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Sample records for acute embolic superior

  1. Superior Mesenteric Artery Embolism Treated with Percutaneous Mechanical Thrombectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, Peter Kuhelj, Dimitrij; Bunc, Matjaz

    2011-02-15

    A case of acute superior mesenteric artery embolism treated with percutaneous thrombus aspiration is described. A 63-year-old man with chronic atrial fibrillation was admitted to the hospital with progressive abdominal pain. Computed tomography angiography revealed an occlusion of the distal part of the superior mesenteric artery. The patient was effectively treated using transaxillary percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy using a 6F Aspirex thrombectomy catheter.

  2. Systemic thrombolysis for acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Bartel, Billie

    2015-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism is a frequent cause of hospitalization and is associated with a wide range of symptom severity. Anticoagulants are the mainstay of treatment for acute pulmonary embolism; however, in patients with massive or submassive pulmonary embolism, advanced therapy with thrombolytics may be considered. The decision to use thrombolytic therapy for acute pulmonary embolism should be based on careful risk-benefit analysis for each patient, including risk of morbidity and mortality associated with the embolism and risk of bleeding associated with the thrombolytic. Alteplase is currently the thrombolytic agent most studied and with the most clinical experience for this indication, although the most appropriate dose remains controversial, especially in patients with low body weight. When considering thrombolysis, unfractionated heparin is the preferred initial anticoagulant due to its short duration of action and its reversibility should bleeding occur. PMID:25559613

  3. Acute Thrombo-embolic Renal Infarction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haijiang; Yan, Yong; Li, Chunsheng; Guo, Shubin

    2016-07-01

    A 65-year-old woman was admitted for acute onset of right lower abdominal pain. She was taking anticoagulant medication regularly for rheumatic valvular disease and atrial fibrillation. Physical examination revealed no obvious abdominal or flank tenderness. Right thrombo-embolic renal infarction was diagnosed after performing computed tomography angiography (CTA). PMID:27335786

  4. Acute Renal Failure after Uterine Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, Sachin; Wu, Yu-Hsin; Shlansky-Goldberg, Richard D.; Stavropoulos, S. William

    2004-09-15

    Renal failure is a potential complication of any endovascular procedure using iodinated contrast, including uterine artery embolization (UAE). In this report we present a case of acute renal failure (ARF) following UAE performed as a treatment for uterine fibroids. The likely causes of ARF in this patient are explored and the possible etiologies of renal failure in patients undergoing UAE are reviewed.

  5. Pulmonary embolism and acute cytomegalovirus infection in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Del Borgo, Cosmo; Gianfreda, Romina; Belvisi, Valeria; Citton, Rita; Soscia, Fabrizio; Notarianni, Ermanno; Tieghi, Tiziana; Mastroianni, Claudio Maria

    2010-12-01

    A case of an immunocompetent man with acute CMV infection associated with a pulmonary embolism is described. Acute CMV infection could be a risk factor for developing thromboembolism. Pulmonary embolism should be included in differential diagnosis in patients with acute CMV infections and pulmonary opacities. PMID:21196823

  6. Microcoil Embolization for Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    D'Othee, Bertrand Janne Surapaneni, Padmaja; Rabkin, Dmitry; Nasser, Imad; Clouse, Melvin

    2006-02-15

    Purpose. To assess outcomes after microcoil embolization for active lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Methods. We retrospectively studied all consecutive patients in whom microcoil embolization was attempted to treat acute lower GI bleeding over 88 months. Baseline, procedural, and outcome parameters were recorded following current Society of Interventional Radiology guidelines. Outcomes included technical success, clinical success (rebleeding within 30 days), delayed rebleeding (>30 days), and major and minor complication rates. Follow-up consisted of clinical, endoscopic, and pathologic data. Results. Nineteen patients (13 men, 6 women; mean age {+-} 95% confidence interval = 70 {+-} 6 years) requiring blood transfusion (10 {+-} 3 units) had angiography-proven bleeding distal to the marginal artery. Main comorbidities were malignancy (42%), coagulopathy (28%), and renal failure (26%). Bleeding was located in the small bowel (n = 5), colon (n 13) or rectum (n = 1). Technical success was obtained in 17 patients (89%); 2 patients could not be embolized due to vessel tortuosity and stenoses. Clinical follow-up length was 145 {+-} 75 days. Clinical success was complete in 13 (68%), partial in 3 (16%), and failed in 2 patients (11%). Delayed rebleeding (3 patients, 27%) was always due to a different lesion in another bowel segment (0 late rebleeding in embolized area). Two patients experienced colonic ischemia (11%) and underwent uneventful colectomy. Two minor complications were noted. Conclusion. Microcoil embolization for active lower GI bleeding is safe and effective in most patients, with high technical and clinical success rates, no procedure-related mortality, and a low risk of bowel ischemia and late rebleeding.

  7. Differential diagnostic dilemma between pulmonary embolism and acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Enes Elvin; Nikus, Kjell C.; Erdogan, Halil I.; Ozdemir, Kurtulus

    2015-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a frequent life-threatening condition in emergency departments. Careful diagnosis is important, and different diagnostic tests such as electrocardiogram (ECG), biochemical markers, echocardiogram, and computed tomography are required. Although ECG is a cheap and rapid diagnostic test for pulmonary embolism, it has some limitations in the differential diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome and acute PE. Herein, we report ECG results of a patient diagnosed with acute PE mimicking acute coronary syndrome. PMID:27092202

  8. Management dilemmas in acute pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Condliffe, Robin; Elliot, Charlie A; Hughes, Rodney J; Hurdman, Judith; Maclean, Rhona M; Sabroe, Ian; van Veen, Joost J; Kiely, David G

    2014-01-01

    Background Physicians treating acute pulmonary embolism (PE) are faced with difficult management decisions while specific guidance from recent guidelines may be absent. Methods Fourteen clinical dilemmas were identified by physicians and haematologists with specific interests in acute and chronic PE. Current evidence was reviewed and a practical approach suggested. Results Management dilemmas discussed include: sub-massive PE, PE following recent stroke or surgery, thrombolysis dosing and use in cardiac arrest, surgical or catheter-based therapy, failure to respond to initial thrombolysis, PE in pregnancy, right atrial thrombus, role of caval filter insertion, incidental and sub-segmental PE, differentiating acute from chronic PE, early discharge and novel oral anticoagulants. Conclusion The suggested approaches are based on a review of the available evidence and guidelines and on our clinical experience. Management in an individual patient requires clinical assessment of risks and benefits and also depends on local availability of therapeutic interventions. PMID:24343784

  9. Surgical embolectomy for acute massive pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Senol; Toktas, Faruk; Goncu, Tugrul; Eris, Cuneyt; Gucu, Arif; Ay, Derih; Erdolu, Burak; Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Karaagac, Kemal; Vural, Hakan; Ozyazicioglu, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE) is associated with significant mortality rate despite diagnostic and therapeutic advances. The aim of this study was to analyze our clinical outcomes of patients with acute massive PE who underwent emergency surgical pulmonary embolectomy. Methods: This retrospective study included 13 consecutive patients undergoing emergency surgical pulmonary embolectomy for acute massive PE at our institution from March 2000 to November 2013. The medical records of all patients were reviewed for demograhic and preoperative data and postoperative outcomes. All patients presented with cardiogenic shock with severe right ventricular dysfunction confirmed by echocardiography, where 4 (30.8%) of the patients experienced cardiac arrest requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation before surgery. Results: The mean age of patients was 61.8 ± 14 years (range, 38 to 82 years) with 8 (61.5%) males. The most common risk factors for PE was the history of prior deep venous thrombosis (n = 9, 69.2%). There were 3 (23.1%) in-hospital deaths including operative mortality of 7.7% (n = 1). Ten (76.9%) patients survived and were discharged from the hospital. The mean follow-up was 25 months; follow-up was 100% complete in surviving patients. There was one case (7.7%) of late death 12 months after surgery due to renal carcinoma. Postoperative echocardiographic pressure measurements demonstrated a significant reduction (P < 0.001). At final follow-up, all patients were in New York Heart Association class I and no readmission for a recurrent of PE was observed. Conclusion: Surgical pulmonary embolectomy is a reasonable option and could be performed with acceptable results, if it is performed early in patients with acute massive PE who have not reached the profound cardiogenic shock or cardiac arrest. PMID:25664045

  10. Q Fever Endocarditis Presenting with Superior Mesenteric Artery Embolism and Renal Infarction.

    PubMed

    Raizada, Amol; Apte, Nachiket; Pham, Scott

    2016-02-01

    Q fever is a zoonotic disease with a reservoir in mammals, birds, and ticks. Acute cases in human beings can be asymptomatic, or they can present with a flu-like illness, pneumonia, or hepatitis. Approximately 5% of cases progress to chronic Q fever. Endocarditis, the most typical manifestation of chronic Q fever, is usually associated with small vegetations that occur in patients who have had prior valvular damage or who are immunocompromised. We present what we think is the first reported case of superior mesenteric artery embolism from Q fever endocarditis of the aortic valve, in a 39-year-old woman who needed surgical embolectomy and subsequent aortic valve replacement. PMID:27047296

  11. Pulmonary embolism in an immunocompetent patient with acute cytomegalovirus colitis

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Jen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Acute cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection occurs commonly in immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients, but is usually asymptomatic in the latter. Vascular events associated with acute CMV infection have been described, but are rare. Hence, such events are rarely reported in the literature. We report a case of pulmonary embolism secondary to acute CMV colitis in an immunocompetent 78-year-old man. The patient presented with fever and diarrhea. Colonic ulcers were diagnosed based on colonoscopy findings, and CMV was the proven etiology on pathological examination. The patient subsequently experienced acute respiratory failure. Pulmonary embolism was diagnosed based on the chest radiography and computed tomography findings. A diagnosis of acute CMV colitis complicated by pulmonary embolism was made. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous administration of unfractionated heparin and intravenous ganciclovir. PMID:27175121

  12. Emergency Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Acute Renal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong Liang; Xu, Chun Yang; Wang, Hong Hui; Xu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aims of this study were to identify arteriographic manifestations of acute renal hemorrhage and to evaluate the efficacy of emergency embolization. Emergency renal artery angiography was performed on 83 patients with acute renal hemorrhage. As soon as bleeding arteries were identified, emergency embolization was performed using gelatin sponge, polyvinyl alcohol particles, and coils. The arteriographic presentation and the effect of the treatment for acute renal hemorrhage were analyzed retrospectively. Contrast extravasation was observed in 41 patients. Renal arteriovenous fistulas were found in 12 of the 41 patients. In all, 8 other patients had a renal pseudoaneurysm, 5 had pseudoaneurysm rupture complicated by a renal arteriovenous fistula, and 1 had pseudoaneurysm rupture complicated by a renal artery-calyceal fistula. Another 16 patients had tumor vasculature seen on arteriography. Before the procedure, 35 patients underwent renal artery computed tomography angiography (CTA). Following emergency embolization, complete hemostasis was achieved in 80 patients, although persistent hematuria was present in 3 renal trauma patients and 1 patient who had undergone percutaneous nephrolithotomy (justifying surgical removal of the ipsilateral kidney in this patient). Two-year follow-up revealed an overall effective rate of 95.18 % (79/83) for emergency embolization. There were no serious complications. Emergency embolization is a safe, effective, minimally invasive treatment for renal hemorrhage. Because of the diversified arteriographic presentation of acute renal hemorrhage, proper selection of the embolic agent is a key to successful hemostasis. Preoperative renal CTA plays an important role in diagnosing and localizing the bleeding artery. PMID:26496273

  13. Meteorological parameters and severity of acute pulmonary embolism episodes.

    PubMed

    Staśkiewicz, Grzegorz; Czekajska-Chehab, Elżbieta; Przegaliński, Jerzy; Maciejewski, Marcin; Pachowicz, Marcin; Drop, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    Frequency of acute pulmonary embolism episodes has been previously shown to correlate significantly with meteorological factors in the period preceding their occurrence. The purpose of the study was to analyze the relation of meteorological factors and the severity of acute pulmonary embolism, expressed by the CT-based pulmonary obstruction score. A retrospective analysis of medical data of 182 consecutive patients with acute pulmonary embolism diagnosed with CT pulmonary angiography was performed. Severity of pulmonary obstruction was assessed by analysis of CT pulmonary angiography examinations, and defined with pulmonary obstruction score by Qanadli et al. The study group was divided into low (L group, 95 patients) and high PE severity (H group, 87 patients), with a cutoff value of 50% of maximum pulmonary obstruction score. Meteorological data collected for the relevant time period were: air temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, visibility, wind speed and precipitation. No significant differences in seasonal distribution of pulmonary embolism episodes were observed. Episodes of more severe pulmonary embolism were preceded by periods of lower atmospheric pressure (1,016.35 hPA for group H, vs. 1,016.35 hPa for group L, p = 0.022). No significant relations between other meteorological factors and severity of PE were observed. The reported finding shows the need of further research on the nature of meteorological factors influence on the course of pulmonary embolism, which should be analyzed not ony regarding the frequency, but also severity of PE episodes. PMID:21736277

  14. Endovascular Therapeutic Approaches for Acute Superior Mesenteric Artery Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, S. Sonesson, B.; Resch, T.

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the outcome of attempted endovascular intervention in patients with acute embolic or thrombotic superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion. The records of 21 patients during a 3-year period between 2005 and 2008 were retrieved from the in-hospital registry. The first group included 10 patients (6 women and 4 men; median age 78 years) with acute embolic occlusion of the SMA. The median duration of symptoms from symptom onset to angiography was 30 hours (range 6 to 120). Synchronous emboli (n = 12) occurred in 6 patients. Embolus aspiration was performed in 9 patients, and 7 of these had satisfactory results. Complementary local thrombolysis was successful in 2 of 3 patients. Residual emboli were present at completion angiography in all 7 patients who underwent successful aspiration embolectomy, and bowel resection was necessary in only 1 of these patients. One serious complication occurred because of a long SMA dissection. The in-hospital survival rate was 90% (9 of 10 patients). The second group included 11 patients (10 women and 1 man; median age 68 years) with atherosclerotic acute SMA occlusions. The median time of symptom duration before intervention was 97 hours (range 17 to 384). The brachial, femoral, and SMA routes were used in 6, 7, and 5 patients, respectively. SMA stenting was performed through an antegrade (n = 7) or retrograde (n = 3) approach. Bowel resection was necessary in 4 patients. No major complications occurred. The in-hospital survival rate was 82% (9 of 11 patients). Endovascular therapy of acute SMA occlusion provides a good alternative to open surgery.

  15. Onyx removal after embolization of a superior sagittal sinus dural arteriovenous fistula involving scalp artery

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Jun; Maruya, Jun; Nishimaki, Keiichi; Ito, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) in superior sagittal sinus (SSS) requires multimodal treatment. Onyx embolization is useful for DAVF; however, scalp artery embolization has cast extrusion risk. Case Description: A 59-year-old male presented with involuntary movements of both legs and progressive dementia. Cerebral angiography demonstrated the DAVF in the SSS fed by bilateral superficial temporal, occipital, and middle meningeal arteries. The posterior SSS was thrombosed, and the main drainers were cortical veins. Combined treatment with transarterial embolization using Onyx and transvenous embolization using coils was performed. Although symptoms were improved, a small DAVF remained. Two months later, Onyx cast extrusion through the scalp was observed, requiring removal and debridement because of infection at the extrusion sites. Surgery for the residual DAVF would be difficult because of scalp condition; therefore, an additional endovascular treatment was conducted, completely occluding DAVF. Conclusion: Onyx embolization is useful for DAVF; however, scalp artery embolization has cast extrusion risk. Therefore, scalp infection should be considered because it may preclude additional surgical procedures. PMID:27313969

  16. Early embolic events complicating intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ping Song; Lin, Chien Hung; Chao, Hai Lun; Chao, A Ching

    2012-11-01

    Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV rt-PA) is the only established thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke. However, secondary embolism after IV rt-PA for acute ischemic stroke is recognized as an uncommon complication, and the pathophysiology is unclear. We describe a 72-year-old man with acute infarction in the territory of left anterior cerebral artery who developed new infarction in the territory of right middle cerebral artery and acute peripheral arterial occlusion after IV rt-PA therapy. It suggested a central embolic source. Because the patient has paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (Af), the possible embolic sources may come from fragmentation of pre-existing intra-atrial clot. Although Af and the presence of cardiac thrombus are not contraindication for IV rt-PA in acute ischemic stroke, our case and review suggested that the administration of IV rt-PA to patients with known Af and intracardiac thrombus could represent a particular risk situation and should be carefully evaluated. PMID:22205004

  17. Acute management of vascular air embolism

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Nissar; Ummunisa, Firdous

    2009-01-01

    Vascular air embolism (VAE) is known since early nineteenth century. It is the entrainment of air or gas from operative field or other communications into the venous or arterial vasculature. Exact incidence of VAE is difficult to estimate. High risk surgeries for VAE are sitting position and posterior fossa neurosurgeries, cesarean section, laparoscopic, orthopedic, surgeries invasive procedures, pulmonary overpressure syndrome, and decompression syndrome. Risk factors for VAE are operative site 5 cm above the heart, creation of pressure gradient which will facilitate entry of air into the circulation, orogenital sex during pregnancy, rapid ascent in scuba (self contained underwater breathing apparatus) divers and barotrauma or chest trauma. Large bolus of air can lead to right ventricular air lock and immediate fatality. In up to 35% patient, the foramen ovale is patent which can cause paradoxical arterial air embolism. VAE affects cardiovascular, pulmonary and central nervous system. High index of clinical suspicion is must to diagnose VAE. The transesophgeal echocardiography is the most sensitive device which will detect smallest amount of air in the circulation. Treatment of VAE is to prevent further entrainment of air, reduce the volume of air entrained and haemodynamic support. Mortality of VAE ranges from 48 to 80%. VAE can be prevented significantly by proper positioning during surgery, optimal hydration, avoiding use of nitrous oxide, meticulous care during insertion, removal of central venous catheter, proper guidance, and training of scuba divers. PMID:20009308

  18. Acute management of vascular air embolism.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Nissar; Ummunisa, Firdous

    2009-09-01

    Vascular air embolism (VAE) is known since early nineteenth century. It is the entrainment of air or gas from operative field or other communications into the venous or arterial vasculature. Exact incidence of VAE is difficult to estimate. High risk surgeries for VAE are sitting position and posterior fossa neurosurgeries, cesarean section, laparoscopic, orthopedic, surgeries invasive procedures, pulmonary overpressure syndrome, and decompression syndrome. Risk factors for VAE are operative site 5 cm above the heart, creation of pressure gradient which will facilitate entry of air into the circulation, orogenital sex during pregnancy, rapid ascent in scuba (self contained underwater breathing apparatus) divers and barotrauma or chest trauma. Large bolus of air can lead to right ventricular air lock and immediate fatality. In up to 35% patient, the foramen ovale is patent which can cause paradoxical arterial air embolism. VAE affects cardiovascular, pulmonary and central nervous system. High index of clinical suspicion is must to diagnose VAE. The transesophgeal echocardiography is the most sensitive device which will detect smallest amount of air in the circulation. Treatment of VAE is to prevent further entrainment of air, reduce the volume of air entrained and haemodynamic support. Mortality of VAE ranges from 48 to 80%. VAE can be prevented significantly by proper positioning during surgery, optimal hydration, avoiding use of nitrous oxide, meticulous care during insertion, removal of central venous catheter, proper guidance, and training of scuba divers. PMID:20009308

  19. Massive Pulmonary Embolism at the Onset of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sorà, Federica; Chiusolo, Patrizia; Laurenti, Luca; Autore, Francesco; Giammarco, Sabrina; Sica, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Life-threatening bleeding is a major and early complication of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), but in the last years there is a growing evidence of thromboses in APL. We report the first case of a young woman with dyspnea as the first symptom of APL due to massive pulmonary embolism (PE) successfully treated with thrombolysis for PE and heparin. APL has been processed with a combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) obtaining complete remission. PMID:27413520

  20. Superior parietal lobule approach for choroid plexus papillomas without preoperative embolization in very young children.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Benjamin C; Cloney, Michael B; Anderson, Richard C E; Feldstein, Neil A

    2015-07-01

    OBJECT Choroid plexus papillomas (CPPs) are rare neoplasms, often found in the atrium of the lateral ventricle of infants, and cause overproduction hydrocephalus. The extensive vascularity and medially located blood supply of these tumors, coupled with the young age of the patients, can make prevention of blood loss challenging. Preoperative embolization has been advocated to reduce blood loss and prevent the need for transfusion, but this mandates radiation exposure and the additional risks of vessel injury and stroke. For these reasons, the authors present their experience using the superior parietal lobule approach to CPPs of the atrium without adjunct therapy. METHODS A retrospective review was conducted of all children who presented to Columbia University/Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital of New York with a CPP in the atrium of the lateral ventricle and who underwent surgery using a superior parietal lobule approach without preoperative embolization. RESULTS Nine children were included, with a median age of 7 months. There were no perioperative complications or new neurological deficits. All patients had intraoperative blood loss of less than 100 ml, with a mean minimum hematocrit of 26.9% (range 19.6%-36.2%). No patients required a blood transfusion. The median follow-up was 39 months, during which time no patient demonstrated residual or recurrent tumor on MRI, nor did any have an increase in ventricular size or require CSF diversion. CONCLUSIONS The superior parietal lobule approach is safe and effective for very young children with CPPs in the atrium of the lateral ventricle. The results suggest that preoperative embolization is not essential to avoid transfusion or achieve overall good outcomes in these patients. This management strategy avoids radiation exposure and the additional risks associated with embolization. PMID:25860983

  1. [Acute massive pulmonary embolism in a patient using clavis panax].

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Isa Oner; Arslan, Sakir; Cağırcı, Göksel; Yılmaz, Akar

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, the use of herbal combinations, plant extracts or food supplements has increased in our country and all over the world. However, there is not enough data to determine the effective doses of these substances in the composition of herbal preparations, or their effects on metabolism and drug interactions. With the widespread use of herbal combinations, life-threatening side effects and clinical manifestations that arise from them have been reported. Herein we present a case with acute massive pulmonary embolism while using an herbal combination in the context of Tribulus terrestris, Avena sativa and Panax ginseng. A 41-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department with the complaint of sudden onset of dyspnea and syncope. As a result of investigations (blood gases, echocardiography, ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy) he was diagnosed with an acute massive pulmonary embolism. The patient's use of panax did not pose as a risk factor for the pulmonary embolism. He was given thrombolytic therapy and shortness of breath improved. At the pre-discharge the patient was informed of the risks associated with the herbal combination, especially panax. Coumadin was started and he was discharged for the INR checks to come. PMID:23760126

  2. Acute pulmonary embolism during an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Painter, Nate P; Kumar, Priya A; Arora, Harendra

    2014-01-01

    A 76-year-old female patient presented for an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for the removal of a biliary stent and lithotripsy. During the procedure, an acute drop in the end-tidal CO 2 , followed by cardiovascular collapse prompted the initiation of the advanced cardiac life support protocol. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) demonstrated direct evidence of pulmonary embolism. The patient was promptly treated with thrombolytic therapy and subsequently discharged home on oral warfarin therapy, with no noted sequelae. Although, there have been case reports of air embolism during an ERCP presenting with cardiovascular collapse, to the best of our knowledge, there are no reported cases of acute pulmonary embolus during this procedure. While the availability of TEE in the operating suites is quite common, quick access and interpretation capabilities in remote locations may not be as common. With the expansion of anesthesia services outside of the operating rooms, it may be prudent to develop rapid response systems that incorporate resources such as TEE and trained personnel to deal with such emergent situations. PMID:24732617

  3. [Acute pulmonary embolism: beware of the wolf in sheep's clothing].

    PubMed

    Klok, Frederikus A; Vahl, Jelmer E; Huisman, Menno V; van Dijkman, Paul R M

    2012-01-01

    Two male patients aged 57 and 73 were referred to the cardiologist because of progressive dyspnoea. In one patient, the general practitioner had previously adopted an expectative policy because of a clean chest X-ray. At presentation after 4 weeks, the patient was diagnosed with and treated for acute coronary syndrome because of minor ECG abnormalities. Additional CT scanning showed a large saddle embolus. Despite adequate treatment, the patient suffered an electrical asystole and died. The other patient underwent ECG, bicycle ergometry, MRI adenosine, echocardiography and lung function tests over a period of 5 weeks before pulmonary embolism (PE) was diagnosed. As the signs and symptoms of PE are largely non-specific, diagnostic delay is common, with risk of poor clinical outcome. PE should at least be considered whenever a patient presents with acute or worsening breathlessness, chest pain, circulatory collapse or coughing, particularly in the presence of known thrombotic risk factors or when there is no clear alternative. PMID:22296892

  4. Anticoagulant treatment for acute pulmonary embolism: a pathophysiology-based clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Agnelli, Giancarlo; Becattini, Cecilia

    2015-04-01

    The management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism is made challenging by its wide spectrum of clinical presentation and outcome, which is mainly related to patient haemodynamic status and right ventricular overload. Mechanical embolic obstruction and neurohumorally mediated pulmonary vasoconstriction are responsible for right ventricular overload. The pathophysiology of acute pulmonary embolism is the basis for risk stratification of patients as being at high, intermediate and low risk of adverse outcomes. This risk stratification has been advocated to tailor clinical management according to the severity of pulmonary embolism. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of the treatment of acute pulmonary embolism. New direct oral anticoagulants, which are easier to use than conventional anticoagulants, have been compared with conventional anticoagulation in five randomised clinical trials including >11 000 patients with pulmonary embolism. Patients at high risk of pulmonary embolism (those with haemodynamic compromise) were excluded from these studies. Direct oral anticoagulants have been shown to be as effective and at least as safe as conventional anticoagulation in patients with pulmonary embolism without haemodynamic compromise, who are the majority of patients with this disease. Whether these agents are appropriate for the acute-phase treatment of patients at intermediate-high risk pulmonary embolism (those with both right ventricle dysfunction and injury) regardless of any risk stratification remains undefined. PMID:25700388

  5. Inhaled nitric oxide in acute pulmonary embolism: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Tariq; Neuman, Adi; Tantary, Mohmad; Bhat, Hilal; Glass, Daniel; Mannino, William; Akhtar, Muhammad; Bhat, Alina; Teli, Sumaya; Lafferty, James

    2015-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is usually a complication secondary to migration of a deep venous clot or thrombi to lungs, but other significant etiologies include air, amniotic fluid, fat, and bone marrow. Regardless of the underlying etiology, little progress has been made in finding an effective pharmacologic intervention for this serious complication. Among the wide spectrum of PE, massive PE is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, primarily due to severely elevated pulmonary vascular resistance leading to right ventricular failure, hypoxemia, and cardiogenic shock. We currently have limited therapeutic options at our disposal. Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) has been proposed as a potential therapeutic agent in cases of acute PE in which hemodynamic compromise secondary to increased pulmonary vascular resistance is present, based on iNO's selective dilation of the pulmonary vasculature and antiplatelet activity. A systematic search of studies using the PubMed database was undertaken in order to assess the available literature. Although there are currently no published randomized controlled trials on the subject, except a recently publish phase I trial involving eight patients, several case reports and case series describe and document the use of iNO in acute PE. The majority of published reports have documented improvements in oxygenation and hemodynamic variables, often within minutes of administration of iNO. These reports, when taken together, raise the possibility that iNO may be a potential therapeutic agent in acute PE. However, based on the current literature, it is not possible to conclude definitively whether iNO is safe and effective. These case reports underscore the need for randomized controlled trials to establish the safety and efficacy of iNO in the treatment of massive acute PE. The purpose of this article is to review the current literature in the use of iNO in the setting of PE given how acute PE causes acute onset of pulmonary

  6. Syncope as a presentation of acute pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Altınsoy, Bülent; Erboy, Fatma; Tanrıverdi, Hakan; Uygur, Fırat; Örnek, Tacettin; Atalay, Figen; Tor, Meltem

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Syncope is an atypical presentation for acute pulmonary embolism (APE). There are conflicting data concerning syncope and prognosis of APE. Patients and methods One hundred and seventy-nine consecutive patients aged 22–96 years (median, 68 years) with APE were retrospectively enrolled in the study. Results Prevalence of syncope was 13% (n=23) at the time of presentation. Compared to patients without syncope, those with syncope had a higher rate of central embolism (83% vs 43%, respectively, P=0.002), right ventricular dysfunction (91% vs 68%, P=0.021), and troponin positivity (80% vs 39%, P=0.001) but not 30-day mortality (13% vs 10%, P=0.716). Multivariate analysis showed that central localization (odds ratio: 9.08) and cardiac troponin positivity (odds ratio: 4.67) were the independent correlates of the presence of syncope in the patients with APE. Frequency of cardiopulmonary disease was lower, and duration from symptom onset to hospital admission was shorter in patients with syncope (P=0.138 and 0.118, respectively), although not significant. Conclusion Syncope most likely represents an intermediate condition between massive APE and hypotension. In APE patients with syncope, the prognosis seems to depend on the underlying pathology, the patient’s age, comorbidities and duration from symptom onset to hospital admission, and the use of thrombolytic therapy. PMID:27390523

  7. The prognostic value of pulmonary embolism severity index in acute pulmonary embolism: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prognostic assessment is important for the management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (APE). Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI) and simple PESI (sPESI) are new emerged prognostic assessment tools for APE. The aim of this meta-analysis is to assess the accuracy of the PESI and the sPESI to predict prognostic outcomes (all-cause and PE-related mortality, serious adverse events) in APE patients, and compare between these two PESIs. Methods MEDLINE and EMBASE database were searched up to June 2012 using the terms “Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index” and “pulmonary embolism”. Summary odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for prognostic outcomes in low risk PESI versus high risk PESI were calculated. Summary receiver operating characteristic curve (SROC) used to estimate overall predicting accuracies of prognostic outcomes. Results Twenty-one studies were included in this meta-analysis. The results showed low-risk PESI was significantly associated with lower all-cause mortality (OR 0.13; 95% CI 0.12 to 0.15), PE-related mortality (OR 0.09; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.17) and serious adverse events (OR 0.34; 95% CI 0.29 to 0.41), with no homogeneity across studies. In sPESI subgroup, the OR of all-cause mortality, PE-related mortality, and serious adverse events was 0.10 (95% CI 0.08 to 0.14), 0.09 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.26) and 0.40 (95% CI 0.31 to 0.51), respectively; while in PESI subgroup, the OR was 0.14 (95% CI 0.13 to 0.16), 0.09 (95% CI 0.04 to 0.21), and 0.30 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.38), respectively. For accuracy analysis, the pooled sensitivity, the pooled specificity, and the overall weighted AUC for PESI predicting all-cause mortality was 0.909 (95% CI: 0.900 to 0.916), 0.411 (95% CI: 0.407 to 0.415), and 0.7853±0.0058, respectively; for PE-related mortality, it was 0.953 (95% CI: 0.913 to 0.978), 0.374 (95% CI: 0.360 to 0.388), and 0.8218±0.0349, respectively; for serious adverse events, it was 0.821 (95% CI: 0.795 to 0.845), 0

  8. Diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic management of acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Tapson, Victor F

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. Recognizing PE and administering anticoagulants can significantly improve patient outcomes by reducing mortality rates and preventing recurrent events. For more than 50 years, standard therapy has involved parenteral anticoagulation followed by long-term therapy with the vitamin K antagonist warfarin. However, management of warfarin therapy is challenging due to its narrow therapeutic range and interactions with genetic and environmental factors. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been developed to simplify anticoagulation and avoid the concerns associated with warfarin. DOACs are administered at a fixed dosage without routine monitoring and have few drug interactions. In recent years, DOACs have received FDA approval for the treatment of acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and PE based on the results of well-conducted clinical trials. This review discusses approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of PE and the use of DOACs as an alternative to warfarin treatment for the management of the disease. While many of the indications for DOACs and concepts discussed apply to both DVT and PE, our focus will be acute PE. PMID:27450108

  9. Clinical Presentation of Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Survey of 800 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Miniati, Massimo; Cenci, Caterina; Monti, Simonetta; Poli, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common and potentially fatal disease that is still underdiagnosed. The objective of our study was to reappraise the clinical presentation of PE with emphasis on the identification of the symptoms and signs that prompt the patients to seek medical attention. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied 800 patients with PE from two different clinical settings: 440 were recruited in Pisa (Italy) as part of the Prospective Investigative Study of Acute Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PISAPED); 360 were diagnosed with and treated for PE in seven hospitals of central Tuscany, and evaluated at the Atherothrombotic Disorders Unit, Firenze (Italy), shortly after hospital discharge. We interviewed the patients directly using a standardized, self-administered questionnaire originally utilized in the PISAPED. The two samples differed significantly as regards age, proportion of outpatients, prevalence of unprovoked PE, and of active cancer. Sudden onset dyspnea was the most frequent symptom in both samples (81 and 78%), followed by chest pain (56 and 39%), fainting or syncope (26 and 22%), and hemoptysis (7 and 5%). At least one of the above symptoms was reported by 756 (94%) of 800 patients. Isolated symptoms and signs of deep vein thrombosis occurred in 3% of the cases. Only 7 (1%) of 800 patients had no symptoms before PE was diagnosed. Conclusions/Significance Most patients with PE feature at least one of four symptoms which, in decreasing order of frequency, are sudden onset dyspnea, chest pain, fainting (or syncope), and hemoptysis. The occurrence of such symptoms, if not explained otherwise, should alert the clinicians to consider PE in differential diagnosis, and order the appropriate objective test. PMID:22383978

  10. Adjunctive Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement for Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, V. M.; Lee-Llacer, J.; Williams, J.; Ubaissi, H.; Gutierrez, G.

    2010-08-15

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are sometimes placed as an adjunct to full anticoagulation in patients with significant pulmonary embolism (PE). We aimed to determine the prevalence of adjunctive IVC filter placement in individuals diagnosed with PE, as well as the effect of adjunctive filter placement on mortality in patients with right heart strain associated with PE. This was a retrospective study of patients with acute PE treated with full anticoagulation admitted to a single academic medical center. Information abstracted from patient charts included presence or absence of right heart strain and of deep-vein thrombosis, and whether or not an IVC filter was placed. The endpoint was in-hospital mortality. Over 2.75 years, we found that 248 patients were diagnosed with acute PE, with an in-hospital mortality rate of 4.4%. The prevalence of adjunctive IVC filter placement was 13.3% (33 of 248), and the prevalence of documented right heart strain was 27.0% (67 of 248). In-hospital mortality was 10.2% in the non-filter-treated group (5 of 49), whereas there were no deaths in the filter-treated group (0 of 18); however, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.37). Both the presence of deep-vein thrombosis and of right heart strain increased the likelihood that an adjunctive IVC filter was placed (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.001, respectively). At our institution, patients were treated with IVC filters in addition to anticoagulation in 13.3% of cases of acute PE. Prospective studies or large clinical registries should be conducted to clarify whether this practice improves outcomes.

  11. Acute tumor lysis syndrome after proximal splenic artery embolization.

    PubMed

    Salsamendi, Jason T; Doshi, Mehul H; Gortes, Francisco J; Levi, Joe U; Narayanan, Govindarajan

    2016-06-01

    Preoperative splenic artery embolization for massive splenomegaly has been shown to reduce intraoperative hemorrhage during splenectomy. We describe a case of tumor lysis syndrome after proximal splenic artery embolization in a patient with advanced mantle cell lymphoma and splenic involvement. The patient presented initially with hyperkalemia two days after embolization that worsened during splenectomy. He was stabilized, but developed laboratory tumor lysis syndrome with renal failure and expired. High clinical suspicion of tumor lysis syndrome in this setting is advised. Treatment must be started early to avoid serious renal injury and death. Lastly, same day splenectomy and embolization should be considered to decrease the likelihood of developing tumor lysis syndrome. PMID:27257458

  12. Endovascular Mechanical Thrombectomy of an Occluded Superior Division Branch of the Left MCA for Acute Cardioembolic Stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, H. C. Meyers, P. M.; Yavagal, D. R.; Harel, N. Y.; Elkind, M. S. V.; Mohr, J. P.; Pile-Spellman, J.

    2003-06-15

    Cardiac embolism accounts for a large proportion of ischemic stroke. Revascularization using systemic or intra-arterial thrombolysis is associated with increasing risks of cerebral hemorrhageas time passes from stroke onset. We report successful mechanicalthrombectomy from a distal branch of the middle cerebral artery (MCA)using a novel technique. A 72-year old man suffered an acute ischemic stroke from an echocardiographically proven ventricular thrombus due toa recent myocardial infarction. Intra-arterial administration of 4 mgrt-PA initiated at 5.7 hours post-ictus failed to recanalize an occluded superior division branch of the left MCA. At 6 hours,symptomatic embolic occlusion persisted. Mechanical extraction of the clot using an Attracter-18 device (Target Therapeutics, Freemont, CA) resulted in immediate recanalization of the MCA branch. Attracter-18 for acute occlusion of MCA branches may be considered in selected patients who fail conventional thrombolysis or are nearing closure of the therapeutic window for use of thrombolytic agents.

  13. Acute neurological symptoms during hypobaric exposure: consider cerebral air embolism.

    PubMed

    Weenink, Robert P; Hollmann, Markus W; van Hulst, Robert A

    2012-11-01

    Cerebral arterial gas embolism (CAGE) is well known as a complication of invasive medical procedures and as a risk in diving and submarine escape. In the underwater environment, CAGE is caused by trapped air, which expands and leads to lung vessel rupture when ambient pressure decreases during ascent. Pressure decrease also occurs during hypobaric activities such as flying and, therefore, CAGE may theoretically be a risk in hypobaric exposure. We reviewed the available literature on this subject. Identified were 12 cases of CAGE due to hypobaric exposure. Based on these cases, we discuss pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of CAGE due to hypobaric exposure. The low and slow pressure decrease during most hypobaric activities (as opposed to diving) account for the low incidence of CAGE during these exposures and suggest that severe air trapping must be present to cause barotrauma. This is also suggested by the large prevalence of air filled cysts in the case reports reviewed. We recommend considering CAGE in all patients presenting with acute central neurological injury during or shortly after pressure decrease such as flying. A CT scan of head and chest should be performed in these patients. Treatment with hyperbaric oxygen therapy should be initiated as soon as possible in cases of proven or probable CAGE. PMID:23156097

  14. Care of the patient with an acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    York, Nancy L; Kane, Christy J; Smith, Carol; Minton, Lori A

    2015-01-01

    There are evidence-based prevention strategies known to reduce the risk of pulmonary embolism formation. However, pulmonary emboli remain a leading cause of death in critically ill patients with a 3-month mortality of 10% to 15%. This article addresses patients' risk factors, pulmonary embolism prevention strategies, clinical manifestations, and treatment modalities the interdisciplinary team should understand. PMID:25470260

  15. Timely embolectomy in acute massive pulmonary embolism prevents catastrophe: An experience from two cases

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Dwarakaprasad; Setty, Huliyurdurga Srinivasasetty Natraj; Kumarswamy; Kumar, Sunil; Jayanth; Manjunath, Cholenahalli Nanjappa

    2016-01-01

    Acute massive pulmonary embolism is a life-threatening emergency that must be promptly diagnosed and managed. Over the last several years, the use of computed tomography scanning has improved the clinician's ability to diagnose acute pulmonary embolism. We report two cases of acute massive pulmonary embolism who presented with sudden onset of dyspnea and underwent successful open pulmonary embolectomy. The first case presented with acute onset of dyspnea of 2 days duration, in view of hemodynamic deterioration and two-dimensional echocardiography, it revealed clot in right ventricular (RV) apex and right pulmonary artery; the patient underwent cardiopulmonary bypass and open pulmonary embolectomy with RV clot extraction. The second case presented with a sudden onset of dyspnea on the 15th postoperative day for traumatic rupture of urinary bladder, in view of recent surgery, the patient was subjected to surgical embolectomy. Following surgical intervention, both the patients made a prompt recovery. PMID:27433070

  16. Transcatheter embolization of pancreatic arteriovenous malformation associated with recurrent acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, S; Mukund, Amar; Bhatia, Vikram; Arora, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) is extremely rare; even rarer is its association with pancreatitis. The authors report a case of PAVM causing recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis in a 46-year-old male. Patient refused surgery and was treated with transcatheter arterial embolization using liquid embolic agent (mixture of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate glue and lipiodol), which resulted in a significant decrease in the size of the PAVM. PMID:27081231

  17. Transarterial Thrombin Injection Secured with an Embolic Protection Device as a Treatment for a Superior Mesenteric Artery Pseudoaneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Juszkat, Robert Krasinski, Zbigniew; Wykretowicz, Mateusz; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Majewski, Waclaw

    2011-02-15

    A pseudoaneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) is a rare and life-threatening condition of various etiology. Even unruptured it can cause severe health problems or death. We report a 71-year-old male with a SMA pseudoaneurysm who was successfully treated with a transarterial thrombin injection secured with an embolic protection device used in carotid angioplasty. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a SMA pseudoaneurysm treated by this method.

  18. Assessment of heat shock proteins and endothelial dysfunction in acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    İn, Erdal; Deveci, Figen; Kaman, Dilara

    2016-06-01

    We determined the levels of some heat shock proteins (HSP27, HSP70, and HSP90), L-arginine, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) levels in patients with acute pulmonary embolism. The present case-control study comprised a healthy control group (n = 57) and patients with acute pulmonary embolism (n = 84). HSPs, L-arginine, ADMA, and SDMA levels were measured in all of the cases. The mean age of the control group was 56.72 ± 8.44 years, and the mean age of the patients with acute pulmonary embolism was 60.20 ± 16.56 years (P = 0.104). Compared with controls, patients with acute pulmonary embolism had significantly higher mean serum HSP27, HSP90, and ADMA levels, whereas the mean serum L-arginine and SDMA levels were lower (P < 0.001, for all parameters). In patients with acute pulmonary embolism serum HSP27, HSP70, and ADMA levels were negatively correlated with partial pressures of arterial oxygen levels (r = -0.281, P = 0.01; r = -0.263, P = 0.016; and r = -0.275, P = 0.011, respectively) and arterial oxygen saturation (r = -0.225, P = 0.039; r = -0.400, P < 0.001; r = -0.299, P = 0.006, respectively). The findings of the present study demonstrated that oxidative stress and endothelial damage increase in acute pulmonary embolism. PMID:26761580

  19. Acute ischemic colitis secondary to air embolism after diving

    PubMed Central

    Payor, Austin Daniel; Tucci, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic colitis (IC) secondary to air embolism from decompression sickness or barotrauma during diving is an extremely rare condition. After extensive review of the available literature, we found that there has been only one reported case of IC secondary to air embolism from diving. Although air embolization from diving and the various medical complications that follow have been well documented, the clinical manifestation of IC from an air embolism during diving is very rare and thus far unstudied. Common symptoms of IC include abdominal pain, bloody or non-bloody diarrhea or nausea or vomiting or any combination. Emergency physicians and Critical Care specialists should consider IC as a potential diagnosis for a patient with the above-mentioned symptoms and a history of recent diving. We report a case of IC from air embolism after a routine dive to 75 feet below sea level in a 53-year-old White female who presented to a community Emergency Department complaining of a 2-day history of diffuse abdominal pain and nausea. She was diagnosed by colonoscopy with biopsies and treated conservatively with antibiotics, bowel rest, and a slow advancement in diet. PMID:22096777

  20. A Pregnant Woman with Acute Massive Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuan Po; Lin, Li-Sian

    2014-01-01

    A 30-year-old pregnant woman who suffered from massive pulmonary embolism presented in an unstable hemodynamic status. Angiojet catheter embolectomy and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) were performed, which caused the patient’s condition to improve. Use of ECMO was continued during the weaning program, but the patient died of intracranial hemorrhage, a complication of ECMO. PMID:27122772

  1. [Acute upper limb embolism in a severely burned patient].

    PubMed

    Wiebringhaus, P; Pierson, T; Menke, H

    2014-12-01

    Thrombosis and pulmonary embolisms are the most common complications in the hospital. The need for anticoagulation during hospital stay is obligatory. Arterial embolisms are rare. They often take place in patients with a pre-existing peripheral artery occlusive disease or in patients with atrial fibrillation. The most common complications in burn patients are wound infection, pneumonia, catheter-associated infections and paralytic ileus. There are almost no data available regarding arterial embolism in burn patients. Therefore we would like to present the case of a 60-year-old woman who was injured by a fire at home and was transported to our special burn unit. She sustained partial thickness burns of both legs and buttocks. The TBSA was 15%. During the first days of clinical stay the patient suffered from a pain induced movement reduction of the left hand. There were no peripheral pulses palpable or by pulsed-wave Doppler detectable. An urgent selected angiography of the left arm was performed and a arterial embolism of the proximal part of the a. brachialis was detected. The patient was operated immediately. After debridement and split-skin graft of the burn wounds the patient was taken to rehabiliation after 35 days. PMID:25564950

  2. Acute ischemic non-embolic stroke and serum level of uric acid

    PubMed Central

    Sheykholeslami, Nazanin Zia; Gadari, Faranak; Ahmady, Jafar

    2012-01-01

    Background Impact of high level of uric acid on stroke is still controversial. We conducted this study to investigate the relationship between acute ischemic non-embolic stroke and serum levels of uric acid. Methods This was a case-control study on patients with acute ischemic non-embolic stroke in Rafsanjan, Iran. The control group consisted of normal persons who were similar to the case group in terms of age and gender. Serum level of uric acid in the first 24 hours of admission was measured with photometry method. Results In a total of 130 patients (59 mens), hyperuricemia was seen in 13.0% of subjects in the control group and 10.7% of subjects in the case group. Nine patients in case group and 7 patients in control group with hyperuricemia were women. No significant relationship was found between acute ischemic non-embolic stroke and serum level of uric acid. Conclusion There was no relationship between uric acid and acute ischemic non-embolic stroke. PMID:24250850

  3. Acute Bilateral Internal Carotid Occlusion from Embolization of Left Atrial Thrombus During Transesophageal Echocardiography: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Syed Saad; Manjila, Sunil; Singh, Gagandeep; Xavier, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is a relatively safe imaging modality used to visualize intracardiac thrombus. Summary of case: We report on a unique, fatal complication during TEE of embolization of a pre-existing “smoking” left atrial thrombus causing acute bilateral internal carotid occlusion, confirmed on angiogram. Conclusions: Patients with history of lung pathology, such as COPD, who experience retching and cough during transesophageal echocardiography may be more susceptible to embolization of pre-existing thrombi. A need exists to risk stratify such patients. PMID:27403219

  4. Pulmonary mucormycosis with embolism: two autopsied cases of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kogure, Yasunori; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Shinozaki-Ushiku, Aya; Watanabe, Akira; Kamei, Katsuhiko; Yoshizato, Tetsuichi; Nannya, Yasuhito; Fukayama, Masashi; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2014-01-01

    Mucormycosis is an increasingly important cause of morbidity and mortality for patients with hematological malignancies. The diagnosis of mucormycosis usually requires mycological evidence through tissue biopsy or autopsy because the signs and symptoms are nonspecific and there are currently no biomarkers to identify the disease. We herein present two autopsied cases of acute myeloid leukemia with prolonged neutropenia who developed invasive mucormycosis accompanied by pulmonary artery embolism. Our cases were featured by unexplained fever and rapidly progressive dyspnea. Computed tomography scan detected nodular lesions or nonspecific consolidations in the lungs. Cultures, cytological study, and serum fungal markers consistently gave negative results. Autopsy revealed embolism of the pulmonary artery which consisted of fibrin clots by filamentous fungi. Genomic DNA was extracted from the paraffin-embedded clots and was applied to polymerase chain reaction amplification, leading to the diagnosis of infection by Rhizopus microsporus. We should carefully search for life-threatening pulmonary embolism when patients with hematological malignancies develop pulmonary mucormycosis. PMID:25031775

  5. A Case of Acute Fulminant Fat Embolism Syndrome after Liposuction Surgery.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Seong Wook; Ban, Tae Hyun; Rhee, Chin Kook

    2015-10-01

    Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is a clinical manifestation that consists of multiple organ dysfunction due to fat emboli. FES occurs as a complication after trauma or procedures such as surgery. The diagnostic criteria of FES have not yet been established, so clinical criteria are used for its diagnosis. The clinical course of acute fulminant FES can be rapid. Liposuction surgery, in which adipocytes are mechanically disrupted, is one cause of FES. As the number of liposuction surgeries increases, clinicians should be aware of the possibility of FES. This was the first report of a case of acute fulminant FES with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome after liposuction surgery, in Korea. PMID:26508938

  6. A Case of Acute Fulminant Fat Embolism Syndrome after Liposuction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Seong Wook; Ban, Tae Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is a clinical manifestation that consists of multiple organ dysfunction due to fat emboli. FES occurs as a complication after trauma or procedures such as surgery. The diagnostic criteria of FES have not yet been established, so clinical criteria are used for its diagnosis. The clinical course of acute fulminant FES can be rapid. Liposuction surgery, in which adipocytes are mechanically disrupted, is one cause of FES. As the number of liposuction surgeries increases, clinicians should be aware of the possibility of FES. This was the first report of a case of acute fulminant FES with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome after liposuction surgery, in Korea. PMID:26508938

  7. [Cardiac Angiosarcoma with Acute Myocardial Infarction due to Tumor Embolism;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Date, Yusuke; Miyazu, Katsuyuki; Ikeda, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    We report the case of a 28-year-old man with a rare angiosarcoma complicated by acute myocardial infarction secondary to tumor embolism. He was transported to our emergency unit because of sudden onset of chest pain. The echocardiography showed a 42×60 mm mass in the left ventricle, and the coronary angiography showed embolic occlusion of the proximal left anterior descending and circumflex arteries. Emergent surgical removal of the mass was attempted under cardiopulmonary bypass, concomitant with double coronary artery bypass grafting and mitral valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. However, complete tumor excision was impossible. The postoperative pathological examination revealed undifferentiated angiosarcoma. Twenty days after the operation, the patient suffered acute cerebral hemorrhage from a metastatic tumor in the brain. He died at 37 days after the initial cardiac surgery. PMID:27586319

  8. Risk of Hemorrhage in Combined Neuroform Stenting and Coil Embolization of Acutely Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Jankowitz, B.; Thomas, A.J.; Vora, N.; Gupta, R.; Levy, E.; Yamamoto, J.; Kassam, A.; Gologorsky, Y.; Panapitiya, N.; Sandhu, E.; Crago, E.; Hricik, A.; Lee, K.; Gallek, M.; Jovin, T.; Horowitz, M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Stenting as adjuvant therapy for the coiling of acutely ruptured aneurysms remains controversial due to the necessity of anticoagulation and antiplatelet medications. We report our experience using the Neuroform stent in the management of 41 aneurysms in 40 patients over a period of three years. For aneurysms whose open surgical risk remains excessive with a morphology that would preclude complete embolization, the risks of stenting may be warranted. PMID:20557738

  9. 30-Day Mortality in Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Prognostic Value of Clinical Scores and Anamnestic Features

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Andreas Gunter; Taute, Bettina-Maria; Baasai, Nansalmaa; Wienke, Andreas; Meyer, Hans Jonas; Schramm, Dominik; Surov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Identification of high-risk patients with pulmonary embolism is vital. The aim of the present study was to examine clinical scores, their single items, and anamnestic features in their ability to predict 30-day mortality. Materials and Methods A retrospective, single-center study from 06/2005 to 01/2010 was performed. Inclusion criteria were presence of pulmonary embolism, availability of patient records and 30-day follow-up. The following clinical scores were calculated: Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II, original and simplified pulmonary embolism severity index, Glasgow Coma Scale, and euroSCORE II. Results In the study group of 365 patients 39 patients (10.7%) died within 30 days due to pulmonary embolism. From all examined scores and parameters the best predictor of 30-day mortality were the Glasgow Coma scale (≤ 10) and parameters of the circulatory system including presence of mechanical ventilation, arterial pH (< 7.335), and systolic blood pressure (< 99 mm Hg). Conclusions Easy to ascertain circulatory parameters have the same or higher prognostic value than the clinical scores that were applied in this study. From all clinical scores studied the Glasgow Coma Scale was the most time- and cost-efficient one. PMID:26866472

  10. Efficacy of Solitaire™ Stent Arterial Embolectomy in Treating Acute Cardiogenic Cerebral Embolism in 17 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Maolin; He, Wenqin; Dai, Weizheng; Ye, Yingan; Ruan, Zhifang; Wang, Shuanghu; Xie, Huifang

    2016-01-01

    Background Thrombolysis with rtPA is the only accepted drug therapy for acute ischemic stroke. Since acute cerebral stroke is so pervasive, newly developed recanalization methods have the potential for wide-ranging impacts on patient health and safety. We explored the efficacy and safety of Solitaire stent arterial embolectomy in the treatment of acute cardiogenic cerebral embolism. Material/Methods Between October 2012 and June 2015, 17 patients underwent Solitaire stent arterial embolectomy, either alone or in combination with rtPA intravenous thrombolysis, to treat acute cardiogenic cerebral embolism. Sheath placement time, vascular recanalization time, number of embolectomy attempts, and IV rtPA dose and time were recorded. Success and safety of the recanalization procedure, as well as clinical outcomes, were assessed. These results were compared to 16 control patients who were treated using only rtPA IV thrombolysis. Results Full recanalization of the occluded arteries was achieved in 15 (88.2%) of the Solitaire stent patients. NIH Stroke Scale scores of embolectomy patients improved by an average of 12.59±8.24 points between admission and discharge, compared to 5.56±5.96 in the control group (P<0.05). Glasgow Coma Score improvement between admission and discharge was also significantly higher in the embolectomy group (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, high perfusion encephalopathy, incidence of hernia, or mortality between the 2 groups (P>0.05). Conclusions Solitaire stent embolectomy is a safe and effective alternative to simple venous thrombolytic therapy, and it can significantly improve short-term neurological function and long-term prognosis in acute cardiogenic cerebral embolism. PMID:27090916

  11. Java interface to a computer-aided diagnosis system for acute pulmonary embolism using PIOPED findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, Erik D.; Tourassi, Georgia D.; Gauger, Matthew; Floyd, Carey E., Jr.

    1999-05-01

    An interface to a Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system for diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Embolism (PE) from PIOPED radiographic findings was developed. The interface is based on Internet technology which is user-friendly and available on a broad range of computing platforms. It was designed to be used as a research tool and as a data collection tool, allowing researchers to observe the behavior of a CAD system and to collect radiographic findings on ventilation-perfusion lung scans and chest radiographs. The interface collects findings from physicians in the PIOPED reporting format, processes those findings and presents them as inputs to an artificial neural network (ANN) previously trained on findings from 1,064 patients from the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PIOPED) study. The likelihood of PE predicted by the ANN and by the physician using the system is then saved for later analysis.

  12. Superior Hypogastric Nerve Block to Reduce Pain After Uterine Artery Embolization: Advanced Technique and Comparison to Epidural Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Binkert, Christoph A.; Hirzel, Florian C.; Gutzeit, Andreas; Zollikofer, Christoph L.; Hess, Thomas

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo evaluate a modified superior hypogastric nerve block (SHNB) to reduce pain after uterine artery embolization (UAE) compared to epidural anesthesia.Materials and methodsIn this retrospective study, the amount of opiate drugs needed after UAE was compared between SHNB and epidural anesthesia. Eighty one consecutive women (mean age: 43.67 years) were in the SHNB group and 27 consecutive women (mean age: 43.48 years) treated earlier at the same institution in the epidural anesthesia group. UAE was performed from a unilateral femoral artery approach using a 4F catheter. 500–700 or 700–900 μm trisacryl gelatine microspheres were used as embolic agents. The SHNB was performed by advancing a 21G from the abdominal wall below the umbilicus to the anterior portion of the 5th vertebral body. For optimal guidance a cranio-caudal tilt of 5°–15° was used. On a lateral view the correct contrast distribution in front of the vertebral body is confirmed. Then 20 ml local anesthesia (ropivacain 0.75 %) is injected. In case of an asymmetric right–left distribution the needle was repositioned.ResultsAll SHNB were successful without severe complications. The mean time for the SHNB was 4 min 38 s (2 min 38 s–9 min 27 s). The needle was repositioned in average 0.87 times. The opiate dose for the SHNB group was 19.33 ± 22.17 mg which was significantly lower. The average time to receive an opiate drug after SHNB was 4 h 41 min.ConclusionThe SHNB is a safe and minimally time-consuming way to reduce pain after UAE especially within the first 4 h.

  13. Modified PISAPED Criteria in Combination with Ventilation Scintigraphic Finding for Predicting Acute Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Naoyuki; Fettich, Jure; Küçük, Nurie Özlem; Kraft, Otakar; Mut, Fernando; Choudhury, Partha; Sharma, Surendra K; Endo, Keigo; Dondi, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    This prospective clinical study aimed at assessing three pulmonary scintigraphic algorithms to detect acute pulmonary embolism (PE): Lung ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy along with modified prospective investigation of pulmonary embolism diagnosis (PIOPED) criteria; lung perfusion scintigraphy along with prospective investigative study of acute pulmonary embolism diagnosis (PISAPED) criteria; and lung perfusion scan in combination with ventilation scan, along with modified PISAPED criteria, which were newly developed. Patients with suspicion of PE were eligible for this study if they had no abnormal chest x-ray. Their diagnostic workup included a clinical assessment, a pulmonary V/Q scintigraphy, and CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA), as well as a clinical outcome assessment over a period of 24 weeks. Referred to the final clinical diagnosis of patients, the sensitivity and specificity of each algorithm were evaluated. The diagnostic performance of each algorithm by the area under the maximum likelihood fitted receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was determined. With respect to the PISAPED criteria, the sensitivity was 60.8% and specificity was 87.3%. No patient was classified into nondiagnostic category. The PIOPED criteria showed that the sensitivity was 95.0% and specificity was 88.2%, while 57.4% of the patients were in nondiagnostic category. The areas under the ROC curve constructed from the PISAPED criteria results and the modified PIOPED criteria results were 0.734 and 0.859 (P < 0.01), respectively. The modified PISAPED criteria demonstrated that the sensitivity was 83.8% and specificity was 89.1%. No patient was classified into nondiagnostic category. The area under the ROC curve constructed from modified PISAPED criteria was 0.864 (P < 0.01). Perfusion scans used with ventilation scans and modified PISAPED criteria may increase the diagnostic accuracy of pulmonary scintigraphy for acute PE, compared with the two major algorithms. PMID

  14. [Severe pulmonary embolism and acute lower limb ischemia complicating peripartum cardiomyopathy successfully treated by streptokinase].

    PubMed

    Yaméogo, N V; Kaboré, E; Seghda, A; Kagambèga, L J; Kaboré, H P; Millogo, G R C; Kologo, K J; Kambiré, Y; Bama, A; Toguyeni, B J Y; Samadoulougou, A K; Zabsonré, P

    2016-02-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a cardiac disease at high thromboembolism potential. The authors report a case of peripartum cardiomyopathy admitted for congestive heart failure. Echocardiography found a dilated cardiomyopathy with severely impaired left ventricular systolic function and biventricular thrombi. During hospitalization his condition was complicated by severe bilateral pulmonary embolism and left lower limb arterial acute thrombosis. The treatment consisted of thrombolysis with streptokinase associated with dobutamine (in addition to the conventional treatment of heart failure and bromocriptine). The outcome was favorable, marked by pulmonary and lower limb arterial unblocking. PMID:25623958

  15. Successful recovery from an acute kidney injury due to amniotic fluid embolism.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Katsuhito; Naito, Shotaro; Okado, Tomokazu; Rai, Tatemitu; Mori, Yutaro; Toda, Takayuki; Uchida, Shinichi; Sasaki, Sei; Matsui, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old Japanese woman at 40 weeks gestation visited the maternity hospital after imminent labor had begun. After the delivery, persistent bleeding developed resulting in hemorrhagic shock. Although the hemorrhage was eventually controlled, hepatic and renal dysfunction occurred, leading to acute kidney injury (AKI). The patient's clinical presentation was suggestive of amniotic fluid embolism (AFE). We subsequently initiated continuous renal replacement therapy (RRT) for AKI. The patient's condition improved, she discontinued RRT, and her renal function recovered. We herein report a patient who successfully recovered from AKI caused by AFE. PMID:25742893

  16. Acute pulmonary embolism caused by enlarged uterine leiomyoma: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Khademvatani, Kamal; Rezaei, Yousef; Kerachian, Abdollah; Seyyed-Mohammadzad, Mir Hossein; Eskandari, Ramin; Rostamzadeh, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 42 Final Diagnosis: Acute pulmonary embolism Symptoms: Chest pain • dyspnea Medication: Streptokinase • Warfarin Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Cardiology and Neoplasm Objective: Management of emergency care Background: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and subsequent pulmonary embolism (PE) caused by pelvic vein compression are rare and life-threatening complications of leiomyoma of the uterus. Case Report: We report a 42-year-old virgin woman with a history of leiomyoma who presented to the emergency department with complaints of dyspnea and pleuritic chest pain with transient spotting. On physical examination, she had a non-tender abdomen with a 20-week size uterus. Imaging investigations revealed an acute DVT in her left leg and a huge uterine-derived mass compressing the common iliac veins. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) demonstrated an echogenic mass in her right pulmonary artery consistent with thrombosis. The patient was completely cured using thrombolytic therapy and myomectomy, and was well at 1 year after thrombolysis. Conclusions: PE caused by pelvic vein compression is a rare complication of leiomyoma, which should be considered. Thrombolytic therapy associated with myomectomy can be implemented for treating such cases, and TEE can be used for diagnosing suspected high-risk PE. PMID:25061497

  17. Electrocardiography Patterns and the Role of the Electrocardiography Score for Risk Stratification in Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyeon Min; Lee, Ju Hwan; Kwon, Yong Seop; Lee, Sang Hyuk; Bae, Myung Hwan; Lee, Jang Hoon; Yang, Dong Heon; Park, Hun Sik; Chae, Shung Chull; Jun, Jae-Eun; Park, Wee-Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives Data on the usefulness of a combination of different electrocardiography (ECG) abnormalities in risk stratification of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) are limited. We thus investigated 12-lead ECG patterns in acute PE to evaluate the role of the ECG score in risk stratification of patients with acute PE. Subjects and Methods One hundred twenty-five consecutive patients (63±14 years, 56 men) with acute PE who were admitted to Kyungpook National University Hospital between November 2001 and January 2008 were included. We analyzed ECG patterns and calculated the ECG score in all patients. We evaluated right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) (n=75) and RV hypokinesia (n=80) using echocardiography for risk stratification of acute PE patients. Results Among several ECG findings, sinus tachycardia and inverted T waves in V1-4 (39%) were observed most frequently. The mean ECG score and RVSP were 7.36±6.32 and 49±21 mmHg, respectively. The ECG score correlated with RVSP (r=0.277, p=0.016). The patients were divided into two groups {high ECG-score group (n=38): ECG score >12 and low ECG-score group (n=87): ECG score ≤12} based on the ECG score, with the maximum area under the curve. RV hypokinesia was observed more frequently in the high ECG-score group than in the low ECG-score group (p=0.006). Multivariate analysis revealed that a high ECG score was an independent predictor of high RVSP and RV hypokinesia. Conclusion Sinus tachycardia and inverted T waves in V1-4 were commonly observed in acute PE. Moreover, the ECG score is a useful tool in risk stratification of patients with acute PE. PMID:21088753

  18. Embolization followed by surgery for treatment of perimedullary arteriovenous fistula causing acute myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, I-Han; Lee, Han-Chung; Yen, Pao-Sheng; Cho, Der-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Perimedullary arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is rare. There are three subtypes, and the treatment strategies for each are different. Subtype B (multiple fistulas) can be treated by either embolization or surgery. On the basis of a case from our treatment experience, we propose a method for achieving optimal outcome while minimizing nerve injury. Case Description: A 51-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with acute myelopathy caused by a perimedullary AVF. Initially, we treated her by embolization using the chemical agent Onyx. Her symptoms improved immediately but gradually returned beginning 1 week later. Two months later, the symptoms had returned to pretreatment status, so we removed the fistulas surgically. Severe adhesions between nerve and occult venous varices were noted during the operation. Afterward, the patient's symptoms improved significantly. Histopathological sections showed an inflammatory reaction around the varices. Conclusions: We initially considered several possible reasons for the return of symptoms: (a) Hypoperfusion of the spinal cord; (b) mass effect of the occult vein varices; (c) residual AVF or vascular remodeling resulting in recurrent cord hypertension; (d) Onyx-induced perivascular inflammation resulting in nerves adhering to each other and to occult venous varices. Clinical, surgical, and pathological findings ruled out the first three, leaving Onyx-induced perivascular inflammation as the probable reason. Given our treatment experience and the pros and cons of the two methods, we propose that initial embolization followed by surgery after 5 days to remove occult venous varices is the ideal strategy for treating perimedullary AVF of subtype B. PMID:26069849

  19. Risk-adapted management of acute pulmonary embolism: recent evidence, new guidelines.

    PubMed

    Käberich, Anja; Wärntges, Simone; Konstantinides, Stavros

    2014-10-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), the third most frequent acute cardiovascular syndrome, may cause life-threatening complications and imposes a substantial socio-economic burden. During the past years, several landmark trials paved the way towards novel strategies in acute and long-term management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Risk stratification is increasingly recognized as a cornerstone for an adequate diagnostic and therapeutic management of the highly heterogeneous population of patients with acute PE. Recently published European Guidelines emphasize the importance of clinical prediction rules in combination with imaging procedures (assessment of right ventricular function) and laboratory biomarkers (indicative of myocardial stress or injury) for identification of normotensive PE patients at intermediate risk for an adverse short-term outcome. In this patient group, systemic full-dose thrombolysis was associated with a significantly increased risk of intracranial bleeding, a complication which discourages its clinical application unless hemodynamic decompensation occurs. A large-scale clinical trial program evaluating new oral anticoagulants in the initial and long-term treatment of venous thromboembolism showed at least comparable efficacy and presumably increased safety of these drugs compared to the current standard treatment. Research is continuing on catheter-directed, ultrasound-assisted, local, low-dose thrombolysis in the management of intermediate-risk PE. PMID:25386356

  20. Risk-Adapted Management of Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Recent Evidence, New Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Käberich, Anja; Wärntges, Simone; Konstantinides, Stavros

    2014-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), the third most frequent acute cardiovascular syndrome, may cause life-threatening complications and imposes a substantial socio-economic burden. During the past years, several landmark trials paved the way towards novel strategies in acute and long-term management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Risk stratification is increasingly recognized as a cornerstone for an adequate diagnostic and therapeutic management of the highly heterogeneous population of patients with acute PE. Recently published European Guidelines emphasize the importance of clinical prediction rules in combination with imaging procedures (assessment of right ventricular function) and laboratory biomarkers (indicative of myocardial stress or injury) for identification of normotensive PE patients at intermediate risk for an adverse short-term outcome. In this patient group, systemic full-dose thrombolysis was associated with a significantly increased risk of intracranial bleeding, a complication which discourages its clinical application unless hemodynamic decompensation occurs. A large-scale clinical trial program evaluating new oral anticoagulants in the initial and long-term treatment of venous thromboembolism showed at least comparable efficacy and presumably increased safety of these drugs compared to the current standard treatment. Research is continuing on catheter-directed, ultrasound-assisted, local, low-dose thrombolysis in the management of intermediate-risk PE. PMID:25386356

  1. Critical Review and Update on the Treatment of Acute and Chronic Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Nancy L; Bhatt, Snehal H

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE), can be life-threatening without rapid appropriate therapy and often leads to chronic disease and disability. The ambiguity of symptoms makes PE difficult to diagnose, and available imaging strategies have their limitations. Treatment options for acute PE include fibrinolytics, surgical embolectomy, catheter-directed treatment, or vena cava filter placement as well as traditional parenteral anticoagulants, used alone or as a bridge to a vitamin K antagonist (VKA). The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) rivaroxaban and apixaban allow for single drug therapy, eliminating the need for initial parenteral anticoagulation, while dabigatran and edoxaban are initiated after a short course of parenteral therapy. The DOACs serve as a viable alternative to warfarin for chronic management for PE. Pulmonary embolism provoked from transient risk factors often requires a short-term course of anticoagulation (3 months). Unprovoked events, and those that occur in the presence of continuing risk factors such as cancer, or clinical markers such as residual vein thrombosis and elevated d-dimers can predict a higher risk of recurrent events and warrant extended anticoagulation. This review evaluates current recommendations for the treatment of PE, including dosing strategies, duration of therapy, and special populations such as renal impairment, malignancy, and obesity. PMID:26589472

  2. Treatment of Acute Massive Pulmonary Embolism by Streptokinase during Labour and Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hall, R. J. C.; Young, C.; Sutton, G. C.; Cambell, S.

    1972-01-01

    A 29-year-old woman sustained an acute massive pulmonary embolism in the 32nd week of pregnancy. Rapid clinical improvement followed the use of streptokinase. Treatment was continued for 41 hours, including labour and the first three hours after delivery. There was slow but severe postpartum haemorrhage. Partial uterine atony occurred, and may have been due, at least in part, to fibrin degradation products arising from thrombolysis. No adverse effects were noted in the baby. Our experience suggests that streptokinase may be given during labour but that an oxytocic agent may be needed; and that reversal of fibrinolysis before delivery is best achieved by the use of aprotinin (Trasylol) rather than aminocaproic acid. Imagesp647-a PMID:4539533

  3. Shape-based analysis of right ventricular dysfunction associated with acute pulmonary embolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajbakhsh, Nima; Xue, Wenzhe; Wu, Hong; Liang, Jianming; McMahon, Eileen M.; Belohlavek, Marek

    2012-03-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (APE) is known as one of the major causes of sudden death. However, high level of mortality caused by APE can be reduced, if detected in early stages of development. Hence, biomarkers capable of early detection of APE are of utmost importance. This study investigates how APE affects the biomechanics of the cardiac right ventricle (RV), taking one step towards developing functional biomarkers for early diagnosis and determination of prognosis of APE. To that end, we conducted a pilot study in pigs, which revealed the following major changes due to the severe RV afterload caused by APE: (1) waving paradoxical motion of the RV inner boundary, (2) decrease in local curvature of the septum, (3) lower positive correlation between the movement of inner boundaries of the septal and free walls of the RV, (4) slower blood ejection by the RV, and (5) discontinuous movement observed particularly in the middle of the RV septal wall.

  4. Clinical presentation and in-hospital death in acute pulmonary embolism: does cancer matter?

    PubMed

    Casazza, Franco; Becattini, Cecilia; Rulli, Eliana; Pacchetti, Ilaria; Floriani, Irene; Biancardi, Marco; Scardovi, Angela Beatrice; Enea, Iolanda; Bongarzoni, Amedeo; Pignataro, Luigi; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is one of the most common risk factors for acute pulmonary embolism (PE), but only few studies report on the short-term outcome of patients with PE and a history of cancer. The aim of the study was to assess whether a cancer diagnosis affects the clinical presentation and short-term outcome in patients hospitalized for PE who were included in the Italian Pulmonary Embolism Registry. All-cause and PE-related in-hospital deaths were also analyzed. Out of 1702 patients, 451 (26.5 %) of patients had a diagnosis of cancer: cancer was known at presentation in 365, or diagnosed during the hospital stay for PE in 86 (19 % of cancer patients). Patients with and without cancer were similar concerning clinical status at presentation. Patients with cancer less commonly received thrombolytic therapy, and more often had an inferior vena cava filter inserted. Major or intracranial bleeding was not different between groups. In-hospital all-cause death occurred in 8.4 and 5.9 % of patients with and without cancer, respectively. At multivariate analysis, cancer (OR 2.24, 95 % CI 1.27-3.98; P = 0.006) was an independent predictor of in-hospital death. Clinical instability, PE recurrence, age ≥75 years, recent bed rest ≥3 days, but not cancer, were independent predictors of in-hospital death due to PE. Cancer seems a weaker predictor of all-cause in-hospital death compared to other factors; the mere presence of cancer, without other risk factors, leads to a probability of early death of 2 %. In patients with acute PE, cancer increases the probability of in-hospital all-cause death, but does not seem to affect the clinical presentation or the risk of in-hospital PE-related death. PMID:27023066

  5. The role of computed tomography in the diagnosis of acute and chronic pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, Halil; de Roos, Albert; Geleijins, Jacob; Huisman, Menno V.; Kroft, Lucia J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a potentially life threatening condition requiring adequate diagnosis and treatment. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is excellent for including and excluding PE, therefore CT is the first-choice diagnostic imaging technique in patients suspected of having acute PE. Due to its wide availability and low invasiveness, CTPA tends to be overused. Correct implementation of clinical decision rules in diagnostic workup for PE improves adequate use of CT. Also, CT adds prognostic value by evaluating right ventricular (RV) function. CT-assessed RV dysfunction and to lesser extent central emboli location predicts PE-related mortality in normotensive and hypotensive patients, while PE embolic obstruction index has limited prognostic value. Simple RV/left ventricular (LV) diameter ratio measures >1.0 already predict risk for adverse outcome, whereas ratios <1.0 can safely exclude adverse outcome. Consequently, assessing the RV/LV diameter ratio may help identify patients who are potential candidates for treatment at home instead of treatment in the hospital. A minority of patients develop chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) following acute PE, which is a life-threatening condition that can be diagnosed by CT. In proximal CTEPH, involving the more central pulmonary arteries, thrombectomy usually results in good outcome in terms of both functional status and long-term survival rate. CT is becoming the imaging method of choice for diagnosing CTEPH as it can identify patients who may benefit from thrombectomy. New CT developments such as distensibility measurements and dual-energy or subtraction techniques may further refine diagnosis and prognosis for improved patient care. PMID:26133321

  6. Home treatment of patients with small to medium sized acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Elf, J E; Jögi, J; Bajc, M

    2015-02-01

    Most patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) are still treated as inpatients. This is a retrospective cohort study of patients with acute PE, diagnosed using V/P SPECT between 2007 and 2011. Patients were treated at home if they were hemodynamically stable, did not require oxygen or parenteral analgetics, had no contraindications to anticoagulant treatment and V/P SPECT showed an extension of the PE of less than 40%. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of home treatment with our algorithm. During the study period 416 outpatients were diagnosed with acute symptomatic PE of whom in total 260 (62.5%) were discharged home from the emergency unit and another 47 (11%) within 24 h from admission. During 3 months follow-up one (0.3%) patient had a recurrent thrombotic event. Eleven (3.6%) patients had a major or clinically relevant bleed and the overall mortality was 2% (n = 6). There were no PE-related mortality. Home treatment should be considered and is safe in the majority of hemodynamically stable outpatients with small to medium size PE, quantified using V/P SPECT. PMID:24942995

  7. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in elderly patients with acute venous thrombo-embolism: the SWIss Venous ThromboEmbolism Registry (SWIVTER)

    PubMed Central

    Spirk, David; Husmann, Marc; Hayoz, Daniel; Baldi, Thomas; Frauchiger, Beat; Engelberger, Rolf; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice; Baumgartner, Iris; Kucher, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Aims Although acute venous thrombo-embolism (VTE) often afflicts patients with advanced age, the predictors of in-hospital mortality for elderly VTE patients are unknown. Methods and results Among 1247 consecutive patients with acute VTE from the prospective SWIss Venous ThromboEmbolism Registry (SWIVTER), 644 (52%) were elderly (≥65 years of age). In comparison to younger patients, the elderly more often had pulmonary embolism (PE) (60 vs. 42%; P< 0.001), cancer (30 vs. 20%; P< 0.001), chronic lung disease (14 vs. 8%; P= 0.001), and congestive heart failure (12 vs. 2%; P< 0.001). Elderly VTE patients were more often hospitalized (75 vs. 52%; P< 0.001), and there was no difference in the use of thrombolysis, catheter intervention, or surgical embolectomy between the elderly and younger PE patients (5 vs. 6%; P= 0.54), despite a trend towards a higher rate of massive PE in the elderly (8 vs. 4%; P= 0.07). The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 6.6% in the elderly vs. 3.2% in the younger VTE patients (P= 0.033). Cancer was associated with in-hospital death both in the elderly [hazard ratio (HR) 4.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.32–10.38; P< 0.001] and in the younger patients (HR 4.90, 95% CI 1.37–17.59; P= 0.015); massive PE was a predictor of in-hospital death in the elderly only (HR 3.77, 95% CI 1.63–8.74; P= 0.002). Conclusion Elderly patients had more serious VTE than younger patients, and massive PE was particularly life-threatening in the elderly. PMID:22036872

  8. Clinical Features of Acute Massive Pulmonary Embolism Complicated by Radiofrequency Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue-Chun; Lin, Jiafeng; Wu, Lianpin; Li, Jia; Chen, Peng; Guang, Xue-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although pulmonary embolism (PE) complicated by radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is rare, it can be life-threatening. Our goal was to elucidate the clinical features of acute massive PE after RFCA. Of 2386 patients who underwent RFCA for supraventricular tachycardia or idiopathic ventricular arrhythmia, 4 patients (0.16%) whose cases were complicated by acute massive PE were examined. These 4 patients were female and middle-aged (range 43–52 years), and 2 of the 4 patients had iron-deficiency anemia and reactive thrombocytosis. Ablation in all patients was performed in the left heart via the right femoral arterial approach. All of the patients had a long-duration hemostasis procedure and bed rest following femoral arterial sheath removal after RFCA. All of the patients collapsed and lost consciousness during their first attempt at walking after RFCA. The emergent electrocardiogram in 2 of the 4 patients revealed an S1Q3T3 pattern, 1 patient demonstrated new onset of right bundle-branch block (RBBB) and S1Q3 pattern and Qr pattern in V1, and the remaining patient had negative T waves in leads V1, V2, and III. The emergent echocardiogram revealed right ventricular hypokinesis and pulmonary hypertension in the 4 patients with acute PE after ablation. Although all of the patients initially experienced sinus tachycardia when they recovered consciousness, 2 of the 4 patients suddenly developed intense bradycardia and lost consciousness again, and these patients finally died (50% fatality rate). All of the patients were identified by CT pulmonary angiography or pulmonary angiography. Our report suggests that although acute massive PE is highly rare, there is a real and fatal risk in patients who experienced acute massive PE after RFCA. Particular attention should be paid to the first ambulation after RFCA. Acute PE should be strongly suspected when sudden loss of consciousness occurs upon mobilization after RFCA. The new onset of S1Q3T3 pattern, RBBB

  9. Clinical Features of Acute Massive Pulmonary Embolism Complicated by Radiofrequency Ablation: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue-Chun; Lin, Jiafeng; Wu, Lianpin; Li, Jia; Chen, Peng; Guang, Xue-Qiang

    2015-10-01

    Although pulmonary embolism (PE) complicated by radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is rare, it can be life-threatening. Our goal was to elucidate the clinical features of acute massive PE after RFCA. Of 2386 patients who underwent RFCA for supraventricular tachycardia or idiopathic ventricular arrhythmia, 4 patients (0.16%) whose cases were complicated by acute massive PE were examined. These 4 patients were female and middle-aged (range 43-52 years), and 2 of the 4 patients had iron-deficiency anemia and reactive thrombocytosis. Ablation in all patients was performed in the left heart via the right femoral arterial approach. All of the patients had a long-duration hemostasis procedure and bed rest following femoral arterial sheath removal after RFCA. All of the patients collapsed and lost consciousness during their first attempt at walking after RFCA. The emergent electrocardiogram in 2 of the 4 patients revealed an S1Q3T3 pattern, 1 patient demonstrated new onset of right bundle-branch block (RBBB) and S1Q3 pattern and Qr pattern in V1, and the remaining patient had negative T waves in leads V1, V2, and III. The emergent echocardiogram revealed right ventricular hypokinesis and pulmonary hypertension in the 4 patients with acute PE after ablation. Although all of the patients initially experienced sinus tachycardia when they recovered consciousness, 2 of the 4 patients suddenly developed intense bradycardia and lost consciousness again, and these patients finally died (50% fatality rate). All of the patients were identified by CT pulmonary angiography or pulmonary angiography. Our report suggests that although acute massive PE is highly rare, there is a real and fatal risk in patients who experienced acute massive PE after RFCA. Particular attention should be paid to the first ambulation after RFCA. Acute PE should be strongly suspected when sudden loss of consciousness occurs upon mobilization after RFCA. The new onset of S1Q3T3 pattern, RBBB or T

  10. Prognostic value of troponins in acute nonmassive pulmonary embolism: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Anurag; Saleeb, Michael; Rathor, Parul; Sehgal, Vishal; Kabak, Besher; Hosur, Srikanth

    2015-01-01

    The objective of our meta-analysis is to update the evidence on the prognostic value of elevated troponin levels in patient with acute normotensive pulmonary embolism (PE). We did a systematic literature review of database, including Pubmed, EMBASE, and Cochrane. Studies were included if those were done on normotensive patients with acute PE and serum troponin assay was done. The primary end point was short term all cause mortality. The secondary end points were short term PE related mortality and serious adverse events. Elevated troponin levels were significantly associated with the increased risk for short term mortality (odds ratio [OR], 4.80; 95% CI, 3.25-7.08, I(2) = 54%), PE related mortality (OR, 3.80; 95% CI, 2.74-5.27, I(2) = 0%) and serious adverse events (OR, 3.65; 95% CI, 2.41-5.53, I(2) = 47%). Our study suggests that elevated levels of troponin identify a subgroup of patients with increased risk for short term mortality and serious adverse events. PMID:25976228

  11. Acute-onset nontraumatic paraplegia in childhood: fibrocartilaginous embolism or acute myelitis?

    PubMed

    Davis, G A; Klug, G L

    2000-09-01

    Fibrocartilaginous embolus causing acute spinal cord infarction is a rare cause of acute-onset paraplegia or quadriplegia. Few cases of survivors have been reported in the neurosurgical literature, with most reports involving postmortem or biopsy findings. There is little information on MRI findings in such patients. We present the youngest patient ever reported, and discuss the important differences between fibrocartilaginous embolus and acute myelitis of childhood. A 6-year-old girl with a history of back pain presented with sudden-onset nontraumatic paraplegia, with a clinical anterior spinal artery syndrome. Initial MRI scan revealed intervertebral disc disease at L1-2 and an incidental thoracic syrinx, but no cause for her acute-onset paraplegia was identified. Cerebrospinal fluid and other investigations were all negative. Sequential MRI scans revealed development of spinal cord expansion from T10 to the conus medullaris, with increased cord signal in the anterior aspect of the spinal cord. The intervertebral disc disease was unchanged. The imaging and clinical findings were caused by fibrocartilaginous embolus, which meant there was no need for spinal cord biopsy. The report describes the clinical and imaging criteria for diagnosis of fibrocartilaginous embolus, highlighting the case for avoiding an unnecessary biopsy. The clinical pattern in the paediatric group is discussed, with features differentiating it from acute myelitis of childhood. PMID:11048627

  12. Incidence and risk factors of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension in patients after acute pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Suqiao; Yang, Yuanhua; Zhai, Zhenguo; Kuang, Tuguang; Gong, Juanni; Zhang, Shuai; Zhu, Jianguo; Liang, Lirong; Shen, Ying H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Early identification and treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) are critical to prevent disease progression. We determined the incidence and risk factors for CTEPH in patients with a first episode of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods In this study, consecutive patients with first-episode acute PE were followed for ≤5 years. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) was screened for by echocardiography. Suspected cases were evaluated by right heart catheterization (RHC) and pulmonary angiography (PA). If invasive procedures were not permitted, PH was diagnosed by systolic pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP) >50 mmHg. Diagnosis of CTEPH was confirmed by PA, ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) lung scan, or computed tomography (CT) PA (CTPA). Results Overall, 614 patients with acute PE were included (median follow-up, 3.3 years). Ten patients were diagnosed with CTEPH: cumulative incidence 0.8% [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.0-1.6%] at 1 year, 1.3% (95% CI, 0.3-2.3%) at 2 years, and 1.7% (95% CI, 0.7-2.7%) at 3 years. No cases of CTEPH developed after 3 years. History of lower-limb varicose veins [hazard ratio (HR), 4.3; 95% CI, 1.2-15.4; P=0.024], SPAP >50 mmHg at initial PE episode (HR, 23.5; 95% CI, 2.7-207.6; P=0.005), intermediate-risk PE (HR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.0-1.4; P=0.030), and CT obstruction index over 30% at 3 months after acute PE (HR, 42.5; 95% CI, 4.4-409.8; P=0.001) were associated with increased risk of CTEPH. Conclusions CTEPH was not rare after acute PE in this Chinese population, especially within 3 years of diagnosis. Lower-limb varicose veins, intermediate-risk PE with elevated SPAP in the acute phase, and residual emboli during follow-up might increase the risk of CTEPH. PMID:26716031

  13. Is there a place for inhaled nitric oxide in the therapy of acute pulmonary embolism?

    PubMed

    Tanus-Santos, Jose E; Theodorakis, Michael J

    2002-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a serious complication resulting from the migration of emboli to the lungs. Although deep venous thrombi are the most common source of emboli to the lungs, other important sources include air, amniotic fluid, fat and bone marrow. Regardless of the specific source of the emboli, very little progress has been made in the pharmacological management of this high mortality condition. Because the prognosis is linked to the degree of elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance, any therapeutic intervention to improve the hemodynamics would probably increase the low survival rate of this critical condition. Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) has been widely tested and used in cases of pulmonary hypertension of different causes. In the last few years some authors have described beneficial effects of iNO in animal models of acute PE and in anecdotal cases of massive PE. The primary cause of death in massive PE that is caused by deep venous thrombi, gas or amniotic fluid, is acute right heart failure and circulatory shock. Increased pulmonary vascular resistance following acute PE is the cumulative result of mechanical obstruction of pulmonary vessels and pulmonary arteriolar constriction (attributable to a neurogenic reflex and to the release of vasoconstrictors). As such, the vasodilator effects of iNO could actively oppose the pulmonary hypertension following PE. This hypothesis is consistently supported by experimental studies in different animal models of PE, which demonstrated that iNO decreased (by 10 to 20%) the pulmonary artery pressure without improving pulmonary gas exchange. Although maximal vasodilatory effects are probably achieved by less than 5 parts per million iNO, which is a relatively low concentration, no dose-response study has been published so far. In addition to the animal studies, a few anecdotal reports in the literature suggest that iNO may improve the hemodynamics during acute PE. However, no prospective, controlled

  14. Microcatheter Looping Facilitates Access to Both the Acutely Angled Parent Artery and Cerebral Aneurysms for Effective Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cong-Hui; Ye, Jian-Ya; Su, Xian-Hui; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Dong-Liang; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Er-Wei; Han, Yong-Feng; Yang, Song-Tao; Gao, Bu-Lang

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aneurysms with an acutely angled parent artery are difficult to access for coiling. This study aimed to investigate the safety and effectiveness of microcatheter looping for embolization of cerebral aneurysms with access difficulty. Ten patients (male:female=5:5) with cerebral aneurysms treated with the microcatheter looping technique were analyzed retrospectively. The parent artery formed an acute angle with the major artery in five aneurysms. The microcatheter was looped into a “α” loop for treatment in the anterior temporal artery aneurysm and a “U” loop in the remaining nine aneurysms. All ten aneurysms were successfully treated with the microcatheter looping technique. The microcatheter tip was successfully navigated into the aneurysm sac and remained stable throughout the embolization process. All aneurysms were occluded with total occlusion in five and near-total occlusion in five, and the parent artery remained patent in all cases. No complications occurred peri-procedurally. The Glasgow Outcome Scale was 5 in all patients before discharge. Follow-up angiography six to 12 months later revealed a good occlusion status of the aneurysms. The microcatheter looping technique is effective when the conventional embolization technique fails to treat cerebral aneurysms with difficult access especially when the parent artery forming an acute angle with the major artery exacerbates difficult access to the aneurysms. PMID:25496676

  15. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction as a contributor to response in acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Burrowes, K S; Clark, A R; Wilsher, M L; Milne, D G; Tawhai, M H

    2014-08-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is an adaptive response unique to the lung whereby blood flow is diverted away from areas of low alveolar oxygen to improve ventilation-perfusion matching and resultant gas exchange. Some previous experimental studies have suggested that the HPV response to hypoxia is blunted in acute pulmonary embolism (APE), while others have concluded that HPV contributes to elevated pulmonary blood pressures in APE. To understand these contradictory observations, we have used a structure-based computational model of integrated lung function in 10 subjects to study the impact of HPV on pulmonary hemodynamics and gas exchange in the presence of regional arterial occlusion. The integrated model includes an experimentally-derived model for HPV. Its function is validated against measurements of pulmonary vascular resistance in normal subjects at four levels of inspired oxygen. Our results show that the apparently disparate observations of previous studies can be explained within a single model: the model predicts that HPV increases mean pulmonary artery pressure in APE (by 8.2 ± 7.0% in these subjects), and concurrently shows a reduction in response to hypoxia in the subjects who have high levels of occlusion and therefore maximal HPV in normoxia. PMID:24770844

  16. Early interventional therapy for acute massive pulmonary embolism guided by minimally invasive hemodynamic monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihua; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Weiwen; Lu, Wei; Chen, Meiqin; Luo, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of minimally invasive hemodynamic monitoring in the early catheter-based intervention for acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods: A total of 40 cases with acute massive PE were randomized into experimental and control group with 20 cases in each group. In the experimental group, the hemodynamics was monitored via Vigileo/FloTrac system, while echocardiography was used in the control group. Twelve hours after systemic thrombolysis, catheter-based clot fragmentation and local thrombolysis were employed in the experimental group if Vigileo/FloTrac system revealed hemodynamic abnormality. For the control group, the application of catheter was determined by the findings in echocardiography at 24 hours after systemic thrombolysis. Results: A total of 12 cases in the experimental group underwent catheter therapy successfully while 4 cases in the control group received the same treatment. Compared to the control group, 12 hours after catheter intervention the experimental group had higher PaO2/FIO2 and right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) but lower pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP), indicating the effectiveness of Vigileo/FloTrac monitoring. The 28-day survival rates were identical between the groups although one patent in the control group died. Both the RVEF and PASP were significantly improved in the experimental group in 6 months compared to the control group. Conclusions: In massive PE, hemodynamic monitoring via Vigileo/FloTrac system might be useful in the decision making for catheter intervention after systemic thrombolysis and might improve the outcomes for patients. PMID:26550360

  17. The Prevalence and Incidence of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Jerrett K.; Yong, Andy Sze Chiang; Chow, Vincent; Kritharides, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Background Symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) is a major cause of cardiovascular death and morbidity. Estimated prevalence and incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) in developed countries are between 388–661 per 100,000, and 90–123 per 100,000 person-years respectively. However, the prevalence and incidence of AF in patients presenting with an acute PE and its predictors are not clear. Methods Individual patient clinical details were retrieved from a database containing all confirmed acute PE presentations to a tertiary institution from 2001–2012. Prevalence and incidence of AF was tracked from a population registry by systematically searching for AF during any hospital admission (2000–2013) based on International Classification of Disease (ICD-10) code. Results Of the 1,142 patients included in this study, 935 (81.9%) had no AF during index PE admission whilst 207 patients had documented baseline AF (prevalence rate 18,126 per 100,000; age-adjusted 4,672 per 100,000). Of the 935 patients without AF, 126 developed AF post-PE (incidence rate 2,778 per 100,000 person-years; age-adjusted 984 per 100,000 person-years). Mean time from PE to subsequent AF was 3.4 ± 2.9 years. Total mortality (mean follow-up 5.0 ± 3.7 years) was 42% (n = 478): 35% (n = 283), 59% (n = 119) and 60% (n = 76) in the no AF, baseline AF and subsequent AF cohorts respectively. Independent predictors for subsequent AF after acute PE include age (hazard ratio [HR] 1.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04–1.08, p<0.001), history of congestive cardiac failure (HR 1.88, 95% CI 1.12–3.16, p = 0.02), diabetes (HR 1.72, 95% CI 1.07–2.77, p = 0.02), obstructive sleep apnea (HR 4.83, 1.48–15.8, p = 0.009) and day-1 serum sodium level during index PE admission (HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.90–0.98, p = 0.002). Conclusions Patients presenting with acute PE have a markedly increased age-adjusted prevalence and subsequent incidence of AF. Screening for AF may be of importance post-PE. PMID:26930405

  18. Massive Systemic Air Embolism during Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support of a Neonate with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome after Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Timpa, Joseph G.; O’Meara, Carlisle; McILwain, R. Britt; Dabal, Robert J.; Alten, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is universally accepted as a potential lifesaving therapy for neonates suffering severe cardiorespiratory failure, with survival reported as 81% weaning off ECMO and 69% to hospital discharge in this population. Although ECMO may reduce mortality in certain neonatal patients, it is associated with significant complications. Air in the circuit complicates 4.9% of neonatal ECMO runs, and it is crucial that all ECMO caregivers are trained in the prevention of air embolism and possess the knowledge necessary to efficiently identify and remove air from the ECMO circuit to prevent life threatening consequences. We present a fatal case of neonatal systemic air embolism leading to massive entrainment of air into the ECMO venous return cannula of a neonatal patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome following repair of obstructed total anomalous pulmonary venous connection. We describe the pathophysiology and presentation of this rare condition and the importance of early recognition, due to its high mortality rate. PMID:21848179

  19. Embolization of Acute Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Resistant to Endoscopic Treatment: Results and Predictors of Recurrent Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Loffroy, Romaric Rao, Pramod; Ota, Shinichi; Lin Mingde; Kwak, Byung-Kook; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2010-12-15

    Acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) hemorrhage is a frequent complication associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The most common cause of UGI bleeding is peptic ulcer disease, but the differential diagnosis is diverse and includes tumors; ischemia; gastritis; arteriovenous malformations, such as Dieulafoy lesions; Mallory-Weiss tears; trauma; and iatrogenic causes. Aggressive treatment with early endoscopic hemostasis is essential for a favorable outcome. However, severe bleeding despite conservative medical treatment or endoscopic intervention occurs in 5-10% of patients, requiring surgery or transcatheter arterial embolization. Surgical intervention is usually an expeditious and gratifying endeavor, but it can be associated with high operative mortality rates. Endovascular management using superselective catheterization of the culprit vessel, < sandwich> occlusion, or blind embolization has emerged as an alternative to emergent operative intervention for high-risk patients and is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding refractory to endoscopic treatment. Indeed, many published studies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and its high technical and clinical success rates, which range from 69 to 100% and from 63 to 97%, respectively, even if the choice of the best embolic agent among coils, cyanaocrylate glue, gelatin sponge, or calibrated particles remains a matter of debate. However, factors influencing clinical outcome, especially predictors of early rebleeding, are poorly understood, and few studies have addressed this issue. This review of the literature will attempt to define the role of embolotherapy for acute nonvariceal UGI hemorrhage that fails to respond to endoscopic hemostasis and to summarize data on factors predicting angiographic and embolization failure.

  20. Plasma copeptin for short term risk stratification in acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Wyzgał, Anna; Koć, Marcin; Pacho, Szymon; Bielecki, Maksymilian; Wawrzyniak, Radosław; Kostrubiec, Maciej; Ciurzyński, Michał; Kurnicka, Katarzyna; Goliszek, Sylwia; Paczyńska, Marzena; Palczewski, Piotr; Pruszczyk, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    Copeptin (COP) was reported to have prognostic value in various cardiovascular diseases. We hypothesized that COP levels reflect the severity of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) and may be useful in prognostic assessment. Plasma COP concentrations were measured on the Kryptor Compact Plus platform (BRAHMS, Hennigsdorf, Germany). The study included 107 consecutive patients with diagnosed acute PE (47 males, 60 females), with median age of 65 years (range 20-88). High risk PE was diagnosed in 3 patients (2.8 %), intermediate risk in 69 (64.5 %), and low risk PE in 35 (32.7 %) patients. Control group included 64 subjects (25 males, 39 females; median age 52.5 year, range 17-87). Four patients (3.7 %) died during 30-day observation. Complicated clinical course (CCC) was experienced by 10 (9.3 %) patients. COP level was higher in PE patients than in controls [11.55 pmol/L (5.16-87.97), and 19.00 pmol/L (5.51-351.90), respectively, p < 0.0001], and reflected PE severity. COP plasma concentration in low risk PE was 14.67 nmol/L (5.51-59.61) and in intermediate/high risk PE 19.84 mol/L (5.64-351.90) p < 0.05. Median COP levels in nonsurvivors was higher than in survivors, 84.6 (28.48-351.9) pmol/L and 18.68 (5.512-210.1) pmol/L, respectively, p = 0.009. Subjects with CCC presented higher COP levels than patients with benign clinical course 53.1 (17.95-351.9) pmol/L and 18.16 (5.51-210.1) pmol/L, respectively, p = 0.001. Log-transformed plasma COP was the significant predictor of CCC, OR 16.5 95 % CI 23.2-111.9, p < 0.001. AUC-for prediction of CCC using plasma COP was 0.811 (95 % CI 0.676-0.927). The COP cut off value of 17.95 nmol/l had sensitivity of 100 %, specificity 49.5 %, positive predictive value of 16.9 % and negative predictive value of 100 %. We conclude that plasma COP levels can be regarded for promising marker of severity of acute PE and show potential in risk stratification of these patients. PMID:26438275

  1. Prognostic models in acute pulmonary embolism: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Antoine; Mallett, Susan; Daoud-Elias, Marie; Poggi, Jean-Noël; Clarke, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Objective To review the evidence for existing prognostic models in acute pulmonary embolism (PE) and determine how valid and useful they are for predicting patient outcomes. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources OVID MEDLINE and EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library from inception to July 2014, and sources of grey literature. Eligibility criteria Studies aiming at constructing, validating, updating or studying the impact of prognostic models to predict all-cause death, PE-related death or venous thromboembolic events up to a 3-month follow-up in patients with an acute symptomatic PE. Data extraction Study characteristics and study quality using prognostic criteria. Studies were selected and data extracted by 2 reviewers. Data analysis Summary estimates (95% CI) for proportion of risk groups and event rates within risk groups, and accuracy. Results We included 71 studies (44 298 patients). Among them, 17 were model construction studies specific to PE prognosis. The most validated models were the PE Severity Index (PESI) and its simplified version (sPESI). The overall 30-day mortality rate was 2.3% (1.7% to 2.9%) in the low-risk group and 11.4% (9.9% to 13.1%) in the high-risk group for PESI (9 studies), and 1.5% (0.9% to 2.5%) in the low-risk group and 10.7% (8.8% to12.9%) in the high-risk group for sPESI (11 studies). PESI has proved clinically useful in an impact study. Shifting the cut-off or using novel and updated models specifically developed for normotensive PE improves the ability for identifying patients at lower risk for early death or adverse outcome (0.5–1%) and those at higher risk (up to 20–29% of event rate). Conclusions We provide evidence-based information about the validity and utility of the existing prognostic models in acute PE that may be helpful for identifying patients at low risk. Novel models seem attractive for the high-risk normotensive PE but need to be externally validated then be assessed in impact studies. PMID

  2. A Case of Acute Ischemic Duodenal Ulcer Associated with Superior Mesenteric Artery Dissection After Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Eun Sun; Jeong, Sook-Hyang Kim, Jin Wook; Lee, Sang Hyub; Yoon, Chang Jin; Kang, Sung Gwon

    2009-03-15

    We report a case of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE)-related acute ischemic duodenal ulcer that developed in association with dissection of the superior mesenteric artery. We conclude that the acute duodenal ulcer was developed by ischemia related to superior mesenteric artery dissection during TACE. TACE should be conducted carefully with continuous observation of abdominal arteries.

  3. Echocardiographic Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Embolism in Patients with McConnell’s Sign

    PubMed Central

    Mediratta, Anuj; Addetia, Karima; Medvedofsky, Diego; Gomberg-Maitland, Mardi; Mor-Avi, Victor; Lang, Roberto M.

    2016-01-01

    Background “McConnell’s sign” (McCS), described as hypo- or akinesis of the right ventricular (RV) free wall with preservation of the apex, is associated with acute pulmonary embolism (aPE). However, the sensitivity of McCS for the detection of aPE is limited. We sought to evaluate in patients with McCS, whether echocardiographic parameters of global and regional RV function could differentiate between patients with and without aPE. Methods We reviewed echocardiograms of 81 patients with McCS, who underwent CT or V/Q studies for suspected PE, and 40 normal controls (NL). Echocardiograms were analyzed to measure pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP), tricuspid regurgitation (TR) by vena contracta width, conventional indices of RV function, and speckle tracking–derived longitudinal free wall strain. ROC analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of these parameters for diagnosis of aPE. Results Fifty-five of eighty-one (68%) had PE (McCS + PE), while 26 of 81 (32%) did not (McCS – PE). Compared to NL, global and segmental RV strain were lower in patients with McCS, contrary to the notion of normal apical function. In McCS + PE, compared to McCS – PE: (1) PASP, fractional area change and TR were significantly lower; (2) strain magnitude was significantly lower globally and in basal and apical segments. Individual parameters had similar diagnostic accuracy by ROC analysis, which further improved by combining parameters. In McCS – PE, 69% of patients had pulmonary hypertension (PH). Conclusions McCS and aPE are not synonymous. RV free wall strain may aid in differential diagnosis of patients with McCS evaluated for aPE. Specifically, McCS should prompt an inquiry for evidence of PH, which would indicate that aPE is less likely. PMID:26669928

  4. Life-threatening Cerebral Edema Caused by Acute Occlusion of a Superior Vena Cava Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Sofue, Keitaro Takeuchi, Yoshito Arai, Yasuaki; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-02-15

    A71-year-old man with advanced lung cancer developed a life-threatening cerebral edema caused by the acute occlusion of a superior vena cava (SVC) stent and was successfully treated by an additional stent placement. Although stent occlusion is a common early complication, no life-threatening situations have been reported until now. Our experience highlights the fact that acute stent occlusion can potentially lead to the complete venous shutdown of the SVC, resulting in life-threatening cerebral edema, after SVC stent placement. Immediate diagnosis and countermeasures are required.

  5. Onyx embolization of dural arteriovenous fistulas of the cavernous sinus through the superior pharyngeal branch of the ascending pharyngeal artery

    PubMed Central

    Pero, Guglielmo; Quilici, Luca; Piano, Mariangela; Valvassori, Luca; Boccardi, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    We report three cases of dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) of the cavernous sinus treated by Onyx injection through the superior pharyngeal branch of the ascending pharyngeal artery. The treatment of choice of DAVFs of the cavernous sinus is endovascular, and it is preferentially done via transvenous occlusion of the cavernous sinus. The cavernous sinus can be reached through either the inferior petrosal sinus or the superior ophthalmic vein. When these venous routes are occluded, the first attempt is to pass through the occluded inferior petrosal sinus, but sometimes this attempt can fail. In some cases there are small transosseous feeders to the fistula arising from the superior pharyngeal branch of the ascending pharyngeal artery. When all of the more conventional approaches are unattainable, this route can be attempted. In our experience, it allowed safe and rapid occlusion of the fistula. PMID:24759156

  6. Pulmonary embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Dunnick, N.R.; Newman, G.E.; Perlmutt, L.M.; Braun, S.D.

    1988-11-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a common medical problem whose incidence is likely to increase in our aging population. Although it is life-threatening, effective therapy exists. The treatment is not, however, without significant complications. Thus, accurate diagnosis is important. Unfortunately, the clinical manifestations of pulmonary embolism are nonspecific. Furthermore, in many patients the symptoms of an acute embolism are superimposed on underlying chronic heart or lung disease. Thus, a high index of suspicion is needed to identify pulmonary emboli. Laboratory parameters, including arterial oxygen tensions and electrocardiography, are as nonspecific as the clinical signs. They may be more useful in excluding another process than in diagnosing pulmonary embolism. The first radiologic examination is the chest radiograph, but the clinical symptoms are frequently out of proportion to the findings on the chest films. Classic manifestations of pulmonary embolism on the chest radiograph include a wedge-shaped peripheral opacity and a segmental or lobar diminution in vascularity with prominent central arteries. However, these findings are not commonly seen and, even when present, are not specific. Even less specific findings include cardiomegaly, pulmonary infiltrate, elevation of a hemidiaphragm, and pleural effusion. Many patients with pulmonary embolism may have a normal chest radiograph. The chest radiograph is essential, however, for two purposes. First, it may identify another cause of the patient's symptoms, such as a rib fracture, dissecting aortic aneurysm, or pneumothorax. Second, a chest radiograph is essential to interpretation of the radionuclide V/Q scan. The perfusion scan accurately reflects the perfusion of the lung. However, a perfusion defect may result from a variety of etiologies. Any process such as vascular stenosis or compression by tumor may restrict blood flow. 84 references.

  7. [A case of acute chronic respiratory failure due to fat embolism syndrome after the left femoral neck fracture].

    PubMed

    Oda, Keishi; Kawanami, Toshinori; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Ogoshi, Takaaki; Kozaki, Minako; Nagata, Shuya; Nishida, Chinatsu; Yamasaki, Kei; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2011-09-01

    A 78 year old Japanese woman was transferred to our hospital for the treatment of a fracture of the left femoral neck in April, 2010. She had been taking oral corticosteroid (prednisolone 5 mg/day) for the treatment of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia since 2003, and had been treated by home oxygen therapy since 2007. She fell in the restroom at home and hurt herself, and was transferred to our hospital for treatment of a left femoral neck fracture in April, 2010. Her respiratory status was stable just after the transfer; however, she was transferred to the intensive care unit and started to receive mechanical ventilation due to rapidly progressive respiratory failure on the fourth day after admission. Chest X-ray and computed tomography revealed rapid progression of bilateral ground-glass attenuations, and acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia was clinically suspected. However, the elevation of D-dimer over time and characteristic findings of petechial hemorrhagic lesions on her palpebral conjunctivae and neck with microscopic findings of phagocytized lipid in alveolar macrophages in her endobronchial secretion led to the diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome. She was successfully treated with high-dose corticosteroid and sivelestat sodium, and she was discharged on the 21st day after admission. Although a differential diagnosis of acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia and fat embolism syndrome was necessary and difficult in the present case, characteristic findings of petechial hemorrhagic lesions of skin, palpebral conjunctiva and lipid-laden alveolar macrophages in endotracheal aspirate were useful for the accurate and prompt diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome. PMID:21913383

  8. Where do we stand? Functional imaging in acute and chronic pulmonary embolism with state-of-the-art CT.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Mathias; Haubenreisser, Holger; Sudarski, Sonja; Doesch, Christina; Ong, Melissa M; Borggrefe, Martin; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Henzler, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is the diagnostic imaging modality of choice for acute and chronic pulmonary embolism (PE) in order to assess vascular anatomy and parenchymal morphology. Over the past decade, several prognostic CTPA markers associated with an increased risk of adverse clinical events and in-hospital mortality have been evaluated, namely cardiac chamber dimensions, obstruction scores, and visualization of iodinated contrast material in the lung parenchyma by dual-energy (DE) CTPA. This article reviews the current status and potential prognostic advantages of CTPA or DE CTPA with its recent developments for accessing right ventricular dysfunction and the assessment of first pass lung perfusion with DE CTPA in the diagnosis of acute and chronic PE. PMID:26431747

  9. Acute Coronary Artery Air Embolism Following CT-Guided Lung Biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, Asem AbdelRaouf, Salah; Qandeel, Monther; Swaidan, Maisa

    2005-01-15

    CT-guided needle biopsy is a common procedure for obtaining a tissue diagnosis and consequently correctly managing patients. This procedure has many potential complications, ranging from simple pneumothorax or self-limiting hemoptysis to life-threatening pulmonary hemorrhage and air embolism. Though the latter is a rare complication of CT-guided needle biopsy, it has attracted a lot of interest. We report a case of right coronary air embolism resulting in myocardial infarction after a CT-guided percutaneous needle biopsy of the lung.

  10. The Influence of Acute Hyperglycemia in an Animal Model of Lacunar Stroke That Is Induced by Artificial Particle Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Jun; Lin, Ming-Wei; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Kuo, Yu-Min; Tsai, Yi-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Animal and clinical studies have revealed that hyperglycemia during ischemic stroke increases the stroke's severity and the infarct size in clinical and animal studies. However, no conclusive evidence demonstrates that acute hyperglycemia worsens post-stroke outcomes and increases infarct size in lacunar stroke. In this study, we developed a rat model of lacunar stroke that was induced via the injection of artificial embolic particles during full consciousness. We then used this model to compare the acute influence of hyperglycemia in lacunar stroke and diffuse infarction, by evaluating neurologic behavior and the rate, size, and location of the infarction. The time course of the neurologic deficits was clearly recorded from immediately after induction to 24 h post-stroke in both types of stroke. We found that acute hyperglycemia aggravated the neurologic deficit in diffuse infarction at 24 h after stroke, and also aggravated the cerebral infarct. Furthermore, the infarct volumes of the basal ganglion, thalamus, hippocampus, and cerebellum but not the cortex were positively correlated with serum glucose levels. In contrast, acute hyperglycemia reduced the infarct volume and neurologic symptoms in lacunar stroke within 4 min after stroke induction, and this effect persisted for up to 24 h post-stroke. In conclusion, acute hyperglycemia aggravated the neurologic outcomes in diffuse infarction, although it significantly reduced the size of the cerebral infarct and improved the neurologic deficits in lacunar stroke. PMID:27226775

  11. Transvenous Embolization for Carotid-Cavernous Fistula in a Patient with Vascular Type of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome—Direct Superior Ophthalmic Vein Approach: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    TANAKA, Teppei; HAYAKAWA, Motoharu; SADATO, Akiyo; ADACHI, Kazuhide; WATABE, Takeya; MAEDA, Shingo; OHMURA, Masahiro; HIROSE, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    The vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is an autosomal dominant hereditary disease characterized by connective tissue fragility throughout the body, including the arteries, viscera, and gastrointestinal tract. We report a case in which we performed transvenous embolization (TVE) via direct superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) approach to treat a direct carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). The patient was a 37-year-old woman who developed tinnitus in her left ear and a headache during examination in the outpatient clinic of another hospital in order to make a definitive diagnosis of vEDS, and she was referred to our hospital and examined. Based on the results of all of the studies she was diagnosed with a CCF. Conservative treatment was attempted, but was not very effective. Because of progressing aphasia, TVE was performed via the SOV direct cut. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. It has been reported that cerebral angiography is generally contraindicated in vEDS and that the morbimortality associated with endovascular treatment is very high. When performing treatment it is necessary to be sufficiently aware of the risks it entails. PMID:24418783

  12. [Coronary Embolism Probably Caused by Surgical Glue after Operation for Acute Aortic Dissection;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Chieri; Takihara, Hitomi; Okada, Shuichi

    2016-07-01

    A 70-year-old female underwent an emergency replacement of the ascending aorta for acute aortic dissection. We used surgical adhesive BioGlue and teflon felt strips to reinforce the dissected aortic wall. On the 5th post operative day, electrocardiogram showed ischemic inverted T wave and the serum creatine phosphokinase level elevated without any symptoms such as chest pain or low blood pressure. By coronary angiography, severe stenosis was detected of the left descending coronary artery, and percutaneous coronary intervention was performed. Intravascular ultrasound images revealed that no atherosclerotic components were present in the embolic materials. As a result of in vitro examination, that material was probably a fragment of the BioGlue. The patient was discharged on foot 23 days after surgery. PMID:27365070

  13. Catheter-Directed Therapy in Acute Pulmonary Embolism with Right Ventricular Dysfunction: A Promising Modality to Provide Early Hemodynamic Recovery.

    PubMed

    Gorek Dilektasli, Asli; Demirdogen Cetinoglu, Ezgi; Acet, Nilufer Aylin; Erdogan, Cuneyt; Ursavas, Ahmet; Ozkaya, Guven; Coskun, Funda; Karadag, Mehmet; Ege, Ercument

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Catheter-directed therapy (CDT) for pulmonary embolism (PE) is considered as an alternative to systemic thrombolysis (ST) in patients with hemodynamically unstable acute PE who are considered at high bleeding risk for ST. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CDT in the management of acute PE with right ventricular dysfunction (RVD). The primary outcomes were mortality, clinical success, and complications. Secondary outcomes were change in hemodynamic parameters in the first 24 hours following the procedure. MATERIAL AND METHODS Medical records of consecutive patients diagnosed as having acute massive or submassive PE with accompanying RVD treated by immediate CDT at our institution from January 2007 to January 2014 were reviewed. Patient characteristics, mortality, achievement of clinical success, and minor and major bleeding complications were analyzed in the overall study group, as well as massive vs. submassive PE subgroups. Change in hemodynamic parameters in the second, eighth, and 24th hours after the CDT procedure were also analyzed. RESULTS The study included 15 consecutive patients (M/F=10/5) with a mean age of 54.2±16.6 years who underwent immediate CDT. Nine of the patients had submassive PE, and 6 had massive PE. In-hospital mortality rate was 13.3% (95% CI, 0.04-0.38). One major, but not life-threatening, bleeding episode was evident in the whole group. Hemodynamic parameters were stabilized and clinical success was achieved in 14/15 (93.3%; 95% CI, 70.2-98.8) of the patients in the first 24 hours. Notably, the hemodynamic recovery was significantly evident in the first 8 hours after the procedure. CONCLUSIONS CDT is a promising treatment option for patients with acute PE with RVD with no fatal bleeding complication. In experienced centers, CDT should be considered as a first-line treatment for patients with acute PE and RVD and contraindications for ST, with the advantage of providing early hemodynamic recovery. PMID:27081754

  14. Length of hospital stay is shorter in South Asian patients with acute pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephanie F; Gollop, Nicholas D; Uppal, Hardeep; Chandran, Suresh; Potluri, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common diagnosis in UK hospitals and confers a significant hospital stay (LOS). There is very little evidence concerning ethnic variations on LOS in patients with PE. We sought to investigate ethnic variations in LOS in a large sample of 3440 patients with PE from 2000 to 2013 across seven hospitals in the north west of UK. We found that South Asian patients have significantly lower LOS compared with Caucasian patients. We discuss possible reasons for, and implications of, this finding.

  15. Endovascular embolization

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment - endovascular embolism; Coil embolization; Cerebral aneurysm - endovascular; Coiling - endovascular; Saccular aneurysm - endovascular; Berry aneurysm - endovascular repair; Fusiform aneurysm repair - endovascular; Aneurysm repair - endovascular

  16. [Pulmonary embolism].

    PubMed

    Söffker, Gerold; Kluge, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism is an important differential diagnosis of acute chest pain. The clinical signs are often non-specific. However, diagnosis and therapy must be done quickly in order to reduce morbidity and mortality. The new (2014) European guidelines for acute pulmonary embolism (PE) focus on risk-adapted diagnostic algorithms and prognosis adapted therapy concepts. According to the hemodynamic presentation the division in a high-risk group (unstable patient with persistent hypotension or shock) or in non-high-risk groups (hemodynamically stable) was proposed. In the high-risk group the immediate diagnosis is usually done by multidetector spiral computed tomography (MDCT) and primarily the medical therapy of right ventricular dysfunction and thrombolysis is recommended.In the non-high-risk group, this is subdivided into an intermediate-risk group and low-risk group, the diagnosis algorithm based on the PE-pretest probability--determined by validated scores. Moreover, the diagnosis is usually secured by MDCT--the new gold standard in the PE-diagnosis, scores, or it can be primarily ruled out due to the high negative predictive value of D-dimer determination. To improve the prognostic risk stratification in non-high-risk group patients the additional detection of right ventricular dysfunction (MDCT, echocardiography), cardiac biomarkers (troponin, NT proBNP) and validated scores (e.g. Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index) is recommended. Therefore, the intermediate-risk group can be further subdivided. For treatment of non-high-risk group patients, the initial anticoagulation (except those with severe renal insufficiency) using low molecular weight heparin/fondaparinux and conversion to vitamin-K antagonists or alternatively with direct oral anticoagulants (DOAK) is recommended. Hemodynamically stable patients with right ventricular dysfunction and myocardial ischemia (Intermediate-high-risk group patients) but with clinically progressive hemodynamic

  17. Superiority of West Nile Virus RNA Detection in Whole Blood for Diagnosis of Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Lustig, Yaniv; Mannasse, Batya; Koren, Ravit; Katz-Likvornik, Shiri; Hindiyeh, Musa; Mandelboim, Michal; Dovrat, Sara; Sofer, Danit; Mendelson, Ella

    2016-09-01

    The current diagnosis of West Nile virus (WNV) infection is primarily based on serology, since molecular identification of WNV RNA is unreliable due to the short viremia and absence of detectable virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Recent studies have shown that WNV RNA can be detected in urine for a longer period and at higher concentrations than in plasma. In this study, we examined the presence of WNV RNA in serum, plasma, whole-blood, CSF, and urine samples obtained from patients diagnosed with acute WNV infection during an outbreak which occurred in Israel in 2015. Our results demonstrate that 33 of 38 WNV patients had detectable WNV RNA in whole blood at the time of diagnosis, a higher rate than in any of the other sample types tested. Overall, whole blood was superior to all other samples, with 86.8% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value, and 83.9% negative predictive value. Interestingly, WNV viral load in urine was higher than in whole blood, CSF, serum, and plasma despite the lower sensitivity than that of whole blood. This study establishes the utility of whole blood in the routine diagnosis of acute WNV infection and suggests that it may provide the highest sensitivity for WNV RNA detection in suspected cases. PMID:27335150

  18. Botulinum Toxin Injection for Treatment of Acute Traumatic Superior Oblique Muscle Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Talebnejad, Mohammad Reza; Tahamtan, Maryam; Nowroozzadeh, M. Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of botulinum toxin injection into the inferior oblique (IO) muscle for management of unilateral acute traumatic superior oblique (SO) palsy. Methods: In this prospective case series, 10-20 units of botulinum toxin A (Dysport, Ipsen, Biopharm Ltd., Wrexham, UK) was injected into the ipsilateral IO muscle of 13 consecutive patients with unilateral acute traumatic SO palsy. All patients received injections within four weeks of the incident. Results: Mean age was 29 ± 15 years and 12 (92%) subjects were male. Mean amount of hypertropia (in primary position) was decreased from 10.0 ± 3.9Δ at baseline to 4.6 ± 8.9Δ, one month after the injection, and to 1.5 ± 2.7Δ at final follow-up (P = 0.001). IO overaction improved from 2.7 ± 0.6 to 1.0 ± 1.2 and 0.6 ± 0.9 (P ≤ 0.001), and subjective torsion from 5.3 ± 3.9 to 3.2 ± 3.4 and 1.6 ± 2.5 degrees (P ≤ 0.001), at the same time intervals respectively. One month after the injection as well as at final follow-up, 10 (77%) patients were diplopia-free in primary and reading positions. Subgroup analysis showed that patients who recovered had less baseline hypertropia as compared to those who failed (8.3Δ vs. 15.7Δ, respectively; P = 0.01). All patients with a favorable outcome had baseline hypertropia of 10Δ or less. Conclusion: A single injection of BTA into the IO muscle can rapidly and safely resolve symptomatic diplopia in patients with acute traumatic SO palsy, while waiting for spontaneous recovery. PMID:26730311

  19. Catheter-Directed Therapy in Acute Pulmonary Embolism with Right Ventricular Dysfunction: A Promising Modality to Provide Early Hemodynamic Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Dilektasli, Asli Gorek; Cetinoglu, Ezgi Demirdogen; Acet, Nilufer Aylin; Erdogan, Cuneyt; Ursavas, Ahmet; Ozkaya, Guven; Coskun, Funda; Karadag, Mehmet; Ege, Ercument

    2016-01-01

    Background Catheter-directed therapy (CDT) for pulmonary embolism (PE) is considered as an alternative to systemic thrombolysis (ST) in patients with hemodynamically unstable acute PE who are considered at high bleeding risk for ST. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CDT in the management of acute PE with right ventricular dysfunction (RVD). The primary outcomes were mortality, clinical success, and complications. Secondary outcomes were change in hemodynamic parameters in the first 24 hours following the procedure. Material/Methods Medical records of consecutive patients diagnosed as having acute massive or submassive PE with accompanying RVD treated by immediate CDT at our institution from January 2007 to January 2014 were reviewed. Patient characteristics, mortality, achievement of clinical success, and minor and major bleeding complications were analyzed in the overall study group, as well as massive vs. submassive PE subgroups. Change in hemodynamic parameters in the second, eighth, and 24th hours after the CDT procedure were also analyzed. Results The study included 15 consecutive patients (M/F=10/5) with a mean age of 54.2±16.6 years who underwent immediate CDT. Nine of the patients had submassive PE, and 6 had massive PE. In-hospital mortality rate was 13.3% (95% CI, 0.04–0.38). One major, but not life-threatening, bleeding episode was evident in the whole group. Hemodynamic parameters were stabilized and clinical success was achieved in 14/15 (93.3%; 95% CI, 70.2–98.8) of the patients in the first 24 hours. Notably, the hemodynamic recovery was significantly evident in the first 8 hours after the procedure. Conclusions CDT is a promising treatment option for patients with acute PE with RVD with no fatal bleeding complication. In experienced centers, CDT should be considered as a first-line treatment for patients with acute PE and RVD and contraindications for ST, with the advantage of providing early hemodynamic recovery. PMID:27081754

  20. Transradial Approach for Transcatheter Selective Superior Mesenteric Artery Urokinase Infusion Therapy in Patients with Acute Extensive Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Maoqiang Guo Liping; Lin Hanying; Liu Fengyong; Duan Feng; Wang Zhijun

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of transradial approach for transcatheter superior mesenteric artery (SMA) urokinase infusion therapy in patients with acute extensive portal and superior mesenteric venous thrombosis. During a period of 7 years, 16 patients with acute extensive thrombosis of the portal (PV) and superior mesenteric veins (SMV) were treated by transcatheter selective SMA urokinase infusion therapy by way of the radial artery. The mean age of the patients was 39.5 years. Through the radial sheath, a 5F Cobra catheter was inserted into the SMA, and continuous infusion of urokinase was performed for 5-11 days (7.1 {+-} 2.5 days). Adequate anticoagulation was given during treatment, throughout hospitalization, and after discharge. Technical success was achieved in all 16 patients. Substantial clinical improvement was seen in these 16 patients after the procedure. Minor complications at the radial puncture site were observed in 5 patients, but trans-SMA infusion therapy was not interrupted. Follow-up computed tomography scan before discharge demonstrated nearly complete disappearance of PV-SMV thrombosis in 9 patients and partial recanalization of PV-SMV thrombosis in 7 patients. The 16 patients were discharged 9-19 days (12 {+-} 6.0 days) after admission. Mean duration of follow-up after hospital discharge was 44 {+-} 18.5 months, and no recurrent episodes of PV-SMV thrombosis developed during that time period. Transradial approach for transcatheter selective SMA urokinase infusion therapy in addition to anticoagulation is a safe and effective therapy for the management of patients with acute extensive PV-SMV thrombosis.

  1. Triage for suspected acute Pulmonary Embolism: Think before opening Pandora's Box.

    PubMed

    Levin, David; Seo, Joon Beom; Kiely, David G; Hatabu, Hiroto; Gefter, Warren; van Beek, Edwin J R; Schiebler, Mark L

    2015-06-01

    This is a review of the current strengths and weaknesses of the various imaging modalities available for the diagnosis of suspected non-massive Pulmonary Embolism (PE). Without careful consideration for the clinical presentation, and the timely application of clinical decision support (CDS) methodology, the current overutilization of imaging resources for this disease will continue. For a patient with a low clinical risk profile and a negative D-dimer there is no reason to consider further workup with imaging; as the negative predictive value in this scenario is the same as imaging. While the current efficacy and effectiveness data support the continued use of Computed Tomographic angiography (CTA) as the imaging golden standard for the diagnosis of PE; this test does have the unintended consequences of radiation exposure, possible overdiagnosis and overuse. There is a persistent lack of appreciation on the part of ordering physicians for the effectiveness of the alternatives to CTA (ventilation-perfusion imaging and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography) in these patients. Careful use of standardized protocols for patient triage and the application of CDS will allow for a better use of imaging resources. PMID:25864020

  2. The Evaluation of Serum Copeptin Levels and Some Commonly Seen Thrombophilic Mutation Prevalence in Acute Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Nurinnisa; Baygutalp, Nurcan Kilic; Bayramoglu, Atif; Polat, Harun; Gul, Mehmet Ali; Bakan, Ebubekir; Aslan, Sahin; Gunes, Ozge Nur

    2016-06-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common, emergent condition and may affect a large number of patients. Copeptin has been indicated to be a sensitive biomarker of arginine vasopressin release, and has diagnostic and prognostic value in various clinical conditions. Genetic mutations are considerable components of thrombophilic diseases, and factor II gene G20210A, (FII20210A), factor V Leiden (FVL, G1691A) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene C677T (MTHFR677T) single nucleotide polymorphisms are the most common mutations of thrombophilic diseases. In this study, serum copeptin levels were determined in patients with PE and healthy controls, and the results were discussed. The prevalence of some commonly seen thrombophilic mutations was also evaluated in patients with PE. The study included 32 patients (18 male, 14 female) with PE and 24 (13 male, 11 female) age- and gender-matched healthy controls. A significant difference in serum copeptin levels was determined between the patient and control groups (8.58 ± 4.42 and 4.07 ± 1.02 pmol/L, respectively). Heterozygous mutant genotype for FII20210A and heterozygous mutant genotype for FVL were observed in 3.1 and 9.4% of patients, respectively. Mutant genotype of 49% was determined for MTHFR677T mutations. It was concluded that copeptin may have diagnostic value for PE. PMID:26886096

  3. Treatment of Massive or Submassive Acute Pulmonary Embolism With Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Ashraf; Briasoulis, Alexandros; Telila, Tesfaye; Belgrave, Kevin; Grines, Cindy

    2016-03-15

    The presentation of acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PE) can be highly variable resulting in diagnostic challenges and management difficulties. Current guidelines suggest that therapy must be adjusted based on the severity of PE presentation. Systemic thrombolysis is the standard therapy for acute massive PE; however, systemic thrombolysis carries an estimated 20% risk of major hemorrhage, including a 3% to 5% risk of hemorrhagic stroke. There are data supporting the use of catheter-directed therapy (CDT) in massive and submassive PE, but past studies have limited its use to patients in whom systemic thrombolysis has either failed or was contraindicated. There is a paucity of data comparing the efficacy of CDT compared to systemic thrombolysis in different risk groups. This review will summarize the available data on the techniques and indications and outcomes of CDT for acute PE. PMID:26833207

  4. Successful Management of Intraoperative Acute Bilateral Pulmonary Embolism in a High Grade Astrocytoma Patient.

    PubMed

    Khraise, Wail N; Allouh, Mohammed Z; Hiasat, Mohammad Y; Said, Raed S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Intraoperative pulmonary embolism (PE) is a rare life-threatening complication in patients undergoing surgical intervention. Generally, cancer patients have a higher risk for developing this complication. Unfortunately, there is no standard procedure for its management. CASE REPORT We report the case of a 39-year-old woman with high-grade glioma in the right frontal lobe who was admitted to the surgical theater for craniotomy and excision of the tumor. During the general anesthesia procedure and just before inserting the central venous line, her end-tidal CO2 and O2 saturation dropped sharply. The anesthesiologist quickly responded with an aggressive resuscitation procedure that included aspiration through the central venous line, 100% O2, and IV administration of ephedrine 6 mg, colloid 500 mL, normal saline 500 mL, and heparin 5000 IU. The patient was extubated and remained in the supine position until she regained consciousness and her vital signs returned to normal. Subsequent radiological examination revealed a massive bilateral PE. A retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter was inserted, and enoxaparin anticoagulant therapy was prescribed to stabilize the patient's condition. After 3 weeks, she underwent an uneventful craniotomy procedure and was discharged a week later under the enoxaparin therapy. CONCLUSIONS The successful management of intraoperative PE requires a quick, accurate diagnosis accompanied with an aggressive, fast response. Anesthesiologists are usually the ones who are held accountable for the diagnosis and early management of this complication. They must be aware of the possibility of such a complication and be ready to react properly and decisively in the operation theater. PMID:27578311

  5. Systematic review and meta-analysis for thrombolysis treatment in patients with acute submassive pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yaoqian; Zhao, Haiyan; Gao, Wanpeng; Wang, Yan; Cao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of thrombolytic treatment in patients with submassive pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods An electronic search was carried out based on the databases from MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index (SCI), and the Cochrane Library. We included prospective, randomized, and clinical trials in thrombolysis with heparin alone in adults who had evidence of right ventricular dysfunction and normotension. The main endpoints consist of mortality, recurrent PE, and bleeding risk. The relative risk (RR) and the relevant 95% confidence intervals were determined by the dichotomous variable. Results Only seven studies involving 594 patients met the inclusion criteria for further review. The cumulative effect of thrombolysis, compared with intravenous heparin, demonstrated no statistically significant difference in mortality (2.7% versus 4.3%; RR=0.64 [0.29–1.40]; P=0.27) or recurrent PE (2% versus 5%; RR=0.44 [0.19–1.05]; P=0.06). Thrombolytic therapy did not increase major hemorrhage compared with intravenous heparin (4.5% versus 3.3%; RR=1.16 [0.51–2.60]; P=0.73), but it was associated with an increased minor hemorrhage (41% versus 9%; RR=3.91 [1.46–10.48]; P=0.007). Conclusion Compared with heparin alone, neither mortality nor recurrent PE is reduced by thrombolysis in patients with submassive PE, and it does not reveal an increasing risk of major bleeding. In addition, thrombolysis also produces the increased risk of minor bleeding; however, no sufficient evidence verifies the thrombolytic benefit in this review, because the number of patients enrolled in the trials is limited. Therefore, a large, double-blind clinical trial is required to prove the outcomes of this meta-analysis. PMID:24611003

  6. Preventing, Recognizing, Treating Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Selzer, Arthur

    1965-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism occurs in three forms: (1) Asymptomatic “silent” embolization of lungs; (2) pulmonary infarction; and (3) massive pulmonary embolization leading to acute cor pulmonale. The commonest source of emboli are veins of the lower extremities and of the pelvic organs. The prevention and the treatment of pulmonary embolism overlap, for except for the heroic procedure of pulmonary embolectomy, treatment is equivalent to the prevention of further emboli. The diagnosis may be easy in typical cases and very difficult in others. PMID:14341314

  7. Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary embolism is a sudden blockage in a lung artery. The cause is usually a blood clot ... loose and travels through the bloodstream to the lung. Pulmonary embolism is a serious condition that can ...

  8. Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Rali, Parth; Gandhi, Viral; Malik, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism covers a wide spectrum of presentation from an asymptomatic individual to a life-threatening medical emergency. It is of paramount importance to appropriately risk stratify patients with pulmonary embolism, particularly with those who present without hypotension. Right ventricular dysfunction can evolve after a patient has received a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, necessitating aggressive measures rather than simple anticoagulation. In this review, we discuss definition, risk stratification, pathogenesis, diagnostic approach, and management, with particular focus on massive pulmonary embolism. PMID:26919674

  9. Comparison of isoflurane and α-chloralose in an anesthetized swine model of acute pulmonary embolism producing right ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Beam, Daren M; Neto-Neves, Evandro M; Stubblefield, William B; Alves, Nathan J; Tune, Johnathan D; Kline, Jeffrey A

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death, and a model is needed for testing potential treatments. In developing a model, we compared the hemodynamic effects of isoflurane and α-chloralose in an acute swine model of PE because the choice of anesthesia will likely affect the cardiovascular responses of an animal to PE. At baseline, swine that received α-chloralose (n = 6) had a lower heart rate and cardiac output and higher SpO2, end-tidal CO2, and mean arterial pressure than did those given isoflurane (n = 9). After PE induction, swine given α-chloralose compared with isoflurane exhibited a lower heart rate (63 ± 10 compared with 116 ± 15 bpm) and peripheral arterial pressure (52 ± 12 compared with 61 ± 12 mm Hg); higher SpO2 (98% ± 3% compared with 95% ± 1%), end-tidal CO2 (35 ± 4 compared with 32 ± 5), and systolic blood pressure (121 ± 8 compared with 104 ± 20 mm Hg); and equivalent right ventricular:left ventricular ratios (1.32 ± 0.50 compared with 1.23 ± 0.19) and troponin I mean values (0.09 ± 0.07 ng/mL compared with 0.09 ± 0.06 ng/mL). Isoflurane was associated with widely variable fibrinogen and activated partial thromboplastin time. Intraexperiment mortality was 0 of 6 animals for α-chloralose and 2 of 9 swine for isoflurane. All swine anesthetized with α-chloralose survived with sustained pulmonary hypertension, RV-dilation-associated cardiac injury without the confounding vasodilatory or coagulatory effects of isoflurane. These data demonstrate the physiologic advantages of α-chloralose over isoflurane for anesthesia in a swine model of severe submassive PE. PMID:25730758

  10. Autologous is Superior to Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia in Second Complete Remission

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Jennifer L. Holter; Rubinger, Morel; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Wang, Hai-Lin; Grigg, Andrew; Selby, George B.; Szer, Jeffrey; Rowe, Jacob M.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Tallman, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To identify favored choice of transplantation in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission. PATIENTS We studied 294 acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients receiving allogeneic (n=232) or autologous (62) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in second complete remission (CR2) reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplantation Research (CIBMTR) from 1995 to 2006 including pre-HCT PML/RAR∝ status in 155 (49% of allogeneic and 66% of autologous). METHODS Patient characteristics and transplant characteristics including treatment related mortality, overall survival, and disease free survival were collected and analyzed for both univariate and multivariate outcomes. RESULTS With median follow-up of 115 (allogeneic) and 72 months (autologous), 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) favored autologous 63% (49-75%) compared to allogeneic 50% (44-57%) (p=0.10) and overall survival (OS) 75% (63-85%) vs. 54% (48-61%) (p=.002) Multivariate analysis showed significantly worse DFS after allogeneic HCT (HR=1.88, 95% CI=1.16-3.06, p=0.011) and age >40 years (HR=2.30, 95% CI 1.44-3.67, p=0.0005). OS was significantly worse after allogeneic HCT (HR=2.66, 95%CI 1.52-4.65, p=0.0006; age >40 (HR=3.29, 95% CI 1.95-5.54, p<0.001) and CR1<12 months (HR=1.56 95% CI 1.07-2.26, p=0.021). Positive pre-HCT PML-RAR∝ status in 17/114 allogeneic and 6/41 autologous transplants did not influence relapse, treatment failure or survival in either group. The survival advantage for autografting was attributable to increased 3 years TRM: allogeneic 30%; autologous 2%, and GVHD. CONCLUSION We conclude that autologous HCT yields superior overall survival for APL in CR2. Long term DFS in autologous recipients, even with MRD+ grafts remains an important subject for further study. PMID:24691221

  11. Simplified PESI score and sex difference in prognosis of acute pulmonary embolism: a brief report from a real life study.

    PubMed

    Masotti, Luca; Panigada, Grazia; Landini, Giancarlo; Pieralli, Filippo; Corradi, Francesco; Lenti, Salvatore; Migliacci, Rino; Arrigucci, Stefano; Frullini, Anna; Bertieri, Maria Chiara; Tatini, Stefano; Fortini, Alberto; Cascinelli, Irene; Mumoli, Nicola; Giuntoli, Stefano; De Palma, Alessandro; De Crescenzo, Veronica; Piacentini, Michele; Tintori, Giancarlo; Dainelli, Alba; Levantino, Giuseppa; Fabiani, Plinio; Risaliti, Filippo; Mastriforti, Roberta; Voglino, Michele; Carli, Valentina; Meini, Simone

    2016-05-01

    Prognostic stratification of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) remains a challenge in clinical practice. Simplified PESI (sPESI) score is a practical validated score aimed to stratify 30-day mortality risk in acute PE. Whether prognostic value of sPESI score differs according to sex has not been previously investigated. Therefore the aim of our study was to provide information about it. Data records of 452 patients, 180 males (39.8 %) and 272 females (60.2 %) discharged for acute PE from Internal Medicine wards of Tuscany (Italy) were analysed. sPESI was retrospectively calculated. Variables enclosed in sPESI score, all cause in-hospital mortality and overall bleedings were compared between sexes. Moreover, predictive ability of sPESI score as prognosticator of all cause in-hospital mortality was tested and compared between sexes. sPESI score 0 (low risk) was found in 17.7 % of males and 13.6 % of females (p = 0.2323). We didn't find significant difference in sPESI scoring distribution. Age ≥80 years (51.4 vs. 33.8 %, p = 0.0003) and heart rate ≥110 bpm (23.5 vs. 14.4 %, p = 0.0219) were found significantly more prevalent in females, whereas active cancer (23.8 vs. 39.4 %, p = 0.0004) and cardio-respiratory diseases (19.8 vs. 27.7 %, p = 0.0416) were in males. All cause in-hospital mortality was 0 % in both genders for sPESI score 0, whereas it was 5.4 % in females and 13.6 % in males with sPESI score 1-2 (p = 0.0208) and 22 % in females and 19.3 % in males with sPESI score ≥3 (p = 0.7776). Overall bleedings were significantly more frequent in females compared with males (4.77 vs. 0.55 %, p = 0.0189). In females overall bleedings ranged from 2.7 % in sPESI score 0 to 6 % in sPESI score ≥3. Predictive ability of sPESI score as prognosticator of all cause in-hospital mortality was higher in females compared to males (AUC 0.72 vs. 0.67, respectively). In real life different co-morbidity burdens in females compared to males

  12. Femur chondrosarcoma misdiagnosed as acute knee arthritis and osteomyelitis--further developing a hitherto unreported complication of tumor embolic ischemic ileal perforation after arthroscopic lavage.

    PubMed

    Chow, Louis Tsun Cheung

    2014-12-01

    The differentiation between osteomyelitis and bone tumor may be difficult due to their overlapping clinical and radiological features. A 25-year-old lady presented with left knee pain and joint effusion associated with redness and hotness. A sub-optimally taken plain radiograph showed mixed osteolytic and osteoblastic lesion in the left lower femur with surrounding soft tissue swelling. Since the clinical diagnosis was acute osteomyelitis and arthritis, arthroscopic lavage was performed as a diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. The removed loose bodies and fibrinous tissue showed pathological features suspicious of chondrosarcoma. Subsequent MRI revealed an infiltrative tumor eroding through the cortex and joint cartilage. En bloc excision of the left lower femur, upper tibia including the knee joint and patella was performed, and the final diagnosis was grade 2 chondrosarcoma. The patient developed bilateral pulmonary metastasis 33 months after operation. Five months later, she suffered from a hitherto undescribed complication of ischemic perforation of the terminal ileum secondary to tumor embolic arterial obstruction with no macroscopic intestinal or peritoneal tumor deposit. The patient developed multiple brain metastases and died 43 months after initial presentation. Our case illustrates that malignant bone tumor as a differential diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis and arthritis merits recognition and exclusion before arthroscopic lavage, which may enhance tumor dissemination and in our patient results in embolic ischemic ileal perforation. PMID:25242025

  13. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients with acute spinal cord injury: a comparison with nonparalyzed patients immobilized due to spinal fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Myllynen, P.; Kammonen, M.; Rokkanen, P.; Boestman, O.L.; Lalla, M.; Laasonen, E.

    1985-06-01

    The occurrence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was studied in the series of 23 consecutive patients with acute spinal cord injury and 14 immobilized patients with spinal fractures without paralysis. The incidence of DVT in paralyzed patients was 100% as detected by the /sup 125/I-labeled fibrinogen test and confirmed by contrast venography, and 64% as detected by repeated clinical examinations and confirmed by contrast venography. The respective incidence of DVT in nonparalyzed patients with spinal fractures was 0%. The diagnosis of DVT was reached earlier with the radiofibrinogen test than with the clinical followup (5 days vs. 25 days). Two of the 23 paralyzed patients (9%) developed nonfatal clinical pulmonary embolism (PE). There were no differences in the values of routine coagulation tests. The result justifies prophylactic anticoagulant therapy in all cases of spinal cord injury during the acute post-traumatic phase.

  14. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  15. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury ...

  16. Acute Superior Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis: Transcatheter Thrombolysis and Aspiration Thrombectomy Therapy by Combined Route of Superior Mesenteric Vein and Artery in Eight Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuofei Liu, Baochen Ding, Weiwei He, Changsheng Wu, Xingjiang Li, Jieshou

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo assess the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of catheter-directed thrombolysis and aspiration thrombectomy therapy by combined route of superior mesenteric vein and artery (SMV+SMA) for acute superior mesenteric venous thrombosis (ASMVT).MethodsThis retrospective study reviewed eight ASMVT patients with transcatheter direct thrombolysis and aspiration thrombectomy therapy via SMV and indirect thrombolysis via SMA during a period of 14 months. The demographics, etiology, risk factors, therapeutic effect, complications, mortality, and follow-up of the study population were assessed. Anatomic and imaging classification of location and extent of thrombus at diagnosis and degree of thrombus lysis were described.ResultsTechnical success was achieved with substantial improvement in symptoms and thrombus resolution after thrombolytic therapy in all patients. The local urokinase infusion by SMA and SMV was performed for 5–7 (6.13 ± 0.83) and 7–15 (12 ± 2.51) days. Anticoagulation was performed catheter-directed and then orally throughout hospitalization and after discharge. Four patients required delayed localized bowel resection after thrombolytic therapy with no death. Thrombolytic therapy was not interrupted despite minor bleeding at the puncture site in two patients and sepsis in another two postoperatively. Nearly complete removal of thrombus was demonstrated by contrast-enhanced CT scan and portography before discharge. Patients were discharged in 10–27 (19.25 ± 4.89) days after admission. No recurrence developed during the follow-up of 10–13 (12.13 ± 0.99) months.ConclusionsCatheter-directed thrombolytic and aspiration therapy via SMV+SMA is beneficial for ASMVT in avoiding patient death, efficient resolving thrombus, rapid improving symptoms, reversing extensive intestinal ischemia, averting bowel resection, or localizing infarcted bowel segment and preventing short bowel syndrome.

  17. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt, Mechanical Aspiration Thrombectomy, and Direct Thrombolysis in the Treatment of Acute Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Bovio, Giulio; Dahamane, M'Hamed; Centanaro, Monica

    2007-09-15

    A patient was admitted because of severe abdominal pain, anorexia, and intestinal bleeding. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography demonstrated acute portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis (PSMVT). The patient was treated percutaneously with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS), mechanical aspiration thrombectomy, and direct thrombolysis, and 1 week after the procedure, complete patency of the portal and superior mesenteric veins was demonstrated. TIPS, mechanical aspiration thrombectomy, and direct thrombolysis together are promising endovascular techniques for the treatment of symptomatic acute PSMVT.

  18. Acute stroke from paradoxical embolism of dense fibrous tissue following pacemaker lead extraction: salvation by mechanical thrombectomy.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Nicolas B; Narata, Ana Paula; Burri, Haran

    2016-02-01

    Systemic embolization is a dreaded complication of transvenous lead extraction (TLE), even without visible vegetations. Preoperative patent foramen ovale evaluation is important, justifying neurological surveillance or consideration of surgical extraction in selected cases. In case of stroke after TLE, mechanical thrombectomy is a successful therapy, and should be readily available. PMID:26862414

  19. Role of cardiac output and the autonomic nervous system in the antinatriuretic response to acute constriction of the thoracic superior vena cava.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.; Ufferman, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the differential characteristics of hepatic congestion and decreased cardiac output in terms of potential afferent stimuli in the antinatriuretic effect of acute thoracic inferior vena cava (TIVC) constriction. An attempt is made to see if the autonomic nervous system is involved in the antinatriuretic effect of acute TIVC or thoracic superior vena cava constriction.

  20. Hyperbaric programs in the United States: Locations and capabilities of treating decompression sickness, arterial gas embolisms, and acute carbon monoxide poisoning: survey results.

    PubMed

    Chin, Walter; Jacoby, Laura; Simon, Olivia; Talati, Nisha; Wegrzyn, Gracelene; Jacoby, Rachelle; Proano, Jacob; Sprau, Susan E; Markovitz, Gerald; Hsu, Rita; Joo, Ellie

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is the primary treatment for arterial gas embolism, decompression sickness and acute carbon monoxide poisoning. Though there has been a proliferation of hyperbaric centers throughout the United States, a scarcity of centers equipped to treat emergency indications makes transport of patients necessary. To locate and characterize hyperbaric chambers capable of treating emergency cases, a survey of centers throughout the entire United States was conducted. Using Google, Yahoo, HyperbaricLink and the UHMS directory, a database for United States chambers was created. Four researchers called clinicians from the database to administer the survey. All centers were contacted for response until four calls went unreturned or a center declined to be included. The survey assessed chamber readiness to respond to high-acuity patients, including staff availability, use of medical equipment such as ventilators and intravenous infusion devices, and responding yes to treating hyperbaric emergencies within a 12-month period. Only 43 (11.9%, N = 361) centers had equipment, intravenous infusion pumps and ventilators, and staff necessary to treat high-acuity patients. Considering that a primary purpose of hyperbaric oxygen therapy is the treatment of arterial gas embolism and decompression sickness, more hyperbaric centers nationwide should be able to accommodate these emergency cases quickly and safely. PMID:27000011

  1. Nonfatal air embolism during shoulder arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vivek; Varghese, Elsa; Rao, Madhu; Srinivasan, Nataraj M; Mathew, Neethu; Acharya, Kiran K V; Rao, P Sripathi

    2013-06-01

    An air embolism is a rare but potentially fatal complication of shoulder arthroscopy. In this article, we report the case of a patient who developed a nonfatal air embolism during shoulder arthroscopy for an acute bony Bankart lesion and a greater tuberosity avulsion fracture. The venous air embolism occurred immediately after the joint was insufflated with air for diagnostic air arthroscopy. The diagnosis was based on a drop in end-tidal carbon dioxide and blood pressure and presence of mill wheel (waterwheel) murmur over the right heart. Supportive treatment was initiated immediately. The patient recovered fully and had no further complications of air embolism. This patient's case emphasizes the importance of being aware that air embolisms can occur during shoulder arthroscopy performed for acute intra-articular fractures of the shoulder. Monitoring end tidal carbon dioxide can be very useful in early detection of air embolisms. PMID:23805421

  2. Coronary embolism causing acute myocardial infarction in a patient with mitral valve prosthesis: successful management with angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Sial, Jawaid Akbar; Ferman, Mohammad Tariq; Saghir, Tahir; Rasool, Syed Ishtiaq

    2009-06-01

    A 24-year-old male patient with anterior myocardial infarction, caused by embolization from mitral valve prosthesis due to inadequate anticoagulation is presented. The patient underwent cardiac catheterization within 90 minutes of arrival. Angiography showed total occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) after the second diagonal branch. Thrombus was extracted with export catheter from LAD, and coronary artery perfusion was restored. The pain disappeared completely immediately after this intervention. Transoesophageal echocardiography performed 2 days later revealed no thrombus at the prosthetic valve. In conclusion, this case demonstrated that coronary embolism may occur even without prosthetic valve thrombus or dysfunction with suboptimal International Normalized Ratio levels, and can be successfully treated with coronary angiography with clot extraction with aspiration catheter (Export XT 6F Medtronic) only, without stenting. PMID:19534381

  3. Pulmonary artery relative area change is inversely related to ex vivo measured arterial elastic modulus in the canine model of acute pulmonary embolization.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lian; Kellihan, Heidi B; Henningsen, Joseph; Bellofiore, Alessandro; Forouzan, Omid; Roldán-Alzate, Alejandro; Consigny, Daniel W; Gunderson, McLean; Dailey, Seth H; Francois, Christopher J; Chesler, Naomi C

    2014-09-22

    A low relative area change (RAC) of the proximal pulmonary artery (PA) over the cardiac cycle is a good predictor of mortality from right ventricular failure in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH). The relationship between RAC and local mechanical properties of arteries, which are known to stiffen in acute and chronic PH, is not clear, however. In this study, we estimated elastic moduli of three PAs (MPA, LPA and RPA: main, left and right PAs) at the physiological state using mechanical testing data and correlated these estimated elastic moduli to RAC measured in vivo with both phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) and M-mode echocardiography (on RPA only). We did so using data from a canine model of acute PH due to embolization to assess the sensitivity of RAC to changes in elastic modulus in the absence of chronic PH-induced arterial remodeling. We found that elastic modulus increased with embolization-induced PH, presumably a consequence of increased collagen engagement, which corresponds well to decreased RAC. Furthermore, RAC was inversely related to elastic modulus. Finally, we found MRI and echocardiography yielded comparable estimates of RAC. We conclude that RAC of proximal PAs can be obtained from either MRI or echocardiography and a change in RAC indicates a change in elastic modulus of proximal PAs detectable even in the absence of chronic PH-induced arterial remodeling. The correlation between RAC and elastic modulus of proximal PAs may be useful for prognoses and to monitor the effects of therapeutic interventions in patients with PH. PMID:25128393

  4. Pulmonary artery relative area change is inversely related to ex vivo measured arterial elastic modulus in the canine model of acute pulmonary embolization

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lian; Kellihan, Heidi B.; Henningsen, Joseph; Bellofiore, Alessandro; Forouzan, Omid; Roldán-Alzate, Alejandro; Consigny, Daniel W.; Gunderson, McLean; Dailey, Seth H.; Francois, Christopher J.; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2015-01-01

    A low relative area change (RAC) of the proximal pulmonary artery (PA) over the cardiac cycle is a good predictor of mortality from right ventricular failure in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH). The relationship between RAC and local mechanical properties of arteries, which are known to stiffen in acute and chronic PH, is not clear, however. In this study, we estimated elastic moduli of three PAs (MPA, LPA and RPA: main, left and right PAs) at the physiological state using mechanical testing data and correlated these estimated elastic moduli to RAC measured in vivo with both phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) and M-mode echocardiography (on RPA only). We did so using data from a canine model of acute PH due to embolization to assess the sensitivity of RAC to changes in elastic modulus in the absence of chronic PH-induced arterial remodeling. We found that elastic modulus increased with embolization-induced PH, presumably a consequence of increased collagen engagement, which corresponds well to decreased RAC. Furthermore, RAC was inversely related to elastic modulus. Finally, we found MRI and echocardiography yielded comparable estimates of RAC. We conclude that RAC of proximal PAs can be obtained from either MRI or echocardiography and a change in RAC indicates a change in elastic modulus of proximal PAs detectable even in the absence of chronic PH-induced arterial remodeling. The correlation between RAC and elastic modulus of proximal PAs may be useful for prognoses and to monitor the effects of therapeutic interventions in patients with PH. PMID:25128393

  5. Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a sudden blockage in a lung artery. The cause is usually a blood clot in the leg called a deep vein thrombosis that breaks loose and travels through the bloodstream to the lung. Pulmonary embolism is a ...

  6. Acute embolic occlusion of the right common iliac artery after revision total hip arthroplasty treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis and balloon angioplasty: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongqi; Chen, Song; Chen, Li; Li, Yuefeng; Chai, Yasheng; Wei, Ping; Xu, Shunchi; Liu, Tangyou; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    Methods: A 63-year-old woman with atrial fibrillation presented clinical symptoms and signs of acute ischemia in the right lower extremity on the 17th postoperative day after revision total hip arthroplasty of the left hip for aseptic loosening of femoral component. Aspirin was discontinued 7 days before surgery. Both computed tomography angiography and digital subtraction angiography demonstrated complete occlusion of the right common iliac artery. An emergency catheter-directed thrombolysis with urokinase combined with balloon angioplasty was performed to obtain complete patency of the right common iliac artery. Results: The patient received anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy postoperatively and was fine at the 2-year follow-up. Conclusions: This case demonstrated that catheter-directed thrombolysis combined with balloon angioplasty could be an efficacious, minimally invasive approach for the treatment of acute embolic occlusion of the common iliac artery. Preoperative anticoagulation for patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty with long-term use of aspirin for atrial fibrillation needs further investigation.

  7. Amniotic fluid embolism

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Bhardwaj, Mamta; Kumar, Prashant; Singhal, Suresh; Singh, Tarandeep; Hooda, Sarla

    2016-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is one of the catastrophic complications of pregnancy in which amniotic fluid, fetal cells, hair, or other debris enters into the maternal pulmonary circulation, causing cardiovascular collapse. Etiology largely remains unknown, but may occur in healthy women during labour, during cesarean section, after abnormal vaginal delivery, or during the second trimester of pregnancy. It may also occur up to 48 hours post-delivery. It can also occur during abortion, after abdominal trauma, and during amnio-infusion. The pathophysiology of AFE is not completely understood. Possible historical cause is that any breach of the barrier between maternal blood and amniotic fluid forces the entry of amniotic fluid into the systemic circulation and results in a physical obstruction of the pulmonary circulation. The presenting signs and symptoms of AFE involve many organ systems. Clinical signs and symptoms are acute dyspnea, cough, hypotension, cyanosis, fetal bradycardia, encephalopathy, acute pulmonary hypertension, coagulopathy etc. Besides basic investigations lung scan, serum tryptase levels, serum levels of C3 and C4 complements, zinc coproporphyrin, serum sialyl Tn etc are helpful in establishing the diagnosis. Treatment is mainly supportive, but exchange transfusion, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and uterine artery embolization have been tried from time to time. The maternal prognosis after amniotic fluid embolism is very poor though infant survival rate is around 70%. PMID:27275041

  8. Amniotic fluid embolism.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Bhardwaj, Mamta; Kumar, Prashant; Singhal, Suresh; Singh, Tarandeep; Hooda, Sarla

    2016-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is one of the catastrophic complications of pregnancy in which amniotic fluid, fetal cells, hair, or other debris enters into the maternal pulmonary circulation, causing cardiovascular collapse. Etiology largely remains unknown, but may occur in healthy women during labour, during cesarean section, after abnormal vaginal delivery, or during the second trimester of pregnancy. It may also occur up to 48 hours post-delivery. It can also occur during abortion, after abdominal trauma, and during amnio-infusion. The pathophysiology of AFE is not completely understood. Possible historical cause is that any breach of the barrier between maternal blood and amniotic fluid forces the entry of amniotic fluid into the systemic circulation and results in a physical obstruction of the pulmonary circulation. The presenting signs and symptoms of AFE involve many organ systems. Clinical signs and symptoms are acute dyspnea, cough, hypotension, cyanosis, fetal bradycardia, encephalopathy, acute pulmonary hypertension, coagulopathy etc. Besides basic investigations lung scan, serum tryptase levels, serum levels of C3 and C4 complements, zinc coproporphyrin, serum sialyl Tn etc are helpful in establishing the diagnosis. Treatment is mainly supportive, but exchange transfusion, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and uterine artery embolization have been tried from time to time. The maternal prognosis after amniotic fluid embolism is very poor though infant survival rate is around 70%. PMID:27275041

  9. Arterial air embolism

    PubMed Central

    Nicks, Rowan

    1967-01-01

    The incidence and the outcome of systemic air embolism in 340 consecutive patients who underwent cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass in this unit for congenital defects of the cardiac septa and diseases involving the aortic and mitral valves have been studied. This was thought to have occurred in 40 patients, of whom 10 died. The distribution of air embolism according to the types of operation undertaken was as follows: six of 127 for atrial septal defect; six of 36 for ventricular septal defect; seven of 42 for mitral valve replacement; seven of 47 for aortic valve débridement; and 14 of 55 for aortic valve replacement. The cause was considered to have been systolic ejection of air into the aorta which, following cardiotomy, had been trapped in the pulmonary veins, the left atrium, the ventricular trabeculae, and the aortic root. Since the adoption of a more rigid `debubbling' routine, air embolism has not occurred. The incidence of pulmonary complications occurring in these patients after bypass was studied. Unilateral atelectasis, which occurred in five patients, resulted from retained bronchial secretions in all and was cured by bronchoscopic aspiration in all. The cause of bilateral atelectases, occurring in nine patients and fatal in eight of these, appeared to be related to cardiopulmonary factors and not to air embolism. Acute air injection made into the pulmonary artery of a dog resulted in pulmonary hypertension and a grossly deficient pulmonary circulation, but changes were largely resolved within a week. In view of this, it is considered that pulmonary air embolism may temporarily embarrass the right heart after the repair of a ventricular septal defect in a patient with an elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and diminished pulmonary vascular bed. Images PMID:6035795

  10. Systemic air embolism causing acute stroke and myocardial infarction after percutaneous transthoracic lung biopsy - a case report.

    PubMed

    Rehwald, Rafael; Loizides, Alexander; Wiedermann, Franz J; Grams, Astrid E; Djurdjevic, Tanja; Glodny, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    The air embolism in this case was likely to have been caused by positioning the patient in a prone position, which was associated with the lesion to be biopsied being at a maximum height over the left atrium. Due to the resulting negative pressure, air entered through a fistula that formed between the airspace and the pulmonary vein. The air could have been trapped in the left atrium by positioning the patient in left lateral position. The event itself could have been prevented by positioning the patient in an ipsilateral dependent position during the biopsy. In addition to hyperbaric oxygen therapy, the preferred treatment options are positioning maneuvers, administration of pure oxygen, and heparinization. PMID:27154545

  11. Impact of catheter fragmentation followed by local intrapulmonary thrombolysis in acute high risk pulmonary embolism as primary therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Bishav; Aslam, Naved; Kumar Mehra, Anil; Takkar Chhabra, Shibba; Wander, Praneet; Tandon, Rohit; Singh Wander, Gurpreet

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary embolism (PE) with more than 50% compromise of pulmonary circulation results significant right ventricular (RV) afterload leading to progressive RV failure, systemic hypotension and shock. Prompt restoration of thrombolysis, surgical embolectomy, or percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) prevents progressive hemodynamic decline. We report our single center experience in high risk PE patients treated with standard pigtail catheter mechanical fragmentation followed by intrapulmonary thrombolysis as a primary therapy. Methods 50 consecutive patients with diagnosis of high risk PE defined as having shock index >1 with angiographic evidence of >50% pulmonary arterial occlusion are included in the present study. All patients underwent emergent cardiac catheterization. After ensuring flow across pulmonary artery with mechanical breakdown of embolus by rotating 5F pigtail catheter; bolus dose of urokinase (4400 IU/kg) followed by infusion for 24 h was given in the thrombus. Hemodynamic parameters were recorded and follow up pulmonary angiogram was done. Clinical and echo follow up was done for one year. Results Pigtail rotational mechanical thrombectomy restored antegrade flow in all patients. The mean pulmonary artery pressure, Miller score, Shock index decreased significantly from 41 ± 8 mmHg, 20 ± 5, 1.32 ± 0.3 to 24.52 ± 6.89, 5.35 ± 2.16, 0.79 ± 0.21 respectively (p < 0.0001). In-hospital major complications were seen in 4 patients. There was a statistically significant reduction of PA pressures from 62 ± 11 mmHg to 23±6 mmHg on follow up. Conclusions Rapid reperfusion of pulmonary arteries with mechanical fragmentation by pigtail catheter followed by intrapulmonary thrombolysis results in excellent immediate and intermediate term outcomes in patients presenting with high risk pulmonary embolism. PMID:24973834

  12. Point-of-care echocardiography for aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism and acute coronary syndrome in patients with killer chest pain: EASY screening focused on the assessment of effusion, aorta, ventricular size and shape and ventricular asynergy.

    PubMed

    Nishigami, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Focus assessed transthoracic echocardiography and focused cardiac ultrasound are point-of-care echo protocols for the evaluation of cardiac disease in the emergency room; however, these protocols may not adequately assess aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, and acute coronary syndrome in patients with killer chest pain. Here, I present an echocardiography protocol focused on screening for these critical cardiovascular diseases. This protocol (termed EASY screening) consists of the assessment of effusion in the pericardial space, aortic abnormalities, the size and shape of the ventricles and asynergy of the left ventricle. Aortic dissection is suggested by positive findings for effusion and/or abnormal aortic findings. Pulmonary embolism is suggested by a dilated right ventricle and a D-shaped left ventricle in the short-axis view. Acute coronary syndrome is suggested by asynergy of left ventricular wall motion. EASY screening may facilitate the assessment of aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism and acute coronary syndrome in patients presenting to the emergency room with killer chest pain. PMID:26497152

  13. Massive Pulmonary Embolism Mimicking Acute Myocardial Infarction: Successful use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support as bridge to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yung-Kun; Siao, Fu-Yuan; Chiu, Chun-Chieh; Yen, Hsu-Heng; Chen, Yao-Li

    2016-07-01

    Prolonged cardiac arrest with pulseless electrical activity (PEA) results in death if its aetiology cannot be corrected immediately. We describe the case of a 75-year-old man with chest pain and his electrocardiogram (ECG) revealing ST-segment elevation in leads II, III, and aVf. Inferior wall myocardial infarction was subsequently diagnosed. Before performing emergency coronary angiography, however, a sudden cardiac arrest with PEA developed and the patient was placed on advanced cardiac life support. Oxygenation support for the extracorporeal membrane was initiated approximately 65min after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Emergency coronary arteriogram showed no obstructive lesions in the right coronary artery. This result, however, was not consistent with the ECG findings, and thus, a massive pulmonary embolism was suspected. Subsequent pulmonary artery angiography showed severe emboli in bilateral branches of the pulmonary arteries. Catheter-directed thrombolysis with urokinase was administered, which ultimately failed, and surgical embolectomy was performed with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. After the above intervention, the patient was discharged on hospital day 60 without any sequelae or neurological deficits. PMID:26935163

  14. Infantile intracranial aneurysm of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Del Santo, Molly Ann; Cordina, Steve Mario

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant who presented with inconsolable crying, vomiting, and sunset eye sign. CT revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, with CT angiogram revealing a superior cerebellar artery aneurysm. An external ventricular drain was placed for acute management of hydrocephalus, with definitive treatment by endovascular technique with a total of six microcoils to embolize the aneurysm. Serial transcranial Dopplers revealed no subsequent vasospasm. Although aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare, once the diagnosis is established, early treatment results in better outcomes. PMID:26929222

  15. Analysis of Doppler flow spectra of the superior vena cava in a canine model of acute thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dan Dan; Chen, Hong Mao; Duan, Yun You; Yuan, Li Jun; Shang, Fu Jun; Liang, Ning Nan; Cao, Wei

    2011-10-01

    We aimed to establish a canine model of acute thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (ATEPH) and to explore the feasibility of diagnosing pulmonary hypertension (PH) through the Doppler flow spectra of the superior vena cava (SVC). A canine model of ATEPH was developed by infusing thrombus into the right femoral vein. The pulmonary arterial pressure was simultaneously measured via a right heart catheter with the guidance of ultrasound. The maximum systolic peak flow velocity (SPV), ventricular reverse peak flow velocity (VRPV), diastolic peak flow velocity (DPV), and atrial reverse peak flow velocity (ARPV) of the SVC were measured by transthoracic echocardiography. ATEPH was successfully established in 24 dogs (88.9%) with the pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) greater than 30 mmHg. ARPV increased significantly with the increase of PASP, and was positively correlated with PASP (P<0.001). The ARPV/SPV larger than 0.8 could be better adopted to identify all the subjects with PH in this study. The Doppler flow spectra of the SVC could be employed to assess the severity of ATEPH.  PMID:21916968

  16. Does Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Embolic Stroke Have Long-term Side Effects on Intracranial Vessels? An Angiographic Follow-up Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kurre, Wiebke Perez, Marta Aguilar; Horvath, Diana; Schmid, Elisabeth; Baezner, Hansjoerg; Henkes, Hans

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. Mechanical thrombectomy (mTE) proved to be effective treating acute vessel occlusions with an acceptable rate of procedural complications. Potential long-term side effects of the vessel wall trauma caused by mechanical irritation of the endothelium are unknown up to now. Methods. From a retrospectively established database of 640 acute stroke treatments, we selected 261 patients with 265 embolic vessel occlusions treated successfully by mTE without permanent implantation of a stent. Analysis comprised the type of devices used and the number of passes performed. Digital subtraction angiography immediately after treatment was evaluated for vasospasm, dissection, and extravasation. Control angiographic images were evaluated for any morphological change compared to the immediate posttreatment angiographic run. Results. Recanalization was achieved with a median of one (range 1-10) mTE maneuvers. Vasospasm occurred in 69 territories (26.0 %) and was treated with glyceroltrinitrate in three. Dissection was observed in one vessel (0.4 %). Intraprocedural hemorrhage in two patients (0.8 %) was either wire or device induced. Follow-up digital subtraction angiography was available for 117 territories after a median of 107 days, revealing target vessel occlusion in one segment (0.9 %) and a de novo stenosis of four segments (3.4 %). All findings were clinically asymptomatic. Posttreatment vasospasm was more frequent in patients with de novo stenosis and occlusion (p = 0.038). Conclusion. De novo stenoses and occlusions occur in a small proportion of patients after mTE. Because all lesions were clinically asymptomatic, this finding does not affect the overall benefit of the treatment. Vasospasm may predict late vessel wall changes.

  17. Amniotic fluid embolism.

    PubMed

    Clark, Steven L

    2014-02-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism remains one of the most devastating conditions in obstetric practice with an incidence of approximately 1 in 40,000 deliveries and a reported mortality rate ranging from 20% to 60%. The pathophysiology appears to involve an abnormal maternal response to fetal tissue exposure associated with breaches of the maternal-fetal physiologic barrier during parturition. This response and its subsequent injury appear to involve activation of proinflammatory mediators similar to that seen with the classic systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Progress in our understanding of this syndrome continues to be hampered by a lack of universally acknowledged diagnostic criteria, the clinical similarities of this condition to other types of acute critical maternal illness, and the presence of a broad spectrum of disease severity. Clinical series based on population or administrative databases that do not include individual chart review by individuals with expertise in critical care obstetrics are likely to both overestimate the incidence and underestimate the mortality of this condition by the inclusion of women who did not have amniotic fluid embolism. Data regarding the presence of risk factors for amniotic fluid embolism are inconsistent and contradictory; at present, no putative risk factor has been identified that would justify modification of standard obstetric practice to reduce the risk of this condition. Maternal treatment is primarily supportive, whereas prompt delivery of the mother who has sustained cardiopulmonary arrest is critical for improved newborn outcome. PMID:24402585

  18. [Amniotic fluid embolism].

    PubMed

    António, Carlos; Marçal, Nelson; Lopes, Carlos; Tortosa, Francisco; Acevedo, Pilar; Monteiro, Jorge; Monteiro, Filipe; Correia, Llurdes; Brum, Ganriela; De Almeida, A Bugalho

    2011-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a rare pathological syndrome, sometimes fatal that arises as an obstetric complication during vaginal delivery, caesarean, immediate postpartum or during pregnancy. It remains as an important cause of fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. The authors present a clinical report of a young woman who developed an acute respiratory failure during labour demanding invasive mechanical ventilation and an urgent caesarean. In spite of early medical intensive therapy, hypoxemia was refractory and had a progressive worsening leading to multi-organ failure and ultimately to death. Diagnosis was confirmed through the identification of fetal material in the lumen of maternal pulmonary microcirculation. PMID:22713206

  19. Transcatheter Embolization of Pseudoaneurysms Complicating Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Golzarian, Jafar; Nicaise, Nicole; Deviere, Jacques; Ghysels, Marc; Wery, Didier; Dussaussois, Luc; Gansbeke, Daniel van; Struyven, Julien

    1997-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic role of angiography in patients with pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis. Methods: Thirteen symptomatic pseudoaneurysms were treated in nine patients with pancreatitis. Eight patients had chronic pancreatitis and pseudocyst and one had acute pancreatitis. Clinical presentation included gastrointestinal bleeding in seven patients and epigastric pain without bleeding in two. All patients underwent transcatheter embolization. Results: Transcatheter embolization resulted in symptomatic resolution in all patients. Rebleeding occurred in two patients, 18 and 28 days after embolization respectively, and was successfully treated by repeated emnbolization. One patient with severe pancreatitis died from sepsis 28 days after embolization. Follow-up was then available for eight patients with no relapse of bleeding after a mean follow-up of 32 months (range 9-48 months). Conclusion: Transcatheter embolization is safe and effective in the management of pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis.

  20. Helical computerized tomography and NT-proBNP for screening of right ventricular overload on admission and at long term follow-up of acute pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) in acute pulmonary embolism (APE) can be assessed with helical computerized tomography (CT) and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). Signs of RVD and elevated natriuretic peptides like NT-proBNP and cardiac troponin (TnT) are associated with increased risk of mortality. However, the prognostic role of both initial diagnostic strategy and the use of NT-proBNP and TnT for screening for long-term probability of RVD remains unknown. The aim of the study was to determine the role of helical CT and NT-proBNP in detection of RVD in the acute phase. In addition, the value of NT-proBNP for ruling out RVD at long-term follow-up was assessed. Methods Sixty-three non-high risk APE patients were studied. RVD was assessed at admission in the emergency department by CT and TTE, and both NT-proBNP and TnT samples were taken. These, excepting CT, were repeated seven months later. Results At admission RVD was detected by CT in 37 (59 %) patients. RVD in CT correlated strongly with RVD in TTE (p < 0.0001). NT-proBNP was elevated (≥ 350 ng/l) in 32 (86 %) patients with RVD but in only seven (27 %) patients without RVD (p < 0.0001). All the patients survived until the 7-month follow-up. TTE showed persistent RVD in 6 of 63 (10 %) patients who all had RVD in CT at admission. All of them had elevated NT-proBNP levels in the follow-up compared with 5 (9 %) of patients without RVD (p < 0.0001). Conclusions TTE does not confer further benefit when helical CT is used for screening for RVD in non-high risk APE. All the patients who were found to have RVD in TTE at seven months follow-up had had RVD in the acute phase CT as well. Thus, patients without RVD in diagnostic CT do not seem to require further routine follow-up to screen for RVD later. On the other hand, persistent RVD and thus need for TTE control can be ruled out by assessment of NT-proBNP at follow-up. A follow-up protocol based on these findings is suggested. PMID:22559861

  1. Successful Recanalization of Acute Superior Mesenteric Artery Thromboembolic Occlusion by a Combination of Intraarterial Thrombolysis and Mechanical Thrombectomy with a Carotid Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Sinak, Igor; Janik, Jan; Mikolajcik, Anton; Mistuna, Dusan

    2013-06-15

    Acute superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion is a life-threatening disease, and acute intestinal ischemia develops from the sudden decrease in perfusion to the intestines. The key to saving the patient's life is early diagnosis, and prompt revascularization of the SMA can prevent intestinal infarction and decrease the risk of bowel segment necrosis. Computed tomographic angiography may be useful for rapid diagnosis. We report recanalization of an SMA occlusion in an 80-year-old man with a combination of intraarterial thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy with a carotid filter.

  2. Stand-alone performance of a computer-assisted detection prototype for detection of acute pulmonary embolism: a multi-institutional comparison

    PubMed Central

    Wittenberg, R; Peters, J F; Weber, M; Lely, R J; Cobben, L P J; Prokop, M; Schaefer-Prokop, C M

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess whether the performance of a computer-assisted detection (CAD) algorithm for acute pulmonary embolism (PE) differs in pulmonary CT angiographies acquired at various institutions. Methods In this retrospective study, we included 40 consecutive scans with and 40 without PE from 3 institutions (n=240) using 64-slice scanners made by different manufacturers (General Electric; Philips; Siemens). CAD markers were classified as true or false positive (FP) using independent evaluation by two readers and consultation of a third chest radiologist in discordant cases. Image quality parameters were subjectively scored using 4/5-point scales. Image noise and vascular enhancement were measured. Statistical analysis was done to correlate image quality of the three institutions with CAD stand-alone performance. Results Patient groups were comparable with respect to age (p=0.22), accompanying lung disease (p=0.12) and inpatient/outpatient ratio (p=0.67). The sensitivity was 100% (34/34), 97% (37/38) and 92% (33/36), and the specificity was 18% (8/44), 15% (6/41) and 13% (5/39). Neither significantly differed between the institutions (p=0.21 and p=0.820, respectively). The mean number of FP findings (4.5, 6.2 and 3.7) significantly varied (p=0.02 and p=0.03), but median numbers (2, 3 and 3) were comparable. Image quality parameters were significantly associated with the number of FP findings (p<0.05) but not with sensitivity. After correcting for noise and vascular enhancement, the number of FPs did not significantly differ between the three institutions (p=0.43). Conclusions CAD stand-alone performance is independent of scanner type but strongly related to image quality and thus scanning protocols. PMID:22167514

  3. Management of venous thrombo-embolism: an update.

    PubMed

    Konstantinides, Stavros; Torbicki, Adam

    2014-11-01

    Venous thrombo-embolism is the third most frequent acute cardiovascular syndrome after myocardial infarction and stroke. Recently published landmark trials paved the way for significant progress in the management of the disease and provided the evidence for the ESC Pulmonary Embolism (PE) Guidelines 2014 update. Risk stratification strategies for non-high-risk PE continue to evolve, with an increasing emphasis on clinical prediction rules and right ventricular (RV) assessment on computed tomographic pulmonary angiography. In the field of anticoagulation treatment, pharmacogenetic testing for vitamin K antagonists on top of clinical parameters was not found to offer a significant benefit during the initiation phase; on the other hand, dosing based on the patient's clinical data seems superior to fixed loading regimens. The phase 3 trial programme of new oral anticoagulants in the treatment of venous thrombo-embolism has been completed, and the results indicate that these agents are at least as effective and probably cause less major bleeding than currently standard treatment. A multicentre prospective phase 4 trial will determine whether early discharge and out-of-hospital treatment of low-risk PE with the oral factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban is feasible, effective, and safe. For intermediate-risk PE defined on the basis of imaging tests and laboratory biomarkers, the bleeding risks of full-dose thrombolytic treatment appear too high to justify its use, unless clinical signs of haemodynamic decompensation appear. Patients in whom PE has resulted in chronic thrombo-embolic pulmonary hypertension and who are not suitable for pulmonary endarterectomy, may be expected to benefit from emerging pharmaceutical and interventional treatment options. PMID:25179762

  4. Submassive pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    The US Surgeon General estimates that 100,000 to 180,000 deaths occur annually from acute pulmonary embolism (PE) in the United States. The case of Ms A, a 60-year-old woman with acute PE and right ventricular dysfunction (submassive PE), illustrates the clinical challenge of identifying this high-risk patient population and determining when more aggressive immediate therapy should be pursued in addition to standard anticoagulation. The clinical examination, electrocardiogram, cardiac biomarkers, chest computed tomography, and echocardiography can be used to risk stratify patients with acute PE. Current options for more aggressive intervention in the treatment of patients with acute PE who are at increased risk of an adverse clinical course include systemic fibrinolysis, pharmacomechanical catheter-directed therapy, surgical pulmonary embolectomy, and inferior vena cava filter insertion. Determination of the optimal duration of anticoagulation and lifestyle modification to reduce overall cardiovascular risk are critical components of the long-term therapy of patients with acute PE. PMID:23299609

  5. Comparison of Hemostatic Durability between N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate and Gelatin Sponge Particles in Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Acute Arterial Hemorrhage in a Coagulopathic Condition in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yonemitsu, Takafumi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Sonomura, Tetsuo; Takasaka, Isao; Nakai, Motoki; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Sahara, Shinya; Iwasaki, Yasuhiro; Naka, Toshio; Shinozaki, Masahiro

    2010-12-15

    This study was designed to compare the efficacy of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) or gelatin sponge particles (GSP) for acute arterial bleeding in a coagulopathic condition using a swine model. Four healthy swine were divided into two coagulopathic conditions: mild and severe. Five hemorrhages were created in each swine (10 hemorrhages per coagulopathy). Mild coagulopathy was achieved by bloodletting 10% of the total circulatory whole blood and preserving activated clotting time (ACT) less than 200 s (ACT < 200 s state); severe coagulopathy was achieved by bloodletting 30% and preserving ACT > 400 s (ACT > 400-second state). For each state, of ACT < 200 s or ACT > 400 s, TAE was conducted with GSP or NBCA to control five hemorrhages arising from artificially created renal and splenic injuries. Angiography immediately after TAE with GSP or NBCA showed complete occlusion in both coagulopathic conditions. In the ACT < 200-second state, follow-up angiography at 5-30 min after TAE with GSP or NBCA showed no evidence of recurrent hemorrhage. In the ACT > 400-second state, follow-up angiography showed recurrent hemorrhage in four (80%) of the five hemorrhages embolized with GSP and in one (20%) of the five hemorrhages embolized with NBCA. Microscopically, red thrombi were observed densely surrounding GSP in mild coagulopathy but were scarce in severe coagulopathy. In a condition with severe coagulopathy, TAE with NBCA was more effective in durability to cease active arterial bleeding than with GSP.

  6. Coronary embolism in valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Charles, R G; Epstein, E J; Holt, S; Coulshed, N

    1982-01-01

    Coronary embolism is considered to be rare but recent evidence suggests that it may be underdiagnosed, and implicated in acute myocardial infarction associated with angiographically normal coronary arteries. Twenty-six patients were studied. In six, coronary embolism was a primary cause of death confirmed at autopsy. In 20 patients, 23 episodes of coronary embolism were diagnosed clinically. The left coronary system was occluded in 65 per cent, transient electrocardiographic changes occurred in 30 per cent, and either no history or an atypical history of acute myocardial infarction occurred in 29 per cent. Other systemic emboli occurred in 25 per cent. Aortic valve lesions were present in 70 per cent and combined mitral and aortic valve disease in 55 per cent of the patients. The incidence of coronary risk factors was low. Sequelae included increased dyspnoea (35 per cent), ventricular aneurysm (25 per cent) and cardiac failure (12 per cent). Angina rarely followed acute myocardial infarction. PMID:7111677

  7. Pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Tarbox, Abigail K.; Swaroop, Mamta

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is responsible for approximately 100,000 to 200,000 deaths in the United States each year. With a diverse range of clinical presentations from asymptomatic to death, diagnosing PE can be challenging. Various resources are available, such as clinical scoring systems, laboratory data, and imaging studies which help guide clinicians in their work-up of PE. Prompt recognition and treatment are essential for minimizing the mortality and morbidity associated with PE. Advances in recognition and treatment have also enabled treatment of some patients in the home setting and limited the amount of time spent in the hospital. This article will review the risk factors, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, evaluation, and treatment of PE. PMID:23724389

  8. Fat embolism syndrome

    PubMed Central

    George, Jacob; George, Reeba; Dixit, R.; Gupta, R. C.; Gupta, N.

    2013-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome is an often overlooked cause of breathlessness in trauma wards. Presenting in a wide range of clinical signs of varying severity, fat embolism is usually diagnosed by a physician who keeps a high degree of suspicion. The clinical background, chronology of symptoms and corroborative laboratory findings are instrumental in a diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome. There are a few diagnostic criteria which are helpful in making a diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome. Management is mainly prevention of fat embolism syndrome, and organ supportive care. Except in fulminant fat embolism syndrome, the prognosis is usually good. PMID:23661916

  9. Pulmonary embolism, part II: Management

    PubMed Central

    Bĕlohlávek, Jan; Dytrych, Vladimír; Linhart, Aleš

    2013-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) bears a significant burden on health and survival. Rapid and accurate risk stratification and management are of paramount importance to ensure the highest quality of care. This present article summarizes currently available and emerging management strategies for the disease. The authors not only review current evidence regarding early therapy of acute PE, including supportive care, anticoagulation, thrombolysis, surgical and catheter-based treatment, but also the possible role of mechanical circulatory support in PE. The authors also discuss complications related to PE and its management. PMID:23940439

  10. Septic Coronary Artery Embolism Treated with Aspiration Thrombectomy: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, Nosheen; Eftekhari, Hossein; Lotfi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Coronary embolization is a potentially fatal sequela of endocarditis. We report a case of Candida endocarditis with septic embolism to the left anterior descending coronary artery. This embolism was successfully treated with aspiration thrombectomy followed by balloon angioplasty. The treatment of acute coronary syndrome in the presence of septic embolism is controversial. Aspiration thrombectomy has been performed in this situation before, and it appears to be safer and more feasible than is thrombolysis or percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. PMID:25120402

  11. Modeling the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Embolism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pliskin, Nava; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The problem of acute pulmonary embolism is employed to illustrate that medical decision analysis is possible despite some of the difficulties encountered in previous application. The usefulness of computerized decision models is discussed. (LBH)

  12. Massive Pulmonary Calculi Embolism: A Novel Complication of Pneumatic Lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Zhou, Yiwu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pneumatic lithotripsy is a minimally invasive technique mainly for the treatment of urinary staghorn stones. Previous literatures have reported some therapeutic complications during or after this procedure, but calculi embolism has not been mentioned before. We report here a fatal case of calculi-induced pulmonary embolism in an adult woman who underwent pneumatic lithotripsy. An autopsy did not reveal any evidence of pulmonary embolism. However, light microscopy revealed noticeable presence of calculi in pulmonary arterioles and capillaries, as evidenced by environmental scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The primary determinants of calculi embolism include intrarenal pressure, and volume and viscosity of the calculi fragments formation. Vascular intravasation of smashed calculi might increase pulmonary vascular resistance and hypoxemia and decrease cardiac output. This case report intends to provide information for clinicians to consider the probability of intraoperative calculi embolism during lithotripsies when patients develop typical symptoms of acute pulmonary embolism. PMID:26222867

  13. Embolic protection devices in percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Meneguz Moreno, Rafael A; Costa, José R; Costa, Ricardo A; Abizaid, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Clinical benefit of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) depends on both angiographic success at lesion site as well as the restoration of adequate macro and microvascular perfusion. The pathophysiology of embolization from coronary lesions during PCI is multifactorial, being more frequently observed in patients with acute coronary syndrome and in those with lesions at saphenous vein graft (SVG). In this population, despite successful epicardial intervention, distal tissue perfusion may still be absent in up to a quarter of all PCI. Multiple devices and pharmacologic regimens have been developed and refined in an attempt to protect the microvascular circulation during PCI. Among them, embolic protection devices have raised as an attractive adjunctive toll due to their ability to retain debris and potentially prevent distal embolization, reducing major adverse cardiac events. Currently, their use has been validated for the treatment of SVG lesions but failed to show effectiveness in the percutaneous approach of acute coronary syndrome patients, including those with ST elevation myocardial infarction. PMID:27007782

  14. Cerebral Air Embolism from Angioinvasive Cavitary Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen; Barrio, George A.; Hurwitz, Lynne M.; Kranz, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Nontraumatic cerebral air embolism cases are rare. We report a case of an air embolism resulting in cerebral infarction related to angioinvasive cavitary aspergillosis. To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports associating these two conditions together. Case Presentation. A 32-year-old female was admitted for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Her hospital course was complicated by pulmonary aspergillosis. On hospital day 55, she acutely developed severe global aphasia with right hemiplegia. A CT and CT-angiogram of her head and neck were obtained demonstrating intravascular air emboli within the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) branches. She was emergently taken for hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). Evaluation for origin of the air embolus revealed an air focus along the left lower pulmonary vein. Over the course of 48 hours, her symptoms significantly improved. Conclusion. This unique case details an immunocompromised patient with pulmonary aspergillosis cavitary lesions that invaded into a pulmonary vein and caused a cerebral air embolism. With cerebral air embolisms, the acute treatment option differs from the typical ischemic stroke pathway and the provider should consider emergent HBOT. This case highlights the importance of considering atypical causes of acute ischemic stroke. PMID:25197589

  15. Amniotic fluid embolism: review.

    PubMed

    Pantaleo, Greco; Luigi, Nappi; Federica, Trezza; Paola, Storelli; Margherita, Neri; Tahir, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism is a rare but dreadful syndrome in Obstetrics, which happens, in most of the cases, in the peripartum period. The actual "embolisation" of the pulmonary vessels does not explain the whole picture of the syndrome. An immune mechanism, similar to an anaphylactic reaction, is more convincingly the background of the event, but the pathogenesis is still ill-defined. Similarly the initial symptoms are difficult to interpret and distinguish from other acute and life-threatening emergencies (i.e. pulmonary embolism, placental abruption, septic shock, stroke, myocardial ischemia, etc.), therefore the diagnosis is one of exclusion, very often on postmortem report. Thus the prevalence of the disease is difficult to establish, most of the reports being postmortem cases or National Registries data. These data, based either on autopsy series or on registries, are non representative of the true prevalence of the event and obviously confusing for the correct understanding of the disease process. Risk factors are all those conditions or manouvres, which contemplate a breech in the maternal-fetal barrier. Again, given the rarity of the syndrome, no single event is clearly identifiable as a case-effect risk factor. Prognosis, which is obviously biased by the reporting system, is particularly grim both in terms of survival and morbidity. The symptoms being often elusive at the beginning, but rapidly and progressively catastrophic, a multidisciplinary team approach is warranted in order to provide the best chance of survival both for mother and baby. Immediate and aggressive resuscitation is, therefore, advised whenever a mother in labour or in the early postpartum period experiences a sudden collapse. PMID:24804726

  16. Acute hypoxia modifies cAMP levels induced by inhibitors of phosphodiesterase-4 in rat carotid bodies, carotid arteries and superior cervical ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Ana R; Batuca, Joana R; Monteiro, Emília C

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors are useful to treat hypoxia-related diseases and are used in experiments studying the effects of oxygen on 3′-5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production. We studied the effects of acute hypoxia on cAMP accumulation induced by PDE inhibitors in oxygen-specific chemosensors, the carotid bodies (CBs) and in non-chemosensitive CB-related structures: carotid arteries (CAs) and superior cervical ganglia (SCG). Experimental approach: Concentration–response curves for the effects of a non-specific PDE inhibitor [isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX) ], PDE4 selective inhibitors (rolipram, Ro 20-1724) and a PDE2 selective inhibitor (erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine) on cAMP levels were obtained in normoxic (20% O2/5% CO2) or hypoxic (5% O2/5% CO2) conditions. Key results: Responses to the PDE inhibitors were compatible with the presence of PDE4 in rat CBs, CAs and SCG but in the absence of PDE2 in CAs and CBs. Acute hypoxia enhanced the effects of IBMX and PDE4 inhibitors on cAMP accumulation in CAs and CBs. In SCG, acute hypoxia reduced cAMP accumulation induced by all the four PDE inhibitors tested. Differences between the effects of Ro 20-1724 and rolipram on cAMP were found in CAs and CBs during hypoxia. Conclusions and implications: The effects of PDE4 inhibitors could be potentiated or inhibited by acute hypoxia depending on the PDE isoforms of the tissue. The similarities between the characterization of PDE4 inhibitors at the CBs and CAs, under normoxia and hypoxia, did not support a specific role for cAMP in the oxygen-sensing machinery at the CB and suggested that no direct CB-mediated, hyperventilatory, adverse effects would be expected with administration of PDE4 inhibitors. PMID:20082613

  17. [Elective cerebral arteriovenous malformation treatment with onyx after coil embolization of ruptured, flow-realeted aneurysm of the posterior circulation].

    PubMed

    Poncyljusz, Wojciech; Falkowski, Aleksander; Rać, Monika; Sagan, Leszek; Kojder, Ireneusz

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial arteriovenous posterior circulation malformation was planned to embolize by onyx injection after acute coil embolization of ruptured flow-realeted aneurysm of posterior cerebral artery. Control angiography revealed completely embolized malformation with normal vessel patency at the end of procedure. There were no adverse events related to this procedure and no neurologic deficit at the discharge. PMID:23276020

  18. 17β-Estradiol mediates superior adaptation of right ventricular function to acute strenuous exercise in female rats with severe pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lahm, Tim; Frump, Andrea L; Albrecht, Marjorie E; Fisher, Amanda J; Cook, Todd G; Jones, Thomas J; Yakubov, Bakhtiyor; Whitson, Jordan; Fuchs, Robyn K; Liu, Aiping; Chesler, Naomi C; Brown, M Beth

    2016-08-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) exerts protective effects on right ventricular (RV) function in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Since acute exercise-induced increases in afterload may lead to RV dysfunction in PAH, we sought to determine whether E2 allows for superior RV adaptation after an acute exercise challenge. We studied echocardiographic, hemodynamic, structural, and biochemical markers of RV function in male and female rats with sugen/hypoxia (SuHx)-induced pulmonary hypertension, as well as in ovariectomized (OVX) SuHx females, with or without concomitant E2 repletion (75 μg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) immediately after 45 min of treadmill running at 75% of individually determined maximal aerobic capacity (75% aerobic capacity reserve). Compared with males, intact female rats exhibited higher stroke volume and cardiac indexes, a strong trend for better RV compliance, and less pronounced increases in indexed total pulmonary resistance. OVX abrogated favorable RV adaptations, whereas E2 repletion after OVX markedly improved RV function. E2's effects on pulmonary vascular remodeling were complex and less robust than its RV effects. Postexercise hemodynamics in females with endogenous or exogenous E2 were similar to hemodynamics in nonexercised controls, whereas OVX rats exhibited more severely altered postexercise hemodynamics. E2 mediated inhibitory effects on RV fibrosis and attenuated increases in RV collagen I/III ratio. Proapoptotic signaling, endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation, and autophagic flux markers were affected by E2 depletion and/or repletion. Markers of impaired autophagic flux correlated with endpoints of RV structure and function. Endogenous and exogenous E2 exerts protective effects on RV function measured immediately after an acute exercise challenge. Harnessing E2's mechanisms may lead to novel RV-directed therapies. PMID:27288487

  19. Crural Artery Traumatic Injuries: Treatment with Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Lopera, Jorge E. Suri, Rajeev; Cura, Marco; Kroma, Ghazwan; El-Merhi, Fadi

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this paper is to report our experience with the endovascular treatment of crural arterial injuries using transcatheter and direct embolization techniques. A total of eight consecutive patients have been treated during a 7-year period. Six males and two females, mean age 32 years (range, 15-56 years), presented with penetrating trauma to the lower extremities. Mechanisms of injuries were stab wounds in six patients, gun shot wound in one patient, and iatrogenic injury in one patient. Five patients presented with acute trauma, while three patients presented with delayed injuries. Crural arterial injuries encountered included pseudoaneurysms with arteriovenous fistulas (n = 6), pseudoaneurysms with vessel transections (n = 2), and pseudoaneurysm (n = 1). Proximal and distal embolization with coils was used in three cases, proximal embolization with coils in three cases, percutaneous thrombin injection in one case, and liquid n-butyl cyanoacrylate in one case. Complete exclusion of the lesions was accomplished by sacrifice of one crural vessel in seven cases and of two crural vessels in one case. Two cases of delayed injuries required combined coil and liquid embolization techniques for lesion exclusion. A minor complication (groin hematoma) occurred in one patient, no distal ischemia was seen, and no amputations were required. Mean follow-up was 61 days (range, 1-180 days). One pseudoaneurysm treated with thrombin injection recurred and required surgical excision. We conclude that transcatheter embolization alone or in combination with different endovascular techniques is useful in the treatment of traumatic crural vessel injuries.

  20. Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices by Direct Percutaneous Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Arulraj, Ramakrishnan; Mangat, Kamarjit S.; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2011-02-15

    Stomal varices can occur in patients with stoma in the presence of portal hypertension. Suture ligation, sclerotherapy, angiographic embolization, stoma revision, beta blockade, portosystemic shunt, and liver transplantation have been described as therapeutic options for bleeding stomal varices. We report the case of a 21-year-old patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis and colectomy with ileostomy for ulcerative colitis, where stomal variceal bleeding was successfully treated by direct percutaneous embolization. We consider percutaneous embolization to be an effective way of treating acute stomal bleeding in decompensated patients while awaiting decisions regarding shunt procedures or liver transplantation.

  1. Acute hypotension associated with intraoperative cell salvage using a leukocyte depletion filter during management of obstetric hemorrhage due to amniotic fluid embolism.

    PubMed

    Rogers, William Kirke; Wernimont, Sarah A; Kumar, Girish C; Bennett, Eliza; Chestnut, David H

    2013-08-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a rare but catastrophic obstetric complication that can lead to profound coagulopathy and hemorrhage. The role of cell salvage and recombinant human Factor VIIa (rFVIIa) administration in such cases remains unclear. We present a case of AFE and describe our experience with the use of cell salvage and rFVIIa administration during the resuscitation. Cell salvage and transfusion through a leukocyte depletion filter was attempted after the diagnosis of AFE was made, but the attempted transfusion was immediately followed by hypotension and a worsening of hemodynamics. rFVIIa, on the contrary, was used with clinical improvement in coagulopathy and without apparent adverse thrombotic effect. PMID:23749444

  2. Therapeutic aspects of fat embolism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Habashi, Nader M; Andrews, Penny L; Scalea, Thomas M

    2006-10-01

    Signs and symptoms of clinical fat embolism syndrome (FES) usually begin within 24-48 hours after trauma. The classic triad involves pulmonary changes, cerebral dysfunction, and petechial rash. Clinical diagnosis is key because laboratory and radiographic diagnosis is not specific and can be inconsistent. The duration of FES is difficult to predict because it is often subclinical or may be overshadowed by other illnesses or injuries. Medical care is prophylactic or supportive, including early fixation and general ICU management to ensure adequate oxygenation and ventilation, hemodynamic stability, prophylaxis of deep venous thrombosis, stress-related gastrointestinal bleeding, and nutrition. Studies support early fracture fixation as a method to reduce recurrent fat embolism and FES. The main therapeutic interventions once FES has been clinically diagnosed are directed towards support of pulmonary and neurological manifestations and management of acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). PMID:16990063

  3. Percutaneous embolization of a high-flow pancreatic transplant arteriovenous fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Angle, J. Fritz; Matsumoto, Alan H.; McGraw, J. Kevin; Hagspiel, Klaus D.; Spinosa, David J.; McCullough, Christopher S.

    1999-03-15

    Percutaneous endovascular techniques were used to treat an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) associated with pancreatic transplantation. A pancreatic transplant superior mesenteric artery-to-superior mesenteric-vein AVF was successfully embolized while flow to the pancreas transplant was preserved. The embolization was aided by the use of Guglielmi detachable coils and a detachable balloon. No complications were encountered. At 23 months follow-up, the patient is doing well with no recurrence.

  4. Percutaneous Embolization of a High-Flow Pancreatic Transplant Arteriovenous Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Angle, J. Fritz; Matsumoto, Alan H.; McGraw, J. Kevin; Hagspiel, Klaus D.; Spinosa, David J.; McCullough, Christopher S.

    1998-03-15

    Percutaneous endovascular techniques were used to treat an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) associated with pancreatic transplantation. A pancreatic transplant superior mesenteric artery-to-superior mesenteric-vein AVF was successfully embolized while flow to the pancreas transplant was preserved. The embolization was aided by the use of Guglielmi detachable coils and a detachable balloon. No complications were encountered. At 23 months follow-up, the patient is doing well with no recurrence.

  5. Foreign body pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Rief, Peter; Belaj, Klara; Smaczny, Nicole; Augustin, Michael; Eller, Philipp; Brodmann, Marianne; Pilger, Ernst

    2013-06-01

    We report a case of a foreign body embolism caused by a tip of an explanted port-a-cath system. The embolus could be removed with a gooseneck snare catheter, the patient fully recovered. PMID:23765525

  6. Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Fistulas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Arteriovenous Malformations/Fistulas Embolization of brain aneurysms ... Aneurysms and Fistulas? What is Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Fistulas? Embolization of brain aneurysms and arteriovenous ...

  7. Posterior Circulation Stroke After Bronchial Artery Embolization. A Rare but Serious Complication

    SciTech Connect

    Laborda, Alicia; Tejero, Carlos; Fredes, Arturo; Cebrian, Luis; Guelbenzu, Santiago; Gregorio, Miguel Angel de

    2013-06-15

    Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) is the treatment of choice for massive hemoptysis with rare complications that generally are mild and transient. There are few references in the medical literature with acute cerebral embolization as a complication of BAE. We report a case of intracranial posterior territory infarctions as a complication BAE in a patient with hemoptysis due to bronchiectasis.

  8. The Superiority of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Over Chemotherapy Alone in the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients with Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; Huang, Sai; Zhu, Cheng-Ying; Gao, Li; Zhu, Hai-Yan; Lv, Na; Jing, Yu; Yu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene rearrangements always had a very poor prognosis. In this study, we report the incidence of MLL rearrangements in AML patients using gene analysis, as well as the clinical significance and prognostic features of these rearrangements. Material/Methods This retrospective study took place from April 2008 to November 2011 in the People’s Liberation Army General Hospital. A total 433 AML patients were screened by multiple nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to determine the incidence of the 11 MLL gene rearrangements. There were 68 cases of MLL gene rearrangements, for a positive rate of 15.7%. A total of 24 patients underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-HSCT), and 34 patients received at least 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Ten patients were lost to follow-up. Results The median follow-up was 29 months. The complete remission (CR) rate was 85.4%. The overall survival (OS) was 57.4±5.9 months for the Allo-HSCT group and 21.0±2.1 months for the chemotherapy group. The Allo-HSCT group had superior survival compared with the chemotherapy group (5-year OS: 59±17% vs. 13±8%, P<0.01; 5-year disease-free survival [DFS]: 65±10% vs. 40±16%, P>0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that transplantation, platelets >50×109/L at onset, and CR are associated with a better OS in MLL rearranged AML patients. Patients with thrombocytopenia and extramedullary involvement were prone to relapse. Conclusions Our results suggest that Allo-HSCT is superior to chemotherapy alone for treating MLL rearranged AML patients. Patients treated with Allo-HSCT have a better prognosis and a longer survival. CR is an independent prognostic factor for OS, and extramedullary involvement is an independent prognostic factor for DFS. MLL rearranged AML patients with thrombocytopenia at onset <50×109 had very bad OS and DFS. PMID:27373985

  9. The Superiority of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Over Chemotherapy Alone in the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients with Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Huang, Sai; Zhu, Cheng-Ying; Gao, Li; Zhu, Hai-Yan; Lv, Na; Jing, Yu; Yu, Li

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene rearrangements always had a very poor prognosis. In this study, we report the incidence of MLL rearrangements in AML patients using gene analysis, as well as the clinical significance and prognostic features of these rearrangements. MATERIAL AND METHODS This retrospective study took place from April 2008 to November 2011 in the People's Liberation Army General Hospital. A total 433 AML patients were screened by multiple nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to determine the incidence of the 11 MLL gene rearrangements. There were 68 cases of MLL gene rearrangements, for a positive rate of 15.7%. A total of 24 patients underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-HSCT), and 34 patients received at least 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Ten patients were lost to follow-up. RESULTS The median follow-up was 29 months. The complete remission (CR) rate was 85.4%. The overall survival (OS) was 57.4±5.9 months for the Allo-HSCT group and 21.0±2.1 months for the chemotherapy group. The Allo-HSCT group had superior survival compared with the chemotherapy group (5-year OS: 59±17% vs. 13±8%, P<0.01; 5-year disease-free survival [DFS]: 65±10% vs. 40±16%, P>0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that transplantation, platelets >50×10^9/L at onset, and CR are associated with a better OS in MLL rearranged AML patients. Patients with thrombocytopenia and extramedullary involvement were prone to relapse. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that Allo-HSCT is superior to chemotherapy alone for treating MLL rearranged AML patients. Patients treated with Allo-HSCT have a better prognosis and a longer survival. CR is an independent prognostic factor for OS, and extramedullary involvement is an independent prognostic factor for DFS. MLL rearranged AML patients with thrombocytopenia at onset <50×10^9 had very bad OS and DFS. PMID:27373985

  10. Arterial embolism of the upper extremities.

    PubMed

    Janevski, B

    1986-10-01

    The angiographic signs, the frequency and the site of distribution of acute emboli of the arteries of the upper extremity are described. The conclusions are based on the author's own experience gained from selective studies of acute arterial embolism of the upper limb, during a period of 15 years. A comparison is made with the results of two of the largest series reported in the literature. In addition, a brief review of the aetiology, pathogenesis, the clinical and roentgenological signs of the condition is given. PMID:3022344

  11. Paradoxical coronary artery embolism - a rare cause of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Fayaz A; Kransdorf, Evan P; Abudiab, Muaz M; Sweeney, John P

    2014-01-01

    Paradoxical coronary artery embolism is a rare, but often an underdiagnosed cause of acute myocardial infarction. It should be considered in patient who presents with chest pain and otherwise having a low risk profile for atherosclerosis coronary artery disease. We describe a case of paradoxical coronary artery embolism causing ST segment elevation myocardial infarction in a patient with upper extremity venous thrombosis. Echocardiography demonstrated a patent foramen ovale (PFO) with bidirectional shunt. In addition to treatment of acute coronary event closure of the PFO should be considered to prevent a recurrence. PMID:25774255

  12. Paradoxical Coronary Artery Embolism - A Rare Cause of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Fayaz A.; Kransdorf, Evan P.; Abudiab, Muaz M.; Sweeney, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Paradoxical coronary artery embolism is a rare, but often an underdiagnosed cause of acute myocardial infarction. It should be considered in patient who presents with chest pain and otherwise having a low risk profile for atherosclerosis coronary artery disease. We describe a case of paradoxical coronary artery embolism causing ST segment elevation myocardial infarction in a patient with upper extremity venous thrombosis. Echocardiography demonstrated a patent foramen ovale (PFO) with bidirectional shunt. In addition to treatment of acute coronary event closure of the PFO should be considered to prevent a recurrence. PMID:25774255

  13. Minimal residual disease in peripheral blood at day 15 identifies a subgroup of childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia with superior prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Volejnikova, Jana; Mejstrikova, Ester; Valova, Tatana; Reznickova, Leona; Hodonska, Ladislava; Mihal, Vladimir; Sterba, Jaroslav; Jabali, Yahia; Prochazkova, Daniela; Blazek, Bohumir; Hak, Jiri; Cerna, Zdenka; Hrusak, Ondrej; Stary, Jan; Trka, Jan; Fronkova, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Background Most minimal residual disease-directed treatment interventions in current treatment protocols for acute lymphoblastic leukemia are based on bone marrow testing, which is a consequence of previous studies showing the superiority of bone marrow over peripheral blood as an investigational material. Those studies typically did not explore the prognostic impact of peripheral blood involvement and lacked samples from very early time points of induction. Design and Methods In this study, we employed real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis to examine minimal residual disease in 398 pairs of blood and bone marrow follow-up samples taken from 95 children with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with the ALL IC-BFM 2002 protocol. Results We confirmed the previously published poor correlation between minimal residual disease in blood and marrow at early treatment time points, with levels in bone marrow being higher than in blood in most samples (median 7.9-fold, range 0.04–8,293-fold). A greater involvement of peripheral blood at diagnosis was associated with a higher white blood cell count at diagnosis (P=0.003) and with enlargement of the spleen (P=0.0004) and liver (P=0.05). At day 15, a level of minimal residual disease in blood lower than 10−4 was associated with an excellent 5-year relapse-free survival in 78 investigated patients (100% versus 69±7%; P=0.0003). Subgroups defined by the level of minimal residual disease in blood at day 15 (high-risk: ≥10−2, intermediate-risk: <10−2 and ≥10−4, standard-risk: <10−4) partially correlated with bone marrow-based stratification described previously, but the risk groups did not match completely. No other time point analyses were predictive of outcome in peripheral blood, except for a weak association at day 8. Conclusions Minimal residual disease in peripheral blood at day 15 identified a large group of patients with an excellent prognosis and added prognostic

  14. Management of Severe Hemoptysis from Pulmonary Aspergilloma Using Endovascular Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Corr, Peter

    2006-10-15

    Purpose. To determine the effectiveness of endovascular embolization as a temporizing measure in the management of severe hemoptysis caused by intracavitary pulmonary aspergilloma. Methods. Patients presenting with hemoptysis, estimated to be more than 300 ml in the preceding 24 hr, in whom a radiological diagnosis of pulmonary aspergilloma was made on chest radiographs and/or computed tomography of the chest were subjected to bronchial and systemic arteriography and embolization using triacryl microspheres. Results. Twelve patients with upper lobe intracavitary aspergillomas were managed with embolization. In 11 patients hemoptysis stopped within 24 hr and with no recurrence over the next 4 weeks. In 1 patient hemoptysis persisted and an upper lobe lobectomy was performed. Conclusion. Embolization of bronchial and systemic arteries is an effective method for treating acute severe hemoptysis from intracavitary aspergillomas, allowing the patient time to recover for definitive surgical management.

  15. Embolization of Collateral Vessels Using Mechanically Detachable Coils in Young Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Y.; Ogino, H.; Hara, M.; Satake, M.; Oshima, H.; Banno, T.; Mizuno, K.; Mishima, A.; Shibamoto, Y.

    2003-11-15

    Our objective was to evaluate the usefulness of embolizing collateral vessels using mechanically detachable coils (MDCs) in children aged 3 years or younger with congenital heart disease. The subjects were 8 children with congenital heart disease featuring collateral vessels (age 18 days-3 years): 3 with a single ventricle, 2 with the tetralogy of Fallot, 2 with pulmonary atresia, and 1 with a ventricular septal defect. The embolized vessels were the major aortopulmonary collateral artery (MAPCA) in 5 patients, the persistent left superior vena cava in 2, and the coronary arteriovenous fistula in 1. A 4 or a 5 F catheter was used as the guiding device, and embolization was performed using MDCs and other conventional coils introduced through the microcatheter. One patient had growth of new MAPCAs after embolization, and these MAPCAs were also embolized with MDCs. Thus, a total of 9 embolization procedures were performed in 8 patients. Complete occlusion of the collateral vessels was achieved in 8 of 9 procedures (89%). Seven of 8 patients (88%) had uneventful courses after embolization, and MDC procedures appeared to play important roles in avoiding coil migration and achievement of safe coil embolization. One patient who underwent MAPCA embolization showed no improvement in heart function and died 2 months and 19 days later. Embolization of collateral vessels using MDCs in young children with congenital heart disease can be an effective procedure and a valuable adjunct to surgical management.

  16. Bilateral massive pulmonary embolism secondary to decompression sickness: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gaye, Ulubay; Sevinc, Sarinc Ulasli; Ozgur, Karacan; Tuna, Gumus; Fusun, Eyuboglu Oner

    2007-01-01

    This case report describes massive pulmonary embolism in a patient as a complication of decompression illness. Twenty-four hours after a scuba dive, a 50-year-old man developed acute pulmonary hypertension and decompression sickness that produced bilateral embolism in the lung at day 6 of hospitalization. He had no risk factor for pulmonary embolism earlier except smoking. Decompression sickness that RESULTS in formation of bubbles of inert gas is a risk for both aviators and divers. The present case strongly suggests that micro-bubbles may cause life-threatening massive pulmonary embolism. PMID:18005806

  17. Pulmonary embolism and amniotic fluid embolism in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Matthew C; Moore, Lisa E

    2013-03-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism and pulmonary embolism are 2 of the most common causes of maternal mortality in the developed world. Symptoms of pulmonary embolism include tachycardia, tachypnea, and shortness of breath, all of which are common complaints in pregnancy. Heightened awareness leads to rapid diagnosis and institution of therapy. Amniotic fluid embolism is associated with maternal collapse. There are currently no proven therapies, although rapid initiation of supportive care may decrease the risk of mortality. PMID:23466134

  18. [Fat embolism after total hip prosthesis replacement preserving the femoral stem].

    PubMed

    Messant, I; Ouardirhi, Y; Vernet, M; Lile, A; Girard, C

    2003-11-01

    Fat embolism is a known complication of traumatology, especially in long bone fractures. It may also occur in liposuction and articular surgery (0.1%). Fat embolic events are most often clinically insignificant and difficult to recognize since clinical manifestations are varied and there is no routine laboratory or radiographic diagnosis. Classically, fat embolism syndrome presents with the triad of pulmonary distress, mental status changes, and cutaneous manifestations. We report the case of a 33-year-old woman who developed acute respiratory distress 10 days after hip arthroplasty. Several aetiologies such as fibrinocruoric pulmonary embolism, pulmonary aspiration and bacterial pneumonia were discussed. Fat embolism was diagnosed, based on suggestive clinical manifestations, radiographic and laboratory findings, although fat embolism after hip arthroplasty without intramedullary pressurization is infrequent. PMID:14612171

  19. Associations and Outcomes of Septic Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Umesh; Brenes, Jorge A; Punjabi, Gopal V; LeClaire, Michele M; Williams, David N

    2014-01-01

    Background: Septic pulmonary embolism is a serious but uncommon syndrome posing diagnostic challenges because of its broad range of clinical presentation and etiologies. Objective: To understand the clinical and radiographic associations of septic pulmonary embolism in patients presenting to an acute care safety net hospital. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of imaging and electronic health records of all patients diagnosed with septic pulmonary embolism in our hospital between January 2000 and January 2013. Results: 41 episodes of septic pulmonary embolism were identified in 40 patients aged 17 to 71 years (median 46); 29 (72%) were men. Presenting symptoms included: febrile illness (85%); pulmonary complaints (66%) including pleuritic chest pain (22%), cough (19%) and dyspnea (15%); and those related to the peripheral foci of infection (24%) and shock (19%). Sources of infection included: skin and soft tissue (44%); infective endocarditis (27%); and infected peripheral deep venous thrombosis (17%). 35/41 (85%) were bacteremic with staphylococcus aureus. All patients had peripheral nodular lesions on chest CT scan. Treatment included intravenous antibiotics in all patients. Twenty six (63%) patients required pleural drainage and/or drainage of peripheral abscesses. Seven (17%) patients received systemic anticoagulants. Eight (20%) patients died due to various complications. Conclusion: The epidemiology of septic pulmonary embolism has broadened over the past decade with an increase in identified extrapulmonary, non-cardiac sources. In the context of an extrapulmonary infection, clinical features of persistent fever, bacteremia and pulmonary complaints should raise suspicion for this syndrome, and typical findings on the chest CT scans confirm the diagnosis. Antibiotics, local drainage procedures and increasingly, anticoagulation are keys to successful outcomes. PMID:25184008

  20. Hemopericardium After Superior Vena Cava Stenting for Malignant SVC Obstruction: The Importance of Contrast-Enhanced CT in the Assessment of Postprocedural Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Brant, Jonathan; Peebles, Charles; Kalra, Paul; Odurny, Allan

    2001-09-15

    We report the complication of hemopericardium following superior vena cava (SVC) stenting with an uncovered Wallstent in a patient with malignant SVC obstruction. The patient collapsed acutely 15 min following stent placement with hypoxemia and hypotension. A CT scan demonstrated a hemopericardium which was successfully treated with a pericardial drain. The possible complications of SVC stenting, including hemopericardium, pulmonary embolism, mediastinal hematoma, and pulmonary edema from increased venous return resulting from improved hemodynamics, ensure a wide differential diagnosis in the post procedural collapsed patient and this case emphasizes the important role of contrast-enhanced CT in the peri-resuscitation assessment of these patients.

  1. Fat embolism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Taviloglu, Korhan; Yanar, Hakan

    2007-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome (FES) was first described in 1862, but its frequency today is still unclear. A diagnosis of FES is often missed because of a subclinical illness or coexisting confusing injuries or disease. Fat embolism syndrome develops most commonly after orthopedic injuries, but it has also been reported after other forms of trauma such as severe burns, liver injury, closed-chest cardiac massage, bone marrow transplantation, and liposuction. Although FES usually presents as a multisystem disorder, the most seriously affected organs are the lung, brain, cardiovascular system, and skin. Fat embolism syndrome is a self-limiting disease and treatment should be mainly supportive. Many drugs have been used to treat FES, but the results are inconclusive. PMID:17186337

  2. Renal Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Sauk, Steven; Zuckerman, Darryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Renal artery embolization (RAE) is an effective minimally invasive alternative procedure for the treatment of a variety of conditions. Since the 1970s when RAE was first developed, technical advances and growing experience have expanded the indications to not only include treatment of conditions such as symptomatic hematuria and palliation for metastatic renal cancer, but also preoperative infarction of renal tumors, treatment of angiomyolipomas, vascular malformations, medical renal disease, and complications following renal transplantation. With the drastically improved morbidity associated with this technique in part due to the introduction of more precise embolic agents and smaller delivery catheters, RAE continues to gain popularity for various urologic conditions. The indications and techniques for renal artery embolization are reviewed in the following sections. PMID:23204638

  3. Coronary Embolism After Iatrogenic Radial Endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Rozado, Jose; Pascual, Isaac; Avanzas, Pablo; Moris, Cesar

    2016-06-01

    A 55-year-old man with double-vessel coronary artery disease was revascularized by percutaneous coronary intervention three years ago. Elective coronary angiography was indicated for angina with positive stress test. During the procedure, severe radial spasm occurred; after the first injection, we detected loss in pressure trace in the diagnostic catheter and acute distal circumflex occlusion. Suspecting catheter thrombosis with coronary embolization, the entire system was exchanged and inspected; inside, we discovered a 2 x 50 mm white biological cylinder. Histological study of this material was compatible with endarterectomy. We present a rare complication of severe radial artery spasm and endarterectomy, with occlusion of the diagnostic catheter and coronary embolization. PMID:27236012

  4. Fat embolism syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatt, Michael E.; Seamon, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is an ill-defined clinical entity that arises from the systemic manifestations of fat emboli within the microcirculation. Embolized fat within capillary beds cause direct tissue damage as well as induce a systemic inflammatory response resulting in pulmonary, cutaneous, neurological, and retinal symptoms. This is most commonly seen following orthopedic trauma; however, patients with many clinical conditions including bone marrow transplant, pancreatitis, and following liposuction. No definitive diagnostic criteria or tests have been developed, making the diagnosis of FES difficult. While treatment for FES is largely supportive, early operative fixation of long bone fractures decreases the likelihood of a patient developing FES. PMID:23724388

  5. Fat embolism after liposuction.

    PubMed

    Ross, R M; Johnson, G W

    1988-06-01

    We present a case of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) after extensive liposuction. On the basis of fever, tachypnea, hypoxia, and ARDS occurring within 48 hours after surgery without evidence of cardiogenic pulmonary edema or sepsis, the etiology is believed to be fat embolism. Although liposuction is generally an effective and safe procedure, awareness of this life-threatening complication is important in order to institute prompt and appropriate treatment. Fat embolism must be differentiated from thromboembolism, as the treatment is different, and heparin is not indicated. It is recommended that training standards and guidelines be devised in order to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with this procedure. PMID:3371109

  6. Animal Models for Therapeutic Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Patricia L.; An, Yuehuei H.

    2003-04-15

    Embolization techniques have been performed in different animals to accumulate basic data before a clinical trial.Choosing the right embolization model for a specific project is critical. However, there are several variables when defining the best model for embolization research such as the size of the animal to be used, the target organs, the route of introducing the embolization agent, and the feasible methods of evaluation. Commonly used research animals for endovascular embolization include rabbits, dogs, and rats. Frequently used target organs are the kidney and the liver. Most models use a transcatheter for introducing the embolus and occasionally open surgery and direct arterial injection are used. Basic methods of evaluation are straightforward, and commonly include macro observation of the embolized organs, angiogram, and histology. This article concisely reviews the available animal models and their evaluation for embolization research to help researchers to choose the appropriate model.

  7. Uterine artery embolization

    MedlinePlus

    ... the procedure. UAE is less invasive than surgical treatments for uterine fibroids. Many women may return more quickly to activities ... SC, Spies JB, Worthington-Kirsch R, et al. Uterine artery embolization for ... from the FIBROID registry. Obstet Gynecol . 2008; 111:22-33. Munro ...

  8. [Fulminant course of amniotic fluid embolism].

    PubMed

    Bermejo-Alvarez, M A; Fervienza, P; Corte-Torres, M G; Cosío, F; Jiménez-Gómez, L J; Hevía, A

    2006-02-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism is an obstetric complication that can present during pregnancy or labor and is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. The incidence is low but the mortality rates for both mother and fetus are high. A 34-year-old woman in the 41st week of gestation was admitted for induction of labor. While still in the labor room, she complained of pruritus around the mouth and tongue. Tonic-clonic convulsions, hypotension, and loss of consciousness followed. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation maneuvers were started and an immediate cesarean section under general anesthesia was performed to deliver a live infant boy. The Apgar score at 5 minutes was 8. The mother was transferred for recovery to the intensive care unit (ICU), where rapid cardiocirculatory and pulmonary decline continued. After 2 episodes of electromechanical dissociation, exitus occurred 2 hours after ICU admission. The autopsy confirmed the diagnosis of amniotic fluid embolism. Keratin squames were found in the capillaries of both lungs and polymorphonuclear cells and proteinaceous material were observed in alveoli. Mechanical obstruction is not the only cause of amniotic fluid embolism. Circulating substances that affect myocardial contractility and coagulation are also implicated and the cause may even be an allergic reaction. The usual signs are acute respiratory failure, cardiovascular collapse, and occasionally convulsions and coagulopathy. Cardiac arrest occurs in 80% of the cases. Treatment is symptomatic to provide life-sustaining measures in response to the clinical picture as it develops. PMID:16553345

  9. Arteriovenous Fistula Embolization in Suspected Parauterine Choriocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Alturkistani, Husain; Almarzooqi, Mohamed-Karji; Oliva, Vincent; Gilbert, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This is a case of choriocarcinoma that did not regress after chemotherapy treatment. A 30-year-old female patient (gravida 2, para 2), presented to our ER with stroke and persistent mild pelvic pain 2 months after a Caesarean section. Computed tomography (CT) revealed an ischemic left hemicerebellar region and a hypervascular mass in the pelvic region. This mass was not present on routine fetal ultrasound during pregnancy. The lesion was treated by chemotherapy after closure of a foramen ovale and insertion of an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. After that, 2 courses of EMACO (Etoposide, Methotrexate, Actinomycin D, Cyclophosphamide, and Vincristine) chemotherapy regimen were given. Posttreatment CT showed the hypervascular mass without any changes. Arteriography showed the arteriovenous fistulae that were embolized successfully with plugs, coils, and glue. Embolization was considered due to the risk of acute hemorrhagic life-threatening complications. Eight chemotherapy courses were added after embolization. Treatment by endovascular approach and reduction of the hypervascular mass can be a valuable adjunct to chemotherapy treatment of choriocarcinoma. PMID:27403360

  10. Hypoxemia in pulmonary embolism, a clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, James E.; Pierce, Alan K.; Johnson, Robert L.; Winga, Edward R.; Harrell, W. Ross; Curry, George C.; Mullins, Charles B.

    1971-01-01

    The cause of hypoxemia was studied in 21 patients with no previous heart or lung disease shortly after an episode of acute pulmonary embolism. The diagnosis was based on pulmonary angiography demonstrating distinct vascular filling defects or “cutoffs.” It was found that virtually all of the hypoxemia in patients with previously normal heart and lungs could be accounted for on the basis of shunt-like effect. The magnitude of the shunting did not correlate with the percent of the pulmonary vascular bed occluded nor with the mean pulmonary artery pressure. The shunts tended to gradually recede over about a month after embolism. Patients without pulmonary infarction were able to inspire 80-111% of their predicted inspiratory capacities, and this maneuver temporarily diminished the observed shunt. Patients with pulmonary infarcts were able to inhale only to 60-69% of predicted inspiratory capacity, and this did not reverse shunting. These data suggest that the cause of right-to-left shunting in patients with pulmonary emboli is predominantly atelectasis. When the elevation of mean pulmonary artery pressure was compared to cardiac index per unit of unoccluded lung, it fell within the range of pulmonary hypertension predicted from published data obtained in patients with exercise in all except one case. This observation suggests that pulmonary vasoconstriction following embolism is not important in humans, although these data are applicable only during the time interval in which our patients were studied and in patients receiving heparin. PMID:5101776

  11. Amniotic fluid embolism after intrauterine fetal demise.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Karl; Langdana, Fali; Clentworth, Howard; Hansby, Chu; Dalley, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of the successful treatment of severe amniotic fluid embolism in a 41-year-old woman undergoing emergency caesarean section at 36 weeks of gestation for placental abruption and intrauterine fetal demise. The treatment included prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation, emergency hysterectomy, re-operation with intra-abdominal packing and intra-aortic balloon pump insertion. The patient made a remarkable recovery and to date has minimal residual morbidity. Amniotic fluid embolism syndrome (AFES) is a rare and often fatal obstetric condition that remains one of the main causes of maternal mortality in developed countries. The incidence varies from 2 to 6 per 100,000 and suggested mortality rates exceed 60%.1-2 The classic triad of sudden hypoxia, hypotension and coagulopathy with acute onset during labour or immediately after delivery forms the hallmark of the AFES diagnosis, however AFES is primarily a clinical diagnosis of exclusion. We present a case of successful maternal outcome following severe amniotic fluid embolism after placental abruption and intrauterine fetal demise. PMID:27607089

  12. Arteriovenous Fistula Embolization in Suspected Parauterine Choriocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Almarzooqi, Mohamed-Karji; Oliva, Vincent; Gilbert, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This is a case of choriocarcinoma that did not regress after chemotherapy treatment. A 30-year-old female patient (gravida 2, para 2), presented to our ER with stroke and persistent mild pelvic pain 2 months after a Caesarean section. Computed tomography (CT) revealed an ischemic left hemicerebellar region and a hypervascular mass in the pelvic region. This mass was not present on routine fetal ultrasound during pregnancy. The lesion was treated by chemotherapy after closure of a foramen ovale and insertion of an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. After that, 2 courses of EMACO (Etoposide, Methotrexate, Actinomycin D, Cyclophosphamide, and Vincristine) chemotherapy regimen were given. Posttreatment CT showed the hypervascular mass without any changes. Arteriography showed the arteriovenous fistulae that were embolized successfully with plugs, coils, and glue. Embolization was considered due to the risk of acute hemorrhagic life-threatening complications. Eight chemotherapy courses were added after embolization. Treatment by endovascular approach and reduction of the hypervascular mass can be a valuable adjunct to chemotherapy treatment of choriocarcinoma. PMID:27403360

  13. [Pulmonary circulation in embolic pulmonary edema].

    PubMed

    Sanotskaia, N V; Polikarpov, V V; Matsievskiĭ, D D

    1989-02-01

    The ultrasonic method was used in acute experiments on cats with open chest under artificial lung ventilation to obtain blood flow in low-lobar pulmonary artery and vein, the blood pressure in pulmonary artery, as well as the left atrial pressure in fat (olive oil) and mechanical (Lycopodium spores) pulmonary embolism. It is shown that pulmonary embolism produces the decrease in the blood flow in pulmonary artery and vein, the increase of the pressure in pulmonary artery and left atria, the increase of lung vessels resistance. The decrease is observed of systemic arterial pressure, bradycardia, and extrasystole. After 5-10 min the restoration of arterial pressure and heart rhythm occur and partial restoration of blood flow in pulmonary artery and vein. In many experiments the blood flow in vein outdoes that in the artery--it allows to suppose the increase of the blood flow in bronchial artery. After 60-90 min there occur sudden decrease of systemic arterial pressure, the decrease of the blood flow in pulmonary artery and vein. The pressure in pulmonary artery and resistance of pulmonary vessels remain high. Pulmonary edema developed in all animals. The death occurs in 60-100 min after the beginning of embolism. PMID:2923969

  14. Pulmonary embolism following celiac plexus block and neurolysis.

    PubMed

    McAninch, Scott A; Raizada, Miles S; Kelly, Seth M

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of acute pain in chronic disease requires the physician to choose from an arsenal of pain management techniques tailored to the individual patient. Celiac plexus block and neurolysis are commonly employed for the management of chronic abdominal pain, especially in debilitating conditions such as cancer or chronic pancreatitis. The procedure is safe, well tolerated, and produces few complications. We present a case of pulmonary embolism following a celiac plexus block and neurolysis procedure. Further study is required to determine if celiac plexus ablation, alone or in combination with other risk factors, may contribute to increased risk for pulmonary embolism in patients seeking treatment for chronic upper abdominal pain conditions. PMID:27365890

  15. Pulmonary embolism following celiac plexus block and neurolysis

    PubMed Central

    Raizada, Miles S.; Kelly, Seth M.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of acute pain in chronic disease requires the physician to choose from an arsenal of pain management techniques tailored to the individual patient. Celiac plexus block and neurolysis are commonly employed for the management of chronic abdominal pain, especially in debilitating conditions such as cancer or chronic pancreatitis. The procedure is safe, well tolerated, and produces few complications. We present a case of pulmonary embolism following a celiac plexus block and neurolysis procedure. Further study is required to determine if celiac plexus ablation, alone or in combination with other risk factors, may contribute to increased risk for pulmonary embolism in patients seeking treatment for chronic upper abdominal pain conditions. PMID:27365890

  16. Anterior spinal cord infarction owing to possible fibrocartilaginous embolism.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Ashok; Onikul, Ella; Ryan, Monique M; Prelog, Kristina; Taranath, Ajay; Chennapragada, Murthy

    2004-06-01

    Anterior spinal artery syndrome is characterised by acute flaccid quadriparesis or paraparesis, disturbance of pain and temperature sensation, and loss of sphincter control. Fibrocartilaginous embolism is a rarely recognised, but important cause of spinal cord infarction. Fibrocartilaginous embolisation usually occurs after minor trauma without major bony lesions, typically with an intervening symptom-free interval and progressive 'stroke-in-evolution' course. There is evidence that the embolus originates from the intervertebral disc, but the mechanism whereby disc fragments enter the spinal vessels is not well understood. We describe the evolution of MRI findings in a case of anterior spinal artery territory infarction thought to be secondary to fibrocartilaginous embolism. PMID:14747876

  17. An interesting septic embolism

    PubMed Central

    Uluorman, Funda; Tanrıverdi, Zülkif; Sevinç, Can; Badak, Özer; Çatalyürek, Hüdai

    2014-01-01

    Septic pulmonary embolism is a rare disease but mortality and morbidity of it is high. Septic pulmonary emboli comes from infected heart valves, thrombophlebitis, and pulmonary artery catheter or infected pacemaker wires as many sources [1,2]. In recent years, pacemaker is a common treatment of the bradiarrhythmia that is persisted in the etiology of septic embolism, its applications has started to pick up [3]. There is the growing number of patients with pacemaker, according to this the frequency of pacemaker lead infection and the number of patients at risk for right-sided endocarditis increase [4]. The patients don't have specific clinical and radiological features because of this it is very difficult to define, so the diagnosis is often delayed [5]. A detailed medical history, a detailed physical examination in diagnosis and evaluation of good additional imaging methods is very important. Early diagnosis and proper treatment, the implementation of the management, can provide good results. PMID:26029562

  18. Efficacy and Limitations of Transarterial Acrylic Glue Embolization for Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    MIYAMOTO, Naoko; NAITO, Isao; SHIMIZU, Tatsuya; YOSHIMOTO, Yuhei

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy and limitations of transarterial acrylic glue embolization for the treatment of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) were investigated. Thirty-four DAVFs treated by transarterial embolization using n-butyl cyanoacrylate were retrospectively reviewed. The locations of DAVFs were the transverse-sigmoid sinus in 11, tentorium in 10, cranial vault in 9, and superior sagittal sinus, jugular bulb, foramen magnum, and middle cranial fossa in 1 each. Borden classification was type I in 7, type II in 3, and type III in 24. Eight patients had undergone prior transvenous coil embolization. Complete obliteration rate was 56% immediately after embolization, 71% at follow-up angiography, and 85% after additional treatments (1 transvenous embolization and 4 direct surgery). Complications occurred in three patients, consisting of asymptomatic vessel perforations during cannulation in two patients and leakage of contrast medium resulting in medullary infarction in one patient. Transarterial glue embolization is highly effective for Borden type III DAVF with direct cortical venous drainage, but has limitations for Borden type I and II DAVFs in which the affected sinus is part of the normal venous circulation. Onyx is a new liquid embolic material and is becoming the treatment of choice for DAVF. The benefits of glue embolization compared to Onyx embolization are high thrombogenicity, and relatively low risks of cranial nerve palsies and of excessive migration into the draining veins of high flow fistula. Transarterial glue embolization continues to be useful for selected patients, and complete cure can be expected in most patients with fewer complications if combined with transvenous embolization or direct surgery. PMID:25746311

  19. Cerebral Lipiodol Embolism after Lymphatic Embolization for Plastic Bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Kirschen, Matthew P; Dori, Yoav; Itkin, Maxim; Licht, Daniel J; Ichord, Rebecca; Vossough, Arastoo

    2016-09-01

    An adolescent with plastic bronchitis due to congenital heart disease had altered mental status after an interventional lymphatic procedure in which lipiodol contrast was used. Neuroimaging revealed cerebral lipiodol embolization due to direct shunting between lymphatic channels and pulmonary veins. Cerebral lipiodol embolization is a potential neurologic morbidity associated with interventional lymphatic procedures. PMID:27297208

  20. Cerebral Lipiodol Embolism after Lymphatic Embolization for Plastic Bronchitis

    PubMed Central

    Kirschen, Matthew P.; Dori, Yoav; Itkin, Maxim; Licht, Daniel J.; Ichord, Rebecca; Vossough, Arastoo

    2016-01-01

    An adolescent with plastic bronchitis due to congenital heart disease had altered mental status after an interventional lymphatic procedure in which lipiodol contrast was used. Neuroimaging revealed cerebral lipiodol embolization due to direct shunting between lymphatic channels and pulmonary veins. Cerebral lipiodol embolization is a potential neurologic morbidity associated with interventional lymphatic procedures. PMID:27297208

  1. [Amniotic fluid embolism: an update].

    PubMed

    Legrand, M; Rossignol, M; Muller, F; Payen, D

    2013-03-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) results from the passage of fœtal and amniotic fragments into the maternal circulation, occurring mostly within minutes before or after delivery. Although maternal and fœtal mortality of AFE remains high (about 40%), AFE should no longer be considered as having an ineluctable fatal course. Diagnosis is often made upon clinical presentation but histological confirmation is difficult owing favorable outcome and because an autopsy has not been performed. Identification of squamous cells in the maternal circulation could not confirm the diagnosis because of their possible maternal origin. High plasma level of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) has recently been identified as a biomarker of amniotic fluid passage into the maternal circulation and might therefore be used to confirm the diagnosis when lung tissue histology is not available. Treatment of AFE remains supportive with a special focus on correction of the coagulopathy and search for acute core pulmonale. In this later case, physicians should consider initiating an extracorporeal life support when facing a patient with refractory shock. Finally, caution is needed with the use of recombinant factor VIIa in this context. PMID:23422343

  2. Diagnostic value of transoesophageal echocardiography in suspected haemodynamically significant pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Pruszczyk, P; Torbicki, A; Kuch-Wocial, A; Szulc, M; Pacho, R

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the value of transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) for diagnosing suspected haemodynamically significant pulmonary embolism and signs of right ventricular overload at standard echocardiography.
METHODS—113 consecutive patients (58 male; 55 female), mean (SD) age 53.6 (13.3) years, in whom there was clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism and right ventricular overload on transthoracic echocardiography, underwent TOE in addition to routine diagnostic procedures to identify pulmonary artery thrombi.
RESULTS—TOE revealed thrombi in 32 of 51 patients who had suspected acute pulmonary embolism and in 31 of 62 with suspected chronic pulmonary embolism. In one patient a pulmonary angiosarcoma rather than chronic pulmonary embolism was found at surgery. The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism was confirmed in 77 patients by scintigraphy, spiral computed tomography, angiography, or necropsy (reference methods). While TOE failed to provide a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism in 15 of these 77 patients, no false positive findings were reported (sensitivity 80.5%, specificity 97.2%). In 11 and 26 cases, respectively, the thrombi were confined to the left or right pulmonary artery. Bilateral thrombi were found in 25 patients. Mobile thrombi were observed only in acute pulmonary embolism (in 19 of 32 patients). No complications of TOE were noted.
CONCLUSIONS—TOE permits visualisation of pulmonary arterial thrombi, confirming the diagnosis in the majority of patients with pulmonary embolism and right ventricular overload. This may be useful for prompt decision making in patients with haemodynamic compromise considered for thrombolysis or embolectomy.


Keywords: pulmonary embolism; transoesophageal echocardiography PMID:11359740

  3. Multidisciplinary management of placenta percreta complicated by embolic phenomena.

    PubMed

    Styron, A G; George, R B; Allen, T K; Peterson-Layne, C; Muir, H A

    2008-07-01

    Hemorrhage and thrombosis are major causes of maternal mortality. This case discusses the management of a woman with placenta percreta complicated by intraoperative pulmonary embolism. A 39-year-old gravida 3 with two previous cesarean deliveries presented at 34 weeks of gestation with an antepartum hemorrhage. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed placenta percreta. The multidisciplinary group including obstetricians, gynecological oncologists, interventional radiologists and anesthesiologists developed a delivery plan. Cesarean delivery was performed with internal iliac artery occlusion and embolization catheters in place. After the uterine incision our patient experienced acute hypotension and hypoxia associated with a drop in the end-tidal carbon dioxide and sinus tachycardia. She was resuscitated and the uterus closed with the placenta in situ. Postoperatively, uterine bleeding was arrested by immediate uterine artery embolization. With initiation of embolization, hypotension and hypoxia recurred. Oxygenation and hemodynamics slowly improved, the case continued and the patient was extubated uneventfully at the end of the procedure. Computed tomography revealed multiple pulmonary emboli. The patient was anticoagulated with low-molecular-weight heparin and returned six weeks later for hysterectomy. Placenta percreta with invasion into the bladder can be catastrophic if not recognized before delivery. The chronology of events suggests that this may have been amniotic fluid emboli. An intact placenta with abnormal architecture, such as placenta percreta, may increase the risk of amniotic fluid embolus. The clinical findings and co-existing filling defects on computed tomography may represent a spectrum of amniotic fluid embolism syndrome. PMID:18501584

  4. Ileocolic Arteriovenous Fistula with Superior Mesenteric Vein Aneurism: Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Gregorio, Miguel Angel de; Gimeno, Maria Jose; Medrano, Joaquin; Schoenholz, Caudio; Rodriguez, Juan; D'Agostino, Horacio

    2004-09-15

    We report a case of a venous aneurysm secondary to an acquired ileocolic arteriovenous fistula in a 64-year-old woman with recurrent abdominal pain and history of appendectomy. The aneurysm was diagnosed by ultrasound and computed tomography. Angiography showed an arteriovenous fistula between ileocolic branches of the superior mesenteric artery and vein. This vascular abnormality was successfully treated with coil embolization.

  5. Massive Air Embolism During Interventional Laser Therapy of the Liver: Successful Resuscitation Without Chest Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Helmberger, Thomas K.; Roth, Ute; Empen, Klaus

    2002-08-15

    We report on a rare, acute, life-threatening complication during percutaneous thermal therapy for hepatic metastases. Massive cardiac air embolism occurred during a maneuver of deep inspiration after the dislodgement of an introducer sheath into a hepatic vein. The subsequent cardiac arrest was treated successfully by immediate transthoracic evacuation of the air by needle aspiration followed by electrical defibrillation. In procedures that may be complicated by gas embolism, cardiopulmonary resuscitation should not be initiated before considering the likelihood of air embolism, and eventually aspiration of the gas.

  6. Successful thrombo-embolectomy in long-standing thrombo-embolic pulmonary hypertension 1

    PubMed Central

    Nash, E. S.; Shapiro, S.; Landau, A.; Barnard, C. N.

    1968-01-01

    The operative removal of thrombo-emboli from the pulmonary arteries in acute pulmonary embolism is an accepted method of treatment. The removal of thrombi that have been present for many months has been attempted less often. This case report covers the operative treatment and the pre- and post-operative physiological studies in a patient with long-standing thrombo-embolic pulmonary hypertension, in whom a large thrombus was removed under cardiopulmonary bypass from the left pulmonary artery. Dramatic clinical improvement resulted. A plea is made for a more radical approach to thrombo-embolic pulmonary hypertension when a local obstruction can be demonstrated. Images PMID:5654068

  7. Multiple Intrahepatic Artery Aneurysms in a Patient with Behcet's Disease: Use of Transcatheter Embolization for Rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Irfan; Fotiadis, Nikolas I. Dilks, Phil; Kocher, Hemant M.; Fotheringham, Tim; Matson, Matthew

    2010-04-15

    Intrahepatic artery aneuryms are a rare and potentially life-threatening condition. We present the first case in the English literature of multiple intrahepatic artery aneuryms in a patient with Behcet's disease who presented acutely with rupture. The ruptured aneurysm was treated successfully with transcatheter arterial coil embolization-CT and clinical follow-up confirming a good result. We discuss the management dilemma with regard to prophylactic embolization of the numerous other small asymptomatic intrahepatic aneurysms in this same patient.

  8. Traumatic fat embolism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Al-Khuwaitir, Tarig S; Al-Moghairi, Abdurahman M; Sherbeeni, Suphia M; Subh, Hamed M

    2002-12-01

    Traumatic fat embolism syndrome occurs most often following fractures of long bones sustained in road traffic accidents and is a common cause of medical consultation from the orthopedic surgery department. The sub-clinical presentation is subtle and expresses itself by the presence of hypoxemia, while the full clinical syndrome compromises respiratory insufficiency, an altered consciousness and a characteristic petechial rash. Recognition is simple once the patient is viewed in the context of his or her clinical setting. Diagnosis is aided further by the presence of hematological and biochemical abnormalities including anemia, thrombocytopenia, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and fat macroglobulinemia. Imaging by chest radiograph, computed tomography or magnetic resonance of the brain is used to confirm the extent of the respective organ involvement and to exclude alternative pathologies. The release of free fatty acids into the circulation and their subsequent effects is the key pathological event. Treatment is based on supportive care and high-dose corticosteroid therapy. We report a patient with traumatic fat embolism syndrome who developed the syndromes classical symptoms and signs following fracture of the long bones of his left lower leg. Admission to an intensive care unit, mechanical ventilatory support with positive end-expiratory pressure and corticosteroid therapy lead to his improvement and allowed eventual open reduction and internal fixation and discharge of our patient. Modern therapy offers a relatively good prognosis for patients with traumatic fat embolism syndrome; the optimal dose and timing of corticosteroid therapy in prophylaxis and treatment however, remain the subject of intense debate. PMID:12518208

  9. Paradoxical embolism interrupted.

    PubMed

    Desai, Ravi; Ayub, Bilal; Martinez, Matthew W

    2014-02-01

    A 41 year-old African-American male presented with syncope preceded by shortness of breath at outside facility and transferred to us for management of extensive pulmonary embolism with unstable vital signs. Electrocardiogram showed sinus tachycardia with S1Q3T3 pattern. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a freely mobile strand like mass in the left atrium. A transoesophageal echocardiogram showed a very large freely mobile thrombus extending from a patent foramen ovale in to the left atrium. He underwent emergent surgery for the extraction of clot followed by thromboembolectomy from both pulmonary arteries. He made a remarkable recovery and was discharged after seven days of hospital stay. PMID:23764146

  10. Fat embolism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Williams, A G; Mettler, F A; Christie, J H; Gordon, R E

    1986-07-01

    The fat embolism syndrome is clinically evident in approximately 0.5-2.0% of patients with long bone fractures. The clinical signs and symptoms are evident in 60% of patients within 24 hours and 85% of patients within 48 hours after trauma. A patient is reported who complained of dyspnea and hemoptysis approximately 72 hours after sustaining a fracture to the distal tibia and fibula. Radionuclide ventilation/perfusion imaging was obtained to rule out pulmonary thromboemboli. Perfusion imaging demonstrated the characteristic diffuse, subsegmental ("mottled") appearance of fatty emboli to the lung. PMID:3731649

  11. Unrecognized stent embolization causing recurrent chest pain.

    PubMed

    Levisay, Justin P; Vaitkus, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Numerous methods have been described for retrieving or addressing stents that have embolized in the coronary arteries. Almost all of these prior reports address the "freshly" embolized stent with retrieval or deployment occurring during the same index procedure during which the embolization occurred. We describe a case of a thrombosed, chronically embolized coronary stent. PMID:16404788

  12. [Posttraumatic fat embolism].

    PubMed

    Bouffard, Y; Guillaume, C; Perrot, D; Delafosse, B; Motin, J

    1984-01-01

    Between 1977 and 1982, fifty cases of post-traumatic fat embolism were treated in a general intensive care unit. Average age of patients was 25.5 +/- 13 years; there was no male majority. Mean free interval was 39 +/- 27 h. 12 cases (24%) had single fractures and 38 (76%) multiple fractures. Forty-four patients had a fractured femur. Thirty-two patients presented the complete clinical syndrome with general, respiratory, neurological and cutaneous signs. Thrombocytopaenia and hypocholesterolaemia were the biological signs most often seen. In forty-four patients, orthopaedic treatment consisted of immediate immobilization, usually with traction. Twenty-six patients were reoperated on: intramedullary nail for twenty patients, plate for the other six. Fat embolism appeared in spite of surgery in six cases; it worsened after surgery in six others. Seven patients had per- or postanaesthetic problems. Fourteen per cent of patients died. The decrease in mortality was mainly due to an improvement in mechanical ventilation techniques. Early surgical fixation remained the rule if there was no serious respiratory distress or haemodynamic instability, although it did not seem to change the mortality rate in this group of patients. PMID:6497076

  13. The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, S.; Griffiths, P. D.

    1974-01-01

    A blind assessment of abnormalities of pulmonary scintiscans in patients with pulmonary emboli and other clinical conditions showed that there was no abnormality specific for pulmonary embolism. However, a normal lung scan virtually excluded pulmonary embolism and an area, or areas, of absent perfusion was confirmatory evidence of embolism, without infarction, if the chest radiograph was normal, and of embolism with infarction if the clinical and radiographic findings were compatible. A controlled analysis of biochemical and electrocardiographic abnormalities associated with pulmonary embolism showed that abnormalities of liver function and blood urea were more frequent than in a group of patients suspected of, but not having, emboli. A similar analysis of the electrocardiograms showed that a Q3R3S1 with T wave inversion over the right ventricular leads and lead III (±avf) that developed or regressed was pathognomonic of embolism, but other features were of little value. It is suggested that all hospital patients should have an electrocardiogram performed on admission so that serial changes may be assessed and that lung scanning should be used as a screening test in patients suspected of having pulmonary embolism. PMID:4467868

  14. Therapeutic embolization: enhanced radiolabeled monitoring.

    PubMed

    duCret, R P; Adkins, M C; Hunter, D W; Yedlicka, J W; Engeler, C M; Castaneda-Zuniga, W R; Amplatz, K; Sirr, S A; Boudreau, R J; Kuni, C C

    1990-11-01

    Radiolabeling of Ivalon (polyvinyl alcohol sponge) particles permits localization of injected particles during embolization through the use of a portable gamma camera and provides a means to prevent potentially fatal complications such as pulmonary embolization. A more efficient technique of labeling Ivalon particles with technetium-99m sulfur colloid was developed. An increase in labeling efficiency allowed more accurate determination of the distribution of injected Ivalon particles. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated the stability of the Ivalon particles during this new labeling process. Two patients with arteriovenous malformations underwent therapeutic embolization with radiolabeled Ivalon particles; gamma camera imaging of the lesion and chest was performed throughout the procedure. PMID:2217800

  15. Diagnostic value of gas exchange tests in patients with clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Prediletto, Renato; Miniati, Massimo; Tonelli, Lucia; Formichi, Bruno; Di Ricco, Giorgio; Marini, Carlo; Bauleo, Carolina; Allescia, Germana; Cocci, Franca; Monti, Simonetta; Pistolesi, Massimo; Giuntini, Carlo

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To assess the value of parameters derived from arterial blood gas tests in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Method: We measured alveolar-arterial partial pressure of oxygen [P(A–a)O2] gradient, PaO2 and arterial partial pressure of carbon diaxide (PaCO2) in 773 consecutive patients with suspected pulmonary embolism who were enrolled in the Prospective Investigative Study of Acute Pulmonary Embolism. Diagnosis: The study design required pulmonary angiography in all patients with abnormal perfusion scans. Results: Of 773 scans, 270 were classified as normal/near-normal and 503 as abnormal. Pulmonary embolism was diagnosed by pulmonary angiography in 312 of 503 patients with abnormal scans. Of 312 patients with pulmonary embolism, 12, 14 and 35% had normal P(A–a)O2, PaO2 and PaCO2, respectively. Of 191 patients with abnormal scans and negative angiograms, 11, 13 and 55% had normal P(A–a)O2, PaO2 and PaCO2, respectively. The proportions of patients with normal/near-normal scans who had normal P(A–a)O2, PaO2 and PaCO2 were 20, 25 and 37%, respectively. No differences were observed in the mean values of arterial blood gas data between patients with pulmonary embolism and those who had abnormal scans and negative angiograms. Among the 773 patients with suspected pulmonary embolism, 364 (47%) had prior cardiopulmonary disease. Pulmonary embolism was diagnosed in 151 (41%) of 364 patients with prior cardiopulmonary disease, and in 161 (39%) of 409 patients without prior cardiopulmonary disease. Among patients with pulmonary embolism, there was no difference in arterial blood gas data between patients with and those without prior CPD. Conclusion: These data indicate that arterial blood gas tests are of limited value in the diagnostic work-up of pulmonary embolism if they are not interpreted in conjunction with clinical and other laboratory tests. PMID:11056733

  16. [A case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome associated with coil embolization of a basilar apex aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Naito, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Yu; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Ochi, Kazuhide; Kiura, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2013-01-01

    About three weeks after successful coil embolization of a basilar apex aneurysm, a 66-year-old woman developed occipital headaches. T2 and FLAIR MRI brain images demonstrated multiple new hyperintense lesions in the posterior circulation territory including cerebellum, right superior cerebellar peduncle, left thalamus and bilateral temporo-occipital lobes and she was subsequently hospitalized. Findings suggestive of other underlying disease were not observed, although an increased protein level was noted in cerebrospinal fluid (69 mg/dl). Headache and clinical findings improved approximately 12 weeks after coil embolization. MRI findings also showed improvement. These clinical and radiological findings made this patient a distinctive case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) associated with coil embolization suggesting that clinicians should be aware that PRES can present as comparatively mild symptoms several weeks after coil embolization. PMID:23892962

  17. Massive Lower Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage from the Surgical Anastomosis in Patients with Multiorgan Trauma: Treatment by Subselective Embolization with Polyvinyl Alcohol Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bulakbasi, Nail; Kurtaran, Kemal; Ustuensoez, Bahri; Somuncu, Ibrahim

    1999-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of subselective arterial embolization with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles with or without microcoil augmentation to control postoperative lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Methods: Ten patients with clinical, scintigraphic, and angiographic evidence of postoperative lower GI bleeding were considered for subselective embolization. Subselective embolizations were performed through coaxial microcatheters with 355-500 {mu}m PVA particles with or without additional coil embolization. Results: Embolization was technically successful in 9 of 10 (90%) patients. In one patient, subselective embolization was not possible; consequently no embolization was performed. Clinical success was achieved after a single embolization in 6 of 10 (60%) patients and after a second embolization in an additional 3 of the 10 (30%) patients. While there was no rebleeding in patients with normal coagulation parameters, all three patients (100%) with coagulopathy rebled, two of them from another source. Although no acute ischemic effects developed, no long-term sequela such as ischemic stricture were specifically looked for. Seven patients developed abdominal discomfort and/or fever within 24-48 hr. Four of 10 patients died of complications other than hemorrhage or ischemia. Conclusion: Subselective PVA embolization with or without a microcoil embolization is an effective and safe means of managing postoperative lower GI hemorrhage in patients with multiorgan trauma.

  18. Emborrhoid: A New Concept for the Treatment of Hemorrhoids with Arterial Embolization: The First 14 Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Vidal, V.; Sapoval, M.; Sielezneff, Y.; Parades, V. De; Tradi, F. Louis, G. Bartoli, J. M.; Pellerin, O.

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThe ‘emborrhoid’ technique consists of the embolization of the hemorrhoidal arteries. The endovascular arterial occlusion is performed using coils placed in the terminal branches of the superior rectal arteries. The emborrhoid technique has been modeled after elective transanal Doppler-guided hemorrhoidal artery ligation which has been shown to be effective in hemorrhoidal disease. We report the first 14 cases of our experience with emborrhoid technique.Materials and MethodsFourteen patients with disabling chronic rectal bleeding were treated using the emborrhoid technique (3 women, 11 men). The stage of the hemorrhoidal disease was II (10 patients), III (3), and IV (1). This treatment was decided by a multidisciplinary team (proctologist, visceral surgeon, and radiologist). Seven patients underwent previous proctological surgery. Ten patients had coagulation disorders (anticoagulants or cirrhosis). Superior rectal arteries were embolized with pushable microcoils (0.018).ResultsTechnical success of the embolization procedure was 100 %. Clinical success at 1 month was 72 % (10/14). Of the 4 patients who experienced rebleeding, two underwent additional embolization of the posterior rectal arteries with success. No pain or ischemic complications were observed in 13 patients. One patient experienced a temporary painful and edematous, perianal reaction.ConclusionOur case studies suggest that coil embolization of the superior rectal arteries is technically feasible, safe and well tolerated. Additional studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of this new ‘emborrhoid’ technique in the management of hemorrhoidal disease.

  19. Diagnosis of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Iber, C; Sirr, S

    1988-09-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is often unrecognized or misdiagnosed because of the lack of specificity of clinical signs and symptoms. PE shares many of the clinical features of pneumonia and is therefore often unrecognized in elderly patients who present with low-grade fever, modest leukocytosis, and pulmonary infiltrates. Assessment of clinical risk factors increases the usefulness of diagnostic tests. The accuracy of diagnosis is improved if specific tests are performed. Ventilation-perfusion lung scans, noninvasive or contrast venography, and pulmonary angiography increase the likelihood of correct diagnosis. Since pulmonary angiography is a relatively low-risk procedure, it should be performed in most patients suspected of having PE who have nondiagnostic lung scans and negative lower extremity venous studies. PMID:3055112

  20. Amniotic fluid embolism.

    PubMed

    Thongrong, Cattleya; Kasemsiri, Pornthep; Hofmann, James P; Bergese, Sergio D; Papadimos, Thomas J; Gracias, Vicente H; Adolph, Michael D; Stawicki, Stanislaw P A

    2013-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is an unpredictable and as-of-yet unpreventable complication of maternity. With its low incidence it is unlikely that any given practitioner will be confronted with a case of AFE. However, this rare occurrence carries a high probability of serious sequelae including cardiac arrest, ARDS, coagulopathy with massive hemorrhage, encephalopathy, seizures, and both maternal and infant mortality. In this review the current state of medical knowledge about AFE is outlined including its incidence, risk factors, diagnosis, pathophysiology, and clinical manifestations. Special attention is paid to the modern aggressive supportive care that resulted in an overall reduction in the still alarmingly high mortality rate of this devastating entity. The key factors for successful management and resolution of this disease process continue to be sharp vigilance, a high level of clinical suspicion, and rapid all-out resuscitative efforts on the part of all clinicians involved in the medical care of the parturient. PMID:23724386

  1. [Pulmogenic air embolism].

    PubMed

    Adebahr, G

    1985-01-01

    Interstitial emphysema and pulmonic hemorrhage alone are not the causes of pulmonic air embolism. The conditions making the entrance of air from the lungs to the vessels of pulmonary circulation are obviously present only if the expiration pressure is suddenly strongly elevated. Based on this point of view, investigations were performed in autopsy cases--falls from a height, being run over, a gunshot in the abdomen. We have succeeded in proving the entrance of air into capillaries and branches of the pulmonary vein. The precipitation of thrombocytes at the margin of large air bubbles in pulmonary veins shows the finding of air in the vessels as a vital or supravital reaction. PMID:4090761

  2. Amniotic fluid embolism

    PubMed Central

    Thongrong, Cattleya; Kasemsiri, Pornthep; Hofmann, James P.; Bergese, Sergio D.; Papadimos, Thomas J.; Gracias, Vicente H.; Adolph, Michael D.; Stawicki, Stanislaw P. A.

    2013-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is an unpredictable and as-of-yet unpreventable complication of maternity. With its low incidence it is unlikely that any given practitioner will be confronted with a case of AFE. However, this rare occurrence carries a high probability of serious sequelae including cardiac arrest, ARDS, coagulopathy with massive hemorrhage, encephalopathy, seizures, and both maternal and infant mortality. In this review the current state of medical knowledge about AFE is outlined including its incidence, risk factors, diagnosis, pathophysiology, and clinical manifestations. Special attention is paid to the modern aggressive supportive care that resulted in an overall reduction in the still alarmingly high mortality rate of this devastating entity. The key factors for successful management and resolution of this disease process continue to be sharp vigilance, a high level of clinical suspicion, and rapid all-out resuscitative efforts on the part of all clinicians involved in the medical care of the parturient. PMID:23724386

  3. Diagnosing pulmonary embolism: new computed tomography applications.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Konstantin; Thieme, Sven; Sommer, Wieland; Johnson, Thorsten; Reiser, Maximilian F

    2010-05-01

    Computed tomographic pulmonary angiography has become the standard of care for the evaluation of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). In addition to the direct depiction or exclusion of a pulmonary embolus in suspected PE, a number of predictive markers have been established to evaluate the patient's prognosis in acute and in chronic PE. An accurate risk stratification based on CT findings is crucial because optimal management, monitoring, and therapeutic strategies depend on the prognosis. With the recent introduction of the so-called "dual-source" CT scanners, that is, a scanner consisting of 2 tubes and 2 detectors mounted orthogonally to each other, different tube voltages can be used simultaneously, resulting in different energies of the emitted x-ray spectra (dual-energy CT; DECT). Initial results have shown that DECT is capable of iodine mapping of the pulmonary parenchyma, reliably depicting the segmental defects in iodine distribution in locations corresponding to embolic vessel occlusions. This study deals with a number of actual topics on PE imaging with multidetector CT and DECT, including the discussion of the relevant imaging findings to assess the patient's prognosis, the potential and additional benefit of dual-energy information on the parenchymal iodine distribution, the optimization of scan protocols including low-radiation dose chest pain protocols, and the discussion on future perspectives of CT in PE patients, such as the role of computer-aided diagnostic tools or the potential of ventilation imaging with DECT. PMID:20463534

  4. Central Versus Peripheral Pulmonary Embolism: Analysis of the Impact on the Physiological Parameters and Long-term Survival

    PubMed Central

    Alonso Martinez, José Luis; Anniccherico Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Urbieta Echezarreta, Miren Aranzazu; García, Ione Villar; Álvaro, Jorge Rojo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies aimed at assessing whether the emboli lodged in the central pulmonary arteries carry a worse prognosis than more peripheral emboli have yielded controversial results. Aims: To explore the impact on survival and long-term prognosis of central pulmonary embolism. Patients and Methods: Consecutive patients diagnosed with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism by means of computed tomography (CT) angiography were evaluated at episode index and traced through the computed system of clinical recording and following-up. Central pulmonary embolism was diagnosed when thrombi were seen in the trunk or in the main pulmonary arteries and peripheral pulmonary embolism when segmental or subsegmental arteries were affected. Results: A total of 530 consecutive patients diagnosed with pulmonary embolism were evaluated; 255 patients had central pulmonary embolism and 275 patients had segmental or subsegmental pulmonary embolism. Patients with central pulmonary embolism were older, had higher plasma levels of N-terminal of the prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-ProBNP), troponin I, D-dimer, alveolar-arterial gradient, and shock index (P < .001 for each one). Patients with central pulmonary embolism had an all-cause mortality of 40% while patients with segmental or subsegmental pulmonary embolism (PE) had an overall mortality of 27% and odds ratio of 1.81 [confidence interval (CI) 95% 1.16-1.9]. Survival was lower in patients with central PE than in patients with segmental or subsegmental pulmonary embolism, even after avoiding confounders (P = .018). Conclusions: Apart from a greater impact on hemodynamics, gas exchange, and right ventricular dysfunction, central pulmonary embolism associates a shorter survival and an increased long-term mortality. PMID:27114970

  5. Crisis management during anaesthesia: embolism

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, J; Helps, S; Westhorpe, R; Mackay, P

    2005-01-01

    Background: Embolism with gas, thrombus, fat, amniotic fluid, or particulate matter may occur suddenly and unexpectedly during anaesthesia, posing a diagnostic and management problem for the anaesthetist. Objectives: To examine the role of a previously described core algorithm "COVER ABCD–A SWIFT CHECK" supplemented by a specific sub-algorithm for embolism, in the management of embolism occurring in association with anaesthesia. Methods: The potential performance of this structured approach for each of the relevant incidents among the first 4000 reported to the Australian Incident Monitoring Study (AIMS) was compared with the actual management as reported by the anaesthetists involved. Results: Among the first 4000 incidents reported to AIMS, 38 reports of embolism were found. A sudden fall in end-tidal carbon dioxide and oxygen saturation were the cardinal signs of embolism, each occurring in about two thirds of cases, with hypotension and electrocardiographic changes each occurring in about one third of cases. Conclusion: The potential value of an explicit structured approach to the diagnosis and management of embolism was assessed in the light of AIMS reports. It was considered that, correctly applied, it potentially would have led to earlier recognition of the problem and/or better management in over 40% of cases. PMID:15933290

  6. Embolization of Life-Threatening Arterial Rupture in Patients with Vascular Ehlers–Danlos Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Takuya; Frank, Michael; Pellerin, Olivier Primio, Massimiliano Di Angelopoulos, Georgios; Boughenou, Marie-Fazia; Pagny, Jean-Yves; Messas, Emmanuel; Sapoval, Marc

    2013-05-09

    PurposeTo evaluate the safety and efficacy of transarterial embolization of life-threatening arterial rupture in patients with vascular Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (vEDS) in a single tertiary referral center.MethodsWe retrospectively analyzed transarterial embolization for vEDS performed at our institution from 2000 to 2012. The indication of embolization was spontaneous arterial rupture or pseudoaneurysm with acute bleeding. All interventions used a percutaneous approach through a 5F or less introducer sheath. Embolic agents were microcoils and glue in 3 procedures, glue alone in 2, and microcoils alone in 2.ResultsFive consecutive vEDS patients were treated by 7 embolization procedures (4 women, mean age 29.8 years). All procedures were successfully performed. Two patients required a second procedure for newly arterial lesions at a different site from the first procedure. Four of the five patients were still alive after a mean follow-up of 19.4 (range 1–74.7) months. One patient died of multiple organ failure 2 days after procedure. Minor procedural complications were observed in 3 procedures (43 %), all directly managed during the same session. Remote arterial lesions occurred after 3 procedures (43 %); one underwent a second embolization, and the other 2 were observed conservatively. Puncture site complication was observed in only one procedure (14 %).ConclusionEmbolization for vEDS is a safe and effective method to manage life-threatening arterial rupture.

  7. Current Evidence on Uterine Embolization for Fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Spies, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Strong evidence for both safety and effectiveness of uterine fibroid embolization has been generated since the procedure's introduction. This review will focus on the key articles representing the best evidence to summarize the outcomes from uterine embolization. This review will attempt to answer three important questions associated with uterine embolization. First, does uterine embolization relieve symptoms caused by uterine fibroids? Second, how well does the improvement in symptoms and quality of life after uterine embolization compare with standard surgical options for fibroids? Finally, how durable is the improvement in fibroid-related symptoms and quality of life after embolization? PMID:24436560

  8. Thrombus entrapped by patent foramen ovale in a patient with pulmonary embolism: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sang Beom; Kim, Chan Mi; Cho, Sung-Ah; Chung, Sungchan

    2015-01-01

    Thrombus-in-transit appears to increase the risk of mortality compared to pulmonary embolism alone and can require alteration in therapeutic plan. We present the case of a biatrial thromboembolus caught in transit across a patent foramen ovale diagnosed by intraoperative transesophageal echocardiogram in a 69-year-old female with acute pulmonary embolism and subsequent acute cerebral infarction. We suggest that echocardiography should be performed in a patient with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism to evaluate right heart function and diagnose emboli in transit. PMID:25664158

  9. Cholesterol crystal embolization diagnosed on bladder transurethral resection.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, Denis; Cordonnier, Carole; Brevet, Marie; Petit, Jacques; Sevestre, Henri

    2005-08-01

    Cholesterol crystal embolization (CCE) is a severe systemic disorder caused by vascular migration of cholesterol crystals originating from ulcerative atherosclerotic plaques located in large arteries. We report 2 cases of CCE diagnosed on bladder transurethral resection in 2 men aged 94 and 72 years. Both patients had atherosclerosis disease. One patient had been treated by heparin 1 month before for pulmonary embolism and the other had had a coronary angiography and bypass graft surgery 5 months before for silent myocardial infarction. One patient presented with hematuria and the other with acute renal failure. Cystoscopy showed multiple papillary tumors of the bladder wall. Bladder transurethral resections showed transitional cell carcinoma with cholesterol crystals occluding the lumen of small arterioles in the submucosa. Eight cases of CCE in the bladder wall have been reported in the literature in 3 women and 5 men aged 56 to 79 years. Cholesterol crystal embolization is often discovered in the bladder wall on necropsy specimens. Only 2 cases have been fortuitously discovered on bladder transurethral resection performed for transitional cell carcinoma. Cholesterol crystal embolization in the bladder wall is often a marker of severe disease although the evolution is quite favorable in our patients, still alive 1 and 2 years after diagnosis. PMID:16084459

  10. Synthetic surfactant containing SP-B and SP-C mimics is superior to single-peptide formulations in rabbits with chemical acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Juviel, José M.; Gordon, Larry M.; Waring, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chemical spills are on the rise and inhalation of toxic chemicals may induce chemical acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although the pathophysiology of ALI/ARDS is well understood, the absence of specific antidotes has limited the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Objectives. Surfactant inactivation and formation of free radicals are important pathways in (chemical) ALI. We tested the potential of lipid mixtures with advanced surfactant protein B and C (SP-B and C) mimics to improve oxygenation and lung compliance in rabbits with lavage- and chemical-induced ALI/ARDS. Methods. Ventilated young adult rabbits underwent repeated saline lung lavages or underwent intratracheal instillation of hydrochloric acid to induce ALI/ARDS. After establishment of respiratory failure rabbits were treated with a single intratracheal dose of 100 mg/kg of synthetic surfactant composed of 3% Super Mini-B (S-MB), a SP-B mimic, and/or SP-C33 UCLA, a SP-C mimic, in a lipid mixture (DPPC:POPC:POPG 5:3:2 by weight), the clinical surfactant Infasurf®, a bovine lung lavage extract with SP-B and C, or synthetic lipids alone. End-points consisted of arterial oxygenation, dynamic lung compliance, and protein and lipid content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Potential mechanism of surfactant action for S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA were investigated with captive bubble surfactometry (CBS) assays. Results. All three surfactant peptide/lipid mixtures and Infasurf equally lowered the minimum surface tension on CBS, and also improved oxygenation and lung compliance. In both animal models, the two-peptide synthetic surfactant with S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA led to better arterial oxygenation and lung compliance than single peptide synthetic surfactants and Infasurf. Synthetic surfactants and Infasurf improved lung function further in lavage- than in chemical-induced respiratory failure, with the difference probably due to greater capillary-alveolar protein

  11. Synthetic surfactant containing SP-B and SP-C mimics is superior to single-peptide formulations in rabbits with chemical acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Walther, Frans J; Hernández-Juviel, José M; Gordon, Larry M; Waring, Alan J

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chemical spills are on the rise and inhalation of toxic chemicals may induce chemical acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although the pathophysiology of ALI/ARDS is well understood, the absence of specific antidotes has limited the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Objectives. Surfactant inactivation and formation of free radicals are important pathways in (chemical) ALI. We tested the potential of lipid mixtures with advanced surfactant protein B and C (SP-B and C) mimics to improve oxygenation and lung compliance in rabbits with lavage- and chemical-induced ALI/ARDS. Methods. Ventilated young adult rabbits underwent repeated saline lung lavages or underwent intratracheal instillation of hydrochloric acid to induce ALI/ARDS. After establishment of respiratory failure rabbits were treated with a single intratracheal dose of 100 mg/kg of synthetic surfactant composed of 3% Super Mini-B (S-MB), a SP-B mimic, and/or SP-C33 UCLA, a SP-C mimic, in a lipid mixture (DPPC:POPC:POPG 5:3:2 by weight), the clinical surfactant Infasurf(®), a bovine lung lavage extract with SP-B and C, or synthetic lipids alone. End-points consisted of arterial oxygenation, dynamic lung compliance, and protein and lipid content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Potential mechanism of surfactant action for S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA were investigated with captive bubble surfactometry (CBS) assays. Results. All three surfactant peptide/lipid mixtures and Infasurf equally lowered the minimum surface tension on CBS, and also improved oxygenation and lung compliance. In both animal models, the two-peptide synthetic surfactant with S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA led to better arterial oxygenation and lung compliance than single peptide synthetic surfactants and Infasurf. Synthetic surfactants and Infasurf improved lung function further in lavage- than in chemical-induced respiratory failure, with the difference probably due to greater capillary-alveolar protein

  12. A case of panic to pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Ng, Mansum; Pandya, Nikila; Conry, Brendon; Gale, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a rare paediatric diagnosis, but its presence is likely to be underestimated due to the subtle and non-specific nature of its symptoms. Common clinical features of PE include shortness of breath, pleuritic chest pain and acute cardiovascular collapse. Less common symptoms can include persistent unexplained tachycardia, fever or deep vein thrombosis. Rarely do patients present with abdominal pain and self-resolving shortness of breath; symptoms our patient experienced. However, in contrast to popular belief, having normal vital signs does not necessarily lower the probability of PE. D-dimer, a specific fibrin degradation product, has a good negative predictive value for venous thromboembolism diagnosis but its use in children is less clear, with up to 40% of children with PE having a normal D-dimer level. CT pulmonary angiography remains the gold standard in diagnosis. PMID:26071441

  13. Embolization of Iatrogenic Vascular Injuries of Renal Transplants: Immediate and Follow-Up Results

    SciTech Connect

    Dorffner, Roland; Thurnher, Siegfried; Prokesch, Rupert; Bankier, Alexander; Turetschek, Karl; Schmidt, Alice; Lammer, Johannes

    1998-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome in seven patients in whom iatrogenic vascular complications were treated with catheter embolization. Methods: Angiography showed an arteriovenous fistula in six of the seven patients, a pseudoaneurysm in three patients, and an arteriocaliceal fistula in three patients. Embolization was performed with GAW coils or microcoils in all cases. In three patients enbucrilate, polyvinyl alcohol, or absorbable gelatin powder was administered as an adjunct to the coils. Results: Angiographic success with total occlusion of the vascular injury was achieved in five of the seven patients and clinical success was achieved in four of seven cases. In two cases, nephrectomy after embolization was necessary because of renal artery occlusion or acute hemorrhage at the renal artery anastomosis, respectively. Infarction of 30%-50% of the renal parenchyma was seen in two cases. Conclusion: Angiographically successful embolization is not necessarily associated with clinical success. The complication rate is high.

  14. Pulmonary embolism after arterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma: An autopsy case report

    PubMed Central

    Hatamaru, Keiichi; Azuma, Shunjiro; Akamatsu, Takuji; Seta, Takeshi; Urai, Shunji; Uenoyama, Yoshito; Yamashita, Yukitaka; Ono, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    We report an extremely rare case of pulmonary lipiodol embolism with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A 77-year-old man who was diagnosed with a huge HCC was admitted for TACE. Immediately after the procedure, this patient experienced severe dyspnea. We suspected that his symptoms were associated with a pulmonary lipiodol embolism after TACE, and we began intensive treatment. However, his condition did not improve, and he died on the following day. A subsequent autopsy revealed that the cause of death was ARDS due to pulmonary lipiodol embolism. No cases have been previously reported for which an autopsy was performed to explain the most probable mechanism of pulmonary lipiodol embolism; thus, ours is the first report for such a rare case. PMID:25632211

  15. Microballoon Occlusion Test to Predict Colonic Ischemia After Transcatheter Embolization of a Ruptured Aneurysm of the Middle Colic Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Inokuchi, Hiroyuki; Irie, Hiroyuki; Nishie, Akihiro; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Ishigami, Kousei; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Daisuke; Honda, Hiroshi; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Morita, Masaru; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2008-07-15

    A 76-year-old woman presented with sudden massive melena, and superior mesenteric arteriography showed an aneurysm in the middle colic artery (MCA). Because she had a history of right hemicolectomy and ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) during open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, embolization of the MCA aneurysm was considered to pose a risk comparable to that of colonic ischemia. A microballoon occlusion test during occlusion of the MCA confirmed retrograde visualization of the IMA branches through the collateral arteries by way of the left internal iliac artery, and embolization was successfully performed using microcoils. No colonic ischemia or aneurysm rupture occurred after embolization.

  16. Allogeneic transplantation is not superior to chemotherapy in most patients over 40 years of age with Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first remission.

    PubMed

    Wolach, Ofir; Stevenson, Kristen E; Wadleigh, Martha; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Steensma, David P; Ballen, Karen K; Soiffer, Robert J; Antin, Joseph H; Neuberg, Donna S; Ho, Vincent T; Stone, Richard M

    2016-08-01

    Survival of patients ≥40 years of age with Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains poor with current therapeutic approaches. It is unknown whether allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) in first remission confers a survival benefit compared to a chemotherapy-only approach. We retrospectively compared the outcome of patients >40 years treated with HSCT or chemotherapy alone in first remission (n = 40 in each cohort). Three-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were not significantly different between the chemotherapy-only and HSCT groups (OS, 46% [31-68] vs. 40% [27-59], P = 0.35; DFS, 31% [18-52] vs. 40% [27-59], P = 0.98). The 3-year cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) and non-relapse mortality (NRM) were 61% [41-76] and 9% [2-21] for the chemotherapy-only group and 28% [15-43] and 32% [17-47] for the transplant group (CIR, P = 0.011; NRM, P = 0.014). Allogeneic transplantation for patients ≥40 years with Ph-negative ALL in first remission is associated with a lower CIR, but this benefit is offset by considerable NRM as compared with chemotherapy-only approach. HSCT may be beneficial in patients with high-risk disease features. Am. J. Hematol. 91:793-799, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27153389

  17. Prediction of Short-Term Outcome in Acute Superior Vestibular Nerve Failure: Three-Dimensional Video-Head-Impulse Test and Caloric Irrigation

    PubMed Central

    Rambold, Holger A.

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study examines acute unilateral vestibular failure (up to seven days after onset) with modern vestibular testing (caloric irrigation and video-head-impulse test, vHIT) in 54 patients in order to test if the short-term outcome of the patients depends on the lesion pattern defined by the two tests. Patients were grouped according to a pathological unilateral caloric weakness without a pathological vHIT: group I; additional a pathological vHIT of the lateral semicircular canal (SCC): group II; and an additional pathological vHIT of the anterior SCC: group III. Patients with involvement of the posterior SCC were less frequent and not included in the analysis. Basic parameters, such as age of the subjects, days after symptom onset, gender, side of the lesion, treatment, and dizziness handicap inventory, were not different in groups I to III. The frequency of pathological clinical findings and pathological quantified measurements increased from groups I to III. The outcome parameter “days spent in the hospital” was significantly higher in group III compared to group I. The analysis shows that differential vestibular testing predicts short-term outcome of the patients and might be in future important to treat and coach patients with vestibular failure. PMID:26649042

  18. Successful Embolization of a Spontaneous Mesocaval Shunt Using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug II

    SciTech Connect

    Boixadera, Helena; Tomasello, Alejandro; Quiroga, Sergi; Cordoba, Joan; Perez, Mercedes; Segarra, Antoni

    2010-10-15

    A 48-year-old man with alcoholic liver cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy was found to have a large, spontaneous mesocaval shunt. The shunt was successfully occluded with the use of an Amplatzer Vascular Plug. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of this device to embolize a mesocaval shunt involving the superior mesenteric vein.

  19. Embolization during treatment of deep venous thrombosis: incidence, importance, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Santiago; Comerota, Anthony J

    2011-06-01

    The standard of care for the treatment of acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is anticoagulation, which often prevents the formation of new thrombus and reduces the risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) but fails to eliminate the clot burden. Patients who have thrombus remaining in their deep venous system despite therapeutic anticoagulation are at high risk for developing symptoms of the postthrombotic syndrome, a debilitating condition that adversely affects their quality of life. Strategies of thrombus removal for acute DVT, such as operative thrombectomy, catheter-directed thrombolysis, and pharmacomechanical techniques, are designed to avoid postthrombotic morbidity by restoring patency to the deep veins, but there is concern that these techniques may result in fragmentation of clot and pulmonary embolization. Careful patient evaluation before treatment is essential for preventing complications and often reveals asymptomatic pulmonary emboli in as many as 50% of patients. Nonobstructive or free-floating thrombus in the vena cava is a risk factor for procedure-related embolization and is frequently an indication for the use of vena caval filtration. A review of the literature on acute DVT treated by anticoagulation alone or with strategies of thrombus removal reveals that pulmonary embolization is an infrequent occurrence. Treatment with anticoagulation alone, however, increases the risk of patients developing symptoms of the postthrombotic syndrome, whereas thrombus removal strategies reduce postthrombotic morbidity without increasing the risk of embolization. PMID:21550507

  20. Superior performance of co-cultured mesenchymal stem cells and hepatocytes in poly(lactic acid-glycolic acid) scaffolds for the treatment of acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingying; Yang, Jiacai; Hu, Wenjun; Zhang, Shichang; Wang, Yingjie

    2016-02-01

    Recently, cell-based therapies have attracted attention as promising treatments for acute liver failure (ALF). Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are potential candidates for co-culture with hepatocytes in poly(lactic acid-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffolds to support hepatocellular function. However, the mechanism of culturing protocol using PLGA scaffolds for MSC differentiation into hepatocyte-like cells as well as the therapeutic effect of cell seeded PLGA scaffolds on ALF remain unsatisfactory in clinical application. Here, MSCs and hepatocytes were co-cultured at ratios of 1:2.5 (MSCs: Hep), 1:5 and 1:10, respectively. The proliferation abilities of these co-cultured cells were detected by CCK8, MTT, EdU and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the ability of MSCs to differentiate into hepatocytes was detected by PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Therapeutic trials of cell seeded PLGA scaffolds were conducted through mouse abdominal cavity transplantation. Results showed that the 1:5 group showed significantly higher cellular proliferation than the 1:2.5 and 1:10 groups, supernatant albumin and urea nitrogen levels were also significantly higher in the 1:5 group than in other two groups. Similarly, the 1:5 group demonstrated better DNA transcription and liver-specific protein (albumin, CK18 and P450) production. Meanwhile, the GalN-stimulated levels of ALT, AST and TBil in mouse serum were down-regulated significantly more by (MSC  +  Hep)-PLGA scaffold treatment than MSC-PLGA or Hep-PLGA scaffold treatments. Furthermore, the (MSC  +  Hep)-PLGA scaffold-treated ALF mice showed a lower immunogenic response level than the other two groups. These data suggested that the ratio of 1:5 (MSC:Hep) co-cultures was the optimal ratio for MSCs to support hepatocellular metabolism and function in PLGA scaffolds in vitro, the (MSC  +  Hep)-PLGA scaffold treatment could perform better restoration for damaged liver

  1. Treatment of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Décousus, Hervé; Mismetti, Patrick; Couturaud, Francis; Ageno, Walter; Bauersachs, Rupert

    2015-12-01

    The treatment of pulmonary embolism is going to be deeply modified by the development of Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOACs). There are currently three anti-Xa factors (rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban) and one anti-IIa factor (dabigatran) labeled by the FDA and the EMA. All these drugs are direct anticoagulant, orally effective, without the need for adaptation to hemostasis test. As kidney excretion is involved for all of them, they are contra-indicated in patients with severe renal failure (creatinine clearance < 30 mL/min according to Cockcroft & Gault formula). All the anti-Xa factor drugs are metabolized by liver cytochromes and then contra-indicated in case of liver insufficiency. Of note, the four DOACS have been evaluated in non-inferiority trials, including one open-label trial (the EINSTEIN program with the rivaroxaban). Moreover, two of them (rivaroxaban and apixaban) were evaluated in a single drug approach (provided initial increased doses: 15 mg bid during 21 days for rivaroxaban and 10 mg bid during 7 days for apixaban) whereas the two others (edoxaban and dabigatran) were evaluated after at least 5 days of parenteral heparin. They were found to be non-inferior to the conventional treatment, but also seem to be associated with a decreased risk of major bleeding, in a quite young and without significant comorbidities population. The risk/benefit ratio of DOACs in specific subgroups deserves prospective validations. PMID:26547678

  2. Reflex Anuria After Renal Tumor Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Kervancioglu, Selim Sirikci, Akif; Erbagci, Ahmet

    2007-04-15

    We report a case of reflex anuria after transarterial embolization of a renal tumor. Anuria developed immediately after embolization and resolved 74 hr following the procedure. We postulate that reflux anuria in our case was related to mechanoreceptors, chemoreceptors, or both, as these are stimulated by the occluded blood vessels, ischemia, and edema of the normal renal tissue of an embolized kidney.

  3. Endovascular Management of Visceral Artery Pseudoaneurysms: Transcatheter Coil Embolization Using the Isolation Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Nakasone, Yutaka; Tamura, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2010-12-15

    PurposeTo describe our experiences with treatment of visceral artery pseudoaneurysms (VAPA) by transcatheter coil embolization using an isolation technique and to propose indications for treating VAPA with this method.Materials and MethodsWe treated 37 patients with VAPA endovascularly: There were 15 pancreaticoduodenal arcade, 10 hepatic, 5 renal, 3 splenic, and 1 each left gastric, gastroepiploic, adrenal, and superior mesenteric artery pseudoaneurysms. Preprocedure computed tomography (CT) and/or angiographic studies confirmed the presence of VAPA in all 37 patients. Using the isolation technique, we embolized vessels at sites distal and proximal to the pseudoaneurysm.ResultsTranscatheter coil embolization with the isolation technique was technically successful in 33 (89%) of 37 patients, and angiogram confirmed the complete disappearance of the VAPA in 32 patients. No major complications occurred during the procedures. In a patient with a pancreaticoduodenal arcade artery pseudoaneurysm, we were unable to control hemorrhage. In 30 of 32 patients who recovered after transcatheter coil embolization using the isolation technique, follow-up CT scan showed no flow in VAPA; they survived without rebleeding. Two of the 32 patients (6%) with confirmed complete disappearance of VAPA on angiogram and CT scan obtained the day after the procedure manifested rebleeding during follow-up.ConclusionTranscatheter coil embolization using the isolation technique is an effective alternative treatment in patients with VAPA. In combination with coil embolization, the isolation technique is particularly useful in patients whose pseudoaneurysms present surgical difficulties.

  4. Paradoxical cerebral air embolism causing large vessel occlusion treated with endovascular aspiration.

    PubMed

    Belton, Patrick J; Nanda, Ashish; Alqadri, Syeda L; Khakh, Gurpreet S; Chandrasekaran, Premkumar Nattanmai; Newey, Christopher; Humphries, William E

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral air embolism is a dreaded complication of invasive medical procedures. The mainstay of therapy for patients with cerebral air embolism has been hyperbaric oxygen therapy, high flow oxygen therapy, and anticonvulsants. We present a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of cerebral air embolism causing large vessel occlusion, using endovascular aspiration. Our patient developed a cerebral air embolism following sclerotherapy for varicose veins. This caused near total occlusion of the superior division of the M2 segment of the right middle cerebral artery. Symptoms included unilateral paralysis, unintelligible speech, and hemianopia; National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) on presentation was 16. The air embolism was treated using a distal aspiration technique. Angiography following aspiration showed Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction 2B reperfusion. Following aspiration, the patient was re-examined; NIHSS at that time was 4. At 1 month follow-up, the modified Rankin Scale score was 1 and NIHSS was 1. Treatment of cerebral air embolism is discussed. PMID:27435840

  5. Transcatheter Embolization for Delayed Hemorrhage Caused by Blunt Splenic Trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Krohmer, Steven J. Hoffer, Eric K.; Burchard, Kenneth W.

    2010-08-15

    Although the exact benefit of adjunctive splenic artery embolization (SAE) in the nonoperative management (NOM) of patients with blunt splenic trauma has been debated, the role of transcatheter embolization in delayed splenic hemorrhage is rarely addressed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of SAE in the management of patients who presented at least 3 days after initial splenic trauma with delayed hemorrhage. During a 24-month period 4 patients (all male; ages 19-49 years) presented with acute onset of pain 5-70 days after blunt trauma to the left upper quadrant. Two had known splenic injuries that had been managed nonoperatively. All had computed axial tomography evidence of active splenic hemorrhage or false aneurysm on representation. All underwent successful SAE. Follow-up ranged from 28 to 370 days. These cases and a review of the literature indicate that SAE is safe and effective for NOM failure caused by delayed manifestations of splenic arterial injury.

  6. Pulmonary Embolism Following Outpatient Vasectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Frank E.; Farooqi, Bilal; Moore, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic events have several known major risk factors such as prolonged immobilization or major surgery. Pulmonary embolism has rarely been reported after an outpatient vasectomy was completed. We present the rare case of a healthy 32-year-old Caucasian male with no known risk factors who presented with pleuritic chest pain 26 days after his outpatient vasectomy was performed. Subsequently, he was found to have a pulmonary embolism as per radiological imaging. We explore the association between outpatient vasectomies and venous thromboembolic events. A review of the literature is also included. PMID:26989373

  7. Pulmonary Embolism Following Outpatient Vasectomy.

    PubMed

    Mott, Frank E; Farooqi, Bilal; Moore, Harry

    2016-02-01

    Venous thromboembolic events have several known major risk factors such as prolonged immobilization or major surgery. Pulmonary embolism has rarely been reported after an outpatient vasectomy was completed. We present the rare case of a healthy 32-year-old Caucasian male with no known risk factors who presented with pleuritic chest pain 26 days after his outpatient vasectomy was performed. Subsequently, he was found to have a pulmonary embolism as per radiological imaging. We explore the association between outpatient vasectomies and venous thromboembolic events. A review of the literature is also included. PMID:26989373

  8. Bilateral mycotic aneurysm of the superior gluteal artery.

    PubMed

    Bouarhroum, Abdellatif; El Khloufi, Samir; El Hassani, Rachid; Bensaid, Younes

    2009-01-01

    Gluteal artery aneurysms are rare and mostly secondary to blunt or penetrating trauma. As an absolute rarity, we report an exceptional presentation of bilateral mycotic aneurysm of the superior gluteal artery in a 16-year-old boy associated with bacterial endocarditis. The left pseudoaneurysm was ruptured and treated using open surgery; 1 week later, the right location was successfully treated by embolization. PMID:19540714

  9. Sequential multiagent chemotherapy is not superior to high-dose cytarabine alone as postremission intensification therapy for acute myeloid leukemia in adults under 60 years of age: Cancer and Leukemia Group B Study 9222

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Joseph O.; George, Stephen L.; Dodge, Richard K.; Amrein, Philip C.; Powell, Bayard L.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Baer, Maria R.; Davey, Frederick R.; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Larson, Richard A.; Schiffer, Charles A.

    2005-01-01

    The Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) study 9222 tested the hypothesis that treatment intensification of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first remission with multiple chemotherapy agents is superior to high-dose cytarabine (HiDAC) alone. We enrolled 474 patients younger than 60 years old with untreated de novo AML. Daunorubicin and cytarabine resulted in complete remission (CR) in 342 patients (72%), and 309 of these patients were randomized to receive one of 2 different intensification regimens. The first regimen consisted of 3 courses of HiDAC. The second regimen consisted of one course of HiDAC, a second course with etoposide and cyclophosphamide, and a third course with diaziquone and mitoxantrone. After a median follow-up time of 8.3 years, the median survival for all randomized patients was 2.8 years (95% CI, 1.9-6.8 years). There was no difference in disease-free survival (DFS) between the 2 regimens (P = .66). The median DFS was 1.1 years (95% CI, 0.9-1.7 years) for patients receiving HiDAC and 1.0 year (95% CI, 0.9-1.3 years) for those receiving multiagent chemotherapy. Cytogenetics was the only pretreatment characteristic prognostic for DFS, but there was no evidence of a differential treatment effect within cytogenetic risk groups. Toxicity was greater with multiagent chemotherapy. These 2 postremission regimens produced similar outcomes. PMID:15572587

  10. Pre-transplant achievement of negativity in minimal residual disease and French-American-British L1 morphology predict superior outcome after allogeneic transplant for Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia: an analysis of Southeast Asian patients.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liyuan; Hao, Siguo; Diong, Colin; Goh, Yeow-Tee; Gopalakrishnan, Sathish; Ho, Aloysius; Hwang, William; Koh, Liang-Piu; Koh, Mickey; Lim, Zi-Yi; Loh, Yvonne; Poon, Michelle; Tan, Lip-Kun; Tan, Patrick; Linn, Yeh-Ching

    2015-05-01

    To better understand predictive factors and improve the clinical outcome of allogeneic transplant for patients with Philadelphia positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we analyzed 67 Southeast Asian patients transplanted in our institutions. Multivariate analysis showed that disease status before transplant, year of transplant and, interestingly, French-American-British (FAB) subtype had a significant impact on overall survival (OS) and non-relapse mortality. Patients who were minimal residual disease (MRD) negative at transplant had a 3-year OS of 73% compared to those who were MRD positive (45%) and refractory (0%). The 3-year cumulative incidence of relapse was 18% and 36% for the MRD negative and positive groups, respectively. FAB L1 subtype had a significantly superior 3-year OS of 63% vs. 29% for L2 subtype. Pre-transplant use of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor significantly improved outcomes in univariate but not multivariate analysis, as it served to induce more patients into MRD negativity, which was the factor that directly improved transplant outcome. PMID:25139689

  11. Transcatheter Therapy for a Large Mobile Right Atrial Thrombus and Massive Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Narang, Akhil; Mediratta, Anuj; Estrada, Jeremy R; Rosenberg, Jonathan; DeCara, Jeanne M; Howell, Michael D; Lang, Roberto M; Paul, Jonathan D; Nathan, Sandeep; Shah, Atman P; Blair, John E

    2016-05-01

    A variety of interventional management approaches exist for the treatment of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). However, when PE is accompanied by residual right heart thrombus, the best therapeutic options are less clear. We describe a novel combined technique of percutaneous aspiration of unstable right atrial thrombus followed by ultrasound-directed thrombolysis of massive PE. PMID:27145056

  12. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Large Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Aneurysm with Mechanically Detachable Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Toshiya Fujimoto, Yukinori; Jin, Myeong Jun; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2004-03-15

    Large aneurysms (5.5 and 3.6 cm in diameter) arising from the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery located just near the main superior mesenteric artery were incidentally diagnosed in two patients. Transcatheter arterial embolization, packing mechanically detachable coils and microcoils into the aneurysms, was performed while the inflated balloon catheter was placed near the neck of the aneurysms. The procedures were successfully performed and no aneurysmal rupture or bowel ischemia was noted during follow-up. Balloon-assisted transcatheter arterial embolization with mechanically detachable coils seems to be an effective and safe treatment for large inferior pancreaticoduodenal aneurysms.

  13. Ischemic stroke due to paradoxical embolism arising from a popliteal vein aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Auboire, Laurent; Palcau, Laura; Mackowiak, Elise; Viader, Fausto; Le Hello, Claire; Berger, Ludovic

    2014-04-01

    Popliteal vein aneurysm (PVA) is a very uncommon cause of stroke. We present the case of a 63-year-old, right-handed man who presented to the emergency department with transitory ischemic accident (left superior extremity regressive monoplegia). Complete etiologic work-up led to the discovery of both a patent foramen ovale associated with an septum interauricular aneurysm, and of a PVA without mural thrombus. The diagnosis of brain paradoxical embolism was retained. The unique potentially embolic cause was the presence of the PVA. We decided to treat the PVA surgically to avoid a further cerebral vascular episode. Although uncommon, venous etiology must be considered for stroke. PMID:24360944

  14. Embolization Coils Migrating and Being Passed per Rectum After Embolization of a Splenic Artery Pseudoaneurysm, 'The Migrating Coil': A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Numan A.; Akingboye, Akinfemi; Haldipur, Nandon; Mackinlay, James Y.; Jacob, George

    2007-11-15

    Acute or chronic blood loss from pseudoaneurysms of the splanchnic artery in chronic pancreatitis poses diagnostic and management challenges. Arteriographic examination offers both diagnostic and therapeutic options, with success rates of 76%-100% for both modalities. In cases of failure of embolization, repeat embolization is also an option. Surgical intervention is advocated for rebleeding and failure of embolization. Evidence-based guidelines regarding the optimal treatment modality for this condition are lacking. There has been a reported case of dislodgement of coil into the stomach through a gastropseudocystic fistula. We report the case of a migrating steel-wire coil through the gastrointestinal tract and splenic artery pseudoaneurysm. We highlight the potential complications of pseudoaneurysm and other available therapeutic management options.

  15. [Morphological diagnostics of fat embolism].

    PubMed

    Dorosevich, A E; Dmitriev, I V

    2016-01-01

    The present review of the literature concerns the problem of morphological diagnostics of fat embolism, i.e. mechanical obturation of multiple blood vessels with fat globules, that can be detected by a variety of methods including polarization microscopy, staining of native, frozen, and paraffin-embedded histological sections with the use of immunohistochemical techniques, electron microscopy, etc. PMID:27144263

  16. Clinical and Periprocedural Pain Management for Uterine Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Elizabeth Brooke; Stratil, Peter; Mizones, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Uterine artery embolization has Level A data supporting excellent safety and efficacy in treating symptomatic uterine leiomyomata. However, there is a perception that either postprocedural pain is severe or poorly managed by the physician performing these procedures. This has led some primary care physicians to omit this procedure from the patients' options or to steer patients away from this procedure. A few simple techniques (pruning of the vascular tree and embolizing to 5–10 beat stasis) and fastidious pre-, intra-, and post-procedural management can nearly eliminate significant pain associated with embolization. Specifically, early implementation of long-acting low-dose narcotics, antiemetics and anti-inflammatory medications is critical. Finally, the use of a superior hypogastric nerve block, which takes minutes to perform and carries a very low risk, significantly reduces pain and diminishes the need for narcotics; when this technique was used in a prospective study, all patients were able to be discharged the day of the procedure. In the authors' experience, patients treated in this manner largely recover completely within 5 days and have a far less traumatic experience than patients traditionally treated with only midazolam (Versed) and fentanyl citrate (fentanyl) intraprocedurally, and narcotics and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs postprocedurally. PMID:24436562

  17. [Cyanoacrylate pulmonary embolism after embolization of a cerebral arteriovenous malformation. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Fernández, Patricia; Loayza, Patricio; Sabbagh, Eduardo; Badilla, Lautaro; Rojas, David; Verschae, Gregorio; Milet, Beatriz

    2004-04-01

    Arterial embolization with cyanoacrylate is commonly used for the treatment of arteriovenous malformations. We report the case of a 40 years old man who four days after an embolization with cyanoacrylate, begins with cough, bloody sputum, and right hemithorax pleuritic pain. Pulmonary embolism was confirmed with chest X ray, CT scan and scyntigraphy. The patient received anticoagulation, with adequate response. The most common complications of cerebral embolization are related to central nervous system and pulmonary embolism is exceptional. Considering the high number of embolization procedures done nowadays, this complication must be borne in mind. PMID:15382522

  18. Pictorial Superiority Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Douglas L.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Pictures generally show superior recognition relative to their verbal labels. This experiment was designed to link this pictorial superiority effect to sensory or meaning codes associated with the two types of symbols. (Editor)

  19. Acute Lung Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mac Sweeney, Rob; McAuley, Daniel F.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Lung failure is the most common organ failure seen in the intensive care unit. The pathogenesis of acute respiratory failure (ARF) can be classified as (1) neuromuscular in origin, (2) secondary to acute and chronic obstructive airway diseases, (3) alveolar processes such as cardiogenic and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema and pneumonia, and (4) vascular diseases such as acute or chronic pulmonary embolism. This article reviews the more common causes of ARF from each group, including the pathological mechanisms and the principles of critical care management, focusing on the supportive, specific, and adjunctive therapies for each condition. PMID:21989697

  20. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Upper Gastrointestinal Nonvariceal Hemorrhage: Is Empiric Embolization Warranted?

    SciTech Connect

    Arrayeh, Elnasif; Fidelman, Nicholas Gordon, Roy L.; LaBerge, Jeanne M.; Kerlan, Robert K.; Klimov, Alexander; Bloom, Allan I.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To determine whether transcatheter arterial embolization performed in the setting of active gastric or duodenal nonvariceal hemorrhage is efficacious when the bleeding source cannot be identified angiographically. Methods: Records of 115 adult patients who underwent visceral angiography for endoscopically documented gastric (50 patients) or duodenal (65 patients) nonvariceal hemorrhage were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were subdivided into three groups according to whether angiographic evidence of arterial hemorrhage was present and whether embolization was performed (group 1 = no abnormality, no embolization; group 2 = no abnormality, embolization performed [empiric embolization]; and group 3 = abnormality present, embolization performed). Thirty-day rates and duration of primary hemostasis and survival were compared.ResultsFor patients with gastric sources of hemorrhage, the rate of primary hemostasis at 30 days after embolization was greater when embolization was performed in the setting of a documented angiographic abnormality than when empiric embolization was performed (67% vs. 42%). The rate of primary hemostasis at 30 days after angiography was greater for patients with duodenal bleeding who either underwent empiric embolization (60%) or embolization in the setting of angiographically documented arterial hemorrhage (58%) compared with patients who only underwent diagnostic angiogram (33%). Patients with duodenal hemorrhage who underwent embolization were less likely to require additional invasive procedures to control rebleeding (p = 0.006). Conclusion: Empiric arterial embolization may be advantageous in patients with a duodenal source of hemorrhage but not in patients with gastric hemorrhage.

  1. Portal and splanchnic hemodynamics after partial splenic embolization in cirrhotic patients with hypersplenism.

    PubMed

    Helaly, Ahmed Z; Al-Warraky, Mohamed S; El-Azab, Gasser I; Kohla, Mohamed A S; Abdelaal, Elsayed E

    2015-12-01

    To assess the acute effects of partial splenic embolization (PSE) on portal and splanchnic hemodynamics in patients with cirrhosis. Ninety-five patients with hypersplenism were included in the study. Duplex examinations were performed before and 3 and 7 days after PSE. Portal and splanchnic hemodynamics including vessel cross-sectional area (CSA), mean flow velocities (cm/s), blood flows (mL/min), Doppler indices as portal congestion index (CI), liver vascular index, hepatic artery and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) pulsatility and resistive indices (PI and RI), were performed before and after PSE. In our study, 69 of 95 patients were males (72.6%) and 26 females (27.3%). Chronic hepatitis C virus infection was the main cause of cirrhosis (81.1%). PSE failed technically in six patients (6.3%). After PSE, both CSA and CI significantly decreased (p < 0.05 and <0.01). The portal vein velocity significantly increased (p < 0.01). The portal flow volume (892.4 ± 151 mL/min) did not show significant changes. The hepatic artery RI and PI showed a steady increase that became significant 7 days post-PSE (p < 0.05). The RI and PI of SMA increased significantly after 7 days of PSE (p < 0.05). PSE has an immediate portal decompression effect in patients with portal hypertension without reduction in portal flow. This effect on portal pressure should be investigated in future studies as a potential tool for management of acute variceal bleeding when other medical procedures fail. PMID:26547369

  2. Treatment of Nonvariceal Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage by Transcatheter Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muhammad; Ul Haq, Tanveer; Salam, Basit; Beg, Madiha; Azeemuddin, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the sensitivity of mesenteric angiography, technical success of hemostasis, clinical success rate, and complications of transcatheter embolization for the treatment of acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Material and Methods. A retrospective review of 200 consecutive patients who underwent mesenteric arteriography for acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage between February 2004 and February 2011 was done. Results. Of 200 angiographic studies, 114 correctly revealed the bleeding site with mesenteric angiography. 47 (41%) patients had upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and 67 (59%) patients had lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Out of these 114, in 112 patients (98%) technical success was achieved with immediate cessation of bleeding. 81 patients could be followed for one month. Clinical success was achieved in 72 out of these 81 patients (89%). Seven patients rebled. 2 patients developed bowel ischemia. Four patients underwent surgery for bowel ischemia or rebleeding. Conclusion. The use of therapeutic transcatheter embolization for treatment of acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage is highly successful and relatively safe with 98% technical success and 2.4% postembolization ischemia in our series. In 89% of cases it was definitive without any further intervention. PMID:23844289

  3. Ischemic stroke related to an amniotic fluid embolism during labor.

    PubMed

    Woo, Yeon-Sun; Hong, Soon-Cheol; Park, Seong-Mi; Cho, Kyung-Hee

    2015-04-01

    We report a young woman who survived multiple cerebral infarctions related to an amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) during labor. To our knowledge, an embolic stroke due to the coexistence of an AFE and patent foramen ovale (PFO) has not been reported. We describe the patient's clinical and radiological features and discuss the stroke mechanism in relation to our AFE hypothesis. A 32-year-old woman presented to the emergency room after experiencing convulsions during labor (blood pressure, 64/28mmHg; oxygen saturation, 67%). She was in a stupor, and her response to painful stimuli on the right side was weaker than on the left side. Acute stroke was considered as a possible cause. Additionally, an AFE was suspected due to cardiopulmonary arrest during labor. Brain MRI revealed multiple territory embolic infarctions. The transcranial Doppler with bubble study demonstrated a right-to-left shunt during the Valsalva maneuver. A transesophageal echocardiogram revealed a PFO with a right-to-left shunt. The elevated intrathoracic pressure during labor may have caused blood to flow backward through the heart, shunting blood from the right side to the left through the PFO. In cases such as this, an amniotic fluid embolus may travel directly from the venous to the arterial circulation via the PFO, leading to multiple cerebral infarctions. PMID:25709056

  4. Glue embolism: a rare cause of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Pervez; Haqqi, Syed Afzal-ul-Haq; Shaikh, Hafeezullah; Wakani, Asif J

    2011-09-01

    N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate is widely used to sclerose bleeding gastric varices. We report the case of a 65-year-old lady, known case of cirrhosis secondary to hepatitis C infection, who presented to the emergency department with coffee ground vomiting and melena for four days. Gastroscopy showed non-bleeding small esophageal varices, mild portal hypertensive gastropathy and a large gastric fundal varix. Injection sclerotherapy was completed successfully and haemostasis was secured. During the procedure, she was hemodynamically stable with an oxygen saturation of 98%. Immediately after the procedure, she went into cardiopulmonary arrest; cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was started, but she could not be revived. A provisional diagnosis of pulmonary embolism was made. X-ray chest showed linear hyperdense shadows in both pulmonary arteries and in some of their branches, which were not seen on pre-procedural chest X-ray. The patient died of massive pulmonary embolism as confirmed on X-ray chest. PMID:21914421

  5. Multiple Air Embolism During Coronary Angiography: How Do We Deal With It?

    PubMed Central

    Suastika, Luh Oliva Saraswati; Oktaviono, Yudi Her

    2016-01-01

    Coronary air embolism remains a serious complication of cardiac catheterization despite careful prevention. The complications of coronary air embolism range from clinically insignificant events to acute coronary syndrome, cardiogenic shock, and death. We report here a case of multiple air emboli in both left coronary arteries, complicated by cardiogenic shock and ventricular fibrillation in a 49-year-old male patient undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention. The patient recovered after supportive measures, including oxygen, intravenous dopamine infusion, and cardiac compression, and repeated forceful injection of heparinized saline successfully resolved the air emboli. He then eventually underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention in the left anterior descending artery without any residual stenosis. PMID:27226738

  6. Superior Sagittal Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Nakase, Hiroyuki; Takeshima, Toshikazu; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Heimann, Axel; Kempski, Oliver

    1998-01-01

    Sinus-vein thrombosis is increasingly recognized as a much more frequent neurological disorder than was anticipated before. We examined the pathophysiology of superior sagittal sinus thrombosis (SSST) from 19 patients and a rat SSST model. We treated 19 cases with SSST who were diagnosed by angiography. The symptoms of nine patients, who suffered multiple intracerebral hemorrhage, were abrupt. In another ten patients who recovered satisfactorily, the condition progressed slowly and they were treated with heparin and urokinase. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that female, sudden onset (<24 hours) and posterior 1/3 occlusion are related to bad outcome. Experimentally, SSST was induced by ligation and slow injection of kaolin-cephalin suspension into SSS in rats. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation (Hb Sao2) using a “scanning” technique were measured at 48 locations, and fluorescence angiography was performed before and until 90 min after SSST induction. After 48 hours the animals were sacrificed for histological studies. Decrease of rCBF and tissue Hb SO2 and brain damage were seen in group B (n = 10) with an extension of thrombosis from SSS into cortical veins. Brain injury was not observed in group A (n = 8) with SSS thrombus alone and sham-operated animals (n = 5). In conclusion, a brain with acute extension of thrombus from SSS into cortical veins becomes critical for cerebral blood supply and metabolism. CBF, tissue HbSO2 and repeated angiography can be helpful monitors for the early detection of critical conditions after SSST. As to the therapy, restraint on the ongoing thrombus is essential to protect the brain with SSST, and we encourage the use of combination therapy of heparin and urokinase as early as possible in cases without intracerebral hemorrhage. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:17171061

  7. Embolization of uterine arteriovenous malformation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Wang, Guoyun; Xie, Fubo; Wang, Bo; Tao, Guowei; Kong, Beihua

    2013-01-01

    Background: Uterine arteriovenous malformation is a rare but potential life-threatening source of bleeding. A high index of suspicion and accurate diagnosis of the condition in a timely manor are essential because instrumentation that is often used for other sources of uterine bleeding can be lead to massive hemorrhage. Case: We describe here a case of uterine arteriovenous malformation. A 32-year-old woman presented abnormal vaginal bleeding following the induced abortion. A diagnosis of uterine arteriovenous malformation made on the basis of Doppler ultrasonraphy was confirmed through pelvic angiography. The embolization of bilateral uterine arteries was performed successfully. Conclusion: Uterine arteriovenous malformation should be suspected in patient with abnormal vaginal bleeding, especially who had the past medical history incluing cesarean section, induced abortion, or Dillation and Curethage and so on. Although angiography remains the gold standard, Doppler ultrasonography is also a good noninvasive technique. The transcatheter uterine artery embolization offers a safe and effective treatment PMID:24639742

  8. Fat embolism: a clinical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, J D

    1987-01-01

    Fat embolism causes a distinctive clinical syndrome usually seen in trauma victims with long bone fractures. Clinical findings include hyperthermia, respiratory distress, petechiae and retinal fat emboli. Neurologic changes include decreased sensorium, decerebrate posturing and seizure activity. Chest radiographs commonly demonstrate bilateral fluffy infiltrates. Laboratory abnormalities include hypoxemia, respiratory alkalosis, anemia and hypocalcemia. Treatment consists of general supportive care with vigorous pulmonary therapy. Most patients have a good recovery. PMID:3799415

  9. 21 CFR 882.5950 - Neurovascular embolization device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... embolization device. (a) Identification. A neurovascular embolization device is an intravascular implant intended to permanently occlude blood flow to cerebral aneurysms and cerebral ateriovenous...

  10. [Massive pulmonary embolism due to hydatid vesicles. Report of a case (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Grau Junyent, J M; Vernet Vernet, M; Fernández-Huerta, J M; Ramírez Ruz, J; Urbano-Márquez, A; Rozman, C

    1980-04-25

    A patient with hepatic and peritoneal hydatidosis suffered acute episodes of restrictive bronchial disease for the last 2 years. The patient was admitted during the course of one of this acute episodes with clinical symptoms of pulmonary embolism. Supportive therapeutic measures were prescribed, but the patient died 12 hours latter. Autopsy revealed hepatic, peritoneal and pulmonary hidatidosis as well as multiple pulmonary thromboembolisms due to hydatid vesicles. Literature on this subject is reviewed, and different clinical forms and therapeutic possibilities are discussed. The importance of small therapeutic possibilities are discussed. The importance of small recurrent hydatid embolisms in the pathogenesis of acute or subacute cor pulmonale in patients with liver hydatidosis is stressed. PMID:7374237

  11. Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Ruptured Occipital Arterial Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Kanematsu, Masayuki; Kato, Hiroki; Kondo, Hiroshi; Goshima, Satoshi; Tsuge, Yusuke; Kojima, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Haruo

    2011-02-15

    Two cases of ruptured aneurysms in the posterior cervical regions associated with type-1 neurofibromatosis treated by transcatheter embolization are reported. Patients presented with acute onset of swelling and pain in the affected areas. Emergently performed contrast-enhanced CT demonstrated aneurysms and large hematomas widespread in the posterior cervical regions. Angiography revealed aneurysms and extravasations of the occipital artery. Patients were successfully treated by percutaneous transcatheter arterial microcoil embolization. Transcatheter arterial embolization therapy was found to be an effective method for treating aneurysmal rupture in the posterior cervical regions occurring in association with type-1 neurofibromatosis. A literature review revealed that rupture of an occipital arterial aneurysm, in the setting of neurofibromatosis type 1, has not been reported previously.

  12. Incidence of pulmonary embolism during COPD exacerbation*, **

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Evrim Eylem; Hoşgün, Derya; Akpýnar, Serdar; Ataç, Gökçe Kaan; Doğanay, Beyza; Gülhan, Meral

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Because pulmonary embolism (PE) and COPD exacerbation have similar presentations and symptoms, PE can be overlooked in COPD patients. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of PE during COPD exacerbation and to describe the clinical aspects in COPD patients diagnosed with PE. METHODS: This was a prospective study conducted at a university hospital in the city of Ankara, Turkey. We included all COPD patients who were hospitalized due to acute exacerbation of COPD between May of 2011 and May of 2013. All patients underwent clinical risk assessment, arterial blood gas analysis, chest CT angiography, and Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremities. In addition, we measured D-dimer levels and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) levels. RESULTS: We included 172 patients with COPD. The prevalence of PE was 29.1%. The patients with pleuritic chest pain, lower limb asymmetry, and high NT-pro-BNP levels were more likely to develop PE, as were those who were obese or immobile. Obesity and lower limb asymmetry were independent predictors of PE during COPD exacerbation (OR = 4.97; 95% CI, 1.775-13.931 and OR = 2.329; 95% CI, 1.127-7.105, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of PE in patients with COPD exacerbation was higher than expected. The association between PE and COPD exacerbation should be considered, especially in patients who are immobile or obese. PMID:24626268

  13. SPECT/CT and pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Jann; Gutte, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is diagnosed either by ventilation/perfusion (V/P) scintigraphy or pulmonary CT angiography (CTPA). In recent years both techniques have improved. Many nuclear medicine centres have adopted the single photon emission CT (SPECT) technique as opposed to the planar technique for diagnosing PE. SPECT has been shown to have fewer indeterminate results and a higher diagnostic value. The latest improvement is the combination of a low-dose CT scan with a V/P SPECT scan in a hybrid tomograph. In a study comparing CTPA, planar scintigraphy and SPECT alone, SPECT/CT had the best diagnostic accuracy for PE. In addition, recent developments in the CTPA technique have made it possible to image the pulmonary arteries of the lungs in one breath-hold. This development is based on the change from a single-detector to multidetector CT technology with an increase in volume coverage per rotation and faster rotation. Furthermore, the dual energy CT technique is a promising modality that can provide functional imaging in combination with anatomical information. Newer high-end CT scanners and SPECT systems are able to visualize smaller subsegmental emboli. However, consensus is lacking regarding the clinical impact and treatment. In the present review, SPECT and SPECT in combination with low-dose CT, CTPA and dual energy CT are discussed in the context of diagnosing PE. PMID:24213621

  14. Management of Pulmonary Embolism: An Update.

    PubMed

    Konstantinides, Stavros V; Barco, Stefano; Lankeit, Mareike; Meyer, Guy

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) remains a major contributor to global disease burden. Risk-adapted treatment and follow-up contributes to a favorable outcome. Age-adjusted cutoff levels increase D-dimer specificity and may decrease overuse of imaging procedures and overdiagnosis of PE. Primary systemic fibrinolysis has an unfavorable risk-benefit ratio in intermediate-risk PE; catheter-directed techniques are an option for patients with hemodynamic decompensation and high bleeding risk. New oral anticoagulant agents are effective and safe alternatives to standard anticoagulation regimens. Recent trial data do not support insertion of cava filters in patients who can receive anticoagulant treatments. Remaining areas of uncertainty include the therapeutic implications of subsegmental PE, the optimal diagnostic approach to the pregnant patient with suspected PE, and the efficacy and safety of new oral anticoagulant agents in patients with cancer. Campaigns to increase awareness combined with strategies to implement guideline recommendations will be crucial steps towards further optimizing management of acute PE. PMID:26916489

  15. Isolated Pulmonary Embolism following Shoulder Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Goldhaber, Nicole H.; Lee, Christopher S.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) following shoulder arthroscopy is a rare complication. We present a unique case report of a 43-year-old right-hand dominant female who developed a PE 41 days postoperatively with no associated upper or lower extremity DVT. The patient had minimal preoperative and intraoperative risk factors. Additionally, she had no thromboembolic symptoms postoperatively until 41 days following surgery when she developed sudden right-hand swelling, labored breathing, and abdominal pain. A stat pulmonary computed tomography (CT) angiogram of the chest revealed an acute PE in the right lower lobe, and subsequent extremity ultrasounds showed no upper or lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. After a thorough review of the literature, we present the first documented isolated PE following shoulder arthroscopy. Although rare, sudden development of an isolated PE is possible, and symptoms such as sudden hand swelling, trouble breathing, and systemic symptoms should be evaluated aggressively with a pulmonary CT angiogram given the fact that an extremity ultrasound may be negative for deep vein thrombosis. PMID:25548699

  16. Imaging of nonthrombotic pulmonary embolism: biological materials, nonbiological materials, and foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Bach, Andreas Gunter; Restrepo, Carlos Santiago; Abbas, Jasmin; Villanueva, Alberto; Lorenzo Dus, María José; Schöpf, Reinhard; Imanaka, Hideaki; Lehmkuhl, Lukas; Tsang, Flora Hau Fung; Saad, Fathinul Fikri Ahmad; Lau, Eddie; Rubio Alvarez, Jose; Battal, Bilal; Behrmann, Curd; Spielmann, Rolf Peter; Surov, Alexey

    2013-03-01

    Nonthrombotic pulmonary embolism is defined as embolization to the pulmonary circulation caused by a wide range of substances of endogenous and exogenous biological and nonbiological origin and foreign bodies. It is an underestimated cause of acute and chronic embolism. Symptoms cover the entire spectrum from asymptomatic patients to sudden death. In addition to obstruction of the pulmonary vasculature there may be an inflammatory cascade that deteriorates vascular, pulmonary and cardiac function. In most cases the patient history and radiological imaging reveals the true nature of the patient's condition. The purpose of this article is to give the reader a survey on pathophysiology, typical clinical and radiological findings in different forms of nonthrombotic pulmonary embolism. The spectrum of forms presented here includes pulmonary embolism with biological materials (amniotic fluid, trophoblast material, endogenous tissue like bone and brain, fat, Echinococcus granulosus, septic emboli and tumor cells); nonbiological materials (cement, gas, iodinated oil, glue, metallic mercury, radiotracer, silicone, talc, cotton, and hyaluronic acid); and foreign bodies (lost intravascular objects, bullets, catheter fragments, intraoperative material, radioactive seeds, and ventriculoperitoneal shunts). PMID:23102488

  17. Thrombolysis in submassive pulmonary embolism, prudent or puerile?

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Aamer; Yousaf, Shafaq; Chugh, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) remains one of the leading causes of cardiovascular mortality. The safety and efficacy of thrombolytic therapy using tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) for acute PE in clinical practice remain unclear. We describe a case of life-threatening submassive PE causing extreme refractory hypoxaemia, where thrombolysis was successfully administered. Current consensus suggests that patients with features of hemodynamic instability as a result of an acute PE, that is, massive PE, should receive thrombolysis. Patients, not in shock however, but with evidence of right-ventricular (RV) dysfunction echocardiographically, that is, submassive PE may also benefit. Serum troponin and brain-type natriuretic peptide have been suggested as biomarkers of RV injury that may identify a subset of submassive PE patients who may particularly benefit from thrombolytic therapy. The clinical response of this patient to thrombolysis is important, as it may identify a subgroup of patients with submassive PE who warrant this intervention. PMID:23354859

  18. Transcatheter Coil Embolization of Splenic Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Satoshi Hirota, Shozo; Maeda, Hiroaki; Achiwa, Sachiko Arai, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Nakao, Norio

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical results and technical problems of transcatheter coil embolization for splenic artery aneurysm. Subjects were 16 patients (8 men, 8 women; age range, 40-80 years) who underwent transcatheter embolization for splenic artery aneurysm (14 true aneurysms, 2 false aneurysms) at one of our hospitals during the period January 1997 through July 2005. Two aneurysms (12.5%) were diagnosed at the time of rupture. Multiple splenic aneurysms were found in seven patients. Aneurysms were classified by site as proximal (or strictly ostial) (n = 3), middle (n = 3), or hilar (n = 10). The indication for transcatheter arterial embolization was a false or true aneurysm 20 mm in diameter. Embolic materials were fibered coils and interlocking detachable coils. Embolization was performed by the isolation technique, the packing technique, or both. Technically, all aneurysms were devascularized without severe complications. Embolized aneurysms were 6-40 mm in diameter (mean, 25 mm). Overall, the primary technical success rate was 88% (14 of 16 patients). In the remaining 2 patients (12.5%), partial recanalization occurred, and re-embolization was performed. The secondary technical success rate was 100%. Seven (44%) of the 16 study patients suffered partial splenic infarction. Intrasplenic branching originating from the aneurysm was observed in five patients. We conclude that transcatheter coil embolization should be the initial treatment of choice for splenic artery aneurysm.

  19. [Polycitemia vera and pulmonary embolism: case report].

    PubMed

    Nugara, Cinzia; Carità, Patrizia; Coppola, Giuseppe; Mignano, Antonino; Ajello, Laura; Rotolo, Antonino; Assennato, Pasquale; Novo, Salvatore; Corrado, Egle

    2013-12-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a rare clinical onset of chronic myeloproliferative diseases. Early diagnosis is very important because medical therapy reduces both mortality and morbility. We describe a case of pulmonary embolism as clinical onset of an unknown myeloproliferative disorder. On the basis of our experience is very important early diagnosis and therapy to reduce incidence of later major thrombotic complications. PMID:24362834

  20. Embolization Therapy for Traumatic Splenic Lacerations

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, Niloy; Matsumoto, Alan H. Arslan, Bulent; Turba, Ulku C.; Sabri, Saher; Angle, John F.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the clinical success, complications, and transfusion requirements based on the location of and agents used for splenic artery embolization in patients with splenic trauma. Methods: A retrospective study was performed of patients with splenic trauma who underwent angiography and embolization from September 2000 to January 2010 at a level I trauma center. Electronic medical records were reviewed for demographics, imaging data, technical aspects of the procedure, and clinical outcomes. Results: Fifty patients were identified (34 men and 16 women), with an average age of 48 (range, 16-80) years. Extravasation was seen on initial angiography in 27 (54%) and was absent in 23 (46%). All 27 patients with extravasation were embolized, and 18 of 23 (78.2%) without extravasation were embolized empirically. Primary clinical success was similar (>75%) across all embolization locations, embolic agents, and grades of laceration treated. Of 45 patients treated, 9 patients (20%) were embolized in the main splenic artery, 34 (75.6%) in the splenic hilum, and 2 (4.4%) were embolized in both locations. Partial splenic infarctions developed in 47.3% treated in the splenic hilum compared with 12.5% treated in the main splenic artery. There were four (8.9%) mortalities: two occurred in patients with multiple critical injuries and two from nonbleeding etiologies. Conclusions: Embolization of traumatic splenic artery injuries is safe and effective, regardless of the location of treatment. Embolization in splenic hilar branches may have a higher incidence of infarction. The grade of laceration and agents used for embolotherapy did not impact the outcomes.

  1. Stenting in Acute Lower Limb Arterial Occlusions

    SciTech Connect

    Raja, Jowad; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2008-07-15

    Management of critical limb ischemia of acute onset includes surgical embolectomy, bypass grafting, aspiration thrombectomy, thrombolysis, and mechanical thrombectomy followed by treatment of the underlying cause. We present our experience with the use of stents to treat acute embolic/thrombotic occlusions in one iliac and three femoropopliteal arteries. Although this is a small case series, excellent immediate and midterm results suggest that stenting of acute occlusions of the iliac, superficial femoral, and popliteal arteries is a safe and effective treatment option.

  2. Increased airway pressure due to superior mediastinal hematoma during endovascular coiling by transcarotid approach.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Priyanka; Rath, Girija Prasad; Banik, Sujoy; Mahajan, Charu

    2016-05-01

    An elderly woman with subarachanoid hemorrhage presented to our interventional neuroradiology suite for coil embolization of multiple intracranial aneurysms. The patient had difficult vascular access for the passage of microcatheter; hence, the embolization procedure was carried out with direct puncture of the left common carotid artery. During the procedure, the patient developed thromboembolism which was treated by administration of an antiplatelet agent, abciximab. At the end of procedure, she developed airway compromise due to extension of a local neck hematoma into the superior mediastinum. The management issues in such a scenario have been discussed. PMID:27041267

  3. Experimental Evaluation of Early and Long-Term Effects of Microparticle Embolization in Two Different Mini-Pig Models. Part II: Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfl, S.; Stampfl, U.; Rehnitz, C.; Schnabel, Ph.; Satzl, S.; Christoph, P.; Henn, C.; Thomas, F.; Richter, G. M.

    2007-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate trisacryl-gelatin microspheres (40-120 {mu}m) for acute and chronic tissue embolization in mini-pig livers. Methods. Thirteen animals were divided into four groups: group 1 (n = 3), total arterial bed occlusion with acute procedure; groups 2 to 4, chronic superselective embolization with follow-up of 1 week (group 2, n = 1), 4 weeks (group 3, n 4) or 14 weeks (group 4, n = 5). Key endpoints were homogeneity and particle distribution in acute embolizations (group 1) and necrosis and inflammation in chronic embolizations (groups 2-4) as assessed microscopically and angiographically. Results. After liver embolization, parenchymal necrosis did not occur; only signs of vessel wall disintegration were evident. The bile ducts remained intact. A distinct foreign body reaction with sparse leukocytic infiltration and giant cells was found at 14 weeks, but no signs of major inflammation were found. Particles were seen at the presinusoidal level, but no particle transportation into the sinusoids was observed. Conclusions. Embolization in mini-pig livers, using small trisacryl-gelatin microspheres, results in vessel fibrosis without parenchymal or bile duct necrosis. The most likely explanation for preservation of the parenchyma is portal inflow. Small trisacryl-gelatin microspheres may be ideal as an adjunct for chemoembolization.

  4. When Coughing Can Cause Stroke - A Case-Based Update on Cerebral Air Embolism Complicating Biopsy of the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Kau, Thomas Rabitsch, Egon; Celedin, Stefan; Habernig, Sandra M.; Weber, Joerg R.; Hausegger, Klaus A.

    2008-09-15

    Introducing gas to the circulation is a largely iatrogenic problem which can result in serious morbidity and even death. We report a case of CT-guided needle biopsy of a pulmonary lesion complicated by acute stroke. The English literature on cerebral air embolism is reviewed, including an update of current opinions on its pathomechanism, diagnostic findings, therapeutic strategies, and means of prevention.

  5. Pulmonary Artery Cement Embolism after a Vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Nooh, Anas; Abduljabbar, Fahad H.; Abduljabbar, Ahmed H.; Jarzem, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Context. Vertebroplasty is a minimally invasive procedure most commonly used for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures. Although it is relatively safe, complications have been reported over time. Among those complications, massive cement pulmonary embolism is considered a rare complication. Here we report a case of massive diffuse cement pulmonary embolism following percutaneous vertebroplasty for a vertebral compression fracture. Study Design. Case report. Methods. This is a 70-year-old female who underwent vertebroplasty for T11 and T12 vertebral compression fracture. Results. CT-scan revealed an incidental finding of cement embolism in the pulmonary trunk and both pulmonary arteries. Since the patient was asymptomatic, she was monitored closely and she did not need any intervention. Conclusion. Vertebroplasty is a minimally invasive procedure used for treatment of vertebral compression fracture. Despite the low rate of complications, a pulmonary cement embolism can occur. The consequences of cement embolism range widely from being asymptomatic to embolism that can cause paralysis, radiculopathy, or a fatal pulmonary embolism. PMID:26221556

  6. Two Microcatheter Technique for Embolization of Arteriovenous Fistula with Liquid Embolic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lin-Bo; Shim, Jae Ho; Lee, Dong-geun

    2014-01-01

    Problem with embolization of arteriovenous fistula (AVF) with liquid embolic agent is its over-penetration into the veins or regurgitation to the proximal feeder without reaching the shunt point. We present a technique that controls the flow of AVF during embolization. Two microcatheter technique consists of positioning one microcatheter close to the AVF for embolization, and with another microcatheter at the proximal feeding artery to control the AVF flow by coiling. Selective angiograms obtained using a distally positioned microcatheter before and after coiling, were compared how much stagnant effect was achieved. Using two microcatheter technique, AVF occlusion was achieved with good penetration of glue to the venous side of the AVF. Its advantage is the ability to push glue into the shunt without causing over-penetration of glue or its reflux along the feeder. Two microcatheter technique was safe and effective in glue embolization of AVF and also expected to be applied with other liquid embolic agent like Onyx. PMID:24642961

  7. Microcatheter Embolization of Intractable Idiopathic Epistaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Leppaenen, Martti; Seppaenen, Seppo; Laranne, Jussi; Kuoppala, Katriina

    1999-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and safety of microcatheter embolization in the treatment of intractable idiopathic epistaxis. Methods: Thirty-seven patients underwent microcatheter embolization in 1991-1998. We evaluated retrospectively the technical and clinical outcome, the number of complications, the duration of embolization in each case, and the number of blood transfusions needed. All embolizations were done with biplane digital subtraction angiography (DSA) equipment. The procedure was carried out under local anesthesia using transfemoral catheterization, except in one case where the translumbar route was used. Tracker 18 or 10 microcatheters were advanced as far as possible to the distal branches of the sphenopalatine artery. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles were used for embolization in most cases, while platinum coils or a combination of these two materials were occasionally used. The primary outcome was always assessed immediately by angiography. Follow-up data were obtained from patient records, by interviewing patients on the telephone or by postal questionnaires when necessary. The mean follow-up time was 21 months. Results: The embolization was technically successful in all 37 cases. A curative outcome was achieved in 33 cases (89%). The mean duration of the procedure was 110 min. Four patients (8%) had mild transient complications, but no severe or persistent complications were encountered. Twenty-three patients needed a blood transfusion. Slight rebleeding occurred in three patients during the follow-up; all responded to conservative treatment. One patient suffered two episodes of rebleeding within 2 months after primary embolization. Re-embolizations successfully stopped the bleeding. Conclusion: Embolization is the primary invasive modality for treating intractable idiopathic epistaxis. It proved both safe and effective over a relatively long follow-up.

  8. Cerebral Venous Air Embolism Secondary to Mesenteric Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Aileen; Matsuda, Brent; Leo, Qi Jie Nicholas; Sung, Hiro

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral air embolism is a rare, yet potentially fatal condition. We present a case of retrograde cerebral venous air emboli arising from the hepatic portal venous system, secondary to a mesenteric infarction. A 69-year-old man with a history of gastrointestinal amyloidosis presented with fever and lethargy. Computed tomography of the brain detected multiple foci of air in the right frontal, fronto-parietal, and left lateral frontal sulci consistent with cerebral venous air emboli. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis revealed moderate thickening and dilatation of the small bowel with diffuse scattered intestinal pneumatosis suggestive of mesenteric infarction with resultant extensive intrahepatic portal venous air. The patient was deemed a poor candidate for surgical intervention and died as a result of septic shock. We believe the cerebral venous air emboli was a result of retrograde flow of air arising from the hepatic venous air ascending via the inferior and superior vena cava to the cerebral venous system. To our knowledge, there have been no reported cases of retrograde cerebral venous air embolism arising from hepatic portal venous system secondary to mesenteric infarction. The clinical significance and prognosis in this setting requires further investigation. PMID:27239392

  9. Ischemic Effects of Transcatheter Arterial Embolization with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate-Lipiodol on the Colon in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ikoma, Akira; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Sonomura, Tetsuo; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki; Takasaka, Isao; Nakata, Kouhei; Sahara, Shinya; Sawa, Naohisa; Shirai, Shintaro; Mori, Ichiro

    2010-10-15

    This study was designed to assess the safety of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with n-butyl cyanoacrylate-lipiodol (NBCA-Lp) for the large bowel and to investigate the vital response to NBCA-Lp in a swine model. In nine swine, nine arteries nourishing the colon were embolized with NBCA-Lp (1 ml of NBCA mixed with 4 ml of lipiodol): sigmoid-rectal branch artery in six swine, right colic branch artery in two, and middle colic branch artery in one. The amount of NBCA-Lp was 0.1-0.4 ml. Sacrifice was conducted 3 days after TAE to identify histological infarction. Classification was conducted retrospectively: group A, vasa recta without NBCA-Lp embolization despite TAE; group B, three or fewer vasa recta with NBCA-Lp embolization; and group C, five or more vasa recta with NBCA-Lp embolization. In one swine in group A, no necrotic focus was observed. In group B, three of four swine experienced no ischemic damage. The remaining one swine experienced necrosis of mucosal and submucosal layers in one-fourth of the circumference. In group C, all four swine with marginal artery and five vasa recta or more embolized experienced total necrosis of mucosa, submucosa, and smooth muscle layers of the whole colonic circumference. Significant difference on the extent of ischemic damage was observed between groups B and C (P < 0.05). Microscopically, NBCA-Lp induced acute vasculitis. Embolization of three or fewer vasa recta with NBCA-Lp induced no ischemic damage or limited necrosis, whereas embolization of five or more vasa recta with NBCA-Lp induced extensive necrosis.

  10. Ruptured and unruptured mycotic superior mesenteric artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gaurav; Semel, Marcus E; McGillicuddy, Edward A; Ho, Karen J; Menard, Matthew T; Gates, Jonathan D

    2014-11-01

    Aneurysms of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and branches thereof are uncommon but have a high rate of rupture and mortality relative to other visceral artery aneurysms. Historically, the predominant etiology has been infectious; with a renewed rise in intravenous drug abuse rates in the last decade, we hypothesize a resurgence in septic embolic complications may occur in the coming years. Here, we describe the presentation and management of 2 cases of intravenous drug users presenting with infectious endocarditis and SMA main trunk and branch aneurysms, one of which was ruptured. In addition, we review the literature on these rare clinical entities. PMID:25017769

  11. Massive pulmonary embolism: the place for embolectomy

    PubMed Central

    Buckels, N J; Mulholland, C; Galvin, I; Gladstone, D; Cleland, J

    1988-01-01

    Untreated massive pulmonary embolism is associated with a high mortality. Pulmonary embolectomy has been largely superceded by thrombolytic therapy, but there are cases in which pulmonary embolectomy remains the treatment of choice. We present three case reports and discuss the merits of the various treatments available for massive pulmonary embolism. The primary treatment of massive pulmonary embolism should be thrombolytic therapy, but for patients who are at risk of haemorrhage following surgery, who are in cardiogenic shock despite medical treatment, or fail to improve following cardiac arrest, then pulmonary embolectomy remains the treatment of choice. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3 PMID:3232251

  12. Role of Embolization for Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jason A.; Lavine, Sean D.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are complex high-flow lesions that can result in devastating neurological injury when they hemorrhage. Embolization is a critical component in the management of many patients with cerebral AVMs. Embolization may be used as an independent curative therapy or more commonly in an adjuvant fashion prior to either micro- or radiosurgery. Although the treatment-related morbidity and mortality for AVMs—including that due to microsurgery, embolization, and radiosurgery—can be substantial, its natural history offers little solace. Fortunately, care by a multidisciplinary team experienced in the comprehensive management of AVMs can offer excellent results in most cases. PMID:25624978

  13. [Hydatid disease diagnosed following a pulmonary embolism].

    PubMed

    Menassa-Moussa, L; Braidy, C; Riachy, M; Tabet, G; Smayra, T; Haddad-Zebouni, S; Ghossain, M; Aoun, N

    2009-11-01

    Hydatidosis is a parasitic disease found worldwide, particularly in Mediterranean countries, caused by Echinococcus granulosis infection. Humans are an intermediate and accidental host in the cycle of this parasite. The hydatid pulmonary arterial embolism is extremely rare, usually arising in the heart or the liver. We report a case of hydatid pulmonary embolism explored with multidetector scanner and MRI, and confirmed at pathology of the operative specimen. To our knowledge, this is the first case of inaugural hydatid pulmonary arterial embolism found on CT scan establishing the diagnosis of the disease in a patient who had no other location of hydatid cyst. PMID:19615835

  14. Percutaneous Coronary Intervention for Coronary Thrombo-embolism during Balloon Mitral Valvuloplasty in a Pregnant Woman.

    PubMed

    Chikkabasavaiah, Nagamani; Rajendran, Ravindran; P, Beeresha; B, Ramesh

    2016-02-01

    Coronary embolism as a cause of acute myocardial infarction is considered rarer than it actually is because of the difficulties associated with its documentation. Equally rare is the event of a clot embolising to the coronary artery during balloon mitral valvuloplasty (BMV). We had a unique and a rare opportunity to encounter, recognise, document and successfully manage this rare complication during BMV in a pregnant woman. PMID:26602228

  15. Embolization of Large Gastric Varices Using Vena Cava Filter and Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Jason M.; Shah, Himanshu Stecker, Michael S.; Namyslowski, Jan

    2004-08-15

    A 40-year-old male with alcoholic cirrhosis and portal hypertension presented with acute variceal hemorrhage. Abdominal CT scan and endoscopy revealed large gastric varices. The patient underwent a TIPS procedure. Portal venography demonstrated persistent filling of the large gastric varices with associated high-flow spontaneous splenorenal shunt. Because of the large size of the varices, a Simon-Nitinol filter was used in conjunction with multiple embolization coils to enable successful occlusion of the varices.

  16. [Alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient in patients with clinical symptoms of pulmonary embolism].

    PubMed

    Mysiak, A; Salomon, P; Halawa, B

    1999-09-01

    The accurate detection of pulmonary embolism is possible by means of non-invasive but very expensive ventilation-perfusion lung scanning or invasive and with high rate of complications pulmonary angiography. Thus monitoring of many clinical and biochemical parameters has been recently attempted to increase the probability of correct diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. The alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient is a more sensitive indicator of disturbance in oxygenation than occurrence of hypoxia in gasometry. The aim of our study was to examined the changes of the alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient in patients with pulmonary embolism. The survey was made in 35 patients aged from 41 to 75 with acute pulmonary embolism, of these 17 were men and 18 were women. We excluded patients with coexisting serious heart or lung disease. Pulmonary embolism was diagnosed on the grounds of presence of commonly known risk factors, sudden onset, findings on the chest radiography, hypoxia resistant to oxygen therapy, electrocardiography, echocardiography and catheterization of pulmonary artery using a Swan-Ganz catheter. The alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient was measured in arterial blood samples obtained 15 minutes after 100% oxygen ventilation, using standard formulae. All patients were administered heparin, oxygen and warfarine therapy. The control group consisted of 20 patients, 11 women and 9 men aged from 37 to 74, with deep venous thrombosis without coexisting heart or lung disease. In our study we showed that the alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient is a very useful parameter helping with diagnosis and monitoring efficacy of treatment in patients with pulmonary embolism without coexisting heart or lung diseases. PMID:10598485

  17. Massive Pulmonary Embolism: Treatment with the Rotarex Thrombectomy System

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Sheng; Shi Haibin; Gu Jianping; Yang Zhengqiang; Chen Liang; Lou Wensheng; He Xu; Zhou Weizhong; Zhou Chungao; Zhao Linbo; Xia Jinguo; Li Linsun

    2011-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) for acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE). Fourteen patients (8 men, 6 women) with a mean age of 55.4 (range, 38-71) years with acute massive PE were initially diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) and confirmed by pulmonary angiography. All patients presented with acute PE symptoms and hemodynamic compromise. Each patient was treated with Straub Rotarex thrombectomy device and five patients received additional thrombolysis. Technique success and clinical improvement were achieved in all patients without major complications. The mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) decreased from 37.6 {+-} 6.6 to 29 {+-} 6.4 mmHg (P < 0.01) after PMT. Partial arterial pressures of O{sub 2} (PaO{sub 2}) increased from 61.1 {+-} 9.2 to 88 {+-} 5.1 mmHg (P < 0.01). The Miller index was 0.67 {+-} 0.11 and 0.37 {+-} 0.13 (P < 0.01), respectively, before and after PMT (P < 0.01). Eleven patients had no recurrence of PE on a mean follow-up of 28.3 months, whereas the other three patients were lost to follow-up. The preliminary experience in our series suggests that the Straub Rotarex thrombectomy device, which has been utilized in peripheral arteries, also is useful for the treatment of acute massive PE.

  18. The alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient in patients with documented pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Overton, D T; Bocka, J J

    1988-07-01

    It has been reported that the finding of a normal PaO2 level on arterial blood gas analysis does not exclude the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism. We wished to determine whether a more thorough evaluation of the blood gases would prove more helpful; specifically, whether it is possible for a patient with acute pulmonary embolism to have a normal alveolar-arterial (A-a) oxygen gradient. We studied this question in a patient population in which the diagnosis was definitively made via pulmonary arteriography. Sixty-four patients met all study criteria. In these patients, the A-a gradient ranged from 11.6 to 83.9 mm Hg (mean, 41.8 mm Hg). In three patients, the A-a gradient was normal for age. We conclude that a normal A-a oxygen gradient does not exclude the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism, and should not preclude further diagnostic procedures if there is a high index of suspicion. PMID:3132902

  19. Fat embolism syndromes following liposuction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Dong; Zheng, Jiang-Hong; Deng, Chen-Liang; Liu, Qin-Yang; Yang, Song-Lin

    2008-09-01

    Fat embolism syndrome (FES) after liposuction is likely a life-threatening disorder, though its incidence is low. The three chief clinical manifestations include respiratory insufficiency, cerebral involvement, and petechial rash. Although FES is a multisystem disorder, the most seriously affected organs are the lungs, brain, cardiavascular system, and skin. Many laboratory findings are characteristic but nonspecific. The pathogenesis of FES after liposuction has been looked at both mechanically and biochemically. Diagnosis is difficult; Gurd and Wilson's diagnostic criteria based on clinical examination is still extensively used in clinics at present. There is no specific therapy for FES after liposuction for the moment, so prevention, early diagnosis, and supportive therapies are important. In this article we discuss the clinical presentation, pathogensis, and current methods to prevent FES and, if possible, ways to treat this complication. PMID:18509699

  20. Coil Embolization for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of coil embolization compared with surgical clipping to treat intracranial aneurysms. The Technology Endovascular coil embolization is a percutaneous approach to treat an intracranial aneurysm from within the blood vessel without the need of a craniotomy. In this procedure, a microcatheter is inserted into the femoral artery near the groin and navigated to the site of the aneurysm. Small helical platinum coils are deployed through the microcatheter to fill the aneurysm, and prevent it from further expansion and rupture. Health Canada has approved numerous types of coils and coil delivery systems to treat intracranial aneurysms. The most favoured are controlled detachable coils. Coil embolization may be used with other adjunct endovascular devices such as stents and balloons. Background Intracranial Aneurysms Intracranial aneurysms are the dilation or ballooning of part of a blood vessel in the brain. Intracranial aneurysms range in size from small (<12 mm in diameter) to large (12–25 mm), and to giant (>25 mm). There are 3 main types of aneurysms. Fusiform aneurysms involve the entire circumference of the artery; saccular aneurysms have outpouchings; and dissecting aneurysms have tears in the arterial wall. Berry aneurysms are saccular aneurysms with well-defined necks. Intracranial aneurysms may occur in any blood vessel of the brain; however, they are most commonly found at the branch points of large arteries that form the circle of Willis at the base of the brain. In 85% to 95% of patients, they are found in the anterior circulation. Aneurysms in the posterior circulation are less frequent, and are more difficult to treat surgically due to inaccessibility. Most intracranial aneurysms are small and asymptomatic. Large aneurysms may have a mass effect, causing compression on the brain and cranial nerves and neurological deficits. When an intracranial aneurysm ruptures and bleeds

  1. Clinical update on pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Keleşoğlu, Arif; Ardıç, Sadık

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a major cause of cardiovascular mortality and financial burden that affects the community. The diagnosis of PE can be difficult because of the nonspecific symptoms, which include cough, dyspnea, hemoptysis and pleuritic chest pain. Hereditary and acquired risk factors are associated with PE. Incidence of PE is increasing, associated with the development in the diagnostic methods. Evidence-based algorithms can help clinicians diagnose PE. Serum D-dimer level, computed tomography pulmonary angiogram (CTPA), ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy or echocardiography help to establish clinical probability and the severity of PE. Anticoagulation is the standard treatment for PE. However, thrombolytic treatment is a significant alternative in high risk of PE as it provides rapid clot resolution. This article reviews the risk factors, diagnostic algorithms, and methods of treatment in PE in the light of current information. PMID:25097588

  2. Pulmonary imaging in fat embolism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, H M; Ducret, R P; Brindley, D C

    1986-07-01

    Ventilation/perfusion lung scanning can be used to effectively detect fat embolism following skeletal trauma. Typical ventilation/perfusion findings may be present when the chest radiograph is normal, and clinical findings are equivocal. PMID:3731656

  3. Double-balloon remodeling for coil embolization of a primitive trigeminal artery variant aneurysm. A case report.

    PubMed

    Takigawa, Tomoji; Suzuki, Kensuke; Sugiura, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Ryotaro; Takano, Issei; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Hyodo, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe the case of a patient with a wide-necked unruptured aneurysm arising at origin of a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) variant from the right internal carotid artery (ICA), supplying the territory of the right superior cerebellar artery and the anterior inferior cerebellar artery. To preserve the ICA and the PTA variant, coil embolization of the aneurysm was performed using a double-balloon remodeling technique (HyperForm™ and HyperGlide™ Occlusion Balloon Systems; ev3 Endovascular Inc., Irvine, CA, USA). The association of a PTA variant with an aneurysm is very rare. To our knowledge, this is the first description of the use of coil embolization using double-balloon remodeling to treat a PTA variant aneurysm. This technique permits complete embolization and reduces the risk of cerebral and cerebellar ischemia. PMID:24976091

  4. [Cholesterol crystal embolization following urinary diversion: a case report].

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Shohei; Iguchi, Ryo; Noguchi, Tetsuya; Sasaki, Miharu

    2015-03-01

    Cholesterol crystal embolization (CCE) is a cardiovascular disorder with poor prognosis, causing multiple organ failure. The primary pathological condition of the disease is embolization of cholesterol crystals in peripheral vessels. We report a case of CCE following urinary diversion. The patient is a 82-year-old male with history of hypertention, pneumonectasia, interstitial pneumonia, and heavy smoking. He was afflicted with advanced bladder cancer. He underwent urinary diversion, and had been scheduled for palliative radiotherapy. The next day, he developed thromboembolism of the left lower leg as acomplication of urinary diversion. Thrombectomy by endovascular catheter procedure was performed immediately, and anticoagulant therapy was started. The day after the thrombectomy, his lower legs showed livedo reticularis and toes showed cyanosis (blue toe). Since the laboratory data showed acute deterioration in renal function, hemodialysis was initiated. Three days after the thrombectomy he died of multiple organ failure. At autopsy, diffuse atherosclerosis of the aorta was observed, and cholesterol crystalemboli were found in the skin of the left foot ; and, the diagnosis of CCE was confirmed. This case suggests that tissue examinations for early diagnosis and stopping anticoagulant therapy are preferred when CCE is suspected. PMID:25918267

  5. Pathophysiology of spontaneous venous gas embolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambertsen, C. J.; Albertine, K. H.; Pisarello, J. B.; Flores, N. D.

    1991-01-01

    The use of controllable degrees and durations of continuous isobaric counterdiffusion venous gas embolism to investigate effects of venous gas embolism upon blood, cardiovascular, and respiratory gas exchange function, as well as pathological effects upon the lung and its microcirculation is discussed. Use of N2O/He counterdiffusion permitted performance of the pathophysiologic and pulmonary microstructural effects at one ATA without hyperbaric or hypobaric exposures.

  6. Mortality and Embolic Potential of Cardiac Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Ricardo Ribeiro; Fernandes, Fábio; Ramires, Félix José Alvarez; Mady, Charles; Albuquerque, Cícero Piva; Jatene, Fábio Biscegli

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac tumors are rare, mostly benign with high embolic potential. Objectives To correlate the histological type of cardiac masses with their embolic potential, implantation site and long term follow up in patients undergoing surgery. Methods Between January 1986 and December 2011, we retrospectively analyzed 185 consecutive patients who underwent excision of intracardiac mass (119 females, mean age 48±20 years). In 145 patients, the left atrium was the origin site. 72% were asymptomatic and prior embolization was often observed (19.8%). The diagnosis was established by echocardiography, magnetic resonance and histological examination. Results Most tumors were located in the left side of the heart. Myxoma was the most common (72.6%), followed by fibromas (6.9%), thrombi (6.4%) and sarcomas (6.4%). Ranging from 0.6cm to 15cm (mean 4.6 ± 2.5cm) 37 (19.8%) patients had prior embolization, stroke 10.2%, coronary 4.8%, peripheral 4.3% 5.4% of hospital death, with a predominance of malignant tumors (40% p < 0.0001). The histological type was a predictor of mortality (rhabdomyomas and sarcomas p = 0.002) and embolic event (sarcoma, lipoma and fibroelastoma p = 0.006), but not recurrence. Tumor size, atrial fibrillation, cavity and valve impairment were not associated with the embolic event. During follow-up (mean 80±63 months), there were 2 deaths (1.1%) and two recurrences 1 and 11 years after the operation, to the same cavity. Conclusion Most tumors were located in the left side of the heart. The histological type was predictor of death and preoperative embolic event, while the implantation site carries no relation with mortality or to embolic event. PMID:25029470

  7. Fat embolism syndrome following bone marrow harvesting.

    PubMed

    Baselga, J; Reich, L; Doherty, M; Gulati, S

    1991-06-01

    A case of fat embolism syndrome is reported following an uncomplicated bone marrow harvest. The presenting symptoms were restlessness, shortness of breath and arterial hypoxemia. A lung perfusion scan ruled out the presence of a lung thromboembolism. The patient received supportive therapy and recovered within a few hours. We speculate that the larger gauge needle (13 vs 15) used to aspirate the bone marrow may have represented increased trauma to the iliac crest leading to fat embolism. PMID:1873595

  8. Renal embolism as a primary manifestation of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis endocarditis in a patient with chronic aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Naoto; Kinami, Saori; Ohnishi, Hisashi; Takagi, Asuka; Kawamoto, Megumi; Doukuni, Ryota; Umezawa, Kanoko; Oozone, Sachiko; Yoshimura, Sho; Sakamoto, Susumu

    2015-06-01

    We report a case of renal embolism as an initial manifestation of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDSE) endocarditis in a patient with chronic aortic dissection. A 37-year-old man who underwent total aortic arch replacement owing to aortic dissection, presented with a 3-h history of fever, chills, and acute right-sided flank pain. The endocarditis affected the native aortic valve and was complicated by a renal embolism. Blood culture results were positive for SDSE. Intravenous penicillin resulted in satisfactory clinical and echocardiographic recovery. PMID:26110298

  9. CONTOURITES IN LAKE SUPERIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contour currents influence sedimentation in an area 15 km wide and 65 km long at the base of the slope off the Keweenaw Peninsula in Lake Superior, northwestern Michigan. Seismic-reflection profiles (3.5 kHz) from this area show distinct wavy reflectors in a scoured trough at a d...

  10. Massive Pulmonary Embolism: Percutaneous Emergency Treatment Using an Aspirex Thrombectomy Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, Peter; Bunc, Matjaz

    2010-10-15

    Massive pulmonary embolism (PE) is a life-threatening condition with a high early mortality rate caused by acute right ventricular failure and cardiogenic shock. A 51-year-old woman with a massive PE and contraindication for thrombolytic therapy was treated with percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy using an Aspirex 11F catheter (Straub Medical AG, Wangs, Switzerland). The procedure was successfully performed and showed a good immediate angiographic result. The patient made a full recovery from the acute episode and was discharged on heparin treatment. Our case report indicates that in patients with contraindications to systemic thrombolysis, catheter thrombectomy may constitute a life-saving intervention for massive PE.

  11. Saddle pulmonary embolism: right ventricular strain an indicator for early surgical approach

    PubMed Central

    Namana, Vinod; Siddiqui, Sabah; Balasubramanian, Ram; Sarasam, Rajeswer; Shetty, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Current mainstay treatment for pulmonary embolism (PE) includes oral anticoagulation, thrombolytic therapy, catheter embolectomy and acute surgical embolectomy. Surgical embolectomy is reserved for hemodynamically unstable patients (cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest) and contraindication to thrombolytic therapy. We report a case of saddle PE in a young female with echocardiographic signs of right ventricular (RV) dysfunction who underwent early acute surgical embolectomy with a positive outcome. It would be beneficial to use bedside echocardiography even in hemodynamically stable patients to determine RV strain as this could act as an early indicator suggesting the escalation of therapy. PMID:27274856

  12. Amniotic fluid embolism: a leading cause of maternal death yet still a medical conundrum.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, N J; Percival, V; Paech, M J

    2013-11-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism is a rare and potentially catastrophic condition that is unique to pregnancy. The presentation may range from relatively subtle clinical events to sudden maternal cardiac arrest. Despite an increased awareness of the condition, it remains a leading cause of maternal mortality. The underlying mechanisms of amniotic fluid embolism are poorly understood, but current theories support an immune-based mechanism which is triggered by potentially small amounts of amniotic fluid gaining access to the maternal circulation. This can result in a wide spectrum of clinical findings, with cardiovascular and haematological disturbances being prominent. The management of a suspected episode of amniotic fluid embolism is generally considered to be supportive, although in centres with specific expertise, echocardiography may assist in guiding management. Whilst outcomes after an episode of amniotic fluid embolism are still concerning, mortality would appear to have decreased in recent times, likely secondary to an improved awareness of the condition, advances in acute care and the inclusion of less severe episodes in case registries. PMID:24035408

  13. [Preparation and in vitro embolic efficiency evaluation of hydroxycamptothecine-loaded liquid embolic agent].

    PubMed

    Qin, Ling-Zhen; Zhang, Xuan; Wu, Lin-Na; Zhang, Jin; Pan, Xin; Li, Ge; Wu, Chuan-Bin

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the preparation of hydroxycamptothecine (HCPT)-loaded cubic crystal liquid embolic precursor solution, and evaluate its in vitro embolic efficiency. Phytantriol was used as cubic crystal liquid embolic material, and the optimal formulation was selected according to ternary phase diagram. Polarized light microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) were used to characterize the cubic crystal structure. High performance liquid chromatography and X-ray diffraction analysis were used to investigate the lactone ring of HCPT. In vitro dissolution was preliminary evaluated, and the simulation embolic model was constructed to evaluate the embolic efficiency of precursor solution. Meanwhile, the gelation time and adhesion force were investigated. The results showed that HCPT-loaded precursor solution for embolization had been successfully prepared with low viscosity which was injectable. The precursor solution could transform into Pn3m structure liquid crystal phase gel rapidly when contracting with excess water. The formed HPCT gel remained its lactone form as the same in precursor solution, and expressed the good ability to block the saline flow, and HCPT could keep sustained releasing drug over 30 days. The prepared drug-loaded embolic precursor solution showed a promising potential for vascular embolization and application in clinical treatment of tumor. PMID:25233642

  14. Vesical Artery Embolization in Haemorrhagic Cystitis in Children.

    PubMed

    García-Gámez, Andrés; Bermúdez Bencerrey, Patricia; Brio-Sanagustin, Sonia; Guerrero Vara, Rubén; Sisinni, Luisa; Stuart, Sam; Roebuck, Derek; Gómez Muñoz, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Haemorrhagic cystitis is an uncommon and, in its severe form, potentially life-threatening complication of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation or cancer therapy in children. The severe form involves macroscopic haematuria with blood clots, urinary obstruction and/or renal impairment. There are many therapeutic options to treat acute haemorrhage, but only recombinant factor VII has a high level of clinical evidence in children. Supraselective vesical artery embolization (SVAE) is an increasingly used therapeutic procedure for controlling haemorrhage in adults, but is less commonly used in children. This might be due to several factors, such as the invasive nature of the procedure, lack of appropriate medical experience and possible long-term side effects. We present three cases of children successfully treated by means of effective SVAE. PMID:26850734

  15. [Last updates about amniotic fluid embolism and a case report].

    PubMed

    Rosain, Jérémie; Le Saché, Frédéric; Birenbaum, Aurélie; Boisson-Gaudin, Catherine; Bernard, Maguy

    2013-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a rare complication of pregnancy, which, in France, is the second leading cause of maternal mortality. It results from the passage of amniotic fluid into the maternal circulation, but mechanisms leading to clinical signs are not yet clearly identified. After a literature review, we report on the case of a 34 years old patient occurred during labor. Laboratory tests were performed during acute phase to diagnose coagulopathy and to monitor vital parameters. Further laboratory tests were conducted to support the diagnosis: cytology, study of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1, tryptase and alpha-foetoprotein. Performances and place of these laboratory tests must be precised as no specific test can attest the diagnosis. PMID:24342783

  16. Novel Hydrogel Material as a Potential Embolic Agent in Embolization Treatments.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng; Chen, Liming; An, Qingzhu; Chen, Liang; Wen, Ying; Fang, Fang; Zhu, Wei; Yi, Tao

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel graphene-oxide (GO) enhanced polymer hydrogel (GPH) as a promising embolic agent capable of treating cerebrovascular diseases and malignant tumors, using the trans-catheter arterial embolization (TAE) technique. Simply composed of GO and generation five poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (PAMAM-5), our rheology experiments reveal that GPH exhibits satisfactory mechanical strength, which resist the high pressures of blood flow. Subcutaneous experiments on Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats demonstrate the qualified biocompatibility of GPH. Finally, our in vivo experiments on New Zealand rabbits, which mix GPH with the X-ray absorbing contrast agent, Iohexol, reveal complete embolization of the artery. We also note that GPH shortens embolization time and exhibits low toxicity in follow-up experiments. Altogether, our study demonstrates that GPH has many advantages over the currently used embolic agents and has potential applications in clinical practice. PMID:27561915

  17. Novel Hydrogel Material as a Potential Embolic Agent in Embolization Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feng; Chen, Liming; An, Qingzhu; Chen, Liang; Wen, Ying; Fang, Fang; Zhu, Wei; Yi, Tao

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel graphene-oxide (GO) enhanced polymer hydrogel (GPH) as a promising embolic agent capable of treating cerebrovascular diseases and malignant tumors, using the trans-catheter arterial embolization (TAE) technique. Simply composed of GO and generation five poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (PAMAM-5), our rheology experiments reveal that GPH exhibits satisfactory mechanical strength, which resist the high pressures of blood flow. Subcutaneous experiments on Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats demonstrate the qualified biocompatibility of GPH. Finally, our in vivo experiments on New Zealand rabbits, which mix GPH with the X-ray absorbing contrast agent, Iohexol, reveal complete embolization of the artery. We also note that GPH shortens embolization time and exhibits low toxicity in follow-up experiments. Altogether, our study demonstrates that GPH has many advantages over the currently used embolic agents and has potential applications in clinical practice. PMID:27561915

  18. Sporadic Multicentric Right Atrial and Right Ventricular Myxoma Presenting as Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyajit; Tripathy, Mahendra Prasad; Mohanty, Bipin Bihari; Biswas, Sutapa

    2016-01-01

    Multicentric cardiac myxoma is a rare syndrome; usually it is familial. We report a rare case of sporadic right atrium (RA) and right ventricle (RV) myxoma in a 26-year-old female presenting to our hospital for the evaluation of sudden onset of dyspnea and left precordial pain attributed to the embolization of degenerating tumor fragments to the pulmonary artery (PA). The exact incidence of sporadic multicentric RA and RV myxoma presenting as acute pulmonary embolism is unknown as multicentric RA and RV myxoma are very rare. Myxomas presenting as pulmonary embolism is <10%. Majority of cardiac myxomas present as exertional dyspnea, chest pain, positional syncope, fever, weight loss and other constitutional symptoms. Any young patient presenting with acute onset dyspnea with multiple cardiac masses may have tumor embolization to the PA diagnosis with transthoracic echocardiography and high-resolution computed tomography of thorax, fast-tracks patient transfer for urgent cardiac surgery to prevent further embolization. PMID:27293525

  19. Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization of a Mycotic Renal Artery Aneurysm by Use of a Self-Expanding Neurointerventional Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Rabellino, Martin; Garcia-Nielsen, Luis; Zander, Tobias Baldi, Sebastian; Llorens, Rafael; Maynar, Manuel

    2011-02-15

    Mycotic aneurysms are uncommon, especially those located in visceral arteries. We present a case of a patient with two visceral mycotic aneurysms due to bacterial endocarditis, one located in right upper pole renal artery and the second in the splenic artery. Both aneurysms were treated as endovascular embolization using microcoils. In the aneurysm located at the renal artery, the technique of stent-assisted coils embolization was preferred to avoid coils migration due to its wide neck. The stent used was the Solitaire AB, which was designed for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms and was used recently in acute stroke as a mechanical thrombectomy device. Complete embolization of the aneurysm was achieved, preserving all the arterial branches without nephrogram defects in the final angiogram.

  20. Prosthetic Aortic Valve Endocarditis with Left Main Coronary Artery Embolism: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Inayat, Faisal; Farooq, Salman; Ghani, Ali Raza; Mirrani, Ghazi A.; Athar, Muhammed Waqas

    2016-01-01

    Context: Coronary embolization is potentially a fatal sequela of endocarditis. Although the primary cause of acute coronary syndrome is atherosclerotic disease, it is imperative to consider septic embolism as an etiological factor. Case Report: Herein, we report a case of ventricular fibrillation and ST-segment depression myocardial infarction occurring in a patient who initially presented with fever and increased urinary frequency. Coronary angiography revealed new 99% occlusion of the left main coronary artery (LMCA). Transesophageal echocardiography showed bioprosthetic aortic valve with an abscess and vegetation. Histologic examination of the embolectomy specimen confirmed the presence of thrombus and Enterococcus faecalis bacteria. Subsequently, the patient was discharged to the skilled nursing facility in a stable condition where he completed 6 weeks of intravenous ampicillin. Conclusion: We present a rare case of LMCA embolism due to prosthetic valve endocarditis. The present report also highlights the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges associated with such patients. PMID:27500132

  1. Transcatheter Coil Embolization of an Aneurysm of the Pancreatico-duodenal Artery with Occluded Celiac Trunk

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.H. Pfeifer, K.J.; Tato, F.; Reiser, M.; Rieger, J.

    2005-04-15

    We report on a case of a wide-necked aneurysm of the pancreatico-duodenal artery with occlusion of the celiac trunk in an asymptomatic patient. The aneurysm was considered to be at high risk of rupture. Successful embolization after interdisciplinary consultation was followed with color-coded duplex ultrasound (CCDS) demonstrating significant flow reduction. Three weeks later CCDS and angiography demonstrated exclusion of the aneurysm and a patent arterial supply of the liver and spleen fed by superior mesenteric artery (SMA) collaterals. The patient has done well so far, without major adverse clinical events or evidence for tissue necrosis of the liver, pancreas or spleen. Discussion of the case and review of the literature indicate that transcatheter embolization is the therapy of choice even in complicated cases.

  2. Endovascular Therapy as a Primary Revascularization Modality in Acute Mesenteric Ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kärkkäinen, Jussi M.; Lehtimäki, Tiina T. Saari, Petri; Hartikainen, Juha; Rantanen, Tuomo Paajanen, Hannu; Manninen, Hannu

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo evaluate endovascular therapy (EVT) as the primary revascularization method for acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI).MethodsA retrospective review was performed on all consecutive patients treated for AMI during a 5-year period (January 2009 to December 2013). EVT was attempted in all patients referred for emergent revascularization. Surgical revascularization was performed selectively after failure of EVT. Patient characteristics, clinical presentation, and outcomes were studied. Failures and complications of EVT were recorded.ResultsFifty patients, aged 79 ± 9 years (mean ± SD), out of 66 consecutive patients with AMI secondary to embolic or thrombotic obstruction of the superior mesenteric artery were referred for revascularization. The etiology of AMI was embolism in 18 (36 %) and thrombosis in 32 (64 %) patients. EVT was technically successful in 44 (88 %) patients. Mortality after successful or failed EVT was 32 %. The rates of emergency laparotomy, bowel resection, and EVT-related complication were 40, 34, and 10 %, respectively. Three out of six patients with failure of EVT were treated with surgical bypass. EVT failure did not significantly affect survival.ConclusionsEVT is feasible in most cases of AMI, with favorable patient outcome and acceptable complication rate.

  3. Lake Superior, Duluth, MN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This view shows the west end of Lake Superior and Duluth, MN (47.0N, 91.0W). Portions of Minnesota, Michigan and Ontario, Canada are in the scene. The Duluth metropolitan area is at the west end of the lake. The discoloration plume in the water at Duluth is the result of tailings from the iron ore smelters that process the iron ore from the nearby open pit mines seen near the upper left corner of the photo.

  4. Nontraumatic Fat Embolism Found Following Maternal Death after Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Schrufer-Poland, Tabitha; Singh, Paul; Jodicke, Cristiano; Reynolds, Sara; Maulik, Dev

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Fat embolism is a rare form of nonthrombotic embolization. Limited literature exists regarding the diagnosis of fat embolism during the perinatal period. We present the first case of maternal death that resulted from nontraumatic fat embolization following Cesarean delivery. Case Description A 29-year-old gravida 1 with a complex medical and surgical history underwent a primary Cesarean delivery at term. On postoperative day 2 the patient was found to be unresponsive. Despite resuscitative efforts, the patient succumbed. Autopsy findings were remarkable for diffuse pulmonary fat emboli. Furthermore, there was no histological evidence of either amniotic fluid embolism or thromboembolism. The primary cause of death was attributed to nontraumatic fat embolization. Discussion Multiple risk factors may have contributed to the development of nontraumatic fat embolization in our patient. Obstetricians should maintain a high level of suspicion for nontraumatic fat embolization in cases of maternal respiratory decompression and sudden maternal mortality. PMID:26199788

  5. Nontraumatic Fat Embolism Found Following Maternal Death after Cesarean Delivery.

    PubMed

    Schrufer-Poland, Tabitha; Singh, Paul; Jodicke, Cristiano; Reynolds, Sara; Maulik, Dev

    2015-04-01

    Introduction Fat embolism is a rare form of nonthrombotic embolization. Limited literature exists regarding the diagnosis of fat embolism during the perinatal period. We present the first case of maternal death that resulted from nontraumatic fat embolization following Cesarean delivery. Case Description A 29-year-old gravida 1 with a complex medical and surgical history underwent a primary Cesarean delivery at term. On postoperative day 2 the patient was found to be unresponsive. Despite resuscitative efforts, the patient succumbed. Autopsy findings were remarkable for diffuse pulmonary fat emboli. Furthermore, there was no histological evidence of either amniotic fluid embolism or thromboembolism. The primary cause of death was attributed to nontraumatic fat embolization. Discussion Multiple risk factors may have contributed to the development of nontraumatic fat embolization in our patient. Obstetricians should maintain a high level of suspicion for nontraumatic fat embolization in cases of maternal respiratory decompression and sudden maternal mortality. PMID:26199788

  6. Pulmonary Artery Perforation Repair During Thrombectomy Using Microcoil Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, Hiroyuki Murata, Satoru; Kumazaki, Tatsuo; Abe, Yutaka; Takano, Teruo

    2006-02-15

    A distal pulmonary artery perforation was successfully occluded by percutaneous microcoil embolization via a microcatheter. Microcoil embolization is a reasonable alternative therapeutic approach for this rare complication of pulmonary interventional procedures.

  7. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in bedside echocardiography-diagnosed massive pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Won Joon; Lee, Jun Wan; Yoo, Youn Ho; Ryu, Seung; Cho, Sung Wook; Song, Kyoung Hyuk; Park, Sang Il

    2015-10-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is one of the major causes of inhospital cardiac arrest as well as out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Bedside diagnosis of acute PE in the emergency department (ED) can be challenging, especially in a cardiac arrest setting. Even if the early diagnosis of an acute massive PE had been made, hemodynamic instability may be worsened unless obstructive shock gets resolved. We present a case of a 46-year-old woman who developed pulseless electrical activity (PEA) after complaining of weakness and dyspnea in an ambulance, presumptively diagnosed as acute PE by bedside focused echocardiography. She received thrombolytic therapy and was rescued by extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation for recurrent PEA arrest in the ED. Focused bedside echocardiography provides a rapid diagnostic adjunct, and extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation can be a valuable rescue therapy for PEA arrest from massive PE. PMID:26275631

  8. Superior Gluteal Artery Injury during Percutaneous Iliosacral Screw Fixation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Suk; Chung, Phil Hyun; Kim, Young Sung; Lee, Ho Min; Eum, Gyeong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous iliosacral screw fixation is commonly practiced to treat unstable posterior pelvic ring injuries. The number of reported cases of iatrogenic complications is increasing. We present a case of superior gluteal artery injury during bilateral percutaneous iliosacral screw fixation in a patient with sacral fracture of spino-pelvic dissociation. This complication was managed by arterial embolization. We discussed the cause, prevention and treatment of arterial injury along with a review of literature.

  9. Complications and Their Management During NBCA Embolization of Craniospinal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Y.; Berenstein, A.; Setton, A.

    2003-01-01

    Summary Technical complications during embolization of craniospinal lesions using NBCA may be classified as nonspecific catheterization-related or specific embolization-related. Catheterization-related complications include vessel injuries such as spasm, dissection or perforation, catheter injuries and thrombus formation. Embolization-related complications include occlusion of normal territories, migration of the embolic material to the venous side, and catheter gluing to the vessel wall. Causes, prevention and management of each complication are discussed with presentation of demonstrative cases. PMID:20591246

  10. Life-saving systemic thrombolysis in a patient with massive pulmonary embolism and a recent hemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident.

    PubMed

    Bottinor, Wendy; Turlington, Jeremy; Raza, Syed; Roberts, Charlotte S; Malhotra, Rajiv; Jovin, Ion S; Abbate, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism is associated with mortality rates exceeding 50%. Current practice guidelines include the immediate administration of thrombolytic therapy in the absence of contraindications. However, thrombolysis for pulmonary embolism is said to be absolutely contraindicated in the presence of recent hemorrhagic stroke and other conditions. The current contraindications to thrombolytic therapy have been extrapolated from data on acute coronary syndrome and are not specific for venous thromboembolic disease. Some investigators have proposed that the current contraindications be viewed as relative, rather than absolute, in cases of high-risk pulmonary embolism. We present the case of a 60-year-old woman in whom massive pulmonary embolism led to cardiac arrest with pulseless electrical activity. Eight weeks earlier, she had sustained a hemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident-a classic absolute contraindication to thrombolytic therapy. Despite this practice guideline, we administered tissue plasminogen activator systemically in order to save the patient's life. This therapy did not evoke intracranial bleeding, and the patient was eventually discharged from the hospital. Until guidelines specific to venous thromboembolic disease are developed, we think that the current contraindications to thrombolysis should be considered on an individual basis in patients who are at high risk of death from massive pulmonary embolism. PMID:24808778

  11. Life-Saving Systemic Thrombolysis in a Patient with Massive Pulmonary Embolism and a Recent Hemorrhagic Cerebrovascular Accident

    PubMed Central

    Bottinor, Wendy; Turlington, Jeremy; Raza, Syed; Roberts, Charlotte S.; Malhotra, Rajiv; Jovin, Ion S.; Abbate, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism is associated with mortality rates exceeding 50%. Current practice guidelines include the immediate administration of thrombolytic therapy in the absence of contraindications. However, thrombolysis for pulmonary embolism is said to be absolutely contraindicated in the presence of recent hemorrhagic stroke and other conditions. The current contraindications to thrombolytic therapy have been extrapolated from data on acute coronary syndrome and are not specific for venous thromboembolic disease. Some investigators have proposed that the current contraindications be viewed as relative, rather than absolute, in cases of high-risk pulmonary embolism. We present the case of a 60-year-old woman in whom massive pulmonary embolism led to cardiac arrest with pulseless electrical activity. Eight weeks earlier, she had sustained a hemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident—a classic absolute contraindication to thrombolytic therapy. Despite this practice guideline, we administered tissue plasminogen activator systemically in order to save the patient's life. This therapy did not evoke intracranial bleeding, and the patient was eventually discharged from the hospital. Until guidelines specific to venous thromboembolic disease are developed, we think that the current contraindications to thrombolysis should be considered on an individual basis in patients who are at high risk of death from massive pulmonary embolism. PMID:24808778

  12. The use of corticosteroid for the prophylaxis of fat embolism syndrome in patients with long bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Silva, Douglas Fini; Carmona, César Vanderlei; Calderan, Thiago Rodrigues Araújo; Fraga, Gustavo Pereira; Nascimento, Bartolomeu; Rizoli, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    The "Evidence-based Telemedicine - Trauma & Acute Care Surgery" (EBT-TACS) Journal Club conducted a critical review of the literature and selected three recent studies on the use of corticosteroids for the prophylaxis of fat embolism syndrome. The review focused on the potential role of corticosteroids administration to patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) at risk of developing post-traumatic fat embolism. The first study was prospective and aimed at identifying reliable predictors, which occurred early and were associated with the onset of fat embolism syndrome in trauma patients. The second manuscript was a literature review of the role of corticosteroids as a prophylactic measure for fat embolism syndrome (FES). The last manuscript was a meta-analysis on the potential for corticosteroids to prophylactically reduce the risk of fat embolism syndrome in patients with long bone fractures. The main conclusions and recommendations reached were that traumatized patients should be monitored with non-invasive pulse oximetry and lactate levels since these factors may predict the development of FES, and that there is not enough evidence to recommend the use of steroids for the prophylaxis of this syndrome. PMID:24573593

  13. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in a patient with amniotic fluid embolism associated with severe cardiopulmonary complications.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Yumiko; Watanabe, Masafumi; Terashima, Masahiro; Amiya, Eisuke; Nakao, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Akiko; Hyodo, Hironobu; Ando, Jiro; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Nagai, Ryozo; Komuro, Issei

    2013-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a rare but devastating complication of pregnancy. Acute circulatory failure and obstetric disseminated intravascular coagulopathy are often associated with AFE and lead to poor prognosis of this syndrome. Although many reports of AFE and its cardiopulmonary complications exist, their etiology remains unknown. Classically, it was believed that the fatal cardiopulmonary complication in AFE is due to acute and severe pulmonary hypertension caused by critical obstruction of the pulmonary vessels by embolized amniotic fluid. However, recent hypotheses are suggesting that anaphylactic reaction or a cytokine effect induced by amniotic fluid is the main pathophysiological mechanism. We report a case in which cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was performed at the chronic stage of AFE. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was detected at the mid-wall of the left ventricle with no evidence of pulmonary hypertension. This finding suggests that the pathophysiological mechanism of severe cardiac complications in AFE may include direct left ventricular myocardial injury through an immune reaction or cytokine release, rather than pulmonary embolism. PMID:23676374

  14. Distal Embolic Protection for Renal Arterial Interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Dubel, Gregory J. Murphy, Timothy P.

    2008-01-15

    Distal or embolic protection has intuitive appeal for its potential to prevent embolization of materials generated during interventional procedures. Distal protection devices (DPDs) have been most widely used in the coronary and carotid vascular beds, where they have demonstrated the ability to trap embolic materials and, in some cases, to reduce complications. Given the frequency of chronic kidney disease in patients with renal artery stenosis undergoing stent placement, it is reasonable to propose that these devices may play an important role in limiting distal embolization in the renal vasculature. Careful review of the literature reveals that atheroembolization does occur during renal arterial interventions, although it often goes undetected. Early experience with DPDs in the renal arteries in patients with suitable anatomy suggests retrieval of embolic materials in approximately 71% of cases and renal functional improvement/stabilization in 98% of cases. The combination of platelet inhibition and a DPD may provide even greater benefit. Given the critical importance of renal functional preservation, it follows that everything that can be done to prevent atheroembolism should be undertaken including the use of DPDs when anatomically feasible. The data available at this time support a beneficial role for these devices.

  15. [Thirty-eight cases of dysplasia of the superior mesenteric artery].

    PubMed

    Cormier, F; Cormier, J-M

    2005-07-01

    along the arterial trunk, which only required surveillance. There was only one aneurysm which required treatment by resection and venous graft. In these young patients, revascularization was generally achieved with autologous material and the prognosis was favorable. Embolization was successful in treating the sacciform aneurysm in one patient. In conclusion, dysplasia of the superior mesenteric artery has a specific presentation which must be recognized to enable diagnosis of this not uncommon condition in young subjects (even children) who often present with an acute abdomen requiring urgent treatment. PMID:16142179

  16. 21 CFR 868.2025 - Ultrasonic air embolism monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultrasonic air embolism monitor. 868.2025 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2025 Ultrasonic air embolism monitor. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic air embolism monitor is a device used to detect air bubbles...

  17. 21 CFR 868.2025 - Ultrasonic air embolism monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasonic air embolism monitor. 868.2025 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2025 Ultrasonic air embolism monitor. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic air embolism monitor is a device used to detect air bubbles...

  18. 21 CFR 868.2025 - Ultrasonic air embolism monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultrasonic air embolism monitor. 868.2025 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2025 Ultrasonic air embolism monitor. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic air embolism monitor is a device used to detect air bubbles...

  19. Uterine artery embolization for the treatment of adenomyosis.

    PubMed

    Englander, Meridith J

    2008-12-01

    Adenomyosis is a benign uterine disorder that causes menorrhagia and dysmenorrhea. Although it was once considered a contraindication to uterine artery embolization, several authors have examined whether adenomyosis can be treated with uterine artery embolization. This article reviews the pathophysiology of adenomyosis, its imaging characteristics, as well as recent studies evaluating the efficacy of uterine artery embolization for treatment of adenomyosis. PMID:21326580

  20. 21 CFR 870.3300 - Vascular embolization device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3300 Vascular embolization device. (a) Identification. A vascular embolization device is an intravascular implant intended to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vascular embolization device. 870.3300 Section...

  1. 21 CFR 870.3300 - Vascular embolization device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3300 Vascular embolization device. (a) Identification. A vascular embolization device is an intravascular implant intended to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vascular embolization device. 870.3300 Section...

  2. 21 CFR 868.2025 - Ultrasonic air embolism monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic air embolism monitor. 868.2025 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2025 Ultrasonic air embolism monitor. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic air embolism monitor is a device used to detect air bubbles...

  3. 21 CFR 870.3300 - Vascular embolization device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3300 Vascular embolization device. (a) Identification. A vascular embolization device is an intravascular implant intended to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vascular embolization device. 870.3300 Section...

  4. Effectiveness and pitfall of embolization of cerebral arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Miyachi, S; Negoro, M; Okamoto, T; Suzuki, O; Yoshida, J

    1999-11-01

    We studied the course ofperisurgical complications of 66 AVMs and discussed the approapriate precautions. Of 66 patients with AVMs, 14 underwent postembolization surgical removal, and 43 underwent radiosurgery. Four patients were cured with total occlusion of their AVM by embolization alone. 48 patients achieved a more than 70% occlusion of the nidus. We observed 12 complications including 3 permanent and 9 temporary. Four complications occurred immediately after the embolization due to overembolization or thromboembolism, and 7 were observed several hours later which might have been caused by retrograde thrombosis or a chemical reaction to the glue. While presurgical embolization deepseated feeders must be embolized along with fistulous or high-flow feeders, 4 cases of 2nd embolization following radiosurgery showed that meningeal feeders developed or recanalized in cases embolized with absorbable particles. Thus, preradiosurgically, fistulous and meningeal feeders should be treated, and the nidus must be packed with embolic materials with no risk of recanalization. Successful nidus packing performed in 10 AVMs yielded a further nidus reduction before radiosurgery. The intranidal aneurysms which pose a high risk of rebleeding were also embolized. In order to avoid complications in the embolization of AVM, the angioarchitecture, hemodynamics and the relationship to brain function should be well recognized by preoperative functional imaging and superselective angiograms, and adequate embolic materials should be properly injected. As an embolization strategy, the priority of the target feeders should depend on the treatment to follow, and aggressive embolization of risky feeders or causing abrupt hemodynamic change should be avoided. PMID:20670557

  5. Permanent Cortical Blindness After Bronchial Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Doorn, Colette S. van De Boo, Diederick W.; Weersink, Els J. M.; Delden, Otto M. van Reekers, Jim A. Lienden, Krijn P. van

    2013-12-15

    A 35-year-old female with a known medical history of cystic fibrosis was admitted to our institution for massive hemoptysis. CTA depicted a hypertrophied bronchial artery to the right upper lobe and showed signs of recent bleeding at that location. Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) was performed with gelfoam slurry, because pronounced shunting to the pulmonary artery was present. Immediately after BAE, the patient developed bilateral cortical blindness. Control angiography showed an initially not opacified anastomosis between the embolized bronchial artery and the right subclavian artery, near to the origin of the right vertebral artery. Cessation of outflow in the bronchial circulation reversed the flow through the anastomosis and allowed for spill of embolization material into the posterior circulation. Unfortunately the cortical blindness presented was permanent.

  6. [Cerebral fat embolism after closed leg injury].

    PubMed

    Wiel, E; Fleyfel, M; Onimus, J; Godefroy, O; Leclerc, X; Adnet, P

    1997-01-01

    A 21-year-old man sustained a closed fracture of the leg from an industrial accident, without associated head trauma. The orthopaedic treatment consisted of immediate immobilization by setting leg in plaster. Two hours after admission, the Glasgow coma scale score was 10. Four hours after admission he developed a coma (Glasgow coma scale score = 7) with repetitive seizures. No lesion was visible on cerebral CT scan. Chest X-ray was unremarkable. Petechiae on the anterior chest wall and abdomen with bilateral mydriasis occurred. Thrombocytopenia with prothrombine time increase were observed. Magnetic resonance imaging, 27 hours after admission, showed high-intensity areas on T2 weighted views due to fat embolism. Retinal haemorrhages were observed. The bronchoalveolar lavage showing fat staining of tracheal aspirates confirmed the diagnosis of fat embolism. This case report emphasizes the possibility of predominant neurologic manifestations of a fat embolism and the diagnostic help of cerebral magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:9750647

  7. Management of massive and nonmassive pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Sekhri, Vishal; Mehta, Nimeshkumar; Rawat, Naveen; Lehrman, Stuart G.

    2012-01-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism (PE) is characterized by systemic hypotension (defined as a systolic arterial pressure < 90 mm Hg or a drop in systolic arterial pressure of at least 40 mm Hg for at least 15 min which is not caused by new onset arrhythmias) or shock (manifested by evidence of tissue hypoperfusion and hypoxia, including an altered level of consciousness, oliguria, or cool, clammy extremities). Massive pulmonary embolism has a high mortality rate despite advances in diagnosis and therapy. A subgroup of patients with nonmassive PE who are hemodynamically stable but with right ventricular (RV) dysfunction or hypokinesis confirmed by echocardiography is classified as submassive PE. Their prognosis is different from that of others with non-massive PE and normal RV function. This article attempts to review the evidence-based risk stratification, diagnosis, initial stabilization, and management of massive and nonmassive pulmonary embolism. PMID:23319967

  8. Fat Embolism Syndrome: An Autopsy-Proven Case Involving a Patient on Dialysis and Systemic Scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Nahoko; Banno, Shogo; Kimura, Yukihiro; Maeda, Sayaka; Kobayashi, Mizuki; Kawai, Kumi; Suga, Norihiro; Suzuki, Keisuke; Miura, Naoto; Yokoi, Toyoharu; Imai, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis developed acute respiratory distress 12 hours after a fall. Blood gas analysis revealed hypoxia (PaO2 67.7 torr) and metabolic acidosis with an increased anion gap, consistent with lactic acidosis (lactate, 86.5 mg/dL; normal range, 4.0–16.0). Magnetic resonance imaging showed a lumbar vertebral body fracture. On the fourth hospital day, the patient died of multiorgan failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Postmortem studies revealed fat emboli in the systemic circulation, ie, fat embolism syndrome. Diagnosing fat embolism syndrome can be difficult in patients on dialysis or in those with collagen vascular or pulmonary diseases. PMID:24526839

  9. Pathogenesis and management of peripartum coagulopathic calamities (disseminated intravascular coagulation and amniotic fluid embolism).

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Acute coagulopathic peripartum calamities are relatively rare but contribute importantly to maternal morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Abruptio placenta, amniotic fluid embolism, and retained fetal or placental material may lead to fulminant intravascular activation of coagulation which results in thromboembolic complications and consumption coagulopathy causing severe hemorrhage. The central underlying pathophysiological pathway in the coagulopathy associated with these syndromes is the occurrence of tissue factor, released from the placenta and amniotic fluid, in the circulation, in combination with low levels of physiological anticoagulant factors during pregnancy. The diagnosis of DIC may be made trough conventional composite scoring systems employing routine coagulation tests, whereas for the diagnosis of amniotic fluid embolism measurement of insulin like growth factor binding protein-1 seems promising. Therapy is aimed at removing the precipitating factor combined with supportive adjunctive treatment options. PMID:23452737

  10. Bright superior mirages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehn, Waldemar H.

    2003-01-01

    Superior mirages of unusual brightness are occasionally observed. Two such cases, photographed over the frozen surface of Lake Winnipeg, Canada, are documented. Visually, these mirages appear as featureless bright barriers far out on the lake. They are just images of the lake ice, yet the luminance in one case was 2.5 times (in the other, 1.7 times) the luminance of the ice surface in front of the mirage. The mirage itself can be modeled by means of a conduction inversion, but a proper explanation of the brightness is not yet available.

  11. Mechanisms underlying gas exchange alterations in an experimental model of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, J H T; Terzi, R G G; Paschoal, I A; Silva, W A; Moraes, A C; Moreira, M M

    2006-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the ventilation/perfusion ratio that contributes to hypoxemia in pulmonary embolism by analyzing blood gases and volumetric capnography in a model of experimental acute pulmonary embolism. Pulmonary embolization with autologous blood clots was induced in seven pigs weighing 24.00 +/- 0.6 kg, anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Significant changes occurred from baseline to 20 min after embolization, such as reduction in oxygen partial pressures in arterial blood (from 87.71 +/- 8.64 to 39.14 +/- 6.77 mmHg) and alveolar air (from 92.97 +/- 2.14 to 63.91 +/- 8.27 mmHg). The effective alveolar ventilation exhibited a significant reduction (from 199.62 +/- 42.01 to 84.34 +/- 44.13) consistent with the fall in alveolar gas volume that effectively participated in gas exchange. The relation between the alveolar ventilation that effectively participated in gas exchange and cardiac output (V Aeff/Q ratio) also presented a significant reduction after embolization (from 0.96 +/- 0.34 to 0.33 +/- 0.17 fraction). The carbon dioxide partial pressure increased significantly in arterial blood (from 37.51 +/- 1.71 to 60.76 +/- 6.62 mmHg), but decreased significantly in exhaled air at the end of the respiratory cycle (from 35.57 +/- 1.22 to 23.15 +/- 8.24 mmHg). Exhaled air at the end of the respiratory cycle returned to baseline values 40 min after embolism. The arterial to alveolar carbon dioxide gradient increased significantly (from 1.94 +/- 1.36 to 37.61 +/- 12.79 mmHg), as also did the calculated alveolar (from 56.38 +/- 22.47 to 178.09 +/- 37.46 mL) and physiological (from 0.37 +/- 0.05 to 0.75 +/- 0.10 fraction) dead spaces. Based on our data, we conclude that the severe arterial hypoxemia observed in this experimental model may be attributed to the reduction of the V Aeff/Q ratio. We were also able to demonstrate that V Aeff/Q progressively improves after embolization, a fact attributed to the alveolar ventilation

  12. DVT and pulmonary embolism: Part I. Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ramzi, Dino W; Leeper, Kenneth V

    2004-06-15

    The incidence of venous thromboembolic diseases is increasing as the U.S. population ages. At least one established risk factor is present in approximately 75 percent of patients who develop these diseases. Hospitalized patients and nursing home residents account for one half of all cases of deep venous thrombosis. A well-validated clinical prediction rule can be used for risk stratification of patients with suspected deep venous thrombosis. Used in combination with D-dimer or Doppler ultrasound tests, the prediction rule can reduce the need for contrast venography, as well as the likelihood of false-positive or false-negative test results. The inclusion of helical computed tomographic venography (i.e., a below-the-pelvis component) in pulmonary embolism protocols remains under evaluation. Specific combinations of a clinical prediction rule, ventilation-perfusion scanning, and D-dimer testing can rule out pulmonary embolism without an invasive or expensive investigation. A clinical prediction rule for pulmonary embolism is most helpful when it is used with subsequent evaluations such as ventilation-perfusion scanning, D-dimer testing, or computed tomography. Technologic advances are improving the resolution of helical computed tomography to allow detection of smaller emboli; however, further study is needed to provide definitive evidence supporting the role of this imaging technique in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. D-dimer testing is helpful clinically only when the result is negative. A negative D-dimer test can be used in combination with a clinical decision rule, ventilation-perfusion scanning, and/or helical computed tomography to lower the probability of pulmonary embolism to the point that aggressive treatment is not required. Evidence-based algorithms help guide the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. PMID:15222648

  13. Pulmonary embolism: a clinician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Wells, Philip S

    2008-11-01

    Recent advances in the management of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) have both improved diagnostic accuracy as well as made management algorithms safer and more accessible. Physicians need to more frequently consider PE in patients with chest pain or dyspnea and should be aware of the proper diagnostic approach. Diagnostic strategies should include pretest clinical probability, D-dimer assays, and imaging tests. Although it has been proven that the use of algorithms result in better outcomes, there are patient-specific issues that must be considered. Approaches that use computed tomographic pulmonary angiography or ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scanning appear equally safe, but each approach has advantages and disadvantages that should be appreciated to provide the best care. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating whether these diagnostic processes can be made even easier and less expensive. Importantly, patients at low risk with a negative D-dimer can avoid imaging tests and those at moderate risk with a negative high sensitivity D-dimer can have venous thromboembolism excluded without the need for imaging. However, these patients also represent those most likely to have false-positive tests and clinically irrelevant PE. V/Q scanning may be more appropriate in premenopausal women, in those with renal dysfunction or diabetes, in those with known contrast allergies, and perhaps in patients with known family history of breast cancer. As with any illness, there is room for improvement in the management of PE, but it remains unknown whether preventive measures, diagnosis, treatment modalities, or physician or patient education should be the focus. PMID:19331834

  14. Lifesaving Embolization of Coronary Artery Perforation

    SciTech Connect

    Katsanos, Konstantinos; Patel, Sundip; Dourado, Renato; Sabharwal, Tarun

    2009-09-15

    Coronary artery perforation remains one of the most fearsome complications during cardiac catheterization procedures. Although emergent bypass surgery is the preferred treatment for cases with uncontrollable perforation, endovascular vessel sealing and arrest of bleeding with a combination of balloons, covered stents, or embolic materials have also been proposed. The authors describe a case of emergent lifesaving microcoil embolization of the distal right coronary artery in a patient with uncontrollable grade III guidewire perforation resulting in cardiac tamponade. The relevant literature is reviewed and the merits and limitations of the endovascular approach are highlighted.

  15. Fat embolism syndrome after combined aesthetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Erba, Paolo; Farhadi, Jian; Schaefer, Dirk Johannes; Pierer, Gerhard

    2011-02-01

    Fat embolism syndrome is a rare complication that develops after extended soft tissue disruption by liposuction, in particular if combined with time consuming, multiple procedures. Early signs are non-specific and often not considered, so that diagnosis and correct management may be delayed. We report a case in which liposuction combined with other aesthetic surgical procedures caused a fat embolism syndrome in a 46-year-old woman, which was followed by multiple organ failure and the development of sepsis with perimammary abscesses. Extended liposuction of the abdomen and thighs, bilateral augmentation mammaplasty, and stripping of both greater saphenous veins were combined. PMID:20158423

  16. Pulmonary endarterectomy after pulmonary infectious embolisms

    PubMed Central

    Heiberg, Johan; Ilkjær, Lars B.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) is a well-established procedure in the treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTPH). The procedure is known to increase functional outcome and to raise the 5-year survival rate. We report 2 cases of pulmonary valve endocarditis and secondary embolisms causing sustained pulmonary hypertension. Both were treated with PEA. In none of the cases, a cleavage between the thrombotic masses and the vessel wall was obtainable, and both attempts were therefore inadequate. Based on our reports, we recommend not attempting PEA in cases of CTPH after infectious embolisms. PMID:23248168

  17. The fat embolism syndrome. A review.

    PubMed

    Levy, D

    1990-12-01

    While fat embolism occurs in most (more than 90%) patients with traumatic injury, the fat embolism syndrome (FES) occurs in only 3%-4% of patients with long-bone fractures. FES involves multiple organ systems and can cause a devastating clinical deterioration within hours. The major clinical features of FES include hypoxia, pulmonary edema, central nervous system depression, and axillary or subconjunctive petechiae. Improvements have been made in supporting the respiratory compromise and adult respiratory distress syndrome that these patients develop. Aggressive measures to improve the pulmonary function, i.e., positive pressure ventilation and effective fluid management, are important and expedite fixation of bone fractures. PMID:2245559

  18. Pulmonary and Cerebral Fat Embolism Syndrome After Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Soo Hyun; Chang, Hyuk Won; Sohn, Sung Il; Cho, Chul Hyun; Bae, Ki-Cheor

    2013-01-01

    Fat embolism occurs after long bone fracture or orthopedic surgery and usually shows mild symptom. But it rarely results in fat embolism syndrome, presenting as multiorgan dysfunction such as lung, brain and skin. Although the diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome is mostly based on clinical features, we experienced fat embolism syndrome involving lung and brain, showing typical imaging findings in pulmonary computed tomography and brain magnetic resonance image. So we present interesting case about fat embolism syndrome after total knee replacement with reviewing associated literatures including imaging findings. PMID:23671550

  19. Is Embolization of the Pancreas Safe? Pancreatic Histological Changes after Selective Transcatheter Arterial Embolization with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Takuya Yamaguchi, Masato; Takahashi, Takuya; Izaki, Kenta; Uotani, Kensuke; Sakamoto, Noriaki; Sugimura, Kazuro; Sugimoto, Koji

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the safety of selective transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) in a swine model in terms of histological changes in the pancreas. Methods: Three groups of two female swine (58-64 kg) per group underwent TAE of the dorsal pancreatic artery, under anesthesia, with 1:1, 1:4, and 1:9 mixtures of NBCA and iodized oil. Blood parameters were evaluated at days 1, 4, and 10 after TAE, after which the animals were sacrificed and pancreatic tissues were examined under light microscopy. Results: All of the animals were asymptomatic and survived for 10 days. Cone beam computed tomographic angiography revealed occlusion of the dorsal pancreatic artery and no enhancement in the embolized area. The white blood cell count and C-reactive protein level were elevated slightly on day 1 after TAE (mean {+-} SD: 252.7 {+-} 27.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 2}/{mu}l and 0.15 {+-} 0.07 mg/l, respectively), but they normalized or remained near the upper normal limit thereafter. The serum amylase and lipase levels also were elevated on day 1 (8831.7 {+-} 2169.2 U/l and 130 {+-} 53.4 U/l, respectively) but normalized thereafter. Histologically, necrosis and fibrosis were noted only in the embolized segment, and necrosis and acute inflammatory reactions were absent in the nonembolized segment. The border between both segments was well defined. Lymphocytic infiltration and foreign body reaction were noted around the embolized vessels. Conclusions: Selective TAE with NBCA in the pancreas caused localized ischemic necrosis without clinically significant pancreatitis; therefore, this procedure is tolerable in swine.

  20. Embolization in a Patient with Ruptured Anterior Inferior Pancreaticoduodenal Arterial Aneurysm with Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Hiroyuki; Sato, Yozo; Banno, Tatsuo; Arakawa, Toshinao; Hara, Masaki

    2002-08-15

    In median arcuate ligament syndrome, the root of the celiac artery is compressed and narrowed by the median arcuate ligament of the diaphragm during expiration, causing abdominal angina.Aneurysm may be formed in arteries of the pancreas and duodenum due toa chronic increase in blood flow from the superior mesenteric artery into the celiac arterial region. We report a patient saved by embolization with coils of ruptured aneurysm that developed with markedly dilated anterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery due to median arcuate ligament syndrome.

  1. Mechanical Removal of Migrated Onyx Due to Microcatheter Rupture During AVM Embolization: A Technical Case Report.

    PubMed

    Senturk, Cagin

    2015-12-01

    We report a case where migrated Onyx could be removed safely with a mechanical thrombectomy device after withdrawal of the damaged microcatheter. A microcatheter was retained in the superior cerebellar artery with attached Onyx fragments on its tip during embolization of a bled cerebellar AVM. During retrieval maneuvers microcatheter shaft was ruptured and Onyx fragments were released into the vertebrobasilar system causing occlusion. Finally, Onyx fragment on tip of the microcatheter could be detached with dimethyl sulfoxide injection and the microcatheter could be withdrawn. A Merci retriever device (Concentric Medical, Mountain View, CA, USA) was successfully used to retrieve most of the dislodged Onyx material and recanalize the vertebrobasilar circulation. PMID:25910968

  2. Cardio-embolic stroke following remote blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sonali; Atreya, Auras R; Penumetsa, Srikanth C; Hiser, William L

    2013-03-01

    A cardio-embolic stroke as a sequela of remote blunt chest trauma is a rare clinical presentation. Blunt chest trauma can cause various acute cardiac complications like arrhythmias, cardiac contusion etc. However, delayed consequences such as left ventricular thrombus resulting in thromboembolic phenomena are reported infrequently. A 30-year-old healthy man presented to an outside facility with transient neurological deficits. An MRI brain showed lesions suggestive of embolic etiology. A trans-thoracic echocardiogram (TTE) showed a 1.5 × 1.5 cm mass present in the left ventricular (LV) apex. Patient was transferred to our institution for cardiac surgery evaluation. On detailed questioning, he reported an incident of blunt chest trauma during a martial arts exhibition fight that took place 2 years back. Given this history, a cardiac catheterization was done, which showed 30% stenosis in mid-left anterior descending artery (LAD) without any other significant obstructive lesion. A trans-esophageal echocardiogram (TEE) showed akinesis of the LV apex and confirmed TTE finding of a mass, consistent with an apical thrombus. Surgery was deferred and patient was started on anticoagulation. A cardiac MRI done 2 weeks later showed evidence of apical infarction in the LAD territory. LAD is the most commonly affected coronary vessel by blunt traumatic injuries, likely due to its vulnerable anatomical position on the anterior aspect of the heart. A variety of mechanisms including intimal tear, rupture and spasm have been implicated in the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction after blunt chest trauma. PMID:24023477

  3. Selective Arterial Embolization of Idiopathic Priapism

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Gary S.; Braunstein, Larry; Ball, David S.; Roberto, Paul J.; Reich, Jeffrey; Hanno, Phillip

    1996-11-15

    We report a case of idiopathic priapism that was only identified as high-flow or arterial priapism after drainage of the corpora cavernosa. Following failure of conservative and surgical treatment attempts, two consecutive embolizations of a unilateral penile artery were performed with gelgoam particles.

  4. Venous air embolism during a craniofacial procedure.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R J; Mulliken, J B

    1988-07-01

    The possibility of venous air embolism exists whenever the craniofacial operative field is above the level of the heart. Craniotomy with the high-torque craniotome is hypothesized to have produced venous air embolism in the patient described in this report. The diagnosis of venous air embolism is determined by transesophageal Doppler probe, transesophageal echocardiogram or external echocardiogram, and end-tidal N2 and CO2 determinations. Treatment includes control of the air entry sites, aspiration of air from the right atrium via a catheter placed prior to operation, and discontinuing nitrous oxide. If these measures are unsuccessful, the operative field should be transposed below heart level and the procedure terminated. In the event of significant hemodynamic compromise, closed cardiac massage should be tried; if that fails, open cardiac massage and direct aspiration are necessary. The true incidence of venous air embolism in craniofacial operations may be much higher than previously suspected. We therefore recommend placement of appropriate monitoring equipment to detect intracardiac air in those major craniofacial procedures in which there is a potential for intravascular air ingress. PMID:3289061

  5. Bronchial Artery Aneurysm Embolization with NBCA

    SciTech Connect

    Aburano, Hiroyuki Kawamori, Yasuhiro; Horiti, Yasushi; Kitagawa, Kiyohide; Sanada, Junichiro; Matsui, Osamu

    2006-12-15

    We present a case of asymptomatic bronchial artery aneurysm that formed a fistula with part of the pulmonary artery (there was no definite fistula with the pulmonary vein). We were able to catheterize the feeding vessel but could not reach the aneurysm. We therefore injected a mixture of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA; Histoacryl, B. Braun, Melsungen, Germany) and iodized oil (Lipiodol; Guerbet, Aulnay-sous-Bois, France) from the feeding vessel. The fistula, aneurysm, and feeding vessel were almost totally occluded. After embolization, the patient coughed a little; there were no other definite side effects or complications. One and 3 months later, on chest CT, the aneurysm was almost completely occupied with hyperattenuating NBCA-Lipiodol embolization. NBCA is a liquid embolization material whose time to coagulation after injection can be controlled by diluting it with Lipiodol. It is therefore possible to embolize an aneurysm, feeding vessels, and efferent vessels (in our case, it was a fistula) by using an NBCA-Lipiodol mixture of an appropriate concentration, regardless of whether the catheter can reach the aneurysm or not.

  6. Fat embolism in patients with fractured hips.

    PubMed

    Sevitt, S

    1972-04-29

    Fat embolism was assessed at necropsy and correlated with clinical findings in the patients who died among 854 with fractured hips admitted to hospital between 1967 and August 1971. Sixteen cases of clinical importance were found, eight of which were judged to have been fatal or to have seriously contributed to death. Frequencies were as follows: 2.4 to 3.3% among 424 patients with subcapital fractures; 0.7 to 0.8% in the 405 with trochanteric fractures; 4.1 to 7% among subjects treated without operation, representing 30% of those who died within seven days; and 0.9 to 1.1% among patients treated by pinning, nailing, or nail-plating. The higher frequency in the conservatively treated group is probably related to selection of poor-risk subjects. Fat embolism was found in 6.8 to 8.0% of those with subcapital fractures treated by primary Thompson's arthroplasty which utilizes acrylic cement, and in none of those given Moore's prostheses for which cement is not used. Study of a larger group after Moore's prosthesis is required to establish its lack of special risk. Fat embolism accounted for all the deaths within seven days of Thompson's arthroplasty and for most within 14 days; it was clearly related to surgery in some cases.A possible explanation of the hazard of Thompson's arthroplasty is that fat globule entry is enhanced by a rise of intramedullary pressure due to proximal occlusion of the reamed marrow cavity. A controlled trial of the effect of venting the marrow cavity on the frequency of fat embolism is warranted. It is possible that the acrylic monomer may also contribute to venous entry of medullary fat. The higher-age group of those with subcapital fractures and associated chronic cardiac and pulmonary disease might make them more susceptible to fat embolization than those in whom arthroplasty is also carried out for chronic hip disease. PMID:5022012

  7. Fat Embolism in Patients with Fractured Hips

    PubMed Central

    Sevitt, Simon

    1972-01-01

    Fat embolism was assessed at necropsy and correlated with clinical findings in the patients who died among 854 with fractured hips admitted to hospital between 1967 and August 1971. Sixteen cases of clinical importance were found, eight of which were judged to have been fatal or to have seriously contributed to death. Frequencies were as follows: 2·4 to 3·3% among 424 patients with subcapital fractures; 0·7 to 0·8% in the 405 with trochanteric fractures; 4·1 to 7% among subjects treated without operation, representing 30% of those who died within seven days; and 0·9 to 1·1% among patients treated by pinning, nailing, or nail-plating. The higher frequency in the conservatively treated group is probably related to selection of poor-risk subjects. Fat embolism was found in 6·8 to 8·0% of those with subcapital fractures treated by primary Thompson's arthroplasty which utilizes acrylic cement, and in none of those given Moore's prostheses for which cement is not used. Study of a larger group after Moore's prosthesis is required to establish its lack of special risk. Fat embolism accounted for all the deaths within seven days of Thompson's arthroplasty and for most within 14 days; it was clearly related to surgery in some cases. A possible explanation of the hazard of Thompson's arthroplasty is that fat globule entry is enhanced by a rise of intramedullary pressure due to proximal occlusion of the reamed marrow cavity. A controlled trial of the effect of venting the marrow cavity on the frequency of fat embolism is warranted. It is possible that the acrylic monomer may also contribute to venous entry of medullary fat. The higher-age group of those with subcapital fractures and associated chronic cardiac and pulmonary disease might make them more susceptible to fat embolization than those in whom arthroplasty is also carried out for chronic hip disease. PMID:5022012

  8. Hemorrhagic Pseudocyst of Pancreas Treated with Coil Embolization of Gastroduodenal Artery: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sudhir Kumar; Rajendran, Vishnuraja; Jain, Maneesh K.; Kori, Ronal

    2015-01-01

    Hemorrhage into pseudocyst of pancreas can rarely present as life threatening massive UGI bleeding. We present a case of 21-year-old male, admitted to our department, who was a known case of posttraumatic acute pancreatitis and who developed massive upper GI bleeding. CT angiography of abdomen showed aneurysm of gastroduodenal artery. Patient was successfully treated with coil embolization of gastroduodenal artery. PMID:26819796

  9. Lethal coronary air embolism caused by the removal of a double-lumen hemodialysis catheter: a case report

    PubMed Central

    An, Dong Ai; Choi, Hyun Jung; Kim, Tae Hee; Pin, Jung Woo; Ko, Dong Chan

    2016-01-01

    Coronary air embolism is a rare event. We report a case in which an acute myocardial infarction occurred in the region supplied by the right coronary artery after the removal of a double-lumen hemodialysis catheter. Emergent coronary angiography revealed air bubbles obstructing the mid-segment of the right coronary artery with slow flow phenomenon distally. The patient expired due to myocardial infarction. PMID:27274379

  10. Pulmonary embolism: Epidemiology and registries.

    PubMed

    Monreal, Manuel; Mahé, Isabelle; Bura-Riviere, Alessandra; Prandoni, Paolo; Verhamme, Peter; Brenner, Benjamin; Wells, Phil S; Di Micco, Pierpaolo; Bertoletti, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    Real-life data is important in understanding the needs of patients in routine clinical practice, particularly owing to the fact that almost a quarter of patients with venous thromoboembolism (VTE) have at least one exclusion criterion preventing their recruitment into randomized clinical trials. The Registro Informatizado de Enfermedad Trombo Embólica (RIETE) registry is an ongoing, international, multicentre, prospective registry of consecutive patients presenting with acute VTE. In this chapter, we summarized some of the most relevant data concerning the epidemiology of VTE in the RIETE registry. PMID:26547675

  11. Antithrombotic Therapy in Cardiac Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Cervera, Álvaro; Chamorro, Ángel

    2010-01-01

    Anticoagulation is indicated in most cardioembolic ischemic strokes for secondary prevention. In many cardiac conditions, anticoagulation is also indication for primary stroke prevention, mainly when associated to vascular risk factors. Anticoagulation should be started as soon as possible, as it is safe even in moderate acute strokes. The efficacy of early anticoagulation after cardioembolic stroke in relation to outcome has not been assessed adequately, but there is evidence from animal models and clinical studies that anticoagulation with unfractionated heparin is associated with a better outcome mediated in part by its anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:21804782

  12. Transarterial and Transvenous Embolization for Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistulae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J.; Lv, X.; Jiang, C.; Li, Y.; Yang, X.; Wu, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Summary We report on the safety and efficacy of transarterial and transvenous Onyx embolization in the treatment of dural arteriovenous fistulae (DAVFs) of the cavernous sinus. We reviewed the findings from a retrospectively database for 22 patients with cavernous sinus DAVFs who were treated with either transarterial Onyx embolization alone (n = 8) or transarterial and transvenous Onyx embolization (n = 14) over a four year period. The mean follow-up period after endovascular treatment was 21.6 months (range 3-42 mths). Total number of embolizations was 27 for 22 patients. Two patients were treated transvenously after transarterial embolization. All 22 patients (100%) experienced improvement of their clinical symptoms. All 22 patients (100%) experienced total obliteration of their DAVFs, as documented by angiography performed at a mean follow-up of 5.8 months after the last treatment. No patient experienced a recurrence of symptoms after angiography showed DAVF obliteration. One patient exhibited temporary deterioration of ocular symptoms secondary to venous hypertension after near total obliteration; one had transient V cranial nerve deficit related to transarterial embolization, and two patients exhibited transient III and VI cranial nerve weakness related to transvenous embolization. Two patients experienced recurrent symptoms after incomplete transarterial embolization and underwent transvenous embolization at three and four months. Both patients achieved clinical and angiographic cures. Transarterial and transvenous embolization with Onyx, whenever possible, proved to be a safe and effective management for patients with cavernous sinus DAVFs. PMID:20977859

  13. Endovascular Embolization of Bronchial Artery Originating from the Upper Portion of Aortic Arch in Patients with Massive Hemoptysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Sen Sun, Xi-Wen Yu, Dong Jie, Bing

    2013-05-15

    PurposeOur experience with endovascular embolization (EVE) of the bronchial artery (BA) originating from the upper portion of the aortic arch (AA) in six patients is described.MethodsAltogether, 818 patients with hemoptysis underwent multidetector row computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) before EVE or AA angiography during EVE. Aberrant BAs originating from the upper portion of the AA were the source of massive hemoptysis in six patients (0.73 %). MDCT angiograms and/or Digital subtraction angiograms were retrospectively reviewed. Selective catheterization and embolization were performed.ResultsThe ostia of the BAs were located on the superior surface of the AA between the brachiocephalic trunk and left common carotid artery in three patients, the junction of the aorta and medial surface of the left subclavian artery in two, and the posterior wall of the upper portion of the AA in one. The six BAs comprised two common trunks, three single right sides, and one single left side. The targeted vessels were successfully catheterized and embolized by a coaxial microcatheter system using polyvinyl alcohol particles. Other pathologic BAs and nonbronchial systemic arteries also were embolized. Bleeding was immediately controlled in all patients with no recurrence of hemoptysis. No procedure-related complications occurred.ConclusionsApplication of EVE of anomalous origin of BAs in patients with hemoptysis is important, as demonstrated in the six reported patients. MDCTA before EVE or AA angiography during EVE is critical to avoid missing a rare aberrant BA originating from the upper portion of the AA.

  14. Y-configured double stent-assisted coil embolization with double microcatheter technique for complex basilar bifurcation aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Kiura, Yoshihiro; Kawamoto, Yukihiko; Murakami, Taro; Okamura, Akitake; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2012-09-01

    Y-configured double stent technique is useful for coil embolization of a bifurcation wide neck aneurysm while preserving the patency of the two important vessels. However, if the important vessels emanating directly from the aneurysm comprised four vessels, two vessels not deployed, Y-stents might not be preserved with the Y-stent technique by itself. We report a case treated with Y-configured double stent-assisted coil embolization with a double microcatheter technique for complex basilar bifurcation aneurysm. A 78-year-old woman presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) of poor grade. CT-angiography showed a wide neck and shallow aneurysm of complex basilar bifurcation involving both posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs) and superior cerebellar arteries (SCAs). In the chronic stage of SAH, Y-configured double stent-assisted coil embolization with a double microcatheter technique was performed. After Y-stent (two Enterprise) deployment from both the PCAs to the basilar artery, coil embolization of a basilar bifurcation aneurysm was performed using a double microcatheter technique to preserve both SCAs. PMID:23077865

  15. Double Bolus Thrombolysis for Suspected Massive Pulmonary Embolism during Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Gerard; Fitzpatrick, Gareth; El-Gammal, Ayman; Gilligan, Peadar

    2015-01-01

    More than 70% of cardiac arrest cases are caused by acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or pulmonary embolism (PE). Although thrombolytic therapy is a recognised therapy for both AMI and PE, its indiscriminate use is not routinely recommended during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We present a case describing the successful use of double dose thrombolysis during cardiac arrest caused by pulmonary embolism. Notwithstanding the relative lack of high-level evidence, this case suggests a scenario in which recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator (rtPA) may be beneficial in cardiac arrest. In addition to the strong clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism as the causative agent of the patient's cardiac arrest, the extremely low end-tidal CO2 suggested a massive PE. The absence of dilatation of the right heart on subxiphoid ultrasound argued against the diagnosis of PE, but not conclusively so. In the context of the circulatory collapse induced by cardiac arrest, this aspect was relegated in terms of importance. The second dose of rtPA utilised in this case resulted in return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and did not result in haemorrhage or an adverse effect. PMID:26664765

  16. Stent-assisted coil embolization for anterior cerebral artery dissection presented with cerebral infarction

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Mitsuhiro; Hattori, Itaro; Sasaki, Makoto; Ishimori, Hisatsugu; Nemoto, Akihiro; Hikita, Chiyoe; Sato, Junko; Fukuta, Shinya; Morimoto, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Compared to those found in the vertebrobasilar system, intracranial dissection in the anterior circulation is relatively rare, especially in the anterior cerebral artery (ACA). Moreover, only several cases of ACA dissection that underwent endovascular treatment have been reported. Here we present a rare case of gradually developing ACA dissecting aneurysm causing cerebral infarction, successfully treated by stent-assisted coil embolization. Case Description: A 36-year-old man was admitted with sudden right hemiparesis. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed cerebral infarction in the left ACA territory, and MR angiography showed segmental stenosis at the A2 portion of the left ACA. Three-dimensional digital subtraction angiogram showed segmental dilatation and stenosis at the left A2 portion. We diagnosed ACA dissection causing acute cerebral infarction and treated the patient conservatively. Five months after the onset, the dissecting artery at the left A2 portion formed a gradually dilating aneurysm, suggesting increased risk for aneurysmal rupture. We attempted endovascular treatment entailing coil embolization of an aneurysm while preserving the left A2 with stent assistance. The patient remained neurologically stable 6 months after the procedure. Conclusions: Although there are few reported cases of ACA dissection where endovascular treatment was attempted, we consider stent-assisted embolization for gradually developing ACA dissecting aneurysm as an alternative method to prevent bleeding and recurrent infarction. PMID:26677416

  17. Referred Pain to the Ipsilateral Forehead and Orbit: An Unusual Phenomenon During Bronchial Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakantan, Ravi; Ketkar, Manoj; Maddali, Krishna; Deshmukh, Hemant

    1999-07-15

    Purpose: We report an unusual pattern of referred pain to the ipsilateral forehead and orbit observed during bronchial artery embolization (BAE) for massive hemoptysis due to pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and postulate possible neural mechanisms for its occurrence. Methods: Seven men, from a series of 194 patients (171 men, 23 women) undergoing BAE (right bronchial artery 4, left 3) with gelatin sponge for control of massive hemoptysis due to pulmonary TB form the subject of this report. Results: Embolization was successful in achieving control of hemoptysis in these patients and there were no complications following the embolization. Transient, moderately severe, ipsilateral supraorbital and/or retroorbital pain occurred only during the injection of the gelatin sponge contrast mixture into the bronchial artery. The pain did not occur during the injection of heparinized saline or ionic contrast medium. Conclusions: Referred pain during BAE is an unusual phenomenon. Acute vessel distension triggering visceral sensations is probably the causative mechanism. Sympathetic afferents from the bronchi coursing through the posterior pulmonary plexus eventually pass to the trigeminal ganglion via the carotid sympathetic chain. The ophthalmic and maxillary divisions of the trigeminal nerve then mediate pain sensation to the ipsilateral forehead and orbit. Similarly, parasympathetic afferents from the pulmonary plexus crossing the nucleus of the spinal tract of the trigeminal nerve may be responsible for interexchange of impulses to the neurons in this nucleus. Sensory fibers of the ophthalmic and maxillary nerves relaying in this nucleus are then involved in this pain being referred to the forehead and orbit.

  18. Double Bolus Thrombolysis for Suspected Massive Pulmonary Embolism during Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Gerard; Fitzpatrick, Gareth; Gilligan, Peadar

    2015-01-01

    More than 70% of cardiac arrest cases are caused by acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or pulmonary embolism (PE). Although thrombolytic therapy is a recognised therapy for both AMI and PE, its indiscriminate use is not routinely recommended during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We present a case describing the successful use of double dose thrombolysis during cardiac arrest caused by pulmonary embolism. Notwithstanding the relative lack of high-level evidence, this case suggests a scenario in which recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator (rtPA) may be beneficial in cardiac arrest. In addition to the strong clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism as the causative agent of the patient's cardiac arrest, the extremely low end-tidal CO2 suggested a massive PE. The absence of dilatation of the right heart on subxiphoid ultrasound argued against the diagnosis of PE, but not conclusively so. In the context of the circulatory collapse induced by cardiac arrest, this aspect was relegated in terms of importance. The second dose of rtPA utilised in this case resulted in return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and did not result in haemorrhage or an adverse effect. PMID:26664765

  19. Pulmonary embolism--the role of thrombolytic therapy in its management.

    PubMed Central

    More, R. S.; Chauhan, A.

    1996-01-01

    In massive pulmonary embolism where there may be evidence of right ventricular dysfunction and acute pulmonary hypertension, anticoagulation therapy alone may prove inadequate. In such situations use of thrombolytic agents produces an improvement in haemodynamics compared to anticoagulants alone, although studies to date have been too small to address the issue of mortality benefit. It would appear that all age groups gain benefit from the use of thrombolytics. Studies that have compared thrombolytic agents and anticoagulants are discussed. In addition, the issues of the choice of thrombolytic agent and the different modes of delivery of therapy are addressed. Images Figure PMID:8731706

  20. Internal and external carotid artery embolism following facial injection of autologous fat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Wei; Yin, Yi-Mei; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Autologous fat injection is a common aesthetic procedure for soft-tissue augmentation of the face. Although this procedure is generally regarded as safe, several patients have experienced acute visual loss or cerebral infarction after these injections. We describe a case of internal and external carotid artery fat embolism that occurred following injection of autologous fat into the face. It appeared that the injected fat entered a branch of the left external carotid artery and that the embolus likely migrated into the left internal carotid artery and distally into the left ophthalmic artery, left anterior artery, and middle cerebral artery. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 5: PMID:24936097

  1. A Rare but Serious Complication of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Spinal Cord Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Vatankulu, Mehmet Akif; Kayrak, Mehmet; Alihanoglu, Yusuf; Salli, Ali; Ulgen, Mehment S

    2010-01-01

    Background/Objective: Many atherothrombotic complications are associated with coronary angiography. Spinal cord embolism with high morbidity and mortality is one of these complications. Methods: Case report. Results: A 65-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital with acute myocardial infarction. Immediately after coronary angiography, she complained of paresthesia and paraparesis of her legs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detected hyperintensity at the level of the conus medullaris. Antiaggregant therapy and a physiotherapy program continued. After 2 months, clinical and MRI findings had improved. Conclusions: Invasive procedures such as coronary angiography can lead to serious atherothrombotic complications. PMID:20397450

  2. Multiple embolic cerebral infarcts as the first manifestation of metastatic ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bond, Laura M; Skrobo, Darko

    2015-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a 3-day history of an occipital headache associated with transient visual impairment and short-term memory loss. MRI of the brain showed innumerable focal embolic infarcts of differing ages, for which a cause could not be determined. The patient was discharged and readmitted 7 weeks later with acute aphasia and a right-sided hemiplegia. CT of the abdomen revealed a right-sided ovarian mass and prominent retroperitoneal nodes, which cytology confirmed to be metastatic ovarian cancer. PMID:26443095

  3. Onyx embolization of an avulsed thalamoperforator following endoscopic colloid cyst and lamina terminalis fenestration

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Raymond D; Chaudry, Imran; Turk, Aquilla; Spiotta, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    A patient presented with headaches and was found to have a colloid cyst in the third ventricle and ventriculomegaly. The patient underwent endoscopic colloid cyst resection and third ventriculostomy without incidence. Prior to emergence, a blown right pupil was acutely noted, and bright red blood emanated from the ventricular drain that was routinely placed in the endoscopy tract at the conclusion of the procedure. CTangiography demonstrated active extravasation from the pre-pontine cistern into the third ventricle and subarachnoid space. Emergency DSA confirmed active extravasation from an avulsed thalamoperforator arising from the proximal right P1 posterior cerebral artery, which was immediately embolized without incident. PMID:25053667

  4. Onyx embolization of an avulsed thalamoperforator following endoscopic colloid cyst and lamina terminalis fenestration.

    PubMed

    Turner, Raymond D; Chaudry, Imran; Turk, Aquilla; Spiotta, Alejandro

    2015-08-01

    A patient presented with headaches and was found to have a colloid cyst in the third ventricle and ventriculomegaly. The patient underwent endoscopic colloid cyst resection and third ventriculostomy without incidence. Prior to emergence, a blown right pupil was acutely noted, and bright red blood emanated from the ventricular drain that was routinely placed in the endoscopy tract at the conclusion of the procedure. CTangiography demonstrated active extravasation from the pre-pontine cistern into the third ventricle and subarachnoid space. Emergency DSA confirmed active extravasation from an avulsed thalamoperforator arising from the proximal right P1 posterior cerebral artery, which was immediately embolized without incident. PMID:25063695

  5. Major ischaemic stroke caused by an air embolism from a ruptured giant pulmonary bulla.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsdottir, Johanna F; Geirsson, Arnar; Hannesson, Petur; Gudbjartsson, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    We report an extremely rare complication of a major ischaemic cerebral event caused by an air embolism due to spontaneous rupture of a giant pulmonary bulla that occurred during an airline flight. Shortly after take-off, the patient experienced sudden right-sided hemiplegia and dyspnoea. Following an emergency landing in Reykjavik, a CT scan of the brain showed minute air bubbles consistent with air emboli within the left-sided intracerebral arteries, and MRI showed signs of acute ischaemic cerebral infarction in the left hemisphere. The patient later underwent a pulmonary lobectomy and survived this life-threatening complication with relatively mild neurological sequelae. PMID:25743863

  6. Embolization of a PORT-A-CATH device in the main pulmonary artery and its percutaneous extraction in a patient with pinch-off syndrome.

    PubMed

    Çilingiroğlu, Mehmet; Akkuş, Nuri lker

    2012-03-01

    Totally implanted port devices play an important role in acute and chronic medical care of patients with various conditions and are widely used for infusion of fluids, medications, blood or other blood products, and for monitoring hemodynamic parameters. Embolization of a part of port devices is a rare but potentially serious complication of port catheter placement. We report distal embolization of a catheter fragment of a PORT-A-CATH device into the main pulmonary artery and right ventricle and its successful percutaneous retrieval in a patient with metastatic lung cancer, who was also found to have thoracic inlet syndrome or pinch-off syndrome. PMID:22710588

  7. Alternative Treatment for Bleeding Peristomal Varices: Percutaneous Parastomal Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Pabon-Ramos, Waleska M.; Niemeyer, Matthew M.; Dasika, Narasimham L.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To describe how peristomal varices can be successfully embolized via a percutaneous parastomal approach. Methods: The medical records of patients who underwent this procedure between December 1, 2000, and May 31, 2008, were retrospectively reviewed. Procedural details were recorded. Median fluoroscopy time and bleeding-free interval were calculated. Results: Seven patients underwent eight parastomal embolizations. The technical success rate was 88 % (one failure). All embolizations were performed with coils combined with a sclerosant, another embolizing agent, or both. Of the seven successful parastomal embolizations, there were three cases of recurrent bleeding; the median time to rebleeding was 45 days (range 26-313 days). The remaining four patients did not develop recurrent bleeding during the follow-up period; their median bleeding-free interval was 131 days (range 40-659 days). Conclusion: This case review demonstrated that percutaneous parastomal embolization is a feasible technique to treat bleeding peristomal varices.

  8. Spontaneous Hemothorax in Neurofibromatosis Treated with Percutaneous Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Kazunori; Sanada, Junichiro Kurozumi, Akiko; Watanabe, Toshio; Matsui, Osamu

    2007-06-15

    We evaluated the effectiveness of transcatheter arterial coil embolization therapy for the treatment of spontaneous hemothorax followed by aneurysm rupture in neurofibromatosis patients. Three patients were treated for massive hemothorax caused by arterial lesions associated with neurofibromatosis. Bleeding episodes were secondary to ascending cervical artery aneurysm and dissection of vertebral artery in 1 patient, and intercostal artery aneurysm with or without arteriovenous fistula in 2 patients. Patients were treated by transarterial coil embolization combined with chest drainage. In 1 patient, the ruptured ascending cervical artery aneurysm was well embolized but, shortly after the embolization, fatal hemorrhage induced by dissection of the vertebral artery occurred and the patient died. In the other 2 patients, the ruptured intercostal artery aneurysm was well embolized and they were successfully treated and discharged. Transcatheter arterial coil embolization therapy is an effective method for the treatment of spontaneous hemothorax followed by aneurysm rupture in neurofibromatosis patients.

  9. Celiac Trunk Embolization, as a Means of Elongating Short Distal Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Necks, Prior to Endovascular Aortic Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Belenky, Alexander; Haddad, Menashe; Idov, Igor; Knizhnik, Michael; Litvin, Sergey; Bachar, Gil N.; Atar, Eli

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience in elongating short distal necks of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAAs) by coil embolization of the celiac trunk prior to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). During 6 years seven patients (five men and two women; mean age, 74) who had DTAAs with short distal necks unsuitable for conventional EVAR, and well patent superior and inferior mesenteric arteries based on CT, were treated in one session with EVAR after the celiac trunk was coil embolized to elongate the neck. All patients were followed by CT every 3 months in the first year and every 6 months thereafter. Technical success was achieved in all patients, and no early or late ischemic complications were noted. No procedural complications occurred and good aneurysm sealing was obtained in all patients. Three endoleaks were identified after 3 months (one patient) and 6 months (two patients); all were treated successfully with insertion of an additional stent-graft. In patients with DTAAs who are candidates for EVAR but have short aneurysm distal necks, celiac trunk embolization-only if the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries are patent-is a good and safe way to elongate the neck and enable EVAR.

  10. Successful treatment of aberrant splenic artery aneurysm with a combination of coils embolization and covered stents

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Aneurysms of an aberrant splenic artery originating from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) are extremely rare; however, they are clinically important because possible rupture could be catastrophic. The methods of treatment for this condition include surgical resection, minimally invasive techniques (include laparoscopic technique) and endovascular therapy. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of coils embolization combined with covered stents to treat aberrant splenic artery aneurysm (SAA). Cases Presentation We report four consecutive cases of aberrant SAA that the aberrant splenic artery was embolized with coils and the superior mesenteric artery was excluded with a covered stent and an up-to-date review of all previous cases in the field. A follow-up computed tomography performed 6 to 12 months postoperatively showed persistent exclusion with marked shrinkage of the aneurysm sac. Conclusions The authors believe although early results are promising, further careful follow-up will be needed to determine the long-term clinical efficacy, safety and applicability of this approach. PMID:25176112

  11. Serum and urinary enzyme activities in renal artery embolism.

    PubMed

    Donadio, C; Auner, I; Giordani, R; Lucchetti, A; Pentimone, F

    1986-10-31

    Renal artery embolism is not a rare occurrence, especially in patients with valvular heart disease, but the early diagnosis of this condition is infrequently accomplished. We report the clinical and laboratory data of 2 patients with valvular heart disease who presented with unilateral renal artery embolization. The usefulness of the determination of serum and urinary enzymes and renal function tests is discussed. We propose that these parameters support an earlier and more accurate diagnosis of renal artery embolism. PMID:2877758

  12. Venous air embolism following insufflation of the urethra.

    PubMed

    Vanlinthout, L; Boghaert, A; Thienpont, L

    1986-01-01

    Venous air embolism following urethral inflation only scarcely documented: an extensive search of the literature yielded four papers relating to this subject. We report a new case of venous air embolism due to this uncommon etiology. Careful study revealed some common pathogenetic features with previously reported cases. Some important precautions can diminish the likelihood of gas embolism and reduce its fatal outcome in situations, similar to the kind mentioned. PMID:3564882

  13. Successful Embolization of an Ovarian Artery Pseudoaneurysm Complicating Obstetric Hysterectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Rathod, Krantikumar R Deshmukh, Hemant L; Asrani, Ashwin; Salvi, Vinita S; Prabhu, Santoshi

    2005-01-15

    Transcatheter arterial embolization is becoming the therapy of choice for controlling obstetric hemorrhage, affording the ability to control persistent bleeding from pelvic vessels while avoiding the morbidity of surgical exploration. The clinicians are left with little choice if pelvic hemorrhage continues after hysterectomy and ligation of anterior division of both internal iliac arteries. We present one such case of intractable post-obstetric hysterectomy hemorrhage in which an ovarian artery pseudoaneurysm was diagnosed angiographically and successfully embolized, highlighting the role of transcatheter embolization.

  14. Ectopic Jejunal Variceal Rupture in a Liver Transplant Recipient Successfully Treated With Percutaneous Transhepatic Coil Embolization: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Abe, Satoru; Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Hoshikawa, Mayumi; Shirata, Chikara; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2015-11-01

    Here we present the rupture of ectopic jejunal varices developing in a liver transplant recipient without portal hypertension, which was successfully treated with percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization.A 48-year-old man with massive melena was admitted to our department. He had undergone liver transplantation for hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis 8 months before, and his postoperative course was satisfactory except for an acute cellular rejection. No evidence of bleeding was detected by upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, but dynamic multidetector computed tomography of the whole abdomen revealed an intestinal varix protruding into the lumen of the jejunum with suspected extravasation. There was no evidence of portal venous stenosis or thrombosis. Immediately upon diagnosis of the ruptured ectopic jejunal varix, percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization was performed, achieving complete hemostasis. The portal venous pressure measured during the procedure was within normal limits. He was discharged from the hospital 11 days after embolization and remained in stable condition without re-bleeding 6 months after discharge.This is the first report of an ectopic intestinal variceal rupture in an uneventful liver transplant recipient that was successfully treated with interventional percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization. Clinicians encountering liver transplant recipients with melena should be aware of the possibility of late-onset rupture of ectopic varices, even in those having an uneventful post-transplant course without portal hypertension. PMID:26632745

  15. Postoperative hypoxemia due to fat embolism

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Tarun; Sawardekar, Amod; Klingele, Kevin; Tobias, Joseph D.

    2011-01-01

    Although the reported incidence of fat embolism syndrome (FES) is low (approximately 1%), it is likely that microscopic fat emboli are showered during manipulation of long bone fractures. Even though there continues to be debate regarding the etiology and proposed mechanism responsible for FES, significant systemic manifestations may occur. Treatment is generally symptomatic based on the clinical presentations. We report a 10-year-old girl who developed hypoxemia following treatment of a displaced Salter-Harris type II fracture of the distal tibia. The subsequent evaluation and hospital course pointed to fat embolism as the most likely etiology for the hypoxemia. We discuss the etiology for FES, review the proposed pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for its clinical manifestations, present currently accepted diagnostic criteria, and discuss its treatment. PMID:21957420

  16. Embolic protection devices in saphenous percutaneous intervention.

    PubMed

    Morís, Cesar; Lozano, Iñigo; Martín, María; Rondán, Juán; Avanzas, Pablo

    2009-05-01

    Saphenous veins remain a source of conduit for use in surgical coronary bypass graft revascularisation procedures. Saphenous vein grafts have a progressive closure rate estimated to be 12% to 20% at the end of the first year, and approximately 50% by 10 years. Regarding secondary revascularisation in these cases, reoperation carries substantially increased morbidity and mortality rates, making saphenous coronary intervention, in particular stent implantation, a more attractive means of revascularisation. However, this procedure carries a significant risk of major adverse clinical events, predominantly myocardial infarction or reduced antegrade flow (non-reflow phenomenon), mainly due to distal embolisation of atherothrombotic debris and distal microvascular occlusion. Embolic protection devices are used to reduce the risk of distal embolisation. There are two different designs: filter and occlusion-aspiration devices. In this article we present the different systems of embolic protection devices in saphenous percutaneous intervention and the previously published information is reviewed. PMID:19736070

  17. Amniotic fluid embolism: A diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Ashish; Mathur, Megha

    2011-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a rare obstetric catastrophe with an incidence of 7.7 per 100 000 deliveries and mortality as high as 60% to 80%. We describe a case of perioperative cardiac arrest in a young parturient undergoing an emergent cesarean section. Just after delivery of live healthy male baby, patient developed disseminated intravascular coagulation not responding to resuscitation with fluids and blood products. Her autopsy revealed edematous lungs with amniotic fluid debris within pulmonary vessels thus establishing the diagnosis of AFE. Amniotic fluid embolism is life threatening and difficult to predict or prevent condition, which should be always be kept in mind in a parturient with sudden cardiovascular collapse, so that resuscitation commences immediately, as early intervention is essential for a positive outcome. PMID:25885396

  18. Amniotic fluid embolism: Then and now

    PubMed Central

    Rafael, A

    2014-01-01

    Background The first case report to describe amniotic fluid embolism that appeared in 1926 in Basil-Medico is translated from Portuguese to English. Case A patient with a dead fetus for several weeks, presented in labor and died suddenly with fetal squames evident in the maternal pulmonary vasculature at autopsy. Conclusion As can be seen from the translation, this case report is remarkably similar in many of its features to some of the eight patients described 15 years later in the first English language discussion of the disease by Steiner and Luschbaugh in JAMA. An enigma presented by this first case remains today: fetal material in the maternal pulmonary vasculature appears specific for amniotic fluid embolism at autopsy but not in living patients. PMID:27512417

  19. Portal Vein Embolization: What Do We Know?

    SciTech Connect

    Denys, Alban; Prior, John; Bize, Pierre; Duran, Rafael; Baere, Thierry De; Halkic, Nermin; Demartines, Nicolas

    2012-10-15

    Portal vein embolization (PVE) has been developed to increase the size of the future remnant liver (FRL) left in place after major hepatectomy, thus reducing the risk of postoperative liver insufficiency. PVE consist in embolizing preoperatively portal branches of the segments that will be resected. Indication is based on preoperative measurements of the FRL by computed tomography and its ratio with either the theoretical liver volume or by direct measurement of the functional liver volume. After PVE, the volume and function of the FRL increases in 3 to 6 weeks, permitting extensive resections in patients otherwise contraindicated for liver resection. The PVE technique is variable from one center to another; however n-butyl-cyano-acrylate provides an interesting compromise between hypertrophy rate and procedure risk.

  20. Complex Perioperative Decision-Making: Liver Resection in a Patient with Extensive Superior Vena Cava/Right Atrial Thrombus and Superior Vena Cava Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lekowski, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    The perioperative management of patients suffering from extensive superior vena cava (SVC) thrombus complicated by SVC syndrome presents unique challenges. The anesthesiologist needs to be prepared for possible thrombus dislodgement resulting in pulmonary embolism and also has to assess the need for fluid resuscitation given the dangers of massive intravenous fluid application via the upper extremities. We present our perioperative approach in management of a patient scheduled for right hepatectomy who was previously diagnosed with extensive SVC and right atrial (RA) thrombus complicated by SVC syndrome. PMID:26904303

  1. Successful management of a giant spinal arteriovenous malformation with multiple communications between primitive arterial and venous structures by embolization: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kuga, T; Esato, K; Zempo, N; Fujioka, K; Harada, M; Furutani, A; Akiyama, N; Toyota, S; Fujita, Y

    1996-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a giant spinal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) causing heart failure and thoracic myelopathy. Angiography revealed that the spinal AVM had multiple feeding vessels branching from the 5th through 12th intercostal arteries. The drainage vein flowed to the azygos vein and superior vena cava. The AVM destroyed the 7th thoracic vertebra. The cardiac output was 16.7l/min and the shunt ratio was 64% before treatment. Embolization with cyanoacrylate was performed because the operation was considered to be associated with a significant risk of paraplegia and organ ischemia. The cardiac output decreased to 11.6l/min and the shunt ratio was reduced to 32%. After embolization the patient demonstrated no symptoms of either heart failure or sensory deficits. During embolization, provocative tests using sodium amytal and lidocaine with magnetic stimulation were also performed. The above findings suggest that provocative tests and magnetic stimulation are useful to predict paraplegia, which could result from embolization while, in addition, embolization is considered to be a useful treatment for multiple shunt and nidus in this region. PMID:8883257

  2. Arterial Embolization of Giant Hepatic Hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Giavroglou, Constantinos; Economou, Hippolete; Ioannidis, Ioannis

    2003-02-15

    Hepatic cavernous hemangiomas are usually small and asymptomatic. They are usually discovered incidentally and only a few require treatment. However, giant hemangiomas may cause symptoms,which are indications for treatment. We describe four cases of symptomatic giant hepatic hemangiomas successfully treated with transcatheter arterial embolization, performed with polyvinyl alcohol particles. There were no complications. Follow-up with clinical and imaging examinations showed disappearance of symptoms and decrease in size of lesions.

  3. Nonsurgical retrieval of embolized coronary stents.

    PubMed

    Eggebrecht, H; Haude, M; von Birgelen, C; Oldenburg, O; Baumgart, D; Herrmann, J; Welge, D; Bartel, T; Dagres, N; Erbel, R

    2000-12-01

    Embolization of coronary stents before deployment is a rare but challenging complication of coronary stenting. Different methods for nonsurgical stent retrieval have been suggested. There were 20 cases (0.90%) of intracoronary stent embolization among 2,211 patients who underwent implantation of 4,066 stents. Twelve of 1,147 manually crimped stents (1.04%) and eight of 2,919 premounted stents were lost (0.27%, P < 0.01) during retraction of the delivery system, because the target lesion could not be either reached or crossed. Percutaneous retrieval was successfully carried out in 10 of 14 patients (71%) in whom retrieval was attempted. In 10 patients, stent retrieval was tried with 1.5-mm low-profile angioplasty balloon catheters (success in 7/10) and in seven cases with myocardial biopsy forceps or a gooseneck snare (success in 3/7). Three patients (15%) underwent urgent coronary artery bypass surgery after failed percutaneous retrieval, but their outcomes were fatal. In two patients, stents were compressed against the vessel wall by another stent, without compromising coronary blood flow. In two patients, a stent was lost to the periphery without clinical side effects; treatment was conservative in these cases. Embolization of stents before deployment is a rare but serious complication of coronary stenting, with hazardous potential for the patient. Manual mounting of stents is associated with a significantly higher risk of stent embolization. Stent retrieval from the coronary circulation with low-profile angioplasty balloon catheters is a readily available and technically familiar approach that has a relatively high success rate. PMID:11108675

  4. Pulmonary embolism during delivery--treatment and outcome.

    PubMed

    Zamurović, M; Damnjanović, D

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism during delivery is not a frequent occurrence. It is often impossible to ascertain whether it is a case of embolism by amniotic fluid or thromboembolism. Diagnostics of pulmonary embolism in labor is based solely on clinical symptoms. Immediate interdisciplinary treatment with cardiopulmonary resuscitation, hemodynamic stabilization, and correction of haemostasis disorders play a decisive role in prognosis. This paper presents diagnostics, treatment, and consequences of pulmonary embolism in expulsion phase during delivery in epidural anesthesia of a multiparous patient aged 37. PMID:26753499

  5. Stent-assisted coil embolization of coronary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Terasawa, Akihiro; Yokoi, Tuyoshi; Kondo, Keita

    2013-08-01

    Coronary artery aneurysms are uncommon diseases with potential complications including rupture and ischemia from embolic events or thrombosis. No consensus has been established regarding the optimal therapy for coronary artery aneurysms. Percutaneous catheter-based treatments using membrane-covered stents and coil embolization have been described. However, only few reports of stent-assisted coil embolization for coronary artery aneurysms have been published to date. Therefore, we report a case of coronary artery aneurysm successfully treated with stent-assisted coil embolization. PMID:23913616

  6. Angiographic embolization for epistaxis: a review of 114 cases.

    PubMed

    Tseng, E Y; Narducci, C A; Willing, S J; Sillers, M J

    1998-04-01

    Angiography with selective embolization has become an accepted method of treating posterior epistaxis that is not controlled with conservative measures. The authors reviewed 112 cases of patients who had received selective angiographic embolization for refractory epistaxis from January 1990 to December 1995. There were 114 embolizations over this 5-year period. The immediate success rate was 93%, with long-term success achieved in 88% of patients. The overall complication rate was 17%, with the long-term morbidity rate less than 1%. Selective angiographic embolization is a safe and effective method that should be considered in the treatment of refractory epistaxis. PMID:9546280

  7. Renal artery embolization in severe nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Solak, Yalcin; Koc, Osman; Ucar, Ramazan; Ozbek, Orhan; Ergenc, Hasan; Gaipov, Abduzhappar; Turk, Suleyman

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Severe nephrotic syndrome is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Renal artery embolization (RAE) has been used in a number of renal diseases such as renal tumors, arteriovenous fistulas etc. However, data regarding benefits of RAE in patients with symptomatic severe proteinuria is limited. We decided to evaluate role of RAE in the setting of severe symptomatic nephrotic syndrome. Methods Eight patients who had undergone transcatheter renal artery embolization with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) were included. Clinico-demographic characteristics as well as baseline laboratory data including level of proteinuria, serum albumin, C-reactive protein and LDL cholesterol levels were recorded for each patient. After RAE, outpatient clinic control laboratory values were also assessed. Findings All patients except one underwent bilateral RAE (four simultaneous or three sequential). Two patients experienced postembolization syndrome characterized by flank pain, fever, and leukocytosis, which was self-limited and responded to analgesics in all patients. There was no technical complications associated with RAE procedure. All patients became anuric except one. Serum albumin levels increased and serum LDL-cholesterol levels decreased considerably in treated patients. Discussion Renal artery embolization with the purpose of amelioration in nephrotic syndrome complications was effective and free of major technical complications in our patients. PMID:26833695

  8. Carbon dioxide embolism during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zikry, Amir Abu; DeSousa, Kalindi; Alanezi, Khaled H

    2011-01-01

    Bariatric restrictive and malabsorptive operations are being carried out in most countries laparoscopically. Carbon dioxide or gas embolism has never been reported in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. We report a case of carbon dioxide embolism during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) in a young super obese female patient. Early diagnosis and successful management of this complication are discussed. An 18-year-old super obese female patient with enlarged fatty liver underwent LSG under general anesthesia. During initial intra-peritoneal insufflation with CO2 at high flows through upper left quadrant of the abdomen, she had precipitous fall of end-tidal CO2 and SaO2 % accompanied with tachycardia. Early suspicion led to stoppage of further insufflation. Clinical parameters were stabilized after almost 30 min, while the blood gas analysis was restored to normal levels after 1 h. The area of gas entrainment on the damaged liver was recognized by the surgeon and sealed and the surgery was successfully carried out uneventfully. Like any other laparoscopic surgery, carbon dioxide embolism can occur during bariatric laparoscopic surgery also. Caution should be exercised when Veress needle is inserted through upper left quadrant of the abdomen in patients with enlarged liver. A high degree of suspicion and prompt collaboration between the surgeon and anesthetist can lead to complete recovery from this potentially fatal complication. PMID:21772696

  9. Permcath Catheter Embolization: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yousefshahi, Hadi; Bina, Payvand; Yousefshahi, Fardin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays, many types of intravascular devices and catheters are used in order to diagnose and treat diseases. Complications related to these instruments are the costs that doctors and patients have to pay to benefit from their advantages. Catheter embolization is one of these side effects. Patients with devices in their cardiopulmonary system are at risk for severe complications such as arrhythmias, pulmonary embolism, myocardial injuries, hemoptysis, thrombosis and perforation. Case Presentation: A 50-years-old woman, with a history of breast cancer, had a PermCath emplacement in right subclavian vein for a course of chemotherapy. The treatment for cancer seemed to be successful and the PermCath had remained in its position without complication, for a couple of years however, the catheter was founded broken and embolized to the right ventricle and the main left pulmonary artery, diagnosed by a chest X-ray study incidentally. Conclusions: It is better to remove the unused devices safely to prevent and decrease their possible complications. PMID:25964881

  10. Partial splenic artery embolization in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Hadduck, Tyson A; McWilliams, Justin P

    2014-01-01

    Splenomegaly is a common sequela of cirrhosis, and is frequently associated with decreased hematologic indices including thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Partial splenic artery embolization (PSE) has been demonstrated to effectively increase hematologic indices in cirrhotic patients with splenomegaly. This is particularly valuable amongst those cirrhotic patients who are not viable candidates for splenectomy. Although PSE was originally developed decades ago, it has recently received increased attention. Presently, PSE is being utilized to address a number of clinical concerns in the setting of cirrhosis, including: decreased hematologic indices, portal hypertension and its associated sequela, and splenic artery steal syndrome. Following PSE patients demonstrate significant increases in platelets and leukocytes. Though progressive decline of hematologic indices occur following PSE, they remain improved as compared to pre-procedural values over long-term follow-up. PSE, however, is not without risk and complications of the procedure may occur. The most common complication of PSE is post-embolization syndrome, which involves a constellation of symptoms including fever, pain, and nausea/vomiting. The rate of complications has been shown to increase as the percent of total splenic volume embolized increases. The purpose of this review is to explore the current literature in regards to PSE in cirrhotic patients and to highlight their techniques, and statistically summarize their results and associated complications. PMID:24876920

  11. Experimental study of temperature-sensitive chitosan/β-glycerophosphate embolic material in embolizing the basicranial rete mirabile in swines

    PubMed Central

    NING, XIANBIN; ZHAO, CHANGFU; PANG, JINFENG; DING, ZHAOYI; WANG, YUBO; XU, KAN; CHEN, HAO; LI, BINGWEI; LUO, QI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of the non-adhesive temperature-sensitive liquid embolic material, chitosan/β-glycerophosphate (C/GP), in embolizing the basicranial rete mirabile (REM) in a swine model of cerebral arteriovenous malformation (cAVM). A total of 24 domestic swines were used as the experimental animals, among which 12 pigs underwent direct embolization of one side of the REM, while the other 12 pigs underwent embolization of the bilateral REM following anastomosis of the carotid artery and jugular vein. A super-selective microcatheter was introduced into the REM during the embolization procedure, and the C/GP hydrogel was injected until an image of the REM disappeared in the angiography examination. Further angiography examinations were performed after 2 and 6 weeks, and histological examination of the REM was performed after 6 weeks. Of the 24 domestic swines, 23 cases underwent successful thrombosis. Convulsions occurred in one case and that pig died during the embolization procedure. Following embolization, the angiography observations revealed that the embolized REM was no longer able to be developed, and adhesion of the microcatheter tip with the embolic agent did not occur. In addition, no apparent revascularization was observed in the angiography examinations performed at weeks 2 and 6. Therefore, the current preliminary study indicated that use of the non-adhesive temperature-sensitive embolic material was feasible for the embolization of cAVM; thus, C/GP may be used as an ideal embolic material for the treatment of cAVM. PMID:26170955

  12. Experimental Evaluation of Early and Long-Term Effects of Microparticle Embolization in Two Different Mini-Pig Models. Part I: Kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfl, S.; Stampfl, U.; Rehnitz, C.; Schnabel, Ph.; Satzl, S.; Christoph, P.; Henn, C.; Thomas, F.; Kauffmann, G. W.; Richter, G. M.

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. Using a pig model: (1) to evaluate the vascular distribution pattern, including the homogeneity and completeness of the intra-arterial microsphere distribution, of 40-120-{mu}m trisacryl-gelatin microspheres (Embospheres) in acute whole-kidney embolization; (2) to evaluate the durability and biocompatibility of 40-120-{mu}m trisacryl-gelatin microspheres (Embospheres) in chronic partial kidney embolization. Methods. Twenty-two animals were divided into four groups: group 1 (n = 4) underwent total arterial renal occlusion with immediate euthanasia. Groups 2-4 had chronic superselective and partial renal embolization with increasing follow-up times: group 2 (n = 2), 1 week; group 3 (n = 7), 4 weeks; and group 4 (n = 9), 14 weeks. Key endpoints in group 1 were homogeneity and completeness of acute embolizations. In groups 2-4 the key endpoints were durability of embolization and particle-related inflammation in chronic partial embolizations as assessed by quantitative angiography or histomorphometry. A numerical angiographic occlusion score (0.0 to 4.0, where 3.0 is optimal) was developed to assess and quantify the angiographic durability of superselective embolizations (groups 2-4). Results. In group 1, a relatively homogeneous distribution of the particles from segmental arteries to the precapillary level was shown by histomorphometry. Some particles reached the glomerular vas afferens (10 {mu}m diameter). In groups 2-4, a mild recanalization appeared during follow-up. The immediate average postembolization occlusion score of 3.18 {+-} 0.73 was reduced to 1.44 {+-} 0.73 (statistically significant). Microscopy revealed subtotal necrosis but no foreign body granuloma formation. The intra-arterial appearance of giant cells closely attaching to the surface of the embolic spheres inside the vessel lumen was noted. Vessel walls showed major ischemic reactions. Conclusion. Microspheres 40-120 {mu}m in diameter might achieve total occlusion of the arterial kidney

  13. Developments in the management and treatment of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Limbrey, Rachel; Howard, Luke

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a serious and costly disease for patients and healthcare systems. Guidelines emphasise the importance of differentiating between patients who are at high risk of mortality (those with shock and/or hypotension), who may be candidates for thrombolytic therapy or surgery, and those with less severe presentations. Recent clinical studies and guidelines have focused particularly on risk stratification of intermediate-risk patients. Although the use of thrombolysis has been investigated in these patients, anticoagulation remains the standard treatment approach. Individual risk stratification directs initial treatment. Rates of recurrence differ between subgroups of patients with PE; therefore, a review of provoking factors, along with the risks of morbidity and bleeding, guides the duration of ongoing anticoagulation. The direct oral anticoagulants have shown similar efficacy and, in some cases, reduced major bleeding compared with standard approaches for acute treatment. They also offer the potential to reduce the burden on patients and outpatient services in the post-hospital phase. Rivaroxaban, dabigatran and apixaban have been shown to reduce the risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism versus placebo, when given for >12 months. Patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants do not require regular coagulation monitoring, but follow-up, ideally in a specialist PE clinic in consultation with primary care providers, is recommended. PMID:26324810

  14. Diagnosing pulmonary embolism: time to rewrite the textbooks.

    PubMed

    Schoepf, U Joseph

    2005-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is rapidly becoming the first line modality for imaging pulmonary embolism (PE). However, limitations for the accurate diagnosis of small peripheral emboli have prevented the unanimous acceptance of CT as the new standard of reference for imaging PE although the actual significance of the detection and treatment of isolated peripheral emboli is uncertain. At the same time the high negative predictive value of CT pulmonary angiography for excluding clinically significant PE has been established in retrospective and prospective studies. The introduction of multidetector-row spiral CT has greatly improved visualization of peripheral pulmonary arteries and detection of small emboli. Previous concerns regarding the accuracy of spiral CT for the accurate diagnosis of peripheral pulmonary emboli should thus be overcome. Multidetector-row spiral CT has become a widely available and cost-effective modality, which has surpassed other imaging modalities for PE diagnosis to a point where over-utilization may become of concern. Our most immediate goal must be to educate our referring colleagues about these important transitions so that the diagnostic algorithm in patients with suspected acute PE is updated to accurately reflect our current diagnostic prowess in medical imaging. PMID:15915948

  15. [Pulmonary embolism in patients with cancer: foundations of the EPIPHANY study].

    PubMed

    Font, Carme; Carmona-Bayonas, Alberto; Plasencia, Juana M; Calvo-Temprano, David; Sánchez, Marcelo; Jiménez-Fonseca, Paula; Beato, Carmen; Biosca, Mercè; Vicente, Vicente; Otero, Remedios

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism (PE) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer. Having cancer is an independent risk factor for death in the general series of patients with PE and is included as a variable in the prognostic scales of acute symptomatic PE. This fact limits the discriminatory power of these general scales for patients with cancer and has prompted the development of specific prognostic tools: POMPE-C and a scale derived from the RIETE registry. Whether the increased risk of death by PE in patients with cancer is due to complications related to the neoplasm or to a greater severity of the thromboembolic episode in this population has not been well studied. Moreover, the introduction of computed multidetector tomography in recent years has led to a growing diagnosis of incidental PE, which currently represents up to half of pulmonary embolisms in patients with cancer. The EPIPHANY study attempts to further the understanding of the characteristics of pulmonary embolisms in patients with cancer by including incidental and symptomatic events. Its primary objectives are a) to understand the clinical and epidemiological patterns of pulmonary embolism associated with cancer and b) to develop and validate a specific prognosis model for PE in this population. The registry includes variables of interest to oncology (cancer type and extent, oncospecific treatments, patient's functional condition, cancer progression), radiological variables (thrombotic burden, signs of ventricular overload and other findings), location of treatment (hospital or outpatient), acute complications and causes of death in patients with PE associated with cancer. PMID:25771090

  16. Managing pulmonary embolism from presentation to extended treatment.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander T; Dobromirski, Mark; Gurwith, Meredith M P

    2014-02-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) remains a major healthcare problem. PE presents with a variety of non-specific symptoms, and confirmation of diagnosis involves the use of clinical risk scores, scanning techniques and laboratory tests. Treatment choice is informed by the risk of sudden death, with high-risk patients recommended to receive thrombolytic therapy or thrombectomy. Patients with less severe presentations are given anticoagulant therapy, traditionally with parenteral heparins in the acute phase of treatment, transitioning to oral vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). The limitations of these agents and the introduction of non-VKA oral anticoagulants challenge this paradigm. To date, clinical studies of four non-VKA oral anticoagulants to treat acute thrombosis have been published, and rivaroxaban is now approved for treatment and prevention of PE (and deep vein thrombosis). Rivaroxaban and apixaban alone, and dabigatran and edoxaban after parenteral anticoagulant induction, were non-inferior to enoxaparin/VKA for the prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism; the risk of major bleeding was similar with dabigatran and edoxaban and significantly reduced with rivaroxaban and apixaban. Patients with an initial PE are recommended to receive continued anticoagulation for 3 months or longer, depending on individual risk factors, and studies of non-VKA oral anticoagulants have shown a continued benefit for up to 2 years, without a significantly increased risk of major bleeding. Given that the non-VKA oral anticoagulants are given at fixed doses without the need for routine coagulation monitoring, their adoption is likely to ease the burden on both PE patients and healthcare practitioners when longer-term or extended anticoagulation is warranted. PMID:24182642

  17. Episode of massive pulmonary embolism after bilateral breast augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Schonauer, Fabrizio; Nele, Gisella; Di Martino, Annalena; Santoro, Mariangela; Santanelli di Pompeo, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a rare postsurgical complication, even more so following breast augmentation. Herein we present a case of a 23-year-old woman who survived an episode of massive pulmonary embolism after breast implant surgery. Current literature about this subject is very scarce.

  18. Endovascular Embolization of Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage Secondary to Anticoagulant Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Isokangas, Juha-Matti Peraelae, Jukka M.

    2004-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to report a single hospital's experience of endovascular treatment of patients with retroperitoneal hemorrhage (RPH) secondary to anticoagulant treatment. Ten consecutive patients treated in an intensive care unit and needing blood transfusions due to RPH secondary to anticoagulation were referred for digital subtraction angiography (DSA) to detect the bleeding site(s) and to evaluate the possibilities of treating them by transcatheter embolization. DSA revealed bleeding site(s) in all 10 patients: 1 lumbar artery in 4 patients, 1 branch of internal iliac artery in 3 patients and multiple bleeding sites in 3 patients. Embolization could be performed in 9 of them. Coils, gelatin and/or polyvinyl alcohol were used as embolic agents. Bleeding stopped or markedly decreased after embolization in 8 of the 9 (89%) patients. Four patients were operated on prior to embolization, but surgery failed to control the bleeding in any of these cases. Abdominal compartment syndrome requiring surgical or radiological intervention after embolization developed in 5 patients. One patient died, and 2 had sequelae due to RPH. All 7 patients whose bleeding stopped after embolization had a good clinical outcome. Embolization seems to be an effective and safe method to control the bleeding in patients with RPH secondary to anticoagulant treatment when conservative treatment is insufficient.

  19. Intra-arterial Onyx Embolization of Vertebral Body Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Sedora-Roman, Neda I.; Reddy, Arra Suresh; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Thomas, Ajith J.

    2013-01-01

    While Onyx embolization of cerebrospinal arteriovenous shunts is well-established, clinical researchers continue to broaden applications to other vascular lesions of the neuraxis. This report illustrates the application of Onyx (eV3, Plymouth, MN) embolization to vertebral body lesions, specifically, a vertebral hemangioma and renal cell carcinoma vertebral body metastatic lesion. PMID:24729960

  20. Tunable delivery of niflumic acid from resorbable embolization microspheres for uterine fibroid embolization.

    PubMed

    Bédouet, Laurent; Moine, Laurence; Servais, Emeline; Beilvert, Anne; Labarre, Denis; Laurent, Alexandre

    2016-09-10

    Uterine arteries embolization (UAE) is a recent technique that aims, by means of particles injected percutaneously, to stifle fibroids (leiomyomas). This treatment is non-invasive, compared with uterine ablation, but generates pelvic pain for a few days. A strategy to reduce the post-embolization pain would be to use calibrated embolization microspheres preloaded with a non-steroidal inflammatory drug (NSAID). In this study, we first compared four drugs, all active at low concentration on cyclooxygenase-2, i.e. ketoprofen, sodium diclofenac, flurbiprofen and niflumic acid (NFA), for their capacity to be loaded on resorbable embolization microspheres (REM) 500-700μm. NFA had the highest capacity of loading (5mg/mL) on resorbable microspheres. Then, we evaluated in vitro the NFA release profiles from REM having various degradation times of one, two or five days. NFA release was biphasic, with an initial burst (about 60% of the loading) followed by a sustained release that correlated significantly to REM's hydrolysis (rho=0.761, p<0.0001). For each group of beads, the size distribution was not modified by the loading of NFA and their delivery through microcatheter was not impaired by the drug. NFA eluted from REM inhibited the synthesis of prostaglandin E2 from rabbit uterus explants. In summary, NFA is loadable on REM in significant amount and its delivery can be tuned according to the degradation rate of REM to provide an antalgic effect for a few days after UAE. PMID:27374196

  1. Ovarian Artery: Angiographic Appearance, Embolization and Relevance to Uterine Fibroid Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Pelage, J.P. Walker, W.J.; Le Dref, O.; Rymer, R.

    2003-06-15

    Purpose: To describe the angiographic appearance of the ovarian artery and its main variations that may be relevant to uterine fibroid embolization. Methods: The flush aortograms of 294 women who had been treated by uterine artery embolization for fibroids were reviewed. Significant arterial supply to the fibroid, and the origin and diameter of identified ovarian arteries were recorded. In patients with additional embolization of the ovarian artery, the follow-up evaluation also included hormonal levels and Doppler imaging of the ovaries. Results: A total of 75 ovarian arteries were identified in 59 women (bilaterally in 16 women and unilaterally in 43 women). All ovarian arteries originated from the aorta below the level of the renal arteries with a characteristic tortuous course. Fifteen women had at least one enlarged ovarian artery supplying the fibroids. Fourteen women (14/15, 93%) presented at least one of the following factors: prior pelvic surgery, tubo-ovarian pathology or large fundal fibroids. Conclusion: We advocate the use of flush aortography in women with prior tubo-ovarian pathology or surgery or in cases of large fundal fibroids. In the case of an ovarian artery supply to the fibroids, superselective catheterization and embolization of the ovarian artery should be considered.

  2. Visual quantification of embolism reveals leaf vulnerability to hydraulic failure.

    PubMed

    Brodribb, Timothy J; Skelton, Robert P; McAdam, Scott A M; Bienaimé, Diane; Lucani, Christopher J; Marmottant, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Vascular plant mortality during drought has been strongly linked to a failure of the internal water transport system caused by the rapid invasion of air and subsequent blockage of xylem conduits. Quantification of this critical process is greatly complicated by the existence of high water tension in xylem cells making them prone to embolism during experimental manipulation. Here we describe a simple new optical method that can be used to record spatial and temporal patterns of embolism formation in the veins of water-stressed leaves for the first time. Applying this technique in four diverse angiosperm species we found very strong agreement between the dynamics of embolism formation during desiccation and decline of leaf hydraulic conductance. These data connect the failure of the leaf water transport network under drought stress to embolism formation in the leaf xylem, and suggest embolism occurs after stomatal closure under extreme water stress. PMID:26742653

  3. Cerebral air embolism caused by a bronchogenic cyst.

    PubMed

    Jung, Simon; Wiest, Roland; Frigerio, Susanna; Mattle, Heinrich P; Hess, Christian W

    2010-06-01

    An unusual case is presented of a tourist who developed fatal cerebral air embolism, pneumomediastinum and pneumopericardium while ascending from low altitude to Europe's highest railway station. Presumably the air embolism originated from rupture of the unsuspected bronchogenic cyst as a result of pressure changes during the ascent. Cerebral air embolism has been observed during surgery, in scuba diving accidents, submarine escapes and less frequently during exposure to very high altitude. People with known bronchogenic cysts should be informed about the risk of cerebral air embolism and surgical removal should be considered. Cerebral air embolism is a rare cause of coma and stroke in all activities with rapid air pressure changes, including alpine tourism, as our unfortunate tourist illustrates. PMID:20498190

  4. Acute acalculous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Barie, Philip S; Eachempati, Soumitra R

    2003-08-01

    Acute cholecystitis can develop without gallstones in critically ill or injured patients. However, the development of acute acalculous cholecystitis is not limited to surgical or injured patients, or even to the intensive care unit. Diabetes, malignant disease, abdominal vasculitis, congestive heart failure, cholesterol embolization, and shock or cardiac arrest have been associated with acute acalculous cholecystitis. Children may also be affected, especially after a viral illness. The pathogenesis of acute acalculous cholecystitis is a paradigm of complexity. Ischemia and reperfusion injury, or the effects of eicosanoid proinflammatory mediators, appear to be the central mechanisms, but bile stasis, opioid therapy, positive-pressure ventilation, and total parenteral nutrition have all been implicated. Ultrasound of the gallbladder is the most accurate diagnostic modality in the critically ill patient, with gallbladder wall thickness of 3.5 mm or greater and pericholecystic fluid being the two most reliable criteria. The historical treatment of choice for acute acalculous cholecystitis has been cholecystectomy, but percutaneous cholecystostomy is now the mainstay of therapy, controlling the disease in about 85% of patients. Rapid improvement can be expected when the procedure is performed properly. The mortality rates (historically about 30%) for percutaneous and open cholecystostomy appear to be similar, reflecting the severity of illness, but improved resuscitation and critical care may portend a decreased risk of death. Interval cholecystectomy is usually not indicated after acute acalculous cholecystitis in survivors; if the absence of gallstones is confirmed and the precipitating disorder has been controlled, the cholecystostomy tube can be pulled out after the patient has recovered. PMID:12864960

  5. Devascularization of Head and Neck Paragangliomas by Direct Percutaneous Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Ozyer, Umut Harman, Ali; Yildirim, Erkan; Aytekin, Cuneyt; Akay, Tankut Hakki; Boyvat, Fatih

    2010-10-15

    Preoperative transarterial embolization of head and neck paragangliomas using particulate agents has proven beneficial for decreasing intraoperative blood loss. However, the procedure is often incomplete owing to extensive vascular structure and arteriovenous shunts. We report our experience with embolization of these lesions by means of direct puncture and intratumoral injection of n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) or Onyx. Ten patients aged 32-82 years who were referred for preoperative embolization of seven carotid body tumors and three jugular paragangliomas were retrospectively analyzed. Intratumoral injections were primarily performed in four cases with multiple small-caliber arterial feeders and adjunctive to transarterial embolization in six cases with incomplete devascularization. Punctures were performed under ultrasound and injections were performed under roadmap fluoroscopic guidance. Detailed angiographies were performed before and after embolization procedures. Control angiograms showed complete or near-complete devascularization in all tumors. Three tumors with multiple small-caliber arterial feeders were treated with primary NBCA injections. One tumor necessitated transarterial embolization after primary injection of Onyx. Six tumors showed regional vascularization from the vasa vasorum or small-caliber branches of the external carotid artery following the transarterial approach. These regions were embolized with NBCA injections. No technical or clinical complications related to embolization procedures occurred. All except one of the tumors were surgically removed following embolization. In conclusion, preoperative devascularization with percutaneous direct injection of NBCA or Onyx is feasible, safe, and effective in head and neck paragangliomas with multiple small-caliber arterial feeders and in cases of incomplete devascularization following transarterial embolization.

  6. Preoperative embolization of primary bone tumors: A case control study

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Roushan; Sharma, Raju; Rastogi, Shishir; Khan, Shah Alam; Jayaswal, Arvind; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the safety and effectiveness of preoperative embolization of primary bone tumors in relation to intraoperative blood loss, intraoperative blood transfusion volume and surgical time. METHODS: Thirty-three patients underwent preoperative embolization of primary tumors of extremities, hip or vertebrae before resection and stabilization. The primary osseous tumors included giant cell tumors, aneurysmal bone cyst, osteoblastoma, chondroblastoma and chondrosarcoma. Twenty-six patients were included for the statistical analysis (embolization group) as they were operated within 0-48 h within preoperative embolization. A control group (non-embolization group, n = 28) with bone tumor having similar histological diagnosis and operated without embolization was retrieved from hospital record for statistical comparison. RESULTS: The mean intraoperative blood loss was 1300 mL (250-2900 mL), the mean intraoperative blood transfusion was 700 mL (0-1400 mL) and the mean surgical time was 221 ± 76.7 min for embolization group (group I, n = 26). Non-embolization group (group II, n = 28), the mean intraoperative blood loss was 1800 mL (800-6000 mL), the mean intraoperative blood transfusion was 1400 mL (700-8400 mL) and the mean surgical time was 250 ± 69.7 min. On comparison, statistically significant (P < 0.001) difference was found between embolisation group and non-embolisation group for the amount of blood loss and requirement of blood transfusion. There was no statistical difference between the two groups for the surgical time. No patients developed any angiography or embolization related complications. CONCLUSION: Preoperative embolization of bone tumors is a safe and effective adjunct to the surgical management of primary bone tumors that leads to reduction in intraoperative blood loss and blood transfusion volume. PMID:27158424

  7. Pulmonary cement embolization after vertebroplasty, an uncommon presentation of pulmonary embolism: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Nishant; Padegal, Vivek; Satyanarayana, Satish; Santosh, Hassan Krishnamurthy

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary Cement Embolization (PCE) is a rare complication of vertebroplasty surgery. There is no clear guideline for management of this entity. There is no definite protocol for anticoagulation in PCE. This is a case report of our patient who was diagnosed to have Pulmonary Cement Embolization, which was quite significant involving both lungs. She was successfully managed without long term anticoagulation. PMID:26664167

  8. Cerebral air embolism after pleural streptokinase instillation.

    PubMed

    Janisch, Thorsten; Siekmann, Ullrich; Kopp, Rüdger

    2013-12-01

    Iatrogenic pulmonary barotrauma and cerebral arterial gas embolism (CAGE) may complicate a variety of medical procedures, such as certain types of surgery, drug administration through thoracic drainage, pneumoperitoneum, cystoscopy, bronchoscopy, etc. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment following the guidelines for CAGE in diving is the treatment of choice. Pleural streptokinase instillation is a common treatment for parapneumonic pleural effusion and may lead to CAGE. We present such a complication in a 79-year-old woman with a left-sided empyema. Neurological recovery was reasonable, but a left hemiparesis persisted. Prompt treatment of CAGE is necessary to avoid permanent injury and severe disability. PMID:24510333

  9. Direct Percutaneous Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, Sailen G.; Castle, Erik P.; Kriegshauser, J. Scott; Huettl, Eric A.

    2010-02-15

    Stomal variceal bleeding can develop in patients with underlying cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Most patients are best treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation because this addresses the underlying problem of portal hypertension. However, some patients are not good candidates for TIPS creation because they have end-stage liver disease or encephalopathy. We describe such a patient who presented with recurrent bleeding stomal varices, which was successfully treated with percutaneous coil embolization. The patient had bleeding-free survival for 1 month before death from unrelated causes.

  10. Embolic retinopathy due to Corynebacterium minutissimum endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Herschorn, B J; Brucker, A J

    1985-01-01

    Infective embolic retinopathy as a sequela of bacterial endocarditis is described in a 31-year-old woman with mitral valve prolapse. The infective organism, Corynebacterium minutissimum, has not been previously found to cause ocular or multisystem diseases. It is a common mucocutaneous inhabitant which causes erythrasma. In our case report both ocular involvement and septicaemia were present. The infection was confirmed by positive serial blood cultures. Mitral valve prolapse was confirmed by echocardiography. On clinical examination the retinopathy consisted of white intraretinal lesions which resolved with antibiotic therapy. By fluorescein angiography focal areas of hypofluorescence corresponding to the white fundus lesions were present. Optic disc oedema was also seen. PMID:3965026

  11. Patient Presentation and Management of Labial Ulceration Following Uterine Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, Carin Franciosa, Stefan V.; Shah, Suken; Bonn, Joseph; Wu, Christine

    2007-11-15

    Uterine artery embolization is a safe and effective procedure for the treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids. Nontarget embolization of adjacent internal iliac artery branches is a reported complication of uterine artery embolization. The following report describes the presentation and management of ulcerations of the labium minora due to nontarget embolization of the internal pudendal artery.

  12. Positional desaturation due to persistent left superior vena cava draining into the left atrium.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Kousuke; Kawamura, Akio; Muraoka, Naoto; Murata, Mitsushige; Tsuruta, Hikaru; Aeba, Ryo; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2016-05-01

    Persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) is a rare congenital anomaly whose prevalence is 0.3 % of general population. The majority of PLSVC drain into right atrium (RA) through the coronary sinus without clinical harm. However, in about 10 % of patients with PLSVC, it drains into left atrium (LA) causing right-to-left shunt. Here, we present a 60-year-old male patient with a PLSVC draining into LA, who developed dyspnea and desaturation depending on the body position after trans-catheter coil embolization of coronary to pulmonary artery fistulas. PLSVC draining into LA should be included in the differential diagnosis of positional desaturation. PMID:25656932

  13. Giant Right Coronary Artery Aneurysm Associated with a Fistula Draining into the Superior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Dolapoglu, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Giant coronary artery aneurysm associated with a coronary–cameral fistula is an uncommon condition. Such aneurysms are usually associated with other cardiac diseases, such as coronary atherosclerosis, and therefore might augment myocardial ischemia in adults. The main indications for surgical intervention are severe coexisting coronary artery disease, evidence of embolization, and aneurysmal enlargement or rupture. We describe a large right coronary artery aneurysm and a coronary–cameral fistula that drained into the superior vena cava. The surgical repair was successful. PMID:27547153

  14. Septic Pulmonary Embolism Following Appendectomy Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lardo, Soroy; Ariane, Anna; Chen, Khie

    2015-07-01

    Septic Pulmonary embolism is a rare condition where there were numerous pulmonary infarcts resulting from blood clot emboli that also contains microorganism. This disorder is insidious onset, Its clinical features usually unspecific and the diagnosis usually difficult to establish. A 43 old woman who underwent an appendicitis surgery, reentered the hospital at the sixth day after surgery presented with fever, pain at the surgical site, progressive severe dyspnea and chest tightness. From the physical examination finding there were tachycardia, tachypneu, wet rough basal rhonki on the right rear and tenderness at right lower region of the abdomen. The thorax-abdomen CT scan result was pleuropneumonial with minimal effusion in the right side. A CT angiography scan of the chest and abdomen showed intralumen emboli in medial lobe segmen of right pulmonary artery, right pleuropneumonia with segmental lession in segmen 10 right lobe and inflammation process along right lateral wall of the abdomen. Laboratory results that also supported diagnosis were D dimer 3442 ng/mL and culture result from surgical site pus showed E. Coli ESBL (+). Base on these findings, this case was established as a septic pulmonary embolism. PMID:26586389

  15. Pulmonary embolism in pregnancy. Consensus and controversies.

    PubMed

    Benson, M D

    2012-10-01

    Venous thrombotic events (VTE) occur 1-2 per 10,000 pregnancies and remain one of the leading causes of maternal mortality in the developed world. The two largest risk factors are a personal history of VTE and heritable thrombophilias. D-dimer tests for VTE in pregnancy have a high false positive rate and at least some false negatives have been reported. Compression ultrasound should be used to evaluate pregnant women for deep venous thrombosis followed by magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis for a negative test and strong remaining clinical suspicion. For pulmonary embolism, a chest x-ray should be used to triage the patient to either a ventilation/perfusion study after a normal X-ray or a CT pulmonary angiogram after an abnormal one. Treatment generally consists of low molecular weight heparin through a minimum of six weeks post-partum. Thombolysis might have merit in life-threatening, massive pulmonary embolism. VTE prophylaxis in at-risk populations remains a major area of uncertainty. Mechanical prophylaxis for all women undergoing cesarean, in particular, has a paucity of supportive evidence. PMID:23018478

  16. Atypical and ischemic features of embolized meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ken; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Arai, Yoshikazu; Kitai, Ryuhei; Hosoda, Tetsuya; Tsunetoshi, Kenzo; Arishima, Hidetaka; Sato, Kazufumi; Kikuta, Ken-Ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Preoperative embolization (POE) of meningiomas is widely used to facilitate surgical removal and to reduce intraoperative blood loss. The resulting necrosis and enhanced proliferation have been reported to affect subsequent histologic grading. However, there was little concern about ischemic features, for example small cells resembling atypical meningiomas, cytoplasmic vacuoles resembling clear cell meningioma, intercellular discohesion resembling rhabdoid meningioma, and perivascular cuffs resembling papillary meningioma. Therefore, the extent of these ischemic features was scored and Ki-67 staining indices were investigated in a POE group composed of 29 specimens of meningiomas treated with POE and compared with equivalent results for a non-POE group composed of 29 meningiomas that were not treated with POE. Small cells with high N/C ratios, cytoplasmic vacuoles, intercellular discohesion, and perivascular cuffs were significantly increased in the POE group (versus the non-POE group, p < 0.05). There were no significant differences of the Ki-67 index between the POE group (2.2%) and the non-POE group (1.9%) (p = 0.49). Our results suggest that small cell change resulting in necrosis may be followed by POE, and that clear cell-like, rhabdoid cell-like, or pseudopapillary pattern identified in meningiomas may also be induced by POE. Therefore, histological findings and determination of grading should be evaluated cautiously in cases of embolized meningiomas. PMID:21789536

  17. Evaluation of meteorological and epidemiological characteristics of fatal pulmonary embolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törő, Klára; Pongrácz, Rita; Bartholy, Judit; Váradi-T, Aletta; Marcsa, Boglárka; Szilágyi, Brigitta; Lovas, Attila; Dunay, György; Sótonyi, Péter

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify risk factors among epidemiological factors and meteorological conditions in connection with fatal pulmonary embolism. Information was collected from forensic autopsy records in sudden unexpected death cases where pulmonary embolism was the exact cause of death between 2001 and 2010 in Budapest. Meteorological parameters were detected during the investigated period. Gender, age, manner of death, cause of death, place of death, post-mortem pathomorphological changes and daily meteorological conditions (i.e. daily mean temperature and atmospheric pressure) were examined. We detected that the number of registered pulmonary embolism (No 467, 211 male) follows power law in time regardless of the manner of death. We first described that the number of registered fatal pulmonary embolism up to the nth day can be expressed as Y( n) = α ṡ n β where Y denotes the number of fatal pulmonary embolisms up to the nth day and α > 0 and β > 1 are model parameters. We found that there is a definite link between the cold temperature and the increasing incidence of fatal pulmonary embolism. Cold temperature and the change of air pressure appear to be predisposing factors for fatal pulmonary embolism. Meteorological parameters should have provided additional information about the predisposing factors of thromboembolism.

  18. Evaluation of meteorological and epidemiological characteristics of fatal pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Törő, Klára; Pongrácz, Rita; Bartholy, Judit; Váradi-T, Aletta; Marcsa, Boglárka; Szilágyi, Brigitta; Lovas, Attila; Dunay, György; Sótonyi, Péter

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify risk factors among epidemiological factors and meteorological conditions in connection with fatal pulmonary embolism. Information was collected from forensic autopsy records in sudden unexpected death cases where pulmonary embolism was the exact cause of death between 2001 and 2010 in Budapest. Meteorological parameters were detected during the investigated period. Gender, age, manner of death, cause of death, place of death, post-mortem pathomorphological changes and daily meteorological conditions (i.e. daily mean temperature and atmospheric pressure) were examined. We detected that the number of registered pulmonary embolism (No 467, 211 male) follows power law in time regardless of the manner of death. We first described that the number of registered fatal pulmonary embolism up to the nth day can be expressed as Y(n) = α ⋅ n (β) where Y denotes the number of fatal pulmonary embolisms up to the nth day and α > 0 and β > 1 are model parameters. We found that there is a definite link between the cold temperature and the increasing incidence of fatal pulmonary embolism. Cold temperature and the change of air pressure appear to be predisposing factors for fatal pulmonary embolism. Meteorological parameters should have provided additional information about the predisposing factors of thromboembolism. PMID:26178756

  19. SMTP (Stachybotrys microspora triprenyl phenol) enhances clot clearance in a pulmonary embolism model in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stachybotrys microspora triprenyl phenols (SMTPs) are a novel family of small molecules that enhance both activation and fibrin-binding of plasminogen. While their effects on fibrinolysis have been characterized in vitro, little is known about their activity in vivo with respect to plasminogen activation and blood clot clearance. Results To select a potent SMTP congener for the evaluation of its action in vitro and in vivo, we tested several SMTP congeners with distinct structural properties for their effects on plasminogen activation. As a result, SMTP-7 (orniplabin) was found to have distinguished activity. Several lines of biochemical evidence supported the idea that SMTP-7 acted as a plasminogen modulator. SMTP-7 elevated plasma level of plasmin-α2-antiplasmin complex, an index of plasmin formation in vivo, 1.5-fold in mice after the intravenous injections at doses of 5 and 10 mg kg-1. In a rat pulmonary embolism model, SMTP-7 (5 mg kg-1) enhanced the rate of clot clearance ~3-fold in the absence of exogenous plasminogen activator. Clot clearance was enhanced further by 5 mg kg-1 of SMTP-7 in combination with single-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Conclusions Our results show that SMTP-7 is a superior plasminogen modulator among the SMTP family compounds and suggest that the agent enhances plasmin generation in vivo, leading to clearance of thrombi in a model of pulmonary embolism. PMID:22230042

  20. 75 FR 28542 - Superior Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... orient the new Superior Resource Advisory Committee members on their roles and responsibilities. DATES... of the roles and responsibilities of the Superior Resource Advisory Committee members; Election...

  1. Transcatheter arterial embolization - major complications and their prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, F.J. Jr.; Mineau, D.E.

    1983-08-01

    A thorough account is given of the complications of embolization techniques in nonneurovascular areas, including hepatic infarction, renal and splenic abscess formation. Infarction of the urinary bladder, gallbladder, stomach, and bowel are discussed. Suggestions are offered to prevent complications from embolization where possible. Specific agents for embolization are detailed and their relative merits are compared; ethyl alcohol has recently gained popularity for treating esophageal varices and infarcting renal tumors. Care is advocated when using alcohol in the renal arteries; employing this agent is currently contraindicated in the celiac and mesenteric arteries. Coils and balloon systems are also described along with their potential complications.

  2. Percutaneous embolization of varicocele: technique, indications, relative contraindications, and complications

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Joshua; Mittal, Sameer; Pereira, Keith; Bhatia, Shivank; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2016-01-01

    There are several options for the treatment of varicocele, including surgical repair either by open or microsurgical approach, laparoscopy, or through percutaneous embolization of the internal spermatic vein. The ultimate goal of varicocele treatment relies on the occlusion of the dilated veins that drain the testis. Percutaneous embolization offers a rapid recovery and can be successfully accomplished in approximately 90% of attempts. However, the technique demands interventional radiologic expertise and has potential serious complications, including vascular perforation, coil migration, and thrombosis of pampiniform plexus. This review discusses the common indications, relative contraindications, technical details, and risks associated with percutaneous embolization of varicocele. PMID:26658060

  3. Crisis management of air embolism in the or.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Patricia C; Yang, Zhao; Munoz, Ruben

    2015-04-01

    An air embolism in the OR is a life-threatening emergency that demands prompt coordinated interventions by all perioperative team members. Specific applications of protocols and guidelines, such as the flowchart provided in this article, provide key components of traditional and effective responses to surgical crises. Successful management of an air embolism event requires critical skills of perioperative nurses who must consider both the risks for VAE or AAE and preventive actions, be aware of the resources available during an air embolism in the OR, and collaborate with their team members through precise and accurate communication. PMID:25835011

  4. Postcoital Hemorrhage of a Recurrent Seminal Vesicle Cyst Requiring Embolization.

    PubMed

    Royston, Eric; Walker, Marc; Ching, Brian; Morilla, Daniel; Sterbis, Joseph; McMann, Leah

    2014-09-01

    Herein is a case of a 23-year-old man with recurrence of a seminal vesicle cyst after percutaneous drainage and laparoscopic excision complicated by hemorrhage requiring embolization. He presented to the emergency department for pain after ejaculation. Computed tomographic scan of his pelvis revealed extravasation of contrast near his cyst and pelvic fluid collection suspicious for a hematoma. The patient had steadily decreasing hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. An interventional radiologist performed an embolization of the left seminal vesicle cystic arteries. Hemoglobin and hematocrit values improved and he was discharged. Hemorrhage resolved with embolization procedure and pain dissipated over the course of follow up care. PMID:26958478

  5. Facial palsy following embolization of a dural arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Ozluoglu, Levent N; Koycu, A; Jafarov, S; Hizal, E; Boyvat, F

    2016-09-01

    Intracranial arteriovenous malformations are infrequent. Advances in endovascular treatment techniques have promoted the use of endovascular embolization in management of intracranial arteriovenous malformations. Transvenous or transarterial embolization procedures are effective options in the treatment of the arteriovenous fistulas. However, complications such as cranial nerve palsies may occur. Here, we present a case of right-sided lower motor neuron facial paralysis due to embolization of an intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula that have presented with clinical findings on the left eye. Facial functions of the patient improved from total weakness to House-Brackmann grade II, following facial nerve decompression surgery. PMID:26329900

  6. Renoduodenal Fistula After Transcatheter Embolization of Renal Angiomyolipoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sheth, Rahul A.; Feldman, Adam S.; Walker, T. Gregory

    2015-02-15

    Transcatheter embolization of renal angiomyolipomas is a routinely performed, nephron-sparing procedure with a favorable safety profile. Complications from this procedure are typically minor in severity, with postembolization syndrome the most common minor complication. Abscess formation is a recognized but uncommon major complication of this procedure and is presumably due to superinfection of the infarcted tissue after arterial embolization. In this case report, we describe the formation of a renoduodenal fistula after embolization of an angiomyolipoma, complicated by intracranial abscess formation and requiring multiple percutaneous drainage procedures and eventual partial nephrectomy.

  7. Cerebral infarction following thrombolysis for massive pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Bracey, Tim S; Langrish, Chris; Darby, Mike; Soar, Jasmeet

    2006-01-01

    A 29-year-old male developed a fatal stroke 6 h after successful thrombolysis for massive pulmonary embolism. Autopsy showed thrombus protruding through a patent foramen ovale (PFO). A strand of thrombus extended from the aortic arch into the left common carotid artery. The brain showed extensive infarction of the left fronto-parietal area. Thrombolysis caused initial disintegration of the embolism. It is likely that thrombolysis caused fragments of clot to later break lose and embolise into the cerebral circulation. We discuss the need for risk stratification in patients who present with massive pulmonary embolism and PFO. PMID:16219407

  8. Percutaneous embolization of varicocele: technique, indications, relative contraindications, and complications.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Joshua; Mittal, Sameer; Pereira, Keith; Bhatia, Shivank; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2016-01-01

    There are several options for the treatment of varicocele, including surgical repair either by open or microsurgical approach, laparoscopy, or through percutaneous embolization of the internal spermatic vein. The ultimate goal of varicocele treatment relies on the occlusion of the dilated veins that drain the testis. Percutaneous embolization offers a rapid recovery and can be successfully accomplished in approximately 90% of attempts. However, the technique demands interventional radiologic expertise and has potential serious complications, including vascular perforation, coil migration, and thrombosis of pampiniform plexus. This review discusses the common indications, relative contraindications, technical details, and risks associated with percutaneous embolization of varicocele. PMID:26658060

  9. Delivery by cesarean section after embolization for vaginal arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Toru; Yamakawa, Yoshihiro; Ota, Satoshi; Kamei, Tetsuya; Tateno, Masaya

    2008-01-01

    Vaginal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) can lead to life-threatening complications on delivery. No deliveries have been reported after selective embolization for a vaginal AVM. A 34-year-old nulliparous woman was found to have an arterial pulsatile mass on the left vaginal wall. The findings of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography were consistent with an AVM. Selective transcatheter embolization for the AVM was done and, afterwards, the patient was found to be pregnant. The prenatal course was uneventful and the patient underwent elective cesarean delivery at term. Vaginal AVM can be successfully treated with selective embolization, with a good obstetric outcome. PMID:17671389

  10. Volume Changes of Experimental Carotid Sidewall Aneurysms Due to Embolization with Liquid Embolic Agents: A Multidetector CT Angiography Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dudeck, O. Okuducu, A. F.; Jordan, O.; Tesmer, K.; Pech, M.; Weigang, E.; Ruefenacht, D. A.; Doelker, E.; Felix, R.

    2006-12-15

    Iodine-containing polyvinyl alcohol polymer (I-PVAL) is a novel precipitating liquid embolic that allows for artifact-free evaluation of CT angiography (CTA). As accurate aneurysm volumetry can be performed with multidetector CTA, we determined volumes of experimental aneurysms before, immediately after, and 4 weeks after embolization of 14 porcine experimental carotid sidewall aneurysms with this liquid embolic. An automated three-dimensional software measurement tool was used for volumetric analysis of volume-rendering CTA data. Furthermore, intra-aneurysmal pressure changes during liquid embolization were measured in four silicone aneurysms and potential polymer volume changes within 4 weeks were assessed in vitro. Liquid embolic injection was performed during temporary balloon occlusion of the aneurysm neck, resulting in a mean occlusion rate of 98.3%. Aneurysms enlarged significantly during embolization by 61.1 {+-} 28.9%, whereas a significant shrinkage of 5.6 {+-} 2.7% was observed within the follow-up period. Histologic analysis revealed an inflammatory foreign body reaction with partial polymer degradation. In silicone aneurysm models, intra-aneurysmal pressure remained unchanged during liquid embolic injection, whereas balloon inflation resulted in a mean pressure increase of 31.2 {+-} 0.7%. No polymer shrinkage was observed in vitro. The aneurysm enlargement noted was presumably due to pressure elevation after balloon inflation, which resulted in dilatation of the weak venous wall of the newly constructed aneurysm-another shortcoming of this experimental aneurysm model. The volume decrease after 4 weeks expressed partial polymer degradation.

  11. Spontaneous Bleeding from Internal Pudendal Artery associated with Abciximab after Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Successful Treatment with Percutaneous Gel-Foam Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Eun; Jo, Hee-Bum; Moon, Hyoung-Ho; Oh, Dong-Jun; Kwon, Ki-Hwan; Kwon, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Young-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of spontaneous bleeding from a branch of the right internal pudendal artery that resulted in massive scrotal swelling in a patient who had underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention with the use of abciximab concurrent with conventional anticoagulation and dual antiplatelet therapies for the treatment of acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. This unusual complication was promptly identified by percutaneous peripheral arteriography and successfully treated with gel-foam embolization. PMID:27014357

  12. Spontaneous Bleeding from Internal Pudendal Artery associated with Abciximab after Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Successful Treatment with Percutaneous Gel-Foam Embolization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Eun; Jo, Hee-Bum; Moon, Hyoung-Ho; Oh, Dong-Jun; Kwon, Ki-Hwan; Kwon, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Young-Kwon; Kim, Yong-Seok

    2016-03-01

    We describe a case of spontaneous bleeding from a branch of the right internal pudendal artery that resulted in massive scrotal swelling in a patient who had underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention with the use of abciximab concurrent with conventional anticoagulation and dual antiplatelet therapies for the treatment of acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. This unusual complication was promptly identified by percutaneous peripheral arteriography and successfully treated with gel-foam embolization. PMID:27014357

  13. [Role of embolization in the management of uterine fibroids].

    PubMed

    Kahn, V; Fohlen, A; Pelage, J-P

    2011-12-01

    Uterine artery embolization using non spherical PVA particles or calibrated trisacryl microspheres above 500 μm is effective to treat menorrhagia, bulk-related symptoms and pelvic pain in more than 90% of cases in the short-term. In the long-term, embolization is effective in 75% of cases at 5-7 years. At 6 months, uterine volume reduction and dominant fibroid volume reduction varies between 30-60% and 50-80% respectively. During hospital stay, the complication rate is 3%. Secondary hysterectomy for complication is less than 2% at 3 months. Definitive amenorrhea is reported in less than 5% of cases in women of less than 45 years of age. No significant impact of embolization on hormonal function has been reported in women less than 45 years with normal baseline function. Secondary hysterectomy for clinical failure or recurrence is reported in 14-28% of cases at 5 years. Non-spherical PVA particles are associated with more microcatheter occlusion than trisacryl microspheres. No difference between PVA particles and trisacryl microspheres was found in terms of post-embolization pain or analgesic doses. PVA microspheres (Contour SE et Bead Block) are associated with lower clinical success and lower fibroid devascularization using MRI than trisacryl microspheres. No difference between PVA particles and trisacryl microspheres was found in terms of clinical efficacy, uterine volume reduction and complication rate. Randomized studies comparing embolization to hysterectomy demonstrate that reinterventions are more frequently performed after embolization. Secondary hysterectomy is performed in 13 to 24% of cases at 2 years and in up to 28% of cases at 5 years. Hospital stay, duration of recovery and time off work are shorter after embolization compared to hysterectomy. Embolization is cheaper than hysterectomy at 12 and 24 months even taking into consideration the additional costs of imaging and reinterventions. Randomized studies comparing embolization to myomectomy

  14. Comparison of the Efficacy of the Embolic Agents Acrylamido Polyvinyl Alcohol Microspheres and Tris-Acryl Gelatin Microspheres for Uterine Artery Embolization for Leiomyomas: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Worthington-Kirsch, Robert L.; Chesnick, Richard

    2011-06-15

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of acrylamido polyvinyl alcohol microspheres (a-PVAM) as an embolic agent for uterine artery embolization (UAE) compared with Tris-acryl gelatin microspheres (TAGM).Design, Setting, ParticipantsProspective randomized double-blind noninferiority trial. Conducted at two sites both with regional UAE practices. Forty-six women with symptomatic leiomyomas.InterventionUAE procedure was performed with either of the two embolic agents. Either 700-900-{mu}m a-PVAM or 500-700-{mu}m TAGM was used.Main Outcome MeasuresChanges in leiomyoma perfusion, overall uterine volume, and dominant leiomyomas volume measured by contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 1 week, 3 months, and 6 months after UAE by a reader blinded to the embolic agent used. Changes in Uterine Fibroid Symptoms and Quality of Life questionnaire scores were measured at 3, 6, and 12 months after UAE. Results: Forty-six patients were randomized and treated under the study protocol (a-PVAM n = 22, TAGM n = 24). There were no procedure-related complications. Two patients were excluded from analysis (one technical failure of the procedure, one withdrawal from study). Successful (>90%) leiomyoma devascularization was observed in 81% of subjects at 1 week after UAE, 97% at 3 months after UAE, and 95% at 6 months after UAE. No significant differences were observed in 14 of 15 outcome measurements, consistent with noninferiority. TAGM was slightly superior to a-PVAM on one comparison (overall quality of life at 3 months after UAE).

  15. Aortic Branch Artery Pseudoaneurysms Associated with Intramural Hematoma: When and How to Do Endovascular Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Seitun, Sara; Scarano, Flavio; Passerone, Giancarlo; Williams, David M.

    2013-04-15

    To describe when and how to perform endovascular embolization of aortic branch artery pseudoaneurysms associated with type A and type B intramural hematoma (IMH) involving the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta (DeBakey I and III) that increased significantly in size during follow-up. Sixty-one patients (39 men; mean {+-} standard deviation age 66.1 {+-} 11.2 years) with acute IMH undergoing at least two multidetector computed tomographic examinations during follow-up for 12 months or longer were enrolled. Overall, 48 patients (31 men, age 65.9 {+-} 11.5) had type A and type B IMH involving the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta (DeBakey I and III). Among the 48 patients, 26 (54 %; 17 men, aged 64.3 {+-} 11.4 years) had 71 aortic branch artery pseudoaneurysms. Overall, during a mean follow-up of 22.1 {+-} 9.5 months (range 12-42 months), 31 (44 %) pseudoaneurysms disappeared; 22 (31 %) decreased in size; two (3 %) remained stable; and 16 (22 %) increased in size. Among the 16 pseudoaneurysms with increasing size, five of these (three intercostal arteries, one combined intercostobronchial/intercostal arteries, one renal artery), present in five symptomatic patients, had a significant increase in size (thickness >10 mm; width and length >20 mm). These five patients underwent endovascular embolization with coils and/or Amplatzer Vascular Plug. In all patients, complete thrombosis and exclusion of aortic pseudoaneurysm and relief of back pain were achieved. Aortic branch artery pseudoaneurysms associated with type A and type B IMH involving the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta (DeBakey I and III) may be considered relatively benign lesions. However, a small number may grow in size or extend longitudinally with clinical symptoms during follow-up, and in these cases, endovascular embolization can be an effective and safe procedure.

  16. The design and rationale for the Acute Medically Ill Venous Thromboembolism Prevention with Extended Duration Betrixaban (APEX) study.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander T; Harrington, Robert; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Hull, Russell; Gibson, C Michael; Hernandez, Adrian F; Kitt, Michael M; Lorenz, Todd J

    2014-03-01

    Randomized clinical trials have identified a population of acute medically ill patients who remain at risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) beyond the standard duration of therapy and hospital discharge. The aim of the APEX study is to determine whether extended administration of oral betrixaban (35-42 days) is superior to a standard short course of prophylaxis with subcutaneous enoxaparin (10 ± 4 days followed by placebo) in patients with known risk factors for post-discharge VTE. Patients initially are randomized to receive either betrixaban or enoxaparin (and matching placebo) in a double dummy design. Following a standard duration period of enoxaparin treatment (with placebo tablets) or betrixaban (with placebo injections), patients receive only betrixaban (or alternative matching placebo). Patients are considered for enrollment if they are older than 40 years, have a specified medical illness, and restricted mobility. They must also meet the APEX criteria for increased VTE risk (aged ≥75 years, baseline D-Dimer ≥2× upper the limit of "normal", or 2 additional ancillary risk factors for VTE). The primary efficacy end point is the composite of asymptomatic proximal deep venous thrombosis, symptomatic deep venous thrombosis, non-fatal (pulmonary embolus) pulmonary embolism, or VTE-related death through day 35. The primary safety outcome is the occurrence of major bleeding. We hypothesize that extended duration betrixaban VTE prophylaxis will be safe and more effective than standard short duration enoxaparin in preventing VTE in acute medically ill patients with known risk factors for post hospital discharge VTE. PMID:24576517

  17. A Case of Traumatic Mesenteric Bleeding Controlled by only Transcatheter Arterial Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Asayama, Yoshiki E-mail: asayama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Matsumoto, Shunichi; Isoda, Takuro; Kunitake, Naonobu; Nakashima, Hideaki

    2005-04-15

    We report a case of mesenteric hematoma following blunt abdominal trauma that was successfully treated with transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) and did not require surgical repair. A 43-year-old man with blunt abdominal trauma caused in a factory accident was admitted with a stable general condition and laboratory data. On CT examination, a large mesenteric hematoma with extravasation of contrast media was observed. TAE was first attempted to control the bleeding. A superior mesenteric angiogram showed extravasation of contrast medium from a branch of the ileocolic artery and obstruction of the cecal branch. After successful TAE using microcoils, the distal portion of the cecal branch was still preserved via collateral circulation. No abdominal symptoms have occurred during the 7 months following TAE. In mesenteric injury cases with limited intestinal damage, TAE may therefore be a reasonable alternative to emergent laparotomy.

  18. Practice patterns and complication rates of thrombolysis for pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Mark A; Lindenauer, Peter K; Walkey, Allan J

    2016-10-01

    Practice patterns, bleeding complication rates, and outcomes of thrombolytic use for pulmonary embolism (PE) outside of clinical trials are not well characterized. Retrospective cohort study of patients with PE, using an enhanced administrative database of approximately 20 % of hospitalizations in the United States, 2008-2011. We used hierarchical logistic regression to identify patient- and hospital-level factors associated with thrombolytic use and quantified between-hospital variation in thrombolysis. We calculated rates of hemorrhagic complications and mortality in patients receiving thrombolytics stratified by vasopressor use. We identified 91,860 hospitalizations for PE; thrombolytics were utilized in 13.2 % (578/4363) who received vasopressors and 1.6 % (1320/82,997) who did not receive vasopressors. Patients who received thrombolytics were younger, more likely white, with private insurance, fewer comorbidities and more acute organ failures. Hospitals varied widely in thrombolysis rates for PE (0-100 % of patients on vasopressors, 0-12.5 % not on vasopressors) with 17 % of variation unexplained by patient or hospital characteristics. Bleeding complication rates for patients receiving thrombolytics versus no thrombolytics, respectively, were: ICH (0.8 vs. 0.08 %, p < 0.01), major bleeding (13 vs. 3 %, p < 0.01), and major bleeding with transfusion (2.5 vs. 0.05 %, p < 0.01). Among patients given vasopressors, thrombolytics were not associated with hospital mortality (thrombolysis 41 % vs. no thrombolysis 35 % mortality; adjusted OR 0.97, 95 % CI 0.93-1.01, p = 0.15). There is wide variation in thrombolytic use for PE in the US. Patient characteristics and complications associated with real-world thrombolytic use were similar to published randomized trials. PMID:26961258

  19. Recent developments in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    van der Hulle, T; Dronkers, C E A; Klok, F A; Huisman, M V

    2016-01-01

    Due to the nonspecific symptoms of the condition, a diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is frequently considered. However, PE will only be confirmed in 10-20% of patients. Because the imaging test of choice, computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA), is costly and associated with radiation exposure and other complications, a validated diagnostic algorithm consisting of a clinical decision rule and D-dimer test should be used to safely exclude PE in 20-30% of patients without the need for CTPA. Recently, the age-adjusted D-dimer threshold has been validated, and this has increased the proportion of patients at older age in whom PE can be excluded without CTPA. Initial therapeutic management of PE depends on the risk of short-term PE-related mortality. Haemodynamically unstable patients should be closely monitored and receive thrombolytic therapy unless contraindicated because of an unacceptably high bleeding risk, whereas patients with low-risk PE may be safely discharged early from hospital or receive only outpatient treatment. The PESI score and Hestia decision rule are available to select patients in whom early discharge or outpatient treatment will be safe, although the safety of these strategies should be confirmed in additional studies. Standard PE therapy consists of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) followed by vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). Recently, several nonvitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants have been shown to be as effective as LMWH/VKAs, and maybe safer. Determining the optimal duration of treatment for a first unprovoked PE remains a challenge, although clinical prediction rules for estimating the risk of recurrence of venous thromboembolism and anticoagulation-associated haemorrhage are under investigation. Using these prediction rules may lead to both more standardized and more individualized long-term treatment of PE. PMID:26286356

  20. Onyx, a New Liquid Embolic Material for Peripheral Interventions: Preliminary Experience in Aneurysm, Pseudoaneurysm, and Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformation Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Vanninen, Ritva L. Manninen, I.

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. To describe our preliminary experience with a new liquid embolization agent, Onyx, in peripheral interventions. Methods and results. We successfully treated two peripheral aneurysms (one in an internal iliac artery, one in a thoracic collateral artery of an aortic coarctation), two peripheral pseudoaneurysms (one in a lumbar artery, one in a renal artery), and one pulmonary arteriovenous malformation. Conclusion. Onyx is a promising alternative embolic material for peripheral interventions. It can be combined with coils in selected cases, and balloon catheters can be effectively used during slow injection of embolic material to control flow and protect the aneurysm neck.

  1. Combining Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt with Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration or Augmenting TIPS with Variceal Embolization for the Management of Gastric Varices: An Evolving Middle Ground?

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Wael E.

    2014-01-01

    The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria Committee on interventional radiology has recently recognized balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) as a viable alternative to transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in certain anatomic and clinical scenarios for the management of gastric varices. However, it did not define these particular scenarios where BRTO would be a viable alternative. With the increased practice of BRTO in the United States, a debate ensues in the United States and Europe whether BRTO or TIPS should be the primary endovascular procedure of choice for gastric varices. From a conservative standpoint, BRTO is reserved for patients who are not TIPS candidates, while other institutions leave the decision to operator preference and “favorable anatomy” for either procedure. To add to the debate, there is a heightened interest in the improved efficacy of variceal embolization (metallic/bland embolization) concurrent with TIPS compared with TIPS without embolization, and a recent article describing a combination of TIPS and BRTO that demonstrated impressive results superior to BRTO or TIPS alone. This article discusses the most recent outcomes of TIPS and embolization of gastric varices as well as combining BRTO and TIPS. PMID:25177089

  2. Midterm Clinical and First Reproductive Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Uterine Fibroid Embolization and Myomectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Mara, Michal Maskova, Jana; Fucikova, Zuzana; Kuzel, David; Belsan, Tomas; Sosna, Ondrej

    2008-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the midterm results of a radiological and surgical approach to uterine fibroids. One hundred twenty-one women with reproductive plans who presented with an intramural fibroid(s) larger than 4 cm were randomly selected for either uterine artery embolization (UAE) or myomectomy. We compared the efficacy and safety of the two procedures and their impact on patient fertility. Fifty-eight embolizations and 63 myomectomies (42 laparoscopic, 21 open) were performed. One hundred eighteen patients have finished at least a 12-month follow-up; the mean follow-up in the entire study population was 24.9 months. Embolized patients underwent a significantly shorter procedure and required a shorter hospital stay and recovery period. They also presented with a lower CRP concentration on the second day after the procedure (p < 0.0001 for all parameters). There were no significant differences between the two groups in the rate of technical success, symptomatic effectiveness, postprocedural follicle stimulating hormone levels, number of reinterventions for fibroid recurrence or regrowth, or complication rates. Forty women after myomectomy and 26 after UAE have tried to conceive, and of these we registered 50 gestations in 45 women. There were more pregnancies (33) and labors (19) and fewer abortions (6) after surgery than after embolization (17 pregnancies, 5 labors, 9 abortions) (p < 0.05). Obstetrical and perinatal results were similar in both groups, possibly due to the low number of labors after UAE to date. We conclude that UAE is less invasive and as symptomatically effective and safe as myomectomy, but myomectomy appears to have superior reproductive outcomes in the first 2 years after treatment.

  3. Emergency management of fat embolism syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Nissar

    2009-01-01

    Fat emboli occur in all patients with long-bone fractures, but only few patients develop systemic dysfunction, particularly the triad of skin, brain, and lung dysfunction known as the fat embolism syndrome (FES). Here we review the FES literature under different subheadings. The incidence of FES varies from 1–29%. The etiology may be traumatic or, rarely, nontraumatic. Various factors increase the incidence of FES. Mechanical and biochemical theories have been proposed for the pathophysiology of FES. The clinical manifestations include respiratory and cerebral dysfunction and a petechial rash. Diagnosis of FES is difficult. The other causes for the above-mentioned organ dysfunction have to be excluded. The clinical criteria along with imaging studies help in diagnosis. FES can be detected early by continuous pulse oximetry in high-risk patients. Treatment of FES is essentially supportive. Medications, including steroids, heparin, alcohol, and dextran, have been found to be ineffective. PMID:19561953

  4. Pulmonary embolism workup in five steps.

    PubMed

    Smith, Clay B

    2014-07-01

    A workup for pulmonary embolism (PE) is complex, with multiple clinical decision rules to remember. A proper diagnostic workup can safely rule out PE without the use of computed tomography, which is both expensive and exposes patients to radiation and intravenous contrast. However, once PE has been diagnosed, it is important to risk stratify patients according to severity to both treat and disposition them correctly. PQRsTU is a simple, easy-to-remember mnemonic for the workup of PE that considers five phases: PERC phase (PE rule-out criteria), Quantify gestalt phase (to determine proper use of D-dimer or direct to imaging), Risk stratification phase (once PE has been diagnosed), Treatment phase, and Unit or floor (patient disposition). This structured method for evaluating PE will help clinicians develop a systematic, evidence-based approach to this complex and potentially lethal disease. Video is available at https://vimeo.com/91406117 Password: perls. PMID:25040049

  5. Uterine artery embolization for heavy menstrual bleeding.

    PubMed

    Moss, Jonathan; Christie, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Uterine artery embolization (UAE) as a treatment option for fibroids was first reported by Ravina in 1995. Although rapidly adopted by enthusiasts, many were skeptical and its introduction varied widely across the globe. It was not until randomized controlled trials and registries were published and national guidance statements issued that UAE was accepted as a safe and proven treatment for fibroids. The technique is now established as one of the treatment options to be discussed with patients as an alternative to surgery for fibroid-associated heavy menstrual bleeding. Research is on-going to evaluate the relative merits of UAE compared with other medical and surgical treatment options for heavy menstrual bleeding, particularly for women wishing to maintain their fertility. PMID:26756068

  6. Successful embolization of a suprascapular artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Federico; P, Plagnol; B, Salvati; R, Capoano; L, Fiengo; A, Redler

    2014-01-01

    A 45-year-old woman was referred to our service because 9 months earlier she had developed a pulsating mass on the right supraclavicular fossa and torticollis. Ultrasounds and computed tomographic arteriography showed the presence of a subclavian collateral artery aneurysm with a diameter of 21 mm. On selective arteriography, an aneurysm of a suprascapular artery arising directly from the right subclavian artery was reported. The presence of thoracic outlet syndrome was excluded. The aneurysm was successfully treated with ethylene-vinyl alcohol polymer, a liquid embolic agent. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 1 in good general condition. After 12 months, control ultrasounds confirmed the complete thrombosis of the aneurysm sac. PMID:21620668

  7. [Pulmonary embolism: an analysis of 25 patients].

    PubMed

    Li, L Y; Lu, G; Zhu, Y J

    1993-09-01

    We reported 25 cases of patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) definitely diagnosed in our hospital from 1983 to 1990. Twenty-one cases of them were found in the last 5 years. This indicated that the discovery rate had increased obviously. Five of these patients were confirmed by autopsy, the other twenty cases were diagnosed by clinical manifestations combined with perfusion-inspiration lung scans and chest roentgenogram. Due to the prompt diagnosis and the appropriate use of anticoagulants, 72% of the patients survived after treatment. We suggest that all the patients with suspected PE should take perfusion-inspiration lung scans, because this is a noninvasive and reliable method. Digital subtraction angiography is necessary for some patients. Routine chest radiography, arterial blood gas analysis, intrapulmonary shunt test, deep venography or nuclide scan of lower extremities are also useful methods for the diagnosis of PE. PMID:8112138

  8. Embolization with the Amplatzer Vascular Plug in TIPS Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Pattynama, Peter M. T. Wils, Alexandra; Linden, Edwin van der; Dijk, Lukas C. van

    2007-11-15

    Vessel embolization can be a valuable adjunct procedure in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). During the creation of a TIPS, embolization of portal vein collaterals supplying esophageal varices may lower the risk of secondary rebleeding. And after creation of a TIPS, closure of the TIPS itself may be indicated if the resulting hepatic encephalopathy severely impairs mental functioning. The Amplatzer Vascular Plug (AVP; AGA Medical, Golden Valley, MN) is well suited for embolization of large-diameter vessels and has been employed in a variety of vascular lesions including congenital arteriovenous shunts. Here we describe the use of the AVP in the context of TIPS to embolize portal vein collaterals (n = 8) or to occlude the TIPS (n = 2)

  9. Embolization of Spontaneous Hemarthrosis Post Total Knee Replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Given, M. F. Smith, P.; Lyon, S. M.; Robertson, D.; Thomson, K. R.

    2008-09-15

    Spontaneous nonhemophiliac hemarthrosis is an unusual entity, which has been little described. We present three cases of spontaneous recurrent hemarthrosis post total knee replacement (TKR) and successful management with embolization. Three male patients were referred to our service for angiography and treatment of recurrent hemarthrosis post TKR. In all three patients antegrade ipsilateral common femoral artery punctures and selective angiography of the geniculate branches were performed with a microcatheter. Abnormal vasculature was noted in all cases. Subsequent embolization was performed with Contour (Boston Scientific, Target Vascular, Cork, Ireland) embolization particles (150-250 and 250-355 {mu}m) in two patients and microcoils in the third (TornadoR; Cook Inc., Bloomington, IN, USA). Technical success was 100%. One patient had a recurrence of symptoms requiring a repeat procedure 6 months later. No complications were encountered. Selective angiography and particle embolization is an effective technique for management of this unusual but problematic postoperative sequelae.

  10. Fat embolism due to bilateral femoral fracture: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Porpodis, Konstantinos; Karanikas, Michael; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Konoglou, Maria; Domvri, Kalliopi; Mitrakas, Alexandros; Boglou, Panagiotis; Bakali, Stamatia; Iordanidis, Alkis; Zervas, Vasilis; Courcoutsakis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome is usually associated with surgery for large bone fractures. Symptoms usually occur within 36 hours of hospitalization after traumatic injury. We present a case with fat embolism syndrome due to femur fracture. Prompt supportive treatment of the patient’s respiratory system and additional pharmaceutical treatment provided the positive clinical outcome. There is no specific therapy for fat embolism syndrome; prevention, early diagnosis, and adequate symptomatic treatment are very important. Most of the studies in the last 20 years have shown that the incidence of fat embolism syndrome is reduced by early stabilization of the fractures and the risk is even further decreased with surgical correction rather than conservative management. PMID:22287848

  11. Patent foramen ovale and paradoxical embolization: a historical perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Lippmann, H.; Rafferty, T.

    1993-01-01

    The use of transesophageal echocardiography for intraoperative management of critically ill patients allows for routine evaluation of foramen ovale patency. The high prevalence of preoperatively unrecognized flow-patency of this structure has led investigators to emphasize the potential for paradoxical embolization in any patient undergoing anesthesia. This perspective led us to research earliest documentation of paradoxical embolization through a patent foramen ovale as a historical issue with present day relevance. This report examines the 1877 text of Julius Cohnheim in which he described a fatal case of paradoxical embolization to the middle meningeal artery. The 1880 manuscript of Moritz Litten documenting paradoxical embolization to the lower extremity is also presented. Both translations, to our knowledge, represent the first such representations of both the original 1877 edition of Cohnheim's work and Litten's journal article. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:8256459

  12. Transvenous embolization: a report of 4 pediatric cases.

    PubMed

    Renieri, Leonardo; Limbucci, Nicola; Consoli, Arturo; Rosi, Andrea; Nappini, Sergio; Giordano, Flavio; Genitori, Lorenzo; Mangiafico, Salvatore

    2015-04-01

    The treatment of brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in children has always been a challenge for interventionalists, neurosurgeons, and radiosurgeons. Endovascular embolization is usually performed through transarterial access, but in selected cases the transvenous approach can be considered. The authors of this report aimed to evaluate the efficacy of transvenous embolization in very selected pediatric cases. They describe 4 children treated using transvenous embolization for AVMs that were small, had a single drainage vein, and were deeply located or had a difficult arterial access. The 6-month angiographic and clinical follow-ups are reported as well. In all cases, complete occlusion of the AVM was achieved with no side effects for the patient. Transvenous embolization may represent a promising alternative therapeutic option in very selected cases. PMID:25634817

  13. Selective Embolization of Large Symptomatic Iatrogenic Renal Transplant Arteriovenous Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Barley, Fay L.; Kessel, David Nicholson, Tony; Robertson, Iain

    2006-12-15

    We report on the successful treatment of hypertension by occlusion of a large iatrogenic renal transplant arteriovenous fistula using detachable embolization coils with concomitant flow reduction by occlusion balloon in two patients.

  14. Embolic Protection Devices in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Steinvil, Arie; Benson, Richard T; Waksman, Ron

    2016-03-01

    The initially reported periprocedural neurological events rates associated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement raised concerns that ultimately led to the development and to the clinical research of novel embolic protection devices. Although the reduction of clinical stroke is a desired goal, the current research design of embolic protection devices focuses on surrogate markers of the clinical disease, primarily on silent central nervous system lesions observed in postprocedural diffuse-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and cognitive function testing. As the mere presence of particulate debris in brain matter may not correlate with the extent of brain injury, cognitive function, or quality of life, the clinical significance of embolic protection devices has yet to be determined, and interpretation of study results with regard to real-life clinical use should be viewed accordingly. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the updated ongoing clinical research on embolic protection devices and present its major caveats. PMID:26951618

  15. Treatment of Hypersplenism by Partial Splenic Embolization Through Gastric Collaterals

    PubMed Central

    Saddekni, Souheil; Moustafa, Amr Soliman; Tahoon, Hany A; Setita, Mostafa; Abdel-Aal, Ahmed Kamel

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with associated hypersplenism, that was referred to us for partial splenic embolization (PSE) as the patient was not a surgical candidate for splenectomy. Initially, we were not successful in catheterizing the splenic artery from the celiac trunk due to significant atherosclerotic disease. Therefore, we successfully managed to access the distal splenic artery through patent gastro-epiploic collateral circulation along the greater curvature of the stomach. Partial splenic embolization was successfully performed and resulted in improvement of the patient’s peripheral blood cell count as well as 60–70% reduction in the size of the spleen on follow up. Our case highlights an alternative pathway for splenic artery embolization when catheterization of the splenic artery is not feasible. To our knowledge, the use of gastro-epiploic collaterals to embolize the spleen has not been previously reported in literature. PMID:27200164

  16. The role of lung imaging in pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Mishkin, Fred S.; Johnson, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    The advantages of lung scanning in suspected pulmonary embolism are its diagnostic sensitivity, simplicity and safety. The ability to delineate regional pulmonary ischaemia, to quantitate its extent and to follow its response to therapy provides valuable clinical data available by no other simple means. The negative scan effectively excludes pulmonary embolism but, although certain of its features favour the diagnosis of embolism, the positive scan inherently lacks specificity and requires angiographic confirmation when embolectomy, caval plication or infusion of a thrombolytic agent are contemplated. The addition of simple ventilation imaging techniques with radioxenon overcomes this limitation by providing accurate analog estimation or digital quantitation of regional ventilation: perfusion (V/Q) ratios fundamental to understanding the pathophysiologic consequences of embolism and other diseases of the lung. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7p495-bFig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13 PMID:4602128

  17. High frequency jet ventilation in fat embolism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, A; Simpson, D

    1986-11-01

    The use of high frequency jet ventilation in the management of a patient with fat embolism syndrome is described. Its principal advantage over conventional intermittent positive pressure ventilation is a reduction in the amount of sedation necessary. PMID:3789371

  18. Bilateral pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae treated with balloon embolization.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S.; Ruttley, M. J.; Fisher, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    A patient with bilateral pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae is described who was treated successfully by embolization of the two fistulae with detachable balloons introduced percutaneously through the femoral vein. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3714608

  19. Embolization for Hemoptysis in Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension: Report of Two Cases and a Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Reesink, Herre J. Delden, Otto M. van; Kloek, Jaap J.; Jansen, Henk M.; Reekers, Jim A.; Bresser, Paul

    2007-02-15

    Hemoptysis is a known complication in patients with bronchial artery hypertrophy due to a variety of chronic pulmonary disorders. Bronchial artery hypertrophy is observed in most patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), but surprisingly little is known about the incidence of hemoptysis in these patients. In this paper, we report on 2 patients with CTEPH and recurrent severe hemoptysis, who were treated by bronchial artery embolization. One patient recovered and 1 patient died as a consequence of the bleeding. A systematic review revealed 21 studies on the underlying pathology in 1,844 patients with moderate to severe hemoptysis. CTEPH was reported to be the cause of bleeding in 0.1% (n = 2), pulmonary arterial hypertension without chronic thromboembolic disease in 0.2% (n = 4), and acute pulmonary embolism in 0.7% (n = 12) of the patients. In contrast to this, 5 patients (6%) in our own series of 79 CTEPH patients suffered from moderate to severe hemoptysis requiring medical intervention. Severe hemoptysis appears to be an uncommon, but possibly underreported, life-threatening complication in CTEPH patients. As most CTEPH patients require life-long anticoagulants a therapeutic dilemma may ensue. Therefore, we propose that even mild hemoptysis in CTEPH patients warrants prompt evaluation, and treatment by embolization should be offered as first choice in CTEPH patients.

  20. Surgical management of chronic pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed Central

    Sabiston, D C; Wolfe, W G; Oldham, H N; Wechsler, A S; Crawford, F A; Jones, K W; Jones, R H

    1977-01-01

    The clinical course of most patients with pulmonary embolism is one of gradual resolution with re-establishment of flow in the pulmonary arteries. In a small but definite group of patients, the emboli do not resolve and a state of chronic pulmonary embolism ensues. The primary thrombotic process in the systemic venous system may persist, and in some instances may be unrecognized. Such patients experience recurrent showers of emboli which may ultimately occlude a large part of the pulmonary arterial circulation with development of severe respiratory insufficiency. Six patients with this syndrome are described, and in each there was a history of dyspnea, cyanoiss, and exercise intolerance associated with a low arterial PO2, right ventricular hypertrophy, and pulmonary hypertension. Pulmonary scans and arteriograms demonstrated that more than half of the major pulmonary arteries were occluded and, in addition, smaller vessels were also obstructed. Pulmonary embolectomy was performed in each patient. Five of the 6 obtained a highly gratifying response, including relief of the dyspnea and cyanosis, an increase in arterial PO2, and a decrease in pulmonary arterial pressure. In each of the five in whom improvement occurred, the back-bleeding from the pulmonary artery at the time of embolectomy was quite good. In the sixth patient, the back-bleeding was very poor, and despite embolectomy, the vessel thrombosed postoperatively with no improvement in the patient's clinical course. Follow-up studies in these patients range up to 8 years with demonstration of continued patency of the pulmonary arteries as well as continued improvement in clinical symptoms and in the arterial PO2. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 6. Fig. 6C Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. Fig. 11D. Fig. 12. Fig. 12B. Fig. 13 Fig. 1. Fig. 17. Fig. 18. Fig. 19.. PMID:871224

  1. Looking for the Ideal Particle: An Experimental Embolization Study

    SciTech Connect

    Senturk, Cagin; Cakir, Volkan; Yorukoglu, Kutsal; Yilmaz, Osman; Goktay, A. Yigit

    2010-04-15

    This study sought to compare the most frequently used embolic particles in an animal model. In 16 New Zealand white rabbits, right renal arteries were embolized using four different embolic particles (polyvinyl alcohol [PVA] particles, 150-250 {mu}m; PVA microspheres [PVAMs], 150-300 {mu}m; Tris-acryl gelatin microspheres [TGMs], 100-300 {mu}m; expanding microspheres [EXMs], 50-100 {mu}m). Quantity of embolic material used, embolization time, and angiographic patterns were documented. Fourteen days later, a control angiography was done to document angiographic recanalization and all animals were sacrificed. Histopathological specimens were analyzed for microscopic appearance and granulometric size of the particles, extravasation of the particles, perivascular inflammation, and neocapillarization. The volume of the infarct area in each kidney was calculated. Results revealed a significantly lesser amount of embolic material used in the EXM group (p = 0.020). The angiographic recanalization rate in the EXM group (100%), compared with the PVA (0%) and TGM (0%) groups, was found to be statistically significant (p = 0.014). Although 75% of the renal arteries embolized with PVAMs were recanalized, this was not found to be statistically significant (p = 0.071). Occlusion levels in the PVA group were more proximal than with any of the microspheres. While there was no extravasation in the TGM group, extravasation rates in the PVA, PVAM, and EXM groups were 50%, 25%, and 75%, respectively. A mild degree of inflammation was noted in the PVA, PVAM, and TGM groups. EXMs caused a moderate degree of inflammation in two kidneys (50%). There was neocapillarization in the vessel lumen in all kidneys in the PVA and PVAM groups. The difference was significant (p = 0.014) compared with the TGM and EXM groups, which did not have any neocapillarization. Regarding infarct area volumes, the difference among the groups was significant (p = 0.022). EXMs caused significantly (p = 0.021) less

  2. Percutaneous Embolization of Transhepatic Tracks for Biliary Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, Stuart M.; Terhaar, Olaf; Given, Mark F.; O'Dwyer, Helena M.; McGrath, Frank P.; Lee, Michael J.

    2006-12-15

    Significant pain can occur after removing transhepatic catheters from biliary access tracks, after percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) or stenting. We undertook a randomized prospective study to ascertain whether track embolization decreases the amount of pain or analgesic requirement after PBD. Fifty consecutive patients (M:F, 22:28; age range:29-85 years; mean age: 66.3 years) undergoing PBD were randomized to receive track embolization or no track embolization after removal of biliary drainage catheters. A combination of Lipoidol and n-butyl cyanoacrylate were used to embolize transhepatic tracks using an 8F dilator. The patients who did not have track embolization performed had biliary drainage catheters removed over a guide wire. A visual analog scoring (VAS) system was used to grade pain associated with catheter removal, 24 h afterward. A required analgesic score (RAS) was devised to tabulate the analgesia required. No analgesia had a score of 0, oral or rectal nonopiate analgesics had a score of 1, oral opiates had a score of 2, and parenteral opiates had a score of 3. The average VAS and RAS for both groups were calculated and compared.Seven patients were excluded for various reasons, leaving 43 patients in the study group. Twenty-one patients comprised the embolization group and 22 patients comprised the nonembolization group. The mean biliary catheter dwell time was not significantly different (p > 0.05) between the embolization group and nonembolization (mean: 5.4 days vs 6.9 days, respectively). In the nonembolization group, the mean VAS was 3.4. Eight patients required parenteral opiates, three patients required oral opiates, and five patients required oral or rectal analgesics, yielding a mean RAS of 1.6. In the embolization group, the mean VAS was 0.9. No patient required parenteral opiates, six patients required oral opiates, and two patients had oral analgesia. The average RAS was 0.6. Both the VAS and the RAS were significantly lower in the

  3. Spontaneous cerebral gas embolism and pulmonary arteriovenous malformation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Harlan, Nicole P; Davies, Laura H; Weaver, Lindell K; Cloward, Thomas V; Churchill, Susan; Deru, Kayla; Yanase, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary barotrauma can cause cerebral arterial gas embolism (CAGE) from pulmonary overdistension of alveoli forcing gas into the pulmonary vasculature. We report a case of CAGE in a man found to have occult pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) and undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). A 46-year-old man was admitted to the hospital for an acute seizure and left-sided weakness, with telangiectasias on his lower lip and tongue. Brain-computed tomography (CT) showed gas emboli in the right hemisphere. Chest CT revealed a 1.8-cm PAVM in the posterior right costophrenic sulcus. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed no intracardiac shunt or patent foramen ovale. He was treated with phenytoin, lidocaine and hyperbaric oxygen. The PAVM was occluded with a detachable balloon followed by coil embolization. Polysomnography revealed severe obstructive sleep apnea, which was treated with CPAP. Seven years later, the patient was functioning at his pre-event baseline. We propose the CAGE was caused by high negative intrathoracic pressures while breathing against an obstructed upper airway, with air entrainment into the PAVM and subsequent arterialization. PMID:26591982

  4. Spontaneous Rupture of the Hepatic Artery in a Patient with Type 1 Neurofibromatosis Treated by Embolization: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, V. Day, C.P.; Manimaran, N.; Hurlow, R.A.; Orme, R.

    2007-02-15

    We report the case of a 48-year-old man with neurofibromatosis presenting with sudden-onset abdominal pain, profound hypotension, and a drop in hemoglobin. CT scan demonstrated a massive hematoma within the right lobe of the liver with rupture into the peritoneal cavity. Angiography demonstrated diffuse abnormalities of the hepatic circulation with fusifom, ectatic, and stenotic segments. Acute extravasation from a peripheral branch of the right hepatic artery was identified and successfully embolized with subsequent hemodynamic stabilization of the patient. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report of this kind in a patient with type I neurofibromatosis.

  5. Five-year follow-up of pulmonary embolism under anticoaugulation: The PISA-PEET (Pulmonary Embolism Extension Therapy) study.

    PubMed

    Marconi, Letizia; Carrozzi, Laura; Aquilini, Ferruccio; Celi, Alessandro; Pistelli, Francesco; Palla, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Benefits and harms of long-term anticoagulant therapy (AT) after acute pulmonary embolism (PE) are poorly known. The aim of this study was to investigate the outcome of patients with PE treated with AT for 5 years according to American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines.Patients with both unprovoked and secondary PE were consecutively enrolled in a "real life" study. After a 12-month AT, they continued or stopped the treatment according to ACCP guidelines, and were followed-up for 5 years. Outcomes were all-cause mortality, recurrence, and fatal recurrence under AT.Of the original consecutive 585 patients, 471 were included (83 dead, 31 lost during the 1st year). Of these, 361 (76.6%) continued AT. During 5 years, death occurred in 109 (30.2%) patients, with a mortality rate of 8.00 events/100 person-years of follow-up; recurrence in 34 (9.4%), with an incidence rate of 2.58 events/person-years; fatal recurrence in 13 (3.6%), with an incidence rate of 0.95 events/person-years. The case fatality rate for recurrence was 38.2%. In the subgroup of patients with unprovoked PE, the chance of dying was significantly lower (RR 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.24-0.53) and the tendency to fatal recurrence (not significantly) greater (0.11 events/100 person-years vs 0.07 events/100 person-years) than in the remaining patients. Major bleeding occurred in 5 (1.3%) patients. The case fatality rate for bleeding was 14.3%.During 5-year AT, 30% of patients dies, 10% experiences recurrences, and 5% has fatal recurrences. According to guidelines, most patients need to continue AT; the case fatality rate for bleeding is lower than that for recurrence. PMID:27559946

  6. Simple handling of venous air embolism during abdominal myomectomy.

    PubMed

    Basaran, Betül; Basaran, Ahmet; Kozanhan, Betül; Özmen, Sadık; Basaran, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of venous air embolism during abdominal myomectomy. Although true incidence of venous air embolism is not known, in literature most of reported cases are belongs to sitting position craniotomies. Many of those are subclinical, and diagnostic methods have varying degrees of sensitivity and specificity. At time of suspicion, prevention of any subsequent air emboli is the cornerstone of treatment. PMID:27591473

  7. Superselective Embolization in Posttraumatic Priapism with Glubran 2 Acrylic Glue

    SciTech Connect

    Gandini, Roberto; Spinelli, Alessio; Konda, Daniel Reale, Carlo Andrea; Fabiano, Sebastiano; Pipitone, Vincenzo; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2004-09-15

    Two patients with posttraumatic priapism underwent transcatheter embolization using microcoils, resulting in temporary penile detumescence and an apparent resolution of the artero-venous fistula. In both cases, priapism recurred 24 hours after the procedure and was successfully treated through selective transcatheter embolization of the nidus using acrylic glue (Glubran 2). The patients showed complete recovery of sexual activity within 30 days from the procedure and persistent exclusion of the artero-venous fistula after a 12-month follow-up.

  8. Paradoxical Cerebral Fat Embolism in Revision Hip Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Piuzzi, Nicolás S.; Zanotti, Gerardo; Comba, Fernando M.; Buttaro, Martin A.; Piccaluga, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of clinical fat embolism syndrome (FES) is low (<1%) whilst fat embolism (FE) of marrow fat appears to occur more often (Mellor and Soni (2001)). Paradoxical brain FE may occur in patients undergoing hip orthopedic surgery who have an undocumented patent foramen ovale (PFO). We report a case of an eighty-year-old male patient, who underwent a scheduled revision hip surgery suffering a paradoxical cerebral FE. PMID:25184065

  9. Therapeutic failure of uterine fibroid embolization caused by underlying leiomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Common, A A; Mocarski, E J; Kolin, A; Pron, G; Soucie, J

    2001-12-01

    The authors describe an unusual case in which continued growth of uterine fibroids in a postmenopausal patient after polyvinyl alcohol embolization therapy prompted hysterectomy, which revealed an underlying leiomyosarcoma. The surgery was nearly fatal as a result of venous bleeding, and parasitization of blood from adjacent bowel by the tumor was noted. The difficulty of preoperative diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma and the need for diligent follow-up after uterine fibroid embolization are discussed. PMID:11742024

  10. Subacute massive pulmonary embolism treated with plasminogen and streptokinase.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, D A; Neville, E; Hall, R J

    1983-01-01

    Major pulmonary embolism occurring insidiously over several weeks (subacute massive pulmonary embolism) has a high mortality and may not respond well to standard anticoagulant or thrombolytic treatment. A priming dose of plasminogen was used to enhance thrombolysis produced by a streptokinase infusion in five consecutive patients with subacute massive pulmonary embolism. In each patient a dramatic clinical improvement occurred with a substantial increase in pulmonary blood flow. All five patients survived to leave hospital. Malignant disease was the underlying cause of embolism in three patients, two of whom died of their malignant disease in the six months after treatment of their pulmonary embolism. The third patient with malignant disease had a choriocarcinoma; at least some of the pulmonary obstruction may have been tumour tissue but this obstruction was dramatically cleared by the treatment. The use of a combination of plasminogen with streptokinase should be considered in severely ill patients with subacute massive pulmonary embolism, particularly if other treatment, including streptokinase alone, has failed. Images PMID:6665749

  11. Preoperative Embolization of Extra-axial Hypervascular Tumors with Onyx

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Matthew R.; Salem, Mohamed M.; Reddy, Arra S.; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Kasper, Ekkehard M.; Thomas, Ajith J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Preoperative endovascular embolization of intracranial tumors is performed to mitigate anticipated intraoperative blood loss. Although the usage of a wide array of embolic agents, particularly polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), has been described for a variety of tumors, literature detailing the efficacy, safety and complication rates for the usage of Onyx is relatively sparse. Materials and Methods We reviewed our single institutional experience with pre-surgical Onyx embolization of extra-axial tumors to evaluate its efficacy and safety and highlight nuances of individualized cases. Results Five patients underwent pre-surgical Onyx embolization of large or giant extra-axial tumors within 24 hours of surgical resection. Four patients harbored falcine or convexity meningiomas (grade I in 2 patients, grade II in 1 patient and grade III in one patient), and one patient had a grade II hemangiopericytoma. Embolization proceeded uneventfully in all cases and there were no complications. Conclusion This series augments the expanding literature confirming the safety and efficacy of Onyx in the preoperative embolization of extra-axial tumors, underscoring its advantage of being able to attain extensive devascularization via only one supplying pedicle. PMID:27114961

  12. Endovascular Embolization of Brain Arteriovenous Malformations with Eudragit-E

    PubMed Central

    TAMURA, Goichiro; KATO, Noriyuki; YAMAZAKI, Tomosato; AKUTSU, Yoshimitsu; HOSOO, Hisayuki; KASUYA, Hiromichi; SONOBE, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Eudragit-E was originally developed as a non-adhesive liquid embolic material in the late 1990s and is a copolymer of methyl and butyl methacrylate and dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate that is dissolved in ethanol and iopamidol. This material has been used for endovascular embolization of brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) for some time but is currently not widely used. Because safety and feasibility of Eudragit-E has not been well documented, we here report our experience using this material for treating 22 human brain AVMs. From June 1998 to February 2014, 30 endovascular procedures using Eudragit-E were performed to treat 22 patients, including 14 men and 8 women with a mean age of 41.1 years (15–70 years). The mean follow-up period was 56 months (12–129 months), and the Spetzler-Martin grades were I (4 patients), II (9 patients), III (5 patients), and IV (4 patients). Residual AVMs were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery or surgery. The rate of complete obliteration with embolization alone was 27.3%. The overall obliteration rate after endovascular embolization with/without subsequent stereotactic radiosurgery or surgery was 72.7%. Eudragit-E caused two cases of cerebral infarction. One case of intracerebral hemorrhage due to postoperative hemodynamic changes also occurred. The rate of complications directly related to embolization was 10.0%. The safety and effectiveness of Eudragit-E embolization were satisfactory. PMID:25739432

  13. Role of preoperative embolization for intradural spinal hemangioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Ampie, Leonel; Choy, Winward; Khanna, Ryan; Smith, Zachary A; Dahdaleh, Nader S; Parsa, Andrew T; Bloch, Orin

    2016-02-01

    Spinal hemangioblastomas (HB) are relatively rare neoplasms with a high degree of vascularity. Therapy for symptomatic tumors involves total resection when possible. Due to the enriched blood supply of these neoplasms, there is a high risk of significant intraoperative blood loss, which can lead to perioperative complications. Preoperative embolization of HB has been suggested to reduce blood loss and operative morbidity, but its use remains controversial. Data on the risks and benefits of preoperative embolization for this tumor remains limited. We identified and analyzed all 29 reported cases of preoperative embolization of intradural spinal HB within the literature. There were 18 men and nine women, and patients ranged from 24 to 61 years of age. Mean tumor size was 3.5 cm. Cervical and thoracic location was most common, accounting for 48.3% and 20% of cases, respectively. Complications from embolization and surgery were minimal, with no deaths or permanent neurological morbidity. Minimal intraoperative bleeding and excellent rates of gross total resection were reported with preoperative embolization. However, outcomes from microsurgery alone from historical series have similarly reported excellent outcomes. While there is no established standard, preoperative embolization should be reserved for particularly high risk patients with risk of intraoperative bleeding. PMID:26585384

  14. Endovascular embolization of brain arteriovenous malformations with Eudragit-E.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Goichiro; Kato, Noriyuki; Yamazaki, Tomosato; Akutsu, Yoshimitsu; Hosoo, Hisayuki; Kasuya, Hiromichi; Sonobe, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Eudragit-E was originally developed as a non-adhesive liquid embolic material in the late 1990s and is a copolymer of methyl and butyl methacrylate and dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate that is dissolved in ethanol and iopamidol. This material has been used for endovascular embolization of brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) for some time but is currently not widely used. Because safety and feasibility of Eudragit-E has not been well documented, we here report our experience using this material for treating 22 human brain AVMs. From June 1998 to February 2014, 30 endovascular procedures using Eudragit-E were performed to treat 22 patients, including 14 men and 8 women with a mean age of 41.1 years (15-70 years). The mean follow-up period was 56 months (12-129 months), and the Spetzler-Martin grades were I (4 patients), II (9 patients), III (5 patients), and IV (4 patients). Residual AVMs were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery or surgery. The rate of complete obliteration with embolization alone was 27.3%. The overall obliteration rate after endovascular embolization with/without subsequent stereotactic radiosurgery or surgery was 72.7%. Eudragit-E caused two cases of cerebral infarction. One case of intracerebral hemorrhage due to postoperative hemodynamic changes also occurred. The rate of complications directly related to embolization was 10.0%. The safety and effectiveness of Eudragit-E embolization were satisfactory. PMID:25739432

  15. The letter height superiority illusion.

    PubMed

    New, Boris; Doré-Mazars, Karine; Cavézian, Céline; Pallier, Christophe; Barra, Julien

    2016-02-01

    Letters are identified better when they are embedded within words rather than within pseudowords, a phenomenon known as the word superiority effect (Reicher in Journal of Experimental Psychology, 81, 275-280, 1969). This effect is, inter alia, accounted for by the interactive-activation model (McClelland & Rumelhart in Psychological Review, 88, 375-407, 1981) through feedback from word to letter nodes. In this study, we investigated whether overactivation of features could lead to perceptual bias, wherein letters would be perceived as being taller than pseudoletters, or words would be perceived as being taller than pseudowords. In two experiments, we investigated the effects of letter and lexical status on the perception of size. Participants who had to compare the heights of letters and pseudoletters, or of words and pseudowords, indeed perceived the former stimuli as being taller than the latter. Possible alternative interpretations of this height superiority effect for letters and words are discussed. PMID:26370216

  16. A New Device for Vascular Embolization: Report on Case of Two Pulmonary Arteriovenous Fistulas Embolization Using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Michele; Rebonato, Alberto Greco, Laura; Stefanini, Giulio; Citone, Michele; Speranza, Annnarita; David, Vincenzo

    2006-10-15

    A pulmonary arteriovenous fistula (PAVF) is a rare vascular malformation commonly treated by embolization with coils or balloons to prevent the risk of several serious complications such as cerebral embolism and brain abscess. A 32-year-old female with two PAVFs and neurological ischemic manifestations has been successfully treated by transcatheter embolization of both fistulas using a new device (Amplatzer Vascular Plug). This self-expanding cylindrical nitinol mesh cage with high radial strength allows a chance of relocation until properly positioned. It is preferred to coils or balloons because a large caliber of feeding artery implied high risk of uncontrollable distal embolization. There appear to be no reports in the literature concerning use of this device, which could represent a useful innovative tool in embolotherapies, especially in large vascular areas.

  17. Treatment of microvascular micro-embolization using microbubbles and long-tone-burst ultrasound: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Pacella, John J; Brands, Judith; Schnatz, Frederick G; Black, John J; Chen, Xucai; Villanueva, Flordeliza S

    2015-02-01

    Despite epicardial coronary artery reperfusion by percutaneous coronary intervention, distal micro-embolization into the coronary microcirculation limits myocardial salvage during acute myocardial infarction. Thrombolysis using ultrasound and microbubbles (sonothrombolysis) is an approach that induces microbubble oscillations to cause clot disruption and restore perfusion. We sought to determine whether this technique could restore impaired tissue perfusion caused by thrombotic microvascular obstruction. In 16 rats, an imaging transducer was placed on the biceps femoris muscle, perpendicular to a single-element 1-MHz treatment transducer. Ultrasound contrast perfusion imaging was performed at baseline and after micro-embolization. Therapeutic ultrasound (5000 cycles, pulse repetition frequency = 0.33 Hz, 1.5 MPa) was delivered to nine rats for two 10-min sessions during intra-arterial infusion of lipid-encapsulated microbubbles; seven control rats received no ultrasound-microbubble therapy. Ultrasound contrast perfusion imaging was repeated after each treatment or control period, and microvascular volume was measured as peak video intensity. There was a 90% decrease in video intensity after micro-embolization (from 8.6 ± 4.8 to 0.7 ± 0.8 dB, p < 0.01). The first and second ultrasound-microbubble sessions were respectively followed by video intensity increases of 5.8 ± 5.1 and 8.7 ± 5.7 dB (p < 0.01, compared with micro-embolization). The first and second control sessions, respectively, resulted in no significant increase in video intensity (2.4 ± 2.3 and 3.6 ± 4.9) compared with micro-embolization (0.6 ± 0.7 dB). We have developed an in vivo model that simulates the distal thrombotic microvascular obstruction that occurs after primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Long-pulse-length ultrasound with microbubbles has a therapeutic effect on microvascular perfusion and may be a valuable adjunct to reperfusion therapy for acute myocardial infarction. PMID

  18. Writing superiority in cued recall.

    PubMed

    Fueller, Carina; Loescher, Jens; Indefrey, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In list learning paradigms with free recall, written recall has been found to be less susceptible to intrusions of related concepts than spoken recall when the list items had been visually presented. This effect has been ascribed to the use of stored orthographic representations from the study phase during written recall (Kellogg, 2001). In other memory retrieval paradigms, by contrast, either better recall for modality-congruent items or an input-independent writing superiority effect have been found (Grabowski, 2005). In a series of four experiments using a paired associate learning paradigm we tested (a) whether output modality effects on verbal recall can be replicated in a paradigm that does not involve the rejection of semantically related intrusion words, (b) whether a possible superior performance for written recall was due to a slower response onset for writing as compared to speaking in immediate recall, and (c) whether the performance in paired associate word recall was correlated with performance in an additional episodic memory recall task. We observed better written recall in the first half of the recall phase, irrespective of the modality in which the material was presented upon encoding. An explanation for this effect based on longer response latencies for writing and hence more time for memory retrieval could be ruled out by showing that the effect persisted in delayed response versions of the task. Although there was some evidence that stored additional episodic information may contribute to the successful retrieval of associate words, this evidence was only found in the immediate response experiments and hence is most likely independent from the observed output modality effect. In sum, our results from a paired associate learning paradigm suggest that superior performance for written vs. spoken recall cannot be (solely) explained in terms of additional access to stored orthographic representations from the encoding phase. Our findings rather

  19. Coil Protruding into the Common Femoral Vein Following Pelvic Venous Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Petra Holdstock, Judith M.; Bacon, Jennifer L.; Lopez, Anthony J.; Whiteley, Mark S.; Price, Barrie A.

    2008-03-15

    Pelvic venous embolization is performed for pelvic congestion syndrome and prior to lower limb varicose vein surgery in females with associated pelvic venous insufficiency. The procedure is analogous to varicocele embolization in males, although refluxing internal iliac vein tributaries may also be embolized. We report a case of inadvertent coil placement in the common femoral vein while embolizing the obturator vein, during pelvic vein embolization for recurrent lower limb varicose veins. There were no clinical consequences and the coil was left in situ. We advise caution when embolizing internal iliac vein tributaries where there is clinically significant communication with veins of the lower limb.

  20. Superior sulcus tumors (Pancoast tumors)

    PubMed Central

    Battistella, Lucia; Mammana, Marco; Calabrese, Francesca; Rea, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Superior Sulcus Tumors, frequently termed as Pancoast tumors, are a wide range of tumors invading the apical chest wall. Due to its localization in the apex of the lung, with the potential invasion of the lower part of the brachial plexus, first ribs, vertebrae, subclavian vessels or stellate ganglion, the superior sulcus tumors cause characteristic symptoms, like arm or shoulder pain or Horner’s syndrome. The management of superior sulcus tumors has dramatically evolved over the past 50 years. Originally deemed universally fatal, in 1956, Shaw and Paulson introduced a new treatment paradigm with combined radiotherapy and surgery ensuring 5-year survival of approximately 30%. During the 1990s, following the need to improve systemic as well as local control, a trimodality approach including induction concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection was introduced, reaching 5-year survival rates up to 44% and becoming the standard of care. Many efforts have been persecuted, also, to obtain higher complete resection rates using appropriate surgical approaches and involving multidisciplinary team including spine surgeon or vascular surgeon. Other potential treatment options are under consideration like prophylactic cranial irradiation or the addition of other chemotherapy agents or biologic agents to the trimodality approach. PMID:27429965