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Sample records for acute carpal syndrome

  1. Acute Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Review of Current Literature.

    PubMed

    Gillig, Jonathan D; White, Stephen D; Rachel, James Nicholas

    2016-07-01

    Acute carpal tunnel syndrome is a progressive median nerve compression leading to loss of two-point discrimination. Most cases encountered are in the emergency department following wrist trauma and distal radius fractures. Although rare, atraumatic etiologies have been reported and diligent evaluation of these patients should be performed. If missed or neglected, irreversible damage to the median nerve may result. Once diagnosed, emergent carpal tunnel release should be performed. If performed in a timely manner outcomes are excellent, often with complete recovery. PMID:27241382

  2. Subclinical carpal tunnel syndrome in patients with acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Dahmardeh, Maryam; Dabiri, Soroosh

    2012-01-01

    Background Stroke is the first cause of morbidity all around the world. Entrapment neuropathies are a known complication of stroke. The objective of this study is to assess the frequency of subclinical carpal tunnel syndrome in the healthy and paretic hands of stroke patients. Methods The authors performed nerve conduction study in the first three days after admission in 39 stroke patients without subclinical carpal tunnel syndrome and 30 days after admission. Electrophysiological studies were done in both paretic and non-paretic hands. Both ulnar and median nerves were studied. Results After one month we found subclinical carpal tunnel syndrome in 16 paretic hands and 13 healthy hands. We did not find any difference in the frequency of carpal tunnel syndrome in two sides. Conclusion The authors suggest that simultaneous different mechanisms may act in inducing carpal tunnel syndrome in both hands of hemiparetic patients. PMID:24250872

  3. [Acute Carpal Tunnel Syndrome due to Spontaneous Bleeding after Taking Rivaroxaban (Xarelto®)].

    PubMed

    Hohendorff, B; Biber, F; Sauer, H; Franke, J

    2016-06-01

    A 64-year-old man suffered from acute carpal tunnel syndrome of his right hand without explainable reason. An emergency operation drained a pronounced haematoma. There is a strong suspicion this was a bleeding complication related to taking rivaroxaban (Xarelto(®)). PMID:25970598

  4. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome of the hand following a cat bite

    PubMed Central

    Sbai, Mohamed Ali; Dabloun, Slim; Benzarti, Sofien; Khechimi, Myriam; Jenzeri, Abdesselem; Maalla, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Cat bites at the hand are common situation in emergency departments. Neglected or poorly supported, these lesions sometimes lead to serious injuries that may compromise the function of the hand. Pasteurellamultocida is the most offending germ in these lesions, despite their sensitivity to antibiotics; it can sometimes lead to deep infections involving the skin, bones and joints. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome is exceptional after cat bite. We report a case of a 56 Year old female presenting with an acute carpal tunnel syndrome associated with compartment syndrome of the right hand 6 days after a cat bite of her right thumb. The patient was treated by surgery to relieve the median nerve. Microbiology identified PasteurellaMultocida. PMID:26421101

  5. Parvovirus B19-induced acute bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome in twin girls.

    PubMed

    Sakallı, Hale; Baskın, Esra; Dener, Şefik

    2015-01-01

    We describe 2 cases of 6-year-old twin girls presenting with acute carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) associated with human parvovirus B19 (HPV-B19) infection, as evidenced by serological data and detection of HPV-B19 DNA in blood with use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). To our knowledge, this is the first time that HPV-B19 infection has been suggested as the causal agent of simultaneous acute bilateral CTS in twins, thus presenting the possibility that similar immunologic responses can be observed in twins during viral infections. PMID:26422355

  6. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... through NIH's National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine are investigating the effects of acupuncture on pain, loss of median nerve function, and changes in the brain associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. In addition, a ...

  7. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... also need to make changes in your work duties or home and sports activities. Some of the ... Call for an appointment with your provider if: You have symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome Your symptoms ...

  8. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Gregory R.

    1994-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a neuropathy resulting from compression of the median nerve as it passes through a narrow tunnel in the wrist on its way to the hand. The lack of precise objective and clinical tests, along with symptoms that are synonymous with other syndromes in the upper extremity, cause carpal tunnel syndrome to appear to be a rare entity in athletics. However, it should not be ruled out as a possible etiology of upper extremity paralysis in the athlete. More typically, carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common peripheral entrapment neuropathy encountered in industry. Treatment may include rest and/or splinting of the involved wrist, ice application, galvanic stimulation, or iontophoresis to reduce inflammation, and then transition to heat modalities and therapeutic exercises for developing flexibility, strength, and endurance. In addition, an ergonomic assessment should be conducted, resulting in modifications to accommodate the carpal tunnel syndrome patient. ImagesFig 3.Fig 4.Fig 5.Fig 6.Fig 7. PMID:16558255

  9. Intradermal Therapy (Mesotherapy) for the Treatment of Acute Pain in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Conforti, Giorgio; Capone, Loredana

    2014-01-01

    Background The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common cause of severe hand pain. In this study we treated acute pain in CTS patients by means of local intradermal injections of anti-inflammatory drugs (mesotherapy). Methods In twenty-five patients (forty-five hands), CTS diagnosis was confirmed by clinical and neurophysiological examination prior to mesotherapy. A mixture containing lidocaine 10 mg, ketoprophen lysine-acetylsalycilate 80 mg, xantinol nicotinate 100 mg, cyanocobalamine 1,000 mcg plus injectable water was used. Sites of injection were three parallel lines above the transverse carpal ligament and two v-shaped lines, one at the base of the thenar eminence, and the other at the base of the hypothenar eminence. Results The day after the treatment, all but four patients reported a significant reduction in pain and paresthesias. After 12 months, 17 patients had a complete pain relief, eight patients reported recurrence of pain and sensory symptoms and four out of them underwent surgical treatment. Conclusions With the obvious limits of a small-size open-label study, our results suggest that mesotherapy can temporary relieve pain and paresthesias in most CTS patients and in some cases its effect seems to be long-lasting. Further controlled studies are needed to confirm our preliminary findings and to compare mesotherapy to conventional approaches for the treatment of CTS. PMID:24478901

  10. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Carpal tunnel syndrome is a collection of clinical symptoms and signs caused by compression of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. However, the severity of symptoms and signs does not often correlate well with the extent of nerve compression. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments, non-drug treatments, and surgical treatments for carpal tunnel syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to October 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 33 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: carpal tunnel release surgery (open and endoscopic), diuretics, local corticosteroids injection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), therapeutic ultrasound, and wrist splints.

  11. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aroori, Somaiah; Spence, Roy AJ

    2008-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is one of the most common peripheral neuropathies. It affects mainly middle aged women. In the majority of patients the exact cause and pathogenesis of CTS is unclear. Although several occupations have been linked to increased incidence and prevalence of CTS the evidence is not clear. Occupational CTS is uncommon and it is essential to exclude all other causes particularly the intrinsic factors such as obesity before attributing it to occupation. The risk of CTS is high in occupations involving exposure to high pressure, high force, repetitive work, and vibrating tools. The classic symptoms of CTS include nocturnal pain associated with tingling and numbness in the distribution of median nerve in the hand. There are several physical examination tests that will help in the diagnosis of CTS but none of these tests are diagnostic on their own. The gold standard test is nerve conduction studies. However, they are also associated with false positive and false negative results. The diagnosis of CTS should be based on history, physical examination and results of electrophysiological studies. The patient with mild symptoms of CTS can be managed with conservative treatment, particularly local injection of steroids. However, in moderate to severe cases, surgery is the only treatment that provides cure. The basic principle of surgery is to increase the volume of the carpal tunnel by dividing transverse carpal ligament to release the pressure on the median nerve. Apart from early recovery and return to work there is no significant difference in terms of early and late complications and long-term pain relief between endoscopic and open carpal tunnel surgery. PMID:18269111

  12. Pathophysiology of carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aboonq, Moutasem S.

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common median nerve neuropathy, accounting for 90% of all neuropathies. Carpal tunnel syndrome presents in 3.8% of the general population, with a higher prevalence among women. There are several risk factors associated with CTS, including both medical and non medical factors. The pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in the median nerve compression and traction are thought to be complex, and as yet are not fully understood. The present review aimed to provide an overview of the pathophysiology of median nerve neuropathy in the carpal tunnel, and subsequent development of CTS. PMID:25630774

  13. Carpal tunnel syndrome and work.

    PubMed

    Newington, Lisa; Harris, E Clare; Walker-Bone, Karen

    2015-06-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral nerve entrapment syndrome, and it frequently presents in working-aged adults. Its mild form causes 'nuisance' symptoms including dysaesthesia and nocturnal waking. At its most severe, CTS can significantly impair motor function and weaken pinch grip. This review discusses the anatomy of the carpal tunnel and the clinical presentation of the syndrome as well as the classification and diagnosis of the condition. CTS has a profile of well-established risk factors including individual factors and predisposing co-morbidities, which are briefly discussed. There is a growing body of evidence for an association between CTS and various occupational factors, which is also explored. Management of CTS, conservative and surgical, is described. Finally, the issue of safe return to work post carpal tunnel release surgery and the lack of evidence-based guidelines are discussed. PMID:26612240

  14. A wakeboarding injury presented as acute carpal syndrome and median nerve contusion after wrist strangulation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background We present a case of combined median nerve contusion with immediate loss of sensation after the strangulation with a wakeboarding rope and prolonged referral to our department 72 hours after the injury accompanied by an acute carpal tunnel syndrome with immediate relief of numbness of a significant proportion of the median nerve following surgical decompression. Case presentation The palmar branch of the median nerve was surrounded by a significant haematoma in addition to the strangulation damage caused by its more superficial location in contrast to the median nerve. Conclusion In case of acute median neuropathy, urgent surgical intervention with exploration, decompression of both, the median nerve and the superficial branch of the median nerve, accompanied by compartment measurements of the forearm should be performed to regain or re-establish neurological integrity. PMID:19178709

  15. Carpal tunnel syndrome: role of carpal canal size.

    PubMed

    Bleecker, M L; Bohlman, M; Moreland, R; Tipton, A

    1985-11-01

    Carpal canal size was examined as a risk factor associated with carpal tunnel syndrome in the workplace. Seven of 14 electricians had symptomatic carpal tunnel syndrome. On measuring cross-sectional areas by CT, affected workers had a cross-sectional area of 1.75 +/- 0.21 cm2; control values were 2.53 +/- 0.15 cm2 (p less than 0.05). Individuals with a subclinical syndrome had an area of 1.83 +/- 0.22 cm2, similar to the symptomatic group. Wrist circumference was not a predictor of smallest carpal canal area. Unusual bony and soft tissue structures within the carpal canal were easily identified with CT. PMID:4058749

  16. Complex regional pain syndrome and acute carpal tunnel syndrome following radial artery cannulation: a neurological perspective and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lazaro, Reynaldo P

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) associated with acute carpal tunnel syndrome (aCTS) developed in a 38-year-old right-handed man following radial artery cannulation (RAC) during the course of lumbar spine surgery. Inciting events and risk factors that might have led to these complications included: multiple arterial punctures and subsequent hematoma formation, radial artery spasm compounded by aggressive hemostasis, anatomical changes in the wrists related to repetitive manual activities in the workplace, and possible protracted hyperextension of the wrists during perioperative and operative procedure. Although CRPS is considered a rare complication of RAC, the condition is disabling and debilitating, especially when associated with aCTS. PMID:25621693

  17. Carpal tunnel syndrome in children.

    PubMed

    Van Meir, Nathalie; De Smet, Luc

    2003-10-01

    transverse carpal ligament. Intensive sports practice has been reported as an aetiological factor in several cases of childhood CTS. Nerve territory oriented macrodactily, a benign localised form of gigantism, is another unusual cause of CTS in children, as are fibrolipomas of the median nerve or intraneural perineuroma or haemangioma of the median nerve. Acute cases have been reported in children with haemophilia, secondary to local bleeding. Another local cause is a musculotendinous malformation of the palmaris longus, the flexor digitorum superficialis, the flexor carpi radialis brevis (a supernumerary muscle), the first lumbricalis or the palmaris brevis. Isolated cases of childhood CTS have also been reported in Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, in Poland's syndrome and in scleroderma. Finally, several cases have been noted following trauma, most often related with epiphysiolysis of the distal radius. Immediate reduction has cleared the problem in most cases, but exploration of the median nerve should be considered otherwise, and also in cases with delayed occurrence of symptoms. Overall 145 of the 163 reviewed cases have undergone open carpal tunnel release. Childhood CTS often has an unusual presentation, with modest complaints and children are often too young to communicate their problem. In CTS with specific aetiologies such as storage disease, the symptoms may be masked by the skeletal dysplasia and joint stiffness. Every child with even mild symptoms must be thoroughly examined and a family history must be taken. Children with storage disease may benefit from early clinical and electrophysiological screening before they develop obvious clinical signs. PMID:14648946

  18. Fibrolipomatous hamartoma of the median nerve: A cause of acute bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome in a three-year-old child: A case report and comprehensive literature review

    PubMed Central

    Senger, Jenna-Lynn; Classen, Dale; Bruce, Garth; Kanthan, Rani

    2014-01-01

    A three-year-old boy was investigated for inexplicable incessant crying. On examination, his left wrist was mildly swollen (three to four months) and sensitive. Exploration and carpal tunnel decompression of the left wrist with incisional biopsy was performed for the presence of a fusiform swelling intimately associated with the median nerve. Histopathology revealed the presence of enlarged nerve bundles admixed with mature fat cells and diffuse fibroblastic proliferation. Three months later, he underwent urgent contralateral carpal tunnel decompression for a similar presentation. The final diagnosis was bilateral fibrolipomatous hamartoma (FLH) of the median nerves causing acute bilateral compression neuropathy. FLH of the median nerve is an extremely unusual cause of acute bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome in a young child presenting with ‘incessant crying’. A comprehensive review of FLH including epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, imaging, pathology, treatment and prognosis is discussed. PMID:25332651

  19. [Ultrasonography for carpal tunnel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Kenichi

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasonography in cases of carpal tunnel syndrome is described with respect to the following aspects: (1) imaging technique; (2) image characteristics; (3) detection of pathophysiology; (4) diagnosis of idiopathic cases; (5) screening of local pathologies (space-occupying lesions, tenosynovitis, and bone and joint abnormalities), incomplete release, and anatomic variations; and (6) role in facilitating minimally-invasive surgery. PMID:24607945

  20. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kokkalis, Zinon T.; Tolis, Konstantinos E.; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D.; Panagopoulos, Georgios N.; Igoumenou, Vasilios G.; Mavrogenis, Andreas F.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic. PMID:27517078

  1. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Tolis, Konstantinos E; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Panagopoulos, Georgios N; Igoumenou, Vasilios G; Mavrogenis, Andreas F

    2016-06-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic. PMID:27517078

  2. Carpal tunnel area as a risk factor for carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Winn, F J; Habes, D J

    1990-03-01

    Carpal tunnel area was investigated as a risk factor for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). It was hypothesized that if canal area is a risk factor for the syndrome, individuals who develop the syndrome should have smaller carpal canal areas than those who remain free of the syndrome. Sixty-one subjects, approximately equally divided by sex, age group, and diagnosis, were examined. A measurement of cross-sectional areas of the carpal canal by computerized axial tomography indicated that individuals diagnosed as carpal tunnel patients had significantly larger carpal canal areas than controls. The results indicate that a small carpal canal area does not appear to be a risk factor for carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:2181299

  3. Diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. Ultrasound versus electromyography.

    PubMed

    Lee, D; van Holsbeeck, M T; Janevski, P K; Ganos, D L; Ditmars, D M; Darian, V B

    1999-07-01

    This article presents a new technique for diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome using ultrasound. The ultrasound characteristics of the normal and abnormal median nerve are discussed in relation to carpal tunnel syndrome. The development of ultrasound as a new diagnostic modality for carpal tunnel syndrome is presented in a three-part study correlating the ultrasound measurements of the median nerve and electromyogram of the median nerve. A new algorithm for evaluating patients with carpal tunnel syndrome is presented. PMID:10442084

  4. Ganglion cysts and carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, J J; Bertoni, J M; Jaeger, S H

    1988-09-01

    We review 12 cases of ganglion cyst with carpal tunnel syndrome in 11 patients seen at the Hand Rehabilitation Center. Mean age was 42 years (range, 28 to 60 years). One half of the cysts were associated with direct trauma, usually with wrist hyperextension. Symptoms usually developed after the appearance or sudden growth of the cyst. Motor conduction or distal sensory latency was abnormal in seven of eight studied cases. Tinel's sign on tapping the cyst may be pathognomonic for this syndrome. Cyst removal and incision of the flexor retinaculum relieved the symptoms in 11 cases. The other case had total resolution after spontaneous cyst rupture. This syndrome is successfully treated with cyst decompression with release of the carpal canal and has an excellent prognosis. To our knowledge this represents the largest operative series of carpal tunnel syndrome and ganglion cyst. PMID:3241055

  5. Treatment of repetitive use carpal tunnel syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Chadwick F.; Vangsness, C. Thomas; Anderson, Thomas; Good, Wayne

    1995-05-01

    In 1990, a randomized, double-blind study was initiated to evaluate the use of an eight-point conservative treatment program in carpal tunnel syndrome. A total of 160 patients were delineated with symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. These patients were then divided into two groups. Both groups were subjected to an ergonomically correct eight-point work modification program. A counterfeit low level laser therapy unit was utilized in Group A, while an actual low level laser therapy unit was utilized in Group B. The difference between Groups A and B was statistically significant in terms of return to work, conduction study improvement, and certain range of motion and strength studies.

  6. Employees' Knowledge of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandy-Goldston, Terrie M.

    A study examined employees' knowledge of the causes of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), its prevention, and their legal rights after being diagnosed with CTS. A 24-item questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 30 Chicago-area employees who had been afflicted with CTS. Of those surveyed, 99% considered their CTS injury related to their…

  7. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in ARL Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Joyce K.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 72 member libraries in the Association of Research Libraries revealed the incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and the measures taken to cope with it. Recommends implementing proactive ergonomics programs; soliciting staff input for solutions; providing report guidelines; using external help; stressing preventive measures and…

  8. Carpal arch and median nerve changes during radioulnar wrist compression in carpal tunnel syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Tamara L; Evans, Peter J; Seitz, William H; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the morphological changes of the carpal arch and median nerve during the application of radiounlarly directed compressive force across the wrist in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Radioulnar compressive forces of 10 N and 20 N were applied at the distal level of the carpal tunnel in 10 female patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. Immediately prior to force application and after 3 min of application, ultrasound images of the distal carpal tunnel were obtained. It was found that applying force across the wrist decreased the carpal arch width (p < 0.001) and resulted in increased carpal arch height (p < 0.01), increased carpal arch curvature (p < 0.001), and increased radial distribution of the carpal arch area (p < 0.05). It was also shown that wrist compression reduced the flattening of the median nerve, as indicated by changes in the nerve's circularity and flattening ratio (p < 0.001). This study demonstrated that the carpal arch can be non-invasively augmented by applying compressive force across the wrist, and that this strategy may decompress the median nerve providing symptom relief to patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1234-1240, 2016. PMID:26662276

  9. Carpal arch and median nerve changes during radioulnar wrist compression in carpal tunnel syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Tamara L.; Evans, Peter J.; Seitz, William H.; Li, Zong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the morphological changes of the carpal arch and median nerve during the application of radiounlarly directed compressive force across the wrist in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Radioulnar compressive forces of 10 N and 20 N were applied at the distal level of the carpal tunnel in 10 female patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. Immediately prior to force application and after 3 minutes of application, ultrasound images of the distal carpal tunnel were obtained. It was found that applying force across the wrist decreased the carpal arch width (p < 0.001) and resulted in increased carpal arch height (p < 0.01), increased carpal arch curvature (p < 0.001), and increased radial distribution of the carpal arch area (p < 0.05). It was also shown that wrist compression reduced the flattening of the median nerve, as indicated by changes in the nerve’s circularity and flattening ratio (p < 0.001). Statement of clinical significance This study demonstrated that the carpal arch can be non-invasively augmented by applying compressive force across the wrist, and that this strategy may decompress the median nerve providing symptom relief to patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:26662276

  10. Personal and occupational factors associated with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cannon, L J; Bernacki, E J; Walter, S D

    1981-04-01

    This paper describes a case control study of the personal and environmental factors associated with the onset of carpal tunnel syndrome in workers at an aircraft engine manufacturing company. A comparison of 30 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and 90 matched controls indicated that the use of vibratory hand tools and a history of gynecological surgery, specifically hysterectomy and oophorectomy, were strongly associated with the onset of carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:7218063

  11. In the Clinic. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kleopa, Kleopas A

    2015-09-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of carpal tunnel syndrome, focusing on screening and prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers. PMID:26322711

  12. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by vascular nerve impairment treated with open release of the carpal tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Juul, Rasmus; Tarnowski, Jan R.; Houe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We present a patient suffering from classical unilateral symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome, where the results of electrophysiological examinations were negative. Ultrasound showed at pulsatile median artery that led to direct mechanical impact on the median nerve. The patient was successfully treated with open release of the carpal tunnel.

  13. Acute Effect of Topical Menthol on Chronic Pain in Slaughterhouse Workers with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Triple-Blind, Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Markus D.; Jay, Kenneth; Colado, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Topical menthol gels are classified “topical analgesics” and are claimed to relieve minor aches and pains of the musculoskeletal system. In this study we investigate the acute effect of topical menthol on carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). We screened 645 slaughterhouse workers and recruited 10 participants with CTS and chronic pain of the arm/hand who were randomly distributed into two groups to receive topical menthol (Biofreeze) or placebo (gel with a menthol scent) during the working day and 48 hours later the other treatment (crossover design). Participants rated arm/hand pain intensity during the last hour of work (scale 0–10) immediately before 1, 2, and 3 hours after application. Furthermore, global rating of change (GROC) in arm/hand pain was assessed 3 hours after application. Compared with placebo, pain intensity and GROC improved more following application of topical menthol (P = 0.026 and P = 0.044, resp.). Pain intensity of the arm/hand decreased by −1.2 (CI 95%: −1.7 to −0.6) following topical menthol compared with placebo, corresponding to a moderate effect size of 0.63. In conclusion, topical menthol acutely reduces pain intensity during the working day in slaughterhouse workers with CTS and should be considered as an effective nonsystemic alternative to regular analgesics in the workplace management of chronic and neuropathic pain. PMID:25298894

  14. Prevalence of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome among Individuals with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Jens Erik Just; Peter, Peter Johannsen; Nielsen, Viggo Kamp; Mai, Jesper

    1998-01-01

    Forty-eight patients with Down syndrome were examined clinically and electrophysiologically for occurrence of carpal tunnel syndrome. Twenty-seven patients had normal findings, 13 had prolonged distal motor latency and reduced distal nerve conduction velocity, and 8 patients had one of these signs. Results show that prevalence of…

  15. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: The Risk to Educational Interpreters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stedt, Joe D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and its ramifications for sign language users, in particular, educational interpreters. Discussed are the syndrome's incidence, causes, diagnostic procedures, medical and surgical interventions, and prevention guidelines. (JDD)

  16. Screening for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Using Sonography

    PubMed Central

    Roll, Shawn C.; Evans, Kevin D.; Li, Xiaobai; Freimer, Miriam; Sommerich, Carolyn M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The use of sonography in musculoskeletal research and clinical applications is increasing; however, measurement techniques for diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome with sonography continue to be inconsistent. Novel methods of measurement using internal comparisons to identify swelling of the median nerve require investigation and comparison to currently used techniques. Methods The flattening ratio of the median nerve, bowing of the flexor retinaculum, and cross-sectional area of the median nerve were collected in the forearm, at the radio-carpal joint, and at the level of the pisiform in both symptomatic patients and asymptomatic control participants. Electrodiagnostic testing was completed in symptomatic patients as a diagnostic standard. Results Median nerve measurements were collected from 166 wrists of symptomatic and asymptomatic participants. The flattening ratio did not show any correlation to electrodiagnostic testing and was identical between both symptomatic and asymptomatic participants. Moderate to strong correlations were noted between electrodiagnostic testing results and sonographic measurements of the cross-sectional area at the pisiform, retinacular bowing, and both the ratio and change of the cross-sectional area between the forearm and pisiform. The area under the curve was large for all receiver operating characteristic curves for each measurement (0.759–0.899), and sensitivity was high (80.4%–82.4%). Conclusions Measurement of swelling through a ratio or absolute change had similar diagnostic accuracy as individual measurement of the cross-sectional area within the carpal tunnel. These measures may be useful for improving accuracy in more diverse clinical populations. Further refinement of protocols to identify the largest cross-sectional area within the carpal tunnel region and statistical methods to analyze clustered, multilevel outcome data are recommended to improve diagnostics. PMID:22124001

  17. [Carpal tunnel syndrome among supermarket cashiers].

    PubMed

    Bonfiglioli, R; Venturi, S; Graziosi, F; Fiorentini, C; Mattioli, S

    2005-01-01

    We studied Carpal Tunnel Syndrome prevalence in part time and full time female supermarket cashiers and in a control group (female primary school teachers). Subjects underwent a clinical examination in which information about personal, physiological, pathological and occupational factors were collected by a physician with a questionnaire and a self-administered Katz's hand diagram. The study protocol included median nerve conduction studies (NCS) for each worker, performed bilaterally according to the palmar technique described by J. Kimura. Case definition of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome was based on the combination of typical symptoms (classic/probable or possible) and electrodiagnostic findings according to the Consensus Criteria for the Classification of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome published by Rempel et al. in 1998. Biomechanical risk for upper limb was assessed by a group of trained observer using videotape and scales of hand activity level (HAL) and normalized peak of force (PF) proposed by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH): supermarket cashier job tasks resulted on the threshold limit value line, confirming high biomechanical risk factors for CTS. Both symptoms and case prevalence resulted higher in supermarket cashiers than in control group and in full time cashiers if compared with part time ones. This difference between groups of part-/full-time cashiers could be due to total hours of exposure during the week and/or to the amount of recovery time between work sessions. Further longitudinal study could give more information about the role of different biomechanical risk factors in the onset of cumulative trauma disorders of the upper limb. PMID:15915683

  18. Medical surveillance for carpal tunnel syndrome in workers.

    PubMed

    Bleecker, M L

    1987-09-01

    Carpal canal size was examined as a risk factor associated with carpal tunnel syndrome in the workplace. Seven of 14 electricians had symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. When cross-sectional areas were measured by computed tomography (CT), affected workers had a cross-sectional area of 1.75 +/- 0.21 cm2; control values were 2.53 +/- 0.15 cm2 (p less than 0.05). Subjects with a subclinical syndrome had an area of 1.83 +/- 0.22 cm2, which was similar to the group with symptoms. Wrist circumference was not a predictor of the smallest carpal canal area. Unusual bony and soft tissue structures within the carpal canal were easily identified with CT. PMID:3655258

  19. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by lipoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sbai, Mohamed Ali; Benzarti, Sofien; Msek, Hichem; Boussen, Monia; Khorbi, Adel

    2015-01-01

    Lipoma is a relatively frequent, benign soft-tissue tumor rarely located in the hand. A lipoma of the hand causing a carpal tunnel syndrome by compression of the median nerve is exceptional. We report the case of a 70-year-old female presenting with a carpal tunnel syndrome. A compression of the median nerve by a lipoma was discovered during surgery. Transverse carpal ligament release with lipoma excision and neurolysis of the median nerve were performed. Histopathological study of the resected mass was consistent with a lipoma. Two-month postoperatively, the patient recovered full hand function with entire disappearance of acroparesthesia. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by space occupying lesions is rare. Diagnosis is difficult, usually based on the clinical study, electrophysiology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Transverse carpal ligament release and excision of lipoma provides excellent functional recovery. PMID:26664552

  20. The relationship among five common carpal tunnel syndrome tests and the severity of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Priganc, Victoria W; Henry, Sharon M

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the relationship among clinical carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) tests and the severity of CTS. A total of 66 subjects with electrodiagnostically confirmed CTS were tested on five CTS tests, then classified according to the severity of CTS. An association was found between testing positive on Phalen's test and the severity of CTS (p < 0.05). In contrast, no association was found between the severity of CTS and results on Tinel's sign, manual version of the carpal compression test (mCCT), Katz-Stirrat hand diagram, or carpal tunnel outcomes assessment tool. The more severe the CTS, the more likely one is to test positive on Phalen's test. Tinel's sign and the mCCT are not influenced by the severity of CTS. This study suggests that Tinel's sign and mCCT may not be useful in assessing the effectiveness of treatment. The Katz-Stirrat hand diagram and the carpal tunnel outcomes assessment tool are not influenced by the severity of CTS, indicating that numerous factors can influence a patient's response on subjective questionnaires. PMID:12943125

  1. Neglected lunate dislocation presenting as carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cansü, Eren; Heydar, Ahmed Majid; Elekberov, Anar; Ünal, Mehmet Bekir

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Most of carpal tunnel syndrome cases are idiopathic, and secondary causes are so rare that can be easily missed. We present a patient with neglected undiagnosed lunate dislocation compressing on median nerve causing its signs and symptoms. PMID:27252962

  2. Vascular factors in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boland, Robert A; Adams, Roger D

    2002-01-01

    An increase in hand and forearm volume was induced without hand movement in ten subjects who had carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). A tester, unaware of sides affected by CTS, performed the Volume Provocation Test (VPT) by inflating a sphygmomanometer cuff around the upper arm to 15 mm Hg less than diastolic pressure for four minutes. Pre- and post-test volumes, intensity of discomfort, and quality and distribution of produced symptoms were recorded. The VPT induced significant increases of segment volumes bilaterally (P1 tailed <0.05), but not more on the side of strongest symptoms compared to the less affected, or asymptomatic side (P1 tailed = 0.07). Mean discomfort on the side of strongest symptoms (5.4/10) was significantly higher (P1 tailed <0.01) than on the contralateral side (2.4/10). In 44% of the affected arms, some or all of the subjects' nocturnal symptoms were reproduced after volume increase, suggesting that CTS is a vascular phenomenon in these patients. PMID:11866348

  3. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Caused by Space Occupying Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ho Jung; Yoon, Hong Ki; Hahn, Soo Bong; Kim, Sung Jae

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnosis and treatment of the carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) due to space occupying lesions (SOL). Materials and Methods Eleven patients and 12 cases that underwent surgery for CTS due to SOL were studied retrospectively. We excluded SOL caused by bony lesions, such as malunion of distal radius fracture, volar lunate dislocation, etc. The average age was 51 years. There were 3 men and 8 women. Follow-up period was 12 to 40 months with an average of 18 months. The diagnosis of CTS was made clinically and electrophysiologically. In patients with swelling or tenderness on the area of wrist flexion creases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or computed tomogram (CT) were additionally taken as well as the carpal tunnel view. We performed conventional open transverse carpal ligament release and removal of SOL. Results The types of lesion confirmed by pathologic examination were; tuberculosis tenosynovitis in 3 cases, nonspecific tenosynovitis in 2 cases, and gout in one case. Other SOLs were tumorous condition in five cases, and abnormal palmaris longus hypertrophy in 1 case. Tumorous conditions were due to calcifying mass in 4 cases and ganglion in 1 case. Following surgery, all cases showed alleviation of symptom without recurrence or complications. Conclusion In cases with swelling or tenderness on the area of wrist flexion creases, it is important to obtain a carpal tunnel view, and MRI and/or CT should be supplemented in order to rule out SOLs around the carpal tunnel, if necessary. PMID:19430560

  4. Sonographic diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome: a study in 200 hospital workers*

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Adham do Amaral e; Skare, Thelma Larocca; Nassif, Paulo Afonso Nunes; Sakuma, Alexandre Kaue; Barros, Wagner Haese

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome in a sample of 200 healthy hospital workers, establishing the respective epidemiological associations. Materials and Methods Two hundred individuals were submitted to wrist ultrasonography to measure the median nerve area. They were questioned and examined for epidemiological data, body mass index, carpal tunnel syndrome signs and symptoms, and submitted to the Boston carpal tunnel questionnaire (BCTQ) to evaluate the carpal tunnel syndrome severity. A median nerve area ≥ 9 mm2 was considered to be diagnostic of carpal tunnel syndrome. Results Carpal tunnel syndrome was diagnosed by ultrasonography in 34% of the sample. It was observed the association of carpal tunnel syndrome with age (p < 0.0001), paresthesia (p < 0.0001), Tinel’s test (p < 0.0001), Phalen’s test (p < 0.0001), BCTQ score (p < 0.0001), and years of formal education (p < 0.0001). Years of formal education was the only variable identified as an independent risk factor for carpal tunnel syndrome (95% CI = 1.03 to 1.24). Conclusion The prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome in a population of hospital workers was of 34%. The number of years of formal education was the only independent risk factor for carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:26543279

  5. Work-Related Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Diagnosis and Treatment Guideline.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Gary M; Friedman, Andrew S

    2015-08-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common entrapment neuropathy, and its risk of occurrence in the presence of repetitive, forceful angular hand movements, or vibration, is common. It is critical to make the diagnosis based on appropriate clinical history and findings and with corroborating electrodiagnostic studies. Conservative management should be undertaken with the goal of maintaining employment; surgical decompression can be highly effective, particularly if undertaken early on. PMID:26231963

  6. [Carpal tunnel syndrome revealed by digital ulcerations caused by arterial vasospasm].

    PubMed

    Léger, O; Lavallé, F

    2005-02-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome presenting as a trophic disorder in the hand is unusual. We report the case of a 66 year old man in whom nerve conduction tests confirmed compression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel, and vasospasm in the corresponding area was demonstrated by arteriography for, we believe, the first time. Simple decompression of the carpal tunnel brought about total recovery. The mechanism of the autonomic disorders found in carpal tunnel syndrome remains controversial. The clinical case that we report objectively demonstrates the vasospasm caused by the compression of the autonomic fibres of the median nerve. PMID:15754710

  7. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  8. Recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome, epineural fibrous fixation, and traction neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hunter, J M

    1991-08-01

    This article has reviewed recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome, epineural fibrous fixation, and traction neuropathy of the median nerve. The problems surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of recurrent CTS have been discussed at length. The percent of failures from traditional open ligament surgery is observed to be high, and will become more prevalent as more casual treatments are carried out. This article makes a positive statement with reference to mobilization of the median nerve and anatomic restoration of the transverse carpal ligament. Fibrous fixation of the median nerve is a product of life and function. All cases are different, reflecting the strength, abilities, and personalities of the patients. A bottom line is drawn on these patients, where the summation of the problems of life become symptomatic and disabling. Epineural fibrous fixations induce median nerve traction, governed by hand, wrist, and forearm movements. Traction and tension suggest the intermittent disturbance of nerve nutrition and nerve conduction as the elastic limits of the nerve are approached. These factors accumulate and, in time, cause traction neuropathies with pain. This is followed by a reduced work capability. This impairment can be reversed by surgical nerve mobilization followed by functional nerve gliding therapy. A background history injury to the hand and wrist may be significant, as well as factors such as overuse and misuse of the hand and extremity. Prior to surgery, the careful application of diagnostic stress tests are essential, for the differential diagnosis of fixation traction and positional peripheral neuropathies. Nerve mobilization supported by magnification and the techniques of hand surgery has been successful by the methods discussed and has permitted, importantly, the restoration of the anatomic retinaculum for the flexor tendon system. This can be restored in carpal tunnel surgery and reconstructed with basic ligament material in recurrent carpal tunnel

  9. Validation of a diagnostic sign in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Pryse-Phillips, W E

    1984-01-01

    Of three signs in carpal tunnel syndrome, Phalen's, Tinel's and the Flick sign, the last of these was the most valid and reliable. The presence of a positive Flick sign predicted electrodiagnostic abnormality in 93% of cases and had a false positive rate of under 5% among other neural lesions in the arm. The key question consists of an enquiry as to what the patient does with the affected hand at times when symptoms are at their worst; a flicking movement of the wrist and fingers demonstrated by the patient constitutes a positive response. Images PMID:6470728

  10. [Capitate Non-Union: One of the Causes of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Stocker, R L; Macheiner, A

    2016-06-01

    We report on a carpal tunnel syndrome in a 50-year-old woman, presumably caused in part by a 35-year-old asymptomatic capitate non-union. The carpal tunnel was released and a large exostosis removed. 3 weeks after the operation the patient was free of symptoms. PMID:26053562

  11. Carpal tunnel syndrome severity staging using sonographic and clinical measures

    PubMed Central

    Roll, Shawn C.; Volz, Kevin R.; Fahy, Christine M.; Evans, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasonography may be valuable in staging carpal tunnel syndrome severity, especially by combining multiple measures. This study aimed to develop a preliminary severity staging model using multiple sonographic and clinical measures. Methods Measures were obtained in 104 participants. Multiple categorization structures for each variable were correlated to diagnostic severity based on nerve conduction. Goodness-of-fit was evaluated for models using iterative combinations of highly correlated variables. Using the best-fit model, a preliminary scoring system was developed, and frequency of misclassification was calculated. Results The severity staging model with best fit (Rho 0.90) included patient-reported symptoms, functional deficits, provocative testing, nerve cross-sectional area, and nerve longitudinal appearance. An 8-point scoring scale classified severity accurately for 79.8% of participants. Discussion This severity staging model is a novel approach to carpal tunnel syndrome evaluation. Including more sensitive measures of nerve vascularity, nerve excursion, or other emerging techniques may refine this preliminary model. PMID:25287477

  12. A vertical mouse and ergonomic mouse pads alter wrist position but do not reduce carpal tunnel pressure in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Annina B; Kubler, Paul A; Johnston, Venerina; Coppieters, Michel W

    2015-03-01

    Non-neutral wrist positions and external pressure leading to increased carpal tunnel pressure during computer use have been associated with a heightened risk of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). This study investigated whether commonly used ergonomic devices reduce carpal tunnel pressure in patients with CTS. Carpal tunnel pressure was measured in twenty-one patients with CTS before, during and after a computer mouse task using a standard mouse, a vertical mouse, a gel mouse pad and a gliding palm support. Carpal tunnel pressure increased while operating a computer mouse. Although the vertical mouse significantly reduced ulnar deviation and the gel mouse pad and gliding palm support decreased wrist extension, none of the ergonomic devices reduced carpal tunnel pressure. The findings of this study do therefore not endorse a strong recommendation for or against any of the ergonomic devices commonly recommended for patients with CTS. Selection of ergonomic devices remains dependent on personal preference. PMID:25479984

  13. Occupational carpal tunnel syndrome in Washington State, 1984-1988.

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, G M; Haug, J; Heyer, N; Checkoway, H; Peck, N

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are no published population-based studies of occupational carpal tunnel syndrome (OCTS) using a strict case definition. Most studies are either industry specific or present patient self-report of symptoms. METHODS: We conducted a population-based incidence study of OCTS using the Washington State Workers' Compensation database. Incident OCTS claims were identified with paid bills for physician reported ICD codes 354.0 and 354.1. RESULTS: There were 7,926 incident OCTS claims identified for the years 1984-1988, which yields an industry-wide incidence rate of 1.74 claims/1,000 FTEs. The mean age (37.4 years) and female/male ratio (1.2:1) in this population differ from those reported in nonoccupational carpal tunnel studies (mean age, 51 years; female/male ratio, 3:1). The female-specific OCTS incidence rate increased significantly during the study period. The highest industry specific OCTS rates were found in the food processing, carpentry, egg production, wood products, and logging industries. CONCLUSION: Demographic differences and industry-specific rates consistent with workplace exposures suggest that OCTS is distinct from CTS occurring in nonoccupational settings. Workers' compensation data proved useful in identifying high risk industries. PMID:1827570

  14. Familial carpal tunnel syndrome: a report of a Finnish family.

    PubMed

    Mahjneh, I; Saarinen, A; Siivola, J

    2001-12-01

    The existence of familial carpal tunnel syndrome (FCTS) as a separate autonomic entity has been discussed during the last few years. In order to contribute with more data to the literature, we report here the results of clinical. electrophysiological, pathological and radiological studies performed in 5 patients belonging to the same Finnish pedigree. The disease appeared usually before the second decade with numbness and pain on the I--III digits. In most patients symptoms were unilateral but within 2 years they became bilateral. In all patients typical electrophysiological features of median nerve entrapment have been recorded. X-rays of the wrist showed narrow carpal tunnel in all patients. In all patients the possibility of having HNPP as well as familial amyloidosis has been excluded by molecular genetic and pathological studies. All patients underwent surgery and at postoperative stage symptoms were relieved or completely disappeared. Our study supports the theory that FCTS exists as a separate autonomic entity, therefore it is important in front of a sporadic case to investigate the family occurrence of CTS. PMID:11903093

  15. Who develops carpal tunnel syndrome during pregnancy: An analysis of obesity, gestational weight gain, and parity

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bryan; Wright, Sean; Weiner, Mark; Wright, Kevin; Rubin, David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the prevalence, onset, and risk factors of carpal tunnel syndrome during pregnancy. Methods Maternal electronic medical records were linked to birth certificate records using social security number. The outcome of carpal tunnel syndrome during pregnancy was defined as ICD9 code 354.0 given at a prenatal visit. Chi-square, t-test, and adjusted logistic regression were performed. Results We analyzed 17,623 prenatal visits from the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania from 1/2003–12/2007. Mean maternal age was 26.4 (6.5) years, with 21% white, 69% black, and 46% overweight or obese. Ninety-one (2.8%) mothers participated in 765 prenatal visits given a carpal tunnel syndrome diagnosis code. Compared to mothers without carpal tunnel syndrome, mothers with carpal tunnel syndrome were older (29.72 (5.42) versus 26.04 (6.37) years, p = 0.005), gained more weight during pregnancy (40.65 (10.13) pounds versus 34.2 (9.41) pounds, p = 0.04), and more likely to have college education (69.9% versus 44.5%, p = 0.03). Average onset (SD) of carpal tunnel syndrome was 18.1 (8.4) weeks’ gestation. Conclusion Mothers with carpal tunnel syndrome had high rates of overweight, obesity, and excessive gestational weight gain. Diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome was rare but often occurred in the first and second trimesters, earlier than the frequently reported third trimester onset seen in literature. When looking at predictors of carpal tunnel syndrome, obese prepregnancy body mass index (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) and excessive gestational weight gain, greater than two previous live births, higher level of maternal education and more prenatal care (>10 visits) were associated with increased risk of carpal tunnel syndrome. Higher maternal age was not associated with carpal tunnel syndrome diagnosis after adjusting for weight and parity, suggesting mediation by these covariates.

  16. Carpal tunnel syndrome, syndrome of partial thenar atrophy, and W. Russell Brain: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Boskovski, Marko T; Thomson, J Grant

    2014-09-01

    This article presents the history of the discovery of compression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel without an identifiable cause as a distinct clinical entity. By analyzing primary sources, we show that, at the beginning of the twentieth century, physicians described patients with paresthesias and numbness in the hands, most prominent at night, accompanied by bilateral symmetrical atrophy along the radial side of thenar eminence. At the time, the 2 most influential hypotheses regarding etiology were, first, compression of the lower trunk of the brachial plexus by a cervical or first rib, and second, compression of the thenar branch of the median nerve as it passes beneath the anterior annular ligament of the wrist. The condition was named syndrome of partial thenar atrophy and was considered a distinct clinical entity. In 1946, after extensive analysis, neurologist Walter Russell Brain concluded that both sensory and motor symptoms of the syndrome were caused by "compression neuritis" of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel. At his suggestion, surgeon Arthur Dickson Wright performed decompression of the nerve by "an incision of the carpal ligament," with excellent results. Brain presented this work at the Royal Society of Medicine in London in 1946 and published his landmark paper in Lancet the following year. In so doing, he established the basis for the disease we know today as idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. Unfortunately, in 1947, Brain did not realize that another "condition" with the same clinical picture but without atrophy of the thenar muscles, known as acroparesthesia at the time, was actually the same disease as syndrome of partial thenar atrophy, but of lesser severity. As a result of Brain's influence, 7 other papers were published by 1950. Between 1946 and 1950, there were at least 10 papers that presented, in total, 31 patients (26 women) who exhibited symptoms of compression of the median nerve without an identifiable cause and underwent

  17. Single injection of platelet-rich plasma as a novel treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Malahias, Michael Alexander; Johnson, Elizabeth O.; Babis, George C.; Nikolaou, Vasileios S.

    2015-01-01

    Both in vitro and in vivo experiments have confirmed that platelet-rich plasma has therapeutic effects on many neuropathies, but its effects on carpal tunnel syndrome remain poorly understood. We aimed to investigate whether single injection of platelet-rich plasma can improve the clinical symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. Fourteen patients presenting with median nerve injury who had suffered from mild carpal tunnel syndrome for over 3 months were included in this study. Under ultrasound guidance, 1–2 mL of platelet-rich plasma was injected into the region around the median nerve at the proximal edge of the carpal tunnel. At 1 month after single injection of platelet-rich plasma, Visual Analogue Scale results showed that pain almost disappeared in eight patients and it was obviously alleviated in three patients. Simultaneously, the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand questionnaire showed that upper limb function was obviously improved. In addition, no ultrasonographic manifestation of the carpal tunnel syndrome was found in five patients during ultrasonographic measurement of the width of the median nerve. During 3-month follow-up, the pain was not greatly alleviated in three patients. These findings show very encouraging mid-term outcomes regarding use of platelet-rich plasma for the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:26807124

  18. What is the role of Semmes-Weinstein monofilament testing in the diagnosis of electrophysiologically graded carpal tunnel syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Pelin; Gunduz, Osman Hakan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to investigate the ability of Semmes-Weinstein Monofilament testing to detect carpal tunnel syndrome, as well as moderate-to-severe carpal tunnel syndrome using varying thresholds and methods. [Subjects] Clinical and electrophysiological data of 62 patients (124 hands) with a mean age of 49.09±10.5 years were evaluated in this study. [Methods] Sensitivity and specificity were calculated according to two threshold values (2.83 and 3.22) and two methods, a conventional method and an internal comparison method. A threshold value of 3.22 was also used to determine sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of electrophysiologically moderate-to-severe carpal tunnel syndrome. Data of the first three digits were averaged to reveal the mean strength value of the monofilaments for each hand. [Results] The criteria of 2.83-conventional method yielded a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 17% in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. The threshold value of 3.22 using a conventional method was found to detect moderate-to-severe carpal tunnel syndrome with high sensitivity (80%) and excellent specificity (93%). A statistically significant difference was observed in the mean strength values of the monofilaments in moderate-to-severe carpal tunnel syndrome hands and hands without carpal tunnel syndrome. [Conclusion] The current study demonstrated that Semmes-Weinstein monofilament testing might be a valuable quantitative method for detecting moderate-to-severe carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:26834344

  19. Effectiveness of low-level laser on carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Hua-Feng; Ma, Xin-Long; Tian, Peng; Huang, Yuting

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been applied in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) for an extended period of time without definitive consensus on its effectiveness. This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of low-level laser in the treatment of mild to moderate CTS using a Cochrane systematic review. Methods: We conducted electronic searches of PubMed (1966–2015.10), Medline (1966–2015.10), Embase (1980–2015.10), and ScienceDirect (1985–2015.10), using the terms “carpal tunnel syndrome” and “laser” according to the Cochrane Collaboration guidelines. Relevant journals or conference proceedings were searched manually to identify studies that might have been missed in the database search. Only randomized clinical trials were included, and the quality assessments were performed according to the Cochrane systematic review method. The data extraction and analyses from the included studies were conducted independently by 2 reviewers. The results were expressed as the mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the continuous outcomes. Results: Seven randomized clinical trials met the inclusion criteria; there were 270 wrists in the laser group and 261 wrists in the control group. High heterogeneity existed when the analysis was conducted. Hand grip (at 12 weeks) was stronger in the LLLT group than in the control group (MD = 2.04; 95% CI: 0.08–3.99; P = 0.04; I2 = 62%), and there was better improvement in the visual analog scale (VAS) (at 12 weeks) in the LLLT group (MD = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.84–1.11; P < 0.01; I2 = 0%). The sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) (at 12 weeks) was better in the LLLT group (MD = 1.08; 95% CI: 0.44–1.73; P = 0.001; I2 = 0%). However, 1 included study was weighted at >95% in the calculation of these 3 parameters. There were no statistically significant differences in the other parameters between the 2 groups. Conclusion

  20. Reliability Assessment of Various Sonographic Techniques for Evaluating Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Junck, Anthony D; Escobedo, Eva M; Lipa, Bethany M; Cronan, Michael; Anthonisen, Colleen; Poltavskiy, Eduard; Bang, Heejung; Han, Jay J

    2015-11-01

    Objectives-The aim of this study was to determine the intra- and inter-rater reliability of sonographic measurements of the median nerve cross-sectional area in individuals with carpal tunnel syndrome and healthy control participants.Methods-The median nerve cross-sectional area was evaluated by sonography in 18 participants with carpal tunnel syndrome (18 upper extremities) and 9 control participants (18 upper extremities) at 2 visits 1 week apart. Two examiners, both blinded to the presence or absence of carpal tunnel syndrome, captured independent sonograms of the median nerve at the levels of the carpal tunnel inlet, pronator quadratus, and mid-forearm. The cross-sectional area was later measured by each examiner independently. Each also traced images that were captured by the other examiner.Results-Both the intra- and inter-rater reliability rates were highest for images taken at the carpal tunnel inlet (radiologist, r = 0.86; sonographer, r = 0.87; inter-rater, r = 0.95; all P < .0001), whereas they was lowest for the pronator quadratus (r = 0.49, 0.29, and 0.72, respectively; all P < .0001). At the mid-forearm, the intra-rater reliability was lower for both the radiologist and sonographer, whereas the inter-rater reliability was relatively high (r = 0.54, 0.55, and 0.81; all P < .0001). Tracing of captured images by different examiners showed high concordance for the median cross-sectional area at the carpal tunnel inlet (r = 0.96-0.98; P < .0001).Conclusions-The highest intra- and inter-rater reliability was found at the carpal tunnel inlet. The results also demonstrate that tracing of the median nerve cross-sectional area from captured images by different examiners does not contribute significantly to measurement variability. PMID:26453123

  1. Increased Prevalence of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Andrew W.; Shoemaker, Ashley H.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by phenotypic abnormalities including brachydactyly/brachymetacarpia, short stature, and sc ossifications. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a chief complaint in many patients with AHO. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate the prevalence of CTS in patients with AHO. Design: This was a cross-sectional study. Setting: The study was conducted at the Clinical Research Center (Institute of Clinical and Translational Medicine), Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Albright Clinic, Kennedy Krieger Institute. Participants: Thirty-three subjects with a diagnosis of AHO participated in the study. Main Outcome Measures: We assessed for the presence and location of hand tingling, numbness, pain, weakness, flick sign, difficulty with fine motor skills, severe hand or nail biting, and nocturnal symptoms in the setting of normocalcemia and a euthyroid state. Patients were considered to have CTS if they were positive for three of these symptoms. All subjects were analyzed for mutations in the GNAS gene. Results: Twenty-two subjects (67%) had a clinical diagnosis of CTS (95% confidence interval 0.48, 0.82). Twenty-eight of 33 subjects were confirmed to have mutations in GNAS, of whom 68% had CTS (95% confidence interval 0.48, 0.84). There were 14 children in this study; 36% had a clinical diagnosis of CTS. Body mass index, brachydactyly/brachymetacarpia, prior GH treatment, and specific GNAS mutations were not associated with CTS. Conclusions: We report a high prevalence of CTS in both adults and children with AHO. The diagnosis of CTS should be considered when evaluating a patient with AHO because the intervention for CTS could improve overall function and quality of life in these patients. PMID:21525160

  2. Treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome with alpha-lipoic acid.

    PubMed

    Di Geronimo, G; Caccese, A Fonzone; Caruso, L; Soldati, A; Passaretti, U

    2009-01-01

    Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral mononeuropathy; its symptoms and functional limitations significantly penalize the daily activities and quality of life of many people. While surgery is reserved to most severe cases, the earlier stages of disease may be controlled by a pharmacological treatment aimed to "neuroprotection", i.e. to limiting and correcting the nerve damage. Our study was aimed to compare the efficacy of a fixed association of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) 600 mg/die and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) 360 mg/die, and a multivitamin B preparation (Vit B6 150 mg, Vit B1 100 mg, Vit B12 500 microg daily) for 90 days in 112 subjects with moderately severe CTS. Demographic, case-history and treatment efficacy data were collected; the Boston questionnaire was administered and the patients were evaluated by Hi-Ob scale and electro-myography. A significant reduction in both symptoms scores and functional impairment (Boston questionnaire) was observed in ALA/GLA group, while the multivitamin group experienced a slight improvement of symptoms and a deterioration of functional scores. Electromyography showed a statistically significant improvement with ALA/GLA, but not with the multivitamin product. The Hi-Ob scale showed significant efficacy of ALA/GLA in improving symptoms and functional impairment, while in the multivitamin group the improvement was significant, but less marked than in the ALA/GLA group. In conclusion, the fixed association of ALA and GLA proved to be a useful tool and may be proposed for controlling symptoms and improving the evolution of CTS, especially in the earlier stages of disease. PMID:19499849

  3. Carpal tunnel biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Calandruccio JH. Carpal tunnel syndrome, ulnar tunnel syndrome, and stenosing tenosynovitis. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012: ...

  4. Comparative study on the stiffness of transverse carpal ligament between normal subjects and carpal tunnel syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Hideaki; Miura, Toshiki; Morizaki, Yutaka; Uehara, Kosuke; Ohe, Takashi; Tanaka, Sakae

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the stiffness of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) between healthy volunteers and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients using sonoelastography. We studied 17 healthy volunteers (four men, 13 women; range 37-84 years) and 18 hands of 13 patients with CTS (three men, ten women; range 41-79 years). Thickness and elasticity of the TCL were evaluated by sonoelastography. Elasticity was estimated by strain ratio of an acoustic coupler, which has a standardized elasticity as a reference medium, to the TCL (AC/T strain ratio). The AC/T strain ratios of the healthy volunteers and the CTS patients were 6.0 and 8.1, respectively (p = 0.030). The AC/T strain ratio showed a positive correlation with the duration of symptoms in the CTS patients (p = 0.035, r = 0.50). We concluded that increased stiffness of the TCL could be one of the causes for CTS. PMID:24164125

  5. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Associated with Oral Bisphosphonates. A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal, Alfonso; Martín Arias, Luis H.; Sáinz, María; Escudero, Antonio; Fierro, Inmaculada; Sauzet, Odile; Cornelius, Victoria R.; Molokhia, Mariam

    2016-01-01

    Background Bisphosphonates are widely used to prevent osteoporotic fractures. Some severe musculoskeletal reactions have been described with this medication; among them, some cases of carpal tunnel syndrome. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore whether bisphosphonates may be associated with this syndrome. Methods A cohort study was conducted to compare exposed to unexposed women; the exposed group was that composed of women having received at least one prescription of an oral bisphosphonate. For the purpose, we used information from The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database. The outcome of interest was defined as those women diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. A survival analysis was performed; the Cox proportional hazard model was used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals, and to adjust for identified confounding variables. Results Out of a sample of 59,475 women older than 51 years, 19,825 were treated with bisphosphonates during the period studied. No differences in age distribution or mean follow-up time were observed between the two groups in comparison. Overall, there were 572 women diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome, 242 (1.2%) in the group exposed to bisphosphonates, and 330 (0.8%) in the unexposed. An adjusted hazard ratio of developing carpal tunnel syndrome of 1.38 (95%CI, 1.15–1.64) was found for women exposed to bisphosphonates; no significant changes in the hazard ratios were found when considering different levels of bisphosphonate exposure. Conclusions An increased risk of carpal tunnel syndrome is associated with the use of bisphosphonates in postmenopausal women. PMID:26765346

  6. Yoga Asanas for the Relief and Prevention of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beleu, Steve

    This collection of yoga asanas (exercises) can help relieve the pain of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and help prevent CTS among people who work on computer terminals. For maximum benefit, the exercises should be practiced daily or on as regular a schedule as possible. They are not intended to replace surgery or a physician's prescribed care. They…

  7. Interpreter's Wrist: Repetitive Stress Injury and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Sign Language Interpreters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stedt, Joe D.

    1992-01-01

    In a survey concerning repetitive stress injury (RSI) and carpal tunnel syndrome, 87 percent of the 40 sign language interpreters reported that they had at some time experienced at least 2 symptoms associated with RSI, and most interpreters knew others with RSI problems. Data indicate that RSI is a severe problem among sign language interpreters.…

  8. Quantitative MRI of the wrist and nerve conduction studies in patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, S; Itsubo, T; Yasutomi, T; Nakagawa, H; Kamimura, M; Kato, H

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To correlate morphological findings of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) with the function of the median nerve. Methods: In this study, 105 wrists of 105 women patients with idiopathic CTS, and 36 wrists of 36 female volunteers were subjected to nerve conduction studies and MRI. Cross sectional area, signal intensity ratio, and the flattening ratio of the median nerve, carpal tunnel area, flexor tendon area, synovial area, and intersynovial space, and the palmar bowing of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) were quantified by MRI and correlated with the severity of the disease determined by nerve conduction studies. Results: Cross sectional areas of the median nerve, flexor tendons, and carpal tunnel, and the palmar bowing of the TCL of the CTS groups were greater than in the control group, but differences were not detected among the CTS groups for the area of the flexor tendons and the carpal tunnel. Enlargement, flattening, and high signal intensity of the median nerve at the distal radioulnar joint level were more significant in the advanced than in the earlier stages of the disease. Increase in palmar bowing of the TCL was less prominent in the most advanced group. Linear correlation between the area of the carpal tunnel and palmar bowing of the TCL was noted. Conclusion: Severity of the disease could be judged by evaluating not only longitudinal changes of signal intensity and configuration of the median nerve, but also palmar bowing of the TCL. Increased palmar bowing of the TCL was found to be associated with an increase in the area of the carpal tunnel. PMID:16024888

  9. Quality of information on the Internet about carpal tunnel syndrome: an update.

    PubMed

    Lutsky, Kevin; Bernstein, Joseph; Beredjiklian, Pedro

    2013-08-01

    The use of the Internet for health-related information has increased significantly. In 2000, the current authors examined the source and content of orthopedic information on the Internet. At that time, Internet information regarding carpal tunnel syndrome was found to be of limited quality and poor informational value. The purposes of the current study were to reevaluate the type and quality of information on the Internet regarding carpal tunnel syndrome and to determine whether the quality of information available has improved compared with 1 decade ago. The phrase carpal tunnel syndrome was entered into the 5 most commonly used Internet search engines. The top 50 nonsponsored and the top 5 sponsored universal resource locators identified by each search engine were collected. Each unique Web site was evaluated for authorship and content, and an informational score ranging from 0 to 100 points was assigned. Approximately one-third of nonsponsored Web sites were commercial sites or selling commercial products. Seventy-six percent of sponsored sites were selling a product for the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. Thirty-eight percent of nonsponsored sites provided unconventional information, and 48% of sponsored sites provided misleading information. Just more than half of nonsponsored sites were authored by a physician or academic institution. The informational mean score was 53.8 points for nonsponsored sites and 14.5 points for sponsored sites. The informational quality on the Internet on carpal tunnel syndrome has improved over the past decade. Despite this progress, significant room exists for improvement in the quality and completeness of the information available. PMID:23937750

  10. Occupational Overuse Syndrome (Technological Diseases): Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, a Mouse Shoulder, Cervical Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tiric-Campara, Merita; Krupic, Ferid; Biscevic, Mirza; Spahic, Emina; Maglajlija, Kerima; Masic, Zlatan; Zunic, Lejla; Masic, Izet

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Technological diseases are diseases of the modern era. Some are caused by occupational exposures, and are marked with direct professional relation, or the action of harmful effects in the workplace. Due to the increasing incidence of these diseases on specific workplaces which may be caused by one or more causal factors present in the workplace today, these diseases are considered as professional diseases. Severity of technological disease usually responds to the level and duration of exposure, and usually occurs after many years of exposure to harmful factor. Technological diseases occur due to excessive work at the computer, or excessive use of keyboards and computer mice, especially the non-ergonomic ones. This paper deals with the diseases of the neck, shoulder, elbow and wrist (cervical radiculopathy, mouse shoulder and carpal tunnel syndrome), as is currently the most common diseases of technology in our country and abroad. These three diseases can be caused by long-term load and physical effort, and are tied to specific occupations, such as occupations associated with prolonged sitting, working at the computer and work related to the fixed telephone communication, as well as certain types of sports (tennis, golf and others). PMID:25568584

  11. Thrombosis of the persistent median artery as a cause of carpal tunnel syndrome - case study.

    PubMed

    Rzepecka-Wejs, Ludomira; Multan, Aleksandra; Konarzewska, Aleksandra

    2012-12-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most frequent neuropathy of the upper extremity, that mainly occurs in manual workers and individuals, whose wrist is overloaded by performing repetitive precise tasks. In the past it was common among of typists, seamstresses and mechanics, but nowadays it is often caused by long hours of computer keyboard use. The patient usually complains of pain, hypersensitivity and paresthesia of his hand and fingers in the median nerve distribution. The symptoms often increase at night. In further course of the disease atrophy of thenar muscles is observed. In the past the diagnosis was usually confirmed in nerve conduction studies. Nowadays a magnetic resonance scan or an ultrasound scan can be used to differentiate the cause of the symptoms. The carpal tunnel syndrome is usually caused by compression of the median nerve passing under the flexor retinaculum due to the presence of structures reducing carpal tunnel area, such as an effusion in the flexor tendons sheaths (due to overload or in the course of rheumatoid diseases), bony anomalies, muscle and tendon variants, ganglion cysts or tumors. In some cases diseases of upper extremity vessels including abnormalities of the persistent median artery may also result in carpal tunnel syndrome. We present a case of symptomatic carpal tunnel syndrome caused by thrombosis of the persistent median artery which was diagnosed in ultrasound examination. The ultrasound scan enabled for differential diagnosis and resulted in an immediate referral to clinician, who recommended instant commencement on anticoagulant treatment. The follow-up observation revealed nearly complete remission of clinical symptoms and partial recanalization of the persistent median artery. PMID:26676173

  12. A Comparison of Hand Pain and Hand Function after Z-plasty Reconstruction of the Transverse Carpal Ligament with Traditional Median Neurolysis in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Saravi, Majid Sajjadi; Kariminasab, Mohammad Hossein; Bari, Mehdi; Ghaffari, Salman; Razavipour, Mehran; Daneshpoor, Seyed Mohamad Mehdi; Yazdi, Mahsa Vojoudi; Davoudi, Mehrnaz Mohammad; Azar, Masoud Shayesteh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common focal mono-neuropathy. A study was designed to compare the effects of traditional open carpal tunnel release with median neurolysis and Z-plasty reconstruction of the transverse carpal ligament on post-operative hand pain and hand function in patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. Methods: Fifty-two patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome entered the study. The patients were randomly assigned into two groups to undergo simple transverse carpal ligament release or division of the ligament with Z-lengthening reconstruction. Forty-five patients completed the study. Two patients of the simple open surgery group and 5 patients of the Z-plasty reconstruction group did not complete the follow up course. After the procedure, the patients were followed to assess post-operative pain and hand function during a 12-week period. Results: The scores of hand pain on the first day after surgery were not statistically different between the two groups (P=0.213). But the score of hand pain was significantly lower in the Z-plasty reconstruction group at week 1, week 3, and week 6 after surgery (P<0.001). However, at week 12, no patient complained of hand pain in both groups. Considering hand function, no patient had normal hand grip after the first week, but after three weeks, a significantly higher proportion of patients in the Z-plasty reconstruction group had reached near normal hand grip (76.1% vs. 29.1%;). However, at weeks 6 and 12, the differences were not statistically different between the two groups. Conclusion: We observed significant reduction in hand pain, shorter duration of hand pain and shorter period of time to reach normal hand grip by Z-plasty reconstruction of the TCL. PMID:27200393

  13. Acute bilateral spontaneous forearm compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dalton, David M; Munigangaiah, Sudarshan; Subramaniam, Tava; McCabe, John P

    2014-01-01

    Acute spontaneous compartment syndrome of the forearm is rarely reported in the literature. It is typically associated with trauma or thromboembolism in the acute setting and repetitive exertional stress in the chronic setting. However it is rare for it to present bilaterally with no apparent underlying cause. We report the case of a young 31-year-old lady who presented to our Emergency Department with bilateral compartment syndrome of the forearm. Her presenting complaints included acute severe pain and swelling of the forearms bilaterally, with a decreased range of movement of the wrist and fingers. She also complained of numbness in all fingers. She had no history of recent trauma and ultrasound scans showed no evidence of vascular compromise. Past medical history was notable only for idiopathic hypertension and coeliac disease. The patient was taken to theatre urgently where flexor and extensor compartments and carpal tunnel were decompressed. Pronator Teres was found to be dusky initially but turned pink after decompression. All other muscles were normal. An interesting fact of this case was that combination of the high compartment pressures and anaesthetic related hypotension caused the forearm pulses to become impalpable at induction, these returned intra-operatively. The patient has been seen in the outpatient department following discharge. She is well apart from some mildly reduced grip strength in her right hand likely due to carpal tunnel decompression. No cause was found for the scenario after extensive medical investigation. PMID:24641749

  14. The role of proteoglycans in idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Michelle; Freeland, Alan; Mohamed, Adel; Benghuzzi, Ham

    2005-01-01

    Decompression of the carpal canal is the most common hand surgery performed in the United States. Hand surgeons perform 460,000 carpal tunnel releases (CTR) each year, which cost the medical industry in excess of two billion dollars per year. The focus of this investigation was to identify the changes, which occur in the flexor tenosynovium of patients undergoing CTR at the connective tissue level. The connective tissues determine the amount and arrangement of macromolecules (fibers, proteoglycans, and glycoproteins) in the extracellular matrix. The proteoglycans are soluble macromolecules that have both structural and metabolic roles. Glycoproteins help to form the interstitial space, basement membrane and function as cell surface receptors. The mechanical function of the proteoglycans includes stabilization of the collagen fibers as well as function in the hydration of the tissues. It has been previous shown that changes in the oxygen concentration at the tissue level can alter the proteoglycans profile of the tissue. During periods of hypoxia, such as those obtained during repetitive motion CTS; the glycolytic pathway acts as the energy source for the tissue. Productions of chondroitin sulfates are a process consumes NAD and would be potentially toxic to the cells under anaerobic conditions. Production of keratan sulfate is NAD sparing product, and may act as a survival pathway for cells under adverse conditions. The disruption in the proteoglycan balance will allow for alterations in the ECM and changes in hydration status of the tissues may have serious implication in CTS because the carpal canal is anatomically very narrow and increases in volume within the canal can result in further compression of the nerve. Flexor tenosyioum was obtained from patients undergoing CTR and compared with control tissue for dermatan, keratan and chondroitin sulfate. The results show a greater density of keratan reactivity in CTS tissues identified by immunostaining. In addition

  15. Carpal tunnel syndrome in Mucopolysaccharidoses. A report of four cases in child.

    PubMed

    Bona, I; Vial, C; Brunet, P; Couturier, J C; Girard-Madoux, M; Bady, B; Guibaud, P

    1994-12-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is very uncommon in childhood. Sixty-five cases are reported in the literature, principally due to metabolic diseases. In Mucopolysaccharidoses, prospective studies (Wraith and Alani, 1990) found a bilateral CTS in about 90%. We report four cases of Mucopolysaccharidoses, diagnosed on clinical and biological data (two cases of Hurler disease, and two cases of Hunter disease), in children aged less than five years. Each child had claw hands, without thenar atrophy. Median nerve conduction studies and electromyography confirm the CTS. Motor and sensory nerve conductions are normal in other nerves. Concentric needle studies show in two cases, on abductor pollicis brevis, spontaneous activities as repetitive discharges, fasciculations and multiplets. Median nerve stimulations reveal responses with late potentials during 70 ms due to reinnervation. The physiopathology of those carpal tunnel syndromes is discussed. PMID:7882890

  16. Grey-scale sonography and sonoelastography for diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Hideaki; Morizaki, Yutaka; Kashiyama, Takahiro; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common peripheral entrapment neuropathy of the median nerve at wrist level, and is thought to be caused by compression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel. There is no standard quantitative reference for the diagnosis of CTS. Grey-scale sonography and sonoelastography (SEL) have been used as diagnostic tools. The most commonly agreed findings in grey-scale sonography for the diagnosis of CTS is enlargement of the median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA). Several authors have assessed additional parameters. “Delta CSA” is the difference between the proximal median nerve CSA at the pronator quadratus and the maximal CSA within the carpal tunnel. The “CSA ratio” is the ratio of CSA in the carpal tunnel to the CSA at the mid forearm. These additional parameters showed better diagnostic accuracy than CSA measurement alone. Recently, a number of studies have investigated the elasticity of the median nerve using SEL, and have shown that this also has diagnostic value, as it was significantly stiffer in CTS patients compared to healthy volunteers. In this review, we summarize the usefulness of grey-scale sonography and SEL in diagnosing CTS. PMID:27027498

  17. The Clinical Practice Guideline on Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Workers' Compensation.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, Charles A

    2016-06-01

    The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons has released an updated Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) on the evaluation and treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). In 2007, the initial CPG on CTS evaluated diagnosis and in 2008 and 2011, the CPG on CTS assessed treatment. The most recent CPG assesses both diagnosis and treatment in a generally non-controversial way. We assess the potential impact of this CPG on the care of workers compensation patients. PMID:27113907

  18. A handy review of carpal tunnel syndrome: From anatomy to diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi-rad, Mohammad; Nosair, Emad; Vegh, Andrea; Mohammadi, Afshin; Akkad, Adam; Lesha, Emal; Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Sayed, Doaa; Davarian, Ali; Maleki-Miyandoab, Tooraj; Hasan, Anwarul

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most commonly diagnosed disabling condition of the upper extremities. It is the most commonly known and prevalent type of peripheral entrapment neuropathy that accounts for about 90% of all entrapment neuropathies. This review aims to provide an outline of CTS by considering anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical manifestation, diagnostic modalities and management of this common condition, with an emphasis on the diagnostic imaging evaluation. PMID:24976931

  19. Electroacupuncture Helped Ease Carpal Tunnel in Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159240.html Electroacupuncture Helped Ease Carpal Tunnel in Study But experts say finding is preliminary, didn't ... condition known as carpal tunnel syndrome. In the study, electroacupuncture helped carpal tunnel patients with long-lasting ...

  20. Evaluation of surgical treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome using local anesthesia☆

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marco Felipe Francisco Honorato; da Rocha Luz Júnior, Aurimar; Roncaglio, Bruno; Queiróz Júnior, Célio Pinheiro; Tribst, Marcelo Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the results and complications from surgical treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome by means of an open route, using a local anesthesia technique comprising use of a solution of lidocaine, epinephrine and sodium bicarbonate. Material and methods This was a cohort study conducted through evaluating the medical files of 16 patients who underwent open surgery to treat carpal tunnel syndrome, with use of local anesthesia consisting of 20 mL of 1% lidocaine, adrenaline at 1:100,000 and 2 mL of sodium bicarbonate. The DASH scores before the operation and six months after the operation were evaluated. Comparisons were made regarding the intensity of pain at the time of applying the anesthetic and during the surgical procedure, and in relation to other types of procedure. Results The DASH score improved from 65.17 to 16.53 six months after the operation (p < 0.01). In relation to the anesthesia, 75% of the patients reported that this technique was better than or the same as venous puncture and 81% reported that it was better than a dental procedure. Intraoperative pain occurred in two cases. There were no occurrences of ischemia. Conclusion Use of local anesthesia for surgically treating carpal tunnel syndrome is effective for performing the procedure and for the final result. PMID:26962490

  1. Low-power laser therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome: effective optical power

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Zhao, Cheng-qiang; Ye, Gang; Liu, Can-dong; Xu, Wen-dong

    2016-01-01

    Low-power laser therapy has been used for the non-surgical treatment of mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome, although its efficacy has been a long-standing controversy. The laser parameters in low-power laser therapy are closely related to the laser effect on human tissue. To evaluate the efficacy of low-power laser therapy, laser parameters should be accurately measured and controlled, which has been ignored in previous clinical trials. Here, we report the measurement of the effective optical power of low-power laser therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome. By monitoring the backside reflection and scattering laser power from human skin at the wrist, the effective laser power can be inferred. Using clinical measurements from 30 cases, we found that the effective laser power differed significantly among cases, with the measured laser reflection coefficient ranging from 1.8% to 54%. The reflection coefficient for 36.7% of these 30 cases was in the range of 10–20%, but for 16.7% of cases, it was higher than 40%. Consequently, monitoring the effective optical power during laser irradiation is necessary for the laser therapy of carpal tunnel syndrome.

  2. Diagnosis of Severe Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Using Nerve Conduction Study and Ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Kazuhiro; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Kido, Kenji; Imajo, Yasuaki; Funaba, Masahiro; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the correlation between nerve conduction study and ultrasonographic findings for assessment of the usefulness of ultrasonography in determining carpal tunnel syndrome severity. Hands of adults with carpal tunnel syndrome were assessed using ultrasound and nerve conduction studies and grouped according to median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA). There were significant differences (p < 0.01) in mean median nerve CSA between controls, patients with median sensory nerve conduction velocity ≤40 m/s and patients with absent sensory nerve action potential and between controls, patients with median nerve distal motor latency ≥4.5 ms and patients with absent compound muscle action potentials of the abductor pollicis brevis. This is the first report to define median nerve CSA cutoff values (18 mm(2)) for determining carpal tunnel syndrome severity in patients with absent compound muscle action potentials of the abductor pollicis brevis. Median nerve CSA values below the cutoff values should prompt clinicians to consider other disorders, such as cervical compressive myelopathy. PMID:26111913

  3. [Two unusual complications of the Klippel-Trénaunay syndrome: carpal tunnel syndrome and cerebral venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Awada, A; Al Jumah, M; Al Ayafi, H

    2003-07-01

    Most neurological complications of the Klippel-Trénaunay syndrome are due to the presence of cerebral or spinal arteriovenous malformations and their consequences. We report 2 cases of unusual complications of this syndrome. In the first case, where the anomalies were restricted to the left upper extremity, the occurrence of hand numbness led to the discovery of a carpal tunnel syndrome, probably due to the lymphatic abnormal proliferation within the carpal tunnel. In the second case the disease was much more widespread and affecting, among other localizations, the cephalic extremity. The patient presented with intractable left motor seizures that appeared to be due to an occlusion of the right transverse and sigmoid sinuses. Treatment with heparin and anticonvulsants led to rapid recovery. PMID:12910081

  4. Subsynovial Connective Tissue is Sensitive to Surgical Interventions in a Rabbit Model of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu-Long; Moriya, Tamami; Zhao, Chunfeng; Kirk, Ramona L.; Chikenji, Takako; Passe, Sandra M.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2011-01-01

    The most common histological finding in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is non-inflammatory fibrosis and thickening of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) in the tunnel. While the cause of SSCT fibrosis and the relationship of SSCT fibrosis and CTS are unknown, one hypothesis is that SSCT injury causes fibrosis, and that the fibrosis then leads to CTS. We investigated the sensitivity of the SSCT to injuries. Two types of surgical intervention were performed in a rabbit model: a skin incision with tendon laceration and SSCT stretching sufficient to damage the SSCT, and skin incision alone,. Twelve weeks after surgery, the rabbit carpal tunnel tissues were studied with immunochemistry for TGF-β receptors 1, 2, and 3, collagen III, and collagen VI. All TGF-β receptors were expressed. The percentages of the TGF-β receptors’ expressions were less in the control SSCT fibroblasts than in the fibroblasts from rabbits with surgical interventions. The surgical interventions did not result in any alteration of collagen III expression. However, both surgical interventions resulted in a significant decrease in collagen VI expression compared to the control group. The two surgical interventions achieved similar expression of TGF-β receptors and collagens. Our results provide evidence that the SSCT is sensitive to surgical interventions, even when these are modest. Since SSCT fibrosis is a hallmark of carpal tunnel syndrome, these data also suggest that such fibrosis could result from relatively minor trauma. PMID:22009518

  5. Hand pain other than carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS): the role of occupational factors.

    PubMed

    Andréu, José-Luis; Otón, Teresa; Silva-Fernández, Lucía; Sanz, Jesús

    2011-02-01

    Some occupational factors have been implicated in the development of disorders manifested as hand pain. The associations seem to be well documented in processes such as hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) or writer's cramp. There are contradictory data in the literature about the relationships of trigger finger, De Quervain's tenosynovitis (DQT) and tenosynovitis of the wrist with occupational factors. In this article, we review current knowledge about clinical manifestations, case definition, implicated occupational factors, diagnosis and treatment of the most relevant hand pain disorders that have been associated with occupational factors, excluding carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). PMID:21663848

  6. Atypical Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in a Holt Oram Patient: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Mace, James; Reddy, Srikanth; Mohil, Randeep

    2014-01-01

    We present a case report of a patient diagnosed with Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS) presenting with clinical and electrophysiologically confirmed carpal tunnel syndrome. Pre-operative Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an abnormal course of the median nerve; as such an atypical incision and approach were carried out to decompress the nerve to excellent post operative clinical effect. To our knowledge this is the first description of abnormal nervous course in a patient with HOS leading to peripheral entrapment. A literature surrounding the important aspects of HOS to the orthopaedic surgeon is presented concomitantly. PMID:25621081

  7. Comparison of high-resolution sonography and electrophysiology in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kanikannan, Meena Angamuthu; Boddu, Demudu Babu; Umamahesh; Sarva, Sailaja; Durga, Padmaja; Borgohain, Rupam

    2015-01-01

    Background: The diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS) in comparison to electro-diagnostic testing (EDX) in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is debatable. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of HRUS with EDX in patients with various grades of CTS and CTS associated with peripheral neuropathy (CTS + PNP). Materials and Methods: A prospective cohort of 57 patients with possible CTS was studied along with matched controls. The cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve at the inlet of carpal tunnel was assessed by a sonologist blinded to the clinical and EDX data. Palm wrist distal sensory latency difference (PWDSLD), second lumbrical-interosseus distal motor latency difference (2LIDMLD) and CSA were compared in patients with different grades of severity of CTS and CTS+PNP. Results: Total 92 hands of 57 patients met the clinical criteria for CTS. Mean CSA at the inlet of carpal tunnel was 0.11 ± 0.0275 cm2. It had the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive values of 76.43%, 72.72%, 89.47% and 68%, respectively (P < 0.0001). Overall, HRUS had good correlation with PWDSLD and 2LIDMLD electro-diagnostic studies in all grades of CTS and CTS + PNP. Conclusion: HRUS can be used as a complementary screening tool to EDX. However, EDX has been found to be more sensitive and specific in mild CTS. PMID:26019423

  8. Acute Radiation Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary Radiation Emergencies & Your Health Possible Health Effects Contamination and Exposure Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) Cutaneous Radiation ... Decision Making in Radiation Emergencies Protective Actions Internal Contamination Clinical Reference (ICCR) Application Psychological First Aid in ...

  9. Gliding characteristics of flexor tendon and tenosynovium in carpal tunnel syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ettema, Anke M; Zhao, Chunfeng; Amadio, Peter C; O'Byrne, Megan M; An, Kai-Nan

    2007-04-01

    The characteristic pathological finding in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is noninflammatory fibrosis of the synovium. How this fibrosis might affect tendon function, if at all, is unknown. The subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) lies between the flexor tendons and the visceral synovium (VS) of the ulnar tenosynovial bursa. Fibrosis of the SSCT may well affect its gliding characteristics. To investigate this possibility, the relative motion of the flexor tendon and VS was observed during finger flexion in patients undergoing carpal tunnel surgery, and for comparison in hands without CTS, in an in vitro cadaver model. We used a camera to document the gliding motion of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS III) tendon and SSCT in three patients with CTS during carpal tunnel release and compared this with simulated active flexion in three cadavers with no antemortem history of CTS. The data were digitized with the use of Analyze Software (Biomedical Imaging Resource, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN). In the CTS patients, the SSCT moved en bloc with the tendon, whereas, in the controls the SSCT moved smoothly and separately from the tendon. The ratio of VS to tendon motion was higher for the patients than in the cadaver controls. These findings suggest that in patients with CTS the synovial fibrosis has altered the gliding characteristics of the SSCT. The alterations in the gliding characteristics of the SSCT may affect the ability of the tendons in the carpal tunnel to glide independently from each other, or from the nearby median nerve. These abnormal tendon mechanics may play a role in the etiology of CTS. PMID:16944527

  10. What Does the Transverse Carpal Ligament Contribute to Carpal Stability?

    PubMed Central

    Vanhees, Matthias; Verstreken, Frederik; van Riet, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Background The transverse carpal ligament is well known for its involvement in carpal tunnel syndrome, and sectioning of this ligament remains the definite treatment for this pathology. Some authors believe that the transverse carpal ligament is an important stabilizer of the carpal arch, whereas others do not consider it to be significant. Several studies have been performed, both in vivo and in in vitro. Sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament does not seem to have any effect on the width of the carpal arch in the unloaded condition. However, patients will load the arch during their activities of daily living. Materials and Methods A cadaveric study was done with distraction of the carpal bones before and after sectioning the transverse carpal ligament. Results With the transverse carpal ligament intact, the carpal arch is mobile, with distraction leading up to 50% widening of the arch. Sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament resulted in a significant widening of the carpal arch by a further 30%. Conclusions Loading of the carpal arch after sectioning of the transeverse carapal ligament leads to a significant increase in intracarpal mobility. This will inevitably influence carpal kinematics in the patient and might be responsible for some complications after simple carpal tunnel releases, such as pillar pain, palmar tenderness, and loss of grip strength. PMID:25709876

  11. Wrist flexion as an adjunct to the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dunnan, J B; Waylonis, G W

    1991-03-01

    The effects of five minutes of wrist flexion on median motor and sensory evoked potential latencies in 87 individuals were studied. Nineteen subjects had carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) as diagnosed by increased median nerve latencies across the wrist, and 68 had values in the normal range and were assigned to the control group. A slight prolongation of up to 0.5m sec of evoked potential latencies was observed in both groups after flexion, but the differences between the two groups were not significant to establish the value of adding wrist flexion to conventional screening methods. PMID:1998456

  12. Mucopolysaccharidosis type-IS presenting with onset of carpal tunnel syndrome at adolescence.

    PubMed

    Bahadir, Cengiz; Kurtulus, Duygu; Cihandide, Ercan

    2009-12-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) results from deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-L iduronidase. Three subtypes, based on severity of clinical findings, have been described, of which MPS type IS (also called Scheie syndrome) is the mildest form. A woman (age, 30 years) and her little brother (age, 21 years) presented to our clinic complaining of atrophy of the thenar muscles, numbness in both hands, and contractures in the finger joints. Electrophysiologic examination showed severe carpal tunnel syndrome for both patients. Findings of cardiac and ocular involvements and decreased level of alpha-L iduronidase confirmed the diagnosis of Scheie syndrome. Enzyme replacement therapy was initiated for the further prevention of musculoskeletal and other organ complications. Delayed diagnosis of MPS type-IS and the musculoskeletal findings are discussed in these 2 familial patients. PMID:19955999

  13. Single versus repetitive injection of lignocaine in the management of carpal tunnel syndrome--a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Akarsu, S; Karadaş, Ö; Tok, F; Levent Gül, H; Eroğlu, E

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of single versus repetitive injection of lignocaine into the carpal tunnel for the management of carpal tunnel syndrome. The 42 patients included were randomly assigned to two Groups: group 1 was injected with 4 mL of 1% lignocaine once and Group 2 was injected with 4 mL of 1% lignocaine twice a week for 2 weeks. Clinical and electrophysiological evaluations were performed at the study onset, and at 6 and 12 weeks following the final injection. Initially, the groups were similar with respect to clinical and electrophysiological findings. All parameters in Group 2 improved 6 weeks post treatment (p < 0.05), and these improvements persisted at 12 weeks post treatment (p < 0.05). Repetitive local lignocaine injection was effective in reducing the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome and improving electrophysiological findings. PMID:25061062

  14. Assessment of the Presence of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus, Hypothyroidism and Acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Nas, Kemal; Kilinç, Faruk; Tasdemir, Nebahat; Bozkurt, Mehtap; Yildiz, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is one of the most common entrapment neuropathies of the upper limbs. It results from compromised median nerve function of the wrist that is caused by increased pressure in the carpal tunnel. Repetitive use of the hand and wrist, obesity, pregnancy, rheumatoid diseases, trauma and endocrinopathies are some of the risk factors for CTS. Aim The purpose of this study was to find out whether patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), hypothyroidism and acromegaly have an increased incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome compared to each other and normal population. Materials and Methods Patients were assigned into three groups as follows: patients with type II DM n: 100, patients with hypothyroidism n:48 and patients with acromegaly n:36. In addition, 50 healthy individuals were included in the study as control subjects. Patients were asked if they had any pain, symptoms of paraesthesia and numbness. Patients with peripheral neuropathy were excluded from the study. Boston Symptom Severity Scale and Functional Capacity Scale were used to assess symptom severity and functional capacity. CTS was investigated by performing electrophysiological study for both hands. Results The incidence of CTS was significantly higher in all three groups compared to the control group (p>0.05). In addition, the incidence of CTS was significantly higher in the DM group compared to the hypothyroid and acromegaly groups (p<0.001). The incidence of bilateral CTS in the DM group was significantly higher compared to both hypothyroid and acromegaly groups and the control group (p<0.001). Conclusion CTS has a higher incidence in DM, hypothyroid and acromegaly patients compared to healthy individuals. Clinicians should be careful about development of CTS in DM, hypothyroidism and acromegaly. They should adopt a multidisciplinary approach and co-operate with the psychiatrist. PMID:26266148

  15. Transverse Movement of the Median Nerve in the Carpal Tunnel during Wrist and Finger Motion in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nanno, Mitsuhiko; Sawaizumi, Takuya; Kodera, Norie; Tomori, Yuji; Takai, Shinro

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral compression neuropathy of the upper extremity. Repetitive wrist and finger motion has been suggested as a major factor of pathogenesis of CTS. However, little is known about the pathomechanics of CTS. We aimed to evaluate the movement of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel during wrist and finger motions using transverse ultrasound in 21 patients with CTS (5 men and 16 women with mean age 69.0 years). We examined quantitatively the median nerve location as a coordinate within the carpal tunnel at varied wrist positions with all fingers full extension and flexion respectively in the affected and unaffected sides. We thus found that at all wrist positions during finger motion, the median nerve moved significantly more ulnopalmarly in the affected side compared to the unaffected side (p < 0.05). Especially, at the wrist palmar-flexion position as a provocative test, the nerve moved significantly (p < 0.05) the most ulnopalmarly among all wrist positions in the affected side. The nerve was the most strongly compressed against the transverse carpal ligament by the flexor tendons. Additionally, the displacement amount of the nerve in the dorsal-palmar direction was significantly smaller in the affected side than in the unaffected side. These findings indicate that such a pattern of nerve movement has the potential to distinguish affected from unaffected individuals. This ultrasound information could be useful in better understanding of the pathomechanics of CTS, and in further improvement of diagnosis and treatment for CTS. PMID:26133190

  16. The Effect of Polarized Polychromatic Noncoherent Light (Bioptron) Therapy on Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Raeissadat, Seyed Ahmad; Rayegani, Seyed Mansoor; Rezaei, Sajad; Bahrami, Mohammad Hasan; Eliaspour, Dariush; Karimzadeh, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: To study the effects of Polarized Polychromatic Noncoherent Light (Bioptron) therapy on patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods: This study was designed as a randomized clinical trial. Forty four patients with mild or moderate CTS (confirmed by clinical and electrodiagnostic studies) were assigned randomly into two groups (intervention and control goups). At the beginning of the study, both groups received wrist splinting for 8 weeks. Bioptron light was applied for the intervention group (eight sessions, for 3/weeks). Bioptron was applied perpendicularly to the wrist from a 10 centimeter sdistance. Pain severity and electrodiagnostic measurements were compared from before to 8 weeks after initiating each treatment. Results: Eight weeks after starting the treatments, the mean of pain severity based on Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores decreased significantly in both groups. Median Sensory Nerve Action Potential (SNAP) latency decreased significantly in both groups. However, other electrophysiological findings (median Compound Motor Action Potential (CMAP) latency and amplitude, also SNAP amplitude) did not change after the therapy in both groups. There was no meaningful difference between two groups regarding the changes in the pain severity. Conclusion: Bioptron with the above mentioned parameters led to therapeutic effects equal to splinting alone in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. However, applying Bioptron with different therapeutic protocols and light parameters other than used in this study, perhaps longer duration of therapy and long term assessment may reveal different results favoring Bioptron therapy. PMID:25606338

  17. Assessment of Decisional Conflict about the Treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome, Comparing Patients and Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Hageman, Michiel GJS.; Bossen, Jeroen K.; Neuhaus, Valentin; Mudgal, Chaitanya S.; Ring, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: As part of the process of developing a decision aid for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) according to the Ottawa Decision Support Framework, we were interested in the level of ‘decisional conflict’ of hand surgeons and patients with CTS. This study addresses the null hypothesis that there is no difference between surgeon and patient decisional conflict with respect to test and treatment options for CTS. Secondary analyses assess the impact of patient and physician demographics and the strength of the patient-physician relationship on decisional conflict. Methods: One-hundred-twenty-three observers of the Science of Variation Group (SOVG) and 84 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome completed a survey regarding the Decisional Conflict Scale. Patients also filled out the Pain Self-efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ) and the Patient Doctor Relationship Questionnaire (PDRQ-9). Results: On average, patients had significantly greater decision conflict and scored higher on most subscales of the decisional conflict scale than hand surgeons. Factors associated with greater decision conflict were specific hand surgeon, less self-efficacy (confidence that one can achieve one’s goals in spite of pain), and higher PDRQ (relationship between patient and doctor). Surgeons from Europe have--on average--significantly more decision conflict than surgeons in the United States of America. Conclusions: Patients with CTS have more decision conflict than hand surgeons. Decision aids might help narrow this gap in decisional conflict. PMID:27200394

  18. Battling Carpal Tunnel Syndrome through Ergonomics: A Case Study of Texas A&M's Library Provides Insights and Answers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Joyce K.

    1995-01-01

    Current library automation practices and new technologies have forced library managers to seek some means of reducing carpal tunnel syndrome, and a case study of Texas A&M's library provides insights. Highlights include identifying and assessing the injuries, adjusting work surfaces, testing and selecting new keyboards, and developing adjustable…

  19. Grading severity of carpal tunnel syndrome in electrodiagnostic reports: why grading is recommended.

    PubMed

    Sucher, Benjamin M

    2013-09-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is not difficult to confirm by electrodiagnosis (EDx), but the challenge lies in whether to grade the severity and the method for doing so. The arguments about grading are discussed, with an emphasis in favor, using a method that relies on the EDx data, but qualifies that it is the median neuropathy being graded and not the syndrome of CTS. Although use of latencies can be arbitrary and misleading, it is possible to apply other criteria, such as low amplitudes or conduction block and denervation, to develop a grading scale that could be applied widely. Several previously published grading schemes are reviewed, and a new method is described that combines the prior ranking criteria into 3 basic categories. Application of a grading system identifies the degree of nerve injury and thus allows the referring physician to utilize optimally the EDx report to manage the patient. PMID:23436589

  20. Carpal tunnel syndrome associated with the use of aromatase inhibitors in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nishihori, Taiga; Choi, Jaehyuk; DiGiovanna, Michael P; Thomson, J Grant; Kohler, Peter C; McGurn, Joanne; Chung, Gina G

    2008-08-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AI) inhibit peripheral conversion of androgens to estradiol and are commonly used as hormonal therapy for postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer in the metastatic and adjuvant settings. Joint-related symptoms, however, are seen in a significant proportion of patients. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common nerve entrapment disorder affecting the median nerve. We describe 6 patients with newly diagnosed CTS after initiation of adjuvant AI therapy. Aromatase inhibitors were discontinued in several patients secondary to this toxicity with some switching to tamoxifen and most subsequently experiencing relief of their symptoms. Potential pathophysiologic roles of hormonal manipulation with AIs and other risk factors that might contribute to CTS are discussed. Aromatase inhibitors might accentuate the occurrence of CTS and potentially other nerve entrapment syndromes, and a more systematic approach should be used to better understand the clinical significance and incidence of these symptoms. PMID:18757265

  1. Clinical Findings of Asymptomatic Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical differences between patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) who have asymptomatic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and those who have symptomatic CTS. Methods Sixty-three patients with DM were assessed using the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ), nerve conduction studies (NCS), and ultrasonographic evaluation of the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve. According to the BCTQ responses and NCS results, the patients were divided into the following three groups: group 1 (n=16), in which NCS results did not reveal CTS; group 2 (n=19), in which NCS results revealed CTS but the group scored 0 points on the BCTQ (asymptomatic); and group 3 (n=28), in which NCS results revealed CTS and the group scored >1 point on the BCTQ (symptomatic). The clinical findings, NCS results, and CSA of the median nerve were compared among the three groups. Results There were no significant differences in age, DM duration, glycated hemoglobin levels, and presence of diabetic polyneuropathy among the three groups. The peak latency of the median sensory nerve action potential was significantly shorter in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3 (p<0.001); however, no difference was observed between groups 2 and 3. CSA of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel in group 2 was significantly larger than that in group 1 and smaller than that in group 3 (p<0.05). Conclusion The results of our study suggest that the symptoms of CTS in patients with diabetes are related to CSA of the median nerve, which is consistent with swelling of the nerve. PMID:27446786

  2. Surgical treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome and trigger digits in children with mucopolysaccharide storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Van Heest, A E; House, J; Krivit, W; Walker, K

    1998-03-01

    The role of surgical intervention for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and trigger digits in children with mucopolysaccharide storage disorders (MPSDs) has not been clearly defined, particularly as the treatment of the underlying disease has advanced to include bone marrow transplantation. This study reviews our experience in the treatment of CTS and trigger digits in 22 children with MPSDs who were evaluated for CTS by electromyographic (EMG)/nerve conduction velocity (NCV) testing. Seventeen children were diagnosed with CTS by EMG/NCV testing and were treated with bilateral open surgical release with or without flexor tenosynovectomy. The EMG/NCV testing revealed normal results in 5 patients who are subsequently being monitored. Forty-five digits in 8 children were diagnosed clinically with trigger digits. Nineteen digits were treated by annular pulley release alone. Twenty-six digits were treated by annular pulley release with partial flexor digitorum superficialis tendon resection. The average age at the time of hand surgery was 6.3 years, and at the time of follow-up, 9.6 years. Postoperative EMG/NCV testing in 7 children showed 1 with improvement and 6 with normalization. None of the patients undergoing carpal tunnel release went on to develop thenar atrophy or absent sensibility, as has been reported in untreated cases. Patients were evaluated for triggering digits both by preoperative tendon palpation and by intraoperative flexor tendon excursion at the time of open carpal tunnel release. All patients undergoing trigger release had improved active digital flexion seen at the final follow-up visit. Because of the very high incidence of CTS and trigger digits in this population, the authors currently recommend routine screening of EMG/NCV for all children with MPSDs. Early surgical intervention for nerve compression and stenosing flexor tenosynovitis can maximize hand function in these children. PMID:9556262

  3. [Carpal tunnel syndrome in children with mucopolysaccharidosis type 1H: diagnosis and therapy in an interdisciplinary centre].

    PubMed

    Meyer-Marcotty, M V; Kollewe, K; Dengler, R; Grigull, L; Altintas, M A; Vogt, P M

    2012-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is common in children with mucopolysaccharidosis type 1H (MPS type 1H). Clinical signs of carpal tunnel syndrome are frequently absent in these children and it is often very difficult to perform and interpret neurophysiological investigations. In this article we wish to present our experience and results regarding the diagnosis and postoperative results after decompression of the median nerve.In an interdisciplinary set-up we are currently treating 11 MPS type 1H children following blood stem cell transplantation. 7 patients were operated 12 times (5 bilateral operations) because of a carpal tunnel syndrome (age at the time of operation 83,3 months, (43-143 months), 2 male, 5 female). 6 patients had a follow up after 23,7 months (9-59 months). 6 patients had a histological analysis of the flexor retinaculum. Three patients had a postoperative neurophysiological investigation.Each of the operated patients had at least 1 preoperative clinical sign of a carpal tunnel syndrome. We found at least 1 pathological finding in motor and sensory nerve conduction studies in each patient. 6 of the 7 children operated on were symptom-free at postoperative follow-up. 1 of the 3 patients with a postoperative neurophysiological follow up showed a deterioration of the nerve conduction studies. This patient was free of symptoms postoperatively. Biopsy of the flexor retinaculum confirmed abundant proteoglycan deposition. We had neither postoperative complications nor were revisional operations necessary.The Diagnosis of a carpal tunnel syndrome in children with MPS Typ 1H needs a thorough medical history, the correct interpretation of the clinical symptoms and sophisticated nerve conduction studies. Wether the improvement of the postoperative clinical situation lasts has to be evaluated in a long term investigation especially because in one patient in our group we saw a deterioration of the nerve conduction studies postoperatively. PMID:22382905

  4. Sensory axons excitability changes in carpal tunnel syndrome after neural mobilization.

    PubMed

    Ginanneschi, Federica; Cioncoloni, David; Bigliazzi, Jacopo; Bonifazi, Marco; Lorè, Cosimo; Rossi, Alessandro

    2015-09-01

    Increased mechanosensitivity of the median nerve in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has been demonstrated during upper limb tension test 1 (ULTT1) when the nerve is passively elongated. However, the neurophysiological changes of the sensory axons during stressing activities are unknown. The aim of present study was to verify possible changes in the excitability of median nerve afferent axons following nerve stress in elongation, in subjects with and without CTS. Eight CTS hands and eight controls were selected. Recruitment properties of the median nerve were studied by analyzing the relationship between the intensity of electrical stimulation and the size of motor response, before and after intermittent-repetitive neural mobilization. Only in CTS hands, after the intervention, the stimulus-response curve was strikingly abnormal: both plateau and slope values were significantly lower. During anatomical stress across the median nerve in elongation, compressive forces may exert mechanical traction on the median nerve, since it is 'tethered' at the carpal tunnel, resulting inactivation of Na(+) channels at the wrist, or impairment of energy-dependent processes which affect axonal conduction block. We conclude that in entrapment neuropathies, neural mobilization during nerve elongation may generate conduction failure in peripheral nerve. Our study supports specific considerations for patient education and therapeutic approaches. PMID:25896622

  5. Motor Unit Number Estimation and Motor Unit Action Potential Analysis in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Min Kyun; Jee, Sung Ju; Kim, Young-Jae; Shin, Hyun-Dae

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical significance of motor unit number estimation (MUNE) and quantitative analysis of motor unit action potential (MUAP) in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) according to electrophysiologic severity, ultrasonographic measurement and clinical symptoms. Method We evaluated 78 wrists of 45 patients, who had been diagnosed with CTS and 42 wrists of 21 healthy controls. Median nerve conduction studies, amplitude and duration of MUAP, and the MUNE of the abductor pollicis brevis were measured. The cross sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve at the pisiform and distal radioulnar joint level was determined by high resolution ultrasonography. Clinical symptom of CTS was assessed using the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ). Results The MUNE, the amplitude and the duration of MUAP of the CTS group were significantly different from those found in the control group. The area under the ROC curve was 0.944 for MUNE, 0.923 for MUAP amplitude and 0.953 for MUAP duration. MUNE had a negative correlation with electrophysiologic stage of CTS, amplitude and duration of MUAP, CSA at pisiform level, and the score of BCTQ. The amplitude and duration of MUAP had a positive correlation with the score of BCTQ. The electrophysiologic stage was correlated with amplitude but not with the duration of MUAP. Conclusion MUNE, amplitude and duration of MUAP are useful tests for diagnosis of CTS. In addition, the MUNE serves as a good indicator of CTS severity. PMID:22506210

  6. Sensitivity of three median-to-ulnar comparative tests in diagnosis of mild carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uncini, A; Di Muzio, A; Awad, J; Manente, G; Tafuro, M; Gambi, D

    1993-12-01

    We studied 193 hands of 113 patients referred for typical carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Ninety-five (49%) hands had normal median distal motor latency (< or = 4.2 ms) and normal or borderline sensory conduction velocity from digit 2 stimulation (> or = 45 m/s). In these cases we performed three median to ulnar comparative tests: (1) difference between median and ulnar distal motor latencies recorded from the second lumbrical and interossei muscles (2L-INT); (2) difference between median and ulnar sensory latencies from digit 4 stimulation (D4M-D4U); and (3) difference between median and ulnar mixed nerve latencies from palmar stimulation (PM-PU). The 2L-INT difference was > or = 0.6 ms in 10% of hands. PM-PU and D4M-D4U were > or = 0.5 ms in 56% and 77% of hands, respectively. The greater sensitivity of D4M-D4U might be explained by the funicular topography and consequent greater susceptibility to compression of the cutaneous fibers from the third interspace which, at the distal carpal tunnel, are clumped superficially in the anteroulnar portion of the median nerve just beneath the transverse ligament. PMID:8232394

  7. The SF-6D health utility index in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Atroshi, I; Gummesson, C; McCabe, S J; Ornstein, E

    2007-04-01

    Cost effectiveness is an important factor to consider when choosing between various hand surgical interventions. Health utility measures can be used to determine cost effectiveness. The SF-6D is a health utility index derived from 11 items of the SF-36 quality of life questionnaire; values range from 0.296 to 1.0 ("perfect" health). We evaluated the validity of the SF-6D in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) who completed the SF-36 and the CTS symptom severity and functional status questionnaire before and 3 months after carpal tunnel release. Complete responses to the SF-6D items were available for 100 patients at baseline and 95 patients at baseline and follow-up. The mean SF-6D health utility index was 0.69 (SD 0.13) before surgery and 0.77 (SD 0.13) after surgery (moderate effect size). The SF-6D could discriminate between patient groups differing in self-rated global health and in whether, or not, they had a minimal clinically important improvement in CTS symptom severity after surgery. The SF-6D appears to be a valid measure of health utilities in patients with CTS and can be used in cost effectiveness studies. PMID:17223234

  8. Efficacy of high frequency ultrasound in postoperative evaluation of carpal tunnel syndrome treatment

    PubMed Central

    Urbanik, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common entrapment neuropathy and a frequent cause of sick leave because of work-related hand overload. The main treatment is operation. Aim The aim of the study is to assess the usefulness of high frequency ultrasound in the postoperative evaluation of CTS treatment efficacy. Material and methods Sixty-two patients (50 women and 12 men aged 28–70, mean age 55.2) underwent surgical treatment of CTS. Ultrasound examinations of the wrist in all carpal tunnel sufferers were performed 3 months after the procedure with the use of a high frequency broadband linear array transducer (6–18 MHz, using 18 MHz band) of MyLab 70/Esaote. On the basis of the collected data, the author has performed multiple analyses to confirm the usefulness of ultrasound imaging for postoperative evaluation of CTS treatment efficacy. Results Among all 62 patients, 3 months after surgical median nerve decompression: in 40 patients, CTS symptoms subsided completely, and sonographic evaluation did not show median nerve entrapment signs; in 9 patients, CTS symptoms persisted or exacerbated, and ultrasound proved nerve compression revealing preserved flexor retinaculum fibers; in 13 patients, scar tissue symptoms occurred, and in 5 of them CTS did not subside completely (although ultrasound showed no signs of compression). Conclusions Ultrasound imaging with the use of a high frequency transducer is a valuable diagnostic tool for postoperative assessment of CTS treatment efficacy. PMID:27103999

  9. Electroacupuncture and splinting versus splinting alone to treat carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Vincent C.H.; Ho, Robin S.T.; Liu, Siya; Chong, Marc K.C.; Leung, Albert W.N.; Yip, Benjamin H.K.; Griffiths, Sian M.; Zee, Benny C.Y.; Wu, Justin C.Y.; Sit, Regina W.S.; Lau, Alexander Y.L.; Wong, Samuel Y.S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The effectiveness of acupuncture for managing carpal tunnel syndrome is uncertain, particularly in patients already receiving conventional treatments (e.g., splinting). We aimed to assess the effects of electroacupuncture combined with splinting. Methods: We conducted a randomized parallel-group assessor-blinded 2-arm trial on patients with clinically diagnosed primary carpal tunnel syndrome. The treatment group was offered 13 sessions of electroacupuncture over 17 weeks. The treatment and control groups both received continuous nocturnal wrist splinting. Results: Of 181 participants randomly assigned to electroacupuncture combined with splinting (n = 90) or splinting alone (n = 91), 174 (96.1%) completed all follow-up. The electroacupuncture group showed greater improvements at 17 weeks in symptoms (primary outcome of Symptom Severity Scale score mean difference [MD] −0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.36 to −0.03), disability (Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire score MD −6.72, 95% CI −10.9 to −2.57), function (Functional Status Scale score MD −0.22, 95% CI −0.38 to −0.05), dexterity (time to complete blinded pick-up test MD −6.13 seconds, 95% CI −10.6 to −1.63) and maximal tip pinch strength (MD 1.17 lb, 95% CI 0.48 to 1.86). Differences between groups were small and clinically unimportant for reduction in pain (numerical rating scale −0.70, 95% CI −1.34 to −0.06), and not significant for sensation (first finger monofilament test −0.08 mm, 95% CI −0.22 to 0.06). Interpretation: For patients with primary carpal tunnel syndrome, chronic mild to moderate symptoms and no indication for surgery, electroacupuncture produces small changes in symptoms, disability, function, dexterity and pinch strength when added to nocturnal splinting. Trial registration: Chinese Clinical Trial Register no. ChiCTR-TRC-11001655 (www.chictr.org.cn/showprojen.aspx?proj=7890); subsequently deposited in the World Health

  10. Spatial-temporal features of thermal images for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estupinan Roldan, Kevin; Ortega Piedrahita, Marco A.; Benitez, Hernan D.

    2014-02-01

    Disorders associated with repeated trauma account for about 60% of all occupational illnesses, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) being the most consulted today. Infrared Thermography (IT) has come to play an important role in the field of medicine. IT is non-invasive and detects diseases based on measuring temperature variations. IT represents a possible alternative to prevalent methods for diagnosis of CTS (i.e. nerve conduction studies and electromiography). This work presents a set of spatial-temporal features extracted from thermal images taken in healthy and ill patients. Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers test this feature space with Leave One Out (LOO) validation error. The results of the proposed approach show linear separability and lower validation errors when compared to features used in previous works that do not account for temperature spatial variability.

  11. Wheelchair ergonomic hand drive mechanism use improves wrist mechanics associated with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zukowski, Lisa A; Roper, Jaimie A; Shechtman, Orit; Otzel, Dana M; Hovis, Patty W; Tillman, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Among conventional manual wheelchair (CMW) users, 49% to 63% experience carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) that is likely induced by large forces transmitted through the wrist and extreme wrist orientations. The ergonomic hand drive mechanism (EHDM) tested in this study has been shown to utilize a more neutral wrist orientation. This study evaluates the use of an EHDM in terms of wrist orientations that may predispose individuals to CTS. Eleven adult full-time CMW users with spinal cord injury participated. Motion data were captured as participants propelled across a flat surface, completing five trials in a CMW and five trials in the same CMW fitted with the EHDM. Average angular wrist orientations were compared between the two propulsion styles. Use of the EHDM resulted in reduced wrist extension and ulnar deviation. The shift to more neutral wrist orientations observed with EHDM use may reduce median nerve compression. PMID:25856042

  12. Vibrometry testing for carpal tunnel syndrome: a longitudinal study of daily variations.

    PubMed

    White, K M; Congleton, J J; Huchingson, R D; Koppa, R J; Pendleton, O J

    1994-01-01

    The method of limits procedure was used to obtain 84 120Hz vibration thresholds, over a 3-month period, on four age-matched women with different levels of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Each woman used a keyboard for 4 hours a day during work. Testing was conducted in a room with a temperature of 28 degrees C +/- 2 degrees C after 20 minutes acclimation. Results indicate vibration thresholds vary significantly from day to day and also demonstrate how a single vibrometry measure may falsely identify the participant's true CTS condition. Specifically, a single measure could account for a negative CTS determinations in affected wrists or positive CTS determinations in healthy wrists. Subsequent analysis revealed menses related fluid retention and day of the week increase the vibration thresholds. Analyzing the levels of fluid retention by day of the week indicates a compounding effect of the personal and occupational risk factors. PMID:8291957

  13. Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is the incriminating structure in carpal tunnel syndrome. As it increases in size, the pressures within the ... you can visualize the movement of the tendons as I move the fingers, the tendons are gliding ...

  14. Ultrasound-Guided Pulsed Radiofrequency for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Single-Blinded Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective We assessed the therapeutic efficiency of ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) treatment of the median nerve in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods We conducted a prospective, randomized, controlled, single-blinded study. Forty-four patients with CTS were randomized into intervention or control groups. Patients in the intervention group were treated with PRF and night splint, and the control group was prescribed night splint alone. Primary outcome was the onset time of significant pain relief assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS), and secondary outcomes included evaluation of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTQ) results, cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve, sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) of the median nerve, and finger pinch strength. All outcome measurements were performed at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after treatment. Results Thirty-six patients completed the study. The onset time of pain relief in the intervention group was significantly shorter (median onset time of 2 days vs. 14 days; hazard ratio = 7.37; 95% CI, 3.04–17.87) compared to the control group (p < 0.001). Significant improvement in VAS and BCTQ scores (p < 0.05) was detected in the intervention group at all follow-up periods compared to the controls (except for the severity subscale of BCTQ at week 1). Ultrasound-guided PRF treatment resulted in a lower VAS score and stronger finger pinch compared to the control group over the entire study. Conclusions Our study shows that ultrasound-guided PRF serves as a better approach for pain relief in patients with CTS. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02217293 PMID:26067628

  15. Pre- and post-operative comorbidities in idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome: cervical arthritis, basal joint arthritis of the thumb, and trigger digit.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Gong, H S; Lee, H J; Lee, Y H; Rhee, S H; Baek, G H

    2013-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 633 hands in 362 patients who had idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome and underwent carpal tunnel release between 1999 and 2009. Electrophysiological studies and simple radiographs of the wrist, cervical spine, and basal joint of the thumb were routinely checked, and patients were also assessed for the presence of trigger digit or de Quervain's disease before and after surgery. Among 362 patients, cervical arthritis was found in 253 patients (70%), and C5-C6 arthritis was the most common site. Basal joint arthritis of the thumb was observed in 216 (34%) of the 633 hands. Trigger digit or de Quervain's disease was observed in 85 of the 633 hands (13%) before surgery, and developed in 67 hands (11%) after surgery. Cervical arthritis, basal joint arthritis, and trigger digit commonly coexist with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. Patient education about these disorders is very important when they coexist with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:22553311

  16. [Acute coronary syndromes: epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Alev Arat

    2013-04-01

    Coronary heart disease is the main cause of death in the world as well as in Turkey. It's not only a health issue but also a social problem with a high economic burden and negative impact on quality of life. The majority of deaths are attributable to acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and their complications.This review summarizes some important facts regarding ACS epidemiology in the world and in Turkey. PMID:27323430

  17. Assessment of Median Nerve Mobility by Ultrasound Dynamic Imaging for Diagnosing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tai-Tzung; Lee, Ming-Ru; Liao, Yin-Yin; Chen, Jiann-Perng; Hsu, Yen-Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by median nerve entrapment at the wrist and the resulting median nerve dysfunction. CTS is diagnosed clinically as the gold standard and confirmed with nerve conduction studies (NCS). Complementing NCS, ultrasound imaging could provide additional anatomical information on pathological and motion changes of the median nerve. The purpose of this study was to estimate the transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements by analyzing ultrasound dynamic images to distinguish between normal subjects and CTS patients. Transverse ultrasound images were acquired, and a speckle-tracking algorithm was used to determine the lateral displacements of the median nerve in radial-ulnar plane in B-mode images utilizing the multilevel block-sum pyramid algorithm and averaging. All of the averaged lateral displacements at separate acquisition times within a single flexion-extension cycle were accumulated to obtain the cumulative lateral displacements, which were curve-fitted with a second-order polynomial function. The fitted curve was regarded as the transverse sliding pattern of the median nerve. The R2 value, curvature, and amplitude of the fitted curves were computed to evaluate the goodness, variation and maximum value of the fit, respectively. Box plots, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm were utilized for statistical analysis. The transverse sliding of the median nerve during finger movements was greater and had a steeper fitted curve in the normal subjects than in the patients with mild or severe CTS. The temporal changes in transverse sliding of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel were found to be correlated with the presence of CTS and its severity. The representative transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements were demonstrated to be useful for quantitatively estimating

  18. The Efficacy of 100 and 300 mg Gabapentin in the Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eftekharsadat, Bina; Babaei-Ghazani, Arash; Habibzadeh, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a neuropathy due to the compression of the median nerve. It is shown that gabapentin in high doses is effective in treatment of CTS patients. In this study we evaluated the efficacy of low doses of gabapentin in treatment of CTS patients. Ninety patients with CTS were randomly assigned to groups A, B and C. Gabapentin was administered to group A with dose of 100 mg/day and to group B with dose of 300 mg/day for 2 months. Group C received no treatment. Before and after treatment, patients were evaluated using Visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain and parasthesia, Boston carpal tunnel questionnaire (BCTQ) including Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) and Functional Status Scale (FSS) to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment. The pinch and grip strength was also measured. There was significant improvement in VAS, grip strength, pinch strength, SSS, FSS and BCTQ score in all three groups (p < 0.05), but the changes in CMAP and SNAP was not significant. Groups A and B in comparison to group C had significantly better improvement in VAS, pinch strength, SSS, FSS and BCTQ total score (p < 0.05). There was significantly more improvement in pinch strength and SSS score in group B compared to group A (p < 0.05). Gabapentin in low doses is a useful drug in treatment of CTS symptoms with no side effects and intolerance. Gabapentin with dose of 300 mg/day is more effective than the dose of 100 mg/day. PMID:26664397

  19. The evaluation of vitamin D levels in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gürsoy, Azize Esra; Bilgen, Halide Rengin; Dürüyen, Hümeyra; Altıntaş, Özge; Kolukisa, Mehmet; Asil, Talip

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). 25(OH)D levels were checked in 108 consecutive patients with CTS symptoms and 52 healthy controls. All patients underwent nerve conduction studies and completed Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BQ) symptom severity and functional status scales to quantify symptom severity, pain status and functional status. There were 57 patients with electrophysiological confirmed CTS (EP+ group) and 51 electrophysiological negative symptomatic patients (EP- group). 25(OH) D deficiency (25(OH)D < 20 ng/ml) was found in 96.1 % of EP- group, in 94.7 % of EP+ group and in 73.8 % of control group. 25(0H) D level was found significantly lower both in EP+ and EP- groups compared to control group (p = 0.006, p < 0.001, respectively). Although mean vitamin D level in EP- group was lower than EP+ group, statistically difference was not significant between EP+ and EP- groups (p = 0.182). BQ symptom severity and functional status scores and BQ pain sum score were not significantly different between EP+ and EP- groups. We found no correlation with 25(OH) D level for BQ symptom severity, functional status and pain sum scores. 25(OH) D deficiency is a common problem in patients with CTS symptoms. As evidenced by the present study, assessment of serum 25(OH)D is recommended in CTS patients even with electrophysiological negative results. PMID:26939675

  20. Assessment of Median Nerve Mobility by Ultrasound Dynamic Imaging for Diagnosing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tai-Tzung; Lee, Ming-Ru; Liao, Yin-Yin; Chen, Jiann-Perng; Hsu, Yen-Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by median nerve entrapment at the wrist and the resulting median nerve dysfunction. CTS is diagnosed clinically as the gold standard and confirmed with nerve conduction studies (NCS). Complementing NCS, ultrasound imaging could provide additional anatomical information on pathological and motion changes of the median nerve. The purpose of this study was to estimate the transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements by analyzing ultrasound dynamic images to distinguish between normal subjects and CTS patients. Transverse ultrasound images were acquired, and a speckle-tracking algorithm was used to determine the lateral displacements of the median nerve in radial-ulnar plane in B-mode images utilizing the multilevel block-sum pyramid algorithm and averaging. All of the averaged lateral displacements at separate acquisition times within a single flexion–extension cycle were accumulated to obtain the cumulative lateral displacements, which were curve-fitted with a second-order polynomial function. The fitted curve was regarded as the transverse sliding pattern of the median nerve. The R2 value, curvature, and amplitude of the fitted curves were computed to evaluate the goodness, variation and maximum value of the fit, respectively. Box plots, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm were utilized for statistical analysis. The transverse sliding of the median nerve during finger movements was greater and had a steeper fitted curve in the normal subjects than in the patients with mild or severe CTS. The temporal changes in transverse sliding of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel were found to be correlated with the presence of CTS and its severity. The representative transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements were demonstrated to be useful for quantitatively estimating

  1. Value of high-frequency ultrasound in diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuji; Meng, Zengdong; Pan, Xuekun; Qin, Libo; Wang, Gang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of high-frequency ultrasound examination for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). A total of 63 wrists from 45 patients diagnosed with CTS were selected as the study group, and 43 asymptomatic wrists of 40 cases were included as the normal control group. Parameters such as the transverse diameter, vertical diameter, cross-sectional area (CSA), and flattening rate (FR) of the carpal tunnel radioulnar joint, postular bone, and median nerve in the hamate bone hook plane were measured, and the differences between the two groups were compared. The median nerve CSA in the postular bone plate was significantly greater in the study group than in the normal control group (0.17±0.05 vs. 0.09±0.02, P<0.01), and the FR at the hook of the hamate was significantly higher in the study group (3.52±0.86 vs. 3.21±0.26, P<0.01). Our results suggest that ultrasonography can effectively provide dynamic real-time images of the wrist in addition to being painless, non-invasive, and associated with relatively low costs. Based on our findings, we believe that ultrasonography is an effective examination method for CTS. When the threshold of the median nerve CSA in the postular bone plate was set as 10 mm2, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 92% and 86%, respectively. Therefore, the median nerve CSA may represent a good clinical indicator of CTS. PMID:26885222

  2. Interleukin and growth factor gene variants and risk of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Burger, Marilize C; de Wet, Hanli; Collins, Malcolm

    2015-06-10

    Recent research has identified DNA sequence variants within genes encoding structural components of the collagen fibril, the basic structural unit of tendons, to modify the risk of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Since the expression of these previously associated genes are regulated by cytokine and growth factor signalling pathways, the aim of this study was to determine whether variants within these cell signalling pathway genes, namely interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, interleukin 6 receptor (IL-6R) and vascular endothelial growth factor A(VEGFA), are also associated with CTS. One hundred and three self-reported Coloured participants, with a history of carpal tunnel release surgery (CTS) and 149 matched control participants (CON) without any reported history of CTS symptoms were genotyped for the functional IL-1β rs16944 (-511C/T), IL-6 rs1800795 (-174G/C), IL-6R rs2228145 (C/A) and VEGFA rs699947 (-2578C/A) variants. Only the IL-6R variant was significantly associated with CTS (p=0.005, OR=0.41, 95% CI 0.22-0.75). When the previously reported associated COL5A1 and BGN variants were included in the analysis, gene-gene interactions were also shown to significantly modulate the risk of CTS. In conclusion, the AA genotype of IL-6R rs2228145 was independently associated with reduced risk of CTS in a South African Coloured population. The IL-6R variant interacted with the previously reported COL5A1 and BGN variants to modulate CTS risk. This highlights that interleukin and growth factor gene variants should also be considered, in addition to the extracellular matrix proteins, for future research in determining the aetiology of CTS. PMID:25813875

  3. Er:YAG laser for the surgical treatment of the carpal tunnel syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, Detlef; Ebinger, Thomas; Illich, Wolfgang; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    2003-10-01

    We developed a new surgical procedure to improve the recurrence rate using an Er:YAG laser as dissection tool for the carpal ligament with the objective to ablate a small amount of the carpal ligament and to denaturate its ends. The Er:YAG Laser was transmitted to the applicator via a GeO fiber. With this system we proceeded 10 carpal ligament dissections without any complications in the follow-up period. All patients were free of pain and recurrence.

  4. [Carpal tunnel syndrome in workers engaged in the assembly of manufactured products in various industries in the province of Brescia].

    PubMed

    Barbieri, P G

    1996-01-01

    Tests were carried out on five manual assembly departments in a variety of different factories, in order to assess the risks associated with the onset of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and to describe the prevalence of this disorder among exposed workers. The application of the risk analysis method proposed by the EPM Research Unit in Milan (Italy) demonstrated the presence of numerous jobs featuring both a high frequency of actions per minute and a total lack of recovery times, in addition to a variety of incongrous upper limb postures. The clinical and instrumental investigation diagnosed 76 cases of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome among the 170 exposed workers. 62% of the cases was bilateral and 24% was associated with Guyon Channel Syndrome. In two of the five departments reviewed, the carpal tunnel disorders detected were endemic, and featured unusually high prevalence. The situation had been seriously underestimated by the company technical and medical staff, resulting in a failure to call for the urgent adoption of individual protection and collective prevention measures. The authors recommend that an extensive and adequate occupational risk assessment analysis be performed: the local occupational health services could play a critical role in identifying the highest risk industries and the diseases diagnosed in a hospital environment. PMID:9148125

  5. Pressure-morphology relationship of a released carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hee; Marquardt, Tamara L; Gabra, Joseph N; Shen, Zhilei Liu; Evans, Peter J; Seitz, William H; Li, Zong-Ming

    2013-04-01

    We investigated morphological changes of a released carpal tunnel in response to variations of carpal tunnel pressure. Pressure within the carpal tunnel is known to be elevated in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and dependent on wrist posture. Previously, increased carpal tunnel pressure was shown to affect the morphology of the carpal tunnel with an intact transverse carpal ligament (TCL). However, the pressure-morphology relationship of the carpal tunnel after release of the TCL has not been investigated. Carpal tunnel release (CTR) was performed endoscopically on cadaveric hands and the carpal tunnel pressure was dynamically increased from 10 to 120 mmHg. Simultaneously, carpal tunnel cross-sectional images were captured by an ultrasound system, and pressure measurements were recorded by a pressure transducer. Carpal tunnel pressure significantly affected carpal arch area (p < 0.001), with an increase of >62 mm(2) at 120 mmHg. Carpal arch height, length, and width also significantly changed with carpal tunnel pressure (p < 0.05). As carpal tunnel pressure increased, carpal arch height and length increased, but the carpal arch width decreased. Analyses of the pressure-morphology relationship for a released carpal tunnel revealed a nine times greater compliance than that previously reported for a carpal tunnel with an intact TCL. This change of structural properties as a result of transecting the TCL helps explain the reduction of carpal tunnel pressure and relief of symptoms for patients after CTR surgery. PMID:23184493

  6. New advances in the mechanisms and etiology of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    de-la-Llave-Rincón, Ana I; Puentedura, Emilio J; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César

    2012-05-01

    In recent years, knowledge about the etiological mechanisms of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has evolved significantly, allowing for a better understanding of this pain syndrome. Some studies have demonstrated that patients with CTS exhibit sensory symptoms not only within the areas innervated by the median nerve but also in extra-median regions, i.e., forearm or shoulder. It has also been demonstrated that patients with CTS may exhibit widespread pressure hypersensitivity and generalized thermal hyperalgesia, but not hypoesthesia, which is not related to electro-diagnostic findings. In addition, fine motor control and pinch grip force disturbances have been found to be commonly observed in this patient population. All these data suggest that central sensitization mechanisms are involved in the somato-sensory and motor disturbances found in CTS, probably related to cortical plastic changes. The presence of sensitization mechanisms could play an important role in the development of bilateral sensory symptoms in CTS and also can determine the therapeutic strategies for this condition. We propose that therapeutic interventions applied to individuals with CTS should include approaches that would modulate nociceptive barrage into the central nervous system. PMID:22642915

  7. Diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome: interobserver reliability of the blinded scratch-collapse test.

    PubMed

    Blok, Robin D; Becker, Stéphanie J E; Ring, David C

    2014-06-01

    The reliability of the scratch-collapse test for diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has not been tested by independent investigators. This study measured the reliability of the scratch-collapse test comparing the treating hand surgeon and blinded evaluators. We performed a prospective observational study of 41 patients with a provisional diagnosis of CTS or a combination of CTS and cubital tunnel syndrome and prescribed electrodiagnostic testing. The treating hand surgeon performed the scratch-collapse test. Next, the test was administered by one of the six observers, unaware of the patient's symptoms and the diagnosis made by treating hand surgeon. The kappa statistic (κ) was used to calculate the interrater reliability between the treating hand surgeons and blinded scratchers. The agreement between the blinded observers and the hand surgeons on the scratch-collapse test was substantial 0.63 (95 % CI, 0.34-0.87; p < 0.001). The sensitivity of the blinded scratch test in our sample was 32 %. In a small study with a spectrum bias favoring electrophysiologically confirmed CTS the reliability was lower than that reported by the inventors of the test, but was still substantial. We propose a larger study of patients with a greater variety of electrodiagnostic test results using fewer observers with more experience. PMID:24876682

  8. Acute aortic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  9. [Acute aortic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nienaber, Christoph A

    2016-06-01

    Acute aortic syndrome is the common denominator for acute events to the aortic wall and encompasses dissection of the aorta, intramural hematoma, formation of aortic ulcers and trauma to the aorta with an annual incidence of up to 35 cases/100.000 between 65 and 75 years of age. Both, inflammation and/or microtrauma at the level of the aortic media layer, and a genetic disposition are promoting elements of AAS, while the extent and anatomic involvement of the ascending aorta call for either surgical resection/repair in the proximal part of the aorta, or an endovascular solution for pathologies in the distal aorta; in all cases of dissection (regardless of location) reconstruction/realignment has been proven to portend better long-term outcomes (in addition to medical management of blood pressure). PMID:27254622

  10. Acute aortic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corvera, Joel S

    2016-05-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  11. Acute Compartment Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Andrew H

    2016-07-01

    Acute compartment syndrome (ACS) is a well-known pathophysiologic complication of trauma or tissue ischemia. ACS affects the appearance, function, and even the viability of the involved limb, and demands immediate diagnosis and treatment. However, ACS is difficult to diagnose and the only effective treatment is decompressive surgical fasciotomy. The clinical signs and symptoms may easily be attributed to other aspects of the injury, which further complicates the diagnosis. This article highlights the latest information regarding the diagnosis of ACS, how to perform fasciotomies, how to manage fasciotomy wounds, and also reviews complications and outcomes of ACS. PMID:27241376

  12. The Relationship between Nerve Conduction Study and Clinical Grading of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cheluvaiah, Janardhan D.; Agadi, Jagadish B.; Nagaraj, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is the most common nerve entrapment. Subjective sensory symptoms are common place in patients with CTS, but sometimes they are not supported by objective findings in the neurological examination. Electrodiagnostic (EDx) studies are a valid and reliable means of confirming the diagnosis. The amplitudes along with the conduction velocities of the sensory nerve action potential and motor nerve action potential reflect the functional state of axons, and are useful parameters and complement the clinical grading in the assessment of severity of CTS. Aim To conduct median nerve sensory and motor conduction studies on patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and correlate the relationship between nerve conduction study parameters and the clinical severity grading. Materials and Methods Based on clinical assessment, the study patients were divided into 03 groups with mild CTS, moderate CTS and severe CTS respectively as per Mackinnson’s classification. Median and ulnar nerve conduction studies were performed on bilateral upper limbs of 50 patients with symptoms of CTS and 50 age and sex matched healthy control subjects. The relationship between the clinical severity grade and various nerve conduction study parameters were correlated. Results In this prospective case control study, 50 patients with symptoms consistent with CTS and 50 age and sex matched healthy control subjects were examined over a 10 month period. A total of 30 patients had unilateral CTS (right upper limb in 19 and left upper limb in 11) and 20 patients had bilateral CTS. Female to male ratio was 3.54 to 1. Age ranged from 25 to 81 years. The mean age at presentation was 49.68±11.7 years. Tingling paresthesias of hand and first three fingers were the most frequent symptoms 48 (98%). Tinel’s and Phalen’s sign were positive in 36 (72%) and 44 (88%) patients respectively. The mean duration of symptoms at presentation was 52.68±99.81 weeks. 16 patients (32%) had

  13. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Lemierre's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Paul N.; Soghikian, Maida V.; Bhangoo, Munveer S.

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an infectious disease defined by the presence of septic thrombophlebitis with associated embolic phenomenon, most commonly to the lungs. Here we present two cases from a single institution of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) developing as a result of Lemierre's syndrome in previously healthy young adult men. ARDS can occur as a consequence of pulmonary septic emboli and sepsis, both of which are well-described consequences of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe important diagnostic and management considerations in the care of patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure and Lemierre's syndrome. Essential components of management include prompt antibiotic therapy, lung-protective ventilation strategies, and supportive care. PMID:25143837

  14. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Lemierre's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hein, Paul N; Soghikian, Maida V; Bhangoo, Munveer S

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an infectious disease defined by the presence of septic thrombophlebitis with associated embolic phenomenon, most commonly to the lungs. Here we present two cases from a single institution of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) developing as a result of Lemierre's syndrome in previously healthy young adult men. ARDS can occur as a consequence of pulmonary septic emboli and sepsis, both of which are well-described consequences of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe important diagnostic and management considerations in the care of patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure and Lemierre's syndrome. Essential components of management include prompt antibiotic therapy, lung-protective ventilation strategies, and supportive care. PMID:25143837

  15. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Peripheral Polyneuropathy in Patients with End Stage Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pyun, Sung-Bom; Cho, Won Yong; Boo, Chang Su

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to identify the causes of the development of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) associated with end stage kidney disease (ESKD). A total of 112 patients with ESKD, 64 on hemodialysis (HD) and 48 on peritoneal dialysis (PD), were enrolled. The duration of ESKD and dialysis, the site of the arteriovenous (A-V) fistula for HD, laboratory data such as blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and beta-2-microglobulin were determined. Clinical evaluation of CTS and electrophysiological studies for the diagnosis of CTS and peripheral neuropathy were performed. The electrophysiological studies showed that the frequency of CTS was not different in the HD and PD groups (P = 0.823) and the frequency of CTS was not different in the limb with the A-V fistula compared to the contralateral limb (P = 0.816). The frequency of HD and PD were not related to beta-2-microglobulin levels, an indicator of amyloidosis. The frequency of CTS did not increase as the severity of the peripheral neuropathy and the duration of ESKD and dialysis increased (P = 0.307). The results of this study do not support that microglobulin induced amyloidosis or placement of an A-V fistula are associated with an increase in CTS. PMID:21935280

  16. General population job exposure matrix applied to a pooled study of prevalent carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dale, Ann Marie; Zeringue, Angelique; Harris-Adamson, Carisa; Rempel, David; Bao, Stephen; Thiese, Matthew S; Merlino, Linda; Burt, Susan; Kapellusch, Jay; Garg, Arun; Gerr, Fred; Hegmann, Kurt T; Eisen, Ellen A; Evanoff, Bradley

    2015-03-15

    A job exposure matrix may be useful for the study of biomechanical workplace risk factors when individual-level exposure data are unavailable. We used job title-based exposure data from a public data source to construct a job exposure matrix and test exposure-response relationships with prevalent carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Exposures of repetitive motion and force from the Occupational Information Network were assigned to 3,452 active workers from several industries, enrolled between 2001 and 2008 from 6 studies. Repetitive motion and force exposures were combined into high/high, high/low, and low/low exposure groupings in each of 4 multivariable logistic regression models, adjusted for personal factors. Although force measures alone were not independent predictors of CTS in these data, strong associations between combined physical exposures of force and repetition and CTS were observed in all models. Consistent with previous literature, this report shows that workers with high force/high repetition jobs had the highest prevalence of CTS (odds ratio = 2.14-2.95) followed by intermediate values (odds ratio = 1.09-2.27) in mixed exposed jobs relative to the lowest exposed workers. This study supports the use of a general population job exposure matrix to estimate workplace physical exposures in epidemiologic studies of musculoskeletal disorders when measures of individual exposures are unavailable. PMID:25700886

  17. General Population Job Exposure Matrix Applied to a Pooled Study of Prevalent Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Ann Marie; Zeringue, Angelique; Harris-Adamson, Carisa; Rempel, David; Bao, Stephen; Thiese, Matthew S.; Merlino, Linda; Burt, Susan; Kapellusch, Jay; Garg, Arun; Gerr, Fred; Hegmann, Kurt T.; Eisen, Ellen A.; Evanoff, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    A job exposure matrix may be useful for the study of biomechanical workplace risk factors when individual-level exposure data are unavailable. We used job title–based exposure data from a public data source to construct a job exposure matrix and test exposure-response relationships with prevalent carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Exposures of repetitive motion and force from the Occupational Information Network were assigned to 3,452 active workers from several industries, enrolled between 2001 and 2008 from 6 studies. Repetitive motion and force exposures were combined into high/high, high/low, and low/low exposure groupings in each of 4 multivariable logistic regression models, adjusted for personal factors. Although force measures alone were not independent predictors of CTS in these data, strong associations between combined physical exposures of force and repetition and CTS were observed in all models. Consistent with previous literature, this report shows that workers with high force/high repetition jobs had the highest prevalence of CTS (odds ratio = 2.14–2.95) followed by intermediate values (odds ratio = 1.09–2.27) in mixed exposed jobs relative to the lowest exposed workers. This study supports the use of a general population job exposure matrix to estimate workplace physical exposures in epidemiologic studies of musculoskeletal disorders when measures of individual exposures are unavailable. PMID:25700886

  18. Prevalence, incidence and risk factors of carpal tunnel syndrome in a large footwear factory.

    PubMed

    Roquelaure, Y; Mariel, J; Dano, C; Fanello, S; Penneau-Fontbonne, D

    2001-01-01

    The study was conducted to assess the prevalence and incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in a large modern footwear factory and to identify factors predictive of CTS. To this end, 199 workers were examined in 1996, and 162 of them were re-examined in 1997. Ergonomic and psychosocial risk factors of CTS were assessed by workpost analysis and self-administered questionnaire. The prevalence of CTS at baseline in 1996 and in 1997 was 16.6% (95%CI: 11.4-21.7) and 11.7% (95%CI: 6.7-16.8), respectively. The incidence rate of CTS in 1997 was 11.7% (95%CI: 6.7-7.8). No specific type of job performance was associated with CTS. Obesity (OR = 4.4; 95%CI: 1.1-17.1) and psychological distress at baseline (OR = 4.3; 95%CI: 1.0-18.6) were strongly predictive of CTS. Rapid trigger movements of the fingers were also predictive of CTS (OR = 3.8; 95%CI: 1.0-17.2). A strict control of thework by superiors was negatively associatedwith CTS (OR = 0.5; 95%CI: 0.2-1.3). The prevalence and incidence of CTS in this workforce were largely higher than in the general population and numerous industries. The study highlights the role of psychological distress in workers exposed to a high level of physical exposure and psychological demand. PMID:11885919

  19. Utility of MRI Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Ma, Jingxu; Zhao, Liping; Wang, Yunling; Jia, Xiaowen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND After successful utilization of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in detecting brain pathologies, it is now being examined for use in the detection of peripheral neuropathies. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the diagnostic potentials of DTI in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). MATERIAL AND METHODS The literature search was performed in multiple electronic databases using a keyword search and final selection of the studies was based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. We performed a meta-analyses of mean differences in fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) between CTS patient and healthy subjects. Publication bias detection was done with Begg's test and sensitivity analyses were performed to explore the source/s of higher heterogeneity and the authenticity of results. RESULTS FA was significantly lower in CTS patients in comparison with healthy subjects (mean and the difference [95% confidence interval] was -0.06 [-0.10, -0.02] (p=0.003). The ADC was significantly higher in CTS patients (mean difference [95% CI] was 0.10 [0.02, 0.18], p=0.02). Overall sensitivity of FA-based diagnosis was 82.82%, with 77.83% specificity. CONCLUSIONS DTI can be a valuable tool in diagnosing CTS. PMID:26942911

  20. Clinical and electrophysiological evaluation of neutral wrist nocturnal splinting in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Chao; Dong, Hongjuan; Chu, Hong; Lu, Zuneng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To prospectively assess the effectiveness of neutral wrist nocturnal splinting in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) by using clinical scores and nerve conduction studies (NCS). [Subjects and Methods] Forty-one patients enrolled in the study were clinically evaluated by a symptom severity scale (SSS) and functional status scale (FSS), and were electrophysiologically evaluated by conventional NCS; distal motor latency (DML), sensory conduction velocity (SCV), and difference in sensory latency between the median and ulnar nerves (ΔDSL) were measured. Subjects were treated with wrist splinting. Patients who showed no improvement in symptoms were treated with other conservative treatments, the remaining patients continued to wear splints. SSS, FSS, and NCS were evaluated after splinting as well. [Results] The follow-up was completed in 20 patients (31 wrists) with splinting. SSS and FSS decreased, the DML shortened and ΔDSL decreased significantly after splinting for 3.03 ± 1.16 months. There were significant correlations between SSS and DML, SCV of wrist digit 2, and SCV of wrist digit 4. No correlations were found between SSS and ΔDSL, and FSS and the parameters of NCS. [Conclusion] Neutral wrist nocturnal splinting is effective in at least short term for CTS patients. There is a weak correlation between clinical scores and NCS, which suggests that both approaches should be used to effectively assess the therapeutic effect of CTS treatment.

  1. Evaluation of the scratch collapse test for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Makanji, H S; Becker, S J E; Mudgal, C S; Jupiter, J B; Ring, D

    2014-02-01

    This prospective study measured and compared the diagnostic performance characteristics of various clinical signs and physical examination manoeuvres for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), including the scratch collapse test. Eighty-eight adult patients that were prescribed electrophysiological testing to diagnose CTS were enrolled in the study. Attending surgeons documented symptoms and results of standard clinical manoeuvres. The scratch collapse test had a sensitivity of 31%, which was significantly lower than the sensitivity of Phalen's test (67%), Durkan's test (77%), Tinel's test (43%), CTS-6 lax (88%), and CTS-6 stringent (54%). The scratch test had a specificity of 61%, which was significantly lower than the specificity of thenar atrophy (96%) and significantly higher than the specificity of Durkan's test (18%) and CTS-6 lax (13%). The sensitivity of the scratch collapse test was not superior to other clinical signs and physical examination manoeuvers for CTS, and the specificity of the scratch collapse test was superior to that of Durkan's test and CTS-6 lax. Further studies should seek to limit the influence of a patient's clinical presentation on scratch test performance and assess the scratch test's inter-rater reliability. PMID:23855039

  2. Mechanosensitivity of the median nerve in patients with chronic carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jaberzadeh, Shapour; Zoghi, Maryam

    2013-04-01

    The aim was to investigate the relationship between the effects of median nerve strain during the elbow extension component of the upper limb neurodynamic test 1 (ULNT1) and the evoked musculoskeletal changes. 11 patients with chronic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and 11 matched asymptomatic controls participated in the study. In all subjects, elbow extension was carried out in both ULNT1 and neutral positions of the shoulder and arm. From these two starting positions a KIN-COM(®) dynamometer carried out passive elbow extension while EMG activity of 10 arm and shoulder muscles, elbow-flexor resistive torque and elbow extension ROM were measured concurrently. The result showed that, in the ULNT1 position, increased EMG activity of the involved muscles, increased elbow extension resistive torque and pain responses occurred much earlier in the range of elbow extension in the CTS group compared to healthy controls. These findings demonstrated increased mechanosensitivity of the median nerve in CTS patients compared to healthy controls. PMID:23561861

  3. Ulcero-osteolytic lesions in a woman with type 2 diabetes and carpal tunnel syndrome: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Elisabetta L; Previti, Marcello; Giandalia, Annalisa; Russo, Giuseppina T; Cucinotta, Domenico

    2016-03-01

    We describe the case of a 73-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes presenting with ulcers and ostelytic lesions on distal phalanges of left hand, who was diagnosed with the rare "ulcero-mutilating" variant of carpal tunnel syndrome. A review of literature on cutaneous manifestations associated with the syndrome is also presented. PMID:26830858

  4. Palmitoylethanolamide, a neutraceutical, in nerve compression syndromes: efficacy and safety in sciatic pain and carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Keppel Hesselink, Jan M; Kopsky, David J

    2015-01-01

    Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is an endogenous lipid modulator in animals and humans, and has been evaluated since the 1970s as an anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug in more than 30 clinical trials, in a total of ~6,000 patients. PEA is currently available worldwide as a nutraceutical in different formulations, with and without excipients. Here we describe the results of all clinical trials evaluating PEA’s efficacy and safety in nerve compression syndromes: sciatic pain and pain due to carpal tunnel syndrome, and review preclinical evidence in nerve impingement models. Both the pharmacological studies as well as the clinical trials supported PEA’s action as an analgesic compound. In total, eight clinical trials have been published in such entrapment syndromes, and 1,366 patients have been included in these trials. PEA proved to be effective and safe in nerve compression syndromes. In one pivotal, double blind, placebo controlled trial in 636 sciatic pain patients, the number needed to treat to reach 50% pain reduction compared to baseline was 1.5 after 3 weeks of treatment. Furthermore, no drug interactions or troublesome side effects have been described so far. Physicians are not always aware of PEA as a relevant and safe alternative to opioids and co-analgesics in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Especially since the often prescribed co-analgesic pregabaline has been proven to be ineffective in sciatic pain in a double blind enrichment trial, PEA should be considered as a new and safe treatment option for nerve compression syndromes. PMID:26604814

  5. Sickness Absence from Work among Persons with New Physician-Diagnosed Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Population-Based Matched-Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Atroshi, Isam; Zhou, Caddie; Jöud, Anna; Petersson, Ingemar F.; Englund, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome is common among employed persons. Data on sickness absence from work in relation to carpal tunnel syndrome have been usually based on self-report and derived from clinical or occupational populations. We aimed to determine sickness absence among persons with physician-diagnosed carpal tunnel syndrome as compared to the general population. Methods In Skåne region in Sweden we identified all subjects, aged 17–57 years, with new physician-made diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome during 5 years (2004–2008). For each subject we randomly sampled, from the general population, 4 matched reference subjects without carpal tunnel syndrome; the two cohorts comprised 5456 and 21,667 subjects, respectively (73% women; mean age 43 years). We retrieved social insurance register data on all sickness absence periods longer than 2 weeks from 12 months before to 24 months after diagnosis. Of those with carpal tunnel syndrome 2111 women (53%) and 710 men (48%) underwent surgery within 24 months of diagnosis. We compared all-cause sickness absence and analyzed sickness absence in conjunction with diagnosis and surgery. Results Mean number of all-cause sickness absence days per each 30-day period from 12 months before to 24 months after diagnosis was significantly higher in the carpal tunnel syndrome than in the reference cohort. A new sickness absence period longer than 2 weeks in conjunction with diagnosis was recorded in 12% of the women (n = 492) and 11% of the men (n = 170) and with surgery in 53% (n = 1121) and 58% (n = 408) of the surgically treated, respectively; median duration in conjunction with surgery was 35 days (IQR 27–45) for women and 41 days (IQR 28–50) for men. Conclusions Persons with physician-diagnosed carpal tunnel syndrome have substantially more sickness absence from work than age and sex-matched persons from the general population from1 year before to 2 years after diagnosis. Gender differences were small. PMID:25803841

  6. ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Is ARDS? ARDS, or acute respiratory distress syndrome, is a lung condition that leads to low oxygen levels in the blood. ARDS can be life threatening because your body's organs need oxygen-rich ...

  7. Carpal tunnel syndrome due to a plexiform neurofibroma of the median nerve in a neurofibromatosis type 1 patient: clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Daniel; Aido, Ricardo; Sousa, Marco; Costa, Luís; Oliveira, Vânia; Cardoso, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 56-year-old male patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) diagnosed during adolescence and with an insidious clinical evolution, characterised by an exuberant cutaneous involvement, referred to the orthopaedics outpatient clinic presenting with carpal tunnel syndrome secondary to a plexiform neurofibroma of the median nerve. A comprehensive clinical approach is discussed, considering the natural history of the disease and its potential complications, as well as the lack of consensus regarding standard therapeutic options for the compressive peripheral neuropathies in the NF1 disease. PMID:23853185

  8. Effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on the treatment of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vahdatpour, Babak; Kiyani, Abolghasem; Dehghan, Farnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common neuropathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a new and noninvasive treatment including extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in the treatment of CTS. Materials and Methods: This study is a clinical trial conducted on 60 patients with moderate CTS in selected health centers of Isfahan Medical University from November 2014 to April 2015. Patients with CTS were randomly divided into two groups. Conservative treatment including wrist splint at night for 3 months, consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for 2 weeks, and oral consumption of Vitamin B1 for a month was recommended for both groups. The first group was treated with ESWT, one session per week for 4 weeks. Focus probe with 0.05, 0.07, 0.1, and 0.15 energy and shock numbers 800, 900, 1000, and 1100 were used from the first session to the fourth, respectively. The evaluated parameters were assessed before treatment and after 3 and 6 months. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 19, Student’s t-test, and Chi-square test. Results: All parameters were significantly decreased in the ESWT group after 3 months. These results remained almost constant after 6 months compared with 3 months after treatment. However, only two parameters considerably improved after 3 months of treatment in the control group. The entire indexes in the control group implicated the regression of results in long-term period. Conclusion: It is recommended to use ESWT as a conservative treatment in patients with CTS. PMID:27563630

  9. Comparison of Risk of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Patients with Distal Radius Fractures After 7 Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huan-Li; Wang, Gui-Bin; Jia, Yue-Qing; Zhu, Shi-Cai; Zhang, Feng-Fang; Liu, Hong-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Background To compare risk of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in distal radius fracture (DRF) patients after 7 treatments using bridging external fixation (BrEF), non-bridging external fixation (non-BrEF), plaster fixation, K-wire fixation, dorsal plating fixation, volar plating fixation, and dorsal and volar plating by performing a network meta-analysis. Material/Methods An exhaustive search of electronic databases identified randomized controlled trails (RCTs) closely related to our study topic. The published articles were screened, based on predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria, to select high-quality studies for the present network meta-analysis. Data extracted from the selected studies were analyzed using STATA version 12.0 software. Results The literature search and selection process identified 12 eligible RCTs that contained a total of 1370 DRF patients (394 patients with BrEF, 377 patients with non-BrEF, 89 patients with K-wire fixation, 192 patients with plaster fixation, 42 patients with dorsal plating fixation, 152 patients with volar plating fixation, and 124 patients with dorsal and volar plating fixation). Our network meta-analysis results demonstrated no significant differences in CTS risk among the 7 treatments (P>0.05). The value of surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA), however, suggested that dorsal plating fixation is the optimal treatment, with the lowest risk of CTS in DRF patients (dorsal plating fixation: 89.2%; dorsal and volar plating: 57.8%; plaster fixation: 50.9%; non-BrEF: 50.6%; volar plating fixation: 39.6%; BrEF: 38.4%; K-wire fixation: 23.6%). Conclusions Our network meta-analysis provides evidence that dorsal plating fixation significantly decreases the risk of CTS and could be the method of choice in DRF patients. PMID:26391617

  10. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: The Role of Occupational Factors Among 906 Workers

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Mohammad; Rezaee, Maryam; Chavoshi, Farzaneh; Mojtahed, Mohammad; Shams Koushki, Ehsan

    2012-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is common in the industrial setting. However,there is a controversy about the sole role of occupational ergonomic hazards in CTS. Objectives This study was conducted among assembling workers of a detergent factory and computer users with the aims of A) determination of CTS prevalence and B) evaluation of personal risk factors and level of exposure to occupational risk factors via Quick Exposure Check (QEC). Materials and Methods In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 906 cases (332 assembling workers and 574 computer workers) were enrolled. CTS was assessed by symptoms on the Katz hand diagram and physical examination. QEC technique was applied to evaluate physical exposure to the risk factors. Results According to this study, the prevalence of probable CTS was 14% in men and 8.9% in women; the rate of probable CTS was significantly higher in assembly workers than in computer users (P < 0.001). Mean age and work duration in the probable CTS group was statistically higher than in non-CTS group. But both groups were in the same range (fewer than 30, P = 0.024, 0.004); BMI in the probable CTS group was slightly lower than in non CTS group, but BMI in both groups were in the normal range. Wrist ratio > 0.7 correlated with increased risk of probable CTS (P < 0.001) Prevalence of probable CTS was significantly higher in third and fourth levels of QEC (P < 0.001). Conclusions Although this article had limitations, our findings suggest that the level of occupational exposure is an indicator of CTS development. PMID:24350110

  11. Relationship of age, body mass index, wrist and waist circumferences to carpal tunnel syndrome severity.

    PubMed

    Komurcu, Hatice Ferhan; Kilic, Selim; Anlar, Omer

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has a multifactorial etiology involving systemic, anatomical, idiopathic, and ergonomic characteristics. In this study, an investigation of the relationship between the CTS degree established by electrophysiological measurements in patients with clinical CTS prediagnosis, and age, gender, body mass index (BMI), hand wrist circumference, and waist circumference measurements has been done. On 547 patients included in the study, motor and sensory conduction examinations of the median and ulnar nerve were done on one or two upper extremities thought to have CTS. In terms of CTS severity, the patients were divided into four groups (normal, mild, medium, and severe CTS). A total of 843 electrophysiological examinations were done consisting of 424 on the right hand wrist and 419 on the left hand wrist. When the age group of 18-35 years is taken as the reference group, the CTS development risk independent of BMI has been found to have increased by a factor of 1.86 for ages 36-64 years, and by 4.17 for ages 65 years and higher after adjustment for BMI. With respect to normal degree CTS group, the BMI were significantly different in groups with mild, medium, and severe CTS. The waist circumferences of groups with mild, medium, and severe CTS severity were found to be significantly higher in comparison to the normal reference group. When this value was corrected with BMI and re-examined the statistically significant differences persisted. The study identified a significant relationship between the CTS severity and age, BMI, waist circumference. PMID:24257492

  12. Relationship of Age, Body Mass Index, Wrist and Waist Circumferences to Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Severity

    PubMed Central

    KOMURCU, Hatice Ferhan; KILIC, Selim; ANLAR, Omer

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has a multifactorial etiology involving systemic, anatomical, idiopathic, and ergonomic characteristics. In this study, an investigation of the relationship between the CTS degree established by electrophysiological measurements in patients with clinical CTS prediagnosis, and age, gender, body mass index (BMI), hand wrist circumference, and waist circumference measurements has been done. On 547 patients included in the study, motor and sensory conduction examinations of the median and ulnar nerve were done on one or two upper extremities thought to have CTS. In terms of CTS severity, the patients were divided into four groups (normal, mild, medium, and severe CTS). A total of 843 electrophysiological examinations were done consisting of 424 on the right hand wrist and 419 on the left hand wrist. When the age group of 18–35 years is taken as the reference group, the CTS development risk independent of BMI has been found to have increased by a factor of 1.86 for ages 36–64 years, and by 4.17 for ages 65 years and higher after adjustment for BMI. With respect to normal degree CTS group, the BMI were significantly different in groups with mild, medium, and severe CTS. The waist circumferences of groups with mild, medium, and severe CTS severity were found to be significantly higher in comparison to the normal reference group. When this value was corrected with BMI and re-examined the statistically significant differences persisted. The study identified a significant relationship between the CTS severity and age, BMI, waist circumference. PMID:24257492

  13. Screening for Acromegaly in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Prospective Study (ACROCARP).

    PubMed

    Zoicas, F; Kleindienst, A; Mayr, B; Buchfelder, M; Megele, R; Schöfl, C

    2016-07-01

    Early diagnosis of acromegaly prevents irreversible comorbidities and facilitates surgical cure. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is common in acromegaly and patients have often undergone surgery for CTS prior to the diagnosis of acromegaly. We hypothesized that screening CTS-patients for acromegaly could facilitate active case-finding. We prospectively enrolled 196 patients [135 women, 56.9 (range 23-103) years] who presented with CTS for surgery. Patients were asked about 6 symptoms suggestive of acromegaly using a questionnaire calculating a symptom score (0-6 points), and insulin-like-growth factor 1 (IGF-1) was measured. If IGF-1 was increased, IGF-1 measurement was repeated, and random growth hormone (GH) and/or an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with assessment of GH-suppression were performed. The mean symptom score was 1.7±1.3 points. Three patients reported the maximal symptom score of 6 points, but none of them had an increased IGF-1. There was no correlation between the symptom score and IGF-1-SDS (standard deviation score) (r=0.026; p=0.71). Four patients had an IGF-1>2 SDS. In 2 patients acromegaly was ruled out using random GH and OGTT. One patient had normal IGF-1 and random GH at follow-up. One patient refused further diagnostics. In this prospective cohort of patients with CTS, the observed frequency of acromegaly was at most 0.51% (95% CI 0.03 to 2.83%). In this prospective study, none of the 196 patients with CTS had proven acromegaly. Thus, we see no evidence to justify general screening of patients with CTS for acromegaly. PMID:26849823

  14. An Association between Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Migraine Headaches—National Health Interview Survey, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Law, Huay-Zong; Amirlak, Bardia; Cheng, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Migraine headaches have not historically been considered a compression neuropathy. Recent studies suggest that some migraines are successfully treated by targeted peripheral nerve decompression. Other compression neuropathies have previously been associated with one another. The goal of this study is to evaluate whether an association exists between migraines and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), the most common compression neuropathy. Methods: Data from 25,880 respondents of the cross-sectional 2010 National Health Interview Survey were used to calculate nationally representative prevalence estimates and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) of CTS and migraine headaches. Logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% CI for the degree of association between migraines and CTS after controlling for known demographic and health-related factors. Results: CTS was associated with older age, female gender, obesity, diabetes, and smoking. CTS was less common in Hispanics and Asians. Migraine was associated with younger age, female gender, obesity, diabetes, and current smoking. Migraine was less common in Asians. Migraine prevalence was 34% in those with CTS compared with 16% in those without CTS (aOR, 2.60; 95% CI, 2.16–3.13). CTS prevalence in patients with migraine headache was 8% compared with 3% in those without migraine headache (aOR, 2.67; 95% CI, 2.22–3.22). Conclusions: This study is the first to demonstrate an association between CTS and migraine headache. Longitudinal and genetic studies with physician verification of migraine headaches and CTS are needed to further define this association. PMID:25878944

  15. Carpal tunnel syndrome and computer exposure at work in two large complementary cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Mediouni, Z; Bodin, J; Dale, A M; Herquelot, E; Carton, M; Leclerc, A; Fouquet, N; Dumontier, C; Roquelaure, Y; Evanoff, B A; Descatha, A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The boom in computer use and concurrent high rates in musculoskeletal complaints and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) among users have led to a controversy about a possible link. Most studies have used cross-sectional designs and shown no association. The present study used longitudinal data from two large complementary cohorts to evaluate a possible relationship between CTS and the performance of computer work. Settings and participants The Cosali cohort is a representative sample of a French working population that evaluated CTS using standardised clinical examinations and assessed self-reported computer use. The PrediCTS cohort study enrolled newly hired clerical, service and construction workers in several industries in the USA, evaluated CTS using symptoms and nerve conduction studies (NCS), and estimated exposures to computer work using a job exposure matrix. Primary and secondary outcome measures During a follow-up of 3–5 years, the association between new cases of CTS and computer work was calculated using logistic regression models adjusting for sex, age, obesity and relevant associated disorders. Results In the Cosali study, 1551 workers (41.8%) completed follow-up physical examinations; 36 (2.3%) participants were diagnosed with CTS. In the PrediCTS study, 711 workers (64.2%) completed follow-up evaluations, whereas 31 (4.3%) had new cases of CTS. The adjusted OR for the group with the highest exposure to computer use was 0.39 (0.17; 0.89) in the Cosali cohort and 0.16 (0.05; 0.59) in the PrediCTS cohort. Conclusions Data from two large cohorts in two different countries showed no association between computer work and new cases of CTS among workers in diverse jobs with varying job exposures. CTS is far more common among workers in non-computer related jobs; prevention efforts and work-related compensation programmes should focus on workers performing forceful hand exertion. PMID:26353869

  16. Sensitivity and specificity of vibrometry for detection of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gerr, F; Letz, R; Harris-Abbott, D; Hopkins, L C

    1995-09-01

    A cross-sectional study was performed to assess the utility of vibrotactile thresholds (VTs) obtained before and after a 10-minute period of wrist flexion as a method for detection of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) among adult subjects. Subjects with hand discomfort were recruited from patients referred to a university-based electromyography laboratory. Asymptomatic subjects were recruited from among office and technical staff at a professional school. In addition to electrophysiologic evaluation (EP), all subjects were offered VT measurement of the index and small fingers, bilaterally, before and after a 10-minute period of wrist flexion. A total of 144 subjects were recruited, and three hand-condition groups were established: 57 hands had symptoms and EP results compatible with CTS (Group 1), 58 hands had symptoms compatible with CTS and normal EP results (Group 2), and 123 hands had no symptoms and normal EP results (Group 3). Group 1 was considered the "disease-positive" group, and Groups 2 and 3 were both considered "disease-negative" groups. Analyses were performed separately for dominant and nondominant hands, and results were pooled when appropriate. Outcomes of interest were the VTs obtained from the index and small fingers before and after 10 minutes of maximal voluntary wrist flexion as well as variables calculated from them. Significant differences in mean VT were observed between the three hand-condition groups for most of the outcomes evaluated. At any given level of specificity, the sensitivity of vibrometry performed after 10 minutes of wrist flexion was approximately two times that obtained before wrist flexion for detection of electrophysiologically confirmed CTS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8528719

  17. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Estenssoro, Elisa; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an acute respiratory failure produced by an inflammatory edema secondary to increased lung capillary permeability. This causes alveolar flooding and subsequently deep hypoxemia, with intrapulmonary shunt as its most important underlying mechanism. Characteristically, this alteration is unresponsive to high FIO2 and only reverses with end-expiratory positive pressure (PEEP). Pulmonary infiltrates on CXR and CT are the hallmark, together with decreased lung compliance. ARDS always occurs within a week of exposition to a precipitating factor; most frequently pneumonia, shock, aspiration of gastric contents, sepsis, and trauma. In CT scan, the disease is frequently inhomogeneous, with gravitational infiltrates coexisting with normal-density areas and also with hyperaerated parenchyma. Mortality is high (30-60%) especially in ARDS associated with septic shock and neurocritical diseases. The cornerstone of therapy lies in the treatment of the underlying cause and in the use mechanical ventilation which, if inappropriately administered, can lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. Tidal volume = 6 ml/kg of ideal body weight to maintain an end-inspiratory (plateau) pressure = 30 cm H2O ("protective ventilation") is the only variable consistently associated with decreased mortality. Moderate-to-high PEEP levels are frequently required to treat hypoxemia, yet no specific level or titration strategy has improved outcomes. Recently, the use of early prone positioning in patients with PaO2/FIO2 = 150 was associated with increased survival. In severely hypoxemic patients, it may be necessary to use adjuvants of mechanical ventilation as recruitment maneuvers, pressure-controlled modes, neuromuscular blocking agents, and extracorporeal-membrane oxygenation. Fluid restriction appears beneficial. PMID:27576283

  18. Pressure-Morphology Relationship of a Released Carpal Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Hee; Marquardt, Tamara L.; Gabra, Joseph N.; Shen, Zhilei Liu; Evans, Peter J.; Seitz, William H.; Li, Zong-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate morphological changes of a released carpal tunnel in response to variations of carpal tunnel pressure. Pressure within the carpal tunnel is known to be elevated in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and dependent on wrist posture. Previously, increased carpal tunnel pressure was shown to affect the morphology of the carpal tunnel with an intact transverse carpal ligament. However, the pressure-morphology relationship of the carpal tunnel after release of the transverse carpal ligament has not been investigated. Carpal tunnel release (CTR) was performed endoscopically on cadaveric hands and the carpal tunnel pressure was dynamically increased from 10 to 120 mmHg. Simultaneously, carpal tunnel cross-sectional images were captured by an ultrasound system and pressure measurements were recorded by a pressure transducer. It was found that carpal tunnel pressure significantly affected carpal arch area (p<0.001), with an increase >62 mm2 at 120 mmHg. Carpal arch height, length, and width were also found to significantly change with carpal tunnel pressure (p<0.05). As carpal tunnel pressure increased, carpal arch height and length increased, but the carpal arch width decreased. Analyses of the pressure-morphology relationship for a released carpal tunnel revealed a nine times greater compliance than that previously reported for a carpal tunnel with an intact transverse carpal ligament. This change of structural properties as a result of transecting the transverse carpal ligament helps explain the reduction of carpal tunnel pressure and relief of symptoms for patients after CTR surgery. PMID:23184493

  19. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yadam, Suman; Bihler, Eric; Balaan, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious inflammatory disorder with high mortality. Its main pathologic mechanism seems to result from increased alveolar permeability. Its definition has also changed since first being described according to the Berlin definition, which now classifies ARDS on a severity scale based on PaO2 (partial pressure of oxygen, arterial)/FIO2 (fraction of inspired oxygen) ratio. The cornerstone of therapy was found to be a low tidal volume strategy featuring volumes of 6 to 8 mL per kg of ideal body weight that has been shown to have decreased mortality as proven by the ARDSnet trials. There are other areas of treatment right now that include extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, as well for severe refractory hypoxemia. Other methods that include prone positioning for ventilation have also shown improvements in oxygenation. Positive end-expiratory pressure with lung recruitment maneuvers has also been found to be helpful. Other therapies that include vasodilators and neuromuscular agents are still being explored and need further studies to define their role in ARDS. PMID:26919679

  20. Narrowing carpal arch width to increase cross-sectional area of carpal tunnel – a cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zong-Ming; Gabra, Joseph N.; Marquardt, Tamara L.; Kim, Dong Hee

    2013-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel morphology plays an essential role in the etiology and treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. The purpose of this study was to observe the morphological changes of the carpal tunnel as a result of carpal arch width narrowing. It was hypothesized carpal arch width narrowing would result in increased height and area of the carpal arch. Methods The carpal arch width of eight cadaveric hands was narrowed by a custom apparatus and cross-sectional ultrasound images were acquired. The carpal arch height and area were quantified as the carpal arch width was narrowed. Correlation and regression analyses were performed for the carpal arch height and area with respect to the carpal arch width. Findings The carpal tunnel became more convex as the carpal arch width was narrowed. The initial carpal arch width, height, and area were 25.7 (SD 1.9) mm, 4.1 (SD 0.6) mm, and 68.5 (SD 14.0) mm2, respectively. The carpal arch height and area negatively correlated with the carpal arch width, with correlation coefficients of −0.974 (SD 0.018) and −0.925 (SD 0.034), respectively. Linear regression analyses showed a 1 mm narrowing of the carpal arch width resulted in proportional increases of 0.40 (SD 0.14) mm in the carpal arch height and 4.0 (SD 2.2) mm2 in the carpal arch area. Interpretation This study demonstrates that carpal arch width narrowing leads to increased carpal arch height and area, a potential mechanism to reduce the mechanical insult to the median nerve and relieve symptoms associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:23583095

  1. Multidimensional ultrasound imaging of the wrist: Changes of shape and displacement of the median nerve and tendons in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Filius, Anika; Scheltens, Marjan; Bosch, Hans G; van Doorn, Pieter A; Stam, Henk J; Hovius, Steven E R; Amadio, Peter C; Selles, Ruud W

    2015-09-01

    Dynamics of structures within the carpal tunnel may alter in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) due to fibrotic changes and increased carpal tunnel pressure. Ultrasound can visualize these potential changes, making ultrasound potentially an accurate diagnostic tool. To study this, we imaged the carpal tunnel of 113 patients and 42 controls. CTS severity was classified according to validated clinical and nerve conduction study (NCS) classifications. Transversal and longitudinal displacement and shape (changes) were calculated for the median nerve, tendons and surrounding tissue. To predict diagnostic value binary logistic regression modeling was applied. Reduced longitudinal nerve displacement (p≤ 0.019), increased nerve cross-sectional area (p≤ 0.006) and perimeter (p≤ 0.007), and a trend of relatively changed tendon displacements were seen in patients. Changes were more convincing when CTS was classified as more severe. Binary logistic modeling to diagnose CTS using ultrasound showed a sensitivity of 70-71% and specificity of 80-84%. In conclusion, CTS patients have altered dynamics of structures within the carpal tunnel. PMID:25865180

  2. The acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pooja

    2015-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure. Its development leads to high rates of mortality, as well as short- and long-term complications, such as physical and cognitive impairment. Therefore, early recognition of this syndrome and application of demonstrated therapeutic interventions are essential to change the natural course of this devastating entity. In this review article, we describe updated concepts in ARDS. Specifically, we discuss the new definition of ARDS, its risk factors and pathophysiology, and current evidence regarding ventilation management, adjunctive therapies, and intervention required in refractory hypoxemia. PMID:25829644

  3. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... and adolescents include: Hemolytic uremic syndrome Henoch-Schönlein purpura IgA nephropathy Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis Common causes in ... Heart failure - overview Hemolytic-uremic syndrome Henoch-Schönlein purpura Hepatitis High blood pressure Hypersensitivity vasculitis IgA nephropathy ...

  4. The effect of tendon excursion velocity on longitudinal median nerve displacement: differences between carpal tunnel syndrome patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Filius, Anika; Thoreson, Andrew R; Wang, Yuexiang; Passe, Sandra M; Zhao, Chunfeng; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2015-04-01

    The subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) is a viscoelastic structure connecting the median nerve (MN) and the flexor tendons in the carpal tunnel. Increased strain rates increases stiffness in viscoelastic tissues, and thereby its capacity to transfer shear load. Therefore, tendon excursion velocity may impact the MN displacement. In carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) the SSCT is fibrotic and may be ruptured, and this may affect MN motion. In this study, ultrasonography was performed on 14 wrists of healthy controls and 25 wrists of CTS patients during controlled finger motions performed at three different velocities. Longitudinal MN and tendon excursion were assessed using a custom speckle tracking algorithm and compared across the three different velocities. CTS patients exhibited significantly less MN motion than controls (p ≤ 0.002). While in general, MN displacement increased with increasing tendon excursion velocity (p ≤ 0.031). These findings are consistent with current knowledge of SSCT mechanics in CTS, in which in some patients the fibrotic SSCT appears to have ruptured from the tendon surface. PMID:25640903

  5. Acute spontaneous tumor lysis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jasek, A M; Day, H J

    1994-10-01

    An 83-year-old woman with no previous history of malignancy was admitted to our institution with weakness and anemia and subsequently developed acute tumor lysis syndrome secondary to newly diagnosed Burkitt's leukemia/lymphoma. This syndrome has been previously described in patients with hematologic malignancies; however, its development has been related to the administration of chemotherapy, steroids, or radiotherapy. The spontaneous occurrence of tumor lysis syndrome has not been previously reported; however, Cohen et al. [Am J Med 58:486-491, 1980] report 8 of 37 patients with "clinically insignificant pretreatment derangements" of serum potassium, phosphate, and calcium. PMID:8092128

  6. Acute coronary syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Heart attack-ACS; Myocardial infarction-ACS; MI-ACS; Acute MI-ACS; ST-elevation myocardial infarction-ACS; Non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction-ACS; Unstable angina-ACS; Accelerating angina-ACS; New- ...

  7. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... chap 33. Lee WL, Slutsky AS. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and ARDS. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  8. Effect of radial shock wave therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome: A prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yung-Tsan; Ke, Ming-Jen; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chang, Chih-Ya; Lin, Ching-Yueh; Li, Tsung-Ying; Shih, Feng-Mei; Chen, Liang-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Three recent studies demonstrated the positive effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for treating carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). However, none have entirely proved the effects of ESWT on CTS because all studies had a small sample size and lacked a placebo-controlled design. Moreover, radial ESWT (rESWT) has not been used to treat CTS. We conducted a prospective randomized, controlled, double-blinded study to assess the effect of rESWT for treating CTS. Thirty-four enrolled patients (40 wrists) were randomized into intervention and control groups (20 wrists in each). Participants in the intervention group underwent three sessions of rESWT with nightly splinting, whereas those in the control group underwent sham rESWT with nightly splinting. The primary outcome was visual analog scale (VAS), whereas the secondary outcomes included the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTQ), cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve, sensory nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve, and finger pinch strength. Evaluations were performed before treatment and at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the third rESWT session. A significantly greater improvement in the VAS, BCTQ scores, and CSA of the median nerve was noted in the intervention group throughout the study as compared to the control group (except for BCTQ severity at week 12 and CSA at weeks 1 and 4) (p < 0.05). This is the first study to assess rESWT in a randomized placebo-controlled trial and demonstrate that rESWT is a safe and effective method for relieving pain and disability in patients with CTS. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:977-984, 2016. PMID:26610183

  9. Clinical course, costs and predictive factors for response to treatment in carpal tunnel syndrome: the PALMS study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common neuropathy of the upper limb and a significant contributor to hand functional impairment and disability. Effective treatment options include conservative and surgical interventions, however it is not possible at present to predict the outcome of treatment. The primary aim of this study is to identify which baseline clinical factors predict a good outcome from conservative treatment (by injection) or surgery in patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. Secondary aims are to describe the clinical course and progression of CTS, and to describe and predict the UK cost of CTS to the individual, National Health Service (NHS) and society over a two year period. Methods/Design In this prospective observational cohort study patients presenting with clinical signs and symptoms typical of CTS and in whom the diagnosis is confirmed by nerve conduction studies are invited to participate. Data on putative predictive factors are collected at baseline and follow-up through patient questionnaires and include standardised measures of symptom severity, hand function, psychological and physical health, comorbidity and quality of life. Resource use and cost over the 2 year period such as prescribed medications, NHS and private healthcare contacts are also collected through patient self-report at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. The primary outcome used to classify treatment success or failures will be a 5-point global assessment of change. Secondary outcomes include changes in clinical symptoms, functioning, psychological health, quality of life and resource use. A multivariable model of factors which predict outcome and cost will be developed. Discussion This prospective cohort study will provide important data on the clinical course and UK costs of CTS over a two-year period and begin to identify predictive factors for treatment success from conservative and surgical interventions. PMID:24507749

  10. Carpal osteoarthrosis.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Brett; Szabo, Robert M

    2006-11-01

    Despite improved understanding of carpal mechanics, increased awareness of intercarpal ligament injuries, and improved techniques for treating carpal instability, post-traumatic intercarpal osteoarthrosis remains a common problem. Osteoarthritis of the carpal bones, including scapholunate advance collapse wrist, scaphotrapeziotrapezoid arthritis, lunotriquetral arthritis, triquetrohamate arthritis, and pisotriquetral arthritis, follows specific unique patterns, but in each, the final common pathway leads to degenerative change. Injury or deformity leads to instability and altered kinematics, producing abnormal joint contact pressures. Cartilage injury and eventual degeneration of the join follow. The etiology, prevalence, and current evaluation and treatment of these conditions are of importance to hand surgeons. PMID:17097471

  11. Acute radiation syndrome and chronic radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grammaticos, Philip; Giannoula, Evanthia; Fountos, George P

    2013-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) or sickness or poisoning or toxicity is induced after a whole body exposure of men to high doses of radiation between 1-12Gy. First symptoms are from the gastrointestinal system, which together with bone marrow are the most sensitive parts of our body. Chronic radiation syndrome (CRS) may be induced by smaller than 1Gy radiation doses or after a mild form of ARS. Prophylaxis and treatment suggestions are described. In cases of ARS, a large part of the exposed population after proper medical care may survive, while without medical care this part of the population will be lost. Prophylaxis may also save another part of the population. PMID:23570025

  12. Mild leptospirosis with three-year persistence of IgG- and IgM-antibodies, initially manifesting as carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Sehnal, Ernst; Stanek, Gerold

    2005-08-01

    Long-term persistence of IgG- and IgM-antibodies against leptospira after mild leptospirosis has not been reported. In a 45-year-old female pet-shop worker with carpal tunnel syndrome, accompanied by arthralgias, coughing, repeatedly elevated temperature, followed by easy fatigability, personality change, memory and speech disturbance, blurred vision, myalgia and swollen lymph nodes, leptospirosis was diagnosed, based upon history, clinical findings, and serological investigations. After the described symptoms had disappeared following doxycyclin for 2 weeks, IgG- and IgM-antibodies against leptospira remained positive during the next three years. This case illustrates that leptospirosis may start as carpal tunnel syndrome and that the severity of leptospirosis does not seem to be related to the intensity of the humoral immune response against the causative agent. PMID:16038755

  13. Effect of Linum usitatissimum L. (linseed) oil on mild and moderate carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome is known as the most common entrapment neuropathy. Conservative treatments cannot reduce the symptomatic severity satisfactorily; therefore, effectiveness of Linum usitatissimum L. (linseed) oil on carpal tunnel syndrome, as a complementary treatment, was evaluated in the current study. Linseed oil is a well-known preparation in Iranian traditional medicine and its analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects have been shown in previous studies. Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted. One hundred patients (155 hands) with idiopathic mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome aged between 18 and 65 years old were randomized in two parallel groups. These two groups were treated during 4 weeks with topical placebo and linseed oil. In addition, a night wrist splint was prescribed for both groups. Symptomatic severity and functional status were measured using Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. In addition, median sensory nerve conduction velocity, motor distal latency, sensory distal latency and compound latency as electrodiagnostic parameters were measured at baseline and after the intervention period. Results After the intervention, significant improvement was observed regarding Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire symptomatic severity and functional status mean differences (p <0.001) in the linseed oil group compared with those in the placebo group. Also, regarding the mean differences of both groups, significant improvement of nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve was seen in the linseed oil group by a value of 2.38 m/sec (p < 0.05). However, motor distal latency and sensory distal latency of the median nerve showed no between-group significant changes (p = 0.14 for both items). Finally, compound latency was improved slightly in the case group, comparing mean differences between the groups (p <0.05). No significant adverse events were reported from using linseed

  14. Prediction of Outcome in Women With Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Who Receive Manual Physical Therapy Interventions: A Validation Study.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Cleland, Joshua A; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Palacios-Ceña, María; Martínez-Perez, Almudena; Pareja, Juan A; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Secondary analysis of a randomized trial. Background A clinical prediction rule to identify patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) most likely to respond to manual physical therapy has been published but requires further testing to determine its validity. Objective To assess the validity of a clinical prediction rule proposed for the management of patients with CTS in a different group of patients with a variety of treating clinicians. Methods A preplanned secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial investigating the efficacy of manual physical therapies, including desensitization maneuvers of the central nervous system, in 120 women suffering from CTS was performed. Patients were randomized to receive 3 sessions of manual physical therapy (n = 60) or surgical release/decompression of the carpal tunnel (n = 60). Self-perceived improvement with a global rating of change was recorded at 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Pain intensity (mean pain and worst pain on a 0-to-10 numeric pain-rating scale) and scores on the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (functional status and symptom severity subscales) were assessed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. A baseline assessment of status on the clinical prediction rule was performed (positive status on the clinical prediction rule was defined as meeting at least 2 of the following criteria: pressure pain threshold of less than 137 kPa over the affected C5-6 joint; heat pain threshold of less than 39.6°C over the affected carpal tunnel; and general health score [Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey] of greater than 66 points). Linear mixed models with repeated measures were used to examine the validity of the rule. Results Participants with a positive status on the rule who received manual physical therapy did not experience greater improvements compared to those with a negative status on the rule for mean pain (P = .65), worst pain (P = .86), function (P = .99), or symptom

  15. Is carpal tunnel decompression warranted for HNPP?

    PubMed

    Earle, Nicholas; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2013-12-01

    The role of carpal tunnel decompression surgery for patients that have hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) is currently unknown. Since recovery from carpal tunnel compression is often associated with remyelination or nodal reconstruction rather than axonal regeneration, it is uncertain whether the PMP22 deletion associated with HNPP interrupts myelin or nodal reconstitution. We describe two patients with genetically confirmed HNPP and symptomatic carpal tunnel syndrome that had clinical and electrophysiological improvement after surgical decompression. The findings indicate a capacity for conduction repair in HNPP. They also suggest a need for further investigation and discussion around whether to offer carpal tunnel decompression to symptomatic HNPP patients. PMID:24171697

  16. Acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jawaid, Saad; Chaudary, Adeel

    2014-01-01

    The paramedics brought a 60-year-old man to the emergency department after a sudden onset of shortness of breath with a subsequent drop in the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). On arrival the patient looked peri-arrest. His O2 saturations were 84% on 15 L of oxygen. He had gasping breathing with a completely silent chest and the GCS was 6/15 (E=1, V=1, M=4). The blood gas revealed type-2 respiratory failure. The chest X-ray was unremarkable and ECG was not indicative for cardiac catheterisation lab activation. Bedside shock scan was done which showed global hypokinesia of the left ventricle. In spite of unconvincing ECG and chest X-ray, an acute cardiac event was diagnosed in view of an abnormal bedside echo. The patient was transferred to the cardiac catheterisation lab for urgent percutaneous coronary intervention which revealed critical stenosis of the left main stem coronary artery, which was successfully stented. The patient had a good recovery from the life-threatening event. PMID:24913081

  17. Melorheostosis of the hand affecting the c6 sclerotome and presenting with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Shalimar; Mat Nor, Noreen Fazlina; Mohamed Haflah, Nor Hazla

    2014-04-01

    Melorheostosis is a rare, progressive bone disease accompanied by hyperostosis and soft tissue fibrosis. While affected adults present with contracture and pain, children present with limb length discrepancy and deformity. We report the case of a 20-year-old woman with melorheostosis since childhood who presented with right hand deformity and numbness. Radiographs showed not only a combination of dense sclerosis and opacities, but also the classic 'flowing candle wax' appearance. Radiography can be used to identify melorheostosis, thus preventing unnecessary bone biopsies. Carpal tunnel release revealed the presence of a thickened flexor retinaculum and a degenerated median nerve distal to the retinaculum, but did not show hyperostosis. This case highlights the role of nerve decompression in melorheostosis and the importance of early identification of the disease to prevent unnecessary bone biopsies. PMID:24763843

  18. High-resolution ultrasonography of the carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Buchberger, W; Schön, G; Strasser, K; Jungwirth, W

    1991-10-01

    Twenty-eight wrists of 25 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and 28 wrists of 14 normal control subjects were studied with high-frequency real-time ultrasonography. Three general findings could be observed in CTS, regardless of its cause: swelling of the median nerve at the entrance of the carpal tunnel; flattening of the median nerve in the distal carpal tunnel; and increased palmar flexion of the transverse carpal ligament. Quantitative analysis proved these findings to be significant. We conclude that high-resolution sonography is able to diagnose median nerve compression in the carpal tunnel syndrome and to detect some of its potential causes. PMID:1942218

  19. [Lesions of the radio-carpal joint in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and its surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Herasymenko, S I; Babko, A M

    2014-08-01

    Affection of radio-carpal joint is most frequently revealed in patients, suffering rheumatoid arthritis. While the disease progressing in almost 75% of patients the inflammatory changes in radio-carpal joint occur. An acute and chronic synovitis, damage of a cartilage constitute a cause of a typical erosion of bones inside a joint, weakening of a tendo-ligamentous apparatus and its further deformity. Operative treatment was aimed for the inflammatory focus elimination, reduction of the pain syndrome severity, the function loss, and the joint deformity correction. The mostly used operative interventions are tenoectomy, synovectomy, arthrodesis, total endoprosthesis. PMID:25417294

  20. Diagnostic Value of the Second Lumbrical-Interosseous Distal Motor Latency Comparison Test in Severe Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, SangHun; Kim, DongHyun; Cho, Hee-Mun; Nam, Ho-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the usefulness of the second lumbrical-interosseous (2L-INT) distal motor latency (DML) comparison test in localizing median neuropathy to the wrist in patients with absent median sensory and motor response in routine nerve conduction studies. Methods Electrodiagnostic results from 1,705 hands of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) symptoms were reviewed retrospectively. All subjects were evaluated using routine nerve conduction studies: median sensory conduction recorded from digits 1 to 4, motor conduction from the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, and the 2L-INT DML comparison test. Results Four hundred and one hands from a total of 1,705 were classified as having severe CTS. Among the severe CTS group, 56 hands (14.0%) showed absent median sensory and motor response in a routine nerve conduction study, and, of those hands, 42 (75.0%) showed an abnormal 2L-INT response. Conclusion The 2L-INT DML comparison test proved to be a valuable electrodiagnostic technique in localizing median mononeuropathy at the wrist, even in the most severe CTS patients. PMID:26949669

  1. Pooling job physical exposure data from multiple independent studies in a consortium study of carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kapellusch, Jay M.; Garg, Arun; Bao, Stephen S.; Silverstein, Barbara A.; Burt, Susan E.; Dale, Ann Marie; Evanoff, Bradley A.; Gerr, Frederic E.; Harris-Adamson, Carisa; Hegmann, Kurt T.; Merlino, Linda A.; Rempel, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Pooling data from different epidemiological studies of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) is necessary to improve statistical power and to more precisely quantify exposure–response relationships for MSDs. The pooling process is difficult and time-consuming, and small methodological differences could lead to different exposure–response relationships. A subcommittee of a six-study research consortium studying carpal tunnel syndrome: (i) visited each study site, (ii) documented methods used to collect physical exposure data and (iii) determined compatibility of exposure variables across studies. Certain measures of force, frequency of exertion and duty cycle were collected by all studies and were largely compatible. A portion of studies had detailed data to investigate simultaneous combinations of force, frequency and duration of exertions. Limited compatibility was found for hand/wrist posture. Only two studies could calculate compatible Strain Index scores, but Threshold Limit Value for Hand Activity Level could be determined for all studies. Challenges of pooling data, resources required and recommendations for future researchers are discussed. PMID:23697792

  2. An ergonomics study on the evaluation of carpal tunnel syndrome among Chikan embroidery workers of West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Gangopadhyay, Somnath; Chakrabarty, Sabarni; Sarkar, Krishnendu; Dev, Samrat; Das, Tamal; Banerjee, Sunetra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chikan embroidery is a popular handicraft in India that involves hand-intensive stitching while seated in a static posture with the upper back curved and the head bent over the fabric. Women perform most Chikan embroidery. Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyze the repetitive nature of this work among female Chikan embroiderers by measuring the prevalence of upper extremity discomfort and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods: The Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire was used to analyze the extent of upper extremity pain symptomology. The repetitive nature of Chikan embroidery work was evaluated using the Assessment of Repetitive Tasks of the upper limbs tool (ART). Motor nerve conduction studies of median and ulnar nerves were performed with embroidery workers and a control group to determine the risk of CTS. Results: Among embroidery workers, the prevalence of wrist pain was 68% and forearm pain was 60%. The embroiderers also commonly reported Tingling and numbness in the hands and fingertips. The ART analysis found that Chikan embroidery is a highly repetitive task and nerve conduction studies showed that the embroidery workers were more likely to experience CTS than women in the control group. Conclusions: Chikan embroidery is a hand-intensive occupation involving repetitive use of hands and wrists and this study population is at risk of experiencing CTS. Future research should explore the potential benefits of ergonomics measures including incorporating breaks, stretching exercises, and the use of wrist splints to reduce repetitive strain and the probability of developing CTS. PMID:25658674

  3. Diagnostic Significance of Ultrasonographic Measurements and Median-Ulnar Ratio in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Correlation with Nerve Conduction Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mesci, Nilgün; Çetinkaya, Yilmaz; Geler Külcü, Duygu

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We determined the reliability of ultrasonography (US) measurements for diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and their correlation with symptom duration and electrophysiology findings. We determined whether the ratio of the median-to-ulnar cross-sectional areas (CSAs) can support CTS diagnoses. Methods The pisiform CSA (CSApisiform), swelling ratio (SR), palmar bowing, and CSApisiform/ulnar CSA (CSAulnar) measurements made in two subgroups of CTS patients (having sensory affection alone or having both sensory and motor affection) were compared with controls. CSAulnar was measured in Guyon's canal at the level of most-protuberant portion of the pisiform bone. Results The values of all of the measured US parameters were higher in patients with CTS (n=50) than in controls (n=62). CSApisiform could be used to diagnose CTS of mild severity. All of the parameters were positively correlated with the distal latency of the compound muscle action potential, and all of them except for SR were negatively correlated with the sensory nerve conduction velocity. A CSApisiform/CSAulnar ratio of ≥1.79 had a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity of 76% for diagnosing CTS. Conclusions Only CSApisiform measurements were reliable for diagnosing early stages of CTS, and CSApisiform/CSAulnar had a lower diagnostic value for diagnosing CTS. PMID:27095524

  4. "…you earn money by suffering pain:" Beliefs About Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Among Latino Poultry Processing Workers.

    PubMed

    Arcury, Thomas A; Mora, Dana C; Quandt, Sara A

    2015-06-01

    The nature of poultry processing puts workers at risk for developing neurological injuries, particularly carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Many poultry processing workers are Latino immigrants. This qualitative analysis uses an explanatory models of illness (EMs) framework to describe immigrant Latino poultry processing workers' (Guatemalan and Mexican) beliefs of CTS. Understanding these workers' CTS EMs provides a foundation for recommendations to reduce the risk factors for this occupational injury. In-depth interviews were completed with 15 poultry processing workers diagnosed with CTS. Systematic qualitative analysis was used to delineate beliefs about causes, symptoms, physiology, treatments, quality-of-life and health implications of CTS. Participants' EMs largely reflect current biomedical understanding of CTS. These EMs are similar for Guatemalan and Mexican workers. Beliefs about causes include factors in the work environment (e.g., repetition, cold) and individual physical weakness. Treatments include over-the-counter medicine, as well as traditional remedies. Most know the future impact of CTS will include chronic pain. These workers know what causes CTS and that curing it would require quitting their jobs, but feel that they must endure CTS to support their families. Latino poultry processing workers, whether Guatemalan or Mexican, have a fairly complete understanding of what causes CTS, how to treat it, and what they must do to cure it. However, situational factors force them to endure CTS. Policy changes are needed to change the structure of work in poultry processing, particularly line speed and break frequency, if the prevalence of CTS is to be reduced. PMID:24363119

  5. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and exposure to vibration, repetitive wrist movements, and heavy manual work: a case-referent study.

    PubMed Central

    Wieslander, G; Norbäck, D; Göthe, C J; Juhlin, L

    1989-01-01

    Possible connections between carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and exposure to vibrating handheld tools, repetitive wrist movements, and heavy manual work were examined in a case-referent study. The cases were 38 men operated on for CTS between 1974 and 1980. For each case, two referents were drawn from among other surgical cases (hospital referents) and two further referents from the population register and telephone directory, respectively (population referents). Thirty four of 38 cases (89%) and 143 of 152 referents (94%) were interviewed by telephone. An increased prevalence of obesity, rheumatoid disease, diabetes, or thyroid disease was observed among the cases but most did not suffer from any of these disorders. CTS was significantly correlated with exposure to vibration from handheld tools and to repetitive wrist movements but showed a weaker correlation with work producing a heavy load on the wrist. A cause-effect relation between CTS and exposures to handheld vibrating tools and to work causing repetitive movements of the wrist seems probable. Some differences between hospital and population referents indicate that a case-referent study of this type could be biased by inappropriate selection of referents. PMID:2920142

  6. A pooled job physical exposure dataset from multiple independent studies in a consortium study of carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Stephen S.; Kapellusch, Jay M.; Garg, Arun; Silverstein, Barbara A.; Harris-Adamson, Carisa; Burt, Susan E.; Dale, Ann Marie; Evanoff, Bradley A.; Gerr, Frederic E.; Hegmann, Kurt T.; Merlino, Linda A.; Thiese, Matthew S.; Rempel, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Six research groups independently conducted prospective studies of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) incidence in 54 US workplaces in 10 US States. Physical exposure variables were collected by all research groups at the individual worker level. Data from these research groups were pooled to increase the exposure spectrum and statistical power. Objective This paper provides a detailed description of the characteristics of the pooled physical exposure variables and the source data information from the individual research studies. Methods Physical exposure data were inspected and prepared by each of the individual research studies according to detailed instructions provided by an exposure sub-committee of the research consortium. Descriptive analyses were performed on the pooled physical exposure dataset. Correlation analyses were performed among exposure variables estimating similar exposure aspects. Results At baseline, there were a total of 3010 subjects in the pooled physical exposure dataset. Overall, the pooled data meaningfully increased the spectra of most exposure variables. The increased spectra were due to the wider range in exposure data of different jobs provided by the research studies. The correlations between variables estimating similar exposure aspects showed different patterns among data provided by the research studies. Conclusions The increased spectra of the physical exposure variables among the data pooled likely improved the possibility of detecting potential associations between these physical exposure variables and CTS incidence. It is also recognized that methods need to be developed for general use by all researchers for standardization of physical exposure variable definition, data collection, processing and reduction. PMID:25504866

  7. One-year Incidence of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Latino Poultry Processing Workers and Other Latino Manual Workers

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Michael S.; Walker, Francis O.; Newman, Jill C.; Schulz, Mark R.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Mora, Dana; Chen, Haiying; Eaton, Bethany; Quandt, Sara A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) over one year in Latino poultry processing workers. Methods Symptoms and nerve conduction studies were used to identify Latino poultry processing workers (106 wrists) and Latinos in other manual labor occupations (257 wrists) that did not have CTS at baseline, and these individuals were then evaluated in the same manner one year later. Results Based on wrists, the one-year incidence of CTS was higher in poultry processing workers than non-poultry manual workers (19.8% vs. 11.7%, p = 0.022). Poultry workers had a higher odds (1.89; p = 0.089) of developing CTS over one year compared to non-poultry manual workers. Discussion Latino poultry processing workers have an incidence of CTS that is possibly higher than Latinos in other manual labor positions. Latino poultry workers’ high absolute and relative risk of CTS likely results from the repetitive and strenuous nature of poultry processing work. PMID:23996875

  8. Geographic variation in surgical treatment for work-related carpal tunnel syndrome: does improved return to work matter?

    PubMed

    Wasiak, Radoslaw; Pransky, Glenn; Yao, Peikang

    2006-01-01

    Medical treatment of compensated work-related conditions has two objectives--improve injured workers' health status and allow safe and sustained return to work (RTW). Theoretically, the choice of treatment method should be based primarily on these objectives. Surgical treatment of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) provides an opportunity to evaluate whether this occurs. The traditional method of open release has been complemented by an endoscopic procedure, particularly useful in work-related cases due to the anticipated benefit of earlier RTW. The objective of this study was to investigate the differences in surgical treatment for work-related CTS across eight US workers' compensation (WC) jurisdictions, and the factors associated with these differences. From all WC claims reported to a single insurer during the 1995-1999 period, we identified individuals with a one or two surgical procedures for work-related CTS. Among selected individuals (n=4,421), about 20% were treated using the endoscopic procedure; this percentage had a ten-fold variation across the eight jurisdictions. However, utilization of endoscopic release did not increase during the study period, despite reports of better RTW outcomes. The highly jurisdictional nature of the US WC system, with significant differences in reimbursement levels for endoscopic procedures, and geographical differences in medical training were among the potential contributors to the observed variation in utilization. PMID:16373974

  9. Acupuncture-Evoked Response in Somatosensory and Prefrontal Cortices Predicts Immediate Pain Reduction in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Yumi; Kettner, Norman; Lee, Jeungchan; Kim, Jieun; Cina, Stephen; Malatesta, Cristina; Gerber, Jessica; McManus, Claire; Im, Jaehyun; Libby, Alexandra; Mezzacappa, Pia; Morse, Leslie R.; Park, Kyungmo; Audette, Joseph; Napadow, Vitaly

    2013-01-01

    The linkage between brain response to acupuncture and subsequent analgesia remains poorly understood. Our aim was to evaluate this linkage in chronic pain patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Brain response to electroacupuncture (EA) was evaluated with functional MRI. Subjects were randomized to 3 groups: (1) EA applied at local acupoints on the affected wrist (PC-7 to TW-5), (2) EA at distal acupoints (contralateral ankle, SP-6 to LV-4), and (3) sham EA at nonacupoint locations on the affected wrist. Symptom ratings were evaluated prior to and following the scan. Subjects in the local and distal groups reported reduced pain. Verum EA produced greater reduction of paresthesia compared to sham. Compared to sham EA, local EA produced greater activation in insula and S2 and greater deactivation in ipsilateral S1, while distal EA produced greater activation in S2 and deactivation in posterior cingulate cortex. Brain response to distal EA in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and brain response to verum EA in S1, SMA, and PFC were correlated with pain reduction following stimulation. Thus, while greater activation to verum acupuncture in these regions may predict subsequent analgesia, PFC activation may specifically mediate reduced pain when stimulating distal acupoints. PMID:23843881

  10. Carpal tunnel release

    MedlinePlus

    Median nerve decompression; Carpal tunnel decompression; Surgery - carpal tunnel ... The median nerve and the tendons that flex (or curl) your fingers go through a passage called the carpal tunnel in ...

  11. The diagnostic value of ultrasonography in carpal tunnel syndrome: a comparison between diabetic and non-diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To compare the value of ultrasonography for diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in patients with and without diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods Eighty non-DM and 40 DM patients with electromyography-confirmed CTS were assessed and underwent high-resolution ultrasonography of the wrists. Cross-sectional area (CSA) and flattening ratio (FR) of the median nerve were measured at the carpal tunnel outlet (D) and wrist crease (W). Results The 80 non-DM and 40 DM patients had 81 and 59 CTS-hands, respectively. The CSA_D and CSA_W were significantly larger in the CTS-hands and DM-CTS-hands compared to the normal control (p < 0.001). However, there is no difference of CSA_D and CSA_W between DM and non-DM CTS patients. Receiver operating characteristics [ROC] curve analysis revealed that CSA_W ≥13 mm2 was the most powerful predictor of CTS in DM (area under curve [AUC] = 0.72; sensitivity 72.9%, specificity 61.9%) and non-DM (AUC = 0.72; sensitivity 78.5%, specificity 53.2%) patients. The CSA positively correlated with the distal motor latency of the median compound motor action potential (CMAP), distal sensory latency of the median sensory nerve action potential (SNAP), and latency of the median F wave, but negatively correlated with the amplitude of the median CMAP, amplitude of the median SNAP, and sensory NCV of the median nerve. Stepwise logistic regression revealed that CSA_W (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.07-1.38; p = 0.003) was independently associated with CTS in DM patients and any 1 mm2 increase in CSA_W increased the rate of CTS by 28%. Conclusions The CSA of the median nerve at the outlet and wrist crease are significantly larger in CTS hands in both DM and non-DM patients compared to normal hands. The CSA of the median nerve by ultrasonography may be a diagnostic tool for evaluating CTS in DM and non-DM patients. PMID:23800072

  12. Towards Prevention of Acute Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A.; Thongprayoon, C.; Pickering, B.W.; Akhoundi, A.; Wilson, G.; Pieczkiewicz, D.; Herasevich, V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Identifying patients at risk for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) before their admission to intensive care is crucial to prevention and treatment. The objective of this study is to determine the performance of an automated algorithm for identifying selected ARDS predisposing conditions at the time of hospital admission. Methods This secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study included 3,005 patients admitted to hospital between January 1 and December 31, 2010. The automated algorithm for five ARDS predisposing conditions (sepsis, pneumonia, aspiration, acute pancreatitis, and shock) was developed through a series of queries applied to institutional electronic medical record databases. The automated algorithm was derived and refined in a derivation cohort of 1,562 patients and subsequently validated in an independent cohort of 1,443 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of an automated algorithm to identify ARDS risk factors were compared with another two independent data extraction strategies, including manual data extraction and ICD-9 code search. The reference standard was defined as the agreement between the ICD-9 code, automated and manual data extraction. Results Compared to the reference standard, the automated algorithm had higher sensitivity than manual data extraction for identifying a case of sepsis (95% vs. 56%), aspiration (63% vs. 42%), acute pancreatitis (100% vs. 70%), pneumonia (93% vs. 62%) and shock (77% vs. 41%) with similar specificity except for sepsis and pneumonia (90% vs. 98% for sepsis and 95% vs. 99% for pneumonia). The PPV for identifying these five acute conditions using the automated algorithm ranged from 65% for pneumonia to 91 % for acute pancreatitis, whereas the NPV for the automated algorithm ranged from 99% to 100%. Conclusion A rule-based electronic data extraction can reliably and accurately identify patients at risk of ARDS at the time of hospital

  13. [Bilateral acute depigmentation of the iris syndrome].

    PubMed

    Portmann, A; Gueudry, J; Siahmed, K; Muraine, M

    2011-05-01

    Bilateral acute depigmentation of the iris syndrome (BADI syndrome) is a new clinical entity. Young females from 20 to 45 years of age are most commonly affected. It is characterized by bilateral nontransilluminating depigmentation of the iris stroma. During the acute phase, this clinical entity also combines with red painful eye, pigmentation of the trabecular meshwork, anterior chamber flare, circulating pigment, and pigmented deposit on the endothelium cornea. At the acute stage, the symptoms are controlled with topical corticosteroid treatment. The prognosis is good. We report a 41-year-old woman presenting with BADI syndrome. PMID:21531477

  14. [Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)].

    PubMed

    Gillissen, Adrian; Ruf, Bernhard R

    2003-06-15

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a viral disease, observed primarily in Southern China in November 2002, with variable flu-like symptoms and pneumonia, in approx. 5% leading to death from respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). The disease was spread over more than 30 states all over the globe by SARS-virus-infected travelers. WHO and CDC received first information about a new syndrome by the end of February 2003, after the first cases outside the Republic of China had been observed. A case in Hanoi, Vietnam, led to the first precise information about the new disease entity to WHO, by Dr. Carlo Urbani, a co-worker of WHO/Doctors without Borders, who had been called by local colleagues to assist in the management of a patient with an unknown severe disease by the end of February 2003. Dr. Urbani died from SARS, as did many other health care workers. In the meantime, more than 7,000 cases have been observed worldwide, predominantly in China and Hong Kong, but also in Taiwan, Canada, Singapore, and the USA, and many other countries, and more than 600 of these patients died from RDS. Since the beginning of March 2003, when WHO and CDC started their activities, in close collaboration with a group of international experts, including the Bernhard-Nocht-Institute in Hamburg and the Department of Virology in Frankfurt/Main, a previously impossible success in the disclosure of the disease was achieved. Within only 8 weeks of research it was possible to describe the infectious agent, a genetically modified coronavirus, including the genetic sequence, to establish specific diagnostic PCR methods and to find possible mechanisms for promising therapeutic approaches. In addition, intensifying classical quarantine and hospital hygiene measures, it was possible to limit SARS in many countries to sporadic cases, and to reduce the disease in countries such as Canada and Vietnam. This review article summarizes important information about many issues of SARS (May 15th, 2003

  15. Diagnostic value of median nerve ultrasonography for screening of carpal tunnel syndrome in hypothyroid patients: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Mehrpour, Masoud; Mirzaasgari, Zahra; Rohani, Mohammad; Safdarian, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common peripheral entrapment neuropathy in patients with hypothyroid. The diagnosis of CTS is usually clinical and confirmed by electrodiagnostic (EDX) procedures. This study aimed to describe the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution ultrasonography (US) as an alternative method to nerve conduction study (NCS) for the diagnosis of subclinical CTS in patients with hypothyroidism. Methods: Between April 2013 and November 2014, from the patients with the diagnosis of hypothyroidism referring to the institute of endocrinology and metabolism of Firoozgar Hospital, Tehran, Iran, those who met our inclusion criteria entered this cross-sectional study. The patients divided into two groups of subclinical CTS with the age- and gender-matched control group. US measurements of the median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA) in the CT inlet were compared with the NCS results as the gold standard diagnostic test. Results: A total number of 152 wrists of 76 hypothyroid patients were examined in this study. The mean of median nerve CSA at the tunnel inlet was 9.96 ± 2.20 mm2 for the CTS group and 7.08 ± 1.38 mm2 for the control group (P < 0.05). 31 wrists (20.4%) were diagnosed as CTS using NCS while US diagnosed 19 wrists (12.5%) as CTS. Using receiver-operating-characteristics analysis, the sensitivity and specificity of US at the diagnosis of CTS were 45.0 and 95.8%, respectively, with a median nerve CSA cutoff point of 9.8 mm2. Positive and negative predictive values of US were 87.2 and 85.5%, respectively, with a test accuracy of 85.5%. Conclusion: According to our findings, US has an acceptable diagnostic value to confirm CTS in hypothyroid patients. However, it may not replace NCS due to low sensitivity. PMID:27326360

  16. Effectiveness of splinting and splinting plus local steroid injection in severe carpal tunnel syndrome: A Randomized control clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Khosrawi, Saeid; Emadi, Masoud; Mahmoodian, Amir Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Study aimed to compare the effectiveness of two commonly used conservative treatments, splinting and local steroid injection in improving clinical and nerve conduction findings of the patients with severe carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Materials and Methods: In this randomized control clinical trial, the patients with severe CTS selected and randomized in two interventional groups. Group A was prescribed to use full time neutral wrist splint and group B was injected with 40 mg Depo-Medrol and prescribed to use the full time neutral wrist splint for 12 weeks. Clinical and nerve conduction findings of the patients was evaluated at baseline, 4 and 12 weeks after interventions. Results: Twenty-two and 21 patients were allocated in group A and B, respectively. Mean of clinical symptoms and functional status scores, nerve conduction variables and patients’ satisfaction score were not significant between group at baseline and 4 and 12 weeks after intervention. Within the group comparison, there was significant improvement in the patients’ satisfaction, clinical and nerve conduction items between the baseline level and 4 weeks after intervention and between the baseline and 12 weeks after intervention (P < 0.01). The difference was significant for functional status score between 4 and 12 weeks after intervention in group B (P = 0.02). Conclusion: considering some findings regarding the superior effect of splinting plus local steroid injection on functional status scale and median nerve distal motor latency, it seems that using combination therapy could be more effective for long-term period specially in the field of functional improvement of CTS. PMID:26962518

  17. Primary somatosensory/motor cortical thickness distinguishes paresthesia-dominant from pain-dominant carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yumi; Kettner, Norman; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Hyungjun; Cina, Stephen; Malatesta, Cristina; Gerber, Jessica; McManus, Claire; Libby, Alexandra; Mezzacappa, Pia; Mawla, Ishtiaq; Morse, Leslie R; Audette, Joseph; Napadow, Vitaly

    2016-05-01

    Paresthesia-dominant and pain-dominant subgroups have been noted in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), a peripheral neuropathic disorder characterized by altered primary somatosensory/motor (S1/M1) physiology. We aimed to investigate whether brain morphometry dissociates these subgroups. Subjects with CTS were evaluated with nerve conduction studies, whereas symptom severity ratings were used to allocate subjects into paresthesia-dominant (CTS-paresthesia), pain-dominant (CTS-pain), and pain/paresthesia nondominant (not included in further analysis) subgroups. Structural brain magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired at 3T using a multiecho MPRAGE T1-weighted pulse sequence, and gray matter cortical thickness was calculated across the entire brain using validated, automated methods. CTS-paresthesia subjects demonstrated reduced median sensory nerve conduction velocity (P = 0.05) compared with CTS-pain subjects. In addition, cortical thickness in precentral and postcentral gyri (S1/M1 hand area) contralateral to the more affected hand was significantly reduced in CTS-paresthesia subgroup compared with CTS-pain subgroup. Moreover, in CTS-paresthesia subjects, precentral cortical thickness was negatively correlated with paresthesia severity (r(34) = -0.40, P = 0.016) and positively correlated with median nerve sensory velocity (r(36) = 0.51, P = 0.001), but not with pain severity. Conversely, in CTS-pain subjects, contralesional S1 (r(9) = 0.62, P = 0.042) and M1 (r(9) = 0.61, P = 0.046) cortical thickness were correlated with pain severity, but not median nerve velocity or paresthesia severity. This double dissociation in somatotopically specific S1/M1 areas suggests a neuroanatomical substrate for symptom-based CTS subgroups. Such fine-grained subgrouping of CTS may lead to improved personalized therapeutic approaches, based on superior characterization of the linkage between peripheral and central neuroplasticity. PMID:26761384

  18. Acute myelogenous leukaemia in Hurler's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, K T; McKenna, R W; Desnick, R J

    1978-06-01

    The occurrence of the Hurler syndrome and acute myelogenous leukaemia in a 2 1/2-year-old girl is described. This represents the first published report of the concurrence of these two diseases. PMID:97385

  19. Carpal tunnel syndrome, diabetic neuropathy, fibromyalgia, glucosamine and chondroitin, hypnosis in pain management, marijuana for pain.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Scott M

    2007-01-01

    This feature presents information for patients in a question and answer format. It is written to simulate actual questions that many pain patients ask and to provide answers in a context and language that most pain patients will comprehend. Issues addressed in this issue are carpel tunnel syndrome, fibromyalgia, glucosamine and chondroitin, hypnosis, marijuana. PMID:17844729

  20. Haemophagocytic syndrome complicating acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Stark, R.; Manoharan, A.

    1989-01-01

    A 41 year old female developed reactive haemophagocytic histiocytosis secondary to herpes simplex infection, during remission induction for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. She recovered fully with acyclovir and supportive treatment. Previous publications on the association between acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and haemophagocytic syndrome are reviewed, and the nature of the haemophagocytic disorder is discussed. Images Figure 1 PMID:2687829

  1. Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Heart Failure Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Sarraf, Mohammad; Schrier, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Impaired cardiac function leads to activation of the neurohumoral axis, sodium and water retention, congestion and ultimately impaired kidney function. This sequence of events has been termed the Cardiorenal Syndrome. This is different from the increase in cardiovascular complications which occur with primary kidney disease, that is, the so-called Renocardiac Syndrome. The present review discusses the pathogenesis of the Cardiorenal Syndrome followed by the benefits and potential deleterious effects of pharmacological agents that have been used in this setting. The agents discussed are diuretics, aquaretics, natriuretic peptides, vasodilators, inotropes and adenosine α1 receptor antagonists. The potential role of ultrafiltration is also briefly discussed. PMID:21423563

  2. Pathobiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sapru, Anil; Flori, Heidi; Quasney, Michael W; Dahmer, Mary K

    2015-06-01

    The unique characteristics of pulmonary circulation and alveolar-epithelial capillary-endothelial barrier allow for maintenance of the air-filled, fluid-free status of the alveoli essential for facilitating gas exchange, maintaining alveolar stability, and defending the lung against inhaled pathogens. The hallmark of pathophysiology in acute respiratory distress syndrome is the loss of the alveolar capillary permeability barrier and the presence of protein-rich edema fluid in the alveoli. This alteration in permeability and accumulation of fluid in the alveoli accompanies damage to the lung epithelium and vascular endothelium along with dysregulated inflammation and inappropriate activity of leukocytes and platelets. In addition, there is uncontrolled activation of coagulation along with suppression of fibrinolysis and loss of surfactant. These pathophysiological changes result in the clinical manifestations of acute respiratory distress syndrome, which include hypoxemia, radiographic opacities, decreased functional residual capacity, increased physiologic deadspace, and decreased lung compliance. Resolution of acute respiratory distress syndrome involves the migration of cells to the site of injury and re-establishment of the epithelium and endothelium with or without the development of fibrosis. Most of the data related to acute respiratory distress syndrome, however, originate from studies in adults or in mature animals with very few studies performed in children or juvenile animals. The lack of studies in children is particularly problematic because the lungs and immune system are still developing during childhood and consequently the pathophysiology of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome may differ in significant ways from that seen in acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults. This article describes what is known of the pathophysiologic processes of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome as we know it today while also presenting the much

  3. Association of a high normalized protein catabolic rate and low serum albumin level with carpal tunnel syndrome in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Hung; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Lin, Jui-Hsiang; Lee, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common mononeuropathy in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The association between chronic inflammation and CTS in hemodialysis (HD) patients has rarely been investigated. HD patients with a high normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR) and low serum albumin level likely have adequate nutrition and inflammation. In this study, we assume that a low serum albumin level and high nPCR is associated with CTS in HD patients. We recruited 866 maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients and divided them into 4 groups according to their nPCR and serum albumin levels: (1) nPCR <1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level <4 g/dL; (2) nPCR ≥1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level <4 g/dL; (3) nPCR <1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level ≥4 g/dL; and (4) nPCR ≥1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level ≥4 g/dL. After adjustment for related variables, HD duration and nPCR ≥1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level <4 g/dL were positively correlated with CTS. By calculating the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve, we calculated that the nPCR and HD duration cut-off points for obtaining the most favorable Youden index were 1.29 g/kg/d and 7.5 years, respectively. Advance multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that in MHD patients, nPCR ≥1.29 g/kg/d and serum albumin <4 g/dL, and also HD duration >7.5 years were associated with CTS. A high nPCR and low serum albumin level, which likely reflect adequate nutrition and inflammation, were associated with CTS in MHD patients. PMID:27368039

  4. Associations analysis of GSTM1, T1 and P1 Ile105Val polymorphisms with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eroğlu, Pınar; Erkol İnal, Esra; Sağ, Şebnem Özemri; Görükmez, Özlem; Topak, Ali; Yakut, Tahsin

    2016-05-01

    Oxidative stress was related with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). We aimed to clarify the associations between glutathione S-transferase (GST)M1, GSTT1 and GSTP1-Ile105Val polymorphisms and CTS. One hundred-forty patients with CTS and 97 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Tinel and Phalen signs were noted as positive or negative. Functional and clinical status of patients was evaluated by the Boston Questionnaire. The intensity of hand and/or wrist pain was evaluated on 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS). We applied the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to determine the polymorphisms of the GSTM1 and GSTT1 and the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism method for detecting the GSTP1-Ile105Val polymorphism. The M1 null genotype was significantly higher in patients with CTS compared to healthy controls, and the M1 null genotype seemed to increase the risk of CTS approximately two-fold (P = 0.011; odds ratio (OR) = 1.98; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.17-3.36). The M1 null, T1 present combined genotype was significantly higher in patients with CTS compared to healthy controls (P = 0.043); however, it seemed not to increase the risk of CTS (P = 0.14; OR = 0.62; 95 % CI 0.33-1.76). We found significantly higher levels of the VAS, Boston Symptom Severity Scale and Phalen sign in patients with the Ile/Val or the Val/Val genotypes compared to those in patients with the Ile/Ile genotype (P = 0.003, 0.004 and 0.044, respectively). We proposed that genes involved in the protection from oxidative stress may influence the susceptibility, clinical and functional status of CTS. The GSTM1 null genotype may be related with the development of CTS, whereas the Val allele of GSTP1-Ile105Val polymorphism may be associated with worse functional and clinical status in CTS. PMID:25566970

  5. Association of a high normalized protein catabolic rate and low serum albumin level with carpal tunnel syndrome in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Hung; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Lin, Jui-Hsiang; Lee, Meng

    2016-06-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common mononeuropathy in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The association between chronic inflammation and CTS in hemodialysis (HD) patients has rarely been investigated. HD patients with a high normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR) and low serum albumin level likely have adequate nutrition and inflammation. In this study, we assume that a low serum albumin level and high nPCR is associated with CTS in HD patients. We recruited 866 maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients and divided them into 4 groups according to their nPCR and serum albumin levels: (1) nPCR <1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level <4 g/dL; (2) nPCR ≥1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level <4 g/dL; (3) nPCR <1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level ≥4 g/dL; and (4) nPCR ≥1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level ≥4 g/dL. After adjustment for related variables, HD duration and nPCR ≥1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level <4 g/dL were positively correlated with CTS. By calculating the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve, we calculated that the nPCR and HD duration cut-off points for obtaining the most favorable Youden index were 1.29 g/kg/d and 7.5 years, respectively. Advance multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that in MHD patients, nPCR ≥1.29 g/kg/d and serum albumin <4 g/dL, and also HD duration >7.5 years were associated with CTS. A high nPCR and low serum albumin level, which likely reflect adequate nutrition and inflammation, were associated with CTS in MHD patients. PMID:27368039

  6. Correlation between Female Sex Hormones and Electrodiagnostic Parameters and Clinical Function in Post-menopausal Women with Idiopathic Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Azam; Naseri, Mahshid; Namazi, Hamid; Ashraf, Mohammad Javad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the role of sex-hormonal changes in idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) among post-menopausal women through measuring estrogen receptor (ER) expression in their transverse carpal ligament (TCL) and serum estrogen level, as well as determine the correlation between these factors and electrodiagnostic parameters and Boston score. Methods Biopsy samples of TCL were collected from 12 postmenopausal women who had undergone surgery for severe idiopathic CTS; control specimens were collected from 10 postmenopausal women without CTS who had undergone surgery for the other hand pathologies. To determine the distributions of ER in TCL, histological and immunohistochemical examinations were performed. Serum estrogen level was also measured. Electrodiagnosis and Boston questionnaire were used for CTS severity and determination of the patients' function. Results ER expression in TCL and serum estrogen level were not significantly different in the case group compared to the control group (P = 0.79 and P = 0.88, respectively). Also, there was no correlation between ER expression or serum estrogen level and electrodiagnostic parameters or Boston score. Conclusions Sex hormones cannot still be considered as the etiology of idiopathic CTS in postmenopausal women. The role of other factors such as wrist ratio and narrower outlet in females compared to the males should be considered along with hormonal changes. PMID:27617242

  7. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  8. Acute myelofibrosis in children with Down's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D I

    1975-01-01

    Two boys with Down's syndrome, recognized at birth, developed acute myelogibrosis at the ages of 19 and 21 months. The disorder presented with anaemia and splenomegaly, and clinically resembled acute leukaemia, but bone marrow histology showed a bizarre pattern with generalized fibrosis, markedly increased reticulin, large reticulum cells, and giant cells resembling megakaryocytes. The children survived 6 and 11 months from diagnosis. A third case is quoted (Hillman and Forrester, 1968) which was also studied at this hospital; the features of all 3 cases are similar. There appears to be an increased incidence of acute myelofibrosis in children with Down's syndrome, which may be a further example of the instability of the haemopoietic system in the disease. In children with Down's syndrome and unusual leukaemia-like illness, histological examination of the bone marrow may be diagnostic. Images FIG. 1. FIG. 2. FIG.3. PMID:125073

  9. Acute Myocardial Infarction in Nephrotic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Kavita; Hiremath, Shirish; Lakade, Sachin; Davakhar, Sudarshan

    2015-11-01

    A 28 year old male, known case of nephrotic syndrome since 12 years, hypertensive presented with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and accelerated hypertension. Coronary angiography revealed 100% thrombotic occlusion of mid left anterior descending artery, treated with thrombus aspiration and intracoronary tirofiban and nitroglycerine. He was stabilized within 24 hours. The pathogenesis of AMI in nephrotic syndrome has been discussed with this case report. PMID:27608787

  10. Inflammation: a trigger for acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sager, Hendrik B; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the vessel wall and a major cause of death worldwide. One of atherosclerosis' most dreadful complications are acute coronary syndromes that comprise ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, and unstable angina. We now understand that inflammation substantially contributes to the initiation, progression, and destabilization of atherosclerosis. In this review, we will focus on the role of inflammatory leukocytes, which are the cellular protagonists of vascular inflammation, in triggering disease progression and, ultimately, the destabilization that causes acute coronary syndromes. PMID:27273431

  11. Pictorial essay: Role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression

    PubMed Central

    Botchu, Rajesh; Khan, Aman; Jeyapalan, Kanagaratnam

    2012-01-01

    USG has been used for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. Scarring and incomplete decompression are the main causes for persistence or recurrence of symptoms. We performed a retrospective study to assess the role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression. Of 422 USG studies of the wrist performed at our center over the last 5 years, 14 were for failed carpal tunnel decompression. Scarring was noted in three patients, incomplete decompression in two patients, synovitis in one patient, and an anomalous muscle belly in one patient. No abnormality was detected in seven patients. We present a pictorial review of USG findings in failed carpal tunnel decompression. PMID:22623813

  12. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Associated with Tumor Lysis Syndrome in a Child with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Macaluso, Alessandra; Genova, Selene; Maringhini, Silvio; Coffaro, Giancarlo; Ziino, Ottavio; D’Angelo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome is a serious and dangerous complication usually associated with antiblastic treatment in some malignancies characterized by high cell turn-over. Mild or severe electrolyte abnormalities including high serum levels of uric acid, potassium, phosphorus, creatinine, bun and reduction of calcium can be responsible for multi-organ failure, involving mostly kidneys, heart and central nervous system. Renal damage can be followed by acute renal failure, weight gain, progressive liver impairment, overproduction of cytokines, and subsequent maintenance of multi-organ damage. Life-threatening acute respiratory failure associated with tumor lysis syndrome is rare. We describe a child with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed an unusually dramatic tumor lysis syndrome, after administration of the first low doses of steroid, that was rapidly associated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Subsequent clinical course and treatment modalities that resulted in the gradual and full recovery of the child are also described. PMID:25918625

  13. Delayed Presentation of Acute Gluteal Compartment Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tasch, James J.; Misodi, Emmanuel O.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 23 Final Diagnosis: Acute gluteal compartment syndrome Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Gluteal fasciotomy Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Acute gluteal compartment syndrome is a rare condition that usually results from prolonged immobilization following a traumatic event, conventionally involving the presence of compounding factors such as alcohol or opioid intoxication. If delay in medical treatment is prolonged, severe rhabdomyolysis may ensue, leading to acute renal failure and potentially death. Case Report: We report the case of a 23-year-old male with a recent history of incarceration and recreational drug use, who presented with reports of severe right-sided buttock pain and profound right-sided neurological loss following a questionable history involving prolonged immobilization after a fall from a standing position. The patient required an emergent gluteal fasciotomy immediately upon admission and required temporary hemodialysis. After an extended hospital stay, he ultimately recovered with only mild deficits in muscular strength in the right lower extremity. Conclusions: This report demonstrates the importance of early recognition of gluteal compartment syndrome to prevent morbidity and mortality. Compartment syndrome presents in many unique ways, and healthcare practitioners must have a keen diagnostic sense to allow for early surgical intervention. Proper wick catheter measurements should be utilized more frequently, instead of relying on clinical symptomatology such as loss of peripheral pulses for diagnosis of compartment syndrome. PMID:27432320

  14. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... or too far from your body. Don't rest your wrists on hard surfaces for long periods of time. Switch hands during work tasks. Make sure the tools you use aren't too big for your hands. ... give your hands and wrists time to rest. Don't sit or stand in the same ...

  15. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety & Health Administration U.S. Department of Labor 200 Constitution Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20210 http://www.osha. ... of Neurological Disorders and Stroke or any other Federal agency. Advice on the treatment or care of ...

  16. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by typing on a computer, using a mouse, or repeating movements while working, playing a musical ... devices, such as keyboards, different types of computer mouse, cushioned mouse pads, and keyboard drawers Having someone ...

  17. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... American College of Rheumatology Committee on Communications and Marketing. This information is provided for general education only. ... Lists Supporters About Us Leadership Careers at ACR Social Media Newsroom Annual Reports & Financial Statements Policies & Guidelines ...

  18. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... at the base of your hand. It contains nerve and tendons. Sometimes, thickening from irritated tendons or other swelling narrows the tunnel and causes the nerve to be compressed. Symptoms usually start gradually. As ...

  19. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... 226-4267 Toll-Free; (301) 565-2966 TTY Internet Address: http://www.niams.nih.gov/ National Institute ... 352-9424 Toll-Free; (301) 468-5981 TTY Internet Address: http://www.ninds.nih.gov/ National Institute ...

  20. Effect of Wrist Posture on Carpal Tunnel Pressure while Typing

    PubMed Central

    Rempel, David M.; Keir, Peter J.; Bach, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    Long weekly hours of keyboard use may lead to or aggravate carpal tunnel syndrome. The effects of typing on fluid pressure in the carpal tunnel, a possible mediator of carpal tunnel syndrome, are unknown. Twenty healthy subjects participated in a laboratory study to investigate the effects of typing at different wrist postures on carpal tunnel pressure of the right hand. Changes in wrist flexion/extension angle (p = 0.01) and radial/ulnar deviation angle (p = 0.03) independently altered carpal tunnel pressure; wrist deviations in extension or radial deviation were associated with an increase in pressure. The activity of typing independently elevated carpal tunnel pressure (p= 0.001) relative to the static hand held in the same posture. This information can guide the design and use of keyboards and workstations in order to minimize carpal tunnel pressure while typing. The findings may also be useful to clinicians and ergonomists in the management of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome who use a keyboard. PMID:18383144

  1. Effectiveness of mechanical traction as a non-surgical treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome compared to care as usual: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common condition (prevalence of 4%) where the median nerve is compressed within the carpal tunnel resulting in numbness, tingling, and pain in the hand. Current non-surgical treatment options (oral medication, corticosteroid injections, splinting, exercise, and mobilization) show limited effects, especially in the long-term. Carpal tunnel release (CTR) surgery is effective in 70 to 75% of patients, but is relatively invasive and can be accompanied by complications. In an observational study, mechanical traction proved to be effective in up to 70% of patients directly after treatment and in 60% after two years follow-up. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) will examine the effectiveness of mechanical traction compared to care as usual in CTS. Methods/Design Patients diagnosed with CTS will be recruited from an outpatient neurology clinic and randomly assigned to the intervention group (mechanical traction) or the control group (care as usual). Participants in the intervention group will receive 12 treatments with mechanical traction during six consecutive weeks. Primary outcome is symptom severity and functional status, which are measured with the Boston Carpel Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ). Secondary outcomes are quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF), health related resource utilization, and absenteeism from work. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, and at 3, 6, and 12 months after inclusion. Linear mixed effect models will be used to determine the change from baseline at 12 months on the BCTQ, WHOQOL-BREF, absenteeism from work and health related resource utilization. The baseline measurement, change from baseline at three and six months, as well as duration of symptoms until inclusion, age, gender, and co-morbidity will be included as covariates The Pearson’s correlation coefficient will be generated to assess the correlation between depression and anxiety and treatment outcome. Discussion Since current non

  2. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Assessment with Ultrasonography: Value of Inlet-to-Outlet Median Nerve Area Ratio in Patients versus Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Zhu, Jiaan; Ye, Dongmei; Feng, Xianxuan; Xu, Yiming; Wang, Gang; Bai, Yuehong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic value of the Inlet-to-outlet median nerve area ratio (IOR) in patients with clinically and electrophysiologically confirmed carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods Forty-six wrists in 46 consecutive patients with clinical and electrodiagnostic evidence of CTS and forty-four wrists in 44 healthy volunteers were examined with ultrasonography. The cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve was measured at the carpal tunnel inlet (the level of scaphoid-pisiform) and outlet (the level of the hook of the hamate), and the IOR was calculated for each wrist. Ultrasonography and electrodiagnostic tests were performed under blinded conditions. Electrodiagnostic testing combined with clinical symptoms were considered to be the gold standard test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to evaluate the diagnostic value between the inlet CSA and IOR. Results The study population included 16 men and 30 women (mean age, 45.3 years; range, 18–83 years). The control population included 18 men and 26 women (mean age, 50.4 years; range, 18–79 years). The mean inlet CSA was 8.7 mm2 in healthy controls and 14.6mm2 in CTS group (P<0.001). The mean IOR in healthy volunteers (1.0) was smaller than that in patients (1.6, P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed a diagnostic advantage to using the IOR rather than the inlet CSA (P<0.01). An IOR cutoff value of ≥ 1.3 would yield 93% specificity and 91% sensitivity in the diagnosis of CTS. Conclusion The IOR of median nerve area promises to be an effective means in the diagnosis of CTS. A large-scale, randomized controlled trial is required to determine how and when this parameter will be used. PMID:25617835

  3. Carpal tunnel syndrome in hemodialysis patients as a dialysis-related amyloidosis manifestation – incidence, risk factors and results of surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kopeć, Jerzy; Gądek, Artur; Drożdż, Maciej; Miśkowiec, Krzysztof; Dutka, Julian; Sydor, Antoni; Chowaniec, Eve; Sułowicz, Władysław

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common complication of dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA) developing in patients on long-term dialysis therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of CTS and identify factors influencing the development of CTS in patients on maintenance hemodialysis, as well as results of its surgical treatment. Material/Methods The study included 386 patients, among whom CTS was diagnosed in 40 patients (10.4%) on the basis of signs and physical symptoms, as well as by nerve conduction. The group of patients with CTS and the group of patients without CTS were compared according to age (mean 54.50 vs. 56.48 years) and duration of dialysis treatment. Initial analysis of CTS incidence by sex, presence of anti-HCV antibodies, and location of arterio-venous fistula (AV fistula) was undertaken. Results Duration of dialysis treatment was the statistically significant risk factor for the development of CTS (16.05 vs. 4.51 years; p<0.0001). Among patients treated for a long period on hemodialysis (20–30 years), 100% required surgical release procedures, while 66.66% of those treated for 15–19 years, 42.1% of those treated for 10–14 years, and 1.6% of those treated for less than 10 years. CTS was diagnosed more often in anti-HCV-positive patients as compared with anti-HCV-negative patients (47.5 vs. 6.9%; p<0.0001). No significant differences were found when comparing CTS incidence by sex or between the development of CTS requiring surgical release intervention and location of the AV fistula. Conclusions Surgical release procedure of the carpal tunnel gave good treatment results in patients with CTS. PMID:21873947

  4. Hemolysis in Acute Alcoholic Hepatitis: Zieve's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sitrin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A 45-year-old man presented with acute alcoholic hepatitis, jaundice, and anemia on admission. There was no history of bleeding or any evidence of gastrointestinal blood loss. Lab studies revealed hemolysis as the cause of anemia. The patient was diagnosed with Zieve's syndrome and managed with supportive measures. He recovered well and was discharged to a detoxification unit in a stable condition. Zieve's syndrome has been described in literature, mostly in non-English language case studies, but is largely under-recognized and under-reported. Diagnosis should be made quickly to avoid unnecessary invasive diagnostic interventions. PMID:26203455

  5. Acute Abdominal Pain Secondary to Chilaiditi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Andrew S.; Lopez, Michael A.; Buicko, Jessica L.; Lopez-Viego, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Chilaiditi syndrome is a rare condition occurring in 0.025% to 0.28% of the population. In these patients, the colon is displaced and caught between the liver and the right hemidiaphragm. Patients' symptoms can range from asymptomatic to acute intermittent bowel obstruction. Diagnosis is best achieved with CT imaging. Identification of Chilaiditi syndrome is clinically significant as it can lead to many significant complications such as volvulus, perforation, and bowel obstruction. If the patient is symptomatic, treatment is usually conservative. Surgery is rarely indicated with indications including ischemia and failure of resolution with conservative management. PMID:23936720

  6. Acute leukemias in children with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Seewald, Laura; Taub, Jeffrey W; Maloney, Kelly W; McCabe, Edward R B

    2012-09-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) often present with hematopoietic abnormalities, and are at increased risk of developing leukemia. Specifically, 3-10% of newborns with DS are diagnosed with transient myeloproliferative disease, and children with DS are 500 times more likely to develop acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) and 20 times more likely to develop acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) than typical children. This review examines the characteristics of these leukemias and their development in the unique genetic background of trisomy 21. A discussion is also provided for areas of future research and potential therapeutic development. PMID:22867885

  7. Differential diagnostic dilemma between pulmonary embolism and acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Enes Elvin; Nikus, Kjell C.; Erdogan, Halil I.; Ozdemir, Kurtulus

    2015-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a frequent life-threatening condition in emergency departments. Careful diagnosis is important, and different diagnostic tests such as electrocardiogram (ECG), biochemical markers, echocardiogram, and computed tomography are required. Although ECG is a cheap and rapid diagnostic test for pulmonary embolism, it has some limitations in the differential diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome and acute PE. Herein, we report ECG results of a patient diagnosed with acute PE mimicking acute coronary syndrome. PMID:27092202

  8. Delayed Presentation of Acute Gluteal Compartment Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tasch, James J; Misodi, Emmanuel O

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Acute gluteal compartment syndrome is a rare condition that usually results from prolonged immobilization following a traumatic event, conventionally involving the presence of compounding factors such as alcohol or opioid intoxication. If delay in medical treatment is prolonged, severe rhabdomyolysis may ensue, leading to acute renal failure and potentially death. CASE REPORT We report the case of a 23-year-old male with a recent history of incarceration and recreational drug use, who presented with reports of severe right-sided buttock pain and profound right-sided neurological loss following a questionable history involving prolonged immobilization after a fall from a standing position. The patient required an emergent gluteal fasciotomy immediately upon admission and required temporary hemodialysis. After an extended hospital stay, he ultimately recovered with only mild deficits in muscular strength in the right lower extremity. CONCLUSIONS This report demonstrates the importance of early recognition of gluteal compartment syndrome to prevent morbidity and mortality. Compartment syndrome presents in many unique ways, and healthcare practitioners must have a keen diagnostic sense to allow for early surgical intervention. Proper wick catheter measurements should be utilized more frequently, instead of relying on clinical symptomatology such as loss of peripheral pulses for diagnosis of compartment syndrome. PMID:27432320

  9. Acute kidney injury in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Marenzi, Giancarlo; Cosentino, Nicola; Bartorelli, Antonio L

    2015-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly being seen in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs). This condition has a complex pathogenesis, an incidence that can reach 30% and it is associated with higher short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, AKI is still characterised by lack of a single accepted definition, unclear pathophysiology understanding and insensitive diagnostic tools that make its detection difficult, particularly in the setting of ACS. Recent data suggested that patients with AKI during ACS, even those in whom renal function seems to fully recover, face an increased, persisting risk of future AKI and may develop chronic kidney disease. Thus, in these patients, nephrology follow-up, after hospital discharge, and secondary preventive measures should possibly be implemented. In this review, we aim at providing a framework of knowledge to increase cardiologists' awareness of AKI, with the goal of improving the outcome of patients with ACS. PMID:26243789

  10. MDCT evaluation of acute aortic syndrome (AAS).

    PubMed

    Valente, Tullio; Rossi, Giovanni; Lassandro, Francesco; Rea, Gaetano; Marino, Maurizio; Muto, Maurizio; Molino, Antonio; Scaglione, Mariano

    2016-05-01

    Non-traumatic acute thoracic aortic syndromes (AAS) describe a spectrum of life-threatening aortic pathologies with significant implications on diagnosis, therapy and management. There is a common pathway for the various manifestations of AAS that eventually leads to a breakdown of the aortic intima and media. Improvements in biology and health policy and diffusion of technology into the community resulted in an associated decrease in mortality and morbidity related to aortic therapeutic interventions. Hybrid procedures, branched and fenestrated endografts, and percutaneous aortic valves have emerged as potent and viable alternatives to traditional surgeries. In this context, current state-of-the art multidetector CT (MDCT) is actually the gold standard in the emergency setting because of its intrinsic diagnostic value. Management of acute aortic disease has changed with the increasing realization that endovascular therapies may offer distinct advantages in these situations. This article provides a summary of AAS, focusing especially on the MDCT technique, typical and atypical findings and common pitfalls of AAS, as well as recent concepts regarding the subtypes of AAS, consisting of aortic dissection, intramural haematoma, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer and unstable aortic aneurysm or contained aortic rupture. MDCT findings will be related to pathophysiology, timing and management options to achieve a definite and timely diagnostic and therapeutic definition. In the present article, we review the aetiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, outcomes and therapeutic approaches to acute aortic syndromes. PMID:27033344

  11. Acute coronary syndrome in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    El-Deeb, Mohammed; El-Menyar, Ayman; Gehani, Abdulrazzak; Sulaiman, Kadhim

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the available information on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of acute coronary syndromes (ST-elevation myocardial infarction [STEMI] and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction [NSTEMI]) during all stages of pregnancy. We searched the English-language literature indexed in MEDLINE, Scopus and EBSCO host research databases from 1980 through to August 2010 using the indexing terms 'pregnancy', 'ante-,peri-, and postpartum', 'acute coronary syndrome', 'myocardial infarction', 'STEMI' and 'NSTEMI'. Symptomatic coronary artery disease is still infrequent in women of childbearing age, but the recent increase in its prevalence in pregnancy has been attributed to the modern trend of childbearing in older years because many young working women are postponing having children. Although rare, acute pregnancy-related MI is a devastating event that may claim the life of a mother and her fetus. The incidence of MI is estimated at 0.6-1 per 10,000 pregnancies. The case fatality rate has been reported to be 5-37%. Owing to the rarity of the event, information related to MI in pregnancy is derived from case reports and, therefore, is subject to considerable reporting bias. Treatment needs to be prompt and urgent because of the very high mortality rate. Current guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of MI should be expanded to include pregnancy-related MI. Screening and management of cardiovascular risk factors should be achieved before pregnancy. PMID:21517733

  12. Clinical Usefulness of Oral Supplementation with Alpha-Lipoic Acid, Curcumin Phytosome, and B-Group Vitamins in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Undergoing Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pajardi, Giorgio; Bortot, Paola; Ponti, Veronica; Novelli, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the clinical usefulness of oral supplementation with a combination product containing alpha-lipoic acid, curcumin phytosome, and B-group vitamins in 180 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), scheduled to undergo surgical decompression of the median nerve. Patients in Group A (n = 60) served as controls and did not receive any treatment either before or after surgery. Patients in Group B (n = 60) received oral supplementation twice a day for 3 months both before and after surgery (totaling 6 months of supplementation). Patients in Group C (n = 60) received oral supplementation twice a day for 3 months before surgery only. Patients in Group B showed significantly lower nocturnal symptoms scores compared with Group A subjects at both 40 days and 3 months after surgery (both P values <0.05). Moreover, patients in Group B had a significantly lower number of positive Phalen's tests at 3 months compared with the other study groups (P < 0.05). We conclude that oral supplementation with alpha-lipoic acid, curcumin phytosome, and B-group vitamins twice a day both before and after surgery is safe and effective in CTS patients scheduled to undergo surgical decompression of the median nerve. PMID:24563654

  13. Clinical usefulness of oral supplementation with alpha-lipoic Acid, curcumin phytosome, and B-group vitamins in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome undergoing surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Pajardi, Giorgio; Bortot, Paola; Ponti, Veronica; Novelli, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the clinical usefulness of oral supplementation with a combination product containing alpha-lipoic acid, curcumin phytosome, and B-group vitamins in 180 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), scheduled to undergo surgical decompression of the median nerve. Patients in Group A (n = 60) served as controls and did not receive any treatment either before or after surgery. Patients in Group B (n = 60) received oral supplementation twice a day for 3 months both before and after surgery (totaling 6 months of supplementation). Patients in Group C (n = 60) received oral supplementation twice a day for 3 months before surgery only. Patients in Group B showed significantly lower nocturnal symptoms scores compared with Group A subjects at both 40 days and 3 months after surgery (both P values <0.05). Moreover, patients in Group B had a significantly lower number of positive Phalen's tests at 3 months compared with the other study groups (P < 0.05). We conclude that oral supplementation with alpha-lipoic acid, curcumin phytosome, and B-group vitamins twice a day both before and after surgery is safe and effective in CTS patients scheduled to undergo surgical decompression of the median nerve. PMID:24563654

  14. Comparison of shock wave therapy and nutraceutical composed of Echinacea angustifolia, alpha lipoic acid, conjugated linoleic acid and quercetin (perinerv) in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Notarnicola, Angela; Maccagnano, Giuseppe; Tafuri, Silvio; Fiore, Alessandra; Pesce, Vito; Moretti, Biagio

    2015-06-01

    Even though the initial treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is conservative, knowledge of the clinical effects of supplements and of some methods of physiotherapy is still preliminary. Many biological mechanisms can support the administration of shock wave therapy (ESWT) or of alpha lipoic acid (ALA) based nutraceutical, conjugated linoleic acid (GLA), anti-oxidants and Echinacea angustifolia for CTS. The shock waves reduce the nerve compression, produce an anti-inflammatory action, and accelerate the regeneration of neuropathy. ALA and GLA induce antioxidant protective actions, reduce inflammation, promote neuroregeneration, and decrease pain. The Echinacea modulates the endogenous cannabinoid system.The aim of study is to verify the efficiency of shock wave therapy versus nutraceutical composed of ALA, GLA, and Echinacea in CTS. Sixty patients were enrolled in this study and they were randomly assigned to one of two treatments. Both groups showed significant improvements in pain, symptoms' severity and functional scores, and electrodiagnostic results until the sixth month. We verified a trend to a better pain regression in the nutraceutical group. The presence of the medicinal Echinacea represents an added value to the antioxidant effect in ALA and GLA, which can justify this result. ESWT or the association of ALA, GLA, and Echinacea proved to be two effective treatments for controlling symptoms and improving the evolution of CTS. PMID:25953494

  15. Surveillance and prevention of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome: an application of the Sentinel Events Notification System for Occupational Risks.

    PubMed

    Maizlish, N; Rudolph, L; Dervin, K; Sankaranarayan, M

    1995-05-01

    In response to limitations in state-based, occupational disease surveillance, the California Department of Health Services developed a model for provider- and case-based surveillance of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome. The objectives were to enhance case reporting, identify risk factors and high-risk work sites, and link preventive interventions to work sites and the broader community. Using elements from surveillance of communicable diseases and sentinel health events, a model was integrated into the pre-existing reporting system in one California county. Between 1989 and 1991, 54 Santa Clara County health care providers reported 382 suspected cases, of which 365 from 195 work sites met reporting guidelines. Risk factors were profiled from interviews of 135 prioritized cases and 38 employers. Of 24 work sites prioritized for a free, voluntary, nonenforcement inspection, 18 refused and 6 completed an on-site visit. Sentinel Event Notification System for Occupational Risks (SENSOR) captured many cases not reported to the pre-existing reporting system. Case interviews indicated a profile of symptoms and signs, treatment, and exposure to uncontrolled occupational risk factors, including a lack of training on ergonomics hazards. Employer health insurance, rather than workers' compensation, was the apparent source of payment for most medical bills. Employers lacked knowledge and motivation to reduce ergonomic risks. Governmentally mandated occupational ergonomics standards are urgently needed. PMID:7611307

  16. Heightened pain sensitivity in individuals with signs and symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome and the relationship to clinical outcomes following a manual therapy intervention.

    PubMed

    Bialosky, Joel E; Bishop, Mark D; Robinson, Michael E; Price, Donald D; George, Steven Z

    2011-12-01

    Neurophysiological responses related to lessening of pain sensitivity are a suggested mechanism of manual therapy. Prior studies have observed generalized lower pain thresholds associated with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in comparison to healthy controls. The present study sought to determine whether similar findings were present in suprathreshold measures and measures specific to central integration of pain (temporal summation and after sensations). Additionally, we wished to determine whether measures of pain sensitivity were related to clinical outcomes in participants with signs and symptoms of CTS receiving a manual therapy intervention. Individuals with signs and symptoms of CTS reported greater pain sensitivity to suprathreshold measures of mechanical pain, temporal summation, and after sensation in comparison to healthy controls. Immediate lessening of mechanical pain sensitivity and after sensations in response to a manual therapy intervention and 3-week attenuation of temporal summation following a 3-week course of manual therapy were associated with 3-week changes in clinical pain intensity in participants with signs and symptoms of CTS. These findings suggest heightened pain sensitivity across several parameters may be associated with CTS. Furthermore, changes in mechanical pain, after sensation, and temporal summation may be related to improvements in clinical outcomes. PMID:21764354

  17. Contemporary management of acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Large, G

    2005-01-01

    This review focuses on the modern management of the non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (unstable angina and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction). Patients with these syndromes are at varying degrees of risk of (re)infarction and death. This risk can be reliably predicted by clinical, electrocardiographic, and biochemical markers. Aspirin, clopidogrel, heparin (unfractionated or low molecular weight), and anti-ischaemic drugs should be offered to all patients, irrespective of the predicted level of risk. Patients at high risk should also receive a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor inhibitor and should undergo early coronary arteriography with a view to percutaneous or surgical revascularisation. Lower risk patients should undergo non-invasive testing. When inducible myocardial ischaemia is exhibited coronary arteriography should follow. When non-invasive testing is negative, a conservative management strategy is safe. PMID:15811883

  18. Dual pathway therapy in acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stachon, Peter; Ahrens, Ingo; Bode, Christoph; Zirlik, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    In 10 % of patients, who suffer an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), a major cardiovascular event occurs despite optimal therapy. The occlusion of the vessel is driven by atherothrombosis, which arises from platelet activation and activation of the coagulation cascade. In the last decade the secondary prevention continuously improved by development of dual anti-platelet therapy with new P2Y12-inhibitors such as clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor. Until recently, the coagulation cascade was not targeted in secondary prevention. The coagulation factor Xa plays a crucial role in thrombosis and is elevated in patients after acute coronary syndrome, therefore representing an attractive target for novel therapies in ACS. Former studies with vitamin K antagonists showed reduction of cardiovascular events but increased major bleedings. Two phase-3 trials investigated the role of novel oral anticoagulant agents on top of aspirin and clopidogrel in patients with ACS. The APPRAISE-2 study, which tested the oral factor Xa inhibitor apixaban was prematurely terminated because of an increase of major bleedings in the absence of an effect on cardiovascular events. In contrast, the ATLAS ACS2 TIMI-51 trial interrogating the oral factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban in a low dose regimen showed significant reduction of cardiovascular events as well as total mortality. Thus, add-on treatment with low dose rivaroxaban emerged as a new option for patients with ACS. This review illustrates recent advances in the development of antithrombotic therapy in acute coronary syndromes, provides guidance on which patients should receive which therapy for secondary prevention of events, and points out potentially fruitful new strategies for the future of antithrombotic treatment in ACS. PMID:26660521

  19. Acute Type A Aortic Dissection Missed as Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ansari-Ramandi, Mohammad Mostafa; Firoozi, Ata

    2016-01-01

    Although the aortic dissection is not common, its outcome is frequently fatal, and many patients with aortic dissection die before referral to the hospital or any diagnostic testing. The symptoms of aortic dissection can be similar to myocardial ischemia. A 66-year-old male was referred to our hospital with suspicion of aortic dissection after echocardiography done for evaluating his high blood pressure. He had symptoms of acute coronary syndrome two years before and had done coronary angiography. On presentation to our hospital he had a high blood pressure. On reviewing his past medical history and examining, in the film of coronary angiography, the dissection flap in ascending aorta was identified. Although type A aortic dissection is a catastrophic condition with high mortality and requires prompt surgical treatment but in some cases it may be misdiagnosed as acute coronary syndrome. Sometimes against its high mortality when left untreated, patients survive and are diagnosed later in life incidentally. So it is of great importance to have great clinical suspicion for aortic dissection in patients referring to the hospital with chest pain and the predisposing factors. PMID:27437290

  20. Genetics of the acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acute coronary artery syndrome in the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Western countries, and its epidemiological burden is also constantly increasing worldwide, including Asia. Due to social and economic consequences, a number of experimental and epidemiological studies have analyzed its etiology so far, in order to develop effective preventive and treatment measures. Thanks to these studies, it is now clear that coronary artery disease (CAD) is a complex multifactorial disorder, resulting from close interaction between acquired and inherited risk factors. In particular, considerable advances were made in the last decade about our understanding of the genetic causes of CAD, mainly propelled by the progresses in whole genome scanning and the development of genome wide association studies. This narrative review is hence dedicated to explore the role of genetic factors in the risk of developing acute CAD. PMID:27294088

  1. Acute Coronary Syndrome and ST Segment Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Carey, Mary G

    2016-09-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is caused by a critical obstruction of a coronary artery because of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. Three specific conditions are included: ST elevation myocardial infarction, non-ST elevation myocardial infarction, and unstable angina. The ST segment on the electrocardiogram is a sensitive and specific marker of myocardial ischemia and infarction; however, ST segment deviation is regional not global, thus the ECG lead must be placed over the affected region of the myocardium. This article describes ACS and infarction and the use of ST segment monitoring to detect these conditions. PMID:27484662

  2. A Case with Repeated Recurrent Acute Coronary Syndrome due to Pseudoephedrine Use: Kounis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Çeliker, Metin; Tuncer, Mustafa; Şekeralmaz, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Allergic reaction-associated acute coronary syndrome picture is defined as Kounis syndrome. Although drug use is the most common cause of allergic reaction, foods and environmental factors may also play a role in the etiology. Herein, a case with acute coronary syndrome that developed two times at 8-month interval due to pseudoephedrine use for upper respiratory tract infection is presented. PMID:25435880

  3. Ecstasy-induced acute coronary syndrome: something to rave about.

    PubMed

    Hoggett, Kerry; McCoubrie, David; Fatovich, Daniel M

    2012-06-01

    Ecstasy or 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine is a commonly used illicit recreational drug, enjoying popularity for its stimulant effects. Although acute coronary syndrome is recognized after cocaine and methamphetamine use, association with Ecstasy use has rarely been reported. We report three cases of significantly delayed acute coronary syndrome and ST elevation myocardial infarction related to ingestion of Ecstasy. PMID:22672176

  4. Unrecognized acute exertional compartment syndrome of the leg and treatment.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Nebojsa; Bottoni, Craig; Cassidy, Charles

    2011-04-01

    Acute-on-chronic exertional compartment syndrome is rare and may be easily missed without a high degree of awareness and clinical suspicion. We report a case of unrecognized acute-on-chronic exertional compartment syndrome in a recreational soccer player. The late sequela of this condition, foot drop, was successfully treated with transfer of the peroneus longus tendon. PMID:21667742

  5. Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-30

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. What's new in acute compartment syndrome?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Edward J; Sanders, David W; Shuler, Michael S; Lawendy, Abdel-Rahman; Cole, Ashley L; Alqahtani, Saad M; Schmidt, Andrew H

    2012-12-01

    Acute compartment syndrome (ACS) after trauma is often the result of increased size of the damaged tissues after acute crush injury or from reperfusion of ischemic areas. It usually is not solely caused by accumulation of free blood or fluid in the compartment, although that can contribute in some cases. There is no reliable and reproducible test that confirms the diagnosis of ACS. A missed diagnosis or failure to cut the fascia to release pressure within a few hours can result in severe intractable pain, paralysis, and sensory deficits. Reduced blood circulation leads to oxygen and nutrient deprivation, muscle necrosis, and permanent disability. Currently, the diagnosis of ACS is made on the basis of physical examination and repeated needle sticks over a short time frame to measure intracompartmental pressures. Missed compartment syndromes continue to be one of most common causes of malpractice lawsuits. Existing technology for continuous pressure measurements are insensitive, particularly in the deep tissues and compartments, and their use is restricted to highly trained personnel. Newer concepts of the pathophysiology accompanied by new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities have recently been advanced. Among these are the concept of inflammatory mediators as markers and anti-inflammatories as medical adjunct therapy. New diagnostic modalities include near-infrared spectroscopy, ultrafiltration catheters, and radio-frequency identification implants. These all address current shortcomings in the diagnostic armamentarium that trauma surgeons can use. The strengths and weaknesses of these new concepts are discussed to allow the trauma surgeon to follow current evolution of the field. PMID:22913965

  7. Medical management of the acute radiation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    López, Mario; Martín, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    The acute radiation syndrome (ARS) occurs after whole-body or significant partial-body irradiation (typically at a dose of >1 Gy). ARS can involve the hematopoietic, cutaneous, gastrointestinal and the neurovascular organ systems either individually or in combination. There is a correlation between the severity of clinical signs and symptoms of ARS and radiation dose. Radiation induced multi-organ failure (MOF) describes the progressive dysfunction of two or more organ systems over time. Radiation combined injury (RCI) is defined as radiation injury combined with blunt or penetrating trauma, burns, blast, or infection. The classic syndromes are: hematopoietic (doses >2–3 Gy), gastrointestinal (doses 5–12 Gy) and cerebrovascular syndrome (doses 10–20 Gy). There is no possibility to survive after doses >10–12 Gy. The Phases of ARS are—prodromal: 0–2 days from exposure, latent: 2–20 days, and manifest illness: 21–60 days from exposure. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) at a dose of 5 μg/kg body weight per day subcutaneously has been recommended as treatment of neutropenia, and antibiotics, antiviral and antifungal agents for prevention or treatment of infections. If taken within the first hours of contamination, stable iodine in the form of nonradioactive potassium iodide (KI) saturates iodine binding sites within the thyroid and inhibits incorporation of radioiodines into the gland. Finally, if severe aplasia persists under cytokines for more than 14 days, the possibility of a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation should be evaluated. This review will focus on the clinical aspects of the ARS, using the European triage system (METREPOL) to evaluate the severity of radiation injury, and scoring groups of patients for the general and specific management of the syndrome. PMID:24376971

  8. Carpal tunnel release

    MedlinePlus

    ... cuts through the carpal ligament to make more space for the nerve and tendons. The surgery is done in the following way: First, you receive numbing medicine so that you do not feel pain during ...

  9. Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  10. The role of median nerve terminal latency index in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome in comparison with other electrodiagnostic parameters

    PubMed Central

    Vahdatpour, Babak; Khosrawi, Saeid; Chatraei, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) considers the most common compression neuropathy, which nerve conduction studies (NCSs) used for its detection routinely and universally. This study was performed to determine the value of the median TLI and other NCS variables and to investigate their sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of CTS. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out among 100 hands of healthy volunteers and 50 hands of patients who had a positive history of paresthesia and numbness in upper extremities. Information including age, gender, and result of sensory and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), peak latency difference of median and ulnar nerves of fourth digit (M4-U4 peak latency difference), and TLI were recorded for analysis. Sensitivity and specificity of electro diagnostic parameters in the diagnosis of CTS was investigated. Results: Normal range of the median nerve TLI was 0.43 ± 0.077. There was no significant difference between two groups for MNCV means (P = 0. 45). Distal sensory latency and distal motor latency (DML) of median nerve and fourth digit median-ulnar peak latency differences (PM4-PU4) for CTS group was significantly higher (P < 0.001) and mean for sensory nerve conduction velocity was significantly higher in control group (P < 0.001). The most sensitive electrophysiological finding in CTS patients was median TLI (82%), but the most specific one was DML (98%). Conclusion: Although in early stages of CTS, we usually expect only abnormalities in the sensory studies, but TLI may better demonstrate the effect on median nerve motor fiber even in mild cases of CTS. PMID:27376049