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Sample records for acute hemolytic transfusion

  1. An acute hemolytic transfusion reaction due to the “anti-c” rhesus antibody: A case report emphasizing the role of transfusion medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sachan, Deepti; Jayakumar, Rajeswari; Varghese, Joy; Rela, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Rhesus (Rh) mediated hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTR) are usually immunoglobulin G mediated and delayed onset. Rh antibodies being the cause of acute HTR (AHTR) and intravascular hemolysis are still under debate. We report here a case of a 53-year-old male who developed AHTR due to “anti-c” antibodies within 3 h of blood transfusion, precipitating fatal acute liver failure in a patient with hepatitis C related chronic liver disease. This case emphasizes the need of inclusion of antibody screening in routine pretransfusion testing as well as a critical role of transfusion medicine specialists for early diagnosis and minimizing transfusion-related morbidity and mortality. PMID:26420949

  2. [Blood matching and transfusion for 12 acute autoimmune hemolytic anemia patients by extracorporal hemolysis test].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Min; Tang, Cong-Hai; Wu, A-Yang; Yang, Hui-Cong; Gan, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Tian-Xin; Huang, Yan-Xue; Xu, Wei-Ping

    2014-12-01

    In order to screen the compatible red cells by using extracorporal hemolysis test for acute autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) patients who were difficult to be matched by automatic microcolumn gel indirect antiglobulin test. Twenty-six cases of AIHA were chosen as control group, to whom the same type of donor red blood cells were infused with the weakest blood agglutination; 12 cases of acute AIHA patients were chosen as test group, these patients were difficult to be matched by automatic microcolumn gel indirect antiglobulin test, and the donor red cells without hemolysis by extracoral hemolysis test were transfused for them. The results showed that compared with the control group,the effect of transfusion was better in test group (P < 0.01), with 2.26 U leukocyte-depleted erythrocyte suspension in average, whose hemoglobin, reticulocyte and total bilirubin levels were changed significantly compared with those before blood transfusion (P < 0.01) . It is concluded that the compatible red blood cells for the acute AIHA patients can be screened by the extracorporal hemolysis test, when it is difficult to screen by the automatic microcolumn gel indirect antiglobulin test. PMID:25543503

  3. Transfusion reaction - hemolytic

    MedlinePlus

    ... a blood transfusion. The reaction occurs when the red blood cells that were given during the transfusion are destroyed by the person's immune system. There are other types of allergic transfusion reactions that do not cause hemolysis.

  4. Incompatible blood transfusion: Challenging yet lifesaving in the management of acute severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sudipta Sekhar; Zaman, Rafiq Uz; Safi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is characterized by the production of autoantibodies directed against red cell antigens. Most patients of AIHA arrive in the emergency or out-patient department (OPD) with severe anemia requiring urgent blood transfusion. Here we share our experience of managing these patients with incompatible blood transfusions and suggest the minimal test required to assure patient safety. Materials and Methods: A total of 14 patients admitted with severe anemia, diagnosed with AIHA and requiring blood transfusion urgently were included in the study. A series of immunohematological investigations were performed to confirm the diagnosis and issue best match packed red blood cells (PRBC) to these patients. Results: A total of 167 PRBC units were crossmatched for 14 patients of which 46 units (28%) were found to be best match ones and 26 (56.5%) of these units were transfused. A mean turn around time of 222 min was observed in issuing the “best match” blood. Severe hemolysis was observed in all patients with a median hemoglobin increment of 0.88 g/dl after each unit PRBC transfusion. Conclusion: Decision to transfuse in AIHA should be based on the clinical condition of the patient. No critical patient should be denied blood transfusion due to serological incompatibility. Minimum investigations such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT), antibody screening and autocontrol should be performed to ensure transfusion safety in patients. All transfusion services should be capable of issuing “best match” PRBCs in AIHA. PMID:25161349

  5. Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in children with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    de Montalembert, Mariane; Dumont, Marie-Dominique; Heilbronner, Claire; Brousse, Valentine; Charrara, Oussama; Pellegrino, Béatrice; Piguet, Christophe; Soussan, Valérie; Noizat-Pirenne, France

    2011-01-01

    Background Transfusion is a cornerstone of the management of sickle cell disease but carries a high risk of hemolytic transfusion reaction, probably because of differences in erythrocyte antigens between blood donors of European descent and patients of African descent. Patients may experience hemolytic transfusion reactions that are delayed by from a few days to two weeks and manifest as acute hemolysis (hemoglobinuria, jaundice, and pallor), symptoms suggesting severe vaso-occlusive crisis (pain, fever, and acute chest syndrome), and profound anemia, often with reticulocytopenia. This case-series study aims to describe the main characteristics of this syndrome, to discuss its pathophysiology, and to propose a management strategy. Design and Methods We identified 8 pediatric cases of delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions between 2006 and 2009 in the database of the Necker Hospital, France. All patients had received cross-matched red cell units compatible in the ABO, RH, and KEL systems. We reviewed the medical charts in the computerized blood transfusion databases. All patients were admitted to the intensive care unit. We progressively adopted the following strategy: intravenous immunoglobulins, and darbopoietin alpha when the reticulocyte count was below 150×109/L, without further blood transfusion during the acute episode unless absolutely necessary. Results The median time between the transfusion and the diagnosis of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction was six days. All patients had severe bone pain; all but one had a high-grade fever. Five patients had hemoglobin levels less than than 4g/dL and 3 had reticulocytopenia. In 5 patients, no new antibody was found; one patient had weakly reactive antibodies. Only 2 patients had new allo-antibodies possibly responsible for the delayed hemolytic reaction. Conclusions The initial symptoms of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction were complex and mimicked other complications of sickle cell disease. In most of our cases, no new antibody was identified, which underlines the complexity of the pathophysiology of this syndrome. PMID:21330322

  6. Initiation and Regulation of Complement during Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Stowell, Sean R.; Winkler, Anne M.; Maier, Cheryl L.; Arthur, C. Maridith; Smith, Nicole H.; Girard-Pierce, Kathryn R.; Cummings, Richard D.; Zimring, James C.; Hendrickson, Jeanne E.

    2012-01-01

    Hemolytic transfusion reactions represent one of the most common causes of transfusion-related mortality. Although many factors influence hemolytic transfusion reactions, complement activation represents one of the most common features associated with fatality. In this paper we will focus on the role of complement in initiating and regulating hemolytic transfusion reactions and will discuss potential strategies aimed at mitigating or favorably modulating complement during incompatible red blood cell transfusions. PMID:23118779

  7. Acute transfusion reactions: an update.

    PubMed

    Scorer, T; Doughty, H

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade the use of blood products by the United Kingdom (UK) military has increased significantly; with the increase in transfusion comes an increased incidence of transfusion-related incidents. Acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) are a common consequence of transfusion, which vary widely in their severity and are likely to be under-reported, although reporting is a regulatory requirement. This paper discusses the importance of identifying ATRs and managing them appropriately. It introduces a flowchart (due to be incorporated in the next version of Joint Service Publication (JSP) 999, Clinical Guidelines for Operations (CGOs)), which is designed to assist the military multi-disciplinary team caring for patients in the operational environment. PMID:25895413

  8. [Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in sicle cell disease patients: a new challenge for the Hemovigilance network].

    PubMed

    Rieux, C; De Meyer, E; Boudjedir, K

    2015-03-01

    Delayed hemolytic reaction transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) is a serious and still under diagnosed event. Clinical and biological presentation mimics an acute SCD complication. It is a life-threatening event, especially in hyperhemolysis syndrome (HS) characterized by a massive destruction of both the donor's and patient's red blood cells. The main cause is related to the presence of alloantibodies directed against red blood cell antigens, more rarely autoantibodies. In approximately a third of the cases, no new antibody is highlighted. Pathophysiological hypotheses are still under debate but most of the authors agree on the role played by the SCD inflammatory state. Several therapeutic approaches are used but the data are still insufficient to estimate their efficiency. It is admitted that a new transfusion may exacerbate the phenomenon and the benefit-risk of any transfusion must be carefully evaluated. Measures limiting alloimmunization and rigorous follow-up of SCD patients and their immunohematologic status can prevent some of these accidents. The Hemovigilance network has a role to play in the recognition and the description of this risk. A first analysis realized on the French national Hemovigilance database of the French National Agency for Medicines and Health Products Safety (ANSM) over the period 2000-2013, shows us interesting information but some inadequacies, described here, must be taken into account to strengthen these data and insure in the future a better reporting quality. PMID:25441454

  9. ‘Chameleonic’ Serological Findings Leading to Life-Threatening Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Sümnig, Ariane; Mayer, Beate; Kiefel, Volker; Greinacher, Andreas; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The phenomena of co-incidence of transfusion-induced allo- and autoantibodies, blockage and/or loss of red blood cell (RBC) antigens are conspicuous and may result in confusion and misdiagnosis. Case Report A 67-year-old female was transferred to the intensive care unit due to hemolysis which developed 2 days following transfusion of three Rh(D)-negative RBC units in the presence of strongly reactive autoantibodies. Standard serological testing and genotyping were performed. Upon arrival, the patient was typed as Ccddee. Her hemolysis was decompensated, and an immediate blood transfusion was required. In addition, direct and indirect antiglobulin tests (DAT and IAT) as well as the eluate were strongly positive. Emergency transfusion of Rh(D)-negative RBCs resulted in increased hemolysis and renal failure. An exhaustive testing revealed anti-D, anti-c, CCddee phenotype and CCD.ee genotype. Three units of cryopreserved CCddee RBCs were transfused, and the patient's condition immediately improved. The discrepancy between Rh-D phenotyping and genotyping was likely caused by masking of the D-epitopes by the autoantibodies. In fact, further enquiry revealed that the patient had been phenotyped as Rh(D)-positive 6 months ago and had been transfused at that time following hip surgery. Conclusion The phenomena of transfusion-induced autoantibodies, masked alloantibodies, antigen blockage and/or loss are rare but important features which should be considered in patients presenting with autoimmune hemolytic anemia and/or hemolytic transfusion reactions. PMID:26696804

  10. [Infantile pyknocytosis: A cause of noenatal hemolytic anemia. Is recombinant erythropoietin an alternative to transfusion?].

    PubMed

    Bagou, M; Rolland, E; Gay, C; Patural, H

    2016-01-01

    Infantile pyknocytosis is a neonatal hemolytic disorder which causes anemia and icterus and is characterized by the presence of an increased number of distorted red blood cells called pyknocytes. Resolution spontaneously occurs in the first semester of life. It has been generally described as a rare entity, with an occasional family history. We report seven cases of infantile pyknocytosis observed in our hospital in 3years. Most of the infants presented with hemolytic icterus and profound anemia that was reaching its peak by the 3rd week of life. Three neonates received one to three red blood cell transfusions, according to former recommendations. However, the following four received a treatment with recombinant erythropoietin administered subcutaneously. Only one of these four cases required a transfusion. All of them were free of hematological disease 2-3months after completion of treatment. Infantile pyknocytosis is a recognized cause of neonatal hemolytic anemia, which requires careful examination of red cell morphology on a peripheral blood smear. The cause of this transient disorder remains unknown. Our observations show that recombinant erythropoietin therapy is effective in treating infantile pyknocytosis and increases the reticulocyte response, thus improving the hemoglobin level. PMID:26563723

  11. Blood transfusion for the treatment of acute anaemia in inflammatory bowel disease and other digestive diseases

    PubMed Central

    García-Erce, José Antonio; Gomollón, Fernando; Muñoz, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) is frequently used as the first therapeutic option for the treatment of acute anaemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), especially when it developed due to gastrointestinal or perioperative blood loss, but is not risk-free. Adverse effects of ABT include, but are not limited to, acute hemolytic reaction (wrong blood or wrong patient), febrile non-hemolytic transfusional reaction, bacterial contamination, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion associated circulatory overload, transfusion-related immuno-modulation, and transmission of almost all infectious diseases (bacteria, virus, protozoa and prion), which might result in increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, the main physiological goal of ABT, i.e. to increase oxygen consumption by the hypoxic tissues, has not been well documented. In contrast, the ABT is usually misused only to increase the haemoglobin level within a fixed protocol [mostly two by two packed red blood cell (PRC) units] independently of the patient’s tolerance to normovolemic anaemia or his clinical response to the transfusion of PRC units according to a “one-by-one” administration schedule. Evidence-based clinical guidelines may promote best transfusion practices by implementing restrictive transfusion protocols, thus reducing variability and minimizing the avoidable risks of transfusion, and the use of autologous blood and pharmacologic alternatives. In this regard, preoperative autologous blood donation (PABD) consistently diminished the frequency of ABT, although its contribution to ABT avoidance is reduced when performed under a transfusion protocol. In addition, interpretation of utility of PABD in surgical IBD patients is hampered by scarcity of published data. However, the role of autologous red blood cells as drug carriers is promising. Finally, it must be stressed that a combination of methods used within well-constructed protocols will offer better prospects for blood conservation in selected IBD patients undergoing elective surgery. PMID:19787832

  12. Transfusion-related acute lung injury; clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongmin; Na, Sungwon

    2015-04-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) was introduced in 1983 to describe a clinical syndrome seen within 6 h of a plasma-containing blood products transfusion. TRALI is a rare transfusion complication; however, the FDA has suggested that TRALI is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. Understanding the pathogenesis of TRALI will facilitate adopting preventive strategies, such as deferring high plasma volume female product donors. This review outlines the clinical features, pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of TRALI. PMID:25844126

  13. Effect of a single plasma transfusion on thromboembolism in 13 dogs with primary immune-mediated hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Mary F; Scott-Moncrieff, J Catharine; Brooks, Marjory B

    2004-01-01

    Thirteen dogs with primary immune-mediated hemolytic anemia received fresh-frozen plasma within 12 hours of admission, in addition to unfractionated heparin and other therapies, such as prednisone, azathioprine, and packed red blood cell transfusion. Antithrombin activity was quantified prior to transfusion and at 30 minutes and 48 hours after transfusion. Plasma antithrombin activity did not change significantly after a single plasma transfusion. There were no deaths in the first 48 hours of treatment. Thromboembolism was identified at necropsy in six of 10 dogs that died within 12 months of admission. There was no significant difference in the incidence of thromboembolism between the current treatment group and a historical control group. PMID:15533964

  14. Tc-99m red blood cells for the study of rapid hemolytic processes associated with heterologous blood transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetto, A.R.; Harrison, C.R.; Blumhardt, R.; Trow, L.L.

    1984-10-01

    Chromium-51 labeled erythrocytes (Cr-51 RBC) are suitable for the study of hematologic disorders which involve relatively slow destruction of circulating erythrocytes, taking several days to several weeks. However, Cr-51 RBC are not suitable for investigating rapid hemolytic processes which occur within a matter of a few hours due to the variable and unpredictable elution of Cr-51 from the erythrocytes during the first 24 hours or so. Imaging, which could be useful in identifying organ systems involved in the hemolytic process, cannot be performed with Cr-51 RBC because of the high dose commitment caused by the low yield of gamma rays from Cr-51 (2). A method of labeling RBC with Tc-99m, which results in a radiopharmaceutical that combines the excellent dosimetric and imaging qualities of Tc-99m with an extremely stable bond between the Tc-99m and the RBC, is reported. The successful application of this technique in providing red cell support for a cancer patient with an unusual history of intravascular hemolytic transfusion reactions is also reported.

  15. Reducing Non-Infectious Risks of Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.; Gropper, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary As screening for transfusion-associated infections has improved, non-infectious complications of transfusion now cause the majority of morbidity and mortality associated with transfusion in the United States. For example, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and hemolytic transfusion-reactions are the first, second, and third leading causes of death from transfusion respectively. These complications and others are reviewed here and several controversial methods for prevention of non-infectious complications of transfusion are discussed; universal leukoreduction of red cell units, use of male-only plasma, and restriction of red cell storage age. PMID:21792054

  16. Fatal hemolytic transfusion reaction due to anti-Ku in a Knull patient.

    PubMed

    Lin, M; Wang, C L; Chen, F S; Ho, L H

    2003-01-01

    A fatal transfusion reaction due to anti-Ku in a Knull (Ko) patient is reported. The patient was transfused with 34 units of incompatible RBCs during 44 days of hospitalization. Apart from the first transfusion, all subsequent transfusions failed to raise the patient's Hb. No serum antibody was identified until he was transferred to another hospital for dialysis. A compatibility test demonstrated a weak antibody and autocontrol reacting at room temperature by a manual polybrene method. The antibody was considered to be a "cold agglutinin." A blood sample was sent to a reference laboratory where the patient was found to be Knull and the antibody was identified as anti-Ku. PMID:15373542

  17. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: transfusion, platelets and biological response modifiers.

    PubMed

    Tariket, Sofiane; Sut, Caroline; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Laradi, Sandrine; Pozzetto, Bruno; Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2016-05-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) may be induced by plasma, platelet concentrates and red blood cell concentrates. The mechanism leading to TRALI is thought to involve two steps. The priming step consists of previous inflammatory pathological conditions or external factors attracting leukocytes to lung vessels and creating conditions favorable for the second step, in which anti-HLA or anti-HNA antibodies or biologically active lipids, usually in transfused blood products, stress leukocytes and inflame lung epithelia. Platelets may be involved in the pathogenesis of TRALI because of their secretory potential and capacity to interact with other immune cells. There is no drug based-prophylaxis, but transfusion strategies are used to mitigate the risk of TRALI. PMID:26855042

  18. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injured (TRALI): Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, P; Carrasco, R; Romero-Dapueto, C; Castillo, R.L

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening intervention that develops within 6 hours of transfusion of one or more units of blood, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality resulting from transfusion. It is necessary to dismiss other causes of acute lung injury (ALI), like sepsis, acute cardiogenic edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or bacterial infection. There are two mechanisms that lead to the development of this syndrome: immune-mediated and no immune- mediated TRALI. A common theme among the experimental TRALI models is the central importance of neutrophils in mediating the early immune response, and lung vascular injury. Central clinical symptoms are dyspnea, tachypnea, tachycardia, cyanosis and pulmonary secretions, altogether with other hemodynamic alterations, such as hypotension and fever. Complementary to these clinical findings, long-term validated animal models for TRALI should allow the determination of the cellular targets for TRALI-inducing alloantibodies as well as delineation of the underlying pathogenic molecular mechanisms, and key molecular mediators of the pathology. Diagnostic criteria have been established and preventive measures have been implemented. These actions have contributed to the reduction in the overallnumber of fatalities. However, TRALI still remains a clinical problem. Any complication suspected of TRALI should immediately be reported. PMID:26312100

  19. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injured (TRALI): Current Concepts.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, P; Carrasco, R; Romero-Dapueto, C; Castillo, R L

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening intervention that develops within 6 hours of transfusion of one or more units of blood, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality resulting from transfusion. It is necessary to dismiss other causes of acute lung injury (ALI), like sepsis, acute cardiogenic edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or bacterial infection. There are two mechanisms that lead to the development of this syndrome: immune-mediated and no immune- mediated TRALI. A common theme among the experimental TRALI models is the central importance of neutrophils in mediating the early immune response, and lung vascular injury. Central clinical symptoms are dyspnea, tachypnea, tachycardia, cyanosis and pulmonary secretions, altogether with other hemodynamic alterations, such as hypotension and fever. Complementary to these clinical findings, long-term validated animal models for TRALI should allow the determination of the cellular targets for TRALI-inducing alloantibodies as well as delineation of the underlying pathogenic molecular mechanisms, and key molecular mediators of the pathology. Diagnostic criteria have been established and preventive measures have been implemented. These actions have contributed to the reduction in the overallnumber of fatalities. However, TRALI still remains a clinical problem. Any complication suspected of TRALI should immediately be reported. PMID:26312100

  20. The hazards of blood transfusion in historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Harvey G.

    2008-01-01

    The beginning of the modern era of blood transfusion coincided with World War II and the resultant need for massive blood replacement. Soon thereafter, the hazards of transfusion, particularly hepatitis and hemolytic transfusion reactions, became increasingly evident. The past half century has seen the near eradication of transfusion-associated hepatitis as well as the emergence of multiple new pathogens, most notably HIV. Specific donor screening assays and other interventions have minimized, but not eliminated, infectious disease transmission. Other transfusion hazards persist, including human error resulting in the inadvertent transfusion of incompatible blood, acute and delayed transfusion reactions, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD), and transfusion-induced immunomodulation. These infectious and noninfectious hazards are reviewed briefly in the context of their historical evolution. PMID:18809775

  1. Brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) envenomation leading to acute hemolytic anemia in six adolescents.

    PubMed

    McDade, Jenny; Aygun, Banu; Ware, Russell E

    2010-01-01

    Loxosceles reclusa (brown recluse spider) bites often cause local envenomation reactions; however, acute hemolysis from systemic loxoscelism is rare. To highlight this important diagnostic consideration for unexplained hemolysis in areas endemic for brown recluse spiders, we report on 6 adolescents with acute hemolytic anemia from presumed L reclusa bites. PMID:20006769

  2. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury: The Work of DAMPs*

    PubMed Central

    Land, Walter G.

    2013-01-01

    Current notions in immunology hold that not only pathogen-mediated tissue injury but any injury activates the innate immune system. In principle, this evolutionarily highly conserved, rapid first-line defense system responds to pathogen-induced injury with the creation of infectious inflammation, and non-pathogen-induced tissue injury with ‘sterile’ tissue inflammation. In this review, evidence has been collected in support of the notion that the transfusion-related acute lung injury induces a ‘sterile’ inflammation in the lung of transfused patients in terms of an acute innate inflammatory disease. The inflammatory response is mediated by the patient's innate immune cells including lung-passing neutrophils and pulmonary endothelial cells, which are equipped with pattern recognition receptors. These receptors are able to sense injury-induced, damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) generated during collection, processing, and storage of blood/blood components. The recognition process leads to activation of these innate cells. A critical role for a protein complex known as the NLRP3 inflammasome has been suggested to be at the center of such a scenario. This complex undergoes an initial ‘priming’ step mediated by 1 class of DAMPs and then an ‘activating’ step mediated by another class of DAMPs to activate interleukin-1beta and interleukin-18. These 2 cytokines then promote, via transactivation, the formation of lung inflammation. PMID:23637644

  3. Platelet Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor is a Potential Mediator of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, James P; Ambruso, Daniel R; Voelkel, Norbert F; Silliman, Christopher C

    2015-01-01

    Objective The occurrence of non-hemolytic transfusion reactions is highest with platelet and plasma administration. Some of these reactions are characterized by endothelial leak, especially transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). Elevated concentrations of inflammatory mediators secreted by contaminating leukocytes during blood product storage may contribute to such reactions, but platelet-secreted mediators may also contribute. We hypothesized that platelet storage leads to accumulation of the endothelial permeability mediator vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and that intravascular administration of exogenous VEGF leads to extensive binding to its lung receptors. Methods Single donor, leukocyte-reduced apheresis platelet units were sampled over 5 days of storage. VEGF protein content of the centrifuged supernatant was determined by ELISA, and the potential contribution of VEGF from contaminating leukocytes was quantified. Isolated-perfused rat lungs were used to study the uptake of radiolabeled VEGF administered intravascularly, and the effect of unlabeled VEGF on lung leak. Results There was a time-dependent release of VEGF into the plasma fraction of the platelet concentrates (62 ± 9 pg/ml on day one, 149 ± 23 pg/ml on day 5; mean ± SEM, p<0.01, n=8) and a contribution by contaminating leukocytes was excluded. Exogenous 125I-VEGF bound avidly and specifically to the lung vasculature, and unlabeled VEGF in the lung perfusate caused vascular leak. Conclusion Rising concentrations of VEGF occur during storage of single donor platelet concentrates due to platelet secretion or disintegration, but not due to leukocyte contamination. Exogenous VEGF at these concentrations rapidly binds to its receptors in the lung vessels. At higher VEGF concentrations, VEGF causes vascular leak in uninjured lungs. These data provide further evidence that VEGF may contribute to the increased lung permeability seen in TRALI associated with platelet products. PMID:25705568

  4. An Attempt to Induce Transient Immunosuppression Pre-erythrocytapheresis in a Girl With Sickle Cell Disease, a History of Severe Delayed Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions and Need for Hip Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cattoni, Alessandro; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Perseghin, Paolo; Zatti, Giovanni; Gaddi, Diego; Cossio, Andrea; Biondi, Andrea; Corti, Paola; Masera, Nicoletta

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We report on a case of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR) occurred 7 days after an erythrocytapheresis or eritroexchange procedure (EEX) treated with rituximab and glucocorticoids in a 15-years old patient with sickle cell disease. EEX was performed despite a previous diagnosis of alloimmunization, in order to reduce hemoglobin S rate before a major surgery for avascular necrosis of the femoral head. A first dose of rituximab was administered before EEX. However, rituximab couldn’t prevent DHTR that occurred with acute hemolysis, hemoglobinuria and hyperbilirubinemia. A further dose of rituximab and three boli of methylprednisolone were given after the onset of the reaction. It is likely that the combined use of rituximab and steroids managed to gradually improve both patient’s general conditions and hemoglobin levels. Nor early or late side effects were registered in a 33-months follow-up period. This report suggests the potential effectiveness and safety of rituximab in combination with steroids in managing and mitigating the symptoms of delayed post-transfusional hemolytic reactions in alloimmunized patients affected by sickle cell disease with absolute need for erythrocytapheresis. PMID:23888247

  5. Severe Rh alloimmunization and hemolytic disease of the fetus managed with plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin and intrauterine transfusion: A case report.

    PubMed

    Houston, Brett L; Govia, Rachelle; Abou-Setta, Ahmed M; Reid, Gregory J; Hadfield, Marie; Menard, Chantalle; Noyd, Jocelyn; Main, Susan; Zarychanski, Ryan

    2015-12-01

    Rh alloimmunization remains a potentially devastating complication of pregnancy, with fetal anemia causing hydrops and intrauterine death. Intrauterine transfusion is the standard treatment, but is particularly dangerous before 20 weeks gestation. When the need for intrauterine transfusion is anticipated early in pregnancy, immune-modulating therapies such as plasmapheresis and IVIG have been used to delay transfusion to a later gestational age. We report a 35-year-old G5P1 Rh(D)-negative woman with severe Rh alloimmunization managed successfully with sequential plasmapheresis, intravenous immune globulin and intrauterine transfusion. The optimal plasmapheresis treatment protocol and incremental benefit of IVIG remains unknown. PMID:26321100

  6. Acute lung injury after platelet transfusion in a patient with dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Karoli, Ritu; Bhat, Sanjay; Fatima, Jalees; Verma, Pankaj

    2014-07-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious clinical syndrome associated with the transfusion of plasmacontaining blood components. Recently, TRALI has come to be recognized as the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. This complication typically presents as shortness of breath, hypoxemia, hypotension, fever, and non cardiogenic pulmonary edema, occurring within 6 h after transfusion. Although the mechanism of TRALI has not been exactly known, it has been associated with human leukocyte antigen antibodies and with biologically active mediators in stored cellular blood components. We, hereby, present a case of a patient with dengue fever who developed acute lung injury (ALI), presumably TRALI, after transfusion of platelet concentrates. He was treated with supportive measures and mechanical ventilation. Greater knowledge and increased awareness especially amongst the clinicians regarding TRALI is needed for prevention and treatment of this potentially severe complication of blood/component transfusion. PMID:25161356

  7. Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury after Cesarean Section in a Patient with HELLP Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moon, Kyoung Min; Han, Min Soo; Rim, Ch'ang Bum; Kim, So Ri; Shin, Sang Ho; Kang, Min Seok; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Jihye; Kim, Sang Il

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious adverse reaction of transfusion, and presents as hypoxemia and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema within 6 hours of transfusion. A 14-year-old primigravida woman at 34 weeks of gestation presented with upper abdominal pain without dyspnea. Because she showed the syndrome of HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count), an emergency cesarean section delivery was performed, and blood was transfused. In the case of such patients, clinicians should closely observe the patient's condition at least during the 6 hours while the patient receives blood transfusion, and should suspect TRALI if the patient complains of respiratory symptoms such as dyspnea. Furthermore, echocardiography should be performed to distinguish between the different types of transfusion-related adverse reactions. PMID:26885326

  8. Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury after Cesarean Section in a Patient with HELLP Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyoung Min; Rim, Ch'ang Bum; Kim, So Ri; Shin, Sang Ho; Kang, Min Seok; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Jihye; Kim, Sang Il

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious adverse reaction of transfusion, and presents as hypoxemia and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema within 6 hours of transfusion. A 14-year-old primigravida woman at 34 weeks of gestation presented with upper abdominal pain without dyspnea. Because she showed the syndrome of HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count), an emergency cesarean section delivery was performed, and blood was transfused. In the case of such patients, clinicians should closely observe the patient's condition at least during the 6 hours while the patient receives blood transfusion, and should suspect TRALI if the patient complains of respiratory symptoms such as dyspnea. Furthermore, echocardiography should be performed to distinguish between the different types of transfusion-related adverse reactions. PMID:26885326

  9. Transfusion-related acute lung injury following coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    PubMed

    Bitargil, M; Arslan, C; Başbuğ, H S; Göçer, H; Günerhan, Y; Bekov, Y Y

    2015-11-01

    Blood transfusion is sometimes a necessary procedure during or following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. However, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI)/possible TRALI is a rare and fatal complication and characterized by acute hypoxemia and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema that occurs within 6 hours following a transfusion. Anti-leukocyte antibodies or, possibly, other bioactive substances cause inflammation and capillary endothelial destruction in susceptible recipients' lungs. Prompt diagnosis and mechanical ventilatory support are important. A successful treatment of two male patients following CABG surgery, compatible with TRALI/possible TRALI, is presented here. PMID:25575703

  10. Hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... system changes Laboratory tests will show signs of hemolytic anemia and acute renal failure . Tests may include: Blood ... Blood clotting problems Hemolytic anemia Kidney failure Nervous system problems Too few platelets ( thrombocytopenia ) Uremia

  11. Case report of transfusion-related acute lung injury in a pediatric spine surgery patient transfused leukoreduced red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Cudilo, Elizabeth M; Varughese, Anna M; Mahmoud, Mohamed; Carey, Patricia M; Subramanyam, Rajeev

    2015-12-01

    Despite leukoreduced red blood cells (LR-RBCs) reducing the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), we present a case of a 16-year-old female with kyphosis who received a transfusion of one unit of LR-RBCs, which lead to life-threatening, intraoperative TRALI. The clinical presentation included pulmonary edema, severe postoperative lactic acidosis, left ventricular dysfunction, increased creatine phosphokinase, fatty infiltration of the liver, and hemodynamic instability requiring inotropic support. This presentation is not the classic description of TRALI. Our patient improved with supportive treatment and was successfully extubated on postoperative day 4. TRALI work-up revealed antibody formation to HLA A2, A68, B44, and DQA 5 for the LR-RBCs unit administered. PMID:26126598

  12. The Role of Neutrophils in the Pathogenesis of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Y.L.; Silliman, C.C.

    2010-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the major cause of transfusion related morbidity and mortality, world wide. Efforts to reduce or eliminate this serious complication of blood transfusion are hampered by an incomplete understanding of its pathogenesis. Currently, TRALI is thought to be mediated by donor alloantibodies directed against host leukocytes or the result of two distinct clinical events. For both proposed mechanisms the neutrophil (PMN) is the key effector cell. This paper reviews TRALI pathophysiology, explores the role of the PMN, details practical information for appropriate diagnosis, and promotes further studies into the pathogenesis of TRALI. PMID:19765516

  13. Exchange transfusion of least incompatible blood for severe hemolytic disease of the newborn due to anti-Rh17.

    PubMed

    Li, Bi-juan; Jiang, Yuan-jun; Yuan, Fen; Ye, Hong-xing

    2010-02-01

    HDN attributed to the rare Rh variants has become more and more significant caused by anti-D, but the compatible blood is usually very difficult to obtain when exchange transfusion is required. We treated a 10-hour neonate of O, D + C + c - E - e+ blood group with severe HDN due to anti-Rh17 with least incompatible blood typed O, D + C - c + E + e-. The neonatal hemolysis was relieved obviously and bilirubin was reduced gradually after exchange transfusion. The infant was discharged in good health 13 days after birth with 135.0 g/L, 28.0 micromol/L and 10.7 micromol/L of Hb, total bilirubin and direct bilirubin, respectively. No sequelae were observed in a three-year follow-up. The result suggesting that the least incompatible blood is an alternative choice for exchange transfusion in severe HDN due to anti-Rh17 in case that Rh17 antigen-negative blood is unavailable. PMID:19725902

  14. Platelet transfusion - the new immunology of an old therapy.

    PubMed

    Stolla, Moritz; Refaai, Majed A; Heal, Joanna M; Spinelli, Sherry L; Garraud, Olivier; Phipps, Richard P; Blumberg, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusion has been a vital therapeutic approach in patients with hematologic malignancies for close to half a century. Randomized trials show that prophylactic platelet transfusions mitigate bleeding in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. However, even with prophylactic transfusions, as many as 75% of patients, experience hemorrhage. While platelet transfusion efficacy is modest, questions and concerns have arisen about the risks of platelet transfusion therapy. The acknowledged serious risks of platelet transfusion include viral transmission, bacterial sepsis, and acute lung injury. Less serious adverse effects include allergic and non-hemolytic febrile reactions. Rare hemolytic reactions have occurred due to a common policy of transfusing without regard to ABO type. In the last decade or so, new concerns have arisen; platelet-derived lipids are implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury after transfusion. With the recognition that platelets are immune cells came the discoveries that supernatant IL-6, IL-27 sCD40L, and OX40L are closely linked to febrile reactions and sCD40L with acute lung injury. Platelet transfusions are pro-inflammatory, and may be pro-thrombotic. Anti-A and anti-B can bind to incompatible recipient or donor platelets and soluble antigens, impair hemostasis and thus increase bleeding. Finally, stored platelet supernatants contain biological mediators such as VEGF and TGF-β1 that may compromise the host versus tumor response. This is particularly of concern in patients receiving many platelet transfusions, as for acute leukemia. New evidence suggests that removing stored supernatant will improve clinical outcomes. This new view of platelets as pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory agents suggests that innovative approaches to improving platelet storage and pre-transfusion manipulations to reduce toxicity could substantially improve the efficacy and safety of this long-employed therapy. PMID:25699046

  15. Platelet Transfusion – The New Immunology of an Old Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stolla, Moritz; Refaai, Majed A.; Heal, Joanna M.; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Garraud, Olivier; Phipps, Richard P.; Blumberg, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusion has been a vital therapeutic approach in patients with hematologic malignancies for close to half a century. Randomized trials show that prophylactic platelet transfusions mitigate bleeding in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. However, even with prophylactic transfusions, as many as 75% of patients, experience hemorrhage. While platelet transfusion efficacy is modest, questions and concerns have arisen about the risks of platelet transfusion therapy. The acknowledged serious risks of platelet transfusion include viral transmission, bacterial sepsis, and acute lung injury. Less serious adverse effects include allergic and non-hemolytic febrile reactions. Rare hemolytic reactions have occurred due to a common policy of transfusing without regard to ABO type. In the last decade or so, new concerns have arisen; platelet-derived lipids are implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury after transfusion. With the recognition that platelets are immune cells came the discoveries that supernatant IL-6, IL-27 sCD40L, and OX40L are closely linked to febrile reactions and sCD40L with acute lung injury. Platelet transfusions are pro-inflammatory, and may be pro-thrombotic. Anti-A and anti-B can bind to incompatible recipient or donor platelets and soluble antigens, impair hemostasis and thus increase bleeding. Finally, stored platelet supernatants contain biological mediators such as VEGF and TGF-β1 that may compromise the host versus tumor response. This is particularly of concern in patients receiving many platelet transfusions, as for acute leukemia. New evidence suggests that removing stored supernatant will improve clinical outcomes. This new view of platelets as pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory agents suggests that innovative approaches to improving platelet storage and pre-transfusion manipulations to reduce toxicity could substantially improve the efficacy and safety of this long-employed therapy. PMID:25699046

  16. [Acute intravasal hemolysis in Clostridium perfringens sepsis. Differential diagnosis of hemolytic episodes].

    PubMed

    Strobel, E; Nathrath, M; Peters, J; Abele-Horn, M; Wllenweber, J

    1994-03-18

    A 19-year-old man with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia developed fever, general deterioration and somnolence 3 days after a cycle of cytostatic treatment. He had anaemia (haemoglobin 6.6 g/dl), leukopenia (100/microliters) and thrombocytopenia (7,000/microliters). As an acute septicaemia was suspected he received broad spectrum antibiotic therapy, together with two units of red cell and platelet concentrates. However, his condition worsened rapidly over the next 5 hours (meningism, seizures, fever to 41.1 degrees C, dyspnoea). Another blood count revealed severe haemolysis. Computed tomography of the skull demonstrated multilocular intraparenchymal gas formation. Although the antibiotic treatment was extended the patient died several hours later. Retrospective examination for suspected transfusion mismatch provided no evidence for erythrocyte incompatibility. But there was liberation of T-antigen as sign of a bacterial cause of erythrocyte damage. An anaerobic blood culture grew Clostridium perfringens. This case demonstrates that acute intravascular haemolysis in septicaemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of transfusion mismatch. PMID:8131716

  17. Prevalence of Beta-Hemolytic Streptococci Groups A, C, and G in Patients with Acute Pharyngitis

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Trupti B; Nadagir, Shobha D; Biradar, Asmabegaum

    2016-01-01

    Context: Group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GAS) is the most frequently isolated pathogen in acute pharyngitis. However, the role of Group C (GCS) and Group G (GGS) streptococci in disease burden is under recognized. The present study is carried out to find out the prevalence of acute pharyngitis caused by the different serogroups of streptococci and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of these streptococcal isolates. Study and Design: A cross sectional study. Materials and Methods: A total of 218 throat swabs from patients with acute pharyngitis and 82 from healthy controls were collected and processed as per standard protocol. Samples were inoculated on blood agar and Streptococcus selective agar. Isolates were identified by the conventional method and serogrouped by latex agglutination test using Remel Streptex kit. Results: Beta-hemolytic streptococci (BHS) were isolated from 34 (15.59%) of pharyngitis patients and 11 (13.41%) of the healthy carrier. Among pharyngitis, GAS was isolated from 20 (9.17%), GCS 7 (3.21%), and GGS 7 (3.21%) patients. Carriage rate of GAS was 6 (7.31%) and GCS, 5 (6.09%). Vancomycin (100%), amoxyclavulanic acid (90%), levofloxacin (85%), and cephotaxime (80%) were found to be most effective antibiotics. Comparatively, higher drug resistance was observed among GCS and GGS to all the drugs used in the study except for levofloxacin. Conclusions: Although rate of pharyngitis associated with GCS and GGS is marginally lower than GAS, their carriage rate among healthy and relative higher drug resistance emphasizes the need for periodic surveillance of infection by the different serogroups of BHS. PMID:27013813

  18. The simultaneous incidence of acute pancreatitis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a rare duo in a patient with SLE

    PubMed Central

    Masoodi, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    A young female presented with acute abdominal pain of two days duration consistent with acute pancreatitis. During her stay in the hospital she had a sudden drop in hemoglobin to 6 g/dl without any overt blood loss. On evaluation, it was evident that she had acute pancreatitis, in addition to displaying features of autoimmune hemolytic anemia. She had been a known case of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and had discontinued her treatment. She was managed with methylprednisolone pulse therapy. Her clinical condition improved, and she has been regularly attending our clinic for the last 2 years. According to a literature search in Medline, it would appear that this is the first report of a case in which SLE with autoimmune hemolytic anemia has been associated with acute pancreatitis in a single case. PMID:25276114

  19. Antibody-mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury; from discovery to prevention.

    PubMed

    Peters, Anna L; Van Stein, Danielle; Vlaar, Alexander P J

    2015-09-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), a syndrome of respiratory distress caused by blood transfusion, is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. The majority of TRALI cases have been related to passive infusion of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) and human neutrophil antigen (HNA) antibodies in donor blood. In vitro, ex vivo and in vivo animal models have provided insight in TRALI pathogenesis. The various classes of antibodies implicated in TRALI appear to have different pathophysiological mechanisms for the induction of TRALI involving endothelial cells, neutrophils, monocytes and, as very recently has been discovered, lymphocytes. The HLA and HNA-antibodies are found mainly in blood from multiparous women as they have become sensitized during pregnancy. The incidence of TRALI has decreased rapidly following the introduction of a male-only strategy for plasma donation. This review focuses on pre-clinical and clinical studies investigating the pathophysiology of antibody-mediated TRALI. PMID:25921271

  20. Acute Iatrogenic Polycythemia Induced by Massive Red Blood Cell Transfusion During Subtotal Abdominal Colectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chiapaikeo, David; Rohani, Pejman

    2015-01-01

    A 46 year old man was transfused ten units of packed red blood cells during subtotal colectomy after intraoperative point-of-care testing values demonstrated hemoglobin values less than seven grams per deciliter (g/dL). A postoperative hemoglobin analyzed in a standard hematologic laboratory revealed a hemoglobin value of 27.8 g/dL. He underwent emergent red blood cell depletion therapy which decreased his hemoglobin to 7.5 g/dL. The physiologic consequences of iatrogenic polycythemia caused by massive transfusion during major abdominal surgery must take into account the fluid shifts that interplay between the osmotic load, viscosity of blood, and postoperative third spacing of fluid. Treatment of acute iatrogenic polycythemia can be effectively accomplished by red blood cell depletion therapy. However, fluid shifts caused by massive transfusion followed by rapid red cell depletion produce a unique physiologic state that is without a well-described algorithm for management. PMID:25852846

  1. Acute normovolemic hemodilution to avoid blood transfusion during intracranial aneurysm surgery in a patient with atypical antibodies.

    PubMed

    Parasa, Sujay Kumar; Bidkar, Prasanna Udupi; Parida, Satyen

    2016-01-01

    Acute normovolemic haemodilution (ANH) has been used in neurosurgical operations to reduce the incidence of homologous blood transfusions. We report a case of anterior communicating artery aneurysm in a patient with atypical antibodies in the serum, who was posted for clipping of the said aneurysm, and was managed with ANH in the perioperative period in order to avoid blood transfusions. PMID:26957709

  2. Acute normovolemic hemodilution to avoid blood transfusion during intracranial aneurysm surgery in a patient with atypical antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Parasa, Sujay Kumar; Bidkar, Prasanna Udupi; Parida, Satyen

    2016-01-01

    Acute normovolemic haemodilution (ANH) has been used in neurosurgical operations to reduce the incidence of homologous blood transfusions. We report a case of anterior communicating artery aneurysm in a patient with atypical antibodies in the serum, who was posted for clipping of the said aneurysm, and was managed with ANH in the perioperative period in order to avoid blood transfusions.

  3. Characterizing the Epidemiology of Postoperative Transfusion-related Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Leanne; Jia, Qing; Subramanian, Arun; Yadav, Hemang; Wilson, Gregory A.; Murphy, Sean P.; Pathak, Jyotishman; Schroeder, Darrell R.; Kor, Daryl J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States; however, it remains poorly characterized in surgical populations. To better inform perioperative transfusion practice, and to help mitigate perioperative TRALI, the authors aimed to better define its epidemiology before and after TRALI mitigation strategies were introduced. Methods This retrospective cohort study examined outcomes of adult patients undergoing noncardiac surgery with general anesthesia who received intraoperative transfusions during 2004 (n = 1,817) and 2011 (n = 1,562). The demographics and clinical characteristics of transfusion recipients, blood transfusion descriptors, and combined TRALI/possible TRALI incidence rates were evaluated. Univariate analyses were used to compare associations between patient characteristics, transfusion details, and TRALI mitigation strategies with TRALI/possible TRALI incidence rates in a before-and-after study design. Results The incidence of TRALI/possible TRALI was 1.3% (23 of 1,613) in 2004 versus 1.4% (22 of 1,562) in 2011 (P = 0.72), with comparable overall rates in males versus females (1.4% [23 of 1,613] vs. 1.2% [22 of 1,766]) (P = 0.65). Overall, thoracic (3.0% [4 of 133]), vascular (2.7% [10 of 375]), and transplant surgeries (2.2% [4 of 178]) carried the highest rates of TRALI/possible TRALI. Obstetric and gynecologic surgical patients had no TRALI episodes. TRALI/possible TRALI incidence increased with larger volumes of blood product transfused (P < 0.001). Conclusions Perioperative TRALI/possible TRALI is more common than previously reported and its risk increases with greater volumes of blood component therapies. No significant reduction in the combined incidence of TRALI/possible TRALI occurred between 2004 and 2011, despite the introduction of TRALI mitigation strategies. Future efforts to identify specific risk factors for TRALI/possible TRALI in surgical populations may reduce the burden of this life-threatening complication. PMID:25611652

  4. Pathogenesis of non-antibody mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Peters, Anna L; van Hezel, Maike E; Juffermans, Nicole P; Vlaar, Alexander P J

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a major cause of transfusion-related mortality. Causative factors are divided in antibody mediated TRALI and non-antibody mediated TRALI. Antibody mediated TRALI is caused by passive transfusion of cognate antibodies and non-antibody mediated TRALI is caused by transfusion of aged cellular blood products. This review focuses on mechanisms in non-antibody mediated TRALI which includes soluble mediators accumulating during storage of red blood cells (RBCs) and platelets (PLTs), as well as changes in morphology and function of aged PLTs and RBCs. These mediators cause TRALI in two-hit animal models and have been implicated in TRALI onset in clinical studies. Pre-clinical studies show a clear relation between TRALI and increased storage time of cellular blood products. Observational clinical studies however report conflicting data. Knowledge of pathophysiological mechanisms of TRALI is necessary to improve storage conditions of blood products, develop prevention strategies and develop a therapy for TRALI. PMID:25277811

  5. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: a dangerous and underdiagnosed noncardiogenic pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Krzysztof; Ma?lanka, Krystyna; Kosior, Dariusz A

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is one of the leading causes of death associated with transfusion of blood and blood components. The understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of this syndrome has much improved during the last decades, nevertheless numerous issues are still unresolved and symptomatic treatment remains the cornerstone of medical management. Consequently more attention is directed at primary as well as secondary prevention. The awareness of the problem within the medical society is still unsatisfactory which results in a high number of unrecognized cases or of inaccurate diagnoses one of which is cardiogenic pulmonary edema. The aim of this review is to make the TRALI syndrome more familiar to clinicians and to emphasize how significant proper medical management is both for the patients presenting TRALI symptoms as well as for future recipients of blood components. PMID:23913451

  6. Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Hemolytic Anemia? Hemolytic anemia (HEE-moh-lit-ick uh-NEE-me-uh) ... more blood cells to replace them. However, in hemolytic anemia, the bone marrow can't make red blood ...

  7. Hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - hemolytic ... Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow is unable to replace the red blood cells that are being destroyed. Immune hemolytic anemia occurs when the immune system mistakenly sees your ...

  8. C-reactive protein enhances murine antibody-mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Rick; Kim, Michael; Shanmugabhavananthan, Shanjeevan; Liu, Jonathan; Li, Yuan; Semple, John W

    2015-12-17

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a syndrome of respiratory distress triggered by blood transfusions and is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. TRALI has primarily been attributed to passive infusion of HLA and/or human neutrophil antigen antibodies present in transfused blood products, and predisposing factors such as inflammation are known to be important for TRALI initiation. Because the acute-phase protein C-reactive protein (CRP) is highly upregulated during infections and inflammation and can also enhance antibody-mediated responses such as in vitro phagocytosis, respiratory burst, and in vivo thrombocytopenia, we investigated whether CRP affects murine antibody-mediated TRALI induced by the anti-major histocompatibility complex antibody 34-1-2s. We found that BALB/c mice injected with 34-1-2s or CRP alone were resistant to TRALI, however mice injected with 34-1-2s together with CRP had significantly enhanced lung damage and pulmonary edema. Mechanistically, 34-1-2s injection with CRP resulted in a significant synergistic increase in plasma levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and pulmonary neutrophil accumulation. Importantly, murine MIP-2 is the functional homolog of human interleukin-8, a known risk factor for human TRALI. These results suggest that elevated in vivo CRP levels, like those observed during infections, may significantly predispose recipients to antibody-mediated TRALI reactions and support the notion that modulating CRP levels is an effective therapeutic strategy to reduce TRALI severity. PMID:26453659

  9. Transfusion of Human Platelets Treated with Mirasol Pathogen Reduction Technology Does Not Induce Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Caudrillier, Axelle; Mallavia, Beñat; Rouse, Lindsay; Marschner, Susanne; Looney, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen reduction technology (PRT) has been developed in an effort to make the blood supply safer, but there is controversy as to whether it may induce structural or functional changes to platelets that could lead to acute lung injury after transfusion. In this study, we used a commercial PRT system to treat human platelets that were then transfused into immunodeficient mice, and the development of acute lung injury was determined. P-selectin expression was higher in the Mirasol PRT-treated platelets compared to control platelets on storage day 5, but not storage day 1. Transfusion of control vs. Mirasol PRT-treated platelets (day 5 of storage, 109 platelets per mouse) into NOD/SCID mice did not result in lung injury, however transfusion of storage day 5 platelets treated with thrombin receptor-activating peptide increased both extravascular lung water and lung vascular permeability. Transfusion of day 1 platelets did not produce lung injury in any group, and LPS priming 24 hours before transfusion had no effect on lung injury. In a model of transfusion-related acute lung injury, NOD/SCID mice were susceptible to acute lung injury when challenged with H-2Kd monoclonal antibody vs. isotype control antibody. Using lung intravital microscopy, we did not detect a difference in the dynamic retention of platelets in the lung circulation in control vs. Mirasol PRT-treated groups. In conclusion, Mirasol PRT produced an increase in P-selectin expression that is storage-dependent, but transfusion of human platelets treated with Mirasol PRT into immunodeficient mice did not result in greater platelet retention in the lungs or the development of acute lung injury. PMID:26176623

  10. Advances in transfusion science for shock-trauma: Optimising the clinical management of acute haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Seghatchian, Jerard; Putter, Jeffrey S

    2015-12-01

    The primary resuscitation of severely injured patients, acute haemorrhage and shock-trauma has been well reported in the literature. Resuscitation protocols include the use of diverse agents such as fresh whole blood [FWB], packed red blood cells [PRBCs], reconstituted blood products, fresh frozen plasma [FFP] and its derivative concentrates or recombinant products, volume expanders and tranexamic acid [TXA]. The reasonably prudent use of these agents and products is necessary to reverse risk factors of haemorrhagic shock such as haemodilution, hypothermia, acidosis and coagulopathy. Addressing the mechanisms of haemoregulation in the pathophysiology of DIC is important to optimise transfusion practice. PMID:26653928

  11. Two Novel Missense Mutations and a 5bp Deletion in the Erythroid-Specific Promoter of the PKLR Gene in Two Unrelated Patients With Pyruvate Kinase Deficient Transfusion-Dependent Chronic Nonspherocytic Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Kager, Leo; Minkov, Milen; Zeitlhofer, Petra; Fahrner, Bernhard; Ratzinger, Franz; Boztug, Kaan; Dossenbach-Glaninger, Astrid; Haas, Oskar A

    2016-05-01

    We report two children with severe chronic hemolytic anemia, the cause of which was difficult to establish because of transfusion dependency. Reduced erythrocyte pyruvate kinase activity in their asymptomatic parents provided the diagnostic clues for mutation screening of the PKLR gene and revealed that one child was a compound heterozygote of a novel paternally derived 5-bp deletion in the promoter region (c.-88_-84delTCTCT) and a maternally derived missense mutation in exon nine (c.1174G>A; p.Ala392Thr). The second child was a compound heterozygote of two novel missense mutations, namely a paternally derived exon ten c.1381G>A (p.Glu461Lys) and a maternally derived exon seven c.907-908delCC (p.Pro303GlyfsX12) variant. PMID:26728349

  12. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome complicating an acute chest syndrome: potential benefit of early combination of exchange transfusion and prone positioning].

    PubMed

    Dusacre, J-A; Pons, B; Piednoir, P; Soubirou, J-F; Thiery, G

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of an 8-year-old sickle cell anemia child admitted for acute respiratory failure complicating acute chest syndrome. Because of threatening respiratory failure, tracheal intubation was performed immediately after ICU admission. The patient met the criteria for ARDS with a PaO2/FiO2 ratio of 94mmHg. An exchange transfusion was performed immediately after admission. HbS fraction failed from 69 % to 30 %. Fluid resuscitation with crystalloids and continuous norepinephrine infusion was needed because of arterial hypotension. Due to persistent severe hypoxemia with PaO2/FiO2 ratio below 100, the patient was placed in prone positioning 16hours after admission, for a total duration of 14hours. A second 12-hour session of prone positioning was performed 41h after admission and PaO2/FiO2 ratio reached 300mmHg after. Treatment also included transfusion of two red-cell pack on day 1 and 2 after admission in order to maintain hemoglobin level above 8g/dL, and a daily folic acid supplementation. The control of hyperthermia was achieved by a systematic parenteral administration of paracetamol. Cefotaxime and erythromycine were continued until day 7 despite the negative results of all bacteriological samples. The outcome was favorable from day 3 and the patient met the criteria for extubation on day 5. A first attempt of extubation was performed on day 5, but re-intubation was required because of laryngeal edema. Steroids were given for 48h and the patient was successfully extubated on day 7. She was discharged from the ICU on day 8, and from the hospital on day 12. We discuss the various treatments available for the management of acute chest syndrome and their actual relevance in acute respiratory distress syndrome in the absence of strong evidence-based guidelines in pediatric ARDS. PMID:25458459

  13. Hemolytic crisis

    MedlinePlus

    Schwartz RS. Autoimmune and intravascular hemolytic anemias In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 163. Gallagher PG. Hemolytic ...

  14. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis and Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia in a child following Loxosceles reclusa envenomation.

    PubMed

    Lane, Leanna; McCoppin, Holly H; Dyer, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Previously reported cases of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis secondary to brown recluse spider bite have been questioned due to lack of identification of the spider or because of the concomitant administration of antibiotics. We report a 9-year-old boy who arrived at the emergency department with a confirmed Loxosceles reclusa bite to the neck. On the third day of hospitalization, he developed hundreds of monomorphous, sterile pustules, initially in intertriginous areas. The eruption disseminated and was followed by pinpoint desquamation typical for acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis. During this he also developed late onset Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia and systemic loxoscelism. Sphingomyelinase in Loxosceles venom induces the production of interleukin-8 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, providing a mechanism by which Loxosceles reclusa bite may trigger acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis. We suggest that this case adds Loxosceles envenomation to the spectrum of agents that can trigger acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis. PMID:22082464

  15. Acute methemoglobinemia with hemolytic anemia following bio-organic plant nutrient compound exposure: Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Malkarnekar, Santoshi Balkrishna; Anjanappa, Raveesha; Naveen, L; Kiran, B G

    2014-02-01

    Two young women, were reffered to our hospital on two different occasions with history of breathlessness and mental confusion, following consumption of two different bio-organic plant nutrient compounds with a suicidal intent. On examination, they had cyanotic mucous membranes, and their blood samples showed the classic 'dark chocolate brown' appearance. Work up revealed cyanosis unresponsive to oxygen supplementation and absence of cardiopulmonary abnormality. Pulse oximetry revealed saturation of 75% in case 1 and 80% in case 2, on 8 liters oxygen supplementation via face masks, although their arterial blood gas analysis was normal, suggestive of "saturation gap". Methemoglobinemia was suspected based on these findings and was confirmed by Carbon monoxide-oximetry (CO-oximetry). Methylene blue was administered and the patients showed dramatic improvement. Both the patients developed evidence of hemolysis approximately 72 hours following admission which improved with blood transfusion and supportive treatment. The patients were eventually discharged without any neurological sequalae. PMID:24678158

  16. [Hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Tuchscherer, A; Chemnitz, J

    2015-09-01

    Hemolytic anemia can be caused by various hereditary or acquired diseases. Classification is usually based on corpuscular or extracorpuscular defects. Beside the anemia, laboratory testing indicates increased lactate dehydrogenase, unconjugated bilirubin and reticulocytes as well as reduced or absent plasma haptoglobin. Knowledge of further diagnostic procedures (e.g., Coombs test, schistocytes, hemoglobin electrophoresis or flow cytometric analysis) leads in many cases to an underlying disease with differentiated therapeutic options. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is often associated with diseases as HIV, connective tissue disease, lymphomas or malignant tumors and the hemolytic process is preexisting in many cases. Thrombotic microvascular diseases (e.g., thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura or hemolytic-uremic syndrome) are further important causes of hemolytic anemia which need immediate diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26245867

  17. [Successful Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for a Patient with Nearly Fatal Hypoxemia Induced by Transfusion-related Acute Lung Injury].

    PubMed

    Honda, Ayako; Morita, Masato; Taniguchi, Akiko; Tabuchi, Akihiko; Kubo, Sadahiro

    2015-11-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is known to be the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. A nearly fatal case of postoperative TRALI, successfully managed with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), is reported. The patient was a 70-year-old woman for whom laparoscopic nephrectomy was planned. She received several units of packed red blood cells and fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) intraoperatively due to massive bleeding. At the end of the operation, her PaO2/FIO2 ratio was 504, and she was extubated. Shortly after extubation, she developed severe hypoxemia. A chest X-ray showed bilateral infiltrates without cardiac enlargement. After entering the ICU, her respiratory condition deteriorated rapidly despite treatment with noninvasive positive pressure ventilation followed by re-intubation 8 hours after the operation. Even with very high positive pressure ventilation above 35 mmHg, her oxygenation decreased to PaO2 39.9 mmHg (FIO2 1.0). As a lifesaving measure, venovenous ECMO was started 15 hours after the operation. The pulmonary infiltration improved significantly over the next 5 days. Anti-HLA antibodies were detected in the FFP donor serum, that was transfused at the time of extubation. Now that TRALI is thought to be reversible, ECMO might be useful for even what was previously fatal hypoxemia. PMID:26689071

  18. Blood transfusion in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Nigam, A; Prakash, A; Saxena, P

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion of blood and blood components is a common practice in obstetric wards but it is not without risk. The incidence of transfusion reactions varies from 4 in every hundred transfusions for non-haemolytic reactions to one in every 40,000 for haemolytic transfusion reactions. The physiological basis of blood transfusion is outlined in this article. Most of the donated blood is processed into components: packed red cells (PRBCs), platelets, and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) or cryoprecipitate. Various alternatives to blood transfusion exist and include autotransfusion, pre-autologous blood storage, use of oxygen carrying blood substitutes and intraoperative cell salvage. Despite the risks associated with transfusions, obstetricians are frequently too aggressive in transfusing blood and blood products to their patients. Acute blood loss in obstetrics is usually due to placenta praevia, postpartum blood loss and surgery related. An early involvement of a consultant obstetrician, anaesthetist, haematologist and the blood bank is essential. There are no established criteria for initiating red cell transfusions and the decision is purely based on clinical and haematological parameters, which have been discussed along with the general principles of blood transfusion in obstetrics and some practical guidelines. PMID:24899337

  19. Hemolytic-uremic syndrome with acute encephalopathy in a pregnant woman infected with epidemic enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli: characteristic brain images and cytokine profiles.

    PubMed

    Ito, M; Shiozaki, A; Shimizu, M; Saito, S

    2015-05-01

    A food-poisoning outbreak due to enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) occurred in Toyama, Japan. The case of a 26-year-old pregnant woman with hemolytic-uremic syndrome who developed acute encephalopathy due to EHEC infection after eating raw meat is presented herein. On day 2 following admission, a cesarean section was performed because of a non-reassuring fetal status. Fecal bacterial culture confirmed an O111/O157 superinfection. Intensive care therapies including continuous hemodiafiltration and plasma exchange were performed. After the operation, the patient developed encephalopathy for which steroid pulse therapy was added. Her condition improved gradually and she was discharged 55 days after delivery. PMID:25841635

  20. Transfusion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Savage, William J

    2016-06-01

    Transfusion reactions are common occurrences, and clinicians who order or transfuse blood components need to be able to recognize adverse sequelae of transfusion. The differential diagnosis of any untoward clinical event should always consider adverse sequelae of transfusion, even when transfusion occurred weeks earlier. There is no pathognomonic sign or symptom that differentiates a transfusion reaction from other potential medical problems, so vigilance is required during and after transfusion when a patient presents with a change in clinical status. This review covers the presentation, mechanisms, and management of transfusion reactions that are commonly encountered, and those that can be life-threatening. PMID:27113000

  1. Transfusion-related adverse reactions: From institutional hemovigilance effort to National Hemovigilance program

    PubMed Central

    Vasudev, Rahul; Sawhney, Vijay; Dogra, Mitu; Raina, Tilak Raj

    2016-01-01

    Aims: In this study we have evaluated the various adverse reactions related to transfusion occurring in our institution as a pilot institutional effort toward a hemovigilance program. This study will also help in understanding the problems faced by blood banks/Transfusion Medicine departments in implementing an effective hemovigilance program. Materials and Methods: All the adverse reactions related to transfusion of whole blood and its components in various clinical specialties were studied for a period of 1 year. Any transfusion-related adverse event was worked up in accordance with guidelines laid down by the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS) and departmental standard operating procedures. Results: During the study period from November 1, 2011 to October 31, 2012, 45812 components were issued [30939 WB/PRBC; 12704 fresh frozen plasma (FFP); 2169 platelets]. Risk estimation per 1000 units of red cells (WB/PRBC) transfused was estimated to be: 0.8 for febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reaction (FNHTR), 0.7 for allergic reaction, 0.19 for acute hemolytic transfusion reaction (AcHTR), 0.002 for anaphylactoid reactions, 0.1 for bacterial sepsis, and 0.06 for hypervolemia and hypocalcemia. 0.09 is the risk for delayed transfusion reaction and 0.03 is the risk for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Risk estimate per 1,000 units of platelets transfused was estimated to be 1.38 for FNHTR, 1.18 for allergic reaction, and 1 in case of bacterial sepsis. Risk estimation per 1,000 units of FFP was estimated to be 0.15 for FNHTR and 0.2 for allergic reactions. Conclusions: Factors such as clerical checks at various levels, improvement in blood storage conditions outside blood banks, leukodepletion, better inventory management, careful donor screening, bedside monitoring of transfusion, and documentation of adverse events may decrease transfusion-related adverse events. Better coordination between transfusion specialists and various clinical specialties is the need of the hour and it will help in making the whole transfusion chain safe and effective. There is a need for a hemovigilance program at the national level so that true incidence and the spectrum of adverse events due to transfusion are known and policies formulated to minimize the risks associated with it. PMID:27011667

  2. Serum Shiga toxin 2 values in patients during the acute phase of post-diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxins (Stxs) produced by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are considered as the main causative agent, leading to the development of the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS); these toxins injure endothelial cells mainly the glomeruli. After passing through the intestinal wall, Stxs hav...

  3. A prospective, randomized, double-blind study, comparing unirradiated to irradiated white blood cell transfusions in acute leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Freireich, E J; Lichtiger, B; Mattiuzzi, G; Martinez, F; Reddy, V; Kyle Wathen, J

    2013-04-01

    A prospective, randomized double-blind study comparing the effects of irradiated and unirradiated white blood cells was conducted in 108 acute leukemia patients with life-threatening infections, refractory to antibiotics. The study demonstrated no significant improvement in 30-day survival or overall survival. Transfusion of unirradiated white cells did not compromise the patient's opportunity to undergo allogeneic stem cell transplant, nor the success rate or overall survival after allogeneic transplant. The important positive finding in this study was that the unirradiated white cells produced a significantly higher increment in circulating granulocytes and in a higher proportion of patients granulocyte count exceeded 1000 per microliter, approaching normal concentrations. The increase in the number and the improved survival of the unirradiated granulocytes suggest that this procedure might potentially be a method to improve the utility of granulocyte transfusions and merits further investigation. The study demonstrated non-inferiority for unirradiated white cells. There were no harmful effects such as graft-versus-host disease, indicating that such studies would be safe to conduct in the future. PMID:23072780

  4. Hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Canpolat, Nur

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by the triad of thrombotic microangiopathy, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Hemolytic uremic syndrome represents a heterogeneous group of disorders with variable etiologies that result in differences in presentation, management and outcome. In recent years, better understanding of the HUS, especially those due to genetic mutations in the alternative complement pathway have provided an update on the terminology, classification, and treatment of the disease. This review will provide the updated classification of the disease and the current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches on the complement-mediated HUS in addition to STEC-HUS which is the most common cause of the HUS in childhood. PMID:26265890

  5. Phase II trial of standard versus increased transfusion volume in Ugandan children with acute severe anemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe anemia (SA, hemoglobin <6 g/dl) is a leading cause of pediatric hospital admission in Africa, with significant in-hospital mortality. The underlying etiology is often infectious, but specific pathogens are rarely identified. Guidelines developed to encourage rational blood use recommend a standard volume of whole blood (20 ml/kg) for transfusion, but this is commonly associated with a frequent need for repeat transfusion and poor outcome. Evidence is lacking on what hemoglobin threshold criteria for intervention and volume are associated with the optimal survival outcomes. Methods We evaluated the safety and efficacy of a higher volume of whole blood (30 ml/kg; Tx30: n = 78) against the standard volume (20 ml/kg; Tx20: n = 82) in Ugandan children (median age 36 months (interquartile range (IQR) 13 to 53)) for 24-hour anemia correction (hemoglobin >6 g/dl: primary outcome) and 28-day survival. Results Median admission hemoglobin was 4.2 g/dl (IQR 3.1 to 4.9). Initial volume received followed the randomization strategy in 155 (97%) patients. By 24-hours, 70 (90%) children in the Tx30 arm had corrected SA compared to 61 (74%) in the Tx20 arm; cause-specific hazard ratio = 1.54 (95% confidence interval 1.09 to 2.18, P = 0.01). From admission to day 28 there was a greater hemoglobin increase from enrollment in Tx30 (global P <0.0001). Serious adverse events included one non-fatal allergic reaction and one death in the Tx30 arm. There were six deaths in the Tx20 arm (P = 0.12); three deaths were adjudicated as possibly related to transfusion, but none secondary to volume overload. Conclusion A higher initial transfusion volume prescribed at hospital admission was safe and resulted in an accelerated hematological recovery in Ugandan children with SA. Future testing in a large, pragmatic clinical trial to establish the effect on short and longer-term survival is warranted. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.Gov identifier: NCT01461590 registered 26 October 2011. Please see related commentary article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/12/68/abstract. PMID:24767094

  6. Transfusion medicine and the pregnant patient.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alfred Ian; Kaufman, Richard M

    2011-04-01

    Alloimmunity in pregnancy is the basis for two of the major complications of pregnancy in transfusion medicine: hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN), and fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT). Use of Rh(D) immune globulin has dramatically reduced the incidence of HDFN in Rh(D)-mismatched pregnancies. Treatment of HDFN may involve intrauterine transfusion, with fetal and neonatal survival rates of 70% to 90%. Treatments for FNAIT include immune globulin, steroids, or in severe cases, intrauterine platelet transfusions. Transfusion medicine is central to the management of pregnancy-associated complications such as postpartum hemorrhage, parvovirus B19 infection, hemoglobinopathies, and aplastic anemia. PMID:21444037

  7. Red blood cell alloimmunization in sickle cell disease: pathophysiology, risk factors, and transfusion management

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Russell E.

    2012-01-01

    Red blood cell transfusions have reduced morbidity and mortality for patients with sickle cell disease. Transfusions can lead to erythrocyte alloimmunization, however, with serious complications for the patient including life-threatening delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions and difficulty in finding compatible units, which can cause transfusion delays. In this review, we discuss the risk factors associated with alloimmunization with emphasis on possible mechanisms that can trigger delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions in sickle cell disease, and we describe the challenges in transfusion management of these patients, including opportunities and emerging approaches for minimizing this life-threatening complication. PMID:22563085

  8. Anemia, Blood Transfusion Requirements and Mortality Risk in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Adults Requiring Acute Medical Admission to Hospital in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhoff, Andrew D.; Lawn, Stephen D.; Schutz, Charlotte; Burton, Rosie; Boulle, Andrew; Cobelens, Frank J.; Meintjes, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    Background. Morbidity and mortality remain high among hospitalized patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in sub-Saharan Africa despite widespread availability of antiretroviral therapy. Severe anemia is likely one important driver, and some evidence suggests that blood transfusions may accelerate HIV progression and paradoxically increase short-term mortality. We investigated the relationship between anemia, blood transfusions, and mortality in a South African district hospital. Methods. Unselected consecutive HIV-infected adults requiring acute medical admission to a Cape Town township district hospital were recruited. Admission hemoglobin concentrations were used to classify anemia severity according to World Health Organization/AIDS Clinical Trials Group criteria. Vital status was determined at 90 days, and Cox regression analyses were used to determine independent predictors of mortality. Results. Of 585 HIV-infected patients enrolled, 578 (98.8%) were included in the analysis. Anemia was detected in 84.8% of patients and was severe (hemoglobin, 6.5–7.9 g/dL) or life-threatening (hemoglobin, <6.5 g/dL) in 17.3% and 13.3%, respectively. Within 90 days of the date of admission, 13.5% (n = 78) patients received at least 1 blood transfusion with red cell concentrate and 77 (13.3%) patients died. In univariable analysis, baseline hemoglobin and receipt of blood transfusion were associated with increased mortality risk. However, in multivariable analysis, neither hemoglobin nor receipt of a blood transfusion were independently associated with greater mortality risk. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome-defining illnesses other than tuberculosis and impaired renal function independently predicted mortality. Conclusions. Newly admitted HIV-infected adults had a high prevalence of severe or life-threatening anemia and blood transfusions were frequently required. However, after adjustment for confounders, blood transfusions did not confer an increased mortality risk. PMID:26730391

  9. Anemia, Blood Transfusion Requirements and Mortality Risk in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Adults Requiring Acute Medical Admission to Hospital in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kerkhoff, Andrew D; Lawn, Stephen D; Schutz, Charlotte; Burton, Rosie; Boulle, Andrew; Cobelens, Frank J; Meintjes, Graeme

    2015-12-01

    Background. ?Morbidity and mortality remain high among hospitalized patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in sub-Saharan Africa despite widespread availability of antiretroviral therapy. Severe anemia is likely one important driver, and some evidence suggests that blood transfusions may accelerate HIV progression and paradoxically increase short-term mortality. We investigated the relationship between anemia, blood transfusions, and mortality in a South African district hospital. Methods. ?Unselected consecutive HIV-infected adults requiring acute medical admission to a Cape Town township district hospital were recruited. Admission hemoglobin concentrations were used to classify anemia severity according to World Health Organization/AIDS Clinical Trials Group criteria. Vital status was determined at 90 days, and Cox regression analyses were used to determine independent predictors of mortality. Results. ?Of 585 HIV-infected patients enrolled, 578 (98.8%) were included in the analysis. Anemia was detected in 84.8% of patients and was severe (hemoglobin, 6.5-7.9 g/dL) or life-threatening (hemoglobin, <6.5 g/dL) in 17.3% and 13.3%, respectively. Within 90 days of the date of admission, 13.5% (n = 78) patients received at least 1 blood transfusion with red cell concentrate and 77 (13.3%) patients died. In univariable analysis, baseline hemoglobin and receipt of blood transfusion were associated with increased mortality risk. However, in multivariable analysis, neither hemoglobin nor receipt of a blood transfusion were independently associated with greater mortality risk. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome-defining illnesses other than tuberculosis and impaired renal function independently predicted mortality. Conclusions. ?Newly admitted HIV-infected adults had a high prevalence of severe or life-threatening anemia and blood transfusions were frequently required. However, after adjustment for confounders, blood transfusions did not confer an increased mortality risk. PMID:26730391

  10. Red cell transfusion and the immune system.

    PubMed

    Hart, S; Cserti-Gazdewich, C M; McCluskey, S A

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the complex immunological consequences of red cell transfusion is essential if we are to use this valuable resource wisely and safely. The decision to transfuse red cells should be made after serious considerations of the associated risks and benefits. Immunological risks of transfusion include major incompatibility reactions and transfusion-related acute lung injury, while other immunological insults such as transfusion-related immunomodulation are relatively underappreciated. Red cell transfusions should be acknowledged as immunological exposures, with consequences weighed against expected benefits. This article reviews immunological consequences and the emerging evidence that may inform risk-benefit considerations in clinical practice. PMID:25440393

  11. [Safer and more appropriate blood transfusion therapy].

    PubMed

    Handa, Makoto

    2015-10-01

    The risks associated with transfusion with blood components have been greatly reduced due to the implementation of innovative strategies for donor selection and testing, as well as safety measures such as universal prestorage leukocyte reduction. However, a variety of residual or unsolved risks, such as severe acute reaction of transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload and transfusion-transmitted infections, remain. Patients with hematological disorders are at high risk, since they receive therapeutic interventions frequently requiring transfusion. Thereby, balancing risk and benefit for patients, hematologists should prescribe blood components through evidence-based decision-making, minimize unnecessary transfusions and then conduct safe and error-free transfusion with a standard procedure involving the transfusion process at the bedside. PMID:26458457

  12. Transfusion and management of surgical patients with hematologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Wade G; Uffort, Ekong; Denning, David

    2015-04-01

    Clinical trials have provided guidance in developing triggers for transfusing in the hemodynamically stable patient. These studies have identified that improved outcomes can be obtained in the massively transfused patient when platelets and fresh frozen plasma are transfused with packed red blood cells. Studies that characterize the complications of transfusions, such as transfusion-related acute lung injury and poor cancer-related outcomes, are discussed. Emerging data that characterize the risk factors associated with transfusion-related acute lung injury and suggest metastasis and local recurrence occur at a higher rate in the transfused patient are discussed. Hematologic disorders commonly encountered by surgeons are discussed. PMID:25814112

  13. Blood Transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... TAHL-uh-gus) blood donation. Another option for blood transfusions is called directed donation . This is when a family member or friend donates blood specifically to be used by a designated patient. ...

  14. Blood transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... some people choose a method called autologous blood donation. Autologous blood is blood donated by you , which you later receive if you need a transfusion during or after surgery. You can have blood ...

  15. Transfusion reaction in a case with the rare Bombay blood group

    PubMed Central

    Shahshahani, Hayedeh Javadzadeh; Vahidfar, Mohamad Reza; Khodaie, Seyed Ali

    2013-01-01

    Bombay phenotype is extremely rare in Caucasian with an incidence of 1 in 250,000. When individuals with the Bombay phenotype need blood transfusion, they can receive only autologous blood or blood from another Bombay blood group. Transfusing blood group O red cells to them can cause a fatal hemolytic transfusion reaction. In this study, we report a case with the rare Bombay blood group that was misdiagnosed as the O blood group and developed a hemolytic transfusion reaction. This highlights the importance of both forward and reverse typing in ABO blood grouping and standard cross-matching and performing standard pretransfusion laboratory tests in hospital blood banks. PMID:23559776

  16. Current trends in platelet transfusions practice: The role of ABO-RhD and human leukocyte antigen incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Valsami, Serena; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Gialeraki, Argyri; Chimonidou, Maria; Politou, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusions have contributed to the revolutionary modern treatment of hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. Despite the long-term application of platelet transfusion in therapeutics, all aspects of their optimal use (i.e., in cases of ABO and/or Rh (D incompatibility) have not been definitively determined yet. We reviewed the available data on transfusion practices and outcome in ABO and RhD incompatibility and platelet refractoriness due to anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Transfusion of platelets with major ABO-incompatibility is related to reduced posttransfusion platelet (PLT) count increments, compared to ABO-identical and minor, but still are equally effective in preventing clinical bleeding. ABO-minor incompatible transfusions pose the risk of an acute hemolytic reaction of the recipient that is not always related to high anti-A, B donor titers. ABO-identical PLT transfusion seems to be the most effective and safest therapeutic strategy. Exclusive ABO-identical platelet transfusion policy could be feasible, but alternative approaches could facilitate platelet inventory management. Transfusion of platelets from RhD positive donors to RhD negative patients is considered to be effective and safe though is associated with low rate of anti-D alloimmunization due to contaminating red blood cells. The prevention of D alloimmunization is recommended only for women of childbearing age. HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of platelet refractoriness. Managing patients with refractoriness with cross-matched or HLA-matched platelets is the current practice although data are still lacking for the efficacy of this practice in terms of clinical outcome. Leukoreduction contributes to the reduction of both HLA and anti-D alloimmunization. PMID:26420927

  17. Current trends in platelet transfusions practice: The role of ABO-RhD and human leukocyte antigen incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Valsami, Serena; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Gialeraki, Argyri; Chimonidou, Maria; Politou, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusions have contributed to the revolutionary modern treatment of hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. Despite the long-term application of platelet transfusion in therapeutics, all aspects of their optimal use (i.e., in cases of ABO and/or Rh (D incompatibility) have not been definitively determined yet. We reviewed the available data on transfusion practices and outcome in ABO and RhD incompatibility and platelet refractoriness due to anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Transfusion of platelets with major ABO-incompatibility is related to reduced posttransfusion platelet (PLT) count increments, compared to ABO-identical and minor, but still are equally effective in preventing clinical bleeding. ABO-minor incompatible transfusions pose the risk of an acute hemolytic reaction of the recipient that is not always related to high anti-A, B donor titers. ABO-identical PLT transfusion seems to be the most effective and safest therapeutic strategy. Exclusive ABO-identical platelet transfusion policy could be feasible, but alternative approaches could facilitate platelet inventory management. Transfusion of platelets from RhD positive donors to RhD negative patients is considered to be effective and safe though is associated with low rate of anti-D alloimmunization due to contaminating red blood cells. The prevention of D alloimmunization is recommended only for women of childbearing age. HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of platelet refractoriness. Managing patients with refractoriness with cross-matched or HLA-matched platelets is the current practice although data are still lacking for the efficacy of this practice in terms of clinical outcome. Leukoreduction contributes to the reduction of both HLA and anti-D alloimmunization. PMID:26420927

  18. Tibor Jack Greenwalt: Father of Transfusion Medicine.

    PubMed

    Stansbury, Lynn G; Hess, John R

    2010-10-01

    Tibor J. Greenwalt (1914-2005) was, as much as anyone, the Father of Transfusion Medicine. He was founder of the Blood Center of Wisconsin, the first member of the American Association of Blood Banks, founding editor of Transfusion, chair of the National Research Council's Committee on Blood and Transfusion, national medical director of the American Red Cross Blood Services, and president of the International Society of Blood Transfusion. He wrote 200 papers and 25 books, describing erythroblastosis fetalis as an immune hemolytic anemia, new blood groups and antigens, the effects of hepatitis testing on blood safety, better ways to store red cell, and much more. He worked until days before his death at age 91, ending a 63-year career with 5 papers in press. PMID:20851334

  19. Accumulation of CD62P during storage of apheresis platelet concentrates and the role of CD62P in transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Tong, Shan; Wang, Haibao; Zhang, Ting; Chen, Linfeng; Liu, Bowei

    2015-11-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-associated morbidity and mortality. Activated platelets have important roles in TRALI and CD62P was identified to be an important indicator of platelet activation. However, the precise roles of CD62P in TRALI have remained elusive. The present study assessed CD62P accumulation during storage of apheresis platelet concentrates (A‑Plts) and established a mouse model of TRALI to further investigate the roles of CD62P in TRALI. The results showed that the CD62P concentration in A‑Plts was increased with the storage time. Mice were treated with monoclonal major histocompatibility complex (MHC)‑1 antibody to induce TRALI. The murine model of TRALI was successfully established as evidenced by pulmonary oedema, accompanied by decreased clearance of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), increased pulmonary and systemic inflammation, elevated lung myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity as well as increased pulmonary and systemic coagulation in the TRALI group compared with those in the control group. To further determine the role of CD62P in TRALI, mice were treated with anti‑CD62P antibody to knockdown CD62P in vivo. It was found that pulmonary oedema, BALF clearance, pulmonary and systemic inflammation, MPO activity as well as pulmonary and systemic coagulation were decreased in the TRALI + anti‑CD62P antibody group compared with those in the TRALI + isotype antibody group. The present study supported the notion that CD62P is involved in mediating TRALI and may provide an important molecular basis for enhancing the clinical safety and effectiveness of platelet transfusion. PMID:26397744

  20. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn: managing the mother, fetus, and newborn.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Meghan; Matthews, Dana C

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) affects 3/100 000 to 80/100 000 patients per year. It is due to maternal blood group antibodies that cause fetal red cell destruction and in some cases, marrow suppression. This process leads to fetal anemia, and in severe cases can progress to edema, ascites, heart failure, and death. Infants affected with HDFN can have hyperbilirubinemia in the acute phase and hyporegenerative anemia for weeks to months after birth. The diagnosis and management of pregnant women with HDFN is based on laboratory and radiographic monitoring. Fetuses with marked anemia may require intervention with intrauterine transfusion. HDFN due to RhD can be prevented by RhIg administration. Prevention for other causal blood group specificities is less studied. PMID:26637714

  1. [Atypical hemolytic and uremic syndrome associated with von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease (ADAMTS 13) deficiency in children].

    PubMed

    Ben Abdallah Chabchoub, R; Boukedi, A; Bensalah, M; Maalej, B; Gargour, L; Turk, F; Ben Halima, N; Wolf, M; Veyradier, A; Mahfoudh, A

    2013-08-01

    Hemolytic and uremic syndrome (HUS) is a classical form of thrombotic microangiopathies characterized by the association of hemolytic anemia with schizocytes, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. Two forms of HUS have been described: the typical form that occurs after ingestion of a strain of bacteria, usually Escherichia coli types, which expresses verotoxin (also called shiga-like toxin), typically followed by bloody diarrhea, and atypical HUS, which is rare during childhood and can also be revealed by bloody diarrhea. We report a case of a 25-month-old infant who presented with hematuria and pallor after an episode of diarrhea. Biological tests revealed anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure. The diagnosis of typical HUS was made, but the causal microorganism was not identified. Progression was favorable within 5 days of plasma transfusions. Two months later, the patient presented with the same symptoms and neurological impairment without any diarrhea. Von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease activity (ADAMTS 13) was low. Therefore, the diagnosis of atypical HUS by severe deficiency of ADAMTS 13 was suggested. The treatment was based on plasma transfusions resulting in remission. Atypical HUS associated with severe ADAMTS 13 deficiency rarely occurs in childhood. The prognosis, usually threatening, has been completely transformed thanks to a better understanding of the pathogenesis and to therapeutic progress. PMID:23827373

  2. Transfusion medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Murawski, K.; Peetoom, F.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings contain 24 selections, including papers presented at the conference of American Red Cross held in May 1985, on the Subject of transfusion medicine. Some of the titles are: Fluosol/sup R/-DA in Radiation Therapy; Expression of Cloned Human Factor VIII and the Molecular Basis of Gene Defects that Cause Hemophilia; DNA-Probing Assay in the Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Genome in Human Peripheral Blood Cells; and Monoclonal Antibodies: Convergence of Technology and Application.

  3. Several mutations including two novel mutations of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene in Polish G6PD deficient subjects with chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, acute hemolytic anemia, and favism.

    PubMed

    Jablonska-Skwiecinska, E; Lewandowska, I; Plochocka, D; Topczewski, J; Zimowski, J G; Klopocka, J; Burzynska, B

    1999-01-01

    DNA sequencing revealed seven different glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) mutations in G6PD deficient subjects from 10 Polish families. Among them we found two novel mutations: 679C-->T (G6PD Radlowo, class 2) and a 1006A-->G (G6PD Torun, class 1). Variant G6PD Radlowo was characterized biochemically. Both novel mutations were analyzed using a model of the tertiary structure of the human enzyme. The main chain of G6PD Torun is different from the wild-type G6PD. The remaining mutations identified by us in deficient Polish patients were: 542A-->T (G6PD Malaga), 1160G-->A (G6PD Beverly Hills), 1178G-->A (G6PD Nashville), 1192G-->A (G6PD Puerto Limon), and 1246G-->A (G6PD Tokyo). Variant Tokyo was found in four families. In one of them favism was the first clinical sign of G6PD deficiency and chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (CNSHA) was diagnosed later. Variants G6PD Nashville and G6PD Puerto Limon were accompanied by the silent mutation 1311C-->T of the G6PD gene. PMID:10571945

  4. Recombinant Human Erythropoietin Therapy for a Jehovah's Witness Child With Severe Anemia due to Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Woo, Da Eun; Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Yu Kyung; Park, Yong Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Patients with hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) can rapidly develop profound anemia as the disease progresses, as a consequence of red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis and inadequate erythropoietin synthesis. Therefore, RBC transfusion should be considered in HUS patients with severe anemia to avoid cardiac or pulmonary complications. Most patients who are Jehovah's Witnesses refuse blood transfusion, even in the face of life-threatening medical conditions due to their religious convictions. These patients require management alternatives to blood transfusions. Erythropoietin is a glycopeptide that enhances endogenous erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. With the availability of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO), several authors have reported its successful use in patients refusing blood transfusion. However, the optimal dose and duration of treatment with rHuEPO are not established. We report a case of a 2-year-old boy with diarrhea-associated HUS whose family members are Jehovah's Witnesses. He had severe anemia with acute kidney injury. His lowest hemoglobin level was 3.6 g/dL, but his parents refused treatment with packed RBC transfusion due to their religious beliefs. Therefore, we treated him with high-dose rHuEPO (300 IU/kg/day) as well as folic acid, vitamin B12, and intravenous iron. The hemoglobin level increased steadily to 7.4 g/dL after 10 days of treatment and his renal function improved without any complications. To our knowledge, this is the first case of successful rHuEPO treatment in a Jehovah's Witness child with severe anemia due to HUS. PMID:26958070

  5. Recombinant Human Erythropoietin Therapy for a Jehovah's Witness Child With Severe Anemia due to Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Da Eun; Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Yu Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) can rapidly develop profound anemia as the disease progresses, as a consequence of red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis and inadequate erythropoietin synthesis. Therefore, RBC transfusion should be considered in HUS patients with severe anemia to avoid cardiac or pulmonary complications. Most patients who are Jehovah's Witnesses refuse blood transfusion, even in the face of life-threatening medical conditions due to their religious convictions. These patients require management alternatives to blood transfusions. Erythropoietin is a glycopeptide that enhances endogenous erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. With the availability of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO), several authors have reported its successful use in patients refusing blood transfusion. However, the optimal dose and duration of treatment with rHuEPO are not established. We report a case of a 2-year-old boy with diarrhea-associated HUS whose family members are Jehovah's Witnesses. He had severe anemia with acute kidney injury. His lowest hemoglobin level was 3.6 g/dL, but his parents refused treatment with packed RBC transfusion due to their religious beliefs. Therefore, we treated him with high-dose rHuEPO (300 IU/kg/day) as well as folic acid, vitamin B12, and intravenous iron. The hemoglobin level increased steadily to 7.4 g/dL after 10 days of treatment and his renal function improved without any complications. To our knowledge, this is the first case of successful rHuEPO treatment in a Jehovah's Witness child with severe anemia due to HUS. PMID:26958070

  6. Hemolytic anemia produced by regurgitation through transposed chordae tendineae.

    PubMed

    Birkbeck, James P; Gorton, Michael E; Vacek, James L

    2005-11-01

    Hemolytic anemia after mitral repair and annuloplasty ring placement is very uncommon, and rarely described. The case is presented of a 53-year-old woman who developed severe mitral regurgitation and transfusion-dependent hemolytic anemia following mitral valve repair with a Carpentier-Edwards annuloplasty ring, which included transposition of chordae tendineae from the posterior leaflet to the anterior leaflet. Transesophageal echocardiography suggested that the transposed chordae tethered the anterior leaflet, causing malcoaptation of the leaflets. This resulted in central regurgitation divided by the chordae tendineae, producing two turbulent flow jets causing hemolysis. At reoperation, these chordae were removed and two longer Gortex neochordae to the anterior leaflet were placed with subsequent resolution of the anemia. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of hemolytic anemia caused by transposed mitral valve chordae tendineae from the posterior to the anterior leaflet. PMID:16359054

  7. Types of Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Anemia Blood Transfusion Rh Incompatibility Sickle Cell Disease Thalassemias Send a link ... can occur during pregnancy if a woman has Rh-negative blood and her baby has Rh-positive ...

  8. A rare case of acute pancreatitis and life-threatening hemolytic anemia associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection in a young healthy adult.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sukhchain; Khosla, Pam

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a common infection that affects 95% of adults worldwide at some point during life. It is usually asymptomatic or causes a self-limiting clinical syndrome known as infectious mononucleosis. It rarely causes complications. Here, we present a case of a healthy 21-year-old female college student who suffered from severe pancreatitis and life-threatening autoimmune hemolytic anemia in association with EBV infection, and we also discuss the common presentation of EBV infection and the diagnosis and treatment of simple and complicated EBV infection. PMID:26190854

  9. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    PubMed

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options. PMID:26575109

  10. Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) haemovigilance and progress is improving transfusion safety

    PubMed Central

    Bolton-Maggs, Paula H B; Cohen, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) UK confidential haemovigilance reporting scheme began in 1996. Over the 16 years of reporting, the evidence gathered has prompted changes in transfusion practice from the selection and management of donors to changes in hospital practice, particularly better education and training. However, half or more reports relate to errors in the transfusion process despite the introduction of several measures to improve practice. Transfusion in the UK is very safe: 2·9 million components were issued in 2012, and very few deaths are related to transfusion. The risk of death from transfusion as estimated from SHOT data in 2012 is 1 in 322 580 components issued and for major morbidity, 1 in 21 413 components issued; the risk of transfusion-transmitted infection is much lower. Acute transfusion reactions and transfusion-associated circulatory overload carry the highest risk for morbidity and death. The high rate of participation in SHOT by National Health Service organizations, 99·5%, is encouraging. Despite the very useful information gained about transfusion reactions, the main risks remain human factors. The recommendations on reduction of errors through a ‘back to basics’ approach from the first annual SHOT report remain absolutely relevant today. PMID:24032719

  11. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia caused by cold agglutinins in a young pregnant woman.

    PubMed

    Batalias, Labros; Trakakis, Eftihios; Loghis, Costas; Salabasis, Costas; Simeonidis, George; Karanikolopoulos, Panagiotis; Kassanos, Demetrios; Salamalekis, Emmanuel

    2006-04-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder. A 34-year old woman presented with thrombophlebitis after her first delivery, during puerperium. A high titer of cold agglutinins was found. Lymphomas, systemic lupus erythematosus, and tumors were excluded. She conceived again. Due to the anemia she had frequent blood transfusions and she delivered at 38 weeks of gestation. PMID:16854701

  12. Red blood cell transfusion in newborn infants

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, Robin K; Jefferies, Ann L

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cell transfusion is an important and frequent component of neonatal intensive care. The present position statement addresses the methods and indications for red blood cell transfusion of the newborn, based on a review of the current literature. The most frequent indications for blood transfusion in the newborn are the acute treatment of perinatal hemorrhagic shock and the recurrent correction of anemia of prematurity. Perinatal hemorrhagic shock requires immediate treatment with large quantities of red blood cells; the effects of massive transfusion on other blood components must be considered. Some guidelines are now available from clinical trials investigating transfusion in anemia of prematurity; however, considerable uncertainty remains. There is weak evidence that cognitive impairment may be more severe at follow-up in extremely low birth weight infants transfused at lower hemoglobin thresholds; therefore, these thresholds should be maintained by transfusion therapy. Although the risks of transfusion have declined considerably in recent years, they can be minimized further by carefully restricting neonatal blood sampling. PMID:24855419

  13. Management of Patients with Sickle Cell Disease Using Transfusion Therapy: Guidelines and Complications.

    PubMed

    Chou, Stella T; Fasano, Ross M

    2016-06-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion therapy is a key component of comprehensive management of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and has increased over time as a means of primary and secondary stroke prevention. RBC transfusions also prove to be lifesaving for many acute sickle cell-related complications. Although episodic and chronic transfusion therapy has significantly improved the morbidity and mortality of patients with SCD, transfusions are not without adverse effects. This review addresses RBC transfusion methods, evidence-based and/or expert panel-based consensus on indications for chronic and episodic transfusion indications, and strategies to prevent and manage transfusion-related complications. PMID:27112998

  14. Elderly female with Autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Dey, Anupam

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare disease with an estimated prevalence of around 17/100,000. It is often difficult to diagnose and treat AIHA, especially in elderly. A 60-year-old female was admitted with the complaints of low grade fever, on-off for 6 months, progressive fatigue and dyspnea on exertion. She was transfused with three units of blood within these 6 months. Examination revealed pallor, edema, hemic murmur, and palpable liver. Hb was 2.9 gm%, T Bil 5.2 mg/dl, ESR 160 mm, and reticulocyte count 44.05%. Direct Coombs test was positive, anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and Anti ds DNA were positive. A diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with AIHA was considered and patient was transfused with two units of packed red cells and put on steroid (prednisolone) at 1 mg/kg body weight daily. After 3 weeks, her Hb had increased to 10.4 gm% with gross clinical improvement. PMID:26538992

  15. Elderly female with Autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Anupam

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare disease with an estimated prevalence of around 17/100,000. It is often difficult to diagnose and treat AIHA, especially in elderly. A 60-year-old female was admitted with the complaints of low grade fever, on-off for 6 months, progressive fatigue and dyspnea on exertion. She was transfused with three units of blood within these 6 months. Examination revealed pallor, edema, hemic murmur, and palpable liver. Hb was 2.9 gm%, T Bil 5.2 mg/dl, ESR 160 mm, and reticulocyte count 44.05%. Direct Coombs test was positive, anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and Anti ds DNA were positive. A diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with AIHA was considered and patient was transfused with two units of packed red cells and put on steroid (prednisolone) at 1 mg/kg body weight daily. After 3 weeks, her Hb had increased to 10.4 gm% with gross clinical improvement. PMID:26538992

  16. Alternatives to Blood Transfusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Blood Transfusion and Donation + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » TOPICS Document ... Possible risks of blood transfusions Alternatives to blood transfusions Donating blood Blood donation by cancer survivors To learn more References Previous ...

  17. Types of Blood Transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... need only that part to treat the illness. Red Blood Cell Transfusions Red blood cells are the most commonly transfused part of the ... waste products. You may need a transfusion of red blood cells if you've lost blood due to an ...

  18. Hemolytic disease of the newborn due to anti-jkb: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Velasco Rodríguez, Diego; Pérez-Segura, G; Jiménez-Ubieto, A; Rodríguez, M A; Montejano, L

    2014-06-01

    Although anti-Jkb is a well-defined cause of severe acute or delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions, it is rarely associated with severe Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn (HDN), even with high antibody titer. To date, only 13 cases have been reported, so the possible reasons for that still remain unclear. Most of HDN due to anti-Jkb are mild-to-moderate, and usually have a good prognosis. A 41-years-old woman, who had a positive antibody screening test in her 13th week of pregnancy, was sent to the blood bank for study before an amniocentesis. Antibody identification and red blood cell (RBC) phenotyping of the patient and his husband were performed, plus arrays study in the amniotic fluid. An anti-Jkb was identified in the patient's serum with a titer of 1:1, and her RBC phenotype was O Rh(D) positive, C(+), c(+), E(-), e(+), K(-), Jka(+), Jkb(-). The RBC genotype of the fetus was B Rh(D) positive, Jka(+), Jkb(+). Antibody titer remained stable and the pregnancy was uneventful. At birth, there was no need of phototherapy or exchange transfusion for the newborn and her Jk(b+) typing result was confirmed in a cord blood sample. Although most of HDN cases due to anti-Jkb have a good outcome, monitoring antibody titer should be done to prevent fatal complications. Furthermore, antenatal antibody screening should be performed in every pregnant woman irrespective of her Rh(D) antigen status in order to detect red cell alloimmunization to other clinically significant blood group antigens. PMID:24839369

  19. Assays of hemolytic toxins.

    PubMed

    Rowe, G E; Welch, R A

    1994-01-01

    The ability to produce a cytolytic toxin contributes to the success of many organisms in a particular niche by such diverse means as lysis of a phagolysosomal membrane of the macrophage by hemolysin from the intracellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, disruption of leukocyte activity by the Escherichia coli hemolysin, and destruction of invading bacteria by hemolysin from the annelid Glycera dibranchiata. The relative contribution of erythrocyte lysis to survival of the cytolysin producer is still under investigation. Nevertheless, the hemolytic phenotype is both a powerful tool for identifying novel cytolysins and a convenient marker for studying cytolytic activity in established toxins. PMID:7520121

  20. Recent Advances in Preventing Adverse Reactions to Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Thomas S; Fung, Mark K; Harm, Sarah K

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum of adverse reactions to blood product transfusion ranges from a benign clinical course to serious morbidity and mortality.  There have been many advances in technologies and transfusion strategies to decrease the risk of adverse reactions. Our aim is to address a few of the advancements in increasing the safety of the blood supply, specifically pathogen reduction technologies, bacterial contamination risk reduction, and transfusion associated acute lung injury risk mitigation strategies. PMID:27081471

  1. Recent Advances in Preventing Adverse Reactions to Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Thomas S; Fung, Mark K; Harm, Sarah K

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum of adverse reactions to blood product transfusion ranges from a benign clinical course to serious morbidity and mortality.  There have been many advances in technologies and transfusion strategies to decrease the risk of adverse reactions. Our aim is to address a few of the advancements in increasing the safety of the blood supply, specifically pathogen reduction technologies, bacterial contamination risk reduction, and transfusion associated acute lung injury risk mitigation strategies. PMID:27081471

  2. [Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Blasco Pelicano, Miquel; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Campistol Plana, Josep M

    2015-11-20

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a clinical entity characterized by thrombocytopenia, non-immune hemolytic anemia and renal impairment. Kidney pathology shows thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) with endothelial cell injury leading to thrombotic occlusion of arterioles and capillaries. Traditionally, HUS was classified in 2 forms: Typical HUS, most frequently occurring in children and caused by Shiga-toxin-producing bacteria, and atypical HUS (aHUS). aHUS is associated with mutations in complement genes in 50-60% of patients and has worse prognosis, with the majority of patients developing end stage renal disease. After kidney transplantation HUS may develop as a recurrence of aHUS or as de novo disease. Over the last years, many studies have demonstrated that complement dysregulation underlies the endothelial damage that triggers the development of TMA in most of these patients. Advances in our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of aHUS, together with the availability of novel therapeutic options, will enable better strategies for the early diagnosis and etiological treatment, which are changing the natural history of aHUS. This review summarizes the aHUS clinical entity and describes the role of complement dysregulation in the pathogenesis of aHUS. Finally, we review the differential diagnosis and the therapeutic options available to patients with aHUS. PMID:25433773

  3. Can hospital transfusion committees change transfusion practice?

    PubMed Central

    Torella, Francesco; Haynes, Sarah L; Bennett, Joanne; Sewell, Darreul; McCollum, Charles N

    2002-01-01

    Blood and blood products are commonly over-used in hospital practice. We investigated whether the introduction of a red-cell transfusion trigger (haemoglobin <8 g dL-1) influenced transfusion practice in surgery. Coronary artery bypass grafts (CABGs, n=400), total hip replacements (n=107), colectomies (n=85) and transurethral prostatectomies (TURPs, n=158) were reviewed over two periods of six months, before and after the introduction of the policy by the local hospital transfusion committee. After introduction of the policy, the proportion of patients transfused fell from 57% to 45% with CABGs (P=0.02) and from 52% to 26% with hip replacements (P=0.006); for colectomies and TURPs there was no change. Hospital stay did not increase in any of the groups. In the second period, haemoglobin concentration on discharge was lower after total hip replacement, by a mean (95% CI) of 0.7 (0.3-1.2) g dL-1 (P=0.002) and after colectomy, by a mean of 0.6 (0.1-1.1) g dL-1 (P=0.03). Although other factors cannot be excluded, we suggest that the reductions in red-cell transfusion were in large part attributable to the new transfusion policy. PMID:12205210

  4. Pregnancy-Associated Atypical Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Antonio F.; Roman, Jorge; Wyble, Aaron; Pacheco, Luis D.

    2016-01-01

    Précis Introduction Early diagnosis of atypical uremic–hemolytic syndrome may be challenging during the puerperium period. Correct diagnosis and timely management are crucial to improve outcomes. Background Pregnancy-associated atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (p-aHUS) is a rare condition characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Triggered by pregnancy, genetically predisposed women develop the syndrome, leading to a disastrous hemolytic disease characterized by diffuse endothelial damage and platelet consumption. This disease is a life-threatening condition that requires prompt diagnosis and therapy. Case A 19-year-old G1P1 Caucasian female with suspicion of HELLP syndrome was treated at our facility for severe thrombocytopenia and acute kidney injury. A diagnosis of atypical uremic–hemolytic syndrome was later confirmed. The patient's condition improved with normalization of platelets and improvement in kidney function after 14 days of plasmapheresis. She was subsequently treated with eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody against C5. The patient tolerated well the therapy and is currently in remission. Conclusion Diagnosis of p-aHUS is challenging, as it can mimic various diseases found during pregnancy and the postpartum. Plasma exchange should be promptly initiated within 24 hours of diagnosis. Eculizumab has risen to become an important tool to improve long-term comorbidities and mortality in this group population. PMID:26989566

  5. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Dacie, J V

    1975-10-01

    Warm-type autoantibodies of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) are usually IgG but may be IgM or IgA. They are usual Rh specific. Cold-type antibodies are IgM or IgG (Donath-Landsteiner [DL] antibody). IgM antibodies are usually anit-l (occasionally anti-i) and DL antibodies anti-P. The warm IgG antibodies do not fix complement (C); they cause red blood cell (RBC) destruction predominantly in the spleen as the result of interaction between fixing; they cause RBC destruction either by intravascular lysis (complement sequence completed) or by interaction between C3-coated RBCs and phagocytes in liver and spleen. Gentic factors, immunoglobulin deficiency, somatic mutation, viral infections and drugs, and failure of T-lymphocyte function, all probably play a part in breaking immunological tolerance and the development of AIHA. PMID:1164110

  6. Initial transfusion intensity predicts survival in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lap Shu Alan; Shapiro, Roman; Buckstein, Rena; Lin, Yulia; Callum, Jeannie; Chodirker, Lisa; Lee, Christina D; Prica, Anca; Lam, Adam; Mamedov, Alexandre; Wells, Richard A

    2014-10-01

    We evaluated 52 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) who had received at least one red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. In the 4-week period following the first transfusion, 24 patients (group 1) required no transfusion, while 28 (group 2) required transfusion of two or more units of RBCs. Survival was greater in group 1 (440 weeks vs. 167 weeks, p < 0.01), even when only international prognostic scoring system (IPSS) low and intermediate-1 risk patients were analyzed (median overall survival 491 vs. 170 weeks, p < 0.05), independent of age, IPSS and progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The intensity of transfusion required in the first few weeks after the first transfusion predicts disease severity and correlates with survival. PMID:24397595

  7. Selective prophylactic transfusion in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Grossetti, Elizabeth; Carles, Gabriel; El Guindi, Wael; Seve, Beatrice; Montoya, Yohni; Creveuil, Christian; Dreyfus, Michel

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To record feto-maternal complications following the use of selective prophylactic transfusions in women with major sickle cell disease (SCD) and determine whether selective prophylactic transfusion reduces these complications, through a comparison with a population of women who received transfusions for complications only. DESIGN. A retrospective cohort study. SETTING. Public regional referral hospital in western French Guyana. POPULATION. Between 1992 and 2004, in all 29 women, 55 pregnancies, and 56 neonates. METHODS. Close obstetric follow-up and selective prophylactic transfusions after 26 weeks. Main outcome measures. Adverse obstetric outcome (pre-eclampsia, preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), intrauterine fetal death (IUFD), cesarean delivery, neonatal and maternal mortality) and end-points for SCD outcome (vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC), acute chest syndrome, and infections). RESULTS. Complications involved the different major SCD types to an equal extent. Comparison with the control group showed that women who had received prophylactic transfusions had lower rates of VOC (p=0.002) and preterm deliveries (p=0.036), but a significant increase in IUGR cases (p=0.048). CONCLUSION. Selective prophylactic transfusion seems to reduce certain maternal and fetal complications in women with severe forms of SCD. These results can only be confirmed through a randomized prospective study. PMID:19639465

  8. [A case of hemolytic-uremic syndrome with development of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome: diagnosis and clinical tactics].

    PubMed

    Dzhumabaeva, B T; Biriukova, L S; Tsvetaeva, N V; Sukhanova, G A; Vasil'ev, S A; Shavlokhov, V S; Karagiulian, S R; Kaplanskaia, I B; Petrova, V I; Avdonin, P V

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes a case of practically simultaneous development of the hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) and the catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) complicated by mesenteric vessel thrombosis and small bowel necrosis. Multimodality treatment comprising volume plasmapheresis, fresh frozen plasma transfusion, hemodialysis, anticoagulant and disaggregant therapy could relieve thrombogenic events, such as pulmonary artery thromboembolism and intestinal necrosis. PMID:20564925

  9. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is defined by the triad of mechanical hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal impairment. Atypical HUS (aHUS) defines non Shiga-toxin-HUS and even if some authors include secondary aHUS due to Streptococcus pneumoniae or other causes, aHUS designates a primary disease due to a disorder in complement alternative pathway regulation. Atypical HUS represents 5 -10% of HUS in children, but the majority of HUS in adults. The incidence of complement-aHUS is not known precisely. However, more than 1000 aHUS patients investigated for complement abnormalities have been reported. Onset is from the neonatal period to the adult age. Most patients present with hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal failure and 20% have extra renal manifestations. Two to 10% die and one third progress to end-stage renal failure at first episode. Half of patients have relapses. Mutations in the genes encoding complement regulatory proteins factor H, membrane cofactor protein (MCP), factor I or thrombomodulin have been demonstrated in 20-30%, 5-15%, 4-10% and 3-5% of patients respectively, and mutations in the genes of C3 convertase proteins, C3 and factor B, in 2-10% and 1-4%. In addition, 6-10% of patients have anti-factor H antibodies. Diagnosis of aHUS relies on 1) No associated disease 2) No criteria for Shigatoxin-HUS (stool culture and PCR for Shiga-toxins; serology for anti-lipopolysaccharides antibodies) 3) No criteria for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (serum ADAMTS 13 activity > 10%). Investigation of the complement system is required (C3, C4, factor H and factor I plasma concentration, MCP expression on leukocytes and anti-factor H antibodies; genetic screening to identify risk factors). The disease is familial in approximately 20% of pedigrees, with an autosomal recessive or dominant mode of transmission. As penetrance of the disease is 50%, genetic counseling is difficult. Plasmatherapy has been first line treatment until presently, without unquestionable demonstration of efficiency. There is a high risk of post-transplant recurrence, except in MCP-HUS. Case reports and two phase II trials show an impressive efficacy of the complement C5 blocker eculizumab, suggesting it will be the next standard of care. Except for patients treated by intensive plasmatherapy or eculizumab, the worst prognosis is in factor H-HUS, as mortality can reach 20% and 50% of survivors do not recover renal function. Half of factor I-HUS progress to end-stage renal failure. Conversely, most patients with MCP-HUS have preserved renal function. Anti-factor H antibodies-HUS has favourable outcome if treated early. PMID:21902819

  10. The transfusion dilemma--weighing the known and newly proposed risks of blood transfusions against the uncertain benefits.

    PubMed

    Refaai, Majed A; Blumberg, Neil

    2013-03-01

    Due to its significant role in saving lives, blood transfusion became one of the most commonly used therapies in medicine. In the USA red blood cell transfusions, for instance, are given to an estimated 3-4 million patients per year. However, the accepted benefits of transfusion do not come without harm. Acute transfusion reactions have been estimated to occur in almost one-fifth of total transfusions, with serious reactions in approximately 0.5%. Although methods of blood collection, preparation and storage have improved significantly, potential complications and controversial efficacy, especially of red blood cell transfusions, are still a major concern. One long-standing primary concern has been bacterial and viral contamination but recently other risks have been identified, mostly related to recipient immunomodulation and storage lesion-related changes. PMID:23590913

  11. [Transfusions in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Moulias, Sophie; Lesure, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Elderly people are Darticularlv Drone to anaemia and the need for transfusions. However, in response to the known adverse effects of red blood cell transfusions, particularly in the context of chronic anaemia, new recommendations have been issued. it is always necessary to consider this procedure on a case-by-case basis, analysing the risk-benefit ratio. PMID:25966521

  12. [Hemolytic uremic syndrome in children of Mendoza, Argentina: association with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection].

    PubMed

    Rivas, M; Balbi, L; Miliwebsky, E S; Garca, B; Tous, M I; Leardini, N A; Prieto, M A; Chillemi, G M; de Principi, M E

    1998-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) has been associated with pathogenesis of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) worldwide. The aim of the present study was to characterize the HUS cases reported in Mendoza and to determine their association with STEC infection. From July 1994 through June 1996 thirty-six patients with HUS were admitted to Hospital Peditrico "Dr. HJ Notti" (Mean age 22.8 +/- 14.9 months, 44% females). The children developed HUS following an acute diarrheal illness in 94.4% of the cases. Bloody diarrhea was observed in 83.3% of them. Antimicrobial therapy had been administered to 69.4% of the patients. Most of the patients were well-nourished (88.9%), belong to middle-low socioeconomical condition (91.7%), from urban areas (72.2%) and they were mostly assisted during summer and the beginning of autumn. The acute stage of the disease occurred with presentation of pallor (100%), edema (25%), anuria (38.9%), oliguria (41.7%), hemolytic anemia (97.2%), thrombocytopenia (86.1%) and neurological involvement (41.7%). Twenty-five of them presented the full clinical syndrome. Peritoneal dialysis were performed in 50% and packed blood cell transfusion in 88.9%. The mean days of hospitalization was 15.1 +/- 9.2 [range 1-32]. A 91.7% of the patients recovered renal function, two developed chronic renal failure and one died. Cumulative evidence of STEC infection was found in 19 (86.4%) of 22 HUS patients. STEC O157:H7, biotype C was found in 8 (36.4%). The prevalent Stx type was Stx2 in STEC, free fecal Stx (STMF) and Stx-neutralizing antibodies (a-Stx). In Mendoza, as in the rest of Argentina E. coli O157:H7, biotype C, Stx2 producer is the most frequently detected pathogen in HUS cases. PMID:9674201

  13. Is Penicillium citrinum implicated in sago hemolytic disease?

    PubMed

    Atagazli, Latifeh; Greenhill, Andrew R; Melrose, Wayne; Pue, Aisak G; Warner, Jeffrey M

    2010-05-01

    Sago hemolytic disease (SHD) is an acute hemolytic syndrome affecting rural Papua New Guineans who depend on the starch of Metroxylon sagu as a staple carbohydrate. It is a suspected mycotoxicosis associated with fungal succession in stored and perhaps poorly fermented sago. Despite a mortality rate of approximately 25%, little is know about the disease. Recent studies have identified Penicillium citrinum as a possible candidate in the etiology of SHD. This is based on the frequency of isolation from sago starch and the hemolytic nature of the organism as demonstrated when cultured on sheep and human blood agar. A highly non-polar lipophilic P. citrinum fraction from C18 solid phase extraction demonstrated high hemolytic activity in a semi-quantitative assay using both mouse and human erythrocytes. When the red cell membrane proteins were subjected to sodium dodecyl-sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) separation, cleavage of protein band 3 and spectrin was demonstrated. This breach of major structural red cell proteins is consistent with the severe hemolysis found in vivo. Our findings warrant further investigation into the hemolytic activity of P. citrinum and its role as the etiological agent of SHD. PMID:20578553

  14. Transfusion thresholds and other strategies for guiding allogeneic red blood cell transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Jeffrey L; Carless, Paul A; Hebert, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Background Most clinical practice guidelines recommend restrictive red cell transfusion practices, with the goal of minimising exposure to allogeneic blood. The purpose of this review is to compare clinical outcomes in patients randomised to restrictive versus liberal transfusion thresholds (triggers). Objectives To examine the evidence for the effect of transfusion thresholds on the use of allogeneic and/or autologous red cell transfusion, and the evidence for any effect on clinical outcomes. Search methods We identified trials by searching: the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register (searched 1 February 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 1), MEDLINE (Ovid) 1948 to January Week 3 2011, EMBASE (Ovid) 1980 to 2011 (Week 04), ISI Web of Science: Science Citation Index Expanded (1970 to February 2011) and ISI Web of Science: Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science (1990 to February 2011). We checked reference lists of other published reviews and relevant papers to identify any additional trials. Selection criteria Controlled trials in which patients were randomised to an intervention group or to a control group. We included trials where intervention groups were assigned on the basis of a clear transfusion ‘trigger’, described as a haemoglobin (Hb) or haematocrit (Hct) level below which a red blood cell (RBC) transfusion was to be administered. Data collection and analysis We pooled risk ratios of requiring allogeneic blood transfusion, transfused blood volumes and other clinical outcomes across trials using a random-effects model. Two people performed data extraction and assessment of the risk of bias. Main results We included 19 trials involving a total of 6264 patients and they were similar enough that results could be combined. Restrictive transfusion strategies reduced the risk of receiving a RBC transfusion by 39% (risk ratio (RR) 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.52 to 0.72). This equates to an average absolute risk reduction (ARR) of 34% (95% CI 24% to 45%). The volume of RBCs transfused was reduced on average by 1.19 units (95% CI 0.53 to 1.85 units). However, heterogeneity between trials was statistically significant (P < 0.00001; I2 ≥ 93%) for these outcomes. Restrictive transfusion strategies did not appear to impact the rate of adverse events compared to liberal transfusion strategies (i.e. mortality, cardiac events, myocardial infarction, stroke, pneumonia and thromboembolism). Restrictive transfusion strategies were associated with a statistically significant reduction in hospital mortality (RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.62 to 0.95) but not 30-day mortality (RR 0.85, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.03). The use of restrictive transfusion strategies did not reduce functional recovery, hospital or intensive care length of stay. The majority of patients randomised were included in good-quality trials, but some items of methodological quality were unclear. There are no trials in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Authors’ conclusions The existing evidence supports the use of restrictive transfusion triggers in most patients, including those with pre-existing cardiovascular disease. As there are no trials, the effects of restrictive transfusion triggers in high-risk groups, such as acute coronary syndrome, need to be tested in further large clinical trials. In countries with inadequate screening of donor blood, the data may constitute a stronger basis for avoiding transfusion with allogeneic red cells. PMID:22513904

  15. Exchange Transfusion in Severe Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Khatib, Khalid Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is endemic in India with the incidence of P. falciparum Malaria increasing gradually over the last decade. Severe malaria is an acute disease, caused by P. falciparum, but increasingly also by P. vivax with major signs of organ dysfunction and/or high levels of parasitaemia (>10%) in blood smear. Use of exchange transfusion with antimalarial drug therapy as an additional modality of treatment in severe Falciparum malaria is controversial and is unclear. We report a case of severe malaria complicated by multiorgan failure and ARDS. Patient responded well to manual exchange transfusion with standard artesunate-based chemotherapy. PMID:27042503

  16. Carbamazepine-induced hemolytic and aplastic crises associated with reduced glutathione peroxidase activity of erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masaki; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Hatakeyama, Naoki; Kubo, Noriaki; Tachi, Nobutada; Kanno, Hitoshi; Fujii, Hisaichi; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2007-11-01

    Although pure red cell aplasia is a well-known side effect of carbamazepine treatment, intravascular hemolytic anemia is rare. We describe a 5-year-old boy who developed concurrent intravascular hemolytic anemia and erythroblastopenia, probably due to carbamazepine. Carbamazepine treatment was subsequently discontinued, and the patient was treated with red blood cell transfusions, haptoglobin, and methylprednisolone. His hematologic abnormalities were almost fully recovered within 2 weeks. Examination of the patient's and mother's erythrocyte enzyme activities revealed mildly decreased erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity. We speculate that patients with reduced GSH-Px activity are at a high risk of developing carbamazepine-induced hemolytic crisis and/or aplastic crisis. PMID:18055338

  17. Getting it Right: Optimizing Transfusion Management during the Procedure

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Darryl; Potger, Kieran; Southwell, Joanne; Ambrose, Mark; Connolly, Terry; Louis, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: There is little doubt that blood transfusions have saved many lives in cases of acute hypovolemia and anemia, but both the literature and practitioners still do not agree as to what the appropriate indicators for transfusion are in a cardiac surgical patient. Furthermore, there are those who claim that the benefit of blood transfusions has never been conclusively demonstrated, and evidence of transfusion related harm continues to accumulate. Cardiac surgical patients may be transfused not only because of bleeding but also due to hemodilution from preoperative and intraoperative intravenous fluids and pump primes in conjunction with a possible preoperative anemia. Getting transfusion right to improve our practice has to be approached multifactorially. The use of prophylactic dosing of blood products has been suggested to be ineffective in reducing blood loss. There are many factors that impact transfusion rates including determining the optimal hematocrit where it is highly unlikely that one figure will be applicable to all patients. The formulation of transfusion guidelines and algorithms that have been agreed upon by all practitioners involved in the care of cardiac surgical patients may have a positive effect—if everyone agrees to transfuse patients via the formulated guidelines or algorithms. Importantly, no one individual should be able make the decision on whether a patient requires a blood transfusion—it must at all times be a team decision, whether in the operating room or intensive care unit. PMID:20092090

  18. Intraoperative transfusion practices in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Meier, J.; Filipescu, D.; Kozek-Langenecker, S.; Llau Pitarch, J.; Mallett, S.; Martus, P.; Matot, I.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transfusion of allogeneic blood influences outcome after surgery. Despite widespread availability of transfusion guidelines, transfusion practices might vary among physicians, departments, hospitals and countries. Our aim was to determine the amount of packed red blood cells (pRBC) and blood products transfused intraoperatively, and to describe factors determining transfusion throughout Europe. Methods. We did a prospective observational cohort study enrolling 5803 patients in 126 European centres that received at least one pRBC unit intraoperatively, during a continuous three month period in 2013. Results. The overall intraoperative transfusion rate was 1.8%; 59% of transfusions were at least partially initiated as a result of a physiological transfusion trigger- mostly because of hypotension (55.4%) and/or tachycardia (30.7%). Haemoglobin (Hb)- based transfusion trigger alone initiated only 8.5% of transfusions. The Hb concentration [mean (sd)] just before transfusion was 8.1 (1.7) g dl−1 and increased to 9.8 (1.8) g dl−1 after transfusion. The mean number of intraoperatively transfused pRBC units was 2.5 (2.7) units (median 2). Conclusion. Although European Society of Anaesthesiology transfusion guidelines are moderately implemented in Europe with respect to Hb threshold for transfusion (7–9 g dl−1), there is still an urgent need for further educational efforts that focus on the number of pRBC units to be transfused at this threshold. Clinical trial registration. NCT 01604083. PMID:26787795

  19. Blood Transfusion (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... about getting diseases from infected blood, but the United States has one of the safest blood supplies in ... through a transfusion is extremely low in the United States today because of very stringent blood screening. Also, ...

  20. Hemolytic anemia caused by chemicals and toxins

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - hemolytic - caused by chemicals or toxins ... Possible substances that can cause hemolytic anemia include: Anti-malaria drugs (quinine compounds) Arsenic Dapsone Intravenous water infusion (not half-normal saline or normal saline) Metals (chromium/chromates, ...

  1. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... In some cases, a drug can cause the immune system to mistake your own red blood cells for foreign substances. The body responds by making ...

  2. Phenacetin-induced hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Millar, John; Ploquin, Robert; de Leeuw, Nannie K. M.

    1972-01-01

    The hematological features of phenacetin-induced hemolytic anemia are presented in order to make the physician aware of the abnormalities which suggest the use of an oxidant drug. The presence of bitten out red cells is the commonest initial clue to the existence of drug-induced hemolytic anemia. The diagnosis is confirmed by the demonstration of Heinz bodies and sulfhemoglobinemia. Early recognition of this form of drug-abuse may avert the development or progression of analgesic nephropathy. ImagesFIG. 2 PMID:5016923

  3. [Transfusion and sickle cell disease: axes of transfusion safety optimization].

    PubMed

    Noizat-Pirenne, F

    2014-05-01

    Transfusion remains a major treatment in sickle cell disease. In France, sickle cell disease patients are mainly from Sub-Saharan Africa and West Indies. The immuno-hematological characteristics of these patients of African ancestry induce a short supply of compatible packed red blood cells and an increased rate of haemolytic transfusion reactions, compared to the general transfused population. The optimization of transfusion safety relies on all steps of the transfusion chain. This article aims to describe the current situation in France and to determine the axes of optimization at all steps of the transfusion organization: promotion of donation, preparation of products, taking into account the sickle trait, qualification of packed red blood cells, supply of the blood banks concerned by transfusion of these patients, transfusion protocols and pre transfusion analysis. Research and formation play an important part. PMID:24811565

  4. Ensemble learning approaches to predicting complications of blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Murphree, Dennis; Ngufor, Che; Upadhyaya, Sudhindra; Madde, Nagesh; Clifford, Leanne; Kor, Daryl J; Pathak, Jyotishman

    2015-08-01

    Of the 21 million blood components transfused in the United States during 2011, approximately 1 in 414 resulted in complication [1]. Two complications in particular, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), are especially concerning. These two alone accounted for 62% of reported transfusion-related fatalities in 2013 [2]. We have previously developed a set of machine learning base models for predicting the likelihood of these adverse reactions, with a goal towards better informing the clinician prior to a transfusion decision. Here we describe recent work incorporating ensemble learning approaches to predicting TACO/TRALI. In particular we describe combining base models via majority voting, stacking of model sets with varying diversity, as well as a resampling/boosting combination algorithm called RUSBoost. We find that while the performance of many models is very good, the ensemble models do not yield significantly better performance in terms of AUC. PMID:26737958

  5. Ensemble Learning Approaches to Predicting Complications of Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Murphree, Dennis; Ngufor, Che; Upadhyaya, Sudhindra; Madde, Nagesh; Clifford, Leanne; Kor, Daryl J.; Pathak, Jyotishman

    2016-01-01

    Of the 21 million blood components transfused in the United States during 2011, approximately 1 in 414 resulted in complication [1]. Two complications in particular, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), are especially concerning. These two alone accounted for 62% of reported transfusion-related fatalities in 2013 [2]. We have previously developed a set of machine learning base models for predicting the likelihood of these adverse reactions, with a goal towards better informing the clinician prior to a transfusion decision. Here we describe recent work incorporating ensemble learning approaches to predicting TACO/TRALI. In particular we describe combining base models via majority voting, stacking of model sets with varying diversity, as well as a resampling/boosting combination algorithm called RUSBoost. We find that while the performance of many models is very good, the ensemble models do not yield significantly better performance in terms of AUC. PMID:26737958

  6. Red Blood Cell Transfusion Strategies in Adult and Pediatric Patients with Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Roubinian, Nareg; Carson, Jeffrey L

    2016-06-01

    Anemia in patients with malignancy is common as a consequence of their disease and treatment. Substantial progress has been made in the management of anemia with red blood cell transfusion in acute conditions, such as bleeding and infection, through the performance of large clinical trials. These trials suggest that transfusion at lower hemoglobin thresholds (restrictive transfusion ∼7-8 g/dL) is safe and in some cases superior to higher transfusion thresholds (liberal transfusion ∼9-10 g/dL). However, additional studies are needed in patients with malignancy to understand best practice in relation to quality of life as well as clinical outcomes. PMID:27112994

  7. Chimerism in transfusion medicine

    PubMed Central

    Brunker, Patricia AR

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion therapy is complicated by the production of alloantibodies to antigens present in the donor and lacking in the recipient through the poorly-understood but likely multi-factorial process of alloimmunization. The low prevalence of alloimmunization in transfused patients (6.1%)1 suggests that processes central to immunologic tolerance may be operating in the vast majority of transfused patients who do not produce alloantibodies. Using RhD as a prototype, evidence is reviewed that the ability to make antibodies to red blood cell (RBC) antigens may result in part from immunologic tolerance acquired in utero. These ideas are extended to other examples of maternal microchimerism (MMc) of other non-inherited maternal antigens (NIMA). An evolutionary argument is offered that multi-generational immunity supports the hypothesis that MMc may partly explain the “non-responder” phenotype in RBC alloimmunization. PMID:24196285

  8. Metabolomics in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Nemkov, Travis; Hansen, Kirk C; Dumont, Larry J; D'Alessandro, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    Biochemical investigations on the regulatory mechanisms of red blood cell (RBC) and platelet (PLT) metabolism have fostered a century of advances in the field of transfusion medicine. Owing to these advances, storage of RBCs and PLT concentrates has become a lifesaving practice in clinical and military settings. There, however, remains room for improvement, especially with regard to the introduction of novel storage and/or rejuvenation solutions, alternative cell processing strategies (e.g., pathogen inactivation technologies), and quality testing (e.g., evaluation of novel containers with alternative plasticizers). Recent advancements in mass spectrometry-based metabolomics and systems biology, the bioinformatics integration of omics data, promise to speed up the design and testing of innovative storage strategies developed to improve the quality, safety, and effectiveness of blood products. Here we review the currently available metabolomics technologies and briefly describe the routine workflow for transfusion medicine-relevant studies. The goal is to provide transfusion medicine experts with adequate tools to navigate through the otherwise overwhelming amount of metabolomics data burgeoning in the field during the past few years. Descriptive metabolomics data have represented the first step omics researchers have taken into the field of transfusion medicine. However, to up the ante, clinical and omics experts will need to merge their expertise to investigate correlative and mechanistic relationships among metabolic variables and transfusion-relevant variables, such as 24-hour in vivo recovery for transfused RBCs. Integration with systems biology models will potentially allow for in silico prediction of metabolic phenotypes, thus streamlining the design and testing of alternative storage strategies and/or solutions. PMID:26662506

  9. Possible Risks of Blood Transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Blood Transfusion and Donation + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » TOPICS Document ... Possible risks of blood transfusions Alternatives to blood transfusions Donating blood Blood donation by cancer survivors To learn more References Previous ...

  10. Hemolytic anemia after kidney transplantation: case report and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Frohn, C; Jabs, W J; Fricke, L; Goerg, S

    2002-03-01

    A 58-year-old woman presented with hemolysis and thrombocytopenia 2 weeks after receiving a kidney graft. Hemolytic uremic syndrome was initially suspected, because in addition to hematological changes the graft function was missing. Unexpectedly, the results of the direct antiglobulin test became positive (4+), which is not normally observed in the hemolytic uremic syndrome. Differentiation of the eluted antibodies revealed anti-rhesus D specificity, which had to be interpreted either as an autoantibody of patient's origin or, hypothetically, as a "graft versus host" antibody of donor origin. Gm- and Km allotyping of these antibodies demonstrated a pattern which differed from the patient's but was identical to that of the kidney donor. Therefore hemolysis could be explained unambiguously by "graft versus host" antibodies. Whether the thrombocytopenia was also due to an immune process was not clear, although some evidence favors this hypothesis. Immunosuppressive treatment remained unchanged and several red blood cell transfusions were necessary before reactivity of the direct antiglobulin test diminished and became negative 7 weeks after kidney transplantation. The occurrence of hemolysis in the early posttransplantation period should thus draw attention to the possibility of "graft versus host" antibodies directed against red cells. Concomitant thrombocytopenia may occur. Donor screening for irregular erythrocyte antibodies should be performed whenever solid organ transplantation is intended. PMID:11904742

  11. Transfusion problems associated with transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Storb, R.; Weiden, P.L.

    1981-04-01

    Researchers have reviewed the role of blood transfusions in renal and marrow graft recipients. Striking contrasts are evident: while transfusions may promote successful kidney grafting, any transfusions before initiation of the transplant conditioning regimen may jeopardize the treatment of severe aplastic anemia by marrow transplantation. Researchers have suggested guidelines for the transfusion support of transplant candidates before transplantation and for marrow graft recipients after transplantation. It is important to recognize that after conditioning for marrow transplantation, all patients will be profoundly pancytopenic for a limited period of time, and intensive transfusion support is vital to patient survival.

  12. Ethical issues in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Elhence, Priti

    2006-01-01

    The practice of transfusion medicine involves a number of ethical issues because blood comes from human beings and is a precious resource with a limited shelf life. In 1980 the International Society of Blood Transfusion endorsed its first formal code of ethics, which was adopted by the World Health Organisation and the League of Red Crescent Societies. A revised code of ethics for donation and transfusion was endorsed in 2000. Blood donation as a gift, donor confidentiality, donor notification and donor consent, consent for transfusion, the right to refuse blood transfusion, the right to be informed if harmed, and ethical principles for establishments, are discussed in the international and Indian contexts. PMID:17223681

  13. [Emergence of donor-derived anti-HLA antibody and subsequent transfusion-refractory thrombocytopenia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from an HLA-matched sibling donor in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Yuri; Hoshino, Takumi; Mihara, Masahiro; Mitsui, Takeki; Koiso, Hiromi; Takizawa, Makiko; Yokohama, Akihiko; Saitoh, Takayuki; Uchiumi, Hideki; Handa, Hiroshi; Tsukamoto, Norifumi; Murakami, Hirokazu; Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2013-02-01

    A 45-year-old woman with acute myelogenous leukemia developed platelet transfusion refractoriness (PTR) after the engraftment of an allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) from her multiparous sister, which was attributed to HLA antibodies that could not be detected in the patient's serum before transplantation. She achieved neutrophil engraftment by day 18 and megakaryocytopoiesis and complete donor chimerism was confirmed in the bone marrow on day 21. IgG-class HLA antibodies were detected in her serum on day 24 after PBSCT; however, on day 15, no HLA antibodies were detected. The specificity of the antibodies that emerged in the patient closely resembled that of the antibodies found in the donor. The donor had probably been immunized during pregnancy by their partner's HLA-antigens expressed by the fetus. Consequently, transplanted donor-derived cells provoked HLA antibodies in the recipient early after PBSCT, and those HLA antibodies induced PTR. The presence of HLA antibodies should be examined at least in pregnant female donors whose recipients developed PTR attributable to HLA antibodies after SCT. PMID:23470830

  14. A case of severe chlorite poisoning successfully treated with early administration of methylene blue, renal replacement therapy, and red blood cell transfusion: case report.

    PubMed

    Gebhardtova, Andrea; Vavrinec, Peter; Vavrincova-Yaghi, Diana; Seelen, Mark; Dobisova, Anna; Flassikova, Zora; Cikova, Andrea; Henning, Robert H; Yaghi, Aktham

    2014-08-01

    The case of a 55-year-old man who attempted suicide by ingesting <100?mL of 28% sodium chlorite solution is presented. On arrival in the intensive care unit, the patient appeared cyanotic with lowered consciousness and displayed anuria and chocolate brown serum.Initial laboratory tests revealed 40% of methemoglobin. The formation of methemoglobin was effectively treated with methylene blue (10% after 29 hours).To remove the toxin, and because of the anuric acute renal failure, the patient received renal replacement therapy. Despite these therapeutic measures, the patient developed hemolytic anemia and disseminated intravascular coagulation, which were treated with red blood cell transfusion and intermittent hemodialysis. These interventions led to the improvement of his condition and the patient eventually fully recovered. Patient gave written informed consent.This is the third known case of chlorite poisoning that has been reported. Based upon this case, we suggest the management of sodium chlorite poisoning to comprise the early administration of methylene blue, in addition to renal replacement therapy and transfusion of red blood cells. PMID:25144325

  15. A Case of Severe Chlorite Poisoning Successfully Treated With Early Administration of Methylene Blue, Renal Replacement Therapy, and Red Blood Cell Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gebhardtova, Andrea; Vavrinec, Peter; Vavrincova-Yaghi, Diana; Seelen, Mark; Dobisova, Anna; Flassikova, Zora; Cikova, Andrea; Henning, Robert H.; Yaghi, Aktham

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The case of a 55-year-old man who attempted suicide by ingesting <100 mL of 28% sodium chlorite solution is presented. On arrival in the intensive care unit, the patient appeared cyanotic with lowered consciousness and displayed anuria and chocolate brown serum. Initial laboratory tests revealed 40% of methemoglobin. The formation of methemoglobin was effectively treated with methylene blue (10% after 29 hours). To remove the toxin, and because of the anuric acute renal failure, the patient received renal replacement therapy. Despite these therapeutic measures, the patient developed hemolytic anemia and disseminated intravascular coagulation, which were treated with red blood cell transfusion and intermittent hemodialysis. These interventions led to the improvement of his condition and the patient eventually fully recovered. Patient gave written informed consent. This is the third known case of chlorite poisoning that has been reported. Based upon this case, we suggest the management of sodium chlorite poisoning to comprise the early administration of methylene blue, in addition to renal replacement therapy and transfusion of red blood cells. PMID:25144325

  16. Transfusion support for haemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    Greenwalt, T J; Zelenski, K R

    1984-02-01

    The indications and management of blood transfusion in the haemoglobinopathies have been reviewed. The sickle cell diseases that require transfusion support are sickle cell anaemia, sickle haemoglobin-C and -D diseases and sickle beta-thalassaemia. Homozygous beta-thalassaemia (Cooley's anaemia) is the major problem among the thalassaemias. The pathophysiology of the sickle cell disorders is largely based on the secondary effects of increased blood viscosity, whereas in the thalassaemias the defect is ineffective haematopoiesis. In the former the major problems occur as manifestations of vaso-occlusive crises with disseminated bone and abdominal pain, priapism, stroke and leg ulcers. Bone infarction and aseptic necrosis occur but the widespread bone changes, underdevelopment and haemochromatosis that complicate the thalassaemia are not prominent. Transfusion therapy in the sickle cell diseases is mainly episodic and is guided by the frequency of crises and the severity of vaso-occlusive complications. Partial exchange transfusion and the maintenance of haemoglobin A concentrations at 40 to 50 per cent is frequently indicated. In the thalassaemias, maintenance of haemoglobin levels is essential for normal growth and development. The problem of haemochromatosis is very serious. With hypertransfusion regimens the haemoglobin and haemotocrit are maintained above 12-13 g/dl and 35 per cent. The resulting benefit appears to be reduced blood volume, less iron turnover, and less intestinal iron absorption. The splenomegaly in these disorders is frequently associated with hypersplenism requiring well-timed splenectomy. Chronic and intensive chelation is necessary to prevent the ravages of iron overload. The availability of automated equipment for in vivo and ex vivo blood cell separation has brought new possibilities for improving the management of these haemoglobinopathies. It is feasible, but not as yet practical, to offer transfusions of neocytes (red cells with a mean age of 30 days) which have a 50 per cent longer survival than routine red cell preparations (mean age of 60 days). Neocytes can be prepared ex vivo from fresh routine blood donations using blood cell separator devices. The result is reduced transfusion requirements. A more recent suggestion for using the new technology is to remove the patient's oldest and most abnormal corpuscles on the basis of buoyant density and replacing them with neocytes . Thus the short-lived abnormal red cells would be removed before they could unload their iron. With automation it is possible to perform these procedures on an outpatient basis. PMID:6373080

  17. A Case of Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia after Myxoma Excision and Mitral Valve Repair Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Joo; Kim, Sang Pil; Shin, Ho-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia occurs in a diverse group of disorders, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and prosthetic cardiac valves. Hemolytic anemia also occurs as a rare complication after mitral valve repair. In this report, we describe a case of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia following myxoma excision and mitral valve repair, which was presented as hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:27081450

  18. [Cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia complicated with relapsed myelodysplastic syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hiroshi; Nakane, Takahiko; Fujino, Keizo; Koh, Shiro; Yoshimura, Takuro; Nishimoto, Mitsutaka; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Koh, Hideo; Nakao, Yoshitaka; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Hino, Masayuki

    2015-04-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is known to often be complicated by a range of autoimmune diseases. We herein present a case with MDS complicated by cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia (cold AIHA). The patient was a 51-year-old woman. She was diagnosed with MDS (refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia) in May 2009. In January 2010, she underwent unrelated allogeneic bone marrow transplantation but was re-admitted in October 2010 for treatment of relapsed MDS. Despite daily transfusions of red blood cells, her anemia failed to improve. Her laboratory examinations showed a low haptoglobin level and elevation of indirect bilirubin and LDH. The direct Coombs test was positive at a low and at room temperature and cold agglutinin was negative. After confirming the diagnosis of cold AIHA, all transfusion fluids were warmed but her anemia still failed to improve. In addition to the warmed transfusion fluids, we administered corticosteroids, immunosuppressive agents and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin infusions. This management strategy ameliorated the patient's hemolytic anemia. To our knowledge, MDS cases complicated by cold AIHA are rare. Our patient thus provides a valuable contribution to medical knowledge. PMID:25971272

  19. Cytomegalovirus and blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Barbara, J A; Tegtmeier, G E

    1987-09-01

    The problem of transfusion-transmitted cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection differs from that for other transfusion-transmitted infections in that only patients who are immunocompromised require CMV-free blood or components. The virus is cell-associated and transmission appears to be due to reactivation of latent virus in white blood cells. As a herpes virus, CMV can be responsible for primary infections, reactivations or reinfections in humans. The use of restriction endonuclease techniques is sometimes necessary to pinpoint the origin of infections. Serological studies have shown that CMV infection is worldwide, but seropositivity rates vary widely being highest in underdeveloped countries, rising both with age and lower socio-economic status. Provision of CMV seronegative blood therefore involves considerable administrative as well as laboratory effort and planning, especially if panels of previously tested, seronegative donors are organized. Serious complications of transfusion-transmitted CMV infection (which can occasionally prove fatal) are only seen with immuno-suppressed patients (commonly low birth weight infants or transplant recipients). Prevention or amelioration of CMV infection with appropriate patients can be attempted by reducing the number of white blood cells present in blood or components by filtration or washing, administration of CMV immune globulin or provision of blood found by serological screening to be CMV-seronegative. PMID:2844331

  20. Hemolytic Disease of the Fetus and Newborn due to Intravenous Drug Use.

    PubMed

    Markham, Kara B; Scrape, Scott R; Prasad, Mona; Rossi, Karen Q; O'Shaughnessy, Richard W

    2016-03-01

    Objectives The objective is to present a pregnancy complication associated with intravenous drug use, namely, that of red blood cell alloimmunization and hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Methods An observational case series is presented including women with red blood cell alloimmunization most likely secondary to intravenous drug abuse Results Five pregnancies were identified that were complicated by red blood cell alloimmunization and significant hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, necessitating intrauterine transfusion, an indicated preterm birth, or neonatal therapy. Conclusions As opioid abuse continues to increase in the United States, clinicians should be aware of the potential for alloimmunization to red blood cell antibodies as yet another negative outcome from intravenous drug abuse. PMID:26989567

  1. Hemolytic Disease of the Fetus and Newborn due to Intravenous Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Markham, Kara B.; Scrape, Scott R.; Prasad, Mona; Rossi, Karen Q.; O'Shaughnessy, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective is to present a pregnancy complication associated with intravenous drug use, namely, that of red blood cell alloimmunization and hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Methods An observational case series is presented including women with red blood cell alloimmunization most likely secondary to intravenous drug abuse Results Five pregnancies were identified that were complicated by red blood cell alloimmunization and significant hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, necessitating intrauterine transfusion, an indicated preterm birth, or neonatal therapy. Conclusions As opioid abuse continues to increase in the United States, clinicians should be aware of the potential for alloimmunization to red blood cell antibodies as yet another negative outcome from intravenous drug abuse. PMID:26989567

  2. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by anti-PD-1 therapy in metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Benjamin Y; Micklethwaite, Kenneth P; Swaminathan, Sanjay; Kefford, Richard F; Carlino, Matteo S

    2016-04-01

    We report the occurrence of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient receiving the anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody, nivolumab, for metastatic melanoma in the presence of known red cell alloantibodies, despite having received prior ipilimumab without evidence of hemolysis. The patient had a history of multiple red cell alloantibodies and a positive direct antiglobulin test, identified at the time of a prior transfusion, which occurred before treatment with ipilimumab. The patient developed symptomatic warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia after four cycles of treatment with nivolumab. Clinical improvement was noted following cessation of the drug and treatment with corticosteroids. Given that there was no prior history of hemolysis, even during treatment with ipilimumab, we hypothesize that anti-PD-1 therapy disrupted peripheral tolerance, unmasking an underlying autoimmune predisposition. PMID:26795275

  3. Hemolytic uremic syndrome following Hemiscorpius lepturus (scorpion) sting.

    PubMed

    Valavi, E; Ansari, M J Alemzadeh

    2008-10-01

    Scorpion envenomations are a public health problem in many countries. Scorpions are second only to snakes in causing human fatalities from envenomation. Species of scorpions capable of inflicting fatal stings are living in North and South Africa, the Middle East, India, America, Trinidad, and Tobago. Hemiscorpius lepturus (from the Hemiscorpiidae family) is the most medically important scorpion in Iran which accounts for 92% of all hospitalized scorpion sting cases. The venom from H. lepturus is primarily a cytotoxic agent and has hemolytic, nephrotoxic, and to some extent, hepatotoxic activities. We found a combination of microangiopatic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure in a seven year-old female child who was referred to us with a 12 h history of bloody urine following a H. lepturus sting. Her blood smear showed fragmented erythrocytes and burr cells, leading us to a diagnosis of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). This report highlights the importance of acceptable prophylaxis and therapeutic protocols for HUS in these patients. PMID:20142930

  4. What is autologous blood transfusion?

    PubMed

    Sansom, A

    1993-07-01

    The word autologous is Greek in origin. The definition is exact 'autos' means self and 'logus' means relation. Thus, the meaning is 'related to self'. Autologous blood transfusion, which also is referred to frequently but incorrectly and imprecisely as auto transfusion, designates the reinfusion of blood or blood components to the same individual from whom they were taken. Homologous blood is blood or blood components, from another human donor, taken and stored for later transfusion as required. PMID:8400524

  5. Pulmonary insults due to transfusions, radiation, and hyperoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Duane, P.

    1988-09-01

    Pulmonary insults caused by transfusion, radiation, and hyperoxia share many clinical features with insults caused by serious pulmonary infections. The major objective in evaluating these patients is to establish the diagnosis with as much certainty as possible. Unfortunately, there are no clinical aspects or laboratory tests that are pathognomonic for these diseases; therefore, it is often necessary to rely on a knowledge of those features which help to distinguish these disorders from infectious etiologies. For example, patients suffering from transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) experience onset of insult within 6 hours of a transfusion and have the presence of leukoagglutinins in their serum. Patients with radiation injuries frequently have roentgenographic infiltrates that conform to the ports of radiation. Despite extensive animal and human studies, factors distinguishing hyperoxic injury from infectious disorders remain poorly defined. These clinical features and others are reviewed to identify the essential components in the diagnosis of TRALI, acute radiation pneumonitis, and hyperoxic pneumonitis. 84 references.

  6. [The transfusion card: value, limitations].

    PubMed

    Joussemet, M; Grome, P; Fabre, G

    1992-01-01

    The transfusion-sheet is an important document which appears first in the French legislation on May 1985 the 17. Its aim is to keep a close watch over transfusion of red blood cells, platelet concentrates and fresh frozen plasma and also immunohematologic evolution of data for every patient. In spite of its importance for everyone in charge of transfusion practice (physicians, biologists, transfusion center,...), a lot of problems may be observed in the strict and complete updating of the document. Informatisation of all the steps of the medical and biological practice appears of crucial interest to perfect its use. PMID:1477747

  7. [European Union and blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Rouger, P

    2003-06-01

    Blood transfusion is progressing, Europe is growing, European blood transfusion organisations are developing rapidly. The first step was the publication of a new directive (2002/98/CE). The directive is the result of a compromise between technocracy, lobbying and blood transfusion professionals. European blood transfusion must be based on medical, scientific and social criteria. Two imperatives must be considered: the respect of ethics and; independence from the commercial system. The primary objective is to give satisfaction to patients while respecting blood donors. PMID:12798844

  8. Frequency and Pattern of Noninfectious Adverse Transfusion Reactions at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jooyoung; Choi, Seung Jun; Kim, Sinyoung; Alghamdi, Essam

    2016-01-01

    Background Although transfusion is a paramount life-saving therapy, there are multiple potential significant risks. Therefore, all adverse transfusion reaction (ATR) episodes require close monitoring. Using the computerized reporting system, we assessed the frequency and pattern of non-infectious ATRs. Methods We analyzed two-year transfusion data from electronic medical records retrospectively. From March 2013 to February 2015, 364,569 units of blood were transfused. Of them, 334,582 (91.8%) records were identified from electronic nursing records. For the confirmation of ATRs by blood bank physicians, patients' electronic medical records were further evaluated. Results According to the nursing records, the frequency of all possible transfusion-related events was 3.1%. After the blood bank physicians' review, the frequency was found to be 1.2%. The overall frequency of febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTRs) to red blood cells (RBCs), platelet (PLT) components, and fresh frozen plasmas (FFPs) were 0.9%, 0.3%, and 0.2%, respectively, and allergic reactions represented 0.3% (RBCs), 0.9% (PLTs), and 0.9% (FFPs), respectively. The pre-storage leukocyte reduction significantly decreased the frequency of FNHTRs during the transfusion of RBCs (P<0.01) or PLTs (P≒0.01). Conclusions The frequency of FNHTRs, allergic reactions, and "no reactions" were 22.0%, 17.0%, and 60.7%, respectively. Leukocyte-reduction was associated with a lower rate of FNHTRs, but not with that of allergic reactions. The development of an effective electronic reporting system of ATRs is important in quantifying transfusion-related adverse events. This type of reporting system can also accurately identify the underlying problems and risk factors to further the quality of transfusion care for patients. PMID:26522757

  9. Current understanding of allergic transfusion reactions: incidence, pathogenesis, laboratory tests, prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Fumiya

    2013-02-01

    Non-haemolytic transfusion reactions are the most common type of transfusion reaction and include transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, allergic reactions, febrile reactions, post-transfusion purpura and graft-versus- host disease. Although life-threatening anaphylaxis occurs rarely, allergic reactions occur most frequently. If possible, even mild transfusion reactions should be avoided because they add to patients' existing suffering. During the last decade, several new discoveries have been made in the field of allergic diseases and transfusion medicine. First, mast cells are not the only cells that are key players in allergic diseases, particularly in the murine immune system. Second, it has been suggested that immunologically active undigested or digested food allergens in a donor's blood may be transferred to a recipient who is allergic to these antigens, causing anaphylaxis. Third, washed platelets have been shown to be effective for preventing allergic transfusion reactions, although substantial numbers of platelets are lost during washing procedures, and platelet recovery after transfusion may not be equivalent to that with unwashed platelets. This review describes allergic transfusion reactions, including the above-mentioned points, and focusses on their incidence, pathogenesis, laboratory tests, prevention and treatment. PMID:23215650

  10. [Hemolytic anemia under erlotinib treatment].

    PubMed

    Sakhri, L; Mennecier, B; Quoix, A

    2013-12-01

    Erlotinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor widely prescribed of which the most common sides effects are grade I or II rash and diarrhea. We report two cases of hemolytic anemia (HA) induced by erlotinib. Our two patients were treated with erlotinib after a prior line of systemic platinum-doublet therapy for metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. Both patients presented, shortly after starting treatment with erlotinib, an HA which was fatal for one of them. To our knowledge, this major side effect of erlotinib has not been reported in the literature. We will try through this article to make a literature review of the most important side effects of erlotinib and we will also focus on the HA induced by other molecules used in oncology. PMID:24183296

  11. Transfusion service disaster planning.

    PubMed

    Bundy, K L; Foss, M L; Stubbs, J R

    2008-01-01

    The Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minnesota, recently set forth a directive to develop a Mayo Emergency Incident Command System (MEICS) plan to respond to major disasters. The MEICS plan that was developed interfaces with national response plans to ensure effective communication and coordination between our institution and local, state, and federal agencies to establish a common language and communication structure. The MEICS plan addresses multiple aspects of dealing with resource needs during a crisis, including the need for blood and transfusion medicine services. The MEICS plan was developed to supplement our current local emergency preparedness procedures and provide a mechanism for responding to the escalating severity of an emergency to deal with situations of a magnitude that is outside the normal experience. A plan was developed to interface the existing Transfusion Medicine disaster plan standard operating procedures (SOP) with the institutional and Department of Laboratory Medicine (DLMP) MEICS plans. The first step in developing this interface was defining MEICS. Other major steps were defining the chain of command, developing a method for visually indicating who is "in charge," planning communication, defining the actions to be taken, assessing resource needs, developing flowcharts and updating SOPs, and developing a blood rationing team to deal with anticipated blood shortages. Several key features of the interface and updated disaster plan that were developed are calling trees for response personnel, plans for relocating leadership to alternative command centers, and action sheets to assist with resource assessment. The action sheets also provide documentation of key actions by response personnel. PMID:19845076

  12. What Is a Blood Transfusion?

    MedlinePlus

    ... see "What Are the Risks of a Blood Transfusion?" ) Blood bank staff also screen each blood donation to find out whether it's type A, B, AB, or O and whether it's Rh-positive or Rh-negative. Getting a blood type that ... blood for a transfusion, some blood banks remove white blood cells. This ...

  13. Transfusion-associated bacterial sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, S J; Friedman, L I; Dodd, R Y

    1994-01-01

    The incidence of sepsis caused by transfusion of bacterially contaminated blood components is similar to or less than that of transfusion-transmitted hepatitis C virus infection, yet significantly exceeds those currently estimated for transfusion-associated human immunodeficiency and hepatitis B viruses. Outcomes are serious and may be fatal. In addition, transfusion of sterile allogenic blood can have generalized immunosuppressive effects on recipients, resulting in increased susceptibility to postoperative infection. This review examines the frequency of occurrence of transfusion-associated sepsis, the organisms implicated, and potential sources of bacteria. Approaches to minimize the frequency of sepsis are discussed, including the benefits and disadvantages of altering the storage conditions for blood. In addition, the impact of high levels of bacteria on the gross characteristics of erythrocyte and platelet concentrates is described. The potentials and limitations of current tests for detecting bacteria in blood are also discussed. PMID:7923050

  14. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Children: Mayo Clinic Experience.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Janani; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Jacob, Eapen K; Kreuter, Justin D; Go, Ronald S

    2016-04-01

    We studied 35 pediatric patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia seen at Mayo Clinic from 1994 to 2014. The median age was 10.0 years and 65.7% were males. Most had warm antibodies (80.0%) and some secondary to viral (14.3%) or autoimmune disorders (31.4%). Seven (20.0%) patients presented with Evans syndrome, 3 of whom also had common variable immunodeficiency. The median hemoglobin at diagnosis was 6.1 g/dL and 62.8% patients required red cell transfusions. The severity of anemia was worse among children below 10 years (median 5.5 vs. 7.0 g/dL, P=0.01). Steroid was the initial treatment for 88.5% patients, with overall response rate of 82.7% (68.5% complete, 14.2% partial) and median response duration of 10.7 months (range, 0.2 to 129.7+ mo). After median follow-up of 26.6 months, 8 (22.8%) patients relapsed. Salvage treatments included splenectomy, intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, and mycophenolate mofetil. Infectious complications occurred in 9 (25.7%) patients and 1 patient died of cytomegalovirus infection. Four patients had cold agglutinin disease and 3 (75.0%) responded to steroids. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder in pediatric population and most respond well to steroids regardless of the type of antibody. Infectious complications are common and screening for immunodeficiency is recommended among those with Evans syndrome. PMID:26925716

  15. [Ethics and blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Tissot, J-D; Garraud, O; Danic, B; Cabaud, J-J; Lefrère, J-J

    2013-09-01

    Blood donation is an act of solidarity. Most often, this act is done on a volunteer basis and, depending on countries and circumstances, is not remunerated. The increase in need, the always-greater number of deferral criteria, the safety issues and the changes in the structures of our societies are among the many subjects for ethical debates. Taking these into account, the actors of the transfusion must analyze certain parameters: the value of a donation, the meaning of volunteering, the appropriateness of remunerating the act of giving a part of one's self, no longer as a donation or an expression of altruism and solidarity, but as a commercial act regimented by economic laws. PMID:23916572

  16. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  17. Graft failure due to hemolytic uremic syndrome recurrence.

    PubMed

    Iaria, G; Iorio, B; Anselmo, A; De Luca, L; Tariciotti, L; Ielpo, B; Muzi, F; Lucchesi, C; D'Andria, D; Orlando, G; Del Poeta, G; Poggi, E; Piazza, A; Tisone, G

    2006-05-01

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a severe disease characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. We herein report our experience with a 43-year-old female patient who underwent a second cadaveric kidney transplantation in February 2005, for adult-onset HUS. The first renal transplantation, which was performed in 1996, required removal after 3 weeks for probable recurrence of HUS. The immunosuppressive regimen for the second transplant included basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroids. On postoperative day (POD) 7, she received steroid treatment for an acute rejection episode with improved renal function. On POD 19 due to worsening renal function, a graft biopsy showed HUS recurrence, thus we instituted hemodialysis and then plasmapheresis treatments. At two months after transplantation, the patient continued under plasmapheresis treatment due to clinical evidence of HUS. On POD 80, cytomegalovirus infection was diagnosed and intravenous gancyclovir treatment started for 3 weeks. After 110 days from transplant, a deterioration in renal function was evident: the graft was swollen and painful with Doppler ultrasound showing patency of both the renal artery and vein but, low blood flow. After 2 weeks of hemodialysis, the patient underwent transplantectomy. In adult-onset HUS the recurrence rate reduces graft survival, particularly among patients undergoing second transplantation. PMID:16757250

  18. Lipid peroxidation in the hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, S; Fong, J S

    1978-01-01

    Based on recent evidence of a genetic influence on prognosis (1) and the existence of red cell membrane phospholipid depletion with low or absent serum alpha-tocopherol (2) levels in three children with the Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (H.U.S.), we wish to suggest the existence of an inborn error of antioxident capacity as the basic pathogenetic mechanism in the development of the hemolytic uremic syndrome (H.U.S.). PMID:713892

  19. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Sonani, Rajesh; Bhatnagar, Nidhi; Maitrey, Gajjar

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA), a very infrequent condition which represents a group of disorders in which presence of autoantibodies directed against self-antigens leads to shortened red cell survival. Till date, a very few cases of AIHA in Malaria patients are reported worldwide but still AIHA should be considered a relatively rare cause of anemia in malaria. A 20 year male presented with intermittent fever since seven days and yellowish discoloration of urine and sclera since 5 days. He was transfused three units of blood at a private clinic before one month. On examination, pallor, icterus and spelnomegaly were present. Hemoglobin (Hb) was 3.2 gm% and peripheral smear revealed ring forms of both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. Serum LDH and Serum billirubin (Indirect and Direct) were high. This patient’s blood group was B +ve with positive autocontrol. Indirect Antiglobulin Test (IAT), antibody screening and antibody identification were pan-positive with reaction strength of +4 against each cell. Direct Antiglobulin Test was +4 positive anti IgG and negative with anti C3. He was treated with Artesunate and methylprednisone. Least incompatible, saline washed O Neg and B neg red cells were transfused on the 2nd day of starting treatment. Hb was raised to 6.1 gm% on 4th day. Patient was discharged on 9th day with Hb 7.0 gm% with oral tapering dose of steroids. In the above case, patient was suffering from high grade malarial parasitemia with co-existing autoimmune RBC destruction by IgG auto-antibodies which led to sudden drop in Hb and rise in serum LDH and indirect billirubin. Least incompatible packed red cells along with antimalarials and steroids led to clinical improvement. So far, one case report each from India, Korea, Canada and Germany and one case series report of three cases from India have been reported. Under-reporting or rarity of this phenomenon may be accountable for this. PMID:24014948

  20. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with Malaria.

    PubMed

    Sonani, Rajesh; Bhatnagar, Nidhi; Maitrey, Gajjar

    2013-07-01

    Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA), a very infrequent condition which represents a group of disorders in which presence of autoantibodies directed against self-antigens leads to shortened red cell survival. Till date, a very few cases of AIHA in Malaria patients are reported worldwide but still AIHA should be considered a relatively rare cause of anemia in malaria. A 20 year male presented with intermittent fever since seven days and yellowish discoloration of urine and sclera since 5 days. He was transfused three units of blood at a private clinic before one month. On examination, pallor, icterus and spelnomegaly were present. Hemoglobin (Hb) was 3.2 gm% and peripheral smear revealed ring forms of both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. Serum LDH and Serum billirubin (Indirect and Direct) were high. This patient's blood group was B +ve with positive autocontrol. Indirect Antiglobulin Test (IAT), antibody screening and antibody identification were pan-positive with reaction strength of +4 against each cell. Direct Antiglobulin Test was +4 positive anti IgG and negative with anti C3. He was treated with Artesunate and methylprednisone. Least incompatible, saline washed O Neg and B neg red cells were transfused on the 2(nd) day of starting treatment. Hb was raised to 6.1 gm% on 4(th) day. Patient was discharged on 9th day with Hb 7.0 gm% with oral tapering dose of steroids. In the above case, patient was suffering from high grade malarial parasitemia with co-existing autoimmune RBC destruction by IgG auto-antibodies which led to sudden drop in Hb and rise in serum LDH and indirect billirubin. Least incompatible packed red cells along with antimalarials and steroids led to clinical improvement. So far, one case report each from India, Korea, Canada and Germany and one case series report of three cases from India have been reported. Under-reporting or rarity of this phenomenon may be accountable for this. PMID:24014948

  1. Refractory atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome with monoclonal gammopathy responsive to bortezomib-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Leung, Nelson; Sethi, Sanjeev; Gertz, Morie A; Fervenza, Fernando C

    2015-06-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a relatively rare disorder described by the triad of hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure. Atypical HUS could be genetic, acquired, or idiopathic (without known genetic changes or environmental triggers). Monoclonal protein has uncommonly been reported as a cause of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA). We report a 59-year-old white man who presented with acute kidney injury (AKI) with MAHA and was given a diagnosis of aHUS with monoclonal gammopathy. His kidney function and proteinuria worsened with persistent hemolysis despite eculizumab and later cyclophosphamide and prednisone treatment. He responded well to VRD (bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone) regimen. Renal function, proteinuria, and hemolysis all improved, and he was been in remission for more than 15 months. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful treatment with bortezomib-based regimen for a patient with aHUS and monoclonal protein refractory to eculizumab therapy. PMID:25345382

  2. Evidence Base for Restrictive Transfusion Triggers in High-Risk Patients

    PubMed Central

    Spahn, Donat R.; Spahn, Gabriela H.; Stein, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Liberal versus restrictive red blood cell (RBC) transfusion triggers have been debated for years. This review illustrates the human body's physiologic response to acute anemia and summarizes the evidence from prospective randomized trials (RCTs) for restrictive use of RBC transfusions in high-risk patients. During progressive anemia, the human body maintains the oxygen delivery to the tissues by an increase in cardiac output and peripheral oxygen extraction. Seven RCTs with a total of 5,566 high-risk patients compared a restrictive hemoglobin (Hb) transfusion trigger (Hb < 70 or < 80 g/l) with a liberal Hb transfusion trigger (Hb < 90 or < 100 g/l). Unanimously these studies show non-inferiority, safety, and a significant reduction in RBC transfusions in the restrictive groups. In one RCT mortality was higher in the liberal Hb transfusion group, and in two additional RCTs mortality of subgroups or after risk adjustment was significantly higher in the liberal Hb transfusion trigger groups. Conclusion Strong RCT evidence suggests the safety of restrictive transfusion triggers. As a consequence, an Hb transfusion trigger of <70 g/l is recommended for high risk patients. PMID:26019706

  3. Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemias

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon disorder caused by autoantibodies directed against self red blood cells. It can be idiopathic or secondary, and classified as warm, cold (cold hemagglutinin disease (CAD) and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) or mixed, according to the thermal range of the autoantibody. AIHA may develop gradually, or have a fulminant onset with life-threatening anemia. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. The first-line therapy for warm AIHA are corticosteroids, which are effective in 70–85% of patients and should be slowly tapered over a time period of 6–12 months. For refractory/relapsed cases, the current sequence of second-line therapy is splenectomy (effective approx. in 2 out of 3 cases but with a presumed cure rate of up to 20%), rituximab (effective in approx. 80–90% of cases), and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins, danazol, plasma-exchange, and alemtuzumab and high-dose cyclophosphamide as last resort option. As the experience with rituximab evolves, it is likely that this drug will be located at an earlier point in therapy of warm AIHA, before more toxic immunosuppressants, and in place of splenectomy in some cases. In CAD, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment. PMID:25271314

  4. Blood transfusions and Jehovah's Witnesses.

    PubMed

    Thompson, H A

    1989-04-01

    Jehovah's Witnesses believe that a human must not sustain his life with another creature's blood, and they recognize no distinction "between taking blood into the mouth and taking it into the blood vessels." It is their deep-seated religious conviction that Jehovah will turn his back on anyone who receives blood transfusions (1). Thus, Jehovah's Witnesses regularly refuse transfusions for themselves and their children because they believe the procedure creates a risk of losing eternal salvation. Legally, such refusals are based on the constitutional grounds that the transfusion is an invasion of the right of privacy and a violation of the individual's freedom of religious practice. When courts review these refusals they focus on state interests that outweigh the individual's rights. With an eye toward providing guidance to Texas physicians in dealing with such refusals, this article reviews case law on the subject of blood transfusions and Jehovah's Witnesses. PMID:2727941

  5. Neonatal Sulfhemoglobinemia and Hemolytic Anemia Associated With Intestinal Morganella morganii.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kiera; Ryan, Clodagh; Dempsey, Eugene M; O'Toole, Paul W; Ross, R Paul; Stanton, Catherine; Ryan, C Anthony

    2015-12-01

    Sulfhemoglobinemia is a rare disorder characterized by the presence of sulfhemoglobin in the blood. It is typically drug-induced and may cause hypoxia, end-organ damage, and death through oxygen deprivation. We present here a case of non-drug-induced sulfhemoglobinemia in a 7-day-old preterm infant complicated by hemolytic anemia. Microbiota compositional analysis of fecal samples to investigate the origin of hydrogen sulphide revealed the presence of Morganella morganii at a relative abundance of 38% of the total fecal microbiota at the time of diagnosis. M morganii was not detected in the fecal samples of 40 age-matched control preterm infants. M morganii is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause serious infection, particularly in immunocompromised hosts such as neonates. Strains of M morganii are capable of producing hydrogen sulphide, and virulence factors include the production of a diffusible α-hemolysin. The infant in this case survived intact through empirical oral and intravenous antibiotic therapy, probiotic administration, and red blood cell transfusions. This coincided with a reduction in the relative abundance of M morganii to 3%. Neonatologists should have a high index of suspicion for intestinal pathogens in cases of non-drug-induced sulfhemoglobinemia and consider empirical treatment of the intestinal microbiota in this potentially lethal condition. PMID:26553186

  6. Transfusion medicine as of 2014

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Transfusion of blood components is one of the most common medical treatments, and in spite of the time that has evolved since we started to transfuse blood routinely in the 1930s, there are issues associated with its use that we are still trying to improve. Issues such as when to transfuse and adverse effects associated with the transfusion are fields where new evidence is being generated that ideally should help us to indicate when and what to transfuse to the patients. The recognition that the evidence generated in randomized control trials was not widely applied to guide the indication of the transfusion of blood components has provoked the development of initiatives that try to reduce its unnecessary usage. Those initiatives, grouped under the name of patient blood management, have represented a significant paradigm change, and a growing number of activities in this field are performed in health-care facilities around the world. This article tries to summarize the latest publications in those fields. PMID:25580259

  7. A prospective, active haemovigilance study with combined cohort analysis of 19 175 transfusions of platelet components prepared with amotosalen–UVA photochemical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, F; Osselaer, J; Pierelli, L; Lozano, M; Cid, J; Tardivel, R; Garraud, O; Hervig, T; Domanovic, D; Cukjati, M; Gudmundson, S; Hjalmarsdottir, I B; Castrillo, A; Gonzalez, R; Brihante, D; Santos, M; Schlenke, P; Elliott, A; Lin, J-S; Tappe, D; Stassinopoulos, A; Green, J; Corash, L

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives A photochemical treatment process (PCT) utilizing amotosalen and UVA light (INTERCEPT™ Blood System) has been developed for inactivation of viruses, bacteria, parasites and leucocytes that can contaminate blood components intended for transfusion. The objective of this study was to further characterize the safety profile of INTERCEPT-treated platelet components (PCT-PLT) administered across a broad patient population. Materials and Methods This open-label, observational haemovigilance programme of PCT-PLT transfusions was conducted in 21 centres in 11 countries. All transfusions were monitored for adverse events within 24 h post-transfusion and for serious adverse events (SAEs) up to 7 days post-transfusion. All adverse events were assessed for severity (Grade 0–4), and causal relationship to PCT-PLT transfusion. Results Over the course of 7 years in the study centres, 4067 patients received 19 175 PCT-PLT transfusions. Adverse events were infrequent, and most were of Grade 1 severity. On a per-transfusion basis, 123 (0·6%) were classified an acute transfusion reaction (ATR) defined as an adverse event related to the transfusion. Among these ATRs, the most common were chills (77, 0·4%) and urticaria (41, 0·2%). Fourteen SAEs were reported, of which 2 were attributed to platelet transfusion (<0·1%). No case of transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease, transfusion-transmitted infection or death was attributed to the transfusion of PCT-PLT. Conclusion This longitudinal haemovigilance safety programme to monitor PCT-PLT transfusions demonstrated a low rate of ATRs, and a safety profile consistent with that previously reported for conventional platelet components. PMID:25981525

  8. Electronic health record surveillance algorithms facilitate the detection of transfusion-related pulmonary complications

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Leanne; Singh, Amandeep; Wilson, Gregory A.; Toy, Pearl; Gajic, Ognjen; Malinchoc, Michael; Herasevich, Vitaly; Pathak, Jyotishman; Kor, Daryl J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) are leading causes of transfusion-related mortality. Notably, poor syndrome recognition and underreporting likely result in an underestimate of their true attributable burden. We aimed to develop accurate electronic health record–based screening algorithms for improved detection of TRALI/transfused acute lung injury (ALI) and TACO. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS This was a retrospective observational study. The study cohort, identified from a previous National Institutes of Health–sponsored prospective investigation, included 223 transfused patients with TRALI, transfused ALI, TACO, or complication-free controls. Optimal case detection algorithms were identified using classification and regression tree (CART) analyses. Algorithm performance was evaluated with sensitivities, specificities, likelihood ratios, and overall misclassification rates. RESULTS For TRALI/transfused ALI detection, CART analysis achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 83.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 74.4%–90.4%) and 89.7% (95% CI, 80.3%–95.2%), respectively. For TACO, the sensitivity and specificity were 86.5% (95% CI, 73.6%–94.0%) and 92.3% (95% CI, 83.4%–96.8%), respectively. Reduced PaO2/FiO2 ratios and the acquisition of posttransfusion chest radiographs were the primary determinants of case versus control status for both syndromes. Of true-positive cases identified using the screening algorithms (TRALI/transfused ALI, n = 78; TACO, n = 45), only 11 (14.1%) and five (11.1%) were reported to the blood bank by physicians, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Electronic screening algorithms have shown good sensitivity and specificity for identifying patients with TRALI/transfused ALI and TACO at our institution. This supports the notion that active electronic surveillance may improve case identification, thereby providing a more accurate understanding of TRALI/transfused ALI and TACO epidemiology. PMID:22934792

  9. The hemolytic activity of bracken extracts in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Tjatur Rasa, F S; Saito, T; Satoh, H

    1999-02-01

    This study was conducted to elucidate the hemolytic activity of a new toxic substance in bracken fern. A crude extract (CE) was prepared from the methanol extracts of bracken by the column chromatography. When the CE was injected subcutaneously in guinea pigs, the hemoglobinuria and hemolysis were observed within 6 hr, and 3 days later edema and hemorrhages in the urinary bladder were observed. The CE was then fractionated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and three (HF, BF and CF) of the fractions showed the toxic activities in guinea pigs. The HF caused the hemolysis, whereas both the BF and the CF caused the hemorrhagic cystitis without any hemolytic activities. The HF was further fractionated by the HPLC, resulting of the 3 fractions (HF-I, II and III). The hemolysis was caused only with the HF-II, and HF-II as well as HF did not cause the hemorrhagic cystitis. HPLC analysis revealed that both BF and CF contains braxin B and braxin C, respectively, and both HF and HF-II do not contain braxin A, B or C. These facts suggest that bracken fern contains a new toxic substance (hemolysin) which induces the acute hemolysis in guinea pigs. PMID:10081750

  10. Mount St. Helens' volcanic ash: hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Vallyathan, V; Mentnech, M S; Stettler, L E; Dollberg, D D; Green, F H

    1983-04-01

    Volcanic ash samples from four Mount St. Helens' volcanic eruptions were subjected to mineralogical, analytical, and hemolytic studies in order to evaluate their potential for cytotoxicity and fibrogenicity. Plagioclase minerals constituted the major component of the ash with free crystalline silica concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 7.2%. The in vitro hemolytic activity of the volcanic ash was compared to similar concentrations of cytotoxic and inert minerals. The ash was markedly hemolytic, exhibiting an activity similar to chrysotile asbestos, a known fibrogenic agent. The hemolysis of the different ash samples varied with particle size but not with crystalline silica concentration. The results of these studies taken in conjunction with the results of our animal studies indicate a fibrogenic potential of volcanic ash in heavily exposed humans. PMID:6832120

  11. The role of N-hydroxyphenetidine in phenacetin-induced hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Jensen, C B; Jollow, D J

    1991-10-01

    Phenacetin is well known to cause hemolytic anemia and methemoglobinemia in humans. Early mechanistic studies clearly established a causal role for active/reactive drug metabolites in the process but did not unequivocally identify these metabolite(s) or resolve the question of whether these two hemotoxicities are mechanistically linked. As part of ongoing studies on the mechanism underlying arylamine-induced hemotoxicities, we have recently shown that the arylhydroxylamine metabolites of aniline and dapsone mediate the hemolytic activity of aniline and dapsone, respectively. The present study was undertaken to determine if N-hydroxyphenetidine (PNOH), the known arylhydroxylamine metabolite of phenacetin, is responsible for phenacetin-induced hemolytic anemia. As measured by decreased survival of 51Cr-labeled erythrocytes in rats, phenacetin, p-phenetidine, and PNOH were all hemolytic in vivo, with PNOH being significantly the most potent of the three. In vitro exposure of 51Cr-tagged erythrocytes to PNOH, followed by transfusion into isologous rats, resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in erythrocyte survival, indicating that PNOH is a direct-acting hemolytic agent. Phenacetin and p-phenetidine were inactive. Phenacetin, p-phenetidine, and PNOH all produced dose-dependent methemoglobinemia in rats. In parallel in vitro studies, PNOH elevated methemoglobin levels, p-phenetidine and phenacetin did not. However, attempts to identify PNOH in the blood of phenacetin- and p-phenetidine-treated rats were unsuccessful, despite the use of a highly sensitive analytical method. Hemotoxic concentrations of PNOH were found to be highly unstable in the presence of red cells, though relatively stable in the buffer vehicle alone. Inhibitors of acetylation (p-aminobenzoic acid [PABA]) and deacetylation (bis-[p-nitrophenyl]phosphate [BNPP]), used to alter the cyclic interconversion of phenacetin and p-phenetidine, caused changes in phenacetin hemotoxicity that indicated the hemotoxin was a deacetylated metabolite distal to p-phenetidine. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that PNOH, formed during the metabolic clearance of phenacetin, mediates phenacetin-induced hemolytic anemia and methemoglobinemia through direct toxic actions in the erythrocyte. PMID:1949026

  12. Genetics Home Reference: atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: Kidney Failure: Choosing a Treatment That's Right for You Educational Resources (5 links) Disease InfoSearch: Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome 1 Orphanet: Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome The Merck Manual ...

  13. Refractory IgG Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Treated with Eculizumab: A Novel Application of Anticomplement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Kim; Caplan, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA) is the most common form of AIHA, with corticosteroids in first-line treatment resulting in a 60–80% response rate. Atypical wAIHA and IgG plus complement mediated disease have a higher treatment failure rate and higher recurrence rate. We report a case of severe wAIHA secondary to Waldenström macroglobulinemia with life threatening intravascular hemolysis refractory to prednisone, rituximab, splenectomy, and plasmapheresis. A four-week treatment of eculizumab in this heavily pretreated patient resulted in a sustained increase in hemoglobin and transfusion independence, suggesting a role for complement inhibition in refractory wAIHA.

  14. Hemolytic anemia and methemoglobinemia in a preterm baby as a complication of antenatal intraamnial injection of toluidine blue.

    PubMed

    Mehler, K; Oberthuer, A; Weisshaar, G; Valter, M; Vierzig, A; Eifinger, F

    2013-09-01

    A late preterm infant was born 4.5 h after intraamniotic injection of 90 mg of Toluidine blue to confirm premature rupture of membranes. Due to the fetal exposition to the dye, the entire body of the patient was blue stained and the baby suffered from methemoglobinemia, Heinz' body positive hemolytic anemia and hyperbilirubinaemia requiring exchange transfusion. These complications underline that antenatal exposition of toluidine blue may result in considerable postnatal infant morbidity. Therefore intraamniotic application of toluidine blue should be discouraged. PMID:23519748

  15. How we treat delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Kate; Hoppe, Carolyn; Mijovic, Aleksandar; Thein, Swee L

    2015-09-01

    Transfusion therapy is effective in the prevention and treatment of many complications of sickle cell disease (SCD). However, its benefits must be balanced against its risks, including delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions (DHTR). Not only is the relative rate of alloimmunization higher in patients with SCD than in other patient populations, but attendant risks associated with DHTR are even greater in SCD. Clinicians' awareness of DHTR events is poor because symptoms of DHTR mimic acute vaso-occlusive pain and immunohaematology findings are often negative. Transfusions delivered in the acute rather than elective setting appear to confer a higher risk of DHTR. Management of DHTR in SCD depends on the clinical severity, ranging from supportive care to immunosuppression, and optimization of erythropoiesis. DHTR must be considered in any recently transfused patient presenting with acute sickle cell pain. Meticulous documentation of transfusion and immunohaematology history is key. We anticipate an increase in DHTR events in SCD patients with the increasing use of red blood cell transfusion therapy. PMID:25967919

  16. Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome is a rare condition that occurs only in identical twins while they are in the womb. ... Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) occurs when the blood supply of 1 twin moves to the ...

  17. Discussion on pharmacogenetic interaction in G6PD deficiency and methods to identify potential hemolytic drugs.

    PubMed

    Manganelli, Genesia; Fico, Annalisa; Martini, Giuseppe; Filosa, Stefania

    2010-06-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common form of red blood cell enzymopathy. The disorder has reached polymorphic frequencies in different parts of the world due to the relative protection conferred against malaria. G6PD is a housekeeping X-linked gene encoding the first enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, an NADPH-producing dehydrogenase. Because erythrocytes do not generate NADPH in any other way than pentose phosphate pathway, they are more susceptible than any other cells to oxidative damages. G6PD deficiency is a prime example of a hemolytic anemia due to an interaction between an intracorpuscular cause and an extracorpuscular cause, because in the majority of cases an exogenous agent triggers hemolysis. Hemolysis, in fact, can be caused by exposure to oxidant agents. Although studies performed on epidemiology, genetics and molecular biology have broaden the information on G6pd deficiency, there are still no reliable and validated methods to test drug hemolytic potential in G6PD deficient patients. The review gives an overview of current knowledge on G6pd deficiency and on the methods that have been developed so far in order to identify drugs causing acute hemolytic anemia in G6pd deficiency. Moreover, we discuss the new potential preclinical strategies to assess, in vitro and in vivo, drug hemolytic risks. PMID:20350285

  18. Prevalence and specificities of red cell alloantibodies in transfusion-dependent beta thalassemia patients in Yazd

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, M; JavadzadehShahshahani, H; Moghaddam, M; Taghvaee, N

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple transfusions in thalassemia patients may lead to antibody production against blood group antigens and hemolytic transfusion reaction might occur. In this study, antibody screening test was performed by tube and gel methods to determine the prevalence and specificity of alloantibodies in thalassemia patients. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, overall of 100 thalassemia patients from Yazd thalassemia clinic were recruited from July to September 2013. Two blood samples with volume of 6 ml were collected from each patient for standard tube and gel method antibody screening tests and a questionnaire consisting of demographic, health and blood transfusion status was completed. Results Out of 100 cases, 54 were female (54%) and 46 male (46%). The patients' age mean was 14.97±7.91 years with 2 to 33 years age range. Only 4% (n=4) had developed alloantibodies. (One patient developed dual alloantibody (Anti-C and Anti-D) and three patients developed single alloantibody (Anti-K)).Gel method detected 4 patients with alloantibody but in two patients not detected by the standard tube method. Conclusion The prevalence of RBC alloantibody production in this study was less than most previous studies. Anti-K was the most prevalent alloantibody in thalassemia patients in Yazd. It seems Rh and Kell blood group phenotyping in a newly diagnosed thalassemia patient and selection of matched blood for transfusion is very important. PMID:26131348

  19. Report on errors in pretransfusion testing from a tertiary care center: A step toward transfusion safety

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Meena; Meenia, Renu; Akhter, Naveen; Sawhney, Vijay; Irm, Yasmeen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Errors in the process of pretransfusion testing for blood transfusion can occur at any stage from collection of the sample to administration of the blood component. The present study was conducted to analyze the errors that threaten patients’ transfusion safety and actual harm/serious adverse events that occurred to the patients due to these errors. Materials and Methods: The prospective study was conducted in the Department Of Transfusion Medicine, Shri Maharaja Gulab Singh Hospital, Government Medical College, Jammu, India from January 2014 to December 2014 for a period of 1 year. Errors were defined as any deviation from established policies and standard operating procedures. A near-miss event was defined as those errors, which did not reach the patient. Location and time of occurrence of the events/errors were also noted. Results: A total of 32,672 requisitions for the transfusion of blood and blood components were received for typing and cross-matching. Out of these, 26,683 products were issued to the various clinical departments. A total of 2,229 errors were detected over a period of 1 year. Near-miss events constituted 53% of the errors and actual harmful events due to errors occurred in 0.26% of the patients. Sample labeling errors were 2.4%, inappropriate request for blood components 2%, and information on requisition forms not matching with that on the sample 1.5% of all the requisitions received were the most frequent errors in clinical services. In transfusion services, the most common event was accepting sample in error with the frequency of 0.5% of all requisitions. ABO incompatible hemolytic reactions were the most frequent harmful event with the frequency of 2.2/10,000 transfusions. Conclusion: Sample labeling, inappropriate request, and sample received in error were the most frequent high-risk errors. PMID:27011670

  20. Postoperative early hemolytic anemia due to inverted teflon felt strip after emergency repair for type A dissection.

    PubMed

    Hata, M; Yoshitake, I; Wakui, S; Unosawa, S; Hata, H; Shiono, M

    2012-10-01

    A 39-year-old man underwent emergency surgery for type A acute aortic dissection complicated by paraplegia. However, hemolytic anemia increased significantly due to severe stenosis of the proximal anastomosis one month after surgery. He finally underwent a redo procedure 4 months after the initial operation whereupon it was verified that half of the inner felt strip used for proximal stump fixation had turned up and was protruding into the inner lumen. We report here on a rare case of survival of postoperative early hemolytic anemia due to severe graft stenosis caused by an inverted inner Teflon felt strip without any extra vascular compression. PMID:21766281

  1. A Prospective Study on Red Blood Cell Transfusion Related Hyperkalemia in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Shahzad; Ali Baig, Mahadi; Chang, Christopher; Dabas, Ridhima; Akhtar, Mallika; Khan, Areej; Nemani, Krishna; Alani, Rahima; Majumder, Omran; Gazizova, Natalya; Biswas, Shaluk; Patel, Priyeshkumar; Al-Hilli, Jaffar A.; Shad, Yasar; Berger, Barbara J.; Zaman, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Transfusion-associated hyperkalemic cardiac arrest is a serious complication in patients receiving packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions. Mortality from hyperkalemia increases with large volumes of PRBC transfusion, increased rate of transfusion, and the use of stored PRBCs. Theoretically, hyperkalemia may be complicated by low cardiac output, acidosis, hyperglycemia, hypocalcemia, and hypothermia. In this study, we focus on transfusion-related hyperkalemia involving only medical intensive care unit (MICU) patients. Method This prospective observational study focuses on PRBC transfusions among MICU patients greater than 18 years of age. Factors considered during each transfusion included patient’s diagnosis, indication for transfusion, medical co-morbidities, acid-base disorders, K+ levels before and after each PRBC transfusion, age of stored blood, volume and rate of transfusion, and other adverse events. We used Pearson correlation and multivariate analysis for each factor listed above and performed a logistic regression analysis. Results Between June 2011 and December 2011, 125 patients received a total of 160 units of PRBCs. Median age was 63 years (22 - 92 years). Seventy-one (57%) were females. Sixty-three patients (50%) had metabolic acidosis, 75 (60%) had acute renal failure (ARF), and 12 (10%) had end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Indications for transfusion included septic shock (n = 65, 52%), acute blood loss (n = 25, 20%), non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) (n = 25, 20%) and preparation for procedures (n = 14, 11%). Baseline K+ value was 3.9 ± 1.1 mEq/L compared to 4.3 ± 1.2 mEq/L post-transfusion respectively (P = 0.9). During this study period, 4% of patients developed hyperkalemia (K+ 5.5 mEq/L or above). The mean change of serum potassium in patients receiving transfusion ≥ 12 days old blood was 4.1 ± 0.4 mEq/L compared to 4.8 ± 0.3 mEq/L (mean ± SD) in patients receiving blood 12 days or less old. Sixty-two patients (77.5%) that were transfused stored blood (for more than 12 days) had increased serum K+; eight (17.7%) patients received blood that was stored for less than 12 days. In both univariate (P = 0.02) and multivariate (P = 0.04) analysis, findings showed that among all factors, transfusion of stored blood was the only factor that affected serum potassium levels (95% CI: 0.32 - 0.91). No difference was found between central and peripheral intravenous access (P = 0.12), acidosis (P = 0.12), ARF (P = 0.6), ESRD (P = 0.5), and multiple transfusions (P = 0.09). One subject developed a sustained cardiac arrest after developing severe hyperkalemia (K+ = 9.0) following transfusion of seven units of PRBCs. Multivariate logistic regression showed linear correlation between duration of stored blood and serum K+ (R2 = 0.889). Conclusion This study assesses factors that affect K+ in patients admitted to MICU. Results from the study show that rise in serum K+ level is more pronounced in patients who receive stored blood (> 12 days). Future studies should focus on the use of altered storage solution, inclusion of potassium absorption filters during transfusion and cautious use of blood warmer in patients requiring massive blood transfusions. PMID:25883703

  2. [Blood transfusion in sickle cell disease].

    PubMed

    Santo, D E; Graça, F

    1992-12-01

    Sickle cell disease is a genetic disorder characterized by the presence of hemoglobin S. This hemoglobin has a low affinity for oxygen, allowing a good oxygenation of tissues with low levels of hemoglobin. Therefore, blood transfusions are not necessary to correct basal anemia, but are indispensable in the treatment and prevention of some complications. Detailed indications for blood transfusions are presented, as well as the different types of transfusion usually performed: simple, exchange and hypertransfusion. Finally, reference is made to the preferable blood components to be used, complications related with transfusion, the preventive measures to be taken and the need for a patient's transfusion record. PMID:1293951

  3. Heinz-body hemolytic anemia associated with ingestion of methylene blue in a river otter.

    PubMed

    Narurkar, Neelesh S; Thomas, Jennifer S; Phalen, David N

    2002-02-01

    Heinz-body hemolytic anemia and nephrosis associated with hemoglobinuria were diagnosed in a North American river otter. Fluids were administered, and the signs of renal failure improved immediately. Severe anemia developed, and the otter received a semisynthetic hemoglobin product to maintain the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood until a blood transfusion could be given. Immediate clinical improvement was observed following hemoglobin administration, and adverse effects were not seen. Six days after admission, the otter began to produce its own RBC and recovered without complications. The Heinz-body anemia was determined to be caused by methylene blue that was in the water of minnows consumed by the otter the night before it became ill. Methylene blue is a common ingredient in products used to extend the life of bait fish. Bait fish kept in water treated with methylene blue should not be used as food for fish-eating animals. PMID:11829270

  4. When pure is not so pure: chloramine-related hemolytic anemia in home hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Junglee, Naushad A; Rahman, Saeed U; Wild, Mike; Wilms, Anke; Hirst, Sarah; Jibani, Mahdi; Seale, Jim R C

    2010-07-01

    Worldwide, chloramines are used as the preferred disinfectant for city water supplies. Although they have distinct advantages compared with chlorine and are deemed harmless to the general population, hemodialysis (HD) patients are at risk from chloramine-induced hemolytic anemia. In recent years, this has been highlighted in regional dialysis units but not as frequently in the home HD group. We report on 2 home HD patients who succumbed to severe oxidative hemolysis due to high mains water chloramine concentrations. Both patients were extensively investigated for other cause of anemia before a definitive diagnosis was reached. Delays in diagnosing this uncommon condition can be costly in terms of significant morbidity and excessive usage of recombinant erythropoietin and blood transfusion. Prevention primarily involves enforcing strict water quality control and establishing regular communication with water supply boards and home HD patients. Double (inline) carbon filters should be installed in patient's homes as an effective means for removing high incoming chloramine concentrations. PMID:20618875

  5. Blood transfusion reactions in Malaysian newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Boo, N Y; Chan, B H

    1998-12-01

    A prospective observational study was carried out over a seven month period in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of a large Malaysian maternity hospital to determine the rate of blood transfusion and the incidence of transfusion reactions in newborn infants. During the study period, the rates of blood transfusion was 6.1% (n = 117) of NICU admission or 8.2 per 1,000 live births. The median birth weight of the infants who had received blood transfusion was 1,740 grams (range: 725-4,350), and their mean gestational age was 33.6 weeks (sd = 5.1, range = 24-41 weeks). The median age of infants when they first received blood transfusion was 4.0 days (range: 1-27 days). When compared with infants of birth weight between 3,000 and 3,499 grams, infants of birth weight less than 1,500 grams received significantly higher median number of transfusions per infant, (p < 0.001). The incidence of transfusion reaction was 2.7% (3/110) of all transfused infants or 1.3% (3/223) of all blood transfusions. Febrile nonhemolytic reaction was the only type of transfusion reaction detected during the study period. This study showed that transfusion reactions in newborn infants were not common. PMID:10971978

  6. The platelet as an immune cell--CD40 ligand and transfusion immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, Neil; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Francis, Charles W.; Taubman, Mark B.; Phipps, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery that platelets possess cell membrane, cytoplasmic and secreted forms of the co-stimulatory molecule CD40 ligand (CD40L, also known as CD154) has led to a revolution in the view of this anucleate, differentiated cell fragment, previously thought only to be involved in blood clotting (hemostasis). During the last decade it has become clear that platelets function in innate and adaptive immunity and possess pro-inflammatory, as well as pro-thrombotic properties. They interact not only with other platelets and endothelial cells, but with lymphocytes, dendritic cells and structural cells such as fibroblasts. Soluble forms of CD40L (sCD40L) in the human circulation are almost entirely derived from platelets. Elevated levels of CD40L are associated with clinically important conditions, such as vascular disease, abnormal clotting (thrombosis), lung injury and autoimmune disease. Each year millions of platelet transfusions are given to patients that contain large amounts of sCD40L. sCD40L in the supernatant of stored platelets can induce cytokines, chemokines and lipid mediators by activating CD40 bearing cells. Increased levels of sCD40L in transfused blood are associated with transfusion related acute lung injury, a potentially fatal complication, as well as more common, milder transfusion reactions such as fever and rigors. These effects come under the rubric of transfusion immunomodulation, which postulates that transfusion recipient biology, particularly immune function, is dramatically altered by transfusion of stored allogeneic blood. PMID:19184537

  7. [Clinical aspects of endotheliotropic (hemolytic) nephroangiopathy].

    PubMed

    Renner, E; Cohen, S

    1989-01-01

    Clinical syndromes as hemolytic-uremic-syndrome, thrombotic-thrombocytopenic-pupura and primary-malignant-hypertension not only present multiple clinical but also etiological and pathogenetical common characteristics. Thoenes and John developed in 1980 the unifying concept of endotheliotropic (hemolytic) nephroangiopathy for these diseases which are characterised by pathologic interaction between damaged endothelial cells and erythrocytes. This concept was increasingly discussed and accepted in the literature during the course of the last years. We describe the clinical manifestation of the subgroupes which were defined by Thoenes and John according to the vascular pattern of pathomorphologic intrarenal lesions. It can be shown that the classification based on pathomorphologic findings is very useful for the differentialdiagnostic characterisation and the prognostic evaluation in a given single case. PMID:2482603

  8. A CLASSIFICATION OF NON-HEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCI

    PubMed Central

    Kinsella, Ralph A.; Swift, Homer F.

    1917-01-01

    1. No connection can be demonstrated between grouping of non-hemolytic streptococci based upon fermentation reactions, and grouping based upon immunological reactions. 2. A classification of non-hemolytic streptococci can be effected by studying the complement fixation reactions between the streptococci and their antisera. 3. The arrangement of the streptococci in such a classification depends on the fact that two diverse elements are present in the group. Some strains partake entirely of one of these elements, some entirely of the other, while other strains partake of both. 4. The arrangement is further determined by the fact that among the strains composed of one element there are differences in complexity, some strains being made up of many molecules or features, others having much simpler structure. This gives rise to an inverse ratio between the fixing capacity of a serum and the capacity of the corresponding antigen to be fixed. PMID:19868128

  9. Well being of obstetric patients on minimal blood transfusions (WOMB trial)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Primary postpartum haemorrhage is an obstetrical emergency often causing acute anaemia that may require immediate red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. This anaemia results in symptoms such as fatigue, which may have major impact on the health-related quality of life. RBC transfusion is generally thought to alleviate these undesirable effects although it may cause transfusion reactions. Moreover, the postpartum haemoglobin level seems to influence fatigue only for a short period of time. At present, there are no strict transfusion criteria for this specific indication, resulting in a wide variation in postpartum policy of RBC transfusion in the Netherlands. Methods/Design The WOMB trial is a multicentre randomised non-inferiority trial. Women with acute anaemia due to postpartum haemorrhage, 12-24 hours after delivery and not initially treated with RBC transfusion, are eligible for randomisation. Patients with severe physical complaints are excluded. Patients are randomised for either RBC transfusion or expectant management. Health related quality of life (HRQoL) will be assessed at inclusion, at three days and one, three and six weeks postpartum with three validated measures (Multi-dimensional Fatigue Inventory, ShortForm-36, EuroQol-5D). Primary outcome of the study is physical fatigue three days postpartum. Secondary outcome measures are general and mental fatigue scores and generic health related quality of life scores, the number of RBC transfusions, length of hospital stay, complications and health-care costs. The primary analysis will be by intention-to-treat. The various longitudinal scores will be evaluated using Repeated Measurements ANOVA. A costs benefit analysis will also be performed. The power calculation is based on the exclusion of a difference in means of 1.3 points or greater in favour of RBC transfusion arm regarding physical fatigue subscale. With missing data not exceeding 20%, 250 patients per arm have to be randomised (one-sided alpha = 0.025, power = 80%). Discussion This study will provide evidence for a guideline regarding RBC transfusion in the postpartum patient suffering from acute anaemia. Equivalence in fatigue score, remaining HRQoL scores and physical complications between both groups is assumed, in which case an expectant management would be preferred to minimise transfusion reactions and costs. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00335023, Nederlands Trial Register NTR335 PMID:21162725

  10. Eculizumab in children with hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, David; Smith-Jackson, Kate

    2016-03-01

    Greenbaum et al. report the first prospective trial of eculizumab in pediatric atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. As in adult trials, eculizumab appears effective and no serious safety signals were reported. There is the first suggestion of a dichotomy in response to treatment with a trend toward poorer outcome in those without complement abnormalities. This group, however, had worse renal function at presentation, and it remains to be seen whether this represents true non-response or merely late presentation. PMID:26880449

  11. A Case of Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn due to Dia Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Jethava, Ashif; Olivares, Esperanza; Shariatmadar, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    Anti-Dia is a clinically significant red cell antibody known to cause hemolytic disease of the newborn. Here, we report on a case of mild hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by Dia antibody. The mother had three prior pregnancies with no history of blood transfusion. She delivered a preterm 35-week-old female newborn by cesarean section. The neonate developed anemia and mild icterus on postnatal day five with hemoglobin of 9500 mg/dL and total bilirubin of 10 mg/dL. The direct antiglobulin test on the neonate's red blood cells was positive. The maternal serum and an eluate from the infant RBCs were negative in routine antibody detection tests but were positive using commercially prepared Di(a+) red cells. The neonate was discharged home in stable condition following treatment with erythropoietin and phototherapy. When a newborn has a positive DAT in the absence of major blood group incompatibility or commonly detected RBC antibodies, an antibody to a low frequency antigen such as Dia must be considered. Further immunohematology tests are required to determine presence of the antibody and the clinician must be alerted to closely monitor the infant for signs of anemia and hemolysis. PMID:26682081

  12. Transfusion medicine in trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Murthi, Sarah B; Dutton, Richard P; Edelman, Bennett B; Scalea, Thomas M; Hess, John R

    2011-01-01

    Injured patients stress the transfusion service with frequent demands for uncrossmatched red cells and plasma, occasional requirements for large amounts of blood products and the need for new and better blood products. Transfusion services stress trauma centers with demands for strict accountability for individual blood component units and adherence to indications in a clinical field where research has been difficult, and guidance opinion-based. New data suggest that the most severely injured patients arrive at the trauma center already coagulopathic and that these patients benefit from prompt, specific, corrective treatment. This research is clarifying trauma system requirements for new blood products and blood-product usage patterns, but the inability to obtain informed consent from severely injured patients remains an obstacle to further research. PMID:21083009

  13. Blood transfusion between the wars.

    PubMed

    Schneider, William H

    2003-04-01

    This article examines the introduction of blood transfusion into general practice from the end of the First World War to the Second World War. Developments during most of this period were not the result of new discoveries but rather the spread of ideas and the establishment of donor organizations to secure an adequate blood supply. The identification, testing, and organization of potential donors were done in a wide variety of settings that reflected differences in political and cultural experiences. At the end of the 1930s, with war approaching, the resolution of problems with storage of blood and the discovery of new techniques for separating and storing plasma dramatically changed transfusion practice. Thus, the innovations of the Second World War were very much based on the development of broad donor organizations plus the new technical discoveries that had occurred during the interwar period. PMID:12776438

  14. Transfusion-transmitted parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gagandeep; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2010-07-01

    The transmission of parasitic organisms through transfusion is relatively rare. Of the major transfusion-transmitted diseases, malaria is a major cause of TTIP in tropical countries whereas babesiosis and Chagas' disease pose the greatest threat to donors in the USA In both cases, this is due to the increased number of potentially infected donors. There are no reliable serologic tests available to screen donors for any of these organisms and the focus for prevention remains on adherence to donor screening guidelines that address travel history and previous infection with the etiologic agent. One goal is the development of tests that are able to screen for and identify donors potentially infectious for parasitic infections without causing the deferral of a large number of non-infectious donors or significantly increasing costs. Ideally, methods to inactivate the infectious organism will provide an element of added safety to the blood supply. PMID:20859503

  15. Transfusion-transmitted parasitic infections

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gagandeep; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    The transmission of parasitic organisms through transfusion is relatively rare. Of the major transfusion-transmitted diseases, malaria is a major cause of TTIP in tropical countries whereas babesiosis and Chagas’ disease pose the greatest threat to donors in the USA In both cases, this is due to the increased number of potentially infected donors. There are no reliable serologic tests available to screen donors for any of these organisms and the focus for prevention remains on adherence to donor screening guidelines that address travel history and previous infection with the etiologic agent. One goal is the development of tests that are able to screen for and identify donors potentially infectious for parasitic infections without causing the deferral of a large number of non-infectious donors or significantly increasing costs. Ideally, methods to inactivate the infectious organism will provide an element of added safety to the blood supply. PMID:20859503

  16. The evolving role of the transfusion practitioner.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kristy; Akers, Christine; Davis, Amanda K; Wood, Erica; Hennessy, Clare; Bielby, Linley

    2015-04-01

    Much of the recent work in transfusion practice has shifted to focus on the patient, after efforts over previous decades to ensure the quality and safety of blood products. After the commencement of hemovigilance and transfusion practice improvement programs, the introduction of transfusion practitioners (TP) into health care services and blood centers has continued to increase worldwide. Since this relatively new role was introduced, much work of the TP has focused on patient and staff education, adverse events, transfusion governance, and monitoring of transfusion practices within organizations. The complex nature of the transfusion process makes the TP an integral link in the transfusion chain. Together with hospital transfusion teams and committees, the TP works collaboratively to facilitate the transfusion change management programs and initiatives. Recently, the TP role has evolved to include an emphasis on patient blood management and, to some extent, is shaped by national standards and regulations. These established roles of the TP, together with the ever-changing field of transfusion medicine, provide new opportunities and challenges for a role that is continuing to evolve worldwide. PMID:25634259

  17. Management of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in children

    PubMed Central

    Grisaru, Silviu

    2014-01-01

    Acute renal failure associated with a fulminant, life-threatening systemic disease is rare in previously healthy young children; however, when it occurs, the most common cause is hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). In most cases (90%), this abrupt and devastating illness is a result of ingestion of food or drink contaminated with pathogens that produce very potent toxins. Currently, there are no proven treatment options that can directly inactivate the toxin or effectively interfere with the cascade of destructive events triggered by the toxin once it gains access to the bloodstream and binds its receptor. However, HUS is self-limited, and effective supportive management during the acute phase is proven to be a life saver for children affected by HUS. A minority of childhood HUS cases, approximately 5%, are caused by various genetic mutations causing uncontrolled activation of the complement system. These children, who used to have a poor prognosis leading to end-stage renal disease, now have access to exciting new treatment options that can preserve kidney function and avoid disease recurrences. This review provides a summary of the current knowledge on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of childhood HUS, focusing on a practical approach to best management measures. PMID:24966691

  18. Hemolytic uremic syndrome with mild renal involvement due to Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O145 strain.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Lucía; Apezteguía, Lucía; Piñeyrúa, Cecilia; Dabezies, Agustín; Bianco, María N; Schelotto, Felipe; Varela, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a disorder characterized by the presence of the classic triad: microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal injury. HUS without acute renal failure can be confused with other hematologic diseases. An infantile HUS caused by a Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O145 strain carrying genotype stx2, ehxA, eae subtype β1 is herein reported. The infant did not require dialysis during the acute stage of HUS, evolved favorably, maintained normal blood pressure and normal renal function and had no recurrence until the last control. This could be due to several factors, such as the characteristics of infecting STEC strain and a reduction in host susceptibility to renal injury. This report highlights the regional participation of non-O157 STEC in childhood diseases and the importance of performing active surveillance for all forms of HUS. PMID:25011592

  19. Hemolytic crisis in a G6PD-deficient infant after ingestion of pumpkin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A 8 month-old infant presented with acute onset of severe jaundice, anemia requiring transfusion and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency. The infant did not take drugs, he did not consume fava beans, but fava beans DNA was found on pumpkin he consumed the day before jaundice onset. This is the first case of hemolysis triggered by ingestion of food cross-contaminated with fava beans. PMID:25048415

  20. Hemolytic crisis in a G6PD-deficient infant after ingestion of pumpkin.

    PubMed

    Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Redaelli, Francesca; Gualdi, Valentina; Rizzi, Valeria; Mameli, Chiara; Dilillo, Dario; Fabiano, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    A 8 month-old infant presented with acute onset of severe jaundice, anemia requiring transfusion and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency. The infant did not take drugs, he did not consume fava beans, but fava beans DNA was found on pumpkin he consumed the day before jaundice onset. This is the first case of hemolysis triggered by ingestion of food cross-contaminated with fava beans. PMID:25048415

  1. Clinical Response and Transfusion Reactions of Sheep Subjected to Single Homologous Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Rejane Santos; Minervino, Antonio Humberto Hamad; Araújo, Carolina Akiko Sato Cabral; Rodrigues, Frederico Augusto Mazzocca Lopes; Oliveira, Francisco Leonardo Costa; Zaminhan, Janaina Larissa Rodrigues; Moreira, Thiago Rocha; Sousa, Isadora Karolina Freitas; Ortolani, Enrico Lippi; Barrêto Júnior, Raimundo Alves

    2014-01-01

    Studies in relation to blood conservation and responses to transfusion are scarce for ruminants. We evaluated the clinical manifestations of sheep that received a single homologous transfusion of whole blood, focusing on transfusion reactions. Eighteen adult sheep were subjected to a single phlebotomy to withdraw 40% of the total blood volume, which was placed into CPDA-1 bags and then divided into G0, animals that received fresh blood, and G15 and G35, animals that received blood stored for 15 or 35 days, respectively. Clinical observations were recorded throughout the transfusion, whereas heart rate, respiratory rate, and rectal temperature were assessed at the following times: 24 hours after phlebotomy and before transfusion; 30 minutes, six, twelve, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours and eight and 16 days after transfusion. All groups presented transfusion reactions, among which hyperthermia was the most frequent (50% of animals). Tachycardia occurred most frequently in the G35 animals (50% of them). During transfusion G35 animals presented more clinical manifestation (P < 0.05). Transfusion of fresh or stored total blood improved the blood volume, but transfusion reactions occurred, demonstrating that a single transfusion of fresh or stored blood can cause inflammatory and febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions in sheep. PMID:25544959

  2. Clinical Applications of Hemolytic Markers in the Differential Diagnosis and Management of Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Barcellini, W.; Fattizzo, B.

    2015-01-01

    Several hemolytic markers are available to guide the differential diagnosis and to monitor treatment of hemolytic conditions. They include increased reticulocytes, an indicator of marrow compensatory response, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, a marker of intravascular hemolysis, reduced haptoglobin, and unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. The direct antiglobulin test is the cornerstone of autoimmune forms, and blood smear examination is fundamental in the diagnosis of congenital membrane defects and thrombotic microangiopathies. Marked increase of lactate dehydrogenase and hemosiderinuria are typical of intravascular hemolysis, as observed in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and hyperferritinemia is associated with chronic hemolysis. Prosthetic valve replacement and stenting are also associated with intravascular and chronic hemolysis. Compensatory reticulocytosis may be inadequate/absent in case of marrow involvement, iron/vitamin deficiency, infections, or autoimmune reaction against bone marrow-precursors. Reticulocytopenia occurs in 20–40% of autoimmune hemolytic anemia cases and is a poor prognostic factor. Increased reticulocytes, lactate dehydrogenase, and bilirubin, as well as reduced haptoglobin, are observed in conditions other than hemolysis that may confound the clinical picture. Hemoglobin defines the clinical severity of hemolysis, and thrombocytopenia suggests a possible thrombotic microangiopathy or Evans' syndrome. A comprehensive clinical and laboratory evaluation is advisable for a correct diagnostic and therapeutic workup of the different hemolytic conditions. PMID:26819490

  3. Clinical Applications of Hemolytic Markers in the Differential Diagnosis and Management of Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Barcellini, W; Fattizzo, B

    2015-01-01

    Several hemolytic markers are available to guide the differential diagnosis and to monitor treatment of hemolytic conditions. They include increased reticulocytes, an indicator of marrow compensatory response, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, a marker of intravascular hemolysis, reduced haptoglobin, and unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. The direct antiglobulin test is the cornerstone of autoimmune forms, and blood smear examination is fundamental in the diagnosis of congenital membrane defects and thrombotic microangiopathies. Marked increase of lactate dehydrogenase and hemosiderinuria are typical of intravascular hemolysis, as observed in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and hyperferritinemia is associated with chronic hemolysis. Prosthetic valve replacement and stenting are also associated with intravascular and chronic hemolysis. Compensatory reticulocytosis may be inadequate/absent in case of marrow involvement, iron/vitamin deficiency, infections, or autoimmune reaction against bone marrow-precursors. Reticulocytopenia occurs in 20-40% of autoimmune hemolytic anemia cases and is a poor prognostic factor. Increased reticulocytes, lactate dehydrogenase, and bilirubin, as well as reduced haptoglobin, are observed in conditions other than hemolysis that may confound the clinical picture. Hemoglobin defines the clinical severity of hemolysis, and thrombocytopenia suggests a possible thrombotic microangiopathy or Evans' syndrome. A comprehensive clinical and laboratory evaluation is advisable for a correct diagnostic and therapeutic workup of the different hemolytic conditions. PMID:26819490

  4. [Study on hemolytic mechanism of polyphyllin II].

    PubMed

    Ning, Li-hua; Zhou, Bo; Zhang, Yao-xiang; Li, Xin-ping

    2015-09-01

    To study the hemolytic effect of polyphyllin II (PP II) mediated by anion channel protein and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), in order to initially reveal its hemolytic mechanism in vitro. In the experiment, the spectrophotometric method was adopted to detect the hemolysis of PP II in vitro and the effect of anion channel-related solution and blocker, glucose channel-related inhibitor and multi-target drugs dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and diazepam on the hemolysis of PP II. The scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope were used to observe the effect of PP II on erythrocyte (RBC) morphology. The results showed that PP II -processed blood cells were severely deformed into spherocytes, acanthocyturia and vesicae. According to the results of the PP II hemolysis experiment in vitro, the anion hypertonic solution LiCl, NaHCO3, Na2SO4 and PBS significantly inhibited the hemolysis induced by PP II (P < 0.05), while blockers NPPB and DIDS remarkably promoted it (P < 0.01). Hyperosmotic sodium chloride, fructose and glucose at specific concentrations notably antagonized the hemolysis induced by PP II (P < 0.05). The glucose channel inhibitor Cytochalasin B and verapamil remarkably antagonized the hemolysis induced by PP II (P < 0.01). The hemolysis induced by PP II could also be antagonized by 1 gmol x L(1) diazepam and 100 μmol x L(-1) DHEA pretreated for 1 min (P < 0.01). In conclusion, the hemolytic mechanism of PP II in vitro may be related to the increase in intracellular osmotic pressure and rupture of erythrocytes by changing the anion channel transport activity, with GLUT1 as the major competitive interaction site. PMID:26983211

  5. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Packman, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs. PMID:26696800

  6. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Packman, Charles H

    2015-09-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs. PMID:26696800

  7. Case Report: Severe form of hemolytic-uremic syndrome with multiple organ failure in a child: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Mijatovic, Dino; Blagaic, Ana; Zupan, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is a leading cause of acute renal failure in infants and young children. It is traditionally defined as a triad of acute renal failure, hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia that occur within a week after prodromal hemorrhagic enterocolitis. Severe cases can also be presented by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), toxic megacolon with ileus, pancreatitis, central nervous system (CNS) disorders and multiple organ failure (MOF). Case presentation: A previously healthy 4-year old Caucasian girl developed acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia following a short episode of abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea. By the end of the first week the diagnosis of the typical HUS was established. During the second week the disease progressed into MOF that included ileus, pancreatitis, hepatitis, coma and ARDS, accompanied by hemodynamic instability and extreme leukocytosis. Nonetheless, the girl made a complete recovery after one month of the disease. She was successfully treated in the intensive care unit and significant improvement was noticed after plasmapheresis and continuous veno-venous hemodialysis. Conclusions: Early start of plasmapheresis and meticulous supportive treatment in the intensive care unit, including renal placement therapy, may be the therapy of choice in severe cases of HUS presented by MOF. Monitoring of prognostic factors is important for early performance of appropriate diagnostic and therapeutical interventions. PMID:25075296

  8. Examination of Reticulocytosis among Chronically Transfused Children with Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Kaushal, Megha; Byrnes, Colleen; Khademian, Zarir; Duncan, Natalie; Luban, Naomi L. C.; Miller, Jeffery L.; Fasano, Ross M.; Meier, Emily Riehm

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is an inherited hemolytic anemia with compensatory reticulocytosis. Recent studies have shown that increased levels of reticulocytosis during infancy are associated with increased hospitalizations for SCA sequelae as well as cerebrovascular pathologies. In this study, absolute reticulocyte counts (ARC) measured prior to transfusion were analysed among a cohort of 29 pediatric SCA patients receiving chronic transfusion therapy (CTT) for primary and secondary stroke prevention. A cross-sectional flow cytometric analysis of the reticulocyte phenotype was also performed. Mean duration of CTT was 3.1 ± 2.6 years. Fifteen subjects with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) -vasculopathy had significantly higher mean ARC prior to initiating CTT compared to 14 subjects without MRA-vasculopathy (427.6 ± 109.0 K/μl vs. 324.8 ± 109.2 K/μl, p<0.05). No significant differences in hemoglobin or percentage sickle hemoglobin (HbS) were noted between the two groups at baseline. Reticulocyte phenotyping further demonstrated that the percentages of circulating immature [CD36(+), CD71(+)] reticulocytes positively correlated with ARC in both groups. During the first year of CTT, neither group had significant reductions in ARC. Among this group of children with SCA, cerebrovasculopathy on MRA at initiation of CTT was associated with increased reticulocytosis, which was not reduced after 12 months of transfusions. PMID:27116614

  9. Operative blood transfusion quality improvement audit

    PubMed Central

    Al Sohaibani, Mazen; Al Malki, Assaf; Pogaku, Venumadhav; Al Dossary, Saad; Al Bernawi, Hanan

    2014-01-01

    Context: To determine how current anesthesia team handless the identification of surgical anaesthetized patient (right patient). And the check of blood unit before collecting and immediately before blood administration (right blood) in operating rooms where nurses have minimal duties and responsibility to handle blood for transfusion in anaesthetized patients. Aims: To elicit the degree of anesthesia staff compliance with new policies and procedures for anaesthetized surgical patient the blood transfusion administration. Settings and Design: Setting: A large tertiary care reference and teaching hospital. Design: A prospective quality improvement. Elaboration on steps for administration of transfusion from policies and procedures to anaesthetized patients; and analysis of the audit forms for conducted transfusions. Subjects and Methods: An audit form was used to get key performance indicators (KPIs) observed in all procedures involve blood transfusion and was ticked as item was met, partially met, not met or not applicable. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics as number and percentage Microsoft excel 2003. Central quality improvement committee presented the results in number percentage and graphs. Results: The degree of compliance in performing the phases of blood transfusion by anesthesia staff reached high percentage which let us feel certain that the quality is assured that the internal policy and procedures (IPP) are followed in the great majority of all types of red cells and other blood products transfusion from the start of requesting the blood or blood product to the prescript of checking the patient in the immediate post-transfusion period. Conclusions: Specific problem area of giving blood transfusion to anaesthetized patient was checking KPI concerning the phases of blood transfusion was audited and assured the investigators of high quality performance in procedures of transfusion. PMID:25886107

  10. [Cutaneo-viscero-hemolytic loxoscelism with acute renal failure].

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Flavia V; Dotto, Beatriz; Sesin, Ana M; Prettini, Viviana; Sesin, Jorge; Aliciardi, Enrique; Vergottini, Juan C; Gonzalez, Mauricio

    2008-01-01

    The Loxoscelism is caused by the bite of spider Loxosceles laeta gender, of worldwide distribution. The poisoning can cause lesions dermonecrotic and less frequently a systemic illness that can be fatal. The mechanism of venom action is multifactorial. The characteristic dermonecrotic lesion results from the direct effects of the venom on the celular and basal membrane components, as well as the extracelular matrix. The initial interaction between the poison and tissues, causes complement activation, migration of polymorphic neutrophils, liberation of proteolytic enzymes, cytoquines, aggregation platelet, and blood flow alterations that result in edema and ischemia, with development of necrosis. There is no a definitive treatment for loxoscelism. However, the value of specific antivenom, to decrease lesion size and limit systemic illness even when such administration is delayed. We present a case of cutaneous-visceral loxoscelismo with unfavorable evolution. PMID:20803945

  11. Patient blood management: a fresh look at a fresh approach to blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Liumbruno, G M; Vaglio, S; Grazzini, G; Spahn, D R; Biancofiore, G

    2015-10-01

    The overall use of allogeneic blood transfusions in clinical practice remains relatively high and still varies widely among centres and practitioners. Moreover, allogeneic blood transfusions have historically been linked with risks and complications: some of them (e.g. transfusion reactions and transmission of pathogens) have been largely mitigated through advancements in blood banking whereas some others (e.g. immunomodulation and transfusion-related acute lung injury) appear to have more subtle etiologies and are more difficult to tackle. Furthermore, blood transfusions are costly and the supply of blood is limited. Finally, evidence indicates that a great number of the critically ill patients who are being transfused today may not be having tangible benefits from the transfusion. Patient blood management is an evidence-based, multidisciplinary, multimodal, and patient-tailored approach aimed at reducing or eliminating the need for allogeneic transfusion by managing anaemia, perioperative blood conservation, surgical haemostasis, and blood as well as plasma-derivative drug use. From this point of view, the reduction of allogeneic blood usage is not an end in itself but a tool to achieve better patient clinical outcome. This article focuses on the three-pillar matrix of patient blood management where the understanding of basic physiology and pathophysiology is at the core of evidence-based approaches to optimizing erythropoiesis, minimising bleeding and tolerating anemia. Anesthesiologists and critical care physicians clearly have a key role in patient blood management programmes are and should incorporate its principles into clinical practice-based initiatives that improve patient safety and clinical outcomes. PMID:25311950

  12. Indications and organisational methods for autologous blood transfusion procedures in Italy: results of a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Catalano, Liviana; Campolongo, Alessandra; Caponera, Maurizio; Berzuini, Alessandra; Bontadini, Andrea; Furlò, Giuseppe; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Liumbruno, Giancarlo M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pre-operative donation of autologous blood is a practice that is now being abandoned. Alternative methods of transfusing autologous blood, other than predeposited blood, do however play a role in limiting the need for transfusion of allogeneic blood. This survey of autologous blood transfusion practices, promoted by the Italian Society of Transfusion Medicine and Immunohaematology more than 2 years after the publication of national recommendations on the subject, was intended to acquire information on the indications for predeposit in Italy and on some organisational aspects of the alternative techniques of autotransfusion. Materials and methods A structured questionnaire consisting of 22 questions on the indications and organisational methods of autologous blood transfusion was made available on a web platform from 15 January to 15 March, 2013. The 232 Transfusion Services in Italy were invited by e-mail to complete the online survey. Results Of the 232 transfusion structures contacted, 160 (69%) responded to the survey, with the response rate decreasing from the North towards the South and the Islands. The use of predeposit has decreased considerably in Italy and about 50% of the units collected are discarded because of lack of use. Alternative techniques (acute isovolaemic haemodilution and peri-operative blood salvage) are used at different frequencies across the country. Discussion The data collected in this survey can be considered representative of national practice; they show that the already very limited indications for predeposit autologous blood transfusion must be adhered to even more scrupulously, also to avoid the notable waste of resources due to unused units. Users of alternative autotransfusion techniques must be involved in order to gain a full picture of the degree of use of such techniques; multidisciplinary agreement on the indications for their use is essential in order for these indications to have an effective role in “patient blood management” programmes. PMID:25350961

  13. Atypical Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Rafiq, Arsalan; Tariq, Hassan; Abbas, Naeem; Shenoy, Roopalekha

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 59 Final Diagnosis: Atyipcal hemolytic uremic syndrome Symptoms: Delirium • headache Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Hematology Objective: Rare disease Background: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disease characterized by hemolysis, thrombocytopenia, and renal dysfunction. It is a disease related to genetic mutations in the alternative complement pathway and has a distinct pathophysiology but is difficult to differentiate from other thrombotic microangiopathies. Case Report: We present a case of a 59-year-old female patient who presented with accelerated hypertension, acute renal failure, hemolysis, and encephalopathy. She was managed with antihypertensive medication, but her encephalopathy did not improve. Evaluation resulted in our impression of the disease being atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The patient continued to be managed with good blood pressure control and later was started on eculizumab, but evaluation of response to therapy was hindered by the patient’s non-compliance with therapy and follow-up appointments. Conclusions: We have a very limited understanding of the genetics and epidemiology of atypical HUS, and the overlapping clinical features sometimes delay diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment of this rare disease. PMID:25708146

  14. No CLL transmission through blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Landgren, Ola

    2015-10-22

    In this issue of Blood, Hjalgrim et al used the Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions (SCANDAT2) database, which includes comprehensive information on donors and recipients of >20 million blood products handled by the Danish and Swedish blood banks between 1968 and 2010, to address the clinically relevant question of whether chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is transmitted through blood transfusions. PMID:26494921

  15. Psychrobacter arenosus bacteremia after blood transfusion, France.

    PubMed

    Caspar, Yvan; Recule, Christine; Pouzol, Patricia; Lafeuillade, Bruno; Mallaret, Marie-Reine; Maurin, Max; Croize, Jacques

    2013-07-01

    We report a case of transfusion-associated bacteremia caused by Psychrobacter arenosus. This psychrotolerant bacterium was previously isolated in 2004 from coastal sea ice and sediments in the Sea of Japan, but not from humans. P. arenosus should be considered a psychrotolerant bacterial species that can cause transfusion-transmitted bacterial infections. PMID:23764120

  16. Review of neonatal red cell transfusion practices.

    PubMed

    Luban, N L

    1994-09-01

    In the United States in 1991, 290,000 or 7.1% of the 4,110,907 live births were premature infants; 53,299 or 1.3% were infants with birth weights of less than 1500 grams. Many if not all of these very low birth weight infants will require red blood cell transfusions for one of several reasons. These include exchange transfusions for hyperbilirubinemia, but most often transfusions are simple small volume transfusion also called 'topper' transfusions. Most of these small volume transfusions are given for iatrogenic blood loss or 'bleeding into the laboratory.' Studies have demonstrated that the sicker the infant, the more blood sampling is needed and the greater the exposure to red blood cell (RBC), platelet and plasma products. Simple RBC transfusions may also be given for specific clinical indications or to maintain a predetermined hemoglobin concentration. This manuscript will review the criteria for RBC transfusion in neonates and selection of product as regards anticoagulant and specialized processing. In addition, the results of recombinant erythropoietin (r-EPO) clinical trials in neonates will be discussed. PMID:7819817

  17. Reducing transfusion requirements in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Donohue, Ciara I; Mallett, Susan V

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) was historically associated with massive blood loss and transfusion. Over the past two decades transfusion requirements have reduced dramatically and increasingly transfusion-free transplantation is a reality. Both bleeding and transfusion are associated with adverse outcomes in LT. Minimising bleeding and reducing unnecessary transfusions are therefore key goals in the perioperative period. As the understanding of the causes of bleeding has evolved so too have techniques to minimize or reduce the impact of blood loss. Surgical “piggyback” techniques, anaesthetic low central venous pressure and haemodilution strategies and the use of autologous cell salvage, point of care monitoring and targeted correction of coagulopathy, particularly through use of factor concentrates, have all contributed to declining reliance on allogenic blood products. Pre-emptive management of preoperative anaemia and adoption of more restrictive transfusion thresholds is increasingly common as patient blood management (PBM) gains momentum. Despite progress, increasing use of marginal grafts and transplantation of sicker recipients will continue to present new challenges in bleeding and transfusion management. Variation in practice across different centres and within the literature demonstrates the current lack of clear transfusion guidance. In this article we summarise the causes and predictors of bleeding and present the evidence for a variety of PBM strategies in LT. PMID:26722645

  18. [Blood transfusion: the challenges for tomorrow?].

    PubMed

    Folléa, Gilles; Garraud, Olivier; Tiberghien, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    As any therapeutic means, blood transfusion requires regular evaluation, particularly for its indications, effectiveness and risks. The availability of randomized clinical trials, the evolution of the quality of blood components, and the economic constraints shared by all countries, all lead to rethink both transfusion therapy as a whole and the organization of the transfusion chain from donor to recipient. The main tools available to improve transfusion and the transfusion chain management are the following: programs of patient blood management (PBM) to optimize the use of blood products with a patient centred approach, blood supply management tools to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the transfusion chain, donor management tools to adapt donor collections to the patients' needs in compliance with safety requirements for patients and donors, and coordination of these activities. A better understanding of these tools and their implementation will certainly be major challenges for transfusion medicine in the near future. Integrating these evolutions in regulations through the revision of the European Directives on blood and blood components (the review process is expected to be launched in 2015) should enroll them in the long term, for the benefit of patients, donors and all other stakeholders involved in the transfusion chain. PMID:25578549

  19. Generation of hemolytic activity in ozone-treated phosphatidylcholine

    SciTech Connect

    Butterman, J.; Chan, P.C.; Kesner, L.

    1987-04-01

    When liposomes prepared from purified soybean phosphatidylcholine were treated with ozone, at least two types of hemolytic agents were formed. One type was stable at 0 degree C but was destroyed rapidly at 37 degrees C. A second type was evolved during storage of ozone-treated phosphatidylcholine at 37 degrees C in the absence of EDTA. This study is concerned mainly with the heat-labile type. The hemolytic activity was not associated with lipid hydroperoxides. A number of substances were shown to inhibit the hemolytic activity and these may be divided into two classes. The first included cysteine, polyamines, n-heptylamine, semicarbazide, and tryptophan. Preincubation of the ozone-treated phosphatidylcholine was necessary with a Class 1 inhibitor, presumably for the interaction of the inhibitor with a functional group of the hemolytic agents. The Class II inhibitors, including BHT and vitamin C, required no preincubation. These possibly abolished the hemolytic activity by scavenging free radicals in the process.

  20. Blood platelet kinetics and platelet transfusion.

    PubMed

    Aster, Richard H

    2013-11-01

    The discovery of citrate anticoagulant in the 1920s and the development of plastic packs for blood collection in the 1960s laid the groundwork for platelet transfusion therapy on a scale not previously possible. A major limitation, however, was the finding that platelet concentrates prepared from blood anticoagulated with citrate were unsuitable for transfusion because of platelet clumping. We found that this could be prevented by simply reducing the pH of platelet-rich plasma to about 6.5 prior to centrifugation. We used this approach to characterize platelet kinetics and sites of platelet sequestration in normal and pathologic states and to define the influence of variables such as anticoagulant and ABO incompatibility on post-transfusion platelet recovery. The "acidification" approach enabled much wider use of platelet transfusion therapy until alternative means of producing concentrates suitable for transfusion became available. PMID:24177466

  1. Effect of Blood Donor Characteristics on Transfusion Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chassé, Michaël; McIntyre, Lauralyn; English, Shane W; Tinmouth, Alan; Knoll, Greg; Wolfe, Dianna; Wilson, Kumanan; Shehata, Nadine; Forster, Alan; van Walraven, Carl; Fergusson, Dean A

    2016-04-01

    Optimal selection of blood donors is critical for ensuring the safety of blood products. The current selection process is concerned principally with the safety of the blood donor at the time of donation and of the recipient at the time of transfusion. Recent evidence suggests that the characteristics of the donor may affect short- and long-term transfusion outcomes for the transfused recipient. We conducted a systematic review with the primary objective of assessing the association between blood donor characteristics and red blood cell (RBC) transfusion outcomes. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central databases and performed manual searches of top transfusion journals for all available prospective and retrospective studies. We described study characteristics, methodological quality, and risk of bias and provided study-level effect estimates and, when appropriate, pooled estimates with 95% confidence intervals using the Mantel-Haenszel or inverse variance approach. The overall quality of the evidence was graded using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. From 6121 citations identified by our literature search, 59 studies met our eligibility criteria (50 observational, 9 interventional). We identified the evaluation of association of 17 donor characteristics on RBC transfusion outcome. The risk of bias and confounding of the included studies was high. The quality of evidence was graded as very low to low for all 17 donor characteristics. Potential associations were observed for donor sex with reduced survival at 90 days and 6 months in male recipients that receive donated blood from females (hazard ratio 2.60 [1.09, 6.20] and hazard ratio 2.40 [1.10, 5.24], respectively; n = 1), Human Leukocyte Antigen - antigen D Related (HLA-DR) selected transfusions (odds ratio [OR] 0.39 [0.15, 0.99] for the risk of transplant alloimmunization, n = 9), presence of antileukocyte antibodies (OR 5.84 [1.66, 20.59] for risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury, n = 4), and donor RBC antigens selection (OR 0.20 [0.08, 0.52] for risk of alloimmunization, n = 4). Based on poor quality evidence, positive antileukocyte antibodies, female donor to male recipients, HLA-DR selected RBC transfusion, or donor RBC antigen selection may affect RBC transfusion outcome. Our findings that donor characteristics may be associated with transfusion outcomes warrant establishing vein-to-vein data infrastructure to allow for large robust evaluations. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42013006726. PMID:26920039

  2. Postpartum hemolytic uremic syndrome in a 17-year-old Filipina primigravid.

    PubMed

    Anacleto, Francisco E; Cifra, Christina L; Elises, Joel S

    2003-12-01

    A 17-year-old Filipina primigravid developed acute renal failure secondary to hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) after undergoing emergency cesarean section for severe pre-eclampsia and abruptio placenta. She underwent hemodialysis with concurrent infusions of fresh-frozen plasma and packed red cells for 5 weeks. Renal biopsy revealed findings consistent with HUS with glomerular crescents. She received three doses of pulse methylprednisolone followed by oral prednisone. Renal function improved 5 weeks after the onset of HUS. The pathogenesis, differential diagnosis, and treatment options of postpartum HUS are discussed. PMID:14564496

  3. The transfusion medicine we want

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Associação Brasileira de Hematologia e Hemoterapia (ABHH), through its Board of Directors, hosted a national symposium called "Forum: The Transfusion Medicine we want", to discuss proposed policies and techniques related to the area. This meeting was held in São Paulo on August 19 and 20, 2010, with the participation of experts, authorities and representatives of organized groups of patients and users. The discussions were organized around three specific issues selected from over 100 suggestions sent to the ABHH through public consultation on the web: 1. Strategies; 2. Financing; 3. Blood products. A plenary session, held at the end of the meeting, adopted recommendations that are relevant to the different discussion topics. This document contains actions proposed by the ABHH to meet the demands discussed. PMID:23284248

  4. Hemostatic Function and Transfusion Efficacy of Apheresis Platelet Concentrates Treated with Gamma Irradiation in Use for Thrombocytopenic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mei; Xu, Wei; Wang, Bao-Long; Su, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background During the transfusion of blood components, the transfer of allogeneic donor white blood cells (WBCs) can mediate transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD). To minimize the reaction, exposure of blood products to gamma irradiation is currently the standard of care. The aim of our study was to evaluate and compare hemostatic function, transfusion efficacy, and safety of gamma-irradiated single-donor apheresis platelet concentrates (PCs) and of conventional non-irradiated PCs in patients with chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. Methods 20 double-dose single-donor leukoreduced PCs were split in two identical units; one was gamma-irradiated with 25 Gy (study arm A) and the other remains non-irradiated (study arm B). Both units were stored under equal conditions. Hematologic patients were randomly assigned to receive gamma-irradiated or conventional non-irradiated PCs. Hemostatic function was evaluated by thrombelastography (TEG). TEG measurements were taken pre transfusion and 1 and 24 h post transfusion. TEG profiles were measured, noting the time to initiate clotting (R), the angle of clot formation (α), and the maximum amplitude (clot strength (MA)). Whole blood samples were collected from these thrombocytopenic patients at 1 and 24 h for PLT count increments (CIs) and corrected count increments (CCIs) with assessments of transfusion efficacy. Time to next PLT transfusion, transfusion requirement of RBCs, active bleeding, and adverse events (AEs), were analyzed. Results No differences could be found in hemostatic function parameters (MA, R, and α) between study arms A and B (all p values > 0.096) pre transfusion as well as 1 and 24 h post transfusion. No differences between study arms A and B were observed for mean (± standard deviation (SD)) 1-hour CCI (12.83 ± 6.33 vs. 11.59 ± 5.97) and 24-hour CCI (6.56 ± 4.10 vs. 5.76 ± 4.05). Mean 1-hour CI and 24-hour CI were not significantly different in both study arms (p = 0.254 and p = 0.242 respectively). Median time to the next PC transfusion after study PC was not significantly different between groups: (2.4 vs. 2.2 days, p = 0.767). No differences could be found in transfusion requirement of red blood cells (p = 0.744) between both study arms. There were also no regarding bleeding, adverse events, and acute transfusion reaction(s). Conclusions This study confirms safety of gamma-irradiated PCs for treatment thrombocytopenia. Hemostatic function, transfusion efficacy, bleeding, and safety of single-donor apheresis PCs treated with gamma irradiation versus untreated control PCs are comparable. PMID:25053932

  5. [New concepts about hemolytic-uremic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Urízar, R; Cerda, J; Muñoz, R; Largent, J; Saieh, C

    1991-01-01

    According to the heterogenous nature of hemolytic uremic syndrome in relation to the etiology, pathophysiology, treatment and diagnosis, we wish to draw attention to the main characteristics about its epidemiological clinical and immunopathological aspects. The HUS's distributes through all the world, but in Argentina, North of Europe, South Africa and west of USA the incidence is higher than the rest of the countries. The immunopathological studies shows thrombotic angiopathic lesion, consisting in generalized alteration of the capillary and arteriolar epithelium. Decreased levels of PGI2, Von Willebrand's factor and bacterial toxins are apparently involved among mechanism that are able to produce HUS. Dialysis is one of the main helps in the treatment of HUS, and in spite of our continued advances in knowledge about this disease, still further developments are needed in pathophysiology and therapeutics to enlight its intimate mechanisms. PMID:1844006

  6. Infantile cytomegalovirus-associated autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Murray, J C; Bernini, J C; Bijou, H L; Rossmann, S N; Mahoney, D H; Morad, A B

    2001-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a hematologic disorder that is rarely seen in infants and young children. Most cases are associated with viral or bacterial infection, but the immunologic events leading to hemolysis are poorly understood. We describe two infants with severe cytomegalovirus (CMV)-associated warm antibody AIHA. One case was immunohematologically analyzed and showed suggestive evidence that endogenous anti-CMV IgG antibodies were the pathogenic antibodies leading to hemolysis, implicating a possible causal relationship between AIHA and CMV infection. Both patients were ultimately treated with intravenous CMV immune globulin, with subsequent improvement. These cases suggest that investigation for the presence of CMV in infantile AIHA is warranted and that CMV immune globulin should be considered as a therapeutic option. PMID:11464992

  7. Platelet transfusion goals in oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Ross M; Josephson, Cassandra D

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advances in platelet component preparation and transfusion support over the years, platelet products remain a limited resource due to their short (5 day) shelf life, and therefore their optimal use in the non-bleeding thrombocytopenic patient continue to draw much attention. There have been a number of national and international guidelines for platelet transfusion therapy in patients with hematologic diseases, some within the last 1-2 years that have incorporated key randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which address issues, such as the optimal platelet dose, the most appropriate threshold for prophylactic platelet transfusions, and whether prophylactic platelet transfusions are superior to therapeutic-only platelet transfusion practices for the prevention life-threatening bleeding in patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. This review highlights key RCTs and recent systematic reviews focused on optimal platelet transfusion therapy in adult and pediatric patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia secondary to chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), discuss how recent innovations in platelet component processing may affect transfusion efficiency, and introduce renewed concepts on adjuvant therapies to prevent bleeding in the hypoproliferative thrombocytopenic patient. PMID:26637759

  8. Autologous blood transfusion for elective surgery.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, M D; Janu, M R; Davies, V J; Wedderburn, C E

    1986-04-14

    Between September 1983 and June 1985, 336 patients were assessed by the Autologous Blood Transfusion Service; 267 men, mean age, 65 (range, 16-75) years, and 40 women, mean age, 63 (range, 40-70) years, participated in the programme (29 patients were excluded as unsuitable). Orthopaedic and vascular surgery accounted for 80% of the cases. Complications were minor even in this elderly group. Surgical and transfusion details for a one-month period were studied retrospectively. Of the surgical cases that required crossmatched blood, 50% were for "emergency" and "burn" surgery, and 50% for elective surgery. Forty-five per cent of this latter group were unsuitable as autologous donors, 21% had participated in the autologous blood transfusion programme, and an additional 34% were deemed to be suitable donors. The realistic upper limits of our autologous blood transfusion programme were determined as being 55% of elective cases that require crossmatched blood. To be efficient an autologous blood transfusion service must be incorporated into an existing homologous blood transfusion service and must complement, rather than replace, homologous blood transfusion. PMID:3959965

  9. [Successful second cord blood transplantation (CBT) for late graft failure associated with several immune disorders after the initial CBT in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Mori, Minako; Yonezawa, Akihito; Kitagawa, Tomoya; Sasaki, Yuya; Onaka, Takashi; Imada, Kazunori

    2015-07-01

    A 64-year-old woman underwent reduced-intensity conditioning cord blood transplantation (RIC-CBT) for refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A 6/6 antigen-level HLA-identical cord blood from a male infant was transfused. After successful engraftment with complete donor chimerism, the patient developed mixed chimera (XX 8.8%) on day 82. Tapering of tacrolimus was started on day 96. Bone marrow chimerism analysis showed a decreasing recipient cell population (XX 2.2%) on day 117 and tacrolimus was discontinued with no clinical signs of GVHD on day 123. However, pancytopenia with agranulocytosis was detected on day 138. She was diagnosed as having secondary graft failure associated with Coombs-positive immune hemolytic anemia and immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). At the same time, the percentage of recipient T cell chimerism in peripheral blood was about 50% and the B cell population showed lambda light chain restriction. On day 180, she received a second RIC-CBT due to lack of improvement of agranulocytosis. A single dose of rituximab was administered on day - 11 before the second CBT to eliminate the activated B cells. Prompt neutrophil engraftment was achieved and both hemolytic anemia and ITP also showed resolution. She is currently well (30 months after the second CBT), showing normal blood cell counts and complete second donor chimerism of marrow cells. PMID:26251154

  10. Quality of transfusion products in blood banking.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Capuzzo, Enrico; Turdo, Rosalia; Glingani, Claudia

    2014-03-01

    The primary goal in transfusion medicine and cellular therapies is to promote high standards of quality and produce ever safer and more efficacious products. The establishment of a transfusion service quality management system, which includes several organizational structures, responsibilities, policies, processes, procedures, and resources, is now mandatory and widely regulated worldwide. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the quality system in transfusion medicine as applied to the production of blood components, including red blood cells, platelets, and fresh frozen plasma. PMID:24474089

  11. [Blood transfusion and supply chain management safety].

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Jean-François; Caldani, Cyril; Cabaud, Jean-Jacques; Chavarin, Patricia; Rochette-Eribon, Sandrine

    2015-02-01

    The level of safety attained in blood transfusion now makes this a discipline better managed care activities. This was achieved both by scientific advances and policy decisions regulating and supervising the activity, as well as by the quality system, which we recall that affects the entire organizational structure, responsibilities, procedures, processes and resources in place to achieve quality management. So, an effective quality system provides a framework within which activities are established, performed in a quality-focused way and continuously monitored to improve outcomes. This system quality has to irrigate all the actors of the transfusion, just as much the establishments of blood transfusion than the health establishments. PMID:25578550

  12. Iron deficiency and hemolytic anemia reversed by ventricular septal myectomy

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Steven M.; Cable, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia has been reported to occur in the setting of aortic stenosis and prosthetic heart valves, but much more rarely in association with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Of the few descriptions of hemolytic anemia secondary to HC, all but one case involved bacterial endocarditis contributing to left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. We present the case of a 67-year-old man with recurrent hemolytic anemia and HC, without infective endocarditis. Attempts at iron repletion and augmentation of beta-blocker therapy proved his anemia to be refractory to medical management. Ventricular septal myectomy led to the resolution of hemolysis, anemia, and its coexisting symptoms. PMID:26424952

  13. Blood Donation and Transfusion: A Primer for Health Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felts, W. Michael; Glascoff, Mary A.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a primer for health educators about blood donation and transfusion, examining the nature of human blood, the background of blood transfusion, blood donation criteria, risks related to homologous blood transfusion, directed blood donation, potential alternatives to homologous transfusion, and resources for education on the subject. (SM)

  14. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  15. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  16. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  17. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  18. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  19. Successful treatment of neonatal atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome with C5 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Anastaze Stelle, K; Gonzalez, E; Wilhelm-Bals, A; Michelet, P-R; Korff, C M; Parvex, P

    2016-03-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is rare in neonates. We report the case of atypical HUS (aHUS) revealed by neonatal seizures. This 18-day-old baby presented with repeated clonus of the left arm and eye deviation. Four days earlier, she had suffered from gastroenteritis (non-bloody diarrhea and vomiting without fever). Her work-up revealed hemolytic anemia (120g/L), thrombocytopenia (78g/L), and impaired renal function (serum creatinine=102μmol/L) compatible with the diagnosis of HUS. Levels of C3 and C4 in the serum were normal. Shiga-toxin in the stools as well as the IgM and IgG against Escherichia coli O157 were negative. ADAMTS 13 deficiency, inborn error of the cobalamin pathway, deficiency in the H and I protein, and factor H antibodies were excluded and we concluded in aHUS. Genetic screening of the alternative complement pathway was normal. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging performed after 24h and 1week showed restricted diffusion areas with periventricular white matter ischemic-hemorrhagic lesions. Extensive infectious work-up was negative. Upon admission the baby received antiepileptic drugs and 2days later C5 monoclonal antibody (eculizumab) and two transfusions of packed erythrocytes because the hemoglobin value had dropped to 55g/L. The platelet value was minimal at 30g/L. Renal function normalized in 48h without dialysis and neurological examination was normal in 1week. She was discharged from the hospital at day 10 with eculizumab perfusions (300mg) planned every 3weeks. After 24months, she was relapse-free and seizure-free, with a normal neurological examination. PMID:26775886

  20. Maternal anti-M induced hemolytic disease of newborn followed by prolonged anemia in newborn twins.

    PubMed

    Arora, Satyam; Doda, Veena; Maria, Arti; Kotwal, Urvershi; Goyal, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Allo-anti-M often has an immunoglobulin G (IgG) component but is rarely clinically significant. We report a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn along with prolonged anemia in newborn twins that persisted for up to 70 days postbirth. The aim was to diagnose and successfully manage hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN) due to maternal alloimmunization. Direct antiglobulin test (DAT), antigen typing, irregular antibody screening and identification were done by polyspecific antihuman globulin cards and standard tube method. At presentation, the newborn twins (T1, T2) had HDN with resultant low reticulocyte count and prolonged anemia, which continued for up to 70 days of life. Blood group of the twins and the mother was O RhD positive. DAT of the both newborns at birth was negative. Anti-M was detected in mothers as well as newborns. Type of antibody in mother was IgG and IgM type whereas in twins it was IgG type only. M antigen negative blood was transfused thrice to twin-1 and twice to twin-2. Recurring reduction of the hematocrit along with low reticulocyte count and normal other cell line indicated a pure red cell aplastic state. Anti-M is capable of causing HDN as well as prolonged anemia (red cell aplasia) due to its ability to destroy the erythroid precursor cells. Newborns with anemia should be evaluated for all the possible causes to establish a diagnosis and its efficient management. Mother should be closely monitored for future pregnancies as well. PMID:25722586

  1. Maternal anti-M induced hemolytic disease of newborn followed by prolonged anemia in newborn twins

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Satyam; Doda, Veena; Maria, Arti; Kotwal, Urvershi; Goyal, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Allo-anti-M often has an immunoglobulin G (IgG) component but is rarely clinically significant. We report a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn along with prolonged anemia in newborn twins that persisted for up to 70 days postbirth. The aim was to diagnose and successfully manage hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN) due to maternal alloimmunization. Direct antiglobulin test (DAT), antigen typing, irregular antibody screening and identification were done by polyspecific antihuman globulin cards and standard tube method. At presentation, the newborn twins (T1, T2) had HDN with resultant low reticulocyte count and prolonged anemia, which continued for up to 70 days of life. Blood group of the twins and the mother was O RhD positive. DAT of the both newborns at birth was negative. Anti-M was detected in mothers as well as newborns. Type of antibody in mother was IgG and IgM type whereas in twins it was IgG type only. M antigen negative blood was transfused thrice to twin-1 and twice to twin-2. Recurring reduction of the hematocrit along with low reticulocyte count and normal other cell line indicated a pure red cell aplastic state. Anti-M is capable of causing HDN as well as prolonged anemia (red cell aplasia) due to its ability to destroy the erythroid precursor cells. Newborns with anemia should be evaluated for all the possible causes to establish a diagnosis and its efficient management. Mother should be closely monitored for future pregnancies as well. PMID:25722586

  2. Blood doping: the flip side of transfusion and transfusion alternatives.

    PubMed

    Cacic, Daniel Limi; Hervig, Tor; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2013-08-01

    Blood doping in sports has been a hot topic of present. Longitudinal follow up of hematological parameters in different endurance sports, during the 1990s and early 2000s, has provided considerable suspicions about extensive blood manipulation, with performance enhancing effects. Recent doping revelations in the media also prove that blood doping is not an anticipated myth but it is, in fact, real. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents and autologous blood transfusions are used in synergy with substantial effect on the maximum oxygen uptake and delivery to muscles. Whilst both methods of blood manipulation represent a potential health hazard, in the context of an elevated hematocrit, nevertheless despite a number of suspicious deaths amongst athletes, this has not yet been fully documented. A reliable test for detection of recombinant human erythropoietin was implemented in 2000, but this is probably circumvented by microdose regimens. The Athlete's Biological Passport represents the progeny of the idea of an indirect approach based on long term monitoring of hematological parameters, thus making it possible to detect autologous blood doping and erythropoietin use after the substance is excreted. Nevertheless with advances in anti-doping measures it is possible that the levels of excretion of substances used can be masked. Clearly more sensitive and specific diagnostic tools and research/development in these areas of major concern are warranted, which, combined with changes in the athlete's attitude, will help in reaching the vision of fair play. PMID:23791798

  3. Comparative analysis of autologous blood transfusion and allogeneic blood transfusion in surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Long, Miao-Yun; Liu, Zhong-Han; Zhu, Jian-Guang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate application effects of autologous blood transfusion and allogeneic blood transfusion in surgically treated patients receiving spine surgery, abdomen surgery and ectopic pregnancy surgery. Methods: 130 patients who would undergo selective operations were divided into autologous transfusion group and allogeneic transfusion group. Both groups received the same anesthesia, and there was no significant difference in transfusion volume or fluid infusion volume. Results: The serum TNF-? level in autologous transfusion group after operation showed a clear upward trend and had significant difference compared with that before operation (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, after operation, the serum TNF-? level in autologous transfusion group was all significantly higher than that allogeneic transfusion group and the comparative difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). IgG level in treatment group did not significantly fluctuate during perioperative period, but IgG level in allogeneic transfusion group after operation was all significantly lower than that before operation, and there was statistically significant difference between both groups (P < 0.05). At the same time, complement C3 level in treatment group after operation was significantly higher than that before operation (P < 0.05), but complement C3 level in allogeneic transfusion group did not significantly change. After operation, there was statistically significant difference in complement C3 level between both groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Autologous transfusion is already a widely accepted transfusion method at present, and it can increase TNF-? and complement C3 levels in the body of surgically treated patients to strengthen immune ability against infection. PMID:25356154

  4. Refractory IgG Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Treated with Eculizumab: A Novel Application of Anticomplement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kim; Caplan, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA) is the most common form of AIHA, with corticosteroids in first-line treatment resulting in a 60-80% response rate. Atypical wAIHA and IgG plus complement mediated disease have a higher treatment failure rate and higher recurrence rate. We report a case of severe wAIHA secondary to Waldenström macroglobulinemia with life threatening intravascular hemolysis refractory to prednisone, rituximab, splenectomy, and plasmapheresis. A four-week treatment of eculizumab in this heavily pretreated patient resulted in a sustained increase in hemoglobin and transfusion independence, suggesting a role for complement inhibition in refractory wAIHA. PMID:27092282

  5. Hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by anti-Wright (anti-Wra): case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Squires, Amanda; Nasef, Nehad; Lin, Yulia; Callum, Jeannie; Khadawardi, Emad M; Drolet, Christine; Core, David; Simmons, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies to red cell antigens that are found at low frequency in the general population are rare causes of hemolytic disease of the newborn. To understand how to detect these cases, we provide a basic review of routine antenatal maternal antibody testing and report a case of a neonate with severe HDN caused by anti-Wright (anti-Wra), successfully managed with transfusion, phototherapy, and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin. When hemolysis in a newborn is suspected in the absence of major blood group incompatibility or commonly detected maternal red cell antibodies, a direct antiglobulin test should be performed. A positive DAT should alert the clinician to the presence of maternal antibodies against low-incidence antigens. Antibodies to the Wra antigen are one such rare cause of HDN. PMID:22397791

  6. Hemolytic disease of newborn due to anti-Jk b in a woman with high risk pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Thakral, Beenu; Malhotra, Sheetal; Saluja, Karan; Kumar, Praveen; Marwaha, Neelam

    2010-08-01

    This case illustrates the importance of blood group antibodies in antenatal serology other than Rh system as a cause of hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN). In India, antenatal antibody screening is done at majority of transfusion centers in only Rh (D) negative mothers. In this multigravida woman with high risk obstetrical history, an antenatal antibody screening by indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) was not performed as she was Rh (D) positive. Postnatal work up for the pathological jaundice in the neonate revealed that red cell alloimmunization had occurred due to anti-Jk(b). We conclude that antenatal antibody screening should be done in all pregnant women irrespective of the D antigen status to detect and manage red cell alloimmunization to any other clinically significant blood group antigens. PMID:20558106

  7. Anti-M Antibody Induced Prolonged Anemia Following Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn Due to Erythropoietic Suppression in 2 Siblings.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Atsushi; Ohto, Hitoshi; Yasuda, Hiroyasu; Negishi, Yutaka; Tsuiki, Hideki; Arakawa, Takeshi; Yagi, Yoshihito; Uchimura, Daisuke; Miyazaki, Toru; Ohashi, Wataru; Takamoto, Shigeru

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) arising from MNSs incompatibility is rare, with few reports of prolonged anemia and reticulocytopenia following HDN. We report the younger of 2 male siblings, both of whom had anti-M-induced HDN and anemia persisting for over a month. Peripheral reticulocytes remained inappropriately low for the degree of anemia, and they needed multiple red cell transfusions. Viral infections were ruled out. Corticosteroids were given for suspected pure red cell aplasia. Anemia and reticulocytopenia subsequently improved. Colony-forming unit erythroid assay revealed erythropoietic suppression of M antigen-positive erythroid precursor cells cultured with maternal or infant sera containing anti-M. In conclusion, maternal anti-M caused HDN and prolonged anemia by erythropoietic suppression in 2 siblings. PMID:25929611

  8. Hemoglobinuria-related acute kidney injury is driven by intrarenal oxidative reactions triggering a heme toxicity response.

    PubMed

    Deuel, J W; Schaer, C A; Boretti, F S; Opitz, L; Garcia-Rubio, I; Baek, J H; Spahn, D R; Buehler, P W; Schaer, D J

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular hemolysis can result in hemoglobinuria with acute kidney injury. In this study we systematically explored two in vivo animal models and a related cell culture system to identify hemoglobinuria-triggered damage pathways. In models of stored blood transfusion and hemoglobin (Hb) exposure in guinea pigs and beagle dogs we found that hemoglobinuria led to intrarenal conversion of ferrous Hb(Fe(2+)) to ferric Hb(Fe(3+)), accumulation of free heme and Hb-cross-linking products, enhanced 4-hydroxynonenal reactivity in renal tissue, and acute tubule injury. These changes were associated in guinea pigs with activation of a renal cortex gene expression signature indicative of oxidative stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Tubule cells of hemolytic animals demonstrated enhanced protein expression of heme oxygenase and heat shock protein and enhanced expression of acute kidney injury-related neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin. These adverse changes were completely prevented by haptoglobin treatment. The in vivo findings were extrapolated to a MS-based proteome analysis of SILAC-labeled renal epithelial cells that were exposed to free heme within a concentration range estimate of renal tubule heme exposure. These experiments confirmed that free heme is a likely trigger of tubule barrier deregulation and oxidative cell damage and reinforced the hypothesis that uncontrolled free heme could trigger the UPR as an important pathway of renal injury during hemoglobinuria. PMID:26794659

  9. Hemoglobinuria-related acute kidney injury is driven by intrarenal oxidative reactions triggering a heme toxicity response

    PubMed Central

    Deuel, J W; Schaer, C A; Boretti, F S; Opitz, L; Garcia-Rubio, I; Baek, J H; Spahn, D R; Buehler, P W; Schaer, D J

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular hemolysis can result in hemoglobinuria with acute kidney injury. In this study we systematically explored two in vivo animal models and a related cell culture system to identify hemoglobinuria-triggered damage pathways. In models of stored blood transfusion and hemoglobin (Hb) exposure in guinea pigs and beagle dogs we found that hemoglobinuria led to intrarenal conversion of ferrous Hb(Fe2+) to ferric Hb(Fe3+), accumulation of free heme and Hb-cross-linking products, enhanced 4-hydroxynonenal reactivity in renal tissue, and acute tubule injury. These changes were associated in guinea pigs with activation of a renal cortex gene expression signature indicative of oxidative stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Tubule cells of hemolytic animals demonstrated enhanced protein expression of heme oxygenase and heat shock protein and enhanced expression of acute kidney injury-related neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin. These adverse changes were completely prevented by haptoglobin treatment. The in vivo findings were extrapolated to a MS-based proteome analysis of SILAC-labeled renal epithelial cells that were exposed to free heme within a concentration range estimate of renal tubule heme exposure. These experiments confirmed that free heme is a likely trigger of tubule barrier deregulation and oxidative cell damage and reinforced the hypothesis that uncontrolled free heme could trigger the UPR as an important pathway of renal injury during hemoglobinuria. PMID:26794659

  10. Relationship between Stroke Volume Variation and Blood Transfusion during Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Moon; Lee, Yoon Kyung; Yoo, Hwanhee; Lee, Sukyung; Kim, Hee Yeong; Kim, Young-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Background. Intraoperative blood transfusion increases the risk for perioperative mortality and morbidity in liver transplant recipients. A high stroke volume variation (SVV) method has been proposed to reduce blood loss during living donor hepatectomy. Herein, we investigated whether maintaining high SVV could reduce the need for blood transfusion and also evaluated the effect of the high SVV method on postoperative outcomes in liver transplant recipients. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed 332 patients who underwent liver transplantation, divided into control (maintaining <10% of SVV during surgery) and high SVV (maintaining 10-20% of SVV during surgery) groups. We evaluated the blood transfusion requirement and hemodynamic parameters, including SVV, as well as postoperative outcomes, such as incidences of acute kidney injury, durations of postoperative intensive care unit and hospital stay, and rates of 1-year mortality. Results. Mean SVV values were 7.0% ± 1.3% in the control group (n = 288) and 11.2% ± 1.8% in the high SVV group (n = 44). The median numbers of transfused packed red blood cells and fresh frozen plasmas in the high SVV group were significantly lower than those in control group (0 vs. 2 units, P = 0.003; and 0 vs. 3 units, P = 0.033, respectively). No significant between-group differences were observed for postoperative outcomes. Conclusions. Maintaining high SVV can reduce the blood transfusion requirement during liver transplantation without worsening postoperative outcomes. These findings provide insights into improving perioperative management in liver transplant recipients. PMID:26941584

  11. Blood Conservation Strategies and Liver Transplantation Transfusion-Free Techniques Derived from Jehovah's Witness Surgical Cohorts.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Mansi; Kulkarni, Sujit; Dhanireddy, Kiran; Perez, Alexander; Selby, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Red blood cell and component transfusions are a frequent and widely accepted accompaniment of surgical procedures. Although the risk of specific disease transmission via allogeneic blood transfusions (ABT) is very low, the occurrence of transfusion related immune modulation (TRIM) still remains a ubiquitous concern. Recent studies have shown that ABT are linked to increased morbidity and mortality across various specialties, with negative outcomes directly correlated to number of transfusions. Blood conservation methods are therefore necessary to reduce ABT. Acute normo-volemic hemodilution (ANH) along with pre-operative blood augmentation and intraoperative cell salvage are blood conservation techniques utilized in tertiary and even quaternary (transplantation) surgery in Jehovah's Witnesses with excellent outcomes. The many hematologic complications such as anemia, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathies that occur with liver transplantation present a significant barrier when trying to avoid ABT. Despite this, living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) has been successfully performed in a transfusion-free environment, providing valuable insight into the possibilities of limiting ABT and its associated risks in all patients. PMID:26606822

  12. Chronic transfusion therapy improves but does not normalize systemic and pulmonary vasculopathy in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Detterich, Jon A; Kato, Roberta M; Rabai, Miklos; Meiselman, Herbert J; Coates, Thomas D; Wood, John C

    2015-08-01

    Tricuspid regurgitant (TR) jet velocity and its relationship to pulmonary hypertension has been controversial in sickle cell disease (SCD). Plasma free hemoglobin is elevated in SCD patients and acutely impairs systemic vascular reactivity. We postulated that plasma free hemoglobin would be negatively associated with both systemic and pulmonary endothelial function, assessed by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery and TR jet velocity, respectively. Whole blood viscosity, plasma free hemoglobin, TR jet, and FMD were measured in chronically transfused SCD pre- and posttransfusion (N = 25), in nontransfused SCD (N = 26), and in ethnicity-matched control subjects (N = 10). We found increased TR jet velocity and decreased FMD in nontransfused SCD patients compared with the other 2 groups. TR jet velocity was inversely correlated with FMD. There was a striking nonlinear relationship between plasma free hemoglobin and both TR jet velocity and FMD. A single transfusion in the chronically transfused cohort improved FMD. In our patient sample, TR jet velocity and FMD were most strongly associated with plasma free hemoglobin and transfusion status (transfusions being protective), and thus consistent with the hypothesis that intravascular hemolysis and increased endogenous erythropoiesis damage vascular endothelia. PMID:26036801

  13. Tacrolimus (FK 506)-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Walder, B; Ricou, B; Suter, P M

    1998-10-01

    A case of tacrolimus (FK 506)-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome is reported. The direct implication of tacrolimus, an alternative immunosuppressant to cyclosporine, was strongly supported by the recurrence of the syndrome after a second exposure to the treatment. PMID:9811409

  14. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome and Chronic Ulcerative Colitis Treated with Eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Tennille N.; Griffiths, Heidi; Miyashita, Yosuke; Bhatt, Riha; Jaffe, Ronald; Moritz, Michael; Hofer, Johannes; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) presents with hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and thrombotic microangiopathy of the kidney and usually results from Shiga-toxin induced activation of the alternative complement pathway. Gastroenteritis is a common feature of the Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli HUS, referred to as STEC-HUS. An inherited or acquired complement dysregulation may lead to HUS referred to as non-STEC or atypical (a)HUS. Although gastroenteritis is not a common presentation of aHUS, some patients develop ischemic colitis and may be misdiagnosed as acute appendicitis or acute ulcerative colitis (UC). Case Diagnosis –Treatment We present a patient with low circulating complement (C) 3 levels who developed aHUS in the course of chronic active UC. Resolution of renal and gastrointestinal manifestations in response to treatment with eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against terminal C5 protein suggests the role of alternative complement in the pathogenesis of both, aHUS and UC. Conclusion This case illustrates that dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway may manifest in other organs besides the kidney and that the circulating C3 levels do not correlate with the disease activity or the clinical response to eculizumab.

  15. Five Years' Experience with Intrauterine Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Corston, J. McD.; Pereira, E.; Cudmore, D. W.; Morton, B. S.

    1970-01-01

    Five years' experience with intrauterine transfusion involving 94 transfusions on 50 fetuses forms the basis of the paper. Twenty-three fetuses survived, which represents an overall salvage of 46%. Of 22 fetuses who received intrauterine transfusions before 28 weeks' gestation, seven (31.9%) survived, which justifies the attempt. Of 28 fetuses who received intrauterine transfusions after 28 weeks' gestation, 16 (57.1%) survived, which compares favourably with other series. A comparison of two different procedural techniques shows no statistically significant difference in ultimate results. Indications for amniocentesis are outlined and intrauterine transfusion was advised if the optical density difference fell in Liley's zone III (or a very high zone II) and rose at a rate which anticipated a zone III reading prior to 32 weeks' gestation. A pediatric assessment and therapeutic management of the 33 live births are presented. Twenty-eight babies received exchange transfusions. Five were excluded for reasons outlined in the text. Ten of the live-born died neonatally. The 23 survivors continue to thrive mentally and physically and follow-up continues. PMID:5455275

  16. Transfusion and coagulation management in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Clevenger, Ben; Mallett, Susan V

    2014-01-01

    There is wide variation in the management of coagulation and blood transfusion practice in liver transplantation. The use of blood products intraoperatively is declining and transfusion free transplantations take place ever more frequently. Allogenic blood products have been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. Primary haemostasis, coagulation and fibrinolysis are altered by liver disease. This, combined with intraoperative disturbances of coagulation, increases the risk of bleeding. Meanwhile, the rebalancing of coagulation homeostasis can put patients at risk of hypercoagulability and thrombosis. The application of the principles of patient blood management to transplantation can reduce the risk of transfusion. This includes: preoperative recognition and treatment of anaemia, reduction of perioperative blood loss and the use of restrictive haemoglobin based transfusion triggers. The use of point of care coagulation monitoring using whole blood viscoelastic testing provides a picture of the complete coagulation process by which to guide and direct coagulation management. Pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include the use of anti-fibrinolytic drugs to reduce fibrinolysis, and rarely, the use of recombinant factor VIIa. Factor concentrates are increasingly used; fibrinogen concentrates to improve clot strength and stability, and prothrombin complex concentrates to improve thrombin generation. Non-pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include surgical utilisation of the piggyback technique and maintenance of a low central venous pressure. The use of intraoperative cell salvage and normovolaemic haemodilution reduces allogenic blood transfusion. Further research into methods of decreasing blood loss and alternatives to blood transfusion remains necessary to continue to improve outcomes after transplantation. PMID:24876736

  17. Pathophysiology and treatment of typical and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Picard, C; Burtey, S; Bornet, C; Curti, C; Montana, M; Vanelle, P

    2015-06-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare disease, frequently responsible for renal insufficiency in children. Recent findings have led to renewed interest in this pathology. The discovery of new gene mutations in the atypical form of HUS and the experimental data suggesting the involvement of the complement pathway in the typical form, open new perspectives for treatment. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge on both typical and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome pathophysiology and examines new perspectives for treatment. PMID:25845294

  18. [Blood component transfusion in Croatia].

    PubMed

    Grgicević, D; Bozović, I; Pende, B

    1978-01-01

    Blood component therapy has been wildly accepted all over the world due to the better effects achieved in treating the patients, its safety and economy. In SRH it is replacing whole blood transfusions rather slowly as can be seen through five years of production and utilisation of blood derivatives. In 1974-1978 period a number of donations in Croatia increased to 27 per 1.000 inhabitants, but it is still very far from optimal 40-60 donations per 1.000 inhabitants. In that period the production of albumin increased 5 times, of immunoglobulins 10 times and factor VIII 10 times. In 1978 per 1.000 inhabitants, 2,1 1 of plasma were fractionated, 53 gr of albumin and 23 ml of imunoglobulins were used plus additional 6.200 units per one haemophiliac. These quantities are not sufficient to cover the needs of the health service in SRH. To overcome the shortage it is necessary to increase the number of donations, to augmant the average amount of donation to 450 ml., to increase the number of plasmapheresis and to use blood component therapy on a larger scale. Only after obtaining 10-12 1 of plasma for fractionation per 1.000 inhabitants optimal quantities of derivatives can be secured. PMID:757666

  19. Transfusion and component characteristics are not associated with allergic transfusion reactions to apheresis platelets

    PubMed Central

    Savage, William J.; Tobian, Aaron A.R.; Savage, Jessica H.; Hamilton, Robert G.; Borge, P. Dayand; Kaufman, Richard M.; Ness, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Transfusion-related characteristics have been hypothesized to cause allergic transfusion reactions (ATRs) but they have not been thoroughly studied. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the associations of infusion rate, infusion volume, ABO mismatching, component age, and premedication with the incidence and severity of ATRs. A secondary objective is to compare the risk of these attributes relative to the previously reported risk factor for aeroallergen sensitization in transfusion recipients, as measured by an aeroallergen-specific IgE antibody screen. Study Design and Methods Clinical and transfusion-related data were collected on subjects with reported ATRs and uneventful (control) apheresis platelet transfusions over a combined 21 month period at two academic medical centers. Control transfusions were selected as the next uneventful transfusion after an ATR was reported. Logistic regression, Mann-Whitney and t tests were used to assess associations with ATRs. Previously reported aeroallergen-specific IgE screening data was incorporated into a multivariable logistic regression. Results 143 ATRs and 61 control transfusions were evaluated among 168 subjects, ages 2-86 years. Infusion rate, infusion volume, ABO mismatching, component age, and premedication showed no statistically significant association with ATRs (P>0.05). Neither infusion rate nor infusion volume increased the risk of anaphylaxis vs. mucocutaneous only ATRs. Aeroallergen sensitization has previously been associated with ATRs. After controlling for transfusion-related covariates, aeroallergen sensitization remained statistically significantly associated with ATRs (OR 2.68, 95%CI: 1.26-5.69). Conclusions Transfusion and component-specific attributes are not associated with ATRs. An allergic predisposition in transfusion recipients is associated most strongly with ATR risk. PMID:25209730

  20. Cost of allogeneic and autologous blood transfusion in Canada. Canadian Cost of Transfusion Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Tretiak, R; Laupacis, A; Rivière, M; McKerracher, K; Souêtre, E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the cost, from a societal perspective, of blood transfusion in Canada. STUDY DESIGN: Cost-structure analysis. SETTING: Data were collected from eight hospitals and from six blood centres operated by the Canadian Red Cross Society in four provinces. OUTCOME MEASURES: Costs associated with four stages of transfusion-- collection, production, distribution and delivery--in 1933 were assessed. Costs were divided into the following categories; personnel, purchases, external services, overhead, donors' time, patients' time (for autologous transfusion), wastage and infection. RESULTS: The mean overall cost of a transfusion performed on an inpatient basis was $210 per unit of red blood cells for an allogeneic transfusion and $338 per unit of blood for an autologous transfusion. The mean cost of an allogeneic transfusion performed on an outpatient basis was $280 per unit of red blood cells. CONCLUSION: The costs determined in this study can be used in future studies comparing the cost-effectiveness of allogeneic transfusion with that of alternative methods. PMID:8625000

  1. Favism: a hemolytic disease associated with increased superoxide dismutase and decreased glutathione peroxidase activities in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Mavelli, I; Ciriolo, M R; Rossi, L; Meloni, T; Forteleoni, G; De Flora, A; Benatti, U; Morelli, A; Rotilio, G

    1984-02-15

    Red blood cells of favism patients with acute hemolytic crisis have markedly more superoxide dismutase (superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) and less glutathione peroxidase (glutathione:hydrogenperoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.11.1.9) than either normal controls, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient subjects or favism patients outside hemolytic crisis. This altered value of the two enzyme activities is not due to increased reticulocyte content of blood. The electrophoretic triplet pattern of superoxide dismutase is also changed, with significant increase of the most positively charged band. Similar modifications of the two enzyme activities are observed after treatment of normal red blood cells with high concentrations of divicine and ascorbate, which are redox compounds that are contained in fava seeds. This treatment produces no hemolysis, but leads to hemolysis if the treated cells are resuspended in the homologous plasma. These results suggest a possible role of active oxygen species in the development of favism. PMID:6698000

  2. Transfusion of red cells in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (TRIST): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Insight regarding transfusion practices in Hematopoietic Stem cell Transplantation (HSCT) are lacking and the impact of red cell transfusion in this high risk group on outcomes following HSCT are not well appreciated. Red blood cell transfusion can be life-saving, however, liberal use of transfusion in critically ill patients failed to demonstrate significant clinical benefit. A large number of other observational studies have also demonstrated an association between red blood cell transfusions and increased morbidity such as infections and multi organ failure as well as increased mortality. The role of red cell transfusion on the clinical outcomes observed in patients undergoing HSCT remains poorly understood and a prospective randomized study of transfusion is required to gain insight and knowledge on best transfusion practices in this high risk population. Methods This report describes the design and methodological issues of a randomized pilot study evaluating red cell transfusion triggers in the setting of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. This study has been funded by a peer review grant from the Canadian Blood Services and is registered on Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01237639. Results In 3 Canadian centres, 100 patients undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation will be randomized to either a restrictive (target hemoglobin of 70-90 g/L) or liberal (target hemoglobin of 90-110 g/L) red cell transfusion strategy, based daily hemoglobin values up to 100 days post-transplant. The study will stratify participants by centre and type of transplant. The primary goal is to demonstrate study feasibility and we will collect clinical outcomes on 1) Transfusion Requirements, 2) Transplant Related Mortality, 3) Maximum grade of acute Graft versus Host Disease, 4) Veno-occlusive Disease, 5) Serious Infections, 6) Bearman Toxicity Score, 7) Bleeding, 8) Quality of Life, 9) Number of Hospitalizations and 10) Number of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Admissions. Conclusion Upon completion, this pilot trial will provide preliminary insight into red cell transfusion practice and its influence in hematopoietic stem cell transplant outcomes. The results of this trial will inform the conduct of a larger study. PMID:21936907

  3. Delayed-onset hemolytic anemia in patients with travel-associated severe malaria treated with artesunate, France, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Jauréguiberry, Stéphane; Thellier, Marc; Ndour, Papa Alioune; Ader, Flavie; Roussel, Camille; Sonneville, Romain; Mayaux, Julien; Matheron, Sophie; Angoulvant, Adela; Wyplosz, Benjamin; Rapp, Christophe; Pistone, Thierry; Lebrun-Vignes, Bénédicte; Kendjo, Eric; Danis, Martin; Houzé, Sandrine; Bricaire, François; Mazier, Dominique; Buffet, Pierre; Caumes, Eric

    2015-05-01

    Artesunate is the most effective treatment for severe malaria. However, delayed-onset hemolytic anemia has been observed in ≈20% of travelers who receive artesunate, ≈60% of whom require transfusion. This finding could discourage physicians from using artesunate. We prospectively evaluated a cohort of 123 patients in France who had severe imported malaria that was treated with artesunate; our evaluation focused on outcome, adverse events, and postartesunate delayed-onset hemolysis (PADH). Of the 123 patients, 6 (5%) died. Overall, 97 adverse events occurred. Among the 78 patients who received follow-up for >8 days after treatment initiation, 76 (97%) had anemia, and 21 (27%) of the 78 cases were recorded as PADH. The median drop in hemoglobin levels was 1.3 g/dL; 15% of patients with PADH had hemoglobin levels of <7 g/dL, and 1 required transfusion. Despite the high incidence of PADH, the resulting anemia remained mild in 85% of cases. This reassuring result confirms the safety and therapeutic benefit of artesunate. PMID:25898007

  4. Delayed-Onset Hemolytic Anemia in Patients with Travel-Associated Severe Malaria Treated with Artesunate, France, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Thellier, Marc; Ndour, Papa Alioune; Ader, Flavie; Roussel, Camille; Sonneville, Romain; Mayaux, Julien; Matheron, Sophie; Angoulvant, Adela; Wyplosz, Benjamin; Rapp, Christophe; Pistone, Thierry; Lebrun-Vignes, Bénédicte; Kendjo, Eric; Danis, Martin; Houzé, Sandrine; Bricaire, François; Mazier, Dominique; Buffet, Pierre; Caumes, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Artesunate is the most effective treatment for severe malaria. However, delayed-onset hemolytic anemia has been observed in ≈20% of travelers who receive artesunate, ≈60% of whom require transfusion. This finding could discourage physicians from using artesunate. We prospectively evaluated a cohort of 123 patients in France who had severe imported malaria that was treated with artesunate; our evaluation focused on outcome, adverse events, and postartesunate delayed-onset hemolysis (PADH). Of the 123 patients, 6 (5%) died. Overall, 97 adverse events occurred. Among the 78 patients who received follow-up for >8 days after treatment initiation, 76 (97%) had anemia, and 21 (27%) of the 78 cases were recorded as PADH. The median drop in hemoglobin levels was 1.3 g/dL; 15% of patients with PADH had hemoglobin levels of <7 g/dL, and 1 required transfusion. Despite the high incidence of PADH, the resulting anemia remained mild in 85% of cases. This reassuring result confirms the safety and therapeutic benefit of artesunate. PMID:25898007

  5. Highly efficient prion transmission by blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Andréoletti, Olivier; Litaise, Claire; Simmons, Hugh; Corbière, Fabien; Lugan, Séverine; Costes, Pierrette; Schelcher, François; Vilette, Didier; Grassi, Jacques; Lacroux, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    It is now clearly established that the transfusion of blood from variant CJD (v-CJD) infected individuals can transmit the disease. Since the number of asymptomatic infected donors remains unresolved, inter-individual v-CJD transmission through blood and blood derived products is a major public health concern. Current risk assessments for transmission of v-CJD by blood and blood derived products by transfusion rely on infectious titers measured in rodent models of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSE) using intra-cerebral (IC) inoculation of blood components. To address the biological relevance of this approach, we compared the efficiency of TSE transmission by blood and blood components when administrated either through transfusion in sheep or by intra-cerebral inoculation (IC) in transgenic mice (tg338) over-expressing ovine PrP. Transfusion of 200 µL of blood from asymptomatic infected donor sheep transmitted prion disease with 100% efficiency thereby displaying greater virulence than the transfusion of 200 mL of normal blood spiked with brain homogenate material containing 10³ID₅₀ as measured by intracerebral inoculation of tg338 mice (ID₅₀ IC in tg338). This was consistent with a whole blood titer greater than 10³·⁶ID₅₀ IC in tg338 per mL. However, when the same blood samples were assayed by IC inoculation into tg338 the infectious titers were less than 32 ID per mL. Whereas the transfusion of crude plasma to sheep transmitted the disease with limited efficacy, White Blood Cells (WBC) displayed a similar ability to whole blood to infect recipients. Strikingly, fixation of WBC with paraformaldehyde did not affect the infectivity titer as measured in tg338 but dramatically impaired disease transmission by transfusion in sheep. These results demonstrate that TSE transmission by blood transfusion can be highly efficient and that this efficiency is more dependent on the viability of transfused cells than the level of infectivity measured by IC inoculation. PMID:22737075

  6. Treatment Options for Primary Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Short Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Abdulgabar

    2015-01-01

    Summary Until now, treatment of primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm type (wAIHA) is primarily based on immunosuppression. However, many patients do not respond adequately to treatment, and treated patients may develop severe side effects due to uncontrolled, mixed and/or long-lasting immunosuppression. Unfortunately, the newly used therapeutic monoclonal antibodies are unspecific and remain frequently ineffective. Thus, development of a specific therapy for AIHA is necessary. The ideal therapy would be the identification and elimination of the causative origin of autoimmunization and/or the correction or reprogramming of the dysregulated immune components. Blood transfusion is the most rapidly effective measure for patients who develop or may develop hypoxic anemia. Although some effort has been made to guide physicians on how to adequately treat patients with AIHA, a number of individual aspects should be considered prior to treatment. Based on my serological and clinical experience and the analysis of evidence-based studies, we remain far from any optimized therapeutic measures for all AIHA patients. Today, the old standard therapy using controlled steroid administration, with or without azathioprine or cyclophosphamide, is, when complemented with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, still the most effective therapy in wAIHA. Rituximab or other monoclonal antibodies may be used instead of splenectomy in therapy-refractory patients. PMID:26696797

  7. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia attributed to an intrauterine contraceptive device

    PubMed Central

    Khawandanah, Mohamad O.; Weiss, Susan M.; Cherry, Mohamad A.; Maymani, Hossein; Selby, George B.; Aster, Richard H.; George, James N.; Holter Chakrabarty, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Evans syndrome is a rare condition manifested by combined autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and thrombocytopenia or neutropenia. It is often associated with other autoimmune disorders, immunodeficiencies, and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. CASE REPORT We describe a patient with Evans syndrome that may have been related to exposure to a polyethylene-based intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD). A 26-year-old white female presented with severe, symptomatic AIHA and subsequently developed severe thrombocytopenia. She had a refractory course resistant to multiple treatments including corticosteroids, intravenous immune globulin, rituximab, splenectomy, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporine, eculizumab, and plasma exchange. It was then noticed that her serum autoantibody agglutinated red blood cells (RBCs) in the presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG) but not in the absence of PEG nor when an alternative agglutination enhancing technique, low-ionic-strength solution, was used. Therefore, her polyethylene-containing IUD, which was a polyethylene frame with a levonorgestrel-releasing device, was removed. Norgestrel-dependent, platelet (PLT)-reactive antibodies were not identified by either flow cytometry or in vivo in a NOD/SCID mouse. Testing for PEG-dependent antibodies was not possible. Remission, with no requirement for RBC or PLT transfusions and return of her hemoglobin and PLT counts to normal, followed removal of the IUD. CONCLUSION The patient’s recovery after removal of the IUD and the PEG dependence of RBC agglutination suggested a possibility that the IUD may have been a contributing factor to the etiology of Evans syndrome in this patient. PMID:25208591

  8. The changing relationships in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Sazama, K

    1999-08-01

    Maintaining quality in provision of transfusion services in the face of mergers, acquisitions, affiliations, and risk-sharing relationships between organizations that formerly conducted business in a traditional vendor-purchaser model is the ultimate challenge. Publications, both lay and professional, highlight the speed and nature of the impetus for change, especially in the United States, where managed care philosophies are driving a bottom-line mentality. Blood collection and transfusion organizations are developing new relationships, including entry of for-profit entities into a formerly virtually exclusively not-for-profit environment, provision of transfusion services by formerly exclusive blood collection entities and vice versa, outsourcing of selected portions, and other innovative relationships, with significantly more competitive marketing strategies. Measures of quality of transfusion services should benchmark current practices, if possible, before entering into new relationships to ensure that the quality of patient care remains high. Concerns about the fiscal viability of organizations should not minimize safety and availability of blood for transfusion when needed. PMID:10420219

  9. [Groupamatic 360 C1 and transfusion safety].

    PubMed

    Toscer, M; Guimbretiere, J; Harousseau, H

    1978-03-01

    Presentation of an evaluation program of patient blood grouping through Groupamatic, with final report printed out under the control of the management computer of the blood center. The flow chart is composed of three main steps:--information tracking on a two-part card,--duplicated determination of blood groups and phenotypes by Groupamatic,--correlation check between the two runs by the management computer, followed by the print out of the blood grouping results. Print out always includes two STEPS:--for the first blood grouping: self adhesive label on a color form and on the transfusion record,--for the second blood grouping: definite blood group card and check label for transfusion record,--for antibody screening and pretransfusion check up, results and label with a summary taped on. Transfusion file should always follow the patient and allows to write his transfusion "past" just by sticking on the I.D. numbers of transfused products. Furthermore, the management computer prints out:--the result log book.--a daily updated alphanumeric listing. PMID:675012

  10. Transfusion and blood donation in comic strips.

    PubMed

    Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Danic, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    The representation of blood transfusion and donation of blood in the comic strip has never been studied. The comic strip, which is a relatively recent art, emerged in the 19th century before becoming a mass medium during the 20th century. We have sought, by calling on collectors and using the resources of Internet, comic strips devoted, wholly or in part, to the themes of transfusion and blood donation. We present some of them here in chronologic order, indicating the title, country of origin, year of publication, and names of authors. The theme of the superhero using transfusion to transmit his virtues or his powers is repeated throughout the 20th century in North American comic strips. More recently, comic strips have been conceived from the outset with a promotional aim. They perpetuate positive images and are directed toward a young readership, wielding humor to reduce the fear of venipuncture. Few comic strips denounce the abuse of the commercialization of products derived from the human body. The image of transfusion and blood donation given by the comic strips is not to be underestimated because their readership is primarily children, some of whom will become blood donors. Furthermore, if some readers are transfused during their lives, the impact of a memory more or less conscious of these childhood readings may resurface, both in hopes and in fears. PMID:23643789

  11. [Management of massive transfusion - the role of the blood transfusion service].

    PubMed

    Sone, Shinji; Tsuno, Hirokazu; Okazaki, Hitoshi

    2014-12-01

    Massive transfusion (hemorrhage) is defined as blood transfusion exceeding the circulatory blood volume within 24 hours. Here, we investigated cases of massive transfusion, defined as transfusion of more than 21 units of red blood cells within 24 hours, in our institution in the period from August 2005 to March 2013. Massive transfusion accounted for approximately 1% of all blood transfusions in our institution, and the majority were cardiac surgery cases (75%), with 80% of the cases receiving blood transfusion irtfhe operating theater. Brain-dead heart and liver transplantations were started in our hospital in 2006. Due to the revision of the Organ Transplantation Law in July 2010, brain-dead organ donations increased in Japan. Massive transfusion was required in approximately 47% of heart and 41% of liver transplants, with 44% of the transplants being conducted on holidays, and 47% at night. Therefore, the implementation of a 24-hour duty system for medical technologists, including holidays, is essential for the prompt testing and supply of blood products. For improvement of the safety of blood supply, a computer network system, connecting the blood control system of the blood transfusion service, the anesthetic system of the operating theater, and the hospital general medical system, was implemented in our hospital in March 2007. In the operating theater, anesthetists can request blood products, order new blood products, cross-check the provided blood products, and register their use, using this system. At the blood transfusion service, the blood products to be provided are cross- checked against the anesthetists' requests. Through this system, the anesthetists and blood transfusion service staff can check the list of blood products available for the surgical patient as well as those already transfused, on a real-time basis. For analysis of the improvements achieved, we compared the number of non-used blood units, i.e., the number of those provided minus the number of transfused units in the surgical theater, in the period after (2009-2012) and before (2005-2006) the implementation of this computer network system. In the period after its implementation, the number of non-used units decreased from 17.4 units to 7.5 units (P<0.001), leading us to conclude that this system helped avoid the excessive ordering of blood products by the anesthetists. (Review). PMID:25823247

  12. Cost-effectiveness analysis of preoperative transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease using evidence from the TAPS trial

    PubMed Central

    Spackman, Eldon; Sculpher, Mark; Howard, Jo; Malfroy, Moira; Llewelyn, Charlotte; Choo, Louise; Hodge, Renate; Johnson, Tony; Rees, David C; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Kirby-Allen, Melanie; Davies, Sally; Williamson, Lorna

    2014-01-01

    The study’s objective was to assess the cost-effectiveness of preoperative transfusion compared with no preoperative transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease undergoing low- or medium-risk surgery. Seventy patients with sickle cell disease (HbSS/Sß0thal genotypes) undergoing elective surgery participated in a multicentre randomised trial, Transfusion Alternatives Preoperatively in Sickle Cell Disease (TAPS). Here, a cost-effectiveness analysis based on evidence from that trial is presented. A decision-analytic model is used to incorporate long-term consequences of transfusions and acute chest syndrome. Costs and health benefits, expressed as quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), are reported from the ‘within-trial’ analysis and for the decision-analytic model. The probability of cost-effectiveness for each form of management is calculated taking into account the small sample size and other sources of uncertainty. In the range of scenarios considered in the analysis, preoperative transfusion was more effective, with the mean improvement in QALYs ranging from 0.018 to 0.206 per patient, and also less costly in all but one scenario, with the mean cost difference ranging from −£813 to £26. All scenarios suggested preoperative transfusion had a probability of cost-effectiveness >0.79 at a cost-effectiveness threshold of £20 000 per QALY. PMID:24329965

  13. Recent Developments in Transplantation and Transfusion Medicine.

    PubMed

    Edinur, Hisham A; Chambers, Geoffrey K; Dunn, Paul P J

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation and transfusion are related and clinically important areas of multidisciplinary expertise, including pre-operative treatment, donor recruitment, tissue matching, and post-operative care. We have seen significant developments in these areas, especially in the late 20th and early 21st century. This paper reviews the latest advances in modern transplantation and transfusion medicine, including several new genetic markers (e.g., major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor, and human platelet antigens) for donor and recipient matching, genotyping platforms (e.g., next-generation sequencer and Luminex technology), donor recruitment strategies, and several clinical applications in which genotyping has advantages over agglutination tests (e.g., genotyping of weakly expressed antigens and determination of blood groups and human leukocyte antigen types in multi-transfused patients). We also highlight the roles of population studies and international collaborations in moving towards more efficient donor recruitment strategies. PMID:26218888

  14. Management of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in children.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak; Dohar, Joseph E

    2006-12-01

    Acute pharyngotonsillitis is one of the most common infections encountered by pediatricians and family physicians. According to the US Vital Health Statistics report, acute pharyngotonsillitis is responsible for more than 6 million office visits each year by children younger than 15 years of age and an additional 1.8 million visits by adolescents and young adults aged 15 to 24 years. Most children with acute pharyngotonsillitis have symptoms that can be attributed to infection with a respiratory virus, such as adenovirus, influenza virus, parainfluenza virus, rhinovirus, and respiratory syncytial virus. However, in approximately 30% to 40% of cases, acute pharyngotonsillitis is of bacterial etiology. Group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GABHS) are responsible for most bacterial cases of acute pharyngotonsillitis, although other pathogens, such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Arcanobacterium haemolyticum, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Chlamydia pneumoniae, may be the causative agents in sporadic cases. Pharyngotonsillitis caused by these latter pathogens can sometimes be distinguished from that caused by GABHS by considering the patient's medical history in concert with the clinical presentation. In some cases, acute pharyngotonsillitis may have an idiopathic etiology. An accurate diagnosis of GABHS infection is important because it is the only common form of acute pharyngotonsillitis for which antibiotic therapy is definitely indicated. Antibiotic therapy can shorten the clinical course of GABHS pharyngotonsillitis, reduce the rate of transmission, and prevent suppurative and nonsuppurative complications, such as peritonsillar abscess and acute rheumatic fever. Although the threat of rheumatic fever is much lower for children in the United States than in developing nations, preventing rheumatic fever and the spread of disease is the primary goal of antibiotic therapy in GABHS pharyngotonsillitis treatment and a cornerstone of practice guidelines. PMID:17137534

  15. Liberal Versus Restrictive Transfusion Thresholds For Patients With Symptomatic Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Jeffrey L; Brooks, Maria Mori; Abbott, J Dawn; Chaitman, Bernard; Kelsey, Sheryl F; Triulzi, Darrell J; Srinivas, Vankeepuram; Menegus, Mark A; Marroquin, Oscar C; Rao, Sunil V; Noveck, Helaine; Passano, Elizabeth; Hardison, Regina M; Smitherman, Thomas; Vagaonescu, Tudor; Wimmer, Neil J; Williams, David O

    2013-01-01

    Background Prior trials suggest it is safe to defer transfusion at hemoglobin levels above 7–8 g/dL in most patients. Patients with acute coronary syndrome may benefit from higher hemoglobin levels. Methods We performed a pilot trial in 110 patients with acute coronary syndrome or stable angina undergoing cardiac catheterization and a hemoglobin < 10 g/dL. Patients in the liberal transfusion strategy received one or more units of blood to raise the hemoglobin level ≥ 10 g/dL. Patients in the restrictive transfusion strategy were permitted to receive blood for symptoms from anemia or for a hemoglobin < 8 g/dL. The predefined primary outcome was the composite of death, myocardial infarction, or unscheduled revascularization 30 days post randomization. Results Baseline characteristics were similar between groups except age (liberal-67.3, restrictive-74.3). The mean number of units transfused was 1.6 in the liberal group and 0.6 in the restrictive group. The primary outcome occurred in 6 patients (10.9%) in the liberal group and 14 (25.5%) in the restrictive group (risk difference= 15.0%; 95% confidence interval of difference 0.7% to 29.3%; p=0.054 and adjusted for age p=0.076). Death at 30 days was less frequent in liberal group (n=1, 1.8%) compared to restrictive group (n=7, 13.0%; p=0.032). Conclusions The liberal transfusion strategy was associated with a trend for fewer major cardiac events and deaths than a more restrictive strategy. These results support the feasibility of and the need for a definitive trial. PMID:23708168

  16. Thrombotic Risks in Red Blood Cell Transfusions.

    PubMed

    Dubovoy, Timur; Engoren, Milo

    2016-03-01

    Red blood cells play a key role in normal hemostasis and thrombosis. Their ability to affect coagulation is multifactorial and depends on their mechanical properties affecting viscosity and blood flow, ability to aggregate and adhere to each other and potentially to vascular endothelium, molecular signaling via microvesicles and surface proteins, including blood group antigens, and participation in nitric oxide metabolism. Transfused red blood cells suffer from a storage lesion that damages the cells leading to changes in shape, function, and intracellular communication. In this article, we review if and how transfused red blood cells may lead to both increased hemorrhage and increased thrombosis. PMID:26838697

  17. Human Babesiosis: An Emerging Transfusion Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Oz, Helieh S.; Westlund, Karin H.

    2012-01-01

    Babesiosis, a common disease of animals, can infect humans via vector tick bite, particularly in endemic areas. The recent reports of fatal cases in Hepatitis C and postliver transplant patients resulting from transfusion of contaminated blood should alert the medical profession regarding this emerging dilemma in endemic as well as nonendemic areas and the need for accurate blood screening for transfusion. Here, we illustrate different stages of the parasite lifecycle, progression of babesiosis in animal model, some aspects of pathologic outcomes, ongoing therapeutic modalities, and a feasible Acridine Orange fluorescent methodology for the diagnostic evaluation of blood samples. PMID:22536513

  18. Chemokine receptor CCR1 disruption limits renal damage in a murine model of hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Maria V; Auvynet, Constance; Poupel, Lucie; Rodero, Mathieu; Mejias, Maria Pilar; Panek, Cecilia A; Vanzulli, Silvia; Combadiere, Christophe; Palermo, Marina

    2012-03-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli is the main etiological agent that causes hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a microangiopathic disease characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. Although direct cytotoxic effects on endothelial cells by Stx are the primary pathogenic event, there is evidence that indicates the inflammatory response mediated by polymorphonuclear neutrophils and monocytes as the key event during HUS development. Because the chemokine receptor CCR1 participates in the pathogenesis of several renal diseases by orchestrating myeloid cell kidney infiltration, we specifically addressed the contribution of CCR1 in a murine model of HUS. We showed that Stx type 2-treated CCR1(-/-) mice have an increased survival rate associated with less functional and histological renal damage compared with control mice. Stx type 2-triggered neutrophilia and monocytosis and polymorphonuclear neutrophil and monocyte renal infiltration were significantly reduced and delayed in CCR1(-/-) mice compared with control mice. In addition, the increase of the inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-6) in plasma was delayed in CCR1(-/-) mice compared with control mice. These data demonstrate that CCR1 participates in cell recruitment to the kidney and amplification of the inflammatory response that contributes to HUS development. Blockade of CCR1 could be important to the design of future therapies to restrain the inflammatory response involved in the development of HUS. PMID:22203055

  19. Neonatal atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome from a factor H mutation treated with eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sheena; Pradhan, Madhura; Meyers, Kevin E.C.; Le Palma, Krish; Laskin, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) results from an inherited dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway leading to thrombotic microangiopathy consisting of hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal injury. The complement inhibitor eculizumab is an approved treatment, but its reported use in neonates – who have an inherently high risk of infection – is limited. Case diagnosis/treatment: A 28-day-old female presented with gross hematuria and hypertension. aHUS was suspected based on anemia with schistocytes, thrombocytopenia, low C3, and acute kidney injury requiring peritoneal dialysis. A septic work-up initiated on day 2 for hypothermia and respiratory failure was negative. There was no improvement after 6 days of plasma therapy. Despite being < 6 weeks old she was vaccinated with pneumococcal-13 conjugate, meningococcal (groups C and Y) polysaccharide, and Haemophilus b tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccines and started on penicillin prophylaxis. After 1 dose of eculizumab 300 mg, dialysis was discontinued and her hematological parameters improved. Genetic testing revealed a complement factor H mutation. After 11 months of follow-up, she remains on eculizumab and penicillin without recurrence of aHUS or any infectious complications. Conclusions: Eculizumab is a safe and effective treatment option for aHUS even in neonates at high risk for infection. PMID:25816809

  20. Complement factor H gene mutation associated with autosomal recessive atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ying, L; Katz, Y; Schlesinger, M; Carmi, R; Shalev, H; Haider, N; Beck, G; Sheffield, V C; Landau, D

    1999-12-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) presents with the clinical features of hypertension, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. Both dominant and recessive modes of inheritance have been reported. This study describes the genetic and functional analysis of a large Bedouin kindred with autosomal recessive HUS. The kindred consists of several related nuclear families in which all parent unions of affected children are consanguineous. A previous report demonstrated that a dominant form of HUS maps to chromosome 1q and that complement factor H (CFH), a regulatory component of the complement system, lies within the region and is involved in the dominant disorder. Early-onset and persistent hypocomplementemia in this Bedouin kindred prompted us to evaluate the CFH gene. Linkage analysis was performed, demonstrating linkage between the disorder and the markers near the CFH gene. Mutation analysis of the CFH coding region revealed a single missense mutation. Functional analyses demonstrate that the mutant CFH is properly expressed and synthesized but that it is not transported normally from the cell. This is the first study reporting that a recessive, atypical, early-onset, and relapsing HUS is associated with the CFH protein and that a CFH mutation affects intracellular trafficking and secretion. PMID:10577907

  1. Complement Factor H Gene Mutation Associated with Autosomal Recessive Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Lihua; Katz, Yitzhak; Schlesinger, Menachem; Carmi, Rivka; Shalev, Hanna; Haider, Neena; Beck, Gretel; Sheffield, Val C.; Landau, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Summary Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) presents with the clinical features of hypertension, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. Both dominant and recessive modes of inheritance have been reported. This study describes the genetic and functional analysis of a large Bedouin kindred with autosomal recessive HUS. The kindred consists of several related nuclear families in which all parent unions of affected children are consanguineous. A previous report demonstrated that a dominant form of HUS maps to chromosome 1q and that complement factor H (CFH), a regulatory component of the complement system, lies within the region and is involved in the dominant disorder. Early-onset and persistent hypocomplementemia in this Bedouin kindred prompted us to evaluate the CFH gene. Linkage analysis was performed, demonstrating linkage between the disorder and the markers near the CFH gene. Mutation analysis of the CFH coding region revealed a single missense mutation. Functional analyses demonstrate that the mutant CFH is properly expressed and synthesized but that it is not transported normally from the cell. This is the first study reporting that a recessive, atypical, early-onset, and relapsing HUS is associated with the CFH protein and that a CFH mutation affects intracellular trafficking and secretion. PMID:10577907

  2. Favism and hemolytic anemia in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient subjects in North Sardinia.

    PubMed

    Meloni, T; Forteleoni, G; Dore, A; Cutillo, S

    1983-01-01

    The present paper reports the incidence from 1965 to 1979 of acute hemolytic anemia for a total of 948 cases in G-6-PD-deficient subjects due to the ingestion of fresh or dried fava beans or certain drugs and to viral infections. The highest percentage of hemolytic crises was due to fresh fava beans (94.4%). No cases of favism were observed in breast-fed babies whose mothers had eaten fava beans or from pollen inhalation. The male sex proved to be the hardest hit. Hemoglobin values were lower than or equal to 7 g/dl in about 75% of males and 50% of females. Total bilirubin values were lower than 103 mumol/l (6 mg/dl) in about 75% of males and 85% of females. Both the hemoglobin and bilirubin values were statistically significant. Mean transaminase values (SGPT) were significantly higher than those of normal controls. No correlation between favism and blood groups was found. PMID:6408883

  3. What Are the Risks of a Blood Transfusion?

    MedlinePlus

    ... will have a reaction after the transfusion. Iron Overload Getting many blood transfusions can cause too much iron to build up in your blood (iron overload). People who have a blood disorder like thalassemia , ...

  4. [Indications and surveillance of platelet transfusions in surgery].

    PubMed

    Coffe, C; Bardiaux, L; Couteret, Y; Devillers, M; Leroy, M; Morel, P; Pouthier-Stein, F; Hervé, P

    1995-01-01

    Surgery, after hematology, is the biggest consumer of homologous platelet concentrates. Platelet transfusion is indicated to prevent or control bleeding associated with deficiencies in platelet number or function. In surgery, general patterns (in function of pre-surgery platelet count) can be adopted in most of the indications for platelets. In emergency situations, and in some particular cases (related to the patient, the type of operation, etc.), the transfusion procedure depends on the team's experience, the results of the available clinical and biological tests, and the drugs. Strict monitoring is required during the transfusion procedure. The efficacy of the transfusion must be controlled 1 h and 24 hours after the transfusion, and a number of factors must be assessed, namely the immunological impact of the transfusion (on red blood cells, leukocytes and platelets) and the occurrence of infectious diseases transmitted via transfusion. In addition, for a possible future transfusion, a strategy must be proposed. PMID:7767484

  5. Heme: Modulator of Plasma Systems in Hemolytic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Roumenina, Lubka T; Rayes, Julie; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Dimitrov, Jordan D

    2016-03-01

    Hemolytic diseases such as sickle-cell disease, β-thalassemia, malaria, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia continue to present serious clinical hurdles. In these diseases, lysis of erythrocytes causes the release of hemoglobin and heme into plasma. Extracellular heme has strong proinflammatory potential and activates immune cells and endothelium, thus contributing to disease pathogenesis. Recent studies have revealed that heme can interfere with the function of plasma effector systems such as the coagulation and complement cascades, in addition to the activity of immunoglobulins. Any perturbation in such functions may have severe pathological consequences. In this review we analyze heme interactions with coagulation, complement, and immunoglobulins. Deciphering such interactions to better understand the complex pathogenesis of hemolytic diseases is pivotal. PMID:26875449

  6. Group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis outbreak.

    PubMed

    Culqui, Dante R; Manzanares-Laya, Sandra; Van Der Sluis, Sarah Lafuente; Fanlo, Albert Anton; Comas, Rosa Bartolomé; Rossi, Marcello; Caylá, Joán A

    2014-04-01

    The aim was to describe an outbreak of group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in health care professionals. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of 17 clients who dined at the same table in a restaurant in Barcelona in July 2012. The frequency, timing and severity of symptoms were analyzed, as were demographic variables and others concerning the food ingested. The attack rate was 58.8%. Six of the 10 clients were positive for group A β-hemolytic streptococcal. Six of the 13 individuals who handled the food involved in the dinner had symptoms. No association was identified with the food consumed. There is epidemiological evidence of foodborne group A β-hemolytic streptococcal transmission, but respiratory transmission could not be ruled out. PMID:24897054

  7. Group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Culqui, Dante R; Manzanares-Laya, Sandra; Van Der Sluis, Sarah Lafuente; Fanlo, Albert Anton; Comas, Rosa Bartolomé; Rossi, Marcello; Caylá, Joán A

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to describe an outbreak of group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in health care professionals. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of 17 clients who dined at the same table in a restaurant in Barcelona in July 2012. The frequency, timing and severity of symptoms were analyzed, as were demographic variables and others concerning the food ingested. The attack rate was 58.8%. Six of the 10 clients were positive for group A β-hemolytic streptococcal. Six of the 13 individuals who handled the food involved in the dinner had symptoms. No association was identified with the food consumed. There is epidemiological evidence of foodborne group A β-hemolytic streptococcal transmission, but respiratory transmission could not be ruled out. PMID:24897054

  8. [Hemolytic anemia and dysenteric syndrome: a case of ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Claes, G; Colard, M; Benghiat, F S; Maerevoet, M; Bailly, B; De Wilde, V

    2015-01-01

    A 53-years-old man has a dysentery since two weeks. The blood test shows Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia and inflammation. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is treated with corticosteroid. A colonoscopy reveals an ulcerative colitis. The evolution of the patient is complicated by a spontaneous digestive perforation treated by total proctocolectomy. After this intervention, there is a resolution of the AIHA and the patient is gradually weaned from corticosteroids. AIHA is a rare extra-intestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease essentially ulcerative colitis. Identification of this cause of secondary AIHA is important for the therapeutic strategy. However treatment is nonspecific and based on low levels of evidence. PMID:26749635

  9. Autoimmune neurological disorders associated with group-A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Hachiya, Yasuo; Miyata, Rie; Tanuma, Naoyuki; Hongou, Kazuhisa; Tanaka, Keiko; Shimoda, Konomi; Kanda, Sachiko; Hoshino, Ai; Hanafusa, Yukiko; Kumada, Satoko; Kurihara, Eiji; Hayashi, Masaharu

    2013-08-01

    Although central nervous system (CNS) disorders associated with group-A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) infection occur only rarely, Sydenham's chorea is a well-recognized disease that can arise following infection. Children may develop a tic, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and extrapyramidal movement subsequent to GABHS infection. These disorders have been termed pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococci (PANDAS). Herein we report one case each of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), PANDAS and subacute encephalitis associated with GABHS infection. To evaluate the pathogenesis of the CNS disorders associated with GABHS infection, we measured levels of neurotransmitters, cytokines, anti-neuronal autoantibodies, and performed immunohistochemistry using patient sera to stain human brain sections. All three cases showed psychiatric behavioral disorders. Immunotherapy was effective, and homovanillic acid levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were elevated at the acute stage in all three cases. In each case of ADEM and PANDAS, immunohistochemistry demonstrated neuronal impairment in the basal ganglia during the acute stage. Neuronal immunoreactivity was visualized in the cerebral cortex at the acute stage in the case of subacute encephalitis. There was no direct correlation between immunoreactivity of patient sera on the brain sections and positivity of anti-neuronal autoantibodies or CSF biomarkers. The results suggest that autoimmune responses may modulate neurotransmission, and the use of patient serum for immunohistochemistry is a sensitive screening method for the detection of anti-neuronal autoantibodies in CNS disorders associated with GABHS infection. PMID:23142103

  10. Why People with Cancer Might Need Blood Transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Blood Transfusion and Donation + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » TOPICS Document ... Possible risks of blood transfusions Alternatives to blood transfusions Donating blood Blood donation by cancer survivors To learn more References Previous ...

  11. The signaling role of CD40 ligand in platelet biology and in platelet component transfusion.

    PubMed

    Aloui, Chaker; Prigent, Antoine; Sut, Caroline; Tariket, Sofiane; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Pozzetto, Bruno; Richard, Yolande; Cognasse, Fabrice; Laradi, Sandrine; Garraud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a transmembrane molecule of crucial interest in cell signaling in innate and adaptive immunity. It is expressed by a variety of cells, but mainly by activated T-lymphocytes and platelets. CD40L may be cleaved into a soluble form (sCD40L) that has a cytokine-like activity. Both forms bind to several receptors, including CD40. This interaction is necessary for the antigen specific immune response. Furthermore, CD40L and sCD40L are involved in inflammation and a panoply of immune related and vascular pathologies. Soluble CD40L is primarily produced by platelets after activation, degranulation and cleavage, which may present a problem for transfusion. Soluble CD40L is involved in adverse transfusion events including transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). Although platelet storage designed for transfusion occurs in sterile conditions, platelets are activated and release sCD40L without known agonists. Recently, proteomic studies identified signaling pathways activated in platelet concentrates. Soluble CD40L is a good candidate for platelet activation in an auto-amplification loop. In this review, we describe the immunomodulatory role of CD40L in physiological and pathological conditions. We will focus on the main signaling pathways activated by CD40L after binding to its different receptors. PMID:25479079

  12. The Signaling Role of CD40 Ligand in Platelet Biology and in Platelet Component Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Aoui, Chaker; Prigent, Antoine; Sut, Caroline; Tariket, Sofiane; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Pozzetto, Bruno; Richard, Yolande; Cognasse, Fabrice; Laradi, Sandrine; Garraud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a transmembrane molecule of crucial interest in cell signaling in innate and adaptive immunity. It is expressed by a variety of cells, but mainly by activated T-lymphocytes and platelets. CD40L may be cleaved into a soluble form (sCD40L) that has a cytokine-like activity. Both forms bind to several receptors, including CD40. This interaction is necessary for the antigen specific immune response. Furthermore, CD40L and sCD40L are involved in inflammation and a panoply of immune related and vascular pathologies. Soluble CD40L is primarily produced by platelets after activation, degranulation and cleavage, which may present a problem for transfusion. Soluble CD40L is involved in adverse transfusion events including transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). Although platelet storage designed for transfusion occurs in sterile conditions, platelets are activated and release sCD40L without known agonists. Recently, proteomic studies identified signaling pathways activated in platelet concentrates. Soluble CD40L is a good candidate for platelet activation in an auto-amplification loop. In this review, we describe the immunomodulatory role of CD40L in physiological and pathological conditions. We will focus on the main signaling pathways activated by CD40L after binding to its different receptors. PMID:25479079

  13. Transfusion-associated graft versus host disease (TAGVHD)--with reference to neonatal period.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Sanjay G; Gokhale, Sankalp S

    2015-04-01

    Transfusion-associated graft versus host disease [TAGVHD] results from the engraftment of transfused immuno-competent cells in blood transfusion recipients, whose immune system is unable to reject them. All blood products containing viable, immuno-competent T cells have been implicated in TAGVHD. Presence of a "one-way HLA match between donor and recipient" is associated with a significantly increased risk of TAGVHD. Though sharing of haplotype is the most probable explanation, it is far from adequate. Since TAGVHD is not seen in patients with AIDS, and an acute GVHD-like syndrome has been noted in some identical twins and autologous (self) transplants, some other processes, possibly of an "autoimmune" nature are responsible for TAGVHD. Most of the cases have been reported from Japan. This clustering in space and time is rather intriguing. We offer here alternative hypothesis. Foetal and then neonatal lymphocytes exhibit tolerance towards donor cytotoxic T lymphocytes; and consequently very few cases of TAGVHD have been reported in neonates than expected. This tolerance is a part of altered immunology of pregnancy. We feel that it is possible to use maternal blood for transfusion to her newborn baby by following certain protocol and procedure and TAGVHD is no barrier. PMID:24871361

  14. Randomized Controlled Study on Safety and Feasibility of Transfusion Trigger Score of Emergency Operations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, De-Xing; Liu, Jin; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Qiu-Ying; Xie, Mian; Zhu, Zhao-Qiong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Due to the floating of the guideline, there is no evidence-based evaluation index on when to start the blood transfusion for patients with hemoglobin (Hb) level between 7 and 10 g/dl. As a result, the trigger point of blood transfusion may be different in the emergency use of the existing transfusion guidelines. The present study was designed to evaluate whether the scheme can be safely and effectively used for emergency patients, so as to be supported by multicenter and large sample data in the future. Methods: From June 2013 to June 2014, patients were randomly divided into the experimental group (Peri-operative Transfusion Trigger Score of Emergency [POTTS-E] group) and the control group (control group). The between-group differences in the patients’ demography and baseline information, mortality and blood transfusion-related complications, heart rate, resting arterial pressure, body temperature, and Hb values were compared. The consistency of red blood cell (RBC) transfusion standards of the two groups of patients with the current blood transfusion guideline, namely the compliance of the guidelines, utilization rate, and per-capita consumption of autologous RBC were analyzed. Results: During the study period, a total of 72 patients were recorded, and 65 of them met the inclusion criteria, which included 33 males and 32 females with a mean age of (34.8 ± 14.6) years. 50 underwent abdomen surgery, 4 underwent chest surgery, 11 underwent arms and legs surgery. There was no statistical difference between the two groups for demography and baseline information. There was also no statistical differences between the two groups in anesthesia time, intraoperative rehydration, staying time in postanesthetic care unit, emergency hospitalization, postoperative 72 h Acute Physiologic Assessment and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores, blood transfusion-related complications and mortality. Only the POTTS-E group on the 1st postoperative day Hb was lower than group control, P < 0.05. POTTS-E group was totally (100%) conformed to the requirements of the transfusion guideline to RBC infusion, which was higher than that of the control group (81.25%), P < 0.01. There were no statistical differences in utilization rates of autologous blood of the two groups; the utilization rates of allogeneic RBC, total allogeneic RBC and total RBC were 48.48%, 51.5%, and 75.7% in POTTS-E group, which were lower than those of the control group (84.3%, 84.3%, and 96.8%) P < 0.05 or P < 0.01. Per capita consumption of intraoperative allogeneic RBC, total allogeneic RBC and total RBC were 0 (0, 3.0), 2.0 (0, 4.0), and 3.1 (0.81, 6.0) in POTTS-E groups were all lower than those of control group (4.0 [2.0, 4.0], 4.0 [2.0, 6.0] and 5.8 [2.7, 8.2]), P < 0.05 or P < 0.001. Conclusions: Peri-operative Transfusion Trigger Score-E evaluation scheme is used to guide the application of RBC. There are no differences in the recent prognosis of patients with the traditional transfusion guidelines. This scheme is safe; Compared with doctor experience-based subjective assessment, the scoring scheme was closer to patient physiological needs for transfusion and more reasonable; Utilization rate and the per capita consumption of RBC are obviously declined, which has clinical significance and is feasible. Based on the abovementioned three points, POTTS-E scores scheme is safe, reasonable, and practicable and has the value for carrying out multicenter and large sample clinical researches. PMID:26112723

  15. [Transfusion safety. Introduction and identifying the problem].

    PubMed

    Ambriz Fernández, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    The problems that exist in our country in the security of the transfusion chain affect every step in the recruitment, donor selection, and aseptic collection, screening tests, production of blood components, storage, transportation and transfusion to recipient. Some of which can lead to fatal cases or moving slowly because of the fragmentation of our health system.With the principles of ethics, we must move towards a unified national blood system overcoming the conflicts of interest that affect the impact on administrative certifications; decrease the irrational use of resources, optimize costs and achieve a transfusion medicine security system and haemovigilance of the at the hospital. There has to be some regional blood banks well-coordinated in health institutions, with central management systems of quality and more specialized procedures,the latter can be achieved with more than 150 public blood banks, transforming them into positions of blood collection of voluntary donation of repetition. The resources would be released equip regional banks. Also required to provide education and legislation ad hoc for goals in voluntary blood donation and focused mainly the university population and centralize information for haemovigilance based computer systems specific hospitals, that reduce errors and restrict risk blood components involved in fatal cases, and reduce the possibility of punitive actions. It has international advice of the whole transfusion chain. PMID:23435078

  16. [Blood transfusion: control of infectious risks].

    PubMed

    Laperche, Syria; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Morel, Pascal; Pouchol, Elodie; Pozzetto, Bruno

    2015-02-01

    From blood donor collection to transfusion of the recipient, there are several layers of protection of the blood supply. These measures combined with huge progresses over the three past decades in pathogen discovery and blood testing for specific pathogens (human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) viruses, Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)), provide the greatest safety. With the implementation of serological and molecular testing, at least in high-income countries, transfusion-transmitted infections have become extremely rare. However, for pathogen agents, which are not tested and especially those which are responsible for emerging infectious disease, it became apparent that full control of infectious disease had not been achieved. In addition, the immune status of the recipient has also an impact in the outcome of infectious diseases transmitted by transfusion. Blood safety is based on several measures: education and deferral of donors with risk factors for transmissible disease, blood testing, pathogen reduction interventions, and patient blood management. This paper proposes a review of the residual risk of transmission of infectious diseases by transfusion and of the additional interventions able to further reduce it. PMID:25547992

  17. Transfusion practice in orthotopic liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Allanki Surekha

    2009-01-01

    Liver transplant procedures require the most blood components, despite the fact that blood use in liver transplantation has declined dramatically over the last decade. Liver transplant recipients present unique challenges, not only in terms of blood supply, but also requirements for specialized blood components, serologic problems, and immunologic effects of transfusion on both the allograft and the recipient. The cause of intraoperative blood loss in liver transplantation is multifactorial, due to both technical factors and poor coagulation control. This procedure carries the risk of massive blood loss, which requires massive transfusions and is associated with postoperative infections, reduced graft survival, multi-organ dysfunction, and higher risk of mortality. Efforts to reduce intraoperative bleeding leading to limitation of blood transfusions are desirable to improve results and also to control costs. Method of literature search: The name of topic is typed and searched in Google search. The name of topic is typed and searched in PubMed search. Related articles were also searched. Some standard books in Transfusion Medicine were also referred. PMID:20040808

  18. Road blocks in making platelets for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Thon, J N; Medvetz, D A; Karlsson, S M; Italiano, J E

    2015-06-01

    The production of laboratory-generated human platelets is necessary to meet present and future transfusion needs. This manuscript will identify and define the major roadblocks that must be overcome to make human platelet production possible for clinical use, and propose solutions necessary to accelerate development of laboratory-generated human platelets to market. PMID:26149051

  19. Precautions and Adverse Reactions during Blood Transfusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... the transfused blood after it is collected. In addition to an increase in temperature, the person has chills and sometimes headache or back pain. Sometimes the person also has symptoms of an allergic reaction such as itching or a rash. Usually, acetaminophen ...

  20. Detection of septic transfusion reactions to platelet transfusions by active and passive surveillance.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hong; Xiao, Wenbin; Lazarus, Hillard M; Good, Caryn E; Maitta, Robert W; Jacobs, Michael R

    2016-01-28

    Septic transfusion reactions (STRs) resulting from transfusion of bacterially contaminated platelets are a major hazard of platelet transfusion despite recent interventions. Active and passive surveillance for bacterially contaminated platelets was performed over 7 years (2007-2013) by culture of platelet aliquots at time of transfusion and review of reported transfusion reactions. All platelet units had been cultured 24 hours after collection and released as negative. Five sets of STR criteria were evaluated, including recent AABB criteria; sensitivity and specificity of these criteria, as well as detection by active and passive surveillance, were determined. Twenty of 51?440 platelet units transfused (0.004%; 389 per million) were bacterially contaminated by active surveillance and resulted in 5 STRs occurring 9 to 24 hours posttransfusion; none of these STRs had been reported by passive surveillance. STR occurred only in neutropenic patients transfused with high bacterial loads. A total of 284 transfusion reactions (0.55%) were reported by passive surveillance. None of these patients had received contaminated platelets. However, 6 to 93 (2.1%-32.7%) of these 284 reactions met 1 or more STR criteria, and sensitivity of STR criteria varied from 5.1% to 45.5%. These results document the continued occurrence of bacterial contamination of platelets resulting in STR in neutropenic patients, failure of passive surveillance to detect STR, and lack of specificity of STR criteria. These findings highlight the limitations of reported national STR data based on passive surveillance and the need to implement further measures to address this problem such as secondary testing or use of pathogen reduction technologies. PMID:26598718

  1. Economic impact of blood transfusions: balancing cost and benefits.

    PubMed

    Oge, Tufan; Kilic, Cemil Hakan; Kilic, Gokhan Sami

    2014-02-01

    Blood transfusions may be lifesaving, but they inherit their own risks. Risk of transfusion to benefit is a delicate balance. In addition, blood product transfusions purchases are one of the largest line items among the hospital and laboratory charges. In this review, we aimed to discuss the transfusion strategies and share our transfusion protocol as well as the steps for hospitals to build-up a blood management program while all these factors weight in. Moreover, we evaluate the financial burden to the health care system. PMID:25610294

  2. Economic Impact of Blood Transfusions: Balancing Cost and Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Oge, Tufan; Kilic, Cemil Hakan; Kilic, Gokhan Sami

    2014-01-01

    Blood transfusions may be lifesaving, but they inherit their own risks. Risk of transfusion to benefit is a delicate balance. In addition, blood product transfusions purchases are one of the largest line items among the hospital and laboratory charges. In this review, we aimed to discuss the transfusion strategies and share our transfusion protocol as well as the steps for hospitals to build-up a blood management program while all these factors weight in. Moreover, we evaluate the financial burden to the health care system. PMID:25610294

  3. [The polybrene test in the diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Tsvetaeva, N V; Kolodeĭ, S V; Zavadenko, M A; Kulagin, M N

    1991-01-01

    The efficacies of Coombs' test and the polybrene test, heretofore not used in this country, for the diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemias are compared in examinations of 27 donors and 62 patients with this condition. The results evidence a high efficacy of the polybrene test. The test is simple and available for wide use at clinical laboratories. PMID:1724488

  4. Hemolytic anemia associated with heterograft replacement of the mitral valve.

    PubMed

    Myers, T J; Hild, D H; Rinaldi, M J

    1978-08-01

    The first case of overt hemolytic anemia following mitral valve replacement with a porcine heterograft is reported. Cardiac catheterization failed to reveal a paravalvular leak or valvular incompetence to account for the hemolysis. Red cell traumatization by the Dacron-covered Stellite ring and stent is suggested as the cause of hemolysis with the porcine heterograft. PMID:567264

  5. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    van der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-04-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Furthermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfusion of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion or irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted.

  6. Precautions surrounding blood transfusion in autoimmune haemolytic anaemias are overestimated

    PubMed Central

    Yürek, Salih; Mayer, Beate; Almahallawi, Mohammed; Pruss, Axel; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2015-01-01

    Background It is very evident that many precautions are taken regarding transfusion of red blood cells in patients with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. Frequently, considerable efforts are made to examine the indication and serological compatibility prior to transfusion in such patients. However, at times, this may unnecessarily jeopardize patients who urgently require a red blood cell transfusion. Materials and methods Thirty-six patients with warm-type autoimmune haemolytic anaemia were included in this study. All patients had reactive serum autoantibodies and required blood transfusion. Standard serological assays were employed for the detection and characterization of antibodies to red blood cells. Results A positive direct antiglobulin test was observed in all 36 patients, in addition to detectable antibodies in both the eluate and serum. Significant alloantibodies were detected in the serum samples of three patients (anti-c, anti-JKa, and anti-E). In 32 patients, red blood cell transfusion was administered with no significant haemolytic transfusion reactions due to auto- and/or allo-antibodies. Due to overestimation of positive cross-matches three patients received no transfusion or delayed transfusion and died, and one patient died due to unrecognised blood loss and anaemia which was attributed to an ineffective red blood cell transfusion. Discussion Many of the reported recommendations regarding transfusion of red blood cells in autoimmune haemolytic anaemia are highly questionable, and positive serological cross-matches should not result in a delay or refusal of necessary blood transfusions. PMID:26192772

  7. Management of bleeding in a multi-transfused patient with positive HLA class I alloantibodies and thrombocytopenia associated with platelet dysfunction refractory to transfusion of cross-matched platelets.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Lars; Blumenberg, Detlef

    2005-06-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common condition in the critical care setting. Repetitive platelet transfusion might lead to formation of alloantibodies. HLA class I and human platelet antigen antibodies can lead to transfusion-refractory thrombocytopenia. Transfusion of cross-matched platelets often is effective in these patients. We report on the successful use of recombinant activated factor VII in an acute bleeding situation in a multi-transfused patient presenting with positive HLA class I alloantibody status and thrombocytopenia associated with platelet dysfunction refractory to even transfusion of cross-matched platelets. The 41-year-old female patient developed HLA class I antibodies during former episodes of massive transfusion. Her former medical history was empty concerning hemorrhagic events. During this specific bleeding episode the patient suffered from intractable profuse bleeding from the nasopharynx and oral cavity. Global coagulation tests were within the normal range. Platelet dysfunction was confirmed by PFA100. Initially the patient responded well to Desmopressin infusion, but after 36 h she became thrombocytopenic and refractory to even transfusion of cross-matched platelets. Recombinant activated factor VII was chosen as the last resort. Two identical boli of 160 microg/kg NovoSeven each were injected via a central line within an interval of 3 h. After the first injection bleeding was significantly reduced and vasopressor support discontinued. After the second bolus bleeding completely ceased and did not reoccur. We did not observe any side effects. The pluripotent hemostatic agent recombinant activated factor VII might be a new option in the treatment of hemorrhagic episodes in patients presenting with this rare disorder, especially when the patient is refractory to cross-matched platelets or matched platelets are not available. PMID:15870549

  8. Impairment of Bone Health in Pediatric Patients with Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Schündeln, Michael M.; Goretzki, Sarah C.; Hauffa, Pia K.; Wieland, Regina; Bauer, Jens; Baeder, Lena; Eggert, Angelika; Hauffa, Berthold P.; Grasemann, Corinna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sickle cell anemia and thalassemia result in impaired bone health in both adults and youths. Children with other types of chronic hemolytic anemia may also display impaired bone health. Study Design To assess bone health in pediatric patients with chronic hemolytic anemia, a cross-sectional study was conducted involving 45 patients with different forms of hemolytic anemia (i.e., 17 homozygous sickle cell disease and 14 hereditary spherocytosis patients). Biochemical, radiographic and anamnestic parameters of bone health were assessed. Results Vitamin D deficiency with 25 OH-vitamin D serum levels below 20 ng/ml was a common finding (80.5%) in this cohort. Bone pain was present in 31% of patients. Analysis of RANKL, osteoprotegerin (OPG) and osteocalcin levels indicated an alteration in bone modeling with significantly elevated RANKL/OPG ratios (control: 0.08+0.07; patients: 0.26+0.2, P = 0.0007). Osteocalcin levels were found to be lower in patients compared with healthy controls (68.5+39.0 ng/ml vs. 118.0+36.6 ng/ml, P = 0.0001). Multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed a significant (P<0.025) influence of LDH (partial r2 = 0.29), diagnosis of hemolytic anemia (partial r2 = 0.05) and age (partial r2 = 0.03) on osteocalcin levels. Patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia were more frequently and more severely affected by impaired bone health than patients with hereditary spherocytosis. Conclusion Bone health is impaired in pediatric patients with hemolytic anemia. In addition to endocrine alterations, an imbalance in the RANKL/OPG system and low levels of osteocalcin may contribute to this impairment. PMID:25299063

  9. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID:24379786

  10. Impact of a Transfusion-free Program on Patients Undergoing Pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young Bae; Yun, Sangchul; Young Ok, Si; Joon Kim, Han; Choi, Dongho

    2016-02-01

    Patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) often require transfusion. However, transfusion-related complications and decreased blood donation in Korea encourage the development of new treatment strategies for PD patients. Although transfusion-free (TF) operation is thought to be beneficial, results supporting its beneficial effects are lacking. The aim of our study was to demonstrate the impact on PD patients of a TF program. From December 2003 to April 2013, 80 consecutive patients with periampullary lesions underwent PD performed. These patients were divided into two groups as follows: 39 PD patients in the "before TF program" (Group 1) and 41 PD patients in the "after TF program" (Group 2). Among patients in Group 2, patients who agreed with the TF program were enrolled and proceed with the TF program prospectively. Participants in the TF program had perioperative blood augmentation and intraoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution. The perioperative data were compared with the two groups. The mean preoperative hemoglobin, operative times, and operative blood loss showed no significance between two groups. The mean postoperative hemoglobin was lower in Group 2 (11.7 g/dL vs 10.9 g/dL, P = 0.038). The mean amount of blood transfusion was significantly lower in Group 2. (950.8 mL vs 124.9 mL, P = 0.009). The TF program considerably decreases the amount of perioperative blood transfusion. The overall perioperative course and complication rate in the TF group were not inferior to those in the non-TF group. The TF program appears safe and should be considered in PD patients. PMID:26874136

  11. Transfusion Associated Graft Versus Host Disease Following Whole Blood Transfusion from an Unrelated Donor in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ketan K.; Ranjan, Rajiv R.; Shah, Apurva P.

    2010-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a well-known complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD) is much less common and nearly uniformly fatal complication of blood transfusion. The risk factors underlying the development of TA- GVHD are incompletely defined, but it is commonly seen in individuals with congenital or acquired immunodeficiency, transfusions from blood relatives, intrauterine transfusions and HLA-matched platelet transfusions. Diagnosis of TA-GVHD may be difficult at a time due to rarity in occurrence and overlapping clinical features with various infections and drug reactions. We describe a case of transfusion-associated GVHD that occurred after transfusion of whole blood from unrelated donor in an immunocompetent patient. PMID:21886390

  12. Management of patients who refuse blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Chand, N Kiran; Subramanya, H Bala; Rao, G Venkateswara

    2014-09-01

    A small group of people belonging to a certain religion, called Jehovah's witness do not accept blood transfusion or blood products, based on biblical readings. When such group of people are in need of health care, their faith and belief is an obstacle for their proper treatment, and poses legal, ethical and medical challenges for attending health care provider. Due to the rapid growth in the membership of this group worldwide, physicians attending hospitals should be prepared to manage such patients. Appropriate management of such patients entails understanding of ethical and legal issues involved, providing meticulous medical management, use of prohaemostatic agents, essential interventions and techniques to reduce blood loss and hence, reduce the risk of subsequent need for blood transfusion. An extensive literature search was performed using search engines such as Google scholar, PubMed, MEDLINE, science journals and textbooks using keywords like 'Jehovah's witness', 'blood haemodilution', 'blood salvage' and 'blood substitutes'. PMID:25535432

  13. Blood transfusion: patient identification and empowerment.

    PubMed

    Stout, Lynn; Joseph, Sundari

    Positive patient identification is pivotal to several steps of the transfusion process; it is integral to ensuring that the correct blood is given to the correct patient. If patient misidentification occurs, this has potentially fatal consequences for patients. Historically patient involvement in healthcare has focused on clinical decision making, where the patient, having been provided with medical information, is encouraged to become involved in the decisions related to their individualised treatment. This article explores the aspects of patient contribution to patient safety relating to positive patient identification in transfusion. When involving patients in their care, however, clinicians must recognise the diversity of patients and the capacity of the patient to be involved. It must not be assumed that all patients will be willing or indeed able to participate. Additionally, clinicians' attitudes to patient involvement in patient safety can determine whether cultural change is successful. PMID:26878405

  14. Photodynamic decontamination of blood for transfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Hur, Ehud; Margolis-Nunno, H.; Gottlieb, P.; Lustigman, S.; Horowitz, Bernard

    1995-01-01

    Currently transfused cellular components of blood are not available in a sterile form and carry a small risk of transmitting viral and parasite diseases. Using phthalocyanines and red light, lipid enveloped viruses, e.g., HIV-1, can be inactivated in red blood cell concentrates (RBCC). Under conditions leading to virus sterilization the blood borne parasites Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease) and Plasmodium falciparum (malaria) could be eliminated to undetectable levels (> 4 log10 kill). RBC damage during treatment could be avoided by increasing the light fluence rate to 80 mW/cm2, and by including the free radical scavenger glutathione and the vitamin E derivative Trolox during light exposure. Similar sterilization of platelet concentrates was achieved with the psoralen derivative AMT and UVA light. Platelet damage due to PUVA treatment was avoided by including the plant flavonoid rutin during irradiation. It is concluded that elimination of the risk of transmitting pathogens during blood transfusion is feasible with photochemical treatments.

  15. Blood transfusion safety: A study of adverse reactions at the blood bank of a tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Negi, Gita; Gaur, Dushyant Singh; Kaur, Rajveer

    2015-01-01

    Background: An adverse transfusion reaction (ATR) is an unfavorable reaction to the transfused unit, the severity of which may be different among individuals depending upon the type of reaction and the patient's susceptibility. Transfusion reactions may be immediate or delayed type depending on the onset and immune or nonimmune type depending on the pathogenesis. A study was conducted to study the frequency of various transfusion reactions and the associated morbidity. Materials and Methods: All ATRs occurring over a period of 3 years at a tertiary care health center were studied in detail according to the institute's protocol. Results: Of 38,013 units of blood and components that had been issued, 101 (0.2%) cases had an ATR. The most common reaction was allergic - 34/101 (33.6%) followed by febrile - 26/101 (25.7%). Other reactions included transfusion-related acute lung injury in 6/101 (5.9%) cases, and immune reactions were seen in 19/101 (18.8%) cases. Conclusion: Allergic and febrile reactions are most common and least harmful, but fatal reactions can also occur, and preventive measures must be taken to avoid such reactions. PMID:26682203

  16. Use of an identification system based on biometric data for patients requiring transfusions guarantees transfusion safety and traceability

    PubMed Central

    Bennardello, Francesco; Fidone, Carmelo; Cabibbo, Sergio; Calabrese, Salvatore; Garozzo, Giovanni; Cassarino, Grazia; Antolino, Agostino; Tavolino, Giuseppe; Zisa, Nuccio; Falla, Cadigia; Drago, Giuseppe; Di Stefano, Giovanna; Bonomo, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    Background One of the most serious risks of blood transfusions is an error in ABO blood group compatibility, which can cause a haemolytic transfusion reaction and, in the most severe cases, the death of the patient. The frequency and type of errors observed suggest that these are inevitable, in that mistakes are inherent to human nature, unless significant changes, including the use of computerised instruments, are made to procedures. Methods In order to identify patients who are candidates for the transfusion of blood components and to guarantee the traceability of the transfusion, the Securblood system (BBS srl) was introduced. This system records the various stages of the transfusion process, the health care workers involved and any immediate transfusion reactions. The patients and staff are identified by fingerprinting or a bar code. The system was implemented within Ragusa hospital in 16 operative units (ordinary wards, day hospital, operating theatres). Results In the period from August 2007 to July 2008, 7282 blood components were transfused within the hospital, of which 5606 (77%) using the Securblood system. Overall, 1777 patients were transfused. In this year of experience, no transfusion errors were recorded and each blood component was transfused to the right patient. We recorded 33 blocks of the terminals (involving 0.6% of the transfused blood components) which required the intervention of staff from the Service of Immunohaematology and Transfusion Medicine (SIMT). Most of the blocks were due to procedural errors. Conclusions The Securblood system guarantees complete traceability of the transfusion process outside the SIMT and eliminates the possibility of mistaken identification of patients or blood components. The use of fingerprinting to identify health care staff (nurses and doctors) and patients obliges the staff to carry out the identification procedures directly in the presence of the patient and guarantees the presence of the doctor at the start of the transfusion. PMID:19657483

  17. Blood transfusion safety: a new philosophy.

    PubMed

    Franklin, I M

    2012-12-01

    Blood transfusion safety has had a chequered history, and there are current and future challenges. Internationally, there is no clear consensus for many aspects of the provision of safe blood, although pan-national legislation does provide a baseline framework in the European Union. Costs are rising, and new safety measures can appear expensive, especially when tested against some other medical interventions, such as cancer treatment and vaccination programmes. In this article, it is proposed that a comprehensive approach is taken to the issue of blood transfusion safety that considers all aspects of the process rather than considering only new measures. The need for an agreed level of safety for specified and unknown risks is also suggested. The importance of providing care and support for those inadvertently injured as a result of transfusion problems is also made. Given that the current blood safety decision process often uses a utilitarian principle for decision making--through the calculation of Quality Adjusted Life Years--an alternative philosophy is proposed. A social contract for blood safety, based on the principles of 'justice as fairness' developed by John Rawls, is recommended as a means of providing an agreed level of safety, containing costs and providing support for any adverse outcomes. PMID:23171300

  18. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-04-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Futhermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfuson of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion of irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted.

  19. Postoperative infections after oesophageal resections: the role of blood transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Rovera, Francesca; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Boni, Luigi; Imperatori, Andrea; Tabacchi, Alessandra; Carcano, Giulio; Diurni, Mario; Dionigi, Renzo

    2006-01-01

    Background Perioperative blood transfusion carries numerous potential risks concerning the transmission of infective diseases and immunodepression that can facilitate the occurrence of postoperative infectious complications. Explanation of connections between perioperative blood transfusion and postoperative septic complication worldwide is not well documented. Many studies have described a correlation between perioperative blood transfusions and postoperative infections. On the contrary, other studies indicate that factors influencing the need for blood transfusions during surgery have a greater bearing than blood transfusion per se on the occurrence of postoperative complications. Patients and methods A prospective study was conducted in our Department on 110 consecutive patients undergoing oesophageal resection for primary cancer, in order to evaluate the incidence of postoperative infections related to perioperative allogenic blood transfusions. For each patient we preoperatively recorded in a computerized data-base several known risk-factors for postoperative infections; in detail we registered the administration of allogenic perioperative blood transfusions (period of administration, number of packages administered). Results Among the enrolled 110 patients, 53 (48%) received perioperative blood transfusions: in this group postoperative infections (overall infective complications) occurred in 27 patients. After a multivariate analysis we observed that perioperative blood transfusions significantly affected as an independent variable the development of wound infections (p = 0.02). Conclusion Blood transfusions independently affected the incidence of wound infections in patients who underwent oesophageal resection for primary cancer. PMID:17118175

  20. Successful implementation of strategies to transform Emergency Department transfusion practice.

    PubMed

    Reed, Matthew J; Kelly, Sarah-Louise; Beckwith, Hannah; Innes, Catherine J; Manson, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Blood component transfusion is an important and lifesaving Emergency Department (ED) procedure. It is not however risk-free and careful consideration of its clinical benefit for each individual patient is therefore essential. In 2008, we audited the patterns of blood component usage in 2007 within our ED. This work revealed that whilst 3209 units of blood component were ordered only 39.5% were transfused, and 9.5% were unaccounted for. This was the first and only published detailed look at ED blood transfusion practices. We had to address our poor traceability (i.e. unaccounted for units), our high blood usage, and our ordering of units which were then not transfused as this can lead to wastage. Firstly, better links between the ED and the Scottish National Blood Transfusion Service (SNBTS) were established. A set of improvement measures were then implemented including better ED medical and nursing staff education, monthly traceability reports sent to the ED clinical management teams, the introduction of an ED transfusion guideline, moving our blood fridge into the resuscitation room, having a named ED transfusion consultant and ED transfusion link nurse, ED consultant representation on the Hospital Transfusion Group and finally increasing awareness of ED emergency transfusion with a rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) research programme. In 2012, we re-audited our practice looking at our blood component usage in 2011. There was a 64% reduction in blood component ordering (3209 vs. 1034 units), a 39% reduction in blood component transfusion (1131 vs. 687 units), a 68% increase in the proportion of ordered units that were transfused and a 96% reduction in unaccounted units (289 vs. 9 units) between 2007 and 2011. In attempting to cost the savings resulting from our changes we showed that SNBTS spent £306,437 less in 2011 compared to 2007 on handling and issuing ED transfusion requests. Our improvements are immediately generalizable across the UK and the potential savings to the NHS are enormous. PMID:26734190

  1. Blood transfusion; additional historical aspects. Part 1. The birth of transfusion immunology.

    PubMed

    Boulton, F E

    2013-12-01

    The decades around the turn of the 19th into the 20th centuries covered a seminal period in the history of transfusion medicine as there was an increasing appreciation of a potential role in the management of surgical and obstetric bleeding, and also in severe non-surgical anaemias. The main obstacles to transfusing human blood were first the occasional devastating adverse reactions due, we now know, to ABO blood group incompatibility; and second the awkward propensity of shed blood to clot. This article describes in more detail how the pioneers in human transfusion immunology in the late 19th century and early 20th century learnt to recognise and avoid ABO incompatibility, and includes some hitherto obscure and rarely cited material. A companion article (Boulton, 2013, Submitted for publication) describes early attempts to find suitable anticoagulants. PMID:24003949

  2. What are RBC-transfusion-dependence and -independence?

    PubMed

    Gale, R P; Barosi, G; Barbui, T; Cervantes, F; Dohner, K; Dupriez, B; Gupta, V; Harrison, C; Hoffman, R; Kiladjian, J-J; Mesa, R; Mc Mullin, M F; Passamonti, F; Ribrag, V; Roboz, G; Saglio, G; Vannucchi, A; Verstovsek, S

    2011-01-01

    The term RBC-transfusion-dependence is widely-used by hematologists to describe a condition of severe anemia typically arising when erythropoiesis is reduced such that a person continuously requires ≥1 RBC-transfusions over a specified interval. Defining a person as RBC-transfusion-dependent has important implications in diverse hematological disorders especially because it strongly-correlated with decreased survival. Conversely, becoming RBC-transfusion-independent or receiving fewer RBC-transfusions over a specified interval is defined as improvement or response in many disease- and/or therapy-setting. Whether this correlates with improved survival is controversial. We used a structured expert-panel consensus panel process to define RBC-transfusion-dependence and -independence or improvement. We suggest these definitions may prove useful to persons studying or treating these diseases. PMID:20692036

  3. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Hodgkin's Disease: An Unusual Pediatric Association.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Maria Miguel; Oliva, Tereza; Pinto, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a recognized complication of lymphoproliferative disorders. AIHA associated with Hodgkin's disease (HD) is uncommon especially in the pediatric population. The diagnosis of AIHA is usually associated with HD at the time of initial presentation or during the course of disease, but it could precede it by years to months. In adults the association of AIHA and HD is more frequent in advanced stages and in the nodular sclerosis and mixed cellularity type HD. Warm immune hemolytic anemia is mainly controlled with steroids and chemotherapy. We report a case of a pediatric patient with direct antiglobulin positive test at the diagnosis of a late relapse of stage III B mixed cellularity type HD. PMID:26904342

  4. Critical appraisal of eculizumab for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Lilian M Pereira; Langman, Craig B

    2016-01-01

    The biology of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome has been shown to involve inability to limit activation of the alternative complement pathway, with subsequent damage to systemic endothelial beds and the vasculature, resulting in the prototypic findings of a thrombotic microangiopathy. Central to this process is the formation of the terminal membrane attack complex C5b-9. Recently, application of a monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to C5, eculizumab, became available to treat patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, replacing plasma exchange or infusion as primary therapy. This review focuses on the evidence, based on published clinical trials, case series, and case reports, on the efficacy and safety of this approach. PMID:27110144

  5. [Occurrence and drug-resistance of beta-hemolytic streptococci].

    PubMed

    Mikołajczyk, Dorota; Budzyńska, Anna; Kaczmarek, Agnieszka; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was the analysis of drug-resistance and frequency appearance of beta-hemolytic streptococci strains which were isolated in 2003-2005 in the University Hospital at the L. Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz University of Nicolaus Copernicus in Toruń. Among investigeted beta-hemolytic streptococci the most frequency isolated species was S. agalactiae. All isolates examined in our study were susceptible to penicillin, the higest rate of resistance was found for tetracycline. The rates of resistence to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (phenotyp MLS(B)) were as follows: S. agalactiae (18.7%), S. pyogenes (10.1%), group G streptococci (10.6%) and group C streptococci (8.0%). In our study we presented also a special case patient from which in investigeted period S. agalactiae was isolated twenty eight times. For ten chromosomal DNA isolated from this patient three different PFGE profiles were obtained. PMID:18416122

  6. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Hodgkin's Disease: An Unusual Pediatric Association

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Maria Miguel; Oliva, Tereza; Pinto, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a recognized complication of lymphoproliferative disorders. AIHA associated with Hodgkin's disease (HD) is uncommon especially in the pediatric population. The diagnosis of AIHA is usually associated with HD at the time of initial presentation or during the course of disease, but it could precede it by years to months. In adults the association of AIHA and HD is more frequent in advanced stages and in the nodular sclerosis and mixed cellularity type HD. Warm immune hemolytic anemia is mainly controlled with steroids and chemotherapy. We report a case of a pediatric patient with direct antiglobulin positive test at the diagnosis of a late relapse of stage III B mixed cellularity type HD. PMID:26904342

  7. A Web Server and Mobile App for Computing Hemolytic Potency of Peptides.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Singh, Sandeep; Tuknait, Abhishek; Gautam, Ankur; Mathur, Deepika; Anand, Priya; Varshney, Grish C; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-01-01

    Numerous therapeutic peptides do not enter the clinical trials just because of their high hemolytic activity. Recently, we developed a database, Hemolytik, for maintaining experimentally validated hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides. The present study describes a web server and mobile app developed for predicting, and screening of peptides having hemolytic potency. Firstly, we generated a dataset HemoPI-1 that contains 552 hemolytic peptides extracted from Hemolytik database and 552 random non-hemolytic peptides (from Swiss-Prot). The sequence analysis of these peptides revealed that certain residues (e.g., L, K, F, W) and motifs (e.g., "FKK", "LKL", "KKLL", "KWK", "VLK", "CYCR", "CRR", "RFC", "RRR", "LKKL") are more abundant in hemolytic peptides. Therefore, we developed models for discriminating hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides using various machine learning techniques and achieved more than 95% accuracy. We also developed models for discriminating peptides having high and low hemolytic potential on different datasets called HemoPI-2 and HemoPI-3. In order to serve the scientific community, we developed a web server, mobile app and JAVA-based standalone software (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hemopi/). PMID:26953092

  8. A Web Server and Mobile App for Computing Hemolytic Potency of Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Singh, Sandeep; Tuknait, Abhishek; Gautam, Ankur; Mathur, Deepika; Anand, Priya; Varshney, Grish C.; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous therapeutic peptides do not enter the clinical trials just because of their high hemolytic activity. Recently, we developed a database, Hemolytik, for maintaining experimentally validated hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides. The present study describes a web server and mobile app developed for predicting, and screening of peptides having hemolytic potency. Firstly, we generated a dataset HemoPI-1 that contains 552 hemolytic peptides extracted from Hemolytik database and 552 random non-hemolytic peptides (from Swiss-Prot). The sequence analysis of these peptides revealed that certain residues (e.g., L, K, F, W) and motifs (e.g., “FKK”, “LKL”, “KKLL”, “KWK”, “VLK”, “CYCR”, “CRR”, “RFC”, “RRR”, “LKKL”) are more abundant in hemolytic peptides. Therefore, we developed models for discriminating hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides using various machine learning techniques and achieved more than 95% accuracy. We also developed models for discriminating peptides having high and low hemolytic potential on different datasets called HemoPI-2 and HemoPI-3. In order to serve the scientific community, we developed a web server, mobile app and JAVA-based standalone software (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hemopi/). PMID:26953092

  9. A Web Server and Mobile App for Computing Hemolytic Potency of Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Singh, Sandeep; Tuknait, Abhishek; Gautam, Ankur; Mathur, Deepika; Anand, Priya; Varshney, Grish C.; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2016-03-01

    Numerous therapeutic peptides do not enter the clinical trials just because of their high hemolytic activity. Recently, we developed a database, Hemolytik, for maintaining experimentally validated hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides. The present study describes a web server and mobile app developed for predicting, and screening of peptides having hemolytic potency. Firstly, we generated a dataset HemoPI-1 that contains 552 hemolytic peptides extracted from Hemolytik database and 552 random non-hemolytic peptides (from Swiss-Prot). The sequence analysis of these peptides revealed that certain residues (e.g., L, K, F, W) and motifs (e.g., “FKK”, “LKL”, “KKLL”, “KWK”, “VLK”, “CYCR”, “CRR”, “RFC”, “RRR”, “LKKL”) are more abundant in hemolytic peptides. Therefore, we developed models for discriminating hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides using various machine learning techniques and achieved more than 95% accuracy. We also developed models for discriminating peptides having high and low hemolytic potential on different datasets called HemoPI-2 and HemoPI-3. In order to serve the scientific community, we developed a web server, mobile app and JAVA-based standalone software (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hemopi/).

  10. Detection of hemolytic Listeria monocytogenes by using DNA colony hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, A.R.; Wentz, B.A.; Hill, W.E.

    1987-09-01

    A fragment of about 500 base pairs of the beta-hemolysin gene from Listeria monocytogenes was used to screen different bacterial strains by DNA colony hybridization. The cells in the colonies were lysed by microwaves in the presence of sodium hydroxide. Of 52 different strains of Listeria species screened, only the DNA from beta-hemolytic (CAMP-positive) strains of L. monocytogenes hybridized with this probe.

  11. Effect of restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategies on outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease in a non-cardiac surgery setting: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Rob; Brunskill, Susan; Trivella, Marialena; Doree, Carolyn; Holst, Lars; Parker, Martyn; Gregersen, Merete; Pinheiro de Almeida, Juliano; Walsh, Timothy S; Stanworth, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare patient outcomes of restrictive versus liberal blood transfusion strategies in patients with cardiovascular disease not undergoing cardiac surgery. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Randomised controlled trials involving a threshold for red blood cell transfusion in hospital. We searched (to 2 November 2015) CENTRAL, Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PubMed, LILACS, NHSBT Transfusion Evidence Library, ClinicalTrials.gov, WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, ISRCTN Register, and EU Clinical Trials Register. Authors were contacted for data whenever possible. Trial selection Published and unpublished randomised controlled trials comparing a restrictive with liberal transfusion threshold and that included patients with cardiovascular disease. Data extraction and synthesis Data extraction was completed in duplicate. Risk of bias was assessed using Cochrane methods. Relative risk ratios with 95% confidence intervals were presented in all meta-analyses. Mantel-Haenszel random effects models were used to pool risk ratios. Main outcome measures 30 day mortality, and cardiovascular events. Results 41 trials were identified; of these, seven included data on patients with cardiovascular disease. Data from a further four trials enrolling patients with cardiovascular disease were obtained from the authors. In total, 11 trials enrolling patients with cardiovascular disease (n=3033) were included for meta-analysis (restrictive transfusion, n=1514 patients; liberal transfusion, n=1519). The pooled risk ratio for the association between transfusion thresholds and 30 day mortality was 1.15 (95% confidence interval 0.88 to 1.50, P=0.50), with little heterogeneity (I2=14%). The risk of acute coronary syndrome in patients managed with restrictive compared with liberal transfusion was increased (nine trials; risk ratio 1.78, 95% confidence interval 1.18 to 2.70, P=0.01, I2=0%). Conclusions The results show that it may not be safe to use a restrictive transfusion threshold of less than 80 g/L in patients with ongoing acute coronary syndrome or chronic cardiovascular disease. Effects on mortality and other outcomes are uncertain. These data support the use of a more liberal transfusion threshold (>80 g/L) for patients with both acute and chronic cardiovascular disease until adequately powered high quality randomised trials have been undertaken in patients with cardiovascular disease. Registration PROSPERO CRD42014014251. PMID:27026510

  12. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome diagnosed four years after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Keiko; Kawanishi, Kunio; Sato, Masayo; Itabashi, Mitsuyo; Fujii, Akiko; Kanetsuna, Yukiko; Huchinoue, Shouhei; Ohashi, Ryuji; Koike, Junki; Honda, Kazuho; Nagashima, Yoji; Nitta, Kosaku

    2015-07-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) in allograft kidney transplantation is caused by various factors including rejection, infection, and immunosuppressive drugs. We present a case of a 32 year old woman with aHUS four years after an ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation from a living relative. The primary cause of end-stage renal disease was unknown; however, IgA nephropathy (IgAN) was suspected from her clinical course. She underwent pre-emptive kidney transplantation from her 60 year old mother. The allograft preserved good renal function [serum creatinine (sCr) level 110-130 μmol/L] until a sudden attack of abdominal pain four years after transplant, with acute renal failure (sCr level, 385.3 μmol/L), decreasing platelet count, and hemolytic anemia with schizocytes. On allograft biopsy, there was thrombotic microangiopathy in the glomeruli, with a cellular crescent formation and mesangial IgA and C3 deposition. Microvascular inflammation, such as glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and arteriole endarteritis were also detected. A disintegrin-like and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motifs 13 (ADAMTS13) did not decrease and Shiga toxin was not detected. Donor-specific antibodies or autoantibodies, including anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody and anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibody, were negative. The patient was diagnosed with aHUS and received three sessions of plasmapheresis and methylprednisolone pulse therapy, followed by oral methylprednisolone (0.25-0.5 mg/kg) instead of tacrolimus. She temporarily required hemodialysis (sCr level, 658.3 μmol/L). Thereafter, her sCr level improved to 284.5 μmol/L without dialysis therapy. This case is clinically considered as aHUS after kidney transplantation, associated with various factors, including rejection, glomerulonephritis, and toxicity from drugs such as tacrolimus. PMID:26031589

  13. Serratamolide is a Hemolytic Factor Produced by Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Robert M. Q.; Stella, Nicholas A.; Lahr, Roni M.; Wang, Shaoru; Veverka, Tara I.; Kowalski, Regis P.; Liu, Xinyu

    2012-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is a common contaminant of contact lens cases and lenses. Hemolytic factors of S. marcescens contribute to the virulence of this opportunistic bacterial pathogen. We took advantage of an observed hyper-hemolytic phenotype of crp mutants to investigate mechanisms of hemolysis. A genetic screen revealed that swrW is necessary for the hyper-hemolysis phenotype of crp mutants. The swrW gene is required for biosynthesis of the biosurfactant serratamolide, previously shown to be a broad-spectrum antibiotic and to contribute to swarming motility. Multicopy expression of swrW or mutation of the hexS transcription factor gene, a known inhibitor of swrW expression, led to an increase in hemolysis. Surfactant zones and expression from an swrW-transcriptional reporter were elevated in a crp mutant compared to the wild type. Purified serratamolide was hemolytic to sheep and murine red blood cells and cytotoxic to human airway and corneal limbal epithelial cells in vitro. The swrW gene was found in the majority of contact lens isolates tested. Genetic and biochemical analysis implicate the biosurfactant serratamolide as a hemolysin. This novel hemolysin may contribute to irritation and infections associated with contact lens use. PMID:22615766

  14. Hemolytic venoms from marine cnidarian jellyfish – an overview

    PubMed Central

    Mariottini, Gian Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Cnidarian jellyfish are viewed as an emergent problem in several coastal zones throughout the world. Recurrent outbreaks pose a serious threat to tourists and bathers, as well as to sea-workers, involving health and economical aspects. As a rule, cnidarian stinging as a consequence of nematocyst firing induces merely local symptoms but cardiovascular or neurological complications can also occur. Hemolysis is a frequent effect of cnidarian stinging; this dangerous condition is known to be caused by several venoms and can sometimes be lethal. At present, the bulk of data concerning hemolytic cnidarian venoms comes from the study of benthic species, such as sea anemones and soft corals, but hemolytic factors were found in venoms of several siphonophore, cubozoan and scyphozoan jellyfish, which are mainly involved in the envenomation of bathers and sea-workers. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review the scientific literature concerning the hemolytic venoms from cnidarian jellyfish taking into consideration their importance in human pathology as well as health implications and possible therapeutic measures. PMID:25386336

  15. Transfusion Considerations in Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Bercovitz, Rachel S; Josephson, Cassandra D

    2016-06-01

    Pediatric patients with malignancies or benign hematologic diseases are a heterogeneous group with complicated underlying pathophysiologies leading to their requirements for transfusion therapy. Common practice among pediatric hematologists, oncologists, and transplant physicians is to transfuse stable patients red cells to maintain a hemoglobin greater than 7 or 8 g/dL and transfuse platelets to maintain a count greater than 10,000 or 20,000 platelets/μL. This review compiles data from myriad studies performed in pediatric patients to give readers the knowledge needed to make an informed choice when considering different management strategies for the transfusion of red blood cells, platelets, plasma, and granulocytes. PMID:27113005

  16. Transfusion Medicine in Sub-Saharan Africa: Conference Summary.

    PubMed

    Dzik, Walter Sunny; Kyeyune, Dorothy; Otekat, Grace; Natukunda, Bernard; Hume, Heather; Kasirye, Phillip G; Ddungu, Henry; Kajja, Isaac; Dhabangi, Aggrey; Mugyenyi, Godfrey R; Seguin, Claire; Barnes, Linda; Delaney, Meghan

    2015-07-01

    In November 2014, a 3-day conference devoted to transfusion medicine in sub-Saharan Africa was held in Kampala, Uganda. Faculty from academic institutions in Uganda provided a broad overview of issues pertinent to transfusion medicine in Africa. The conference consisted of lectures, demonstrations, and discussions followed by 5 small group workshops held at the Uganda Blood Transfusion Service Laboratories, the Ugandan Cancer Institute, and the Mulago National Referral Hospital. Highlighted topics included the challenges posed by increasing clinical demands for blood, the need for better patient identification at the time of transfusion, inadequate application of the antiglobulin reagent during pretransfusion testing, concern regarding proper recognition and evaluation of transfusion reactions, the expanded role for nurse leadership as a means to improve patient outcomes, and the need for an epidemiologic map of blood usage in Africa. Specialty areas of focus included the potential for broader application of transcranial Doppler and hydroxyurea therapy in sickle cell disease, African-specific guidelines for transfusion support of cancer patients, the challenges of transfusion support in trauma, and the importance of African-centered clinical research in pediatric and obstetric transfusion medicine. The course concluded by summarizing the benefits derived from an organized quality program that extended from the donor to the recipient. As an educational tool, the slide-audio presentation of the lectures will be made freely available at the International Society of Blood Transfusion Academy Web site: http://www.isbtweb.org/academy/. PMID:25752939

  17. Potential Harm of Prophylactic Platelet Transfusion in Adult Dengue Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tau-Hong; Wong, Joshua G. X.; Leo, Yee-Sin; Thein, Tun-Linn; Ng, Ee-Ling; Lee, Linda K.; Lye, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Thrombocytopenia is a hallmark of dengue infection, and bleeding is a dreaded complication of dengue fever. Prophylactic platelet transfusion has been used to prevent bleeding in the management of dengue fever, although the evidence for its benefit is lacking. In adult dengue patients with platelet count <20,000/mm3 without bleeding, we aimed to assess if prophylactic platelet transfusion was effective in reducing clinical bleeding and other outcomes. Method We conducted a retrospective non-randomised observational study of dengue patients with platelet count < 20,000/mm3 without bleeding (except petechiae) admitted to Tan Tock Seng Hospital from January 2005 to December 2008. Baseline characteristics and clinical outcomes were compared between the non-transfused vs. transfused groups. Outcomes studied were clinical bleeding, platelet increment, hospital length of stay, intensive care unit admission and death. Results Of the 788 patients included, 486 received prophylactic platelet transfusion. There was no significant difference in the presence of clinical bleeding in the two groups (18.2% in non-transfused group vs. 23.5% in transfused group; P = 0.08). Patients in the transfused group took a median of 1 day longer than the non-transfused group to increase their platelet count to 50,000/mm3 or more (3 days vs. 2 days, P <0.0001). The median duration of hospital stay in the non-transfused group was 5 days vs. 6 days in the transfused group (P< 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the proportion requiring ICU admission (non-transfused 0.66% vs. transfused 1.23%, P = 0.44) and death (non-transfused 0% vs. transfused 0.2%, P = 0.43). Conclusion Platelet transfusion in absence of bleeding in adult dengue with platelet count <20,000/mm3 did not reduce bleeding or expedite platelet recovery. There was potential harm by slowing recovery of platelet count to >50,000/mm3 and increasing length of hospitalization. PMID:27015272

  18. Transfusion-associated dyspnea--shadow or substance?

    PubMed

    Badami, K G; Joliffe, E; Stephens, M

    2015-08-01

    New Zealand Blood Service Haemovigilance uses International Society of Blood Transfusion/International Haemovigilance Network definitions to categorize transfusion reactions (TR). Transfusion-associated dyspnoea (TAD) is a category for TR with respiratory features (TRRF) that do not fit definitive entities. TRRF, including TAD, are clinically significant. TR classified as TAD were reviewed. We found that many TAD may have been transfusion-associated circulatory overload. Better information in TR reports and refining TR diagnostic criteria may result in less misclassification of TRRF. TAD may represent mild, atypical or overlap entities, and there may be a residuum of cases with currently unexplained pathophysiology. PMID:25854631

  19. Fatal Yersinia enterocolitica sepsis after blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Wright, D C; Selss, I F; Vinton, K J; Pierce, R N

    1985-11-01

    A patient with fatal Yersinia enterocolitica sepsis was seen recently in our intensive care unit. The patient had received two units of packed red blood cells during a surgical procedure. Cultures of the donor blood yielded Y enterocolitica, and a whole-organism enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of the donors' sera suggested a recent infection with Y enterocolitica in an asymptomatic donor. Though rare, Y enterocolitica, which can grow at the cold temperatures of refrigerated blood, should be considered as a possible source of sepsis following blood transfusion. PMID:3840356

  20. [Plasmodium falciparum Malaria and Exchange Transfusion Application].

    PubMed

    Kızılateş, Filiz; Berk, Hande; Seyman, Derya; Kurtoğlu, Erdal; Öztoprak, Nefise

    2015-06-01

    Malaria caused by P. falciparum, is endemic in tropical and subtropical areas but is seen as sporadic cases in our country. A patient, early diagnosed and succesfully treated with antimalarial drug administration and a patient, with severe clinical manifestations and succesfully treated with antimalarial medication as well as Erythrocyte Exchange Transfusion (EET), who were not applied chemoprophylaxis are presented. The cases are presented in order to emphasize on the necessity of giving education to the people going to endemic areas from our country for work or travel and on the necessity of taking chemoprophylaxis and to take attention that EET may be preffered in the therapy of severe malaria cases. PMID:26081890

  1. Internet-based transfusion audit system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitan, Jacek; Haley, Rebecca

    1995-03-01

    This project is aimed at developing a cost-effective working environment for the transfusion medicine specialists of American Red Cross (ARC). In this project we are developing a multimedia-based consultation environment that uses Internet and teleconferencing to increase the quality of services and to replace currently used 800 telephone lines. Through the use of Internet/LAN/ISDN the physicians can share information and references while they discuss patient cases. A multimedia interface allows the physician to access data from the office and from the house. This paper discusses the approach, current status of the project and future plans to extend the approach to other areas of medicine.

  2. Leukocyte Antigen and Antibody Detection Assays: Tools for Assessing and Preventing Pulmonary Transfusion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Stroncek, David F.; Fadeyi, Emmanuel; Adams, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    Antibodies to neutrophil and HLA antigens can cause pulmonary transfusion reactions and in some cases acute lung injury. When evaluating cases of pulmonary transfusion reactions it is often necessary to test donors for neutrophil and HLA antibodies and also type the recipient for neutrophil and HLA antigens. A variety of ELISA and flow cytometry based solid phase assays are available to test for HLA class I and class II antibodies, but not neutrophil antibodies. Screening for neutrophil antibodies requires the preparation of panels of fresh neutrophils and testing in agglutination, immunofluorescence, or flow cytometry assays. Genotyping of HLA class I and II antigens is performed with a variety of sequence specific primers, sequenced specific oligonucleotide probe and sequence based typing assays. Neutrophil specific antigens HNA-1a, -1b, -1c, -4a and -5a can be genotyped, but not HNA-2a or -3a. Phenotyping of HNA-2a can be preformed with CD177 monoclonal antibodies, but the gene encoding HNA-3a has not been identified and the genomic basis for the HNA-2a-negative phenotype in not known. In conclusion, patients and donors involved with pulmonary transfusion reactions can be quickly typed for HLA antigens and tested for HLA antibodies but testing for neutrophil antibodies and antigens requires the use of a reference laboratory. PMID:17900489

  3. History of blood transfusion in sub-saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Schneider, William H

    2013-01-01

    The adequacy and safety of blood transfusion in sub-Saharan Africa is the subject of much concern, yet there have been very few studies of its history. An overview of that record finds that transfusions were first reported in Africa (sub-Saharan and excluding South Africa) in the early 1920s, and organized transfusion practices were established before the Second World War. Blood transfusion grew rapidly after 1945, along with the construction of new hospitals and expanded health services in Africa. Significant differences existed between colonial powers in the organization of transfusion services, but these converged after independence as their use continued to grow and decentralized and hospital-based practices were adopted. It was only after the oil crisis in the mid-1970s that health spending declined and the collection, testing, and transfusion of blood began to level off. Thus, when the AIDS crisis hit transfusion services, they were already struggling to meet the needs of patients. At this time, foreign assistance as well as the World Health Organization and the League of Red Cross Societies helped respond to both the immediate problem of testing blood, and for some countries, support existed for the broader reorganization of transfusion. Overall, the history shows that transfusion was adopted widely and quickly, limited mainly by the availability of knowledgeable doctors and hospital facilities. There was less resistance than expected by Africans to receive transfusions, and the record shows a remarkable flexibility in obtaining blood. The dangers of disease transmission were recognized from an early date but were balanced against the potential lifesaving benefits of transfusion. PMID:22981696

  4. Blood transfusion in sickle cell disease leading to posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES).

    PubMed

    Raj, Shashi; Killinger, James; Overby, Philip

    2013-10-01

    Children with sickle cell disease have a very high risk of lifelong neurologic morbidity and mortality. Cerebrovascular accidents are a known complication in children with sickle cell disease. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a constellation of acute neurologic findings increasingly recognized in pediatric critical care population with evidence of vasogenic edema on brain imaging possibly due to cerebral vascular endothelial cell dysfunction. This report, for the first time, describes a young adult with sickle cell disease who developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following blood transfusion. PMID:22899796

  5. Contemporary issues in transfusion medicine informatics

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gaurav; Parwani, Anil V.; Raval, Jay S.; Triulzi, Darrell J.; Benjamin, Richard J.; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2011-01-01

    The Transfusion Medicine Service (TMS) covers diverse clinical and laboratory-based services that must be delivered with accuracy, efficiency and reliability. TMS oversight is shared by multiple regulatory agencies that cover product manufacturing and validation standards geared toward patient safety. These demands present significant informatics challenges. Over the past few decades, TMS information systems have improved to better handle blood product manufacturing, inventory, delivery, tracking and documentation. Audit trails and access to electronic databases have greatly facilitated product traceability and biovigilance efforts. Modern blood bank computing has enabled novel applications such as the electronic crossmatch, kiosk-based blood product delivery systems, and self-administered computerized blood donor interview and eligibility determination. With increasing use of barcoding technology, there has been a marked improvement in patient and specimen identification. Moreover, the emergence of national and international labeling standards such as ISBT 128 have facilitated the availability, movement and tracking of blood products across national and international boundaries. TMS has only recently begun to leverage the electronic medical record to address quality issues in transfusion practice and promote standardized documentation within institutions. With improved technology, future growth is expected in blood bank automation and product labeling with applications such as radio frequency identification devices. This article reviews several of these key informatics issues relevant to the contemporary practice of TMS. PMID:21383927

  6. Contemporary issues in transfusion medicine informatics.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gaurav; Parwani, Anil V; Raval, Jay S; Triulzi, Darrell J; Benjamin, Richard J; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2011-01-01

    The Transfusion Medicine Service (TMS) covers diverse clinical and laboratory-based services that must be delivered with accuracy, efficiency and reliability. TMS oversight is shared by multiple regulatory agencies that cover product manufacturing and validation standards geared toward patient safety. These demands present significant informatics challenges. Over the past few decades, TMS information systems have improved to better handle blood product manufacturing, inventory, delivery, tracking and documentation. Audit trails and access to electronic databases have greatly facilitated product traceability and biovigilance efforts. Modern blood bank computing has enabled novel applications such as the electronic crossmatch, kiosk-based blood product delivery systems, and self-administered computerized blood donor interview and eligibility determination. With increasing use of barcoding technology, there has been a marked improvement in patient and specimen identification. Moreover, the emergence of national and international labeling standards such as ISBT 128 have facilitated the availability, movement and tracking of blood products across national and international boundaries. TMS has only recently begun to leverage the electronic medical record to address quality issues in transfusion practice and promote standardized documentation within institutions. With improved technology, future growth is expected in blood bank automation and product labeling with applications such as radio frequency identification devices. This article reviews several of these key informatics issues relevant to the contemporary practice of TMS. PMID:21383927

  7. [Hepatitis E virus: Blood transfusion implications].

    PubMed

    Gallian, P; Piquet, Y; Assal, A; Djoudi, R; Chiaroni, J; Izopet, J; Tiberghien, P

    2014-11-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a non-enveloped RNA virus transmitted by the fecal-oral route. Autochthonous hepatitis E occurring in developed countries is caused by genotypes 3 and 4 and is a zoonotic infection. Humans are infected mostly after ingestion of undercooked meat from infected animals. Most HEV 3 and 4 infections are clinically inapparent. However, genotype 3 (HEV 3) can lead to chronic hepatitis in immuno-compromised patients such as organ-transplant recipients and patients with haematological malignancies. In Europe, HEV 3 is implicated in transfusion-transmitted HEV infection. In France, as observed in several European countries, prevalence of HEV RNA and specific IgG antibodies are high indicating that viral circulation is important. The systematic HEV NAT screening of blood donations used for preparation of solvent detergent plasma indicate that 1 to 2218 donation is infected by HEV RNA. The need or implementation's impacts of safety measures to prevent HEV transmission by blood transfusion are under reflexion by French's health authorities. The HEV NAT screening is the only available tool of prevention. Alternative strategies are under investigation including individual or mini pool NAT testing all or part of blood donations. PMID:25267201

  8. Massive Transfusion of 5 U Packed Redblood Cells, 3 U Fresh Frozen Plasma, and 160 cc of Platelets in a 14-Month-Old Patient.

    PubMed

    Sparkle, Tanaya; Cameron, Staci

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We present a case in which extremely rapid massive transfusion was successfully used to combat severe acute bleeding during a parietooccipital tumor resection in a 14-month-old patient. CASE REPORT An 8-kg patient was found to have a 4×5×5-cm parietooccipital tumor on computed tomography scan, for which resection was urgently planned. Sudden acute bleeding was encountered, which was communicated to the anesthesia team. Transfusion was initiated and a total of 5 units of packed red blood cells, 3 units of fresh frozen plasma, 160 ml of platelets, 200 ml of albumin, and 500 ml of 0.9% normal saline were transfused during a 4-h period. We administered 4 g of mannitol and 0.8 mg of furosemide to deal with anticipated fluid overload. The patient was sent to the intensive care unit and extubated the next day. No clinically significant hemostatic or fluid overload complications were noted after the treatment. CONCLUSIONS Massive transfusion (MT) was found to be safe and effective in this case. Most of what we know about pediatric MT is an extrapolation of data from adult studies. Although practical, it might not be ideal due to the differences in the physiology and incomplete development of hemostatic mechanisms in children, especially those younger than 12 months. Studies evaluating the use of pediatric MT protocols have not shown a significant advantage over transfusion per clinician discretion. PMID:27032708

  9. Plasma exchange in Immunoglobulin A nephropathy with thrombotic microangiopathy and acute cortical necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Doddi, P.; Gowda, K.; Ramachandran, R.; Nada, R.; Kumar, V.; Rathi, M.; Kohli, H. S.; Gupta, K. L.

    2016-01-01

    A 25-year-old female presented with decreased urine output, deranged renal function, thrombocytopenia, and hemolytic anemia. Kidney biopsy was consistent with thrombotic microangiopathy with acute cortical necrosis and Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN). Hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and urine output improved after five sessions of plasma exchange. Renal function showed a delayed recovery and serum creatinine normalized by 3 months. This is first case of successful use of plasma exchange in hemolytic uremic syndrome with cortical necrosis associated with IgAN. PMID:26937078

  10. Fresh whole blood transfusion capability for Special Operations Forces

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, Maj Andrew; Callum, Jeannie; da Luz, Luis Teodoro; Schmid, Joanne; Funk, Christopher; Glassberg, Col Elon; Tien, Col Homer

    2015-01-01

    Summary Fresh whole blood (FWB) transfusion is an option for providing volume and oxygen carrying capacity to bleeding Special Operations soldiers who are injured in an austere environment and who are far from a regular blood bank. Retrospective data from recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan show an association between the use of FWB and survival. We reviewed the literature to document the issues surrounding FWB transfusion to Special Operations soldiers in the austere environment and surveyed the literature regarding best practice guidelines for and patient outcomes after FWB transfusions. Most literature regarding FWB transfusion is retrospective or historical. There is limited prospective evidence currently to change transfusion practice in tertiary care facilities, but FWB remains an option in the austere setting. PMID:26100776

  11. Factors influencing blood transfusion during adult liver transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Deakin, M.; Gunson, B. K.; Dunn, J. A.; McMaster, P.; Tisone, G.; Warwick, J.; Buckels, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    From 1982 to 1990, 300 adults received liver transplants in Birmingham UK with a median intraoperative blood transfusion rate of 23.5 units for the first 50 patients falling to 8 units for the last 50. The major factors in the reduction of blood usage were the experience of the team, the use of venovenous bypass and the use of an argon beam coagulator. Univariate analysis of preoperative factors in an attempt to predict patients at risk of excessive intraoperative transfusion showed that levels of serum sodium, urea, creatinine, haemoglobin, patient weight and the presence of ascites were significantly related to the quantity of blood transfused, although stepwise discriminant analysis showed that only blood urea and platelet count had an independent association with transfusion. The final model was poorly predictive of intraoperative transfusion requirements. Technical factors rather than patient-related factors are more important in the control of intraoperative bleeding in newly established transplant programmes. PMID:8215151

  12. [Revision of the guideline 'Blood transfusion': for the newborn].

    PubMed

    von Lindern, Jeannette S; Brand, Anneke; Lopriore, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    The large majority (> 90%) of very premature infants and newborn infants with haemolysis receive one or more red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. Up to 35% of newborn infants have thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 150 x 109/l). Following an unambiguous blood transfusion guideline leads to decrease in the number of transfusions given. The necessity for RBC transfusions can be diminished by use of diagnostic tests, micro-analysis techniques and delay of umbilical cord clamping (waiting for 30 seconds to 3 minutes after birth). Newborn infants with a gestational age < 32 weeks or birth weight < 1500 g must receive irradiated and Parvovirus-B19 safe blood products until 6 months post-term. It is still unclear whether lower Hb values and thrombocyte counts can be accepted as a transfusion limit without negative effect on the (neurological) long term outcomes and without increase in risk of intraventricular bleeding. PMID:22748371

  13. Early intravenous immunoglobin (two-dose regimen) in the management of severe Rh hemolytic disease of newborn--a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Elalfy, Mohsen Saleh; Elbarbary, Nancy Samir; Abaza, Heba Wegdan

    2011-04-01

    Phototherapy is the standard treatment in moderately severe hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN), whereas exchange transfusion (ET) is the second line in progressive cases. Intravenous immunoglobin (IVIG) has been suggested to decrease the need for ET. We aimed at assessing the efficacy of early two-dose regimens of IVIG to avoid unnecessary ET in severe Rh HDN. The study included 90 full-term neonates with Rh incompatibility unmodified by antenatal treatment and not eligible for early ET and which were randomly assigned into one of three groups: group (I), treated by conventional method; groups IIa and IIb received IVIG once at 12 h postnatal age if PT was indicated, in a dose of 0.5 and 1 g/kg, respectively. Analysis revealed 11 neonates (22%) in the conventional group and 2 (5%) in the intervention group who administered low-dose IVIG at 12 h, while none in group IIb required exchange transfusion (p = 0.03). Mean bilirubin levels were significantly lower during the first 96 h in the intervention group compared to the conventional group (p < 0.0001). Shorter duration of phototherapy (52.8 ± 12.39 h) and hospital stay (3.25 ± 0.71 days) in the IVIG group compared to conventional group (84 ± 12.12 h and 4.72 ± 0.78 days, p < 0.0001, respectively) were observed. We conclude that IVIG administration at 12 h was effective in the treatment of severe Rh HDN; the low-dose IVIG (0.5 g/kg) was as effective as high dose (1 g/kg) in reducing the duration of phototherapy and hospital stay, but less effective in avoiding exchange transfusion. PMID:20924607

  14. Engineering antimicrobial peptides with improved antimicrobial and hemolytic activities.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Zhao, Chao; Liang, Guizhao; Zhang, Mingzhen; Zheng, Jie

    2013-12-23

    The rapid rise of antibiotic resistance in pathogens becomes a serious and growing threat to medicine and public health. Naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important line of defense in the immune system against invading bacteria and microbial infection. In this work, we present a combined computational and experimental study of the biological activity and membrane interaction of the computationally designed Bac2A-based peptide library. We used the MARTINI coarse-grained molecular dynamics with adaptive biasing force method and the umbrella sampling technique to investigate the translocation of a total of 91 peptides with different amino acid substitutions through a mixed anionic POPE/POPG (3:1) bilayer and a neutral POPC bilayer, which mimic the bacterial inner membrane and the human red blood cell (hRBC) membrane, respectively. Potential of mean force (PMF, free energy profile) was obtained to measure the free energy barrier required to transfer the peptides from the bulk water phase to the water-membrane interface and to the bilayer interior. Different PMF profiles can indeed identify different membrane insertion scenarios by mapping out peptide-lipid energy landscapes, which are correlated with antimicrobial activity and hemolytic activity. Computationally designed peptides were further tested experimentally for their antimicrobial and hemolytic activities using bacteria growth inhibition assay and hemolysis assay. Comparison of PMF data with cell assay results reveals a good correlation of the peptides between predictive transmembrane activity and antimicrobial/hemolytic activity. Moreover, the most active mutants with the balanced substitutions of positively charged Arg and hydrophobic Trp residues at specific positions were discovered to achieve the improved antimicrobial activity while minimizing red blood cell lysis. Such substitutions provide more effective and cooperative interactions to distinguish the peptide interaction with different lipid bilayers. This work provides a useful computational tool to better understand the mechanism and energetics of membrane insertion of AMPs and to rationally design more effective AMPs. PMID:24279498

  15. Prognostic impact of pre-transplantation transfusion history and secondary iron overload in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation: a GITMO study

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrino, Emilio Paolo; Porta, Matteo Giovanni Della; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Malcovati, Luca; Angelucci, Emanuele; Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Falda, Michele; Onida, Francesco; Bernardi, Massimo; Guidi, Stefano; Lucarelli, Barbarella; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Cerretti, Raffaella; Marenco, Paola; Pioltelli, Pietro; Pascutto, Cristiana; Oneto, Rosi; Pirolini, Laura; Fanin, Renato; Bosi, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Background Transfusion-dependency affects the natural history of myelodysplastic syndromes. Secondary iron overload may concur to this effect. The relative impact of these factors on the outcome of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome receiving allogeneic stem-cell transplantation remains to be clarified. Design and Methods We retrospectively evaluated the prognostic effect of transfusion history and iron overload on the post-transplantation outcome of 357 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome reported to the Gruppo Italiano Trapianto di Midollo Osseo (GITMO) registry between 1997 and 2007. Results Transfusion-dependency was independently associated with reduced overall survival (hazard ratio=1.48, P=0.017) and increased non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio=1.68, P=0.024). The impact of transfusion-dependency was noted only in patients receiving myeloablative conditioning (overall survival: hazard ratio=1.76, P=0.003; non-relapse mortality: hazard ratio=1.70, P=0.02). There was an inverse relationship between transfusion burden and overall survival after transplantation (P=0.022); the outcome was significantly worse in subjects receiving more than 20 red cell units. In multivariate analysis, transfusion-dependency was found to be a risk factor for acute graft-versus-host disease (P=0.04). Among transfusion-dependent patients undergoing myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation, pre-transplantation serum ferritin level had a significant effect on overall survival (P=0.01) and non-relapse mortality (P=0.03). This effect was maintained after adjusting for transfusion burden and duration, suggesting that the negative effect of transfusion history on outcome might be determined at least in part by iron overload. Conclusions Pre-transplantation transfusion history and serum ferritin have significant prognostic value in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation, inducing a significant increase of non-relapse mortality. These results indicate that transfusion history should be considered in transplantation decision-making in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome. PMID:19903678

  16. Recurrent Hemolytic and Uremic Syndrome Induced by Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Commereuc, Morgane; Weill, Francois-Xavier; Loukiadis, Estelle; Gouali, Malika; Gleizal, Audrey; Kormann, Raphaël; Ridel, Christophe; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A widespread belief is that typical hemolytic and uremic syndrome (HUS) does not recur. We report the case of a patient infected twice with raw milk taken from his own cow and containing a Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 that induced recurrent HUS causing severe renal and cerebral disorders. A genomic comparison of the human and bovine Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 isolates revealed that they were identical. Typical HUS may recur. Since milk from this animal was occasionally distributed locally, thereby posing a serious threat for the whole village, this particular cow was destroyed. PMID:26735524

  17. Recurrent Hemolytic and Uremic Syndrome Induced by Escherichia Coli.

    PubMed

    Commereuc, Morgane; Weill, Francois-Xavier; Loukiadis, Estelle; Gouali, Malika; Gleizal, Audrey; Kormann, Raphaël; Ridel, Christophe; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    A widespread belief is that typical hemolytic and uremic syndrome (HUS) does not recur. We report the case of a patient infected twice with raw milk taken from his own cow and containing a Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 that induced recurrent HUS causing severe renal and cerebral disorders. A genomic comparison of the human and bovine Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 isolates revealed that they were identical.Typical HUS may recur. Since milk from this animal was occasionally distributed locally, thereby posing a serious threat for the whole village, this particular cow was destroyed. PMID:26735524

  18. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia during adalimumab treatment for plaque psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Harada, Yukinori; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Sato, Midori; Kodaira, Mutsuki; Kono, Tsunesuke

    2015-01-01

    Adalimumab is commonly used to treat autoimmune diseases with few reported hematological adverse reactions. We herein describe the case of an 85-year-old Japanese man with plaque psoriasis who developed autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) after 3 years of adalimumab treatment. The patient suddenly developed hematuria and dyspnea on exertion while receiving adalimumab treatment. Laboratory data showed low hemoglobin levels and slightly increased reticulocyte counts, while direct and indirect antiglobulin tests were positive. The patient was diagnosed with AIHA which resolved after replacing the adalimumab treatment with prednisolone therapy. The findings from this case indicate that AIHA may be caused by long-term adalimumab treatment. PMID:25948357

  19. Case of fatal sickle cell intrahepatic cholestasis despite use of exchange transfusion in an African-American patient.

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Daniel B.; Miksad, Rebecca A.; Buff, Michael S.; Wang, Yihong; Dezube, Bruce J.

    2006-01-01

    Sickle cell intrahepatic cholestasis (SCIC) is a rare complication of sickle cell anemia, characterized by marked hyperbilirubinemia and acute hepatic failure with an often fatal course. However, the few reported adult cases that were treated with exchange transfusion had a favorable outcome. We herein describe a 48-year-old African-American man with hemoglobin S/B thalassemia and previously treated hepatitis C with compensated cirrhosis, who presented with a total bilirubin of 59.7 mg/dL and direct bilirubin of 43.6 mg/dL in the absence of choledocholithiasis. Despite an exchange transfusion and aggressive packed red blood cell transfusions, which successfully decreased the hemoglobin S levels to <15%, he perished from progressive hepatic and renal failure. Autopsy demonstrated extensive intrahepatocellular and intracanalicular cholestasis in a background of cirrhosis. Our case suggests that poor prognostic factors for adult SCIC patients treated with exchange transfusion may include older age and underlying hepatic disease. Images Figure 2 PMID:16895293

  20. Alterations in Bone and Erythropoiesis in Hemolytic Anemia: Comparative Study in Bled, Phenylhydrazine-Treated and Plasmodium-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Robert; Tshikudi Malu, Diane; Dumais, Mathieu; Dalko, Esther; Gaudreault, Véronique; Roméro, Hugo; Martineau, Corine; Kevorkova, Olha; Dardon, Jaime Sanchez; Dodd, Erin Lynn; Bohle, David Scott; Scorza, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    Sustained erythropoiesis and concurrent bone marrow hyperplasia are proposed to be responsible for low bone mass density (BMD) in chronic hemolytic pathologies. As impaired erythropoiesis is also frequent in these conditions, we hypothesized that free heme may alter marrow and bone physiology in these disorders. Bone status and bone marrow erythropoiesis were studied in mice with hemolytic anemia (HA) induced by phenylhydrazine (PHZ) or Plasmodium infection and in bled mice. All treatments resulted in lower hemoglobin concentrations, enhanced erythropoiesis in the spleen and reticulocytosis. The anemia was severe in mice with acute hemolysis, which also had elevated levels of free heme and ROS. No major changes in cellularity and erythroid cell numbers occurred in the bone marrow of bled mice, which generated higher numbers of erythroid blast forming units (BFU-E) in response to erythropoietin. In contrast, low numbers of bone marrow erythroid precursors and BFU-E and low concentrations of bone remodelling markers were measured in mice with HA, which also had blunted osteoclastogenesis, in opposition to its enhancement in bled mice. The alterations in bone metabolism were accompanied by reduced trabecular bone volume, enhanced trabecular spacing and lower trabecular numbers in mice with HA. Taken together our data suggests that hemolysis exerts distinct effects to bleeding in the marrow and bone and may contribute to osteoporosis through a mechanism independent of the erythropoietic stress. PMID:23029401

  1. Detection of stages of autoimmune hemolytic anemia by evaluating erythrocyte deformability and density.

    PubMed

    Shurkhina, E S; Nesterenko, V M; Lisovskaya, I L; Tsvetaeva, N V; Kolodei, S V; Nikulina, O F; Ataullakhanov, F I

    2004-09-01

    Study of erythrocyte density and deformability in patients with hemolytic anemia, including long-term monitoring of 5 patients, helped us to characterize the pathological processes leading to changes in the erythrocyte population at different terms of the disease and to detect its main stages (agglutination, pathological dehydration, combination of pathological dehydration and microvesiculation, hemolytic crisis, and remission). PMID:15665924

  2. Hemolytic activity of venom from crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci spines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci is a venomous species from Taiwan whose venom provokes strong hemolytic activity. To understand the hemolytic properties of A. planci venom, samples were collected from A. planci spines in the Penghu Islands, dialyzed with distilled water, and lyophilized into A. planci spine venom (ASV) powder. Results Both crude venom and ASV cause 50% hemolysis at a concentration of 20 μg/mL. The highest hemolytic activity of ASV was measured at pH 7.0-7.4; ASV-dependent hemolysis was sharply reduced when the pH was lower than 3 or greater than 8. There was almost no hemolytic activity when the Cu2+ concentration was increased to 10 mM. Furthermore, incubation at 100°C for 30 to 60 minutes sharply decreased the hemolytic activity of ASV. After treatment with the protease α-chymotrypsin, the glycoside hydrolase cellulase, and the membrane component cholesterin, the hemolytic activity of ASV was significantly inhibited. Conclusions The results of this study provide fundamental information about A. planci spine venom. The hemolytic activity was affected by pH, temperature, metal ions, EDTA, cholesterin, proteases, and glycoside hydrolases. ASV hemolysis was inhibited by Cu2+, cholesterin, α-chymotrypsin, and cellulose, factors that might prevent the hemolytic activity of venom and provide the medical treatment for sting. PMID:24063308

  3. Evaluating treatment of hepatitis C for hemolytic anemia management.

    PubMed

    DebRoy, Swati; Kribs-Zaleta, Christopher; Mubayi, Anuj; Cardona-Melndez, Gloriell M; Medina-Rios, Liana; Kang, MinJun; Diaz, Edgar

    2010-06-01

    The combination therapy of antiviral peg-interferon and ribavirin has evolved as one of the better treatments for hepatitis C. In spite of its success in controlling hepatitis C infection, it has also been associated with treatment-related adverse side effects. The most common and life threatening among them is hemolytic anemia, necessitating dose reduction or therapy cessation. The presence of this side effect leads to a trade-off between continuing the treatment and exacerbating the side effects versus decreasing dosage to relieve severe side effects while allowing the disease to progress. The drug epoietin (epoetin) is often administered to stimulate the production of red blood cells (RBC) in the bone marrow, in order to allow treatment without anemia. This paper uses mathematical models to study the effect of combination therapy in light of anemia. In order to achieve this we introduce RBC concentration and amount of drug in the body as state variables in the usual immunological virus infection model. Analysis of this model provides a quantification of the amount of drug a body can tolerate without succumbing to hemolytic anemia. Indirect estimation of parameters allow us to calculate the necessary increment in RBC production to be > or =2.3 times the patient's original RBC production rate to sustain the entire course of treatment without encountering anemia in a sensitive patient. PMID:20303990

  4. Towards the identification of autologous blood transfusions through capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Christopher R; Fang, Jack Chuan-Yu; Walthall, Kimberly J; Green, Chelsea C; Porobic, Vukica

    2014-01-01

    The use of autologous blood transfusions by endurance athletes has remained one of the most difficult doping practices to detect. The implementation of the Athlete's Biological Passport by some sporting bodies has proved to be effective; however, the analysis relies on the long-term monitoring of numerous biological markers, looking for abnormal variations in a number of biological markers to indicate doping. This work introduces an approach to identify autologous blood transfusions by examining the red blood cells (RBCs) directly. By using high-speed capillary electrophoretic separations, the relative distribution of the sizes of the RBCs in a sample can be established in under 3min, following the preparation of the cells. As RBCs that have been stored for transfusions undergo vesiculation, the relative size of the transfused cells differs from the native cells. The capillary electrophoretic separation allows for a rapid examination of this distribution and the changes that are seen when transfused RBCs are mixed with native cells. In this work, the effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated in the identification of simulated (in vitro) autologous blood transfusions performed with blood samples from three highly trained cyclists; it was possible to rapidly identify when as little as 5% of the RBCs in the sample were from a simulated autologous transfusion. PMID:24281324

  5. BLOOD TRANSFUSION REQUIREMENT DURING CAESAREAN DELIVERY: RISK FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    Eyelade, O.R.; Adesina, O.A.; Adewole, I.F.; Adebowale, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Group specific blood is often cross-matched ready for all patients scheduled for caesarean section in anticipation of haemorrhage during the surgery. This study was conducted to determine the risk factors for blood transfusion during anaesthesia for caesarean section. Methods: This was a prospective cross-sectional study. A total of 706 pregnant patients scheduled for emergency or elective Caesarean section at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria between March and August 2011 were recruited. Participants were followed-up from the date of delivery till the end point of the study which could fall into either of the following conditions: satisfactory post-operative clinical status up to 48 hours post-delivery or death. Transfusion rate was determined and Chi-square test was used to determine if there exist an association between blood transfusion status and preoperative haematocrit level, years of experience of obstetrician, indication for Caesarean Section(CS), CS type (primary or repeat) and HIV status. Results: Transfusion rate was 9.1 %; variables found to be significantly associated with blood transfusion were; preoperative haematocrit less than 26%, increasing parity, years of experience of resident obstetrician, indication for CS (bleeding or not bleeding) and estimated blood loss. Being HIV positive does not increase the need for blood transfusion. Conclusion: Preoperative anaemia, increasing parity and severe blood loss at surgery significantly contribute to the requirement for blood transfusion in patients undergoing caesarean section. PMID:26807084

  6. The relationship between transfusion and hypoxemia in combat casualties.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J A; James, P M; Bredenberg, C E; Anderson, R W; Heisterkamp, C A; Simmons, R L

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between transfusion and subsequent hypoxemia was examined retrospectively in the records of combat casualties studied by the first three U.S. Army Surgical Research Teams in Vietnam. There was no evident relationship in 425 casualties studied before anesthesia and operation. In 199 casualties studied preoperatively and on at least two of the first three postoperative days, there was no evident relationship in those with injuries not involving the chest or abdomen. Eighteen such casualties received over ten units of blood each (average 24.5) and exhibited subsequent changes in arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) which were indistinguishable from those transfused lesser amounts or not all. Similar observations were made in casualties with injuries to the abdomen, although there was a tendency to lower PaO2 two days after injury in those heavily transfused. In those with thoracic injury, there was statistically significantly lower PaO2 on the first two postoperative days in those heavily transfused. Two possible interpretations are considered, one that blood transfusion contributed to hypoxemia, and alternatively, that a greater magnitude of the injuries accounted for both the worsened hypoxemia and the need for more transfusions. The latter was thought more likely. The differences in PaO2 related to the type of injury exceeded the differences associated with transfusion. PMID:697435

  7. Administration of Ricin Induces a Severe Inflammatory Response via Nonredundant Stimulation of ERK, JNK, and P38 MAPK and Provides a Mouse Model of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Korcheva, Veselina; Wong, John; Corless, Christopher; Iordanov, Mihail; Magun, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Recent interest in the health consequences of ricin as a weapon of terrorism has led us to investigate the effects of ricin on cells in vitro and in mice. Our previous studies showed that depurination of the 28S rRNA by ricin results in the inhibition of translation and the coordinate activation of the stress-activated protein kinases JNK and p38 MAPK. In RAW 264.7 macrophages, ricin induced the activation of ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPK, the accumulation of mRNA encoding tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1, the transcription factors c-Fos, c-Jun, and EGR1, and the appearance of TNF-α protein in the culture medium. Using specific inhibitors of MAPKs, we demonstrated the nonredundant roles of the individual MAPKs in mediating proinflammatory gene activation in response to ricin. Similarly, the intravenous administration of ricin to mice led to the activation of ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPK in the kidneys, and increases in plasma-borne TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6. Ricin-injected mice developed the hallmarks of hemolytic uremic syndrome, including thrombotic microangiopathy, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. Microarray analyses demonstrated a massive proinflammatory transcriptional response in the kidneys, coincidental with the symptoms of hemolytic uremic syndrome. Therapeutic management of the inflammatory response may affect the outcome of intoxication by ricin. PMID:15632024

  8. Profiles of blood and blood component transfusion recipients in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Khoza, Star; Hassall, Oliver; Faragher, Brian E.; Kajja, Isaac; Mvere, David A.; Emmanuel, Jean C.; Postma, Maarten J.; van Hulst, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    Background There are limited published data on the characteristics of blood transfusion recipients in sub-Saharan Africa. This study describes the demographic characteristics of blood transfusion recipients and patterns of blood and blood component use in Zimbabwe. Materials and methods Data on the characteristics of the blood transfusion recipients (age, sex, blood group), blood components received (type, quantity), discharge diagnoses and outcomes following transfusion (discharge status, duration of stay in hospital), were retrospectively collected from four major hospitals for the period from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012. Diagnoses were grouped into broad categories according to the disease headings of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Surgical procedures were grouped into broad categories according to organ system using ICD-9. Results Most of the 1,793 transfusion recipients studied were female (63.2%) and in the reproductive age group, i.e. 15–49 years (65.3%). The median age of the recipients was 33 years (range, 0–93). The majority of these recipients (n=1,642; 91.6%) received a red blood cell transfusion. The majority of the patients were diagnosed with conditions related to pregnancy and childbirth (22.3%), and diseases of blood and blood-forming organs (17.7%). The median time spent in hospital was 8 days (range, 0–214) and in-hospital mortality was 15.4%. Discussion Our sample of blood transfusion recipients were fairly young and most of them received red blood cell transfusions. The majority of patients in the reproductive age group received blood transfusions for pregnancy and childbirth-related diagnoses. PMID:26192782

  9. Transfusion related adverse events in the Platelet Dose study

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Richard M.; Assmann, Susan F.; Triulzi, Darrell J.; Strauss, Ronald G.; Ness, Paul; Granger, Suzanne; Slichter, Sherrill J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND How platelet (PLT) product characteristics such as dose, source (whole blood-derived (WBD) vs. apheresis), storage duration, and ABO matching status affect the risks of transfusion-related adverse events (TRAEs) is unclear. Similarly, more information is needed to define how recipient characteristics affect the frequency of TRAEs following PLT transfusion. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS In the multicenter Platelet Dose (“PLADO”) study, pediatric and adult hematology-oncology patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia were randomized to receive low-dose (LD), medium-dose (MD), or high-dose (HD) PLT prophylaxis for a pre-transfusion PLT count ≤10,000/μL. All PLT units (apheresis or WBD) were leukoreduced. Post hoc analyses of PLADO data were performed using multi-predictor models. RESULTS 5034 PLT transfusions to 1102 patients were analyzed. A TRAE occurred with 501 PLT transfusions (10.0%). The most common TRAEs were fever (6.6% of transfusions), allergic/hypersensitivity reactions (1.9%), and sinus tachycardia (1.8%). Patients assigned HD PLTs were more likely than LD or MD patients to experience any TRAE (OR for HD vs. MD 1.50, 95% CI (1.10, 2.05), three-group comparison p=0.02). PLT source and ABO matching status were not significantly related to overall TRAE risk. Compared to a patient’s first PLT transfusion, subsequent PLT transfusions were less likely to have a TRAE reported, primarily due to a lower risk of allergic/hypersensitivity reactions. CONCLUSION The most important PLT unit characteristic associated with TRAEs was PLT dose per transfusion. HD PLTs may increase the risk of TRAEs, and LD PLTs may reduce the risk. PMID:25065959

  10. Concurrent reactive arthritis, Graves’ disease, and warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Clifford D

    2009-01-01

    Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia is due to the presence of warm agglutinins that react with protein antigens on the surface of red blood cells causing premature destruction of circulating red blood cells. We report the first case of concurrent reactive arthritis, Graves’ disease, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. A 40-year-old man with reactive arthritis, Graves’ disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, mitral valve prolapse, and Gilbert’s disease presented with a one month history of jaundice, fatigue, and black stools. After diagnosis of warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, the patient was started on prednisone 1 mg/kg with rapid improvement in his anemia and jaundice. Our subject’s mother and possibly his maternal grandmother also had autoimmune hemolytic anemia, which raises the possibility of hereditary autoimmune hemolytic anemia, a rarely reported condition. PMID:19918501

  11. Platelet transfusions: impact on hemostasis, thrombosis, inflammation and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Refaai, Majed A.; Phipps, Richard P.; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Blumberg, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Platelet transfusion is one of the most crucial therapeutic approaches in Medicine. However, severe and fatal adverse reactions may develop. In addition to their important function in hemostasis, platelets’ role in inflammation has become more evident. Recently, platelets are also recognized as the main source of circulating soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L, (CD154)), which plays significant roles in hemostasis, platelet activation, clot stability, interactions with other cells, and upregulation of different mediators. In this review, we will briefly highlight the importance of platelet transfusion, its role in inflammatory and thrombotic transfusion reactions, and visit the most recent findings on sCD40L. PMID:21093892

  12. Problems and Approaches for Blood Transfusion in the Developing Countries.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David J; Field, Stephen; Delaney, Meghan; Bates, Imelda

    2016-04-01

    A safe supply of blood and the knowledge, skill, and resources for the appropriate use of blood are essential for medical services. Many problems are faced in the development of transfusion services in low- or medium-income countries (LMICs). Unfortunately, in many countries, providing safe blood is made more difficult by a lack of blood donors and the high frequency of transfusion-transmissible infections. The problems are compounded by the frequent need for urgent life-saving transfusions. This article examines the problems in supply, safety, and use of blood and how they are being addressed in LMICs, predominantly focusing on sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27040966

  13. Gain-of-function mutations in complement factor B are associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Jorge, Elena Goicoechea; Harris, Claire L.; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Carreras, Luis; Arranz, Elena Aller; Garrido, Cynthia Abarrategui; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar; Morgan, B. Paul; de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez

    2007-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is an important cause of acute renal failure in children. Mutations in one or more genes encoding complement-regulatory proteins have been reported in approximately one-third of nondiarrheal, atypical HUS (aHUS) patients, suggesting a defect in the protection of cell surfaces against complement activation in susceptible individuals. Here, we identified a subgroup of aHUS patients showing persistent activation of the complement alternative pathway and found within this subgroup two families with mutations in the gene encoding factor B (BF), a zymogen that carries the catalytic site of the complement alternative pathway convertase (C3bBb). Functional analyses demonstrated that F286L and K323E aHUS-associated BF mutations are gain-of-function mutations that result in enhanced formation of the C3bBb convertase or increased resistance to inactivation by complement regulators. These data expand our understanding of the genetic factors conferring predisposition to aHUS, demonstrate the critical role of the alternative complement pathway in the pathogenesis of aHUS, and provide support for the use of complement-inhibition therapies to prevent or reduce tissue damage caused by dysregulated complement activation. PMID:17182750

  14. Eculizumab is a safe and effective treatment in pediatric patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, Larry A; Fila, Marc; Ardissino, Gianluigi; Al-Akash, Samhar I; Evans, Jonathan; Henning, Paul; Lieberman, Kenneth V; Maringhini, Silvio; Pape, Lars; Rees, Lesley; van de Kar, Nicole C A J; Vande Walle, Johan; Ogawa, Masayo; Bedrosian, Camille L; Licht, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is caused by alternative complement pathway dysregulation, leading to systemic thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) and severe end-organ damage. Based on 2 prospective studies in mostly adults and retrospective data in children, eculizumab, a terminal complement inhibitor, is approved for aHUS treatment. Here we prospectively evaluated efficacy and safety of weight-based dosing of eculizumab in eligible pediatric patients with aHUS in an open-label phase II study. The primary end point was complete TMA response by 26 weeks. Twenty-two patients (aged 5 months-17 years) were treated; 16 were newly diagnosed, 12 had no prior plasma exchange/infusion during current TMA symptomatology, 11 received baseline dialysis, and 2 had prior renal transplants. By week 26, 14 achieved a complete TMA response, 18 achieved hematologic normalization, and 16 had 25% or better improvement in serum creatinine. Plasma exchange/infusion was discontinued in all, and 9 of the 11 patients who required dialysis at baseline discontinued, whereas none initiated new dialysis. Eculizumab was well tolerated; no deaths or meningococcal infections occurred. Bone marrow failure, wrist fracture, and acute respiratory failure were reported as unrelated severe adverse events. Thus, our findings establish the efficacy and safety of eculizumab for pediatric patients with aHUS and are consistent with proposed immediate eculizumab initiation following diagnosis in children. PMID:26880462

  15. Adult-onset eculizumab-resistant hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with cobalamin C deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cornec-Le Gall, Emilie; Delmas, Yahsou; De Parscau, Loïc; Doucet, Laurent; Ogier, Hélène; Benoist, Jean-François; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Le Meur, Yannick

    2014-01-01

    A 20-year-old man was hospitalized for malignant hypertension, mechanical hemolysis, and kidney failure. Kidney biopsy confirmed glomerular and arteriolar thrombotic microangiopathy. Etiologic analyses, which included ADAMTS13 activity, stool culture, complement factor proteins (C3, C4, factor H, factor I, and MCP [membrane cofactor protein]), anti-factor H antibodies, HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) serology, and antinuclear and antiphospholipid antibodies, returned normal results. Malignant hypertension was diagnosed. Ten months later, we observed a relapse of acute kidney injury and mechanical hemolysis. Considering a diagnosis of complement dysregulation-related atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), we began treatment with eculizumab. Despite the efficient complement blockade, the patient's kidney function continued to decline. We performed additional analyses and found that the patient's homocysteine levels were dramatically increased, with no vitamin B12 (cobalamin) or folate deficiencies. We observed very low plasma methionine levels associated with methylmalonic aciduria, which suggested cobalamin C disease. We stopped the eculizumab infusions and initiated specific treatment, which resulted in complete cessation of hemolysis. MMACHC (methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type C protein) sequencing revealed compound heterozygosity for 2 causative mutations. To our knowledge, this is the first report of adult-onset cobalamin C-related HUS. Considering the wide availability and low cost of the homocysteine assay, we suggest that it be included in the diagnostic algorithm for adult patients who present with HUS. PMID:24210589

  16. Prevalence and characteristics of pharyngeal group A beta-hemolytic streptococci in US Navy recruits receiving benzathine penicillin prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Heggie, A D; Jacobs, M R; Linz, P E; Han, D P; Kaplan, E L; Boxerbaum, B

    1992-11-01

    US military recruits receive benzathine penicillin prophylaxis because of endemicity of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) infections. GABHS prevalence in Navy recruits receiving single-dose benzathine penicillin prophylaxis was assessed during spring and fall 1989 by culturing throat specimens from randomly selected groups of approximately 230 men before and 2, 4, and 7 weeks after prophylaxis and from men with pharyngitis diagnosed at sick call. Of 60 GABHS isolates, 75% were serotype M-3. The pharyngitis rate increased from 0.18% in the spring to 1.55% in the fall with a concurrent increase in serotype M-3 prevalence from 35% to 91%. The GABHS prevalence rate was three- to fourfold lower after prophylaxis. There were no cases of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) despite predominance of M-3, a rheumatogenic serotype. It was concluded that penicillin prophylaxis continues to be effective for control of GABHS infections and prevention of ARF in Navy recruits. PMID:1402011

  17. A Survey on Transfusion Status in Orthopedic Surgery at a Trauma Center

    PubMed Central

    Soleimanha, Mehran; Haghighi, Mohammad; Mirbolook, Ahmadreza; Sedighinejad, Abbas; Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Naderi-Nabi, Bahram; Chavoshi, Tahereh; Mehrnoosh, Mehrnoosh Ghandili

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increased costs and mortality associated with inappropriate blood transfusions have led to investigations about blood request and blood transfusion techniques. We investigated the transfusion status in patients who underwent orthopedic surgery in Poursina Hospital (Rasht, Iran) to optimizing blood usage and determine if a scheduled transfusion program for every orthopedic surgery could improve blood transfusion management. Method: In this descriptive-prospective study, all orthopedic surgeries in Poursina Hospital, Rasht, between April to June 2013 were reviewed. All patient information was recorded, including: demographics, type of surgery, hemoglobin level, cross-match test, duration of surgery, and blood loss, and transfusion. Based on the one-way ANOVA and independent samples test analysis, cross-match to transfusion ratio and transfusion possibility, the transfusion index, and maximal surgical blood order schedule were calculated to determine blood transfusion status. Results: Among 872 selected orthopedic surgery candidates, 318 of them were cross-matched and among those, 114 patients received a blood transfusion. In this study, the cross-match to transfusion ratio was 6.4, transfusion possibility 36.47%, transfusion index 0.6, and maximal surgical blood order schedule 0.9. Conclusion: We found that blood ordering was moderately higher than the standard; so it is highly recommended to focus on the knowledge of evidence based on transfusion and standard guidelines for blood transfusion to avoid over-ordering. PMID:26894223

  18. Geographical variations in current clinical practice on transfusions and iron chelation therapy across various transfusion-dependent anaemias

    PubMed Central

    Viprakasit, Vip; Gattermann, Norbert; Lee, Jong Wook; Porter, John B.; Taher, Ali T.; Habr, Dany; Martin, Nicolas; Domokos, Gabor; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Many patients with chronic anaemia require blood transfusions as part of their treatment regimen. As a result, iron overload will inevitably develop if not adequately managed by iron chelation therapy. There are many guidelines relating to transfusion and chelation practices for patients with transfusion-dependent anaemia; however, there is a lack of information on how treatment practices differ around the world. The objective of this manuscript is to highlight key features of current transfusion and chelation management, including similarities and differences across various anaemias and between geographical regions worldwide. Materials and methods Data collected at study entry to the multicentre Evaluation of Patients’ Iron Chelation with Exjade (EPIC) study, which recruited 1,744 patients with a variety of transfusion-dependent anaemias across 23 countries from three geographic regions, were assessed. These analyses compared transfusion and chelation treatment prior to the start of study treatment, together with iron burden assessed at study entry by serum ferritin, liver iron concentration and labile plasma iron levels. Results and conclusions Data show that transfusion and iron chelation practices differ between anaemias and between geographical regions; this may be linked to availability and accessibility of transfusion and chelation therapy, patients’ compliance, physicians’ attitudes, costs and use of treatment guidelines. Approximately 60% of these transfusion-dependent patients were severely iron overloaded with a serum ferritin level over 2,500 ng/mL, indicating that the risks of iron burden may have been underestimated and current iron chelation therapy, if considered, may not have been adequate to control iron burden. PMID:22871821

  19. Compatible Transfusion Therapy for Paroxysmal Cold Hemoglobinuria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rausen, Aaron R.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Presented are case histories of two children, ages 2 and 4 years, with paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH, a syndrome characterized by acute intravascular hemoglobin dissolution and hemoglobin in the urine). (Author/CL)

  20. Massive Transfusion of 5 U Packed Redblood Cells, 3 U Fresh Frozen Plasma, and 160 cc of Platelets in a 14-Month-Old Patient

    PubMed Central

    Sparkle, Tanaya; Cameron, Staci

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 1 Final Diagnosis: Parietooccipital brain tumor Symptoms: Drowsiness • failure to thrive • irritability • seizure-like activity Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Massive transfusion during tumor resection Specialty: Anesthesiology Objective: Management of emergency care Background: We present a case in which extremely rapid massive transfusion was successfully used to combat severe acute bleeding during a parietooccipital tumor resection in a 14-month-old patient. Case Report: An 8-kg patient was found to have a 4×5×5-cm parietooccipital tumor on computed tomography scan, for which resection was urgently planned. Sudden acute bleeding was encountered, which was communicated to the anesthesia team. Transfusion was initiated and a total of 5 units of packed red blood cells, 3 units of fresh frozen plasma, 160 ml of platelets, 200 ml of albumin, and 500 ml of 0.9% normal saline were transfused during a 4-h period. We administered 4 g of mannitol and 0.8 mg of furosemide to deal with anticipated fluid overload. The patient was sent to the intensive care unit and extubated the next day. No clinically significant hemostatic or fluid overload complications were noted after the treatment. Conclusions: Massive transfusion (MT) was found to be safe and effective in this case. Most of what we know about pediatric MT is an extrapolation of data from adult studies. Although practical, it might not be ideal due to the differences in the physiology and incomplete development of hemostatic mechanisms in children, especially those younger than 12 months. Studies evaluating the use of pediatric MT protocols have not shown a significant advantage over transfusion per clinician discretion. PMID:27032708

  1. Thrombocytopenia, Platelet Transfusion, and Outcome Following Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chin, Jun Liong; Hisamuddin, Syafiah Hanis; O'Sullivan, Aoife; Chan, Grace; McCormick, P Aiden

    2016-05-01

    Thrombocytopenia affects patients undergoing liver transplantation. Intraoperative platelet transfusion has been shown to independently influence survival after liver transplantation at 1 and 5 years. We examined the impact of thrombocytopenia and intraoperative platelet transfusion on short-term graft and overall survival after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). A total of 399 patients undergoing first OLT were studied. Graft and overall survival in patients with different degrees of thrombocytopenia and with or without intraoperative platelet transfusion were described. The degree of thrombocytopenia prior to OLT did not affect graft or overall survival after transplant. However, graft survival in patients receiving platelets was significantly reduced at 1 year (P= .023) but not at 90 days (P= .093). Overall survival was significantly reduced at both 90 days (P= .040) and 1 year (P= .037) in patients receiving platelets. We conclude that a consistently lower graft and overall survival were observed in patients receiving intraoperative platelet transfusion. PMID:25430936

  2. Proteomic applications in blood transfusion: working the jigsaw puzzle.

    PubMed

    Devine, D V; Schubert, P

    2011-01-01

    The application of proteomic technologies to transfusion medicine has opened new avenues to our understanding of the products we prepare for patients and the processes that impact the quality of those products. The development of the field of proteomics has paralleled that of transfusion medicine with over a century of key scientific accomplishments required to bring us to our modern systems. We review the technology of proteomics and its application to transfusion medicine with specific reference to the analysis of blood products, both fractionated and fresh. Although the use of proteomic tools to address transfusion medicine questions is really just beginning, it is clear that this method of analysis provides different insights into unaddressed issues in the area of blood product research. Proteomics also offers the promise of improving our approach to the control of blood product quality and even the assessment of blood donors, but these are efforts for the near future. PMID:21175658

  3. Patient cytokine response in transfusion-associated sepsis.

    PubMed

    McAllister, S K; Bland, L A; Arduino, M J; Aguero, S M; Wenger, P N; Jarvis, W R

    1994-05-01

    Cytokine concentrations in plasma from patients transfused with packed erythrocytes contaminated with gram-negative bacilli were measured. Cytokine concentrations in posttransfusion plasma were significantly elevated. A difference in cytokine patterns between survivors and a nonsurvivor was observed. PMID:8168982

  4. Transfusion-associated necrotizing enterocolitis: translating knowledge into nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Luton, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a leading cause of prolonged hospitalizations for premature infants in the United States. In a recent large retrospective study, a significant proportion of NEC cases were shown to occur within 48 hours of packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion, especially in growing preterm neonates of older postnatal age. A small body of evidence consistently demonstrates that 25-35 percent of NEC cases are temporally associated with PRBC transfusion and that cases of NEC associated with transfusion are generally more severe with a higher rate of surgical intervention and mortality. Awareness of this association is vital for potential prevention and early recognition of NEC. The neonatal nurse has a primary role in care strategies that may affect NEC. This review of literature was compiled to educate neonatal nurses about the existence of transfusion-associated necrotizing enterocolitis and guide the translation of knowledge into nursing practice at the bedside. PMID:23666186

  5. Which carries the biggest risk: Anaemia or blood transfusion?

    PubMed

    Vincent, J-L

    2015-08-01

    It is well recognized that anaemia, a frequent complication of critical illness, is associated with poor outcomes, perhaps particularly in patients with ischaemic heart disease. But studies have also reported increased morbidity and mortality in patients who receive blood transfusions. So which carries the biggest risk, when should we transfuse and when should we hold off? Should we have fixed transfusion triggers and if so in all patients, or different triggers for different groups of patients? Indeed, these are more complex decisions than initially apparent. ICU patients are very heterogeneous and will react differently to the same intervention. As such, decisions to transfuse or not must be individualized, taking into account specific patient factors, such as age and comorbidities, physiologic variables, as well as the haemoglobin value. This approach will ensure that anaemia is treated when necessary while avoiding unnecessary exposure to red blood cells. PMID:26070458

  6. Alternative Pathway of Complement in Children with Diarrhea-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Joshua M.; Marians, Russell; Emlen, Woodruff; Wood, Susan; Smith, Christopher; Akana, Hillary; Holers, V. Michael; Lesser, Martin; Kline, Myriam; Hoffman, Cathy; Christen, Erica

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS) is a common cause of acute kidney injury in children. Mutations in alternative pathway (AP) complement regulatory proteins have been identified in severe cases of thrombotic microangiopathy, but the role of the AP in D+HUS has not been studied. Therefore, we determined whether plasma levels of markers of activation of the AP are increased in D+HUS and are biomarkers of the severity of renal injury that predict the need for dialysis. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Patients were randomly selected from among participants in the HUS-SYNSORB Pk trial. Plasma samples were collected on days 1, 4, 7, and 10 after enrollment and day 28 after discharge from the hospital. Levels of two complement pathway products, Bb and SC5b-9, were determined by ELISA. Results: Seventeen children (6 boys and 11 girls; age, 5.4 ± 3.5 yr) were studied. Eight (47%) required dialysis support, and two had serious extrarenal events. On the day of enrollment, plasma levels of Bb and SC5b-9 were significantly increased in all patients compared with healthy controls (P < 0.01). The elevated concentrations normalized by day 28 after discharge. Circulating levels of complement pathway fragments did not correlate with severity of renal injury or occurrence of complications. Conclusions: Patients with acute-onset D+HUS manifest activation of the AP of complement that is temporally related to the onset of disease and that resolves within 1 mo. Therapies to inhibit the AP of complement may be useful in attenuating the severity of renal injury and extrarenal complications. PMID:19820137

  7. Cell salvage for minimising perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Carless, Paul A; Henry, David A; Moxey, Annette J; O’Connell, Dianne; Brown, Tamara; Fergusson, Dean A

    2014-01-01

    Background Concerns regarding the safety of transfused blood have prompted reconsideration of the use of allogeneic (from an unrelated donor) red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, and a range of techniques to minimise transfusion requirements. Objectives To examine the evidence for the efficacy of cell salvage in reducing allogeneic blood transfusion and the evidence for any effect on clinical outcomes. Search methods We identified studies by searching CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1950 to June 2009), EMBASE (1980 to June 2009), the internet (to August 2009) and bibliographies of published articles. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials with a concurrent control group in which adult patients, scheduled for non-urgent surgery, were randomised to cell salvage (autotransfusion) or to a control group who did not receive the intervention. Data collection and analysis Data were independently extracted and the risk of bias assessed. Relative risks (RR) and weighted mean differences (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Data were pooled using a random-effects model. The primary outcomes were the number of patients exposed to allogeneic red cell transfusion and the amount of blood transfused. Other clinical outcomes are detailed in the review. Main results A total of 75 trials were included. Overall, the use of cell salvage reduced the rate of exposure to allogeneic RBC transfusion by a relative 38% (RR 0.62; 95% CI 0.55 to 0.70). The absolute reduction in risk (ARR) of receiving an allogeneic RBC transfusion was 21% (95% CI 15% to 26%). In orthopaedic procedures the RR of exposure to RBC transfusion was 0.46 (95% CI 0.37 to 0.57) compared to 0.77 (95% CI 0.69 to 0.86) for cardiac procedures. The use of cell salvage resulted in an average saving of 0.68 units of allogeneic RBC per patient (WMD −0.68; 95% CI −0.88 to −0.49). Cell salvage did not appear to impact adversely on clinical outcomes. Authors’ conclusions The results suggest cell salvage is efficacious in reducing the need for allogeneic red cell transfusion in adult elective cardiac and orthopaedic surgery. The use of cell salvage did not appear to impact adversely on clinical outcomes. However, the methodological quality of trials was poor. As the trials were unblinded and lacked adequate concealment of treatment allocation, transfusion practices may have been influenced by knowledge of the patients’ treatment status potentially biasing the results in favour of cell salvage. PMID:20393932

  8. Jehovah's Witnesses and autonomy: honouring the refusal of blood transfusions.

    PubMed

    Bock, Gregory L

    2012-11-01

    This paper explores the scriptural and theological reasons given by Jehovah's Witnesses (JWs) to refuse blood transfusions. Julian Savulescu and Richard W Momeyer argue that informed consent should be based on rational beliefs and that the refusal of blood transfusions by JWs is irrational, but after examining the reasons given by JWs, I challenge the claim that JW beliefs are irrational. I also question whether we should give up the traditional notion of informed consent. PMID:22790086

  9. Association between transfusion of whole blood and recurrence of cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, N; Heal, J M; Murphy, P; Agarwal, M M; Chuang, C

    1986-01-01

    Transfusion affects the immune response to renal transplantation and may be associated with recurrence of various human neoplasms. Data from patients with colonic, rectal, cervical, and prostate tumours showed an association between transfusion of any amount of whole blood or larger amounts of red blood cells at the time of surgery and later recurrence of cancer. Recipients of one unit of whole blood had a significantly higher incidence of recurrence (45%) than recipients of a single unit of red cells (12%) (p = 0.03). Recipients of two units of whole blood also had a higher rate of recurrence (52%) than those receiving two units of red cells (23%) (p = 0.03). Recipients of any amount of whole blood had similar recurrence rates (38-52%). Recipients of four or more units of red blood cells had a higher rate of recurrence (55%) than those receiving three or fewer units of red blood cells (20%) (p = 0.005). Mortality due to cancer in patients receiving three or fewer units of red blood cells (2%) was similar to that in patients who did not have transfusions (7%) and significantly lower than that observed in patients receiving three or fewer units of whole blood (20%) (p = 0.003). A proportional hazards risk analysis showed that transfusion of any whole blood or more than three units of red blood cells was significantly associated with earlier recurrence and death due to cancer. These data support an association between transfusion and recurrence of cancer. They also suggest that some factor present in greater amounts in whole blood, such as plasma, may contribute to the increased risk of recurrence in patients who have undergone transfusion. Until the questions raised by retrospective studies of cancer recurrence and transfusion can be answered by prospective interventional trials with washed red blood cells, red blood cells should be transfused to patients with cancer in preference to whole blood when clinically feasible. PMID:3092902

  10. Characterizing the Epidemiology of Perioperative Transfusion-associated Circulatory Overload

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Leanne; Jia, Qing; Yadav, Hemang; Subramanian, Arun; Wilson, Gregory A.; Murphy, Sean P.; Pathak, Jyotishman; Schroeder, Darrell R.; Ereth, Mark H.; Kor, Daryl J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) is a leading cause of transfusion-related fatalities, but its incidence and associated patient and transfusion characteristics are poorly understood. To inform surgical transfusion practice and to begin mitigating perioperative TACO, the authors aimed to define its epidemiology. Methods In this retrospective cohort study, the medical records of adult patients undergoing noncardiac surgery with general anesthesia during 2004 or 2011 and receiving intraoperative transfusions were screened using an electronic algorithm for identification of TACO. Those patients who were screened as high probability for TACO underwent rigorous manual review. Univariate and multivariate analyses evaluated associations between patient and transfusion characteristics with TACO rates in a before-and-after study design. Results A total of 2,162 and 1,908 patients met study criteria for 2004 and 2011, respectively. The incidence of TACO was 5.5% (119 of 2,162) in 2004 versus 3.0% (57 of 1,908) in 2011 (P < 0.001), with comparable rates for men (4.8% [98 of 2,023]) and women (3.8% [78 of 2,047]) (P = 0.09). Overall, vascular (12.1% [60 of 497]), transplant (8.8% [17 of 193]), and thoracic surgeries (7.2% [10 of 138]) carried the highest TACO rates. Obstetric and gynecologic patients had the lowest rate (1.4% [4 of 295]). The incidence of TACO increased with volume transfused, advancing age, and total intraoperative fluid balance (all P < 0.001). Conclusions The incidence of perioperative TACO is similar to previous estimates in nonsurgical populations. There was a reduction in TACO rate between 2004 and 2011, with incidence patterns remaining comparable in subgroup analyses. Future efforts exploring risk factors for TACO may guide preventive or therapeutic interventions, helping to further mitigate this transfusion complication. PMID:25611653

  11. Concerns of patients, MDs are transforming transfusion medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Robb, N

    1996-01-01

    Fear of HIV and AIDS has been the driving force in reducing physicians' use of blood and blood products. Nancy Robb interviewed doctors across the country to determine steps they are taking to lower the number of transfusions and discovered that transfusion medicine in Canada has undergone a sea change. Images p392-a p393-a p394-a p395-a p396-a PMID:8564912

  12. Molecular basis for group B beta-hemolytic streptococcal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hellerqvist, C G; Sundell, H; Gettins, P

    1987-01-01

    Group B beta-hemolytic Streptococcus (GBS) is a major pathogen affecting newborns. We have investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the respiratory distress induced in sheep after intravenous injection of a toxin produced by this organism. The pathophysiological response is characterized by pulmonary hypertension, followed by granulocytopenia and increased pulmonary vascular permeability to protein. 31P NMR studies of GBS toxin and model components before and after reductive alkaline hydrolysis demonstrated that phosphodiester residues are an integral part of the GBS toxin. Reductive alkaline treatment cleaves phosphate esters from secondary and primary alcohols and renders GBS toxin nontoxic in the sheep model and inactive as a mediator of elastase release in vitro from isolated human granulocytes. We propose that the interaction of cellular receptors with mannosyl phosphodiester groups plays an essential role in the pathophysiological response to GBS toxin. PMID:3540959

  13. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with TAFRO syndrome].

    PubMed

    Edahiro, Yoko; Ichikawa, Kunimoto; Sunami, Yoshitaka; Koike, Michiaki; Komatsu, Norio

    2015-11-01

    TAFRO syndrome is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by low platelet counts, anasarca, fever, reticulin fibrosis, renal dysfunction, and organomegaly. Patients with TAFRO syndrome occasionally have courses complicated by immunological diseases. Herein, we describe a case of TAFRO syndrome associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). The patient was admitted because of menorrhagia. She had thrombocytopenia, pleural effusion and ascites, hepatomegaly, and multiple lymphadenopathies. Her symptoms worsened, especially fever, pleural effusion and ascites, and she developed AIHA. Steroid pulse therapy followed by 45 mg of prednisolone (PSL) improved not only the symptoms of TAFRO syndrome but also those of AIHA. There have been no reports, to our knowledge, of AIHA associated with TAFRO syndrome, and detailed studies on this syndrome are needed. PMID:26666723

  14. Molecular Basis for Group B β -hemolytic Streptococcal Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellerqvist, Carl G.; Sundell, Hakan; Gettins, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Group B β -hemolytic Streptococcus (GBS) is a major pathogen affecting newborns. We have investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the respiratory distress induced in sheep after intravenous injection of a toxin produced by this organism. The pathophysiological response is characterized by pulmonary hypertension, followed by granulocytopenia and increased pulmonary vascular permeability to protein. 31P NMR studies of GBS toxin and model components before and after reductive alkaline hydrolysis demonstrated that phosphodiester residues are an integral part of the GBS toxin. Reductive alkaline treatment cleaves phosphate esters from secondary and primary alcohols and renders GBS toxin nontoxic in the sheep model and inactive as a mediator of elastase release in vitro from isolated human granulocytes. We propose that the interaction of cellular receptors with mannosyl phosphodiester groups plays an essential role in the pathophysiological response to GBS toxin.

  15. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia with normal serum lactate dehydrogenase level].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hideaki; Hangaishi, Akira; Saika, Makoto; Morioka, Takehiko; Ando, Yayoi; Kida, Michiko; Usuki, Kensuke

    2015-11-01

    We herein report two cases of AIHA (autoimmune hemolytic anemia), a 25-year-old woman and a 77-year-old man, who presented with normal serum LDH values. Though in these two cases, low hemoglobin and haptoglobin, high total bilirubin and positive direct Coombs' test results led to the diagnosis of AIHA, both patients had normal LDH levels (218 and 187 IU/l). Both cases were successfully treated with prednisone. In the diagnosis of AIHA, elevated LDH is usually used as a marker of hemolysis. However, medical records of 24 AIHA patients collected in our institute from January 2001 to August 2012 revealed LDH levels to have been normal in 25% of these cases. This report indicates the importance of obtaining complete information about the blood testing of patients and taking these data into account when considering the diagnosis of AIHA. PMID:26666722

  16. Cryptococcal meningitis in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, YaLi; Sang, Junjun; Pan, Weihua; Du, Lin; Liao, Wanqing; Chen, Jianghan; Zhu, Yuanjie

    2014-08-01

    To summarize the epidemiology, clinical features, treatment, and outcome of cryptococcal meningitis (CM) in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) patients and to provide a reference for the prevention and control of AIHA complicated with CM, we evaluated five cases of CM in patients with AIHA treated in our hospital from 2003 to 2013 and eight related foreign cases. All of the clinical isolates were Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii and grouped into the VNI genotype and serotype A. The clinical features exhibit significant features. Headache, nausea, and fever are common symptoms of AIHA complicated with CM. The early clinical manifestations lack specificity, which may lead to delayed diagnosis and treatment. Long-term use of prednisone (≥15 mg day(-1)), poor control of anemia, and splenectomy are risk factors for AIHA complicated with cryptococcal infection. The combination of intravenous amphotericin B and oral 5-fluorocytosine remains the preferred treatment for AIHA complicated with CM. PMID:24952011

  17. Peripheral gangrene complicating idiopathic and recessive hemolytic uremic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, B S; Garcia, C D; Chesney, R W; Segar, W E; Giugno, K; Chem, R

    2000-09-01

    Three patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) developed peripheral gangrene. Bilateral carotid artery thromboses occurred in one of these patients after recovery from HUS. One patient had a long history of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. In the second patient, a flu-like illness preceded the onset of HUS. The third was one of two sisters, with the HUS appearing more than 1 year apart. None had evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulation or infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. The patient with rheumatoid arthritis had renal cortical necrosis but recovered moderate renal function after treatment with dialysis and plasmapheresis for 6 months. The child with a genetic form of HUS died of renal failure and had massive cortical necrosis and vascular thrombosis at autopsy. This is the first report of peripheral gangrene in children with idiopathic HUS and autosomal recessive HUS. PMID:10975312

  18. [New viral risks in blood transfusion by 2016].

    PubMed

    Pozzetto, B; Garraud, O

    2016-02-01

    Viral safety remains a major concern in transfusion of blood products. Over years, the control measures applied to blood products were made more and more sophisticated; however, the number of infectious agents, and notably of viruses, that can be transmitted by transfusion is increasing continuously. The aim of this review paper is to actualize that published in the same journal by the same authors in 2011 with more details on some of actual vs virtual viral threats that were identified recently in the field of blood transfusion. The main subjects that are covered successively concern the transmission via transfusion of hepatitis E virus, the frequency of transfusion transmitted arboviruses, transfusion at the time of the Ebola epidemics in West Africa, the debated role of Marseillevirus (giant viruses infecting amoebae and suspected to infect human blood latently), and, finally, the recent report of the identification in blood donors of a new member of the Flaviviridae family. The addition of these new viral risks to those already identified-partially controlled or not-pleads for the urgent need to move forward to considering inactivation of infectious agents in blood products. PMID:26781857

  19. Perioperative Red Blood Cell Transfusion: What We Do Not Know

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Chong; Xiong, Li-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Blood transfusion saves lives but may also increase the risk of injury. The objective of this review was to evaluate the possible adverse effects related to transfusion of red blood cell (RBC) concentrates stored for prolonged periods. Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from PubMed articles published in English up to February 2015. Study Selection: Clinical and basic research articles were selected according to their relevance to this topic. Results: The ex vivo changes to RBC that occur during storage are collectively called storage lesion. It is still inconclusive if transfusion of RBC with storage lesion has clinical relevance. Multiple ongoing prospective randomized controlled trials are aimed to clarify this clinical issue. It was observed that the adverse events related to stored RBC transfusion were prominent in certain patient populations, including trauma, critical care, pediatric, and cardiac surgery patients, which leads to the investigation of underlying mechanisms. It is demonstrated that free hemoglobin toxicity, decreasing of nitric oxide bioavailability, and free iron-induced increasing of inflammation may play an important role in this process. Conclusion: It is still unclear whether transfusion of older RBC has adverse effects, and if so, which factors determine such clinical effects. However, considering the magnitude of transfusion and the widespread medical significance, potential preventive strategies should be considered, especially for the susceptible recipients. PMID:26315088

  20. Improved survival of newborns receiving leukocyte transfusions for sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Cairo, M.S.; Rucker, R.; Bennetts, G.A.; Hicks, D.; Worcester, C.; Amlie, R.; Johnson, S.; Katz, J.

    1984-11-01

    To determine the role of polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocyte transfusions in neonates with sepsis, 23 consecutive newborns were prospectively randomly selected during an 18-month period in a treatment plan to receive polymorphonuclear leukocyte transfusions with supportive care or supportive care alone. Thirteen neonates received transfusions every 12 hours for a total of five transfusions. Each transfusion consisting of 15 mL/kg of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was subjected to 1,500 rads of radiation. The polymorphonuclear leukocytes were obtained by continuous-flow centrifugation leukapheresis and contained 0.5 to 1.0 X 10(9) granulocytes per 15 mL with less than 10% lymphocytes. Positive findings on blood cultures were obtained in 14/23 patients and seven were randomly selected for each treatment group. Absolute granulocyte counts were less than 1,500/microL in 13 patients but tibial bone marrow examinations revealed that the neutrophil supply pool was depleted in only three patients. The survival was significantly greater in the treatment group compared with the group that did not receive transfusions.

  1. Accuracy of continuous noninvasive hemoglobin monitoring for the prediction of blood transfusions in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Galvagno, Samuel M; Hu, Peter; Yang, Shiming; Gao, Cheng; Hanna, David; Shackelford, Stacy; Mackenzie, Colin

    2015-12-01

    Early detection of hemorrhagic shock is required to facilitate prompt coordination of blood component therapy delivery to the bedside and to expedite performance of lifesaving interventions. Standard physical findings and vital signs are difficult to measure during the acute resuscitation stage, and these measures are often inaccurate until patients deteriorate to a state of decompensated shock. The aim of this study is to examine a severely injured trauma patient population to determine whether a noninvasive SpHb monitor can predict the need for urgent blood transfusion (universal donor or additional urgent blood transfusion) during the first 12 h of trauma patient resuscitation. We hypothesize that trends in continuous SpHb, combined with easily derived patient-specific factors, can identify the immediate need for transfusion in trauma patients. Subjects were enrolled if directly admitted to the trauma center, >17 years of age, and with a shock index (heart rate/systolic blood pressure) >0.62. Upon admission, a Masimo Radical-7 co-oximeter sensor (Masimo Corporation, Irvine, CA) was applied, providing measurement of continuous non-invasive hemoglobin (SpHb) levels. Blood was drawn and hemoglobin concentration analyzed and conventional pulse oximetry photopletysmograph signals were continuously recorded. Demographic information and both prehospital and admission vital signs were collected. The primary outcome was transfusion of at least one unit of packed red blood cells within 24 h of admission. Eight regression models (C1-C8) were evaluated for the prediction of blood use by comparing area under receiver operating curve (AUROC) at different time intervals after admission. 711 subjects had continuous vital signs waveforms available, to include heart rate (HR), SpHb and SpO2 trends. When SpHb was monitored for 15 min, SpHb did not increase AUROC for prediction of transfusion. The highest ROC was recorded for model C8 (age, sex, prehospital shock index, admission HR, SpHb and SpO2) for the prediction of blood products within the first 3 h of admission. When data from 15 min of continuous monitoring were analyzed, significant improvement in AUROC occurred as more variables were added to the model; however, the addition of SpHb to any of the models did not improve AUROC significantly for prediction of blood use within the first 3 h of admission in comparison to analysis of conventional oximetry features. The results demonstrate that SpHb monitoring, accompanied by continuous vital signs data and adjusted for age and sex, has good accuracy for the prediction of need for transfusion; however, as an independent variable, SpHb did not enhance predictive models in comparison to use of features extracted from conventional pulse oximetry. Nor was shock index better than conventional oximetry at discriminating hemorrhaging and prediction of casualties receiving blood. In this population of trauma patients, noninvasive SpHb monitoring, including both trends and absolute values, did not enhance the ability to predict the need for blood transfusion. PMID:25753142

  2. Study on effectiveness of transfusion program in thalassemia major patients receiving multiple blood transfusions at a transfusion centre in Western India

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neeraj; Mishra, Anupa; Chauhan, Dhaval; Vora, C.; Shah, N. R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Children suffering from beta-thalassemia major require repeated blood transfusions which may be associated with dangers like iron overload and contraction of infections such as HIV, HCV, and HBsAg which ultimately curtail their life span. On the other hand, inadequate transfusions lead to severe anemia and general fatigue and debility. Materials and Methods: Data were obtained from 142 beta-thalassemia major patients aged 3 years or more receiving regular blood transfusions at a transfusion centre in Western India from 1 April 2009 to 30 June 2009. The clinical data and laboratory results were subsequently analyzed. Results: Of the 142 patients, 76 (53.5%) were undertransfused (mean Hb <10 gm%). 96 (67%) of the patients were taking some form of chelation therapy but out of them only 2 (2%) were adequately chelated (S. ferritin <1000 ng/ml). 5 (3.5%) of the patients were known diabetics on insulin therapy. 103 (72%) of the patients were retarded in terms of growth. The prevalence of transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs) such as HCV, HIV, and HBsAg was respectively 45%, 2%, and 2%, with the prevalence of HCV being significantly more than the general population. The HCV prevalence showed positive correlation with the age of the patients and with the total no of blood transfusions received. As many as 15% (6 out of 40) children who were born on or after 2002 were HCV positive despite the blood they received being subjected to screening for HCV. Conclusions: The study suggests the need to step up the transfusions to achieve hemoglobin goal of 10 gm% (as per the moderate transfusion regimen) and also to institute urgent and effective chelation measures with the aim of keeping serum ferritin levels below 1000 ng/ml to avoid the systemic effects of iron overload. In addition, strict monitoring of the children for endocrinopathy and other systemic effects of iron overload should be done. Rigid implementation of quality control measures for the ELISA kits used to detect HCV in donor blood needs to be done urgently. Alternately, more sensitive and specific measures (like NAT testing) should be employed for detection of HCV. In the absence of a definitive cure accessible and available to all patients, strict implementation of the above suggested measures will go a long way in improving the quality (and quantity) of life in patients of beta-thalassemia major. PMID:20859507

  3. Lichenoid Variant of Chronic Cutaneous Graft Versus Host Reaction Post Blood Transfusion: A Rare Event Post Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnaiah, Pushpa Kodipalya; Lakshman, Archana; Aradhya, Sacchidanand Sarvajnamurthy; Veerabhadrappa, Nataraja Holavanahally

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD) is a less frequently seen disease that occurs post solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. Chronic GVHD occurring post blood transfusion is an even more uncommon disease. It can present either as a lichenoid disease or as a sclerodermatous disease involving multiple systems. In this article, we report a case of chronic graft versus host reaction occurring in skin secondary to blood transfusion. PMID:26538747

  4. A steryl glycoside fraction with hemolytic activity from tubers of Momordica cochinchinensis.

    PubMed

    Ng, T B; Li, W W; Yeung, H W

    1986-10-01

    A hemolytic fraction has been obtained from fresh tubers of Momordica cochinchinensis. The fraction was strongly adsorbed on DEAE-Sepharose CL6B. It did not stain with Coomassie brilliant blue in SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and it gave no immunoprecipitin arcs in immunoelectrophoresis. The hemolytic activity of the fraction was resistant to heat and proteolytic enzymes. The behavior of the fraction in thin-layer chromatography and its positive reaction in Liebermann-Burchard test indicated that the hemolytic activity of the fraction can be attributed to a steryl glycoside(s). PMID:3821135

  5. Monitoring compliance with transfusion guidelines in hospital departments by electronic data capture

    PubMed Central

    Norgaard, Astrid; de Lichtenberg, Trine Honnens; Nielsen, Jens; Johansson, Pär I.

    2014-01-01

    Background The practice of transfusing red blood cells is still liberal in some centres suggesting a lack of compliance with guidelines recommending transfusion of red blood cells at haemoglobin levels of 6–8 g/dL in the non-bleeding patient. Few databases provide ongoing feedback of data on pre-transfusion haemoglobin levels at the departmental level. In a tertiary care hospital, no such data were produced before this study. Our aim was to establish a Patient Blood Management database based on electronic data capture in order to monitor compliance with transfusion guidelines at departmental and hospital levels. Materials and methods Hospital data on admissions, diagnoses and surgical procedures were used to define the populations of patients. Data on haemoglobin measurements and red blood cell transfusions were used to calculate pre-transfusion haemoglobin, percentage of transfused patients and transfusion volumes. Results The model dataset include 33,587 admissions, of which 10% had received at least one unit of red blood cells. Haemoglobin measurements preceded 96.7% of the units transfused. The median pre-transfusion haemoglobin was 8.9 g/dL (interquartile range 8.2–9.7) at the hospital level. In only 6.5% of the cases, transfusion was initiated at 7.3 g/dL or lower as recommended by the Danish national transfusion guideline. In 27% of the cases, transfusion was initiated when the haemoglobin level was 9.3 g/dL or higher, which is not recommended. A median of two units was transfused per transfusion episode and per hospital admission. Transfusion practice was more liberal in surgical and intensive care units than in medical departments. Discussion We described pre-transfusion haemoglobin levels, transfusion rates and volumes at hospital and departmental levels, and in surgical subpopulations. Initial data revealed an extensive liberal practice and low compliance with national transfusion guidelines, and identified wards in need of intervention. PMID:24960656

  6. Single-center transfusion rate for 555 consecutive liver transplantations: impact of two eras.

    PubMed

    Coêlho, G R; Feitosa Neto, B A; de G Teixeira, C C; Marinho, D S; Rangel, M L M; Garcia, J H P

    2013-11-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the treatment of choice for patients with acute or chronic end-stage liver disease, irresectable primary liver tumor, and metabolic disorders. Historically, OLT has been associated with considerable blood loss and the need for transfusions. However, over the years there has been reduction is need for blood products. The aim of this article was to compare two distinct eras for perioperative blood transfusion rate among patients undergoing OLT; Era I, 200 transplantations in 188 patients, and Era II, 355 transplantations in 339 patients. The donor mean age was 33.70 (Era I) versus 35.34 (Era II). Cause of death in both eras was traumatic brain injury followed by cerebral vascular accident. Organ recipient data showed a mean age of 48.87 (Era I) versus 46.49 (Era II). During Era I patients with Child B (56.8%) prevailed, followed by Child C (35.4%) and Child A (7.8%). In Era II also patients with Child B (53.1%) prevailed, followed by Child C (39.6%) and Child A (7.3%). The prevalence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during Era I was 9% (18) and in Era II 20% (71). The use of blood products in the perioperative period: was as follows packed red blood cells 1.76 (Era I) versus 0.57 (Era II) units; fresh frozen plasma 1.89 (Era I) versus 0.49 (Era II) units; platelets 2.16 (Era I) versus 0.28 (Era II) units; and cryoprecipitate 0.08 (Era I) versus 0.03 (Era II) units. OLT using the piggyback technique was performed with a transfusion rate below <30%, and it reduced blood loss and prevented severe hemodynamic instability. PMID:24182806

  7. Effects of Blood Transfusion on Exercise Capacity in Thalassemia Major Patients

    PubMed Central

    Benedetto, Daniela; Rao, Carmelo Massimo; Cefalù, Claudia; Aguglia, Demetrio Oreste; Cattadori, Gaia; D’Ascola, Domenico Giuseppe; Benedetto, Frank Antonio; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Sciomer, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Anemia has an important role in exercise performance. However, the direct link between rapid changes of hemoglobin and exercise performance is still unknown.To find out more on this topic, we studied 18 beta-thalassemia major patients free of relevant cardiac dysfunction (age 33.5±7.2 years,males = 10). Patients performed a maximal cardiopulmolmonary exercise test (cycloergometer, personalized ramp protocol, breath-by-breath measurements of expired gases) before and the day after blood transfusion (500 cc of red cell concentrates). After blood transfusion, hemoglobin increased from 10.5±0.8 g/dL to 12.1±1.2 (p<0.001), peak VO2 from 1408 to 1546mL/min (p<0.05), and VO2 at anaerobic threshold from 965 to 1024mL/min (p<0.05). No major changes were observed as regards heart and respiratory rates either at peak exercise or at anaerobic threshold. Similarly, no relevant changes were observed in ventilation efficiency, as evaluated by the ventilation vs. carbon dioxide production relationship, or in O2 delivery to the periphery as analyzed by the VO2 vs. workload relationship. The relationship between hemoglobin and VO2 changes showed, for each g/dL of hemoglobin increase, a VO2 increase = 82.5 mL/min and 35 mL/min, at peak exercise and at anaerobic threshold, respectively. In beta-thalassemia major patients, an acute albeit partial anemia correction by blood transfusion determinates a relevant increase of exercise performance, observed both at peak exercise and at anaerobic threshold. PMID:26010540

  8. [Responsibility for prescribing and monitoring an act transfusion and safety blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Piercecchi-Marti, M D; Tuchtan-Torrents, L; Lassale, B; Leonetti, G; Bartoli, C

    2014-11-01

    The act to transfuse is a prescription following basic rules similar to drug prescriptions. If harm happens, potentially linked with this prescription, the harm's responsibility is borne by the physician, the paramedics, the care organization but by the supplier laboratory too. The setting of good practice rules consistent with science data at the time when the act is performed, the respect of the patient's rights and the quality of supplied products will be assessed during the expertise. Under restorative responsibility, it is necessary to previously establish a direct and certain causation between the litigious act and the harm to enforce the vicarious liability. Nowadays, legal precedents grant a larger protection to more and more numerous victims, enhancing the field of the fault with the appeal to assumption of fault. At the same time, the lawmaker himself promulgated objective conditions of compensation for many categories of victims of medical risk from which transfused people are part. The law of March the 4th of 2002 went one step closer devoting a new foundation of compensation: national solidarity. PMID:25282487

  9. Transfusion transmitted infections – A retrospective analysis from the National Blood Transfusion Service in Eritrea

    PubMed Central

    Fessehaye, Nahom; Naik, Durgadas; Fessehaye, Tesfay

    2011-01-01

    Background The emergence of transfusion transmitted infection (TTI) especially HIV/AIDS has created a huge obstacle in ensuring blood safety. To assess the situation in Eritrea, we carried out a retrospective study of 29,501 blood donors for the prevalence of TTI's i.e. HIV, HBV, HCV and Syphilis. Methods The study population included all donors who donated blood from January 2006 to November 2009. The data was collected from the National Blood Transfusion Services (NTBS) of Eritrea and includes category of donor and result for TTI markers. Results A total of 29,501 units of blood were collected from 23,385(79%) voluntary blood donors and the rest 6,116(21%) units were collected from family replacement donors. The over all prevalence of TTI's were 3.8% with 3.5% in voluntary blood donors and 5.1% in family replacement donors. The sero-prevalence for TTI markers were 0.18% HIV, 2.58% HBV, 0.57% HCV and 0.49% Syphilis. Conclusion In conclusion, even if the TTI prevalence rate among Eritrean blood donors is low, ensuring blood safety has a long way to go. PMID:22145069

  10. [Situation and perspectives of blood transfusion in Togo].

    PubMed

    Ségbéna, A Y; Fétéké, L; Bikandou, B; Awitala, E J; Koura, A G

    2009-01-01

    We report the successive stages of the reorganization of the blood transfusion sector in Togo. The starting point was the elaboration of the national policy of blood transfusion, then the adoption of a decree organizing the sector as well the various decree of application, particularly that related to transfusion good practices. The current policy recommends two poles of qualification of the blood ant its components and the creation of six stations of collection and distribution attached to these poles. The reorganization started with the rehabilitation of the National Blood Transfusion Centre (CNTS) in Lomé. If the problem of human resources is alarming, especially the availability of hemobiologists, the rehabilitation allowed the increase of the blood collection passing from 5272 donations in December 2003 to 18 164 in December 2008. However, the requirement of blood products is satisfied in 50% in all the country. In 2003, 24% of the blood products were rejected for positive viral markers against 8.37% in 2008 in relation with the improvement of blood safety. Efforts must be continued to reinforce it in the CNTS and to make a better selection of the donors at the Regional Blood Transfusion Centre (CRTS) de Sokodé. The analysis of the weak points of the sector (human resource insufficiency, shortage of the blood products, blood safety) made it possible to indicate solutions to improve the sector of blood transfusion sector. Future outcome is funded in the blood transfusion safety development project in Togo financed by the Agence française de développement (AFD, French development agency). PMID:19896405

  11. Anemia and red blood cell transfusion in neurocritical care

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Andreas H; Zygun, David A

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Anemia is one of the most common medical complications to be encountered in critically ill patients. Based on the results of clinical trials, transfusion practices across the world have generally become more restrictive. However, because reduced oxygen delivery contributes to 'secondary' cerebral injury, anemia may not be as well tolerated among neurocritical care patients. Methods The first portion of this paper is a narrative review of the physiologic implications of anemia, hemodilution, and transfusion in the setting of brain-injury and stroke. The second portion is a systematic review to identify studies assessing the association between anemia or the use of red blood cell transfusions and relevant clinical outcomes in various neurocritical care populations. Results There have been no randomized controlled trials that have adequately assessed optimal transfusion thresholds specifically among brain-injured patients. The importance of ischemia and the implications of anemia are not necessarily the same for all neurocritical care conditions. Nevertheless, there exists an extensive body of experimental work, as well as human observational and physiologic studies, which have advanced knowledge in this area and provide some guidance to clinicians. Lower hemoglobin concentrations are consistently associated with worse physiologic parameters and clinical outcomes; however, this relationship may not be altered by more aggressive use of red blood cell transfusions. Conclusions Although hemoglobin concentrations as low as 7 g/dl are well tolerated in most critical care patients, such a severe degree of anemia could be harmful in brain-injured patients. Randomized controlled trials of different transfusion thresholds, specifically in neurocritical care settings, are required. The impact of the duration of blood storage on the neurologic implications of transfusion also requires further investigation. PMID:19519893

  12. Retroviral infections transmitted by blood transfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, S. G.; Fang, C.; Williams, A.

    1990-01-01

    Modifications in donor screening and the introduction of laboratory testing of donated blood for anti-HIV-1 and anti-HTLV-I have resulted in a significant reduction in the risks of retroviral infections from blood transfusion. Presently, the American Red Cross detects an average of eight carriers of human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) per 100,000 otherwise acceptable blood donors (0.008 percent), compared with an average of 35 per 100,000 (0.035 percent) when testing for HIV-1 antibodies began in 1985. Surveillance studies in the United States indicate a small likelihood that HIV-2 carriers will pass current screening procedures and be accepted as blood donors. Even if an HIV-2-infected person were to be accepted as a blood donor, there is a 42-92 percent likelihood that this person's blood would be detected as infective for HIV-2 and excluded because of serological cross-reactions that occur in the EIA for HIV-1 antibodies. During 1989, which was the first year that donated blood was routinely tested for antibodies to human T-lymphotropic virus, type I (HTLV-I) in the United States, approximately nine in 100,000 donors (0.009 percent) were confirmed positive for antibodies to HTLV-I, and their donated blood was excluded. Subsequent testing has revealed that a significant number of these persons whose sera was reactive by the HTLV-I EIA were, in fact, infected by HTLV-II. Epidemiological studies of human retroviral infections (HIV-1, HIV-2, HTLV-I, and HTLV-II) continue to provide important data and direction for improving criteria for qualifying blood donors. PMID:1981409

  13. Twin-to-Twin Transfusion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mahieu-Caputo, Dominique; Dommergues, Marc; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Lacoste, Mireille; Cai, Yi; Narcy, Françoise; Jolly, Dominique; Gonzales, Marie; Dumez, Yves; Gubler, Marie-Claire

    2000-01-01

    The twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTS) results from an unbalanced blood supply through placental anastomoses in monochorionic twins. It induces growth restriction, renal tubular dysgenesis, and oliguria in the donor and visceromegaly and polyuria in the recipient. A better understanding of its pathophysiology could contribute to improving the management of TTS, which still carries a high perinatal mortality in both twins. As well as several other candidates, the renin-angiotensin system might be involved in TTS. To evaluate its role in the pathogenesis of the syndrome, we studied the kidneys of 21 twin pairs who died from TTS at 19 to 30 weeks, compared with 39 individuals in a control group, using light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization. The overexpression of the renin protein and transcript with frequent evidence of renin synthesis by mesangial cells was observed in the donor kidneys, presumably as a consequence of chronic renal hypoperfusion. This upregulation of renin synthesis might be beneficial to restore euvolemia. In severe cases of TTS, however, angiotensin-II-induced vasoconstriction acts as an additional deleterious factor by further reducing the renal blood flow in donors. In recipients, renin expression was virtually absent, possibly because it was down-regulated by hypervolemia. However, in addition to congestion and hemorrhagic infarction, there were severe glomerular and arterial lesions resembling those observed in polycythemia- or hypertension-induced microangiopathy. We speculate that fetal hypertension in the recipient might be partly mediated by the transfer of circulating renin produced by the donor, through the placental vascular shunts. PMID:10666392

  14. The first report of cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia in an adolescent with prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Gürbüz, Fatih; Yağcı-Küpeli, Begül; Kör, Yılmaz; Yüksel, Bilgin; Zorludemir, Suzan; Gürbüz, Berrak Bilginer; Küpeli, Serhan

    2014-01-01

    Prolactinomas are common pituitary tumors that can cause gonadal dysfunction and infertility related to hyperprolactinemia. Dopamine agonists are the first-line treatment in these patients. Cabergoline leads to significant reduction in serum prolactin levels and tumor size in patients with prolactinoma. Dopamine agonists have been associated with adverse effects such as nausea, vomiting and psychosis. We report here a case with cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia. The patient had cabergoline treatment history for prolactinoma and presented with weakness, fatigue, nausea, and paleness. Laboratory findings revealed severe anemia-related immune hemolysis. There were no causes identified to explain hemolytic anemia except cabergoline. Therefore, cabergoline therapy was stopped and subsequently hemolytic anemia resolved and did not occur again. This is the first reported pediatric case with prolactinoma and cabergoline-induced hemolytic anemia. Clinicians should be watchful for this rare side effect induced by cabergoline. PMID:23945126

  15. Auto immune hemolytic anemia in a child precipitated by chicken pox.

    PubMed

    Billoo, Samina Shamim; Jamalvi, Syed Waseem

    2008-05-01

    Auto Immune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA) is a rare entity in children. We report a case of an adolescent girl with AIHA, which was precipitated by chicken pox. Clinical course over 3 years, till remission is described. PMID:18541094

  16. Comparison of hemolytic activities of coal fly ash and its soluble and insoluble fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.K.; Wong, M.H.; Tam, N.F.Y.

    1986-08-01

    Coal fly ash of a particle diameter smaller than 10 ..mu..m was collected from the precipitator of a power plant in Hong Kong. Comparison of hemolytic activities between fly ash and free silica showed that fly ash had a lower biological effect than free silica. The hemolytic activities of the soluble and insoluble fractions of fly ash were further compared by two methods: total hemoglobin method and cyanmethemoglobin method. An analysis of results showed significant differences for fly ash and its soluble fraction between methods. Fly ash, which contained a silicate level similar to its insoluble fraction, had a hemolytic activity higher than the summation of both its soluble and insoluble fractions. This indicates that the hemolytic activity was independent of the silicate content in the fly ash samples.

  17. Blood transfusion in Europe: basic principles for initial and continuous training in transfusion medicine: an approach to an European harmonisation.

    PubMed

    Mueller, M M; Seifried, E

    2006-11-01

    Over the past few decades, transfusion medicine and haemotherapy have evolved into complex medical disciplines comprising a broad field of subspecialties such as immunohaematology, blood component production, haemapheresis and haemostaseology. Transfusion medicine is thus an important qualification at the interfaces of analytical laboratory medicine, pharmaceutical production and clinical disciplines such as internal medicine, anaesthesiology or surgery. Physicians specialising in transfusion medicine are valuable and competent partners for these related disciplines when it comes to safe, effective and tailored haemotherapy. Why has transfusion medicine become so complex? On the one hand, one can discern problems such as infectious diseases like the HIV disaster in the past century, resulting in guidelines, directives and laws such as the transfusion law in Germany. Thereby, we now enjoy the highest level of blood product safety ever regarding viral transmission thanks to the broad implementation of PCR testing. On the other hand, there are numerous positive reasons for the increasing complexity of transfusion medicine: Modern medical therapies like stem cell transplantation, cellular therapy, transplantation of solid organs, regenerative medicine and surgery cannot exist without a safe supply of blood products and high quality standard as well as special blood products and laboratory services provided by blood banks and transfusion medicine specialists. Good laboratory practice (GLP), good manufacturing practice (GMP), quality management systems and quality control on the pharmaceutical manufacturer's level are only few examples of the standards in today's blood banking. European directives in the field of blood products, stem cell preparations and tissue have led to higher uniform quality standards for biological preparations in a unified Europe, which is the desired outcome, but which also increases the complexity of this field. In contrast, directives 93/16/EEC and 2001/19/EC, the directives of the European Parliament and of the Council on the mutual recognition of professional qualifications of European doctors currently in force, as well as the impending directive 2005/36/EC, which has to be translated into national law until October 2007, do not include transfusion medicine, blood transfusion or immunohaematology at all. Other medical specialities, which like our field, are not common to all member states of the European Union, are listed in the above mentioned directives with the minimum length of training and minimal requirements for the qualifications. Examples include clinical biology, biological haematology, microbiology-bacteriology, biological chemistry, immunology, thoracic, paediatric or vascular surgery as well as physiotherapy, stomatology, neuro-psychiatry, dermato-venerology, occupational medicine, allergology, geriatrics, gastro-enterological surgery, community medicine, nuclear medicine, pharmacology, accident and emergency medicine or tropical medicine. Most of the above are medical specialities in some member states, but not in all. A concerted initiative inaugurated by the European Network of Transfusion Medicine Societies (EuroNet-TMS) and the European Blood Alliance (EBA) aims to compile the situation of the transfusion medicine speciality throughout Europe. A preliminary summary of the current situation in 15 European states was prepared in 2005 after a first set of questions, which was sent out by us via the EBA platform. The authors appreciate Clair Watts' compilation of the answers provided by the 15 European colleagues. A summary of these answers is depicted in Table 1. However, the initiative aims at a more complex analysis of the different requirements and constituent parts of the qualification in transfusion medicine in different countries. A long-term objective of this initiative might be to introduce the transfusion medicine specialisation into the above mentioned EC directives in order to facilitate mutual recognition of transfusion medicine qualifications throughout Europe. PMID:17196864

  18. Reticulocytopenia in severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) of the warm antibody type.

    PubMed

    Hauke, G; Fauser, A A; Weber, S; Maas, D

    1983-06-01

    A patient with severe AIHA of the warm antibody type, absence of reticulocytes and red cell hyperplasia of the bone marrow is described. In order to maintain a reasonable hemoglobin level 38 units of washed packed red cells were required within 24 days. The treatment with high doses of steroids showed no permanent beneficial effect. After splenectomy the red cell destruction was immediately reduced and the patient went into a remission. Bone marrow culture studies during the acute phase of the disease and at the time of complete hemato- and immunological remission, i.e. 4 months after splenectomy suggested a circulating autoantibody directed to early erythroid progenitors (BFU-E). The inhibitory activity in the patient's plasma did not influence granulocytic or mixed colony formation (CFU-GEMM). In addition to autoantibodies directed to erythroblasts and erythropoietin involved in the pathogenic mechanisms leading to red cell aplasia type I and II the culture studies suggest an unusual autoantibody that might cause the observed reticulocytopenia and erythropoietic hyperplasia of the bone marrow in AIHA. After the splenectomy the patient recovered, he required no further blood transfusions and his disease has not recurred. PMID:6850101

  19. Hemolytic activity in the periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis: kinetics of enzyme release and localization.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, L; Bramanti, T E; Ebersole, J L; Holt, S C

    1991-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis W50, W83, A7A1-28, and ATCC 33277 were investigated for their abilities to lyse sheep, human, and rabbit erythrocytes. All of the P. gingivalis strains studied produced an active hemolytic activity during growth, with maximum activity occurring in late-exponential-early-stationary growth phase. The enzyme was cell bound and associated with the outer membrane. Fractionation of P. gingivalis W50 localized the putative hemolysin almost exclusively in the outer membrane fraction, with significant hemolytic activity concentrated in the outer membrane vesicles. Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions significantly increased the expression of hemolytic activity. Hemolytic activity was inhibited by proteinase K, trypsin, the proteinase inhibitors Na-P-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone and benzamidine, the metabolic inhibitor M-chlorophenyl-hydrazone, and iodoacetate. KCN and sodium azide (NaN3) only partially inhibited P. gingivalis hemolytic activity, while antiserum to whole cells of each of the P. gingivalis strains had a significant inhibitory effect on hemolytic activity. The P. gingivalis W50 hemolysin was inhibited by cysteine, dithiothreitol, and glutathione at concentrations of at least 10 mM; at low concentrations (i.e., 2 mM), dithiothreitol did not completely inhibit hemolytic activity. Heating to temperatures above 55 degrees C resulted in an almost complete inhibition of hemolytic activity. The effect of heme limitation (i.e., iron) on hemolysin production indicated that either limitation or starvation for heme resulted in significantly increased hemolysin production compared with that of P. gingivalis grown in the presence of excess heme. PMID:2037355

  20. An unusual presentation of hemolytic anemia in a patient with prosthetic mitral valve.

    PubMed

    Najib, Mohammad Q; Vinales, Karyne L; Paripati, Harshita R; Kundranda, Madappa N; Valdez, Riccardo; Rihal, Charanjit S; Chaliki, Hari P

    2011-07-01

    Although rare, periprosthetic valvular regurgitation can cause hemolytic anemia. We present the case of a 63-year-old man who had an unusual presentation of hemolytic anemia due to periprosthetic mitral valve regurgitation (PMVR) in the presence of cold agglutinins. Due to high surgical risk, PMVR was percutaneously closed with three Amplatzer devices under the guidance of three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography. PMID:21453302

  1. Plasma in the PICU: why and when should we transfuse?

    PubMed

    Labarinas, Sonia; Arni, Delphine; Karam, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Whereas red blood cell transfusions have been used since the 19th century, plasma has only been available since 1941. It was originally mainly used as volume replacement, mostly during World War II and the Korean War. Over the years, its indication has shifted to correct coagulation factors deficiencies or to prevent bleeding. Currently, it remains a frequent treatment in the intensive care unit, both for critically ill adults and children. However, observational studies have shown that plasma transfusion fail to correct mildly abnormal coagulation tests. Furthermore, recent epidemiological studies have shown that plasma transfusions are associated with an increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Therefore, plasma, as any other treatment, has to be used when the benefits outweigh the risks. Based on observational data, most experts suggest limiting its use either to massively bleeding patients or bleeding patients who have documented abnormal coagulation tests, and refraining for transfusing plasma to nonbleeding patients whatever their coagulation tests. In this paper, we will review current evidence on plasma transfusions and discuss its indications. PMID:23725411

  2. Resveratrol preserves the function of human platelets stored for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Lannan, Katie L; Refaai, Majed A; Ture, Sara K; Morrell, Craig N; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P; Spinelli, Sherry L

    2016-03-01

    Stored platelets undergo biochemical, structural and functional changes that lead to decreased efficacy and safety of platelet transfusions. Not only do platelets acquire markers of activation during storage, but they also fail to respond normally to agonists post-storage. We hypothesized that resveratrol, a cardioprotective antioxidant, could act as a novel platelet storage additive to safely prevent unwanted platelet activation during storage, while simultaneously preserving normal haemostatic function. Human platelets treated with resveratrol and stored for 5d released less thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin E2 compared to control platelets. Resveratrol preserved the ability of platelets to aggregate, spread and respond to thrombin, suggesting an improved ability to activate post-storage. Utilizing an invitro model of transfusion and thromboelastography, clot strength was improved with resveratrol treatment compared to conventionally stored platelets. The mechanism of resveratrol's beneficial actions on stored platelets was partly mediated through decreased platelet apoptosis in storage, resulting in a longer half-life following transfusion. Lastly, an invivo mouse model of transfusion demonstrated that stored platelets are prothrombotic and that resveratrol delayed vessel occlusion time to a level similar to transfusion with fresh platelets. We show resveratrol has a dual ability to reduce unwanted platelet activation during storage, while preserving critical haemostatic function. PMID:26683619

  3. Blood donation and blood transfusion: special considerations for African Americans.

    PubMed

    Shaz, Beth H; Zimring, James C; Demmons, Derrick G; Hillyer, Christopher D

    2008-07-01

    Unique issues in blood donation and blood transfusion regarding African Americans (AA) in the United States span the donation process, manufacturing of products, and hospital transfusion service. As AAs become a growing population, a constant supply of blood donated by AAs is necessary to support this growth. Nationally, AAs are underrepresented in blood collection, which may be secondary to AAs having higher rates of anemia and other deferrable conditions or unique motivators as well as other barriers to blood donation. When investigating blood transfusion practices, blood utilization for different races and ethnicities is unknown. AAs may receive more red blood cell (RBC) transfusions because they have a higher proportion of diseases that require transfusion. Patients with sickle cell disease are at increased risk of RBC alloimmunization likely due to the predominance of RBC units from white donors in the existing blood supply, but it is not known if all AA recipients experience increased alloimmunization rates compared with whites. In conclusion, there is a need to increase donation by AAs, which can only be achieved by conducting studies to understand racial differences in donor recruitment and to better understand blood utilization and adverse events as a factor of race and ethnicity. PMID:18572096

  4. [Septic shock following platelet transfusion contaminated with Citrobacter koseri in a child with postchemotherapy febrile neutropenia].

    PubMed

    Tichit, R; Saumet, L; Marchandin, H; Haouy, S; Latry, P; Sirvent, N

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial transfusion risk is currently the greatest infectious risk of blood transfusion. We report the case of a child with postchemotherapy febrile neutropenia who presented septic shock following platelet transfusion contaminated with Citrobacter koseri. The life-threatening development could have been avoided by strict compliance with good clinical practice. The stability of mortality rates due to adverse effects of bacterial proliferation during platelet transfusions in France since 1994 calls for optimization of all preventive measures throughout the transfusion chain and perfect knowledge of transfusion rules by medical staff and care givers. PMID:26552624

  5. Effects of co-existing microalgae and grazers on the production of hemolytic toxins in Karenia mikimotoi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weidong; Zhang, Naisheng; Cui, Weimin; Xu, Yanyan; Li, Hongye; Liu, Jiesheng

    2011-11-01

    Karenia mikimotoi (Miyake & Kominami ex Oda) Hansen & Moestrup is associated with harmful algal blooms in temperate and subtropical zones of the world. The hemolytic substances produced by K. mikimotoi are thought to cause mortality in fishes and invertebrates. We evaluated the composition of the hemolytic toxin produced by K. mikimotoi cultured in the laboratory using thin-layer chromatography. In addition, we evaluated the effect of co-occuring algae ( Prorocentrum donghaiense and Alexandrium tamarense) and the cladoceran grazer Moina mongolica on hemolytic toxin production in K. mikimotoi. The hemolytic toxins from K. mikimotoi were a mixture of 2 liposaccharides and 1 lipid. Waterborne clues from P. donghaiense and A. tamarense inhibited the growth of K. mikimotoi but increased the production of hemolytic toxins. Conversely, K. mikimotoi strongly inhibited the growth of caged P. donghaiense and A. tamarense. In addition, the ingestion of K. mikimotoi by M. mongolica induced the production of hemolytic toxins in K. mikimotoi. Taken together, our results suggest that the presence of other microalgae and grazers may be as important as environmental factors for controlling the production of hemolytic substances. K. mikimotoi secreted allelochemicals other than unstable fatty acids with hemolytic activity. The production of hemolytic toxins in dinoflagellates was not only dependent on resource availability, but also on the risk of predation. Hemolytic toxins likely play an important role as chemical deterrents secreted by K. mikimotoi.

  6. Avoidance of Blood Transfusion to Patients Suffering From Myocardial Injury and Severe Anemia Is Associated With Increased Long-Term Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Barbarova, Irina; Klempfner, Robert; Rapoport, Avigal; Wasserstrum, Yishay; Goren, Idan; Kats, Ana; Segal, Gad

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myocardial injury and anemia are common among patients in internal medicine departments. Nevertheless, the level of anemia in which blood should be given to these patients is ill defined. We conducted a retrospective, cohort analysis. A total of 209 patients hospitalized to internal medicine, with myocardial injury (troponin I > 0.2 mcg/L, not diagnosed as ACS, acute coronary syndrome) and anemia (Hb < 10 g/dL, without overt bleeding) were included. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 20.7%. A total of 37 patients (17.8%) had severe anemia (Hb < 8 g/dL). A total of 73 patients (34.9%) were transfused. Severe anemia was not associated with increased long-term mortality in the whole cohort while survival of patients with severe anemia that were not transfused was significantly reduced compared to transfused patients (44% vs 80%; P = 0.03). Mortality rates were similar for all patients with Hb ≥ 8 g/dL, regardless of transfusion (54% vs 49%; P = 0.60). Consistently, lack of blood transfusion in patients with severe anemia was independently associated with a 2.27 (1.08–4.81) greater adjusted risk of all-cause mortality (P-value for interaction = 0.04), whereas it did not significantly increase in patients with Hb ≥ 8 g/dL. Avoidance of blood transfusion is associated with unfavorable outcomes among patients with myocardial injury and severe anemia. PMID:26402836

  7. Antibody Therapy in the Management of Shiga Toxin-Induced Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tzipori, Saul; Sheoran, Abhineet; Akiyoshi, Donna; Donohue-Rolfe, Arthur; Trachtman, Howard

    2004-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a disease that can lead to acute renal failure and often to other serious sequelae, including death. The majority of cases are attributed to infections with Escherichia coli, serotype O157:H7 strains in particular, which cause bloody diarrhea and liberate one or two toxins known as Shiga toxins 1 and 2. These toxins are thought to directly be responsible for the manifestations of HUS. Currently, supportive nonspecific treatment is the only available option for the management of individuals presenting with HUS. The benefit of antimicrobial therapy remains uncertain because of several reports which claim that such intervention can in fact exacerbate the syndrome. There have been only a few specific therapies directed against neutralizing the activities of these toxins, but none so far has been shown to be effective. This article reviews the literature on the mechanism of action of these toxins and the clinical manifestations and current management and treatment of HUS. The major focus of the article, however, is the development and rationale for using neutralizing human antibodies to combat this toxin-induced disease. Several groups are currently pursuing this approach with either humanized, chimeric, or human antitoxin antibodies produced in transgenic mice. They are at different phases of development, ranging from preclinical evaluation to human clinical trials. The information available from preclinical studies indicates that neutralizing specific antibodies directed against the A subunit of the toxin can be highly protective. Such antibodies, even when administered well after exposure to bacterial infection and onset of diarrhea, can prevent the occurrence of systemic complications. PMID:15489355

  8. A decision-making tool for exchange transfusions in infants with severe hyperbilirubinemia in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Olusanya, B O; Iskander, I F; Slusher, T M; Wennberg, R P

    2016-05-01

    Late presentation and ineffective phototherapy account for excessive rates of avoidable exchange transfusions (ETs) in many low- and middle-income countries. Several system-based constraints sometimes limit the ability to provide timely ETs for all infants at risk of kernicterus, thus necessitating a treatment triage to optimize available resources. This article proposes a practical priority-setting model for term and near-term infants requiring ET after the first 48 h of life. The proposed model combines plasma/serum bilirubin estimation, clinical signs of acute bilirubin encephalopathy and neurotoxicity risk factors for predicting the risk of kernicterus based on available evidence in the literature. PMID:26938921

  9. Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia: 70 cases (1988-1996).

    PubMed

    Reimer, M E; Troy, G C; Warnick, L D

    1999-01-01

    Survival times and mortality rates in dogs with idiopathic immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) have been infrequently reported in the literature. This study evaluates survival and mortality in a large group of dogs with IMHA. The association of age, sex, and breed with IMHA was evaluated by comparing affected dogs to control dogs admitted to the hospital during the same time period. Treatment regimens were reviewed to determine the effects of different agents upon survival of dogs with IMHA during hospitalization and after discharge. Median survival times for each treatment group were 57 days (prednisone), 28 days (prednisone, cyclophosphamide), 974 days (prednisone, azathioprine), 15 days (prednisone, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine), and one day (no treatment). Overall mortality rate in the population of dogs studied was 70%. Twenty-nine (41.4%) dogs either died or were euthanized while hospitalized. Forty-one (59%) dogs were discharged from the hospital. Of the dogs discharged, 10 died within the first month, another five died within three months, and another five died within a year of discharge due to assumed complications of therapy or relapses of IMHA. PMID:10493413

  10. Chicken (Gallus gallus) hemolytic complement: optimal conditions for its titration.

    PubMed

    Barta, O; Barta, V

    1975-01-01

    The effect of pH, ionic strength, cation concentration, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid trisodium salt (Na3EDTA), time and temperature were studied to determine the optimal conditions for titrating the hemolytic complement (C) activity in sera of chicken (Gallus gallus). Swine erythrocytes (E) sensitized with rabbit antibodies were the most sensitive, while chicken serum had a smaller amount of "natural" antibody against them than against red blood cells from other five species tested. The highest titers of chicken C, when tested with swine sensitized E, were detected when isotonic NaCl-barbital buffer was used as diluent, having the ionic strength of 0.15, conductance of 11 millimhos/cm at 20 degrees C. However, maximal chicken C titers detected with sensitized rabbit E were obtained at ionic strength of 0.07 to 0.11 depending on pH. A final concentration of 1 X 10(-3) M of Mg2+ and 3 X 10(-4) M of Ca2+ and pH 8 were optimal in both cases. The temperature of 30 degrees C and time of 60 minutes were appropriate to reveal the maximal titers.. PMID:241720

  11. Age-related penetrance of hereditary atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Maren; Rybicki, Lisa A; Winter, Aurelia; Hoffmann, Michael M; Reiermann, Stefanie; Linke, Hannah; Arbeiter, Klaus; Patzer, Ludwig; Budde, Klemens; Hoppe, Bernd; Zeier, Martin; Lhotta, Karl; Bock, Andreas; Wiech, Thorsten; Gaspert, Ariana; Fehr, Thomas; Woznowski, Magdalena; Berisha, Gani; Malinoc, Angelica; Goek, Oemer-Necmi; Eng, Charis; Neumann, Hartmut P H

    2011-11-01

    Hereditary atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), a dramatic disease frequently leading to dialysis, is associated with germline mutations of the CFH, CD46, or CFI genes. After identification of the mutation in an affected aHUS patient, single-site gene testing of relatives is the preventive care perspective. However, clinical data for family counselling are scarce. From the German-Speaking-Countries-aHUS-Registry, 33 index patients with mutations were approached for permission to offer relatives screening for their family-specific mutations and to obtain demographic and clinical data. Mutation screening was performed using direct sequencing. Age-adjusted penetrance of aHUS was calculated for each gene in index cases and in mutation-positive relatives. Sixty-one relatives comprising 41 parents and 20 other relatives were enrolled and mutations detected in 31/61. In total, 40 research participants had germline mutations in CFH, 19 in CD46 and in 6 CFI. Penetrance at age 40 was markedly reduced in mutation-positive relatives compared to index patients overall with 10% versus 67% (P < 0.001); 6% vs. 67% (P < 0.001) in CFH mutation carriers and 21% vs. 70% (P= 0.003) in CD46 mutation carriers. Age-adjusted penetrance for hereditary aHUS is important to understand the disease, and if replicated in the future, for genetic counselling. PMID:21906045

  12. Update on hemolytic uremic syndrome: Diagnostic and therapeutic recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Bertoni, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a rare disease. In this work the authors review the recent findings on HUS, considering the different etiologic and pathogenetic classifications. New findings in genetics and, in particular, mutations of genes that encode the complement-regulatory proteins have improved our understanding of atypical HUS. Similarly, the complement proteins are clearly involved in all types of thrombotic microangiopathy: typical HUS, atypical HUS and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Furthermore, several secondary HUS appear to be related to abnormalities in complement genes in predisposed patients. The authors highlight the therapeutic aspects of this rare disease, examining both “traditional therapy” (including plasma therapy, kidney and kidney-liver transplantation) and “new therapies”. The latter include anti-Shiga-toxin antibodies and anti-C5 monoclonal antibody “eculizumab”. Eculizumab has been recently launched for the treatment of the atypical HUS, but it appears to be effective in the treatment of typical HUS and in TTP. Future therapies are in phases I and II. They include anti-C5 antibodies, which are more purified, less immunogenic and absorbed orally and, anti-C3 antibodies, which are more powerful, but potentially less safe. Additionally, infusions of recombinant complement-regulatory proteins are a potential future therapy. PMID:24255888

  13. New Insights in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Barcellini, Wilma

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is caused by the increased destruction of red blood cells (RBCs) by anti-RBC autoantibodies with or without complement activation. RBC destruction may occur both by a direct lysis through the sequential activation of the final components of the complement cascade (membrane attack complex), or by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). The pathogenic role of autoantibodies depends on their class (the most frequent are IgG and IgM), subclass, thermal amplitude (warm and cold forms),as well as affinity and efficiency in activating complement. Several cytokines and cytotoxic mechanisms (CD8+ T and natural killer cells) are further involved in RBC destruction. Moreover, activated macrophages carrying Fc receptors may recognize and phagocyte erythrocytes opsonized by autoantibodies and complement. Direct complement-mediated lysis takes place mainly in the circulations and liver, whereas ADCC, cytotoxicity, and phagocytosis occur preferentially in the spleen and lymphoid organs. The degree of intravascular hemolysis is 10-fold greater than extravascular one. Finally, the efficacy of the erythroblastic compensatory response can greatly influence the clinical picture of AIHA. The interplay and relative burden of all these pathogenic mechanisms give reason for the great clinical heterogeneity of AIHAs, from fully compensated to rapidly evolving fatal cases. PMID:26696796

  14. [Detection and analysis of ABO Hemolytic disease in newborn].

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhao-Xia; Dong, Qing-Song

    2014-10-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the incidence and the model of ABO hemolytic disease in newborn (ABO-HDN) and the results of the three hemolysis test, so as to provide the evidences for clinical diagnosis and therapy. A total of 227 cases of maternal-fetal ABO incompatibility from January 2013 to October 2013 in the First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University were enrolled in the study. The ABO blood group of newborn and mother was detemined and three hemolysis tests (direct antiglobulin test, free antibody test, RBC antibody release test) were performed. The results indicated that in 227 cases of ABO incompatible pregnancies,186 cases were ABO-HDN (81.94%). There was no significant difference in the incidence between O-A and O-B incompatible pregnancies (P > 0.05). The positive ratio of direct antiglobulin test, free antibody test and RBC antibody release test were 59.14% (110/186), 84.78% (156/186) and 94.62% (176/186) respectively. It is concluded that the incidence of ABO-HDN is high. The main models of ABO-HDN were O-A and O-B. There was no significant difference in the incidence between O-A and O-B incompatible pregnancies. Three hemolysis tests are high sensitivity and are helpful in early diagnosis and early treatment of HDN. PMID:25338602

  15. The impact of hemoglobin level and transfusion on the outcomes of chemotherapy in gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xianren; Liu, Jingfu; Chen, Yujuan; Wang, Na; Lu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the impact of hemoglobin levels in predicting outcomes and evaluate whether transfusion could improve the outcomes of chemotherapy on gastric cancer patients. Methods: A total 310 patients were divided into two groups: high Hb group (Hb >90 g/L) and low Hb group (Hb <90 g/L). A portion of patients in low Hb group received transfusion. The effect of hemoglobin level on the chemotherapy outcomes was determined according to the comparison between patients with high hemoglobin and patients with low hemoglobin without transfusion. The effect of transfusion on the chemotherapy outcomes was evaluated by comparing the two low groups (with and without transfusion). Results: A total of 310 patients were within the study criteria. Among them, 27.7% patients in high Hb group, 44.5% patients in low Hb without transfusion and 27.7% patients in low Hb with transfusion were followed up. The 5-years survival rates of high Hb group, low Hb group without transfusion and with transfusion were respectively 29%, 10% and 8%. The survival rate of patients in Hb group without transfusion was higher. The chemotherapy rates of patients in high Hb group, low Hb without transfusion group and with transfusion group were respectively 32.56%, 42.03% and 18.6%. Conclusion: Low nadir Hb (<90 g/L) during chemotherapy had an effect on the survival and chemotherapy response rate. The chemotherapy outcomes could not be improved through increasing Hb level by red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. PMID:26064334

  16. Blood transfusion at the time of the First World War--practice and promise at the birth of transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Boulton, F; Roberts, D J

    2014-12-01

    The centenary of the start of the First World War has stirred considerable interest in the political, social, military and human factors of the time and how they interacted to produce and sustain the material and human destruction in the 4 years of the war and beyond. Medical practice may appear distant and static and perhaps seems to have been somewhat ineffectual in the face of so much trauma and in the light of the enormous advances in medicine and surgery over the last century. However, this is an illusion of time and of course medical, surgical and psychiatric knowledge and procedures were developing rapidly at the time and the war years accelerated implementation of many important advances. Transfusion practice lay at the heart of resuscitation, and although direct transfusion from donor to recipient was still used, Geoffrey Keynes from Britain, Oswald Robertson from America and his namesake Lawrence Bruce Robertson from Canada, developed methods for indirect transfusion from donor to recipient by storing blood in bottles and also blood-banking that laid the foundation of modern transfusion medicine. This review explores the historical setting behind the development of blood transfusion up to the start of the First World War and on how they progressed during the war and afterwards. A fresh look may renew interest in how a novel medical speciality responded to the needs of war and of post-war society. PMID:25586955

  17. Limiting excessive postoperative blood transfusion after cardiac procedures. A review.

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, V A; Ferraris, S P

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of blood product use after cardiac operations reveals that a few patients (< or = 20%) consume the majority of blood products (> 80%). The risk factors that predispose a minority of patients to excessive blood use include patient-related factors, transfusion practices, drug-related causes, and procedure-related factors. Multivariate studies suggest that patient age and red blood cell volume are independent patient-related variables that predict excessive blood product transfusion after cardiac procedures. Other factors include preoperative aspirin ingestion, type of operation, over- or underutilization of heparin during cardiopulmonary bypass, failure to correct hypothermia after cardiopulmonary bypass, and physician overtransfusion. A survey of the currently available blood conservation techniques reveals 5 that stand out as reliable methods: 1) high-dose aprotinin therapy, 2) preoperative erythropoietin therapy when time permits adequate dosage before operation, 3) hemodilution by harvest of whole blood immediately before cardiopulmonary bypass, 4) autologous predonation of blood, and 5) salvage of oxygenator blood after cardiopulmonary bypass. Other methods, such as the use of epsilon-aminocaproic acid or desmopressin, cell saving devices, reinfusion of shed mediastinal blood, and hemofiltration have been reported to be less reliable and may even be harmful in some high-risk patients. Consideration of the available data allows formulation of a 4-pronged plan for limiting excessive blood transfusion after surgery: 1) recognize the causes of excessive transfusion, including the importance of red blood cell volume, type of procedure being performed, preoperative aspirin ingestion, etc.; 2) establish a quality management program, including a survey of transfusion practices that emphasizes physician education and availability of real-time laboratory testing to guide transfusion therapy; 3) adopt a multimodal approach using institution-proven techniques; and 4) continually reassess blood product use and analyze the cost-benefits of blood conservation interventions. PMID:7580359

  18. [Transfusion medicine in the 2000s, on a reform].

    PubMed

    Hervé, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    The creation of the Etablissement Français du Sang (EFS) was mentioned in the Law of July 1, 1998, pertaining to sanitary safety. The EFS is the sole operator of blood transfusion. With a unique legal status, supervised by the Ministry in charge of Health, the EFS organizes the activities involved in the transfusion chain over the whole territory, it promotes research activities and take part in international scientific cooperation. Its activities include medical biology as well as cell and gene therapy. As part of the new 2000-2004 territorial transfusion scheme, the EFS network comprises 18 centers (versus 43 in the previous plan), 14 of which are located in the French territory and the other 4 overseas. The network includes 18 technical platforms for the biological qualification of blood products, while 27 are dedicated to their preparation, transformation and storage. The activities of collection and distribution, which comply with the principle of proximity to both donors and patients, are ensured by 220 sites spread over the whole territory. For the future, the EFS wants to focus its efforts on reducing residual infectious risks (using molecular biology tools), preventing immunological risks, drawing up an education program aiming at teaching transfusion medicine differently. Despite the advances achieved in biotechnologies, the development of substitution products to replace blood transfusion will still require a lot of time. The EFS wishes to focus its action following three different axes: transfusion medicine, medical biology and cell engineering. With its 18 centers and its 8,200 persons, the EFS must face the challengers of the 2000s, relying on the advances in biotechnologies. PMID:12145845

  19. Antibody screening in multitransfused patients: a prerequisite before each transfusion.

    PubMed

    Lamba, Divjot S; Mittal, Kshitija; Sood, Tanvi; Bedi, Ravneet Kaur; Kaur, Paramjit; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2014-10-01

    Life-long red blood cell (RBC) transfusions remain the main treatment for severe thalassemia. We hereby report a case of anti S and anti Lu(a) in a β-thalassemia major patient detected incidentally on antibody screening. The patient was a known case of β-thalassemia major and was on regular blood transfusion every 3 weeks from the institute from the age of 6 months. Subsequently, on one occasion, patient's crossmatch was compatible despite positive antibody screen using microcolumn gel technique. Autocontrol and direct antiglobulin test were negative on microcolumn gel. Anti S and anti Lu(a) antibodies were identified. Blood unit found compatible was negative for S and Lu(a) antigens. Antibody titers were 1:1 for both anti S and anti Lu(a) in AHG phase using tube technique and antibodies were of IgG type. Blood unit was transfused uneventfully to the patient. Donors were traced back (last three donations) and called for repeat blood sample testing for S and Lu(a) antigen. Two out of three donors were found to be S antigen positive and one out of these two was Lu(a) antigen positive. Anti S and anti Lu(a) antibodies were again identified on patient's subsequent visit for transfusion. The present case re-emphasize the importance of antibody screening at each visit in earlier detection of antibodies in multi transfused patients. Encouraging patients to receive transfusion from one center and dedicating donors could reduce alloimmunization rate but larger studies are required. PMID:25294114

  20. Auto-transfusion tourniquets: the next evolution of tourniquets.

    PubMed

    Tang, David H; Olesnicky, Bohdan T; Eby, Michael W; Heiskell, Lawrence E

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the relationship between hemorrhagic shock and the pathophysiology of shock using conventional tourniquets. We will focus on corollary benefits with the use of HemaClear(®), a self-contained, sterile, exsanguinating auto-transfusion tourniquet. This discussion will demonstrate that the use of auto-transfusion tourniquets is a practical evidence-based approach in fluid resuscitation: it shortens the duration of shock after hemorrhage and trauma compared with conventional tourniquets. Emphasis is placed on the use of the HemaClear(®) as an alternative fluid resuscitation tool which is more efficient in the battlefield, pre-hospital and in-hospital settings. PMID:27147871

  1. Auto-transfusion tourniquets: the next evolution of tourniquets

    PubMed Central

    Tang, David H; Olesnicky, Bohdan T; Eby, Michael W; Heiskell, Lawrence E

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the relationship between hemorrhagic shock and the pathophysiology of shock using conventional tourniquets. We will focus on corollary benefits with the use of HemaClear®, a self-contained, sterile, exsanguinating auto-transfusion tourniquet. This discussion will demonstrate that the use of auto-transfusion tourniquets is a practical evidence-based approach in fluid resuscitation: it shortens the duration of shock after hemorrhage and trauma compared with conventional tourniquets. Emphasis is placed on the use of the HemaClear® as an alternative fluid resuscitation tool which is more efficient in the battlefield, pre-hospital and in-hospital settings.

  2. Platelet Transfusions in Patients with Hypoproliferative Thrombocytopenia: Conclusions from Clinical Trials and Current Controversies.

    PubMed

    Crighton, Gemma L; Estcourt, Lise J; Wood, Erica M; Stanworth, Simon J

    2016-06-01

    Patients with hematologic malignancies frequently become thrombocytopenic as a result of their underlying malignancy or treatments, including cytotoxic chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and are at increased risk of hemorrhage. Prophylactic platelet transfusions are aimed at preventing severe or life-threatening hemorrhage. This review summarizes recent evidence, including the need for prophylactic platelet transfusions, the optimal dose, platelet transfusion triggers, and risk factors for bleeding. It also discusses controversies surrounding platelet transfusions in this population. PMID:27112995

  3. Assessment of the clinical transfusion practice at a regional referral hospital in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Natukunda, B; Schonewille, H; Smit Sibinga, C Th

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the indications for transfusion, blood ordering practices and post-transfusion complications, and to assess the clinical transfusion practice at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital (MRRH) in Mbarara, Uganda. There are no guidelines on the appropriate use of blood at MRRH. Therefore, there was a need to assess the local clinical transfusion practice. Patients' hospital files were studied for evidence of blood transfusions in 2008. All five wards were reviewed and details on the transfusion process were recorded. A total of 1730 patients (median age, 19.0 years; range, 1 day to 88 years; female-to-male ratio, 1.4), for whom blood was cross-matched, were studied. Of these, 1674 (96.8%) patients actually received transfusions, which were as whole blood in 58.4% of recipients. The mean number of units per recipient was 1.7 and the cross-match-to-transfusion ratio was 1.3. The three most frequent indications for transfusion were malaria (38.8%), bleeding (27.1%) and other infections (16.1%). There were no records for pre-transfusion haemoglobin, compatibility testing, transfusion start-times and vital signs in 30.2, 51.8, 21.5 and 97.6% of the recipients, respectively. Transfusion reactions were recorded for 10 (0.6%) patients. Although there was no evidence of blood wastage, inadequacies were noted in the documentation of the transfusion process. There is a need to train staff in blood transfusion and to design a 'blood transfusion form' for easy monitoring and evaluation. A hospital transfusion committee and guidelines on the appropriate use of blood should be put in place at MRRH. PMID:20136779

  4. [Experience of mismatched blood transfusion for an rh negative patient and reconsideration of emergency blood transfusion manual in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Aya; Hoshi, Takuo; Nishikawa, Masashi; Aya, Daisuke; Ueda, Hiroshi; Yokouchi, Takako; Tanaka, Makoto

    2013-08-01

    We report a B Rh negative patient undergoing total pelvic exenteration, who received both ABO and Rh incompatible packed red blood cells in an emergency situation. After this experience, we revised the manual of emergency blood transfusion. We defined level of severity to share information with surgeon, nurses, anesthesiologists and the member of the blood center. We changed anesthesia information management system for showing blood type including Duffy blood group system and checking out whether we can transfuse Rh positive blood to Rh negative patient in an emergency situation at the timeout of surgery. PMID:23984584

  5. The Lbw2 Locus Promotes Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Scatizzi, John C.; Haraldsson, Maria K.; Pollard, K. Michael; Theofilopoulos, Argyrios N.; Kono, Dwight H.

    2012-01-01

    The lupus-prone NZB strain uniquely develops a genetically imposed severe spontaneous autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) that is very similar to the corresponding human disease. Previous studies have mapped anti-erythrocyte Ab (AEA)-promoting NZB loci to several chromosomal locations, including chromosome 4, however, none of these have been analyzed with interval congenics. Here, we used NZB.NZW-Lbw2 congenic (designated Lbw2 congenic) mice containing an introgressed fragment of NZW on chromosome 4 encompassing Lbw2, a locus previously linked to survival, glomerulonephritis, and splenomegaly, to investigate the role in AIHA. Lbw2 congenic mice exhibited marked reductions in AEAs and splenomegaly, but not in anti-nuclear Abs. Furthermore, Lbw2 congenics had greater numbers of marginal zone B cells and reduced expansion of peritoneal cells, particularly the B-1a cell subset at early ages, but no reduction in B cell response to LPS. Analysis of a panel of subinterval congenic mice showed that the full effect of Lbw2 on AEA production was dependent on three subloci, with splenomegaly mapping to two of the subloci, and expansions of peritoneal cell populations, including B-1a cells to one. These results directly demonstrated the presence of AEA-specific promoting genes on NZB chromosome 4, documented a marked influence of background genes on autoimmune phenotypes related to Lbw2, and further refined the locations of the underlying genetic variants. Delineation of the Lbw2 genes should yield new insights into both the pathogenesis of AIHA and the nature of epistatic interactions of lupus-modifying genetic variants. PMID:22371393

  6. Expansion of CD8+ cells in autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, S Ju; Sidorova, Ju V; Tsvetaeva, N V; Nikulina, O F; Biderman, B V; Nikulina, E E; Kulikov, S M; Sudarikov, A B

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare blood disease associated with the production of auto-antibodies and autoimmune hemolysis. A critical role of B-cells in the development of AIHA has been demonstrated before. Here, we present the analysis of the clonal T-cell populations in patients with AIHA. Thirty-three patients with AIHA were included in this study. Thirteen patients with other anemias, 14 patients with other autoimmune conditions (SLE - 6, RA - 8) and 20 healthy donors were included in the study as a control group. The clonality of T-cell was evaluated by the assessment of the T-cell receptor gamma and beta chain gene rearrangements (TCRG and TCRB). The incidence of T-cell monoclonality detected in patients with AIHA was significantly higher compared to the control group. The persistence of T-cell clones did not correlate with the level of hemoglobin and other signs of remission or relapse and did not disappear after the therapy and clinical improvement (observation period was between 1 and 10 years). There was no correlation between the T-cell clonality and the gender, age, splenectomy, duration or severity of the disease. Fractionation of T-lymphocytes (CD4+, CD8+, CD4+25+) revealed that the monoclonal T-cells belonged to the CD8+ sub-population. We assume that besides a possible causative role of the T-cell clones in AIHA to autoimmune process, these clones do not directly participate in the development and maintenance of hemolysis. Most of the AIHA patients (48.5%) demonstrated a T-cell monoclonality, which requires monitoring and should be distinguished from T-cell tumors. PMID:26829107

  7. Peripheral gangrene in children with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Malina, Michal; Gulati, Ashima; Bagga, Arvind; Majid, Mohammad A; Simkova, Eva; Schaefer, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a thrombotic microangiopathy with severe clinical manifestation, frequent recurrence, and poor long-term prognosis. It is usually caused by abnormalities in complement regulation. We report 2 cases of children affected by a catastrophic extrarenal complication. A 4-year-old Indian girl developed gangrene of the finger tips 2 days after initial presentation of aHUS. Factor H autoantibodies were identified. Renal function continued to decline despite daily plasma exchanges, and she was started on peritoneal dialysis 5 days after admission. The distal tips of the left hand remained gangrenous with a line of demarcation. Three weeks later, she did not return for follow-up and died at home because of dialysis-related complications. An Arabic girl developed end-stage renal disease due to aHUS in the fourth month after birth. A de novo activating C3 mutation was found. At age 9 months, she suddenly developed ischemic changes in fingers of both hands and several toes. The lesions progressed, and several finger tips became gangrenous despite intense plasma exchange therapy. The decision was made to administer complement blocking therapy with the C5 antibody eculizumab. All nonnecrotic digits rapidly regained perfusion. The 3 already gangrenous fingers healed with loss of the end phalanges. During maintenance, eculizumab aHUS activity subsided completely and some late recovery of renal function was observed. aHUS may present by thrombotic macroangiopathy of small peripheral arteries. Eculizumab appears effective in preserving tissue viability if administered before gangrene occurs and should be considered as first-line rescue therapy in such cases. PMID:23230076

  8. Toward a patient-based paradigm for blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Albert; Vamvakas, Eleftherios

    2014-01-01

    The current “manufacturing paradigm” of transfusion practice has detached transfusion from the clinical environment. As an example, fresh whole blood in large-volume hemorrhage may be superior to whole blood reconstituted from multiple components. Multicomponent apheresis can overcome logistical difficulties in matching patient needs with fresh component availability and can deliver the benefits of fresh whole blood. Because of the different transfusion needs of patients in emerging economies and the vulnerability of these blood systems to emerging infections, fresh whole blood and multicomponent apheresis can better meet patient needs when compared with transplants of the “manufacturing paradigm”. We propose that patient blood management, along with panels of repeat, paid, accredited apheresis and fresh whole-blood donors can be used in emerging economies to support decentralized blood services. This alternative transfusion–medicine paradigm could eventually also be adopted by established economies to focus transfusion medicine on local patient needs and to alleviate the problem of the aging volunteer donor base. PMID:24520208

  9. Impact of Transfusion on Cancer Growth and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Goubran, Hadi A.; Elemary, Mohamed; Radosevich, Miryana; Seghatchian, Jerard; El-Ekiaby, Magdy; Burnouf, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    For many years, transfusion of allogeneic red blood cells, platelet concentrates, and plasma units has been part of the standard therapeutic arsenal used along the surgical and nonsurgical treatment of patients with malignancies. Although the benefits of these blood products are not a matter of debate in specific pathological conditions associated with life-threatening low blood cell counts or bleeding, increasing clinical evidence is nevertheless suggesting that deliberate transfusion of these blood components may actually lead to negative clinical outcomes by affecting patient’s immune defense, stimulating tumor growth, tethering, and dissemination. Rigorous preclinical and clinical studies are needed to dimension the clinical relevance, benefits, and risks of transfusion of blood components in cancer patients and understand the amplitude of problems. There is also a need to consider validating preparation methods of blood components for so far ignored biological markers, such as microparticles and biological response modifiers. Meanwhile, blood component transfusions should be regarded as a personalized medicine, taking into careful consideration the status and specificities of the patient, rather than as a routine hospital procedure. PMID:27006592

  10. Effects of a CME Program on Physicians' Transfusion Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Alan L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The hospital charts of 44 patients who were autologous blood donors undergoing elective orthopedic surgery and a matched group of 44 patients who were not autologous blood donors were analyzed to determine their physicians' transfusion practices. A continuing medical education program was developed. (Author/MLW)

  11. Exchange transfusion in complicated pediatric malaria: A critical appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Barman, Himesh

    2015-01-01

    Complicated falciparum malaria is a killer disease resulting in high mortality in spite of appropriate treatment. Some workers have reported improved survival when adjunct exchange blood transfusion is included in the treatment modality while others opine against it. This review is an effort to address and critically appraise current evidence for the treatment mode for severe malaria. The literature was searched with a specified search strategy to identify reports of children who underwent exchange transfusion for severe malaria. Total 23 children who underwent exchange transfusion for severe falciparum malaria published by 9 authors were identified. Age ranged from 5 months to 16 years with a mean age of 6.4 years. The average preprocedure parasite index (PI) was 41.4% (95confidence interval [CI]; 31.2-51.4). The average blood volume exchanged was 118.6% (95% CI; 94.7-143) of the circulating blood volume. The average postexchange reduction in PI was 34.1% (95% CI; 25.4-42.8). Three out of 23 children encountered some complications. All the children survivedKeywords: Exchange blood transfusion, parasite index, pediatric Intensive Care Unit, red cell exchange, severe falciparum malaria. PMID:25878429

  12. Impact of Transfusion on Cancer Growth and Outcome.

    PubMed

    Goubran, Hadi A; Elemary, Mohamed; Radosevich, Miryana; Seghatchian, Jerard; El-Ekiaby, Magdy; Burnouf, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    For many years, transfusion of allogeneic red blood cells, platelet concentrates, and plasma units has been part of the standard therapeutic arsenal used along the surgical and nonsurgical treatment of patients with malignancies. Although the benefits of these blood products are not a matter of debate in specific pathological conditions associated with life-threatening low blood cell counts or bleeding, increasing clinical evidence is nevertheless suggesting that deliberate transfusion of these blood components may actually lead to negative clinical outcomes by affecting patient's immune defense, stimulating tumor growth, tethering, and dissemination. Rigorous preclinical and clinical studies are needed to dimension the clinical relevance, benefits, and risks of transfusion of blood components in cancer patients and understand the amplitude of problems. There is also a need to consider validating preparation methods of blood components for so far ignored biological markers, such as microparticles and biological response modifiers. Meanwhile, blood component transfusions should be regarded as a personalized medicine, taking into careful consideration the status and specificities of the patient, rather than as a routine hospital procedure. PMID:27006592

  13. [Possibility of using DST-30 thermoelastoplast in blood transfusion systems].

    PubMed

    Il'iakov, E V; El'tsefon, B S; Polezhaev, V V; Zotkina, I V; Krivonosov, A I

    1979-01-01

    Investigating possible application of the DCT-30 thermoelastoplastic shows advantages of some physico-technical properties of this product based on natural caoutchouc and latex by comparison with base-rubber onene. It justifies recommending the former for making injection tubes in the blood transfusion systems. PMID:763103

  14. The use of big data in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Pendry, K

    2015-06-01

    'Big data' refers to the huge quantities of digital information now available that describe much of human activity. The science of data management and analysis is rapidly developing to enable organisations to convert data into useful information and knowledge. Electronic health records and new developments in Pathology Informatics now support the collection of 'big laboratory and clinical data', and these digital innovations are now being applied to transfusion medicine. To use big data effectively, we must address concerns about confidentiality and the need for a change in culture and practice, remove barriers to adopting common operating systems and data standards and ensure the safe and secure storage of sensitive personal information. In the UK, the aim is to formulate a single set of data and standards for communicating test results and so enable pathology data to contribute to national datasets. In transfusion, big data has been used for benchmarking, detection of transfusion-related complications, determining patterns of blood use and definition of blood order schedules for surgery. More generally, rapidly available information can monitor compliance with key performance indicators for patient blood management and inventory management leading to better patient care and reduced use of blood. The challenges of enabling reliable systems and analysis of big data and securing funding in the restrictive financial climate are formidable, but not insurmountable. The promise is that digital information will soon improve the implementation of best practice in transfusion medicine and patient blood management globally. PMID:26178303

  15. Chronic autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children: a report of four patients.

    PubMed

    Duru, F; Grgey, A; Cetin, M; Kanra, T; Altay, C

    1994-01-01

    Four children, ages seven to ten years, with direct antiglobulin test (DAT)-positive chronic hemolytic anemia are presented. The patients were followed for 3 to 10 years. Autoantibody against red cell antigens was nonspecific IgG type in all of the patients. In one of the four patients, anemia was associated with splenomegaly and jaundice. In this patient, the third component of the complement was also detected on the red cell surface. In one patient, serum IgA deficiency and frequent pulmonary infections were associated with the disease. This patient developed rheumatoid arthritis five years after diagnosis of hemolytic anemia. The third patient initially had thrombocytopenia subsequently developed DAT-positive hemolytic anemia, vitiligo and alopecia without any evidence of serologic changes suggestive of collagen vascular disorders. In these three patients, partial response was obtained with steroid therapy. The fourth patient developed DAT-positive hemolytic anemia twice during the five year follow-up period. Anemia resolved completely with steroid therapy in two months during the first episode, and in five months in the second. Generalized and peripheral lymphadenopathies which developed at the time of the second hemolytic anemia episode have persisted for the last three years. Administration of cyclosporine in two of the four patients did not result in any amelioration of the symptoms. PMID:7996066

  16. Characteristics of hemolytic activity induced by skin secretions of the frog Kaloula pulchra hainana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The hemolytic activity of skin secretions obtained by stimulating the frog Kaloula pulchra hainana with diethyl ether was tested using human, cattle, rabbit, and chicken erythrocytes. The skin secretions had a significant concentration-dependent hemolytic effect on erythrocytes. The hemolytic activity of the skin secretions was studied in the presence of osmotic protectants (polyethylene glycols and carbohydrates), cations (Mg2+, Ca2+, Ba2+, Cu2+, and K+), or antioxidants (ascorbic acid, reduced glutathione, and cysteine). Results Depending on their molecular mass, osmotic protectants effectively inhibited hemolysis. The inhibition of skin hemolysis was observed after treatment with polyethylene glycols (1000, 3400, and 6000 Da). Among divalent cations, only 1 mM Cu2+ markedly inhibited hemolytic activity. Antioxidant compounds slightly reduced the hemolytic activity. Conclusions The results suggested that skin secretions of K. pulchra hainana induce a pore-forming mechanism to form pores with a diameter of 1.36-2.0 nm rather than causing oxidative damage to the erythrocyte membrane. PMID:24499077

  17. Red blood cell transfusion practices in very low birth weight infants in 1990s postsurfactant era.

    PubMed Central

    Beeram, M. R.; Krauss, D. R.; Riggs, M. W.

    2001-01-01

    The purposes of this study are (1) to evaluate the practice of red blood cell transfusions in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants (between 501 to 1500 g) during the postsurfactant era of the 1990s; and (2) to evaluate if there is a decreasing trend in red cell transfusions in the 1990s. Database and medical records of VLBW infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) between January 1990 and December 1995 at Scott & White Clinic, Temple, Texas, were reviewed. Five hundred twenty-seven infants were admitted to the NICU, excluding 5 infants that were transferred out for possible cardiac surgery or for other reasons. Fifty one (9.7%) of these infants died prior to discharge. Hence, data from 476 survivors were reviewed for red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. Transfusions were given at the discretion of the attending neonatologist. None of the infants received erythropoietin. Of the 476 infants, 289 (61%) received RBC transfusions during the hospital stay, with 2.7+/-3.6 transfusions per infant with a volume of 40.5+/-50.4 mL/kg. Smaller infants required significantly more transfusions compared to larger infants when divided into 250-g subgroups. No statistically significant difference was noted in the number of RBC transfusions per infant or number of infants transfused during the 6-year period from year to year. We conclude that VLBW infants in the 1990s postsurfactant era required 2.7 RBC transfusions per infant, on average, with the smallest infants requiring the most transfusions. These data will be helpful to counsel mothers in preterm labor regarding the need of transfusions for each birth weight category. Red cell transfusion practice has not changed over this 6-year period in the 1990s. Additional measures such as erythropoietin or even stricter transfusion criteria may be necessary to decrease transfusions further. However, safety of such measures should be carefully evaluated. PMID:11688921

  18. Efficiency and Cost Analysis of Cell Saver Auto Transfusion System in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bilgili, Mustafa Gökhan; Erçin, Ersin; Peker, Gökhan; Kural, Cemal; Başaran, Serdar Hakan; Duramaz, Altuğ; Avkan, Cevdet

    2014-01-01

    Background: Blood loss and replacement is still a controversial issue in major orthopaedic surgery. Allogenic blood transfusion may cause legal problems and concerns regarding the transmission of transfusion-related diseases. Cellsaver Systems (CSS) were developed as an alternative to allogenic transfusion but CSS transfusion may cause coagulation, infection and haemodynamic instability. Aims: Our aim was to analyse the efficiency and cost analysis of a cell saver auto-transfusion system in the total knee arthroplasty procedure. Study Design: Retrospective comparative study. Methods: Those patients who were operated on by unilateral, cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) were retrospectively evaluated. Group 1 included 37 patients who were treated using the cell saver system, and Group 2 involved 39 patients who were treated by allogenic blood transfusion. The groups were compared in terms of preoperative haemoglobin and haematocrit levels, blood loss and transfusion amount, whether allogenic transfusion was made, degree of deformity, body mass index and cost. Results: No significant results could be obtained in the statistical comparisons made in terms of the demographic properties, deformity properties, preoperative laboratory values, transfusion amount and length of hospital stay of the groups. Average blood loss was calculated to be less in Group 1 (p<0.05) and cost was higher in Group 1 (p<0.05). Conclusion: Cell saver systems do not decrease the amount of allogenic blood transfusion and costs more. Therefore, the routine usage of the auto-transfusion systems is a controversial issue. Cell saver system usage does not affect allogenic blood transfusion incidence or allogenic blood transfusion volume. It was found that preoperative haemoglobin and body mass index rates may affect allogenic blood transfusion. Therefore, it is foreseen that auto-transfusion systems could be useful in patients with low haemoglobin level and body mass index. PMID:25207187

  19. Antibodies to Leptospira among blood donors in higher-risk areas of Australia: possible implications for transfusion safety

    PubMed Central

    Faddy, Helen; Seed, Clive; Lau, Colleen; Racloz, Vanessa; Flower, Robert; Smythe, Lee; Burns, Mary-Anne; Dohnt, Michael; Craig, Scott; Harley, Robert; Weinstein, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is one of the most common bacterial zoonoses worldwide, and clinical manifestations range from asymptomatic infection to acute febrile illness, multi-organ failure and death. Asymptomatic, acute bacteraemia in a blood donor provides a potential for transfusion-transmission, although only a single such case from India has been recorded. Human leptospirosis is uncommon in developed countries; however, the state of Queensland in Australia has one of the highest rates among developed countries, especially after increased rainfall. This study examined the prevalence of antibodies to Leptospira spp. in blood donors residing in higher-risk areas of Australia, to evaluate the appropriateness of current blood safety guidelines. Materials and methods Plasma samples collected from blood donors residing in higher-risk areas of Australia during 2009 and 2011 were included in the study. All samples were tested for the presence of antibodies to 22 leptospiral serovars using the microscopic agglutination test. Result No sample had antibody titres suggestive of a current or recent infection, however, seven samples (1.44%, 95% CI: 0.38–2.50%) had titres suggestive of a past infection. Discussion This study provides data that may support the appropriateness of current relevant donor selection policies in Australia. Given that the risk profile for leptospirosis is expanding and that the infection is likely to become more prevalent with climate change, this disease may become more of a concern for transfusion safety in the future. PMID:24960651

  20. [Parvovirus B19 as a cause of acute arthritis].

    PubMed

    Trøseid, M; Gerlyng, P

    1999-09-30

    Parvovirus B19 is known to cause erythema infection (fifth disease), acute and chronic arthritis, aplastic crises in chronic hemolytic anemia, chronic anemia in the immunocompromised host and hydrops fetalis. We present two patients with acute arthritis due to parvovirus infection. Both had symmetrical synovitis in wrists and ankles. Patient 1 presented with fever and rash before joint symptoms occurred; patient 2 had joint symptoms only. Arthritis due to parvovirus is usually self-limited, but may develop into a chronic disease similar to rheumatoid arthritis. Parvovirus should be considered one of the differential diagnoses while dealing with acute or chronic arthritis. PMID:10553337

  1. Red Blood Cell Transfusion Is Not Associated with Necrotizing Enterocolitis: A Review of Consecutive Transfusions in a Tertiary Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Wallenstein, Matthew B.; Arain, Yassar H.; Birnie, Krista L.; Andrews, Jennifer; Palma, Jonathan P.; Benitz, William E.; Chock, Valerie Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the association between red blood cell transfusion and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in a neonatal intensive care unit with liberal transfusion practices. Study design A retrospective cohort study was conducted for all infants weighing <1500 g who received at least 1 packed red blood cell transfusion between January 2008 and June 2013 in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit. The primary outcome was NEC, defined as Bell stage II or greater. The temporal association of NEC and transfusion was assessed using multivariate Poisson regression. Results The study sample included 414 very low birth weight infants who received 2889 consecutive red blood cell transfusions. Twenty-four infants (5.8%) developed NEC. Four cases of NEC occurred within 48 hours of a previous transfusion event. Using multivariate Poisson regression, we did not find evidence of a temporal association between NEC and transfusion (P = .32). Conclusion There was no association between NEC and red blood cell transfusion. Our results differ from pre vious studies and suggest that the association between NEC and transfusion may be contextual. PMID:25039042

  2. Hemolytic differences among artificial cardiac valves used in a ventricular assist pump.

    PubMed

    Billy, G G; Miller, C A; Pallone, M N; Donachy, J H; Pierce, W S

    1995-04-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) required for cardiac support may produce clinically significant hemolysis. VAD valves differ in both mechanics and hemodynamics. Therefore, we examined a ball valve, a modified tilting disc (MTD) valve, a polyurethane trileaflet valve, and a Björk-Shiley monostrut valve to determine their degrees of hemolysis. The valves were tested in a Pierce-Donachy VAD which pumped fresh bovine blood through a mock loop. Blood samples were analyzed for hematocrit and plasma hemoglobin, from which the indices of hemolysis were calculated. A one-way analysis of variance indicated significant differences between certain valves. The MTD was the most hemolytic. No significant hemolytic difference was found between the trileaflet and monostrut valves despite their different designs. The monostrut valve and the MTD valve were hemolytically very different despite their similar design. This study suggests that the valve type significantly affects the hemolysis produced by the VAD. PMID:7598654

  3. Cases of Hemolytic Anemia with Periprosthetic Leaks Evaluated by Real-Time 3-Dimensional Transesophageal Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eui-Jong; Kim, Tae-Yop; Hwang, Jong Min; Kim, Sang-Phil

    2012-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia is recognized as a rare complication of mitral valve replacement or repair. We report on a 44-year-old man with shortness of breath and hemolytic anemia, 23 years after mitral valve replacement (Hall-Kaster), and a 63-year-old woman diagnosed of hemolytic anemia, 4 years after mitral and tricuspid annuloplasty (Tailor ring, An-core ring). Routine 2-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography revealed paravalvular leakage around the prosthesis. Subsequent real-time 3-dimensional (3D)transesophageal echocardiography helped the perceptional appreciation of the leakage and the measuring of the regurgitant orifice area using the anatomically correct plane. Surgical findings of each case fit those of 3D volumetric images. PMID:22509440

  4. Novel hemagglutinating, hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of the intermediate subunit of Entamoeba histolytica lectin

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kentaro; Yahata, Kazuhide; Gopal Dhoubhadel, Bhim; Fujii, Yoshito; Tachibana, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (Gal/GalNAc) inhibitable lectin of Entamoeba histolytica, a common protozoan parasite, has roles in pathogenicity and induction of protective immunity in mouse models of amoebiasis. The lectin consists of heavy (Hgl), light (Lgl), and intermediate (Igl) subunits. Hgl has lectin activity and Lgl does not, but little is known about the activity of Igl. In this study, we assessed various regions of Igl for hemagglutinating activity using recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli. We identified a weak hemagglutinating activity of the protein. Furthermore, we found novel hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of the lectin, which resided in the carboxy-terminal region of the protein. Antibodies against Igl inhibited the hemolytic activity of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites. This is the first report showing hemagglutinating, hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of an amoebic molecule, Igl. PMID:26354528

  5. Assessment of the external validity of a predictive score for blood transfusion in liver surgery

    PubMed Central

    Janny, Sylvie; Eurin, Mathilde; Dokmak, Safi; Toussaint, Amélie; Farges, Olivier; Paugam-Burtz, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Background Perioperative bleeding is a predictor of morbidity following liver resection. The transfusion-related score (TRS), which is derived from five variables (cirrhosis, preoperative haemoglobin level, tumour size, vena cava exposure and associated extraliver surgical procedure), has been proposed to predict the likelihood of transfusion in liver resection. Objective The purpose of this observational study was to evaluate the external validity of the TRS. Methods In a retrospective, monocentre, observational cohort study of patients undergoing elective liver resection surgery, data for transfused and non-transfused patients were compared by univariate analysis. The TRS was calculated for each patient. The frequency of transfusion was calculated for each score level. The accuracy of the TRS was evaluated using the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC). Results A total of 205 patients submitted to liver resection were included. Of these, 48 (23.4%) patients received a blood transfusion. There was no significant difference between transfused and non-transfused patients in age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score or cirrhosis. The AUC for the TRS was 0.68 (95% confidence interval 0.59–0.77). Among TRS items, only vena cava exposure and associated surgical procedures were significantly associated with risk for transfusion. Conclusions In the present population, the TRS appeared to serve as a weak predictor of perioperative transfusion. This study confirms that the external validity of the transfusion predictive score should be subject to further investigation before it can be implemented in clinical use. PMID:25516363

  6. Comparison of Hemagglutination and Hemolytic Activity of Various Bacterial Clinical Isolates Against Different Human Blood Groups

    PubMed Central

    HRV, Rajkumar; Devaki, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Among the various pathogenic determinants shown by microorganisms hemagglutination and hemolysin production assume greater significance in terms of laboratory identification. This study evaluated the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of various bacterial isolates against different blood groups. One hundred and fifty bacterial strains, isolated from clinical specimens like urine, pus, blood, and other body fluids were tested for their hemagglutinating and hemolytic activity against human A, B, AB, and O group red blood cells. Among the 150 isolates 81 were Escherichia coli, 18 were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 19 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were Pseudomonas spp, six were Proteus mirabilis, and the rest 16 were Staphylococcus aureus. Nearly 85% of the isolates agglutinated A group cells followed by B and AB group (59.3% and 60.6% respectively). Least number of isolates agglutinated O group cells (38.0%). When the hemolytic activity was tested, out of these 150 isolates 79 (52.6%) hemolyzed A group cells, 61 (40.6%) hemolyzed AB group cells, 46 (30.6%) hemolyzed B group cells, and 57 (38.6%) isolates hemolyzed O group cells. Forty-six percent of the isolates exhibited both hemagglutinating and hemolytic property against A group cells, followed by B and AB group cells (28.6% and 21.3% respectively). Least number of isolates i.e., 32 (21.3%) showed both the properties against O group cells. The isolates showed wide variation in their hemagglutination and hemolytic properties against different combinations of human blood group cells. The study highlights the importance of selection of the type of cells especially when human RBCs are used for studying the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of bacterial isolates because these two properties are considered as characteristic of pathogenic strains. PMID:27014523

  7. Comparison of Hemagglutination and Hemolytic Activity of Various Bacterial Clinical Isolates Against Different Human Blood Groups.

    PubMed

    Hrv, Rajkumar; Devaki, Ramakrishna; Kandi, Venkataramana

    2016-01-01

    Among the various pathogenic determinants shown by microorganisms hemagglutination and hemolysin production assume greater significance in terms of laboratory identification. This study evaluated the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of various bacterial isolates against different blood groups. One hundred and fifty bacterial strains, isolated from clinical specimens like urine, pus, blood, and other body fluids were tested for their hemagglutinating and hemolytic activity against human A, B, AB, and O group red blood cells. Among the 150 isolates 81 were Escherichia coli, 18 were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 19 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were Pseudomonas spp, six were Proteus mirabilis, and the rest 16 were Staphylococcus aureus. Nearly 85% of the isolates agglutinated A group cells followed by B and AB group (59.3% and 60.6% respectively). Least number of isolates agglutinated O group cells (38.0%). When the hemolytic activity was tested, out of these 150 isolates 79 (52.6%) hemolyzed A group cells, 61 (40.6%) hemolyzed AB group cells, 46 (30.6%) hemolyzed B group cells, and 57 (38.6%) isolates hemolyzed O group cells. Forty-six percent of the isolates exhibited both hemagglutinating and hemolytic property against A group cells, followed by B and AB group cells (28.6% and 21.3% respectively). Least number of isolates i.e., 32 (21.3%) showed both the properties against O group cells. The isolates showed wide variation in their hemagglutination and hemolytic properties against different combinations of human blood group cells. The study highlights the importance of selection of the type of cells especially when human RBCs are used for studying the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of bacterial isolates because these two properties are considered as characteristic of pathogenic strains. PMID:27014523

  8. [Differential courses of development in children born with hemolytic disease of newborn].

    PubMed

    Rösler, H D; Springstein, H J

    1988-01-01

    Repeated psychological investigations were performed in a group of 124 children who received exchange transfusions due to morbus haemolyticus neonatorum as newborns. Their psychomotoric development was compared with a control group without exchange transfusions. In the Mhn-children a lower level of cognitive capacity was observed. There was a higher percentage of mental retardation and of handicaps. The distribution between female and male children was nearly equal. PMID:3354275

  9. Hemolytic anemia and progressive neurologic impairment: think about triosephosphate isomerase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Aissa, Khaoula; Kamoun, Fatma; Sfaihi, Lamia; Ghedira, Elyes Slim; Aloulou, Hajer; Kamoun, Thouraya; Pissard, Serge; Hachicha, Mongia

    2014-08-01

    We have reported the first Tunisian case of triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) deficiency in a 2-year-old girl. She was the first child of a nonconsanguineous couple. The disease included a neonatal onset of chronic hemolytic anemia, recurrent low-respiratory infections then progressive neurological involvement. The diagnosis was made after her death from the TPI values of her parents who exhibited intermediate enzyme deficiency. Molecular study of TPI genes showed that the father and the mother are heterozygous for Glu105Asp mutation. Pediatricians must be alert to the differential diagnosis in patients having hemolytic anemia and other concomitant manifestations. PMID:24840153

  10. Case of cytomegalovirus-associated direct anti-globulin test-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Saeko; Sato, Masanori; Sasaki, Goro; Eguchi, Hiroyuki; Oishi, Tsutomu; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Kawaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2013-12-01

    A 1-year-old boy developed autoimmune hemolytic anemia after a negative direct anti-globulin test. The concentration of erythrocyte membrane-associated immunoglobulin G, determined using an immunoradiometric assay, correlated with disease activity. He was positive for cytomegalovirus (CMV) both serologically and by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, indicating that his autoimmune hemolytic anemia was directly caused by CMV infection. Since anti-CMV immunoglobulin G was not absorbed by the patient's erythrocytes, cross-reaction between erythrocyte antigens and CMV was not likely a causative factor for hemolysis. PMID:24330288

  11. Intravascular hemolytic anemia in a patient with antibodies related to meropenem.

    PubMed

    Oka, Satoko; Shiragami, Hiroshi; Nohgawa, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    A 76-year-old woman treated with meropenem developed intravascular hemolytic attacks. A direct antiglobulin test was positive for C3d and IgG, and drug-dependent antibody testing indicated that the antibodies were indeed drug-dependent and reacted with drug-treated RBCs and RBCs in the presence of the drug. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case in which the causative antibodies related to meropenem were identified. This case highlights the importance of maintaining a high level of suspicion for drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia in patients with explained hemolysis as well as conducting specialized serologic testing. PMID:25986273

  12. Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn Due to Anti-c Isoimmunization: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sheeladevi, C S; Suchitha, S; Manjunath, G V; Murthy, Srinivas

    2013-09-01

    The Rhesus (Rh) blood group is one of the most complex blood groups known in humans. It has remained of primary importance in obstetrics, being the main cause of hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). Anti-D causes the most severe form of HDN. Other Rh allo antibodies that are capable of causing severe HDN include anti-c, which clinically is the most important Rh antigen after the D antigen. We report a case of hemolytic disease of the newborn due to Rh anti-c in an infant of an Rh positive mother. PMID:24426362

  13. Hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by maternal anti-Dib: a case report in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Broadberry, R E; Chang, F C; Ding, F; Lin, M

    1993-10-01

    Possibly the first case of hemolytic disease caused by anti-Dib in a Chinese infant is reported. The infant developed jaundice soon after birth; based on study, the jaundice has been diagnosed as a result of maternal anti-Dib which was most likely induced by previous pregnancies. The phenotype of the mother's red cells was Di (a+b-). The frequency of the Dia antigen among Chinese in Taiwan is 3.2%. In Orientals, hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by maternal anti-Dib is likely to be more severe than that caused by anti-Dia. PMID:8258120

  14. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated with blood-product transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.R.; Kuritsky, J.N.; Katzmann, J.A.; Homburger, H.A.

    1983-11-01

    A 53-year-old white man had fever, malaise, and dyspnea on exertion. His chest roentgenogram was normal, but pulmonary function tests showed impaired diffusion capacity and a gallium scan showed marked uptake in the lungs. Results of an open-lung biopsy documented Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Immunologic test results were consistent with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The patient denied having homosexual contact or using intravenous drugs. Twenty-nine months before the diagnosis of pneumocystis pneumonia was made, the patient had had 16 transfusions of whole blood, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma during coronary artery bypass surgery at another medical center. This patient is not a member of any currently recognized high-risk group and is believed to have contracted the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from blood and blood-product transfusions.

  15. Age of red blood cells and outcome in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) and, in particular, older RBCs has been associated with increased short-term mortality in critically ill patients. We evaluated the association between age of transfused RBCs and acute kidney injury (AKI), hospital, and 90-day mortality in critically ill patients. Methods We conducted a prospective, observational, predefined sub-study within the FINNish Acute Kidney Injury (FINNAKI) study. This study included all elective ICU admissions with expected ICU stay of more than 24 hours and all emergency admissions from September to November 2011. To study the age of RBCs, we classified transfused patients into quartiles according to the age of oldest transfused RBC unit in the ICU. AKI was defined according to KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) criteria. Results Out of 1798 patients, 652 received at least one RBC unit. The median [interquartile range] age of the oldest RBC unit transfused was 12 [11-13] days in the freshest quartile and 21 [17-27] days in the quartiles 2 to 4. On logistic regression, RBC age was not associated with the development of KDIGO stage 3 AKI. Patients in the quartile of freshest RBCs had lower crude hospital and 90-day mortality rates compared to those in the quartiles of older blood. After adjustments, older RBC age was associated with significantly increased risk for hospital mortality. Age, Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II)-score without age points, maximum Sequental Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score and the total number of transfused RBC units were independently associated with 90-day mortality. Conclusions The age of transfused RBC units was independently associated with hospital mortality but not with 90-day mortality or KDIGO stage 3 AKI. The number of transfused RBC units was an independent risk factor for 90-day mortality. PMID:24093554

  16. Blood Transfusion and Donation - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Portuguese (português) ... sanguines - français (French) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Hindi (हिन्दी) Receiving Blood Transfusions हिन्दी (Hindi) ...

  17. [Intrauterine blood transfusion in case of placental chorangioma].

    PubMed

    Gruca-Stryjak, Karolina; Ropacka-Lesiak, Mariola; Breborowicz, Grzegorz

    2011-04-01

    The paper presents a case of placental tumor causing hemodynamic changes. Doppler studies and fetal echocardiography allowed the diagnosis of hyperkinetic circulation in the course of fetal anemia. Cordocentesis has been performed and confirmed fetal anemia. The treatment used, intrauterine blood transfusion, allowed the compensation of hemodynamic and hematological disorders. Paper presents a detailed diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the event chorangioma in pregnancy. PMID:21735699

  18. Transfusion Support for ABO-Incompatible Progenitor Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kopko, Patricia M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary ABO-incompatible transplants comprise up to 50% of allogeneic progenitor cell transplants. Major, minor and bidirectional ABO-incompatible transplants each have unique complications that can occur, including hemolysis at the time of progenitor cell infusion, hemolysis during donor engraftment, passenger lymphocyte syndrome, delayed red blood cell engraftment, and pure red cell aplasia. Appropriate transfusion support during the different phases of the allogeneic progenitor cell transplant process is an important part of ABO-incompatible transplantation. PMID:27022318

  19. Transfusion dependency of cardiac surgery--update 2006.

    PubMed

    Nydegger, U

    2006-12-23

    In developed countries perioperative blood transfusion requirements for red blood cell concentrates (RBC), platelet concentrates (PC), fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and stable plasma derivatives have now levelled off with more patients requiring less or no products whilst fewer patients need the larger proportion of donations. This text explores the reasons for such a development in patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery where the transfusion requirement has drastically declined in recent years. A reduced requirement of a mean of 2 RBCs is now the need per patient in most centers. Such a reduction is possible through various recent perioperative improvements: (i) thorough preoperative haematological checks in order to equip the patient for blood loss, surgical trauma and extracorporeal circulation (ECC) in which heparinized blood is pumped at high speed through an oxygenator, heat exchanger, reservoirs, tubings and connectors. (ii) Peroperative administration of inhibitors of fibrinolysis (aprotinin, epsilon-aminocaproic acid) reduce profuse haemorrhagic tendency. Successful attempts to minimise ECCs, including foamless aspiration of wound blood, refined surgical technology, tissue glue, and point-of-care laboratory testing (POCT) in the operating theatre all contribute to a reduced transfusion requirement. A substantial proportion of patients can now be operated on without ECC. New thrombelastography analysis allows for real-time monitoring of haemorrhagic/thrombogenic risk. Modern blood product quality contributes to limiting blood product usage. (iii) During the postoperative recovery phase, anaemia can be corrected by i.v.iron and recombinant human erythropoietin. Such measures allow the transfusion trigger, based on haemoglobin concentration, to be set as low as 70 g/l in suitable patients. PMID:17299655

  20. Intravenous immunoglobulin transfusion in colostrum-deprived dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Boccardo, A; Belloli, A; Biffani, S; Locatelli, V; Dall'Ara, P; Filipe, J; Restelli, I; Proverbio, D; Pravettoni, D

    2016-03-01

    Immunoglobulin transfusion is employed in the management of the failure of passive transfer (FPT). The aim of this study was to investigate the dose of immunoglobulin G (IgG) needed to reach a protective concentration (>10 g/L) in colostrum-deprived dairy calves. Twenty-eight Holstein Friesian newborn male calves were randomly assigned to either a control group (CG) or a treatment group (PG). Calves in the CG received 4 L of high quality colostrum within 12 h of birth. Calves in the PG received 62.7 ± 3.1 g of IgG IV in 2.6 ± 0.3 L of plasma within 6 h after birth. Serum immunoglobulin G (sIgG) and serum total protein (sTP) concentrations were assayed before and after (24 h, 72 h and 1 week after birth) plasma transfusion or colostrum ingestion. Serum (s) IgG and sTP concentrations increased in both groups throughout the period of observation. Mean sIgG and sTP concentrations after colostrum ingestion or plasma transfusion were higher in the CG than in the PG (P <0.01). Nine treated calves developed diarrhoea during the study and four were humanely euthanased due to progressive clinical deterioration. None of the calves in the CG showed signs of disease or died during the study. The dose of IgG used in this trial effectively provided an adequate sIgG concentration in colostrum-deprived calves (>10 g/L). Calves in the CG had significantly lower morbidity and mortality rates compared to those in the PG, suggesting that plasma transfusion alone is ineffective in providing complete protection against neonatal disease. PMID:26831168

  1. Comparison of Coagulation Parameters, Anticoagulation, and Need for Transfusion in Patients on Interventional Lung Assist or Veno-Venous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Weingart, Christian; Lubnow, Matthias; Philipp, Alois; Bein, Thomas; Camboni, Daniele; Müller, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Clinical data on anticoagulation needs of modern extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and its impact on coagulation are scarce. Therefore, we analyzed coagulation-related parameters, need for transfusion, and management of anticoagulation in adult patients with severe acute respiratory failure during treatment with either pumpless interventional lung assist (iLA) or veno-venous ECMO (vv-ECMO). Sixty-three patients treated with iLA and 192 patients treated with vv-ECMO at Regensburg University Hospital between January 2005 and May 2011 were analyzed. Data related to anticoagulation, transfusion, and coagulation parameters were collected prospectively by the Regensburg ECMO registry. Except for a higher, sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score in the ECMO group (12 [9-15] vs. 11 [7-14], P = 0.007), a better oxygenation, and a lower dosage of vasopressors in the iLA patients, both groups had similar baseline characteristics. No difference was noted in terms of outcome and overall transfusion requirements. Factors of the plasmatic coagulation system were only marginally altered over time and did not differ between groups. Platelet counts in ECMO-treated patients, but not in those treated with iLA, dropped significantly during extracorporeal support. A more intense systemic anticoagulation with a mean activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) > 53 s led to a higher need for transfusions compared with the group with a mean aPTT < 53 s, whereas the average durability of membrane oxygenators was not affected. Need for red blood cell (RBC) transfusion was highest in patients with extrapulmonary sepsis (257 mL/day), and was significantly lower in primary pulmonary adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (102 mL/day). Overall, 110 (0-274) mL RBC was transfused in the ECMO group versus 146 (41-227) mL in the iLA group per day on support. The impact of modern iLA and ECMO systems on coagulation allows comparatively safe long-term treatment of adult patients with acute respiratory failure. A moderate systemic anticoagulation seems to be sufficient. Importantly, platelets are more affected by vv-ECMO compared with pumpless iLA. PMID:25921195

  2. Computerized continuous quality improvement methods used to optimize blood transfusions.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, R. M.; Christiansen, P. D.; Tate, K. E.; Laub, M. B.; Holmes, S. R.

    1993-01-01

    Blood transfusion, although common, is not without risk and expense. Recently there has been a national focus on both overtransfusion and undertransfusion. To provide the best quality of patient care, there must be a balance between both over and undertransfusion. We used a computer system to minimize overtransfusion by prompting physicians when orders that did not meet accepted criteria were made. Continuous quality improvement methods were used to optimize blood transfusions. We also evaluated undertransfusions by assessing patients who did not receive a red cell transfusion when the Hemoglobin or Hematocrit showed it was clearly indicated. Using our computerized alerting system we are able to promptly notify physicians when such conditions exist. Results of the blood ordering show that overtransfusions of red cells have been minimized. Reductions in both mean Hematocrit and the standard deviation have occurred as predicted by continuous quality improvement theory. Assessment of undertransfusions showed that it was a minimal problem, but one that can be easily addressed with our laboratory alerting system. PMID:8130455

  3. Thromboelastography-guided transfusion Therapy in the trauma patient.

    PubMed

    Brazzel, Charice

    2013-04-01

    This article presents thromboelastography (TEG) as an important assay to incorporate into anesthesia practice for development of evidence-based therapy of trauma patients receiving blood transfusions. The leading cause of death worldwide results from trauma. Hemorrhage is responsible for 30% to 40% of trauma mortality and accounts for almost 50% of the deaths occurring in the initial 24 hours following the traumatic incident. On admission, 25% to 35% of trauma patients present with coagulopathy, which is associated with a sevenfold increase in morbidity and mortality. The literature supports that routine plasma-based routine coagulation tests, such as prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and international normalized ratio, are inadequate for monitoring coagulopathy and guided transfusion therapy in trauma patients. A potential solution is incorporating the use of the TEG assay into the care of trauma patients to render evidence-based therapy for patients requiring massive blood transfusions. Analysis with TEG provides a complete picture of hemostasis, which is far superior to isolated, static conventional tests. The result is a fast, well-designed, and precise diagnosis enabling more cost-effective treatment, improved clinical outcome, accurate use of blood products, and pharmaceutical therapies at the point of care. PMID:23971232

  4. Bilaterally Symmetrical Lower Extremity Compartment Syndrome following Massive Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Karaoren, Gulsah; Bakan, Nurten; Tomruk, Senay Goksu; Topaç, Zelin; Kurtulmuş, Tuhan; Irkören, Saime

    2016-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is a serious condition characterized by raised intracompartmental pressure, which develops following trauma. Well leg compartment syndrome (WLCS) is a term reserved for compartment syndrome in a nontraumatic setting, usually resulting from prolonged lithotomy position during surgery. In literature, 8 cases have been reported regarding well leg compartment syndrome in a supine position and bilateral symmetrical involvement was observed in only 2 cases. In WLCS etiology, lengthy surgery, lengthy hypotension, and extremity malpositioning have been held responsible but one of the factors with a role in the etiology may have been the tissue oedema and impaired microcirculation formed from the effect of vasoactive mediators expressed into the circulation associated with the massive blood transfusion. The case is presented here regarding symmetrical lower extremity compartment syndrome after surgery in which massive transfusion was made for gross haemorrhage from an abdominal injury. In conclusion, blood transfusion applied at the required time is life-saving but potential risks must always be considered. PMID:26885421

  5. Improving platelet transfusion safety: biomedical and technical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Chavarin, Patricia; Laperche, Syria; Morel, Pascal; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Pozzetto, Bruno; Lozano, Miguel; Blumberg, Neil; Osselaer, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Platelet concentrates account for near 10% of all labile blood components but are responsible for more than 25% of the reported adverse events. Besides factors related to patients themselves, who may be particularly at risk of side effects because of their underlying illness, there are aspects of platelet collection and storage that predispose to adverse events. Platelets for transfusion are strongly activated by collection through disposal equipment, which can stress the cells, and by preservation at 22 °C with rotation or rocking, which likewise leads to platelet activation, perhaps more so than storage at 4 °C. Lastly, platelets constitutively possess a very large number of bioactive components that may elicit pro-inflammatory reactions when infused into a patient. This review aims to describe approaches that may be crucial to minimising side effects while optimising safety and quality. We suggest that platelet transfusion is complex, in part because of the complexity of the “material” itself: platelets are highly versatile cells and the transfusion process adds a myriad of variables that present many challenges for preserving basal platelet function and preventing dysfunctional activation of the platelets. The review also presents information showing - after years of exhaustive haemovigilance - that whole blood buffy coat pooled platelet components are extremely safe compared to the gold standard (i.e. apheresis platelet components), both in terms of acquired infections and of immunological/inflammatory hazards. PMID:26674828

  6. [The current state of transfusion medicine in Japan].

    PubMed

    Makino, Shigeyoshi

    2014-04-01

    In Japan, transfusion medicine, which is supported by the voluntary blood donation system, is facing a risk of blood shortage. This is due to reduced donations by the younger generation as well as the falling birth rate and the aging of the population, with a consequent increase in the elderly population that depends on blood transfusions for conditions such as cancer and hematological and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, to guarantee stable provision of blood products, in addition to implementing measures to promote blood donation, healthcare professionals must, as a policy, strictly follow the rules for appropriate use of blood products as defined in the "Criteria for the Use of Blood Products". Additionally, measures such as the use of autologous blood to reduce allogeneic blood usage and the implementation of adequate internal control systems to reduce blood wastage should be considered. Further, although this is not presently covered by the Japanese Health Insurance System, cryoprecipitate or fibrinogen products, which are used as alternative therapies in cases of hypofibrinogenemia due to massive bleeding, are effective not only for reducing the blood transfusion volume, but also for alleviating bleeding in patients. Additionally, the use of erythropoietin to treat chemotherapy-induced anemia is an effective measure to improve patients' quality of life, and its prompt approval by the Health Insurance System is desired. PMID:24743355

  7. DRGs in Transfusion Medicine and Hemotherapy in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Matthäus; Ostermann, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    Patients requiring transfusion medicine and hemotherapy in an inpatient setting are incorporated into the German Diagnosis Related Groups (G-DRG) system in multiple ways. Different DRGs exist in Major Diagnostic Category 16 for patients that have been admitted for the treatment of a condition from the field of transfusion medicine. However, the reimbursement might be not cost covering for many cases, and efforts have to be intensified to find adequate definitions and prices. We believe that this can only be successful if health service research is intensified in this field. For patients requiring hemotherapy and transfusion medicine concomitant to the treatment of an underlying disease such as cancer, multiple systems exist to increase remuneration, among them the Patient Clinical Complexity Level (PCCL) and complex constellations to induce DRG splits. For direct reimbursement of high cost products, additional remuneration fees (Zusatzentgelte, ZE) are the most important. In addition, expensive innovations not reflected within the DRGs can be reimbursed after application and negotiation of the New Diagnostic and Treatment Methods (Neue Untersuchungs-und Behandlungsmethoden, NUB) system. The NUB system guarantees that medical progress is put rapidly into clinical practice and prevents financial issues from becoming a stumbling block for the use of innovative drugs and methods. PMID:22670123

  8. Hepcidin as a new biomarker for detecting autologous blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Leuenberger, Nicolas; Barras, Laura; Nicoli, Raul; Robinson, Neil; Baume, Norbert; Lion, Niels; Barelli, Stefano; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Saugy, Martial

    2016-05-01

    Autologous blood transfusion (ABT) is an efficient way to increase sport performance. It is also the most challenging doping method to detect. At present, individual follow-up of haematological variables via the athlete biological passport (ABP) is used to detect it. Quantification of a novel hepatic peptide called hepcidin may be a new alternative to detect ABT. In this prospective clinical trial, healthy subjects received a saline injection for the control phase, after which they donated blood that was stored and then transfused 36 days later. The impact of ABT on hepcidin as well as haematological parameters, iron metabolism, and inflammation markers was investigated. Blood transfusion had a particularly marked effect on hepcidin concentrations compared to the other biomarkers, which included haematological variables. Hepcidin concentrations increased significantly: 12 hr and 1 day after blood reinfusion, these concentrations rose by seven- and fourfold, respectively. No significant change was observed in the control phase. Hepcidin quantification is a cost-effective strategy that could be used in an "ironomics" strategy to improve the detection of ABT. Am. J. Hematol. 91:467-472, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26822428

  9. Occult hepatitis B virus infection and blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dong Hee; Whang, Dong Hee; Song, Eun Young; Han, Kyou Sup

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-transmitted infections including hepatitis B virus (HBV) have been a major concern in transfusion medicine. Implementation of HBV nucleic acid testing (NAT) has revealed occult HBV infection (OBI) in blood donors. In the mid-1980s, hepatitis B core antibody (HBc) testing was introduced to screen blood donors in HBV non-endemic countries to prevent transmission of non-A and non-B hepatitis. That test remains in use for preventing of potential transmission of HBV from hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative blood donors, even though anti-hepatitis C virus tests have been introduced. Studies of anti-HBc-positive donors have revealed an HBV DNA positivity rate of 0%-15%. As of 2012, 30 countries have implemented HBV NAT. The prevalence of OBI in blood donors was estimated to be 8.55 per 1 million donations, according to a 2008 international survey. OBI is transmissible by blood transfusion. The clinical outcome of occult HBV transmission primarily depends on recipient immune status and the number of HBV DNA copies present in the blood products. The presence of donor anti-HBs reduces the risk of HBV infection by approximately five-fold. The risk of HBV transmission may be lower in endemic areas than in non-endemic areas, because most recipients have already been exposed to HBV. Blood safety for HBV, including OBI, has substantially improved, but the possibility for OBI transmission remains. PMID:25848484

  10. Improving platelet transfusion safety: biomedical and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Chavarin, Patricia; Laperche, Syria; Morel, Pascal; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Pozzetto, Bruno; Lozano, Miguel; Blumberg, Neil; Osselaer, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-01

    Platelet concentrates account for near 10% of all labile blood components but are responsible for more than 25% of the reported adverse events. Besides factors related to patients themselves, who may be particularly at risk of side effects because of their underlying illness, there are aspects of platelet collection and storage that predispose to adverse events. Platelets for transfusion are strongly activated by collection through disposal equipment, which can stress the cells, and by preservation at 22 °C with rotation or rocking, which likewise leads to platelet activation, perhaps more so than storage at 4 °C. Lastly, platelets constitutively possess a very large number of bioactive components that may elicit pro-inflammatory reactions when infused into a patient. This review aims to describe approaches that may be crucial to minimising side effects while optimising safety and quality. We suggest that platelet transfusion is complex, in part because of the complexity of the "material" itself: platelets are highly versatile cells and the transfusion process adds a myriad of variables that present many challenges for preserving basal platelet function and preventing dysfunctional activation of the platelets. The review also presents information showing - after years of exhaustive haemovigilance - that whole blood buffy coat pooled platelet components are extremely safe compared to the gold standard (i.e. apheresis platelet components), both in terms of acquired infections and of immunological/inflammatory hazards. PMID:26674828

  11. Bioethics and religious bodies: refusal of blood transfusions in Germany.

    PubMed

    Rajtar, Małgorzata

    2013-12-01

    The refusal of medical treatment is a recurrent topic in bioethical debates and Jehovah's Witnesses often constitute an exemplary case in this regard. The refusal of a potentially life-saving blood transfusion is a controversial choice that challenges the basic medical principle of acting in patients' best interests and often leads physicians to adopt paternalistic attitudes toward patients who refuse transfusion. However, neither existing bioethical nor historical and social sciences scholarship sufficiently addresses experiences of rank-and-file Witnesses in their dealings with the health care system. This article draws on results of a nine-month (2010, 2011-2012) ethnographic research on the relationship between religious, legal, ethical, and emotional issues emerging from the refusal of blood transfusions by Jehovah's Witnesses in Germany (mainly in Berlin). It shows how bioethical challenges are solved in practice by some German physicians and what they perceive to be the main goal of biomedicine: promoting the health or broadly understood well-being of patients. I argue that two different understandings of the concept of autonomy are at work here: autonomy based on reason and autonomy based on choice. The first is privileged by German physicians in line with a Kantian philosophical tradition and constitutional law; the second, paradoxically, is utilized by Jehovah's Witnesses in their version of the Anglo-Saxon Millian approach. PMID:23538204

  12. Streptococcal acute pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Anjos, Lais Martins Moreira; Marcondes, Mariana Barros; Lima, Mariana Ferreira; Mondelli, Alessandro Lia; Okoshi, Marina Politi

    2014-07-01

    Acute pharyngitis/tonsillitis, which is characterized by inflammation of the posterior pharynx and tonsils, is a common disease. Several viruses and bacteria can cause acute pharyngitis; however, Streptococcus pyogenes (also known as Lancefield group A β-hemolytic streptococci) is the only agent that requires an etiologic diagnosis and specific treatment. S. pyogenes is of major clinical importance because it can trigger post-infection systemic complications, acute rheumatic fever, and post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Symptom onset in streptococcal infection is usually abrupt and includes intense sore throat, fever, chills, malaise, headache, tender enlarged anterior cervical lymph nodes, and pharyngeal or tonsillar exudate. Cough, coryza, conjunctivitis, and diarrhea are uncommon, and their presence suggests a viral cause. A diagnosis of pharyngitis is supported by the patient's history and by the physical examination. Throat culture is the gold standard for diagnosing streptococcus pharyngitis. However, it has been underused in public health services because of its low availability and because of the 1- to 2-day delay in obtaining results. Rapid antigen detection tests have been used to detect S. pyogenes directly from throat swabs within minutes. Clinical scoring systems have been developed to predict the risk of S. pyogenes infection. The most commonly used scoring system is the modified Centor score. Acute S. pyogenes pharyngitis is often a self-limiting disease. Penicillins are the first-choice treatment. For patients with penicillin allergy, cephalosporins can be an acceptable alternative, although primary hypersensitivity to cephalosporins can occur. Another drug option is the macrolides. Future perspectives to prevent streptococcal pharyngitis and post-infection systemic complications include the development of an anti-Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine. PMID:25229278

  13. Isolation and identification of two hemolytic forms of streptolysin-O.

    PubMed

    Bhakdi, S; Roth, M; Sziegoleit, A; Tranum-Jensen, J

    1984-11-01

    Streptolysin-O was isolated from culture supernatants of group-A beta-hemolytic streptococci (Richards strain) by ammonium sulfate and polyethylene glycol precipitation, DEAE-ion exchange chromatography, preparative isoelectric focusing, and chromatography on Sephacryl S-300. Two forms of the toxin possessing similar hemolytic capacity were identified. The native toxin was a single polypeptide chain devoid of amino sugars with a sedimentation coefficient of 3.9S and a molecular weight of 69,000, and was isoelectric at pH 6.0 to 6.4. Partial degradation of the native toxin occurred during the isolation procedure, yielding a hemolytically active polypeptide with a molecular weight of 57,000 and a pI of 7.0 to 7.5. Both forms of the toxin generated the typical, heterogeneous, open and closed ring-structured channels in erythrocyte membranes. Structural considerations indicated that between 25 and 100 monomer toxin molecules constituted the individual ultrastructurally recognizable channels. Hemolytic titrations indicated that the presence of 70 to 125 toxin molecules per erythrocyte was required to generate an average of one functional lesion per cell. The data are consistent with the concept that one or very few streptolysin-O channels will cause hemolysis. PMID:6500696

  14. In vitro hemolytic activity of Lonomia obliqua caterpillar bristle extract on human and Wistar rat erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Seibert, Carla Simone; Shinohara, Elvira Maria Guerra; Sano-Martins, Ida Sigueko

    2003-06-01

    Human accidental envenomation caused by skin contact with the bristles of Lonomia obliqua caterpillar causes coagulation and fibrinolysis disorders. Alterations of hematologic parameters are observed only in severe cases of envenomation, but with no clinical evidence of intravascular hemolysis. However, since we have observed intravascular hemolysis in preliminary studies using Wistar rats as an experimental model for investigating L. obliqua envenomation, the objective of the present study was to investigate the in vitro hemolytic activity of the bristle extract of L. obliqua caterpillars on human and rat erythrocytes. Our results showed that the bristle extract has indirect and direct hemolytic activity on human and rat erythrocytes, although direct hemolytic activity was only observed at higher bristle extract concentrations. We also observed that the bristle extract has a proteolytic activity on band 3 of human and rat erythrocyte membranes. Thus, crude L. obliqua bristle extract was found to contain at least two components with hemolytic activity on erythrocytes, a phospholipase enzyme and another protein with a direct activity on the erythrocyte membrane. PMID:12782083

  15. Urease production from clinical isolates of beta-hemolytic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lesher, R J; Jones, W H

    1978-09-01

    Twenty-four lactose-fermenting, urease-producing strains of beta-hemolytic Escherichia coli were isolated from a variety of clinical material. All isolates were indole positive, citrate negative, and produced the characteristic green metallic sheen on eosin-methylene blue agar. PMID:359596

  16. Rituximab for immune hemolytic anemia following T- and B-Cell-depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Corti, P; Bonanomi, S; Vallinoto, C; Balduzzi, A; Uderzo, C; Cazzaniga, G; Gaipa, G; Dassi, M; Perseghin, P; Rovelli, A

    2003-01-01

    The treatment of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IHA) complicating hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is often unsatisfactory. We report a case of IHA which occurred after T- and B-cell depleted unrelated donor HSCT carried out for mucopolysaccharidosis type I-H (Hurler syndrome) which was successfully treated with anti-CD20+ monoclonal antibody PMID:12486323

  17. 78 FR 79469 - Strategies To Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ... Globulin Infusions; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public... Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to... complication of Immune Globulin Intravenous (IGIV) (Human) infusion. Complications of hemolysis include...

  18. Strategies for Surveillance of Pediatric Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet), 2000–2007

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Kanyin L.; Apostal, Mirasol; Comstock, Nicole; Hurd, Sharon; Webb, Tameka Hayes; Mickelson, Stephanie; Scheftel, Joni; Smith, Glenda; Shiferaw, Beletshachew; Boothe, Effie

    2012-01-01

    Background. Postdiarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is the most common cause of acute kidney failure among US children. The Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) conducts population-based surveillance of pediatric HUS to measure the incidence of disease and to validate surveillance trends in associated Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 infection. Methods. We report the incidence of pediatric HUS, which is defined as HUS in children <18 years. We compare the results from provider-based surveillance and hospital discharge data review and examine the impact of different case definitions on the findings of the surveillance system. Results. During 2000–2007, 627 pediatric HUS cases were reported. Fifty-two percent of cases were classified as confirmed (diarrhea, anemia, microangiopathic changes, low platelet count, and acute renal impairment). The average annual crude incidence rate for all reported cases of pediatric HUS was 0.78 per 100 000 children <18 years. Regardless of the case definition used, the year-to-year pattern of incidence appeared similar. More cases were captured by provider-based surveillance (76%) than by hospital discharge data review (68%); only 49% were identified by both methods. Conclusions. The overall incidence of pediatric HUS was affected by key characteristics of the surveillance system, including the method of ascertainment and the case definitions. However, year-to-year patterns were similar for all methods examined, suggesting that several approaches to HUS surveillance can be used to track trends. PMID:22572665

  19. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of acute pancreatitis may include: Acute kidney failure Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) Buildup of fluid in the abdomen ( ascites ) Cysts or abscesses in the pancreas Heart failure Low blood pressure Repeat episodes of acute ...

  20. Therapeutic options to minimize allogeneic blood transfusions and their adverse effects in cardiac surgery: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Antônio Alceu; da Silva, José Pedro; da Silva, Luciana da Fonseca; de Sousa, Alexandre Gonçalves; Piotto, Raquel Ferrari; Baumgratz, José Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Introdution Allogeneic blood is an exhaustible therapeutic resource. New evidence indicates that blood consumption is excessive and that donations have decreased, resulting in reduced blood supplies worldwide. Blood transfusions are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, as well as higher hospital costs. This makes it necessary to seek out new treatment options. Such options exist but are still virtually unknown and are rarely utilized. Objective To gather and describe in a systematic, objective, and practical way all clinical and surgical strategies as effective therapeutic options to minimize or avoid allogeneic blood transfusions and their adverse effects in surgical cardiac patients. Methods A bibliographic search was conducted using the MeSH term “Blood Transfusion” and the terms “Cardiac Surgery” and “Blood Management.” Studies with titles not directly related to this research or that did not contain information related to it in their abstracts as well as older studies reporting on the same strategies were not included. Results Treating anemia and thrombocytopenia, suspending anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, reducing routine phlebotomies, utilizing less traumatic surgical techniques with moderate hypothermia and hypotension, meticulous hemostasis, use of topical and systemic hemostatic agents, acute normovolemic hemodilution, cell salvage, anemia tolerance (supplementary oxygen and normothermia), as well as various other therapeutic options have proved to be effective strategies for reducing allogeneic blood transfusions. Conclusion There are a number of clinical and surgical strategies that can be used to optimize erythrocyte mass and coagulation status, minimize blood loss, and improve anemia tolerance. In order to decrease the consumption of blood components, diminish morbidity and mortality, and reduce hospital costs, these treatment strategies should be incorporated into medical practice worldwide. PMID:25714216