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Sample records for acute childhood leukemia

  1. General Information about Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  3. Risk Groups for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  4. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  5. Global Characteristics of Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Samad, A; Pombo-de-Oliveira, MS; Scelo, G; Smith, MT; Feusner, J; Wiemels, JL; Metayer, C

    2014-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) comprises approximately 5–10% of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases in the US. While variation in this percentage among other populations was noted previously, global patterns of childhood APL have not been thoroughly characterized. In this comprehensive review of childhood APL, we examined its geographic pattern and the potential contribution of environmental factors to observed variation. In 142 studies (spanning >60 countries) identified, variation was apparent—de novo APL represented from 2% (Switzerland) to >50% (Nicaragua) of childhood AML in different geographic regions. Because a limited number of previous studies addressed specific environmental exposures that potentially underlie childhood APL development, we gathered 28 childhood cases of therapy-related APL, which exemplified associations between prior exposures to chemotherapeutic drugs/radiation and APL diagnosis. Future population-based studies examining childhood APL patterns and the potential association with specific environmental exposures and other risk factors are needed. PMID:25445717

  6. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Epidemiology of childhood acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, S; Neglia, J P

    1995-05-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is the second most common leukemia in children, with approximately 400 new cases occurring annually in the United States. Worldwide, the highest rates of childhood AML occur in Asia and the lowest rates are reported from India and South America. Numerous genetic risk factors for childhood AML have been defined, including Down syndrome, neurofibromatosis, and Fanconi anemia. Research into environmental risk factors has been limited by the rarity of this disease; however, studies of AML in adults have implicated ionizing radiation, solvents, and petroleum products as potential etiologic agents. The largest analytic study of childhood AML found that occupational exposures of either parent to pesticides, paternal exposure to petroleum products, and postnatal exposures to pesticides are increased in children with AML. In addition, maternal use of marijuana during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of AML, especially the monocytic subtypes. Further study of childhood AML, including occurrence of the disease as a second malignancy, is needed in order to confirm these findings and to increase our understanding of this leukemia. PMID:7749772

  8. Genomic characterization of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mullighan, Charles G

    2013-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy and a leading case of childhood cancer death. The last decade has witnessed a transformation in our understanding of the genetic basis of ALL due to detailed integrative genomic profiling of large cohorts of childhood ALL. Initially using microarray based approaches, and more recently with next-generation sequencing, these studies have enabled more precise subclassification of ALL, and have shown that each ALL entity is characterized by constellations of structural and sequence mutations that typically perturb key cellular pathways including lymphoid development, cell cycle regulation, tumor suppression, Ras- and tyrosine kinase-driven signaling, and epigenetic regulation. Importantly, several of the newly identified genetic alterations have entered the clinic to improve diagnosis and risk stratification, and are being pursued as new targets for therapeutic intervention. Studies of ALL have also led the way in dissecting the subclonal heterogeneity of cancer, and have shown that individual patients commonly harbor multiple related but genetically distinct subclones, and that this genetically determined clonal heterogeneity is an important determinant of relapse. In addition, genome-wide profiling has identified inherited genetic variants that influence ALL risk. Ongoing studies are deploying detailed integrative genetic transcriptomic and epigenetic sequencing to comprehensively define the genomic landscape of ALL. This review describes the recent advances in our understanding of the genetics of ALL, with an emphasis on those alterations of key pathogenic or therapeutic importance. PMID:24246699

  9. Genomic characterization of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mullighan, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy and a leading case of childhood cancer death. The last decade has witnessed a transformation in our understanding of the genetic basis of ALL due to detailed integrative genomic profiling of large cohorts of childhood ALL. Initially using microarray based approaches, and more recently with next-generation sequencing, these studies have enabled more precise sub-classification of ALL, and have shown that each ALL entity is characterized by constellations of structural and sequence mutations that typically perturb key cellular pathways including lymphoid development, cell cycle regulation, tumor suppression, Ras- and tyrosine kinase driven signaling, and epigenetic regulation. Importantly, several of the newly identified genetic alterations have entered the clinic to improve diagnosis and risk stratification, and are being pursued as new targets for therapeutic intervention. Studies of ALL have also led the way in dissecting the subclonal heterogeneity of cancer, and have shown that individual patients commonly harbor multiple related but genetically distinct subclones, and that this genetically determined clonal heterogeneity is an important determinant of relapse. In addition, genome-wide profiling has identified inherited genetic variants that influence ALL risk. Ongoing studies are deploying detailed integrative genetic transcriptomic and epigenetic sequencing to comprehensively define the genomic landscape of ALL. This review describes the recent advances in our understanding of the genetics of ALL, with an emphasis on those alterations of key pathogenic or therapeutic importance. PMID:24246699

  10. Childhood Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute types. Symptoms include Infections Fever Loss of appetite Tiredness Easy bruising or bleeding Swollen lymph nodes Night sweats Shortness of breath Pain in the bones or joints Risk factors for childhood leukemia include having a brother ...

  11. Mechanisms of clonal evolution in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eugene; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Ford, Anthony; Kweon, Soo-Mi; Trageser, Daniel; Hasselfeld, Brian; Henke, Nadine; Mooster, Jana; Geng, Huimin; Schwarz, Klaus; Kogan, Scott C.; Casellas, Rafael; Schatz, David G.; Lieber, Michael R; Greaves, Mel F.; Müschen, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia can often be retraced to a pre-leukemic clone carrying a prenatal genetic lesion. Postnatally acquired mutations then drive clonal evolution towards overt leukemia. RAG1-RAG2 and AID enzymes, the diversifiers of immunoglobulin genes, are strictly segregated to early and late stages of B-lymphopoiesis, respectively. Here, we identified small pre-BII cells as a natural subset of increased genetic vulnerability owing to concurrent activation of these enzymes. Consistent with epidemiological findings on childhood ALL etiology, susceptibility to genetic lesions during B-lymphopoiesis at the large to small pre-BII transition is exacerbated by abnormal cytokine signaling and repetitive inflammatory stimuli. We demonstrate that AID and RAG1-RAG2 drive leukemic clonal evolution with repeated exposure to inflammatory stimuli, paralleling chronic infections in childhood. PMID:25985233

  12. Biomarkers in Bone Marrow Samples From Pediatric Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  13. Childhood acute leukemias are frequent in Mexico City: descriptive epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Worldwide, acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It is particularly common in the Hispanic populations residing in the United States, Costa Rica, and Mexico City. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute leukemia in children who were diagnosed and treated in public hospitals in Mexico City. Methods Included in this study were those children, under 15 years of age and residents of Mexico City, who were diagnosed in 2006 and 2007 with leukemia, as determined by using the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. The average annual incidence rates (AAIR), and the standardized average annual incidence rates (SAAIR) per million children were calculated. We calculated crude, age- and sex-specific incidence rates and adjusted for age by the direct method with the world population as standard. We determined if there were a correlation between the incidence of acute leukemias in the various boroughs of Mexico City and either the number of agricultural hectares, the average number of persons per household, or the municipal human development index for Mexico (used as a reference of socio-economic level). Results Although a total of 610 new cases of leukemia were registered during 2006-2007, only 228 fit the criteria for inclusion in this study. The overall SAAIR was 57.6 per million children (95% CI, 46.9-68.3); acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was the most frequent type of leukemia, constituting 85.1% of the cases (SAAIR: 49.5 per million), followed by acute myeloblastic leukemia at 12.3% (SAAIR: 6.9 per million), and chronic myeloid leukemia at 1.7% (SAAIR: 0.9 per million). The 1-4 years age group had the highest SAAIR for ALL (77.7 per million). For cases of ALL, 73.2% had precursor B-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR: 35.8 per million) and 12.4% had T-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR 6.3 per million). The peak ages for ALL were 2-6 years and 8-10 years. More than half the children (58.8%) were classified as high

  14. Nanoparticle targeted therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satake, Noriko; Lee, Joyce; Xiao, Kai; Luo, Juntao; Sarangi, Susmita; Chang, Astra; McLaughlin, Bridget; Zhou, Ping; Kenney, Elaina; Kraynov, Liliya; Arnott, Sarah; McGee, Jeannine; Nolta, Jan; Lam, Kit

    2011-06-01

    The goal of our project is to develop a unique ligand-conjugated nanoparticle (NP) therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). LLP2A, discovered by Dr. Kit Lam, is a high-affinity and high-specificity peptidomimetic ligand against an activated α4β1 integrin. Our study using 11 fresh primary ALL samples (10 precursor B ALL and 1 T ALL) showed that childhood ALL cells expressed activated α4β1 integrin and bound to LLP2A. Normal hematopoietic cells such as activated lymphocytes and monocytes expressed activated α4β1 integrin; however, normal hematopoietic stem cells showed low expression of α4β1 integrin. Therefore, we believe that LLP2A can be used as a targeted therapy for childhood ALL. The Lam lab has developed novel telodendrimer-based nanoparticles (NPs) which can carry drugs efficiently. We have also developed a human leukemia mouse model using immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ null mice engrafted with primary childhood ALL cells from our patients. LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using primary leukemia cells and this mouse model. NPs will be loaded first with DiD near infra-red dye, and then with the chemotherapeutic agents daunorubicin or vincristine. Both drugs are mainstays of current chemotherapy for childhood ALL. Targeting properties of LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated by fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry, MTS assay, and mouse survival after treatment. We expect that LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be preferentially delivered and endocytosed to leukemia cells as an effective targeted therapy.

  15. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Indicators of Early Immune Stimulation: A Childhood Leukemia International Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Rudant, Jérémie; Lightfoot, Tracy; Urayama, Kevin Y.; Petridou, Eleni; Dockerty, John D.; Magnani, Corrado; Milne, Elizabeth; Spector, Logan G.; Ashton, Lesley J.; Dessypris, Nikolaos; Kang, Alice Y.; Miller, Margaret; Rondelli, Roberto; Simpson, Jill; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Orsi, Laurent; Roman, Eve; Metayer, Catherine; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    The associations between childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and several proxies of early stimulation of the immune system, that is, day-care center attendance, birth order, maternally reported common infections in infancy, and breastfeeding, were investigated by using data from 11 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (enrollment period: 1980–2010). The sample included 7,399 ALL cases and 11,181 controls aged 2–14 years. The data were collected by questionnaires administered to the parents. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, study, maternal education, and maternal age. Day-care center attendance in the first year of life was associated with a reduced risk of ALL (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.71, 0.84), with a marked inverse trend with earlier age at start (P < 0.0001). An inverse association was also observed with breastfeeding duration of 6 months or more (odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.79, 0.94). No significant relationship with a history of common infections in infancy was observed even though the odds ratio was less than 1 for more than 3 infections. The findings of this large pooled analysis reinforce the hypothesis that day-care center attendance in infancy and prolonged breastfeeding are associated with a decreased risk of ALL. PMID:25731888

  16. Childhood Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. It is the most common type of childhood cancer. ... blood cells help your body fight infection. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  17. No involvement of bovine leukemia virus in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, A.P.; Robison, L.L.; Kashmiri, S.V.; McClain, K.L.; Woods, W.G.; Smithson, W.A.; Heyn, R.; Finlay, J.; Schuman, L.M.; Renier, C.

    1988-05-15

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine lymphosarcoma. Much speculation continues to be directed at the role of BLV in human leukemia. To test this hypothesis rigorously, a case-control study of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was conducted between December 1983 and February 1986. Cases (less than or equal to 16 years at diagnosis) derived from patients diagnosed at the primary institutions and affiliated hospitals were matched (age, sex, and race) with regional population controls. DNA samples from bone marrow or peripheral blood from 157 cases (131 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 26 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) and peripheral blood from 136 controls were analyzed by Southern blot technique, under highly stringent conditions, using cloned BLV DNA as a probe. None of the 157 case or 136 control DNA samples hybridized with the probe. The high statistical power and specificity of this study provide the best evidence to date that genomic integration of BLV is not a factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia/non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  18. Combination Chemotherapy and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Children With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Non-T, Non-B Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  19. Studying Biomarkers in Samples From Younger Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4)

  20. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-19

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-07

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Nilotinib and Imatinib Mesylate After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-09

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. Rationale for an international consortium to study inherited genetic susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sherborne, Amy L.; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv; Bartram, Claus R.; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; Petridou, Eleni; Semsei, Ágnes F.; Szalai, Csaba; Sinnett, Daniel; Krajinovic, Maja; Healy, Jasmine; Lanciotti, Marina; Dufour, Carlo; Indaco, Stefania; El-Ghouroury, Eman A; Sawangpanich, Ruchchadol; Hongeng, Suradej; Pakakasama, Samart; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ugarte, Evelia L.; Leal, Valeria P.; Espinoza, Juan P.M.; Kamel, Azza M.; Ebid, Gamal T.A.; Radwan, Eman R.; Yalin, Serap; Yalin, Erdinc; Berkoz, Mehmet; Simpson, Jill; Roman, Eve; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hosking, Fay J.; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Greaves, Mel; Houlston, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the major pediatric cancer in developed countries. To date most association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been based on the candidate gene approach and have evaluated a restricted number of polymorphisms. Such studies have served to highlight difficulties in conducting statistically and methodologically rigorous investigations into acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk. Recent genome-wide association studies of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia have provided robust evidence that common variation at four genetic loci confers a modest increase in risk. The accumulated experience to date and relative lack of success of initial efforts to identify novel acute lymphoblastic leukemia predisposition loci emphasize the need for alternative study designs and methods. The International Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Genetics Consortium includes 12 research groups in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and the Americas engaged in studying the genetics of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The initial goal of this consortium is to identify and characterize low-penetrance susceptibility variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia through association-based analyses. Efforts to develop genome-wide association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in terms of both sample size and single nucleotide polymorphism coverage, and to increase the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms taken forward to large-scale replication should lead to the identification of additional novel risk variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Ethnic differences in the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are well recognized and thus in assessing the interplay between inherited and non-genetic risk factors, analyses using different population cohorts with different incidence rates are likely to be highly informative. Given that the frequency of many acute lymphoblastic leukemia subgroups is small, identifying differential effects will realistically only be

  4. A 50-Year Journey to Cure Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.

    2013-01-01

    The 50th anniversary of Seminars in Hematology coincides with the 50th of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, and both milestones are inexorably linked to studies contributing to the cure of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We thought it fitting, therefore, to mark these events by traveling back in time to point out some of the achievements, institutions, study groups and individuals that have made cure of childhood ALL a reality. In many instances, progress was driven by new ideas, while in others it was driven by new experimental tools that allowed more precise assessment of the biology of leukemic blasts and their utility in selecting therapy. We also discuss a number of contemporary advances that point the way to exciting future directions. Whatever pathways are taken, a clear challenge will be to use emerging genome-based or immunologic-based treatment options in ways that will enhance, rather than duplicate or compromise, recent gains in outcome with classic cytotoxic chemotherapy. The theme of this journey serves as a reminder of the chief ingredient of any research directed to a catastrophic disease such as ALL. It is the audacity of a small group of investigators who confronted a childhood cancer with the goal of cure, not palliation, as their mindset. PMID:23953334

  5. General Information about Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Myeloid Malignancies Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  6. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Idarubicin and Cytarabine With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  8. Parental Tobacco Smoking and Acute Myeloid Leukemia: The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium.

    PubMed

    Metayer, Catherine; Petridou, Eleni; Aranguré, Juan Manuel Mejía; Roman, Eve; Schüz, Joachim; Magnani, Corrado; Mora, Ana Maria; Mueller, Beth A; de Oliveira, Maria S Pombo; Dockerty, John D; McCauley, Kathryn; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hatzipantelis, Emmanouel; Rudant, Jérémie; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Kaatsch, Peter; Miligi, Lucia; Wesseling, Catharina; Doody, David R; Moschovi, Maria; Orsi, Laurent; Mattioli, Stefano; Selvin, Steve; Kang, Alice Y; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2016-08-15

    The association between tobacco smoke and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is well established in adults but not in children. Individual-level data on parental cigarette smoking were obtained from 12 case-control studies from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC, 1974-2012), including 1,330 AML cases diagnosed at age <15 years and 13,169 controls. We conducted pooled analyses of CLIC studies, as well as meta-analyses of CLIC and non-CLIC studies. Overall, maternal smoking before, during, or after pregnancy was not associated with childhood AML; there was a suggestion, however, that smoking during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk in Hispanics (odds ratio = 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20, 3.61) but not in other ethnic groups. By contrast, the odds ratios for paternal lifetime smoking were 1.34 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.62) and 1.18 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.51) in pooled and meta-analyses, respectively. Overall, increased risks from 1.2- to 1.3-fold were observed for pre- and postnatal smoking (P < 0.05), with higher risks reported for heavy smokers. Associations with paternal smoking varied by histological type. Our analyses suggest an association between paternal smoking and childhood AML. The association with maternal smoking appears limited to Hispanic children, raising questions about ethnic differences in tobacco-related exposures and biological mechanisms, as well as study-specific biases. PMID:27492895

  9. RUNX1 amplification in lineage conversion of childhood B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia to acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Podgornik, Helena; Debeljak, Marusa; Zontar, Darja; Cernelc, Peter; Prestor, Veronika Velensek; Jazbec, Janez

    2007-10-01

    Amplification of RUNX1 (alias AML1) is a recurrent karyotypic abnormality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that is generally associated with a poor outcome. It does not occur with other primary chromosomal abnormalities in acute ALL. AML1 amplification in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a rare secondary event described mainly in therapy-related cases. AML1 amplification was found in a 13-year-old patient with AML M4/M5 leukemia that occurred 5 years after she had been diagnosed with common B-cell ALL. Conventional cytogenetic, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and polymerase chain reaction methods revealed no other chromosomal change expected to occur in a disease that we assumed to be a secondary leukemia. Due to the lack of cytogenetic data from the diagnostic sample, we developed a new approach to analyze the archived bone marrow smear, which had been stained previously with May-Grünwald-Geimsa by the FISH method. This analysis confirmed that in addition to t(12;21), AML1 amplification and overexpression existed already at the time the diagnosis was made. The chromosomal changes, however, were found in different clones of bone marrow cells. While the first course of chemotherapy successfully eradicated the cell line with the t(12;21), the second cell line with AML1 amplification remained latent during the time of complete remission and reappeared with a different immunophenotype. PMID:17889714

  10. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  11. A revised definition for cure of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pui, C H; Pei, D; Campana, D; Cheng, C; Sandlund, J T; Bowman, W P; Hudson, M M; Ribeiro, R C; Raimondi, S C; Jeha, S; Howard, S C; Bhojwani, D; Inaba, H; Rubnitz, J E; Metzger, M L; Gruber, T A; Coustan-Smith, E; Downing, J R; Leung, W H; Relling, M V; Evans, W E

    2014-12-01

    With improved contemporary therapy, we reassess long-term outcome in patients completing treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) to determine when cure can be declared with a high degree of confidence. In six successive clinical trials between 1984 and 2007, 1291 (84.5%) patients completed all therapies in continuous complete remission. The post-therapy cumulative risk of relapse or development of a second neoplasm and the event-free survival rate and overall survival were analyzed according to the presenting features and the three treatment periods defined by relative outcome. Over the three treatment periods, there has been progressive increase in the rate of event-free survival (65.2% vs 74.8% vs 85.1% (P<0.001)) and overall survival (76.5% vs 81.1% vs 91.7% (P<0.001)) at 10 years. The most important predictor of outcome after completion of therapy was the type of treatment. In the most recent treatment period, which omitted the use of prophylactic cranial irradiation, the post-treatment cumulative risk of relapse was 6.4%, death in remission 1.5% and development of a second neoplasm 2.3% at 10 years, with all relapses except one occurring within 4 years of therapy. None of the 106 patients with the t(9;22)/BCR-ABL1, t(1;19)/TCF3-PBX1 or t(4;11)/MLL-AFF1 had relapsed after 2 years from completion of therapy. These findings demonstrate that with contemporary effective therapy that excludes cranial irradiation, approximately 6% of children with ALL may relapse after completion of treatment, and those who remain in remission at 4 years post treatment may be considered cured (that is, less than 1% chance of relapse). PMID:24781017

  12. Bone mineral density in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Athanassiadou, Fani; Tragiannidis, Athanassios; Rousso, Israel; Katsos, Georgios; Sidi, Vassiliki; Papageorgiou, Theodotis; Papastergiou, Christos; Tsituridis, Ioannis; Koliouskas, Dimitrios

    2006-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate bone metabolism with measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) after management (chemo-, radiotherapy) for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Bone mineral density (g/cm2) of lumbar spine was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (Norland bone densitometer) in 18 children with ALL and a median of 34 months' post-diagnosis with no history of relapse, secondary malignancy, or transplantation. In addition, patients' BMDs were correlated with particular attention to age, sex and time (years) from completion of chemotherapy. The results were compared with healthy age- and sex-matched controls of the same population and expressed as standard deviation scores (SDS). Mean age of children was 9.8 +/- 3.7 years. Of 18 children (10 boys and 8 girls), 13 were grouped as standard and 5 as high-risk, respectively. Based on z-score values, 9 were classified as normal (z-score <1 SD), 7 as osteopenic (z-score 1-2.5 SD) and 2 as osteoporotic (z-score >2.5 SD). Children with ALL had reduced lumbar BMDs (z score -0.99) in comparison to healthy controls (z score -0.14) (p=0.011), which is indicative of relative osteopenia. Moreover, the reduced BMD was associated with patient age (z score -0.14 and -1.52 for ages <10 and >10 years, respectively, p=0.016). Reduced BMD was not correlated with time from completion of chemotherapy (p=0.33), risk group (p=0.9) and sex (p=0.3). We conclude that children's BMDs are reduced after completion of chemotherapy for ALL. The causes are multifactorial and mainly related to antineoplastic treatments, such as corticosteroids and methotrexate, physical inactivity and cranial irradiation. We suggest that further studies are needed to evaluate the long-term effect on BMD in these children and to prevent pathological fractures later in life. PMID:16848106

  13. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  14. What Is Childhood Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... key statistics for childhood leukemia? What is childhood leukemia? Cancer starts when cells start to grow out ... start making antibodies to fight them. Types of leukemia in children Leukemia is often described as being ...

  15. Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-20

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  16. Minimal residual disease analysis by eight-color flow cytometry in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Karawajew, Leonid; Dworzak, Michael; Ratei, Richard; Rhein, Peter; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Buldini, Barbara; Basso, Giuseppe; Hrusak, Ondrej; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Henze, Günter; Seeger, Karl; von Stackelberg, Arend; Mejstrikova, Ester; Eckert, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    Multiparametric flow cytometry is an alternative approach to the polymerase chain reaction method for evaluating minimal residual disease in treatment protocols for primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Given considerable differences between primary and relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment regimens, flow cytometric assessment of minimal residual disease in relapsed leukemia requires an independent comprehensive investigation. In the present study we addressed evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry in the clinical trial for childhood relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia using eight-color flow cytometry. The major challenge of the study was to reliably identify low amounts of residual leukemic cells against the complex background of regeneration, characteristic of follow-up samples during relapse treatment. In a prospective study of 263 follow-up bone marrow samples from 122 patients with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we tested various B-cell markers, adapted the antibody panel to the treatment protocol, and evaluated its performance by a blinded parallel comparison with the polymerase chain reaction data. The resulting eight-color single-tube panel showed a consistently high overall concordance (P<0.001) and, under optimal conditions, sensitivity similar to that of the reference polymerase chain reaction method. Overall, evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry can be successfully integrated into the clinical management of relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia either as complementary to the polymerase chain reaction or as an independent risk stratification tool. ALL-REZ BFM 2002 clinical trial information: NCT00114348 PMID:26001791

  17. High hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Chromosomal gains as the main driver event

    PubMed Central

    Paulsson, Kajsa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT High hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia is characterized by multiple chromosomal gains. Recent results show that this subtype harbors relatively few genetic abnormalities besides the extra chromosomes, which appear to arise early and are likely the main driver event. Secondary hits primarily target genes in the rat sarcoma (RAS) signaling pathway and histone modifiers. PMID:27308574

  18. High hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Chromosomal gains as the main driver event.

    PubMed

    Paulsson, Kajsa

    2016-01-01

    High hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia is characterized by multiple chromosomal gains. Recent results show that this subtype harbors relatively few genetic abnormalities besides the extra chromosomes, which appear to arise early and are likely the main driver event. Secondary hits primarily target genes in the rat sarcoma (RAS) signaling pathway and histone modifiers. PMID:27308574

  19. Nivolumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  20. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  1. Development of secondary skull sarcoma after treatment for childhood acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Makoto; Narita, Yoshitaka; Miyakita, Yasuji; Okita, Yoshiko; Kayama, Takamasa; Shibui, Soichiro

    2012-12-01

    Secondary cancer is a serious late complication in childhood leukemia survivors. Here, we report a case of secondary skull sarcoma developing after treatment for childhood acute myeloid leukemia, including bone marrow transplantation (BMT). This patient had breast cancer 1 year before treatment for the skull sarcoma. The patient underwent macroscopic total removal of the skull tumor with bone margin with postoperative radiation therapy and did not develop tumor recurrence for 25 months. Our patient's experience suggests that survivors of childhood leukemia are at risk of developing skull sarcoma and that multi-agent chemotherapy, including anthracycline, TBI used as conditioning for BMT, and development of GVHD, are possible risk factors. Considering the possibility of multiple secondary malignancies in such patients, careful long-term follow up is mandatory. PMID:22897987

  2. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-29

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Cranial radiation in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. Neuropsychologic sequelae

    SciTech Connect

    Whitt, J.K.; Wells, R.J.; Lauria, M.M.; Wilhelm, C.L.; McMillan, C.W.

    1984-08-01

    A battery of neuropsychologic tests was administered ''blindly'' to 18 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who had been randomly assigned to treatment regimens with or without cranial radiation. These children were all in complete continuous remission for more than 3 1/2 years and were no longer receiving therapy. The results indicated no substantial differences between groups as a function of radiation therapy. However, decreased neuropsychologic performance was found when the entire sample was compared with population norms. These data do not support the hypothesis that cranial radiation therapy is responsible for the neuropsychologic sequelae seen in these survivors of ALL. Post hoc multiple regression analysis indicated that parental education levels accounted for more of the neuropsychologic variability seen in these children than other factors such as age at diagnosis, type of therapy, or sex of child.

  5. Tacrolimus and Methotrexate With or Without Sirolimus in Preventing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Young Patients Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-23

    B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Graft Versus Host Disease; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  6. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePlus

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  7. Outcome following late marrow relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Chessells, J.; Leiper, A.; Rogers, D.

    1984-10-01

    Thirty-four children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed bone marrow relapse after treatment was electively stopped, received reinduction, consolidation, continuing therapy, and intrathecal (IT) methotrexate (MTX). Sixteen children who relapsed within six months of stopping treatment had a median second-remission duration of 26 weeks; all next relapses occurred in the bone marrow. In 18 children who relapsed later, the median duration of second remission was in excess of two years, but after a minimum of four years follow-up, 16 patients have so far relapsed again (six in the CNS). CNS relapse occurred as a next event in four of 17 children who received five IT MTX injections only and in two of 14 children who received additional regular IT MTX. Although children with late marrow relapses may achieve long second remissions, their long-term out-look is poor, and regular IT MTX does not afford adequate CNS prophylaxis. It remains to be seen whether more intensive chemotherapy, including high-dose chemoradiotherapy and bone marrow transplantation, will improve the prognosis in this group of patients.

  8. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia During Therapy For Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bhojwani, Deepa; Darbandi, Rashid; Pei, Deqing; Ramsey, Laura B.; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Sandlund, John T.; Cheng, Cheng; Pui, Ching-Hon; Relling, Mary V.; Jeha, Sima; Metzger, Monika L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Asparaginase and steroids can cause hypertriglyceridemia in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). There are no guidelines for screening or management of patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia (>1000 mg/dL) during ALL therapy. Patients and Methods Fasting lipid profiles were obtained prospectively at 4 time-points for 257 children consecutively enrolled on a frontline ALL study. Risk factors were evaluated by the exact chi-square test. Details of adverse events and management of hypertriglyceridemia were extracted retrospectively. Results Eighteen of 257 (7%) patients developed severe hypertriglyceridemia. Older age and treatment with higher doses of asparaginase and steroids on the standard/high-risk arm were significant risk factors. Severe hypertriglyceridemia was not associated with pancreatitis after adjustment for age and treatment arm or with osteonecrosis after adjustment for age. However, patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia had a 2.5 to 3 times higher risk of thrombosis compared to patients without, albeit the difference was not statistical significant. Of the 30 episodes of severe hypertriglyceridemia in 18 patients, 7 were managed conservatively while the others with pharmacotherapy. Seventeen of 18 patients continued to receive asparaginase and steroids. Triglyceride levels normalized after completion of ALL therapy in all 12 patients with available measurements. Conclusion Asparaginase- and steroid-induced transient hypertriglyceridemia can be adequately managed with dietary modifications and close monitoring without altering chemotherapy. Patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia were not at increased risk of adverse events, with a possible exception of thrombosis. The benefit of pharmacotherapy in decreasing symptoms and potential complications requires further investigation. PMID:25087182

  9. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-30

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  10. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  11. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-18

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  12. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  13. Residential Proximity to Agricultural Pesticide Applications and Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rull, Rudolph P.; Gunier, Robert; Von Behren, Julie; Hertz, Andrew; Crouse, Vonda; Buffler, Patricia A.; Reynolds, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    Ambient exposure from residential proximity to applications of agricultural pesticides may contribute to the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Using residential histories collected from the families of 213 ALL cases and 268 matched controls enrolled in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study, the authors assessed residential proximity within a half-mile (804.5 meters) of pesticide applications by linking address histories with reports of agricultural pesticide use. Proximity was ascertained during different time windows of exposure, including the first year of life and the child’s lifetime through the date of diagnosis for cases or reference for controls. Agricultural pesticides were categorized a priori into groups based on similarities in toxicological effects, physicochemical properties, and target pests or uses. The effects of moderate and high exposure for each group of pesticides were estimated using conditional logistic regression. Elevated ALL risk was associated with lifetime moderate exposure, but not high exposure, to certain physicochemical categories of pesticides, including organophosphates, cholorinated phenols, and triazines, and with pesticides classified as insecticides or fumigants. A similar pattern was also observed for several toxicological groups of pesticides. These findings suggest future directions for the identification of specific pesticides that may play a role in the etiology of childhood leukemia. PMID:19700145

  14. High incidence of obesity in young adults after treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood.

    PubMed

    Didi, M; Didcock, E; Davies, H A; Ogilvy-Stuart, A L; Wales, J K; Shalet, S M

    1995-07-01

    To determine whether obesity complicated the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we studied the body mass index (BMI) of 63 female when and 51 male patients from the time of diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia to the time when final height was attained. The BMI z score was calculated for each patient at diagnosis, at end of treatment, and at attainment of final height. Obesity at attainment of final height was defined as a BMI greater than the 85th percentile of the normal reference population. At final height 23 of 51 male (45%) and 30 of 63 female patients (47%) were obese. Girls became obese between diagnosis and the end of chemotherapy (p = 0.02), after which they had no further increase, indicating that chemotherapy may have played a role in their obesity. Boys had a progressive and gradual increase in BMI z score through to attainment of final height. Obesity did not appear to be associated with growth hormone insufficiency, disproportionate growth, or abnormal timing of puberty. We conclude that approximately half the survivors of leukemia in childhood become obese young adults. Many of those treated with the more recent regimens studied are still only in their mid or preteen years and should be advised regarding a more active lifestyle and a healthy diet in an attempt to reduce the incidence of obesity. PMID:7608813

  15. Genetic markers in a multi-ethnic sample for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Amy E; Kamdar, Kala Y; Lupo, Philip J; Okcu, M Fatih; Scheurer, Michael E; Dorak, M Tevfik

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple risk loci for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but mostly in European/White populations, despite Hispanics having a greater risk. We re-examined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of known associations with childhood ALL and known human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region lymphoma risk markers in a multi-ethnic population. Significant associations were found in two ARID5B variants (rs7089424 and rs10821936). We replicated a strong risk association in non-Hispanic White males with rs2395185, a protective marker for lymphoma. Another HLA region marker, rs2647012, showed a risk association among Hispanics only, while a strong protective association was found with rs1048456, a follicular lymphoma risk marker. Our study validated this new case-control sample by confirming genetic markers associated with childhood ALL, and yielded new associations with lymphoma markers. Despite positive results, our study did not provide any clues as to why Hispanics have a higher susceptibility to childhood leukemia, suggesting that environmental factors may have a strong contribution. PMID:24707947

  16. Cardiac Failure 30 Years after Treatment Containing Anthracycline for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, John M.; Scully, Rebecca E.; Sallan, Stephen E.; Lipshultz, Steven E.

    2012-01-01

    In 1977, a 5-year-old girl diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was treated on DFCI Childhood ALL Protocol 77-01, receiving a cumulative doxorubicin dose of 465 mg/m2, cranial radiation, and other drugs. After being in continuous complete remission for 34 months, she developed heart failure (HF) and was treated with digoxin and furosemide. At 16, she was diagnosed and treated for dilated cardiomyopathy. Over the years she continued to have bouts of HF, which became less responsive to treatment. At 36, she received a heart transplant. Six months later, she stopped taking her medications and suffered a sudden cardiac death. PMID:22584777

  17. Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase in a Case of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    McCaffrey, Ronald; Smoler, Donna F.; Baltimore, David

    1973-01-01

    Cells from a patient with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia contain an apparent DNA polymerase activity that was not found in any other cells except thymus cells. The enzyme has the properties of terminal transferase, an enzyme known to be found in thymocytes. The cells also contain the three major DNA polymerases found in growing cells. The results suggest that these tumor cells arose from a block in the differentiation of thymocytes. Terminal transferase may be a marker for the origin of leukemic cells. PMID:4346893

  18. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting as ''cold'' lesions on bone scan: a report of two cases

    SciTech Connect

    Caudle, R.J.; Crawford, A.H.; Gelfand, M.J.; Gruppo, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    ''Cold'' lesions on bone scan have been reported in a variety of disease processes, including infection, avascular necrosis, and cysts. We present two cases of children who presented with large ''cold'' areas on technetium bone scans and were treated initially for septic processes. Acute childhood leukemia frequently presents with bone or joint pain, fever, and elevation of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Although the diagnosis may be difficult if the characteristic clinical signs and laboratory findings are absent, the presence of anemia should alert the physician to the possibility of malignancy. Bone scanning provides a sensitive method of localizing pathology, but diagnosis requires biopsy or marrow aspiration.

  19. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

  20. Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-29

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  1. Brain sarcoma of meningeal origin after cranial irradiation in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberin, P.; Maor, E.; Zaizov, R.; Cohen, I.J.; Hirsch, M.; Yosefovich, T.; Ronen, J.; Goldstein, J.

    1984-10-01

    The authors report their experience with an unusual case of intracerebral sarcoma of meningeal cell origin in an 8 1/2-year-old girl. This tumor occurred 6 1/2 years after cranial irradiation at relatively low dosage (2200 rads) had been delivered to the head in the course of a multimodality treatment for acute lymphocytic leukemia. The tumor recurred approximately 10 months after the first surgical intervention. Macroscopic total excision of the recurrent growth followed by whole-brain irradiation (4500 rads) failed to eradicate it completely and local recurrence prompted reoperation 18 months later. This complication of treatment in long-term childhood leukemia survivors is briefly discussed, as well as the pathology of meningeal sarcomas.

  2. HLA-A11 is associated with poor prognosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

    PubMed

    Orgad, S; Cohen, I J; Neumann, Y; Vogel, R; Kende, G; Ramot, B; Zaizov, R; Gazit, E

    1988-12-01

    A possible association between HLA antigens, susceptibility or resistance to leukemia, and responsiveness to treatment has been studied in 144 patients with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and compared to other prognostic factors, i.e. white blood cell (WBC) counts, age at onset, sex, ethnic origin, and cell surface markers. All sequentially newly diagnosed children (97) comprised the group for the prospective study (PSG) and were followed for 6 years. The group included 37 patients classified as T-ALL, 41 as CALLA+, 27 as NULL, 12 as B and pre-B, and 27 unclassified patients, who were diagnosed before 1980. During the follow-up period, 45 patients of the PSG died. Forty-seven patients designated long-term survivors (LTS) have been followed 6-20 years after diagnosis, having completed a 3-5 year course of anti-leukemia therapy, and having remained disease free thereafter. High WBC counts at diagnosis and T-cell-surface markers were associated with poor prognosis, as were enthnic origin and specific HLA antigens. Thus, there was one (1) a significant increase in HLA-A30 and a decrease in HLA B-14 in the PSG Jewish patients; and (2) a complete absence of HLA-ALL in LTS while, in the PSG, 8 of 9 HLA-All-positive patients died during the follow-up period. This suggests that HLA-All is associated with poor prognosis in childhood ALL. PMID:3199882

  3. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  4. Stages of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  6. Deletion analysis of p16(INKa) and p15(INKb) in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Graf Einsiedel, Hagen; Taube, Tillmann; Hartmann, Reinhard; Wellmann, Sven; Seifert, Georg; Henze, Günter; Seeger, Karl

    2002-06-15

    This study aimed at determining the prevalence of INK4 deletions and their impact on outcome in 125 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at first relapse using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Patients were enrolled into relapse trials ALL-REZ BFM (ALL-Relapse Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster) 90 and 96. The prevalence of p16(INK4a) and p15(INK4b) homozygous deletions was 35% (44 of 125) and 30% (38 of 125), respectively. A highly significant association of both gene deletions was found with the 2 major adverse prognostic factors known for relapsed childhood ALL: T-cell immunophenotype and first remission duration. There was no correlation between INK4 deletions and probability of event-free survival. These findings argue against an independent prognostic role of INK4 deletions in relapsed childhood ALL. PMID:12036898

  7. Brain Function in Young Patients Receiving Methotrexate for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Long-Term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Psychological Impact of Cancer; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Paternal Smoking and Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruiling; Zhang, Luoping; McHale, Cliona M.; Hammond, S. Katharine

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the association between paternal smoking and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Method. We identified 18 published epidemiologic studies that reported data on both paternal smoking and childhood ALL risk. We performed a meta-analysis and analyzed dose-response relationships on ALL risk for smoking during preconception, during pregnancy, after birth, and ever smoking. Results. The summary odds ratio (OR) of childhood ALL associated with paternal smoking was 1.11 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.05–1.18, I2 = 18%) during any time period, 1.25 (95% CI: 1.08–1.46, I2 = 53%) preconception; 1.24 (95% CI: 1.07–1.43, I2 = 54%) during pregnancy, and 1.24 (95% CI: 0.96–1.60, I2 = 64%) after birth, with a dose-response relationship between childhood ALL and paternal smoking preconception or after birth. Conclusion. The evidence supports a positive association between childhood ALL and paternal ever smoking and at each exposure time period examined. Future epidemiologic studies should assess paternal smoking during well-defined exposure windows and should include biomarkers to assess smoking exposure and toxicological mechanisms. PMID:21765828

  9. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  10. Tretinoin, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride With or Without Arsenic Trioxide Followed by Tretinoin With or Without Mercaptopurine and Methotrexate in Treating Patients With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  11. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  12. Late thyroid complications in survivors of childhood acute leukemia. An L.E.A. study.

    PubMed

    Oudin, Claire; Auquier, Pascal; Bertrand, Yves; Chastagner, Philippe; Kanold, Justyna; Poirée, Maryline; Thouvenin, Sandrine; Ducassou, Stephane; Plantaz, Dominique; Tabone, Marie-Dominique; Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Gandemer, Virginie; Lutz, Patrick; Sirvent, Anne; Villes, Virginie; Barlogis, Vincent; Baruchel, André; Leverger, Guy; Berbis, Julie; Michel, Gérard

    2016-06-01

    Thyroid complications are known side effects of irradiation. However, the risk of such complications in childhood acute leukemia survivors who received either central nervous system irradiation or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is less described. We prospectively evaluated the incidence and risk factors for thyroid dysfunction and tumors in survivors of childhood acute myeloid or lymphoid leukemia. A total of 588 patients were evaluated for thyroid function, and 502 individuals were assessed for thyroid tumors (median follow-up duration: 12.6 and 12.5 years, respectively). The cumulative incidence of hypothyroidism was 17.3% (95% CI: 14.1-21.1) and 24.6% (95% CI: 20.4-29.6) at 10 and 20 years from leukemia diagnosis, respectively. Patients who received total body irradiation (with or without prior central nervous system irradiation) were at higher risk of hypothyroidism (adjusted HR: 2.87; P=0.04 and 2.79, P=0.01, respectively) as compared with transplanted patients who never received any irradiation. Patients transplanted without total body irradiation who received central nervous system irradiation were also at higher risk (adjusted HR: 3.39; P=0.02). Patients irradiated or transplanted at older than 10 years of age had a lower risk (adjusted HR: 0.61; P=0.02). Thyroid malignancy was found in 26 patients (5.2%). Among them, two patients had never received any type of irradiation: alkylating agents could also promote thyroid cancer. The cumulative incidence of thyroid malignancy was 9.6% (95% CI: 6.0-15.0) at 20 years. Women were at higher risk than men (adjusted HR: 4.74; P=0.002). In conclusion, thyroid complications are frequent among patients who undergo transplantation after total body irradiation and those who received prior central nervous system irradiation. Close monitoring is thus warranted for these patients. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT 01756599. PMID:26969082

  13. Late thyroid complications in survivors of childhood acute leukemia. An L.E.A. study

    PubMed Central

    Oudin, Claire; Auquier, Pascal; Bertrand, Yves; Chastagner, Philippe; Kanold, Justyna; Poirée, Maryline; Thouvenin, Sandrine; Ducassou, Stephane; Plantaz, Dominique; Tabone, Marie-Dominique; Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Gandemer, Virginie; Lutz, Patrick; Sirvent, Anne; Villes, Virginie; Barlogis, Vincent; Baruchel, André; Leverger, Guy; Berbis, Julie; Michel, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid complications are known side effects of irradiation. However, the risk of such complications in childhood acute leukemia survivors who received either central nervous system irradiation or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is less described. We prospectively evaluated the incidence and risk factors for thyroid dysfunction and tumors in survivors of childhood acute myeloid or lymphoid leukemia. A total of 588 patients were evaluated for thyroid function, and 502 individuals were assessed for thyroid tumors (median follow-up duration: 12.6 and 12.5 years, respectively). The cumulative incidence of hypothyroidism was 17.3% (95% CI: 14.1–21.1) and 24.6% (95% CI: 20.4–29.6) at 10 and 20 years from leukemia diagnosis, respectively. Patients who received total body irradiation (with or without prior central nervous system irradiation) were at higher risk of hypothyroidism (adjusted HR: 2.87; P=0.04 and 2.79, P=0.01, respectively) as compared with transplanted patients who never received any irradiation. Patients transplanted without total body irradiation who received central nervous system irradiation were also at higher risk (adjusted HR: 3.39; P=0.02). Patients irradiated or transplanted at older than 10 years of age had a lower risk (adjusted HR: 0.61; P=0.02). Thyroid malignancy was found in 26 patients (5.2%). Among them, two patients had never received any type of irradiation: alkylating agents could also promote thyroid cancer. The cumulative incidence of thyroid malignancy was 9.6% (95% CI: 6.0–15.0) at 20 years. Women were at higher risk than men (adjusted HR: 4.74; P=0.002). In conclusion, thyroid complications are frequent among patients who undergo transplantation after total body irradiation and those who received prior central nervous system irradiation. Close monitoring is thus warranted for these patients. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT 01756599. PMID:26969082

  14. [Markers of metabolic syndrome and peptides regulating metabolism in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Skoczeń, Szymon; Tomasik, Przemysław; Balwierz, Walentyna; Surmiak, Marcin; Sztefko, Krystyna; Galicka-Latała, Danuta

    2011-01-01

    Along with the growing epidemic of overweight the risk of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality are increasing markedly. Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a condition clustering together several risk factors of those complications such as visceral obesity, glucose intolerance, arterial hypertension and dislipidemia. The risk of obesity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors is higher than in general population. We aimed to assess (1) the relationships between chosen adipokines and neuropeptides, chemotherapy, CRT, and body fatness and (2) evaluate adipokines and neuropeptides concentrations as a new markers of MS in children. We conducted cross-sectional evaluation of 82 ALL survivors (median age: 13.2 years; range: 4,8-26,2; median time from treatment: 3.2 years), including fasting laboratory testing: peptides (leptin, GLP-1, orexin, PYY, apelin), total cholesterol and its fractions, triglycerides; anthropometric measurements (weight, height), systolic and diastolic blood pressure. We estimated percentiles of body mass index and percentiles of blood pressure. Between 82 survivors overweight and diastolic hypertension was diagnosed in 31% of patients (35% in CRT group) and 15% respectively. At least one abnormality in lipids concentrations was found in 43%. Girls were more affected than boys. Statistically significant increased in leptin and apelin concentrations and decreased in soluble leptin receptor concentrations in the overweight group were observed compared to the non overweight subjects. Significant increase in orexin levels in females who had received CRT compared to those who had not received CRT was found. CRT is the main risk factor of elevated of body mass among survivors of childhood leukemia. Dyslipidemia and hypertension, along with increased adiposity indicate higher risk of MS development. Girls are more affected than boys. Leptin, orexin and apelin seem to be good markers of increased adiposity especially after CRT

  15. Corrigendum: The Associations Between Maternal Factors During Pregnancy and the Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kangkang; Xu, Xuejing; Liu, Xiaodong; Wang, Xikui; Hua, Shucheng; Wang, Chunpeng; Liu, Xin

    2016-05-01

    Because of the erroneous application of multiple publications, the conclusions of our recent paper (Pediatr Blood Cancer 2015;62:1162-70) were not reliable. The corrected results show that coffee drinking during pregnancy was risk factor for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (OR = 1.44, 95% confidence interval = 1.07-1.92). PMID:26999072

  16. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Bone Necrosis; Central Nervous System Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Testicular Leukemia; Therapy-Related Toxicity; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) -- children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leung WH, Pounds S, Cao X, e t al. Definition of cure in childhood acute myeloid leukemia. Cancer . 2014 Aug ... MD, Medical Oncologist, Fresno, CA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  18. Household pesticide exposure and the risk of childhood acute leukemia in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Gao, Yu; Shi, Rong; Chen, Didi; Wang, Xiaojin; Kamijima, Michihiro; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Nakajima, Tamie; Khalequzzaman, Md; Zhou, Yijun; Zheng, Ying; Bao, Pingping; Tian, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Childhood acute leukemia (AL) is the most common malignant tumor in children, but its etiology remains largely unknown. We investigated the relationship between household exposure to pesticides and childhood AL. Between 2009 and 2010 in Shanghai, a total of 248 newly diagnosed cases of AL and 111 gender-, age-, and hospital-matched controls were included. Five nonspecific dialkyl phosphate (DAP) metabolites of organophosphate pesticides (OPPs) [including dimethyl phosphate (DMP), diethyl phosphate (DEP), dimethyl thiophosphate (DMTP), diethyl thiophosphate (DETP), and diethyl dithiophosphate (DEDTP)] in the urine were analyzed by gas chromatography. The results showed that the median DMP, DEP, DMTP, DETP, and DEDEP levels adjusted for creatinine (Cr) in cases (13.2, 10.0, 31.3, 8.5, and 6.1 μg g(-1), respectively) were all significantly elevated compared with those in controls (3.6, 3.6, 13.3, 2.7, and 1.7 μg g(-1), respectively) (P < 0.05). The household use of mosquito repellent was significantly associated with an increased risk of childhood AL (odds ratio (OR) = 1.9; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-3.1). Moreover, higher exposures were significantly associated with an elevated risk of childhood AL for DMs, DEs, and DAPs. Our findings support the notion that the household use of pesticides may play a role in the etiology of childhood AL and provide some evidence to warrant further investigation of the link between household pesticide exposures and childhood AL in Shanghai. PMID:25854207

  19. High concordance of subtypes of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia within families: lessons from sibships with multiple cases of leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, K; Lausten Thomsen, U; Baruchel, A; Pacheco, C E; Pieters, Rob; Pombo-de-Oliveira, M S; Andersen, E W; Rostgaard, K; Hjalgrim, H; Pui, C-H

    2012-04-01

    Polymorphic genes have been linked to the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Surrogate markers for a low burden of early childhood infections are also related to increased risk for developing childhood ALL. It remains uncertain, whether siblings of children with ALL have an increased risk of developing ALL. This international collaboration identified 54 sibships with two (N = 51) or more (N = 3) cases of childhood ALL (ages <18 years). The 5-year event-free survival for 61 patients diagnosed after 1 January 1990 was 0.83 ± 0.05. Ages at diagnosis (Spearman correlation coefficient, r(S) = 0.41, P = 0.002) were significantly correlated, but not WBCs (r(S) = 0.23, P = 0.11). In 18 sibships with successful karyotyping in both cases, six were concordant for high-hyperdiploidy (N = 3), t(12;21) [ETV6/RUNX1] (N = 1), MLL rearrangement (N = 1) or t(1;19)(q23/p13) (N = 1). Eleven sibships were ALL-subtype concordant, being T-cell ALL (T-ALL) (N = 5, of a total of six sibships, where the first-born had T-ALL) or B-lineage ALL belonging to the same cytogenetic subset (N = 6), a finding that differs significantly from the expected chance distribution (κ: 0.58; P < 0.0001). These data indicate strong genetic and/or environmental risk factors for childhood ALL that are restricted to specific ALL subtypes, which must be taken into account, when performing epidemiological studies to reveal etiological factors. PMID:22005784

  20. Significance of CD66c expression in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Iijima, Kazutoshi; Tomita, Osamu; Miharu, Masashi; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Kenichiro; Okita, Hajime; Kajiwara, Michiko; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Inukai, Takeshi; Makimoto, Atsushi; Fukushima, Takashi; Nanmoku, Toru; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Manabe, Atsushi; Kikuchi, Akira; Sugita, Kanji; Fujimoto, Junichiro; Hayashi, Yasuhide; Ohara, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Upon analyzing 696 childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) cases, we identified the characteristics of CD66c expression. In addition to the confirmation of strong correlation with BCR-ABL positivity and hyperdiploid, we further observed that CD66c is frequently expressed in CRLF2-positive (11/15, p<0.01 against chimeric gene-negative) as well as hypodiploid cases (3/4), whereas it is never expressed in ETV6-RUNX1, MLL-AF4, MLL-AF9, MLL-ENL, and E2A-PBX1-positive cases. Although the expression of CD66c itself is not directly linked to the prognosis, the accompanying genetic abnormalities are important prognostic factors for BCP-ALL, indicating the importance of CD66c expression in the initial diagnosis of BCP-ALL. PMID:24231528

  1. Molecular Analysis of Central Nervous System Disease Spectrum in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Chindo; Sitthi-Amorn, Jitsuda; Douglas, Jessica; Ramani, Ritika; Miele, Lucio; Vijayakumar, Vani; Karlson, Cynthia; Chipeta, James; Megason, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of the central nervous system (CNS) is an essential therapeutic component in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The goal of this study was to identify molecular signatures distinguishing patients with CNS disease from those without the disease in pediatric patients with ALL. We analyzed gene expression data from 207 pediatric patients with ALL. Patients without CNS were classified as CNS1, while those with mild and advanced CNS disease were classified as CNS2 and CNS3, respectively. We compared gene expression levels among the three disease classes. We identified gene signatures distinguishing the three disease classes. Pathway analysis revealed molecular networks and biological pathways dysregulated in response to CNS disease involvement. The identified pathways included the ILK, WNT, B-cell receptor, AMPK, ERK5, and JAK signaling pathways. The results demonstrate that transcription profiling could be used to stratify patients to guide therapeutic decision-making in pediatric ALL. PMID:26997880

  2. Dust-metal Loadings and the Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Todd P.; Ward, Mary H.; Colt, Joanne S.; Dahl, Gary; Ducore, Jonathan; Reinier, Kyndaron; Gunier, Robert B.; Hammond, S. Katharine; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Metayer, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the relationship between the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and levels of metals in carpet dust. A dust sample was collected from the homes of 142 ALL cases and 187 controls participating in the California Childhood Leukemia Study using a high volume small surface sampler (2001–2006). Samples were analyzed using microwave-assisted acid digestion in combination with inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, nickel, tin, tungsten, and zinc. Eight metals were detected in at least 85% of the case and control homes; tungsten was detected in less than 15% of homes. Relationships between dust-metal loadings (μg metal per m2 carpet) and ALL risk were modeled using multivariable logistic regression, adjusting for the child’s age, sex, and race/ethnicity and confounders, including household annual income. A doubling of dust-metal loadings was not associated with significant changes in ALL risk [odds ratio (95% confidence interval): arsenic: 0.94 (0.83, 1.05), cadmium: 0.91 (0.80, 1.04), chromium: 0.99 (0.87, 1.12), copper: 0.96 (0.90, 1.03), lead: 1.01 (0.93, 1.10), nickel: 0.92 (0.80, 1.07), tin: 0.93 (0.82, 1.05), and zinc: 0.91 (0.81, 1.02)]. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that metals in carpet dust are risk factors for childhood ALL. PMID:25736162

  3. Minimal Residual Disease Evaluation in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Clinical Evidence Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Leukemia accounts for nearly a third of childhood cancers in Canada, with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) comprising nearly 80% of cases. Identification of prognostic factors that allow risk stratification and tailored treatment have improved overall survival. However, nearly a quarter of patients considered standard risk on the basis of conventional prognostic factors still relapse, and relapse is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Relapse is thought to result from extremely low levels of leukemic cells left over once complete remission is reached, termed minimal residual disease (MRD). Poor event-free survival (EFS) as well as overall survival for those who are classified as MRD-positive have been substantiated in seminal studies demonstrating the prognostic value of MRD for EFS in the past few decades. This review sought to further elucidate the relationship between MRD and EFS by looking at relapse, the primary determinant of EFS and the biological mechanism through which MRD is thought to act. This evidence review aimed to ascertain whether MRD is an independent prognostic factor for relapse and to assess the effect of MRD-directed treatment on patient-important outcomes in childhood ALL. Methods Large prospective cohort studies with a priori multivariable analysis that includes potential confounders are required to draw confirmatory conclusions about the independence of a prognostic factor. Data on the prognostic value of MRD for relapse measured by molecular methods (polymerase chain reaction [PCR] of immunoglobulin or T-cell receptor rearrangements) or flow cytometry for leukemia-associated immunophenotypes or difference-from-normal approach were abstracted from included studies. Relevant data on relapse, EFS, and overall survival were abstracted from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of MRD-directed treatment. Results A total of 2,832 citations were reviewed, of which 12 studies were included in this

  4. The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Metayer, Catherine; Milne, Elizabeth; Clavel, Jacqueline; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Petridou, Eleni; Taylor, Malcolm; Schüz, Joachim; Spector, Logan G.; Dockerty, John D.; Magnani, Corrado; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.; Sinnett, Daniel; Murphy, Michael; Roman, Eve; Monge, Patricia; Ezzat, Sameera; Mueller, Beth A.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Birch, Jill; Kaatsch, Peter; Koifman, Sergio; Lightfoot, Tracy; Bhatti, Parveen; Bondy, Melissa L.; Rudant, Jérémie; O’Neill, Kate; Miligi, Lucia; Dessypris, Nick; Kang, Alice Y.; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children under 15 years of age; 80% are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 17% are acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Childhood leukemia shows further diversity based on cytogenetic and molecular characteristics, which may relate to distinct etiologies. Case–control studies conducted worldwide, particularly of ALL, have collected a wealth of data on potential risk factors and in some studies, biospecimens. There is growing evidence for the role of infectious/immunologic factors, fetal growth, and several environmental factors in the etiology of childhood ALL. The risk of childhood leukemia, like other complex diseases, is likely to be influenced both by independent and interactive effects of genes and environmental exposures. While some studies have analyzed the role of genetic variants, few have been sufficiently powered to investigate gene–environment interactions. Objectives The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) was established in 2007 to promote investigations of rarer exposures, gene–environment interactions and subtype-specific associations through the pooling of data from independent studies. Methods By September 2012, CLIC included 22 studies (recruitment period: 1962–present) from 12 countries, totaling approximately 31 000 cases and 50 000 controls. Of these, 19 case–control studies have collected detailed epidemiologic data, and DNA samples have been collected from children and child–parent trios in 15 and 13 of these studies, respectively. Two registry-based studies and one study comprising hospital records routinely obtained at birth and/or diagnosis have limited interview data or biospecimens. Conclusions CLIC provides a unique opportunity to fill gaps in knowledge about the role of environmental and genetic risk factors, critical windows of exposure, the effects of gene–environment interactions and associations among specific leukemia subtypes in different ethnic

  5. Residential Levels of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers and Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in California

    PubMed Central

    Colt, Joanne S.; Deziel, Nicole C.; Whitehead, Todd P.; Reynolds, Peggy; Gunier, Robert B.; Nishioka, Marcia; Dahl, Gary V.; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Buffler, Patricia A.; Metayer, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Background: House dust is a major source of exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), which are found at high levels in U.S. homes. Methods: We studied 167 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cases 0–7 years of age and 214 birth certificate controls matched on date of birth, sex, and race/ethnicity from the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study. In 2001–2007, we sampled carpets in the room where the child spent the most time while awake; we used a high-volume small-surface sampler or we took dust from the home vacuum. We measured concentrations of 14 PBDE congeners including penta (28, 47, 99, 100, 153, 154), octa (183, 196, 197, 203), and decaBDEs (206–209). Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using logistic regression, adjusting for demographics, income, year of dust collection, and sampling method. Results: BDE-47, BDE-99, and BDE-209 were found at the highest concentrations (medians, 1,173, 1,579, and 938 ng/g, respectively). Comparing the highest to lowest quartile, we found no association with ALL for summed pentaBDEs (OR = 0.7; 95% CI: 0.4, 1.3), octaBDEs (OR = 1.3; 95% CI: 0.7, 2.3), or decaBDEs (OR = 1.0; 95% CI: 0.6, 1.8). Comparing homes in the highest concentration (nanograms per gram) tertile to those with no detections, we observed significantly increased ALL risk for BDE-196 (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.8), BDE-203 (OR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.6), BDE-206 (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.9), and BDE-207 (OR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.03, 3.8). Conclusion: We found no association with ALL for common PBDEs, but we observed positive associations for specific octa and nonaBDEs. Additional studies with repeated sampling and biological measures would be informative. Citation: Ward MH, Colt JS, Deziel NC, Whitehead TP, Reynolds P, Gunier RB, Nishioka M, Dahl GV, Rappaport SM, Buffler PA, Metayer C. 2014. Residential levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in California. Environ Health Perspect 122:1110–1116

  6. Tobacco Smoke Exposure and the Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic and Myeloid Leukemias by Cytogenetic Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Metayer, Catherine; Zhang, Luoping; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Bartley, Karen; Schiffman, Joshua; Ma, Xiaomei; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Chang, Jeffrey S.; Selvin, Steve; Fu, Cecilia H.; Ducore, Jonathan; Smith, Martyn T.; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tobacco smoke contains carcinogens known to damage somatic and germ cells. We investigated the effect tobacco smoke on the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and myeloid leukemia (AML), especially subtypes of pre-natal origin like ALL with translocation t(12;21) or high-hyperdiploidy (51–67 chromosomes). Methods We collected information on exposures to tobacco smoking before conception, during pregnancy, and after birth in 767 ALL cases, 135 AML cases, and 1,139 controls (1996–2008). Among cases, chromosome translocations, deletions, or aneuploidy were identified by conventional karyotype and fluorescence in-situ hybridization. Results Multivariable regression analyses for ALL and AML overall showed no definite evidence of associations with self-reported (yes/no) parental prenatal active smoking and child's passive smoking. However, children with history of paternal prenatal smoking combined with postnatal passive smoking had a 1.5-fold increased risk of ALL (95% CI: 1.01–2.23), compared to those without smoking history (ORs for pre- or postnatal smoking only were close to one). This joint effect was seen for B-cell precursor ALL with t(12;21) (OR=2.08; 95% CI: 1.04–4.16), but not high hyperdiploid B-cell ALL. Similarly, child's passive smoking was associated with an elevated risk of AML with chromosome structural changes (OR=2.76; 95% CI: 1.01–7.58), but not aneuploidy. Conclusions our data suggest that exposure to tobacco smoking before were associated with increased risks of childhood ALL and AML; and risks varied by timing of exposure (before and/or after birth) and cytogenetic subtype, based on imprecise estimates. Impact Parents should limit exposures to tobacco smoke before and after the child's birth. PMID:23853208

  7. Polymorphisms of the vincristine pathway and response to treatment in children with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ceppi, Francesco; Langlois-Pelletier, Chloé; Gagné, Vincent; Rousseau, Julie; Ciolino, Claire; Lorenzo, Samanta De; Kevin, Kojok M; Cijov, Diana; Sallan, Stephen E; Silverman, Lewis B; Neuberg, Donna; Kutok, Jeffery L; Sinnett, Daniel; Laverdière, Caroline; Krajinovic, Maja

    2015-01-01

    Background Vincristine (VCR) is a standard component in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). VCR cytotoxicity is primarily due to its ability to disrupt the formation of microtubules of the mitotic spindle. Patients & methods A total of 17 polymorphisms in regulatory and coding regions of genes controlling VCR targets (TUBB1, MAP4, ACTG1 and CAPG) or potentially influencing VCR levels (ABCB1 and CYP3A5) were investigated for an association with peripheral neuropathy and outcome in childhood ALL patients. Results High-grade neurotoxicity was more frequent in carriers of the A allele of synonymous (Ala310) G to A (rs1135989) variation in the ACTG1 gene. Substitution (rs4728709) in the promoter of the ABCB1 gene had a protective effect against lower grade neurotoxicity and C to A variation (rs3770102) located 17 nucleotides upstream from the transcription start site had a protective effect against high-grade neurotoxicity. Patients with the ABCB1 3435TT genotype had lower event-free survival; the association with event-free survival was not supported by the analysis in the replication patient set. Conclusion The polymorphisms in the ACTG1, CAPG and ABCB1 genes may modulate VCR-related neurotoxicity, whereas the risk of relapse seems not to be affected by the genes of the VCR pathway. PMID:25084203

  8. Intracellular Signaling Pathways Involved in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Molecular Targets.

    PubMed

    Layton Tovar, Cristian Fabián; Mendieta Zerón, Hugo

    2016-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a malignant disease characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation of immature lymphoid cells. ALL is the most common hematologic malignancy in early childhood, and it reaches peak incidence between the ages of 2 and 3 years. The prognosis of ALL is associated with aberrant gene expression, in addition to the presence of numerical or structural chromosomal alterations, age, race, and immunophenotype. The Relapse rate with regard to pharmacological treatment rises in childhood; thus, the expression of biomarkers associated with the activation of cell signaling pathways is crucial to establish the disease prognosis. Intracellular pathways involved in ALL are diverse, including Janus kinase/Signal transducers and transcription activators (JAK-STAT), Phosphoinositide-3-kinase-protein kinase B (PI3K-AKT), Ras mitogen-activated protein kinase (Ras-MAPK), Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), Nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-κB), and Hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1α (HIF-1α), among others. In this review, we present several therapeutic targets, intracellular pathways, and molecular markers that are being studied extensively at present. PMID:27065575

  9. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bone Marrow Transplantation in Treating Children With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  10. Combination Chemotherapy and Rituximab in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; L3 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma

  11. Prelabor cesarean delivery and early-onset acute childhood leukemia risk.

    PubMed

    Thomopoulos, Thomas P; Skalkidou, Alkistis; Dessypris, Nick; Chrousos, George; Karalexi, Maria A; Karavasilis, Theodoros G; Baka, Margarita; Hatzipantelis, Emmanuel; Kourti, Maria; Polychronopoulou, Sophia; Sidi, Vasiliki; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Moschovi, Maria; Loutradis, Dimitrios; Petridou, Eleni Th

    2016-03-01

    The long-term impact of cesarean delivery (CD) on the health of the offspring is being explored methodically. We sought to investigate the effect of birth by (a) prelabor and (b) during-labor CD on the risk of early-onset (≤3 years) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), specifically of its prevailing precursor B (B-ALL) subtype. A total of 1099 incident cases of ALL (957 B-ALL), 131 of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and their 1 : 1 age-matched and sex-matched controls, derived from the Nationwide Registry for Childhood Hematological Malignancies (1996-2013), were analyzed using multivariate regression models. A null association was found between prelabor and/or during labor CD and either ALL (B-ALL) or AML in the 0-14 age range. By contrast, birth by CD increased significantly the risk of early-onset ALL [odds ratioCD (ORCD)=1.57, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10-2.24] mainly on account of prelabor CD (ORprelaborCD=1.66, 95% CI: 1.13-2.43). The respective figures were even higher for the early-onset precursor B-ALL (ORCD=1.66, 95% CI: 1.15-2.40 and ORprelaborCD=1.79, 95% CI: 1.21-2.66), whereas no association emerged for early-onset AML. Prelabor CD, which deprives exposure of the fetus/infant to the presumably beneficial effect of stress hormones released in both vaginal labor and during labor CD, was associated exclusively with an increased risk of early-onset ALL, particularly the precursor B-ALL subtype. If confirmed, these adverse long-term outcomes of CD may point to re-evaluation of prelabor CD practices and prompt scientific discussion on the best ways to simulate the effects of vaginal delivery, such as a precesarean induction of labor. PMID:25793919

  12. 17-N-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  13. Human leukocyte antigen-DRB1 polymorphism in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    EL ANSARY, MERVAT M.; MOHAMMED, LAMIAA A.; HASSAN, TAMER H.; BARAKA, AHMED; AHMED, ALSHYMAA A.

    2015-01-01

    Similar to autoimmune diseases, there are clear associations between resistance or susceptibility to cancer and the classic human leukocyte antigen (HLA) profile of an individual. HLA-associated susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may provide clues to leukemogenesis in general and to the role of other risk factors. The present study aimed to determine the association between the HLA-DRB1 genotype and susceptibility to ALL in children and to assess the prognostic value of HLA-DRB1 alleles in these patients. This study included 50 ALL patients who were consecutively admitted to the Pediatric Oncology Unit of Zagazig University Hospital and 50 gender-matched healthy volunteers as a control group. The patients were subjected to full clinical history, thorough clinical examination and routine laboratory investigations. Molecular HLA-DRB1 typing for patients and controls using the reverse sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe technique was performed. HLA-DRB1*04 allele frequency was significantly higher in female patients compared to that in female controls (P=0.03) and in patients aged <10 years compared to those aged ≥10 years at the time of diagnosis (P=0.01). HLA-DRB1*11 allele frequency was significantly higher in high-risk compared to standard-risk patients (P=0.01) and in refractory patients compared to those who achieved remission (P=0.02). In conclusion, the HLA-DRB1*04 allele appears to be a female-specific susceptibility factor for the acquisition of childhood ALL and it may affect the age of onset of ALL. In addition, the HLA-DRB1*11 allele may be of prognostic significance in childhood ALL. However, further larger studies are required to support the conclusions drawn from this study. PMID:25798280

  14. Temsirolimus, Dexamethasone, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, Vincristine Sulfate, and Pegaspargase in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-09

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  15. Maternal immunoglobulin E and childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jeffrey S; Buffler, Patricia A; Metayer, Catherine; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Patoka, Joe; Kronish, Daniel; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2009-08-01

    Childhood leukemia, particularly acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), has long been hypothesized to be affected by abnormal immune responses to microbial challenges stemming from a lack of immune modulation in early childhood. Studies of allergies suggest that a child's immune development may be modulated by maternal immune status. We conducted a study to explore the relationship between maternal immunoglobulin E (IgE) and childhood leukemia and to investigate whether maternal immune status can influence childhood leukemia risk. Serum total and specific IgE (respiratory and food) were measured in biological mothers of 352 children (193 healthy controls and 159 leukemia cases, including 139 ALL cases) ages <8 years who were enrolled in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study. Odds ratios associated with maternal IgE were calculated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for child's age, sex, race/ethnicity, and annual household income. A positive association between childhood leukemia or ALL and elevated levels of maternal serum total IgE was observed, especially among Hispanics. In addition, a positive association was observed between childhood leukemia or ALL and maternal respiratory or food IgE status. These results suggest that maternal immune function may play a crucial role in the etiology of childhood leukemia, although additional studies need to be conducted to confirm the results of this study and provide a perspective on mechanisms. PMID:19622720

  16. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms and risk of molecularly defined subtypes of childhood acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wiemels, J L; Smith, R N; Taylor, G M; Eden, O B; Alexander, F E; Greaves, M F

    2001-03-27

    Low folate intake as well as alterations in folate metabolism as a result of polymorphisms in the enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) have been associated with an increased incidence of neural tube defects, vascular disease, and some cancers. Polymorphic variants of MTHFR lead to enhanced thymidine pools and better quality DNA synthesis that could afford some protection from the development of leukemias, particularly those with translocations. We now report associations of MTHFR polymorphisms in three subgroups of pediatric leukemias: infant lymphoblastic or myeloblastic leukemias with MLL rearrangements and childhood lymphoblastic leukemias with either TEL-AML1 fusions or hyperdiploid karyotypes. Pediatric leukemia patients (n = 253 total) and healthy newborn controls (n = 200) were genotyped for MTHFR polymorphisms at nucleotides 677 (C-->T) and 1,298 (A-->C). A significant association for carriers of C677T was demonstrated for leukemias with MLL translocations (MLL+, n = 37) when compared with controls [adjusted odd ratios (OR) = 0.36 with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.15-0.85; P = 0.017]. This protective effect was not evident for A1298C alleles (OR = 1.14). In contrast, associations for A1298C homozygotes (CC; OR = 0.26 with a 95% CI of 0.07--0.81) and C677T homozygotes (TT; OR = 0.49 with a 95% CI of 0.20--1.17) were observed for hyperdiploid leukemias (n = 138). No significant associations were evident for either polymorphism with TEL-AML1+ leukemias (n = 78). These differences in allelic associations may point to discrete attributes of the two alleles in their ability to alter folate and one-carbon metabolite pools and impact after DNA synthesis and methylation pathways, but should be viewed cautiously pending larger follow-up studies. The data provide evidence that molecularly defined subgroups of pediatric leukemias have different etiologies and also suggest a role of folate in the development of childhood leukemia. PMID:11274424

  17. Current Strategies for the Detection of Minimal Residual Disease in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Juliana Maria Camargos; Xavier, Sandra Guerra; de Lima Souza, Marcelo Eduardo; Assumpção, Juliana Godoy; Murao, Mitiko; de Oliveira, Benigna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children. Current treatment strategies for childhood ALL result in long-term remission for approximately 90% of patients. However, the therapeutic response is worse among those who relapse. Several risk stratification approaches based on clinical and biological aspects have been proposed to intensify treatment in patients with high risk of relapse and reduce toxicity on those with a greater probability of cure. The detection of residual leukemic cells (minimal residual disease, MRD) is the most important prognostic factor to identify high-risk patients, allowing redefinition of chemotherapy. In the last decades, several standardized research protocols evaluated MRD using immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and/or real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction at different time points during treatment. Both methods are highly sensitive (10(-3) a 10(-5)), but expensive, complex, and, because of that, require qualified staff and frequently are restricted to reference centers. The aim of this article was to review technical aspects of immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to evaluate MRD in ALL. PMID:27158437

  18. Absence of Association between CCR5 rs333 Polymorphism and Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Perim, Aparecida de Lourdes; Ozawa, Patricia Midori Murobushi; Freire Vitiello, Glauco Akelinghton; Losi Guembarovski, Roberta; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a malignant disorder that originates from one single hematopoietic precursor committed to B- or T-cell lineage. Ordinarily, these cells express CCR5 chemokine receptor, which directs the immune response to a cellular pattern and is involved in cancer pathobiology. The genetic rs333 polymorphism of CCR5 (Δ32), results in a diminished receptor expression, thus leading to impaired cell trafficking. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of CCR5 chemokine receptor rs333 polymorphism in the pathogenesis of ALL. The genotype distribution was studied in 79 patients and compared with 80 control subjects, in a childhood population of Southern Brazil. Genotyping was performed using DNA samples amplified by polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP). The homozygous (Δ32/Δ32) deletion was not observed in any subject involved in the study. Heterozygous genotype was not associated with ALL risk (OR 0.7%; 95% CI 0.21–2.32; P > 0.05), nor recurrence status of ALL (OR 0.86; 95% CI 0.13–5.48; P > 0.05). This work demonstrated, for the first time, no significant differences in the frequency of the CCR5/Δ32 genotype between ALL and control groups, indicating no effect of this genetic variant on the ALL susceptibility and recurrence risk. PMID:24822066

  19. Stromal cell-mediated mitochondrial redox adaptation regulates drug resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jizhong; Masurekar, Ashish; Johnson, Suzanne; Chakraborty, Sohini; Griffiths, John; Smith, Duncan; Alexander, Seema; Dempsey, Clare; Parker, Catriona; Harrison, Stephanie; Li, Yaoyong; Miller, Crispin; Di, Yujun; Ghosh, Zhumur; Krishnan, Shekhar; Saha, Vaskar

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high cure rates in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), relapsed ALL remains a significant clinical problem. Genetic heterogeneity does not adequately explain variations in response to therapy. The chemoprotective tumor microenvironment may additionally contribute to disease recurrence. This study identifies metabolic reprogramming of leukemic cells by bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) as a putative mechanism of drug resistance. In a BMSC-extracellular matrix culture model, BMSC produced chemoprotective soluble factors and facilitated the emergence of a reversible multidrug resistant phenotype in ALL cells. BMSC environment induced a mitochondrial calcium influx leading to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in ALL cells. In response to this oxidative stress, drug resistant cells underwent a redox adaptation process, characterized by a decrease in ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential with an upregulation of antioxidant production and MCL-1 expression. Similar expanded subpopulations of low ROS expressing and drug resistant cells were identified in pre-treatment bone marrow samples from ALL patients with slower response to therapy. This suggests that the bone marrow microenvironment induces a redox adaptation in ALL subclones that protects against cytotoxic stress and potentially gives rise to minimal residual disease. Targeting metabolic remodeling by inhibiting antioxidant production and antiapoptosis was able to overcome drug resistance. Thus metabolic plasticity in leukemic cell response to environmental factors contributes to chemoresistance and disease recurrence. Adjunctive strategies targeting such processes have the potential to overcome therapeutic failure in ALL. PMID:26474278

  20. Dissecting the clonal origins of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia by single-cell genomics

    PubMed Central

    Gawad, Charles; Koh, Winston; Quake, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Many cancers have substantial genomic heterogeneity within a given tumor, and to fully understand that diversity requires the ability to perform single cell analysis. We performed targeted sequencing of a panel of single nucleotide variants (SNVs), deletions, and IgH sequences in 1,479 single tumor cells from six acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients. By accurately segregating groups of cooccurring mutations into distinct clonal populations, we identified codominant clones in the majority of patients. Evaluation of intraclonal mutation patterns identified clone-specific punctuated cytosine mutagenesis events, showed that most structural variants are acquired before SNVs, determined that KRAS mutations occur late in disease development but are not sufficient for clonal dominance, and identified clones within the same patient that are arrested at varied stages in B-cell development. Taken together, these data order the sequence of genetic events that underlie childhood ALL and provide a framework for understanding the development of the disease at single-cell resolution. PMID:25425670

  1. Current Strategies for the Detection of Minimal Residual Disease in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Juliana Maria Camargos; Xavier, Sandra Guerra; de Lima Souza, Marcelo Eduardo; Assumpção, Juliana Godoy; Murao, Mitiko; de Oliveira, Benigna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children. Current treatment strategies for childhood ALL result in long-term remission for approximately 90% of patients. However, the therapeutic response is worse among those who relapse. Several risk stratification approaches based on clinical and biological aspects have been proposed to intensify treatment in patients with high risk of relapse and reduce toxicity on those with a greater probability of cure. The detection of residual leukemic cells (minimal residual disease, MRD) is the most important prognostic factor to identify high-risk patients, allowing redefinition of chemotherapy. In the last decades, several standardized research protocols evaluated MRD using immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and/or real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction at different time points during treatment. Both methods are highly sensitive (10−3 a 10−5), but expensive, complex, and, because of that, require qualified staff and frequently are restricted to reference centers. The aim of this article was to review technical aspects of immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to evaluate MRD in ALL. PMID:27158437

  2. Endothelial Health in Childhood Acute Lymphoid Leukemia Survivors: Pilot Evaluation with Peripheral Artery Tonometry

    PubMed Central

    Ruble, Kathy; Davis, Catherine L; Han, Hae-Ra

    2014-01-01

    Background Childhood cancer survivors are a growing population at risk for poor cardiac outcomes. Acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) survivors are among those at increased risk of cardiovascular complications. Early identification of impaired vascular health may allow for interventions to improve these outcomes. The purpose of this study is to evaluate vascular health using peripheral artery tonometry in ALL survivors and compare results to healthy siblings. Procedure Sixteen ALL survivor, healthy sibling pairs, ages 8-20, were evaluated for vascular health and cardiovascular risk factors (body mass index, central adiposity, blood pressure and fitness). One tailed paired T-test was used to compare the groups. Results Survivors were similar to siblings in cardiovascular risk measures but had poorer vascular health as measured by reactive hyperemia index (survivor RHI 1.54 vs sibling 1.77, p=0.0474). Conclusion This study reveals that even among survivors who are comparable to their healthy siblings in other traditional cardiovascular risks there is evidence of poorer vascular health. PMID:24577544

  3. Stromal cell-mediated mitochondrial redox adaptation regulates drug resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jizhong; Masurekar, Ashish; Johnson, Suzanne; Chakraborty, Sohini; Griffiths, John; Smith, Duncan; Alexander, Seema; Dempsey, Clare; Parker, Catriona; Harrison, Stephanie; Li, Yaoyong; Miller, Crispin; Di, Yujun; Ghosh, Zhumur; Krishnan, Shekhar; Saha, Vaskar

    2015-12-15

    Despite the high cure rates in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), relapsed ALL remains a significant clinical problem. Genetic heterogeneity does not adequately explain variations in response to therapy. The chemoprotective tumor microenvironment may additionally contribute to disease recurrence. This study identifies metabolic reprogramming of leukemic cells by bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) as a putative mechanism of drug resistance. In a BMSC-extracellular matrix culture model, BMSC produced chemoprotective soluble factors and facilitated the emergence of a reversible multidrug resistant phenotype in ALL cells. BMSC environment induced a mitochondrial calcium influx leading to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in ALL cells. In response to this oxidative stress, drug resistant cells underwent a redox adaptation process, characterized by a decrease in ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential with an upregulation of antioxidant production and MCL-1 expression. Similar expanded subpopulations of low ROS expressing and drug resistant cells were identified in pre-treatment bone marrow samples from ALL patients with slower response to therapy. This suggests that the bone marrow microenvironment induces a redox adaptation in ALL subclones that protects against cytotoxic stress and potentially gives rise to minimal residual disease. Targeting metabolic remodeling by inhibiting antioxidant production and antiapoptosis was able to overcome drug resistance. Thus metabolic plasticity in leukemic cell response to environmental factors contributes to chemoresistance and disease recurrence. Adjunctive strategies targeting such processes have the potential to overcome therapeutic failure in ALL. PMID:26474278

  4. The Progression of Bone Mineral Density Abnormalities After Chemotherapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vitanza, Nicholas A; Hogan, Laura E; Zhang, Guangxiang; Parker, Robert I

    2015-07-01

    Although reduced bone mineral density in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is well documented, the degree of demineralization and relation to age are not well described. This is a retrospective chart analysis of 58 patients consecutively treated for ALL without relapse, cranial irradiation, or transplantation. Bone mineral densities were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and patients were divided by sex and age (≤5, 6 to 10, and >10 y) at diagnosis. Serial scans for 6 years after therapy were analyzed as Z-scores. Over 6 years after therapy, 93.1% of patients exhibited a decreased Z-score in at least 1 anatomic site. The difference in Z-score among the age cohorts was significant at both the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Patients older than 10 years at diagnosis had the lowest Z-scores: -2.78 and -2.87 for boys and -2.39 and -2.91 for girls at the lumbar spine and femoral neck, respectively. Children after ALL therapy exhibit a significant bone mineral deficit shortly after completion of therapy that persists for at least 6 years. The degree of bone demineralization can be followed up by a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan and is most severe in patients older than 10 years at the initiation of therapy. PMID:25222061

  5. A computer-aided method to expedite the evaluation of prognosis for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingwei; Li, Shibo; Liu, Hong; Mulvihill, John J; Chen, Wei; Zheng, Bin

    2006-08-01

    This study presented a fully-automated computer-aided method (scheme) to detect metaphase chromosomes depicted on microscopic digital images, count the total number of chromosomes in each metaphase cell, compute the DNA index, and correlate the results to the prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The computer scheme first uses image filtering, threshold, and labeling algorithms to segment and count the number of the suspicious "chromosome," and then computes a feature vector for each "detected chromosome." Based on these features, a knowledge-based classifier is used to eliminate those "non-chromosome" objects (i.e., inter-phase cells, stain debris, and other kinds of background noises). Due to the possible overlap of the chromosomes, a classification criterion was used to identify the overlapped chromosomes and adjust the initially counted number of the total chromosomes in each image. In this preliminary study with 60 testing images (depicting metaphase chromosome cells) acquired from three pediatric patients, the computer scheme generated results matched with the diagnostic results provided by the clinical cytogeneticists. The results demonstrated the feasibility or potential of using a computerized method to replace the tedious and the reader-dependent diagnostic methods commonly used in genetic laboratories to date. PMID:16866573

  6. Growth hormone deficiency predicts cardiovascular risk in young adults treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood.

    PubMed

    Link, Katarina; Moëll, Christian; Garwicz, Stanislaw; Cavallin-Ståhl, Eva; Björk, Jonas; Thilén, Ulf; Ahrén, Bo; Erfurth, Eva Marie

    2004-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy, and until recently prophylactic cranial radiotherapy (CRT) was important for achieving long-term survival. Hypothalamic-pituitary hormone insufficiency is a well-recognized consequence of CRT for childhood cancer. Another problem is increased cardiovascular risk, which has been shown in long-term survivors of other childhood cancers. In the only previously reported study on cardiovascular risk after childhood ALL, obesity and dyslipidemia were recorded in a small subgroup treated with CRT, compared with patients treated with chemotherapy. The mechanisms behind the increase in cardiovascular risk in survivors of childhood cancer are not clarified. The aim of the present study was to elucidate mechanisms of increased cardiovascular risk in former childhood ALL patients. A group of 44 ALL survivors (23 males, median age 25 yr, range 19-32 yr at the time of study) treated with CRT (median 24 Gy, 18-30 Gy) at a median age of 5 yr (1-18 yr) and chemotherapy were investigated for prevalence of GH deficiency and cardiovascular risk factors. Comparison was made with controls randomly selected from the general population and individually matched for sex, age, smoking habits, and residence. All patients and controls underwent a GHRH-arginine test, and patients with a peak GH 3.9 microg/liter or greater were further investigated with an additional insulin tolerance test. Significantly higher plasma levels of insulin (P = 0.002), blood glucose (P = 0.01), and serum levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein (Apo) B, triglycerides, fibrinogen, and leptin (all P

  7. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  8. FLT3 and NPM1 gene mutations in childhood acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mukda, Ekchol; Pintaraks, Katsarin; Sawangpanich, Rachchadol; Wiangnon, Surapon; Pakakasama, Samart

    2011-01-01

    Mutations of receptor tyrosine kinases are implicated in the constitutive activation and development of human hematologic malignancies. Mutations in fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) gene including internal tandem duplication (ITD) and point mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) as well as in nucleoplasmin (NPM1) gene are associated with pathogenesis of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). Several reports have demonstrated high incidences of the FLT3 and NPM1 mutations in adult AML patients. Since the pathogenesis of pediatric AML is different from that of adult and the FLT3 and NPM1 mutations have not been well characterized in childhood AML. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the frequencies of FLT3 and NPM1 mutations in 64 newly diagnosed childhood AML patients. All blood and bone marrow samples were previously diagnosed with AML by using flow cytometry and/or cytochemistry. FLT3-ITD and FLT3-TKD were detected by PCR and PCR-RFLP methods, respectively. The NPM1 mutation was analyzed by PCR and direct DNA sequencing. The FLT3 mutations were detected in 7 of 64 (11.1%), including FLT3-ITD in 4 of 64 (6.3%) and FLT-TKD in 3 of 62 (4.8%). The NPM1 mutation was not detected in this cohort. By multivariate analysis, white blood cell counts, peripheral blood and bone marrow blast cell counts at diagnosis were significantly higher in children with FLT3-ITD (P<0.05). In addition, the median percentage of CD117 was significantly higher in leukemic blast cells with FLT3-ITD than those with wild type (P=0.01). We did not find any FLT3 mutations in children aged less than 5 years. The AML M3 cell type was most frequently associated with FLT3 gene mutations (50%). In conclusion, the FLT3 mutations was found in 11.1% but none of NPM1 mutation was detected in Thai children with AML. These data support the hypothesis of different biology and pathogenesis between adult and childhood AML. PMID:22126574

  9. Mutational analysis of the candidate tumor suppressor genes TEL and KIP1 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stegmaier, K; Takeuchi, S; Golub, T R; Bohlander, S K; Bartram, C R; Koeffler, H P

    1996-03-15

    We have shown previously that loss of heterozygosity at chromosome band 12p13 is among the most frequent genetic abnormalities identified in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) of childhood. Two known genes map within the critically deleted region of 12p: TEL, the gene encoding a new member of the ETS family of transcription factors, which is rearranged in a variety of hematological malignancies; and KIP1, the gene encoding the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27. Both genes are, therefore, excellent candidate tumor suppressor genes. In this report, we determined the exon organization of the TEL gene and performed mutational analysis of TEL and KIP1 in 33 childhood ALL patients known to have loss of heterozygosity at this locus. No mutations in either TEL or KIP1 were found; this suggest that neither TEL nor KIP1 is the critical 12p tumor suppressor gene in childhood ALL. PMID:8640833

  10. Allogeneic Transplantation for Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-14

    Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute; Leukemia; Leukemia Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL); Leukemia Acute Lymphoid Leukemia (ALL); Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Leukemia Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Leukemia Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

  11. Hyperglycemia during induction therapy is associated with increased infectious complications in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) are at high risk for developing hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemic adult ALL patients have shorter remissions, more infections, and increased mortality. No corresponding data are available in children. We hypothesized that children with ALL who become hypergl...

  12. Different molecular mechanisms causing 9p21 deletions in acute lymphoblastic leukemia of childhood.

    PubMed

    Novara, Francesca; Beri, Silvana; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Bellazzi, Riccardo; Malovini, Alberto; Ciccone, Roberto; Cometa, Angela Maria; Locatelli, Franco; Giorda, Roberto; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2009-10-01

    Deletion of chromosome 9p21 is a crucial event for the development of several cancers including acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Double strand breaks (DSBs) triggering 9p21 deletions in ALL have been reported to occur at a few defined sites by illegitimate action of the V(D)J recombination activating protein complex. We have cloned 23 breakpoint junctions for a total of 46 breakpoints in 17 childhood ALL (9 B- and 8 T-lineages) showing different size deletions at one or both homologous chromosomes 9 to investigate which particular sequences make the region susceptible to interstitial deletion. We found that half of 9p21 deletion breakpoints were mediated by ectopic V(D)J recombination mechanisms whereas the remaining half were associated to repeated sequences, including some with potential for non-B DNA structure formation. Other mechanisms, such as microhomology-mediated repair, that are common in other cancers, play only a very minor role in ALL. Nucleotide insertions at breakpoint junctions and microinversions flanking the breakpoints have been detected at 20/23 and 2/23 breakpoint junctions, respectively, both in the presence of recombination signal sequence (RSS)-like sequences and of other unspecific sequences. The majority of breakpoints were unique except for two cases, both T-ALL, showing identical deletions. Four of the 46 breakpoints coincide with those reported in other cases, thus confirming the presence of recurrent deletion hotspots. Among the six cases with heterozygous 9p deletions, we found that the remaining CDKN2A and CDKN2B alleles were hypermethylated at CpG islands. PMID:19484265

  13. The combination effects of bendamustine with antimetabolites against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shoko; Goto, Hiroaki; Yokosuka, Tomoko

    2016-05-01

    Bendamustine combined with other drugs is clinically efficacious for some adult lymphoid malignancies, but to date there are no reports of the use of such combinatorial approaches in pediatric patients. We investigated the in vitro activity of bendamustine combined with other antimetabolite drugs on B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) cell lines established from pediatric patients with refractory or relapsed ALL. We also developed a mathematically drown improved isobologram method to assess the data objectively. Three BCP-ALL cell lines; YCUB-2, YCUB-5, and YCUB-6, were simultaneously exposed to various concentrations of bendamustine and cladribine, cytarabine, fludarabine, or clofarabine. Cell growth inhibition was determined using the WST-8 assay. Combinatorial effects were estimated using our improved isobologram method with IC80 (drug concentration corresponding to 80 % of maximum inhibition). Bendamustine alone inhibited ALL cell growth with mean IC80 values of 11.30-18.90 μg/ml. Combinations of bendamustine with other drugs produced the following effects: (1) cladribine; synergistic-to-additive on all cell lines; (2) cytarabine; synergistic-to-additive on YCUB-5 and YCUB-6, and synergistic-to-antagonistic on YCUB-2; (3) fludarabine; additive-to-antagonistic on YCUB-5, and synergistic-to-antagonistic on YCUB-2 and YCUB-6; (4) clofarabine; additive-to-antagonistic on all cell lines. Flow cytometric analysis also showed the combination effects of bendamustine and cladribine. Bendamustine/cladribine or bendamustine/cytarabine may thus represent a promising combination for salvage treatment in childhood ALL. PMID:26886449

  14. Tobacco Smoke and Risk of Childhood Acute Non-Lymphocytic Leukemia: Findings from the SETIL Study

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli, Stefano; Farioli, Andrea; Legittimo, Patrizia; Miligi, Lucia; Benvenuti, Alessandra; Ranucci, Alessandra; Salvan, Alberto; Rondelli, Roberto; Magnani, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Background Parental smoking and exposure of the mother or the child to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) as risk factors for Acute non-Lymphocytic Leukemia (AnLL) were investigated. Methods Incident cases of childhood AnLL were enrolled in 14 Italian Regions during 1998–2001. We estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) conducting logistic regression models including 82 cases of AnLL and 1,044 controls. Inverse probability weighting was applied adjusting for: age; sex; provenience; birth order; birth weight; breastfeeding; parental educational level age, birth year, and occupational exposure to benzene. Results Paternal smoke in the conception period was associated with AnLL (OR for ≥11 cigarettes/day  = 1.79, 95% CI 1.01–3.15; P trend 0.05). An apparent effect modification by maternal age was identified: only children of mothers aged below 30 presented increased risks. We found weak statistical evidence of an association of AnLL with maternal exposure to ETS (OR for exposure>3 hours/day  = 1.85, 95%CI 0.97–3.52; P trend 0.07). No association was observed between AnLL and either maternal smoking during pregnancy or child exposure to ETS. Conclusions This study is consistent with the hypothesis that paternal smoke is associated with AnLL. We observed statistical evidence of an association between maternal exposure to ETS and AnLL, but believe bias might have inflated our estimates. PMID:25401754

  15. Endocrinological and Cardiological Late Effects Among Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Karakaya, Pakize; Yılmaz, Şebnem; Tüfekçi, Özlem; Kır, Mustafa; Böber, Ece; İrken, Gülersu; Ören, Hale

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Survival rates for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have significantly improved and late effects of therapy have been important in the follow-up of survivors. The objective of this study is to identify the endocrinological and cardiological late effects of ALL patients treated in our pediatric hematology unit. Materials and Methods: Patients treated for ALL with BFM protocols after at least 5 years of diagnosis and not relapsed were included in the study. Endocrinological late effects (growth failure, obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, thyroid gland disorders, osteopenia/osteoporosis, and pubertal disorders) and cardiological late effects were evaluated. The study group was evaluated with anthropometric measurements, body mass index, and laboratory testing of fasting glucose, insulin, serum lipids, thyroid functions, and bone mineral densities. Echocardiography and pulsed wave Doppler imaging were performed for analysis of cardiac functions. Results: Of the 38 ALL survivors, at least 1 adverse event occurred in 23 (60%), with 8 of them (21%) having multiple problems. Six (16%) of the survivors were obese and 8 (21%) of them were overweight. Subjects who were overweight or obese at the time of diagnosis were more likely to be overweight or obese at last follow-up. Obesity was more frequently determined in patients who were younger than 6 years of age at the time of diagnosis. Insulin resistance was observed in 8 (21%) subjects. Insulin resistance was more frequently seen in subjects who had family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Hyperlipidemia was detected in 8 (21%) patients. Hypothyroidism or premature thelarche were detected in 2 children. Two survivors had osteopenia. Cardiovascular abnormalities occurred in one of the subjects with hypertension and cardiac diastolic dysfunction. Conclusion: We point out the necessity of follow-up of these patients for endocrinological and cardiological late effects, since at least one adverse

  16. Energy balance and fitness in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    DeLany, James P.; Kaste, Sue C.; Mulrooney, Daniel A.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Karlage, Robyn E.; Lanctot, Jennifer Q.; Howell, Carrie R.; Lu, Lu; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Robison, Leslie L.; Hudson, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    There is limited information on body composition, energy balance, and fitness among survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), especially those treated without cranial radiation therapy (CRT). This analysis compares these metrics among 365 ALL survivors with a mean age of 28.6 ± 5.9 years (149 treated with and 216 without CRT) and 365 age-, sex-, and race-matched peers. We also report risk factors for outcomes among survivors treated without CRT. Male survivors not exposed to CRT had abnormal body composition when compared with peers (% body fat, 26.2 ± 8.2 vs 22.7 ± 7.1). Survivors without CRT had similar energy balance but had significantly impaired quadriceps strength (−21.9 ± 6.0 Newton-meters [Nm]/kg, 60°/s) and endurance (−11.4 ± 4.6 Nm/kg, 300°/s), exercise capacity (−2.0 ± 2.1 ml/kg per minute), low-back and hamstring flexibility (−4.7 ± 1.6 cm), and dorsiflexion range of motion (−3.1 ± 0.9°) and higher modified total neuropathy scores (+1.6 ± 1.1) than peers. Cumulative asparaginase dose ≥120 000 IU/m2 was associated with impaired flexibility, vincristine dose ≥39 mg/m2 with peripheral neuropathy, glucocorticoid (prednisone equivalent) dose ≥8000 mg/m2 with hand weakness, and intrathecal methotrexate dose ≥225 mg with dorsiflexion weakness. Physical inactivity was associated with hand weakness and decreased exercise capacity. Smoking was associated with peripheral neuropathy. Elimination of CRT from ALL therapy has improved, but not eliminated, body-composition outcomes. Survivors remain at risk for impaired fitness. PMID:25814529

  17. Fatal adenovirus hepatitis during standard chemotherapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hough, Rachael; Chetwood, Andrew; Sinfield, Rebecca; Welch, Jenny; Vora, Ajay

    2005-02-01

    Fulminant hepatitis is a rare complication of adenoviral infection that has not previously been reported in children receiving standard chemotherapy for acute leukemia. The authors have observed fatal adenovirus hepatitis in three children receiving first-line chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The patients presented 10, 17, and 8 months into therapy according to the UKALL XI (third intensification), UKALL 97/99 (maintenance), and pilot UKALL 2003 (delayed intensification II) protocols, respectively. All patients received aggressive supportive care and intravenous immunoglobulins. The second and third patients were also treated with intravenous cidofovir. Despite these measures, all three children deteriorated rapidly and died of fulminant liver failure. Although rare, adenovirus infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute hepatitis in children receiving standard chemotherapy for ALL. PMID:15701979

  18. What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... about acute myeloid leukemia? What is acute myeloid leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in a part of ... the body from doing their jobs. Types of leukemia Not all leukemias are the same. There are ...

  19. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Ph-Like TKI Sensitive Mutations

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Bone Necrosis; Central Nervous System Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Testicular Leukemia; Therapy-Related Toxicity; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  20. Decrease in cerebral metabolic rate of glucose after high-dose methotrexate in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Komatsu, K.; Takada, G.; Uemura, K.; Shishido, F.; Kanno, I. )

    1990-09-01

    We measured changes in the regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRGlu) using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose and positron emission tomography for the assessment of neurotoxicity in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia treated with high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) therapy. We studied 8 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (mean age: 9.6 years) treated with HD-MTX (200 mg/kg or 2,000 mg/M2) therapy. CMRGlu after HD-MTX therapy was most reduced (40%) in the patient who had central nervous system leukemia and was treated with the largest total doses of both intrathecal MTX (IT-MTX) and HD-MTX. CMRGlu in the whole brain after HD-MTX therapy was reduced by an average of 21% (P less than 0.05). The reductions of CMRGlu in 8 patients were correlated with total doses of both IT-MTX (r = 0.717; P less than 0.05) and systemic HD-MTX (r = 0.784; P less than 0.05). CMRGlu of the cerebral cortex, especially the frontal and occipital cortex, was reduced more noticeably than that of the basal ganglia and white matter. We suggest that the measurement of changes in rCMRGlu after HD-MTX therapy is useful for detecting accumulated MTX neurotoxicity.

  1. Minimal Residual Disease Evaluation in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: An Economic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Minimal residual disease (MRD) testing by higher performance techniques such as flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can be used to detect the proportion of remaining leukemic cells in bone marrow or peripheral blood during and after the first phases of chemotherapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The results of MRD testing are used to reclassify these patients and guide changes in treatment according to their future risk of relapse. We conducted a systematic review of the economic literature, cost-effectiveness analysis, and budget-impact analysis to ascertain the cost-effectiveness and economic impact of MRD testing by flow cytometry for management of childhood precursor B-cell ALL in Ontario. Methods A systematic literature search (1998–2014) identified studies that examined the incremental cost-effectiveness of MRD testing by either flow cytometry or PCR. We developed a lifetime state-transition (Markov) microsimulation model to quantify the cost-effectiveness of MRD testing followed by risk-directed therapy to no MRD testing and to estimate its marginal effect on health outcomes and on costs. Model input parameters were based on the literature, expert opinion, and data from the Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario Networked Information System. Using predictions from our Markov model, we estimated the 1-year cost burden of MRD testing versus no testing and forecasted its economic impact over 3 and 5 years. Results In a base-case cost-effectiveness analysis, compared with no testing, MRD testing by flow cytometry at the end of induction and consolidation was associated with an increased discounted survival of 0.0958 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and increased discounted costs of $4,180, yielding an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $43,613/QALY gained. After accounting for parameter uncertainty, incremental cost-effectiveness of MRD testing was associated with an ICER of $50,249/QALY gained. In

  2. Childhood Leukemia--A Look at the Past, the Present and the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findeisen, Regina; Barber, William H.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of childhood leukemia. The causes, the survival period, different types (acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and hairy cell leukemia), symptoms, treatment, side effects of treatment (including learning problems), and the expected future direction of…

  3. Maternal Benzene Exposure during Pregnancy and Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Meta-Analysis of Epidemiologic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Zhu, Jie; Bi, Yongyi; Bai, YuE; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of childhood leukemia is increasing rapidly all over the world. However, studies on maternal benzene exposure during pregnancy and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have not been systematically assessed. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the association between maternal solvent, paint, petroleum exposure, and smoking during pregnancy and risk of childhood ALL. Methods Relevant studies up to September 1st, 2013 were identified by searching the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane library and the Web of Science databases. The effects were pooled using either fixed or random effect models based on the heterogeneity of the studies. Results Twenty-eight case-control studies and one cohort study were included for analysis, with a total of 16,695 cases and 1,472,786 controls involved. Pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for ALL was 1.25 (1.09, 1.45) for solvent, 1.23 (1.02, 1.47) for paint, 1.42 (1.10, 1.84) for petroleum exposure, and 0.99 (0.93, 1.06) for maternal smoking during pregnancy. No publication bias was found in this meta-analysis and consistent results were observed for subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Childhood ALL was associated with maternal solvent, paint, and petroleum exposure during pregnancy. No association was found between ALL and maternal smoking during pregnancy. Avoidance of maternal occupational and environmental benzene exposure during pregnancy could contribute to a decrease in the risk of childhood ALL. PMID:25333868

  4. Molecular Cytogenetics in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Hospital-Based Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Pandita, Aakash; Harish, Rekha; Digra, Sanjeev K; Raina, Alok; Sharma, Annie Arvind; Koul, Ashwani

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study was conducted to determine the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in children aged <19 years with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), attending/admitted in the Department of Pediatrics and Radiotherapy, Government Medical College, Jammu. Furthermore, we aimed to study the correlation between the cytogenetic molecular abnormalities and the immediate clinical outcome (induction of remission). MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a prospective study conducted over a period of 2 years (May 2011 to May 2013) in a tertiary care hospital in India. Forty pediatric (1–19 years) patients (18 males, 22 females; M: F = 0.8 : 1) with newly diagnosed ALL were studied for molecular cytogenetic analysis. Written consent was obtained from the parents of the patients. Bone marrow aspiration was done for making the diagnosis of ALL. Children lost to follow-up and who failed to give consent were excluded from the survey. Host factors and clinical parameters were obtained from patients. RESULTS Bone marrow aspirate samples of 40 diagnosed cases of ALL were subjected to routine cytogenetic analysis, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique was used for molecular analysis. Well-spread metaphase plates were obtained in 18/40 (45%) cases for analysis. RT-PCR revealed abnormal genes in 20/40 (50%) patients. The results of molecular cytogenetic analysis were correlated with patients’ clinical and hematological parameters for risk stratification and immediate outcome (induction of remission). Eighteen out of 40 (45%) cases revealed no abnormality. Among the remaining 22 cases, 8 had TEL–AML1 (20%), 6 had BCR–ABL (15%), 4 had MLL–AF4 (10%), 2 had E2A–PBX1 (5%) fusion genes, and 2 had hyperdiploidy. To conclude, a higher proportion of cases in this study showed adverse translocations such as t (9;22), t (4;11), and t (1;19) compared to that reported in literature. CONCLUSION RT-PCR assay was useful in detecting the

  5. Dasatinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-25

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  6. Clinical impact of circulating microRNAs as blood-based marker in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Swellam, Menha; El-Khazragy, Nashwa

    2016-08-01

    Aberrant microRNA (miRNA) expression participates in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This study aimed to investigate the expression of miRNA-100, miRNA-196a, and miRNA-146a among childhood ALL and study their correlation with other hematological parameters and different phenotypes. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) were obtained from 85 childhood ALL and 25 healthy children for the detection of miRNA expression using quantitative real-time PCR. Significant higher median levels were reported for ALL compared to control children. The diagnostic efficacy for miRNA-146a was superior as both sensitivity and specificity were absolute. A significant correlation was observed between higher expression of miRNA-100 and lower platelet and lymphocyte counts; high expression of miRNA-146a showed significant correlation with low total leukocyte count (TLC) and lymphocyte counts. Significant relation was reported between studied miRNAs and different phenotyping. miRNA-100, miRNA-196a, and miRNA-146a have significant role in childhood ALL leukemogenesis, and they may be useful as biological diagnostic molecular markers. PMID:26857279

  7. Association of SHMT1 gene polymorphisms with the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a sample of Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Bahari, G; Hashemi, M; Naderi, M; Sadeghi-Bojd, S; Taheri, M

    2016-01-01

    The enzymes serine hydroxymethyltransferase 1 (SHMT1) regulate key reaction in folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism. In the current study we aimed to examine the possible association between SHMT1 gene polymorphisms and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in a sample of Iranian population. The rs9901160, rs2273027, rs9909104, rs1979277, and rs11868708 gene polymorphisms of SHMT1 were genotyped in 120 children diagnosed with ALL and 120 healthy children by the polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). The results showed that rs9901160, rs2273027 as well as rs1979277 polymorphism significantly increased the risk of childhood ALL (P<0.05). While, rs9909104 polymorphism significantly decreased the ALL risk (P<0.05). The rs11868708 variant was not associated with risk/protection of childhood ALL (P>0.05). In conclusion, our results suggest that the polymorphisms of SHMT1 gene are associated with childhood ALL risk in a sample of Iranian population. Further studies with larger sample sizes and different ethnicities are necessary to verify our findings. PMID:26950450

  8. Familial history of cancer and childhood acute leukemia: a French population-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Ripert, Mahaut; Menegaux, Florence; Perel, Yves; Méchinaud, Françoise; Plouvier, Emmanuel; Gandemer, Virginie; Lutz, Patrick; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Lamagnére, Jean-Pierre; Margueritte, Geneviève; Boutard, Patrick; Robert, Alain; Armari-Alla, Corinne; Munzer, Martine; Millot, Frédéric; de Lumley, Lionel; Berthou, Christian; Rialland, Xavier; Pautard, Brigitte; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2007-01-01

    Objective A case-control study was conducted to investigate the role of a familial history of cancer in the etiology of childhood acute leukemia (AL). Methods The history of cancer in the relatives of 472 cases was compared to that of 567 population-based controls. Recruitment was frequency matched on age, gender and region. The familial history of cancer in each child’s relatives was reported by the mother in response to a standardized self-administered questionnaire. Results A familial history of solid tumor in first- or second-degree relatives was associated with an increased risk of ALL (OR=1.6 [1.2–2.1]), while a familial history of hematopoietic malignancies in first- or second-degree relatives was associated with an increased risk of AML (OR=4.3 [1.4–13]). The ORs for the histories of cancer increased with the number of relatives with cancer (OR=1.5 [1.1–2.0] for one relative and OR=2.3 [1.3–3.8] for two relatives or more; ptrend<0.0001). Significant associations between childhood AL and familial history of genital cancers and brain tumor were also observed (OR=2.7 [1.2–5.8], OR=10.7 [1.3–86], respectively). Conclusion This study supports the hypothesis that a familial history of cancer may play a role in the etiology of childhood acute leukemia. It also evidences some specific associations that require further investigation. PMID:17923819

  9. Laboratory-Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With High-Risk Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Induction of autophagy-dependent necroptosis is required for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to overcome glucocorticoid resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bonapace, Laura; Bornhauser, Beat C.; Schmitz, Maike; Cario, Gunnar; Ziegler, Urs; Niggli, Felix K.; Schäfer, Beat W.; Schrappe, Martin; Stanulla, Martin; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    In vivo resistance to first-line chemotherapy, including to glucocorticoids, is a strong predictor of poor outcome in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Modulation of cell death regulators represents an attractive strategy for subverting such drug resistance. Here we report complete resensitization of multidrug-resistant childhood ALL cells to glucocorticoids and other cytotoxic agents with subcytotoxic concentrations of obatoclax, a putative antagonist of BCL-2 family members. The reversal of glucocorticoid resistance occurred through rapid activation of autophagy-dependent necroptosis, which bypassed the block in mitochondrial apoptosis. This effect was associated with dissociation of the autophagy inducer beclin-1 from the antiapoptotic BCL-2 family member myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (MCL-1) and with a marked decrease in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity. Consistent with a protective role for mTOR in glucocorticoid resistance in childhood ALL, combination of rapamycin with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone triggered autophagy-dependent cell death, with characteristic features of necroptosis. Execution of cell death, but not induction of autophagy, was strictly dependent on expression of receptor-interacting protein (RIP-1) kinase and cylindromatosis (turban tumor syndrome) (CYLD), two key regulators of necroptosis. Accordingly, both inhibition of RIP-1 and interference with CYLD restored glucocorticoid resistance completely. Together with evidence for a chemosensitizing activity of obatoclax in vivo, our data provide a compelling rationale for clinical translation of this pharmacological approach into treatments for patients with refractory ALL. PMID:20200450

  11. Gonadal function after 12-Gy testicular irradiation in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, L.A.; Craft, A.W.; Kernahan, J.; Evans, R.G.; Aynsley-Green, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Gonadal function was assessed in 15 boys with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who had received testicular irradiation. The dose to the testes was 12 Gy in 12, 15 Gy in 1, and 24 Gy in 2 cases. All of those who had received 12 or 15 Gy had normal Leydig cell function, although high levels of gonadotropins suggest subclinical Leydig cell damage. The 2 who had 24 Gy had Leydig cell failure. All who were old enough to produce a semen specimen were azoospermic.

  12. Clofarabine-based combination chemotherapy for relapse and refractory childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Yuki; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Aoki, Takahiro; Kubota, Yasuo; Oyama, Ryo; Mori, Makiko; Hayashi, Mayumi; Hanada, Ryoji

    2014-11-01

    Clofarabine, one of the key treatment agents for refractory and relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), achieves a remission rate of approximately 30% with single-agent clofarabine induction chemotherapy. However, a remission rate of approximately 50% was reported with a combination chemotherapy regimen consisting of clofarabine, etoposide, and cyclophosphamide. We treated two cases with refractory and relapsed ALL with combination chemotherapy including clofarabine; one was an induction failure but the other achieved remission. Both cases developed an infectious complication (NCI-CTCAE grade 3) and body pain with infusion. Prophylactic antibiotic and opioid infusions facilitated avoiding septic shock and pain. Further investigation of such cases is required. PMID:25501414

  13. Perspectives on the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wiemels, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children but the causes of the disease in the majority of cases are not known. About 80% are precursor-B cell in origin (CD19+, CD10+), and this immunophenotype has increased in incidence over the past several decades in the Western world. Part of this increase may be due to the introduction of new chemical exposures into the child's environment including parental smoking, pesticides, traffic fumes, paint and household chemicals. However, much of the increase in leukemia rates is likely linked to altered patterns of infection during early childhood development, mirroring causal pathways responsible for a similarly increased incidence of other childhood-diagnosed immune-related illnesses including allergy, asthma, and type 1 diabetes. Factors linked to childhood leukemia that are likely surrogates for immune stimulation include exposure to childcare settings, parity status and birth order, vaccination history, and population mixing. In case-control studies, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is consistently inversely associated with greater exposure to infections, via daycare and later birth order. New evidence suggests also that children who contract leukemia may harbor a congenital defect in immune responder status, as indicated by lower levels of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 at birth in children who grow up to contract leukemia, as well as higher need for clinical care for infections within the first year of life despite having lower levels of exposure to infections. One manifestation of this phenomenon may be leukemia clusters which tend to appear as a leukemia “outbreak” among populations with low herd immunity to a new infection. Critical answers to the etiology of childhood leukemia will require incorporating new tools into traditional epidemiologic approaches – including the classification of leukemia at a molecular scale, better exposure assessments at all points in a child's life, a comprehensive

  14. Meningosis prophylaxis with intrathecal /sup 198/Au-colloid and methotrexate in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, O.; Stoll, W.; Plenert, W.

    1982-01-15

    Since 1972, telecobalt irradiation plus intrathecal methotrexate (ITMTX) has been successfully replaced in Jena by intrathecal colloidal radioactive gold (/sup 198/Au) plus ITMTX for meningosis prophylaxis in leukemia. Seventy-three children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) were given 1.24-4.89 mCi (45.8-181 MBq) of colloidal 198Au IT after successful initiation of remission. During cytostatic therapy, the following relapses occurred: meningosis leucaemica, five patients (6.8%); bone-marrow relapse and the meningosis leucaemica, one patient; and bone-marrow relapse, 20 patients (27.4%). In 18 children, combination chemotherapy was terminated after two and a half or three years of treatment. After that time, one meningeal relapse and six bone-marrow relapses occurred. Within the first 24 hours after application of radioactive gold, headaches, vomiting, and fever occurred in less than 10% of the children. An apathy syndrome, leukecephalopathy, or severe infections, were not observed in a single case. Radioactive gold spreads in the subarachnoid space and is phagocytized by the arachnoidea. The tumoricide effect extends selectively over the space of distribution of the latent meningosis leucaemia. The cerebral parenchyma remains unaffected by radiation. Thus, radioactive gold may be preferable to telecobalt irradiation in preventing central nervous system leukemia.

  15. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  17. Busulfan and Etoposide Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Low-Dose Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Effects of Race/Ethnicity and Socioeconomic Status on Outcome in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Sahaja; Hsieh, Samantha; Shinohara, Eric T; DeWees, Todd; Frangoul, Haydar; Perkins, Stephanie M

    2016-07-01

    With modern therapy, overall survival (OS) for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia approaches 90%. However, inferior outcomes for minority children have been reported. Data on the effects of ethnicity/race as it relates to socioeconomic status are limited. Using state cancer registry data from Texas and Florida, we evaluated the impact of neighborhood-level poverty rate and race/ethnicity on OS for 4719 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. On multivariable analysis, patients residing in neighborhoods with the highest poverty rate had a 1.8-fold increase in mortality compared with patients residing in neighborhoods with the lowest poverty rate (hazard ratio [HR], 1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41-2.30). Hispanic and non-Hispanic black patients also had increased risk of mortality compared with non-Hispanic white patients (Hispanic: HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.01-1.39; non-Hispanic black: HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.03-1.66). On subgroup analysis, there was a 21.7% difference in 5-year OS when comparing non-Hispanic white children living in the lowest poverty neighborhoods (5-year OS, 91.2%; 95% CI, 88.6-93.2) to non-Hispanic black children living in the highest poverty neighborhoods (5-year OS, 69.5%; 95% CI, 61.5-76.1). To address such disparities in survival, further work is needed to identify barriers to cancer care in this pediatric population. PMID:27177145

  19. Association between CEBPE Variant and Childhood Acute Leukemia Risk: Evidence from a Meta-Analysis of 22 Studies

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Linjun; Healy, Jasmine; Sinnett, Daniel; Dai, Yue-e

    2015-01-01

    The CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (CEBPs) have been involved in the etiology of acute leukemia (AL) and investigated in numerous genetic association studies, however, the results were inconclusive. The current meta-analysis was conducted to clarify the effect of CEBPE rs2239633 variant on childhood AL risk. Electronic literature search was performed on August 15, 2014, from databases of Medline, PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. A total of 22 case-control studies were eligible for the pooled analysis. The results demonstrated that rs2239633 A allele was significantly associated with a decreased risk of childhood AL (A vs G: OR=0.87, 95%CI = 0.80, 0.94, p<0.001), especially in B-cell ALL subgroup (A vs G: OR = 0.79, 95%CI = 0.74, 0.83, p<0.001), but not among T-cell ALL or AML subgroups. In the stratified analysis by ethnicity, the association was observed in Europeans (A vs G: OR = 0.80, 95%CI = 0.76, 0.84, p<0.001) but not in Asian and mixed populations. Moreover, the results of sensitivity and cumulative meta-analysis indicated the robustness of our results. Also, Begg’s and Egger’s tests did not indicate any evidence of obvious asymmetry. In summary, our study provided evidence that CEBPE rs2239633 variant is associated with decreased risk of childhood B-cell ALL in Europeans. PMID:25938438

  20. Ethnicity and survival in childhood acute myeloid leukemia: a report from the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Aplenc, Richard; Alonzo, Todd A.; Gerbing, Robert B.; Smith, Franklin O.; Meshinchi, Soheil; Ross, Julie A.; Perentesis, John; Woods, William G.; Lange, Beverly J.; Davies, Stella M.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated differences in outcome by ethnicity among children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We analyzed 791 children in the CCG 2891 trial and confirmed positive findings in 850 children in the CCG 2961 trial. Hispanic and black children treated with chemotherapy in CCG 2891 had significantly inferior overall survival (OS) from study entry compared with white children (37%± 9% vs 48%± 4% [P = .016] and 34% ± 10% vs 48% ± 4%, [P = .007], respectively). Significantly fewer black children had related donors. Analyses of CCG 2961 confirmed that black children had significantly decreased OS rates compared with white children (45% ± 12% vs 60% ± 4%; P = .007) The difference in OS rates between Hispanic and white children approached statistical significance (51% ± 8% vs 60% ± 4%; P = .065) Only 7.5% of black children on CCG 2961 had an available family donor. In conclusion, Hispanic and black children with AML have worse survival than white children. Access to chemotherapy, differences in supportive care or leukemia phenotype, and reduced compliance are unlikely explanations for this difference because therapy was given intravenously according to CCG protocols. Fewer black children than expected had an available family marrow donor. (Blood. 2006;108:74-80) PMID:16537811

  1. Obesity is associated with residual leukemia following induction therapy for childhood B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Orgel, Etan; Tucci, Jonathan; Alhushki, Waseem; Malvar, Jemily; Sposto, Richard; Fu, Cecilia H; Freyer, David R; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Mittelman, Steven D

    2014-12-18

    Obesity is associated with poorer event-free survival (EFS) in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Persistent minimal residual disease (MRD) in the bone marrow as measured by multidimensional flow cytometry (MDF) is a key early prognostic indicator and is strongly associated with EFS. We therefore hypothesized that obesity during induction would be associated with positive end-of-induction MRD (≥0.01%). We analyzed MDF of end-induction bone marrow samples from a historical cohort of 198 children newly diagnosed with B-precursor ALL (BP-ALL) and treated with Children's Oncology Group induction regimens. We assessed the influence of body mass index on risk for positive end-induction MRD in the bone marrow. In our cohort of BP-ALL, 30 children (15.2%) were overweight and 41 (20.7%) were obese at diagnosis. Independent of established predictors of treatment response, obesity during induction was associated with significantly greater risk for persistent MRD (odds ratio, 2.57; 95% confidence interval, 1.19 to 5.54; P = .016). Obesity and overweight were associated with poorer EFS irrespective of end-induction MRD (P = .012). Obese children with newly diagnosed BP-ALL are at increased risk for positive end-induction MRD and poorer EFS. PMID:25349177

  2. Confirmation of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Variants, ARID5B and IKZF1, and Interaction with Parental Environmental Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Tiffany-Jane; Milne, Elizabeth; Anderson, Denise; de Klerk, Nicholas H.; Jamieson, Sarra E.; Talseth-Palmer, Bente A.; Bowden, Nikola A.; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Rudant, Jérémie; Orsi, Laurent; Richardson, Ebony; Lavis, Laura; Catchpoole, Daniel; Attia, John R.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Clavel, Jacqueline; Scott, Rodney J.

    2014-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have established association of ARID5B and IKZF1 variants with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Epidemiological studies suggest that environmental factors alone appear to make a relatively minor contribution to disease risk. The polygenic nature of childhood ALL predisposition together with the timing of environmental triggers may hold vital clues for disease etiology. This study presents results from an Australian GWAS of childhood ALL cases (n = 358) and population controls (n = 1192). Furthermore, we utilised family trio (n = 204) genotypes to extend our investigation to gene-environment interaction of significant loci with parental exposures before conception, and child’s sex and age. Thirteen SNPs achieved genome wide significance in the population based case/control analysis; ten annotated to ARID5B and three to IKZF1. The most significant SNPs in these regions were ARID5B rs4245595 (OR 1.63, CI 1.38–1.93, P = 2.13×10−9), and IKZF1 rs1110701 (OR 1.69, CI 1.42–2.02, p = 7.26×10−9). There was evidence of gene-environment interaction for risk genotype at IKZF1, whereby an apparently stronger genetic effect was observed if the mother took folic acid or if the father did not smoke prior to pregnancy (respective interaction P-values: 0.04, 0.05). There were no interactions of risk genotypes with age or sex (P-values >0.2). Our results evidence that interaction of genetic variants and environmental exposures may further alter risk of childhood ALL however, investigation in a larger population is required. If interaction of folic acid supplementation and IKZF1 variants holds, it may be useful to quantify folate levels prior to initiating use of folic acid supplements. PMID:25310577

  3. Risk-Adapted Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Standard-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Localized B-Lineage Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-18

    Adult B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Childhood B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Down Syndrome; Stage I B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) activity in leukemia blasts correlates with poor outcome in childhood acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Folgiero, Valentina; Goffredo, Bianca M; Filippini, Perla; Masetti, Riccardo; Bonanno, Giuseppina; Caruso, Roberta; Bertaina, Valentina; Mastronuzzi, Angela; Gaspari, Stefania; Zecca, Marco; Torelli, Giovanni F; Testi, Anna M; Pession, Andrea; Locatelli, Franco; Rutella, Sergio

    2014-04-30

    Microenvironmental factors contribute to the immune dysfunction characterizing acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) is an interferon (IFN)-γ-inducible enzyme that degrades tryptophan into kynurenine, which, in turn, inhibits effector T cells and promotes regulatory T-cell (Treg) differentiation. It is presently unknown whether childhood AML cells express IDO1 and whether IDO1 activity correlates with patient outcome. We investigated IDO1 expression and function in 37 children with newly diagnosed AML other than acute promyelocytic leukemia. Blast cells were cultured with exogenous IFN-γ for 24 hours, followed by the measurement of kynurenine production and tryptophan consumption. No constitutive expression of IDO1 protein was detected in blast cells from the 37 AML samples herein tested. Conversely, 19 out of 37 (51%) AML samples up-regulated functional IDO1 protein in response to IFN-γ. The inability to express IDO1 by the remaining 18 AML samples was not apparently due to a defective IFN-γ signaling circuitry, as suggested by the measurement of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation. Co-immunoprecipitation assays indicated the occurrence of physical interactions between STAT3 and IDO1 in AML blasts. In line with this finding, STAT3 inhibitors abrogated IDO1 function in AML blasts. Interestingly, levels of IFN-γ were significantly higher in the bone marrow fluid of IDO-expressing compared with IDO-nonexpressing AMLs. In mixed tumor lymphocyte cultures (MTLC), IDO-expressing AML blasts blunted the ability of allogeneic naïve T cells to produce IFN-γ and promoted Treg differentiation. From a clinical perspective, the 8-year event-free survival was significantly worse in IDO-expressing children (16.4%, SE 9.8) as compared with IDO-nonexpressing ones (48.0%, SE 12.1; p=0.035). These data indicate that IDO1 expression by leukemia blasts negatively affects the prognosis of childhood AML. Moreover

  5. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Rituximab in Treating Younger Patients With Stage III-IV Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or B-Cell Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-20

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma

  6. CCND1 G870A polymorphism is associated with toxicity of methotrexate in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yao; Rong, Liucheng; Tong, Na; Wang, Meilin; Zhang, Zhengdong; Fang, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    CCND1 plays a key role in cell cycle progression and may cause methotrexate (MTX) resistance, as well as its cytotoxicity. CCND1 870A variant allele is associated with altered transcripts of this gene. We hypothesized that this polymorphism may contribute to the elimination rate and hepatotoxicity of MTX in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We genotyped the CCND1 G870A polymorphism in 125 childhood ALL patients treated with HDMTX. We found no notable associations between G870A polymorphism and the risk of delayed MTX elimination. However, this polymorphism was significantly associated with an increased risk of MTX hepatotoxicity [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 4.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.35-14.63 for AG versus GG and adjusted OR = 6.39, 95% CI = 1.82-22.43 for AA versus GG]. Our results indicated that the CCND1 G870A polymorphism may be involved in the hepatotoxicity of MTX and act as a biological marker. PMID:26617896

  7. Neurocognitive Outcomes in Long-term Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treated on Contemporary Treatment Protocols: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Yin Ting; Krull, Kevin R.

    2015-01-01

    The intensified administration of chemotherapeutic drugs has gradually replaced cranial radiation therapy (CRT) for the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). While CRT is often implicated in neurocognitive impairment in ALL survivors, there is a paucity of literature that evaluates the persistence of neurocognitive deficits in long-term survivors of pediatric ALL who were treated with contemporary chemotherapy-only protocols. Results from this systematic review concurred to the probable cognitive-sparing effect of chemotherapy-based protocols over CRT in long-term survivors. However, coupled with multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors, survivors who received chemotherapy treatment still suffered from apparent cognitive impairment, particularly in the attention and executive function domains. Notably, there is evidence to suggest that the late neurotoxic effect of methotrexate on survivors’ neurocognitive performance may be dose-related. This review also recommends future pharmacokinetic, neuroimaging and genetic studies to illuminate the multifactorial nature of this subject matter and discusses the potential value of neurochemical, physiological, inflammatory and genetic markers for the prediction of susceptibility to neurocognitive impairment in long-term survivors of childhood ALL. PMID:25857254

  8. Developmental Outcome of Childhood Leukemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coniglio, Susan J.; Blackman, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Literature on developmental and psychosocial outcomes of childhood leukemia is reviewed, focusing on preschool-age children. Studies are categorized in terms of outcome measures: intelligence/achievement, neuropsychological, memory/attention, and psychosocial tests. Evidence suggests that preschool children with leukemia are at high risk for…

  9. Dasatinib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Did Not Respond to Imatinib Mesylate

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  10. Reentry of nondividing leukemic cells into a proliferative phase in acute childhood leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, E. F.; Mauer, A. M.

    1969-01-01

    Reentry of small leukemic blast cells into a proliferative phase was demonstrated in a 3 yr old girl with untreated acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Since the proliferating leukemic cell compartment in this disease is not self-maintaining, continual entry of cells into this compartment is necessary to prevent depletion of proliferating cells. In order to identify the source of replacement cells, the rate of change of tritiated thymidine-labeled cells in the proliferating compartment was observed by means of serial bone marrow samples under two conditions. In the first study period only 10% of small leukemic blast cells were labeled, and in the second study period 72% of this population had become lebeled. During the first period the proliferating blast cells were rapidly replaced by unlabeled cells, while during the second period the replacement cells were coming largely from a labeled cell source. The only identifiable source of cells for maintenance of the proliferating population which was virtually unlabeled during the first period and largely labeled during the second period was the population of small leukemic blast cells. The finding that the small blast cells are only temporarily nonproliferative could account for effectiveness of therapy directed primarily against a dividing cell population. Persistence of some cells with longer resting times into remission could provide a focus for subsequent relapse. PMID:5256065

  11. Increased Body Mass Index during Therapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Significant and Underestimated Complication.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Helen C; Marsh, Julie A; Rath, Shoshana R; Kotecha, Rishi S; Gough, Hazel; Taylor, Mandy; Walwyn, Thomas; Gottardo, Nicholas G; Cole, Catherine H; Choong, Catherine S

    2015-01-01

    Objective & Design. We undertook a retrospective review of children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and treated with modern COG protocols (n = 80) to determine longitudinal changes in body mass index (BMI) and the prevalence of obesity compared with a healthy reference population. Results. At diagnosis, the majority of patients (77.5%) were in the healthy weight category. During treatment, increases in BMI z-scores were greater for females than males; the prevalence of obesity increased from 10.3% to 44.8% (P < 0.004) for females but remained relatively unchanged for males (9.8% to 13.7%, P = 0.7). Longitudinal analysis using linear mixed-effects identified associations between BMI z-scores and time-dependent interactions with sex (P = 0.0005), disease risk (P < 0.0001), age (P = 0.0001), and BMI z-score (P < 0.0001) at diagnosis and total dose of steroid during maintenance (P = 0.01). Predicted mean BMI z-scores at the end of therapy were greater for females with standard risk ALL irrespective of age at diagnosis and for males younger than 4 years of age at diagnosis with standard risk ALL. Conclusion. Females treated on standard risk protocols and younger males may be at greatest risk of becoming obese during treatment for ALL. These subgroups may benefit from intervention strategies to manage BMI during treatment for ALL. PMID:26101530

  12. Feasibility and Initial Effectiveness of Home Exercise During Maintenance Therapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Esbenshade, Adam J.; Friedman, Debra L.; Smith, Webb A.; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Robison, Leslie L.; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk of obesity and deconditioning from cancer therapy. This pilot study assessed feasibility/initial efficacy of an exercise intervention for ALL patients undergoing maintenance therapy. Methods Participants were children with ALL, age 5-10 years, receiving maintenance therapy, in first remission. A 6-month home-based intervention, with written and video instruction, was supervised with weekly calls from an exercise coach. Pre- and post-study testing evaluated strength, flexibility, fitness and motor function. Results Seventeen patients enrolled (participation 63%). Twelve (71%) finished the intervention, completing 81.7±7.2% of prescribed sessions. Improvements ≥5% occurred in 67% for knee and 75% for grip strength, 58% for hamstring/low-back and 83% for ankle flexibility, 75% for the 6-minute-walk-test, and 33% for performance on the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency Version 2. Conclusions This pilot study demonstrated that exercise intervention during ALL therapy is feasible and has promise for efficacy. PMID:24979081

  13. Glucocorticoid-induced alterations in mitochondrial membrane properties and respiration in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Karin; Rainer, Johannes; Bindreither, Daniel; Ritter, Ireen; Gnaiger, Erich; Kofler, Reinhard; Oefner, Peter J; Renner, Kathrin

    2011-06-01

    Mitochondria are signal-integrating organelles involved in cell death induction. Mitochondrial alterations and reduction in energy metabolism have been previously reported in the context of glucocorticoid (GC)-triggered apoptosis, although the mechanism is not yet clarified. We analyzed mitochondrial function in a GC-sensitive precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) model as well as in GC-sensitive and GC-resistant T-ALL model systems. Respiratory activity was preserved in intact GC-sensitive cells up to 24h under treatment with 100 nM dexamethasone before depression of mitochondrial respiration occurred. Severe repression of mitochondrial respiratory function was observed after permeabilization of the cell membrane and provision of exogenous substrates. Several mitochondrial metabolite and protein transporters and two subunits of the ATP synthase were downregulated in the T-ALL and in the precursor B-ALL model at the gene expression level under dexamethasone treatment. These data could partly be confirmed in ALL lymphoblasts from patients, dependent on the molecular abnormality in the ALL cells. GC-resistant cell lines did not show any of these defects after dexamethasone treatment. In conclusion, in GC-sensitive ALL cells, dexamethasone induces changes in membrane properties that together with the reduced expression of mitochondrial transporters of substrates and proteins may lead to repressed mitochondrial respiratory activity and lower ATP levels that contribute to GC-induced apoptosis. PMID:21237131

  14. Psychological Impact of Chemotherapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on Patients and Their Parents.

    PubMed

    Sherief, Laila M; Kamal, Naglaa M; Abdalrahman, Hadel M; Youssef, Doaa M; Abd Alhady, Mohamed A; Ali, Adel S A; Abd Elbasset, Maha Aly; Hashim, Hiatham M

    2015-12-01

    To assess the self-esteem of pediatric patients on chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and psychological status of their parents.The psychological status of 178 children receiving chemotherapy for ALL and their parents was assessed using parenting stress index (PSI) to determine the degree of stress the parents are exposed to using parent's and child's domains. Self-esteem Scale was used to determine the psychological status of patients.The study revealed significant low level of self-esteem in 84.83% of patients. Their parents had significant psychological stress. PSI was significantly associated with parents' low sense of competence, negative attachment to their children, feeling of high restriction, high depression, poor relation to spouse, high social isolation variables of parent's domains. It was significantly associated with low distraction, negative parents' reinforcement, low acceptability, and high demanding variables of child's domains. Long duration of disease was the most detrimental factor among demographic data of the patients.Chemotherapy for ALL has a significant impact on the psychological status of both patients and their parents with high prevalence of low self-esteem in children and high degree of stress in their parents. PMID:26705211

  15. Psychological Impact of Chemotherapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on Patients and Their Parents

    PubMed Central

    Sherief, Laila M.; Kamal, Naglaa M.; Abdalrahman, Hadel M.; Youssef, Doaa M.; Alhady, Mohamed A Abd; Ali, Adel SA; Elbasset, Maha Aly Abd; Hashim, Hiatham M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To assess the self-esteem of pediatric patients on chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and psychological status of their parents. The psychological status of 178 children receiving chemotherapy for ALL and their parents was assessed using parenting stress index (PSI) to determine the degree of stress the parents are exposed to using parent's and child's domains. Self-esteem Scale was used to determine the psychological status of patients. The study revealed significant low level of self-esteem in 84.83% of patients. Their parents had significant psychological stress. PSI was significantly associated with parents’ low sense of competence, negative attachment to their children, feeling of high restriction, high depression, poor relation to spouse, high social isolation variables of parent's domains. It was significantly associated with low distraction, negative parents’ reinforcement, low acceptability, and high demanding variables of child's domains. Long duration of disease was the most detrimental factor among demographic data of the patients. Chemotherapy for ALL has a significant impact on the psychological status of both patients and their parents with high prevalence of low self-esteem in children and high degree of stress in their parents. PMID:26705211

  16. Neurocognitive Outcomes Decades After Treatment for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Report From the St Jude Lifetime Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Krull, Kevin R.; Brinkman, Tara M.; Li, Chenghong; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Ness, Kirsten K.; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Gurney, James G.; Kimberg, Cara; Krasin, Matthew J.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Robison, Leslie L.; Hudson, Melissa M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine rates, patterns, and predictors of neurocognitive impairment in adults decades after treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients and Methods Survivors of childhood ALL treated at St Jude Children's Research Hospital who were still alive at 10 or more years after diagnosis and were age ≥ 18 years were recruited for neurocognitive testing. In all, 1,014 survivors were eligible, 738 (72.8%) agreed to participate, and 567 (76.8%) of these were evaluated. Mean age was 33 years; mean time since diagnosis was 26 years. Medical record abstraction was performed for data on doses of cranial radiation therapy (CRT) and cumulative chemotherapy. Multivariable modeling was conducted and glmulti package was used to select the best model with minimum Akaike information criterion. Results Impairment rates across neurocognitive domains ranged from 28.6% to 58.9%, and those treated with chemotherapy only demonstrated increased impairment in all domains (all P values < .006). In survivors who received no CRT, dexamethasone was associated with impaired attention (relative risk [RR], 2.12; 95% CI, 1.11 to 4.03) and executive function (RR, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.20 to 4.91). The impact of CRT was dependent on young age at diagnosis for intelligence, academic, and memory functions. Risk for executive function problems increased with survival time in a CRT dose-dependent fashion. In all survivors, self-reported behavior problems increased by 5% (RR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.09) with each year from diagnosis. Impairment was associated with reduced educational attainment and unemployment. Conclusion This study demonstrates persistent and significant neurocognitive impairment in adult survivors of childhood ALL and warrants ongoing monitoring of brain health to facilitate successful adult development and to detect early onset of decline as survivors mature. PMID:24190124

  17. Targeted Therapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-28

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Signs and Symptoms of Childhood Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... early? Next Topic How is childhood leukemia diagnosed? Signs and symptoms of childhood leukemia Many of the ... blood cells do. Fever is often the main sign of infection. But some children might have a ...

  19. Epigenetic landscape correlates with genetic subtype but does not predict outcome in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Alem S; Lafta, Fadhel M; Schwalbe, Edward C; Nakjang, Sirintra; Cockell, Simon J; Iliasova, Alice; Enshaei, Amir; Schwab, Claire; Rand, Vikki; Clifford, Steven C; Kinsey, Sally E; Mitchell, Chris D; Vora, Ajay; Harrison, Christine J; Moorman, Anthony V; Strathdee, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Although children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) generally have a good outcome, some patients do relapse and survival following relapse is poor. Altered DNA methylation is highly prevalent in ALL and raises the possibility that DNA methylation-based biomarkers could predict patient outcome. In this study, genome-wide methylation analysis, using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip platform, was carried out on 52 diagnostic patient samples from 4 genetic subtypes [ETV6-RUNX1, high hyperdiploidy (HeH), TCF3-PBX1 and dic(9;20)(p11-13;q11)] in a 1:1 case-control design with patients who went on to relapse (as cases) and patients achieving long-term remission (as controls). Pyrosequencing assays for selected loci were used to confirm the array-generated data. Non-negative matrix factorization consensus clustering readily clustered samples according to genetic subgroups and gene enrichment pathway analysis suggested that this is in part driven by epigenetic disruption of subtype specific signaling pathways. Multiple bioinformatics approaches (including bump hunting and individual locus analysis) were used to identify CpG sites or regions associated with outcome. However, no associations with relapse were identified. Our data revealed that ETV6-RUNX1 and dic(9;20) subtypes were mostly associated with hypermethylation; conversely, TCF3-PBX1 and HeH were associated with hypomethylation. We observed significant enrichment of the neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction pathway in TCF3-PBX1 as well as an enrichment of genes involved in immunity and infection pathways in ETV6-RUNX1 subtype. Taken together, our results suggest that altered DNA methylation may have differential impacts in distinct ALL genetic subtypes. PMID:26237075

  20. [Phenomenon of the evolution of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in childhood acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Andreeva, S V; Drozdova, V D; Kavardakova, N V

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of chromosomal abnormalities in bone marrow cells in 116 children with diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was performed. Frequency of evolution of clonal chromosome abnormalities in AML constituted 42,3%. The most abundant among them were numerical abnormalities of chromosomes 8, 9, and 21 as well as secondary structural abnormalities in region 12p12, 9p22, 9q22, 9q34, 11q14-23, and 16q22. Numerical abnormalities were registered in 26,7% cases. The basic mechanism of leukemic clone evolution was trisomy, deletion and monosomy. The frequency of evolution was 7 times higher in the age group up to 2 years and twice higher in the age group up to 5 years. The high frequency of evolution was established at t(15;17)(q22;q22) and the absence at inv(16)(p13q22). The patients with clonal evolution died earlier, before reaching remission, that can be connected with heavy initial state and high frequency of relapse. Conception of abnormality clone evolution was proposed at some stages: I--appearance of balanced rearrangement; II--trisomy; III--lose of chromosomal material. Appearance of unbalanced genome in evolution possess an advantage in proliferate activity and can be connected with the answer on chemotherapy. Identity of abnormal chromosome structure at diagnosis and relapse of disease can be an evidence of the influence of chemical agent on establishment of some types of evolution of chromosome abnormalities in leukemic cells in AML in children. PMID:20608159

  1. Altered erythrocyte membrane characteristics during anemia in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shyamasree; Bandyopadhyay, Suman; Bhattacharya, Dilip K; Mandal, Chitra

    2005-02-01

    Anemia is a prominent feature in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). To investigate the erythrocyte features during anemia in these patients, we studied the altered characters of these cells and oxidative stress imposed in their serum. This investigation reveals that erythrocytes from ALL patients show (1) increased membrane fluidity detected by fluorescence anisotropy studies, increased osmotic fragility detected by hemolysis of erythrocytes in different saline concentrations, and increased hydrophobicity as measured by binding with 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid, (2) enhanced (approximately threefold) glycosylation and sialylation, monitored by digoxigenin enzyme assay, and (3) expression of disease-specific 210, 105, 83, 54, and 28 kDa 9-O-acetyl sialoglycoconjugates (9-O-AcSGs) demonstrated by Western blot analysis and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis studies using Achatinin-H with specificity towards 9-O-AcSAalpha2-6GalNAc as the analytical probe. (4) In addition, induced oxidative stress was observed in the sera of these children as indicated by increased nitric oxide (approximately fourfold) and thiobarbituric acid (TBA) reactive species (twofold) as detected by Griess reaction and TBA assay, respectively. For all the experiments, erythrocytes from normal individuals served as controls. Thus, the altered membrane characteristics together with their exposure to induced oxidative stress in serum are found to be a few features restricted to diseased erythrocytes. Taken together, our results are suggestive of their interplay in the contribution to the observed anemia in these patients, which may be exploited for better management of the disease. PMID:15338196

  2. Mercaptopurine/Methotrexate maintenance therapy of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: clinical facts and fiction.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Nielsen, Stine N; Frandsen, Thomas L; Nersting, Jacob

    2014-10-01

    The antileukemic mechanisms of 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) and methotrexate (MTX) maintenance therapy are poorly understood, but the benefits of several years of myelosuppressive maintenance therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia are well proven. Currently, there is no international consensus on drug dosing. Because of significant interindividual and intraindividual variations in drug disposition and pharmacodynamics, vigorous dose adjustments are needed to obtain a target degree of myelosuppression. As the normal white blood cell counts vary by patients' ages and ethnicity, and also within age groups, identical white blood cell levels for 2 patients may not reflect the same treatment intensity. Measurements of intracellular levels of cytotoxic metabolites of 6MP and MTX can identify nonadherent patients, but therapeutic target levels remains to be established. A rise in serum aminotransferase levels during maintenance therapy is common and often related to high levels of methylated 6MP metabolites. However, except for episodes of hypoglycemia, serious liver dysfunction is rare, the risk of permanent liver damage is low, and aminotransferase levels usually normalize within a few weeks after discontinuation of therapy. 6MP and MTX dose increments should lead to either leukopenia or a rise in aminotransferases, and if neither is experienced, poor treatment adherence should be considered. The many genetic polymorphisms that determine 6MP and MTX disposition, efficacy, and toxicity have precluded implementation of pharmacogenomics into treatment, the sole exception being dramatic 6MP dose reductions in patients who are homozygous deficient for thiopurine methyltransferase, the enzyme that methylates 6MP and several of its metabolites. In conclusion, maintenance therapy is as important as the more intensive and toxic earlier treatment phases, and often more challenging. Ongoing research address the applicability of drug metabolite measurements for dose adjustments

  3. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Stage II-IV T-Cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... key statistics about acute lymphocytic leukemia? What is acute lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... leukemias). The rest of this document focuses on acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in adults. For information on ALL in ...

  5. KRAS and CREBBP mutations: a relapse-linked malicious liaison in childhood high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Malinowska-Ozdowy, K; Frech, C; Schönegger, A; Eckert, C; Cazzaniga, G; Stanulla, M; zur Stadt, U; Mecklenbräuker, A; Schuster, M; Kneidinger, D; von Stackelberg, A; Locatelli, F; Schrappe, M; Horstmann, M A; Attarbaschi, A; Bock, C; Mann, G; Haas, O A; Panzer-Grümayer, R

    2015-08-01

    High hyperdiploidy defines the largest genetic entity of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Despite its relatively low recurrence risk, this subgroup generates a high proportion of relapses. The cause and origin of these relapses remains obscure. We therefore explored the mutational landscape in high hyperdiploid (HD) ALL with whole-exome (n=19) and subsequent targeted deep sequencing of 60 genes in 100 relapsing and 51 non-relapsing cases. We identified multiple clones at diagnosis that were primarily defined by a variety of mutations in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)/Ras pathway and chromatin-modifying genes. The relapse clones consisted of reappearing as well as new mutations, and overall contained more mutations. Although RTK/Ras pathway mutations were similarly frequent between diagnosis and relapse, both intergenic and intragenic heterogeneity was essentially lost at relapse. CREBBP mutations, however, increased from initially 18-30% at relapse, then commonly co-occurred with KRAS mutations (P<0.001) and these relapses appeared primarily early (P=0.012). Our results confirm the exceptional susceptibility of HD ALL to RTK/Ras pathway and CREBBP mutations, but, more importantly, suggest that mutant KRAS and CREBBP might cooperate and equip cells with the necessary capacity to evolve into a relapse-generating clone. PMID:25917266

  6. Health and Risk Behaviors in Survivors of Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Report From the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Kris Ann P.; Chen, Lu; Chen, Zhengjia; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.; Nicholson, H. Stacy; Neglia, Joseph P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Survivors of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) face increased risks of chronic disease and secondary malignancies. Substance exposure may compound these risks. Procedures Participants were diagnosed with AML at <21 years of age and survived ≥5 years following diagnosis. All underwent chemotherapy alone or followed by autologous BMT (chemo ± autoBMT) or underwent allogeneic BMT (alloBMT) if an HLA-matched related donor was available. Survivors completed a health questionnaire and a Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS). Results Of eligible survivors, 117 were ≥18 years of age and completed a YRBS. Survivors were a mean age of 10 years at diagnosis and 24 years at interview. Of the substance exposures assessed by YRBS, tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana were most common. Twenty-two percent (22%) had smoked cigarettes in the last 30 days. One-quarter (25%) reported binge drinking in the last month. None of these exposures varied by treatment group. Less than 10% of survivors reported cocaine, heroin, or methamphetamine use. Men were more likely to report high substance exposure (P = 0.004). Sadness/suicidality score was associated with cancer-related anxiety (P = 0.006) and multiple health conditions (P = 0.006). Conclusions This analysis reveals exposure to tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana in young adults with few differences based on treatment received. Survivors with cancer-related anxiety or multiple health conditions were more likely to report sadness/hopelessness. PMID:20232426

  7. KRAS and CREBBP mutations: a relapse-linked malicious liaison in childhood high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Malinowska-Ozdowy, K; Frech, C; Schönegger, A; Eckert, C; Cazzaniga, G; Stanulla, M; zur Stadt, U; Mecklenbräuker, A; Schuster, M; Kneidinger, D; von Stackelberg, A; Locatelli, F; Schrappe, M; Horstmann, M A; Attarbaschi, A; Bock, C; Mann, G; Haas, O A; Panzer-Grümayer, R

    2015-01-01

    High hyperdiploidy defines the largest genetic entity of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Despite its relatively low recurrence risk, this subgroup generates a high proportion of relapses. The cause and origin of these relapses remains obscure. We therefore explored the mutational landscape in high hyperdiploid (HD) ALL with whole-exome (n=19) and subsequent targeted deep sequencing of 60 genes in 100 relapsing and 51 non-relapsing cases. We identified multiple clones at diagnosis that were primarily defined by a variety of mutations in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)/Ras pathway and chromatin-modifying genes. The relapse clones consisted of reappearing as well as new mutations, and overall contained more mutations. Although RTK/Ras pathway mutations were similarly frequent between diagnosis and relapse, both intergenic and intragenic heterogeneity was essentially lost at relapse. CREBBP mutations, however, increased from initially 18–30% at relapse, then commonly co-occurred with KRAS mutations (P<0.001) and these relapses appeared primarily early (P=0.012). Our results confirm the exceptional susceptibility of HD ALL to RTK/Ras pathway and CREBBP mutations, but, more importantly, suggest that mutant KRAS and CREBBP might cooperate and equip cells with the necessary capacity to evolve into a relapse-generating clone. PMID:25917266

  8. Inherited GATA3 variants are associated with Ph-like childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and risk of relapse

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Andreu, Virginia; Roberts, Kathryn G.; Harvey, Richard C.; Yang, Wenjian; Cheng, Cheng; Pei, Deqing; Xu, Heng; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Shuyu, E; Yew-Suang Lim, Joshua; Chen, I-Ming; Fan, Yiping; Devidsa, Meenakshi; Borowitz, Michael J.; Smith, Colton; Neale, Geoffrey; Burchard, Esteban G.; Torgerson, Dara G.; Klussmann, Federico Antillon; Villagran, Cesar Rolando Najera; Winick, Naomi J.; Camitta, Bruce M.; Raetz, Elizabeth; Wood, Brent; Yue, Feng; Carroll, William L.; Larsen, Eric; Bowman, W. Paul; Loh, Mignon L.; Dean, Michael; Bhojwani, Deepa; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Yang, Jun J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent genomic profiling of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) identified a novel high-risk subtype with a gene expression signature resembling Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL and a poor prognosis (Ph-like ALL). However, the role of inherited genetic variation in Ph-like ALL pathogenesis remains unknown. In a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 511 ALL cases and 6,661 non-ALL controls, we identified a single susceptibility locus for Ph-like ALL (GATA3, rs3824662, P=2.17×10−14, odds ratio [OR]=3.85, for Ph-like ALL vs. non-ALL; P=1.05×10−8, OR=3.25, for Ph-like ALL vs. non-Ph-like ALL) that was independently validated. The rs3824662 risk allele was associated with somatic lesions underlying Ph-like ALL (i.e., CRLF2 rearrangement, JAK mutation, and IKZF1 deletion) and directly influenced GATA3 transcription. Finally, GATA3 SNP genotype was also associated with early treatment response and the risk of ALL relapse. Our results provide insights into interactions between host and tumor genomes and their importance in ALL pathogenesis and prognosis. PMID:24141364

  9. Is there an increased risk of metabolic syndrome among childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia survivors? A developing country experience.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Sonali; Bansal, Deepak; Bhalla, A K; Verma Attri, Savita; Sachdeva, Naresh; Trehan, Amita; Marwaha, R K

    2016-03-01

    Data on metabolic syndrome (MS) in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) from developing countries are lacking. The purpose of this single-center, uncontrolled, observational study was to assess the frequency of MS in our survivors. The survivors of ALL ≤15 years at diagnosis, who had completed therapy ≥2 years earlier, were enrolled. Anthropometric measurements (weight, height, waist circumference), biochemistry (glucose, insulin, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein [HDL], thyroid function tests, C-reactive protein [CRP], magnesium), measurement of blood pressure, and Tanner staging were performed. MS was defined by International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the National Cholesterol Education Program Third Adult Treatment Panel guidelines (NCEP ATP III) criteria, modified by Cook et al. (Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2003;157:821-827) and Ford et al. (Diabetes Care. 2005;28:878-881). The median age of 76 survivors was 11.9 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 9.6-13.5). Twenty-four (32%) survivors were obese or overweight. The prevalence of insulin resistance (17%), hypertension (7%), hypertriglyceridemia (20%), and low HDL (37%) was comparable to the prevalence in children/adolescents in historical population-based studies from India. The prevalence of MS ranged from 1.3% to 5.2%, as per different defining criteria. Cranial radiotherapy, age at diagnosis, sex, or socioeconomic status were not risk factors for MS. The prevalence of MS in survivors of childhood ALL, at a median duration of 3 years from completion of chemotherapy, was comparable to the reference population. The prevalence of being obese or overweight was, however, greater than historical controls. PMID:26984439

  10. Tretinoin and Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Myeloid Neoplasm

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    BADR, MOHAMED AHMED; HASSAN, TAMER HASAN; EL-GERBY, KHALED MOHAMED; LAMEY, MOHAMED EL-SAYED

    2013-01-01

    The issue of delayed neurological damage as a result of treatment is becoming increasingly important now that an increased number of children survive treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Following modification of the treatment protocols, severe symptomatic late effects are rare, and most adverse effects are detected by sensitive imaging methods such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or by neuropsychological testing. In this study we aimed to determine the prevalence and characteristics of late central nervous system (CNS) damage by MRI and clinical examination in children treated for ALL. A cross-sectional study was carried out at the pediatric oncology unit of Zagazig University, Egypt, and included 25 patients who were consecutively enrolled and treated according to the modified Children’s Cancer Group (CCG) 1991 protocol for standard risk ALL and the modified CCG 1961 protocol for high-risk ALL and who had survived more than 5 years from the diagnosis. All relevant data were collected from patients’ medical records; particularly the data concerning the initial clinical presentation and initial brain imaging. All patients were subjected to thorough history and full physical examination with special emphasis on the neurological system. MRI of the brain was performed for all patients. The mean age of patients was 6.9±3.04 years at diagnosis and was 12.9±3.2 years at the time of study. The patients comprised 14 boys and 11 girls. Abnormal MRI findings were detected in six patients (24%). They were in the form of leukoencephalopathy in two patients (8%), brain atrophy in two patients (8%), old infarct in one patient (4%) and old hemorrhage in one patient (4%). The number of abnormal MRI findings was significantly higher in high-risk patients, patients who had CNS manifestations at diagnosis and patients who had received cranial irradiation. We concluded that cranial irradiation is associated with higher incidence of MRI changes in children

  12. Heterogeneous cytogenetic subgroups and outcomes in childhood acute megakaryoblastic leukemia: a retrospective international study.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Hiroto; Zhou, Yinmei; Abla, Oussama; Adachi, Souichi; Auvrignon, Anne; Beverloo, H Berna; de Bont, Eveline; Chang, Tai-Tsung; Creutzig, Ursula; Dworzak, Michael; Elitzur, Sarah; Fynn, Alcira; Forestier, Erik; Hasle, Henrik; Liang, Der-Cherng; Lee, Vincent; Locatelli, Franco; Masetti, Riccardo; De Moerloose, Barbara; Reinhardt, Dirk; Rodriguez, Laura; Van Roy, Nadine; Shen, Shuhong; Taga, Takashi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Yeoh, Allen E J; Zimmermann, Martin; Raimondi, Susana C

    2015-09-24

    Comprehensive clinical studies of patients with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) are lacking. We performed an international retrospective study on 490 patients (age ≤18 years) with non-Down syndrome de novo AMKL diagnosed from 1989 to 2009. Patients with AMKL (median age 1.53 years) comprised 7.8% of pediatric AML. Five-year event-free (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 43.7% ± 2.7% and 49.0% ± 2.7%, respectively. Patients diagnosed in 2000 to 2009 were treated with higher cytarabine doses and had better EFS (P = .037) and OS (P = .003) than those diagnosed in 1989 to 1999. Transplantation in first remission did not improve survival. Cytogenetic data were available for 372 (75.9%) patients: hypodiploid (n = 18, 4.8%), normal karyotype (n = 49, 13.2%), pseudodiploid (n = 119, 32.0%), 47 to 50 chromosomes (n = 142, 38.2%), and >50 chromosomes (n = 44, 11.8%). Chromosome gain occurred in 195 of 372 (52.4%) patients: +21 (n = 106, 28.5%), +19 (n = 93, 25.0%), +8 (n = 77, 20.7%). Losses occurred in 65 patients (17.5%): -7 (n = 13, 3.5%). Common structural chromosomal aberrations were t(1;22)(p13;q13) (n = 51, 13.7%) and 11q23 rearrangements (n = 38, 10.2%); t(9;11)(p22;q23) occurred in 21 patients. On the basis of frequency and prognosis, AMKL can be classified to 3 risk groups: good risk-7p abnormalities; poor risk-normal karyotypes, -7, 9p abnormalities including t(9;11)(p22;q23)/MLL-MLLT3, -13/13q-, and -15; and intermediate risk-others including t(1;22)(p13;q13)/OTT-MAL (RBM15-MKL1) and 11q23/MLL except t(9;11). Risk-based innovative therapy is needed to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26215111

  13. Early childhood leukemia incidence trends in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Reis, Rejane de Souza; Santos, Marceli de Oliveira; de Camargo, Beatriz; Oliveira, Julio Fernando Pinto; Thuler, Luiz Claudio Santos; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S

    2016-03-01

    Incidence rates of childhood leukemia vary between different regions of the world. The objective of this study was to test possible trends in incidence rate of early childhood leukemia (children <5 years old at the diagnosis) in Brazil. Data from 18 population-based cancer registries (PBCRs) were analyzed (period 1999-2010). The analysis consisted of frequencies, age-adjusted incidence rates, and joinpoint regression results, including annual average percent change (AAPC) in incidence rates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The median age-adjusted incidence rate (AAIR) of overall early childhood leukemia was 61 per million. The AAIR for acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) was 44 per million and nonlymphoid acute leukemia (NLAL) was 14 per million. The median ALL/NLAL ratio was 3.0, suggesting higher incidence rate of NLAL in these settings. The joinpoint analysis demonstrated increased leukemia incidence rate in João Pessoa (AAPC = 20; 95% CI: 3.5, 39.4) and Salvador (AAPC = 8.68; 95% CI: 1.0, 16.9), respectively, whereas incidence rate in São Paulo PBCR decreased (AAPC = -4.02%; 95% CI: -6.1%, -1.9%). Correlation between ALL AAIR and selected variables of socioeconomic (SES) factors was not observed. Increased AAIR regionally overtime was observed. However, the interpretation for such phenomenon should be cautious because it might reflect the access to health care, diagnosis procedures, and improvement of PBCR´s quality. The observed trend supports the necessity of further ecological studies. PMID:26925506

  14. Comparative study of quality of life of adult survivors of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia and Wilms’ tumor

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Clélia Marta Casellato; Cristofani, Lilian Maria; Cornacchioni, Ana Lucia Beltrati; Odone, Vicente; Kuczynski, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To analyze and compare the health-related quality of life of adult survivors of acute lymphocytic leukemia and Wilms’ tumor amongst themselves and in relation to healthy participants. Methods Ninety participants aged above 18 years were selected and divided into three groups, each comprising 30 individuals. The Control Group was composed of physically healthy subjects, with no cancer history; and there were two experimental groups: those diagnosed as acute lymphocytic leukemia, and those as Wilms’ Tumor. Quality of life was assessed over the telephone, using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey. Results Male survivors presented with better results as compared to female survivors and controls in the Vitality domain, for acute lymphocytic leukemia (p=0.042) and Wilms’ tumor (p=0.013). For acute lymphocytic leukemia survivors, in Social aspects (p=0.031), Mental health (p=0.041), and Emotional aspects (p=0.040), the latter also for survivors of Wilms’ tumor (p=0.040). The best results related to the Functional capacity domain were recorded for the experimental group that had a late diagnosis of acute lymphocytic leukemia. There were significant differences between groups except for the Social and Emotional domains for self-perceived health, with positive responses that characterized their health as good, very good, and excellent. Conclusion Survivors of acute lymphocytic leukemia showed no evidence of relevant impairment of health-related quality of life. The Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (via telephone) can be a resource to access and evaluate survivors. PMID:26537509

  15. Preferentially Expressed Antigen of Melanoma (PRAME) and Wilms’ Tumor 1 (WT 1) Genes Expression in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Prognostic Role and Correlation with Survival

    PubMed Central

    Khateeb, Engy El; Morgan, Dalia

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is the most common hematologic malignancy in children. In young children it is also largely curable, with more than 90% of afflicted children achieving long-term remission. PRAME (Preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma) gene belongs to Group 3 class I HLA-restricted widely expressed antigens in which genes encoding widely expressed tumor antigens have been detected in many normal tissues as well as in histologically different types of tumors with no preferential expression on a certain type of cancer. It has been found to be expressed in a variety of cancer cells as leukemia & lymphoma. PRAME monitoring can be useful for detection of minimal residual disease and subsequent relapses particularly those leukemias in which specific tumor markers are unavailable. Wilms’ tumor1 (WT1) gene was identified as a gene that plays an important role in normal kidney development and inactivation of its function was shown to result in the development of Wilms’ tumors in paediatric patients. Disruption of WT1 function has been implicated in the formation of many different tumor types. AIM: to study how PRAME & WT 1 genes expression patterns influence cancer susceptibility & prognosis. PATIENTS & METHODS: 50 patients with denovo childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, as well as 50 age and sex matched apparently healthy volunteers were genotyped for PRAME and WT1 genes expression by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: PRAME gene was expressed in 34 of the patients (68%) and WT1 gene was expressed in 26 of the patients (52%). Expression of both genes was significantly higher compared to controls (P < 0.0001). Analysis of relapse free survival among our patients revealed that patients expressing PRAME gene or WT1 gene had better relapse free survival (p value=0.02 and 0.01 respectively). Relapse free survival increased significantly among patients coexpressing PRAME and WT 1(p value =0

  16. Epidemiology of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergrass, T.W.

    1985-06-01

    Although the etiology of acute leukemia is largely unknown, some facets of the puzzle are becoming clarified. Recognition of important patterns in age-specific mortality rates has suggested that events early in life, perhaps even prenatally, may have an influence on developing leukemia in childhood. The racial differences evident in mortality, incidence, and immunologic subtype of ALL suggest either differences in exposures to certain factors or differences in responses to those factors by white children. Hereditary factors appear to play a role. Familial and hereditary conditions exist that have high incidences of acute leukemia. Chromosomal anomalies are common in these conditions. Viral infections may play a role by contributing to alteration in genetic material through incorporation of the viral genome. How that virus is dealt with after primary infection seems important. The presence of immunodeficiency may allow wider dissemination or enhanced replication of such viruses, thereby increasing the likelihood of cellular transformation to an abnormal cell. Proliferation of that malignant cell to a clone may depend on other cofactors. Perhaps prolonged exposure to substances like benzene or alkylating agents may enhance these interactions between virus and genetic material. Does this change DNA repair mechanisms. Are viral infections handled differently. Is viral genomic information more easily integrated into host cells. Ionizing radiation has multiple effects. Alteration in genetic material occurs both at the molecular and chromosomal levels. DNA may be altered, lost, or added in the cell's attempt to recover from the injury.

  17. mTOR inhibition by everolimus in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia induces caspase-independent cell death.

    PubMed

    Baraz, Rana; Cisterne, Adam; Saunders, Philip O; Hewson, John; Thien, Marilyn; Weiss, Jocelyn; Basnett, Jordan; Bradstock, Kenneth F; Bendall, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, anti-cancer medications are being reported to induce cell death mechanisms other than apoptosis. Activating alternate death mechanisms introduces the potential to kill cells that have defects in their apoptotic machinery, as is commonly observed in cancer cells, including in hematological malignancies. We, and others, have previously reported that the mTOR inhibitor everolimus has pre-clinical efficacy and induces caspase-independent cell death in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Furthermore, everolimus is currently in clinical trial for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we characterize the death mechanism activated by everolimus in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. We find that cell death is caspase-independent and lacks the morphology associated with apoptosis. Although mitochondrial depolarization is an early event, permeabilization of the outer mitochondrial membrane only occurs after cell death has occurred. While morphological and biochemical evidence shows that autophagy is clearly present it is not responsible for the observed cell death. There are a number of features consistent with paraptosis including morphology, caspase-independence, and the requirement for new protein synthesis. However in contrast to some reports of paraptosis, the activation of JNK signaling was not required for everolimus-induced cell death. Overall in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells everolimus induces a cell death that resembles paraptosis. PMID:25014496

  18. mTOR Inhibition by Everolimus in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Induces Caspase-Independent Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Baraz, Rana; Cisterne, Adam; Saunders, Philip O.; Hewson, John; Thien, Marilyn; Weiss, Jocelyn; Basnett, Jordan; Bradstock, Kenneth F.; Bendall, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, anti-cancer medications are being reported to induce cell death mechanisms other than apoptosis. Activating alternate death mechanisms introduces the potential to kill cells that have defects in their apoptotic machinery, as is commonly observed in cancer cells, including in hematological malignancies. We, and others, have previously reported that the mTOR inhibitor everolimus has pre-clinical efficacy and induces caspase-independent cell death in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Furthermore, everolimus is currently in clinical trial for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we characterize the death mechanism activated by everolimus in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. We find that cell death is caspase-independent and lacks the morphology associated with apoptosis. Although mitochondrial depolarization is an early event, permeabilization of the outer mitochondrial membrane only occurs after cell death has occurred. While morphological and biochemical evidence shows that autophagy is clearly present it is not responsible for the observed cell death. There are a number of features consistent with paraptosis including morphology, caspase-independence, and the requirement for new protein synthesis. However in contrast to some reports of paraptosis, the activation of JNK signaling was not required for everolimus-induced cell death. Overall in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells everolimus induces a cell death that resembles paraptosis. PMID:25014496

  19. Low-Dose or High-Dose Conditioning Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-23

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  20. Association between Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR) Gene Polymorphisms and Susceptibility to Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in an Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Gholamreza; Hashemi, Mohammad; Naderi, Majid; Taheri, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present study was aimed to examine the possible association between methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphisms and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in a sample of Iranian population. Subjects and Methods: A total of 220 subjects including 100 children diagnosed with ALL and 120 healthy children participated in the case-control study. The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of MTHFR were determined by ARMS-PCR or PCR-RFLP method. Results: Our investigation revealed that rs13306561 both TC and TC + CC genotypes decreased the risk of ALL compared to TT genotype (OR=0.32, 95%CI=0.15-0.68, p=0.002 and OR=0.35, 95%CI=0.17-0.70, p=0.003, respectively). In addition, the rs13306561 C allele decreased the risk of ALL in comparison with T allele (OR=0.42, 95% CI=0.22-0.78, P=0.005). MTHFR rs1801131 (A1298C) polymorphism showed that the AC heterozygous genotype decreased the risk of ALL in comparison with AA homozygous genotype (OR=0.43, 95%CI=0.21-0.90, p=0.037). Neither the overall Chi-square comparison of cases and control subjects (𝜒2=5.54, p=0.063) nor the logistic regression analysis showed significant association between C677T polymorphism and ALL (OR=1.25, 95% CI=0.69-2.23, p=0.552; CT vs. CC). Conclusion: The current investigation findings showed that MTHFR rs1801131 and rs13306561 polymorphisms decreased the risk of ALL in the population which has been studied. Further studies with larger sample sizes and different ethnicities are required to validate our findings. PMID:27489588

  1. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Results of the Japan Association of Childhood Leukemia Study (JACLS) NHL-98 protocol for the treatment of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and mature B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Naoto; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Takimoto, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Atsuko; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Horibe, Keizo

    2011-02-01

    The Japan Association of Childhood Leukemia Study (JACLS) NHL-98 is a multicenter study designed to evaluate treatment outcomes in Japanese children with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) and mature B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). The study was supported by a central pathology review system and used a new, standardized protocol with short, intensive treatment regimens. From April 1998 to May 2002, 69 patients with B-NHL and B-ALL up to 16 years of age were enrolled in the NHL-98 study. Treatment was stratified by risk group; patients with limited disease were in groups A and B, and those with extensive disease were in groups C and D. Patients in groups B, C, and D received consolidation phases with high-dose methotrexate (HDMTX) followed by other multi-agent chemotherapy. Patients in group A did not receive either MTX or etoposide. Only patients in group D received etoposide. The event-free survival rates were 100% in groups A and B, 75.1% in group C, and 66.2% in group D. Overall, patients with limited disease had favorable results. For patients with extensive disease, additional treatment options such as increased doses of anticancer drugs warrant further investigation. PMID:21261497

  3. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in immunotherapy of cancer may represent a successful example in translational research, in which progress in knowledge and technology in immunology has lead to new strategies of immunotherapy, and even past failure in many clinical trials have led to a better understanding of basic cancer immunobiology. This article reviews the latest concepts in antitumor immunology and its application in the treatment of cancer, with particular focus on acute leukemia. PMID:19100371

  4. Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Edwin C.; Durie, Brian G. M.; Garewal, Harinder S.

    1987-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of acute myelogenous leukemia frequently associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Data on 11 patients with APL treated at our institution were analyzed and compared with those of 147 published cases. Most had a bleeding diathesis at presentation and evidence of DIC eventually developed in all. Seven patients (64%) showed the t(15;17)(q22;q21) karyotype or a similar translocation. Using a chemotherapy induction regimen containing an anthracycline, complete remission, requiring a total of 14 courses of treatment, was achieved in six patients (55%). The median duration of response and median survival for complete responders were 10 and 15 months, respectively. Three patients (27%) died of bleeding complications during induction therapy. The tritiated-thymidine labeling index of leukemia cells predicted which patients would achieve a complete remission. Review of six studies of 147 patients with APL from the past 12 years supports the use of a chemotherapy induction regimen containing anthracycline or amsacrine and heparin for the treatment of DIC. PMID:3472414

  5. Prognostic factors of childhood and adolescent acute myeloid leukemia (AML) survival: evidence from four decades of US population data.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Jobayer; Xie, Li; Caywood, Emi H

    2015-10-01

    Growing insight into prognosis of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) survival has led to improved outcome over time and could be further enhanced through investigation using a large number of patients. To characterize the extent of the association of pediatric AML survival with its identified prognostic factors, we analyzed the United States population-based Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) large dataset of 3442 pediatric AML patients diagnosed and followed between 1973 and 2011 using a Cox proportional hazards model stratified by year of diagnosis. Patients diagnosed between 10 and 19 years of age were at a higher risk of death compared to those diagnosed before age 10 (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR): 1.30, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.17-1.44). African Americans (1.27, 1.09-1.48) and Hispanics (1.15, 1.00-1.32) had an elevated risk of mortality than Caucasians. Compared to the subtype acute promyelocytic leukemia, AML with minimal differentiation (2.44, 1.78-3.35); acute erythroid leukemia (2.34, 1.60-3.40); AML without maturation (1.87, 1.35-2.59); and most other AML subtypes had a higher risk of mortality, whereas AML with inv(16) had a substantially lower risk. Age at diagnosis, race-ethnicity, AML subtype, county level poverty and geographic region appeared as significant prognostic factors of pediatric AML survival in the US. Contrary to previous findings, the subtypes of AML with t(9;11)(p22;q23)MLLT3-MLL, AML without maturation and acute myelomonocytic leukemia emerged to be indicative of poor outcome. PMID:26159683

  6. Role of glutathione S-transferase M1, T1 and P1 gene polymorphisms in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia susceptibility in a Turkish population.

    PubMed

    Guven, Mehmet; Unal, Selin; Erhan, Duygu; Ozdemir, Nihal; Baris, Safa; Celkan, Tiraje; Bostancı, Merve; Batar, Bahadir

    2015-09-01

    The variations between different individuals in the xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes' activity were shown to modify susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Polymorphisms associated with genes coding for the glutathione S-transferase (GST) enzyme were known to affect the metabolism of different carcinogens. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the GSTM1 and GSTT1 deletion polymorphisms, and the GSTP1 Ile105Val single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on the susceptibility to childhood ALL. The study was conducted in 95 children with ALL and 190 healthy control subjects from the Turkish population. The data revealed no difference in the prevalence of the GSTM1 and GSTT1 null genotypes between the childhood ALL patients and the controls. No association was found between GSTP1 Ile105Val variants and the susceptibility to childhood ALL, separately or in combination. Our findings suggested that the status of heritable GST polymorphism might not influence the risk of developing childhood ALL. Studies with a larger sample size are needed to evaluate and confirm the validity of our results. PMID:26137447

  7. Single dose rasburicase in the management of tumor lysis syndrome in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Latha, S. M.; Krishnaprasadh, D.; Murugapriya, P.; Scott, J. X.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) occurs in malignancies with high proliferative potential and tumor burden, such as lymphomas and leukemias. TLS syndrome is an oncologic emergency, requiring prompt intervention. The metabolic derangements cause acute kidney failure and may lead to cardiac arrhythmias, seizures, and death. With the advent of rasburicase, a recombinant urate oxidase, there has been a decline in the TLS-mediated renal failure and the need for dialysis. The recommended regimen and doses pose a heavy financial burden for patients in developing countries like India. With data and studies proving a similar efficacy for the reduced dose and lesser number of rasburicase, we report here a case series of seven children with acute leukemias, whose TLS was managed by a single dose of rasburicase. A retrospective analysis of case records of seven children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and TLS, admitted to our Pediatric Oncology Unit of our Hospital between the period 2011 and 2013, was done. All our patients responded to a single dose, indicating that in appropriately monitored patients, single dose followed by as-needed dosing can be cost-saving. PMID:25838646

  8. Vitamin D and Bone Minerals Status in the Long-term Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Reisi, Nahid; Iravani, Parisa; Raeissi, Pouran; Kelishadi, Roya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low vitamin D and diminished bone minerals with the potential for fractures are one of the nonapparent late effects of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Chemotherapy and radiation were known as two important risk factors. We evaluated these late effects in ALL survivors who were treated with chemotherapy or chemo plus cranial radiation therapy. Methods: In a case–control study, 33 of ALL survivors who were treated with chemotherapy (Group A), and 33 subjects who were treated with chemoplus cranial radiation (Group B) were compared against 33 matched age, sex, and pubertal stage of their healthy siblings (Group C). Standard anthropometric data were collected as well as Tanner staging for puberty, number of fractures since treatment, serum calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), magnesium (Mg), alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D). The independent t-test, one-way ANOVA, Chi-square test, and Tukey's test were used to analyze the data. Results: The findings indicated that the mean serum levels of 25(OH) D in ALL survivors (i.e. Groups A and B) with age mean score of 11.2 years and 12.3 years, average treatment length: 3.25 years and average time after treatment completion: 4 years, was lower compared to the controls group (12.94 ± 6.69, 14.6 ± 8.1, 20.16 ± 10.83, respectively, P < 0.001) but no significant difference was observed between Group A and B in this regard (P > 0.05). Other clinical and laboratory parameters had no significant differences between the survivors and control. Vitamin D deficiency (<20 ng/ml) was observed in 27% of group A and 24% of group B and vitamin D insufficiency (20–30 ng/ml) in 72.7% and 69.6% survivors of Group A and B and 48.5% of controls group (P = 0.003). Conclusions: ALL treatment is associated with the increase in prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in the childhood ALL survivors and since the low vitamin D level potentially increases the risk of low bone density, subsequent

  9. PARC/CCL18 Is a Plasma CC Chemokine with Increased Levels in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Struyf, Sofie; Schutyser, Evemie; Gouwy, Mieke; Gijsbers, Klara; Proost, Paul; Benoit, Yves; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Van Damme, Jo; Laureys, Geneviève

    2003-01-01

    Chemokines play an important role in leukocyte mobilization, hematopoiesis, and angiogenesis. Tissue-specific expression of particular chemokines also influences tumor growth and metastasis. Here, the CC chemokine pulmonary and activation-regulated chemokine (PARC)/CCL18 was measured in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Surprisingly, PARC immunoreactivity was consistently detected in plasma from healthy donors. After purification to homogeneity, the presence of intact PARC (1–69) and processed PARC (1–68) in normal human plasma was confirmed by sequence and mass spectrometry analysis. Furthermore, PARC serum levels were significantly increased in children with T-ALL and prepreB-ALL compared to control serum samples, whereas serum levels in AML and preB-ALL patients were not significantly different from controls. In contrast, the hemofiltrate CC chemokine-1 (HCC-1)/CCL14 was not found to be a biomarker in any of these patients’ strata, whereas the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) was significantly decreased in AML and prepreB-ALL. Stimulated leukocytic cell lines or lymphoblasts from patients produced IL-8/CXCL8 or macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α/CCL3) but not PARC, not even after IL-4 or IL-10 treatment. However, PARC was produced by superantigen or IL-4 stimulated monocytes co-cultured with lymphocytes or lymphoblastic cells. Serum PARC levels thus constitute a novel leukemia marker, possibly reflecting tumor/host cell interactions in the circulation. PMID:14578205

  10. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Donor; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or T-cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-24

    Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Stage II Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  12. Increased risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) by prenatal and postnatal exposure to high voltage power lines: a case control study in Isfahan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Tabrizi, Maral Mazloomi; Bidgoli, Sepideh Arbabi

    2015-01-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is one of the most common hematologic malignancies, accounting for one fourth of all childhood cancer cases. Exposure to environmental factors around the time of conception or pregnancy can increase the risk of ALL in the offspring.This study aimed to evaluted the role of prenatal and postnatal exposure to high voltage power lines on the incidence of childhood ALL.This cross-sectional case control study was carried out on 22 cases and 100 controls who were born and lived in low socioeconomic families in Isfahan and hospitalized for therapeutic purposes in different hospitals from 2013-2014.With regard to the underlying risk factors, familial history and parental factors were noted but in this age, socioeonomic and zonal matched case control study, prenatal and childhood exposure to high voltage power lines was considered as the most important environmental risk factors of ALL (p=0.006, OR=3.651, CI 95%, 1.692-7.878). As the population was of low socioeconomic background, use of mobiles, computers and microwave was negligible. Moreover prenatal and postnatal exposure to indoor electrically charged objects was not determined to be a significant environmental factor. Thus, pre and post natal exposure to high voltage power lines and living in pollutant regions as well as familial influence could be described as risk factors of ALL for the first time in a low socioeconomic status Iranian population. PMID:25824762

  13. Prevalence of Gene Rearrangements in Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Population Study—Report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the Identification of the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Miranda-Peralta, Enrique; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Guerra-Castillo, Francisco Xavier; Pompa-Mera, Ericka Nelly; Ocaña-Mondragón, Alicia; Bernáldez-Ríos, Roberto; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Amador-Sánchez, Raquel; Peñaloza-González, José Gabriel; de Diego Flores-Chapa, José; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Rodríguez-Zepeda, María del Carmen; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Núñez-Villegas, Nancy; Velázquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Reyes-Zepeda, Nancy Carolina; González-Bonilla, Cesar; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010–2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child's diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7%) patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4%) patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1%) patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8%) patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4%) patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children. PMID:25692130

  14. Prevalence of gene rearrangements in Mexican children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a population study-report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the identification of the causes of childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Miranda-Peralta, Enrique; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Guerra-Castillo, Francisco Xavier; Pompa-Mera, Ericka Nelly; Ocaña-Mondragón, Alicia; Rangel-López, Angélica; Bernáldez-Ríos, Roberto; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Amador-Sánchez, Raquel; Peñaloza-González, José Gabriel; de Diego Flores-Chapa, José; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Rodríguez-Zepeda, María Del Carmen; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Núñez-Villegas, Nancy; Velázquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Reyes-Zepeda, Nancy Carolina; González-Bonilla, Cesar; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010-2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child's diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7%) patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4%) patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1%) patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8%) patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4%) patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children. PMID:25692130

  15. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Role of Electromagnetic Field Exposure in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and No Impact of Urinary Alpha- Amylase--a Case Control Study in Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Tabrizi, Maral Mazloomi; Hosseini, Seyed Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is one of the most common hematologic malignancies which accounts for one fourth of all childhood cancer cases. Exposure to environmental factors around the time of conception or pregnancy can increase the risk of ALL in the offspring. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of prenatal and postnatal exposure to high voltage power lines on the incidence of childhood ALL. It also examines the role of various factors such as environmental factors and alpha-amylase as a marker in the development of leukemia. This cross-sectional case control study was carried out on 22 cases and 100 controls who born and lived in low socioeconomic families in Tehran and were hospitalized for therapeutic purposes in different hospitals of rom 2013-2014. With regard to the underlying risk factors; familial history and parental factors were detected as risk factors of ALL but in this age, socioeconomic and zonal matched case control study, prenatal and childhood exposure to high voltage power lines was considered as the most important environmental risk factor (p=0.006, OR=3.651, CI 95% 1.692-7.878). As the population study was from low socioeconomic state, use of mobiles, computers and microwaves was negligible. Moreover prenatal and postnatal exposure to all indoor electrically charged objects were not detected as significant environmental factors in the present study. This work defined the risk of environmental especially continuous pre and postnatal exposure to high voltage power lines and living in pollutant regions through the parents or children as well as the previously described risk factors of ALL for the first time in low socioeconomic status Iranian population. PMID:26625771

  17. Sex disparity in childhood and young adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) survival: Evidence from US population data.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Jobayer; Xie, Li

    2015-12-01

    Sex variation has been persistently investigated in studies concerning acute myeloid leukemia (AML) survival outcomes but has not been fully explored among pediatric and young adult AML patients. We detected sex difference in the survival of AML patients diagnosed at ages 0-24 years and explored distinct effects of sex across subgroups of age at diagnosis, race-ethnicity and AML subtypes utilizing the United States Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) population based dataset of 4865 patients diagnosed with AML between 1973 and 2012. Kaplan-Meier survival function, propensity scores and stratified Cox proportional hazards regression were used for data analyses. After controlling for other prognostic factors, females showed a significant survival advantage over their male counterparts, adjusted hazard ratio (aHR, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09, 1.00-1.18). Compared to females, male patients had substantially increased risk of mortality in the following subgroups of: ages 20-24 years at diagnosis (aHR1.30), Caucasian (1.14), acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) (1.35), acute erythroid leukemia (AEL) (1.39), AML with inv(16)(p13.1q22) (2.57), AML with minimum differentiation (1.47); and had substantially decreased aHR in AML t(9;11)(p22;q23) (0.57) and AML with maturation (0.82). Overall, females demonstrated increased survival over males and this disparity was considerably large in patients ages 20-24 years at diagnosis, Caucasians, and in AML subtypes of AML inv(16), APL and AEL. In contrast, males with AML t(9;11)(p22;q23), AML with maturation and age at diagnosis of 10-14 years showed survival benefit. Further investigations are needed to detect the biological processes influencing the mechanisms of these interactions. PMID:26520618

  18. CD7 aberrant expression led to a lineage switch at relapsed childhood acute pre-B lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Fallah Azad, Vahid; Hedayati Asl, Amir Abbas; Tashvighi, Maryam; Niktoreh Mofrad, Naghmeh; Haghighi, Mansoureh; Mehrvar, Azim

    2016-03-01

    Immunophenotypic changes and lineage switch between diagnosis and relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia are uncommon and accompanied by poor outcomes. In this report, a 12-year-old boy with diagnosis of pre-B ALL with an aberrant expression of CD 7 is described. Patient was treated with the ALL-BFM 2000 protocol and suffered an episode of relapse with a lineage switch from pre-B ALL to T cell ALL. This report concludes that presence of aberrant expression of CD7 at diagnosis of pre-B ALL can have prognostic value of lineage switch to T cell ALL at relapse. PMID:26242204

  19. Baicalein Triggers Mitochondria-Mediated Apoptosis and Enhances the Antileukemic Effect of Vincristine in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia CCRF-CEM Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Ju; Wu, Chieh-Shan; Shieh, Jeng-Jer; Wu, Jyh-Horng; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Chung, Ting-Wen; Chen, Yu-Kuo; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) accounts for approximately 75% of childhood leukemia, and chemotherapy remains the mainstay therapy. Baicalein is an active flavonoid used in traditional Chinese medicine and has recently been found to have anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antiallergic properties. This study aims to investigate the molecular apoptotic mechanisms of baicalein in CCRF-CEM leukemic cells and to evaluate the combined therapeutic efficacy of baicalein with several commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs in CCRF-CEM cells. Our results demonstrate that baicalein induces mitochondria-dependent cleavage of caspases-9 and -3 and PARP with concomitant decreases in IAP family proteins, survivin, and XIAP. Furthermore, our results present for the first time that baicalein triggers a convergence of the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways via the death receptor-caspase 8-tBid signaling cascade in CCRF-CEM cells. In addition, we also present for the first time that the combination of baicalein and vincristine results in a synergistic therapeutic efficacy. Overall, this combination strategy is recommended for future clinical trials in the treatment of pediatric leukemia owing to baicalein's beneficial effects in alleviating the vomiting, nausea, and skin rashes caused by chemotherapy. PMID:23476680

  20. Effects of Methylphenidate on Attention Deficits in Childhood Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-16

    ALL, Childhood; Leukemia, Lymphoblastic; Leukemia, Lymphoblastic, Acute; Leukemia, Lymphoblastic, Acute, L1; Leukemia, Lymphoblastic, Acute, L2; Leukemia, Lymphoblastic, Acute, Philadelphia-Positive; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L1; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L2; Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute; Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute, Childhood; Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute, L1; Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute, L2; Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute; Lymphocytic Leukemia, L1; Lymphocytic Leukemia, L2; Brain Tumors; Cancer of the Brain; Cancer of Brain; Malignant Primary Brain Tumors; Brain Neoplasms, Malignant

  1. Intrinsic and chemo-sensitizing activity of SMAC-mimetics on high-risk childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Schirmer, M; Trentin, L; Queudeville, M; Seyfried, F; Demir, S; Tausch, E; Stilgenbauer, S; Eckhoff, S M; Meyer, L H; Debatin, K-M

    2016-01-01

    SMAC-mimetics represent a targeted therapy approach to overcome apoptosis resistance in many tumors. Here, we investigated the efficacy of the SMAC-mimetic BV6 in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL). In ALL cell lines, intrinsic apoptosis sensitivity was associated with rapid cIAP degradation, NF-κB activation, TNF-α secretion and induction of an autocrine TNF-α-dependent cell death loop. This pattern of responsiveness was also observed upon ex vivo analysis of 40 primograft BCP-ALL samples. Treatment with BV6 induced cell death in the majority of ALL primografts including leukemias with high-risk and poor-prognosis features. Inhibition of cell death by the TNF receptor fusion protein etanercept demonstrated that BV6 activity is dependent on TNF-α. In a preclinical NOD/SCID/huALL model of high-risk ALL, marked anti-leukemia effectivity and significantly prolonged survival were observed upon BV6 treatment. Interestingly, also in vivo, intrinsic SMAC-mimetic activity was mediated by TNF-α. Importantly, BV6 increased the effectivity of conventional induction therapy including vincristine, dexamethasone and asparaginase leading to prolonged remission induction. These data suggest SMAC-mimetics as an important addendum to efficient therapy of pediatric BCP-ALL. PMID:26775704

  2. What Are the Key Statistics for Childhood Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... factors for childhood leukemia? What are the key statistics for childhood leukemia? Leukemia is the most common ... about 2. Visit the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Statistics Center for more key statistics. Survival statistics for ...

  3. Prognostic Factors in Childhood Leukemia (ALL or AML)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for childhood leukemias Prognostic factors in childhood leukemia (ALL or AML) Certain factors that can affect a ... myelogenous leukemia (AML). Prognostic factors for children with ALL Children with ALL are often divided into risk ...

  4. Tipifarnib and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Laboratory-Treated Donor Cord Blood Cell Infusion Following Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-30

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Activity Dependent Phospho-Protein Expression in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

    PubMed Central

    Márk, Ágnes; Hajdu, Melinda; Kenessey, István; Sticz, Tamás; Nagy, Eszter; Barna, Gábor; Váradi, Zsófia; Kovács, Gábor; Kopper, László; Csóka, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Modern treatment strategies have improved the prognosis of childhood ALL; however, treatment still fails in 25–30% of patients. Further improvement of treatment may depend on the development of targeted therapies. mTOR kinase, a central mediator of several signaling pathways, has recently attracted remarkable attention as a potential target in pediatric ALL. However, limited data exists about the activity of mTOR. In the present study, the amount of mTOR activity dependent phospho-proteins was characterized by ELISA in human leukemia cell lines and in lymphoblasts from childhood ALL patients (n = 49). Expression was measured before and during chemotherapy and at relapses. Leukemia cell lines exhibited increased mTOR activity, indicated by phospho-S6 ribosomal protein (p-S6) and phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein (p-4EBP1). Elevated p-4EBP1 protein levels were detected in ALL samples at diagnosis; efficacy of chemotherapy was followed by the decrease of mTOR activity dependent protein phosphorylation. Optical density (OD) for p-4EBP1 (ELISA) was significantly higher in patients with poor prognosis at diagnosis, and in the samples of relapsed patients. Our results suggest that measuring mTOR activity related phospho-proteins such as p-4EBP1 by ELISA may help to identify patients with poor prognosis before treatment, and to detect early relapses. Determining mTOR activity in leukemic cells may also be a useful tool for selecting patients who may benefit from future mTOR inhibitor treatments. PMID:23573198

  7. An animal model to study toxicity of central nervous system therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Effects on behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenix, P.J.; Kernan, W.J.; Tassinari, M.S.; Schunior, A.; Waber, D.P.; Howes, A.; Tarbell, N.J. )

    1990-10-15

    Central nervous system prophylactic therapy used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia can reduce intelligence quotient scores and impair memory and attention in children. Cranial irradiation, intrathecal methotrexate, and steroids are commonly utilized in acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy. How they induce neurotoxicity is unknown. This study employs an animal model to explore the induction of neurotoxicity. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at 17 and 18 days of age were administered 18 mg/kg prednisolone, 2 mg/kg methotrexate, and 1000 cGy cranial irradiation. Another 18-day-old group was administered 1000 cGy cranial irradiation but no drugs. Matching controls received saline and/or a sham exposure to radiation. All animals at 6 weeks and 4 months of age were tested for alterations in spontaneous behavior. A computer pattern recognition system automatically recorded and classified individual behavioral acts displayed during exploration of a novel environment. Measures of behavioral initiations, total time, and time structure were used to compare treated and control animals. A permanent sex-specific change in the time structure of behavior was induced by the prednisolone, methotrexate, and radiation treatment but not by radiation alone. Unlike hyperactivity, the effect consisted of abnormal clustering and dispersion of acts in a pattern indicative of disrupted development of sexually dimorphic behavior. This study demonstrates the feasibility of an animal model delineating the agent/agents responsible for the neurotoxicity of central nervous system prophylactic therapy.

  8. Next-generation-sequencing of recurrent childhood high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia reveals mutations typically associated with high risk patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cai; Bartenhagen, Christoph; Gombert, Michael; Okpanyi, Vera; Binder, Vera; Röttgers, Silja; Bradtke, Jutta; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Harbott, Jochen; Ginzel, Sebastian; Thiele, Ralf; Husemann, Peter; Krell, Pina F I; Borkhardt, Arndt; Dugas, Martin; Hu, Jianda; Fischer, Ute

    2015-09-01

    20% of children suffering from high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia develop recurrent disease. The molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we analyzed the genetic landscape of five patients at relapse, who developed recurrent disease without prior high-risk indication using whole-exome- and whole-genome-sequencing. Oncogenic mutations of RAS pathway genes (NRAS, KRAS, FLT3, n=4) and deactivating mutations of major epigenetic regulators (CREBBP, EP300, each n=2 and ARID4B, EZH2, MACROD2, MLL2, each n=1) were prominent in these cases and virtually absent in non-recurrent cases (n=6) or other pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases (n=18). In relapse nucleotide variations were detected in cell fate determining transcription factors (GLIS1, AKNA). Structural genomic alterations affected genes regulating B-cell development (IKZF1, PBX1, RUNX1). Eleven novel translocations involved the genes ART4, C12orf60, MACROD2, TBL1XR1, LRRN4, KIAA1467, and ELMO1/MIR1200. Typically, patients harbored only single structural variations, except for one patient who displayed massive rearrangements in the context of a germline tumor suppressor TP53 mutation and a Li-Fraumeni syndrome-like family history. Another patient harbored a germline mutation in the DNA repair factor ATM. In summary, the relapse patients of our cohort were characterized by somatic mutations affecting the RAS pathway, epigenetic and developmental programs and germline mutations in DNA repair pathways. PMID:26189108

  9. Renal Presentation in Pediatric Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sherief, Laila M.; Azab, Seham F.; Zakaria, Marwa M.; Kamal, M.; Elbasset Aly, Maha Abd; Ali, Adel; Alhady, Mohamed Abd

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Renal enlargement at time of diagnosis of acute leukemia is very unusual. We here in report 2 pediatric cases of acute leukemia who had their renal affection as the first presenting symptom with no evidences of blast cells in blood smear and none of classical presentation of acute leukemia. The first case is a 4-year-old girl who presented with pallor and abdominal enlargement. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral symmetrical homogenous enlarged kidneys suggestive of infiltration. Complete blood picture (CBC) revealed white blood count 11 × 109/L, hemoglobin 8.7 g/dL and platelet count 197 × 109/L. Bone marrow aspiration was performed, and diagnosed precursor B-cell ALL was made. The child had an excellent response to modified CCG 1991 standard risk protocol of chemotherapy with sustained remission, but unfortunately relapsed 11 month after the end of therapy. The second child was 13-month old, presented with pallor, vomiting, abdominal enlargement, and oliguria 2 days before admission. Initial CBC showed bicytopenia, elevated blood urea, creatinine, and serum uric acid, while abdominal ultrasonography revealed bilateral renal enlargement. Bone marrow examination was done and showed 92% blast of biphenotypic nature. So, biphynotypic leukemia with bilateral renal enlargement and acute renal failure was subsequently diagnosed. The patients admitted to ICU and received supportive care and prednisolone. Renal function normalized and chemotherapy was started. The child achieved complete remission with marked reduction of kidney size but, unfortunately she died from sepsis in consolidation phase of therapy. This case demonstrates an unusual early renal enlargement in childhood acute leukemia. Renal involvement of acute leukemia should be considered in child presenting with unexplained bilateral renal enlargement with or without renal function abnormalities and bone marrow examination should be included in the workup. PMID:26376384

  10. Residential Traffic Density and Childhood Leukemia Risk

    PubMed Central

    Von Behren, Julie; Reynolds, Peggy; Gunier, Robert B.; Rull, Rudolph P.; Hertz, Andrew; Urayama, Kevin Y.; Kronish, Daniel; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Exposures to carcinogenic compounds from vehicle exhaust may increase childhood leukemia risk, and the timing of this exposure may be important. Methods We examined the association between traffic density and childhood leukemia risk for three time periods: birth, time of diagnosis, and lifetime average, based on complete residential history in a case-control study. Cases were rapidly ascertained from participating hospitals in northern and central California between 1995 and 2002. Controls were selected from birth records, individually matched on age, sex, race, and Hispanic ethnicity. Traffic density was calculated by estimating total vehicle miles traveled per square mile within a 500-foot (152 meter) radius area around each address. We used conditional logistic regression analyses to account for matching factors and to adjust for household income. Results We included 310 cases of acute lymphocytic leukemias (ALL) and 396 controls in our analysis. The odds ratio for ALL and residential traffic density above the 75th percentile, compared with subjects with zero traffic density, was 1.17 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.76–1.81) for residence at diagnosis and 1.11 (95% CI, 0.70–1.78) for the residence at birth. For average lifetime traffic density, the odds ratio was 1.24 (95% CI, 0.74–2.08) for the highest exposure category. Conclusions Living in areas of high traffic density during any of the exposure time periods was not associated with increased risk of childhood ALL in this study. PMID:18768496

  11. Eosinophilic presentation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rezamand, Azim; Ghorashi, Ziaaedin; Ghorashi, Sona; Nezami, Nariman

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 5 Primary Diagnosis: Rule-out appendicitis Co-existing Diseases: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) Medication: Chemiotherapy Clinical Procedure: Chest CT • flow cytometry Specialty: Pediatrics’ oncology • infection diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: Leukemias are among the most common childhood malignancies. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) accounts for 77% of all leukemias. In rare cases, ALL patients may present with eosinophilia. Case Report: Here, a 5-year old boy was admitted to our hospital with a possible diagnosis of appendicitis. This patient’s complete blood cell count demonstrated leukocytosis with severe eosinophilia. Following a 1-month clinical investigation, 2 bone marrow aspirations, and flow cytometry analysis, a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia was proposed. Finally, the patient was transferred to the oncology ward to receive standard therapeutic protocol, which resulted in disease remission. After chemotherapy for 2 years, patient is successfully treated. Conclusions: ALL is diagnosed by eosinophilia in rare cases. These patients need immediate diagnosis and intensive therapy due to worsened prognosis of ALL presenting as hypereosinophilia. PMID:23869247

  12. Metabolic syndrome in adults who received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute childhood leukemia: an LEA study.

    PubMed

    Oudin, C; Auquier, P; Bertrand, Y; Contet, A; Kanold, J; Sirvent, N; Thouvenin, S; Tabone, M-D; Lutz, P; Ducassou, S; Plantaz, D; Dalle, J-H; Gandemer, V; Beliard, S; Berbis, J; Vercasson, C; Barlogis, V; Baruchel, A; Leverger, G; Michel, G

    2015-11-01

    We evaluated prospectively the incidence and risk factors of the metabolic syndrome (MS) and its components in 170 adult patients (mean age at evaluation: 24.8±5.4 years) who received an hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for childhood ALL, n=119, or AML, n=51. TBI was carried out in 124 cases; a busulfan-based conditioning was done in 30 patients. Twenty-nine patients developed a MS (17.1%, 95% confidence intervals: 11.7-23.6). The cumulative incidence was 13.4% at 25 years of age and 35.5% at 35 years of age. A higher body mass index (BMI) before transplantation and a growth hormone deficiency were associated with increased MS risk (P=0.002 and 0.01, respectively). MS risk was similar for patients who received TBI or busulfan-based conditioning. The TBI use increased the hyperglycemia risk (odds ratio (OR): 4.7, P=0.02). Women were at the risk of developing increased waist circumference (OR: 7.18, P=0.003) and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR: 2.72, P=0.007). The steroid dose was not a risk factor. The MS occurs frequently among transplanted survivors of childhood leukemia. Its incidence increases with age. Both intrinsic (BMI, gender) and extrinsic factors (TBI, alkylating agents) contribute to its etiopathogenesis. PMID:26191949

  13. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. A unique complex translocation involving six different chromosomes in a case of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia with the Philadelphia chromosome and adverse prognosis.

    PubMed

    Achkar, Walid Al; Wafa, Abdulsamad; Mkrtchyan, Hasmik; Moassass, Faten; Liehr, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy. Approximately 84% of cases of ALL are classified as B-precursor ALL, 14% of cases are T-cell and 2% of cases are B-cell (B-)ALL. About one third of B-ALL cases show an abnormal karyotype. Combining data obtained by immunophenotyping, karyotyping and molecular cytogenetic analyses allows for a better understanding of this heterogeneous disease. This study reports an exceptional B-ALL case with a poor prognosis and unique complex chromosomal aberrations not previously observed, i.e., a translocation involving the six chromosomal regions 1q42, 4q21, 4q24, 4q35 (twice), 8q22 and 10p15.3 besides 9q34 and 22q11.2. PMID:22966383

  15. Meta-analysis of the association between CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-ε polymorphism and the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yangqiong; Chen, Hao; Liang, Hong; Wang, Xiaowen; Wang, Lingling

    2014-01-01

    CEBPE rs2239633 polymorphism has been implicated in susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) risk. Several studies investigated the association of this polymorphism with ALL in different populations. However, the results were contradictory. A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the association between CEBPE rs2239633 polymorphism and ALL susceptibility. Databases including Pubmed, EMBASE, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Wangfang were searched to find relevant studies. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of associations. A random-effects model was used. A significant association was found between CEBPE rs2239633 polymorphism and childhood ALL (OR = 1.19, 95% CI, 1.11-1.28). In the subgroup analyses by ethnicity, the significant association was found among Caucasians (OR = 1.19, 95% CI, 1.09-1.30) and Hispanics (OR = 1.39, 95% CI, 1.18-1.63), but not in Asians (OR = 1.05, 95% CI, 0.90-1.22). In the subgroup analysis by histology, B-cell ALL risk (OR = 1.29, 95% CI, 1.15-1.44) and B hyperdiploid ALL risk (OR = 1.84, 95% CI, 1.40-2.43) were increased. Our results suggested that CEBPE rs2239633 polymorphism conferred a risk factor of childhood ALL. PMID:25664070

  16. Contribution of Polymorphisms in IKZF1 Gene to Childhood Acute Leukemia: A Meta-Analysis of 33 Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yue-e; Tang, Linjun; Healy, Jasmine; Sinnett, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Objective Two common polymorphisms in the IKZF1 gene (rs4132601 and rs11978267 variants) have been reported to be associated with childhood acute leukemia (AL) risk, however the results were inconsistent. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis to generate large-scale evidence on whether IKZF1 variants are risk factors for childhood AL. Methods The PubMed, Embase, EBSCO, and Web of Science were searched up to June 2, 2014 for studies on the association of IKZF1 polymorphisms with childhood AL risk. Data were extracted and the odd ratios (ORs) and95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated by a fixed-effects orrandom-effects model. Subgroup analysis by ethnicity and leukemia subtype, sensitivity and cumulative meta-analyses were performed. Moreover, publication bias was assessed by Begg's and Egger's tests. Results In total, 33 case control studies were finally included in this meta-analysis. For rs4132601 polymorphism, significantly increased AL risk was observed in all genetic models (the association was still significant when the p value was Bonferroni adjusted to 0.025). In the subgroup analysis by tumor type, statistical association was observed in B-cell precursor ALL (BCP-ALL). Additionally, when stratified by ethnicity, significantly increased AL risk was only observed in European subgroup, but not among African or mixed population subgroups. Finally, similar results were found forrs11978267 polymorphism. Conclusion In summary, this meta-analysis provides evidence that rs4132601 and rs11978267 polymorphisms in the IKZF1 gene mightcontribute to the occurrence of BCP-ALL, especially in European populations. Moreover, further studies with large sample size are required to clarify possibleroles of IKZF1 variants in other ethnic groups (e.g., Asians and Africans). PMID:25423013

  17. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  18. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  19. FR901228 in Treating Children With Refractory or Recurrent Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  20. Late relapsing childhood lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vora, A; Frost, L; Goodeve, A; Wilson, G; Ireland, R M; Lilleyman, J; Eden, T; Peake, I; Richards, S

    1998-10-01

    Childhood lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is usually assumed to have been permanently eradicated in patients in long-term remission, but occasionally can recur after many years. To learn more about the problem, we studied a group of children whose leukemia had been in remission for 10 or more years before relapse and tried to determine whether they had true recurrences or second malignancies. We studied children treated on Medical Research Council ALL protocols between 1970 and 1984 and followed up by the Clinical Trial Service Unit in Oxford. Detailed clinical and laboratory data was collected from the centers concerned on all who were reported to have had a recurrence of their leukemia after 10 or more years from the time of achieving first complete remission (CR1). To prove that the relapse was a true recurrence rather than a second or secondary leukemia, DNA extracted from archived marrow smears was subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis for the presence of an identical Ig heavy chain (IgH) or T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement at initial diagnosis and subsequent relapse. A total of 1,134 of 2,746 children had survived 10 years or more (range, 10 to 24 years) in CR1 and of those, 12 (approximately 1%) had subsequently relapsed. Relapse blast cells were shown to express the common ALL antigen (CD 10) in all cases and an identical clonal IgH or TCR gene rearrangement was found on PCR analysis of DNA from diagnosis and relapse in all eight cases where DNA extraction was successful. A further program of therapy was successful in inducing a second CR in all patients, four of whom have succumbed to a second relapse after 12 to 27 months. The remaining eight are in continuing CR2 at a follow-up of 12 to 108 months (median, 52) from relapse. Although the risk of relapse of childhood ALL after 10 years in remission appears to be small (around 1%), it persists. This raises questions about how blasts can survive quiescent for so long and when we can

  1. Risk for childhood leukemia associated with maternal and paternal age.

    PubMed

    Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Thomopoulos, Thomas P; Gialamas, Spyros P; Karalexi, Maria A; Biniaris-Georgallis, Stylianos-Iason; Kontogeorgi, Evangelia; Papathoma, Paraskevi; Tsilimidos, Gerasimos; Skalkidou, Alkistis; Iliadou, Anastasia N; Petridou, Eleni T

    2015-12-01

    The role of reproductive factors, such as parental age, in the pathogenesis of childhood leukemias is being intensively examined; the results of individual studies are controversial. This meta-analysis aims to quantitatively synthesize the published data on the association between parental age and risk of two major distinct childhood leukemia types in the offspring. Eligible studies were identified and pooled relative risk (RR) estimates were calculated using random-effects models, separately for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Subgroup analyses were performed by study design, geographical region, adjustment factors; sensitivity analyses and meta-regression analyses were also undertaken. 77 studies (69 case-control and eight cohort) were deemed eligible. Older maternal and paternal age were associated with increased risk for childhood ALL (pooled RR = 1.05, 95 % CI 1.01-1.10; pooled RR = 1.04, 95 % CI 1.00-1.08, per 5 year increments, respectively). The association between maternal age and risk of childhood AML showed a U-shaped pattern, with symmetrically associated increased risk in the oldest (pooled RR = 1.23, 95 % CI 1.06-1.43) and the youngest (pooled RR = 1.23, 95 % CI 1.07-1.40) extremes. Lastly, only younger fathers were at increased risk of having a child with AML (pooled RR = 1.28, 95 % CI 1.04-1.59). In conclusion, maternal and paternal age represents a meaningful risk factor for childhood leukemia, albeit of different effect size by leukemia subtype. Genetic and socio-economic factors may underlie the observed associations. Well-adjusted studies, scheduled by large consortia, are anticipated to satisfactorily address methodological issues, whereas the potential underlying genetic mechanisms should be elucidated by basic research studies. PMID:26537708

  2. The TGF-β/SMAD pathway is an important mechanism for NK cell immune evasion in childhood B acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rouce, Rayne H.; Shaim, Hila; Sekine, Takuya; Weber, Gerrit; Ballard, Brandon; Ku, Stephanie; Barese, Cecilia; Murali, Vineeth; Wu, Meng-Fen; Liu, Hao; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Bollard, Catherine M.; Rabin, Karen R.; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are key components of the innate immune system, providing potent antitumor immunity. Here, we show that the TGF-β/SMAD signaling pathway is an important mechanism for NK cell immune evasion in childhood B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We characterized NK cells in 50 consecutive children with B-ALL at diagnosis, end-Induction, and during maintenance therapy compared to age-matched controls. ALL-NK cells at diagnosis had an inhibitory phenotype associated with impaired function, most notably IFN-γ production and cytotoxicity. By maintenance, these phenotypic and functional abnormalities partially normalized, however, cytotoxicity against autologous blasts remained impaired. We identified ALL-derived TGF-β1 to be an important mediator of leukemia-induced NK cell dysfunction. The TGF-β/SMAD signaling pathway was constitutively activated in ALL-NK cells at diagnosis and end-induction when compared to healthy controls and patients during maintenance. Culture of ALL blasts with healthy NK cells induced NK dysfunction and an inhibitory phenotype, mediated by activation of the TGF-β/SMAD signaling pathway, and abrogated by blocking TGF-β. These data indicate that by regulating the TGF-β/SMAD pathway, ALL blasts induce changes in NK cells to evade innate immune surveillance, thus highlighting the importance of developing novel therapies to target this inhibitory pathway and restore antileukemic cytotoxicity. PMID:26621337

  3. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. [Acute leukemia in childhood: present status of 100 cases after 7 years of complete remission (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schaison, G; Jacquillat, C; Lemercier, N; Weil, M; Alby, N; Auclerc, M F; Boiron, M; Bernard, J

    1980-01-01

    Amongst 1,200 leukemie children treated between 1958 and 1971, 60 are in complete remission for more than 10 years and 100 for more than 7 years. There were 96 acute lymphoid and 4 acute myeloid leukemias. Ten patients who have relapsed in the past have not done so lately. The F/M sex ratio is 1.5. Poor prognostic features were initially absent in 2/3 of cases. In 1/3 there was associated hyperleucocytosis and/or tumours. 93 children are in remission, their treatment having been stopped for 1 to 12 years. Five children relapsed and 4 are in a second remission for more than 2 years. Two children died in remission: one from a hepatocarcinoma and one from cardiac failure. These patients have been shown to have the following: 1) normal growth; 2) normal puberty: 8 patients have been able to reproduce, giving 10 children, one with multiple malformations; 3) school achievement and later socioprofessional behaviour has been normal. The patients have often sought a medical or paramedical career. Sequelae are minimal, psychological problems being minimal in the child. With the protocols used, mean remission curve shows a plateau after 9 years and complete definitive care is achieved in 92 per cent of patients surviving at 7 years. The very distant future outlook is not known. No other malignant haematological disease has occurred but one child died from a carcinoma. PMID:6931627

  6. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-25

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms and Their Relation With DNA Damage, DNA Repair, and Total Antioxidant Capacity in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Survivors.

    PubMed

    Dincer, Yildiz; Yüksel, Selin; Batar, Bahadir; Güven, Mehmet; Onaran, Ilhan; Celkan, Tiraje

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative stress and defective DNA repair are major contributory factors in the initiation and progression of carcinogenesis. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy cause oxidative DNA damage, consume antioxidant capacity, and impair DNA repair activity. These effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy may be contributory factors in the development of secondary malignancy in cancer survivors. Basal, H2O2-induced, and postrepair DNA damage; urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine level as a marker of oxidatively damaged DNA; and serum total antioxidant capacity were measured; XPD Lys751Gln, XRCC1 Arg399Gln, and XRCC1 Arg194Trp polymorphisms were analyzed in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors. Basal and H2O2-induced DNA damage were found to be higher in the ALL survivor group versus the control group, however, there was no significant difference between the other parameters. No association was found between the examined parameters and polymorphisms of XPD 751 and XRCC1 399 and both the groups. XRCC1 194Trp allele was found to be associated with a low level of postrepair DNA damage in the ALL survivors. In conclusion, basal DNA damage and susceptibility to oxidation are high in childhood ALL survivors. This situation which may easily lead to occurrence of a secondary cancer does not seem to be a result of deficient DNA repair. PMID:24577548

  8. Association of ABCC2 −24C>T Polymorphism with High-Dose Methotrexate Plasma Concentrations and Toxicities in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Yin, You; Sheng, Qi; Lu, Xiaotong; Wang, Fang; Lin, Zhiyan; Tian, Huaiping; Xu, Ajing; Zhang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is a key agent for the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Increased MTX plasma concentrations are associated with a higher risk of adverse drug effects. ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 2 (ABCC2) is important for excretion of MTX and its toxic metabolite. The ABCC2 −24C>T polymorphism (rs717620) reportedly contributes to variability of MTX kinetics. In the present study, we assessed the association between the ABCC2 −24C>T polymorphism and methotrexate (MTX) toxicities in childhood ALL patients treated with high-dose MTX. A total of 112 Han Chinese ALL patients were treated with high-dose MTX according to the ALL-Berlin-Frankfurt-Muenster 2000 protocol. Our results showed that presence of the −24T allele in ABCC2 gene led to significantly higher MTX plasma concentrations at 48 hours after the start of infusion, which would strengthen over repeated MTX infusion. The −24T allele in ABCC2 gene was significantly associated with higher risks of high-grade hematologic (leucopenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia) and non-hematologic (gastrointestinal and mucosal damage/oral mucositis) MTX toxicities. This study provides the first evidence that the −24T allele in ABCC2 gene is associated with the severity of MTX toxicities, which add fresh insights into clinical application of high-dose MTX and individualization of MTX treatment. PMID:24404132

  9. A Heritable Missense Polymorphism in CDKN2A Confers Strong Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Is Preferentially Selected during Clonal Evolution.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kyle M; de Smith, Adam J; Hansen, Helen M; Smirnov, Ivan V; Gonseth, Semira; Endicott, Alyson A; Xiao, Jianqiao; Rice, Terri; Fu, Cecilia H; McCoy, Lucie S; Lachance, Daniel H; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Wiencke, John K; Jenkins, Robert B; Wrensch, Margaret R; Ma, Xiaomei; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2015-11-15

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified SNPs in six genes that are associated with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A lead SNP was found to occur on chromosome 9p21.3, a region that is deleted in 30% of childhood ALLs, suggesting the presence of causal polymorphisms linked to ALL risk. We used SNP genotyping and imputation-based fine-mapping of a multiethnic ALL case-control population (Ncases = 1,464, Ncontrols = 3,279) to identify variants of large effect within 9p21.3. We identified a CDKN2A missense variant (rs3731249) with 2% allele frequency in controls that confers three-fold increased risk of ALL in children of European ancestry (OR, 2.99; P = 1.51 × 10(-9)) and Hispanic children (OR, 2.77; P = 3.78 × 10(-4)). Moreover, of 17 patients whose tumors displayed allelic imbalance at CDKN2A, 14 preferentially retained the risk allele and lost the protective allele (PBinomial = 0.006), suggesting that the risk allele provides a selective advantage during tumor growth. Notably, the CDKN2A variant was not significantly associated with melanoma, glioblastoma, or pancreatic cancer risk, implying that this polymorphism specifically confers ALL risk but not general cancer risk. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that coding polymorphisms of large effect can underlie GWAS "hits" and that inherited polymorphisms may undergo directional selection during clonal expansion of tumors. PMID:26527286

  10. Loci on 7p12.2, 10q21.2 and 14q11.2 are associated with risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Papaemmanuil, Elli; Hosking, Fay J; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Price, Amy; Olver, Bianca; Sheridan, Eammon; Kinsey, Sally E; Lightfoot, Tracy; Roman, Eve; Irving, Julie A E; Allan, James M.; Tomlinson, Ian P; Taylor, Malcolm; Greaves, Mel; Houlston, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    To identify risk variants for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) we conducted a genome-wide association study of 2 case-control series, analyzing the genotypes of 291,423 tagging SNP genotypes in a total of 907 ALL cases and 2,398 controls. We identified risk loci for ALL at 7p12.2 (IKZF1, rs4132601; OR = 1.69, P = 1.20 x 10-19), 10q21.2 (ARIDB5, rs7089424; OR = 1.65, P = 6.69 x 10-19) and 14q11.2 (CEBPE, rs2239633; OR = 1.34, P = 2.88 x 10-7). The 10q21.2 (ARIDB5) risk association appears to be selective for the subset of B-cell precursor ALL with hyperdiploidy. These data show that common low-penetrance susceptibility alleles contribute to the risk of developing childhood ALL and provide novel insight into disease causation of this hematological cancer; notably all 3 risk variants map to genes involved in transcriptional regulation and differentiation of B-cell progenitors. PMID:19684604

  11. Flavopiridol and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or Refractory Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-01

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Monoclonal antibodies to treat acute lymphocytic leukemia Targeted therapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia In recent years, new ... These drugs are often referred to as targeted therapy. Some of these drugs can be useful in ...

  13. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Classified?

    MedlinePlus

    ... How is acute lymphocytic leukemia treated? How is acute lymphocytic leukemia classified? Most types of cancers are assigned numbered ... ALL are now named as follows: B-cell ALL Early pre-B ALL (also called pro-B ...

  14. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  15. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  16. Acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, F R; Rowe, J M; Radich, J; Dick, J E

    2001-01-01

    Through the hard work of a large number of investigators, the biology of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is becoming increasingly well understood, and as a consequence, new therapeutic targets have been identified and new model systems have been developed for testing novel therapies. How these new therapies can be most effectively studied in the clinic and whether they will ultimately improve cure rates are questions of enormous importance. In this article, Dr. Jacob Rowe presents a summary of the current state-of-the-art therapy for adult AML. His contribution emphasizes the fact that AML is not a single disease, but a number of related diseases each distinguished by unique cytogenetic markers which in turn help determine the most appropriate treatment. Dr. Jerald Radich continues on this theme, emphasizing how these cytogenetic abnormalities, as well as other mutations, give rise to abnormal signal transduction and how these abnormal pathways may represent ideal targets for the development of new therapeutics. A third contribution by Dr. Frederick Appelbaum describes how AML might be made the target of immunologic attack. Specifically, strategies using antibody-based or cell-based immunotherapies are described including the use of unmodified antibodies, drug conjugates, radioimmunoconjugates, non-ablative allogeneic transplantation, T cell adoptive immunotherapy and AML vaccines. Finally, Dr. John Dick provides a review of the development of the NOD/SCID mouse model of human AML emphasizing both what it has taught us about the biology of the disease as well as how it can be used to test new therapies. Taken together, these reviews are meant to help us understand more about where we are in the treatment of AML, where we can go and how we might get there. PMID:11722979

  17. Presence of FLT3-ITD and high BAALC expression are independent prognostic markers in childhood acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Staffas, Anna; Kanduri, Meena; Hovland, Randi; Rosenquist, Richard; Ommen, Hans Beier; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Forestier, Erik; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Jónsson, Ólafur G; Zeller, Bernward; Palle, Josefine; Lönnerholm, Gudmar; Hasle, Henrik; Palmqvist, Lars; Ehrencrona, Hans

    2011-11-24

    Mutation status of FLT3, NPM1, CEBPA, and WT1 genes and gene expression levels of ERG, MN1, BAALC, FLT3, and WT1 have been identified as possible prognostic markers in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We have performed a thorough prognostic evaluation of these genetic markers in patients with pediatric AML enrolled in the Nordic Society of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (NOPHO) 1993 or NOPHO 2004 protocols. Mutation status and expression levels were analyzed in 185 and 149 patients, respectively. Presence of FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD) was associated with significantly inferior event-free survival (EFS), whereas presence of an NPM1 mutation in the absence of FLT3-ITD correlated with significantly improved EFS. Furthermore, high levels of ERG and BAALC transcripts were associated with inferior EFS. No significant correlation with survival was seen for mutations in CEBPA and WT1 or with gene expression levels of MN1, FLT3, and WT1. In multivariate analysis, the presence of FLT3-ITD and high BAALC expression were identified as independent prognostic markers of inferior EFS. We conclude that analysis of the mutational status of FLT3 and NPM1 at diagnosis is important for prognostic stratification of patients with pediatric AML and that determination of the BAALC gene expression level can add valuable information. PMID:21967978

  18. Comparative genomic hybridization in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: correlation with interphase cytogenetics and loss of heterozygosity analysis.

    PubMed

    Scholz, I; Popp, S; Granzow, M; Schoell, B; Holtgreve-Grez, H; Takeuchi, S; Schrappe, M; Harbott, J; Teigler-Schlegel, A; Zimmermann, M; Fischer, C; Koeffler, H P; Bartram, C R; Jauch, A

    2001-01-15

    We used comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to study DNA copy number changes in 71 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) including 50 B-lineage and 21 T-ALLs. Forty-two patients (59%) showed genomic imbalances whereby gains were more frequently observed than losses (127 vs. 29). Gains most commonly affected the entire chromosomes 21 and 10 (19.7% each), 6, 14, 18, X (15.5% each), 17 (14.1%) and 4 (11.3%). Highly hyperdiploid karyotypes (chromosome number >50) occurred more frequently in B-lineage than in T-lineage ALL (24% vs. 4.8%). In both cell lineages deletions were mainly detected on 9p (14.1%) and 12p (8.4%), and on 6q in T-lineage ALL (4.2%). These findings were compared with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of 6q, 9p, 11q, and 12p previously performed in 56 of the 71 patients. Among 54 sites of LOH, CGH revealed losses of the respective chromosome arms in 17 LOH-positive regions (31.5%). G-banding analysis and interphase cytogenetics with subregional probes for 14 loci confirmed the presence of genomic imbalances as detected by CGH. We, therefore, conclude that, in the absence of cytogenetic data, CGH represents a suitable method for identifying hyperdiploid karyotypes as well as prognostically relevant deletions in ALL patients. PMID:11172898

  19. A six gene expression signature defines aggressive subtypes and predicts outcome in childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Mi, Jian-Qing; Debernardi, Alexandra; Vitte, Anne-Laure; Emadali, Anouk; Meyer, Julia A.; Charmpi, Konstantina; Ycart, Bernard; Callanan, Mary B.; Carroll, William L.; Khochbin, Saadi; Rousseaux, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal gene expression in cancer represents an under-explored source of cancer markers and therapeutic targets. In order to identify gene expression signatures associated with survival in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a strategy was designed to search for aberrant gene activity, which consists of applying several filters to transcriptomic datasets from two pediatric ALL studies. Six genes whose expression in leukemic blasts was associated with prognosis were identified:three genes predicting poor prognosis (AK022211, FASTKD1 and STARD4) and three genes associated with a favorable outcome (CAMSAP1, PCGF6 and SH3RF3). Combining the expression of these 6 genes could successfully predict prognosis not only in the two discovery pediatric ALL studies, but also in two independent validation cohorts of adult patients, one from a publicly available study and one consisting of 62 newly recruited Chinese patients. Moreover, our data demonstrate that our six gene based test is particularly efficient in stratifying MLL or BCR.ABL negative patients. Finally, common biological traits characterizing aggressive forms of ALL in both children and adults were found, including features of dormant hematopoietic stem cells, suggesting new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26001296

  20. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  2. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

    MedlinePlus

    ... WBC) count Platelet count Bone marrow biopsy Lumbar puncture (spinal tap) to check for leukemia cells in ... home Managing your pets during chemotherapy Bleeding problems Dry mouth Eating enough calories Safe eating during cancer ...

  3. Acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a low number of platelets. A white blood cell count ( WBC ) can be high, low, or normal. Bone ... and overall health How high your white blood cell count was Certain genetic changes in the leukemia cells ...

  4. 8-Chloro-Adenosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-11

    Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsed Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myeloproliferative Disorder

  5. Immunophenotype of adult and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: changes at first relapse and clinico-prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Guglielmi, C; Cordone, I; Boecklin, F; Masi, S; Valentini, T; Vegna, M L; Ferrari, A; Testi, A M; Foa, R

    1997-09-01

    The immunologic features of leukemic cells at the time of 1st hematologic relapse were compared to those obtained at initial diagnosis in 128 patients (69 children and 59 adults) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated at a single institution. An immunophenotypic change was observed in 59 cases (46%), more frequently in T (20/25) than in B (39/103) lineage ALL (80 vs 38%, P=0.0008), but with a similar incidence in adults and children. Of these cases, 34 (24 B- and 10 T-ALL) changed at relapse their intralineage subgroup affiliation, although no complete shift from B to T lineage ALL, or vice versa, was observed. The myeloid antigens CD13 and/or CD33 were frequently lost (2/5 cases) or acquired (12/123 cases) at relapse. In 21 cases, the immunophenotype at relapse was more undifferentiated than at diagnosis, while it was more differentiated in 13 cases. Initial treatment intensity or preceding treatment with teniposide did not affect the phenotypic profile at relapse. Complete response (CR) rate to salvage therapy and event-free survival were not influenced by the immunophenotypic shifts, nor by the presence, at relapse, of leukemic cells expressing the myeloid antigens CD13 and/or CD33. Univariate analysis suggested that prognosis after relapse was dependent on the duration of 1st CR, patients' age and immunophenotype at the time of diagnosis, with a worse outcome for patients with T lineage ALL and for patients with the less differentiated subgroup of B lineage ALL (CD19+ and CD10-). Multivariate analysis showed that only two factors, duration of 1st CR and grade of immunologic differentiation at diagnosis, have independent prognostic value in relapsed ALL. PMID:9305605

  6. Minimal effects of E. coli and Erwinia asparaginase on the coagulation system in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a randomized study.

    PubMed

    Risseeuw-Appel, I M; Dekker, I; Hop, W C; Hählen, K

    1994-01-01

    A randomized study was done in twenty newly diagnosed children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Ten children were treated with Escherichia coli L-asparaginase, and ten with Erwinia chrysanthemi L-asparaginase. L-asparaginase (ASP) treatment started halfway during ALL-induction treatment with vincristine, prednisone, daunorubicin and intrathecal methotrexate. The mean activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) level in all children demonstrated a significant fall (P < 0.001) from 28.25 sec at diagnosis to 23.0 sec at the start of ASP treatment. In this same time interval, the mean fibrinogen level declined markedly from 3 g/l to 1.2 g/l (P < 0.001), probably due to prednisone therapy. The APTT stayed shortened during ASP therapy, whereas the hypofibrinogenemia recovered significantly faster in the Erwinia group (P < or = 0.01). Factors (F) II, V, VII and X stayed within the normal range, while F VIII and F IX were elevated. During the entire period of induction therapy, the ATIII activity remained within the normal range in both treatment groups. The protein C values, however, demonstrated a steady decline from 140% at start of ASP treatment to a mean of 81% and 93%, respectively, at the end of the ASP therapy in the E. coli and Erwinia group. Five of the ten children treated with E. coli ASP demonstrated protein C levels below 70% at the end of ASP therapy, opposed to none of the Erwinia treated patients (P = 0.03). We suggest that the effect of ASP resulting in decreased coagulation factor synthesis is in part counterbalanced by the effect of prednisone on the coagulation system, when ASP is administered at the end of ALL induction treatment. The overall effect of ASP either of E. coli or of Erwinia on the hemorrhagic system reveals a slight imbalance towards thrombosis, mainly because of a gradual decrease in protein C activity. This imbalance is less pronounced in the Erwinia group. PMID:8058004

  7. Assessment of mercaptopurine (6MP) metabolites and 6MP metabolic key-enzymes in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wojtuszkiewicz, Anna; Barcelos, Ana; Dubbelman, Boas; De Abreu, Ronney; Brouwer, Connie; Bökkerink, Jos P; de Haas, Valerie; de Groot-Kruseman, Hester; Jansen, Gerrit; Kaspers, Gertjan L; Cloos, Jacqueline; Peters, G J

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is treated with combination chemotherapy including mercaptopurine (6MP) as an important component. Upon its uptake, 6MP undergoes a complex metabolism involving many enzymes and active products. The prognostic value of all the factors engaged in this pathway still remains unclear. This study attempted to determine which components of 6MP metabolism in leukemic blasts and red blood cells are important for 6MP's sensitivity and toxicity. In addition, changes in the enzymatic activities and metabolite levels during the treatment were analyzed. In a cohort (N=236) of pediatric ALL patients enrolled in the Dutch ALL-9 protocol, we studied the enzymes inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT), hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT), and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) as well as thioguanine nucleotides (TGN) and methylthioinosine nucleotides (meTINs). Activities of selected enzymes and levels of 6MP derivatives were measured at various time points during the course of therapy. The data obtained and the toxicity related parameters available for these patients were correlated with each other. We found several interesting relations, including high concentrations of two active forms of 6MP--TGN and meTIN--showing a trend toward association with better in vitro antileukemic effect of 6MP. High concentrations of TGN and elevated activity of HGPRT were found to be significantly associated with grade III/IV leucopenia. However, a lot of data of enzymatic activities and metabolite concentrations as well as clinical toxicity were missing, thereby limiting the number of assessed relations. Therefore, although a complex study of 6MP metabolism in ALL patients is feasible, it warrants more robust and strict data collection in order to be able to draw more reliable conclusions. PMID:24940700

  8. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  9. Effects of radiation on testicular function in long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A report from the Children Cancer Study Group

    SciTech Connect

    Sklar, C.A.; Robison, L.L.; Nesbit, M.E.; Sather, H.N.; Meadows, A.T.; Ortega, J.A.; Kim, T.H.; Hammond, G.D. )

    1990-12-01

    Testicular function was evaluated in 60 long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). All the patients were treated on two consecutive Children Cancer Study Group protocols and received identical chemotherapy and either 18 or 24 Gy radiation therapy (RT) to one of the following fields: craniospinal plus 12 Gy abdominal RT including the gonads (group 1); craniospinal (group 2); or cranial (group 3). The median age at the time of their last evaluation was 14.5 years (range, 10.5 to 25.7), which took place a median of 5.0 years (range, 1 to 10.3) after discontinuing therapy. The incidence of primary germ cell dysfunction as judged by raised levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and/or reduced testicular volume was significantly associated with field of RT; 55% of group 1, 17% of group 2, and 0% of group 3 were abnormal (P = .002). Leydig cell function, as assessed by plasma concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone, and pubertal development, was unaffected in the majority of subjects regardless of RT field. These data indicate that in boys undergoing therapy for ALL, germ cell dysfunction is common following testicular irradiation and can occur following exposure to scattered irradiation from craniospinal RT. In contrast, Leydig cell function appears resistant to direct irradiation with doses as high as 12 Gy.

  10. An animal model to study toxicity of central nervous system therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Effects on growth and craniofacial proportion

    SciTech Connect

    Schunior, A.; Zengel, A.E.; Mullenix, P.J.; Tarbell, N.J.; Howes, A.; Tassinari, M.S. )

    1990-10-15

    Many long term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia have short stature, as well as craniofacial and dental abnormalities, as side effects of central nervous system prophylactic therapy. An animal model is presented to assess these adverse effects on growth. Cranial irradiation (1000 cGy) with and without prednisolone (18 mg/kg i.p.) and methotrexate (2 mg/kg i.p.) was administered to 17- and 18-day-old Sprague-Dawley male and female rats. Animals were weighed 3 times/week. Final body weight and body length were measured at 150 days of age. Femur length and craniofacial dimensions were measured directly from the bones, using calipers. For all exposed groups there was a permanent suppression of weight gain with no catch-up growth or normal adolescent growth spurt. Body length was reduced for all treated groups, as were the ratios of body weight to body length and cranial length to body length. Animals subjected to cranial irradiation exhibited microcephaly, whereas those who received a combination of radiation and chemotherapy demonstrated altered craniofacial proportions in addition to microcephaly. Changes in growth patterns and skeletal proportions exhibited sexually dimorphic characteristics. The results indicate that cranial irradiation is a major factor in the growth failure in exposed rats, but chemotherapeutic agents contribute significantly to the outcome of growth and craniofacial dimensions.