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Sample records for acute gouty arthritis

  1. Gouty Arthritis: A Review of Acute Management and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Liza; Saseen, Joseph J

    2016-08-01

    Gouty arthritis is one of the most common rheumatic diseases. The clinical burden of gouty arthritis has historically been well recognized; however, gout is often misdiagnosed and mismanaged. The prevalence of gout is rising and is likely attributed to several factors including increased incidence of comorbidities, lifestyle factors, and increased use of causative medications. With the increasing prevalence, there have been several innovations and evidence-based updates related to the diagnosis and management of gout. Acute gouty arthritis should be treated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), colchicine, or corticosteroids, or a combination of two agents. Xanthine oxidase inhibitor therapy remains the consensus first-line treatment option for the prevention of recurrent gout. Add-on therapies that reduce serum urate concentration include traditional uricosuric agents and a novel uric acid reabsorption inhibitor. Prophylaxis of acute gout with NSAIDs, colchicine, or corticosteroids is universally recommended when initiating any urate-lowering therapy in order to prevent acute gouty arthritis for a period of at least 6 months. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology and risk factors for gouty arthritis and evaluate diagnostic strategies and therapeutic regimens for the management of gout, including a new drug approval. PMID:27318031

  2. Appearance of acute gouty arthritis on indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Palestro, C.J.; Vega, A.; Kim, C.K.; Swyer, A.J.; Goldsmith, S.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy was performed on a 66-yr-old male with polyarticular acute gouty arthritis. Images revealed intense labeled leukocyte accumulation in a pattern indistinguishable from septic arthritis, in both knees and ankles, and the metatarsophalangeal joint of both great toes, all of which were involved in the acute gouty attack. Joint aspirate as well as blood cultures were reported as no growth; the patient was treated with intravenous colchicine and ACTH for 10 days with dramatic improvement noted. Labeled leukocyte imaging, repeated 12 days after the initial study, revealed near total resolution of joint abnormalities, concordant with the patient's clinical improvement. This case demonstrates that while acute gouty arthritis is a potential pitfall in labeled leukocyte imaging, in the presence of known gout, it may provide a simple, objective, noninvasive method of evaluating patient response to therapy.

  3. Development of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia in a Patient With Gouty Arthritis on Long Term Colchicine.

    PubMed

    Buyukkurt, Nurhilal; Korur, Asli; Boga, Can

    2016-06-01

    Colchicine is a frequently used drug in rheumatological diseases. Acute promyelocytic leukemia developed in a patient who used colchicine for gouty arthritis since 10 years is presented and the possible relation between the long term use of colchicine and hematological malignancies is discussed. PMID:27408362

  4. Management of gouty arthritis in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Abdul A; Elkhalili, Naser

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a comorbid condition that affects, based on recent estimates, between 47% and 54% of patients with gouty arthritis. However, data from randomized controlled trials in patients with gouty arthritis and CKD are limited, and current gouty arthritis treatment guidelines do not address the challenges associated with managing this patient population. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine are recommended first-line treatments for acute gouty arthritis attacks. However, in patients with CKD, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are not recommended because their use can exacerbate or cause acute kidney injury. Also, colchicine toxicity is increased in patients with CKD, and dosage reduction is required based on level of kidney function. Allopurinol, febuxostat, and pegloticase are all effective treatments for controlling elevated uric acid levels after the treatment of an acute attack. However, in patients with CKD, required allopurinol dosage reductions may limit efficacy; pegloticase requires further investigation in this population, and febuxostat has not been studied in patients with creatinine clearance<30 mL/min. This article reviews the risks and benefits associated with currently available pharmacologic agents for the management of acute and chronic gouty arthritis including urate-lowering therapy in patients with CKD. Challenges specific to primary care providers are addressed, including guidance to help them decide when to collaborate with, or refer patients to, rheumatology and nephrology specialists based on the severity of gout and CKD. PMID:22960848

  5. Chuanhu Anti-Gout Mixture versus Colchicine for Acute Gouty Arthritis: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Double-Dummy, Non-Inferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wang, YanGang; Wang, Luan; Li, EnZe; Li, Yang; Wang, ZhongChao; Sun, XiaoFang; Yu, XiaoLong; Ma, Lin; Wang, YunLong; Wang, YouXin

    2014-01-01

    Background The Chuanhu anti-gout mixture has been used for many years in the treatment of gout in Chinese Traditional Medicine, and current methods for treatments for acute gouty arthritis have been either less effective or have had serious side effects. Methods In this 12-week, double-blind, double-dummy, non-inferiority study, outpatient individuals with newly diagnosed acute gouty arthritis were randomly assigned to receive Chuanhu anti-gout mixture or colchicine. Both the study investigators and the participants were masked to the treatment assignments. The primary outcome was the recurrence rate of acute gouty arthritis, and the secondary outcomes were changes in white blood cells (WHC) and C-reactive protein (CRP). This trial is registered at ISRCTN.org as trial ISRCTN65219941. Results A total of 176 patients were randomly assigned to receive either the Chuanhu anti-gout mixture or Colchicine. The overall recurrence rates in the Chuanhu anti-gout mixture group (CH group) and the Colchicine group (Col group) were 12.50% vs 14.77% (difference -2.22%, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): -10.78%~6.23%), meeting the predefined non-inferiority criterion of 15%, as did the data for WHC and CRP. The incidence of adverse events (mainly diarrhea) was less in the Col group than in the CH group (2.27% vs 28.41%, 95% CI 0.01~0.26). In addition, changes in blood uric acid, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and creatinine in the CH group were significantly larger compared to those in the Col group (P<0.05). Conclusions The Chuanhu anti-gout mixture was non-inferior to colchicine for the treatment of acute gouty arthritis. The study suggested that the Chuanhu anti-gout mixture can be considered an alternative choice for the treatment of acute gouty arthritis because of its lower incidence of adverse events and its protection of kidney and renal function. PMID:25013367

  6. The effect of resveratrol on the recurrent attacks of gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyan; Zheng, Shucong; Wang, Yuankai; Zhu, Huiqing; Liu, Qiong; Xue, Yu; Qiu, Jianhua; Zou, Hejian; Zhu, Xiaoxia

    2016-05-01

    Gouty arthritis is characterized by inflammation induced by monosodium urate (MSU) crystal deposition, which is resulted by an increase of serum urate concentration. The management of gout, especially the recurrent acute attacks of chronic gouty arthritis, is still a problem to be resolved. In this study, we aimed to develop the preventive and therapeutic effect of resveratrol on gouty arthritis. MSU was used to induce gouty arthritis in the foot pad of C57BL/6 mice. Yeast polysaccharide and potassium oxonate were used to induce hyperuricemia in Kunming mice. Resveratrol was intraperitoneal injected to the mice in the treatment group. The pad inflammation and the level of serum uric acid were investigated to estimate the effect of resveratrol in gouty arthritis. Hyperuricemia was significantly detected in the mice treated with yeast polysaccharide and potassium oxonate, and gouty arthritis was successfully induced with MSU in mice. We further identified that resveratrol inhibited pad swelling and pad 99mTc uptake in gouty mice. Moreover, serum uric acid level was also decreased by resveratrol in hyperuricemia mice. This study highlighted that resveratrol might be applied to prevent the recurrent acute attack of gouty arthritis because of its inhibition of articular inflammation and down-regulation of serum uric acid. PMID:25451618

  7. Canakinumab reduces the risk of acute gouty arthritis flares during initiation of allopurinol treatment: results of a double-blind, randomised study

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, Naomi; Mysler, Eduardo; Lin, Hsiao-Yi; De Meulemeester, Marc; Rovensky, Jozef; Arulmani, Udayasankar; Balfour, Alison; Krammer, Gerhard; Sallstig, Peter; So, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study assessed the efficacy and safety of canakinumab, a fully human anti-interleukin 1β monoclonal antibody, for prophylaxis against acute gouty arthritis flares in patients initiating urate-lowering treatment. Methods In this double-blind, double-dummy, dose-ranging study, 432 patients with gouty arthritis initiating allopurinol treatment were randomised 1:1:1:1:1:1:2 to receive: a single dose of canakinumab, 25, 50, 100, 200, or 300 mg subcutaneously; 4×4-weekly doses of canakinumab (50+50+25+25 mg subcutaneously); or daily colchicine 0.5 mg orally for 16 weeks. Patients recorded details of flares in diaries. The study aimed to determine the canakinumab dose having equivalent efficacy to colchicine 0.5 mg at 16 weeks. Results A dose-response for canakinumab was not apparent with any of the four predefined dose-response models. The estimated canakinumab dose with equivalent efficacy to colchicine was below the range of doses tested. At 16 weeks, there was a 62% to 72% reduction in the mean number of flares per patient for canakinumab doses ≥50 mg versus colchicine based on a negative binomial model (rate ratio: 0.28–0.38, p≤0.0083), and the percentage of patients experiencing ≥1 flare was significantly lower for all canakinumab doses (15% to 27%) versus colchicine (44%, p<0.05). There was a 64% to 72% reduction in the risk of experiencing ≥1 flare for canakinumab doses ≥50 mg versus colchicine at 16 weeks (hazard ratio (HR): 0.28–0.36, p≤0.05). The incidence of adverse events was similar across treatment groups. Conclusions Single canakinumab doses ≥50 mg or four 4-weekly doses provided superior prophylaxis against flares compared with daily colchicine 0.5 mg. PMID:21540198

  8. Comparison of Prednisolone, Etoricoxib, and Indomethacin in Treatment of Acute Gouty Arthritis: An Open-Label, Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lingling; Liu, Shiqun; Guan, Meiping; Xue, Yaoming

    2016-01-01

    Background At present there are several kinds of medicine for treating acute gout arthritis (AGA). This study compared the efficacy and safety of prednisolone, etoricoxib, and indomethacin in the treatment of AGA. Material/Methods This was an open-label, randomized, active-comparator study in patients with AGA. Patients were randomized to 4 days of prednisolone 35 mg qd, etoricoxib 120 mg qd, or indomethacin 50 mg tid. The primary efficacy endpoint was the reduction of self-assessed pain in the index joint from baseline. Secondary endpoints included changes in physician’s assessment of tenderness, erythema, swelling, and joint activity; patient assessment of response to therapy; and safety. Results We analyzed 113 patients. Baseline demographics were comparable among treatment groups. Oral prednisolone, etoricoxib, and indomethacin were similarly effective in improving pain, tenderness, and joint activity over 4 days. For inflammation, oral prednisolone, etoricoxib, and indomethacin were similarly effective in reducing erythema, but prednisolone might be more effective in reducing swelling than indomethacin. The patient response to therapy was similar in the 3 groups. There were more total adverse events with indomethacin compared with the other 2 drugs. Conclusions Efficacy was comparable among prednisolone, etoricoxib, and indomethacin for the treatment of AGA. Prednisolone might be more effective in reducing inflammation and it had a better safety profile. PMID:26965791

  9. A case of gouty arthritis following percutaneous radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dae Hee; Lee, Hyo-Suk

    2010-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) is considered an effective technique for providing local control in the majority of Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. Although RFA is generally well tolerated, recent studies have reported complications associated with RFA. We describe a case of acute gouty arthritis in a 71-year-old man with chronic renal failure who was treated with RFA for a HCC lesion and who had hepatitis B-associated cirrhosis and mild renal insufficiency. Regular surveillance of the patient detected a 3.5 cm HCC lesion. Because the patient had declined surgery, RFA was chosen for therapy. On the third post-procedural day, the laboratory results showed increases in his uric acid and potassium levels, which were compatible with a tumor lysis syndrome. On the 6th post-procedural day, the patient complained of new right knee pain. Subsequent joint aspiration revealed monosodium urate monohydrate crystals. We made the diagnosis of acute gouty arthritis arising from tumor lysis and liver infarction caused by HCC ablation, which was aggravated by acute renal insufficiency. After adequate hydration and administration of oral colchicines, the patient’s right knee pain subsided and the uric acid serum level returned to normal. This is the first described case of acute gouty arthritis after RFA for a HCC lesion in a patient with underlying chronic renal insufficiency. To avoid hyperuricemia and an acute attack of gout after RFA therapy for HCC, early identification of patients at risk is warranted, such as those with a large tumor, rapid tumor growth, and renal insufficiency, and preventative measures should be considered. PMID:20135729

  10. Serum Procalcitonin as a Useful Serologic Marker for Differential Diagnosis between Acute Gouty Attack and Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with gout are similar to those with bacterial infection in terms of the nature of inflammation. Herein we compared the differences in procalcitonin (PCT) levels between these two inflammatory conditions and evaluated the ability of serum PCT to function as a clinical marker for differential diagnosis between acute gouty attack and bacterial infection. Materials and Methods Serum samples were obtained from 67 patients with acute gouty arthritis and 90 age-matched patients with bacterial infection. Serum PCT levels were measured with an enzyme-linked fluorescent assay. Results Serum PCT levels in patients with acute gouty arthritis were significantly lower than those in patients with bacterial infection (0.096±0.105 ng/mL vs. 4.94±13.763 ng/mL, p=0.001). However, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels showed no significant differences between the two groups. To assess the ability of PCT to discriminate between acute gouty arthritis and bacterial infection, the areas under the curves (AUCs) of serum PCT, uric acid, and CRP were 0.857 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.798–0.917, p<0.001], 0.808 (95% CI, 0.738–0.878, p<0.001), and 0.638 (95% CI, 0.544–0.731, p=0.005), respectively. There were no significant differences in ESR and white blood cell counts between these two conditions. With a cut-off value of 0.095 ng/mL, the sums of sensitivity and specificity of PCT were the highest (81.0% and 80.6%, respectively). Conclusion Serum PCT levels were significantly lower in patients with acute gouty attack than in patients with bacterial infection. Thus, serum PCT can be used as a useful serologic marker to differentiate between acute gouty arthritis and bacterial infections. PMID:27401644

  11. Morin, a dietary bioflavonol suppresses monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation in an animal model of acute gouty arthritis with reference to NLRP3 inflammasome, hypo-xanthine phospho-ribosyl transferase, and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekar, Chitra; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-09-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of morin, a dietary bioflavanol was explored on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced inflammation in rats, an experimental model for acute gouty arthritis. Morin treatment (30mg/kg b.wt) significantly attenuated the ankle swelling and the levels of lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and articular elastase along with an increased anti-oxidant status (catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) in the joint homogenate of MSU crystal-induced rats. Histological assessment revealed that morin limited the diffusion of joint space, synovial hyperplasia, and inflammatory cell infiltrations. The mRNA expression of NLRP3 (nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3) inflammasome, caspase-1, pro-inflammatory cytokines, MCP-1, inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65 was found downregulated and HPRT (hypo-xanthine phospho-ribosyl transferase) mRNA expression was upregulated in morin treated MSU crystal-induced rats. In addition, morin treatment reduced the protein expression of NF-κB p65, p-NF-κB p65, iNOS, COX-2, and TNF-α. The results clearly demonstrated that morin exert a potent anti-inflammatory effect on MSU crystal-induced inflammation in rats. PMID:27268719

  12. Sonographic Findings in Gouty Arthritis: Diagnostic Value and Association with Disease Duration.

    PubMed

    Elsaman, Ahmed M; Muhammad, Eman M S; Pessler, Frank

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the sonographic features of gouty arthritis and correlate findings with disease duration. The study was conducted on 100 patients in ambulatory care aged ≥40 y. Inclusion criteria included mono- or oligo-arthritis with effusion of the knee or the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint and no known history of gout. A complete medical history was obtained with emphasis on the known risk factors or causes of gouty arthritis. A 12-MHz Medison linear probe was used for ultrasonography (US). Synovial fluid analysis with polarizing light microscopy was performed on all patients. Ninety-eight knee joints and 33 first MTP joints were examined. Gouty arthritis was found by US in four forms: (i) floating echogenic foci in effusion fluid or Baker cysts, (ii) deposits on the cartilage surface (double contour sign), (iii) erosions and (iv) mature tophus/tophi. These were found in 78.9%, 42.3%, 39.4% and 28.2% of patients, respectively. The overall sensitivity and specificity of US in detecting gout (as defined by the clinical gold standard, i.e., detection of urate crystals by polarizing light microscopy) were 85.9% and 86.7%, respectively. Detection of echogenic foci in effusion fluid was associated with the shortest duration of symptoms (median duration 2 y) followed by double contour sign (3.5 y), erosions (4 y) and tophus (12.5 y). Sonographic findings in gout can be assigned a temporal pattern, with echogenic foci being associated with the shortest and full tophus formation with the longest disease duration. PMID:26995154

  13. Marrow aplasia following colchicine treatment for gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ferrannini, E; Pentimone, F

    1984-01-01

    A 69-year-old man was given 8 mg of colchicine intravenously to treat an acute attack of gout. A maintenance dose of 2 mg/day of oral colchicine was then used to prevent recurrence. Three months later, the patient developed thrombocytopenia, followed by leukopenia and then by anemia at three and four months distance, respectively. The patient had shown no signs of acute toxicity with intravenous colchicine, but liver enzymes were raised after two months of oral treatment. The sequential involvement of the three blood precursor lines, in the order to their physiological half-lives, suggests direct toxicity, rather than idiosyncrasy, due to slow accumulation of the drug within target cells. The prophylactic use of colchicine, especially in the elderly, is questioned. PMID:6532622

  14. Clinical profile, therapeutic approach and outcome of gouty arthritis in northern India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Singh, Y N; Malaviya, A N; Chaudhary, K; Tripathy, S

    1990-06-01

    Thirty patients with gouty arthritis were studied over 3 years. The diagnosis was established with the help of polarised light microscopy. All the patients were males, with a median age of 45 years. They belonged to the middle or upper socio-economic class and were obese (mean body mass index 29.7). Chronic alcoholism, diabetes mellitus and hypertension were present in one patient each. No patient had symptomatic coronary artery disease. Although 6 patients had a history of renal colic, only one had gouty nephropathy with chronic renal failure. Six patients had a positive family history of gout. The disease involved mostly the joints of the lower extremity and podagra was observed in 70% of patients. Eight patients had tophi at various sites. There were 17 'over producers' and 13 'under excretors' of uric acid. The treatment consisted of patient education, symptomatic control with non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and/or colchicine and antihyperuricaemic therapy. The overproducers were treated with allopurinol while the under excretors were treated with [corrected] sulfinpyrazone. In general, there was a good response to therapy as indicated by lowering of serum uric acid and the number of painful episodes per year. The overall profile of the disease appears similar to that seen in the West. PMID:2384454

  15. Acute Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shirtliff, Mark E.; Mader, Jon T.

    2002-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection. PMID:12364368

  16. Effects of RuPeng15 Powder (RPP15) on Monosodium Urate Crystal-Induced Gouty Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Y.-Y.; Li, Y.-F.; Xu, M.; Li, W.-Y.; Yang, M.; Li, R.-L.

    2015-01-01

    RuPeng15 Powder (RPP15) is a herbal multicompound remedy that originates from traditional Tibetan medicine and possesses antigout, anti-inflammatory, and antihyperuricemic properties based on the traditional conceptions. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic effect of PRP15 in rat gouty arthritis induced by monosodium urate (MSU) crystals. In the present study, we found that treatment with RPP15 (0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 g/kg) in rats with gouty arthritis induced by MSU crystals significantly attenuated the knee swelling. Histomorphometric and immunohistochemistry analyses revealed that MSU-induced inflammatory cell infiltration and the elevated expressions of nuclear transcription factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65) in synovial tissues were significantly inhibited, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) result showed that MSU-induced high levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in synovial fluid were reduced by treatment with RPP15 (0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 g/kg). We conclude that RPP15 may be a promising candidate for the development of a new treatment for gout and its activity of antigout may be partially related to inhibiting TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, and NF-κB p65 expression in the synovial tissues. PMID:26221174

  17. Zisheng Shenqi decoction ameliorates monosodium urate crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects.

    PubMed

    Han, Jieru; Xie, Ying; Sui, Fangyu; Liu, Chunhong; Du, Xiaowei; Liu, Chenggang; Feng, Xiaoling; Jiang, Deyou

    2016-09-01

    Based on traditional Chinese medicinal theories on gouty arthritis, Zisheng Shenqi decoction (ZSD), a novel Chinese medicinal formula, was developed due to its multiple functions, including reinforcing renal function, promoting blood circulation and relieving pain. In the present study, the effect of ZSD on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats was investigated and the underlying mechanisms were examined. The data from these investigations showed that the injection of MSU crystals into the ankle joint cavity caused significant elevations in ankle swelling and inflammatory cell infiltration into the synovium, whereas these abnormal changes were markedly suppressed by oral administration of ZSD (40 mg/kg) for 7 days. Mechanically, ZSD treatment prevented MSU crystal‑induced inflammatory responses, as evidenced by downregulation in the expression levels of NACHT domain, leucine‑rich repeat and pyrin domain containing protein (NALP) 1 and NALP6 inflammasomes, decreased serum levels of tumor necrosis factor‑α and interleukin‑1β, and inhibited activation of nuclear factor‑κB. In addition, ZSD administration markedly enhanced the anti-oxidant status in MSU crystal‑induced rats by the increase in the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, and the levels of reduced glutathione. These results indicated that ZSD effectively prevented MSU crystal-induced gouty arthritis via modulating multiple anti‑oxidative and anti‑inflammatory pathways, suggesting a promising herbal formula for the prevention and treatment of gouty arthritis. PMID:27432278

  18. Zisheng Shenqi decoction ameliorates monosodium urate crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jieru; Xie, Ying; Sui, Fangyu; Liu, Chunhong; Du, Xiaowei; Liu, Chenggang; Feng, Xiaoling; Jiang, Deyou

    2016-01-01

    Based on traditional Chinese medicinal theories on gouty arthritis, Zisheng Shenqi decoction (ZSD), a novel Chinese medicinal formula, was developed due to its multiple functions, including reinforcing renal function, promoting blood circulation and relieving pain. In the present study, the effect of ZSD on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats was investigated and the underlying mechanisms were examined. The data from these investigations showed that the injection of MSU crystals into the ankle joint cavity caused significant elevations in ankle swelling and inflammatory cell infiltration into the synovium, whereas these abnormal changes were markedly suppressed by oral administration of ZSD (40 mg/kg) for 7 days. Mechanically, ZSD treatment prevented MSU crystal-induced inflammatory responses, as evidenced by downregulation in the expression levels of NACHT domain, leucine-rich repeat and pyrin domain containing protein (NALP) 1 and NALP6 inflammasomes, decreased serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β, and inhibited activation of nuclear factor-κB. In addition, ZSD administration markedly enhanced the anti-oxidant status in MSU crystal-induced rats by the increase in the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, and the levels of reduced glutathione. These results indicated that ZSD effectively prevented MSU crystal-induced gouty arthritis via modulating multiple anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory pathways, suggesting a promising herbal formula for the prevention and treatment of gouty arthritis. PMID:27432278

  19. Kinsenoside screening with a microfluidic chip attenuates gouty arthritis through inactivating NF-κB signaling in macrophages and protecting endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Qiao; Bing, Wang; Di, Yin; Hua, Li; Shi-He, Li; Yu-Hua, Zheng; Xiu-Guo, Han; Yu-Gang, Wang; Qi-Ming, Fan; Shih-Mo, Yang; Ting-Ting, Tang

    2016-01-01

    Gouty arthritis is a rheumatic disease that is characterized by the deposition of monosodium urate (MSU) in synovial joints cause by the increased serum hyperuricemia. This study used a three-dimensional (3D) flowing microfluidic chip to screen the effective candidate against MSU-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) damage, and found kinsenoside (Kin) to be the leading active component of Anoectochilus roxburghi, one of the Chinese medicinal plant widely used in the treatment of gouty arthritis clinically. Cell viability and apoptosis of HUVECs were evaluated, indicating that direct Kin stimulation and conditioned medium (CM) from Kin-treated macrophages both negatively modulated with MSU crystals. Additionally, Kin was capable of attenuating MSU-induced activation of nuclear factor-κB/mitogen-activated protein kinase (NF-κB/MAPK) signaling, targeting IκB kinase-α (IKKα) and IKKβ kinases of macrophages and influencing the expressions of NF-κB downstream cytokines and subsequent HUVEC bioactivity. Inflammasome NLR pyrin domain-containing 3 (NALP3) and toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) were also inhibited after Kin treatment. Also, Kin downregulated CD14-mediated MSU crystals uptake in macrophages. In vivo study with MSU-injected ankle joints further revealed the significant suppression of inflammatory infiltration and endothelia impairment coupled with alleviation of ankle swelling and nociceptive response via Kin treatments. Taken together, these data implicated that Kin was the most effective candidate from Anoectochilus roxburghi to treat gouty arthritis clinically. PMID:27584788

  20. Acute gouty arthritis in a patient after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Fokter, Samo K; Repse-Fokter, Alenka

    2010-06-01

    Symptomatic gout in an artificial joint is exceptionally rare. We present a 68-year-old male patient who developed progressive knee pain and swelling one year after the cemented total arthroplasty of his left knee. The diagnosis was confirmed by crystal identification in the synovial fluid. Beside thorough workout to rule out infection in a painful and inflamed prosthetic knee, specific history of gout should be sought and fluid aspirate examined cytologically and under polarised light for crystal arthropathy. PMID:20552289

  1. Therapeutic Effects of Chinese Medicine Herb Pair, Huzhang and Guizhi, on Monosodium Urate Crystal-Induced Gouty Arthritis in Rats Revealed by Anti-Inflammatory Assessments and NMR-Based Metabonomics

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bin; Huang, Huizhu; Li, Zhong; Gong, Mengjuan; Shi, Wan; Zhu, Chunxia; Gu, Zulian; Zou, Zhongjie

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic effects of Huzhang-Guizhi herb pair (HG), firstly included in Hu-Zhang Power documented in Taiping Shenghui Fang, on monosodium urate (MSU) crystals-induced gouty arthritis in rats. We found that pretreatment with HG in rats with gouty arthritis could significantly attenuate the ankle joint swelling, and this beneficial antigout effect might be mediated, at least in part, by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) production in synovial fluid as well as nuclear transcription factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65) protein expression in synovial tissue. Moreover, metabonomic analysis demonstrated that 5 and 6 potential biomarkers associated with gouty arthritis in plasma and urine, respectively, which were mainly involved in energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and gut microbe metabolism, were identified. HG could reverse the pathological process of MSU-induced gouty arthritis through regulating the disturbed metabolic pathways. These results provided important mechanistic insights into the protective effects of HG against MSU-induced gouty arthritis in rats. PMID:26989428

  2. Therapeutic Effects of Chinese Medicine Herb Pair, Huzhang and Guizhi, on Monosodium Urate Crystal-Induced Gouty Arthritis in Rats Revealed by Anti-Inflammatory Assessments and NMR-Based Metabonomics.

    PubMed

    Han, Bin; Huang, Huizhu; Li, Zhong; Gong, Mengjuan; Shi, Wan; Zhu, Chunxia; Gu, Zulian; Zou, Zhongjie

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic effects of Huzhang-Guizhi herb pair (HG), firstly included in Hu-Zhang Power documented in Taiping Shenghui Fang, on monosodium urate (MSU) crystals-induced gouty arthritis in rats. We found that pretreatment with HG in rats with gouty arthritis could significantly attenuate the ankle joint swelling, and this beneficial antigout effect might be mediated, at least in part, by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) production in synovial fluid as well as nuclear transcription factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65) protein expression in synovial tissue. Moreover, metabonomic analysis demonstrated that 5 and 6 potential biomarkers associated with gouty arthritis in plasma and urine, respectively, which were mainly involved in energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and gut microbe metabolism, were identified. HG could reverse the pathological process of MSU-induced gouty arthritis through regulating the disturbed metabolic pathways. These results provided important mechanistic insights into the protective effects of HG against MSU-induced gouty arthritis in rats. PMID:26989428

  3. A Randomized, Controlled Trial to Assess the Efficacy of Arthroscopic Debridement in Combination with Oral Medication Versus Oral Medication in Patients with Gouty Knee Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wanyan, Pingping; Wang, Jian Min; Tian, Jin Hui; Hu, Long; Shen, Xi Ping; Yang, Ke Hu

    2015-12-01

    Gouty knee arthritis refers to a form of inflammatory diseases caused by deposits of needle-like crystals of uric acid in knee joint. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of arthroscopic debridement in combination with oral medication versus oral medication alone for the treatment of gouty knee arthritis. A total of 60 patients with gouty knee arthritis were randomized to receive either arthroscopic surgery in combination with oral medication or oral medication alone. Efficacy was assessed with the angle of motion, functions, and visual analog scale (VAS). These indices were measured prior to treatment and at 2, 4, 12, 24, and 48 weeks posttreatment. Surgery- and medication-related complications were observed. Significant differences in flexion and extension of the knee joint, lymphoma scores, and VAS were detected between the two groups at 2, 4, and 12 weeks posttreatment (P < 0.05) but not at weeks 24 and 48 posttreatment (P > 0.05) . Significant differences in these indices were detected at different time points in each group (P < 0.05), except between weeks 24 and 48 (P > 0.05). Arthroscopic surgery in combination with oral medication is superior to single oral medication in the flexion and extension of the knee joint, lymphoma scores, and pain relief (VAS) before 24 weeks, although no statistical differences were detected in the efficacy after 24 weeks, and in medication-related safety between the two groups. Although arthroscopic debridement cannot replace systemic uric acid-lowering treatments such as medication and dietary control, it is still an effective approach. PMID:26730077

  4. Suppressive effect of Sanmiao formula on experimental gouty arthritis by inhibiting cartilage matrix degradation: An in vivo and in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fangfang; Yin, Lian; Ji, Leilei; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Guangji; Shi, Le; Xu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Sanmiao formula (SM) is a compound prescription, which has been used in traditional Chinese medicine since the Ming Dynasty for gouty and rheumatoid arthritis treatments. However, no evidence has been unfolded to show the relationship between SM and gouty arthritis (GA), particularly inhibiting cartilage matrix degradation. In the present study, we undertook a characterization of anti-GA activity of SM using an in vivo rat model induced by potassium oxonate and cold bath together with in vitro studies with chondrocytes for further molecular characterization. Potassium oxonate and cold bath rats were treated with SM at doses of 7.2g/kg per day for 5days. SM treatments significantly suppressed the swelling rate and the severe pathologic changes in the joints of the animals in gout model. Inflammatory factors count by ELISA analysis, SM exhibited inhibition on IL-1β and TNF-α. Moreover, histological analysis of the joints and SM-serum substantially interfered with the MSU-induced expression of glycosaminoglycans (GAG), up-regulated the content of proteoglycan. Importantly, SM interfered with GA-augmented expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) -3 and aggrecanases (ADAMTS)-4, which are considered to be key enzymes in cartilage matrix degradation, and simultaneously augmented GA-reduced tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) -1 and -3 expression in the joints and chondrocytes. Therefore, SM is looking forward to be a potential novel agent that could prevent cartilage matrix degradation effectively in gouty arthritis, and this provides a new target for development of new medicines. PMID:26637956

  5. The interleukin 1 inhibitor rilonacept in treatment of chronic gouty arthritis: results of a placebo-controlled, monosequence crossover, non-randomised, single-blind pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Terkeltaub, R; Sundy, J S; Schumacher, H R; Murphy, F; Bookbinder, S; Biedermann, S; Wu, R; Mellis, S; Radin, A

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recent studies suggest that blockade of the NLRP3 (cryopyrin) inflammasome interleukin 1β (IL1β) pathway may offer a new treatment strategy for gout. Objective: To explore the potential utility of rilonacept (IL1 Trap) in patients with chronic active gouty arthritis in a proof-of-concept study. Methods: This 14-week, multicentre, non-randomised, single-blind, monosequence crossover study of 10 patients with chronic active gouty arthritis included a placebo run-in (2 weeks), active rilonacept treatment (6 weeks) and a 6-week post-treatment follow-up. Results: Rilonacept was generally well tolerated. No deaths and no serious adverse events occurred during the study. One patient withdrew owing to an injection-site reaction. Patients’ self-reported median pain visual analogue scale scores significantly decreased from week 2 (after the placebo run-in) to week 4 (2 weeks of rilonacept) (5.0 to 2.8; p<0.049), with sustained improvement at week 8 (1.3; p<0.049); 5 of 10 patients reported at least a 75% improvement. Median symptom-adjusted and severity-adjusted joint scores were significantly decreased. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels fell significantly. Conclusions: This proof-of-concept study demonstrated that rilonacept is generally well tolerated and may offer therapeutic benefit in reducing pain in patients with chronic refractory gouty arthritis, supporting the need for larger, randomised, controlled studies of IL1 antagonism such as with rilonacept for this clinical indication. PMID:19635719

  6. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like gout, crystals form in the joints. But in this ... CPPD arthritis can be confused with: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Exams and Tests Most arthritic ...

  7. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like with gout, crystals form in the joints. But in calcium ... pyrophosphate arthritis can be misdiagnosed as: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis

  8. Therapeutic Effect of Total Saponins from Dioscorea nipponica Makino on Gouty Arthritis Based on the NF-κB Signal Pathway: An In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qi; Liu, Shumin; Yua, Donghua; Zhang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Dioscorea nipponica Makino is one of the most common used traditional Chinese drugs which are used to treat gouty arthritis (GA). Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway plays an important role during this process. In the present study, we investigated the effects of total saponins from D. nipponica Makino (TDN) on NF-κB pathway in interleukin-1β (IL-1β) induced fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS). Materials and Methods: FLS were divided into three groups: Normal group, model group, which was given 10 μg/L IL-1β to induce the proliferation, and TDN group (10 μg/L IL-1β +100 μg/L TDN). 1 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h after treating, immune fluorescence method was used to detect the cell location of NF-κB p65. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay was used to detect the activation of NF-κB p65. Western blot method was used to detect the protein expressions of NF-κB p65, IκBα, and p-IκBα. Results: TDN could inhibit the activation and transfer of NF-κB p65. As time went on, the expression of NF-κB p65 in the cytoplasm was decreased while it was increased in the nucleus. The expression of p-IκBα was increased, whereas the expression of IκBα was not changed. TDN could regulate these abnormal expressions. Conclusion: TDN may treat GA by regulating NF-κB signal pathway. SUMMARY TDN could inhibit the transfer of NF-κB p65.TDN could inhibit the activation of NF-κB p65.TDN could inhibit the expression of p-IκBa. Abbreviations used: TDN: Total saponins from Dioscorea nipponica Makino, GA: Gouty arthritis, FLS: Fibroblast-like synoviocytes, IL-1β: Interleukin-1 beta, IF: Immune fluorescence, EMSA: Electrophoretic mobility shift assay, WB: Western blot. PMID:27601855

  9. Acute pseudoseptic arthritis and palmoplantar pustulosis.

    PubMed

    Chamot, A M; Vion, B; Gerster, J C

    1986-01-01

    The case of a 60-year-old woman who developed acute peripheral arthritis of a pseudoseptic character (high synovial leucocytosis and fever) associated to a palmoplantar pustulosis is reported. PMID:3514079

  10. Crystal structures of Apo and GMP bound hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase from Legionella pneumophila and the implications in gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nannan; Gong, Xiaojian; Lu, Min; Chen, Xiaofang; Qin, Ximing; Ge, Honghua

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) (EC 2.4.2.8) reversibly catalyzes the transfer of the 5-phophoribosyl group from 5-phosphoribosyl-alpha-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to hypoxanthine or guanine to form inosine monophosphate (IMP) or guanosine monophosphate (GMP) in the purine salvage pathway. To investigate the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme in the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila, we determined the crystal structures of the L. pneumophila HGPRT (LpHGPRT) both in its apo-form and in complex with GMP. The structures reveal that LpHGPRT comprises a core domain and a hood domain which are packed together to create a cavity for GMP-binding and the enzymatic catalysis. The binding of GMP induces conformational changes of the stable loop II. This new binding site is closely related to the Gout arthritis-linked human HGPRT mutation site (Ser103Arg). Finally, these structures of LpHGPRT provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of HGPRT. PMID:26968365

  11. Genetic analysis of ABCG2 and SLC2A9 gene polymorphisms in gouty arthritis in a Korean population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun Sung; Kim, Yunsuek; Park, Geon; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Park, Byung Lae; Kim, Hyun Sook

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Gout is a common inf lammatory arthritis triggered by the crystallization of uric acid in the joints. Serum uric acid levels are highly heritable, suggesting a strong genetic component. Independent studies to confirm the genetic associations with gout in various ethnic populations are warranted. We investigated the association of polymorphisms in the ABCG2 and SLC2A9 genes with gout in Korean patients and healthy individuals. Methods: We consecutively enrolled 109 patients with gout and 102 healthy controls. The diagnosis of gout was based on the preliminary criteria of the America College of Rheumatology. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole blood samples. We identified single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) changes in the ABCG2 and SLC2A9 genes using a direct sequencing technique. rs2231142 in ABCG2 and rs6449213 and rs16890979 in SLC2A9 and nearby regions were amplified by polymerase chain reaction. Results: Patients with gout had significantly higher A/A genotype (29.3% vs. 4.9%, respectively) and A allele (52.8% vs. 26.5%, respectively) frequencies of rs2231142 in ABCG2 than did controls (χ2 = 29.42, p < 0.001; odds ratio, 3.32; 95% confidence interval, 2.11 to 5.20). We found novel polymorphisms (c.881A>G and c.1002+78G>A) in the SLC2A9 gene. The univariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the c.881A>G and c.1002+78G>A SNPs were significantly higher in patients than in controls. Conclusions: We demonstrated a significant association between rs2231142 in the ABCG2 gene and gout and identified novel SNPs, c.881A>G and c.1002+78G>A, in the SLC2A9 gene that may be associated with gout in a Korean population. PMID:26552468

  12. Atypical arthritis revisited: Acute rheumatic fever

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Binoy; Bhutia, Euden; Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    A 13-year-old boy presented with vague musculoskeletal pain and involvement of multiple small and large joints along with axial skeleton for the last 3 years, poorly responsive to aspirin. However, on account of presence of carditis and fulfilment of Jones criteria, a diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) with atypical arthritis was made. We report this case to break the myth and sensitize pediatricians and rheumatologists to keep the possibility of atypical articular presentations, as in our case, in patients with ARF and prevent delayed diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27212853

  13. Acute Arthritis in Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Ahmeti, Salih; Ajazaj-Berisha, Lindita; Halili, Bahrije; Shala, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever is a severe viral disease caused by a Nairovirus. An atypical manifestation in the form of acute arthritis was found in a confirmed Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus Kosova-Hoti strain positive patient. Acute arthritis in Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) may be as a result of immune mechanisms or the bleeding disorder underlying CCHF. PMID:24926169

  14. Arthritis and the Feet

    MedlinePlus

    ... for months, or years, then abate, sometimes permanently. Gout (gouty arthritis) : Gout is a condition caused by a buildup of ... sauces, shellfish, and brandy is popularly associated with gout, there are other protein compounds in foods such ...

  15. Mast Cell Stabilizer Ketotifen Inhibits Gouty Inflammation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Dur-Zong; Chu, Pei-Yi; Chen, Si-Jin; Liu, Ming-Yie

    2016-01-01

    Gout, an extremely painful arthritis with relapsing inflammatory attacks, is a common inflammatory joint disease in adults. We examined the therapeutic effect of ketotifen, a mast cell stabilizer, on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced acute inflammation. Eight-week-old male Wistar rats were injected with MSU crystals (5 mg per rat) into air pouch. Ketotifen (0, 0.1, 03, and 1 mg/kg) was given 1 hour before MSU crystal injection. Lavage histamine, leukocyte counts, mast cell counts, nitric oxide, and proinflammatory mediator levels were assessed 12 hours after MSU injection. Ketotifen significantly inhibited MSU-induced mast cell activation and histamine concentration in air pouch lavage. Ketotifen dose-dependently inhibited MSU-initiated leukocyte infiltration into the air pouch. Furthermore, ketotifen significantly decreased proinflammatory mediators, including nitric oxide, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6, production in MSU-treated rats. Ketotifen may attenuate MSU-induced acute inflammation by inhibiting mast cell activation and leukocyte infiltration in rats. Furthermore, ketotifen has the potential to be a new approach in managing patients with gouty inflammation in the future. PMID:23884077

  16. Spondylitic psoriatic arthritis presenting as acute urinary retention

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Tom Edward Ngo; Que, Mary Lareine V; Tee, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a seronegative arthropathy occurring in the presence of psoriasis. In majority of cases, typical psoriatic skin lesions precede joint disease, making diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis without typical skin lesions, a diagnostic challenge. Nail lesions are commonly seen in patients affected by this condition, making it a useful clue in the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. This is a case of a 58-year-old Filipino woman presenting with sudden acute urinary retention and weakness of both lower extremities accompanied with active polyarthritis. Onycholytic nail changes initially thought to be a fungal nail infection led to the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis involving the spine. The patient was eventually treated with methotrexate and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs leading to full resolution of symptoms. The patient is currently ambulatory and on regular follow-up. This case report highlights the importance of clinical and physical findings particularly the nails that would lead to a diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. PMID:24789155

  17. Acute pseudo-septic arthritis following viscosuplementation of the knee.

    PubMed

    Idrissi, Zineb; Benbouazza, Karima; Fourtassi, Maryam; Raissouni, Hanae; El Aadmi, Meriem; Zanat, Fatima; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2012-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman with a history of medial femoro-tibial compartment of knee osteoarthritis was admitted for acute arthritis six days after a second intra-articular injection of Hyaluronic acid. The joint fluid was inflammatory, with no crystals, and laboratory tests showed marked inflammation leading to antibiotic treatment for suspected septic arthritis. The persistent symptoms and negative results of joint fluid and blood cultures led to discontinuation of the antibiotic therapy after 10 days. Anti-inflammatory with rehabilitation therapy of the knee relieved the symptoms, and the patient was discharged home 3 weeks after her admission. Aseptic arthritis induced by repeated Hyaluronic acid injection is the most likely diagnosis. Physicians should be conscious of this extremely severe complication. PMID:22937184

  18. Acute pseudo-septic arthritis following viscosuplementation of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Idrissi, Zineb; Benbouazza, Karima; Fourtassi, Maryam; Raissouni, Hanae; El Aadmi, Meriem; Zanat, Fatima; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2012-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman with a history of medial femoro-tibial compartment of knee osteoarthritis was admitted for acute arthritis six days after a second intra-articular injection of Hyaluronic acid. The joint fluid was inflammatory, with no crystals, and laboratory tests showed marked inflammation leading to antibiotic treatment for suspected septic arthritis. The persistent symptoms and negative results of joint fluid and blood cultures led to discontinuation of the antibiotic therapy after 10 days. Anti-inflammatory with rehabilitation therapy of the knee relieved the symptoms, and the patient was discharged home 3 weeks after her admission. Aseptic arthritis induced by repeated Hyaluronic acid injection is the most likely diagnosis. Physicians should be conscious of this extremely severe complication. PMID:22937184

  19. Efficacy of Anakinra for Various Types of Crystal-Induced Arthritis in Complex Hospitalized Patients: A Case Series and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Aouba, A.; Deshayes, S.; Frenzel, L.; Decottignies, A.; Pressiat, C.; Bienvenu, B.; Boue, F.; Damaj, G.; Hermine, O.; Georgin-Lavialle, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. There are few data on anakinra use after failure of conventional medications for crystal-induced peripheral arthritis and/or crowned dens syndrome among complex hospitalized patients. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed the outcome of six patients affected with subacute crystal-induced arthritis who had received anakinra in second or third line therapy, including three patients with crowned dens syndrome and three others with gouty arthritis. Patients' comorbidities, reasons for anakinra use and associated drugs, and outcomes were recorded. Results. All patients presented with elevated inflammatory syndrome, systemic symptoms with poly/oligoarthritis. Except for absolute contraindications, all patients were previously treated with full or decreased dose of NSAID, colchicine, and/or glucocorticoids, with unsatisfactory response. All three gouty patients exhibited complete responses in all acute involvements under anakinra within 3 to 5 days, including one of them who needed the reintroduction of colchicine treatment that was previously unsuccessful. Crowned dens syndrome patients, including two with pseudogout and one with subacute hydroxyapatite deposition disease, needed 9 to 11 days to achieve complete response. Tolerance to anakinra was good. Conclusion. In case series of complex hospitalized patients, anakinra showed good activity in crowned dens syndrome and associated crystal-induced peripheral arthritis, with longer treatment duration than in gouty arthritis. PMID:25922564

  20. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or have trouble moving around, you might have arthritis. Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints ... joint can become severely damaged. Some kinds of arthritis can also cause problems in your organs, such ...

  1. Interleukin-1β and Interleukin-6 in Arthritis Animal Models: Roles in the Early Phase of Transition from Acute to Chronic Inflammation and Relevance for Human Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Bracci-Laudiero, Luisa; Alivernini, Stefano; Gremese, Elisa; Tolusso, Barbara; De Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is the major target of the therapeutic approach in rheumatoid arthritis. A key issue in the approach to chronic arthritis is the understanding of the crucial molecules driving the transition from the acute phase to the chronic irreversible phase of the disease. In this review we analyzed five experimental arthritis animal models (antigen-induced arthritis, adjuvant-induced arthritis, streptococcal cell wall arthritis, collagen-induced arthritis and SKG) considered as possible scenarios to facilitate interpretation of the biology of human rheumatoid arthritis. The SKG model is strictly dependent on interleukin (IL)-6. In the other models, IL-1β and IL-6, more than TNF-α, appear to be relevant in driving the transition, which suggests that these should be the targets of an early intervention to stop the course toward the chronic form of the disease. PMID:20683549

  2. Update on the Management of Pediatric Acute Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Castellazzi, Luca; Mantero, Marco; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis are two infections whose frequencies are increasing in pediatric patients. Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis need to be carefully assessed, diagnosed, and treated to avoid devastating sequelae. Traditionally, the treatment of acute osteoarticular infection in pediatrics was based on prolonged intravenous anti-infective therapy. However, results from clinical trials have suggested that in uncomplicated cases, a short course of a few days of parenteral antibiotics followed by oral therapy is safe and effective. The aim of this review is to provide clinicians an update on recent controversies and advances regarding the management of acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in children. In recent years, the emergence of bacterial species resistant to commonly used antibiotics that are particularly aggressive highlights the necessity for further research to optimize treatment approaches and to develop new molecules able to fight the war against acute osteoarticular infection in pediatric patients. PMID:27258258

  3. Update on the Management of Pediatric Acute Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Castellazzi, Luca; Mantero, Marco; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis are two infections whose frequencies are increasing in pediatric patients. Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis need to be carefully assessed, diagnosed, and treated to avoid devastating sequelae. Traditionally, the treatment of acute osteoarticular infection in pediatrics was based on prolonged intravenous anti-infective therapy. However, results from clinical trials have suggested that in uncomplicated cases, a short course of a few days of parenteral antibiotics followed by oral therapy is safe and effective. The aim of this review is to provide clinicians an update on recent controversies and advances regarding the management of acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in children. In recent years, the emergence of bacterial species resistant to commonly used antibiotics that are particularly aggressive highlights the necessity for further research to optimize treatment approaches and to develop new molecules able to fight the war against acute osteoarticular infection in pediatric patients. PMID:27258258

  4. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... when taking arthritis medicines . Over-the-counter medicines: Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is often the first medicine tried. Take up to 4000 mg a day (two arthritis-strength Tylenol every 8 hours). To prevent damage to your ...

  5. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Difficulty moving a joint (called "limited range of motion") Some types of arthritis may cause joint deformity. ... exercise). Walking is a good example. Range of motion exercises for flexibility. Strength training for muscle tone. ...

  6. Antiarthritic effects of Ajuga bracteosa Wall ex Benth. in acute and chronic models of arthritis in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaithwas, Gaurav; Gautam, Raju; Jachak, Sanjay M; Saklani, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antiarthritic activity of Ajuga bracteosa using albino rats. Methods The antiarthritic activity of 70% ethanolic extract of Ajuga bracteosa (EEAB) was evaluated against turpentine oil- and formaldehyde- induced acute non immunological and complete freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced chronic immunological arthritis in albino rats. Results EEAB showed a significant (P<0.05) and dose dependent inhibitory effect against acute and chronic models of arthritis. EEAB exhibited better antiarthritic activity than the standard aspirin. Conclusions EEAB exhibits a significant and promising antiarthritic activity against acute and chronic arthritis and supports the traditional use of Ajuga bracteosa for rheumatism and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:23569895

  7. The effects of combined therapy of rheumatoid arthritis on the acute phase reactants.

    PubMed

    Rexhepi, Sylejman; Rexhepi, Mjellma; Sahatçiu-Meka, Vjollca; Pllana, Ejup; Dragusha, Gani; Gashi, Masar; Rexhepi, Blerta

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents the results of studies of acute phase reactants in the 60 treated patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Patients were divided into two groups, depending on the applied treatment: group I (n = 30) was treated with methotrexate, sulfasalazine and hydroxychloroquine, and group II (n = 30) with methotrexate. The results of our study shows that there is a statistically significant reduction in the value of acute phase reactants and clinical parameters after treatment in both investigated groups of patients, and also a significant statistical difference between the first and second group of treated patients. PMID:20429264

  8. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina C; Tavares, Luciana P; Vago, Juliana P; Batista, Nathália V; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Vieira, Angelica T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Sousa, Lirlândia P; van de Loo, Fons A J; Teixeira, Mauro M; Amaral, Flávio A; Ferreira, Adaliene V M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  9. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina C.; Tavares, Luciana P.; Vago, Juliana P.; Batista, Nathália V.; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M.; Vieira, Angelica T.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Amaral, Flávio A.; Ferreira, Adaliene V. M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  10. Adalimumab-induced acute interstitial lung disease in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Olívia Meira; Pereira, Daniel Antunes Silva; Baldi, Bruno Guedes; Costa, André Nathan; Athanazio, Rodrigo Abensur; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    The use of immunobiological agents for the treatment of autoimmune diseases is increasing in medical practice. Anti-TNF therapies have been increasingly used in refractory autoimmune diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis, with promising results. However, the use of such therapies has been associated with an increased risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. In addition, the use of anti-TNF agents can cause pulmonary complications, such as reactivation of mycobacterial and fungal infections, as well as sarcoidosis and other interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). There is evidence of an association between ILD and the use of anti-TNF agents, etanercept and infliximab in particular. Adalimumab is the newest drug in this class, and some authors have suggested that its use might induce or exacerbate preexisting ILDs. In this study, we report the first case of acute ILD secondary to the use of adalimumab in Brazil, in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and without a history of ILD. PMID:24626274

  11. Performance of the Existing Classification Criteria for Gout in Thai Patients Presenting With Acute Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jatuworapruk, Kanon; Lhakum, Panomkorn; Pattamapaspong, Nuttaya; Kasitanon, Nuntana; Wangkaew, Suparaporn; Louthrenoo, Worawit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently, there are 5 existing classification criteria for gout: the Rome, New York, American Rheumatism Association (ARA), Mexico, and Netherlands criteria. This study was carried out to determine the performance of these classification criteria in Thai patients presenting with acute arthritis. All consecutive patients presenting with acute arthritis and being consulted at the Rheumatology Unit, Chiang Mai University Hospital from January 2013 to May 2015 were invited to join the study. Gout was defined by the presence of monosodium urate crystals in the synovial fluid or tissue examined by experienced rheumatologists. The 5 existing gout classification criteria were performed and evaluated in all of the patients, who were divided in subgroups of early disease (≤2 years), established disease (>2 years), and those without tophus. There were 136 gout and 97 nongout patients. Sensitivity and specificity across all criteria ranged from 75.7% to 97.1% and 68.0% to 84.5%, respectively. Overall, the Mexico criteria had the highest sensitivity (97.1%), and the ARA survey criteria the highest specificity (84.5%), whereas the Mexico criteria performed well in early disease with sensitivity and specificity of 97.1% and 81.7%, respectively. All 5 criteria showed high sensitivity (from 76.4% to 99.1%) but low specificity (from 30.8% to 65.4%) in established disease. In patients without tophus, the sensitivity and specificity ranged from 64.1% to 95.7% and 68.8% to 85.4%, respectively. The ARA survey criteria across all groups showed consistently high specificity for gout. The 5 existing classification criteria for gout had limited sensitivity and specificity in Thai patients presenting with acute arthritis. The ARA survey criteria are the most suitable for diagnosing gout in Thai people when crystal identification is not available. PMID:26844519

  12. Post-streptococcal reactive arthritis in children: a distinct entity from acute rheumatic fever

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    There is a debate whether post-streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA) is a separate entity or a condition on the spectrum of acute rheumatic fever (ARF). We believe that PSRA is a distinct entity and in this paper we review the substantial differences between PSRA and ARF. We show how the demographic, clinical, genetic and treatment characteristics of PSRA differ from ARF. We review diagnostic criteria and regression formulas that attempt to classify patients with PSRA as opposed to ARF. The important implication of these findings may relate to the issue of prophylactic antibiotics after PSRA. However, future trials will be necessary to conclusively answer that question. PMID:22013970

  13. Grisel syndrome, acute otitis media, and temporo-mandibular reactive arthritis: A rare association.

    PubMed

    Martins, J; Almeida, S; Nunes, P; Prata, F; Lobo, M L; Marques, J G

    2015-08-01

    We present a case report of a four-year-old boy with torcicollis and trismus after acute otitis media. Grisel Syndrome diagnosis in association with temporo-mandibular reactive arthritis was admitted, leading to early conservative treatment. GS should be suspected in a child presenting with torticollis after an upper respiratory tract infection or an ENT surgical procedure. The association with temporo-mandibular reactive findings is somehow rarer but not impossible, due to the close vascular communication between retropharyngeal and pterigoid spaces. PMID:26060148

  14. Coexistent digital gouty and infective flexor tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Akram, Qasim; Hughes, Michael; Muir, Lindsay

    2016-01-01

    Flexor tenosynovitis of the hand is often caused by trauma or infection. Gouty tenosynovitis is an uncommon presentation of the condition and is usually misdiagnosed as infection with the patient undergoing surgery. The coexistence of infection and gout causing flexor tenosynovitis has never been described before in the literature; we report the first ever case and emphasise the importance of its awareness for optimal treatment. A 54-year-old man was initially diagnosed and treated as having infective flexor tenosynovitis and, later, due to a lack of improvement in his symptoms, was discovered to also have gout. We review the literature and suggest management strategy for use in daily clinical practice, including an algorithm, for this presentation. PMID:27358092

  15. Transforming growth factor beta 1 suppresses acute and chronic arthritis in experimental animals.

    PubMed Central

    Brandes, M E; Allen, J B; Ogawa, Y; Wahl, S M

    1991-01-01

    Systemic administration of the cytokine, TGF beta 1, profoundly antagonized the development of polyarthritis in susceptible rats. TGF beta 1 administration (1 or 5 micrograms/animal), initiated one day before an arthritogenic dose of streptococcal cell wall (SCW) fragments, virtually eliminated the joint swelling and distortion typically observed during both the acute phase (articular index, AI = 2.5 vs. 11; P less than 0.025) and the chronic phase (AI = 0 vs. 12.5) of the disease. Moreover, TGF beta 1 suppressed the evolution of arthritis even when administration was begun after the acute phase of the disease. Histopathological examination of the joint revealed the systemic TGF beta 1 treatment greatly reduced inflammatory cell infiltration, pannus formation, and joint erosion. Consistent with the inhibition of inflammatory cell recruitment into the synovium, TGF beta 1 reversed the leukocytosis associated with the chronic phase of the arthritis. Control animals subjected to the same TGF beta 1 dosing regimen displayed no discernable immunosuppressive or toxic effects even after 4 wk of treatment. These observations not only provide insight into the immunoregulatory effects of TGF beta, but also implicate this cytokine as a potentially important therapeutic agent. Images PMID:1999490

  16. Rofecoxib: a review of its use in the management of osteoarthritis, acute pain and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Matheson, A J; Figgitt, D P

    2001-01-01

    Rofecoxib is a selective cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor which has little or no effect on the COX-1 isoenzyme at doses up to 1000 mg/day. Rofecoxib has greater selectivity for COX-2 than celecoxib, meloxicam, diclofenac and indomethacin. In well-controlled clinical trials, rofecoxib 12.5 to 500 mg/day has been evaluated for its efficacy in the treatment of osteoarthritis, acute pain and rheumatoid arthritis [lower dosages (5 to 125 mg/day) were generally used in the chronic pain indications]. In the treatment of patients with osteoarthritis, rofecoxib was more effective in providing symptomatic relief than placebo, paracetamol (acetaminophen) and celecoxib and was similar in efficacy to ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen and nabumetone. Overall, both the physician's assessment of disease status and the patient's assessment of response to therapy tended to favour rofecoxib. In patients with postsurgical dental pain, pain after spinal fusion or orthopaedic surgery, or primary dysmenorrhoea, rofecoxib provided more rapid and more sustained pain relief and reduced requirements for supplemental morphine use after surgery than placebo. Rofecoxib was more efficacious than celecoxib in patients with acute dental pain and pain after spinal fusion surgery, although celecoxib may have been used at a subtherapeutic dose. In comparison with traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) ibuprofen, diclofenac and naproxen sodium, rofecoxib was similar in efficacy in the treatment of acute pain. Although naproxen sodium provided more rapid pain relief than rofecoxib in patients with primary dysmenorrhoea, the reverse was true after orthopaedic surgery: rofecoxib provided more rapid pain relief and less supplemental morphine was needed. Rofecoxib was as effective as naproxen in providing symptomatic relief for over 8700 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Compared with traditional NSAID therapy, rofecoxib had a significantly lower incidence of endoscopically confirmed

  17. Viral arthritis.

    PubMed

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-04-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  18. Fibrosarcoma arising from gouty tophi: report of a unique case and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-Jun; Wang, Hai-Yan; Cheng, Kai; Wang, Xuan; Yu, Bo; Shi, Shan-Shan; Zhou, Xiao-Jun; Shi, Qun-Li

    2015-01-01

    Fibrosarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal tumor. To the author’s best knowledge, no previous case of fibrosarcoma arising from gouty tophi has been reported. Here we reported the first case of fibrosarcoma arising from gouty tophi. A case of 58-year-old man was presented with a mass with ulcer and infection in the second joint of left middle finger for 2 months, with long standing gouty tophi. The tumor was biopsied and the biopsy showed complete excision of the tumor. With the pathological and immunohistochemical features considered, the diagnosis of fibrosarcoma associated with gouty tophi was made. The clinical findings, pathological characteristics and treatment were described. PMID:26097616

  19. Reactive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Keat, A

    1999-01-01

    infection at a distant site without traditional evidence of sepsis at the affected joint(s). Although several forms of disease could be described as "reactive", particularly acute rheumatic fever, post-meningococcal septicaemia arthritis and Lyme disease, in clinical practice the term is restricted to an acute spondyloarthritis, usually, but not exclusively, linked to acute genitourinary or gastrointestinal infection. A proportion of patients fulfil criteria for Reiter's Syndrome [1]. PMID:10599344

  20. The influence of corticosteroids on sequential clinical and synovial fluid parameters in joints with acute infectious arthritis in the horse.

    PubMed

    Tulamo, R M; Bramlage, L R; Gabel, A A

    1989-09-01

    Infectious arthritis was induced experimentally in one tarsocrural joint of six horses by intra-articular injection of 1 ml Staphylococcus aureus-saline suspension with the addition of 200 mg methylprednisolone acetate. The corresponding contralateral joint was injected with 1 ml of saline with the addition of 200 mg methylprednisolone acetate, and served as a control. The purpose of the experiment was to examine the effect of corticosteroids on the acute clinical signs of infectious arthritis, and the associated changes in synovial fluid, to separate the effects of a steroid injection from those of infection alone. This should aid early diagnosis of infection. The progression of the infectious arthritis was assessed over nine days by clinical examination and sequential synovial fluid analysis. The corticosteroids masked the clinical signs in some horses for up to the third day although changes in the synovial fluid were present earlier. Cellular changes preceded biochemical changes initially. Leucocyte counts showed a significant increase in cell numbers after infection was established. Persistent neutrophilia, over 90 per cent, together with a pH under 6.9 were the most consistent findings in the infected synovia. Total protein values were lower in infected joints with, than those without, corticosteroids; although there was a progressive rise in total protein concentration throughout the experiment in both groups. Serum and synovial glucose difference and synovial lactate had very little diagnostic value because significant increases due to the corticosteroids were documented in the control joints. PMID:2776719

  1. Crystal-induced endogenous pyrogen production. A further look at gouty inflammation.

    PubMed

    Malawista, S E; Duff, G W; Atkins, E; Cheung, H S; McCarty, D J

    1985-09-01

    We found previously that crystals of sodium urate and silicon dioxide (silica) can stimulate the production of endogenous pyrogen (EP), now called interleukin-1 (IL-1), the polypeptide mediator of fever and other aspects of inflammation. We have confirmed and extended the work with urate crystals and have examined 2 other crystals associated with joint problems, hydroxyapatite (HA) and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD). The crystals were added to suspensions of human blood leukocytes (2.5 X 10(6) monocytes/dose, with 10% fresh autologous plasma); after 18 hours of incubation, the EP content of the supernatants was assayed in the rabbit pyrogen test. HA and CPPD crystals neither induced EP production nor reduced the amount of staphylococci-induced EP. Presized (10 - 40 micron) urate crystals were pyrogenic, but less so than the unsized and aggregated urate crystals investigated previously and reexamined here. On ultrasonication, the aggregated urate crystals became first more pyrogenic and then less so as the crystals were dispersed and broken down. Ultrasound did not impart pyrogenicity to HA or CPPD crystals: their failure to stimulate EP/IL-1 production from leukocytes in vitro indicates a difference in their phlogistic properties, compared with crystals of urate or silica. The results with urate crystals have pathogenetic implications in a number of areas of gouty inflammation: initiation of the acute attack, other aspects of the acute-phase response, polyarticular involvement, and the inflammatory consequences of chronic stimulation by tophaceous material. PMID:2994686

  2. Arthritis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  3. Investigation of Antiarthritic Potential of Plumeria alba L. Leaves in Acute and Chronic Models of Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vipin; Gupta, Pankaj; Singh, Surender

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The present investigation was designed to evaluate antiarthritic potential of fractions of hydroalcoholic extract from leaves of P. alba. Materials and Methods. Plumeria alba L. leaves were extracted with hydroalcohol (30 : 70) to obtain hydroalcoholic extract of P. alba. This extract was further fractionated with solvents ethyl acetate and n-butanol to obtain EAPA and BPA, respectively. These fractions were tested against formaldehyde and Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) induced arthritis. Arthritis assessment, paw volume, body weight, motor incoordination, and nociceptive threshold were measured. On day 21, the animals were sacrificed and histopathology was done. Results. The 100 and 200 mg/kg doses of EAPA and BPA caused a significant (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) reduction in paw swelling in both models. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and spleen weight decreased significantly (P < 0.01) in arthritic rats treated with extracts. There was significant (P < 0.05) improvement in thymus weight in EAPA treated rats whereas significant (P < 0.01) improvement was also seen in haemoglobin level (Hb) in diclofenac treated group. Motor incoordination and nociceptive threshold were also significantly (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) improved. Conclusion. The present study suggests that Plumeria alba L. has protective activity against arthritis and supports the traditional use of P. alba for rheumatism and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:25025056

  4. The pathogenesis of arthritis associated with acute hepatitis-B surface antigen-positive hepatitis. Complement activation and characterization of circulating immune complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Wands, J R; Mann, E; Alpert, E; Isselbacher, K J

    1975-01-01

    Circulating immune complexes were identified in cryoproteins isolated from serial samples of serum from six patients with acute viral hepatitis with and without arthritic symptoms. Cryoprecipitates were analyzed for the presence of hepatitis-B surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis-B surface antibody (anti-HBs) by hemagglutination inhibition and hemagglutination. Complement components were detected by counter electrophoresis, and immunoglobulins were detected by gel diffusion. HBsAg, IgG, and IgM were identified in cryoprecipitates from all hepatitis patients, but were higher in concentration in patients with arthritis. Only cryoprecipitates from hepatitis patients with arthritis contained IgA and complement components C3, C4, and C5 as well as IgG and IgM, which disappear with resolution of the arthritis. The subtypes of IgG in these cryoprecipitates were predominantly the complement-fixing IgG1 and IgG3, HBsAg and anti-HBs were concentrated several-fold in the cryoprecipitates when compared to the serum concentration. Sequential studies in two patients demonstrated that the initial appearance of anti-HBs in the cryoprotein complex was associated with the detection in the complex of IgM suggesting a primary immune response to HBsAg. The C3 activator fragment (C3A) of the properdin complex was found in fresh serum obtained from three hepatitis patients with arthritis and not in uncomplicated hepatitis. The cryoprecipitable immune complexes from patients with arthritis converted C3PA in fresh normal sera to C3A in vitro whereas cryoprotein isolated from patients with uncomplicated hepatitis had no such effect. Thus, the transient appearance of circulating complement-fixing immune complexes in patients with the arthritis of acute hepatitis is associated with activation of both classical and alternate complement pathways and suggests that they play an important role in the pathogenesis of these serum sickness-like extrahepatic symptoms. Images PMID:1123429

  5. Circulating Cytokine Profiles and Their Relationships with Autoantibodies, Acute Phase Reactants, and Disease Activity in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Pieter W. A.; Hodkinson, Bridget; Ally, Mahmood; Musenge, Eustasius; Wadee, Ahmed A.; Fickl, Heidi; Tikly, Mohammed; Anderson, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Our objective was to analyse the relationship between circulating cytokines, autoantibodies, acute phase reactants, and disease activity in DMARDs-naïve rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients (n = 140). All cytokines were significantly higher in the RA cohort than in healthy controls. Moderate-to-strong positive intercorrelations were observed between Th1/Th2/macrophage/fibroblast-derived cytokines. RF correlated significantly with IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, G-CSF, GM-CSF, IFN-γ, and TNF (P < .0001), and aCCP and aMCV with IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, and IL-10 (P < .0002), while IL-6 correlated best with the acute phase reactants, CRP, and SAA (P < .0001). In patients with a DAS28 score of ≥5.1, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-1Ra, TNF, GM-CSF, and VEGF were significantly correlated (P < .04–.001) with high disease activity (HDA). Circulating cytokines in RA reflect a multifaceted increase in immune reactivity encompassing Th1 and Th2 cells, monocytes/macrophages, and synovial fibroblasts, underscored by strong correlations between these cytokines, as well as their relationships with RF, aCCP, and aMCV, with some cytokines showing promise as biomarkers of HDA. PMID:21437211

  6. Pseudogout: A Rare Cause of Acute Arthritis Following Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Mahvash; Sabir, Numaera; Charalambous, Charalambos P.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an acute pseudogout attack following single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in a 35-year-old man. At the initial reconstruction surgery, he was found to have early degenerative changes mainly in the lateral compartment. He presented with acute onset pain and swelling following reconstruction of the ACL. Arthroscopic irrigation was performed and the synovial fluid was positive for calcium pyrophosphate crystals. A pseudogout attack must be considered in the differential diagnosis in cases of acute onset pain and swelling after arthroscopic surgery, especially with the background of degenerative knee changes, and this may signify a poorer long-term outcome. PMID:26389074

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rheumatoid Arthritis What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? An Inflammatory, Autoimmune Disease Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disease that causes ... sometimes feverish. Rheumatoid arthritis is classified as an autoimmune disease. An autoimmune disease occurs when the immune system ...

  8. Infections and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; Ravindran, Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites can all cause arthritis of either acute or chronic nature, which can be divided into infective/septic, reactive, or inflammatory. Considerable advances have occurred in diagnostic techniques in the recent decades resulting in better treatment outcomes in patients with infective arthritis. Detection of emerging arthritogenic viruses has changed the epidemiology of infection-related arthritis. The role of viruses in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory arthritides such as rheumatoid arthritis is increasingly being recognized. We discuss the various causative agents of infective arthritis and emphasize on the approach to each type of arthritis, highlighting the diagnostic tests, along with their statistical accuracy. Various investigations including newer methods such as nucleic acid amplification using polymerase chain reaction are discussed along with the pitfalls in interpreting the tests. PMID:26096095

  9. The effectiveness of Echinacea extract or composite glucosamine, chondroitin and methyl sulfonyl methane supplements on acute and chronic rheumatoid arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Nadia Ms; Hamuda, Hayam M; Melek, Samuel T; Darwish, Sahar K

    2013-03-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effect of the oral administration for 15 days of either Echinacea (E) or genuphil (a composite of chondroitin sulphate, glucosamine and methyl sulfonyl methane [GCM]) nutraceutical supplements on female rat model of acute or chronic arthritis induced by bacterial outer membrane protein (OMP) from faecal flora of healthy and rheumatic humans. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP2), C-reactive protein (CRP) and rheumatoid factor (RF) values increased (p < 0.05) in both arthritic groups as compared to normal values. The rheumatic markers anti-CCP2, CRP and RF values decreased significantly in E- and GCM-treated groups compared to arthritic none-treated acute or chronic groups. The results of RF values of GCM-treated groups in acute and chronic models decreased exhibiting no statistical difference compared with the normal value. Histological examinations of the hind paw sections revealed moderate inflammation, oedema and mild proliferation of synovial cells in acute arthritic rats and more damage to cartilage and bone with severe inflammation in chronic ones. Echinacea acute treated group showed edema with proliferated synovial membrane and partial damage in cartilage and bone. While in the E-chronic treated group, rough edge with destructed cartilage and bone existed. However, the acute GCM group revealed mild cartilage damage. But the chronic GCM group showed mild synovial cells proliferation and revealed no inflammation with mild cartilage damage edge. Results demonstrated the OMP arthropathic property and through promising light on arthritis treatment using E- or GCM, with the advantage of GMC results over that of E-. The composite GCM is needed for further studies over the dose and duration to assess its preventive effects against the bacterial OMP arthrogenicity. PMID:22173958

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  11. Viral arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Infectious arthritis - viral ... Arthritis may be a symptom of many virus-related illnesses. It usually disappears on its own without ... the rubella vaccine, only a few people develop arthritis. No risk factors are known.

  12. Near infrared lymphatic imaging demonstrates the dynamics of lymph flow and lymphangiogenesis during the acute vs. chronic phases of arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Quan; Wood, Ronald; Schwarz, Edward M.; Wang, Yong-Jun; Xing, Lianping

    2010-01-01

    Objective Development of an in vivo imaging method to assess lymphatic draining function in the K/B×N mouse model of inflammatory arthritis. Methods Indocyanine green (ICG), a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, was injected intradermally into the footpad of wild-type mice, the limb was illuminated with an 806 nm NIR laser, and the movement of ICG from the injection site to the draining popliteal lymph node (PLN) was recorded with a CCD camera. ICG-NIR images were analyzed to obtain 5 measures of lymphatic function across time. K/B×N arthritic mice and control non-arthritic littermates were imaged at one-month of age when acute joint inflammation commenced, and repeated at 3 months when joint inflammation became chronic. Lymphangiogenesis in PLNs was assessed by immunochemistry. Results ICG and its transport within lymphatic vessels were readily visualized and quantitative measures derived. During the acute phase of arthritis, the lymphatic vessels were dilated with increased ICG signal intensity and lymphatic pulses, and PLNs became fluorescent quickly. During the chronic phase, new lymphatic vessels were present near the foot. However, ICG appearance in lymphatic vessels was delayed. The size and area of PLN lymphatic sinuses progressively increased in the K/B×N mice. Conclusion ICG-NIR lymphatic imaging is a valuable method to assess the lymphatic draining function in mice with inflammatory arthritis. ICG-NIR imaging of K/B×N mice identified two distinct lymphatic phenotypes during the acute and chronic phase of inflammation. This technique can be used to assess new therapies for lymphatic disorders. PMID:20309866

  13. Association of disease activity with acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease during tocilizumab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a retrospective, case-control study.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Mitsuhiro; Kaneko, Yuko; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Kondo, Harumi; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study was to identify risk factors for acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease (ILD) during tocilizumab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This is a retrospective, case-control study. We reviewed 395 consecutive RA patients who received tocilizumab. First, we divided the patients according to the presence (RA-ILD) or absence of ILD (non-ILD) assessed by chest X-ray or high-resolution computed tomography, and compared them for characteristics relevant to RA-ILD. Subsequently, focusing on the patients with RA-ILD, we assessed their baseline characteristics and clinical courses comparing patients with acute exacerbation to those without. Comparing 78 with ILD and 317 without ILD, the following were identified as factors related to RA-ILD on multivariate analysis: age 60 years or older (OR 4.5, 95 % CI 2.2-9.4, P < 0.0001), smoking habit (OR 2.9, 95 % CI 1.5-5.5, P = 0.002), and high rheumatoid factor levels (OR 2.8, 95 % CI 1.4-5.5, P = 0.002). Of 78 RA-ILD patients, six developed acute exacerbation during tocilizumab treatment. The median duration between the initiation of tocilizumab treatment and the acute exacerbation occurrence was 48 weeks. While baseline characteristics did not differ between acute exacerbation and non-acute exacerbation groups, patients experiencing acute exacerbation had significantly higher Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) at 24 weeks (20.8 vs. 6.2, P = 0.019). Univariate analysis showed that CDAI > 10 at 24 weeks was a risk factor for acute exacerbation (OR 4.7, 95 % CI 2.1-10.4, P = 0.02). Uncontrolled arthritis activity during tocilizumab treatment may be associated with acute exacerbation of RA-ILD, suggesting post-treatment monitoring of disease activity is important not only with respect to RA itself but also for RA-ILD. PMID:27072347

  14. Isolated septic facet joint arthritis as a rare cause of acute and chronic low back pain – a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Klekot, Dominika; Zimny, Anna; Czapiga, Bogdan; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: The most common cause of low back pain is degenerative disease of the intervertebral disc and other structures of the lumbar spine. However, in some cases other less frequent causes of such pain can be seen, for example septic facet joint arthritis. Until now, only 40 cases of such inflammatory changes within the spine have been reported in the literature. The disease is probably underestimated due to improper diagnostic pathway. Case Report: The authors describe a case of a 53-year-old woman who was repeatedly hospitalized during a five-month period because of an acute, severe low back pain, with sphincter dysfunction, partially resembling sciatic symptoms. Physical examinations revealed also focal tenderness in the area of the lumbar spine. Inflammatory markers (ESR – erythrocyte sedimentation rate, CRP – C-reactive protein) were elevated. Conservative analgetic treatment brought only partial and temporary relief of the pain and symptoms. The final accurate diagnosis of isolated septic facet joint arthritis at the level of L5/S1 was established after several months from the onset of the first symptoms, after performing various imaging examinations, including bone scintigraphy as well as CT and MRI of the lumbosacral spine. The patient fully recovered after antibiotic therapy and surgery, which was proven in several follow-up examinations showing no relevant pathology of the lumbar spine. The authors broadly describe the etiology and clinical symptoms of the septic facet joint arthritis as well as the significant role of imaging methods, especially MRI, in diagnostic process. The authors also discuss currently available treatment options, both conservative and surgical. Conclusions: The diagnostic procedure of septic facet joint arthritis requires several steps to be taken. Establishing a correct diagnosis may be difficult, that is why it is important to remember about rare causes of low back pain and to perform detailed physical

  15. Simplified Radiographic Damage Index for Affected Joints in Chronic Gouty Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate a new radiographic damage scoring method (DAmagE index of GoUt; DAEGU) in chronic gout using plain radiography. Two independent observers scored foot x-rays from 15 patients with chronic gout according to the DAEGU method and the modified Sharp/van der Heijde (SvdH) method. The 10 metatarsophalangeal (MTP) and 2 interphalangeal (IP) joints of the first toes of both feet were scored to assess the degrees of erosion and joint space narrowing (JSN). The intraobserver and interobserver reliabilities were analyzed by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and minimal detectable change (MDC). The correlation between the DAEGU and SvdH methods was analyzed by calculating the Spearman's rho correlation coefficients and Kappa coefficients. The DAEGU method was found to be highly reproducible (0.945–0.987 for the intraobserver and 0.993–0.996 for the interobserver ICC values). The erosion, JSN, and total scores exhibited strong positive correlations between the DAEGU and SvdH methods and also within each method (r = 0.860–0.969, P < 0.001 for all parameters). The DAEGU and SvdH methods were in very good agreement as determined by Kappa coefficient analysis [0.732 (0.387–1.000) for erosion and 1.000 (1.000–1.000) for JSN]. In conclusion, this study revealed that DAEGU method was a reliable and feasible tool in the assessment of radiographic damage in chronic gout. The DAEGU method may provide a more easy assessment of structural damage in chronic gout in the real clinical practice. PMID:26955246

  16. Simplified Radiographic Damage Index for Affected Joints in Chronic Gouty Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Son, Chang-Nam; Kim, Tae Eun; Park, Kyungmin; Hwang, Jun Hyun; Kim, Seong-Kyu

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate a new radiographic damage scoring method (DAmagE index of GoUt; DAEGU) in chronic gout using plain radiography. Two independent observers scored foot x-rays from 15 patients with chronic gout according to the DAEGU method and the modified Sharp/van der Heijde (SvdH) method. The 10 metatarsophalangeal (MTP) and 2 interphalangeal (IP) joints of the first toes of both feet were scored to assess the degrees of erosion and joint space narrowing (JSN). The intraobserver and interobserver reliabilities were analyzed by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and minimal detectable change (MDC). The correlation between the DAEGU and SvdH methods was analyzed by calculating the Spearman's rho correlation coefficients and Kappa coefficients. The DAEGU method was found to be highly reproducible (0.945-0.987 for the intraobserver and 0.993-0.996 for the interobserver ICC values). The erosion, JSN, and total scores exhibited strong positive correlations between the DAEGU and SvdH methods and also within each method (r = 0.860-0.969, P < 0.001 for all parameters). The DAEGU and SvdH methods were in very good agreement as determined by Kappa coefficient analysis [0.732 (0.387-1.000) for erosion and 1.000 (1.000-1.000) for JSN]. In conclusion, this study revealed that DAEGU method was a reliable and feasible tool in the assessment of radiographic damage in chronic gout. The DAEGU method may provide a more easy assessment of structural damage in chronic gout in the real clinical practice. PMID:26955246

  17. Efficacy and safety profile of combination of tramadol-diclofenac versus tramadol-paracetamol in patients with acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain, and acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: a Phase III, 5-day open-label study

    PubMed Central

    Chandanwale, Ajay S; Sundar, Subramanian; Latchoumibady, Kaliaperumal; Biswas, Swati; Gabhane, Mukesh; Naik, Manoj; Patel, Kamlesh

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a fixed-dose combination (FDC) of tramadol and diclofenac versus a standard approved FDC of tramadol and paracetamol, in patients with acute moderate to severe pain. Methods A total of 204 patients with moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions (n=52), acute flare of osteoarthritis (n=52), acute flare of rheumatoid arthritis (n=50), or postoperative pain (n=50) were enrolled in the study at baseline. Each disease category was then randomized to receive either of two treatments for 5 days: group A received an FDC of immediate-release tramadol hydrochloride (50 mg) and sustained-release diclofenac sodium (75 mg) (one tablet, twice daily), and group B received an FDC of tramadol hydrochloride (37.5 mg) and paracetamol (325 mg) (two tablets every 4–6 hours, up to a maximum of eight tablets daily). The primary efficacy end points were reductions in pain intensity from baseline at day 3 and day 5 as assessed by a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score. Results Group A showed a significant reduction in the VAS score for overall pain from baseline on day 3 (P=0.001) and day 5 (P<0.0001) as compared with group B. The combination of tramadol-diclofenac resulted in few mild to moderate adverse events (nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, and gastritis), which required minimal management, without any treatment discontinuation. The number of adverse events in group A was nine (8.82%) compared with 22 (21.78%) in group B, after 5 days of treatment. Conclusion An FDC of tramadol-diclofenac showed a significantly greater reduction in pain intensity and was well tolerated compared with tramadol-paracetamol, resulting in better analgesia in patients suffering from moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain following orthopedic surgery, or acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25152629

  18. Femur chondrosarcoma misdiagnosed as acute knee arthritis and osteomyelitis--further developing a hitherto unreported complication of tumor embolic ischemic ileal perforation after arthroscopic lavage.

    PubMed

    Chow, Louis Tsun Cheung

    2014-12-01

    The differentiation between osteomyelitis and bone tumor may be difficult due to their overlapping clinical and radiological features. A 25-year-old lady presented with left knee pain and joint effusion associated with redness and hotness. A sub-optimally taken plain radiograph showed mixed osteolytic and osteoblastic lesion in the left lower femur with surrounding soft tissue swelling. Since the clinical diagnosis was acute osteomyelitis and arthritis, arthroscopic lavage was performed as a diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. The removed loose bodies and fibrinous tissue showed pathological features suspicious of chondrosarcoma. Subsequent MRI revealed an infiltrative tumor eroding through the cortex and joint cartilage. En bloc excision of the left lower femur, upper tibia including the knee joint and patella was performed, and the final diagnosis was grade 2 chondrosarcoma. The patient developed bilateral pulmonary metastasis 33 months after operation. Five months later, she suffered from a hitherto undescribed complication of ischemic perforation of the terminal ileum secondary to tumor embolic arterial obstruction with no macroscopic intestinal or peritoneal tumor deposit. The patient developed multiple brain metastases and died 43 months after initial presentation. Our case illustrates that malignant bone tumor as a differential diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis and arthritis merits recognition and exclusion before arthroscopic lavage, which may enhance tumor dissemination and in our patient results in embolic ischemic ileal perforation. PMID:25242025

  19. Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  20. Psoriatic arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis.

  1. Reactive Arthritis Secondary to Cauda Equina Injury following Spine Fracture: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Wu, Shaoling; Ma, Chao

    2011-01-01

    A 38-year-old man presented with a one-month history of muscle weakness and dysesthesia in the lower extremities, urinary retention, and urinary tract infection after lumbar burst fracture resulted from high fall. During the rehabilitation in our hospital, he had arthritis in both the ankle and knee. However, the patient was treated as gouty arthropathy initially. The arthritis was completely remitted in a few days after the patient was diagnosed as reactive arthritis and started with sulfasalazine therapy and there was no recurrence during 4 months of follow-up. Based on this case, early recognition of reactive arthritis is of major importance to avoid delayed initiation of appropriate treatment in the patients with polyarthritis secondary to neurogenic bladder following cauda equina injury after spine fracture. PMID:23198221

  2. Characterization of the acute and persistent pain state present in K/BxN serum transfer arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, Christina A.; Corr, Maripat; Firestein, Gary S.; Mobargha, Anahita; Yaksh, Tony L.; Svensson, Camilla I.

    2010-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune arthritis that affects approximately 1% of the population. Synovial inflammation cannot fully explain the level of pain reported by patients and facilitation of pain processing at the spinal level has been implicated. We characterized the K/BxN serum transfer arthritis model as a model of joint inflammation-induced pain and examine pharmacologic responsiveness and spinal glia activation. Mechanical allodynia developed congruently with joint swelling. Surprisingly, allodynia persisted after resolution of inflammation. At the peak of joint inflammation, (days 4–10) hypersensitivity was attenuated with i.p. etanercept, gabapentin, and ketorolac. Following resolution of synovial inflammation (day 19–28), only gabapentin relieved allodynia. The superficial dorsal horn of arthritic mice displayed increased staining of microglia at early and late time points, but astrocyte staining increased only during the inflammatory phase. ATF3, a marker of nerve injury, was significantly increased in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia during the late phase (day 28). Hence, serum transfer in the K/BxN serum transfer arthritis model produces a persistent pain state, where the allodynia during the inflammatory state is attenuated by TNF and prostaglandin inhibitors, and the pharmacology and histochemistry data suggest a transition from an inflammatory state to a state that resembles a neuropathic condition over time. Therefore, the K/BxN serum transfer model represents a multifaceted model for studies exploring pain mechanisms in conditions of joint inflammation and may serve as a platform for exploring novel treatment strategies for pain in human arthritic conditions. K/BxN serum transfer arthritis produces persistent mechanical hypersensitivity despite resolution of clinical signs with evidence of transition from an inflammatory to neuropathic pain state. PMID:20739123

  3. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  4. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling of the ... physical exam and imaging tests to diagnose psoriatic arthritis. There is no cure, but medicines can help ...

  5. Arthritis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... hour massage will be donated to the Arthritis Foundation! Jingle Bell Run Join us for the nation's ... a cure! Answers When You Need Them Arthritis Foundation licensed social workers provide 24/7 assistance on ...

  6. Fungal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and irritation (inflammation) of a joint by a fungal infection. It is also called mycotic arthritis. Causes Fungal ... symptoms of fungal arthritis. Prevention Thorough treatment of fungal infections elsewhere in the body may help prevent fungal ...

  7. Comparison of the suppressive effects of soluble CR1 and C5a receptor antagonist in acute arthritis induced in rats by blocking of CD59

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, M; Nishikawa, K; Morgan, B P; Matsuo, S

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the effects of suppression of complement activation at C3 level and inhibition of C5a on acute synovitis in rats. Acute synovitis was induced in Wistar rats by intra-articular (i.a.) injection into one knee of 0.3 mg of MoAb 6D1 (anti-rat CD59 antibody). In the treatment groups, soluble CR1 (sCR1) or C5a receptor (C5aR) antagonist was administered intra-articularly or intravenously and effects on the course of the acute synovitis were monitored. Synovitis induced by 6D1 was characterized by joint swelling, thickening of synovial tissue, cellular infiltration and deposition of membrane attack complex (MAC) on the synovial surface. Neither inflammatory change nor MAC deposition was found in rats which received an i.a. injection of sCR1 to suppress complement activity in the joint. Intra-articular injection of sCR1 did not reduce plasma complement activity. Intravenous administration of sCR1 suppressed plasma complement activity but had no effect on the course of the arthritis and synovitis with MAC deposition was observed. Neither i.a. nor i.v. injection of C5aR antagonist had any suppressive effects on inflammatory change or MAC deposition in synovium. The data show that inflammatory change induced by 6D1 was mediated by local complement activation and was not accompanied by systemic complement activation. C5a generation was not responsible for the observed inflammation, suggesting that other complement activation products, possibly MAC, mediate the inflammatory change observed in this model of acute synovitis in rats. PMID:10632677

  8. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  9. MyD88-dependent IL-1 receptor signaling is essential for gouty inflammation stimulated by monosodium urate crystals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Jen; Shi, Yan; Hearn, Arron; Fitzgerald, Kate; Golenbock, Douglas; Reed, George; Akira, Shizuo; Rock, Kenneth L.

    2006-01-01

    While it is known that monosodium urate (MSU) crystals cause the disease gout, the mechanism by which these crystals stimulate this inflammatory condition has not been clear. Here we find that the Toll/IL-1R (TIR) signal transduction adaptor myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) is required for acute gouty inflammation. In contrast, other TIR adaptor molecules, TIRAP/Mal, TRIF, and TRAM, are not required for this process. The MyD88-dependent TLR1, -2, -4, -6, -7, -9, and -11 and IL-18 receptor (IL-18R) are not essential for MSU-induced inflammation. Moreover, MSU does not stimulate HEK cells expressing TLR1–11 to activate NF-κB. In contrast, mice deficient in the MyD88-dependent IL-1R showed reduced inflammatory responses, similar to those observed in MyD88-deficient mice. Similarly, mice treated with IL-1 neutralizing antibodies also showed reduced MSU-induced inflammation, demonstrating that IL-1 production and IL-1R activation play essential roles in MSU-triggered inflammation. IL-1R deficiency in bone marrow–derived cells did not affect the inflammatory response; however, it was required in non–bone marrow–derived cells. These results indicate that IL-1 is essential for the MSU-induced inflammatory response and that the requirement of MyD88 in this process is primarily through its function as an adaptor molecule in the IL-1R signaling pathway. PMID:16886064

  10. Lyme arthritis of the pediatric ankle.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Amiethab; Walrath, Jessica; Hennrikus, William

    2014-10-01

    Lyme arthritis results from acute inflammation caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. The number of cases per year has been rising since 2006, with a majority of patients being affected in the northeastern United States. Development of Lyme arthritis is of particular importance to the orthopedic surgeon because Lyme arthritis often presents as an acute episode of joint swelling and tenderness and may be confused with bacterial septic arthritis. Considering the vast difference in treatment management between these 2 pathologies, differentiating between them is of critical importance. Septic arthritis often needs to be addressed surgically, whereas Lyme arthritis can be treated with oral antibiotics alone. Laboratory testing for Lyme disease often results in a delay in diagnosis because many laboratories batch-test Lyme specimens only a few times per week because of increased expense. The authors present a case of Lyme arthritis in the pediatric ankle in an endemic region. No clear algorithm exists to delineate between septic arthritis and Lyme arthritis of the joint. Improved clinical guidelines for the identification and diagnosis of Lyme arthritis of the ankle are important so that appropriate antibiotics can be used and surgery can be avoided. PMID:25275987

  11. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... physical exam as well as x rays or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the affected joints. Although there is no lab test to diagnose psoriatic arthritis, your doctor may order tests on blood or joint fluid to rule out other forms of arthritis with ...

  12. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Another form of reactive arthritis starts with eating food or handling something that has bacteria on it. To diagnose infectious arthritis, your health care provider may do tests of your blood, urine, and joint fluid. Treatment includes medicines and sometimes surgery.

  13. Reactive arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Reactive arthritis is a group of conditions that may involve the joints, eyes, and urinary and genital systems. ... The exact cause of reactive arthritis is unknown. It occurs most often in men younger than age 40. It may follow an infection in the urethra ...

  14. Psoriatic arthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cantini, Fabrizio; Niccoli, Laura; Nannini, Carlotta; Kaloudi, Olga; Bertoni, Michele; Cassarà, Emanuele

    2010-10-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory rheumatic disorder of unknown etiology occurring in patients with psoriasis. The Classification Criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis study group has recently developed a validated set of classification criteria for psoriatic arthritis with a sensitivity of 91.4% and a specificity of 98.7%. Three main clinical patterns have been identified: oligoarticular (≤ 4 involved joints) or polyarticular (≥ 5 involved joints) peripheral disease and axial disease with or without associated peripheral arthritis. In this context distal interphalangeal arthritis and arthritis mutilans may occur. According to other reports, also in our centre, asymmetric oligoarthritis is the most frequent pattern at onset. Axial disease has been estimated between 5% and 36% of patients. It is characterized by an irregular involvement of the axial skeleton with a predilection for the cervical spine. Recurrent episodes of enthesitis and dactylitis represent a hallmark of psoriatic arthritis. In around 20% of cases distal extremity swelling with pitting edema of the hands or feet is observed. Unilateral acute iridocyclitis, usually recurrent in alternate fashion, is the most frequent extra-articular manifestation, and accelerated atherosclerosis is the prominent comorbidity. The clinical course of peripheral and axial psoriatic arthritis is usually less severe than rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, respectively. Local corticosteroid injections and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are recommended in milder forms. Sulphasalazine and methotrexate are effective in peripheral psoriatic arthritis. Recent studies have provided evidence on the efficacy of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α drugs to control symptoms and to slow or arrest radiological disease progression. PMID:21199465

  15. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis with cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, H A; Kvasnicka, J

    1978-01-01

    A 4-year-old girl with seronegative systemic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis developed acute cardiac tamponade. Pericardiocentesis and systemic corticosteroids resulted in complete recovery of the pericardial involvement. This was followed by complete remission of rheumatoid disease. Images PMID:686861

  16. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis the same as Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis? Yes, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is a new ... of chronic inflammatory diseases that affect children. Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is the older term that was used ...

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rheumatoid arthritis drugs. However, because they are very expensive, insurance approval is generally required. Most of them ... rich in fish oils (omega-3 fatty acids). Smoking cigarettes should be stopped. Excessive alcohol should also ...

  18. Enteropathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... as well. Those who test positive for the HLA-B27 genetic marker are much more likely to have spinal involvement with enteropathic arthritis than those who test negative. Disease Course/Prognosis ...

  19. Septic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2013:chap 109. Krogstad P. Septic arthritis. In: Cherry JD, Harrison GJ, Kaplan SL, Steinbach WJ, Hotez PJ. Feigin and Cherry's Textbook of Pediatric Infectious Diseases . 7th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  20. Gonococcal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... people who have gonorrhea caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae . Gonococcal arthritis affects women more often than men. ... Saunders; 2013:chap 109. Marrazzo JM, Apicella MA. Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonnorrhea). In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, ...

  1. Psoriatic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that often occurs with a skin condition called psoriasis . ... inflammatory condition. About 1 in 20 people with psoriasis may develop arthritis with the skin condition. In most cases, psoriasis ...

  2. Reactive Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with treatment and may cause joint damage. What Research Is Being Conducted on Reactive Arthritis? Researchers continue ... such as methotrexate and sulfasalazine. More information on research is available from the following websites: National Institutes ...

  3. Psoriatic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that often occurs with a skin condition called psoriasis . Causes Psoriasis is a common skin problem that causes red ... inflammatory condition. About 1 in 20 people with psoriasis may develop arthritis with the skin condition. In ...

  4. Bacterial arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ho, G

    1991-08-01

    In this review of the 1990 septic arthritis literature, we revisit synovial fluid leukocytosis, examine the utility of synovial fluid glucose and protein measurements, and look at the levels of two cytokines, tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1, in infected joint fluids. We see the many faces of gonococcal arthritis and the ravages of septic arthritis when the host has rheumatoid arthritis. Should we recommend antibiotic prophylaxis for the rheumatoid patient with a prosthetic joint who is undergoing a procedure that leads to transient bacteremia? What are some of the salient features of septic arthritis when it involves the sternoclavicular or sacroiliac joints? We also look at some unusual microorganisms, eg, group C Streptococcus, Streptococcus viridans, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas cepacia, Pseudomonas maltophilia, and Neisseria sicca. In patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, we encounter reports of septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and spinal epidural abscess caused by opportunistic microorganisms. Two unusual sites of infection include the C1-2 lateral facet joint and subacromial bursa without involvement of the glenohumeral joint. Finally, we examine how to drain a septic knee: the orthopedic point of view. PMID:1911055

  5. Prospective surveillance study of acute respiratory infections, influenza-like illness and seasonal influenza vaccine in a cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are frequent in children and complications can occur in patients with chronic diseases. We evaluated the frequency and impact of ARI and influenza-like illness (ILI) episodes on disease activity, and the immunogenicity and safety of influenza vaccine in a cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Methods Surveillance of respiratory viruses was conducted in JIA patients during ARI season (March to August) in two consecutive years: 2007 (61 patients) and 2008 (63 patients). Patients with ARI or ILI had respiratory samples collected for virus detection by real time PCR. In 2008, 44 patients were immunized with influenza vaccine. JIA activity index (ACRPed30) was assessed during both surveillance periods. Influenza hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers were measured before and 30-40 days after vaccination. Results During the study period 105 ARI episodes were reported and 26.6% of them were ILI. Of 33 samples collected, 60% were positive for at least one virus. Influenza and rhinovirus were the most frequently detected, in 30% of the samples. Of the 50 JIA flares observed, 20% were temporally associated to ARI. Influenza seroprotection rates were higher than 70% (91-100%) for all strains, and seroconversion rates exceeded 40% (74-93%). In general, response to influenza vaccine was not influenced by therapy or disease activity, but patients using anti-TNF alpha drugs presented lower seroconversion to H1N1 strain. No significant differences were found in ACRPed30 after vaccination and no patient reported ILI for 6 months after vaccination. Conclusion ARI episodes are relatively frequent in JIA patients and may have a role triggering JIA flares. Trivalent split influenza vaccine seems to be immunogenic and safe in JIA patients. PMID:23510667

  6. Tofacitinib for acute rheumatoid arthritis patients who have had an inadequate response to disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD): a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingming; Liang, Fuxiang; Yin, Xiaoxue; Xiao, Xiaojuan; Shi, Peiyu; Wei, Dang; Yao, Liang; Wang, Qi; Chen, Yaolong

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to assess the efficacy and safety of tofacitinib for the treatment of patients with acute rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who have had an inadequate response to disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD). Randomized controlled trials were searched in MEDLINE (1966-2013), Embase (1947-2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (1948-2013), WHO International Clinical Trial Registration Platform (2004-2013), Clinical Trial.gov (1999-2013), and China Biology Medicine disc (1978-2013). The review included 10 studies involving 4,929 patients. A pooled analysis of six studies showed that tofacitinib had a superior effect over placebo (both with background therapy) at weeks 12 and 24. Also, the pooled results of three studies showed that tofacitinib monotherapy had a significantly greater effect over placebo. Compared to adalimumab, tofacitinib was found to be more efficacious as well. For safety, tofacitinib monotherapy had less serious adverse events (sAE) than placebo but not other adverse effects (oAE). In the comparison of tofacitinib and placebo both with background therapy, no difference in sAE and oAE were found. However, the quality of the evidence was quite low when evaluated using GRADE. Tofacitinib alone, or together with non-biologic DMARDs, was associated with more favorable remission in the signs and symptoms of RA than adalimumab or placebo. Also, tofacitinib monotherapy was safer than placebo with regards to reported sAE, but not oAE. However, the quality of evidence is exceedingly low; long-term, large-scale, and high-quality post-marketing research is suggested to further verify the conclusion. PMID:24389749

  7. Clinical and pathologic features of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome due to an IFIH1 mutation: A pediatric case report.

    PubMed

    Marguet, Florent; Laquerrière, Annie; Goldenberg, Alice; Guerrot, Anne-Marie; Quenez, Olivier; Flahaut, Philippe; Vanhulle, Catherine; Dumant-Forest, Clémentine; Charbonnier, Françoise; Vezain, Myriam; Bekri, Soumeya; Tournier, Isabelle; Frébourg, Thierry; Nicolas, Gaël

    2016-05-01

    We describe the case of a young patient with calcifying encephalopathy, born to asymptomatic parents. An extensive hypothesis-driven etiological assessment was performed and failed to detect the precise etiology during many years. We therefore decided to perform whole exome sequencing of the child-unaffected parents trio. A de novo pathogenic variant in the IFIH1 gene which has recently been shown to cause autosomal dominant forms of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome was identified. This child presented with a severe form with neonatal thrombocytopenia and hepatomegaly, the latter having been detected during late gestation. Although first milestones were uneventful, he progressively lost motor skills from the age of 12 months and developed severe spastic paraplegia. Brain imaging revealed white matter abnormalities and extensive calcifications. He also presented atypical skin lesions, different from chilblains. His medical history was marked by two episodes of acute pancreatitis. We provide herein the results of pathological examination including detailed description of the neuropathological hallmarks. To our knowledge, this the first detailed clinico-pathological description of a patient with an IFIH1 pathogenic variant. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26833990

  8. Aicardi-Goutières syndrome is caused by IFIH1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Oda, Hirotsugu; Nakagawa, Kenji; Abe, Junya; Awaya, Tomonari; Funabiki, Masahide; Hijikata, Atsushi; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Funatsuka, Makoto; Ohshima, Yusei; Sugawara, Yuji; Yasumi, Takahiro; Kato, Hiroki; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ohara, Osamu; Fujita, Takashi; Heike, Toshio

    2014-07-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a rare, genetically determined early-onset progressive encephalopathy. To date, mutations in six genes have been identified as etiologic for AGS. Our Japanese nationwide AGS survey identified six AGS-affected individuals without a molecular diagnosis; we performed whole-exome sequencing on three of these individuals. After removal of the common polymorphisms found in SNP databases, we were able to identify IFIH1 heterozygous missense mutations in all three. In vitro functional analysis revealed that IFIH1 mutations increased type I interferon production, and the transcription of interferon-stimulated genes were elevated. IFIH1 encodes MDA5, and mutant MDA5 lacked ligand-specific responsiveness, similarly to the dominant Ifih1 mutation responsible for the SLE mouse model that results in type I interferon overproduction. This study suggests that the IFIH1 mutations are responsible for the AGS phenotype due to an excessive production of type I interferon. PMID:24995871

  9. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint as a complication of acute otitis media in a child: A rare case and the importance of real-time PCR for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Bast, F; Collier, S; Chadha, P; Collier, J

    2015-11-01

    We document the case of a 7-year-old boy who presented with pain in his left ear and trismus after a diagnosis of acute otitis media one week previously. His blood inflammatory markers were raised and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed significant left temporomandibular joint effusion and partial attenuation of the left mastoid. A clinical diagnosis of septic arthritis of the TMJ was made and the patient was commenced on broad-spectrum antibiotics. Analysis using real time PCR enabled identification of the offending organism, confirmation of the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment to be specifically tailored for treatment. PMID:26340928

  10. Co-existence of acute myeloid leukemia with multilineage dysplasia and Epstein-Barr virus-associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhira, Michihide; Hanzawa, Kyoko; Watanabe, Reiko; Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Nemoto, Tomoe; Toyozumi, Yasuo; Tamaru, Jun-ichi; Itoyama, Shinji; Suzuki, Katsuya; Kameda, Hideto; Mori, Shigehisa; Kizaki, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease mediated by inflammatory processes mainly at the joints. Recently, awareness of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (T-LPD) has been heightened for its association with methotraxate usage in RA patients. In the contrary, acute myeloid leukemia with multilineage dysplasia (AML-MLD) has never been documented to be present concomitantly with the above two conditions. In this report we present a case of an autopsy-proven co-existence of AML-MLD and EBV-associated T-LPD in a patient with RA. PMID:19566938

  11. Four-week effects of allopurinol and febuxostat treatments on blood pressure and serum creatinine level in gouty men.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ah; Seo, Young-Il; Song, Yeong W

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the effects of uric acid lowering therapy (UALT), febuxostat and allopurinol, on blood pressure (BP) and serum creatinine level. Post-hoc data were derived from a phase-III, randomised, double-blind, 4-week trial of male gouty patients that compared the safety and efficacy of febuxostat and allopurinol in adults with gout. The subjects were randomly assigned to one of five groups, 35-37 in each group (febuxostat: 40, 80, 120 mg/d; allopurinol: 300 mg/d; control group: placebo). Blood pressure and serum creatinine level were measured at baseline and at weeks 2 and 4. Diastolic BP and creatinine level had decreased significantly in the UALT groups compared to the control group at week 4. Diastolic BP had decreased significantly in the allopurinol group and serum creatinine level had decreased significantly in the febuxostat groups at week 4. After adjusting for confounding variables, serum uric acid changes were found to be significantly correlated with changes in serum creatinine level but were not associated with changes in systolic or diastolic BP. UALT in gouty subjects significantly decreased diastolic BP and serum creatinine level. Changes in uric acid were significantly correlated with those in serum creatinine level, suggesting the feasibility of renal function improvement through UALT in gouty men. PMID:25120316

  12. Grammatical Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Don

    1994-01-01

    Discusses grammatical arthritis (an internal buildup of rules that hinders writing flexibility); four new "rules" (concerning "data is,""none are,""hopefully," and the restrictive "which"); attitudes toward English grammar; how to be a helpful editor; and where to learn about grammar. (SR)

  13. Arthritis of the Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by just two types: osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive condition that ... other, it results in pain, stiffness, and weakness. Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease that ...

  14. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Arthritis Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Rheumatoid Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: ... Size: 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  15. Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bursitis and Tendinitis, Q&A Fibromyalgia, Q&A Gout, Q&A Juvenile Arthritis, Q&A Childhood Arthritis ( ... Many people also experience fatigue and sleep disturbances. Gout. A type of arthritis resulting from deposits of ...

  16. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... stiffness, inflammation, swelling and, sometimes, destruction of joints. Gout — a form of arthritis that occurs when uric ... the joints. Some 2.1 million Americans have gout. Lupus — a form of arthritis, like rheumatoid arthritis, ...

  17. Reactive Arthritis Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Of Spondylitis The Heart In Spondyloarthritis Inflammatory vs. Mechanical Back ... Arthritis Symptoms Because there is no specific laboratory test for reactive arthritis, doctors sometimes find it difficult ...

  18. Midfoot arthritis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amar; Rao, Smita; Nawoczenski, Deborah; Flemister, Adolf S; DiGiovanni, Benedict; Baumhauer, Judith F

    2010-07-01

    Midfoot arthritis is a common cause of significant pain and disability. Although the medial tarsometatarsal (TMT) joints provide < 7 degrees of sagittal plane motion, the more mobile lateral fourth and fifth TMT joints provide balance and accommodation on uneven ground. These small constrained TMT joints also provide stability and translate the forward propulsion motion of the hindfoot and ankle joint to the forefoot metatarsophalangeal joints from heel rise to toe-off. Posttraumatic degeneration is the primary cause of midfoot arthritis, although primary degeneration and inflammatory conditions can also affect this area. The result is a painful midfoot that can no longer effectively transmit load from the hindfoot to the forefoot. Shoe modifications and orthotic inserts are the mainstay of nonsurgical management. Successful management of midfoot arthritis with orthoses is predicated on achieving adequate joint stabilization while still allowing function. Surgical intervention typically involves arthrodesis of the medial midfoot, although the best treatment of the more mobile lateral column is a subject of debate. PMID:20595134

  19. Polymorphonuclear leucocyte function and previous yersinia arthritis: enhanced chemokinetic migration and oxygen radical production correlate with the severity of the acute disease.

    PubMed Central

    Koivuranta-Vaara, P; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Repo, H

    1987-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) functions (migration in vitro, chemiluminescence, O-2 production, binding of chemotactic peptide, and aggregation) were studied in HLA-B27 positive patients with previous yersinia arthritis (YA). PMNs of patients whose disease had been severe showed chemokinetic and chemiluminescence responses significantly higher than the PMNs of those with a mild disease. The results support the view that enhanced PMN function contributes to inflammatory symptoms in patients with YA. PMID:3592787

  20. Clinical and Molecular Phenotype of Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Gillian ; Patrick, Teresa ; Parmar, Rekha ; Taylor, Claire F. ; Aeby, Alec ; Aicardi, Jean ; Artuch, Rafael ; Montalto, Simon Attard ; Bacino, Carlos A. ; Barroso, Bruno ; Baxter, Peter ; Benko, Willam S. ; Bergmann, Carsten ; Bertini, Enrico ; Biancheri, Roberta ; Blair, Edward M. ; Blau, Nenad ; Bonthron, David T. ; Briggs, Tracy ; Brueton, Louise A. ; Brunner, Han G. ; Burke, Christopher J. ; Carr, Ian M. ; Carvalho, Daniel R. ; Chandler, Kate E. ; Christen, Hans-Jürgen ; Corry, Peter C. ; Cowan, Frances M. ; Cox, Helen ; D’Arrigo, Stefano ; Dean, John ; De Laet, Corinne ; De Praeter, Claudine ; Déry, Catherine ; Ferrie, Colin D. ; Flintoff, Kim ; Frints, Suzanna G. M. ; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels ; Gener, Blanca ; Goizet, Cyril ; Goutières, Françoise ; Green, Andrew J. ; Guët, Agnès ; Hamel, Ben C. J. ; Hayward, Bruce E. ; Heiberg, Arvid ; Hennekam, Raoul C. ; Husson, Marie ; Jackson, Andrew P. ; Jayatunga, Rasieka ; Jiang, Yong-Hui ; Kant, Sarina G. ; Kao, Amy ; King, Mary D. ; Kingston, Helen M. ; Klepper, Joerg ; van der Knaap, Marjo S. ; Kornberg, Andrew J. ; Kotzot, Dieter ; Kratzer, Wilfried ; Lacombe, Didier ; Lagae, Lieven ; Landrieu, Pierre Georges ; Lanzi, Giovanni ; Leitch, Andrea ; Lim, Ming J. ; Livingston, John H. ; Lourenco, Charles M. ; Lyall, E. G. Hermione ; Lynch, Sally A. ; Lyons, Michael J. ; Marom, Daphna ; McClure, John P. ; McWilliam, Robert ; Melancon, Serge B. ; Mewasingh, Leena D. ; Moutard, Marie-Laure ; Nischal, Ken K. ; Østergaard, John R. ; Prendiville, Julie ; Rasmussen, Magnhild ; Rogers, R. Curtis ; Roland, Dominique ; Rosser, Elisabeth M. ; Rostasy, Kevin ; Roubertie, Agathe ; Sanchis, Amparo ; Schiffmann, Raphael ; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine ; Seal, Sunita ; Shalev, Stavit A. ; Corcoles, C. Sierra ; Sinha, Gyan P. ; Soler, Doriette ; Spiegel, Ronen ; Stephenson, John B. P. ; Tacke, Uta ; Tan, Tiong Yang ; Till, Marianne ; Tolmie, John L. ; Tomlin, Pam ; Vagnarelli, Federica ; Valente, Enza Maria ; Van Coster, Rudy N. A. ; Van der Aa, Nathalie ; Vanderver, Adeline ; Vles, Johannes S. H. ; Voit, Thomas ; Wassmer, Evangeline ; Weschke, Bernhard ; Whiteford, Margo L. ; Willemsen, Michel A. A. ; Zankl, Andreas ; Zuberi, Sameer M. ; Orcesi, Simona ; Fazzi, Elisa ; Lebon, Pierre ; Crow, Yanick J. 

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3′→5′ exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from northern Europe. Almost all mutations in RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were missense. We identified an RNASEH2C founder mutation in 13 Pakistani families. We also collected clinical data from 123 mutation-positive patients. Two clinical presentations could be delineated: an early-onset neonatal form, highly reminiscent of congenital infection seen particularly with TREX1 mutations, and a later-onset presentation, sometimes occurring after several months of normal development and occasionally associated with remarkably preserved neurological function, most frequently due to RNASEH2B mutations. Mortality was correlated with genotype; 34.3% of patients with TREX1, RNASEH2A, and RNASEH2C mutations versus 8.0% RNASEH2B mutation–positive patients were known to have died (P=.001). Our analysis defines the phenotypic spectrum of AGS and suggests a coherent mutation-screening strategy in this heterogeneous disorder. Additionally, our data indicate that at least one further AGS-causing gene remains to be identified. PMID:17846997

  1. [The criteria of differentiated diagnostics of early arthritis on the basis of analysis of serum hyaluronidase and deoxyribonuclease activity].

    PubMed

    Volkova, M V; Kunder, E V

    2012-10-01

    The study analyzed serum hyaluronidase and deoxyribonuclease activity in patients with early arthritis--early rheumatoid arthritis and acute reactive arthritis. The criteria of their differential diagnostics were developed on the basis of data obtained. The genuine methods were applied to analyze hyaluronidase and deoxyribonuclease activity of blood serum based on formation of clot of etacridine acetate (rivanol) with hyaluronic acid and DNA inversely proportionally to their polymerization under the impact of enzymes. The increased serum hyaluronidase and deoxyribonuclease activity was established in patients with early arthritis as compared with control group (p < 0.001). The prevalence of mentioned types of activity under early rheumatoid arthritis as compared with acute reactive arthritis was detected too. The rests for differentiate diagnostics of early rheumatoid arthritis and acute reactive arthritis were developed conformed to criteria of the most useful diagnostic tests in rheumatology. PMID:23265051

  2. Unusual cutaneous features associated with a heterozygous gain-of-function mutation in IFIH1: overlap between Aicardi–Goutières and Singleton–Merten syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Bursztejn, A.-C.; Briggs, T.A.; del Toro Duany, Y.; Anderson, B.H.; O’Sullivan, J.; Williams, S.G.; Bodemer, C.; Fraitag, S.; Gebhard, F.; Leheup, B.; Lemelle, I.; Oojageer, A.; Raffo, E.; Schmitt, E.; Rice, G.I.; Hur, S.; Crow, Y.J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cutaneous lesions described as chilblain lupus occur in the context of familial chilblain lupus or Aicardi–Goutières syndrome. To date, seven genes related to Aicardi–Goutières syndrome have been described. The most recently described encodes the cytosolic double-stranded RNA receptor IFIH1 (also known as MDA5), a key component of the antiviral type I interferon-mediated innate immune response. Enhanced type I interferon signalling secondary to gain-of-function mutations in IFIH1 can result in a range of neuroinflammatory phenotypes including classical Aicardi–Goutières syndrome. It is of note that none of the patients with a neurological phenotype so far described with mutations in this gene was reported to demonstrate cutaneous involvement. We present a family segregating a heterozygous pathogenic mutation in IFIH1 showing dermatological involvement as a prominent feature, variably associated with neurological disturbance and premature tooth loss. All three affected individuals exhibited increased expression of interferon-stimulated genes in whole blood, and the mutant protein resulted in enhanced interferon signalling in vitro, both in the basal state and following ligand stimulation. Our results further extend the phenotypic spectrum associated with mutations in IFIH1, indicating that the disease can be confined predominantly to the skin, while also highlighting phenotypic overlap with both Aicardi–Goutières syndrome and Singleton–Merten syndrome. PMID:26284909

  3. Menstrual arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, J E; Singh, M M; Griffiths, I D

    1993-01-01

    The menstrual cycle is characterised by variations in the absolute and relative concentrations of the hormones of the hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis, which in turn affect cell function and cytokine and heat shock protein production. Menstruation involves the shedding of the secretory endometrium, which is part of the mucosal associated lymphoid tissue and hence is rich in immunologically competent cells such as CD8 T cells and macrophages. The case is reported here of a patient presenting with a recurrent but transient symmetrical inflammatory polyarthritis which only occurred at menstruation with no residual damage. The disease was suppressed by danazol. Endometrial degradation products are suggested as the trigger of this 'menstrual arthritis'. PMID:8427519

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  5. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve five or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  6. Treating Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  7. Classification of Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  8. Diagnosing Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  9. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ... The cause of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is not known. It ... illness . This means the body attacks and destroys healthy body ...

  10. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Forms of Arthritis Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents Today, ... of Linda Saisselin Osteoarthritis (OA) — the form of arthritis typically occurring during middle or old age, this ...

  11. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... children with arthritis Preventing anemia in children with chronic inflammatory diseases such as arthritis Whether daily calcium supplements ... density in children with arthritis The impact of chronic and recurrent pain on ... role of an inflammatory chemical called interleukin-15 (IL-15). For More ...

  12. Gait changes precede overt arthritis and strongly correlate with symptoms and histopathological events in pristane-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) in the rat has been described as an animal model of inflammatory arthritis which exhibits features similar to rheumatoid arthritis in humans, such as a chronic, destructive, and symmetrical involvement of peripheral joints. However, so far little is known about the earliest inflammatory events and their influence on locomotor behaviour during the course of PIA. To investigate this issue a detailed analysis of the pathologic changes occurring during the prodromal and early stages of PIA was performed. Methods Arthritis was induced in DA.rats by injection of 150 μl 2,6,10,4-tetramethyl-pentadecane (pristane) at the base of the tail and changes in locomotor behaviour of the affected paws were monitored using the CatWalk quantitative gait analysis system. The pathologic events occurring in the joints of pristane-injected animals were studied before onset, at onset, and during acute phase of arthritis by histological methods. Results Gait analysis revealed that changes in locomotion such as reduced paw print areas and stance phase time are already apparent before the onset of clinically discernible arthritis symptoms (erythema, paw swelling) and correlate with PIA scores. In agreement with these findings, inflammatory tenosynovitis could be observed by histology already before the onset of erythema and swelling of the respective paws. In the most heavily affected rats also irregularities in step sequence patterns occurred A kinetic analysis of clinical and histological findings demonstrated that gait changes precede the pathological changes occurring during the acute phase of pristane-induced arthritis. Conclusions Gait analysis allows for pinpointing the initial inflammatory changes in experimental arthritis models such as pristane-induced arthritis. Analysis of early clinically relevant symptoms in arthritis models may facilitate the search for novel therapeutics to interfere with pain, inflammation and joint destruction

  13. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis.

  14. Mutations in ADAR1 cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome associated with a type I interferon signature

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Gillian I; Kasher, Paul R; Forte, Gabriella M A; Mannion, Niamh M; Greenwood, Sam M; Szynkiewicz, Marcin; Dickerson, Jonathan E; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; Zampini, Massimiliano; Briggs, Tracy A; Jenkinson, Emma M; Bacino, Carlos A; Battini, Roberta; Bertini, Enrico; Brogan, Paul A; Brueton, Louise A; Carpanelli, Marialuisa; Laet, Corinne De; de Lonlay, Pascale; del Toro, Mireia; Desguerre, Isabelle; Fazzi, Elisa; Garcia-Cazorla, Àngels; Heiberg, Arvid; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Kumar, Ram; Lin, Jean-Pierre S-M; Lourenco, Charles M; Male, Alison M; Marques, Wilson; Mignot, Cyril; Olivieri, Ivana; Orcesi, Simona; Prabhakar, Prab; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Robinson, Robert A; Rozenberg, Flore; Schmidt, Johanna L; Steindl, Katharina; Tan, Tiong Y; van der Merwe, William G; Vanderver, Adeline; Vassallo, Grace; Wakeling, Emma L; Wassmer, Evangeline; Whittaker, Elizabeth; Livingston, John H; Lebon, Pierre; Suzuki, Tamio; McLaughlin, Paul J; Keegan, Liam P; O’Connell, Mary A; Lovell, Simon C; Crow, Yanick J

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and thereby potentially alter the information content and structure of cellular RNAs. Notably, although the overwhelming majority of such editing events occur in transcripts derived from Alu repeat elements, the biological function of non-coding RNA editing remains uncertain. Here, we show that mutations in ADAR1 (also known as ADAR) cause the autoimmune disorder Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS). As in Adar1-null mice, the human disease state is associated with upregulation of interferon-stimulated genes, indicating a possible role for ADAR1 as a suppressor of type I interferon signaling. Considering recent insights derived from the study of other AGS-related proteins, we speculate that ADAR1 may limit the cytoplasmic accumulation of the dsRNA generated from genomic repetitive elements. PMID:23001123

  15. Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis (I): Pristane-Induced Arthritis in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Tuncel, Jonatan; Haag, Sabrina; Hoffmann, Markus H.; Yau, Anthony C. Y.; Hultqvist, Malin; Olofsson, Peter; Bäcklund, Johan; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Weidner, Daniela; Fischer, Anita; Leichsenring, Anna; Lange, Franziska; Haase, Claus; Lu, Shemin; Gulko, Percio S.; Steiner, Günter; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2016-01-01

    Background To facilitate the development of therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the Innovative Medicines Initiative BTCure has combined the experience from several laboratories worldwide to establish a series of protocols for different animal models of arthritis that reflect the pathogenesis of RA. Here, we describe chronic pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) model in DA rats, and provide detailed instructions to set up and evaluate the model and for reporting data. Methods We optimized dose of pristane and immunization procedures and determined the effect of age, gender, and housing conditions. We further assessed cage-effects, reproducibility, and frequency of chronic arthritis, disease markers, and efficacy of standard and novel therapies. Results Out of 271 rats, 99.6% developed arthritis after pristane-administration. Mean values for day of onset, day of maximum arthritis severity and maximum clinical scores were 11.8±2.0 days, 20.3±5.1 days and 34.2±11 points on a 60-point scale, respectively. The mean frequency of chronic arthritis was 86% but approached 100% in long-term experiments over 110 days. Pristane was arthritogenic even at 5 microliters dose but needed to be administrated intradermally to induce robust disease with minimal variation. The development of arthritis was age-dependent but independent of gender and whether the rats were housed in conventional or barrier facilities. PIA correlated well with weight loss and acute phase reactants, and was ameliorated by etanercept, dexamethasone, cyclosporine A and fingolimod treatment. Conclusions PIA has high incidence and excellent reproducibility. The chronic relapsing-remitting disease and limited systemic manifestations make it more suitable than adjuvant arthritis for long-term studies of joint-inflammation and screening and validation of new therapeutics. PMID:27227821

  16. ICPMS analysis of proteins separated by Native-PAGE: Evaluation of metaloprotein profiles in human synovial fluid with acute and chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Moyano, Mario F; Mariño-Repizo, Leonardo; Tamashiro, Héctor; Villegas, Liliana; Acosta, Mariano; Gil, Raúl A

    2016-07-01

    The role of trace elements bound to proteins in the etiology and pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains unclear. In this sense, the identification and detection of metalloproteins has a strong and growing interest. Metalloprotein studies are currently carried out by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) associated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), and despite that complete information can be obtained for metals such as Fe, Cu and Zn, difficulties due to poor sensitivity for other trace elements such as Sn, As, etc, are currently faced. In the present work, a simple and fast method for the determination of trace metals bound to synovial fluid (SF) proteins was optimized. Proteins from SF (long and short-term RA) were separated in ten fractions by native PAGE, then dissolved in nitric acid and peroxide hydrogen, and analyzed by ICPMS. Fifteen metals were determined in each separated protein fraction (band). Adequate calibration of proteins molecular weight allowed stablishing which protein type were bound to different metals. PMID:27259351

  17. Preliminary study on the role of virtual touch tissue quantification combined with a urinary β2-microglobulin test on the early diagnosis of gouty kidney damage.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fei; Wang, Zheng-Bin; Meng, Dong-Mei; Liu, Rong-Gui; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Li, Hui-Ying; Lv, Fei-Fei

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the work described here was to evaluate the role of virtual touch tissue quantification (VTQ) combined with urinary β2-microglobulin (β2-MG) measurement in the early diagnosis of gouty kidney damage. Two hundred fifty-nine patients with gouty kidney damage and 200 healthy control subjects were tested. The shear wave velocity (SWV) of the renal parenchyma and sinus as determined with VTQ and the urinary β2-MG level of the two groups were analyzed. Although there were no significant differences in age, body mass index, creatinine level and blood urea nitrogen between the two groups (all p's > 0.05), the aforementioned parameters were higher in the group with gouty kidney damage than in the control group. Urinary β2-MG levels of the patients with kidney damage were significantly higher than those of the control subjects (t = 6.38, p < 0.01). The SWV of the renal parenchyma was higher than that of the sinus in both groups. Compared with controls, patients with kidney damage had significantly increased renal parenchyma and sinus SWVs (all p-values < 0.05). Urinary β2-MG level was positively linearly correlated with the SWV of renal parenchyma in patients with kidney damage (r = 0.442, p < 0.0001). However, there was no correlation between urinary β2-MG level and the SWV of the sinus in patients with kidney damage (r = 0). In the control group, there was no correlation between urinary β2-MG level and the SWV of the renal parenchyma or sinus. The elasticity of the kidney as determined with VTQ, combined with the urinary β2-MG level, may be helpful in the early diagnosis of gouty kidney damage. PMID:24642221

  18. [Manifestation of Lyme arthritis in the puerperal period].

    PubMed

    Bussen, S; Steck, T

    1994-08-01

    Lyme disease, a tick-transmitted spirochetal illness caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, usually begins with a characteristic erythema chronicum migrans accompanied by flu-like symptoms. This phase may later be followed by meningitis, neuritis, carditis or arthritis. Congenital abnormalities due to maternal infection during pregnancy have been described. We report on a case of a 36-year old V gravida III para. After a normal pregnancy and a Cesarean section the patient developed postpartal an acute Lyme arthritis. PMID:7975802

  19. Severe inflammatory arthritis and lymphadenopathy in the absence of TNF

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Ian K.; O’Donnell, Kristy; Lawlor, Kate E.; Wicks, Ian P.

    2001-01-01

    It has been postulated that TNF has a pivotal role in a cytokine cascade that results in joint inflammation and destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To evaluate this, we examined the response of TNF-deficient (Tnf–/–) mice in two models of RA. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced by injection of chick type II collagen (CII) in CFA. Tnf–/– mice had some reduction in the clinical parameters of CIA and, on histology, significantly more normal joints. However, severe disease was evident in 54% of arthritic Tnf–/– joints. Tnf–/– mice had impaired Ig class switching, but preserved T cell proliferative responses to CII and enhanced IFN-γ production. Interestingly, CII-immunized Tnf–/– mice developed lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly associated with increased memory CD4+ T cells and activated lymph node B cells. Acute inflammatory arthritis was also reduced in Tnf–/– mice, although again some mice exhibited severe disease. We conclude that TNF is important but not essential for inflammatory arthritis; in each model, severe arthritis could proceed even in the complete absence of TNF. These results call into doubt the concept that TNF is obligatory for chronic autoimmune and acute inflammatory arthritis and provide a rationale for further studies into TNF-independent cytokine pathways in arthritis. PMID:11413159

  20. Severe inflammatory arthritis and lymphadenopathy in the absence of TNF.

    PubMed

    Campbell, I K; O'Donnell, K; Lawlor, K E; Wicks, I P

    2001-06-01

    It has been postulated that TNF has a pivotal role in a cytokine cascade that results in joint inflammation and destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To evaluate this, we examined the response of TNF-deficient (Tnf(-/-)) mice in two models of RA. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced by injection of chick type II collagen (CII) in CFA. Tnf(-/-) mice had some reduction in the clinical parameters of CIA and, on histology, significantly more normal joints. However, severe disease was evident in 54% of arthritic Tnf(-/-) joints. Tnf(-/-) mice had impaired Ig class switching, but preserved T cell proliferative responses to CII and enhanced IFN-gamma production. Interestingly, CII-immunized Tnf(-/-) mice developed lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly associated with increased memory CD4(+) T cells and activated lymph node B cells. Acute inflammatory arthritis was also reduced in Tnf(-/-) mice, although again some mice exhibited severe disease. We conclude that TNF is important but not essential for inflammatory arthritis; in each model, severe arthritis could proceed even in the complete absence of TNF. These results call into doubt the concept that TNF is obligatory for chronic autoimmune and acute inflammatory arthritis and provide a rationale for further studies into TNF-independent cytokine pathways in arthritis. PMID:11413159

  1. Bone and Joint Infections in Children: Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anil; Aggarwal, Aditya N

    2016-08-01

    The pathological invasion of a joint and subsequent inflammation is known as septic arthritis. The knee and hip are the most frequently involved joints. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of septic arthritis in children. An acute onset of illness with an inflamed painful joint and restricted movements and inability to use joint (pseudoparalysis) clinically indicates septic arthritis. The diagnosis is difficult in a neonate or young child where refusal to feed, crying, discomfort during change of diaper (if hip is involved) or attempted joint movement may be the only findings. Fever and other systemic signs may also be absent in neonates. Septic arthritis is diagnosed clinically, supported by appropriate radiological and laboratory investigations. The peripheral blood white cell count is frequently raised with a predominance of polymorphonuclear cells. The acute phase reactants such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) are often markedly raised. Ultrasonography and MRI are preferred investigations in pediatric septic arthritis. Determination of infecting organism in septic arthritis is the key to the correct antibiotic choice, treatment duration and overall management. Joint aspirate and/or blood culture should be obtained before starting antibiotic treatment. Several effective antibiotic regimes are available for managing septic arthritis in children. Presence of large collections, thick pus, joint loculations and pus evacuating into surrounding soft tissues are main indications for surgical drainage. Joint aspiration can be a practical alternative in case the lesion is diagnosed early, with uncomplicated presentations and superficial joints. PMID:26189923

  2. Long term prognosis of reactive salmonella arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Leirisalo-Repo, M; Helenius, P; Hannu, T; Lehtinen, A; Kreula, J; Taavitsainen, M; Koskimies, S

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Reactive joint complications triggered by salmonella gastroenteritis are increasingly reported, but the outcome and long term prognosis of the patients is incompletely known. This study looked at the prognosis of salmonella arthritis in patients hospitalised in 1970-1986.
METHODS—Hospital records from two hospitals in southern Finland were screened for patients with the discharge diagnosis of salmonellosis or reactive, postinfectious arthritis or Reiter's disease. For the patients with confirmed diagnosis of reactive salmonella arthritis, data about the acute disease were collected from the hospital records. A follow up study was performed.
RESULTS—There were 63 patients (28 women, 35 men, mean age 36.5 years) with salmonella arthritis. Urethritis occurred in 27%, eye inflammation in 13%, and low back pain in 44% of the patients. HLA-B27 was present in 88%. More men than women were HLA-B27 positive. HLA-B27 positive patients had higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (mean 80.9 v 46.5 mm 1st h, p = 0.0180). Also, extra-articular features and radiological sacroiliitis were seen only in HLA-B27 positive patients. A follow up study was performed on 50 patients mean 11.0 (range 5-22 years) later. Twenty patients had recovered completely. Ten patients had mild joint symptoms, 11 patients had had a new acute transient arthritis, and five acute iritis. Eight patients had developed chronic spondyloarthropathy. Radiological sacroiliitis was seen in six of 44 patients, more frequently in male than in female patients (32% v 0%; p = 0.0289). Recurrent or chronic arthritis, iritis or radiological sacroiliitis developed only in HLA-B27 positive patients.
CONCLUSION—Joint symptoms are common after reactive salmonella arthritis. HLA-B27 contributes to the severity of acute disease and to the late prognosis.

 PMID:9370874

  3. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Won; Cho, Jin-Yong; Kim, Hyeon-Min

    2016-08-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease. The most common symptoms of this disease are acute malocclusion, limited mouth opening, swelling, and tenderness of affected TMJ. These symptoms are often confused with internal derangement of the articular disc, rheumatoid arthritis, retrodiscitis, or osteoarthritis. Therefore, differential diagnosis by image examination is required. Usually, antimicrobial treatment and surgical drainage by needle aspiration, arthroscopy, or arthrotomy are effective treatment approaches. In this study, a patient who was diagnosed with septic arthritis was treated with arthrocentesis and antibiotics without significant complications. We present a case report with a review of the literature. PMID:27595091

  4. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease. The most common symptoms of this disease are acute malocclusion, limited mouth opening, swelling, and tenderness of affected TMJ. These symptoms are often confused with internal derangement of the articular disc, rheumatoid arthritis, retrodiscitis, or osteoarthritis. Therefore, differential diagnosis by image examination is required. Usually, antimicrobial treatment and surgical drainage by needle aspiration, arthroscopy, or arthrotomy are effective treatment approaches. In this study, a patient who was diagnosed with septic arthritis was treated with arthrocentesis and antibiotics without significant complications. We present a case report with a review of the literature. PMID:27595091

  5. When is arthritis reactive?

    PubMed

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-07-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra-articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA-B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised "trigger" infection. The identification and management of "sexually acquired" and "enteric" forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  6. When is arthritis reactive?

    PubMed Central

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra‐articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA‐B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised “trigger” infection. The identification and management of “sexually acquired” and “enteric” forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  7. Tumour necrosis factor soluble receptors behave as acute phase reactants following surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, chronic osteomyelitis and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Chikanza, I C; Roux-Lombard, P; Dayer, J M; Panayi, G S

    1993-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is involved in diverse biological processes including immune and inflammatory reactions and the response to surgical stress. Two soluble TNF receptor protein fragments, TNF-sR55 (from the p55 kD TNF receptor) and TNF-sR75 (from the p75 kD TNF receptor), are released by cells during inflammation and may modulate the e effects of TNF-alpha. We have studied the kinetics of secretion of TNF-alpha, TNF-sR55 and TNF-sR75 in the sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and control subjects with osteoarthritis (OA) or chronic osteomyelitis (OM) before and after major surgery. Significantly higher pre-operative levels of TNF-sR55 and TNF-sR75 were found in RA and OM as compared with OA (P < 0.02). Following surgery, TNF-sR55 increased within 24 h in RA, OM and OA (P < 0.05), whereas TNF-sR75 increased significantly only in OM and OA patients (P < 0.05). By contrast, no TNF-alpha was detectable before and after surgery in any of the subjects, but this may have been due to impaired detection (by ELISA) of TNF-alpha when it is bound to TNF-sR. These findings suggest that TNF-sR55 and TNF-sR75 may be further markers of the host's reaction to inflammatory insults. They may also play a role in modulating the immune and inflammatory reactions by inhibiting the systemic effects of TNF-alpha. PMID:8385584

  8. Hallux metatarsophalangeal arthritis.

    PubMed

    Weinfeld, S B; Schon, L C

    1998-04-01

    Arthritis of the hallux metatarsophalangeal joint is a common disorder that affects shoewear, ambulation, and other activities of daily living. Etiologies include degenerative arthritis (hallux rigidus), crystal induced arthropathy (gout, pseudogout), rheumatoid arthritis, the seronegative spondyloathropathies, posttraumatic degeneration, and advanced hallux valgus. Accurate diagnosis and selection of the appropriate intervention depends on recognition of pertinent clinical and radiographic features. This study presents a synopsis of the senior author's (LCS) experience with 439 surgically treated patients with hallux metatarsophalangeal arthritis, focusing on origin and treatment. PMID:9584362

  9. Acute sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Rimar, Doron; Boulman, Nina; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Rosner, Itzhak; Odeh, Majed

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the data on the etiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, and diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis. A Pubmed search utilizing the indexing term "acute sacroiliitis" was conducted and the data pertinent to the aim of the review was extracted and organized in accordance with the preplanned structure of the manuscript. The diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis is often challenging because of both the relative rarity of this presentation and diverse character of acute sacroiliac pain, frequently mimicking other, more prevalent disorders. Technetium bone scintigraphy can localize the disease process to the sacroiliac joint, while computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detailed characterization and the extent of the disease as well as the diagnosis of complications. Pyogenic sacroiliitis is by far the most common cause of acute sacroiliitis. Brucellosis, acute sacroiliitis in the course of reactive arthritis, and crystalline-induced sacroiliitis frequently imitate pyogenic sacroiliitis. Acute sacroiliitis can rarely be also related to hematological malignancies or treatment with isotretinoin. Awareness to the possibility of acute sacroiliitis and a thorough physical examination are the necessary prerequisites to its timely diagnosis, while the appropriate laboratory and imaging studies should confirm the precise diagnosis and direct the appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26847855

  10. Varicella arthritis in a child.

    PubMed Central

    Shuper, A; Mimouni, M; Mukamel, M; Varsano, I

    1980-01-01

    A 2 1/2-year-old girl developed arthritis in a metatarsophalangeal joint concomitantly with varicella. As she recovered within 2 days without antimicrobial treatment, it was considered that the arthritis was directly due to the viral infection. The importance of differentiating viral arthritis from septic arthritis, a well-known complication of varicella, is stressed. PMID:7436508

  11. Genome-wide DNA hypomethylation and RNA:DNA hybrid accumulation in Aicardi–Goutières syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yoong Wearn; Sanz, Lionel A; Xu, Xiaoqin; Hartono, Stella R; Chédin, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Aicardi–Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a severe childhood inflammatory disorder that shows clinical and genetic overlap with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). AGS is thought to arise from the accumulation of incompletely metabolized endogenous nucleic acid species owing to mutations in nucleic acid-degrading enzymes TREX1 (AGS1), RNase H2 (AGS2, 3 and 4), and SAMHD1 (AGS5). However, the identity and source of such immunogenic nucleic acid species remain undefined. Using genome-wide approaches, we show that fibroblasts from AGS patients with AGS1-5 mutations are burdened by excessive loads of RNA:DNA hybrids. Using MethylC-seq, we show that AGS fibroblasts display pronounced and global loss of DNA methylation and demonstrate that AGS-specific RNA:DNA hybrids often occur within DNA hypomethylated regions. Altogether, our data suggest that RNA:DNA hybrids may represent a common immunogenic form of nucleic acids in AGS and provide the first evidence of epigenetic perturbations in AGS, furthering the links between AGS and SLE. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08007.001 PMID:26182405

  12. Characterization of samhd1 morphant zebrafish recapitulates features of the human type I interferonopathy Aicardi-Goutières syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kasher, Paul R; Jenkinson, Emma M; Briolat, Valérie; Gent, David; Morrissey, Catherine; Zeef, Leo A H; Rice, Gillian I; Levraud, Jean-Pierre; Crow, Yanick J

    2015-03-15

    In humans, loss of function mutations in the SAMHD1 (AGS5) gene cause a severe form of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS), an inherited inflammatory-mediated encephalopathy characterized by increased type I IFN activity and upregulation of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). In particular, SAMHD1-related AGS is associated with a distinctive cerebrovascular pathology that commonly leads to stroke. Although inflammatory responses are observed in immune cells cultured from Samhd1 null mouse models, these mice are physically healthy, specifically lacking a brain phenotype. We have investigated the use of zebrafish as an alternative system for generating a clinically relevant model of SAMHD1-related AGS. Using temporal gene knockdown of zebrafish samhd1, we observe hindbrain ventricular swelling and brain hemorrhage. Furthermore, loss of samhd1 or of another AGS-associated gene, adar, leads to a significant upregulation of innate immune-related genes and an increase in the number of cells expressing the zebrafish type I IFN ifnphi1. To our knowledge, this is the first example of an in vivo model of AGS that recapitulates features of both the innate immune and neurological characteristics of the disease. The phenotypes associated with loss of samhd1 and adar suggest a function of these genes in controlling innate immune processes conserved to zebrafish, thereby also contributing to our understanding of antiviral signaling in this model organism. PMID:25672750

  13. Septic arthritis in the era of immunosuppressive treatments.

    PubMed

    Salar, O; Baker, B; Kurien, T; Taylor, A; Moran, C

    2014-03-01

    Immunosuppressants have been the mainstay of treatment for certain inflammatory joint conditions for many years. Developments in this field, namely biological treatments, have led to a change in the classical presentation of acute bone, joint and soft tissue infections. The normal findings of severe pain and tenderness on examination may be absent or simply mimic a typical exacerbation of the chronic joint condition. A minimally raised white cell count and elevated C-reactive protein in the absence of systemic signs of infection may be interpreted as further evidence for the diagnosis of an exacerbation of inflammatory arthritis. We present a unique case of recurrent polyarticular septic arthritis in a patient treated with immunosuppression for refractory rheumatoid arthritis. We hope this article will enable doctors to appreciate and recognise the changing face of septic arthritis in the modern era of immunosuppressant treatments. PMID:24780657

  14. Incidence and outcome of arthritis in meningococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Sud, Ritika; Bhatnagar, M K; Sud, Alok; Tiwari, Akshay

    2009-03-01

    Meningococcal outbreaks are a major health concern in Delhi and adjoining regions. Besides acute pyogenic meningitis, meningococcal disease can also manifest as vasculitis, dermatitis and arthritis. To study the frequency, characteristics and long-term outcome of joint involvement in May 2005 meningococcal outbreak in New Delhi, 24 patients with proven meningococcal disease admitted to the hospital from May, 2005 through August, 2005 were studied for occurrence and outcome of joint involvement, and were followed up and evaluated for any complications. The frequency of arthritis was found to be 20%, which is much higher than reported. Diplococci could be identified in the joint aspirate of all 5 patients who developed arthritis. All patients had features of acute septic arthritis which healed without residual deformity following arthrotomy. A significant percentage of patients can still be expected to develop acute septic arthritis in an outbreak of meningococcal meningitis, and a high index of suspicion should be kept for the same. Prompt diagnosis and management will lead to healing without complications in most cases. PMID:19810382

  15. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... vein that are done regularly at the hospital. Physical Therapy An appropriate physical therapy program is essential to the management of any type of arthritis. A physical therapist will explain the importance of certain activities ...

  16. Arthritis of the Hand

    MedlinePlus

    ... of hand and wrist arthritis. (Note: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not test dietary supplements. These compounds may cause negative interactions with other medications. Always consult your doctor before taking dietary supplements.) ...

  17. Living with Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... effects. Learn more about biologic treatments . Reducing your sensitivity to pain When the pain of psoriatic arthritis ... your doctor about medication that helps reduce your sensitivity to pain. Prescription pain medications such as Gabapentin ...

  18. Arthritis and IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Search: What are Crohn's & Colitis? What is Crohn's Disease What is Ulcerative Colitis Types of Medications What’s ... affect as many as 25% of people with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. Although arthritis is typically associated ...

  19. Spontaneous talar and calcaneal fracture in rheumatoid arthritis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Spina, Antonio; Clemente, Alberto; Vancini, Chiara; Fejzo, Majlinda; Campioni, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) leads to a progressive weakening of the skeleton which may result in bone fractures. However, spontaneous fractures (exclusive of stress fractures, vertebral collapse, and superficial articular fragmentation) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been only occasionally reported in the medical literature. A case of spontaneous talar and calcaneal fracture in rheumatoid arthritis is described. Bone lesions were identified on radiographs, MR images and scintigraphy in a patient with right ankle pain. The absence of episodes of acute trauma, and the presence of acute clinical manifestations should guide the clinical suspicion. PMID:22470803

  20. HLA-DRB1 shared epitope genotyping using the revised classification and its association with circulating autoantibodies, acute phase reactants, cytokines and clinical indices of disease activity in a cohort of South African rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The revised shared epitope (SE) concept in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is based on the presence (S) or absence (X) of the SE RAA amino acid motif at positions 72 to 74 of the third hypervariable region of the various human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1 alleles. The purpose of this study was to investigate SE subtypes on the basis of the American College of Rheumatology 1987 revised criteria for the classification of RA in a cohort of South African RA patients (n = 143) and their association with clinical and circulating biomarkers of disease activity (autoantibodies, acute phase reactants and cytokines). Methods Genomic DNA was analysed using high-resolution recombinant sequence-specific oligonucleotide PCR typing of the HLA-DRB1 allele. Subtypes of the SE were classified according to the amino acids at positions 72 to 74 for the RAA sequence, and further sub-divided according to the amino acids at positions 70 and 71, which either contribute to (S2, S3P), or negate (S1, S3D) RA susceptibility. Disease activity was assessed on the basis of (1) Disease Activity Score in 28 joints using C-reactive protein (CRP), (2) rheumatoid factor (RF), (3) CRP and (4) serum amyloid A by nephelometry, anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (aCCP) by an immunofluorometric procedure, and cytokines by multiplex bead array technology. Results Of the 143 RA patients, 81 (57%) were homozygous (SS) and 50 (35%) were heterozygous (SX) for the SE alleles with significant overexpression of S2 and S3P (respective odds ratios (ORs) 5.3 and 5.8; P < 0.0001), and 12 (8%) were classified as no SE allele (XX). Both the SS and SX groups showed a strong association with aCCP positivity (OR = 10.2 and P = 0.0010, OR = 9.2 and P = 0.0028, respectively) relative to the XX group. Clinical scores and concentrations of the other biomarkers of disease activity (RF, CRP and T helper cell type 1 (Th1), Th2, macrophage and fibroblast cytokines) were also generally higher in the SS group than

  1. Induction of lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, J.L.; Schell, R.F.; Hejka, A.; England, D.M.; Konick, L.

    1988-09-01

    In studies of experimental Lyme disease, a major obstacle has been the unavailability of a suitable animal model. We found that irradiated LSH/Ss Lak hamsters developed arthritis after injection of Borrelia burgdorferi in the hind paws. When nonirradiated hamsters were injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi, acute transient synovitis was present. A diffuse neutrophilic infiltrate involved the synovia and periarticular structures. The inflammation was associated with edema, hyperemia, and granulation tissue. Numerous spirochetes were seen in the synovial and subsynovial tissues. The histopathologic changes were enhanced in irradiated hamsters. The onset and duration of the induced swelling were dependent on the dose of radiation and the inoculum of spirochetes. Inoculation of irradiated hamsters with Formalin-killed spirochetes or medium in which B. burgdorferi had grown for 7 days failed to induce swelling. This animal model should prove useful for studies of the immune response to B. burgdorferi and the pathogenesis of Lyme arthritis.

  2. Physical Activity and Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... to take a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  4. [Infection-induced reactive arthritis : etiopathogenesis, clinical spectrum, therapy].

    PubMed

    Brzank, M; Wollenhaupt, J

    2013-12-01

    Reactive arthritis is an inflammatory joint disease induced by a preceding, sometimes asymptomatic bacterial infection outside the joints. With an estimated prevalence of 40/100,000 inhabitants, the disease primarily affects adults between the ages of 20 and 40 years. The clinical presentation is typically characterized by monoarthritis to oligoarthritis of the lower extremities with possible accompanying enthesitis, bursitis, tenosynovitis, sacroiliitis, dactylitis and rare extra-articular manifestations. Because of the similar clinical symptoms and an association with HLA-B27, reactive arthritis is attributed to the spondyloarthropathies. Typical triggering pathogens are Chlamydia, Salmonella, Yersinia, Shigella and Campylobacter. In about 20% of the cases the usually self-limiting disease becomes chronic. The pathogenesis is not yet understood in detail but it is currently assumed that the intracellular persistence of the pathogen causes an immune reaction resulting in arthritis. Common international diagnostic criteria do not yet exist; therefore the diagnosis is made largely on the basis of clinical findings, medical history and the direct and/or indirect pathogen detection. Several therapeutic options are used to treat reactive arthritis. Ongoing extra-articular infections, with the exception of enteritis should be treated with antibiotics. Besides symptom-orientated treatment of acute arthritis, in prolonged and chronic reactive arthritis an immunomodulatory therapy with steroids, sulfasalazine or methotrexate is used. The role of long-term antibiotic therapy for eradication of persistent intra-articular pathogens in chronic cases is the subject of current research. PMID:24337200

  5. Arthritis-associated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Osial, T A; Cash, J M; Eisenbeis, C H

    1993-12-01

    There are a number of diseases characterized by inflammatory arthropathy that, although not as commonly seen as rheumatoid arthritis, often present to the family physician as difficult diagnostic problems. The diagnosis is frequently most difficult during the early course of these diseases. During recent years, new and altered concepts have arisen regarding both diagnostic and therapeutic management of this challenging group of arthropathies. This article presents a review of the more common arthritis-associated syndromes with emphasis on the differential diagnosis and medicinal therapeutics. PMID:8310085

  6. Bacillus pumilus Septic Arthritis in a Healthy Child

    PubMed Central

    Shivamurthy, V. M.; Gantt, Soren; Reilly, Christopher; Tilley, Peter; Guzman, Jaime; Tucker, Lori

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of septic arthritis caused by a Bacillus species, B. pumilus, occurring in a healthy child. This organism rarely causes serious infections and has only been described in newborns and immunocompromised individuals or as a skin infection. This child developed an indolent joint swelling after a minor skin injury, and symptoms were initially thought most consistent with chronic arthritis. The case demonstrates that clinicians should consider joint infection in children presenting with acute monoarticular swelling, even without prominent systemic features. PMID:27366165

  7. Diagnosis and classification of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kourilovitch, Maria; Galarza-Maldonado, Claudio; Ortiz-Prado, Esteban

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease of unclear etiology that is manifested in by a progressive and destructive polyarthritis in association with serological evidence of autoreactivity. Its diagnosis is based on the classification criteria that involve four parameters: joint involvement, serology (rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide--anti-CCP), levels of acute phase reactants and the duration of the symptoms Aletaha, et al. [1]. This classification simplifies the categorization of the patients with early RA; however, the diagnosis requires highly trained specialists who are able to differentiate early symptoms of RA from other pathologies. PMID:24568777

  8. Leflunomide in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kaltwasser, Joachim Peter

    2007-09-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a common unique form of inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis. Its exact prevalence is unknown but 5-30% of the 2-3% of subjects of the general population affected with psoriasis are developing PsA. Typically PsA presents as an oligoarticular asymmetrical arthritis with predominant distal finger joint pattern, presence of spinal involvement enthesitis and dactylitis. There is evidence that T-cells play a key role in the immunopathology of PsA as well as Psoriasis. Leflunomide, a selective pyrimidine synthesis inhibitor with the property to inhibit T-cell activation and proliferation has been shown to improve both joint and skin symptoms in patients with PsA. Significant response rates have been observed for Psoriatic Arthritis Response Criteria (PsARC), modified ACR20 and PASI 50 after 24 weeks of treatment with 20 mg/d Leflunomide orally in a randomised, placebo controlled multicenter trial (TOPAS Study). Leflunomide treatment also improved quality of life and showed a favourable safety profile. It is therefore concluded that Leflunomide offers an efficacious, well tolerated, safe, and relatively inexpensive therapeutic option for the treatment of actively inflamed joints and psoriatic skin lesions in patients with PsA. PMID:17854740

  9. [Arthritis and palmoplantar pustulosis].

    PubMed

    Bauduceau, B; Hanny, P; Chanudet, X; Celton, H; Doury, P; Larroque, P

    1987-01-01

    Pustulosis palmaris et plantaris may be associated with a number of articular diseases. Known to be present in Fiessinger-Leroy-Reiter syndrome and psoriasis arthropatica, this skin disease has been classified by Japanese authors as a new nosological entity: pustular osteo-arthritis. Pustulosis palmaris et plantaris seems to represent a meeting point for axial rheumatisms close to ankylozing spondylitis. PMID:3563169

  10. Suppression of arthritis-induced bone erosion by a CRAC channel antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Harry C; Soboloff, Jonathan; Robinson, Lisa J; Tourkova, Irina L; Larrouture, Quitterie C; Witt, Michelle R; Holaskova, Ida; Schafer, Rosana; Elliott, Meenal; Hirsch, Raphael; Barnett, John B

    2016-01-01

    Objective We have shown in vitro and in vivo that osteoclast maturation requires calcium-release activated calcium (CRAC) channels. In inflammatory arthritis, osteoclasts mediate severe and debilitating bone erosion. In the current study, we assess the value of CRAC channels as a therapeutic target to suppress bone erosion in acute inflammatory arthritis. Methods Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced in mice. The CRAC channel inhibitor 3,4-dichloropropionaniline (DCPA) and a placebo was administered 1 day prior to collagen II booster to induce arthritis. Effects on swelling, inflammatory cell invasion in joints, serum cytokines and bone erosion were measured. Results Assays, by blinded observers, of arthritis severity showed that DCPA, 21 mg/kg/day, suppressed arthritis development over 3 weeks. Bone and cartilage damage in sections of animal feet was reduced approximately 50%; overall swelling of joints was reduced by a similar amount. Effects on bone density by µCT showed clear separation in DCPA-treated CIA animals from CIA without treatment, while differences between controls without CIA and CIA treated with DCPA differed by small amounts and in most cases were not statistically different. Response was not related to anticollagen titres. There were no adverse effects in the treated group on animal weight or activity, consistent with low toxicity. The effect was maximal 12–17 days after collagen booster, during the rapid appearance of arthritis in untreated CIA. At 20 days after treatment (day 40), differences in arthritis score were reduced and tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)-1, or IL-6 in the serum of the animals were similar in treated and untreated animals. Conclusions DCPA, a novel inhibitor of CRAC channels, suppresses bone erosion associated with acute arthritis in mice and might represent a new treatment modality for acute arthrits. PMID:26819750

  11. Chondrosternal Arthritis in Infant: An Unusual Entity

    PubMed Central

    Dumitriu, Dana

    2014-01-01

    Primary arthritis of chondrosternal joint is very rare and occurs in infants less than 18 months of age. Presentation is most often subacute but may be acute. Child presents with a parasternal mass with history of fever and/or local signs of infection. Clinical symptoms vary from a painless noninflammatory to a painful mass with local tenderness and swelling, while fever may be absent. Laboratory data show low or marginally raised levels of white blood cells and C-reactive protein, reflecting, respectively, the subacute or acute character of the infection. It is a self-limiting affection due to the adequate immune response of the patient. Evolution is generally good without antibiotherapy with a progressive spontaneous healing. A wait-and-see approach with close follow-up in the first weeks is the best therapeutic option. PMID:25386377

  12. Chondrosternal arthritis in infant: an unusual entity.

    PubMed

    Nikolarakou, Athina; Dumitriu, Dana; Docquier, Pierre-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Primary arthritis of chondrosternal joint is very rare and occurs in infants less than 18 months of age. Presentation is most often subacute but may be acute. Child presents with a parasternal mass with history of fever and/or local signs of infection. Clinical symptoms vary from a painless noninflammatory to a painful mass with local tenderness and swelling, while fever may be absent. Laboratory data show low or marginally raised levels of white blood cells and C-reactive protein, reflecting, respectively, the subacute or acute character of the infection. It is a self-limiting affection due to the adequate immune response of the patient. Evolution is generally good without antibiotherapy with a progressive spontaneous healing. A wait-and-see approach with close follow-up in the first weeks is the best therapeutic option. PMID:25386377

  13. Clinical and neuroradiologic variability of Aicardi-Goutiéres syndrome: Two siblings with RNASEH2C mutation and a boy with TREX1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Uyur Yalçın, Emek; Maraş Genç, Hülya; Kara, Bülent

    2015-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a rare, autosomal recessively inherited, immune-mediated neurodevelopmental disorder. The syndrome causes infantile-onset progressive encephalopathy characterized by the neuroradiologic features of basal ganglia and periventricular white matter calcification, leucodystrophy and cerebral atrophy. Lymphocytosis and elevated levels of interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) in the cerebrospinal fluid are supplementary findings of AGS. It is frequently misdiagnosed as sequelae of congenital infection (pseudo-TORCH) and mostly recognized later. We describe three AGS cases with different clinical presentation, two male siblings with RNASEH2C mutation and a boy with TREX1 mutation. These cases highlight the importance of considering AGS in the differential diagnosis of unexplained leukoencephalopathy and developmental delay. We suggest to search for intracranial calcification, especially if there are more than one affected cases in a family. PMID:27411419

  14. Arthritis associated with calcium oxalate crystals in an anephric patient treated with peritoneal dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, A.; Ryan, L.M.; McCarty, D.J.

    1988-09-02

    The authors report a case of calcium oxalate arthropathy in a woman undergoing intermittent peritoneal dialysis who was not receiving pharmacologic doses of ascorbic acid. She developed acute arthritis, with calcium oxalate crystals in Heberden's and Bouchard's nodes, a phenomenon previously described in gout. Intermittent peritoneal dialysis may be less efficient than hemodialysis in clearing oxalate, and physicians should now consider calcium oxalate-associated arthritis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis who are not receiving large doses of ascorbic acid.

  15. Postoperative Surgical Infection After Spinal Surgery in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kensuke; Ohba, Tetsuro; Ebata, Shigeto; Haro, Hirotaka

    2016-05-01

    Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis are at higher risk for infection than the general population, and surgical site infection after spinal surgery in this population can result in clinically significant complications. The goal of this study was to identify risk factors for acute surgical site infection after spinal surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were treated with nonbiologic (conventional) disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) alone or with biologic DMARDs. All patients treated with biologic agents were treated with nonbiologic agents as well. The authors performed a retrospective, single-center review of 47 consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis who underwent spinal surgery and had follow-up of 3 months or longer. The incidence of surgical site infection was examined, and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to test the association of surgical site infection with putative risk factors, including the use of biologic agents, methotrexate, and prednisolone, as well as the duration of rheumatoid arthritis, the presence of diabetes, patient age, length of surgery, and number of operative levels. After spinal surgery, 14.89% (7 of 47) of patients had surgical site infection. Use of methotrexate and/or prednisolone, patient age, diabetes, duration of rheumatoid arthritis, length of surgery, number of operative levels, and use of biologic DMARDs did not significantly increase the risk of infection associated with spinal surgery. All patients who had surgical site infection had undergone spinal surgery with instrumentation. The findings show that greater attention to preventing surgical site infection may be needed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who undergo spinal surgery with instrumentation. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to show that the use of biologic agents did not increase the incidence of surgical site infection after spinal surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

  16. Reactive arthritis or post-infective arthritis?

    PubMed

    Keat, Andrew

    2002-09-01

    Infective mechanisms probably underlie a wide range of inflammatory arthropathies. There appears to be a spectrum of mechanisms ranging from the frankly septic, through low-grade infection with very small numbers of microorganisms in the joint to arthritides in which no hard evidence for an infective cause exists. In the midst of the spectrum lie 'post-infective' and 'reactive' arthritides, characterized clinically, genetically and by epidemiological links with infection. Identification of bacterial components within joint material from such patients suggested that the causes of the arthritis had been found. It is now clear that many bacteria are present in inflamed joints; establishing their significance will be of crucial importance, but not easy. PMID:12406424

  17. A case of reactive arthritis due to Clostridium difficile colitis

    PubMed Central

    Essenmacher, Alex C.; Khurram, Nazish; Bismack, Gregory T.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an acute, aseptic, inflammatory arthropathy following an infectious process but removed from the site of primary infection. It is often attributed to genitourinary and enteric pathogens, such as Chlamydia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia, in susceptible individuals. An uncommon and less recognized cause of this disease is preceding colonic infection with Clostridium difficile, an organism associated with pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea in hospitalized patients and those recently exposed to antibiotics. Recognition of this association may be complicated by non-specific presentation of diarrhea, the interval between gastrointestinal and arthritic symptoms, and the wide differential in mono- and oligoarthritis. We present the case of a 61-year-old, hospitalized patient recently treated for C. difficile colitis who developed sudden, non-traumatic, right knee pain and swelling. Physical examination and radiographs disclosed joint effusion, and sterile aspiration produced cloudy fluid with predominant neutrophils and no growth on cultures. Diagnostic accuracy is enhanced by contemporaneous laboratory investigations excluding other entities such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis and other infections that typically precede reactive arthritis. Contribution of Clostridium infection to reactive arthritis is an obscure association frequently difficult to prove, but this organism is warranted inclusion in the differential of reactive arthritis. PMID:26908381

  18. Alternative for Anti-TNF Antibodies for Arthritis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Paquet, Joseph; Henrionnet, Christel; Pinzano, Astrid; Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Gillet, Pierre; Netter, Patrick; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Pourel, Jacques; Grossin, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases, including arthritis. Neutralization of this cytokine by anti-TNF-α antibodies has shown its efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is now widely used. Nevertheless, some patients currently treated with anti-TNF-α remain refractory or become nonresponder to these treatments. In this context, there is a need for new or complementary therapeutic strategies. In this study, we investigated in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory potentialities of an anti-TNF-α triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO), as judged from effects on two rat arthritis models. The inhibitory activity of this TFO on articular cells (synoviocytes and chondrocytes) was verified and compared to that of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in vitro. The use of the anti-TNF-α TFO as a preventive and local treatment in both acute and chronic arthritis models significantly reduced disease development. Furthermore, the TFO efficiently blocked synovitis and cartilage and bone destruction in the joints. The results presented here provide the first evidence that gene targeting by anti-TNF-α TFO modulates arthritis in vivo, thus providing proof-of-concept that it could be used as therapeutic tool for TNF-α-dependent inflammatory disorders. PMID:21811249

  19. A case of reactive arthritis due to Clostridium difficile colitis.

    PubMed

    Essenmacher, Alex C; Khurram, Nazish; Bismack, Gregory T

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an acute, aseptic, inflammatory arthropathy following an infectious process but removed from the site of primary infection. It is often attributed to genitourinary and enteric pathogens, such as Chlamydia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia, in susceptible individuals. An uncommon and less recognized cause of this disease is preceding colonic infection with Clostridium difficile, an organism associated with pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea in hospitalized patients and those recently exposed to antibiotics. Recognition of this association may be complicated by non-specific presentation of diarrhea, the interval between gastrointestinal and arthritic symptoms, and the wide differential in mono- and oligoarthritis. We present the case of a 61-year-old, hospitalized patient recently treated for C. difficile colitis who developed sudden, non-traumatic, right knee pain and swelling. Physical examination and radiographs disclosed joint effusion, and sterile aspiration produced cloudy fluid with predominant neutrophils and no growth on cultures. Diagnostic accuracy is enhanced by contemporaneous laboratory investigations excluding other entities such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis and other infections that typically precede reactive arthritis. Contribution of Clostridium infection to reactive arthritis is an obscure association frequently difficult to prove, but this organism is warranted inclusion in the differential of reactive arthritis. PMID:26908381

  20. Interleukin 6 and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yuji; Tanaka, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a representative cytokine featuring pleiotropic activity and redundancy. A transient synthesis of IL-6 contributes to host defense against infectious agents and tissue injuries by inducing acute phase reactions and immunological and hematopoietic responses. However, uncontrolled persistent production of IL-6 may lead to the development of several immune-mediated diseases. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease with joint and systemic inflammation resulting from immunological abnormalities and it has been found that IL-6 plays a key role in the development of this disease. Clinical trials in various parts of the world of tocilizumab, a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, have proved its efficacy and tolerable safety either as monotherapy or in combination with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. As a result, it is currently used as a first-line biologic for the treatment of moderate-to-severe RA in more than 100 countries. Clarification of the mechanism(s) through which tocilizumab exerts its effect on RA and of the reason(s) why IL-6 is continuously produced in RA can be expected to lead to the best use of this agent for RA patients and aid in investigations into the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:24524085

  1. Arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa.

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, R; Sequeira, W

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To review the presentation and clinical findings of arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa. METHOD--Medical records from the rheumatology clinics of two major teaching hospitals were reviewed for arthritis and hidradenitis suppurativa. The nine patient records fulfilling these criteria were reviewed and compared with 20 previous reports. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION--The arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa is rare and most commonly affects the peripheral joints. The axial skeleton is less frequently involved and is often asymptomatic. Images PMID:8311560

  2. [Psoriatic arthritis and etanercept].

    PubMed

    Pedraz, J; Daudén, E

    2010-05-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PA) is a chronic inflammatory condition whose symptoms generally appear after the skin symptoms. Making an early diagnosis and treatment of the disease is of vital importance because of the potential development of mutilating and deforming arthritis. Classical treatments of PA include the use of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) such as methotrexate, sulfasalazine, or gold, and finally, leflunomide. Research on the pathophysiology of psoriasis and of the PA has led to the incorporation of biological treatments, specifically anti-TNF drugs. The three treatments used most in PA are etanercept, infliximab and adalimumab. Of all these, we are going to make a systematic review of the principal studies available on etanercept for the treatment of PA. PMID:20492877

  3. [Pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Hertzberger-ten Cate, R; Fiselier, T

    1991-10-01

    On basis of clinical and immunogenetic factors most children with pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis can be included in one of the subtypes: type 1 and type 2 pauciarticular JCA. Type 1 occurs in young children, mainly girls, with involvement of knees, ankles or elbows. In the majority of children antinuclear antibodies can be detected. The presence of these autoantibodies is associated with chronic anterior uveitis. Type 2 or the juvenile spondylarthropathies include morbus Bechterew, the reactive arthritides and arthritis associated with psoriasis and inflammatory bowel diseases. Large joints of the lower extremities are involved, back pain is unusual at onset, but enthesitis is frequently present. There is a strong association with HLA-B27. Treatment of both subsets consists of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, application of intra-articular steroids, physio- and hydrotherapy and splinting. In children with a polyarticular course of type 1, or a prolonged course of type 2 disease modifying drugs are often needed. PMID:1957301

  4. [Juvenile psoriatic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Lu, Shan; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Qian; Yu, Xin-Ying; Liu, Dong-Ming; Liu, Xiang-Yuan

    2007-08-01

    A case of juvenile psoriatic arthritis in a 12 year-old boy was reported. The patient had a history of one and half a year of bilateral heel pain, followed by pain in the right knee and ankle and right hip joint. He developed psoriatic lesions affecting his nails and skin. He had increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) contents. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) B27 was detected but serum rheumatoid factor was not in the patient. A skin biopsy revealed psoriasis and ultrasonography demonstrated synovitis in right knee and ankle. Juvenile psoriatic arthritis was diagnosed based on his physical, laboratory and skin biopsy findings. A treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and sulfasalazine produced no effect. Leflunomide in conjunction with anti-TNF biologic agents (Etanercept) was administered, followed by symptomatic improvement 2 weeks later. PMID:17706035

  5. Adalimumab in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Salvarani, Carlo; Pipitone, Nicolò; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Chiarolanza, Ilaria; Boiardi, Luigi; Caruso, Andrea; Pazzola, Giulia; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Di Lernia, Vito; Albertini, Giuseppe

    2012-07-01

    Open prospective studies and randomized controlled trials (RCT) have shown the short-term efficacy of adalimumab (ADA) in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and psoriasis. ADA effectively treated all varied musculoskeletal manifestations characteristic of PsA, including peripheral arthritis, spinal disease, enthesitis, and dactylitis. ADA significantly inhibited structural changes on radiographs, lessened disability, and improved quality of life in patients with active PsA. One study showed the efficacy of 24-week ADA therapy on bone marrow edema and erosions, as measured by magnetic resonance imaging. The clinical and radiographic efficacy of ADA demonstrated during short-term treatment was sustained during longterm treatment. ADA was generally well tolerated and its safety profile was similar to that reported in studies of ADA in rheumatoid arthritis. Overall, ADA has a favorable risk-benefit profile in PsA. The combination of ADA and cyclosporine seems to be more effective than ADA monotherapy in patients with active PsA and inadequate response to methotrexate; however, this observation must be confirmed in RCT. PMID:22751600

  6. Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Thomas; Furman, Janet

    2016-06-01

    Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD) arthropathy, also called pseudogout, is common, and becomes more prevalent as patients age. The presenting symptoms are similar to both gout and septic arthritis but may be treated differently. This article describes a typical patient presentation and management from an emergency medicine and orthopedic surgery standpoint. PMID:27228038

  7. Mycoplasma bovis mastitis and arthritis in a dairy heifer.

    PubMed

    2015-12-19

    Mycoplasma bovis causing mastitis and arthritis in a dairy heifer. Nutritional myopathy in a three-month-old suckler calf. Acute fasciolosis in ewes in Ayrshire. Cardiomyopathy of unknown aetiology causing death of a three-year-old Suffolk ram. Spinal aspergillosis in a seven-week-old pheasant poult These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for August from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS). PMID:26679914

  8. Subchondral pseudocysts in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rennell, C; Mainzer, F; Multz, C V; Genant, H K

    1977-12-01

    Subchondral cyst formation (geode) is a not uncommon manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis which may at times impede correct radiologic interpretation. Four patients with rheumatoid arthritis who demonstrated striking subarticular cystic erosive disease are described. These cases emphasize the nature and appearance of this interesting finding. PMID:413361

  9. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients. PMID:26063174

  10. [Novel immunodiagnostics for inflammatory arthritis].

    PubMed

    Wahle, M; Kling, E

    2016-05-01

    Immunodiagnostics play an important role in the differential diagnostics of arthritis but the test results must be interpreted with respect to the clinical context. The detection of antibodies against citrullinated proteins has significantly improved the immunodiagnostics of arthritis, whereas the importance of testing for rheumatoid factor has decreased due to the low specificity. Antibodies against carbamylated or oxidized proteins will expand the immunodiagnostics of arthritis (especially rheumatoid arthritis) in the future. In contrast, the determination of cytokine concentrations in plasma or synovial fluid plays a subordinate role in the differential diagnostics of arthritis. Indirect immunofluorescence continues to be the gold standard in the detection of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and in the case of positive results further testing for antigen specificity should be carried out. The presence of ANA is not necessarily associated with autoimmune diseases. An example of a non-pathogenic ANA is anti-DFS70 antibodies. PMID:27142378

  11. Autoantibodies in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Conigliaro, P; Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Sunzini, F; Novelli, L; Perricone, C; Perricone, R

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone with joint destruction. The lack of immunological tolerance in RA represents the first step toward the development of autoimmunity. Susceptible individuals, under the influence of environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, and silica exposure, develop autoimmune phenomena that result in the presence of autoantibodies. HLA and non-HLA haplotypes play a major role in determining the development of specific autoantibodies differentiating anti-citrullinated antibodies (ACPA)-positive and negative RA patients. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and ACPA are the serological markers for RA, and during the preclinical immunological phase, autoantibody titers increase with a progressive spread of ACPA antigens repertoire. The presence of ACPA represents an independent risk factor for developing RA in patients with undifferentiated arthritis or arthralgia. Moreover, anti-CarP antibodies have been identified in patients with RA as well as in individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms of RA. Several autoantibodies mainly targeting post-translational modified proteins have been investigated as possible biomarkers to improve the early diagnosis, prognosis and response to therapy in RA patients. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is distinguished from RA by infrequent positivity for RF and ACPA, together with other distinctive clinical features. Actually, specific autoantibodies have not been described. Recently, anti-CarP antibodies have been reported in sera from PsA patients with active disease. Further investigations on autoantibodies showing high specificity and sensibility as well as relevant correlation with disease severity, progression, and response to therapy are awaited in inflammatory arthritides. PMID:26970491

  12. [Early rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Babić-Naglić, Durdica

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is chronic joint disease which if untreated leads to permanent structural damage and disability. Early diagnosis and therapy are the main requests for good clinical practice. Early diagnosis tools include specific clinical assesment, serological, immunogenetic and radiological evaluation. Disease activity score is cornerstone in clinical assesment, rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP) are very specific serological parameters. The shared epitope containing HLA-DRB1* alleles represent the most significant genetic risk for RA. Magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging are very sensitive methods in early phase of disease. PMID:19024271

  13. Prevalence of acute and chronic viral seropositivity and characteristics of disease in patients with psoriatic arthritis treated with cyclosporine: a post hoc analysis from a sex point of view on the observational study of infectious events in psoriasis complicated by active psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Delia; Chimenti, Sergio; Grossi, Paolo Antonio; Marchesoni, Antonio; Bardazzi, Federico; Ayala, Fabio; Simoni, Lucia; Vassellatti, Donatella; Bellia, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Sex medicine studies have shown that there are sex differences with regard to disease characteristics in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, including psoriasis, in immune response and susceptibility to viral infections. We performed a post hoc analysis of the Observational Study of infectious events in psoriasis complicated by active psoriatic arthritis (SYNERGY) study in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) treated with immunosuppressive regimens including cyclosporine, in order to evaluate potential between-sex differences in severity of disease and prevalence of viral infections. Methods SYNERGY was an observational study conducted in 24 Italian dermatology clinics, which included 238 consecutively enrolled patients with PsA, under treatment with immunosuppressant regimens including cyclosporin A. In this post hoc analysis, patients’ demographical data and clinical characteristics of psoriasis, severity and activity of PsA, prevalence of seropositivity for at least one viral infection, and treatments administered for PsA and infections were compared between sexes. Results A total of 225 patients were evaluated in this post hoc analysis, and 121 (54%) were males. Demographic characteristics and concomitant diseases were comparable between sexes. Statistically significant sex differences were observed at baseline in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score (higher in males), mean number of painful joints, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, and the global activity of disease assessed by patients (all higher in females). The percentage of patients with at least one seropositivity detected at baseline, indicative of concomitant or former viral infection, was significantly higher among women than among men. No between-sex differences were detected in other measures, at other time points, and in treatments. Patients developed no hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus reactivation during cyclosporine treatment. Conclusion Our post hoc

  14. Targeting GM-CSF in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Avci, Ali Berkant; Feist, Eugen; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is well-known as a haemopoietic growth factor. However, it is also essential in regulating functions of mature myeloid cells such as macrophages. Preclinical studies and observations of flares of arthritis in patients following GM-CSF treatment supported its important contribution to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). As the most advanced compound, mavrilimumab, a monoclonal antibody against GM-CSF receptor, has already completed phase II trials with a long term of follow-up period of 74 weeks. During this exposure period, an acceptable sustained safety and tolerability profile has been observed addressing the concerns of development of cytopenias or pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Of note, a rapid and sustained efficacy and normalisation of acute phase reactants were consistently shown in studies both targeting GM-CSF and its receptor. Its tumour necrosis factor (TNF) independent mode of action with concurrent blockade of GM-CSF as well as IL-17 signalling reported from preclinical studies supports the assumption that it can be a useful biologic and an alternative agent in TNF inhibitor resistant patients with RA. Therefore, subsequent studies are warranted to investigate the safety and efficacy of GM-CSF blocking agents in different subgroups of RA. PMID:27586802

  15. Campylobacter Reactive Arthritis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Janet E.; Krizova, Adriana; Garg, Amit X.; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Ouimet, Janine M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on the epidemiology of Campylobacter associated ReA. Methods A Medline (PubMed) search identified studies from 1966–2006 that investigated the epidemiology of Campylobacter associated ReA. Search terms included: “reactive arthritis”, “spondyloarthropathy”, “Reiter’s syndrome”, “gastroenteritis”, “diarrhea”, “epidemiology”, “incidence”, “prevalence”, and “Campylobacter”. Results The literature available to date suggests that the incidence of Campylobacter reactive arthritis may occur in 1 to 5% of those infected. The annual incidence of ReA after Campylobacter or Shigella may be 4.3 and 1.3 respectively per 100,000. The duration of acute ReA varies considerably between reports, and the incidence and impact of chronic reactive arthritis from Campylobacter infection is virtually unknown. Conclusions Campylobacter associated ReA incidence and prevalence varies widely from reviews such as: case ascertainment differences, exposure differences, lack of diagnostic criteria for ReA and perhaps genetics and ages of exposed individuals. At the population level it may not be associated with HLA-B27 and inflammatory back involvement is uncommon. Follow up for long-term sequelae is largely unknown. Five percent of Campylobacter ReA may be chronic or relapsing (with respect to musculoskeletal symptoms). PMID:17360026

  16. Transgenic Disruption of Glucocorticoid Signaling in Osteoblasts Attenuates Joint Inflammation in Collagen Antibody-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jinwen; Zhang, Yaqing; Kim, Sarah; Wiebe, Edgar; Spies, Cornelia M; Buttgereit, Frank; Cooper, Mark S; Seibel, Markus J; Zhou, Hong

    2016-05-01

    The role of endogenous glucocorticoids (GCs) in rheumatoid arthritis remains unclear. Herein, we examined the role of osteoblastic GC signaling in collagen antibody-induced arthritis. Intracellular GC signaling was abrogated exclusively in mature osteoblasts via transgenic (tg) expression of 11ß-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2. Arthritis was induced in 8-week-old male tg mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates. Paw swelling was scored daily from induction to end point (day 14). Inflammation, cartilage degradation, and local bone erosion were assessed at the wrist, knee, and ankle joints. Systemic skeletal changes were determined by microcomputed tomography and histomorphometrical analysis of the tibiae. Both tg and WT mice developed acute arthritis in response to the administration of collagen antibodies. However, compared with WT mice, both clinical and histological indexes of joint inflammation were significantly mitigated in animals with disrupted osteoblastic GC signaling. In WT mice, arthritis was associated with increased bone resorption, decreased bone formation, and significant bone loss. In contrast, bone turnover and bone mass remained unchanged in tg arthritic mice. Disruption of GC signaling in osteoblasts significantly reduces joint inflammation and prevents structural bone and cartilage damage in collagen antibody-induced arthritis. These data corroborate the concept that osteoblasts modulate the inflammatory response in immune-mediated arthritis via a GC-dependent pathway. PMID:26988651

  17. Etodolac: analgesic effects in musculoskeletal and postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Pena, M

    1990-01-01

    Numerous clinical trials have shown etodolac to be an effective analgesic. The purpose of the present report is to review results of 14 studies that demonstrate the effectiveness of etodolac in a variety of painful conditions. Presented are the results of four postsurgical pain studies, one study of acute gouty arthritis and nine studies of acute musculoskeletal disorders: acute low back pain, acute painful shoulder, tendinitis and bursitis, and acute sports injuries. A single oral dose of etodolac (25, 50, 100, 200, or 400 mg) was compared with aspirin (650 mg) or a combination of acetaminophen (600 mg) plus codeine (60 mg) for the relief of pain up to 12 h following oral, urogenital or orthopedic surgery. In multiple dose studies of acute gouty arthritis and musculoskeletal conditions, etodolac 200 or 300 mg twice a day (b.i.d.) or 200 mg three times a day (t.i.d.) was compared with naproxen 500 mg b.i.d. or t.i.d., diclofenac 50 mg b.i.d. or t.i.d., and piroxicam 20 or 40 mg once a day (o.d.) administered over 5 to 14 days. The efficacy of etodolac was at least equal and in some ways superior to aspirin and acetaminophen plus codeine in the relief of postsurgical pain. In studies of acute gouty arthritis, significant improvement from baseline were seen for all efficacy parameters evaluated for both the etodolac- and naproxen-treated patients. All the present studies of musculoskeletal conditions have shown etodolac to be effective and comparable in analgesic efficacy to naproxen, diclofenac or piroxicam. In summary, etodolac therapy for pain following surgery, in acute gouty arthritis and in acute musculoskeletal conditions resulted in analgesia comparable to that provided by several well-established analgesic or anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:2150571

  18. "Unusual Cause Of Tophi With Renal Thrombotic Microangiopathy".

    PubMed

    Sahu, Kamal Kant; Law, Arjun Datt; Kumar, Ganesh; Dhir, Varun; Naseem, Shano; Nada, Ritambhra; Varma, Subhash Chander; Malhotra, Pankaj

    2016-06-01

    Chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL) is a rare entity amongst myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). The classical presentation of CNL is with splenomegaly, mature neutrophilic leucocytosis and hyperuricemia. We herein report a case who presented with symptoms of acute gouty arthritis. Physical examination showed typical red, tender tophi in the right hand, right foot and both pinnae suggesting an acute episode of gout. During evaluation, moderate splenomegaly, mature neutrophilia, hyperuricemia and sub-nephrotic range range proteinuria were noted. Bone marrow examination and kidney biopsy was done. Final diagnosis of CNL with acute gouty arthritis and chronic renal thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) was made. Although hyperuricemia is a common finding in MPNs but presentation of our case with symptoms of acute tophi and chronic TMA is atypical. PMID:27408367

  19. [Diagnosing and therapy of gout].

    PubMed

    Pavelka, Karel

    2015-06-01

    Gout is an inflammatory, metabolically conditioned crystal-induced disease. Prevalence of gout is on the increase. In clinical practice it is frequently wrongly diagnosed and the therapy of acute attacks in particular is not adequate. The first part of the publication discusses diagnostic possibilities of gouty arthritis. First of all the advantage of the analysis of synovial exudate and of direct evidence of crystals in the polarization microscope is emphasized. If the material for crystallographic analysis is not available, it is necessary to use a combination of clinical criteria as specified e.g. in the recommendations of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR). The second part focuses on the therapy of gout which is divided into the periods of asymptomatic hyperuricemia, acute gouty attack, intercritical and chronic tophaceous gout. Asymptomatic hyperuricemia is only treated when uricemia greater than 540 µmol/l occur repeatedly, or when other risk factors and comorbidities are present. In the treatment of acute gouty attack its early start is more important than the choice of a preparation. Alternatives are NSA, colchicine or glucocorticoids. A newly regist-ered medicine for the treatment of refractory acute inflammation is the IL-1 inhibitor canakinumab. The treatment of hyperuricemia involves regimen and diet measures, abstinence and hypouricemic therapy. Available are the xanthine oxidase inhibitors, allopurinol and febuxostat; the latter is better suited for patients with moderate renal insufficiency. A new medicine for the treatment of severe refractory tophaceous gout is pegloticase.Key words: gouty arthritis - colchicine - nonsteroidal antirheumatic drugs. PMID:26258966

  20. Stay active and exercise - arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your overall health and sense of well-being. Exercise keeps your muscles strong and increases your range ... Water exercises may be the best exercise for your arthritis. Swimming laps, water aerobics, or even just walking in ...

  1. MedlinePlus: Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... an Expert For You Women Patient Handouts Summary Psoriasis is a skin disease that causes itchy or ... other parts of your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and ...

  2. Leflunomide for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    2000-07-01

    Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are given to patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to prevent synovitis, slow destruction of articular cartilage and bone, preserve function and control systemic manifestations of the disease. Recognition that irreversible joint damage often occurs early in RA has led to much prompter use of DMARDs, with sulfasalazine or methotrexate commonly considered the treatment of first choice. Leflunomide (Arava-Aventis) is a new DMARD, licensed for the treatment of adults with active RA. The manufacturer claims that leflunomide has "comparable efficacy to methotrexate and sulphasalazine", with a "faster onset of action", and an "acceptable tolerability profile". Here, we consider the place of leflunomide in the management of patients with RA. PMID:11027115

  3. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kathleen; Yang, So Min; Kim, Seong Heon; Han, Kyoung Hee; Park, Se Jin; Shin, Jae Il

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper. PMID:25479074

  4. Physiotherapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented. PMID:15266230

  5. [Rheumatoid arthritis and malignancy].

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tomohiro; Dobashi, Hiroaki

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with excess mortality. Especially, malignancy is a major cause of mortality. According to previous reports, the overall incidence of malignancies in RA patients has been reported to be comparable or slightly higher than that in general population. The increased incidence of malignant lymphoma and lung cancer has been reported to be consistent in most studies. The use of some csDMARD was also reported as risk factors for malignancy. Recently, MTX associated lymphoproliferative disorder(MTX-LPD) is one of the important complications in RA treatment. We revealed the mean MTX dose was demonstrated to be an independent risk factor regarding MTX-LPD onset in RA patients. This data suggest that the treatment with higher MTX dose promotes LPD onset in Japanese RA patients. PMID:27311195

  6. Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented. PMID:15266230

  7. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Krupa H; Karjodkar, Freny R; Sansare, Kaustubh; Patil, Darshana

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is the most chronic musculoskeletal disease of pediatric population. The chronic course of disease has a great impact on oral health. Temporomandibular joint is involved in JIA causing limited mouth opening with progressive open bite, retrognathia, microgenia and bird like appearance. Joints of upper and lower extremities are also involved. Effect on upper limb function leads to difficulty with fine motor movements required for brushing and flossing. This increases incidence of caries and periodontal disease in children. The cause of JIA is still poorly understood and none of the available drugs for JIA can cure the disease. However, prognosis has improved as a result of progress in disease classification and management. The dental practitioner should be familiar with the symptoms and oral manifestations of JIA to help manage as multidisciplinary management is essential. PMID:24808703

  8. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and the temporomandibular joint: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    El Assar de la Fuente, S; Angenete, O; Jellestad, S; Tzaribachev, N; Koos, B; Rosendahl, K

    2016-05-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common inflammatory rheumatic disease of childhood and represents a series of chronic inflammatory arthritides of unknown cause. Involvement of the temporomandibular joint has been reported in up to 87% of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis when based on magnetic tomography imaging; it can be asymptomatic and may lead to severe long term complications. In this review a summary of the contemporary literature of imaging of the temporomandibular joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis will be provided, including ultrasound which is a valuable method for guided joint injections, but does not necessarily allow detection of acute inflammation, cone beam computed tomography, which has emerged as a feasible and accurate low-dose alternative as compared to conventional computed tomography to detect destructive change, and magnetic resonance imaging which is considered the method of choice for assessing acute, inflammatory change, although the lack of normative standards remains a challenge in children. PMID:26924432

  9. Ciclamilast Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-cheng; Zhang, Shui-juan; Jin, Bo; Wu, Yujin; Yang, Xin-fu; Yu, Bing; Xie, Qiang-min

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the effect of a novel and selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor, ciclamilast, on chronic inflammation in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA), a rat model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and acute inflammation in the rat and mouse model of carrageenan-induced paw edema and peritonitis. Our results showed that daily oral administration of ciclamilast at 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg dose-dependently inhibited the increase in hind paw volume of rats with AIA. The inhibition of paw edema was associated with inhibition of both the production of cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 and cell infiltration assessed in subcutaneous paw tissue. Moreover, there was significantly less tissue destruction in the ciclamilast-treated rats compared to the vehicle-treated rats, as assessed by radiographic analysis and histopathological evaluation. In the two acute inflammation models, ciclamilast inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats and inflammatory cell migration into the peritoneal cavity in mice in a dose-dependent manner. These results not only suggest that ciclamilast, as a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD), can attenuate RA but also provide proof of principle that a PDE4 inhibitor may be useful for the treatment of arthritis. PMID:26000303

  10. Striking intrafamilial phenotypic variability in Aicardi-Goutières syndrome associated with the recurrent Asian founder mutation in RNASEH2C.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Julie; Agrawal, Shakti; Ibrahim, Zala; Southwood, Taunton R; Philip, Sunny; Macpherson, Lesley; Bhole, Malini V; Crow, Yanick J; Oley, Christine

    2013-02-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is an encephalopathy of early childhood which is most commonly inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. The disorder demonstrates significant genetic heterogeneity with causative mutations in five genes identified to date. Although most patients with AGS experience a severe neonatal or infantile presentation, poor neurodevelopmental outcome and reduced survival, clinical variability in the onset and severity of the condition is being increasingly recognized. A later presentation with a more variable effect on development, morbidity and mortality has been particularly observed in association with mutations in SAMHD1 and RNASEH2B. In contrast, the recurrent c.205C > T (p.R69W) RNASEH2C Asian founder mutation has previously only been identified in children with a severe AGS phenotype. Here, to our knowledge, we present the first report of marked phenotypic variability in siblings both harboring this founder mutation in the homozygous state. In this family, one female child had a severe AGS phenotype with an onset in infancy and profound developmental delay, whilst an older sister was of completely normal intellect with a normal head circumference and was only diagnosed because of the presence of chilblains and a mild hemiplegia. An appreciation of intrafamilial phenotypic expression is important in the counseling of families considering prenatal diagnosis, and may also be relevant to the assessment of efficacy in future clinical trials. In addition, marked phenotypic variation raises the possibility that more mildly affected patients are not currently identified. PMID:23322642

  11. RNase H2 catalytic core Aicardi-Goutières syndrome-related mutant invokes cGAS-STING innate immune-sensing pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Pokatayev, Vladislav; Hasin, Naushaba; Chon, Hyongi; Cerritelli, Susana M; Sakhuja, Kiran; Ward, Jerrold M; Morris, H Douglas; Yan, Nan; Crouch, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    The neuroinflammatory autoimmune disease Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) develops from mutations in genes encoding several nucleotide-processing proteins, including RNase H2. Defective RNase H2 may induce accumulation of self-nucleic acid species that trigger chronic type I interferon and inflammatory responses, leading to AGS pathology. We created a knock-in mouse model with an RNase H2 AGS mutation in a highly conserved residue of the catalytic subunit, Rnaseh2a(G37S/G37S) (G37S), to understand disease pathology. G37S homozygotes are perinatal lethal, in contrast to the early embryonic lethality previously reported for Rnaseh2b- or Rnaseh2c-null mice. Importantly, we found that the G37S mutation led to increased expression of interferon-stimulated genes dependent on the cGAS-STING signaling pathway. Ablation of STING in the G37S mice results in partial rescue of the perinatal lethality, with viable mice exhibiting white spotting on their ventral surface. We believe that the G37S knock-in mouse provides an excellent animal model for studying RNASEH2-associated autoimmune diseases. PMID:26880576

  12. Altered spatio-temporal dynamics of RNase H2 complex assembly at replication and repair sites in Aicardi-Goutières syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kind, Barbara; Muster, Britta; Staroske, Wolfgang; Herce, Henry D; Sachse, René; Rapp, Alexander; Schmidt, Franziska; Koss, Sarah; Cardoso, M Cristina; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae

    2014-11-15

    Ribonuclease H2 plays an essential role for genome stability as it removes ribonucleotides misincorporated into genomic DNA by replicative polymerases and resolves RNA/DNA hybrids. Biallelic mutations in the genes encoding the three RNase H2 subunits cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS), an early-onset inflammatory encephalopathy that phenotypically overlaps with the autoimmune disorder systemic lupus erythematosus. Here we studied the intracellular dynamics of RNase H2 in living cells during DNA replication and in response to DNA damage using confocal time-lapse imaging and fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy. We demonstrate that the RNase H2 complex is assembled in the cytosol and imported into the nucleus in an RNase H2B-dependent manner. RNase H2 is not only recruited to DNA replication foci, but also to sites of PCNA-dependent DNA repair. By fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we demonstrate a high mobility and fast exchange of RNase H2 at sites of DNA repair and replication. We provide evidence that recruitment of RNase H2 is not only PCNA-dependent, mediated by an interaction of the B subunit with PCNA, but also PCNA-independent mediated via the catalytic domain of the A subunit. We found that AGS-associated mutations alter complex formation, recruitment efficiency and exchange kinetics at sites of DNA replication and repair suggesting that impaired ribonucleotide removal contributes to AGS pathogenesis. PMID:24986920

  13. [Reactive arthritis: inflammation or true infection?].

    PubMed

    Finckh, Axel

    2016-03-01

    Reactive arthritis has been classically defined as an aseptic arthritis induced by a bacterial infection in another organ. If the classical form of reactive arthritis is in fact a spondyloarthritis triggered by a urogenital or intestinal bacterial infection, it is not necessarily sterile, and in some cases it may be worthwhile to treat a chronic infection with long-term antibiotherapy. In a broader definition, the concept of reactive arthritis is widened to other post-infectious rheumatism, such as post-streptococcal arthritis or post-viral arthritis. PMID:27089639

  14. Bone marrow examination before steroids in thrombocytopenic purpura or arthritis.

    PubMed

    Reid, M M

    1992-12-01

    Corticosteroids were used to treat two children with presumed idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and one with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis without examination of the bone marrow. Of the two with presumed idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, one had Fanconi's anaemia and the other may have had aplastic anaemia. The third child had acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. The diagnosis of Fanconi's anaemia was delayed. A diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma was caused in the second case. In the third, delayed diagnosis and, perhaps, compromised outlook resulted. These three cases re-emphasize the well aired caveats about the diagnosis of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and provide further support for the arguments of those who believe that if corticosteroids are to be used to treat such children, their bone marrow should be examined first. PMID:1290852

  15. Post-streptococcal reactive arthritis: where are we now.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Himanshu; Marshall, Tarnya

    2016-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with polyarthritis and constitutional symptoms, and a recent history of multiple tick bites and skin rash on trekking holiday. He did not respond to oral doxycycline and cephalexine for presumed Lyme's disease. Further investigation confirmed strongly positive streptococcal serology. There was absence of clinical or echocardiography evidence of heart involvement and immunological screening for inflammatory arthritis was negative. In the absence of other major Jones criteria for acute rheumatic fever, besides polyarthritis and the serological evidence of a recent streptococcal infection, a diagnosis of post-streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA) was also made. He responded well to penicillin therapy and has been started on oral penicillin prophylaxis as per available guidance. As streptococcal infections in the adult population are increasingly reported, it is a timely opportunity to revisit PSRA, and develop comprehensive treatment and antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines. PMID:27520996

  16. Post-streptococcal reactive arthritis: where are we now

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Himanshu; Marshall, Tarnya

    2016-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with polyarthritis and constitutional symptoms, and a recent history of multiple tick bites and skin rash on trekking holiday. He did not respond to oral doxycycline and cephalexine for presumed Lyme's disease. Further investigation confirmed strongly positive streptococcal serology. There was absence of clinical or echocardiography evidence of heart involvement and immunological screening for inflammatory arthritis was negative. In the absence of other major Jones criteria for acute rheumatic fever, besides polyarthritis and the serological evidence of a recent streptococcal infection, a diagnosis of post-streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA) was also made. He responded well to penicillin therapy and has been started on oral penicillin prophylaxis as per available guidance. As streptococcal infections in the adult population are increasingly reported, it is a timely opportunity to revisit PSRA, and develop comprehensive treatment and antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines. PMID:27520996

  17. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Treatment and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Treatment and Causes Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents How Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated? Doctors have many ways to treat this ...

  18. Arthritis Mechanisms May Vary by Joint

    MedlinePlus

    ... Molecular differences between knee and hip joints with rheumatoid arthritis may inform more personal treatment strategies. Sebastian Kaulitzki/Hemera/Thinkstock Knee and hip joints with rheumatoid arthritis have differing genetic markers linked to inflammation, suggesting ...

  19. Experimental Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis Shows Promise

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_158076.html Experimental Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis Shows Promise Baricitinib helped patients who failed other ... HealthDay News) -- An experimental drug to treat rheumatoid arthritis showed promise in a new six-month trial. ...

  20. New Treatments Helping Kids with Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159984.html New Treatments Helping Kids With Juvenile Arthritis Several biologics have been approved by the FDA ... 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New treatments for juvenile arthritis offer hope to children with the chronic autoimmune ...

  1. Arthritis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arthritis URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/arthritis.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  2. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Definition and classification].

    PubMed

    Deslandre, C

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a group of diseases defined by the presence of arthritis of more than 6weeks duration in patients aged less than 16years and with unknown etiology. The international classification based on clinical and biological criteria define each type of JIA: systemic, oligoarticular, polyarticular with and without rheumatoid factor, enthesitis-related arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis. However, some discussions persist concerning systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, whose clinical symptoms and pathogenic mechanisms are quite similar to those observed in autoinflammatory diseases, arthritis with antinuclear factors (poly- and oligoarticular) that could be considered as a homogenous group, and a family history of psoriasis that frequently led to unclassified arthritis. Better knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms should improve the initial clinical classification with more homogeneous groups of patients and reduce the number of unclassified cases of arthritis. PMID:26968301

  3. Arthritis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arthritis URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/arthritis.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  4. [Exotic viral arthritis: role of alphavirus].

    PubMed

    Jeandel, P; Josse, R; Durand, J P

    2004-01-01

    Only six of the many alphavirus known to affect humans can cause articular manifestations. They are the Ross River and Barmah Forest viruses from the South Pacific, the Chikungunya, O'Nyong Nyong and Sindbis viruses from tropical Africa, and the Mayaro virus from South America. In most cases, articular manifestations involve arthralgia or transient arthritis and are usually minor. However in some cases especially involving Ross River virus acute polyarthritis may be the most prominent clinical feature and even develop before fever. Although these joint symptoms may be severe and persist for weeks or months in a subacute mode with slightly inflammatory episodes that can be relieved using analgesics, they never cause permanent damage. Differential diagnosis of alphavirsus-related polyarthritis is simple to diagnosis especially in epidemic outbreaks as is frequently the case for Ross River virus epidemics in Australia. Imported cases should be suspected in patients presenting acute or subacute polyarthritis after a recent stay of any length of time in a tropical country and can be confirmed by ordering serology from a specialized reference laboratory. PMID:15224565

  5. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  6. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  7. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  8. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  9. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  10. Vaccinations for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Lisa M.; Winthrop, Kevin L.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suffer an increased burden of infectious disease-related morbidity and mortality and have twice the risk of acquiring a severe infection compared to the general population. This increased risk is not only a result of the autoimmune disease but is also attributed to the immunosuppressive therapies that are commonly used in this patient population. Given the increase in infection-related risks in RA, there is great interest in mitigating such risk. A number of vaccines are available to the rheumatologist, with a handful that are of importance for RA patients in the United States. The goal of this paper is to highlight the most recent literature on the key vaccines and the specific considerations for the rheumatologist and their RA patients, with a particular focus on influenza, pneumococcal, and herpes zoster vaccines. It is important for rheumatologist to understand and be aware of which vaccines are live and what potential contraindications exist for giving vaccines to RA patients. PMID:24925587

  11. [Vasculitis in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Bély, M; Apáthy, A

    1996-07-21

    The frequency and histopathological characteristics of systemic vasculitis were studied in the autopsy material of 161 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Systemic vasculitis was observed in 36 case (22.4%). In percentage of all cases with systemic vasculitis, the most frequently involved organs were the heart (66.7%), skeletal muscles (54.8%), and peripheral nerves (52%). The skin was involved only in about one third of 36 cases (36%). In most cases the arterioles and the small arteries were affected by vasculitis. Three types of vasculitis (non specific, fibrinoid necrotic, granulomatous) could be observed simultaneously in different vessels or combined in the same vessel. Different stages of inflammation could be found simultaneously, reflecting the relapsing nature of vasculitis. The frequency, the severity, and the recurrence of vasculitis are different aspects of the same phenomenon running usually parallel to each other in different organs and on different vessels. Vasculitis lead to local ischaemia and regressive changes depend on the number and size of the involved vessels. Systemic vasculitis led to death in 19 of 36 cases. Vasculitis was detected clinically in 7 of 36 cases. Exitus lethalis depend on the localization of the involved vessels. Vasculitis in the heart and brain are more life threatening, than that of localized to the skin. PMID:8757068

  12. Rheumatoid arthritis and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Klipple, G L; Cecere, F A

    1989-05-01

    The activity of RA is significantly altered by pregnancy with approximately 70 per cent of patients experiencing substantial improvement in symptoms, signs and sometimes extra-articular manifestations. This lessening of disease activity occurs in association with an almost complete cessation of medications. However, whether partial or complete this remission is short-lived with more than 90 per cent of women who improved relapsing by 6 to 8 months postpartum. Further, in approximately 30 per cent of RA patients the course remains unchanged or worsens during gestation and indeed the first symptoms of RA may develop during pregnancy or shortly thereafter. Conversely active rheumatoid arthritis seems to little influence the maternal course or fetal outcome of pregnancy. The multiple and complex immunologic alterations of the pregnant state are designed to ensure survival of the fetal allograft in a foreign host. A number of these alterations particularly involving modulation of cell-mediated immunity, immunoglobulin composition, immune complex generation, or the inflammatory response have the potential to interfere with the pathophysiology of RA. In short, although the specific mechanism remains an enigma, the reason for the amelioration of RA during pregnancy is probably an incidental and fortuitous reaction to one or more of these immunomodulatory factors. PMID:2657889

  13. Polyarticular psoriatic arthritis is more like oligoarticular psoriatic arthritis, than rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Helliwell, P S; Porter, G; Taylor, W J

    2007-01-01

    Background and objective Since the original description of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) subgroups by Moll and Wright, there has been some discrepancy in the precise prevalence of the different subgroups and in particular the proportion of patients with polyarthritis. The higher prevalence of the polyarthritis subgroup may be due to the inclusion of patients with seronegative rheumatoid arthritis with coincidental psoriasis. The classification of psoriatic arthritis (CASPAR) study database provided an opportunity to examine this question. Methods The CASPAR study collected clinical, radiological and laboratory data on 588 patients with physician‐diagnosed PsA and 525 controls with other inflammatory arthritis, 70% of whom had rheumatoid arthritis. Patients with PsA were divided into two groups: polyarthritis and non‐polyarthritis (which included the Moll and Wright subgroups of spinal disease, distal interphalangeal predominant and arthritis mutilans) and were compared with patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Comparisons were made between all three groups and, if a significant difference occurred, between the two groups with PsA. Results The three groups differed significantly with regard to all clinical and laboratory variables except duration of disease. Significant differences were also found between the two groups of PsA in terms of age, sex, total number of involved joints, disability score and symmetry. However, no differences were found between the groups of patients with PsA in terms of seropositivity for rheumatoid factor and antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide, enthesitis, and spinal pain and stiffness. Further, dactylitis was commonly seen in patients with PsA (57% in the polyarticular group and 45% in non‐polyarticular group), and uncommonly found in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (5%). With the exception of entheseal changes, syndesmophytes and osteolysis, typical radiological features of PsA could not be used to distinguish between the Ps

  14. Pyogenic infection and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, I. F.; Deans, A. C.; Keat, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    Ten episodes of severe pyogenic infection occurring in nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. There was a wide range of presenting features including pyoarthrosis in 7 episodes. Three cases presented with meningitis, bacterial endocarditis and probable multiple abscesses respectively. Infection was caused by Staphylococcus aureus in 7 episodes and by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae and beta-haemolytic Streptococcus in each of one episode. Three infective episodes were fatal. Pyogenic, especially staphylococcal, infection should be considered in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with unexplained illness with or without sudden deterioration in joint symptoms. It is important to recognize and treat infection rapidly. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3671222

  15. Childhood arthritis: classification and radiology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Karl; Gardner-Medwin, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Childhood arthritis has now been reclassified into a single internationally recognized entity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Radiology provides an important role in the management of JIA, in helping in the differential diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and detecting complications. Traditionally, plain radiographs have been the imaging investigation of choice but magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound are now providing a more effective and safer alternative. The appropriate use of sequences in MR imaging is important in the early detection of joint abnormalities in JIA. PMID:11798203

  16. CAPing inflammation and acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Rosin, Diane L; Okusa, Mark D

    2016-09-01

    The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway has been shown to modulate inflammation in disease models such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. A recent study demonstrated a protective effect of vagus nerve stimulation with activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in the ischemia reperfusion model of acute kidney injury. PMID:27521104

  17. Treatment of arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, with radioactive isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, E.; Bordoni, M.E.; Thornton, A.K.

    1988-06-21

    A radioactive composition is described for the treatment of arthritis comprising, in combination, a ferric hydroxide or aluminum hydroxide aggregate suspension having a particle size of 3 to 20 microns, wherein a radionuclide is entrapped, the radionuclide being /sup 166/Holmium.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis are variations in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes , especially the HLA-DRB1 gene. The proteins produced from HLA genes help the immune system distinguish the body's own proteins from proteins made by foreign invaders ( ...

  19. Medicines to Treat Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and 55, but it can happen at any age. Rheumatoid arthritis affects women more than men. Visit your doctor to talk about your health and the medicines you may need. This factsheet will give you information about a type of medicine. You will learn ...

  20. [The temporomandibular joint in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: what radiologists need to look for on magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    De La Hoz Polo, M; Navallas, M

    2014-01-01

    The term "juvenile idiopathic arthritis" (JIA) encompasses a group of arthritis of unknown cause with onset before the age of 16 years that last for at least 6 weeks. The prevalence of temporomandibular joint involvement in published series ranges from 17% to 87%. Temporomandibular joint involvement is difficult to detect clinically, so imaging plays a key role in diagnosis and monitoring treatment. MRI is the technique of choice for the study of arthritis of the temporomandibular joint because it is the most sensitive technique for detecting acute synovitis and bone edema. Power Doppler ultrasonography can also detect active synovitis by showing the hypervascularization of the inflamed synovial membrane, but it cannot identify bone edema. This article describes the MRI technique for evaluating the temporomandibular joint in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, defines the parameters to look for, and illustrates the main findings. PMID:24792314

  1. Saline breast implant fluid collection and reactive arthritis in a patient with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kohannim, Omid; Rubin, Zachary; Taylor, Mihaela

    2011-03-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is a potentially lethal condition with an increasing incidence over the last 30 years. We present the case of a 55-year-old patient with signs and symptoms of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. This patient's presentation was unique in that it was followed by an accumulation of fluid at her breast implant in addition to a polyarticular reactive arthritis. We propose that the patient's reactive arthritis is consistent with the diagnosis of post-streptococcal reactive arthritis, a variant of acute rheumatic fever, which similarly to its variant is immunologically driven. We hypothesize that the fluid collection around the patient's breast implant was triggered by her infection and was also immunologically mediated. PMID:21325958

  2. Clostridium difficile Enterocolitis and Reactive Arthritis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Cappella, Michela; Pugliese, Fabrizio; Zucchini, Andrea; Marchetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is a rare complication of Clostridium difficile enterocolitis, especially in children. We review the 6 pediatric cases published in the English and non-English literature and discuss their clinical presentation, outcome, treatment, and pathophysiology. We also report the seventh case of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis in a 6-year-old boy who was treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate for 10 days because of an upper respiratory infection. After the antibiotic course, the child developed at the same time diarrhea with positive stool culture for Clostridium difficile and an asymmetric polyarthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and metronidazole completely resolved the pain, joint swelling, and diarrhea. After twelve months of follow-up there has been no recurrence. This report confirms the self-limiting course of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis. Clostridium difficile testing in children with gastrointestinal symptoms and acute onset of joint pain should be always considered. PMID:27190666

  3. Clostridium difficile Enterocolitis and Reactive Arthritis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Cappella, Michela; Pugliese, Fabrizio; Zucchini, Andrea; Marchetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is a rare complication of Clostridium difficile enterocolitis, especially in children. We review the 6 pediatric cases published in the English and non-English literature and discuss their clinical presentation, outcome, treatment, and pathophysiology. We also report the seventh case of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis in a 6-year-old boy who was treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate for 10 days because of an upper respiratory infection. After the antibiotic course, the child developed at the same time diarrhea with positive stool culture for Clostridium difficile and an asymmetric polyarthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and metronidazole completely resolved the pain, joint swelling, and diarrhea. After twelve months of follow-up there has been no recurrence. This report confirms the self-limiting course of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis. Clostridium difficile testing in children with gastrointestinal symptoms and acute onset of joint pain should be always considered. PMID:27190666

  4. Autoimmune hypothyroidism: might its presence be useful to support the diagnosis of sarcoidosis in a patient with acute symmetrical oligoarthritis?

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fernandez, F J; Sanchez-Trigo, S; Sesma, P

    2011-01-01

    Acute sarcoid arthritis may be present in isolation or as part of Löfgren's syndrome. Its true incidence is unclear since the diagnosis may be difficult when patients present with articular symptoms alone. The diagnosis of sarcoid arthritis is based upon suggestive clinical, imaging, synovial fluid findings, and in some cases upon synovial biopsy. The finding of sterile noncaseating granulomatous inflammation on biopsy is supportive, but it is not pathognomic of sarcoidosis. On the other hand, sarcoidosis has been associated with autoimmune diseases, especially with autoimmune thyroid disease. We believe that it might be of interest to evaluate thyroid function testing in patients with clinical features consistent with sarcoid arthritis, and the diagnosis of sarcoidosis should be considered in patients who present with symmetrical arthritis and thyroid autoimmune disease. We describe herein a patient with subclinical autoimmune hypothyroidism and an acute symmetrical oligoarthritis, with a clinical presentation and laboratory data consistent with acute sarcoid arthritis (Ref. 14). PMID:21692413

  5. Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You?

    MedlinePlus

    Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You? What is rheumatoid arthritis (RA)? Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a serious condition. The body’s immune system attacks the lining of ...

  6. Genetics of psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    O'Rielly, Darren D; Rahman, Proton

    2014-10-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) represents a group of inflammatory rheumatic diseases that cluster within families and possess overlapping clinical features. The pathogenesis of SpA encompasses a complex array of genetic, immunological and environmental factors. In this article, we will briefly review the genetics of PsA, and then focus on the genes that may be potentially linked either directly or indirectly to the immunopathology of the Th-17 pathway. The most consistent and dominant genetic effect of PsV and PsA is located on chromosome 6p21.3 within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, which accounts for approximately one-third of the genetic contribution of PsV and PsA. To date, 36 genes have reached genome-wide significance, accounting for approximately 22% of psoriasis (PsV) heritability. Prominent genes identified via GWAS include HLA-Cw6, IL12B, IL23R, IL23A, TNIP1, TNFAIP3, LCE3B-LCE3C, TRAF3IP2, NFkBIA, FBXL19, TYK2, IFIH1, REL, and ERAP1. Genes identified in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) has largely echoed those in PsV and include HLA-B/C, HLA-B, IL-12B, IL-23R, TNIP1, TRAF3IP2, FBXL19, and REL. The lack of identified genetic susceptibility loci is largely attributed to the much smaller number of PsA patients and the greater clinical heterogeneity of PsA. Searching for different types of genetic variants such as small CNVs and/or insertions/deletions has also led to the identification of several genes with a function relative to PsV in particular including DEFB4, LCE3C_LCE3B, and IL-22 gene (exon 1). The candidate genes identified in PsV/PsA have highlighted pathways of critical importance to psoriatic disease including distinct signaling pathways comprised of barrier integrity, innate immune response and adaptive immune response, mediated primarily by Th-17 and Th-1 signalling. While GWAS studies have yielded great insights into the genes that contribute to the pathogenesis of PsV and PsA, replication in large cohorts, fine-mapping and resequencing

  7. Psoriatic arthritis: Epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jung-Tai; Yeh, Horng-Ming; Liu, Shyun-Yeu; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of psoriatic arthritis has evolved as new knowledge of the disease has emerged. However, the exact prevalence of psoriatic arthritis is unknown, and its pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated. Genetic, environmental, and immunologic factors have all been implicated in disease development. Early diagnosis and treatment have become primary objectives in clinical rheumatology. Psoriatic arthritis not only causes functional impairment, but also increases mortality risk of patients. The advent of new therapeutic agents capable of arresting the progression of joint damage is expected. However, early psoriatic arthritis assessment remains limited. The objectives of this article are to outline the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of psoriatic arthritis and to suggest a paradigm for identifying early psoriatic arthritis patients. PMID:25232529

  8. [Chronic osteitis and arthritis of palmoplantar pustulosis. A familial form of B-27 negative spondylarthropathy].

    PubMed

    Kurc, D; De Saint-Père, R; Madoule, P; Laoussadi, S; Caquet, R

    1987-01-01

    A 35-year old woman presented with pustulosis palmaris et plantaris evolving in acute episodes parallel to those of a rheumatic disease consisting of bilateral sacro-iliac arthritis, manubriosternal fusion and sterno-clavicular arthritis. Her brother had spondylitis compatible with the diagnosis of pustular osteo-arthritis though without pustulosis. He presented with bilateral sacro-iliac arthritis, manubriosternal fusion, sterno-clavicular arthritis and an ossified fragment detached from the antero-inferior angle of C6. The two patients had the same HLA phenotype: A1, A9, B5, B41, CW4, DR2, DR4, absence of B27. In a specimen from the sacro-iliac joint the authors found active bone remodelling and inflammatory osteitis with fibrosis and infiltrates rich in mononucleate cells. An electron microscopic study--to the authors' knowledge, the first to be performed in such cases--demonstrated intracytoplasmic filamentous inclusions in two macrophages of the synovial fringe. Only one other case of the familial form has been published so far. Like the rheumatism of acne conglobata, the spondylitis of pustulosis palmaris et plantaris is one of the causes of sterno-costo-clavicular hyperostosis. PMID:3563168

  9. [Cardiovascular risk in patients with psoriatic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Korotaeva, T V; Novikoya, D S; Loginova, E Yu

    2016-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic.immune-mediated disease that is observed in 8-30% of psoriatic patients. It has been recently established that PsA and psoriasis are closely associated with the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome, hypertension; abdominal obesity, and a risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including fatal myocardial infarction (Ml) and acute cerebrovascular accidents, which shortens lifespan in the patients compared to the general population. The authors state their belief that the synergic effect of traditional risk factors (RFs) for CYD and systemic inflammation underlie the development of atherosclerosis in PsA. It is pointed out that the risk of CYD may be reduced not only provided that the traditional RFs for CVD are monitored, but also systemic inflammation is validly suppressed. The cardioprotective abilities of methotrexate and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) inhibitors are considered; the data of investigations showing that the treatment of PsA patients with TNF-a inhibitors results in a reduction in carotid artery intima-media thickness are given. lt is noted that there is a need for the early monitoring of traditional RFs for CVD in patients with PsA and for the elaboration of interdisciplinary national guidelines. PMID:27458624

  10. Legionella pneumophila Arthritis: use of medium specific for Mycobacteria for isolation of L. pneumophila in culture of articular fluid specimens.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Pascale; Leautez, Sophie; Ninin, Emmanuelle; Jarraud, Sophie; Raffi, François; Drugeon, Henri

    2002-07-01

    We report the first case, to our knowledge, of acute purulent arthritis due to Legionella pneumophila in an immunosuppressed patient. L. pneumophila was isolated from samples of blood and articular fluid cultured with use of medium specific for mycobacteria (Bactec 13A medium). PMID:12060893

  11. Immune modulation of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Dimitrios A; Geraldino-Pardilla, Laura; Bathon, Joan M

    2011-12-01

    The approval - several years ago - of the first tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitor for the management of rheumatoid arthritis launched a new era in the therapeutics of rheumatology. Since then an almost cataclysmic discovery of new treatment targets and corresponding biologic agents ensued. Nowadays, the rheumatologist and the rheumatologic patient have the luxury of several immune modulators available to successfully treat the majority of patients with RA or other inflammatory arthritides and conditions. In this review we focus on a discussion of the approved immune modulators/biologic agents available for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. We also present an overview of agents under development. For the immune modulators discussed, we describe their mechanism of action and summarise initial data and recent updates on efficacy and safety. PMID:22265267

  12. Microbial Infection and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Song; Yu, Yangsheng; Yue, Yinshi; Zhang, Zhixin; Su, Kaihong

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex autoimmune disease affecting 1–2% of general worldwide population. The etiopathogenesis of RA involves the interplay of multiple genetic risk factors and environmental triggers. Microbial infections are believed to play an important role in the initiation and perpetuation of RA. Recent clinical studies have shown the association of microbial infections with RA. Accumulated studies using animal models have also found that microbial infections can induce and/or exaggerate the symptoms of experimental arthritis. In this review, we have identified the most common microbial infections associated with RA in the literature and summarized the current evidence supporting their pathogenic role in RA. We also discussed the potential mechanisms whereby infection may promote the development of RA, such as generation of neo-autoantigens, induction of loss of tolerance by molecular mimicry, and bystander activation of the immune system. PMID:25133066

  13. Emerging immunotherapies for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Gary; Cooles, Faye AH; Isaacs, John D; Hilkens, Catharien MU

    2014-01-01

    Novel treatments in development for rheumatoid arthritis target 3 broad areas: cytokines, cells, and signaling pathways. Therapies from each domain share common advantages (for example previously demonstrated efficacy, potential long-term immunomodulation, and oral administration respectively) that have stimulated research in each area but also common obstacles to their development. In this review recent progress in each area will be discussed alongside the factors that have impeded their path to clinical use. PMID:24535556

  14. [Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis].

    PubMed

    Ebschner, U; Hartschuh, W; Petzoldt, D

    2000-02-01

    Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis is a rare dermatologic disorder seen in patients suffering from diseases in which circulating immune complexes occur. The typical cutaneous signs are linear cords usually located on the lateral aspect of the trunk. The characteristic, although not specific, histology reveals a dense diffuse infiltrate composed mostly of histiocytes, accompanied by neutrophils and eosinophils, and degenerated collagen surrounded by palisades of histiocytes. We discuss this disorder and its differential diagnosis. PMID:10743580

  15. An Unusual Association: Iliopsoas Bursitis Related to Calcium Pyrophosphate Crystal Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Di Carlo, Marco; Draghessi, Antonella; Carotti, Marina; Salaffi, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    A 71-year-old man with osteoarthritis and chondrocalcinosis came to our observation developing a swelling in the groin region after a recent left colectomy for adenocarcinoma. The imaging techniques revealed the presence of an iliopsoas bursitis in connection with the hip. The synovial fluid analysis detected the presence of calcium pyrophosphate (CPP) crystals and allowed the final and unusual diagnosis of iliopsoas bursitis related to acute CPP crystal hip arthritis. PMID:26550514

  16. Intraarticular corticosteroids in refractory childhood Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nimmrich, S; Becker, I; Horneff, G

    2014-07-01

    Lyme arthritis caused by infection with Borrelia burgdorferi is a common late manifestation of Lyme borreliosis. Current treatment recommendations include at least one oral or intravenous antibiotic course, followed by antirheumatic therapy in case of refractory arthritis. We reviewed the course of 31 children with Lyme arthritis who had received antibiotic treatment and assessed outcome and requirement of antirheumatic therapy. Of a total of 31 patients, 23 (74%) showed complete resolution of arthritis after one or two courses of antibiotics, whereas in 8 patients (28%), steroid injections had been performed due to relapsing or remaining symptoms. All of these 8 patients showed immediate resolution of symptoms after intraarticular steroid injections. Four of them (50%) remained asymptomatic so far with a follow-up period between five up to 40 months. In two cases, multiple intraarticular corticosteroid injections were required; three patients received additional or consecutive treatment with systemic antirheumatic treatment. Patients with antibiotic refractory arthritis showed a higher rate of positivity of the IgG p58 and OspC immunoblot bands (p = 0.05) at presentation. Antibodies against OspA, an indicator of later stage infection, occurred more frequently in the refractory group without reaching significant level. No clinical marker as indicator for severe or prolonged course of Lyme arthritis was identifiable. A quarter of childhood Lyme arthritis patients were refractory to antibiotics and required antirheumatic treatment. Intraarticular steroid injections in childhood Lyme arthritis refractory to antibiotics can lead to marked clinical improvement. PMID:24390634

  17. Brucellar sternoclavicular arthritis, the forgotten complication.

    PubMed

    Mousa, A M; Muhtaseb, S A; Al-Mudallal, D S; Marafie, A A; Habib, F M

    1988-06-01

    Of 511 cases of brucellosis studied between December 1983 and February 1986, four (0.8%) had sternoclavicular (STCL) arthritis. Two were male and two female, and only one was younger than 50 years old. All four cases had significantly high specific IgG antibody titres (1 of 1280), measured by the indirect immunofluorescent (IIF) test, and two had Brucella melitensis isolated from their blood. In two cases, STCL arthritis was the presenting problem, and it was associated in one with ankle arthritis, hepatitis, renal impairment, orogenital ulcers and a haematological picture of myelodysplasia; in the other it was a relapsing STCL arthritis. In the remaining two cases, STCL arthritis was part of an extensive osteoarticular disease, which was associated in one with cachexia, liver cirrhosis, heart failure and prostatitis with urine retention, and in the other with severe thrombocytopenia. Excellent results were obtained from six to eight weeks' therapy with streptomycin, rifampicin and cotrimoxazole or tetracycline. PMID:3250341

  18. Photoacoustic tomography to identify inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2012-09-01

    Identifying neovascularity (angiogenesis) as an early feature of inflammatory arthritis can help in early accurate diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality which relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. PAT is used to identify changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis in a rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, on rats revealed that there is a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histology images obtained from both the normal and the arthritis affected rats correlated well with the PAT findings. Results support the fact that the emerging PAT could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis.

  19. Inflammatory arthritis in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes: a multicenter retrospective study and literature review of 68 cases.

    PubMed

    Mekinian, Arsène; Braun, Thorsten; Decaux, Olivier; Falgarone, Géraldine; Toussirot, Eric; Raffray, Loic; Omouri, Mohamed; Gombert, Bruno; De Wazieres, Benoit; Buchdaul, Anne-Laure; Ziza, Jean-Marc; Launay, David; Denis, Guillaume; Madaule, Serge; Rose, Christian; Grignano, Eric; Fenaux, Pierre; Fain, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    We describe the characteristics and outcome of inflammatory arthritis in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in a French multicenter retrospective study. Twenty-two patients with MDS (median age, 77.5 yr [interquartile range, 69-81]; 10 women) were included. Inflammatory arthritis presented as polyarthritis in 17 cases (77%) and with symmetric involvement in 15 cases (68%). At diagnosis, the median disease activity score 28 based on C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) was 4.5 [2-6.5]. Two patients had anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs), and 1 had radiologic erosions. The median time between the diagnoses of arthritis and MDS was 10 months [6-42], with a median articular symptom duration of 3 months [2-8]. The diagnosis of both diseases was concomitant in 6 cases (27%); arthritis preceded MDS in 12 cases (55%), and occurred after MDS in 4 (18%). While the number of swollen and tender joints significantly decreased during follow-up, as did the median DAS28-CRP (from 4.3 [3.8-4.6] at baseline to 2.9 [1.75-3.3]; p < 0.05), CRP remained elevated (CRP >20 mg/L) in 8 patients (42%). Nevertheless, radiographic progression and new ACPA positivity were not observed during a median follow-up of 29 months [9-76]. While most of the patients were treated with steroids (n = 16) for arthritis, additional treatment was administered in only 4 patients (hydroxychloroquine, n = 2; sulfasalazine [Salazopyrin] and etanercept, n = 1, respectively). Eleven patients died during follow-up from acute myeloid leukemia (n = 5); infections (n = 3); or cerebral bleeding, cardiorespiratory failure, or undetermined cause (n = 1, respectively). Inflammatory arthritis associated with MDS can have various presentations and is often seronegative and nonerosive. Steroids alone are the most common treatment in MDS-associated arthritis, but that treatment is insufficient to control arthritis. Steroid-sparing strategies need to be identified. PMID:24378738

  20. Gallium scintigraphy for diagnosis of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis in children

    SciTech Connect

    Borman, T.R.; Johnson, R.A.; Sherman, F.C.

    1986-05-01

    Thirty-four children with presumptive acute osteomyelitis or septic arthritis underwent early gallium-67 citrate scintigraphy and have been retrospectively reviewed. Diagnostic accuracy using this technique was 91%. Gallium-67 citrate is a more reliable radiopharmaceutical agent for the detection of selected acute musculoskeletal infections than either technetium methylene diphosphonate or indium-111. However, the radiation dosage from gallium is higher than from other radiopharmaceutical agents, and the authors would recommend its use only in cases where the diagnosis cannot be made on the basis of clinical, laboratory, or plain roentgenographic criteria.

  1. Circadian rhythms: glucocorticoids and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Sulli, Alberto; Pizzorni, Carmen; Secchi, Maria Elena; Soldano, Stefano; Seriolo, Bruno; Straub, Rainer H; Otsa, Kati; Maestroni, Georges J

    2006-06-01

    Circadian rhythms are driven by biological clocks and are endogenous in origin. Therefore, circadian changes in the metabolism or secretion of endogenous glucocorticoids are certainly responsible in part for the time-dependent changes observed in the inflammatory response and arthritis. More recently, melatonin (MLT), another circadian hormone that is the secretory product of the pineal gland, has been found implicated in the time-dependent inflammatory reaction with effects opposite those of cortisol. Interestingly, cortisol and MLT show an opposite response to the light. The light conditions in the early morning have a strong impact on the morning cortisol peak, whereas MLT is synthesized in a strictly nocturnal pattern. Recently, a diurnal rhythmicity in healthy humans between cellular (Th1 type) or humoral (Th2 type) immune responses has been found and related to immunomodulatory actions of cortisol and MLT. The interferon (IFN)-gamma/interleukin (IL)-10 ratio peaked during the early morning and correlated negatively with plasma cortisol and positively with plasma MLT. Accordingly, the intensity of the arthritic pain varies consistently as a function of the hour of the day: pain is greater after waking up in the morning than in the afternoon or evening. The reduced cortisol and adrenal androgen secretion, observed during testing in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients not treated with glucocoticoids, should be clearly considered as a "relative adrenal insufficiency" in the presence of a sustained inflammatory process, and allows Th1 type cytokines to be produced in higher amounts during the late night. In conclusion, the right timing (early morning) for the glucocorticoid therapy in arthritis is fundamental and well justified by the circadian rhythms of the inflammatory mechanisms. PMID:16855156

  2. Food-induced (allergic) arthritis. Inflammatory arthritis exacerbated by milk.

    PubMed

    Panush, R S; Stroud, R M; Webster, E M

    1986-02-01

    Suggestive, but largely unproven, observations have associated arthritis with environmental antigens, including foods. We studied a patient with inflammatory arthritis in a prospective, "blinded," controlled fashion to determine whether her symptoms were associated with food sensitivities. This 52-year-old white woman with 11 years of class I, stage I, active disease, had symptomatic exacerbations allegedly associated with meat, milk, and beans. We observed an increase in symptoms following an unblinded food challenge and then studied her in our clinical research unit. On her normal diet for 6 days, she averaged 30 minutes of morning stiffness, 9 tender joints, 3 swollen joints, 87% subjective assessment (100% = best possible), and 89% examiner assessment. While she was fasting (3 days) or taking Vivonex (2 days), we noted no morning stiffness, tender joint score of 1, swollen joint score of 0, and assessments of 100% (P less than 0.05 versus normal diet). She was then nourished with Vivonex for 33 days without difficulty and challenged in a blinded fashion at mealtimes with lyophilized foods placed into opaque capsules. Four milk challenges (equivalent to greater than or equal to 8 ounces per meal) produced up to 30 minutes of morning stiffness, 14 tender joints, 4 swollen joints, subjective assessment of 85%, and objective assessment of 80% (P less than 0.05 versus fasting-Vivonex), peaking 24-48 hours postchallenge. Placebo and other foods (lettuce and carrots) were without effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3513771

  3. Imaging techniques in childhood arthritis.

    PubMed

    Harcke, H T; Mandell, G A; Cassell, I L

    1997-08-01

    Technological advances in imaging have given physicians caring for children with arthritis a greater opportunity to detect abnormalities early in the course of a disease and better methods for monitoring chronic changes. Indications for using radiography, bone densitometry, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, CT scanning, and MR imaging are discussed in this article. In this era of managed care, the practicing clinician is urged more than ever to consult with the radiologist in selecting the study or sequence of studies to be used in particular case. In this way, evaluation can be limited to the most effective strategy from both the clinical and cost perspectives. PMID:9287376

  4. Arthritis in the Durer family.

    PubMed

    Weisz, George M

    2007-01-01

    Deciphering the secret language of painters became a discipline into which Art historians have branched ever since the Renaissance. Various aspects of paintings and sculptures were decoded in this process. This decoding system remains however incomplete without interpreting also the medical conditions that appear in the painted subjects. History of Medicine and of Arts could be both enriched by diagnosing retrospectively diseases existent in that historical period; by identifying portraits or describing genetic family diseases. One such case is the arthritis identifiable in three out of four artists in the Durer family, visible in paintings or engravings of the early 16-th century. PMID:17943408

  5. Significance of bone marrow edema in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Kontny, Ewa; Maśliński, Włodzimierz; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Warczyńska, Agnieszka; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2013-01-01

    Summary Assessing the pathology of the synovium, its thickening and increased vascularity through ultrasound and magnetic resonance examinations (more often an ultrasound study alone) is still considered a sensitive parameter in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis and in monitoring of treatment efficacy. Magnetic resonance studies showed that, aside from the joint pannus, the subchondral bone tissue constitutes an essential element in the development of rheumatoid arthritis. Bone marrow edema correlates with inflammation severity, joint destruction, clinical signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, and thus is considered a predictor of rapid radiological progression of the disease. The newest studies reveal that bone marrow edema may be a more sensitive indicator of the response to therapy than appearance of the synovium. Bone marrow edema presents with increased signal in T2-weighted images, being most visible in fat saturation or IR sequences (STIR, TIRM). On the other hand, it is hypointense and less evident in T1-weighted images. It becomes enhanced (hyperintense) after contrast administration. Histopathological studies confirmed that it is a result of bone inflammation (osteitis/osteomyelitis), i.e. replacememt of bone marrow fat by inflammatory infiltrates containing macrophages, T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, plasma cells and osteoclasts. Bone marrow edema appears after a few weeks from occurrence of symptoms and therefore is considered an early marker of inflammation. It correlates with clinical assessment of disease activity and elevated markers of acute inflammatory phase, i.e. ESR and CRP. It is a reversible phenomenon and may become attenuated due to biological treatment. It is considered a “herald” of erosions, as the risk of their formation is 6-fold higher in sites where BME was previously noted PMID:23493495

  6. Impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes of carotid artery stenting in acute ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng-Sheng; Lin, Chih-Ming; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke patients with moderate-to-severe carotid artery stenosis. However, the midterm outcome for patients undergoing this procedure varies considerably with baseline characteristics. To determine the impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes following carotid artery stenting, data from 107 eligible patients with a first episode of ischemic stroke were collected by retrospective chart review. A modified Rankin Scale (mRS) was used to divide patients into two baseline groups, mRS ≤2 and mRS >2. A three-step decision-tree statistical analysis was conducted. After weighting the decision-tree parameters, the following impact hierarchy was obtained: admission low-density lipoprotein, gouty arthritis, chronic kidney disease, ipsilateral common carotid artery resistance index, contralateral ophthalmic artery resistance index, sex, and dyslipidemia. The finite-state machine model demonstrated that, in patients with baseline mRS ≤2, 46% had an improved mRS score at follow-up, whereas 54% had a stable mRS score. In patients with baseline mRS >2, a stable mRS score was observed in 75%, improved score in 23%, and a poorer score in 2%. Admission low-density lipoprotein was the strongest predictive factor influencing poststenting outcome. In addition, our study provides further evidence that carotid artery stenting can be of benefit in first-time ischemic stroke patients with baseline mRS scores >2. PMID:27099508

  7. Impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes of carotid artery stenting in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cheng-Sheng; Lin, Chih-Ming; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke patients with moderate-to-severe carotid artery stenosis. However, the midterm outcome for patients undergoing this procedure varies considerably with baseline characteristics. To determine the impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes following carotid artery stenting, data from 107 eligible patients with a first episode of ischemic stroke were collected by retrospective chart review. A modified Rankin Scale (mRS) was used to divide patients into two baseline groups, mRS ≤2 and mRS >2. A three-step decision-tree statistical analysis was conducted. After weighting the decision-tree parameters, the following impact hierarchy was obtained: admission low-density lipoprotein, gouty arthritis, chronic kidney disease, ipsilateral common carotid artery resistance index, contralateral ophthalmic artery resistance index, sex, and dyslipidemia. The finite-state machine model demonstrated that, in patients with baseline mRS ≤2, 46% had an improved mRS score at follow-up, whereas 54% had a stable mRS score. In patients with baseline mRS >2, a stable mRS score was observed in 75%, improved score in 23%, and a poorer score in 2%. Admission low-density lipoprotein was the strongest predictive factor influencing poststenting outcome. In addition, our study provides further evidence that carotid artery stenting can be of benefit in first-time ischemic stroke patients with baseline mRS scores >2. PMID:27099508

  8. Indirect costs of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Raciborski, Filip; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that in Poland about 400,000 persons in general suffer from inflammatory joint diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Epidemiological surveys documenting the frequency and disturbance of musculoskeletal disorders in the Polish population are few in number. Most of the estimations are based on epidemiological data from other countries (prevalence of 0.5–1%). According to the data of the National Health Fund in Poland 135,000–157,000 persons in total are treated because of rheumatoid arthritis per year [ICD10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems): M05, M06]. In the case of this group of diseases indirect costs significantly outweigh the direct costs. Indirect costs increase together with activity level of the disease. The cost analysis of productivity loss of RA patients indicates that sickness absenteeism and informal care are the most burdensome. At the national level it amounts in total from 1.2 billion to 2.8 billion PLN per year, depending on the method of analysis. These costs could be significantly reduced through early diagnosis and introduction of effective treatment. PMID:27407258

  9. [Imaging modalities in psoriatic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Hermann, K-G A; Ohrndorf, S; Werner, S G; Finzel, S; Backhaus, M

    2013-10-01

    This review presents an overview of the range of imaging modalities used in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Conventional radiography is used to detect structural changes of the joints and tendon attachments. These changes occur late in the course of PsA hence conventional radiography contributes little to the early detection of PsA; however, the detection of periosteal proliferations on radiographs allows a relatively specific diagnosis of PsA. Skeletal scintigraphy and computed tomography are rarely used in PsA. Arthrosonography (ultrasound of the joints) is gaining increasing importance in the early identification of inflammatory soft tissue signs of PsA in the peripheral joints. Sonography enables early detection of synovitis and tenosynovitis as well as superficial erosions and also inflammatory processes of the tendon attachments. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is indispensable for identifying possible involvement of the axial skeleton. Moreover, it allows good visualization of periostitis and arthritis. High resolution microcomputed tomography is an interesting novel diagnostic tool which allows highly sensitive evaluation of the bone structure and can detect very tiny bone lesions where typical signs of PsA are omega-shaped erosions and small corona-like spikes. Another interesting new diagnostic technique is fluorescence optical imaging (FOI) with the Xiralite system which is highly sensitive for detecting inflammatory processes of the hands. PMID:24085530

  10. [Reiter disease or reactive arthritis?].

    PubMed

    Eppinger, S; Schmitt, J; Meurer, M

    2006-04-01

    There is an ongoing international discussion on whether the condition reactive arthritis should be named after a former Nazi functionary. The German dermatological community should participate in this debate. In 1916, Hans Reiter described a disease with the symptoms urethritis, conjunctivitis, and arthritis, which was later named after him. After becoming titular professor in May 1918, Reiter was appointed director of the regional public health department Mecklenburg-Schwerin in 1926. At the same time he taught social hygiene at the University of Rostock, where he was appointed full professor in 1928. In 1931, Hans Reiter became a member of the National Socialist German Workers Party (NSDAP). In July 1932 he was elected representative of the NSDAP to the seventh assembly of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. After becoming its acting director in July 1933, Reiter was appointed president of the Reich public health department in Berlin on October 1, 1933. Both his excellent professional qualifications, as well as his National Socialist attitudes, were considered key criteria for taking over this important position. As the president of the Reich public health department, Reiter was said to have known about the conduct of experiments with typhus-fever at the concentration camp Buchenwald in which 250 humans died. From the end of the Second World War until 1947, Reiter was imprisoned in the Nuremberg Prison for War Criminals, but never convicted of a crime. PMID:17419129

  11. Diet therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Panush, R S; Carter, R L; Katz, P; Kowsari, B; Longley, S; Finnie, S

    1983-04-01

    Although diet therapy for arthritis has received considerable publicity, there is little objective information about its efficacy. We undertook a 10-week, controlled, double-blind, randomized trial of patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty-six patients completed the study; 11 were on an experimental diet (a specific popular diet free of additives, preservatives, fruit, red meat, herbs, and dairy products) and 15 were on a "placebo" diet. Of 183 variables analyzed, there were no clinically important differences among rheumatologic, laboratory, immunologic, radiologic, or nutritional findings between patients on experimental and placebo diets. Six RA patients on the placebo and 5 on the experimental diet improved by objective criteria. Improvement averaged 29% for patients on placebo and 32% for patients on experimental diets. Two patients on the experimental diet improved notably, elected to remain on the experimental diet following the study period, have continued to improve, and noted exacerbations of disease upon consuming nonexperimental diet foods. Our study failed to provide evidence of objective overall clinical benefit of this diet as followed by a group of patients with longstanding, progressive, active RA. However, our data are not inconsistent with the possibility that individualized dietary manipulations might be beneficial for selected patients with rheumatic disease. PMID:6838671

  12. Diagnosis and management of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Amy M

    2011-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is the most commonly diagnosed systemic inflammatory arthritis. Women, smokers, and those with a family history of the disease are most often affected. Criteria for diagnosis include having at least one joint with definite swelling that is not explained by another disease. The likelihood of a rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis increases with the number of small joints involved. In a patient with inflammatory arthritis, the presence of a rheumatoid factor or anti-citrullinated protein antibody, or elevated C-reactive protein level or erythrocyte sedimentation rate suggests a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Initial laboratory evaluation should also include complete blood count with differential and assessment of renal and hepatic function. Patients taking biologic agents should be tested for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and tuberculosis. Earlier diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis allows for earlier treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic agents. Combinations of medications are often used to control the disease. Methotrexate is typically the first-line drug for rheumatoid arthritis. Biologic agents, such as tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, are generally considered second-line agents or can be added for dual therapy. The goals of treatment include minimization of joint pain and swelling, prevention of radiographic damage and visible deformity, and continuation of work and personal activities. Joint replacement is indicated for patients with severe joint damage whose symptoms are poorly controlled by medical management. PMID:22150658

  13. Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    El Mezouar, Imane; Abourazzak, Fatema Zahra; Mansouri, Samia; Harzy, Taoufik

    2014-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis, so called osteomyelitis pubis is the infection which involves pubic symphysis and its joint. It is a rare condition, representing less than one percent of all cases of osteomyelitis. It affects most frequently young athletes and women undergoing gynecologic or urologic surgery. It presents itself with fever and pubic pain which irradiates to the genitals and increases when hip is mobilized, and this fact produces gait claudication. Diagnosis is based on clinic supported by microbiologic culture results, image methods, and proteins augment during acute phase. The etiologic agents most commonly found are Staphylococcus aureus, followed by gram-negative bacilli, and polymicrobial infection in recent pelvis surgery. The antibiotic treatment is adjusted depending on the microbiological diagnosis, adding NSAIDs, and bed rest. We report a 16 year-old male presenting with pubic pain and fever. Magnetic resonance imagery showed arthritis of the pubic symphysis. The patient was treated with antibiotics with a good clinical response. PMID:25419287

  14. Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis: an atypical abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Ghislain, L; Heylen, A; Alexis, F; Tintillier, M

    2015-02-01

    Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis is a rare infection mostly caused by Staphylococcus aureus, and is traditionally associated with risk factors (sports, female incontinence surgery). Typical features of pubic symphysis infection include abdominal, pelvic, or groin pain that increases upon standing and walking, causing limping to occur. Acute onset of fever is often associated. It is important to distinguish septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis from its aseptic homologue, improperly called 'osteitis pubis' in English literature. This general term is mostly used to designate a mechanical pubic pain and has several aetiological meanings (joint stress, postoperative pain, rheumatic diseases). However, some authors consider the infection of the pubic symphysis as a variant of osteitis pubis, placing the two diseases in the continuum of the same entity. This confusion in pubic pathology related to its rarity and its atypical presentation, may in some cases lead to diagnostic and therapeutic delay. In this article, we would like to make practitioners aware of this uncommon and often ignored anatomical site, so that it can recover its place in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. PMID:25227947

  15. Inhibition of Inflammatory Arthritis Using Fullerene Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Dellinger, Anthony L.; Cunin, Pierre; Lee, David; Kung, Andrew L.; Brooks, D. Bradford; Zhou, Zhiguo; Nigrovic, Peter A.; Kepley, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis; RA) is a complex disease driven by the interplay of multiple cellular lineages. Fullerene derivatives have previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory capabilities mediated, in part, by their ability to prevent inflammatory mediator release by mast cells (MC). Recognizing that MC can serve as a cellular link between autoantibodies, soluble mediators, and other effector populations in inflammatory arthritis, it was hypothesized that fullerene derivatives might be used to target this inflammatory disease. A panel of fullerene derivatives was tested for their ability to affect the function of human skin-derived MC as well as other lineages implicated in arthritis, synovial fibroblasts and osteoclasts. It is shown that certain fullerene derivatives blocked FcγR- and TNF-α-induced mediator release from MC; TNF-α-induced mediator release from RA synovial fibroblasts; and maturation of human osteoclasts. MC inhibition by fullerene derivatives was mediated through the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and FcγR-mediated increases in cellular reactive oxygen species and NF-κB activation. Based on these in vitro data, two fullerene derivatives (ALM and TGA) were selected for in vivo studies using K/BxN serum transfer arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1 mice. Dye-conjugated fullerenes confirmed localization to affected joints in arthritic animals but not in healthy controls. In the K/BxN moldel, fullerenes attenuated arthritis, an effect accompanied by reduced histologic inflammation, cartilage/bone erosion, and serum levels of TNF-α. Fullerenes remained capable of attenuating K/BxN arthritis in mast cell-deficient mice Cre-Master mice, suggesting that lineages beyond the MC represent relevant targets in this system. These studies suggest that fullerene derivatives may hold promise both as an assessment tool and as anti-inflammatory therapy of arthritis. PMID:25879437

  16. Septic and aseptic arthritis: a continuum?

    PubMed

    Taylor-Robinson, D; Keat, A

    1999-03-01

    This chapter considers the likelihood that a wide spectrum of infection-provoked arthritis exists, ranging from overt sepsis to apparently aseptic chronic arthritis in which very small numbers of causal bacteria can be detected only by using highly sensitive techniques. It asks whether joints are, as conventionally held, normally devoid of micro-organisms and how to judge the significance of bacteria detected within apparently sterile joints. Through a consideration of known septic, probably infective and apparently aseptic forms of arthritis, a set of criteria for attributing causality to putative arthritogenic micro-organisms is proposed. PMID:10952856

  17. Chemokines and angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Szekanecz, Zoltan; Pakozdi, Angela; Szentpetery, Agnes; Besenyei, Timea; Koch, Alisa E.

    2010-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis, chemokines mediate the migration of inflammatory leukocytes into the synovium. Among the four known chemokine families, CXC, CC chemokines and fractalkine seem to be of outstanding importance in this process. Angiogenesis, the formation of new vessels, is also important during the perpetuation of inflammation underlying rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, authors discuss the role of the most important chemokines and chemokine repetors in arthritis-associated neovascularization. The process and regulation of angiogenesis are described in this context as well. Apart from discussing the pathogenic role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in arthritic vessel formation, authors also review the important relevance of chemokines and angiogenesis for therapeutic intervention. PMID:19482623

  18. Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sathish

    2016-04-01

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is an inflammatory condition characterized by fever, lymphadenopathy, arthritis, rash and serositis. In sJIA, systemic inflammation has been associated with dysregulation of the innate immune system, suggesting that it is an autoinflammatory disorder. IL-1 and IL-6 play a major role in the pathogenesis of sJIA and treatment with IL-1 and IL-6 inhibitors has shown to be highly effective. Recent data suggests that early cytokine blockage might abrogate chronic, destructive, therapy resistant arthritis phase, reflecting a potential "window of opportunity" in the care of children with sJIA. PMID:26916892

  19. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or though physical contact (for example, on unwashed hands). Being exposed to tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts, vapors, and fumes can also cause acute bronchitis. Less often, bacteria can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute ...

  20. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  1. A Comparative Metabolomic Evaluation of Behcet's Disease with Arthritis and Seronegative Arthritis Using Synovial Fluid.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Joong Kyong; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Jungyeon; Hwang, Jiwon; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Cha, Hoon-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) with arthritis is often confused with seronegative arthritis (SNA) because of shared clinical symptoms and the lack of definitive biomarkers for BD. To investigate possible metabolic patterns and potential biomarkers of BD with arthritis, metabolomic profiling of synovial fluid (SF) from 6 patients with BD with arthritis and 18 patients with SNA was performed using gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in conjunction with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. A total of 123 metabolites were identified from samples. Orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis showed clear discrimination between BD with arthritis and SNA. A set of 11 metabolites were identified as potential biomarkers for BD using variable importance for projection values and the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Compared with SNA, BD with arthritis exhibited relatively high levels of glutamate, valine, citramalate, leucine, methionine sulfoxide, glycerate, phosphate, lysine, isoleucine, urea, and citrulline. There were two markers identified, elevated methionine sulfoxide and citrulline, that were associated with increased oxidative stress, providing a potential link to BD-associated neutrophil hyperactivity. Glutamate, citramalate, and valine were selected and validated as putative biomarkers for BD with arthritis (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 61.1%). This is the first report to present potential biomarkers from SF for discriminating BD with arthritis from SNA. The metabolomics of SF may be helpful in searching for potential biomarkers and elucidating the clinicopathogenesis of BD with arthritis. PMID:26270538

  2. Ultrasound Detection of Salmonella Septic Arthritis in a Rheumatoid Arthritis Patient on Anti-TNF Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of Salmonella septic arthritis detected by ultrasound in a 40-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis while he was on anti–tumor necrosis factor-α monoclonal antibody certolizumab. An aspirate of his left elbow joint showed Salmonella enteritidis infection that was sensitive to ceftraixone. This was preceded by a brief episode of loose stools following a visit to the Far East. He was treated with antibiotics and made a good recovery. There have only been a few case reports of Salmonella septic arthritis in a rheumatoid arthritis patient on anti–tumor necrosis factor treatment but none previously in association with certolizumab. PMID:26425605

  3. The timing of glucocorticoid administration in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arvidson, N. G.; Gudbjornsson, B.; Larsson, A.; Hallgren, R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To test the hypothesis that the timing of prednisolone administration might be critical in determining its effect on the diurnal rheumatoid inflammatory process.
METHODS—26 patients with rheumatoid arthritis were randomly divided into two equal groups and allocated to low doses of prednisolone at either 2.00 am or 7.30 am. Because of the diurnal variation in disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis, assessments of the two study groups were performed at 7.30 am both at the start of the study (day 1) and after four doses of prednisolone (day 5). The study protocol differences in the time period from the last dose of prednisolone to assessment were 5.5 hours in the 2.00 am group and 24 hours in the 7.30 am group.
RESULTS—Administration of low doses of prednisolone (5 or 7.5 mg daily) at 2.00 am had favourable effects on the duration of morning stiffness (P << 0.001), joint pain (P < 0.001), Lansbury index (P << 0.001), Ritchie index (P << 0.001), and morning serum concentrations of IL-6 (P < 0.01). The other study group showed minor but significant effects on morning stiffness (P < 0.05) and circulating concentrations of IL-6 (P < 0.05). Modest and similar improvements of C reactive protein, serum amyloid protein A, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were seen in both study groups.
CONCLUSIONS—Administration of low doses of glucocorticoids with a rather short biological half life seems to improve acute rheumatoid arthritis symptoms if it precedes the period of circadian flare in inflammatory activity, as defined by enhanced IL-6 synthesis. Further studies are needed to test the relative merits of different timing protocols of glucocorticoid administration in rheumatoid arthritis.

 PMID:9059137

  4. Evidence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection in sexually acquired reactive arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Keat, A C; Thomas, B J; Taylor-Robinson, D; Pegrum, G D; Maini, R N; Scott, J T

    1980-01-01

    Thirty male patients with sexually acquired reactive arthritis (SARA) have been studied at the time of their initial presentation and thereafter. Chlamydia trachomatis was isolated from the urethral exudate of 9 (36.0%) of the 25 patients from whom urethral specimens were taken, and elevated titres of IgM antibody of C. trachomatis were detected in 11 (36.6%) of the 30 initial sera. Thirteen (43.3%) of the patients has a positive urethral culture and/or elevated titre of IgM antibody, and it is therefore suggested that 43.3% of these patients suffered an acute chlamydial infection at or near the time of the onset of their joint disease. The demonstration of 4-fold or greater rises and/or falls in IgM antibody titre (8 patients) and IgG antibody titre (6 patients) in a group of 15 men studied throughout the course of their disease strongly supports this conclusion. A positive urethral culture and/or raised titre of IgM serum antibody was also detected in 25 (50%) of 50 men with uncomplicated nongonococcal urethritis (NGU), suggesting that the prevalence of chlamydial infections in the 2 conditions is similar. Titres of IgG serum antibody to C. trachomatis were, however, significantly higher in patients with SARA than in those with NGU or other rheumatic diseases, and in healthy controls. The geometric mean titres (GMT) of IgG serum antibody in patients with SARA, NGU, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and in healthy controls were 1:47.5, 1:8.6, 1:2.2, 1;2.2, 1:3.5, and 1:1.4, respectively. These findings suggest that an exaggerated antibody response to acute infection by C. trachomatis may be an important factor in the development of SARA in some but not all patients. PMID:6893652

  5. Arthritis mutilans: a report from the GRAPPA 2012 annual meeting.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Vinod; Gladman, Dafna D; Helliwell, Philip S; Gudbjörnsson, Björn

    2013-08-01

    Arthritis mutilans is often described as the most severe form of psoriatic arthritis. However, a widely agreed on definition of the disease has not been developed. At the 2012 annual meeting of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA), members hoped to agree on a definition of arthritis mutilans and thus facilitate clinical and molecular epidemiological research into the disease. Members discussed the clinical features of arthritis mutilans and definitions used by researchers to date; reviewed data from the ClASsification for Psoriatic ARthritis study, the Nordic psoriatic arthritis mutilans study, and the results of a premeeting survey; and participated in breakout group discussions. Through this exercise, GRAPPA members developed a broad consensus on the features of arthritis mutilans, which will help us develop a GRAPPA-endorsed definition of arthritis mutilans. PMID:23908536

  6. Vocational Rehabilitation for Persons with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allaire, Saralynn H.

    1998-01-01

    Useful vocational rehabilitation strategies for persons with rheumatoid arthritis include (1) management of symptoms and reduction of energy demand; (2) reasonable job accommodations; (3) identification of suitable jobs and necessary training; and (4) enhancement of self-advocacy skills. (SK)

  7. Juvenile Arthritis: Discoveries Lead to Newer Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Juvenile Arthritis: Discoveries Lead to Newer Treatments Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... better for different subgroups of the disease. In recent years, FDA has approved several of these treatments. ...

  8. [Arthritis and osteitis at the hand].

    PubMed

    Meier, R; Pillukat, T

    2011-06-01

    Septic arthritis and osteitis at the hand are associated with a high morbidity. Trauma is the major cause for these infections. In the majority of cases the fingers are involved. Causative microorganisms are predominantly Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. In addition, an increasing number of Gram-negative bacteria have been found in hand infections. As differential diagnosis, tumours and non-septic arthritis must be considered. Treatment includes surgical debridement, immobilisation and functional rehabilitation. Crucial for the surgical strategy are the virulence of the pathogens, the resistance of the patient and the location of the infection. If functional recovery cannot be expected, salvage procedures like arthrodeses and resection arthroplasties are sometimes required. Surgical treatment is sufficient in septic arthritis and osteomyelitis of the hand. However, to avoid permanent disability, rapid diagnosis and therapy are essential. This review describes our treatment concepts in septic arthritis and osteomyelitis at the hand. PMID:21494997

  9. Pharmacotherapy Options in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pradeep; Banik, Snehashish

    2013-01-01

    Drugs form the mainstay of therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Five main classes of drugs are currently used: analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), glucocorticoids, nonbiologic and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Current clinical practice guidelines recommend that clinicians start biologic agents if patients have suboptimal response or intolerant to one or two traditional disease modifying agents (DMARDs). Methotrexate, sulfasalazine, leflunomide and hydroxychloroquine are the commonly used DMARDs. Currently, anti-TNF is the commonly used first line biologic worldwide followed by abatacept and it is usually combined with MTX. There is some evidence that tocilizumab is the most effective biologic as a monotherapy agent. Rituximab is generally not used as a first line biologic therapy due to safety issues but still as effective as anti-TNF. The long term data for the newer oral small molecule biologics such as tofacitinib is not available and hence used only as a last resort. PMID:23997576

  10. Arthritis at the shoulder joint.

    PubMed

    Sankaye, Prashant; Ostlere, Simon

    2015-07-01

    The shoulder is a complex joint with numerous structures contributing to mobility and stability. Shoulder pain is a common clinical complaint that may be due to a wide spectrum of disorders including rotator cuff disease, instability, and arthropathy. Primary osteoarthritis of the shoulder joint is uncommon because it is a non-weight-bearing joint. Significant osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint is unusual in the absence of trauma, and the detection of advanced degenerative changes in patients without a known history of trauma should alert the clinician to search for other disorders. This article reviews the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and key imaging findings of the common categories of the arthritis affecting the glenohumeral joint. PMID:26021591

  11. Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis treatment.

    PubMed

    Menter, Alan

    2016-06-01

    Over the past several years, an increased understanding of the pathophysiology of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) has led to the development of several new biologic therapies. Appropriate treatment selection and timing may slow, and even halt, the progression of psoriasis and PsA; as a result, it can decrease the economic burden. As treatment options vary based on individual disease characteristics and patient preferences, reviewing the patient's complete clinical picture is imperative. An updated treatment algorithm, based on patients' most severe disease domain, is now available to guide the selection of optimal therapy. Special care should be given to patients with both psoriasis and PsA who experience multiple disease domains, a heavy symptom burden, and an increased risk of comorbidities. PMID:27356194

  12. Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis overview.

    PubMed

    Menter, Alan

    2016-06-01

    Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are chronic immune-mediated diseases that primarily affect the skin and joints, respectively; these diseases are also associated with high rates of cardiovascular and other comorbidities. Despite over 40 genes proven to be related to the disease, the exact causes of psoriasis and PsA are still to be determined. Recent insights into the underlying pathophysiology of these diseases have revealed novel therapeutic targets. Effective management requires timely diagnosis and initiation of treatment. Yet, both psoriasis and PsA remain underrecognized and undertreated in current clinical practice. Recognizing the true physical, social, and emotional burden of psoriasis and PsA, as well as their associated comorbidities, is the first step to improving the prognosis for affected patients. PMID:27356193

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Amandeep; Naik, Shobha; Pai, Anuradha; Anuradha, Ardra

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT) in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease. PMID:25684928

  14. Long-term clinical course of idiopathic pulmonary haemosiderosis with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Shunsuke; Terada, Jiro; Naito, Akira; Nishimura, Rintaro; Tsushima, Kenji; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2016-09-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary haemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare cause of diffuse alveolar haemorrhage during childhood, and its precise pathophysiology and long-term clinical course remain unclear. A 31-year-old man was diagnosed with IPH at four years of age and had recurrent episodes of haemoptysis. The patient's symptoms responded well to steroids. However, pulmonary fibrosis and the cystic region in the lung progressively worsened. At age 27, the patient developed polyarthritis with positive anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies. The patient also developed hand synovitis, which was diagnosed with ultrasonography. These results indicate complications from rheumatoid arthritis. The patient's dyspnoea gradually worsened, and at the age of 31, he developed pneumothorax and an acute exacerbation of IPH. The clinical course from ages 4 to 31 included progressive chronic respiratory failure because of pulmonary fibrosis, acute exacerbations, complications with rheumatoid arthritis, and deliberation regarding lung transplantation. The development of rheumatoid arthritis after the onset of IPH supports the theory of an autoimmune mechanism of IPH. PMID:27516890

  15. Reactive Arthritis Caused by Urinary Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Yuji; Yamagami, Shinichiro; Inoue, Hisashi; Uehara, Yuki; Kobayashi, Shigeto; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 58-year-old man presenting with chest pain who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The patient subsequently developed a fever over 38°C, pain on micturition, and cloudy urine 3 days following PCI. Urine cultures were positive for Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis, whereas blood cultures were negative. Arthritis occurred two weeks following urinary tract infection (UTI). We herein present a rare case of reactive arthritis caused by UTI following PCI. PMID:27150879

  16. Septic arthritis due to Aerococcus viridans.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P W; Trueblood, M C

    1985-10-01

    A 20-year-old woman was found to have septic arthritis of the hip due to Aerococcus viridans. This organism closely resembles Streptococcus viridans, but forms gram positive tetrads rather than chains in broth media. The organism has been reported rarely to cause endocarditis and one case of osteomyelitis has been observed. To our knowledge septic arthritis due to Aerococcus viridans has not been previously reported. PMID:4087248

  17. Primary and Posttraumatic Arthritis of the Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Debdut; Wysocki, Robert W.; Cohen, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Whether degenerative joint disease of the elbow may be the result of primary or posttraumatic etiologies, arthritis of the elbow commonly leads to pain, loss of motion, and functional disability. A detailed history and focused physical examination, in combination with imaging modalities, can help localize the origin of symptoms and help direct treatment. Although nonoperative treatment is the initial therapy for arthritis of the elbow, surgical interventions may provide substantial relief to the appropriately selected patient. PMID:23781338

  18. Does food cause or cure arthritis?

    PubMed

    Panush, R S

    1991-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis and most other forms of inflammatory joint disease--systemic rheumatic diseases--remain illnesses of unknown cause for which current therapy often is inadequate. The possibility that food antigens induce or perpetuate symptoms in at least some patients is novel, rational, and exciting. Studies that relate diet with arthritis might offer the potential of identifying new therapeutic approaches for selected patients and of developing new insights into disease pathogenesis. PMID:1862237

  19. Anti cytokine therapy in chronic inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Charlotte; Davies, Ruth; Choy, Ernest

    2016-10-01

    This is a review looking at anti cytokine therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Psoriatic Arthritis (PSA) and Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS). The review explores the similarities and differences in the clinical features, as well as treatments and cytokines involved in the development and propagation of the disease. Particular attention is paid to TNFα inhibitors IL-1ra, IL-6 and JAK kinase Inhibitors, anti IL23 and IL-12 and the new developments with anti-IL-17. PMID:27497159

  20. Can Rheumatoid Arthritis Be Prevented?

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of elevations of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-related biomarkers prior to the onset of clinically apparent RA raises hopes that individuals who are at risk for future RA can be identified in a preclinical phase of disease that is defined as abnormalities of RA-related immune activity prior to the clinically apparent onset of joint disease. Additionally, there is a growing understanding of the immunologic processes that are occurring in preclinical RA, as well as a growing understanding of risk factors that may be mechanistically related to RA development. Furthermore, there are data supporting that treatment of early RA can lead to drug free remission. Taken as a whole, these findings suggest that it may be possible to use biomarkers and other factors to accurately identify the likelihood and timing of onset of future RA, and intervene with immunomodulatory therapies and/or risk factor modification to prevent the future onset of RA in at-risk individuals. Importantly, several clinical prevention trials for RA have already been tried, and one is underway. However, while our understanding of the growing understanding of the mechanisms and natural history of RA development may be leading us to the implementation of prevention strategies for RA, there are still several challenges to be met. These include developing sufficiently accurate methods of predicting those at high risk for future RA so that clinical trials can be developed based on accurate rates of development of arthritis and subjects can be adequately informed of their risk for disease, identifying the appropriate interventions and biologic targets for optimal prevention, and addressing the psychosocial and economic aspects that are crucial to developing broadly applicable prevention measures for RA. These issues notwithstanding, prevention of RA may be within reach in the near future. PMID:24315049

  1. Inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-mediated tryptophan catabolism accelerates collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Szántó, Sándor; Koreny, Tamás; Mikecz, Katalin; Glant, Tibor T; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Varga, John

    2007-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is one of the initial and rate-limiting enzymes involved in the catabolism of the essential amino acid tryptophan. In cultured cells, the induction of IDO leads to depletion of tryptophan and tryptophan starvation. Recent studies suggest that modulation of tryptophan concentration via IDO plays a fundamental role in innate immune responses. Induction of IDO by interferon-gamma in macrophages and dendritic cells results in tryptophan depletion and suppresses the immune-mediated activation of fibroblasts and T, B, and natural killer cells. To assess the role of IDO in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a model of rheumatoid arthritis characterized by a primarily Th1-like immune response, activity of IDO was inhibited by 1-methyl-tryptophan (1-MT) in vivo. The results showed significantly increased incidence and severity of CIA in mice treated with 1-MT. Activity of IDO, as determined by measuring the levels of kynurenine/tryptophan ratio in the sera, was increased in the acute phase of arthritis and was higher in collagen-immunized mice that did not develop arthritis. Treatment with 1-MT resulted in an enhanced cellular and humoral immune response and a more dominant polarization to Th1 in mice with arthritis compared with vehicle-treated arthritic mice. The results demonstrated that development of CIA was associated with increased IDO activity and enhanced tryptophan catabolism in mice. Blocking IDO with 1-MT aggravated the severity of arthritis and enhanced the immune responses. These findings suggest that IDO may play an important and novel role in the negative feedback of CIA and possibly in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:17511858

  2. Abnormal bone remodelling in inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bogoch, Earl R.; Moran, Erica

    1998-01-01

    Osteopenia is responsible for substantial comorbidity in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and is an important factor in the surgical management of joint disease. In animal models of bone loss stimulated by inflammatory arthritis, increased bone remodelling and altered microstructure of bone have been documented. The subchondral bone plate near the joint surface is narrow and perforated by vascular inflammatory invasion, and in the shaft the thin cortices are weakened by giant resorption defects. Biomechanical tests and a mathematical model of bone strength suggest that cortical defects, much larger than those found in normal osteonal remodelling, are principally responsible for the experimentally observed loss of strength. Similarly, these defects may explain the increased femoral fracture risk in rheumatoid arthritis. The osteoclast, the cell resorbing bone, is demonstrated in increased number and activity in rheumatoid arthritis and in animal models. Bisphosphonates, drugs that inhibit osteoclast function, have been shown experimentally to reduce both focal and generalized osteopenia and to prevent loss of bone strength. Bisphosphonates also protect articular cartilage from damage characteristic of inflammatory arthritis. The mechanism of chondroprotection may be prevention of subchondral bone resorption by the osteoclast and also an altered distribution of bone marrow cells. Thus, bisphosphonates, currently in clinical use for other bone metabolic diseases, appear to have potential as prophylaxis and treatment for osteopenia and joint damage in inflammatory arthritis. PMID:9711159

  3. Bilateral Cricoarytenoid Arthritis: A Cause of Recurrent Upper Airway Obstruction in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Pradeep; Bhardwaj, Abhishek; Venkatachalam, VP

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral cricoarytenoid joint arthritis with history of rheumatoid arthritis, presented with stridor to the outpatient department. Endolaryngoscopy revealed adducted vocal cords and a nodule over left arytenoid which later confirmed to be rheumatoid nodule on histopathologic examination. Initially, although patient responded well to medical treatment, recurrence was noticed after 6 months follow-up.

  4. Nerve Zap Eased Rheumatoid Arthritis in Small Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_159838.html Nerve Zap Eased Rheumatoid Arthritis in Small Study Treatment worked some for patients ... the gut may help ease stubborn symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, preliminary research suggests. The study, of 17 adults ...

  5. Arthritis Education: Opportunities and State of the Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daltroy, Lawren H.; Liang, Matthew H.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of programs have produced changes in knowledge, behavior, and health for arthritis patients. National dissemination of patient education programs is in progress. Research needs center on new populations, delivery methods, and arthritis-specific applications of theory. (SK)

  6. Common Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis Reduces Risk of Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research 2013 April 2013 (historical) Common Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis Reduces Risk of Death Taking methotrexate—a commonly ... reduce the risk of death among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to recently-published research in the ...

  7. Immunopathology of chronic lentivirus-induced arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkerson, M. J.; Davis, W. C.; Baszler, T. V.; Cheevers, W. P.

    1995-01-01

    This study evaluated histopathology and mononuclear cell phenotypes in synovial lesions of chronic arthritis induced by experimental infection of Saanen goats with caprine arthritis-encephalitis lentivirus. Histological examination of carpal joint synovium of three infected goats with clinical arthritis revealed progressive lesions consisting of membrane villus hypertrophy with extensive angiogenesis and mononuclear cell infiltration and degenerative changes of membrane villus necrosis associated with loss of vasculature and infiltrates. Changes in synovial tissue of five age-matched infected goats without clinical arthritis were limited to moderate synovial membrane hyperplasia also noted in an age-matched uninfected goat. Immunohistochemistry identified CD45R+ CD5- B lymphocytes as the principal component of most perivascular infiltrates in arthritic synovium. Other mononuclear cells included perivascular CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and macrophages with a prominent accumulation of CD8+ T lymphocytes at the lining surface of inflamed villi. T lymphocytes and macrophages as well as synovial lining cells were activated with respect to MHC class II but not for interleukin-2 receptors. Inflamed villi also contained lymphoid aggregates comprised of B cell germinal centers and activated T-cell mantles. B cells expressing immunoglobulin occurred around follicles and throughout inflamed villi. These findings indicate that memory immune responses that favor expansion and maturation of B cells and immunoglobulin production contribute to the immunopathology of chronic arthritis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7778682

  8. Management of Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Vijay; Murray, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) comprises a group of heterogeneous disorders of chronic arthritis in childhood and remains the commonest pediatric rheumatic disease associated with significant long-term morbidity. Advances in understanding of the pathogenesis, better definition of disease control/remission measures, and the arrival of biological agents have improved the outcomes remarkably. Methotrexate (Mtx) remains the first-line disease modifying (DMARD) therapy for most children with JIA due to its proven efficacy and safety. Sulphosalazine (SSz) (especially for enthesitis) and leflunomide may also have a secondary role. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNF-I), alone or in combination with Mtx have shown tremendous benefit in children with polyarticular JIA, enthesitis related arthritis (ERA) and psoriatic arthritis. Tocilizumab appears very efficacious in systemic arthritis and abatacept and tocilizumab also appear to benefit polyarticular JIA; the role of rituximab remains unclear, though clearly beneficial in adult RA. TNF-I with Mtx is also effective in uveitis associated with JIA. Biologicals have demonstrated an impressive safety record in children with JIA, although close monitoring for rare but potentially dangerous adverse events, such as tuberculosis and other infections; paradoxical development of additional autoimmune diseases; and possibly an increased risk of cancers is warranted. PMID:26639461

  9. 77 FR 14529 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-12

    ... moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis who have had an inadequate response to one or more disease... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice...

  10. Molecular targets in arthritis and recent trends in nanotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder Kaur; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Due to its severity and increasing epidemiology, arthritis needs no description. There are various forms of arthritis most of which are disabling, very painful, and common. In spite of breakthroughs in the field of drug discovery, there is no cure for arthritis that can eliminate the disease permanently and ease the pain. The present review focuses on some of the most successful drugs in arthritis therapy and their side effects. Potential new targets in arthritis therapy such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-17A, tumor necrosis factor alpha, osteopontin, and several others have been discussed here, which can lead to refinement of current therapeutic modalities. Mechanisms for different forms of arthritis have been discussed along with the molecules that act as potential biomarkers for arthritis. Due to the difficulty in monitoring the disease progression to detect the advanced manifestations of the diseases, drug-induced cytotoxicity, and problems with drug delivery; nanoparticle therapy has gained the attention of the researchers. The unique properties of nanoparticles make them highly attractive for the design of novel therapeutics or diagnostic agents for arthritis. The review also focuses on the recent trends in nanoformulation development used for arthritis therapy. This review is, therefore, important because it describes the relevance and need for more arthritis research, it brings forth a critical discussion of successful drugs in arthritis and analyses the key molecular targets. The review also identifies several knowledge gaps in the published research so far along with the proposal of new ideas and future directions in arthritis therapy. PMID:26345140

  11. 38 CFR 4.58 - Arthritis due to strain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Arthritis due to strain... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.58 Arthritis due to strain. With service incurred lower extremity amputation or shortening, a disabling arthritis, developing...

  12. 38 CFR 4.58 - Arthritis due to strain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arthritis due to strain... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.58 Arthritis due to strain. With service incurred lower extremity amputation or shortening, a disabling arthritis, developing...

  13. 38 CFR 4.58 - Arthritis due to strain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Arthritis due to strain... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.58 Arthritis due to strain. With service incurred lower extremity amputation or shortening, a disabling arthritis, developing...

  14. 76 FR 29767 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... arthritis attacks. ILARIS has also been shown to extend the time to the next attack and reduce the...

  15. 38 CFR 4.58 - Arthritis due to strain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Arthritis due to strain... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.58 Arthritis due to strain. With service incurred lower extremity amputation or shortening, a disabling arthritis, developing...

  16. 38 CFR 4.58 - Arthritis due to strain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Arthritis due to strain... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.58 Arthritis due to strain. With service incurred lower extremity amputation or shortening, a disabling arthritis, developing...

  17. HLA-linked rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Hasstedt, S.J.; Clegg, D.O.; Ingles, L.; Ward, R.H.

    1994-10-01

    Twenty-eight pedigrees were ascertained through pairs of first-degree relatives diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA was confirmed in 77 pedigree members including probands; the absence of disease was verified in an additional 261 pedigree members. Pedigree members were serologically typed for HLA. We used likelihood analysis to statistically characterize the HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus. The genetic model assumed tight linkage to HLA. The analysis supported the existence of an HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus, estimated the lifetime penetrance as 41% in male homozygotes and as 48% in female homozygotes. Inheritance was recessive in males and was nearly recessive in females. In addition, the analysis attributed 78% of the variance within genotypes to genetic or environmental effects shared by siblings. The genetic model inferred in this analysis is consistent with previous association, linkage, and familial aggregation studies of RA. The inferred HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus accounts for approximately one-fifth of the RA in the population. Although other genes may account for the remaining familial RA, a large portion of RA cases may occur sporadically. 79 refs., 9 tabs.

  18. Genetic epidemiology of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, A H; Kwoh, C K; Venglish, C M; Aston, C E; Chakravarti, A

    1995-01-01

    We conducted family studies and segregation analyses of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that were based on consecutive patients with RA ascertained without regard to family history or known risk factors. First-degree relatives from 135 simplex and 30 multiplex families were included in the analyses. A highly penetrant recessive major gene, with a mutant allele frequency of .005, was identified as the most parsimonious genetic risk factor. Significant evidence for heterogeneity in risk for RA was observed for proband gender but not for proband age at onset. Kaplan-Meier risk analysis demonstrated significant evidence for differences in the distribution of risk among first-degree relatives. These analyses demonstrated that both proband gender and age at onset are important risk factors but that proband gender appears to be the more important determinant of risk, with relatives of male probands having the greatest cumulative risk for RA. In addition, log-linear modeling identified proband gender, familiality (multiplex or simplex), and an interaction term between these two variables as being adequate to define the distribution of risk in families. The pattern of risk for RA among susceptible individuals and its inheritance is thus heterogeneous. For future genetic analyses, families with an excess of affected males having a young age at onset may be the most informative in identifying the putative recessive gene and its modifiers. PMID:7611283

  19. The microbiome and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Scher, Jose U.; Abramson, Steven B.

    2012-01-01

    Humans are not (and have never been) alone. From the moment we are born, millions of micro-organisms populate our bodies and coexist with us rather peacefully for the rest of our lives. This microbiome represents the totality of micro-organisms (and their genomes) that we necessarily acquire from the environment. Micro-organisms living in or on us have evolved to extract the energy they require to survive, and in exchange they support the physiological, metabolic and immune capacities that have contributed to our evolutionary success. Although currently categorized as an autoimmune disorder and regarded as a complex genetic disease, the ultimate cause of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains elusive. It seems that interplay between predisposing genetic factors and environmental triggers is required for disease manifestation. New insights from DNA sequence-based analyses of gut microbial communities and a renewed interest in mucosal immunology suggest that the microbiome represents an important environmental factor that can influence autoimmune disease manifestation. This Review summarizes the historical clues that suggest a possible role for the microbiota in the pathogenesis of RA, and will focus on new technologies that might provide scientific evidence to support this hypothesis. PMID:21862983

  20. Unmet needs in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bykerk, Vivian

    2009-06-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), including the introduction of biologic therapies and employment of combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) strategies, remission rates remain suboptimal and patients with RA are still missing a significant number of work days. Early diagnostic criteria are needed to ensure that appropriate treatment is initiated early so as to prevent joint damage. Better prognostic markers are also needed to identify patients with the potential for poor outcomes, in whom more aggressive strategies can be applied at the outset. Because of stringent inclusion criteria and heterogeneous definitions of remission, results seen in clinical trials of RA are not necessarily generalizable to results seen in clinical practice. As a result, existing guidelines may not adequately reflect current practice. In the absence of biomarkers to predict the course of disease, methotrexate remains the standard of care initially for most patients with RA. The ability to predict the course of disease could allow more appropriately targeted therapy and higher rates of remission. PMID:19509330

  1. Effect of pumpkin-seed oil on the level of free radical scavengers induced during adjuvant-arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Fahim, A T; Abd-el Fattah, A A; Agha, A M; Gad, M Z

    1995-01-01

    Pumpkin-seed oil (PSO), a natural supplement rich with antioxidant ingredients, was given to rats in which arthritis was induced using Freund's complete adjuvant. Its effect was compared with that of indomethacin, as a classical anti-inflammatory agent. Two experimental patterns were studied, an acute phase that was applied only with PSO and a chronic phase applied for both PSO and indomethacin. Compared to normal untreated rats, it was shown that the induction of arthritis caused a decrease in serum sulphhydryl groups, with an increase in serum ceruloplasmin in both phases. Blood glutathione was first elevated in the acute phase, then its level was reduced in the chronic phase. Serum N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase activity was elevated only at the acute phase, while plasma total proteins and albumin were reduced at the chronic phase. Liver glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity was markedly increased, while no changes were observed in the levels of liver lipid peroxides and glutathione. These changes in the studied parameters were attributed to the superoxides and free radicals during arthritic inflammation. Administration of PSO succeeded in modulating most of the altered parameters affected during arthritis, especially at the chronic phase. Also, a remarkable inhibition of paw oedema was observed. A similar pattern was obtained upon treatment with indomethacin except that indomethacin markedly elevated liver lipid peroxides levels. Concurrent administration of PSO with indomethacin caused no changes in the parameters studied compared to that induced by treatment with indomethacin alone. PMID:7784309

  2. Arthritis and pain. Psychosocial aspects in the management of arthritis pain.

    PubMed

    Backman, Catherine L

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize psychosocial factors associated with arthritis pain and highlight recent evidence for psychosocial approaches to managing arthritis pain. By definition, psychosocial factors refer to two dimensions of experience: the psychological (cognitive, affective) and social (interacting with others, engaging in life activities). Psychosocial factors influence the perception of pain and the presence of pain influences psychological well-being and social participation. After discussing the impact of arthritis pain on participation in work, family life, and leisure, evidence for psychosocial interventions is summarized, emphasizing reviews and studies published from January 2000 to August 2006. PMID:17169138

  3. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  4. Arthritis in Flemish paintings (1400-1700).

    PubMed Central

    Dequeker, J

    1977-01-01

    A close examination of the hands of people depicted in paintings of the Flemish school showed that in five paintings there were figures with hand lesions resembling those of rhematoid arthritis. Although none of the deformities or swellings are indisputable examples of rheumatoid arthritis, they do at least suggest that the painters must have been confronted with rheumatoid-like lesions in their models. In two other paintings there were signs of rheumatic fever and of temporal arteritis. No arthritic lesions were found in the works of painters of the Italian Renaissance, probably because they are less detailed. The finding of rheumatoid deformities in the Flemish paintings does, however, question the general belief that rheumatoid arthritis is a condition that has arisen relatively recently. Images FIGS 1-2 FIG 3 FIG 4 FIG 5 FIG 6 FIG 7 PMID:324568

  5. Relationship of Psoriatic Arthritis to Other Spondyloarthritides.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Ignazio; D'Angelo, Salvatore; Gilio, Michele; Palazzi, Carlo; Lubrano, Ennio; Padula, Angela

    2015-11-01

    In the early 1970s, Moll and co-workers formulated the unified concept of spondyloarthritides, a group of conditions sharing similar clinical features. Subsequently, criteria for their classification have been proposed by Amor and coworkers, the European Spondylarthropathy Study Group, and the Assessment in SpondyloArthritis international Society. Opinion, however, is divided between those who believe that the different entities of the complex represent the variable expression of the same disease ("lumpers") and those who think that these should be considered separately but under the same umbrella ("splitters"). Several sets of criteria have been proposed for psoriatic arthritis (PsA), the most recent being the ClASsification for Psoriatic Arthritis (CASPAR) criteria. According to some authors, there are persuasive arguments to support the view of PsA as a distinct entity. PMID:26523053

  6. Glycosylation as a marker for inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Simone; Unwin, Louise; Muniyappa, Mohankumar; Rudd, Pauline M

    2014-01-01

    Changes in serum protein glycosylation play an important role in inflammatory arthritis. Altered galactosylation of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in rheumatoid arthritis attracts special attention due to the devastating nature of the disease. Studying glycosylation changes of serum proteins has been recognized as a potential strategy to provide added value regarding diagnostics, aetiopathology and therapy of inflammatory arthritic diseases. Key questions, which are approached in these fields of research, are whether or not glycosylation can be used as a complementary pre-clinical and clinical marker for disease differentiation, diagnosis, the prediction of disease course and severity as well as for the evaluation of disease therapies. These studies mainly focus on TNF antagonists, which present a new and promising way of treating inflammatory arthritis. The recent availability of new high-throughput glycoanalytical tools enables a more profound and efficient investigation in large patient cohorts and helps to gain new insights in the complex mechanism of the underlying disease pathways. PMID:24643039

  7. Pharmacogenetics of treatment response in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jani, Meghna; Barton, Anne; Ho, Pauline

    2015-07-01

    TNF-blocking agents, non-biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (nbDMARDs) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly prescribed treatments in psoriatic arthritis. A large proportion of patients do not respond to these medications, although unfortunately clinically useful biomarkers that predict future response are currently lacking. Several candidate gene polymorphisms have been associated with responses to biologic therapies and nbDMARDs; however, replication and validation of these variants in large prospective psoriatic arthritis cohorts are required before translating these to clinical practice. In this review, we discuss the advances made in pharmacogenetics of treatment response in psoriatic arthritis to date, with focus on biologic therapies approved for use, nbDMARDs and NSAIDs, as well as outline emerging methodologies to obtain data that will help inform a future precision medicine approach in this condition. PMID:25980667

  8. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Szekanecz, Zoltan; Vegvari, Aniko; Szabo, Zoltan; Koch, Alisa E.

    2010-01-01

    Chemokines are involved in leukocyte recruitment to inflammatory sites, such as the synovial tissue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There is a structural and a functional classification of chemokines. The former includes four groups: CXC, CC, C and CX3C chemokines. Chemokines may also be either inflammatory or homeostatic, however, these functions often overlap. Anti-chemokine and anti-chemokine receptor targeting may be therapeutically used in the future biological therapy of arthritis. Most data in this field have been obtained from animal models of arthritis as only very few human RA trials have been completed. However, it is very likely that various specific chemokine and chemokine receptor antagonists will be developed and administered to RA patients. PMID:20036936

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis, the contraceptive pill, and androgens.

    PubMed

    James, W H

    1993-06-01

    Evidence is accumulating that low androgen concentrations are a cause of rheumatoid arthritis. This would explain a number of established features of the epidemiology of the disease. These include: (a) the variation of disease activity with pregnancy; (b) the variation of age at onset by sex; (c) the variation by sex with HLA-B15; (d) the association with bone mineral density; and (e) the differing time trends in incidence rates by sex. It is argued, moreover, that if one makes a plausible assumption--namely, that women who choose oral contraceptives have high androgen concentrations at the time they first make this choice--then an explanation becomes available for the confusion about the relation between rheumatoid arthritis and oral contraception. Grounds are adduced for that assumption. If this line of reasoning is substantially correct it also has implications for the relations between rheumatoid arthritis and smoking and consumption of alcohol. PMID:8323402

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis in population samples in Iraq.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rawi, Z S; Alazzawi, A J; Alajili, F M; Alwakil, R

    1978-01-01

    A prevalence survey for rheumatoid arthritis was carried out during the summer of 1975 in persons aged 16 years and over in areas of Iraq representative of differences in geography and ethnicity. Definite rheumatoid arthritis was observed in 1% of the 6999 individuals studied, but differences in occurrence rates in relation to various associated characteristics were not detected. It is concluded that present rheumatological services in Iraq have not developed in response to the magnitude of the existing burden. Morning stiffness was reported fairly frequently by individuals without rheumatoid arthritis, but the significance of this observation is not easy to determine. Raynaud's phenomenon was also recorded, but comparative evaluation of the findings is not possible. PMID:629609

  11. Outcome of ankle arthrodesis in posttraumatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, BS Narayana; Kumar, J Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Ankle arthrodesis is still a gold standard salvage procedure for the management of ankle arthritis. There are several functional and mechanical benefits of ankle arthrodesis, which make it a viable surgical procedure in the management of ankle arthritis. The functional outcomes following ankle arthrodesis are not very well known. The purpose of this study was to perform a clinical and radiographic evaluation of ankle arthrodesis in posttraumatic arthritis performed using Charnley's compression device. Materials and Methods: Between January 2006 and December 2009 a functional assessment of 15 patients (10 males and 5 females) who had undergone ankle arthrodesis for posttraumatic arthritis and/or avascular necrosis (AVN) talus (n=6), malunited bimalleolar fracture (n=4), distal tibial plafond fractures (n=3), medial malleoli nonunion (n=2). All the patients were assessed clinically and radiologically after an average followup of 2 years 8 months (range 1–5.7 years). Results: All patients had sound ankylosis and no complications related to the surgery. Scoring the patients with the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot scale, we found that 11 of the 15 had excellent results, two had good, and two showed fair results. They were all returned to their preinjury activities. Conclusion: We conclude that, the ankle arthrodesis can still be considered as a standard procedure in ankle arthritis. On the basis of these results, patients should be counseled that an ankle fusion will help to relieve pain and to improve overall function. Still, one should keep in mind that it is a salvage procedure that will cause persistent alterations in gait with a potential for deterioration due to the development of subtalar arthritis. PMID:22719119

  12. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Psoriatic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Orbai, Ana-Maria; Ogdie, Alexis

    2016-05-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures are an important component to assessing disease impact and therapy response in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Overall, there are few PsA-specific PROs. Most PROs used in PsA are borrowed from other diseases (eg, rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis) or general population PROs. PROs are used in PsA clinical trials and in the clinical management of PsA. In this review, we discuss the most commonly used PRO in PsA, including their inclusion in composite measures. Future studies may be helpful to determine the best performing PROs in patients with PsA. PMID:27133489

  13. [Guidelines for the management of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Kawahito, Yutaka

    2016-06-01

    In 2014, guidelines for the management of rheumatoid arthritis, was announced from Japan College of Rheumatology. This guideline was made by the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) method with a concept of "treat to target" led for European and American recommendation of rheumatoid arthritis. It assesses not only evidences but also the balance of desirable and undesirable consequences, values and preferences of the patient, and resource use. It is constructed by evidence summary of 88 clinical questions and 37 recommendations about medication, orthopaedic surgery and rehabilitation. PMID:27311182

  14. Cardiovascular Risk in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Tracy Y.; Li, Edmund K.; Tam, Lai-Shan

    2012-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis. In addition to skin and joint involvement, there is increasing evidence suggesting that patients with PsA also have an increase in risk of clinical and subclinical cardiovascular diseases, mostly due to accelerating atherosclerosis. Both conventional and nonconventional cardiovascular risk factors contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk in PsA. Chronic inflammation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in PsA, acting independently and/or synergistically with the conventional risk factors. In this paper, we discuss the current literature indicating that patients with PsA are at risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22645614

  15. Getting arthritis gene therapy into the clinic

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher H.; Ghivizzani, Steven C.; Robbins, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Gene transfer technologies enable the controlled, targeted and sustained expression of gene products at precise anatomical locations, such as the joint. In this way, they offer the potential for more-effective, less-expensive treatments of joint diseases with fewer extra-articular adverse effects. A large body of preclinical data confirms the utility of intra-articular gene therapy in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. However, relatively few clinical trials have been conducted, only one of which has completed phase II. This article summarizes the status in 2010 of the clinical development of gene therapy for arthritis, identifies certain constraints to progress and suggests possible solutions. PMID:21135882

  16. Psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis: differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Maddalena; Caso, Francesco; Scarpa, Raffaele; Megna, Matteo; Patrì, Angela; Balato, Nicola; Costa, Luisa

    2016-08-01

    Psoriasis frequency ranges from 1 to 3 % in white population, and arthritis occurs in 10-40 % of psoriasis patients, representing a relevant health issue. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthropathy, associated with psoriasis, in which ocular-, intestinal-, metabolic-, and cardiovascular-related manifestations can variably coexist. In order to favor early PsA and psoriasis diagnosis, it is crucial to rule out other conditions that can resemble the disease and delay appropriate therapeutic approach. Therefore, the aim of this review is to focus on PsA and psoriasis differential diagnosis. PMID:27156076

  17. Biomarkers of (osteo)arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mobasheri, Ali; Henrotin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Arthritic diseases are a major cause of disability and morbidity, and cause an enormous burden for health and social care systems globally. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis. The key risk factors for the development of OA are age, obesity, joint trauma or instability. Metabolic and endocrine diseases can also contribute to the pathogenesis of OA. There is accumulating evidence to suggest that OA is a whole-organ disease that is influenced by systemic mediators, inflammaging, innate immunity and the low-grade inflammation induced by metabolic syndrome. Although all joint tissues are implicated in disease progression in OA, articular cartilage has received the most attention in the context of aging, injury and disease. There is increasing emphasis on the early detection of OA as it has the capacity to target and treat the disease more effectively. Indeed it has been suggested that this is the era of “personalized prevention” for OA. However, the development of strategies for the prevention of OA require new and sensitive biomarker tools that can detect the disease in its molecular and pre-radiographic stage, before structural and functional alterations in cartilage integrity have occurred. There is also evidence to support a role for biomarkers in OA drug discovery, specifically the development of disease modifying osteoarthritis drugs. This Special Issue of Biomarkers is dedicated to recent progress in the field of OA biomarkers. The papers in this Special Issue review the current state-of-the-art and discuss the utility of OA biomarkers as diagnostic and prognostic tools. PMID:26954784

  18. Cervical myelopathy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Meijers, K A; Cats, A; Kremer, H P; Luyendijk, W; Onvlee, G J; Thomeer, R T

    1984-01-01

    Results obtained in 43 Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with cervical myelopathy are described; all patients showed several alarm signs together with neurological disturbances. Thirty-four cases were operable; nine patients were not operated upon for various reasons (refusal, and general condition). In the surgically treated patients, the changes were localized in the C1-C2 area (n = 20), in the area below C2 (n = 5), or in both (n = 9). The patients were put on skull traction pre- and post-operatively and nursed on a circo-electric bed. Pre-operatively, the duration of traction varied from a few days to weeks (mean 3 weeks). Post-operatively, the patients were given continuous skull traction for 2 1/2-3 months. This procedure yielded neurological improvement and a stable graft in all but two patients. On follow-up, recurrence of neurological complaints was seen in nine patients, in four due to a new slip at a lower level. Three of these cases were reoperated with good results. Twenty-three patients have died: four 'early' (one pre-operatively and three within 6 weeks post-operatively) and 19 'late'. The mean duration of follow-up was 4.5 years. In those who died 'late', the cause of death was due to the effects of an unstable graft in two cases and in the others the causes were not related to changes in the cervical spine. In the 10 patients who are still alive the mean duration of follow-up is 5 years. The nine patients who were not operated upon all died within a year, 4 of them due to consequences of cord compression. If cervical spondylodesis is feasible in an RA patient with myelopathy, the procedure is advocated. PMID:6529877

  19. Imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Fiona M

    2013-08-01

    Imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has undergone extraordinary change in recent years and new techniques are now available to help the clinician diagnose and manage patients much more effectively than previously. While established modalities such as plain radiography (X-Ray) remain important, especially for detection of erosions and determining the progression of joint damage, there are many instances where ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scanning provide added information. MRI and US are now used regularly by clinicians to help diagnose RA in the pre-radiographic stage as they offer improved visualisation of joint erosions. They also have the potential to provide prognostic information as MRI bone oedema/osteitis is linked to the later development of erosions and power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) joint positivity is also a predictor of joint damage. Nuclear imaging techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are also highly sensitive for detecting joint change in early RA and pre-RA but not yet used clinically mainly because of accessibility and radiation exposure. MRI, US, scintigraphy, SPECT and PET have all been shown to detect sub-clinical joint inflammation in patients in clinical remission, a state that is now the goal of most treat-to-target management strategies. Thus, imaging may be used to direct therapeutic decision making and MRI is also now being used in clinical trials to determine the impact of disease-suppressing therapy on the course of synovitis and osteitis. As is the case for all tests, it would be unwise to rely completely on any one imaging result, as false positives and negatives can occur for all modalities. Thus, the clinician needs to choose the most relevant and reliable imaging test, while also striving to minimise patient discomfort, radiation burden and economic impact. PMID:24315051

  20. Biomarkers of (osteo)arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mobasheri, Ali; Henrotin, Yves

    2015-12-01

    Arthritic diseases are a major cause of disability and morbidity, and cause an enormous burden for health and social care systems globally. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis. The key risk factors for the development of OA are age, obesity, joint trauma or instability. Metabolic and endocrine diseases can also contribute to the pathogenesis of OA. There is accumulating evidence to suggest that OA is a whole-organ disease that is influenced by systemic mediators, inflammaging, innate immunity and the low-grade inflammation induced by metabolic syndrome. Although all joint tissues are implicated in disease progression in OA, articular cartilage has received the most attention in the context of aging, injury and disease. There is increasing emphasis on the early detection of OA as it has the capacity to target and treat the disease more effectively. Indeed it has been suggested that this is the era of "personalized prevention" for OA. However, the development of strategies for the prevention of OA require new and sensitive biomarker tools that can detect the disease in its molecular and pre-radiographic stage, before structural and functional alterations in cartilage integrity have occurred. There is also evidence to support a role for biomarkers in OA drug discovery, specifically the development of disease modifying osteoarthritis drugs. This Special Issue of Biomarkers is dedicated to recent progress in the field of OA biomarkers. The papers in this Special Issue review the current state-of-the-art and discuss the utility of OA biomarkers as diagnostic and prognostic tools. PMID:26954784

  1. Long-term followup of rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanay, A.; Field, E.H.; Hoppe, R.T.; Strober, S.

    1987-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation was administered to 32 patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis. Twenty-four patients showed at least a 25% improvement in 3 of 4 disease activity parameters, which persisted during the followup period of up to 48 months. Eight of the 32 patients required adjunctive immunosuppressive drug therapy to maintain improvement. Four patients died after total lymphoid irradiation; the causes of death were acute myocardial infarction (1 patient), pulmonary embolism (1 patient), and rheumatoid lung disease complicated by respiratory infection (2 patients). After therapy, patients exhibited a prolonged reduction in the number and function of circulating T helper cells.

  2. Ultrasound in Rheumatologic Interstitial Lung Disease: A Case Report of Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Laria, A; Lurati, A; Scarpellini, M

    2015-01-01

    According to the American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society consensus classification, idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) include several clinic-radiologic-pathologic entities: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, acute interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated ILD, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and lymphoid interstitial pneumonia. Ultrasound Lung Comets (ULCs) are an echographic chest-sonography hallmark of pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. We describe the ultrasound (US) findings in the follow-up of a NSIP's case in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PMID:26240772

  3. [Lesions of the radio-carpal joint in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and its surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Herasymenko, S I; Babko, A M

    2014-08-01

    Affection of radio-carpal joint is most frequently revealed in patients, suffering rheumatoid arthritis. While the disease progressing in almost 75% of patients the inflammatory changes in radio-carpal joint occur. An acute and chronic synovitis, damage of a cartilage constitute a cause of a typical erosion of bones inside a joint, weakening of a tendo-ligamentous apparatus and its further deformity. Operative treatment was aimed for the inflammatory focus elimination, reduction of the pain syndrome severity, the function loss, and the joint deformity correction. The mostly used operative interventions are tenoectomy, synovectomy, arthrodesis, total endoprosthesis. PMID:25417294

  4. Aspergillus osteoarthritis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gunsilius, E; Lass-Flörl, C; Mur, E; Gabl, C; Gastl, G; Petzer, A L

    1999-11-01

    We report an unusual case of arthritis of the right wrist due to Aspergillus fumigatus without evidence for a generalized infection, following chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The diagnosis was made by surgical biopsy. Amphotericin-B (Am-B) was not tolerated by the patient. Liposomal preparations of Am-B penetrate poorly into bone and cartilage. Therefore, oral itraconazole was given; the arthritis improved and chemotherapy was continued without infectious complications. Two weeks after complete hematopoietic recovery, an intracranial hemorrhage from a mycotic aneurysm of a brain vessel occurred, although the patient was still receiving itraconazole. We emphasize the importance of prompt and thorough efforts to identify the causative agent in immunocompromised patients with a joint infection. Itraconazole is effective in Aspergillus osteoarthritis but, due to its poor penetration into the brain, the combination with a liposomal formulation of Am-B is recommended. PMID:10602898

  5. X-linked agammaglobulinemia combined with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zaihua; Kang, Yuli; Lin, Zhenlang; Huang, Yanjing; Lv, Huoyang; Li, Yasong

    2015-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. XLA can also present in combination with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the major chronic rheumatologic disease in children. We report herein the first known case of a juvenile patient diagnosed with XLA combined with JIA that later developed into invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic polyarthritis. An additional comprehensive review of XLA combined with JIA and invasive K. pneumoniae septic arthritis is also presented. XLA was identified by the detection of BTK mutations while the diagnosis of JIA was established by clinical and laboratory assessments. Septic arthritis caused by invasive K. pneumoniae was confirmed by culturing of the synovia and gene detection of the isolates. Invasive K. pneumoniae infections can not only result in liver abscesses but also septic arthritis, although this is rare. XLA combined with JIA may contribute to invasive K. pneumoniae infection. PMID:24567239

  6. Substance P and Acute Pain in Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lisowska, Barbara; Siewruk, Katarzyna; Lisowski, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is a limited information about the role of Substance P (SP) in acute pain nociception following surgical stimulation in patients with a chronic inflammatory state not to mention the link between this neuropeptide level changes and intensity of pain. The goal of the research was to find the correlation between SP level changes and acute pain intensity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis undergoing elective orthopedic surgery. Material and Methods Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were enrolled in the study. The correlation between acute pain intensity and concentration of SP in serum as well as in drainage fluid from postoperative wound was assessed in patients with RA who underwent Total Knee Replacement (TKA) under spinal anesthesia. Results In patients with RA a correlation between intensity of acute pain and serum SP was found postoperatively, whereas there was no correlation between intensity of acute pain and concentration of SP in drainage fluid. Conclusions 1. The correlation between acute pain intensity and SP serum concentration was found postoperatively in patients with RA. 2. The correlation between acute pain intensity and SP concentration in drainage fluid was not found postoperatively in patients with RA. PMID:26731421

  7. Optimizing Exercise Programs for Arthritis Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulware, Dennis W.; Byrd, Shannon L.

    1993-01-01

    Exercise can help decrease pain and improve function in people with rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. Physicians must provide individualized, realistic, enjoyable exercise programs that help affected joints, build fitness, and maximize patient compliance. Physicians must also provide appropriate follow-up care, adjusting the exercise program…

  8. Systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cimaz, Rolando

    2016-09-01

    Systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SoJIA) is a systemic inflammatory disease which has up to now been classified as a category of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. However, in this context, systemic inflammation has been associated with dysregulation of the innate immune system, suggesting that it may rather be part of the spectrum of autoinflammatory disorders. The disease is in fact unique with regard to the other JIA categories, in terms of clinical manifestations, prognosis, and response to conventional immunosuppressant therapies. It is characterized clinically by fever, lymphadenopathy, arthritis, rash, and serositis. IL-1 and IL-6 play a major role in the pathogenesis of SoJIA, and treatment with IL-1 and IL-6 inhibitors has shown to be highly effective. However, complications of SoJIA, including macrophage activation syndrome, limitations in functional outcome by arthritis and long-term damage from chronic inflammation continue to be a major issue in patients' care. Recent advances on the pathogenesis and treatment have revolutionized the care and prognosis of this potentially life-threatening pediatric condition. PMID:27392503

  9. Mineral Oil Aspiration Related Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Andrew D.; Fischer, Philip R.; Reed, Ann M.; Wylam, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of rheumatoid factor-positive migratory polyarthritis in a 5-year-old male who had been administered bidaily oral mineral oil as a laxative since birth. Minor respiratory symptoms, radiographic and bronchoscopic findings were consistent with chronic lipoid pneumonia. We speculate that immune sensitization to mineral oil promoted the clinical syndrome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. PMID:26171269

  10. Mineral Oil Aspiration Related Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Andrew D; Fischer, Philip R; Reed, Ann M; Wylam, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of rheumatoid factor-positive migratory polyarthritis in a 5-year-old male who had been administered bidaily oral mineral oil as a laxative since birth. Minor respiratory symptoms, radiographic and bronchoscopic findings were consistent with chronic lipoid pneumonia. We speculate that immune sensitization to mineral oil promoted the clinical syndrome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. PMID:26171269

  11. [Cystic Rheumatoid Arthritis--case report].

    PubMed

    Mourão, Ana Filipa; Santos, Fernando Pimentel; Falcão, Sandra; Pinto, Teresa Laura; Barros, Rita; de Matos, António Alves; Branco, Jaime Cunha

    2007-01-01

    Among the many radiological findings seen in Rheumatoid Arthritis RA small subchondral geodes and erosions are typical. Large geodes are far less common abnormalities and their presence may indicate diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. We present a case report of a 55-year old woman with seronegative RA that developed a large geode in the knee with extensive joint destruction. PMID:18159206

  12. Rheumatoid arthritis in a military aviator.

    PubMed

    Moszyk, Danielle J; Sulit, Daryl J

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory condition whose pathogenesis is determined partially by genetic and environmental factors. Without treatment, 20 to 30% of individuals with this condition will become permanently disabled in a few years. Rheumatoid arthritis and its potential complications can cause significant disability and could seriously affect the performance of an aviator. Traditionally, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD) and biologics have not been used until disease progression occurs, but they recently have been added earlier in the course of disease for a more aggressive approach to treatment. It has been shown to significantly reduce the number of affected joints, pain, and disability. This newer treatment regimen has helped a military pilot continue his aviation career. We present the case of an experienced designated military pilot who was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. He was initially treated early with a DMARD and biologic medication. He has remained in remission and currently only uses etanercept (biologic medication) and a non-steriodal anti-inflammatory drug to control his disease. He has responded favorably to therapy and has few limitations. Due to his positive response to treatment, the aviator was granted military aeromedical waivers for rheumatoid arthritis and chronic medication use. PMID:17225486

  13. Exposure to Mimivirus Collagen Promotes Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nikunj; Hülsmeier, Andreas J.; Hochhold, Nina; Neidhart, Michel; Gay, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in animals, also occur in some recently described nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses such as Mimiviridae, which replicate in amoebae. To clarify the impact of viral collagens on the immune response of animals exposed to Mimiviridae, we have investigated the localization of collagens in Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus particles and the response of mice to immunization with mimivirus particles. Using protein biotinylation, we have first shown that viral collagen encoded by open reading frame L71 is present at the surface of mimivirus particles. Exposure to mimivirus collagens elicited the production of anti-collagen antibodies in DBA/1 mice immunized intradermally with mimivirus protein extracts. This antibody response also targeted mouse collagen type II and was accompanied by T-cell reactivity to collagen and joint inflammation, as observed in collagen-induced arthritis following immunization of mice with bovine collagen type II. The broad distribution of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses in the environment suggests that humans are constantly exposed to such large virus particles. A survey of blood sera from healthy human subjects and from rheumatoid arthritis patients indeed demonstrated that 30% of healthy-subject and 36% of rheumatoid arthritis sera recognized the major mimivirus capsid protein L425. Moreover, whereas 6% of healthy-subject sera recognized the mimivirus collagen protein L71, 22% of rheumatoid arthritis sera were positive for mimivirus L71. Accordingly, our study shows that environmental exposure to mimivirus represents a risk factor in triggering autoimmunity to collagens. PMID:24173233

  14. 5. Diagnosis and Treatment of Lyme Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arvikar, Sheila L.; Steere, Allen C.

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS In the United States, Lyme arthritis is the most common feature of late stage infection with the tick-borne spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, usually beginning months after the initial tick bite. However, in some patients, including most of those seen today, the earlier phases of the infection are asymptomatic and arthritis is the presenting manifestation of the disease. Patients with Lyme arthritis have intermittent or persistent attacks of joint swelling and pain in one or a few large joints, especially the knee, usually over a period of several years, without prominent systemic manifestations. Serologic testing is the mainstay of diagnosis. Synovial fluid PCR testing for B. burgdorferi DNA is often positive prior to treatment, but it is not a reliable marker of spirochetal eradication after antibiotic therapy. Responses to oral or intravenous antibiotic treatment are generally excellent, although a small percentage of patients have persistent synovitis after 2-3 months of oral and IV antibiotics, which usually then responds to anti-inflammatory therapies, disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), or synovectomy. This chapter reviews the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of Lyme arthritis. PMID:25999223

  15. Diagnosis of arthritis through fuzzy inference system.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sachidanand; Kumar, Atul; Panneerselvam, K; Vennila, J Jannet

    2012-06-01

    Expert or knowledge-based systems are the most common type of AIM (artificial intelligence in medicine) system in routine clinical use. They contain medical knowledge, usually about a very specifically defined task, and are able to reason with data from individual patients to come up with reasoned conclusion. Although there are many variations, the knowledge within an expert system is typically represented in the form of a set of rules. Arthritis is a chronic disease and about three fourth of the patients are suffering from osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis which are undiagnosed and the delay of detection may cause the severity of the disease at higher risk. Thus, earlier detection of arthritis and treatment of its type of arthritis and related locomotry abnormalities is of vital importance. Thus the work was aimed to design a system for the diagnosis of Arthitis using fuzzy logic controller (FLC) which is, a successful application of Zadeh's fuzzy set theory. It is a potential tool for dealing with uncertainty and imprecision. Thus, the knowledge of a doctor can be modelled using an FLC. The performance of an FLC depends on its knowledge base which consists of a data base and a rule base. It is observed that the performance of an FLC mainly depends on its rule base, and optimizing the membership function distributions stored in the data base is a fine tuning process. PMID:20927572

  16. The association between arthritis and the weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikman, Helen

    Despite the pervasiveness of the idea that arthritis is influenced by the weather, scientific evidence on the matter is sparse and non-conclusive. This study, conducted in the Australian inland city of Bendigo, sought to establish a possible relationship between the pain and rigidity of arthritis and the weather variables of temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, wind speed and precipitation. Pain and rigidity levels were scored by 25 participants with osteoarthritis and/or rheumatoid arthritis four times per day for 1 month from each season. Mean pain and rigidity scores for each time of each day were found to be correlated with the meteorological data. Correlations between mean symptoms and temperature and relative humidity were significant (P <0.001). Time of day was included in the analysis. Stepwise multiple regression analysis indicated that meteorological variables and time of day accounted for 38% of the variance in mean pain and 20% of the variance in mean rigidity when data of all months were considered. A post-study telephone questionnaire indicated 92% of participants perceived their symptoms to be influenced by the weather, while 48% claimed to be able to predict the weather according to their symptoms. Hence, the results suggest (1) decreased temperature is associated with both increased pain and increased rigidity and (2) increased relative himidity is associated with increased pain and rigidity in arthritis sufferers.

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Complementary Health Approaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... Davis MC, Reich JW, et al. Comparison of cognitive behavioral and mindfulness meditation interventions on adaptation to rheumatoid arthritis for patients with and without history of recurrent depression. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology . 2008;76(3):408–421. Acupuncture Casimiro L, ...

  18. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis using photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrich, Christian; Diddens, Heyke C.; Nosir, Hany R.; Siebert, Werner E.

    1995-03-01

    The only early therapy of rheumatoid arthritis in orthopedic surgery is a synovectomy, which is restricted to more or less big joints. A laser-synovectomy of small joints is ineffective yet. An alternative method may be photodynamic therapy. In our study we describe the photodynamic effect of Photosan 3 in a cell culture study.

  19. Palisaded neutrophilic granulomatous dermatitis in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sangueza, Omar P; Caudell, Misty D; Mengesha, Yebabe M; Davis, Loretta S; Barnes, Cheryl J; Griffin, Julia E; Fleischer, Alan B; Jorizzo, Joseph L

    2002-08-01

    Palisaded neutrophilic granulomatous dermatitis (PNGD) is an entity that has not been clearly defined either clinically or histopathologically. It is seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases. In the past, many cases of PNGD have been described under several different names including palisaded neutrophilic and granulomatous dermatitis, linear subcutaneous bands, interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with cutaneous cords and arthritis, rheumatoid papules, and Churg-Strauss granuloma. We report 7 additional cases of PNGD. Clinically, 6 patients presented with erythematous to violaceous plaques, papules, and nodules on multiple body sites; one presented with subcutaneous linear bands on the shoulder. Five had rheumatoid arthritis; one had adult-onset Still's disease; and one showed clinical signs of rheumatoid arthritis, although serologically the rheumatoid factor was negative. On histologic examination, a spectrum of changes was observed ranging from urticaria-like infiltrates to leukocytoclastic vasculitis and granuloma annulare with neutrophils. We report these cases to expand the histologic spectrum of this entity and to further delineate the different forms of clinical presentation. PMID:12140472

  20. Evaluation of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody therapy using murine type II collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bailin; Song, Zheng; Wu, Bin; Gardner, Debra; Shealy, David; Song, Xiao-Yu; Wooley, Paul H

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin-6 is a multifunctional cytokine that is critical for T/B-cell differentiation and maturation, immunoglobulin secretion, acute-phase protein production, and macrophage/monocyte functions. Extensive research into the biology of IL-6 has implicated IL-6 in the pathophysiology and pathogenesis of RA. An anti-murine IL-6 mAb that neutralizes mouse IL-6 activities was tested in animal model of collagen-induced arthritis. Prophylactic treatment with anti-IL-6 mAb significantly reduced the incidence and severity of arthritis compared to control mAb treated mice. The mitogenic response of B and T cells isolated from the lymph nodes of anti-IL-6 treated mice was significantly reduced compared to cells isolated from control mAb treated mice. The overall histopathology score for paws from the anti-IL-6 treated mice was significantly reduced when compared to paws from mice treated with control mAb, including both inflammatory (synovitis and pannus) and erosive (erosions and architecture) parameters. Reduced loss of cartilage matrix components was also observed in the anti-IL-6 treated mice. Collectively, these data suggest that IL-6 plays a major role in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis, and thus support the potential benefit of anti-IL-6 mAb treatment in rheumatoid arthritis patients. PMID:19368720

  1. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  2. Effect of Aqueous Extract of Giant Horsetail (Equisetum giganteum L.) in Antigen-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Farinon, Mirian; Lora, Priscila Schmidt; Francescato, Leandro Nicolodi; Bassani, Valquiria Linck; Henriques, Amélia Teresinha; Xavier, Ricardo Machado; de Oliveira, Patricia Gnieslaw

    2013-01-01

    Equisetum giganteum is a plant used in traditional medicine as diuretic. From our knowledge this is the first time this plant is tested in an in vivo model of acute inflammation. To evaluate the effect of aqueous extract of giant horsetail (AEGH) as immunomodulatory therapy, antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) was generated in mice with methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA). Inflammation was evaluated by articular nociception, leukocytes migration and lymphocyte proliferation. AEGH reduced nociception at 3, 6 and 24 h (P < 0.01), decreased leukocyte migration (P < 0.015), and inhibited lymphocyte proliferation stimulated with Concanavalin A and Lipopolysaccharide (P < 0.05). In conclusion, AEGH has an anti-inflammatory potential in acute model of inflammation, as well as immunomodulatory effect on both B and T lymphocytes, with an action independent of cytotoxicity. PMID:24494034

  3. Effect of Aqueous Extract of Giant Horsetail (Equisetum giganteum L.) in Antigen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Farinon, Mirian; Lora, Priscila Schmidt; Francescato, Leandro Nicolodi; Bassani, Valquiria Linck; Henriques, AmÉlia Teresinha; Xavier, Ricardo Machado; de Oliveira, Patricia Gnieslaw

    2013-01-01

    Equisetum giganteum is a plant used in traditional medicine as diuretic. From our knowledge this is the first time this plant is tested in an in vivo model of acute inflammation. To evaluate the effect of aqueous extract of giant horsetail (AEGH) as immunomodulatory therapy, antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) was generated in mice with methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA). Inflammation was evaluated by articular nociception, leukocytes migration and lymphocyte proliferation. AEGH reduced nociception at 3, 6 and 24 h (P < 0.01), decreased leukocyte migration (P < 0.015), and inhibited lymphocyte proliferation stimulated with Concanavalin A and Lipopolysaccharide (P < 0.05). In conclusion, AEGH has an anti-inflammatory potential in acute model of inflammation, as well as immunomodulatory effect on both B and T lymphocytes, with an action independent of cytotoxicity. PMID:24494034

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... disease, which means the arthritis results from your immune system attacking your body's own tissues. The course of ...

  5. 78 FR 36305 - Proposed Information Collection (Non-Degenerative Arthritis (Including Inflammatory, Autoimmune...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Non-Degenerative Arthritis (Including Inflammatory, Autoimmune, Crystalline and Infectious Arthritis) and Dysbaric Osteonecrosis Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity... disability benefits related to a claimant's diagnosis of a non-degenerative arthritis or...

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... which means the arthritis results from your immune system attacking your body's own tissues. The course of ...

  7. [The pulmonological manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Bernscherer, György; Karabélyos, Csaba; Tarján, Zsolt

    2008-07-20

    In their review article the authors overview the primary and secondary pulmonary complications of rheumatoid arthritis with the help of bibliographic data. They emphasize the pulmonological complications of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs used for the pharmaceutical therapy of rheumatoid arthritis, of which they discuss the methotrexate induced pulmonary diseases. Methotrexate participates nearly in all of additive double and triple--O'Dell-scheme--combined disease modifying antirheumatic drugs therapy. Because of that, the early detection of drug-induced pulmonological complications is important. For rheumatologists the treatment of methotrexate resistant rheumatoid arthritis is always getting a higher and higher challenge. Biological therapeutical drugs act as cytokine antagonists, by blocking TNF-alpha and, compared to disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, they can more effectively inhibit the progression of the disease. These are the biological response modifiers. Their main representatives are infliximab, adalimumab, and etanercept. At the end, the authors discuss secondary pulmonary complications caused by biological response modifiers, e.g. the biological response modifiers associated pulmonary tuberculosis, bacterial tracheobronchitis, bacterial pneumonia, bronchiectasia, pulmonary oedema, rapid fibrosing alveolitis, and coccidioidomycosis. At 3% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, treated with biological response modifiers, who live in Arizona, California, Nevada, pulmonary and systemic mycosis--coccidioidomycosis can appear with a 15% of mortality. As a consequence of frequent earthquakes, the spores getting into the air from the ground infect immunosuppressed patients treated with biological response modifiers. The authors draw attention to the fact that patients who receive biological therapy and travel to the above-mentioned endemic or earthquake-active regions, have a potential high risk, so it is indispensable that they are informed by the

  8. Morbidity impact of rheumatoid arthritis on society.

    PubMed

    McDuffie, F C

    1985-01-21

    Classic and definite rheumatoid arthritis affects from 0.5 to 1 percent of the United States' population between the ages of 20 and 80. In the age group of 55 to 75 years, this figure increases to 4.5 percent. In addition to the pain and suffering produced by this disease, family structure is dramatically affected--the divorce rate for patients with rheumatoid arthritis is 70 percent above that for the general population. Rheumatoid arthritis also results in serious economic loss to society. In 1983, the direct cost (out-of-pocket expense for medical care) was $777 million, and the indirect cost (loss of productivity) was $215 million, with a total of approximately $1 billion. The average person with stage III rheumatoid arthritis suffers a 60 percent decline in earnings during the first six years after onset of the disease. Recent studies have indicated that the ability to remain employed depends at least as much on job-related factors as on the extent of disease or success of medical treatment. Job autonomy or the ability to control one's working conditions is the most important factor. Other important variables are education, seniority, and work that is not excessively physically demanding. Good transportation between home and job is also an essential requirement for remaining employed. There are few data available on the cost/benefit ratio of the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. An 18-month study showed a trend toward greater improvement in patients given optimal care by a team of experts in a medical center as compared with average treatment provided in the community. A study in Scotland on cost of hospitalization of 366 patients (about one half underwent surgery) showed cost benefits of xi 14,000 to xi 131,000 over a five- to 10-year period for those who returned to work. Patients who did not return to work incurred medical costs of xi 100,000. There is little question that more effective medical treatment and better rehabilitation strategies for people

  9. Th2 and eosinophil responses suppress inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhu; Andreev, Darja; Oeser, Katharina; Krljanac, Branislav; Hueber, Axel; Kleyer, Arnd; Voehringer, David; Schett, Georg; Bozec, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Th2–eosinophil immune responses are well known for mediating host defence against helminths. Herein we describe a function of Th2–eosinophil responses in counteracting the development of arthritis. In two independent models of arthritis, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection leads to Th2 and eosinophil accumulation in the joints associated with robust inhibition of arthritis and protection from bone loss. Mechanistically, this protective effect is dependent on IL-4/IL-13-induced STAT6 pathway. Furthermore, we show that eosinophils play a central role in the modulation of arthritis probably through the increase of anti-inflammatory macrophages into arthritic joints. The presence of these pathways in human disease is confirmed by detection of GATA3-positive cells and eosinophils in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Taken together, these results demonstrate that eosinophils and helminth-induced activation of the Th2 pathway axis effectively mitigate the course of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:27273006

  10. Th2 and eosinophil responses suppress inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhu; Andreev, Darja; Oeser, Katharina; Krljanac, Branislav; Hueber, Axel; Kleyer, Arnd; Voehringer, David; Schett, Georg; Bozec, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Th2-eosinophil immune responses are well known for mediating host defence against helminths. Herein we describe a function of Th2-eosinophil responses in counteracting the development of arthritis. In two independent models of arthritis, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection leads to Th2 and eosinophil accumulation in the joints associated with robust inhibition of arthritis and protection from bone loss. Mechanistically, this protective effect is dependent on IL-4/IL-13-induced STAT6 pathway. Furthermore, we show that eosinophils play a central role in the modulation of arthritis probably through the increase of anti-inflammatory macrophages into arthritic joints. The presence of these pathways in human disease is confirmed by detection of GATA3-positive cells and eosinophils in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Taken together, these results demonstrate that eosinophils and helminth-induced activation of the Th2 pathway axis effectively mitigate the course of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:27273006

  11. Experimental Lyme disease in dogs produces arthritis and persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Appel, M J; Allan, S; Jacobson, R H; Lauderdale, T L; Chang, Y F; Shin, S J; Thomford, J W; Todhunter, R J; Summers, B A

    1993-03-01

    Lyme disease was reproduced in specific pathogen-free beagle dogs by exposure to Borrelia burgdorferi-infected ticks (Ixodes dammini). Seroconversion and disease frequency were higher after exposure to infected adult ticks than to infected nymphs. Young pups developed clinical disease more readily than older dogs. The incubation period lasted 2-5 months. Acute recurrent lameness with fibrinopurulent arthritis was the dominant clinical sign. Dogs recovered but developed persistent mild polyarthritis. B. burgdorferi persisted in recovered dogs for at least 1 year. Isolation of B. burgdorferi and detection by polymerase chain reaction was most successful from skin biopsies at the site of the tick bite. Antibody to B. burgdorferi antigens was first detected by ELISA and Western blots by 4-6 weeks after exposure. High serum levels persisted during 17 months of observation. In contrast to infection from ticks, inoculation of dogs with cultured B. burgdorferi resulted in seroconversion with a shorter duration of antibody persistence and no clinical disease. PMID:8440936

  12. [Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis in two athletes].

    PubMed

    Andrews, José A; Rizzato Lede, Daniel; Senderovsky, Melisa; Finn, Bárbara C; Emery, Nicholas; Bottaro, Federico; Bruetman, Julio E; Young, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis, so called osteomyelitis pubis is the infection which involves pubic symphysis and its joint. It is a rare condition, representing less than one percent of all cases of osteomyelitis. It affects most frequently young athletes and women undergoing gynecologic or urologic surgery. It presents itself with fever and pubic pain which irradiates to the genitals and increases when hip is mobilized, and this fact produces gait claudication. Differential diagnosis should be made with pubic osteitis, which is a sterile inflammatory condition. Diagnosis is based on clinic supported by microbiologic culture results, image methods, and proteins augment during acute phase. Image guided puncture is often necessary for the differential diagnosis with pubic osteitis. The etiologic agents most commonly found are Staphylococcus aureus, followed by gram-negative bacilli, and polymicrobial infection in recent pelvis surgery. The antibiotic treatment is adjusted depending on the microbiological diagnosis, adding NSAIDs, and bed rest. Surgical debridement is required up to 55% of the cases. Two cases of osteomyelitis of the pubis by S. aureus, with good outcome to treatment with antibiotics, NSAIDs and rest are here described. Both patients were healthy relevant athletes. PMID:22763164

  13. [A case of rheumatoid arthritis involving disseminated torichosporonosis].

    PubMed

    Ueda, Yo; Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Yuji; Takahashi, Yuko; Mimori, Akio

    2011-09-01

    A 75-year-old man who developed disseminated trichosporonosis had a long history of immunosuppressive therapy with weekly methotrexate and low-dose prednisolone for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). He had been administered 30 mg of prednisolone per day for organizing pneumonia, probably due to the RA, for about 3 months before admission for a lumbar compression fracture. He then developed bilateral aspiration pneumonia with pleural effusion, treated successfully with broad-spectrum antibiotics meropenem and ciprofloxacin, and fluid management. He then developed acute, progressive respiratory failure with changes in both lung lobes in chest computed tomography (CT). Meropenem, ciprofloxacin, micafungin, and pulsed steroid administration were ineffective. He died of respiratory failure, after which Trichosporon asahii was first detected in blood and urine culture. Disseminated trichosporonosis was determined based on positive blood culture, elevated serum glucuronoxylomannan antigen and beta-D glucan, and the man's lack of clinical progress. He had numerous risk factors for trichosporonosis, including neutrophilic dysfunction due to prolonged steroid therapy, administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics and micafungin, and central venous catheterization. Disseminated trichosporonosis is a chiefly hematological infection and case reports without hematological disorders are rare, so we report this instructive case. PMID:22117385

  14. Reliable and cost-effective serodiagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Pieter W A; Ally, Mahmood M T M; Anderson, Ronald

    2016-06-01

    Early diagnosis of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) optimises therapeutic benefit and the probability of achieving disease remission. Notwithstanding clinical acumen, early diagnosis is dependent on access to reliable serodiagnostic procedures, as well as on the discerning application and interpretation of these. In the case of RA, however, no disease-specific serodiagnostic procedure is available due to the multi-factorial and polygenic nature of this autoimmune disorder. This has resulted in the development of an array of serodiagnostic procedures based on the detection of autoantibodies reactive with various putative autoantigens. Other procedures based on measurement of elevations in the concentrations of systemic biomarkers of inflammation, most commonly acute phase reactants and cytokines/chemokines, are used as objective indices of disease activity. Following a brief overview of RA research in African populations, the current review is focused on those autoantibodies/biomarkers, specifically rheumatoid factor, anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies and C-reactive protein, which are currently recognised as being the most reliable and cost-effective with respect to disease prediction and diagnosis, as well as in monitoring activity and outcome. PMID:26856871

  15. Abatacept in difficult-to-treat juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin B; Benseler, SM

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic rheumatic disease in children and an important cause of short-term and long-term disability. Gene changes in the immune system can predispose to JIA and regulation of the immune system is crucial in the pathogenesis. The goal of therapy is complete disease control using disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDS). Activated T-cells may play a role in the immunopathology of JIA. Therefore, targeting T-cell activation is a rational approach for the treatment of JIA. Abatacept (ABA), a selective co-stimulation modulator, has been shown to be effective in treating all JIA subtypes and is generally safe and well tolerated in JIA. Neutralizing antibodies were found in 6/9 (67%) of seropositive patients, but anti-ABA antibodies did not appear to be associated with disease flare, serious adverse events, acute infusional adverse events, hypersensitivity, autoimmune disorders, or low ABA serum concentrations. Anti-ABA antibodies were more frequent when ABA concentrations were below therapeutic levels. Although information on ABA in JIA is still limited, available data suggest a potential role in difficult to treat JIA patients previously treated with other biologic agents and for non-responders to TNF-blockade. PMID:19707464

  16. Recent Advances in Psoriatic Arthritis from Obscurity to Prominence.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Taral; Joshi, V R

    2015-10-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a fascinating inflammatory arthritis. Till recently it did not generate interest for lack of understanding of its immunopathology, and lack of effective treatment. This has changed. PsA is now one of the hot topics - all due to elucidation of genetic susceptibility associations, immunopathogenesis and availability of effective therapy. In this communication we provide an overview of these aspects of psoriatic arthritis. PMID:27608691

  17. How effective is ustekinumab in controlling psoriatic arthritis?

    PubMed

    Bonifati, Claudio; Graceffa, Dario

    2016-05-01

    Recently ustekinumab has been approved for the therapy of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Some case series have been published reporting new onset of inflammatory arthritis in psoriasis patients treated with ustekinumab. In addition, flare of joint inflammation in PsA patients has also been reported. We describe a case series of seven patients affected by PsA who experienced either a worsening or a flare of inflammatory arthritis during treatment with ustekinumab. PMID:26626908

  18. Immunosuppression by fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in collagen arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, W.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Belli, J.A.; Trentham, D.E.

    1982-05-01

    Treatments with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and cyclophosphamide were evaluated for rats injected with type II collagen. Preadministration of TLI and repeated injections of cyclophosphamide suppressed the severity of arthritis and lowered antibody titers to collagen significantly. TLI initiated at the onset of collagen arthritis decreased humoral and cellular responses to collagen but did not affect the severity of arthritis. These data demonstrate that both TLi and cyclophosphamide are immunosuppressive in an experimentally inducible autoimmune disease.

  19. Case Comparison of Response To Aquatic Exercise: Acute versus Chronic Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mobily, Kenneth E.; Mobily, Paula R.; Lessard, Kerry A.; Berkenpas, Molly S.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the effects of individualized aquatic exercise programs on people with knee impairments. An adolescent athlete with an acute injury demonstrated significant functional improvement. A 33-year-old with arthritis demonstrated only marginal progress. Comparison of cases relative to valid data collection methods and response to aquatic…

  20. [Active psoriatic arthritis during pregnancy: challenges and limitations of pharmacotherapy].

    PubMed

    Matuszewska, Agnieszka; Misterska-Skóra, Maria; Wiland, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    Cases of psoriatic arthritis coexisting with pregnancy are sparse and therefore little is known about the fetal effect of medication in women with psoriatic arthritis. As a rule, drugs and dosages are minimized in these patients. Among disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, cyclosporine and sulphasalazine are preferred. Methotrexate and leflunomide are strictly contraindicated and must be withdrawn 3 months or 2 years, respectively, before a pregnancy is planned. Psoriatic arthritis may be treated during pregnancy with glucocorticosteroids, especially with prednisone or prednisolone. We present the case ofa 40-year-old gravida with psoriatic arthritis which exacerbated during the first trimester of pregnancy. Therapeutic implications in such cases are discussed. PMID:21365940

  1. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  2. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  3. Serum selenium concentrations in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, J R; Lemley-Gillespie, S; Palmer, W R; Weaver, A L; Moore, G F; Klassen, L W

    1991-01-01

    Selenium is a trace element and an essential part of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase, which protects cells from oxidative damage. Selenium has been shown to have antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and immune altering effects. Serum selenium concentrations in 101 patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis were found to be significantly lower than those in 29 normal, healthy controls (mean (SD) 148 (42) v 160 (25) micrograms/l) and also lower than those in eight patients with fibrositis (148 (42) v 166 (25) micrograms/l). It is speculated that serum selenium concentrations may modulate the effect of viral or other infections in subjects with the appropriate genetic background and in this way enhance the development or progression of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:2059080

  4. Treatment of psoriatic arthritis: management recommendations.

    PubMed

    Gossec, Laure; Smolen, Josef S

    2015-01-01

    Given the varied therapeutic options available for the management of psoriatic arthritis (PsA), recommendations for the management of PsA have been developed by several expert groups. These recommendations deal mainly with pharmacological treatments. At the international level, 2 recommendations sets are available: these have been developed by the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) and by the European League against Rheumatism (EULAR). These recommendations were published in 2009 and in 2012, respectively; and updates of these recommendations are currently ongoing. The first sets of recommendations dealt with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, glucocorticoids, conventional synthetic disease modifying drugs and tumour necrosis factor inhibitors; the 2015 sets of recommendations also deal with new drugs with other mechanisms of action, namely ustekinumab, secukinumab and apremilast. In the present paper, we will review these management recommendations. PMID:26471459

  5. Nanomedicine delivers promising treatments for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; O’Mary, Hannah; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    An increased understanding in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, reveals that the diseased tissue and the increased presence of macrophages and other overexpressed molecules within the tissue can be exploited to enhance the delivery of nanomedicine. Nanomedicine can passively accumulate into chronic inflammatory tissues via the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon, or be surface conjugated with a ligand to actively bind to receptors overexpressed by cells within chronic inflammatory tissues, leading to increased efficacy and reduced systemic side-effects. This review highlights the research conducted over the past decade on using nanomedicine for potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes some of the major findings and promising opportunities on using nanomedicine to treat this prevalent and chronic disease. PMID:26084368

  6. Imaging in Foot and Ankle Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Victoria H; Rowbotham, Emma L; Grainger, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    The foot and ankle are commonly involved in a range of arthritides that affect the joints, bones, and soft tissues. Accurate plain film interpretation can often aid the diagnosis and monitor disease progression and treatment response. Ultrasound and MRI afford superior depiction of the soft tissues, and advances over recent years have centered on early detection of synovitis, enabling earlier diagnosis and treatment. Advantages and disadvantages of the imaging techniques of radiography, multidetector computed tomography, ultrasound, and MRI are discussed, as is optimization of these modalities for the assessment of the anatomically complex joints of the foot and ankle. Diagnostic features enabling differentiation between rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative spondyloarthropathies, osteoarthritis, gout, crystal deposition disease, pigmented villonodular synovitis, Charcot arthropathy, septic arthritis, synovial osteochondromatosis, hemophilia, and reflex sympathetic dystrophy are also reviewed. PMID:27336451

  7. Osteoporosis diagnostics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Dura, Marta; Blumfield, Einat; Żuchowski, Paweł; Waszczak, Marzena; Jeka, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic connective tissue disease. The development of comorbidities often occurs in the course of RA. One of them is osteoporosis, which has serious social and economic effects and may contribute to the increase in the degree of disability and premature death of the patient. Due to the young age in which RA disease occurs, densitometry (DXA) of the lumbar spine is the basic examination in osteoporosis diagnostics. In the course of RA, much more frequently than in healthy persons of the same age, osteoporotic fractures of vertebral bodies occur, which hinder a correct assessment in the DXA test. Rheumatoid arthritis patients often undergo computed tomography (CT) examination of the abdominal cavity for other medical indications than suspected spinal injury. Then, CT examination may also serve for the assessment of bone density, especially in patients with osteoporotic fractures. PMID:27407274

  8. Patient advocacy and arthritis: moving forward.

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Amye L.; Euller-Ziegler, Liana

    2004-01-01

    Patient advocacy is based on the premise that people have the right to make their own choices about their health care. Personal advocacy is centred on the experiential expertise of the individual affected by the condition, whereas group advocacy is grounded on patient-centred strategies and actions. The first patient advocacy groups for arthritis were set up over 20 years ago in the USA and have subsequently spread to many other countries. This paper discusses the growth and impact of personal advocacy as well as recent developments in group advocacy in the Asia-Pacific region, Europe, and North America, in terms of arthritis awareness, research, corporate partnerships, and the Bone and Joint Decade global initiative. PMID:15042233

  9. [Reactive arthritis: advances in diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Palazzi, C; Olivieri, I; Salvarani, C; D'Amico, E; Alleva, G; Vitullo, P; Petricca, A

    2002-01-01

    Reactive Arthritis (ReA) is an aseptic synovitis developing after a primary infection distant from the joint, mainly localized in the gastrointestinal (Enteroarthritis) or genitourinary tract (Uroarthritis). Because of either the asymmetric joint involvement, the possibility of involvement of the spine and enthesis, and the HLA-B27 association ReA is considered one of the spondylarthropathies. Recently, bacterial components or viable bacteria were found in joints during ReA. For this reason, the limits between ReA itself and infectious arthritis are now less definite. Generally accepted diagnostic and classification criteria are still lacking but the improvement in techniques for detection of bacteria increase the possibility to identify the triggering agents. Several studies have examined the role of antimicrobial drugs in ameliorating the natural course of ReA, with some positive results for Uroarthritis only. However, more conventional treatments based on NSAIDs, sulfasalazine and steroids are effective in many cases. PMID:12105678

  10. Preclinical Rheumatoid Arthritis (Autoantibodies): An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple studies demonstrate that there is a period of development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during which there are elevations of disease-related biomarkers, including autoantibodies, in the absence of and prior to the development of RA; this period can be termed ‘preclinical RA’. These ‘preclinical’ autoantibodies including rheumatoid factor and antibodies to citrullinated protein antigens, and more recent studies have also identified a wider variety of autoantibodies and a wide range of inflammatory biomarkers. These findings in conjunction with established and emerging data about genetic and environmental risk factors for RA support a model of disease development where certain factors lead to an initial triggering of RA-related autoimmunity that expands over time to the point where symptomatic arthritis classifiable as RA develops. Herein will be reviewed updates in the field, as well as a discussion of current limitations of our understanding of preclinical RA, and potential future directions for study. PMID:24643396

  11. [Side effects of COX-2 selective inhibitors. Critic related with its administration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Carrillo Gutiérrez, Ofmara Y; Pérez Sánchez, Adriana G; Medina Serriteño, Nicolás; Rodríguez Orozco, Alain R

    2007-01-01

    At the end of 2000 the new age of AINEs was introduced, specially the selective inhibitors of the COX-2, whose main function is to block the production of the prostaglandins and the acute tissue inflammation. These inhibitors have analgesic, antithermal and antiinflammatory effects similar to traditional AINEs; they are prescribed specifically to diminish pain and inflammation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. After them introduction, it was reported that they can produce cardiovascular effects, mainly infarcts. This revision exposes the adverse effects that selective inhibitors of the COX-2 produce when elevated doses are administered, during prolonged time, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis; in addition, it comments present recommendations for them prescription. PMID:18297851

  12. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    van Tuyl, Lilian H D; Michaud, Kaleb

    2016-05-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and their measures have a long and important history for determining the status and treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This article describes the history and evolution of PROs for RA and the current state of the field, with key examples of accepted and widely used measures, and offers some reflection on the roles of PROs for the study and management of RA. PMID:27133486

  13. [Regaining quality of life despite rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    A, Madame

    2016-01-01

    A patient aged 32 who had been living with her partner for a few years, is diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. They both needed to understand and adapt. The caregivers had a frontline role in the multidisciplinary care but addressing the impact on the patient's sexual quality of life remains difficult. The patient describes her experience and how harmony and desire were re-established. PMID:27317820

  14. Parasitic rheumatism presenting as rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Burnstein, S L; Liakos, S

    1983-06-01

    A symmetrical polyarthritis with low titer positive rheumatoid factor occurred in a young man who also complained of chronic diarrhea after returning from Vietnam. Endolimax nana grew on stool culture. Both the patient's diarrhea and arthritis responded effectively to therapy with metronidazole. The diagnosis of parasitic rheumatism was made in retrospect. Diagnostic consideration should be given to this entity in patients with unusual arthropathies, particularly if they have stayed in an endemic parasitic country and have gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:6604161

  15. B Cell Lymphoma mimicking Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cosatti, M A; Pisoni, C N; Altuve, J L; Lorente, C

    2016-01-01

    Non Hodking´s lymphoma (NHL) may involve bones but synovial involvement is uncommon. We describe a patient who presented with polyarthritis, sicca symptoms and rash suggestive of rheumatoid arthritis. An atypical skin rash prompted skin and synovial biopsies. A diagnosis of synovial and skin malignant large B-cell lymphoma anaplastic subtype was performed. Chemotherapy with dexamethasone, vincristine and rituximab was started. Following treatment the patient had complete resolution of cutaneous and articular lymphoma manifestations. PMID:27419896

  16. A rare cause of septic arthritis: melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Caldera, Aruna Sanjeewa; Kumanan, Thirunavukarasu; Corea, Enoka

    2013-10-01

    Melioidosis is a pyogenic infection with high mortality caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. As the clinical presentation is not distinctive, a high index of clinical suspicion is required for diagnosis. We present a case of a 50-year-old farmer who was diabetic and a chronic alcoholic, who presented to us with pneumonia, followed by septic arthritis. He was ultimately diagnosed as having melioidosis. PMID:24067292

  17. IL-10-producing regulatory B10 cells ameliorate collagen-induced arthritis via suppressing Th17 cell generation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Deng, Jun; Liu, Yang; Ko, King-Hung; Wang, Xiaohui; Jiao, Zhijun; Wang, Shengjun; Hua, Zichun; Sun, Lingyun; Srivastava, Gopesh; Lau, Chak-Sing; Cao, Xuetao; Lu, Liwei

    2012-06-01

    IL-10-producing CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells, also known as B10 cells, have been shown to possess a regulatory function in the inhibition of immune responses, but whether and how B10 cells suppress the development of autoimmune arthritis remain largely unclear. In this study, we detected significantly decreased numbers of IL-10-producing B cells, but increased IL-17-producing CD4(+) T (Th17) cells in both spleen and draining lymph nodes of mice during the acute stage of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) when compared with adjuvant-treated control mice. On adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded B10 cells, collagen-immunized mice showed a marked delay of arthritis onset with reduced severity of both clinical symptoms and joint damage, accompanied by a substantial reduction in the number of Th17 cells. To determine whether B10 cells directly inhibit the generation of Th17 cells in culture, naive CD4(+) T cells labeled with carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE) were co-cultured with B10 cells. These B10 cells suppressed Th17 cell differentiation via the reduction of STAT3 phosphorylation and retinoid-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) expression. Moreover, Th17 cells showed significantly decreased proliferation when co-cultured with B10 cells. Although adoptive transfer of Th17 cells triggered the development of collagen-induced arthritis in IL-17(-/-)DBA/1J mice, co-transfer of B10 cells with Th17 cells profoundly delayed the onset of arthritis. Thus, our findings suggest a novel regulatory role of B10 cells in arthritic progression via the suppression of Th17 cell generation. PMID:22538089

  18. Septic Arthritis in the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khalisy, Hassan Mahdi; Nikiforov, Ivan; Mansoora, Qurat; Goldman, John; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare event that has only been reported a few dozen times worldwide. This case is remarkable for septic arthritis of the TMJ joint in an otherwise healthy male. Case Report: A 24-year-old male presented to the emergency department with periauricular swelling, erythema, fever, myalgia's and generalized joint pain. He had previously sought medical attention and was placed on ciprofloxacin. However, he developed facial swelling and a rash and had to discontinue the antibiotic. On physical exam the patient had a large swelling and tenderness in his left periauricular area, with erythema and deviation of the right mandible which limited his ability to open the mouth. A computed tomography showed mild asymmetric soft tissue swelling in the left pharyngeal region but did not show joint effusion. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging did show effusion of the joint space. The effusion was drained, and the synovial fluid was submitted for gram stain, culture, and sensitivity. The cultures grew menthicillin sensitive Staphyloccocus Aureus. The patient was discharged to complete a two week course of intravenous (IV) Ceftriaxone and IV Vancomycin via home infusion. Conclusion: Septic Arthritis of the TMJ is a rare event with very specific clinical symptoms. Due to the low sensitivity of the computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging should be considered when computed tomography scan is negative for TMJ effusion. PMID:26713295

  19. The conundrum of juvenile psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ravelli, Angelo; Consolaro, Alessandro; Schiappapietra, Benedetta; Martini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JPsA) has provided paediatric rheumatologists with a controversial topic for many years. The principal area of contention centres on the discordance between its treatment as a single diagnostic category in current classification schemes and the demonstration of its heterogeneous nature. A further point of debate is the distinctiveness of JPsA as an entity. Owing to these uncertainties, the concept of JPsA has evolved over the years and there have been several changes in its definition and diagnostic criteria. Recently, strong evidence has been provided that the spectrum of JPsA include at least two distinct subgroups, one that has the same characteristics as early-onset ANA-positive JIA, and another that is part of the spectrum of spondyloarthropathies and resembles the forms of psoriatic arthritis in adults that belong to the same disease family. These findings call for a revision of the classification of childhood arthritis, that refutes the assumptions that children with JPsA constitute a single homogeneous population and that JPsA should be considered an individual disease entity. PMID:26470604

  20. Immunomodulation of Autoimmune Arthritis by Herbal CAM

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesha, Shivaprasad H.; Rajaiah, Rajesh; Berman, Brian M.; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a debilitating autoimmune disease of global prevalence. The disease is characterized by synovial inflammation leading to cartilage and bone damage. Most of the conventional drugs used for the treatment of RA have severe adverse reactions and are quite expensive. Over the years, increasing proportion of patients with RA and other immune disorders are resorting to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for their health needs. Natural plant products comprise one of the most popular CAM for inflammatory and immune disorders. These herbal CAM belong to diverse traditional systems of medicine, including traditional Chinese medicine, Kampo, and Ayurvedic medicine. In this paper, we have outlined the major immunological pathways involved in the induction and regulation of autoimmune arthritis and described various herbal CAM that can effectively modulate these immune pathways. Most of the information about the mechanisms of action of herbal products in the experimental models of RA is relevant to arthritis patients as well. The study of immunological pathways coupled with the emerging application of genomics and proteomics in CAM research is likely to provide novel insights into the mechanisms of action of different CAM modalities. PMID:21234398

  1. A Comparative Metabolomic Evaluation of Behcet’s Disease with Arthritis and Seronegative Arthritis Using Synovial Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungyeon; Hwang, Jiwon; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Cha, Hoon-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Behcet’s disease (BD) with arthritis is often confused with seronegative arthritis (SNA) because of shared clinical symptoms and the lack of definitive biomarkers for BD. To investigate possible metabolic patterns and potential biomarkers of BD with arthritis, metabolomic profiling of synovial fluid (SF) from 6 patients with BD with arthritis and 18 patients with SNA was performed using gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in conjunction with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. A total of 123 metabolites were identified from samples. Orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis showed clear discrimination between BD with arthritis and SNA. A set of 11 metabolites were identified as potential biomarkers for BD using variable importance for projection values and the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Compared with SNA, BD with arthritis exhibited relatively high levels of glutamate, valine, citramalate, leucine, methionine sulfoxide, glycerate, phosphate, lysine, isoleucine, urea, and citrulline. There were two markers identified, elevated methionine sulfoxide and citrulline, that were associated with increased oxidative stress, providing a potential link to BD-associated neutrophil hyperactivity. Glutamate, citramalate, and valine were selected and validated as putative biomarkers for BD with arthritis (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 61.1%). This is the first report to present potential biomarkers from SF for discriminating BD with arthritis from SNA. The metabolomics of SF may be helpful in searching for potential biomarkers and elucidating the clinicopathogenesis of BD with arthritis. PMID:26270538

  2. K/BxN Serum-Transfer Arthritis as a Model for Human Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Anne D.; Haase, Claus; Cook, Andrew D.; Hamilton, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The K/BxN serum-transfer arthritis (STA) model is a murine model in which the immunological mechanisms occurring in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other arthritides can be studied. To induce K/BxN STA, serum from arthritic transgenic K/BxN mice is transferred to naive mice and manifestations of arthritis occur a few days later. The inflammatory response in the model is driven by autoantibodies against the ubiquitously expressed self-antigen, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6PI), leading to the formation of immune complexes that drive the activation of different innate immune cells such as neutrophils, macrophages, and possibly mast cells. The pathogenesis further involves a range of immune mediators including cytokines, chemokines, complement factors, Toll-like receptors, Fc receptors, and integrins, as well as factors involved in pain and bone erosion. Hence, even though the K/BxN STA model mimics only the effector phase of RA, it still involves a wide range of relevant disease mediators. Additionally, as a murine model for arthritis, the K/BxN STA model has some obvious advantages. First, it has a rapid and robust onset of arthritis with 100% incidence in genetically identical animals. Second, it can be induced in a wide range of strain backgrounds and can therefore also be induced in gene-deficient strains to study the specific importance of disease mediators. Even though G6PI might not be an essential autoantigen, for example, in RA, the K/BxN STA model is a useful tool to understand how autoantibodies, in general, drive the progression of arthritis by interacting with downstream components of the innate immune system. Finally, the model has also proven useful as a model wherein arthritic pain can be studied. Taken together, these features make the K/BxN STA model a relevant one for RA, and it is a potentially valuable tool, especially for the preclinical screening of new therapeutic targets for RA and perhaps other forms of inflammatory arthritis. Here, we

  3. Acute malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Dupont, John S

    2006-01-01

    Acute malocclusion can result from disturbances in the maxillary/mandibular tooth relationship. These alterations in the occlusal position can result from high fillings, sinus problems, abscesses, periodontal disease, and moving or erupting teeth. Conditions seen less frequently include acute malocclusions secondary to an event (such as trauma) that make a stable dental relationship an unstable one. Patients can demonstrate any of a number of clinical conditions that interfere with their comfort and ability to function. This article provides information on some of the less familiar causes of acute malocclusion. PMID:16689064

  4. Interleukin-6 reduces cartilage destruction during experimental arthritis. A study in interleukin-6-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    van de Loo, F. A.; Kuiper, S.; van Enckevort, F. H.; Arntz, O. J.; van den Berg, W. B.

    1997-01-01

    Using interleukin (IL)-6-deficient (IL-6(0/0) mice or wild-type mice, we investigated the controversial role of IL-6 in joint inflammation and cartilage pathology during zymosan-induced arthritis (ZIA). Monoarticular arthritis was elicited by injection of zymosan into the right knee joint cavity. Production of IL-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), IL-6, and nitric oxide by the inflamed knee was assessed in washouts of joint capsule specimens. Plasma corticosterone was measured using a radioimmunoassay. Proteoglycan synthesis was assessed using [35S]sulfate incorporation into patellas ex vivo. Joint swelling was quantified by joint uptake of circulating 99mTechnetium pertechnetate. Histology was taken to evaluate cellular infiltration and cartilage damage. Zymosan caused a rapid increase in articular IL-1, IL-6, TNF, and NO levels. Except for IL-6, the released amounts and time course of these mediators were comparable in the IL-6-deficient mice and the wild-type mice. Elevated plasma corticosterone levels were measured during the first day of arthritis in both strains. At day 2 of ZIA, joint inflammation (joint swelling and cell exudate) in IL-6-deficient mice was comparable with that in the wild-type mice. The marked suppression of chondrocyte proteoglycan synthesis and proteoglycan degradation were on the average higher in the IL-6-deficient mice. Together this resulted in a more pronounced proteoglycan depletion in the IL-6-deficient mice as compared with the wild-type mice during the first week of arthritis. Injection of recombinant IL-6 into the joint cavity corrected the IL-6 deficiency and significantly reduced cartilage destruction. Inflammation was more chronic in the wild-type mice, and these mice also showed a higher prevalence for osteophyte formation. In ZIA, IL-6 plays a dual role in connective tissue pathology, reducing proteoglycan loss in the acute phase and enhancing osteophyte formation in the chronic phase. The latter could be related to the more

  5. Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiangtao; Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu; Zheng, Yanping

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). •Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. •Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. •Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-κB-dependent genes, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

  6. Assessment of interferon-related biomarkers in Aicardi-Goutières syndrome associated with mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, and ADAR: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Gillian I; Forte, Gabriella M A; Szynkiewicz, Marcin; Chase, Diana S; Aeby, Alec; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; Ackroyd, Sam; Allcock, Rebecca; Bailey, Kathryn M; Balottin, Umberto; Barnerias, Christine; Bernard, Genevieve; Bodemer, Christine; Botella, Maria P; Cereda, Cristina; Chandler, Kate E; Dabydeen, Lyvia; Dale, Russell C; De Laet, Corinne; De Goede, Christian G E L; del Toro, Mireia; Effat, Laila; Enamorado, Noemi Nunez; Fazzi, Elisa; Gener, Blanca; Haldre, Madli; Lin, Jean-Pierre S-M; Livingston, John H; Lourenco, Charles Marques; Marques, Wilson; Oades, Patrick; Peterson, Pärt; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Roubertie, Agathe; Schmidt, Johanna Loewenstein; Shalev, Stavit A; Simon, Rogelio; Spiegel, Ronen; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Temtamy, Samia A; Vassallo, Grace; Vilain, Catheline N; Vogt, Julie; Wermenbol, Vanessa; Whitehouse, William P; Soler, Doriette; Olivieri, Ivana; Orcesi, Simona; Aglan, Mona S; Zaki, Maha S; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Vanderver, Adeline; Kisand, Kai; Rozenberg, Flore; Lebon, Pierre; Crow, Yanick J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is an inflammatory disorder caused by mutations in any of six genes (TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, and ADAR). The disease is severe and effective treatments are urgently needed. We investigated the status of interferon-related biomarkers in patients with AGS with a view to future use in diagnosis and clinical trials. Methods In this case-control study, samples were collected prospectively from patients with mutation-proven AGS. The expression of six interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) was measured by quantitative PCR, and the median fold change, when compared with the median of healthy controls, was used to create an interferon score for each patient. Scores higher than the mean of controls plus two SD (>2·466) were designated as positive. Additionally, we collated historical data for interferon activity, measured with a viral cytopathic assay, in CSF and serum from mutation-positive patients with AGS. We also undertook neutralisation assays of interferon activity in serum, and looked for the presence of autoantibodies against a panel of interferon proteins. Findings 74 (90%) of 82 patients had a positive interferon score (median 12·90, IQR 6·14–20·41) compared with two (7%) of 29 controls (median 0·93, IQR 0·57–1·30). Of the eight patients with a negative interferon score, seven had mutations in RNASEH2B (seven [27%] of all 26 patients with mutations in this gene). Repeat sampling in 16 patients was consistent for the presence or absence of an interferon signature on 39 of 41 occasions. Interferon activity (tested in 147 patients) was negatively correlated with age (CSF, r=−0·604; serum, r=−0·289), and was higher in CSF than in serum in 104 of 136 paired samples. Neutralisation assays suggested that measurable antiviral activity was related to interferon α production. We did not record significantly increased concentrations of autoantibodies to interferon subtypes in patients with

  7. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by viruses that attack the lining of the bronchial tree ... infection. As your body fights back against these viruses, more swelling occurs and more mucus is produced. ...

  8. Acute Pericarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... large pericardial effusions). Acute pericarditis usually responds to colchicine or NSAIDs (such as aspirin and ibuprofen ) taken ... reduce pain but relieves it by reducing inflammation. Colchicine also decreases the chance of pericarditis returning later. ...

  9. Home Care Guide on Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (For Parents).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesecke, Linda L.; And Others

    The booklet, written by the medical staff of a children's hospital, provides information for parents of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Arthritis is a swelling of the joint(s) in children and lasts for over 6 weeks (sometimes many years). Aspirin is the main medicine given for JRA, and it works not only to control pain but also,…

  10. Paleopathologic evidence for the evolution of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Klepinger, L L

    1978-01-01

    A human skeleton recovered from a Sicilian archaeological site and dating from the Hellenistic period (330-210 B.C.) presents a pathological pattern suggesting a transition between ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis, providing evidence in support of the hypothesis that rheumatoid arthritis may have recently evolved out of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:367177

  11. Understanding Arthritis Promoting Healthy Lifestyles for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremethick, Mary Jane; Hogan, Patricia I.; Coleman, Barb; Adams, Kady

    2010-01-01

    One of the goals of "Healthy People 2010" is to decrease the incidence of limitation in physical activity due to arthritis. Physical education, recreation, and dance professionals can play an important role in meeting this objective by addressing barriers to physical activity and exercise in older adults with arthritis, and by successfully…

  12. Common commercial cosmetic products induce arthritis in the DA rat.

    PubMed Central

    Sverdrup, B; Klareskog, L; Kleinau, S

    1998-01-01

    Many different agents, including mineral oil and silicone, have the capacity to act as immunological adjuvants, i.e., they can contribute to the activation of the immune system. Some adjuvants, including mineral oil, are known to induce arthritis in certain strains of rats after intradermal injection or percutaneous application. The aim of this study was to determine if common commercial cosmetic products containing mineral oil could induce arthritis in the highly susceptible DA (Dark Agouti) rat. Intradermal injection of five out of eight assayed cosmetic products without further additives resulted in arthritis with synovitis. One of the products induced a very aggressive arthritis, which had declined after 5-9 weeks. When this product was also assayed for arthritogenicity upon percutaneous administration, it induced a mild and transient arthritis in 5 out of 10 DA rats, whereas control animals showed no clinical signs of joint involvement. No arthritic reaction was seen in rats after peroral feeding with the most arthritogenic product or by intravaginal application of Freund's adjuvants. Silicone gel implants in DA rats did not cause arthritis. We conclude that mineral oils included in common commercially available products retain their adjuvant properties and are arthritogenic in the presently investigated arthritis-prone rat strain. There is yet no evidence that mineral oils present in cosmetics may contribute to arthritis in humans, but we suggest that this question should be subject to further investigation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9417771

  13. Prevalence and Impact of Arthritis: Opportunities for Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Ray; Allegrante, John P.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Due to its chronic nature and its associated impact on physical function and life quality, arthritis in its various forms imposes a significant burden on society. Objective: To critically review and evaluate: (1) what has been documented about the burden of arthritis, (2) what is being done in treatment, and (3) what might be done at…

  14. The Child with Arthritis in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanzo, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Arthritis is a condition often associated with the elderly. However, arthritis affects approximately 275,000 children nationwide. Symptoms may vary from one swollen joint to multiply affected joints coupled with fatigue, fever, and rash. Its effect on the school-age child can range from missing a few days of school per year to hospitalizations…

  15. 78 FR 32403 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... meeting. Agenda: On July 22, 2013, the committee will discuss the Assessment of...

  16. First Case of Lyme Arthritis Involving a Prosthetic Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Wright, William F.; Oliverio, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto is the most common tick-borne illness in the United States. Arthritis is usually a mani­festation of late dis­ease but has not been associated with cases of periprosthetic joint infections. We report on a patient who was first diagnosed with periprosthetic joint infection and subsequently Lyme arthritis. PMID:27419168

  17. Avenues to autoimmune arthritis triggered by diverse remote inflammatory challenges.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Nina; Tan, Jian K; Mason, Linda J; Robert, Remy; McKenzie, Craig I; Lim, Florence; Wong, Connie H; Macia, Laurence; Thorburn, Alison N; Russ, Brendan E; Masters, Seth L; Mackay, Charles R

    2016-09-01

    Environmental factors contribute to development of autoimmune diseases. For instance, human autoimmune arthritis can associate with intestinal inflammation, cigarette smoking, periodontal disease, and various infections. The cellular and, molecular pathways whereby such remote challenges might precipitate arthritis or flares remain unclear. Here, we used a transfer model of self-reactive arthritis-inducing CD4(+) cells from KRNtg mice that, upon transfer, induce a very mild form of autoinflammatory arthritis in recipient animals. This model enabled us to identify external factors that greatly aggravated disease. We show that several distinct challenges precipitated full-blown arthritis, including intestinal inflammation through DSS-induced colitis, and bronchial stress through Influenza infection. Both triggers induced strong IL-17 expression primarily in self-reactive CD4(+) cells in lymph nodes draining the site of inflammation. Moreover, treatment of mice with IL-1β greatly exacerbated arthritis, while transfer of KRNtg CD4(+) cells lacking IL-1R significantly reduced disease and IL-17 expression. Thus, IL-1β enhances the autoaggressive potential of self-reactive CD4(+) cells, through increased Th17 differentiation, and this influences inflammatory events in the joints. We propose that diverse challenges that cause remote inflammation (lung infection or colitis, etc.) result in IL-1β-driven Th17 differentiation, and this precipitates arthritis in genetically susceptible individuals. Thus the etiology of autoimmune inflammatory arthritis likely relates to diverse triggers that converge to a common pathway involving IL-1β production and Th17 cell distribution. PMID:27427404

  18. Anglo-French contributions to the recognition of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Kevin J.

    1982-01-01

    Early descriptions of rheumatoid arthritis in the English and French literature are reviewed. Charcot pointed out that the disease was recognised as distinct from gout in eighteenth century England, and pictorial evidence for this is presented. His own work on arthritis led to a series of noteworthy interactions with Alfred Baring Garrod, which are discussed. Images PMID:7051988

  19. Acute bone infarction: a rare complication in thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Kanthawang, Thanat; Pattamapaspong, Nuttaya; Louthrenoo, Worawit

    2016-07-01

    Acute bone infarction is a well-described complication in sickle cell hemoglobinopathy but it is rarely reported in patients with thalassemia. This report describes an 18-year-old man with homozygous β-thalassemia presenting with a fever and severe acute bilateral ankle pain. The acute onset of severe pain and fever were clinical mimics of infectious arthritis and osteomyelitis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed acute bone infarction in the meta-diaphysis of bilateral tibias presenting as central unenhanced devitalized bone with T1-high signal intensity fluid in the subperiosteum and soft tissue. Characteristic imaging features are discussed, emphasizing the benefit of fat suppression pre-and post-intravenous gadolinium T1-weighted images. The etiologies of bone infarction in thalassemia are reviewed. PMID:27105620

  20. Brief Report: Chikungunya viral arthritis in the United States: A mimic of seronegative rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Julie M.; Taffner, Samantha; Malkova, Olga N.; Oh, Stephen T.; Kim, Alfred H.J.; Diamond, Michael S.; Lenschow, Deborah J.; Yokoyama, Wayne M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthritogenic mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that spread to the Caribbean in 2013 and the United States in 2014. CHIKV-infected patients develop inflammatory arthritis that can persist for months to years, but little is known about the rheumatologic and immunologic features of CHIKV arthritis in humans, particularly as compared to rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we describe these features in a group of 10 American travelers who were nearly simultaneously infected while visiting Haiti in June 2014. METHODS Patients were assessed by history, physical examination, and laboratory studies. All patients with CHIKV arthritis had detectable anti-CHIKV IgG. Using cytometry by time of flight (CyTOF), we analyzed peripheral blood mononuclear cells in CHIKV-infected patients, healthy controls, and patients with untreated, active RA. RESULTS Among ten CHIKV-infected individuals, eight developed persistent symmetric polyarthritis, who otherwise met the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria for (seronegative) RA. CyTOF analysis revealed that RA and CHIKV-infected patients had greater percentages of activated and effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cells than healthy controls. CONCLUSION In addition to similar clinical features, patients with CHIKV infection and RA develop highly similar peripheral T cell phenotypes. These overlapping clinical and immunologic features highlight a need for rheumatologists to consider CHIKV infection when evaluating patients with new, symmetric polyarthritis. PMID:25605621

  1. Ureaplasma septic arthritis in an immunosuppressed patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    George, Michael David; Cardenas, Ana Maria; Birnbaum, Belinda K; Gluckman, Stephen J

    2015-06-01

    Mycoplasmas, including Ureaplasma and Mycoplasma species, are uncommon but important causes of septic arthritis, especially affecting immunosuppressed patients. Many of the reported cases have been associated with congenital immunodeficiency disorders, especially hypogammaglobulinemia. Mycoplasmas are difficult to grow in the laboratory, and these infections may be underdiagnosed using culture techniques. We report a case of a 21-year-old woman with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and hip arthroplasties treated with rituximab and adalimumab who developed urogenital infections and soft tissue abscesses followed by knee arthritis with negative routine cultures. Ureaplasma species was identified from synovial fluid on 2 separate occasions using a broad-range 16S ribosomal RNA gene polymerase chain reaction. Azithromycin led to rapid improvement in symptoms, but after completion of therapy, involvement of the hip prosthesis became apparent, and again, 16S rRNA gene polymerase chain reaction was positive for Ureaplasma species. The literature is reviewed with a discussion of risk factors for Mycoplasma septic arthritis, clinical presentation, methods of diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:26010188

  2. Streptococcus gordonii septic arthritis : two cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite advances in antimicrobial and surgical therapy, septic arthritis remains a rheumatologic emergency that can lead to rapid joint destruction and irreversible loss of function. In adults, Staphylococcus aureus is the most common microorganism isolated from native joints. Streptococcus gordonii is a prominent member of the viridans group of oral bacteria and is among the bacteria most frequently identified as being primary agent of subacute bacterial endocarditis. To the best of our knowledge, Streptococcus gordonii has not yet been described as agent of septic arthritis. Case Presentation We describe here two cases of septic arthritis due to Streptococcus gordonii. It gives us an opportunity to review epidemiology, diagnosis criteria and management of septic arthritis. Conclusion Although implication of S. gordonii as aetiologic agent of subacute endocarditis is well known, this organism is a rare cause of septic arthritis. In this case, the exclusion of associated endocarditis is warranted. PMID:22974507

  3. Current concepts in psoriatic arthritis: pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    de Vlam, Kurt; Gottlieb, Alice B; Mease, Philip J

    2014-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis occurs in a subset of psoriasis patients and is therefore commonly encountered in dermatology practice. Although its exact pathogenesis is unknown, psoriatic arthritis is thought to share common mechanisms with psoriatic skin symptoms. Innate and adaptive immune responses are abnormally activated in psoriasis and may acquire the ability to attack peripheral joints and other sites following an environmental trigger (e.g. mechanical stress, trauma, infection) in genetically susceptible patients. The increased cardiovascular risk inherent in psoriasis appears further enhanced in psoriatic arthritis, likely reflecting the overall burden of systemic inflammation contributing to atherogenic processes. Basic research and clinical trials have suggested that tumour necrosis factor is important in psoriatic arthritis pathophysiology, and accumulating evidence suggests that Th17 cells and interleukin-17A may also be important. Basic research and clinical trials inform our understanding of psoriatic arthritis pathophysiology and, in turn, help dermatologists to make better treatment decisions. PMID:24573106

  4. Role of genetics in infection-associated arthritis.

    PubMed

    Benham, Helen; Robinson, Philip C; Baillet, Athan C; Rehaume, Linda M; Thomas, Ranjeny

    2015-04-01

    Genetic discoveries in arthritis and their associated biological pathways spanning the innate and adaptive immune system demonstrate the strong association between susceptibility to arthritis and control of exogenous organisms. The canonical theory of the aetiology of immune-mediated arthritis and other immune-mediated diseases is that the introduction of exogenous antigenic stimuli to a genetically susceptible host sets up the environment for an abnormal immune response manifesting as disease. A disruption in host-microbe homeostasis driven by disease-associated genetic variants could ultimately provide the source of exogenous antigen triggering disease development. We discuss genetic variants impacting the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system and their relationship to microbial control and arthritic disease. We go on to consider the evidence for a relationship between HLA-B27, infection and arthritis, and then emerging evidence for an interaction between microbiota and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26362740

  5. Techniques for assessing knee joint pain in arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Volker; Han, Jeong S; Adwanikar, Hita; Fu, Yu; Ji, Guangchen

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of pain is of critical importance for mechanistic studies as well as for the validation of drug targets. This review will focus on knee joint pain associated with arthritis. Different animal models have been developed for the study of knee joint arthritis. Behavioral tests in animal models of knee joint arthritis typically measure knee joint pain rather indirectly. In recent years, however, progress has been made in the development of tests that actually evaluate the sensitivity of the knee joint in arthritis models. They include measurements of the knee extension angle struggle threshold, hind limb withdrawal reflex threshold of knee compression force, and vocalizations in response to stimulation of the knee. A discussion of pain assessment in humans with arthritis pain conditions concludes this review. PMID:17391515

  6. People Getting a Grip on Arthritis: A Knowledge Transfer Strategy to Empower Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosseau, Lucie; Lineker, Sydney; Bell, Mary; Wells, George; Casimiro, Lynn; Egan, Mary; Cranney, Ann; Tugwell, Peter; Wilson, Keith G.; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was twofold. First, to help people with arthritis become aware of and utilize Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Osteoarthritis (OA) Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) as they relate to self-management strategies. Second, to evaluate the impact of specific Knowledge Translation (KT) activities on CPG uptake. More…

  7. Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis - a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Kurkó, Júlia; Besenyei, Timea; Laki, Judit; Glant, Tibor T; Mikecz, Katalin; Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2013-10-01

    The "Bermuda triangle" of genetics, environment and autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Various aspects of genetic contribution to the etiology, pathogenesis and outcome of RA are discussed in this review. The heritability of RA has been estimated to be about 60 %, while the contribution of HLA to heritability has been estimated to be 11-37 %. Apart from known shared epitope (SE) alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*01 and DRB1*04, other HLA alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*13 and DRB1*15 have been linked to RA susceptibility. A novel SE classification divides SE alleles into S1, S2, S3P and S3D groups, where primarily S2 and S3P groups have been associated with predisposition to seropositive RA. The most relevant non-HLA gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with RA include PTPN22, IL23R, TRAF1, CTLA4, IRF5, STAT4, CCR6, PADI4. Large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 30 loci involved in RA pathogenesis. HLA and some non-HLA genes may differentiate between anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) seropositive and seronegative RA. Genetic susceptibility has also been associated with environmental factors, primarily smoking. Some GWAS studies carried out in rodent models of arthritis have confirmed the role of human genes. For example, in the collagen-induced (CIA) and proteoglycan-induced arthritis (PgIA) models, two important loci - Pgia26/Cia5 and Pgia2/Cia2/Cia3, corresponding the human PTPN22/CD2 and TRAF1/C5 loci, respectively - have been identified. Finally, pharmacogenomics identified SNPs or multiple genetic signatures that may be associated with responses to traditional disease-modifying drugs and biologics. PMID:23288628

  8. MICL controls inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Redelinghuys, Pierre; Whitehead, Lauren; Augello, Andrea; Drummond, Rebecca A; Levesque, Jean-Michel; Vautier, Simon; Reid, Delyth M; Kerscher, Bernhard; Taylor, Julie A; Nigrovic, Peter A; Wright, John; Murray, Graeme I; Willment, Janet A; Hocking, Lynne J; Fernandes, Maria J G; De Bari, Cosimo; Mcinnes, Iain B; Brown, Gordon D

    2016-01-01

    Background Myeloid inhibitory C-type lectin-like receptor (MICL, Clec12A) is a C-type lectin receptor (CLR) expressed predominantly by myeloid cells. Previous studies have suggested that MICL is involved in controlling inflammation. Objective To determine the role of this CLR in inflammatory pathology using Clec12A−/− mice. Methods Clec12A−/− mice were generated commercially and primarily characterised using the collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model. Mechanisms and progress of disease were characterised by clinical scoring, histology, flow cytometry, irradiation bone-marrow chimera generation, administration of blocking antibodies and in vivo imaging. Characterisation of MICL in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was determined by immunohistochemistry and single nucleotide polymorphism analysis. Anti-MICL antibodies were detected in patient serum by ELISA and dot-blot analysis. Results MICL-deficient animals did not present with pan-immune dysfunction, but exhibited markedly exacerbated inflammation during CAIA, owing to the inappropriate activation of myeloid cells. Polymorphisms of MICL were not associated with disease in patients with RA, but this CLR was the target of autoantibodies in a subset of patients with RA. In wild-type mice the administration of such antibodies recapitulated the Clec12A−/− phenotype. Conclusions MICL plays an essential role in regulating inflammation during arthritis and is an autoantigen in a subset of patients with RA. These data suggest an entirely new mechanism underlying RA pathogenesis, whereby the threshold of myeloid cell activation can be modulated by autoantibodies that bind to cell membrane-expressed inhibitory receptors. PMID:26275430

  9. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePlus

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  10. Septic Arthritis Due to Cellulosimicrobium cellulans▿

    PubMed Central

    Magro-Checa, César; Chaves-Chaparro, Lara; Parra-Ruiz, Jorge; Peña-Monje, Alejandro; Rosales-Alexander, José Luis; Salvatierra, Juan; Raya, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Cellulosimicrobium cellulans has been reported as a rare cause of human pathogenesis. Infections mainly occur in immunocompromised patients and very often are associated with a foreign body. We report the first case of septic arthritis caused by C. cellulans in an immunocompetent patient. Our patient suffered a penetrating palm tree thorn injury to his left knee 8 weeks before admission. Although no foreign objects were found, they were suspected because previous reports suggest a frequent association with this microorganism, and open debridament was performed. Removal of foreign bodies related to this organism must be considered a high-priority treatment in these patients to achieve a complete recovery. PMID:21998421

  11. [New assessment method in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Hirata, Shintaro; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2016-06-01

    To assess disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), several composite measures have been used. However, more objective indices have been desired due to subjectivity in conventional indices. The Multi-Biomarker Disease Activity(MBDA) score is a novel serum testing based disease activity score ranging 1-100, derived from pre-specified algorithms in combination with 12 biomarkers. The MBDA score not only reflects disease activity in RA, but also is predictive for radiographic progression and risk of flare after drug reduction. Here we review usefulness of the MBDA score in RA. PMID:27311181

  12. Therapeutic implications of autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Aletaha, Daniel; Blüml, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterised by the presence of autoantibodies. Their value for diagnostic/prognostic purposes has been well established. In contrast, their role in established disease and their associations with disease activity is less clear. Moreover, as evidence is accumulating that these autoantibodies are causally involved in certain key aspects of the disease, such as the initiation and perpetuation of joint inflammation or join destruction, autoantibodies in RA can no longer be regarded as mere epiphenomena, but are integral elements of the pathophysiology of RA. PMID:27252890

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis association at 6q23.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Wendy; Barton, Anne; Ke, Xiayi; Eyre, Steve; Hinks, Anne; Bowes, John; Donn, Rachelle; Symmons, Deborah; Hider, Samantha; Bruce, Ian N; Wilson, Anthony G; Marinou, Ioanna; Morgan, Ann; Emery, Paul; Carter, Angela; Steer, Sophia; Hocking, Lynne; Reid, David M; Wordsworth, Paul; Harrison, Pille; Strachan, David; Worthington, Jane

    2007-12-01

    The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) identified nine single SNPs putatively associated with rheumatoid arthritis at P = 1 x 10(-5) - 5 x 10(-7) in a genome-wide association screen. One, rs6920220, was unequivocally replicated (trend P = 1.1 x 10(-8)) in a validation study, as described here. This SNP maps to 6q23, between the genes oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 3 (OLIG3) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3). PMID:17982455

  14. [Systemic treatments for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Philipp, S; Kokolakis, G; Sabat, R

    2016-06-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most common chronic dermatoses. More than 25 % of the affected individuals require effective systemic treatment because of severe symptoms and/or the significantly restricted quality of life. Thanks to intensive research and successful cooperation between academia and the pharmaceutical industry, the options for treating psoriasis have dramatically increased in recent years. Especially targeted therapies give us the opportunity for personalized regimen. This review describes the spectrum of the systemic treatments for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and discusses the efficacy, safety, and particular features of the individual substances. PMID:27240668

  15. Septic arthritis caused by Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Riera, Jaume; Conesa, Xavier; Pisa, Jose; Moreno, Josefa; Siles, Eduard; Novell, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of infection by Mycobacterium marinum is rising, mainly due to the increasing popularity of home aquariums. The infection typically manifests as skin lesions, with septic arthritis being a rare presentation form. The disease is difficult to diagnose even when there is a high clinical suspicion, as culture in specific media may not yield positive findings. Thus, establishment of appropriate treatment is often delayed. Synovectomy, capsular thinning, and joint drainage together with prolonged, combined antibiotic therapy may be needed to cure the infection. PMID:26511731

  16. Decreased fibrinolytic activity in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Mussoni, L; Pintucci, G; Romano, G; De Benedetti, F; Massa, M; Martini, A

    1990-01-01

    The basal fibrinolytic activity in 17 children with active juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) was investigated. It was found that patients with JCA, and particularly those with the systemic form, show decreased plasma fibrinolytic activity and a marked increase in plasminogen activator inhibitor. Additionally, it was found that patients with systemic JCA, but not those with the polyarticular or pauciarticular form, have increased circulating levels of tissue-type plasminogen activator, and endothelial cell protein, suggesting possible endothelial cell participation in systemic JCA. PMID:2125408

  17. The Acute and Chronic Presentation of Gluteus Medius Calcific Tendinitis- A Case Report of Two

    PubMed Central

    Almedghio, Sami; Garneti, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The calcific tendinitis is a common to happen around the shoulder, calcific tendinitis of tendons adjacent to the hip is not common like the shoulder. It can present either as acute hip pain and limitation of movement or chronic hip pain. We present two patients one with acute presentation and the other one chronic. Case Report: We present a case series of two patients with calcific tendinitis of the gluteus medius muscle. One patient a 37-year-old male presented with acute severe hip pain associated with a raised temperature, prompting concern about septic arthritis. The second patient presented with chronic hip pain. Calcification of the soft tissues adjacent to the greater trochanter was evident on plain radiographs in both patients. CT and MRI scans excluded septic or inflammatory arthritis in the patient with an acute presentation, the patient’s condition settled with analgesia and NSAIDs. Conclusion: An unusual combination of symptoms and finding mimicking septic arthritis should be considered in patients presenting with acute calcific tendinitis of the hip gluteus medius muscle. PMID:27299002

  18. Myelitis and optic neuritis induced by a long course of etanercept in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Waka; Takada, Kazuki; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Kohsaka, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman presented with an acute onset of myelitis and optic neuritis after 47 months of etanercept use for rheumatoid arthritis. Etanercept was discontinued and pulse methylprednisolone therapy (1000 mg/day for 3 days) was started, followed by a quick and complete resolution. Demyelination associated with antitumor necrosis factor agents, reported to develop mostly from 1 week to 12 months after the initiation of the agents, could develop after a few years and thus warrants vigilant monitoring. PMID:25085953

  19. Odontoid upward migration in rheumatoid arthritis. An analysis of 45 patients with "cranial settling".

    PubMed

    Menezes, A H; VanGilder, J C; Clark, C R; el-Khoury, G

    1985-10-01

    Lack of correlation between the severity of rheumatoid subluxation of the upper cervical vertebrae and supposed absence of neurological damage has led to the erroneous supposition that this finding is innocuous. Incomplete autopsy studies in rheumatoid arthritis have failed to recognize the cause of death, despite previously proven dramatic occipito-atlanto-axial dislocations. The most feared entity of rheumatoid basilar invagination, namely "cranial settling," is poorly understood. Between 1978 and 1984, the authors treated 45 rheumatoid arthritis patients who were symptomatic with "cranial settling." This consisted of vertical odontoid penetration through the foramen magnum (9 to 33 mm), occipito-atlanto-axial dislocation, lateral atlantal mass erosion, downward telescoping of the anterior arch of C-1 on the axis, and rostral rotation of the posterior arch of C-1 producing ventral and dorsal cervicomedullary junction compromise. Cervicomedullary junction dysfunction has mistakenly been called "entrapment neuropathy," "progression of disease," or "vasculitis." Occipital pain occurred in all 45 patients, myelopathy in 36, blackout spells in 24, brain-stem signs in 17, and lower cranial nerve palsies in 10. Four patients had prior tracheostomies. Four previously asymptomatic patients with "cranial settling" presented acutely quadriplegic. The factors governing treatment were reducibility and direction of encroachment determined by skeletal traction and myelotomography. Transoral odontoidectomy was performed in seven patients with irreducible pathology. All patients underwent occipitocervical bone fusion (with C-1 decompression if needed) and acrylic fixation. Improvement occurred during traction, implying that compression might be the etiology for the neurological signs. There were no complications. Thus, "cranial settling" is a frequent complication of rheumatoid arthritis; although it is poorly recognized, it has serious implications and is treatable. PMID:4032013

  20. In vivo role of phagocytic synovial lining cells in onset of experimental arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Van Lent, P. L.; Van den Hoek, A. E.; Van den Bersselaar, L. A.; Spanjaards, M. F.; Van Rooijen, N.; Dijkstra, C. D.; Van de Putte, L. B.; Van den Berg, W. B.

    1993-01-01

    The in vivo role of phagocytic synovial lining cells (SLC) was studied in acute experimental arthritis in the mouse. SLCs were selectively depleted by injecting liposomes encapsulating the drug dichloromethylene diphosphonate (CL2MDP, Clodronate). Optimal depletion of phagocytic lining cells occurred 7 days after CL2MDP liposome injection. Eliciting an immune complex-mediated arthritis in SLC-depleted knee joints largely prevented inflammation if compared to control arthritic knee joints. Joint swelling and influx of inflammatory cells into the joint cavity was markedly diminished. Cartilage damage, in this model related to influx of inflammatory cells, was significantly decreased. Reduced influx of inflammatory cells (mainly polymorphonuclear neutrophils) was correlated to a decreased production of chemotactic factors as measured in washouts of arthritic joints in a two-compartment Transwell system. Interleukin-1-driven chemotactic factors seem to be involved. Interleukin-1 levels were significantly lowered in SLC-depleted arthritic knee joints as compared to controls. Injection of recombinant murine interleukin-1 in SLC-depleted knee joints caused less influx of inflammatory cells as compared to injection into control knee joints. A specific damage of CL2MDP liposome treatment to synovial blood vessels was excluded as intraarticular injection of human recombinant C5a in lining-depleted knee joints showed similar influx of inflammatory cells if compared to human recombinant C5a injection in control knee joints. This study indicates that in immune complex-mediated arthritis, phagocytic lining cells regulate the onset of the inflammatory response. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:8214013

  1. Acute Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Hammad; Fasanya, Adebayo; Cheema, Tariq; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Acute pneumonia is an active infection of the lungs that results when an individual at risk gets exposed to a particular microbiological pathogen. Acute pneumonia is the leading cause of death in the United States that is attributable to an infection. The risk factors, pathogenesis, and microbiological organisms involved differ if the pneumonia develops in the community versus health care-associated environment. The development of concise and comprehensive guidelines has led to an improvement in the management of the problem. However, the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms and the increase in the percentage of elderly population keep mortality risk very substantial. PMID:26919676

  2. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a multimodality approach.

    PubMed

    Sheybani, Elizabeth F; Khanna, Geetika; White, Andrew J; Demertzis, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by synovial inflammation and is the most common rheumatic complaint in children. To facilitate research and treatment, JIA has been further classified on the basis of the number of joints involved, additional symptoms, family history, and serologic findings. Imaging in patients with JIA has historically relied on radiography, which allows the accurate assessment of chronic changes of JIA, including growth disturbances, periostitis, and joint malalignment. However, radiographic findings of active inflammation are nonspecific, and, in the past, clinical evaluation has taken precedence over imaging of acute disease. Recent advances in disease-modifying therapeutic agents that can help prevent long-term disability in patients with JIA have led to greater emphasis on the detection of early joint-centered inflammation that cannot be accurately assessed radiographically and may not be evident clinically. Both contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and Doppler ultrasonography (US) are well suited for this application and are playing an increasingly important role in diagnosis, risk stratification, treatment monitoring, and problem solving. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging is the most sensitive technique for the detection of synovitis and is the only modality that can help detect bone marrow edema, both of which indicate active inflammation. US is more sensitive than radiography for the detection of synovial proliferation and effusions and is particularly useful in the evaluation of small peripheral joints. The complexity of the temporomandibular and sacroiliac joints limits the usefulness of radiographic or US evaluation, and contrast-enhanced MR imaging is the preferred modality for evaluation of these structures. PMID:24025923

  3. Lyme arthritis and post-Lyme disease syndrome.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Arthur; Britchkov, Michael

    2002-07-01

    In the United States, intermittent or chronic mono- or oligoarthritis, particularly affecting the knee, is the most common manifestation of late Lyme disease (LD). Lyme arthritis (LA) can usually be prevented by early treatment of acute LD. However, the erythema migrans rash may go undetected in children and in the dark skin of African Americans, leading to delayed treatment and a relatively increased incidence in LA. Virtually all untreated patients with LA have high levels of serum immunoglobulin G antibodies, and sometimes low levels of immunoglobulin M antibodies, to Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) by ELISA and Western blot. These responses may persist for many years after antibiotic treatment, and therefore, serologic results do not accurately distinguish between active or past infection. Most patients with LA respond well to standard courses of antibiotic treatment, but a small percentage have persistent knee synovitis, in some cases possibly related to the triggering of intrasynovial autoimmunity. Other patients develop a syndrome of diffuse arthralgia, myalgia, fatigue, and subjective cognitive difficulty during or soon after LD, which persists despite antibiotic treatment. Patients with this post-treatment, post-LD syndrome were recently studied in a placebo-controlled double-blind antibiotic trial. There was no evidence of Borrelial infection in these patients by culture or detection of Bb DNA in blood or spinal fluid. Furthermore, there was no difference in responsiveness of these patients to a 3-month course of antibiotic compared with placebo treatment. Thus, LA caused by active Bb infection, post-treatment LA with persistent knee synovitis and post-LD syndrome are distinct and distinguishable clinical entities. PMID:12118171

  4. Chronic arthritis induced in rats by cell wall fragments of Eubacterium species from the human intestinal flora.

    PubMed Central

    Severijnen, A J; van Kleef, R; Hazenberg, M P; van de Merwe, J P

    1990-01-01

    To investigate arthritis-inducing properties of Eubacterium species, which are major residents of the human intestinal flora, cell wall fragments (CWF) of several Eubacterium strains were prepared and tested in an animal model. After a single intraperitoneal injection in the rat, CWF of E. aerofaciens, E. contortum, and E. lentum induced a chronic polyarthritis. E. limosum and E. tortuosum CWF induced an acute self-limiting joint inflammation, whereas E. rectale CWF failed to do so. The rhamnose contents of the isolated CWF were not related to their arthritis-inducing properties. Paradoxically, the sensitivity of CWF to lysozyme digestion, which is regarded as a parameter for the clearance of CWF in tissues, appeared to be positively correlated with the ability of Eubacterium CWF to induce chronic joint inflammation. Our findings show the diversity in arthritis-inducing properties among different species of the anaerobic genus Eubacterium and underline the importance of the anaerobic intestinal flora in the induction of joint inflammation. Images PMID:2298490

  5. Laser transillumination for diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, E.; Podbielska, H.; Bauer, J.; Dmochowska, L.; Dziewięcka, M.

    2006-02-01

    In this work, the special portable apparatus was constructed for performing the transillumination examination on interphalangeal joints of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. It consisted of He-Ne laser with optics for collimated illumination, special holder for placing the finger (perpendicular to optical axis, dorsal site towards camera), and CCD camera with memory stick. The captured images in JPEG format with 1152x864 resolution were converted into the gray level pictures and analyzed by means of image processing program from OPTIMAS. 35 ill patients and 11 healthy volunteers were examined. The histograms and 35 luminances were calculated. The average function was applied in order to calculate the mean gray level values in images of corresponding fingers of healthy subjects. These values were compared with values calculated for ill persons. We proved that that transillumination images may have a diagnostic value. For RA suffering patients the corresponding transillumination images represented the lower gray level values than the average value of finger of health volunteers. For II finger of left hand 96% images of ill persons have lower gray level and in case of right hand it was 93%. This proves that basing in transillumination one can diagnose with high probability the patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

  6. Disseminated Mycobacterium abscessus Infection Following Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Shoichi; Sekiya, Noritaka; Takizawa, Yasunobu; Morioka, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirofumi; Aono, Akio; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Mitarai, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Satomi; Kamei, Satoshi; Setoguchi, Keigo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium abscessus is a rapidly growing mycobacterium found mainly in patients with respiratory or cutaneous infections, but it rarely causes disseminated infections. Little is known about the clinical characteristics, treatment, and prognosis of disseminated M abscessus infection. A 75-year-old Japanese woman who had been treated for 17 years with a corticosteroid for antisynthetase syndrome with antithreonyl-tRNA synthetase antibody developed swelling of her right elbow. X-ray of her right elbow joint showed osteolysis, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed fluid in her right elbow joint. M abscessus grew in joint fluid and blood cultures. She was diagnosed with a disseminated M abscessus infection following septic arthritis. Antimicrobial treatment by clarithromycin, amikacin, and imipenem/cilastatin combined with surgical debridement was administered. Although blood and joint fluid cultures became negative 1 week later, the patient died at 6 weeks from starting antimicrobial treatment. We reviewed 34 cases of disseminated M abscessus infections from the literature. Most of the patients had immunosuppressive backgrounds such as transplantation, use of immunosuppressive agents, hematological malignancy, and end stage renal disease. The duration from onset of symptoms to diagnosis was over 3 months in half of the cases. All fatal cases had positive blood cultures or use of immunosuppressive agents. Clinicians should bear in mind that mycobacterial infections including M abscessus are one of the differential diagnoses in patients with subacute arthritis and soft tissue infections. PMID:26020393

  7. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and oral health].

    PubMed

    Kobus, Agnieszka; Kierklo, Anna; Sielicka, Danuta; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common autoimmune inflammatory disease of connective tissue in children. It is characterized by progressive joint destruction which causes preserved changes in the musculoskeletal system. The literature describes fully clinical symptoms and radiological images in different subtypes of JIA. However, there is still a limited number of studies reporting on the medical condition of the oral cavity of ill children. JIA can affect hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity by: the general condition of the child's health, arthritis of the upper limbs, as the result of the pharmacotherapy, changes in secretion and composition of saliva, inflammation of the temporomandibular joint and facial deformity. The study summarizes the available literature on the condition of the teeth and periodontal and oral hygiene in the course of JIA. The presence of diverse factors that modify the oral cavity, such as facial growth, functioning of salivary glands, or the supervision and care provided by adults, prevents clear identification if JIA leads to severe dental caries and periodontal disease. Despite conflicting results in studies concerning the clinical oral status, individuals with JIA require special attention regarding disease prevention and maintenance of oral health. PMID:27180959

  8. Infection and musculoskeletal conditions: Reactive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rihl, Markus; Klos, Andreas; Köhler, Lars; Kuipers, Jens G

    2006-12-01

    Reactive arthritis (ReA) has been recognized as a clinical disease entity for nearly 100 years. The prevalence is estimated to be 30-40/100,000 adults. The HLA-B27-associated form is part of the spondyloarthritis concept. According to the current hypothesis the arthritis follows a primary extra-articular infection and is characterized by the presence of bacterial antigen and/or of viable but non-culturable bacteria persisting within the joint. Pathogenesis involves the modification of host cells by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, e.g. lipopolysaccharide), bacterial effector proteins, the adaptive immune system, and the genetic background. Up to 30% of patients develop chronic symptoms, and therapeutic options for these patients are still limited. Data for recommendations to apply conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are rare; however, sulfasalazine seems to be effective, and first reports on agents that block tumour necrosis factor (TNF) are promising. Combination therapy of several antibiotics might open the window to curing the disease; however, controlled clinical studies are needed. PMID:17127200

  9. Macrophages - silent enemies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Świdrowska-Jaros, Joanna; Orczyk, Krzysztof; Smolewska, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    The inflammatory response by secretion of cytokines and other mediators is postulated as one of the most significant factors in the pathophysiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The effect of macrophage action depends on the type of their activation. Classically activated macrophages (M1) are responsible for release of molecules crucial for joint inflammation. Alternatively activated macrophages (M2) may recognize self antigens by scavenger receptors and induce the immunological reaction leading to autoimmune diseases such as JIA. Molecules essential for JIA pathophysiology include: TNF-α, the production of which precedes synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis; IL-1 as a key mediator of synovial damage; chemotactic factors for macrophages IL-8 and MCP-1; IL6, the level of which correlates with the radiological joint damage; MIF, promoting the secretion of TNF-α and IL-6; CCL20 and HIF, significant for the hypoxic synovial environment in JIA; GM-CSF, stimulating the production of macrophages; and IL-18, crucial for NK cell functions. Recognition of the role of macrophages creates the potential for a new therapeutic approach. PMID:27383571

  10. MicroRNAs in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Eisa; Eftekhari, Rahil; Oraei, Mona; Gharib, Alvand; Bidad, Katayoon

    2015-04-01

    The role of genetic and epigenetic factors in the development of rheumatic diseases has been an interesting field of research over the past decades all around the world. Research on the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been active and ongoing, and investigations have attempted to use miRNAs as biomarkers in disease diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. This review focuses on experimental researches in the field of miRNAs and RA to present the data available up to this date and includes researches searched by keywords "microRNA" and "rheumatoid arthritis" in PubMed from 2008 to January 2015. All references were also searched for related papers. miRNAs are shown to act as proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory agents in diverse cell types, and their role seems to be regulatory in most instances. Researchers have evaluated miRNAs in patients compared to controls or have investigated their role by overexpressing or silencing them. Multiple targets have been identified in vivo, in vitro, or in silico, and the researches still continue to show their efficacy in clinical settings. PMID:25736037

  11. Psoriatic arthritis treatment: biological response modifiers.

    PubMed

    Mease, P J; Antoni, C E

    2005-03-01

    In recent years there has been a surge of interest in the treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders as a result of the development and application of targeted biological therapies. The elucidation of the overlapping cellular and cytokine immunopathology of such diverse conditions as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Crohn's disease, and psoriasis points to specific targets for bioengineered proteins or small molecules. Similar to clinical trials in RA, trials in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) have shown excellent clinical results with the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blockers, etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab in a variety of domains including the joints, quality of life, function, and slowing of disease progress as evidenced radiologically. In addition, these agents have shown benefit in domains more unique to PsA, such as the skin lesions of psoriasis, enthesitis, and dactylitis, pointing out the similar pathogenesis of the disease in the skin, the tendons, and the synovial membrane. This therapy has been generally safe and well tolerated in clinical trials of PsA. Other logical candidates for targeted therapy in development include other anti-TNF agents, costimulatory blockade agents that affect T cell function, blockers of other cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1, 6, 12, 15, or 18, and B cell modulatory medicines. Also, it will be useful to learn more about the effects of combining traditional disease modifying drugs and the newer biologicals. PMID:15708944

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Periodontal Disease. An Update.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Archana; Almas, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    A review of the epidemiological, pathological and immunological relationships between two chronic inflammatory diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontal disease (PD). RA is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints, characterized by loss of connective tissue and mineralized structures, the so-called "synovial membrane." Periodontitis is the inflammatory destruction of the periodontal attachment and alveolar bone. While the etiology of these two diseases may differ, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are similar. And it is possible that individuals manifesting both PD and RA may suffer from a unifying underlying systemic deregulation of the inflammatory response. There is an overproduction of a variety of cytokines and MMPs that appears to be common in both diseases. Oral health parameters should be more closely monitored in patients with RA, an autoimmune disease. Data suggest that periodontal therapies combined with routine RA treatments further improve RA status. Interventions to prevent, minimize or treat periodontitis in arthritis patients will definitely promise a better quality of life for these patients. PMID:26521325

  13. Angiogenic and Inflammatory Properties of Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory arthropathy associated with psoriasis and included in seronegative spondyloarthropathy. PsA has several unique characteristics different from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), such as enthesopathy, dactylitis, and abnormal bone remodeling. As compared with synovitis of RA (pannus), proliferation of PsA synovium is mild and characterized by hypervascularity and increased infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the synovial tissues. Angiogenesis plays a crucial role in cutaneous psoriasis, and several angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor, interleukin-8, angiopoietin, tumor necrosis factor-α and transforming growth factor-β, are suggested to play an important role also in the pathophysiology of PsA. Further, IL-17 has various functions such as upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, attraction of neutrophils, stimulation of keratinocytes, endothelial cell migration, and osteoclast formation via RANKL from activated synovial fibroblasts. Thus, IL-17 may be important in angiogenesis, fibrogenesis, and osteoclastogenesis in PsA. In this paper, roles of angiogenesis in the psoriatic synovium are discussed, which may strengthen the understanding of the pathogenesis of PsA. PMID:23819059

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Foot and Ankle.

    PubMed

    Abdo; Iorio

    1994-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis of the foot and ankle can be a debilitating problem, particularly for patients who have undergone successful hip or knee arthroplasty. Optimal medical management, use of orthotic devices, and surgical intervention are essential components of patient care. Forefoot involvement with hallux valgus and lesser metatarsophalangeal joint subluxation and dislocation are the most common findings. Reconstruction usually requires lesser metatarsophalangeal joint excisional arthroplasty and first metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis. Midfoot tarsometatarsal and intertarsal involvement is treated with orthotic devices and intertarsal fusion for advanced arthropathy. Hindfoot involvement frequently leads to pes planovalgus deformity, which may require isolated talonavicular arthrodesis if treated early or triple arthrodesis for advanced destruction. Ankle involvement is less frequent; when it is unresponsive to conservative measures, ankle symptoms may be improved by arthrodesis. Although great advances have been made in medical and surgical management of rheumatoid arthritis, the disease remains a serious problem. Through prudent use of medical management, orthotic devices, and other conservative measures as well as surgical intervention, long-term function can be enhanced greatly. PMID:10709025

  15. Nocardia Arthritis: 3 Cases and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Chaussade, Hélène; Lebeaux, David; Gras, Guillaume; Catherinot, Emilie; Rammaert, Blandine; Poiree, Sylvain; Lecuyer, Hervé; Zeller, Valérie; Bernard, Louis; Lortholary, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Nocardia are Gram-positive filamentous bacteria responsible for infections ranging from opportunistic life-threatening disseminated diseases to chronic skin and soft-tissue infections. Even if virtually all organs can be infected, articular involvement is rare. Therefore, we report 3 recent cases and performed a literature review of cases of Nocardia arthritis in order to describe clinical features, therapeutic challenges, and outcome of these patients. Among 34 patients (31 in the literature plus our 3 cases), 21 (62%) were due to hematogenous dissemination, 9 (26%) were due to direct bacterial inoculation through the skin, and in 4 cases, the mechanism of infection was unknown. Four out of these 34 cases occurred on prosthetic joints. Whereas hematogenous infections mostly occurred in immunocompromised hosts (17 of 21, 81%), direct inoculation was mostly seen in immunocompetent patients. Eighty-two percent of patients (28 out of 34) received trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-containing regimens and median antibiotic treatment duration was 24 weeks (range, 12–120) for hematogenous infections and 12 weeks (range, 6–24) for direct inoculations. Outcome was favorable in 27 cases despite unsystematic surgical management (17 cases) without sequelae in 70% of the cases. Nocardia arthritis is rare but its management is complex and should rely on a combined approach with rheumatologist, infectious diseases expert, and surgeon. PMID:26496274

  16. Total ankle replacement for posttraumatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Weme, Rebecca A Nieuwe; van Solinge, Guido; N Doornberg, Job; Sierevelt, Inger; Haverkamp, Daniël; Doets, H Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Most studies on total ankle replacement (TAR) have used a case mix of patients. We evaluated the outcome of TAR performed for end-stage arthritis either because of fracture or ligamentous injury. Patients and methods We prospectively followed 88 consecutive patients (50 postfracture ankles and 40 ankles with instability arthritis (2 bilateral)) who underwent TAR between 2001 and 2009. Mean follow-up for both groups was 5 years. Results Preoperative varus deformity of 10° or more was present in 23 ankles in the instability group. At 6 years, survival with revision or salvage fusion as an endpoint was 87% (95% CI: 74–99) in the postfracture group and 79% (95% CI: 63–94) in the instability group. Progressive periprosthetic osteolysis was seen in 23 ankles, and required salvage fusion in 6. The number of reoperations was similar in both groups. Clinical outcome, as assessed with 2 ankle scores and 2 questionnaires, showed good results and was similar at the latest follow-up. Interpretation The outcome was similar in the postfracture and instability groups and also similar to that reported in series including a case mix of patients. In contrast to earlier reports, preoperative frontal plane deformity in this series was not identified as a risk factor for failure. PMID:25772269

  17. Pain Treatment in Arthritis-Related Pain: Beyond NSAIDs

    PubMed Central

    van Laar, Mart; Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Mellinghoff, Hans-Ulrich; Merchante, Ignacio Morón; Nalamachu, Srinivas; O'Brien, Joanne; Perrot, Serge; Raffa, Robert B

    2012-01-01

    Managing pain from chronic conditions, such as, but not limited to, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, requires the clinician to balance the need for effective analgesia against safety risks associated with analgesic agents. Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis pain is incompletely understood but involves both nociceptive and non-nociceptive mechanisms, including neuropathic mechanisms. Prevailing guidelines for arthritis-related pain do not differentiate between nociceptive and non-nociceptive pain, sometimes leading to recommendations that do not fully address the nature of pain. NSAIDs are effective in treating the nociceptive arthritis-related pain. However, safety concerns of NSAIDs may cause clinicians to undertreat arthritis-related pain. In this context, combination therapy may be more appropriate to manage the different pain mechanisms involved. A panel convened in November 2010 found that among the currently recommended analgesic products for arthritis-related pain, fixed-low-dose combination products hold promise for pain control because such products allow lower doses of individual agents resulting in decreased toxicity and acceptable efficacy due to synergy between the individual drugs. Better evidence and recommendations are required to improve treatment of chronic arthritis-related pain. PMID:23264838

  18. Myeloproliferative disorders in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with total body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Urowitz, M.B.; Rider, W.D.

    1985-01-21

    Four patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis were treated with total body irradiation administered in two sittings, 300 to 400 rads to each half of the body. All four patients had taken antimetabolites prior to receiving total body irradiation, and two continued to use them after total body irradiation. Two patients had taken alkylating agents before, and one had used them after total body irradiation. All patients showed clinical improvement. However, in two patients myeloproliferative disorders developed: a myelodysplastic preleukemia at 40 months after total body irradiation in one and acute myelogenous leukemia at 25 months in the other. Total body irradiation differs from total nodal irradiation in the total dose of irradiation (300 to 400 rads versus 2,000 to 3,000), and in the duration of the therapy (two sittings versus treatment over several weeks to months). Furthermore, the patients in the total body irradiation study frequently used cytotoxic drugs before and/or after irradiation, whereas in one total nodal irradiation study, azathioprine (2 mg/kg per day or less) was permitted, but no other cytotoxic agents were allowed. Rheumatologists may therefore face a binding decision when deciding to treat a patient with rheumatoid arthritis with either a cytotoxic drug or irradiation.

  19. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Vitis thunbergii var. taiwaniana on Knee Damage Associated with Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ching-Fent; Wang, Kun-Teng; Chen, Lih-Geeng; Lee, Chia-Jung; Tseng, Sung-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Vitis thunbergii Sieb. et Zucc. var. taiwaniana Lu (VT) is an indigenous plant in Taiwan that is traditionally used for promoting joint health. In this study, we used in vitro primary human chondrocytes (PHCs) and two in vivo animal models to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of VT on arthritis. Results showed that the water extract of the stems and roots from VT (VT-SR) was rich in flavones and phenols with 1.1 mg/g of resveratrol, 6.7 mg/g of hopeaphenol, and 5.1 mg/g of (+)-ɛ-viniferin. VT-SR significantly scavenged DPPH radicals and inhibited prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PHCs without exhibiting significant cytotoxicity. In in vivo models, the VT-SR (500 mg/kg) significantly decreased serum PGE2 and knee 2-18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) levels in LPS-induced acute inflammatory arthritis in rabbits. In addition, dietary supplementation with VT-SR for 28 days significantly alleviated type II collagenase-induced rat osteoarthritis with improvements in weight bearing and range of motion tests. In conclusion, our results suggest that the VT-SR is a good candidate for developing dietary supplements to prevent joint deterioration and inhibit inflammation. PMID:24720858

  20. Granulomatous uveitis and reactive arthritis as manifestations of post-streptococcal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abderrahim, Kais; Chebil, Ahmed; Falfoul, Yosra; Bouladi, Mejda; El Matri, Leila

    2015-10-01

    To report a case of bilateral granulomatous post-streptococcal syndrome uveitis in association with reactive arthritis as manifestation of post-streptococcal syndrome. To our knowledge, this could represent the first reported case in the literature. A 9-year-old girl, with no past ocular history, presented with a 5-day history of bilateral blurred vision, red eyes, photophobia and walking difficulties because of a right ankle pain. Ophthalmic examination disclosed a visual acuity limited to hand motion, mutton-fat keratic precipitates, anterior chamber cells and posterior synechiae in both eyes. Ocular pressure was normal. Physical examination showed a fever (38 °C), inflammatory ankle arthritis and scarlet fever (streptococcal lesion). Anti-streptococcal lysine O titer was 419 μ/ml. The patient was treated with topical steroids, cycloplegics, high-dose oral steroids and preventive course of penicillin with total improvement and no recurrence. Post-streptococcal syndrome should be considered in the etiology of acute bilateral granulomatous uveitis in children, and anti-streptococcal lysine O titer should be considered in serodiagnostic testing. PMID:22986580

  1. Silent myocardial infarction secondary to cardiac autonomic neuropathy in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Unnikrishnan, Dileep; Jacob, Aasems; Anthony Diaz, Mark; Lederman, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    An 83-year-old female patient with rheumatoid arthritis and hypertension presented to the emergency department with fever and chills of 1 day duration. On examination, temperature was 100.9 F, heart rate 111/min and she had orthostatic hypotension. Laboratory tests showed elevated blood urea nitrogen and white cell count. The patient underwent treatment for symptomatic urinary tract infection and while her fever and leucocytosis resolved, tachycardia persisted. An EKG done showed T inversions in leads II, III, arteriovenous fistula, V2 and V3. Troponin-I was elevated. Nuclear stress test revealed apical wall motion abnormality confirming myocardial infarction. Ewing's tests were carried out at bedside and these diagnosed severe autonomic neuropathy. Rheumatoid arthritis can cause cardiac autonomic neuropathy from chronic inflammation. This case entails the importance of assessing and detecting cardiac autonomic neuropathy in chronic inflammatory conditions, and the need to be cautious of acute coronary events in these patients, even for minimal or no symptoms. PMID:27489064

  2. Complement in acute and chronic arthritides: assessment of C3c, C9, and protectin (CD59) in synovial membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Konttinen, Y T; Ceponis, A; Meri, S; Vuorikoski, A; Kortekangas, P; Sorsa, T; Sukura, A; Santavirta, S

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the role of complement cascade induced damage and protection against it in acute arthritides compared to rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic joint derangements. METHODS: C3c, C9, and protectin (CD59) were examined by avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex staining. RESULTS: Marked deposits of C3c and C9 were found in synovial vasculature and intercellular matrix of the lining in rheumatoid arthritis and in acute arthritides (including bacterial, reactive, and osteoarthritis flare up). Furthermore, protectin was not visible in synovial lining cells and was relatively weakly expressed in stromal and endothelial cells in rheumatoid arthritis; also in acute arthritides protectin expression was weak. In contrast, C3c and C9 deposits were not found in chronic conditions associated with degenerative diseases (osteoarthritis and osteochondritis dissecans) or mechanical causes (patellar luxation and a ruptured meniscus), in which also the protectin expression was prominent in synovial lining, endothelial and some stromal cells. CONCLUSIONS: Activation of the complement in rheumatoid arthritis and in acute arthritides seems to be associated with a decreased protection of synovial cells against cellular effects and lysis mediated by membrane attack complex. Images PMID:9014582

  3. IL-12p40 Homodimer Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seon-Yeong; Jung, Young Ok; Kim, Doo-Jin; Kang, Chang-Min; Moon, Young-Mee; Heo, Yu-Jung; Oh, Hye-Jwa; Park, Seong-Jeong; Yang, Se-Hwan; Kwok, Seung Ki; Ju, Ji-Hyeon; Park, Sung-Hwan; Sung, Young Chul

    2015-01-01

    IL-23 is the key cytokine that induces the expansion of Th17 cells. It is composed of p19 and p40 subunits of IL-12. The p40 subunit binds competitively to the receptor of IL-23 and blocks its activity. Our aim was to assess the preventive and therapeutic effect of the IL-12p40 homodimer (p40)2 subunit in autoimmune arthritis animal models. In the current study, using IL-1R antagonist–knockout mice and a collagen-induced arthritis model, we investigated the suppressive effect of (p40)2 on inflammatory arthritis. We demonstrated that the recombinant adenovirus-expressing mouse (p40)2 model prevented the development of arthritis when given before the onset of arthritis. It also decreased the arthritis index and joint erosions in the mouse model if transferred after arthritis was established. (p40)2 inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines and Ag-specific T cell proliferation. It also induced CD4+CD25+Foxp3 regulatory T (Treg) cells in vitro and in vivo, whereas the generation of retinoic acid receptor–related organ receptor γt and Th17 cells was suppressed. The induction of Treg cells and the suppression of Th17 cells were mediated via activated STAT5 and suppressed STAT3. Our data suggest that (p40)2 suppressed inflammatory arthritis successfully. This could be a useful therapeutic approach in autoimmune arthritis to regulate the Th17/Treg balance and IL-23 signaling. PMID:26324771

  4. Smoking and overweight determine the likelihood of developing rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    de Hair, Maria J H; Landewé, Robert B M; van de Sande, Marleen G H; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; van Baarsen, Lisa G M; Gerlag, Danielle M; Tak, Paul P

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a prototypic chronic inflammatory disease with a debilitating course if untreated. A genetic predisposition for RA is known, and its occurrence is associated with the presence of autoantibodies in the serum and with environmental factors. It is unknown if smoking and overweight are contributory factors for developing RA in individuals with RA-specific autoantibodies in the serum. Methods Fifty-five individuals at risk for developing RA, based on the presence of RA-specific autoantibodies in the serum, who never had any evidence of arthritis upon physical examination, were followed over time. Smoking was assessed as being never or ever smoker and body mass index as <25 (normal) or ≥25 kg/m2 (overweight). Clinical endpoint was the occurrence of arthritis. Proportional hazard regression analysis was performed to investigate the potential of (combinations of) variables in predicting the onset of arthritis over time. Results After a median follow up time of 13 (IQR 6–27) months, 15 individuals (27%) developed arthritis. Smoking was associated with the development of arthritis (HR (95% CI): 9.6 (1.3 to 73.0); p=0.029). Overweight was, independently of smoking, associated with arthritis (HR (95% CI): 5.6 (1.3 to 25.0); p=0.023). The overall arthritis risk of 28% after a median of 27 months follow up increased to 60% in individuals with a smoking history combined with overweight. Conclusions This is the first prospective study showing that smoking and overweight increase the risk of development of arthritis in a cohort of autoantibody-positive individuals at risk for developing RA. These results show the importance of life style factors in development of RA and should be critically evaluated in future clinical research aimed at disease prevention. PMID:23104761

  5. IL-12p40 Homodimer Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seon-Yeong; Jung, Young Ok; Kim, Doo-Jin; Kang, Chang-Min; Moon, Young-Mee; Heo, Yu-Jung; Oh, Hye-Jwa; Park, Seong-Jeong; Yang, Se-Hwan; Kwok, Seung Ki; Ju, Ji-Hyeon; Park, Sung-Hwan; Sung, Young Chul; Kim, Ho-Youn; Cho, Mi-La

    2015-10-01

    IL-23 is the key cytokine that induces the expansion of Th17 cells. It is composed of p19 and p40 subunits of IL-12. The p40 subunit binds competitively to the receptor of IL-23 and blocks its activity. Our aim was to assess the preventive and therapeutic effect of the IL-12p40 homodimer (p40)2 subunit in autoimmune arthritis animal models. In the current study, using IL-1R antagonist-knockout mice and a collagen-induced arthritis model, we investigated the suppressive effect of (p40)2 on inflammatory arthritis. We demonstrated that the recombinant adenovirus-expressing mouse (p40)2 model prevented the development of arthritis when given before the onset of arthritis. It also decreased the arthritis index and joint erosions in the mouse model if transferred after arthritis was established. (p40)2 inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines and Ag-specific T cell proliferation. It also induced CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3 regulatory T (Treg) cells in vitro and in vivo, whereas the generation of retinoic acid receptor-related organ receptor γt and Th17 cells was suppressed. The induction of Treg cells and the suppression of Th17 cells were mediated via activated STAT5 and suppressed STAT3. Our data suggest that (p40)2 suppressed inflammatory arthritis successfully. This could be a useful therapeutic approach in autoimmune arthritis to regulate the Th17/Treg balance and IL-23 signaling. PMID:26324771

  6. Prevalence of arthritis in India and Pakistan: a review.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Ehtisham; Bilal, Saira; Kiani, Adnan; Haque, Uzma

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies of rheumatoid arthritis worldwide suggest that prevalence of arthritis is higher in Europe and North America than in developing countries. Prevalence data for major arthritis disorders have been compiled in West for several decades, but figures from the third world are just emerging. A coordinated effort by WHO and ILAR (International League Against Rheumatism) has resulted in collecting data for countries like Philippines, China, Malaysia, Indonesia, and rural South Africa but the information about prevalence of arthritis in India and Pakistan is scarce. Since both countries, i.e., India and Pakistan, share some ethnic identity, we reviewed published literature to examine the prevalence of arthritis in these countries. Medline and Pubmed were searched for suitable articles about arthritis from 1980 and onwards. Findings from these articles were reviewed and summarized. The prevalence, clinical features, and laboratory findings of rheumatoid arthritis are compiled for both India and Pakistan. Data collected from these two countries were compared with each other, and some of the characteristics of the disease were compared with Europe and North America. It is found to be quite similar to developed countries. Additionally, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is of different variety than reported in West. It is more of polyarticular onset type while in West pauciarticular predominates. Additionally, in systemic onset, JRA uveitis and ANA are common finding in developed countries; on the other hand, they are hardly seen in this region. Although the prevalence of arthritis in Pakistan and India is similar to Western countries, there are inherent differences (clinical features, laboratory findings) in the presentation of disease. The major strength of the study is that it is the first to pool reports to provide an estimate of the disease in the Indian subcontinent. Scarcity of data is one of the major limitations. This study helps to understand the pattern of

  7. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  8. Systematic literature review of domains assessed in psoriatic arthritis to inform the update of the psoriatic arthritis core domain set

    PubMed Central

    Kalyoncu, Umut; Ogdie, Alexis; Campbell, Willemina; Bingham, Clifton O; de Wit, Maarten; Gladman, Dafna D; Mease, Philip; Steinkoenig, Ingrid; Strand, Vibeke; Riese, Victoria G; Orbai, Ana-Maria

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this systematic literature review (SLR) were to identify domains and outcome measures used in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) studies in the past 5 years, and to compare the measurement of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 2006 PsA Core Domain Set in studies published in 2010–2015 vs those published in 2006–2010. We performed a systematic literature search in two databases, PubMed and Embase, to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in PsA. We also identified PsA longitudinal observational studies (LOS). Three patient research partners provided input into study conception, and data collection and interpretation. We identified 41 studies representing 22 unique RCTs, 27 LOS and 12 registries. Across all studies, we identified 24 domains and 169 outcome measures. In addition to the PsA Core Domain Set (6 domains), the following domains were also assessed in more than 30% of RCTs: acute phase reactants, dactylitis, enthesitis, fatigue and work productivity. We identified a range of 1–15 outcome measures per domain with a mean (SD) of 7 (4.7) per domain. The complete PsA Core Domain Set was assessed in 59% of RCTs in 2010–2015 compared to 23.5% RCTs in 2006–2010. There has been increased measurement of the PsA Core Domain Set in RCTs and LOS in the past 5 years. Numerous additional outcomes were also measured. The PsA Core Domain Set needs an update to standardise PsA outcome assessments. This SLR will inform the development of an updated PsA Core Domain Set with patient research partner input. PMID:26966554

  9. Bilateral hip arthritis in a case of renal osteodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Nyokabi, David Ndegwa; Vaish, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    Chronic renal disease is often associated with secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPP) and rarely with tertiary HPP. Hip arthritis with protrusio acetabuli, secondary to tertiary HPP, is a rare case scenario and has not been described well in the literature. We present a rare case of bilateral hip arthritis with protrusio acetabuli secondary to renal osteodystrophy due to tertiary HPP. The diagnosis and aetiology of hip arthritis and its treatment have been discussed along with a detailed review of literature of skeletal lesions due to HPP. PMID:24554674

  10. Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis: Flip Sides of the Coin?

    PubMed

    Boehncke, Wolf-Henning

    2016-04-12

    Presence (current or past) of psoriasis of the skin is a major criterion to establish the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. However, in individual patients, the course of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis do not seem to correlate. This raises the issue of whether psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are distinct entities, or parts of the spectrum of a "psoriatic disease". Arguments in favour of both concepts, derived from clinical observations, animal experiments, genetic approaches, and therapeutic studies are reviewed, and the implications for scientists and practicing dermatologists highlighted. PMID:26928459

  11. Poststaphylococcal coagulase negative reactive arthritis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of a 49-year-old patient who developed poststaphylococcal coagulase negative reactive arthritis. The woman presented with constitutional symptoms, arthritis, urinary infection and conjunctivitis. The blood culture was positive for the staphylococcal coagulase negative infection. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were elevated, whereas the rheumatoid factor was negative. Radiographic findings confirmed diagnosis of pleuropneumonia, and one year later of chronic asymmetric sacroileitis. Physicians should be aware of possible reactive arthritis after staphylococcal coagulase negative bacteremia. PMID:20062603

  12. Pelvic osteomyelitis mimicking septic hip arthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Richelle C; Strongwater, Allan M

    2009-09-01

    Peripelvic infections are rare, compared with the incidence of septic hip arthritis, but are serious, requiring emergent treatment. They often are not included in differential diagnoses for patients presenting with fever, pain, inability to bear weight, elevated white blood cell count, and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Most patients are treated initially as a septic hip arthritis. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial to outcome in peripelvic abscess. Use of MRI may help to elucidate the correct diagnosis. Previously reported peripelvic infections included obturator internus and externus, and psoas, but to the best of our knowledge, this is first case report of infection of the ischiopubic ramus synchondrosis presenting as septic arthritis. PMID:19491707

  13. Destructive arthritis of the wrist and palmoplantar pustulosis.

    PubMed

    Goupille, P; Pizzuti, P; Jattiot, F; Valat, J P

    1994-01-01

    The authors report a case of destructive arthritis of the right wrist occurring in a 29-year-old Algerian man, associated with palmoplantar pustulosis and HLA B27 antigen. Joint fluid and synovial biopsy were sterile and the course was favourable with surgical synovectomy and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Usually, arthritis associated with palmoplantar pustulosis is of the non-erosive type but cases of destructive arthritis have been reported. This condition is probably a new member of the seronegative spondylarthropathy group. PMID:8070165

  14. Role of immunity to mycobacterial stress proteins in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    McLean, L.; Winrow, V.; Blake, D.

    1990-01-01

    'Stress Proteins in Inflammation' provided a forum for the discussion of topical issues in this rapidly moving field. The mycobacterial 65 kDa stress proteins play a key role in certain animal models of inflammatory arthritis. However, the impression emerging is that the mechanism probably involves more than a simple cross-reaction between mycobacterial SP65 and either the host SP65 or a cartilage antigen, and that evidence for a primary role in human rheumatoid arthritis is lacking. A realistic role for immune responses against stress proteins might be the amplification or perpetuation of inflammation. If so, this is unlikely to be limited to arthritis. PMID:2184873

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of systemic anti-tumour necrosis factor α treatment in human/murine SCID arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Schadlich, H.; Ermann, J.; Biskop, M.; Falk, W.; Sperling, F.; Jungel, A.; Lehmann, J.; Emmrich, F.; Sack, U.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To evaluate in vivo the contribution of tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) to the chimeric transfer model of human rheumatoid arthritis synovial membrane into SCID mice (hu/mu SCID arthritis), systemic anti-TNFα treatment was performed and the clinical, serological, and histopathological effects of this treatment assessed.
METHODS—Animals were treated with the rat-antimouse TNFα monoclonal antibody V1q, starting on day 1 after hu/mu engraftment, twice weekly for 12 weeks. Joint swelling, serum concentrations of human and murine interleukin 6 (IL6), and serum amyloid P (SAP) were measured. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses of the joints were also performed at the end of treatment.
RESULTS—Neutralisation of murine TNFα induced the following effects: (a) reduction of extent and duration of the acute arthritis phase, with significant reduction of joint swelling at two weeks; (b) decrease of murine SAP concentrations after the first antibody administration; and (c) increase of murine IL6 in the serum. At the end of treatment, there was a significant reduction of the inflammatory infiltration in the engrafted joints. Because of the mild degree of joint erosion, no treatment effects could be demonstrated on the destructive process.
CONCLUSION—In the lymphocyte independent hu/mu SCID arthritis, anti-TNFα treatment reduces local and systemic signs of inflammation.

 PMID:10381487

  16. Arthritis and tenosynovitis associated with the anti-PD1 antibody pembrolizumab in metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Chan, Matthew M K; Kefford, Richard F; Carlino, Matteo; Clements, Arthur; Manolios, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    We report the acute onset of polyarticular inflammatory arthritis in 2 patients receiving the immune check-point inhibitor, pembrolizumab (MK-3475), anti-PD1 drug for metastatic melanoma after 14 and 11 months therapy, respectively. The first patient had severe tenosynovitis, synovitis, bone marrow edema, and myositis, whereas the second patient had predominantly synovitis and tenosynovitis. Good symptomatic control was obtained with bisphosphonates and salazopyrin, avoiding the use of T-cell immunosuppressants. These cases raise important questions on whether anti-PD1 therapy allows preexisting autoimmune T-cell clones to escape tolerance by suppressing regulatory T cells or whether they allow autoimmunity to develop de novo. These conditions heighten our awareness of complications associated with the clinical use of these agents, and provide a prototypical model for future research into the understanding of autoimmunity. PMID:25415286

  17. Gout

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Gout Information for adults A A A Gout often results in nodules called tophi; this image shows an affected elbow. Overview Gout, also called gouty arthritis, is a disease of ...

  18. Bite force and temporomandibular disorder in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wenneberg, B; Kjellberg, H; Kiliaridis, S

    1995-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the functional condition of the stomatognathic system in children suffering from juvenile chronic arthritis, with respect to bite force and temporomandibular disorder in relation to radiographic abnormalities of the mandibular condyle, occlusal factors and systemic disease parameters. Thirty-five children with juvenile chronic arthritis were compared to 89 healthy children with an Angle Class I occlusion and 62 children with an Angle Class II malocclusion. Subjective symptoms and clinical signs of temporomandibular disorder and radiographic mandibular condylar changes were more common in children with juvenile chronic arthritis than in the two comparison groups. Maximal molar and incisal bite forces and maximal molar bite force endurance times were also significantly reduced in children with juvenile chronic arthritis. It is concluded that the differences between the groups are caused mainly by the systemic inflammatory disease itself, but a functional influence of weakened masticatory muscles cannot be excluded. PMID:7472737

  19. Treatment in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kasapçopur, Özgür; Barut, Kenan

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic rheumatic disease of the childhood with the highest risk of disability. Active disease persists in the adulthood in a significant portion of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis despite many developments in the diagnosis and treatment. Therefore, initiation of efficient treatment in the early period of the disease may provide faster control of the inflammation and prevention of long-term harms. In recent years, treatment options have also increased in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis owing to biological medications. All biological medications used in children have been produced to target the etiopathogenesis leading to disease including anti-tumor necrosis factor, anti-interleukin 1 and anti-interleukin 6 drugs. In this review, scientific data about biological medications used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options will be discussed. PMID:26078691

  20. Molecular targets of natural health products in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Khalifé, Sarah; Zafarullah, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) consume 'natural health products' (NHPs) whose therapeutic efficacy, toxicity and mechanisms of action are poorly understood. In a previous issue of Arthritis Research and Therapy, Haqqi and colleagues characterized IL-1-activated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3 (MKK3) and p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) isoforms in human OA chondrocytes. The cartilageprotective mechanisms of pomegranate extract involve diminishing MKK3-activated p38α, JNK, NF-κB and Runx2 pathways, which regulate inflammatory proteins and cartilage-destroying proteases. Epigallocatechin- 3-gallate, resveratrol, curcumin and other NHP active ingredients suppress multiple inflammatory and catabolic molecular mediators of arthritis. Non-toxicity, reduced severity and incidence of arthritis in animal models warrant testing NHP active ingredients for preventing human OA and RA. PMID:21345249

  1. [Psoriatic arthritis : Overview of drug therapy options and administration characteristics].

    PubMed

    Behrens, F; Thaçi, D; Wollenhaupt, J; Krüger, K

    2016-06-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the musculoskeletal system with association to skin psoriasis and is characterized by variable clinical symptoms with very heterogeneous degrees of disease suffering for patients. Clinical manifestations essentially include alterations to the skin and nails, peripheral arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis and/or spinal involvement. This variability necessitates an individualized therapy of patients with different therapy targets. Apart from international guidelines no therapy recommendations are available in Germany for treatment of psoriatic arthritis. For this reason this article summarizes the established points, characteristics and aspects to be considered in the therapy of psoriatic arthritis in Germany, taking the various main forms of the disease into consideration. PMID:27259913

  2. [Genetics and genomics in rheumatoid arthritis (RA): An update].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Elías, Ana Karen; Maldonado-Murillo, Karina; López-Mendoza, Luis Fernando; Ramírez-Bello, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that affects approximately 0.5-1% of the general population and leads to chronic synovial inflammation, destruction of cartilage and bone, and disability. The heritability of rheumatoid arthritis has been estimated to be about 60%, while the contribution of HLA to heritability has been estimated to be 11-37%. Other genes, such as PTPN22, STAT4, CTLA4, TRAF1, PADI4, IRF5, FCRL3, TNFIP3, TNF-α, miRNAs, CD28, CD40, TYK2, etc., have been associated with susceptibility, severity, activity, and treatment response of rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this review is to describe the role of gene variants located in immune system genes associated with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27160622

  3. Antibodies Act Jointly to Promote Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1999 Spotlight on Research 2014 September 2014 (historical) Antibodies Act Jointly to Promote Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis Two types of antibody molecules act in concert to stimulate inflammation in ...

  4. What People with Rheumatoid Arthritis Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... increased risk for osteoporosis, are two to three times more likely than men to have rheumatoid arthritis as well. Osteoporosis Management Strategies Strategies for preventing and treating osteoporosis in ...

  5. Acetaminophen Won't Help Arthritis Pain, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Won't Help Arthritis Pain, Study Finds Prescription diclofenac a more effective choice for short-term pain ... drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) or diclofenac are better choices for short-term pain relief, ...

  6. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pommepuy, I; Farny, M; Billey, T; Olivier, P; Lassoued, S

    1998-01-01

    A 75-year old man with rheumatoid arthritis developed bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP), which responded to treatment with prednisolone (1 mg/kg/d) and cyclophosphamide (100 mg/d). PMID:9523389

  7. The lung in rheumatoid arthritis, cause or consequence? Erratum.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    The name of the one of the first authors is spelt incorrectly in the article, 'The lung in rheumatoid arthritis, cause or consequence? The correct spelling is Aikaterini Chatzidionysiou. PMID:26855334

  8. Arthritis Possible Side Effect of Certain Cancer Drugs: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_159602.html Arthritis Possible Side Effect of Certain Cancer Drugs: Study Doctors should weigh ... research is needed to confirm a cause-and-effect relationship, the researchers said. Still, "I don't ...

  9. Gene Polymorphisms and Pharmacogenetics in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rego-Pérez, Ignacio; Fernández-Moreno, Mercedes; Blanco, Francisco J

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, chronic and inflammatory disease of unknown etiology with genetic predisposition. The advent of new biological agents, as well as the more traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, has resulted in highly efficient therapies for reducing the symptoms and signs of RA; however, not all patients show the same level of response in disease progression to these therapies. These variations suggest that RA patients may have different genetic regulatory mechanisms. The extensive polymorphisms revealed in non-coding gene-regulatory regions in the immune system, as well as genetic variations in drug-metabolizing enzymes, suggest that this type of variation is of functional and evolutionary importance and may provide clues for developing new therapeutic strategies. Pharmacogenetics is a rapidly advancing area of research that holds the promise that therapies will soon be tailored to an individual patient’s genetic profile. PMID:19506728

  10. Light scattering study of rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Beuthan, J; Netz, U; Minet, O; Mueller, G; Scheel, A; Henniger, J

    2002-11-30

    The distribution of light scattered by finger joints is studied in the near-IR region. It is shown that variations in the optical parameters of the tissue (scattering coefficient {mu}{sub s}, absorption coefficient {mu}{sub a}, and anisotropy factor g) depend on the presence of the rheumatoid arthritis (RA). At the first stage, the distribution of scattered light was measured in diaphanoscopic experiments. The convolution of a Gaussian error function with the scattering phase function proved to be a good approximation of the data obtained. Then, a new method was developed for the reconstruction of distribution of optical parameters in the finger cross section. Model tests of the quality of this reconstruction method show good results. (laser biology and medicine)

  11. Septic arthritis caused by chronic osteomyelitis.

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, J. L.; Watson, P. A.; Crouch, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    We have treated four cases of previously quiescent osteomyelitis which presented as septic arthritis in an adjacent joint. The osteomyelitic focus was in the bone proximal to the involved joints (zero to ten centimeters above the joint line). Based on the presenting history, physical findings, laboratory tests and cultures of joint fluids, the joint sepsis was low grade in all patients which led to delays in diagnosis and treatment. Aggressive surgical debridement of both bone and joint, followed by a prolonged course of antibiotics led to resolution in all patients. A high index of suspicion combined with adequate radiographs of the surrounding bones should lead to the appropriate diagnosis and treatment. Images Figure 1A-B Figure 1C Figure 1D Figure 2 PMID:9234979

  12. CDP-870 (certolizumab) in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, V V; Moots, R J

    2005-04-01

    The development of biological anti-TNF-alpha therapy has revolutionised the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases, and has identified a worldwide market for expensive yet effective therapies for chronic diseases. Certolizumab (CDP-870) is a new agent that employs a novel strategy to neutralise TNF-alpha--namely the prokaryotic expression of TNF-alpha-specific Fab antibody fragments, coupled to polyethylene glycol--to produce a drug that is potentially less expensive to manufacture than other anti-TNF-alpha agents and which may be administered by subcutaneous injection once a month. The background to the ongoing development of this new agent and its clinical effects are discussed in this article. PMID:15934837

  13. [Tofacitinib for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2016-06-01

    The combined use of synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (sDMARDs) such as methotrexate and biological DMARDs (bDMARDs) has revolutionized treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Remission is now realistic targets, achieved by a large proportion of RA patients. However, bDMARDs are limited to intravenous or subcutaneous uses and orally available small but strong products have been developed. Oral administration of tofacitinib targeting the Janus kinase (JAK) is significantly effective than placebo in active RA patients with sDMARD-naïve, inadequately responsive to sDMARDs or TNF-inhibitors. The efficacy was rapid and as strong as adalimumab, a TNF-inhibitor. The common adverse events were related to infection, hematologic and hepatic disorders and association of tofacitinib with carcinogenicity and infections remains debated. PMID:27311188

  14. Interest of modelling in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Beresniak, Ariel; Dupont, Danielle M; Becker, Jean-Claude; Merkesdal, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Such as prospective studies can provide evidence-based information for clinicians and regulatory agencies, modelling studies provide useful information when experimental studies are to complex, too long, or too expensive to carry out. If modelling has been widely used in pharmacokinetics, it is in the field of pharmacoeconomics that numerous models have been published in recent years, including models relevant to the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The most common modelling techniques published in RA are decision trees and Markov models which are used to perform cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analyses using real or simulated populations. This paper reviews the main types of modelling techniques used in pharmacoeconomic studies with the aim of clarifying their interest and limitations for the clinicians. Generating such evidence is highly relevant to assisting clinical recommendations and reimbursement decisions towards enabling the optimal management of RA and reducing its overall clinical and economic burden, for the benefits of patients and health systems. PMID:23078913

  15. Diagnostic challenges in acromioclavicular septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old man with Klinefelter's syndrome presented with a painful shoulder and staphylococcal sepsis. He received intravenous antibiotics while investigations were performed to locate the source of infection. MRI demonstrated infection in the acromioclavicular joint (ACJ). The patient clinically improved and a further 5 weeks of oral antibiotics were given. He remained asymptomatic at 2-year follow-up. Although ACJ septic arthritis is rare, independent of immune-competent status, a high index of suspicion is essential for prompt diagnosis. The condition presents additional diagnostic challenges due to unfamiliarity, the challenges of interpreting imaging, desire for radiological guided arthrocentesis and low volume aspirates. Overcoming these pitfalls is essential to avoid significant morbidity and mortality. PMID:27257000

  16. Treg cells in rheumatoid arthritis: an update.

    PubMed

    Cooles, Faye A H; Isaacs, John D; Anderson, Amy E

    2013-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease arising from a breakdown in immunological self-tolerance, which leads to aberrant immune responses to autoantigens. Regulatory CD4(+) T-cells (Tregs) underpin one of the key mechanisms of self-tolerance and are a major focus of study in RA and other autoimmune diseases. In order to design new and improved therapies to reinstate self-tolerance, and perhaps cure disease, we need to understand the complex mechanism of action of Tregs. This review addresses recent findings in the field of Tregs in RA, with particular focus on identification of potential defects in Treg-mediated self-tolerance mechanisms present in RA patients, as well as how Tregs interact with other cells in the inflamed joints. As antigen-specific Tregs are a potential route for the reinstatement of immune tolerance, we also discuss new strategies currently being investigated which expand or induce de novo generation of Tregs. PMID:23888361

  17. Septic Arthritis of the Shoulder Complicating Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Raiser, Sara; Davidson, Kathryn; Walsh, Ashley; Egerman, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Septic arthropathy leads to rapid joint destruction, impairment, and disability. Staphylococcus can be particularly virulent to bone and joints leading to adverse obstetric events. At 28 of weeks gestation, a patient presented with pyelonephritis and progressive left shoulder pain. Magnetic resonance imaging indicated early clavicular destruction and acromial involvement. Glenohumeral joint aspiration produced Staphylococcus aureus. The patient then had premature rupture of membranes and progressed rapidly to preterm delivery. Placental pathology revealed chorioamnionitis and microabscesses. Treatment of the infected joint required further surgical drainage and bone resection as well as extended antibiotics. It is important to remember that joint pain in pregnancy may indicate infective arthritis, and pyelonephritis can be a source of such an infection. Evaluation includes magnetic resonance imaging and consultation for joint aspiration. Prompt recognition and treatment are necessary to prevent joint destruction. PMID:24959364

  18. Effect of yogic package on rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay Kumar; Bhandari, R B; Rana, Budhi Bal

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at studying the effect of yogic package (YP) with some selected pranayama, cleansing practices and meditation on pain intensity, inflammation, stiffness, pulse rate (PR), blood pressure (BP), lymphocyte count (LC), C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum uric acid (UA) level among subjects of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Randomized control group design was employed to generate pre and post data on participants and controls. Repealed Measure ANOVAs with Bonferroni adjustment were applied to check significant overall difference among pre and post means of participants and controls by using PASW (SPSS Inc. 18th Version). Observed result favored statistically significant positive effect of YP on selected RA parameters and symptoms under study at P<0.05, 0.01 and 0.001 respectively that showed remarkable improvement in RA severity after 40-day practice of YP. It concluded that YP is a significant means to reduce intensity of RA. PMID:23362725

  19. Coexistence of rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Węgierska, Małgorzata; Żuchowski, Paweł; Dura, Marta; Zalewska, Joanna; Waszczak, Marzena; Jeka, Sławomir

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are chronic progressive inflammatory diseases, leading to joint damage and reducing the physical fitness of patients. They are among the most common rheumatic diseases. However, their etiology and symptomatology are different. Formerly, AS was often wrongly diagnosed as RA. Today there are no major diagnostic difficulties in differentiation between these diseases, thanks to modern laboratory tests and imaging. However, a problem may arise when the patient has symptoms typical for both diseases simultaneously. Cases of coexistence of RA with AS – according to our best knowledge – are rare. This study aims to compare our experience in diagnosis and treatment of concomitant RA and AS with the experience of other researchers. Implementation of the proper diagnostic algorithm, allowing for correct diagnosis of both diseases in one patient, may be useful for differential diagnosis of similar cases in the future.

  20. Septic arthritis of the hip - current concepts.

    PubMed

    Rutz, E; Brunner, R

    2009-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the hip is the commonest septic condition during growth, reaching a distinct peak in frequency during infancy. The aetiology is a haematogenous joint infection. Indicative signs are severe pain when moving the joint, septic appearance and a poor general condition of these small and young patients. The diagnosis often can be difficult in infants since septic temperatures are not always present. An ultrasound scan shows the hip joint effusion and the capsular distension. X-ray investigation helps to exclude defective situations. Therapeutic options are: in patients with short history without radiologically visible complications we recommend repeated arthroscopic irrigation and in patients with long history and a radiologically visible defect of the femoral head or dislocation we recommend arthrotomy and open revision or reduction of the hip joint. PMID:19306242