of H. dulcis (HDPS) and to evaluate its hepatoprotective effect on acute alcohol-induced liver injury in mice. HDPS, prepared by hot water extraction, ethanol precipitation and treatment of macroporous resin, was found to be non-starch polysaccharide and mainly composed of galactose, arabinose, rhamnose and galacturonic acid. In in vitro antioxidant assay, HDPS exhibited high superoxide radical scavenging activity, strong inhibition effect on lipid peroxidation and a medium ferrous ion-chelating activity. For hepatoprotective activity in vivo, the administration of HDPS significantly decreased the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, significantly decreased the liver level of malondialdehyde and remarkably restored the liver activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in alcohol-induced liver injury mice. The results suggested that HDPS had a significant protective effect against acute alcohol-induced liver injury possibly via its antioxidant activity to protect biological systems against the oxidative stress. PMID:22750723

  10. Limited theraputic effect of n-acetylcysteine on hepatic insulin resistance in an experimental model of alcohol-induced steatohepatitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alcohol-related steatohepatitis is associated with increased oxidative stress, DNA damage, lipotoxicity, and insulin resistance in liver. Hypothesis: Since inflammation and oxidative stress can promote insulin resistance, effective treatment with anti-oxidants, e.g. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), may rest...

  11. High dose lycopene supplementation increases hepatic CYP2E1 protein and TNF-alpha expression in alcohol fed rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lycopene (LYC) has attracted considerable attention due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, in vivo knowledge of possible interactions between escalating doses of LYC and chronic alcohol ingestion are lacking. F-344 rats (6 groups, n = 10) were fed either a liquid ethanol Lie...

  12. Using an immune functional assay to differentiate acute cellular rejection from recurrent hepatitis C in liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Roniel; Ararat, Miguel; Soldevila-Pico, Consuelo; Dixon, Lisa; Pan, Jen-Jung; Firpi, Roberto; Machicao, Victor; Levy, Cynthia; Nelson, David; Morelli, Giuseppe

    2009-02-01

    In transplant recipients transplanted for hepatitis C, presentation of abnormal transaminases can herald the presentation of recurrent hepatitis C, cellular rejection, or both. Given the sometimes ambiguous histology with these 2 entities, the ability to distinguish them is of great importance because misinterpretation can potentially affect graft survival. We used an immune functional assay to help assess the etiology of abnormal liver function test results in liver transplant recipients. Blood samples for the immune functional assay were taken from 42 recipients prospectively at various times post-transplant and compared with clinical and histologic findings. In patients whose liver biopsy showed evidence of cellular rejection, the immune response was noted to be very high, whereas in those with active recurrence of hepatitis C, the immune response was found to be very low. This finding was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.0001). In those patients in whom there was no predominant histologic features suggesting 1 entity over the other, the immune response was higher than in those with aggressive hepatitis C but lower than in those with cellular rejection. In conclusion, these data show the potential utility of the ImmuKnow assay as a means of distinguishing hepatitis C from cellular rejection and its potential usefulness as a marker for outlining the progression of hepatitis C. PMID:19177434

  13. Early Hepatic Dysfunction Is Associated with a Worse Outcome in Patients Presenting with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Post-Hoc Analysis of the ACURASYS and PROSEVA Studies

    PubMed Central

    Dizier, Stéphanie; Forel, Jean-Marie; Ayzac, Louis; Richard, Jean-Christophe; Hraiech, Sami; Lehingue, Samuel; Loundou, Anderson; Roch, Antoine; Guerin, Claude; Papazian, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bilirubin is well-recognized marker of hepatic dysfunction in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Multiple organ failure often complicates acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) evolution and is associated with high mortality. The effect of early hepatic dysfunction on ARDS mortality has been poorly investigated. We evaluated the incidence and the prognostic significance of increased serum bilirubin levels in the initial phase of ARDS. Methods The data of 805 patients with ARDS were retrospectively analysed. This population was extracted from two recent multicenter, prospective and randomised trials. Patients presenting with ARDS with a ratio of the partial pressure of arterial oxygen to the fraction of inspired oxygen < 150 mmHg measured with a PEEP ? 5 cm of water were included. The total serum bilirubin was measured at inclusion and at days 2, 4, 7 and 14. The primary objective was to analyse the bilirubin at inclusion according to the 90-day mortality rate. Results The 90-day mortality rate was 33.8% (n = 272). The non-survivors were older, had higher Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score and were more likely to have a medical diagnosis on admission than the survivors. At inclusion, the SOFA score without the liver score (10.3±2.9 vs. 9.0±3.0, p<0.0001) and the serum bilirubin levels (36.1±57.0 vs. 20.5±31.5 ?mol/L, p<0.0001) were significantly higher in the non-survivors than in the survivors. Age, the hepatic SOFA score, the coagulation SOFA score, the arterial pH level, and the plateau pressure were independently associated with 90-day mortality in patients with ARDS. Conclusion Bilirubin used as a surrogate marker of hepatic dysfunction and measured early in the course of ARDS was associated with the 90-day mortality rate. PMID:26636318

  14. Cellular and humoral immune reactions in chronic active liver disease. II. Lymphocyte subsets and viral antigens in liver biopsies of patients with acute and chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, H F; Houthoff, H J; Huitema, S; Wolters, G; Poppema, S; Gips, C H

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics and distribution of the inflammatory infiltrate in liver biopsies of 25 patients with hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection were studied in relation to the distribution and expression of HBV antigens. Mononuclear subsets were characterized with monoclonal (OKT, OKM, Leu) antibodies to surface antigens. For the demonstration of viral antigens directly conjugated antibodies to surface (HBsAg), core (HBcAg) and 'e' (HBeAg) antigen were used. For the study of mutual relations all methods were performed on serial cut tissue sections. In chronic active hepatitis B (CAH-B, n = 12) OKT8+ lymphocytes of T cell origin were the only cell type present in areas with liver cell degeneration and T cell cytotoxicity appears to be the only immune mechanism. In chronic persistent hepatitis B (CPH-B, n = 7) the only conspicuous feature was the presence of many Leu 3+ lymphocytes of the helper/inducer population in the portal tracts. In acute hepatitis B (AHB, n = 6) OKT8+ cells of non-T origin (OKT1-,3-) and Leu 7+ cells of presumed natural killer (NK) potential predominated in the areas with liver cell necrosis, and non-T cell cytotoxicity appears to be the predominant immune mechanism. In none of these disease entities a positive spatial relation could be established between the cytotoxic cells and the demonstrable expression of HBV antigens in hepatocytes. It is concluded that differences in immunological reaction pattern may explain the different course in the three forms of HBV infection studied. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6713726

  15. Alcoholic Lung Injury: Metabolic, Biochemical and Immunological Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Kaphalia, Lata; Calhoun, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse is a systemic disorder and a risk factor for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A significant amount of ingested alcohol reaches airway passages in the lungs and can be metabolized via oxidative and non-oxidative pathways. About 90% of the ingested alcohol is metabolized via hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-catalyzed oxidative pathway. Alcohol can also be metabolized by cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), particularly during chronic alcohol abuse. Both the oxidative pathways, however, are associated with oxidative stress due to the formation of acetaldehyde and/or reactive oxygen species (ROS). Alcohol ingestion is also known to cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which can be mediated by oxidative and/or non-oxidative metabolites of ethanol. An acute as well as chronic alcohol ingestions impair protective antioxidants, oxidize reduced glutathione (GSH, cellular antioxidant against ROS and oxidative stress), and suppress innate and adaptive immunity in the lungs. Oxidative stress and suppressed immunity in the lungs of chronic alcohol abusers collectively are considered to be major risk factors for infection and development of pneumonia, and such diseases as ARDS and COPD. Prior human and experimental studies attempted to identify common mechanisms by which alcohol abuse directly causes toxicity to alveolar epithelium and respiratory tract, particularly lungs. In this review, the metabolic basis of lung injury, oxidative and ER stress and immunosuppression in experimental models and alcoholic patients, as well as potential immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies for improving host defenses against alcohol-induced pulmonary infections are discussed. PMID:23892124

  16. [Viral hepatitis in travellers].

    PubMed

    Abreu, Cândida

    2007-01-01

    Considering the geographical asymmetric distribution of viral hepatitis A, B and E, having a much higher prevalence in the less developed world, travellers from developed countries are exposed to a considerable and often underestimated risk of hepatitis infection. In fact a significant percentage of viral hepatitis occurring in developed countries is travel related. This results from globalization and increased mobility from tourism, international work, humanitarian and religious missions or other travel related activities. Several studies published in Europe and North America shown that more than 50% of reported cases of hepatitis A are travel related. On the other hand frequent outbreaks of hepatitis A and E in specific geographic areas raise the risk of infection in these restricted zones and that should be clearly identified. Selected aspects related with the distribution of hepatitis A, B and E are reviewed, particularly the situation in Portugal according to the published studies, as well as relevant clinical manifestations and differential diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Basic prevention rules considering enteric transmitted hepatitis (hepatitis A and hepatitis E) and parenteral transmitted (hepatitis B) are reviewed as well as hepatitis A and B immunoprophylaxis. Common clinical situations and daily practice "pre travel" advice issues are discussed according to WHO/CDC recommendations and the Portuguese National Vaccination Program. Implications from near future availability of a hepatitis E vaccine, a currently in phase 2 trial, are highlighted. Potential indications for travellers to endemic countries like India, Nepal and some regions of China, where up to 30% of sporadic cases of acute viral hepatitis are caused by hepatitis E virus, are considered. Continued epidemiological surveillance for viral hepatitis is essential to recognize and control possible outbreaks, but also to identify new viral hepatitis agents that may emerge as important global health issues. PMID:18331700

  17. Reduction of endotoxin attenuates liver fibrosis through suppression of hepatic stellate cell activation and remission of intestinal permeability in a rat non-alcoholic steatohepatitis model.

    PubMed

    Douhara, Akitoshi; Moriya, Kei; Yoshiji, Hitoshi; Noguchi, Ryuichi; Namisaki, Tadashi; Kitade, Mitsuteru; Kaji, Kosuke; Aihara, Yosuke; Nishimura, Norihisa; Takeda, Kosuke; Okura, Yasushi; Kawaratani, Hideto; Fukui, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Previous clinical studies have demonstrated that endotoxin/toll?like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling is critical in the inflammatory pathways associated with non?alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). In human and animal studies, NASH was associated with portal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the plasma LPS level was hypothesized to be associated with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, change in composition of the microbiota and increased intestinal permeability. The aim of the present study was to investigate the roles of endogenous endotoxin and TLR4 in the pathogenesis of NASH. The effects of antibiotics were assessed in vivo using a choline deficiency amino acid (CDAA)?induced experimental liver fibrosis model. Antibiotics, including polymyxins and neomycins, were orally administered in drinking water. Antibiotics attenuated hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation and liver fibrosis via TGF?? and collagen in an experimental hepatic fibrosis model. The mechanism by which antibiotics attenuated LPS?TLR4 signaling and liver fibrosis was assessed. Notably, TLR4 mRNA level in the liver was elevated in the CDAA group and the CDAA?induced increase was significantly reduced by antibiotics. However, no significant differences were observed in the intestine among all groups. Elevated mRNA levels of LPS binding protein, which was correlated with serum endotoxin levels, were recognized in the CDAA group and the CDAA?induced increase was significantly reduced by antibiotics. The intestinal permeability of the CDAA group was increased compared with the choline?supplemented amino acid group. The tight junction protein (TJP) in the intestine, determined by immunohistochemical analysis was inversely associated with intestinal permeability. Antibiotics improved the intestinal permeability and enhanced TJP expression. Inhibition of LPS?TLR4 signaling with antibiotics attenuated liver fibrosis development associated with NASH via the inhibition of HSC activation. These results indicated that reduction of LPS and restoration of intestinal TJP may be a novel therapeutic strategy for treatment of liver fibrosis development in NASH. PMID:25421042

  18. Reduction of endotoxin attenuates liver fibrosis through suppression of hepatic stellate cell activation and remission of intestinal permeability in a rat non-alcoholic steatohepatitis model

    PubMed Central

    DOUHARA, AKITOSHI; MORIYA, KEI; YOSHIJI, HITOSHI; NOGUCHI, RYUICHI; NAMISAKI, TADASHI; KITADE, MITSUTERU; KAJI, KOSUKE; AIHARA, YOSUKE; NISHIMURA, NORIHISA; TAKEDA, KOSUKE; OKURA, YASUSHI; KAWARATANI, HIDETO; FUKUI, HIROSHI

    2015-01-01

    Previous clinical studies have demonstrated that endotoxin/toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling is critical in the inflammatory pathways associated with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). In human and animal studies, NASH was associated with portal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the plasma LPS level was hypothesized to be associated with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, change in composition of the microbiota and increased intestinal permeability. The aim of the present study was to investigate the roles of endogenous endotoxin and TLR4 in the pathogenesis of NASH. The effects of antibiotics were assessed in vivo using a choline deficiency amino acid (CDAA)-induced experimental liver fibrosis model. Antibiotics, including polymyxins and neomycins, were orally administered in drinking water. Antibiotics attenuated hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation and liver fibrosis via TGF-? and collagen in an experimental hepatic fibrosis model. The mechanism by which antibiotics attenuated LPS-TLR4 signaling and liver fibrosis was assessed. Notably, TLR4 mRNA level in the liver was elevated in the CDAA group and the CDAA-induced increase was significantly reduced by antibiotics. However, no significant differences were observed in the intestine among all groups. Elevated mRNA levels of LPS binding protein, which was correlated with serum endotoxin levels, were recognized in the CDAA group and the CDAA-induced increase was significantly reduced by antibiotics. The intestinal permeability of the CDAA group was increased compared with the choline-supplemented amino acid group. The tight junction protein (TJP) in the intestine, determined by immunohistochemical analysis was inversely associated with intestinal permeability. Antibiotics improved the intestinal permeability and enhanced TJP expression. Inhibition of LPS-TLR4 signaling with antibiotics attenuated liver fibrosis development associated with NASH via the inhibition of HSC activation. These results indicated that reduction of LPS and restoration of intestinal TJP may be a novel therapeutic strategy for treatment of liver fibrosis development in NASH. PMID:25421042

  19. Effects of acute alcohol intoxication on verbal memory in young men as a function of time of day.

    PubMed

    Poltavski, Dmitri V; Marino, Joanna M; Guido, Jenny M; Kulland, Ashley; Petros, Thomas V

    2011-01-10

    This experiment examined whether the time of day of alcohol administration influences alcohol metabolism and the impact of alcohol on verbal memory. It was hypothesized that circadian fluctuations in endogenous levels of testosterone in young men would differentially affect blood alcohol levels, which would consequently impair their memory performance to a different degree. Participants were administered alcohol or placebo drinks either at 8am or 6pm and recall of 4 prose passages was examined. The results indicated that recall declined for subjects administered alcohol but time of day did not moderate these effects. Nevertheless, generally alcohol breath levels changed in the predicted direction as a function of the time of the day with higher levels recorded in the morning and lower levels in the afternoon. The results suggested that observed differences in breath alcohol levels may be influenced by differences in endogenous levels of testosterone, but the effect of this presumed interaction on verbal memory appears inconclusive. PMID:20951713

  20. Effect of diallyl disulfide on acute gastric mucosal damage induced by alcohol in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, I-C; Baek, H-S; Kim, S-H; Moon, C; Park, S-H; Kim, S-H; Shin, I-S; Park, S-C; Kim, J-C

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the gastroprotective effects of diallyl disulfide (DADS), a secondary organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L.) on experimental model of ethanol (EtOH)-induced gastric ulcer in rats. The antiulcerogenic activity of DADS was evaluated by gross/histopathological inspection, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and lipid peroxidation with antioxidant enzyme activities in the stomach. DADS (100 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage 2 h prior to EtOH treatment (5 ml/kg). The animals were killed 1 h after receiving EtOH treatment. Pretreatment with DADS attenuated EtOH-induced gastric mucosal injury, as evidenced by decreased severity of hemorrhagic lesions and gastric ulcer index upon visual inspection. DADS also prevented histopathological alterations and gastric apoptotic changes caused by EtOH. An increase in tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) and inducible nitric oxide synthase was observed in the gastric tissues of EtOH-treated rats that coincided with increased serum TNF-? and interleukin 6 levels. In contrast, DADS effectively suppressed production of pro-inflammatory mediators induced by EtOH. Furthermore, DADS prevented the formation of gastric malondialdehyde and the depletion of reduced glutathione content and restored antioxidant enzyme activities, such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase in the gastric tissues of EtOH-treated rats. These results indicate that DADS prevents gastric mucosal damage induced by acute EtOH administration in rats and that the protective effects of DADS may be due to its potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:24972622

  1. Multicentre study of acute alcohol use and non-fatal injuries: data from the WHO collaborative study on alcohol and injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Guilherme; Cherpitel, Cheryl; Orozco, Ricardo; Bond, Jason; Ye, Yu; Macdonald, Scott; Rehm, Jürgen; Poznyak, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the risk of non-fatal injury at low levels and moderate levels of alcohol consumption as well as the differences in risk across modes of injury and differences among alcoholics. METHODS: Data are from patients aged 18 years and older collected in 2001-02 by the WHO collaborative study on alcohol and injuries from 10 emergency departments around the world (n = 4320). We used a case-crossover method to compare the use of alcohol during the 6 hours prior to the injury with the use of alcohol during same day of the week in the previous week. FINDINGS: The risk of injury increased with consumption of a single drink (odds ratio (OR) = 3.3; 95% confidence interval = 1.9-5.7), and there was a 10-fold increase for participants who had consumed six or more drinks during the previous 6 hours. Participants who had sustained intentional injuries were at a higher risk than participants who had sustained unintentional injuries. Patients who had no symptoms of alcohol dependence had a higher OR. CONCLUSION: Since low levels of drinking were associated with an increased risk of sustaining a non-fatal injury, and patients who are not dependent on alcohol may be at higher risk of becoming injured, comprehensive strategies for reducing harm should be implemented for all drinkers seen in emergency departments. PMID:16799729

  2. Hypertonic saline resuscitation enhances blood pressure recovery and decreases organ injury following hemorrhage in acute alcohol intoxicated rodents

    PubMed Central

    Sulzer, Jesse K.; Whitaker, Annie M.; Molina, Patricia E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute alcohol intoxication (AAI) impairs the hemodynamic and arginine vasopressin (AVP) counter-regulation to hemorrhagic shock (HS) and lactated Ringer’s (LR) fluid resuscitation (FR). The mechanism of AAI-induced suppression of AVP release in response to HS involves accentuated nitric oxide (NO) inhibitory tone. In contrast, AAI does not prevent AVP response to increased osmolarity produced by hypertonic saline (HTS) infusion. We hypothesized that FR with HTS during AAI would enhance AVP release by decreasing PVN NO inhibitory tone subsequently improving mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and organ perfusion. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats received a 15h alcohol infusion (2.5g/kg + 0.3 g/kg/h) or dextrose (DEX) prior to HS (40mmHg × 60 min) and FR with HTS (7.5%; 4ml/kg) or LR (2.4 × blood volume removed). Organ blood flow was determined and brains collected for NO content at 2h post-FR. Results HTS improved MABP recovery in AAI (109 vs 80mmHg) and DEX (114 vs 83mmHg) animals compared to LR. This was associated with higher (>60%) circulating AVP levels at 2h post-FR than those detected in LR animals in both groups. Neither AAI alone nor HS in DEX animals resuscitated with LR altered organ blood flow. In AAI animals, HS and FR with LR reduced blood flow to liver (72%), small intestine (65%), and large intestine (67%) compared to shams. FR with HTS improved liver (3-fold) and small intestine (2-fold) blood flow compared to LR in AAI-HS animals. The enhanced MABP response to HTS was prevented by pretreatment with a systemic AVP V1a receptor antagonist. HTS decreased PVN NO content in both groups 2h post-FR. Conclusions These results suggest that FR with HTS in AAI results in removal of central NO inhibition of AVP, restoring AVP levels and improving MABP and organ perfusion in AAI-HS. PMID:23147176

  3. NSAID-induced acute phase response is due to increased intestinal permeability and characterized by early and consistent alterations in hepatic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tugendreich, Stuart; Pearson, Cecelia I; Sagartz, John; Jarnagin, Kurt; Kolaja, Kyle

    2006-01-01

    Toxicogenomics using a reference database can provide a better understanding and prediction of toxicity, largely by creating biomarkers that tie gene expression to actual pathology events. During the course of building a toxicogenomic database, an observation was made that a number of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory compounds (NSAIDs) at supra-pharmacologic doses induced an acute phase response (APR) and displayed hepatic gene expression patterns similar to that of intravenous lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Since NSAIDs are known to cause injury along the gastrointestinal tract, it has been suggested that NSAIDs increase intestinal permeability, allowing LPS and/or bacteria into the systemic circulation and stimulating an APR detectable in the liver. A short term study was subsequently conducted examining the effects of aspirin, indomethacin, ibuprofen, and rofecoxib to rats and a variety of endpoints were examined that included serum levels of inflammatory cytokines, histologic evaluation, and hepatic gene expression. Both indomethacin and ibuprofen injured the gastrointestinal tract, induced an APR, and increased serum levels of LPS, while rofecoxib and aspirin did not affect the GI tract or induce an APR. In treatments that eventually showed a systemic inflammatory response, hepatic expression of many inflammatory genes was noted as early as 6 hours after treatment well before alterations in traditional clinical pathology markers were detected. This finding led to the creation of a hepatic gene expression biomarker of APR that was effectively shown to be an early identifier of imminent inflammatory injury. In terms of the relative gastrointestinal safety and the NSAIDs studied, an important safety distinction can be made between the presumptive efficacious dose and the APR-inducing dose for indomethacin (1-2-fold), ibuprofen (5-fold), and rofecoxib (approximately 250-fold). Our data support the notion that NSAID-induced intestinal injury results in leakage of commensural bacteria and/or LPS into the circulation, provoking a systemic inflammatory response and that hepatic gene expression-based biomarkers can be used as early and sensitive biomarkers of APR onset. PMID:16642600

  4. Diagnosis and Management of Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dugum, Mohannad; McCullough, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol is a leading cause of liver disease and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Several factors, including the amount and duration of alcohol consumption, affect the development and progression of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). ALD represents a spectrum of liver pathology ranging from fatty change to fibrosis to cirrhosis. Early diagnosis of ALD is important to encourage alcohol abstinence, minimize the progression of liver fibrosis, and manage cirrhosis-related complications including hepatocellular carcinoma. A number of questionnaires and laboratory tests are available to screen for alcohol intake. Liver biopsy remains the gold-standard diagnostic tool for ALD, but noninvasive accurate alternatives, including a number of biochemical tests as well as liver stiffness measurement, are increasingly being utilized in the evaluation of patients with suspected ALD. The management of ALD depends largely on complete abstinence from alcohol. Supportive care should focus on treating alcohol withdrawal and providing enteral nutrition while managing the complications of liver failure. Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is a devastating acute form of ALD that requires early recognition and specialized tertiary medical care. Assessment of AH severity using defined scoring systems is important to allocate resources and initiate appropriate therapy. Corticosteroids or pentoxifylline are commonly used in treating AH but provide a limited survival benefit. Liver transplantation represents the ultimate therapy for patients with alcoholic cirrhosis, with most transplant centers mandating a 6 month period of abstinence from alcohol before listing. Early liver transplantation is also emerging as a therapeutic measure in specifically selected patients with severe AH. A number of novel targeted therapies for ALD are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:26356792

  5. Hepatic and Pulmonary Toxicogenomic Profiles in Mice Intratracheally Instilled With Carbon Black Nanoparticles Reveal Pulmonary Inflammation, Acute Phase Response, and Alterations in Lipid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Bourdon, Julie A.; Halappanavar, Sabina; Saber, Anne T.; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Williams, Andrew; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla; Yauk, Carole L.

    2012-01-01

    Global pulmonary and hepatic messenger RNA profiles in adult female C57BL/6 mice intratracheally instilled with carbon black nanoparticles (NPs) (Printex 90) were analyzed to identify biological perturbations underlying systemic responses to NP exposure. Tissue gene expression changes were profiled 1, 3, and 28 days following exposure to 0.018, 0.054, and 0.162 mg Printex 90 alongside controls. Pulmonary response was marked by increased expression of inflammatory markers and acute phase response (APR) genes that persisted to day 28 at the highest exposure dose. Genes in the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase pathway were increased, and those involved in cholesterol efflux were decreased at least at the highest dose on days 1 and 3. Hepatic responses mainly consisted of the HMG-CoA reductase pathway on days 1 (high dose) and 28 (all doses). Protein analysis in tissues and plasma of 0.162 mg Printex 90–exposed mice relative to control revealed an increase in plasma serum amyloid A on days 1 and 28 (p < 0.05), decreases in plasma high-density lipoprotein on days 3 and 28, an increase in plasma low-density lipoprotein on day 28 (p < 0.05), and marginal increases in total hepatic cholesterol on day 28 (p = 0.06). The observed changes are linked to APR. Although further research is needed to establish links between observations and the onset and progression of systemic disorders, the present study demonstrates the ability of NPs to induce systemic effects. PMID:22461453

  6. Upregulated Expression of A20 on Monocytes is Associated With Increased Severity of Acute-on-Chronic Hepatitis B Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yonghong; He, Yu; Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Yun; Qin, Yuan; Fan, Chao; Ji, Guangxi; Zhang, Peixin; Jia, Zhansheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A20 expression is increased in various inflammatory diseases. However, the role of A20 in acute-on-chronic liver failure is unknown. This study was to evaluate A20 expression on monocytes and its associations with the severity of acute-on-chronic hepatitis B liver failure (ACHBLF). Thirty-seven patients with ACHBLF, 20 patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), and 15 healthy controls (HC) were enrolled in this case-control study. A20-positive monocytes were identified using flow cytometry. Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-10, IL-12p70, and TNF-? were determined using bead cytometry. A20 and IL-10 expressions were examined in THP-1 cells stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The frequency of A20+ monocytes was significantly increased in patients with ACHBLF compared with HC (median [interquartile range, IQR]: 15.7 [22.8]% vs 2.5 [4.7]%, P?

  7. [Disturbances of folic acid and homocysteine metabolism in alcohol abuse].

    PubMed

    Cylwik, Bogdan; Chrostek, Lech

    2011-04-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse leads to malnutrition, and thus to the deficiency of many nutrients, including vitamins and trace elements. Most often comes to the deficiency of all vitamins, however because the clinical implications, the most important is folic acid (vitamin B9) deficiency. Biochemical effect of folate deficiency is elevated homocysteine concentration in the blood, named "cholesterol of XXI. century". In the paper, the folate and homocysteine metabolism in alcohol abuse was discussed. Mechanisms of alcohol action on folate homeostasis in the human body have been indicated. Chronic alcohol consumption leads to deficiency of this vitamin due to their dietary inadequacy, intestinal malabsorption, decreased hepatic uptake and increased body excretion, mainly via urine. The decreased concentration of serum folic acid may occur in 80% of alcoholics. The cause of elevated concentrations of homocysteine in the serum of alcohol abusers is also a deficiency of vitamins involved such as vitamin B12 and pyridoxal phosphate. Disturbance of folic acid and homocysteine metabolism in alcohol abusers can lead to serious clinical consequences. Folic acid deficiency leads inter alia to macrocytic and megaloblastic anemia and neurological disorders. Megaloblastic anemia occurs in about half of alcohol abusers with chronic liver diseases. In turn, high level of homocysteine in blood is associated with an inreased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor that favors the occurrence of acute coronary syndromes in patients with coronary heart disease. PMID:21595178

  8. Peripheral and Hepatic Vein Cytokine Levels in Correlation with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)-Related Metabolic, Histological, and Haemodynamic Features

    PubMed Central

    Vonghia, Luisa; Magrone, Thea; Verrijken, An; Michielsen, Peter; Van Gaal, Luc; Jirillo, Emilio; Francque, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Background Haemodynamic impairment, inflammatory mediators and glucose metabolism disturbances have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD). Aim To investigate the cytokine profile in NAFLD patients in peripheral (P) and hepatic venous (HV) blood and to compare with histology, haemodynamic and metabolic parameters. Methods 40 obese patients with an indication for a transjugular liver biopsy were enrolled. Besides an extended liver and metabolic work-up, interleukin (IL) 1B, IL4, IL6, IL10, IL23, tumour necrosis factor (TNF) ? and interferon (INF) ? were measured in plasma obtained from P and HV blood by means of multiplex immunoassay. The T helper (Th)1/Th2, the macrophage M1/M2 and the IL10/IL17a ratios were calculated. Results A decrease of the P-IL10/IL17-ratio and an increase of the P-M1/M2-ratio (p<0.05) were observed in NASH versus no-NASH patients. A P-M1/M2-ratio increase was detected also in patients with portal hypertension in comparison with patients without it (p<0.05). Moreover diabetic patients showed an increase of the P-Th1/Th2-ratio in comparison with non-diabetic ones (p<0.05). The P-M1/M2 ratio positively correlated with steatosis grade (r = 0.39, p = 0.02) and insulin (r = 0.47, p = 0.003). The HV-M1/M2 ratio positively correlated with fasting insulin and Hepatic Venous Pressure Gradient (r = 0.47, p = 0.003). IL6 correlated with the visceral fat amount (r = 0.36, p = 0.02). The P- and HV-IL10/IL17 ratios negatively correlated with fasting insulin (respectively r = -0.4, p = 0.005 and r = 0.4, p = 0.01). Conclusions A proinflammatory cytokine state is associated with more disturbed metabolic, histological, and haemodynamic features in NAFLD obese patients. An increase of the M1/M2 ratio and a decrease of the IL10/IL17 ratio play a key role in this process. PMID:26599575

  9. Alcoholic liver disease: Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Ki Tae; Kim, Moon Young; Baik, Soon Koo

    2014-01-01

    The excess consumption of alcohol is associated with alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). ALD is a major healthcare problem, personal and social burden, and significant reason for economic loss worldwide. The ALD spectrum includes alcoholic fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. The diagnosis of ALD is based on a combination of clinical features, including a history of significant alcohol intake, evidence of liver disease, and laboratory findings. Abstinence is the most important treatment for ALD and the treatment plan varies according to the stage of the disease. Various treatments including abstinence, nutritional therapy, pharmacological therapy, psychotherapy, and surgery are currently available. For severe alcoholic hepatitis, corticosteroid or pentoxifylline are recommended based on the guidelines. In addition, new therapeutic targets are being under investigation. PMID:25278689

  10. Six month abstinence rule for liver transplantation in severe alcoholic liver disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Obed, Aiman; Stern, Steffen; Jarrad, Anwar; Lorf, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is the second most common diagnosis among patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT). The recovery results of patients transplanted for ALD are often at least as good as those of patients transplanted for other diagnoses and better than those suffering from hepatitis C virus, cryptogenic cirrhosis, or hepatocellular carcinoma. In the case of medically non-responding patients with severe acute alcoholic hepatitis or acute-on chronic liver failure, the refusal of LT is often based on the lack of the required alcohol abstinence period of six months. The obligatory abidance of a period of abstinence as a transplant eligibility requirement for medically non-responding patients seems unfair and inhumane, since the majority of these patients will not survive the six-month abstinence period. Data from various studies have challenged the 6-mo rule, while excellent survival results of LT have been observed in selected patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis not responding to medical therapy. Patients with severe advanced ALD should have legal access to LT. The mere lack of pre-LT abstinence should not be an obstacle for being listed. PMID:25892898

  11. Acute myeloid leukemia of a primary hepatic carcinoma patient after liver transplantation: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-Jun; Dong, Meng-Meng; Chen, Yun; He, Jing-Song; Huang, He; Cai, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is an important means to treat end-stage liver disease. Although effective immunosuppressant medication greatly assists the survival of patients, it is likely to promote infections and cancer. Acute leukemia (AL) is a rare complication after LDLT and up to now only 1 case of post-transplantation AL has occurred in our liver transplantation center after more than 1,600 LDLT interventions since 1993. In the present report, we describe a rare case of subsequent acute myeloid leukemia (AML), 27 months after LDLT and review the literature of this infrequent complication. PMID:26722593

  12. Portal Vein Embolization with Radiolabeled Polyvinyl Alcohol Particles in a Swine Model: Hepatic Distribution and Implications for Pancreatic Islet Cell Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Richard J.; Mercer, John R.; Al-Saif, Faisal; Molinari, Michele; Ashforth, Robert A.; Rajotte, Ray V.; Conner-Spady, Barbara; Shapiro, A. M. James

    2009-05-15

    The distribution of radiolabeled polyvinyl alcohol microspheres (PVAMs) when infused into the portal vein of domestic swine was investigated, with the purpose of assessing implications for pancreatic islet cell transplantation. PVAMs measuring 100-300 {mu}m (Contour SE) and labeled with {sup 99m}Tc were infused into the main portal vein of 12 swine, with intermittent portal venous pressure measurements. The infusion catheter was introduced antegradely via direct or indirect cannulation of the portal vein. The liver was subsequently divided into anatomical segments. Radioactivity (decay corrected) was measured for {sup 99m}Tc microsphere synthesis, dose preparation, gross organ activities, tissue samples, and blood. Particulate labeling, catheter positioning, and infusion were successful in all cases. The number of particles used was (185,000 {+-} 24,000) with a volume of 1 ml. Mean portal pressure at 5 min was significantly higher than baseline, but without a significant difference at 15 min. Extrahepatic tissue and serum radioactivity was negligible. A significant difference in number of radioactive particles per gram was detected between segments 6/7 and segments 5/8. Intrasegmental activity was analyzed, and for segments 2/3 a significant difference in the percentage dose per gram across samples was demonstrated (P = 0.001). Effective and stable radiolabeling of PVAMs with {sup 99m}Tc-sulfur colloid was demonstrated. Portal venous infusion of 100- to 300-{mu}m particles showed entrapment in the sinusoidal hepatic system with transient portal pressure elevation. Preferential embolization into the right lateral and posterior segments occurs, suggesting that flow dynamics/catheter tip position plays a role in particle distribution.

  13. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography for the Non-Invasive Evaluation of Hepatic Fibrosis in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients: A Systematic Review & Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haixia; Fu, Jing; Hong, Ruixia; Liu, Li; Li, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background In order to better monitor non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients at higher risk for HCC, there is a need for non-invasive diagnostic approaches to screen for the presence of advanced fibrosis in these patients. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis will be to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of ARFI elastography in detecting hepatic fibrosis in NAFLD patients. Methods Relevant studies were identified from systematic searches of several major electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials). The primary outcomes were the summary sensitivity, summary specificity, the diagnostic odds ratio, and the summary receiver operating characteristic curve (SROC) of ARFI elastography in detecting significant fibrosis (defined as 4>F?2) in NAFLD patients. Study quality was assessed using the Quality Assessment of Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy included in Systematic Review (QUADAS-2). Results The summary sensitivity and specificity of ARFI in detecting significant fibrosis were 80.2% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.758–0.842; p = 0.0000) and 85.2% (95% CI: 0.808–0.890), p = 0.1617), respectively. The pooled diagnostic odds ratio of ARFI in detecting significant fibrosis was 30.13 (95% CI: 12.08–75; chi-squared = 14.59, p = 0.0237). The area under the SROC curve (AUC) was 0.898 (standard error (SE): 0.031) with a Q* index of 0.830 (SE: 0.033). Conclusions ARFI elastography appears to be modestly accurate in detecting significant fibrosis in NAFLD patients. Future studies in this field should provide head-to-head comparisons of ARFI elastography versus other elastographic imaging modalities in NAFLD patients. PMID:26131717

  14. Acute Effects of Alcohol on Stimulus-Induced Gamma Oscillations in Human Primary Visual and Motor Cortices

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Anne E; Sumner, Petroc; Singh, Krish D; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is a rich drug affecting both the ?-amino butyric acid (GABA) and glutamatergic neurotransmitter systems. Recent findings from both modeling and pharmacological manipulation have indicated a link between GABAergic activity and oscillations measured in the gamma frequency range (30–80?Hz), but there are no previous reports of alcohol's modulation of gamma-band activity measured by magnetoencephalography (MEG) or electroencephalography (EEG). In this single-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, 16 participants completed two study days, on one day of which they consumed a dose of 0.8?g/kg alcohol, and on the other day a placebo. MEG recordings of brain activity were taken before and after beverage consumption, using visual grating and finger abduction paradigms known to induce gamma-band activity in the visual and motor cortices respectively. Time–frequency analyses of beamformer source reconstructions in the visual cortex showed that alcohol increased peak gamma amplitude and decreased peak frequency. For the motor task, alcohol increased gamma amplitude in the motor cortex. These data support the notion that gamma oscillations are dependent, in part, on the balance between excitation and inhibition. Disruption of this balance by alcohol, by increasing GABAergic inhibition at GABAA receptors and decreasing glutamatergic excitation at N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors, alters both the amplitude and frequency of gamma oscillations. The findings provide further insight into the neuropharmacological action of alcohol. PMID:24622470

  15. Molecular mechanisms of hepatic injury and repair 

    E-print Network

    Henderson, Neil C

    In this thesis I examined molecular mechanisms involved in acute and chronic liver injury, and also studied basic pathways mediating tumour promotion. Acute hepatic failure secondary to paracetamol poisoning is associated ...

  16. A model to predict 3-month mortality risk of acute-on-chronic hepatitis B liver failure using artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Zheng, M-H; Shi, K-Q; Lin, X-F; Xiao, D-D; Chen, L-L; Liu, W-Y; Fan, Y-C; Chen, Y-P

    2013-04-01

    Model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scoring was initiated using traditional statistical technique by assuming a linear relationship between clinical features, but most phenomena in a clinical situation are not linearly related. The aim of this study was to predict 3-month mortality risk of acute-on-chronic hepatitis B liver failure (ACHBLF) on an individual patient level using an artificial neural network (ANN) system. The ANN model was built using data from 402 consecutive patients with ACHBLF. It was trained to predict 3-month mortality by the data of 280 patients and validated by the remaining 122 patients. The area under the curve of receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) was calculated for ANN and MELD-based scoring systems. The following variables age (P < 0.001), prothrombin activity (P < 0.001), serum sodium (P < 0.001), total bilirubin (P = 0.015), hepatitis B e antigen positivity rate (P < 0.001) and haemoglobin (P < 0.001) were significantly related to the prognosis of ACHBLF and were selected to build the ANN. The ANN performed significantly better than MELD-based scoring systems both in the training cohort (AUROC = 0.869 vs 0.667, 0.591, 0.643, 0.571 and 0.577; P < 0.001, respectively) and in the validation cohort (AUROC = 0.765 vs 0.599, 0.563, 0.601, 0.521 and 0.540; P ? 0.006, respectively). Thus, the ANN model was shown to be more accurate in predicting 3-month mortality of ACHBLF than MELD-based scoring systems. PMID:23490369

  17. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Hepatitis A Article Body Hepatitis means “inflammation of the liver.” This inflammation can ... well as infection. There are at least 5 hepatitis viruses. Hepatitis A is contracted when a child ...

  18. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hepatitis B? Hepatitis B can lead to cirrhosis, liver cancer and death. Hepatitis B is incurable. A safe, ... can lead to cirrhosis (scarring of the liver), liver cancer, and even death.Hepatitis A can cause varying ...

  19. Hepatitis G virus: is it a hepatitis virus?

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, R C; Keeffe, E B; Greenberg, H B

    1997-01-01

    Hepatitis G virus (HGV) and GB virus C (GBV-C) are two newly discovered viral agents, different isolates of a positive-sense RNA virus that represents a new genus of Flaviviridae. The purpose of this review is to analyze new data that have recently been published on the epidemiology and associations between HGV and liver diseases such as posttransfusion hepatitis, acute and chronic non-A-E hepatitis, fulminant hepatitis, cryptogenic cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The role of HGV in coinfection with other hepatitis viruses, the response to antiviral therapy, and the impact of HGV on liver transplantation are also discussed. HGV is a transmissible blood-borne viral agent that frequently occurs as a coinfection with other hepatitis viruses due to common modes of transmission. The prevalence of HGV ranges from 0.9 to 10% among blood donors throughout the world and is found in 1.7% of volunteer blood donors in the United States. The majority of patients infected with HGV by blood transfusion do not develop chronic hepatitis, but hepatitis G viremia frequently persists without biochemical evidence of hepatitis. Serum HGV RNA has been found in 0 to 50% of patients with fulminant hepatitis of unknown etiology and 14 to 36% of patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis. The association between HGV and chronic non-A-E hepatitis remains unclear. Although HGV appears to be a hepatotrophic virus, its role in independently causing acute and chronic liver diseases remains uncertain. PMID:9265860

  20. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of umbelliferone in chronic alcohol-fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Mi-Ok; Lee, Hae-In; Ham, Ju Ri; Seo, Kwon-Il; Kim, Myung-Joo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Inflammation is associated with various types of acute and chronic alcohol liver diseases. In this study, we examined whether umbelliferone (7-hydroxycoumarin, UF) ameliorates chronic alcohol-induced liver damage by modulating inflammatory response and the antioxidant system. METHODS Rats were fed a Liber-Decarli liquid diet containing 5% alcohol with or without UF (0.05 g/L) for 8 weeks, while normal rats received an isocaloric carbohydrate liquid diet. RESULTS Chronic alcohol intake significantly increased serum tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) and interleukin 6 levels and decreased interleukin 10 level; however, UF supplementation reversed the cytokines related to liver damage. UF significantly suppressed hepatic lipopolysaccharide binding protein, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), nuclear factor kappa B, and TNF-? gene expression increases in response to chronic alcohol intake. Masson's trichrome staining revealed that UF improved mild hepatic fibrosis caused by alcohol, and UF also significantly increased the mRNA expressions and activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase in liver, and thus, decreased lipid peroxide and mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide levels. CONCLUSIONS The findings of this study indicate that UF protects against alcohol-induced liver damage by inhibiting the TLR4 signaling pathway and activating the antioxidant system. PMID:26244074

  1. The PNPLA3 rs738409 148M/M Genotype Is a Risk Factor for Liver Cancer in Alcoholic Cirrhosis but Shows No or Weak Association in Hepatitis C Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Luda, Carolin; Berg, Thomas; Müller, Tobias; Grünhage, Frank; Lammert, Frank; Coenen, Martin; Krämer, Benjamin; Körner, Christian; Vidovic, Natascha; Oldenburg, Johannes; Nattermann, Jacob; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Spengler, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Background An isoleucine>methionine mutation at position 148 in the PNPLA3 gene (p.I148M, rs738409) has recently been identified as a susceptibility factor for liver damage in steatohepatitis. Here, we studied whether the PNPLA3 rs738409 polymorphism also affects predisposition to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods We compared distributions of PNPLA3 genotypes in 80 and 81 Caucasian patients with alcoholic and hepatitis C virus (HCV)-associated HCC to 80 and 81 age- and sex-matched patients with alcohol-related and HCV-related cirrhosis without HCC, respectively. PNPLA3 genotypes in 190 healthy individuals from the same population served as reference. Potential confounders obesity, diabetes, HCV genotype and HBV co-infection were controlled by univariate and multivariate logistic regression with forward variable selection. Results PNPLA3 genotypes were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for all study groups. The frequency of the 148M allele was significantly (p<0.001) increased in alcoholic cirrhosis with (53.7%) and without HCC (36.2%) but was not different between healthy controls (22.9%) and patients with cirrhosis (25.3%; p?=?0.545) and HCC (30.2%; p?=?0.071) due to hepatitis C. HCC risk was highest in 148M/M homozygous patients with alcoholic liver disease (odds ratio (OR) 16.8 versus healthy controls; 95% confidence interval (CI) 6.68–42.43, p<0.001). Finally, multivariate regression confirmed 148M/M homozygosity (OR 2.8; 95%-CI: 1.24–6.42; p?=?0.013) as HCC risk factor in alcoholic cirrhosis. In HCV-related cirrhosis only HCV genotype 1 was confirmed as a HCC risk factor (OR 4.2; 95%-CI: 1.50–11.52; p?=?0.006). Conclusion The PNPLA3 148M variant is a prominent risk factor for HCC in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis, while its effects are negligible in patients with cirrhosis due to HCV. This polymorphism provides an useful tool to identify individuals with particularly high HCC risk in patients with alcoholic liver disease that should be taken into account in future HCC prevention studies. PMID:22087248

  2. Alcoholic and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Manuela G; French, Samuel W; French, Barbara A; Seitz, Helmut K; Cohen, Lawrence B; Mueller, Sebastian; Osna, Natalia A; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Seth, Devanshi; Bautista, Abraham; Thompson, Kyle J; McKillop, Iain H; Kirpich, Irina A; McClain, Craig J; Bataller, Ramon; Nanau, Radu M; Voiculescu, Mihai; Opris, Mihai; Shen, Hong; Tillman, Brittany; Li, Jun; Liu, Hui; Thomes, Paul G; Ganesan, Murali; Malnick, Steve

    2014-12-01

    This paper is based upon the "Charles Lieber Satellite Symposia" organized by Manuela G. Neuman at the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) Annual Meetings, 2013 and 2014. The present review includes pre-clinical, translational and clinical research that characterize alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). In addition, a literature search in the discussed area was performed. Strong clinical and experimental evidence lead to recognition of the key toxic role of alcohol in the pathogenesis of ALD. The liver biopsy can confirm the etiology of NASH or alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) and assess structural alterations of cells, their organelles, as well as inflammatory activity. Three histological stages of ALD are simple steatosis, ASH, and chronic hepatitis with hepatic fibrosis or cirrhosis. These latter stages may also be associated with a number of cellular and histological changes, including the presence of Mallory's hyaline, megamitochondria, or perivenular and perisinusoidal fibrosis. Genetic polymorphisms of ethanol metabolizing enzymes such as cytochrome p450 (CYP) 2E1 activation may change the severity of ASH and NASH. Alcohol mediated hepatocarcinogenesis, immune response to alcohol in ASH, as well as the role of other risk factors such as its co-morbidities with chronic viral hepatitis in the presence or absence of human immunodeficiency virus are discussed. Dysregulation of hepatic methylation, as result of ethanol exposure, in hepatocytes transfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), illustrates an impaired interferon signaling. The hepatotoxic effects of ethanol undermine the contribution of malnutrition to the liver injury. Dietary interventions such as micro and macronutrients, as well as changes to the microbiota are suggested. The clinical aspects of NASH, as part of metabolic syndrome in the aging population, are offered. The integrative symposia investigate different aspects of alcohol-induced liver damage and possible repair. We aim to (1) determine the immuno-pathology of alcohol-induced liver damage, (2) examine the role of genetics in the development of ASH, (3) propose diagnostic markers of ASH and NASH, (4) examine age differences, (5) develop common research tools to study alcohol-induced effects in clinical and pre-clinical studies, and (6) focus on factors that aggravate severity of organ-damage. The intention of these symposia is to advance the international profile of the biological research on alcoholism. We also wish to further our mission of leading the forum to progress the science and practice of translational research in alcoholism. PMID:25217800

  3. Alcoholic and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Manuela G.; French, Samuel W.; French, Barbara A.; Seitz, Helmut K.; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Mueller, Sebastian; Osna, Natalia A.; Kharbanda, Kusum K.; Seth, Devanshi; Bautista, Abraham; Thompson, Kyle J.; McKillop, Iain H.; Kirpich, Irina A.; McClain, Craig J.; Bataller, Ramon; Nanau, Radu M.; Voiculescu, Mihai; Opris, Mihai; Shen, Hong; Tillman, Brittany; Li, Jun; Liu, Hui; Thomas, Paul G.; Ganesan, Murali; Malnick, Steve

    2015-01-01

    This paper is based upon the “Charles Lieber Satellite Symposia” organized by Manuela G. Neuman at the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) Annual Meetings, 2013 and 2014. The present review includes pre-clinical, translational and clinical research that characterize alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). In addition, a literature search in the discussed area was performed. Strong clinical and experimental evidence lead to recognition of the key toxic role of alcohol in the pathogenesis of ALD. The liver biopsy can confirm the etiology of NASH or alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) and assess structural alterations of cells, their organelles, as well as inflammatory activity. Three histological stages of ALD are simple steatosis, ASH, and chronic hepatitis with hepatic fibrosis or cirrhosis. These latter stages may also be associated with a number of cellular and histological changes, including the presence of Mallory's hyaline, megamitochondria, or perivenular and perisinusoidal fibrosis. Genetic polymorphisms of ethanol metabolizing enzymes such as cytochrome p450 (CYP) 2E1 activation may change the severity of ASH and NASH. Alcohol mediated hepatocarcinogenesis, immune response to alcohol in ASH, as well as the role of other risk factors such as its comorbidities with chronic viral hepatitis in the presence or absence of human deficiency virus are discussed. Dysregulation of hepatic methylation, as result of ethanol exposure, in hepatocytes transfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), illustrates an impaired interferon signaling. The hepatotoxic effects of ethanol undermine the contribution of malnutrition to the liver injury. Dietary interventions such as micro and macronutrients, as well as changes to the microbiota are suggested. The clinical aspects of NASH, as part of metabolic syndrome in the aging population, are offered. The integrative symposia investigate different aspects of alcohol-induced liver damage and possible repair. We aim to (1) determine the immuno-pathology of alcohol-induced liver damage, (2) examine the role of genetics in the development of ASH, (3) propose diagnostic markers of ASH and NASH, (4) examine age differences, (5) develop common research tools to study alcohol-induced effects in clinical and pre-clinical studies, and (6) focus on factors that aggravate severity of organ-damage. The intention of these symposia is to advance the international profile of the biological research on alcoholism. We also wish to further our mission of leading the forum to progress the science and practice of translational research in alcoholism. PMID:25217800

  4. Toxin-induced hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Annette M; Hendrickson, Robert G

    2014-02-01

    Toxins such as pharmaceuticals, herbals, foods, and supplements may lead to hepatic damage. This damage may range from nonspecific symptoms in the setting of liver test abnormalities to acute hepatic failure. The majority of severe cases of toxin-induced hepatic injury are caused by acetaminophen and ethanol. The most important step in the patient evaluation is to gather an extensive history that includes toxin exposure and exclude common causes of liver dysfunction. Patients whose hepatic dysfunction progresses to acute liver failure may benefit from transfer to a transplant service for further management. Currently, the mainstay in management for most exposures is discontinuing the offending agent. This manuscript will review the incidence, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of the different forms of toxin-induced hepatic injury and exam in-depth the most common hepatic toxins. PMID:24275171

  5. Finasteride Has Regionally Different Effects on Brain Oxidative Stress and Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Acute Thioacetamide-Induced Hepatic Encephalopathy in Rats.

    PubMed

    Mladenovi?, Dušan; Petronijevi?, Nataša; Stojkovi?, Tihomir; Velimirovi?, Milica; Jevti?, Gordana; Hrn?i?, Dragan; Radosavljevi?, Tatjana; Raši?-Markovi?, Aleksandra; Maksi?, Nebojša; Djuric, Dragan; Stanojlovi?, Olivera

    2015-01-01

    Finasteride (FIN) inhibits neurosteroid synthesis and potentially improves the course of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). This study aimed to investigate the effects of FIN on brain oxidative stress and acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity in acute thioacetamide-induced HE in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into groups: 1. control; 2. thioacetamide-treated group (TAA; 900 mg/kg); 3. finasteride-treated group (FIN; 150 mg/kg); 4. group treated with FIN and TAA (FIN+TAA). Daily doses of FIN (50 mg/kg) and TAA (300 mg/kg) were administered intraperitoneally during three days and in FIN+TAA group FIN was administered 2h before every dose of TAA. FIN pretreatment prevented TAA-induced rise in malondialdehyde level in the cortex due to restoration of catalase activity and increased expression of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and induced an increase in malondialdehyde level in the thalamus due to reduction of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) activity. Although FIN pretreatment did not affect malondialdehyde level in hippocampus and caudate nucleus, hippocampal SOD1 expression was higher (p<0.05) and GR activity lower in FIN+TAA vs. TAA group (p<0.05). GPx activity was lower in caudate nucleus in FIN+TAA vs. TAA group (p<0.01). FIN pretreatment prevented TAA-induced rise in AchE activity in the thalamus and caudate nucleus and AchE activity correlates inversely in the thalamus (p<0.05) and positively in caudate nucleus (p<0.01) with malondialdehyde level. FIN has regionally selective effects on oxidative stress and AchE activity in the brain in acute TAA-induced HE in rats. The prooxidant role of FIN in the thalamus may be causally linked with inhibition of AchE. PMID:26241899

  6. Finasteride Has Regionally Different Effects on Brain Oxidative Stress and Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Acute Thioacetamide-Induced Hepatic Encephalopathy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mladenovi?, Dušan; Petronijevi?, Nataša; Stojkovi?, Tihomir; Velimirovi?, Milica; Jevti?, Gordana; Hrn?i?, Dragan; Radosavljevi?, Tatjana; Raši?-Markovi?, Aleksandra; Maksi?, Nebojša; Djuric, Dragan; Stanojlovi?, Olivera

    2015-01-01

    Finasteride (FIN) inhibits neurosteroid synthesis and potentially improves the course of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). This study aimed to investigate the effects of FIN on brain oxidative stress and acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity in acute thioacetamide-induced HE in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into groups: 1. control; 2. thioacetamide-treated group (TAA; 900 mg/kg); 3. finasteride-treated group (FIN; 150 mg/kg); 4. group treated with FIN and TAA (FIN+TAA). Daily doses of FIN (50 mg/kg) and TAA (300 mg/kg) were administered intraperitoneally during three days and in FIN+TAA group FIN was administered 2h before every dose of TAA. FIN pretreatment prevented TAA-induced rise in malondialdehyde level in the cortex due to restoration of catalase activity and increased expression of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and induced an increase in malondialdehyde level in the thalamus due to reduction of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) activity. Although FIN pretreatment did not affect malondialdehyde level in hippocampus and caudate nucleus, hippocampal SOD1 expression was higher (p<0.05) and GR activity lower in FIN+TAA vs. TAA group (p<0.05). GPx activity was lower in caudate nucleus in FIN+TAA vs. TAA group (p<0.01). FIN pretreatment prevented TAA-induced rise in AchE activity in the thalamus and caudate nucleus and AchE activity correlates inversely in the thalamus (p<0.05) and positively in caudate nucleus (p<0.01) with malondialdehyde level. FIN has regionally selective effects on oxidative stress and AchE activity in the brain in acute TAA-induced HE in rats. The prooxidant role of FIN in the thalamus may be causally linked with inhibition of AchE. PMID:26241899

  7. Acceleration of hepatitis C virus envelope evolution in humans is consistent with progressive humoral immune selection during the transition from acute to chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Fisher, Brian E; Dowd, Kimberly A; Astemborski, Jacquie; Cox, Andrea L; Ray, Stuart C

    2010-05-01

    During the transition from acute to chronic infection in individuals persistently infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), cellular responses initiate within the first 6 months of primary infection and collapse thereafter, whereas humoral responses activate later during the chronic phase. Whether and how this deviation of immune responses specifically influences HCV evolution are unknown. To determine the pattern of HCV evolution during this critical period, we conducted extensive sequence analysis on annual clonal hemigenomic sequences for up to 3 years in six well-characterized subjects, using statistical methods that accounted for repeated measures. Significantly different evolutionary rates were observed in envelope versus nonenvelope genes, with an increasing rate of nonsynonymous change (dN) in envelope genes and a stable dN in nonenvelope genes (P = 0.006). The ratio of the envelope to nonenvelope nonsynonymous rate increased from 2 in year 1 to 5 in years 2 and 3. Centripetal changes (reversions toward matching of the worldwide subtype 1a consensus sequence) were frequently observed during the 3-year transition from acute infection to chronicity, even in the presence of neutralizing antibody (NAb) pressure. Remarkably, sequences of hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) remained stable for up to 21 months in the absence of NAb pressure in one subject, followed by rapid changes that were temporally associated with the detection of NAb responses, which strongly suggests that HVR1 evolution is shaped by NAb pressure. These data provide the first systematic estimates of HCV evolutionary rates in multiple genes during early infection in vivo and provide additional evidence for deterministic, rather than random, evolution of HCV. PMID:20200239

  8. Silencing of Hepatic Fatty Acid Transporter Protein 5 in Vivo Reverses Diet-induced Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    -alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Improves Hyperglycemia*S Received for publication,May 8, 2008, and in revised-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a serious health problem linked to obesity and type 2 diabetes. To investigate fatty acid transport protein 5 in vivo prior to or after establishing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

  9. Therapy for alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Jaurigue, Maryconi M; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholism results in about 2.5 million deaths annually worldwide, representing 4% of all mortality. Although alcoholism is associated with more than 60 diseases, most mortality from alcoholism results from alcoholic liver disease (ALD). ALD includes alcoholic steatosis, alcoholic hepatitis, and alcoholic cirrhosis, in order of increasing severity. Important scoring systems of ALD severity include: Child-Pugh, a semi-quantitative scoring system useful to roughly characterize clinical severity; model for end-stage liver disease, a quantitative, objective scoring system used for prognostication and prioritization for liver transplantation; and discriminant function, used to determine whether to administer corticosteroids for alcoholic hepatitis. Abstinence is the cornerstone of ALD therapy. Psychotherapies, including twelve-step facilitation therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and motivational enhancement therapy, help support abstinence. Disulfiram decreases alcohol consumption by causing unpleasant sensations after drinking alcohol from accumulation of acetaldehyde in serum, but disulfiram can be hepatotoxic. Adjunctive pharmacotherapies to reduce alcohol consumption include naltrexone, acamprosate, and baclofen. Nutritional therapy helps reverse muscle wasting, weight loss, vitamin deficiencies, and trace element deficiencies associated with ALD. Although reduced protein intake was previously recommended for advanced ALD to prevent hepatic encephalopathy, a diet containing 1.2-1.5 g of protein/kg per day is currently recommended to prevent muscle wasting. Corticosteroids are first-line therapy for severe alcoholic hepatitis (discriminant function ? 32), but proof of their efficacy in decreasing mortality remains elusive. Pentoxifylline is an alternative therapy. Complications of advanced ALD include ascites, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, esophageal variceal bleeding, hepatic encephalopathy, hepatorenal syndrome, hepatopulmonary syndrome, and portopulmonary hypertension. Alcoholic cirrhotics have increased risk of developing hepatomas. Liver transplantation is the ultimate therapy for severe ALD, but generally requires 6 mo of proven abstinence for eligibility. Alcoholic cirrhotics who maintain abstinence generally have a relatively favorable prognosis after liver transplantation. PMID:24605013

  10. Acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Bernal, William; Jalan, Rajiv; Quaglia, Alberto; Simpson, Kenneth; Wendon, Julia; Burroughs, Andrew

    2015-10-17

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure combines an acute deterioration in liver function in an individual with pre-existing chronic liver disease and hepatic and extrahepatic organ failures, and is associated with substantial short-term mortality. Common precipitants include bacterial and viral infections, alcoholic hepatitis, and surgery, but in more than 40% of patients, no precipitating event is identified. Systemic inflammation and susceptibility to infection are characteristic pathophysiological features. A new diagnostic score, the Chronic Liver Failure Consortium (CLIF-C) organ failure score, has been developed for classification and prognostic assessment of patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure. Disease can be reversed in many patients, and thus clinical management focuses upon the identification and treatment of the precipitant while providing multiorgan-supportive care that addresses the complex pattern of physiological disturbance in critically ill patients with liver disease. Liver transplantation is a highly effective intervention in some specific cases, but recipient identification, organ availability, timing of transplantation, and high resource use are barriers to more widespread application. Recognition of acute-on-chronic liver failure as a clinically and pathophysiologically distinct syndrome with defined diagnostic and prognostic criteria will help to encourage the development of new management pathways and interventions to address the unacceptably high mortality. PMID:26423181

  11. Hepatoprotective effects of eburicoic acid and dehydroeburicoic acid from Antrodia camphorata in a mouse model of acute hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guan-Jhong; Deng, Jeng-Shyan; Huang, Shyh-Shyun; Lee, Chao-Ying; Hou, Wen-Chi; Wang, Sheng-Yang; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung

    2013-12-01

    The hepatoprotective effects of eburicoic acid (TR1) and dehydroeburicoic acid (TR2) from Antrodia camphorata (AC) against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver damage were investigated in mice. TR1 and TR2 was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) for 7 days prior to the administration of CCl4. Pretreatment with TR1 and TR2 prevented the elevation of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and liver lipid peroxides in CCl4-treated mice. The activities of antioxidant enzymes [catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx)], nitric oxide (NO) production, and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) were decreased after the treatment with TR1 and TR2 in CCl4-treated mice. Western blotting revealed that TR1 and TR2 significantly decreased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expressions and increased the expression of cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1) in CCl4-treated mice. Therefore, we speculate that TR1 and TR2 protect the liver from CCl4-induced hepatic damage via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. PMID:23871054

  12. Serum levels of YKL-40 and PIIINP as prognostic markers in patients with alcoholic liver disease

    E-print Network

    Price, Paul A.

    with alcoholic hepatitis and/or cirrhosis had the highest levels. Serum YKL-40 was associated with the presence alcoholic hepatitis and liver fibrosis/cirrhosis [1,2]. Alcohol can lead to progressive perivenous injury. The increase in ECM deposited in the space of Disse leads to hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis [4]. It has been

  13. Therapy of Delta Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Yurdaydin, Cihan; Idilman, Ramazan

    2015-10-01

    Delta hepatitis is the less frequently encountered but most severe form of viral hepatitis. Acute delta hepatitis, as a result of coinfection with hepatitis B and hepatitis delta, is rare, but may lead to fulminant hepatitis, and no therapy exists for this form. Chronic delta hepatitis (CDH) mostly develops as a result of superinfection of a hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carrier with hepatitis delta virus (HDV). In general, HDV is the dominant virus. However, a dynamic shift of the dominant virus may occur with time in rare instances, and hepatitis B virus (HBV) may become the dominant virus, at which time nucleos(t)ide analog therapy may be indicated. Otherwise, the only established management of CDH consists of conventional or pegylated interferon therapy, which has to be administered at doses used for hepatitis B for a duration of at least 1 year. Posttreatment week-24 virologic response is the most widely used surrogate marker of treatment efficacy, but it does not represent a sustained virologic response, and late relapse can occur. As an easy-to-use simple serological test, anti-HDV-immunoglobulin M (IgM) correlates with histological inflammatory activity and clinical long-term outcome; however, it is not as sensitive as HDV RNA in assessing treatment response. No evidence-based rules for treating CDH exist, and treatment duration needs to be individualized based on virologic response at end of treatment or end of follow-up. Effective treatment may decrease liver-related complications, such as decompensation or liver-related mortality. In patients with decompensated cirrhosis, interferons are contraindicated and liver transplantation has to be considered. Alternative treatment options are an urgent need in CDH. New treatment strategies targeting different steps of the HDV life cycle, such as hepatocyte entry inhibitors or prenylation inhibitors, are emerging and provide hope for the future. PMID:26253093

  14. National Trend and Characteristics of Acute Hepatitis C among HIV-Infected Individuals: A Matched Case-Control Study—Taiwan, 2001–2014

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yi-Chun; Tsai, Mao-Song; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Hung, Chien-Ching; Chuang, Jen-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been increasingly recognized among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) worldwide. We investigated the trend of and factors associated with acute hepatitis C (AHC) among HIV-infected individuals in Taiwan. Methods The National Disease Surveillance System collects characteristics of AHC, HIV, syphilis, and gonorrhea cases through mandatory reports and patient interviews. Reported AHC patients in 2014 were interviewed additionally on sexual and parenteral exposures. Information on HCV genotypes were collected from the largest medical center serving HIV-infected Taiwanese. We defined an HIV/AHC case as a documented negative HCV antibody test result followed within 12 months by a positive test in a previously reported HIV-infected individual. Each case was matched to two HIV-infected, non-AHC controls for age, age of HIV diagnosis, sex, transmission route, HIV diagnosis date, and county/city. Conditional logistic regression was used to identify associated characteristics. Results During 2001–2014, 93 of 6,624 AHC reports were HIV/AHC cases; the annual case count increased from one in 2009 to 34 in 2014. All were males (81 [87%] MSM) aged 21–49 years with AHC diagnosed 2–5,923 days after HIV diagnoses. Sixty-eight (73%) lived in the Taipei metropolitan area. Detected HCV genotypes were 2a (n = 6), 1b (n = 5), 1b + 2a (n = 1) and 2b (n = 1). Among 28 HIV/AHC patients interviewed in 2014, 13 (46%) reported engaging in unprotected sex ?3 months before AHC diagnosis. Seventy-nine HIV/AHC cases were matched to 158 controls. HIV/AHC was associated with recent syphilis (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 10.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.2–28.6) and last syphilis >6 months (aOR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.2–6.9). Conclusions HIV/AHC cases continued to increase particularly among sexually active HIV-infected MSM with a syphilis diagnosis in northern Taiwan. We recommend surveillance of associated behavioral and virologic characteristics and HCV counseling and testing for HIV-infected men in Taiwan. PMID:26439381

  15. Green tea extract (Camellia sinensis) fermented by Lactobacillus fermentum attenuates alcohol-induced liver damage.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Ho; Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Sae Hun

    2012-01-01

    Here, the impact of an extract derived from green tea (Camellia sinensis) and fermentation with Lactobacilli fermentum strain OCS19 was explored with acute alcohol-induced liver damage. The study employed the HepG2 hepatic cell line and an in vivo murine model of liver damage. L. fermentum-fermented green tea extract (FGTE) was found to possess pronounced alcohol metabolizing enzyme activity. It significantly enhanced the cell viability of HepG2 cells following of them exposure, to ethanol (p<0.05) as compared with an extract derived from Hovenia dulcis, a positive control that is known for its action as an alcohol antagonist. Our in vivo studies indicated that prior administration of FGTE to alcohol-exposed mice significantly prevented subsequent increases in blood alcohol concentration (p<0.05), in addition to the induction of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and triglycerides (p<0.05). Furthermore, the activity of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and its mRNA expression level both increased in the livers of mice treated with FGTE, similarly to the H. dulcis-treated group. Taken together, these results may suggest that green tea extract coupled with L. fermentum fermentation attenuates the risk of ethanol-induced liver damage. PMID:23221715

  16. [Treatment of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Miguet, J; Hrusovský, S

    1995-09-01

    Chronic forms of viral B,C and D hepatitis and fulminant hepatitis represent a serious healthcare problem. The study deals with the changes in the strategy in treating these diseases. During the chronic active hepatitis caused by the B hepatitis virus, the main aim of treatment is to cease multiplication of viruses, eliminate the clinical symptoms, prevent the development of cirrhosis, or the origin of hepatocellular carcinoma. The authors analyze the possibilities of the application of corticosteroids, viricidal drugs (vidarabin and interferons) and other medicaments (acyclovir, zidovudin, duramin, gancyclovir, chinacrin, and others) besides corticosteroids, interleukin 2 and tymozin from the group of immunomodulators were tested. The testing included the factor stimulating the colonies of granulocytes and myeloblasts and other substances. The therapy of acute protracted B hepatitis by means of interferon still requires controlled studies. Superinfection by D virus in chronic carriers of HBsAG causes chronic hepatitis which quickly leads to the development of cirrhosis. The therapy on basis of alpha interferon decreases the RNA virus D hepatitis serum level and leads to an improvement in the development of chronic hepatitis in half of the patients. Therapy of chronic C hepatitis on basis of corticosteroids is ineffective, and can be dangerous. Acyclovir is proved to be ineffective as well. The open study indicated certain positive results in application of interferon. The fulminant hepatitis can be defined as a development of encephalopathy and a decrease of the prothrombin time to less than 50% in the course of acute hepatitis. The break-point in the therapy of fulminant hepatitis took place in association with the performance of the transplantation of the liver. Impossibility to transplant the liver means that the effect of therapy of fulminant hepatitis is merely of supportive value. Majority of patients die due to neurologic complications, namely unmanageable oedema of the brain. But still, neither the antioedema therapy, e.g. on basis of manitol, as well as by means of corticosteroids, hemodialysis, hemofiltration, plasmapheresis and hemoperfusion, nor the treatment on basis of E1 prostaglandine improved the survival of patients. (Tab. 2, Ref. 82). PMID:8556359

  17. TIPE2 mRNA Level in PBMCs Serves as a Novel Biomarker for Predicting Short-Term Mortality of Acute-on-Chronic Hepatitis B Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yu-Chen; Wang, Na; Sun, Yan-Yan; Xiao, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract It remains difficult to accurately predicate short-term mortality of acute-on-chronic hepatitis B liver failure (ACHBLF). Tumor necrosis factor-?-induced protein 8-like 2 (TIPE2) is a novel identified negative regulator of immune response and we have previously demonstrated TIPE2 play an essential role in the pathogenesis of ACHBLF. We therefore aimed to evaluate the diagnosis value of TIPE2 mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) for predicting 3-month mortality of ACHBLF patients. This prospective study consisted of 108 ACHBLF patients from March 2009 to May 2013 as training cohort and 63 ACHBLF patients from June 2013 to December 2014 as validation cohort. Forty-two patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and 22 healthy volunteers were also included as controls. The mRNA level of TIPE2 in PBMCs was determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Univariate analysis and Cox proportional hazard regression analysis were performed to identify independent risk factors to 3-month mortality. Area under the receptor operating characteristic curve (AUROC) was performed to assess diagnostic value of TIPE2 mRNA in training and validation cohort. The level of TIPE2 mRNA was significantly higher in ACHBLF patients (median (interquartile): 6.5 [3.7, 9.6]) compared with CHB (2.3 [1.6, 3.7]) and healthy controls (0.4 [0.3, 0.6]; both P?hepatic encephalopathy (HR?=?1.848, 95% CI: 1.028–3.321), model for end-stage liver diseases (MELD) score (HR?=?1.062, 95% CI: 1.009–1.118), and TIPE2 mRNA (HR?=?1.081, 95% CI: 1.009–1.159). An optimal cut-off point 6.54 of TIPE2 mRNA showed sensitivity of 74.63%, specificity of 90.24%, positive predictive value of 92.5%, and negative predictive value of 67.3% for predicting 3-month mortality in training cohort. Furthermore, TIPE2 mRNA plus MELD performed better than MELD alone for predicting 3-month mortality in training (AUROC, 0.853 vs 0.722, P?

  18. Hepatitis E, the neglected one.

    PubMed

    Blasco-Perrin, Hélène; Abravanel, Florence; Blasco-Baque, Vincent; Péron, Jean Marie

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a worldwide disease. It is the first cause of acute viral hepatitis in the world with an estimated 20 million cases every year and 56 000 deaths. In developing countries, hepatitis E is a waterborne infection. In these countries, HEV genotypes 1 and 2 cause large outbreaks and affect young subjects with a significant mortality rate in pregnant women and patients with cirrhosis. In the developed countries, HEV genotypes 3 and 4 are responsible for autochthonous, sporadic hepatitis and transmission is zoonotic. HEV can cause neurological disorders and in immunocompromised patients, chronic infections. The progression of acute hepatitis E is most often mild and resolves spontaneously. Diagnostic tools include anti-HEV IgM antibodies in serum and/or viral RNA in the blood or stools by PCR. Ribavirin is used to treat chronic infection. A vaccine has been developed in China. PMID:26725910

  19. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePLUS

    Hepatitis A is inflammation (irritation and swelling) of the liver from the hepatitis A virus. ... The hepatitis A virus is found mostly in the stools and blood of an infected person. The virus is present ...

  20. Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C in Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    What are hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections? Hepatitis B and hepatitis C are serious infections that affect the liver. Both diseases ... term illness. What extra risks are caused by hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections during pregnancy? Not only ...

  1. Hepatitis C and HIV

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hepatitis C Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Hepatitis C What is Hepatitis? Hepatitis means inflammation of the ... related pages, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B . Hepatitis C AND HIV About 25% of people living with ...

  2. Hepatitis C and Incarceration

    MedlinePLUS

    HEPATITIS C & INCARCERATION What is hepatitis? “Hepatitis” means inflammation or swelling of the liver. The liver is an important ... viral hepatitis: Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. They are all different from each other and ...

  3. The appropriateness of the treatment setting for the inpatient post-acute treatment of alcohol dependence disorders in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Rossegger, Astrid; Keller, Anne; Odenwald, Michael; Endrass, Jérôme

    2009-01-01

    Background In Switzerland, a total of 1'000 patients a year are treated for alcohol-dependence in specialized institutions. Though the current literature suggests favoring outpatient treatment, whether outpatient or inpatient treatment is more efficient cannot be answered generally. For Germany, "AWMF"-treatment guidelines were formulated in order to treat patients with substance use disorders in the appropriate treatment settings. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the majority of patients treated in the largest specialized institution for alcohol abuse treatment in Switzerland were treated in the appropriate setting. Methods All completed treatments conducted in the Forel-Hospital – the largest clinic of its kind in Switzerland – between the 1st of January 2004 and the 20th of December 2006 were included in the investigation (n = 915). Patient and treatment characteristics were gathered using the information from the PSYREC and act-info questionnaire. The AWMF criteria were operationalized on the basis of the questionnaire. Results Applying the AWMF criteria resulted in the emergence of three groups: 73.7% of the study sample could clearly be assigned to the inpatient treatment group, and for 7.5% there was evidence supporting the allocation to an outpatient treatment setting. In 18.8% of the cases, however, the AWMF criteria did not allow an assignment to either of the treatment settings. Of the total sample, 18.5% of all patients apparently did not profit from the inpatient treatment setting, whereas for the vast majority (81.5%), a therapeutic progress was documented. In those patients who, according to the AWMF guidelines, did not need an inpatient setting, a larger proportion improved than in the group of the patients who needed an inpatient treatment in a specialized hospital. Furthermore, the logistic regression analyses revealed that the less severe the clinical state of a patient upon admittance, the higher the odds of improvement during the hospital stay. Conclusion The results serve as evidence that for at least three out of four patients treated in the investigated specialized institution, an inpatient treatment was appropriate. The principal reason for the necessity of an inpatient treatment setting was that this hospital population showed severe psychiatric, somatic or social irregularities. Only a very limited number of patients hospitalized in a specialized institution for the treatment of alcohol-related disorders can be treated in an outpatient setting. PMID:19570222

  4. Aplastica Anemia And Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cudillo, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (aAA) is a severe and rare disease, characterized by hematopoietic bone marrow failure and peripheral cytopenia. The pathophysiology is immune mediated in most cases, activated T1 lymphocytes have been identified as effector cells. The disease can be successfully treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia (HAA) is a syndrome of bone marrow failure following the development of acute seronegative hepatitis. HAA syndrome most often affects young males who presented severe pancytopenia two to three months after an episode of acute hepatitis. The clinical course of hepatitis is more frequently benign but a fulminant severe course is also described. The bone marrow failure can be explosive and severe and it is usually fatal if untreated, no correlations have been observed between severity of hepatitis and AA. In none of the studies a specific virus could be identified and most cases are seronegative for known hepatitis viruses. The clinical characteristics and response to immunotherapy indicate a central role for immune-mediated mechanism in the pathogenesis of HAA. The initial target organ of the immune response is the liver as suggested by the time interval between hepatitis and the onset of bone marrow failure. Liver histology is characterized by T cell infiltrating the parenchyma as reported in acute hepatitis. Recently in HAA it has been demonstrated intrahepatic and blood lymphocytes with T cell repertoire similar to that of confirmed viral acute hepatitis. The expanded T cell clones return to a normal distribution after response to immunosuppressive treatment, suggesting the antigen or T cell clearance. Therapeutic options are the same as acquired aplastic anemia. PMID:21415960

  5. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Mahesh M; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used "over the counter" sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to unravel the mechanism of alcohol-induced sleep disruptions. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models. We performed microdialysis, immunohistochemical, pharmacological, sleep deprivation and lesion studies which suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol's action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption and disrupts sleep, we examined the effects of binge drinking on sleep-wakefulness. Our results suggest that disrupted sleep homeostasis may be the primary cause of sleep disruption observed following binge drinking. Finally, we have also shown that sleep disruptions observed during acute withdrawal, are caused due to impaired sleep homeostasis. In conclusion, we suggest that alcohol may disrupt sleep homeostasis to cause sleep disruptions. PMID:25499829

  6. Interactions between Hepatitis C Virus and the Human Apolipoprotein H Acute Phase Protein: A Tool for a Sensitive Detection of the Virus

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Grégor; Kaiser, Marco; Lucarz, Estelle; Gobby, Delphine; Bray, Dorothy; Ellerbrok, Heinz; Zarski, Jean Pierre; Veas, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection exhibits a high global prevalence frequently associated with hepatocellular carcinoma, taking years to develop. Despite the standardization of highly sensitive HCV quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) detection methods, false-negative diagnoses may be generated with current methods, mainly due to the presence of PCR inhibitors and/or low viral loads in the patient’s sample. These false-negative diagnoses impact both public health systems, in developing countries, and an in lesser extent, in developed countries, including both the risk of virus transmission during organ transplantation and/or blood transfusion and the quality of the antiviral treatment monitoring. To adopt an appropriate therapeutic strategy to improve the patient’s prognosis, it is urgent to increase the HCV detection sensitivity. Based upon previous studies on HBV, we worked on the capacity of the scavenger acute phase protein, Apolipoprotein H (ApoH) to interact with HCV. Using different approaches, including immunoassays, antibody-inhibition, oxidation, ultracentrifugation, electron microscopy and RT-PCR analyses, we demonstrated specific interactions between HCV particles and ApoH. Moreover, when using a two-step HCV detection process, including capture of HCV by ApoH-coated nanomagnetic beads and a home-made real-time HCV-RT-PCR, we confirmed the presence of HCV for all samples from a clinical collection of HCV-seropositive patients exhibiting an RT-PCR COBAS® TaqMan® HCV Test, v2.0 (COBAS)-positive result. In contrast, for HCV-seropositive patients with either low HCV-load as determined with COBAS or exhibiting HCV-negative COBAS results, the addition of the two-step ApoH-HCV-capture and HCV-detection process was able to increase the sensitivity of HCV detection or more interestingly, detect in a genotype sequence-independent manner, a high-proportion (44%) of HCV/RNA-positive among the COBAS HCV-negative patients. Thus, the immune interaction between ApoH and HCV could be used as a sample preparation tool to enrich and/or cleanse HCV patient’s samples to enhance the detection sensitivity of HCV and therefore significantly reduce the numbers of false-negative HCV diagnosis results. PMID:26502286

  7. Effect of 1,5-dicaffeylquinic acid (cynarine) on cholesterol levels in serum and liver of acute ethanol-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Wójcicki, J

    1978-03-01

    The effect of 1,5-dicaffeylquinic acid (Cynarine) on total cholesterol levels in serum and liver of acute ethanol-treated rats was studied. Male Wister rats were administered ethyl alcohol, 6 g/kg per day by gavage over three days. In rats treated with ethanol alone, the serum and hepatic cholesterol showed a significant rise of 44 and 75%, respectively. In rats receiving ethanol and Cynarine simultaneously, a distinct reduction of the serum and hepatic cholesterol levels was observed. PMID:580239

  8. Hepatic protein synthetic activity in vivo after ethanol administration

    SciTech Connect

    Donohue, T.M. Jr.; Sorrell, M.F.; Tuma, D.J.

    1987-02-01

    Hepatic protein synthetic activity in vivo was measured by the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)puromycin into elongating nascent polypeptides of rat liver to form peptidyl-(/sup 3/H)puromycin. Our initial experiments showed that saturating doses of (/sup 3/H)puromycin were achieved at 3-6 mumol/100 g body weight, and that maximum labeling of nascent polypeptides was obtained 30 min after injection of the labeled precursor. Labeled puromycin was found to be suitable for measuring changes in the status of protein synthesis, since the formation of the peptidyl-(/sup 3/H)puromycin was decreased in fasted animals and was increased in rats pretreated with L-tryptophan. (/sup 3/H)Puromycin incorporation into polypeptides was then measured after acute ethanol administration as well as after prolonged consumption of ethanol which was administered as part of a liquid diet for 31 days. Acute alcohol treatment caused no significant change in (/sup 3/H)puromycin incorporation into liver polypeptides. In rats exposed to chronic ethanol feeding, peptidyl-(3H)puromycin formation, when expressed per mg of protein, was slightly lower compared to pair-fed controls, but was unchanged compared to chow-fed animals. When the data were expressed per mg of DNA or per 100 g body wt, no differences in protein synthetic activity were observed among the three groups. These findings indicate that neither acute nor chronic alcohol administration significantly affects protein synthetic activity in rat liver. They further suggest that accumulation of protein in the liver, usually seen after prolonged ethanol consumption, is apparently not reflected by an alteration of hepatic protein synthesis.

  9. Pharmacotherapy for alcoholic patients with alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Vuittonet, Cynthia L.; Halse, Michael; Leggio, Lorenzo; Fricchione, Samuel B.; Brickley, Michael; Haass-Koffler, Carolina L.; Tavares, Tonya; Swift, Robert M.; Kenna, George A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An update on pharmacotherapy for achieving and maintaining abstinence and mitigating hepatic damage in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is presented. Summary Currently there are limited pharmacotherapy options for managing ALD, which encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders ranging from steatosis and alcoholic hepatitis to fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular cancer. Individual variation in the severity, presentation, and complex pathologenesis of ALD defines barriers to effective treatment. Scoring of disease severity using validated assessment instruments should guide treatment approaches; abstinence and proper nutrition continue to be the cornerstones of management. A literature search (through December 31, 2013) identified no reports of randomized controlled trials using Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medications for the treatment of alcohol dependence in ALD-spectrum disorders. Disulfiram, acamprosate, and naltrexone (oral and intramuscular), while approved by FDA for treatment of alcohol dependence, are not currently approved for use in patients with ALD. Baclofen (also not FDA-approved for use in ALD) is the only medication available in the United States with demonstrated safety and efficacy in reducing alcoholic behavior that has been formally tested in clinical trials in patients with ALD. Pharmacotherapy of alcoholic hepatitis using glucocorticoids or pentoxifylline has shown promise, but these options are reserved for severe ALD only. Conclusion Although various treatments have been investigated for ALD in patients with alcoholism, complete abstinence from alcohol is currently the only recommended form of hepatoprotection for the entire spectrum of ALD diagnoses. PMID:25027533

  10. 76 FR 17140 - National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ...Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Special Emphasis Panel; RFA-AA-11-02 Alcohol Induced Metabolic and Hepatic Injury (AIMHI) (R01) Date: April 20, 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant...

  11. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePLUS

    ... commonly used with viral hepatitis and related conditions. Web Resources American Liver Foundation A national nonprofit organization ... other liver diseases through research, education, and advocacy. Web site features a database directory of hepatitis clinical ...

  12. Hepatic ischemia

    MedlinePLUS

    Hepatic ischemia is a condition in which the liver does not get enough blood or oxygen, causing injury to ... pressure from any condition can lead to hepatic ischemia. Such conditions may include: Abnormal heart rhythms Dehydration ...

  13. Hepatic Cysts.

    PubMed

    Kaul; Friedenberg; Rothstein

    2000-12-01

    Treatment of hepatic cysts should be considered only for those patients who are symptomatic. For simple cysts, percutaneous aspiration invariably leads to recurrence; laparoscopic deroofing is usually curative. Open deroofing (fenestration) should be reserved for cysts inaccessible by laparoscopy. Percutaneous instillation of sclerosing agents (ethanol, iophendylate, minocycline) into nonbiliary and nonparasitic cysts is an alternative therapeutic option in certain cases. Due to increased morbidity, hepatic resection should be reserved for polycystic liver disease, diffuse hepatic involvement, or recurrence after a deroofing procedure. Patients with congenital fibropolycystic disorders (eg, congenital hepatic fibrosis) with evidence of hepatic decompensation, should be considered for liver transplantation. For hepatic hydatid cysts, simple cystectomy or the PAIR (puncture, aspirate, inject, and reaspirate) technique with albendazole treatment have been shown to be equally successful. In the case of alveolar echinococcosis, hepatic resection and liver transplantation are the only effective modalities for localized and extensive hepatic disease, respectively. PMID:11096603

  14. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePLUS

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... washed in untreated water Putting into your mouth a finger or object that came into contact with ...

  15. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 507 Hepatitis C WHAT IS HEPATITIS C? HOW IS IT DIAGNOSED? ... treatment may be less likely to work. Hep C treatment is less effective for coinfected people. Cure ...

  16. Characteristics and clinical outcome of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced acute hepato-nephrotoxicity among Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ya-Li; Tian, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Fang; Li, Wen-Ge; Cheng, Dan-Ying; Yang, Yan-Fang; Gao, Hong-Mei

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the clinicopathological characteristics of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced acute hepato-nephrotoxicity among Chinese patients. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnosis code for acute kidney injury (AKI) (584.5 or 584.9) and for acute liver injury (ALI) (570.0 or 573.3) from January 2004 to December 2013. Medical records were reviewed to confirm the diagnosis of AKI and ALI and to quantify NSAID administration. RESULTS: Seven of 59 patients (11.8%) were identified with acute hepato-nephrotoxicity induced by NSAIDs. Five patients (71.4%) received over the recommended NSAIDs dose. Compared with NSAIDs-associated mere AKI, the risk factors of NSAIDs-induced acute hepato-nephrotoxicity are age older than 60 years (57.1%), a high prevalence of alcohol use (71.4%) and positive hepatitis B virus (HBV) markers (85.7%). Compared with NSAIDs-associated mere ALI, the risk factors of NSAIDs-induced acute hepato-nephrotoxicity are age older than 60 years (57.1%), increased extracellular volume depletion (71.4%), and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitor combined use (57.1%). Acute interstitial nephritis and acute tubulointerstitial disease were apparent in three out of six (42.9%) kidney biopsy patients, respectively. Acute hepatitis was found in four out of six (66.7%) liver biopsy patients. Overall complete recovery occurred in four patients within a mean of 118.25 ± 55.42 d. CONCLUSION: The injury typically occurred after an overdose of NSAIDs. The risk factors include age older than 60 years, alcohol use, positive HBV markers, extracellular volume depletion and RAAS inhibitor combined use. PMID:25320533

  17. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePLUS

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis C, is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It usually spreads through contact with ... childbirth. Most people who are infected with hepatitis C don't have any symptoms for years. If ...

  18. OPERANT BEHAVIOR AND ALCOHOL LEVELS IN BLOOD AND BRAIN OF ALCOHOL-DEPENDENT RATS

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, Nicholas W.; Smith, Amanda D.; Cole, Maury; Weiss, Friedbert; Koob, George F.; Richardson, Heather N.

    2009-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present investigation was to more clearly define blood-alcohol parameters associated with alcohol dependence produced by alcohol vapor inhalation and alcohol-containing liquid diet. Methods Alcohol levels in blood and brain were compared during and after four hours of acute alcohol vapor exposure; also, brain-alcohol levels were assessed in alcohol-exposed (14d alcohol vapor) and alcohol-naïve rats during and after four hours of acute alcohol vapor exposure. A separate group of rats were implanted with i.v. catheters, made dependent on alcohol via vapor inhalation, and tested for operant alcohol responding; blood-alcohol levels (BALs) were measured throughout operant alcohol drinking sessions during alcohol withdrawal. A final group of rats consumed alcohol-liquid diet until they were dependent, and those rats were then tested for operant behavior at various withdrawal time points; BALs were measured at different withdrawal time points and after operant sessions. Results Blood-and brain-alcohol levels responded similarly to vapor, but brain-alcohol levels peaked at a higher point and more slowly returned to zero in alcohol-naïve rats relative to alcohol-exposed rats. Alcohol vapor exposure also produced an upward shift in subsequent operant alcohol responding and resultant BALs. Rats consumed large quantities of alcohol-liquid diet, most of it during the dark cycle, sufficient to produce high blood-alcohol levels and elevated operant alcohol responding when tested during withdrawal from liquid diet. Conclusions These results emphasize that the key determinants of excessive alcohol drinking behavior are the BAL range and pattern of chronic high-dose alcohol exposure. PMID:19740131

  19. Association between Hepatitis G and Unknown Chronic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Soleiman-Meigooni, Saeed; Asgari, Ali; Hoseini-Shokouh, Seyyed Javad; Rajabi, Jalil; Kazemi-Galougahi, Mohammad Hassan; Moshtaghi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis G virus (HGV) is a hepatotrope virus with unknown importance. The genome of the virus has been detected in patients with acute or chronic non-A-E hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to determine the association between hepatitis G and unknown chronic hepatitis. Methods: This case-control study was performed in Ebne-Sina military hospital in Hamadan, Iran. The cases were 35 military staff with unknown chronic hepatitis. The control group consisted of 59 healthy subjects who had normal levels of serum alanine aminoteransferase (ALT). The data were analyzed by SPSS, version18, using Fisher’s exact test, the Student’s t-test, and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: Only one patient in the case group (2.9%) tested positive for HGV antibodies, and no one was infected in the control group. There was no association between HGV infection and unknown chronic hepatitis in our study (P=0.37). A significant association was found between the male gender and unknown chronic hepatitis (OR=14.9, P=0.01). Conclusion: No association between HGV infection and unknown chronic hepatitis was found in our study, so it was not necessary to evaluate these patients for HGV infection. PMID:26052409

  20. Acute Exposure to Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) Phosphate (TDCIPP) Causes Hepatic Inflammation and Leads to Hepatotoxicity in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunsheng; Su, Guanyong; Giesy, John P; Letcher, Robert J; Li, Guangyu; Agrawal, Ira; Li, Jing; Yu, Liqin; Wang, Jianghua; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) has been frequently detected in environmental media and has adverse health effect on wildlife and humans. It has been implicated to have hepatotoxicity, but its molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, adult male zebrafish were exposed to TDCIPP and global hepatic gene expression was examined by RNA-Seq and RT-qPCR in order to understand the molecular mechanisms of TDCIPP-induced hepatotoxicity. Our results indicated that TDCIPP exposure significantly up-regulated the expression of genes involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress and Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway, implying an inflammatory response, which was supported by up-regulation of inflammation-related biomaker genes. Hepatic inflammation was further confirmed by histological observation of increase of infiltrated neutrophils and direct observation of liver recruitment of neutrophils labeled with Ds-Red fluorescent protein of Tg(lysC:DsRed) zebrafish upon TDCIPP exposure. To further characterize the hepatotoxicity of TDCIPP, the expression of hepatotoxicity biomarker genes, liver histopathology and morphology were examined. The exposure to TDCIPP significantly up-regulated the expression of several biomarker genes for hepatotoxicity (gck, gsr and nqo1) and caused hepatic vacuolization and apoptosis as well as increase of the liver size. Collectively, our results suggest that exposure to TDCIPP induces hepatic inflammation and leads to hepatotoxicity in zebrafish. PMID:26743178

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY THE MERGING PATHOGEN HEPATITIS E IN WATER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Like the hepatitis A virus, it is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and can cause short-term, acute hepatitis. In addition, hepatitis E has been found to cause a signific...

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY THE EMERGING PATHOGEN HEPATITIS E IN WATER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Like the hepatitis A virus, it is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and can cause short-term, acute hepatitis. In addition, hepatitis E has been found to cause a signific...

  3. Alcohol and liver, 2010.

    PubMed

    Osna, Natalia A

    2010-03-21

    Liver is known as an organ that is primarily affected by alcohol. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is the cause of an increased morbidity and mortality worldwide. Progression of ALD is driven by "second hits". These second hits include the complex of nutritional, pharmacological, genetic and viral factors, which aggravate liver pathology. However, in addition to liver failure, ethanol causes damage to other organs and systems. These extrahepatic manifestations are regulated via the similar hepatitis mechanisms. In the Topic Highlight series, we provide an update of current knowledge in the field of ALD. PMID:20238395

  4. Managing alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease continues to be a significant cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality throughout the world. A number of diagnostic and prognostic models have been developed in the management of this condition, although specific roles for liver biopsy still remain particularly in the setting of alcoholic hepatitis. Despite a large number of recent treatment trials, the ideal pharmacotherapy approach remains undefined. Most essential is the supportive care and focus on abstinence and nutrition. Owing in part to a great deal of attention from governmental funding sources, a number of new treatment approaches are undergoing rigorous evaluation, hopefully providing future treatment options in this very severe condition. PMID:26523266

  5. Alcoholic neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    Neuropathy - alcoholic; Alcoholic polyneuropathy ... The exact cause of alcoholic neuropathy is unknown. It likely includes both a direct poisoning of the nerve by the alcohol and the effect of poor nutrition ...

  6. Alcoholism - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - alcoholism ... The following organizations are good resources for information on alcoholism : Alcoholics Anonymous -- www.aa.org Al-Anon/Alateen -- www.al-anon.org/home National Institute on Alcohol ...

  7. Disseminated Herpes Simplex Virus with Fulminant Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rimawi, Bassam H.; Meserve, Joseph; Rimawi, Ramzy H.; Min, Zaw; Gnann, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Disseminated herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a rare cause of acute fulminant liver failure. We hereby present a case series of three patients with acute disseminated HSV with necrotizing hepatitis successfully treated with a week course of acyclovir. Early empiric administration of acyclovir therapy while awaiting confirmatory tests is critical in this potentially lethal disease. PMID:26290760

  8. Hepatitis C Test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hepatitis C Antibody; Anti-HCV; HCV-PCR; HCV-RNA; Hepatitis C Viral Load Formal name: Viral Hepatitis C Antibody Screen; Viral Hepatitis C RNA by PCR; Hepatitis C Virus Genotype Related tests: ...

  9. Hepatitis B Vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... What is hepatitis B?Hepatitis B is a serious infection that affects the liver. It is caused by the hepatitis B virus. ...

  10. Hepatitis virus panel

    MedlinePLUS

    Hepatitis A antibody test; Hepatitis B antibody test; Hepatitis C antibody test; Hepatitis D antibody test ... Blood (serology) tests are used to check for antibodies to each of the hepatitis viruses.

  11. Hepatitis A Vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    Twinrix® (as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... What is hepatitis A?Hepatitis A is a serious liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). HAV is found in ...

  12. Blockade of Retinol Metabolism Protects T Cell-Induced Hepatitis by Increasing Migration of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Sun; Yi, Hyon-Seung; Suh, Yang-Gun; Byun, Jin-Seok; Eun, Hyuk Soo; Kim, So Yeon; Seo, Wonhyo; Jeong, Jong-Min; Choi, Won-Mook; Kim, Myung-Ho; Kim, Ji Hoon; Park, Keun-Gyu; Jeong, Won-Il

    2015-01-01

    Retinols are metabolized into retinoic acids by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (Raldh). However, their roles have yet to be clarified in hepatitis despite enriched retinols in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Therefore, we investigated the effects of retinols on Concanavalin A (Con A)-mediated hepatitis. Con A was injected into wild type (WT), Raldh1 knock-out (Raldh1?/?), CCL2?/? and CCR2?/? mice. For migration study of regulatory T cells (Tregs), we used in vivo and ex vivo adoptive transfer systems. Blockade of retinol metabolism in mice given 4-methylpyrazole, an inhibitor of ADH, and ablated Raldh1 gene manifested increased migration of Tregs, eventually protected against Con A-mediated hepatitis by decreasing interferon-? in T cells. Moreover, interferon-? treatment increased the expression of ADH3 and Raldh1, but it suppressed that of CCL2 and IL-6 in HSCs. However, the expression of CCL2 and IL-6 was inversely increased upon the pharmacologic or genetic ablation of ADH3 and Raldh1 in HSCs. Indeed, IL-6 treatment increased CCR2 expression of Tregs. In migration assay, ablated CCR2 in Tregs showed reduced migration to HSCs. In adoptive transfer of Tregs in vivo and ex vivo, Raldh1-deficient mice showed more increased migration of Tregs than WT mice. Furthermore, inhibited retinol metabolism increased survival rate (75%) compared with that of the controls (25%) in Con A-induced hepatitis. These results suggest that blockade of retinol metabolism protects against acute liver injury by increased Treg migration, and it may represent a novel therapeutic strategy to control T cell-mediated acute hepatitis. PMID:26537191

  13. Blockade of Retinol Metabolism Protects T Cell-Induced Hepatitis by Increasing Migration of Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Sun; Yi, Hyon-Seung; Suh, Yang-Gun; Byun, Jin-Seok; Eun, Hyuk Soo; Kim, So Yeon; Seo, Wonhyo; Jeong, Jong-Min; Choi, Won-Mook; Kim, Myung-Ho; Kim, Ji Hoon; Park, Keun-Gyu; Jeong, Won-Il

    2015-11-30

    Retinols are metabolized into retinoic acids by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (Raldh). However, their roles have yet to be clarified in hepatitis despite enriched retinols in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Therefore, we investigated the effects of retinols on Concanavalin A (Con A)-mediated hepatitis. Con A was injected into wild type (WT), Raldh1 knock-out (Raldh1(-/-)), CCL2(-/-) and CCR2(-/-) mice. For migration study of regulatory T cells (Tregs), we used in vivo and ex vivo adoptive transfer systems. Blockade of retinol metabolism in mice given 4-methylpyrazole, an inhibitor of ADH, and ablated Raldh1 gene manifested increased migration of Tregs, eventually protected against Con A-mediated hepatitis by decreasing interferon-? in T cells. Moreover, interferon-? treatment increased the expression of ADH3 and Raldh1, but it suppressed that of CCL2 and IL-6 in HSCs. However, the expression of CCL2 and IL-6 was inversely increased upon the pharmacologic or genetic ablation of ADH3 and Raldh1 in HSCs. Indeed, IL-6 treatment increased CCR2 expression of Tregs. In migration assay, ablated CCR2 in Tregs showed reduced migration to HSCs. In adoptive transfer of Tregs in vivo and ex vivo, Raldh1-deficient mice showed more increased migration of Tregs than WT mice. Furthermore, inhibited retinol metabolism increased survival rate (75%) compared with that of the controls (25%) in Con A-induced hepatitis. These results suggest that blockade of retinol metabolism protects against acute liver injury by increased Treg migration, and it may represent a novel therapeutic strategy to control T cell-mediated acute hepatitis. PMID:26537191

  14. Hepatitis E Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Harry R.; Abravanel, Florence; Izopet, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a worldwide disease. An improved understanding of the natural history of HEV infection has been achieved within the last decade. Several reservoirs and transmission modes have been identified. Hepatitis E is an underdiagnosed disease, in part due to the use of serological assays with low sensitivity. However, diagnostic tools, including nucleic acid-based tests, have been improved. The epidemiology and clinical features of hepatitis E differ between developing and developed countries. HEV infection is usually an acute self-limiting disease, but in developed countries it causes chronic infection with rapidly progressive cirrhosis in organ transplant recipients, patients with hematological malignancy requiring chemotherapy, and individuals with HIV. HEV also causes extrahepatic manifestations, including a number of neurological syndromes and renal injury. Acute infection usually requires no treatment, but chronic infection should be treated by reducing immunosuppression in transplant patients and/or the use of antiviral therapy. In this comprehensive review, we summarize the current knowledge about the virus itself, as well as the epidemiology, diagnostics, natural history, and management of HEV infection in developing and developed countries. PMID:24396139

  15. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: A Behavioral Teratology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavale, Kenneth A.; Karge, Belinda D.

    1986-01-01

    The review examines the literature on the behaviorally teratogenic aspects of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, including: (1) prevalence of alcohol abuse among women, (2) acute and chronic effects of alcohol on the fetus, (3) genetic susceptibility, (4) neuropathology, (5) correlative conditions, and (6) animal studies. (Author/DB)

  16. Alcohol and Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Chevy Chase, MD. National Clearinghouse for Mental Health Information.

    This concise survey presents some of the highlights of modern research on drinking and alcoholism, as based on technical articles published in the scientific literature and the views expressed by leading authorities in the field. Contents include discussions about: (1) the nature and scope of the problem; (2) the chemical composition of alcoholic

  17. Diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Torruellas, Cara; French, Samuel W; Medici, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is a hepatotoxin that is commonly consumed worldwide and is associated with a spectrum of liver injury including simple steatosis or fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a general term used to refer to this spectrum of alcohol-related liver injuries. Excessive or harmful alcohol use is ranked as one of the top five risk factors for death and disability globally and results in 2.5 million deaths and 69.4 million annual disability adjusted life years. All patients who present with clinical features of hepatitis or chronic liver disease or who have elevated serum elevated transaminase levels should be screened for an alcohol use disorder. The diagnosis of ALD can generally be made based on history, clinical and laboratory findings. However, the diagnosis of ALD can be clinically challenging as there is no single diagnostic test that confirms the diagnosis and patients may not be forthcoming about their degree of alcohol consumption. In addition, clinical findings may be absent or minimal in early ALD characterized by hepatic steatosis. Typical laboratory findings in ALD include transaminase levels with aspartate aminotransferase greater than alanine aminotransferase as well as increased mean corpuscular volume, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, and IgA to IgG ratio. In unclear cases, the diagnosis can be supported by imaging and liver biopsy. The histological features of ALD can ultimately define the diagnosis according to the typical presence and distribution of hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and Mallory-Denk bodies. Because of the potential reversible nature of ALD with sobriety, regular screening of the general population and early diagnosis are essential. PMID:25206273

  18. Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura Associated with Hepatitis A Infection in a Five-year Old Boy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Urganci, N; Kilicaslan, O; Kalyoncu, D; Yilmaz, S

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acute hepatitis A infection is usually a self-limiting disease and mostly asymptomatic in children younger than six years old. Extrahepatic autoimmune manifestations such as immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) have been reported rarely in children with acute hepatitis A infection. We report herein a paediatric case with ITP which is due to hepatitis A virus infection. PMID:25781273

  19. Hepatitis C: progress and problems.

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, J A

    1994-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV), a single-stranded RNA virus, is the major cause of posttransfusion hepatitis. HCV isolates differ in nucleotide and amino acid sequences. Nucleotide changes are concentrated in hypervariable regions and may be related to immune selection. In most immunocompetent persons, HCV infection is diagnosed serologically, using antigens from conserved regions. Amplification of RNA may be necessary to detect infection in immunosuppressed patients. Transmission by known parenteral routes is frequent; other means of spread are less common and may represent inapparent, percutaneous dissemination. Infection can lead to classical acute hepatitis, but most infected persons have no history of acute disease. Once infected, most individuals apparently remain carriers of the virus, with varying degrees of hepatocyte damage and fibrosis ensuing. Chronic hepatitis may lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, disease progression varies widely, from less than 2 years to cirrhosis in some patients to more than 30 years with only chronic hepatitis in others. Determinants important in deciding outcome are unknown. Alpha interferon, which results in sustained remission in selected patients, is the only available therapy. Long-term benefits from such therapy have not been demonstrated. Prevention of HCV infection by vaccination is likely to be challenging if ongoing viral mutation results in escape from neutralization and clearance. PMID:7834603

  20. The Transforming Growth Factor ?1/Interleukin-31 Pathway Is Upregulated in Patients with Hepatitis B Virus-Related Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure and Is Associated with Disease Severity and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xueping; Guo, Ruyi; Ming, Desong; Deng, Yong; Su, Milong; Lin, Chengzu; Li, Julan; Lin, Zhenzhong

    2015-01-01

    The transforming growth factor ?1/interleukin-31 (TGF-?1/IL-31) pathway plays an important role in the process of cell injury and inflammation. The purpose of this work was to explore the role of the TGF-?1/IL-31 pathway in the cytopathic process of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). The quantitative serum levels of TGF-?1, IL-9, IL-10, IL-17, IL-22, IL-23, IL-31, IL-33, and IL-35 were analyzed among chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients (n = 17), ACLF patients (n = 18), and normal control (NC) subjects (n = 18). Disease severity in patients with ACLF was assessed using the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) and Child-Pugh scores. Serum TGF-?1 levels were strongly positively correlated with IL-31 in all subjects, and both of them were positively correlated with IL-17, IL-22, and IL-33. In CHB and ACLF patients, serum levels of TGF-?1 and IL-31 were both increased significantly compared with those in NC subjects and positively correlated with total bilirubin (TBil) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels. ACLF patients showed the highest levels of TGF-?1 and IL-31, which were positively correlated with Child-Pugh scores. Furthermore, the recovery from the liver injury in CHB was accompanied by decreased TGF-?1 and IL-31 levels. More importantly, serum levels of TGF-?1 and IL-31 were markedly upregulated in ACLF nonsurvivors, and IL-31 displayed the highest sensitivity and specificity (85.7% and 100.0%, respectively) in predicting nonsurvival of ACLF patients. Increasing activity of the TGF-?1/IL-31 pathway is well correlated with the extent of liver injury, disease severity, and nonsurvival of ACLF patients, while reducing activity is detected along the recovery from liver injury in CHB, suggesting its potential role in the pathogenesis of liver injury during chronic HBV infection. PMID:25716231

  1. In vivo relationship between monoamine oxidase type B and alcohol dehydrogenase: effects of ethanol and phenylethylamine

    SciTech Connect

    Aliyu, S.U.; Upahi, L.

    1988-01-01

    The role of acute ethanol and phenylethylamine on the brain and platelet monoamine oxidase activities, hepatic cytosolic alcohol dehydrogenase, redox state and motor behavior were studied in male rats. Ethanol on its own decreased the redox couple ratio, as well as, alcohol dehydrogenase activity in the liver while at the same time it increased brain and platelet monoamine oxidase activity due to lower Km with no change in Vmax. The elevation in both brain and platelet MAO activity was associated with ethanol-induced hypomotility in the rats. Co-administration of phenylethylamine and ethanol to the animals, caused antagonism of the ethanol-induced effects described above. The effects of phenylethylamine alone, on the above mentioned biochemical and behavioral indices, are more complex. Phenylethylamine on its own, like ethanol, caused reduction of the cytosolic redox, ratio and elevation of monoamine oxidase activity in the brain and platelets. However, in contrast to ethanol, this monoamine produced hypermotility and activation of the hepatic cytosolic alcohol dehydrogenase activity in the animals.

  2. Fibrogenesis in alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Hideki; Kawada, Norifumi

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In developed countries, ALD is a major cause of end-stage liver disease that requires transplantation. The spectrum of ALD includes simple steatosis, alcoholic hepatitis, ?brosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Alcohol abstinence is the most effective therapy for ALD. However, targeted therapies are urgently needed for patients with severe ALD (i.e., alcoholic hepatitis) or those who do not abstain from alcohol. The lack of studies and the availability of animal models that do not reflect all the features of this disease in humans inhibit the development of new drugs for ALD. In ALD-associated fibrosis, hepatic stellate cells are the principal cell type responsible for extracellular matrix production. Although the mechanisms underlying fibrosis in ALD are largely similar to those observed in other chronic liver diseases, oxidative stress, methionine metabolism abnormalities, hepatocyte apoptosis, and endotoxin lipopolysaccharides that activate Kupffer cells may play unique roles in disease-related fibrogenesis. Lipogenesis during the early stages of ALD has recently been implicated as a risk factor for the progression of cirrhosis. Other topics include osteopontin, interleukin-1 signaling, and genetic polymorphism. In this review, we discuss the basic pathogenesis of ALD and focus on liver fibrogenesis. PMID:25009376

  3. :Robust hepatitis C virus infection in vitro Jin Zhong, Pablo Gastaminza, Guofeng Cheng, Sharookh Kapadia, Takanobu Kato, Dennis R.

    E-print Network

    Huang, Ching-Tsan

    1 :Robust hepatitis C virus infection in vitro Jin Zhong, Pablo Gastaminza, Guofeng Cheng hepatitis C virus, HCV RNA acute and chronic hepatitisfulminant hepatitis cirrhosishepatocellular carcinoma5A GFP Huh-7.5[5] [6] HCV JFH-1 [7] Huh-7.5.1 HCV HCV replicon fulminant hepatitis HCV

  4. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bleibel, Wissam; Al-Osaimi, Abdullah M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis affect hundreds of millions of patients all over the world. The majority of patients with cirrhosis will eventually develop complications related to portal hypertension. One of these recurrent and difficult to treat complications is hepatic encephalopathy. Studies have indicated that overt hepatic encephalopathy affects 30 to 45% of patients with cirrhosis and a higher percentage may be affected by minimal degree of encephalopathy. All of these factors add to the impact of hepatic encephalopathy on the healthcare system and presents a major challenge to the gastroenterologist, hospitalist and primary care physician. PMID:23006457

  5. Involvement of hepatic stellate cell cytoglobin in acute hepatocyte damage through the regulation of CYP2E1-mediated xenobiotic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Teranishi, Yuga; Matsubara, Tsutomu; Krausz, Kristopher W; Le, Thi T T; Gonzalez, Frank J; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Ikeda, Kazuo; Kawada, Norifumi

    2015-05-01

    Oxygen (O2) is required for cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent drug metabolism. Cytoglobin (CYGB) is a unique globin expressed exclusively in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). However, its role in O2-dependent metabolism in neighboring hepatocytes remains unknown. This study provides evidence that CYGB in HSCs is involved in acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol; APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. Serum alanine aminotransferase levels were higher in wild-type mice than in Cygb-null mice. Wild-type mice exhibited more severe hepatocyte necrosis around the central vein area compared with Cygb-null mice, thus indicating that CYGB deficiency protects against APAP-induced liver damage. Although no difference in the hepatic expression of CYP2E1, a key enzyme involved in APAP toxicity, was observed between wild-type and Cygb-null mice, the serum levels of the APAP metabolites cysteinyl-APAP and N-acetyl-cysteinyl-APAP were decreased in Cygb-null mice, suggesting reduced APAP metabolism in the livers of Cygb-null mice. In primary cultures, APAP-induced hepatocyte damage was increased by co-culturing with wild-type HSCs but not with Cygb-null HSCs. In addition, cell damage was markedly alleviated under low O2 condition (5% O2), suggesting the requirement of O2 for APAP toxicity. Carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury (CYP2E1-dependent), but not lipopolysaccharide/D-galactosamine-induced injury (CYP2E1-independent), was similarly alleviated in Cygb-null mice. Considering the function of CYGB as O2 carrier, these results strongly support the hypothesis that HSCs are involved in the CYP2E1-mediated xenobiotic activation by augmenting O2 supply to hepatocytes. In conclusion, CYGB in HSCs contributes to the CYP-mediated metabolism of xenobiotics in hepatocytes by supplying O2 for enzymatic oxidation. PMID:25686096

  6. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is a condition that causes temporary worsening of brain function in people with advanced liver disease. When ... travel through your body until they reach your brain, causing mental and physical symptoms of HE. Hepatic ...

  7. Hepatitis D

    MedlinePLUS

    ... pain Nausea or vomiting Fever Loss of appetite Dark urine Joint pain Diagnosis Healthcare providers review symptoms ... risk behaviors associated with hepatitis D superinfection, including Sex with an infected partner Contact with the blood ...

  8. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePLUS

    ... who had hepatitis C Received a tattoo or acupuncture with needles that were not disinfected properly after ... have a tattoo license or permit or an acupuncture license) Received an organ transplant from a donor ...

  9. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary ?-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  10. [Acute liver failure].

    PubMed

    Alberto, Sara Folgado; Pires, S Sousa; Figueiredo, A; Deus, J Ramos de

    2009-01-01

    Acute liver failure refers to the rapid development of severe acute liver injury with impaired synthetic function in a patient who previously had a normal liver or a well compensated liver disease. Its aetiology is diversified and it provides one of the best indicators of prognosis thus being crucial its quick identification. Because it can progress to multiple organ failure syndrome these patients should be managed in an Intensive Care Unit. The first therapeutic approach consists of intensive care support until treatment for specific aetiologies can be started. Besides encephalopathy, many other complications can develop causing the high rates of morbidity and mortality of acute liver failure and so they need tight surveillance and treatment. Liver support systems are therapeutic options still in study and without proven success in a long term period which makes hepatic transplantation the final therapeutic. Given the wide limitations of hepatic transplantation the final decision is based on a correct diagnosis and prognostic scoring systems. PMID:20350465

  11. What Is Hepatitis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is hepatitis? Online Q&A Reviewed July 2015 Q: What is hepatitis? A: Hepatitis is an inflammation ... urine, extreme fatigue, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. Q: What are the different hepatitis viruses? A: Scientists ...

  12. Delta agent (Hepatitis D)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the following tests: Anti-delta agent antibody Liver biopsy Liver enzymes (blood test) ... against hepatitis B. Adults who are at high risk for hepatitis B ... If you do not get Hepatitis B, you cannot get Hepatitis D.

  13. No evidence of transmission from an acute case of hepatitis A in a foodhandler: follow-up of almost 1,000 potentially exposed individuals, London, United Kingdom, April 2012.

    PubMed

    Hall, V; Abrahams, A; Turbitt, D; Cathcart, S; Maguire, H; Balasegaram, S

    2014-01-01

    Identification of acute hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection in a foodhandler in a London hotel led to a large incident response. We identified three potentially exposed groups: hotel staff who had regularly consumed food prepared by the case and shared toilet facilities with the case, patients who shared the same hospital ward as the case and hotel guests who consumed food prepared by the case. We arranged post-exposure HAV vaccination for all 83 potentially exposed hotel staff and all 17 patients. We emailed 887 guests advising them to seek medical care if symptomatic, but did not advise vaccination as it was too late to be effective for most guests. Through the International Health Regulations national focal points and the European Union Early warning and response system (EWRS), we communicated the details of the incident to public health agencies and potential risk of HAV transmission to international guests. Potentially exposed hotel staff and guests were asked to complete an online or telephone-administered questionnaire 50 days following possible exposure, to identify any secondary cases. Survey response was low, with 155 responses from guests and 33 from hotel staff. We identified no secondary cases of HAV infection through follow-up. PMID:25108536

  14. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of ... Stomach ache Nausea Diarrhea No appetite Fever Headaches Diagnosis To check for hepatitis viruses, your doctor will ...

  15. Chronic hepatitis E: A brief review

    PubMed Central

    Murali, Arvind R; Kotwal, Vikram; Chawla, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E viral infection has traditionally been considered an acute, self-limited, water borne disease similar to hepatitis A, endemic to developing countries. However, over the past decade, zoonotic transmission and progression to chronicity in human patients has been identified, resulting in persistently elevated transaminase levels, progressive liver injury and cirrhosis. In addition to liver injury, neurological, renal and rheumatological manifestations have also been reported. Chronic hepatitis E occurs mainly in immunosuppressed individuals such as transplant recipients, human immunodeficiency virus patients with low CD4 counts and in patients with hematological malignancies receiving chemotherapy. Diagnosis is established by persistent elevation of hepatitis E virus RNA in the stool or serum. This population often requires treatment with antiviral agents, particularly ribavirin, as spontaneous clearance with reduction in immunosuppression occurs only in about a third of the patients. The purpose of this review, is to further discuss the clinical presentation, and recent advances in diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis of chronic hepatitis E. PMID:26380044

  16. Hepatitis A: Old and New

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, Jennifer A.

    2001-01-01

    The hepatitis A virus (HAV), a picornavirus, is a common cause of hepatitis worldwide. Spread of infection is generally person to person or by oral intake after fecal contamination of skin or mucous membranes; less commonly, there is fecal contamination of food or water. Hepatitis A is endemic in developing countries, and most residents are exposed in childhood. In contrast, the adult population in developed countries demonstrates falling rates of exposure with improvements in hygiene and sanitation. The export of food that cannot be sterilized, from countries of high endemicity to areas with low rates of infection, is a potentially important source of infection. After ingestion and uptake from the gastrointestinal tract, the virus replicates in the liver and is excreted into the bile. Cellular immune responses to the virus lead to destruction of infected hepatocytes with consequent development of symptoms and signs of disease. Humoral immune responses are the basis for diagnostic serologic assays. Acute HAV infection is clinically indistinguishable from other causes of acute viral hepatitis. In young children the disease is often asymptomatic, whereas in older children and adults there may be a range of clinical manifestations from mild, anicteric infection to fulminant hepatic failure. Clinical variants include prolonged, relapsing, and cholestatic forms. Management of the acute illness is supportive, and complete recovery without sequelae is the usual outcome. Research efforts during World War II led to the development of passive immunoprophylaxis. Pooled immune serum globulin is efficacious in the prevention and attenuation of disease in exposed individuals. More recently, active immunoprophylaxis by vaccination has been accomplished. Future eradication of this disease can now be contemplated. PMID:11148002

  17. Natural Course of Fulminant Hepatic Failure: The Scenario in Bangladesh and the Differences from the West

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Shahinul; Azam, Golam; Mustafa, Golam; Azad, Abul Kalam; Haque, Izazul; Gani, Shakil; Ahmad, Nooruddin; Alam, Khorshed; Khan, Mobin

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aim: Fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) is a devastating complication of acute viral hepatitis, leading to death in most cases. The etiology and predictors of outcome differ according to the geographical region. This study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the etiology, complications, and outcome of FHF in Bangladesh. Patients and Methods: In this prospective study, we included 67 consecutive cases of FHF presenting to the Department of Hepatology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, between November 2003 and May 2008. Thirty-nine of the patients were male and 28 were female. Data was analyzed using SPSS, version 13.0. Results: The mean age of the subjects was 31.9 ± 11.7 years. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) was the commonest etiological factor for FHF (50 cases, 74.6%); of the 50 cases with HEV infection, 43 (64.2%) were not coinfected with any other virus, four cases were Hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers, and three had coinfection with hepatitis A virus (HAV). HBV was the cause of FHF in nine (13.4%) patients. HCV, paracetamol, and alcohol were not responsible for any of the cases. Most of the patients (57 patients, 85%) developed FHF within 2 weeks of the onset of jaundice. Of the 67 patients, 49 (73.1%) died. Cerebral edema was the single most common cause of death (48 patients, 71.6%). Other complications were renal failure (23 patients, 34.3%), sepsis (15 patients, 22.4%), electrolyte imbalance (12 patients 17.9%), and bleeding tendency (7 patients, 10.4%). Occurrence of cerebral edema, longer prothrombin time, higher grade of encephalopathy, and longer jaundice-to-encephalopathy interval had significant negative influence on outcome. Conclusions: The etiology of FHF in Bangladesh is different from that in the West. Prolongation of prothrombin time and occurrence of cerebral edema are predictors of the worst prognosis. PMID:19794267

  18. [Skin manifestations related to hepatitis C viruses].

    PubMed

    Doutre, M S; Beylot, C; Beylot-Barry, M; Couzigou, P; Beylot, J

    1995-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus causes both hepatic and extrahepatic disorders, particularly as regards dermatology. The link between essential mixed cryoglobulinemias and the C virus infection has been clearly evidenced., whereas its frequency seems low in other systemic vasculitis such as polyarteritis nodosa. Similarly, the link between C virus hepatopathy and porphyria cutanea tarda is now proven. Lichen planus is also described as being associated with this virus, but further epidemiological studies are required to determine the exact prevalence of lichen in C virus hepatopathy cases. Finally, various cutaneous disorders, such as urticaria, erythema multiforme, dermo-hypodermitis, etc, occasionally arise during acute or chronic hepatitis C. PMID:7481154

  19. Immunopathogenesis of Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, David E

    2015-12-01

    Despite advances in therapy, hepatitis C virus infection remains a major global health issue with 3 to 4 million incident cases and 170 million prevalent chronic infections. Complex, partially understood, host-virus interactions determine whether an acute infection with hepatitis C resolves, as occurs in approximately 30% of cases, or generates a persistent hepatic infection, as occurs in the remainder. Once chronic infection is established, the velocity of hepatocyte injury and resultant fibrosis is significantly modulated by immunologic as well as environmental factors. Immunomodulation has been the backbone of antiviral therapy despite poor understanding of its mechanism of action. PMID:26600217

  20. Hybrid ducks overfed with boiled corn develop an acute hepatic steatosis with decreased choline and polyunsaturated fatty acid level in phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Gabarrou, J F; Salichon, M R; Guy, G; Blum, J C

    1996-01-01

    Hepatic and plasma lipid changes were investigated in hybrid ducks after steatosis was induced by overfeeding. Fourteen hybrid ducks were force-fed (11 kg corn in 13 days). The liver of the overfed ducks weighed ten times more than that of controls (695 vs 69 g). The phospholipid, ash, water and protein content of the liver were only slightly higher (2.6-, 3.6-, 4.4- and 3.2-fold, respectively) but the liver lipid concentration was 16.5 times higher after than before overfeeding (56.1 vs 3.4 g/100 g liver, respectively). Liver phosphatidylcholine concentration was higher in the control group (32.4 vs 22.9 mol/100 mol phospholipid) revealing a choline deficiency that could contribute to the development of liver steatosis. In liver phospholipid, the level of linoleic and arachidonic acids were markedly decreased in the overfed ducks, from 5 and 18.1 to 3.7 and 7.1 mol/100 mol fatty acids, respectively, and were mainly replaced by oleic acid. Plasma triacylglycerols increased 5.9-fold, cholesterol 2.2-fold and phospholipid 1.6-fold. Heat-induced (50 min at 105 degrees C) fat release, an index of poor liver integrity, was particularly high for the large, fat livers which contained low levels of phospholipids and phosphatidylcholine. PMID:8987099

  1. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can harm your baby. Alcohol also increases the risk of death from car crashes, injuries, homicide, and suicide. If you want to stop drinking, there is help. Start by talking to your health care provider. Treatment may include medicines, counseling, and ...

  2. New models of hepatitis E virus replication in human and porcine hepatocyte cell lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes acute, enterically-transmitted hepatitis. It is associated with large epidemics in tropical and subtropical regions where it is endemic or with sporadic cases in non-endemic regions. Unlike other hepatitis viruses, HEV has several animal reservoirs. Phylogenetic studie...

  3. Structure of the hepatitis E virus-like particle suggests mechanisms for virus assembly

    E-print Network

    Tao, Yizhi Jane

    Structure of the hepatitis E virus-like particle suggests mechanisms for virus assembly (received for review May 1, 2009) Hepatitis E virus (HEV), a small, non-enveloped RNA virus in the family Hepeviridae, is associated with endemic and epidemic acute viral hepatitis in developing countries. Our 3.5-Å

  4. Fructose: it's "alcohol without the buzz".

    PubMed

    Lustig, Robert H

    2013-03-01

    What do the Atkins Diet and the traditional Japanese diet have in common? The Atkins Diet is low in carbohydrate and usually high in fat; the Japanese diet is high in carbohydrate and usually low in fat. Yet both work to promote weight loss. One commonality of both diets is that they both eliminate the monosaccharide fructose. Sucrose (table sugar) and its synthetic sister high fructose corn syrup consist of 2 molecules, glucose and fructose. Glucose is the molecule that when polymerized forms starch, which has a high glycemic index, generates an insulin response, and is not particularly sweet. Fructose is found in fruit, does not generate an insulin response, and is very sweet. Fructose consumption has increased worldwide, paralleling the obesity and chronic metabolic disease pandemic. Sugar (i.e., fructose-containing mixtures) has been vilified by nutritionists for ages as a source of "empty calories," no different from any other empty calorie. However, fructose is unlike glucose. In the hypercaloric glycogen-replete state, intermediary metabolites from fructose metabolism overwhelm hepatic mitochondrial capacity, which promotes de novo lipogenesis and leads to hepatic insulin resistance, which drives chronic metabolic disease. Fructose also promotes reactive oxygen species formation, which leads to cellular dysfunction and aging, and promotes changes in the brain's reward system, which drives excessive consumption. Thus, fructose can exert detrimental health effects beyond its calories and in ways that mimic those of ethanol, its metabolic cousin. Indeed, the only distinction is that because fructose is not metabolized in the central nervous system, it does not exert the acute neuronal depression experienced by those imbibing ethanol. These metabolic and hedonic analogies argue that fructose should be thought of as "alcohol without the buzz." PMID:23493539

  5. Gynura procumbens Reverses Acute and Chronic Ethanol-Induced Liver Steatosis through MAPK/SREBP-1c-Dependent and -Independent Pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jun; Mu, Yun-Mei; Li, Ting-Ting; Yang, Yan-Ling; Zhang, Mei-Tuo; Li, Yu-Sang; Zhang, Wei Kevin; Tang, He-Bin; Shang, Hong-Cai

    2015-09-30

    The present study aimed to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect and mechanism of action of Gynura procumbens on acute and chronic ethanol-induced liver injuries. Ethanol extract from G. procumbens stems (EEGS) attenuated acute ethanol-induced serum alanine aminotransferase levels and hepatic lipid accumulation. Therefore, EEGS was successively extracted by petroleum, ethyl acetate, and n-butyl alcohol. The results showed that the n-butyl alcohol extract was the active fraction of EEGS, and hence it was further fractionated on a polyamide glass column. The 60% ethanol-eluted fraction that contained 13.6% chlorogenic acid was the most active fraction, and its effect was further evaluated using a chronic model. Both the n-butyl alcohol extract and the 60% ethanol-eluted fraction inhibited chronic ethanol-induced hepatic lipid accumulation by modulating lipid metabolism-related regulators through MAPK/SREBP-1c-dependent and -independent signaling pathways and ameliorated liver steatosis. Our findings suggest that EEGS and one of its active ingredients, chlorogenic acid, may be developed as potential effective agents for ethanol-induced liver injury. PMID:26345299

  6. Hepatoprotective effect of carob against acute ethanol-induced oxidative stress in rat.

    PubMed

    Souli, Abdelaziz; Sebai, Hichem; Chehimi, Latifa; Rtibi, Kaïs; Tounsi, Haifa; Boubaker, Samir; Sakly, Mohsen; El-Benna, Jamel; Amri, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether subacute treatment with aqueous extract of carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.) pods (AECPs) protects against ethanol (EtOH)-induced oxidative stress in rat liver. Animals were divided into four groups: control, carob, EtOH and EtOH + carob. Wistar rats were intraperitoneally pretreated with AECP (600 mg/kg body weight (bw)) during 7 days and intoxicated for 6 h by acute oral administration of EtOH (6 g/kg bw) 24 h after the last injection. We found that acute administration of EtOH leads to hepatotoxicity as monitored by the increase in the levels of hepatic marker aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase as well as hepatic tissue injury. EtOH also increased the formation of malondialdehyde in the liver, indicating an increase in lipid peroxidation and depletion of antioxidant enzyme activities as superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Subacute carob pretreatment prevented all the alterations induced by EtOH and returned their levels to near normal. Importantly, we showed that acute alcohol increased hepatic and plasmatic hydrogen peroxide and free iron levels. The carob pretreatment reversed EtOH effects to near control levels. These data suggest that carob could have a beneficial effect in inhibiting the oxidative damage induced by acute EtOH administration and that its mode of action may involve an opposite effect on plasma and tissue-free iron accumulation. Indeed, carob can be offered as a food additive to protect against EtOH-induced oxidative damage. PMID:23363576

  7. [HOMA-IR in patients with chronic hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Botshorishvili, T; Vashakidze, E

    2012-02-01

    The aim of investigation was to study the frequency of IR in type of viral hepatitis C, correlation with the degree of hepatic lesion and liver cirrhosis. 130 patients were investigated: 20 with acute hepatitis C; 38 with chronic hepatitis C; 72 with cirrhosis: among them 10 with Stage A, 14 with Stage B and 48 with Stage C. Also we used 30 healthy people as the controls. The study demonstrates significant changes of insulin, glucose, HOMA-IR type of viral hepatitis C, correlation with the degree of hepatic lesion and liver cirrhosis. In patients with liver cirrhosis levels of HOMA-IR is higher than in patients with chronic hepatitis C. In patients with acute hepatitis C levels of HOMA-IR was normal as in the control group. The results showed that various types of chronic viral hepatitis C and stages of cirrhosis set to increase HOMA-IR versus the controls., which were the most prominent in cases of severe hepatic lesion, which indicates that insulin resistance is a frequent companion of CHC. PMID:22466538

  8. Hepatitis E

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with safe water, particularly before handling food; avoiding drinking water and/or ice of unknown purity; adhering to WHO safe food practices. In 2011, the first vaccine to prevent hepatitis E infection was registered in China. Although it is not available globally, it could ...

  9. Mismatch Negativity: No Difference Between Controls and Abstinent Alcoholics

    PubMed Central

    Fein, G.; Whitlow, B.; Finn, P.

    2007-01-01

    Background A number of studies have examined the amplitude of the mismatch negativity (MMN) evoked potential as a measure of a brain inhibitory deficit in alcoholics or those at risk for alcoholism. The current study examined MMN in alcoholics abstinent an average of 6.7 years (with a minimum of six months abstinence) compared to controls. This study examined the association of MMN with alcoholism family history density, with indices of the presence and severity of externalizing disorders (a risk-factor for alcoholism), and with alcohol use variables. Methods Electroencephalograms were gathered on 76 subjects (38 controls, 38 abstinent alcoholics) during a non-attending mismatch negativity experiment. Measures of alcoholism family history density, disinhibited personality traits, and antisocial symptoms served as measures of risk-factors known to be associated with a genetic liability to alcoholism. Alcohol use variables were used as measures of alcoholism severity. Results There were no differences in MMN amplitude or latency between controls and abstinent alcoholics. There also were no significant associations between MMN measures and the measures of risk for alcoholism or with the severity of alcohol use or duration of abstinence. Conclusions The results suggest that MMN is not affected in chronic alcoholics or associated with alcoholism vulnerability, and thus does not reflect a trait marker of alcoholism or alcoholism risk. The current results do not address effects on MMN of acute alcohol ingestion or withdrawal from alcohol. PMID:14745312

  10. Transforming growth factor-beta and platelet-derived growth factor signal via c-Jun N-terminal kinase-dependent Smad2/3 phosphorylation in rat hepatic stellate cells after acute liver injury.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Katsunori; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Mori, Shigeo; Tahashi, Yoshiya; Yamagata, Hideo; Furukawa, Fukiko; Seki, Toshihito; Nishizawa, Mikio; Fujisawa, Junichi; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2005-04-01

    After liver injury, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) regulate the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and tissue remodeling. Mechanisms of PDGF signaling in the TGF-beta-triggered cascade are not completely understood. TGF-beta signaling involves phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 at linker and C-terminal regions. Using antibodies to distinguish Smad2/3 phosphorylated at linker regions from those phosphorylated at C-terminal regions, we investigated Smad2/3-mediated signaling in rat liver injured by CCl(4) administration and in cultured HSCs. In acute liver injury, Smad2/3 were transiently phosphorylated at both regions. Although linker-phosphorylated Smad2 remained in the cytoplasm of alpha-smooth muscle actin-immunoreactive mesenchymal cells adjacent to necrotic hepatocytes in centrilobular areas, linker-phosphorylated Smad3 accumulated in the nuclei. c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in the activated HSCs directly phosphorylated Smad2/3 at linker regions. Co-treatment of primary cultured HSCs with TGF-beta and PDGF activated the JNK pathway, subsequently inducing endogenous linker phosphorylation of Smad2/3. The JNK pathway may be involved in migration of resident HSCs within the space of Disse to the sites of tissue damage because the JNK inhibitor SP600125 inhibited HSC migration induced by TGF-beta and PDGF signals. Moreover, treatment of HSCs with both TGF-beta and PDGF increased transcriptional activity of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 through linker phosphorylation of Smad3. In conclusion, TGF-beta and PDGF activate HSCs by transmitting their signals through JNK-mediated Smad2/3 phosphorylation at linker regions, both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:15793284

  11. Alcohol’s Burden on Immunity Following Burn, Hemorrhagic Shock, or Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Patricia E.; Katz, Paige S.; Souza-Smith, Flavia; Ford, Stephen M.; Teng, Sophie X.; Dodd, Tracy Y.; Maxi, John K.; Mayeux, Jacques P.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption contributes to increased incidence and severity of traumatic injury. Compared with patients who do not consume alcohol, alcohol-consuming patients have higher rates of long-term morbidity and mortality during recovery from injury. This can be attributed in part to an impaired immune response in individuals who consume alcohol. Acute and chronic alcohol use can affect both the innate and adaptive immune defense responses within multiple organ systems; the combination of alcohol use and injury results in increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral pathogens. This review examines the major deleterious effects of alcohol on immunity following tissue damage or traumatic injury, with a focus on alcohol’s influence on the ability of the immune and major organ systems to fight disease and to repair damaged tissues following injury.

  12. Understanding the Effects of Stress and Alcohol Cues on Motivation for Alcohol via Behavioral Economics

    PubMed Central

    Amlung, Michael; MacKillop, James

    2014-01-01

    Background Psychological stress and alcohol cues are common antecedents of both ongoing drinking and relapse. One candidate mechanism of risk from these factors is acute increases in craving, but experimental support for this hypothesis is mixed. Furthermore, the combination of stress and cues has been largely unstudied. The current study employed a behavioral economic approach to investigate the combined roles of psychosocial stress and alcohol cues on motivation for alcohol. Methods In a sample of 84 adult heavy drinkers, we examined the effects of an acute laboratory stress induction and an alcohol cue exposure on subjective craving and stress, arousal, and behavioral economic decision-making. Primary dependent measures included an intertemporal cross-commodity multiple choice procedure (ICCMCP), incorporating both price and delay elements; an alcohol purchase task (APT), measuring alcohol demand; and a monetary delay discounting task (DDT), measuring intertemporal choice. Results The stress induction significantly increased stress, craving, and the incentive value of alcohol on the ICCMCP and APT. Stress-related increases in value on the ICCMCP were mediated by increased alcohol demand. Exposure to alcohol cues only significantly affected craving, APT breakpoint, and arousal. Delay discounting was not affected by either stress or cues. Conclusions These results reveal unique behavioral economic dimensions of motivation for alcohol following acute stress and an alcohol cue exposure. More broadly, as the first application of this approach to understanding the role of stress in drug motivation, these findings support its utility and potential in future applications. PMID:24890323

  13. Hepatitis E virus infection: Epidemiology and treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ga Young; Poovorawan, Kittiyod; Intharasongkroh, Duangnapa; Sa-Nguanmoo, Pattaratida; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Chirathaworn, Chintana; Poovorawan, Yong

    2015-11-12

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is now established as an emerging enteric viral hepatitis. Standard treatments in acute and chronic hepatitis E remain to be established. This study undertakes a review of the epidemiology, treatment implication and vaccine prevention from published literature. HEV infection is a worldwide public health problem and can cause acute and chronic hepatitis E. HEV genotypes 1 and 2 are primarily found in developing countries due to waterborne transmission, while the zoonotic potential of genotypes 3 and 4 affects mostly industrialized countries. An awareness of HEV transmission through blood donation, especially in the immunocompromised and solid organ transplant patients, merits an effective anti-viral therapy. There are currently no clear indications for the treatment of acute hepatitis E. Despite concerns for side effects, ribavirin monotherapy or in combination with pegylated interferon alpha for at least 3 mo appeared to show significant efficacy in the treatment of chronic hepatitis E. However, there are no available treatment options for specific patient population groups, such as women who are pregnant. Vaccination and screening of HEV in blood donors are currently a global priority in managing infection. New strategies for the treatment and control of hepatitis E are required for both acute and chronic infections, such as prophylactic use of medications, controlling large outbreaks, and finding acceptable antiviral therapy for pregnant women and other patient groups for whom the current options of treatment are not viable. PMID:26568916

  14. Hepatitis E virus infection: Epidemiology and treatment implications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ga Young; Poovorawan, Kittiyod; Intharasongkroh, Duangnapa; Sa-nguanmoo, Pattaratida; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Chirathaworn, Chintana; Poovorawan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is now established as an emerging enteric viral hepatitis. Standard treatments in acute and chronic hepatitis E remain to be established. This study undertakes a review of the epidemiology, treatment implication and vaccine prevention from published literature. HEV infection is a worldwide public health problem and can cause acute and chronic hepatitis E. HEV genotypes 1 and 2 are primarily found in developing countries due to waterborne transmission, while the zoonotic potential of genotypes 3 and 4 affects mostly industrialized countries. An awareness of HEV transmission through blood donation, especially in the immunocompromised and solid organ transplant patients, merits an effective anti-viral therapy. There are currently no clear indications for the treatment of acute hepatitis E. Despite concerns for side effects, ribavirin monotherapy or in combination with pegylated interferon alpha for at least 3 mo appeared to show significant efficacy in the treatment of chronic hepatitis E. However, there are no available treatment options for specific patient population groups, such as women who are pregnant. Vaccination and screening of HEV in blood donors are currently a global priority in managing infection. New strategies for the treatment and control of hepatitis E are required for both acute and chronic infections, such as prophylactic use of medications, controlling large outbreaks, and finding acceptable antiviral therapy for pregnant women and other patient groups for whom the current options of treatment are not viable. PMID:26568916

  15. Alcohols toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Wimer, W.W.; Russell, J.A.; Kaplan, H.L.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive reference volume which summarizes literature reports of the known consequences of human and animal contact with alcohols and alcohol-derived substances is presented. Following a discussion of alcohol nomenclature and a brief history of alcohols, the authors have provided detailed chapters on the toxicology of methanol, ethanol, normal and isopropanol, and the butanols. Properties of these alcohols are compared; industrial hygiene and exposure limits are discussed. Additional sections are included covering processing and production technology and exhaust emissions studies. Of particular interest are the section containing abstracts and synopses of principal works and the extensive bibliography of studies dating from the 1800s. 331 references, 26 figures, 56 tables

  16. Protein metabolism in alcoholism: effects on specific tissues and the whole body.

    PubMed

    Preedy, V R; Reilly, M E; Patel, V B; Richardson, P J; Peters, T J

    1999-01-01

    Ethanol is one of the few nutrients that is profoundly toxic. Alcohol causes both whole-body and tissue-specific changes in protein metabolism. Chronic ethanol missuse increases nitrogen excretion with concomitant loss of lean tissue mass. Even acute doses of alcohol elicit increased nitrogen excretion. The loss of skeletal muscle protein (i.e., chronic alcoholic myopathy) is one of several adverse reactions to alcohol and occurs in up to two-thirds of all ethanol misusers. There are a variety of other diseases and tissue abnormalities that are entirely due to ethanol-induced changes in the amounts of individual proteins or groups of tissue proteins; for example, increased hepatic collagen in cirrhosis, reduction in myosin in cardiomyopathy, and loss of skeletal collagen in osteoporosis. Ethanol induces changes in protein metabolism in probably all organ or tissue systems. Clinical studies in alcoholic patients without overt liver disease show reduced rates of skeletal muscle protein synthesis though whole-body protein turnover does not appear to be significantly affected. Protein turnover studies in alcohol misusers are, however, subject to artifactual misinterpretations due to non-abstinence, dual substance misuse (e.g., cocaine or tobacco), specific nutritional deficiencies, or the presence of overt organ dysfunction. As a consequence, the most reliable data examining the effects of alcohol on protein metabolism is derived from animal studies, where nutritional elements of the dosing regimen can be strictly controlled. These studies indicate that, both chronically and acutely, alcohol causes reductions in skeletal muscle protein synthesis, as well as of skin, bone, and the small intestine. Chronically, animal studies also show increased urinary nitrogen excretion and loss of skeletal muscle protein. With respect to skeletal muscle, the reductions in protein synthesis do not appear to be due to the generation of reactive oxygen species, are not prevented with nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, and may be indirectly mediated by the reactive metabolite acetaldehyde. Changes in skeletal muscle protein metabolism have profound implications for whole body physiology, while protein turnover changes in organs such as the heart (exemplified by complex alterations in protein profiles) have important implications for cardiovascular function and morbidity. PMID:10422097

  17. Facts about Alcohol and Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Leonard C.

    Recognition of alcoholism as a treatable illness is a result of public education based on scientific facts. This publication, a digest of a more detailed survey of research about drinking and alcoholism, presents information about alcohol and its effects on individuals and society. It provides facts about the short-term and long-term effects of…

  18. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  19. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is ... population. This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  20. Hepatitis C FAQs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis C FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... URL - Redirecting ... Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home Statistics & Surveillance Populations & ...

  1. Protect Yourself from Hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a new liver. Several different viruses—named the hepatitis A, B, C, D and E viruses—can cause ... it. Different hepatitis viruses spread in different ways. Hepatitis A, the most common, is spread through food or ...

  2. Current Knowledge on Hepatitis E

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Gracia, María Teresa; García, Mario; Suay, Beatriz; Mateos-Lindemann, María Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Although only a single serotype of hepatitis E virus (HEV), the causative agent of hepatitis E, has been identified, there is great genetic variation among the different HEV isolates reported. There are at least four major recognized genotypes of HEV: genotypes 1 and 2 are mainly restricted to humans and linked to epidemic outbreaks in nonindustrialized countries, whereas genotypes 3 and 4 are zoonotic in both developing and industrialized countries. Besides human strains, genotype 3 and 4 strains of HEV have been genetically characterized from swine, sika deer, mongooses, sheep, and rabbits. Currently, there are approximately 11,000 human and animal sequences of HEV available at the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration. HEV is the major cause of waterborne outbreaks of hepatitis in areas of poor sanitation. Additionally, it is responsible for sporadic cases of viral hepatitis in not only endemic but industrialized countries as well. Transmission of HEV occurs predominantly by the fecal-oral route, although parenteral and perinatal routes have been reported. HEV infection develops in most individuals as a self-limiting, acute, icteric hepatitis; with mortality rates around 1%. However, some affected individuals will develop fulminant hepatic failure, a serious condition that is frequently fatal without a liver transplant. This complication is particularly common when the infection occurs in pregnant women, where mortality rates rise dramatically to up to 25%. Among the preventive measures available to avoid HEV infection, two separate subunit vaccines containing recombinant truncated capsid proteins of HEV have been shown to be highly effective in the prevention of disease. One of them, HEV 239, was approved in China, and its commercialization by Innovax began in November 2012 under the name Hecolin®. PMID:26355220

  3. Caffeinated Alcoholic Beverages – An Emerging Trend in Alcohol Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Kelle M; Hauser, Sheketha R; Bell, Richard L.; Engleman, Eric A

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol use disorders are pervasive in society and their impact affects quality of life, morbidity and mortality, as well as individual productivity. Alcohol has detrimental effects on an individual’s physiology and nervous system, and is associated with disorders of many organ and endocrine systems impacting an individual’s health, behavior, and ability to interact with others. Youth are particularly affected. Unfortunately, adolescent usage also increases the probability for a progression to dependence. Several areas of research indicate that the deleterious effects of alcohol abuse may be exacerbated by mixing caffeine with alcohol. Some behavioral evidence suggests that caffeine increases alcohol drinking and binge drinking episodes, which in turn can foster the development of alcohol dependence. As a relatively new public health concern, the epidemiological focus has been to establish a need for investigating the effects of caffeinated alcohol. While the trend of co-consuming these substances is growing, knowledge of the central mechanisms associated with caffeinated ethanol has been lacking. Research suggests that caffeine and ethanol can have additive or synergistic pharmacological actions and neuroadaptations, with the adenosine and dopamine systems in particular implicated. However, the limited literature on the central effects of caffeinated ethanol provides an impetus to increase our knowledge of the neuroadaptive effects of this combination and their impact on cognition and behavior. Research from our laboratories indicates that an established rodent animal model of alcoholism can be extended to investigate the acute and chronic effects of caffeinated ethanol. PMID:25419478

  4. Monkey Alcohol Tissue Research Resource: Banking Tissues for Alcohol Research

    PubMed Central

    Daunais, JB; Davenport, AT; Helms, CM; Gonzales, SW; Hemby, SE; Friedman, DP; Farro, JP; Baker, EJ; Grant, KA

    2015-01-01

    Background An estimated 18 million adults in the United States meet the clinical criteria for diagnosis of alcohol abuse or alcoholism, a disorder ranked as the third leading cause of preventable death. In addition to brain pathology, heavy alcohol consumption is co-morbid with damage to major organs including heart, lungs, liver, pancreas and kidneys. Much of what is known about risk for and consequences of heavy consumption derive from rodent or retrospective human studies. The neurobiological effects of chronic intake in rodent studies may not easily translate to humans due to key differences in brain structure and organization between species, including a lack of higher-order cognitive functions, and differences in underlying prefrontal cortical neural structures that characterize the primate brain. Further, rodents do not voluntarily consume large quantities of EtOH and they metabolize it more rapidly than primates. Methods The basis of the Monkey Alcohol Tissue Research Resource (MATRR) is that nonhuman primates (NHPs), specifically monkeys, show a range of drinking excessive amounts of alcohol (>3.0 g/kg or a 12 drink equivalent/day) over long periods of time (12–30 months) with concomitant pathological changes in endocrine, hepatic and central nervous system (CNS) processes. The patterns and range of alcohol intake that monkeys voluntarily consume parallel what is observed in humans with alcohol use disorders and the longitudinal experimental design spans stages of drinking from the ethanol-naïve state to early exposure through chronic abuse. Age- and sex-matched control animals self-administer an isocaloric solution under identical operant procedures. Results The MATRR is a unique post-mortem tissue bank that provides CNS and peripheral tissues, and associated bioinformatics from monkeys that self-administer ethanol using a standardized experimental paradigm to the broader alcohol research community. Conclusions This resource provides a translational platform from which we can better understand the disease processes associated with alcoholism. PMID:24942558

  5. Ghrelin Receptor (GHS-R1A) Antagonism Suppresses Both Alcohol Consumption and the Alcohol Deprivation Effect in Rats following Long-Term Voluntary Alcohol Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksson, Ida; Engel, Jörgen A.; Jerlhag, Elisabet

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is a heterogeneous disorder where several signalling systems play important roles. Recent studies implicate that the gut-brain hormone ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide, is a potential mediator of alcohol related behaviours. Ghrelin increases whereas a ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1A) antagonist decreases alcohol consumption as well as operant self-administration of alcohol in rodents that have consumed alcohol for twelve weeks. In the present study we aimed at investigating the effect of acute and repeated treatment with the GHS-R1A antagonist JMV2959 on alcohol intake in a group of rats following voluntarily alcohol consumption for two, five and eight months. After approximately ten months of voluntary alcohol consumption the expression of the GHS-R1A gene (Ghsr) as well as the degree of methylation of a CpG island found in Ghsr was examined in reward related brain areas. In a separate group of rats, we examined the effect of the JMV2959 on alcohol relapse using the alcohol deprivation paradigm. Acute JMV2959 treatment was found to decrease alcohol intake and the effect was more pronounced after five, compared to two months of alcohol exposure. In addition, repeated JMV2959 treatment decreased alcohol intake without inducing tolerance or rebound increase in alcohol intake after the treatment. The GHS-R1A antagonist prevented the alcohol deprivation effect in rats. There was a significant down-regulation of the Ghsr expression in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in high- compared to low-alcohol consuming rats after approximately ten months of voluntary alcohol consumption. Further analysis revealed a negative correlation between Ghsr expression in the VTA and alcohol intake. No differences in methylation degree were found between high- compared to low-alcohol consuming rats. These findings support previous studies showing that the ghrelin signalling system may constitute a potential target for development of novel treatment strategies for alcohol dependence. PMID:23977009

  6. Incident Type Alcohol Violation

    E-print Network

    Stowell, Michael

    Incident Type Alcohol Violation Alcohol Violation Alcohol Violation DUI/DWAI DUI/DWAI DUI/DWAI DUI/DWAI Alcohol Violation Alcohol Violation Alcohol Violation Harassment Alcohol Violation Alcohol Violation-00002374 10/31/2015 04:05 3300 BASELINE RD Boulder CO 80303 POSSESSING/SELLING OF ALCOHOL BY MINORS Cleared

  7. Hepatic lipase deficiency produces glucose intolerance, inflammation and hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Andrés-Blasco, Irene; Herrero-Cervera, Andrea; Vinué, Ángela; Martínez-Hervás, Sergio; Piqueras, Laura; Sanz, María Jesús; Burks, Deborah Jane; González-Navarro, Herminia

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus constitute a major problem to global health, and their incidence is increasing at an alarming rate. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which affects up to 90% of obese people and nearly 70% of the overweight, is commonly associated with MetS characteristics such as obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. In the present study, we demonstrate that hepatic lipase (HL)-inactivation in mice fed with a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet produced dyslipidemia including hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and increased non-esterified fatty acid levels. These changes were accompanied by glucose intolerance, pancreatic and hepatic inflammation and steatosis. In addition, compared with WT mice, HL(-/-) mice exhibited enhanced circulating MCP1 levels, monocytosis and higher percentage of CD4+Th17+ cells. Consistent with increased inflammation, livers from HL(-/-) mice had augmented activation of the stress SAPK/JNK- and p38-pathways compared with the activation levels of the kinases in livers from WT mice. Analysis of HL(-/-) and WT mice fed regular chow diet showed dyslipidemia and glucose intolerance in HL(-/-) mice without any other changes in inflammation or hepatic steatosis. Altogether, these results indicate that dyslipidemia induced by HL-deficiency in combination with a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet promotes hepatic steatosis and inflammation in mice which are, at least in part, mediated by the activation of the stress SAPK/JNK- and p38-pathways. Future studies are warranted to asses the viability of therapeutic strategies based on the modulation of these kinases to reduce hepatic steatosis associated to lipase dysfunction. PMID:26423094

  8. Detection of core antibody in hepatitis B infection.

    PubMed Central

    Spence, L.; Fauvel, M.

    1976-01-01

    Hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) is found on the decoated Dane particle and on a morphologically similar particle detected mainly in the nucleus of hepatocytes of patients with hepatitis B. HBcAg prepared from the liver of a chimpanzee infected with hepatitis B virus was used to test human serum for core antibody (anti-HBc) by complement fixation. Anti-HBc was found in serum collected from patients with hepatitis B in both the acute and convalescent stages, from carriers of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and from patients with chronic liver or renal disease who were carriers of HBsAg. It was not found in patients with hepatitis A or infectious mononucleosis, or in healthy persons who were not carriers of HBsAg. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:1032591

  9. [Metadoxine in alcohol-related pathology].

    PubMed

    Santoni, S; Corradini, P; Zocchi, M; Camarri, F

    1989-07-31

    Metadoxine is an active drug for treatment of acute and chronic alcohol intoxication, affecting both liver and brain function. The authors reviewed the international pharmacological and clinical literature on the drug which shows the potential usefulness of metadoxine in the treatment of alcohol-induced diseases. The case report concerns the results in 20 chronic alcoholics, admitted to the hospital for acute alcohol intake treated with metadoxine (one 500 mg tablet twice daily). Biohumoral hepatopathy parameters and clinical parameters of neuropsychic behaviour were examined simultaneously. Compared with a control group of patients undergoing traditional therapy (sedative and multi-vitamin drugs), metadoxine showed a significant improvement of the values of gamma-GT, GPT, blood ammonia, blood alcohol and of neuropsychic and behavioural parameters such as agitation, tremor, asterixis, sopor and depression. No side-effects or unfavourable reactions occurred during metadoxine treatment, which confirms the safety of this molecule. PMID:2529084

  10. ATTENUATION OF ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION BY MDMA (ECSTASY) IN TWO STRAINS OF ALCOHOL PREFERRING RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alcohol preference and manifestation of alcoholism are thought by many to be associated with serotonin (5-HT) dysfunction in the brain. hus, experiments were performed to determine the effect of acute and sub-chronic administration (s.c.) of (+/-)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine...

  11. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Georgiou, Georgios K; Harissis, Haralampos; Mitsis, Michalis; Batsis, Haralampos; Fatouros, Michalis

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of “chyle” occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation, appendicitis or visceral ischemia. Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported. Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis. This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis, and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer, since, due to hypertriglyceridemia, serum amylase values appeared within the normal range. Moreover, abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis. Following abdominal lavage and drainage, the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide. PMID:22563182

  12. Ameliorative effects of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF) from Schisandra chinensis on alcoholic liver oxidative injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Qu, Xin-Nan; Han, Ye; Zheng, Si-Wen; Wang, Jia; Wang, Ying-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the protective effect of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF) on acute alcohol-induced liver oxidative injury in mice. 5-HMF, a maillard reaction product, was isolated from the fruits of Schisandra chinensis for animal experiments. Experimental ICR mice were pretreated with different doses of 5-HMF (7.5, 15, and 30 mg/kg) for seven days by gavage feeding. Biochemical markers and enzymatic antioxidants from serum and liver tissue were examined. Our results showed that the activities of ALT (alanine aminotransferase), AST (aspartate transaminase), TC (total cholesterol), TG (triglyceride), L-DLC (low density lipoprotein) in serum and the levels of MDA (malondialdehyde) in liver tissue, decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in the 5-HMF-treated group compared with the alcohol group. On the contrary, enzymatic antioxidants CAT (catalase), GSH-Px (glutathione peroxidase), and GSH SOD (superoxide dismutase) were markedly elevated in liver tissue treated with 5-HMF (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the hepatic levels of pro-inflammatory response marker tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) and interleukin-1? (IL-1?) were significantly suppressed (p < 0.05). Histopathological examination revealed that 5-HMF (30 mg/kg) pretreatment noticeably prevented alcohol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis and fatty degeneration. It is suggested that the hepatoprotective effects exhibited by 5-HMF on alcohol-induced liver oxidative injury may be due to its potent antioxidant properties. PMID:25622257

  13. Ameliorative Effects of 5-Hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF) from Schisandra chinensis on Alcoholic Liver Oxidative Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Qu, Xin-Nan; Han, Ye; Zheng, Si-Wen; Wang, Jia; Wang, Ying-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the protective effect of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF) on acute alcohol-induced liver oxidative injury in mice. 5-HMF, a maillard reaction product, was isolated from the fruits of Schisandra chinensis for animal experiments. Experimental ICR mice were pretreated with different doses of 5-HMF (7.5, 15, and 30 mg/kg) for seven days by gavage feeding. Biochemical markers and enzymatic antioxidants from serum and liver tissue were examined. Our results showed that the activities of ALT (alanine aminotransferase), AST (aspartate transaminase), TC (total cholesterol), TG (triglyceride), L-DLC (low density lipoprotein) in serum and the levels of MDA (malondialdehyde) in liver tissue, decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in the 5-HMF-treated group compared with the alcohol group. On the contrary, enzymatic antioxidants CAT (catalase), GSH-Px (glutathione peroxidase), and GSH SOD (superoxide dismutase) were markedly elevated in liver tissue treated with 5-HMF (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the hepatic levels of pro-inflammatory response marker tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) and interleukin-1? (IL-1?) were significantly suppressed (p < 0.05). Histopathological examination revealed that 5-HMF (30 mg/kg) pretreatment noticeably prevented alcohol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis and fatty degeneration. It is suggested that the hepatoprotective effects exhibited by 5-HMF on alcohol-induced liver oxidative injury may be due to its potent antioxidant properties. PMID:25622257

  14. Alcohol biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Ingall, Glynnis B

    2012-09-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption poses a wide variety of significant immediate and long-term health risks. Ethanol biomarkers have clinical utility for detection, diagnosis, and treatment of alcohol use disorders as well as for screening for fetal alcohol exposure. Indirect biomarkers are those that reflect the toxic effects of ethanol on organs, tissues, or body biochemistry, whereas direct biomarkers are products of ethanol metabolism. Liver enzymes, carbohydrate deficient transferrin and mean corpuscular volume are discussed as examples of indirect markers of alcohol use. Commentary on the direct ethanol markers includes the following: acetaldehyde adducts, ethyl glucuronide, ethyl sulfate, phosphatidylethanol and fatty acids ethyl esters. PMID:22939298

  15. Interaction of paracetamol in chronic alcoholic patients. Importance for odontologists.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Guardia, Javier; Cutando, Antonio

    2008-04-01

    For social, cultural and historical motives alcohol (ethanol or isopenthanol) is considered to be just a beverage rather than a liquor. However, from a pharmatherapeutic point of view alcohol is a depressor of the central nervous system. The effects of alcohol consumption can range from raised loquacity to drunkenness, loss of consciousness and death as a result of insufficient respiration. Probably the most frequent pharmacological interaction is the combination of alcohol with other depressors of the central nervous system which increases the depression even further. Some medicaments which more frequently produce an interaction are antihistamines, analgesics, antidepressants and medicaments for coughs, common cold and influenza. Paracetamol or acetaminophen is an analgesic medicament similar to acetylsalicylic acid lacking anticoagulatory properties and gastric irritation. However, its major drawback is hepatic toxicity as a result of a toxic metabolite produced in the liver by cytochrome P-450, principally cytochrome CYP2E1, which is detoxified under normal conditions by hepatic glutathione. Ethanol is also detoxified by CYP2E1, which is an inducer of ethanol such that chronic ingestion increases the level of this enzyme. When the ingestion of alcohol is stopped, CYP2E1 is greatly increased and only metabolises the paracetamol giving rise to high quantities of hepatotoxic metabolites so that the hepatic glutathione is unable to detoxify resulting in irreversible hepatic damage. Therefore for odontologists it is important that in chronic alcoholic patients the consumption of alcohol should not be suspended on prescribing paracetamol. PMID:18379447

  16. Molecular Mechanisms to Control Post-Transplantation Hepatitis B Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Takaki, Akinobu; Yasunaka, Tetsuya; Yagi, Takahito

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B often progresses to decompensated liver cirrhosis requiring orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Although newer nucleos(t)ide analogues result in >90% viral and hepatitis activity control, severely decompensated patients still need OLT because of drug-resistant virus, acute exacerbation, or hepatocellular carcinoma. Acute hepatitis B is also an indication for OLT, because it can progress to fatal acute liver failure. After OLT, the hepatitis B recurrence rate is >80% without prevention, while >90% of transplant recipients are clinically controlled with combined hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) and nucleos(t)ide analogue treatment. However, long-term HBIG administration is associated with several unresolved issues, including limited availability and extremely high cost; therefore, several treatment protocols with low-dose HBIG, combined with nucleos(t)ide analogues, have been investigated. Another approach is to induce self-producing anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) antibodies using an HBV envelope (HBs) antigen vaccine. Patients who are not HBV carriers, such as those with acutely infected liver failure, are good candidates for vaccination. For chronic HBV carrier liver cirrhosis patients, a successful vaccine response can only be achieved in selected patients, such as those treated with experimentally reduced immunosuppression protocols. The present protocol for post-OLT HBV control and the future prospects of newer treatment strategies are reviewed. PMID:26263973

  17. Autoimmune-like hepatitis during masitinib therapy in an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patient

    PubMed Central

    Salvado, Maria; Vargas, Victor; Vidal, Marta; Simon-Talero, Macarena; Camacho, Jessica; Gamez, Josep

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of acute severe hepatitis resulting from masitinib in a young amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patient. Hepatotoxicity induced by masitinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is usually transient with mild elevation of transaminases, although acute hepatitis has been not reported to date. The hepatitis was resolved after masitinib was discontinued and a combination of prednisone and azathioprine was started. The transaminases returned to baseline normal values five months later. This is the first case in the hepatitis literature associated with masitinib. The autoimmune role of this drug-induced liver injury is discussed. Physicians should be aware of this potential complication. PMID:26420975

  18. Natural Killer Cells in Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rehermann, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are traditionally regarded as first-line effectors of the innate immune response, but they also have a distinct role in chronic infection. Here, we review the role of NK cells against hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV), two agents that cause acute and chronic hepatitis in humans. Interest in NK cells was initially sparked by genetic studies that demonstrated an association between NK cell–related genes and the outcome of HCV infection. Viral hepatitis also provides a model to study the NK cell response to both endogenous and exogenous type I interferon (IFN). Levels of IFN-stimulated genes increase in both acute and chronic HCV infection and pegylated IFN? has been the mainstay of HCV and HBV treatment for decades. In chronic viral hepatitis, NK cells display decreased production of antiviral cytokines. This phenotype is found in both HCV and HBV infection but is induced by different mechanisms. Potent antivirals now provide the opportunity to study the reversibility of the suppressed cytokine production of NK cells in comparison with the antigen-induced defect in IFN? and tumor necrosis factor-? production of virus-specific T cells. This has implications for immune reconstitution in other conditions of chronic inflammation and immune exhaustion, such as human immunodeficiency virus infection and cancer. PMID:26682281

  19. Seasonality of Hepatitis: A Review Update

    PubMed Central

    Fares, Auda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Viral hepatitis is an infection that has been reported to be present throughout the year, but some particular months are associated with higher incidences. The primary objective was to review and report on the current knowledge and evidence that existed on seasonality of different type of acute viral hepatitis worldwide in order to develop recommendations for future research, prevention and control. Materials and Methods: A systematic literature review was performed to identify all the primary reports and studies published during 1970-2013 on acute hepatitis A, B, C and E (AHA, AHB, AHC and AHE) in human subjects by searching PubMed, reference lists of major articles and correspondence with scientific experts. For each report or study included, the following information was extracted (as applicable to study): Location (country and setting), study population (number of cases, patients), seasonal or monthly rate and study duration. Results: There is no definite and consistent seasonal pattern has been observed on AHA; AHB; AHE and AHC, although evidence points towards spring and summer peak for hepatitis A, B, C and E. Multiple source of transmission such as; summer travel to an endemic area, swimming habits of the population in hot months, increase sexual contact, tattoo, poor hygiene and environmental sanitation and food habits (feco-oral transmission of viral hepatitis) probably exists and should be further investigated through analytical and epidemiological. PMID:25810997

  20. Alcohol Alert Measuring the Burden of Alcohol

    E-print Network

    Rau, Don C.

    Alcohol Alert Number 87 Measuring the Burden of Alcohol Alcohol has been part of human culture for all imbibing and the greater society. But measuring the true burden posed by alcohol on a local, national

  1. ACUTE LEUKEMIAS ACUTE MYELOGENOUS

    E-print Network

    Trisomy 8(+8), t(9;22), t(6;9) 90% myeloblasts AML-M2 Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia with Maturation Black B, & Choloacetate Esterase t(8;21) #12;9/16/2013 4 AML-M3 Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia between chromosomes 8 and 21 AML with a translocation or inversion in chromosome 16 AML with changes

  2. Activating Transcription Factor 6 Is Necessary and Sufficient for Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, Deanna L.; Lindtner, Claudia; Vacaru, Ana M.; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Tsedensodnom, Orkhontuya; Vasilkova, Taisa; Buettner, Christoph; Sadler, Kirsten C.

    2014-01-01

    Fatty liver disease (FLD) is characterized by lipid accumulation in hepatocytes and is accompanied by secretory pathway dysfunction, resulting in induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6), one of three main UPR sensors, functions to both promote FLD during acute stress and reduce FLD during chronic stress. There is little mechanistic understanding of how ATF6, or any other UPR factor, regulates hepatic lipid metabolism to cause disease. We addressed this using zebrafish genetics and biochemical analyses and demonstrate that Atf6 is necessary and sufficient for FLD. atf6 transcription is significantly upregulated in the liver of zebrafish with alcoholic FLD and morpholino-mediated atf6 depletion significantly reduced steatosis incidence caused by alcohol. Moreover, overexpression of active, nuclear Atf6 (nAtf6) in hepatocytes caused FLD in the absence of stress. mRNA-Seq and qPCR analyses of livers from five day old nAtf6 transgenic larvae revealed upregulation of genes promoting glyceroneogenesis and fatty acid elongation, including fatty acid synthase (fasn), and nAtf6 overexpression in both zebrafish larvae and human hepatoma cells increased the incorporation of 14C-acetate into lipids. Srebp transcription factors are key regulators of lipogenic enzymes, but reducing Srebp activation by scap morpholino injection neither prevented FLD in nAtf6 transgenics nor synergized with atf6 knockdown to reduce alcohol-induced FLD. In contrast, fasn morpholino injection reduced FLD in nAtf6 transgenic larvae and synergistically interacted with atf6 to reduce alcoholic FLD. Thus, our data demonstrate that Atf6 is required for alcoholic FLD and epistatically interacts with fasn to cause this disease, suggesting triglyceride biogenesis as the mechanism of UPR induced FLD. PMID:24874946

  3. Activating transcription factor 6 is necessary and sufficient for alcoholic fatty liver disease in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Howarth, Deanna L; Lindtner, Claudia; Vacaru, Ana M; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Tsedensodnom, Orkhontuya; Vasilkova, Taisa; Buettner, Christoph; Sadler, Kirsten C

    2014-01-01

    Fatty liver disease (FLD) is characterized by lipid accumulation in hepatocytes and is accompanied by secretory pathway dysfunction, resulting in induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6), one of three main UPR sensors, functions to both promote FLD during acute stress and reduce FLD during chronic stress. There is little mechanistic understanding of how ATF6, or any other UPR factor, regulates hepatic lipid metabolism to cause disease. We addressed this using zebrafish genetics and biochemical analyses and demonstrate that Atf6 is necessary and sufficient for FLD. atf6 transcription is significantly upregulated in the liver of zebrafish with alcoholic FLD and morpholino-mediated atf6 depletion significantly reduced steatosis incidence caused by alcohol. Moreover, overexpression of active, nuclear Atf6 (nAtf6) in hepatocytes caused FLD in the absence of stress. mRNA-Seq and qPCR analyses of livers from five day old nAtf6 transgenic larvae revealed upregulation of genes promoting glyceroneogenesis and fatty acid elongation, including fatty acid synthase (fasn), and nAtf6 overexpression in both zebrafish larvae and human hepatoma cells increased the incorporation of 14C-acetate into lipids. Srebp transcription factors are key regulators of lipogenic enzymes, but reducing Srebp activation by scap morpholino injection neither prevented FLD in nAtf6 transgenics nor synergized with atf6 knockdown to reduce alcohol-induced FLD. In contrast, fasn morpholino injection reduced FLD in nAtf6 transgenic larvae and synergistically interacted with atf6 to reduce alcoholic FLD. Thus, our data demonstrate that Atf6 is required for alcoholic FLD and epistatically interacts with fasn to cause this disease, suggesting triglyceride biogenesis as the mechanism of UPR induced FLD. PMID:24874946

  4. Innate immune recognition of hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a hepatotropic DNA virus and its infection results in acute or chronic hepatitis. It is reported that the host innate immune system contributes to viral control and liver pathology, while whether and how HBV can trigger the components of innate immunity remains controversial. In recent years, the data accumulated from HBV-infected patients, cellular and animal models have challenged the concept of a stealth virus for HBV infection. This editorial focuses on the current findings about the innate immune recognition to HBV. Such evaluation could help us to understand HBV immunopathogenesis and develop novel immune therapeutic strategies to combat HBV infection. PMID:26413220

  5. Alcohol Energy Drinks

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home / About Addiction / Alcohol / Alcohol Energy Drinks Alcohol Energy Drinks Read 6985 times font size decrease font size increase font size Print Email Alcohol energy drinks (AEDs) or Caffeinated alcoholic beverages (CABs) are ...

  6. Neuralgic amyotrophy and hepatitis E virus infection

    PubMed Central

    van Eijk, Jeroen J.J.; Madden, Richie G.; van der Eijk, Annemiek A.; Hunter, Jeremy G.; Reimerink, Johan H.J.; Bendall, Richard P.; Pas, Suzan D.; Ellis, Vic; van Alfen, Nens; Beynon, Laura; Southwell, Lucy; McLean, Brendan; Jacobs, Bart C.; van Engelen, Baziel G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is an association between an acute preceding hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection and neuralgic amyotrophy (NA), and if so, whether patients with HEV-related NA differ from patients without an associated HEV infection. Methods: HEV testing was conducted in a retrospective cohort of 28 Cornish patients with NA (2011–2013) and a prospective cohort of 38 consecutive Dutch patients with NA (2004–2007). Acute-phase serum samples were analyzed for the presence of anti-HEV immunoglobulin (Ig) M and IgG and HEV RNA (quantitative real-time PCR). Results: Five cases (10.6%) of acute hepatitis E infection were identified in a total group of 47 patients with NA of whom serum samples were available. In 4 patients, HEV RNA was detected in serum samples taken at presentation. All patients with HEV-associated NA had clinical and electrophysiologic evidence of bilateral brachial plexus involvement. Anti-HEV IgM positivity was not related to age, sex, disease severity, disease course, or outcome. Conclusions: Acute hepatitis E is found in 10% of patients with NA from the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. Further research is required to investigate the role of HEV in NA in other geographical locations and to determine pathophysiologic mechanisms. PMID:24401685

  7. Alcoholic liver disease: Clinical and translational research.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Manuela G; Malnick, Stephen; Maor, Yaakov; Nanau, Radu M; Melzer, Ehud; Ferenci, Peter; Seitz, Helmut K; Mueller, Sebastian; Mell, Haim; Samuel, Didier; Cohen, Lawrence B; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Osna, Natalia A; Ganesan, Murali; Thompson, Kyle J; McKillop, Iain H; Bautista, Abraham; Bataller, Ramon; French, Samuel W

    2015-12-01

    The present review spans a broad spectrum of topics dealing with alcoholic liver disease (ALD), including clinical research, translational research, pathogenesis and therapies. A special accent is placed on alcohol misuse, as alcohol is a legally commercialized and taxable product. Drinking alcohol, particularly from a young age, is a major health problem. Alcoholism is known to contribute to morbidity and mortality. A systematic literature search was performed in order to obtain updated data (2008-2015). The review is focused on genetic polymorphisms of alcohol metabolizing enzymes and the role of cytochrome p450 2E1 and iron in ALD. Alcohol-mediated hepatocarcinogenesis is also discussed in the presence or absence of co-morbidities such as viral hepatitis C as well as therapeutic the role of innate immunity in ALD-HCV. Moreover, emphasis was placed on alcohol and drug interactions, as well as liver transplantation for end-stage ALD. Finally, the time came to eradicate alcohol-induced liver and intestinal damage by using betaine. PMID:26342547

  8. Role of mitochondria in alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Nassir, Fatiha; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is the leading cause of liver related morbidity and mortality. Chronic or binge alcohol drinking causes hepatic steatosis which can develop to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and ultimately hepatocellular carcinoma. The pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is poorly characterized, however several recent studies point to a major role of mitochondria in this process. Mitochondria play a crucial role in cellular energy metabolism and in reactive species formation. Alcohol treatment causes mitochondrial DNA damage, lipid accumulation and oxidative stress. Studies in both animal models and in humans showed that alcohol administration causes changes in the mitochondrial morphology and function suggesting a role of these changes in the pathogenesis of ALD. We review recent findings on mechanisms by which alcohol negatively impacts mitochondrial biogenesis and function and we will discuss the specific intracellular pathways affected by alcohol consumption. Interestingly, recent findings indicate that a large number of mitochondrial proteins are acetylated and that mitochondrial proteins acetylation and sirtuins are modulated by alcohol. Understanding the mechanisms behind alcohol mediated impaired mitochondrial biogenesis and function may help identify potential therapeutic targets for treating ALD in humans. PMID:24605012

  9. [Clinical and biological specificities of female alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Limosin, F

    2002-01-01

    Even though the number of alcohol-dependent women is only about 1/3 of the number of alcoholic men, the alcoholism in women, by its clinical features and its course, is the source of therapeutic and economic stakes, particularly in young women among whom an increase of alcohol consumption related problems is reported. Another specificity of the female alcoholism is the lack of care seeking, whereas women have tendency globally to solicit more often care structures than men. Women represent only 1/4 of the overall treated alcoholic patients. The main explanation for this phenomenon is the pejorative social and moral connotation of the female alcoholism, with frequent feelings of shame and deep guilt, that also account for the frequency of hidden and lonely alcohol intakes. The female alcoholism is essentially characterized by an increased vulnerability to the toxic effects of the alcohol, whereas the pathological consumption starts later and with smaller daily amounts. Most studies have revealed a higher vulnerability in women to somatic complications directly attributable to the alcohol organs toxicity, such as hepatic cirrhosis and cardiovascular complications (high blood pressure, non obstructive cardiomyopathy). The reported brain morphological abnormalities could also occur more precociously in alcoholic women than in men. A decreased corpus callosum size among alcoholic women, but not in alcoholic men, was thus found in a recent study, compared with healthy controls. Among the different hypothesis proposed to explain this increased alcohol toxicity, the most incriminated is higher alcohol blood rates for the same ingested amount, mainly of the fact of a lower size with a weaker proportion of the bodily total water, but also of weaker concentrations of gastro-intestinal tract ADH, or of a longer metabolism during some menstrual phases. Indeed, some experimental studies on animal showed that the alcohol toxic effects may occur only from a threshold of alcohol blood rate. More recent studies suggest that the explanation to keep is more related to the lower gastric metabolism in women (lower ADH activity), than the difference of gastric volume or alcohol hepatic oxidation. Regarding to comorbidity, in the Epidemiologic Catchment Area survey, 65% of women, versus 44% of men, with abuse and/or dependence to alcohol had at least one another life-time psychiatric disorder (mainly depression and anxiety disorders), compared to 36% of the overall women of the studied sample. On the other hand, the alcohol dependence is, more often than in men, secondary to other psychiatric disorders, essentially depressive episodes, but less associated to antisocial behaviours. Among the different etiopathogenic factors involved in the alcohol dependence occurrence, genetic factors seem to have a determinant impact. According to the previous family, separation/adoption and twins studies performed, genetic factors could explain 50 to 60% of the alcoholism vulnerability in both men and women. In this context, and whereas we assist to the development of etiopathogenic models with new therapeutic perspectives in alcohol dependence, it seems necessary not to neglect female alcoholism specificities. PMID:12506262

  10. Alcohol conversion

    DOEpatents

    Wachs, Israel E. (Bridgewater, NJ); Cai, Yeping (Louisville, KY)

    2002-01-01

    Preparing an aldehyde from an alcohol by contacting the alcohol in the presence of oxygen with a catalyst prepared by contacting an intimate mixture containing metal oxide support particles and particles of a catalytically active metal oxide from Groups VA, VIA, or VIIA, with a gaseous stream containing an alcohol to cause metal oxide from the discrete catalytically active metal oxide particles to migrate to the metal oxide support particles and to form a monolayer of catalytically active metal oxide on said metal oxide support particles.

  11. Docosahexaenoic acid prevents trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in mice by altering expression of hepatic genes regulating fatty acid synthesis and oxidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Concomitant supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 n-3; DHA) prevented t10, c12- conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and insulin resistance. Effective dose of DHA and mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Methods: We examined abi...

  12. Pharmacological Inhibition of the Chemokine CXCL16 Diminishes Liver Macrophage Infiltration and Steatohepatitis in Chronic Hepatic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wehr, Alexander; Baeck, Christer; Ulmer, Florian; Gassler, Nikolaus; Hittatiya, Kanishka; Luedde, Tom; Neumann, Ulf Peter; Trautwein, Christian; Tacke, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries, resulting in steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis and eventually cirrhosis. Modulating inflammatory mediators such as chemokines may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for NAFLD. We recently demonstrated that the chemokine receptor CXCR6 promotes hepatic NKT cell accumulation, thereby controlling inflammation in experimental NAFLD. In this study, we first investigated human biopsies (n?=?20), confirming that accumulation of inflammatory cells such as macrophages is a hallmark of progressive NAFLD. Moreover, CXCR6 gene expression correlated with the inflammatory activity (ALT levels) in human NAFLD. We then tested the hypothesis that pharmacological inhibition of CXCL16 might hold therapeutic potential in NAFLD, using mouse models of acute carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)- and chronic methionine-choline-deficient (MCD) diet-induced hepatic injury. Neutralizing CXCL16 by i.p. injection of anti-CXCL16 antibody inhibited the early intrahepatic NKT cell accumulation upon acute toxic injury in vivo. Weekly therapeutic anti-CXCL16 administrations during the last 3 weeks of 6 weeks MCD diet significantly decreased the infiltration of inflammatory macrophages into the liver and intrahepatic levels of inflammatory cytokines like TNF or MCP-1. Importantly, anti-CXCL16 treatment significantly reduced fatty liver degeneration upon MCD diet, as assessed by hepatic triglyceride levels, histological steatosis scoring and quantification of lipid droplets. Moreover, injured hepatocytes up-regulated CXCL16 expression, indicating that scavenging functions of CXCL16 might be additionally involved in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Targeting CXCL16 might therefore represent a promising novel therapeutic approach for liver inflammation and steatohepatitis. PMID:25372401

  13. Alcohol Facts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... m amazed I didn't see it coming." Peter is recovering from an alcohol addiction. The addiction grew slowly over many years. Read Peter's story Treatment & Recovery Information Treatment and Recovery Does ...

  14. Alcohol withdrawal

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Seeing or feeling things that aren't there (hallucinations) Seizures Severe confusion ... alcohol withdrawal. You will be watched closely for hallucinations and other signs of delirium tremens. Treatment may ...

  15. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePLUS

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  16. [Extra-hepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Causse, X; Germanaud, J; Legoux, A; Legoux, J L

    1995-01-15

    A variety of prodromal symptoms of viral hepatitis (urticaria, fever, arthralgias, headache, polyradiculonevritis) are attributed to A, B, C, D or E hepatitis only when jaundice appears, and because they disappear with it. Spectacular extrahepatic symptoms (polyarteritis nodosa, cryoglobulinemia, glomerulonephritis, marrow aplasia...) may be associated with B or C hepatitis without any liver symptom. Some of the extrahepatic symptoms observed during chronic hepatitis C therapy with interferon (thyroid dysfunctions, cutaneo-mucous lichen) may be related to the immunomodulatory effects of interferon rather than to virus C itself. PMID:7725020

  17. Combined glucocorticoid and antiviral therapy of hepatitis B virus-related liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Bockmann, Jan-Hendrik; Dandri, Maura; Lüth, Stefan; Pannicke, Nadine; Lohse, Ansgar W

    2015-01-01

    Acute hepatic failure due to hepatitis B virus (HBV) can occur both during primary infection as well as after reactivation of chronic infection. Guidelines recommend considering antiviral therapy in both situations, although evidence supporting this recommendation is weak. Since HBV is not directly cytopathic, the mechanism leading to fulminant hepatitis B is thought to be primarily immune-mediated. Therefore, immunosuppression combined with antiviral therapy might be a preferred therapeutic intervention in acute liver failure in hepatitis B. Here we report our favourable experience in three hepatitis B patients with fulminant hepatic failure who were treated by combining high-dose steroid therapy with standard antiviral treatment, which resulted in a rapid improvement of clinical and liver parameters. PMID:25717260

  18. Incident Type Alcohol Violation

    E-print Network

    Stowell, Michael

    Incident Type Alcohol Violation Alcohol Violation Alcohol Violation Alcohol Violation Other Offense Traffic Offense Traffic Offense Criminal Trespass Criminal Trespass Other Offense Theft Theft Alcohol Violation Alcohol Violation Alcohol Violation Date/Time Occured 2015-00002337 10/30/2015 22:05 1955 COLORADO

  19. Alcohol-Dependent Liver Cell Necrosis in vitro: A New Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanne, Francis A. X.; Zucker, Amy H.; Farber, John L.; Rubin, Emanuel

    1981-04-01

    In alcoholic liver injury, necrosis is involved in the progression from benign fatty liver to alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis. However, there is no practical model of alcohol-dependent liver cell necrosis. The calcium-dependent killing of cultured rat hepatocytes by two different membrane-active hepatotoxins, galactosamine and phalloidin, is potentiated by ethyl alcohol. This indicates that some general physical effect of alcohol on cellular membranes renders cells susceptible to otherwise nonlethal injuries. The in vitro model described in this report may thus be used to search for a general mechanism underlying alcohol-related tissue injury.

  20. The chimpanzee model for hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wieland, Stefan F

    2015-06-01

    Even before the discovery of hepatitis B virus (HBV), it was known that chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) are susceptible to human hepatitis viruses. The chimpanzee is the only primate animal model for HBV infections. Much like HBV-infected human patients, chimpanzees can develop acute and chronic HBV infections and consequent hepatitis. Chimpanzees also develop a cellular immune response similar to that observed in humans. For these reasons, the chimpanzee has proven to be an invaluable model for investigations on HBV-driven disease pathogenesis and also the testing of novel antiviral therapies and prophylactic approaches. PMID:26033082

  1. Hepatitis B FAQs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home Statistics & Surveillance Populations & Settings Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home Statistics & Surveillance Populations & Settings Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource ...

  2. Hepatitis A FAQs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home Statistics & Surveillance Populations & Settings Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home Statistics & Surveillance Populations & Settings Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource ...

  3. Hepatitis C (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Hepatitis C is a virus-caused liver inflammation which may cause jaundice, fever and cirrhosis. Persons who are most at risk for contracting and spreading hepatitis C are those who share needles for injecting drugs ...

  4. Hepatitis B Test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... IgM; anti-HBe; Hepatitis B e Antibody; HBV DNA Formal name: Hepatitis B Virus Testing Related tests: ... produced by the virus, and others detect viral DNA . The main uses for HBV tests include: To ...

  5. Hepatitis B virus infection in immigrant populations

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Nicola; Alessio, Loredana; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Macera, Margherita; Sagnelli, Caterina; Zampino, Rosa; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the most common cause of hepatitis worldwide, with nearly 350 million people chronically infected and 600000 deaths per year due to acute liver failure occurring during acute hepatitis or, more frequently, in HBV-related liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. Ongoing immigration from countries with a high HBV endemicity to those with a low HBV endemicity warrants particular attention to prevent the spread of HBV infection to the native population. This review article analyzes the epidemiology and virological and clinical characteristics of HBV infection in immigrant populations and in their host countries, and suggests prophylactic measures to prevent the spread of this infection. Among the immigrants from different geographical areas, those from South East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa show the highest prevalences of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carriers, in accordance with the high endemicity of the countries of origin. The molecular characteristics of HBV infection in immigrants reflect those of the geographical areas of origin: HBV genotype A and D predominate in immigrants from Eastern Europe, B and C in those from Asia and genotype E in those from Africa. The literature data on the clinical course and treatment of HBsAg-positive immigrants are scanty. The management of HBV infection in immigrant populations is difficult and requires expert personnel and dedicated structures for their assistance. The social services, voluntary operators and cultural mediators are essential to achieve optimized psychological and clinical intervention.

  6. Cholestatic hepatitis due to Ecballium elaterium ingestion.

    PubMed

    Bizid, Sondès; Sabbah, Mériam; Msakni, Issam; Slimene, Baha Ben; Mohamed, Ghanem; Bouali, Riadh; Abdallah, Hatem Ben; Abdelli, Nabil

    2015-10-01

    Ecballium elaterium is an herbaceous plant belonging to the Cucurbitaceae family. This plant is fairly common in the Mediterranean regions. It is frequently consumed in infusion, mixture of fruit or even in aerosol in cases of fever or flu. This plant is known for its respiratory and ocular toxicity. Hepatotoxicity has never been described in the literature. We report a case of acute cholestatic hepatitis due to Ecballium elaterium in a 39 years old patient, with no past medical history. PMID:25573494

  7. Herbal SGR Formula Prevents Acute Ethanol-Induced Liver Steatosis via Inhibition of Lipogenesis and Enhancement Fatty Acid Oxidation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ping; Li, Xiang; Kong, De-song; Li, Huan-zhou; Niu, Cong-cong; Pan, Su-hua

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that herbal SGR formula partially attenuates ethanol-induced fatty liver, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, mice were pretreated with SGR (100 and 200?mg/kg/d?bw) for 30?d before being exposed to ethanol (4.8?g/kg?bw). The biochemical indices and histopathological changes were examined to evaluate the protective effects and to explore potential mechanisms by investigating the adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor-? (PPAR-?), sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and so forth. Results showed that SGR pretreatment markedly inhibited acute ethanol-induced liver steatosis, significantly reduced serum and hepatic triglyceride (TG) level, and improved classic histopathological changes. SGR suppressed the protein expression of hepatic SREBP-1c and TNF-? and increased adiponectin, PPAR-?, and AMPK phosphorylation in the liver. Meanwhile, acute toxicity tests showed that no death or toxic side effects within 14 days were observed upon oral administration of the extracts at a dose of 16?g/kg body wt. These results demonstrate that SGR could protect against acute alcohol-induced liver steatosis without any toxic side effects. Therefore, our studies provide novel molecular insights into the hepatoprotective effect of SGR formula, which may be exploited as a therapeutic agent for ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis. PMID:26101535

  8. Fructose: It’s “Alcohol Without the Buzz”123

    PubMed Central

    Lustig, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    What do the Atkins Diet and the traditional Japanese diet have in common? The Atkins Diet is low in carbohydrate and usually high in fat; the Japanese diet is high in carbohydrate and usually low in fat. Yet both work to promote weight loss. One commonality of both diets is that they both eliminate the monosaccharide fructose. Sucrose (table sugar) and its synthetic sister high fructose corn syrup consist of 2 molecules, glucose and fructose. Glucose is the molecule that when polymerized forms starch, which has a high glycemic index, generates an insulin response, and is not particularly sweet. Fructose is found in fruit, does not generate an insulin response, and is very sweet. Fructose consumption has increased worldwide, paralleling the obesity and chronic metabolic disease pandemic. Sugar (i.e., fructose-containing mixtures) has been vilified by nutritionists for ages as a source of “empty calories,” no different from any other empty calorie. However, fructose is unlike glucose. In the hypercaloric glycogen-replete state, intermediary metabolites from fructose metabolism overwhelm hepatic mitochondrial capacity, which promotes de novo lipogenesis and leads to hepatic insulin resistance, which drives chronic metabolic disease. Fructose also promotes reactive oxygen species formation, which leads to cellular dysfunction and aging, and promotes changes in the brain’s reward system, which drives excessive consumption. Thus, fructose can exert detrimental health effects beyond its calories and in ways that mimic those of ethanol, its metabolic cousin. Indeed, the only distinction is that because fructose is not metabolized in the central nervous system, it does not exert the acute neuronal depression experienced by those imbibing ethanol. These metabolic and hedonic analogies argue that fructose should be thought of as “alcohol without the buzz.” PMID:23493539

  9. Hepatic abscesses after adhesiolysis

    PubMed Central

    Antonsen, J.; Balachandran, R.; Helgstrand, F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hematogenous spread of bacteria from the bowel due to bacterial translocation has been postulated in animal and trauma studies. This case presents a patient with possible hematogenous bacterial spreading after acute laparotomy. Case presentation A 57-year old woman was admitted with abdominal pain. A computed tomography showed mechanical small bowel obstruction. A laparotomy was performed showing no contamination, and no bowel resection was performed. The patient was not given any antibiotics during this time. The patient was re-admitted 24 h after discharge with fever, elevated white count and abdominal pain. A computed tomography showed newly developed intrahepatic abscesses. These were treated with antibiotics, and the patient was discharged with follow-up ultrasound showing diminished abscesses. Discussion This case discusses the possible pathophysiology behind the development of intrahepatic abscesses after small bowel obstruction. Conclusion Febrilia and pain in upper right quadrant of the abdomen days after a simple operation for bowel obstruction could be caused by translocation of intestinal bacteria and subsequent formation of hepatic abscesses. PMID:26410805

  10. Hepatitis Infection in the Treatment of Opioid Dependence and Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Kresina, Thomas F; Sylvestre, Diana; Seeff, Leonard; Litwin, Alain H; Hoffman, Kenneth; Lubran, Robert; Clark, H Westley

    2008-01-01

    Many new and existing cases of viral hepatitis infections are related to injection drug use. Transmission of these infections can result directly from the use of injection equipment that is contaminated with blood containing the hepatitis B or C virus or through sexual contact with an infected individual. In the latter case, drug use can indirectly contribute to hepatitis transmission through the dis-inhibited at-risk behavior, that is, unprotected sex with an infected partner. Individuals who inject drugs are at-risk for infection from different hepatitis viruses, hepatitis A, B, or C. Those with chronic hepatitis B virus infection also face additional risk should they become co-infected with hepatitis D virus. Protection from the transmission of hepatitis viruses A and B is best achieved by vaccination. For those with a history of or who currently inject drugs, the medical management of viral hepatitis infection comprising screening, testing, counseling and providing care and treatment is evolving. Components of the medical management of hepatitis infection, for persons considering, initiating, or receiving pharmacologic therapy for opioid addiction include: testing for hepatitis B and C infections; education and counseling regarding at-risk behavior and hepatitis transmission, acute and chronic hepatitis infection, liver disease and its care and treatment; vaccination against hepatitis A and B infection; and integrative primary care as part of the comprehensive treatment approach for recovery from opioid abuse and dependence. In addition, participation in a peer support group as part of integrated medical care enhances treatment outcomes. Liver disease is highly prevalent in patient populations seeking recovery from opioid addiction or who are currently receiving pharmacotherapy for opioid addiction. Pharmacotherapy for opioid addiction is not a contraindication to evaluation, care, or treatment of liver disease due to hepatitis virus infection. Successful pharmacotherapy for opioid addiction stabilizes patients and improves patient compliance to care and treatment regimens as well as promotes good patient outcomes. Implementation and integration of effective hepatitis prevention programs, care programs, and treatment regimens in concert with the pharmacological therapy of opioid addiction can reduce the public health burdens of hepatitis and injection drug use. PMID:25977607

  11. Recurrent hepatitis C after liver transplantation: clinical and therapeutical issues.

    PubMed

    Samuel, D; Feray, C

    2000-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) reinfection after liver transplantation is almost constant, assessed by the persistence of HCV RNA in 90% of cases. Acute hepatitis appeared in 75% of patients at a median of 4 months' post-transplantation. The 5-year actuarial rate of acute and chronic hepatitis on the graft is 75% and 60%, respectively. The rate of HCV cirrhosis on the graft is variable from 8 to 25% at 5 years. After transplantation, HCV viraemia is dramatically increased and correlates with the occurrence of acute hepatitis on the graft. Intrahepatic levels of HCV are high at the time of acute hepatitis, and decrease with constitution of chronic graft hepatitis lesions, implying an immunological response to the viral infection. A relationship between genotype 1b and the prevalence of HCV hepatitis on the graft has been suggested in European but not American series. The influence of the age of the recipient, quasispecies, viral compartmentalization, immunosuppressive treatment, and of HLA matching is being evaluated. The 5-year patient survival is around 65-80%. However, the occurrence of cirrhosis with a risk of graft failure may decrease the 10 and 15-year patient survival. Attempts to give prophylactic post-transplant antiviral treatment are under evaluation. Antiviral treatment of post-transplant graft lesions with combination therapy interferon-ribavirin gave promising results but indications and duration of treatment should be evaluated. In conclusion, HCV reinfection is frequent, but medium-term survival is good. However, the long-term graft and patient survival remains unknown, and efficient prevention and treatment of HCV graft is mandatory. PMID:10760038

  12. Women and Alcohol

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Into Health ® National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism www.niaaa.nih.gov • 301.443.3860 Selected ... Into Health ® National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism www.niaaa.nih.gov • 301.443.3860 Breast ...

  13. Children of Alcoholics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... problems than children whose parents are not alcoholics. Alcoholism runs in families, and children of alcoholics are ... situation. Although the child tries to keep the alcoholism a secret, teachers, relatives, other adults, or friends ...

  14. Nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis with short-term alcohol intoxication - a case report.

    PubMed

    Papadatos, Stamatis S; Deligiannis, Georgios; Bazoukis, George; Michelongona, Paschalia; Spiliopoulou, Aikaterini; Mylonas, Stefanos; Zissis, Christos

    2015-10-01

    Alcohol-induced rhabdomyolysis is a potentially life-threatening condition due to the probability of progression to acute renal injury. Patients admitted to emergency department with acute alcohol intoxication should always undergo blood and urine tests for early recognition and treatment of rhabdomyolysis. PMID:26509002

  15. Nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis with short-term alcohol intoxication – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Papadatos, Stamatis S; Deligiannis, Georgios; Bazoukis, George; Michelongona, Paschalia; Spiliopoulou, Aikaterini; Mylonas, Stefanos; Zissis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Alcohol-induced rhabdomyolysis is a potentially life-threatening condition due to the probability of progression to acute renal injury. Patients admitted to emergency department with acute alcohol intoxication should always undergo blood and urine tests for early recognition and treatment of rhabdomyolysis. PMID:26509002

  16. Cellular and mitochondrial effects of alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Manzo-Avalos, Salvador; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo

    2010-12-01

    Alcohol dependence is correlated with a wide spectrum of medical, psychological, behavioral, and social problems. Acute alcohol abuse causes damage to and functional impairment of several organs affecting protein, carbohydrate, and fat metabolism. Mitochondria participate with the conversion of acetaldehyde into acetate and the generation of increased amounts of NADH. Prenatal exposure to ethanol during fetal development induces a wide spectrum of adverse effects in offspring, such as neurologic abnormalities and pre- and post-natal growth retardation. Antioxidant effects have been described due to that alcoholic beverages contain different compounds, such as polyphenols as well as resveratrol. This review analyzes diverse topics on the alcohol consumption effects in several human organs and demonstrates the direct participation of mitochondria as potential target of compounds that can be used to prevent therapies for alcohol abusers. PMID:21318009

  17. Neuroplasticity and Predictors of Alcohol Recovery.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dongju; Sinha, Rajita

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcohol-related neuroadaptations in key neural circuits of emotional and cognitive control play a critical role in the development of, and recovery from, alcoholism. Converging evidence in the neurobiological literature indicates that neuroplastic changes in the prefrontal-striatal-limbic circuit, which governs emotion regulation and decisionmaking and controls physiological responses in the autonomic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis system, contribute to chronic alcoholism and also are significant predictors of relapse and recovery. This paper reviews recent evidence on the neuroplasticity associated with alcoholism in humans, including acute and chronic effects, and how these neurobiological adaptations contribute to alcohol recovery, along with the discussion of relevant clinical implications and future research directions. PMID:26259094

  18. Alcohol Dependence (Alcoholism) FACT SHEET -Alcohol Dependence (Alcoholism) National Institutes of Health

    E-print Network

    Rau, Don C.

    Alcohol Dependence (Alcoholism) FACT SHEET - Alcohol Dependence (Alcoholism) National Institutes of alcohol dependence, or the nervous system changes that occur as a result of prolonged heavy drinking. Alcohol dependence was thought to be a disease of middle age. Disulfiram (Antabuse®) was the only

  19. Metabolism of silage alcohols in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, N B; Storm, A; Raun, B M L; Røjen, B A; Harmon, D L

    2007-03-01

    Dairy cows fed silage are subjected to various alcohols and low molecular weight esters. Four lactating Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulas and permanent indwelling catheters in the hepatic portal vein, hepatic vein, mesenteric vein, and mesenteric artery were used to study the absorption of alcohols into portal blood and the metabolism of feed alcohols in the rumen and splanchnic tissues. The cows were allocated to 4 experimental treatments in a Latin square design. All treatments were formulated as total mixed rations with the same overall nutrient composition, differing by the source of corn silage. Treatments were a control silage and 3 qualities of problematic corn silage (silage with Fusarium toxin, Penicillium-infected silage, and silage with a high propanol content). Feeding was followed by a decreasing ruminal pH, as well as decreasing molar proportions of ruminal acetate and isobutyrate. The ruminal concentrations of total VFA, ethanol, propanol, 2-butanol, ethyl acetate, propyl acetate, glucose, and L-lactate, and molar proportions of propionate, butyrate, isovalerate, valerate, and caproate increased after feeding. Treatments affected ruminal concentrations of propanol, propyl acetate, and butyrate and a strong correlation was observed between ruminal propyl acetate and the molar proportion of butyrate (r = -0.79). Arterial concentrations of ethanol, propanol, propanal, acetone (sum of acetone and acetoacetate), 3-hydroxybutyrate, L-lactate, glutamate, and glutamine increased, and the arterial concentration of glucose decreased after feeding, but no effects of treatment were observed for arterial variables. The postprandial increase in arterial ethanol was maintained for 5 h. The net portal release of ethanol tended to decrease with the treatment with the lowest ethanol content, and the net splanchnic release of ethanol increased after feeding, but overall, the net splanchnic flux of ethanol was not different from zero, in agreement with the liver being the major organ for alcohol metabolism. The net portal flux and net hepatic flux of propanol were affected by treatment. All dietary ethanol and propanol were accounted for by absorption of the respective alcohol into the portal blood. The hepatic extraction ratios of ethanol and propanol were, on average, 63 to 66%, and no indications of saturation of hepatic alcohol metabolism were observed at any time. We concluded that typical amounts of alcohols in corn silage do not interfere with splanchnic metabolism of any of the measured variables and do not saturate hepatic pathways for alcohol metabolism. However, even low concentrations of alcohols in feed might affect ruminal metabolism and are followed by hours of elevated peripheral blood concentrations of alcohols. PMID:17297111

  20. Allyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Allyl alcohol ; CASRN 107 - 18 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  1. Propargyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Propargyl alcohol ; CASRN 107 - 19 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  2. Isobutyl alcohol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Isobutyl alcohol ; CASRN 78 - 83 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  3. Use of Alcohol Before Suicide in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Mark S.; Huguet, Nathalie; McFarland, Bentson H.; Caetano, Raul; Conner, Kenneth R.; Giesbrecht, Norman; Nolte, Kurt B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Few studies have compared acute use of alcohol in suicide decedents with that in a nonsuicide group. This study provides the first national analysis of acute use of alcohol prior to suicide compared with an estimate of acute use of alcohol in a living sample. Methods Pooled 2003-2011 National Violent Death Reporting System data were used to estimate the prevalence of postmortem blood alcohol content positivity (BAC >0.0 g/dl) and intoxication (BAC ? 0.08 g/dl). Population estimates of comparable use of alcohol (within the past 48 hours) were based on the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Results Compared to the living sample, male and female suicide decedents showed, respectively, a 1.83- (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.73-1.93) and 2.40-fold (95% CI, 2.24-2.57) increased risk of alcohol ingestion prior to their death after age, race/ethnicity, and chronic alcohol problems were controlled. Furthermore, male and female decedents exhibited, respectively, a 6.18- (95% CI, 5.57-6.86) and a 10.04-fold (95% CI, 8.67-11.64) increased risk of being intoxicated prior to their death after confounders were considered. Conclusions The findings underscore the crucial need to include among the essential components of suicide prevention policies programs that minimize use of alcohol, particularly drinking to intoxication. PMID:24953567

  4. Effects of Alcohol Intoxication on Anger Experience and Expression among Partner Assaultive Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckhardt, Christopher I.

    2007-01-01

    The author investigated the acute effects of alcohol intoxication on anger experience and expression among 46 maritally violent (MV) and 56 maritally nonviolent (NV) men randomly assigned to receive alcohol, placebo, or no alcohol. Participants completed an anger-arousing articulated thoughts in simulated situations (ATSS) paradigm and imagined…

  5. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Acute Pancreatitis > Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy test Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is ... of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for ...

  6. Alcohol Induced Alterations to the Human Fecal VOC Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Robin D.; Dailey, Allyson; Zaidi, Fatima; Navarro, Karl; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip A.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that excessive alcohol consumption impacts the intestinal microbiota composition, causing disruption of homeostasis (dysbiosis). However, this observed change is not indicative of the dysbiotic intestinal microbiota function that could result in the production of injurious and toxic products. Thus, knowledge of the effects of alcohol on the intestinal microbiota function and their metabolites is warranted, in order to better understand the role of the intestinal microbiota in alcohol associated organ failure. Here, we report the results of a differential metabolomic analysis comparing volatile organic compounds (VOC) detected in the stool of alcoholics and non-alcoholic healthy controls. We performed the analysis with fecal samples collected after passage as well as with samples collected directly from the sigmoid lumen. Regardless of the approach to fecal collection, we found a stool VOC metabolomic signature in alcoholics that is different from healthy controls. The most notable metabolite alterations in the alcoholic samples include: (1) an elevation in the oxidative stress biomarker tetradecane; (2) a decrease in five fatty alcohols with anti-oxidant property; (3) a decrease in the short chain fatty acids propionate and isobutyrate, important in maintaining intestinal epithelial cell health and barrier integrity; (4) a decrease in alcohol consumption natural suppressant caryophyllene; (5) a decrease in natural product and hepatic steatosis attenuator camphene; and (6) decreased dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide, microbial products of decomposition. Our results showed that intestinal microbiota function is altered in alcoholics which might promote alcohol associated pathologies. PMID:25751150

  7. Outbreak of carbon tetrachloride poisoning in a color printing factory related to the use of isopropyl alcohol and an air conditioning system in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Deng, J F; Wang, J D; Shih, T S; Lan, F L

    1987-01-01

    Three workers from a color printing factory were admitted to community hospitals in 1985 with manifestations of acute hepatitis. One of the three had superimposed acute renal failure and pulmonary edema. An investigation was subsequently conducted at the plant to determine the etiology of the outbreak and the prevalence of liver disease among the remaining workers. Comprehensive medical evaluations were conducted, which included physical examinations, liver function tests, and serological screening for hepatitis. Seventeen of 25 workers from the plant had abnormal liver function tests 10 days after the outbreak, and a significant association was found between the presence of abnormal liver function tests and a history of recently having worked inside any of three rooms in which an interconnecting air conditioning system had been installed to cool the printing machines. After further investigation, it was determined that the incident occurred following inadvertent use of carbon tetrachloride to clean a pump in the printing machine. A simulation of the pump cleaning operation revealed ambient air levels of carbon tetrachloride of 300-500 ppm. Ultimately, it was concluded that the outbreak was in all likelihood due to the combined use of carbon tetrachloride and isopropyl alcohol in the cleaning operation. This outbreak underscores the importance of adopting appropriate industrial hygiene measures in a rapidly industrializing nation such as Taiwan. PMID:3618597

  8. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Can Strike Anyone

    MedlinePLUS

    ... please turn Javascript on. From Hollywood's "Walk of Stars" to Main Street, USA, people from all walks ... that includes many well-known names: Legendary television star Larry Hagman was diagnosed with advanced hepatitis C ...

  9. Bilateral Emphysematous Pyelonephritis with Hepatic Portal Venous Gas: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, Mao Li; NORDING, Hasnizal; LIM, Chen Hong

    2015-01-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis is a rare life-threatening condition caused by a severe acute necrotising infection of the renal parenchyma and its perinephric tissues, and it is commonly seen in diabetic patients. There is a rare association between emphysematous pyelonephritis and hepatic portal venous gas. Hepatic portal venous gas is an uncommon radiological finding, which implies a significant underlying abdominal disease. The management of emphysematous pyelonephritis has evolved from prompt nephrectomy to medical therapy. In the present report, we present a case of a diabetic woman diagnosed with bilateral emphysematous pyelonephritis with hepatic portal venous gas that was successfully managed medically despite the presence of poor prognostic factors, such as acute renal failure and thrombocytopenia. PMID:26715900

  10. Interstellar Alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, S. B.; Kress, M. E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Millar, T. J.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the gas-phase chemistry in dense cores where ice mantles containing ethanol and other alcohols have been evaporated. Model calculations show that methanol, ethanol, propanol, and butanol drive a chemistry leading to the formation of several large ethers and esters. Of these molecules, methyl ethyl ether (CH3OC2H5) and diethyl ether (C2H5)2O attain the highest abundances and should be present in detectable quantities within cores rich in ethanol and methanol. Gas-phase reactions act to destroy evaporated ethanol and a low observed abundance of gas-phase C,H,OH does not rule out a high solid-phase abundance. Grain surface formation mechanisms and other possible gas-phase reactions driven by alcohols are discussed, as are observing strategies for the detection of these large interstellar molecules.

  11. Effect of Motivational Interviewing on Reduction of Alcohol Use

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Shoptaw, Steven; Cohen, Allan; Greengold, Barbara; Nyamathi, Kamala; Marfisee, Mary; de Castro, Viviane; Khalilifard, Farinaz; George, Daniel; Leake, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Background Methadone-Maintained (MM) clients who engage in excessive alcohol use are at high risk for HIV and Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Nurse-led Hepatitis Health Promotion (HHP) may be one strategy to decrease alcohol use in this population. Objective To evaluate the impact of nurse-led HHP, delivered by nurses compared to Motivational Interviewing (MI), delivered by trained therapists in group sessions or one-on-one on reduction of alcohol use. Methods A three-arm randomized, controlled trial, conducted with 256 MM adults attending one of five MM outpatient clinics in the Los Angeles area. Within each site, moderate-to-heavy alcohol-using MM participants were randomized into one of three conditions: 1) nurse-led hepatitis health promotion group sessions (n=87); 2) MI delivered in group sessions (MI-group; n=90), or 3) MI delivered one-on-one sessions (MI-single, n=79). Results Self-reported alcohol use was reduced from a median of 90 drinks/month at baseline to 60 drinks/month at six month follow-up. A Wilcoxon sign-rank test indicated a significant reduction in alcohol use in the total sample (p < .05). In multiple logistic regression analysis controlling for alcohol consumption at baseline and other covariates, no differences by condition were found. Discussion As compared to two programs delivered by MI specialists, a culturally-sensitive and easy to implement nurse-led HHP program produced similar reductions in alcohol use over six months. Employing nurse-led programs may allow cost savings for treatment programs as well as a greater integration of alcohol reduction counseling along with a more comprehensive focus on general health-related issues than previously conducted. PMID:19836904

  12. Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hepatitis B can be spread through sharing needles, syringes, or other injection equipment. In addition, the hepatitis ... devices or other diabetes-care equipment such as syringes or insulin pens. How infectious is the hepatitis ...

  13. Hepatitis C: Information on Testing and Diagnosis

    MedlinePLUS

    HEPATITIS C Information on Testing & Diagnosis What is Hepatitis C? Hepatitis C is a serious liver disease that results from infection with the Hepatitis C virus. Hepatitis C has been called a silent ...

  14. [Treatment of alcoholic liver diseases. Abstinence, nutritional support, drug therapy, liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Pár, A

    2000-04-16

    The review summarizes clinically established treatment forms of alcoholic liver disease in four main chapters: abstinence, nutritional supportation, drug therapy and liver transplantation are discussed. Drug therapy is described according to the three types of alcoholic hepatopathies (fatty liver, hepatitis and cirrhosis). Early diagnosis and treatment depending on the severity and stage of alcoholic liver disease are of importance for the attempts to retard progression and improve prognosis. PMID:10817009

  15. [Epidemiology of viral hepatitis C in the Donetsk region].

    PubMed

    Za?tsev, I A; Poti?, V V; Zaplotnaia, A A; Demkovich, O O

    2014-11-01

    The article is devoted to the analysis of features of natural history of hepatitis C in Donetsk region, with the purpose to determine the number of patients in need of treatment in the first place, forecast on their cure, determination of the number of patients needing the retreatment. Namely, it is showed the age distribution of acute viral hepatitis B and C among the patients of Donetsk region, the percentage of patients with different severity of fibrosis inthe population of patients with chronic hepatitis C in Donetsk region. The stage of liver fibrosis and the degree of disease activity were compared. Furthermore, it is showed the distribution of genotypes of hepatitis C virus in a population of patients of Donetsk region. PMID:25528849