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1

DELAYED HEMOLYTIC TRANSFUSION REACTION IN SICKLE CELL DISEASE  

PubMed Central

Delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions (DHTR) are potentially life-threatening complications observed in patients with sickle cell disease. We review the clinical features, pathophysiology, laboratory evaluation, and management of this complication. It is important that DHTR be included in the differential diagnosis of acute pain episodes following a red blood cell transfusion in a patient with sickle cell disease.

Scheunemann, Leslie P.; Ataga, Kenneth I.

2009-01-01

2

Initiation and Regulation of Complement during Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions  

PubMed Central

Hemolytic transfusion reactions represent one of the most common causes of transfusion-related mortality. Although many factors influence hemolytic transfusion reactions, complement activation represents one of the most common features associated with fatality. In this paper we will focus on the role of complement in initiating and regulating hemolytic transfusion reactions and will discuss potential strategies aimed at mitigating or favorably modulating complement during incompatible red blood cell transfusions.

Stowell, Sean R.; Winkler, Anne M.; Maier, Cheryl L.; Arthur, C. Maridith; Smith, Nicole H.; Girard-Pierce, Kathryn R.; Cummings, Richard D.; Zimring, James C.; Hendrickson, Jeanne E.

2012-01-01

3

Diagnostic approaches to acute transfusion reactions.  

PubMed

The erroneous transfusion of ABO-incompatible red cells may lead to life-threatening hemolysis and complement-induced shock, resulting in death in less than 10% of cases (acute hemolytic transfusion reaction, AHTR). Identification of the cause of an erroneous transfusion is accomplished in nearly all incidents merely by checking the identity of the patient, blood sample and blood bag. The erroneous transfusion is confirmed by serological and--in the case of a fatality- immunohistochemical methods. The differential diagnosis should rule out transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), other immunologically triggered causes such as febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reaction (FNHTR) or allergic reactions, but also nonimmunological causes such as bacterial contamination of the blood components, transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) and other rare events such as citrate overload or embolism (by air or debris). In the case of a fatality, evaluation of a patient's medical records, serological and microbiological analyses, autopsy and histology, taken together, clarify questions of causality. PMID:20140541

Leo, A; Pedal, I

2010-06-01

4

Acute pain transfusion reaction.  

PubMed

A 34-year-old woman with a diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis (HLH) received a double umbilical cord blood transplantation following a myeloablative chemotherapy preparative regimen with busulfan and cyclophosphamide. HLH is a rare, potentially fatal hematologic disorder characterized by the overactivation of histocytes and T lymphocytes, leading to organ infiltration and acute illness. On day 25 post-transplantation, the patient required a platelet transfusion for a platelet count of 6,000 per ml (normal range = 150,000-450,000 per ml). The patient's blood type prior to the cord blood transplantation was B positive and, although both umbilical cord blood donors were O positive, the patient was still B positive per blood bank testing on that day. Although the recipient of an allogenic stem cell transplantation will eventually become the blood type of the donor, the time for this process to occur varies for each person. That process must be monitored by the blood bank for the purpose of cross-matching blood products to decrease hemolysis as much as possible. The patient was premedicated with the facility's standard for platelet transfusions: acetaminophen 650 mg and diphenhydramine 25 mg about 30 minutes prior to the platelet transfusion. PMID:24161631

Hardwick, Jody; Osswald, Michael; Walker, Daniel

2013-11-01

5

Post-transfusion Hypertension and Seizure in Congenital Hemolytic anemia: A Case Report and Literature Review.  

PubMed

A rare syndrome of hypertension, seizures and intracranial bleed has been reported among patients with congenital hemolytic anemia who underwent multiple blood transfusions. We report this syndrome in a 12-year-old Malay girl with hemoglobin E-beta-thalassemia, who underwent intensive transfusion and subsequently had headache, visual loss, severe hypertension and seizures. A comprehensive literature review revealed 30 patients with this syndrome, of whom 15 had intracranial bleed and 12 among these 15 died. A less-intensive transfusion regimen among patients with chronic hemolytic anemia and prompt detection and management of hypertension may prevent this potentially fatal syndrome. PMID:24473404

Ngim, Chin Fang; Ng, Chen Siew; Lai, Nai Ming

2014-06-01

6

Long-term neurodevelopmental outcome after intrauterine transfusion for the treatment of fetal hemolytic disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The aim of the study was to assess the developmental outcome of neonatal survivors of hemolytic disease of the neonate treated with modern intrauterine transfusion techniques. Study Design: In this prospective, observational study, auditory evoked-response tests were performed in the nursery. Neurodevelopmental evaluation with the Gesell Developmental Schedules was performed between 9 and 18 months of corrected age to

Lynda Hudon; Kenneth J. Moise; Suzanne E. Hegemier; Reba M. Hill; Alicia A. Moise; E. O’Brian Smith; Robert J. Carpenter

1998-01-01

7

[Serological characteristics and transfusion efficacy evaluation in 61 cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia].  

PubMed

This study was aimed to analyze the serological characteristics, efficacy and safety of incompatible RBC transfusion in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). The patients with idiopathic or secondary AIHA were analyzed retrospectively, then the serological characteristics and the incidence of adverse transfusion reactions were investigated, and the efficacy and safety of incompatible RBC transfusion were evaluated according to the different autoantibody type and infused different RBC components. The results showed that out of 61 cases of AIHA, 21 cases were idiopathic, and 40 cases were secondary. 8 cases (13.1%) had IgM cold autoantibody, 50 cases (82.0%) had IgG warm autoantibody, and 3 cases (4.9%) had IgM and IgG autoantibodies simultaneously. There were 18 cases (29.5%) combined with alloantibodies. After the exclusion of alloantibodies interference, 113 incompatible RBC transfusions were performed for 36 patients with AIHA, total efficiency rate, total partial efficiency rate and total inefficiency rate were 56.6%, 15.1% and 28.3%, respectively. Incompatible RBC transfusions were divided into non-washed RBC group and washed RBC group. The efficiency rate, partial efficiency rate and inefficiency rate in non-washed RBC group were 57.6%, 13.0% and 29.4%, respectively. The efficiency rate, partial efficiency rate and inefficiency rate in washed RBC group were 53.6%, 21.4% and 25.0%, respectively. There was no significant difference of transfusion efficacy (P > 0.05) in two groups. Incompatible RBC transfusions were also divided into IgM cold autoantibody group and IgG warm autoantibody group. The efficiency rate, partial efficiency rate and inefficiency rate in IgM cold autoantibody group were 46.2%, 30.8% and 29.4%, respectively. The efficiency rate, partial efficiency rate and inefficiency rate in IgG warm autoantibody group were 56.7%, 13.4% and 29.9%, respectively. There was no significant difference of transfusion efficacy (P > 0.05 ) in two groups. Hemolytic transfusion reaction was not observed in all incompatible RBC transfusions. It is concluded that the same ABO type of non-washed RBC transfusion and O type washed RBC transfusion are all relatively safe for the AIHA patients with severe anemia after the exclusion of alloantibodies interference. There is no significant difference of transfusion efficacy in two groups. The same ABO type of non-washed RBC transfusion is more convenient and efficient than washed RBC transfusion, and excessive use of type O RBCs can also be avoided. PMID:24156449

Yu, Yang; Sun, Xiao-Lin; Ma, Chun-Ya; Guan, Xiao-Zhen; Zhang, Xiao-Juan; Chen, Lin-Fen; Wang, Ke; Luo, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Yi; Li, Ming-Wei; Feng, Yan-Nan; Tong, Shan; Yu, Shuai; Yang, Lu; Wu, Yue-Qing; Zhuang, Yuan; Pan, Ji-Chun; Fen, Qian; Zhang, Ting; Wang, De-Qing

2013-10-01

8

Red blood cell transfusions in acute paediatrics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions should usually be given only to restore or maintain oxygen delivery to vital organs and tissues. Medical history has clearly documented the importance of blood transfusion in saving lives threatened by acute haemorrhage or severe anaemia. The availability of blood products has facilitated many surgical and medical advances, allowing the support of patients who could

S L Morley

2009-01-01

9

Transfusion-related acute lung injury.  

PubMed

Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) refers to a clinical syndrome of acute lung injury that occurs in a temporal relationship with the transfusion of blood products. Because of the difficulty in making its diagnosis, TRALI is often underreported. Three not necessarily mutually exclusive hypotheses have been described to explain its etiogenesis: antibody mediated, non-antibody mediated, and two hit mechanisms. Treatment is primarily supportive and includes supplemental oxygen. Diuretics are generally not indicated, as hypovolemia should be avoided. Compared with many other forms of acute lung injury, including the acute respiratory distress syndrome, TRALI is generally transient, reverses spontaneously, and carries a better prognosis. A variety of prevention strategies have been proposed, ranging from restrictive transfusion strategies to using plasma derived only from males. PMID:18372350

Jawa, Randeep S; Anillo, Sergio; Kulaylat, Mahmoud N

2008-01-01

10

Transfusion support of autoimmune hemolytic anemia: how could the blood group genotyping help?  

PubMed

Conventional pretransfusion testing based on hemagglutination assays can be challenging for patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) because of the presence of auto-antibodies. It has been suggested that deoxyribonucleic acid-based methods could be more efficient in the selection of antigen-matched red blood cell units in those settings. Because of the high risk of alloimmunization of these patients and the labor-intensive nature of adsorption techniques, we decided to evaluate the feasibility of selecting antigen-matched units on the basis of RBC genotyping. We included in our routine RBC genotyping program samples from 7 patients with AIHA presenting a strongly positive direct antiglobulin test. This made the routine compatibility tests difficult. Most patients had previously received transfusions because of warm AIHA. Matched donor units were selected according to the genotype. For all but 1 patient, blood group genotyping could be done on time to allow antigen-matched transfusion. Four patients received antigen-matched red blood cell units based on RBC genotyping and for 1 patient the fact that no matched units were available led us to postpone the transfusion. After each transfusion, the recovery was recorded and considered satisfactory for all transfused patients. PMID:24120494

El Kenz, Hanane; Efira, André; Le, Phu Quoc; Thiry, Claire; Valsamis, Joseph; Azerad, Marie-Agnès; Corazza, Francis

2014-01-01

11

[Transfusion-related acute lung injury].  

PubMed

Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) developed into the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality after the first description by Popovsky et al. approximately three decades ago. It was the most frequent reason for transfusion-related fatalities worldwide before implementation of risk minimization strategies by donor selection. Plasma-rich blood products, such as fresh frozen plasma and apheresis platelets seem to be the leading triggers of TRALI. Hypoxemia and development of pulmonary edema within 6 h of transfusion are the diagnostic criteria for TRALI. The differentiation between cardiac failure and other transfusion-related lung injuries, such astransfusion-associated circulatory overload ( TACO) is difficult and causal treatment is not available. Therapy is based on supportive measures, such as oxygen insufflationor mechanical ventilation. The exactly pathogenesis is still unknown but the most propagated hypothesis is the two-event-model. Neutrophils are primed by the underlying condition, e.g. sepsis or trauma during the first event and these primed neutrophils are activated by transfused leukoagglutinating antibodies (immunogen) or bioreactive mediators (non-immunogen) during the second-event. Transfusion of leukoagglutinating antibodies from female donors with one or more previous pregnancies is the most frequent reason. No more TRALI fatalities were reported after implementation of the donor selection in Germany in 2009. PMID:23558721

Tank, S; Sputtek, A; Kiefmann, R

2013-04-01

12

Limiting the extent of a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction with automated red blood cell exchange.  

PubMed

Delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions (DHTRs) are mediated by blood group antibodies that undergo anamnestic increases following antigen reexposure. Available options for the treatment or prophylaxis of DHTRs are limited. We report the use of automated red blood cell exchange (ARE) to limit hemolysis associated with an emerging DHTR. Following transfusion of 12 red blood cell units, a family member's comments led to the discovery of a patient's history of 4 alloantibodies (anti-E, anti-c, anti-Fy(a), and anti-M). Testing revealed that all 12 units were incompatible for at least 1 antigen. Six days after transfusion, the patient developed a newly positive antibody screen and direct antiglobulin test (DAT) result. To prevent further hemolysis, ARE was performed to replace incompatible red blood cells with antigen-negative units. After ARE, the patient's DAT results were negative and he was discharged without demonstrating symptoms of hemolysis. This case illustrates the use of ARE to limit hemolysis and prevent symptoms of a DHTR. PMID:23721278

Tormey, Christopher A; Stack, Gary

2013-06-01

13

Acute Transfusion Reactions (ATRs) in Intensive Care Unit (ICU): A Retrospective Study.  

PubMed

Background: Blood transfusion is a frequent and integral part of critical care. Although life saving, it can occasionally be unsafe and result in a spectrum of adverse events. Acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) are probably under diagnosed in critically ill patients due to confusion of the symptoms with the underlying disease. Aim: To analyze the incidence and spectrum of ATRs occuring in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective review conducted from 1(st) April 2011 till 31(st) March 2013. The ATRs related to the administration of blood components in the patients admitted in various Intensive Care Units (ICUs) were recorded, analyzed and classified on the basis of their clinical features and laboratory tests. Results: During the study period 98651 blood components were issued. Out of these 21971 were issued to various ICUs. A total of 225 transfusion reactions were reported from the various critical care departments during this period. The most frequent were Febrile Non Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions (FNHTR) 136 (60.4%), allergic reactions 70 (31.2%), hemolytic reactions 1(0.4%) and non specific reactions 18 (8%). The incidence of ATRs in our study was found to be 1.09% in adult ICUs and 0.36% in pediatric ICUs. Conclusions: Blood transfusion is a vital therapeutic procedure with a potential risk to already critical patients. So a strict vigilance has to be kept and each transfusion has to be monitored carefully with prompt recognition and treatment of ATRs. A rational use of these products considering their deleterious effects can decrease transfusion related morbidity and mortality in the critically ill patients. PMID:24701502

Kumar, Rajesh; Gupta, Manvi; Gupta, Varun; Kaur, Amarjit; Gupta, Sonia

2014-02-01

14

Transfusion-related acute lung injury in multiple traumatized patients  

PubMed Central

Background: Many of the multiple traumatized patients who refer to the hospital need transfusion. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious clinical syndrome associated with the transfusion of plasma-containing blood components. In the article, we present a case of TRALI following transfusion of packed red blood cells Case Presentation: A 24 year old male referred to Shahid Beheshti Hospital due to multiple trauma with left femoral and humerus fractures. Due to severe anemia he received 3 units of packed red blood cells. The symptoms of TRALI began 2 hours after transfusion. He was transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) due to metabolic acidosis and severe hypoxia. The TRALI was confirmed after ruling out the other probable pulmonary diseases. He recovered and was discharged. Conclusion: Transfusion related acute lung injury should be considered in any case receiving transfusion of plasma containing blood components.

Alijanpour, Ebrahim; Jabbari, Ali; Hoseini, Fahimeh; Tabasi, Shabnam

2012-01-01

15

[Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO)].  

PubMed

In recent years, much attention has been paid to respiratory complications of transfusion. Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined as an acute lung injury that is temporally associated with blood transfusion. TRALI is one of the leading causes of mortality. Although the etiology of TRALI is not fully understood, one of its main causes is thought to be anti-leukocyte antibodies, such as HLA antibody or HNA antibody. A precautionary male-predominant plasma strategy has been implemented in many developed countries, which has resulted in considerable achievements in reducing the incidence of TRALI. Meanwhile, transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) has emerged as a major differential diagnosis of TRALI. TACO is a well-known complication of transfusion, which has been considered not as a side effect of transfusion but a result of erroneous medical practice. It has long been an under-reported complication of transfusion and has not been investigated scientifically. Recent data on transfusion mortality from the Food and Drug Administration revealed that TACO was the second highest cause of death in the United States. Our data also suggested a steep increase in the reported cases of TACO in Japan. Precautionary measures should also be implemented for this emerging complication. PMID:23947178

Okazaki, Hitoshi

2013-05-01

16

Post-partum sequential occurrence of two diverse transfusion reactions (transfusion associated circulatory overload and transfusion related acute lung injury)  

PubMed Central

Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) are two dissimilar pathological conditions associated with transfusion of blood products where the time course of the events and clinical presentation overlap leading to uncertainty in establishing the diagnosis and initiating the treatment, which otherwise differs. We encountered a case where a patient of post-partum hemorrhage developed TACO in the immediate post-operative period due to aggressive resuscitative attempts with blood products. The patient's condition was appropriately diagnosed and was managed according to the clinical scenario, and the condition abated. Subsequently, on the third post-operative day the patient again required blood product transfusions following which the patient developed TRALI, the diagnosis of which was also established and adequate treatment strategy was undertaken.

Haldar, Rudrashish; Samanta, Sukhen

2013-01-01

17

Post-partum sequential occurrence of two diverse transfusion reactions (transfusion associated circulatory overload and transfusion related acute lung injury).  

PubMed

Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) are two dissimilar pathological conditions associated with transfusion of blood products where the time course of the events and clinical presentation overlap leading to uncertainty in establishing the diagnosis and initiating the treatment, which otherwise differs. We encountered a case where a patient of post-partum hemorrhage developed TACO in the immediate post-operative period due to aggressive resuscitative attempts with blood products. The patient's condition was appropriately diagnosed and was managed according to the clinical scenario, and the condition abated. Subsequently, on the third post-operative day the patient again required blood product transfusions following which the patient developed TRALI, the diagnosis of which was also established and adequate treatment strategy was undertaken. PMID:24339663

Haldar, Rudrashish; Samanta, Sukhen

2013-10-01

18

An immediate hemolytic transfusion reaction due to anti-C and a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction due to anti-Ce+e: hemoglobinemia, hemoglobinuria and transient impaired renal function.  

PubMed

A patient with phenotype R2r and anti-C has a hemolytic transfusion reaction (HTR) with hemoglobinemia and hemoglobinuria which occurred within 2 h of receiving an R1r transfusion. Transient impaired renal function ensued. A patient with phenotype R2R2 and anti-Ce+e had the same experience on day 4 after receiving three R1r and one rr units. 2 other patients, 1 R2r with anti-C who received one R1r unit and the other R2R2 with anti-Ce+e who received two R1r units, showed no clinical evidence of HTR. Both anti-C antibodies were entirely IgG while both anti-Ce+e antibodies initially were predominantly IgM. IgG subclassing was unsuccessful and red blood cell-mononuclear phagocyte assays were normal. These cases occurred from 1979 to 1981. PMID:6438912

Molthan, L; Matulewicz, T J; Bansal-Carver, B; Benz, E J

1984-01-01

19

Pure red-cell aplasia and autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with acute hepatitis A  

PubMed Central

Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) have rarely been reported as an extrahepatic manifestation of acute hepatitis A (AHA). We report herein a case of AHA complicated by both PRCA and AIHA. A 49-year-old female with a diagnosis of AHA presented with severe anemia (hemoglobin level, 6.9 g/dL) during her clinical course. A diagnostic workup revealed AIHA and PRCA as the cause of the anemia. The patient was treated with an initial transfusion and corticosteroid therapy. Her anemia and liver function test were completely recovered by 9 months after the initial presentation. We review the clinical features and therapeutic strategies for this rare case of extrahepatic manifestation of AHA.

Chang, Hyo Jeong; Cho, Sung Gyun; Oh, Tae Hoon; Jeon, Tae Joo; Shin, Won Chang; Choi, Won Choong

2014-01-01

20

Probiotic-associated high-titer anti-B in a group A platelet donor as a cause of severe hemolytic transfusion reactions  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTRs) can occur with transfusion of platelets (PLTs) containing ABO-incompatible plasma. Reported cases have involved group O donors. Two cases of PLT-mediated HTRs associated with the same group A plateletpheresis component, collected from a donor taking high doses of probiotics are reported. CASE REPORT Case 1 was a 40-year-old 69-kg group B stem cell transplant patient who received one-half of a group A plateletpheresis component. Severe back pain occurred 10 minutes into the transfusion, accompanied by anemia and hyperbilirubinemia. Case 2 was a 5-year-old 26-kg group B male with aplastic anemia who received the other half of the same plateletpheresis component, volume reduced to 37 mL. Syncope occurred immediately after the transfusion, with laboratory evidence of hemolysis a few hours later. RESULTS Serologic investigation of posttransfusion samples from both patients revealed positive direct anti-globulin tests: C3d only for Case 1 and immunoglobulin (Ig)G and C3d for Case 2; the eluates contained anti-B. The group A donor’s anti-B titer was 16,384 at saline and IgG phases. Donor lookback revealed that the donor had donated 134 apheresis PLTs over many years. For 3 years, he had intermittently taken probiotics; 3 weeks before the index donation, he began taking three tablets of probiotics every day. Lookback of prior group B recipients uncovered a case of acute hemolysis that was not recognized at the time. The solubilized probiotic inhibited anti-B in vitro. CONCLUSION Non–group O PLT donors can have high-titer anti-A or anti-B that might mediate HTRs, and probiotic ingestion in blood donors represents a novel mechanism of stimulating high-titer anti-B.

Daniel-Johnson, Jennifer; Leitman, Susan; Klein, Harvey; Alter, Harvey; Lee-Stroka, Agnes; Scheinberg, Phillip; Pantin, Jeremy; Quillen, Karen

2012-01-01

21

Estimation of the prevalence and rate of acute transfusion reactions occurring in Windhoek, Namibia  

PubMed Central

Background Acute transfusion reactions are probably common in sub-Saharan Africa, but transfusion reaction surveillance systems have not been widely established. In 2008, the Blood Transfusion Service of Namibia implemented a national acute transfusion reaction surveillance system, but substantial under-reporting was suspected. We estimated the actual prevalence and rate of acute transfusion reactions occurring in Windhoek, Namibia. Methods The percentage of transfusion events resulting in a reported acute transfusion reaction was calculated. Actual percentage and rates of acute transfusion reactions per 1,000 transfused units were estimated by reviewing patients’ records from six hospitals, which transfuse >99% of all blood in Windhoek. Patients’ records for 1,162 transfusion events occurring between 1st January – 31st December 2011 were randomly selected. Clinical and demographic information were abstracted and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Healthcare Safety Network criteria were applied to categorize acute transfusion reactions1. Results From January 1 – December 31, 2011, there were 3,697 transfusion events (involving 10,338 blood units) in the selected hospitals. Eight (0.2%) acute transfusion reactions were reported to the surveillance system. Of the 1,162 transfusion events selected, medical records for 785 transfusion events were analysed, and 28 acute transfusion reactions were detected, of which only one had also been reported to the surveillance system. An estimated 3.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.3–4.4) of transfusion events in Windhoek resulted in an acute transfusion reaction, with an estimated rate of 11.5 (95% CI: 7.6–14.5) acute transfusion reactions per 1,000 transfused units. Conclusion The estimated actual rate of acute transfusion reactions is higher than the rate reported to the national haemovigilance system. Improved surveillance and interventions to reduce transfusion-related morbidity and mortality are required in Namibia.

Meza, Benjamin P.L.; Lohrke, Britta; Wilkinson, Robert; Pitman, John P.; Shiraishi, Ray W.; Bock, Naomi; Lowrance, David W.; Kuehnert, Matthew J.; Mataranyika, Mary; Basavaraju, Sridhar V.

2014-01-01

22

Mutations in Kruppel-like factor 1 cause transfusion-dependent hemolytic anemia and persistence of embryonic globin gene expression.  

PubMed

In this study, we report on 8 compound heterozygotes for mutations in the key erythroid transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 1 in patients who presented with severe, transfusion-dependent hemolytic anemia. In most cases, the red cells were hypochromic and microcytic, consistent with abnormalities in hemoglobin synthesis. In addition, in many cases, the red cells resembled those seen in patients with membrane defects or enzymopathies, known as chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (CNSHA). Analysis of RNA and protein in primary erythroid cells from these individuals provided evidence of abnormal globin synthesis, with persistent expression of fetal hemoglobin and, most remarkably, expression of large quantities of embryonic globins in postnatal life. The red cell membranes were abnormal, most notably expressing reduced amounts of CD44 and, consequently, manifesting the rare In(Lu) blood group. Finally, all tested patients showed abnormally low levels of the red cell enzyme pyruvate kinase, a known cause of CNSHA. These patients define a new type of severe, transfusion-dependent CNSHA caused by mutations in a trans-acting factor (Krüppel-like factor 1) and reveal an important pathway regulating embryonic globin gene expression in adult humans. PMID:24443441

Viprakasit, Vip; Ekwattanakit, Supachai; Riolueang, Suchada; Chalaow, Nipon; Fisher, Chris; Lower, Karen; Kanno, Hitoshi; Tachavanich, Kalaya; Bejrachandra, Sasithorn; Saipin, Jariya; Juntharaniyom, Monthana; Sanpakit, Kleebsabai; Tanphaichitr, Voravarn S; Songdej, Duantida; Babbs, Christian; Gibbons, Richard J; Philipsen, Sjaak; Higgs, Douglas R

2014-03-01

23

[Acute lung injury as a consequence of blood transfusion].  

PubMed

Acute lung injury (ALI) has been recognized as a consequence of blood transfusion (BT) since 1978; the Food and Drug Administration, has classified it as the third BT mortality issue, in 2004, and in first place related with ALI. It can be mainly detected as: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). The clinical onset is: severe dyspnea, bilateral lung infiltration and low oxygen saturation. In USA, ARDS has an incidence of three to 22.4 cases/100 000 inhabitants, with 58.3 % mortality. TACO and TRALI are less frequent; they have been reported according to the number of transfusions: one in 1275 to 6000 for TRALI and one in 356 transfusions for TACO. Mortality is reported from two to 20 % in TRALI and 20 % in TACO. Antileukocyte antibodies in blood donors plasma, caused TRALI in 89 % of cases; also it has been found antigen specificity against leukocyte blood receptor in 59 %. The UCI patients who received a BT have ALI as a complication in 40 % of cases. The capillary pulmonary endothelia is the target of leukocyte antibodies and also plasma biologic modifiers of the stored plasma, most probable like a Sanarelli-Shwar-tzman phenomenon. PMID:21838994

Rodríguez-Moyado, Héctor

2011-01-01

24

Guideline on the investigation and management of acute transfusion reactions. Prepared by the BCSH Blood Transfusion Task Force.  

PubMed

Although acute non-haemolytic febrile or allergic reactions (ATRs) are a common complication of transfusion and often result in little or no morbidity, prompt recognition and management are essential. The serious hazards of transfusion haemovigilance organisation (SHOT) receives 30-40 reports of anaphylactic reactions each year. Other serious complications of transfusion, such as acute haemolysis, bacterial contamination, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) or transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) may present with similar clinical features to ATR. This guideline describes the approach to a patient developing adverse symptoms and signs related to transfusion, including initial recognition, establishing a likely cause, treatment, investigations, planning future transfusion and reporting within the hospital and to haemovigilance organisations. Key recommendations are that adrenaline should be used as first line treatment of anaphylaxis, and that transfusions should only be carried out where patients can be directly observed and where staff are trained in manging complications of transfusion, particularly anaphylaxis. Management of ATRs is not dependent on classification but should be guided by symptoms and signs. Patients who have experienced an anaphylactic reaction should be discussed with an allergist or immunologist, in keeping with UK resuscitation council guidelines. PMID:22928769

Tinegate, Hazel; Birchall, Janet; Gray, Alexandra; Haggas, Richard; Massey, Edwin; Norfolk, Derek; Pinchon, Deborah; Sewell, Carrock; Wells, Angus; Allard, Shubha

2012-10-01

25

Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction with multiple alloantibody (Anti S, N, K) and a monospecific autoanti-JKb in intermediate ?-thalassemia patient in Tabriz  

PubMed Central

It appears that delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions may occur several days after the administration of donor red cells is true even though they have been shown to be compatible in cross match tests by the antiglobulin technique. A specific case was observed in our center, which confirms the fact. The patient was a 37-year-old male suffering from intermediate ?-thalassemia. He had a history of two previous transfusions, with unknown transfusion reaction. In the last transfusion, laboratory data showed: Hb 7.8 g/dL and Hematocrit (Hct) 24.2%. The patient received two units of cross matched, compatible concentrated red blood cells (RBCs). After eight days a severe reaction was observed with clinical evidence of tachycardia, fatigue, fever, back pain, chest discomfort, jaundice, nausea and anorexia. Accordingly delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction was suspected, and anti-RBC antibodies were tested. Laboratory tests revealed the presence of three alloantibodies: Anti-N, anti-S, anti-K, and a monospecific autoanti-JKb.

Dolatkhah, Roya; Esfahani, Ali; Torabi, Seyed Esmaeil; Kermani, Iraj Asvadi; Sanaat, Zohreh; Ziaei, Jamal Eivazei; Nikanfar, Alireza; Chavoshi, Seyed Hadi; Ghoreishi, Zohreh; Kermani, Atabak Asvadi

2013-01-01

26

Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction with multiple alloantibody (Anti S, N, K) and a monospecific autoanti-JK(b) in intermediate ?-thalassemia patient in Tabriz.  

PubMed

It appears that delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions may occur several days after the administration of donor red cells is true even though they have been shown to be compatible in cross match tests by the antiglobulin technique. A specific case was observed in our center, which confirms the fact. The patient was a 37-year-old male suffering from intermediate ?-thalassemia. He had a history of two previous transfusions, with unknown transfusion reaction. In the last transfusion, laboratory data showed: Hb 7.8 g/dL and Hematocrit (Hct) 24.2%. The patient received two units of cross matched, compatible concentrated red blood cells (RBCs). After eight days a severe reaction was observed with clinical evidence of tachycardia, fatigue, fever, back pain, chest discomfort, jaundice, nausea and anorexia. Accordingly delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction was suspected, and anti-RBC antibodies were tested. Laboratory tests revealed the presence of three alloantibodies: Anti-N, anti-S, anti-K, and a monospecific autoanti-JK(b). PMID:24014947

Dolatkhah, Roya; Esfahani, Ali; Torabi, Seyed Esmaeil; Kermani, Iraj Asvadi; Sanaat, Zohreh; Ziaei, Jamal Eivazei; Nikanfar, Alireza; Chavoshi, Seyed Hadi; Ghoreishi, Zohreh; Kermani, Atabak Asvadi

2013-07-01

27

[Respiratory complications after transfusion].  

PubMed

Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records. PMID:24814817

Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

2014-05-01

28

Unusual manifestations of acute Q fever: autoimmune hemolytic anemia and tubulointerstitial nephritis.  

PubMed

Q fever is a worldwide zoonotic infection that caused by Coxiella burnetii, a strict intracellular bacterium. It may be manifested by some of the autoimmune events and is classified into acute and chronic forms. The most frequent clinical manifestation of acute form is a self-limited febrile illness which is associated with severe headache, muscle ache, arthralgia and cough. Meningoencephalitis, thyroiditis, pericarditis, myocarditis, mesenteric lymphadenopathy, hemolytic anemia, and nephritis are rare manifestations. Here we present a case of acute Q fever together with Coombs' positive autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and tubulointerstitial nephritis treated with chlarithromycin, steroids and hemodialysis. Clinicians should be aware of such rare manifestations of the disease. PMID:22607576

Korkmaz, Serdal; Elaldi, Nazif; Kayatas, Mansur; Sencan, Mehmet; Yildiz, Esin

2012-01-01

29

Unusual manifestations of acute Q fever: autoimmune hemolytic anemia and tubulointerstitial nephritis  

PubMed Central

Q fever is a worldwide zoonotic infection that caused by Coxiella burnetii, a strict intracellular bacterium. It may be manifested by some of the autoimmune events and is classified into acute and chronic forms. The most frequent clinical manifestation of acute form is a self-limited febrile illness which is associated with severe headache, muscle ache, arthralgia and cough. Meningoencephalitis, thyroiditis, pericarditis, myocarditis, mesenteric lymphadenopathy, hemolytic anemia, and nephritis are rare manifestations. Here we present a case of acute Q fever together with Coombs’ positive autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and tubulointerstitial nephritis treated with chlarithromycin, steroids and hemodialysis. Clinicians should be aware of such rare manifestations of the disease.

2012-01-01

30

HLA-DR antibodies in transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI): A case report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious adverse consequence of blood product transfusion. Cases of TRALI have gone unrecognized or misdiagnosed, since the symptoms can be confused with other transfusion-related events or with non-transfusion related comorbidities. Suspected cases of TRALI may be insufficiently investigated, and mild or moderate cases may not be investigated or reported at all. We report

Manuel Muro; Jose Rivera; Carmen Botella; Jose A. Campillo; Francisca Ferrer; María R. Álvarez-López

2008-01-01

31

An Attempt to Induce Transient Immunosuppression Pre-erythrocytapheresis in a Girl With Sickle Cell Disease, a History of Severe Delayed Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions and Need for Hip Prosthesis  

PubMed Central

Abstract We report on a case of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR) occurred 7 days after an erythrocytapheresis or eritroexchange procedure (EEX) treated with rituximab and glucocorticoids in a 15-years old patient with sickle cell disease. EEX was performed despite a previous diagnosis of alloimmunization, in order to reduce hemoglobin S rate before a major surgery for avascular necrosis of the femoral head. A first dose of rituximab was administered before EEX. However, rituximab couldn’t prevent DHTR that occurred with acute hemolysis, hemoglobinuria and hyperbilirubinemia. A further dose of rituximab and three boli of methylprednisolone were given after the onset of the reaction. It is likely that the combined use of rituximab and steroids managed to gradually improve both patient’s general conditions and hemoglobin levels. Nor early or late side effects were registered in a 33-months follow-up period. This report suggests the potential effectiveness and safety of rituximab in combination with steroids in managing and mitigating the symptoms of delayed post-transfusional hemolytic reactions in alloimmunized patients affected by sickle cell disease with absolute need for erythrocytapheresis.

Cattoni, Alessandro; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Perseghin, Paolo; Zatti, Giovanni; Gaddi, Diego; Cossio, Andrea; Biondi, Andrea; Corti, Paola; Masera, Nicoletta

2013-01-01

32

Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury in Children with Hematological Malignancies  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Although uncommon, acute lung injury (ALI) and its more severe form the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are serious\\u000a life-threatening complications that may occur during the routine treatment of children with hematological malignancies. ALI\\u000a may be the results of both the treatment of the malignancy or an adverse event related to supportive care, especially transfusion.\\u000a Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI)

Rachel S. Bercovitz; J. Bradley Ball; Marguerite R. Kelher; Christopher C. Silliman

33

[Antibodies, human leukocyte antigens, and biomodulators in transfusion-related acute adverse effects].  

PubMed

With the onset of the AIDS epidemic, major changes occurred in blood banking and transfusion medicine. These changes occurred mainly in donor selection and screening tests for infectious diseases, blood centers modified their organizational philosophy regarding quality. Transfusion of blood products are procedures that allow us to correct the haematology deficiencies for which was indicated. But today, despite the strict controls that precede transfusion,recipients may have undesirable effects, which are known as adverse effects or adverse reactions to transfusion. Antibodies and antigens of the HLA system plays a role in a series of events related to transfusion, such as immunological platelet refractoriness, febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions, transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease. The determination of anti-HLA antibodies is evidence that in most developed countries is used on a daily basis in the regular assessment of patients multitransfused or waiting lists for organs from deceased donors. The biomodulators are able to modify biological responses which act in sequence to lead to the differentiation of T lymphocytes. These agents may subcategorizes those which facilitate a normal immune response, those stimulates the immune response, those are capable of inducing immunosuppression not cytotoxic, and those enhancing the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic treatment (transfusion or transplant). PMID:23435079

Martínez Álvarez, Julio César

2013-01-01

34

Transfusion practices for acute traumatic brain injury: a survey of physicians at US trauma centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  To determine whether physician specialty influences transfusion threshold in patients with acute severe traumatic brain injury\\u000a (TBI).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We surveyed transfusion preferences of chiefs of trauma surgery, chairs of neurosurgery, and surgical and neurosurgical ICU\\u000a directors at all 187 US Level I trauma centers using a scenario-based, multiple-choice instrument administered by mail. We\\u000a evaluated the hemoglobin value used as a transfusion

Matthew J. Sena; Ryan M. Rivers; J. Paul Muizelaar; Felix D. Battistella; Garth H. Utter

2009-01-01

35

The Role of Neutrophils in the Pathogenesis of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)  

PubMed Central

Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the major cause of transfusion related morbidity and mortality, world wide. Efforts to reduce or eliminate this serious complication of blood transfusion are hampered by an incomplete understanding of its pathogenesis. Currently, TRALI is thought to be mediated by donor alloantibodies directed against host leukocytes or the result of two distinct clinical events. For both proposed mechanisms the neutrophil (PMN) is the key effector cell. This paper reviews TRALI pathophysiology, explores the role of the PMN, details practical information for appropriate diagnosis, and promotes further studies into the pathogenesis of TRALI.

Fung, Y.L.; Silliman, C.C.

2010-01-01

36

Acute exacerbation of subclinical pulmonary fibrosis following red cell transfusion: a case report  

PubMed Central

Background Red cell transfusion is associated with lung injury in susceptible hosts, although many cases do not meet criteria for transfusion related acute lung injury. Patients with underlying pulmonary fibrosis can exhibit precipitous deteriorations in respiratory status of unknown etiology defined as acute exacerbations due to superimposed lung injury syndrome. It is unclear whether red cell transfusion is associated with acute exacerbation of underlying pulmonary fibrosis. Case Report We describe a patient who underwent an uneventful elective left total hip replacement but developed anemia post-operatively. Twenty-four hours following transfusion of her fifth non-leukoreduced AS-5 red cell unit, she developed new bilateral airspace infiltrates associated with progressive hypoxemia. These RBC units were 35-38 days old. Despite supportive care and diuresis, patient remained profoundly hypoxemic with infiltrates that progressed to fibrosis. Results The patient had mild sub-clinical lower-lobe predominant interstitial pulmonary fibrosis but developed diffuse bilateral ground glass opacities with areas of consolidation 24 h after receiving her last RBC unit. Transbronchial biopsy of the right lower lobe showed active organizing pneumonia and underlying interstitial fibrosis, supporting the clinical diagnosis of acute exacerbation of pulmonary fibrosis. The bronchoalveolar lavage showed progressive bloody effluent, consistent with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, a marker of lung injury. There was no evidence of viral inclusions, fungal elements, pneumocystis, or bacterial organisms. Conclusion Transfusion of multiple units of aged RBCs was temporally associated with an acute exacerbation and rapid progression of underlying sub-clinical pulmonary fibrosis.

Woodske, Matthew; Donahoe, Michael P.; Yazer, Mark; Lee, Janet S

2011-01-01

37

Transfusion related anaphylaxis during orthotopic liver transplantation.  

PubMed

Acute non-hemolytic transfusion reactions, consisting of both allergic and febrile reactions, are common occurring in up to 10.2% of transfused blood products [1], however anaphylaxis, or severe allergic reactions, are rare following transfusion. The incidence of anaphylaxis is more common after the transfusion of plasma containing products with estimations from 1:10,000-33,000units of platelets and 1:29,000-50,000units of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) compared with 1:50,000-200,000 units of red blood cells [1,2]. Despite the rare occurrence, the clinical significance of transfusion related anaphylaxis can be severe with 12 reported fatalities over a 5-year span [3]. We report a case of FFP related anaphylaxis in a patient anticipating orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) with a unique peri-operative treatment plan. PMID:24485952

Paroskie, Allison; Booth, Garrett S

2014-04-01

38

A case of transfusion-related acute lung injury induced by anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies in acute leukemia  

PubMed Central

Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a noncardiogenic pulmonary edema that occurs during or within 6 hours after transfusion. Risk factors for TRALI, which is relatively common in critically ill patients, include recent surgery, hematologic malignancy, and sepsis. Here, we report a case of TRALI induced by anti-human leukocyte antigen (anti-HLA) class II antibodies (HLA-DR) occurring after transfusion of platelet concentrates in a patient with acute leukemia. Although most patients with TRALI show improvement within 48-96 hours, our patient's condition rapidly worsened, and he did not respond to supportive treatment. TRALI is a relatively common and serious adverse transfusion reaction that requires prompt diagnosis and management.

Jin, Sun Mi; Jang, Moon Ju; Huh, Ji Young; Park, Myoung Hee; Song, Eun Young

2012-01-01

39

Prognostic effect of blood transfusion in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia  

PubMed Central

Background Most children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) receive blood transfusions. Transfusions may affect ALL outcomes through transfusion-related immunomodulation (TRIM). Methods We analyzed overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) in relation to leukocyte reduced and irradiated (LR/IRR) blood products transfused during the induction phase in 136 children with ALL. Hazard ratios (HRs) for death and relapse were estimated through Cox regression analysis. Results One hundred and twenty patients (89%) were transfused with packed red blood cells (PRBCs) and 79 (58%) with single donor platelets (SDPs). The median number of transfusions was 2 (interquartile range [IQR]=1-3 events) and 1 (IQR=0-3 events) for PRBCs and SDPs, respectively. Patients who had white blood cell (WBC) count >50,000×109/L, were classified as high risk according to the high National Cancer Institute criteria, displayed a T cell phenotype, or were minimal residual disease-positive at end of induction were more likely to receive >3 transfusions during induction (P=0.001, 0.002, 0.03, and 0.01, respectively). In univariate analysis, PRBC, SDP, and fresh frozen plasma transfusions did not have any significant association with relapse or death. For PRBC transfusions, the HRs for EFS and OS were 1.02 (95% CI, 0.85-1.24; P=0. 76) and 1.03 (95% CI, 0.83-1.27; P=0.76), respectively. For SDP transfusions, HRs were 1.03 (95% CI, 0.90-1.18; P=0.64) and 0.98 (95% CI, 0.80-1.20; P=0.87) for EFS and OS, respectively. Conclusion LR/IRR blood products may not confer a TRIM effect in childhood ALL and are unlikely to affect outcome.

Alkayed, Khaldoun; Al Hmood, Ammar

2013-01-01

40

[A case of acute autoimmune hepatitis associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia].  

PubMed

A 61-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with severe jaundice and anemia. She was diagnosed with severe acute hepatitis secondary to autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) on the basis of positive anti-nuclear antibody titers, high serum IgG levels, and liver biopsy. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) was diagnosed because of the presence of reticulocytosis, decreased haptoglobin, positive direct Coombs test, and erythroid hyperplasia in the bone marrow. Although AIH occurs in association with various immunological disorders, an association with AIHA is rarely reported. We report a rare case of severe AIH associated with AIHA. PMID:24097153

Hanai, Tatsunori; Naiki, Takafumi; Takamatsu, Manabu; Imai, Kenji; Kitagawa, Junichi; Suetsugu, Atsushi; Takai, Koji; Shiraki, Makoto; Shimizu, Masahito; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Tsurumi, Hisashi; Moriwaki, Hisataka

2013-10-01

41

Collapsing glomerulopathy and hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with falciparum malaria: completely reversible acute kidney injury.  

PubMed

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most dreaded complications of severe malaria. Herein, we report a case of spontaneous resolution of AKI due to collapsing glomerulopathy (CG) and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) associated with P. falciparum malaria. Our case report highlights the fact that early intervention on the triggering cause of CG without a long course of steroids may obtain a remission of this severe subset of CG and may obtain a remission of HUS without therapeutic plasmapheresis The etiologic treatment of CG and HUS may avoid progression to end-stage renal disease. PMID:24431586

Kute, Vivek Balkrishna; Trivedi, Hargovind L; Vanikar, Aruna V; Shah, Pankaj R; Gumber, Manoj R; Kanodia, Kamal V

2013-10-01

42

Neonatal transfusion.  

PubMed

Neonates and particularly preterm neonates are frequent recipients of large volumes of blood products relative to their size. Good quality evidence for transfusion practice in this patient group has been lacking but is now increasing. Triggers for red cell transfusion are now better defined, with on-going trials of platelet transfusions likely to yield similar evidence. Transfusion is now extremely safe, but complications such as transfusion associated acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) are likely to be under recognised, particularly in the sick extremely preterm neonate with respiratory symptoms. This review summarises the rationale and current practice with regard to blood component therapy. Background data on component specifications and hazards of transfusion are provided. Indications for transfusion of specific products including red cells, platelets, and plasma are discussed, and their use is illustrated by case examples. PMID:24095206

Kelly, Anne M; Williamson, Lorna M

2013-11-01

43

[Acute adverse effects in transfusion. Proposals for the hemosurveillance system].  

PubMed

The management model based on risk prevention has become a major influence in shaping policies for transfusion safety. There are approximately sixty interactions between the health worker and the patient during the transfusion process,representing the number of times where you have the opportunity to make a mistake.We present an analysis of the weaknesses of the National Blood System, with particular attention to the haemovigilance donor and patient. The proposals include the implementation of the National Blood containing the need to establish from the National Blood Safety, significant changes in the regulatory framework and the internal regulations of the Ministry of Health, the CNTS and COFEPRIS. Is required to promote and coordinate the collection of accurate information from the committees of transfusion medicine, which will be accompanied by an initial diagnosis from the National Survey of Blood. Requires notice to other forms of funding to ensure the viability of the projects operating blood bank. Finally, as a strategic resource, the blood is of public, so access should not be restricted. PMID:23435081

Baptista González, Héctor

2013-01-01

44

A prophylactic fresh frozen plasma transfusion leads to a possible case of transfusion-related acute lung injury.  

PubMed

A 39-year-old man with cholangiocarcinoma presented with fever and abdominal pain. He was hypotensive, jaundiced and had right upper quadrant tenderness. Laboratory testing showed a leucocytosis, elevated liver function tests, total bilirubin and International Normalised Ratio (INR). Given the concern for cholangitis, the patient was given antibiotics and three units of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) before biliary drain placement. After drain placement, and within 3?h of receiving blood products, the patient became tachypnoeic and hypoxic with a chest X-ray revealing new bilateral airspace disease. The rapid development of respiratory distress was determined to most likely be transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). He rapidly progressed to intubation and required 100% FiO2, high positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP) and intermittent-prone ventilation for 48?h but eventually recovered and was extubated. TRALI is an under-recognised aetiology for respiratory distress in the critically ill. Adopting a conservative transfusion strategy may prevent TRALI. PMID:25053669

Banerjee, Debasree; Hussain, Rashid; Mazer, Jeffrey; Carino, Gerardo

2014-01-01

45

Acute myocardial infarction associated with blood transfusion: case report and literature review.  

PubMed

A 62-year old patient with a history of chronic anemia associated with malabsorption secondary to short gut syndrome, experienced acute chest pain the second hour after the transfusion of a crossmatch-compatible erythrocyte suspension. His electrocardiogram (ECG) revealed widespread ST-segment depressions and he had an elevated troponin level. Laboratory findings and physical examination did not indicate the presence of immunological or non-immunological blood transfusion reactions. Cardiac catheterization was performed and showed angiographically non-obstructive, atherosclerotic plaques and the absence of vasospasm or thrombus formation. Following antiischemic therapy his symptoms resolved completely. The ECG obtained 24 hours after the emergence of chest pain demonstrated normal sinus rhythm with no ST-T wave changes. We present a rare case of acute myocardial infarction induced following a blood transfusion. To the best of our knowledge, a few cases of acute myocardial infarction associated with blood transfusion have been formally recorded in the medical literature and the clinical experience regarding such cases is indeed quite limited. The present case is reviewed in the context of the relevant literature as a practical resource for clinical practice. PMID:24462652

Velibey, Yalcin; Erbay, Aliriza; Ozkurt, Enver; Usta, Emrah; Akin, Filiz

2014-04-01

46

Successful Colectomy for Hemorrhagic Colitis with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome and Acute Encephalopathy due to Escherichia coli O157 Infection  

PubMed Central

An 81-year-old man was admitted to a primary care hospital due to bloody diarrhea. The findings of abdominal computed tomography indicated ischemic colitis, so conservative therapy was started. On the 4th hospital day, the patient was transferred to our hospital because of renal dysfunction. Physical examination showed clouding of consciousness and abdominal distention. Abdominal computed tomography revealed massive ascites and thickening of the whole colonic wall. With a diagnosis of acute abdomen, an emergent laparotomy was performed. Extended right hemicolectomy was performed because of severe ischemic change and necrosis of the right side of the colon. In the stool culture before the operation, Escherichia coli O157 and verotoxin were found, so this case was diagnosed as hemorrhagic colitis with hemolytic uremic syndrome and acute encephalopathy due to Escherichia coli O157 infection. Postoperatively, the hemolytic uremic syndrome and acute encephalopathy were prolonged. However, with intensive care, the patient recovered and was discharged on the 33rd postoperative day.

Tominaga, Tetsuro; Oikawa, Masahiro; Takeshita, Hiroaki; Kunizaki, Masaki; Tou, Kazuo; Abo, Takafumi; Hidaka, Shigekazu; Nanashima, Atsushi; Sawai, Terumitsu; Nagayasu, Takeshi

2014-01-01

47

Transfusion related acute lung injury with massive pulmonary secretion during cardiac surgery. A case report.  

PubMed

A Indo-Caribbean patient undergoing cardiac surgery developed Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI) with massive endobronchial secretion of clear fluid mimicking severe pulmonary edema. Hypoxemia and lung stiffness were so severe that didn't allow closure of the sternum on completion of surgery. The patient was treated with invasive ventilation, high positive pressure and % FiO2 and aggressive endotracheal suction. After several hours, secretions reduced spontaneously and the patient made an uneventful recovery. PMID:24694086

Teodori, Julien; Rampersad, Kamal; Teodori, Giovanni; Roopchand, Roland; Angelini, Gianni Davide

2014-01-01

48

Possible transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) in cardiac surgery patients  

PubMed Central

Aim To determine the incidence of possible transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and related risk factors in cardiac surgery patients. Methods A single-center prospective cohort study was conducted from January 2009 to March 2010 at the Zagreb University Hospital Center, Croatia. Patient-, transfusion-, and surgery-related data were collected. The study included 262 patients who were observed for respiratory worsening including measurements of arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2), and partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2). Possible TRALI was defined according to the Toronto Consensus Conference definition broadened for 24-hour post-transfusion. This cohort was divided in two groups. TRALI group included 32 participants with diagnosis of TRALI and the control group included 220 patients with or without respiratory worsening, but with no signs of ALI. Results Possible TRALI was observed in 32 (12.2%) patients. Compared with the control group, possible TRALI patients had higher American Association of Anesthesiology scores, higher rate of respiratory comorbidity (43.8% vs 15.5%), and required more red blood cells (median 4, range [2.5-6] vs 2 [1-3]), plasma (5 [0-6] vs 0 [0-2]), and platelet units (0 [0-8] vs 0 [0-0]) (P?transfused blood units (odds ratio [OR] 1.23; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10-1.37) and duration of cardiopulmonary bypass (OR 1.08; 95% CI 1.05-1.11). Post-transfusion PaO2/FiO2 ratio was significantly decreased in possible TRALI patients and significantly increased in transfused controls without acute lung injury. Conclusion We observed a higher rate of possible TRALI cases than in other studies on cardiac surgery patients. Serial monitoring of PaO2/FiO2 ratio and detection of its post-transfusion worsening aids in identification of possible TRALI cases.

Zah-Bogovic, Tajana; Mesaric, Jasna; Hrabac, Pero; Majeric-Kogler, Visnja

2014-01-01

49

Hemolytic Anemia  

MedlinePLUS

... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Hemolytic Anemia? Hemolytic anemia (HEE-moh-lit-ick uh-NEE-me-uh) ... blood cells to replace them. However, in hemolytic anemia, the bone marrow can't make red blood ...

50

Suspected Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury Improving following Administration of Tranexamic Acid: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

A 16-year-old woman with craniofacial injury developed severe acute respiratory failure under the primary reconstructive surgical procedure requiring several units of blood and plasma. A transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) was suspected and supportive treatment was initiated. Because of the severity of symptoms, acute extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was planned. During preparation for ECMO, a single intravenous dose, 1?g of tranexamic acid, was administered and a remarkable improvement was observed shortly thereafter. The patient was placed on ECMO for 16 hours. The further course was uncomplicated and the patient was discharged from ICU on the 6th day after admission fully and she recovered. A clinical improvement was observed in a timely fashion following the administration of tranexamic acid. The handling of a suspected TRALI and potential benefit from administration of tranexamic acid are discussed in this case report.

Ryniak, Stan; Harbut, Piotr; Ostlund, Anders; Jakobsson, Jan G.

2014-01-01

51

[Transfusion-related acute lung injury during the treatment of EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis].  

PubMed

Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a severe pulmonary complication following blood transfusions. We experienced a case of possible TRALI during the course of EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (EBV-HLH). A 19-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital suffering from fever and abdominal pain. Her laboratory data revealed pancytopenia, liver damage, coagulopathy, and a high titer of EBV-DNA. Computed tomography showed hepatosplenomegaly and bone marrow aspiration revealed hemophagocytosis and the proliferation of atypical lymphocytes. A diagnosis of EBV-HLH was made and plasma exchange was performed. Severe hypoxia due to pulmonary edema developed two hours after starting the plasma transfusion. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy and non-invasive positive pressure ventilation ameliorated her respiratory condition. Anti-HLA class I and II antibodies were detected in donor sera and a cross-match test between patient lymphocytes and donor plasma was positive. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of TRALI complicated with EBV-HLH. It is possible that hypercytokinemia accompanied by HLH was associated with the onset of TRALI. PMID:23666220

Nakashima, Eriko; Shiratsuchi, Motoaki; Honda, Emi; Fujioka, Eriko; Ohno, Hirofumi; Nakashima, Yasuhiro; Matsushima, Takamitsu; Iwasaki, Hiromi; Abe, Yasunobu; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

2013-04-01

52

Peripheral blood monocyte-derived chemokine blockade prevents murine transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).  

PubMed

Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality and can occur with any type of transfusion. TRALI is thought to be primarily mediated by donor antibodies activating recipient neutrophils resulting in pulmonary endothelial damage. Nonetheless, details regarding the interactions between donor antibodies and recipient factors are unknown. A murine antibody-mediated TRALI model was used to elucidate the roles of the F(ab')2 and Fc regions of a TRALI-inducing immunoglobulin G anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antibody (34.1.2s). Compared with intact antibody, F(ab')2 fragments significantly increased serum levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2); however, pulmonary neutrophil levels were only moderately increased, and no pulmonary edema or mortality occurred. Fc fragments did not modulate any of these parameters. TRALI induction by intact antibody was completely abrogated by in vivo peripheral blood monocyte depletion by gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) or chemokine blockade with a MIP-2 receptor antagonist but was restored upon repletion with purified monocytes. The results suggest a two-step process for antibody-mediated TRALI induction: the first step involves antibody binding its cognate antigen on blood monocytes, which generates MIP-2 chemokine production that is correlated with pulmonary neutrophil recruitment; the second step occurs when antibody-coated monocytes increase Fc-dependent lung damage. PMID:24637362

McKenzie, Christopher G J; Kim, Michael; Singh, Tarandeep K; Milev, Youli; Freedman, John; Semple, John W

2014-05-29

53

Mac1+/Gr1+ cells contribute to transfusion-related acute lung injury.  

PubMed

Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious complication associated with blood transfusion and can cause transfusion associated fatalities. Both antibody dependent and non-dependent mechanisms are involved in TRALI, as proposed over the past years. Nonetheless, many details of the immune cells involved in TRALI, particularly the Mac1(+)/Gr1(+) cells from donors, are not fully understood yet. Here we used an in vitro transwell system and a mouse model to study the role of donor leukocytes, present in the donor material, in the occurrence of TRALI reactions. We found that there is a number of immature myeloid cells with Mac1(+)/Gr1(+) phenotype present in the red blood cell (RBC) products, when prepared by regular methods. We found that murine Mac1(+)/Gr1(+) cells from stored RBC products display an elevated MHC I and CD40 expression, as well as an enhanced tumor necrosis factor alpha(TNF-?), interlukin-6(IL-6) and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) secretion. When tested in a transwell endothelial migration assay, Mac1(+)/Gr1(+) cells showed a significant capability to cross the endothelial barrier. In vivo investigation demonstrated that compared to the purified RBC transfusion, more murine Mac1(+)/Gr1(+) cells from the regular method produced RBC sequestered in the lung, which associated to shorter survival. Taken together, these data suggest that donor derived Mac1(+)/Gr1(+) cells can play a significant role in TRALI reactions, and that reduction of Mac1(+)/Gr1(+) cell number from RBC products is necessary to control the severity of TRALI reactions in clinic. PMID:23548440

Hu, Xing-bin; Yin, Dan-dan; Chen, Yao-zhen; Yang, Hai-feng Ou; Zhang, Xian-qing

2013-12-01

54

Restrictive vs liberal blood transfusion for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding: rationale and protocol for a cluster randomized feasibility trial.  

PubMed

Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is the commonest reason for hospitalization with hemorrhage in the UK and the leading indication for transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs). Observational studies suggest an association between more liberal RBC transfusion and adverse patient outcomes, and a recent randomised trial reported increased further bleeding and mortality with a liberal transfusion policy. TRIGGER (Transfusion in Gastrointestinal Bleeding) is a pragmatic, cluster randomized trial which aims to evaluate the feasibility and safety of implementing a restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion policy in adult patients admitted with AUGIB. The trial will take place in 6 UK hospitals, and each centre will be randomly allocated to a transfusion policy. Clinicians throughout each hospital will manage all eligible patients according to the transfusion policy for the 6-month trial recruitment period. In the restrictive centers, patients become eligible for RBC transfusion when their hemoglobin is <8 g/dL. In the liberal centers patients become eligible for transfusion once their hemoglobin is <10 g/dL. All clinicians will have the discretion to transfuse outside of the policy but will be asked to document the reasons for doing so. Feasibility outcome measures include protocol adherence, recruitment rate, and evidence of selection bias. Clinical outcome measures include further bleeding, mortality, thromboembolic events, and infections. Quality of life will be measured using the EuroQol EQ-5D at day 28, and the costs associated with hospitalization for AUGIB in the UK will be estimated. Consent will be sought from participants or their representatives according to patient capacity for use of routine hospital data and day 28 follow up. The study has ethical approval for conduct in England and Scotland. Results will be analysed according to a pre-defined statistical analysis plan and disseminated in peer reviewed publications to relevant stakeholders. The results of this study will inform the feasibility and design of a phase III randomized trial. PMID:23706959

Jairath, Vipul; Kahan, Brennan C; Gray, Alasdair; Doré, Caroline J; Mora, Ana; Dyer, Claire; Stokes, Elizabeth A; Llewelyn, Charlotte; Bailey, Adam A; Dallal, Helen; Everett, Simon M; James, Martin W; Stanley, Adrian J; Church, Nicholas; Darwent, Melanie; Greenaway, John; Le Jeune, Ivan; Reckless, Ian; Campbell, Helen E; Meredith, Sarah; Palmer, Kelvin R; Logan, Richard F A; Travis, Simon P L; Walsh, Timothy S; Murphy, Michael F

2013-07-01

55

Restrictive vs Liberal Blood Transfusion for Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Rationale and Protocol for a Cluster Randomized Feasibility Trial  

PubMed Central

Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is the commonest reason for hospitalization with hemorrhage in the UK and the leading indication for transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs). Observational studies suggest an association between more liberal RBC transfusion and adverse patient outcomes, and a recent randomised trial reported increased further bleeding and mortality with a liberal transfusion policy. TRIGGER (Transfusion in Gastrointestinal Bleeding) is a pragmatic, cluster randomized trial which aims to evaluate the feasibility and safety of implementing a restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion policy in adult patients admitted with AUGIB. The trial will take place in 6 UK hospitals, and each centre will be randomly allocated to a transfusion policy. Clinicians throughout each hospital will manage all eligible patients according to the transfusion policy for the 6-month trial recruitment period. In the restrictive centers, patients become eligible for RBC transfusion when their hemoglobin is < 8 g/dL. In the liberal centers patients become eligible for transfusion once their hemoglobin is < 10 g/dL. All clinicians will have the discretion to transfuse outside of the policy but will be asked to document the reasons for doing so. Feasibility outcome measures include protocol adherence, recruitment rate, and evidence of selection bias. Clinical outcome measures include further bleeding, mortality, thromboembolic events, and infections. Quality of life will be measured using the EuroQol EQ-5D at day 28, and the costs associated with hospitalization for AUGIB in the UK will be estimated. Consent will be sought from participants or their representatives according to patient capacity for use of routine hospital data and day 28 follow up. The study has ethical approval for conduct in England and Scotland. Results will be analysed according to a pre-defined statistical analysis plan and disseminated in peer reviewed publications to relevant stakeholders. The results of this study will inform the feasibility and design of a phase III randomized trial.

Jairath, Vipul; Kahan, Brennan C.; Gray, Alasdair; Dore, Caroline J.; Mora, Ana; Dyer, Claire; Stokes, Elizabeth A.; Llewelyn, Charlotte; Bailey, Adam A.; Dallal, Helen; Everett, Simon M.; James, Martin W.; Stanley, Adrian J.; Church, Nicholas; Darwent, Melanie; Greenaway, John; Le Jeune, Ivan; Reckless, Ian; Campbell, Helen E.; Meredith, Sarah; Palmer, Kelvin R.; Logan, Richard F.A.; Travis, Simon P.L.; Walsh, Timothy S.; Murphy, Michael F.

2013-01-01

56

Acute isovolaemic haemodilution: the best option for autologous blood transfusion in Africa?  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to identify the best method of autologous blood transfusion to be applied in an East African hospital. One hundred and nine consecutive patients for whom major blood loss was anticipated were enrolled. Seventeen patients donated 1 unit of blood 3 days preoperatively and 92 underwent acute isovolaemic haemodilution prior to induction of anaesthesia. For the haemodiluted patients a 2:1 ratio of sterile pryogen-free saline to collected blood was used. One of the 16 patients from whom 2 units were withdrawn by haemodilution experienced hypovolaemia which was rapidly restored by additional transfusion of colloid. Of the patients who donated blood preoperatively only 23.5% were autotransfused compared to 98.9% of the haemodiluted patients. Of the latter 23.9% (22) had an intraoperative blood loss exceeding 15% of their total blood volume and 7.6% (7) lost more than 25%. Only one received homologous blood in addition. For hospitals with limited blood bank facilities and regular cancellation of surgery, the use of acute isovolaemic haemodilution is recommended. A 3:1 ratio of saline to blood is now advised when 1 unit is withdrawn and a part replacement with crystalloid when 2 units are collected. PMID:7502321

Berege, Z A; Jacobs, B; Matasha, M R; Mpelumbe, F; Kimaro, E

1995-10-01

57

Effect of a restrictive transfusion strategy on transfusion-attributable severe acute complications and costs in the US ICUs: a model simulation  

PubMed Central

Background Nearly half of all patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) receive red blood cell (pRBC) transfusions (TFs), despite their associated complications. Restrictive transfusion strategy (Hemoglobin [Hb] < 7 g/dL) has been shown to reduce TF exposure. We estimated the potential annual reduction in transfusion-attributable severe acute complications (TSACs) and costs across the US ICUs with the adoption of restrictive strategy. Methods A model, utilizing inputs from published studies, was constructed. Step 1 calculated potential number of patients appropriate for this strategy. In step 2, total number of pRBC units avoided with the restrictive trigger was extrapolated to the annual TFs in the US ICUs. Step 3 quantified excess acute complications and the number of pRBC units TF/1 TSAC in the TRICC trial. Step 4 transformed restrictive strategy-related avoidance of pRBC units to a reduction in TSACs, and step 5 quantified the associated cost savings. Results Of the 4.4 million annual ICU admissions, 1,020,800 comprised the at-risk population. The total of 1,295,126 units of pRBC ($643/unit) could be saved with the restrictive strategy. Based on the data from the TRICC trial, dividing the 49 excess complications in the liberal group into the calculated excess of pRBCs transfused (1,624 units) yielded the rate of 33 pRBC units per one complication. Thus, dividing 1,295,126 units saved by 33 units/1 TSAC, the base-case analysis showed that 39,246 TSACs could potentially be avoided annually in the US ICUs, with the cost savings of $821,109,826. Conclusion This model demonstrates that a restrictive transfusion strategy in appropriate at risk ICU patients is dominant and could result in improved quality of care and cost savings. Given the potential savings of 40,000 TSACs and nearly $1 billion, it is incumbent upon the intensivist community to promote more ubiquitous adoption of a clinically appropriate restrictive transfusion strategy in the ICU.

Zilberberg, Marya D; Shorr, Andrew F

2007-01-01

58

Massive transfusion.  

PubMed

Massive Transfusion is a part of Damage Control Resuscitation. The aim of transfusion therapy is to restore oxygen delivery to poorly perfused tissues and to treat the acute coagulopathy of trauma. The severity and complexity of modern injuries have led to the use of swift, protocol-driven care with the use of'Shock Packs' and management of metabolic complications. The proactive treatment of the coagulopathy has been termed Haemostatic Resuscitation. The delivery of this transfusion capability has required an increasingly sophisticated logistic and laboratory response. New operational capabilities have included cold chain solutions; laboratory management information systems; platelet apheresis and ROTEM. This investment in the massive transfusion capability has delivered rapid resuscitation. It has also enabled clinicians to direct individualised transfusion support following initial resuscitation i.e. goal directed therapy. Future technical solutions should further support the prehospital delivery of transfusion while addressing the logistic tail. However, the key to success is the knowledge and skills of frontline staff to deliver safe and appropriate blood transfusion. PMID:22049808

Doughty, H A; Woolley, T; Thomas, G O R

2011-09-01

59

[Acute anemia in high digestive hemorrhage. Margins of security for their handling without transfusion of red globules].  

PubMed

Red cells transfusion in the patient with acute hemorrhage, must be evaluated in a risk/benefit rate context. The present tendencies appoint that the use of the hematocrit "magic" number is unsafe and uncertain to decide a red cell transfusion. We have conducted a prospective randomized and controlled trial in 60 patients with acute digestive hemorrhage without haemodynamic failure. We realized two groups: 1) control group: the target of transfusion in these patients was the hematocrit value of > or = 28%. 2) treatment group: these patients were supported with normovolemic haemodilution with crystalloid solutions until a hematocrit value of 21%. All patients have endoscopic diagnosis and they went evaluated across the study with clinic and laboratory controls. Both groups were significative differences in the hematocrit value. We did not see differences between the groups in the hospital stay neither the rate of organs failure. We find difference between the groups in the amount of red cell units (0.61 +/- 0.87 vs. 2.14 +/- 1.10; treatment and control respectively, P < 0.001). The APACHE score was greater in the treatment group. This supports that the oldest patients, who probably have least physiologic reserve, could be treated without complications. Acute hemorrhage-normovolemic haemodilution-digestive hemorrhage transfusion. PMID:10599402

Villarejo, F; Rizzolo, M; Lópéz, E; Domeniconi, G; Arto, G; Apezteguia, C

1999-01-01

60

Supportive transfusion therapy in cancer patients with acquired defects of hemostasis.  

PubMed

Bleeding occurs in approximately 10% of patients with cancer: supportive transfusion therapy with Platelets Concentrates (PC), Fresh Frozen Plasma (FFP) and plasma-derived or recombinant concentrates is often required for the cessation and prevention of the bleeding episodes. The most frequent causes of bleeding in cancer is thrombocytopenia followed by liver insufficiency with or without vitamin K deficiency, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and the inappropriate or excessive use of anticoagulants. Other acquired hemostatic defects such as acquired hemophilia (AHA) and acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) are rare but they can be life-threatening. Thrombocytopenia in cancer patients may be the consequence of marrow invasion, chemotherapy or platelet auto-antibodies; patients with severe hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia, must be treated with PC and carefully followed to assess refractoriness to PC. The management of the other acquired defects of hemostasis usually requires the use of FFP and specific plasma-derived or recombinant concentrates. PC, FFP and plasma-derived concentrates can induce complications and/or adverse events in cancer patients: these include mainly allergic (ALR) or anaphylactic reactions (ANR), Transfusion-Associated Graft-Versus-Host Disease (TA-GVHD), Trasfusion-transmitted bacteriemia (TTB), Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), Acute Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions (AHTR), Febrile Non Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions (FNHTR). Therefore, modifications such as leukocyte-reduction and irradiation of the blood components to be transfused in cancer patients are recommended to reduce the risk of these complications. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. PMID:24862147

Federici, Augusto B; Intini, Daniela; Lattuada, Antonella; Vanelli, Chiara; Arrigoni, Luisa; Sacchi, Elisabetta; Russo, Umberto

2014-05-01

61

Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transfusion Is Safe and Improves Liver Function in Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure Patients  

PubMed Central

Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is a severe, life-threatening complication, and new and efficient therapeutic strategies for liver failure are urgently needed. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transfusions have been shown to reverse fulminant hepatic failure in mice and to improve liver function in patients with end-stage liver diseases. We assessed the safety and initial efficacy of umbilical cord-derived MSC (UC-MSC) transfusions for ACLF patients associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. A total of 43 ACLF patients were enrolled for this open-labeled and controlled study; 24 patients were treated with UC-MSCs, and 19 patients were treated with saline as controls. UC-MSC therapy was given three times at 4-week intervals. The liver function, adverse events, and survival rates were evaluated during the 48-week or 72-week follow-up period. No significant side effects were observed during the trial. The UC-MSC transfusions significantly increased the survival rates in ACLF patients; reduced the model for end-stage liver disease scores; increased serum albumin, cholinesterase, and prothrombin activity; and increased platelet counts. Serum total bilirubin and alanine aminotransferase levels were significantly decreased after the UC-MSC transfusions. UC-MSC transfusions are safe in the clinic and may serve as a novel therapeutic approach for HBV-associated ACLF patients.

Shi, Ming; Zhang, Zheng; Xu, Ruonan; Lin, Hu; Fu, Junliang; Zou, Zhengsheng; Zhang, Aimin; Shi, Jianfei; Chen, Liming; Lv, Sa; He, Weiping; Geng, Hua; Jin, Lei; Liu, Zhenwen

2012-01-01

62

Genetic-algorithm-based artificial neural network modeling for platelet transfusion requirements on acute myeloblastic leukemia patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, an artificial neural network (ANN) model with the genetic algorithm (GA) is used to predict the platelet transfusion requirements for the acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) patients. The hybrid Taguchi-genetic algorithm (HTGA) is applied in this ANN to find the optimal parameters (i.e., weights of links and biases govern the input–output relationship of an ANN) by directly maximizing

Wen-Hsien Ho; Chao-Sung Chang

2011-01-01

63

Effect of restrictive fluid management and acute normovolemic intraoperative hemodilution on transfusion requirements during living donor hepatectomy.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a restrictive fluid management strategy and acute normovolemic intraoperative hemodilution (ANIH) to decrease transfusion requirements among living-donors for liver transplantation (LDLT). We retrospectively reviewed the data of 114 consecutive LDLT donors. The patients were divided into 2 groups based on whether (Group I; n = 73) or not (Group II; n = 41) a restrictive fluid management strategy with ANIH was used during the procedure. For each group we recorded demographic features, intraoperative and postoperative transfusions, amount of administered intraoperative crystalloid and colloids, intraoperative hemodynamics, preoperative and postoperative laboratory values (renal and liver functions), intraoperative and postoperative urine output, and length of hospital stay. Demographic features and preoperative laboratory values were similar for the 2 groups, except for age (Group I, 36 +/- 9 vs Group II, 33 +/- 8; P = .04). Intraoperatively, 7 patients (10%) in Group 1 and 9 (22%) in Group II required blood transfusions (P = .06). The respective amount of heterologous blood transfusion for Groups I and II was 96 +/- 321 mL vs 295 +/- 678 mL (P = .06). Postoperative renal and liver functions were not different between the 2 groups (P > .05). Patients in Group I had a shorter hospital stay than those in Group II (8.2 +/- 4.6 days vs 10.1 +/- 4.9 days; P = .03). In conclusion, a restrictive fluid management strategy with ANIH was a safe blood-salvage technique for LDLT. This approach was also associated with decreased length of hospital stay and a trend toward decreased transfusion requirements. PMID:18261592

Balci, S T; Pirat, A; Torgay, A; Cinar, O; Sevmis, S; Arslan, G

2008-01-01

64

Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Summary Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a triad of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. The atypical form of HUS is a disease characterized by complement overactivation. Inherited defects in complement genes and acquired autoantibodies against complement regulatory proteins have been described. Incomplete penetrance of mutations in all predisposing genes is reported, suggesting that a precipitating event or trigger is required to unmask the complement regulatory deficiency. The underlying genetic defect predicts the prognosis both in native kidneys and after renal transplantation. The successful trials of the complement inhibitor eculizumab in the treatment of atypical HUS will revolutionize disease management.

Kavanagh, David; Goodship, Tim H.; Richards, Anna

2013-01-01

65

Is intensive monitoring during the first transfusion in pediatric patients necessary?  

PubMed

Background Some pediatric patients, typically those that are very young or felt to be especially sick are temporarily admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for observation during their first transfusion. If a significant reaction that requires ICU management does not occur, these patients are then transferred to a regular ward where future blood products are administered. The aim of this project was to determine if heightened observation such as temporary ICU admissions for the first transfusion are warranted. Methods From the blood bank records of a tertiary care pediatric hospital, a list of patients on whom a transfusion reaction was reported between 2007 and 2012, the type of reaction and the patient's transfusion history, were extracted. The hospital location where the transfusion occurred, and whether the patient was evaluated by the ICU team or transferred to the ICU for management of the reaction was determined from the patient's electronic medical record. Results There were 174 acute reactions in 150 patients. Of these 150 patients, 13 (8.7%) different patients experienced a reaction during their first transfusion; all 13 patients experienced clinically mild reactions (8 febrile non-hemolytic, 4 mild allergic, and 1 patient who simultaneously had a mild allergic and a febrile non-hemolytic), and none required ICU management. Six severe reactions (6 of 174, 3.4%) involving significant hypotension and/or hypoxia that required acute and intensive management occurred during subsequent (i.e. not the first) transfusion in six patients. Conclusions The practice of intensive observation for the first transfusion in pediatric patients is probably unnecessary. PMID:24074624

Berg, Aaron; Courtney, Rachael; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Triulzi, Darrell J; Yazer, Mark H

2014-07-01

66

The incidence, risk factors, and outcome of transfusion-related acute lung injury in a cohort of cardiac surgery patients: a prospective nested case-control study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality. Both antibodies and bioactive lipids that have accumulated during storage of blood have been implicated in TRALI pathogenesis. In a single-center, nested, case-control study, patients were prospectively observed for onset of TRALI according to the consensus definition. Of 668 patients, 16 patients (2.4%) developed TRALI. Patient-related

A. P. J. Vlaar; J. J. Hofstra; R. M. Determann; D. P. Veelo; F. Paulus; W. Kulik; J. Korevaar; B. A. de Mol; M. M. W. Koopman; L. Porcelijn; J. M. Binnekade; M. B. Vroom; M. J. Schultz; N. P. Juffermans

2011-01-01

67

Contribution of damage-associated molecular patterns to transfusion-related acute lung injury in cardiac surgery  

PubMed Central

Background The incidence of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) in cardiac surgery patients is high and this condition contributes to an adverse outcome. Damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecules, HMGB1 and S100A12, are thought to mediate inflammatory changes in acute respiratory distress syndrome. We aimed to determine whether DAMP are involved in the pathogenesis of TRALI in cardiac surgery patients. Materials and methods This was a secondary analysis of a prospective observational trial in cardiac surgery patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of a university hospital in the Netherlands. Fourteen TRALI cases were randomly matched with 32 transfused and non-transfused controls. Pulmonary levels of HMGB1, S100A12 and inflammatory cytokines (interleukins-1?, -6, and -8 and tumour necrosis factor-?) were determined when TRALI evolved. In addition, systemic and pulmonary levels of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) were determined. Results HMGB1 expression and levels of sRAGE in TRALI patients did not differ from those in controls. There was a trend towards higher S100A12 levels in TRALI patients compared to the controls. Furthermore, S100A12 levels were associated with increased levels of markers of pulmonary inflammation, prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass, hypoxemia and duration of mechanical ventilation. Conclusion No evidence was found that HMGB1 and sRAGE contribute to the development of TRALI. S100A12 is associated with duration of cardiopulmonary bypass, pulmonary inflammation, hypoxia and prolonged mechanical ventilation and may contribute to acute lung injury in cardiac surgery patients.

Muller, Marcella C.A.; Tuinman, Pieter R.; Vlaar, Alexander P.; Tuip, Anita M.; Maijoor, Kelly; Achouiti, Achmed; van t Veer, Cornelis; Vroom, Margreeth B.; Juffermans, Nicole P.

2014-01-01

68

Role of Riboflavin- and UV Light-Treated Plasma in Prevention of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury  

PubMed Central

Summary Introduction Risk reduction strategies for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) include the preferential use of male donors to provide fresh frozen plasma (FFP). Implementing this measure based on FFP quarantine program is a very complex process. To improve FFP inventory management and the availability of FFP from male donors, the Mirasol Pathogen Reduction Technology® (PRT) system for FFP using riboflavin and UV light was adopted in our region in 2012. Methods The percentage of male/female FFP units issued and TRALI cases in patients receiving FFP in the period before implementing riboflavin and UV light (2010–2011) was compared with the period post implementation of riboflavin and UV light (2012–2013). Results In 2010 and 2011, there was one FFP transfusion-related TRALI case reported per year, when the proportion of male/female FFP distributed to the hospitals was 60/40. During 2012 and 2013, there have been no FFP transfusion-related TRALI cases, when the proportion of male/female FFP distributed to the hospitals was around 97/3. Mirasol PRT allows quick availability (24 h from collection) compared to quarantined FFP (?3 months from collection). Conclusion Thanks to its readiness, simplicity and feasibility, riboflavin- and UV light-treated FFP implementation can facilitate the preferential use of FFP from male donors as a TRALI prevention strategy.

Jimenez-Marco, Teresa; Ruiz-Alderton, Daniel; Bautista-Gili, Antonia M.; Girona-Llobera, Enrique

2014-01-01

69

Differential effect of plasma and red blood cell transfusion on acute lung injury and infection risk following liver transplantation  

PubMed Central

Rationale Patients with chronic liver disease are at an increased risk of developing transfusion-associated acute lung injury (TRALI) from plasma containing blood products. Similarly, red blood cell transfusions have been associated with post-operative and nosocomial infections in surgical and critical care populations. Patients undergoing liver transplantation receive a large amount of cellular and plasma containing blood products, but it is presently unclear which blood components are associated with these post-operative complications. Results A retrospective cohort study of 525 consecutive liver transplant patients revealed a peri-operative TRALI incidence of 1.3% (7/525), 95%CI [0.6%–2.7%], associated with an increased hospital mortality (28.6% (2/7) vs. 2.9% (15/518), p=0.02) and intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (2 days, [1–11] vs. 0 days [0–2], 0.03). Only high plasma containing blood products (plasma and platelets) were associated with the development of TRALI. A total of 14.3% (74/525) of patients developed a post-operative infection which was also associated with an increased in-hospital mortality (10.8% (8/74) vs. 2.0% (9/451), p < 0.01) and prolonged length of stay. Multivariate logistic regression identified the number of red blood cell units transfused (adj OR 1.08 95%CI [1.02–1.14], p<0.01), the presence of peri-operative renal dysfunction and re-operation to be significantly associated with post-operative infection. Conclusions Patients undergoing liver transplantation are at high risk of developing post-operative complications from blood transfusion. Plasma containing blood products were associated with the development of TRALI while red blood cells were associated with the development of post-operative infection in a dose dependent manner.

Benson, Alexander B.; Burton, James R.; Austin, Gregory L.; Biggins, Scott W.; Zimmerman, Michael A.; Kam, Igal; Mandell, Susan; Silliman, Christopher C.; Rosen, Hugo; Moss, Marc

2010-01-01

70

Recommendations in the event of a suspected transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).  

PubMed

The following recommendations, which aim at improving the clinical diagnosis ofTRALI and the laboratory investigations that can support it, were drawn up by a working group of the Superior Health Council. TRALI is a complication of blood transfusion that is both serious and underreported. Systematic reporting may help to develop preventive actions. Therefore, the Superior Health Council recommends that there should be a more stringent surveillance of patients who receive a blood component transfusion. The clinician should pay very close attention to any change in the patient's respiratory status (cf. dyspnoea and arterial desaturation), which should be notified systematically to the haemovigilance contact person in the hospital. PMID:22897069

Van der Linden, P; Lambermont, M; Dierick, A; Hübner, R; Benoit, Y; De Backer, D; De Paep, R; Ferrant, A; Latinne, D; Muylle, L; Selleslag, D; Szabo, B; Thomas, I; Vandekerckhove, B; Deneys, V

2012-01-01

71

Plasma exchange for hemolytic crisis and acute liver failure in Wilson disease.  

PubMed

Wilson disease (WD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism which primarily involves the liver and the central nervous system. Rarely, WD can present as acute liver failure (ALF) and this disease is universally fatal in the absence of liver transplantation. The authors report a young girl with WD ALF, who showed signs of recovery after prompt initiation of plasma exchange (PE) and chelation therapy. Though liver transplantation could not be done in this child and the child died 8 d after stopping PE, this case highlights that PE can be a successful medical treatment in WD ALF and should be considered as a therapeutic measure to stabilize a patient by decreasing serum copper, reducing hemolysis, and helping to prevent renal tubular injury from copper and copper complexes until liver transplantation is possible. PMID:23494839

Verma, Nishant; Pai, Gautham; Hari, Pankaj; Lodha, Rakesh

2014-05-01

72

Immune Hemolytic Anemia--Selected Topics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is most often idiopathic. However, in recent years, AIHA has been noted with increased incidence in patients receiving purine nucleoside analogues for hematologic malig- nancies; it has also been described as a complication of blood transfusion in patients who have also had alloimmunization. As the technology of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has become more wide- spread,

P. C. Hoffman; Morie A. Gertz; Robert A. Brodsky

2006-01-01

73

A Computerized Prediction Model of Hazardous Inflammatory Platelet Transfusion Outcomes  

PubMed Central

Background Platelet component (PC) transfusion leads occasionally to inflammatory hazards. Certain BRMs that are secreted by the platelets themselves during storage may have some responsibility. Methodology/Principal Findings First, we identified non-stochastic arrangements of platelet-secreted BRMs in platelet components that led to acute transfusion reactions (ATRs). These data provide formal clinical evidence that platelets generate secretion profiles under both sterile activation and pathological conditions. We next aimed to predict the risk of hazardous outcomes by establishing statistical models based on the associations of BRMs within the incriminated platelet components and using decision trees. We investigated a large (n?=?65) series of ATRs after platelet component transfusions reported through a very homogenous system at one university hospital. Herein, we used a combination of clinical observations, ex vivo and in vitro investigations, and mathematical modeling systems. We calculated the statistical association of a large variety (n?=?17) of cytokines, chemokines, and physiologically likely factors with acute inflammatory potential in patients presenting with severe hazards. We then generated an accident prediction model that proved to be dependent on the level (amount) of a given cytokine-like platelet product within the indicated component, e.g., soluble CD40-ligand (>289.5 pg/109 platelets), or the presence of another secreted factor (IL-13, >0). We further modeled the risk of the patient presenting either a febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reaction or an atypical allergic transfusion reaction, depending on the amount of the chemokine MIP-1? (<20.4 or >20.4 pg/109 platelets, respectively). Conclusions/Significance This allows the modeling of a policy of risk prevention for severe inflammatory outcomes in PC transfusion.

Nguyen, Kim Anh; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Sebban, Marc; Fromont, Elisa; Chavarin, Patricia; Absi, Lena; Pozzetto, Bruno; Cognasse, Fabrice; Garraud, Olivier

2014-01-01

74

Diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury: TRALI or not TRALI?  

PubMed

TRALI is a challenging diagnosis for both the transfusion specialist and the clinician. A Canadian consensus panel has recently proposed guidelines to better define TRALI and its implications. The guidelines recommend classifying each suspected case in one of the following 3 categories: (1) "TRALI," (2) "Possible TRALI," or (3) "Not TRALI." We report the clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and management of 3 patients with respiratory failure (RF) following allogeneic blood transfusions. These patients all experienced RF within 6 hr post-transfusion. Based on a review of the clinical and laboratory data and applying the Canadian guidelines, the first patient, a 67-yr-old man with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, was diagnosed as "TRALI" due to the sudden onset of RF requiring intensive resuscitation. The second patient, a 55-yr-old man with aplastic anemia, was diagnosed as "Possible TRALI" due to pre-existing RF that worsened after blood transfusion. The third patient, a 1-yr-old male, was diagnosed as transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) and "Possible TRALI," although his RF improved after treatment with diuretics. In all 3 cases, the blood donor center was informed of the suspected TRALI reactions. The remaining blood products from the donors associated with these reactions were quarantined. After review of the clinical data, the donors associated with cases #1 and #3 were screened by the blood center for granulocyte and HLA antibodies. Using a Luminex flow bead array, the following class I and class II antibodies specific for patient #1 were identified in the respective donor: anti-A25, B8, B18, and anti-DR15, DR 17. Subsequently, donor #1 was permanently deferred. A non-specific IgM anti-granulocyte antibody was identified in the donor associated with case #3, and this donor was subsequently disqualified from plasma and platelet donations. In conclusion, the Canadian guidelines to categorize patients suspected of TRALI provide a useful framework for evaluation of these patients and their respective blood donors. PMID:16501237

Fontaine, Magali J; Malone, James; Mullins, Franklin M; Grumet, F Carl

2006-01-01

75

Erythropoiesis after Exchange Transfusion in Hemolytic Anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

maintaining the red cell mass at a functionally optimal size. Since the primary function of the red cell mass is to transport oxygen to the tissues, it is generally assumed that the control is triggered by the tissue tension of oxygen. Recent studies indicate that the oxygen tension in one target area, the kidney, is inversely proportional to the production

ALLAN J. ERSLEV; JOSEPH P. MCKENNA

1966-01-01

76

Phase II trial of standard versus increased transfusion volume in Ugandan children with acute severe anemia  

PubMed Central

Background Severe anemia (SA, hemoglobin <6 g/dl) is a leading cause of pediatric hospital admission in Africa, with significant in-hospital mortality. The underlying etiology is often infectious, but specific pathogens are rarely identified. Guidelines developed to encourage rational blood use recommend a standard volume of whole blood (20 ml/kg) for transfusion, but this is commonly associated with a frequent need for repeat transfusion and poor outcome. Evidence is lacking on what hemoglobin threshold criteria for intervention and volume are associated with the optimal survival outcomes. Methods We evaluated the safety and efficacy of a higher volume of whole blood (30 ml/kg; Tx30: n?=?78) against the standard volume (20 ml/kg; Tx20: n?=?82) in Ugandan children (median age 36 months (interquartile range (IQR) 13 to 53)) for 24-hour anemia correction (hemoglobin >6 g/dl: primary outcome) and 28-day survival. Results Median admission hemoglobin was 4.2 g/dl (IQR 3.1 to 4.9). Initial volume received followed the randomization strategy in 155 (97%) patients. By 24-hours, 70 (90%) children in the Tx30 arm had corrected SA compared to 61 (74%) in the Tx20 arm; cause-specific hazard ratio?=?1.54 (95% confidence interval 1.09 to 2.18, P?=?0.01). From admission to day 28 there was a greater hemoglobin increase from enrollment in Tx30 (global P <0.0001). Serious adverse events included one non-fatal allergic reaction and one death in the Tx30 arm. There were six deaths in the Tx20 arm (P?=?0.12); three deaths were adjudicated as possibly related to transfusion, but none secondary to volume overload. Conclusion A higher initial transfusion volume prescribed at hospital admission was safe and resulted in an accelerated hematological recovery in Ugandan children with SA. Future testing in a large, pragmatic clinical trial to establish the effect on short and longer-term survival is warranted. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.Gov identifier: NCT01461590 registered 26 October 2011. Please see related commentary article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/12/68/abstract.

2014-01-01

77

Red blood cell alloimmunization in sickle cell disease: pathophysiology, risk factors, and transfusion management  

PubMed Central

Red blood cell transfusions have reduced morbidity and mortality for patients with sickle cell disease. Transfusions can lead to erythrocyte alloimmunization, however, with serious complications for the patient including life-threatening delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions and difficulty in finding compatible units, which can cause transfusion delays. In this review, we discuss the risk factors associated with alloimmunization with emphasis on possible mechanisms that can trigger delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions in sickle cell disease, and we describe the challenges in transfusion management of these patients, including opportunities and emerging approaches for minimizing this life-threatening complication.

Ware, Russell E.

2012-01-01

78

Characterization of transfusion-elicited acute antibody-mediated rejection in a rat model of kidney transplantation.  

PubMed

Animal models of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) may provide important evidence supporting proof of concept. We elicited donor-specific antibodies (DSA) by transfusion of donor blood (Brown Norway RT1(n) ) into a complete mismatch recipient (Lewis RT1(l) ) 3 weeks prior to kidney transplantation. Sensitized recipients had increased anti-donor splenocyte IgG1, IgG2b and IgG2c DSA 1 week after transplantation. Histopathology was consistent with ABMR characterized by diffuse peritubular capillary C4d and moderate microvascular inflammation with peritubular capillaritis?+?glomerulitis?>?2. Immunofluorescence studies of kidney allograft tissue demonstrated a greater CD68/CD3 ratio in sensitized animals, primarily of the M1 (pro-inflammatory) phenotype, consistent with cytokine gene analyses that demonstrated a predominant T helper (TH )1 (interferon-?, IL-2) profile. Immunoblot analyses confirmed the activation of the M1 macrophage phenotype as interferon regulatory factor 5, inducible nitric oxide synthase and phagocytic NADPH oxidase 2 were significantly up-regulated. Clinical biopsy samples in sensitized patients with acute ABMR confirmed the dominance of M1 macrophage phenotype in humans. Despite the absence of tubulitis, we were unable to exclude the effects of T cell-mediated rejection. These studies suggest that M1 macrophages and TH 1 cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of acute mixed rejection in sensitized allograft recipients. PMID:24708533

Huang, G; Wilson, N A; Reese, S R; Jacobson, L M; Zhong, W; Djamali, A

2014-05-01

79

Alloimmunization Following Prophylactic Granulocyte Transfusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nineteen noninfected adults receiving ini- tial induction chemotherapy for acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) were ran- domized to receive either prophylactic granulocyte transfusion or platelet transfu- sion alone on an alternate-day schedule. An average of 11 granulocyte transfusions (range 3-19) were administered\\/patient with a mean dose of 11.5 x 1 0? granulo- cytes\\/transfusion. The groups were identi- cal with respect to

Charles A. Schiffer; Joseph Aisner; Peter A. Daly; Stephen C. Schimpif; Peter H. Wiernik

80

A Fatal Case of Severe Hemolytic Disease of Newborn Associated with Anti-Jkb  

PubMed Central

The Kidd blood group is clinically significant since the Jk antibodies can cause acute and delayed transfusion reactions as well as hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN). In general, HDN due to anti-Jkb incompatibility is rare and it usually displays mild clinical symptoms with a favorable prognosis. Yet, we apparently experienced the second case of HDN due to anti-Jkb with severe clinical symptoms and a fatal outcome. A female patient having the AB, Rh(D)-positive boodtype was admitted for jaundice on the fourth day after birth. At the time of admission, the patient was lethargic and exhibited high pitched crying. The laboratory data indicated a hemoglobin value of 11.4 mg/dL, a reticulocyte count of 14.9% and a total bilirubin of 46.1 mg/dL, a direct bilirubin of 1.1 mg/dL and a strong positive result (+++) on the direct Coomb's test. As a result of the identification of irregular antibody from the maternal serum, anti-Jkb was detected, which was also found in the eluate made from infant's blood. Despite the aggressive treatment with exchange transfusion and intensive phototherapy, the patient died of intractable seizure and acute renal failure on the fourth day of admission. Therefore, pediatricians should be aware of the clinical courses of hemolytic jaundice due to anti-Jkb, and they should be ready to treat this disease with active therapeutic interventions.

Kim, Won Duck

2006-01-01

81

Zinc-induced hemolytic anemia in a dog.  

PubMed

A dog ingested a zinc nut that was retained in the stomach and caused a life-threatening hemolytic crisis with renal, gastrointestinal, and hepatic dysfunction. The dog was stabilized by blood transfusion and was anesthetized, and the zinc nut was removed with a fiberoptic endoscope. With continued supportive care, the dog recovered. Metallic zinc is found in high concentrations in nuts, bolts, and pennies. Zinc toxicosis should be considered in cases of unexplained hemolytic anemia. PMID:3654320

Torrance, A G; Fulton, R B

1987-08-15

82

Transfusion malaria*  

PubMed Central

A global review of the problem of malaria accidentally transmitted by blood transfusion revealed that about 350 cases were reported during the period 1911-50 and 1756 during the period 1950-72. The great rise in the frequency of blood transfusions in medical practice and the increase of travel between countries in which malaria is absent and those where it is prevalent render transfusion malaria a problem of clinical and public health importance. Attention is drawn to the value of modern serological methods for the screening of blood donors.

Bruce-Chwatt, L. J.

1974-01-01

83

Thromboelastometry Based Early Goal-Directed Coagulation Management Reduces Blood Transfusion Requirements, Adverse Events, and Costs in Acute Type A Aortic Dissection: A Pilot Study  

PubMed Central

Background In aortic surgery bleeding complications can be fatal. Therefore, rotational thromboelastometry(ROTEM™)-based coagulation management was introduced. Methods After 5 cases of acute type A aortic dissection and aortic arch replacement had been treated based on ROTEM findings (ROTEM group; RG), 5 cases without ROTEM were matched as control group (CG). CG treatment was based on conventional tests and clinical findings. Blood component and coagulation factor requirements, ventilation time, duration of stay at intensive care unit (ICU), hospitalization, and thrombotic or bleeding incidents as well as transfusion-associated costs were compared. Results Administration of blood products and coagulation factor concentrates, ventilation time, ICU length of stay, and hospitalization tended to be lower in RG. Postoperative plasma transfusion (p = 0.038), recognized incidents (p = 0.048), and resulting costs on coagulation treatment (p = 0.049) were significantly reduced. Conclusion Our data suggest that ROTEM-based coagulation management can reduce transfusion requirements and corresponding costs in patients with aortic arch replacement. These data has to be confirmed by prospective randomized trials.

Hanke, Alexander A.; Herold, Ulf; Dirkmann, Daniel; Tsagakis, Konstantinos; Jakob, Heinz; Gorlinger, Klaus

2012-01-01

84

Transfusion reaction in a case with the rare Bombay blood group  

PubMed Central

Bombay phenotype is extremely rare in Caucasian with an incidence of 1 in 250,000. When individuals with the Bombay phenotype need blood transfusion, they can receive only autologous blood or blood from another Bombay blood group. Transfusing blood group O red cells to them can cause a fatal hemolytic transfusion reaction. In this study, we report a case with the rare Bombay blood group that was misdiagnosed as the O blood group and developed a hemolytic transfusion reaction. This highlights the importance of both forward and reverse typing in ABO blood grouping and standard cross-matching and performing standard pretransfusion laboratory tests in hospital blood banks.

Shahshahani, Hayedeh Javadzadeh; Vahidfar, Mohamad Reza; Khodaie, Seyed Ali

2013-01-01

85

[Immunoreaction and blood transfusion--chairmen's introductory remarks].  

PubMed

Although blood transfusion is an extremely important therapeutic procedure that usually proceeds without complications, there are some risks associated with donated blood. Investigations into the causes of transfusion reactions and their prevention are important issues for transfusion therapy. In addition to nucleic acid amplification testing (NAT) for infectious diseases and the irradiation of blood to prevent post-transfusion GVHD, prestorage leukocyte reduction and diversion of the first part of the donation of blood were recently introduced into transfusion therapy. This symposium, entitled "Immunoreaction and blood transfusion", reviewed the immune responses associated with blood transfusion, which is probably the most frequent medical procedure performed in allogeneic organ transplantation, with four themes provided by the four featured invited speakers: transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, transfusion-transmitted infectious disease surveillance, and transfusion-related immunomodulation. PMID:23947177

Kawabe, Tsutomu; Matsushita, Tadashi

2013-05-01

86

Types of Transfusions  

MedlinePLUS

... How blood transfusions are done Types of transfusions Red blood cell transfusions Red blood cell basics Red blood cells (RBCs) give ... causes the bone marrow to make more. When red blood cell transfusions are used Anemia People who ...

87

Suicidal death of erythrocytes in recurrent hemolytic uremic syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by hemolytic anemia with fragmented erythrocytes, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. Lack of complement inactivating factor H predisposes to the development of atypical HUS. Little is known about mechanisms linking complement activation with loss of erythrocyte integrity during HUS. Recent studies disclosed that increased cytosolic Ca2+ activity and cellular ceramide trigger programmed erythrocyte death

Philipp A. Lang; Ortraud Beringer; Jan P. Nicolay; Oliver Amon; Daniela S. Kempe; Tobias Hermle; Philipp Attanasio; Ahmad Akel; Richard Schäfer; Björn Friedrich; Teut Risler; Matthias Baur; Christoph J. Olbricht; Lothar Bernd Zimmerhackl; Peter F. Zipfel; Thomas Wieder; Florian Lang

2006-01-01

88

Antibody response to Shiga toxins in Argentinean children with enteropathic hemolytic uremic syndrome at acute and long-term follow-up periods.  

PubMed

Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infection is associated with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations that include diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Systemic Stx toxemia is considered to be central to the genesis of HUS. Distinct methods have been used to evaluate anti-Stx response for immunodiagnostic or epidemiological analysis of HUS cases. The development of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blot (WB) assay to detect the presence of specific antibodies to Stx has introduced important advantages for serodiagnosis of HUS. However, application of these methods for seroepidemiological studies in Argentina has been limited. The aim of this work was to develop an ELISA to detect antibodies against the B subunit of Stx2, and a WB to evaluate antibodies against both subunits of Stx2 and Stx1, in order to analyze the pertinence and effectiveness of these techniques in the Argentinean population. We studied 72 normal healthy children (NHC) and 105 HUS patients of the urban pediatric population from the surrounding area of Buenos Aires city. Using the WB method we detected 67% of plasma from NHC reactive for Stx2, but only 8% for Stx1. These results are in agreement with the broad circulation of Stx2-expressing STEC in Argentina and the endemic behavior of HUS in this country. Moreover, the simultaneous evaluation by the two methods allowed us to differentiate acute HUS patients from NHC with a great specificity and accuracy, in order to confirm the HUS etiology when pathogenic bacteria were not isolated from stools. PMID:21559455

Fernández-Brando, Romina J; Bentancor, Leticia V; Mejías, María Pilar; Ramos, María Victoria; Exeni, Andrea; Exeni, Claudia; Laso, María del Carmen; Exeni, Ramón; Isturiz, Martín A; Palermo, Marina S

2011-01-01

89

Blood Transfusions  

MedlinePLUS

... iron may build up in your body ( iron overload ). This can put your organs at risk. Iron overload can happen after as few as 10 red blood cell transfusions (20 units). Iron overload can be treated with iron chelators. Learn more ...

90

Pulmonary consequences of transfusion: TRALI and TACO.  

PubMed

Transfusion-related acute lung injury and transfusion-associated circulatory overload are important, life-threatening complications of transfusion. Each adversely impact hospital length of stay and cost of healthcare. TRALI is clinically indistinguishable from the adult respiratory distress syndrome but it has a more favorable prognosis. Approximately 10% of TRALI patients die from this complication. The at-risk patient for TRALI has not been identified. The most commonly cited incidence is 1:5000 plasma-containing blood component transfusions. Although several pathways may lead to TRALI, passive transfusion of leukocyte antibodies is currently the most important association. TACO occurs in 1-8% of patients undergoing hip or knee arthroplasty. It is precipitated by positive fluid balance and high transfusion flow rates. TACO is characterized by respiratory distress and acute pulmonary edema. PMID:16872902

Popovsky, Mark A

2006-06-01

91

Transfusion-related Plasmodium ovale malaria complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in a non-endemic country  

Microsoft Academic Search

46year old female presented with a one week history of high grade fever, chills, cough, and severe nausea. The patient had been admitted a month earlier with severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding from hemorrhoids necessitating transfusion of 7units of packed red blood cells. Initial work-up was unremarkable. Because of persistent symptoms, the patient was admitted 2days later. Malaria smear was positive.

Souha Haydoura; Ola Mazboudi; Khalil Charafeddine; Imad Bouakl; Tania A. Baban; Ali T. Taher; Souha S. Kanj

2011-01-01

92

The role of cytokines in blood transfusion reactions.  

PubMed

Recent advance in the understanding of the mechanism of hemolytic transfusion reactions results from the investigation of cytokine generation in in vitro models of incompatible red blood cell transfusion. Cytokines with pyrogenic and pro-inflammatory activities as well as cytokines with activating properties for granulocytes, monocytes and endothelial cells are produced in both 'intravascular' and 'extravascular' types of hemolytic reactions. It has also been demonstrated that cytokines are generated and accumulated in blood components such as platelet concentrates, during storage. A large part of febrile transfusion reactions results from transfusion of stored platelet concentrates containing high cytokine levels and not from antigen-antibody reactions. Prestorage removal of white blood cells, which generate cytokines during storage, from platelet concentrates reduces strongly the reaction incidence and should be standard practice. PMID:7580393

Muylle, L

1995-06-01

93

PRIMARY NONFAMILIAL HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

A LTHOUGH patients with hemolytic anemia are not numerous, they continue to be a problem of special interest and great difficulty. In the majority of cases the disease is of the familial or congenital type. The commonly accepted criteria for the diagnosis of congenital hemolytic anemia include the presence of a microsphero- cytic blood picture with an increase in signs

J. M. STICKNEY; FRANK J. HECK

94

Transfusion medicine  

SciTech Connect

These proceedings contain 24 selections, including papers presented at the conference of American Red Cross held in May 1985, on the Subject of transfusion medicine. Some of the titles are: Fluosol/sup R/-DA in Radiation Therapy; Expression of Cloned Human Factor VIII and the Molecular Basis of Gene Defects that Cause Hemophilia; DNA-Probing Assay in the Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Genome in Human Peripheral Blood Cells; and Monoclonal Antibodies: Convergence of Technology and Application.

Murawski, K.; Peetoom, F.

1986-01-01

95

[Pulmonary complications of transfusion (TACO-TRALI)].  

PubMed

Pulmonary oedemas occurring during or after a blood transfusion appear as the most frequent serious immediate incidents in the French hemovigilance database. They include transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). TACO are a major cause of transfusion-related death in France. TRALI are more and more recognized and notified. In no case, pooled fresh frozen plasma (100 donations) treated with solvent-detergent were involved in French TRALI cases. A logigrame will allow hemovigilance officers to better classify pulmonary oedemas in e-fit, the French hemovigilance database. PMID:19446484

Renaudier, P; Rebibo, D; Waller, C; Schlanger, S; Vo Mai, M-P; Ounnoughene, N; Breton, P; Cheze, S; Girard, A; Hauser, L; Legras, J-F; Saillol, A; Willaert, B; Caldani, C

2009-05-01

96

An unusual toxic cause of hemolytic-uremic syndrome.  

PubMed

Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) has been associated with a variety of infective as well as non-infective causes. HUS as a toxic manifestation of exposure to herbicides/pesticides has not been reported so far in literature. We report a subject who presented with clinical features of features of HUS after intentional suicidal ingestion of the herbicidal agent monochloroacetic acid (MCA). A 55-year-old farmer was admitted with a history of consumption of monochloroacetic acid with vomiting, hematochezia and oligo-anuria. Our investigations revealed severe renal failure, metabolic acidosis, anemia, and thrombocytopenia with evidence of intravascular hemolysis. He was treated for HUS with plasma transfusions and haemodialysis in view of renal failure. During the course of hospital admission he developed acute antero-septal myocardial infarction and subsequently succumbed to the disease. MCA is used as an herbicidal agent and also a bleaching agent for silkworm cocoons. The toxicity of MCA has included metabolic acidosis, rhabdomyolysis and renal failure; however HUS has not been described in the literature. Extra -renal manifestations of HUS such as cardiomyopathy have also been infrequently described. This case is presented to highlight an as yet unknown toxicity of MCA. PMID:17538244

Nayak, Shobhana G; Satish, Renuka; Gokulnath

2007-05-01

97

Progress Notes in Military Blood Banking. A Systematic Approach to Early Recognition and Treatment of Incompatible Blood Transfusion Injury.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A specific combination of procedures, including pasma hemoglobin determination and a direct Coombs' test, which bypass the original crossmatch tests and focus on the important question of whether a hemolytic transfusion reaction is occurring, is described...

F. R. Camp H. S. Kaplan N. F. Conte N. I. German R. M. Nalbandian

1971-01-01

98

Maternal Perception of Decreased Fetal Movement in One Twin: A Clue Leading to the Early Detection of Absent Variability due to Acute Twin-to-Twin Transfusion Syndrome.  

PubMed

Decreased fetal movement (DFM) perceived by pregnant women sometimes indicates imminent fetal jeopardy. It is unknown whether this also holds true for twin pregnancy. A 27-year-old primiparous woman with monochorionic diamniotic (MD) pregnancy had a slight difference of amniotic fluid volume at 31(2/7) weeks of gestation. DFM only in one twin at 31(4/7) weeks of gestation prompted her to receive urgent consultation. Since cardiotocogram indicated absent variability of one twin, we performed Cesarean section. Male infants weighing 2060?g and 1578?g were delivered; hemoglobin was 20.7 versus 10.8?g/dL, respectively; cardiothoracic ratio was 70% versus 44%, respectively, indicating acute twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS). The recipient infant had heart failure, which was still observed at 1 month postpartum. In conclusion, maternal perception of DFM indicated imminent fetal death or jeopardy caused by acute TTTS, suggesting that education regarding DFM for women with twin pregnancy may be clinically important. PMID:23984131

Suzuki, Hirotada; Kuwata, Tomoyuki; Ohkuchi, Akihide; Yada, Yukari; Matsubara, Shigeki; Suzuki, Mitsuaki

2013-01-01

99

Maternal Perception of Decreased Fetal Movement in One Twin: A Clue Leading to the Early Detection of Absent Variability due to Acute Twin-to-Twin Transfusion Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Decreased fetal movement (DFM) perceived by pregnant women sometimes indicates imminent fetal jeopardy. It is unknown whether this also holds true for twin pregnancy. A 27-year-old primiparous woman with monochorionic diamniotic (MD) pregnancy had a slight difference of amniotic fluid volume at 312/7 weeks of gestation. DFM only in one twin at 314/7 weeks of gestation prompted her to receive urgent consultation. Since cardiotocogram indicated absent variability of one twin, we performed Cesarean section. Male infants weighing 2060?g and 1578?g were delivered; hemoglobin was 20.7 versus 10.8?g/dL, respectively; cardiothoracic ratio was 70% versus 44%, respectively, indicating acute twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS). The recipient infant had heart failure, which was still observed at 1 month postpartum. In conclusion, maternal perception of DFM indicated imminent fetal death or jeopardy caused by acute TTTS, suggesting that education regarding DFM for women with twin pregnancy may be clinically important.

Suzuki, Hirotada; Kuwata, Tomoyuki; Ohkuchi, Akihide; Yada, Yukari; Matsubara, Shigeki; Suzuki, Mitsuaki

2013-01-01

100

Hemolytic uremic syndrome in an infant following Bordetella pertussis infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reported here is the case of a 6-week-old female infant with a severe Bordetella pertussis infection requiring supportive pressure-positive ventilation in the intensive care unit. After being discharged from the intensive care unit, she developed hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal failure, which suggested a diagnosis of hemolytic uremic syndrome. The clinical outcome was favorable with no renal consequences. This

I. Pela; D. Seracini; A. Caprioli; F. Castelletti; A. Giammanco

2006-01-01

101

Mechanisms of hemolytic anemia during experimental methemoglobinemias.  

PubMed

A complex study of the peripheral erythron component was performed during methemoglobinemias induced by single administration of sodium nitrate and phenylhydrazine in LD50. Administration of methemoglobin-forming agents to rats induced the development of hemolytic anemia. The pathogenesis of this disorder included significant long-term modifications of the erythrocyte membrane. The severity and duration of anemia syndrome depended on chemical structure of xenobiotics, blood methemoglobin level, and the duration of the acute period of methemoglobinemia. PMID:17415463

Novitskii, V V; Ryazantseva, N V; Shperling, I A; Filippova, O N; Rogov, O A

2006-11-01

102

Trends in trauma transfusion.  

PubMed

Trauma is the leading cause of death in young adults and acute blood loss contributes to a large portion of mortality in the early post-trauma period. The recognition of lethal triad of coagulopathy, hypothermia and acidosis has led to the concepts of damage control surgery and resuscitation. Recent experience with managing polytrauma victims from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars has led to a few significant changes in clinical practice. Simultaneously, transfusion practices in the civilian settings have also been extensively studied retrospectively and prospectively in the last decade. Early treatment of coagulopathy with a high ratio of fresh frozen plasma and platelets to packed red blood cells (FFP:platelet:RBC), prevention and early correction of hypothermia and acidosis, monitoring of hemostasis using point of care tests like thromoboelastometry, use of recombinant activated factor VII, antifibrinolytic drugs like tranexamic acid are just some of the emerging trends. Further studies, especially in the civilian trauma centers, are needed to confirm the lessons learned in the military environment. Identification of patients likely to need massive transfusion followed by immediate preventive and therapeutic interventions to prevent the development of coagulopathy could help in reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with uncontrolled hemorrhage in trauma patients. PMID:22096774

Bhananker, Sanjay M; Ramaiah, Ramesh

2011-01-01

103

Red blood cell transfusion in newborn infants.  

PubMed

Red blood cell transfusion is an important and frequent component of neonatal intensive care. The present position statement addresses the methods and indications for red blood cell transfusion of the newborn, based on a review of the current literature. The most frequent indications for blood transfusion in the newborn are the acute treatment of perinatal hemorrhagic shock and the recurrent correction of anemia of prematurity. Perinatal hemorrhagic shock requires immediate treatment with large quantities of red blood cells; the effects of massive transfusion on other blood components must be considered. Some guidelines are now available from clinical trials investigating transfusion in anemia of prematurity; however, considerable uncertainty remains. There is weak evidence that cognitive impairment may be more severe at follow-up in extremely low birth weight infants transfused at lower hemoglobin thresholds; therefore, these thresholds should be maintained by transfusion therapy. Although the risks of transfusion have declined considerably in recent years, they can be minimized further by carefully restricting neonatal blood sampling. PMID:24855419

Whyte, Robin K; Jefferies, Ann L

2014-04-01

104

[Risks and side effects of blood transfusion].  

PubMed

While transfusion of blood components is usually safe, there are risks of adverse effects that can have immunologic, nonimmunologic, or infectious causes. In patients, the fear of infectious disease transmission predominates, although the risk has been extremely low since the introduction of reliable serologic and molecular biological testing methods. This article addresses the incidence, clinical picture, and etiology of adverse effects of transfusion. It also reports on current knowledge concerning transfusion-associated acute lung injury, which has gained much attention in the last few years. Besides hepatitis and human immunodeficiency viruses, cytomegalovirus, parvovirus B19, prion transmission, and the risk of variant Creutzfeld-Jakob disease are also discussed. PMID:19756492

Fölsch, B; Cassens, U

2009-09-01

105

Audit of Transfusion Procedures in 660 Hospitals A College of American Pathologists Q-Probes Study of Patient Identification and Vital Sign Monitoring Frequencies in 16 494 Transfusions  

Microsoft Academic Search

c Context.—Hemolytic transfusion reactions are often the result of failure to follow established identification and monitoring procedures. Objective.—To measure the frequencies with which health care workers completed specific transfusion pro- cedures required for laboratory and blood bank accredi- tation. Design.—In 2 separate studies, participants in the Col- lege of American Pathologists Q-Probes laboratory quality improvement program audited nonemergent red blood

David A. Novis; Karen A. Miller; Peter J. Howanitz; Stephen W. Renner; Molly K. Walsh

106

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Six types of autoimmune hemolytic anemias have been described. Table 1 provides summary highlights for each type of AIHA.\\u000a WAIHA accounts for the majority of cases, followed by CAIHA and DIAHA. In recent years, AIHA status post-BMT has been noted\\u000a to occur more often than previously reported, particularly in T-cell-depleted graft recipients. The clinical presentation\\u000a is diverse among the various

Claire Hashimoto

1998-01-01

107

Hemolytic disease of the newborn due to anti-jkb: case report and review of the literature.  

PubMed

Although anti-Jkb is a well-defined cause of severe acute or delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions, it is rarely associated with severe Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn (HDN), even with high antibody titer. To date, only 13 cases have been reported, so the possible reasons for that still remain unclear. Most of HDN due to anti-Jkb are mild-to-moderate, and usually have a good prognosis. A 41-years-old woman, who had a positive antibody screening test in her 13th week of pregnancy, was sent to the blood bank for study before an amniocentesis. Antibody identification and red blood cell (RBC) phenotyping of the patient and his husband were performed, plus arrays study in the amniotic fluid. An anti-Jkb was identified in the patient's serum with a titer of 1:1, and her RBC phenotype was O Rh(D) positive, C(+), c(+), E(-), e(+), K(-), Jka(+), Jkb(-). The RBC genotype of the fetus was B Rh(D) positive, Jka(+), Jkb(+). Antibody titer remained stable and the pregnancy was uneventful. At birth, there was no need of phototherapy or exchange transfusion for the newborn and her Jk(b+) typing result was confirmed in a cord blood sample. Although most of HDN cases due to anti-Jkb have a good outcome, monitoring antibody titer should be done to prevent fatal complications. Furthermore, antenatal antibody screening should be performed in every pregnant woman irrespective of her Rh(D) antigen status in order to detect red cell alloimmunization to other clinically significant blood group antigens. PMID:24839369

Velasco Rodríguez, Diego; Pérez-Segura, G; Jiménez-Ubieto, A; Rodríguez, M A; Montejano, L

2014-06-01

108

Long-term course and mechanisms of progression of renal disease in hemolytic uremic syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Long-term course and mechanisms of progression of renal disease in hemolytic uremic syndrome. In the classic form of hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with toxins of gram-negative enterobacteria, mortality in the acute stage has been lower than 5% since 1978 (data from the Nephrology Committee, Argentine Society of Pediatrics). Children usually die because of severe involvement of the central nervous system,

Horatio A. Repetto

2005-01-01

109

Informed consent for blood transfusion: what do medicine residents tell? What do patients understand?  

PubMed

Blood transfusion is a common intervention in the hospital setting, and its benefits may not be clear but it has associated risks. Despite this, transfusion consent may not be obtained satisfactorily. We assessed transfusion consent effectiveness by comparing information given by residents with information understood by patients who receive transfusions. Medicine department residents who obtained consent were surveyed via telephone in conjunction with bedside surveys of adult inpatients who received transfusions. A total of 43 patient and 34 resident surveys were completed. Deficiencies in the transfusion consent process were noted. Discussed transfusion benefits (such as wound healing) were not always true benefits whereas some important risks (such as transfusion-related acute lung injury) were infrequently conferred. Risks were more often reported as "not discussed" than benefits. Only a few participants were aware of the hospital's Transfusion Health Guide, which provides information on transfusion benefits, risks, and alternatives. PMID:23010711

Friedman, Mark; Arja, Wajih; Batra, Rashmi; Daniel, Sugganth; Hoehn, Daniela; Paniz, Alberto Mondolfi; Selegean, Sorin; Slova, Denisa; Srivastava, Swati; Vergara, Norge

2012-10-01

110

Hemolytic anemia and metastatic carcinoma: case report and literature review.  

PubMed

Hemolytic anemia can complicate the development of a variety of solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Although patients may have an established diagnosis with documented metastases, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) can be a presenting feature of an occult malignancy. Prompt diagnosis is essential because conditions that mimic the symptoms of MAHA, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, have different prognoses and therapeutic options. Although the exact pathogenesis is not yet delineated, we present herein a case of cancer-associated MAHA and discuss the known pathways that can contribute to the initiation and propagation of hemolytic anemia in patients with cancer. The patient is a 69-year-old woman with breast carcinoma that had metastasized to her rectum, urinary bladder, and brain. She eventually developed progressive decline in her functional status, with intermittent epistaxis and melena. The results of laboratory studies revealed hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia; results of a bone-marrow biopsy confirmed the involvement by metastatic carcinoma. The patient received red blood cell and platelet transfusions and was discharged to hospice care after clinical stabilization. She died soon thereafter. PMID:24868993

Pendse, Avani A; Edgerly, Claire H; Fedoriw, Yuri

2014-01-01

111

Optimizing platelet transfusion therapy.  

PubMed

Platelet transfusions are widely used. Prophylactic transfusions are employed in severely thrombocytopenic patients without evidence of bleeding, but no randomized trial data prove the safety or efficacy of this approach. Randomized trials have demonstrated the equivalence of transfusion triggers of 10,000 and 20,000/microl for prophylactic transfusions. The former threshold is potentially safer for the patient, conservative of donor resources and leads to lower costs, with perhaps a slightly greater risk of minor hemorrhage. Randomized trials have demonstrated the equivalence of pheresis or whole blood-derived platelet transfusions. The former present a lower risk for infectious agents, and the latter are less expensive and a more efficient use of limited donor resources. Randomized trials prove that leukoreduced and ABO identical platelet transfusions reduce the risks of HLA alloimmunization and platelet transfusion refractoriness (both leukoreduction and ABO matching), transfusion reactions (leukoreduction) and CMV transmission (leukoreduction). Leukoreduction and ABO matching of platelet transfusions also have been associated in preliminary observational studies with reduced morbidity and mortality in surgical patients and reduced infections in patients with leukemia. These results require further investigation. Future challenges include (1) determining the best approach to bacterial contamination of platelets, whether by detection methods or pathogen inactivation and (2) determining the threshold for prophylactic platelet transfusions in thrombocytopenic patients undergoing surgery or invasive procedures. PMID:15183900

Heal, Joanna Mary; Blumberg, Neil

2004-09-01

112

Effects of large dosages of amoxicillin/clavulanate or azithromycin on nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, nonpneumococcal alpha-hemolytic streptococci, and Staphylococcus aureus in children with acute otitis media.  

PubMed

Prior use of antibiotics is associated with carriage of resistant bacteria. Colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, nonpneumococcal alpha-hemolytic streptococci (NPAHS), and Staphylococcus aureus was evaluated in children receiving antibiotic therapy for acute otitis media and in untreated, healthy control subjects. Children were randomly assigned to receive either amoxicillin/clavulanate (90 mg/kg per day) or azithromycin. Swabs were obtained before initiating therapy and again 2 weeks and 2 months after initiating therapy. We also obtained swabs from control subjects at the time of enrollment and 2 weeks and 2 months after enrollment. The decrease in the rate of carriage of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae at 2 weeks was significant only in the amoxicillin/clavulanate group (P<.001 and P=.005, respectively). The rate of nasopharyngeal colonization with NPAHS among treated patients increased from 23% to 39% at 2 months (P=.01). This increase was similar for both treatment groups. These results suggest that the competitive balance between organisms is altered by antibiotic therapy. PMID:11981724

Ghaffar, Faryal; Muniz, Luz Stella; Katz, Kathy; Smith, Jeanette L; Shouse, Theresa; Davis, Phyllis; McCracken, George H

2002-05-15

113

A case of recurrent autoimmune hemolytic anemia during remission associated with acute pure red cell aplasia and hemophagocytic syndrome due to human parvovirus B19 infection successfully treated by steroid pulse therapy with a review of the literature  

PubMed Central

The patient was a 47-year-old man diagnosed as having autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in April 2011. He also had a congenital chromosomal abnormality, a balanced translocation. Treatment with prednisolone (PSL) 60 mg/day resulted in resolution of the AIHA, and the treatment was completed in November 2011. While the patient no longer had anemia, the direct and indirect Coombs tests remained positive. In May 2013, he developed recurrent AIHA associated with acute pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) caused by human parvovirus B19 (HPV B19) infection. Tests for anti-erythropoietin and anti-erythropoietin receptor antibodies were positive. Steroid pulse therapy resulted in resolution of the AIHA, PRCA, as well as HPS. The serum test for anti-erythropoietin antibodies also became negative after the treatment. However, although the serum was positive for anti-HPV B19 IgG antibodies, the patient continued to have a low CD4 lymphocyte count (CD4, <300/?L) and persistent HPV B19 infection (HPV B19 DNA remained positive), suggesting the risk of recurrence and bone marrow failure.

Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Shimada, Asami; Imai, Hidenori; Wakabayashi, Mutsumi; Sugimoto, Keiji; Nakamura, Noriko; Sawada, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Norio; Noguchi, Masaaki

2014-01-01

114

Myocardial Infarction and Transfusion Requirements in Transfusion Dependent Anemic Patients.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The influence of myocardial infarction (MI) on the transfusion requirements of transfusion dependent patients has not been previously studied. We studied thirty frequently transfused patients on long-term hemodialysis and a similar number of age and sex m...

J. P. Crowley C. R. Valeri J. Chazan

1990-01-01

115

[Post-transfusion pulmonary oedema: the French hemovigilance network classification method].  

PubMed

Pulmonary oedema after transfusion of blood products may be hydrostatic (transfusion-associated circulatory overload [taco]) or exsudative (transfusion-related acute lung injury [trali]). Both conditions have been recognized as major hazards to transfusion recipients. Risk characterization is necessary to improve safety and to monitor trends in the national blood transfusion system. A collaborative multidisciplinary working group of the French National Hemovigilance Committee has proposed an analysis framework for case definitions and classification. The method relies on internationally used definitions and is adapted to the codification procedures used in the french transfusion incident reports electronic data management. PMID:21051260

Ozier, Y; Renaudier, P; Caldani, C; Aguilon, P; Canivet, N; Fabrigli, P; Mertes, P-M; Muller, J-Y; Rebibo, D; Tazerout, M; Trophilme, C; Willaert, B; Carlier, M

2010-12-01

116

[A case of Rh-incompatible transfusion in critical hemorrhage].  

PubMed

A 66-year-old man was injured in the traffic accident and showed the signs of hemorrhagic shock. His blood type was Rh negative O. As excessive bleeding was going on, we decided to transfuse 8 units of Rh-incompatible type O red blood cell (RBC) without performing cross match test according to the guideline for treatment of critical bleeding. Though we were aware of the risks of that treatment, no hemolytic reaction nor any other side effect was observed during and after the transfusion. Anti-Rh antibody was not developed either while Anti-Rh immunoglobulin was not given to him. His blood type has been proved to be Del type red blood cell. We conclude that transfusion of Rh-incompatible blood in patient with critical hemorrhage should be encouraged to save life. PMID:22571127

Bessho, Yukiko; Sugai, Katsuhei; Fuse, Akihisa; Hitomi, Eiji; Sugai, Yoriko

2012-03-01

117

Pulmonary Hemorrhage Complicating a Typical Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a case of pulmonary bleeding and subsequent acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in a 20-month-old female suffering from a typical postdiarrheal hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). Acute renal failure was treated early by peritoneal dialysis. It is of interest to underline that thrombocytopenia or any coagulative impairment was absent when this complication occurred, and spontaneous diuresis recovery was ongoing. All

M. Piastra; A. Ruggiero; A. Langer; E. Caresta; A. Chiaretti; S. Pulitanò; G. Polidori; R. Riccardi

2004-01-01

118

Transfusion medicine and safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advances in safety of blood transfusion in clinical practice principally relate to preventing transfusion-transmitted infections (TTI). Epidemiological studies of TTI have resulted in the development, standardization, and implementation of an expanding array of immunoassays employed worldwide in routine screening of blood donated by voluntary blood donors. Exclusion of infected blood and their donors has remarkably reduced the risk of transmitting

Roger Dodd; W. Kurt Roth; Paul Ashford; Elizabeth M. Dax; Girish Vyas

2009-01-01

119

High-dose intravenous immune globulin therapy for hyperbilirubinemia caused by Rh hemolytic disease.  

PubMed

We conducted a multicenter controlled trial to test the hypothesis that high-dose intravenous immune globulin (HDivIG) therapy can modulate bilirubin production and reduce the frequency of exchange transfusions in newborn infants with Rh hemolytic disease. Thirty-four patients with Rh incompatibility proved by positive direct antiglobulin test (Coombs test) results were randomly assigned to receive conventional treatment including phototherapy, with or without additional HDivIG therapy at 500 mg/kg given for a 2-hour period as soon as the diagnosis was established. Exchange transfusions were performed if serum bilirubin concentrations exceeded the modified curves of Polácek by more than 2 mg/dl. Two patients were excluded because of protocol violations. The results in 32 infants were analyzed. In the HDivIG group, 2 (12.5%) of 16 children required exchange transfusions, whereas it became necessary in 11 (69%) of 16 children in the control group (p less than 0.005). Bilirubin levels in the HDivIG group were lower despite reduced frequency of exchange transfusions. No side effects of HDivIG treatment were observed. We conclude that HDivIG therapy by a yet unknown mechanism reduces serum bilirubin levels and the need for blood exchange transfusions in children with Rh hemolytic disease. PMID:1306646

Rübo, J; Albrecht, K; Lasch, P; Laufkötter, E; Leititis, J; Marsan, D; Niemeyer, B; Roesler, J; Roll, C; Roth, B

1992-07-01

120

Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome  

PubMed Central

Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is defined by the triad of mechanical hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal impairment. Atypical HUS (aHUS) defines non Shiga-toxin-HUS and even if some authors include secondary aHUS due to Streptococcus pneumoniae or other causes, aHUS designates a primary disease due to a disorder in complement alternative pathway regulation. Atypical HUS represents 5 -10% of HUS in children, but the majority of HUS in adults. The incidence of complement-aHUS is not known precisely. However, more than 1000 aHUS patients investigated for complement abnormalities have been reported. Onset is from the neonatal period to the adult age. Most patients present with hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal failure and 20% have extra renal manifestations. Two to 10% die and one third progress to end-stage renal failure at first episode. Half of patients have relapses. Mutations in the genes encoding complement regulatory proteins factor H, membrane cofactor protein (MCP), factor I or thrombomodulin have been demonstrated in 20-30%, 5-15%, 4-10% and 3-5% of patients respectively, and mutations in the genes of C3 convertase proteins, C3 and factor B, in 2-10% and 1-4%. In addition, 6-10% of patients have anti-factor H antibodies. Diagnosis of aHUS relies on 1) No associated disease 2) No criteria for Shigatoxin-HUS (stool culture and PCR for Shiga-toxins; serology for anti-lipopolysaccharides antibodies) 3) No criteria for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (serum ADAMTS 13 activity > 10%). Investigation of the complement system is required (C3, C4, factor H and factor I plasma concentration, MCP expression on leukocytes and anti-factor H antibodies; genetic screening to identify risk factors). The disease is familial in approximately 20% of pedigrees, with an autosomal recessive or dominant mode of transmission. As penetrance of the disease is 50%, genetic counseling is difficult. Plasmatherapy has been first line treatment until presently, without unquestionable demonstration of efficiency. There is a high risk of post-transplant recurrence, except in MCP-HUS. Case reports and two phase II trials show an impressive efficacy of the complement C5 blocker eculizumab, suggesting it will be the next standard of care. Except for patients treated by intensive plasmatherapy or eculizumab, the worst prognosis is in factor H-HUS, as mortality can reach 20% and 50% of survivors do not recover renal function. Half of factor I-HUS progress to end-stage renal failure. Conversely, most patients with MCP-HUS have preserved renal function. Anti-factor H antibodies-HUS has favourable outcome if treated early.

2011-01-01

121

Platelet transfusion: basic aspects.  

PubMed

Platelet transfusions have been shown to prevent major haemorrhage and improve survival in thrombocytopenic patients. Since then, advances in the preparation of platelet components, including the introduction of pathogen reduction techniques, have been achieved. The number of transfused platelet components is still growing owing to the increasing number of patients treated for haemato-oncological diseases. Additionally, indications have been extended, for example to patients with drug-induced platelet dysfunction. This review focuses on current platelet component production and storage techniques, including pathogen reduction, indications for platelet transfusion and safety issues including alloimmunisation and management of platelet refractoriness. PMID:24338781

Holbro, Andreas; Infanti, Laura; Sigle, Jörg; Buser, Andreas

2013-01-01

122

[Hemolytic disease of the newborn due to anti-S-antibodies].  

PubMed

In the serum of S-negative secundi para woman a specific anti-S agglutinin of the IgG type was identified. The same agglutinin was identified in the serum and on the eritrocytes of the newborn with sympthomes of a light Hemolytic disease. Exchange transfusion was not necessary. The anti-S described is an immune warm agglutinin showing the efect of dose and is discovered only by the Coombs technique. PMID:411482

Gligorovi?, V N; Gligorovi?, S; Veselinovi?, I; Milosevi?, M

1977-01-01

123

Transfusion-transmitted infections  

PubMed Central

Although the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections today is lower than ever, the supply of safe blood products remains subject to contamination with known and yet to be identified human pathogens. Only continuous improvement and implementation of donor selection, sensitive screening tests and effective inactivation procedures can ensure the elimination, or at least reduction, of the risk of acquiring transfusion transmitted infections. In addition, ongoing education and up-to-date information regarding infectious agents that are potentially transmitted via blood components is necessary to promote the reporting of adverse events, an important component of transfusion transmitted disease surveillance. Thus, the collaboration of all parties involved in transfusion medicine, including national haemovigilance systems, is crucial for protecting a secure blood product supply from known and emerging blood-borne pathogens.

Bihl, Florian; Castelli, Damiano; Marincola, Francesco; Dodd, Roger Y; Brander, Christian

2007-01-01

124

Blood Transfusion and Donation  

MedlinePLUS

... Red blood cells - cells that carry oxygen to and from tissues and organs Platelets - cells that form clots to control ... agents, such as HIV, can survive in blood and infect the person receiving the blood transfusion. To ...

125

Truth about Transfusions  

MedlinePLUS

... call the place that collects it the blood bank . Get it? A bank is a safe place for money and other ... a blood transfusion. After blood is collected, blood banks test it very carefully to make sure the ...

126

Transfusion Medicine: Historical Overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Although blood transfusions had been given already in the 17th century, it was not until Karl Landsteiner had discovered the\\u000a blood groups in 1900–1901 that a reasonably safe transfer of blood from one person to another could be performed. The second\\u000a important part in the foundation of transfusion medicine was the finding that citrate was a potent inhibitor of blood

C. F. Högman

127

STUDY OF TRANSFUSED BLOOD  

PubMed Central

Group IV transfused blood in a recipient of unlike group is eliminated by a blood-destroying activity of the body. This blood-destroying activity is periodic both in men and women, and in women coincident with menstruation. The elimination of the transfused blood probably takes place as part of a period of blood-destroying and blood-producing activity of the body, although direct evidence to this effect is so far lacking.

Ashby, Winifred

1921-01-01

128

[Transfusion and sickle cell disease: axes of transfusion safety optimization].  

PubMed

Transfusion remains a major treatment in sickle cell disease. In France, sickle cell disease patients are mainly from Sub-Saharan Africa and West Indies. The immuno-hematological characteristics of these patients of African ancestry induce a short supply of compatible packed red blood cells and an increased rate of haemolytic transfusion reactions, compared to the general transfused population. The optimization of transfusion safety relies on all steps of the transfusion chain. This article aims to describe the current situation in France and to determine the axes of optimization at all steps of the transfusion organization: promotion of donation, preparation of products, taking into account the sickle trait, qualification of packed red blood cells, supply of the blood banks concerned by transfusion of these patients, transfusion protocols and pre transfusion analysis. Research and formation play an important part. PMID:24811565

Noizat-Pirenne, F

2014-05-01

129

The prevention of transfusion-associated circulatory overload.  

PubMed

Transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) is an important and potentially injurious complication of transfusion that is underappreciated by clinicians. Risk factors for TACO include being at an extreme of age, having preexisting cardiac and/or (potentially) renal dysfunction, acute myocardial infarction, and individuals receiving plasma. Keys to preventing TACO, aside from identifying high-risk individuals, should be multifaceted. We advocate for the widespread use of pretransfusion checklists and implementation of nonemergent transfusion protocols. We suggest the regular use of pretransfusion diuretics in high-risk individuals. When a transfusion is required, we believe that "critical" nursing supervision and leadership are instrumental in the coordination of slow transfusion rates on computerized infusion pumps and ensuring patients are appropriately monitored. We believe that using these methodologies on a global scale will prevent many TACO events and minimize the severity when it does occur. PMID:23465703

Alam, Asim; Lin, Yulia; Lima, Ana; Hansen, Mark; Callum, Jeannie L

2013-04-01

130

Measuring bleeding as an outcome in clinical trials of prophylactic platelet transfusions.  

PubMed

A 12-year-old girl with acute myeloid leukemia has completed her third cycle of chemotherapy and is in the hospital awaiting count recovery. Her platelet count today is 15 000 and, based on your institution's protocol, she should receive a prophylactic platelet transfusion. She has a history of allergic reactions to platelet transfusions and currently has no bleeding symptoms. The patient's mother questions the necessity of today's transfusion and asks what her daughter's risk of bleeding would be if the count is allowed to decrease lower before transfusing. You perform a literature search regarding the risk of bleeding with differing regimens for prophylactic platelet transfusions. PMID:23233575

Bercovitz, Rachel S; O'Brien, Sarah H

2012-01-01

131

Pulmonary hypertension in hemolytic anemias  

PubMed Central

Pulmonary hypertension (PH) has been reported with nearly all forms of the inherited as well as the acquired hemolytic anemias. Recent research investigating the pathophysiology of PH in sickle cell disease and thalassemia has helped elucidate the central role of hemolysis-mediated endothelial dysfunction in the development of PH in these populations. Although the most appropriate treatment of PH in patients with hemolytic anemia is not clearly defined, the associated significant increased risk of death underscores the need for randomized clinical trials in this area.

Vichinsky, Elliott

2010-01-01

132

Biochemical changes during exchange transfusion in hyperbilirubinemia in term newborn babies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Double volume (170 ml\\/kg body weight) exchange transfusion was done in 52 term infants in the first week of life for neonatal\\u000a hyperbilirubinemia. The M:F ratio was 1.08:1 and 37 (71.1%) babies were of low birth weight. Causes of jaundice were hemolytic\\u000a in 46.2% and non-hemolytic in 41.3% cases; in 13.5% babies no cause of jaundice could be found. After

Amit Jain; D. Puri; M. M. A. Faridi

1997-01-01

133

Alternatives to blood transfusion.  

PubMed

The use of alternatives to allogeneic blood continues to rest on the principles that blood transfusions have inherent risks, associated costs, and affect the blood inventory available for health-care delivery. Increasing evidence exists of a fall in the use of blood because of associated costs and adverse outcomes, and suggests that the challenge for the use of alternatives to blood components will similarly be driven by costs and patient outcomes. Additionally, the risk-benefit profiles of alternatives to blood transfusion such as autologous blood procurement, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, and haemostatic agents are under investigation. Nevertheless, the inherent risks of blood, along with the continued rise in blood costs are likely to favour the continued development and use of alternatives to blood transfusion. We summarise the current roles of alternatives to blood in the management of medical and surgical anaemias. PMID:23706802

Spahn, Donat R; Goodnough, Lawrence T

2013-05-25

134

Pulmonary Hypertension in Hemolytic Disorders  

PubMed Central

The inherited hemoglobin disorders sickle cell disease and thalassemia are the most common monogenetic disorders worldwide. Pulmonary hypertension is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in adult patients with sickle cell disease and thalassemia, and hemolytic disorders are potentially among the most common causes of pulmonary hypertension. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension in hemolytic disorders is likely multifactorial, including hemolysis, impaired nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, chronic hypoxemia, chronic thromboembolic disease, chronic liver disease, and asplenia. In contrast to patients with traditional forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension, patients with hemolytic disorders have a mild-to-moderate degree of elevation in mean pulmonary pressures, with mild elevations in pulmonary vascular resistance. The hemodynamic etiology of pulmonary hypertension in these patients is multifactorial and includes pulmonary arterial hypertension, pulmonary venous hypertension, and pulmonary hypertension secondary to a hyperdynamic state. Currently, there are limited data on the effects of any specific treatment modality for pulmonary hypertension in patients with hemolytic disorders. It is likely that maximization of treatment of the primary hemoglobinopathy in all patients and treatment with selective pulmonary vasodilators and antiproliferative agents in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension would be beneficial. However, there is still a major need for large multinational trials of novel therapies for this patient population.

Gladwin, Mark T.

2010-01-01

135

Treatment and outcome of Shiga-toxin-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is the most common cause of acute renal failure in childhood and the reason for chronic renal\\u000a replacement therapy. It leads to significant morbidity and mortality during the acute phase. In addition to acute morbidity\\u000a and mortality, long-term renal and extrarenal complications can occur in a substantial number of children years after the\\u000a acute episode of

Johanna Scheiring; Sharon P. Andreoli; Lothar Bernd Zimmerhackl

2008-01-01

136

Recovery of residual curarization after red blood cell transfusion  

PubMed Central

Summary Background The muscle-relaxing effects of succinylcholine are terminated via hydrolysis by plasma cholinesterase. There are multiple genetic variants of this enzyme and clinical circumstances that might influence the activity of plasma cholinesterase and eventually lead to prolonged neuromuscular blockade following succinylcholine application. Case Report Here, we report a parturient woman with atonic bleeding who suffered significant blood loss (hemoglobin 6.0 g·dL?1). For surgical curettage, general anesthesia was performed by using short-acting succinylcholine. By the end of the 105-minute procedure, the patient’s trachea was extubated. After extubation she showed signs of the prolonged neuromuscular blocking action of succinylcholine. At this time, the patient received an AB0-compatible red blood cell transfusion and recovered instantly from neuromuscular blockade. The plasma cholinesterase (3.200 U·L?1) was below the normal range (4.900–12.000 U·L?1). Patient’s blood DNA analysis revealed heterozygously the genetic K variant of plasma cholinesterase. After red blood cell transfusion, serum potassium was elevated (5.7 mmol·L?1; 4.4 mmol·L?1 prior to transfusion). Conclusions Pregnancy, blood loss and genetic variation contributed to impairment of plasma cholinesterase. Due to high-speed red blood cell transfusion, hemolytic release of erythrocyte cholinesterase might have terminated the neuromuscular blocking succinylcholine effect.

Eckle, Veit-Simon; Schmid, Eckhard; Fehm, Tanja; Grasshoff, Christian

2012-01-01

137

[Blood transfusion and inflammation].  

PubMed

Transfusion of labile blood products (LBPs) generates occasional inflammatory : type, hazards; for a large part of these, no antigen/antibody conflict is thus, detected. Residual leucocytes used to account for a large part of such incidents - rarely accidents. Since, however, the systematic leukoreduction of LBPs, leucocytes are the less and less incriminated in adverse events. Platelets themselves proved capable of secreting copious amounts of inflammatory mediators, even in the absence of any deliberated stimulation. Meanwhile, even though exceptionally, inflammation can be observed after red blood cell transfusion. It has been noticed that the collection mode of cellular compounds, as well as the preparation and storage conditions are capable of inflicting lesions to the cell membranes and to activate those cells, and thus promoting inflammatory responses. Storage lesions as well as ageing of the stored cells alongside with cell apoptosis contribute to inflammatory responses. This present 'State of the Art' paper aims at encompassing the primary and secondary components of the LBPs, along with the various types of molecules displaying pro-inflammatory properties that can be encountered in transfusion. A better knowledge of causes of inflammatory transfusion-linked hazards is indeed instrumental to the implementation of safety measures aimed at reducing or suppressing these unwanted effects. PMID:23587611

Garraud, O; Cognasse, F; Hamzeh-Cognasse, H; Laradi, S; Pozzetto, B; Muller, J-Y

2013-05-01

138

Crystalloid to Packed Red Blood Cell Transfusion Ratio in the Massively Transfused Patient: When A Little Goes Along Way  

PubMed Central

Objective Massive transfusion protocols have emphasized the importance of ratio-based transfusion of plasma and platelets relative to packed red blood cells (PRBCs), however the risks attributable to crystalloid resuscitation in patients requiring massive transfusion remain largely unexplored. We hypothesized that an increased crystalloid:PRBC (C:PRBC) ratio would be associated with increased morbidity and poor outcome following massive transfusion. Methods Data were obtained from a multi-center prospective cohort study evaluating outcomes in blunt injured adults with hemorrhagic shock. Patients requiring massive transfusion (?10u PRBCs in first 24hrs) were analyzed. The C:PRBC ratio was computed by the ratio of crystalloid infused in liters (L) to the units of PRBCs transfused in the first 24hrs post-injury. Logistic regression modeling was used to characterize the independent risks associated with the 24hr C:PRBC ratio, after controlling for important confounders and other blood component transfusion requirements. Results Logistic regression revealed that the 24hr C:PRBC ratio was significantly associated with a greater independent risk of MOF, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). No association with mortality or nosocomial infection was found. A dose response analysis revealed patients with a C:PRBC ratio >1.5:1, had over a 70% higher independent risk of MOF, and over a 2-fold higher risk of ARDS and ACS. Conclusion In patients requiring massive transfusion, crystalloid resuscitation in a ratio greater than 1.5:1 per unit of PRBCs transfused was independently associated with a higher risk of MOF, ARDS, and ACS. These results suggest overly aggressive crystalloid resuscitation should be minimized in these severely injured patients. Further research is required to determine if incorporation of the C:PRBC ratio into massive transfusion protocols improves outcome.

Neal, Matthew D.; Hoffman, Marcus K.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Minei, Joseph P.; Maier, Ronald V.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Peitzman, Andrew B.; Moore, Ernest E.; Cohen, Mitchell J.; Sperry, Jason L.

2011-01-01

139

Geoepidemiology of autoimmune hemolytic anemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Autoantibodies against red blood cell antigens are considered the diagnostic hallmark of AIHA: Direct antiglobulin test (DAT) completed by cytofluorometry and specific diagnostic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) allow for a better understanding of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) triggers. Once B-cell tolerance checkpoints are bypassed, the patient loses self-tolerance, if the AIHA is not also caused by an possible variety of secondary

Jean-Francois Lambert; Urs E. Nydegger

2010-01-01

140

Megadose Methylprednisolone (MDMP) Treatment in a Patient with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA) Resistant to Conventional Corticosteroid Administration: A Case Report.  

PubMed

A female in the Netherlands with severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) was treated with conventional corticosteroid (2 mg/kg/d in divided doses) and blood transfusions for 18 months without improvement. The presented patient responded to megadose methylprednisolone (MDMP) 30 mg/kg/d for 3 d, followed by 20 mg/kg for 4 d, and subsequently 10, 5, 2, and 1 mg/kg/d each for 1 week. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24385786

Ozsoylu, Sinasi; Berenschot, Henriette Wa

2013-06-01

141

Transfusion associated circulatory overload  

PubMed Central

Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) is an established, but grossly under diagnosed and underreported complication of blood transfusion. We present the case of a 46-year-old diabetic and hypertensive patient admitted to our hospital for recurrent episodes of urinary retention. Over initial 3 days of the admission, the patient received multiple units of packed red blood cells (RBC) and fresh frozen plasma, uneventfully. However, the patient developed signs and symptoms suggestive of TACO with only small amount of the 4th unit of RBC. The patient had to be shifted to the Intensive Care Unit for further management of this complication. Etiology of TACO is more complex than a mere circulatory overload and is still not completely understood. TACO leads to a prolonged hospital stay and morbidity in the patients developing this complication. TACO thus needs to be suspected in patients at risk for this complication.

Agnihotri, Naveen; Agnihotri, Ajju

2014-01-01

142

Transfusion associated circulatory overload.  

PubMed

Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) is an established, but grossly under diagnosed and underreported complication of blood transfusion. We present the case of a 46-year-old diabetic and hypertensive patient admitted to our hospital for recurrent episodes of urinary retention. Over initial 3 days of the admission, the patient received multiple units of packed red blood cells (RBC) and fresh frozen plasma, uneventfully. However, the patient developed signs and symptoms suggestive of TACO with only small amount of the 4(th) unit of RBC. The patient had to be shifted to the Intensive Care Unit for further management of this complication. Etiology of TACO is more complex than a mere circulatory overload and is still not completely understood. TACO leads to a prolonged hospital stay and morbidity in the patients developing this complication. TACO thus needs to be suspected in patients at risk for this complication. PMID:24987240

Agnihotri, Naveen; Agnihotri, Ajju

2014-06-01

143

Humanized mouse model of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency for in vivo assessment of hemolytic toxicity  

PubMed Central

Individuals with glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency are at risk for the development of hemolytic anemia when given 8-aminoquinolines (8-AQs), an important class of antimalarial/antiinfective therapeutics. However, there is no suitable animal model that can predict the clinical hemolytic potential of drugs. We developed and validated a human (hu)RBC-SCID mouse model by giving nonobese diabetic/SCID mice daily transfusions of huRBCs from G6PD-deficient donors. Treatment of SCID mice engrafted with G6PD-deficient huRBCs with primaquine, an 8-AQ, resulted in a dose-dependent selective loss of huRBCs. To validate the specificity of this model, we tested known nonhemolytic antimalarial drugs: mefloquine, chloroquine, doxycycline, and pyrimethamine. No significant loss of G6PD-deficient huRBCs was observed. Treatment with drugs known to cause hemolytic toxicity (pamaquine, sitamaquine, tafenoquine, and dapsone) resulted in loss of G6PD-deficient huRBCs comparable to primaquine. This mouse model provides an important tool to test drugs for their potential to cause hemolytic toxicity in G6PD-deficient populations.

Rochford, Rosemary; Ohrt, Colin; Baresel, Paul C.; Campo, Brice; Sampath, Aruna; Magill, Alan J.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Walker, Larry A.

2013-01-01

144

Exchange transfusion in neonatal septicemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Exchange transfusion of fresh heparinised whole blood was evaluated as a means of supplying “opsonins” and blood cells and lessening the high mortality of bacterial septicaemia in neonates. Pre-transfusion, post-transfusion, donor, and adult control sera were examined for the presence of “opsonic” activity againstStaphylococcus aureus (A 502 strain) in a standardized bactericidal in vitro assay. In all 23 neonates

B. H. Belohradsky; R. Roos; W. Marget

1978-01-01

145

Current understanding of allergic transfusion reactions: incidence, pathogenesis, laboratory tests, prevention and treatment.  

PubMed

Non-haemolytic transfusion reactions are the most common type of transfusion reaction and include transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, allergic reactions, febrile reactions, post-transfusion purpura and graft-versus- host disease. Although life-threatening anaphylaxis occurs rarely, allergic reactions occur most frequently. If possible, even mild transfusion reactions should be avoided because they add to patients' existing suffering. During the last decade, several new discoveries have been made in the field of allergic diseases and transfusion medicine. First, mast cells are not the only cells that are key players in allergic diseases, particularly in the murine immune system. Second, it has been suggested that immunologically active undigested or digested food allergens in a donor's blood may be transferred to a recipient who is allergic to these antigens, causing anaphylaxis. Third, washed platelets have been shown to be effective for preventing allergic transfusion reactions, although substantial numbers of platelets are lost during washing procedures, and platelet recovery after transfusion may not be equivalent to that with unwashed platelets. This review describes allergic transfusion reactions, including the above-mentioned points, and focusses on their incidence, pathogenesis, laboratory tests, prevention and treatment. PMID:23215650

Hirayama, Fumiya

2013-02-01

146

State of the art: massive transfusion.  

PubMed

The aim of this article was to review recent developments in the resuscitation of both trauma and non-trauma patients in haemorrhagic shock. Strategies for the resuscitation of massively haemorrhaging patients and the use of massive transfusion protocols (MTPs) have been a major focus of the trauma literature over the past several years. The application of haemostatic resuscitation practices and MTPs to non-trauma populations has long been in practice, but has only recently been the subject of active research. Medline and PubMed were reviewed for 'massive transfusion' (MT) from 2012 to present. Non-English and paediatric articles were excluded. Articles were systematically reviewed for their relevance to MT. There were eight major areas of development identified. In recent MT literature, there was an increased focus on massively haemorrhaging non-trauma patients, the role of acute traumatic coagulopathy, the use of thromboelastography (TEG), and the impact of MTPs on blood product waste and efficiency of product delivery. Other developments included additional MT prediction tools and The PRospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) study. There was also interest in re-evaluating the clinical relevance of the current MT definition and identifying new foci for MT. These recent developments reflect efforts to better understand and manage non-traumatic haemorrhage and to address prior limitations in the trauma literature. Inevitably, new questions have been raised, which will likely direct ongoing and future research in MT. PMID:24889805

McDaniel, L M; Etchill, E W; Raval, J S; Neal, M D

2014-06-01

147

Adult hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae.  

PubMed

Hemolyitic uremic syndrome (HUS), characterized by triad of acute kidney injury, thrombocytopenia, and hemolytic anemia, has considerable morbidity and mortality and is known to be associated with diarrheal illness. It usually occurs after a diarrheal illness due to Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a rare but well recognized trigger for nondiarrhea associated HUS in children, but has not been reported in adults. We report a case of an adult presenting with pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by HUS and required renal replacement therapy. PMID:23380391

Allen, Jennifer C; McCulloch, Thomas; Kolh, Nitin V

2014-08-01

148

Reasons for moving toward a patient-centric paradigm of clinical transfusion medicine practice.  

PubMed

The combination of patient blood management (PBM) modalities and multicomponent apheresis permits us to administer even safer transfusions than those using the "safer-than-ever" blood components distributed in the beginning of the 21st century. PBM identifies a patient at risk of transfusion and formulates a multidisciplinary and multimodal-yet individualized-plan for reducing the need for allogeneic transfusion. Multicomponent apheresis can collect any combination of red blood cells, platelets, and plasma from the same donor during the same donation, and it should eventually reserve all components harvested from the same donation for transfusion to the same recipient. Together, PBM and multicomponent apheresis represent a new paradigm-the patient-centric paradigm-of transfusion medicine whose purpose is to reduce the transfusion risk for each individual patient to the level of the ALARA (as-low-as-reasonably-achievable) risk. PBM and multicomponent apheresis can meet a patient's transfusion needs with at least twofold fewer allogeneic donor exposures, thereby reducing the risk of infectious and immunologic complications of transfusion by at least twofold. The reduction in risk includes the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality (transfusion-related acute lung injury) and the cardinal threat to transfusion safety (the next "HIV-like" pathogen to emerge in the future). Once it is determined that PBM and multicomponent apheresis can replace the current blood-procurement system at a "reasonable" cost and without jeopardizing the supply of blood and components, the patient-centric paradigm should replace the current, component-centric paradigm of transfusion medicine to reduce the transfusion risk to the level of the ALARA risk. PMID:22882177

Vamvakas, Eleftherios C

2013-04-01

149

[Blood transfusion and kidney transplantation].  

PubMed

The non-transfusion policy for potential recipients of kidney allografts that has been followed in recent years has not proven successful. There is now ample clinical evidence of improved transplant function in the transfused recipients category. This has also been confirmed in recipients of a first cadaver kidney in Basel and Geneva. If the conditions valid for human kidney transplantation are matched as closely as possible in animal experiments, prolongation of graft function rather than accelerated rejection is usually observed after blood transfusions. Potential kidney graft recipients should be more liberally transfused and experimental evidence ought to be accumulated in order to establish a rationale for optimal host conditioning, while avoiding the hazards of blood transfusions to the greatest extent possible. PMID:405740

Harder, F; Jeannet, M; Brunner, F; Claudi, B; Floersheim, G L; Klauda, P; Leski, M; Mégevand, R; Op Den Winkel, R; Thiel, G; Tondelli, P

1977-05-21

150

[Ethics and blood transfusion].  

PubMed

Blood donation is an act of solidarity. Most often, this act is done on a volunteer basis and, depending on countries and circumstances, is not remunerated. The increase in need, the always-greater number of deferral criteria, the safety issues and the changes in the structures of our societies are among the many subjects for ethical debates. Taking these into account, the actors of the transfusion must analyze certain parameters: the value of a donation, the meaning of volunteering, the appropriateness of remunerating the act of giving a part of one's self, no longer as a donation or an expression of altruism and solidarity, but as a commercial act regimented by economic laws. PMID:23916572

Tissot, J-D; Garraud, O; Danic, B; Cabaud, J-J; Lefrère, J-J

2013-09-01

151

Fatal carboplatin-induced immune hemolytic anemia in a child with a brain tumor  

PubMed Central

Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia (DIIHA) is an uncommon side effect of pharmacologic intervention. A rare mediator of DIIHA, carboplatin is an agent used to treat many pediatric cancers. We describe here, the first case of fatal carboplatin induced DIIHA in a pediatric patient and a brief review of the literature. Our patient developed acute onset of multi-organ failure with evidence of complement activation, secondary to a drug induced red cell antibody. Early recognition of the systemic insult associated with carboplatin induced hemolytic anemia may allow for future affected patients to receive plasmapheresis, a potentially effective therapy.

Haley, Kristina M; Russell, Thomas B; Boshkov, Lynn; Leger, Regina M; Garratty, George; Recht, Michael; Nazemi, Kellie J

2014-01-01

152

Fatal carboplatin-induced immune hemolytic anemia in a child with a brain tumor.  

PubMed

Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia (DIIHA) is an uncommon side effect of pharmacologic intervention. A rare mediator of DIIHA, carboplatin is an agent used to treat many pediatric cancers. We describe here, the first case of fatal carboplatin induced DIIHA in a pediatric patient and a brief review of the literature. Our patient developed acute onset of multi-organ failure with evidence of complement activation, secondary to a drug induced red cell antibody. Early recognition of the systemic insult associated with carboplatin induced hemolytic anemia may allow for future affected patients to receive plasmapheresis, a potentially effective therapy. PMID:24868179

Haley, Kristina M; Russell, Thomas B; Boshkov, Lynn; Leger, Regina M; Garratty, George; Recht, Michael; Nazemi, Kellie J

2014-01-01

153

Detection of Trace Amounts of Fetal RhD-Positive Red Cells with Flow Cytometry after Multiple Rh-Negative Intrauterine Transfusions and RhD-Gene Determination with PCR  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary In 2 cases of RhD-sensitized women, hemolytic disease of the newborns (hdn) was mitigated by intrauterine transfusions of·Rh-negative donor blood during pregnancy. In both cases preterm delivery was performed by cesarean section in week 32 of pregnancy. With cord blood the direct antiglobulin test (DAT) was negative using the gel test. The blood groups corresponded to the transfused donor

R. Lynen; T. J. Legler; J. H. Maas; A. Suren; R. Osmers; B. Behring; W. Schroeter; M. Koehler

1996-01-01

154

The Physician Compliance of Red Blood Cell Transfusion by Computerized Transfusion Decision Support System  

Microsoft Academic Search

“When should we trigger a transfusion?” is always a critical question between the patient's benefits and risks in RBC transfusion. A computerized transfusion decision support system (CTDSS) has been used since September 2004 in an academic medical center with 1400 beds. In this study, the factors affecting red blood cell (RBC) transfusion were investigated. Totally 20,551 RBC-transfusion episodes between January

Chao-Sung Chang; Yu-Chih Lin; Chiu Chu Lin; Chi-Jung Yeh; Yung-Chao Wu; Yi-Ching Lin

155

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with Malaria.  

PubMed

Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA), a very infrequent condition which represents a group of disorders in which presence of autoantibodies directed against self-antigens leads to shortened red cell survival. Till date, a very few cases of AIHA in Malaria patients are reported worldwide but still AIHA should be considered a relatively rare cause of anemia in malaria. A 20 year male presented with intermittent fever since seven days and yellowish discoloration of urine and sclera since 5 days. He was transfused three units of blood at a private clinic before one month. On examination, pallor, icterus and spelnomegaly were present. Hemoglobin (Hb) was 3.2 gm% and peripheral smear revealed ring forms of both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. Serum LDH and Serum billirubin (Indirect and Direct) were high. This patient's blood group was B +ve with positive autocontrol. Indirect Antiglobulin Test (IAT), antibody screening and antibody identification were pan-positive with reaction strength of +4 against each cell. Direct Antiglobulin Test was +4 positive anti IgG and negative with anti C3. He was treated with Artesunate and methylprednisone. Least incompatible, saline washed O Neg and B neg red cells were transfused on the 2(nd) day of starting treatment. Hb was raised to 6.1 gm% on 4(th) day. Patient was discharged on 9th day with Hb 7.0 gm% with oral tapering dose of steroids. In the above case, patient was suffering from high grade malarial parasitemia with co-existing autoimmune RBC destruction by IgG auto-antibodies which led to sudden drop in Hb and rise in serum LDH and indirect billirubin. Least incompatible packed red cells along with antimalarials and steroids led to clinical improvement. So far, one case report each from India, Korea, Canada and Germany and one case series report of three cases from India have been reported. Under-reporting or rarity of this phenomenon may be accountable for this. PMID:24014948

Sonani, Rajesh; Bhatnagar, Nidhi; Maitrey, Gajjar

2013-07-01

156

Eculizumab safely reverses neurologic impairment and eliminates need for dialysis in severe atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome  

PubMed Central

This case report describes how eculizumab reversed neurologic impairment and improved renal damage in severe atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. A 50-year-old female, after presenting with diarrhea and abdominal pain, developed pancolitis, acute renal failure, and thrombocytopenia. The patient underwent total abdominal colectomy. Pathology confirmed ischemic colitis with scattered mesenteric microthrombi. Due to mental and respiratory decline, she remained intubated. Continuous venovenous hemodialysis was initiated. Renal failure, neurologic changes, hemolysis, thrombotic microangiopathy, and low complement levels all suggested atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Eculizumab 900 mg was administered intravenously on hospital day 6 and continued weekly for four doses followed by maintenance therapy. She recovered neurologically and renally after the third dose, and hematologically by the sixth dose. Her recovery has been sustained on long-term eculizumab treatment. In severe atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, eculizumab safely reverses neurologic impairment and eliminates the need for dialysis. The optimal duration of treatment with eculizumab remains to be determined.

Ohanian, Maro; Cable, Christian; Halka, Kathleen

2011-01-01

157

Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia in Hodgkin's lymphoma.  

PubMed

Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia is a rare presentation of Hodgkin's lymphoma though its association with Non- Hodgkin's lymphoma is well known. It is usually detected at the time of diagnosis when it accompanies Hodgkin's and rarely precedes it. It is a warm immune hemolytic anemia which is responsive to steroids and rituximab. We hereby report a case of advanced Hodgkin's disease who presented as AIHA. PMID:24772757

Shah, Mihir B; Nanjapp, Veena; Devaraj, H S; Sindhu, K S

2013-07-01

158

Acute Rhabdomyolysis from Eating Quail.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Acute rhabdomyolysis results from susceptible persons eating quail during the migrating season. The etiology is unknown. Muscular exercise is an important precipitating factor. In this paper the literature on this and related rhabdomyolytic and hemolytic ...

J. B. Bateman

1977-01-01

159

Changes in fetal acid base status during intravascular transfusion.  

PubMed Central

Umbilical venous pH, PCO2, PO2, and base excess was measured immediately before and after 72 intravascular transfusions in 34 fetuses with erythroblastosis fetalis. In 67 uncomplicated transfusions, infused adult blood led to a mean (95% confidence intervals) fall in pH (0.037, CI 0.029 to 0.044) and base excess (2.03, CI 1.61 to 2.45) and a mean rise in PCO2 (0.24 kPa, CI 0.13 to 0.35). These changes correlated significantly with the increase in fetal haemoglobin and packed cell volume. Five transfusions were associated with complications within six hours: intrauterine death in two, fetal-distress necessitating delivery in two, and preterm labour in one. Two had pre-existing acidosis, whereas two of the three with normal blood gas and acid base measurements before transfusion had acute changes that were outside the normal ranges that had been established in uncomplicated transfusions.

Nicolini, U; Santolaya, J; Fisk, N M; Hubinont, C; Kochenour, N K; Greco, P; Rodeck, C H

1988-01-01

160

Blood Transfusion and Cytomegalovirus Infection.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this study is to determine if cytomegalovirus (CMV) is transmitted from blood donors to blood recipients in the course of transfusion. Ninety pediatric patients undergoing open-heart surgery and 32 renal transplant recipients have entered o...

M. Ho J. A. Armstrong

1973-01-01

161

Possible Risks of Blood Transfusions  

MedlinePLUS

... these forms of hepatitis. Hepatitis is the most common disease transmitted by blood transfusions. A 2009 study on ... 2007, blood banks also began testing for Chagas disease (common in South and Central America). Diseases caused by ...

162

Blood Transfusion: Safer Than Ever  

MedlinePLUS

... associated with transfusion. This occurs when the recipient's plasma and donor's red blood cells are incompatible, causing antibodies in the recipient's plasma to destroy the donor blood. The U.S. Food ...

163

Hemolytic and Hemoxidative Activities in Mycoplasma penetrans  

PubMed Central

Mycoplasma penetrans is a newly isolated Mollicute from the urine of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus that demonstrates the capacity to adhere to and invade human cells. A previous report, based on assays with mouse red blood cells (RBCs), indicated that M. penetrans lacked hemolytic activity. In our studies, we incubated different isolates of M. penetrans with various RBC species and observed hemolytic zones surrounding individual mycoplasma colonies. All M. penetrans strains displayed hemolysis after 2 to 3 days of incubation. Hemolytic activity diffused from single colonies, eventually causing complete lysis. Hemolysis was most pronounced with sheep RBCs, followed by horse, chicken, and human cells. Furthermore, hemolytic activity was demonstrable in both intact mycoplasma cell preparations and spent culture supernatant. However, unlike intact mycoplasmas, the hemolytic activity in the supernatant was dependent on the reducing agent, cysteine. In addition to hemolysis, a brown precipitate was closely associated with mycoplasma colonies, suggesting oxidation of hemoglobin. Absorption spectra indicated that hemoglobin was oxidized to methemoglobin, and the addition of catalase demonstrated H2O2-mediated hemoxidation. Other experiments suggested that hemoxidation enhanced total hemolysis, providing the first evidence of both hemolytic and hemoxidative activities in M. penetrans.

Kannan, T. R.; Baseman, Joel B.

2000-01-01

164

Early intravenous immunoglobin (two-dose regimen) in the management of severe Rh hemolytic disease of newborn—a prospective randomized controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phototherapy is the standard treatment in moderately severe hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN), whereas exchange transfusion\\u000a (ET) is the second line in progressive cases. Intravenous immunoglobin (IVIG) has been suggested to decrease the need for\\u000a ET. We aimed at assessing the efficacy of early two-dose regimens of IVIG to avoid unnecessary ET in severe Rh HDN. The study\\u000a included 90

Mohsen Saleh Elalfy; Nancy Samir Elbarbary; Heba Wegdan Abaza

2011-01-01

165

Zopiclone induced methemoglobinemia and hemolytic anemia.  

PubMed

Objective: To characterize the risk of methemoglobinemia and hemolytic anemia following large overdoses of zopiclone, a cyclopyrrolone hypnotic-sedative and a racemic mixture of R-zopiclone and S-zopiclone (eszopiclone). Methods: This review included all reports of zopiclone induced methemoglobinemia, hemolytic anemia, and oxidative stress that had been published in medical journals or discussed in continuous medical education (CME) programs. These reports were identified by searching the Medline (1980 - December 9, 2013), China Journal Net (1994 - December 2013), and Google Scholar, using zopiclone, eszopiclone, methemoglobinemia, hemolytic anemia, and oxidative stress as the search terms. Results: Six cases of methemoglobinemia, one case of methemoglobinemia, with concomitant hemolytic anemia, and one case of hemolytic anemia were identified. These complications occurred after large zopiclone overdoses (450 - 3,750, 1,125 - 1,500, and 375 - 750 mg, respectively, i.e., 60 - 500, 150 - 200, and 50 - 100 times the daily dose of 7.5 mg). The resulting methemoglobinemia could be severe (19.4 - 24.5%), while the hemolytic anemia was mild (Hb 9.0 - 9.6 g/dL). Molecular modelling analyses indicate that eszopiclone and its two metabolites will be kinetically labile. Their molecular surfaces have significant amounts of electron-deficient regions. All three compounds are expected to react with cellular nucleophiles, such as glutathione, causing its depletion and oxidative stress. Conclusions: After large overdoses, zopiclone, alone or together with its metabolites, most probably causes oxidative stress in erythrocytes to account for the methemoglobinemia and hemolytic anemia. Further studies are required to determine their incidence and the dose-related capacity of zopiclone and its metabolites in producing erythrocyte oxidative stress. PMID:24569128

Chan, Thomas Y K

2014-05-01

166

Technology for enhanced transfusion safety.  

PubMed

Data from reporting systems around the world document that non-infectious hazards are the leading cause of serious morbidity or mortality resulting from blood transfusion. Among these non-infectious hazards, mis-transfusion represents the most frequently observed serious hazard and occurs at an estimated rate of 1 in 14,000 transfusions. Mis-transfusion events result from "lapse errors" (slip ups) rather than cognitive mistakes. Lapse errors are more likely to occur during repetitive tasks when individuals are distracted, rushed, or fatigued--conditions to which machines are not susceptible. The final bedside check and the collection of patient samples for pre-transfusion testing are key "error spots" and are candidates for new technology innovation. Existing technology includes non-computerized devices; bedside devices based on bar code technology; and the use of radiofrequency chips. Several commercial systems employing bar-code technology have reached clinical application or are undergoing refinement. Radiofrequency-based systems are on the near horizon. Nearly all systems begin with the application of machine-readable data to the patient's wristband. The third error spot--the decision to transfuse--will be a challenging area for future application of information technology. Computerized physician order-entry, decision support and ultimately active computer-based decision-making are expected to enhance transfusion decisions. Despite the explosive growth in information technology in modern society, healthcare has lagged behind many other sectors in the use of enhanced information technology. Studies are needed to identify which technologies improve patient outcomes. Healthcare workers, administrators, and regulators need to embrace the use of new technology in order to reduce errors and improve safety for patients. PMID:16304423

Dzik, Walter H

2005-01-01

167

[Transfusion risk related to female/male plasma use. Analysis and debate].  

PubMed

Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a syndrome characterized by acute respiratory distress following the transfusion of blood components. The pathophysiological hallmark of TRALI is increased pulmonary microvascular permeability. Several reports demonstrate that the majority of TRALI cases are precipitated by transfusion of donor antibodies directed against HLA (human leukocyte antigens) or HNA (human neutrophil antigens) expressed on the neutrophils’ surface of the recipient. This antibody-antigen interaction is thought to directly cause neutrophils activation and release of cytotoxic agents, with subsequent endothelial damage and capillary leak. Following plasma transfusion is an important and underreported adverse event. Some blood centers have limited the collection of plasma from female donors due to their propensity for developing anti HLA antibodies after pregnancy. PMID:23435080

Mejía Domínguez, Ana María

2013-01-01

168

Blood transfusion usage among adults with sickle cell disease - a single institution experience over ten years.  

PubMed

Transfusion of red blood cells is a major therapeutic option in sickle cell disease (SCD). There is strong evidence for its efficacy, particularly in primary and secondary stroke prevention in children, however, its use in other areas remains controversial. This study assessed the patterns of transfusion in the adult cohort attending King's College Hospital over a 10-year period, from 2000 to 2009. Total blood usage has increased significantly (P = 0·006) during this time, with 78% of the blood received by only 6% of the patients. The increase is explained by increased automated red cell exchange and increased usage for planned and acute transfusions for sickle-related complications. PMID:21275951

Drasar, Emma; Igbineweka, Norris; Vasavda, Nisha; Free, Matthew; Awogbade, Moji; Allman, Marlene; Mijovic, Aleksandar; Thein, Swee Lay

2011-03-01

169

Genetics of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS).  

PubMed

Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a rare, life-threatening disease characterized by thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. The atypical form of HUS (aHUS), representing 5 to 10% of cases, lacks the association with infection by Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli strains that characterizes the commonest clinical presentation of HUS. In the majority of aHUS cases, the disease results from the complement-mediated damage to the microvascular endothelium because of inherited defects in complement genes or autoantibodies against complement regulatory proteins. Incomplete penetrance of aHUS in carriers of mutations is common to all aHUS-associated complement genes and it is now established that the overall genetic predisposition to aHUS of an individual results from the combination of different inherited factors. Moreover, the patient's genotype influences the clinical evolution, the response to plasma therapies, and the recurrence after transplantation. Here, we describe the genetic component of aHUS, the lessons that we have learned from the functional characterization of the aHUS-associated mutations, and the benefits of a comprehensive genetic analysis of the patients. PMID:24799305

Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Hidalgo, Marta Subías; Pinto, Sheila; Tortajada, Agustín

2014-06-01

170

[Granulocytes transfusion for neutropenic patients].  

PubMed

A renewed interest in the transfusion of granulocytes for support of patients afflicted by severe and prolonged neutropenia has resulted from improved methods of mobilization and collection that provide cellular products superior in number and functions as compared with historical experiences of the 70's. In this review we discuss the clinical experience reported in the literature over the past three decades, the progress made in donor selection, the use of growth factors and mechanical apheresis. We comment on adverse effects, emphasize present indications and our own experience for the use of granulocyte transfusions. Hopefully, the progress made in this area will justify the consideration of granulocyte transfusions in the management of the severely neutropenic patient and provide proper documentation to avoid repeating the disappointment experienced in the previous two decades. PMID:11294144

Fernández, J; Pressiani, V; Solimano, J; Koziner, B

2001-01-01

171

A case of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.  

PubMed

A 9-year-old boy presented with fever not responding to antibiotic therapy and elevated blood urea and serum creatinine levels. The patient developed microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia during the hospital stay. Kidney biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The patient had sufficient urine output, normal blood pressure, and no evidence of peripheral edema during the whole course of his disease. Serum levels of anti-Epstein-Barr virus immunoglobulin M was elevated, indicating the possible role of Epstein-Barr virus infection in inducing atypical HUS in this patient. The patient underwent hemodialysis with dramatic response. He was discharged with normal kidney function after a few days. Kidney function and platelet count were normal 12 months after the initial presentation. This case report shows that atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome could have unusual presentations such as the absence of oliguria, hypertension, and edema, with rapid recovery and good prognosis. PMID:25001143

Fallahzadeh, Mohammad Amin; Fallahzadeh, Mohammad Kazem; Derakhshan, Ali; Shorafa, Eslam; Mojtahedi, Yusof; Geramizadeh, Bita; Fallahzadeh, Mohammad Hossein

2014-07-01

172

Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Induced by Levofloxacin  

PubMed Central

Drug-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition. We report the case of a 32-year-old white female who presented to the emergency department with generalized fatigue, fever, and jaundice. The patient reported using levofloxacin few days prior to presentation for urinary tract infection. The patient had evidence of hemolytic anemia with a hemoglobin of 6.7?g/dL which dropped to 5?g/dL on day 2, the direct Coombs test was positive, indirect bilirubin was 5.5?mg/dL, and LDH was 1283?IU/L. Further testing ruled out autoimmune disease, lymphoma, and leukemia as etiologies for the patient's hemolytic anemia. Levofloxacin was immediately stopped with a gradual hematologic recovery within few days.

Sheikh-Taha, Marwan; Frenn, Pascale

2014-01-01

173

Pathology Case Study: Transfusion Reaction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a case study presented by the University of Pittsburgh Department of Pathology in which a young woman experienced vomiting, dizziness, headaches, and change of mental status due to conjunctival petechiae. Visitors are given the transfusion reaction investigation, and have the opportunity to diagnose the patient. This is an excellent resource for students in the health sciences to familiarize themselves with using patient history and laboratory results to diagnose disease. It is also a helpful site for educators to use to introduce or test student learning in transfusion pathology.

Johnson, Douglas R.; Triulzi, Darrell

2008-09-02

174

Shiga toxin-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome complicated by intestinal perforation in a child with typical hemolytic uremic syndrome  

PubMed Central

Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is one of the most common causes of acute renal failure in childhood and is primarily diagnosed in up to 4.5% of children who undergo chronic renal replacement therapy. Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 is the predominant bacterial strain identified in patients with HUS; more than 100 types of Shiga toxin-producing enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) subtypes have also been isolated. The typical HUS manifestations are microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal insufficiency. In typical HUS cases, more serious EHEC manifestations include severe hemorrhagic colitis, bowel necrosis and perforation, rectal prolapse, peritonitis, and intussusceptions. Colonic perforation, which has an incidence of 1%-2%, can be a fatal complication. In this study, we report a typical Shiga toxin-associated HUS case complicated by small intestinal perforation with refractory peritonitis that was possibly because of ischemic enteritis. Although the degree of renal damage is the main concern in HUS, extrarenal complications should also be considered in severe cases, as presented in our case.

Chang, Hye Jin; Kim, Hwa Young; Choi, Jae Hong; Choi, Hyun Jin; Ko, Jae Sung; Ha, Il Soo; Cheong, Hae Il; Choi, Yong

2014-01-01

175

Shiga toxin-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome complicated by intestinal perforation in a child with typical hemolytic uremic syndrome.  

PubMed

Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is one of the most common causes of acute renal failure in childhood and is primarily diagnosed in up to 4.5% of children who undergo chronic renal replacement therapy. Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 is the predominant bacterial strain identified in patients with HUS; more than 100 types of Shiga toxin-producing enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) subtypes have also been isolated. The typical HUS manifestations are microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal insufficiency. In typical HUS cases, more serious EHEC manifestations include severe hemorrhagic colitis, bowel necrosis and perforation, rectal prolapse, peritonitis, and intussusceptions. Colonic perforation, which has an incidence of 1%-2%, can be a fatal complication. In this study, we report a typical Shiga toxin-associated HUS case complicated by small intestinal perforation with refractory peritonitis that was possibly because of ischemic enteritis. Although the degree of renal damage is the main concern in HUS, extrarenal complications should also be considered in severe cases, as presented in our case. PMID:24678335

Chang, Hye Jin; Kim, Hwa Young; Choi, Jae Hong; Choi, Hyun Jin; Ko, Jae Sung; Ha, Il Soo; Cheong, Hae Il; Choi, Yong; Kang, Hee Gyung

2014-02-01

176

Anesthetic management of living donor liver transplantation for complement factor H deficiency hemolytic uremic syndrome: a case report  

PubMed Central

We experienced a living donor liver transplantation for a 26-month-old girl with complement factor H deficiency. Complement factor H is a plasma protein that regulates the activity of the complement pathway. Complement overactivity induced by complement factor H deficiency is associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Liver transplantation can be the proper treatment for this condition. During the liver transplantation of these patients, prevention of the complement overactivation is necessary. Minimizing complement activation, through the use of modalities such as plasma exchange before the surgery and transfusion of fresh frozen plasma throughout the entire perioperative period, may be the key for successful liver transplantation in these patients.

Park, Suk-Hee

2014-01-01

177

Hemolytic anemia and methemoglobinemia in a preterm baby as a complication of antenatal intraamnial injection of toluidine blue.  

PubMed

A late preterm infant was born 4.5 h after intraamniotic injection of 90 mg of Toluidine blue to confirm premature rupture of membranes. Due to the fetal exposition to the dye, the entire body of the patient was blue stained and the baby suffered from methemoglobinemia, Heinz' body positive hemolytic anemia and hyperbilirubinaemia requiring exchange transfusion. These complications underline that antenatal exposition of toluidine blue may result in considerable postnatal infant morbidity. Therefore intraamniotic application of toluidine blue should be discouraged. PMID:23519748

Mehler, K; Oberthuer, A; Weisshaar, G; Valter, M; Vierzig, A; Eifinger, F

2013-09-01

178

[Ethics and transfusion - Seminar report -].  

PubMed

This paper brings together the abstracts and proceedings of a seminar held on the topic of "ethics and transfusion", October 15, 2013 at the National Institute of Blood Transfusion, Paris. PMID:24814818

Hervé, C; Tissot, J-D; Bouësseau, M-C; Pottier, R; Monsellier, M; Garraud, O; Hermine, O; Sannié, T; Cazenave, J-P; Cabaud, J-J; Lefrère, J-J

2014-05-01

179

Blood Transfusion Therapy and Diamond Blackfan Anemia  

MedlinePLUS

... development of red blood cell antibodies, and iron overload in different organs of the body. Blood transfusion ... finds donors that match it very closely. Iron overload Iron overload occurs following frequent blood transfusions. All ...

180

Rituximab in steroid refractory autoimmune hemolytic anemia.  

PubMed

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is rare in children and infants and steroids are the corner stone of therapy. Management of the patients with steroid refractory/dependent disease is difficult .Rituximab is being used in the treatment of a variety of autoimmune diseases including Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA),especially in adults but there is scarce data regarding the use of this agent in pediatric AIHA patients.The authors report two cases of steroid refractory AIHA, who responded to rituximab with review the literature of its use in pediatrics. PMID:21830023

Gupta, Nitin; Sharma, Sanjeev; Seth, Tulika; Mishra, Pravas; Mahapatra, Manoranjan; Kumar, Suman; Kapoor, Rajan; Agarwal, Narendra

2012-06-01

181

Immune complications associated with chronic transfusion.  

PubMed

Blood transfusion and component therapy are an integral part of treatment for patients with certain life-threatening illnesses. Any benefit derived from transfusion must be weighed against the potential risk for complications. Patients who are chronically transfused present a unique challenge to practitioners. The presentation will focus on alloimmunization to red blood cell antigens, platelet refractoriness, transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease, and cytomegalovirus infection. Prevention or management of these complications also will be discussed. PMID:12355057

Harris, Diana J

2002-01-01

182

Hemolytic uremic syndrome in solid-organ transplant recipients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Post-transplant hemolytic uremic syndrome characterized by microangiopathic hemolysis, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure is an infrequent but potentially serious complication in organ transplant recipients. Hemolytic uremic syndrome developed in 2% (2\\/100) of our consecutive liver transplants. We report our patients and review a total of 91 cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome in adult solid organ transplant recipients reported in the literature.

Nina Singh; Timothy Gayowski; Ignazio R. Marino

1996-01-01

183

Incidence and pattern of 12 years of reported transfusion adverse events in Zimbabwe: a retrospective analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Haemovigilance hinges on a systematically structured reporting system, which unfortunately does not always exist in resource-limited settings. We determined the incidence and pattern of transfusion-related adverse events reported to the National Blood Service Zimbabwe. Materials and methods A retrospective review of the transfusion-event records of the National Blood Service Zimbabwe was conducted covering the period from 1 January 1999 to 31 December 2011. All transfusion-related event reports received during the period were analysed. Results A total of 308 transfusion adverse events (0.046%) were reported for 670,625 blood components distributed. The majority (61.6%) of the patients who experienced an adverse event were female. The median age was 36 years (range, 1–89 years). The majority (68.8%) of the adverse events were acute transfusion reactions consisting of febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions (58.5%), minor allergies (31.6%), haemolytic reactions (5.2%), severe allergic reactions (2.4%), anaphylaxis (1.4%) and hypotension (0.9%). Two-thirds (66.6%) of the adverse events occurred following administration of whole blood, although only 10.6% of the blood was distributed as whole blood. Packed cells, which accounted for 75% of blood components distributed, were associated with 20.1% of the events. Discussion The incidence of suspected transfusion adverse events was generally lower than the incidences reported globally in countries with well-established haemovigilance systems. The administration of whole blood was disproportionately associated with transfusion adverse events. The pattern of the transfusion adverse events reported here highlights the probable differences in practice between different settings. Under-reporting of transfusion events is rife in passive reporting systems.

Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Khoza, Star; Mvere, David A.; Chitiyo, McLeod E.; Postma, Maarten J.; van Hulst, Marinus

2014-01-01

184

Successful treatment of cisplatin-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome with therapeutic plasma exchange  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cisplatin is a known cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The acute, fulminant form of cisplatin-induced HUS is almost always fatal. We present a 67-year-old Hispanic woman who was treated with cisplatin for squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue. Three days after receiving the treatment, she presented with increasing fatigue, decreased urine output, and confusion. Physical examination was remarkable for

J Palmisano; M Agraharkar; AA Kaplan

1998-01-01

185

Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) secondary to cobalamin C ( cblC ) disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diarrhea-positive hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a common cause of acute renal failure in children. Diarrhea-negative\\u000a (D?), or atypical HUS, is etiologically distinct. A Medline search identified seven previously reported D? cases of HUS secondary\\u000a to cobalamin C (cblC) disease presenting in infancy. An infantile presentation is reported to be associated with a high mortality rate (6\\/7 cases).\\u000a We describe

Ajay P. Sharma; Cheryl R. Greenberg; Asuri N. Prasad; Chitra Prasad

2007-01-01

186

[Transfusion-associated circulatory overload].  

PubMed

A working group of the French National Hemovigilance Committee has been in charge of heightening awareness of Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) among physicians and nurses. This multidisciplinary group has produced the present document that focuses on epidemiological data provided by the French haemovigilance network, physiopathology, diagnosis, treatment and specific actions that could prevent or minimize the risk of TACO. PMID:23039960

Ozier, Y; Mouquet, F; Rieux, C; Mertes, P-M; Muller, J-Y; Caldani, C; Boudjedir, K; Carlier, M

2012-11-01

187

[Biermer's disease and autoimmune hemolytic anemia].  

PubMed

Biermer's disease is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis of the fundus predominantly responsible for a malabsorption of vitamin B12. Despite its association with several autoimmune disorders, few observations have reported an association with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We report a case of Biermer's disease associated with AIHA in a patient of 66 years old. PMID:22796620

Nafil, Hatim; Tazi, Illias; Mahmal, Lahoucine

2012-01-01

188

The physician compliance of red blood cell transfusion by computerized transfusion decision support system.  

PubMed

"When should we trigger a transfusion?" is always a critical question between the patient's benefits and risks in red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. A computerized transfusion decision support system (CTDSS) has been used since September 2004 in an academic medical center with 1400 beds. In this study, the factors affecting RBC transfusion were investigated. In total 20,551 RBC-transfusion episodes between January and December 2008 were reviewed. The nearest hemoglobin concentration before transfusion is defined as the transfusion trigger. The physician compliance, the factors associated with the transfusion triggers and posttransfusion hemoglobin increment were investigated. The physician compliance is 83.1%. The transfusion trigger is 8.32 ± 1.84 (mean ± standard deviation) g/dL. The transfusion triggers are statistically significant in terms of both different order sources and disease types (p<0.05).The posttransfusion hemoglobin level increased in two-thirds of the episodes. The percentages of hemoglobin increments after transfusion are dependent on the transfusion triggers. Appropriate transfusion practice may reduce the overuse of blood components and improve transfusion quality. CTDSS should be more powerful to intervene in the appropriateness of transfusion practice. PMID:22632889

Chang, Chao-Sung; Lin, Yu-Chih; Lin, Chiu-Chu; Yeh, Chi-Jung; Wu, Yung-Chao; Lin, Yi-Ching

2012-06-01

189

Guidelines for the transfusion of platelets.  

PubMed

Recommendations aiming at standardising and rationalising clinical indications for the transfusion of platelets in Belgium were drawn up by a working group of the Superior Health Council. To this end the Superior Health Council organised an expert meeting devoted to "Guidelines for the transfusion of platelets" in collaboration with the Belgian Hematological Society. The experts discussed the indications for platelet transfusions, the ideal platelet concentrate and the optimal platelet transfusion therapy. The recommendations prepared by the experts were validated by the working group with the purpose of harmonising platelet transfusion in Belgian hospitals. PMID:17451144

Bosly, A; Muylle, L; Noens, L; Pietersz, R; Heims, D; Hübner, R; Selleslag, D; Toungouz, M; Ferrant, A; Sondag, D

2007-01-01

190

The platelet as an immune cell--CD40 ligand and transfusion immunomodulation  

PubMed Central

The discovery that platelets possess cell membrane, cytoplasmic and secreted forms of the co-stimulatory molecule CD40 ligand (CD40L, also known as CD154) has led to a revolution in the view of this anucleate, differentiated cell fragment, previously thought only to be involved in blood clotting (hemostasis). During the last decade it has become clear that platelets function in innate and adaptive immunity and possess pro-inflammatory, as well as pro-thrombotic properties. They interact not only with other platelets and endothelial cells, but with lymphocytes, dendritic cells and structural cells such as fibroblasts. Soluble forms of CD40L (sCD40L) in the human circulation are almost entirely derived from platelets. Elevated levels of CD40L are associated with clinically important conditions, such as vascular disease, abnormal clotting (thrombosis), lung injury and autoimmune disease. Each year millions of platelet transfusions are given to patients that contain large amounts of sCD40L. sCD40L in the supernatant of stored platelets can induce cytokines, chemokines and lipid mediators by activating CD40 bearing cells. Increased levels of sCD40L in transfused blood are associated with transfusion related acute lung injury, a potentially fatal complication, as well as more common, milder transfusion reactions such as fever and rigors. These effects come under the rubric of transfusion immunomodulation, which postulates that transfusion recipient biology, particularly immune function, is dramatically altered by transfusion of stored allogeneic blood.

Blumberg, Neil; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Francis, Charles W.; Taubman, Mark B.; Phipps, Richard P.

2010-01-01

191

Loss of red cell chemokine scavenging promotes transfusion-related lung inflammation  

PubMed Central

Red cell transfusions are associated with the development of acute lung injury in the critically ill. Recent evidence suggests that storage induced alterations of the red blood cell (RBC) collectively termed the “storage lesion” may be linked with adverse biologic consequences. Using a 2-event model of systemic endotoxemia followed by a secondary challenge of RBC transfusion, we investigated whether purified RBC concentrates from syngeneic C57BL/6 mice altered inflammatory responses in murine lungs. Transfusion of RBCs stored for 10 days increased neutrophil counts, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and chemokine (KC) concentrations in the airspaces, and lung microvascular permeability compared with transfusion of less than 1-day-old RBCs. Because RBCs have been shown to scavenge inflammatory chemokines through the blood group Duffy antigen, we investigated the expression and function of Duffy during storage. In banked human RBCs, both Duffy expression and chemokine scavenging function were reduced with increasing duration of storage. Transfusion of Duffy knockout RBCs into Duffy wild-type en-dotoxemic mice increased airspace neutrophils, inflammatory cytokine concentrations, and lung microvascular permeability compared with transfusion of Duffy wild-type RBCs. Thus, reduction in erythrocyte chemokine scavenging is one functional consequence of the storage lesion by which RBC transfusion can augment existing lung inflammation.

Mangalmurti, Nilam S.; Xiong, Zeyu; Hulver, Mei; Ranganathan, Mrunalini; Liu, Xiang Hong; Oriss, Timothy; Fitzpatrick, Meghan; Rubin, Marc; Triulzi, Darrell; Choi, Augustine

2009-01-01

192

[Computer management to avoid errors in transfusion].  

PubMed

Even with the great progress in blood safety, such as the nucleic acid amplification test(NAT) for HBV, HCV and HIV, ABO-mismatched transfusion still occurs in the 21st century. Computer crossmatch between the patient's blood type already registered on computer, the patient's blood type as examined just before transfusion and the blood type labeled on blood bags all help avoid misunderstanding of blood type at shipping. Computerized management of the transfusion services database is also effective in promoting appropriate transfusion or autologous transfusion. Since mistakes can occur anywhere in the system, the Japanese Society of Blood Transfusion(JSBT) made a poster showing six steps where errors were most likely. They then distributed a questionnaire about mismatched transfusion to 777 major hospitals and made it clear that the main cause of mistakes was confirmation errors at bedside before transfusion. In response to the findings, JSBT created a manual for performing exactly matched and safe transfusions, including a manual for transfusion in emergencies, as well as first-line treatment procedures in case of major mismatched transfusion. In order to avoid mistakes at bedside, a barcode matching system between the patient's wristband and blood bag is ideal. It will also be useful for comprehensive risk management in modern medicine. PMID:12652693

Takahashi, Koki

2003-01-01

193

Anemia and transfusion of red blood cells  

PubMed Central

The red cells transfusion is a mainstay in the treatment of anemic patients. These blood transfusions are not without risks. The risk-benefit profile for red cell transfusions to treat anaemia is uncertain, but they may contribute to adverse patient outcomes in some situations. The ability of a patient to tolerate anaemia depends on their clinical condition and the presence of any significant co-morbidity; maintenance of circulating volume is of paramount importance. There is no universal transfusion trigger. Advances in the development and validation of physiological, accessible, practical and reliable markers to guide therapy are expected. To improve patients' outcomes, further study is required to more fully explore the risk of anemia, optimal hemoglobin level, and the risk and efficacy of RBC transfusion. Future clinical investigations with high priority should determine the efficacy of transfusion in those classified as uncertain scenarios. In the absence of data, it is prudent that transfusion is administered with caution in these clinical scenarios.

2013-01-01

194

Anti B cell targeted therapy for autoimmune hemolytic anemia in an infant.  

PubMed

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an immune mediated destruction of erythrocytes, which has a good prognosis in children. It is known to have chronic, remitting or relapsing course, especially in infants and adolescents. Treatment of refractory or relapsing AIHA is a challenge as the other aim of the treatment is to avoid prolonged exposure to steroids or other immunosuppressants in small children. Rituximab is used in patients who are non-responsive to conventional treatment such as steroids, intravenous immunoglobulins and transfusion therapy. It has varying therapeutic success rate. We report a case of AIHA in a 4-month-old infant who had ill-sustained response to conventional therapy, but responded to rituximab. PMID:24130393

Makadia, Darshak; Siddaiahgari, Sirisha Rani; Latha, M S

2013-01-01

195

Anti B cell targeted therapy for autoimmune hemolytic anemia in an infant  

PubMed Central

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an immune mediated destruction of erythrocytes, which has a good prognosis in children. It is known to have chronic, remitting or relapsing course, especially in infants and adolescents. Treatment of refractory or relapsing AIHA is a challenge as the other aim of the treatment is to avoid prolonged exposure to steroids or other immunosuppressants in small children. Rituximab is used in patients who are non-responsive to conventional treatment such as steroids, intravenous immunoglobulins and transfusion therapy. It has varying therapeutic success rate. We report a case of AIHA in a 4-month-old infant who had ill-sustained response to conventional therapy, but responded to rituximab.

Makadia, Darshak; Siddaiahgari, Sirisha Rani; Latha, M. S.

2013-01-01

196

Rhesus-D zygosity and hemolytic disease of fetus and newborn.  

PubMed

Alloimmunization against the Rhesus-D (RhD) antigen still remains as a major cause of hemolytic disease of fetus and newborn (HDFN). Determination of paternal RhDzygosity is performed by molecular testing and is valuable for the management of alloimmunized pregnant women. A 30-year-old pregnant woman with AB negative blood group presented with two consecutive abortions and no history of blood transfusion. By application of the antibody screening, identification panel, and selected cells, she was found to be highly alloimmunized. RhDzygosity was performed on her partner and was shown to be homozygous for RhD. The sequence- specific priming-polymerase chain reaction used in this report is essential to establish whether the mother requires an appropriate immunoprophylaxis or the fetus is at risk of HDFN. PMID:24014950

Moghaddam, Mostafa; Naghi, Amirali; Hassani, Fatemeh; Amini, Sedighe

2013-07-01

197

Intravenous immunoglobulin-induced hemolytic anemia after thoracoscopic thymectomy for myasthenia gravis.  

PubMed

A 24-year-old woman underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic thymectomy for Osserman IIB myasthenia gravis (MG). In preparation for thymectomy, high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) was administered 1 week before the surgical procedure. After uneventful thoracoscopic thymectomy, the postoperative hemoglobin value decreased from 12.1 mg/dL to 8.2 mg/dL. A diagnosis of IVIG-associated hemolytic anemia was made based on a peripheral smear with numerous spherocytes, a positive direct antiglobulin test result, and increased reticulocyte count. Hemoglobin levels after IVIG administration should be monitored closely before and after elective surgical procedures to identify severe anemia. Transfusion of type-matched blood should be avoided and risk factors understood. PMID:24882299

Tsukada, Hisashi; Sunkara, Rajitha; Chi, Dorcas Doja; Keogh, Deirdre; Gaissert, Henning

2014-06-01

198

Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary hypertension associated with hemolytic anemia  

PubMed Central

Hereditary hemoglobin disorders affecting the globin chain synthesis namely thalassemia syndromes and sickle cell disease (SCD) are the most common genetic disorders in human. Around 7% of the world population carries genes for these disorders, mainly the Mediterranean Basin, Middle and Far East, and Sub-Saharan Africa. An estimated 30 million people worldwide are living with sickle cell disease, while 60-80 million carry beta thalassemia trait. About 400,000 children are born with severe hemoglobinopathies each year. Cardiovascular complications of hemoglobinopathies include left and right ventricular (RV) dysfunction, arrhythmias, pericarditis, myocarditis, valvular heart disease, myocardial ischemia, and notably pulmonary hypertension (PH). Because of a unique pathophysiology, pulmonary hypertension associated with hemolytic disorders was moved from WHO group I to group V PH diseases. Treatment strategies are also unique and include blood transfusion, iron chelation, hydroxyurea, and oxygen therapy. The role of PH-specific agents has not been established.

Saleemi, Sarfraz

2014-01-01

199

Transfusion medicine in trauma patients  

PubMed Central

Injured patients stress the transfusion service with frequent demands for uncrossmatched red cells and plasma, occasional requirements for large amounts of blood products and the need for new and better blood products. Transfusion services stress trauma centers with demands for strict accountability for individual blood component units and adherence to indications in a clinical field where research has been difficult, and guidance opinion-based. New data suggest that the most severely injured patients arrive at the trauma center already coagulopathic and that these patients benefit from prompt, specific, corrective treatment. This research is clarifying trauma system requirements for new blood products and blood-product usage patterns, but the inability to obtain informed consent from severely injured patients remains an obstacle to further research.

Murthi, Sarah B; Dutton, Richard P; Edelman, Bennett B; Scalea, Thomas M; Hess, John R

2011-01-01

200

Identification of hemolytic activity in Prevotella intermedia.  

PubMed

Hemolysin production was measured in strains of Prevotella intermedia. Zones of beta-hemolysis were detected on agar plates supplemented with either sheep, rabbit or human erythrocytes. A standard tube assay was performed on cell suspensions of the organism to measure hemolytic activity, which was found to be dose dependent, eliminated by heat treatment, and saturable with increasing concentrations of blood. Growth-phase experiments suggested that hemolysin production was increased during logarithmic growth and was reduced during stationary phase. Cell fractionation, performed on several strains of P. intermedia, localized the activity in the outer membrane and in cell vesicles. The biological implication of this study is that P. intermedia, by virtue of its hemolytic activity, is capable of liberating the hemoglobin from erythrocytes, thereby acquiring an essential nutrient, iron, for its metabolism. PMID:9573800

Beem, J E; Nesbitt, W E; Leung, K P

1998-04-01

201

Skin involvement in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.  

PubMed

Skin involvement in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is very uncommon and therefore often unrecognized as a specific symptom of aHUS. We describe 3 cases of patients with aHUS who developed skin lesions that completely recovered when disease-specific treatment was established. These cases suggest that in individuals with aHUS, when skin lesions of unknown origin occur, the possibility that they are due to thrombotic microangiopathy should be considered. PMID:24290245

Ardissino, Gianluigi; Tel, Francesca; Testa, Sara; Marzano, Angelo Valerio; Lazzari, Riccardo; Salardi, Stefania; Edefonti, Alberto

2014-04-01

202

[Therapeutic effect of donor leukocyte transfusion in relapsing marrow transplants in Japan].  

PubMed

The immune reactivity of allogeneic lymphocytes plays a major role in control of leukemia after bone marrow transplantation. We studies the efficacy of donor leukocyte transfusion (DLT) on acute and chronic leukemia in relapse after bone marrow transplantation in Japan. Sixty nine patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia (N = 17), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (N = 25), acute myelocytic leukemia (N = 26), myelodysplastic syndrome (N = 5), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (N = 2) and rhabdomyosarcoma (N = 1) were treated with transfusions of donor lymphocytes. Therapeutic effects were induced by donor leukocyte transfusion in 20 patients (29%) including 3 patients out of 4 (75%) with CML in cytogenetic and chronic phase relapse, 4 out of 5 (80%) patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, 3 out of 13 (23%) patients with CML in transformed phase, 5 out of 25 (20%) patients with acute myelocytic leukemia, and 4 out of 20 (20%) patients with acute lymphoblasic leukemia. Twenty two patients (30%) developed acute GVHD (> or = 2) and 6 out of 73 (8.2%) patients developed fatal GVHD after donor leukocyte transfusion. Patients relapsed within 6 months after marrow transplantation had a probability of having severe acute GVHD (> or = 2) after DLT. Fourteen out of 24 (58%) patients with GVL response were re-relapsed thereafter. Minimal dose of donor leukocytes infused in successfully treated 9 patients without cytoreductive therapy was 2 x 10(7)/kg in total and minimal dose of that in 6 patients with fatal GVHD was 7 x 10(7)/kg in total. The anti-leukemia effect of donor leukocyte transfusion was strongest against CML in cytogenetic and chronic phase and induce a durable complete remission. PMID:9423332

Shiobara, S; Takahasi, S; Yabe, H; Maruta, I; Kodera, Y

1997-11-01

203

Prospective Study of Post Transfusion Hepatitis (Transfusion-transmitted Viruses Study).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

To complete the analysis of major factors potentially influencing risk of non-A, non-B viral hepatitis, recipient characteristics were analyzed. Sex, age, prior transfusion, prior hepatitis B experience, and number of transfusions administered had no infl...

J. W. Mosley R. D. Aach G. L. Gitnick F. B. Hollinger W. Szmuness

1981-01-01

204

Blood transfusion requirements in femoral neck fracture  

Microsoft Academic Search

The blood transfusion requirements of a consecutive series of 249 unselected patients with femoral neck fracture were studied retrospectively. A total of 339 Units of blood were transfused (a mean of 1.36 Units per patient). Blood transfusion occurred in 132 patients (53.0%), with each receiving a mean of 2.57 Units. Patients aged 80 years and above as a group were

D. G. Swain; P. G. Nightingale; J. V. Patel

2000-01-01

205

Management of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in children  

PubMed Central

Acute renal failure associated with a fulminant, life-threatening systemic disease is rare in previously healthy young children; however, when it occurs, the most common cause is hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). In most cases (90%), this abrupt and devastating illness is a result of ingestion of food or drink contaminated with pathogens that produce very potent toxins. Currently, there are no proven treatment options that can directly inactivate the toxin or effectively interfere with the cascade of destructive events triggered by the toxin once it gains access to the bloodstream and binds its receptor. However, HUS is self-limited, and effective supportive management during the acute phase is proven to be a life saver for children affected by HUS. A minority of childhood HUS cases, approximately 5%, are caused by various genetic mutations causing uncontrolled activation of the complement system. These children, who used to have a poor prognosis leading to end-stage renal disease, now have access to exciting new treatment options that can preserve kidney function and avoid disease recurrences. This review provides a summary of the current knowledge on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of childhood HUS, focusing on a practical approach to best management measures.

Grisaru, Silviu

2014-01-01

206

Precautions and Adverse Reactions during Blood Transfusion  

MedlinePLUS

... leukocyte reduction), allergic reactions are less common. Fluid overload: Transfusion recipients can receive more fluid than their ... Special Blood Donation Procedures Next: Overview of Iron Overload

207

Blood transfusion during cardiac surgery is associated with inflammation and coagulation in the lung: a case control study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Blood transfusion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in cardiac surgery patients, but cause-and-effect relations\\u000a remain unknown. We hypothesized that blood transfusion is associated with changes in pulmonary and systemic inflammation and\\u000a coagulation occurring in patients who do not meet the clinical diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We performed a case control study in a mixed medical-surgical

Pieter R Tuinman; Alexander P Vlaar; Alexander D Cornet; Jorrit J Hofstra; Marcel Levi; Joost CM Meijers; Albertus Beishuizen; Marcus J Schultz; AB Johan Groeneveld; Nicole P Juffermans

2011-01-01

208

Etiological, clinical and laboratory data of post-transfusion hepatitis: A retrospective study of 379 cases from 53 italian hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Among the 8,604 cases of acute viral hepatitis hospitalized during 1982 in 53 Italian hospitals, we studied 379 cases of post-transfusion hepatitis, 262 cases which occurred after surgery and 4,576 cases with no history of parenteral exposure. The etiological agents of post-transfusion hepatitis were NANB viruses in 57.8%, HBV in 39.0% and HAV in 3.2% of the cases. CMV

G. Giusti; B. Galanti; G. B. Gaeta; C. Gallo

1987-01-01

209

Human erythrovirus B19 and blood transfusion - an update.  

PubMed

Erythrovirus (parvovirus) B19 (B19) is a common human pathogen. It is a non-enveloped single-strand DNA virus packaging its genome in small tight capsids consisting of viral VP1 and VP2 proteins. It is now accepted that B19 is a relatively quickly evolving virus having diverged in several genetic variants recently identified. The main route of B19 transmission is respiratory, with a majority of infections occurring during childhood and manifesting as erythema infectiousum. B19 can also be transmitted vertically and via blood transfusion and organ transplantation. The majority of adult populations show immunological evidence of previous exposure to B19. Although the immune response is able to clear infection and provide life-long protection against B19, recent data suggest that in some, if not the majority, of individuals the acute phase of infection is followed by viral persistence in the blood or other tissues regardless of the host's immunocompetence. Transmission of B19 by blood and blood products and its resistance to common viral inactivation methods raises several blood safety questions, still unanswered. The diversity of B19 strains and the ability of the virus to persist in the presence of specific antibodies raise the issue of transmissibility by transfusion not so much to immunocompetent recipients but rather to the large proportion of recipients in whom there is some degree of immunodeficiency. The ability of the virus to reactivate in immunodeficient recipients may create difficulties in differentiating between transfusion transmission and reactivation. PMID:17680952

Parsyan, A; Candotti, D

2007-08-01

210

Study of the Possible Relationship of Intrauterine or Exchange Transfusion of Blood to Leukemia in Children.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The case records of 339 children with acute leukemia between 1965 and 1974 were reviewed for a history of intrauterine or exchange transfusions. Children with other types of neoplasms were used as controls. In addition, the histories of 85 children with n...

M. Haghbin

1977-01-01

211

Perioperative Red Blood Cell Transfusion: Harmful or Beneficial to the Patient?  

PubMed Central

Although the transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) is safer than ever regarding infections, it is still associated with several adverse reactions and therefore should only be used on the basis of evidence-based triggers. However, prevention of RBC transfusion and subsequent substitution of blood losses with acellular solutions will inevitably result in dilutional anemia. Acute dilutional anemia can be compensated by the body over a wide range of hemoglobin concentrations without a critical restriction of tissue oxygenation. On the other hand, chronic anemia is known to be a potent cause of morbidity and mortality. As a consequence, the impact of perioperative anemia on mortality is difficult to describe, because anemia, as well as the transfusion of RBCs, can influence the clinical outcome. The resulting ‘Gordian knot’ cannot be cut easily, and this circumstance forces clinical physicians to make a daily trade-off between transfusion-associated and anemia-associated risks. This review focuses on the physiology of oxygen transport, the hazards of acute anemia, the hazards of RBC transfusion, and the literature putting these problems into perspective.

Meier, Jens; Muller, Markus M.; Lauscher, Patrick; Sireis, Walid; Seifried, Erhard; Zacharowski, Kai

2012-01-01

212

Risks and benefits of transfusion for children with severe anemia in Africa  

PubMed Central

Severe anemia contributes significantly to child mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Blood transfusion is used in emergencies but carries risks. In BMC Medicine, Olupot-Olupot and colleagues report the findings of a phase II trial in children with severe anemia in Eastern Uganda. They provide important early safety and efficacy data supporting large volume whole blood transfusion (30 ml/kg) compared with the World Health Organization recommendation of 20 ml/kg. Large volume transfusions result in more rapid and frequent correction of severe anemia; they can be expected to reduce the risk of transfusions, and help manage the scarce resource of donor blood. However, severe anemia arises from varying combinations of acute, sub-acute and chronic etiologies. The Fluid Expansion As Supportive Therapy study reminds us that the risks and benefits of even simple interventions are complex, and that rapid normalization of physiology may not always be the best strategy. There is no substitute for high quality evidence and to this end we strongly support Olupot-Oluput and colleagues’ call for a definitive trial of large volume transfusions in severe anemia. Please see related research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/12/67/abstract.

2014-01-01

213

Transfusion-associated cytomegalovirus mononucleosis.  

PubMed Central

Transfusion-associated cytomegalovirus mononucleosis is generally considered only as a complication of extracorporeal circulation following cardiac surgery. Three cases following trauma were recognized in less than one year. Both massive and limited volume blood transfusions were involved. Hectic fever was a characteristic feature in these otherwise remarkably asymptomatic individuals, without the classic features of heterophile-positive infectious mononucleosis. Since the illness developed several weeks into the post-operative period after extensive thoracic or abdominal trauma surgery, the presence of an undrained abscess was naturally the major diagnostic concern. Atypical lymphocytosis, markers of altered immunity (cold agglutinins, rheumatoid factor) and moderate hepatic dysfunction were important laboratory clues. In one case, focal isotope defects in the spleen scan misleadingly suggested a septic complication. A false-positive monospot test initially obscured the correct serologic diagnosis in the same patient. Failure to consider this selflimited viral infection may be a critical factor leading to unnecessary surgery. Other viral agents capable of eliciting a similar syndrome are cited. Images Fig. 1.

Lerner, P I; Sampliner, J E

1977-01-01

214

Case Report: Severe form of hemolytic-uremic syndrome with multiple organ failure in a child: a case report  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is a leading cause of acute renal failure in infants and young children. It is traditionally defined as a triad of acute renal failure, hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia that occur within a week after prodromal hemorrhagic enterocolitis. Severe cases can also be presented by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), toxic megacolon with ileus, pancreatitis, central nervous system (CNS) disorders and multiple organ failure (MOF). Case presentation: A previously healthy 4-year old Caucasian girl developed acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia following a short episode of abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea. By the end of the first week the diagnosis of the typical HUS was established. During the second week the disease progressed into MOF that included ileus, pancreatitis, hepatitis, coma and ARDS, accompanied by hemodynamic instability and extreme leukocytosis. Nonetheless, the girl made a complete recovery after one month of the disease. She was successfully treated in the intensive care unit and significant improvement was noticed after plasmapheresis and continuous veno-venous hemodialysis. Conclusions: Early start of plasmapheresis and meticulous supportive treatment in the intensive care unit, including renal placement therapy, may be the therapy of choice in severe cases of HUS presented by MOF. Monitoring of prognostic factors is important for early performance of appropriate diagnostic and therapeutical interventions.

Mijatovic, Dino; Blagaic, Ana; Zupan, Zeljko

2014-01-01

215

Emerging viral infections relevant to transfusion medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of new technologies leads to the discovery of new viruses. For each of these new infectious agents relevance to transfusion needs to be assessed. The questions to be answered are transmissibility by transfusion, pathogenicity, prevalence in blood donors, persistence and the availability of screening assays. Since 1995, three new viruses have been identified and extensively studied. GB virus-C\\/hepatitis

J.-P. Allain

2000-01-01

216

Transfusion-transmitted malaria in Canada  

PubMed Central

THREE CASES OF TRANSFUSION-TRANSMITTED MALARIA in Canada are described. Although very rare, this diagnosis should be considered in transfusion recipients who have undiagnosed symptoms consistent with malaria. Thick and thin blood smears should be urgently examined to exclude this possibility.

Slinger, Robert; Giulivi, Antonio; Bodie-Collins, Margaret; Hindieh, Farid; John, Ron St.; Sher, Graham; Goldman, Mindy; Ricketts, Maura; Kain, Kevin C.

2001-01-01

217

Psychrobacter arenosus Bacteremia after Blood Transfusion, France  

PubMed Central

We report a case of transfusion-associated bacteremia caused by Psychrobacter arenosus. This psychrotolerant bacterium was previously isolated in 2004 from coastal sea ice and sediments in the Sea of Japan, but not from humans. P. arenosus should be considered a psychrotolerant bacterial species that can cause transfusion-transmitted bacterial infections.

Recule, Christine; Pouzol, Patricia; Lafeuillade, Bruno; Mallaret, Marie-Reine; Maurin, Max; Croize, Jacques

2013-01-01

218

Babesia spp. infections transmitted through blood transfusion.  

PubMed

Babesiosis in humans is caused by infection with various species of Babesia (Apicomplexa, Piroplasmida), mainly transmitted by an arthropod vector--Ixodes spp. ticks. This review will focus on blood transfusion as another mode of Babesia transmission, especially in endemic areas, as well as the impact of human babesiosis on transfusion medicine. PMID:21682090

Si?ski, Edward; Welc-Faleciak, Renata; Pog?ód, Ryszard

2011-01-01

219

Transfusion-transmitted malaria in Canada.  

PubMed

Three cases of transfusion-transmitted malaria in Canada are described. Although very rare, this diagnosis should be considered in transfusion recipients who have undiagnosed symptoms consistent with malaria. Thick and thin blood smears should be urgently examined to exclude this possibility. PMID:11232141

Slinger, R; Giulivi, A; Bodie-Collins, M; Hindieh, F; John, R S; Sher, G; Goldman, M; Ricketts, M; Kain, K C

2001-02-01

220

Transfusion-transmitted malaria in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

THREE CASES OF TRANSFUSION-TRANSMITTED MALARIA in Canada are described. Although very rare, this diagnosis should be considered in transfusion recipients who have undiagnosed symptoms consistent with malaria. Thick and thin blood smears should be urgently examined to exclude this possibility.

Robert Slinger; Antonio Giulivi; Margaret Bodie-Collins; Farid Hindieh; Graham Sher; Mindy Goldman; Maura Ricketts; Kevin C. Kain

221

Diagnosis and classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.  

PubMed

Uncompensated autoantibody-mediated red blood cell (RBC) consumption is the hallmark of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). Classification of AIHA is pathophysiologically based and divides AIHA into warm, mixed or cold-reactive subtypes. This thermal-based classification is based on the optimal autoantibody-RBC reactivity temperatures. AIHA is further subcategorized into idiopathic and secondary with the later being associated with a number of underlying infectious, neoplastic and autoimmune disorders. In most cases AIHA is confirmed by a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT). The standard therapeutic approaches to treatment of AIHA include corticosteroids, splenectomy, immunosuppressive agents and monoclonal antibodies. PMID:24418298

Bass, Garrett F; Tuscano, Emily T; Tuscano, Joseph M

2014-01-01

222

Transfusion burden in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients with persistent anemia treated in routine clinical practice: a retrospective observational study  

PubMed Central

Background Transfusion patterns are not well characterized in non-dialysis (ND) chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This study describes the proportion of patients transfused, units of blood transfused and trigger-hemoglobin (Hb) levels for transfusions in severe anemic, ND-CKD patients in routine practice. Methods A retrospective cohort study of electronic medical record data from the Henry Ford Health System identified 374 adult, ND-CKD patients with severe anemia (Hb < 10 g/dL and subsequent use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents [ESA] therapy, blood transfusions, or a second Hb < 10 g/dL) between January 2004 and June 2008. Exclusions included those with prior diagnoses of cancer, renal or liver transplant, end-stage renal disease, acute bleeding, trauma, sickle cell disease, or aplastic anemia. A gap of ? 1 days between units of blood transfused was counted as a separate transfusion. Results At least 1 transfusion (mean of 2 units; range, 1-4) was administered to 20% (75/374) of ND-CKD patients with mean (± SD) follow-up of 459 (± 427) days. The mean (± SD) Hb level closest and prior to a transfusion was 8.8 (± 1.5) g/dL. Patients who were hospitalized in the 6 months prior to their first anemia diagnosis were 6.3 times more likely to receive a blood transfusion than patients who were not hospitalized (p < 0.0001). Patients with peripheral vascular disease (PVD) were twice as likely to have a transfusion as patients without PVD (p = 0.04). Conclusions Transfusions were prevalent and the trigger hemoglobin concentration was approximately 9 g/dL among ND-CKD patients with anemia. To reduce the transfusion burden, clinicians should consider other anemia treatments including ESA therapy.

2012-01-01

223

Blood platelet kinetics and platelet transfusion  

PubMed Central

The discovery of citrate anticoagulant in the 1920s and the development of plastic packs for blood collection in the 1960s laid the groundwork for platelet transfusion therapy on a scale not previously possible. A major limitation, however, was the finding that platelet concentrates prepared from blood anticoagulated with citrate were unsuitable for transfusion because of platelet clumping. We found that this could be prevented by simply reducing the pH of platelet-rich plasma to about 6.5 prior to centrifugation. We used this approach to characterize platelet kinetics and sites of platelet sequestration in normal and pathologic states and to define the influence of variables such as anticoagulant and ABO incompatibility on post-transfusion platelet recovery. The “acidification” approach enabled much wider use of platelet transfusion therapy until alternative means of producing concentrates suitable for transfusion became available.

Aster, Richard H.

2013-01-01

224

Guidelines for the transfusion of red cells.  

PubMed

The following recommendations, which aim at standardising and rationalising clinical indications for the transfusion of red cells in Belgium, were drawn up by a working group of the Superior Health Council. To this end, the Superior Health Council organised an expert meeting devoted to "Guidelines for the transfusion of red cells" in collaboration with the Belgian Hematological Society. The experts discussed the indications for red cell transfusions, the ideal red cell concentrate, the practical issues of administering red cells, and red cell transfusions in patients in a critical condition. The recommendations formulated by the experts were validated by the working group with the purpose of harmonising red cell transfusion in Belgian hospitals. PMID:19186562

Baele, P L; Muylle, L; Noens, L; Gulliksson, H; Brands, A; Isbister, J; Van der Linden, P; Hübner, R; Berneman, Z; Lamy, M; Ferrant, A; Lambermont, M; Sondag, D

2008-01-01

225

Integrating molecular technologies for red blood cell typing and compatibility testing into blood centers and transfusion services.  

PubMed

Nucleic acid-based technology is now at a point where the field of transfusion medicine is ready for its widespread application. In the donor center, genotyping of red blood cell (RBC) products provides phenotype-matched products for special patient populations or antigen-negative products for patients with alloantibodies. In the immunohematology reference laboratory, molecular technologies aid in discerning blood types in the situation of a typing discrepancy and improve pretransfusion RBC testing reagents. In the hospital transfusion service, genotyping patients aids in providing phenotype-matched RBC products. In prenatal testing, genotyping for RHD aids in the decision for Rh immune globulin prophylaxis and predicting risk of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Before genotyping is accepted as the universal standard for pretransfusion and donor testing, important limitations of this technology must be addressed, including the fact that the genotype does not always predict the phenotype and the need for creating the ideal high-throughput platform. Clinical trials are needed to answer important questions, and a donor and patient database is needed. A stepwise plan for progressive introduction into the donor centers and transfusion services must be established. In conclusion, the field of transfusion medicine is ready to expand the use of molecular diagnostics. PMID:18353252

Hillyer, Christopher D; Shaz, Beth H; Winkler, Anne M; Reid, Marion

2008-04-01

226

Thrombotic microangiopathy, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thrombotic microangiopathy, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. The term thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) defines a lesion of vessel wall thickening (mainly arterioles or capillaries), intraluminal platelet thrombosis, and partial or complete obstruction of the vessel lumina. Depending on whether renal or brain lesions prevail, two pathologically indistinguishable but somehow clinically different entities have been described: the hemolytic uremic syndrome

Piero Ruggenenti; Marina Noris; Giuseppe Remuzzi

2001-01-01

227

[Abnormal agglutination by reducing surface charge of red cell membrane as source of error in ABO typing and actual cases of incompatible ABO blood transfusion due to various factors].  

PubMed

T activation of red cells results from the effects of microbial sialidase catalysing the cleavage of sialic acid from red cell membrane. Abnormal agglutination may be induced when human-derived antiA,B antibodies containing antiT are used. By the using of mouse-derived antiA,B monoclonal antibodies this type of polyagglutination as source of error could be overcome. Most common cause of ABO mismatch is due to more simple technical or clerical error resulting in transfusion of the wrong blood to the recipient. Three such cases with non-fatal hemolytic transfusion reaction are described. PMID:9301303

Okada, K

1997-09-01

228

Immunotherapy treatments of warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.  

PubMed

Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (WAIHA) is one of four clinical types of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), with the characteristics of autoantibodies maximally active at body temperature. It produces a variable anemia-sometimes mild and sometimes severe. With respect to the absence or presence of an underlying condition, WAIHA is either idiopathic (primary) or secondary, which determines the treatment strategies in practice. Conventional treatments include immune suppression with corticosteroids and, in some cases, splenectomy. In recent years, the number of clinical studies with monoclonal antibodies and immunosuppressants in the treatment of WAIHA increased as the knowledge of autoimmunity mechanisms extended. This thread of developing new tools of treating WAIHA is well exemplified with the success in using anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, Rituximab. Following this success, other treatment methods based on the immune mechanisms of WAIHA have emerged. We reviewed these newly developed immunotherapy treatments here in order to provide the clinicians with more options in selecting the best therapy for patients with WAIHA, hoping to stimulate researchers to find more novel immunotherapy strategies. PMID:24106518

Liu, Bainan; Gu, Wangang

2013-01-01

229

Immunotherapy Treatments of Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia  

PubMed Central

Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (WAIHA) is one of four clinical types of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), with the characteristics of autoantibodies maximally active at body temperature. It produces a variable anemia—sometimes mild and sometimes severe. With respect to the absence or presence of an underlying condition, WAIHA is either idiopathic (primary) or secondary, which determines the treatment strategies in practice. Conventional treatments include immune suppression with corticosteroids and, in some cases, splenectomy. In recent years, the number of clinical studies with monoclonal antibodies and immunosuppressants in the treatment of WAIHA increased as the knowledge of autoimmunity mechanisms extended. This thread of developing new tools of treating WAIHA is well exemplified with the success in using anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, Rituximab. Following this success, other treatment methods based on the immune mechanisms of WAIHA have emerged. We reviewed these newly developed immunotherapy treatments here in order to provide the clinicians with more options in selecting the best therapy for patients with WAIHA, hoping to stimulate researchers to find more novel immunotherapy strategies.

Gu, Wangang

2013-01-01

230

Hemostatic Function and Transfusion Efficacy of Apheresis Platelet Concentrates Treated with Gamma Irradiation in Use for Thrombocytopenic Patients  

PubMed Central

Summary Background During the transfusion of blood components, the transfer of allogeneic donor white blood cells (WBCs) can mediate transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD). To minimize the reaction, exposure of blood products to gamma irradiation is currently the standard of care. The aim of our study was to evaluate and compare hemostatic function, transfusion efficacy, and safety of gamma-irradiated single-donor apheresis platelet concentrates (PCs) and of conventional non-irradiated PCs in patients with chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. Methods 20 double-dose single-donor leukoreduced PCs were split in two identical units; one was gamma-irradiated with 25 Gy (study arm A) and the other remains non-irradiated (study arm B). Both units were stored under equal conditions. Hematologic patients were randomly assigned to receive gamma-irradiated or conventional non-irradiated PCs. Hemostatic function was evaluated by thrombelastography (TEG). TEG measurements were taken pre transfusion and 1 and 24 h post transfusion. TEG profiles were measured, noting the time to initiate clotting (R), the angle of clot formation (?), and the maximum amplitude (clot strength (MA)). Whole blood samples were collected from these thrombocytopenic patients at 1 and 24 h for PLT count increments (CIs) and corrected count increments (CCIs) with assessments of transfusion efficacy. Time to next PLT transfusion, transfusion requirement of RBCs, active bleeding, and adverse events (AEs), were analyzed. Results No differences could be found in hemostatic function parameters (MA, R, and ?) between study arms A and B (all p values > 0.096) pre transfusion as well as 1 and 24 h post transfusion. No differences between study arms A and B were observed for mean (± standard deviation (SD)) 1-hour CCI (12.83 ± 6.33 vs. 11.59 ± 5.97) and 24-hour CCI (6.56 ± 4.10 vs. 5.76 ± 4.05). Mean 1-hour CI and 24-hour CI were not significantly different in both study arms (p = 0.254 and p = 0.242 respectively). Median time to the next PC transfusion after study PC was not significantly different between groups: (2.4 vs. 2.2 days, p = 0.767). No differences could be found in transfusion requirement of red blood cells (p = 0.744) between both study arms. There were also no regarding bleeding, adverse events, and acute transfusion reaction(s). Conclusions This study confirms safety of gamma-irradiated PCs for treatment thrombocytopenia. Hemostatic function, transfusion efficacy, bleeding, and safety of single-donor apheresis PCs treated with gamma irradiation versus untreated control PCs are comparable.

Zhu, Mei; Xu, Wei; Wang, Bao-Long; Su, Hong

2014-01-01

231

[Cutaneo-viscero-hemolytic loxoscelism with acute renal failure].  

PubMed

The Loxoscelism is caused by the bite of spider Loxosceles laeta gender, of worldwide distribution. The poisoning can cause lesions dermonecrotic and less frequently a systemic illness that can be fatal. The mechanism of venom action is multifactorial. The characteristic dermonecrotic lesion results from the direct effects of the venom on the celular and basal membrane components, as well as the extracelular matrix. The initial interaction between the poison and tissues, causes complement activation, migration of polymorphic neutrophils, liberation of proteolytic enzymes, cytoquines, aggregation platelet, and blood flow alterations that result in edema and ischemia, with development of necrosis. There is no a definitive treatment for loxoscelism. However, the value of specific antivenom, to decrease lesion size and limit systemic illness even when such administration is delayed. We present a case of cutaneous-visceral loxoscelismo with unfavorable evolution. PMID:20803945

Alfaro, Flavia V; Dotto, Beatriz; Sesin, Ana M; Prettini, Viviana; Sesin, Jorge; Aliciardi, Enrique; Vergottini, Juan C; Gonzalez, Mauricio

2008-01-01

232

The transfusion medicine we want  

PubMed Central

The Associação Brasileira de Hematologia e Hemoterapia (ABHH), through its Board of Directors, hosted a national symposium called "Forum: The Transfusion Medicine we want", to discuss proposed policies and techniques related to the area. This meeting was held in São Paulo on August 19 and 20, 2010, with the participation of experts, authorities and representatives of organized groups of patients and users. The discussions were organized around three specific issues selected from over 100 suggestions sent to the ABHH through public consultation on the web: 1. Strategies; 2. Financing; 3. Blood products. A plenary session, held at the end of the meeting, adopted recommendations that are relevant to the different discussion topics. This document contains actions proposed by the ABHH to meet the demands discussed.

2011-01-01

233

Human complement factor H deficiency associated with hemolytic uremic syndrome.  

PubMed

This study reports on six cases of deficiency in the human complement regulatory protein Factor H (FH) in the context of an acute renal disease. Five of the cases were observed in children presenting with idiopathic hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Two of the children exhibited a homozygous deficiency characterized by the absence of the 150-kD form of Factor H and the presence, upon immunoblotting, of the 42-kD Factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1) and other FH-related protein (FHR) bands. Southern blot and PCR analysis of DNA of one patient with homozygous deficiency ruled out the presence of a large deletion of the FH gene as the underlying defect for the deficiency. The other four children presented with heterozygous deficiency and exhibited a normal immunoblotting pattern of proteins of the FH family. Factor H deficiency is the only complement deficiency associated with HUS. These observations suggest a role for FH and/or FH receptors in the pathogenesis of idiopathic HUS. PMID:9848786

Rougier, N; Kazatchkine, M D; Rougier, J P; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V; Blouin, J; Deschenes, G; Soto, B; Baudouin, V; Pautard, B; Proesmans, W; Weiss, E; Weiss, L

1998-12-01

234

Hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with Plasmodium vivax malaria successfully treated with plasma exchange.  

PubMed

We report a case of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in an adult patient with Plasmodium vivax malaria. The patient presented with worsening anemia, persistent thrombocytopenia and acute kidney injury. HUS was diagnosed based on the high serum lactate dehydrogenase, elevated reticulocyte count and presence of schistocytes on peripheral blood smear. Kidney biopsy showed features of thrombotic microangiopathy. Complete hematological remission was achieved after five sessions of therapeutic plasma exchange. Renal function partially recovered and stabilized at discharge. Vivax malaria, generally considered benign, may be rarely associated with HUS. PMID:24574629

Keskar, V S; Jamale, T E; Hase, N K

2014-01-01

235

Nurses' perceptions of transfusion training: an evaluation.  

PubMed

Within Scottish hospitals transfusion education is mandatory for all staff involved in the process of transfusion. Currently two modes of delivery exist, face-to-face and e-learning. The researcher,a transfusion practitioner, wished to evaluate the perceptions of registered nurses within her local children's hospital to the transfusion education available. The aim of the evaluation was to ascertain whether there were perceived benefits, whether expectations were met and whether nurses perceived that there were any barriers to undertaking the education. Both quantitative and qualitative data were obtained by means of a questionnaire; all registered nurses in the hospital were invited to participate. The study indicates a high level of compliance with mandatory transfusion education and suggests both satisfaction and perceived benefits with transfusion education among those who responded. Some barriers were highlighted, but it was noted that these were not exclusive to transfusion education and in the current challenging environment with conflicting priorities on time, resolution may be complex. PMID:23634461

Stout, Lynn

236

Blood Transfusion and Infection After Cardiac Surgery  

PubMed Central

Cardiac surgery is the largest consumer of blood products in medicine; although believed life saving, transfusion carries substantial adverse risks. This study characterizes the relationship between transfusion and risk of major infection after cardiac surgery. 5,158 adults were prospectively enrolled to assess infections after cardiac surgery. The most common procedures were isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (31%) and isolated valve surgery (30%); 19% were reoperations. Infections were adjudicated by independent infectious disease experts. Multivariable Cox modeling was used to assess the independent effect of blood and platelet transfusions on major infections within 60±5 days of surgery. Red blood cells (RBCs) and platelets were transfused in 48% and 31% of patients, respectively. Each RBC unit transfused was associated with a 29% increase in crude risk of major infection (P<0.001). Among RBC recipients, the most common infections were pneumonia (3.6%) and bloodstream infections (2%). Risk factors for infection included postoperative RBC units transfused, longer duration of surgery, and transplant or ventricular assist device implantation, in addition to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, and elevated preoperative creatinine. Platelet transfusion decreased the risk of infection (P=.02). Greater attention to management practices that limit RBC use, including cell salvage, small priming volumes, vacuum-assisted venous return with rapid autologous priming, and ultrafiltration, and pre- and intraoperative measures to elevate hematocrit could potentially reduce occurrence of major postoperative infections.

Horvath, Keith A.; Acker, Michael A.; Chang, Helena; Bagiella, Emilia; Smith, Peter K.; Iribarne, Alexander; Kron, Irving L.; Lackner, Pamela; Argenziano, Michael; Ascheim, Deborah D.; Gelijns, Annetine C.; Michler, Robert E.; Van Patten, Danielle; Puskas, John D.; O'Sullivan, Karen; Kliniewski, Dorothy; Jeffries, Neal O.; O'Gara, Patrick T.; Moskowitz, Alan J.; Blackstone, Eugene

2014-01-01

237

Blood transfusion and infection after cardiac surgery.  

PubMed

Cardiac surgery is the largest consumer of blood products in medicine; although believed life saving, transfusion carries substantial adverse risks. This study characterizes the relationship between transfusion and risk of major infection after cardiac surgery. In all, 5,158 adults were prospectively enrolled to assess infections after cardiac surgery. The most common procedures were isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery (31%) and isolated valve surgery (30%); 19% were reoperations. Infections were adjudicated by independent infectious disease experts. Multivariable Cox modeling was used to assess the independent effect of blood and platelet transfusions on major infections within 60 ± 5 days of surgery. Red blood cells (RBC) and platelets were transfused in 48% and 31% of patients, respectively. Each RBC unit transfused was associated with a 29% increase in crude risk of major infection (p < 0.001). Among RBC recipients, the most common infections were pneumonia (3.6%) and bloodstream infections (2%). Risk factors for infection included postoperative RBC units transfused, longer duration of surgery, and transplant or ventricular assist device implantation, in addition to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, and elevated preoperative creatinine. Platelet transfusion decreased the risk of infection (p = 0.02). Greater attention to management practices that limit RBC use, including cell salvage, small priming volumes, vacuum-assisted venous return with rapid autologous priming, and ultrafiltration, and preoperative and intraoperative measures to elevate hematocrit could potentially reduce occurrence of major postoperative infections. PMID:23647857

Horvath, Keith A; Acker, Michael A; Chang, Helena; Bagiella, Emilia; Smith, Peter K; Iribarne, Alexander; Kron, Irving L; Lackner, Pamela; Argenziano, Michael; Ascheim, Deborah D; Gelijns, Annetine C; Michler, Robert E; Van Patten, Danielle; Puskas, John D; O'Sullivan, Karen; Kliniewski, Dorothy; Jeffries, Neal O; O'Gara, Patrick T; Moskowitz, Alan J; Blackstone, Eugene H

2013-06-01

238

Transfusion associated circulatory overload: a critical incident.  

PubMed

Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) is a serious but under-recognised complication of blood transfusion. While the exact incidence rate is unknown the associated morbidity and mortality make this a transfusion reaction worthy of attention. This article provides details of a critical incident involving TACO followed by a literature review and discussion written from the perspective of a student ODP. The goal of this article is to raise awareness of TACO amongst hospital staff to facilitate faster recognition and earlier intervention in future events. PMID:24516967

Goodall, E

2014-01-01

239

Refractory response to platelet transfusion therapy.  

PubMed

Platelet transfusions are commonly used for prophylaxis and treatment of bleeding. After a transfusion, an increment or "boost" is expected to occur. While a number of factors can contribute to a poor posttransfusion increment, refractoriness is typically defined as failure to achieve an appropriate increment after receiving 2 consecutive transfusions with fresh ABO-compatible platelets. The most common cause of refractoriness is contamination of the platelet product with leukocytes, resulting in human leukocyte antigens antibody formation. ABO incompatibility and human platelet antigens are also implicated in the development of refractoriness. Nurses who infuse platelets must understand these causes to assist in prevention and management. PMID:20228646

Eisenberg, Seth

2010-01-01

240

Efficacy of hepatitis B vaccine in chimpanzees given transfusions of highly infective blood.  

PubMed

The protective efficacy of a hepatitis B vaccine against infections from transfusions of large volumes of highly infective blood in five immunized chimpanzees was assessed. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) became positive and antibody to HBsAg (anti-HBs) disappeared soon after transfusion in the five chimpanzees. Two chimpanzees that had HBsAg only on the day of transfusion did not develop infection. However, the remaining three chimpanzees with persistent HBsAg antigenemia for three to four days developed serologic evidence of infection. Two chimpanzees did not have hepatitis and the third had a mild, transient case of acute hepatitis. The hepatitis B vaccine prevented the four immunized chimpanzees from developing illness. The remaining chimpanzee developed hepatitis, but a rapid booster response of anti-HBs owing to the previous vaccination appeared to lighten the severity of the disease and prevent chronicity. PMID:6827148

Karasawa, T; Shikata, T; Abe, K; Horiuchi, R; Takahashi, T; Yoshihara, N; Mayumi, M; Suzuki, H; Oda, T

1983-02-01

241

Research of monitoring transfusion system for medical use  

Microsoft Academic Search

A transfusion system faced to hospital is presented. The system has real-time monitoring and alarming (when there exit abnormal instance or the transfusion is completed) functions, which well settle the inconvenience of venous transfusion in clinic, and increase the security and efficiency. The Photoelectric sensor technology and signal processing technology are applied to acquire the reliable detection of the transfusion.

Jingzhu Yang; Gang Li; Di Wu; Fan Hu

2010-01-01

242

A Simple Method to Estimate Volume for Fetal Intravascular Transfusions  

Microsoft Academic Search

We derived a constant termed the transfusion coefficient to simplify the estimation of the fetal intravascular transfusion volume. The product of the estimated fetal weight (g) and 0.02 (transfusion coefficient), estimates the transfusion volume (ml) required to increase the fetal hematocrit by approximately 10 percentage points. Our estimation was comparable to Mandelbrot’s technique and better than Plecas’ method for estimating

Gregg Giannina; Karen Dorman

1998-01-01

243

Blood Donation and Transfusion: A Primer for Health Educators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a primer for health educators about blood donation and transfusion, examining the nature of human blood, the background of blood transfusion, blood donation criteria, risks related to homologous blood transfusion, directed blood donation, potential alternatives to homologous transfusion, and resources for education on the subject. (SM)

Felts, W. Michael; Glascoff, Mary A.

1991-01-01

244

[Hemolytic anemia caused by graft-versus-host reaction in ABO-nonidentical renal transplants from blood group O donors].  

PubMed

Acute hemolytic anemia is one of the side effects associated with cyclosporin and tacrolimus therapy, and three mechanisms have been described to account for hemolytic anemia in patients receiving these drugs: drug induced hemolysis, autoimmune hemolysis and alloimmune hemolysis resulting from donor lymphocytes derived from the allograft (passenger lymphocyte syndrome). We report four cases of renal transplant recipients who developed alloimmune hemolytic anemia due to minor ABO incompatibility while under treatment with cyclosporin (two) and tacrolimus (two). The anti-erythrocyte antibodies responsible for hemolysis were of the IgG isotype and showed anti-A or anti-B specificity. These findings suggest that the hemolysis could be related to alloantibodies derived from the clonal development of donor B lymphocytes in the recipients (microchimerism). In summary, hemolytic anemia due to ABO-minor incompatibility occurs infrequently after renal transplantation. Risks are higher for patients A, B or AB blood group receiving an O blood group graft under treatment with cyclosporin or tacrolimus. Follow-up of these patients is warranted for the early detection and optimal management may be achieved by reduction of immunosuppression and change to mycophenolate mofetil. PMID:11816517

Peces, R; Díaz Corte, C; Navascués, R A

2001-01-01

245

Telemedicine in the blood transfusion laboratory: remote interpretation of pre-transfusion tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have developed a telemedicine system for blood transfusion work, to supply the local hospital laboratory with an expert opinion from the central reference laboratory. The telemedicine system allows remote inspection and interpretation of pre-transfusion tests, which are performed by ID-cards (micro-tube gel technology). The system was installed at three blood transfusion laboratories in Slovenia, approximately 70 km apart. Validation

Marko Meza; Marko Breskvar; Andrej Kosir; Irena Bricl; Jurij Tasic; Primoz Rozman

2007-01-01

246

Retrospective Analysis of Blood Transfusion Recipients: Evidence for Post–Transfusion Hepatitis E  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Objectives: Of 200 volunteer blood donors we had screened earlier for hepatitis E virus (HEV) RNA, using reverse–transcription polymerase chain reaction, 3 were positive, raising the possibility of transfusion–associated hepatitis E in areas endemic for this virus. This retrospective study was to reassess the extent of post–transfusion hepatitis E among transfusion recipients, investigated in 1982. Materials and Methods:

V. A. Arankalle; L. P. Chobe

2000-01-01

247

Update on the transfusion in gastrointestinal bleeding (TRIGGER) trial: statistical analysis plan for a cluster-randomised feasibility trial  

PubMed Central

Background Previous research has suggested an association between more liberal red blood cell (RBC) transfusion and greater risk of further bleeding and mortality following acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB). Methods and design The Transfusion in Gastrointestinal Bleeding (TRIGGER) trial is a pragmatic cluster-randomised feasibility trial which aims to evaluate the feasibility of implementing a restrictive vs. liberal RBC transfusion policy for adult patients admitted to hospital with AUGIB in the UK. This trial will help to inform the design and methodology of a phase III trial. The protocol for TRIGGER has been published in Transfusion Medicine Reviews. Recruitment began in September 2012 and was completed in March 2013. This update presents the statistical analysis plan, detailing how analysis of the TRIGGER trial will be performed. It is hoped that prospective publication of the full statistical analysis plan will increase transparency and give readers a clear overview of how TRIGGER will be analysed. Trial registration ISRCTN85757829

2013-01-01

248

THE KINETICS OF IN VIVO HEMOLYTIC SYSTEMS.  

PubMed

This paper is concerned with a variety of questions which bear on the occurrence of hemolysis in vivo, and with the possibility of regarding the contents of the blood stream as a hemolytic system in which a steady state is maintained by the production of new red cells to replace those which are destroyed. The material which is dealt with includes the following. 1. Mixtures of Lysins, Accelerators, and Inhibitors.-The effects of individual accelerators and inhibitors in mixtures, like the effects of individual lysins, are roughly additive in simple systems, the acceleration or inhibition produced by the individual substances being most conveniently measured in terms of R-values. 2. Normal Intravascular Lysins.-These probably play only a small part in red cell destruction unless their concentration rises to unusual levels, or unless their effects are enhanced by accelerators, or by the reduction of the concentration of normal inhibitors. The three normal in vivo hemolytic processes for which there is substantial evidence involve (a) the action of the bile salts and of the soaps derived from chyle, (b) the action of the spleen, and (c) the action of hemolytic substances derived from tissues. The recent observations of Maegraith, Findlay, and Martin on the presence of widely distributed tissue lysins are confirmed except for their conclusion that these lysins are species-specific. Species-specific tissue lysins, if present, are not the only lysins derivable from tissues by simple immersion in saline, for non-species-specific lytic substances can also be obtained, and seem to be similar to the "lysolecithin" which some regard as responsible for the action of the spleen on red cell fragility and shape. 3. Plasma Inhibitors.-About 30 per cent of the total inhibitory effect of plasma for saponin hemolysis is due to the contained cholesterol, while 25 per cent at most is due to the plasma proteins, particularly globulins. The remaining 45 per cent is probably accounted for by enhancing effects among the inhibitors; e.g., the enhancing effect of lecithin on the cholesterol inhibition. The mechanism of the inhibition is still incompletely understood; probably reactions between inhibitor and lysin and reactions between inhibitor and components of the red cell surface are both involved, and it is important to observe that the inhibitory effect of plasma or of a plasma constituent may be greater in systems containing one lysin than in systems containing another. No evidence for diffusible inhibitory substances in plasma has been found, and the variations observed in the inhibitory power of human plasma seem to be related to the combined concentrations of cholesterol, protein, and probably lecithin, rather than to the cholesterol content alone. For this reason the inhibitory power tends to be low under conditions of poor nutrition. 4. The Steady State and the Kinetics of Hemolysis In Vivo.-On the assumption that the steady state is the result of a balance between a process which produces red cells and a process which destroys them, equations have been developed for the way in which cells of different resistances are affected when the rate of destruction changes. A method for analyzing experimental curves is described and illustrated. In general, this part of the paper relates the level of the red cell count in the animal to the intensity of the hemolytic processes taking place in vivo, and does not lend itself to detailed abstraction. PMID:19873397

Ponder, E

1944-07-20

249

Transfusion-transmitted Babesia spp.: bull's-eye on Babesia microti.  

PubMed

Babesia spp. are intraerythrocytic protozoan parasites of animals and humans that cause babesiosis, a zoonotic disease transmitted primarily by tick vectors. Although a variety of species or types of Babesia have been described in the literature as causing infection in humans, the rodent parasite Babesia microti has emerged as the focal point of human disease, especially in the United States. Not only has B. microti become established as a public health concern, this agent is increasingly being transmitted by blood transfusion: estimates suggest that between 70 and 100 cases of transfusion-transmitted Babesia (TTB) have occurred over the last 30 years. A recent upsurge in TTB cases attributable to B. microti, coupled with at least 12 fatalities in transfusion recipients diagnosed with babesiosis, has elevated TTB to a key policy issue in transfusion medicine. Despite clarity on a need to mitigate transmission risk, few options are currently available to prevent the transmission of B. microti by blood transfusion. Future mitigation efforts may stress serological screening of blood donors in regionalized areas of endemicity, with adjunct nucleic acid testing during the summer months, when acute infections are prevalent. However, several hurdles remain, including the absence of a licensed blood screening assay and a thorough cost-benefit analysis of proposed interventions. Despite current obstacles, continued discussion of TTB without proactive intervention is no longer a viable alternative. PMID:21233506

Leiby, David A

2011-01-01

250

Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome  

MedlinePLUS

Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) is a rare condition that occurs only in identical twins while they are in the womb. ... TTTS occurs when the blood supply of one twin moves to the other the shared placenta. The ...

251

Prevention and Management of Platelet Transfusion Refractoriness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Platelet transfusion refractoriness is a major complication of long–term platelet supportive care. Refractoriness may lead to fatal bleeding complications in thrombocytopenic patients. Major factors involved are factors related to the clinical condition of the patient as well as HLA alloimmunisation. Non–alloimmune factors may occur in up to 80% of the patients. However, platelet transfusion outcome is impaired in only 50%

V. M. J. Novotny

1999-01-01

252

Transfusion and coagulation management in liver transplantation  

PubMed Central

There is wide variation in the management of coagulation and blood transfusion practice in liver transplantation. The use of blood products intraoperatively is declining and transfusion free transplantations take place ever more frequently. Allogenic blood products have been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. Primary haemostasis, coagulation and fibrinolysis are altered by liver disease. This, combined with intraoperative disturbances of coagulation, increases the risk of bleeding. Meanwhile, the rebalancing of coagulation homeostasis can put patients at risk of hypercoagulability and thrombosis. The application of the principles of patient blood management to transplantation can reduce the risk of transfusion. This includes: preoperative recognition and treatment of anaemia, reduction of perioperative blood loss and the use of restrictive haemoglobin based transfusion triggers. The use of point of care coagulation monitoring using whole blood viscoelastic testing provides a picture of the complete coagulation process by which to guide and direct coagulation management. Pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include the use of anti-fibrinolytic drugs to reduce fibrinolysis, and rarely, the use of recombinant factor VIIa. Factor concentrates are increasingly used; fibrinogen concentrates to improve clot strength and stability, and prothrombin complex concentrates to improve thrombin generation. Non-pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include surgical utilisation of the piggyback technique and maintenance of a low central venous pressure. The use of intraoperative cell salvage and normovolaemic haemodilution reduces allogenic blood transfusion. Further research into methods of decreasing blood loss and alternatives to blood transfusion remains necessary to continue to improve outcomes after transplantation.

Clevenger, Ben; Mallett, Susan V

2014-01-01

253

Transfusion and coagulation management in liver transplantation.  

PubMed

There is wide variation in the management of coagulation and blood transfusion practice in liver transplantation. The use of blood products intraoperatively is declining and transfusion free transplantations take place ever more frequently. Allogenic blood products have been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. Primary haemostasis, coagulation and fibrinolysis are altered by liver disease. This, combined with intraoperative disturbances of coagulation, increases the risk of bleeding. Meanwhile, the rebalancing of coagulation homeostasis can put patients at risk of hypercoagulability and thrombosis. The application of the principles of patient blood management to transplantation can reduce the risk of transfusion. This includes: preoperative recognition and treatment of anaemia, reduction of perioperative blood loss and the use of restrictive haemoglobin based transfusion triggers. The use of point of care coagulation monitoring using whole blood viscoelastic testing provides a picture of the complete coagulation process by which to guide and direct coagulation management. Pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include the use of anti-fibrinolytic drugs to reduce fibrinolysis, and rarely, the use of recombinant factor VIIa. Factor concentrates are increasingly used; fibrinogen concentrates to improve clot strength and stability, and prothrombin complex concentrates to improve thrombin generation. Non-pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include surgical utilisation of the piggyback technique and maintenance of a low central venous pressure. The use of intraoperative cell salvage and normovolaemic haemodilution reduces allogenic blood transfusion. Further research into methods of decreasing blood loss and alternatives to blood transfusion remains necessary to continue to improve outcomes after transplantation. PMID:24876736

Clevenger, Ben; Mallett, Susan V

2014-05-28

254

[Scientific bases of education in transfusion medicine].  

PubMed

Transfusion medicine is a medical speciality which deals with all aspects of blood transfusion. The recent evolution of this speciality was marked by an increased collaboration with clinical medicine, the development of alternatives to allotransfusion (autotransfusion, growth factors, molecular genetics), and the technical progress in laboratory techniques. The development of basic science boosted the introduction of new techniques in the detection of virus and blood cell typing. The analysis of clinical trials allowed a better definition of guidelines for the use of blood products. The blood transfusion teaching program is limited during medical training. Specialists in transfusion medicine have to complete a post-graduate course to become certified. Continuous medical training is organised to allow the specialists to keep their accreditation. Transfusion medicine is becoming more and more complex. This complexity should not lead to breaking down transfusion medicine into several activities, but on the contrary to uniting this medical speciality, within which the different actors shall remain open-minded and able to use the same 'language'. PMID:10666792

Wautier, J L

1999-12-01

255

Effect of a fixed-ratio (1:1:1) transfusion protocol versus laboratory-results-guided transfusion in patients with severe trauma: a randomized feasibility trial  

PubMed Central

Background: Hemorrhage coupled with coagulopathy remains the leading cause of preventable in-hospital deaths among trauma patients. Use of a transfusion protocol with a predefined ratio of 1:1:1 (1 each of red blood cells [RBC], frozen plasma [FP] and platelets) has been associated with improved survival in retrospective studies in military and civilian settings, but such a protocol has its challenges and may increase the risk of respiratory complications. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to assess the feasibility of a 1:1:1 transfusion protocol and its effect on mortality and complications among patients with severe trauma. Methods: We included 78 patients seen in a tertiary trauma centre between July 2009 and October 2011 who had hypotension and bleeding and were expected to need massive transfusion (? 10 RBC units in 24 h). We randomly assigned them to either the fixed-ratio (1:1:1) transfusion protocol (n = 40) or to a laboratory-results–guided transfusion protocol (control; n = 38). The primary outcome, feasibility, was assessed in terms of blood product ratios and plasma wastage. Safety was measured based on 28-day mortality and survival free of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Results: Overall, a transfusion ratio of 1:1:1 was achieved in 57% (21/37) of patients in the fixed-ratio group, as compared with 6% (2/32) in the control group. A ratio of 1:1 (RBC:FP) was achieved in 73% (27/37) in the fixed-ratio group and 22% (7/32) in the control group. Plasma wastage was higher with the intervention protocol (22% [86/390] of FP units v. 10% [30/289] in the control group). The 28-day mortality and number of days free of acute respiratory distress syndrome were statistically similar between the groups. Interpretation: The fixed-ratio transfusion protocol was feasible in our study, but it was associated with increased plasma wastage. Larger randomized trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy of such a protocol in trauma care. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, no. NCT00945542

Nascimento, Bartolomeu; Callum, Jeannie; Tien, Homer; Rubenfeld, Gordon; Pinto, Ruxandra; Lin, Yulia; Rizoli, Sandro

2013-01-01

256

[The importance of antenatal immunoprophylaxis for prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn].  

PubMed

Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) is a consequence of maternal alloimmunization against fetal red blood cell antigens. Alloimmunization against D antigen from Rhesus (Rh) blood group system is particularly important because of its strong immunogenicity. During the last few decades, the introduction of RhD prophylaxis by postpartum administration of anti-D immunoglobulin to RhD negative women, now improved with antenatal prophylaxis, has led to a dramatic decrease in perinatal mortality and morbidity from HDFN. However, severe cases have not disappeared, mostly due to prophylaxis failure. In our case, inappropriate prenatal care during the first pregnancy in an RhD negative mother resulted in primary immunization. In the next pregnancy with an RhD positive child, the mother's secondary immune response was extremely strong and led to early development of severe fetal anemia. The fetus survived thanks to the treatment with intrauterine transfusions (IUT), but they caused suppression of erythropoiesis, which lasted for months after birth. The long lasting, late anemia was treated with repeated postnatal red cell transfusions and recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO). Despite the severity of HDFN in our case, the short-term outcome is good. The boy has normal growth until now, but due to the possibility of an adverse long-term neurodevelopmental outcome, this case requires continuous follow up. It also reminds of the fact that RhD alloimmunization remains an actual problem in daily routine. Antenatal prophylaxis is a crucial step in quality care of those who are at a risk of HDFN. PMID:21568074

Starcevi?, Mirta; Mataija, Marina; Sovi?, Dragica; Dodig, Javorka; Matijevi?, Ratko; Kukuruzovi?, Monika

2011-03-01

257

Granulocyte transfusions for children with infection and neutropenia or granulocyte dysfunction.  

PubMed

Transfusions of granulocytes can be used as an adjunct therapy to antimicrobials in patients with infection and neutropenia or granulocyte dysfunction. However, there is a lack of strong clinical evidence to support the use of this treatment strategy, particularly in children. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of children who received granulocytes at our institution from April 2009 to October 2012, with emphasis on primary indication for the transfusion and clinical outcome in terms of infection. The patients had granulocyte dysfunction or severe neutropenia, defined as absolute neutrophil count (ANC) < 500 cells/mm(3) due to chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), and reasonable hope for bone marrow recovery or engraftment. Eighteen children received granulocytes during 20 distinct episodes: 62% (n = 13) for acute infection, 29% (n = 5) for unresolved chronic infection during the time of HSCT, and 9% (n = 2) for other clinical conditions such as typhilitis and appendectomy. Overall, 92% (n = 12) of the episodes of acute infection had complete or partial resolution, as determined by review of vital signs, physical exam findings and discontinuation of antimicrobials. A substantial number (46%) of children who received granulocytes for acute infection developed respiratory adverse events, but all of these recovered. We conclude that granulocyte transfusions continue to be primarily used in neutropenic patients with acute infections, and that its use in this group of patients is reasonable. However, a prospective randomized clinical trial is needed to evaluate safety and whether the use of granulocytes is superior to antimicrobial-only therapy. PMID:24383443

Díaz, Rosa; Soundar, Esther; Hartman, S Kate; Dreyer, ZoAnn; Teruya, Jun; Hui, Shiu-Ki Rocky

2014-08-01

258

Reappraisal of the Etiology of Extracorpuscular Non-Autoimmune Acquired Hemolytic Anemia in 2657 Hospitalized Patients with Non-Neoplastic Disease  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Unlike autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), literature on the etiological study of non-autoimmune hemolytic anemia (non-AIHA) is scarce. The incidence and prevalence of non-AIHA in different geographic regions are largely unknown perhaps owing to the lack of perspective investigation and different profiles of etiologies from different geographic regions. We aimed to examine the real-world etiology or mechanisms of the non-hereditary non-AIHA from a nationwide population-based administrative claim database in Taiwan. PATIENTS AND METHODS The National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan was adopted for this research. The studied population was total inpatient claim records including both pediatric and adult patients, contributed by a population of 23 million insured individuals in Taiwan. From 2002 to 2008, we retrieved 3,903 patients having no pre-existing malignancy discharged after inpatient management for acquired hemolytic anemia, which was defined as coding in discharge diagnoses containing ICD-9-CM code 283. By contrast, ICD-9-CM code 282 and all of the sub-codes are for hereditary hemolytic anemias. RESULTS AIHA accounted for 32% of the total cases. Among 2,657 patients with non-AIHA, mechanical or microangiopathic mechanism accounted for 19% of cases; hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) 4%, hemoglobinuria because of hemolysis from external causes such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) and march hemoglobinuria 7%, and chronic idiopathic hemolytic anemia or other unspecified non-AIHA 69%. We looked further for specific etiology or mechanism for this group of patients with non-hereditary extrinsic non-AIHA (n = 2,657). The explanatory disease states or conditions were splenomegaly; alcohol use disorder (spur cell hemolysis); heart-valve prosthesis; malignant hypertension; disseminated intravascular coagulation; transfusion reaction; dengue fever-induced hemolytic anemia; direct parasitization; snake, lizard, or spider bite; and Wilson’s disease with internal toxin mechanism. All these cases can explain up to 34.6% of all the non-hereditary extrinsic non-AIHA cases. Fragmentation hemolysis (HUS, heart-valve prosthesis, malignant hypertension, and disseminated intravascular coagulation) accounted for 7.4% of non-AIHA hospitalized patients with non-neoplastic disease. CONCLUSIONS This article is the first one to clearly demonstrate that the non-neoplastic-induced HUS requiring hospitalization cases in Taiwan, which has a population of over 23 million were 110 over a span of seven years, 16 cases per year. Although the etiologies of non-AIHA are well known and described in the literature, this work added the statistical percentages of the various etiologies of non-AIHA in Taiwan.

Kok, Victor C; Lee, Chien-Kuan; Horng, Jorng-Tzong; Lin, Che-Chen; Sung, Fung-Chang

2014-01-01

259

The Transfusion Audit as a Tool to Improve Transfusion Practice: a Critical Appraisal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transfusion audits have a long history and they are required by many regulatory agencies. These audits have been touted as effective in reducing unnecessary transfusions as evidenced by many published articles on the subject. Most of these studies, however, have one or more flaws in their design including the use of historical controls, disregard of the Hawthorne effect, use of

Michael H Kanter

1998-01-01

260

Cloning of Prevotella intermedia loci demonstrating multiple hemolytic domains.  

PubMed

A gene bank was created from Prevotella intermedia strain 27 chromosomal DNA, and a clone was isolated that conferred the expression of two separate modes of hemolytic activity in recombinant Escherichia coli. The original recombinant hemolytic strain (EB34) contained plasmid, pEB34, with a 5.6-kb insert from Sau 3 AI-digested P. intermedia strain 27 chromosomal DNA cloned into the Bam HI site of pUC18. EB34 and deletion subclones were tested for expression of hemolytic activity in a standard tube assay, measuring lysis of erythrocytes spectrophotometrically as a function of hemoglobin release. Cell suspensions of EB34 demonstrated a dose-dependent hemolytic activity, inhibitable by proteases, and heat treatment but not dependent on calcium ions, and not inhibitable by osmoprotectants. Cell-free lysates also demonstrated a heat inhibitable, dose dependent hemolytic activity. Sub-cloning experiments localized the hemolytic region of the insert to a 3.9-kb fragment under direction of the lac promoter. Sequence analysis of the entire insert revealed the presence of multiple open reading frames (1 to 3) in this region which correlated to different forms of hemolytic expression, such that subclones containing all open reading frames 1 to 3 demonstrated strong hemolytic phenotype on blood plates and in the tube assay. Subclones containing only ORF1 demonstrated hemolysis on plates, but not in the tube assay. Subclones containing only open reading frames 2 and 3, but not ORF1 demonstrated hemolysis in the tube assay but not on plates. Homology searches of DNA and protein databases have not revealed significant homologies with reported hemolysins or proteins in any of the open reading frames. PMID:10495708

Beem, J E; Nesbitt, W E; Leung, K P

1999-06-01

261

Prognostic impact of pre-transplantation transfusion history and secondary iron overload in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation: a GITMO study  

PubMed Central

Background Transfusion-dependency affects the natural history of myelodysplastic syndromes. Secondary iron overload may concur to this effect. The relative impact of these factors on the outcome of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome receiving allogeneic stem-cell transplantation remains to be clarified. Design and Methods We retrospectively evaluated the prognostic effect of transfusion history and iron overload on the post-transplantation outcome of 357 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome reported to the Gruppo Italiano Trapianto di Midollo Osseo (GITMO) registry between 1997 and 2007. Results Transfusion-dependency was independently associated with reduced overall survival (hazard ratio=1.48, P=0.017) and increased non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio=1.68, P=0.024). The impact of transfusion-dependency was noted only in patients receiving myeloablative conditioning (overall survival: hazard ratio=1.76, P=0.003; non-relapse mortality: hazard ratio=1.70, P=0.02). There was an inverse relationship between transfusion burden and overall survival after transplantation (P=0.022); the outcome was significantly worse in subjects receiving more than 20 red cell units. In multivariate analysis, transfusion-dependency was found to be a risk factor for acute graft-versus-host disease (P=0.04). Among transfusion-dependent patients undergoing myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation, pre-transplantation serum ferritin level had a significant effect on overall survival (P=0.01) and non-relapse mortality (P=0.03). This effect was maintained after adjusting for transfusion burden and duration, suggesting that the negative effect of transfusion history on outcome might be determined at least in part by iron overload. Conclusions Pre-transplantation transfusion history and serum ferritin have significant prognostic value in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation, inducing a significant increase of non-relapse mortality. These results indicate that transfusion history should be considered in transplantation decision-making in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

Alessandrino, Emilio Paolo; Porta, Matteo Giovanni Della; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Malcovati, Luca; Angelucci, Emanuele; Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Falda, Michele; Onida, Francesco; Bernardi, Massimo; Guidi, Stefano; Lucarelli, Barbarella; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Cerretti, Raffaella; Marenco, Paola; Pioltelli, Pietro; Pascutto, Cristiana; Oneto, Rosi; Pirolini, Laura; Fanin, Renato; Bosi, Alberto

2010-01-01

262

G6PD deficiency with hemolytic anemia due to a rare gene deletion--a report of the first case in Malaysia.  

PubMed

A 2-year-old Chinese boy was referred to Hospital UKM for investigation of recurrent episodes of dark-coloured urine and pallor since birth. He was born prematurely at 34 weeks gestation and developed severe early-onset neonatal jaundice requiring exchange blood transfusion. Screening at birth showed Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. On admission, physical examination revealed pallor, jaundice and mild hepatomegaly. Results of laboratory investigations showed a hemoglobin level of 11.0 g/dl with a hemolytic blood picture, reticulocytosis of 20% and red cell G6PD activity reported as undetectable. The patient's DNA was analysed for G6PD mutations by PCR-based techniques and DNA sequencing and results showed a 24 bp deletion of nucleotide 953-976 in the exon 9 of the G6PD gene. DNA analysis was also performed on blood samples of the patient's mother and female sibling confirming their heterozygous status, although both showed normal red cell G6PD activity levels. The patient was discharged well and his parents were appropriately advised on the condition and the importance of taking folic acid regularly. This is a first case report in Malaysia of G6PD deficiency causing chronic-hemolytic anemia. The rare 24 bp deletion causes the G6PD Nara variant, previously reported only in two other unrelated males, a Japanese and a Portuguese both with chronic hemolytic anemia. PMID:16753852

Ainoon, O; Boo, N Y; Yu, Y H; Cheong, S K; Hamidah, H N

2006-04-01

263

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis.  

PubMed Central

Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis is an immunodeficiency disease characterized by T-cell dysregulation and chronic superficial candidal infections. We report on three patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis who developed autoantibodies to erythrocytes. Our first patient, a 19-year-old female, developed autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) that required multiple courses of treatment, including corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, and danazol. During the last exacerbation of AIHA, intensive treatment with corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin failed and yet the patient responded to plasmapheresis. Our second patient, a 21-year-old male, developed AIHA which responded to oral corticosteroid therapy. Our third patient, a 6-year-old female without evidence of hemolysis, was found to have erythrocyte autoantibodies on routine screening. These three patients had positive direct antiglobulin tests, and the first patient had both immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM erythrocyte autoantibodies, while the remaining two patients had only IgG autoantibody. This is the first report of the association of AIHA with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. We suggest that all patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis be screened periodically for erythrocyte autoantibodies. Plasmapheresis, a safe ancillary procedure in the management of AIHA, may be life-saving in some cases. The occurrence of erythrocyte autoantibodies in mucocutaneous candidiasis may be related to immunoregulatory disorders in this disease.

Oyefara, B I; Kim, H C; Danziger, R N; Carroll, M; Greene, J M; Douglas, S D

1994-01-01

264

Safety and efficacy of early postoperative hyperbaric oxygen therapy with restriction of transfusions in patients with HCC who have undergone partial hepatectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Recent studies have shown that intraoperative blood loss and blood transfusions promote postoperative recurrence of hepatocellular\\u000a carcinoma (HCC). Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a specific method of oxygen administration, which is independent of fluid\\u000a therapy or blood transfusion. The aim of the present study was to assess the usefulness of acute HBOT after liver resection\\u000a for patients with HCC in

Shinichi Ueno; Masahiko Sakoda; Hiroshi Kurahara; Satoshi Iino; Koji Minami; Kei Ando; Yukou Mataki; Kosei Maemura; Sumiya Ishigami; Hiroyuki Shinchi; Shoji Natsugoe

2011-01-01

265

Transfusion requirements in septic shock (TRISS) trial - comparing the effects and safety of liberal versus restrictive red blood cell transfusion in septic shock patients in the ICU: protocol for a randomised controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Transfusion of red blood cells (RBC) is recommended in septic shock and the majority of these patients receive RBC transfusion in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, benefit and harm of RBCs have not been established in this group of high-risk patients. Methods/Design The Transfusion Requirements in Septic Shock (TRISS) trial is a multicenter trial with assessor-blinded outcome assessment, randomising 1,000 patients with septic shock in 30 Scandinavian ICUs to receive transfusion with pre-storage leuko-depleted RBC suspended in saline-adenine-glucose and mannitol (SAGM) at haemoglobin level (Hb) of 7 g/dl or 9 g/dl, stratified by the presence of haematological malignancy and centre. The primary outcome measure is 90-day mortality. Secondary outcome measures are organ failure, ischaemic events, severe adverse reactions (SARs: anaphylactic reaction, acute haemolytic reaction and transfusion-related circulatory overload, and acute lung injury) and mortality at 28 days, 6 months and 1 year. The sample size will enable us to detect a 9% absolute difference in 90-day mortality assuming a 45% event rate with a type 1 error rate of 5% and power of 80%. An interim analysis will be performed after 500 patients, and the Data Monitoring and Safety Committee will recommend the trial be stopped if a group difference in 90-day mortality with P ?0.001 is present at this point. Discussion The TRISS trial may bridge the gap between clinical practice and the lack of efficacy and safety data on RBC transfusion in septic shock patients. The effect of restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion strategy on mortality, organ failure, ischaemic events and SARs will be evaluated. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01485315. Registration date 30 November 2011. First patient was randomised 3 December 2011.

2013-01-01

266

Cutaneous absorption of trivalent chromium: tissue levels and treatment by exchange transfusion  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT A man was accidentally immersed in hot acidic trivalent chromium sulphate solution but none was swallowed. The clinical course was dominated by burns, intravascular haemolysis, and acute renal failure. Blood concentrations of chromium were measured during treatment and tissue concentrations were measured at death. Exchange transfusion reduced blood chromium concentrations by two-thirds. The total quantities of chromium absorbed and removed by various routes were calculated. In-vitro studies showed that the chromium solution did not directly cause haemolysis. Images

Kelly, W F; Ackrill, P; Day, J P; O'Hara, Maureen; Tye, C T; Burton, I; Orton, C; Harris, M

1982-01-01

267

[Analysis on effectiveness of platelet transfusion in 1786 patients].  

PubMed

This study was aimed to observe and analyze the effectiveness of platelet transfusion. The platelet count of 1786 patients before transfusion and on 20-24 hours after transfusion was determined by using Auto-Hematology Analyzer, the percent platelet recovery (PPR) was calculated, the platelet transfusion efficiency (PTE) was evaluated by PPR and hemorrhage presentation after platelet transfusion, and the PTE was statistically analyzed according to disease cause, transfusion frequency, platelet type and once transfusion amount. The results showed that the total PTE of 1786 patients was 52.5%. The comparison of PTE among groups of disease cause showed that PTE in leukemia and aplastic anemia (AA) was lowest, as compared with that of other diseases (P < 0.05), while PTE in operation group was highest. The comparison of PTE among groups of transfusion frequency revealed also statistical difference (P < 0.01), meanwhile PTE decreased with increasing of transfusion frequency. The comparison of PTE among groups of platelet type (platelet phoresis or platelet concentrate) showed statistical difference (P < 0.01). The comparison of PTE among groups of platelet concentrate of once transfusion amount showed no statistical difference (P > 0.05). It is concluded that the PTE closely relates with disease cause of patients, moreover transfusion frequency also associates with PTE, the more frequency of transfusion, the higher possibility of transfusion refractoriness. The PTE of platelet pheresis is obviously superior to that of platelet concentrate, while PTE of platelet concentrate not significantly relates with once adequate or not. PMID:23998608

Yang, Mei; Luo, Hong; Shu, Bin; An, Bang-Quan; Xia, Shi-Qin; Wang, Mao-Ling

2013-08-01

268

Liberal Versus Restrictive Transfusion Thresholds For Patients With Symptomatic Coronary Artery Disease  

PubMed Central

Background Prior trials suggest it is safe to defer transfusion at hemoglobin levels above 7–8 g/dL in most patients. Patients with acute coronary syndrome may benefit from higher hemoglobin levels. Methods We performed a pilot trial in 110 patients with acute coronary syndrome or stable angina undergoing cardiac catheterization and a hemoglobin < 10 g/dL. Patients in the liberal transfusion strategy received one or more units of blood to raise the hemoglobin level ? 10 g/dL. Patients in the restrictive transfusion strategy were permitted to receive blood for symptoms from anemia or for a hemoglobin < 8 g/dL. The predefined primary outcome was the composite of death, myocardial infarction, or unscheduled revascularization 30 days post randomization. Results Baseline characteristics were similar between groups except age (liberal-67.3, restrictive-74.3). The mean number of units transfused was 1.6 in the liberal group and 0.6 in the restrictive group. The primary outcome occurred in 6 patients (10.9%) in the liberal group and 14 (25.5%) in the restrictive group (risk difference= 15.0%; 95% confidence interval of difference 0.7% to 29.3%; p=0.054 and adjusted for age p=0.076). Death at 30 days was less frequent in liberal group (n=1, 1.8%) compared to restrictive group (n=7, 13.0%; p=0.032). Conclusions The liberal transfusion strategy was associated with a trend for fewer major cardiac events and deaths than a more restrictive strategy. These results support the feasibility of and the need for a definitive trial.

Carson, Jeffrey L; Brooks, Maria Mori; Abbott, J Dawn; Chaitman, Bernard; Kelsey, Sheryl F; Triulzi, Darrell J; Srinivas, Vankeepuram; Menegus, Mark A; Marroquin, Oscar C; Rao, Sunil V; Noveck, Helaine; Passano, Elizabeth; Hardison, Regina M; Smitherman, Thomas; Vagaonescu, Tudor; Wimmer, Neil J; Williams, David O

2013-01-01

269

Transfusion-transmitted hepatitis B virus infection.  

PubMed

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains a major risk of transfusion-transmitted infection due to the pre-seroconversion window period (WP), infection with immunovariant viruses, and with occult carriage of HBV infection (OBI). Reduction of HBV residual risk depends upon developing more sensitive HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) tests, adopting anti-HBc screening when appropriate, and implementing HBV nucleic acid testing (NAT), either in minipools or more efficiently in individual samples. HBV NAT combines the ability to significantly reduce the window period and to detect occult HBV carriage substantiating decades of clinical observation that HBsAg-negative/anti-HBc-positive blood could transmit HBV. Clinical observations suggest limited transmission rate of occult HBV compared to WP. Low transmission rate might be related to low viral load observed in OBIs or to the presence of mutants associated with occult carriage. OBIs carrying detectable anti-HBs ( approximately 50%) are essentially not infectious by transfusion. However, recent data suggest that the neutralizing capacity of low anti-HBs may be inefficient when overcome by exposure to high viral load. Anti-HBc blood units without detectable anti-HBs appear moderately infectious except in immunocompromised recipients. Immunodeficient elderly and patients receiving immunosuppressive treatments may be susceptible to infection with lower infectious dose even in the presence of anti-HBs. The immune status of blood recipients should be taken into consideration when investigating "post-transfusion" HBV infection. Pre-transfusion testing and post-transfusion long-term follow-up of recipients, and molecular analysis of the virus infecting both donor and recipient are critical to definitively incriminate transfusion in the transmission of HBV. PMID:19615780

Candotti, Daniel; Allain, Jean-Pierre

2009-10-01

270

[Preventing deficiencies in the transfusion process].  

PubMed

The methods of system reliability analysis represent an interesting set of tools used to follow the so-called "transfusion process", defined as all the steps from donors sensitization to recipients follow-up. FMECA, (Failure Mode Effects and Criticality Analysis), can be used as a prevention tool, independently of any dysfunction in the process. Of course, it can equally be used following a failure, in order to analyse the causes and to apply the specific corrections. Quality insurance, system reliability analysis, epidemiologic surveillance and safety monitoring operate in synergy. These three issues pertaining to transfusion safety constitute a dynamic system. PMID:7881591

Hergon, E; Rouger, P; Garnerin, P

1994-01-01

271

Minneapolis bridges falling down: emergency transfusion preparedness.  

PubMed

The 7/1/2007 bridge collapse into the Mississippi River was instructional from both a disaster response and a mass casualty transfusion response perspective. It is a well cited example of how community disaster response coordination can work well, especially following systematic preparation of an integrated response network. The blood center is and should be an integral part of this disaster response and should be included in drills where appropriate. We give personal perspectives on both the hospital and transfusion service response to this particularly dramatic event. PMID:23820433

Gorlin, Jed B; Hick, John L

2013-12-01

272

"Human Babesiosis": An Emerging Transfusion Dilemma  

PubMed Central

Babesiosis, a common disease of animals, can infect humans via vector “tick bite”, particularly in endemic areas. The recent reports of fatal cases in Hepatitis C and postliver transplant patients resulting from transfusion of contaminated blood should alert the medical profession regarding this emerging dilemma in endemic as well as nonendemic areas and the need for accurate blood screening for transfusion. Here, we illustrate different stages of the parasite lifecycle, progression of babesiosis in animal model, some aspects of pathologic outcomes, ongoing therapeutic modalities, and a feasible Acridine Orange fluorescent methodology for the diagnostic evaluation of blood samples.

Oz, Helieh S.; Westlund, Karin H.

2012-01-01

273

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in a Very High Risk Group of Patients with the Support of Granulocyte Transfusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

High risk patients with active fungal infection who had undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with the\\u000a support of granulocyte transfusions (GTX) as an adjunct to antifungal agents are reviewed retrospectively. Patients requiring\\u000a immediate allogeneic HSCT for their primary hematological disorders (two severe aplastic anemia, one T cell acute lymphoblastic\\u000a leukemia (ALL) in second complete remission, one acute myeloid leukemia

Idil YenicesuGulsan; Gülsan Sucak; Günter Dilsiz; ?ahika Zeynep Ak?; Zeynep Arzu Ye?in

274

Hyperkalemia After Packed Red Blood Cell Transfusion in Trauma Patients.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A spectrum of derangements of potassium homeostasis have been reported on patients undergoing transfusion with cell-based transfusion products, specifically, packed red blood cells (PRBCs) and fresh whole blood. In both adults and children, hypokalemia ha...

F. P. Hurst K. C. Abbott M. C. Aboudara R. M. Perkins

2008-01-01

275

What Are the Risks of a Blood Transfusion?  

MedlinePLUS

... will have a reaction after the transfusion. Iron Overload Getting many blood transfusions can cause too much iron to build up in your blood (iron overload). People who have a blood disorder like thalassemia , ...

276

Transfusion immunomodulation from a clinical perspective: an update.  

PubMed

Accumulated evidence demonstrates that allogeneic blood transfusions have clinically significant effects on the recipient's immune system. This transfusion immunomodulation effect is associated with an increased rate of cancer recurrence (uncertain causality) and post-operative infection (established causality). The exact mechanisms of transfusion immunomodulation are still unknown. Data suggests that transfusion immunomodulation is a biologic effect strongly associated with the infusion of allogeneic leukocytes. Soluble mediators that accumulate in transfused red cells and platelets during storage are also possible causes of post-transfusion complications. Some approaches can mitigate these effects. Most important is adopting more conservative transfusion practices. Leukoreduction (proven) and plasma depletion (proposed) are other methods to significantly reduce transfusion immunomodulation and its clinical sequela. PMID:24168641

Refaai, Majed A; Blumberg, Neil

2013-12-01

277

An approach to prevent the severe adverse events associated with transfusion of FDA-approved blood products.  

PubMed

There have been several retrospective studies reporting severe adverse events of mortality and morbidity associated with blood transfusions. Mortality and morbidity associated with posttransfusion infection, transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI), and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) have been reported in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, after massive transfusions for severe traumatic injuries, and after transfusions for elective and emergency indications. After 35 days of storage at 4 degrees C in additive solutions, RBC have 24-h posttransfusion survival values of 75% but do not function satisfactorily. For RBC to function satisfactorily shortly after transfusion, they should be stored at 4 degrees C for no more than 2 weeks. Yet while the FDA requires a 24-h posttransfusion survival value of 75%, there is no requirement for the function of the transfused RBC. It has been shown that red blood cells that circulate and function immediately or shortly after transfusion exert a very important hemostatic effect to reduce the bleeding time and nonsurgical blood loss in anemic and thrombocytopenic patients. Greater restoration of hemostasis is seen with viable and functional RBC transfusions than with platelets or plasma even though the platelets and plasma proteins may have satisfactory viability and function. The length of storage of the blood products affects their survival and function and the transfusion of nonviable compatible RBC, antibodies to granulocytes and WBC HLA antigens and biologically active substances affects the patient's clinical outcome. One of the easiest ways to prevent the severe adverse events that have been observed is to ensure that the transfused blood products survive and function at an optimum level and that the levels of antibodies to granulocytes and WBC HLA antigens and biologically active substances are eliminated or reduced. The best way to ensure this is to store liquid-preserved leukoreduced human red blood cells at 4 degrees C in additive solutions for no more than 2 weeks and leukoreduced platelets at room temperature for no more than 2 days. These liquid-preserved blood products can be used in conjunction with frozen RBC, platelets, and plasma stored in -80 degrees C mechanical freezers and will avoid the need for fresh whole blood and prevent the severe adverse events associated with the transfusion of blood products. PMID:20392670

Valeri, C Robert; Ragno, Gina

2010-06-01

278

Postoperative infections after oesophageal resections: the role of blood transfusions  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Perioperative blood transfusion carries numerous potential risks concerning the transmission of infective diseases and immunodepression that can facilitate the occurrence of postoperative infectious complications. Explanation of connections between perioperative blood transfusion and postoperative septic complication worldwide is not well documented. Many studies have described a correlation between perioperative blood transfusions and postoperative infections. On the contrary, other studies indicate

Francesca Rovera; Gianlorenzo Dionigi; Luigi Boni; Andrea Imperatori; Alessandra Tabacchi; Giulio Carcano; Mario Diurni; Renzo Dionigi

2006-01-01

279

Familial Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: A Review of Its Genetic and Clinical Aspects  

PubMed Central

Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare renal disease (two per one million in the USA) characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. Both sporadic (80% of cases) and familial (20% of cases) forms are recognized. The study of familial aHUS has implicated genetic variation in multiple genes in the complement system in disease pathogenesis, helping to define the mechanism whereby complement dysregulation at the cell surface level leads to both sporadic and familial disease. This understanding has culminated in the use of Eculizumab as first-line therapy in disease treatment, significantly changing the care and prognosis of affected patients. However, even with this bright outlook, major challenges remain to understand the complexity of aHUS at the genetic level. It is possible that a more detailed picture of aHUS can be translated to an improved understanding of disease penetrance, which is highly variable, and response to therapy, both in the short and long terms.

Bu, Fengxiao; Borsa, Nicolo; Gianluigi, Ardissino; Smith, Richard J. H.

2012-01-01

280

Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome: the interplay between complements and the coagulation system.  

PubMed

Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is a rare life-threatening disorder characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and impaired renal function. A thrombotic microangiopathy underlies the clinical features of HUS. In the majority of cases, HUS follows an infection with toxin-producing bacteria such as verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli. In some cases, HUS is not preceded by a clinically apparent infection, and therefore, is named atypical HUS. The prognosis of atypical HUS is poor. While mortality approaches 25% during the acute phase, end-stage renal disease develops in nearly half of patients within a year. Evidence is accumulating that complement activation through the alternative pathway is at the heart of the pathophysiology leading to atypical HUS. Genetic abnormalities involving complement regulatory proteins and complement components form the molecular basis for complement activation. Since microvascular thrombosis is a quintessential feature of atypical HUS, complements and the coagulation system must work in tandem to give rise to the pathologic alterations observed in this condition. Here, a brief discussion of clinical and morphologic features of atypical HUS is followed by a concise presentation of the complement and coagulation systems. The interplay between complements and the coagulation system is graphically highlighted. Last but not least, conventional and emerging therapies for atypical HUS are outlined. PMID:24072143

Nayer, Ali; Asif, Arif

2013-09-01

281

Giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a nine month old infant  

PubMed Central

Giant cell hepatitis (GCH) with autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare entity, limited to young children, with an unknown pathogenesis. We report the case of 9-mo old who presented with fever, diarrhea and jaundice four days before hospitalization. Physical examination found pallor, jaundice and hepatosplenomegaly. The laboratory workup showed serum total bilirubin at 101 ?mol/L, conjugated bilirubin at 84 ?mol/L, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and immunoglobulin G (IgG) and anti-C3d positive direct Coombs’ test. The antinuclear, anti-smooth muscle and liver kidney microsomes 1 non-organ specific autoantibodies, antiendomisium antibodies were negative. Serological assays for viral hepatitis B and C, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex and Epstein Barr virus were negative. The association of acute liver failure, Evan’s syndrome, positive direct Coomb’s test of mixed type (IgG and C3) and the absence of organ and non-organ specific autoantibodies suggested the diagnosis of GCH. The diagnosis was confirmed by a needle liver biopsy. The patient was treated by corticosteroids, immunomodulatory therapy and azathioprine but died with septicemia.

Bouguila, Jihene; Mabrouk, Sameh; Tilouche, Samia; Bakir, Dajla; Trabelsi, Amel; Hmila, Amel; Boughammoura, Lamia

2013-01-01

282

Transmission of prion diseases by blood transfusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Attempts to detect infectivity in the blood of humans and animals affected with transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs or prion diseases) have often been inconclusive because of the limitations of cross-species bioassays and the small volumes of blood that can be injected by the intracerebral route. A model has been developed for the experimental study of TSE transmission by blood transfusion

Nora Hunter; James Foster; Angela Chong; Sandra McCutcheon; David Parnham; Samantha Eaton; Calum MacKenzie; Fiona Houston

2002-01-01

283

Transfusion practice in orthotopic liver transplantation.  

PubMed

Liver transplant procedures require the most blood components, despite the fact that blood use in liver transplantation has declined dramatically over the last decade. Liver transplant recipients present unique challenges, not only in terms of blood supply, but also requirements for specialized blood components, serologic problems, and immunologic effects of transfusion on both the allograft and the recipient. The cause of intraoperative blood loss in liver transplantation is multifactorial, due to both technical factors and poor coagulation control. This procedure carries the risk of massive blood loss, which requires massive transfusions and is associated with postoperative infections, reduced graft survival, multi-organ dysfunction, and higher risk of mortality. Efforts to reduce intraoperative bleeding leading to limitation of blood transfusions are desirable to improve results and also to control costs. Method of literature search: The name of topic is typed and searched in Google search. The name of topic is typed and searched in PubMed search. Related articles were also searched. Some standard books in Transfusion Medicine were also referred. PMID:20040808

Devi, Allanki Surekha

2009-01-01

284

[Transfusion safety. Introduction and identifying the problem].  

PubMed

The problems that exist in our country in the security of the transfusion chain affect every step in the recruitment, donor selection, and aseptic collection, screening tests, production of blood components, storage, transportation and transfusion to recipient. Some of which can lead to fatal cases or moving slowly because of the fragmentation of our health system.With the principles of ethics, we must move towards a unified national blood system overcoming the conflicts of interest that affect the impact on administrative certifications; decrease the irrational use of resources, optimize costs and achieve a transfusion medicine security system and haemovigilance of the at the hospital. There has to be some regional blood banks well-coordinated in health institutions, with central management systems of quality and more specialized procedures,the latter can be achieved with more than 150 public blood banks, transforming them into positions of blood collection of voluntary donation of repetition. The resources would be released equip regional banks. Also required to provide education and legislation ad hoc for goals in voluntary blood donation and focused mainly the university population and centralize information for haemovigilance based computer systems specific hospitals, that reduce errors and restrict risk blood components involved in fatal cases, and reduce the possibility of punitive actions. It has international advice of the whole transfusion chain. PMID:23435078

Ambriz Fernández, Raúl

2013-01-01

285

Transfusion in the age of molecular diagnostics  

PubMed Central

DNA-based tests are increasingly being used to predict a blood group phenotype to improve transfusion medicine. This is possible because genes encoding 29 of the 30 blood group systems have been cloned and sequenced, and the molecular bases associated with most antigens have been determined. RBCs carrying a particular antigen, if introduced into the circulation of an individual who lacks that antigen (through transfusion or pregnancy), can elicit an immune response. It is the antibody from such an immune response that causes problems in clinical practice and the reason why antigen-negative blood is required for safe transfusion. The classical method of testing for blood group antigens and antibodies is hemagglutination; however, it has certain limitations, some of which can be overcome by testing DNA. Such testing allows conservation of antibodies for confirmation by hemagglutination of predicted antigen-negativity. High-throughput platforms provide a means to test relatively large numbers of donors, thereby opening the door to change the way antigen-negative blood is provided to patients and to prevent immunization. This review summarizes how molecular approaches, in conjunction with conventional hemagglutination, can be applied in transfusion medicine.

Reid, Marion E.

2010-01-01

286

Anemia and transfusion after subarachnoid hemorrhage.  

PubMed

Delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may be affected by a number of factors, including cerebral blood flow and oxygen delivery. Anemia affects about half of patients with SAH and is associated with worse outcome. Anemia also may contribute to the development of or exacerbate delayed cerebral ischemia. This review was designed to examine the prevalence and impact of anemia in patients with SAH and to evaluate the effects of transfusion. A literature search was made to identify original research on anemia and transfusion in SAH patients. A total of 27 articles were identified that addressed the effects of red blood cell transfusion (RBCT) on brain physiology, anemia in SAH, and clinical management with RBCT or erythropoietin. Most studies provided retrospectively analyzed data of very low-quality according to the GRADE criteria. While RBCT can have beneficial effects on brain physiology, RBCT may be associated with medical complications, infection, vasospasm, and poor outcome after SAH. The effects may vary with disease severity or the presence of vasospasm, but it remains unclear whether RBCTs are a marker of disease severity or a cause of worse outcome. Erythropoietin data are limited. The literature review further suggests that the results of the Transfusion Requirements in Critical Care Trial and subsequent observational studies on RBCT in general critical care do not apply to SAH patients and that randomized trials to address the role of RBCT in SAH are required. PMID:21769459

Le Roux, Peter D

2011-09-01

287

The risk of transfusion-transmitted viral infections at the Gabonese National Blood Transfusion Centre  

PubMed Central

Background Blood transfusions carry the risk of transmitting blood-borne infections. In contrast to the situation in the developed world, there is a limited number of studies examining this problem in sub-Saharan Africa. In this study we aimed to calculate the risks of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection from units of blood issued by the Gabonese Blood Transfusion Centre between 2009 and 2011. Materials and methods All the donations were tested for infectious diseases and the seroconversion incidence rates of HIV, HBV and HCV were calculated. The residual risk of transfusion-associated transmission for each virus was calculated by multiplying the seroconversion rates by the window period expressed in fractions of a year. Results The risks of becoming infected with HIV, HCV, and HBV in subjects receiving units of blood from the Gabonese Blood Transfusion Centre were 64.7, 207.94 and 534.53 per million donations, respectively. Conclusions This study, which is the first to quantify the true risks of transfusion-transmitted infections in Gabon, reveals and confirms the need to reinforce preventative and screening strategies to improve transfusion safety in sub-Saharan Africa.

Rerambiah, Leonard Kounegnigan; Rerambiah, Laurence Essola; Bengone, Calixte; Djoba Siawaya, Joel F.

2014-01-01

288

Serial haematology results in transfused and non-transfused dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi.  

PubMed

This prospective longitudinal study investigated the progression of haematological changes in 32 transfused and 54 non-transfused dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi over the 1st 6 days following diagnosis and treatment. The effect of patient age on the results of complete blood counts was determined. Haematology data were analysed at presentation and at 24 hours, 3 days and 6 days after presentation. Dogs were treated with diminazene aceturate at diagnosis and a blood transfusion was given if deemed clinically required. Mildly to moderately regenerative normocytic normochromic anaemia was observed in all dogs throughout the study period. Transfused dogs more often had an inflammatory leukogram at presentation and at 24 hours, than dogs that were not transfused. In dogs with a left shift, a concurrent normal or decreased segmented neutrophil count was found more commonly than neutrophilia. Severe thrombocytopenia that resolved within a week was common. Blood transfusion alleviated the anaemia, but had no significant effect on white blood cell or platelet responses. Blood cell responses were not significantly influenced by age. In conclusion, the red blood cell and white blood cell responses were less than expected in dogs with babesiosis, given the degree of anaemia and inflammation present. The magnitude of thrombocytopenia and rapid return of the platelet count to normal suggested a possible immune-mediated mechanism for the thrombocytopenia. PMID:22332296

Scheepers, E; Leisewitz, A L; Thompson, P N; Christopher, M M

2011-09-01

289

78 FR 79469 - Strategies To Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions; Public Workshop  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug...Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions.'' The purpose of the public workshop...Globulin Intravenous (IGIV) (Human) infusion. Complications of hemolysis...

2013-12-30

290

Fatal immune hemolytic anemia following allogeneic stem cell transplantation: report of 2 cases and review of literature.  

PubMed

Immune hemolytic anemia is a well-recognized complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). There are 4 possible causes for this complication. First, antibodies present in the recipient destroy donor cells. Second, donor red cell antibodies at the time of stem cell infusion are transferred to the recipient. Third, sometimes, engrafted donor lymphocytes cause active production of red cell antibodies. Fourth, another cause of hemolysis after allogeneic HSCT is autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). It is thought to be due to antibodies produced by the donor's immune system against antigens on red cells of donor origin. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia after allogeneic HSCT is rare, it is still not well characterized, and it represents a life-threatening situation. We describe 2 patients with acute myeloid leukemia treated with intensive chemotherapy and umbilical cord blood stem cell transplantation (UCBT). One patient developed AIHA at day +182 and the other at day +212 after receiving UCBT. Patients received 5 and 7 line treatment options, respectively, including continuous corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, splenectomy, cyclophosphamide, plasma exchange, rituximab, bortezomib, and eculizumab. However, both patients died because of massive hemolysis after 85 and 106 days of intensive treatment, respectively. These cases reflect the extreme difficulty in the therapeutic management of patients with AIHA following UCBT. After an extensive review of the literature, the exact physiopathologic mechanisms of AIHA after allogeneic HSCT in general, and after UCBT in particular, and therefore an effective treatment remain unknown. PMID:23562007

Rovira, Jordina; Cid, Joan; Gutiérrez-García, Gonzalo; Pereira, Arturo; Fernández-Avilés, Francesc; Rosiñol, Laura; Martínez, Carmen; Carreras, Enric; Urbano, Alvaro; Rovira, Montserrat; Lozano, Miguel

2013-07-01

291

Polycythemia in an Infant Secondary to Granulocyte Transfusions  

PubMed Central

Granulocyte transfusions may be useful for neutropenic pediatric patients with refractory bacterial or fungal infections. Many potential adverse sequelae associated with granulocyte transfusions are well recognized, including febrile reactions, fluid overload, alloimmunization, and lung injury. Other potential adverse sequelae, however, are less well known. This case report describes an infant with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) who developed polycythemia (hemoglobin 10 g/dL to 17.6 g/dL) following four daily transfusions of 20 ml/kg of apheresis collected, steroid stimulated donor granulocytes. Expanded knowledge of potential risks of transfused granulocytes will allow for rapid recognition of transfusion related complications, should they occur.

Adisa, Olufolake; Hendrickson, Jeanne E.; Hopkins, Courtney K.; Katzenstein, Howard M.; Josephson, Cassandra D.

2011-01-01

292

Transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease.  

PubMed

Transfusion-associated graft versus host disease (TA-GVHD) is a fatal complication of transfusion of blood products that usually affects immunocompromised patients. Herein, we present our experience with a diabetic patient who had undergone cardiopulmonary bypass and developed TA-GVHD. The chronological order of events observed were fresh whole-blood transfusion from relatives, fever, rash, liver dysfunction, and pancytopenia. Skin biopsies demonstrated GVHD involvement. The patient died within 3 weeks after the transfusions despite prompt treatment. GVHD must be considered in the differential diagnosis if a patient with a recent transfusion history admits with fever, skin rash, abnormal liver function tests, and pancytopenia. PMID:23890576

Sunul, Hasibe; Erguven, Nedret

2013-10-01

293

A hemolytic protein from cultured mycelia of mushroom, Termitomyces clypeatus.  

PubMed

A hemolytic protein was purified from cultured mycelia of T. clypeatus. Some of the physico-chemical properties of the hemolysin were studied. The protein was analysed to be a lipoprotein and delipidation removed its hemolytic property. The monomeric protein subunit of the lipoprotein had a molecular weight of 64,000. Mode of action of the hemolysin were studied by observing protections of sugar and lipid components to hemolysin mediated lysis of red blood cells. It was observed that the hemolysin possibly interacted with the phospholipid components of the blood cells causing lysis. PMID:8500815

Khowala, S; Banerjee, P C; Ghosh, A K; Sengupta, S

1993-01-01

294

Hemolytic uremic syndrome following taipan envenomation with response to plasmapheresis.  

PubMed

We report a case of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in a 33 year old male who was bitten by a taipan, with apparent massive envenomation. The microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) and thrombocytopenic aspects of his HUS appeared to respond to plasmapheresis, but his anuric renal failure persisted. He also had prolonged severe muscular paralysis which gradually began to resolve over the course of two weeks. At this point he suffered a cardiac arrest sustaining severe and subsequently fatal hypoxic brain injury. This case raises the possibility that the taipan venom may have induced HUS by damaging the renal endothelium. His cardiac arrest was not apparently related to his HUS. PMID:9423222

Cobcroft, R G; Williams, A; Cook, D; Williams, D J; Masci, P

1997-11-01

295

Unique risks of red blood cell transfusions in very-low-birth-weight neonates: associations between early transfusion and intraventricular hemorrhage and between late transfusion and necrotizing enterocolitis.  

PubMed

Red blood cell transfusions can be life-saving for neonates with severe anemia or active hemorrhage. However, risks of transfusions exist and should always be weighed against potential benefits. At least two transfusion risks are unique to very low birth weight neonates. The first is an association between transfusions given in the first days after birth and the subsequent occurrence of a grade 3 or 4 intraventricular hemorrhage. The second is an association between "late" RBC transfusions and the subsequent occurrence of necrotizing enterocolitis. Much remains to be discovered about the pathogenesis of these two outcomes. Moreover, work is needed to clearly establish whether transfusions are causatively-associated with these outcomes or are co-variables. This review will provide basic data establishing these associations and propose mechanistic explanations. PMID:24059555

Christensen, Robert D; Baer, Vickie L; Del Vecchio, Antonio; Henry, Erick

2013-10-01

296

One-year period prevalence of blood transfusion.  

PubMed

Transfusion practice is reported to differ considerably between countries. Comparisons often rely on transfusion rates, incidence - or prevalence rates. In this paper, the one-year period prevalence rate (1-YPPR) of transfusion of red cells (RBC) is presented. Transfusion data, demographic data and patient data were retrospectively combined to calculate sex and diagnosis specific and age standardized 1-YPPR s of RBC transfusion for the complete population in a Danish county. During the calendar year of 2006, 4427 patients received RBC transfusion in Funen County. The crude 1-YPPR of RBC transfusion was 9.2/1000 citizens. Most of the transfused patients had a main diagnosis of neoplasm (22% of recipients), diseases of the circulatory system (15%), the digestive system (15%), injuries (13%) and diseases of the blood (8%). Age standardization reversed the relation between sex specific 1-YPPRs, yielding a statistically significantly higher 1-YPPR in males (6.8/1000) vs. females (6.3/1000). The method for calculating a diagnosis specific 1-YPPR of transfusion of RBC is presented and proposed as an option for comparison of transfusion practice with other transfusion centres. The crude and the diagnosis specific 1-YPPR s are found to increase with age. Thus, age standardization of crude prevalence rates is necessary for meaningful comparisons between populations. PMID:19912580

Madsen, J T; Kimper-Karl, M L; Sprogøe, U; Georgsen, J; Titlestad, K

2010-06-01

297

Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival  

SciTech Connect

In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Furthermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfusion of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion or irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted.

van der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

1982-04-01

298

Interdisciplinary process improvement for enhancing blood transfusion safety.  

PubMed

We describe a multipronged, multidisciplinary effort to improve the safety of blood transfusion in our hospital. System-wide practices related to the ordering, delivery, and transfusion of blood products were addressed including: (1) appropriate selection of patients and utilization of blood, (2) accurate blood product labeling and tracking, (3) reliable transportation of blood products between the transfusion service laboratory and the bedside, (4) electronic verification of patients and products at the point of transfusion, and (5) documentation of transfusion events in the patient's medical record. By implementing new technologies and focusing LEAN process improvement techniques on the preanalytical, analytical, and postanalytical phases of the transfusion cycle, we have been able to significantly reduce the risk of transfusion error in our patient population. PMID:20364648

LaRocco, Mark; Brient, Kathy

2010-01-01

299

An association between decreased cardiopulmonary complications (TRALI and TACO) and implementation of universal leukoreduction of blood transfusions  

PubMed Central

Background Cardiopulmonary adverse events after transfusion include acute lung injury (TRALI) and circulatory overload (TACO), which are potentially lethal and incompletely understood. Study Design and Methods To determine whether the incidence of TRALI and TACO was affected by leukoreduction we conducted a retrospective, before and after study of acute transfusion reactions for the seven years prior to and after introduction of universal leukoreduction in 2000, involving 778,559 blood components. Results Substantial decreases occurred in the rates of TRALI (?83%; from 2.8 cases per 100,000 components pre- to 0.48 post-universal leukoreduction; p=0.01), TACO (?49%; 7.4 to 3.8 cases per 100,000; p=0.03) and febrile reactions (?35%; 11.4 to 7.4 cases per 10,000; p<0.0001). The incidence of allergic reactions remained unchanged (7.0 per 100,000 pre- and post-universal leukoreduction). These outcomes were primarily attributable to decreased TRALI/TACO associated with RBC and platelet transfusions (?64%) with notably smaller decreases associated with FFP or cryoprecipitate transfusions (?29%). The incidence of TRALI/TACO after 28,120 washed red cell and 69,325 platelet transfusions was zero. Conclusion These data suggest novel hypotheses for further testing in animal models, in prospective clinical trials, and via the new US Hemovigilance System : (1) Is TACO or TRALI mitigated by leukoreduction? (2) Is the mechanism of TACO more complex than excessive blood volume? (3) Does washing mitigate TRALI and TACO due to platelet and RBC transfusions?

Blumberg, Neil; Heal, Joanna M.; Gettings, Kelly; Phipps, Richard P.; Masel, Debra; Refaai, Majed; Kirkley, Scott; Fialkow, L. Benjamin

2010-01-01

300

Green teeth in a premature infant following hemolytic jaundice.  

PubMed

Green staining of the dentition is a phenomenon associated with the deposition of bilirubin in the matrix of hard tissue during formation. This article presents a case of green teeth in a patient born 28 weeks premature with a medical history of hemolytic jaundice and grade IV intraventricular hemorrhage at birth. PMID:23823340

Rammal, M; Meador, M; Rodriguez, M; Lish, B

2013-07-01

301

Cationic amphiphilic non-hemolytic polyacrylates with superior antibacterial activity.  

PubMed

Acrylic copolymers with appropriate compositions of counits having cationic charge with 2-carbon and 6-carbon spacer arms can show superior antibacterial activities with concomitant very low hemolytic effect. These amphiphilic copolymers represent one of the most promising synthetic polymer antibacterial systems reported. PMID:24854366

Punia, Ashish; He, Edward; Lee, Kevin; Banerjee, Probal; Yang, Nan-Loh

2014-06-01

302

Childhood Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, United Kingdom and Ireland  

Microsoft Academic Search

We conducted prospective surveillance of childhood hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) from 1997 to 2001 to describe disease incidence and clinical, epidemiologic and microbiologic characteristics. We compared our findings, where possible, with those of a previous study conducted from 1985 to 1988. The average annual incidence of HUS for the United Kingdom and Ireland (0.71\\/100,000) was unchanged from 1985 to 1988.

Richard M. Lynn; Sarah J. O'Brien; C. Mark Taylor; Goutam K. Adak; Henrik Chart; Tom Cheasty; John E. Coia; Iain A. Gillespie; Mary E. Locking; William J. Reilly; Henry R. Smith; Aoife Waters; Geraldine A. Willshaw

2005-01-01

303

Pathology Case Study: Post Transfusion Hemolysis  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a case study presented by the University of Pittsburgh Department of Pathology, which describes a 56-year-old female with a 20 year history of systemic lupus erythematosis with a history of deep venous thrombosis and a recent myocardial infarct. Visitors are given patient history and admission data along with data results from the resulting transfusion reaction investigation. A "Final Diagnosis" section provides a discussion of the findings as well as references. This is an excellent resource for students in the health sciences to familiarize themselves with using patient history and laboratory results to diagnose disease. It is also a helpful site for educators to use to introduce or test student learning in pathology and transfusion medicine.

Hari, Raj

2009-03-24

304

Principles of transfusion medicine in small animals.  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this review was to provide the reader with an updated overview of small animal transfusion medicine, and an approach to integrating it into private practice, based on a review of the veterinary and human literature spanning the last 3 decades. Electronic, online databases that were searched included CAB International and Medline; multiple keywords or subject headings were searched that were appropriate to each of the sections reviewed: canine and feline blood groups, blood-typing and crossmatching, donors, blood collection, storage, blood components, blood transfusion, blood component therapy, blood substitutes, and adverse reactions. The safe use of blood component therapy requires knowledge of blood groups and antibody prevalence, and knowledge of the means to minimize the risk of adverse reactions by including the use of proper donors and screening assays that facilitate detection of serological incompatibility. The 2 assays available to the practitioner are crossmatching, which is readily done in-house, and blood typing. Blood typing is available in the form of a commercial testing kit, through use of purchased reagents, or via a request to an external laboratory. The risk of potentially fatal adverse reactions is higher in cats than in dogs. The decision to transfuse and the type of product to administer depend on several factors, such as the type of anemia and the size of the animal. In conclusion, transfusion medicine has become more feasible in small animal practice, with improved access to blood products through either on-site donors, the purchase of blood bank products, external donor programs, or the availability of blood component substitutes.

Lanevschi, A; Wardrop, K J

2001-01-01

305

Staging of Twin-Twin Transfusion Syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE:The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of sonographic and clinical parameters to develop a staging classification of twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS).STUDY DESIGN:Severe TTTS was defined as the presence of polyhydramnios (maximum vertical pocket of ?8 cm) and oligohydramnios (maximum vertical pocket of ?2 cm). Nonvisualization of the bladder in the donor twin (?BDT) and absence

Rubén A Quintero; Walter J Morales; Mary H Allen; Patricia W Bornick; Patricia K Johnson; Michael Kruger

1999-01-01

306

Neonatal paracetamol poisoning: treatment by exchange transfusion.  

PubMed Central

The metabolism and excretion of paracetamol was studied in an infant of 29 weeks' gestation who was exposed to the drug when his mother ingested 32.5 g 16 hours before delivery. We have confirmed that sulphation is the major pathway and that the mixed function oxidase system is sufficiently active at this gestational age to produce hepatotoxic metabolic products. As most of the recognised drug treatments for paracetamol poisoning seemed unsuitable in this case, the infant was treated with exchange transfusions.

Lederman, S; Fysh, W J; Tredger, M; Gamsu, H R

1983-01-01

307

The annual cost of blood transfusions in the United Kingdom.  

PubMed

This study estimated the annual cost of blood transfusions in the UK during 1994/1995. The analysis was based on published data, information derived from interviews with relevant NHS personnel and a purpose-designed structured questionnaire of blood donors. The cost to the UKs blood transfusion services of providing blood and blood products for transfusion was 165.5 Pounds million in 1994/1995. During this period, 2.75 million conventional donations of whole blood and 144,000 apheresis donations of platelets and plasma were collected: 2.58 million units of red blood cells were issued, resulting in approximately 866,000 red blood cell transfusions; 334,000 units of fresh frozen plasma and 1.16 million units of platelets were issued, resulting in approximately 17,000 and 188,000 isolated plasma and platelet transfusions, respectively. Hospital resource use attributable to providing blood transfusions during 1994/1995 cost the NHS 52.6 Pounds million. In total, blood transfusions cost the NHS 218.2 Pounds million during 1994/1995. Of this, red blood cell transfusions accounted for 76% of the annual cost, isolated platelet transfusions 16%, isolated plasma transfusions 1% and other products 7%. Donors incurred direct costs of 3.1 Pounds million and indirect costs of 11.2 Pounds million were accrued due to lost productivity. Additionally, blood donors gave up 2.5 million hours of their leisure time donating blood. PMID:9681222

Guest, J F; Munro, V; Cookson, R F

1998-04-01

308

Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival  

SciTech Connect

In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Futhermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfuson of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion of irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted.

Van Der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

1982-04-01

309

Characterization of the hemolytic activity of Haemophilus ducreyi.  

PubMed Central

H. ducreyi is the causative agent of chancroid, a genital ulcer disease most prevalent in developing countries. Chancroid enhances the heterosexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus and is identified in focal outbreaks in the United States, but little is known about its pathogenesis. We studied the hemolysin produced by H. ducreyi because this molecule might be an important virulence factor in the pathogenesis of chancroid. Ten strains of H. ducreyi were tested on newly devised blood agar plates and were found to have hemolytic activity. We examined the hemolytic activity of H. ducreyi 35000 further and found that it was heat labile, cell associated, greatest at pH 7.0, and produced in logarithmic- but not stationary-phase cultures. Using transposons Tn916 and Tn1545-delta 3, we have isolated three classes of transposon mutants of strain 35000: those with no detectable hemolytic activity, those with reduced hemolytic activity, and those with enhanced hemolytic activity. Transposon insertions in the nonhemolytic mutants were located in a DNA sequence which hybridized to the Proteus mirabilis hemolysin gene. Analysis of clones containing overlapping sections of this region served to further localize the H. ducreyi hemolysin gene and allow its expression in Escherichia coli and complementation of the nonhemolytic defect in an H. ducreyi mutant. These experiments indicate that H. ducreyi 35000 produces a hemolysin that is related to the calcium-independent hemolysin produced by P. mirabilis. Further experiments are needed to define the similarity of the H. ducreyi hemolysin to other calcium-independent hemolysins and to determine its role in the pathogenesis of chancroid.

Totten, P A; Norn, D V; Stamm, W E

1995-01-01

310

Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia  

PubMed Central

Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias.

Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

2013-01-01

311

Leukocyte depletion for safe blood transfusion.  

PubMed

Leukocytes have ability to distinguish between self cells (body own cells) and foreign (allogenic) cells on the basis of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins that are present on the cell membrane and are effectively unique to a person. During allogenic blood transfusion a person receives large number of allogenic donor leukocytes and these are recognized as foreign cells by the recipient immune system which leads to several adverse reactions. To avoid such leukocyte-mediated adverse reactions leukodepleted blood transfusion is required. Leukocytes can be separated on the basis of size, dielectric properties, by affinity separation, freeze-thawing and centrifugation but all these methods are time consuming and costly. Filtration is another method for leukocyte depletion that is comparatively less expensive and more efficient as it gives more than 90% leukodepletion of blood along with minimal cell loss. However, present filtration procedures also have some limitations as they work efficiently with blood components but not with whole blood and show non-specific adhesion of large number of platelets and red blood cells along with leukocytes. All the currently available filters are costly, which has been a major reason for their limited application. Therefore, demand for a more efficient and cost-effective filter is high in medical community and scientists are attenpting to improve the efficiency of currently available filters. The present review gives an overview of the significance of leukodepleted blood transfusion and focuses on different methods for leukocyte depletion and challenges involved in all these technologies. PMID:19418471

Singh, Shikha; Kumar, Ashok

2009-08-01

312

Age, blood transfusion, and survival after trauma.  

PubMed

Blood transfusion affects outcomes after trauma, but whether elderly patients are disproportionately affected remains unknown. To determine the possible interaction between age, packed cell transfusion volume (PCTV), and mortality after injury, we designed a 6-year retrospective review (January 1995 through December 2000) of patients > or = 16 years of age who received blood transfusion within the first 24 hours after injury. One thousand three hundred twelve patients > or = 16 years of age admitted to our trauma center received packed red blood cells in the initial 24 hours after admission. Of the 1312 patients, 1028 (78%) were < or = 55 years and 284 (22%) were > 55 years of age, and overall mortality was 21.2 per cent. Age, Injury Severity Score (ISS) Glasbow Coma Scale (GCS), and PCTV emerged as independent predictors of mortality. PCTV for elderly survivors (4.6 units) was significantly less than that of younger survivors (6.7 units). Furthermore, mean PCTV for all survivors decreased progressively with advancing age. No patient >75 years with a PCTV > 12 units survived. Age and PCTV act independently, yet synergistically to increase mortality following injury. PMID:15098792

Mostafa, Gamal; Gunter, Oliver L; Norton, H James; McElhiney, Barbara M; Bailey, Donna F; Jacobs, David G

2004-04-01

313

Transfusion-associated falciparum malaria successfully treated with red blood cell exchange transfusion.  

PubMed

Falciparum malaria is frequently associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The use of exchange transfusion as a therapeutic modality for severe cases of malaria has been described previously. We describe a case of a 49 year-old African American gentleman with a history of hemoglobin-SC disease who presented with a severe case of Plasmodium falciparum malaria 3 weeks after having received an infected blood transfusion. His peripheral smear showed the presence of numerous intraerythrocytic ring forms and "banana-shaped" gametocytes with a high-grade parasitemia, estimated at 18%. He was treated with antimalarial chemotherapy and also underwent a 12-unit red blood cell exchange transfusion, decreasing his parasite load to < 1%, as determined on repeat smear. It is prudent to be aware of the efficacy of this adjunctive treatment, especially with ever-increasing travel and a resultant increase in the prevalence of tropical diseases in the United States. PMID:11093688

Tejura, B; Sass, D A; Fischer, R A; Daskal, I; Eiger, G

2000-11-01

314

[Influence of Gilbert's syndrome on serum bilirubin levels and gallstone formation in children with chronic hemolytic disease].  

PubMed

To determine whether Gilbert's syndrome increases the risk of gallstone formation in children with chronic hemolytic disease, we studied 44 children with this diagnosis. Gallstones were detected by abdominal ultrasonography. This took place annually in scheduled examinations or in the context of acute abdominal pain. In all patients, the mean values of hemoglobin, reticulocyte and serum bilirubin in the chronic phase were recorded. In addition, TA insertion in the A(TA)nTATAA motif within the promoter region of the enzyme uridine-diphosphate-glucuronyl transferase (UGT1A1) was screened, since this is typically associated with GS.We found 10 (22.7 %) homozygotes for the mutated allele TA*7/TA*7, 12 (27.3 %) TA*6/TA*6 heterozygotes and 22 (50 %) homozygotes for the wild-type allele TA*6/TA*6. No statistically significant differences were found in the values of hemoglobin (Kruskal-Wallis test 2.496; p > 0.05) or in reticulocyte count (Kruskal-Wallis test 1.696; p > 0,05) between the three groups of patients, suggesting a similar degree of hemolysis. Patients with the UGT1A1 TA*7/TA*7 genotype showed higher mean serum bilirubin levels than did patients who were homozygous for the wild-type allele (Mann-Whitney test 35.5; p < 0.05). None of the patients with the TA*6/TA*6 genotype developed gallstones, whereas this complication was found in 2 of 12 (16.6 %) heterozygotes and 6 of 10 (60 %) homozygotes for the allele with TA insertion. In this latter group, 4 patients presented acute pancreatitis as a consequence of gallstone formation.The association between increased bilirubin load due to chronic hemolytic disease and diminished hepatic conjugation leads to raised serum bilirubin levels and consequently to an increased risk of gallstone formation. Therefore, we recommend screening for Gilbert's syndrome in children in the initial phases of chronic hemolytic diseases. PMID:12466075

Costa, E; Pinto, R; Vieira, E; Polo, S; Sarmento, A M; Oliveira, I; Pimenta, R; Dos Santos, R; Barbot, J

2002-12-01

315

Guidelines for managing conscientious objection to blood transfusion.  

PubMed

Parents sometimes deny their children blood transfusion because of their religious beliefs. The Japanese Joint Committee on the Refusal of Blood Transfusion on Religious Grounds asserts that the health and life of every child younger than 15 years should be guarded by the collective efforts of health, welfare, and advocacy institutions when a parent or guardian seeks to withhold transfusion therapy. Patients 18 years or older should receive treatment without transfusion after signing and submitting a "Certificate of Refusal Blood Transfusion and Exemption from Liability." For a patient younger than 18 years, but 15 years or older, essential transfusion can be performed if the patient or at least one guardian consents. Without patient's or guardian's consent, guidelines for patients 18 years or older shall apply. Health care providers should offer the best possible care that is consistent with a patient's age and competency. PMID:19539876

Ohto, Hitoshi; Yonemura, Yuji; Takeda, Junzo; Inada, Eiichi; Hanada, Ryoji; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Miyano, Takeshi; Kai, Katsunori; Iwashi, Waichiro; Muto, Kaori; Asai, Fumikazu

2009-07-01

316

Fetal and Neonatal Hematologic Parameters in Red Cell Alloimmunization: Predicting the Need for Late Neonatal Transfusions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to determine whether the need for late neonatal transfusion can be predicted in fetuses who received intrauterine transfusions. The records of 36 patients who underwent intrauterine transfusion were reviewed. New-borns who required late transfusions had a lower reticulocyte count at their last intrauterine transfusion, a longer duration between their lowest fetal reticulocyte count and

George R. Saade; Kenneth J. Moise; Michael A. Belfort; Diane E. Hesketh; Robert J. Carpenter

1993-01-01

317

Immune and nonimmune causes of low recovery from leukodepleted platelet transfusions: a prospective study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alloantibodies against HLA antigens can be reduced by applying leukodepletion to transfusions. Because the importance of immunological and nonimmunological causes of poor platelet transfusion results using leukodepleted transfusions is not clear, we conducted a prospective study in an unselected patient population receiving leukodepleted transfusions. In 97 patients with hematological malignancies, 181 random leukodepleted platelet transfusions were studied for immunological causes

M.-D. Levin; J. C. de Veld; B. van der Holt; M. B. van't Veer

2003-01-01

318

Transfusion associated graft versus host disease in an immunocompetent patient.  

PubMed Central

Transfusion associated graft versus host disease is a rare disorder usually confined to patients who are immunosuppressed. A case is described in a 77 year old woman who was presumed immunocompetent. She was transfused with one unit of blood from an individual who was homozygous for the same HLA haplotype as her. The diagnosis of transfusion associated graft versus host disease should be suspected in a patient who develops aplastic anaemia within 30 days of a transfusion of blood products. It is suggested that blood donations from first degree relatives should not be permitted, unless the donation is irradiated to prevent lymphocyte proliferation.

O'Connor, N. T.; Mackintosh, P.

1992-01-01

319

[Closed-loop blood transfusion management system based on PDA].  

PubMed

A closed-loop transfusion management system is constructed that covers blood preservation, transportation, transfer, distribution of blood, distribution, clinical blood specimen collection and blood transfusion process, which can monitor the implementation of doctor's advice, view the transport process of blood and blood samples, and record blood transfusion and adverse reaction information. These measurements can play a good effect in reduction of manual records and handover links in blood transfusion management, enhance the blood bank management, guarantee safely using blood, and realize the goal of real-time monitoring and closed-loop management. PMID:24409802

Chen, Yiyi; Chen, Canda; Luo, Luo; Yin, Zhou; Zhou, Min; Xie, Qiong; Xu, Min; Zhang, Qiutao

2013-09-01

320

Blood transfusion requirements for endoscopic sinonasal inverted papilloma resections  

PubMed Central

Background Endoscopic resection of sinonasal Inverted Papilloma (SNIP) tumors has been shown to reduce intra-operative blood loss and recovery time compared to open approaches. The purpose of this study is to investigate the incidence and requirements of blood transfusion for endoscopic SNIP surgeries. Methods An individual retrospective cohort study of endoscopic SNIP surgeries over a 10-year period was performed. Age, sex, pre-existing co-morbidity, use of anti-coagulants, tumor type and stage, time of surgery, estimated blood loss and the requirement for blood transfusion were recorded. Results 82 patients were included (57 males, 25 females). 4 (5%) Stage 1, 7 (8.5%) Stage 2, 62 (75.5%) Stage 3 and 9 (11%) Stage 4 SNIP tumors were identified according to the Krouse staging system. 3 (4%) patients required blood transfusion. 3 of the 9 (33%) Stage 4 tumors required blood transfusion. Stage 4 tumors were significantly associated with blood transfusion (p?transfusion and no other pre-operative variable was associated with requirement for blood transfusion. Conclusion Endoscopic SNIP resections rarely require blood transfusions. No pre-operative factor other than tumor stage is associated with the requirement for blood transfusion. We would therefore suggest that only Stage 4 SNIP tumors require pre-operative type and screen.

2013-01-01

321

Blood transfusions in cardiac surgery: indications, risks, and conservation strategies.  

PubMed

Although red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are frequently used in cardiac operations, an increasing amount of data has demonstrated deleterious consequences. Consequently, the appropriate use of this limited resource is unclear. In this review, we discuss the relationship between anemia and the outcomes of cardiac surgical procedures, the risks associated with RBC transfusion, and the impact of blood transfusions on mortality and morbidity after cardiac operations. The review concludes with a discussion of randomized trials comparing restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategies and a consideration of blood conservation techniques. PMID:24359936

Kilic, Arman; Whitman, Glenn J R

2014-02-01

322

Acute pancreatitis induced thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura  

PubMed Central

Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare syndrome of unknown cause with an estimated incidence of one case per million. The disease is characterized by a pentad of symptoms: Thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, neurologic changes, renal dysfunction, and fever. It causes thrombosis in the microvasculature of several organs, producing diverse manifestations. Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a well-described consequence of TTP. Acute pancreatitis triggering TTP is uncommon.

Ali, Mohammed Arshad; Shaheen, Jalal Syed Shafiuddin; Khan, Mohammed Ali

2014-01-01

323

Pure red cell aplasia following autoimmune hemolytic anemia: an enigma.  

PubMed

A 26-year-old previously healthy female presented with a 6-month history of anemia. The laboratory findings revealed hemolytic anemia and direct antiglobulin test was positive. With a diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), prednisolone was started but was ineffective after 1 month of therapy. A bone marrow trephine biopsy revealed pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) showing severe erythroid hypoplasia. The case was considered PRCA following AIHA. This combination without clear underlying disease is rare. Human parvovirus B19 infection was not detected in the marrow aspirate during reticulocytopenia. The patient received azathioprine, and PRCA improved but significant hemolysis was once again documented with a high reticulocyte count. The short time interval between AIHA and PRCA phase suggested an increased possibility of the evolution of a single disease. PMID:23525059

Saha, M; Ray, S; Kundu, S; Chakrabarti, P

2013-01-01

324

Gemcitabine-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome in ovarian carcinoma.  

PubMed

Multiple chemotherapeutic agents, either alone or in combination, have been implicated in causing hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Gemcitabine has been reported to cause this condition rarely. A 48-year-old Caucasian woman, gravida 3, para 3 (G3P3), was diagnosed with stage III C ovarian carcinoma and after completing numerous chemotherapeutic regimens, she was started on gemcitabine. During her fourth cycle of gemcitabine, she developed generalized anasarca and presented to hospital with hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure. A diagnosis of HUS was made, which was confirmed by renal biopsy, and the patient was started on hemodialysis and plasmapheresis. We conclude if a patient has advanced-stage disease and has been heavily treated with chemotherapy before, there is a high risk that, on gemcitabine monotherapy, the patient can develop HUS earlier than expected. PMID:17929123

Kalra, Nishant; Kad, Rahul; Osama, Sayed

2007-10-01

325

Improving the bacteriological safety of platelet transfusions.  

PubMed

Despite the increased application of aseptic techniques for blood collection and the preparation of platelet concentrates, morbidity and mortality arising from the transfusion of bacterially contaminated allogeneic platelet products persist. This problem exists because stored platelet concentrates represent a nearly ideal growth medium for bacteria and because they are stored at temperatures (22 degrees +/- 2 degrees C) that facilitate bacterial growth. The presence of bacteria in blood components including platelets has been a problem for many decades and currently is the most common microbiological cause of transfusion-associated morbidity and mortality. A variety of strategies have been devised and/or proposed in an attempt to try to reduce the risk of transfusion-associated sepsis. These include pretransfusion bacterial detection, efforts to reduce the likelihood of bacterial contamination, the optimization of blood product processing and storage, reducing recipient exposure, and the introduction of pathogen inactivation methodology. With regard to doing bacterial detection, a number of automated detection systems have become available to test for contaminated platelet components, but their utility to some extent is restricted by the time they take to indicate the presence of bacteria and/or their lack of sensitivity to detect initially low bacterial loads. A variety of other approaches has been shown to reduce the risk of bacterial contamination and include filtration to remove leukocytes and bacteria, diversion of the initial aliquot of blood during donation, and improved donor skin disinfection. Platelet pathogen inactivation methods under investigation include the addition of L-carnitine, gamma-irradiation, riboflavin plus UVA irradiation, and amotosalen HCl plus UVA irradiation. The latter process is licensed for clinical use with platelets in some countries in Europe. All of these approaches, either collectively or individually, hold considerable promise that the prevalence of adverse events associated with bacteria in platelet products will decline significantly in the very foreseeable future. PMID:14689374

Blajchman, Morris A; Goldman, Mindy; Baeza, Federico

2004-01-01

326

An association of ABO non-identical platelet and cryoprecipitate transfusions with altered red cell transfusion needs in surgical patients  

PubMed Central

Background Transfusion of ABO non-identical plasma, platelets and cryoprecipitate is routine practice even though adverse effects can occur. Methods and Materials Our hospital changed transfusion practice in 2005 and adopted a policy of providing ABO identical blood components to all patients when feasible. We retrospectively compared the transfusion requirements, length of stay, and in-hospital mortality in relation to ABO blood group in surgical patients who received platelet transfusions before and after this change to determine if it resulted in any benefit. Results Prior to the change in practice both group B and AB patients received more ABO non-identical platelet transfusion (p = 0.0004), required significantly greater numbers of red cell transfusions (p = 0.04), and had 50% longer hospital stays (p = 0.039) than group O and A patients. Following the policy change, there was a trend for fewer red cell transfusions (p = 0.17) and length of stay in group B and AB patients than group O or A patients. Overall, the mortality rate per red cell transfusion decreased from 15.2 per 1000 to 11.0 per 1000 (p = 0.013). Conclusions These results, in the context of previous findings, suggest that providing ABO identical platelets and cryoprecipitate might be associated with reduction in transfusion requirements and improve outcomes in surgical patients.

Refaai, Majed A.; Fialkow, Lawrence B.; Heal, Joanna M.; Henrichs, Kelly F.; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Phipps, Richard P.; Masel, Edward; Smith, Brian H.; Corsetti, James P.; Francis, Charles W.; Bankey, Paul E.; Blumberg, Neil

2010-01-01

327

Serological and Clinical Aspects of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemias  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryAutoimmune hemolytic anemias (AIHAs) may occur when specific autoantibodies react with red blood cell (RBC) antigens. Decompensated hemolysis and detectable autoantibodies against RBCs are classical findings. The autoantibodies preferentially react at 37 °C (warm autoantibodies). The majority of these autoantibodies are of the IgG class; IgM and IgA warm autoantibodies are less common. Roughly 50% of the patients have an

A. Salama; N. Ahrens; H. Kiesewetter

2002-01-01

328

Severe canine hereditary hemolytic anemia treated by nonmyeloablative marrow transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Severe hemolytic anemia in Basenji dogs secondary to pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency can be corrected by marrow allografts from healthy littermates after a conventional high-dose myeloablative conditioning regimen. The nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen used here, which consisted of a sublethal dose of 200 cGy total body irradiation before and immunosuppression with mycophenolate mofetil and cyclosporine after a dog leukocyte antigen (DLA)-identical

J. Maciej Zaucha; Cong Yu; Clinton D Lothrop; Richard A Nash; George Sale; George Georges; Hans-Peter Kiem; Glenn P Niemeyer; Marc Dufresne; Qiongfang Cao; Rainer Storb

2001-01-01

329

Cardiac hemolytic anemia resolving after second mitral annuloplasty.  

PubMed Central

Following an episode of rheumatic carditis, severe mitral incompetence developed in a 9-year-old girl. A mitral annuloplasty succeeded for a short time in ameliorating her symptoms of cardiac failure. However, mitral incompetence recurred and was accompanied by severe anemia and hemosiderinuria. Distortion of erythrocytes was evident on a peripheral blood smear. A second mitral annuloplasty resulted in resolution of the hemolytic anemia. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2

O'Regan, S.; Newman, A. J.

1976-01-01

330

Internet-based transfusion audit system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This project is aimed at developing a cost-effective working environment for the transfusion medicine specialists of American Red Cross (ARC). In this project we are developing a multimedia-based consultation environment that uses Internet and teleconferencing to increase the quality of services and to replace currently used 800 telephone lines. Through the use of Internet/LAN/ISDN the physicians can share information and references while they discuss patient cases. A multimedia interface allows the physician to access data from the office and from the house. This paper discusses the approach, current status of the project and future plans to extend the approach to other areas of medicine.

Maitan, Jacek; Haley, Rebecca

1995-03-01

331

Liberal or Restrictive Transfusion in High-Risk Patients after Hip Surgery  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND The hemoglobin threshold at which postoperative red-cell transfusion is warranted is controversial. We conducted a randomized trial to determine whether a higher threshold for blood transfusion would improve recovery in patients who had undergone surgery for hip fracture. METHODS We enrolled 2016 patients who were 50 years of age or older, who had either a history of or risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and whose hemoglobin level was below 10 g per deciliter after hip-fracture surgery. We randomly assigned patients to a liberal transfusion strategy (a hemoglobin threshold of 10 g per deciliter) or a restrictive transfusion strategy (symptoms of anemia or at physician discretion for a hemoglobin level of <8 g per deciliter). The primary outcome was death or an inability to walk across a room without human assistance on 60-day follow-up. RESULTS A median of 2 units of red cells were transfused in the liberal-strategy group and none in the restrictive-strategy group. The rates of the primary outcome were 35.2% in the liberal-strategy group and 34.7% in the restrictive-strategy group (odds ratio in the liberal-strategy group, 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84 to 1.22), for an absolute risk difference of 0.5 percentage points (95% CI, ?3.7 to 4.7). The rates of in-hospital acute coronary syndrome or death were 4.3% and 5.2%, respectively (absolute risk difference, ?0.9%; 99% CI, ?3.3 to 1.6), and rates of death on 60-day follow-up were 7.6% and 6.6%, respectively (absolute risk difference, 1.0%; 99% CI, ?1.9 to 4.0). The rates of other complications were similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS A liberal transfusion strategy, as compared with a restrictive strategy, did not reduce rates of death or inability to walk independently on 60-day follow-up or reduce in-hospital morbidity in elderly patients at high cardiovascular risk. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; FOCUS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00071032.)

Carson, Jeffrey L.; Terrin, Michael L.; Noveck, Helaine; Sanders, David W.; Chaitman, Bernard R.; Rhoads, George G.; Nemo, George; Dragert, Karen; Beaupre, Lauren; Hildebrand, Kevin; Macaulay, William; Lewis, Courtland; Cook, Donald Richard; Dobbin, Gwendolyn; Zakriya, Khwaja J.; Apple, Fred S.; Horney, Rebecca A.; Magaziner, Jay

2012-01-01

332

Assesment, treatment and prevention of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.  

PubMed

Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a heterogeneous group of hemolytic disorders. Different terminologies have been described in HUS, which are as follows: (1) D+ HUS: Presentation with a preceding diarrhea; (2) typical HUS: D+ HUS with a single and self-limited episode; (3) atypical HUS (aHUS): Indicated those with complement dysregulation; (4) recurrent HUS: Recurrent episodes of thrombocytopenia and/or microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) after improvement of hematologic abnormalities; and (5) familial HUS: Necessary to distinct synchronous outbreaks of D+ HUS in family members and asynchronous disease with an inherited risk factor. aHUS is one of the potential causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in children. It has a high recurrence after renal transplantation in some genetic forms. Therefore, recognition of the responsible mechanism and proper prophylactic treatment are recommended to prevent or delay the occurrence of ESRD and prolong the length of survival of the transplanted kidney. A computerized search of MEDLINE and other databases was carried out to find the latest results in pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of aHUS. PMID:23412906

Nickavar, Azar; Sotoudeh, Kambiz

2013-01-01

333

Modification of sticholysin II hemolytic activity by free radicals.  

PubMed

Sticholysin II is a highly hemolytic toxin present in the caribbean sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. Pre-incubation of St II with 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane), a source of peroxyl radicals in air saturated solution, readily reduces its hemolytic activity. Analysis of the amino acids present in the protein after its modification shows that only tryptophan groups are significantly modified by the free radicals. According to this, the loss of hemolytic activity correlates with the loss of the protein intrinsic fluorescence. The results indicate that, at high toxin concentrations, nearly a tryptophan residue and 0.2 toxin molecules are inactivated by each radical introduced into the system. Association of St II to multilamellar liposomes (egg yolk phosphatidyl choline:sphingomyelin 1:1) increases the toxin intrinsic fluorescence, indicating a more hydrophobic average environment of the five tryptophan groups of the protein. In agreement with this, incorporation of St II to the liposomes reduces the rate of fluorescence loss during its modification by free radicals, particularly at long incubation times. These results are explained in terms of two populations of tryptophans that are quenched at different rates by acrylamide and whose rates of inactivation by free radicals are also different. PMID:9723837

Pazos, I F; Alvarez, C; Lanio, M E; Martinez, D; Morera, V; Lissi, E A; Campos, A M

1998-10-01

334

Serratamolide is a Hemolytic Factor Produced by Serratia marcescens  

PubMed Central

Serratia marcescens is a common contaminant of contact lens cases and lenses. Hemolytic factors of S. marcescens contribute to the virulence of this opportunistic bacterial pathogen. We took advantage of an observed hyper-hemolytic phenotype of crp mutants to investigate mechanisms of hemolysis. A genetic screen revealed that swrW is necessary for the hyper-hemolysis phenotype of crp mutants. The swrW gene is required for biosynthesis of the biosurfactant serratamolide, previously shown to be a broad-spectrum antibiotic and to contribute to swarming motility. Multicopy expression of swrW or mutation of the hexS transcription factor gene, a known inhibitor of swrW expression, led to an increase in hemolysis. Surfactant zones and expression from an swrW-transcriptional reporter were elevated in a crp mutant compared to the wild type. Purified serratamolide was hemolytic to sheep and murine red blood cells and cytotoxic to human airway and corneal limbal epithelial cells in vitro. The swrW gene was found in the majority of contact lens isolates tested. Genetic and biochemical analysis implicate the biosurfactant serratamolide as a hemolysin. This novel hemolysin may contribute to irritation and infections associated with contact lens use.

Shanks, Robert M. Q.; Stella, Nicholas A.; Lahr, Roni M.; Wang, Shaoru; Veverka, Tara I.; Kowalski, Regis P.; Liu, Xinyu

2012-01-01

335

History of blood transfusion in sub-saharan Africa.  

PubMed

The adequacy and safety of blood transfusion in sub-Saharan Africa is the subject of much concern, yet there have been very few studies of its history. An overview of that record finds that transfusions were first reported in Africa (sub-Saharan and excluding South Africa) in the early 1920s, and organized transfusion practices were established before the Second World War. Blood transfusion grew rapidly after 1945, along with the construction of new hospitals and expanded health services in Africa. Significant differences existed between colonial powers in the organization of transfusion services, but these converged after independence as their use continued to grow and decentralized and hospital-based practices were adopted. It was only after the oil crisis in the mid-1970s that health spending declined and the collection, testing, and transfusion of blood began to level off. Thus, when the AIDS crisis hit transfusion services, they were already struggling to meet the needs of patients. At this time, foreign assistance as well as the World Health Organization and the League of Red Cross Societies helped respond to both the immediate problem of testing blood, and for some countries, support existed for the broader reorganization of transfusion. Overall, the history shows that transfusion was adopted widely and quickly, limited mainly by the availability of knowledgeable doctors and hospital facilities. There was less resistance than expected by Africans to receive transfusions, and the record shows a remarkable flexibility in obtaining blood. The dangers of disease transmission were recognized from an early date but were balanced against the potential lifesaving benefits of transfusion. PMID:22981696

Schneider, William H

2013-01-01

336

Blood transfusion in sickle cell disease leading to posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES).  

PubMed

Children with sickle cell disease have a very high risk of lifelong neurologic morbidity and mortality. Cerebrovascular accidents are a known complication in children with sickle cell disease. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a constellation of acute neurologic findings increasingly recognized in pediatric critical care population with evidence of vasogenic edema on brain imaging possibly due to cerebral vascular endothelial cell dysfunction. This report, for the first time, describes a young adult with sickle cell disease who developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following blood transfusion. PMID:22899796

Raj, Shashi; Killinger, James; Overby, Philip

2013-10-01

337

BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION IN THE TREATMENT OF ACUTE LEUKEMIAS IN CHILDREN  

Microsoft Academic Search

Observations on 18 patients with acute myeloid leukemia led to the ; conclusion that treatment with bone marrow transfusions combined with 6-; mercaptopurine, corticosteroid hormones, and packed red cell transfusions has a ; favorable effect on remission and the course of leukemia in children. No cures ; resulted from this treatment. Best results were obtained when 6-merciptopurine ; treatment was

V. I. Kalinicheva; L. M. Rozanova; D. I. Rafalson; L. K. Nikolayeva

1961-01-01

338

French Haemovigilance Data on Platelet Transfusion  

PubMed Central

Summary The Agence Française de Securite Sanitaire des Produits de Santé (Afssaps; French Health Products Safety Agency) is responsible, through its hemovigilance unit, for the organization and the functioning of the national hemovigilance network. In accordance with the French law, it receives all data on adverse transfusion reactions regardless of their severity. With the aim of evaluating the tolerance of two kinds of labile blood products (LBP), pooled platelet concentrates (PP) and apheresis platelet concentrates (APC), we screened the French national database from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2006. We observed that the number of transfusion incident reports is more than twice as high with APC (8.61:1,000 LBP) than with PP (4.21:1,000 LBP). The difference between these two ratios is statistically significant as shown by chi-square test (e = 21.00 with ? = 5%). The risk to suffer adverse reactions of any type, except for alloimmunization, is higher with APC, and the major type of diagnosis related to APC is allergic reaction (1:200 APC issued) even if those allergic reactions are rarely serious. The new French National Hemovigilance Commission should impel a working group evaluating this topic and above all the impact of additive solutions which have been used since 2005 to put forward preventives measures.

Willaert, Beatrice; Vo Mai, Mai-Phuong; Caldani, Cyril

2008-01-01

339

Improved traceability and transfusion safety with a new portable computerised system in a hospital with intermediate transfusion activity  

PubMed Central

Background. A retrospective study carried out on medical records of transfused patients in our hospital in 2002 revealed that manual identification procedures were insufficient to offer satisfactory traceability. The aim of this study was to assess adequacy of transfusion traceability and compliance with proper identification procedures after introducing an electronic identification system (EIS) for transfusion safety. Materials and methods. The chosen EIS (Gricode®) was set up. Traceability was calculated as the percentage of empty blood units used returned to the Transfusion Service, compared to the number of supplied units. Compliance in the Transfusion Service was calculated as the percentage of electronic controls from dispatch of blood components/transfusion request performed, compared to the total number of transfused units. Compliance in the ward was calculated as the percentage of electronic controls from sample collection/transfusion performed, compared to the total number of samples collected. Results. This retrospective study showed that only 48.0% of the medical records were free of inaccuracies. After the implementation of the EIS (2005–2008), traceability was always above 99%. Percentage of monthly compliance from 2006 to 2008 was always above 93%, showing a significant trend to increase (p<0.05). The mean compliance in this period was higher in the Transfusion Service (97.8±0.7 SD) than in the ward (94.9±2.4 SD; p<0.001). Compliance in the ward was lowest when the system was first implemented (87.9% in April 2006) after which it progressively increased. No errors in ABO transfusions were registered. Conclusion. After implementation of the EIS, traceability and compliance reached very high levels, linked to an improvement in transfusion safety.

Uriz, Maria Jose; Antelo, Maria Luisa; Zalba, Saioa; Ugalde, Nazaret; Pena, Esther; Corcoz, Andrea

2011-01-01

340

A confirmed Ehrlichia ewingii infection likely acquired through platelet transfusion.  

PubMed

Ehrlichiosis is a tick-borne disease that ranges in severity from asymptomatic infection to fatal sepsis. Ehrlichiosis acquired from transfusion of blood products has not been documented in the literature to date. A case of Ehrlichia ewingii infection likely transmitted by transfusion of leukoreduced platelets is described, and public health implications are discussed. PMID:23511303

Regan, Joanna; Matthias, James; Green-Murphy, Audrey; Stanek, Danielle; Bertholf, Marsha; Pritt, Bobbi S; Sloan, Lynne M; Kelly, Aubree J; Singleton, Joseph; McQuiston, Jennifer H; Hocevar, Susan N; Whittle, John P

2013-06-01

341

THREAT helps to identify epistaxis patients requiring blood transfusions  

PubMed Central

Objective To analyze the characteristics of patients who needed a blood transfusion due to epistaxis-caused anemia and to define potential risk factors. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting A total cohort of 591 epistaxis patients, prospectively included between March 2007 and April 2008 at the ENT department of the University Hospital of Zurich, was evaluated concerning the need for blood transfusions. Methods The clinical charts and medical histories of these patients were evaluated. Main outcome measures Common parameters that increase the risk for severe anemia due to epistaxis. Results Twenty-two patients required blood transfusions due to their medical condition. 22.7% suffered from traumatic nosebleeds. Another 27.3% had a known medical condition with an increased bleeding tendency. These proportions were significantly higher than in the group of patients without need of blood transfusion. The odds ratio for receiving a blood transfusion was 14.0 in patients with hematologic disorders, 4.3 in traumatic epistaxis and 7.7 in posterior bleeders. The transfusion-dependent epistaxis patients suffered significantly more often from severe posterior nosebleeds with the need for a surgical therapeutic approach. Conclusions Patients with severe nosebleeds either from the posterior part of the nose or with known hematologic disorders or traumatic epistaxis should be closely monitored by blood parameter analyses to evaluate the indication for hemotransfusion. The acronym THREAT (Trauma, Hematologic disorder, and REAr origin of bleeding ? Transfusion) helps to remember and identify the factors associated with an increased risk of receiving blood transfusion.

2013-01-01

342

Transfusion Medicine in Slovenia ? Current Status and Future Challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

A short history of the blood transfusion activities in Slovenia is given, starting with the hommage to Dr. Janez Plecnik, a contributor to the famous experiment of the ABO blood groups discovery by Landsteiner in 1900. The organized blood transfusion services of Slovenia that celebrate the 60th anniversary in 2006 have been traditionally based on a system of unpaid voluntary

Primož Rožman; Dragoslav Domanovi?

2006-01-01

343

Exchange transfusion of a patient with fulminant Lassa fever  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report a patient with fulminant Lassa fever who responded dramatically to a 2.5-litre exchange transfusion of whole blood. On admission he was semicomatose with facial oedema and oral haemorrhage; his platelets showed markedly depressed aggregation to ADP; and his plasma inhibited the aggregation responses of normal platelets in vitro. Exchange transfusion resulted in rapid clinical improvement, recovery of platelet

D. Cummins; D. Bennett; S. J. Machin

1991-01-01

344

Blood transfusion-related posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.  

PubMed

Neurological complications have rarely been described after blood transfusion. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a recently recognized entity affecting predominantly the posterior cerebral hemispheres. We report two distinctive cases with history of chronic anemia that developed headache, blurred vision and seizure after blood transfusion. Magnetic resonance imaging indicated vasogenic edema consistent with PRES. PMID:24857623

Zhao, Zhen-Yu; He, Feng; Gao, Pei-Hong; Bi, Jian-Zhong

2014-07-15

345

Ethical issues in the forced transfusion of Jehovah's Witness children  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the views of Jehovah's Witnesses in regards to their refusal of blood transfusions for themselves and their children. After setting out the legal framework society presently has in place for dealing with such refusals, the paper reviews the ethics literature that justifies the intervention by the State to force the transfusion of Jehovah's Witness children. It is

Mark Sheldon

1996-01-01

346

Tattoos as risk factors for transfusion-transmitted diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Several infectious diseases have been found to be associated with tattooing, including some transfusion transmitted diseases (TTDs). Information on tattooing has been included in screening interviews of prospective blood donors and may be a reason for deferral.Methods: Review of articles identified through MEDLINE (and other computerized data bases) using medical subject heading (MeSH) terms and textwords for “tattooing,” “transfusion,”

Sérgio de A. Nishioka; Theresa W. Gyorkos

2001-01-01

347

Benefits of HIV screening of blood transfusions in Zambia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Blood transfusion continues to be an important route of transmission of HIV in developing countries, especially for young children following the perinatal period. Testing for HIV is costly and reliable donor support for the purchase of test kits is often essential, yet difficult to secure. The costs of screening of transfusions for HIV and the financial benefits in terms of

S Foster; A Buvé

1995-01-01

348

Toward a patient-based paradigm for blood transfusion  

PubMed Central

The current “manufacturing paradigm” of transfusion practice has detached transfusion from the clinical environment. As an example, fresh whole blood in large-volume hemorrhage may be superior to whole blood reconstituted from multiple components. Multicomponent apheresis can overcome logistical difficulties in matching patient needs with fresh component availability and can deliver the benefits of fresh whole blood. Because of the different transfusion needs of patients in emerging economies and the vulnerability of these blood systems to emerging infections, fresh whole blood and multicomponent apheresis can better meet patient needs when compared with transplants of the “manufacturing paradigm”. We propose that patient blood management, along with panels of repeat, paid, accredited apheresis and fresh whole-blood donors can be used in emerging economies to support decentralized blood services. This alternative transfusion–medicine paradigm could eventually also be adopted by established economies to focus transfusion medicine on local patient needs and to alleviate the problem of the aging volunteer donor base.

Farrugia, Albert; Vamvakas, Eleftherios

2014-01-01

349

Acute pancreatitis  

MedlinePLUS

... from an accident Other causes include: Complications of cystic fibrosis Hemolytic uremic syndrome Hyperparathyroidism Kawasaki disease Reye syndrome Use of certain medications (especially estrogens, ...

350

Cirrhosis associated with multiple transfusions in thalassaemia.  

PubMed Central

The study of surgical liver biopsy specimens obtained during splenectomy in 86 children with thalassaemia indicated that such patients may develop liver disease that evolves into cirrhosis. Histological characteristics suggest that it is post-necrotic cirrhosis. Onset of cirrhosis in some patients may occur as early as 7-8 years old, and at age about 15-16 years most children with thalassaemia show features of cirrhosis. In addition to fibrosis, hepatitis, or even aggressive hepatitis may develop as has also been observed in patients without thalassaemia who have undergone multiple transfusions. This study presents the current probable evolution of liver disease in patients with thalassaemia and may thus serve as a reference from which to evaluate any future progress in the treatment and care of patients with Cooley's disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2

Jean, G; Terzoli, S; Mauri, R; Borghetti, L; Di Palma, A; Piga, A; Magliano, M; Melevendi, M; Cattaneo, M

1984-01-01

351

Increased leucocyte apoptosis in transfused ?-thalassaemia patients.  

PubMed

This exploratory study assessed apoptosis in peripheral blood leucocytes (PBL) from ?-thalassaemia patients receiving chronic transfusions and chelation therapy (deferasirox or deferoxamine) at baseline, 1, 6, and 12 months. At baseline, thalassaemic PBLs presented 50% greater levels of Bax (BAX), 75% higher caspase-3/7, 48% higher caspase-8 and 88% higher caspase-9 activities and 428% more nucleosomal DNA fragmentation than control subjects. Only neutrophils correlated significantly with apoptotic markers. Previously, we showed that over the treatment year, hepatic iron declined; we now show that the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 (BCL2), (-27·3%/year), and caspase-9 activity (-13·3%/year) declined in both treatment groups, suggesting that chelation decreases body iron and indicators of PBL apoptosis. PMID:23216540

Walter, Patrick B; Porter, John; Evans, Patricia; Kwiatkowski, Janet L; Neufeld, Ellis J; Coates, Thomas; Giardina, Patricia J; Grady, Robert W; Vichinsky, Elliott; Olivieri, Nancy; Trachtenberg, Felicia; Alberti, Daniele; Fung, Ellen; Ames, Bruce; Higa, Annie; Harmatz, Paul

2013-02-01

352

[Blood transfusion and ethics: new questions].  

PubMed

Chairman to the French Institutional Review Board, Professor Didier Sicard raises blood donation issues from an ethical standpoint. The contaminated blood scandal focused on the necessity of reducing transfusion risks and regarded blood safety as an ethical mandatory requirement, a debatable subject to deal with. The author proposes to reconsider the nature of unpaid blood donations while advising not to scorn the remunerated gift when such is the case. As for the use of blood, he questions the solutions based on a zero risk perspective, in particular an excessive auto-transfusional practice or a restrictive use of blood, lately regarded as essential. Starting from the blood donation concern this article leads us to think over both our society's fears and the precautionary principle abuses. PMID:17010652

Sicard, D

2006-09-01

353

Predictive Models and Algorithms for the Need of Transfusion Including Massive Transfusion in Severely Injured Patients  

PubMed Central

Background Despite improvements on how to resuscitate exsanguinating patients, one remaining key to improve outcome is to expeditiously and reproducibly identify patients most likely to require transfusion including massive transfusion (MT). This work summarizes yet developed algorithms/scoring systems for transfusion including MT in civilian and military trauma populations. Methods A systematic search of evidence was conducted utilizing OVID/MEDLINE (1966 to present) and the ‘Medical Algorithms Project’. Results and Conclusions The models developed suggest combinations of physiologic, hemodynamic, laboratory, injury severity and demographic triggers identified on the initial evaluation of the bleeding trauma patient. Many approaches use a combination of dichotomous variables readily accessible after arrival but others rely on time-consuming calculations or complex algorithms and may have limited real-time application. Weighted and more sophisticated systems including higher numbers of variables perform superior. A common limitation to all models is their retrospective nature, and prospective validations are urgently needed. Point-of-care viscoelastic testing may be an alternative to these systems.

Maegele, Marc; Brockamp, Thomas; Nienaber, Ulrike; Probst, Christian; Schoechl, Herbert; Gorlinger, Klaus; Spinella, Philip

2012-01-01

354

Engineering antimicrobial peptides with improved antimicrobial and hemolytic activities.  

PubMed

The rapid rise of antibiotic resistance in pathogens becomes a serious and growing threat to medicine and public health. Naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important line of defense in the immune system against invading bacteria and microbial infection. In this work, we present a combined computational and experimental study of the biological activity and membrane interaction of the computationally designed Bac2A-based peptide library. We used the MARTINI coarse-grained molecular dynamics with adaptive biasing force method and the umbrella sampling technique to investigate the translocation of a total of 91 peptides with different amino acid substitutions through a mixed anionic POPE/POPG (3:1) bilayer and a neutral POPC bilayer, which mimic the bacterial inner membrane and the human red blood cell (hRBC) membrane, respectively. Potential of mean force (PMF, free energy profile) was obtained to measure the free energy barrier required to transfer the peptides from the bulk water phase to the water-membrane interface and to the bilayer interior. Different PMF profiles can indeed identify different membrane insertion scenarios by mapping out peptide-lipid energy landscapes, which are correlated with antimicrobial activity and hemolytic activity. Computationally designed peptides were further tested experimentally for their antimicrobial and hemolytic activities using bacteria growth inhibition assay and hemolysis assay. Comparison of PMF data with cell assay results reveals a good correlation of the peptides between predictive transmembrane activity and antimicrobial/hemolytic activity. Moreover, the most active mutants with the balanced substitutions of positively charged Arg and hydrophobic Trp residues at specific positions were discovered to achieve the improved antimicrobial activity while minimizing red blood cell lysis. Such substitutions provide more effective and cooperative interactions to distinguish the peptide interaction with different lipid bilayers. This work provides a useful computational tool to better understand the mechanism and energetics of membrane insertion of AMPs and to rationally design more effective AMPs. PMID:24279498

Zhao, Jun; Zhao, Chao; Liang, Guizhao; Zhang, Mingzhen; Zheng, Jie

2013-12-23

355

Stroke With Transfusions Changing to Hydroxyurea (SWiTCH).  

PubMed

Stroke is a devastating complication of sickle cell anemia (SCA) with high recurrence if untreated. Chronic transfusions reduce recurrent strokes but have associated morbidities including iron overload. Stroke With Transfusions Changing to Hydroxyurea (SWiTCH) was a multicenter phase 3 randomized trial comparing standard treatment (transfusions/chelation) to alternative treatment (hydroxyurea/phlebotomy) for children with SCA, stroke, and iron overload. SWiTCH was a noninferiority trial with a composite primary end point, allowing an increased stroke risk but requiring superiority for removing iron. Subjects on standard treatment received monthly transfusions plus daily deferasirox iron chelation. Subjects on alternative treatment received hydroxyurea plus overlap transfusions during dose escalation to maximum tolerated dose (MTD), followed by monthly phlebotomy. Subjects on standard treatment (N = 66) maintained 30% sickle hemoglobin (HbS) and tolerated deferasirox at 28.2 ± 6.0 mg/kg/d. Subjects on alternative treatment (N = 67) initiated hydroxyurea and 60 (90%) reached MTD at 26.2 ± 4.9 mg/kg/d with 29.1% ± 6.7% fetal hemoglobin (HbF). Adjudication documented no strokes on transfusions/chelation but 7 (10%) on hydroxyurea/phlebotomy, still within the noninferiority stroke margin. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute closed SWiTCH after interim analysis revealed equivalent liver iron content, indicating futility for the composite primary end point. Transfusions and chelation remain a better way to manage children with SCA, stroke, and iron overload. PMID:22318199

Ware, Russell E; Helms, Ronald W

2012-04-26

356

Alterations in Bone and Erythropoiesis in Hemolytic Anemia: Comparative Study in Bled, Phenylhydrazine-Treated and Plasmodium-Infected Mice  

PubMed Central

Sustained erythropoiesis and concurrent bone marrow hyperplasia are proposed to be responsible for low bone mass density (BMD) in chronic hemolytic pathologies. As impaired erythropoiesis is also frequent in these conditions, we hypothesized that free heme may alter marrow and bone physiology in these disorders. Bone status and bone marrow erythropoiesis were studied in mice with hemolytic anemia (HA) induced by phenylhydrazine (PHZ) or Plasmodium infection and in bled mice. All treatments resulted in lower hemoglobin concentrations, enhanced erythropoiesis in the spleen and reticulocytosis. The anemia was severe in mice with acute hemolysis, which also had elevated levels of free heme and ROS. No major changes in cellularity and erythroid cell numbers occurred in the bone marrow of bled mice, which generated higher numbers of erythroid blast forming units (BFU-E) in response to erythropoietin. In contrast, low numbers of bone marrow erythroid precursors and BFU-E and low concentrations of bone remodelling markers were measured in mice with HA, which also had blunted osteoclastogenesis, in opposition to its enhancement in bled mice. The alterations in bone metabolism were accompanied by reduced trabecular bone volume, enhanced trabecular spacing and lower trabecular numbers in mice with HA. Taken together our data suggests that hemolysis exerts distinct effects to bleeding in the marrow and bone and may contribute to osteoporosis through a mechanism independent of the erythropoietic stress.

Moreau, Robert; Tshikudi Malu, Diane; Dumais, Mathieu; Dalko, Esther; Gaudreault, Veronique; Romero, Hugo; Martineau, Corine; Kevorkova, Olha; Dardon, Jaime Sanchez; Dodd, Erin Lynn; Bohle, David Scott; Scorza, Tatiana

2012-01-01

357

Successful Remission of Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome During the Third-line Weekly Gemcitabine for Metastatic Breast Cancer.  

PubMed

Sequential palliative chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer incorporating weekly gemcitabine administered as three-weeks-on, one-week-off schedule is widely adopted throughout the East Asia region. Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) associated with weekly gemcitabine for a breast cancer patient is extremely rare. We report here a case of 43-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer who received weekly gemcitabine as a third-line palliative chemotherapy for her disease. She developed HUS after a cumulative dose of 11,000 mg/m(2) gemcitabine, evidenced by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) with schistocytes seen in peripheral blood smear, decreased haptoglobin level (<0.29 mmol/L), thrombocytopenia, negative direct Coombs test, and acute kidney injury. Owing to the ease of administration of weekly gemcitabine, gemcitabine-induced thrombocytopenia, multifactorial anemia in metastatic breast cancer, and possibility of cancer progression, HUS could have gone unnoticed. Breast cancer oncologist should be cognizant of this rare HUS even during weekly gemcitabine treatment. PMID:24701120

Kok, Victor C; Wu, Sheng-Chung; Lee, Chien-Kuang

2014-01-01

358

Quiescent complement in nonhuman primates during E coli Shiga toxin-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic microangiopathy.  

PubMed

Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) produce ribosome-inactivating Shiga toxins (Stx1, Stx2) responsible for development of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and acute kidney injury (AKI). Some patients show complement activation during EHEC infection, raising the possibility of therapeutic targeting of complement for relief. Our juvenile nonhuman primate (Papio baboons) models of endotoxin-free Stx challenge exhibit full spectrum HUS, including thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and AKI with glomerular thrombotic microangiopathy. There were no significant increases in soluble terminal complement complex (C5b-9) levels after challenge with lethal Stx1 (n = 6) or Stx2 (n = 5) in plasma samples from T0 to euthanasia at 49.5 to 128 hours post-challenge. d-dimer and cell injury markers (HMGB1, histones) confirmed coagulopathy and cell injury. Thus, complement activation is not required for the development of thrombotic microangiopathy and HUS induced by EHEC Shiga toxins in these preclinical models, and benefits or risks of complement inhibition should be studied further for this infection. PMID:23733336

Lee, Benjamin C; Mayer, Chad L; Leibowitz, Caitlin S; Stearns-Kurosawa, D J; Kurosawa, Shinichiro

2013-08-01

359

Quiescent complement in nonhuman primates during E coli Shiga toxin-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic microangiopathy  

PubMed Central

Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) produce ribosome-inactivating Shiga toxins (Stx1, Stx2) responsible for development of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and acute kidney injury (AKI). Some patients show complement activation during EHEC infection, raising the possibility of therapeutic targeting of complement for relief. Our juvenile nonhuman primate (Papio baboons) models of endotoxin-free Stx challenge exhibit full spectrum HUS, including thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and AKI with glomerular thrombotic microangiopathy. There were no significant increases in soluble terminal complement complex (C5b-9) levels after challenge with lethal Stx1 (n = 6) or Stx2 (n = 5) in plasma samples from T0 to euthanasia at 49.5 to 128 hours post-challenge. d-dimer and cell injury markers (HMGB1, histones) confirmed coagulopathy and cell injury. Thus, complement activation is not required for the development of thrombotic microangiopathy and HUS induced by EHEC Shiga toxins in these preclinical models, and benefits or risks of complement inhibition should be studied further for this infection.

Lee, Benjamin C.; Mayer, Chad L.; Leibowitz, Caitlin S.

2013-01-01

360

Pleural solitary fibrous tumor complicated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.  

PubMed

We herein report a 74-year-old woman who presented with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) associated with pleural solitary fibrous tumor (SFT). Her AIHA was initially treated with 1 mg/kg daily of oral prednisolone (PSL) for 2 months, which had a limited effect. However, after surgical tumor resection, the patient showed remarkable improvement of AIHA with normalizations of serum lactate dehydrogenase and bilirubin levels, and we were able to rapidly reduce the PSL dosage. This is the first description of a case of AIHA caused by SFT. PMID:25030571

Takahashi, Hiroshi; Ohkawara, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Kazuhiko; Harada-Shirado, Kayo; Furukawa, Miki; Sukegawa, Masumi; Shichishima-Nakamura, Akiko; Noji, Hideyoshi; Wakamatsu, Saho; Tasaki, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Kazuei; Takeishi, Yasuchika

2014-01-01

361

[Platelet transfusion: products, indications, dose, threshold and efficacy].  

PubMed

The quality of platelet concentrates had been greatly improved since the implementation of processing techniques based on the use of the buffy-coat in the years 1980. More recently, in the last 10 years, it is in the domain of safety that the greatest advances have been done, by the introduction of platelet additive solutions, on one hand, and by the progressive availability of pathogen reduction techniques, on the other hand. These developments in quality and safety of platelet components are important, as they lead to the conclusion that nowadays, apheresis platelet concentrates and pooled random donor platelet concentrates can be considered as equivalent, the only specific indication of the former being the care of HLA or HPA allo-immunized patients. This review covers the physiological basis of prophylactic and curative platelet transfusions, and the means to evaluate their efficacy. The main investigations that are necessary to perform in the event of an inefficient prophylactic transfusion are also mentioned. Platelet transfusion is an essential part of the transfusion support in case of central thrombocytopenia, and more indications in other medical and surgical situations are well defined. The vast majority of clinical situations in which platelet transfusions are indicated have been defined in the national guidelines published in 2003 by the AFSSAPS French authority, and are still fully valid today. Therefore, only some specific domains for which recent published data are questioning our present practices are discussed, such as the use of platelet concentrates in massive transfusion. Finally, three critical factors for establishing a coherent platelet transfusion strategy are developed: the transfusion trigger for prophylactic platelet transfusion, the platelet dose, and the impact of ABO compatibility between the product and the recipient. PMID:19443257

Andreu, G; Vasse, J; Tardivel, R; Semana, G

2009-05-01

362

Transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease  

SciTech Connect

The clinical pathologic syndrome of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is usually a sequela of bone marrow transplantation. This disorder occurs as a result of recognition by engrafted donor-derived lymphocytes of foreign recipient transplantation antigens. GVHD may also result from engraftment of lymphocytes from other sources, including (1) transfusion of lymphocytes containing blood components, (2) transplacental maternal fetal transfusion, and (3) passive transfer of lymphocytes in solid organ transplantation. The recipients are usually severely immunodeficient and thus incapable of rejecting the transfused lymphocytes. This syndrome may, however, also develop in immunologically competent patients receiving blood products from individuals with histocompatibility antigens not recognized as foreign. 58 refs.

Rappeport, J.M. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (USA))

1990-09-01

363

Transmission of Babesia microti by blood transfusion in Texas.  

PubMed

In the USA, seasonal tickborne transmission of Babesia microti occurs in the Northeast and upper Midwest. A resident of Texas became infected through a red blood cell transfusion from an asymptomatic local donor who had summered in Massachusetts. The patient's infection was diagnosed by blood smear examination in January, 7 weeks post-transfusion. He died 1 week later from variceal haemorrhage complicated by haemolysis. Premortem patient specimens and archived blood from the donor unit tested positive for B. microti antibodies and DNA. Babesiosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of post-transfusion haemolytic anaemia or thrombocytopenia, regardless of the geographical region or season. PMID:19138264

Cangelosi, J J; Sarvat, B; Sarria, J C; Herwaldt, B L; Indrikovs, A J

2008-11-01

364

Geographical variations in current clinical practice on transfusions and iron chelation therapy across various transfusion-dependent anaemias  

PubMed Central

Background and objectives Many patients with chronic anaemia require blood transfusions as part of their treatment regimen. As a result, iron overload will inevitably develop if not adequately managed by iron chelation therapy. There are many guidelines relating to transfusion and chelation practices for patients with transfusion-dependent anaemia; however, there is a lack of information on how treatment practices differ around the world. The objective of this manuscript is to highlight key features of current transfusion and chelation management, including similarities and differences across various anaemias and between geographical regions worldwide. Materials and methods Data collected at study entry to the multicentre Evaluation of Patients’ Iron Chelation with Exjade (EPIC) study, which recruited 1,744 patients with a variety of transfusion-dependent anaemias across 23 countries from three geographic regions, were assessed. These analyses compared transfusion and chelation treatment prior to the start of study treatment, together with iron burden assessed at study entry by serum ferritin, liver iron concentration and labile plasma iron levels. Results and conclusions Data show that transfusion and iron chelation practices differ between anaemias and between geographical regions; this may be linked to availability and accessibility of transfusion and chelation therapy, patients’ compliance, physicians’ attitudes, costs and use of treatment guidelines. Approximately 60% of these transfusion-dependent patients were severely iron overloaded with a serum ferritin level over 2,500 ng/mL, indicating that the risks of iron burden may have been underestimated and current iron chelation therapy, if considered, may not have been adequate to control iron burden.

Viprakasit, Vip; Gattermann, Norbert; Lee, Jong Wook; Porter, John B.; Taher, Ali T.; Habr, Dany; Martin, Nicolas; Domokos, Gabor; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

2013-01-01

365

No Evidence of Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus Transmission by Blood Transfusion from Infected Rhesus Macaques  

PubMed Central

The discovery of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) in human tissue samples has been shown to be due to virus contamination with a recombinant murine retrovirus. However, due to the unknown pathogenicity of this novel retrovirus and its broad host range, including human cell lines, it is important to understand the modes of virus transmission and develop mitigation and management strategies to reduce the risk of human exposure and infection. XMRV transmission was evaluated by whole-blood transfusion in rhesus macaques. Monkeys were infected with XMRV to serve as donor monkeys for blood transfers at weeks 1, 2, and 3 into naïve animals. The donor and recipient monkeys were evaluated for XMRV infection by nested PCR assays with nucleotide sequence confirmation, Western blot assays for development of virus-specific antibodies, and coculture of monkey peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with a sensitive target cell line for virus isolation. XMRV infection was demonstrated in the virus-injected donor monkeys, but there was no evidence of virus transmission by whole-blood transfusion to naïve monkeys based upon PCR analysis of PBMCs using XMRV-specific gag and env primers, Western blot analysis of monkey plasma up to 31 to 32 weeks after transfusion, and coculture studies using monkey PBMCs from various times after transfusion. The study demonstrates the lack of XMRV transmission by whole-blood transfusion during the acute phase of infection. Furthermore, analysis of PBMC viral DNA showed extensive APOBEC-mediated G-to-A hypermutation in a donor animal at week 9, corroborating previous results using macaques and supporting the possible restriction of XMRV replication in humans by a similar mechanism.

Williams, Dhanya K.; Galvin, Teresa A.; Gao, Yamei; O'Neill, Christina; Glasner, Dustin

2013-01-01

366

Heminecrolysin, the first hemolytic dermonecrotic toxin purified from scorpion venom.  

PubMed

Envenomation caused by Hemiscorpius (H.) lepturus from Liochlidae family presents clinical features that have not been previously described for the Buthidae family scorpions. The most significant manifestations of H. lepturus envenomation are hemolysis and dermonecrosis which could lead in severe cases to renal, cardio-respiratory failure, and death. In this study, we aimed to identify and characterize the protein(s) causing these effects. We have purified a 33 kDa protein from the venom of H. lepturus and named it Heminecrolysin. Tryptic digestion and MS/MS analysis of obtained peptides showed homology with previously described brown spider sphingomyelinases D. Functional characterization of Heminecrolysin indicated a sphingomyelinase D, a complement-dependent hemolysis properties and a dermonecrosis activity. Heminecrolysin displayed higher hemolytic activity to human erythrocytes (ED50 of 0.025 ?g/ml), a stronger inflammatory and dermonecrotic effects when injected intra-dermally to rabbit skins, while its efficiency to hydrolyze sphingomyelin seems weaker than other known spider dermonecrotic SMasesD (149 ± 32.5 nmol/mg). Step of sensitization of human erythrocytes by Heminecrolysin was shown to be Mg²? and Ca²?-independent while hemolysis step in the presence of complement required both bivalent ions. Heminecrolysin is the first hemolytic dermonecrotic toxin identified in venom other than spiders. Except in spider Loxosceles genus and some pathogenic strains of Corynebacteria, sphingomyelinase D activity is unknown in the animal kingdom. PMID:21658401

Borchani, Lamia; Sassi, Atfa; Shahbazzadeh, Delavar; Strub, Jean-Marc; Tounsi-Guetteti, Haïfa; Boubaker, Mohamed Samir; Akbari, Abolfazl; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; El Ayeb, Mohamed

2011-07-01

367

A HEMOLYTIC SYSTEM ASSOCIATED WITH ENTERITIS IN RABBITS  

PubMed Central

A disease characterized by frequent association of enteritis and polyagglutinable cells often develops in weanling rabbits. The red cell lesion renders the cells susceptible to agglutination and hemolysis in normal rabbit sera. The degree of red cell abnormality varies among different animals and disappears when the animals recover. The abnormality of the red cells responsible for their polyagglutinability and susceptibility to hemolysis was resistant to the action of trypsin or papain and persisted in heated stroma preparations derived from polyagglutinable cells. The factors necessary for agglutination and hemolysis of the polyagglutinable cells are present in normal rabbit sera but are lacking in the sera of affected rabbits. These factors returned to normal levels as the polyagglutinable cell lesion disappeared. The sera of rabbits with polyagglutinable cells contained normal levels of complement and properdin. Whereas the agglutinating factor in normal sera is heat-stable at 56°C for 30 minutes, the hemolytic factor is heat labile. The hemolytic factor is apparently distinct from complement and properdin since it was adsorbed from normal rabbit serum by zymosan or by polyagglutinable cells at 0°C. However, complement was fixed when normal rabbit serum was reacted with stroma from polyagglutinable cells. Hemolysis of polyagglutinable cells by normal rabbit serum at 25°C was inhibited by preliminary incubation of the mixture at 0°C prior to incubation at 25°C. Evidence was obtained which indicated that this inhibition was due to progression of a reaction involving Ca++ independent of a reaction involving Mg++.

Evans, Robert S.; Bingham, Margaret; Weiser, Russell S.

1963-01-01

368

Recessive mutations in DGKE cause atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome  

PubMed Central

Pathologic thrombosis is a major cause of mortality. Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) features episodes of small vessel thrombosis resulting in microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal failure1. Atypical HUS (aHUS) can result from genetic or autoimmune factors2 that lead to pathologic complement cascade activation3. By exome sequencing we identify recessive mutations in DGKE (diacylglycerol kinase epsilon) that co-segregate with aHUS in 9 unrelated kindreds, defining a distinctive Mendelian disease. Affected patients present with aHUS before age 1, have persistent hypertension, hematuria and proteinuria (sometimes nephrotic range), and develop chronic kidney disease with age. DGKE is found in endothelium, platelets, and podocytes. Arachidonic acid-containing diacylglycerols (DAG) activate protein kinase C, which promotes thrombosis. DGKE normally inactivates DAG signaling. We infer that loss of DGKE function results in a pro-thrombotic state. These findings identify a new mechanism of pathologic thrombosis and kidney failure and have immediate implications for treatment of aHUS patients.

Lemaire, Mathieu; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Schaefer, Franz; Choi, Murim; Tang, Wai Ho; Le Quintrec, Moglie; Fakhouri, Fadi; Taque, Sophie; Nobili, Francois; Martinez, Frank; Ji, Weizhen; Overton, John D.; Mane, Shrikant M.; Nurnberg, Gudrun; Altmuller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Morin, Denis; Deschenes, Georges; Baudouin, Veronique; Llanas, Brigitte; Collard, Laure; Majid, Mohammed A.; Simkova, Eva; Nurnberg, Peter; Rioux-Leclerc, Nathalie; Moeckel, Gilbert W.; Gubler, Marie Claire; Hwa, John; Loirat, Chantal; Lifton, Richard P.

2013-01-01

369

Current approaches for the treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.  

PubMed

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an infrequent group of diseases defined by autoantibody mediated red blood cell destruction. Correct diagnosis and classification of this condition are essential to provide appropriate treatment. AIHA is divided into warm and cold types according to the characteristics of the autoantibody involved and by the presence of an underlying or associated disorder into primary and secondary AIHA. Due to its low frequency, treatment for AIHA is largely based on small prospective trials, case series, and empirical observations. This review describes in detail the different treatment approaches for autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Warm antibody type AIHA should be treated with steroids, to which most patients respond, although relapse can occur and maintenance doses are frequently required. Splenectomy is an effective second line treatment and can provide long-term remission without medication. Rituximab is a useful alternative for steroid refractory patients, those requiring high maintenance doses and unfavorable candidates for surgery. Promising therapeutic modifications with this monoclonal antibody are emerging including drug combinations, lower doses, and long-term use. Primary cold agglutinin disease has been recognized as having a lymphoproliferative monoclonal origin. It is unresponsive to both steroids and splenectomy. Rituximab is currently the best therapeutic alternative for this condition, and several treatment regimens are available with variable responses. PMID:23689532

Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; Rodríguez-Martínez, Marisol; Gómez-de-León, Andrés; Tarín-Arzaga, Luz; Gómez-Almaguer, David

2013-10-01

370

Covalent binding and hemolytic activity of complement proteins.  

PubMed Central

We report the inactivation of the third component of complement (C3) by hydroxylamine. C3 hemolytic and covalent binding activities decline with identical kinetics, demonstrating a direct correlation between the two activities. We conclude that covalent, surface-bound C3b is hemolytically active. The inactivation of C3 is first order with respect to hydroxylamine. We also studied C3 inactivation with [14C]methylamine. The inactivation corresponds quantitatively with the labeling of C3 in the C3d domain. The data obtained support the following hypothesis: there is an internal thioester within C3 which becomes highly reactive on activation to C3b, and C3b binds to receptive surfaces by transfer of the acyl function of the thioester to a hydroxyl group on the receptive surface. This proposed model for the reaction of C3 with receptive surfaces also applies to C4, which binds to membrane surfaces covalently and is able to be inactivated by hydroxylamine and methylamine. C5, on the other hand, is not inactivated by treatment with the amines. Images

Law, S K; Lichtenberg, N A; Levine, R P

1980-01-01

371

Compatible Transfusion Therapy for Paroxysmal Cold Hemoglobinuria  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented are case histories of two children, ages 2 and 4 years, with paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH, a syndrome characterized by acute intravascular hemoglobin dissolution and hemoglobin in the urine). (Author/CL)

Rausen, Aaron R.; And Others

1975-01-01

372

High Oxygen Partial Pressure Decreases Anemia-Induced Heart Rate Increase Equivalent to Transfusion  

PubMed Central

Background Anemia is associated with morbidity and mortality and frequently leads to transfusion of erythrocytes. We sought to compare directly the effect of high inspired oxygen fraction vs. transfusion of erythrocytes on the anemia-induced increased heart rate (HR) in humans undergoing experimental acute isovolemic anemia. Methods We combined HR data from healthy subjects undergoing experimental isovolemic anemia in seven studies performed by our group. We examined HR changes associated with breathing 100% oxygen by non-rebreathing face mask vs. transfusion of erythrocytes at their nadir hemoglobin (Hb) concentration of 5 g/dL. Data were analyzed using a mixed-effects model. Results HR had an inverse linear relationship to hemoglobin concentration with a mean increase of 3.9 beats per minute per gram of Hb (beats/min/g Hb) decrease (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.7 – 4.1 beats/min/g Hb), P < 0.0001. Return of autologous erythrocytes significantly decreased HR by 5.3 beats/min/g Hb (95% CI, 3.8 – 6.8 beats/min/g Hb) increase, P < 0.0001. HR at nadir Hb of 5.6 g/dL (95% CI, 5.5 – 5.7 g/dL) when breathing air (91.4 beats/min; 95% CI, 87.6 – 95.2 beats/min) was reduced by breathing 100% oxygen (83.0 beats/min; 95% CI, 79.0 -87.0 beats/min), P < 0.0001. The HR at hemoglobin 5.6 g/dL when breathing oxygen was equivalent to the HR at Hb 8.9 g/dL when breathing air. Conclusions High arterial oxygen partial pressure reverses the heart rate response to anemia, probably owing to its usability, rather than its effect on total oxygen content. The benefit of high arterial oxygen partial pressure has significant potential clinical implications for the acute treatment of anemia and results of transfusion trials.

Feiner, John R.; Finlay-Morreale, Heather E.; Toy, Pearl; Lieberman, Jeremy A.; Viele, Maurene K.; Hopf, Harriet W.; Weiskopf, Richard B.

2011-01-01

373

Rh disease: intrauterine intravascular fetal blood transfusion by cordocentesis.  

PubMed

A total of 49 cordocenteses, including 40 intrauterine intravascular fetal blood tranasfusions, were performed in 30 pregnancies complicated by red cell isoimmunization. Transfusions were started at 19-33 weeks' gestation and repeated up to five times, at one-to-four week intervals. The volumes of transfused blood were 20-110 ml, hematocrits were 58-82 percent and the rate of transfusions was 1-15 ml/min. The pretransfusion fetal hemoglobins were 3.5-11.6 g/dl and the posttransfusion fetal hemoglobins were 7.5-15.6 g/dl. There were three intrauterine deaths and two neonatal deaths. The overall survival rate was 83.3 percent including all cordocenteses. The survival rate for the intrauterine transfusions was 81 percent. PMID:10770677

Ondero?lu, L; Oncülo?lu, C

1999-01-01

374

[Long-term blood transfusion in sickle-cell anemia].  

PubMed

Ten homozygous sickle cell patients, aged from 4 to 20 years, underwent a periodic red blood cells transfusion program. Indications were = one stroke or more in 4 cases, repeated severe painful crisis in 2 cases, and for others = chronic anaemia induced by hypersplenism, priapism, chronic leg ulceration, dwarfism with delayed sexual maturation. Transfusion program lasted from 6 months to 6 years. In 7 cases, a phlebotomy preceded the transfusion by the same venipuncture in order to reduce the inevitable iron overload progression. Clinical benefit was clear in the following cases: lack of painful crisis with return to school, leg ulceration healing, growth and weight increase, onset of puberty. Benefit is more difficult to assess in the other observations and, particularly, in stroke. No red cell antibodies were found. An HIV contamination occurred in 3 children. All transfused patients during a period exceeding one year developed iron overload, needing a daily chelation by intramuscular deferoxamine in two of them. PMID:3619565

De Montalembert, M; Girot, R; Boiteux, F; Manigne, P

1987-05-01

375

Post-transplant recurrence of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in a patient with thrombomodulin mutation.  

PubMed

HUS is characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. While "typical" HUS is usually associated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infections and recovers in the majority of cases, aHUS is caused by mutations of complement components or antibodies against CFH leading to uncontrolled activation of alternative complement pathway and often to ESRD. Recently, THBD gene mutations have been reported in aHUS. Theoretically, the risk of disease recurrence after renal transplantation should be low because THBD is primarily a membrane-bound protein expressed by endothelial cells; however, a small proportion of THBD is present as a soluble form in plasma. We report the case of a 19-yr-old man with aHUS secondary to a THBD mutation that relapsed twice after two renal transplantations performed 12 yr apart. Despite successful control of HUS with plasma exchange and eculizumab after the second transplantation, the graft was ultimately lost due to severe steroid-resistant cellular rejection. The present report suggests that THBD mutations may favor-relapse of aHUS after renal transplantation. PMID:24118826

Sinibaldi, Serena; Guzzo, Isabella; Piras, Rossella; Bresin, Elena; Emma, Francesco; Dello Strologo, Luca

2013-12-01

376

Treatment of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli-Induced Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (eHUS).  

PubMed

Treatment of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome (eHUS) still mostly relies on supportive intensive care regimens. Antibiotic treatment, as administered to eHUS patients during the 2011 O104:H4 outbreak, may reduce the shedding period, but this may apply only to this particular strain. In any case, there is no evidence for a beneficial use in the diarrheal phase and earlier warnings that antibiotic therapy at this stage may actually increase the likelihood of HUS remain unrefuted. Plasma exchange, a frequently chosen therapy in acute atypical HUS, was not beneficial for the outbreak patients and a prospective study of 274 pediatric eHUS patients even indicates a poorer long-term outcome. As eHUS is a disease where complement plays a pathophysiological role and individual beneficial treatments had been published, eculizumab was broadly administered during the outbreak, in particular to severely ill patients. The equally good outcome of treated versus untreated patients obviously does not allow a clear-cut statement, but rather points toward an advantageous use, at least for the severe cases. Although the role of complement should not be overestimated, the use of a complement blocker-not necessarily being a therapeutic option for uncomplicated eHUS-in severe disease may actually make the difference between favorable or detrimental outcome. PMID:24802085

Würzner, Reinhard; Riedl, Magdalena; Rosales, Alejandra; Orth-Höller, Dorothea

2014-06-01

377

Peritoneal EMH in a dog with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia.  

PubMed

Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) is the process by which normal blood cells are produced outside the bone marrow. In humans, EMH effusions are rare and are characterized by the presence of megakaryocytes, immature erythrocytes, immature leukocytes, or combinations of those cells. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report to describe a case of peritoneal EMH effusion in a dog. A 5 yr old castrated male shorthaired dachshund presented with a 2 day history of pigmenturia and inappetence. A complete blood count revealed regenerative anemia with marked agglutination, spherocytosis, and an acute inflammatory leukogram characterized by a neutrophilia, regenerative left shift, and monocytosis. Ultrasound-guided aspiration of peritoneal effusion yielded a sample of high nucleated cellularity predominantly composed of mature and immature neutrophils and erythroid precursor cells. The patient was diagnosed with primary immune-mediated hemolytic anemia with concurrent EMH peritoneal effusion. The following case description and discussion explore the clinical findings associated with the unusual effusion and outline the possible pathogenesis by which the EMH effusion may have arisen in the dog. PMID:23690489

Brenner, Karen; Pohlman, Lisa; Muldowney, Ian; Petersen, Don; Schermerhorn, Thomas

2013-01-01

378

Primary Biliary Cirrhosis-Related Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Three Case Reports and Review of the Literature  

PubMed Central

The association between primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is uncommon; only fourteen such case reports have been described. In this report, three patients who developed AIHA on the basis of PBC underwent successful therapy with corticosteroids and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). Patient 3 was more complicated, suffering from PBC, Evans syndrome, Sjögren syndrome and Klinefelter syndrome simultaneously. This has not previously been reported in the world literature. Review of all fifteen cases showed that there is a prominent occurrence sequence that AIHA might take place on the basis of PBC. With sufficient doses of corticosteroids or immunosuppressant therapy, besides hemolysis under effective control, liver function also improved. According to the criteria of secondary AIHA, we may call them PBC-related AIHA. Thus, patients with PBC with serum bilirubin levels rising suddenly should undergo screening for associated hemolysis. Recommended treatment for PBC-related AIHA includes sufficient doses of corticosteroids to control the hemolysis in the acute phase, and immunosuppressant or adequate dose of UDCA to maintain therapy. These case reports have been increasing in recent years, so further reserch is needed to illustrate the incidence and natural courses of these two organ-specific autoimmune diseases.

Tian, Yu; Wang, Chi; Liu, Jian-Xiang; Wang, Hua-Hong

2009-01-01

379

Blood Transfusion Policies in Elective General Surgery: How to Optimise Cross-Match-to-Transfusion Ratios  

PubMed Central

Objective Preoperative over-ordering of blood is common and leads to the wastage of blood bank resources. The preoperative blood ordering and transfusion practices for common elective general surgical procedures were evaluated in our university hospital to formulate a maximum surgical blood order schedule (MSBOS) for those procedures where a cross-match appears necessary. Methods We evaluated blood ordering practices retrospectively in all elective general surgical procedures in our institution over a 6-month period. Cross-match-to-transfusion ratios (C:T) were calculated and compared to current trust and the British Society of Haematology (BSH) guidelines. The adjusted C:T ratio was also calculated and was defined as the C:T ratio when only cross-matched blood used intraoperatively was included in the calculation. Results 541 patients were identified during the 6-month period. There were 314 minor and 227 major surgeries carried out. 99.6% (n = 226) of the patients who underwent major surgery and 95.5% (n = 300) of the patients having minor surgery had at least a group and save (G and S) test preoperatively. A total of 507 units of blood were cross-matched and 238 units were used. The overall C:T ratio was therefore 2.1:1, which corresponds to a 46.9% red cell usage. There was considerable variation in the C:T ratio, depending on the type of surgery performed. The adjusted C:T ratio varied between 3.75 and 37. Conclusions Compliance with transfusion policies is poor and over-ordering of blood products commonplace. Implementation of the updated recommended MSBOS and introduction of G and S for eligible surgical procedures is a safe, effective and cost-effective method to prevent preoperative over-ordering of blood in elective general surgery. Savings of GBP 8,596.00 per annum are achievable with the incorporation of updated evidence-based guidelines in our university hospital.

Hall, Thomas C.; Pattenden, Clare; Hollobone, Chloe; Pollard, Cristina; Dennison, Ashley R.

2013-01-01

380

The annual cost of blood transfusions in the UK.  

PubMed

This study estimated the annual UK cost of blood transfusions in 2000/2001, updating a study we performed in 1994/1995. The analysis was based on published data, information from interviews with National Health Service (NHS) personnel and a structured questionnaire for blood donors. The annual cost of provision and transfusion of blood products increased by 256% in real terms, to pounds 898 million in 2000/2001, whereas the number of whole-blood donations increased by 2% to 2.8 million. The number of apheresis donations decreased by 52% to 70 000. Total blood product units issued to hospitals in 2000/2001 increased by 17% and were used in an estimated 1.7 million transfusions. The estimated NHS cost for an adult transfusion was pounds 635 for red blood cells, pounds 378 for fresh frozen plasma, pounds 347 for platelets and pounds 834 for cryoprecipitate. Blood donors incurred an annual direct cost of pounds 8.1 million and 3.1 million hours of used leisure time. There was also an indirect cost of pounds 7.2 million arising from lost productivity. The large increases since 1994/1995 reflect a real increase in expenditure by the blood transfusion services, partly due to the introduction of leucodepletion, greater hospital resource use due to more transfusions being undertaken and under-recording of hospital activity in 1994/1995. PMID:12880391

Varney, S J; Guest, J F

2003-08-01

381

MICROHEMODYNAMIC ABERRATIONS CREATED BY TRANSFUSION OF STORED BLOOD  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Human red blood cells (RBCs) can be stored for up to 42 days under controlled conditions. Physical and chemical changes occur during RBC storage, altering their function. This study links stored cells mechanical changes with hemodynamic functional alterations upon transfusion. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Mechanical properties of fresh and stored RBCs were evaluated in vitro. Their transfusion effects were evaluated in vivo using intravital microscopy of the rat's cremaster muscle preparation. Rats were hemodiluted to 30% hematocrit, to mimic an anemic state pre-transfusion, then exchange transfused with fresh or stored cells. RESULTS In vitro studies on rheology and oxygen affinity of stored cells confirmed previously published results. Storage was found to modify static and dynamic red cell mechanic behavior. Post transfusion, systemic hemodynamics were similar for fresh and stored cells; however, microvascular hemodynamics were drastically affected by stored cells. Stored cells reduced blood flow and oxygen delivery. Additionally, the presence of stored cells in circulation affected cell-to-cell and cell-to-wall interactions, affected cell hydrodynamics. Stored cells disrupted the erythrocyte cell free layer (CFL) and wall shear stress (WSS) signals. CONCLUSION The reduced cell deformability due to RBC “storage lesions” caused pathological changes in microvascular hemodynamics, endothelial cell mechanotransduction, and RBC dynamics. Thus, the mechanical changes of blood banked cells can limit transfusion ability to achieve its intended goal.

Yalcin, Ozlem; Ortiz, Daniel; Tsai, Amy G.; Johnson, Paul C.; Cabrales, Pedro

2014-01-01

382

[Treatment of post-transfusion iron overload by deferoxamine].  

PubMed

Iron chelation therapy must be associated with the regular blood transfusions required for thalassaemia and other chronic anemias. We report here a study concerning 4 groups of patients, aged 6 to 28, regularly transfused at Necker Enfants-Malades hospital: a) 20 with thalassaemia major; b) 6 with thalassaemia intermedia; c) 2 with sickle cell disease and d) 2 with Blackfan-Diamond syndrome. The transfusion regimen consisting of monthly or quarterly transfusions varied as a function of the groups. Desferal was used in all patients. The dosage and the route of administration (IV, IM, SC) were adapted to the amount of iron transfused and to the nature of the disease. The serum ferritin level was considered as the indicator of the iron overload. Comparisons were established between the quantities of iron transfused, ferritin levels, and parameters such as dosage, route of administration and compliance to Desferal. During the period of study 3 patients died from cardiac failure due to transfusional hemosiderosis. Endocrine complications (diabetes 2 cases, hypocalcemia 3 cases, hypothyroidism 1 case and delayed puberty 7 cases) were observed. This high incidence of complications induced by post-transfusional iron overload has recently prompted us to improve the quality of chelation therapy through the use of the services of a specialized center where patients as well as their families can be trained more adequately in home care and self-treatment. PMID:2735804

de Montalembert, M; Llados, A; Hannedouche, T; Girot, R

1989-02-01

383

Improved survival of newborns receiving leukocyte transfusions for sepsis  

SciTech Connect

To determine the role of polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocyte transfusions in neonates with sepsis, 23 consecutive newborns were prospectively randomly selected during an 18-month period in a treatment plan to receive polymorphonuclear leukocyte transfusions with supportive care or supportive care alone. Thirteen neonates received transfusions every 12 hours for a total of five transfusions. Each transfusion consisting of 15 mL/kg of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was subjected to 1,500 rads of radiation. The polymorphonuclear leukocytes were obtained by continuous-flow centrifugation leukapheresis and contained 0.5 to 1.0 X 10(9) granulocytes per 15 mL with less than 10% lymphocytes. Positive findings on blood cultures were obtained in 14/23 patients and seven were randomly selected for each treatment group. Absolute granulocyte counts were less than 1,500/microL in 13 patients but tibial bone marrow examinations revealed that the neutrophil supply pool was depleted in only three patients. The survival was significantly greater in the treatment group compared with the group that did not receive transfusions.

Cairo, M.S.; Rucker, R.; Bennetts, G.A.; Hicks, D.; Worcester, C.; Amlie, R.; Johnson, S.; Katz, J.

1984-11-01

384

Blood transfusion in Europe: basic principles for initial and continuous training in transfusion medicine: an approach to an European harmonisation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past few decades, transfusion medicine and haemotherapy have evolved into complex medical disciplines comprising a broad field of subspecialties such as immunohaematology, blood component production, haemapheresis and haemostaseology. Transfusion medicine is thus an important qualification at the interfaces of analytical laboratory medicine, pharmaceutical production and clinical disciplines such as internal medicine, anaesthesiology or surgery. Physicians specialising in transfusion

M. M. Mueller; E. Seifried

2006-01-01

385

A retrospective review of patient factors, transfusion practices, and outcomes in patients with transfusion-associated circulatory overload.  

PubMed

Transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) is a common yet underrecognized and underreported complication of transfusion associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to examine patient and transfusion characteristics in a cohort of TACO cases. A retrospective medical record review of 100 consecutive TACO episodes reported at 2 academic centers was performed. Information related to demographics, medical history, radiologic and echocardiographic investigations, infusion practices, reaction features, management, and outcome were collected. Ninety-eight cases were accessible for review. A history of congestive heart failure (41%), renal dysfunction (44%), and age more than 70 years (56%) were common in TACO patients. Suboptimal fluid status management and inappropriate infusion practices were often seen (eg, verbal orders, double red cell transfusions, rapid infusion rates, lack or improper timing of preemptive diuretics). The median volume of blood ordered was 500 mL, and the median volume of crystalloid or colloid (preceding 24 hours) was 2200 mL. A physician order specifying the infusion rate was documented in 50% of transfusion orders. Preemptive diuretics were ordered in only 29% of cases, most commonly introduced midway or after the transfusion at a dose of furosemide 20 mg intravenously. After TACO, 18% of patients required transfer to the intensive care unit, 8% suffered a major complication, and 2% died. Suboptimal ordering and infusion practices may be contributing to the high incidence and severity of TACO. Research in TACO prevention strategies, such as slow rates of infusion and preemptive diuretics, is warranted. PMID:24075097

Lieberman, Lani; Maskens, Carolyn; Cserti-Gazdewich, Christine; Hansen, Mark; Lin, Yulia; Pendergrast, Jacob; Yi, Qi Long; Callum, Jeannie

2013-10-01

386

Single-center transfusion rate for 555 consecutive liver transplantations: impact of two eras.  

PubMed

Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the treatment of choice for patients with acute or chronic end-stage liver disease, irresectable primary liver tumor, and metabolic disorders. Historically, OLT has been associated with considerable blood loss and the need for transfusions. However, over the years there has been reduction is need for blood products. The aim of this article was to compare two distinct eras for perioperative blood transfusion rate among patients undergoing OLT; Era I, 200 transplantations in 188 patients, and Era II, 355 transplantations in 339 patients. The donor mean age was 33.70 (Era I) versus 35.34 (Era II). Cause of death in both eras was traumatic brain injury followed by cerebral vascular accident. Organ recipient data showed a mean age of 48.87 (Era I) versus 46.49 (Era II). During Era I patients with Child B (56.8%) prevailed, followed by Child C (35.4%) and Child A (7.8%). In Era II also patients with Child B (53.1%) prevailed, followed by Child C (39.6%) and Child A (7.3%). The prevalence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during Era I was 9% (18) and in Era II 20% (71). The use of blood products in the perioperative period: was as follows packed red blood cells 1.76 (Era I) versus 0.57 (Era II) units; fresh frozen plasma 1.89 (Era I) versus 0.49 (Era II) units; platelets 2.16 (Era I) versus 0.28 (Era II) units; and cryoprecipitate 0.08 (Era I) versus 0.03 (Era II) units. OLT using the piggyback technique was performed with a transfusion rate below <30%, and it reduced blood loss and prevented severe hemodynamic instability. PMID:24182806

Coêlho, G R; Feitosa Neto, B A; de G Teixeira, C C; Marinho, D S; Rangel, M L M; Garcia, J H P

2013-11-01

387

Identification of serogroups of beta hemolytic streptococci in children with tonsillo-pharyngitis.  

PubMed

Rheumatic fever and post streptococcal glomerulonephritis are common sequelae of beta hemolytic streptococci among Bangladeshi children. The occurrence of these serious complications of beta hemolytic streptococcal throat infections are related to the epidemiology of group A beta hemolytic streptococci. Little is known about the epidemiology of beta hemolytic streptococci in Bangladesh. We have studied 6890 school boys and girls of Narayangonj to find out the prevalence of beta hemolytic streptococcal infections of throat. From them we selected 2175 children, who were suffering from tonsillo-pharyngitis. This cross sectional study was conducted during March-December 1999. All statistical analysis was done by using statistical package SPSS windows version 8. The mean (SD) age of the children was 11.1 (3.3) years. Four hundred and twenty eight isolates of beta hemolytic streptococci were recovered from tonsillo-pharyngeal swab cultures obtained from 428 children. Among the isolated beta hemolytic streptococci, 92 (21.5%) belonged to group A, 5 (1.2%) to group B, 14 (3.3%) to group C and 317 (74.0%) to group G. These findings demonstrated the predominance of group G followed by A infection among school children. Therefore special attention should be paid not only to group A but also to group G. Further studies to determine prevalence of M serotypes are necessary. PMID:15053273

Ahmed, J; Zaman, M M; Keramat Ali, S M

2003-12-01

388

A Fetal Hemolytic Anemia in a Child with Cytomegalovirus Infection  

PubMed Central

Background Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a hematologic disorder that is rarely observed in infants and young children. Most of the cases are associated with viral or bacterial infections. In some cases, AIHA can be characterized by a chronic course and an unsatisfactory control of hemolysis, thus requiring prolonged immunosuppressive therapy. Case report Especially in children younger than 2 years of age, the clinical course of the disease may show either resistance to steroids or dependence on high-dose steroids. We report here an infant fatal autoimmune Conclusion This case suggests that investigation for the presence of CMV infection in infantile AIHA should be considered. Severe hemolysis is rare but could be a potentially life-threatening complication of CMV infection described mostly in immune compromised adults and children.

Hosseeini, S; Ansari, Sh; Kalantar, E; Sabzechian, M; Alibeik, A; Dorgalaleh, A

2014-01-01

389

Virulence Factors for Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Denmark1  

PubMed Central

We present an analysis of strain and patient factors associated with the development of bloody diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) among Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) patients registered in Denmark in a 6-year period. Of 343 STEC patients, bloody diarrhea developed in 36.4% and HUS in 6.1%. In a multivariate logistic regression model, risk factors for bloody diarrhea were the eae and stx2 genes, O groups O157 and O103, and increasing age. Risk factors for HUS were presence of the stx2 (odds ratio [OR] 18.9) and eae (OR undefined) genes, being a child, and having bloody diarrhea. O group O157, although associated with HUS in a univariate analysis (OR 4.0), was not associated in the multivariate analysis (OR 1.1). This finding indicates that, rather than O group, the combined presence of the eae and stx2 genes is an important predictor of HUS.

Olsen, Katharina E. P.; Scheutz, Flemming; Jensen, Charlotte; Schiellerup, Peter; Engberg, J?rgen; Petersen, Andreas Munk; Olesen, Bente; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; M?lbak, Kare

2004-01-01

390

Cryptococcal meningitis in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.  

PubMed

To summarize the epidemiology, clinical features, treatment, and outcome of cryptococcal meningitis (CM) in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) patients and to provide a reference for the prevention and control of AIHA complicated with CM, we evaluated five cases of CM in patients with AIHA treated in our hospital from 2003 to 2013 and eight related foreign cases. All of the clinical isolates were Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii and grouped into the VNI genotype and serotype A. The clinical features exhibit significant features. Headache, nausea, and fever are common symptoms of AIHA complicated with CM. The early clinical manifestations lack specificity, which may lead to delayed diagnosis and treatment. Long-term use of prednisone (?15 mg day(-1)), poor control of anemia, and splenectomy are risk factors for AIHA complicated with cryptococcal infection. The combination of intravenous amphotericin B and oral 5-fluorocytosine remains the preferred treatment for AIHA complicated with CM. PMID:24952011

Yang, YaLi; Sang, Junjun; Pan, Weihua; Du, Lin; Liao, Wanqing; Chen, Jianghan; Zhu, Yuanjie

2014-08-01

391

Anemia and red blood cell transfusion in neurocritical care  

PubMed Central

Introduction Anemia is one of the most common medical complications to be encountered in critically ill patients. Based on the results of clinical trials, transfusion practices across the world have generally become more restrictive. However, because reduced oxygen delivery contributes to 'secondary' cerebral injury, anemia may not be as well tolerated among neurocritical care patients. Methods The first portion of this paper is a narrative review of the physiologic implications of anemia, hemodilution, and transfusion in the setting of brain-injury and stroke. The second portion is a systematic review to identify studies assessing the association between anemia or the use of red blood cell transfusions and relevant clinical outcomes in various neurocritical care populations. Results There have been no randomized controlled trials that have adequately assessed optimal transfusion thresholds specifically among brain-injured patients. The importance of ischemia and the implications of anemia are not necessarily the same for all neurocritical care conditions. Nevertheless, there exists an extensive body of experimental work, as well as human observational and physiologic studies, which have advanced knowledge in this area and provide some guidance to clinicians. Lower hemoglobin concentrations are consistently associated with worse physiologic parameters and clinical outcomes; however, this relationship may not be altered by more aggressive use of red blood cell transfusions. Conclusions Although hemoglobin concentrations as low as 7 g/dl are well tolerated in most critical care patients, such a severe degree of anemia could be harmful in brain-injured patients. Randomized controlled trials of different transfusion thresholds, specifically in neurocritical care settings, are required. The impact of the duration of blood storage on the neurologic implications of transfusion also requires further investigation.

Kramer, Andreas H; Zygun, David A

2009-01-01

392

Blood transfusion therapy for traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest  

PubMed Central

Background: Blood transfusion therapy (BTT), which represents transplantation of living cells, poses several risks. Although BTT is necessary for trauma victims with hemorrhagic shock, it may be futile for patients with blunt traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest (BT-CPA). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively examined the medical records of consecutive patients with T-CPA. The study period was divided into two periods: The first from 1995-1998, when we used packed red cells (PRC) regardless of the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and the second from 1999-2004, when we did not use PRC before ROSC. The rates of ROSC, admission to the ICU, and survival-to-discharge were compared between these two periods. Results: We studied the records of 464 patients with BT-CPA (175 in the first period and 289 in the second period). Although the rates of ROSC and admission to the ICU were statistically higher in the first period, there was no statistical difference in the rate of survival-to-discharge between these two periods. In the first period, the rate of ROSC was statistically higher in the non-BTT group than the BTT group. However, for cases in which ROSC was performed and was successful, there were no statistical differences in the rate of admission and survival-to-discharge between the first and second group, and between the BTT and non-BTT group. Conclusion: Our retrospective consecutive study shows the possibility that BTT before ROSC for BT-CPA and a treatment strategy that includes this treatment improves the success rate of ROSC, but not the survival rate. BTT is thought to be futile as a treatment for BT-CPA before ROSC.

Moriwaki, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Mitsugi; Tahara, Yoshio; Iwashita, Masayuki; Kosuge, Takayuki; Toyoda, Hiroshi; Arata, Shinju; Suzuki, Noriyuki

2013-01-01

393

Engraftment of heavily transfused patients with severe aplastic anemia with a fludarabine-based regimen.  

PubMed

We have developed a practical conditioning regimen without anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG), irradiation, or other myeloablative alkylating agent for low-income countries in which patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA), who usually have heavily transfused and a prolonged disease history. The application of ATG, Busulphan, and/or irradiation to cyclophosphamide (Cy) to avoid graft rejection has many short- and long-term complications. In this study, we focused on evaluating a fludarabine-based conditioning regimen, among 83 patients with SAA. Patients were treated with fludarabine (40 mg/m(2) /d; day [-5 to -2]) and cyclophosphamide (50 mg/kg/d; day [-5 to -2]). Altogether, 81 patients indicated initial engraftment, whereas two cases showed primary graft failure. And four of the 81 cases indicated graft rejection during follow-up. Regardless of a high cumulative incidence of acute (55/83; 66.2% grade II-IV; 47/83; 56.6% III-IV) and chronic graft-versus-host disease (50/83; 60.2%), in total, 77 patients showed durable engraftment and transfusion independence, and 64 are alive at a median time of 49 months with an overall survival rate of 66%. In conclusion, this conditioning indicated well toleration, mild toxicity, durable engraftment, excellent survival as well as less cost. Its application might shed new light on SAA at high risk of graft rejection in resource-limited countries. PMID:23387380

Wang, San-Bin; Li, Li; Pan, Xin-Hua; Hu, Deng-Ming; Peng, Li-Hui; Liu, Lin; Xie, Zheng-Jun; Yin, Bo; Sun, Xiao-Juan; Yu, Jing; Liang, Yang

2013-01-01

394

Overview of Blood Transfusion System of Iran: 2002-2011  

PubMed Central

Despite importance of blood transfusion services as life saving procedures, some countries are unable to meet their national requirements for blood and blood components in a timely manner. Since establishment of Iran Blood Transfusion Organization (IBTO) in 1974 as an integral part of national health system, Iran has experienced a drastic improvement both in availability and safety of blood and blood products. Iran now has not only reached to a 100% non remunerated voluntary blood donation but also secured a national self sufficiency of blood and blood components. Efforts of IBTO as the sole player of transfusion medicines in Iran enabled the country for timely providing of life saving blood transfusion services for all Iranian patients in need of such services. In order to meet the country’s demand in 2011 about 2 million units of whole blood for a population of about 75 million collected by IBTO. This indicates 26.2 donations per 1000 population. Currently about 94% of blood donors in Iran are 25–35 years old males and contribution of female donors in blood donation is less than 6%. IBTO screen all donated blood for important transfusion transmissible infections such as HBV, HIV, HCV and syphilis. Prevalence of HBsAg, HCV and HIV in donated blood in IBTO in 2011 was 0.20%, 0.06% and 0.004% respectively.

Cheraghali, AM

2012-01-01

395

Plasma in the PICU: why and when should we transfuse?  

PubMed Central

Whereas red blood cell transfusions have been used since the 19th century, plasma has only been available since 1941. It was originally mainly used as volume replacement, mostly during World War II and the Korean War. Over the years, its indication has shifted to correct coagulation factors deficiencies or to prevent bleeding. Currently, it remains a frequent treatment in the intensive care unit, both for critically ill adults and children. However, observational studies have shown that plasma transfusion fail to correct mildly abnormal coagulation tests. Furthermore, recent epidemiological studies have shown that plasma transfusions are associated with an increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Therefore, plasma, as any other treatment, has to be used when the benefits outweigh the risks. Based on observational data, most experts suggest limiting its use either to massively bleeding patients or bleeding patients who have documented abnormal coagulation tests, and refraining for transfusing plasma to nonbleeding patients whatever their coagulation tests. In this paper, we will review current evidence on plasma transfusions and discuss its indications.

2013-01-01

396

Decreasing Prevalence of Transfusion Transmitted Infection in Indian Scenario  

PubMed Central

Transfusion transmitted infections are major problem associated with blood transfusion. Accurate estimates of risk of TTIs are essential for monitoring the safety of blood supply and evaluating the efficacy of currently employed screening procedures. The present study was carried out to assess the percentage of voluntary donors and replacement donors and to find out prevalence and changing trends of various TTIs blood donors in recent years. A study was carried out on blood units of voluntary and replacement donors which were collected from January 2008 to December 2012. On screening of 180,371 replacement units, seropositivity of transfusion transmitted disease in replacement donors was 0.15% in HIV, 1.67% in hepatitis B surface antigen, 0.49% in hepatitis C virus, 0.01% in VDRL, and 0.009% in malaria. Of 11,977 voluntary units, seropositivity of transfusion transmitted disease in voluntary donors was 0.08% in HIV, 0.24% in hepatitis B surface antigen, 0.001% in hepatitis C virus, 0.008% in VDRL (sexually transmitted disease), and 0.01% in malaria. From results it has been concluded that prevalence of transfusion transmitted infection (HIV, HBV, HCV, VDRL, and malaria) was more in replacement donors in comparison to voluntary donors. Extensive donor selection and screening procedures will help in improving the blood safety.

Rizvi, S. Nishat Fatima; Agarwal, Devisha

2014-01-01

397

[Blood transfusion in emergency settings: French military health service experience].  

PubMed

Blood transfusion is required in a number of emergency settings and the French military health service (FMHS) has issued specific guidelines for the treatment of war casualties. These guidelines take into account European standards and laws, NATO standards, and also public sentiment regarding transfusion. These guidelines reflect a determination to control the process and to avoid the improvisation frequently associated with wartime transfusion. The evolution in warfare (terrorism and bombing more frequent than gunshot) and the wide use of body armor have deeply changed the clinical presentation of war injuries. These now involve the extremities in 80% of cases, with extensive tissue damage and heavy blood loss. The FMHS recommends that war casualties with hemorrhagic shock be brought quickly to a medical treatment facility (MTF) after first-line treatment applied through buddy aid or by medics. In the MTF, before an early Medevac, a damage control surgery will be performed, with resuscitation using freeze-dried plasma, red blood cells and fresh whole blood. The French military blood bank is responsible for blood product supply, training and medical advice regarding transfusion therapy during wartime, as well as hemovigilance. All transfusion therapy practices are periodically assessed but research on whole blood pathogen reduction is being conducted in order to reduce the residual infectious risk associated with this product. PMID:21051268

Sailliol, A; Ausset, S; Peytel, E

2010-12-01

398

Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in a Jehovah's Witness: a management dilemma.  

PubMed

Jehovah's witnesses represent a unique group of patients whose religious beliefs prohibit receiving transfusion of all blood products. Since most chemotherapeutic regimens used to treat acute leukemia are myelosuppressive and often resulting in potentially life threatening pancytopenia, their refusal of blood products poses a challenge to clinicians. We report a case of a Jehovah's Witness patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who was successfully treated with non-myelosuppressive chemotherapy for both first and second remission and achieved complete remissions both times without transfusion of blood products. PMID:24621157

Zhou, Louise; Mohsen, Amr; Khan, Mohammad A; Guthrie, Troy

2014-06-01

399

Fatal pulmonary hypersensitivity reaction to HL-A incompatible blood transfusion:report of a case and review of the literature.  

PubMed

A girl with Thalassemia major reacted to a transfusion of packed red blood cells with increasing respiratory distress until death 12 1/2 hours later. Chills and fever were followed by dry cough, dyspnea, and pulmonary edema. The recipient had lymphocytotoxic antibodies specific for donor leukocyte antigens HL-A11 and possibly W14. At autopsy, the lungs showed pulmonary edema with extensive nonspecific acute alveolar injury. Similar cases in the literature are reviewed. PMID:1258114

Wolf, C F; Canale, V C

1976-01-01

400

Application of photoactive yellow protein as a photoresponsive module for controlling hemolytic activity of staphylococcal ?-hemolysin.  

PubMed

A chimeric protein (N-PYP-Hla), consisting of staphylococcal pore-forming toxin ?-hemolysin (Hla) and photoactive yellow protein (PYP), exhibited photoresponsive hemolytic activities, where visible light irradiation gave rise to retardation of hemolysis at 25 °C. PMID:22475822

Ui, Mihoko; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Araki, Yasuyuki; Wada, Takehiko; Takei, Toshiaki; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Endo, Sumire; Kinbara, Kazushi

2012-05-16

401

Immunosuppression-mediated hepatitis B reactivation diagnosed following an investigation into suspected transfusion-transmitted hepatitis B.  

PubMed

In August 2006, the regional unit for nosocomial infection control (ARLIN) was notified of a case of symptomatic acute hepatitis B (HBV) infection in an immunosuppressed 87-year-old patient who had received a blood transfusion five months previously. Immunosuppression for the treatment of a variety of conditions is increasing. Immunosuppressed patients should be investigated for previous HBV infection and given pre-emptive therapy where indicated. We report our experience investigating a case of HBV reactivation in an immunosuppressed patient. We describe the investigation and highlight the continued need for vigilance for HBV reactivation in immunosuppressed patients who may present to a range of clinicians. PMID:23313029

Floret, N; Cervoni, J P; Sheppard, F; Des Floris, M F Leconte; Duchêne, F

2013-03-01

402

Inflammatory response, immunosuppression, and cancer recurrence after perioperative blood transfusions  

PubMed Central

Summary Debate on appropriate triggers for transfusion of allogeneic blood products and their effects on short- and long-term survival in surgical and critically ill patients continue with no definitive evidence or decisive resolution. Although transfusion-related immune modulation (TRIM) is well established, its influence on immune competence in the recipient and its effects on cancer recurrence after a curative resection remains controversial. An association between perioperative transfusion of allogeneic blood products and risk for recurrence has been shown in colorectal cancer in randomized trials; whether the same is true for other types of cancer remains to be determined. This article focuses on the laboratory, animal, and clinical evidence to date on the mechanistic understanding of inflammatory and immune-modulatory effects of blood products and their significance for recurrence in the cancer surgical patient.

Cata, J. P.; Wang, H.; Gottumukkala, V.; Reuben, J.; Sessler, D. I.

2013-01-01

403

Inflammatory response, immunosuppression, and cancer recurrence after perioperative blood transfusions.  

PubMed

Debate on appropriate triggers for transfusion of allogeneic blood products and their effects on short- and long-term survival in surgical and critically ill patients continue with no definitive evidence or decisive resolution. Although transfusion-related immune modulation (TRIM) is well established, its influence on immune competence in the recipient and its effects on cancer recurrence after a curative resection remains controversial. An association between perioperative transfusion of allogeneic blood products and risk for recurrence has been shown in colorectal cancer in randomized trials; whether the same is true for other types of cancer remains to be determined. This article focuses on the laboratory, animal, and clinical evidence to date on the mechanistic understanding of inflammatory and immune-modulatory effects of blood products and their significance for recurrence in the cancer surgical patient. PMID:23599512

Cata, J P; Wang, H; Gottumukkala, V; Reuben, J; Sessler, D I

2013-05-01

404

Pregnancy with a severe hemoglobinopathy: unintended consequences of transfusions.  

PubMed

We report a case of a pregnant woman with a complex hemoglobinopathy who developed a symptomatic anemia at 28 weeks of gestation and was treated with multiple transfusions of type-specific packed red blood cells. Shortly thereafter, she developed a fever and joint pains, along with laboratory values consistent with hemolysis. Timing suggested a delayed transfusion reaction. An extensive evaluation including red blood cell antigen identification and cross-reaction failed to reveal the cause for her hemolysis. Despite her critically low hemoglobin levels, her transfusions were withheld in an attempt to allow the patient to recover conservatively. With this strategy, her hemoglobin remained below her baseline, but her symptoms began to improve. Her laboratory values normalized, and hemolysis was no longer evident. Three weeks later, her hemoglobin levels returned back to her baseline without additional intervention. She went on to deliver a full-term male infant. PMID:23424691

Kim, David; Mendez-Figueroa, Hector; Anderson, Brenna L

2013-01-01

405

Pregnancy with a Severe Hemoglobinopathy: Unintended Consequences of Transfusions  

PubMed Central

We report a case of a pregnant woman with a complex hemoglobinopathy who developed a symptomatic anemia at 28 weeks of gestation and was treated with multiple transfusions of type-specific packed red blood cells. Shortly thereafter, she developed a fever and joint pains, along with laboratory values consistent with hemolysis. Timing suggested a delayed transfusion reaction. An extensive evaluation including red blood cell antigen identification and cross-reaction failed to reveal the cause for her hemolysis. Despite her critically low hemoglobin levels, her transfusions were withheld in an attempt to allow the patient to recover conservatively. With this strategy, her hemoglobin remained below her baseline, but her symptoms began to improve. Her laboratory values normalized, and hemolysis was no longer evident. Three weeks later, her hemoglobin levels returned back to her baseline without additional intervention. She went on to deliver a full-term male infant.

Kim, David; Mendez-Figueroa, Hector; Anderson, Brenna L.

2013-01-01

406

TT viral infection through blood transfusion: retrospective investigation on patients in a prospective study of post-transfusion hepatitis.  

PubMed

AIM:To investigate the role of blood transfusion in TT viral infection(TTV).METHODS:We retrospectively studied serum samples from 192 transfusion recipients who underwent cardiovascular surgery and blood transfusion between July 1991 and June 1992. All patients had a follow-up every other week for at least 6 months after transfusion. Eighty recipients received blood before screening donors for hepatitis C antibody (anti-HCV), and 112 recipients received screened blood. Recipients with alanine aminotransferase level > 2.5 times the upper normal limit were tested for serological markers for viral hepatitis A, B, C, G, Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus. TTV infection was defined by the positivity for serum TTV DNA using the polymerase chain reaction method.RESULTS: Eleven and three patients, who received anti-HCV unscreened and screened blood, respectively, had serum ALT levels > 90IU/L. Five patients (HCV and TTV 1; HCV, HGV, and TTV 1; TTV 2; and CMV and TTV 1) were positive for TTV DNA, and four of them had sero conversion of TTV DNA.CONCLUSION:TTV can be transmitted via blood transfusion.Two recipients infected by TTV alone may be associated with the hepatitis. However, whether TTV was the causal agent remains unsettled, and further studies are necessary to define the role of TTV infection in chronic hepatitis. PMID:11819526

Yang, Sien-Sing; Wu, Chi-Hua; Chen, Tzu-Hsiu; Huang, Yang-Yang; Huang, Ching-Shan

2000-02-01

407

Acute Anaplasmosis in Imported Cattle  

PubMed Central

Of 18 Hereford cattle imported into Quebec from the eastern U.S.A., five exhibited acute hemolytic anemia, icterus, depression, fever, anorexia and died; 11 were killed because they had positive or suspicious anaplasma titers and two were quarantined. Anaplasma marginale organisms were found in the erythrocytes of the sick animals by light and electron microscopy. The partial absence of erythrocytic plasmalemma on several electron photomicrographs suggested exit of the anaplasma bodies. Titers up to 1:320 in infected animals were found by the complement fixation test. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.

Bundza, A.; Samagh, B. S.

1982-01-01

408

Hemolytic-Anemia-Associated Pulmonary Hypertension: Sickle-Cell-Disease- and Thalassemia-Associated Pulmonary Hypertension  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is now recognized as a complication of both chronic and acquired hemolytic anemias. The process\\u000a of hemolysis appears to be central to disease pathogenesis. Sickle cell disease (SCD), a congenital hemoglobinopathy affecting\\u000a as many as 30 million individuals worldwide, is the best characterized hemolytic anemia associated with PH. Multiple clinical\\u000a studies have demonstrated a 10–30% prevalence of

Elizabeth S. Klings; Mark T. Gladwin

409

Hemolytic Activity and Siderophore Production in Different Aeromonas Species Isolated from Fish  

PubMed Central

The hemolytic activity and siderophore production of several strains of motile aeromonads were determined. The hemolytic activity of Aeromonas caviae and Aeromonas eucrenophila was enhanced after trypsinization of the samples. The enhancement of hemolysis was observed in strains that carried an aerolysin-like gene, detected by a PCR procedure. Siderophore production was demonstrated in all but one strain of Aeromonas jandaei. No apparent relationship was observed between the presence of plasmid DNA and hemolysis or siderophore production.

Santos, Jesus A.; Gonzalez, Cesar J.; Otero, Andres; Garcia-Lopez, Maria-Luisa

1999-01-01

410

Hemolytic activity and siderophore production in different Aeromonas species isolated from fish.  

PubMed

The hemolytic activity and siderophore production of several strains of motile aeromonads were determined. The hemolytic activity of Aeromonas caviae and Aeromonas eucrenophila was enhanced after trypsinization of the samples. The enhancement of hemolysis was observed in strains that carried an aerolysin-like gene, detected by a PCR procedure. Siderophore production was demonstrated in all but one strain of Aeromonas jandaei. No apparent relationship was observed between the presence of plasmid DNA and hemolysis or siderophore production. PMID:10584028

Santos, J A; González, C J; Otero, A; García-López, M L

1999-12-01

411

Hemolytic uremic syndrome after allogeneic or autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for childhood malignancies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Of 193 children who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for various malignancies, 10 developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) 1½–5 months later. All 10 had microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and impaired renal function. Six of 10 presented with pericardial effusion, while three presented with hypertension. No child required plasma exchange, and all patients have survived without life-threatening long-term sequelae. By

M Kondo; S Kojima; K Horibe; K Kato; T Matsuyama

1998-01-01

412

Hemolytic and antimicrobial activities differ among saponin-rich extracts from guar, quillaja, yucca, and soybean.  

PubMed

Hemolytic and antibacterial activities of eight serial concentrations ranged from 5-666 microg/mL of saponin-rich extracts from guar meal (GM), quillaja, yucca, and soybean were tested in 96-well plates and read by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plate-well as 650 nm. Hemolytic assay used a 1% suspension of chicken red blood cells with water and phosphate buffered saline as positive and negative controls, respectively. Antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, and Escherichia coli were evaluated using ampicillin and bacteria without saponin-rich extract as positive and negative controls, respectively. The 100% MeOH GM and commercial quillaja saponin-rich extracts were significantly the highest in both hemolytic and antibacterial activities against all bacteria at the same concentration tested. Soybean saponin-rich extract had no antibacterial activity against any of the bacteria at the concentrations tested while yucca saponin-rich extract had no antibacterial activity against the gram-negative bacteria at the concentrations tested. GM and quillaja saponin-rich extracts were hemolytic, while yucca and soybean saponin-rich extracts were not hemolytic at the concentrations tested. No saponin-rich extract source had antibacterial activity against S. typhimurium or E. coli at the concentrations tested. Both GM and quillaja saponin-rich extracts exhibited antibacterial activity against S. aureus. Saponin-rich extracts from different plant sources have different hemolytic and antibacterial activities. PMID:19915999

Hassan, Sherif M; Byrd, James A; Cartwright, Aubry L; Bailey, Chris A

2010-10-01

413

Risk Factors for Development of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in a Cohort of Adult Patients with STEC 0104:H4 Infection  

PubMed Central

The outbreak of Shiga toxin producing E.coli O104:H4 in northern Germany in 2011 was one of the largest worldwide and involved mainly adults. Post-diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) occurred in 22% of STEC positive patients. This study’s aim was to assess risk factors for HUS in STEC-infected patients and to develop a score from routine hospital parameters to estimate patient risks for developing HUS. In a cohort analysis, adult patients with STEC infection were included in five participating hospitals in northern Germany between May and July 2011. Clinical data were obtained from questionnaires and medical records, laboratory data were extracted from hospitals’ electronic data systems. HUS was defined as thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia and acute renal dysfunction. Random forests and multivariate logistic regression were used to identify risk factors for HUS and develop a score using the estimated coefficients as weights. Among 259 adults with STEC infection, vomiting (OR 3.48,95%CI 1.88–6.53), visible blood in stools (OR 3.91,95%CI1.20–16.01), age above 75 years (OR 3.27, 95%CI 1.12–9.70) and elevated leukocyte counts (OR 1.20, 95%CI 1.10–1.31, per 1000 cells/mm3) were identified as independent risk factors for HUS. A score using these variables has an area under the ROC curve of 0.74 (95%CI 0.68–0.80). Vomiting, visible blood in stools, higher leukocyte counts, and higher age indicate increased risk for developing HUS. A score using these variables might help to identify high risk patients who potentially benefit from aggressive pre-emptive treatment to prevent or mitigate the devastating consequences of HUS.

Zoufaly, Alexander; Cramer, Jakob P.; Vettorazzi, Eik; Sayk, Friedhelm; Bremer, Jan P.; Koop, Irmtraut; de Weerth, Andreas; Schmiedel, Stefan; Jordan, Sabine; Fraedrich, Katharina; Asselborn, Niels H.; Nitschke, Martin