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Sample records for acute hemolytic transfusion

  1. Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Erwin

    2008-01-01

    Summary The risk of hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTRs) is approximately 1:70,000 per unit. Acute HTRs occurring during or within 24 h after administration of a blood product are usually caused by transfusion of incompatible red blood cells (RBCs), and, more rarely, of a large volume of incompatible plasma. Delayed HTRs are caused by a secondary immune response to an antigen on the donor's RBCs. In some patients with delayed HTRs, an additional bystander hemolysis of the patient's RBCs can be assumed. Different mechanisms lead to intra- and extra-vascular hemolysis, such as complete complement activation, phagocytosis of RBCs covered with C3b by macrophages after incomplete complement activation, or destruction of RBCs covered only with IgG by direct cell-cell contact with K cells. The clinical consequences of HTRs are triggered via several pathophysiological pathways like formation of anaphylatoxins, release of cytokines causing a systemic inflammatory response syndrome, activation of the kinin system, the intrinsic clotting cascade and fibrinolysis resulting in hypotension, disseminated intravascular coagulation, diffuse bleeding, and disruption of microcirculation leading to renal failure and shock. In the following, the symptoms of HTR are introduced, laboratory investigations and treatment are described, and some recommendations for prevention are given. PMID:21512623

  2. Initiation and Regulation of Complement during Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Stowell, Sean R.; Winkler, Anne M.; Maier, Cheryl L.; Arthur, C. Maridith; Smith, Nicole H.; Girard-Pierce, Kathryn R.; Cummings, Richard D.; Zimring, James C.; Hendrickson, Jeanne E.

    2012-01-01

    Hemolytic transfusion reactions represent one of the most common causes of transfusion-related mortality. Although many factors influence hemolytic transfusion reactions, complement activation represents one of the most common features associated with fatality. In this paper we will focus on the role of complement in initiating and regulating hemolytic transfusion reactions and will discuss potential strategies aimed at mitigating or favorably modulating complement during incompatible red blood cell transfusions. PMID:23118779

  3. Investigation of whether the acute hemolysis associated with Rho(D) immune globulin intravenous (human) administration for treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura is consistent with the acute hemolytic transfusion reaction model

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Ann Reed; Lee-Stroka, Hallie; Byrne, Karen; Scott, Dorothy E.; Uhl, Lynne; Lazarus, Ellen; Stroncek, David F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Immune thrombocytopenic purpura and secondary thrombocytopenia patients treated with Rho(D) immune globulin intravenous (human; anti-D IGIV) have experienced acute hemolysis, which is inconsistent with the typical presentation of extravascular hemolysis—the presumed mechanism of action of anti-D IGIV. Although the mechanism of anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis has not been established, the onset, signs/symptoms, and complications appear consistent with the intravascular hemolysis of acute hemolytic transfusion reactions (AHTRs). In transfusion medicine, the red blood cell (RBC) antigen-antibody incompatibility(-ies) that precipitate AHTRs can be detected in vitro with compatibility testing. Under the premise that anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis results from RBC antigen-antibody–mediated complement activation, this study evaluated whether the incompatibility(-ies) could be detected in vitro with a hemolysin assay, which would support the AHTR model as the hemolytic mechanism. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Seven anti-D IGIV lots were tested to determine the RBC antibody identities in those lots, including four lots that had been implicated in acute hemolytic episodes. Hemolysin assays were performed that tested each of 73 RBC specimens against each lot, including the RBCs of one patient who had experienced acute hemolysis after anti-D IGIV administration. RESULTS Only two anti-D IGIV lots contained RBC antibodies beyond those expected. No hemolysis endpoint was observed in any of the hemolysin assays. CONCLUSION Although the findings did not support the AHTR model, the results are reported to contribute knowledge about the mechanism of anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis and to prompt continued investigation into cause(s), prediction, and prevention of this potentially serious adverse event. PMID:19220820

  4. Diagnostic approaches to acute transfusion reactions.

    PubMed

    Leo, A; Pedal, I

    2010-06-01

    The erroneous transfusion of ABO-incompatible red cells may lead to life-threatening hemolysis and complement-induced shock, resulting in death in less than 10% of cases (acute hemolytic transfusion reaction, AHTR). Identification of the cause of an erroneous transfusion is accomplished in nearly all incidents merely by checking the identity of the patient, blood sample and blood bag. The erroneous transfusion is confirmed by serological and--in the case of a fatality- immunohistochemical methods. The differential diagnosis should rule out transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), other immunologically triggered causes such as febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reaction (FNHTR) or allergic reactions, but also nonimmunological causes such as bacterial contamination of the blood components, transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) and other rare events such as citrate overload or embolism (by air or debris). In the case of a fatality, evaluation of a patient's medical records, serological and microbiological analyses, autopsy and histology, taken together, clarify questions of causality. PMID:20140541

  5. Hypothesis: Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions Represent an Alternative Type of Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Hod, Eldad A.; Sokol, Set A.; Zimring, James C.; Spitalnik, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    Classical anaphylaxis is the most severe, and potentially fatal, type of allergic reaction, manifested by hypotension, bronchoconstriction, and vascular permeability. Similarly, a hemolytic transfusion reaction (HTR) is the most feared consequence of blood transfusion. Evidence for the existence of an alternative, IgG-mediated pathway of anaphylaxis may be relevant for explaining the pathophysiology of IgG-mediated-HTRs. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence for this alternative pathway of anaphylaxis and to present the hypothesis that an IgG-mediated HTR is one example of this type of anaphylaxis. PMID:18830382

  6. Acute transfusion reactions: an update.

    PubMed

    Scorer, T; Doughty, H

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade the use of blood products by the United Kingdom (UK) military has increased significantly; with the increase in transfusion comes an increased incidence of transfusion-related incidents. Acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) are a common consequence of transfusion, which vary widely in their severity and are likely to be under-reported, although reporting is a regulatory requirement. This paper discusses the importance of identifying ATRs and managing them appropriately. It introduces a flowchart (due to be incorporated in the next version of Joint Service Publication (JSP) 999, Clinical Guidelines for Operations (CGOs)), which is designed to assist the military multi-disciplinary team caring for patients in the operational environment. PMID:25895413

  7. [Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in sicle cell disease patients: a new challenge for the Hemovigilance network].

    PubMed

    Rieux, C; De Meyer, E; Boudjedir, K

    2015-03-01

    Delayed hemolytic reaction transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) is a serious and still under diagnosed event. Clinical and biological presentation mimics an acute SCD complication. It is a life-threatening event, especially in hyperhemolysis syndrome (HS) characterized by a massive destruction of both the donor's and patient's red blood cells. The main cause is related to the presence of alloantibodies directed against red blood cell antigens, more rarely autoantibodies. In approximately a third of the cases, no new antibody is highlighted. Pathophysiological hypotheses are still under debate but most of the authors agree on the role played by the SCD inflammatory state. Several therapeutic approaches are used but the data are still insufficient to estimate their efficiency. It is admitted that a new transfusion may exacerbate the phenomenon and the benefit-risk of any transfusion must be carefully evaluated. Measures limiting alloimmunization and rigorous follow-up of SCD patients and their immunohematologic status can prevent some of these accidents. The Hemovigilance network has a role to play in the recognition and the description of this risk. A first analysis realized on the French national Hemovigilance database of the French National Agency for Medicines and Health Products Safety (ANSM) over the period 2000-2013, shows us interesting information but some inadequacies, described here, must be taken into account to strengthen these data and insure in the future a better reporting quality. PMID:25441454

  8. ‘Chameleonic’ Serological Findings Leading to Life-Threatening Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Sümnig, Ariane; Mayer, Beate; Kiefel, Volker; Greinacher, Andreas; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The phenomena of co-incidence of transfusion-induced allo- and autoantibodies, blockage and/or loss of red blood cell (RBC) antigens are conspicuous and may result in confusion and misdiagnosis. Case Report A 67-year-old female was transferred to the intensive care unit due to hemolysis which developed 2 days following transfusion of three Rh(D)-negative RBC units in the presence of strongly reactive autoantibodies. Standard serological testing and genotyping were performed. Upon arrival, the patient was typed as Ccddee. Her hemolysis was decompensated, and an immediate blood transfusion was required. In addition, direct and indirect antiglobulin tests (DAT and IAT) as well as the eluate were strongly positive. Emergency transfusion of Rh(D)-negative RBCs resulted in increased hemolysis and renal failure. An exhaustive testing revealed anti-D, anti-c, CCddee phenotype and CCD.ee genotype. Three units of cryopreserved CCddee RBCs were transfused, and the patient's condition immediately improved. The discrepancy between Rh-D phenotyping and genotyping was likely caused by masking of the D-epitopes by the autoantibodies. In fact, further enquiry revealed that the patient had been phenotyped as Rh(D)-positive 6 months ago and had been transfused at that time following hip surgery. Conclusion The phenomena of transfusion-induced autoantibodies, masked alloantibodies, antigen blockage and/or loss are rare but important features which should be considered in patients presenting with autoimmune hemolytic anemia and/or hemolytic transfusion reactions.

  9. [Transfusion-related acute lung injury].

    PubMed

    Tank, S; Sputtek, A; Kiefmann, R

    2013-04-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) developed into the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality after the first description by Popovsky et al. approximately three decades ago. It was the most frequent reason for transfusion-related fatalities worldwide before implementation of risk minimization strategies by donor selection. Plasma-rich blood products, such as fresh frozen plasma and apheresis platelets seem to be the leading triggers of TRALI. Hypoxemia and development of pulmonary edema within 6 h of transfusion are the diagnostic criteria for TRALI. The differentiation between cardiac failure and other transfusion-related lung injuries, such astransfusion-associated circulatory overload ( TACO) is difficult and causal treatment is not available. Therapy is based on supportive measures, such as oxygen insufflationor mechanical ventilation. The exactly pathogenesis is still unknown but the most propagated hypothesis is the two-event-model. Neutrophils are primed by the underlying condition, e.g. sepsis or trauma during the first event and these primed neutrophils are activated by transfused leukoagglutinating antibodies (immunogen) or bioreactive mediators (non-immunogen) during the second-event. Transfusion of leukoagglutinating antibodies from female donors with one or more previous pregnancies is the most frequent reason. No more TRALI fatalities were reported after implementation of the donor selection in Germany in 2009. PMID:23558721

  10. [Infantile pyknocytosis: A cause of noenatal hemolytic anemia. Is recombinant erythropoietin an alternative to transfusion?].

    PubMed

    Bagou, M; Rolland, E; Gay, C; Patural, H

    2016-01-01

    Infantile pyknocytosis is a neonatal hemolytic disorder which causes anemia and icterus and is characterized by the presence of an increased number of distorted red blood cells called pyknocytes. Resolution spontaneously occurs in the first semester of life. It has been generally described as a rare entity, with an occasional family history. We report seven cases of infantile pyknocytosis observed in our hospital in 3years. Most of the infants presented with hemolytic icterus and profound anemia that was reaching its peak by the 3rd week of life. Three neonates received one to three red blood cell transfusions, according to former recommendations. However, the following four received a treatment with recombinant erythropoietin administered subcutaneously. Only one of these four cases required a transfusion. All of them were free of hematological disease 2-3months after completion of treatment. Infantile pyknocytosis is a recognized cause of neonatal hemolytic anemia, which requires careful examination of red cell morphology on a peripheral blood smear. The cause of this transient disorder remains unknown. Our observations show that recombinant erythropoietin therapy is effective in treating infantile pyknocytosis and increases the reticulocyte response, thus improving the hemoglobin level. PMID:26563723

  11. Successful treatment of fetal hemolytic disease due to glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency (GPI) using repeated intrauterine transfusions: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Adama van Scheltema, Phebe N; Zhang, Ai; Ball, Lynne M; Steggerda, Sylke J; van Wijk, Richard; Fransen van de Putte, Dietje E; van Kamp, Inge L

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Hemolytic anemia due to GPI deficiency can be severe and life threatening during fetal life. When parents decline invasive testing, ultrasound monitoring of fetuses at risk is feasible. Intrauterine transfusion can be effective for the treatment of severe fetal anemia due to GPI deficiency. PMID:26509025

  12. Transfusion-related acute lung injury; clinical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongmin

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) was introduced in 1983 to describe a clinical syndrome seen within 6 h of a plasma-containing blood products transfusion. TRALI is a rare transfusion complication; however, the FDA has suggested that TRALI is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. Understanding the pathogenesis of TRALI will facilitate adopting preventive strategies, such as deferring high plasma volume female product donors. This review outlines the clinical features, pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of TRALI. PMID:25844126

  13. Acute Transfusion Reactions (ATRs) in Intensive Care Unit (ICU): A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Gupta, Manvi; Gupta, Varun; Kaur, Amarjit; Gupta, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Blood transfusion is a frequent and integral part of critical care. Although life saving, it can occasionally be unsafe and result in a spectrum of adverse events. Acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) are probably under diagnosed in critically ill patients due to confusion of the symptoms with the underlying disease. Aim: To analyze the incidence and spectrum of ATRs occuring in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective review conducted from 1st April 2011 till 31st March 2013. The ATRs related to the administration of blood components in the patients admitted in various Intensive Care Units (ICUs) were recorded, analyzed and classified on the basis of their clinical features and laboratory tests. Results: During the study period 98651 blood components were issued. Out of these 21971 were issued to various ICUs. A total of 225 transfusion reactions were reported from the various critical care departments during this period. The most frequent were Febrile Non Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions (FNHTR) 136 (60.4%), allergic reactions 70 (31.2%), hemolytic reactions 1(0.4%) and non specific reactions 18 (8%). The incidence of ATRs in our study was found to be 1.09% in adult ICUs and 0.36% in pediatric ICUs. Conclusions: Blood transfusion is a vital therapeutic procedure with a potential risk to already critical patients. So a strict vigilance has to be kept and each transfusion has to be monitored carefully with prompt recognition and treatment of ATRs. A rational use of these products considering their deleterious effects can decrease transfusion related morbidity and mortality in the critically ill patients. PMID:24701502

  14. [Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO)].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Hitoshi

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, much attention has been paid to respiratory complications of transfusion. Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined as an acute lung injury that is temporally associated with blood transfusion. TRALI is one of the leading causes of mortality. Although the etiology of TRALI is not fully understood, one of its main causes is thought to be anti-leukocyte antibodies, such as HLA antibody or HNA antibody. A precautionary male-predominant plasma strategy has been implemented in many developed countries, which has resulted in considerable achievements in reducing the incidence of TRALI. Meanwhile, transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) has emerged as a major differential diagnosis of TRALI. TACO is a well-known complication of transfusion, which has been considered not as a side effect of transfusion but a result of erroneous medical practice. It has long been an under-reported complication of transfusion and has not been investigated scientifically. Recent data on transfusion mortality from the Food and Drug Administration revealed that TACO was the second highest cause of death in the United States. Our data also suggested a steep increase in the reported cases of TACO in Japan. Precautionary measures should also be implemented for this emerging complication. PMID:23947178

  15. Recognition, Investigation and Management of Acute Transfusion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Al-Riyami, Arwa Z.; Al-Hashmi, Sabria; Al-Arimi, Zainab; Wadsworth, Louis D.; Al-Rawas, Abdulhakim; Al-Khabori, Murtadha; Daar, Shahina

    2014-01-01

    The recognition and management of transfusion reactions (TRs) are critical to ensure patient safety during and after a blood transfusion. Transfusion reactions are classified into acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) or delayed transfusion reactions, and each category includes different subtypes. Different ATRs share common signs and symptoms which can make categorisation difficult at the beginning of the reaction. Moreover, TRs are often under-recognised and under-reported. To ensure uniform practice and safety, it is necessary to implement a national haemovigilance system and a set of national guidelines establishing policies for blood transfusion and for the detection and management of TRs. In Oman, there are currently no local TR guidelines to guide physicians and hospital blood banks. This paper summarises the available literature and provides consensus guidelines to be used in the recognition, management and reporting of ATRs. PMID:25097764

  16. Post-partum sequential occurrence of two diverse transfusion reactions (transfusion associated circulatory overload and transfusion related acute lung injury).

    PubMed

    Haldar, Rudrashish; Samanta, Sukhen

    2013-10-01

    Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) are two dissimilar pathological conditions associated with transfusion of blood products where the time course of the events and clinical presentation overlap leading to uncertainty in establishing the diagnosis and initiating the treatment, which otherwise differs. We encountered a case where a patient of post-partum hemorrhage developed TACO in the immediate post-operative period due to aggressive resuscitative attempts with blood products. The patient's condition was appropriately diagnosed and was managed according to the clinical scenario, and the condition abated. Subsequently, on the third post-operative day the patient again required blood product transfusions following which the patient developed TRALI, the diagnosis of which was also established and adequate treatment strategy was undertaken. PMID:24339663

  17. Tc-99m red blood cells for the study of rapid hemolytic processes associated with heterologous blood transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetto, A.R.; Harrison, C.R.; Blumhardt, R.; Trow, L.L.

    1984-10-01

    Chromium-51 labeled erythrocytes (Cr-51 RBC) are suitable for the study of hematologic disorders which involve relatively slow destruction of circulating erythrocytes, taking several days to several weeks. However, Cr-51 RBC are not suitable for investigating rapid hemolytic processes which occur within a matter of a few hours due to the variable and unpredictable elution of Cr-51 from the erythrocytes during the first 24 hours or so. Imaging, which could be useful in identifying organ systems involved in the hemolytic process, cannot be performed with Cr-51 RBC because of the high dose commitment caused by the low yield of gamma rays from Cr-51 (2). A method of labeling RBC with Tc-99m, which results in a radiopharmaceutical that combines the excellent dosimetric and imaging qualities of Tc-99m with an extremely stable bond between the Tc-99m and the RBC, is reported. The successful application of this technique in providing red cell support for a cancer patient with an unusual history of intravascular hemolytic transfusion reactions is also reported.

  18. Reducing Non-Infectious Risks of Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.; Gropper, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary As screening for transfusion-associated infections has improved, non-infectious complications of transfusion now cause the majority of morbidity and mortality associated with transfusion in the United States. For example, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and hemolytic transfusion-reactions are the first, second, and third leading causes of death from transfusion respectively. These complications and others are reviewed here and several controversial methods for prevention of non-infectious complications of transfusion are discussed; universal leukoreduction of red cell units, use of male-only plasma, and restriction of red cell storage age. PMID:21792054

  19. [Acute lung injury as a consequence of blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moyado, Héctor

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) has been recognized as a consequence of blood transfusion (BT) since 1978; the Food and Drug Administration, has classified it as the third BT mortality issue, in 2004, and in first place related with ALI. It can be mainly detected as: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). The clinical onset is: severe dyspnea, bilateral lung infiltration and low oxygen saturation. In USA, ARDS has an incidence of three to 22.4 cases/100 000 inhabitants, with 58.3 % mortality. TACO and TRALI are less frequent; they have been reported according to the number of transfusions: one in 1275 to 6000 for TRALI and one in 356 transfusions for TACO. Mortality is reported from two to 20 % in TRALI and 20 % in TACO. Antileukocyte antibodies in blood donors plasma, caused TRALI in 89 % of cases; also it has been found antigen specificity against leukocyte blood receptor in 59 %. The UCI patients who received a BT have ALI as a complication in 40 % of cases. The capillary pulmonary endothelia is the target of leukocyte antibodies and also plasma biologic modifiers of the stored plasma, most probable like a Sanarelli-Shwar-tzman phenomenon. PMID:21838994

  20. Experimental Models of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    PubMed Central

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we will discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approaches. Experimental models suggest that TRALI occurs when a host, with a primed immune system, is exposed to an activating agent such as anti-leukocyte antibody or a biologic response modifier such as lysophosphatidylcholines. Recent work has suggested a critical role for platelets in antibody-based experimental models and identified potential therapeutic strategies for TRALI. PMID:21134622

  1. Guideline on the investigation and management of acute transfusion reactions. Prepared by the BCSH Blood Transfusion Task Force.

    PubMed

    Tinegate, Hazel; Birchall, Janet; Gray, Alexandra; Haggas, Richard; Massey, Edwin; Norfolk, Derek; Pinchon, Deborah; Sewell, Carrock; Wells, Angus; Allard, Shubha

    2012-10-01

    Although acute non-haemolytic febrile or allergic reactions (ATRs) are a common complication of transfusion and often result in little or no morbidity, prompt recognition and management are essential. The serious hazards of transfusion haemovigilance organisation (SHOT) receives 30-40 reports of anaphylactic reactions each year. Other serious complications of transfusion, such as acute haemolysis, bacterial contamination, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) or transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) may present with similar clinical features to ATR. This guideline describes the approach to a patient developing adverse symptoms and signs related to transfusion, including initial recognition, establishing a likely cause, treatment, investigations, planning future transfusion and reporting within the hospital and to haemovigilance organisations. Key recommendations are that adrenaline should be used as first line treatment of anaphylaxis, and that transfusions should only be carried out where patients can be directly observed and where staff are trained in manging complications of transfusion, particularly anaphylaxis. Management of ATRs is not dependent on classification but should be guided by symptoms and signs. Patients who have experienced an anaphylactic reaction should be discussed with an allergist or immunologist, in keeping with UK resuscitation council guidelines. PMID:22928769

  2. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    PubMed

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records. PMID:24814817

  3. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury: The Work of DAMPs*

    PubMed Central

    Land, Walter G.

    2013-01-01

    Current notions in immunology hold that not only pathogen-mediated tissue injury but any injury activates the innate immune system. In principle, this evolutionarily highly conserved, rapid first-line defense system responds to pathogen-induced injury with the creation of infectious inflammation, and non-pathogen-induced tissue injury with ‘sterile’ tissue inflammation. In this review, evidence has been collected in support of the notion that the transfusion-related acute lung injury induces a ‘sterile’ inflammation in the lung of transfused patients in terms of an acute innate inflammatory disease. The inflammatory response is mediated by the patient's innate immune cells including lung-passing neutrophils and pulmonary endothelial cells, which are equipped with pattern recognition receptors. These receptors are able to sense injury-induced, damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) generated during collection, processing, and storage of blood/blood components. The recognition process leads to activation of these innate cells. A critical role for a protein complex known as the NLRP3 inflammasome has been suggested to be at the center of such a scenario. This complex undergoes an initial ‘priming’ step mediated by 1 class of DAMPs and then an ‘activating’ step mediated by another class of DAMPs to activate interleukin-1beta and interleukin-18. These 2 cytokines then promote, via transactivation, the formation of lung inflammation. PMID:23637644

  4. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury: The Work of DAMPs.

    PubMed

    Land, Walter G

    2013-02-01

    Current notions in immunology hold that not only pathogen-mediated tissue injury but any injury activates the innate immune system. In principle, this evolutionarily highly conserved, rapid first-line defense system responds to pathogen-induced injury with the creation of infectious inflammation, and non-pathogen-induced tissue injury with 'sterile' tissue inflammation. In this review, evidence has been collected in support of the notion that the transfusion-related acute lung injury induces a 'sterile' inflammation in the lung of transfused patients in terms of an acute innate inflammatory disease. The inflammatory response is mediated by the patient's innate immune cells including lung-passing neutrophils and pulmonary endothelial cells, which are equipped with pattern recognition receptors. These receptors are able to sense injury-induced, damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) generated during collection, processing, and storage of blood/blood components. The recognition process leads to activation of these innate cells. A critical role for a protein complex known as the NLRP3 inflammasome has been suggested to be at the center of such a scenario. This complex undergoes an initial 'priming' step mediated by 1 class of DAMPs and then an 'activating' step mediated by another class of DAMPs to activate interleukin-1beta and interleukin-18. These 2 cytokines then promote, via transactivation, the formation of lung inflammation. PMID:23637644

  5. Prophylactic strategies for acute hemolysis secondary to plasma-incompatible platelet transfusions: correlation between qualitative hemolysin test and isohemagglutinin titration

    PubMed Central

    Landim, Cinthia Silvestre; Gomes, Francisco Carlos Almeida; Zeza, Bernardete Martin; Mendrone-Júnior, Alfredo; Dinardo, Carla Luana

    2015-01-01

    Objective Brazilian legislation has recently suggested the use of the qualitative hemolysin test instead of isohemagglutinin titers as prophylaxis for acute hemolysis related to plasma-incompatible platelet transfusions. The efficacy of this test in preventing hemolytic reactions has never been evaluated while isohemagglutinin titers have been extensively studied. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the results of these two tests. The impact of each type of prophylaxis on the platelet inventory management and the ability of the qualitative hemolysin test to prevent red cell sensitization after the transfusion of incompatible units were also studied. Methods A total of 246 donor blood samples were evaluated using both isohemagglutinin titers and the qualitative hemolysin test, and the results were statistically compared. Subsequently, 600 platelet units were tested using the hemolysin assay and the percentage of units unsuitable for transfusion was compared to historical data using isohemagglutinin titers (cut-off: 100). Moreover, ten patients who received units with minor ABO incompatibilities that were negative for hemolysis according to the qualitative hemolysin test were evaluated regarding the development of hemolysis and red cell sensitization (anti-A or anti-B). Results Isohemagglutinin titration and the results of qualitative hemolysin test did not correlate. The routine implementation of the qualitative hemolysin test significantly increased the percentage of platelet units found unsuitable for transfusions (15–65%; p-value <0.001). Furthermore the qualitative hemolysin test did not prevent red blood cell sensitization in a small exploratory analysis. Conclusion Qualitative hemolysin test results do not correlate to those of isohemagglutinin titers and its implementation as the prophylaxis of choice for hemolysis associated with plasma-incompatible platelet transfusions lacks clinical support of safety and significantly affects platelet inventory management. PMID:26190423

  6. Acute cholestatic hepatitis a virus infection presenting with hemolytic anemia and renal failure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lapp, Robert T; Rochling, Fedja

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus is the most common acute viral hepatitis worldwide with approximately 1.5 million cases annually. Hepatitis A virus infection in general is self-limited. In rare cases, hepatitis A virus infection may cause renal failure, hemolytic anemia, and/or cholestasis. We report the first case of acute cholestatic hepatitis A virus infection complicated by hemolytic anemia, and renal failure in one patient. A 42-year-old Caucasian male presented with cholestasis, hemolytic anemia and renal failure after consuming street tacos in Central and South America while on a business trip. His protracted course required corticosteroid therapy, multiple sessions of plasma exchange, and numerous units of packed red blood cells. This case demonstrates the importance of vaccination in high-risk adults. A prompt diagnosis of acute hepatitis A virus infection is essential, as uncommon presentations may delay diagnosis leading to permanent morbidity and potentially death in fulminant cases. We also demonstrate the efficacy of treatment of cholestatic hepatitis A virus infection, hemolytic anemia, and renal failure with corticosteroids and plasma exchange. PMID:25431704

  7. Transfusion reaction - hemolytic

    MedlinePLUS

    ... way blood cells may be classified is by Rh factors. People who have Rh factors in their blood are called "Rh positive." People ... Rh negative." Rh negative people form antibodies against Rh factor if they receive Rh positive blood. There are ...

  8. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI): A Clinical Review with Emphasis on the Critically Ill

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Alexander B.; Moss, Marc; Silliman, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality world-wide. Although first described in 1983, it took two decades to develop consensus definitions that remain controversial. The pathogenesis of TRALI is related to the infusion of donor antibodies that recognize leukocyte antigens in the transfused host or the infusion of lipids and other biologic response modifiers that accumulate during storage or processing of blood components. TRALI appears to be the result of at least two sequential events and treatment is supportive. This review demonstrates that critically ill patients are more susceptible to TRALI and require special attention by critical care specialists, haematologists and transfusion medicine experts. Further research is required into TRALI and its pathogenesis so that transfusions are safer and administered appropriately. Avoidance including male-only transfusion practices, the use of leukoreduced components, fresher blood/blood components and solvent detergent plasma are also discussed. PMID:19663827

  9. Case report of transfusion-related acute lung injury in a pediatric spine surgery patient transfused leukoreduced red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Cudilo, Elizabeth M; Varughese, Anna M; Mahmoud, Mohamed; Carey, Patricia M; Subramanyam, Rajeev

    2015-12-01

    Despite leukoreduced red blood cells (LR-RBCs) reducing the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), we present a case of a 16-year-old female with kyphosis who received a transfusion of one unit of LR-RBCs, which lead to life-threatening, intraoperative TRALI. The clinical presentation included pulmonary edema, severe postoperative lactic acidosis, left ventricular dysfunction, increased creatine phosphokinase, fatty infiltration of the liver, and hemodynamic instability requiring inotropic support. This presentation is not the classic description of TRALI. Our patient improved with supportive treatment and was successfully extubated on postoperative day 4. TRALI work-up revealed antibody formation to HLA A2, A68, B44, and DQA 5 for the LR-RBCs unit administered. PMID:26126598

  10. Acute Systolic Heart Failure Associated with Complement-Mediated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, John L.; Moore, Jared M.; Cataland, Spero R.

    2015-01-01

    Complement-mediated hemolytic uremic syndrome (otherwise known as atypical HUS) is a rare disorder of uncontrolled complement activation that may be associated with heart failure. We report the case of a 49-year-old female with no history of heart disease who presented with microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Given her normal ADAMSTS13 activity, evidence of increased complement activation, and renal biopsy showing evidence of thrombotic microangiopathy, she was diagnosed with complement-mediated HUS. She subsequently developed acute hypoxemic respiratory failure secondary to pulmonary edema requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed evidence of a Takotsubo cardiomyopathy with an estimated left ventricular ejection fraction of 20%, though ischemic cardiomyopathy could not be ruled out. Treatment was initiated with eculizumab. After several failed attempts at extubation, she eventually underwent tracheotomy. She also required hemodialysis to improve her uremia and hypervolemia. After seven weeks of hospitalization and five doses of eculizumab, her renal function and respiratory status improved, and she was discharged in stable condition on room air and independent of hemodialysis. Our case illustrates a rare association between acute systolic heart failure and complement-mediated HUS and highlights the potential of eculizumab in stabilizing even the most critically-ill patients with complement-mediated disease. PMID:26557394

  11. Platelet Transfusion – The New Immunology of an Old Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stolla, Moritz; Refaai, Majed A.; Heal, Joanna M.; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Garraud, Olivier; Phipps, Richard P.; Blumberg, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusion has been a vital therapeutic approach in patients with hematologic malignancies for close to half a century. Randomized trials show that prophylactic platelet transfusions mitigate bleeding in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. However, even with prophylactic transfusions, as many as 75% of patients, experience hemorrhage. While platelet transfusion efficacy is modest, questions and concerns have arisen about the risks of platelet transfusion therapy. The acknowledged serious risks of platelet transfusion include viral transmission, bacterial sepsis, and acute lung injury. Less serious adverse effects include allergic and non-hemolytic febrile reactions. Rare hemolytic reactions have occurred due to a common policy of transfusing without regard to ABO type. In the last decade or so, new concerns have arisen; platelet-derived lipids are implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury after transfusion. With the recognition that platelets are immune cells came the discoveries that supernatant IL-6, IL-27 sCD40L, and OX40L are closely linked to febrile reactions and sCD40L with acute lung injury. Platelet transfusions are pro-inflammatory, and may be pro-thrombotic. Anti-A and anti-B can bind to incompatible recipient or donor platelets and soluble antigens, impair hemostasis and thus increase bleeding. Finally, stored platelet supernatants contain biological mediators such as VEGF and TGF-?1 that may compromise the host versus tumor response. This is particularly of concern in patients receiving many platelet transfusions, as for acute leukemia. New evidence suggests that removing stored supernatant will improve clinical outcomes. This new view of platelets as pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory agents suggests that innovative approaches to improving platelet storage and pre-transfusion manipulations to reduce toxicity could substantially improve the efficacy and safety of this long-employed therapy. PMID:25699046

  12. Phenobarbital and Phototherapy Combination Enhances Decline of Total Serum Bilirubin and May Decrease the Need for Blood Exchange Transfusion in Newborns with Isoimmune Hemolytic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaabneh, Mahmoud AF; Salama, Ghassan SA; Shakkoury, Ayoub GA; Al-abdallah, Ibrahim MH; Alshamari, Afrah; Halaseh, Ruba AA

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of phenobarbital and phototherapy combination on the total serum bilirubin of the newborn infants with isoimmune hemolytic disease (IHD) and its impact on blood exchange transfusion rates. PATIENTS AND METHOD This single-blinded, prospective, randomized, controlled trial was conducted between March 2013 and December 2014 at the pediatric ward of two Military Hospitals in Jordan. A total of 200 full-term neonates with IHD were divided randomly into two groups: (1) the phenobarbital plus phototherapy group (n = 103), and (2) the phototherapy-only group (n = 97). Infants in group 1 received an oral dose of 2.5 mg/kg phenobarbital every 12 hours for 3 days in addition to phototherapy. The total serum bilirubin was observed. RESULTS Of the total 200 included newborn infants, 186 infants completed the study: 97 infants were included in group 1 and 89 infants in group 2. The difference between the mean total serum bilirubin levels at 24, 48, and 72 hours after starting the trial was clinically and statistically significant at P < 0.05. The differences between the two groups were also statistically significant at P < 0.05. Of the total 186 who completed the study, only 22 underwent blood exchange transfusion [7 from group 1, and 15 from group 2 (P = 0.0478)]. CONCLUSION In a limited-resources setting, phenobarbital in combination with phototherapy may be helpful to newborn infants with IHD, as it results in a faster decline in total serum bilirubin, thus decreasing the need for blood exchange transfusion than phototherapy alone. PMID:26309423

  13. Acute Lung Injury Complicating Blood Transfusion in Post-Partum Hemorrhage: Incidence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Teofili, Luciana; Bianchi, Maria; Zanfini, Bruno A.; Catarci, Stefano; Sicuranza, Rossella; Spartano, Serena; Zini, Gina; Draisci, Gaetano

    2014-01-01

    Background We retrospectively investigated the incidence and risk factors for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) among patients transfused for post-partum hemorrhage (PPH). Methods We identified a series of 71 consecutive patients with PPH requiring the urgent transfusion of three or more red blood cell (RBC) units, with or without transfusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and/or platelets (PLT). Clinical records were then retrieved and examined for respiratory distress events. According to the 2004 consensus definition, cases of new-onset hypoxemia, within 6 hours after transfusion, with bilateral pulmonary changes, in the absence of cardiogenic pulmonary edema were identified as TRALI. If an alternative risk factor for acute lung injury was present, possible TRALI was diagnosed. Results Thirteen cases of TRALI and 1 case of possible TRALI were identified (overall incidence 19.7%). At univariate analysis, patients with TRALI received higher number of RBC, PLT and FFP units and had a longer postpartum hospitalization. Among the diseases occurring in pregnancy- and various pre-existing comorbidities, only gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia, significantly increased the risk to develop TRALI (p = 0.006). At multivariate analysis including both transfusion- and patient-related risk factors, pregnancy-related, hypertensive disorders were confirmed to be the only predictors for TRALI, with an odds ratio of 27.7 ( 95% CI 1.27–604.3, p=0.034). Conclusions Patients suffering from PPH represent a high-risk population for TRALI. The patients with gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia, not receiving anti-hypertensive therapy, have the highest risk. Therefore, a careful monitoring of these patients after transfusions is recommended. PMID:25408855

  14. Neonatal transfusion.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Anne M; Williamson, Lorna M

    2013-11-01

    Neonates and particularly preterm neonates are frequent recipients of large volumes of blood products relative to their size. Good quality evidence for transfusion practice in this patient group has been lacking but is now increasing. Triggers for red cell transfusion are now better defined, with on-going trials of platelet transfusions likely to yield similar evidence. Transfusion is now extremely safe, but complications such as transfusion associated acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) are likely to be under recognised, particularly in the sick extremely preterm neonate with respiratory symptoms. This review summarises the rationale and current practice with regard to blood component therapy. Background data on component specifications and hazards of transfusion are provided. Indications for transfusion of specific products including red cells, platelets, and plasma are discussed, and their use is illustrated by case examples. PMID:24095206

  15. Acute iatrogenic polycythemia induced by massive red blood cell transfusion during subtotal abdominal colectomy.

    PubMed

    Chiapaikeo, David; Rohani, Pejman

    2015-02-24

    A 46 year old man was transfused ten units of packed red blood cells during subtotal colectomy after intraoperative point-of-care testing values demonstrated hemoglobin values less than seven grams per deciliter (g/dL). A postoperative hemoglobin analyzed in a standard hematologic laboratory revealed a hemoglobin value of 27.8 g/dL. He underwent emergent red blood cell depletion therapy which decreased his hemoglobin to 7.5 g/dL. The physiologic consequences of iatrogenic polycythemia caused by massive transfusion during major abdominal surgery must take into account the fluid shifts that interplay between the osmotic load, viscosity of blood, and postoperative third spacing of fluid. Treatment of acute iatrogenic polycythemia can be effectively accomplished by red blood cell depletion therapy. However, fluid shifts caused by massive transfusion followed by rapid red cell depletion produce a unique physiologic state that is without a well-described algorithm for management. PMID:25852846

  16. Acute Iatrogenic Polycythemia Induced by Massive Red Blood Cell Transfusion During Subtotal Abdominal Colectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chiapaikeo, David; Rohani, Pejman

    2015-01-01

    A 46 year old man was transfused ten units of packed red blood cells during subtotal colectomy after intraoperative point-of-care testing values demonstrated hemoglobin values less than seven grams per deciliter (g/dL). A postoperative hemoglobin analyzed in a standard hematologic laboratory revealed a hemoglobin value of 27.8 g/dL. He underwent emergent red blood cell depletion therapy which decreased his hemoglobin to 7.5 g/dL. The physiologic consequences of iatrogenic polycythemia caused by massive transfusion during major abdominal surgery must take into account the fluid shifts that interplay between the osmotic load, viscosity of blood, and postoperative third spacing of fluid. Treatment of acute iatrogenic polycythemia can be effectively accomplished by red blood cell depletion therapy. However, fluid shifts caused by massive transfusion followed by rapid red cell depletion produce a unique physiologic state that is without a well-described algorithm for management. PMID:25852846

  17. Antibody-mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury; from discovery to prevention.

    PubMed

    Peters, Anna L; Van Stein, Danielle; Vlaar, Alexander P J

    2015-09-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), a syndrome of respiratory distress caused by blood transfusion, is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. The majority of TRALI cases have been related to passive infusion of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) and human neutrophil antigen (HNA) antibodies in donor blood. In vitro, ex vivo and in vivo animal models have provided insight in TRALI pathogenesis. The various classes of antibodies implicated in TRALI appear to have different pathophysiological mechanisms for the induction of TRALI involving endothelial cells, neutrophils, monocytes and, as very recently has been discovered, lymphocytes. The HLA and HNA-antibodies are found mainly in blood from multiparous women as they have become sensitized during pregnancy. The incidence of TRALI has decreased rapidly following the introduction of a male-only strategy for plasma donation. This review focuses on pre-clinical and clinical studies investigating the pathophysiology of antibody-mediated TRALI. PMID:25921271

  18. The influence of a simple blood transfusion policy on overtransfusion in acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Adam; Thompson, Clare; Clegg, Andrew; Snook, Jonathon

    2015-08-01

    Blood transfusion is widely used in the management of acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage (AUGIH). Trial data suggests that excessive transfusion may be detrimental, yet overtransfusion remains commonplace. This study reports the impact of introducing a simple cross-match policy in a district general hospital, which resulted in a substantial fall in the prevalence of overtransfusion (odds ratio 0.43; 95% confidence interval 0.19-0.98), with potential patient benefits in terms of rebleeding, and a reduction in the total blood transfused from 162 to 121 units per 100 patients with AUGIH. For the cost of blood alone, this corresponds to projected savings across the NHS in England in excess of £2 million per annum. PMID:26407379

  19. Variability in splanchnic tissue oxygenation during preterm red blood cell transfusion given for symptomatic anaemia may reveal a potential mechanism of transfusion-related acute gut injury

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Sean M.; Hendricks-Muñoz, Karen D.; Mally, Pradeep V.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence indicating an association between red blood cell (RBC) transfusions and necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants, especially late-onset NEC. This phenomenon is referred to as transfusion-related acute gut injury (TRAGI). One theory as to a pathophysiological mechanism is that transfusion may result in an ischemia-reperfusion injury to intestinal tissue. We tested the hypothesis that there is significantly greater variability during transfusion in splanchnic tissue oxygen saturation (SrSO2) than in cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (CrSO2). Materials and methods This was a prospective, observational study using near-infrared spectroscopy to monitor SrSO2 and CrSO2 in preterm neonates undergoing RBC transfusion for symptomatic anaemia. Mean, standard deviation, highest and lowest SrSO2 and CrSO2 values during each transfusion were determined. The greatest difference in SrSO2 and CrSO2 during each transfusion was calculated, along with the coefficient of variation. Results We studied 37 subjects. Throughout all transfusions, the mean SrSO2 was 45.6% ±13.8 and the mean CrSO2 was 65.4% ±6.9 (p<0.001). The variability of SrSO2 was significantly greater than that of CrSO2. Averaging data from all subjects, the greatest difference in SrSO2 was 43.8% ±13.4 compared with 23.3% ±7.6 for CrSO2 (p<0.001). The mean coefficient of variation in all transfusions was 20.5% for SrSO2 and 6.0% for CrSO2 (p<0.001). Increasing post-conceptional age did not affect SrSO2 variability (R2 =0.022; p=0.379), whereas CrSO2 variability during transfusion decreased with increasing post-conceptional age (R2=0.209; p=0.004). Discussion In preterm infants, there is a large degree of tissue oxygenation variability in splanchnic tissue during RBC transfusion and this does not change with increasing maturity. We speculate that these findings, combined with lower average tissue oxygenation, may demonstrate susceptibility of the preterm gut to TRAGI. PMID:25761320

  20. Red blood cell transfusion for hematologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Grossman, Brenda J

    2015-12-01

    Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have determined, in surgical and critically ill patients, relatively safe hemoglobin (Hb) thresholds of 7-8 g/dL to guide restrictive transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs). However, in patients with various hematologic disorders, strong evidence in support of such an approach is sparse and the optimal transfusion practice is yet to be defined. This review focuses on RBC transfusion practice in three hematologic diseases and a treatment strategy, including autoimmune hemolytic anemia, thalassemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These entities manifest in a broad spectrum of anemia, acute or chronic, in patients with different comorbidities and degrees of transfusion requirement. Thus the nuances in the indications of RBC transfusion and the goals to achieve in these specific situations may have been underappreciated. The limited data available highlight the importance of titrating RBC transfusion based on the clinical context and patient characteristics. Future RCTs are necessary to firmly establish the Hb thresholds associated with improved outcomes relevant to these specific patient populations, which will facilitate the personalized decision-making in RBC transfusion. PMID:26637758

  1. C-reactive protein enhances murine antibody-mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Rick; Kim, Michael; Shanmugabhavananthan, Shanjeevan; Liu, Jonathan; Li, Yuan; Semple, John W

    2015-12-17

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a syndrome of respiratory distress triggered by blood transfusions and is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. TRALI has primarily been attributed to passive infusion of HLA and/or human neutrophil antigen antibodies present in transfused blood products, and predisposing factors such as inflammation are known to be important for TRALI initiation. Because the acute-phase protein C-reactive protein (CRP) is highly upregulated during infections and inflammation and can also enhance antibody-mediated responses such as in vitro phagocytosis, respiratory burst, and in vivo thrombocytopenia, we investigated whether CRP affects murine antibody-mediated TRALI induced by the anti-major histocompatibility complex antibody 34-1-2s. We found that BALB/c mice injected with 34-1-2s or CRP alone were resistant to TRALI, however mice injected with 34-1-2s together with CRP had significantly enhanced lung damage and pulmonary edema. Mechanistically, 34-1-2s injection with CRP resulted in a significant synergistic increase in plasma levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and pulmonary neutrophil accumulation. Importantly, murine MIP-2 is the functional homolog of human interleukin-8, a known risk factor for human TRALI. These results suggest that elevated in vivo CRP levels, like those observed during infections, may significantly predispose recipients to antibody-mediated TRALI reactions and support the notion that modulating CRP levels is an effective therapeutic strategy to reduce TRALI severity. PMID:26453659

  2. Acute hemolytic vascular inflammatory processes are prevented by nitric oxide replacement or a single dose of hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Camila Bononi; Souza, Lucas Eduardo Botelho; Leonardo, Flavia Costa; Costa, Fabio Trindade Maranhão; Werneck, Claudio C; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Conran, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Hemolysis and consequent release of cell-free hemoglobin (CFHb) impair vascular nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and cause oxidative and inflammatory processes. Hydroxyurea (HU), a common therapy for sickle cell disease (SCD), induces fetal Hb production and can act as an NO donor. We evaluated the acute inflammatory effects of intravenous water-induced hemolysis in C57BL/6 mice and determined the abilities of an NO donor, diethylamine NONOate (DEANO), and a single dose of HU to modulate this inflammation. Intravenous water induced acute hemolysis in C57BL/6 mice, attaining plasma Hb levels comparable to those observed in chimeric SCD mice. This hemolysis resulted in significant and rapid systemic inflammation and vascular leukocyte recruitment within 15 minutes, accompanied by NO metabolite generation. Administration of another potent NO scavenger (2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide) to C57BL/6 mice induced similar alterations in leukocyte recruitment, whereas hemin-induced inflammation occurred over a longer time frame. Importantly, the acute inflammatory effects of water-induced hemolysis were abolished by the simultaneous administration of DEANO or HU, without altering CFHb, in an NO pathway-mediated manner. In vitro, HU partially reversed the Hb-mediated induction of endothelial proinflammatory cytokine secretion and adhesion molecule expression. In summary, pathophysiological levels of hemolysis trigger an immediate inflammatory response, possibly mediated by vascular NO consumption. HU presents beneficial anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting rapid-onset hemolytic inflammation via an NO-dependent mechanism, independently of fetal Hb elevation. Data provide novel insights into mechanisms of hemolytic inflammation and further support perspectives for the use of HU as an acute treatment for SCD and other hemolytic disorders. PMID:26019278

  3. Suspected Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury Improving following Administration of Tranexamic Acid: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ryniak, Stan; Harbut, Piotr; Östlund, Anders; Jakobsson, Jan G.

    2014-01-01

    A 16-year-old woman with craniofacial injury developed severe acute respiratory failure under the primary reconstructive surgical procedure requiring several units of blood and plasma. A transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) was suspected and supportive treatment was initiated. Because of the severity of symptoms, acute extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was planned. During preparation for ECMO, a single intravenous dose, 1?g of tranexamic acid, was administered and a remarkable improvement was observed shortly thereafter. The patient was placed on ECMO for 16 hours. The further course was uncomplicated and the patient was discharged from ICU on the 6th day after admission fully and she recovered. A clinical improvement was observed in a timely fashion following the administration of tranexamic acid. The handling of a suspected TRALI and potential benefit from administration of tranexamic acid are discussed in this case report. PMID:24995132

  4. Restrictive vs Liberal Blood Transfusion for Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Rationale and Protocol for a Cluster Randomized Feasibility Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jairath, Vipul; Kahan, Brennan C.; Gray, Alasdair; Doré, Caroline J.; Mora, Ana; Dyer, Claire; Stokes, Elizabeth A.; Llewelyn, Charlotte; Bailey, Adam A.; Dallal, Helen; Everett, Simon M.; James, Martin W.; Stanley, Adrian J.; Church, Nicholas; Darwent, Melanie; Greenaway, John; Le Jeune, Ivan; Reckless, Ian; Campbell, Helen E.; Meredith, Sarah; Palmer, Kelvin R.; Logan, Richard F.A.; Travis, Simon P.L.; Walsh, Timothy S.; Murphy, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is the commonest reason for hospitalization with hemorrhage in the UK and the leading indication for transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs). Observational studies suggest an association between more liberal RBC transfusion and adverse patient outcomes, and a recent randomised trial reported increased further bleeding and mortality with a liberal transfusion policy. TRIGGER (Transfusion in Gastrointestinal Bleeding) is a pragmatic, cluster randomized trial which aims to evaluate the feasibility and safety of implementing a restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion policy in adult patients admitted with AUGIB. The trial will take place in 6 UK hospitals, and each centre will be randomly allocated to a transfusion policy. Clinicians throughout each hospital will manage all eligible patients according to the transfusion policy for the 6-month trial recruitment period. In the restrictive centers, patients become eligible for RBC transfusion when their hemoglobin is < 8 g/dL. In the liberal centers patients become eligible for transfusion once their hemoglobin is < 10 g/dL. All clinicians will have the discretion to transfuse outside of the policy but will be asked to document the reasons for doing so. Feasibility outcome measures include protocol adherence, recruitment rate, and evidence of selection bias. Clinical outcome measures include further bleeding, mortality, thromboembolic events, and infections. Quality of life will be measured using the EuroQol EQ-5D at day 28, and the costs associated with hospitalization for AUGIB in the UK will be estimated. Consent will be sought from participants or their representatives according to patient capacity for use of routine hospital data and day 28 follow up. The study has ethical approval for conduct in England and Scotland. Results will be analysed according to a pre-defined statistical analysis plan and disseminated in peer reviewed publications to relevant stakeholders. The results of this study will inform the feasibility and design of a phase III randomized trial. PMID:23706959

  5. Acute liver function decompensation in a patient with sickle cell disease managed with exchange transfusion and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography

    PubMed Central

    Ona, Mel A.; Changela, Kinesh; Sadanandan, Swayamprabha; Jelin, Abraham; Anand, Sury; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell intrahepatic cholestasis is a relatively uncommon complication of homozygous sickle cell anemia, which may lead to acute hepatic failure and death. Treatment is mainly supportive, but exchange transfusion is used as salvage therapy in life threatening situations. We describe a case of a 16-year-old female with homozygous sickle cell anemia who presented to the emergency room with fatigue, malaise, dark urine, lower back pain, scleral icterus and jaundice. She was found to have marked hyperbilirubinemia, which persisted after exchange transfusion. Because of the concomitant presence of gallstones and choledocholithiasis, the patient underwent endoscopic ultrasound and laparoscopic cholecystectomy followed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiography and sphincterotomy. PMID:25177368

  6. Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    King, Karen E; Ness, Paul M

    2005-07-01

    The appropriate therapy of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is dependent on the correct diagnosis and classification of this family of hemolytic disorders. Although the majority of cases are warm AIHA, there are several distinct types of cold AIHA and a number of drug-induced etiologies of AIHA, which must be investigated to determine if stopping a drug will induce a remission. In warm AIHA, corticosteroids are standard, followed by consideration of splenectomy in recalcitrant cases. If steroids and splenectomy are insufficient, other forms of immunosuppressive therapy are typically initiated. In cold AIHA, keeping the patient warm in often sufficient, but therapy directed at an underlying lympholiferative disorder may be helpful. Brisk hemolysis, inadequate responses to therapy, and worsening anemia require transfusion therapy. Although the pretransfusion workup is made difficult by the presence of the autoantibody, transfusion services can usually provide blood safe for transfusion by excluding underlying alloantibodies. When transfusion is urgently required and compatible blood cannot be located, incompatible blood may be provided as a life-saving measure. Communication between the transfusion service and the hematologist is critical to assess the risks in these settings. Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers may provide an important bridging therapy in the future. Requests for "least incompatible" blood do not enhance transfusion safety and often result in unnecessary delays. PMID:16041662

  7. Recurrent hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayana, G.; Rajesh, R.; Jojo, A.; Kurian, G.; Unni, V. N.

    2008-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is an uncommon cause of acute renal failure. Diarrhea-associated (D+) HUS, usually seen in children, is a common variety of HUS. HUS that is not associated with diarrhea (D?) is caused by a heterogeneous group of disorders. We report here a case of recurrent HUS (D?) in an adult female with hypocomplementemia. PMID:20142920

  8. Blood Donation and Transfusion (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... virus (HTLV) OTHER RISKS FROM A TRANSFUSION — In addition to the risk of infection from transfusion, other risks include the following: ? Shortness of breath due to immune/inflammatory reactions, known as transfusion-associated acute lung injury (TRALI) ? ...

  9. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, David; Goodship, Tim H.; Richards, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Summary Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a triad of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. The atypical form of HUS is a disease characterized by complement overactivation. Inherited defects in complement genes and acquired autoantibodies against complement regulatory proteins have been described. Incomplete penetrance of mutations in all predisposing genes is reported, suggesting that a precipitating event or trigger is required to unmask the complement regulatory deficiency. The underlying genetic defect predicts the prognosis both in native kidneys and after renal transplantation. The successful trials of the complement inhibitor eculizumab in the treatment of atypical HUS will revolutionize disease management. PMID:24161037

  10. Blood Transfusion

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Platelets White Cells Transfusion of Red Cells Iron Overload Transfusion of Platelets Transfusion of Granulocytes Transfusion of ... you may have, such as heart disease. Iron Overload. The body contains about 2,000 to 3, ...

  11. Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Anemia Blood Transfusion Rh Incompatibility Sickle Cell Disease Thalassemias Send a link to NHLBI to ...

  12. Comparison of acute non-haemolytic transfusion reactions in female and male patients receiving female or male blood components

    PubMed Central

    Imoto, S; Araki, N; Shimada, E; Saigo, K; Nishimura, K; Nose, Y; Bouike, Y; Hashimoto, M; Mito, H; Okazaki, H

    2007-01-01

    To study the relationship between antibodies detected in patients’ and/or donors’ sera and the clinical features of acute non-haemolytic transfusion reactions (ANHTRs), and to determine any gender-related difference. ANHTRs range from urticaria to transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Antibodies to human leukocyte antigen (HLA), granulocytes, platelets, and/or plasma proteins are implicated in some of the ANHTRs. A higher antibody positivity is expected for females than for males. A comparative study of ANHTRs for antibody positivity and their clinical features between females and males for both patients and donors is helpful for characterizing ANHTRs including TRALI more clearly, but such studies are few and outdated. Two hundred and twenty-three ANHTR cases reported by 45 hospitals between October 2000 and July 2005 were analysed. The patients and 196 donors of suspect blood products were screened for antibodies to HLA Class I, HLA Class II, granulocytes, and platelets. The patients were also screened for anti-plasma protein antibodies. The types and severity of ANHTR did not differ significantly between female and male patients. The frequency of the anti-HLA antibodies, but not that of the non-HLA antibodies, was significantly higher in females. Non-HLA antibodies were significantly associated with severe reactions in females. All the TRALI cases had predisposing risk factors for acute lung injury, and 60% of the cases showed anti-leucocyte antibodies. Although the anti-HLA antibodies were detected more frequently in females than males, no significant association of ANHTRs including TRALI with gender, not only for patients, but also for donors, could be shown in this study. PMID:18067650

  13. Comparison of acute non-haemolytic transfusion reactions in female and male patients receiving female or male blood components.

    PubMed

    Imoto, S; Araki, N; Shimada, E; Saigo, K; Nishimura, K; Nose, Y; Bouike, Y; Hashimoto, M; Mito, H; Okazaki, H

    2007-12-01

    To study the relationship between antibodies detected in patients' and/or donors' sera and the clinical features of acute non-haemolytic transfusion reactions (ANHTRs), and to determine any gender-related difference. ANHTRs range from urticaria to transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Antibodies to human leukocyte antigen (HLA), granulocytes, platelets, and/or plasma proteins are implicated in some of the ANHTRs. A higher antibody positivity is expected for females than for males. A comparative study of ANHTRs for antibody positivity and their clinical features between females and males for both patients and donors is helpful for characterizing ANHTRs including TRALI more clearly, but such studies are few and outdated. Two hundred and twenty-three ANHTR cases reported by 45 hospitals between October 2000 and July 2005 were analysed. The patients and 196 donors of suspect blood products were screened for antibodies to HLA Class I, HLA Class II, granulocytes, and platelets. The patients were also screened for anti-plasma protein antibodies. The types and severity of ANHTR did not differ significantly between female and male patients. The frequency of the anti-HLA antibodies, but not that of the non-HLA antibodies, was significantly higher in females. Non-HLA antibodies were significantly associated with severe reactions in females. All the TRALI cases had predisposing risk factors for acute lung injury, and 60% of the cases showed anti-leucocyte antibodies. Although the anti-HLA antibodies were detected more frequently in females than males, no significant association of ANHTRs including TRALI with gender, not only for patients, but also for donors, could be shown in this study. PMID:18067650

  14. Serum Shiga toxin 2 values in patients during the acute phase of post-diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxins (Stxs) produced by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are considered as the main causative agent, leading to the development of the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS); these toxins injure endothelial cells mainly the glomeruli. After passing through the intestinal wall, Stxs hav...

  15. Hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Canpolat, Nur

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by the triad of thrombotic microangiopathy, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Hemolytic uremic syndrome represents a heterogeneous group of disorders with variable etiologies that result in differences in presentation, management and outcome. In recent years, better understanding of the HUS, especially those due to genetic mutations in the alternative complement pathway have provided an update on the terminology, classification, and treatment of the disease. This review will provide the updated classification of the disease and the current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches on the complement-mediated HUS in addition to STEC-HUS which is the most common cause of the HUS in childhood. PMID:26265890

  16. Anemia, Blood Transfusion Requirements and Mortality Risk in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Adults Requiring Acute Medical Admission to Hospital in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhoff, Andrew D.; Lawn, Stephen D.; Schutz, Charlotte; Burton, Rosie; Boulle, Andrew; Cobelens, Frank J.; Meintjes, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    Background.?Morbidity and mortality remain high among hospitalized patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in sub-Saharan Africa despite widespread availability of antiretroviral therapy. Severe anemia is likely one important driver, and some evidence suggests that blood transfusions may accelerate HIV progression and paradoxically increase short-term mortality. We investigated the relationship between anemia, blood transfusions, and mortality in a South African district hospital. Methods.?Unselected consecutive HIV-infected adults requiring acute medical admission to a Cape Town township district hospital were recruited. Admission hemoglobin concentrations were used to classify anemia severity according to World Health Organization/AIDS Clinical Trials Group criteria. Vital status was determined at 90 days, and Cox regression analyses were used to determine independent predictors of mortality. Results.?Of 585 HIV-infected patients enrolled, 578 (98.8%) were included in the analysis. Anemia was detected in 84.8% of patients and was severe (hemoglobin, 6.5–7.9 g/dL) or life-threatening (hemoglobin, <6.5 g/dL) in 17.3% and 13.3%, respectively. Within 90 days of the date of admission, 13.5% (n = 78) patients received at least 1 blood transfusion with red cell concentrate and 77 (13.3%) patients died. In univariable analysis, baseline hemoglobin and receipt of blood transfusion were associated with increased mortality risk. However, in multivariable analysis, neither hemoglobin nor receipt of a blood transfusion were independently associated with greater mortality risk. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome-defining illnesses other than tuberculosis and impaired renal function independently predicted mortality. Conclusions.?Newly admitted HIV-infected adults had a high prevalence of severe or life-threatening anemia and blood transfusions were frequently required. However, after adjustment for confounders, blood transfusions did not confer an increased mortality risk.

  17. Alloimmunization is associated with older age of transfused red blood cells in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Desai, Payal C; Deal, Allison M; Pfaff, Emily R; Qaqish, Bahjat; Hebden, Leyna M; Park, Yara A; Ataga, Kenneth I

    2015-08-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization is a significant clinical complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). It can lead to difficulty with cross-matching for future transfusions and may sometimes trigger life-threatening delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions. We conducted a retrospective study to explore the association of clinical complications and age of RBC with alloimmunization in patients with SCD followed at a single institution from 2005 to 2012. One hundred and sixty six patients with a total of 488 RBC transfusions were evaluated. Nineteen patients (11%) developed new alloantibodies following blood transfusions during the period of review. The median age of RBC units was 20 days (interquartile range: 14-27 days). RBC antibody formation was significantly associated with the age of RBC units (P?=?0.002), with a hazard ratio of 3.5 (95% CI: 1.71-7.11) for a RBC unit that was 7 days old and 9.8 (95% CI: 2.66-35.97) for a unit that was 35 days old, 28 days after the blood transfusion. No association was observed between RBC alloimmunization and acute vaso-occlusive complications. Although increased echocardiography-derived tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRV) was associated with the presence of RBC alloantibodies (P?=?0.02), TRV was not significantly associated with alloimmunization when adjusted for patient age and number of transfused RBC units. Our study suggests that RBC antibody formation is significantly associated with older age of RBCs at the time of transfusion. Prospective studies in patients with SCD are required to confirm this finding. PMID:25963831

  18. MHC class I–specific antibody binding to nonhematopoietic cells drives complement activation to induce transfusion-related acute lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Strait, Richard T.; Hicks, Wyenona; Barasa, Nathaniel; Mahler, Ashley; Khodoun, Marat; Köhl, Jörg; Stringer, Keith; Witte, David; Van Rooijen, Nico; Susskind, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), a form of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema that develops during or within 6 h after a blood transfusion, is the most frequent cause of transfusion-associated death in the United States. Because development of TRALI is associated with donor antibodies (Abs) reactive with recipient major histocompatibility complex (MHC), a mouse model has been studied in which TRALI-like disease is caused by injecting mice with anti–MHC class I monoclonal Ab (mAb). Previous publications with this model have concluded that disease is caused by FcR-dependent activation of neutrophils and platelets, with production of reactive oxygen species that damage pulmonary vascular endothelium. In this study, we confirm the role of reactive oxygen species in the pathogenesis of this mouse model of TRALI and show ultrastructural evidence of pulmonary vascular injury within 5 min of anti–MHC class I mAb injection. However, we demonstrate that disease induction in this model involves macrophages rather than neutrophils or platelets, activation of complement and production of C5a rather than activation of Fc?RI, Fc?RIII, or Fc?RIV, and binding of anti–MHC class I mAb to non-BM–derived cells such as pulmonary vascular endothelium. These observations have important implications for the prevention and treatment of TRALI. PMID:22025304

  19. Current trends in platelet transfusions practice: The role of ABO-RhD and human leukocyte antigen incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Valsami, Serena; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Gialeraki, Argyri; Chimonidou, Maria; Politou, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusions have contributed to the revolutionary modern treatment of hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. Despite the long-term application of platelet transfusion in therapeutics, all aspects of their optimal use (i.e., in cases of ABO and/or Rh (D incompatibility) have not been definitively determined yet. We reviewed the available data on transfusion practices and outcome in ABO and RhD incompatibility and platelet refractoriness due to anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Transfusion of platelets with major ABO-incompatibility is related to reduced posttransfusion platelet (PLT) count increments, compared to ABO-identical and minor, but still are equally effective in preventing clinical bleeding. ABO-minor incompatible transfusions pose the risk of an acute hemolytic reaction of the recipient that is not always related to high anti-A, B donor titers. ABO-identical PLT transfusion seems to be the most effective and safest therapeutic strategy. Exclusive ABO-identical platelet transfusion policy could be feasible, but alternative approaches could facilitate platelet inventory management. Transfusion of platelets from RhD positive donors to RhD negative patients is considered to be effective and safe though is associated with low rate of anti-D alloimmunization due to contaminating red blood cells. The prevention of D alloimmunization is recommended only for women of childbearing age. HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of platelet refractoriness. Managing patients with refractoriness with cross-matched or HLA-matched platelets is the current practice although data are still lacking for the efficacy of this practice in terms of clinical outcome. Leukoreduction contributes to the reduction of both HLA and anti-D alloimmunization. PMID:26420927

  20. Current trends in platelet transfusions practice: The role of ABO-RhD and human leukocyte antigen incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Valsami, Serena; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Gialeraki, Argyri; Chimonidou, Maria; Politou, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusions have contributed to the revolutionary modern treatment of hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. Despite the long-term application of platelet transfusion in therapeutics, all aspects of their optimal use (i.e., in cases of ABO and/or Rh (D incompatibility) have not been definitively determined yet. We reviewed the available data on transfusion practices and outcome in ABO and RhD incompatibility and platelet refractoriness due to anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Transfusion of platelets with major ABO-incompatibility is related to reduced posttransfusion platelet (PLT) count increments, compared to ABO-identical and minor, but still are equally effective in preventing clinical bleeding. ABO-minor incompatible transfusions pose the risk of an acute hemolytic reaction of the recipient that is not always related to high anti-A, B donor titers. ABO-identical PLT transfusion seems to be the most effective and safest therapeutic strategy. Exclusive ABO-identical platelet transfusion policy could be feasible, but alternative approaches could facilitate platelet inventory management. Transfusion of platelets from RhD positive donors to RhD negative patients is considered to be effective and safe though is associated with low rate of anti-D alloimmunization due to contaminating red blood cells. The prevention of D alloimmunization is recommended only for women of childbearing age. HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of platelet refractoriness. Managing patients with refractoriness with cross-matched or HLA-matched platelets is the current practice although data are still lacking for the efficacy of this practice in terms of clinical outcome. Leukoreduction contributes to the reduction of both HLA and anti-D alloimmunization. PMID:26420927

  1. Blood Transfusion

    MedlinePLUS

    ... bank will store your blood for your use. Alternatives to Blood Transfusions Researchers are trying to find ... to make blood. There's currently no man-made alternative to human blood. However, researchers have developed medicines ...

  2. Blood transfusions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... if you need a blood transfusion after surgery. Blood from these donors must be collected at least a few days ... blood bank before your surgery to have directed donor blood. It is important to note that there is ...

  3. [Immunoreaction and blood transfusion--chairmen's introductory remarks].

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Tsutomu; Matsushita, Tadashi

    2013-05-01

    Although blood transfusion is an extremely important therapeutic procedure that usually proceeds without complications, there are some risks associated with donated blood. Investigations into the causes of transfusion reactions and their prevention are important issues for transfusion therapy. In addition to nucleic acid amplification testing (NAT) for infectious diseases and the irradiation of blood to prevent post-transfusion GVHD, prestorage leukocyte reduction and diversion of the first part of the donation of blood were recently introduced into transfusion therapy. This symposium, entitled "Immunoreaction and blood transfusion", reviewed the immune responses associated with blood transfusion, which is probably the most frequent medical procedure performed in allogeneic organ transplantation, with four themes provided by the four featured invited speakers: transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, transfusion-transmitted infectious disease surveillance, and transfusion-related immunomodulation. PMID:23947177

  4. Unexpected Anemia and Reticulocytopenia in an Adolescent With Sickle Cell Anemia Receiving Chronic Transfusion Therapy.

    PubMed

    Blauel, Emily R; Grossmann, Lily T; Vissa, Madhav; Miller, Scott T

    2015-10-01

    In a patient with sickle cell disease receiving chronic transfusion, exacerbation of anemia with reticulocytopenia must prompt consideration of a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction with hyperhemolysis, as further transfusion may worsen this condition; definitive diagnosis is sometimes difficult. Anemia evolving during parvovirus B19-induced erythroid hypoplasia (transient aplastic crisis) should be attenuated in chronic transfusion patients due to superior survival of transfused over endogenous red blood cells. A 16-year-old with sickle cell disease receiving chronic transfusion of modified intensity (goal to maintain hemoglobin S<50%) who developed symptomatic anemia with reticulocytopenia was later shown to have had transient aplastic crisis. PMID:26207780

  5. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn: managing the mother, fetus, and newborn.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Meghan; Matthews, Dana C

    2015-12-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) affects 3/100 000 to 80/100 000 patients per year. It is due to maternal blood group antibodies that cause fetal red cell destruction and in some cases, marrow suppression. This process leads to fetal anemia, and in severe cases can progress to edema, ascites, heart failure, and death. Infants affected with HDFN can have hyperbilirubinemia in the acute phase and hyporegenerative anemia for weeks to months after birth. The diagnosis and management of pregnant women with HDFN is based on laboratory and radiographic monitoring. Fetuses with marked anemia may require intervention with intrauterine transfusion. HDFN due to RhD can be prevented by RhIg administration. Prevention for other causal blood group specificities is less studied. PMID:26637714

  6. Accumulation of CD62P during storage of apheresis platelet concentrates and the role of CD62P in transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Tong, Shan; Wang, Haibao; Zhang, Ting; Chen, Linfeng; Liu, Bowei

    2015-11-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-associated morbidity and mortality. Activated platelets have important roles in TRALI and CD62P was identified to be an important indicator of platelet activation. However, the precise roles of CD62P in TRALI have remained elusive. The present study assessed CD62P accumulation during storage of apheresis platelet concentrates (A?Plts) and established a mouse model of TRALI to further investigate the roles of CD62P in TRALI. The results showed that the CD62P concentration in A?Plts was increased with the storage time. Mice were treated with monoclonal major histocompatibility complex (MHC)?1 antibody to induce TRALI. The murine model of TRALI was successfully established as evidenced by pulmonary oedema, accompanied by decreased clearance of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), increased pulmonary and systemic inflammation, elevated lung myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity as well as increased pulmonary and systemic coagulation in the TRALI group compared with those in the control group. To further determine the role of CD62P in TRALI, mice were treated with anti?CD62P antibody to knockdown CD62P in vivo. It was found that pulmonary oedema, BALF clearance, pulmonary and systemic inflammation, MPO activity as well as pulmonary and systemic coagulation were decreased in the TRALI + anti?CD62P antibody group compared with those in the TRALI + isotype antibody group. The present study supported the notion that CD62P is involved in mediating TRALI and may provide an important molecular basis for enhancing the clinical safety and effectiveness of platelet transfusion. PMID:26397744

  7. HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA Erythrocytes premature

    E-print Network

    HEMOLYISIS · Within the Macrophages of the Spleen, liver, or BM · Causes · Inherited RBC Defects · Acquired EXTRINSIC DEFECTS · Antagonistic Plasma Factors · Traumatic Physical Cell Injury · Immune Medicated Cell of the Newborn HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA CAUSED BY PHYSICAL INJURY TO THE ERYTHROCYTE · Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia

  8. Blood Transfusions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... might be the red blood cells, platelets or plasma . Rarely is whole blood (red cells, plasma, platelets, and white cells) used for a transfusion. ... important for other components such as platelets and plasma, where most of the red blood cells have ...

  9. [Pulmonary complications of transfusion (TACO-TRALI)].

    PubMed

    Renaudier, P; Rebibo, D; Waller, C; Schlanger, S; Vo Mai, M-P; Ounnoughene, N; Breton, P; Cheze, S; Girard, A; Hauser, L; Legras, J-F; Saillol, A; Willaert, B; Caldani, C

    2009-05-01

    Pulmonary oedemas occurring during or after a blood transfusion appear as the most frequent serious immediate incidents in the French hemovigilance database. They include transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). TACO are a major cause of transfusion-related death in France. TRALI are more and more recognized and notified. In no case, pooled fresh frozen plasma (100 donations) treated with solvent-detergent were involved in French TRALI cases. A logigrame will allow hemovigilance officers to better classify pulmonary oedemas in e-fit, the French hemovigilance database. PMID:19446484

  10. Transfusion medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Murawski, K.; Peetoom, F.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings contain 24 selections, including papers presented at the conference of American Red Cross held in May 1985, on the Subject of transfusion medicine. Some of the titles are: Fluosol/sup R/-DA in Radiation Therapy; Expression of Cloned Human Factor VIII and the Molecular Basis of Gene Defects that Cause Hemophilia; DNA-Probing Assay in the Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Genome in Human Peripheral Blood Cells; and Monoclonal Antibodies: Convergence of Technology and Application.

  11. Host Platelets and, in Part, Neutrophils Mediate Lung Accumulation of Transfused UVB-Irradiated Human Platelets in a Mouse Model of Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Xuan; Zhi, Li; Gelderman, Monique P.; Vostal, Jaroslav G.

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that ultraviolet light B (UVB)-treated human platelets (hPLTs) can cause acute lung injury (ALI) in a two-event SCID mouse model in which the predisposing event was Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection and the second event was infusion of UVB-treated hPLTs. To delineate contributions of host mouse platelets (mPLTs) and neutrophils in the pathogenesis of ALI in this mouse model, we depleted mPLTs or neutrophils and measured hPLT accumulation in the lung. We also assessed lung injury by protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). LPS injection followed by infusion of UVB-treated hPLTs resulted in sequestration of both mPLTs and hPLTs in the lungs of SCID mice, although the numbers of neutrophils in the lung were not significantly different from the control group. Depletion of mouse neutrophils caused only a mild reduction in UVB-hPLTs accumulation in the lungs and a mild reduction in protein content in BALF. In comparison, depletion of mPLTs almost completely abolished hPLTs accumulation in the lung and significantly reduced protein content in BALF. UVB-treated hPLTs bound to host mPLTs, but did not bind to neutrophils in the lung. Aspirin treatment of hPLTs in vitro abolished hPLT accumulation in the lung and protected mice from lung injury. Our data indicate that host mPLTs accumulated in the lungs in response to an inflammatory challenge and subsequently mediated the attachment of transfused UVB-hPLTs. Neutrophils also recruited a small percentage of platelets to the lung. These findings may help develop therapeutic strategies for ALI which could potentially result from transfusion of UV illuminated platelets. PMID:23028636

  12. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in Children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of hemolytic uremic syndrome in children is an Escherichia coli (E. coli) infection of the digestive system. The ... of hemolytic uremic syndrome in children is an Escherichia coli ( E. coli ) infection of the digestive system. Normally, ...

  13. Red blood cell transfusion in newborn infants

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, Robin K; Jefferies, Ann L

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cell transfusion is an important and frequent component of neonatal intensive care. The present position statement addresses the methods and indications for red blood cell transfusion of the newborn, based on a review of the current literature. The most frequent indications for blood transfusion in the newborn are the acute treatment of perinatal hemorrhagic shock and the recurrent correction of anemia of prematurity. Perinatal hemorrhagic shock requires immediate treatment with large quantities of red blood cells; the effects of massive transfusion on other blood components must be considered. Some guidelines are now available from clinical trials investigating transfusion in anemia of prematurity; however, considerable uncertainty remains. There is weak evidence that cognitive impairment may be more severe at follow-up in extremely low birth weight infants transfused at lower hemoglobin thresholds; therefore, these thresholds should be maintained by transfusion therapy. Although the risks of transfusion have declined considerably in recent years, they can be minimized further by carefully restricting neonatal blood sampling. PMID:24855419

  14. Complement in hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-11-26

    Complement is increasingly being recognized as an important driver of human disease, including many hemolytic anemias. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells are susceptible to hemolysis because of a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD59 and CD55. Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develop a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that in most cases is attributable to mutations that lead to activation of the alternative pathway of complement. For optimal therapy, it is critical, but often difficult, to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; however, novel bioassays are being developed. In cold agglutinin disease (CAD), immunoglobulin M autoantibodies fix complement on the surface of red cells, resulting in extravascular hemolysis by the reticuloendothelial system. Drugs that inhibit complement activation are increasingly being used to treat these diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy for PNH, aHUS, and CAD. PMID:26582375

  15. Detection of rare blood group, Bombay (Oh) phenotype patients and management by acute normovolemic hemodilution

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Manisha; Navaid, Seema; Peethambarakshan, A.; Agrawal, Kalpana; Khan, Athar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Due to lack of correct blood grouping practices, the rare Bombay Oh phenotype may be missed, subjecting patients to the risk of severe hemolytic transfusion reaction. In the absence of blood donor registry, transfusion management of patients needing immediate surgery is a challenge. This study presents detection of rare Bombay Oh phenotype patients and their management by acute peri-operative acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH) in a hospital from central India. Materials and Methods: Blood grouping of patients and blood donors with a standard tube method was carried out and samples identified as rare Bombay phenotype were confirmed by saliva inhibition test. Surgical management of cases needing transfusion was done by ANH, as per the British Committee for Standards in Hematology guidelines. Results: The incidence of Bombay phenotype was 0.002% or 1 in 51,924 in the study. Amongst three cases (patients) identified as Bombay phenotype, one was Bombay Oh, Rh negative. Two cases were missed in the first instance and one case actually did not require transfusion. In the absence of a blood donor registry for Bombay phenotype, the cases needing transfusion were successfully managed with ANH in the operation theatre. Conclusion: A simple test like blood grouping should be done with serious intention with incorporation of both forward and reverse grouping, so that no patient receives wrong blood leading to fatal hemolysis due to transfusion. ANH is a cost-effective transfusion option for suitable patients. Appropriate clinical decision making, use of strategies to decrease peri-operative blood losses and cost-effective country based planning could be more widely applied to improve clinical transfusion practice. PMID:25722578

  16. Transfusions of blood products and cancer outcomes.

    PubMed

    Velásquez, J F; Cata, J P

    2015-10-01

    Approximately half of cancer patients scheduled for major surgery are anemic. Also, a significant number of patients will present to the operating room with low platelet counts and coagulopathic disorders. Unfortunately, administration of red blood cells, platelets concentrates and fresh-frozen plasma is associated with unwanted adverse effects including fever, hemolytic reactions and transfusion-related immunomodulation (TRIM). TRIM is a multifactorial immunologic phenomenon in the recipient mediated by donor leukocytes, microparticles such as ectosomes, and growth factors. As some of these molecules are secreted in a time-dependent manner, blood storage time may play an important in TRIM, although the evidence is limited. Perioperative administration of red blood cells and associated TRIM has also been associated with increased recurrence of certain solid tumors, such as colorectal, lung, and hepatobiliary tumors. In this continuing education article, we review the available evidence on how perioperative blood product transfusions can affect oncological outcomes, such as cancer recurrence. PMID:25896733

  17. Management of anaemia and blood transfusion in critical care - implementing national guidelines in ICU

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Sethina; Kendrick, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Anaemia in intensive care is common, with approximately 50% of patients receiving a red cell transfusion. Recognised complications from transfusion include ‘transfusion associated lung injury’, infection, and organ failure progression. Most cohort studies show a positive relationship between red cell transfusion and adverse outcomes. In 2012, the British Committee for Standards in Haematology issued guidelines for red cell (RBC) transfusion in critical care. They recommend a haemoglobin transfusion trigger of below 70 g/dL unless the patient is bleeding, has acute sepsis, neurological injury, or an acute coronary syndrome. RBC transfusions in a single intensive care unit (ICU) were prospectively assessed for compliance with national guidance. Each transfusion was categorised with a traffic light system: red for inappropriate, green for appropriate, and amber for those that were not clearly appropriate or inappropriate. The quality improvement project began with a clinical effectiveness audit of doctors' knowledge of critical care transfusion thresholds. Two quality improvement interventions were used: 1) a local blood transfusion guideline was produced and posters were placed in the ICU 2) this guidance was attached to the transfusion prescriptions. Data was collected after each intervention. A total of 30 random adult RBC transfusions were analysed between August 2013 and February 2014. Despite good results from the effectiveness audit an assessment of RBC transfusions demonstrated room for improvement. Prior to introduction of the guideline intervention, a total of two transfusions were green, one red and seven amber. Following both interventions there were seven green transfusions and three amber. No transfusions were classed as inappropriate. According to additional trust based ICU transfusion records, there was approximately a 50% reduction (41 to 18 RBC transfusions) in overall blood transfusions following the first intervention in October 2013. Simple interventions to raise awareness such as surveys, posters, and reminders can dramatically improve RBC prescribing in accordance to evidence based guidelines. Making prescribers aware of guidelines can dramatically reduce the total number of overall transfusions and increase transfusion appropriateness.

  18. Types of Blood Transfusions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... especially in the joints (knees, ankles, and elbows). Plasma Transfusions Plasma is the liquid part of your blood. It's ... or a severe infection, you may need a plasma transfusion. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: January 30, ...

  19. [Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Blasco Pelicano, Miquel; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Campistol Plana, Josep M

    2015-11-20

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a clinical entity characterized by thrombocytopenia, non-immune hemolytic anemia and renal impairment. Kidney pathology shows thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) with endothelial cell injury leading to thrombotic occlusion of arterioles and capillaries. Traditionally, HUS was classified in 2 forms: Typical HUS, most frequently occurring in children and caused by Shiga-toxin-producing bacteria, and atypical HUS (aHUS). aHUS is associated with mutations in complement genes in 50-60% of patients and has worse prognosis, with the majority of patients developing end stage renal disease. After kidney transplantation HUS may develop as a recurrence of aHUS or as de novo disease. Over the last years, many studies have demonstrated that complement dysregulation underlies the endothelial damage that triggers the development of TMA in most of these patients. Advances in our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of aHUS, together with the availability of novel therapeutic options, will enable better strategies for the early diagnosis and etiological treatment, which are changing the natural history of aHUS. This review summarizes the aHUS clinical entity and describes the role of complement dysregulation in the pathogenesis of aHUS. Finally, we review the differential diagnosis and the therapeutic options available to patients with aHUS. PMID:25433773

  20. [Post-transfusion pulmonary oedema: the French hemovigilance network classification method].

    PubMed

    Ozier, Y; Renaudier, P; Caldani, C; Aguilon, P; Canivet, N; Fabrigli, P; Mertes, P-M; Muller, J-Y; Rebibo, D; Tazerout, M; Trophilme, C; Willaert, B; Carlier, M

    2010-12-01

    Pulmonary oedema after transfusion of blood products may be hydrostatic (transfusion-associated circulatory overload [taco]) or exsudative (transfusion-related acute lung injury [trali]). Both conditions have been recognized as major hazards to transfusion recipients. Risk characterization is necessary to improve safety and to monitor trends in the national blood transfusion system. A collaborative multidisciplinary working group of the French National Hemovigilance Committee has proposed an analysis framework for case definitions and classification. The method relies on internationally used definitions and is adapted to the codification procedures used in the french transfusion incident reports electronic data management. PMID:21051260

  1. [A case of Rh-incompatible transfusion in critical hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Bessho, Yukiko; Sugai, Katsuhei; Fuse, Akihisa; Hitomi, Eiji; Sugai, Yoriko

    2012-03-01

    A 66-year-old man was injured in the traffic accident and showed the signs of hemorrhagic shock. His blood type was Rh negative O. As excessive bleeding was going on, we decided to transfuse 8 units of Rh-incompatible type O red blood cell (RBC) without performing cross match test according to the guideline for treatment of critical bleeding. Though we were aware of the risks of that treatment, no hemolytic reaction nor any other side effect was observed during and after the transfusion. Anti-Rh antibody was not developed either while Anti-Rh immunoglobulin was not given to him. His blood type has been proved to be Del type red blood cell. We conclude that transfusion of Rh-incompatible blood in patient with critical hemorrhage should be encouraged to save life. PMID:22571127

  2. Platelet Transfusion – the Art and Science of Compromise

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Joan; Harm, Sarah K.; Yazer, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Many modern therapies depend on platelet (PLT) transfusion support. PLTs have a 4- to 7-day shelf life and are frequently in short supply. In order to optimize the inventory PLTs are often transfused to adults without regard for ABO compatibility. Hemolytic reactions are infrequent despite the presence of ‘high titer’ anti-A and anti-B antibodies in some of the units. Despite the low risk for hemolysis, some centers provide only ABO identical PLTs to their recipients; this practice might have other beneficial outcomes that remain to be proven. Strategies to mitigate the risk of hemolysis and the clinical and laboratory outcomes following ABO-matched and mismatched transfusions will be discussed. Although the PLTs themselves do not carry the D antigen, a small number of RBCs are also transfused with every PLT dose. The quantity of RBCs varies by the type of PLT preparation, and even a small quantity of D+ RBCs can alloimmunize a susceptible D? host. Thus PLT units are labeled as D+/–, and most transfusion services try to prevent the transfusion of D+ PLTs to D– females of childbearing age. A similar policy for patients with hematological diseases is controversial, and the elements and mechanisms of anti-D alloimmunization will be discussed. PMID:23922541

  3. IgA anaphylactic transfusion reactions.

    PubMed

    Sandler, S G; Mallory, D; Malamut, D; Eckrich, R

    1995-01-01

    IgA anaphylactic transfusion reactions are rare events, estimated to occur in 1 in 20,000 to 47,000 transfusions. The signs and symptoms of these reactions do not differentiate them from other causes of anaphylaxis. The diagnosis of an anaphylactic transfusion reaction is established by showing an IgA-antibody in the patient's serum. Most laboratories that test for IgA antibodies rely on the PHA method, which uses red blood cells that are coated with serologically defined IgA multiple myeloma proteins. We tested sera referred from Red Cross regional blood centers and hospitals from patients with suspected IgA anaphylactic reactions and found an IgA antibody in 76.3% of IgA-deficient patients. However, only 17.5% of all samples referred contained an IgA antibody, indicating that most persons with suspected IgA anaphylactic reactions had experienced acute generalized reactions that were from causes other than anti-IgA transfusion. Using PHIA to measure serum concentrations of IgA and PHA to detect IgA antibodies, we found the frequency of IgA deficiency (< 0.05 mg/dL) and class-specific anti-IgA in random blood donors to be approximately 1 in 1,200. Titers of anti-IgA did not distinguish these seemingly healthy blood donors from patients with a history of an anaphylactic transfusion reaction. Because the frequency of 1 in 1,200 greatly exceeds the observed frequency of anaphylactic reactions in transfused persons, we conclude that using PHA for anti-IgA does not reliably predict risk for an anaphylactic transfusion reaction. Additional research is needed to define a more specific marker to identify those persons who are truly at risk for these serious, but rare, complications of blood transfusion. PMID:7719037

  4. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is defined by the triad of mechanical hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal impairment. Atypical HUS (aHUS) defines non Shiga-toxin-HUS and even if some authors include secondary aHUS due to Streptococcus pneumoniae or other causes, aHUS designates a primary disease due to a disorder in complement alternative pathway regulation. Atypical HUS represents 5 -10% of HUS in children, but the majority of HUS in adults. The incidence of complement-aHUS is not known precisely. However, more than 1000 aHUS patients investigated for complement abnormalities have been reported. Onset is from the neonatal period to the adult age. Most patients present with hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal failure and 20% have extra renal manifestations. Two to 10% die and one third progress to end-stage renal failure at first episode. Half of patients have relapses. Mutations in the genes encoding complement regulatory proteins factor H, membrane cofactor protein (MCP), factor I or thrombomodulin have been demonstrated in 20-30%, 5-15%, 4-10% and 3-5% of patients respectively, and mutations in the genes of C3 convertase proteins, C3 and factor B, in 2-10% and 1-4%. In addition, 6-10% of patients have anti-factor H antibodies. Diagnosis of aHUS relies on 1) No associated disease 2) No criteria for Shigatoxin-HUS (stool culture and PCR for Shiga-toxins; serology for anti-lipopolysaccharides antibodies) 3) No criteria for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (serum ADAMTS 13 activity > 10%). Investigation of the complement system is required (C3, C4, factor H and factor I plasma concentration, MCP expression on leukocytes and anti-factor H antibodies; genetic screening to identify risk factors). The disease is familial in approximately 20% of pedigrees, with an autosomal recessive or dominant mode of transmission. As penetrance of the disease is 50%, genetic counseling is difficult. Plasmatherapy has been first line treatment until presently, without unquestionable demonstration of efficiency. There is a high risk of post-transplant recurrence, except in MCP-HUS. Case reports and two phase II trials show an impressive efficacy of the complement C5 blocker eculizumab, suggesting it will be the next standard of care. Except for patients treated by intensive plasmatherapy or eculizumab, the worst prognosis is in factor H-HUS, as mortality can reach 20% and 50% of survivors do not recover renal function. Half of factor I-HUS progress to end-stage renal failure. Conversely, most patients with MCP-HUS have preserved renal function. Anti-factor H antibodies-HUS has favourable outcome if treated early. PMID:21902819

  5. [Transfusions in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Moulias, Sophie; Lesure, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Elderly people are Darticularlv Drone to anaemia and the need for transfusions. However, in response to the known adverse effects of red blood cell transfusions, particularly in the context of chronic anaemia, new recommendations have been issued. it is always necessary to consider this procedure on a case-by-case basis, analysing the risk-benefit ratio. PMID:25966521

  6. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... In some cases, a drug can cause the immune system to mistake your own red blood cells for foreign substances. The body responds by making ...

  7. The prevention of transfusion-associated circulatory overload.

    PubMed

    Alam, Asim; Lin, Yulia; Lima, Ana; Hansen, Mark; Callum, Jeannie L

    2013-04-01

    Transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) is an important and potentially injurious complication of transfusion that is underappreciated by clinicians. Risk factors for TACO include being at an extreme of age, having preexisting cardiac and/or (potentially) renal dysfunction, acute myocardial infarction, and individuals receiving plasma. Keys to preventing TACO, aside from identifying high-risk individuals, should be multifaceted. We advocate for the widespread use of pretransfusion checklists and implementation of nonemergent transfusion protocols. We suggest the regular use of pretransfusion diuretics in high-risk individuals. When a transfusion is required, we believe that "critical" nursing supervision and leadership are instrumental in the coordination of slow transfusion rates on computerized infusion pumps and ensuring patients are appropriately monitored. We believe that using these methodologies on a global scale will prevent many TACO events and minimize the severity when it does occur. PMID:23465703

  8. [Hemolytic anemias and vitamin B12 deficieny].

    PubMed

    Dietzfelbinger, Hermann; Hubmann, Max

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic anemias consist of corpuscular, immun-hemolytic and toxic hemolytic anemias. Within the group of corpuscular hemolytic anemias, except for the paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), all symptoms are caused by underlying heredetiary disorders within the red blood cell membran (hereditary spherocytosis), deficiencies of red cell enzymes (G6PDH- and pyrovatkinase deficiency) or disorders in the hemoglobin molecule (thalassaemia and sickle cell disease). Immune-hemolytic anemias are acquired hemolytic anemias and hemolysis is caused by auto- or allo-antibodies which are directed against red blood cell antigens. They are classified as warm, cold, mixed type or drug-induced hemolytic anemia. Therapy consists of glucocorticoids and other immunsuppressive drugs. Pernicious anemia is the most important vitamin B12 deficiency disorder. Diagnosis relies on cobalamin deficiency and antibodies to intrinsic factor. The management should focus on a possibly life-long replacement treatment with cobalamin. PMID:26306021

  9. Transfusion Complications in Thalassemia Patients: A Report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

    PubMed Central

    Vichinsky, Elliott; Neumayr, Lynne; Trimble, Sean; Giardina, Patricia J.; Cohen, Alan R.; Coates, Thomas; Boudreaux, Jeanne; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Kenney, Kristy; Grant, Althea; Thompson, Alexis A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Study Objectives Transfusions are the primary therapy for thalassemia but have significant cumulative risks. In 2004, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) established a national blood safety monitoring program for thalassemia. The purpose of this report is to summarize the patient population as well as previous non-immune and immune transfusion complications at the time of enrollment into the program. A focus on factors associated with allo- and auto-immunization in chronically transfused patients and a description of blood product preparation and transfusion practices at the participating institutions are included. Study Design and Methods The CDC Thalassemia Blood Safety Network is a consortium of thalassemia centers, longitudinally following patients to determine transfusion-related complications. Enrollment occurred from 2004 through 2012 and annual data collection is ongoing. Demographic data, transfusion history, and previous transfusion and non-transfusion complications were summarized for patients enrolled between 2004 and 2011. Logistic analyses of factors associated with allo- and auto-immunization were developed. Summary statistics of infections reported at the time of enrollment were also calculated. Results The race/ethnicity of the 407 thalassemia patients enrolled in the Network was predominantly Asian or Caucasian and 27% were immigrants. The average age was 22.3 years ± 13.2 and patients received an average total number of 149 ± 103.4 units of red blood cells. Iron-induced multi-organ dysfunction was common despite chelation. At study entry, 86 patients had previously been exposed to possible transfusion-associated pathogens, including Hepatitis-C (61), Hepatitis B (20), Hepatitis A (3), Parvovirus (9), HIV (4), malaria (1), staphylococcus aureus (1) and babesia (1). As 27% of the population was born outside of the United States (India, Pakistan, Thailand, China, Vietnam and Iran accounting for 57%), the source of infection cannot be unequivocally tied to transfusion. In total, 24% of transfused patients were reported to have possible transfusion-associated pathogens. Transfusion reactions occurred in 48% of patients, including allergic, febrile, and hemolytic; 19% of transfused patients were alloimmunized (defined as a having an antibody to a foreign red blood cell antigen). The most common antigens were E, Kell and C. One hemolytic reaction to an anti-Mia antibody was noted. Years of transfusion was the strongest predictor of alloimmunization. However, initiating transfusions in infancy may induce immune tolerance. Autoantibodies occurred in 6.5% and were predicted by previous alloimmunization (p < .0001). Local institutional transfusion policies, rather than patient characteristics, were the major determinants in the preparation of red-blood cells for transfusion. Conclusion Hemosiderosis and immunologic and non-immunologic transfusion reactions are major problems in thalassemia patients. Infections continue to be a problem in thalassemia and new pathogens have been noted. National transfusion guidelines for red cell phenotyping and preparation are needed in thalassemia to decrease transfusion-related morbidity. PMID:23889533

  10. A Case of Severe Chlorite Poisoning Successfully Treated With Early Administration of Methylene Blue, Renal Replacement Therapy, and Red Blood Cell Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gebhardtova, Andrea; Vavrinec, Peter; Vavrincova-Yaghi, Diana; Seelen, Mark; Dobisova, Anna; Flassikova, Zora; Cikova, Andrea; Henning, Robert H.; Yaghi, Aktham

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The case of a 55-year-old man who attempted suicide by ingesting <100?mL of 28% sodium chlorite solution is presented. On arrival in the intensive care unit, the patient appeared cyanotic with lowered consciousness and displayed anuria and chocolate brown serum. Initial laboratory tests revealed 40% of methemoglobin. The formation of methemoglobin was effectively treated with methylene blue (10% after 29 hours). To remove the toxin, and because of the anuric acute renal failure, the patient received renal replacement therapy. Despite these therapeutic measures, the patient developed hemolytic anemia and disseminated intravascular coagulation, which were treated with red blood cell transfusion and intermittent hemodialysis. These interventions led to the improvement of his condition and the patient eventually fully recovered. Patient gave written informed consent. This is the third known case of chlorite poisoning that has been reported. Based upon this case, we suggest the management of sodium chlorite poisoning to comprise the early administration of methylene blue, in addition to renal replacement therapy and transfusion of red blood cells. PMID:25144325

  11. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Toxins, Vessels, and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Victoria; Trachtman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by thrombotic microangiopathy of the glomerular microcirculation and other vascular beds. Its defining clinical phenotype is acute kidney injury (AKI), microangiopathic anemia, and thrombocytopenia. There are many etiologies of HUS including infection by Shiga toxin-producing bacterial strains, medications, viral infections, malignancy, and mutations of genes coding for proteins involved in the alternative pathway of complement. In the aggregate, although HUS is a rare disease, it is one of the most common causes of AKI in previously healthy children and accounts for a sizable number of pediatric and adult patients who progress to end stage kidney disease. There has been great progress over the past 20?years in understanding the pathophysiology of HUS and its related disorders. There has been intense focus on vascular injury in HUS as the major mechanism of disease and target for effective therapies for this acute illness. In all forms of HUS, there is evidence of both systemic and intra-glomerular inflammation and perturbations in the immune system. Renewed investigation into these aspects of HUS may prove helpful in developing new interventions that can attenuate glomerular and tubular injury and improve clinical outcomes in patients with HUS. PMID:25593915

  12. Blood Transfusion (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Children who need many transfusions may require a central line (a tube inserted into a larger vein in the chest) or a PICC line (a ... flow. The nurse will measure your child's blood pressure, body ... plastic tube is removed from the vein and a bandage is placed over the area. ...

  13. An In vivo Drug Screening Model Using Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficient Mice to Predict the Hemolytic Toxicity of 8-Aminoquinolines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Gao, Xiugong; Ishida, Hiroshi; Amnuaysirikul, Jack; Weina, Peter J.; Grogl, Max; O'Neil, Michael T.; Li, Qigui; Caridha, Diana; Ohrt, Colin; Hickman, Mark; Magill, Alan J.; Ray, Prabhati

    2013-01-01

    Anti-malarial 8-aminoquinolines drugs cause acute hemolytic anemia in individuals with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PDD). Efforts to develop non-hemolytic 8-aminoquinolines have been severely limited caused by the lack of a predictive in vivo animal model of hemolytic potential that would allow screening of candidate compounds. This report describes a G6PDD mouse model with a phenotype closely resembling the G6PDD phenotype found in the African A-type G6PDD human. These G6PDD mice, given different doses of primaquine, which used as a reference hemolytic drug, display a full array of hemolytic anemia parameters, consistently and reproducibly. The hemolytic and therapeutic indexes were generated for evaluation of hemotoxicity of drugs. This model demonstrated a complete hemolytic toxicity response to another known hemolytic antimalarial drug, pamaquine, but no response to non-hemolytic drugs, chloroquine and mefloquine. These results suggest that this model is suitable for evaluation of selected 8-AQ type candidate antimalarial drugs for their hemolytic potential. PMID:23530079

  14. Severe Hemolytic Jaundice in a Neonate with a Novel COL4A1 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Tomotaki, Seiichi; Mizumoto, Hiroshi; Hamabata, Takayuki; Kumakura, Akira; Shiota, Mitsutaka; Arai, Hiroshi; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Hata, Daisuke

    2014-05-23

    We report our experience with a preterm infant with severe hemolytic jaundice who required exchange transfusion just after birth. The patient was negative for alloimmune hemolysis as a result of maternal-fetal blood type incompatibility, and tests for inherited defects in erythrocyte metabolism, membrane function, and hemoglobin synthesis were normal. We also performed a bone marrow examination, but could not identify the cause of hemolysis. The patient had several other complications, including porencephaly, epilepsy, elevated serum levels of creatine kinase, and persistent microscopic hematuria. Later, we detected a genetic mutation in COL4A1, which was recently found to be associated with hemolytic anemia. We therefore believe that all of the patient's clinical features, including hemolytic anemia, were due to the mutation in COL4A1. Genetic testing for COL4A1 mutations is recommended in neonates who exhibit hemolytic disease of unknown etiology, especially when other complications compatible with COL4A1-related disorders are present. PMID:24861536

  15. Iron and transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Waldvogel-Abramovski, Sophie; Waeber, Gérard; Gassner, Christoph; Buser, Andreas; Frey, Beat M; Favrat, Bernard; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Blood bankers have focused their energy to secure blood transfusion, and only recently have studies been published on the effect of blood donation on iron metabolism. In many facilities, hemoglobin measurement is only performed just before or even during blood donation, but the determination of iron stores is largely ignored. The 2013 paradox of transfusion medicine is due to the fact that blood donation may be harmful and leads to iron deficiency with or without anemia, but for other individuals, it may be a healthy measure preventing type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this review is to discuss iron metabolism in the perspective of blood donation, notably regarding their possible genetic profiles that eventually will discriminate "good" iron absorbers from "bad" iron responders. PMID:24148756

  16. Transfusion associated circulatory overload.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Naveen; Agnihotri, Ajju

    2014-06-01

    Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) is an established, but grossly under diagnosed and underreported complication of blood transfusion. We present the case of a 46-year-old diabetic and hypertensive patient admitted to our hospital for recurrent episodes of urinary retention. Over initial 3 days of the admission, the patient received multiple units of packed red blood cells (RBC) and fresh frozen plasma, uneventfully. However, the patient developed signs and symptoms suggestive of TACO with only small amount of the 4(th) unit of RBC. The patient had to be shifted to the Intensive Care Unit for further management of this complication. Etiology of TACO is more complex than a mere circulatory overload and is still not completely understood. TACO leads to a prolonged hospital stay and morbidity in the patients developing this complication. TACO thus needs to be suspected in patients at risk for this complication. PMID:24987240

  17. Frequency and Pattern of Noninfectious Adverse Transfusion Reactions at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jooyoung; Choi, Seung Jun; Kim, Sinyoung; Alghamdi, Essam

    2016-01-01

    Background Although transfusion is a paramount life-saving therapy, there are multiple potential significant risks. Therefore, all adverse transfusion reaction (ATR) episodes require close monitoring. Using the computerized reporting system, we assessed the frequency and pattern of non-infectious ATRs. Methods We analyzed two-year transfusion data from electronic medical records retrospectively. From March 2013 to February 2015, 364,569 units of blood were transfused. Of them, 334,582 (91.8%) records were identified from electronic nursing records. For the confirmation of ATRs by blood bank physicians, patients' electronic medical records were further evaluated. Results According to the nursing records, the frequency of all possible transfusion-related events was 3.1%. After the blood bank physicians' review, the frequency was found to be 1.2%. The overall frequency of febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTRs) to red blood cells (RBCs), platelet (PLT) components, and fresh frozen plasmas (FFPs) were 0.9%, 0.3%, and 0.2%, respectively, and allergic reactions represented 0.3% (RBCs), 0.9% (PLTs), and 0.9% (FFPs), respectively. The pre-storage leukocyte reduction significantly decreased the frequency of FNHTRs during the transfusion of RBCs (P<0.01) or PLTs (P?0.01). Conclusions The frequency of FNHTRs, allergic reactions, and "no reactions" were 22.0%, 17.0%, and 60.7%, respectively. Leukocyte-reduction was associated with a lower rate of FNHTRs, but not with that of allergic reactions. The development of an effective electronic reporting system of ATRs is important in quantifying transfusion-related adverse events. This type of reporting system can also accurately identify the underlying problems and risk factors to further the quality of transfusion care for patients. PMID:26522757

  18. Delayed haemolytic transfusion reaction in adults with sickle cell disease: a 5-year experience.

    PubMed

    Vidler, Jennifer B; Gardner, Kate; Amenyah, Kenneth; Mijovic, Aleksandar; Thein, Swee L

    2015-06-01

    Delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions (DHTR) are potentially life-threatening complications in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Between 1 August 2008 and 31 December 2013, 220 of 637 adult patients in our centre had at least one red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in 2158 separate transfusion episodes. Twenty-three DHTR events occurred in 17 patients (13 female) including 15 HbSS, one HbSC and one HbS?(0) thalassaemia, equating to a DHTR rate of 7·7% of patients transfused. Mean interval from RBC transfusion to DHTR event was 10·1 ± 5·4 d, and typical presenting features were fever, pain and haemoglobinuria. Twenty of the 23 (87·0%) DHTR episodes occurred following transfusion in the acute setting. Notably, 11/23 (47·8%) of DHTRs were not diagnosed at the time of the event, most were misdiagnosed as a vaso-occlusive crisis. 16/23 DHTRs had 'relative reticulocytopenia', which was more common in older patients. Seven of 23 episodes resulted in alloantibody formation, and three caused autoantibody formation. DHTRs are a severe but uncommon complication of RBC transfusion in SCD and remain poorly recognized, possibly because they mimic an acute painful crisis. Most of the DHTRs are triggered by RBC transfusion in the acute setting when patients are in an inflammatory state. PMID:25753472

  19. The potential of blood group genotyping for transfusion medicine practice.

    PubMed

    Westhoff, C M

    2008-01-01

    Molecular diagnostics is the fastest growing area of clinical laboratory medicine. The ability to rapidly amplify genes of bacterial, viral, or human origin, and the development of DNA array platforms, are driving a technology revolution in the clinical laboratory. A DNA-based testing approach is particularly applicable to blood bank and transfusion medicine for rapid, cost-effective antigen typing. Experience with DNA-based methods during the past decade has shown that these assays are reproducible and highly correlated with the RBC phenotype. The recent availability of automated, high-throughput, DNA-array platforms now moves testing from the reference laboratory setting into hospital and donor testing centers. This approach has the potential to revolutionize the process of locating antigen-negative donor units by testing for all clinically significant blood group antigens in a single assay. When partnered with the same extended typing of the patient, electronic selection of units antigen-matched at multiple blood group loci is then possible. This paper discusses the potential of this approach to improve transfusion therapy by reducing or eliminating alloantibody production in specific patient populations. These include patients facing long-term transfusion therapy and at high risk for sensitization; patients with warm autoantibodies when compatibility cannot be demonstrated by standard methods; and women for whom the production of atypical antibodies carries a risk for hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, or at the very least, monitoring for an at-risk pregnancy. PMID:19856724

  20. [Hemolytic anemia under erlotinib treatment].

    PubMed

    Sakhri, L; Mennecier, B; Quoix, A

    2013-12-01

    Erlotinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor widely prescribed of which the most common sides effects are grade I or II rash and diarrhea. We report two cases of hemolytic anemia (HA) induced by erlotinib. Our two patients were treated with erlotinib after a prior line of systemic platinum-doublet therapy for metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. Both patients presented, shortly after starting treatment with erlotinib, an HA which was fatal for one of them. To our knowledge, this major side effect of erlotinib has not been reported in the literature. We will try through this article to make a literature review of the most important side effects of erlotinib and we will also focus on the HA induced by other molecules used in oncology. PMID:24183296

  1. Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Rosse, Wendell F; Hillmen, Peter; Schreiber, Alan D

    2004-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia due to immune function is one of the major causes of acquired hemolytic anemia. In recent years, as more is known about the immune system, these entities have become better understood and their treatment improved. In this section, we will discuss three areas in which this progress has been apparent. In Section I, Dr. Peter Hillmen outlines the recent findings in the pathogenesis of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), relating the biochemical defect (the lack of glycosylphosphatidylinositol [GPI]-linked proteins on the cell surface) to the clinical manifestations, particularly hemolysis (and its effects) and thrombosis. He discusses the pathogenesis of the disorder in the face of marrow dysfunction insofar as it is known. His major emphasis is on innovative therapies that are designed to decrease the effectiveness of complement activation, since the lack of cellular modulation of this system is the primary cause of the pathology of the disease. He recounts his considerable experience with a humanized monoclonal antibody against C5, which has a remarkable effect in controlling the manifestations of the disease. Other means of controlling the action of complement include replacing the missing modulatory proteins on the cell surface; these studies are not as developed as the former agent. In Section II, Dr. Alan Schreiber describes the biochemistry, genetics, and function of the Fc gamma receptors and their role in the pathobiology of autoimmune hemolytic anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura due to IgG antibodies. He outlines the complex varieties of these molecules, showing how they vary in genetic origin and in function. These variations can be related to three-dimensional topography, which is known in some detail. Liganding IgG results in the transduction of a signal through the tyrosine-based activation motif and Syk signaling. The role of these receptors in the pathogenesis of hematological diseases due to IgG antibodies is outlined and the potential of therapy of these diseases by regulation of these receptors is discussed. In Section III, Dr. Wendell Rosse discusses the forms of autoimmune hemolytic anemia characterized by antibodies that react preferentially in the cold-cold agglutinin disease and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH). The former is due to IgM antibodies with a common but particular structure that reacts primarily with carbohydrate or carbohydrate-containing antigens, an interaction that is diminished at body temperature. PCH is a less common but probably underdiagnosed illness due to an IgG antibody reacting with a carbohydrate antigen; improved techniques for the diagnosis of PCH are described. Therapy for the two disorders differs somewhat because of the differences in isotype of the antibody. Since the hemolysis in both is primarily due to complement activation, the potential role of its control, as by the monoclonal antibody described by Dr. Hillmen, is discussed. PMID:15561676

  2. Eculizumab safely reverses neurologic impairment and eliminates need for dialysis in severe atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ohanian, Maro; Cable, Christian; Halka, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    This case report describes how eculizumab reversed neurologic impairment and improved renal damage in severe atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. A 50-year-old female, after presenting with diarrhea and abdominal pain, developed pancolitis, acute renal failure, and thrombocytopenia. The patient underwent total abdominal colectomy. Pathology confirmed ischemic colitis with scattered mesenteric microthrombi. Due to mental and respiratory decline, she remained intubated. Continuous venovenous hemodialysis was initiated. Renal failure, neurologic changes, hemolysis, thrombotic microangiopathy, and low complement levels all suggested atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Eculizumab 900 mg was administered intravenously on hospital day 6 and continued weekly for four doses followed by maintenance therapy. She recovered neurologically and renally after the third dose, and hematologically by the sixth dose. Her recovery has been sustained on long-term eculizumab treatment. In severe atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, eculizumab safely reverses neurologic impairment and eliminates the need for dialysis. The optimal duration of treatment with eculizumab remains to be determined. PMID:22287852

  3. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  4. Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia in Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mihir B; Nanjapp, Veena; Devaraj, H S; Sindhu, K S

    2013-07-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia is a rare presentation of Hodgkin's lymphoma though its association with Non- Hodgkin's lymphoma is well known. It is usually detected at the time of diagnosis when it accompanies Hodgkin's and rarely precedes it. It is a warm immune hemolytic anemia which is responsive to steroids and rituximab. We hereby report a case of advanced Hodgkin's disease who presented as AIHA. PMID:24772757

  5. [Ethics and blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Tissot, J-D; Garraud, O; Danic, B; Cabaud, J-J; Lefrère, J-J

    2013-09-01

    Blood donation is an act of solidarity. Most often, this act is done on a volunteer basis and, depending on countries and circumstances, is not remunerated. The increase in need, the always-greater number of deferral criteria, the safety issues and the changes in the structures of our societies are among the many subjects for ethical debates. Taking these into account, the actors of the transfusion must analyze certain parameters: the value of a donation, the meaning of volunteering, the appropriateness of remunerating the act of giving a part of one's self, no longer as a donation or an expression of altruism and solidarity, but as a commercial act regimented by economic laws. PMID:23916572

  6. Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemias

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon disorder caused by autoantibodies directed against self red blood cells. It can be idiopathic or secondary, and classified as warm, cold (cold hemagglutinin disease (CAD) and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) or mixed, according to the thermal range of the autoantibody. AIHA may develop gradually, or have a fulminant onset with life-threatening anemia. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. The first-line therapy for warm AIHA are corticosteroids, which are effective in 70–85% of patients and should be slowly tapered over a time period of 6–12 months. For refractory/relapsed cases, the current sequence of second-line therapy is splenectomy (effective approx. in 2 out of 3 cases but with a presumed cure rate of up to 20%), rituximab (effective in approx. 80–90% of cases), and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins, danazol, plasma-exchange, and alemtuzumab and high-dose cyclophosphamide as last resort option. As the experience with rituximab evolves, it is likely that this drug will be located at an earlier point in therapy of warm AIHA, before more toxic immunosuppressants, and in place of splenectomy in some cases. In CAD, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment. PMID:25271314

  7. Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemias.

    PubMed

    Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma

    2014-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon disorder caused by autoantibodies directed against self red blood cells. It can be idiopathic or secondary, and classified as warm, cold (cold hemagglutinin disease (CAD) and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) or mixed, according to the thermal range of the autoantibody. AIHA may develop gradually, or have a fulminant onset with life-threatening anemia. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. The first-line therapy for warm AIHA are corticosteroids, which are effective in 70-85% of patients and should be slowly tapered over a time period of 6-12 months. For refractory/relapsed cases, the current sequence of second-line therapy is splenectomy (effective approx. in 2 out of 3 cases but with a presumed cure rate of up to 20%), rituximab (effective in approx. 80-90% of cases), and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins, danazol, plasma-exchange, and alemtuzumab and high-dose cyclophosphamide as last resort option. As the experience with rituximab evolves, it is likely that this drug will be located at an earlier point in therapy of warm AIHA, before more toxic immunosuppressants, and in place of splenectomy in some cases. In CAD, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment. PMID:25271314

  8. Escherichia coli O 157:H7-associated hemolytic-uremic syndrome after ingestion of contaminated hamburgers.

    PubMed

    Brandt, J R; Fouser, L S; Watkins, S L; Zelikovic, I; Tarr, P I; Nazar-Stewart, V; Avner, E D

    1994-10-01

    We conducted a retrospective analysis of 37 children with Escherichia coli O157:H7-associated hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The infection was traced to contaminated hamburgers at a fast-food restaurant chain. Within 5 days of the first confirmed case, the Washington State Department of Health identified the source and interrupted transmission of infection. Ninety-five percent of the children initially had severe hemorrhagic colitis. Nineteen patients (51%) had significant extrarenal abnormalities, including pancreatitis, colonic necrosis, glucose intolerance, coma, stroke, seizures, myocardial dysfunction, pericardial effusions, adult respiratory disease syndrome, and pleural effusions. Three deaths occurred, each in children with severe multisystem disease. At follow-up two children have significant impairment of renal function (glomerular filtration rate < 80 ml/min/per 1.73 Hm2); both of these children have a normal serum creatinine concentration. Hemolytic-uremic syndrome is the most common cause of acute renal failure in children, and this experience emphasizes the systemic nature of this disease. Clinicians should anticipate that multisystem involvement may occur in these patients, necessitating acute intervention or chronic follow-up. This outbreak of Hemolytic-uremic syndrome also highlights the microbiologic hazards of inadequately prepared food and emphasizes the importance of public health intervention in controlling Hemolytic-uremic syndrome. PMID:7931869

  9. A prospective, active haemovigilance study with combined cohort analysis of 19 175 transfusions of platelet components prepared with amotosalen–UVA photochemical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, F; Osselaer, J; Pierelli, L; Lozano, M; Cid, J; Tardivel, R; Garraud, O; Hervig, T; Domanovic, D; Cukjati, M; Gudmundson, S; Hjalmarsdottir, I B; Castrillo, A; Gonzalez, R; Brihante, D; Santos, M; Schlenke, P; Elliott, A; Lin, J-S; Tappe, D; Stassinopoulos, A; Green, J; Corash, L

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives A photochemical treatment process (PCT) utilizing amotosalen and UVA light (INTERCEPT™ Blood System) has been developed for inactivation of viruses, bacteria, parasites and leucocytes that can contaminate blood components intended for transfusion. The objective of this study was to further characterize the safety profile of INTERCEPT-treated platelet components (PCT-PLT) administered across a broad patient population. Materials and Methods This open-label, observational haemovigilance programme of PCT-PLT transfusions was conducted in 21 centres in 11 countries. All transfusions were monitored for adverse events within 24 h post-transfusion and for serious adverse events (SAEs) up to 7 days post-transfusion. All adverse events were assessed for severity (Grade 0–4), and causal relationship to PCT-PLT transfusion. Results Over the course of 7 years in the study centres, 4067 patients received 19 175 PCT-PLT transfusions. Adverse events were infrequent, and most were of Grade 1 severity. On a per-transfusion basis, 123 (0·6%) were classified an acute transfusion reaction (ATR) defined as an adverse event related to the transfusion. Among these ATRs, the most common were chills (77, 0·4%) and urticaria (41, 0·2%). Fourteen SAEs were reported, of which 2 were attributed to platelet transfusion (<0·1%). No case of transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease, transfusion-transmitted infection or death was attributed to the transfusion of PCT-PLT. Conclusion This longitudinal haemovigilance safety programme to monitor PCT-PLT transfusions demonstrated a low rate of ATRs, and a safety profile consistent with that previously reported for conventional platelet components. PMID:25981525

  10. Successful treatment of severe immune hemolytic anemia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation with bortezomib: report of a case and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Hosoba, Sakura; Jaye, David L; Cohen, Cynthia; Roback, John D; Waller, Edmund K

    2015-01-01

    Background Immune hemolytic anemia is a well-known complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Posttransplant hemolytic anemia results in increased red blood cell transfusions and medical sequelae including iron overload. Case Report We present a case report of immune hemolytic anemia that occurred after allogeneic HSCT from an ABO major–mismatched, HLA-matched unrelated donor. The patient had high anti-donor A type antibodies that were unresponsive to treatment with steroids and rituximab, resulting in persistent transfusion dependence. A detailed time course of anti-A titers, plasma cell content of the marrow, and B-cell content of the blood is presented. Treatment with bortezomib, a protease inhibitor, eliminated residual host-type plasma cells secreting anti-A and restored normal donor-derived erythropoiesis. Conclusion This report, and a review of literature for treatment of immune hemolytic anemia after allogeneic HSCT, supports the utility of bortezomib as plasma cell–targeted therapy in this setting. PMID:25156334

  11. Transfusion medicine as of 2014

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Transfusion of blood components is one of the most common medical treatments, and in spite of the time that has evolved since we started to transfuse blood routinely in the 1930s, there are issues associated with its use that we are still trying to improve. Issues such as when to transfuse and adverse effects associated with the transfusion are fields where new evidence is being generated that ideally should help us to indicate when and what to transfuse to the patients. The recognition that the evidence generated in randomized control trials was not widely applied to guide the indication of the transfusion of blood components has provoked the development of initiatives that try to reduce its unnecessary usage. Those initiatives, grouped under the name of patient blood management, have represented a significant paradigm change, and a growing number of activities in this field are performed in health-care facilities around the world. This article tries to summarize the latest publications in those fields. PMID:25580259

  12. Group A ?-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Culqui, Dante R; Manzanares-Laya, Sandra; Van Der Sluis, Sarah Lafuente; Fanlo, Albert Anton; Comas, Rosa Bartolomé; Rossi, Marcello; Caylá, Joán A

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to describe an outbreak of group A ?-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in health care professionals. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of 17 clients who dined at the same table in a restaurant in Barcelona in July 2012. The frequency, timing and severity of symptoms were analyzed, as were demographic variables and others concerning the food ingested. The attack rate was 58.8%. Six of the 10 clients were positive for group A ?-hemolytic streptococcal. Six of the 13 individuals who handled the food involved in the dinner had symptoms. No association was identified with the food consumed. There is epidemiological evidence of foodborne group A ?-hemolytic streptococcal transmission, but respiratory transmission could not be ruled out. PMID:24897054

  13. Group A ?-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis outbreak.

    PubMed

    Culqui, Dante R; Manzanares-Laya, Sandra; Van Der Sluis, Sarah Lafuente; Fanlo, Albert Anton; Comas, Rosa Bartolomé; Rossi, Marcello; Caylá, Joán A

    2014-04-01

    The aim was to describe an outbreak of group A ?-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in health care professionals. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of 17 clients who dined at the same table in a restaurant in Barcelona in July 2012. The frequency, timing and severity of symptoms were analyzed, as were demographic variables and others concerning the food ingested. The attack rate was 58.8%. Six of the 10 clients were positive for group A ?-hemolytic streptococcal. Six of the 13 individuals who handled the food involved in the dinner had symptoms. No association was identified with the food consumed. There is epidemiological evidence of foodborne group A ?-hemolytic streptococcal transmission, but respiratory transmission could not be ruled out. PMID:24897054

  14. Mount St. Helens' volcanic ash: hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Vallyathan, V; Mentnech, M S; Stettler, L E; Dollberg, D D; Green, F H

    1983-04-01

    Volcanic ash samples from four Mount St. Helens' volcanic eruptions were subjected to mineralogical, analytical, and hemolytic studies in order to evaluate their potential for cytotoxicity and fibrogenicity. Plagioclase minerals constituted the major component of the ash with free crystalline silica concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 7.2%. The in vitro hemolytic activity of the volcanic ash was compared to similar concentrations of cytotoxic and inert minerals. The ash was markedly hemolytic, exhibiting an activity similar to chrysotile asbestos, a known fibrogenic agent. The hemolysis of the different ash samples varied with particle size but not with crystalline silica concentration. The results of these studies taken in conjunction with the results of our animal studies indicate a fibrogenic potential of volcanic ash in heavily exposed humans. PMID:6832120

  15. Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) with recovery after a long-lasting anuria: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Georgaki-Angelaki, H; Stergiou, N; Kapogiannis, A; Orfanou, I; Grapsa, B; Roma, E

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a seven-year-old girl who suffered from atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS) complicated by septicaemia, central nervous system involvement, and cholangiitis. She remained anuric requiring treatment with peritoneal dialysis (PD) for a five-month period. In addition to conventional therapeutic measures including fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and blood cells transfusions she also underwent to plasma exchange (PE) treatment. Following a stormy hospitalization period of 17 weeks, the patient finally regained renal function and three years later she remains well on antihypertensive treatment and free of dialysis. PMID:21607045

  16. Massive Bleeding and Massive Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Meißner, Andreas; Schlenke, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Massive bleeding in trauma patients is a serious challenge for all clinicians, and an interdisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approach is warranted within a limited time frame. Massive transfusion usually is defined as the transfusion of more than 10 units of packed red blood cells (RBCs) within 24 h or a corresponding blood loss of more than 1- to 1.5-fold of the body's entire blood volume. Especially male trauma patients experience this life-threatening condition within their productive years of life. An important parameter for clinical outcome is to succeed in stopping the bleeding preferentially within the first 12 h of hospital admission. Additional coagulopathy in the initial phase is induced by trauma itself and aggravated by consumption and dilution of clotting factors. Although different aspects have to be taken into consideration when viewing at bleedings induced by trauma compared to those caused by major surgery, the basic strategy is similar. Here, we will focus on trauma-induced massive hemorrhage. Currently there are no definite, worldwide accepted algorithms for blood transfusion and strategies for optimal coagulation management. There is increasing evidence that a higher ratio of plasma and RBCs (e.g. 1:1) endorsed by platelet transfusion might result in a superior survival of patients at risk for trauma-induced coagulopathy. Several strategies have been evolved in the military environment, although not all strategies should be transferred unproven to civilian practice, e.g. the transfusion of whole blood. Several agents have been proposed to support the restoration of coagulation. Some have been used for years without any doubt on their benefit-to-risk profile, whereas great enthusiasm of other products has been discouraged by inefficacy in terms of blood transfusion requirements and mortality or significant severe side effects. This review surveys current literature on fluid resuscitation, blood transfusion, and hemostatic agents currently used during massive hemorrhage in order to optimize patients’ blood and coagulation management in emergency medical aid. PMID:22670125

  17. How we treat delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Kate; Hoppe, Carolyn; Mijovic, Aleksandar; Thein, Swee L

    2015-09-01

    Transfusion therapy is effective in the prevention and treatment of many complications of sickle cell disease (SCD). However, its benefits must be balanced against its risks, including delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions (DHTR). Not only is the relative rate of alloimmunization higher in patients with SCD than in other patient populations, but attendant risks associated with DHTR are even greater in SCD. Clinicians' awareness of DHTR events is poor because symptoms of DHTR mimic acute vaso-occlusive pain and immunohaematology findings are often negative. Transfusions delivered in the acute rather than elective setting appear to confer a higher risk of DHTR. Management of DHTR in SCD depends on the clinical severity, ranging from supportive care to immunosuppression, and optimization of erythropoiesis. DHTR must be considered in any recently transfused patient presenting with acute sickle cell pain. Meticulous documentation of transfusion and immunohaematology history is key. We anticipate an increase in DHTR events in SCD patients with the increasing use of red blood cell transfusion therapy. PMID:25967919

  18. Non-transfusion-dependent thalassemias

    PubMed Central

    Musallam, Khaled M.; Rivella, Stefano; Vichinsky, Elliott; Rachmilewitz, Eliezer A.

    2013-01-01

    Non-transfusion-dependent thalassemias include a variety of phenotypes that, unlike patients with beta (?)-thalassemia major, do not require regular transfusion therapy for survival. The most commonly investigated forms are ?-thalassemia intermedia, hemoglobin E/?-thalassemia, and ?-thalassemia intermedia (hemoglobin H disease). However, transfusion-independence in such patients is not without side effects. Ineffective erythropoiesis and peripheral hemolysis, the hallmarks of disease process, lead to a variety of subsequent pathophysiologies including iron overload and hypercoagulability that ultimately lead to a number of serious clinical morbidities. Thus, prompt and accurate diagnosis of non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia is essential to ensure early intervention. Although several management options are currently available, the need to develop more novel therapeutics is justified by recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of disease. Such efforts require wide international collaboration, especially since non-transfusion-dependent thalassemias are no longer bound to low- and middle-income countries but have spread to large multiethnic cities in Europe and the Americas due to continued migration. PMID:23729725

  19. Isolation of a hemolytic Actinobacillus from waterfowl.

    PubMed

    Hacking, M A; Sileo, L

    1977-01-01

    A previously undescribed species of hemolytic Actinobacillus was isolated from six waterfowl, three with periocular serous exudation and two with airsacculitis and bronchopneumonia. Cultural and biochemical characteristics were compared with those of Actinobacillus and Pasteurella spp, using a numerical technique. PMID:839627

  20. Incidence and pattern of 12 years of reported transfusion adverse events in Zimbabwe: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Khoza, Star; Mvere, David A.; Chitiyo, McLeod E.; Postma, Maarten J.; van Hulst, Marinus

    2014-01-01

    Background Haemovigilance hinges on a systematically structured reporting system, which unfortunately does not always exist in resource-limited settings. We determined the incidence and pattern of transfusion-related adverse events reported to the National Blood Service Zimbabwe. Materials and methods A retrospective review of the transfusion-event records of the National Blood Service Zimbabwe was conducted covering the period from 1 January 1999 to 31 December 2011. All transfusion-related event reports received during the period were analysed. Results A total of 308 transfusion adverse events (0.046%) were reported for 670,625 blood components distributed. The majority (61.6%) of the patients who experienced an adverse event were female. The median age was 36 years (range, 1–89 years). The majority (68.8%) of the adverse events were acute transfusion reactions consisting of febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions (58.5%), minor allergies (31.6%), haemolytic reactions (5.2%), severe allergic reactions (2.4%), anaphylaxis (1.4%) and hypotension (0.9%). Two-thirds (66.6%) of the adverse events occurred following administration of whole blood, although only 10.6% of the blood was distributed as whole blood. Packed cells, which accounted for 75% of blood components distributed, were associated with 20.1% of the events. Discussion The incidence of suspected transfusion adverse events was generally lower than the incidences reported globally in countries with well-established haemovigilance systems. The administration of whole blood was disproportionately associated with transfusion adverse events. The pattern of the transfusion adverse events reported here highlights the probable differences in practice between different settings. Under-reporting of transfusion events is rife in passive reporting systems. PMID:24887217

  1. [Ethics and transfusion--seminar report].

    PubMed

    Hervé, C; Tissot, J-D; Bouësseau, M-C; Pottier, R; Monsellier, M; Garraud, O; Hermine, O; Sannié, T; Cazenave, J-P; Cabaud, J-J; Lefrère, J-J

    2014-05-01

    This paper brings together the abstracts and proceedings of a seminar held on the topic of "ethics and transfusion", October 15, 2013 at the National Institute of Blood Transfusion, Paris. PMID:24814818

  2. Developing nursing practice in platelet transfusions.

    PubMed

    McSporran, Wendy; Watson, Denise

    2014-11-18

    The number of platelet transfusions has risen steadily over the past five years. This article addresses some of the reasons for this increase and examines current transfusion practice in relation to findings of national audits of platelet use and current research. It explores the extended role of the nurse in platelet transfusions, including nurse authorisation, and presents an overview of education material available to inform practice and to ensure judicious use of platelet transfusions with maximum benefit for the patient. PMID:25388736

  3. Transfusion of red blood cells after prolonged storage produces harmful effects that are mediated by iron and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Sokol, Set A.; Wojczyk, Boguslaw S.; Francis, Richard O.; Ansaldi, Daniel; Francis, Kevin P.; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Whittier, Susan; Sheth, Sujit; Hendrickson, Jeanne E.; Zimring, James C.; Brittenham, Gary M.; Spitalnik, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    Although red blood cell (RBC) transfusions can be lifesaving, they are not without risk. In critically ill patients, RBC transfusions are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, which may increase with prolonged RBC storage before transfusion. The mechanisms responsible remain unknown. We hypothesized that acute clearance of a subset of damaged, stored RBCs delivers large amounts of iron to the monocyte/macrophage system, inducing inflammation. To test this in a well-controlled setting, we used a murine RBC storage and transfusion model to show that the transfusion of stored RBCs, or washed stored RBCs, increases plasma nontransferrin bound iron (NTBI), produces acute tissue iron deposition, and initiates inflammation. In contrast, the transfusion of fresh RBCs, or the infusion of stored RBC-derived supernatant, ghosts, or stroma-free lysate, does not produce these effects. Furthermore, the insult induced by transfusion of stored RBC synergizes with subclinical endotoxinemia producing clinically overt signs and symptoms. The increased plasma NTBI also enhances bacterial growth in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that, in a mouse model, the cellular component of leukoreduced, stored RBC units contributes to the harmful effects of RBC transfusion that occur after prolonged storage. Nonetheless, these findings must be confirmed by prospective human studies. PMID:20299509

  4. [Transfusion-associated circulatory overload].

    PubMed

    Ozier, Y; Mouquet, F; Rieux, C; Mertes, P-M; Muller, J-Y; Caldani, C; Boudjedir, K; Carlier, M

    2012-11-01

    A working group of the French National Hemovigilance Committee has been in charge of heightening awareness of Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) among physicians and nurses. This multidisciplinary group has produced the present document that focuses on epidemiological data provided by the French haemovigilance network, physiopathology, diagnosis, treatment and specific actions that could prevent or minimize the risk of TACO. PMID:23039960

  5. A Case of Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn due to Dia Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Jethava, Ashif; Olivares, Esperanza; Shariatmadar, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    Anti-Dia is a clinically significant red cell antibody known to cause hemolytic disease of the newborn. Here, we report on a case of mild hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by Dia antibody. The mother had three prior pregnancies with no history of blood transfusion. She delivered a preterm 35-week-old female newborn by cesarean section. The neonate developed anemia and mild icterus on postnatal day five with hemoglobin of 9500?mg/dL and total bilirubin of 10?mg/dL. The direct antiglobulin test on the neonate's red blood cells was positive. The maternal serum and an eluate from the infant RBCs were negative in routine antibody detection tests but were positive using commercially prepared Di(a+) red cells. The neonate was discharged home in stable condition following treatment with erythropoietin and phototherapy. When a newborn has a positive DAT in the absence of major blood group incompatibility or commonly detected RBC antibodies, an antibody to a low frequency antigen such as Dia must be considered. Further immunohematology tests are required to determine presence of the antibody and the clinician must be alerted to closely monitor the infant for signs of anemia and hemolysis. PMID:26682081

  6. The Team Focus on Improving Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, D.; Brady, P.; Foot, C.; Levy, R.; Thomson, A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: The current literature pertaining to associated morbidity and mortality with homologous blood transfusion in the surgical patient seems to be pointing only in one direction, which is we must start reducing our patients exposure to homologous blood and products. There appears to be ever mounting evidence of increases in infraction, stroke, transfusion related lung injury, infection, and death that authors are associating with transfusion. A number of authors are reporting success in reducing their patients’ requirements for homologous transfusion simply by working as a team or what is known as a multidisciplinary approach and following set transfusion protocols and algorithms. At our institution we have taken note of these reports and have taken the first steps in the formation of a Cardiac Surgical Transfusion Management Group where all specialties involved in the decision making process of transfusion in the cardiac surgical patient can have representation and be directly involved in the establishment of protocols, transfusion algorithms, and a transfusion audit system. The main goal of this group is to implement a change in transfusion practice and to assess the impact the change has had on transfusion requirements and make appropriate recommendations to the treating specialists. PMID:21449243

  7. [A Case of Mitral Valvular Re-repair in a Patient with Hemolytic Anemia after Mitral Valvular Repair].

    PubMed

    Tomino, Mikiko; Miyata, Kazuto; Takeshita, Yuji; Kaneko, Koki; Kanazawa, Hiroko; Uchino, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    A 54-year-old woman was admitted for mitral valvular repair. After folding plasty to A3, a 30 mm Cosgrove-Edwards ring was placed. There was no mitral regurgitation jet observed by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) during the operation. However, high blood pressure was monitored and treated in the intensive care unit, hemolytic anemia developed, and the serum lactate dehydrogenase level was elevated. Two weeks after the operation, serum lactate dehydrogenase was again elevated. TEE showed mild mitral regurgitation and the regurgitation jet colliding with the annuloplasty ring. Multiple transfusions of red blood cells were required. Repeat surgery was therefore undertaken. Lam and associates previously studying patients on hemolysis after mitral valvular repair noted high grade mitral regurgitation jets fragmented or accelerated. In the present case, mitral regurgitation was mild, but the high velocity and manner of regurgitation (collision with the annuloplasty ring) could cause hemolytic anemia. In the present case, high blood pressure might have caused chordae rupture. Furthermore, a flexible ring, such as the Cosgrove-Edwards ring, is likely to cause hemolytic anemia. As contributing factors to hemolysis after mitral valvular repair, perioperative blood pressure management and type of ring are significant. PMID:26422945

  8. Red blood cell alloimmunization is influenced by recipient inflammatory state at time of transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Ross M; Booth, Garrett S; Miles, Megan; Du, Liping; Koyama, Tatsuki; Meier, Emily Riehm; Luban, Naomi L C

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) patients are at increased risk of red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization. Recipient inflammatory state at time of transfusion has been shown to regulate alloimmunization in murine models, but evidence is lacking in SCD patients. We retrospectively studied a cohort of alloimmunized SCD patients to determine the influence of pro-inflammatory SCD-related complications at time of transfusion on alloimmunization. For each transfusion, the presence of pro-inflammatory state, degree of RBC antigen matching, unit age, storage solution and alloantibody detection date were ascertained. Transfusion-associated pro-inflammatory events were compared between transfusions resulting and not resulting in new alloantibodies. Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression were performed. Fifty-two patients received 3166 pre-storage leuco-reduced transfusions of which 128 resulted in alloantibodies. Transfusions during inflammatory events were associated with increased alloantibody risk on univariate and multivariate analysis; acute chest syndrome and vaso-occlusive crisis showed strongest associations with alloimmunization. Increased antigen matching demonstrated a protective effect on alloimmunization (univariate and multivariate analysis). Although an association was seen between citrate-phosphate-dextrose (adenine) stored units and alloimmunization on univariate analysis, no effect was found on multivariate analysis. Identifying recipient pro-inflammatory states at time of transfusion that promote alloimmunization can impact RBC unit selection decisions for SCD patients at risk for alloimmunization. PMID:25256676

  9. Hemolytik: a database of experimentally determined hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Ankur; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Singh, Sandeep; Joshi, Anshika; Anand, Priya; Tuknait, Abhishek; Mathur, Deepika; Varshney, Grish C.; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-01-01

    Hemolytik (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hemolytik/) is a manually curated database of experimentally determined hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides. Data were compiled from a large number of published research articles and various databases like Antimicrobial Peptide Database, Collection of Anti-microbial Peptides, Dragon Antimicrobial Peptide Database and Swiss-Prot. The current release of Hemolytik database contains ?3000 entries that include ?2000 unique peptides whose hemolytic activities were evaluated on erythrocytes isolated from as many as 17 different sources. Each entry in Hemolytik provides comprehensive information about a peptide, like its name, sequence, origin, reported function, property such as chirality, types (linear and cyclic), end modifications as well as details pertaining to its hemolytic activity. In addition, tertiary structure of each peptide has been predicted, and secondary structure states have been assigned. To facilitate the scientific community, a user-friendly interface has been developed with various tools for data searching and analysis. We hope, Hemolytik will be useful for researchers working in the field of designing therapeutic peptides. PMID:24174543

  10. [Blood transfusions: risks beyond communicable diseases].

    PubMed

    Horn, C; Büser, N; von Freyburg, A; Scherer, M

    2013-04-01

    Blood transfusions are daily practice in orthopaedic surgery and traumatology. Due to new surgical techniques and a better understanding of anaemia-associated pathophysiology, the indications for transfusion are becoming more and more strict. This is even more important as in the past few years increasing evidence shows that blood transfusions have a significant impact on hospital mortality and the patient's outcome. This article is intended to provide an overview of the literature in recent years dealing with this problem. PMID:23619654

  11. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Packman, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs.

  12. Atypical Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Rafiq, Arsalan; Tariq, Hassan; Abbas, Naeem; Shenoy, Roopalekha

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 59 Final Diagnosis: Atyipcal hemolytic uremic syndrome Symptoms: Delirium • headache Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Hematology Objective: Rare disease Background: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disease characterized by hemolysis, thrombocytopenia, and renal dysfunction. It is a disease related to genetic mutations in the alternative complement pathway and has a distinct pathophysiology but is difficult to differentiate from other thrombotic microangiopathies. Case Report: We present a case of a 59-year-old female patient who presented with accelerated hypertension, acute renal failure, hemolysis, and encephalopathy. She was managed with antihypertensive medication, but her encephalopathy did not improve. Evaluation resulted in our impression of the disease being atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The patient continued to be managed with good blood pressure control and later was started on eculizumab, but evaluation of response to therapy was hindered by the patient’s non-compliance with therapy and follow-up appointments. Conclusions: We have a very limited understanding of the genetics and epidemiology of atypical HUS, and the overlapping clinical features sometimes delay diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment of this rare disease. PMID:25708146

  13. Indications and organisational methods for autologous blood transfusion procedures in Italy: results of a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Catalano, Liviana; Campolongo, Alessandra; Caponera, Maurizio; Berzuini, Alessandra; Bontadini, Andrea; Furlò, Giuseppe; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Liumbruno, Giancarlo M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pre-operative donation of autologous blood is a practice that is now being abandoned. Alternative methods of transfusing autologous blood, other than predeposited blood, do however play a role in limiting the need for transfusion of allogeneic blood. This survey of autologous blood transfusion practices, promoted by the Italian Society of Transfusion Medicine and Immunohaematology more than 2 years after the publication of national recommendations on the subject, was intended to acquire information on the indications for predeposit in Italy and on some organisational aspects of the alternative techniques of autotransfusion. Materials and methods A structured questionnaire consisting of 22 questions on the indications and organisational methods of autologous blood transfusion was made available on a web platform from 15 January to 15 March, 2013. The 232 Transfusion Services in Italy were invited by e-mail to complete the online survey. Results Of the 232 transfusion structures contacted, 160 (69%) responded to the survey, with the response rate decreasing from the North towards the South and the Islands. The use of predeposit has decreased considerably in Italy and about 50% of the units collected are discarded because of lack of use. Alternative techniques (acute isovolaemic haemodilution and peri-operative blood salvage) are used at different frequencies across the country. Discussion The data collected in this survey can be considered representative of national practice; they show that the already very limited indications for predeposit autologous blood transfusion must be adhered to even more scrupulously, also to avoid the notable waste of resources due to unused units. Users of alternative autotransfusion techniques must be involved in order to gain a full picture of the degree of use of such techniques; multidisciplinary agreement on the indications for their use is essential in order for these indications to have an effective role in “patient blood management” programmes. PMID:25350961

  14. Patient blood management: a fresh look at a fresh approach to blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Liumbruno, G M; Vaglio, S; Grazzini, G; Spahn, D R; Biancofiore, G

    2015-10-01

    The overall use of allogeneic blood transfusions in clinical practice remains relatively high and still varies widely among centres and practitioners. Moreover, allogeneic blood transfusions have historically been linked with risks and complications: some of them (e.g. transfusion reactions and transmission of pathogens) have been largely mitigated through advancements in blood banking whereas some others (e.g. immunomodulation and transfusion-related acute lung injury) appear to have more subtle etiologies and are more difficult to tackle. Furthermore, blood transfusions are costly and the supply of blood is limited. Finally, evidence indicates that a great number of the critically ill patients who are being transfused today may not be having tangible benefits from the transfusion. Patient blood management is an evidence-based, multidisciplinary, multimodal, and patient-tailored approach aimed at reducing or eliminating the need for allogeneic transfusion by managing anaemia, perioperative blood conservation, surgical haemostasis, and blood as well as plasma-derivative drug use. From this point of view, the reduction of allogeneic blood usage is not an end in itself but a tool to achieve better patient clinical outcome. This article focuses on the three-pillar matrix of patient blood management where the understanding of basic physiology and pathophysiology is at the core of evidence-based approaches to optimizing erythropoiesis, minimising bleeding and tolerating anemia. Anesthesiologists and critical care physicians clearly have a key role in patient blood management programmes are and should incorporate its principles into clinical practice-based initiatives that improve patient safety and clinical outcomes. PMID:25311950

  15. [Successful second cord blood transplantation (CBT) for late graft failure associated with several immune disorders after the initial CBT in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Mori, Minako; Yonezawa, Akihito; Kitagawa, Tomoya; Sasaki, Yuya; Onaka, Takashi; Imada, Kazunori

    2015-07-01

    A 64-year-old woman underwent reduced-intensity conditioning cord blood transplantation (RIC-CBT) for refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A 6/6 antigen-level HLA-identical cord blood from a male infant was transfused. After successful engraftment with complete donor chimerism, the patient developed mixed chimera (XX 8.8%) on day 82. Tapering of tacrolimus was started on day 96. Bone marrow chimerism analysis showed a decreasing recipient cell population (XX 2.2%) on day 117 and tacrolimus was discontinued with no clinical signs of GVHD on day 123. However, pancytopenia with agranulocytosis was detected on day 138. She was diagnosed as having secondary graft failure associated with Coombs-positive immune hemolytic anemia and immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). At the same time, the percentage of recipient T cell chimerism in peripheral blood was about 50% and the B cell population showed lambda light chain restriction. On day 180, she received a second RIC-CBT due to lack of improvement of agranulocytosis. A single dose of rituximab was administered on day - 11 before the second CBT to eliminate the activated B cells. Prompt neutrophil engraftment was achieved and both hemolytic anemia and ITP also showed resolution. She is currently well (30 months after the second CBT), showing normal blood cell counts and complete second donor chimerism of marrow cells. PMID:26251154

  16. Hemorrhagic retinopathy in an infant with hemolytic-uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Geraissate, João Caetano Ávila; Yamamoto, Rafael Eidi; Isaac, David Leonardo Cruvinel; Ávila, Marcos Pereira de

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of a 23-month-old female infant with a diagnosis of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and hemorrhagic retinopathy. The patient had a past history of abdominal pain, bloody diarrhea, and acute renal failure. On ophthalmologic examination, indirect ophthalmoscopy revealed extensive areas of flame-shaped hemorrhage, cotton wool spots, macular edema and optic nerve head neovascularization in both eyes. Fluorescein angiography showed severe bilateral retinal ischemia and neovascularization leakage in disk. The patient, who had the visual acuity of 20/1000 in the right eye (OD) and 20/540 in the left eye (OS) at the first examination, was treated with panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) and presented at the end of the 6th month of follow-up improvement to 20/540 in OD and 20/270 in OS. There was also a regression of disc neovascularization, hemorrhages and macular edema. Despite intense retinal ischemia, there were no complications related to angiogenesis such as vitreous hemorrhage and/or neovascular glaucoma. We describe, in this report, the association between hemorrhagic retinopathy with features of Purtscher-like disease and HUS. PMID:25627190

  17. Generation of hemolytic activity in ozone-treated phosphatidylcholine

    SciTech Connect

    Butterman, J.; Chan, P.C.; Kesner, L.

    1987-04-01

    When liposomes prepared from purified soybean phosphatidylcholine were treated with ozone, at least two types of hemolytic agents were formed. One type was stable at 0 degree C but was destroyed rapidly at 37 degrees C. A second type was evolved during storage of ozone-treated phosphatidylcholine at 37 degrees C in the absence of EDTA. This study is concerned mainly with the heat-labile type. The hemolytic activity was not associated with lipid hydroperoxides. A number of substances were shown to inhibit the hemolytic activity and these may be divided into two classes. The first included cysteine, polyamines, n-heptylamine, semicarbazide, and tryptophan. Preincubation of the ozone-treated phosphatidylcholine was necessary with a Class 1 inhibitor, presumably for the interaction of the inhibitor with a functional group of the hemolytic agents. The Class II inhibitors, including BHT and vitamin C, required no preincubation. These possibly abolished the hemolytic activity by scavenging free radicals in the process.

  18. Reducing transfusion requirements in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Ciara I; Mallett, Susan V

    2015-12-24

    Liver transplantation (LT) was historically associated with massive blood loss and transfusion. Over the past two decades transfusion requirements have reduced dramatically and increasingly transfusion-free transplantation is a reality. Both bleeding and transfusion are associated with adverse outcomes in LT. Minimising bleeding and reducing unnecessary transfusions are therefore key goals in the perioperative period. As the understanding of the causes of bleeding has evolved so too have techniques to minimize or reduce the impact of blood loss. Surgical "piggyback" techniques, anaesthetic low central venous pressure and haemodilution strategies and the use of autologous cell salvage, point of care monitoring and targeted correction of coagulopathy, particularly through use of factor concentrates, have all contributed to declining reliance on allogenic blood products. Pre-emptive management of preoperative anaemia and adoption of more restrictive transfusion thresholds is increasingly common as patient blood management (PBM) gains momentum. Despite progress, increasing use of marginal grafts and transplantation of sicker recipients will continue to present new challenges in bleeding and transfusion management. Variation in practice across different centres and within the literature demonstrates the current lack of clear transfusion guidance. In this article we summarise the causes and predictors of bleeding and present the evidence for a variety of PBM strategies in LT. PMID:26722645

  19. Reducing transfusion requirements in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Donohue, Ciara I; Mallett, Susan V

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) was historically associated with massive blood loss and transfusion. Over the past two decades transfusion requirements have reduced dramatically and increasingly transfusion-free transplantation is a reality. Both bleeding and transfusion are associated with adverse outcomes in LT. Minimising bleeding and reducing unnecessary transfusions are therefore key goals in the perioperative period. As the understanding of the causes of bleeding has evolved so too have techniques to minimize or reduce the impact of blood loss. Surgical “piggyback” techniques, anaesthetic low central venous pressure and haemodilution strategies and the use of autologous cell salvage, point of care monitoring and targeted correction of coagulopathy, particularly through use of factor concentrates, have all contributed to declining reliance on allogenic blood products. Pre-emptive management of preoperative anaemia and adoption of more restrictive transfusion thresholds is increasingly common as patient blood management (PBM) gains momentum. Despite progress, increasing use of marginal grafts and transplantation of sicker recipients will continue to present new challenges in bleeding and transfusion management. Variation in practice across different centres and within the literature demonstrates the current lack of clear transfusion guidance. In this article we summarise the causes and predictors of bleeding and present the evidence for a variety of PBM strategies in LT. PMID:26722645

  20. [Blood transfusion: the challenges for tomorrow?].

    PubMed

    Folléa, Gilles; Garraud, Olivier; Tiberghien, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    As any therapeutic means, blood transfusion requires regular evaluation, particularly for its indications, effectiveness and risks. The availability of randomized clinical trials, the evolution of the quality of blood components, and the economic constraints shared by all countries, all lead to rethink both transfusion therapy as a whole and the organization of the transfusion chain from donor to recipient. The main tools available to improve transfusion and the transfusion chain management are the following: programs of patient blood management (PBM) to optimize the use of blood products with a patient centred approach, blood supply management tools to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the transfusion chain, donor management tools to adapt donor collections to the patients' needs in compliance with safety requirements for patients and donors, and coordination of these activities. A better understanding of these tools and their implementation will certainly be major challenges for transfusion medicine in the near future. Integrating these evolutions in regulations through the revision of the European Directives on blood and blood components (the review process is expected to be launched in 2015) should enroll them in the long term, for the benefit of patients, donors and all other stakeholders involved in the transfusion chain. PMID:25578549

  1. Current treatment strategies in autoimmune hemolytic disorders.

    PubMed

    Barcellini, Wilma

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a heterogeneous disease usually classified according to the thermal range of the autoantibody in warm, cold and mixed forms. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. Corticosteroids are the first-line therapy for warm AIHA. For refractory/relapsed cases, the choice is between splenectomy (effective in ?70% cases but with a presumed cure rate of 20%) and rituximab (effective in ?70-80% of cases), which is becoming the preferred second-line treatment, and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins and danazol. For severe or refractory cases, last option treatments are plasma-exchange, high-dose cyclophosphamide and alemtuzumab. As regards cold agglutinin disease, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment. PMID:26343892

  2. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: classification and therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Sève, Pascal; Philippe, Pierre; Dufour, Jean-François; Broussolle, Christiane; Michel, Marc

    2008-12-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon cause of anemia. Classifications of AIHA include warm AIHA, cold AIHA (including mainly chronic cold agglutinin disease and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria), mixed-type AIHA and drug-induced AIHA. AIHA may also be further subdivided on the basis of etiology. Management of AIHA is based mainly on empirical data and on small, retrospective, uncontrolled studies. The therapeutic options for treating AIHA are increasing with monoclonal antibodies and, potentially, complement inhibitory drugs. Based on data available in the literature and our experience, we propose algorithms for the treatment of warm AIHA and cold agglutinin disease in adults. Therapeutic trials are needed in order to better stratify treatment, taking into account the promising efficacy of rituximab. PMID:21082924

  3. Immune Hemolytic Anemia: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Paramjit; Basu, Sabita; Kaur, Ravneet; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2009-01-01

    The transfusion-medicine specialists and physicians are often in a difficult situation when the patient has severe worsening anemia and all the blood is mismatched. This situation can arise in patients with red cell autoantibodies or alloantibodies due to previous transfusions. We report two cases of immune hemolysis – one due to warm auto antibodies and the second due to alloimmunization from multiple transfusions. PMID:21938245

  4. Iron deficiency and hemolytic anemia reversed by ventricular septal myectomy

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Steven M.; Cable, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia has been reported to occur in the setting of aortic stenosis and prosthetic heart valves, but much more rarely in association with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Of the few descriptions of hemolytic anemia secondary to HC, all but one case involved bacterial endocarditis contributing to left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. We present the case of a 67-year-old man with recurrent hemolytic anemia and HC, without infective endocarditis. Attempts at iron repletion and augmentation of beta-blocker therapy proved his anemia to be refractory to medical management. Ventricular septal myectomy led to the resolution of hemolysis, anemia, and its coexisting symptoms. PMID:26424952

  5. Update on the transfusion in gastrointestinal bleeding (TRIGGER) trial: statistical analysis plan for a cluster-randomised feasibility trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous research has suggested an association between more liberal red blood cell (RBC) transfusion and greater risk of further bleeding and mortality following acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB). Methods and design The Transfusion in Gastrointestinal Bleeding (TRIGGER) trial is a pragmatic cluster-randomised feasibility trial which aims to evaluate the feasibility of implementing a restrictive vs. liberal RBC transfusion policy for adult patients admitted to hospital with AUGIB in the UK. This trial will help to inform the design and methodology of a phase III trial. The protocol for TRIGGER has been published in Transfusion Medicine Reviews. Recruitment began in September 2012 and was completed in March 2013. This update presents the statistical analysis plan, detailing how analysis of the TRIGGER trial will be performed. It is hoped that prospective publication of the full statistical analysis plan will increase transparency and give readers a clear overview of how TRIGGER will be analysed. Trial registration ISRCTN85757829 PMID:23837630

  6. The transfusion medicine we want

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Associação Brasileira de Hematologia e Hemoterapia (ABHH), through its Board of Directors, hosted a national symposium called "Forum: The Transfusion Medicine we want", to discuss proposed policies and techniques related to the area. This meeting was held in São Paulo on August 19 and 20, 2010, with the participation of experts, authorities and representatives of organized groups of patients and users. The discussions were organized around three specific issues selected from over 100 suggestions sent to the ABHH through public consultation on the web: 1. Strategies; 2. Financing; 3. Blood products. A plenary session, held at the end of the meeting, adopted recommendations that are relevant to the different discussion topics. This document contains actions proposed by the ABHH to meet the demands discussed. PMID:23284248

  7. Platelet transfusion goals in oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Ross M; Josephson, Cassandra D

    2015-12-01

    Despite the advances in platelet component preparation and transfusion support over the years, platelet products remain a limited resource due to their short (5 day) shelf life, and therefore their optimal use in the non-bleeding thrombocytopenic patient continue to draw much attention. There have been a number of national and international guidelines for platelet transfusion therapy in patients with hematologic diseases, some within the last 1-2 years that have incorporated key randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which address issues, such as the optimal platelet dose, the most appropriate threshold for prophylactic platelet transfusions, and whether prophylactic platelet transfusions are superior to therapeutic-only platelet transfusion practices for the prevention life-threatening bleeding in patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. This review highlights key RCTs and recent systematic reviews focused on optimal platelet transfusion therapy in adult and pediatric patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia secondary to chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), discuss how recent innovations in platelet component processing may affect transfusion efficiency, and introduce renewed concepts on adjuvant therapies to prevent bleeding in the hypoproliferative thrombocytopenic patient. PMID:26637759

  8. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  10. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  11. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  12. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  13. Blood Donation and Transfusion: A Primer for Health Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felts, W. Michael; Glascoff, Mary A.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a primer for health educators about blood donation and transfusion, examining the nature of human blood, the background of blood transfusion, blood donation criteria, risks related to homologous blood transfusion, directed blood donation, potential alternatives to homologous transfusion, and resources for education on the subject. (SM)

  14. Chronic transfusion therapy improves but does not normalize systemic and pulmonary vasculopathy in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Detterich, Jon A; Kato, Roberta M; Rabai, Miklos; Meiselman, Herbert J; Coates, Thomas D; Wood, John C

    2015-08-01

    Tricuspid regurgitant (TR) jet velocity and its relationship to pulmonary hypertension has been controversial in sickle cell disease (SCD). Plasma free hemoglobin is elevated in SCD patients and acutely impairs systemic vascular reactivity. We postulated that plasma free hemoglobin would be negatively associated with both systemic and pulmonary endothelial function, assessed by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery and TR jet velocity, respectively. Whole blood viscosity, plasma free hemoglobin, TR jet, and FMD were measured in chronically transfused SCD pre- and posttransfusion (N = 25), in nontransfused SCD (N = 26), and in ethnicity-matched control subjects (N = 10). We found increased TR jet velocity and decreased FMD in nontransfused SCD patients compared with the other 2 groups. TR jet velocity was inversely correlated with FMD. There was a striking nonlinear relationship between plasma free hemoglobin and both TR jet velocity and FMD. A single transfusion in the chronically transfused cohort improved FMD. In our patient sample, TR jet velocity and FMD were most strongly associated with plasma free hemoglobin and transfusion status (transfusions being protective), and thus consistent with the hypothesis that intravascular hemolysis and increased endogenous erythropoiesis damage vascular endothelia. PMID:26036801

  15. Transfusion associated circulatory overload: a critical incident.

    PubMed

    Goodall, E

    2014-01-01

    Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) is a serious but under-recognised complication of blood transfusion. While the exact incidence rate is unknown the associated morbidity and mortality make this a transfusion reaction worthy of attention. This article provides details of a critical incident involving TACO followed by a literature review and discussion written from the perspective of a student ODP. The goal of this article is to raise awareness of TACO amongst hospital staff to facilitate faster recognition and earlier intervention in future events. PMID:24516967

  16. Quality of transfusion products in blood banking.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Capuzzo, Enrico; Turdo, Rosalia; Glingani, Claudia

    2014-03-01

    The primary goal in transfusion medicine and cellular therapies is to promote high standards of quality and produce ever safer and more efficacious products. The establishment of a transfusion service quality management system, which includes several organizational structures, responsibilities, policies, processes, procedures, and resources, is now mandatory and widely regulated worldwide. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the quality system in transfusion medicine as applied to the production of blood components, including red blood cells, platelets, and fresh frozen plasma. PMID:24474089

  17. [Blood transfusion and supply chain management safety].

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Jean-François; Caldani, Cyril; Cabaud, Jean-Jacques; Chavarin, Patricia; Rochette-Eribon, Sandrine

    2015-02-01

    The level of safety attained in blood transfusion now makes this a discipline better managed care activities. This was achieved both by scientific advances and policy decisions regulating and supervising the activity, as well as by the quality system, which we recall that affects the entire organizational structure, responsibilities, procedures, processes and resources in place to achieve quality management. So, an effective quality system provides a framework within which activities are established, performed in a quality-focused way and continuously monitored to improve outcomes. This system quality has to irrigate all the actors of the transfusion, just as much the establishments of blood transfusion than the health establishments. PMID:25578550

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is caused by infection with certain strains of Escherichia coli bacteria that produce toxic substances called Shiga-like ... clotting ; cell ; chronic ; clotting ; end-stage renal disease ; Escherichia coli ; ESRD ; familial ; gene ; hemolysis ; hemolytic anemia ; idiopathic ; immune ...

  19. Precautions and Adverse Reactions during Blood Transfusion

    MedlinePLUS

    ... More serious allergic reactions may be treated with hydrocortisone or even with epinephrine . Treatments are available that ... Name Select Brand Names acetaminophen TYLENOL epinephrine ADRENALIN hydrocortisone CORTEF, SOLU-CORTEF Blood Transfusion Overview of Blood ...

  20. Transfusion and coagulation management in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Clevenger, Ben; Mallett, Susan V

    2014-01-01

    There is wide variation in the management of coagulation and blood transfusion practice in liver transplantation. The use of blood products intraoperatively is declining and transfusion free transplantations take place ever more frequently. Allogenic blood products have been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. Primary haemostasis, coagulation and fibrinolysis are altered by liver disease. This, combined with intraoperative disturbances of coagulation, increases the risk of bleeding. Meanwhile, the rebalancing of coagulation homeostasis can put patients at risk of hypercoagulability and thrombosis. The application of the principles of patient blood management to transplantation can reduce the risk of transfusion. This includes: preoperative recognition and treatment of anaemia, reduction of perioperative blood loss and the use of restrictive haemoglobin based transfusion triggers. The use of point of care coagulation monitoring using whole blood viscoelastic testing provides a picture of the complete coagulation process by which to guide and direct coagulation management. Pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include the use of anti-fibrinolytic drugs to reduce fibrinolysis, and rarely, the use of recombinant factor VIIa. Factor concentrates are increasingly used; fibrinogen concentrates to improve clot strength and stability, and prothrombin complex concentrates to improve thrombin generation. Non-pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include surgical utilisation of the piggyback technique and maintenance of a low central venous pressure. The use of intraoperative cell salvage and normovolaemic haemodilution reduces allogenic blood transfusion. Further research into methods of decreasing blood loss and alternatives to blood transfusion remains necessary to continue to improve outcomes after transplantation. PMID:24876736

  1. Transfusion and coagulation management in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Clevenger, Ben; Mallett, Susan V

    2014-05-28

    There is wide variation in the management of coagulation and blood transfusion practice in liver transplantation. The use of blood products intraoperatively is declining and transfusion free transplantations take place ever more frequently. Allogenic blood products have been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. Primary haemostasis, coagulation and fibrinolysis are altered by liver disease. This, combined with intraoperative disturbances of coagulation, increases the risk of bleeding. Meanwhile, the rebalancing of coagulation homeostasis can put patients at risk of hypercoagulability and thrombosis. The application of the principles of patient blood management to transplantation can reduce the risk of transfusion. This includes: preoperative recognition and treatment of anaemia, reduction of perioperative blood loss and the use of restrictive haemoglobin based transfusion triggers. The use of point of care coagulation monitoring using whole blood viscoelastic testing provides a picture of the complete coagulation process by which to guide and direct coagulation management. Pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include the use of anti-fibrinolytic drugs to reduce fibrinolysis, and rarely, the use of recombinant factor VIIa. Factor concentrates are increasingly used; fibrinogen concentrates to improve clot strength and stability, and prothrombin complex concentrates to improve thrombin generation. Non-pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include surgical utilisation of the piggyback technique and maintenance of a low central venous pressure. The use of intraoperative cell salvage and normovolaemic haemodilution reduces allogenic blood transfusion. Further research into methods of decreasing blood loss and alternatives to blood transfusion remains necessary to continue to improve outcomes after transplantation. PMID:24876736

  2. Blood transfusion: uses, abuses, and hazards.

    PubMed Central

    Posey, D. H.

    1989-01-01

    Homologous blood transfusion without risk is an unobtainable goal. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus continues to occur at an average rate of one infection per 100,000 transfusions, in spite of the most sensitive and specific testing available. In the past 30 years, the number of red cell antigens identified have increased from primarily ABO and Rh to some 400 antigens, which has also contributed to the hazards of blood transfusion. These risks can be minimized by the judicious use of homologous blood in conjunction with technological advances in transfusion medicine therapy and changes in attitudes of transfusionists. In the operating theater, there has been a resurgence in intraoperative autologous transfusion therapy, and patients are individualized rather than held to an arbitrary hemoglobin standard prior to anesthesia. In the preoperative period, elective surgical candidates may predeposit autologous blood or select directed donors. The prospective recipient or the directed donor may be candidate for recombinant erythropoietin therapy as a prelude to blood donation. This article discusses the uses of blood and blood products, the hazards of blood transfusion, and precautions that can be taken to minimize risks to the patient. PMID:2666679

  3. Patterns and outcomes of red blood cell transfusion in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in contemporary clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Matthew W.; Wang, Yongfei; Curtis, Jeptha P.; Peterson, Eric D.; Rao, Sunil V.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Studies have shown variation in the use of red blood cell transfusion among patients with acute coronary syndromes. There are no definitive data for its efficacy in improving outcomes and concerning data about possible association with harm. Current transfusion practices in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are not well understood. Objectives To determine the current patterns of blood transfusion among patients undergoing PCI and the association of transfusion with adverse cardiac outcomes across hospitals in the U.S. Design, Setting, Participants Retrospective cohort study. The study population included all patient visits from the CathPCI Registry® from July 2009 to March 2013 which included PCI, excluding those with missing data on bleeding complications or underwent in-hospital CABG(N=2258711). Main Outcomes and Measure Transfusion rates in the overall population and by hospitals (N=1431) were the primary outcomes. The association of transfusion with myocardial infarction, stroke, and death after accounting for a patient’s propensity for transfusion was also measured. Results The overall rate of transfusion was 2.14%(95% CI: 2.13% to 2.16%) and transfusion rates slightly declined from 2009Q3 to 2013Q (2.11% (95% CI: 2.03% to 2.19%) to 2.04%(95% CI: 1.97% to 2.12%); P<0.001). Patients who received transfusion were more often older(70.5 vs. 64.6 years of age), female(56.3% vs. 32.0%), and had hypertension(86.4% vs. 82.02%), diabetes(44.8% vs. 34.61%), advanced renal dysfunction(8.7% vs. 2.28%), prior myocardial infarction(33.0% vs. 30.15%), or prior heart failure(27.0% vs. 11.76%). Over 90% of sites transfused <5% of patients, while ~6% of sites transfused ?5% of patients. Variation in hospital risk-standardized rates of transfusion persisted after adjustment and hospitals showed variability in their transfusion thresholds. Receipt of transfusion was associated with MI(42803 events; 4.5% vs. 1.8%; OR 2.60; 95%CI 2.57–2.63), stroke(5011 events; 2.0% vs. 0.2%; OR 7.72; 95% CI 7.47–7.98), and in-hospital death(31885 events; 12.5% vs. 1.2%; OR 4.63; 95% CI 4.57–4.69), irrespective of bleeding complications. Conclusions Among patients undergoing PCI at US hospitals, there was considerable variation in blood transfusion practices, and receipt of transfusion was associated with increased risk of in-hospital adverse cardiac events. These observational findings may warrant a randomized trial of transfusion strategies for patients undergoing PCI. PMID:24570247

  4. Treatment Options for Primary Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Short Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Abdulgabar

    2015-01-01

    Summary Until now, treatment of primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm type (wAIHA) is primarily based on immunosuppression. However, many patients do not respond adequately to treatment, and treated patients may develop severe side effects due to uncontrolled, mixed and/or long-lasting immunosuppression. Unfortunately, the newly used therapeutic monoclonal antibodies are unspecific and remain frequently ineffective. Thus, development of a specific therapy for AIHA is necessary. The ideal therapy would be the identification and elimination of the causative origin of autoimmunization and/or the correction or reprogramming of the dysregulated immune components. Blood transfusion is the most rapidly effective measure for patients who develop or may develop hypoxic anemia. Although some effort has been made to guide physicians on how to adequately treat patients with AIHA, a number of individual aspects should be considered prior to treatment. Based on my serological and clinical experience and the analysis of evidence-based studies, we remain far from any optimized therapeutic measures for all AIHA patients. Today, the old standard therapy using controlled steroid administration, with or without azathioprine or cyclophosphamide, is, when complemented with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, still the most effective therapy in wAIHA. Rituximab or other monoclonal antibodies may be used instead of splenectomy in therapy-refractory patients. PMID:26696797

  5. Treatment Options for Primary Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Short Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Salama, Abdulgabar

    2015-09-01

    Until now, treatment of primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm type (wAIHA) is primarily based on immunosuppression. However, many patients do not respond adequately to treatment, and treated patients may develop severe side effects due to uncontrolled, mixed and/or long-lasting immunosuppression. Unfortunately, the newly used therapeutic monoclonal antibodies are unspecific and remain frequently ineffective. Thus, development of a specific therapy for AIHA is necessary. The ideal therapy would be the identification and elimination of the causative origin of autoimmunization and/or the correction or reprogramming of the dysregulated immune components. Blood transfusion is the most rapidly effective measure for patients who develop or may develop hypoxic anemia. Although some effort has been made to guide physicians on how to adequately treat patients with AIHA, a number of individual aspects should be considered prior to treatment. Based on my serological and clinical experience and the analysis of evidence-based studies, we remain far from any optimized therapeutic measures for all AIHA patients. Today, the old standard therapy using controlled steroid administration, with or without azathioprine or cyclophosphamide, is, when complemented with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, still the most effective therapy in wAIHA. Rituximab or other monoclonal antibodies may be used instead of splenectomy in therapy-refractory patients. PMID:26696797

  6. Transfusion requirements in septic shock (TRISS) trial - comparing the effects and safety of liberal versus restrictive red blood cell transfusion in septic shock patients in the ICU: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transfusion of red blood cells (RBC) is recommended in septic shock and the majority of these patients receive RBC transfusion in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, benefit and harm of RBCs have not been established in this group of high-risk patients. Methods/Design The Transfusion Requirements in Septic Shock (TRISS) trial is a multicenter trial with assessor-blinded outcome assessment, randomising 1,000 patients with septic shock in 30 Scandinavian ICUs to receive transfusion with pre-storage leuko-depleted RBC suspended in saline-adenine-glucose and mannitol (SAGM) at haemoglobin level (Hb) of 7 g/dl or 9 g/dl, stratified by the presence of haematological malignancy and centre. The primary outcome measure is 90-day mortality. Secondary outcome measures are organ failure, ischaemic events, severe adverse reactions (SARs: anaphylactic reaction, acute haemolytic reaction and transfusion-related circulatory overload, and acute lung injury) and mortality at 28 days, 6 months and 1 year. The sample size will enable us to detect a 9% absolute difference in 90-day mortality assuming a 45% event rate with a type 1 error rate of 5% and power of 80%. An interim analysis will be performed after 500 patients, and the Data Monitoring and Safety Committee will recommend the trial be stopped if a group difference in 90-day mortality with P ?0.001 is present at this point. Discussion The TRISS trial may bridge the gap between clinical practice and the lack of efficacy and safety data on RBC transfusion in septic shock patients. The effect of restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion strategy on mortality, organ failure, ischaemic events and SARs will be evaluated. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01485315. Registration date 30 November 2011. First patient was randomised 3 December 2011. PMID:23702006

  7. Red blood cell transfusion in septic shock - clinical characteristics and outcome of unselected patients in a prospective, multicentre cohort

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Treating anaemia with red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is frequent, but controversial, in patients with septic shock. Therefore we assessed characteristics and outcome associated with RBC transfusion in this group of high risk patients. Methods We did a prospective cohort study at 7 general intensive care units (ICUs) including all adult patients with septic shock in a 5-month period. Results Ninety-five of the 213 included patients (45%) received median 3 (interquartile range 2–5) RBC units during shock. The median pre-transfusion haemoglobin level was 8.1 (7.4–8.9) g/dl and independent of shock day and bleeding. Patients with cardiovascular disease were transfused at higher haemoglobin levels. Transfused patients had higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II (56 (45-69) vs. 48 (37-61), p?=?0.0005), more bleeding episodes, lower haemoglobin levels days 1 to 5, higher Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores (days 1 and 5), more days in shock (5 (3-10) vs. 2 (2-4), p?=?0.0001), more days in ICU (10 (4-19) vs. 4 (2-8), p?=?0.0001) and higher 90-day mortality (66 vs. 43%, p?=?0.001). The latter association was lost after adjustment for admission category and SAPS II and SOFA-score on day 1. Conclusions The decision to transfuse patients with septic shock was likely affected by disease severity and bleeding, but haemoglobin level was the only measure that consistently differed between transfused and non-transfused patients. PMID:24571858

  8. Alloantibodies to a paternally derived RBC KEL antigen lead to hemolytic disease of the fetus/newborn in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Stowell, Sean R.; Henry, Kate L.; Smith, Nicole H.; Hudson, Krystalyn E.; Halverson, Greg R.; Park, Jaekeun C.; Bennett, Ashley M.; Girard-Pierce, Kathryn R.; Arthur, C. Maridith; Bunting, Silvia T.; Zimring, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to nonself red blood cell (RBC) antigens, either from transfusion or pregnancy, may result in alloimmunization and incompatible RBC clearance. First described as a pregnancy complication 80 years ago, hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) is caused by alloimmunization to paternally derived RBC antigens. Despite the morbidity/mortality of HDFN, women at risk for RBC alloimmunization have few therapeutic options. Given that alloantibodies to antigens in the KEL family are among the most clinically significant, we developed a murine model with RBC-specific expression of the human KEL antigen to evaluate the impact of maternal/fetal KEL incompatibility. After exposure to fetal KEL RBCs during successive pregnancies with KEL-positive males, 21 of 21 wild-type female mice developed anti-KEL alloantibodies; intrauterine fetal anemia and/or demise occurred in a subset of KEL-positive pups born to wild type, but not agammaglobulinemic mothers. Similar to previous observations in humans, pregnancy-associated alloantibodies were detrimental in a transfusion setting, and transfusion-associated alloantibodies were detrimental in a pregnancy setting. This is the first pregnancy-associated HDFN model described to date, which will serve as a platform to develop targeted therapies to prevent and/or mitigate the dangers of RBC alloantibodies to fetuses and newborns. PMID:23801629

  9. [Acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Ramdani, Benyounès; Zamd, Mohamed; Hachim, Khadija; Soulami, Kenza; Ezzahidy, Madiha; Souiri, Malika; Fadili, Wafaa; Lahboub, Assia; Hanafi, Leila; Boujida, Meryem; Squalli, Saida; Benkirane, Amal; Benghanem, Mohamed Gharbi; Medkouri, Ghizlane

    2012-07-01

    Acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis are defined by an acute nonsuppurative inflammatory insult predominantly glomerular. Its current incidence is uncertain because of the frequency of subclinical forms. The most common infectious agent involved is beta hemolytic streptococcus group A. Acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis is uncommon in adults, and its incidence is progressively declining in developed countries. Humoral immunity plays a key role in the pathogenesis of kidney damage. Complement activation by the alternative pathway is the dominant mechanism, but a third way (lectin pathway) has been recently identified. The classic clinical presentation is sudden onset of acute nephritic syndrome after a free interval from a streptococcal infection. Treatment is essentially symptomatic and prevention is possible through improved hygiene and early treatment of infections. PMID:22483748

  10. 78 FR 79469 - Strategies To Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ...Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug...Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions.'' The purpose of the public workshop...Globulin Intravenous (IGIV) (Human) infusion. Complications of hemolysis...

  11. What Are the Risks of a Blood Transfusion?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... will have a reaction after the transfusion. Iron Overload Getting many blood transfusions can cause too much iron to build up in your blood (iron overload). People who have a blood disorder like thalassemia , ...

  12. Plasmodium vivax induced hemolytic uremic syndrome: An uncommon manifestation that leads to a grave complication and treated successfully with renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jhorawat, Rajesh; Beniwal, Pankaj; Malhotra, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    We are reporting a case of hemolytic uremic syndrome, a rare manifestation of Plasmodium vivax malaria. A young driver was admitted with acute febrile illness, decreased urine output, anemia, thrombocytopenia, jaundice, and increased serum lactate dehydrogenase. He showed a partial response to antimalarial drugs. However, he was readmitted with worsening renal parameters. His kidney biopsy revealed chronic thrombotic microangiopathy. He remained dialysis dependent and later underwent renal transplantation successfully, with excellent graft function at 1-year.

  13. Transfusion-associated graft versus host disease (TAGVHD)--with reference to neonatal period.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Sanjay G; Gokhale, Sankalp S

    2015-04-01

    Transfusion-associated graft versus host disease [TAGVHD] results from the engraftment of transfused immuno-competent cells in blood transfusion recipients, whose immune system is unable to reject them. All blood products containing viable, immuno-competent T cells have been implicated in TAGVHD. Presence of a "one-way HLA match between donor and recipient" is associated with a significantly increased risk of TAGVHD. Though sharing of haplotype is the most probable explanation, it is far from adequate. Since TAGVHD is not seen in patients with AIDS, and an acute GVHD-like syndrome has been noted in some identical twins and autologous (self) transplants, some other processes, possibly of an "autoimmune" nature are responsible for TAGVHD. Most of the cases have been reported from Japan. This clustering in space and time is rather intriguing. We offer here alternative hypothesis. Foetal and then neonatal lymphocytes exhibit tolerance towards donor cytotoxic T lymphocytes; and consequently very few cases of TAGVHD have been reported in neonates than expected. This tolerance is a part of altered immunology of pregnancy. We feel that it is possible to use maternal blood for transfusion to her newborn baby by following certain protocol and procedure and TAGVHD is no barrier. PMID:24871361

  14. Coomb’s Positive Hemolytic Anemia Due To Insect Bite

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia has occasionally been described in association with insect bites. The venom of certain spiders, bees and wasps, and some snakes can rarely cause intravascular hemolysis. We report here a case of Coombs positive hemolytic anemia due to an insect bite. These bites often pose diagnostic challenges and when associated with systemic manifestations necessitate early intervention. This communication reviews the clinico- hematologic spectrum in these cases and also emphasizes the need to capture the insect as identification would help in early diagnosis and management. PMID:22400097

  15. Hemolytic-uremic syndrome: absence of circulating endotoxin.

    PubMed

    van Wieringen, P M; Monnens, L A; Bakkeren, J A

    1976-10-01

    In children with hemolytic-uremic syndrome endotoxin determinations were carried out in the peripheral circulation in order to get evidence for the hypothetical role of endotoxin in the pathogenesis of the disease. For this purpose the Limulus test was used to determine endotoxin activity in 16 patients with hemolytic-uremic syndrome. In the plasma of these patients no endotoxin could be detected above the lower detection limit of 100 pg/ml, although in all patients with septicemia due to gram-negative bacilli the test was positive. PMID:972798

  16. [Blood transfusion - safety of the inventory].

    PubMed

    Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Danic, Bruno; Schneider, Thierry

    2015-02-01

    Over the years, transfusion medicine has been faced to many different problems, notably those related to transmission of pathogens. Major progresses have been accomplished in terms of security. However, nowadays, the discipline is confronted to the day-to-day variability and availability of blood products. More and more donors are excluded from blood donation due to various reasons, and the donor selection criteria have increased over the years, influencing the number of donors able to give blood. This paradox represents one of the constraints that transfusion medicine should resolve in the future. This paper presents some aspects either common or different between France and Switzerland. PMID:25592756

  17. "Human babesiosis": an emerging transfusion dilemma.

    PubMed

    Oz, Helieh S; Westlund, Karin H

    2012-01-01

    Babesiosis, a common disease of animals, can infect humans via vector "tick bite", particularly in endemic areas. The recent reports of fatal cases in Hepatitis C and postliver transplant patients resulting from transfusion of contaminated blood should alert the medical profession regarding this emerging dilemma in endemic as well as nonendemic areas and the need for accurate blood screening for transfusion. Here, we illustrate different stages of the parasite lifecycle, progression of babesiosis in animal model, some aspects of pathologic outcomes, ongoing therapeutic modalities, and a feasible Acridine Orange fluorescent methodology for the diagnostic evaluation of blood samples. PMID:22536513

  18. Risk factors and outcomes in transfusion-associated circulatory overload

    E-print Network

    2013-01-01

    system, our study only captured more severe cases of transfusion-associated circulatorycirculatory overload according to the criteria of the Centers for Disease Control Biovigilance System,system to identify all transfused patients with abnormal arterial blood gas measurements allowed a broader spectrum of transfusion-associated circulatory

  19. Precautions and Adverse Reactions during Blood Transfusion

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the transfused blood after it is collected. In addition to an increase in temperature, the person has chills and sometimes headache or back pain. Sometimes the person also has symptoms of an allergic reaction such as itching or a rash. Usually, acetaminophen ...

  20. Utilization Management in the Blood Transfusion Service

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Jeremy Ryan Andrew; Dzik, Walter “Sunny”

    2015-01-01

    The scope of activity of the Blood Transfusion Service (BTS) makes it unique among the clinical laboratories. The combination of therapeutic and diagnostic roles necessitates a multi-faceted approach to utilization management in the BTS. We present our experience in utilization management in large academic medical center. PMID:24080431

  1. Complement Inhibitor Eculizumab in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Acham-Roschitz, Birgit; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Kirschfink, Michael; Zipfel, Peter F.; Roedl, Siegfried; Vester, Udo; Ring, Ekkehard

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is associated with a congenital or acquired dysregulation of the complement alternative pathway that leads to continuous complement activation on host cells causing inflammation and damage. Eculizumab, a humanized mAb against complement protein C5, inhibits activation of the terminal complement pathway. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: We report an adolescent with relapsing unclassified aHUS. On admission, a high plasma creatinine level indicated a poor prognosis, and hemodialysis had to be started. Plasma exchanges were initially effective against the microangiopathic hemolytic activity and allowed a temporary improvement of renal function with termination of hemodialysis after 7 wk. Subsequently, plasma exchanges (three times per week) failed to prevent ongoing aHUS activity and progressive renal failure. After 12 wk, aHUS treatment was switched to eculizumab. Results: Eculizumab was effective in terminating the microangiopathic hemolytic process in two aHUS relapses; however, after normalization of complement activity, aHUS recurred and ultimately led to anuric end-stage renal failure. Conclusions: In this patient, complement inhibition by eculizumab temporarily terminated the microangiopathic hemolytic activity. Nevertheless, renal damage as a result of preceding and subsequent aHUS activity resulted in end-stage renal failure; therefore, therapeutic success may depend on early administration of eculizumab. The optimal duration of treatment may be variable and remains to be determined. PMID:19556379

  2. Hemolytic activity of dermatophytes species isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Aktas, E; Y?g?t, N

    2015-03-01

    Hemolytic activity was recently reported for several pathogenic fungal species, such as Aspergillus, Candida, Trichophyton, Penicillium and Fusarium. Based on a number of mechanistic and characterization studies, several fungal hemolysins have been proposed as virulence factors. Hemolysins lyse red blood cells resulting in the release of iron, an important growth factor for microbes especially during infection. The requirement of iron in fungal growth is necessary for metabolic processes and as a catalyst for various biochemical processes. Expression of a hemolytic protein with capabilities to lyse red blood cells has also been suggested to provide a survival strategy for fungi during opportunistic infections. The aims of this study were to investigate the hemolytic activities of dermatophytes species isolated from patients with dermatophytosis. Hair, skin and nail samples of patients were examined with direct microscopy using potassium hydroxide and cultivated on Mycobiotic agar and Sabouraud's dextrose agar. To determine hemolytic activities of dermatophytes species, they were subcultured on Columbia Agar with 5% sheep blood and incubated for 7-14 days at 25°C in aerobic conditions. Media which displayed hemolysis were further incubated for 1-5 days at 37°C to increase hemolytic activity. In this study, 66 dermatophytes strains were isolated from clinical specimens and were identified by six different species: 43 (65.1%) Trichophyton rubrum, 7 (10.7%) Trichophyton mentagrophytes, 5 (7.6%) Microsporum canis, 5 (7.6%) Trichophyton tonsurans, 4 (6.0%) Epidermophyton floccosum and 2 (3.0%) Trichophyton violaceum. Twenty-one T. rubrum strains showed incomplete (alpha) hemolysis and nine T. rubrum strains showed complete (beta) hemolysis, whereas hemolysis was absent in 13 T. rubrum strains. Four T. mentagrophytes strains showed complete hemolysis and three T. tonsurans strains showed incomplete hemolysis. However, M. canis, E. floccosum and T. violaceum species had no hemolytic activity. Hemolytic activity is pronounced in dermatophytes and may play an important role as a virulence factor. Hemolysins produced may play an important role in the balance between the host's cellular immunity and the ability of the fungus to diminish the immune response. PMID:25467819

  3. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID:24379786

  4. Impairment of Bone Health in Pediatric Patients with Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Schündeln, Michael M.; Goretzki, Sarah C.; Hauffa, Pia K.; Wieland, Regina; Bauer, Jens; Baeder, Lena; Eggert, Angelika; Hauffa, Berthold P.; Grasemann, Corinna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sickle cell anemia and thalassemia result in impaired bone health in both adults and youths. Children with other types of chronic hemolytic anemia may also display impaired bone health. Study Design To assess bone health in pediatric patients with chronic hemolytic anemia, a cross-sectional study was conducted involving 45 patients with different forms of hemolytic anemia (i.e., 17 homozygous sickle cell disease and 14 hereditary spherocytosis patients). Biochemical, radiographic and anamnestic parameters of bone health were assessed. Results Vitamin D deficiency with 25 OH-vitamin D serum levels below 20 ng/ml was a common finding (80.5%) in this cohort. Bone pain was present in 31% of patients. Analysis of RANKL, osteoprotegerin (OPG) and osteocalcin levels indicated an alteration in bone modeling with significantly elevated RANKL/OPG ratios (control: 0.08+0.07; patients: 0.26+0.2, P?=?0.0007). Osteocalcin levels were found to be lower in patients compared with healthy controls (68.5+39.0 ng/ml vs. 118.0+36.6 ng/ml, P?=?0.0001). Multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed a significant (P<0.025) influence of LDH (partial r2?=?0.29), diagnosis of hemolytic anemia (partial r2?=?0.05) and age (partial r2?=?0.03) on osteocalcin levels. Patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia were more frequently and more severely affected by impaired bone health than patients with hereditary spherocytosis. Conclusion Bone health is impaired in pediatric patients with hemolytic anemia. In addition to endocrine alterations, an imbalance in the RANKL/OPG system and low levels of osteocalcin may contribute to this impairment. PMID:25299063

  5. Blood transfusion safety: A study of adverse reactions at the blood bank of a tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Negi, Gita; Gaur, Dushyant Singh; Kaur, Rajveer

    2015-01-01

    Background: An adverse transfusion reaction (ATR) is an unfavorable reaction to the transfused unit, the severity of which may be different among individuals depending upon the type of reaction and the patient's susceptibility. Transfusion reactions may be immediate or delayed type depending on the onset and immune or nonimmune type depending on the pathogenesis. A study was conducted to study the frequency of various transfusion reactions and the associated morbidity. Materials and Methods: All ATRs occurring over a period of 3 years at a tertiary care health center were studied in detail according to the institute's protocol. Results: Of 38,013 units of blood and components that had been issued, 101 (0.2%) cases had an ATR. The most common reaction was allergic - 34/101 (33.6%) followed by febrile - 26/101 (25.7%). Other reactions included transfusion-related acute lung injury in 6/101 (5.9%) cases, and immune reactions were seen in 19/101 (18.8%) cases. Conclusion: Allergic and febrile reactions are most common and least harmful, but fatal reactions can also occur, and preventive measures must be taken to avoid such reactions. PMID:26682203

  6. [Exchange transfusion and (or) plasmapheresis: effective measures in severe tropical malaria?].

    PubMed

    Heim, M U; Mezger, J; Scheurlen, C; Twardzik, L; Wilmanns, W

    1988-06-10

    A 42-year-old man was admitted to hospital with, previously wrongly diagnosed, fulminant falciparum malaria, 14 days after a two-week trip to Kenya. He had a high fever and was jaundiced, with severe anaemia and thrombocytopenia. He was given quinine intravenously and pyrimethamine/sulfadoxine (Fansidar) by mouth. He developed acute renal failure and increasingly severe cerebral symptoms, at times coma. An exchange transfusion and several plasmaphereses were, therefore, performed. The cerebral symptoms quickly abated during the exchange transfusion, but renal function failed to improve. Because of continuing fever, mefloquin (Lariam) and doxy-cycline (Vibramycin) were also administered. After several dialysis periods the patient improved gradually and was discharged after three weeks in generally good condition with normal renal function. PMID:3288461

  7. Photodynamic decontamination of blood for transfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Hur, Ehud; Margolis-Nunno, H.; Gottlieb, P.; Lustigman, S.; Horowitz, Bernard

    1995-01-01

    Currently transfused cellular components of blood are not available in a sterile form and carry a small risk of transmitting viral and parasite diseases. Using phthalocyanines and red light, lipid enveloped viruses, e.g., HIV-1, can be inactivated in red blood cell concentrates (RBCC). Under conditions leading to virus sterilization the blood borne parasites Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease) and Plasmodium falciparum (malaria) could be eliminated to undetectable levels (> 4 log10 kill). RBC damage during treatment could be avoided by increasing the light fluence rate to 80 mW/cm2, and by including the free radical scavenger glutathione and the vitamin E derivative Trolox during light exposure. Similar sterilization of platelet concentrates was achieved with the psoralen derivative AMT and UVA light. Platelet damage due to PUVA treatment was avoided by including the plant flavonoid rutin during irradiation. It is concluded that elimination of the risk of transmitting pathogens during blood transfusion is feasible with photochemical treatments.

  8. Management of patients who refuse blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Chand, N Kiran; Subramanya, H Bala; Rao, G Venkateswara

    2014-01-01

    A small group of people belonging to a certain religion, called Jehovah's witness do not accept blood transfusion or blood products, based on biblical readings. When such group of people are in need of health care, their faith and belief is an obstacle for their proper treatment, and poses legal, ethical and medical challenges for attending health care provider. Due to the rapid growth in the membership of this group worldwide, physicians attending hospitals should be prepared to manage such patients. Appropriate management of such patients entails understanding of ethical and legal issues involved, providing meticulous medical management, use of prohaemostatic agents, essential interventions and techniques to reduce blood loss and hence, reduce the risk of subsequent need for blood transfusion. An extensive literature search was performed using search engines such as Google scholar, PubMed, MEDLINE, science journals and textbooks using keywords like ‘Jehovah's witness’, ‘blood haemodilution’, ‘blood salvage’ and ‘blood substitutes’. PMID:25535432

  9. Successful implementation of strategies to transform Emergency Department transfusion practice.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Matthew J; Kelly, Sarah-Louise; Beckwith, Hannah; Innes, Catherine J; Manson, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Blood component transfusion is an important and lifesaving Emergency Department (ED) procedure. It is not however risk-free and careful consideration of its clinical benefit for each individual patient is therefore essential. In 2008, we audited the patterns of blood component usage in 2007 within our ED. This work revealed that whilst 3209 units of blood component were ordered only 39.5% were transfused, and 9.5% were unaccounted for. This was the first and only published detailed look at ED blood transfusion practices. We had to address our poor traceability (i.e. unaccounted for units), our high blood usage, and our ordering of units which were then not transfused as this can lead to wastage. Firstly, better links between the ED and the Scottish National Blood Transfusion Service (SNBTS) were established. A set of improvement measures were then implemented including better ED medical and nursing staff education, monthly traceability reports sent to the ED clinical management teams, the introduction of an ED transfusion guideline, moving our blood fridge into the resuscitation room, having a named ED transfusion consultant and ED transfusion link nurse, ED consultant representation on the Hospital Transfusion Group and finally increasing awareness of ED emergency transfusion with a rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) research programme. In 2012, we re-audited our practice looking at our blood component usage in 2011. There was a 64% reduction in blood component ordering (3209 vs. 1034 units), a 39% reduction in blood component transfusion (1131 vs. 687 units), a 68% increase in the proportion of ordered units that were transfused and a 96% reduction in unaccounted units (289 vs. 9 units) between 2007 and 2011. In attempting to cost the savings resulting from our changes we showed that SNBTS spent £306,437 less in 2011 compared to 2007 on handling and issuing ED transfusion requests. Our improvements are immediately generalizable across the UK and the potential savings to the NHS are enormous.

  10. [The precaution principle and blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Sicard, D

    2000-06-01

    Because of the HIV and HCV virus transmission by transfusion during the eighties, there has been a retrospective reflection about the non-application of the precautionary principle, which has appeared only recently in the medical world. Since it was difficult to identify the real cause of the above-cited transmission in France, mainly because of the bad selection of blood donors, we feel we are justified in applying this precautionary principle more and more, in a monopolistic way, for biological security reasons. As a result, the biological research is not limited to looking for a 'degree zero' risk. Whether it concerns the 'PCR', the research of a new potential virus, the excessive fear regarding the transfusion of the new ESB agent, the worry caused by the blood donors who lived in the British Isles, the need for security based upon the precautionary principle is increasing endlessly. It is, however, more reasonable to consider that the precautionary principle should be essence incite a multi-disciplinary reflection involving biological sciences as well as social sciences. The precautionary principle would not make sense if it were not questioned for bad estimations, its harmful influences or its opportunistic use. Transfusion security, which is so important as a goal and as a principle, cannot appeal to the precautionary principle all the time, since the excessive use of this principle would lead to the paradox of not being able to identify the issues anymore. PMID:10919207

  11. Detection of hemolytic Listeria monocytogenes by using DNA colony hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, A.R.; Wentz, B.A.; Hill, W.E.

    1987-09-01

    A fragment of about 500 base pairs of the beta-hemolysin gene from Listeria monocytogenes was used to screen different bacterial strains by DNA colony hybridization. The cells in the colonies were lysed by microwaves in the presence of sodium hydroxide. Of 52 different strains of Listeria species screened, only the DNA from beta-hemolytic (CAMP-positive) strains of L. monocytogenes hybridized with this probe.

  12. Assesment, Treatment and Prevention of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nickavar, Azar; Sotoudeh, Kambiz

    2013-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a heterogeneous group of hemolytic disorders. Different terminologies have been described in HUS, which are as follows: (1) D+ HUS: Presentation with a preceding diarrhea; (2) typical HUS: D+ HUS with a single and self-limited episode; (3) atypical HUS (aHUS): Indicated those with complement dysregulation; (4) recurrent HUS: Recurrent episodes of thrombocytopenia and/or microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) after improvement of hematologic abnormalities; and (5) familial HUS: Necessary to distinct synchronous outbreaks of D+ HUS in family members and asynchronous disease with an inherited risk factor. aHUS is one of the potential causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in children. It has a high recurrence after renal transplantation in some genetic forms. Therefore, recognition of the responsible mechanism and proper prophylactic treatment are recommended to prevent or delay the occurrence of ESRD and prolong the length of survival of the transplanted kidney. A computerized search of MEDLINE and other databases was carried out to find the latest results in pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of aHUS. PMID:23412906

  13. Hemolytic venoms from marine cnidarian jellyfish – an overview

    PubMed Central

    Mariottini, Gian Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Cnidarian jellyfish are viewed as an emergent problem in several coastal zones throughout the world. Recurrent outbreaks pose a serious threat to tourists and bathers, as well as to sea-workers, involving health and economical aspects. As a rule, cnidarian stinging as a consequence of nematocyst firing induces merely local symptoms but cardiovascular or neurological complications can also occur. Hemolysis is a frequent effect of cnidarian stinging; this dangerous condition is known to be caused by several venoms and can sometimes be lethal. At present, the bulk of data concerning hemolytic cnidarian venoms comes from the study of benthic species, such as sea anemones and soft corals, but hemolytic factors were found in venoms of several siphonophore, cubozoan and scyphozoan jellyfish, which are mainly involved in the envenomation of bathers and sea-workers. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review the scientific literature concerning the hemolytic venoms from cnidarian jellyfish taking into consideration their importance in human pathology as well as health implications and possible therapeutic measures. PMID:25386336

  14. Avoidance of Blood Transfusion to Patients Suffering From Myocardial Injury and Severe Anemia Is Associated With Increased Long-Term Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Barbarova, Irina; Klempfner, Robert; Rapoport, Avigal; Wasserstrum, Yishay; Goren, Idan; Kats, Ana; Segal, Gad

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myocardial injury and anemia are common among patients in internal medicine departments. Nevertheless, the level of anemia in which blood should be given to these patients is ill defined. We conducted a retrospective, cohort analysis. A total of 209 patients hospitalized to internal medicine, with myocardial injury (troponin I?>?0.2?mcg/L, not diagnosed as ACS, acute coronary syndrome) and anemia (Hb?transfused. Severe anemia was not associated with increased long-term mortality in the whole cohort while survival of patients with severe anemia that were not transfused was significantly reduced compared to transfused patients (44% vs 80%; P?=?0.03). Mortality rates were similar for all patients with Hb???8?g/dL, regardless of transfusion (54% vs 49%; P?=?0.60). Consistently, lack of blood transfusion in patients with severe anemia was independently associated with a 2.27 (1.08–4.81) greater adjusted risk of all-cause mortality (P-value for interaction?=?0.04), whereas it did not significantly increase in patients with Hb???8?g/dL. Avoidance of blood transfusion is associated with unfavorable outcomes among patients with myocardial injury and severe anemia. PMID:26402836

  15. Transfusion Medicine in Sub-Saharan Africa: Conference Summary.

    PubMed

    Dzik, Walter Sunny; Kyeyune, Dorothy; Otekat, Grace; Natukunda, Bernard; Hume, Heather; Kasirye, Phillip G; Ddungu, Henry; Kajja, Isaac; Dhabangi, Aggrey; Mugyenyi, Godfrey R; Seguin, Claire; Barnes, Linda; Delaney, Meghan

    2015-07-01

    In November 2014, a 3-day conference devoted to transfusion medicine in sub-Saharan Africa was held in Kampala, Uganda. Faculty from academic institutions in Uganda provided a broad overview of issues pertinent to transfusion medicine in Africa. The conference consisted of lectures, demonstrations, and discussions followed by 5 small group workshops held at the Uganda Blood Transfusion Service Laboratories, the Ugandan Cancer Institute, and the Mulago National Referral Hospital. Highlighted topics included the challenges posed by increasing clinical demands for blood, the need for better patient identification at the time of transfusion, inadequate application of the antiglobulin reagent during pretransfusion testing, concern regarding proper recognition and evaluation of transfusion reactions, the expanded role for nurse leadership as a means to improve patient outcomes, and the need for an epidemiologic map of blood usage in Africa. Specialty areas of focus included the potential for broader application of transcranial Doppler and hydroxyurea therapy in sickle cell disease, African-specific guidelines for transfusion support of cancer patients, the challenges of transfusion support in trauma, and the importance of African-centered clinical research in pediatric and obstetric transfusion medicine. The course concluded by summarizing the benefits derived from an organized quality program that extended from the donor to the recipient. As an educational tool, the slide-audio presentation of the lectures will be made freely available at the International Society of Blood Transfusion Academy Web site: http://www.isbtweb.org/academy/. PMID:25752939

  16. Blood transfusion requirements for endoscopic sinonasal inverted papilloma resections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Endoscopic resection of sinonasal Inverted Papilloma (SNIP) tumors has been shown to reduce intra-operative blood loss and recovery time compared to open approaches. The purpose of this study is to investigate the incidence and requirements of blood transfusion for endoscopic SNIP surgeries. Methods An individual retrospective cohort study of endoscopic SNIP surgeries over a 10-year period was performed. Age, sex, pre-existing co-morbidity, use of anti-coagulants, tumor type and stage, time of surgery, estimated blood loss and the requirement for blood transfusion were recorded. Results 82 patients were included (57 males, 25 females). 4 (5%) Stage 1, 7 (8.5%) Stage 2, 62 (75.5%) Stage 3 and 9 (11%) Stage 4 SNIP tumors were identified according to the Krouse staging system. 3 (4%) patients required blood transfusion. 3 of the 9 (33%) Stage 4 tumors required blood transfusion. Stage 4 tumors were significantly associated with blood transfusion (p?transfusion and no other pre-operative variable was associated with requirement for blood transfusion. Conclusion Endoscopic SNIP resections rarely require blood transfusions. No pre-operative factor other than tumor stage is associated with the requirement for blood transfusion. We would therefore suggest that only Stage 4 SNIP tumors require pre-operative type and screen. PMID:23866296

  17. Lung function, transfusion, pulmonary capillary blood volume and sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Lunt, Alan; McGhee, Emily; Robinson, Polly; Rees, David; Height, Susan; Greenough, Anne

    2016-02-01

    Lung function abnormalities occur in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) and may be associated with elevated pulmonary blood volume. To investigate that association, we determined whether blood transfusion in SCD children acutely increased pulmonary capillary blood volume (PCBV) and increased respiratory system resistance (Rrs5). Measurements of Rrs5 and spirometry were made before and after blood transfusion in 18 children, median age 14.2 (6.6-18.5) years. Diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide and nitric oxide were assessed to calculate the PCBV. Post transfusion, the median Rrs5 had increased from 127.4 to 141.3% predicted (p<0.0001) and pulmonary capillary blood volume from 39.7 to 64.1ml/m2 (p<0.0001); forced expiratory volume in one second (p=0.0056) and vital capacity (p=0.0008) decreased. The increase in Rrs5 correlated with the increase in PCBV (r=0.50, p=0.0493). Increased pulmonary capillary blood volume may at least partially explain the lung function abnormalities in SCD children. PMID:26592148

  18. Autologous Priming Technique to Reduce Blood Transfusion in Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowsky, Jacob; Henderson, Mark; Hennein, Hani

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: Excessive hemodilution during cardiopulmonary bypass is associated with decreased oxygen carrying capacity, edema, and organ dysfunction. The use of blood products is often necessary to prime the extracorporeal circuit for pediatric cardiac surgical patients. However, the use of blood products carries serious risks both in the acute and long-term aspects of patient care. Autologous priming of the extracorporeal circuit used in conjunction with ultrafiltration, pharmacologic manipulation, and cell salvage may decrease the need for blood transfusion in the pediatric cardiac surgical population. We have developed a technique that enables us to perform transfusionless complex congenital heart repair targeting patients as small as 5 kg. PMID:16921689

  19. [Management of acute complications in sickle cell disease ].

    PubMed

    Gellen-Dautremer, Justine; Brousse, Valentine; Arlet, Jean-Benoît

    2014-10-01

    Acute complications in sickle cell disease are a major and life-long cause for hospital referral. The most frequent events are painful acute vaso-occlusive crisis involving the limbs and back, and acute chest syndrome. Acute vaso-occlusive crisis is a therapeutic emergency because of the very high level of pain. Acute chest syndrome may be potentially fatal and must be adequately searched for and treated. Sickle cell patients are susceptible to pneumococcal infections notably, but any infection may favour vaso-occlusive crisis. Triggers of sickle cell vase occlusion must be tracked and corrected, if possible. Moderate crisis can be managed at home, but referral is necessary as soon as opiates are needed and/or if acute chest syndrome is suspected. Additional treatments besides opiates include co analgesics, oxygen, hydration, physiotherapy. Blood transfusion may be required but is not systematic. Acute spleen sequestration occurs in young children and requires immediate hospital referral for transfusion. PMID:25510139

  20. Transfusion interventions in critical bleeding requiring massive transfusion: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    McQuilten, Zoe K; Crighton, Gemma; Engelbrecht, Sunelle; Gotmaker, Robert; Brunskill, Susan J; Murphy, Michael F; Wood, Erica M

    2015-04-01

    Critical bleeding (CB) requiring massive transfusion (MT) can occur in a variety of clinical contexts and is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. In 2011, the Australian National Blood Authority (NBA) published patient blood management guidelines for CB and MT, which found limited high-quality evidence from which only 2 recommendations could be made. The aim of this systematic review (SR) was to update these guidelines and identify evidence gaps still to be addressed. A comprehensive search was performed for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and SRs using MeSH index and free text terms in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library (Issue 11, 2012), EMBASE, CINHAL, PUBMED, and the Transfusion Evidence Library up to July 15, 2014. The evidence was grouped according to 4 questions based on the original guideline relating to transfusion interventions: (1) effect of dose, timing, and ratio of red blood cells (RBCs) to component therapy on patient outcomes; (2) effect of RBC transfusion on patient outcomes; (3) effect of fresh frozen plasma, platelet, cryoprecipitate, fibrinogen concentrate, and prothrombin complex concentrate on patient outcomes; and (4) effect of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) on patient outcomes. From this search, 19 studies were identified: 6 RCTs and 13 SRs. Two of the RCTs were pilot/feasibility studies, 3 were investigating rFVIIa, and 1 compared restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion in upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Overall, limited new evidence was identified and substantial evidence gaps remain, particularly with regard to the effect of component therapies, including ratio of RBC to component therapies, on patient outcomes. Clinical trials to address these questions are required. PMID:25716645

  1. French Haemovigilance Data on Platelet Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Willaert, Béatrice; Vo Mai, Mai-Phuong; Caldani, Cyril

    2008-01-01

    Summary The Agence Française de Securite Sanitaire des Produits de Santé (Afssaps; French Health Products Safety Agency) is responsible, through its hemovigilance unit, for the organization and the functioning of the national hemovigilance network. In accordance with the French law, it receives all data on adverse transfusion reactions regardless of their severity. With the aim of evaluating the tolerance of two kinds of labile blood products (LBP), pooled platelet concentrates (PP) and apheresis platelet concentrates (APC), we screened the French national database from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2006. We observed that the number of transfusion incident reports is more than twice as high with APC (8.61:1,000 LBP) than with PP (4.21:1,000 LBP). The difference between these two ratios is statistically significant as shown by chi-square test (e = 21.00 with ? = 5%). The risk to suffer adverse reactions of any type, except for alloimmunization, is higher with APC, and the major type of diagnosis related to APC is allergic reaction (1:200 APC issued) even if those allergic reactions are rarely serious. The new French National Hemovigilance Commission should impel a working group evaluating this topic and above all the impact of additive solutions which have been used since 2005 to put forward preventives measures. PMID:21512639

  2. Contemporary issues in transfusion medicine informatics

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gaurav; Parwani, Anil V.; Raval, Jay S.; Triulzi, Darrell J.; Benjamin, Richard J.; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2011-01-01

    The Transfusion Medicine Service (TMS) covers diverse clinical and laboratory-based services that must be delivered with accuracy, efficiency and reliability. TMS oversight is shared by multiple regulatory agencies that cover product manufacturing and validation standards geared toward patient safety. These demands present significant informatics challenges. Over the past few decades, TMS information systems have improved to better handle blood product manufacturing, inventory, delivery, tracking and documentation. Audit trails and access to electronic databases have greatly facilitated product traceability and biovigilance efforts. Modern blood bank computing has enabled novel applications such as the electronic crossmatch, kiosk-based blood product delivery systems, and self-administered computerized blood donor interview and eligibility determination. With increasing use of barcoding technology, there has been a marked improvement in patient and specimen identification. Moreover, the emergence of national and international labeling standards such as ISBT 128 have facilitated the availability, movement and tracking of blood products across national and international boundaries. TMS has only recently begun to leverage the electronic medical record to address quality issues in transfusion practice and promote standardized documentation within institutions. With improved technology, future growth is expected in blood bank automation and product labeling with applications such as radio frequency identification devices. This article reviews several of these key informatics issues relevant to the contemporary practice of TMS. PMID:21383927

  3. Improving communication of inpatient blood transfusion events to GPs

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Patients who have had blood transfusions whilst in hospital must have this information communicated to their General Practitioner at discharge. Audit demonstrated that just 50% of patients (n=15) under medical specialties who had undergone a blood transfusion had this information included in their discharge letter. To improve this, a section was specifically designated on the e-discharge pro-forma for the documentation of blood transfusion events, and focused teaching was delivered to all new FY1 doctors at their induction. Post intervention, 80% of blood transfusions occurring in medical patients were documented on the e-discharge, with an improvement in how detailed this documentation was (n=40). This simple intervention is an easily reproducible, cost neutral method of ensuring that more blood transfusion events are communicated to patients' GPs; improving care and reducing risk.

  4. Fresh whole blood transfusion capability for Special Operations Forces

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, Maj Andrew; Callum, Jeannie; da Luz, Luis Teodoro; Schmid, Joanne; Funk, Christopher; Glassberg, Col Elon; Tien, Col Homer

    2015-01-01

    Summary Fresh whole blood (FWB) transfusion is an option for providing volume and oxygen carrying capacity to bleeding Special Operations soldiers who are injured in an austere environment and who are far from a regular blood bank. Retrospective data from recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan show an association between the use of FWB and survival. We reviewed the literature to document the issues surrounding FWB transfusion to Special Operations soldiers in the austere environment and surveyed the literature regarding best practice guidelines for and patient outcomes after FWB transfusions. Most literature regarding FWB transfusion is retrospective or historical. There is limited prospective evidence currently to change transfusion practice in tertiary care facilities, but FWB remains an option in the austere setting. PMID:26100776

  5. Tolosa-Hunt syndrome in a patient with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Carrieri, Pietro Biagio; Montella, Silvana; Petracca, Maria; Cerullo, Giovanni; Elefante, Andrea

    2010-10-01

    Tolosa-Hunt syndrome is a steroid responsive painful opthalmoplegia due to a nonspecific inflammation of the cavernous sinus. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is caused by antibodies directed against unmodified autologous red cells. They are both rare conditions. Here we describe the simultaneous occurrence of Tolosa-Hunt syndrome and severe hemolytic crisis in the same patient. PMID:20718692

  6. Hemolytic activity of venom from crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci spines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci is a venomous species from Taiwan whose venom provokes strong hemolytic activity. To understand the hemolytic properties of A. planci venom, samples were collected from A. planci spines in the Penghu Islands, dialyzed with distilled water, and lyophilized into A. planci spine venom (ASV) powder. Results Both crude venom and ASV cause 50% hemolysis at a concentration of 20 ?g/mL. The highest hemolytic activity of ASV was measured at pH 7.0-7.4; ASV-dependent hemolysis was sharply reduced when the pH was lower than 3 or greater than 8. There was almost no hemolytic activity when the Cu2+ concentration was increased to 10 mM. Furthermore, incubation at 100°C for 30 to 60 minutes sharply decreased the hemolytic activity of ASV. After treatment with the protease ?-chymotrypsin, the glycoside hydrolase cellulase, and the membrane component cholesterin, the hemolytic activity of ASV was significantly inhibited. Conclusions The results of this study provide fundamental information about A. planci spine venom. The hemolytic activity was affected by pH, temperature, metal ions, EDTA, cholesterin, proteases, and glycoside hydrolases. ASV hemolysis was inhibited by Cu2+, cholesterin, ?-chymotrypsin, and cellulose, factors that might prevent the hemolytic activity of venom and provide the medical treatment for sting. PMID:24063308

  7. Hemolytic Porcine Intestinal Escherichia coli without Virulence-Associated Genes Typical of Intestinal Pathogenic E. coli ? †

    PubMed Central

    Schierack, Peter; Weinreich, Joerg; Ewers, Christa; Tachu, Babila; Nicholson, Bryon; Barth, Stefanie

    2011-01-01

    Testing 1,666 fecal or intestinal samples from healthy and diarrheic pigs, we obtained hemolytic Escherichia coli isolates from 593 samples. Focusing on hemolytic E. coli isolates without virulence-associated genes (VAGs) typical for enteropathogens, we found that such isolates carried a broad variety of VAGs typical for extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli. PMID:21965399

  8. Hemolytic porcine intestinal Escherichia coli without virulence-associated genes typical of intestinal pathogenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Schierack, Peter; Weinreich, Joerg; Ewers, Christa; Tachu, Babila; Nicholson, Bryon; Barth, Stefanie

    2011-12-01

    Testing 1,666 fecal or intestinal samples from healthy and diarrheic pigs, we obtained hemolytic Escherichia coli isolates from 593 samples. Focusing on hemolytic E. coli isolates without virulence-associated genes (VAGs) typical for enteropathogens, we found that such isolates carried a broad variety of VAGs typical for extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli. PMID:21965399

  9. Increased leucocyte apoptosis in transfused ?-thalassaemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Patrick B.; Porter, John; Evans, Patricia; Kwiatkowski, Janet L.; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Coates, Thomas; Giardina, Patricia J.; Grady, Robert W.; Vichinsky, Elliott; Olivieri, Nancy; Trachtenberg, Felicia; Alberti, Daniele; Fung, Ellen; Ames, Bruce; Higa, Annie; Harmatz, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary This exploratory study assessed apoptosis in peripheral blood leucocytes (PBL) from ?-thalassaemia patients receiving chronic transfusions and chelation therapy (deferasirox or deferoxamine) at baseline, 1, 6, and 12 months. At baseline, thalassaemic PBLs presented 50% greater levels of Bax (BAX), 75% higher caspase-3/7, 48% higher caspase-8 and 88% higher caspase-9 activities and 428% more nucleosomal DNA fragmentation than control subjects. Only neutrophils correlated significantly with apoptotic markers. Previously, we showed that over the treatment year, hepatic iron declined; we now show that the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 (BCL2), (?27.3%/year), and caspase-9 activity (?13.3%/year) declined in both treatment groups, suggesting that chelation decreases body iron and indicators of PBL apoptosis. PMID:23216540

  10. Profiles of blood and blood component transfusion recipients in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Khoza, Star; Hassall, Oliver; Faragher, Brian E.; Kajja, Isaac; Mvere, David A.; Emmanuel, Jean C.; Postma, Maarten J.; van Hulst, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    Background There are limited published data on the characteristics of blood transfusion recipients in sub-Saharan Africa. This study describes the demographic characteristics of blood transfusion recipients and patterns of blood and blood component use in Zimbabwe. Materials and methods Data on the characteristics of the blood transfusion recipients (age, sex, blood group), blood components received (type, quantity), discharge diagnoses and outcomes following transfusion (discharge status, duration of stay in hospital), were retrospectively collected from four major hospitals for the period from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012. Diagnoses were grouped into broad categories according to the disease headings of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Surgical procedures were grouped into broad categories according to organ system using ICD-9. Results Most of the 1,793 transfusion recipients studied were female (63.2%) and in the reproductive age group, i.e. 15–49 years (65.3%). The median age of the recipients was 33 years (range, 0–93). The majority of these recipients (n=1,642; 91.6%) received a red blood cell transfusion. The majority of the patients were diagnosed with conditions related to pregnancy and childbirth (22.3%), and diseases of blood and blood-forming organs (17.7%). The median time spent in hospital was 8 days (range, 0–214) and in-hospital mortality was 15.4%. Discussion Our sample of blood transfusion recipients were fairly young and most of them received red blood cell transfusions. The majority of patients in the reproductive age group received blood transfusions for pregnancy and childbirth-related diagnoses. PMID:26192782

  11. Transfusion-acquired Hemoglobinopathies: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Venkatesan; Purohit, Abhishek; Manivannan, Prabhu; Saxena, Renu

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-acquired hemoglobinopathy occurs when a carrier of hemoglobinopathy with no significant abnormalities donates blood, and the blood is transfused to a recipient. This process can lead to spurious results in the recipient without any clinical abnormality or infrequently can result in disastrous situations. The incidental finding of such posttransfusion related abnormal peaks in hemoglobin high-performance liquid chromatography (Hb HPLC) may cause diagnostic dilemmas and result in unnecessary laboratory testing. Here, we report two such cases of transfusion-acquired hemoglobinopathies, which were subsequently resolved by the abnormally low percentage of the Hb variants, transient nature of the peaks, and parental Hb HPLC. PMID:26417166

  12. Transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed Central

    Rappeport, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The clinical pathologic syndrome of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is usually a sequela of bone marrow transplantation. This disorder occurs as a result of recognition by engrafted donor-derived lymphocytes of "foreign" recipient transplantation antigens. GVHD may also result from engraftment of lymphocytes from other sources, including (1) transfusion of lymphocytes containing blood components, (2) transplacental maternal fetal transfusion, and (3) passive transfer of lymphocytes in solid organ transplantation. The recipients are usually severely immunodeficient and thus incapable of rejecting the transfused lymphocytes. This syndrome may, however, also develop in immunologically competent patients receiving blood products from individuals with histocompatibility antigens not recognized as foreign. PMID:2293503

  13. Compatible Transfusion Therapy for Paroxysmal Cold Hemoglobinuria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rausen, Aaron R.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Presented are case histories of two children, ages 2 and 4 years, with paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH, a syndrome characterized by acute intravascular hemoglobin dissolution and hemoglobin in the urine). (Author/CL)

  14. Geographical variations in current clinical practice on transfusions and iron chelation therapy across various transfusion-dependent anaemias

    PubMed Central

    Viprakasit, Vip; Gattermann, Norbert; Lee, Jong Wook; Porter, John B.; Taher, Ali T.; Habr, Dany; Martin, Nicolas; Domokos, Gabor; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Many patients with chronic anaemia require blood transfusions as part of their treatment regimen. As a result, iron overload will inevitably develop if not adequately managed by iron chelation therapy. There are many guidelines relating to transfusion and chelation practices for patients with transfusion-dependent anaemia; however, there is a lack of information on how treatment practices differ around the world. The objective of this manuscript is to highlight key features of current transfusion and chelation management, including similarities and differences across various anaemias and between geographical regions worldwide. Materials and methods Data collected at study entry to the multicentre Evaluation of Patients’ Iron Chelation with Exjade (EPIC) study, which recruited 1,744 patients with a variety of transfusion-dependent anaemias across 23 countries from three geographic regions, were assessed. These analyses compared transfusion and chelation treatment prior to the start of study treatment, together with iron burden assessed at study entry by serum ferritin, liver iron concentration and labile plasma iron levels. Results and conclusions Data show that transfusion and iron chelation practices differ between anaemias and between geographical regions; this may be linked to availability and accessibility of transfusion and chelation therapy, patients’ compliance, physicians’ attitudes, costs and use of treatment guidelines. Approximately 60% of these transfusion-dependent patients were severely iron overloaded with a serum ferritin level over 2,500 ng/mL, indicating that the risks of iron burden may have been underestimated and current iron chelation therapy, if considered, may not have been adequate to control iron burden. PMID:22871821

  15. Blood Transfusion and Donation - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home ? Multiple Languages ? All Health Topics ? Blood Transfusion and Donation URL ... this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/bloodtransfusionanddonation.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  16. Cell salvage for minimising perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Carless, Paul A; Henry, David A; Moxey, Annette J; O’Connell, Dianne; Brown, Tamara; Fergusson, Dean A

    2014-01-01

    Background Concerns regarding the safety of transfused blood have prompted reconsideration of the use of allogeneic (from an unrelated donor) red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, and a range of techniques to minimise transfusion requirements. Objectives To examine the evidence for the efficacy of cell salvage in reducing allogeneic blood transfusion and the evidence for any effect on clinical outcomes. Search methods We identified studies by searching CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1950 to June 2009), EMBASE (1980 to June 2009), the internet (to August 2009) and bibliographies of published articles. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials with a concurrent control group in which adult patients, scheduled for non-urgent surgery, were randomised to cell salvage (autotransfusion) or to a control group who did not receive the intervention. Data collection and analysis Data were independently extracted and the risk of bias assessed. Relative risks (RR) and weighted mean differences (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Data were pooled using a random-effects model. The primary outcomes were the number of patients exposed to allogeneic red cell transfusion and the amount of blood transfused. Other clinical outcomes are detailed in the review. Main results A total of 75 trials were included. Overall, the use of cell salvage reduced the rate of exposure to allogeneic RBC transfusion by a relative 38% (RR 0.62; 95% CI 0.55 to 0.70). The absolute reduction in risk (ARR) of receiving an allogeneic RBC transfusion was 21% (95% CI 15% to 26%). In orthopaedic procedures the RR of exposure to RBC transfusion was 0.46 (95% CI 0.37 to 0.57) compared to 0.77 (95% CI 0.69 to 0.86) for cardiac procedures. The use of cell salvage resulted in an average saving of 0.68 units of allogeneic RBC per patient (WMD ?0.68; 95% CI ?0.88 to ?0.49). Cell salvage did not appear to impact adversely on clinical outcomes. Authors’ conclusions The results suggest cell salvage is efficacious in reducing the need for allogeneic red cell transfusion in adult elective cardiac and orthopaedic surgery. The use of cell salvage did not appear to impact adversely on clinical outcomes. However, the methodological quality of trials was poor. As the trials were unblinded and lacked adequate concealment of treatment allocation, transfusion practices may have been influenced by knowledge of the patients’ treatment status potentially biasing the results in favour of cell salvage. PMID:20393932

  17. Accuracy of continuous noninvasive hemoglobin monitoring for the prediction of blood transfusions in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Galvagno, Samuel M; Hu, Peter; Yang, Shiming; Gao, Cheng; Hanna, David; Shackelford, Stacy; Mackenzie, Colin

    2015-12-01

    Early detection of hemorrhagic shock is required to facilitate prompt coordination of blood component therapy delivery to the bedside and to expedite performance of lifesaving interventions. Standard physical findings and vital signs are difficult to measure during the acute resuscitation stage, and these measures are often inaccurate until patients deteriorate to a state of decompensated shock. The aim of this study is to examine a severely injured trauma patient population to determine whether a noninvasive SpHb monitor can predict the need for urgent blood transfusion (universal donor or additional urgent blood transfusion) during the first 12 h of trauma patient resuscitation. We hypothesize that trends in continuous SpHb, combined with easily derived patient-specific factors, can identify the immediate need for transfusion in trauma patients. Subjects were enrolled if directly admitted to the trauma center, >17 years of age, and with a shock index (heart rate/systolic blood pressure) >0.62. Upon admission, a Masimo Radical-7 co-oximeter sensor (Masimo Corporation, Irvine, CA) was applied, providing measurement of continuous non-invasive hemoglobin (SpHb) levels. Blood was drawn and hemoglobin concentration analyzed and conventional pulse oximetry photopletysmograph signals were continuously recorded. Demographic information and both prehospital and admission vital signs were collected. The primary outcome was transfusion of at least one unit of packed red blood cells within 24 h of admission. Eight regression models (C1-C8) were evaluated for the prediction of blood use by comparing area under receiver operating curve (AUROC) at different time intervals after admission. 711 subjects had continuous vital signs waveforms available, to include heart rate (HR), SpHb and SpO2 trends. When SpHb was monitored for 15 min, SpHb did not increase AUROC for prediction of transfusion. The highest ROC was recorded for model C8 (age, sex, prehospital shock index, admission HR, SpHb and SpO2) for the prediction of blood products within the first 3 h of admission. When data from 15 min of continuous monitoring were analyzed, significant improvement in AUROC occurred as more variables were added to the model; however, the addition of SpHb to any of the models did not improve AUROC significantly for prediction of blood use within the first 3 h of admission in comparison to analysis of conventional oximetry features. The results demonstrate that SpHb monitoring, accompanied by continuous vital signs data and adjusted for age and sex, has good accuracy for the prediction of need for transfusion; however, as an independent variable, SpHb did not enhance predictive models in comparison to use of features extracted from conventional pulse oximetry. Nor was shock index better than conventional oximetry at discriminating hemorrhaging and prediction of casualties receiving blood. In this population of trauma patients, noninvasive SpHb monitoring, including both trends and absolute values, did not enhance the ability to predict the need for blood transfusion. PMID:25753142

  18. Reappraising the concept of massive transfusion in trauma

    E-print Network

    Stanworth, Simon J.; Morris, Timothy P.; Gaarder, Christine; Goslings, J. Carel; Maegele, Marc; Cohen, Mitchell J.; Koenig, Thomas C.; Davenport, Ross A.; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Johannson, Par I.; Allard, Shubha; Johnson, Tony; Brohi, Karim

    2010-12-30

    candi- date predictors potentially available on admission and thought to be associated with transfusion were consid- ered. Center-specific effects were excluded to allow gen- eralizability of results. Model parameters were estimated by combining across... , Komolafe E, Marrero MA, Mejía-Mantilla J, Miranda J, Morales C, Olaomi O, Olldashi F, Perel P, Peto R, Ramana PV, Ravi RR, Yutthakasemsunt S: Effects of tranexamic acid on death, vascular occlusive events, and blood transfusion in trauma patients...

  19. Risk of Erectile Dysfunction in Transfusion-naive Thalassemia Men

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Guang; Lin, Te-Yu; Lin, Cheng-Li; Dai, Ming-Shen; Ho, Ching-Liang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Based on the mechanism of pathophysiology, thalassemia major or transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients may have an increased risk of developing organic erectile dysfunction resulting from hypogonadism. However, there have been few studies investigating the association between erectile dysfunction and transfusion-naive thalassemia populations. We constructed a population-based cohort study to elucidate the association between transfusion-naive thalassemia populations and organic erectile dysfunction This nationwide population-based cohort study involved analyzing data from 1998 to 2010 obtained from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database, with a follow-up period extending to the end of 2011. We identified men with transfusion-naive thalassemia and selected a comparison cohort that was frequency-matched with these according to age, and year of diagnosis thalassemia at a ratio of 1 thalassemia man to 4 control men. We analyzed the risks for transfusion-naive thalassemia men and organic erectile dysfunction by using Cox proportional hazards regression models. In this study, 588 transfusion-naive thalassemia men and 2337 controls were included. Total 12 patients were identified within the thalassaemia group and 10 within the control group. The overall risks for developing organic erectile dysfunction were 4.56-fold in patients with transfusion-naive thalassemia men compared with the comparison cohort after we adjusted for age and comorbidities. Our long-term cohort study results showed that in transfusion-naive thalassemia men, there was a higher risk for the development of organic erectile dysfunction, particularly in those patients with comorbidities. PMID:25837766

  20. Trans-fused iridoid glycosides from Penstemon mucronatus.

    PubMed

    Krull, R E; Stermitz, F R

    1998-12-01

    Two new trans-fused iridoid glycosides (5 alpha H)-6 alpha-8-epidihydrocornin and (5 alpha H)-6 alpha-8-hydroxy-8-epiloganin, were isolated from Penstemon mucronatus, along with cornin, penstemoside and three hastatosides. The trans-fused iridoids are only the second and third known among over 900 described cis-fused iridoid glycosides. Two pairs of iridoids, identical except for the stereochemistry at C-8, were found. Structures were determined by spectroscopic methods. PMID:9887533

  1. A steryl glycoside fraction with hemolytic activity from tubers of Momordica cochinchinensis.

    PubMed

    Ng, T B; Li, W W; Yeung, H W

    1986-10-01

    A hemolytic fraction has been obtained from fresh tubers of Momordica cochinchinensis. The fraction was strongly adsorbed on DEAE-Sepharose CL6B. It did not stain with Coomassie brilliant blue in SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and it gave no immunoprecipitin arcs in immunoelectrophoresis. The hemolytic activity of the fraction was resistant to heat and proteolytic enzymes. The behavior of the fraction in thin-layer chromatography and its positive reaction in Liebermann-Burchard test indicated that the hemolytic activity of the fraction can be attributed to a steryl glycoside(s). PMID:3821135

  2. Effects of Blood Transfusion on Exercise Capacity in Thalassemia Major Patients

    PubMed Central

    Benedetto, Daniela; Rao, Carmelo Massimo; Cefalù, Claudia; Aguglia, Demetrio Oreste; Cattadori, Gaia; D’Ascola, Domenico Giuseppe; Benedetto, Frank Antonio; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Sciomer, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Anemia has an important role in exercise performance. However, the direct link between rapid changes of hemoglobin and exercise performance is still unknown.To find out more on this topic, we studied 18 beta-thalassemia major patients free of relevant cardiac dysfunction (age 33.5±7.2 years,males = 10). Patients performed a maximal cardiopulmolmonary exercise test (cycloergometer, personalized ramp protocol, breath-by-breath measurements of expired gases) before and the day after blood transfusion (500 cc of red cell concentrates). After blood transfusion, hemoglobin increased from 10.5±0.8 g/dL to 12.1±1.2 (p<0.001), peak VO2 from 1408 to 1546mL/min (p<0.05), and VO2 at anaerobic threshold from 965 to 1024mL/min (p<0.05). No major changes were observed as regards heart and respiratory rates either at peak exercise or at anaerobic threshold. Similarly, no relevant changes were observed in ventilation efficiency, as evaluated by the ventilation vs. carbon dioxide production relationship, or in O2 delivery to the periphery as analyzed by the VO2 vs. workload relationship. The relationship between hemoglobin and VO2 changes showed, for each g/dL of hemoglobin increase, a VO2 increase = 82.5 mL/min and 35 mL/min, at peak exercise and at anaerobic threshold, respectively. In beta-thalassemia major patients, an acute albeit partial anemia correction by blood transfusion determinates a relevant increase of exercise performance, observed both at peak exercise and at anaerobic threshold. PMID:26010540

  3. Unrecognized pattern of von Willebrand factor abnormalities in hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Galbusera, M; Benigni, A; Paris, S; Ruggenenti, P; Zoja, C; Rossi, C; Remuzzi, G

    1999-06-01

    Heterogeneous abnormalities in multimeric structure and fragmentation of endothelial-derived von Willebrand factor (vWF) have been reported in hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). This study was conducted to establish whether different patterns of vWF abnormalities were associated with different clinical syndromes. Plasmatic levels of vWF antigen (vWF:Ag), vWF release from endothelial cells (EC) exposed to patient sera, and vWF multimeric pattern were studied during episodes and again in remission in three groups of patients with severe forms of HUS and TTP paradigmatic of the most common clinical patterns of disease presentation: (1) plasma-responsive; (2) plasma-resistant; and (3) frequently relapsing. Plasma vWF:Ag and serum-induced vWF release from EC were increased in the acute phase of either plasma-responsive and plasma-resistant HUS and TTP, but normalized at remission only in plasma-responsive cases. Both indices were persistently normal in the relapsing forms. Enhanced vWF fragmentation as defined by disappearance of high molecular weight and increase in low molecular weight forms was a consistent finding of the acute phases, and always normalized in remission in all three groups. Unusually large vWF multimers were found exclusively in plasma of relapsing forms of HUS and TTP both during and between relapses. Enhanced levels of vWF:Ag and serum capability to induce vWF release in vitro are markers of disease activity and may reflect systemic endothelial injury and consequent activation. Their presence discriminates acute single-episode cases from relapsing forms and, when failing to normalize with plasma therapy, predicts plasma resistance. Enhanced low molecular weight multimers that closely paralleled disease activity suggest a permissive role of fragmented vWF in the formation of microvascular thrombi. Finally, finding of unusually large multimers exclusively in relapsing forms of HUS and TTP even between relapses, when no other clinical signs of disease activity could be detected, suggests that they cannot be the only factor in microvascular thrombosis. PMID:10361861

  4. A retrospective review of patient factors, transfusion practices, and outcomes in patients with transfusion-associated circulatory overload.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Lani; Maskens, Carolyn; Cserti-Gazdewich, Christine; Hansen, Mark; Lin, Yulia; Pendergrast, Jacob; Yi, Qi Long; Callum, Jeannie

    2013-10-01

    Transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) is a common yet underrecognized and underreported complication of transfusion associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to examine patient and transfusion characteristics in a cohort of TACO cases. A retrospective medical record review of 100 consecutive TACO episodes reported at 2 academic centers was performed. Information related to demographics, medical history, radiologic and echocardiographic investigations, infusion practices, reaction features, management, and outcome were collected. Ninety-eight cases were accessible for review. A history of congestive heart failure (41%), renal dysfunction (44%), and age more than 70 years (56%) were common in TACO patients. Suboptimal fluid status management and inappropriate infusion practices were often seen (eg, verbal orders, double red cell transfusions, rapid infusion rates, lack or improper timing of preemptive diuretics). The median volume of blood ordered was 500 mL, and the median volume of crystalloid or colloid (preceding 24 hours) was 2200 mL. A physician order specifying the infusion rate was documented in 50% of transfusion orders. Preemptive diuretics were ordered in only 29% of cases, most commonly introduced midway or after the transfusion at a dose of furosemide 20 mg intravenously. After TACO, 18% of patients required transfer to the intensive care unit, 8% suffered a major complication, and 2% died. Suboptimal ordering and infusion practices may be contributing to the high incidence and severity of TACO. Research in TACO prevention strategies, such as slow rates of infusion and preemptive diuretics, is warranted. PMID:24075097

  5. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn with late-onset anemia due to anti-M: a case report and review of the Japanese literature.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Hiroyasu; Ohto, Hitoshi; Nollet, Kenneth E; Kawabata, Kinuyo; Saito, Shunnichi; Yagi, Yoshihito; Negishi, Yutaka; Ishida, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) attributed to M/N-incompatibility varies from asymptomatic to lethally hydropic. Case reports are rare, and the clinical significance of anti-M is not completely understood. A challenging case of HDFN due to anti-M prompted an investigation of the Japanese literature, in order to characterize the clinical spectrum of M/N-incompatibility pregnancies in Japan and report results to English-language readers. Japanese reports of HDFN attributed to M/N incompatibility were compiled. Abstracted data include maternal antibody titers at delivery, fetal direct antiglobulin test, hemoglobin, total bilirubin, reticulocyte count at birth, and therapeutic interventions. We investigated characteristics of HDFN due to M/N-incompatible pregnancies in Japan after encountering a case of severe HDFN along with late-onset anemia in an infant born to a woman carrying IgG anti-M with a titer of 1. In total, thirty-three babies with HDFN due to anti-M and one due to anti-N have been reported in Japan since 1975. The median maternal antibody titer was 64 at delivery and was 16 or less in 10 of 34 women (29%). Five of 34 babies (15%) were stillborn or died as neonates. Twenty-one of 29 survivors (72%) had severe hemolytic anemia and/or hydrops fetalis. The reticulocyte count of neonates with anemia stayed below the reference interval. Sixteen (55%) developed late-onset anemia and 14 (48%) were transfused with M-negative RBCs. Significant positive correlation (P < .05) between the hemoglobin value and the reticulocyte count within 4 days of birth was obtained in 16 babies with anti-M HDFN. In the Japanese population, 21 of 34 cases of M/N-incompatible HDFN (72%) have manifested as severe hemolytic anemia and/or hydrops fetalis. Low reticulocyte count in neonates with late-onset anemia is consistent with suppressed erythropoiesis due to anti-M. PMID:24262303

  6. Drag reducing polymers as simple indicators of hemolytic potential in biomechanical devices

    E-print Network

    Shieh, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to determine if drag reducing polymers can be simple indicators of hemolytic potential in biomechanical devices. Specifically, three different blood pumps, known as a left ventricle ...

  7. Comparison of hemolytic activities of coal fly ash and its soluble and insoluble fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.K.; Wong, M.H.; Tam, N.F.Y.

    1986-08-01

    Coal fly ash of a particle diameter smaller than 10 ..mu..m was collected from the precipitator of a power plant in Hong Kong. Comparison of hemolytic activities between fly ash and free silica showed that fly ash had a lower biological effect than free silica. The hemolytic activities of the soluble and insoluble fractions of fly ash were further compared by two methods: total hemoglobin method and cyanmethemoglobin method. An analysis of results showed significant differences for fly ash and its soluble fraction between methods. Fly ash, which contained a silicate level similar to its insoluble fraction, had a hemolytic activity higher than the summation of both its soluble and insoluble fractions. This indicates that the hemolytic activity was independent of the silicate content in the fly ash samples.

  8. Sigma E Regulators Control Hemolytic Activity and Virulence in a Shrimp Pathogenic Vibrio harveyi

    E-print Network

    Rattanama, Pimonsri

    Members of the genus Vibrio are important marine and aquaculture pathogens. Hemolytic activity has been identified as a virulence factor in many pathogenic vibrios including V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, V. alginolyticus, ...

  9. Effects of co-existing microalgae and grazers on the production of hemolytic toxins in Karenia mikimotoi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weidong; Zhang, Naisheng; Cui, Weimin; Xu, Yanyan; Li, Hongye; Liu, Jiesheng

    2011-11-01

    Karenia mikimotoi (Miyake & Kominami ex Oda) Hansen & Moestrup is associated with harmful algal blooms in temperate and subtropical zones of the world. The hemolytic substances produced by K. mikimotoi are thought to cause mortality in fishes and invertebrates. We evaluated the composition of the hemolytic toxin produced by K. mikimotoi cultured in the laboratory using thin-layer chromatography. In addition, we evaluated the effect of co-occuring algae ( Prorocentrum donghaiense and Alexandrium tamarense) and the cladoceran grazer Moina mongolica on hemolytic toxin production in K. mikimotoi. The hemolytic toxins from K. mikimotoi were a mixture of 2 liposaccharides and 1 lipid. Waterborne clues from P. donghaiense and A. tamarense inhibited the growth of K. mikimotoi but increased the production of hemolytic toxins. Conversely, K. mikimotoi strongly inhibited the growth of caged P. donghaiense and A. tamarense. In addition, the ingestion of K. mikimotoi by M. mongolica induced the production of hemolytic toxins in K. mikimotoi. Taken together, our results suggest that the presence of other microalgae and grazers may be as important as environmental factors for controlling the production of hemolytic substances. K. mikimotoi secreted allelochemicals other than unstable fatty acids with hemolytic activity. The production of hemolytic toxins in dinoflagellates was not only dependent on resource availability, but also on the risk of predation. Hemolytic toxins likely play an important role as chemical deterrents secreted by K. mikimotoi.

  10. Platelet transfusion in chemotherapy patients: comparison of the effect of intravenous infusion pumps versus gravity transfusion.

    PubMed

    Meess, A

    2015-01-01

    Platelet concentrates are given to patients suffering with severe thrombocytopenia usually by a gravity transfusion procedure. Increasing patient numbers that are in need of this treatment increase the pressure on hospital staff and space. In order to combat time issues, the use of medical devices such as intravenous infusion pumps are thought to be beneficial for time and simultaneously for safety in transfusion practices. By using infusion pumps, platelet concentrates can be transfused in less time and provide accurate volume measurements. Manufacturers of infusion pumps claim that these devices are safe to be used for blood products including platelet concentrates. However, published studies were performed on older models and newer devices are on the market now. The purpose of this study is to evaluate infusion pumps, which are claimed to be suitable for blood products and to investigate the impact the pumps had on platelets. Furthermore, the study revealed if the intravenous infusion pumps are safe to be used for platelet transfusion as claimed by manufacturers. A simulated transfusion was performed using the Carefusion Alaris GP Plus volumetric pump and Fresenius Kabi Volumat Agilia infusion pump. Samples were taken from expired platelet concentrates before and after passage through the pump. All samples were investigated for full blood count that included platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW) and a plateletcrit (PCT). The samples were then centrifuged to achieve platelet-poor plasma and then tested for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). A power calculation performed on the statistical power analysis program G*power indicated a requirement of 82 samples for a power of 80%. Statistical analysis was performed with the IBM SPSS statistic software. A paired sample t-test was used to calculate mean, standard deviation and P values for the infusion pumps used. The Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test was used to evaluate results that had a non-normal distribution. No statistically significant changes were found for LDH, PDW and platelet count with the Carefusion infusion pump. PCT and MPV were found to have a statistically significant change with P values of 0.005 and 0.001, respectively, and showed a decrease in their values. The Fresenius Kabi infusion pump has shown no statistically difference in LDH, platelet count, PCT or PDW, with P values of 0.075, 0.425, 0.151 and 0.397, respectively. The MPV showed a statistically significant decrease in its value with a P value < 0.043. Although only two pumps were tested, the results achieved by testing the devices revealed that there was no influence on the platelet enzyme LDH or the platelet count as the main parameters. However, the findings showed that there was statistically significant differences in MPV of the expired platelet concentrates. PMID:26510266

  11. Survival of red blood cells after transfusion: processes and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Bosman, Giel J. C. G. M.

    2013-01-01

    The currently available data suggest that efforts toward improving the quality of red blood cell (RBC) blood bank products should concentrate on: (1) preventing the removal of a considerable fraction of the transfused RBCs that takes place within the first hours after transfusion; (2) minimizing the interaction of the transfused RBCs with the patient's immune system. These issues are important in reducing the number and extent of the damaging side effects of transfusions, such as generation of alloantibodies and autoantibodies and iron accumulation, especially in transfusion-dependent patients. Thus, it becomes important for blood bank research not only to assess the classical RBC parameters for quality control during storage, but even more so to identify the parameters that predict RBC survival, function and behavior in the patient after transfusion. These parameters are likely to result from elucidation of the mechanisms that underly physiological RBC aging in vivo, and that lead to the generation of senescent cell antigens and the accumulation of damaged molecules in vesicles. Also, study of RBC pathology-related mechanisms, such as encountered in various hemoglobinopathies and membranopathies, may help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying a storage-associated increase in susceptibility to physiological stress conditions. Recent data indicate that a combination of new approaches in vitro to mimick RBC behavior in vivo, the growing knowledge of the signaling networks that regulate RBC structure and function, and the rapidly expanding set of proteomic and metabolomic data, will be instrumental to identify the storage-associated processes that control RBC survival after transfusion. PMID:24391593

  12. Deletions affecting hemolytic and toxin activities of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Bellalou, J; Sakamoto, H; Ladant, D; Geoffroy, C; Ullmann, A

    1990-01-01

    The Bordetella pertussis cyaA gene encodes a virulence factor which is a bifunctional protein exhibiting calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase and hemolytic activities (P. Glaser, H. Sakamoto, J. Bellahov, A. Ullmann, and A. Danchin, EMBO J. 7:3997-4004, 1988). We characterized the hemolytic and toxin activities of the 200-kilodalton (kDa) bifunctional (CyaA) protein and showed that, whether cell associated or secreted, the 200-kDa CyaA protein carries hemolytic and toxin functions. The catalytically active 45-kDa form of adenylate cyclase released by proteolytic digestion of the 200-kDa CyaA protein displayed neither hemolytic nor toxin activities. We constructed in-phase deletions in the 3' region of the cyaA gene, which presumably carries the hemolytic determinant, and showed that the resulting proteins exhibited wild-type adenylate cyclase activity and were secreted without processing into culture supernatants. The hemolytic activities of these mutant CyaA proteins were severely reduced, and their toxin activities were abolished. These results suggest that the structural integrity of the 200-kDa CyaA protein is necessary for toxin activity and that distinct structural determinants within the CyaA protein are involved in secretion, pore formation, and entry into target cells. Images PMID:2401563

  13. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Post-Kidney Transplantation: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Alasfar, Sami; Alachkar, Nada

    2014-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disorder characterized by over-activation and dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway. Its estimated prevalence is 1–2 per million. The disease is characterized by thrombotic microangiopathy, which causes anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. aHUS has more severe course compared to typical (infection-induced) HUS and is frequently characterized by relapses that leads to end stage renal disease. For a long time, kidney transplantation for these patients was contraindicated because of high rate of recurrence and subsequent renal graft loss. The post-kidney transplantation recurrence rate largely depends on the pathogenetic mechanisms involved. However, over the past several years, advancements in the understanding and therapeutics of aHUS have allowed successful kidney transplantation in these patients. Eculizumab, which is a complement C5 antibody that inhibits complement factor 5a and subsequent formation of the membrane-attack complex, has been used in prevention and treatment of post-transplant aHUS recurrence. In this paper, we present two new cases of aHUS patients who underwent successful kidney transplantation in our center with the use of prophylactic and maintenance eculizumab therapy that have not been published before. The purpose of reporting these two cases is to emphasize the importance of using eculizumab as a prophylactic therapy to prevent aHUS recurrence post-transplant in high-risk patients. We will also review the current understanding of the genetics of aHUS, the pathogenesis of its recurrence after kidney transplantation, and strategies for prevention and treatment of post-transplant aHUS recurrence. PMID:25593925

  14. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Differential Diagnosis from TTP/HUS and Management

    PubMed Central

    Yenerel, Mustafa N.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare form of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). It has an unfavorable outcome with death rates as high as 25% during the acute phase and up to 50% of cases progressing to end-stage renal failure. Uncontrolled complement activation through the alternative pathway is thought to be the main underlying pathopysiology of aHUS and corresponds to all the deleterious findings of the disease. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and Shiga toxin-associated HUS are the 2 other important TMA diseases. Although differentiating HUS from TTP is relatively easy in children with a preceding diarrheal illness or invasive S. pneumoniae, differentiating aHUS from TTP or other microangiopathic disorders can present a major diagnostic challenge in adults. ADAMTS13 analysis is currently the most informative diagnostic test for differentiating TTP, congenital TTP, and aHUS. Today empiric plasma therapy still is recommended by expert opinion to be used as early as possible in any patient with symptoms of aHUS. The overall treatment goal remains restoration of a physiological balance between activation and control of the alternative complement pathway. So it is a reasonable approach to block the terminal complement complex with eculizumab in order to prevent further organ injury and increase the likelihood organ recovery. Persistence of hemolysis or lack of improvement of renal function after 3-5 daily plasmaphereses have to be regarded as the major criteria for uncontrolled TMA even if platelet count has normalized and as an indication to switch the treatment to eculizumab. Eculizumab has changed the future perspectives of patients with aHUS and both the FDA and the EMA have approved it as life-long treatment. However, there are still some unresolved issues about the follow-up such as the optimal duration of eculizumab treatment and whether it can be stopped or how to stop the therapy. PMID:25319590

  15. A case of transfusion independence in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome using deferasirox, sustained for two years after stopping therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, D.; Hsia, C.C.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (mds) experience clinical complications related to progressive marrow failure and have an increased risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia. Frequent red blood cell transfusion can lead to clinical iron overload and is associated with decreased survival in mds patients. Iron chelation therapy reduces markers of iron overload and prevents end-organ damage. Here, we present the case of a patient with low-risk mds with transfusional iron overload. He was treated for 2 years with an oral iron chelator, deferasirox, and after 12 months of treatment, he experienced a hemoglobin increase of more than 50 g/L, becoming transfusion-independent. He has remained transfusion-independent, with a normal hemoglobin level, for more than 2 years since stopping chelation therapy. Hematologic and erythroid responses have previously been reported in mds patients treated with iron chelation. The durability of our patient’s response suggests that iron chelation might alter the natural history of mds in some patients. PMID:25908918

  16. A case of transfusion independence in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome using deferasirox, sustained for two years after stopping therapy.

    PubMed

    Sanford, D; Hsia, C C

    2015-04-01

    Patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (mds) experience clinical complications related to progressive marrow failure and have an increased risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia. Frequent red blood cell transfusion can lead to clinical iron overload and is associated with decreased survival in mds patients. Iron chelation therapy reduces markers of iron overload and prevents end-organ damage. Here, we present the case of a patient with low-risk mds with transfusional iron overload. He was treated for 2 years with an oral iron chelator, deferasirox, and after 12 months of treatment, he experienced a hemoglobin increase of more than 50 g/L, becoming transfusion-independent. He has remained transfusion-independent, with a normal hemoglobin level, for more than 2 years since stopping chelation therapy. Hematologic and erythroid responses have previously been reported in mds patients treated with iron chelation. The durability of our patient's response suggests that iron chelation might alter the natural history of mds in some patients. PMID:25908918

  17. Eculizumab in Typical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS) With Neurological Involvement.

    PubMed

    Pape, Lars; Hartmann, Hans; Bange, Franz Christoph; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Bueltmann, Eva; Ahlenstiel-Grunow, Thurid

    2015-06-01

    In typical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) approximately 25% of patients show central nervous system (CNS) involvement often leading to serious long-term disabilities. We used the C5-complement inhibitor Eculizumab as rescue therapy. From 2011 to 2014, 11 children (median age 22 months, range 11-175) with enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli-positive HUS requiring dialysis who had seizures (11/11) and/or were in a stupor or coma (10/11) were treated with Eculizumab. Two patients enrolled on the Safety and Efficacy Study of Eculizumab in Shiga-Toxin Producing E coli Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome (STEC-HUS) each received 6 doses of Eculizumab, 3 patients 2 doses, and 6 patients 1 dose. Laboratory diagnostics of blood samples and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed as per center practice. Data were analyzed retrospectively. Cranial MRI was abnormal in 8 of 10 patients with findings in the basal ganglia and/or white matter. A 2-year-old boy with severe cardiac involvement and status epilepticus needed repeated cardio-pulmonary resuscitation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. He died 8 days after start of Eculizumab treatment. Two patients with hemorrhagic colitis and repeated seizures required artificial ventilation for 6 and 16 days, respectively. At the time of discharge, 1 patient showed severe neurological impairment and 1 mild neurological impairment. The 8 surviving patients experienced no further seizures after the first dose of Eculizumab. Three patients showed mild neurological impairment at discharge, whilst the remaining 5 showed no impairment. The platelets normalized 4 days (median) after the first dose of Eculizumab (range 0-20 days). The mean duration of dialysis after the first dose of Eculizumab was 14.1 ± 6.1 days. In children with typical HUS and CNS involvement early use of Eculizumab appears to improve neurological outcome. In severe HUS cases which progress rapidly with multiple organ involvement, late treatment with Eculizumab seems to show less benefit. We speculate that prophylactic Eculizumab therapy before development of neurological symptoms could be advantageous. PMID:26091445

  18. Twin-to-Twin Transfusion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mahieu-Caputo, Dominique; Dommergues, Marc; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Lacoste, Mireille; Cai, Yi; Narcy, Françoise; Jolly, Dominique; Gonzales, Marie; Dumez, Yves; Gubler, Marie-Claire

    2000-01-01

    The twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTS) results from an unbalanced blood supply through placental anastomoses in monochorionic twins. It induces growth restriction, renal tubular dysgenesis, and oliguria in the donor and visceromegaly and polyuria in the recipient. A better understanding of its pathophysiology could contribute to improving the management of TTS, which still carries a high perinatal mortality in both twins. As well as several other candidates, the renin-angiotensin system might be involved in TTS. To evaluate its role in the pathogenesis of the syndrome, we studied the kidneys of 21 twin pairs who died from TTS at 19 to 30 weeks, compared with 39 individuals in a control group, using light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization. The overexpression of the renin protein and transcript with frequent evidence of renin synthesis by mesangial cells was observed in the donor kidneys, presumably as a consequence of chronic renal hypoperfusion. This upregulation of renin synthesis might be beneficial to restore euvolemia. In severe cases of TTS, however, angiotensin-II-induced vasoconstriction acts as an additional deleterious factor by further reducing the renal blood flow in donors. In recipients, renin expression was virtually absent, possibly because it was down-regulated by hypervolemia. However, in addition to congestion and hemorrhagic infarction, there were severe glomerular and arterial lesions resembling those observed in polycythemia- or hypertension-induced microangiopathy. We speculate that fetal hypertension in the recipient might be partly mediated by the transfer of circulating renin produced by the donor, through the placental vascular shunts. PMID:10666392

  19. Retroviral infections transmitted by blood transfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, S. G.; Fang, C.; Williams, A.

    1990-01-01

    Modifications in donor screening and the introduction of laboratory testing of donated blood for anti-HIV-1 and anti-HTLV-I have resulted in a significant reduction in the risks of retroviral infections from blood transfusion. Presently, the American Red Cross detects an average of eight carriers of human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) per 100,000 otherwise acceptable blood donors (0.008 percent), compared with an average of 35 per 100,000 (0.035 percent) when testing for HIV-1 antibodies began in 1985. Surveillance studies in the United States indicate a small likelihood that HIV-2 carriers will pass current screening procedures and be accepted as blood donors. Even if an HIV-2-infected person were to be accepted as a blood donor, there is a 42-92 percent likelihood that this person's blood would be detected as infective for HIV-2 and excluded because of serological cross-reactions that occur in the EIA for HIV-1 antibodies. During 1989, which was the first year that donated blood was routinely tested for antibodies to human T-lymphotropic virus, type I (HTLV-I) in the United States, approximately nine in 100,000 donors (0.009 percent) were confirmed positive for antibodies to HTLV-I, and their donated blood was excluded. Subsequent testing has revealed that a significant number of these persons whose sera was reactive by the HTLV-I EIA were, in fact, infected by HTLV-II. Epidemiological studies of human retroviral infections (HIV-1, HIV-2, HTLV-I, and HTLV-II) continue to provide important data and direction for improving criteria for qualifying blood donors. PMID:1981409

  20. [What are the rules and regulations for blood product transfusion in France?].

    PubMed

    Pélissier, Elisabeth; Bierling, Philippe

    2009-01-20

    In France, there are many rules and regulations for blood product transfusion. The clinician who prescribes a blood transfusion must go step by step, except for a vital emergency (must be procedured). He must have: informed consent, immunohaematologic results, specific prescription with quantity and quality of products, realisation of blood transfusion with many administrative and technical necessary controls, and prevent adverse events. A nurse or a midwife can realise the blood transfusion if there is a clinician able to intervene quickly. The blood transfusion must be noted in a medical file which is kept for thirty years. Absolute respect of these rules is the guarantee of transfusion security. PMID:19253890

  1. [Septic shock following platelet transfusion contaminated with Citrobacter koseri in a child with postchemotherapy febrile neutropenia].

    PubMed

    Tichit, R; Saumet, L; Marchandin, H; Haouy, S; Latry, P; Sirvent, N

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial transfusion risk is currently the greatest infectious risk of blood transfusion. We report the case of a child with postchemotherapy febrile neutropenia who presented septic shock following platelet transfusion contaminated with Citrobacter koseri. The life-threatening development could have been avoided by strict compliance with good clinical practice. The stability of mortality rates due to adverse effects of bacterial proliferation during platelet transfusions in France since 1994 calls for optimization of all preventive measures throughout the transfusion chain and perfect knowledge of transfusion rules by medical staff and care givers. PMID:26552624

  2. Dose of Prophylactic Platelet Transfusions and Prevention of Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Slichter, Sherrill J.; Kaufman, Richard M.; Assmann, Susan F.; McCullough, Jeffrey; Triulzi, Darrell J.; Strauss, Ronald G.; Gernsheimer, Terry B.; Ness, Paul M.; Brecher, Mark E.; Josephson, Cassandra D.; Konkle, Barbara A.; Woodson, Robert D.; Ortel, Thomas L.; Hillyer, Christopher D.; Skerrett, Donna L.; McCrae, Keith R.; Sloan, Steven R.; Uhl, Lynne; George, James N.; Aquino, Victor M.; Manno, Catherine S.; McFarland, Janice G.; Hess, John R.; Leissinger, Cindy; Granger, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND We conducted a trial of prophylactic platelet transfusions to evaluate the effect of platelet dose on bleeding in patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. METHODS We randomly assigned hospitalized patients undergoing hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation or chemotherapy for hematologic cancers or solid tumors to receive prophylactic platelet transfusions at a low dose, a medium dose, or a high dose (1.1×1011, 2.2×1011, or 4.4×1011 platelets per square meter of body-surface area, respectively), when morning platelet counts were 10,000 per cubic millimeter or lower. Clinical signs of bleeding were assessed daily. The primary end point was bleeding of grade 2 or higher (as defined on the basis of World Health Organization criteria). RESULTS In the 1272 patients who received at least one platelet transfusion, the primary end point was observed in 71%, 69%, and 70% of the patients in the low-dose group, the medium-dose group, and the high-dose group, respectively (differences were not significant). The incidences of higher grades of bleeding, and other adverse events, were similar among the three groups. The median number of platelets transfused was significantly lower in the low-dose group (9.25×1011) than in the medium-dose group (11.25×1011) or the high-dose group (19.63×1011) (P = 0.002 for low vs. medium, P<0.001 for high vs. low and high vs. medium), but the median number of platelet transfusions given was significantly higher in the low-dose group (five, vs. three in the medium-dose and three in the high-dose group; P<0.001 for low vs. medium and low vs. high). Bleeding occurred on 25% of the study days on which morning platelet counts were 5000 per cubic millimeter or lower, as compared with 17% of study days on which platelet counts were 6000 to 80,000 per cubic millimeter (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS Low doses of platelets administered as a prophylactic transfusion led to a decreased number of platelets transfused per patient but an increased number of transfusions given. At doses between 1.1×1011 and 4.4×1011 platelets per square meter, the number of platelets in the prophylactic transfusion had no effect on the incidence of bleeding. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00128713.) PMID:20164484

  3. Detection of autologous blood transfusions in athletes: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Mørkeberg, Jakob

    2012-07-01

    Autologous blood transfusions (ABTs) has been used by athletes for approximately 4 decades to enhance their performance. Although the method was prohibited by the International Olympic Committee in the mid 1980s, no direct detection method has yet been developed and implemented by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Several indirect methods have been proposed with the majority relying on changes in erythropoiesis-sensitive blood markers. Compared with the first methods developed in 1987, the sensitivity of subsequent tests has not improved the detection of blood doping. Nevertheless, the use of sophisticated statistical algorithms has assured a higher level of specificity in subsequent detection models, which is a crucial aspect of antidoping testing particularly to avoid "false positives." Today, the testing markers with the best sensitivity/specificity ratio are the Hbmr model (an algorithm based on the total amount of circulating hemoglobin level [hemoglobin level mass] and percentage of reticulocytes, 4.51·ln(Hbmass)-?%ret) and the OFF-hr model (algorithm based on hemoglobin level concentration and percentage of reticulocytes, Hb(g/L)-60·?%ret). Only the OFF-hr model is currently approved by WADA. Recently, alternative indirect strategies for detecting blood doping have been proposed. One method is based upon a transfusion-induced immune-response resulting in specific changes in gene expression related to leukocytes such as T lymphocytes. Another method relies on detecting increased plasticizer metabolite levels in the urine caused by the leakage of plasticizers from the blood bags used during the blood storage. These methods need further development and validation across different types of transfusion regimes before they can be implemented. In addition, several research projects have been funded by WADA in recent years and are now under development including "Detection of Autologous Blood Transfusions Using Activated Red Blood Cells (the red blood cells eNOS system)" and "Detection of Autologous Blood Transfusion by Proteomic: Screening to find Unique Biomarkers, Detecting Blood Manipulation from Total Hemoglobin Mass using 15-nitric Oxide as a Tracer Gas, Storage Contamination as a Potential Diagnostic Test for Autologous Blood Transfusion and Test for Blood Transfusion (Autologous/Homologous) based on Changes of Erythrocyte Membrane Protome" (WADA, WADA Funded Research Projects. http://www.wada-ama.org/en/Science-Medicine/Research/Funded-Research-Projects/. 2010). Although strategies to detect autologous blood transfusion have improved, a highly sensitive test to detect small volumes of transfused autologous blood has not yet been implemented. PMID:22119492

  4. Toward a patient-based paradigm for blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Albert; Vamvakas, Eleftherios

    2014-01-01

    The current “manufacturing paradigm” of transfusion practice has detached transfusion from the clinical environment. As an example, fresh whole blood in large-volume hemorrhage may be superior to whole blood reconstituted from multiple components. Multicomponent apheresis can overcome logistical difficulties in matching patient needs with fresh component availability and can deliver the benefits of fresh whole blood. Because of the different transfusion needs of patients in emerging economies and the vulnerability of these blood systems to emerging infections, fresh whole blood and multicomponent apheresis can better meet patient needs when compared with transplants of the “manufacturing paradigm”. We propose that patient blood management, along with panels of repeat, paid, accredited apheresis and fresh whole-blood donors can be used in emerging economies to support decentralized blood services. This alternative transfusion–medicine paradigm could eventually also be adopted by established economies to focus transfusion medicine on local patient needs and to alleviate the problem of the aging volunteer donor base. PMID:24520208

  5. [Blood transfusion in emergency settings: French military health service experience].

    PubMed

    Sailliol, A; Ausset, S; Peytel, E

    2010-12-01

    Blood transfusion is required in a number of emergency settings and the French military health service (FMHS) has issued specific guidelines for the treatment of war casualties. These guidelines take into account European standards and laws, NATO standards, and also public sentiment regarding transfusion. These guidelines reflect a determination to control the process and to avoid the improvisation frequently associated with wartime transfusion. The evolution in warfare (terrorism and bombing more frequent than gunshot) and the wide use of body armor have deeply changed the clinical presentation of war injuries. These now involve the extremities in 80% of cases, with extensive tissue damage and heavy blood loss. The FMHS recommends that war casualties with hemorrhagic shock be brought quickly to a medical treatment facility (MTF) after first-line treatment applied through buddy aid or by medics. In the MTF, before an early Medevac, a damage control surgery will be performed, with resuscitation using freeze-dried plasma, red blood cells and fresh whole blood. The French military blood bank is responsible for blood product supply, training and medical advice regarding transfusion therapy during wartime, as well as hemovigilance. All transfusion therapy practices are periodically assessed but research on whole blood pathogen reduction is being conducted in order to reduce the residual infectious risk associated with this product. PMID:21051268

  6. Update on hemolytic uremic syndrome: Diagnostic and therapeutic recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Bertoni, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a rare disease. In this work the authors review the recent findings on HUS, considering the different etiologic and pathogenetic classifications. New findings in genetics and, in particular, mutations of genes that encode the complement-regulatory proteins have improved our understanding of atypical HUS. Similarly, the complement proteins are clearly involved in all types of thrombotic microangiopathy: typical HUS, atypical HUS and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Furthermore, several secondary HUS appear to be related to abnormalities in complement genes in predisposed patients. The authors highlight the therapeutic aspects of this rare disease, examining both “traditional therapy” (including plasma therapy, kidney and kidney-liver transplantation) and “new therapies”. The latter include anti-Shiga-toxin antibodies and anti-C5 monoclonal antibody “eculizumab”. Eculizumab has been recently launched for the treatment of the atypical HUS, but it appears to be effective in the treatment of typical HUS and in TTP. Future therapies are in phases I and II. They include anti-C5 antibodies, which are more purified, less immunogenic and absorbed orally and, anti-C3 antibodies, which are more powerful, but potentially less safe. Additionally, infusions of recombinant complement-regulatory proteins are a potential future therapy. PMID:24255888

  7. Thrombotic microangiopathy, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Ruggenenti, P; Noris, M; Remuzzi, G

    2001-09-01

    The term thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) defines a lesion of vessel wall thickening (mainly arterioles or capillaries), intraluminal platelet thrombosis, and partial or complete obstruction of the vessel lumina. Depending on whether renal or brain lesions prevail, two pathologically indistinguishable but somehow clinically different entities have been described: the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and the thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Injury to the endothelial cell is the central and likely inciting factor in the sequence of events leading to TMA. Loss of physiological thromboresistance, leukocyte adhesion to damaged endothelium, complement consumption, abnormal von Willebrand factor release and fragmentation, and increased vascular shear stress may then sustain and amplify the microangiopathic process. Intrinsic abnormalities of the complement system and of the von Willebrand factor pathway may account for a genetic predisposition to the disease that may play a paramount role in particular in familial and recurrent forms. Outcome is usually good in childhood, Shiga toxin-associated HUS, whereas renal and neurological sequelae are more frequently reported in adult, atypical, and familial forms of HUS and in TTP. Plasma infusion or exchange is the only treatment of proven efficacy. Bilateral nephrectomy and splenectomy may serve as rescue therapies in very selected cases of plasma resistant HUS or recurrent TTP, respectively. PMID:11532079

  8. Management of hemolytic anemia following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Holbro, Andreas; Passweg, Jakob R

    2015-12-01

    Hemolytic anemia (HA) is a frequent condition with variable pathophysiology. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is unique because it is performed across the ABO blood group barrier. Thereby, there is a transfer of plasma, red blood cells, and immunocompetent cells from the donor to the recipient, possibly leading to HA, due to red blood cell incompatibility. The underlying disease, drugs (particularly those used for conditioning and immunosuppressants), infections, graft-versus-host disease, and autoimmune diseases may all contribute to the clinical and laboratory picture of HA. Additionally, transplantation-associated thrombotic microangiopathy (TA-TMA) may occur and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This review highlights the current knowledge on HA after allogeneic HSCT, particularly due to ABO incompatibility. We follow the timeline of the transplantation process and discuss investigations, differential diagnosis, and prophylactic measures including graft processing to avoid hemolysis in case of ABO incompatibility. Finally, current therapeutic approaches for both TA-TMA and post-HSCT autoimmune HA, which are associated with high morbidity and mortality, are discussed. PMID:26637746

  9. New Insights in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Barcellini, Wilma

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is caused by the increased destruction of red blood cells (RBCs) by anti-RBC autoantibodies with or without complement activation. RBC destruction may occur both by a direct lysis through the sequential activation of the final components of the complement cascade (membrane attack complex), or by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). The pathogenic role of autoantibodies depends on their class (the most frequent are IgG and IgM), subclass, thermal amplitude (warm and cold forms),as well as affinity and efficiency in activating complement. Several cytokines and cytotoxic mechanisms (CD8+ T and natural killer cells) are further involved in RBC destruction. Moreover, activated macrophages carrying Fc receptors may recognize and phagocyte erythrocytes opsonized by autoantibodies and complement. Direct complement-mediated lysis takes place mainly in the circulations and liver, whereas ADCC, cytotoxicity, and phagocytosis occur preferentially in the spleen and lymphoid organs. The degree of intravascular hemolysis is 10-fold greater than extravascular one. Finally, the efficacy of the erythroblastic compensatory response can greatly influence the clinical picture of AIHA. The interplay and relative burden of all these pathogenic mechanisms give reason for the great clinical heterogeneity of AIHAs, from fully compensated to rapidly evolving fatal cases. PMID:26696796

  10. Hospital Blood Transfusion Patterns During Major Noncardiac Surgery and Surgical Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alicia; Trivedi, Amal N.; Jiang, Lan; Vezeridis, Michael; Henderson, William G.; Wu, Wen-Chih

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We retrospectively examined intraoperative blood transfusion patterns at US veteran's hospitals through description of national patterns of intraoperative blood transfusion by indication for transfusion in the elderly; assessment of temporal trends in the use of intraoperative blood transfusion; and relationship of institutional use of intraoperative blood transfusion to hospital 30-day risk-adjusted postoperative mortality rates. Limited data exist on the pattern of intraoperative blood transfusion by indication for transfusion at the hospital level, and the relationship between intraoperative transfusion rates and institutional surgical outcomes. Using the Department of Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program database, we assigned 424,015 major noncardiac operations among elderly patients (?65 years) in 117 veteran's hospitals, from 1997 to 2009, into groups based on indication for intraoperative blood transfusion according to literature and clinical guidelines. We then examined institutional variations and temporal trends in surgical blood use based on these indications, and the relationship between these institutional patterns of transfusion and 30-day postoperative mortality. Intraoperative transfusion occurred in 38,056/424,015 operations (9.0%). Among the 64,390 operations with an indication for transfusion, there was wide variation (median: 49.9%, range: 8.7%–76.2%) in hospital transfusion rates, a yearly decline in transfusion rates (average 1.0%/y), and an inverse relationship between hospital intraoperative transfusion rates and hospital 30-day risk-adjusted mortality (adjusted mortality of 9.8?±?2.8% vs 8.3?±?2.1% for lowest and highest tertiles of hospital transfusion rates, respectively, P?=?0.02). In contrast, for the 225,782 operations with no indication for transfusion, there was little variation in hospital transfusion rates (median 0.7%, range: 0%–3.4%), no meaningful temporal change in transfusion (average 0.0%/y), and similar risk-adjusted 30-day mortality across all tertiles of hospital transfusion rates. Among patients ?65 years with an indication for intraoperative transfusion, intraoperative transfusion patterns varied widely across hospitals and declined through the 1997 to 2009 study period. Hospitals with higher transfusion rates in these patients have lower risk-adjusted 30-day postoperative mortality rates. PMID:26266384

  11. Blood transfusion at the time of the First World War--practice and promise at the birth of transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Boulton, F; Roberts, D J

    2014-12-01

    The centenary of the start of the First World War has stirred considerable interest in the political, social, military and human factors of the time and how they interacted to produce and sustain the material and human destruction in the 4 years of the war and beyond. Medical practice may appear distant and static and perhaps seems to have been somewhat ineffectual in the face of so much trauma and in the light of the enormous advances in medicine and surgery over the last century. However, this is an illusion of time and of course medical, surgical and psychiatric knowledge and procedures were developing rapidly at the time and the war years accelerated implementation of many important advances. Transfusion practice lay at the heart of resuscitation, and although direct transfusion from donor to recipient was still used, Geoffrey Keynes from Britain, Oswald Robertson from America and his namesake Lawrence Bruce Robertson from Canada, developed methods for indirect transfusion from donor to recipient by storing blood in bottles and also blood-banking that laid the foundation of modern transfusion medicine. This review explores the historical setting behind the development of blood transfusion up to the start of the First World War and on how they progressed during the war and afterwards. A fresh look may renew interest in how a novel medical speciality responded to the needs of war and of post-war society. PMID:25586955

  12. A home blood transfusion programme for beta-thalassaemia patients.

    PubMed

    Madgwick, K V; Yardumian, A

    1999-06-01

    Although home transfusion programmes are relatively common in the USA (Anon, 1990, Home Care in the 1990s. Council on Scientific Affairs. Journal of the American Medical Association, 263, 1241-1244), this type of treatment has only recently been considered in Britain and, where it is in operation, is generally supervised by trained nursing staff or via a hospice. North Middlesex Hospital now has 3 years experience of a home transfusion programme operating for beta-thalassaemia major patients, in which relatives are trained and responsible for supervision of the red-cell transfusions at home. For families who request this service, and who are willing and able to undertake it responsibly, the scheme offers the advantages of improved patient comfort, reduced absences from education or employment and reduced hospital bed usage. Patients and their carers express improved satisfaction with the treatment delivered in this way. PMID:10354383

  13. A framework to support safe blood transfusion practice.

    PubMed

    Pirie, E; Green, J

    In response to reports of fragmentation in care, treatment delays and concern over the safety of patients receiving blood transfusion support, a collaborative project between NHS Blood and Transplant and the Scottish National Blood Transfusion Service explored the feasibility of nurses and midwives extending their role to prescribe blood components. The project identified that there were no legal barriers to role development and, following extensive consultation, a governance framework to support safe practice is now available for all NHS trusts and boards. PMID:20806609

  14. [Integrating the blood transfusion service into hospital activities].

    PubMed

    Siegenthaler, P; Kocher, P

    1975-06-14

    The traditional and present activities of a regional transfusion center catering for the blood product requirements of a population of some 250 000 are reviewed. It is suggested that the work of a blood bank should be extended to the laboratory sector and cover immunohematology, hematology and coagulation. Through the laboratory the transfusion center would thus be in close liaison with hospital clinical departments. It is of advantage for the staff of the enlarged blood bank to perform some degree of clinical activity, to facilitate discussion of clinical and technical problems relating to hematological disorders in general. PMID:1145163

  15. [Experience of mismatched blood transfusion for an rh negative patient and reconsideration of emergency blood transfusion manual in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Aya; Hoshi, Takuo; Nishikawa, Masashi; Aya, Daisuke; Ueda, Hiroshi; Yokouchi, Takako; Tanaka, Makoto

    2013-08-01

    We report a B Rh negative patient undergoing total pelvic exenteration, who received both ABO and Rh incompatible packed red blood cells in an emergency situation. After this experience, we revised the manual of emergency blood transfusion. We defined level of severity to share information with surgeon, nurses, anesthesiologists and the member of the blood center. We changed anesthesia information management system for showing blood type including Duffy blood group system and checking out whether we can transfuse Rh positive blood to Rh negative patient in an emergency situation at the timeout of surgery. PMID:23984584

  16. In vitro studies of the hemolytic activity of microemulsions in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Rosa M; José García-Celma, M; Pilar Vinardell, M; Mitjans, Montserrat

    2005-10-01

    Hemolytic activity in human erythrocytes as alternative to in vivo testing was used as a potential screening method to evaluate irritant potential of microemulsions for possible application in pharmaceutical and cosmetic formulations. Microemulsions were prepared by mixing surfactants and oil and slowly titrating the mixtures with aliquots of phosphate buffer saline or water. All microemulsions were characterized by dynamic light scattering to determine both the mean droplet size and droplet distribution. Microemulsion droplet size decreased as aqueous component increased. No differences in droplet size were observed between formulations containing phosphate buffered saline or water. The hemolytic activity was measured photometrically by the RBC assay, based in the cell membrane lysis, to estimate the potential irritation of both surfactants and microemulsions selected with water or PBS as aqueous component. The most hemolytic microemulsions corresponded to those containing the surfactant Labrasol, with or without butyl lactate, and no differences were found between the hemolytic activity between these components and microemulsions containing them. The highest hemolytic activity of microemulsions in this study may be attributed to the excipient used in the formulations. We should avoid the use of high amounts of Labrasol and butyl lactate in microemulsions because they may be potential irritants. PMID:16054795

  17. Antibodies to Leptospira among blood donors in higher-risk areas of Australia: possible implications for transfusion safety

    PubMed Central

    Faddy, Helen; Seed, Clive; Lau, Colleen; Racloz, Vanessa; Flower, Robert; Smythe, Lee; Burns, Mary-Anne; Dohnt, Michael; Craig, Scott; Harley, Robert; Weinstein, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is one of the most common bacterial zoonoses worldwide, and clinical manifestations range from asymptomatic infection to acute febrile illness, multi-organ failure and death. Asymptomatic, acute bacteraemia in a blood donor provides a potential for transfusion-transmission, although only a single such case from India has been recorded. Human leptospirosis is uncommon in developed countries; however, the state of Queensland in Australia has one of the highest rates among developed countries, especially after increased rainfall. This study examined the prevalence of antibodies to Leptospira spp. in blood donors residing in higher-risk areas of Australia, to evaluate the appropriateness of current blood safety guidelines. Materials and methods Plasma samples collected from blood donors residing in higher-risk areas of Australia during 2009 and 2011 were included in the study. All samples were tested for the presence of antibodies to 22 leptospiral serovars using the microscopic agglutination test. Result No sample had antibody titres suggestive of a current or recent infection, however, seven samples (1.44%, 95% CI: 0.38–2.50%) had titres suggestive of a past infection. Discussion This study provides data that may support the appropriateness of current relevant donor selection policies in Australia. Given that the risk profile for leptospirosis is expanding and that the infection is likely to become more prevalent with climate change, this disease may become more of a concern for transfusion safety in the future. PMID:24960651

  18. [Reporting and notification of transfusion serious adverse events in France].

    PubMed

    Daurat, G

    2010-12-01

    Surveillance of serious adverse events in transfusion has recently been enforced in all European Union member states, and in France in 2007. This is an important expansion of the field of haemovigilance towards risk management in transfusion from donor selection to recipients follow up. Participation in this notification system is mandatory for all health professionals. They have to report immediately all serious adverse events to the haemovigilance officer of their hospital or transfusion centre. In accordance with a national procedure, the latter has to notify all serious adverse events to regional and national competent authorities using a web-based application. They also have to perform a root case analysis and propose corrective measures. However, as the definition of the seriousness of adverse events is still imprecise, there is a dramatic heterogeneity in the notification level among regions. Therefore, basic criteria of evaluation of surveillance systems, such as sensitivity or representativeness, are not fulfilled. Next step will be the introduction of a more precise definition of seriousness, through a list of events to be notified, in order to achieve a quality level similar to that of transfusion adverse reactions surveillance. PMID:21050790

  19. Growth factors and their impact on transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Miller, Y M; Klein, H G

    1996-01-01

    Hematopoietic growth factors, glycoproteins that stimulate self-renewal, differentiation, and proliferation of responsive hematopoietic cells, promise to revolutionize transfusion medicine. Recombinant DNA technology has made several of these cytokines available at pharmacologic doses, and new candidate agents for clinical application appear regularly. Growth factors prescribed for patients have already reduced the requirement for red blood cell and granulocyte transfusions in selected clinical circumstances. A lineage-specific thrombopoietin will likely limit the need for platelet transfusions. Hematopoietic cytokine injections have also been used to increase the number of red blood cells, granulocytes and circulating primitive progenitor cells in blood donors. Cytokine-stimulated peripheral blood progenitor cell infusions have complemented and, in some instances, replaced bone marrow for adjunctive cancer chemotherapy and for bone marrow transplantation. Finally, synergistic combinations of cytokines can effect ex vivo expansion of lymphocytes and of progenitor cells to provide novel blood components. Hematopoietic growth factors are still expensive and their long-term effects remain to be determined. However, as the biologic activities of cytokines and the physiology of hematopoietic progenitor cells become better understood, the clinical application of novel cellular components may redefine the concept of blood transfusion. PMID:8958642

  20. Blood transfusion practice: a nationwide survey in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Verlicchi, Franco; Facco, Giuseppina; Macrì, Michela; Antoncecchi, Stefano; Bonomo, Pietro

    2011-01-01

    Background Blood transfusion is a complex activity. Some of the components of this activity are implementation of standard procedures, evaluation of appropriateness of the blood use, methods for bedside identification of patients and the release of blood in emergencies, during out-of-routine hours and from hospitals lacking a Blood Centre. An overview about how these issues are managed in Italy could be of interest. Materials and methods A survey dealing with some issues regarding blood release was performed, using a questionnaire sent to 278 Italian Blood Centres. Results Out of the 278 Centres, 179 (64%) returned the questionnaire. The geographic distribution of the Centres that responded (80 in the north, 46 in the centre and 53 in the south of Italy) offers a good picture of the Italian reality. Globally there seems to be a relatively uniform application of procedures and guidelines, of methods to identify patients, and of evaluating transfusion appropriateness. The systems used to deal with emergency blood release and blood release in non-routine conditions are more variable. The use of technological resources seems to be disappointingly low. Discussion Although many aspects of the blood transfusion process should be improved, the picture that emerged from the survey seems to show, on the whole, a fair quality of blood transfusion practice in Italian Blood Centres. PMID:21627919

  1. Why People with Cancer Might Need Blood Transfusions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... get large doses of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. This destroys the blood-making cells in the bone marrow. These patients often have very low blood cell counts after the procedure and need transfusions. Last Medical Review: 10/07/2013 Last Revised: 10/07/2013 ...

  2. Emergency blood transfusion services after the 2005 earthquake in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Mujeeb, S A; Jaffery, S H

    2007-01-01

    Background On 8 October 2005, an earthquake measuring 7.6 on the Richter Scale struck the Himalayan region of Kashmir and Hazara divisions, killing an estimated 73?000 people. Soon after, a situation and response analysis of the emergency blood transfusion services was carried out in the affected areas to ascertain specific needs and suggest appropriate measures to assist in the disaster plan. Method A semistructured questionnaire, complete with a checklist and participatory observation method, was used to collect data between 12 and 20 October 2005. Study sites were Abbotabad, Mansehra and Muzzafarabad in Pakistan, and interviewees were surgeons and blood bank personnel. Results Of the seven major hospitals in the area, 3 (43%) had a functional blood transfusion service. Although supply of voluntary blood was abundant, shortage of individual blood groups was noted at each centre. Quality assurance standards were either non?existent or inadequate. Only three blood banks had refrigerators, but with limited storage capacities. A complete breakdown of infrastructure coupled with frequent power failures posed a serious threat to safety of the blood. The continued aftershocks added to the problems. Although initial estimates of blood requirement were high, actual demand noted later was much lower. Discussion Timely establishment of blood banks in disaster areas, is a challenging task. Mobile blood banks can be advantageous in such situations. Organisation at a national level for blood transfusion services and development of a minimum standard of quality assurance in normal times should ensure safe emergency blood transfusion services when disaster strikes. PMID:17183037

  3. Effects of a CME Program on Physicians' Transfusion Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Alan L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The hospital charts of 44 patients who were autologous blood donors undergoing elective orthopedic surgery and a matched group of 44 patients who were not autologous blood donors were analyzed to determine their physicians' transfusion practices. A continuing medical education program was developed. (Author/MLW)

  4. Evaluation of Preoperative and Intraoperative RBC Transfusion Practices at Maputo Central Hospital, Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Zachary; Chen, James; Conceicao, Celson; Hoffman, Risa; Miller, Lee; Taela, Atanasio; DeUgarte, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to evaluate preoperative and intraoperative blood transfusion practices in Hospital Central (Maputo, Mozambique) and estimate the number of potentially avoidable transfusions. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS A retrospective cohort study was performed. Age, comorbidities, hemoglobin, the potential for blood loss, and units of packed red blood cell (RBC) transfusions were recorded. Preoperative transfusions were evaluated to determine whether they met criteria established by the Mozambican Ministry of Health as well as proposed guidelines based on more restrictive protocols. Avoidable blood transfusions were defined as those preoperative transfusions that were not indicated based on these guidelines. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors that predicted transfusion. RESULTS Two-hundred and five patients (age range: 0.1 - 86 years) underwent surgery in the main operating room during the two-week study period. Overall, thirty-five (17%) patients received sixty-eight transfusions. Of these, thirty-six transfusions were given preoperatively and thirty-two were given intraoperatively. Thirty-six percent of preoperative transfusions were avoidable according to national guidelines. Ninety-two percent were avoidable using more restrictive guidelines. The primary predictors of preoperative blood transfusion were lower hemoglobin (odd's ratio 0.390 / 1 g/dl; p<0.0001) and the potential for blood loss (odd's ratio 3.73; p=0.0410). CONCLUSIONS Adherence to existing hemoglobin thresholds recommended by national blood transfusion guidelines could significantly reduce the number of transfusions and the association risk of transfusion-transmissible infections. Adoption of more restrictive guidelines is recommended to further improve blood transfusion utilization and further reduce the transmission risk of HIV and hepatitis. PMID:23692441

  5. Novel hemagglutinating, hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of the intermediate subunit of Entamoeba histolytica lectin

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kentaro; Yahata, Kazuhide; Gopal Dhoubhadel, Bhim; Fujii, Yoshito; Tachibana, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (Gal/GalNAc) inhibitable lectin of Entamoeba histolytica, a common protozoan parasite, has roles in pathogenicity and induction of protective immunity in mouse models of amoebiasis. The lectin consists of heavy (Hgl), light (Lgl), and intermediate (Igl) subunits. Hgl has lectin activity and Lgl does not, but little is known about the activity of Igl. In this study, we assessed various regions of Igl for hemagglutinating activity using recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli. We identified a weak hemagglutinating activity of the protein. Furthermore, we found novel hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of the lectin, which resided in the carboxy-terminal region of the protein. Antibodies against Igl inhibited the hemolytic activity of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites. This is the first report showing hemagglutinating, hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of an amoebic molecule, Igl. PMID:26354528

  6. Guidance on platelet transfusion for patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Nahirniak, Susan; Slichter, Sherrill J; Tanael, Susano; Rebulla, Paolo; Pavenski, Katerina; Vassallo, Ralph; Fung, Mark; Duquesnoy, Rene; Saw, Chee-Loong; Stanworth, Simon; Tinmouth, Alan; Hume, Heather; Ponnampalam, Arjuna; Moltzan, Catherine; Berry, Brian; Shehata, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    Patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia are at an increased risk for hemorrhage and alloimmunization to platelets. Updated guidance for optimizing platelet transfusion therapy is needed as data from recent pivotal trials have the potential to change practice. This guideline, developed by a large international panel using a systematic search strategy and standardized methods to develop recommendations, incorporates recent trials not available when previous guidelines were developed. We found that prophylactic platelet transfusion for platelet counts less than or equal to 10 × 10(9)/L is the optimal approach to decrease the risk of hemorrhage for patients requiring chemotherapy or undergoing allogeneic or autologous transplantation. A low dose of platelets (1.41 × 10(11)/m2) is hemostatically as effective as higher dose of platelets but requires more frequent platelet transfusions suggesting that low-dose platelets may be used in hospitalized patients. For outpatients, a median dose (2.4 × 10(11)/m2) may be more cost-effective to prevent clinic visits only to receive a transfusion. In terms of platelet products, whole blood-derived platelet concentrates can be used interchangeably with apheresis platelets, and ABO-compatible platelet should be given to improve platelet increments and decrease the rate of refractoriness to platelet transfusion. For RhD-negative female children or women of child-bearing potential who have received RhD-positive platelets, Rh immunoglobulin should probably be given to prevent immunization to the RhD antigen. Providing platelet support for the alloimmunized refractory patients with ABO-matched and HLA-selected or crossmatched products is of some benefit, yet the degree of benefit needs to be assessed in the era of leukoreduction. PMID:25537844

  7. Blood management by transfusion triggers: when less is more

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Sana; Szallasi, Arpad

    2012-01-01

    Background We reviewed the annual blood utilisation data at our institution for the past 6 years. The number of packed red blood cell units for allogeneic transfusions gradually increased from 3,989 (in 2004) to 4,762 (in 2008): a 19% increase. This exceeded the 7% increase in annual admissions of patients during the same period (from 20,470 in 2004 to 21,908 in 2005). Materials and methods In 2009, we introduced new transfusion guidelines (“triggers”), essentially adopting the recommendations of the Society for the Advancement of Blood Management. Most importantly, we reduced the trigger of blood transfusions in normovolaemic symptomatic chronic anaemia patients from 8 to 7 g/dL haemoglobin. At the same time, we created a new trigger of 9 g/dL haemoglobin for high-risk patients (e.g. those with cardiovascular and/or chronic pulmonary disease as well as those undergoing chemotherapy). Results We monitored the indications for blood transfusions during 2009 (2,717 consecutive orders) and sent out letters of reminder of the new guidelines to our clinicians if criteria were not met (a total of 102 letters, representing 4% of the reviewed orders). Our annual blood utilisation in 2009 showed some improvement (4,648 units) compared to the previous year (4,762 units) despite the increase in admissions of patients (from 21,908 to 22,734): this represents a 6% decrease in blood utilisation when corrected for the admissions of patients. If this trends holds up, the predicted blood utilisation for 2010 based on the January to November data (4,280) promises to show a further improvement (an 11% decrease compared to 2008). Discussion We conclude that blood utilisation may be improved in a community hospital setting by combining new, evidence-based transfusion triggers with physicians’ education. PMID:21839021

  8. Transfusion management using a remote-controlled, automated blood storage

    PubMed Central

    Pagliaro, Pasqualepaolo; Turdo, Rosalia

    2008-01-01

    Background Generally, the safety of transfusion terapies for patients depends in part on the distribution of the blood products. The prevention of adverse events can be aided by technological means, which, besides improving the traceability of the process, make errors less likely. In this context, the latest frontier in automation and computerisation is the remote-controlled, automated refrigerator for blood storage. Materials and methods Computer cross-matching is an efficient and safe method for assigning blood components, based on Information Technology applied to typing and screening. This method can be extended to the management of an automated blood refrigerator, the programme of which is interfaced with the Transfusion Service’s information system. The connection we made in our Service between EmoNet® and Hemosafe® enables real-time, remote-controlled management of the following aspects of blood component distribution: a) release of autologous and allogeneic units already allocated to a patient, b) release of available units, which can be allocated by remote-control to known patients, in the presence of a valid computer cross-match, c) release of O-negative units of blood for emergencies. Results Our system combines an information database, which enables computer cross-matching, with an automated refrigerator for blood storage with controlled access managed remotely by the Transfusion Service. The effectiveness and safety of the system were validated during the 4 months of its routine use in the Transfusion Service’s outpatient department. Conclusions The safety and efficiency of the distribution of blood products can and must be increased by the use of technological innovations. With the EmoNet®/Hemosafe® system, the responsibility for the remote-controlled distribution of red blood cell concentrates remains with the chief of the Transfusion Services, through the use of automated computer procedures and supported by continuous training of technicians and nursing staff. PMID:18946954

  9. [50 years of blood transfusion services of the Swiss Red Cross].

    PubMed

    Hässig, A

    1991-02-01

    In the postwar years the Swiss Red Cross set up and developed a blood transfusion service based on strictly nonremunerated donation. It comprises the Blood Transfusion Service Central Laboratory foundation in Berne and the Swiss Red Cross Regional Blood Transfusion Centres association. The Central Laboratory's responsibilities cover provision of stable blood plasma products and transfusion equipment and the organization of extensive services in the entire field of transfusion medicine. The Regional Centres supply the country with labile cellular blood preparations. The growth of this organization over the last 50 years is described. PMID:2003212

  10. Red blood cell transfusion in pediatric patients with severe chronic anemia: how slow is necessary?

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anurag K; Hsu, Edmund; Quirolo, Keith; Neumayr, Lynne D; Flori, Heidi R

    2012-03-01

    Historic practice recommends slow transfusion for children with chronic anemia and hemoglobin less than 5.0?g/dl due to the theoretical risk of transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO). In our pediatric intensive care unit (PICU), we have been utilizing a more liberal transfusion practice in patients without underlying cardiopulmonary disease, and a faster transfusion rate appears safe in this population. Rate of transfusion must be based on multiple factors including convenience, timeliness of procedures and transport to an appropriate care facility, risk of alloimmunization and wastage of blood, stress for the family, and need for PICU monitoring. PMID:21793178

  11. A simple set for ?ntrauterine fetal blood transfusion constructed by readily available materials in every clinic.

    PubMed

    Keskin, U?ur; Karasahin, Kazim Emre; Ulubay, Mustafa; Fidan, Ula?; Gungor, Sadettin; Ergun, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Intrauterine fetal transfusion needs extensive experience and requires excellent eye-hand coordination, good equipment and experienced team workers to achieve success. While the needle is in the umbilical vein, an assistant withdraws and/or transfuses blood. The needle point should be kept still to prevent lacerations and dislodging. We propose a simple set for Intrauterine Fetal blood transfusion is constructed by readily available materials in every clinic to minimize needle tip movement and movements during syringe attachments and withdrawals during the intrauterine fetal transfusion. This makes possible to withdraw fetal blood sample, and to transfuse blood with minimal intervention. PMID:25293695

  12. The effect of intravenous iron on postoperative transfusion requirements in hip fracture patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anaemia following hip fracture is common. Approximately 30 to 45% of patients have haemoglobin concentrations below population norms on admission, and around 10% are severely anaemic. Anaemia on admission, and in the postoperative period, is associated with poor outcomes with regard to mobility, postoperative mortality and readmission. There is currently no clear consensus on the optimal method of managing perioperative anaemia in this group of frail patients with frequent comorbidity. Liberal red cell transfusion in the postoperative period does not appear to improve outcome, whereas tranexamic acid appears to reduce transfusion rate at the expense of increased cardiovascular morbidity. There are encouraging results from one centre with the use of agents to stimulate red cell production, including intravenous iron and erythropoietin. UK practice differs significantly from these patients and these studies, and it is not clear whether these promising results will translate to the UK population. Methods/Design This is a single-centre randomized controlled parallel group trial, in a British university hospital.Randomization is achieved using a website and computer-generated concealed tables. Participants are 80 patients 70 years or over with acute hip fracture undergoing operative repair. The intervention group receive three daily infusions of 200 mg iron sucrose, starting within 24 hours of admission. The control group receive standard hospital care at the discretion of the clinical team. Red cell transfusions for each group are given in accordance with standard clinical triggers. The primary outcome is an increase in mean reticulocyte count in the intervention group at day 7. Secondary outcome measures include haemoglobin concentrations, early and late transfusion rates, infectious and cardiovascular complications, mobility and 30-day mortality. Discussion This is a pilot study to demonstrate haematopoietic efficacy of intravenous iron in this setting. Hence, we have chosen to measure change in reticulocyte count rather than the more clinically relevant differences in haemoglobin concentration or transfusion rate. If our results are positive, the study will provide the necessary information for development of a full-scale trial of intravenous iron. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN76424792; UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Authority (EuDRACT: 2011-003233-34). PMID:24015990

  13. [Differential courses of development in children born with hemolytic disease of newborn].

    PubMed

    Rösler, H D; Springstein, H J

    1988-01-01

    Repeated psychological investigations were performed in a group of 124 children who received exchange transfusions due to morbus haemolyticus neonatorum as newborns. Their psychomotoric development was compared with a control group without exchange transfusions. In the Mhn-children a lower level of cognitive capacity was observed. There was a higher percentage of mental retardation and of handicaps. The distribution between female and male children was nearly equal. PMID:3354275

  14. Early diagnosis and management of postpartum hemolytic uremic syndrome with plasma exchange.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Manisha; Modi, Gopesh; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Navaid, Seema

    2011-06-01

    The likelihood of survival in cases of postpartum hemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) is as high as 80-90% with early diagnosis and aggressive treatment using plasma exchange (PE). The patients, referred to our center, diagnosed as postpartum HUS presented with thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anaemia with or without fever and severe renal failure, were managed aggressively with PE in conjunction with hemodialysis. All patients showed clinical improvement, along with laboratory indicators like normal renal function tests, increased platelet counts and decreased lactic dehydrogenase levels. Awareness amongst treating physicians, early diagnosis and treatment with PE could be the key factors in reducing maternal mortality due to postpartum HUS in developing countries. PMID:21550309

  15. The hemolytic characteristics of monopivot magnetic suspension blood pumps with washout holes.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Tsutsui, Tatsuo; Jikuya, Tomoaki; Yamane, Takashi

    2005-04-01

    The hemolytic characteristics of monopivot magnetic suspension blood pumps as a function of impeller washout hole configuration and female pivot shape are observed. The pump impellers are designed with three washout hole configurations for blood circulation, and four female pivot shapes to reduce blood stagnation and to enhance antithrombogenicity. The hemolytic characteristics of the monopivot pumps were observed to be better than those of a currently available commercial centrifugal blood pump, BP-80, and changed to be nearly equal when the female pivot shape was changed. This indicates that hemolysis in monopivot pumps is mainly caused by shear stress between the male and female pivots. PMID:15787632

  16. ACUTE LEUKEMIAS ACUTE MYELOGENOUS

    E-print Network

    Trisomy 8(+8), t(9;22), t(6;9) 90% myeloblasts AML-M2 Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia with Maturation Black B, & Choloacetate Esterase t(8;21) #12;9/16/2013 4 AML-M3 Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia between chromosomes 8 and 21 AML with a translocation or inversion in chromosome 16 AML with changes

  17. Indirect hemagglutination assay for diagnosis of Escherichia coli O157 infection in patients with hemolytic-uremic syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Bitzan, M; Karch, H

    1992-01-01

    An indirect hemagglutination assay consisting of sheep erythrocytes coated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Shiga-like toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 was used for the serological diagnosis of E. coli O157 infections in children with classical (enteropathic) hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). One week after the onset of diarrhea (acute phase of the disease), the E. coli O157 antibody titer was greater than or equal to 1:4,096 in 22 of 27 patients with HUS, compared with 4 of 249 controls, the majority of whom had O157 antibody titers of between 1:4 and 1:256. This antibody response was observed in HUS patients with stool cultures positive and negative for E. coli O157. Selective absorption with homologous LPS and heterologous LPS showed that the antibody response was specific for E. coli O157. Because of its simplicity and ease of interpretation, the indirect hemagglutination assay described in this paper is recommended for the serological diagnosis of E. coli O157 infections in patients with HUS. PMID:1583116

  18. Primary Sjögren syndrome presenting with hemolytic anemia and pure red cell aplasia following delivery due to Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia and hemophagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Komaru, Yohei; Higuchi, Takakazu; Koyamada, Ryosuke; Haji, Youichiro; Okada, Masato; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Okada, Sadamu

    2013-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman presented with hemolytic anemia without a reticulocyte response 38 days after delivery. A marked reduction in erythroid cells and an increase in macrophages with active hemophagocytosis were noted in the bone marrow. While conventional Coombs' tests were negative, the level of red blood cell (RBC)-bound immunoglobulin G (IgG) was increased. The patient was diagnosed with primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS) based on her symptoms, positive anti-SS-A antibodies, Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia and pure red cell aplasia associated with RBC-bound IgG and hemophagocytosis. The unique presentation was considered to be a consequence of immunological derangement associated with pSS, pregnancy and delivery. PMID:24126397

  19. [Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome related to abnormalities within the complement system].

    PubMed

    Frémeaux-Bacchi, V; Fakhouri, F; Roumenina, L; Dragon-Durey, M-A; Loirat, C

    2011-04-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) disorder characterised by the association of haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal failure. Atypical forms (non-shigatoxin related forms) may be familial or sporadic, frequently with relapses and most of them lead to end stage renal failure. During the last years, different groups have demonstrated genetic predisposition to atypical HUS (aHUS) involving five genes encoding for complement components which play a role in the activation or control of the alternative pathway: encoding factor H (CFH), accounting for 30% of aHUS; CD46 (encoding membrane cofactor protein [MCP]) accounting for approximately 10% of aHUS; CFI (encoding factor I) accounting for an estimated 5-15% of patients; C3 (encoding C3) accounting for approximately 10% of aHUS; and rarely CFB (encoding factor B). Predisposition to aHUS is inherited with incomplete penetrance. It is admitted that mutations confer a predisposition to develop aHUS rather than directly causing the disease and that a second event (genetic or environmental) is required for disease manifestation. HUS onset follows a triggering event in most cases (frequently banal seasonal infection and pregnancy). Uncontrolled C3 convertase leads to increased deposition of C3b on vascular endothelium and participates to the prothrombotic state. The phenotype of aHUS is variable ranging from mild forms, with complete recovery of renal function to severe forms with end stage renal disease within the first year after the onset. Overall, the outcome is severe with a mortality rate of 10% and with more than 60% of patients on dialysis. The most severe prognosis was in the CFH mutation group. There is a high risk of recurrence of the disease after renal transplantation in patients with mutations in CFH, CFI, CFB and C3. Plasma therapy may allow complete haematological remission but frequently with persistent renal damage. Some patients are plasma resistant and some are plasma dependent. The recent progress in the determination of the susceptibility factors for aHUS, have allowed to propose new diagnostic tests including a molecular genetic testing and may permit to consider some new specific treatments in this disease (human plasma-derived CFH or complement inhibitors). PMID:21376430

  20. A Novel Quantitative Hemolytic Assay Coupled with Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms Analysis Enabled Early Diagnosis of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome and Identified Unique Predisposing Mutations in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yoko; Miyata, Toshiyuki; Matsumoto, Masanori; Shirotani-Ikejima, Hiroko; Uchida, Yumiko; Ohyama, Yoshifumi; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Fujimura, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    For thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs), the diagnosis of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is made by ruling out Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC)-associated HUS and ADAMTS13 activity-deficient thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), often using the exclusion criteria for secondary TMAs. Nowadays, assays for ADAMTS13 activity and evaluation for STEC infection can be performed within a few hours. However, a confident diagnosis of aHUS often requires comprehensive gene analysis of the alternative complement activation pathway, which usually takes at least several weeks. However, predisposing genetic abnormalities are only identified in approximately 70% of aHUS. To facilitate the diagnosis of complement-mediated aHUS, we describe a quantitative hemolytic assay using sheep red blood cells (RBCs) and human citrated plasma, spiked with or without a novel inhibitory anti-complement factor H (CFH) monoclonal antibody. Among 45 aHUS patients in Japan, 24% (11/45) had moderate-to-severe (?50%) hemolysis, whereas the remaining 76% (34/45) patients had mild or no hemolysis (<50%). The former group is largely attributed to CFH-related abnormalities, and the latter group has C3-p.I1157T mutations (16/34), which were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Thus, a quantitative hemolytic assay coupled with RFLP analysis enabled the early diagnosis of complement-mediated aHUS in 60% (27/45) of patients in Japan within a week of presentation. We hypothesize that this novel quantitative hemolytic assay would be more useful in a Caucasian population, who may have a higher proportion of CFH mutations than Japanese patients. PMID:25951460

  1. Prophylactic Eculizumab Use in Kidney Transplantation: A Review of the Literature and Report of a Case with Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kasapo?lu, Umut; Ruhi, Çaglar; Tu?cu, Murat; Boynue?ri, Ba?ak; Titiz, ?zzet; Hançer, Veysel Sabri; Apayd?n, Süheyla

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a very rare disease, which presents with microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from acute kidney injury is observed in 60% of aHUS cases. The prognosis of aHUS patients who undergo kidney transplantation (Ktx) is generally poor, but these patients should be treated prophylactically with eculizumab to prevent recurrence after transplantation. CASE REPORT An 18-year-old man was referred to our center with a history of rapid progression to ESRD with unknown etiology. He had anemia, thrombocytopenia, high levels of LDH, and indirect bilirubin and creatinine on initial laboratory results. Our diagnosis was aHUS due to initial results, normal level of ADAMTS activity, and lack of predisposing factors seen in typical HUS. We planned to perform genetic analysis for the patient and the donor candidate (mother). The variations found on exon 7 of the CFH gene had not been reported previously. According to PolyPhen analysis, this mutation was reported as a potential cause for aHUS. We decided to perform Ktx under eculizumab prophylaxis. Weekly administration of prophylaxis was extended to 1 month. The graft functioned immediately after Ktx. The patient has completed his first year uneventfully in our follow-up, with a creatinine 0.79 mg/dl at his last control visit. CONCLUSIONS We found favorable results of an aHUS case successfully treated with kidney transplantation combined with short-term prophylactic eculizumab therapy. PMID:26621268

  2. 78 FR 79469 - Strategies To Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ... Globulin Infusions; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public... Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to... complication of Immune Globulin Intravenous (IGIV) (Human) infusion. Complications of hemolysis include...

  3. Comparing micellar, hemolytic, and antibacterial properties of di-and tricarboxyl dendritic amphiphiles

    E-print Network

    Falkinham, Joseph

    amphiphiles Bhadreshkumar B. Maisuria a, , Marcelo L. Actis a,à , Shauntrece N. Hardrict a,§ , Joseph O April 2011 Keywords: Dendritic amphiphiles Staphylococcus aureus MRSA Critical micelle concentrations Hemolytic activities a b s t r a c t Homologous dicarboxyl dendritic amphiphiles--RCONHC(CH3)(CH2CH2COOH)2

  4. Dissociation of antimicrobial and hemolytic activities of gramicidin?S through N-methylation modification.

    PubMed

    Li, Yangmei; Bionda, Nina; Yongye, Austin; Geer, Phaedra; Stawikowski, Maciej; Cudic, Predrag; Martinez, Karina; Houghten, Richard A

    2013-11-01

    ?-Sheet antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are well recognized as promising candidates for the treatment of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. To dissociate antimicrobial activity and hemolytic effect of ?-sheet AMPs, we hypothesize that N-methylation of the intramolecular hydrogen bond(s)-forming amides could improve their specificities for microbial cells over human erythrocytes. We utilized a model ?-sheet antimicrobial peptide, gramicidin?S (GS), to study the N-methylation effects on the antimicrobial and hemolytic activities. We synthesized twelve N-methylated GS analogues by replacement of residues at the ?-strand and ?-turn regions with N-methyl amino acids, and tested their antimicrobial and hemolytic activities. Our experiments showed that the HC50 values increased fivefold compared with that of GS, when the internal hydrogen-bonded leucine residue was methylated. Neither hemolytic effect nor antimicrobial activity changed when proline alone was replaced with N-methylalanine in the ?-turn region. However, analogues containing N-methylleucine at ?-strand and N-methylalanine at ?-turn regions exhibited a fourfold increase in selectivity index compared to GS. We also examined the conformation of these N-methylated GS analogues using (1)H?NMR and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy in aqueous solution, and visualized the backbone structures and residue orientations using molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that N-methylation of the internal hydrogen bond-forming amide affected the conformation, backbone shape, and side chain orientation of GS. PMID:24023000

  5. Transfusion-transmitted bacterial infection: risks, sources and interventions.

    PubMed

    Wagner, S J

    2004-04-01

    Records of the transmission of bacterial infections by transfusion date back to the beginning of organized blood banking. Despite tremendous strides in preventing viral infection through careful donor screening and viral testing, there has been little improvement in reducing the risk of bacterial sepsis since the introduction of closed collection systems. Based on the French Haemovigilance study, the British Serious Hazards of Transmission (SHOT) study and fatality reports to the United States Food and Drug Administration, the risk of clinically apparent sepsis exceeds the risk of HIV, HBV, and HCV transmission. Sources of contamination include the skin, blood, disposables, and the environment. Potential interventions to reduce transfusion-associated bacterial sepsis include improvements to donor arm preparation, diversion of the first aliquot of whole blood, introduction of bacterial testing and/or implementation of pathogen reduction methods. PMID:15078249

  6. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated with blood-product transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.R.; Kuritsky, J.N.; Katzmann, J.A.; Homburger, H.A.

    1983-11-01

    A 53-year-old white man had fever, malaise, and dyspnea on exertion. His chest roentgenogram was normal, but pulmonary function tests showed impaired diffusion capacity and a gallium scan showed marked uptake in the lungs. Results of an open-lung biopsy documented Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Immunologic test results were consistent with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The patient denied having homosexual contact or using intravenous drugs. Twenty-nine months before the diagnosis of pneumocystis pneumonia was made, the patient had had 16 transfusions of whole blood, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma during coronary artery bypass surgery at another medical center. This patient is not a member of any currently recognized high-risk group and is believed to have contracted the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from blood and blood-product transfusions.

  7. An evidence-based approach to red blood cell transfusions in asymptomatically anaemic patients.

    PubMed

    Chan, A W; de Gara, C J

    2015-11-01

    Introduction Surgeons and physicians encounter blood transfusions on a daily basis but a robust evidence-based strategy on indications and timing of transfusion in asymptomatic anaemic patients is yet to be determined. For judicious use of blood products, the risks inherent to packed red blood cells, the patient's co-morbidities and haemoglobin (Hb)/haematocrit levels should be considered. This review critiques and summarises the latest available evidence on the indications for transfusions in healthy and cardiac disease patients as well as the timing of transfusions relative to surgery. Methods An electronic literature search of the MEDLINE(®), Google Scholar™ and Trip databases was conducted for articles published in English between January 2006 and January 2015. Studies discussing timing and indications of transfusion in medical and surgical patients were retrieved. Bibliographies of studies were checked for other pertinent articles that were missed by the initial search. Findings Six level 1 studies (randomised controlled trials or systematic reviews) and six professional society guidelines were included in this review. In healthy patients without cardiac disease, a restrictive transfusion trigger of Hb 70-80g/l is safe and appropriate whereas in cardiac patients, the trigger is Hb 80-100g/l. The literature on timing of transfusions relative to surgery is limited. For the studies available, preoperative transfusions were associated with a decreased incidence of subsequent transfusions and timing of transfusions did not affect the rates of colorectal cancer recurrence. PMID:26492900

  8. Preoperative Thromboelastometry as a Predictor of Transfusion Requirements during Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fayed, Nirmeen; Mourad, Wessam; Yassen, Khaled; Görlinger, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background The ability to predict transfusion requirements may improve perioperative bleeding management as an integral part of a patient blood management program. Therefore, the aim of our study was to evaluate preoperative thromboelastometry as a predictor of transfusion requirements for adult living donor liver transplant recipients. Methods The correlation between preoperative thromboelastometry variables in 100 adult living donor liver transplant recipients and intraoperative blood transfusion requirements was examined by univariate and multivariate linear regression analysis. Thresholds of thromboelastometric parameters for prediction of packed red blood cells (PRBCs), fresh frozen plasma (FFP), platelets, and cryoprecipitate transfusion requirements were determined with receiver operating characteristics analysis. The attending anesthetists were blinded to the preoperative thromboelastometric analysis. However, a thromboelastometry-guided transfusion algorithm with predefined trigger values was used intraoperatively. The transfusion triggers in this algorithm did not change during the study period. Results Univariate analysis confirmed significant correlations between PRBCs, FFP, platelets or cryoprecipitate transfusion requirements and most thromboelastometric variables. Backward stepwise logistic regression indicated that EXTEM coagulation time (CT), maximum clot firmness (MCF) and INTEM CT, clot formation time (CFT) and MCF are independent predictors for PRBC transfusion. EXTEM CT, CFT and FIBTEM MCF are independent predictors for FFP transfusion. Only EXTEM and INTEM MCF were independent predictors of platelet transfusion. EXTEM CFT and MCF, INTEM CT, CFT and MCF as well as FIBTEM MCF are independent predictors for cryoprecipitate transfusion. Thromboelastometry-based regression equation accounted for 63% of PRBC, 83% of FFP, 61% of cryoprecipitate, and 44% of platelet transfusion requirements. Conclusion Preoperative thromboelastometric analysis is helpful to predict transfusion requirements in adult living donor liver transplant recipients. This may allow for better preparation and less cross-matching prior to surgery. The findings of our study need to be re-validated in a second prospective patient population. PMID:26019705

  9. Autologous Transfusion of Stored Red Blood Cells Increases Pulmonary Artery Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Pinciroli, Riccardo; Stowell, Christopher P.; Wang, Lin; Yu, Binglan; Fernandez, Bernadette O.; Feelisch, Martin; Mietto, Cristina; Hod, Eldad A.; Chipman, Daniel; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Zapol, Warren M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Transfusion of erythrocytes stored for prolonged periods is associated with increased mortality. Erythrocytes undergo hemolysis during storage and after transfusion. Plasma hemoglobin scavenges endogenous nitric oxide leading to systemic and pulmonary vasoconstriction. Objectives: We hypothesized that transfusion of autologous blood stored for 40 days would increase the pulmonary artery pressure in volunteers with endothelial dysfunction (impaired endothelial production of nitric oxide). We also tested whether breathing nitric oxide before and during transfusion could prevent the increase of pulmonary artery pressure. Methods: Fourteen obese adults with endothelial dysfunction were enrolled in a randomized crossover study of transfusing autologous, leukoreduced blood stored for either 3 or 40 days. Volunteers were transfused with 3-day blood, 40-day blood, and 40-day blood while breathing 80 ppm nitric oxide. Measurements and Main Results: The age of volunteers was 41 ± 4 years (mean ± SEM), and their body mass index was 33.4 ± 1.3 kg/m2. Plasma hemoglobin concentrations increased after transfusion with 40-day and 40-day plus nitric oxide blood but not after transfusing 3-day blood. Mean pulmonary artery pressure, estimated by transthoracic echocardiography, increased after transfusing 40-day blood (18 ± 2 to 23 ± 2 mm Hg; P < 0.05) but did not change after transfusing 3-day blood (17 ± 2 to 18 ± 2 mm Hg; P = 0.5). Breathing nitric oxide decreased pulmonary artery pressure in volunteers transfused with 40-day blood (17 ± 2 to 12 ± 1 mm Hg; P < 0.05). Conclusions: Transfusion of autologous leukoreduced blood stored for 40 days was associated with increased plasma hemoglobin levels and increased pulmonary artery pressure. Breathing nitric oxide prevents the increase of pulmonary artery pressure produced by transfusing stored blood. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01529502). PMID:25162920

  10. Evaluation of Risk Minimisation Measures for Blood Components – Based on Reporting Rates of Transfusion-Transmitted Reactions (1997-2013)

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Markus B.; Heiden, Margarethe; Volkers, Peter; Lohmann, Annette; Keller-Stanislawski, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background To assess the impact of safety measures, we compared reporting rates of transfusion-related reactions before and after the implementation of six measures in 1999, 2004, 2006, 2008 and 2009. Methods Reporting rates of transfusion-transmitted bacterial infection (TTBI), viral infection (TTVI) and immune-mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) were calculated on the basis of confirmed annual reports and distributed blood components. Results The introduction of HCV NAT testing caused a significant reduction of HCV reporting rate from 1:0.6 to 1:83.16 million administered blood components (p < 0.0001), donor screening for antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen caused a reduction of HBV reporting rate from 1:2.90 to 1:10.70 million units (p = 0.0168). A significant reduction from 1:0.094 to 1:2.42 million fresh frozen plasma (FFP) units could also be achieved by risk minimisation TRALI measures (p < 0.0001). Implementation of pre-donation sampling did not result in a significant decrease in TTBI, whereas limitation of shelf life for platelet concentrate (PC) minimised the TTBI reporting rate from 1:0.088 to 1:0.19 million PC units (p = 0.041). For HIV NAT pool testing, no significant reduction in HIV transmission was found due to very low reporting rates (1:10 million versus 1:27 million blood components, p = 0.422). Conclusion On the basis of haemovigilance data, a significant benefit could be demonstrated for four of six implemented safety measures. PMID:26557816

  11. Revisiting blood transfusion preparedness: experience from the Bam earthquake response.

    PubMed

    Abolghasemi, Hassan; Radfar, Mohammad H; Tabatabaee, Morteza; Hosseini-Divkolayee, Nasim S; Burkle, Frederick M

    2008-01-01

    Blood transfusion plays a critical role in the provision of medical care for disasters due to man-made and natural hazards. Although the short-term increase in blood donations following national disasters is well-documented, some aspects of blood transfusion during disasters remain under study. The 2003 earthquake in Bam, Iran resulted in the death of >29,000 people and injured 23,000. In total, 108,985 blood units were donated, but only 21,347 units (23%) actually were distributed to hospitals around the country. Kerman Province, the site of the disaster, received 1,231 (1.3%) of the donated units in the first four days after the disaster. The Bam experience revealed crucial missteps in the development of a post-event strategy for blood product management, and led to the development of a detailed disaster preparedness and response plan that addresses issues of donation, distribution, communication, transportation, and coordination. The current plan requires the Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization to convene a disaster task force immediately as the main coordinator of all disaster preparedness and response activities. PMID:19189607

  12. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePLUS

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  13. Restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategy for red blood cell transfusion: systematic review of randomised trials with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Marie W; Haase, Nicolai; Perner, Anders; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the benefit and harm of restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategies to guide red blood cell transfusions. Design Systematic review with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses of randomised clinical trials. Data sources Cochrane central register of controlled trials, SilverPlatter Medline (1950 to date), SilverPlatter Embase (1980 to date), and Science Citation Index Expanded (1900 to present). Reference lists of identified trials and other systematic reviews were assessed, and authors and experts in transfusion were contacted to identify additional trials. Trial selection Published and unpublished randomised clinical trials that evaluated a restrictive compared with a liberal transfusion strategy in adults or children, irrespective of language, blinding procedure, publication status, or sample size. Data extraction Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts of trials identified, and relevant trials were evaluated in full text for eligibility. Two reviewers then independently extracted data on methods, interventions, outcomes, and risk of bias from included trials. random effects models were used to estimate risk ratios and mean differences with 95% confidence intervals. Results 31 trials totalling 9813 randomised patients were included. The proportion of patients receiving red blood cells (relative risk 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.47 to 0.63, 8923 patients, 24 trials) and the number of red blood cell units transfused (mean difference ?1.43, 95% confidence interval ?2.01 to ?0.86) were lower with the restrictive compared with liberal transfusion strategies. Restrictive compared with liberal transfusion strategies were not associated with risk of death (0.86, 0.74 to 1.01, 5707 patients, nine lower risk of bias trials), overall morbidity (0.98, 0.85 to 1.12, 4517 patients, six lower risk of bias trials), or fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction (1.28, 0.66 to 2.49, 4730 patients, seven lower risk of bias trials). Results were not affected by the inclusion of trials with unclear or high risk of bias. Using trial sequential analyses on mortality and myocardial infarction, the required information size was not reached, but a 15% relative risk reduction or increase in overall morbidity with restrictive transfusion strategies could be excluded. Conclusions Compared with liberal strategies, restrictive transfusion strategies were associated with a reduction in the number of red blood cell units transfused and number of patients being transfused, but mortality, overall morbidity, and myocardial infarction seemed to be unaltered. Restrictive transfusion strategies are safe in most clinical settings. Liberal transfusion strategies have not been shown to convey any benefit to patients. Trial registration PROSPERO CRD42013004272. PMID:25805204

  14. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: from diagnosis to treatment.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a relatively rare condition but a medical urgency requiring immediate intervention to avoid irreversible organ damage or death. Symptoms on presentation include microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia and organ damage. The most frequent direct causes of TMA are thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The most common form of HUS is related to Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infection while approximately 10% of cases are due to dysregulation of the complement pathway (atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome, aHUS). Optimal treatment regimens differ depending on the underlying cause; however, differential diagnosis may be difficult. The most accurate method of diagnosis is based on exclusion and should consider, beyond the symptoms common to TMA, ADAMTS13 activity levels and STEC infection status. For the management of TTP, plasma exchange (PE) is the most important acute intervention and is associated with lower mortality and better outcomes than plasma infusion. In most patients with STEC-HUS, the course of disease is self-limiting although management of acute kidney injury is often required. Until recently, the management of aHUS consisted of early and intensive PE, although this was mostly ineffective in protecting from subsequent organ damage. Eculizumab, an inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway, produces a rapid and sustained inhibition of the TMA process, with significant improvements in long-term clinical outcomes. Due to the significant improvement achieved, eculizumab has subsequently been approved as first-line therapy when an unequivocal diagnosis of aHUS has been made. PMID:25803082

  15. Effects of Continuous Octreotide Infusion on Intraoperative Transfusion Requirements During Orthotopic Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Byram, S W; Gupta, R A; Ander, M; Edelstein, S; Andreatta, B

    2015-11-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is often associated with major hemorrhage and a large red blood cell (RBC) transfusion requirement. Massive transfusion during OLT has been associated with decreased patient and graft survival. As a result, the anesthesiologist may use various techniques to decrease intraoperative blood loss and transfusion requirements, including maintenance of a low central venous pressure, antifibrinolytic drugs, cell salvage, and vasopressors. Due to its properties of splanchnic vasoconstriction and resultant decrease in portal venous blood flow, octreotide may decrease blood loss during the preanhepatic phase of OLT. We performed a retrospective review of 50 consecutive liver transplantations; a continuous octreotide infusion was used during the preanhepatic phase in 30 of these cases. We hypothesized that intraoperative transfusion requirements would be reduced in those patients treated with octreotide. Statistical analysis found that the number of RBCs transfused decreased from 20.4 U to 18.1 U when octreotide was used, although this result was not statistically significant (P = .5). Additional analysis found a significant positive correlation between the number of RBCs transfused and total operating room (OR) time, preoperative international normalized ratio (INR), and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) and a negative correlation between the number of RBCs transfused and preoperative platelets and hemoglobin. Although our small study did not show a statistical difference in the number of units transfused, there was an absolute difference. A prospective, randomized trial would be useful in elucidating the true effect of octreotide on RBC transfusion requirements during OLT. PMID:26680078

  16. Accuracy of Estimated Blood Loss in Predicting Need for Transfusion after Delivery.

    PubMed

    Conner, Shayna N; Tuuli, Methodius G; Colvin, Ryan; Shanks, Anthony L; Macones, George A; Cahill, Alison G

    2015-11-01

    Objective?The definition of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) was developed more than 50 years ago. Since then, the obstetric population has changed dramatically. We sought to determine how well we estimated blood loss (EBL) and find thresholds predicting need for transfusion. Study Design?We performed a prospective cohort study from 2010 to 2012, comparing those who needed transfusion postpartum and those who did not. EBL, calculated EBL (cEBL), and change in hematocrit were calculated for patients who did not receive transfusion, and EBL was calculated for those who did receive transfusion, stratified by delivery type. Receiver operator curves were created and optimal thresholds of EBL to predict transfusion were estimated. Results?Among 4,804 patients, transfusion was required for 0.65% of vaginal and 8.7% of cesarean deliveries. Median EBL was higher in women requiring transfusion. A weak correlation was noted between EBL and cEBL for all deliveries. Thresholds of 500 mL blood loss for vaginal delivery and 1,000 mL for cesarean had the best predictive ability for transfusion. Conclusion?In this modern obstetric, cohort EBL is weakly correlated with cEBL, suggesting that accuracy of clinical estimates of blood loss is modest. However, EBL predicts need for transfusion, with optimal thresholds of 500 mL for a vaginal delivery and 1,000 mL in a cesarean. This validates the traditional definitions of PPH in our modern population. PMID:26007310

  17. Role of sph2 Gene Regulation in Hemolytic and Sphingomyelinase Activities Produced by Leptospira interrogans

    PubMed Central

    Narayanavari, Suneel A.; Lourdault, Kristel; Sritharan, Manjula; Haake, David A.; Matsunaga, James

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic members of the genus Leptospira are the causative agents of leptospirosis, a neglected disease of public and veterinary health concern. Leptospirosis is a systemic disease that in its severest forms leads to renal insufficiency, hepatic dysfunction, and pulmonary failure. Many strains of Leptospira produce hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities, and a number of candidate leptospiral hemolysins have been identified based on sequence similarity to well-characterized bacterial hemolysins. Five of the putative hemolysins are sphingomyelinase paralogs. Although recombinant forms of the sphingomyelinase Sph2 and other hemolysins lyse erythrocytes, none have been demonstrated to contribute to the hemolytic activity secreted by leptospiral cells. In this study, we examined the regulation of sph2 and its relationship to hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities produced by several L. interrogans strains cultivated under the osmotic conditions found in the mammalian host. The sph2 gene was poorly expressed when the Fiocruz L1-130 (serovar Copenhageni), 56601 (sv. Lai), and L495 (sv. Manilae) strains were cultivated in the standard culture medium EMJH. Raising EMJH osmolarity to physiological levels with sodium chloride enhanced Sph2 production in all three strains. In addition, the Pomona subtype kennewicki strain LC82-25 produced substantially greater amounts of Sph2 during standard EMJH growth than the other strains, and sph2 expression increased further by addition of salt. When 10% rat serum was present in EMJH along with the sodium chloride supplement, Sph2 production increased further in all strains. Osmotic regulation and differences in basal Sph2 production in the Manilae L495 and Pomona strains correlated with the levels of secreted hemolysin and sphingomyelinase activities. Finally, a transposon insertion in sph2 dramatically reduced hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities during incubation of L. interrogans at physiologic osmolarity. Complementation of the mutation with the sph2 gene partially restored production of hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities. These results indicate that the sph2 gene product contributes to the hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities secreted by L. interrogans and most likely dominates those functions under the culture condition tested. PMID:26274394

  18. Role of sph2 Gene Regulation in Hemolytic and Sphingomyelinase Activities Produced by Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Narayanavari, Suneel A; Lourdault, Kristel; Sritharan, Manjula; Haake, David A; Matsunaga, James

    2015-08-01

    Pathogenic members of the genus Leptospira are the causative agents of leptospirosis, a neglected disease of public and veterinary health concern. Leptospirosis is a systemic disease that in its severest forms leads to renal insufficiency, hepatic dysfunction, and pulmonary failure. Many strains of Leptospira produce hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities, and a number of candidate leptospiral hemolysins have been identified based on sequence similarity to well-characterized bacterial hemolysins. Five of the putative hemolysins are sphingomyelinase paralogs. Although recombinant forms of the sphingomyelinase Sph2 and other hemolysins lyse erythrocytes, none have been demonstrated to contribute to the hemolytic activity secreted by leptospiral cells. In this study, we examined the regulation of sph2 and its relationship to hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities produced by several L. interrogans strains cultivated under the osmotic conditions found in the mammalian host. The sph2 gene was poorly expressed when the Fiocruz L1-130 (serovar Copenhageni), 56601 (sv. Lai), and L495 (sv. Manilae) strains were cultivated in the standard culture medium EMJH. Raising EMJH osmolarity to physiological levels with sodium chloride enhanced Sph2 production in all three strains. In addition, the Pomona subtype kennewicki strain LC82-25 produced substantially greater amounts of Sph2 during standard EMJH growth than the other strains, and sph2 expression increased further by addition of salt. When 10% rat serum was present in EMJH along with the sodium chloride supplement, Sph2 production increased further in all strains. Osmotic regulation and differences in basal Sph2 production in the Manilae L495 and Pomona strains correlated with the levels of secreted hemolysin and sphingomyelinase activities. Finally, a transposon insertion in sph2 dramatically reduced hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities during incubation of L. interrogans at physiologic osmolarity. Complementation of the mutation with the sph2 gene partially restored production of hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities. These results indicate that the sph2 gene product contributes to the hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities secreted by L. interrogans and most likely dominates those functions under the culture condition tested. PMID:26274394

  19. Pain and other non-neurological adverse events in children with sickle cell anemia and previous stroke who received hydroxyurea and phlebotomy or chronic transfusions and chelation: results from the SWiTCH clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Ofelia; Yovetich, Nancy A; Scott, J Paul; Owen, William; Miller, Scott T; Schultz, William; Lockhart, Alexandre; Aygun, Banu; Flanagan, Jonathan; Bonner, Melanie; Mueller, Brigitta U; Ware, Russell E

    2013-11-01

    To compare the non-neurological events in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) and previous stroke enrolled in SWiTCH. The NHLBI-sponsored Phase III multicenter randomized clinical trial stroke with transfusions changing to hydroxyurea (SWiTCH) (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00122980) compared continuation of chronic blood transfusion/iron chelation to switching to hydroxyurea/phlebotomy for secondary stroke prevention and management of iron overload. All randomized children were included in the analysis (intention to treat). The Fisher's Exact test was used to compare the frequency of subjects who experienced at least one SCA-related adverse event (AE) or serious adverse event (SAE) in each arm and to compare event rates. One hundred and thirty three subjects, mean age 13 ± 3.9 years (range 5.2-19.0 years) and mean time of 7 years on chronic transfusion at study entry, were randomized and treated. Numbers of subjects experiencing non-neurological AEs were similar in the two treatment arms, including SCA-related events, SCA pain events, and low rates of acute chest syndrome and infection. However, fewer children continuing transfusion/chelation experienced SAEs (P = 0.012), SCA-related SAEs (P = 0.003), and SCA pain SAEs (P = 0.016) as compared to children on the hydroxyurea/phlebotomy arm. The timing of phlebotomy did not influence SAEs. Older age at baseline predicted having at least 1 SCA pain event. Patients with recurrent neurological events during SWiTCH were not more likely to experience pain. In children with SCA and prior stroke, monthly transfusions and daily iron chelation provided superior protection against acute vaso-occlusive pain SAEs when compared to hydroxyurea and monthly phlebotomy. PMID:23861242

  20. Pain and Other Non-Neurological Adverse Events in Children with Sickle Cell Anemia and Previous Stroke who Received Hydroxyurea and Phlebotomy or Chronic Transfusions and Chelation: Results from the SWiTCH Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Ofelia; Yovetich, Nancy A.; Scott, J. Paul; Owen, William; Miller, Scott T.; Schultz, William; Lockhart, Alexandre; Aygun, Banu; Flanagan, Jonathan; Bonner, Melanie; Mueller, Brigitta U.; Ware, Russell E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the non-neurological events in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) and previous stroke enrolled in SWiTCH. Methods The NHLBI-sponsored Phase III multicenter randomized clinical trial Stroke With Transfusions Changing to Hydroxyurea (SWiTCH) (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00122980) compared continuation of chronic blood transfusion/iron chelation to switching to hydroxyurea/phlebotomy for secondary stroke prevention and management of iron overload. All randomized children were included in the analysis (intention to treat). The Fisher's Exact test was used to compare the frequency of subjects who experienced at least one SCA-related adverse event (AE) or serious adverse event (SAE) in each arm and to compare event rates. Results 133 subjects, mean age 13 ±3.9 years (range 5.2-19.0 years) and mean time of 7 years on chronic transfusion at study entry, were randomized and treated. Numbers of subjects experiencing non-neurological AEs were similar in the two treatment arms, including SCA-related events, SCA pain events, and low rates of acute chest syndrome and infection. However, fewer children continuing transfusion/chelation experienced SAEs (p=0.012), SCA-related SAEs (p=0.003), and SCA pain SAEs (p=0.016) as compared to children on the hydroxyurea/phlebotomy arm. The timing of phlebotomy did not influence SAEs. Older age at baseline predicted having at least 1 SCA pain event. Patients with recurrent neurological events during SWiTCH were not more likely to experience pain. Conclusions In children with SCA and prior stroke, monthly transfusions and daily iron chelation provided superior protection against acute vaso-occlusive pain SAEs when compared to hydroxyurea and monthly phlebotomy. PMID:23861242

  1. Serogroup-Specific Bacterial Engineered Glycoproteins as Novel Antigenic Targets for Diagnosis of Shiga Toxin-Producing-Escherichia coli-Associated Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Melli, Luciano J.; Ciocchini, Andrés E.; Caillava, Ana J.; Vozza, Nicolás; Chinen, Isabel; Rivas, Marta; Feldman, Mario F.

    2014-01-01

    Human infection with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a major cause of postdiarrheal hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), a life-threatening condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. E. coli O157:H7 is the dominant STEC serotype associated with HUS worldwide, although non-O157 STEC serogroups can cause a similar disease. The detection of anti-O157 E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antibodies in combination with stool culture and detection of free fecal Shiga toxin considerably improves the diagnosis of STEC infections. In the present study, we exploited a bacterial glycoengineering technology to develop recombinant glycoproteins consisting of the O157, O145, or O121 polysaccharide attached to a carrier protein as serogroup-specific antigens for the serological diagnosis of STEC-associated HUS. Our results demonstrate that using these antigens in indirect ELISAs (glyco-iELISAs), it is possible to clearly discriminate between STEC O157-, O145-, and O121-infected patients and healthy children, as well as to confirm the diagnosis in HUS patients for whom the classical diagnostic procedures failed. Interestingly, a specific IgM response was detected in almost all the analyzed samples, indicating that it is possible to detect the infection in the early stages of the disease. Additionally, in all the culture-positive HUS patients, the serotype identified by glyco-iELISAs was in accordance with the serotype of the isolated strain, indicating that these antigens are valuable not only for diagnosing HUS caused by the O157, O145, and O121 serogroups but also for serotyping and guiding the subsequent steps to confirm diagnosis. PMID:25472487

  2. Legal and ethical issues in safe blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekar, Shivaram; Kantharaj, Ambuja

    2014-01-01

    Legal issues play a vital role in providing a framework for the Indian blood transfusion service (BTS), while ethical issues pave the way for quality. Despite licensing of all blood banks, failure to revamp the Drugs and Cosmetic Act (D and C Act) is impeding quality. Newer techniques like chemiluminescence or nucleic acid testing (NAT) find no mention in the D and C Act. Specialised products like pooled platelet concentrates or modified whole blood, therapeutic procedures like erythropheresis, plasma exchange, stem cell collection and processing technologies like leukoreduction and irradiation are not a part of the D and C Act. A highly fragmented BTS comprising of over 2500 blood banks, coupled with a slow and tedious process of dual licensing (state and centre) is a hindrance to smooth functioning of blood banks. Small size of blood banks compromises blood safety. New blood banks are opened in India by hospitals to meet requirements of insurance providers or by medical colleges as this a Medical Council of India (MCI) requirement. Hospital based blood banks opt for replacement donation as they are barred by law from holding camps. Demand for fresh blood, lack of components, and lack of guidelines for safe transfusion leads to continued abuse of blood. Differential pricing of blood components is difficult to explain scientifically or ethically. Accreditation of blood banks along with establishment of regional testing centres could pave the way to blood safety. National Aids Control Organisation (NACO) and National Blood Transfusion Council (NBTC) deserve a more proactive role in the licensing process. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) needs to clarify that procedures or tests meant for enhancement of blood safety are not illegal. PMID:25535417

  3. Antibodies to plasma proteins: an association with platelet transfusion refractoriness.

    PubMed

    Heal, J M; Cowles, J; Masel, D; Rowe, J M; Blumberg, N

    1992-01-01

    We hypothesized that antibodies to HLA-linked polymorphic plasma proteins could be involved in platelet refractoriness by an 'innocent bystander' or immune complex mechanism. Employing a kinetic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique the ability of IgG from the plasma of refractory patients to bind to albumin, fibrinogen, complement components C2 and C4 was measured. As compared with controls a high percentage of refractory patients had increased IgG capable of binding to all four plasma proteins: C2 (83%), C4 (83%), albumin (75%), fibrinogen (34%). In the presence of exogenous plasma proteins these antibodies mediated increased deposition of IgG onto normal donor platelets. The plasma protein binding IgG consisted both of monomeric IgG and a broad range of high molecular weight complexes. IgG anti-plasma protein antibody could be eluted from platelets of refractory patients. The development of anti-plasma protein IgG was studied during the course of platelet transfusion therapy and found to increase progressively so that by the 20th transfusion greater than 90% of samples were positive. The presence of plasma protein binding activity correlated with the development of increased levels of platelet bound IgG and refractoriness. Multiple platelet transfusions lead to sensitization to polymorphic determinants on C2 and C4 as well as the formation of high molecular weight complexes. These antibodies and complexes contribute to the deposition of IgG on platelets and may contribute to refractoriness. PMID:1536814

  4. The evolution of perioperative transfusion testing and blood ordering.

    PubMed

    White, Marissa J; Hazard, Sprague W; Frank, Steven M; Boyd, Joan S; Wick, Elizabeth C; Ness, Paul M; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2015-06-01

    The evolution of modern anesthesia and surgical practices has been accompanied by enhanced supportive procedures in blood banking and transfusion medicine. There is increased focus on the preparation and the use of blood components including, but not limited to, preventing unnecessary type and screen/crossmatch orders, decreasing the time required to provide compatible red blood cells (RBCs), and reducing the waste of limited blood and personnel resources. The aim of this review is to help the anesthesiologist and surgical staff identify patients at highest risk for surgical bleeding. In addition, this review examines how anesthesia and transfusion medicine can efficiently and safely allocate blood components for surgical patients who require transfusions. The following databases were searched: PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar, and the Cochrane Library from January 1970 through March 2014. Subsequent reference searches of retrieved articles were also assessed. Several innovations have drastically changed the procedures by which blood is ordered, inventoried, and the speed in which blood is delivered for patient care. Before entering an operating room, patient blood management provides guidance to clinicians about when and how to treat preoperative anemia and intra- and postoperative strategies to limit the patient's exposure to blood components. Timely updates of the recommendations for blood orders (maximum surgical blood ordering schedule) have enhanced preoperative decision making regarding the appropriateness of the type and screen versus the type and crossmatch order. The updated maximum surgical blood ordering schedule reflects modern practices, such as laparoscopy, improved surgical techniques, and use of hemostatic agents resulting in a more streamlined process for ordering and obtaining RBCs. The electronic (computer) crossmatch and electronic remote blood issue have also dramatically reduced the amount of time required to obtain crossmatch-compatible RBCs when compared with the more traditional serologic crossmatch methods. These changes in blood banking methods have resulted in more efficient delivery of blood to surgical patients. PMID:25988630

  5. A Thermolabile Aldolase A Mutant Causes Fever-Induced Recurrent Rhabdomyolysis without Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Mamoune, Asmaa; Bahuau, Michel; Hamel, Yamina; Serre, Valérie; Pelosi, Michele; Habarou, Florence; Nguyen Morel, Marie-Ange; Boisson, Bertrand; Vergnaud, Sabrina; Viou, Mai Thao; Nonnenmacher, Luc; Piraud, Monique; Nusbaum, Patrick; Vamecq, Joseph; Romero, Norma; Ottolenghi, Chris; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Aldolase A deficiency has been reported as a rare cause of hemolytic anemia occasionally associated with myopathy. We identified a deleterious homozygous mutation in the ALDOA gene in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro but not by glycerol, betaine or benzylhydantoin, three other known chaperones, suggesting that arginine-mediated rescue operated by a mechanism other than protein chaperoning. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines, and reduced by dexamethasone. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a treatment for this severe disease. PMID:25392908

  6. IgM autoagglutinins in warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a poor prognostic feature.

    PubMed

    McCann, E L; Shirey, R S; Kickler, T S; Ness, P M

    1992-01-01

    The presence of both complete IgM autoagglutinins and IgG autoantibodies in warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an uncommon finding. Over a 6-year period, only 5 of 115 (4.1%) patients with AIHA had IgM and IgG autoantibodies. In 3 of the 5 cases, the complete IgM autoagglutinins reacted up to 30 degrees C and these patients responded well to corticosteroid or other therapies for warm AIHA. The 2 patients who had warm (37 degrees C) reactive IgM autoagglutinins, were refractory to corticosteroids, splenectomy and cytotoxic drugs, and died due to the complications of hemolytic anemia. The data in these 5 cases suggest that the thermal amplitude of the IgM antibody in these unusual AIHA cases may be predictive of refractoriness to therapy and poor clinical outcome. PMID:1466193

  7. Successful (?) therapy of hemolytic-uremic syndrome with factor H abnormality.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Angela; Kirchhoff-Moradpour, Antje H; Obieglo, Silke; Brandis, Matthias; Kirschfink, Michael; Zipfel, Peter F; Goodship, Judith A; Zimmerhackl, Lothar B

    2003-09-01

    We report a patient with continuously recurring hemolytic-uremic syndrome due to factor H deficiency. First at the age of 3 months he showed signs of hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal insufficiency, often recurring concomitantly with respiratory tract infections, despite weekly to twice weekly plasma substitution (20 ml/kg body weight). Now at the age of 3.5 years glomerular filtration rate is approximately 50 ml/min/1.73 m(2) and psychomotoric development is normal. Since factor H is mainly synthesized in the liver, hepatic transplantation has been proposed as curative treatment. Before justification of liver transplantation as the ultimate treatment for these patients, an international registry should be developed to optimize and standardize therapeutic alternatives. PMID:12836093

  8. Detection and identification of red cell alloantibodies in multiply transfused thalassemia major patients: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Jain, Roopam; Choudhury, N; Chudgar, U; Harimoorthy, V; Desai, P; Perkins, Jim; Johnson, Susan T

    2014-12-01

    Life long red blood transfusion remains the main treatment for ? thalassemia major patients. The development of alloantibodies complicates transfusion therapy in thalassemia patients. Alloimmunization to red cell antigens is one of the most important immunological transfusion reaction and causes delayed type of transfusion reaction. A prospective study was conducted from January 2007 to January 2010. This was a cohorts of 115 patients were selected from regular transfusion group and they were followed for two and half year. They were followed up for the effect of transfusion during study period. There was a decline in patient number from 115 to 96 due to mortality and transfer of patient. A total of 96 multiply transfused thalassemia patients were prospectively included in this study and three consecutive samples collected after every 6 months and investigated for the development of alloantibody to red cell antigens. Tests for antibody screening and identification were performed on preserved sample to investigate prevalence and development of red cell alloimmunization by standardized laboratory techniques by same person at Prathama Blood Centre. A total of 96 patients were included in the study. 63 patients were males and 33 females. A total of five single alloantibodies were formed in five patients out of them four (80 %) belonged to Kell blood group system and one (20 %) from Rh system. It was observed that two (1.92 %) of new thalassemia patients developed red cell alloantibodies during study period. Red cell alloimmunization should be kept in mind in the patients receiving multiple transfusions. In present study, alloimmunization rate was 5.21 %. Mean transfusion duration in these patients was 23.90 days, probably due to presence of alloantibody. RBC alloantibody detection on regular interval and corresponding antigen negative blood transfusion is strongly recommended in transfusion dependent thalassemia patients. PMID:25435730

  9. Hemolytic staining of the endocardium of the left heart chambers: a new sign for autopsy diagnosis of freshwater drowning.

    PubMed

    Zátopková, Lenka; Hejna, Petr; Janík, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Despite the availability of modern imaging and molecular tools, traditional autopsy, and laboratory findings remain the gold standard for the diagnosis of drowning. This article presents two cases of freshwater drowning in which hemolytic staining of the endocardium of the left heart chambers was observed at autopsy. One case was a suicidal drowning of an 84-year-old man, and the other case was an accidental drowning of an 86-year-old woman. In both cases, there was marked hemolytic staining of the endocardium of the left atrium and ventricle. The endocardium of the right heart chambers was clear and transparent in appearance. Hemolytic intimal staining of the aortic root was observed in one case. Gettler's test was positive in both cases. Hemolytic discoloration of the endocardium of the left heart chambers after freshwater drowning is analogous to hemolytic staining of the aortic root. Both staining patterns result from the hypo-osmolar hemolysis that occurs in the left heart chambers and systemic circulation after hypotonic fluid passes across the alveolocapillary membrane. Hemolytic discoloration of the endocardium of the left heart chambers at autopsy may support a diagnosis of freshwater drowning. PMID:25326681

  10. Exploiting the Nephrotoxic Effects of Venom from the Sea Anemone, Phyllodiscus semoni, to Create a Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Model in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Masashi; Ito, Yasuhiko; Morgan, B. Paul

    2012-01-01

    In the natural world, there are many creatures with venoms that have interesting and varied activities. Although the sea anemone, a member of the phylum Coelenterata, has venom that it uses to capture and immobilise small fishes and shrimp and for protection from predators, most sea anemones are harmless to man. However, a few species are highly toxic; some have venoms containing neurotoxins, recently suggested as potential immune-modulators for therapeutic application in immune diseases. Phyllodiscus semoni is a highly toxic sea anemone; the venom has multiple effects, including lethality, hemolysis and renal injuries. We previously reported that venom extracted from Phyllodiscus semoni induced acute glomerular endothelial injuries in rats resembling hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), accompanied with complement dysregulation in glomeruli and suggested that the model might be useful for analyses of pathology and development of therapeutic approaches in HUS. In this mini-review, we describe in detail the venom-induced acute renal injuries in rat and summarize how the venom of Phyllodiscus semoni could have potential as a tool for analyses of complement activation and therapeutic interventions in HUS. PMID:22851928

  11. Mast cell degranulation by a hemolytic lipid toxin decreases GBS colonization and infection

    PubMed Central

    Gendrin, Claire; Vornhagen, Jay; Ngo, Lisa; Whidbey, Christopher; Boldenow, Erica; Santana-Ufret, Veronica; Clauson, Morgan; Burnside, Kellie; Galloway, Dionne P.; Waldorf, Kristina Adams; Piliponsky, Adrian M.; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Ascending infection of microbes from the lower genital tract into the amniotic cavity increases the risk of preterm birth, stillbirth, and newborn infections. Host defenses that are critical for preventing ascending microbial infection are not completely understood. Group B Streptococcus (GBS) are Gram-positive bacteria that frequently colonize the lower genital tract of healthy women but cause severe infections during pregnancy, leading to preterm birth, stillbirth, or early-onset newborn infections. We recently described that the GBS pigment is hemolytic, and increased pigment expression promotes GBS penetration of human placenta. Here, we show that the GBS hemolytic pigment/lipid toxin and hyperpigmented GBS strains induce mast cell degranulation, leading to the release of preformed and proinflammatory mediators. Mast cell–deficient mice exhibit enhanced bacterial burden, decreased neutrophil mobilization, and decreased immune responses during systemic GBS infection. In a vaginal colonization model, hyperpigmented GBS strains showed increased persistence in mast cell–deficient mice compared to mast cell–proficient mice. Consistent with these observations, fewer rectovaginal GBS isolates from women in their third trimester of pregnancy were hyperpigmented/hyperhemolytic. Our work represents the first example of a bacterial hemolytic lipid that induces mast cell degranulation and emphasizes the role of mast cells in limiting genital colonization by hyperpigmented GBS. PMID:26425734

  12. Comparative study of hemolytic substances produced by coagulase-negative Staphylococcus strains.

    PubMed Central

    Loyer, M; Beaudet, R; Bisaillon, J G

    1990-01-01

    Hemolytic substances H7, H62, and E56, produced by Staphylococcus haemolyticus 7 and 62 and S. epidermidis 56, respectively, were purified. H7 and H62 are probably similar on the basis of their isoelectric focusing profiles in 8 M urea and complete immunological identity as revealed by immunodiffusion with rabbit anti-H7 and anti-E56 sera. For E56, we observed seven bands instead of three in isoelectric focusing and only partial immunological identity with H7 and H62. However, H7 and E56 were similar with regard to the following characteristics: hemolytic spectra against different erythrocytes, kinetics of erythrocyte lysis, heat stability, and inhibition by phosphatidylcholine. E56 was not active at a temperature lower than or equal to 25 degrees C, and its activity increased more rapidly with increased temperature compared with H7. For both substances, the complexes obtained by molecular filtration on Ultrogel AcA54 and the purified peptides by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography showed some hemolytic activity. These results suggest that a particular association or the presence of a given peptide could enhance the activity. Images PMID:2114358

  13. An Outbreak of Heinz Body Positive Hemolytic Anemia in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients1

    PubMed Central

    Pyo, Heui-Jung; Kwon, Young Joo; Wee, Kyoung So; Kwon, So Young; Lee, Chang Hong; Kim, Suhnggwon; Lee, Jung Sang; Cho, Soo-Hun; Cha, Chul Whan

    1993-01-01

    During the four month period, from December 1988 to March 1989, there was an outbreak of Heinz body positive hemolytic anemia in 34 patients undergoing hemodialysis in a 500-bed hospital, Seoul, Korea. The episodes of hemolysis were not reduced by changing the charcoal column and reverse osmosis system, or by adding ascorbic acid to the dialysate. The concentrations of nitrate, copper, aluminum and zinc in the treated water were all within the standards for hemodialysis. The chloramine concentration of the treated water was over 0.6 mg/L, markedly exceeding the allowable level of 0.1 mg/L. This high level of chloramine was proved to be due to the contamination of the water source by raw sewage. After we changed the source of water supply to another, no more episodes of hemolytic anemia occurred. It is concluded that chloramine is one of the major contaminants causing dialysis-induced hemolytic anemia and regular determinations are necessary, especially during winter and dry seasons. PMID:8031729

  14. Hemolytic anemia in two patients with glioblastoma multiforme: A possible interaction between vorinostat and dapsone.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer A; Petty, William J; Harmon, Michele; Peacock, James E; Valente, Kari; Owen, John; Pirmohamed, Munir; Lesser, Glenn J

    2015-06-01

    Patients undergoing treatment for glioblastoma multiforme are routinely placed on prophylactic treatment for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia because of significant therapy-induced lymphopenia. In patients with sulfa allergies, dapsone prophylaxis is often used due to its efficacy, long half-life, cost effectiveness, and general safety at low doses. However, dapsone may uncommonly induce a hemolytic anemia, particularly in patients deficient of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. This hemolysis is thought to be a result of oxidative stress on red blood cells induced by dapsone metabolites which produce reactive oxygen species that disrupt the red blood cell membrane and promote splenic sequestration. A single case report of dapsone-induced hemolytic anemia in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme has been reported. We present two patients with glioblastoma multiforme who developed severe hemolytic anemia shortly after initiating therapy with vorinostat, a pan-active histone deacetylase inhibitor, while on prophylactic dapsone. There are several potential mechanisms by which histone deacetylase inhibition may alter dapsone metabolism including changes in hepatic acetylation or N-glucuronidation leading to an increase in the bioavailability of dapsone's hematotoxic metabolites. In addition, vorinostat may lead to increased hemolysis through inhibition of heat shock protein-90, a chaperone protein that maintains the integrity of the red blood cell membrane cytoskeleton. The potential interaction between dapsone and vorinostat may have important clinical implications as more than 10 clinical trials evaluating drug combinations with vorinostat in patients with malignant glioma are either ongoing or planned in North America. PMID:24576944

  15. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Acute Pancreatitis > Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy test Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is ... of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for ...

  16. A successful transfusion in a tamandua (Tamandua tetradactyla) using both whole blood and blood replacement products.

    PubMed

    Raines, Janis A; Storms, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    A 10-yr-old tamandua (Tamandua tetradactyla) presented with severe lethargy and ataxia. Severe anemia (9% hematocrit) was diagnosed and ultimately resolved with the administration of a whole blood transfusion from conspecific and additional blood replacement products (Oxyglobin). This is the first described use of a whole blood transfusion in an edentate. PMID:25831593

  17. Retrospective Review of Platelet Transfusion Practices during 2013 Dengue Epidemic of Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Chaurasia, Rahul; Zaman, Shamsuz; Chatterjee, Kabita; Das, Bankim

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Dengue infection is a major public health problem. During explosive outbreaks, there is sudden surge in demands of platelet products. The present study was carried out in order to review platelet transfusion practices during the epidemic of dengue. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the clinical details including the platelet counts and haemorrhagic tendencies of dengue patients as well as the transfusion requirements of diagnosed dengue cases admitted at our centre. Results A total of 1,750 random donor platelet and 114 single donor platelet units were transfused to 531 patients. 23.2% platelet transfusions were found to be inappropriate Mean dosage of platelets transfused was 2 × 1011 platelets per patient. A total of 347 (65.3%) patients had bleeding diathesis at the time of presentation. Skin and the oropharynx were the most common bleeding sites. Major bleeding was seen in 119 (34.3%) patients, whereas 228 (65.7%) patients had minor bleeding episodes. Conclusion The study emphasises the need for minimising unnecessary transfusions and for using this scarce resource judiciously, which can be achieved by strict adherence to evidence-based transfusion guidelines and regular review of the on-going transfusion practices. PMID:26557814

  18. The first direct human blood transfusion: the forgotten legacy of George W. Crile.

    PubMed

    Nathoo, Narendra; Lautzenheiser, Frederick K; Barnett, Gene H

    2009-03-01

    GEORGE W. CRILE is best known as the father of physiological surgery in the United States, a pioneer surgeon, an innovator and inventor, a founding member of the American College of Surgeons, and the principal founder of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. However, Crile's legacy of performing the first direct blood transfusion in humans has been all but forgotten, even though the results were published in the leading scientific journals of the day. Crile's lifelong interest in the treatment of surgical shock led to his interest in blood transfusion. A chance visit to the laboratory of Alexis Carrel in 1902 resulted in Crile perfecting his technique for direct blood transfusion. He subsequently modified Carrel's anastomosis technique to administer a faster transfusion, investigated the use of blood transfusions in various clinical settings, and went on to introduce the concept and technique of blood transfusion to soldiers during World War I. In this report, we trace his long-time interest in blood transfusion and document the events that led to the first successful blood transfusion performed between 2 brothers on August 6, 1906, at St. Alexis Hospital, Cleveland, OH. PMID:19240569

  19. NOTE: Arterio-venous flow between monochorionic twins determined during intra-uterine transfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gemert, Martin J. C.; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P. H. M.; Lopriore, Enrico; Pasman, Suzanne A.; Vandenbussche, Frank P. H. A.

    2008-04-01

    Twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) is a severe complication of monozygotic (identical) twin fetuses sharing one single (monochorionic) placenta. TTTS is caused by a net inter-twin transfusion of blood through placental anastomoses, from one twin (the donor) to the other (the recipient), which link the two feto-placental circulations. Currently, the only reliable method to measure the net inter-twin transfusion clinically is when incomplete laser therapy of TTTS occurs and one of the twins becomes anemic and requires an intra-uterine transfusion of adult red blood cells. Then, differences between adult hemoglobin concentrations measured during the transfusion and at birth relate not only to the net inter-twin transfusion but also to the finite lifetime of the adult red blood cells. We have analyzed this situation, derived the differential equations of adult hemoglobin in the donor and recipient twins, given the solutions and given expressions relating the net inter-twin flow with clinically measured parameters. We have included single and multiple intra-uterine transfusions. In conclusion, because incomplete laser therapy occurs frequently, and some cases require an intra-uterine transfusion, this method may allow collecting a wealth of net inter-twin flow data from clinicians involved in laser therapy of TTTS. To aid to the widespread use of this method, we have presented the equations as clearly as possible in tables for easy use by others.

  20. Updated recommendations on the management of gastrointestinal disturbances during iron chelation therapy with Deferasirox in transfusion dependent patients with myelodysplastic syndrome - Emphasis on optimized dosing schedules and new formulations.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Florian; Angelucci, Emanuele; Breccia, Massimo; Gattermann, Norbert; Santini, Valeria; Vey, Norbert; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are oligoclonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by peripheral cytopenias with anemias being the most prevalent feature. The majority of patients will depend on regular transfusions of packed red blood cells (PRBC) during the course of the disease. Particularly patients with MDS and low risk for transformation into acute myeloid leukemia and low risk of early death will receive PRBC transfusions on a regular basis, which puts them at high risk for transfusional iron overload. Transfusion dependence has been associated with negative impact on organ function and reduced life expectancy. Recently, several retrospective but also some prospective studies have indicated, that transfusion dependent patients with MDS might benefit from consequent iron chelation with regard to morbidity and mortality. However, low treatment adherence due to adverse events mainly gastrointestinal in nature is an important obstacle in achieving sufficient iron chelation in MDS patients. Here, we will summarize and discuss the existing data on Deferasirox in low risk MDS published so far and provide recommendations for optimal management of gastrointestinal adverse events during iron chelation aiming at improving treatment compliance and, hence, sufficiently removing excess iron from the patients. PMID:26293555

  1. Babesia in a Nonsplenectomized Patient Requiring Exchange Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Dikshya; Mudduluru, Bindu; Moussaly, Elias; Mobarakai, Neville; Hurford, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Babesiosis is a tick born zoonosis caused by red blood cell parasites of the genus Babesia. It is caused predominantly by B. microti and B. divergens, microti being more common in the US. The parasites are transmitted by Ixodes tick to their host but infection can also spread by blood transfusion and perinatally. Clinical manifestations vary from subclinical infection to fulminating disease depending upon the immune status of the patient. About half of patients, hospitalized with babesiosis, develop complication with fatality rates of 6 to 9% which increase up to 21% among those with immunosuppression. A case of 58-year-old previously healthy man, infected by B. microti, was reported on 2000 who presented with severe disease characterized by severe anemia, DIC, and renal and respiratory failure. First case of overwhelming septic shock without respiratory involvement due to babesiosis in a healthy patient with an intact spleen was published in a case report on 2011. Since our patient here is an immunocompetent healthy male with intact spleen presenting with severe babesiosis requiring exchange transfusion, this presentation of Babesia is rare and warrants further study. PMID:26693364

  2. Applying radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Hohberger, Clive; Davis, Rodeina; Briggs, Lynne; Gutierrez, Alfonso; Veeramani, Dhamaraj

    2012-05-01

    ISO/IEC 18000-3 mode 1 standard 13.56 MHz RFID tags have been accepted by the International Society for Blood Transfusion (ISBT) and the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as data carriers to integrate with and augment ISBT 128 barcode data carried on blood products. The use of 13.56 MHz RFID carrying ISBT 128 data structures allows the global deployment and use of RFID, supporting both international transfer of blood and international disaster relief. The deployment in process at the BloodCenter of Wisconsin and testing at the University of Iowa Health Center is the first FDA-permitted implementation of RFID throughout in all phases of blood banking, donation through transfusion. RFID technology and equipment selection will be discussed along with FDA-required RF safety testing; integration with the blood enterprise computing system and required RFID tag performance. Tag design and survivability is an issue due to blood bag centrifugation and irradiation. Deployment issues will be discussed. Use of RFID results in significant return on investment over the use of barcodes in the blood center operations through labor savings and error reduction. PMID:22079476

  3. Blood transfusion during cesarean section. A 12 years' retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Imberti, R; Preseglio, I; Trotta, V; Filisetti, P; Mapelli, A

    1990-01-01

    Transfusional practice over the last 12 years was investigated retrospectively in 1618 women submitted to lower-segment cesarean section. The overall percentage of transfused patients was low (2.4%) and it has become lower in the last four years (1.1%), in concomitance with the development of better knowledge of tissue oxygenation and with the fear of transmitting infectious diseases, factors which have led anesthesiologists to employ blood only when strictly required. Three conditions greatly increased the risk of bleeding: placenta previa, abruptio placentae and coagulation disorders. Previous cesarean section, fetal distress, dystocias and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy did not increase the risk of bleeding and no difference was found between elective and non-elective surgery. Since for elective surgery two units of blood were crossmatched, the crossmatched/transfused ratio (C/T ratio) was very high (60.8/1). To improve blood bank service efficiency, for surgical operations like cesarean section which rarely require blood, it is possible simply to recur to a type and screen (TS) procedure instead of crossmatching blood, but for categories of patients identified as being at high risk of bleeding--placenta previa, abruptio placentae, coagulation disorders--it is advisable to have crossmatched blood available in the operating theatre. PMID:2371803

  4. A radiolabeled antiglobulin test for crossmatching platelet transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Kickler, T.S.; Braine, H.G.; Ness, P.M.; Koester, A.; Bias, W.

    1983-02-01

    Despite the use of HLA-matched platelets for alloimmunized recipients, transfusion failures occur. In order to reduce these failures, researchers investigated the use of a radiolabeled antiglobulin technique for platelet crossmatching. The principle of the test is that of an indirect Coombs test using /sup 125/I labeled goat anti-human IgG. Incompatibility is determined by calculating a radioactivity antiglobulin test (RAGT) index. Using this technique, researchers performed 89 crossmatches on 19 leukemic or aplastic patients who were refractory to random donor platelets and receiving varying degrees of HLA-matched platelets. Effectiveness of the transfusion was assessed from the posttransfusion corrected platelet count increment (CCI) determined at 1 and 20 hr. When the RAGT index was 1.9 or less, the mean CCI at 1 lhr was 17,570 +/- 7003/cu mm, n . 55. When the RAGT index was 2.0 or greater, the mean CCI was 4237 +/- 4100/cu mm, n . 34. At 20 hr when the RAGT index was 1.9 or less, the mean CCI was 8722 +/- 3143/cu mm, n . 33, and when the index was 2.0 or greater, the mean CCI was 571 +/- 1286/cu mm, n . 23. Using this technique, one false negative resulted. Nine positive crossmatches with good increments at 1 hr were found; at 20 hr, however, the survival of these units was zero. These data suggest that this method is a useful adjunct in the selection of platelets in the refractory patient.

  5. Transfusion indication RBC (PBM-02)”: gap analysis of a Joint Commission Patient Blood Management Performance Measure at a community hospital

    PubMed Central

    De Leon, Essel Marie Bagang; Szallasi, Arpad

    2014-01-01

    Background The Joint Commission accredits health care organisations in the USA as a prerequisite for licensure. In 2011, TJC published seven Patient Blood Management Performance Measures to improve the safety and quality of care. These Measures will provide hospital-specific information about clinical performance. Materials and methods Of the seven TJC PBM Performance Measures, we decided to evaluate PBM-02, “Transfusion indication RBC”, at our hospital. Blood transfusion orders were collected from May 2 to August 2, 2011 and the data analysed. Results Of the 724 consecutive red blood cell transfusion orders, 694 (96%) documented both clinical indication and pre-transfusion haemoglobin/haematocrit results. The leading transfusion indication (47% of total) was “high risk patients with pre-transfusion Hb of <9 g/dL”. The majority (72%) of non-actively bleeding patients received a single unit of blood as recommended by our transfusion guidelines. However, 70% of these patients went on to receive additional units and 21% of the initial orders were placed for two or more units. Patients with active bleeding and special circumstances accounted for 17% and 4% of the transfusions, respectively. Our blood utilisation did not change by introducing the single-unit transfusion policy. Discussion The majority (96%) of the transfusion orders met The Joint Commission criteria by providing both transfusion indication and pre-transfusion Hb and/or Hct values. Our transfusion guidelines recommend single-unit red blood cell transfusions with reassessment of the patient after each transfusion for need to receive more blood. Although most (72%) initial orders followed our transfusion guidelines, 70% of patients who received a single unit initially went on to receive more blood (some in excess of 10 units). Our objective data may be helpful in evaluating blood ordering practices at our hospital and in identifying specific clinical services for review. PMID:23149139

  6. Neurocognitive Profiles of Preterm Infants Randomly Assigned to Lower or Higher Hematocrit Thresholds for Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Amy L.; Richman, Lynn; Lindgren, Scott; Nopoulos, Peg; Bell, Edward F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Preterm infants are frequently transfused with red blood cells based on standardized guidelines or clinical concern that anemia taxes infants’ physiological compensatory mechanisms and thereby threatens their health and well-being. The impact of various transfusion guidelines on long-term neurocognitive outcome is not known. The purpose of this study is to evaluate long-term neurocognitive outcome on children born prematurely and treated at birth with different transfusion guidelines. Methods Neurocognitive outcomes were examined at school age for 56 preterm infants randomly assigned to a liberal (n = 33) or restrictive (n = 23) transfusion strategy. Tests of intelligence, achievement, language, visual-spatial/motor, and memory skills were administered. Between-group differences were assessed. Results Those in the liberal transfusion group performed more poorly than those in the restrictive group on measures of associative verbal fluency, visual memory, and reading. Conclusions Findings highlight possible long-term neurodevelopmental consequences of maintaining higher hematocrit levels. PMID:21360360

  7. Red blood cell transfusion strategies and Maximum surgical blood ordering schedule.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shivakumar S; Shah, Jignesh

    2014-09-01

    Blood transfusion is one of the practices that is in vogue because it expands blood volume and purportedly improves the oxygen carrying capacity. Despite this supposed physiological benefit, paradoxically, both anaemia and transfusion are independently associated with organ injury and increased morbidity. Historically, transfusion was used to maintain blood haemoglobin concentration above 10 g/dL and a haematocrit above 30%. There is now a greater emphasis on interventions to reduce the use of transfusion as it is a scarce and expensive resource with many serious adverse effects. Institutional maximum surgical blood ordering schedule algorithm developed with data analysis and consensus of surgeons, anaesthesiologists and blood banks can reduce the overuse of blood. A PubMed search was performed with search words/combination of words 'erythrocyte transfusion, adverse effects, economics, mortality, therapy, therapeutic use and utilisation'. Search yielded a total of 1541 articles that were screened for clinical relevance for the purpose of this review. PMID:25535420

  8. Low frequency of anti-D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion: the Anti-D Alloimmunization after D-incompatible Platelet Transfusions (ADAPT) study.

    PubMed

    Cid, Joan; Lozano, Miguel; Ziman, Alyssa; West, Kamille A; O'Brien, Kerry L; Murphy, Michael F; Wendel, Silvano; Vázquez, Alejandro; Ortín, Xavier; Hervig, Tor A; Delaney, Meghan; Flegel, Willy A; Yazer, Mark H

    2015-02-01

    The reported frequency of D alloimmunization in D- recipients after transfusion of D+ platelets varies. This study was designed to determine the frequency of D alloimmunization, previously reported to be an average of 5 ± 2%. A primary anti-D immune response was defined as the detection of anti-D ? 28 d following the first D+ platelet transfusion. Data were collected on 485 D- recipients of D+ platelets in 11 centres between 2010 and 2012. Their median age was 60 (range 2-100) years. Diagnoses included: haematological (203/485, 42%), oncological (64/485, 13%) and other diseases (218/485, 45%). Only 7/485 (1·44%; 95% CI 0·58-2·97%) recipients had a primary anti-D response after a median serological follow-up of 77 d (range: 28-2111). There were no statistically significant differences between the primary anti-D formers and the other patients, in terms of gender, age, receipt of immunosuppressive therapy, proportion of patients with haematological/oncological diseases, transfusion of whole blood-derived or apheresis platelets or both, and total number of transfused platelet products. This is the largest study with the longest follow-up of D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion. The low frequency of D alloimmunization should be considered when deciding whether to administer Rh Immune Globulin to D- males and D- females without childbearing potential after transfusion of D+ platelets. PMID:25283094

  9. Tuscan Study on the Appropriateness of Fresh-frozen Plasma Transfusion (TuSAPlaT)

    PubMed Central

    Liumbruno, Giancarlo Maria; Sodini, Maria Laura; Grazzini, Giuliano

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The considerable increase in the consumption of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) recorded in 2002 in the Region of Tuscany made it necessary to check the appropriateness of the use of this blood component in all transfusion facilities in the Tuscan network. Materials and methods From July 1, 2003 to December 31, 2005, the Regional Blood Transfusion Coordinating Centre carried out an audit on the clinical use of FFP in the 40 structures included in the Tuscan transfusion network. The study had two complementary parts: a review of guidelines on the use of FFP and the involvement of Hospital Transfusion Committees in evaluating the outcome of the audit and in the consequent local policy decisions and in educating clinicians. Results The data from all 40 of the regional transfusion structures were analysed. The audit, which was initially retrospective, gradually became prospective. The percentage clinical use of FFP decreased, compared to 2002, in each of the 3 years of the study: a) 2003: ? 8.92%; b) 2004: ? 2.11%; c) 2005: ?1.97%. The inappropriate requests for plasma decreased from 27% to 22.7% of the total. It was possible to classify the inappropriate requests for plasma on the basis of homogeneous, regionally defined criteria. The most frequent inappropriate indication (60.7% of the total) was the use of plasma in the case of haemorrhage in patients with a normal PT and/or PTT or unavailable results. Each hospital revised its own guidelines between 2004 and 2005 and the Hospital Transfusion Committees set up appropriate educational and behavioural interventions. Conclusions The capacity of transfusion facilities to make data on the use of blood components available systematically and continuously is an essential feature of clinical governance; systematic clinical auditing increases the level of appropriate behaviours in the transfusion sector, contemporaneously contributing to self-sufficiency in transfusion products, and may direct research towards those clinical settings at greatest risk of inappropriate use of transfusion therapy with FFP. PMID:19204757

  10. Prophylactic plasma and platelet transfusion in the critically Ill patient: just useless and expensive or even harmful?

    PubMed

    Görlinger, Klaus; Saner, Fuat H

    2015-01-01

    It is still common practice to correct abnormal standard laboratory test results, such as increased INR or low platelet count, prior to invasive interventions, such as tracheostomy, central venous catheter insertion or liver biopsy, in critically ill patients. Data suggest that 30-90 % of plasma transfused for these indications is unnecessary and puts the patient at risk. Plasma transfusion is associated with a high risk of transfusion-associated adverse events such as transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), transfusion-related lung injury (TRALI), transfusion-related immunomodulation (TRIM), and anaphylaxis/allergic reactions. Therefore, the avoidance of inappropriate plasma transfusion bears a high potential of improving patient outcomes. The prospective study by Durila et al., published recently in BMC Anesthesiology, provides evidence that tracheostomies can be performed without prophylactic plasma transfusion and bleeding complications in critically ill patients despite increased INR in case of normal thromboelastometry (ROTEM) results. Thromboelastometry-based restrictive transfusion management helped avoid unnecessary plasma and platelet transfusion, and should reduce the incidence of transfusion-related adverse events and transfusion-associated hospital costs. Therefore, the authors believe that thromboelastometry-based strategies should be implemented to optimize patient blood management in perioperative medicine. PMID:26054337

  11. Development, Validation, and Cost Effectiveness of Clinical Prediction Rules for Group A Beta Hemolytic Streptococcal Pharyngitis In Children From Lower and Upper Middle Income Countries

    E-print Network

    Assefa, Mehret

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes strains isolated from children with pharyngitisPharyngitis Group A beta hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS) isstreptococcus (GABHS), a bacterial pathogen, is responsible for pharyngitis

  12. Acute Inflammation

    MedlinePLUS

    The official consumer website of: Visit ACFAS.org | About ACFAS | Información en Español Advanced Search Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Acute Inflammation Text Size Print Bookmark Acute Inflammation What Is Acute Inflammation? Inflammation is the body’s normal protective response to an injury, irritation, ...

  13. Preserving human cells for regenerative, reproductive, and transfusion medicine

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Waseem; Assal, Rami El; Shafiee, Hadi; Anchan, Raymond M.; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-01-01

    Cell cryopreservation enables maintaining cellular life at sub-zero temperatures by slowing down biochemical processes. Various cell types are routinely cryopreserved in modern reproductive, regenerative, and transfusion medicine. Current cell cryopreservation methods involve freezing (slow/rapid) or vitrifying cells in the presence of a cryoprotective agent (CPA). Although these methods are clinically utilized, cryo-injury due to ice crystals, osmotic shock, and CPA toxicity cause loss of cell viability and function. Recent approaches using minimum volume vitrification provide alternatives to the conventional cryopreservation methods. Minimum volume vitrification provides ultra-high cooling and rewarming rates that enable preserving cells without ice crystal formation. Herein, we review recent advances in cell cryopreservation technology and provide examples of techniques that are utilized in oocyte, stem cell, and red blood cell cryopreservation. PMID:24995723

  14. Alternative Blood Products and Clinical Needs in Transfusion Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Carolyn; Vaglio, Stefania; Grazzini, Giuliano

    2012-01-01

    The primary focus of national blood programs is the provision of a safe and adequate blood supply. This goal is dependent on regular voluntary donations and a regulatory infrastructure that establishes and enforces standards for blood safety. Progress in ex vivo expansion of blood cells from cell sources including peripheral blood, cord blood, induced pluripotent stem cells, and human embryonic stem cell lines will likely make alternative transfusion products available for clinical use in the near future. Initially, alloimmunized patients and individuals with rare blood types are most likely to benefit from alternative products. However, in developed nations voluntary blood donations are projected to be inadequate in the future as blood usage by individuals 60 years and older increases. In developing nations economic and political challenges may impede progress in attaining self-sufficiency. Under these circumstances, ex vivo generated red cells may be needed to supplement the general blood supply. PMID:22567025

  15. Irradiation of hemoderivatives for transfusion in immunodepressed patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, J. Fernandez; Castillo, Elsa Lidia

    In this paper we describe a methodology for irradiating hemotherapeutic products that allows the use of radiator GAMMA-CELL-500-001. Irradiation conditions for PVC 300 mL bags were characterized in which blood plasma, erythrocyte and thrombocyte concentrates, and leukocyte mass were packed. Lacking suitable systems in a 10-40 Gy dose range, we modified the Fricke dosimeter system and verified it according to international standards. This modified system showed good repeatibility and homogeinity of results and linearity in the 10-40 Gy range. The linear correlation coefficient was 0.9966, and the reproductibility was ± 2%. More than 300 bags were processed by this established methodology. Hemoderivatives were transfused to patients with malignant hemopathic disorders, subjected to treatment with cytostatics and immunosuppressors, and in general immunodepressed. At present, results are promising from dosimetric and clinical points of view.

  16. Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome: a comprehensive update.

    PubMed

    Habli, Mounira; Lim, Foong Yen; Crombleholme, Timothy

    2009-06-01

    Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) is a serious complication in about 10% to 20% of monozygous twin gestations with an incidence of 4% to 35% in the United States. Severe TTTS is reported to occur in 5.5% to 17.5% of cases. TTTS is a progressive disease in which sudden deteriorations in clinical status can occur, leading to death of a co-twin. Up to 30% of survivors may have abnormal neurodevelopment as a result of the combination of profound antenatal insult and the complications of severe prematurity. This article presents an overview of what is known about the pathophysiology and the diagnosis of TTTS, the role of echocardiography in TTTS, treatment options available for TTTS, complications of treatment for TTTS, and short- and long-term outcomes of TTTS. PMID:19559327

  17. Thrombocytopenia-Associated Multiple Organ Failure and Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trung C; Cruz, Miguel A; Carcillo, Joseph A

    2015-10-01

    Thrombocytopenia-associated multiple organ failure (TAMOF) is a clinical phenotype that encompasses a spectrum of syndromes associated with disseminated microvascular thromboses, such as the thrombotic microangiopathies thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura/hemolytic uremic syndrome (TTP/HUS) and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Autopsies findings in TTP, HUS, or DIC reveal specific findings that can differentiate these 3 entities. Von Willebrand factor and ADAMTS-13 play a central role in TTP. Shiga toxins and the complement pathway are vital in the development of HUS. Tissue factor is the major protease that drives the pathology of DIC. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common feature in patients with TAMOF. PMID:26410136

  18. Predeposit self-transfusion (PDS) in a hepatobiliopancreatic surgery (HBPS) unit: preliminary data.

    PubMed

    Serrablo, Alejandro; Garcia-Erce, JosE Antonio; Serrablo, Rodolfo; Gonzalvo, Elena; Esarte, JesUs MarIa

    2003-01-01

    Hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery (HBPS) has high morbility and mortality and frequently requires blood transfusion. Allogeneic transfusion may cause adverse sequelae. Predeposit self-transfusiOn (PDS) minimizes allogeneic blood transfusion and avoids most adverse reactions. We present the preliminary data of our PDS experience (with recombinant human erythropoieting, r-HuEPO) in HBPS during the first year. We studied our first-year HBPS-PDS program by a retrospective review of the case histories and transfusion records in our Blood Bank. Sex, weight, underlying disease, packed red cell units (PRCUs) requested, drawn, and transfused, and hospital and ICU stays were analyzed. Nine patients were admitted in the PDS program. Of desired blood units, 83% was obtained, successfully in 77.8% of patients, and 63.2% were transfused with autologous blood transfusion. Only three patients needed allogeneic blood (33.3%). All complications occurred in patients who received allogeneic units. Also, we found stays were three times longer in those patients. PDS could be a valid and safe alternative for patients undergoing elective HBPS because it decreases allogeneic blood requirements, reduces overall complications, and also reduces hospital and ICU stays. PMID:14505154

  19. Distinct roles of trauma and transfusion in induction of immune modulation post-injury

    PubMed Central

    Jackman, Rachael P.; Utter, Garth H.; Muench, Marcus O.; Heitman, John W.; Munz, Matthew M.; Jackman, Robert W.; Biswas, Hope H.; Rivers, Ryan M.; Tobler, Leslie H.; Busch, Michael P.; Norris, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Trauma and transfusion can both alter immunity, and while transfusions are common among traumatically injured patients, few studies have examined their combined effects on immunity. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS We tracked the plasma levels of 41 immunomodulatory proteins in 56 trauma patients from time of injury up to 1 year later. In addition, a murine model was developed to distinguish between the effects of transfusion and underlying injury and blood loss. RESULTS Thirty-one of the proteins had a statistically significant change over time after traumatic injury, with a mixed early response that was predominantly anti-inflammatory followed by a later increase in proteins involved in wound healing and homeostasis. Results from the murine model revealed similar cytokine responses to humans. In mice, trauma/hemorrhage caused early perturbations in a number of the pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators measured, and transfusion blunted early elevations in IL-6, IL-10, MMP-9, and IFN-?. Transfusion caused or exacerbated changes in MCP-1, IL-1?, IL-5, IL-15, and soluble E-selectin. Finally, trauma/hemorrhage alone increased KC and IL-13. CONCLUSIONS This work provides a detailed characterization of the major shift in the immunological environment in response to trauma and transfusion and clarifies which immune mediators are affected by trauma/hemorrhage and which by transfusion. PMID:22452342

  20. An Imported Case of Severe Falciparum Malaria with Prolonged Hemolytic Anemia Clinically Mimicking a Coinfection with Babesiosis

    PubMed Central

    Na, Young Ju; Chai, Jong-Yil; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Lee, Hyun Jung; Song, Ji Young; Je, Ji Hye; Seo, Ji Hye; Park, Sung Hun; Choi, Ji Seon

    2014-01-01

    While imported falciparum malaria has been increasingly reported in recent years in Korea, clinicians have difficulties in making a clinical diagnosis as well as in having accessibility to effective anti-malarial agents. Here we describe an unusual case of imported falciparum malaria with severe hemolytic anemia lasting over 2 weeks, clinically mimicking a coinfection with babesiosis. A 48-year old Korean man was diagnosed with severe falciparum malaria in France after traveling to the Republic of Benin, West Africa. He received a 1-day course of intravenous artesunate and a 7-day course of Malarone (atovaquone/proguanil) with supportive hemodialysis. Coming back to Korea 5 days after discharge, he was readmitted due to recurrent fever, and further treated with Malarone for 3 days. Both the peripheral blood smears and PCR test were positive for Plasmodium falciparum. However, he had prolonged severe hemolytic anemia (Hb 5.6 g/dl). Therefore, 10 days after the hospitalization, Babesia was considered to be potentially coinfected. A 7-day course of Malarone and azithromycin was empirically started. He became afebrile within 3 days of this babesiosis treatment, and hemolytic anemia profiles began to improve at the completion of the treatment. He has remained stable since his discharge. Unexpectedly, the PCR assays failed to detect DNA of Babesia spp. from blood. In addition, during the retrospective review of the case, the artesunate-induced delayed hemolytic anemia was considered as an alternative cause of the unexplained hemolytic anemia. PMID:25548419

  1. An imported case of severe falciparum malaria with prolonged hemolytic anemia clinically mimicking a coinfection with babesiosis.

    PubMed

    Na, Young Ju; Chai, Jong-Yil; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Lee, Hyun Jung; Song, Ji Young; Je, Ji Hye; Seo, Ji Hye; Park, Sung Hun; Choi, Ji Seon; Kim, Min Ja

    2014-12-01

    While imported falciparum malaria has been increasingly reported in recent years in Korea, clinicians have difficulties in making a clinical diagnosis as well as in having accessibility to effective anti-malarial agents. Here we describe an unusual case of imported falciparum malaria with severe hemolytic anemia lasting over 2 weeks, clinically mimicking a coinfection with babesiosis. A 48-year old Korean man was diagnosed with severe falciparum malaria in France after traveling to the Republic of Benin, West Africa. He received a 1-day course of intravenous artesunate and a 7-day course of Malarone (atovaquone/proguanil) with supportive hemodialysis. Coming back to Korea 5 days after discharge, he was readmitted due to recurrent fever, and further treated with Malarone for 3 days. Both the peripheral blood smears and PCR test were positive for Plasmodium falciparum. However, he had prolonged severe hemolytic anemia (Hb 5.6 g/dl). Therefore, 10 days after the hospitalization, Babesia was considered to be potentially coinfected. A 7-day course of Malarone and azithromycin was empirically started. He became afebrile within 3 days of this babesiosis treatment, and hemolytic anemia profiles began to improve at the completion of the treatment. He has remained stable since his discharge. Unexpectedly, the PCR assays failed to detect DNA of Babesia spp. from blood. In addition, during the retrospective review of the case, the artesunate-induced delayed hemolytic anemia was considered as an alternative cause of the unexplained hemolytic anemia. PMID:25548419

  2. Vitamin B12 and Vitamin D Deficiencies: An Unusual Cause of Fever, Severe Hemolytic Anemia and Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vikas A.; Harbada, Rishit; Sharma, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    The array of diagnostic workup for pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO) generally revolves in searching for infections, inflammatory/autoimmune, and endocrine etiologies. A differential diagnosis of fever, hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia can have etiologies varying from infections like malaria, dengue, cytomegalovirus, Ebstein barr virus, Parvovirus, infective endocarditis, to autoimmune disorder (systemic lupus erythromatosis), vasculitis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), autoimmune hemolytic anemia/Evan's syndrome, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuri (PNH), or drugs. Nutritional deficiencies (especially vitamin B12 deficiency) as a cause of fever, hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia are very rare and therefore rarely thought of. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency may cause fever and if accompanied by concurrent hyper-homocysteinemia and hypophosphatemia can sometimes lead to severe hemolysis mimicking the above-mentioned conditions. We present a case that highlights vitamin B12 and vitamin D deficiency as an easily treatable cause of PUO, hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia, which should be actively looked for and treated before proceeding with more complicated and expensive investigation or starting empiric treatments. PMID:25811010

  3. The Effect of Aspirin on Bleeding and Transfusion in Contemporary Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Goldhammer, Jordan E.; Marhefka, Gregary D.; Daskalakis, Constantine; Berguson, Mark W.; Bowen, John E.; Diehl, James T.; Sun, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite evidence that preoperative aspirin improves outcomes in cardiac surgery, recommendations for aspirin use are inconsistent due to aspirin’s anti-platelet effect and concern for bleeding. The purpose of this study was to investigate preoperative aspirin use and its effect on bleeding and transfusion in cardiac surgery. Methods This retrospective study involved consecutive patients (n=1571) who underwent CABG, valve, or combined CABG and valve surgery at a single center between March 2007 and July 2012. Of all patients, 728 met the inclusion criteria and were divided into two groups: those using (n=603) or not using (n=125) aspirin within 5 days of surgery. Data were collected on chest tube drainage, re-operation for bleeding, and transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs), fresh frozen plasma (FFP), and platelets. Results No significant difference was observed between the two groups in chest tube drainage or re-operation for bleeding. An increase in patients transfused with RBCs was observed in the aspirin group (61.9 vs 51.2%, adjusted OR 1.77, p=0.027); however, among those transfused RBCs, no significant difference in mean units transfused or massive transfusion was observed. No significant difference was seen in transfusion requirement of FFP or platelets. Conclusions In patients undergoing CABG, valve, or combined CABG/valve surgery, preoperative aspirin, within 5 days of surgery, was associated with an increased probability of receiving an RBC transfusion. Preoperative aspirin was not associated with an increase in chest tube drainage, re-operation for bleeding complications, or transfusion of FFP or platelets. PMID:26230605

  4. Plasma and Plasma Protein Product Transfusion: A Canadian Blood Services Centre for Innovation Symposium.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Michelle P; Al-Habsi, Khalid S; Golder, Mia; Walsh, Geraldine M; Sheffield, William P

    2015-07-01

    Plasma obtained via whole blood donation processing or via apheresis technology can either be transfused directly to patients or pooled and fractionated into plasma protein products that are concentrates of 1 or more purified plasma protein. The evidence base supporting clinical efficacy in most of the indications for which plasma is transfused is weak, whereas high-quality evidence supports the efficacy of plasma protein products in at least some of the clinical settings in which they are used. Transfusable plasma utilization remains composed in part of applications that fall outside of clinical practice guidelines. Plasma contains all of the soluble coagulation factors and is frequently transfused in efforts to restore or reinforce patient hemostasis. The biochemical complexities of coagulation have in recent years been rationalized in newer cell-based models that supplement the cascade hypothesis. Efforts to normalize widely used clinical hemostasis screening test values by plasma transfusion are thought to be misplaced, but superior rapid tests have been slow to emerge. The advent of non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants has brought new challenges to clinical laboratories in plasma testing and to clinicians needing to reverse non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants urgently. Current plasma-related controversies include prophylactic plasma transfusion before invasive procedures, plasma vs prothrombin complex concentrates for urgent warfarin reversal, and the utility of increased ratios of plasma to red blood cell units transfused in massive transfusion protocols. The first recombinant plasma protein products to reach the clinic were recombinant hemophilia treatment products, and these donor-free equivalents to factors VIII and IX are now being supplemented with novel products whose circulatory half-lives have been increased by chemical modification or genetic fusion. Achieving optimal plasma utilization is an ongoing challenge in the interconnected worlds of transfusable plasma, plasma protein products, and recombinant and engineered replacements. PMID:25862281

  5. Degeneration and atrophy of the thymus of lethally irradiated dogs, rescued by transfusion of cryopreserved autologous blood leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, W.; Fliedner, T.M.; Herbst, E.W.; Huegl, E.B.; Boedey, B.

    1987-12-01

    Dogs exposed to a fatal radiation dose of 12 Gy were rescued by transfusion of autologous blood leukocytes. A severe acute and long-lasting damage to the thymus was observed. The acute damage, as observed on the tenth day, consisted of a marked reduction in the number of lymphocytes, degeneration of Hassall's bodies, and hemorrhage. Long-term effects, observed several months after irradiation, were partial to total atrophy of the thymus. Regeneration, when it occurred, was limited to a few small isolated areas in which lymphopoiesis was supported by epithelial reticular cells. In contrast, the lymph nodes of all dogs had abundant cortical lymphopoiesis. The abundant hemopoiesis present in the marrow from the tenth day after irradiation until the end of the observation period should have provided sufficient circulating precursor cells to seed the thymus and regenerate the organ to the same extent as that observed in the other blood-forming organs. The impairment of lymphopoietic regeneration in the thymus seems to be due, therefore, to damage caused by irradiation on the specific stroma of the organ, which is not able to support such activity.

  6. Impact of silica nanoparticle design on cellular toxicity and hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tian; Malugin, Alexander; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2011-07-26

    Understanding the toxicity of silica nanoparticles (SiO(2)) on the cellular level is crucial for rational design of these nanomaterials for biomedical applications. Herein, we explore the impacts of geometry, porosity, and surface charge of SiO(2) on cellular toxicity and hemolytic activity. Nonporous Sto?ber silica nanospheres (115 nm diameter), mesoporous silica nanospheres (120 nm diameter, aspect ratio 1), mesoporous silica nanorods with aspect ratio of 2, 4, and 8 (width by length 80 × 200 nm, 150 × 600 nm, 130 × 1000 nm), and their cationic counterparts were evaluated on macrophages, lung carcinoma cells, and human erythrocytes. It was shown that the toxicity of SiO(2) is cell-type dependent and that surface charge and pore size govern cellular toxicity. Using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, the cellular association of SiO(2) was quantitated with the association amount increasing in the following order: mesoporous SiO(2) (aspect ratio 1, 2, 4, 8) < amine-modified mesoporous SiO(2) (aspect ratio 1, 2, 4, 8) < amine-modified nonporous Sto?ber SiO(2) < nonporous Sto?ber SiO(2). Geometry did not seem to influence the extent of SiO(2) association at early or extended time points. The level of cellular association of the nanoparticles was directly linked to the extent of plasma membrane damage, suggesting a biological cause-and-effect relationship. Hemolysis assay showed that the hemolytic activity was porosity- and geometry-dependent for bare SiO(2) and surface-charge-dependent for amine-modified SiO(2). A good correlation between hemolytic activity and cellular association was found on a similar dosage basis. These results can provide useful guidelines for the rational design of SiO(2) in nanomedicine. PMID:21630682

  7. Hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic disease associated with an altered phospholipid composition of the erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jaffé, Ernst R.; Gottfried, Eugene L.

    1968-01-01

    A hemolytic disorder with mild hyperbilirubinemia and reticulocytosis of 6 to 15% was documented in eight members of a large family from the Dominican Republic and was presumed to be present in eight other members. The disorder appeared to be inherited as an autosomal dominant characteristic. Analysis of phospholipids by quantitative thinlayer chromatography revealed a distinct increase in phosphatidyl choline (lecithin) to 35.5 ± SD 1.3% of the total (normal: 28.2 ± 1.4%) in erythrocytes of affected members of the family, but not in the cells of unaffected relatives. The alteration appeared to constitute an absolute increase in lecithin content, rather than a decrease in other phospholipids. Erythrocytes from patients with other varieties of hereditary hemolytic disorders and comparable levels of reticulocytosis had normal phospholipid compositions. Plasma lipids of six affected members of the family were not unusual with respect to total lipid weight, total phospholipid, and cholesterol. Three patients with liver disease and jaundice were found to have marked increases in the lecithin content of the erythrocytes, but they also had extremely high plasma levels of total lipid, phospholipids, and cholesterol. Osmotic fragility of the erythrocytes of affected patients was decreased and the increase in fragility after incubation for 24 hr was less than that observed with normal erythrocytes. Autohemolysis after 48 hr was slightly increased and was corrected to nearly normal by the addition of glucose. The activities of 15 enzymes of the erythrocytes of the propositus were normal or elevated and the adenosine triphosphate content was normal. An abnormal hemoglobin could not be demonstrated. The life span of isologous erythrocytes in the propositus was reduced, but homologous erythrocytes survived normally. A causal relationship between the altered phospholipid composition and the hemolytic disorder has not been established. Images PMID:5653215

  8. Cost-effectiveness and budget impact study of solvent/detergent (SD) treated plasma (octaplasLG®) versus fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) in any patient receiving transfusion in Canada.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Eline L; van Eerd, Margreet C; Ouwens, J N Mario; de Peuter, Maria A

    2014-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and budget impact of octaplasLG(®) compared with fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) in all patients receiving a transfusion in Canada. A decision analytic framework was used to model acute and long-term complications that could follow plasma transfusion. Over a life time horizon, the cost with octaplasLG(®) were CA$612.91, which is CA$303.14 less than those with FFP. OctaplasLG(®) resulted in 0.021 quality adjusted life years (QALYs) gained in comparison with FFP. Because of higher efficacy and lower costs, octaplasLG(®) is expected to be the dominant treatment option over FFP in Canada. PMID:23707561

  9. A Simple “Blood-Saving Bundle” Reduces Diagnostic Blood Loss and the Transfusion Rate in Mechanically Ventilated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Riessen, Reimer; Behmenburg, Melanie; Blumenstock, Gunnar; Guenon, Doris; Enkel, Sigrid; Schäfer, Richard; Haap, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Aim of this study was to reduce blood loss caused by diagnostic blood sampling and to minimize the development of anemia in a high-risk group of mechanically ventilated medical intensive care patients. We therefore implemented a “blood-saving bundle” (BSB) combining a closed-loop arterial blood sampling system, smaller sampling tubes, reduced frequency of blood drawings, and reduced sample numbers. Methods The study included all patients from our medical ICU who were ventilated for more than 72 hours. Exclusion criteria were: acute or chronic anemia on admission, bleeding episode(s) during the ICU stay, or end-of-life therapy. The BSB was introduced in 2009 with training and educational support. Patients treated in 2008, before the introduction of the BSB, served as a control group (n = 41, 617 observation days), and were compared with patients treated in 2010 after the introduction of the BSB (BSB group, n = 50, 559 observation days). Primary endpoints were blood loss per day, and development of anemia. Secondary endpoints were numbers of blood transfusions, number of days on mechanical ventilation, and length of the ICU stay. Results Mean blood loss per ICU day was decreased from 43.3 ml (95% CI: 41.2 to 45.3 ml) in the controls to 15.0 ml (14.3 to 15.7 ml) in the BSB group (P < 0.001). The introduction of a closed-loop arterial blood sampling system was the major contributor to this effect. Mean hemoglobin concentrations showed no significant differences in both groups during the ICU stay. Hemoglobin values <9 g/dl, however, were recorded in 21.2% of observation days in the controls versus 15.4% in the BSB group (P = 0.01). Units of transfused red blood cells per 100 observation days decreased from 7 to 2.3 (P < 0.001). The mean number of ventilation days was 7.1 days (6.1 to 8.3 days) in the controls and 7.5 days (6.6 to 8.5 days) in the BSB group (P = NS). In total, patients in the BSB group stayed in ICU for a mean of 9.9 days (8.6 to 11.3 days), compared to a mean ICU stay of 13.0 days (10.9 to 15.4 days) in the control group (P = 0.014). Due to the longitudinal study design, however, we cannot exclude uncontrolled confounders affecting the transfusion frequency and mean ICU stay. Conclusion Our BSB could be easily implemented and was able to reduce diagnostic blood loss. PMID:26421920

  10. Diagnostic and therapeutic considerations in idiopathic hypereosinophilia with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sweidan, Alexander J; Brys, Adam K; Sohn, David D; Sheth, Milan R

    2015-01-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) encompasses numerous diverse conditions resulting in peripheral hypereosinophilia that cannot be explained by hypersensitivity, infection, or atopy and that is not associated with known systemic diseases with specific organ involvement. HES is often attributed to neoplastic or reactive causes, such as chronic eosinophilic leukemia, although a majority of cases remains unexplained and are considered idiopathic. Here, we review the current diagnosis and management of HES and present a unique case of profound hypereosinophilia associated with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia requiring intensive management. This case clearly illustrates the limitations of current knowledge with respect to hypereosinophilia syndrome as well as the challenges associated with its classification and management. PMID:26379449

  11. Diagnostic and therapeutic considerations in idiopathic hypereosinophilia with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Sweidan, Alexander J; Brys, Adam K; Sohn, David D; Sheth, Milan R

    2015-01-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) encompasses numerous diverse conditions resulting in peripheral hypereosinophilia that cannot be explained by hypersensitivity, infection, or atopy and that is not associated with known systemic diseases with specific organ involvement. HES is often attributed to neoplastic or reactive causes, such as chronic eosinophilic leukemia, although a majority of cases remains unexplained and are considered idiopathic. Here, we review the current diagnosis and management of HES and present a unique case of profound hypereosinophilia associated with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia requiring intensive management. This case clearly illustrates the limitations of current knowledge with respect to hypereosinophilia syndrome as well as the challenges associated with its classification and management. PMID:26379449

  12. Case report of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome with retinal arterial and venous occlusion treated with eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Gregory T

    2015-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disease caused by chronic, uncontrolled activation of the alternative complement pathway, leading to thrombotic microangiopathy. Renal impairment and progression to end-stage renal disease are common in untreated patients with aHUS, and extrarenal manifestations are being increasingly characterized in the literature. Ocular involvement remains rare in aHUS. This report describes a patient with aHUS with bilateral central retinal artery and vein occlusion, vitreous hemorrhage, and blindness in addition to renal impairment. The patient’s hematologic and renal parameters and ocular manifestation improved following initiation of eculizumab therapy. PMID:26508891

  13. Transfusion dependence development and disease evolution in patients with MDS and del(5q) and without transfusion needs at diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Silvia M; Díez-Campelo, María; Luño, Elisa; Cabrero, Mónica; Pedro, Carme; Calabuig, Marisa; Nomdedeu, Benet; Cedena, Teresa; Arrizabalaga, Beatriz; García, Marta; Cerveró, Carlos; Collado, Rosa; Azaceta, Gemma; Ardanaz, M Teresa; Muñoz, Juan Antonio; Xicoy, Blanca; Rodríguez, M José Requena; Bargay, Joan; Morell, M Jesús Arilla; Simiele, Adriana; del Cañizo, Consuelo

    2014-03-01

    Patients with isolated del(5q) and MDS are considered to have good prognosis as compared to other MDS subtypes. Most patients suffered of anemia and 50% of them required transfusions at diagnosis. It is known that for patients with MDS and del(5q) in transfusion dependence(TD), Lenalidomide is the first choice treatment. However, there are no data regarding natural evolution of anemia in patients diagnosed in MDS and del(5q) without TD, factors that may impact on the development of TD or disease outcome. In the present study we have performed a retrospective multicenter analysis on 83 patients with low-int 1 MDS and del(5q) without TD. During the study 61 patients became TD at a median of 1.7 years and only the Hb level 9 g/dL was associated with poorer TFS (p = 0.007) in the multivariate analysis. Among these 61 TD patients, 49 received treatment (19 Lenalidomide). Median follow up was 48 months, estimated OS at 2 and 5 year was 92% and 50% respectively. In the multivariate analysis for OS, platelets <100,000 mm(-3) and Lenalidomide treatment retained the statistical significant impact. LFS at 2 and 5 years was 86% and 73% respectively, and median time to sAML was 8.16 years (CI 95%: 6.05-10.27). In the multivariate analysis only thrombocytopenia retained statistical significance. In summary, this retrospective study show that level of Hb is an important parameter in order to determine the time until TD, it should be also stressed the importance of an early treatment in order to prevent TD development and shorter survival. PMID:24333115

  14. Comparative hemolytic activity of undiluted organic water-miscible solvents for intravenous and intra-arterial injection.

    PubMed

    Mottu, F; Stelling, M J; Rüfenacht, D A; Doelker, E

    2001-01-01

    In humans, nonaqueous solvents are administered intravascularly in two kinds of situations. They have been used in subcutaneous or intramuscular pharmaceutical formulations to dissolve water-insoluble drugs. The need for these vehicles had increased in recent years, since the drug development process has yielded many poorly water-soluble drugs. The use of water-miscible nonaqueous solvents in therefore one of the approaches for administering these products as reference solutions useful in formulation bioequivalence studies. The intravascular use of organic solvents has also gained importance owing to a new approach for the treatment of cerebral malformations using precipitating polymers dissolved in water-miscible organic solvents. At present, the solvent most commonly used for the liquid embolics to solubilize the polymers is dimethyl sulfoxide, which exhibits some local and hemodynamic toxicities. In order to find new, less toxic vehicles for pharmaceutical formulations for the intravenous and intra-arterial routes and for embolic materials, 13 water-miscible organic solvents currently used (diluted with water) for pharmaceutical applications, were evaluated in this study. Their hemolytic activity and the morphological changes induced when mixed with blood (1:99, 5:95, 10:90 solvent:blood) were estimated in vitro. From these data, the selected organic solvents could be subdivided into four groups depending on their hemolytic activity: very highly hemolytic solvents (ethyl lactate, dimethyl sulfoxide), highly hemolytic solvents (polyethylene glycol 200, acetone), moderately hemolytic solvents (tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, glycerol formal, ethanol, Solketal, glycofurol) and solvents with low hemolytic activity (propylene glycol, dimethyl isosorbide, diglyme). PMID:11212416

  15. Awareness and performance of blood transfusion standards in operating rooms of Shiraz hospitals in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Robati, R; Mirahmadi Nejad, E

    2015-01-01

    Background Assuring safety and survival of blood in vitro depends on anti-coagulation substances, blood bag characteristics, storage conditions, and transport of blood. Besides, careful selection and screening of donors as well as blood tests can minimize the transmission risk of blood-transmissible pathogens and optimize blood health. The aim of this study was to assay the level of knowledge and practices among anesthesia technicians on blood transfusion standards. Materials and Methods This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed among 85 anesthesia technicians Shiraz, Iran throughout 2012 who were examined by census using blood transfusion questionnaires and checklists. The data were analyzed using SPSS 16 software. Results The obtained findings indicated that 32.44% of the technicians have corrected knowledge of blood transfusion standards; nevertheless, 73.84% have corrected performance. Conclusions The technicians mostly performed based on their habit and experience. However, their knowledge about blood transfusion and blood bag storage was low. PMID:26131349

  16. Rhesus Negative Woman Transfused With Rhesus Positive Blood: Subsequent Normal Pregnancy Without Anti D production.

    PubMed

    Maya, E T; Buntugu, K A; Pobee, F; Srofenyoh, E K

    2015-03-01

    Clinicians sometimes are confronted with the challenge of transfusing haemorrhaging Rhesus (Rh) D negative patients with Rh D positive blood to save their lives. There are concerns about alloimmunization and future haemolytic disease of the newborn in women of the reproductive age. Another fear is transfusion reaction if they receive another Rh D positive blood in future. We present a 32-year-old Rh D negative woman, who had postpartum haemorrhage in her first pregnancy and was transfused with Rh D positive blood because of unavailability of Rh D negative blood. She did not receive anti D immunoglobin but subsequently had a normal term pregnancy of an Rh positive fetus without any detectable anti D antibodies throughout the pregnancy. In life threatening situations from obstetric haemorrhage, transfusion of Rh D negative women with Rh D positive blood should be considered as the last resort. PMID:26339087

  17. Comparison of the Directigen 1-2-3 Group A Strep Test with culture for detection of group A beta-hemolytic streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Huck, W; Reed, B D; French, T; Mitchell, R S

    1989-01-01

    The Directigen 1-2-3 Group A Strep Test (DGAST; BBL Microbiology Systems, Cockeysville, Md.) was compared with conventional culture procedures on Trypticase soy agar with 5% sheep blood (BBL) and Selective Streptococcal Agar (ssA; BBL) for detection of group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GABHS) for 1,006 patients complaining of sore throat. The DGAST was performed at five acute-care clinics according to the instructions of the manufacturer; interpretation of the cultures was done at the central microbiology laboratory. Of 924 patients with complete data, 243 (26.3%) were positive for GABHS on culture when both sheep blood agar and ssA were used. Of the patients with positive cultures, 159 were detected by the DGAST, yielding a sensitivity of 65.4%, a specificity of 84.7%, a positive predictive value of 60.5%, and a negative predictive value of 87.3%. The greater the number of colonies on culture, the greater the sensitivity of the DGAST, and the more intense the positive reaction on the DGAST, the higher the positive predictive value of the test. For the identification of GABHS, sheep blood agar was superior to ssA by 12.9% at 24 h and by 3.4% at 48 h of incubation. PMID:2671028

  18. CYP72A67 Catalyzes a Key Oxidative Step in Medicago truncatula Hemolytic Saponin Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Biazzi, Elisa; Carelli, Maria; Tava, Aldo; Abbruscato, Pamela; Losini, Ilaria; Avato, Pinarosa; Scotti, Carla; Calderini, Ornella

    2015-10-01

    In the Medicago genus, triterpenic saponins are bioactive secondary metabolites constitutively synthesized in the aerial and subterranean parts of plants via the isoprenoid pathway. Exploitation of saponins as pharmaceutics, agrochemicals and in the food and cosmetic industries has raised interest in identifying the enzymes involved in their synthesis. We have identified a cytochrome P450 (CYP72A67) involved in hemolytic sapogenin biosynthesis by a reverse genetic TILLING approach in a Medicago truncatula ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenized collection. Genetic and biochemical analyses, mutant complementation, and expression of the gene in a microsome yeast system showed that CYP72A67 is responsible for hydroxylation at the C-2 position downstream of oleanolic acid synthesis. The affinity of CYP72A67 for substrates with different substitutions at multiple carbon positions was investigated in the same in vitro yeast system, and in relation to two other CYP450s (CYP72A68) responsible for the production of medicagenic acid, the main sapogenin in M. truncatula leaves and roots. Full sib mutant and wild-type plants were compared for their sapogenin profile, expression patterns of the genes involved in sapogenin synthesis, and response to inoculation with Sinorhizobium meliloti. The results obtained allowed us to revise the hemolytic sapogenin pathway in M. truncatula and contribute to highlighting the tissue specificities (leaves/roots) of sapogenin synthesis. PMID:26079384

  19. Estimating the Risk of ABO Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn in Lagos

    PubMed Central

    Akanmu, Alani Sulaimon; Oyedeji, Olufemi Abiola; Adeyemo, Titilope Adenike; Ogbenna, Ann Abiola

    2015-01-01

    Background. ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn is the most common hemolytic consequence of maternofetal blood group incompatibility restricted mostly to non-group-O babies of group O mothers with immune anti-A or anti-B antibodies. Aim. We estimated the risk of ABO HDN with view to determining need for routine screening for ABO incompatibility between mother and fetus. Materials and Methods. Prevalence of ABO blood group phenotypes in blood donors at the donor clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital and arithmetic methods were used to determine population prevalence of ABO genes. We then estimated proportion of pregnancies of group O mothers carrying a non-group-O baby and the risk that maternofetal ABO incompatibility will cause clinical ABO HDN. Results. Blood from 9138 donors was ABO typed. 54.3%, 23%, 19.4%, and 3.3% were blood groups O, A, B, and AB, respectively. Calculated gene frequencies were 0.1416, 0.1209, and 0.7375 for A, B, and O genes, respectively. It was estimated that 14.3% of deliveries will result in a blood group O woman giving birth to a child who is non-group-O. Approximately 4.3% of deliveries are likely to suffer ABO HDN with 2.7% prone to suffer from moderately severe to severe hemolysis. PMID:26491605

  20. Estimating the Risk of ABO Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn in Lagos.

    PubMed

    Akanmu, Alani Sulaimon; Oyedeji, Olufemi Abiola; Adeyemo, Titilope Adenike; Ogbenna, Ann Abiola

    2015-01-01

    Background. ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn is the most common hemolytic consequence of maternofetal blood group incompatibility restricted mostly to non-group-O babies of group O mothers with immune anti-A or anti-B antibodies. Aim. We estimated the risk of ABO HDN with view to determining need for routine screening for ABO incompatibility between mother and fetus. Materials and Methods. Prevalence of ABO blood group phenotypes in blood donors at the donor clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital and arithmetic methods were used to determine population prevalence of ABO genes. We then estimated proportion of pregnancies of group O mothers carrying a non-group-O baby and the risk that maternofetal ABO incompatibility will cause clinical ABO HDN. Results. Blood from 9138 donors was ABO typed. 54.3%, 23%, 19.4%, and 3.3% were blood groups O, A, B, and AB, respectively. Calculated gene frequencies were 0.1416, 0.1209, and 0.7375 for A, B, and O genes, respectively. It was estimated that 14.3% of deliveries will result in a blood group O woman giving birth to a child who is non-group-O. Approximately 4.3% of deliveries are likely to suffer ABO HDN with 2.7% prone to suffer from moderately severe to severe hemolysis. PMID:26491605

  1. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and other thrombotic microangiopathic hemolytic anemias: diagnosis and classification.

    PubMed

    Shenkman, Boris; Einav, Yulia

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) include several diseases, most prominently are thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). TMAs are characterized by profound thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and organ ischemia. In most cases TTP results from deficiency of ADAMTS13, the von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease leading to increase of ultra-large von Willebrand factor (ULVWF) multimers. Congenital TTP is due to mutations in the gene of ADAMTS13 whereas acquired TTP is due to production of autoantibodies against ADAMTS13. In both cases severe deficiency of ADAMTS13 exists. However, the presence of ADAMTS13 activity does not rule out TTP. Diagnostic criteria of TTP are based on clinical features of neurologic and renal disfunction along with anemia and thrombocytopenia, low ADAMTS13 activity, and the presence of ULVWF. The standard treatment of TTP includes plasma exchange, protein A immunoabsobtion, immunosuppressive drugs, CD20 antibodies against B cells, and splenectomy. HUS is commonly caused by infection with Shiga-toxin produced by Escherichia coli. HUS is characterized by thrombocytopenia, anemia, renal impairment and diarrhea. Rarely, atypical HUS appears as a consequence of mutations related to the alternative pathway for the compliment system. Plasmapheresis in HUS is not efficient. Alternatively, plasma therapy and in some cases dialysis are used. TMA diseases may be associated with other infections, bone marrow transplantation, pregnancy, systemic vasculitis, and certain drugs. PMID:24418304

  2. Oxidative stress-mediated hemolytic activity of solvent exchange-prepared fullerene (C60) nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trpkovic, Andreja; Todorovic-Markovic, Biljana; Kleut, Duska; Misirkic, Maja; Janjetovic, Kristina; Vucicevic, Ljubica; Pantovic, Aleksandar; Jovanovic, Svetlana; Dramicanin, Miroslav; Markovic, Zoran; Trajkovic, Vladimir

    2010-09-01

    The present study investigated the hemolytic properties of fullerene (C60) nanoparticles prepared by solvent exchange using tetrahydrofuran (nC60THF), or by mechanochemically assisted complexation with macrocyclic oligosaccharide gamma-cyclodextrin (nC60CDX) or the copolymer ethylene vinyl acetate-ethylene vinyl versatate (nC60EVA-EVV). The spectrophotometrical analysis of hemoglobin release revealed that only nC60THF, but not nC60CDX or nC60EVA-EVV, was able to cause lysis of human erythrocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Atomic force microscopy revealed that nC60THF-mediated hemolysis was preceded by erythrocyte shrinkage and increase in cell surface roughness. A flow cytometric analysis confirmed a decrease in erythrocyte size and demonstrated a significant increase in reactive oxygen species production in red blood cells exposed to nC60THF. The nC60THF-triggered hemolytic activity was efficiently reduced by the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and butylated hydroxyanisole, as well as by serum albumin, the most abundant protein in human blood plasma. These data indicate that nC60THF can cause serum albumin-preventable hemolysis through oxidative stress-mediated damage of the erythrocyte membrane.

  3. Antibacterial and hemolytic activity of a new lectin purified from the seeds of Sterculia foetida L.

    PubMed

    Braga, Alana Araújo; Rodrigues e Lacerda, Rodrigo; Medeiros, Gracy Kelly Vieira de Vasconcelos; Gonçalves, Gregório Fernandes; Pessoa, Hilzeth de Luna Freire; Cardoso, Juscélio Donizete; Gadelha, Carlos Alberto de Almeida; da Silva, Bagnólia Araújo; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate, characterize, and verify possible antibacterial and hemolytic activity for a lectin found in the seeds of Sterculia foetida L. Purification of the lectin from S. foetida (SFL) was realized with ion exchange chromatography DEAE-Sephacel coupled to HPLC. The purity and the molecular weight was determined by SDS-PAGE. The isolated SFL was characterized as to its glycoprotein nature, and sugar specificity, as well as resistance to pH, temperature, denaturing agents, reduction, oxidation, and chelation. A microdilution method was used to determine antibacterial activity, and hemolytic activity was observed in human erythrocytes. The SFL has a molecular weight of 17 kDa, and a carbohydrate content of 53 ?g/mL, specific for arabinose and xylose, and is resistant to treatment with urea, sensitive to treatment with sodium metaperiodate and ?-mercaptoethanol, and in the presence of EDTA lost its hemagglutinating activity (HA). However, in the presence of divalent cations (Ca(2 +) and Mn(2 +)) the HA was increased. The SFL remained active even after incubation at 80 °C, and, within pH values of between 5 and 11. The SFL inhibited the bacterial growth of all the tested strains and caused little hemolysis in human erythrocytes when compared to the positive control Triton X-100. PMID:25422058

  4. Anti-CD20 treatment of giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Paganelli, Massimiliano; Patey, Natacha; Bass, Lee M; Alvarez, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    Giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (GCH-AHA) is a rare autoimmune disease of infancy characterized by severe liver disease associated with Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia. We recently showed that GCH-AHA is probably caused by a humoral immune mechanism. Such data support the use of rituximab, an anti-CD-20 monoclonal antibody specifically targeting B lymphocytes, as a treatment for GCH-AHA. We describe here the detailed clinical evolution of 4 children with GCH-AHA who showed a complete response to rituximab. All patients shared a severe course of the disease with poor control on standard and aggressive immunosuppression. Rituximab was well tolerated, and no side effects or infections were registered. Several doses were needed to induce remission, and 5 to 11 additional maintenance injections were necessary in the 2 more severe cases. Weaning from corticosteroids was achieved in all subjects. A steroid-sparing effect was noted in the 3 children who started rituximab early in the course of the disease. Overall, we show here that there is a strong rationale for treating GCH-AHA with rituximab. Early treatment could reduce the use of corticosteroids. Nevertheless, short-term steroids should be initially associated with rituximab to account for autoantibodies' half-life. Repeated injections are needed to treat and prevent relapses, but the best frequency and duration of treatment remain to be defined. PMID:25201797

  5. Transfusion of Plasma, Platelets, and Red Blood Cells in a 1:1:1 vs a 1:1:2 Ratio and Mortality in Patients With Severe Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Holcomb, John B.; Tilley, Barbara C.; Baraniuk, Sarah; Fox, Erin E.; Wade, Charles E.; Podbielski, Jeanette M.; del Junco, Deborah J.; Brasel, Karen J.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Callcut, Rachael A.; Cohen, Mitchell Jay; Cotton, Bryan A.; Fabian, Timothy C.; Inaba, Kenji; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Muskat, Peter; O’Keeffe, Terence; Rizoli, Sandro; Robinson, Bryce R. H.; Scalea, Thomas M.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Stein, Deborah M.; Weinberg, Jordan A.; Callum, Jeannie L.; Hess, John R.; Matijevic, Nena; Miller, Christopher N.; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Hoyt, David B.; Pearson, Gail D.; Leroux, Brian; van Belle, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Severely injured patients experiencing hemorrhagic shock often require massive transfusion. Earlier transfusion with higher blood product ratios (plasma, platelets, and red blood cells), defined as damage control resuscitation, has been associated with improved outcomes; however, there have been no large multicenter clinical trials. OBJECTIVE To determine the effectiveness and safety of transfusing patients with severe trauma and major bleeding using plasma, platelets, and red blood cells in a 1:1:1 ratio compared with a 1:1:2 ratio. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Pragmatic, phase 3, multisite, randomized clinical trial of 680 severely injured patients who arrived at 1 of 12 level I trauma centers in North America directly from the scene and were predicted to require massive transfusion between August 2012 and December 2013. INTERVENTIONS Blood product ratios of 1:1:1 (338 patients) vs 1:1:2 (342 patients) during active resuscitation in addition to all local standard-of-care interventions (uncontrolled). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcomes were 24-hour and 30-day all-cause mortality. Prespecified ancillary outcomes included time to hemostasis, blood product volumes transfused, complications, incidence of surgical procedures, and functional status. RESULTS No significant differences were detected in mortality at 24 hours (12.7% in 1:1:1 group vs 17.0% in 1:1:2 group; difference, ?4.2% [95% CI, ?9.6% to 1.1%]; P = .12) or at 30 days (22.4% vs 26.1%, respectively; difference, ?3.7% [95% CI, ?10.2% to 2.7%]; P = .26). Exsanguination, which was the predominant cause of death within the first 24 hours, was significantly decreased in the 1:1:1 group (9.2% vs 14.6% in 1:1:2 group; difference, ?5.4% [95% CI, ?10.4% to ?0.5%]; P = .03). More patients in the 1:1:1 group achieved hemostasis than in the 1:1:2 group (86% vs 78%, respectively; P = .006). Despite the 1:1:1 group receiving more plasma (median of 7 U vs 5 U, P < .001) and platelets (12 U vs 6 U, P < .001) and similar amounts of red blood cells (9 U) over the first 24 hours, no differences between the 2 groups were found for the 23 prespecified complications, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, multiple organ failure, venous thromboembolism, sepsis, and transfusion-related complications. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Among patients with severe trauma and major bleeding, early administration of plasma, platelets, and red blood cells in a 1:1:1 ratio compared with a 1:1:2 ratio did not result in significant differences in mortality at 24 hours or at 30 days. However, more patients in the 1:1:1 group achieved hemostasis and fewer experienced death due to exsanguination by 24 hours. Even though there was an increased use of plasma and platelets transfused in the 1:1:1 group, no other safety differences were identified between the 2 groups. TRIAL REGISTRATION clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01545232 PMID:25647203

  6. Granulocyte transfusions in severe aplastic anemia: an eleven-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Quillen, Karen; Wong, Edward; Scheinberg, Phillip; Young, Neal S.; Walsh, Thomas J.; Wu, Colin O.; Leitman, Susan F.

    2009-01-01

    Background Infections, particularly those caused by invasive fungi, are a major cause of death in patients with severe aplastic anemia. The purpose of this study was to analyze our experience with granulocyte transfusions in such patients. Design and Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on all patients with severe aplastic anemia who had received granulocyte transfusions between 1997 and 2007 in our institute. Survival to hospital discharge was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included microbiological, radiographic and clinical responses of the infection at 7 and 30 days after initiating granulocyte therapy, and post-transfusion absolute neutrophil count, stratified by HLA alloimmunization status. Results Thirty-two patients with severe aplastic anemia underwent granulocyte transfusions; the majority had received horse antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine A. One quarter of patients had demonstrable HLA alloimmunization prior to the initiation of granulocyte therapy. Infections were evenly divided between invasive bacterial and fungal infections unresponsive to maximal antibiotic and/or antifungal therapy. The median number of granulocyte components transfused was nine (range, 2–43). The overall survival to hospital discharge was 58%. Survival was strongly correlated with hematopoietic recovery. Among the 18 patients who had invasive fungal infections, 44% survived to hospital discharge. Response at 7 and 30 days correlated with survival. The mean post-transfusion absolute neutrophil count did not differ significantly between response groups (i.e. patients grouped according to whether they had complete or partial resolution of infection, stable disease or progressive infection). There was also no difference in mean post-transfusion absolute neutrophil count between the patients divided according to HLA alloimmunization status. Conclusions Granulocyte transfusions may have an adjunctive role in severe infections in patients with severe aplastic anemia. HLA alloimmunization is not an absolute contraindication to granulocyte therapy. PMID:19996117

  7. Adverse effects of small-volume red blood cell transfusions in the neonatal population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adverse transfusion reactions in the neonatal population are poorly understood and defined. The incidence and pattern of adverse effects due to red blood cell (RBC) transfusion are not well known, and there has been no systematic review of published adverse events. RBC transfusions continue to be linked to the development of morbidities unique to neonates, including chronic lung disease, retinopathy of prematurity, intraventricular haemorrhage and necrotising enterocolitis. Uncertainties about the exact nature of risks alongside benefits of RBC transfusion may contribute to evidence of widespread variation in neonatal RBC transfusion practice. Our review aims to describe clinical adverse effects attributed to small-volume (10–20 mL/kg) RBC transfusions and, where possible, their incidence rates in the neonatal population through the systematic identification of all relevant studies. Methods A comprehensive search of the following bibliographic databases will be performed: MEDLINE (PubMed/OVID which includes the Cochrane Library) and EMBASE (OVID). The intervention of interest is small-volume (10–20 mL/kg) RBC transfusions in the neonatal population. We will undertake a narrative synthesis of the evidence. If clinical similarity and data quantity and quality permit, we will also carry out meta-analyses on the listed outcomes. Discussion This systematic review will identify and synthesise the reported adverse effects and associations of RBC transfusions in the neonatal population. We believe that this systematic review is timely and will make a valuable contribution to highlight an existing research gap. Trial Registration PROSPERO, CRD42013005107 http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/display_record.asp?ID=CRD42013005107 PMID:25143009

  8. Coagulation defects associated with massive blood transfusion: A large multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    YANG, JIANG-CUN; SUN, YANG; XU, CUI-XIANG; DANG, QIAN-LI; LI, LING; XU, YONG-GANG; SONG, YAO-JUN; YAN, HONG

    2015-01-01

    The variations in the coagulation indices of patients receiving massive blood transfusion were investigated across 20 large-scale general hospitals in China. The data of 1,601 surgical inpatients receiving massive transfusion were retrospectively collected and the trends in the platelet counts and coagulation indices prior to and at 16 different time points during packed red blood cell (pRBC; after 2–40 units of pRBC) transfusion were evaluated by linear regression analysis. Temporal variations in the means of prothrombin time (PT), international normalized ratio (INR), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and fibrinogen (FIB) concentration were also assessed and the theoretical estimates and actual measurements of the platelet count were compared. The results demonstrated that the platelet count decreased linearly with an increase in the number of pRBC units transfused (Y=150.460?3.041X; R2 linear=0.775). Following transfusion of 18 units of pRBC (0.3 units of pRBC transfused per kilogram of body weight), the average platelet count decreased to 71×109/l (<75×109/l). Furthermore, variations in the means of PT, INR, APTT and FIB did not demonstrate any pronounced trends and actual platelet counts were markedly higher than the theoretical estimates. In conclusion, no variations in the means of traditional coagulation indices were identified, however, the platelet count demonstrated a significant linear decrease with an increase in the number of pRBC units transfused. Furthermore, actual platelet counts were higher than theoretical estimates, indicating the requirement for close monitoring of actual platelet counts during massive pRBC transfusion. PMID:26095897

  9. Coordination and management of multicenter clinical studies in trauma: Experience from the PRospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) Study

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Fox, Erin E.; del Junco, Deborah J.; Cotton, Bryan A.; Podbielski, Jeanette M.; Matijevic, Nena; Cohen, Mitchell J.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Zhang, Jiajie; Mirhaji, Parsa; Duran, Sarah; Reynolds, Robert J.; Benjamin-Garner, Ruby; Holcomb, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Aim Early death due to hemorrhage is a major consequence of traumatic injury. Transfusion practices differ among hospitals and it is unknown which transfusion practices improve survival. This report describes the experience of the PRospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) Study Data Coordination Center in designing and coordinating a study to examine transfusion practices at ten Level 1 trauma centers in the U.S. Methods PROMMTT was a multisite prospective observational study of severely injured transfused trauma patients. The clinical sites collected real-time information on the timing and amounts of blood product infusions as well as colloids and crystalloids, vital signs, initial diagnostic and clinical laboratory tests, life saving interventions and other clinical care data. Results Between July 2009 and October 2010, PROMMTT screened 12,561 trauma admissions and enrolled 1,245 patients who received one or more blood transfusions within 6 hours of ED admission. A total of 297 massive transfusions were observed over the course of the study at a combined rate of 5.0 massive transfusion patients/week. Conclusion PROMMTT is the first multisite study to collect real-time prospective data on trauma patients requiring transfusion. Support from the Department of Defense and collaborative expertise from the ten participating centers helped to demonstrate the feasibility of prospective trauma transfusion studies. The observational data collected from this study will be an invaluable resource for research in trauma surgery and it will guide the design and conduct of future randomized trials. PMID:22001613

  10. Investigation of the current situation of massive blood transfusion in different surgical departments: a large multicenter study in China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yang; Jin, Zhan-Kui; Xu, Cui-Xiang; Dang, Qian-Li; Zhang, Li-Jie; Chen, Hong-Nan; Song, Yao-Jun; Yang, Jiang-Cun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to learn about the current situation of surgical massive blood transfusion of different surgical departments in China’s Tertiary hospitals, which could provide the basis for the formulation of guidelines on massive blood transfusion. Method: A multicenter retrospective research on the application status of blood constituents during massive blood transfusion was conducted and a comparative analyses of survival and length of hospitalization in patients from different departments (trauma, cardiac surgery, obstetric conditions, or other common surgeries), were performed. Result: In China, during massive blood transfusion the ratio of the dosage of fresh frozen plasma to the dosage of red blood cell suspension reached 1:1-2, while the dosage of platelet and cryoprecipitate appeared to be very small. The risk of in-hospital death were associated with the primary disease in patients receiving massive blood transfusion (Log-Rank P = 0.000), cardiac surgery and trauma patients who received massive blood transfusion have a higher risk of death rate. Conclusions: Patients undergoing massive blood transfusion among different surgical departments have a certain difference in use of blood transfusion, mortality rate and the time of death. Our findings suggested that we should set up an independent transfusion program in cardiac surgery and trauma patients of massive blood transfusion. PMID:26309583

  11. Hemolytic crisis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... perform a physical examination and ask about your medical history and symptoms. The physical exam may occasionally show swelling of the spleen ( splenomegaly ). Tests that may be done include: Blood chemistry panel Complete blood count ( CBC ) Coombs test Haptoglobin ...

  12. Hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... anemia. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, et al., eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . ... anemias. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, et al., eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . ...

  13. Mortality increases after massive exchange transfusion with older stored blood in canines with experimental pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Steven B.; Wang, Dong; Sun, Junfeng; Kanias, Tamir; Feng, Jing; Helms, Christine C.; Solomon, Michael A.; Alimchandani, Meghna; Quezado, Martha; Gladwin, Mark T.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Klein, Harvey G.

    2013-01-01

    Two-year-old purpose-bred beagles (n = 24) infected with Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia were randomized in a blinded fashion for exchange transfusion with either 7- or 42-day-old canine universal donor blood (80 mL/kg in 4 divided doses). Older blood increased mortality (P = .0005), the arterial alveolar oxygen gradient (24-48 hours after infection; P ? .01), systemic and pulmonary pressures during transfusion (4-16 hours) and pulmonary pressures for ? 10 hours afterward (all P ? .02). Further, older blood caused more severe lung damage, evidenced by increased necrosis, hemorrhage, and thrombosis (P = .03) noted at the infection site postmortem. Plasma cell–free hemoglobin and nitric oxide (NO) consumption capability were elevated and haptoglobin levels were decreased with older blood during and for 32 hours after transfusion (all P ? .03). The low haptoglobin (r = 0.61; P = .003) and high NO consumption levels at 24 hours (r = ?0.76; P < .0001) were associated with poor survival. Plasma nontransferrin-bound and labile iron were significantly elevated only during transfusion (both P = .03) and not associated with survival (P = NS). These data from canines indicate that older blood after transfusion has a propensity to hemolyze in vivo, releases vasoconstrictive cell-free hemoglobin over days, worsens pulmonary hypertension, gas exchange, and ischemic vascular damage in the infected lung, and thereby increases the risk of death from transfusion. PMID:23255558

  14. Claims and compensation for complications resulting from blood transfusions in China from 1998 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Li, Heng; Zhao, Xiaowen; Li, Wenhui; Zhao, Hong

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to find causes, outcomes, and trends in malpractice litigation involving blood transfusions in China. This study examines 108 claims resulting from transfusion-related complications over a period of 15 years. The primary outcomes associated with these claims included transfusion-transmitted infection (98 cases, 90.8%), transfusion reactions (nine cases, 8.3%), and failures to obtain informed consent (one case, 0.9%). The specialty of obstetrics and gynecology was more likely to be accepted in judgment. As the supreme status of law, Blood Donation Law plays an important role in the blood safety, which results in less HCV infection cases occurred after 1998. Though the 2002 and 2010's rules give opposite liability principle, the fault liability and no-fault liability, the statistics shows that rules do not have an effect on different liabilities in judicial practice. The current study concludes that the risk of serious adverse transfusion reactions may be significantly increased by unnecessary transfusions. PMID:26099664

  15. Predictors of Red Cell Alloimmunization in Kurdish Multi Transfused Patients with Hemoglobinopathies in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-Mousawi, Muqdad M N; Al-Allawi, Nasir A S; Alnaqshabandi, Rubad

    2015-12-01

    Hemoglobinopathies are significant health problems in Iraq, including its Northern Kurdistan region. One of the essential components of management of these disorders is regular lifelong blood transfusions. The latter is associated with several complications including red cell alloimmunization. No study has looked at the frequency of alloimmunization and its associations in the country. To address the latter issue, 401 multi transfused patients [311 with ?-thalassemia (?-thal) syndrome and 90 with sickle cell disease], registered at a large thalassemia care center in Iraqi Kurdistan had their records reviewed, and their sera tested for atypical antibodies using screening and extended red cell panels. Red cell alloimmunization was detected in 18 patients (4.5%) with a total of 20 alloantibodies, while no autoantibodies were detected. The most frequent alloantibody was anti-E, followed by anti-D, anti-K, anti-C(w), anti-C, anti-c and anti-Le(a). Ethnicity was an important predictor of alloimmunization, while age at start of transfusion (>2 vs. ?2 years) (p?=?0.005), Rhesus D (RhD) negative status (p?=?0.0017) and history of previous transfusion reactions (p?=?0.007) showed a statistically significant higher rate of alloimmunization. However, patients' age, gender, number of units transfused, underlying diagnosis and splenectomy were not significantly associated with alloimmunization. Based on our observations, measures to reduce alloimmunization rates may include extended matching for Rhesus and Kell antigens and early initiation of blood transfusions. PMID:26327166

  16. Anemia and blood transfusion in the critically ill patient: role of erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Critically ill patients receive an extraordinarily large number of blood transfusions. Between 40% and 50% of all patients admitted to intensive care units receive at least 1 red blood cell (RBC) unit during their stay, and the average is close to 5 RBC units. RBC transfusion is not risk free. There is little evidence that 'routine' transfusion of stored allogeneic RBCs is beneficial to critically ill patients. The efficacy of perioperative recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) has been demonstrated in a variety of elective surgical settings. Similarly, in critically ill patients with multiple organ failure, rHuEPO therapy will also stimulate erythropoiesis. In a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, therapy with rHuEPO resulted in a significant reduction in RBC transfusions. Despite receiving fewer RBC transfusions, patients in the rHuEPO group had a significantly greater increase in hematocrit. Strategies to increase the production of RBCs are complementary to other approaches to reduce blood loss in the intensive care unit, and they decrease the transfusion threshold in the management of all critically ill patients. PMID:15196323

  17. Anemia and Blood Transfusion in Patients with Isolated Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dorzi, Hasan M.; Al-Humaid, Waleed; Tamim, Hani M.; Haddad, Samir; Aljabbary, Ahmad; Arifi, Abdulaziz; Arabi, Yaseen M.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale. By reducing cerebral oxygen delivery, anemia may aggravate traumatic brain injury (TBI) secondary insult. This study evaluated the impact of anemia and blood transfusion on TBI outcomes. Methods. This was a retrospective cohort study of adult patients with isolated TBI at a tertiary-care intensive care unit from 1/1/2000 to 31/12/2011. Daily hemoglobin level and packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion were recorded. Patients with hemoglobin < 10?g/dL during ICU stay (anemic group) were compared with other patients. Results. Anemia was present on admission in two (2%) patients and developed in 48% during the first week with hemoglobin < 7?g/dL occurring in 3.0%. Anemic patients had higher admission Injury Severity Score and underwent more craniotomy (50% versus 13%, p < 0.001). Forty percent of them received PRBC transfusion (2.8 ± 1.5 units per patient, median pretransfusion hemoglobin = 8.8?g/dL). Higher hospital mortality was associated with anemia (25% versus 6% for nonanemic patients, p = 0.01) and PRBC transfusion (38% versus 9% for nontransfused patients, p = 0.003). On multivariate analysis, only PRBC transfusion independently predicted hospital mortality (odds ratio: 6.8; 95% confidence interval: 1.1–42.3). Conclusions. Anemia occurred frequently after isolated TBI, but only PRBC transfusion independently predicted mortality. PMID:26605080

  18. Status of Superoxide Dismutase in Transfusion Dependent Thalassaemia

    PubMed Central

    Rujito, Lantip; Mulatsih, Sri; Sofro, Abdul Salam M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thalassemia is a collection of genetic impairments in beta and alpha genes causing various states of anemia. Severe types of the disease need lifelong transfusions, leading to oxidant-antioxidant disturbance due to massive iron deposits. Aims: The aim of this study was to assess the antioxidant enzyme Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and ferritin levels of thalassemia major patients in a peripheral health facility. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and nine probands were recruited and performed laboratory experiments for SOD and Ferritin levels. Chelation administration and clinical score were taken from interviewing the family and from medical report data. Results: The study showed that SOD intensity was lower (162.41 u/ml) compared to the normal cutoff point (P = 0.001), while the mean of Ferritin levels was ten times over the normal value (4226,67 ng/dl). Observations also reported that chelation medicine was not administrated properly. Conclusions: The data indicates that thalassemic patients have oxidant-antioxidant uproar due to oxidative stress. Monitored chelating administration, selective antioxidant, and a well-balanced diet may prevent oxidative injury. PMID:26110130

  19. Deferasirox Reduces Oxidative Stress in Patients With Transfusion Dependency

    PubMed Central

    Saigo, Katsuyasu; Kono, Mari; Takagi, Yuri; Takenokuchi, Mariko; Hiramatsu, Yasushi; Tada, Hiroshi; Hishita, Terutoshi; Misawa, Masahito; Imoto, Shion; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron chelation therapy is useful against the over-accumulation of iron and is expected to reduce oxidative stress resulting from the Fenton reaction and Haber-Weiss reaction. We monitored oxidative status and serum ferritin levels after in vivo administration of deferasirox (DFS) and studied the in vitro effects of iron chelators on neutrophil function. Methods Nine patients suffering from transfusion dependency were recruited for this study, and derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolite (dROM) tests to detect serum hydroperoxide levels were evaluated in addition to serum ferritin levels. Human neutrophil reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was determined with flow cytometry. Results Ferritin levels decreased after DFS treatment (P = 0.068), and a significant reduction in dROM levels was measured (P = 0.031). Fifty microM DFS significantly inhibited ROS production induced by fMLP in vitro (P < 0.0001), and tended to inhibit that induced by PMA. On the other hand, deferioxamine failed to inhibit ROS production even at high concentrations. Conclusions In vivo administration of DFS resulted in the reduction of oxidative stress, and this effect was considered to depend not only on a reduction in iron storage but also on the ability of DFS to inhibit neutrophil ROS production in vitro at clinically relevant plasma levels. Further studies are needed to examine the effects of iron chelators. PMID:23390477

  20. [Prions and risks for blood transfusion: the situation in 2003].

    PubMed

    Deslys, J P

    2003-06-01

    In 2003, Prions still constitute a biological enigma and a public health concern. The risks of transmission of the so called "mad cow disease" are now under control but concerns still persist about potential secondary transmissions, notably via blood transfusion. Information obtained from diseases previously observed in animals (scrapie of sheep and goat) and in man (Kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease) demonstrate the complexity of the relations between these transmissible agents and their host. The difficulty in decontamination, the very long silent incubation period during which diagnosis is not possible and the lack of treatment are alarming elements which explain the increased perception of risk for these diseases. The development of rapid screening tests used on bovine at slaughterhouse has represented an important improvement in the development of a targeted protection against these agents. Today, technical evolutions in diagnosis let us imagine the possibility of blood detection for prions: on one hand new garanties for security may arise but on the other hand it points out the potential infectivity of blood with these agents responsible for constant fatal diseases. Precautionary security measures have to ensure an optimal ratio benefit/risk for the patient and thus, in this field, to balance the risk linked to prions with those clearly identified elsewhere. PMID:12798843

  1. Interference of alpha-hemolytic streptococci isolated from tonsillar surface on beta-hemolytic streptococci (Streptococcus pyogenes)--a methodological study.

    PubMed

    Grahn, E; Holm, S E; Ekedahl, C; Roos, K

    1983-07-01

    The interference between alpha-streptococcal strains obtained from patients with repeated tonsillitis and a collection of group A streptococcal strains were studied. For this purpose three in vitro methods were designed and compared. The results obtained by a simple plating technique suitable for screening purposes were found to correlate well with those using more laborious techniques. In a limited scale some of the alpha- and beta-streptococcal combinations were tested under in vivo conditions using a tissue cage model allowing repeated sampling. In most instances agreement between the results of the in vitro and in vivo methods was registered. Several alpha-strains having inhibitory capacity to the majority of a collection of group A streptococci belonging to different serotypes were found, but also alpha-strains with an inhibitory activity restricted to few group A isolates within a certain serotype. Also beta-streptococcal strains with growth inhibiting activity towards some alpha-strains were found. As the methods were chosen to eliminate many of the unspecific inhibitory factors and the beta-hemolytic test strains showed a pattern of inhibition that varied for each of the reference alpha-strains the activity is most likely attributed to bacteriocin-like substances. PMID:6372328

  2. Alcohol-positive multiple trauma patients with and without blood transfusion: an outcome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Struck, Manuel F; Schmidt, Thomas; Stuttmann, Ralph; Hilbert, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background Blood transfusion is a common therapy for multiple trauma patients, and is often performed soon after hospital admission. It is unclear whether the need for a blood transfusion in multiply injured patients presenting with a positive blood alcohol concentration (BAC) is associated with increased morbidity/mortality, since their risk behavior differs significantly from patients with a negative BAC. In this study, we evaluated the role of blood transfusion in the treatment of BAC-positive multiple trauma patients. Patients In a three-year period, 164 patients at a single trauma center presented with a positive BAC, and 145 met the inclusion criteria for further evaluation and regression analysis. We compared patients who were transfused (n = 76) with those who were not transfused (n = 69). Results In both groups, the most common causes of trauma were traffic accidents and falls. Most patients were admitted to the hospital from the scene of the accident (77.2%) and were male (89.0%). Transfused patients had a lower GCS (p ? .001) and her ISS (p ? .001), were more likely to have severe head injuries (p ? .001), tended to have higher BACs (p = .053), had lower hemoglobin levels and prothrombin times in the first 24 hours (p ? .001), had lower lactate levels, had higher rates of intubation (p ? .001) and ICU admission, and had longer ICU stays and artificial ventilation times (p ? .001). Mortality was significantly higher in transfused patients (n = 15 vs. n = 3, p ? .001). Non-survivors were more likely to have severe head injuries; be intubated and ventilated; be older; have higher ISS scores, lactate levels, and numbers of transfusions in the first 24 hours; and have lower GCS scores, hemoglobin measurements, and prothrombin levels. In a binary logistic regression model, only age (p = .009) and ISS (p = .004) independently predicted mortality. Conclusion In our single-center study, the BAC of multiple trauma patients and the number of blood transfusions they received did not predict mortality in multiple trauma patients if used as independent predictors. Prospective studies with greater sample sizes should be performed to clarify the role of blood transfusions in the outcome of this sub-population. PMID:19267914

  3. Effect of Relative Arrangement of Cationic and Lipophilic Moieties on Hemolytic and Antibacterial Activities of PEGylated Polyacrylates.

    PubMed

    Punia, Ashish; Lee, Kevin; He, Edward; Mukherjee, Sumit; Mancuso, Andrew; Banerjee, Probal; Yang, Nan-Loh

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic amphiphilic polymers have been established as potentially efficient agents to combat widespread deadly infections involving antibiotic resistant superbugs. Incorporation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) side chains into amphiphilic copolymers can reduce their hemolytic activity while maintaining high antibacterial activity. Our study found that the incorporation of PEG has substantially different effects on the hemolytic and antibacterial activities of copolymers depending on structural variations in the positions of cationic centers relative to hydrophobic groups. The PEG side chains dramatically reduced the hemolytic activities in copolymers with hydrophobic hexyl and cationic groups on the same repeating unit. However, in case of terpolymers with cationic and lipophilic groups placed on separate repeating units, the presence of PEG has significantly lower effect on hemolytic activities of these copolymers. PEGylated terpolymers displayed substantially lower activity against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) than Escherichia coli (E. coli) suggesting the deterring effect of S. aureus' peptidoglycan cell wall against the penetration of PEGylated polymers. Time-kill studies confirmed the bactericidal activity of these copolymers and a 5 log reduction in E. coli colony forming units was observed within 2 h of polymer treatment. PMID:26473831

  4. Novel Twin Streptolysin S-Like Peptides Encoded in the sag Operon Homologue of Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcus anginosus

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, Atsushi; Nakano, Kota; Ohkura, Kazuto; Tomoyasu, Toshifumi; Kikuchi, Ken; Whiley, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus anginosus is a member of the anginosus group streptococci, which form part of the normal human oral flora. In contrast to the pyogenic group streptococci, our knowledge of the virulence factors of the anginosus group streptococci, including S. anginosus, is not sufficient to allow a clear understanding of the basis of their pathogenicity. Generally, hemolysins are thought to be important virulence factors in streptococcal infections. In the present study, a sag operon homologue was shown to be responsible for beta-hemolysis in S. anginosus strains by random gene knockout. Interestingly, contrary to pyogenic group streptococci, beta-hemolytic S. anginosus was shown to have two tandem sagA homologues, encoding streptolysin S (SLS)-like peptides, in the sag operon homologue. Gene deletion and complementation experiments revealed that both genes were functional, and these SLS-like peptides were essential for beta-hemolysis in beta-hemolytic S. anginosus. Furthermore, the amino acid sequence of these SLS-like peptides differed from that of the typical SLS of S. pyogenes, especially in their propeptide domain, and an amino acid residue indicated to be important for the cytolytic activity of SLS in S. pyogenes was deleted in both S. anginosus homologues. These data suggest that SLS-like peptides encoded by two sagA homologues in beta-hemolytic S. anginosus may be potential virulence factors with a different structure essential for hemolytic activity and/or the maturation process compared to the typical SLS present in pyogenic group streptococci. PMID:23292771

  5. Effect of Relative Arrangement of Cationic and Lipophilic Moieties on Hemolytic and Antibacterial Activities of PEGylated Polyacrylates

    PubMed Central

    Punia, Ashish; Lee, Kevin; He, Edward; Mukherjee, Sumit; Mancuso, Andrew; Banerjee, Probal; Yang, Nan-Loh

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic amphiphilic polymers have been established as potentially efficient agents to combat widespread deadly infections involving antibiotic resistant superbugs. Incorporation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) side chains into amphiphilic copolymers can reduce their hemolytic activity while maintaining high antibacterial activity. Our study found that the incorporation of PEG has substantially different effects on the hemolytic and antibacterial activities of copolymers depending on structural variations in the positions of cationic centers relative to hydrophobic groups. The PEG side chains dramatically reduced the hemolytic activities in copolymers with hydrophobic hexyl and cationic groups on the same repeating unit. However, in case of terpolymers with cationic and lipophilic groups placed on separate repeating units, the presence of PEG has significantly lower effect on hemolytic activities of these copolymers. PEGylated terpolymers displayed substantially lower activity against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) than Escherichia coli (E. coli) suggesting the deterring effect of S. aureus’ peptidoglycan cell wall against the penetration of PEGylated polymers. Time-kill studies confirmed the bactericidal activity of these copolymers and a 5 log reduction in E. coli colony forming units was observed within 2 h of polymer treatment. PMID:26473831

  6. [Acute renal failure after dengue virus infection: A pediatric case report].

    PubMed

    Nicolon, C; Broustal, E

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is an emerging, rapidly expanding disease, whose clinical and biological manifestations vary. Kidney injury is not usual but can be severe, and it is most often associated with dengue hemorrhagic fever or shock. Guadeloupe, which is located in an endemic area, experienced an epidemic from 2013 to 2014. During this outbreak, a case of renal failure during dengue was observed in a 10-year-old child. No evidence of dengue hemorrhagic fever or shock syndrome was found. The clinical and biological course improved with symptomatic treatment. The association of acute renal failure with hemolytic anemia suggested a diagnosis of hemolytic uremic syndrome. However, this could not be confirmed in the absence of thrombocytopenia and cytopathologic evidence. This case illustrates the diversity of clinical presentations of dengue, and the possibility of severe renal impairment unrelated to the usual factors encountered in dengue. PMID:26563725

  7. [Why is it necessary to review the December 15th 2003 circular relative to the transfusion act?].

    PubMed

    Lassale, B; Besse-Moreau, M; Aullen, J-P

    2014-11-01

    Blood transfusion is currently a delegated medical act in patient care services. Following severe adverse events, hemovigilance now disposes of a dense regulation. Data collection and analysis in the national hemovigilance "e-FIT" database allow detection of errors or malfunctions in the transfusion act. Blood transfusion safety depends on the strict respect of processes from the prescription of blood products and required patient immuno-hematology exams to the administration of blood products and follow-up of the patient. In the circular relative to the transfusion act, many steps of the transfusion process, less explicit, can be interpreted differently by health care professionals and thus lead to errors or severe adverse events. Standardization of procedures for the transfusion act and its surveillance would increase their safety and avoid potential risks for the patient. PMID:25267206

  8. Perioperative acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Goren, O; Matot, I

    2015-12-01

    Perioperative acute kidney injury (AKI) is not uncommon and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Recently, several definition systems for AKI were proposed, incorporating both small changes of serum creatinine and urinary output reduction as diagnostic criteria. Novel biomarkers are under investigation as fast and accurate predictors of AKI. Several special considerations regarding the risk of AKI are of note in the surgical patient. Co-morbidities are important risk factors for AKI. The surgery in itself, especially emergency and major surgery in the critically ill, is associated with a high incidence of AKI. Certain types of surgeries, such as cardiac and transplantation surgeries, require special attention because they carry higher risk of AKI. Nephrotoxic drugs, contrast dye, and diuretics are commonly used in the perioperative period and are responsible for a significant amount of in-hospital AKI. Before surgery, the anaesthetist is required to identify patients at risk of AKI, optimize anaemia, and treat hypovolaemia. During surgery, normovolaemia is of utmost importance. Additionally, the surgical and anaesthesia team is advised to use measures to reduce blood loss and avoid unnecessary blood transfusion. Hypotension should be avoided because even short periods of mean arterial pressure <55-60 mm Hg carry a risk of postoperative AKI. Higher blood pressures are probably required for hypertensive patients. Urine output can be reduced significantly during surgery and is unrelated to perioperative renal function. Thus, fluids should not be given in excess for the sole purpose of avoiding or treating oliguria. Use of hydroxyethyl starch needs to be reconsidered. Recent evidence indicates a beneficial effect of administering low-chloride solutions. PMID:26658199

  9. Spontaneous acute subdural hematoma and intracerebral hemorrhage in a patient with thrombotic microangiopathy during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Wayhs, Sâmia Yasin; Wottrich, Joise; Uggeri, Douglas Prestes; Dias, Fernando Suparregui

    2013-01-01

    Preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low-platelet count), and acute fatty liver of pregnancy are the main causes of thrombotic microangiopathy and severe liver dysfunction during pregnancy and represent different manifestations of the same pathological continuum. The case of a 35-week pregnant woman who was admitted to an intensive care unit immediately after a Cesarean section due to fetal death and the presence of nausea, vomiting, and jaundice is reported. Postpartum preeclampsia and acute fatty liver of pregnancy were diagnosed. The patient developed an acute subdural hematoma and an intracerebral hemorrhage, which were subjected to neurosurgical treatment. The patient died from refractory hemolytic anemia and spontaneous bleeding of multiple organs. Preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy might overlap and be associated with potentially fatal complications, including intracranial hemorrhage, as in the present case. Early detection and diagnosis are crucial to ensure appropriate management and treatment success. PMID:23917984

  10. Allicin from garlic neutralizes the hemolytic activity of intra- and extra-cellular pneumolysin O in vitro.

    PubMed

    Arzanlou, M; Bohlooli, S; Jannati, E; Mirzanejad-Asl, H

    2011-03-15

    Pneumolysin (PLY) is a key virulence factor contributes to the pathogenesis of Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this study we investigated the effect of allicin and aqueous garlic extracts on hemolytic activity of PLY both in prelysed and intact cells. Additionally the antimicrobial activity of allicin was tested against the bacteria. All tested materials potently inhibited the PLY hemolytic activity. Allicin neutralizes PLY in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Twenty five minute incubation of PLY (2 HU/mL) with 0.61 ?M/mL concentration of allicin, totally inhibited hemolytic activity of PLY (IC50 = 0.28 ?M/mL). The inhibitory activity of old extract of garlic was similar to pure allicin (IC50 = 50.46 ?L/mL; 0.31 ?M/mL; P < 0.05). In contrast fresh extract of garlic inhibits the PLY hemolytic activity at lower concentrations (IC50 = 13.96 ?L/mL; 0.08 ?M/mL allicin). Exposure of intact cells to allicin (1.8 ?M) completely inhibited hemolytic activity of PLY inside bacterial cells. The inhibitory effect of the allicin was restored by addition of reducing agent DTT at 5 mM, proposing that allicin likely inhibits the PLY by binding to cysteinyl residue in the binding site. The MIC value of allicin was determined to be 512 ?g/mL (3.15 ?M/mL). These results indicate that PLY is a novel target for allicin and may provide a new line of investigation on pneumococcal diseases in the future. PMID:21184771

  11. Characterization of Antibacterial and Hemolytic Activity of Synthetic Pandinin 2 Variants and Their Inhibition against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Alexis; Villegas, Elba; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Corzo, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    The contention and treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other bacteria that cause infectious diseases require the use of new type of antibiotics. Pandinin 2 (Pin2) is a scorpion venom antimicrobial peptide highly hemolytic that has a central proline residue. This residue forms a structural “kink” linked to its pore-forming activity towards human erythrocytes. In this work, the residue Pro14 of Pin2 was both substituted and flanked using glycine residues (P14G and P14GPG) based on the low hemolytic activities of antimicrobial peptides with structural motifs Gly and GlyProGly such as magainin 2 and ponericin G1, respectively. The two Pin2 variants showed antimicrobial activity against E. coli, S. aureus, and M. tuberculosis. However, Pin2 [GPG] was less hemolytic (30%) than that of Pin2 [G] variant. In addition, based on the primary structure of Pin2 [G] and Pin2 [GPG], two short peptide variants were designed and chemically synthesized keeping attention to their physicochemical properties such as hydrophobicity and propensity to adopt alpha-helical conformations. The aim to design these two short antimicrobial peptides was to avoid the drawback cost associated to the synthesis of peptides with large sequences. The short Pin2 variants named Pin2 [14] and Pin2 [17] showed antibiotic activity against E. coli and M. tuberculosis. Besides, Pin2 [14] presented only 25% of hemolysis toward human erythrocytes at concentrations as high as 100 µM, while the peptide Pin2 [17] did not show any hemolytic effect at the same concentration. Furthermore, these short antimicrobial peptides had better activity at molar concentrations against multidrug resistance M. tuberculosis than that of the conventional antibiotics ethambutol, isoniazid and rifampicin. Therefore, Pin2 [14] and Pin2 [17] have the potential to be used as an alternative antibiotics and anti-tuberculosis agents with reduced hemolytic effects. PMID:25019413

  12. Development of blood transfusion product pathogen reduction treatments: a review of methods, current applications and demands.

    PubMed

    Salunkhe, Vishal; van der Meer, Pieter F; de Korte, Dirk; Seghatchian, Jerard; Gutiérrez, Laura

    2015-02-01

    Transfusion-transmitted infections (TTI) have been greatly reduced in numbers due to the strict donor selection and screening procedures, i.e. the availability of technologies to test donors for endemic infections, and routine vigilance of regulatory authorities in every step of the blood supply chain (collection, processing and storage). However, safety improvement is still a matter of concern because infection zero-risk in transfusion medicine is non-existent. Alternatives are required to assure the safety of the transfusion product and to provide a substitution to systematic blood screening tests, especially in less-developed countries or at the war-field. Furthermore, the increasing mobility of the population due to traveling poses a new challenge in the endemic screening tests routinely used, because non-endemic pathogens might emerge in a specific population. Pathogen reduction treatments sum a plethora of active approaches to eliminate or reduce potential threatening pathogen load from blood transfusion products. Despite the success of pathogen reduction treatments applied to plasma products, there is still a long way to develop and deploy pathogen reduction treatments to cellular transfusion products (such as platelets, RBCs or even to whole blood) and there is divergence on its acceptance worldwide. While the use of pathogen reduction treatments in platelets is performed routinely in a fair number of European blood banks, most of these treatments are not (or just) licensed in the USA or elsewhere in the world. The development of pathogen reduction treatments for RBC and whole blood is still in its infancy and under clinical trials. In this review, we discuss the available and emerging pathogen reduction treatments and their advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of characterizing standard transfusion products with current and emerging approaches (OMICS) and clinical outcome, and integrating this information on a database, thinking on the benefits it might bring in the future toward personalized transfusion therapies. PMID:25620756

  13. The significance of the blood-borne viruses: blood banking and transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, W C

    1993-01-01

    Most of the blood-borne infections that have held our attention during the last half of this century have been well characterized. Although HIV and the hepatitis viruses have enormous world-wide public health implications, there has been considerable success in their prevention of transmission by transfusion. The technology is available to treat and eliminate from virtually all non-cellular blood products the transmission of disease caused by those viruses for which we have had the greatest concern. However, for the cellular blood products the basic methods of prevention continue to be imperfect: donor selection and viral serological testing. The significance of the transmission of blood-borne agents by these products depends upon the frequency of the agent in the donor population and the serological screening performed. There is a marked degree of variation in frequency of these infections, dependent upon geography, living conditions, and life style. Data on the frequency of transfusion-transmitted disease are meagre and usually based upon indirect estimates. In the United States the frequency of the transmission of HIV by cellular blood products is estimated to be 1:125,000 products transfused. A similar estimate for the transmission of hepatitis is 1:200 products transfused. For the developing countries, some of which experience the highest rates of hepatitis and HIV infection in their populations, data on the frequency of transfusion transmission are not generally available. In recent years, new evidence has stimulated interest in a few transfusion-transmissible diseases that, although uncommon from the public health perspective, have both real and potential transfusion impacts for the use of plasma and plasma derivatives as well as cellular products.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8174810

  14. Systematic review of evidence relating to the treatment of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Swann, J W; Skelly, B J

    2013-01-01

    Despite being the most prevalent autoimmune disease of dogs, there is considerable variation between individuals and institutions in the treatment regimens that are employed for the management of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia. The aim of this review was to evaluate evidence relating to the treatment of the disease systematically and to use this evidence to draw conclusions that are applicable in wider veterinary practice. Search tools were employed to identify relevant articles and these were assessed according to stated criteria. The overall quality of published evidence was poor, with many articles failing to provide details of the enrollment, treatment, monitoring, and assessment stages of the study process. In view of this, firm conclusions cannot be drawn regarding the treatment of this disease and further research of a higher quality is required. PMID:23279007

  15. An Unusual Case of Hepatosplenic ?? T-Cell Lymphoma Presenting with Coombs’-Negative Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Feryal A.; Shanmugam, Vignesh; Amer, Aliaa; El-Omri, Halima; Al-Sabbagh, Ahmad; Taha, Ruba Y.; Soliman, Dina S.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma (HSTCL) is a rare and aggressive extranodal T-cell lymphoma that comprises <5% of peripheral T-cell lymphomas. The majority of cases harbor the ?? T-cell receptor (TCR), but recently, a few cases have been shown to express the ?? TCR. Comparison of these two subtypes (?? and ??) shows similar clinicopathologic and cytogenetic features; however, due to the paucity of reported cases, it is not clear whether they are prognostically distinct entities. We report a case of ?? HSTCL with a rather unusual presentation of Coombs’-negative hemolytic anemia. Diagnosis proved challenging due to an unusual blastoid morphology with the absence of typical intrasinusoidal distribution of tumor cells in the bone marrow. This unique case adds to the growing list of this rare subtype of T-cell lymphomas, which warrant urgent attention due to the lack of effective treatment options and dismal prognosis. PMID:26688667

  16. Synthesis, characterization, in vitro anti-proliferative and hemolytic activity of hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanivelu, R.; Ruban Kumar, A.

    2014-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, HAP) nanoparticles are widely used in several biomedical applications due to its compositional similarities to bone mineral, excellent biocompatibility and bioactivity, osteoconductivity. In this present investigation, HAP nanoparticles synthesized by precipitation technique using calcium nitrate and di-ammonium phosphate. The crystalline nature and the functional group analysis are confirmed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman) respectively. The morphological observations are ascertained from field emission electron scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). In vitro anti-proliferative and hemolytic activities are carried out on the synthesized HAP samples and the studies reveals that HAP have mild activity against erythrocytes.

  17. Venom from Opisthacanthus elatus scorpion of Colombia, could be more hemolytic and less neurotoxic than thought.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Gómez, Sebastián; Vargas Muñoz, Leidy Johana; Saldarriaga-Córdoba, Mónica; Quintana Castillo, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    We report the first biochemical, biological, pharmacological and partial proteomic characterization studies of the Opisthancanthus elatus venom (Gervais, 1844) from Colombia. The Reverse Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography venom profile showed 28 main well-defined peaks, most eluting between 20 and 45min (18-30% of acetonitrile, respectively). High-resolution mass analysis indicates the presence of 106 components ranging from 806.59742Da to 16849.4139Da. O. elatus venom showed hemolytic activity and hydrolyzed the specific substrate BapNa suggesting the presence of proteins with serine-protease activity. Collected RP-HPLC fractions eluting at 52.6, 55.5, 55.8, 56.2, and 63.9min (PLA2 region between 33 and 40% of acetonitrile), showed hemolytic activity and hydrolyzed the synthetic substrate 4-nitro-3-octanoyloxy-benzoic acid, indicating the presence of compounds with phospholipases A2 activity. These RP-HPLC fractions, showed molecular masses values up to 13978.19546Da, corroborating the possible presence of the mentioned enzymes. Tryptic digestion and MS/MS analysis showed the presence of a phospholipase like fragment, similar to on described in other Opisthacanthus genus studies. No coagulant activity was observed. No larvicidal or antimicrobial activity was observed at concentrations evaluated. Lethal and toxic activity is expected at doses above 100mg/kg, no neurotoxic effects were detected at lower doses. In conclusion, O. elatus exhibits a venom with a predominant phospholipase A2 activity than thought; mammal's neurotoxic activity is expected above the 100mg/kg, which is very high compared to the venom from other neurotoxic scorpions. PMID:26477848

  18. Erythrocytic Pyruvate Kinase Mutations Causing Hemolytic Anemia, Osteosclerosis, and Secondary Hemochromatosis in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Gultekin, G. Inal; Raj, K.; Foureman, P.; Lehman, S.; Manhart, K.; Abdulmalik, O.; Giger, U.

    2013-01-01

    Background Erythrocytic pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency, first documented in Basenjis, is the most common inherited erythroenzymopathy in dogs. Objectives To report 3 new breed-specific PK-LR gene mutations and a retrospective survey of PK mutations in a small and selected group of Beagles and West Highland White Terriers (WHWT). Animals Labrador Retrievers (2 siblings, 5 unrelated), Pugs (2 siblings, 1 unrelated), Beagles (39 anemic, 29 other), WHWTs (22 anemic, 226 nonanemic), Cairn Terrier (n = 1). Methods Exons of the PK-LR gene were sequenced from genomic DNA of young dogs (<2 years) with persistent highly regenerative hemolytic anemia. Results A nonsense mutation (c.799C>T) resulting in a premature stop codon was identified in anemic Labrador Retriever siblings that had osteosclerosis, high serum ferritin concentrations, and severe hepatic secondary hemochromatosis. Anemic Pug and Beagle revealed 2 different missense mutations (c.848T>C, c.994G>A, respectively) resulting in intolerable amino acid changes to protein structure and enzyme function. Breed-specific mutation tests were developed. Among the biased group of 248 WHWTs, 9% and 35% were homozygous (affected) and heterozygous, respectively, for the previously described mutation (mutant allele frequency 0.26). A PK-deficient Cairn Terrier had the same insertion mutation as the affected WHWTs. Of the selected group of 68 Beagles, 35% were PK-deficient and 3% were carriers (0.37). Conclusions and Clinical Importance Erythrocytic PK deficiency is caused by different mutations in different dog breeds and causes chronic severe hemolytic anemia, hemosiderosis, and secondary hemochromatosis because of chronic hemolysis and, an as yet unexplained osteosclerosis. The newly developed breed-specific mutation assays simplify the diagnosis of PK deficiency. PMID:22805166

  19. Phenotypic features and phylogenetic background of extraintestinal hemolytic Escherichia coli responsible of mortality in puppies.

    PubMed

    Turchetto, Sara; Ustulin, Martina; Citterio, Carlo Vittorio; Zanardello, Claudia; Vascellari, Marta; Vio, Denis; Conedera, Gabriella; Milone, Nicola Maria Ferro; Cocchi, Monia

    2015-08-31

    A 10-day-old litter of five puppies of Bracco Italiano dog breed showed weakness and diarrhea and, 2 days later, four of them died. At the same time, the bitch showed high hyperthermia (40 °C) and endometritis. The necropsy of a puppy revealed a severe lobar pneumonia accompanied with a bilateral nephrosis. No gross lesions were detected in other organs. Histopathology of the lung revealed severe multifocal fibrino-suppurative necrotizing bronchiolar-alveolitis associated with rod-shaped bacterial aggregates and diffuse interstitial lymphocytic infiltration. The kidney showed severe multifocal necrosis of the tubular epithelium and diffuse severe congestion of the parenchyma. A pure culture of hemolytic Escherichia coli carrying the Cnf-1 gene was identified, from both the puppy organs and bitch's milk. Moreover, phylo-typing assigned them to the phylogroup B2. Two weeks later, fecal samples from the bitch and the survived puppy were collected for a second microbiological analysis, identifying two hemolytic E. coli strains, Cnf positive and Cdt negative and Cnf and Cdt negative, respectively. Some E. coli pathogenic strains may cause enteric or extraintestinal disease. In dogs and cats, strains of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) produce specific virulent factors such as hemolysis and cytotoxin necrotizing factors (Cnf). In this episode, we hypothesize that the bitch's milk could be the main source of ExPEC infection causing high puppies mortality. The role of the bitch as a carrier could not be excluded: stressful conditions, such as pregnancy and delivery, would change the host-pathogen dynamics possibly increasing the release of the infectious burden. PMID:25835470

  20. Anticariogenic and Hemolytic Activity of Selected Seed Protein Extracts In vitro conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ishnava, Kalpesh B; Shah, Pankit P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to assess the anticariogenic and hemolytic activity of crude plant seed protein extracts against tooth decaying bacteria. Materials and Methods: The proteins from seeds of 12 different plants were extracted and used for antimicrobial assay against six different organisms. The extraction was carried out in 10mM of sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.0). Protein concentrations were determined as described by Bradford method. Anticariogenic activity was studied by agar well diffusion method and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was evaluated by the two-fold serial broth dilution method. Hemolytic activity, treatment of proteinase K and Kinetic study in Mimusops elengi crude seed protein extract. Results: The anticariogenic assay demonstrated the activity of Mimusops elengi against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. A minor activity of Glycine wightii against Streptococcus mutans was also found. The protein content of Mimusops elengi seed protein extract was 5.84mg/ml. The MIC values for Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes against Mimusops elengi seed protein extract were 364.36?g/ml and 182.19?g/ml, respectively. Kinetic study further elucidated the mode of inhibition in the presence of the Mimusops elengi plant seed protein with respect to time. The concentration of crude extract which gave 50% hemolysis compared to Triton X-100 treatment (HC50) value was 1.58 mg/ml; which is more than five times larger than that of the MIC. Treatment with proteinase K of the Mimusops elengi seed protein resulted in absence of the inhibition zone; which clearly indicates that the activity was only due to protein. Conclusion: Our results showed the prominence of Mimusops elengi plant seed protein extract as an effective herbal medication against tooth decaying bacteria. PMID:25628685

  1. Phosphatidylserine exposure and red cell viability in red cell aging and in hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Boas, Franz Edward; Forman, Linda; Beutler, Ernest

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) normally localizes to the inner leaflet of cell membranes but becomes exposed in abnormal or apoptotic cells, signaling macrophages to ingest them. Along similar lines, it seemed possible that the removal of red cells from circulation because of normal aging or in hemolytic anemias might be triggered by PS exposure. To investigate the role of PS exposure in normal red cell aging, we used N-hydroxysuccinimide-biotin to tag rabbit red cells in vivo, then used phycoerythrin-streptavidin to label the biotinylated cells, and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to detect the exposed PS. Flow cytometric analysis of these cells drawn at 10-day intervals up to 70 days after biotinylation indicated that older, biotinylated cells expose more PS. Furthermore, our data match a simple model of red cell senescence that assumes both an age-dependent destruction of senescent red cells preceded by several hours of PS exposure and a random destruction of red cells without PS exposure. By using this model, we demonstrated that the exposure of PS parallels the rate at which biotinylated red cells are removed from circulation. On the other hand, using an annexin V-FITC label and flow cytometry demonstrates that exposed PS does not cause the reduced red cell life span of patients with hemolytic anemia, with the possible exception of those with unstable hemoglobins or sickle cell anemia. Thus, in some cases PS exposure on the cell surface may signal the removal of red cells from circulation, but in other cases some other signal must trigger the sequestration of cells. PMID:9501218

  2. Genetic Association of the Porcine C9 Complement Component with Hemolytic Complement Activity

    PubMed Central

    Khoa, D. V. A.; Wimmers, K.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is a part of the natural immune regulation mechanism against invading pathogens. Complement activation from three different pathways (classical, lectin, and alternative) leads to the formation of C5-convertase, an enzyme for cleavage of C5 into C5a and C5b, followed by C6, C7, C8, and C9 in membrane attack complex. The C9 is the last complement component of the terminal lytic pathway, which plays an important role in lysis of the target cells depending on its self-polymerization to form transmembrane channels. To address the association of C9 with traits related to disease resistance, the complete porcine C9 cDNA was comparatively sequenced to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in pigs of the breeds Hampshire (HS), Duroc (DU), Berlin miniature pig (BMP), German Landrace (LR), Pietrain (PIE), and Muong Khuong (Vietnamese potbelly pig). Genotyping was performed in 417 F2 animals of a resource population (DUMI: DU×BMP) that were vaccinated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Aujeszky diseases virus and porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus at 6, 14 and 16 weeks of age, respectively. Two SNPs were detected within the third exon. One of them has an amino acid substitution. The European porcine breeds (LR and PIE) show higher allele frequency of these SNPs than Vietnamese porcine breed (MK). Association of the substitution SNP with hemolytic complement activity indicated statistically significant differences between genotypes in the classical pathway but not in the alternative pathway. The interactions between eight time points of measurement of complement activity before and after vaccinations and genotypes were significantly different. The difference in hemolytic complement activity in the both pathways depends on genotype, kind of vaccine, age and the interaction to the other complement components. These results promote the porcine C9 (pC9) as a candidate gene to improve general animal health in the future. PMID:26194222

  3. Genetic Association of the Porcine C9 Complement Component with Hemolytic Complement Activity.

    PubMed

    Khoa, D V A; Wimmers, K

    2015-09-01

    The complement system is a part of the natural immune regulation mechanism against invading pathogens. Complement activation from three different pathways (classical, lectin, and alternative) leads to the formation of C5-convertase, an enzyme for cleavage of C5 into C5a and C5b, followed by C6, C7, C8, and C9 in membrane attack complex. The C9 is the last complement component of the terminal lytic pathway, which plays an important role in lysis of the target cells depending on its self-polymerization to form transmembrane channels. To address the association of C9 with traits related to disease resistance, the complete porcine C9 cDNA was comparatively sequenced to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in pigs of the breeds Hampshire (HS), Duroc (DU), Berlin miniature pig (BMP), German Landrace (LR), Pietrain (PIE), and Muong Khuong (Vietnamese potbelly pig). Genotyping was performed in 417 F2 animals of a resource population (DUMI: DU×BMP) that were vaccinated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Aujeszky diseases virus and porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus at 6, 14 and 16 weeks of age, respectively. Two SNPs were detected within the third exon. One of them has an amino acid substitution. The European porcine breeds (LR and PIE) show higher allele frequency of these SNPs than Vietnamese porcine breed (MK). Association of the substitution SNP with hemolytic complement activity indicated statistically significant differences between genotypes in the classical pathway but not in the alternative pathway. The interactions between eight time points of measurement of complement activity before and after vaccinations and genotypes were significantly different. The difference in hemolytic complement activity in the both pathways depends on genotype, kind of vaccine, age and the interaction to the other complement components. These results promote the porcine C9 (pC9) as a candidate gene to improve general animal health in the future. PMID:26194222

  4. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... acute bronchitis can include: Sore throat Fever A cough that may bring up clear, yellow or green ... your doctor if: You continue to wheeze and cough for more than 2 weeks, especially at night ...

  5. Bronchitis - acute

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to breathe. Another symptom of bronchitis is a cough. Acute means the symptoms have been present only ... diagnosed with chronic bronchitis, you must have a cough with mucus on most days for at least ...

  6. Acute on chronic liver failure in a patient with sickle cell anaemia (HbSS).

    PubMed

    Im, Dana DaEun; Essien, Utibe; DePasse, Jacqueline W; Chiappa, Victor

    2015-01-01

    A man in his late 40s with sickle cell anaemia (HbSS) presented to the emergency department with 2?weeks of diffuse oedema, increased abdominal girth and dyspnoea. His anasarca was thought to be indicative of an acute decompensation of his known liver cirrhosis with transfusion-induced haemosiderosis. While his anasarca improved with diuresis, his direct hyperbilirubinaemia suddenly worsened without any signs of haemolysis, biliary disease or obstruction. He also developed an acute worsening in serum creatinine (1.17-7.0?mg/dL in 7?days) despite subsequent treatment for presumed hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). Given his clinical decline, the patient's goals of care were transitioned to comfort measures only. His clinical presentation and rapid liver and renal deterioration were most typical of sickle cell intrahepatic cholestasis (SCIC). SCIC can lead to rapid deterioration in renal function and can be mistaken for HRS. When SCIC is suspected, consideration of exchange transfusions should be made early. PMID:26135492

  7. Role of nitric oxide scavenging in vascular response to cell-free hemoglobin transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sampei, Kenji; Ulatowski, John A.; Asano, Yoshio; Kwansa, Herman; Bucci, Enrico; Koehler, Raymond C.

    2006-01-01

    Modified Hb solutions have been developed as O2 carrier transfusion fluids, but of concern is the possibility that increased scavenging of nitric oxide (NO) within the plasma will alter vascular reactivity even if the Hb does not readily extravasate. The effect of decreasing hematocrit from ~30% to 18% by an exchange transfusion of a 6% sebacyl cross-linked tetrameric Hb solution on the diameter of pial arterioles possessing tight endothelial junctions was examined through a cranial window in anesthetized cats with and without a NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor. Superfusion of a NOS inhibitor decreased diameter, and subsequent Hb transfusion produced additional constriction that was not different from Hb transfusion alone but was different from the dilation observed by exchange transfusion of an albumin solution after NOS inhibition. In contrast, abluminal application of the cross-linked Hb produced constriction that was attenuated by the NOS inhibitor. Neither abluminal nor intraluminal cross-linked Hb interfered with pial arteriolar dilation to cromakalim, an activator of ATP-sensitive potassium channels. Pial vascular reactivity to hypocapnia and hypercapnia was unaffected by Hb transfusion. Microsphere-determined regional blood flow indicated selective decreases in perfusion after Hb transfusion in the kidney, small intestine, and neurohypophysis, which does not have tight endothelial junctions. Administration of a NOS inhibitor to reduce the basal level of NO available for scavenging before Hb transfusion prevented further decreases in blood flow to these regions compared with NOS inhibition alone. In contrast, blood flow to skeletal and left ventricular muscle increased, and cerebral blood flow was unchanged after Hb transfusion. This cross-linked Hb tetramer is known to appear in renal lymph but not in urine. We conclude that cell-free tetrameric Hb does not scavenge sufficient NO in the plasma space to significantly affect baseline tone in vascular beds with tight endothelial junctions but does produce substantial constriction in beds with porous endothelium. The data support increasing the molecular size of Hb by polymerization or conjugation to limit extravasation in all vascular beds to preserve normal vascular reactivity. PMID:15894576

  8. Role of nitric oxide scavenging in vascular response to cell-free hemoglobin transfusion.

    PubMed

    Sampei, Kenji; Ulatowski, John A; Asano, Yoshio; Kwansa, Herman; Bucci, Enrico; Koehler, Raymond C

    2005-09-01

    Modified Hb solutions have been developed as O(2) carrier transfusion fluids, but of concern is the possibility that increased scavenging of nitric oxide (NO) within the plasma will alter vascular reactivity even if the Hb does not readily extravasate. The effect of decreasing hematocrit from approximately 30% to 18% by an exchange transfusion of a 6% sebacyl cross-linked tetrameric Hb solution on the diameter of pial arterioles possessing tight endothelial junctions was examined through a cranial window in anesthetized cats with and without a NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor. Superfusion of a NOS inhibitor decreased diameter, and subsequent Hb transfusion produced additional constriction that was not different from Hb transfusion alone but was different from the dilation observed by exchange transfusion of an albumin solution after NOS inhibition. In contrast, abluminal application of the cross-linked Hb produced constriction that was attenuated by the NOS inhibitor. Neither abluminal nor intraluminal cross-linked Hb interfered with pial arteriolar dilation to cromakalim, an activator of ATP-sensitive potassium channels. Pial vascular reactivity to hypocapnia and hypercapnia was unaffected by Hb transfusion. Microsphere-determined regional blood flow indicated selective decreases in perfusion after Hb transfusion in the kidney, small intestine, and neurohypophysis, which does not have tight endothelial junctions. Administration of a NOS inhibitor to reduce the basal level of NO available for scavenging before Hb transfusion prevented further decreases in blood flow to these regions compared with NOS inhibition alone. In contrast, blood flow to skeletal and left ventricular muscle increased, and cerebral blood flow was unchanged after Hb transfusion. This cross-linked Hb tetramer is known to appear in renal lymph but not in urine. We conclude that cell-free tetrameric Hb does not scavenge sufficient NO in the plasma space to significantly affect baseline tone in vascular beds with tight endothelial junctions but does produce substantial constriction in beds with porous endothelium. The data support increasing the molecular size of Hb by polymerization or conjugation to limit extravasation in all vascular beds to preserve normal vascular reactivity. PMID:15894576

  9. The effects of blood transfusion on renal functions in orthopaedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Satoglu, Ismail Safa; Akcay, Serkan; Horoz, Levent; Kaya, Erol; Karakasli, Ahmet; Skiak, Eyad; Basci, Onur

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The effects of perioperative blood transfusion on renal functions have been studied in various studies. In this study, we investigated the effects of blood transfusion on postoperative kidney functions in patients who underwent orthopaedic surgeries. Method: Total 136 patients who were operated for several orthopedic pathologies between June 2013 and December 2014 were evaluated. The patients were divided into two groups according to the amounts of blood transfusion. Ninety five patients (69.8%) who were transfused less than 3 units were included in Group 1 and 41 patients (30.2%) who received 3 and more units of blood were included in Group 2. Results: There were no statistical difference between the two groups in terms of preoperative gender, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, chronical renal failure and smoking habbits (P > 0.05). No statistical differences between the groups were seen in terms of postoperative hospital stay, pulmonary and other complications as well as mortality (P > 0.05). When the two groups were compared for blood parameters showing postoperative renal and other system functions, no statistical differences were detected (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Blood transfusion does not have negative effects on postoperative BUN and creatinine levels in patients operated for orthopaedic pathologies. PMID:26430403

  10. Thromboelastometric Monitoring of the Hemostatic Effect of Platelet Concentrates Transfusion in Thrombocytopenic Children Undergoing Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Bernhard; Solomon, Cristina; Cadamuro, Janne; Jones, Neil

    2015-09-01

    Prophylactic platelet concentrates transfusion represents a therapeutic choice in patients with chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. This prospective, non-interventional study evaluated the effects of platelet concentrates transfusion on thromboelastometric parameters of platelet function in 36 transfusion occasions for 11 thrombocytopenic children undergoing chemotherapy. Pre- and posttransfusion (1-2 hours) blood samples were analyzed using standard coagulation tests and thromboelastometry (ROTEM) measurements (EXTEM and FIBTEM tests). Platelet component of the clot was calculated based on the EXTEM and FIBTEM maximum clot elasticity (MCE) results. After transfusion, mean platelet count increased from 16.5 × 10(9)/L to 43.0 × 10(9)/L (P < .001) and platelet component increased from 34.1 to 73.0 (P < .001). Statistically significant increases for posttransfusion EXTEM parameters A10, A20, and maximum clot firmness (MCF) were observed compared to pretransfusion values (P < .001). The EXTEM ?-angle values increased posttransfusion (P < .05). The FIBTEM measurements were comparable pre- and posttransfusion. The study showed that platelet concentrates transfusion in thrombocytopenic children undergoing chemotherapy improves platelet-related coagulation pattern. PMID:25525046

  11. Thromboelastometric Monitoring of the Hemostatic Effect of Platelet Concentrates Transfusion in Thrombocytopenic Children Undergoing Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Cristina; Cadamuro, Janne; Jones, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Prophylactic platelet concentrates transfusion represents a therapeutic choice in patients with chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. This prospective, non-interventional study evaluated the effects of platelet concentrates transfusion on thromboelastometric parameters of platelet function in 36 transfusion occasions for 11 thrombocytopenic children undergoing chemotherapy. Pre- and posttransfusion (1-2 hours) blood samples were analyzed using standard coagulation tests and thromboelastometry (ROTEM) measurements (EXTEM and FIBTEM tests). Platelet component of the clot was calculated based on the EXTEM and FIBTEM maximum clot elasticity (MCE) results. After transfusion, mean platelet count increased from 16.5 × 109/L to 43.0 × 109/L (P < .001) and platelet component increased from 34.1 to 73.0 (P < .001). Statistically significant increases for posttransfusion EXTEM parameters A10, A20, and maximum clot firmness (MCF) were observed compared to pretransfusion values (P < .001). The EXTEM ?-angle values increased posttransfusion (P < .05). The FIBTEM measurements were comparable pre- and posttransfusion. The study showed that platelet concentrates transfusion in thrombocytopenic children undergoing chemotherapy improves platelet-related coagulation pattern. PMID:25525046

  12. Frequency and Specificity of Red Blood Cell Alloimmunization in Chilean Transfused Patients

    PubMed Central

    Caamaño, José; Musante, Evangelina; Contreras, Margarita; Ulloa, Hernán; Reyes, Carolina; Inaipil, Verónica; Saavedra, Nicolás; Guzmán, Neftalí

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Alloimmunization is an adverse effect of blood transfusions. In Chile, alloimmunization frequency is not established, and for this reason the aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and specificity of red blood cell (RBC) alloantibodies in Chilean transfused subjects. Methods Records from 4,716 multi-transfused patients were analyzed. In these patients, antibody screening was carried out prior to cross-matching with a commercially available two-cell panel by the microcolum gel test, and samples with a positive screen were analyzed for the specificity of the alloantibody with a 16-cell identification panel. Results The incidence of RBC alloimmunization in transfused patients was 1.02% (48/4,716) with a higher prevalence in women (40/48). We detected 52 antibodies, the most frequent specificities identified were anti-E (30.8%), anti-K (26.9%), anti-D (7.7%), and anti-Fya (5.8%). The highest incidence of alloantibodies was observed in cancer and gastroenterology patients. Conclusion The data demonstrated a low alloimmunization frequency in Chilean transfused patients, principally associated with antibodies anti-E, anti-K, anti-D, and anti-Fya. PMID:25960709

  13. NOTE: Thrombosis of anastomoses may affect the staging sequence of twin twin transfusion syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P. H. M.; Ross, Michael G.; van Gemert, Martin J. C.

    2008-03-01

    Twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) is a severe complication of monozygotic (identical) twins, which share one single monochorionic placenta. It is caused by placental anastomoses which link the two fetoplacental circulations of the twins and allow a chronic net inter-twin transfusion to develop between the fetuses. Clinical presentation of TTTS manifestations has been classified into five different stages. In this paper, we used our computational model of TTTS and examined the possible differences between chronic and rapidly increasing inter-twin transfusion in the simulated TTTS staging sequence. Our results suggest that rapid alterations in the net inter-twin transfusion, e.g. due to thrombosis of placental anastomoses, may produce a different staging sequence than in TTTS caused by chronic inter-twin transfusion. These results may aid an improved knowledge of TTTS pathophysiology under conditions of a rapidly changing cardiovascular function, and contribute to the planning of optimal intervention under such circumstances. Supported in part by the European Community Euro-twin-2-twin project (JPHMvdW) and by the National Institutes of Health, grant HL40899 (MGR).

  14. Perioperative Allogenenic Blood Transfusion is Associated With Worse Clinical Outcome for Patients Undergoing Gastric Carcinoma Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lihong; Zhu, Dajian; Chen, Xiaowu; Huang, Yanfeng; Ouyang, Manzhao; Zhang, Weijie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Whether perioperative allogenic blood transfusion (ABT) has adverse effect on patients with gastric carcinoma (GC) surgery or not, that is controversial. Our study evaluated the association between ABT and some clinical outcomes of GC surgery patients. Data of relevant studies were based on PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library search. The relative risk (RR) of 5-year survival rates, tumor recurrence, and postoperative complications were performed; subgroup analyses included district, transfusion rates, age, participants, sex, and tumor stage. The study was approved by the ethics committee of the First People's Hospital of Shunde. In total, 9189 participants from 16 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The 5-year survival rate was decreased for the GC patients with ABT (RR?=?0.74, 95% confidence interval [CI]?=?0.69–0.79), the risk of tumor recurrence was significantly higher for ABT patients (RR?=?1.82, 95% CI?=?1.32–2.51), and postoperative complications increased in ABT patients (RR?=?1.36, 95% CI?=?1.02–1.81), respectively; in subgroup analyses, 5-year survival rates were not associated with the transfusion rates (?2?=?0.37, P?=?0.54). Transfusion for patients undergoing GC surgery, even low transfusion rates, would reduce the 5-year survival rates, and elevated the risk of tumor recurrence and postoperative complication. PMID:26426632

  15. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePLUS

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  16. [Rational blood reservation for elective surgery. A prospective evaluation of blood reservation, use of transfusions and resources].

    PubMed

    Jensen, B A

    1992-03-23

    Danish and international studies have documented that preoperative blood ordering policy in elective surgery is extremely inefficient if not based on knowledge of actual transfusion frequencies and requirements. During a 12-month period, the impact of practical application of Type & Screen (T&S), and a thoroughly revised preoperative blood ordering policy in elective surgery, on crossmatch ordering, transfusion extent and safety were assessed prospectively. In addition, the effect on resource and laboratory economy was estimated, using the number of crossmatches, crossmatch to transfusion (C/T) ratio, out-dating, transfusion complications, and the proportional use of fractionated red cell products (erythrocyte concentrate and suspension) as efficiency parameters. In 86% out of 6,766 surgical procedures the recommendations were followed. A total of 1,736 patients had a preoperative cross-match of two or more units of blood and 25.1% were transfused during or within 48 hours following surgery. Only 2.4% of patients with T&S were transfused. Of the crossmatched blood 18.1% was actually transfused, and the overall crossmatch to transfusion ratio (C/T-ratio) was 5.33. In only 0.5% of operations, unexpected crossmatching and transfusions proved necessary during surgery. None of the reported transfusion complications were due to failure of the T&S procedure. During a period of increasing blood bank activities, as measured by the number of blood groupings and the blood turnover, a significant decrease in C/T-ratio and number of crossmatches was observed, corresponding to an estimated annual reduction of 11,000 crossmatches. Outdating declined from 9 to 3.2%, corresponding to savings of approximately 1,000 transfusion units annually, while the complication rate remained constant at 1.7%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1553781

  17. The history of blood transfusion prior to the 20th century--part 2.

    PubMed

    Learoyd, P

    2012-12-01

    Although there are a number of descriptions of 'blood infusion' in antiquity, it was the publication of the discovery of the circulation of blood in 1628 by William Harvey and the work of Christopher Wren and Robert Boyle in 1663 on the infusion of different materials into dogs that paved the way to the possible practical attempts at actual blood transfusion. Although these early experiments, principally by Richard Lower in England and Jean Denis in France provided valuable information regarding inter-species incompatibility and the problems of blood coagulation, it was not until the work of James Blundell in the early part of the 19th century that blood transfusion was used as a means of blood replacement. However, blood transfusion was not to become an accepted therapeutic possibility until the discovery of practical anticoagulation and the ABO blood groups at the start of the 20th century. PMID:23016954

  18. Granulocyte transfusions in children and adults with hematological malignancies: benefits and controversies.

    PubMed

    Cugno, Chiara; Deola, Sara; Filippini, Perla; Stroncek, David F; Rutella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial and fungal infections continue to pose a major clinical challenge in patients with prolonged severe neutropenia after chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). With the advent of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize neutrophils in healthy donors, granulocyte transfusions have been broadly used to prevent and/or treat life-threatening infections in patients with severe febrile neutropenia and/or neutrophil dysfunction. Although the results of randomized controlled trials are inconclusive, there are suggestions from pilot and retrospective studies that granulocyte transfusions may benefit selected categories of patients. We will critically appraise the evidence related to the use of therapeutic granulocyte transfusions in children and adults, highlighting current controversies in the field and discussing complementary approaches to modulate phagocyte function in the host. PMID:26572736

  19. Les transfusions de globules rouges chez le nouveau-né : Des directives révisées

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    En général, depuis dix ans, les professionnels de la santé qui soignent des nouveau-nés à haut risque dans des unités de soins intensifs néonatals sont plus restrictifs dans leur utilisation de transfusions de globules rouges. Le présent énoncé est conçu pour ceux qui soignent des nouveau-nés à haut risque (des prématurés aux nouveau-nés d’un mois). Il vise à fournir des directives pour réduire l’incidence d’anémie chez les nourrissons prématurés et à terme, à repérer des stratégies pour réduire le besoin de transfusions de globules rouges et à limiter l’exposition à des donneurs au sein de cette population. Des recommandations portant sur les transfusions de globules rouges sont incluses.

  20. Reduced Blood Loss and Transfusion Rates: Additional Benefits of Local Infiltration Anaesthesia in Knee Arthroplasty Patients.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Mohammed A; Ajwani, Sanil H; Shepard, Gordon J; Ryan, William G

    2015-11-01

    We hypothesised that local infiltration of anaesthesia (LIA) containing adrenaline may reduce peri-operative blood loss and transfusion requirements in primary total knee arthroplasty patients (TKA) when compared to simple patient control analgesia (PCA). In this retrospective cohort study there were 22 TKAs in the PCA group and 27 TKAs in the LIA group. There were no drains used or significant differences in demographics between groups. There was a statistically significant difference in blood loss (P = 0.003), between the LIA group (M = 942 ml, CI 829-1055), and the PCA group (M = 1314 ml, CI 1099-1527). Patients receiving PCA were 4.3 times more likely to require blood transfusion. Using the LIA technique reduces blood loss and risk of blood transfusion. PMID:26115980

  1. [The precautionary principle applied to blood transfusion. What is its impact on practices and risk management?].

    PubMed

    Hergon, E; Moutel, G; Duchange, N; Bellier, L; Hervé, C; Rouger, P

    2004-07-01

    The precautionary principle has boomed in the French public health sector through blood transfusion. There has been, however, no perambulatory reflection on the definition, objectives, methods of application or consequences of this principle. The question of the pertinence of its application remains unanswered. This study, based on interviews with blood transfusion practitioners, aims to establish their perceptions of the precautionary principle's application in this specific field and of its consequences in terms of risk management and patients' rights. The pros and cons of this application are analysed based on these perceptions. According to our analysis, the precautionary principle seems to be born of confusion. It is seen more as a way to protect decision makers than patients and, if taken to extremes, could prejudice medical logic. Nevertheless, it also brings measures which renew and encourage evolution in transfusion risk management. PMID:15488724

  2. Severe Soft Tissue Infection Caused by a Non-Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcus pyogenes Strain Harboring a Premature Stop Mutation in the sagC Gene

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Roman G.; Ensser, Armin; Dahesh, Samira; Popp, Isabel; Heeg, Christiane; Bleiziffer, Oliver; Merz, Thomas; Schulz, Theresia; Horch, Raymund E.; Bogdan, Christian; Nizet, Victor; van der Linden, Mark

    2013-01-01

    We recovered a non-beta-hemolytic Streptococcus pyogenes strain from a severe soft tissue infection. In this isolate, we detected a premature stop codon within the sagC gene of the streptolysin S (SLS) biosynthetic operon. Reintroduction of full-length sagC gene on a plasmid vector restored the beta-hemolytic phenotype to our clinical isolate, indicating that the point mutation in sagC accounted for loss of hemolytic activity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that a severe soft tissue infection can be caused by a non-beta-hemolytic S. pyogenes strain lacking a functional SagC. PMID:23515542

  3. Postoperative blood transfusion strategy in frail, anemic elderly patients with hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Gregersen, Merete; Borris, Lars C; Damsgaard, Else Marie

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Hip fracture (HF) in frail elderly patients is associated with poor physical recovery and death. There is often postoperative blood loss and the hemoglobin (Hb) threshold for red blood cell (RBC) transfusions in these patients is unknown. We investigated whether RBC transfusion strategies were associated with the degree of physical recovery or with reduced mortality after HF surgery. Patients and methods We enrolled 284 consecutive post-surgical HF patients (aged ? 65 years) with Hb levels < 11.3 g/dL (7 mmol/L) who had been admitted from nursing homes or sheltered housing. Allocation was stratified by residence. The patients were randomly assigned to either restrictive (Hb < 9.7 g/dL; < 6 mmol/L) or liberal (Hb < 11.3 g/dL; < 7 mmol/L) RBC transfusions given within the first 30 days postoperatively. Follow-up was at 90 days. Results No statistically significant differences were found in repeated measures of daily living activities or in 90-day mortality rate between the restrictive group (where 27% died) and the liberal group (where 21% died). Per-protocol 30-day mortality was higher with the restrictive strategy (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.1–5.2; p = 0.03). The 90-day mortality rate was higher for nursing home residents in the restrictive transfusion group (36%) than for those in the liberal group (20%) (HR = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.1–3.6; p = 0.01). Interpretation According to our Hb thresholds, recovery from physical disabilities in frail elderly hip fracture patients was similar after a restrictive RBC transfusion strategy and after a liberal strategy. Implementation of a liberal RBC transfusion strategy in nursing home residents has the potential to increase survival. PMID:25586270

  4. Strengthening the service continuum between transfusion providers and suppliers: enhancing the blood services network.

    PubMed

    Sime, Stacy L

    2005-10-01

    As the cost of health care increases, the focus on cost containment grows. The pressure to reduce costs comes at the same time the public focus is on ensuring a zero-risk blood supply. The blood supply has never been safer or more expensive. With the relative vanquishing of transfusion-transmitted diseases, noninfectious risks now exceed infectious risks. This has resulted in a call to refocus blood safety efforts on interconnected processes that link a unit of blood from its volunteer blood donor to the patient. Additional costs in the blood supply chain will create new pressures on an already taxed system that gets little additional reimbursement with each new safety initiative. Opposing interests have created a tenuous relationship between the blood supplier and the transfusion provider. This adversarial relationship does not benefit the ultimate stakeholder, the patient. It is time to create a service partnership that is built on access, cost, and quality. Initiatives must be undertaken at a local, regional, and national level. Locally, blood suppliers and transfusion providers must reevaluate policies that are focused on individual gain and reinvent policies that will reward improvements in the overall system and expand cooperative services. Regionally, both blood suppliers and transfusion providers need to consolidate services to gain cost and quality benefits without compromising the competitive nature of the industry. Nationally, the creation of a strategic plan will help ensure that a mutually beneficial relationship focused on the patient is created between the blood supplier and transfusion provider at all levels. Development of such a plan would benefit the transfusing and supplying parties by identifying areas of common interest and how each may facilitate the achievement of shared benefits. PMID:16181404

  5. The impact of platelet transfusion characteristics on posttransfusion platelet increments and clinical bleeding in patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Assmann, Susan F.; Strauss, Ronald G.; Ness, P. M.; Hess, John R.; Kaufman, Richard M.; Granger, Suzanne; Slichter, Sherrill J.

    2012-01-01

    Platelet characteristics, such as platelet dose, platelet source (apheresis vs pooled), platelet donor-recipient ABO compatibility, and duration of platelet storage, can affect posttransfusion platelet increments, but it is unclear whether these factors impact platelet transfusion efficacy on clinical bleeding. We performed secondary analyses of platelet transfusions given in the prospective randomized Platelet Dose Study, which included 1272 platelet-transfused hematology-oncology patients who received 6031 prophylactic platelet transfusions. The primary outcome of these analyses was time from first transfusion to first World Health Organization ? grade 2 bleeding. Platelet transfusion increments were assessed at 0.25 to 4 hours and 16 to 32 hours after platelet transfusion. There were 778 patients evaluable for analysis of time to bleeding. Adjusted models showed that randomized dose strategy, platelet source, ABO compatibility, and duration of storage did not predict this outcome. Platelet increments were generally higher for transfusions of apheresis platelets, ABO-identical platelets, and platelets stored 3 days versus 4 to 5 days. Thus, although platelet source, ABO compatibility, and duration of storage exert a modest impact on both absolute and corrected posttransfusion platelet increments, they have no measurable impact on prevention of clinical bleeding. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00128713. PMID:22496156

  6. Harms associated with single unit perioperative transfusion: retrospective population based analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Helen; Auerbach, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether perioperative transfusion of as little as one unit of packed red blood cells in the operating room or the day after surgery is associated with measurably increased odds for perioperative ischemic stroke and myocardial infarction. Design Retrospective cohort study of hospital administrative data. Setting 346 hospitals in the United States participating in the claims based Premier Perspective database from 1 January 2009 to 31 March 2012. Participants 1?583?819 adults who underwent non-cardiac, non-intracranial, non-vascular surgery and required a stay of at least one night in hospital and did not receive packed red blood cells on days two to seven after surgery. Intervention Transfusion of packed red blood cells on the day of surgery or one day after by exposure categories (none or one, two, three or four or more units). Main outcome measures The composite outcome of stroke/myocardial infarction was defined as ischemic stroke, ST elevation myocardial infarction, ventricular tachycardia, or ventricular fibrillation during index admission or as a primary diagnosis for readmission within 30 days. Ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation were included as a surrogate for myocardial infarction. Results 41?421 (2.6%) patients received at least one unit of packed red blood cells within 48 hours of surgery, and 8044 (0.51%) experienced the composite outcome of stroke/myocardial infarction. Patients who were transfused were older, more likely to be women, and had more comorbid disease. Hierarchical logistic regression adjusted for comorbidities and demographics with random effects by hospital showed that transfusion of as little as one unit was associated with an odds ratio of 2.33 (95% confidence interval 1.90 to 2.86) for perioperative stroke/myocardial infarction, and the odds of stroke/myocardial infarction markedly increased with transfusion of four or more units. Subgroup analysis limiting the cohort to one of several common surgical procedures, excluding those who received two or more units, or excluding who received transfusion on postoperative day one showed substantially similar results, as did a matched propensity score analysis. Two methods of modeling unmeasured confounders suggest an odds ratio of >10 with imbalance of up to 47% between patients who did and did not receive transfusion would be required to invalidate our results. Conclusions A perioperative transfusion of one unit of packed red blood cells is associated with increased odds of perioperative ischemic stroke and/or myocardial infarction, even after adjustment for a wide range of factors in our data and despite extensive sensitivity analyses. PMID:26070979

  7. Depressed eruption rate of the rat maxillary incisor in a drug-induced uncompensated hemolytic state model

    SciTech Connect

    Giglio, M.J.; Sanz, A.M.; Bozzini, C.E. )

    1990-03-01

    Female rats weighing about 180 g were separated into two groups. One group (A) received phenylhydrazine (PHZ) every other day during three weeks (for induction of an uncompensated hemolytic state), while the control group (C) received saline. The evidence for the establishment of the uncompensated hemolytic state was obtained by hematocrit value, reticulocyte count, and red-cell-volume-59Fe uptake. Body-weight gain (which is a measure of overall body growth rate), body-length gain (which is a measure of longitudinal skeletal growth rate), food intake, and maxillary incisor eruption rate (ER) were significantly depressed in rats of group A during the PHZ-injection period, in relation to rats of group C. These results indicate that anemia and/or associated factors depress ER, along with body growth and skeletal growth.

  8. Red blood cell transfusions are associated with HLA class I but not H-Y alloantibodies in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Nickel, Robert S; Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Yee, Marianne M; Bray, Robert A; Gebel, Howard M; Kean, Leslie S; Miklos, David B; Horan, John T

    2015-07-01

    Blood transfusions can induce alloantibodies to antigens on red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells and platelets, with these alloantibodies affecting transfusion and transplantation. While transfusion-related alloimmunization against RBC antigens and human leucocyte antigens (HLA) have been studied, transfusion-related alloimmunization to minor histocompatibility antigens (mHA), such as H-Y antigens, has not been clinically characterized. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 114 children with sickle cell disease (SCD) and tested for antibodies to 5 H-Y antigens and to HLA class I and class II. Few patients had H-Y antibodies, with no significant differences in the prevalence of any H-Y antibody observed among transfused females (7%), transfused males (6%) and never transfused females (4%). In contrast, HLA class I, but not HLA class II, antibodies were more prevalent among transfused than never transfused patients (class I: 33% vs. 13%, P = 0·046; class II: 7% vs. 8%, P = 0·67). Among transfused patients, RBC alloantibody history but not amount of transfusion exposure was associated with a high (>25%) HLA class I panel reactive antibody (Odds ratio 6·8, 95% confidence interval 2·1-22·3). These results are consistent with immunological responder and non-responder phenotypes, wherein a subset of patients with SCD may be at higher risk for transfusion-related alloimmunization. PMID:25891976

  9. Contribution to the food products' analysis: A research and evaluation on the hemolytic effect of some pesticides used in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Al-Alam, Josephine; Millet, Maurice; Chbani, Asma; Fajloun, Ziad

    2015-11-01

    Pesticides are a real concern for the society as their use has become critical, leading sometimes to their accumulation as residues in fruits and vegetables. After examining the pesticides sold in Northern Lebanon, this study is focused on the analysis and identification of pesticides residues in fruits and vegetables that are harvested in this region and treated with the locally sold pesticides. Results show: first, (i) a use of Zineb by the name of another pesticide Micronized Sulfur to avoid prosecution; (ii) a significant presence of Metalaxyl in lemons and oranges; (iii) a significant presence of Trifluralin in strawberries; and (iv) a significant presence of Zineb in lemons and tomatoes. Second, with the use of hemolytic tests on human blood results show: (i) a critical concentration and a significant hemolytic effect of some pesticides used in Lebanon; and (ii) an absence of hemolytic effect in the collected fractions of the different analyzed fruit extracts containing pesticides. Finally, this work is the first step for pesticides' analysis in vegetables and fruits in Lebanon, initiating a wider analytical study in order to control and examine the use of pesticides which, according to our results, could have an adverse effect on human health over a long term. PMID:26357889

  10. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary ?-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  11. THE ENDOPARASITOID Campoletis chlorideae INDUCES A HEMOLYTIC FACTOR IN THE HERBIVOROUS INSECT Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiong-Ya; Bai, Su-Fen; Li, Xin; Yin, Xin-Ming; Li, Xian-Chun

    2015-09-01

    Although lysis of invading organisms is a major innate form of immunity used by invertebrates, it remains unclear whether herbivorous insects have hemolysin or not. To address this general question, we tested the hemolytic (HL) activity of the hemolymph and tissue extracts from various stages of the polyphagous insect Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) against the erythrocytes from chicken, duck, and rabbit. An HL activity was identified in the hemolymph of H. armigera larvae. Further studies demonstrated that the HL activity is proteinaceous as it was precipitable by deproteinizing agents. Hemolysins were found in Helicoverpa egg, larva, pupa, and adult, but the activity was higher in feeding larvae than in molting or newly molted larvae. Hemolysins were distributed among a variety of larval tissues including salivary gland, fat body, epidermis, midgut, or testes, but the highest activity was found in salivary gland and fat body. Relative to nonparasitized larvae, parasitization of H. armigera larvae by the endoparasitoid Campoletis chlorideae Uchida induced a 3.4-fold increase in the HL activity in the plasma of parasitized host at day two postparasitization. The present study shows the presence of a parasitoid inducible HL factor in the parasitized insect. The HL activity increased significantly in H. armigera larvae at 12 and 24 h postinjection with Escherichia coli. We infer the HL factor(s) is inducible or due to de novo synthesis, which means that the HL factor(s) is associated with insect immune response by inhibiting or clearance of invading organisms. PMID:25929852

  12. Sensitive, reliable and easy-performed laboratory monitoring of eculizumab therapy in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Volokhina, Elena B; van de Kar, Nicole C A J; Bergseth, Grethe; van der Velden, Thea J A M; Westra, Dineke; Wetzels, Jack F M; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2015-10-01

    Complement C5 inhibitor eculizumab treatment in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is effective, but associated with high costs. Complement inhibition monitoring in these patients has not been standardized. In this study we evaluated novel functional assays for application in routine follow-up. We documented that the Wieslab® complement screen assay showed a sensitivity of 1-2% of C5 activity by adding purified C5 or normal human serum to a C5 deficient serum. All the patient samples obtained during the treatment course, were completely blocked for terminal complement pathway activity for up to four weeks after the eculizumab infusion. Levels of complexes between eculizumab and C5 were inversely correlated to the complement activity (p=0.01). Moreover, titrating serum from eculizumab-treated patients into normal serum revealed that eculizumab was present in excess up to four weeks after infusion. Thus, we demonstrate sensitive, reliable and easy-performed assays which can be used to design individual eculizumab dosage regimens. PMID:26111482

  13. A compact highly efficient and low hemolytic centrifugal blood pump with a magnetically levitated impeller.

    PubMed

    Asama, Junichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Hoshi, Hideo; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2006-03-01

    A magnetically levitated (maglev) centrifugal blood pump (CBP), intended for use as a ventricular assist device, needs to be highly durable and reliable for long-term use without any mechanical failure. Furthermore, maglev CBPs should be small enough to be implanted into patients of various size and weight. We have developed a compact maglev CBP employing a two-degree-of-freedom controlled magnetic bearing, with a magnetically suspended impeller directly driven by an internal brushless direct current (DC) motor. The magnetic bearing actively controls the radial motion of the impeller and passively supports axial and angular motions using a permanent magnet embedded in the impeller. The overall dimensions of the maglev CBP are 65 mm in diameter and 40 mm in height. The total power consumption and pump efficiency for pumping 6 L/min against a head pressure of 105 mm Hg were 6.5 W and 21%, respectively. To evaluate the characteristics of the maglev CBP when subjected to a disturbance, excitation of the base, simulating the movement of the patient in various directions, and the sudden interception of the outlet tube connected with the pump in a mock circulatory loop, simulating an unexpected kink and emergent clamp during a heart surgery, were tested by monitoring the five-degree-of-freedom motion of the impeller. Furthermore, the hemolytic characteristics of the maglev CBP were compared with those of the Medtronic Biomedicus BPX-80, which demonstrated the superiority of the maglev CBP. PMID:16480390

  14. End-tidal carbon monoxide as an indicator of the hemolytic rate.

    PubMed

    Christensen, R D; Lambert, D K; Henry, E; Yaish, H M; Prchal, J T

    2015-03-01

    In the first days of life, low grade jaundice is essentially universal. The source of the elevated bilirubin level giving rise to "physiological jaundice of the newborn" is only partly known. We hypothesized that it is, at least in part, the result of active and specific hemolysis involving a physiological mechanism to lower the high fetal hematocrit, appropriate for the relatively low oxygen environment in utero, to a lower level appropriate for the state of oxygen abundance after birth. We tested this by quantifying end tidal carbon monoxide (ETCO) as a marker of the rate of heme metabolism to bilirubin. We found that ETCO values of 20 neonates and children with known hemolytic disorders were higher than 20 age-matched healthy controls (p<0.0001), indicating that this instrumentation recognizes hemolysis in neonates and children. We also found that ETCO reference intervals were indeed higher in healthy neonates during the first three days after birth (5th to 95th percentile reference range, 1.4 to 1.7ppm) than after 1month of age (all ?1.0ppm, p<0.0001). These results suggest to us that hemolysis is physiological during the first days after birth. The cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for transient hemolysis after birth are topics of current investigation. PMID:25624169

  15. Oxidative stress as a potential causal factor for autoimmune hemolytic anemia and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Junichi; Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Konno, Tasuku; Homma, Takujiro; Iuchi, Yoshihito

    2015-05-01

    The kidneys and the blood system mutually exert influence in maintaining homeostasis in the body. Because the kidneys control erythropoiesis by producing erythropoietin and by supporting hematopoiesis, anemia is associated with kidney diseases. Anemia is the most prevalent genetic disorder, and it is caused by a deficiency of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), for which sulfhydryl oxidation due to an insufficient supply of NADPH is a likely direct cause. Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) result in the sulfhydryl oxidation and hence are another potential cause for anemia. ROS are elevated in red blood cells (RBCs) under superoxide dismutase (SOD1) deficiency in C57BL/6 mice. SOD1 deficient mice exhibit characteristics similar to autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) at the gerontic stage. An examination of AIHA-prone New Zealand Black (NZB) mice, which have normal SOD1 and G6PD genes, indicated that ROS levels in RBCs are originally high and further elevated during aging. Transgenic overexpression of human SOD1 in erythroid cells effectively suppresses ROS elevation and ameliorates AIHA symptoms such as elevated anti-RBC antibodies and premature death in NZB mice. These results support the hypothesis that names oxidative stress as a risk factor for AIHA and other autoimmune diseases such as SLE. Herein we discuss the association between oxidative stress and SLE pathogenesis based mainly on the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of NZB and New Zealand white mice and provide insight into the mechanism of SLE pathogenesis. PMID:25949934

  16. An international consensus approach to the management of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in children.

    PubMed

    Loirat, Chantal; Fakhouri, Fadi; Ariceta, Gema; Besbas, Nesrin; Bitzan, Martin; Bjerre, Anna; Coppo, Rosanna; Emma, Francesco; Johnson, Sally; Karpman, Diana; Landau, Daniel; Langman, Craig B; Lapeyraque, Anne-Laure; Licht, Christoph; Nester, Carla; Pecoraro, Carmine; Riedl, Magdalena; van de Kar, Nicole C A J; Van de Walle, Johan; Vivarelli, Marina; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) emerged during the last decade as a disease largely of complement dysregulation. This advance facilitated the development of novel, rational treatment options targeting terminal complement activation, e.g., using an anti-C5 antibody (eculizumab). We review treatment and patient management issues related to this therapeutic approach. We present consensus clinical practice recommendations generated by HUS International, an international expert group of clinicians and basic scientists with a focused interest in HUS. We aim to address the following questions of high relevance to daily clinical practice: Which complement investigations should be done and when? What is the importance of anti-factor H antibody detection? Who should be treated with eculizumab? Is plasma exchange therapy still needed? When should eculizumab therapy be initiated? How and when should complement blockade be monitored? Can the approved treatment schedule be modified? What approach should be taken to kidney and/or combined liver-kidney transplantation? How should we limit the risk of meningococcal infection under complement blockade therapy? A pressing question today regards the treatment duration. We discuss the need for prospective studies to establish evidence-based criteria for the continuation or cessation of anticomplement therapy in patients with and without identified complement mutations. PMID:25859752

  17. Intrauterine transfusion for fetal anemia due to red blood cell alloimmunization: 14 years experience in Leuven

    PubMed Central

    Pasman, S.A.; Claes, L.; Lewi, L.; Van Schoubroeck, D.; Debeer, A.; Emonds, M.; Geuten, E.; De Catte, L.; Devlieger, R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to report on the pregnancy and neonatal outcome of intrauterine transfusion (IUT) for red blood cell (RBC-)alloimmunization. Material and Methods: Retrospective cohort study of all IUT for RBC-alloimmunization in the University Hospital of Leuven, between January 2000 and January 2014. The influence of hydrops, gestational age and technique of transfusion on procedure related adverse events were examined. Results: 135 IUTs were performed in 56 fetuses. In none of the cases fetal or neonatal death occurred. Mild adverse events were noted in 10% of IUTs, whereas severe adverse events occurred in 1.5%. Hydrops and transfusion in a free loop were associated with an increased risk of adverse events whereas gestational age (GA) at transfusion after 34 weeks was not. Median GA at birth was 35.6 weeks and 9% was born before 34 weeks. Besides phototherapy 65.4% required additional neonatal treatment for alloimmune anemia. Non-hematologic complications occurred in 23.6% and were mainly related to preterm birth. Conclusion: In experienced hands, IUT for RBC-alloimmunization is a safe procedure in this era. Patients should be referred to specialist centers prior to the development of hydrops. IUT in a free loop of cord and unnecessary preterm birth are best avoided. PMID:26175890

  18. [Platelet transfusion and immunization anti-Rh1: implication for immunoprophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Chambost, H

    2014-11-01

    Rhesus (Rh) antigens are not expressed on platelets but residual red cells carry the risk of anti-D iso-immunization in transfusion recipients of platelet concentrates (PC). The main theoretical risk associated with this reaction relates to female subjects due to potential obstetrical situations of maternal-foetal Rh incompatibility. Isogroup PC transfusion in this system is therefore advised. However, logistical constraints impose frequent Rh-incompatible transfusions that require the recommendation of anti-Rh immunoglobulin in a girl of childbearing age in this situation. This recommendation, already restricted to a group of patients deserves to be questioned over a decade after being issued. Data from published reports are difficult to interpret because of the heterogeneity of the few series (CP type, immune status, timing of biological tests) but the current techniques for preparing products and most common use of CP apheresis limited the risk of immunization. Moreover, platelet transfusions are particularly relevant to immunocompromised populations which, to what extent (heavy chemotherapy and/or hematopoietic stem cells recipients) seems to be protected from this risk. It is noteworthy that the clinical consequences that may be expected from such immunization are not reported. Although some authors emphasize significant isoimmunization rates (maximum 19%), the heterogeneous conditions and the lack of evidence of clinical consequence suggest evaluating the recommendations or revising them towards more targeted indications of seroprophylaxis. PMID:25282489

  19. The Importance of the Monitoring of Resuscitation with Blood Transfusion for Uterine Inversion in Obstetrical Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Seishi; Sameshima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to describe critical care for obstetrical hemorrhage, especially in cases of uterine inversion. Study Design. We extracted data for six patients diagnosed with uterine inversion concerning resuscitation. Results. The shock index on admission of the six patients was 1.6 or more on admission. Four of the six experienced delay in diagnosis and received inadequate fluid replacement. Five of the six experienced delay in transfer. Five of the six underwent simultaneous blood transfusion on admission, and the remaining patient experienced a delay of 30 minutes. All six patients successfully underwent uterine replacement soon after admission. One maternal death occurred due to inappropriate practices that included delay in diagnosis, delay in transfer, inadequate fluid replacement, and delayed transfusion. Two patients experiencing inappropriate practices involving delay in diagnosis, delay in transfer, and inadequate fluid replacement survived. Conclusion. If a delay in diagnosis occurs simultaneously with a delay in transfer and inadequate fluid replacement, failure in providing a prompt blood transfusion may be critical and result in maternal death. The monitoring of resuscitation with blood transfusion for uterine inversion is essential for the improvement of obstetrical care. PMID:26491450

  20. Platelet and not erythrocyte microparticles are procoagulant in transfused thalassaemia major patients.

    PubMed

    Agouti, Imane; Cointe, Sylvie; Robert, Stéphane; Judicone, Coralie; Loundou, Anderson; Driss, Fathi; Brisson, Alain; Steschenko, Dominique; Rose, Christian; Pondarré, Corinne; Bernit, Emmanuelle; Badens, Catherine; Dignat-George, Françoise; Lacroix, Romaric; Thuret, Isabelle

    2015-11-01

    The level of circulating platelet-, erythrocyte-, leucocyte- and endothelial-derived microparticles detected by high-sensitivity flow cytometry was investigated in 37 ?-thalassaemia major patients receiving a regular transfusion regimen. The phospholipid procoagulant potential of the circulating microparticles and the microparticle-dependent tissue factor activity were evaluated. A high level of circulating erythrocyte- and platelet-microparticles was found. In contrast, the number of endothelial microparticles was within the normal range. Platelet microparticles were significantly higher in splenectomized than in non-splenectomized patients, independent of platelet count (P < 0·001). Multivariate analysis indicated that phospholipid-dependent procoagulant activity was influenced by both splenectomy (P = 0·001) and platelet microparticle level (P < 0·001). Erythrocyte microparticles were not related to splenectomy, appear to be devoid of proper procoagulant activity and no relationship between their production and haemolysis, dyserythropoiesis or oxidative stress markers could be established. Intra-microparticle labelling with anti-HbF antibodies showed that they originate only partially (median of 28%) from thalassaemic erythropoiesis. In conclusion, when ?-thalassaemia major patients are intensively transfused, the procoagulant activity associated with thalassaemic erythrocyte microparticles is probably diluted by transfusions. In contrast, platelet microparticles, being both more elevated and more procoagulant, especially after splenectomy, may contribute to the residual thrombotic risk reported in splenectomized multi-transfused ?-thalassaemia major patients. PMID:26205481

  1. Molecular Diagnostics in Transfusion Medicine: In Capillary, on a Chip, in Silico, or in Flight?

    PubMed Central

    Garritsen, Henk S.P.; Xiu-Cheng Fan, Alex; Lenz, Daniela; Hannig, Horst; Yan Zhong, Xiao; Geffers, Robert; Lindenmaier, Werner; Dittmar, Kurt E.J.; Wörmann, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    Summary Serology, defined as antibody-based diagnostics, has been regarded as the diagnostic gold standard in transfusion medicine. Nowadays however the impact of molecular diagnostics in transfusion medicine is rapidly growing. Molecular diagnostics can improve tissue typing (HLA typing), increase safety of blood products (NAT testing of infectious diseases), and enable blood group typing in difficult situations (after transfusion of blood products or prenatal non-invasive RhD typing). Most of the molecular testing involves the determination of the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Antigens (e.g. blood group antigens) mostly result from single nucleotide differences in critical positions. However, most blood group systems cannot be determined by looking at a single SNP. To identify members of a blood group system a number of critical SNPs have to be taken into account. The platforms which are currently used to perform molecular diagnostics are mostly gel-based, requiring time-consuming multiple manual steps. To implement molecular methods in transfusion medicine in the future the development of higher-throughput SNP genotyping non-gel-based platforms which allow a rapid, cost-effective screening are essential. Because of its potential for automation, high throughput and cost effectiveness the special focus of this paper is a relative new technique: SNP genotyping by MALDI-TOF MS analysis. PMID:21113259

  2. Comparison of different platelet transfusion thresholds prior to insertion of central lines in patients with thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Desborough, Michael; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Doree, Carolyn; Stanworth, Simon

    2015-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effects of different platelet transfusion thresholds prior to the insertion of a central line in patients with thrombocytopenia (low platelet count). PMID:26627708

  3. 75 FR 22817 - Emerging Infectious Diseases: Evaluation to Implementation for Transfusion and Transplantation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... Transfusion and Transplantation Safety and Quantitative Risk Assessment: Blood Safety and Availability; Public...-day workshop; the purpose is to review the scientific principles of risk assessment and to discuss the role of risk assessment in the regulatory process, specifically as it relates to blood safety...

  4. Washing older blood units before transfusion reduces plasma iron and improves outcomes in experimental canine pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Sun, Junfeng; Solomon, Steven B.; Remy, Kenneth E.; Fernandez, Melinda; Feng, Jing; Kanias, Tamir; Bellavia, Landon; Sinchar, Derek; Perlegas, Andreas; Solomon, Michael A.; Kelley, Walter E.; Popovsky, Mark A.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Klein, Harvey G.; Natanson, Charles

    2014-01-01

    In a randomized controlled blinded trial, 2-year-old purpose-bred beagles (n = 24), with Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia, were exchanged-transfused with either 7- or 42-day-old washed or unwashed canine universal donor blood (80 mL/kg in 4 divided doses). Washing red cells (RBC) before transfusion had a significantly different effect on canine survival, multiple organ injury, plasma iron, and cell-free hemoglobin (CFH) levels depending on the age of stored blood (all, P < .05 for interactions). Washing older units of blood improved survival rates, shock score, lung injury, cardiac performance and liver function, and reduced levels of non-transferrin bound iron and plasma labile iron. In contrast, washing fresh blood worsened all these same clinical parameters and increased CFH levels. Our data indicate that transfusion of fresh blood, which results in less hemolysis, CFH, and iron release, is less toxic than transfusion of older blood in critically ill infected subjects. However, washing older blood prevented elevations in plasma circulating iron and improved survival and multiple organ injury in animals with an established pulmonary infection. Our data suggest that fresh blood should not be washed routinely because, in a setting of established infection, washed RBC are prone to release CFH and result in worsened clinical outcomes. PMID:24366359

  5. Increasing Patient Safety and Efficiency in Transfusion Therapy Using Formal Process Definitions

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    , Food and Drug Administration) and professional healthcare organizations (eg, Joint Commission place patients at elevated risk in the clinical setting. Much of the emphasis in transfusion safety has at elevated risk in the clinical setting. Despite regulatory and accreditation oversight by govern- mental (eg

  6. Concise Review: Stem Cell-Derived Erythrocytes as Upcoming Players in Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Zeuner, Ann; Martelli, Fabrizio; Vaglio, Stefania; Federici, Giulia; Whitsett, Carolyn; Migliaccio, Anna Rita

    2013-01-01

    Blood transfusions have become indispensable to treat the anemia associated with a variety of medical conditions ranging from genetic disorders and cancer to extensive surgical procedures. In developed countries, the blood supply is generally adequate. However, the projected decline in blood donor availability due to population ageing and the difficulty in finding rare blood types for alloimmunized patients indicate a need for alternative red blood cell (RBC) transfusion products. Increasing knowledge of processes that govern erythropoiesis has been translated into efficient procedures to produce RBC ex vivo using primary hematopoietic stem cells, embryonic stem cells, or induced pluripotent stem cells. Although in vitro-generated RBCs have recently entered clinical evaluation, several issues related to ex vivo RBC production are still under intense scrutiny: among those are the identification of stem cell sources more suitable for ex vivo RBC generation, the translation of RBC culture methods into clinical grade production processes, and the development of protocols to achieve maximal RBC quality, quantity, and maturation. Data on size, hemoglobin, and blood group antigen expression and phosphoproteomic profiling obtained on erythroid cells expanded ex vivo from a limited number of donors are presented as examples of the type of measurements that should be performed as part of the quality control to assess the suitability of these cells for transfusion. New technologies for ex vivo erythroid cell generation will hopefully provide alternative transfusion products to meet present and future clinical requirements. PMID:22644674

  7. Adults who refuse blood transfusion in emergency, urgent and elective circumstances.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, R

    2014-11-01

    Surgeons dealing with an adult refusing a blood transfusion find themselves in an unenviable position, torn between wishing to preserve the patient's life while also respecting his or her wishes. This article looks at the legal framework for such circumstances as set out in the Mental Capacity Act 2005. PMID:25350175

  8. Scotblood 2012: transfusion/transplant medicine in the 2nd decade of the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Colligan, David; McGowan, Neil; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2013-06-01

    Transfusion medicine is a technology-based discipline, undergoing continual changes for improvement. It requires staff at all levels to be continually educated and trained in appropriate multidisciplinary skills, in line with the rapid developments in all areas of transfusion practice: from blood/organ collection, through processing and storage to the more advanced cellular and hospital-based transfusion/transplantation therapies. Whilst the majority of the challenges to improve hospital and general transfusion practice can be overcome through team work, education, timely objectives and perseverance, it is important to envisage opportunities for implementing digital technologies to reduce all of the applicable hazards associated with transfusion. These can vary widely from new and emerging pathogens to limitations of supply due to growing demographic changes in populations. In the first decade of 21st century we have already witnessed unprecedented advances in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation to minimise the toxicities of graft versus host disease (GvHD), and in cell therapy to explore immunotherapy against cancer and other malignant disorders. Today there are 1000 genome project hapmaps that only the extreme cost of their implementation to routine practices may limit. Transfusion medicine, like all disciplines of medicine, nevertheless, will face difficult choices between increasing healthcare technology and increasing worldwide health. Drs. Colligan and McGowan, the new lead organisers of this wonderful yearly educational programme have agreed to follow the previous organisers' strategy to make a summary report of their meeting to become available, through TRASCI to broader interested groups, with the sprit that "sharing is caring". The main highlights of the 2012 conference were: targeting transfusion practices in hospital, a continuing journey; emerging infections and the potential causes and possible remedial actions; building for the future; the challenging issues of donor recruitment/retention; and finally; the application of Information Technology as a decision making tool, utilising clinical audit monitoring to evaluate good practice. This year's conference also coincided with the retirement of Martin Bruce OBE, after his 41years distinguished career, who gave the most delightful and humorous talk of a" life time of learning" which delighted all the participants. Finally, 2012 also marked the retirements of the previous lead Scotblood organisers Prof. Robin Fraser and Dr. Hagop Bessos after over thirty years service to SNBTS, and to whom we would like to dedicate this meeting report and wish them a happy and healthy retirement. This commentary comprises summaries of the presentations, based in part on the abstracts provided by the speakers. PMID:23643474

  9. Risk for transfusion-transmitted infectious diseases in Central and South America.

    PubMed

    Schmunis, G A; Zicker, F; Pinheiro, F; Brandling-Bennett, D

    1998-01-01

    We report the potential risk for an infectious disease through tainted transfusion in 10 countries of South and Central America in 1993 and in two countries of South America in 1994, as well as the cost of reagents as partial estimation of screening costs. Of the 12 countries included in the study, nine screened all donors for HIV; three screened all donors for hepatitis B virus (HBV); two screened all donors for Trypanosoma cruzi; none screened all donors for hepatitis C virus (HCV); and six screened some donors for syphilis. Estimates of the risk of acquiring HIV through blood transfusion were much lower than for acquiring HBV, HCV, or T. cruzi because of significantly higher screening and lower prevalence.rates for HIV. An index of infectious disease spread through blood transfusion was calculated for each country. The highest value was obtained for Bolivia (233 infections per 10,000 transfusions); in five other countries, it was 68 to 103 infections per 10,000. The risks were lower in Honduras (nine per 10,000), Ecuador (16 per 10,000), and Paraguay (19 per 10,000). While the real number of potentially infected units or infected persons is probably lower than our estimates because of false positives and already infected recipients, the data reinforce the need for an information system to assess the level of screening for infectious diseases in the blood supply. Since this information was collected, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, and Venezuela have made HCV screening mandatory; serologic testing for HCV has increased in those countries, as well as in El Salvador and Honduras. T. cruzi screening is now mandatory in Colombia, and the percentage of screened donors increased not only in Colombia, but also in Ecuador, El Salvador, and Paraguay. Laws to regulate blood transfusion practices have been enacted in Bolivia, Guatemala, and Peru. However, donor screening still needs to improve for one or more diseases in most countries. PMID:9452393

  10. Plasma Free Hemoglobin and Microcirculatory Response to Fresh or Old Blood Transfusions in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Elisa; Adrario, Erica; Luchetti, Michele Maria; Scorcella, Claudia; Carsetti, Andrea; Mininno, Nicoletta; Pierantozzi, Silvia; Principi, Tiziana; Strovegli, Daniele; Bencivenga, Rosella; Gabrielli, Armando; Romano, Rocco; Pelaia, Paolo; Ince, Can; Donati, Abele

    2015-01-01

    Background Free hemoglobin (fHb) may induce vasoconstriction by scavenging nitric oxide. It may increase in older blood units due to storage lesions. This study evaluated whether old red blood cell transfusion increases plasma fHb in sepsis and how the microvascular response may be affected. Methods This is a secondary analysis of a randomized study. Twenty adult septic patients received either fresh or old (<10 or >15 days storage, respectively) RBC transfusions. fHb was measured in RBC units and in the plasma before and 1 hour after transfusion. Simultaneously, the sublingual microcirculation was assessed with sidestream-dark field imaging. The perfused boundary region was calculated as an index of glycocalyx damage. Tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) and Hb index (THI) were measured with near-infrared spectroscopy and a vascular occlusion test was performed. Results Similar fHb levels were found in the supernatant of fresh and old RBC units. Despite this, plasma fHb increased in the old RBC group after transfusion (from 0.125 [0.098–0.219] mg/mL to 0.238 [0.163–0.369] mg/mL, p = 0.006). The sublingual microcirculation was unaltered in both groups, while THI increased. The change in plasma fHb was inversely correlated with the changes in total vessel density (r = -0.57 [95% confidence interval -0.82, -0.16], p = 0.008), De Backer score (r = -0.63 [95% confidence interval -0.84, -0.25], p = 0.003) and THI (r = -0.72 [95% confidence interval -0.88, -0.39], p = 0.0003). Conclusions Old RBC transfusion was associated with an increase in plasma fHb in septic patients. Increasing plasma fHb levels were associated with decreased microvascular density. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01584999 PMID:25932999

  11. Prophylactic transfusion for pregnant women with sickle cell disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Ann Kinga; Shehata, Nadine; D'Souza, Rohan; Kuo, Kevin H M; Ward, Richard; Shah, Prakesh S; Murphy, Kellie

    2015-11-19

    Pregnancy in women with sickle cell disease is associated with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. Studies assessing the effects of prophylactic red blood cell transfusions on these outcomes have drawn inconsistent conclusions. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effect of prophylactic compared with on-demand red blood cell transfusions on maternal and neonatal outcomes in women with sickle cell disease. A systematic search of several medical literature databases was conducted. Twelve studies involving 1291 participants met inclusion criteria. The studies had moderate to high risk of bias. Meta-analysis demonstrated that prophylactic transfusion was associated with a reduction in maternal mortality (7 studies, 955 participants; odds ratio [OR], 0.23; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.06-0.91), vaso-occlusive pain episodes (11 studies, 1219 participants; OR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.09-0.76), pulmonary complications (9 studies, 1019 participants; OR, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.09-0.72), pulmonary embolism (3 studies, 237 participants; OR, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.01-0.41), pyelonephritis (6 studies, 455 participants; OR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.07-0.51), perinatal mortality (8 studies, 1140 participants; OR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.19-0.99), neonatal death (5 studies, 374 participants; OR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.07-0.93), and preterm birth (9 studies, 1123 participants; OR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.37-0.96). Event rates for most of the results were low. Prophylactic transfusions may positively impact several adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes in women with sickle cell disease; however, the evidence stems from a relatively small number of studies with methodologic limitations. A prospective, multicenter, randomized trial is needed to determine whether the potential benefits balance the risks of prophylactic transfusions. PMID:26302758

  12. Transfusion-dependent low-risk myelodysplastic patients receiving deferasirox: Long-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    IMPROTA, SALVATORE; VILLA, MARIA ROSARIA; VOLPE, ANTONIO; LOMBARDI, ANGELA; STIUSO, PAOLA; CANTORE, NICOLA; MASTRULLO, LUCIA

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) are characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis that results in peripheral cytopenias. Anemia is the most common symptom of MDS and the majority of patients become transfusion-dependent with the risk of iron overload, which may lead to cardiac, hepatic and endocrine complications. Deferasirox is an orally available iron chelator administered once-daily in transfusion-dependent patients with various chronic anemias. Its efficacy has been established in controlled clinical trials. In the present study, we describe our experience with 55 consecutive MDS patients [International Prognostic Scoring System risk score of low (n=32) or intermediate-1 (n=23)] treated with deferasirox in a routine clinical setting following Consensus Guidelines on Iron Chelation Therapy. According to WHO classifications, patients had refractory anemia (n=30), refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts (n=16), refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (n=8) or refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia and ringed sideroblasts (n=1). The median monthly transfusion requirement at baseline was 3 units. Patients received a starting dosage of 10 mg/kg/day, subsequently titrated according to serum ferritin (SF) levels which were measured monthly. Safety assessment included monitoring of liver and renal parameters and recording adverse events (AE) during treatment. At the baseline, the mean ± SD SF level was 2,362±172 ng/ml and after 24 months, the mean ± SD decrease in SF was 1,679±209 ng/ml. Sixteen patients had sustained hematological improvement meeting International Working Group 2006 criteria. One patient became transfusion-independent. No severe AE were reported. In conclusion, deferasirox therapy was effective and safe in reducing transfusional iron overload and it reduces transfusion requirement in a subset of patients. PMID:24260074

  13. Thyroid hormone alterations in trauma patients requiring massive transfusion: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Hifumi, Toru; Okada, Ichiro; Kiriu, Nobuaki; Hasegawa, Eiju; Ogasawara, Tomoko; Kato, Hiroshi; Koido, Yuichi; Inoue, Junichi; Abe, Yuko; Kawakita, Kenya; Hagiike, Masanobu; Kuroda, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is considered a negative prognostic factor, the alterations in free triiodothyronine (fT3) levels in trauma patients requiring massive transfusion have not been reported. METHODS: A prospective observational study comparing 2 groups of trauma patients was conducted. Group M comprised trauma patients requiring massive transfusions (>10 units of packed red blood cells) within 24 hours of emergency admission. Group C comprised patients with an injury severity score >9 but not requiring massive transfusions. Levels of fT3, free thyroxine (fT4), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) were evaluated on admission and on days 1, 2, and 7 after admission. The clinical backgrounds and variables measured including total transfusion amounts were compared and the inter-group prognosis was evaluated. Results are presented as mean±standard deviation. RESULTS: Nineteen patients were enrolled in each group. In both groups, 32 were men, and the mean age was 50±24 years. In group C one patient died from respiratory failure. The initial fT3 levels in group M (1.95±0.37 pg/mL) were significantly lower than those in group C (2.49±0.72 pg/mL; P<0.01) and remained low until 1 week after admission. Initial inter-group fT4 and TSH levels were not significantly different. TSH levels at 1 week (1.99±1.64 µIU/mL) were higher than at admission (1.48±0.5 µIU/mL) in group C (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: Typical NTIS was observed in trauma patients requiring massive transfusions. When initial resuscitation achieved circulatory stabilization, prognosis was not strongly associated with NTIS. PMID:25548600

  14. Blood Loss and Transfusion After Topical Tranexamic Acid Administration in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Shen, Bin; Zeng, Yi

    2015-11-01

    There has been much debate and controversy about the safety and efficacy of the topical use of tranexamic acid in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to perform a meta-analysis to evaluate whether there is less blood loss and lower rates of transfusion after topical tranexamic acid administration in primary TKA. A systematic review of the electronic databases PubMed, CENTRAL, Web of Science, and Embase was undertaken. All randomized, controlled trials and prospective cohort studies evaluating the effectiveness of topical tranexamic acid during primary TKA were included. The focus of the analysis was on the outcomes of blood loss results, transfusion rate, and thromboembolic complications. Subgroup analysis was performed when possible. Of 387 studies identified, 16 comprising 1421 patients (1481 knees) were eligible for data extraction and meta-analysis. This study indicated that when compared with the control group, topical application of tranexamic acid significantly reduced total drain output (mean difference, -227.20; 95% confidence interval, -347.11 to -107.30; P<.00001), total blood loss (mean difference, -311.28; 95% confidence interval, -404.94 to -217.62; P<.00001), maximum postoperative hemoglobin decrease (mean difference, -0.73; 95% confidence interval, -0.96 to -0.50; P<.00001), and blood transfusion requirements (risk ratios, 0.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.24 to 0.43; P=.14). The authors found a statistically significant reduction in blood loss and transfusion rates when using topical tranexamic acid in primary TKA. Furthermore, the currently available evidence does not support an increased risk of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism due to tranexamic acid administration. Topical tranexamic acid was effective for reducing postoperative blood loss and transfusion requirements without increasing the prevalence of thromboembolic complications. [Orthopedics. 2015; 38(11):e1007-e1016.]. PMID:26558665

  15. Reversible Deformation of Transfusion Tracheids in Taxus baccata Is Associated with a Reversible Decrease in Leaf Hydraulic Conductance1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Jiang; Rockwell, Fulton E.; Wheeler, James K.; Holbrook, N. Michele

    2014-01-01

    Declines in leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf) with increasing water stress have been attributed to cavitation of the leaf xylem. However, in the leaves of conifers, the reversible collapse of transfusion tracheids may provide an alternative explanation. Using Taxus baccata, a conifer species without resin, we developed a modified rehydration technique that allows the separation of declines in Kleaf into two components: one reversible and one irreversible upon relaxation of water potential to ?1 MPa. We surveyed leaves at a range of water potentials for evidence of cavitation using cryo-scanning electron microscopy and quantified dehydration-induced structural changes in transfusion tracheids by cryo-fluorescence microscopy. Irreversible declines in Kleaf did not occur until leaf water potentials were more negative than ?3 MPa. Declines in Kleaf between ?2 and ?3 MPa were reversible and accompanied by the collapse of transfusion tracheids, as evidenced by cryo-fluorescence microscopy. Based on cryo-scanning electron microscopy, cavitation of either transfusion or xylem tracheids did not contribute to declines in Kleaf in the reversible range. Moreover, the deformation of transfusion tracheids was quickly reversible, thus acting as a circuit breaker regulating the flux of water through the leaf vasculature. As transfusion tissue is present in all gymnosperms, the reversible collapse of transfusion tracheids may be a general mechanism in this group for the protection of leaf xylem from excessive loads generated in the living leaf tissue. PMID:24948828

  16. Failure of Clindamycin To Eradicate Infection with Beta-Hemolytic Streptococci Inducibly Resistant to Clindamycin in an Animal Model and in Human Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, James S.; Lepak, Alex J.; Thompson, George R.; Craig, William A.; Andes, David R.; Sabol-Dzintars, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Inducible clindamycin resistance in beta-hemolytic streptococci remains an underrecognized phenomenon of unknown clinical significance. We performed an evaluation of inducible clindamycin resistance using an animal model as well as retrospectively reviewing the charts of patients treated with clindamycin monotherapy who were infected with beta-hemolytic streptococci inducibly resistant to clindamycin. The neutropenic mouse thigh model of infection was used to evaluate the in vivo activity of clindamycin against beta-hemolytic streptococci, including isolates susceptible, inducibly resistant, or constitutively resistant to clindamycin. The clinical microbiology laboratory information system and pharmacy databases were cross-referenced to identify patients with infections due to inducibly clindamycin-resistant beta-hemolytic streptococci who were treated with clindamycin monotherapy. Medical records of these patients were reviewed to evaluate microbiologic and clinical outcomes. Inducible clindamycin resistance resulted in impaired killing of beta-hemolytic streptococci in the animal model. Though suppressed initially, compared to those with constitutive resistance (P = 0.0429), by 48 h, colony counts of inducibly clindamycin-resistant organisms were similar to those of constitutively resistant isolates (P = 0.1142). In addition, we identified 8 patients infected with inducibly clindamycin-resistant beta-hemolytic streptococci who experienced clinical and microbiologic failure when treated with clindamycin monotherapy. These patients either improved initially and subsequently failed or never responded to clindamycin therapy. We have demonstrated in a murine model of infection and from human cases that inducible clindamycin resistance in beta-hemolytic streptococci is clinically significant. Routine testing and reporting by clinical laboratories should be encouraged and alternative antimicrobial agents considered when these organisms are encountered in clinical care. PMID:24323478

  17. Acute arsine intoxication as a consequence of metal burnishing operations.

    PubMed

    Romeo, L; Apostoli, P; Kovacic, M; Martini, S; Brugnone, F

    1997-09-01

    The report concerns a 30-year-old factory worker, employed in a small galvanizing plant for over ten years in the burnishing, copper- and nickel-plating of small metal articles for the shoe industry. Acute arsine poisoning was attributed to the use of a dilute solution of CuSO4 (3%), HCl (32%), and As2O3 (2%) for burnishing metal (Fe-Zn) shoelace eyelet holes, in the absence of local exhaust ventilation and with no respiratory protection. Arsine caused severe intravascular hemolysis with a rapid drop in hematocrit and hemoglobin levels. Other body organs were involved as a result of the hypoxic effect of anemia and hemolysis, or as a direct toxic effect of the arsine itself. Our experience confirms that exchange transfusion is capable of rapidly arresting the adverse effects of arsine. The importance of preventive measures and worker information to avoid acute arsine poisoning is emphasized. PMID:9219649

  18. Granulocyte transfusions for preventing infections in people with neutropenia or neutrophil dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Stanworth, Simon; Doree, Carolyn; Blanco, Patricia; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Massey, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite modern antimicrobials and supportive therapy, bacterial and fungal infections are still major complications in people with prolonged disease-related or therapy-related neutropenia. Since the late 1990s there has been increasing demand for donated granulocyte transfusions to treat or prevent severe infections in people who lack their own functional granulocytes. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2009. Objectives To determine the effectiveness and safety of prophylactic granulocyte transfusions compared with a control population not receiving this intervention for preventing all-cause mortality, mortality due to infection, and evidence of infection due to infection or due to any other cause in people with neutropenia or disorders of neutrophil function. Search methods We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 3), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), CINAHL (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980) and ongoing trial databases to April 20 2015. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs comparing people receiving granulocyte transfusions to prevent the development of infection with a control group receiving no granulocyte transfusions. Neonates are the subject of another Cochrane review and were excluded from this review. There was no restriction by outcomes examined, but this review focuses on mortality, mortality due to infection and adverse events. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Main results Twelve trials met the inclusion criteria. One trial is still ongoing, leaving a total of 11 trials eligible involving 653 participants. These trials were conducted between 1978 and 2006 and enrolled participants from fairly comparable patient populations. None of the studies included people with neutrophil dysfunction. Ten studies included only adults, and two studies included children and adults. Ten of these studies contained separate data for each arm and were able to be critically appraised. One study re-randomised people and therefore quantitative analysis was unable to be performed. Overall, the quality of the evidence was very low to low across different outcomes according to GRADE methodology. This was due to many of the studies being at high risk of bias, and many of the outcome estimates being imprecise. All-cause mortality was reported for nine studies (609 participants). There was no difference in all-cause mortality over 30 days between people receiving prophylactic granulocyte transfusions and those that did not (seven studies; 437 participants; RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.63 to 1.36, very low-quality evidence). Mortality due to infection was reported for seven studies (398 participants). There was no difference in mortality due to infection over 30 days between people receiving prophylactic granulocyte transfusions and those that did not (six studies; 286 participants; RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.33 to 1.44, very low-quality evidence). The number of people with localised or systemic bacterial or fungal infections was reported for nine studies (609 participants). There were differences between the granulocyte dose subgroups (test for subgroup differences P = 0.01). There was no difference in the number of people with infections over 30 days between people receiving prophylactic granulocyte transfusions and those that did not in the low-dose granulocyte group (< 1.0 × 1010 granulocytes per day) (four studies, 204 participants; RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.58 to 1.20; very low-quality evidence). There was a decreased number of people with infections over 30 days in the people receiving prophylactic granulocyte transfusions in the intermediate-dose granulocyte group (1.0 × 1010 to 4.0 × 1010 granulocytes per day) (4 studies; 293 participants; RR 0.40, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.63, low-quality evidence). There was a decreased number of participants with bacteraemia and fu

  19. Acute Liver Failure in a Pediatric Patient with Congenital Dysery-Thropoietic Anemia Type I Treated with Deferasirox

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Galina; Pinsk, Vered; Golan-Tripto, Inbal; Ling, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDA) represent a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by morphological abnormalities of erythroid precursor cells and various degrees of hemolysis. Iron overload is a result of continuous hemolysis and recurrent transfusions. It is treated with iron chelators, including deferasirox. We present here a case of acute liver failure in a 12 years old girl with CDA type I treated with deferasirox and discuss the approach to treatment. PMID:26487935

  20. Acute Liver Failure in a Pediatric Patient with Congenital Dysery-Thropoietic Anemia Type I Treated with Deferasirox.

    PubMed

    Ling, Galina; Pinsk, Vered; Golan-Tripto, Inbal; Ling, Eduard

    2015-09-23

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDA) represent a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by morphological abnormalities of erythroid precursor cells and various degrees of hemolysis. Iron overload is a result of continuous hemolysis and recurrent transfusions. It is treated with iron chelators, including deferasirox. We present here a case of acute liver failure in a 12 years old girl with CDA type I treated with deferasirox and discuss the approach to treatment. PMID:26487935

  1. Successful treatment of invasive zygomycosis based on a prompt diagnosis using molecular methods in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yuda, Junichiro; Kato, Koji; Kikushige, Yoshikane; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Kiyosuke, Makiko; Sakamoto, Keiji; Oku, Seido; Miyake, Noriko; Kadowaki, Masako; Iino, Tadafumi; Tanimoto, Kazuki; Takenaka, Katsuto; Iwasaki, Hiromi; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Shimono, Nobuyuki; Teshima, Takanori; Akashi, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Zygomycosis is a lethal and invasive mold infection that is often associated with hematological malignancies. The keys for successful treatment include making a rapid diagnosis and appropriately administering antifungal agents. We herein report the early diagnosis of a case of zygomycosis in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia using a deoxyribonucleic acid sequence analysis. We successfully performed allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with the use of high-dose liposomal amphotericin B and granulocyte transfusion. PMID:24827491

  2. Case report: Benefits and challenges of long-term eculizumab in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cullinan, Noelle; Gorman, Kathleen Mary; Riordan, Michael; Waldron, Mary; Goodship, Timothy H J; Awan, Atif

    2015-06-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is caused by dysregulation of the complement system, leading to complement overactivation. A humanized anti-C5 monoclonal antibody, eculizumab, has been available for the treatment of aHUS since 2011. The long-term safety and efficacy of this novel drug in the pediatric population remain under review. We present a child with a hybrid CFH/CFHR3 gene who, having had multiple disease relapses despite optimal treatment with plasma exchange, commenced eculizumab therapy in August 2010. She remains relapse free in follow-up at 52 months, and treatment has been well tolerated. The risk of meningococcal disease during this treatment is recognized. Despite vaccination against meningococcal disease and appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis, our patient developed meningococcal bacteremia 30 months into treatment. She presented with nonspecific symptoms but recovered without sequelae with appropriate treatment. We recommend that children be vaccinated against invasive meningococcal infection before beginning eculizumab therapy and take appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis during treatment, and we suggest that vaccine responses should be checked and followed annually. Clinicians need to maintain a high index of suspicion for invasive meningococcal disease. Neither vaccination nor antibiotic prophylaxis provides complete protection in patients on eculizumab therapy. The appropriate dosage of eculizumab needed to achieve remission in aHUS in the pediatric population is unknown. Having achieved remission in our patient, we monitor eculizumab and CH50 levels to evaluate ongoing blockade of the terminal complement cascade. Such information may help guide dosing intervals in the future. PMID:25941307

  3. Priming dose of phenylhydrazine protects against hemolytic and lethal effects of 2-butoxyethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Palkar, Prajakta S.; Philip, Binu K.; Reddy, Ramesh N.; Mehendale, Harihara M.

    2007-11-15

    Protection against a high dose of a toxicant by prior exposure to another toxicant is called heteroprotection. Our objective was to establish a heteroprotection model in RBCs. Female Sprague Dawley rats treated with an LD90 dose of 2-butoxyethanol (BE, 1500 mg/kg in water, 5 ml/kg po) 14 days after priming with 0.9% NaCl suffered 90% mortality by 15 days, whereas all rats receiving the LD90 dose of BE 14 days after priming with phenylhydrazine (PHZ, 125 mg/kg in 0.9% NaCl, 3 ml/kg po) survived. Hematocrit decreased from normal 45% to 24% by day 3 after PHZ priming and improved thereafter. Increasing the time interval between the priming and LD90 dose to 21 days abolished the heteroprotection. RBCs obtained on days 7 and 14 after PHZ priming unlike those on day 21 were resilient to the hemotoxic metabolite of BE, butoxyacetic acid (BAA). Unaltered hepatic alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities upon PHZ priming suggested that bioactivation of BE to BAA was unaffected. Lower renal (6 and 12 h) and hepatic (12 h) BAA levels and 3 fold higher excretion of BAA in PHZ-primed rat urine suggested a protective role of toxicokinetics. Higher erythropoietin, reticulocytes, and resiliency of PHZ-primed rat RBCs indicated that newly formed RBCs are resilient to hemolytic BAA. The antioxidant levels in the PHZ-primed rat RBCs did not indicate a protective role in heteroprotection. In conclusion, the resistance of PHZ-primed rats against BE-induced hemotoxicity and lethality is mediated by a combination of altered toxicokinetics, robust erythropoiesis, and resiliency of new RBCs.

  4. Dogs cast NETs too: Canine neutrophil extracellular traps in health and immune-mediated hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Unity; Kimura, Kayoko; Gray, Robert; Lueth, Paul; Bellaire, Bryan; LeVine, Dana

    2015-12-15

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are webs of DNA and protein with both anti-microbial and pro-thrombotic properties which have not been previously reported in dogs. To confirm dog neutrophils can form NETs, neutrophils were isolated from healthy dogs, and stimulated in vitro with 2?M, 8?M, 31?M, and 125?M platelet activating factor (PAF) or 0.03?M, 0.1?M, 0.4?M, 1.6?M and 6.4?M phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). Extracellular DNA was measured using the cell impermeable dye Sytox Green every hour for 4h. At 4h, extracellular DNA was significantly greater than non-stimulated cells at concentrations ?31?M and ?0.1?M for PAF and PMA, respectively. Cells stimulated with 31.25?M PAF reached maximal fluorescence by 1h, whereas maximal fluorescence was not achieved until 2h for cells stimulated with 0.1?M PMA. Immunofluorescent imaging using DAPI and anti-elastase antibody confirmed that extracellular DNA is released as NETs. As NETs have been implicated in thrombosis, nucleosomes, a marker correlated with NET formation, were measured in the serum of dogs with the thrombotic disorder primary immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) (n=7) and healthy controls (n=20) using a commercially available ELISA. NETs were significantly higher in IMHA cases than controls (median 0.12 and 0.90, respectively, p=0.01), but there were large positive interferences associated with hemolysis and icterus. In summary, the study is the first to describe NET generation by canine neutrophils and provides preliminary evidence that a marker associated with NETs is elevated in IMHA. However, this apparent elevation must be interpreted with caution due to the effect of interference, emphasizing the need for a more specific and robust assay for NETs in clinical samples. PMID:26574161

  5. Combined Complement Gene Mutations in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Influence Clinical Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Bresin, Elena; Rurali, Erica; Caprioli, Jessica; Sanchez-Corral, Pilar; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Rodriguez de Cordoba, Santiago; Pinto, Sheila; Goodship, Timothy H.J.; Alberti, Marta; Ribes, David; Valoti, Elisabetta; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Several abnormalities in complement genes reportedly contribute to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), but incomplete penetrance suggests that additional factors are necessary for the disease to manifest. Here, we sought to describe genotype–phenotype correlations among patients with combined mutations, defined as mutations in more than one complement gene. We screened 795 patients with aHUS and identified single mutations in 41% and combined mutations in 3%. Only 8%–10% of patients with mutations in CFH, C3, or CFB had combined mutations, whereas approximately 25% of patients with mutations in MCP or CFI had combined mutations. The concomitant presence of CFH and MCP risk haplotypes significantly increased disease penetrance in combined mutated carriers, with 73% penetrance among carriers with two risk haplotypes compared with 36% penetrance among carriers with zero or one risk haplotype. Among patients with CFH or CFI mutations, the presence of mutations in other genes did not modify prognosis; in contrast, 50% of patients with combined MCP mutation developed end stage renal failure within 3 years from onset compared with 19% of patients with an isolated MCP mutation. Patients with combined mutations achieved remission with plasma treatment similar to patients with single mutations. Kidney transplant outcomes were worse, however, for patients with combined MCP mutation compared with an isolated MCP mutation. In summary, these data suggest that genotyping for the risk haplotypes in CFH and MCP may help predict the risk of developing aHUS in unaffected carriers of mutations. Furthermore, screening patients with aHUS for all known disease-associated genes may inform decisions about kidney transplantation. PMID:23431077

  6. Genetics and Outcome of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: A Nationwide French Series Comparing Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fremeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Fakhouri, Fadi; Garnier, Arnaud; Bienaimé, Frank; Dragon-Durey, Marie-Agnès; Ngo, Stéphanie; Moulin, Bruno; Servais, Aude; Provot, François; Rostaing, Lionel; Burtey, Stéphane; Niaudet, Patrick; Deschênes, Georges; Lebranchu, Yvon; Zuber, Julien; Loirat, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare complement-mediated kidney disease that was first recognized in children but also affects adults. This study assessed the disease presentation and outcome in a nationwide cohort of patients with aHUS according to the age at onset and the underlying complement abnormalities. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A total of 214 patients with aHUS were enrolled between 2000 and 2008 and screened for mutations in the six susceptibility factors for aHUS and for anti–factor H antibodies. Results Onset of aHUS occurred as frequently during adulthood (58.4%) as during childhood (41.6%). The percentages of patients who developed the disease were 23%, 40%, 70%, and 98% by age 2, 18, 40, and 60 years, respectively. Mortality was higher in children than in adults (6.7% versus 0.8% at 1 year) (P=0.02), but progression to ESRD after the first aHUS episode was more frequent in adults (46% versus 16%; P<0.001). Sixty-one percent of patients had mutations in their complement genes. The renal outcome was not significantly different in adults regardless of genetic background. Only membrane cofactor protein (MCP) and undetermined aHUS were less severe in children than adults. The frequency of relapse after 1 year was 92% in children with MCP-associated HUS and approximately 30% in all other subgroups. Conclusion Mortality rate was higher in children than adults with aHUS, but renal prognosis was worse in adults than children. In children, the prognosis strongly depends on the genetic background. PMID:23307876

  7. Joint effusions and purpura in multiply-transfused adult beta-thalassemia- clinical pointers to diagnosis of scurvy.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A; Pandey, A K

    2013-01-01

    Periodic transfusions and effective chelation have ensured that thalassemics survive in to adulthood but their life is punctuated by peculiar problems in adulthood. Three cases of scurvy are being reported presenting uniquely as purpura, right hip joint effusion and right knee joint effusion with haemorrhage in prepatellar and retropatellar bursae, respectively over an 18 month period (2009-2010). The first two cases did give a history of gum bleed. None had any coagulation disturbance or transfusion-transmitted infections or connective tissue disorder. All the three cases responded dramatically to vitamin C supplementation. It is imperative to keep in mind that recurrent blood transfusions are associated with a state of subclinical vitamin C deficiency and overt scurvy may manifest as cumulative number of transfusions increase, as in adult thalassemics. PMID:24899338

  8. Benefits and Barriers of Implementation and Utilization of Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) Systems in Transfusion Medicine.

    PubMed

    Coustasse, Alberto; Cunningham, Brian; Deslich, Stacie; Willson, Eric; Meadows, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology is used by hospital supply chains to track medical products and monitor inventories. Hospitals have also begun incorporating RFID technology as part of their transfusion processes. The purpose of this review was to analyze how healthcare organization supply chains can benefit from the utilization of RFID systems in transfusion service departments. The methodology for this study was a literature review following the steps of a systematic review with a total of 52 sources referenced. RFID technology is used to manage and track blood products from the initial donor phlebotomy to final disposition or product transfusion. RFID-enabled transfusion practices have successfully increased provider productivity and product quality through work-time reduction and error reduction. Findings of this research study suggest that RFID has provided improvements in quality of care and efficiency, while initial costs, security, and privacy appear to be the principal barriers to adoption. PMID:26396555

  9. Blood, sweat and tears : a case study of the development of cultured red blood cells for transfusion 

    E-print Network

    King, Emma Katharine

    2013-11-27

    This thesis is an in-depth case study of an interdisciplinary, paradigm breaking, research team who are seeking to develop cultured red blood cells (RBCs) for transfusion using stem cells (known as the BloodPharma project). ...

  10. Benefits and Barriers of Implementation and Utilization of Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) Systems in Transfusion Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Coustasse, Alberto; Cunningham, Brian; Deslich, Stacie; Willson, Eric; Meadows, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology is used by hospital supply chains to track medical products and monitor inventories. Hospitals have also begun incorporating RFID technology as part of their transfusion processes. The purpose of this review was to analyze how healthcare organization supply chains can benefit from the utilization of RFID systems in transfusion service departments. The methodology for this study was a literature review following the steps of a systematic review with a total of 52 sources referenced. RFID technology is used to manage and track blood products from the initial donor phlebotomy to final disposition or product transfusion. RFID-enabled transfusion practices have successfully increased provider productivity and product quality through work-time reduction and error reduction. Findings of this research study suggest that RFID has provided improvements in quality of care and efficiency, while initial costs, security, and privacy appear to be the principal barriers to adoption. PMID:26396555

  11. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this page Print this page Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a fast-growing cancer of a type ... that your body needs. Tweet Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Transplant outcomes for ALL Initial treatment of ALL ...

  12. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePLUS

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, especially younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  13. Successful Implementation of a Packed Red Blood Cell and Fresh Frozen Plasma Transfusion Protocol in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianyi; Lanz, Jennifer; Davis, Ruth; Rebel, Annette; Vanzant, Erin; Gentile, Lori F.; Cuenca, Alex G.; Ang, Darwin N.; Liu, Huazhi; Lottenberg, Lawrence; Marker, Peggy; Zumberg, Marc; Bihorac, Azra; Moore, Frederick A.; Brakenridge, Scott; Efron, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Blood product transfusions are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to determine if implementation of a restrictive protocol for packed red blood cell (PRBC) and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) transfusion safely reduces blood product utilization and costs in a surgical intensive care unit (SICU). Study Design We performed a retrospective, historical control analysis comparing before (PRE) and after (POST) implementation of a restrictive PRBC/FFP transfusion protocol for SICU patients. Univariate analysis was utilized to compare patient demographics and blood product transfusion totals between the PRE and POST cohorts. Multivariate logistic regression models were developed to determine if implementation of the restrictive transfusion protocol is an independent predictor of adverse outcomes after controlling for age, illness severity, and total blood products received. Results 829 total patients were included in the analysis (PRE, n=372; POST, n=457). Despite higher mean age (56 vs. 52 years, p=0.01) and APACHE II scores (12.5 vs. 11.2, p=0.006), mean units transfused per patient were lower for both packed red blood cells (0.7 vs. 1.2, p=0.03) and fresh frozen plasma (0.3 vs. 1.2, p=0.007) in the POST compared to the PRE cohort, respectively. There was no difference in inpatient mortality between the PRE and POST cohorts (7.5% vs. 9.2%, p=0.39). There was a decreased risk of urinary tract infections (OR 0.47, 95%CI 0.28-0.80) in the POST cohort after controlling for age, illness severity and amount of blood products transfused. Conclusions Implementation of a restrictive transfusion protocol can effectively reduce blood product utilization in critically ill surgical patients with no increase in morbidity or mortality. PMID:26010247

  14. Potential for Zika virus transmission through blood transfusion demonstrated during an outbreak in French Polynesia, November 2013 to February 2014.

    PubMed

    Musso, D; Nhan, T; Robin, E; Roche, C; Bierlaire, D; Zisou, K; Shan Yan, A; Cao-Lormeau, V M; Broult, J

    2014-01-01

    Since October 2013, French Polynesia has experienced the largest documented outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKAV) infection. To prevent transmission of ZIKAV by blood transfusion, specific nucleic acid testing of blood donors was implemented. From November 2013 to February 2014: 42 (3%) of 1,505 blood donors, although asymptomatic at the time of blood donation, were found positive for ZIKAV by PCR. Our results serve to alert blood safety authorities about the risk of post-transfusion Zika fever. PMID:24739982

  15. Effects of a hospital-wide introduction of a massive transfusion protocol on blood product ratio and blood product waste

    PubMed Central

    Balvers, Kirsten; Coppens, Michiel; van Dieren, Susan; van Rooyen-Schreurs, Ingeborg H.M.; Klinkspoor, Henriëtte J.; Zeerleder, Sacha S.; Baumann, Holger M.; Goslings, J. Carel; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Massive transfusion protocols (MTPs) are increasingly used in the transfusion practice and are developed to provide the standardized and early delivery of blood products and procoagulant agents and to supply the transfusion of blood products in a well-balanced ratio. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a hospital-wide introduction of an MTP on blood product ratio and a waste of blood products. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis was performed to compare the transfusion practice in massive bleeding patients before and after the introduction of an MTP and between the use of an MTP and transfusion off-protocol. Massive bleeding was defined as an administration of ?5 units of red blood cells (RBCs) within 12 h. Results: Of 547 massively transfused patients, 192 patients were included in the pre-MTP period and 355 patients in the MTP period. The ratio of RBC to fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and the platelets transfused shifted significantly toward 1:1:1 in the MTP period (P = 0.012). This was mainly caused by a shift in RBC: FFP ratio (P = 0.014). An increase in the waste of blood products was observed, most notably FFPs (P = 0.026). Extending the storage time after thawing reduced the waste of FFPs from 11% to 4%. Conclusion: Hospital-wide introduction of an MTP is an adequate way to achieve a well-balanced transfusion ratio of 1:1:1. This comes at the cost of an increase in the waste of FFPs, which is lowered after extending the duration of storage time after thawing. PMID:26604525

  16. Bilirubin/Albumin Ratio for Predicting Acute Bilirubin-induced Neurologic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ardakani, Shahin Behjati; Dana, Vahid Ghobadi; Ziaee, Vahid; Ashtiani, Mohammad-Taghi Haghi; Djavid, Gholamreza Esmaeeli; Alijani, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bilirubin albumin (B/A) ratio in comparison with total serum bilirubin (TSB) for predicting acute bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction (BIND). Methods Fifty two term and near term neonates requiring phototherapy and exchange transfusion for severe hyperbilirubinemia in Children's Medical Center, Tehran, Iran, during September 2007 to September 2008, were evaluated. Serum albumin and bilirubin were measured at admission. All neonates were evaluated for acute BIND based on clinical findings. Findings Acute BIND developed in 5 (3.8%) neonates. B/A ratio in patients with BIND was significantly higher than in patients without BIND (P<0.001). Receiver operation characteristics (ROC) analysis identified a TSB cut off value of 25 mg/dL [area under the curve (AUC) 0.945] with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 85%. Also, according to the ROC curve, B/A ratio cut off value for predicting acute BIND was 8 (bil mg/al g) (AUC 0.957) with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 94%. Conclusion Based on our results, we suggest using B/A ratio in conjunction with TSB. This can improve the specificity and prevent unnecessary invasive therapy such as exchange transfusion in icteric neonates. PMID:23056760

  17. A Novel Hemotropic Mycoplasma (Hemoplasma) in a Patient With Hemolytic Anemia and Pyrexia

    PubMed Central

    Steer, Jane A.; Barker, Emily N.; Jensen, Jørgen; Mitchell, Joanne; Stocki, Teresa; Chalker, Victoria J.; Hamon, Mike

    2011-01-01

    A patient with chronic moderate neutropenia, acute hemolysis, and pyrexia was found to be infected with a novel hemoplasma species. A clinical response to doxycyline was noted, and moxifloxacin was added subsequently to aid infection clearance. This represents the first report of hemolysis in association with confirmed hemoplasma infection in a human. PMID:22021921

  18. Successful intrauterine treatment and good long-term outcome in an extremely severe case of fetal hemolytic disease

    PubMed Central

    Kretowicz, Piotr; Tarasiuk, Anna; Dangel, Joanna; D?bski, Romuald

    2014-01-01

    A 34-year-old multiparous woman presented with anti-Rh-D antibodies (1: 512) and fetal hydrops at the 21st week of gestation. Ultrasound revealed massive fetal skin edema, ascites, hepatomegaly, placentomegaly, and anhydramnios. No fetal movements were observed. Fetal heart was enlarged, with reportedly decreased contractibility. The Doppler parameters were abnormal: the peak systolic velocity in median cerebral artery (MCA PSV) was increased (84 cm/s, 3 MoM), and absent end diastolic flow (AEDF) was reported in the umbilical artery. Ultrasound examination indicated severe fetal anemia and heart failure. Umbilical vein puncture was performed and the fetal blood count was determined (RBC 0.01 × 106/µl, Ht 0.1%, PLT 67 × 103/µl, WBC 2.1 × 103/µl, indeterminable hemoglobin level). Packed red blood cells (0 Rh-, 30 ml) were immediately transfused to the fetus. Altogether, seven intrauterine transfusions were performed. Fetal hydrops disappeared gradually during the next few weeks. The male neonate (1860 g, 45 cm, Apgar score 3–4) was delivered after the last transfusion at 34th week of gestation due of intrauterine asphyxia. The infant was discharged after 21 days, in good condition, on breastfeeding. There was one 10 mm focus of periventricular leukomalacia in the brain, diagnosed based on trans-fontanel ultrasound, without any signs of damage to other organs. At the age of 5 years, the child is healthy, with no abnormalities in his neurodevelopmental parameters. PMID:26673879

  19. A case of vertical transmission of Chagas disease contracted via blood transfusion in Canada.

    PubMed

    Fearon, Margaret A; Scalia, Vito; Huang, Mary; Dines, Irene; Ndao, Momar; Lagacé-Wiens, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and is endemic in many countries in Latin America, where infected bugs of the Triatominea subfamily carry the parasite in the gut and transmit it to humans through fecal contamination of a bite. However, vertical transmission and transmission through blood transfusion and organ transplantation is well documented. Increasing immigration from endemic countries to North America has prompted blood operators, including Canadian Blood Services and Hema Quebec, to initiate blood donor testing for Chagas antibody. In the present report, an unusual case of vertical transmission from a mother, most likely infected through blood transfusion, and detected as part of a concurrent seroprevalence study in blood donors is described. PMID:24421790

  20. A case of vertical transmission of Chagas disease contracted via blood transfusion in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Fearon, Margaret A; Scalia, Vito; Huang, Mary; Dines, Irene; Ndao, Momar; Lagacé-Wiens, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and is endemic in many countries in Latin America, where infected bugs of the Triatominea subfamily carry the parasite in the gut and transmit it to humans through fecal contamination of a bite. However, vertical transmission and transmission through blood transfusion and organ transplantation is well documented. Increasing immigration from endemic countries to North America has prompted blood operators, including Canadian Blood Services and Hema Quebec, to initiate blood donor testing for Chagas antibody. In the present report, an unusual case of vertical transmission from a mother, most likely infected through blood transfusion, and detected as part of a concurrent seroprevalence study in blood donors is described. PMID:24421790

  1. Survival of Mycoplasma haemofelis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' in blood of cats used for transfusions.

    PubMed

    Gary, Anthony T; Richmond, Holly L; Tasker, Séverine; Hackett, Timothy B; Lappin, Michael R

    2006-10-01

    Blood transfusions are commonly administered to cats; associated risks include the transmission of various infectious diseases including Mycoplasma haemofelis (Mhf) and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' (Mhm). Blood transfusions in citrate-phosphate-dextrose-adenine (CPDA-1) solution are commonly administered immediately or stored for up to 1 month prior to administration. It is unknown whether Mhf or Mhm survive in this solution or temperature. The purpose of this study was to determine if Mhf or Mhm remain viable after storage in CPDA-1 for varying periods of time. The results provide evidence that transmission of hemoplasmas to naïve cats occurs after administration of infected feline blood that has been stored in CPDA-1 solution for 1h (Mhf) and 1 week (Mhm). These findings support the recommendation that cats used as blood donors be screened for Mhf and Mhm infections by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay prior to use. PMID:16777455

  2. Iron chelation therapy in transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients: current strategies and future directions.

    PubMed

    Saliba, Antoine N; Harb, Afif R; Taher, Ali T

    2015-01-01

    Transfusional iron overload is a major target in the care of patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia (TDT) and other refractory anemias. Iron accumulates in the liver, heart, and endocrine organs leading to a wide array of complications. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of the approved iron chelators, deferoxamine, deferiprone, and deferasirox, and the evidence behind the use of each, as monotherapy or as part of combination therapy. We also review the different guidelines on iron chelation in TDT. This review also discusses future prospects and directions in the treatment of transfusional iron overload in TDT whether through innovation in chelation or other therapies, such as novel agents that improve transfusion dependence. PMID:26124688

  3. Iron chelation therapy in transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients: current strategies and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Saliba, Antoine N; Harb, Afif R; Taher, Ali T

    2015-01-01

    Transfusional iron overload is a major target in the care of patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia (TDT) and other refractory anemias. Iron accumulates in the liver, heart, and endocrine organs leading to a wide array of complications. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of the approved iron chelators, deferoxamine, deferiprone, and deferasirox, and the evidence behind the use of each, as monotherapy or as part of combination therapy. We also review the different guidelines on iron chelation in TDT. This review also discusses future prospects and directions in the treatment of transfusional iron overload in TDT whether through innovation in chelation or other therapies, such as novel agents that improve transfusion dependence. PMID:26124688

  4. Genetics of Transfusion Recipient Alloimmunization: Can Clues from Susceptibility to Autoimmunity Pave the Way?

    PubMed Central

    Tatari-Calderone, Zohreh; Luban, Naomi L.C.; Vukmanovic, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Summary The search for genetic determinants of alloimmunization in sickle cell disease transfusion recipients was based on two premises: i) that polymorphisms responsible for stronger immune and/or inflammatory responses and hemoglobin ?S mutation were co-selected by malaria; and ii) that stronger responder status contributes to development of lupus. We found a marker of alloimmunization in the gene encoding for Ro52 protein, also known as Sjögren syndrome antigen 1 (SSA1) and TRIM21. Surprisingly, the nature of the association was opposite of that with lupus; the same variant of a polymorphism (rs660) that was associated with lupus incidence was also associated with induction of tolerance to red blood cell antigens during early childhood. The dual function of Ro52 can explain this apparent contradiction. We propose that other lupus/autoimmunity susceptibility loci may reveal roles of additional molecules in various aspects of alloimmunization induced by transfusion as well as during pregnancy. PMID:25670931

  5. Genetics of transfusion recipient alloimmunization: can clues from susceptibility to autoimmunity pave the way?

    PubMed

    Tatari-Calderone, Zohreh; Luban, Naomi L C; Vukmanovic, Stanislav

    2014-11-01

    The search for genetic determinants of alloimmunization in sickle cell disease transfusion recipients was based on two premises: i) that polymorphisms responsible for stronger immune and/or inflammatory responses and hemoglobin ?(S) mutation were co-selected by malaria; and ii) that stronger responder status contributes to development of lupus. We found a marker of alloimmunization in the gene encoding for Ro52 protein, also known as Sjögren syndrome antigen 1 (SSA1) and TRIM21. Surprisingly, the nature of the association was opposite of that with lupus; the same variant of a polymorphism (rs660) that was associated with lupus incidence was also associated with induction of tolerance to red blood cell antigens during early childhood. The dual function of Ro52 can explain this apparent contradiction. We propose that other lupus/autoimmunity susceptibility loci may reveal roles of additional molecules in various aspects of alloimmunization induced by transfusion as well as during pregnancy. PMID:25670931

  6. Contribution of the Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study (REDS) to research on blood transfusion safety in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Paula; de Almeida-Neto, Cesar; Proietti, Anna Bárbara Carneiro; Capuani, Ligia; Gonçalez, Thelma Terezinha; de Oliveira, Claudia Di Lorenzo; Leão, Silvana Carneiro; Lopes, Maria Inês; Sampaio, Divaldo; Patavino, Giuseppina Maria; Ferreira, João Eduardo; Blatyta, Paula Fraiman; Lopes, Maria Esther Duarte; Mendrone-Junior, Alfredo; Salles, Nanci Alves; King, Melissa; Murphy, Edward; Busch, Michael; Custer, Brian; Sabino, Ester Cerdeira

    2014-03-01

    The Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study (REDS) program was established in the United States in 1989 with the purpose of increasing blood transfusion safety in the context of the HIV/AIDS and human T-lymphotropic virus epidemics. REDS and its successor, REDS-II were at first conducted in the US, then expanded in 2006 to include international partnerships with Brazil and China. In 2011, a third wave of REDS renamed the Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study-III (REDS-III) was launched. This seven-year research program focuses on both blood banking and transfusion medicine research in the United States of America, Brazil, China, and South Africa. The main goal of the international programs is to reduce and prevent the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other known and emerging infectious agents through transfusion, and to address research questions aimed at understanding global issues related to the availability of safe blood. This article describes the contribution of REDS-II to transfusion safety in Brazil. Articles published from 2010 to 2013 are summarized, including database analyses to characterize blood donors, deferral rates, and prevalence, incidence and residual risk of the main blood-borne infections. Specific studies were developed to understand donor motivation, the impact of the deferral questions, risk factors and molecular surveillance among HIV-positive donors, and the natural history of Chagas disease. The purpose of this review is to disseminate the acquired knowledge and briefly summarize the findings of the REDS-II studies conducted in Brazil as well as to introduce the scope of the REDS-III program that is now in progress and will continue through 2018. PMID:24790542

  7. Transfusion-transmitted virus infection in hemodialysis patients in Arar, Saudi Arabia: Prevalence, predictors and genotyping.

    PubMed

    El-Taher, Sheref M; Fouad, Nehad A; Fouad, Mohamed A; Mahedy, Ahmed W; Elnazi, Awwad K

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-transmitted virus (TTV) is a single-stranded DNA virus that was identified in patients with post-transfusion hepatitis of non-A-to-G type. Patients with chronic renal failure on maintenance hemodialysis (HD) have a higher risk of viral infections, and the prevalence of TTV infection is common. The aim of our study was to detect TTV-DNA and its genotype in HD patients. A case-control study compromising of 63 patients on maintenance HD therapy at the Nephrology Center of Central Arar Hospital and 100 healthy individuals who were tested for TTVDNA and its genotype by semi nested-polymerase chain reaction with primers derived from the conserved open reading frame 1 (ORF1) region followed by digestion with NdeI and PstI restriction enzyme. The results show that the prevalence of TTV in HD patients was high and statistically significant; 42.9% compared with 19% in the control group. History of blood transfusion was the only significant predictor, and we found that age of patients, duration of HD, hepatitis B and C infection, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels were not significant predictors of TT virus positivity in HD patients. TTV genotype 1 (G1) was found to be the most common genotype among both HD and healthy controls. The prevalence of TTV among HD patients was significantly higher than that in healthy individuals. History of blood transfusion was the only significant predictor of TTV positivity among them. Genotype 1 was the most predominant type among HD and healthy individuals. Further studies on TTV in peritoneal dialysis patients and transplant patients are needed. PMID:26586062

  8. Erythrocyte storage increases rates of NO- and Nitrite scavenging: Implications for transfusion related toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Stapley, Ryan; Owusu, Benjamin Y.; Brandon, Angela; Cusick, Marianne; Rodriguez, Cilina; Marques, Marisa B.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Barnum, Scott R.; Weinberg, Jordan A.; Lancaster, Jack R.; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Storage of erythrocytes in blood banks is associated with biochemical and morphological changes to the RBC. It has been suggested that these changes have a potential negative clinical effects characterized by inflammation and microcirculatory dysfunction which add to other transfusion related toxicities. However, mechanisms linking RBC storage and toxicity remain unclear. In this study we tested the hypothesis that storage of leukodepleted RBC result in cells that inhibit nitric oxide (NO)-signaling more so than younger cells. Using competition kinetic analyses and protocols that minimized contributions from hemolysis or microparticles, our data indicate that NO-consumption rates increased ~40-fold and NO-dependent vasodilation was inhibited 2-4 fold with 42d old vs. 0d RBC. These results are likely due to the formation of smaller RBC with increased surface area: volume as a consequence of membrane loss during storage. The potential for older RBC to affect NO-formation via deoxygenated RBC mediated nitrite reduction was also tested. RBC storage did not affect deoxygenated RBC-dependent stimulation of nitrite-induced vasodilation. However, stored RBC did increase the rates of nitrite oxidation to nitrate in vitro. Significant loss of whole blood nitrite was also observed in stable trauma patients after transfusion with 1 RBC unit, with the decrease in nitrite occurring after transfusion with RBC stored for >25d, but not with younger RBC. Collectively, these data suggest that increased rates of reactions between intact RBC and NO and nitrite may contribute to mechanisms that lead to storage lesion-related transfusion risk PMID:22720637

  9. Contribution of the Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study (REDS) to research on blood transfusion safety in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Paula; de Almeida-Neto, Cesar; Proietti, Anna Bárbara Carneiro; Capuani, Ligia; Gonçalez, Thelma Terezinha; de Oliveira, Claudia Di Lorenzo; Leão, Silvana Carneiro; Lopes, Maria Inês; Sampaio, Divaldo; Patavino, Giuseppina Maria; Ferreira, João Eduardo; Blatyta, Paula Fraiman; Lopes, Maria Esther Duarte; Mendrone-Junior, Alfredo; Salles, Nanci Alves; King, Melissa; Murphy, Edward; Busch, Michael; Custer, Brian; Sabino, Ester Cerdeira

    2014-01-01

    The Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study (REDS) program was established in the United States in 1989 with the purpose of increasing blood transfusion safety in the context of the HIV/AIDS and human T-lymphotropic virus epidemics. REDS and its successor, REDS-II were at first conducted in the US, then expanded in 2006 to include international partnerships with Brazil and China. In 2011, a third wave of REDS renamed the Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study-III (REDS-III) was launched. This seven-year research program focuses on both blood banking and transfusion medicine research in the United States of America, Brazil, China, and South Africa. The main goal of the international programs is to reduce and prevent the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other known and emerging infectious agents through transfusion, and to address research questions aimed at understanding global issues related to the availability of safe blood. This article describes the contribution of REDS-II to transfusion safety in Brazil. Articles published from 2010 to 2013 are summarized, including database analyses to characterize blood donors, deferral rates, and prevalence, incidence and residual risk of the main blood-borne infections. Specific studies were developed to understand donor motivation, the impact of the deferral questions, risk factors and molecular surveillance among HIV-positive donors, and the natural history of Chagas disease. The purpose of this review is to disseminate the acquired knowledge and briefly summarize the findings of the REDS-II studies conducted in Brazil as well as to introduce the scope of the REDS-III program that is now in progress and will continue through 2018. PMID:24790542

  10. Extramedullary hematopoiesis is associated with lower cardiac iron loading in chronically transfused thalassemia patients.

    PubMed

    Ricchi, Paolo; Meloni, Antonella; Spasiano, Anna; Neri, Maria Giovanna; Gamberini, Maria Rita; Cuccia, Liana; Caruso, Vincenzo; Gerardi, Calogera; D'Ascola, Domenico Giuseppe; Rosso, Rosamaria; Campisi, Saveria; Rizzo, Michele; Terrazzino, Fabrizia; Vangosa, Alessandra Briatico; Chiodi, Elisabetta; Missere, Massimiliano; Mangione, Maurizio; Positano, Vincenzo; Pepe, Alessia

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, in a large cohort of chronically transfused patients, whether the presence of extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) accounts for the typical patterns of cardiac iron distribution and/or cardiac function parameters. We retrospectively selected 1,266 thalassemia major patients who had undergone regular transfusions (611 men and 655 women; mean age: 31.3?±?8.9 years, range: 4.2-66.6 years) and were consecutively enrolled within the Myocardial Iron Overload in Thalassemia network. The presence of EMH was evaluated based on steady-state free precession sequences; cardiac and liver iron overloads were quantified using a multiecho T2* approach; cardiac function parameters and pulmonary diameter were quantified using the steady-state free precession sequences; and myocardial fibrosis was evaluated using the late gadolinium enhancement technique. EMH was detected in 167 (13.2%) patients. The EMH+ patients had significantly lower cardiac iron overload than that of the EMH- patients (P?=?0.003). The patterns of cardiac iron distribution were significantly different in the EMH+ and EMH- patients (P?transfused thalassemia patients, EMH was common and was associated with a thalassemia intermedia-like pattern of cardiac iron deposition despite regular transfusion therapy. Am. J. Hematol. 90:1008-1012, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26228763

  11. Estimation of transfused red cell survival using an enzyme-linked antiglobulin test

    SciTech Connect

    Kickler, T.S.; Smith, B.; Bell, W.; Drew, H.; Baldwin, M.; Ness, P.M.

    1985-09-01

    An enzyme-linked antiglobulin test (ELAT) method was developed to estimate survival of transfused red cells. This procedure is based on a principle analogous to that of the Ashby technique were antigenically distinct red cells are transfused and their survival studied. The authors compared the ELAT survival to the V Chromium method (V Cr) in four patients. Three patients with hypoproliferative anemias showed T 1/2 by ELAT of 17.5, 18, and 17 days versus 18.5, 20, and 19 days by the V Cr method. A fourth patient with traumatic cardiac hemolysis had two studies performed. In this case, the ELAT showed a T 1/2 of 10 and 8.1 days while V Cr T 1/2 values were 11 and 10.5 days. The ELAT method for measuring red cell survival yielded data which agreed closely with the results of the V Cr method. Although V Cr is the accepted method for red cell survival, the ELAT method can be used to estimate transfused red cell survival.

  12. Citrate metabolism in blood transfusions and its relationship due to metabolic alkalosis and respiratory acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai; Xu, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic alkalosis commonly results from excessive hydrochloric acid (HCl), potassium (K+) and water (H2O) loss from the stomach or through the urine. The plasma anion gap increases in non-hypoproteinemic metabolic alkalosis due to an increased negative charge equivalent on albumin and the free ionized calcium (Ca++) content of plasma decreases. The mean citrate load in all patients was 8740±7027 mg from 6937±6603 mL of transfused blood products. The citrate load was significantly higher in patients with alkalosis (9164±4870 vs. 7809±3967, P < 0.05). The estimated mean total citrate administered via blood and blood products was calculated as 43.2±34.19 mg/kilogram/day. In non-massive and frequent blood transfusions, the elevated carbon dioxide output has been shown to occur. Due to citrate metabolism causes intracellular acidosis. As a result of intracellular acidosis compensation, decompensated metabolic alkalosis + respiratory acidosis and electrolyte imbalance may develop, blood transfusions may result in certain complications. PMID:26131288

  13. Hyperkalemia after irradiation of packed red blood cells: Possible effects with intravascular fetal transfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Thorp, J.A.; Plapp, F.V.; Cohen, G.R.; Yeast, J.D.; O'Kell, R.T.; Stephenson, S. )

    1990-08-01

    Plasma potassium, calcium, and albumin concentrations in irradiated blood, and in fetal blood before and after transfusion, were measured. Dangerously high plasma potassium levels were observed in some units of irradiated packed red blood cells (range, 13.9 to 66.5 mEq/L; mean, 44.7 mEq/L) and could be one possible explanation for the high incidence of fetal arrhythmia associated with fetal intravascular transfusion. There are many factors operative in the preparation of irradiated packed red blood cells that may predispose to high potassium levels: the age of the red blood cells, the number of procedures used to concentrate the blood, the duration of time elapsed from concentration, the duration of time elapsed from irradiation, and the hematocrit. Use of fresh blood, avoidance of multiple packing procedures, limiting the hematocrit in the donor unit to less than or equal to 80%, and minimizing the time between concentration, irradiation and transfusion may minimize the potassium levels, and therefore making an additional washing procedure unnecessary.

  14. Transfusion medicine and solid organ transplant - Update and review of some current issues.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, R S; Philip, J; Yadav, Pramod

    2013-04-01

    Transfusion medicine holds a place of prime importance in organ transplant surgeries. There is a huge demand of organs worldwide with long waiting periods before the organ is available for transplant. Currently the dependency on ABO and HLA matching has decreased considerably with the use of modern immunosuppressant drugs and transplant techniques. The greatest advance in clinical implementation of ABO-incompatible transplants came about through desensitization and isoagglutinin elimination techniques with immunoadsorption and anti-CD20 antibodies becoming the norm, and spleenectomy fading out. The implications and practices of transfusion medicine in organ transplant are also undergoing drastic changes. The practice of infusion of one unit of donor's blood preoperatively for immunomodulation is no longer practiced. Use of leuco-reduced products has shown decreasing trends of alloimmunization and graft rejection in cases of multiple surgeries related to organ transplants. Worldwide donor and recipient registry programmes are being setup and existing ones are being upgraded. Such a registry system has been opened in India for kidney transplant cases very recently. Due to such registry programmes the dependency on siblings and directed donations have decreased considerably. This review deals with some of the current issues contributing to the successful outcome of mismatched transplants and the changing concepts of transfusion medicine related to it. PMID:24600091

  15. High Antimicrobial Effectiveness with Low Hemolytic and Cytotoxic Activity for PEG/Quaternary Copolyoxetanes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The alkyl chain length of quaternary ammonium/PEG copolyoxetanes has been varied to discern effects on solution antimicrobial efficacy, hemolytic activity and cytotoxicity. Monomers 3-((4-bromobutoxy)methyl)-3-methyloxetane (BBOx) and 3-((2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethoxy)methyl)-3-methyloxetane (ME2Ox) were used to prepare precursor P[(BBOx)(ME2Ox)-50:50–4 kDa] copolyoxetane via cationic ring opening polymerization. The 1:1 copolymer composition and Mn (4 kDa) were confirmed by 1H NMR spectroscopy. After C–Br substitution by a series of tertiary amines, ionic liquid Cx-50 copolyoxetanes were obtained, where 50 is the mole percent of quaternary repeat units and “x” is quaternary alkyl chain length (2, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, or 16 carbons). Modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) studies showed Tgs between ?40 and ?60 °C and melting endotherms for C14–50 and C16–50. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined for Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A systematic dependence of MIC on alkyl chain length was found. The most effective antimicrobials were in the C6–50 to C12–50 range. C8–50 had better overall performance with MICs of 4 ?g/mL, E. coli; 2 ?g/mL, S. aureus; and 24 ?g/mL, P. aeruginosa. At 5 × MIC, C8–50 effected >99% kill in 1 h against S. aureus, E. coli, and P. aeruginosa challenges of 108 cfu/mL; log reductions (1 h) were 7, 3, and 5, respectively. To provide additional insight into polycation interactions with bacterial membranes, a geometric model based on the dimensions of E. coli is described that provides an estimate of the maximum number of polycations that can chemisorb. Chain dimensions were estimated for polycation C8–50 with a molecular weight of 5 kDa. Considering the approximations for polycation chemisorption (PCC), it is surprising that a calculation based on geometric considerations gives a C8–50 concentration within a factor of 2 of the MIC, 4.0 (±1.2) ?g/mL for E. coli. Cx-50 copolyoxetane cytotoxicity was low for human red blood cells, human dermal fibroblasts (HDF), and human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF). Selectivities for bacterial kill over cell lysis were among the highest ever reported for polycations indicating good prospects for biocompatibility. PMID:24422429

  16. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli as Causes of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in the Czech Republic

    PubMed Central

    Marejková, Monika; Bláhová, Kv?ta; Janda, Jan; Fruth, Angelika; Petráš, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Background Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) cause diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+ HUS) worldwide, but no systematic study of EHEC as the causative agents of HUS was performed in the Czech Republic. We analyzed stools of all patients with D+ HUS in the Czech Republic between 1998 and 2012 for evidence of EHEC infection. We determined virulence profiles, phenotypes, antimicrobial susceptibilities and phylogeny of the EHEC isolates. Methodology/Principal Findings Virulence loci were identified using PCR, phenotypes and antimicrobial susceptibilities were determined using standard procedures, and phylogeny was assessed using multilocus sequence typing. During the 15-year period, EHEC were isolated from stools of 39 (69.4%) of 56 patients. The strains belonged to serotypes [fliC types] O157:H7/NM[fliCH7] (50% of which were sorbitol-fermenting; SF), O26:H11/NM[fliCH11], O55:NM[fliCH7], O111:NM[fliCH8], O145:H28[fliCH28], O172:NM[fliCH25], and Orough:NM[fliCH25]. O26:H11/NM[fliCH11] was the most common serotype associated with HUS (41% isolates). Five stx genotypes were identified, the most frequent being stx2a (71.1% isolates). Most strains contained EHEC-hlyA encoding EHEC hemolysin, and a subset (all SF O157:NM and one O157:H7) harbored cdt-V encoding cytolethal distending toxin. espP? encoding serine protease EspP? was found in EHEC O157:H7, O26:H11/NM, and O145:H28, whereas O172:NM and Orough:NM strains contained espP?. All isolates contained eae encoding adhesin intimin, which belonged to subtypes ? (O26), ? (O55, O145, O157), ?2/? (O111), and ? (O172, Orough). Loci encoding other adhesins (efa1, lpfAO26, lpfAO157OI-141, lpfAO157OI-154, iha) were usually associated with particular serotypes. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated nine sequence types (STs) which correlated with serotypes. Of these, two STs (ST660 and ST1595) were not found in HUS-associated EHEC before. Conclusions/Significance EHEC strains, including O157:H7 and non-O157:H7, are frequent causes of D+ HUS in the Czech Republic. Identification of unusual EHEC serotypes/STs causing HUS calls for establishment of an European collection of HUS-associated EHEC, enabling to study properties and evolution of these important pathogens. PMID:24040117

  17. Interventions for preventing diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS) may follow infection with Shiga-toxin-producing organisms, principally E. coli O157: H7 (STEC), causing high morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to identify interventions to prevent diarrhea-associated HUS. Methods Systematic search of the literature for relevant systematic reviews (SRs), randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and public health guidelines. Results Of 1097 animal and 762 human studies, 18 animal studies (2 SRs, 2 reviews, plus 14 RCTs) and 6 human studies (3 SRs, plus 3 RCTs) met inclusion criteria. E. coli O157: H7 Type III secreted protein vaccination decreased fecal E. coli O157 shedding in cattle (P?=?0.002). E. coli O157: H7 siderophore receptor and porin proteins (SRP) vaccines reduced fecal shedding in cows (OR 0.42 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.73) and increased anti-E. coli 0157: H7 SRP antibodies in their calves (P?