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Sample records for acute hyperglycemia worsens

  1. Chronic hyperglycemia induced via the heterozygous knockout of Pdx1 worsens neuropathological lesion in an Alzheimer mouse model.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chuang; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Jia-Yi; Ding, Chen; Yang, Zhao-Hui; Chai, Rui; Wang, Xu; Wang, Zhan-You

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence has indicated that dysregulated glucose metabolism links Alzheimer's disease (AD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) via glucose metabolic products. Nevertheless, because of the lack of appropriate animal models, whether chronic hyperglycemia worsens AD pathologies in vivo remains to be confirmed. Here, we crossed diabetic mice (Pdx1(+/-) mice) with Alzheimer mice (APP/PS1 transgenic mice) to generate Pdx1(+/-)/APP/PS1. We identified robust increases in tau phosphorylation, the loss of the synaptic spine protein, amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and plaque formation associated with increased microglial and astrocyte activation proliferation, which lead to exacerbated memory and cognition deficits. More importantly, we also observed increased glucose intolerance accompanied by Pdx1 reduction, the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), and the activation of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) signaling pathways during AD progression; these changes are thought to contribute to the processing of Aβ precursor proteins and result in increased Aβ generation and decreased Aβ degradation. Protein glycation, increased oxidative stress and inflammation via hyperglycemia are the primary mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of AD. These results indicate the pathological relationship between these diseases and provide novel insights suggesting that glycemic control may be beneficial for decreasing the incidence of AD in diabetic patients and delaying AD progression. PMID:27406855

  2. Chronic hyperglycemia induced via the heterozygous knockout of Pdx1 worsens neuropathological lesion in an Alzheimer mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chuang; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Jia-Yi; Ding, Chen; Yang, Zhao-Hui; Chai, Rui; Wang, Xu; Wang, Zhan-You

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence has indicated that dysregulated glucose metabolism links Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) via glucose metabolic products. Nevertheless, because of the lack of appropriate animal models, whether chronic hyperglycemia worsens AD pathologies in vivo remains to be confirmed. Here, we crossed diabetic mice (Pdx1+/− mice) with Alzheimer mice (APP/PS1 transgenic mice) to generate Pdx1+/−/APP/PS1. We identified robust increases in tau phosphorylation, the loss of the synaptic spine protein, amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and plaque formation associated with increased microglial and astrocyte activation proliferation, which lead to exacerbated memory and cognition deficits. More importantly, we also observed increased glucose intolerance accompanied by Pdx1 reduction, the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), and the activation of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) signaling pathways during AD progression; these changes are thought to contribute to the processing of Aβ precursor proteins and result in increased Aβ generation and decreased Aβ degradation. Protein glycation, increased oxidative stress and inflammation via hyperglycemia are the primary mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of AD. These results indicate the pathological relationship between these diseases and provide novel insights suggesting that glycemic control may be beneficial for decreasing the incidence of AD in diabetic patients and delaying AD progression. PMID:27406855

  3. The Influence of Acute Hyperglycemia in an Animal Model of Lacunar Stroke That Is Induced by Artificial Particle Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Jun; Lin, Ming-Wei; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Kuo, Yu-Min; Tsai, Yi-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Animal and clinical studies have revealed that hyperglycemia during ischemic stroke increases the stroke's severity and the infarct size in clinical and animal studies. However, no conclusive evidence demonstrates that acute hyperglycemia worsens post-stroke outcomes and increases infarct size in lacunar stroke. In this study, we developed a rat model of lacunar stroke that was induced via the injection of artificial embolic particles during full consciousness. We then used this model to compare the acute influence of hyperglycemia in lacunar stroke and diffuse infarction, by evaluating neurologic behavior and the rate, size, and location of the infarction. The time course of the neurologic deficits was clearly recorded from immediately after induction to 24 h post-stroke in both types of stroke. We found that acute hyperglycemia aggravated the neurologic deficit in diffuse infarction at 24 h after stroke, and also aggravated the cerebral infarct. Furthermore, the infarct volumes of the basal ganglion, thalamus, hippocampus, and cerebellum but not the cortex were positively correlated with serum glucose levels. In contrast, acute hyperglycemia reduced the infarct volume and neurologic symptoms in lacunar stroke within 4 min after stroke induction, and this effect persisted for up to 24 h post-stroke. In conclusion, acute hyperglycemia aggravated the neurologic outcomes in diffuse infarction, although it significantly reduced the size of the cerebral infarct and improved the neurologic deficits in lacunar stroke. PMID:27226775

  4. Leptin Is Associated With Persistence of Hyperglycemia in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, James I.C.; Askelund, Kathryn J.; Premkumar, Rakesh; Phillips, Anthony R.J.; Murphy, Rinki; Windsor, John A.; Petrov, Maxim S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Adipokines have many homeostatic roles, including modulation of glucose metabolism, but their role in the pathophysiology of hyperglycemia associated with acute and critical illnesses in general, and acute pancreatitis (AP) in particular, is largely unknown. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between a panel of adipokines and hyperglycemia in the early course of AP, as well as the role of adipokines as predictors of AP severity. Adiponectin, leptin, omentin, resistin, and visfatin were measured on a daily basis in the first 72 hours after hospital admission. A first set of analyses was undertaken with admission glycemia stratified by severity, and a second set of analyses was undertaken based on persistence of early hyperglycemia. All of the analyses were adjusted for confounders. A total of 32 patients with AP were included in this study. None of the studied adipokines was significantly associated with glucose level on admission. Leptin was significantly (P = 0.003) increased in patients with persistent hyperglycemia. Adiponectin was significantly associated with the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score in patients with persistent hyperglycemia (P = 0.015), visfatin with APACHE II score in patients with persistent hyperglycemia (P = 0.014), and omentin with APACHE II score in all of the patients regardless of the presence or absence of hyperglycemia (P = 0.021). Leptin is significantly associated with persistent hyperglycemia in the early course of AP. Omentin has a potential to become an accurate predictor of AP severity. PMID:26871770

  5. Brain perfusion in acute and chronic hyperglycemia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kikano, G.E.; LaManna, J.C.; Harik, S.I. )

    1989-08-01

    Recent studies show that acute and chronic hyperglycemia cause a diffuse decrease in regional cerebral blood flow and that chronic hyperglycemia decreases the brain L-glucose space. Since these changes can be caused by a decreased density of perfused brain capillaries, we used 30 adult male Wistar rats to study the effect of acute and chronic hyperglycemia on (1) the brain intravascular space using radioiodinated albumin, (2) the anatomic density of brain capillaries using alkaline phosphatase histochemistry, and (3) the fraction of brain capillaries that are perfused using the fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran method. Our results indicate that acute and chronic hyperglycemia do not affect the brain intravascular space nor the anatomic density of brain capillaries. Also, there were no differences in capillary recruitment among normoglycemic, acutely hyperglycemic, and chronically hyperglycemic rats. These results suggest that the shrinkage of the brain L-glucose space in chronic hyperglycemia is more likely due to changes in the blood-brain barrier permeability to L-glucose.

  6. Evidence that hyperglycemia after recovery from hypoglycemia worsens endothelial function and increases oxidative stress and inflammation in healthy control subjects and subjects with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, Antonio; Novials, Anna; Ortega, Emilio; La Sala, Lucia; Pujadas, Gemma; Testa, Roberto; Bonfigli, Anna Rita; Esposito, Katherine; Giugliano, Dario

    2012-11-01

    Currently there is debate on whether hypoglycemia is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis, but little attention has been paid to the effects of recovery from hypoglycemia. In normal control individuals and in people with type 1 diabetes, recovery from a 2-h induced hypoglycemia was obtained by reaching normoglycemia or hyperglycemia for another 2 h and then maintaining normal glycemia for the following 6 h. Hyperglycemia after hypoglycemia was also repeated with the concomitant infusion of vitamin C. Recovery with normoglycemia is accompanied by a significant improvement in endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and inflammation, which are affected by hypoglycemia; however, a period of hyperglycemia after hypoglycemia worsens all of these parameters, an effect that persists even after the additional 6 h of normoglycemia. This effect is partially counterbalanced when hyperglycemia after hypoglycemia is accompanied by the simultaneous infusion of vitamin C, suggesting that when hyperglycemia follows hypoglycemia, an ischemia-reperfusion-like effect is produced. This study shows that the way in which recovery from hypoglycemia takes place in people with type 1 diabetes could play an important role in favoring the appearance of endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and inflammation, widely recognized cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:22891214

  7. Hyperglycemia

    MedlinePlus

    Hyperglycemia means high blood sugar or glucose. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that moves glucose into your ... taking medicines correctly. Other problems that can raise blood sugar include infections, certain medicines, hormone imbalances, or ...

  8. Hyperglycemia and acute kidney injury in critically ill children

    PubMed Central

    Gordillo, Roberto; Ahluwalia, Tania; Woroniecki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyperglycemia and acute kidney injury (AKI) are common in critically ill children and have been associated with higher morbidity and mortality. The incidence of AKI in children is difficult to estimate because of the lack of a standard definition for AKI. The pediatric RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, and End-stage kidney disease) criteria can be used to define AKI in children. Various biomarkers in urine and blood have been studied to detect AKI in critically ill children. However, it is not clear whether hyperglycemia is associated with AKI. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of hyperglycemia on kidney function and its effect on neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in children. Methods We studied retrospective and prospective cohorts of pediatric critically ill subjects admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). We analyzed data from admission that included estimated glomerular filtration rate, plasma and urine NGAL, serum glucose and peak glycemia (highest glycemia during PICU admission), and length of hospital and PICU stay from two different institutions. Results We found that the prevalence of hyperglycemia was 89% in the retrospective cohort and 86% in the prospective cohort, P=0.99. AKI was associated with peak glycemia, P=0.03. There was a statistically significant correlation between peak glycemia and hospital and PICU stays, P=<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively. Urine NGAL and plasma NGAL were not statistically different in subjects with and without hyperglycemia, P=0.99 and P=0.85, respectively. Subjects on vasopressors had lower estimated glomerular filtration rate and higher glycemia, P=0.01 and P=0.04, respectively. Conclusion We conclude that in critically ill children, hyperglycemia is associated with AKI and longer PICU stays. PMID:27601931

  9. Hyperglycemia

    MedlinePlus

    Hyperglycemia means high blood sugar or glucose. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that moves glucose into your cells to ... medicines correctly. Other problems that can raise blood sugar include infections, certain medicines, hormone imbalances, or severe ...

  10. Urine Microscopy Is Associated with Severity and Worsening of Acute Kidney Injury in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Coca, Steven G.; Hall, Isaac E.; Iyanam, Umo; Koraishy, Madiha; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Serum creatinine concentration at the time of nephrology consultation is not necessarily indicative of the severity of acute kidney injury (AKI). Although urine microscopy is useful to differentiate AKI, its role in predicting adverse clinical outcomes has not been well described. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: The relationship between urine microscopy findings at the time of nephrology consultation for AKI and clinical outcomes was evaluated prospectively. A urinary sediment scoring system was created on the basis of the number of renal tubular epithelial cells and granular casts. The primary outcome was worsening of AKI (progressing to higher AKI Network stage, dialysis, or death) during hospitalization. Results: Of 249 patients consulted for AKI, 197 had acute tubular necrosis or prerenal AKI and were included in the analysis. At consultation, 80 (40%) had stage 1, 53 (27%) had stage 2, and 66 (33%) had stage 3 AKI. The urinary sediment combined scores were lowest in those with stage 1 and highest in stage 3 AKI. Seventy-nine patients (40%) experienced worsening of AKI from the time of consultation. The urinary scoring system was significantly associated with increased risk of worsening AKI (adjusted relative risk: 7.3; 95% confidence interval: 4.5 to 9.7 for worsening with score of ≥3 versus score of 0) and was more predictive than AKI Network stage at the time of consultation. Conclusions: The urinary sediment score may be a useful tool to predict worsening of AKI due to either acute tubular necrosis or prerenal AKI during hospitalization. PMID:20089493

  11. Alcohol Worsens Acute Lung Injury by Inhibiting Alveolar Sodium Transport through the Adenosine A1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Urich, Daniela; Soberanes, Saul; Manghi, Tomas S.; Chiarella, Sergio E.; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Budinger, G. R. Scott; Mutlu, Gökhan M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Alcohol intake increases the risk of acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is associated with poor outcomes in patients who develop these syndromes. No specific therapies are currently available to treat or decrease the risk of ARDS in patients with alcoholism. We have recently shown increased levels of lung adenosine inhibit alveolar fluid clearance, an important predictor of outcome in patients with ARDS. We hypothesized that alcohol might worsen lung injury by increasing lung adenosine levels, resulting in impaired active Na+ transport in the lung. Methods We treated wild-type mice with alcohol administered i.p. to achieve blood alcohol levels associated with moderate to severe intoxication and measured the rate of alveolar fluid clearance and Na,K-ATPase expression in peripheral lung tissue and assessed the effect of alcohol on survival during exposure to hyperoxia. We used primary rat alveolar type II cells to investigate the mechanisms by which alcohol regulates alveolar Na+ transport. Results Exposure to alcohol reduced alveolar fluid clearance, downregulated Na,K-ATPase in the lung tissue and worsened hyperoxia-induced lung injury. Alcohol caused an increase in BAL fluid adenosine levels. A similar increase in lung adenosine levels was observed after exposure to hyperoxia. In primary rat alveolar type II cells alcohol and adenosine decreased the abundance of the Na,K-ATPase at the basolateral membrane via a mechanism that required activation of the AMPK. Conclusions Alcohol decreases alveolar fluid clearance and impairs survival from acute lung injury. Alcohol induced increases in lung adenosine levels may be responsible for reduction in alveolar fluid clearance and associated worsening of lung injury. PMID:22272351

  12. Acute and Chronic Hyperglycemia Elicit JIP1/JNK-Mediated Endothelial Vasodilator Dysfunction of Retinal Arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Travis W.; Xu, Wenjuan; Xu, Xin; Kuo, Lih

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hyperglycemia, a hallmark of diabetes mellitus, is associated with retinal inflammation and impairment of endothelium-dependent nitric oxide (NO)–mediated dilation of retinal arterioles. However, molecular mechanisms involved in this diminished endothelial vasodilator function remain unclear. We examined whether inflammatory stress-activated kinases, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38, contribute to retinal arteriolar dysfunction during exposure to acute and chronic hyperglycemia. Methods Retinal arterioles were isolated from streptozocin-induced diabetic pigs (2 weeks; chronic hyperglycemia, 471 ± 23 mg/dL) or age-matched control pigs (euglycemia, 79 ± 5 mg/dL), and then cannulated and pressurized for vasoreactivity study. For acute hyperglycemia study, vessels from nondiabetic pigs were exposed intraluminally to high glucose (25 mM ≈ 450 mg/dL) for 2 hours, and normal glucose (5 mM ≈ 90 mg/dL) served as the control. Results Endothelium-dependent vasodilation to bradykinin was reduced in a similar manner after exposure to acute or chronic hyperglycemia. Administration of NO synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) nearly abolished vasodilations either in control (euglycemia and normal glucose) or hyperglycemic (acute and chronic) vessels. Treatment of either acute or chronic hyperglycemic vessels with JNK inhibitor SP600125 or JNK-interacting protein-1 (JIP1) inhibitor BI-78D3, but not p38 inhibitor SB203580, preserved bradykinin-induced dilation in an L-NAME–sensitive manner. By contrast, endothelium-independent vasodilation to sodium nitroprusside was unaffected by acute or chronic hyperglycemia. Conclusions Activation of JIP1/JNK signaling in retinal arterioles during exposure to acute or chronic hyperglycemia leads to selective impairment of endothelium-dependent NO-mediated dilation. Therapeutic targeting of the vascular JNK pathway may improve retinal endothelial vasodilator function during early diabetes. PMID

  13. Hyperglycemia during induction therapy is associated with increased infectious complications in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) are at high risk for developing hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemic adult ALL patients have shorter remissions, more infections, and increased mortality. No corresponding data are available in children. We hypothesized that children with ALL who become hypergl...

  14. SOD1 overexpression prevents acute hyperglycemia-induced cerebral myogenic dysfunction: relevance to contralateral hemisphere and stroke outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Coucha, Maha; Li, Weiguo; Hafez, Sherif; Abdelsaid, Mohammed; Johnson, Maribeth H.; Fagan, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Admission hyperglycemia (HG) amplifies vascular injury and neurological deficits in acute ischemic stroke, but the mechanisms remain controversial. We recently reported that ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury impairs the myogenic response in both hemispheres via increased nitration. However, whether HG amplifies contralateral myogenic dysfunction and whether loss of tone in the contralateral hemisphere contributes to stroke outcomes remain to be determined. Our hypothesis was that contralateral myogenic dysfunction worsens stroke outcomes after acute hyperglycemic stroke in an oxidative stress-dependent manner. Male wild-type or SOD1 transgenic rats were injected with saline or 40% glucose solution 10 min before surgery and then subjected to 30 min of ischemia/45 min or 24 h of reperfusion. In another set of animals (n = 5), SOD1 was overexpressed only in the contralateral hemisphere by stereotaxic adenovirus injection 2–3 wk before I/R. Myogenic tone and neurovascular outcomes were determined. HG exacerbated myogenic dysfunction in contralateral side only, which was associated with infarct size expansion, increased edema, and more pronounced neurological deficit. Global and selective SOD1 overexpression restored myogenic reactivity in ipsilateral and contralateral sides, respectively, and enhanced neurovascular outcomes. In conclusion, our results show that SOD1 overexpression nullified the detrimental effects of HG on myogenic tone and stroke outcomes and that the contralateral hemisphere may be a novel target for the management of acute hyperglycemic stroke. PMID:25552308

  15. Interaction between worsening renal function and persistent congestion in acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wattad, Malak; Darawsha, Wisam; Solomonica, Amir; Hijazi, Maher; Kaplan, Marielle; Makhoul, Badira F; Abassi, Zaid A; Azzam, Zaher S; Aronson, Doron

    2015-04-01

    Worsening renal function (WRF) and congestion are inextricably related pathophysiologically, suggesting that WRF occurring in conjunction with persistent congestion would be associated with worse clinical outcome. We studied the interdependence between WRF and persistent congestion in 762 patients with acute decompensated heart failure (HF). WRF was defined as ≥0.3 mg/dl increase in serum creatinine above baseline at any time during hospitalization and persistent congestion as ≥1 sign of congestion at discharge. The primary end point was all-cause mortality with mean follow-up of 15 ± 9 months. Readmission for HF was a secondary end point. Persistent congestion was more common in patients with WRF than in patients with stable renal function (51.0% vs 26.6%, p <0.0001). Both persistent congestion and persistent WRF were significantly associated with mortality (both p <0.0001). There was a strong interaction (p = 0.003) between persistent WRF and congestion, such that the increased risk for mortality occurred predominantly with both WRF and persistent congestion. The adjusted hazard ratio for mortality in patients with persistent congestion as compared with those without was 4.16 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.20 to 7.86) in patients with WRF and 1.50 (95% CI 1.16 to 1.93) in patients without WRF. In conclusion, persisted congestion is frequently associated with WRF. We have identified a substantial interaction between persistent congestion and WRF such that congestion portends increased mortality particularly when associated with WRF. PMID:25700802

  16. Influence on prognosis and prevalence of stress hyperglycemia in a cohort of patients with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Modenesi, Renata de Faria; Pena, Felipe Montes; de Faria, Carlos Augusto Cardoso; Carvalho, Ricardo Viana; de Souza, Nelson Robson Mendes; Soares, Jamil da Silva; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco

    2012-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the prevalence of stress hyperglycemia in a cohort of patients with acute coronary syndrome and to determine the correlation of stress hyperglycemia with death, heart failure and/or left ventricular systolic dysfunction during the intrahospital phase. Methods A prospective initial cohort study of hospitalized patients with acute coronary syndrome with or without ST segment elevation. The groups were compared to demonstrate the correlation between stress hyperglycemia and cardiovascular events. The chi-square test or Fisher's exact test and student's t-test were used to compare the groups with and without stress hyperglycemia. The variables with p<0.20 in the univariate analysis were submitted to logistic regression. Results In total, 363 patients with an average age of 12.45 ± 62.06 were studied. There was a predominance of males (64.2%). In total, 96 patients (26.4%) presented with stress hyperglycemia. There were no differences between the groups with or without stress hyperglycemia. The area under the ROC curve was 0.67 for the relationship between stress hyperglycemia and the composite outcome heart failure, left ventricular systolic dysfunction or death at the end of the hospital admission. The ROC curve proved that stress hyperglycemia was the predictor of the composite outcome (death, heart failure and/or ventricular dysfunction). The multivariate analysis did not indicate age, stress hyperglycemia or admission heart rate as risk factors. Conclusion Stress hyperglycemia was common in the studied sample. In the univariate analysis, the presence of stress hyperglycemia was associated with such events as death, heart failure and/or intrahospital ventricular dysfunction in patients with acute coronary syndrome. PMID:23917932

  17. Association of statin use and stress-induced hyperglycemia in patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chen; Qin, Ma; Juan, Yang S; Tao, Li Y; dong, Gao M; Zechun, Zeng; Chun, Yang X; Liang, Cong H; Yin, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Background Only a few information is available on the risk of stress hyperglycemia following acute myocardial infarction after statin use. We investigate the association of stress-induced hyperglycemia following statin use in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Methods An observational analysis of 476 consecutive patients who suffered acute myocardial infarction was carried out. All selected patients were divided into diabetes mellitus and non-diabetes based on the presence or absence of diabetes. The cardiac incidence of in-hospital and stress-induced hyperglycemia was recorded. Results Among patients with stress hyperglycemia in non-diabetes mellitus subgroups, the average fasting plasma glucose values in statin users were higher than in non-statin users (P < 0.05). But in diabetes mellitus subgroups, the average fasting plasma glucose did not have a significant difference between statin users and non-statin users (P > 0.05). In non-diabetes mellitus patients, the incidence of stress hyperglycemia with statin therapy was significantly higher than with non-statin therapy (P = 0.003). But in diabetes mellitus patients group, there is no significant difference in incidence of stress hyperglycemia between patients with statin therapy and patients without statin therapy (P = 0.902).The incidence of heart failure and in-hospital mortality of acute myocardial infarction in patients with stress-induced hyperglycemia was significantly higher than in non-hyperglycemia patients (P < 0.05). Conclusion Statins are related to higher stress hyperglycemia and cardiac incidences after acute myocardial infarction. PMID:27158481

  18. Association between Serum Bilirubin and Acute Intraoperative Hyperglycemia Induced by Prolonged Intermittent Hepatic Inflow Occlusion in Living Liver Donors

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sangbin; Jin, Sang-Man; Ko, Justin Sangwook; Kim, Young Ri; Gwak, Mi Sook; Son, Hee Jeong; Joh, Jae-Won; Kim, Gaab Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Intermittent hepatic inflow occlusion (IHIO) is associated with acute hyperglycemia during living donor hepatectomy when the ischemia is prolonged. Bilirubin is a potent antioxidant to play an important role for maintaining insulin sensitivity and preventing hyperglycemia. Thus, we aimed to test whether serum bilirubin level is associated with prolonged IHIO-induced intraoperative hyperglycemia. Methods Seventy-five living liver donors who underwent a prolonged IHIO with a >30 minute cumulative ischemia were included. The association between preoperative serum bilirubin concentrations and the risk of intraoperative hyperglycemia (blood glucose concentration >180 mg/dl) was analyzed using binary logistic regression with adjusting for potential confounders including age and steatosis. Results The number of donors who underwent 3, 4, 5, and 6 rounds of IHIO was 41, 22, 7, and 5, respectively. Twenty-nine (35%) donors developed intraoperative hyperglycemia. Total bilirubin concentration was inversely associated with hyperglycemia risk (odds ratio [OR] 0.033, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.004–0.313, P = 0.003). There was an interaction between age and total bilirubin concentration: the effect of lower serum total bilirubin (≤0.7 mg/dl) on the development of hyperglycemia was greater in older donors (>40 years) than in younger donors (P = 0.0.028 versus P = 0.212). Both conjugated bilirubin (OR 0.001 95% CI 0.001–0.684) and unconjugated bilirubin (OR 0.011 95% CI 0.001–0.246) showed an independent association with hyperglycemia risk. Conclusions Lower preoperative serum bilirubin was associated with greater risk of prolonged IHIO-induced hyperglycemia during living donor hepatectomy particularly in older donors. Thus, more meticulous glycemic management is recommended when prolonged IHIO is necessary for surgical purposes in old living donors with lower serum bilirubin levels. PMID:27367602

  19. Glucocorticoid signaling in myeloid cells worsens acute CNS injury and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sorrells, Shawn F; Caso, Javier R; Munhoz, Carolina D; Hu, Caroline K; Tran, Kevin V; Miguel, Zurine D; Chien, Bonnie Y; Sapolsky, Robert M

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoid stress hormones (GCs) are well known for being anti-inflammatory, but some reports suggest that GCs can also augment aspects of inflammation during acute brain injury. Because the GC receptor (GR) is ubiquitously expressed throughout the brain, it is difficult to know which cell types might mediate these unusual "proinflammatory" GC actions. We examined this with cell type-specific deletion or overexpression of GR in mice experiencing seizure or ischemia. Counter to their classical anti-inflammatory actions, GR signaling in myeloid cells increased Iba-1 and CD68 staining as well as nuclear p65 levels in the injured tissue. GCs also reduced levels of occludin, claudin 5, and caveolin 1, proteins central to blood-brain-barrier integrity; these effects required GR in endothelial cells. Finally, GCs compromised neuron survival, an effect mediated by GR in myeloid and endothelial cells to a greater extent than by neuronal GR. PMID:23637179

  20. Effect of acute hyperglycemia on potassium (86Rb+) permeability and plasma lipid peroxidation in subjects with normal glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Güven, M; Onaran, I; Ulutin, T; Sultuybek, G; Hatemi, H

    2001-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is likely to be one of the important determinants of ion transport as it is known to induce oxidative stress and may thus enhance non-specific permeability of membranes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of an acute increase in glycemia on 86Rb+ (a marker for K+) influx and lipid peroxidation. We evaluated the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-induced modification on 86Rb+ influx and plasma lipid peroxidation in 20 subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). After 2-hour glucose loading, the levels of passive 86Rb+ influx and plasma lipid peroxidation were significantly increased, whereas the active influx of 86Rb+ was unchanged. The total and passive influx of 86Rb+ into erythrocytes was significantly correlated with the level of plasma lipid peroxidation. This study demonstrates that acute hyperglycemia induces an increase in the passive influx of 86Rb+ in subjects with NGT, suggesting that acute hyperglycemia may produce an oxidative stress in plasma. These changes may be among the earliest changes occurring in response to hyperglycemia. PMID:11383909

  1. Effect of acute hyperglycemia on potassium (86Rb+) permeability and plasma lipid peroxidation in subjects with normal glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Güven, M; Onaran, I; Ulutin, T; Sultuybek, G; Hatemi, H

    2001-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is likely to be one of the important determinants of ion transport as it is known to induce oxidative stress and may thus enhance non-specific permeability of membranes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of an acute increase in glycemia on 86Rb+ (a marker for K+) influx and lipid peroxidation. We evaluated the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-induced modification on 86Rb+ influx and plasma lipid peroxidation in 20 subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). After 2-hour glucose loading, the levels of passive 86Rb+ influx and plasma lipid peroxidation were significantly increased, whereas the active influx of 86Rb+ was unchanged. The total and passive influx of 86Rb+ into erythrocytes was significantly correlated with the level of plasma lipid peroxidation. This study demonstrates that acute hyperglycemia induces an increase in the passive influx of 86Rb+ in subjects with NGT, suggesting that acute hyperglycemia may produce an oxidative stress in plasma. These changes may be among the earliest changes occurring in response to hyperglycemia. PMID:11508792

  2. Renal impairment and worsening of renal function in acute heart failure: can new therapies help? The potential role of serelaxin.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Roland E; Mitrovic, Veselin; Hengstenberg, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Renal dysfunction is a frequent finding in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) and an important prognostic factor for adverse outcomes. Worsening of renal function occurs in 30-50% of patients hospitalised for AHF, and is associated with increased mortality, prolonged hospital stay and increased risk of readmission. Likely mechanisms involved in the decrease in renal function include impaired haemodynamics and activation of neurohormonal factors, such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, the sympathetic nervous system and the arginine-vasopressin system. Additionally, many drugs currently used to treat AHF have a detrimental effect on renal function. Therefore, pharmacotherapy for AHF should carefully take into account any potential complications related to renal function. Serelaxin, currently in clinical development for the treatment of AHF is a recombinant form of human relaxin-2, identical in structure to the naturally occurring human relaxin-2 peptide hormone that mediates cardiac and renal adaptations during pregnancy. Data from both pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate a potentially beneficial effect of serelaxin on kidney function. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms and impact of impairment of renal function in AHF, and the potential benefits of new therapies, such as serelaxin, in this context. PMID:25787721

  3. Acute hyperglycemia induces rapid, reversible increases in glomerular permeability in nondiabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, Josefin; Rippe, Anna; Rippe, Bengt

    2010-06-01

    This study was performed to investigate the impact of acute hyperglycemia (HG) on the permeability of the normal glomerular filtration barrier in vivo. In anesthetized Wistar rats (250-280 g), the left ureter was catheterized for urine collection, while simultaneously blood access was achieved. Rats received an intravenous (iv) infusion of either 1) hypertonic glucose to maintain blood glucose at 20-25 mM (G; n = 8); 2) hypertonic glucose as in 1) and a RhoA-kinase inhibitor (Y-27632; Rho-G; n = 8); 3) 20% mannitol (MANN; n = 7) or 4) hypertonic (12%) NaCl to maintain plasma crystalloid osmotic pressure (pi(cry)) at approximately 320-325 mosmol/l (NaCl; n = 8) or 5) physiological saline (SHAM; n = 8). FITC-Ficoll 70/400 was infused iv for at least 20 min before termination of the experiments, and plasma and urine were collected to determine the glomerular sieving coefficients (theta) for polydisperse Ficoll (molecular radius 15-80 A) by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography. In G there was a marked increase in for Ficoll(55-80A) at 20 min, which was completely reversible within 60 min and abrogated by a Rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, while glomerular permeability remained unchanged in MANN and NaCl. In conclusion, acute HG caused rapid, reversible increases in for large Ficolls, not related to the concomitant hyperosmolarity, but sensitive to ROCK inhibition. The changes observed were consistent with the formation of an increased number of large pores in the glomerular filter. The sensitivity of the permeability changes to ROCK inhibition strongly indicates that the cytoskeleton of the cells in the glomerular barrier may be involved in these alterations. PMID:20237233

  4. Association of Hyperglycemia with In-Hospital Mortality and Morbidity in Libyan Patients with Diabetes and Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Benamer, Sufyan; Eljazwi, Imhemed; Mohamed, Rima; Masoud, Heba; Tuwati, Mussa; Elbarsha, Abdulwahab M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia on admission and during hospital stay is a well-established predictor of short-term and long-term mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Our study investigated the impact of blood glucose levels on admission and in-hospital hyperglycemia on the morbidity and mortality of Libyan patients admitted with acute coronary syndromes (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina). Methods In this retrospective study, the records of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome to The 7th Of October Hospital, Benghazi, Libya, between January 2011 and December 2011 were reviewed. The level of blood glucose on admission, and the average blood glucose during the hospital stay were recorded to determine their effects on in-hospital complications (e.g. cardiogenic shock, acute heart failure, arrhythmias, and/or heart block) and mortality. Results During the study period, 121 patients with diabetes were admitted with acute coronary syndrome. The mortality rate in patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome was 12.4%. Patients with a mean glucose level greater than 200mg/dL had a higher in-hospital mortality and a higher rate of complications than those with a mean glucose level ≤200mg/dL (27.5% vs. 2.6%, p<0.001 and 19.7% vs. 45.5%, p=0.004, respectively). There was no difference in in-hospital mortality between patients with a glucose level at admission ≤140mg/dL and those admitted with a glucose level >140mg/dL (6.9% vs. 14.3%; p=0.295), but the rate of complications was higher in the latter group (13.8% vs. 34.1%; p=0.036). Patients with admission glucose levels >140mg/dL also had a higher rate of complications at presentation (26.4% vs. 6.9%; p=0.027). Conclusion In patients with diabetes and acute coronary syndrome, hyperglycemia during hospitalization predicted a worse outcome in terms of the rates of in-hospital complications and in-hospital mortality. Hyperglycemia at the time of admission was also associated with

  5. Protracted Administration of L-Asparaginase in Maintenance Phase Is the Risk Factor for Hyperglycemia in Older Patients with Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hideki; Imamura, Toshihiko; Saito, Akiko M; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Suenobu, So-ichi; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Deguchi, Takao; Hashii, Yoshiko; Kawasaki, Hirohide; Endo, Mikiya; Hori, Hiroki; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Koji; Yumura-Yagi, Keiko; Hara, Junichi; Oda, Megumi; Sato, Atsushi; Horibe, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    Although L-asparaginase related hyperglycemia is well known adverse event, it is not studied whether the profile of this adverse event is affected by intensification of L-asparaginase administration. Here, we analyzed the profile of L-asparaginase related hyperglycemia in a 1,176 patients with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated according to the Japan Association of Childhood Leukemia Study ALL-02 protocol using protracted L-asparaginase administration in maintenance phase. We determined that a total of 75 L-asparaginase related hyperglycemia events occurred in 69 patients. Although 17 events (17/1176, 1.4%) developed in induction phase, which was lower incidence than those (10-15%) in previous reports, 45 events developed during the maintenance phase with protracted L-asparaginase administration. Multivariate analysis showed that older age at onset (≥ 10 years) was a sole independent risk factor for L-asparaginase-related hyperglycemia (P<0.01), especially in maintenance phase. Contrary to the previous reports, obesity was not associated with L-asparaginase-related hyperglycemia. These findings suggest that protracted administration of L-asparaginase is the risk factor for hyperglycemia when treating adolescent and young adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. PMID:26317422

  6. Acute hyperglycemia alters von Willebrand factor but not the fibrinolytic system in elderly subjects with normal or impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Ludovico; Coppola, Antonino; Grassia, Antonio; Mastrolorenzo, Luigia; Lettieri, Biagio; De Lucia, Domenico; De Nanzio, Annarita; Gombos, Giorgio

    2004-10-01

    To assess whether acute hyperglycemia affects fibrinolytic balance in elderly subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), 40 non-obese elderly subjects (20 NGT, age 68 +/- 8 years; and 20 IGT, age 69 +/- 11 years) were studied. On two experimental days, randomly allocated and spaced 1 week apart, plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, fibrinogen, tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and von Willebrand factor (vWF) were measured in each subject at baseline (0) and 30, 60, 90, 120 min after the ingestion of 75 g glucose or a similarly sweet dose of aspartame (250 mg) (control test). In both NGT and IGT elderly subjects, tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and fibrinogen plasma levels did not significantly change after both oral aspartame and glucose load. In IGT subjects, vWF plasmatic levels decreased after glucose (not aspartame) oral load, reaching the minimum level at 90 min after load (82.7 +/- 7.8 versus 93.7 +/- 10.2, P <0.01). These results demonstrate that acute hyperglycemia does not modify plasma fibrinolysis in elderly subjects. The decrease of plasma concentration of vWF in IGT elderly subjects requires cautious interpretation and further extensive investigations. PMID:15613917

  7. Plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin as a marker for the prediction of worsening renal function in children hospitalized for acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Elsharawy, Sahar; Raslan, Lila; Morsy, Saed; Hassan, Basheir; Khalifa, Naglaa

    2016-01-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is frequently associated with worsening renal function in adult patients. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) serves as an early marker for acute renal tubular injury. To assess the role of plasma NGAL in predicting worsening renal function (WRF) in children with AHF, we studied 30 children hospitalized for AHF; children with history of chronic renal disease or on nephrotoxic drugs were excluded. Twenty age- and sex-matched healthy children were included in the study as a control group. Echocardiographic examination was performed on admission. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and plasma NGAL levels were measured on admission and 72 h later. Seventeen (56.6%) patients developed WRF within the three-day follow-up period. At presentation, plasma NGAL level was significantly elevated in children who developed WRF. Admission plasma NGAL level correlated with renal parameters (BUN, creatinine and eGFR) as well as with left ventricular systolic parameters (ejection fraction and fractional shortening). For prediction of WRF, admission plasma, NGAL level>27.5 μg/L had sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 68%, respectively. The area under the receiver-operator curve was higher for NGAL (0.869) than for BUN (0.569) or eGFR (0.684). We conclude that admission plasma NGAL level can predict WRF in children hospitalized for AHF. PMID:26787566

  8. Hyperglycemia attenuates acute permeability response to advanced glycation end products in retinal microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Warboys, C M; Fraser, P A

    2010-07-01

    Increased microvascular permeability contributes to the development of diabetic retinopathy and is associated with hyperglycemia and accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). The isolated perfused retina preparation was used to investigate the effects of hyperglycemia (HG) on the permeability response to AGEs. Retinae were dissected from rats, and the vasculature perfused with sulforhodamine B fluorescent dye and permeability of venular capillaries was determined from the rate of decrease of fluorescence gradient across a vessel during stasis. The resting permeability was very high in streptozotocin treated and some obese Zucker fatty diabetic rats, but low in others. The permeability response to glycated albumin (which is free radical-dependent) in these animals was reduced for a range of concentrations compared to the lean controls. The effects of 15 min 25 mM glucose (HG) superfusion on the retinal microvascular permeability response to 5 microM AGE-BSA was studied in non-diabetic Wistar rats. HG itself had no effect on permeability, but reduced the response to AGE-BSA from 1.02+/-0.08x10(-6) cm s(-1) to 0.31+/-0.07x10(-6) cm s(-1). The response to bradykinin (also free radical-dependent) was not affected by HG. This suggests that chronic exposure to HG down-regulates the signalling pathways activated in response to RAGE stimulation. PMID:20302881

  9. Peripancreatic fat necrosis worsens acute pancreatitis independent of pancreatic necrosis via unsaturated fatty acids increased in human pancreatic necrosis collections

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Pawan; Patel, Krutika; Durgampudi, Chandra; Trivedi, Ram N; de Oliveira, Cristiane; Crowell, Michael D; Pannala, Rahul; Lee, Kenneth; Brand, Randall; Chennat, Jennifer; Slivka, Adam; Papachristou, Georgios I; Khalid, Asif; Whitcomb, David C; DeLany, James P; Cline, Rachel A; Acharya, Chathur; Jaligama, Deepthi; Murad, Faris M; Yadav, Dhiraj; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Peripancreatic fat necrosis occurs frequently in necrotising pancreatitis. Distinguishing markers from mediators of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is important since targeting mediators may improve outcomes. We evaluated potential agents in human pancreatic necrotic collections (NCs), pseudocysts (PCs) and pancreatic cystic neoplasms and used pancreatic acini, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and an acute pancreatitis (AP) model to determine SAP mediators. Methods We measured acinar and PBMC injury induced by agents increased in NCs and PCs. Outcomes of caerulein pancreatitis were studied in lean rats coadministered interleukin (IL)-1β and keratinocyte chemoattractant/growth-regulated oncogene, triolein alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat. Results NCs had higher fatty acids, IL-8 and IL-1β versus other fluids. Lipolysis of unsaturated triglyceride and resulting unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) oleic and linoleic acids induced necro-apoptosis at less than half the concentration in NCs but other agents did not do so at more than two times these concentrations. Cytokine coadministration resulted in higher pancreatic and lung inflammation than caerulein alone, but only triolein coadministration caused peripancreatic fat stranding, higher cytokines, UFAs, multisystem organ failure (MSOF) and mortality in 97% animals, which were prevented by orlistat. Conclusions UFAs, IL-1β and IL-8 are elevated in NCs. However, UFAs generated via peripancreatic fat lipolysis causes worse inflammation and MSOF, converting mild AP to SAP. PMID:25500204

  10. Association of persistent and transient worsening renal function with mortality risk, readmissions risk, length of stay, and costs in patients hospitalized with acute heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Jacqueline B; Friedman, Howard S; Waltman Johnson, Katherine; Navaratnam, Prakash; Gottlieb, Stephen S

    2015-01-01

    Background Data comparing effects of transient worsening renal function (WRFt) and persistent WRF (WRFp) on outcomes in patients hospitalized with acute heart failure (AHF) are lacking. We determined the characteristics of hospitalized AHF patients who experienced no worsening renal function (non-WRF), WRFt, or WRFp, and the relationship between cohorts and AHF-related outcomes. Methods and results A patient’s first AHF hospitalization (index) was identified in the Cerner Health Facts® database (January 2008−March 2011). Patients had WRF if serum creatinine (SCr) was ≥0.3 mg/dL and increased ≥25% from baseline, and they were designated as WRFp if present at discharge or WRFt if not present at discharge. A total of 55,436 patients were selected (non-WRF =77%, WRFp =10%, WRFt =13%). WRFp had greater comorbidity burden than WRFt. At index hospitalization, WRFp patients had the highest mortality, whereas WRFt patients had the longest length of stay (LOS) and highest costs. These trends were observed at 30, 180, and 365 days postdischarge and confirmed by multivariable analyses. WRF patients had more AHF-related readmissions than non-WRF patients. In sensitivity analyses of the patient subset with live index hospitalization discharges, postdischarge LOS and costs were highest in WRFt patients, whereas mortality associated with a HF hospitalization was significantly higher for WRF patients vs non-WRF patients, with no difference between WRFp and WRFt. Conclusion In patients hospitalized for AHF, WRFp was associated with the highest mortality, whereas WRFt was associated with the highest LOS and costs. WRF patients had higher readmissions than non-WRF patients. Transient increases in SCr appear to be associated with detrimental outcomes, especially longer LOS and higher costs. PMID:26150730

  11. Hydrogen gas reduced acute hyperglycemia-enhanced hemorrhagic transformation in a focal ischemia rat model.

    PubMed

    Chen, C H; Manaenko, A; Zhan, Y; Liu, W W; Ostrowki, R P; Tang, J; Zhang, J H

    2010-08-11

    Hyperglycemia is one of the major factors for hemorrhagic transformation after ischemic stroke. In this study, we tested the effect of hydrogen gas on hemorrhagic transformation in a rat focal cerebral ischemia model. Sprague-Dawley rats (n=72) were divided into the following groups: sham; sham treated with hydrogen gas (H(2)); Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO); and MCAO treated with H(2) (MCAO+H(2)). All rats received an injection of 50% dextrose (6 ml/kg i.p.) and underwent MCAO 15 min later. Following a 90 min ischemic period, hydrogen was inhaled for 2 h during reperfusion. We measured the level of blood glucose at 0 h, 0.5 h, 4 h, and 6 h after dextrose injection. Infarct and hemorrhagic volumes, neurologic score, oxidative stress (evaluated by measuring the level of 8 Hydroxyguanosine (8OHG), 4-Hydroxy-2-Nonenal (HNE) and nitrotyrosine), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/MMP-9 activity were measured at 24 h after ischemia. We found that hydrogen inhalation for 2 h reduced infarct and hemorrhagic volumes and improved neurological functions. This effect of hydrogen was accompanied by a reduction of the expression of 8OHG, HNE, and nitrotyrosine and the activity of MMP-9. Furthermore, a reduction of the blood glucose level from 500+/-32.51 to 366+/-68.22 mg/dl at 4 h after dextrose injection was observed in hydrogen treated animals. However, the treatment had no significant effect on the expression of ZO-1, occludin, collagen IV or aquaporin4 (AQP4). In conclusion, hydrogen gas reduced brain infarction, hemorrhagic transformation, and improved neurological function in rats. The potential mechanisms of decreased oxidative stress and glucose levels after hydrogen treatment warrant further investigation. PMID:20423721

  12. Hydrogen Gas Reduced Acute Hyperglycemia-Enhanced Hemorrhagic Transformation in a Focal Ischemia Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, C.H.; ANATOL, M.; ZHAN, Y.; LIU, W.W.; OSTROWKI, R.P.; TANG, JIPING; ZHANG, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is one of the major factors for hemorrhagic transformation after ischemic stroke. In this study, we tested hydrogen gas on hemorrhagic transformation in a rat focal cerebral ischemia model. Sprague–Dawley rats (n=72) were divided into the following groups: sham; sham treated with hydrogen gas (H2); Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO); and MCAO treated with H2 (MCAO+H2). All the rats received an injection of 50% dextrose (6ml/kg intraperitoneally) and underwent MCAO 15 min later. Following a 90 min ischemic period, hydrogen was inhaled for 2 hr during reperfusion. We measured the level of blood glucose at 0 hr, 0.5 hr, 4 hr, and 6 hr after dextrose injection. Infarct and hemorrhagic volumes, neurologic score, oxidative stress (evaluating by the level of 8OHG, HNE and nitrotyrosine), MMP-2/MMP-9 activity were measured at 24 hr after ischemia. We found that hydrogen inhalation for 2 hr reduced infarct and hemorrhagic volumes and improved neurological functions. This effect of hydrogen is accompanied by a reduction of the expressions of 8OHG, HNE, nitrotyrosine and the activity of MMP-9. Furthermore, a reduction of the blood glucose level from 500±32.51 to 366±68.22 mg/dl at 4 hr after dextrose injection was observed in hydrogen treated animals. However, the treatment had no significant effect on the expression of ZO-1, occluding, collagen IV or AQP4. In conclusion, hydrogen gas reduced the infarction, hemorrhagic transformation, and improved neurological functions in rat. The potential mechanisms of decreased oxidative stress and glucose levels after hydrogen treatment warrant further investigation. PMID:20423721

  13. Effects of acute and chronic hyperglycemia on the neurochemical profiles in the rat brain with streptozotocin-induced diabetes detected using in vivo 1H MR spectroscopy at 9.4 T

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Tung; Lee, Phil; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Smirnova, Irina V.; Choi, In-Young

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia could lead to cerebral metabolic alterations and CNS injury. However, findings of metabolic alterations in poorly managed diabetes in humans and animal models are rather inconsistent. We have characterized the cerebral metabolic consequences of untreated hyperglycemia from the onset to the chronic stage in a streptozotocin-induced rat model of diabetes. In vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to measure over 20 neurochemicals longitudinally. Upon the onset of hyperglycemia (acute state), increases in brain glucose levels were accompanied by increases in osmolytes and ketone bodies, all of which remained consistently high through the chronic state of over 10 weeks of hyperglycemia. Only after over 4 weeks of hyperglycemia, the levels of other neurochemicals including N-acetylaspartate and glutathione were significantly reduced and these alterations persisted into the chronic stage. However, glucose transport was not altered in chronic hyperglycemia of over 10 weeks. When glucose levels were acutely restored to euglycemia, some neurochemical changes were irreversible, indicating the impact of prolonged uncontrolled hyperglycemia on the CNS. Furthermore, progressive changes in neurochemical levels from control to acute and chronic conditions demonstrated the utility of 1H MRS as a noninvasive tool in monitoring the disease progression in diabetes. PMID:22353009

  14. [A case of acute ethanol intoxication with remarkable hyperglycemia by "ume-shu", a Japanese apricot liquor made with a large amount of sugar].

    PubMed

    Sugano, Takayuki; Kojima, Naoki; Kaneko, Susumu; Ishida, Junro; Terada, Taizo; Inagawa, Hiroshi; Okada, Yasusei

    2002-07-01

    A 19-year-old woman ingested 2.2 L of "umeshu", a Japanese apricot liquor made with a large amount of sugar. She was unconscious and in shock. The estimated blood ethanol concentration was 607 mg/dl, and the blood glucose level was 576 mg/dl. Because her respiration and circulation was highly suppressed, blood purification was indicated. Continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) was performed instead of hemodialysis because her hemodynamics was unstable. After CHDF was instituted, her blood glucose level reduced to normal range, and her consciousness became alert. CHDF was effective in eliminating ethanol and stabilizing her hemodynamics within an early stage. Though acute ethanol intoxication is known to inhibit glucogenesis, leading to hypoglycemia, marked hyperglycemia was seen in this case. Ingestion of a large amount of glucose-rich liquor and being in shock seemed to be the causes of hyperglycemia. PMID:12415871

  15. Hyperglycemia Determines Increased Specific MicroRNAs Levels in Sera and HDL of Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients and Stimulates MicroRNAs Production in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Carnuta, Mihaela G.; Sanda, Gabriela M.; Stancu, Camelia S.; Popescu, Andreea C.; Popescu, Mihaela R.; Vlad, Adelina; Dimulescu, Doina R.; Simionescu, Maya; Sima, Anca V.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to determine the levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) in sera and HDL of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) compared to stable angina (SA) patients with/without hyperglycemia, and evaluate comparatively the functional effect of these sera on the processing machinery proteins (Drosha, DGCR8, Dicer) and miRNAs production in human macrophages. MiRNAs levels in sera and HDL from 35 SA and 72 ACS patients and 30 healthy subjects were measured by using microRNA TaqMan assays. MiR-223, miR-92a, miR-486, miR-122, miR-125a and miR-146a levels were higher in the hyperglycemic ACS compared to normoglycemic sera. MiR-223 and miR-486 prevailed in HDL2, while miR-92a predominated in HDL3, all three miRNAs discriminating between ACS and SA patients; their levels were increased in HDL from hyperglycemic ACS patients versus normoglycemic ones. The incubation of human macrophages with sera from ACS and SA patients showed that all patients’ sera induced an increase of Drosha, DGCR8 and Dicer expressions and of selected miRNAs levels compared to control sera, the effect being higher in the case of hyperglycemic versus normoglycemic ACS sera. The addition of glucose to SA and ACS sera increased Drosha, DGCR8 and Dicer expression and miRNAs levels in the exposed macrophages. In conclusion, hyperglycemia is associated with increased miR-223, miR-92a, miR-486 levels in HDL, which discriminate between ACS and SA patients. Exposure of human macrophages to ACS compared to SA sera determines the upregulation of Drosha, DGCR8 and Dicer expression and the increase of selected miRNAs production, the effect being augmented by an increased glucose concentration. PMID:27519051

  16. Hyperglycemia Determines Increased Specific MicroRNAs Levels in Sera and HDL of Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients and Stimulates MicroRNAs Production in Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Simionescu, Natalia; Niculescu, Loredan S; Carnuta, Mihaela G; Sanda, Gabriela M; Stancu, Camelia S; Popescu, Andreea C; Popescu, Mihaela R; Vlad, Adelina; Dimulescu, Doina R; Simionescu, Maya; Sima, Anca V

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to determine the levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) in sera and HDL of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) compared to stable angina (SA) patients with/without hyperglycemia, and evaluate comparatively the functional effect of these sera on the processing machinery proteins (Drosha, DGCR8, Dicer) and miRNAs production in human macrophages. MiRNAs levels in sera and HDL from 35 SA and 72 ACS patients and 30 healthy subjects were measured by using microRNA TaqMan assays. MiR-223, miR-92a, miR-486, miR-122, miR-125a and miR-146a levels were higher in the hyperglycemic ACS compared to normoglycemic sera. MiR-223 and miR-486 prevailed in HDL2, while miR-92a predominated in HDL3, all three miRNAs discriminating between ACS and SA patients; their levels were increased in HDL from hyperglycemic ACS patients versus normoglycemic ones. The incubation of human macrophages with sera from ACS and SA patients showed that all patients' sera induced an increase of Drosha, DGCR8 and Dicer expressions and of selected miRNAs levels compared to control sera, the effect being higher in the case of hyperglycemic versus normoglycemic ACS sera. The addition of glucose to SA and ACS sera increased Drosha, DGCR8 and Dicer expression and miRNAs levels in the exposed macrophages. In conclusion, hyperglycemia is associated with increased miR-223, miR-92a, miR-486 levels in HDL, which discriminate between ACS and SA patients. Exposure of human macrophages to ACS compared to SA sera determines the upregulation of Drosha, DGCR8 and Dicer expression and the increase of selected miRNAs production, the effect being augmented by an increased glucose concentration. PMID:27519051

  17. Hyperglycemia, p53 and mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis are involved in the susceptibility of diabetic models to ischemic acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jianping; Li, Xiaoning; Zhang, Dongshan; Chen, Jian-Kang; Su, Yunchao; Smith, Sylvia B.; Dong, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy, are more susceptible to acute kidney injury (AKI) and have a worse prognosis following AKI. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we tested whether diabetic mice were more sensitive to AKI and show that renal ischemia-reperfusion induced significantly more severe AKI and higher mortality in the streptozotocin and the Akita diabetic mouse models. The severity of AKI in the mice correlated with their blood glucose levels. In vitro, high glucose-conditioned renal proximal tubular cells showed higher apoptosis and caspase activation following ATP-depletion and hypoxic injury, accompanied by a heightened mitochondrial accumulation of Bax and release of cytochrome c. In response to injury, both glucose-conditioned renal proximal tubular cells and diabetic kidney tissues showed markedly higher p53 induction. Suppression of p53 diminished the sensitivity of high glucose-conditioned cells to acute injury in vitro. Moreover, blockade of p53 by pifithrin-α, siRNA, or proximal tubule-targeted gene ablation reduced ischemic AKI in diabetic mice. Insulin reduced blood glucose in diabetic mice and largely attenuated their AKI sensitivity. Thus, our results suggest the involvement of hyperglycemia, p53 and mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis in the susceptibility of diabetic models to AKI. PMID:24963915

  18. Similarities and differences between alpha-tocopherol and gamma-tocopherol in amelioration of inflammation, oxidative stress and pre-fibrosis in hyperglycemia induced acute kidney inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hanna; Eo, Hyeyoon

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major chronic disease which increases global health problems. Diabetes-induced renal damage is associated with inflammation and fibrosis. Alpha (AT) and gamma-tocopherols (GT) have shown antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in inflammation-mediated injuries. The primary aim of this study was to investigate effects of AT and GT supplementations on hyperglycemia induced acute kidney inflammation in alloxan induced diabetic mice with different levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG). MATERIALS/METHODS Diabetes was induced by injection of alloxan monohydrate (150 mg/kg, i.p) in ICR mice (5.5-week-old, male) and mice were subdivided according to their FBG levels and treated with different diets for 2 weeks; CON: non-diabetic mice, m-DMC: diabetic control mice with mild FBG levels (250 mg/dl ≤ FBG ≤ 450 mg/dl), m-AT: m-DM mice fed AT supplementation (35 mg/kg diet), m-GT: m-DM mice with GT supplementation (35 mg/kg diet), s-DMC: diabetic control mice with severe FBG levels (450 mg/dl < FBG), s-AT: s-DM mice with AT supplementation, s-GT: s-DM mice with GT supplementation. RESULTS Both AT and GT supplementations showed similar beneficial effects on NFκB associated inflammatory response (phosphorylated inhibitory kappa B-α, interleukin-1β, C-reactive protein, monocyte chemotactic protein-1) and pre-fibrosis (tumor growth factor β-1 and protein kinase C-II) as well as an antioxidant emzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in diabetic mice. On the other hands, AT and GT showed different beneficial effects on kidney weight, FBG, and oxidative stress associated makers (malondialdehyde, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase) except HO-1. In particular, GT significantly preserved kidney weight in m-DM and improved FBG levels in s-DM and malondialdehyde and catalase in m- and s-DM, while AT significantly attenuated FBG levels in m-DM and improved glutathione peroxidase in m- and s-DM. CONCLUSIONS The results suggest that AT and

  19. Suppression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha and its downstream genes reduces acute hyperglycemia-enhanced hemorrhagic transformation in a rat model of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunhua; Ostrowski, Robert P; Zhou, Changman; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2010-07-01

    We evaluated a role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) and its downstream genes in acute hyperglycemia-induced hemorrhagic transformation in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 280-300 g (n = 105) were divided into sham, 90 min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), MCAO plus HIF-1alpha inhibitors, 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) or 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl)-1-benzylindazole (YC-1), groups. Rats received an injection of 50% dextrose (6 ml/kg intraperitoneally) at 15 min before MCAO. HIF-1alpha inhibitors were administered at the onset of reperfusion. The animals were examined for neurological deficits and sacrificed at 6, 12, 24, and 72 hr following MCAO. The cerebral tissues were collected for histology, zymography, and Western blot analysis. The expression of HIF-1alpha was increased in ischemic brain tissues after MCAO and reduced by HIF-1alpha inhibitors. In addition, 2ME2 reduced the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the elevation of active matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP-2/MMP-9) in the ipsilateral hemisphere. Both 2ME2 and YC-1 reduced infarct volume and ameliorated neurological deficits. However, only 2ME2 attenuated hemorrhagic transformation in the ischemic territory. In conclusion, the inhibition of HIF-1alpha and its downstream genes attenuates hemorrhagic conversion of cerebral infarction and ameliorates neurological deficits after focal cerebral ischemia. PMID:20155812

  20. In-hospital worsening heart failure.

    PubMed

    Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Kelkar, Anita; Fonarow, Gregg C; Anker, Stefan; Greene, Stephen J; Papadimitriou, Lampros; Collins, Sean; Ruschitzka, Frank; Yancy, Clyde W; Teerlink, John R; Adams, Kirkwood; Cotter, Gadi; Ponikowski, Piotr; Felker, G Michael; Metra, Marco; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2015-11-01

    Acute worsening heart failure (WHF) is seen in a sizable portion of patients hospitalized for heart failure, and is increasingly being recognized as an entity that is associated with an adverse in-hospital course. WHF is generally defined as worsening heart failure symptoms and signs requiring an intensification of therapy, and is reported to be seen in anywhere from 5% to 42% of heart failure admissions. It is difficult to ascertain the exact epidemiology of WHF due to varying definitions used in the literature. Studies indicate that WHF cannot be precisely predicted on the basis of baseline variables assessed at the time of admission. Recent data suggest that some experimental therapies may reduce the risk of development of WHF among hospitalized heart failure patients, and this is associated with a reduction in risk of subsequent post-discharge cardiovascular mortality. In this respect, WHF holds promise as a endpoint for acute heart failure clinical trials to better elucidate the benefit of targeted novel therapies. Better understanding of the pathophysiology and a consensus on the definition of WHF will further improve our epidemiological and clinical understanding of this entity. PMID:26235192

  1. Worsening of Asthma with Systemic Corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Ankur; Reddymasu, Savio; Jackson, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Despite widespread use for treatment of asthma and allergies, glucocorticoids may cause allergic reactions, even anaphylaxis. The incidence of adverse reactions to systemic glucocorticoids is 0.3%. The most commonly reported corticosteroids causing anaphylaxis like reactions are hydrocortisone, prednisone, and methylprednisolone. Most authors agree that allergic reactions to systemic corticosteroids are possibly immunoglobulin E mediated. We report a patient with asthma, aspirin allergy, and nasal polyps who developed bronchospasm following the administration of intravenous methylprednisolone sodium succinate during an acute asthmatic attack. We discuss the differential diagnosis of worsening asthma despite adequate treatment, and suggest corticosteroid-induced bronchospasm in our patient. Corticosteroid-induced bronchospasm should be considered when asthmatics fail to improve, or frankly deteriorate with systemic corticosteroid therapy, particularly when a history of aspirin allergy is present. Teaching Point: Know the differential diagnosis for worsening of asthma despite adequate treatment.Consider corticosteroid-induced bronchospasm when asthmatics fail to improve, or frankly deteriorate with systemic corticosteroid therapy.Corticosteroid-induced bronchospasm is more commonly seen in asthmatics with a history of aspirin allergy. PMID:16606375

  2. Seniors' Worsening Depression May Sometimes Predict Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158576.html Seniors' Worsening Depression May Sometimes Predict Dementia Study suggests a common ... HealthDay News) -- In some cases, worsening symptoms of depression in seniors might point to early dementia, a ...

  3. Seniors' Worsening Depression May Sometimes Predict Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158576.html Seniors' Worsening Depression May Sometimes Predict Dementia Study suggests a common ... HealthDay News) -- In some cases, worsening symptoms of depression in seniors might point to early dementia, a ...

  4. Chromium supplementation improved post-stroke brain infarction and hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ying; Mao, Frank Chiahung; Liu, Chia-Hsin; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lai, Nai-Wei; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is common after acute stroke and is associated with a worse outcome of stroke. Thus, a better understanding of stress hyperglycemia is helpful to the prevention and therapeutic treatment of stroke. Chromium is an essential nutrient required for optimal insulin activity and normal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Beyond its nutritional effects, dietary supplement of chromium causes beneficial outcomes against several diseases, in particular diabetes-associated complications. In this study, we investigated whether post-stroke hyperglycemia involved chromium dynamic mobilization in a rat model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia and whether dietary supplement of chromium improved post-stroke injury and alterations. Stroke rats developed brain infarction, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Post-stroke hyperglycemia was accompanied by elevated secretion of counter-regulatory hormones including glucagon, corticosterone, and norepinephrine, decreased insulin signaling in skeletal muscles, and increased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Correlation studies revealed that counter-regulatory hormone secretion showed a positive correlation with chromium loss and blood glucose increased together with chromium loss. Daily chromium supplementation increased tissue chromium levels, attenuated brain infarction, improved hyperglycemia, and decreased plasma levels of glucagon and corticosterone in stroke rats. Our findings suggest that stroke rats show disturbance of tissue chromium homeostasis with a net loss through urinary excretion and chromium mobilization and loss might be an alternative mechanism responsible for post-stroke hyperglycemia. PMID:26477944

  5. Combined contributions of over-secreted glucagon-like peptide 1 and suppressed insulin secretion to hyperglycemia induced by gatifloxacin in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yunli; Wang, Xinting; Liu, Can; Yao, Dan; Hu, Mengyue; Li, Jia; Hu, Nan; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiaodong

    2013-02-01

    Accumulating evidences have showed that gatifloxacin causes dysglycemia in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Our preliminary study demonstrated that gatifloxacin stimulated glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretion from intestinal cells. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between gatifloxacin-stimulated GLP-1 release and dysglycemia in both normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and explore the possible mechanisms. Oral administration of gatifloxacin (100 mg/kg/day and 200 mg/kg/day) for 3 and 12 days led to marked elevation of GLP-1 levels, accompanied by significant decrease in insulin levels and increase in plasma glucose. Similar results were found in normal rats treated with 3-day gatifloxacin. Gatifloxacin-stimulated GLP-1 release was further confirmed in NCI-H716 cells, which was abolished by diazoxide, a K{sub ATP} channel opener. QT-PCR analysis showed that gatifloxacin also upregulated expression of proglucagon and prohormone convertase 3 mRNA. To clarify the contradiction on elevated GLP-1 without insulinotropic effect, effects of GLP-1 and gatifloxacin on insulin release were investigated using INS-1 cells. We found that short exposure (2 h) to GLP-1 stimulated insulin secretion and biosynthesis, whereas long exposure (24 h and 48 h) to high level of GLP-1 inhibited insulin secretion and biosynthesis. Moreover, we also confirmed gatifloxacin acutely stimulated insulin secretion while chronically inhibited insulin biosynthesis. All the results gave an inference that gatifloxacin stimulated over-secretion of GLP-1, in turn, high levels of GLP-1 and gatifloxacin synergistically impaired insulin release, worsening hyperglycemia. -- Highlights: ► Gatifloxacin induced hyperglycemia both in diabetic rats and normal rats. ► Gatifloxacin enhanced GLP-1 secretion but inhibited insulin secretion in rats. ► Long-term exposure to high GLP-1 inhibited insulin secretion and biosynthesis. ► GLP-1 over-secretion may be

  6. An epigenomic signature of postprandial hyperglycemia in peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sung-Mi; Cho, Yoon-Kyung; Hong, Eun-Jung; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jeon, Jae-Pil

    2016-03-01

    Postprandial hyperglycemia is known to be one of the earliest signs of abnormal glucose homeostasis associated with type 2 diabetes. This study aimed to assess clinical significance of a 1-h postprandial glucose level for the development of diabetes, and identify epigenetic biomarkers of postprandial hyperglycemia. We analyzed clinical data from the oral glucose tolerance tests for healthy subjects (n=4502). The ratio (Glu60/Glu0) of 1-h glucose levels to fasting glucose levels was significantly associated with an insulin sensitive index (QUICKI, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index) (β=0.055, P=1.25E-04) as well as a risk of future pre-diabetic and diabetic conversion. Next, DNA methylation profile analyses of 24 matched pairs of the high and low Glu60/Glu0 ratio subjects showed that specific DNA methylation levels in the promoter region of an olfactory receptor gene (olfactory receptor gene family10 member A4, OR10A4) were associated with the Glu60/Glu0 ratios (β=0.337, P=0.03). Moreover, acute oral glucose challenges decreased the DNA methylation levels of OR10A4 but not the global DNA methylation in peripheral leukocytes of healthy subjects (n=7), indicating that OR10A4 is a specific epigenomic target of postprandial hyperglycemia. This work suggests possible relevance of olfactory receptor genes to an earlier molecular biomarker of peripheral hyperglycemia and diabetic conversion. PMID:26632885

  7. Postprandial Hyperglycemia and Glycemic Variability

    PubMed Central

    Standl, Eberhard; Schnell, Oliver; Ceriello, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to evaluate the pros and cons of a specific impact of postprandial hyperglycemia and glycemic variability on the—mainly cardiovascular (CV)—complications of diabetes, above and beyond the average blood glucose (BG) as measured by HbA1c or fasting plasma glucose (FPG). The strongest arguments in favor of this hypothesis come from impressive pathophysiological studies, also in the human situation. Measures of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction seem to be especially closely related to glucose peaks and even more so to fluctuating high and low glucose concentrations and can be restored to normal by preventing those glucose peaks or wide glucose excursions. The epidemiological evidence, which is more or less confined to postprandial hyperglycemia and postglucose load glycemia, is also rather compelling in favor of the hypothesis, although certainly not fully conclusive as there are also a number of conflicting results. The strongest cons are seen in the missing evidence as derived from randomized prospective intervention studies targeting postprandial hyperglycemia longer term, i.e., over several years, and seeking to reduce hard CV end points. In fact, several such intervention studies in men have recently failed to produce the intended beneficial outcome results. As this evidence by intervention is, however, key for the ultimate approval of a treatment concept in patients with diabetes, the current net balance of attained evidence is not in favor of the hypothesis here under debate, i.e., that we should care about postprandial hyperglycemia and glycemic variability. The absence of a uniformly accepted standard of how to estimate these parameters adds a further challenge to this whole debate. PMID:21525442

  8. Association of hyperglycemia and insulin with diabetic cardiovascular complications.

    PubMed

    Khamaisi, Mogher; Wainstein, Julio; Hancu, Nicolae; Milicevic, Zvonko; Raz, Itamar

    2003-02-01

    Patients with diabetes and/or insulin resistance syndrome are at increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease. The UKPDS raised a great debate about the relative importance of hyperglycemia in the development of cardiovascular disease. Recently, several epidemiologic studies have suggested that high postprandial blood glucose levels are associated with a significant risk for the development of cardiovascular disease well as a grave prognosis for these patients during acute coronary events. In addition, a number of reports reinforce the thesis that postprandial hyperglycemia is a risk factor for mortality. Our review summarizes the current knowledge on the relation between blood glucose, insulin levels, and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, relating these data to the new World Health Organization and American Diabetes Association classification of disturbed glucose metabolism. PMID:12674662

  9. Molecular mechanisms of hyperglycemia and cardiovascular-related events in critically ill patients: rationale for the clinical benefits of insulin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ellahham, Samer

    2010-01-01

    Newly recognized hyperglycemia frequently occurs with acute medical illness, especially among patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Hyperglycemia has been linked to increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients, especially when it is newly recognized. Increased rates of reinfarction, rehospitalization, major cardiovascular events, and death in CVD patients have also been found. An expanding body of literature describes the benefits of normalizing hyperglycemia with insulin therapy in hospitalized patients. This article reviews several underlying mechanisms thought to be responsible for the association between hyperglycemia and poor outcomes in critically ill patients and those with cardiovascular events, as well as the biologic rationale for the benefits of insulin therapy in these patients. PMID:21270967

  10. Nigerian Honey Ameliorates Hyperglycemia and Dyslipidemia in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Erejuwa, Omotayo O; Nwobodo, Ndubuisi N; Akpan, Joseph L; Okorie, Ugochi A; Ezeonu, Chinonyelum T; Ezeokpo, Basil C; Nwadike, Kenneth I; Erhiano, Erhirhie; Abdul Wahab, Mohd S; Sulaiman, Siti A

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic dyslipidemia contributes to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Hence, its treatment is necessary to reduce cardiovascular events. Honey reduces hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia. The reproducibility of these beneficial effects and their generalization to honey samples of other geographical parts of the world remain controversial. Currently, data are limited and findings are inconclusive especially with evidence showing honey increased glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic patients. It was hypothesized that this deteriorating effect might be due to administered high doses. This study investigated if Nigerian honey could ameliorate hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. It also evaluated if high doses of honey could worsen glucose and lipid abnormalities. Honey (1.0, 2.0 or 3.0 g/kg) was administered to diabetic rats for three weeks. Honey (1.0 or 2.0 g/kg) significantly (p < 0.05) increased high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol while it significantly (p < 0.05) reduced hyperglycemia, triglycerides (TGs), very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, coronary risk index (CRI) and cardiovascular risk index (CVRI). In contrast, honey (3.0 g/kg) significantly (p < 0.05) reduced TGs and VLDL cholesterol. This study confirms the reproducibility of glucose lowering and hypolipidemic effects of honey using Nigerian honey. However, none of the doses deteriorated hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia. PMID:26927161

  11. Nigerian Honey Ameliorates Hyperglycemia and Dyslipidemia in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Erejuwa, Omotayo O.; Nwobodo, Ndubuisi N.; Akpan, Joseph L.; Okorie, Ugochi A.; Ezeonu, Chinonyelum T.; Ezeokpo, Basil C.; Nwadike, Kenneth I.; Erhiano, Erhirhie; Abdul Wahab, Mohd S.; Sulaiman, Siti A.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic dyslipidemia contributes to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Hence, its treatment is necessary to reduce cardiovascular events. Honey reduces hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia. The reproducibility of these beneficial effects and their generalization to honey samples of other geographical parts of the world remain controversial. Currently, data are limited and findings are inconclusive especially with evidence showing honey increased glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic patients. It was hypothesized that this deteriorating effect might be due to administered high doses. This study investigated if Nigerian honey could ameliorate hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. It also evaluated if high doses of honey could worsen glucose and lipid abnormalities. Honey (1.0, 2.0 or 3.0 g/kg) was administered to diabetic rats for three weeks. Honey (1.0 or 2.0 g/kg) significantly (p < 0.05) increased high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol while it significantly (p < 0.05) reduced hyperglycemia, triglycerides (TGs), very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, coronary risk index (CRI) and cardiovascular risk index (CVRI). In contrast, honey (3.0 g/kg) significantly (p < 0.05) reduced TGs and VLDL cholesterol. This study confirms the reproducibility of glucose lowering and hypolipidemic effects of honey using Nigerian honey. However, none of the doses deteriorated hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia. PMID:26927161

  12. Worsening angle closure glaucoma and choroidal detachments subsequent to closure of a carotid cavernous fistula

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Carotid cavernous fistulas are abnormal communications between the cavernous sinus and the external or internal carotid arteries. Although rare, closure of carotid cavernous fistulas can lead to immediate ocular complications. To our knowledge, our case represents the first report of worsening angle closure glaucoma and choroidal detachments over an extended period of two months subsequent to closure of a carotid cavernous fistula. Case presentation A 70-year-old female with a history of primary angle closure glaucoma presented with 4 mm of proptosis, resistance to retropulsion, tortuous corkscrew blood vessels and an orbital bruit of the right eye. Diagnostic cerebral angiogram showed a small indirect Barrow type D right carotid cavernous fistula. Transarterial embolization was planned but repeat cerebral angiography prior to the procedure demonstrated spontaneous partial closure of the carotid cavernous fistula and the procedure was aborted. One month later, our patient was noted to have worsening vision and choroidal detachments of the right eye. She declined further testing and was thus started on self-administered manual carotid jugular compressions. One month later, she developed progressive worsening of her choroidal detachments and angle closure. She eventually opted for surgical intervention but repeat cerebral angiography showed significant thrombosis of the carotid cavernous fistula and no intervention was warranted. Examination two months later showed complete resolution of the choroidal detachments and open angles of both eyes. Conclusions Our patient demonstrated worsening angle closure glaucoma and choroidal detachments after spontaneous closure of her carotid cavernous fistula had been noted. Ocular complications, including acute angle closure, have been reported to occur immediately after closure of carotid cavernous fistulas, but not over months as in our patient. It is imperative that individuals who have undergone apparent closure

  13. [Glucose Metabolism: Stress Hyperglycemia and Glucose Control].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Katsuya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M

    2016-05-01

    It is important for the anesthesiologists to understand pathophysiology of perioperative stress hyperglycemia, because it offers strategies for treatment of stress hyperglycemia. The effect of glucose tolerance is different in the choice of the anesthetic agent used in daily clinical setting. Specifically, the volatile anesthetics inhibit insulin secretion after glucose load and affects glucose tolerance. During minor surgery by the remifentanil anesthesia, the stress reaction is hard to be induced, suggesting that we should consider low-dose glucose load. Finally it is necessary to perform the glycemic control of the patients who fell into stress hyperglycemia depending on the individual patient. However, there are a lot of questions to be answered in the future. The prognosis of the perioperative patients is more likely to be greatly improved if we can control stress hyperglycemia. PMID:27319094

  14. Poor Sleep May Worsen Thinking Problems in MS Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159463.html Poor Sleep May Worsen Thinking Problems in MS Patients Study found link between severity of sleep apnea and performance on attention, memory tests To ...

  15. Poor Sleep May Worsen Thinking Problems in MS Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159463.html Poor Sleep May Worsen Thinking Problems in MS Patients Study found link between severity of sleep apnea and performance on attention, memory tests To ...

  16. Management of hyperglycemia during the perioperative period.

    PubMed

    Pichardo-Lowden, Ariana; Gabbay, Robert A

    2012-02-01

    Hyperglycemia is frequently encountered in the inpatient setting and is distinctly associated with poor clinical outcomes. Recent literature suggests an association between stringent glycemic control and increased mortality, thus keeping optimal glycemic targets a relevant subject of debate. In the surgical population, hyperglycemia with or without diabetes mellitus may be unrecognized. Factors contributing to hyperglycemia in the hospital include critical illness, use of certain drugs, use of enteral or parenteral nutrition, and variability in oral or nutritional intake as can occur when patients are prepared for procedures or surgery. A sensible approach to managing hyperglycemia in this population includes preoperative recognition of diabetes mellitus and risks for inpatient hyperglycemia. Judicious control of glycemia during the pre-, intra-, and postoperative time periods with avoidance of hypoglycemia mandates the need for a strategy for patient management that extend to time of discharge. We review the consequences of uncontrolled perioperative hyperglycemia, discuss current clinical guidelines and recent controversies, and provide practical tools for glycemic control in the surgical population. PMID:22086363

  17. Predictors of disability worsening in clinically isolated syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jokubaitis, Vilija G; Spelman, Tim; Kalincik, Tomas; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Grand'Maison, François; Duquette, Pierre; Girard, Marc; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Grammond, Pierre; Hupperts, Raymond; Cabrera-Gomez, José; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Boz, Cavit; Giuliani, Giorgio; Fernández-Bolaños, Ricardo; Iuliano, Gerardo; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Verheul, Freek; van Pesch, Vincent; Petkovska-Boskova, Tatjana; Fiol, Marcela; Moore, Fraser; Cristiano, Edgardo; Alroughani, Raed; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Barnett, Michael; Slee, Mark; Vella, Norbert; Herbert, Joseph; Shaw, Cameron; Saladino, Maria Laura; Amato, Maria Pia; Liew, Danny; Paolicelli, Damiano; Butzkueven, Helmut; Trojano, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess demographic, clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and treatment exposure predictors of time to 3 or 12-month confirmed disability worsening in clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and early multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods We utilized the MSBase Incident Study (MSBasis), a prospective cohort study of outcome after CIS. Predictors of time to first 3 and 12-month confirmed expanded disability status scale worsening were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results About 1989 patients were analyzed, the largest seen-from-onset cohort reported to-date. A total of 391 patients had a first 3-month confirmed disability worsening event, of which 307 were sustained for 12 months. Older age at CIS onset (adjusted hazard ratio: aHR 1.17, 95% 1.06, 1.30), pyramidal (aHR 1.45, 95% CI 1.13, 1.89) and ambulation (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.09, 2.34) system dysfunction, annualized relapse rate (aHR 1.20, 95% CI 1.18, 1.22), and lower proportion of observation time on treatment were associated with 3-month confirmed worsening. Predictors of time to 12-month sustained worsening included pyramidal system dysfunction (Hazard ratio: aHR 1.38, 95% CI 1.05, 1.83), and older age at CIS onset (aHR 1.17, 95% CI 1.04, 1.31). Greater proportion of follow-up time exposed to treatment was associated with greater reductions in the rate of worsening. Interpretation This study provides class IV evidence for a strong protective effect of disease-modifying treatment to reduce disability worsening events in patients with CIS and early MS, and confirms age and pyramidal dysfunction at onset as risk factors. PMID:26000321

  18. Treating Hyperglycemia and Diabetes With Insulin Therapy: Transition From Inpatient to Outpatient Care

    PubMed Central

    Lavernia, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Abstract and Introduction Abstract Context Intensive insulin therapy is recommended to control glucose elevations in the critically ill and has been shown to significantly improve outcomes among hospital inpatients with acute hyperglycemia or newly diagnosed diabetes. Once discharged, the hyperglycemic patient may require ongoing outpatient care, most often under the attention of a primary care physician. Evidence acquisition The purpose of this review is to provide a background of in-hospital hyperglycemia management and discharge planning in preparation for continued outpatient care. Primary data sources were identified through a PubMed search (1990–2007) using keywords, such as diabetes, hyperglycemia, in-hospital, discharge, and insulin. Evidence synthesis Hyperglycemia protocols with strict glycemic goals have been shown to improve morbidity and mortality among critically ill inpatients. Discharge planning should prepare patients for self-care and give them the survival skills necessary to maintain glycemic control. In preparation for discharge, patients are usually transitioned from insulin infusions to subcutaneous insulin administered through an appropriate basal-prandial regimen. Conclusion A thorough understanding of hyperglycemia history and treatment will allow the primary care physician to deliver optimal diabetes care and thereby improve both short-term and long-term outcomes for those patients with critical illnesses and hyperglycemia or diabetes. Introduction Hyperglycemia, when left untreated, can have a negative impact on the patient's prognosis and outcome during the hospital stay and after discharge.[1–5] The prevalence of hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients is high, and may be associated with multiple factors: First, about 20.8 million Americans have diabetes, 6.2 million of whom (around one third) have not been diagnosed.[1,6] Furthermore, diabetes itself may contribute to hospitalization because it can lead to cardiovascular disease

  19. Care-seeking decisions for worsening symptoms in heart failure: a qualitative metasynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ivynian, S E; DiGiacomo, M; Newton, P J

    2015-11-01

    Over 50 % of heart failure (HF) patients delay seeking help for worsening symptoms until these reach acute levels and require emergency hospitalisation. This metasynthesis aimed to identify and explore factors influencing timely care-seeking in patients with HF. Electronic databases searched were MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL. Studies were included if they were peer-reviewed journal articles, written in English, and reported perspectives of HF patients following qualitative data collection and analysis. Forty articles underwent analysis following the approach of Thomas and Harden. Leventhal's self-regulatory model (SRM) was used to organise the literature. Much of the literature fits within the SRM; however, this model did not account for all factors that influence patients' care-seeking for worsening symptoms. Factors not accounted for included patients' appraisals of previous care-seeking experiences, perceived system and provider barriers to accessing care, and the influence of external appraisals. When added to factors already represented in the model, such as misattribution of symptoms, not identifying with HF diagnosis, cognitive status, lack of understanding information provided, adaptation to symptoms, and emotional responses, a more comprehensive account of patients' decision-making was revealed. This metasynthesis identified factors, as yet unaccounted for, in a prominent model, and has suggested a more comprehensive framework for addressing care-seeking in HF patients. This information can be used to tailor education, communication, and service initiatives to improve HF patients' responses to worsening symptoms and target those most at risk of delay. PMID:26456919

  20. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Restores Retinal Pigment Epithelium Function in Hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Danielle; Liu, Yueying; Crosson, Craig E; Ablonczy, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    In diabetic individuals, macular edema is a major cause of vision loss. This condition is refractory to insulin therapy and has been attributed to metabolic memory. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is central to maintaining fluid balance in the retina, and this function is compromised by the activation of advanced glycation end-product receptors (RAGE). Here we provide evidence that acute administration of the RAGE agonist, glycated-albumin (gAlb) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), increased histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in RPE cells. The administration of the class I/II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin-A (TSA), suppressed gAlb-induced reductions in RPE transepithelial resistance (in vitro) and fluid transport (in vivo). Systemic TSA also restored normal RPE fluid transport in rats with subchronic hyperglycemia. Both gAlb and VEGF increased HDAC activity and reduced acetyl-α-tubulin levels. Tubastatin-A, a relatively specific antagonist of HDAC6, inhibited gAlb-induced changes in RPE cell resistance. These data are consistent with the idea that RPE dysfunction following exposure to gAlb, VEGF, or hyperglycemia is associated with increased HDAC6 activity and decreased acetyl-α-tubulin. Therefore, we propose inhibiting HDAC6 in the RPE as a potential therapy for preserving normal fluid homeostasis in the hyperglycemic retina. PMID:27617745

  1. A man with worsening gastrointestinal and neurologic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Irving, David

    2016-08-01

    A Coast Guardsman deployed to a remote island in the Bahamas contacted his primary care office about worsening gastrointestinal and neurologic complaints. This article describes the telemedicine consultation to determine the cause of his symptoms, whether he needed emergency evacuation, and how treatment was handled. PMID:27467293

  2. The Ketogenic Diet Improves Recently Worsened Focal Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villeneuve, Nathalie; Pinton, Florence; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Dulac, Olivier; Chiron, Catherine; Nabbout, Rima

    2009-01-01

    Aim: We observed a dramatic response to the ketogenic diet in several patients with highly refractory epilepsy whose seizure frequency had recently worsened. This study aimed to identify whether this characteristic was a useful indication for the ketogenic diet. Method: From the 70 patients who received the ketogenic diet during a 3-year period at…

  3. Qualitative analysis of subcutaneous Lispro and regular insulin injections for stress hyperglycemia: a pilot numerical study.

    PubMed

    Strilka, Richard J; Armen, Scott B; Indeck, Matthew C

    2014-09-01

    Increased glucose variability (GV) is an independent risk factor for mortality in the critically ill; unfortunately, the optimal insulin therapy that minimizes GV is not known. We simulate the glucose-insulin feedback system to study how stress hyperglycemia (SH) states, taken to be a non-uniform group of physiologic disorders with varying insulin resistance (IR) and similar levels of hyperglycemia, respond to the type and dose of subcutaneous (SQ) insulin. Two groups of 100 virtual patients are studied: those receiving and those not receiving continuous enteral feeds. Stress hyperglycemia was facilitated by doubling the gluconeogenesis rate and IR was stepwise varied from a borderline to a high value. Lispro and regular insulin were simulated with dosages that ranged from 0 to 6 units; the resulting GV was analyzed after each insulin injection. The numerical model used consists of a set of non-linear differential equations with two time delays and five adjustable parameters. The results show that regular insulin decreased GV in both patient groups and rarely caused hypoglycemia. With continuous enteral feeds and borderline to mild IR, Lispro showed minimal effect on GV; however, rebound hyperglycemia that increased GV occurred when the IR was moderate to high. Without a nutritional source, Lispro worsened GV through frequent hypoglycemia episodes as the injection dose increased. The inferior performance of Lispro is a result of its rapid absorption profile; half of its duration of action is similar to the glucose ultradian period. Clinical trials are needed to examine whether these numerical results represent the glucose-insulin dynamics that occur in intensive care units, and if such dynamics are present, their clinical effects should be evaluated. PMID:24769252

  4. Impact of obesity on hospital complications and mortality in hospitalized patients with hyperglycemia and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Alexopoulos, Anastasia-Stefania; Fayfman, Maya; Zhao, Liping; Weaver, Jeff; Buehler, Lauren; Smiley, Dawn; Pasquel, Francisco J; Vellanki, Priyathama; Haw, J Sonya; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obesity is associated with increased risk of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular mortality. Several studies have reported increased length of hospital stay and complications; however, there are also reports of obesity having a protective effect on health, a phenomenon coined the ‘obesity paradox’. We aimed to investigate the impact of overweight and obesity on complications and mortality in hospitalized patients with hyperglycemia and diabetes. Research design and methods This retrospective analysis was conducted on 29 623 patients admitted to two academic hospitals in Atlanta, Georgia, between January 2012 and December 2013. Patients were subdivided by body mass index into underweight (body mass index <18.5 kg/m2), normal weight (18.5–24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25–29.9 kg/m2) and obese (>30 kg/m2). Hyperglycemia was defined as a blood glucose >10 mmol/L during hospitalization. Hospital complications included a composite of pneumonia, acute myocardial infarction, respiratory failure, acute kidney injury, bacteremia and death. Results A total of 4.2% were underweight, 29.6% had normal weight, 30.2% were overweight, and 36% were obese. 27.2% of patients had diabetes and 72.8% did not have diabetes (of which 75% had hyperglycemia and 25% had normoglycemia during hospitalization). A J-shaped curve with higher rates of complications was observed in underweight patients in all glycemic groups; however, there was no significant difference in the rate of complications among normal weight, overweight, or obese patients, with and without diabetes or hyperglycemia. Conclusions Underweight is an independent predictor for hospital complications. In contrast, increasing body mass index was not associated with higher morbidity or mortality, regardless of glycemic status. There was no evidence of an obesity paradox among inpatients with diabetes and hyperglycemia. PMID:27486518

  5. Management of Hyperglycemia and Enteral Nutrition in the Hospitalized Patient.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Patricia; Kwiatkowski, Cynthia Ann; Wien, Michelle

    2015-10-01

    There has been increased attention on the importance of identifying and distinguishing the differences between stress-induced hyperglycemia (SH), newly diagnosed hyperglycemia (NDH), and hyperglycemia in persons with established diabetes mellitus (DM). Inpatient blood glucose control is now being recognized as not only a cost issue for hospitals but also a concern for patient safety and care. The reasons for the increased incidence of hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients include preexisting DM, undiagnosed DM or prediabetes, SH, and medication-induced hyperglycemia with resulting transient blood glucose variability. It is clear that identifying and documenting hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients with and without a previous diagnosis of DM and initiating prompt insulin treatment are important. Agreement on the optimum treatment goals for hyperglycemia remains quite controversial, and the benefits of intensive glucose management may be lost at the cost of hypoglycemia in intensive care unit patients. Nutrition support in the form of enteral nutrition (EN) increases the risk of hyperglycemia in both critical and non-critically ill hospitalized patients. Reasons for beginning a tube feeding are the same whether a person has NDH or DM. What differs is how to incorporate EN into the established insulin management protocols. The risk for hyperglycemia with the addition of EN is even higher in those without a previous diagnosis of DM. This review discusses the incidence of hyperglycemia, the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia, factors contributing to hyperglycemia in the hospitalized patient, glycemic management goals, current glycemic management recommendations, and considerations for EN formula selection, administration, and treatment. PMID:26084507

  6. Local 24-h hyperglycemia does not affect endothelium-dependent or -independent vasoreactivity in humans.

    PubMed

    Houben, A J; Schaper, N C; de Haan, C H; Huvers, F C; Slaaf, D W; de Leeuw, P W; Nieuwenhuijzen Kruseman, C

    1996-06-01

    Hyperglycemia induces regional hemodynamic changes, as suggested by animal studies. These hemodynamic changes may play an initiating role in the pathogenesis of diabetic microangiopathy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of acute local hyperglycemia for 24 h on basal human forearm muscle and skin blood flow and endothelium-dependent and -independent vasoreactivity. Local hyperglycemia (approximately 15 mM) was induced by infusion of 5% glucose into the brachial artery of the nondominant arm. In control experiments, the same individual amount of glucose was infused intravenously in the dominant arm to correct for possible systemic effects of the infused glucose. Vasoreactivity of the forearm vasculature was evaluated by local infusion of acetylcholine (ACh), sodium nitroprusside (SNP), NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), and norepinephrine (NE) into the brachial artery. Regional hemodynamic measurements were performed at baseline and after 6, 12, and 24 h of local hyperglycemia. Median (with interquartile range) basal forearm (muscle) blood flow (FBF) was not influenced by the 24-h local hyperglycemia [infused-to-contralateral arm FBF ratio for glucose 1.32 (1.16-1.64) vs. control 1.54 (1.34-1.69)]. Skin microcirculatory blood flow (laser Doppler flowmetry, LDF) was not influenced by the 24-h local hyperglycemia [LDF ratio for glucose 1.00 (0.62-1.56) vs control 0.80 (0.58-1.14)]. In addition, the vasoreactivity of both muscle and skin (not shown) vasculature to ACh [percent change in FBF ratio for glucose 167% (81-263) vs. control 148% (94-211)], SNP [for glucose 486% (178-586) vs. control 293% (196-454)], L-NMMA [for glucose -36% (-56 to -22) vs. control -41% (-51 to -24)], and NE [for glucose -48% (-72 to -41) vs. control -66% (-79 to -33)] was also not affected by the local hyperglycemia. Thus, in contrast to animal studies, our results suggest that a moderate-to-severe hyperglycemia does not affect the regulation of basal blood flow or

  7. Sleep deprivation worsens inflammation and delays recovery in a mouse model of colitis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yueming; Preuss, Fabian; Turek, Fred W.; Jakate, Shriram; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Background and aim We recently showed that patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) report significantly more sleep disturbances. To determine whether disrupted sleep can affect the severity of inflammation and the course of IBD, we used an animal model of colonic inflammation to determine the effects of acute and chronic intermittent sleep deprivation on the severity of colonic inflammation and tissue damage in colitis and recovery from this damage. Methods Acute sleep deprivation (ASD) consisted of 24 h of forced locomotor activity in a mechanical wheel rotating at a constant speed. Chronic intermittent sleep deprivation (CISD) consisted of an acute sleep deprivation episode, followed by additional sleep deprivation periods in the wheel for 6 h every other day throughout the 10 day study period. To induce colitis, mice were given 2% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in their daily drinking water for 7 days. The development and severity of colitis were monitored by measuring weight loss and tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity daily and colon histology scores 10 days after initiation of colitis. Results ASD or CISD did not cause colonic inflammation in vehicle-treated mice. Changes in daily body weight, tissue MPO levels and colon histopathology score were similar between mice that were sleep deprived and controls. Daily DSS ingestion caused colitis in mice. ASD worsened colonic inflammation: tissue MPO levels in ASD/DSS-treated mice were significantly higher than in DSS-treated mice that were not sleep deprived. However, the worsening of colonic inflammation by ASD was not enough to exacerbate clinical manifestations of colitis such as weight loss. In contrast, the deleterious effects of CISD were severe enough to cause worsening of histological and clinical manifestations of colitis. The deleterious effects of sleep deprivation on severity of colitis appeared to be due to both increased colonic inflammation and a decrease in the ability of mice to recover from

  8. Hyperglycemia and Diabetes Mellitus Following Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Rodolfo J; Wallia, Amisha

    2016-02-01

    Hyperglycemia is common following organ transplantation, regardless of the pre-transplant diabetes status. Transient post-transplant hyperglycemia and/or new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) are common and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. NODAT and type 2 diabetes share similar characteristics, but the pathophysiology may differ. Immunosuppressive agents and steroids play a key role in the development of NODAT. Glycemic control is challenging in this population due to fluctuating renal/end-organ function, immunosuppressive dosing, nutritional status, and drug-drug interactions. A proactive and multidisciplinary approach is essential, along with flexible protocols to adjust to patient status, type of organ transplanted, and corticosteroid regimens. Insulin is the preferred agent for hospitalized patients and during the early post-transplant period; optimal glycemic control (BG < 180 mg/dl with minimal hypoglycemia [<70 mg/dl]) is desired. PMID:26803650

  9. [CONTROL OF HYPERGLYCEMIA IN THE CLINICAL PRACTICE].

    PubMed

    Korolev, V A; Makarova, M O

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of hyperglycemia was based on the fasting plasma glucose, the 2-h value in the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test and the determination of glycated hemoglobin. The purpose of investigation is determination of glycated hemoglobin by patients with the risk of critical condition. For it the three patients groups were investigated: with cerebrovascular diseases, with hyperasotemia and with the renal insufficience. We discoved that hyperglycemia and HbA1c formates important factor in the change of the tone of cerebral arteries. Hyperasotemia makes ponderable percent of distribution in the general population of people. The level of glycated hemoglobin by patients with latent renal insufficience was increased. The determination of HbA1c can use for patients with critical conditions. PMID:26827454

  10. Rehydration with soft drink-like beverages exacerbates dehydration and worsens dehydration-associated renal injury.

    PubMed

    García-Arroyo, Fernando E; Cristóbal, Magdalena; Arellano-Buendía, Abraham S; Osorio, Horacio; Tapia, Edilia; Soto, Virgilia; Madero, Magdalena; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Roncal-Jiménez, Carlos; Bankir, Lise; Johnson, Richard J; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura-Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    Recurrent dehydration, such as commonly occurs with manual labor in tropical environments, has been recently shown to result in chronic kidney injury, likely through the effects of hyperosmolarity to activate both vasopressin and aldose reductase-fructokinase pathways. The observation that the latter pathway can be directly engaged by simple sugars (glucose and fructose) leads to the hypothesis that soft drinks (which contain these sugars) might worsen rather than benefit dehydration associated kidney disease. Recurrent dehydration was induced in rats by exposure to heat (36°C) for 1 h/24 h followed by access for 2 h to plain water (W), a 11% fructose-glucose solution (FG, same composition as typical soft drinks), or water sweetened with noncaloric stevia (ST). After 4 wk plasma and urine samples were collected, and kidneys were examined for oxidative stress, inflammation, and injury. Recurrent heat-induced dehydration with ad libitum water repletion resulted in plasma and urinary hyperosmolarity with stimulation of the vasopressin (copeptin) levels and resulted in mild tubular injury and renal oxidative stress. Rehydration with 11% FG solution, despite larger total fluid intake, resulted in greater dehydration (higher osmolarity and copeptin levels) and worse renal injury, with activation of aldose reductase and fructokinase, whereas rehydration with stevia water had opposite effects. In animals that are dehydrated, rehydration acutely with soft drinks worsens dehydration and exacerbates dehydration associated renal damage. These studies emphasize the danger of drinking soft drink-like beverages as an attempt to rehydrate following dehydration. PMID:27053647

  11. The Emory University Perioperative Algorithm for the Management of Hyperglycemia and Diabetes in Non-cardiac Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Elizabeth W; Klopman, Matthew A; Berry, Arnold J; Umpierrez, Guillermo

    2016-03-01

    Hyperglycemia is a frequent manifestation of critical and surgical illness, resulting from the acute metabolic and hormonal changes associated with the response to injury and stress (Umpierrez and Kitabchi, Curr Opin Endocrinol. 11:75-81, 2004; McCowen et al., Crit Care Clin. 17(1):107-24, 2001). The exact prevalence of hospital hyperglycemia is not known, but observational studies have reported a prevalence of hyperglycemia ranging from 32 to 60 % in community hospitals (Umpierrez et al., J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 87(3):978-82, 2002; Cook et al., J Hosp Med. 4(9):E7-14, 2009; Farrokhi et al., Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab. 25(5):813-24, 2011), and 80 % of patients after cardiac surgery (Schmeltz et al., Diabetes Care 30(4):823-8, 2007; van den Berghe et al., N Engl J Med. 345(19):1359-67, 2001). Retrospective and randomized controlled trials in surgical populations have reported that hyperglycemia and diabetes are associated with increased length of stay, hospital complications, resource utilization, and mortality (Frisch et al., Diabetes Care 33(8):1783-8, 2010; Kwon et al., Ann Surg. 257(1):8-14, 2013; Bower et al., Surgery 147(5):670-5, 2010; Noordzij et al., Eur J Endocrinol. 156(1):137-42, 2007; Mraovic et al., J Arthroplasty 25(1):64-70, 2010). Substantial evidence indicates that correction of hyperglycemia reduces complications in critically ill, as well as in general surgery patients (Umpierrez et al., J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 87(3):978-82, 2002; Clement et al., Diabetes Care 27(2):553-97, 2004; Pomposelli et al., JPEN J Parented Enteral Nutr. 22(2):77-81, 1998). This manuscript reviews the pathophysiology of stress hyperglycemia during anesthesia and the perioperative period. We provide a practical outline for the diagnosis and management of preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care of patients with diabetes and hyperglycemia. PMID:26971119

  12. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI. PMID:27034930

  13. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI. PMID:27034930

  14. [Complementary treatment of acute heart failure in patients with diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or anemia].

    PubMed

    Carrasco Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Recio Iglesias, Jesús; Grau Amorós, Jordi

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and anemia are comorbidities with a high prevalence and impact in heart failure (HF). The presence of these comorbidities considerably worsens the prognosis of HF. Diabetic patients have a higher likelihood of developing symptoms of HF and both the treatment of diabetes and that of acute HF are altered by the coexistence of both entities. The glycemic targets in patients with acute HF are not well-defined, but could show a U-shaped relationship. Stress hyperglycemia in non-diabetic patients with HF could also have a deleterious effect on the medium-term prognosis. The inter-relationship between COPD and HF hampers diagnosis due to the overlap between the symptoms and signs of both entities and complementary investigations. The treatment of acute HF is also altered by the presence of COPD. Anemia is highly prevalent and is often the direct cause of decompensated HF, the most common cause being iron deficiency anemia. Iron replacement therapy, specifically intravenous forms, has helped to improve the prognosis of acute HF. PMID:24930086

  15. Predicting worsening asthma control following the common cold

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Michael J.; Castro, Mario; Kunselman, Susan J.; Chinchilli, Vernon M; Reno, Melissa; Ramkumar, Thiruvamoor P.; Avila, Pedro C.; Boushey, Homer A.; Ameredes, Bill T.; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Calhoun, William J.; Cherniack, Reuben M.; Craig, Timothy J.; Denlinger, Loren C.; Israel, Elliot; Fahy, John V.; Jarjour, Nizar N.; Kraft, Monica; Lazarus, Stephen C.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Martin, Richard J.; Peters, Stephen P.; Ramsdell, Joe W.; Sorkness, Christine A.; Rand Sutherland, E.; Szefler, Stanley J.; Wasserman, Stephen I.; Wechsler, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    The asthmatic response to the common cold is highly variable and early characteristics that predict worsening of asthma control following a cold have not been identified. In this prospective multi-center cohort study of 413 adult subjects with asthma, we used the mini-Asthma Control Questionnaire (mini-ACQ) to quantify changes in asthma control and the Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey-21 (WURSS-21) to measure cold severity. Univariate and multivariable models examined demographic, physiologic, serologic, and cold-related characteristics for their relationship to changes in asthma control following a cold. We observed a clinically significant worsening of asthma control following a cold (increase in mini-ACQ of 0.69 ± 0.93). Univariate analysis demonstrated season, center location, cold length, and cold severity measurements all associated with a change in asthma control. Multivariable analysis of the covariates available within the first 2 days of cold onset revealed the day 2 and the cumulative sum of the day 1 and 2 WURSS-21 scores were significant predictors for the subsequent changes in asthma control. In asthmatic subjects the cold severity measured within the first 2 days can be used to predict subsequent changes in asthma control. This information may help clinicians prevent deterioration in asthma control following a cold. PMID:18768579

  16. Hyperglycemia Impairs Proteasome Function by Methylglyoxal

    PubMed Central

    Queisser, Markus A.; Yao, Dachun; Geisler, Sven; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Lochnit, Günter; Schleicher, Erwin D.; Brownlee, Michael; Preissner, Klaus T.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The ubiquitin-proteasome system is the main degradation machinery for intracellularly altered proteins. Hyperglycemia has been shown to increase intracellular levels of the reactive dicarbonyl methylglyoxal (MGO) in cells damaged by diabetes, resulting in modification of proteins and alterations of their function. In this study, the influence of MGO-derived advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation on the activity of the proteasome was investigated in vitro and in vivo. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS MGO-derived AGE modification of proteasome subunits was analyzed by mass spectrometry, immunoprecipitation, and Western blots. Proteasome activity was analyzed using proteasome-specific fluorogenic substrates. Experimental models included bovine retinal endothelial cells, diabetic Ins2Akita mice, glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) knockdown mice, and streptozotocin (STZ)-injected diabetic mice. RESULTS In vitro incubation with MGO caused adduct formation on several 20S proteasomal subunit proteins. In cultured endothelial cells, the expression level of the catalytic 20S proteasome subunit was not altered but proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity was significantly reduced. In contrast, levels of regulatory 19S proteasomal proteins were decreased. In diabetic Ins2Akita, STZ diabetic, and nondiabetic and diabetic G101 knockdown mice, chymotrypsin-like activity was also reduced and MGO modification of the 20S-β2 subunit was increased. CONCLUSIONS Hyperglycemia-induced formation of MGO covalently modifies the 20S proteasome, decreasing its activity in the diabetic kidney and reducing the polyubiquitin receptor 19S-S5a. The results indicate a new link between hyperglycemia and impairment of cell functions. PMID:20009088

  17. Increased Cardiometabolic Risk and Worsening Hypoxemia at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Miele, Catherine H; Schwartz, Alan R; Gilman, Robert H; Pham, Luu; Wise, Robert A; Davila-Roman, Victor G; Jun, Jonathan C; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y; Miranda, J Jaime; Leon-Velarde, Fabiola; Checkley, William

    2016-06-01

    Miele, Catherine H., Alan R. Schwartz, Robert H. Gilman, Luu Pham, Robert A. Wise, Victor G. Davila-Roman, Jonathan C. Jun, Vsevolod Y. Polotsky, J. Jaime Miranda, Fabiola Leon-Velarde, and William Checkley. Increased cardiometabolic risk and worsening hypoxemia at high altitude. High Alt Med Biol. 17:93-100, 2016.-Metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, diabetes, and dyslipidemia are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. While excessive erythrocytosis is associated with cardiovascular complications, it is unclear how worsening hypoxemia of any degree affects cardiometabolic risk factors in high-altitude populations. We studied the relationship between daytime resting oxyhemoglobin saturation and cardiometabolic risk factors in adult participants living in Puno, Peru (3825 m above sea level). We used multivariable logistic regression models to study the relationship between having a lower oxyhemoglobin saturation and markers of cardiometabolic risk. Nine hundred and fifty-four participants (mean age 55 years, 52% male) had information available on pulse oximetry and markers of cardiometabolic risk. Average oxyhemoglobin saturation was 90% (interquartile range 88%-92%) and 43 (4.5%) had excessive erythrocytosis. Older age, decreased height-adjusted lung function, and higher body mass index (BMI) were associated with having an oxyhemoglobin saturation ≤85%. When adjusting for age, sex, socioeconomic status, having excessive erythrocytosis, and site, we found that each 5% decrease in oxyhemoglobin saturation was associated with a higher adjusted odds of metabolic syndrome (OR = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.07-1.72, p < 0.04), insulin resistance as defined by homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) >2 mass units (OR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.00-1.67, p < 0.05), hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5% (OR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.09-2.51, p < 0.04), and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) ≥3 mg/L (OR = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.09-1.96, p

  18. When perennial rhinitis worsens: rhinolith mimicking severe allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Heffler, Enrico; Machetta, Giacomo; Magnano, Mauro; Rolla, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is one of the most common causes of nasal obstruction, but other diseases need to be considered particularly when the clinical course is getting worse. We present a patient with known mild persistent allergic rhinitis due to house dust mites who experienced progressive worsening of nasal obstruction with associated hyposmia and mucopurulent discharge. The lack of improvement of the patient’s symptoms prompted the re-evaluation of the case. Skin prick tests for airborne allergens confirmed sensitisation only to house dust mites. Nasal endoscopy and facial CT scan revealed a huge rhinolith occupying almost completely the right nasal cavity. The rhinolith was surgically removed with resolution of symptoms. Rhinoliths are rare and unusual calcified materials which grow around intranasal foreign body; they are often promoted by trauma, surgical operations and dental work. The patient underwent dental work about 30 months before the diagnosis of rhinolith, suggesting a possible aetiology. PMID:24526202

  19. Extending prayer marks as a sign of worsening chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Cangiano, M; Chisti, Mohammod J; Pietroni, Mark A C; Smith, Jonathan H

    2011-06-01

    A 60-year-old Muslim man was admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of ICDDR,B with an exacerbation of his chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Incidental hyperpigmented skin lesions were noticed overlying the dorsum of his ankles, knees, and elbows. Such asymptomatic areas of thickened, lichenified and hyperpigmented skin are called 'prayer marks' and are well-imprinted on the knees, ankles, and forehead. These are secondary to prolonged periods of pressure over bony prominences during prayer. The patient's wife stated that the appearance of the elbow marks had coincided with an increase in his breathlessness and subsequent use of his elbows to rise from daily prayers. Prayer marks extending to the elbows could be a sign of worsening chronic disease. PMID:21766565

  20. Postprandial hyperglycemia impairs vascular endothelial function in healthy men by inducing lipid peroxidation and increasing asymmetric dimethylarginine:arginine.

    PubMed

    Mah, Eunice; Noh, Sang K; Ballard, Kevin D; Matos, Manuel E; Volek, Jeff S; Bruno, Richard S

    2011-11-01

    Postprandial hyperglycemia induces vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) and increases future cardiovascular disease risk. We hypothesized that postprandial hyperglycemia would decrease vascular function in healthy men by inducing oxidative stress and proinflammatory responses and increasing asymmetric dimethylarginine:arginine (ADMA:arginine), a biomarker that is predictive of reduced NO biosynthesis. In a randomized, cross-over design, healthy men (n = 16; 21.6 ± 0.8 y) ingested glucose or fructose (75 g) after an overnight fast. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), plasma glucose and insulin, antioxidants, malondialdehyde (MDA), inflammatory proteins, arginine, and ADMA were measured at regular intervals during the 3-h postprandial period. Baseline FMD did not differ between trials (P > 0.05). Postprandial FMD was reduced following the ingestion of glucose only. Postprandial MDA concentrations increased to a greater extent following the ingestion of glucose compared to fructose. Plasma arginine decreased and the ratio of ADMA:arginine increased to a greater extent following the ingestion of glucose. Inflammatory cytokines and cellular adhesion molecules were unaffected by the ingestion of either sugar. Postprandial AUC(0-3 h) for FMD and MDA were inversely related (r = -0.80; P < 0.05), suggesting that hyperglycemia-induced lipid peroxidation suppresses postprandial vascular function. Collectively, these findings suggest that postprandial hyperglycemia in healthy men reduces endothelium-dependent vasodilation by increasing lipid peroxidation independent of inflammation. Postprandial alterations in arginine and ADMA:arginine also suggest that acute hyperglycemia may induce VED by decreasing NO bioavailability through an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism. Additional work is warranted to define whether inhibiting lipid peroxidation and restoring arginine metabolism would mitigate hyperglycemia-mediated decreases in vascular function. PMID:21940510

  1. Hyperglycemia Increases Susceptibility to Ischemic Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lévigne, D.; Tobalem, M.; Modarressi, A.; Pittet-Cuénod, B.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic patients are at risk for spontaneous foot ulcers, chronic wounds, infections, and tissue necrosis. Current theories suggest that the development and progression of diabetic foot ulcers are mainly caused by arteriosclerosis and peripheral neuropathy. Tissue necrosis plays a primordial role in the progression of diabetic foot ulcers but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of hyperglycemia per se on the susceptibility of ischemic tissue to necrosis, using a critical ischemic hind limb animal model. We inflicted the same degree of ischemia in both euglycemic and streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemic rats by resecting the external iliac, the femoral, and the saphenous arteries. Postoperative laser Doppler flowmetry of the ischemic feet showed the same degree of reduction in skin perfusion in both hyperglycemic and euglycemic animals. Nevertheless, we found a significantly higher rate of limb necrosis in hyperglycemic rats compared to euglycemic rats (71% versus 29%, resp.). In this study, we revealed that hyperglycemia per se increases the susceptibility to limb necrosis in ischemic conditions. Our results may help to better understand the physiopathology of progressive diabetic wounds and underline the importance of strict glycemic control in patients with critical limb ischemia. PMID:23509730

  2. Complex Partial Seizure as a Manifestation of Non-Ketotic Hyperglycemia: The Needle Recovered From Haystack?

    PubMed

    Rani, Khairil Amir; Ahmed, Mohamed H; Dunphy, Louise; Behnam, Yousif

    2016-06-01

    We present a case of a 75-year-old gentleman with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus presenting with acute onset expressive dysphasia and right hemi-paresis with no prior history of seizure. He developed clusters of stereotypical complex partial seizures which were refractory to anti-epileptic agents. He was not known to have diabetes and his brain MRI was normal. His random blood sugar measurement on admission to hospital was 30 mmol/L with HbA1c measurement of 14.8%. His seizures terminated completely when his hyperglycemia was corrected with insulin and rehydration therapy. PMID:27222677

  3. Complex Partial Seizure as a Manifestation of Non-Ketotic Hyperglycemia: The Needle Recovered From Haystack?

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Khairil Amir; Ahmed, Mohamed H.; Dunphy, Louise; Behnam, Yousif

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 75-year-old gentleman with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus presenting with acute onset expressive dysphasia and right hemi-paresis with no prior history of seizure. He developed clusters of stereotypical complex partial seizures which were refractory to anti-epileptic agents. He was not known to have diabetes and his brain MRI was normal. His random blood sugar measurement on admission to hospital was 30 mmol/L with HbA1c measurement of 14.8%. His seizures terminated completely when his hyperglycemia was corrected with insulin and rehydration therapy. PMID:27222677

  4. Hyperglycemia induces embryopathy, even in the absence of systemic maternal diabetes: an in vivo test of the fuel mediated teratogenesis hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Baack, Michelle L; Wang, Chunlin; Hu, Shanming; Segar, Jeffrey L; Norris, Andrew W

    2014-07-01

    Embryonic exposure to excess circulating fuels is proposed to underlie diabetic embryopathy. To isolate the effects of hyperglycemia from the many systemic anomalies of diabetes, we infused 4 mg/min glucose into the left uterine artery of non-diabetic pregnant rats on gestation days (GD) 7-9. Right-sided embryos and dams exhibited no glucose elevation. Embryos were assessed on GD13, comparing the left versus right uterine horns. Hyperglycemic exposure increased rates of embryopathy, resorptions, and worsened embryopathy severity. By contrast, saline infusion did not affect any of these parameters. To assess for possible embryopathy susceptibility bias between uterine horns, separate dams were given retinoic acid (25mg/kg, a mildly embryopathic dose) systemically on GD7.5. The resultant embryopathy rates were equivalent between uterine horns. We conclude that hyperglycemia, even in the absence of systemic maternal diabetes, is sufficient to produce in vivo embryopathy during organogenesis. PMID:24721120

  5. Hyperglycemia Induces Embryopathy, Even in the Absence of Systemic Maternal Diabetes: An In Vivo Test of the Fuel Mediated Teratogenesis Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Baack, Michelle L.; Wang, Chunlin; Hu, Shanming; Segar, Jeffrey L.; Norris, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic exposure to excess circulating fuels is proposed to underlie diabetic embryopathy. To isolate the effects of hyperglycemia from the many systemic anomalies of diabetes, we infused 4 mg/min glucose into the left uterine artery of non-diabetic pregnant rats on gestation days (GD) 7–9. Right-sided embryos and dams exhibited no glucose elevation. Embryos were assessed on GD13, comparing the left versus right uterine horns. Hyperglycemic exposure increased rates of embryopathy, resorptions, and worsened embryopathy severity. By contrast, saline infusion did not affect any of these parameters. To assess for possible embryopathy susceptibility bias between uterine horns, separate dams were given retinoic acid (25 mg/kg, a mildly embryopathic dose) systemically on GD7.5. The resultant embryopathy rates were equivalent between uterine horns. We conclude that hyperglycemia, even in the absence of systemic maternal diabetes, is sufficient to produce in vivo embryopathy during organogenesis. PMID:24721120

  6. Leukoaraiosis Significantly Worsens Driving Performance of Ordinary Older Drivers

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Rencheng; Fang, Fang; Ohori, Masanori; Nakamura, Hiroki; Kumagai, Yasuhiho; Okada, Hiroshi; Teramura, Kazuhiko; Nakayama, Satoshi; Irimajiri, Akinori; Taoka, Hiroshi; Okada, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Background Leukoaraiosis is defined as extracellular space caused mainly by atherosclerotic or demyelinated changes in the brain tissue and is commonly found in the brains of healthy older people. A significant association between leukoaraiosis and traffic crashes was reported in our previous study; however, the reason for this is still unclear. Method This paper presents a comprehensive evaluation of driving performance in ordinary older drivers with leukoaraiosis. First, the degree of leukoaraiosis was examined in 33 participants, who underwent an actual-vehicle driving examination on a standard driving course, and a driver skill rating was also collected while the driver carried out a paced auditory serial addition test, which is a calculating task given verbally. At the same time, a steering entropy method was used to estimate steering operation performance. Results The experimental results indicated that a normal older driver with leukoaraiosis was readily affected by external disturbances and made more operation errors and steered less smoothly than one without leukoaraiosis during driving; at the same time, their steering skill significantly deteriorated. Conclusions Leukoaraiosis worsens the driving performance of older drivers because of their increased vulnerability to distraction. PMID:25295736

  7. Rare Case of Rapidly Worsening REM Sleep Induced Bradycardia

    PubMed Central

    Duba, Ayyappa S.; Jasty, Suneetha; Mahajan, Ankit; Kodadhala, Vijay; Khan, Raza; Rai, Prithviraj; Ghazvini, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Sinoatrial arrest also known as sinus pause occurs when sinoatrial node of the heart transiently ceases to generate the electrical impulse necessary for the myocardium to contract. It may last from 2.0 seconds to several minutes. Etiologies of sinoatrial arrest can be complex and heterogeneous. During rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, sinus arrests unrelated to apnea or hypopnea are very rare and only a few cases have been reported. Here we report a case of 36-year-old male with no significant past medical history who presented to our hospital after a syncopal episode at night. Physical examination showed no cardiac or neurological abnormalities and initial EKG and neuroimaging were normal. Overnight telemonitor recorded several episodes of bradyarrhythmia with sinus arrest that progressively lengthened over time. Sleep study was done which confirmed that sinus arrests occurred more during REM sleep and are unrelated to apnea or hypopnea. Electrophysiology studies showed sinus nodal dysfunction with no junctional escape, subsequently a dual chamber pacemaker placed for rapidly worsening case of REM sleep induced bradycardia. PMID:26351588

  8. Serum Calcium Increase Correlates With Worsening of Lipid Profile

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Luigia; Faniello, Maria C.; Canino, Giovanni; Tripolino, Cesare; Gnasso, Agostino; Cuda, Giovanni; Costanzo, Francesco S.; Irace, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite the well-documented role of calcium in cell metabolism, its role in the development of cardiovascular disease is still under heavy debate. Several studies suggest that calcium supplementation might be associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, whereas others underline a significant effect on lowering high blood pressure and hyperlipidemia. The purpose of this study was to investigate, in a large nonselected cohort from South Italy, if serum calcium levels correlate with lipid values and can therefore be linked to higher individual cardiovascular risk. Eight-thousand-six-hundred-ten outpatients addressed to the Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, University of Magna Græcia, Catanzaro, Italy from January 2012 to December 2013 for routine blood tests, were enrolled in the study. Total HDL-, LDL- and non-HDL colesterol, triglycerides, and calcium were determined with standard methods. We observed a significant association between total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and serum calcium in men and postmenopause women. Interestingly, in premenopause women, we only found a direct correlation between serum calcium, total cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol. Calcium significantly increased while increasing total cholesterol and triglycerides in men and postmenopause women. Our results confirm that progressive increase of serum calcium level correlates with worsening of lipid profile in our study population. Therefore, we suggest that a greater caution should be used in calcium supplement prescription particularly in men and women undergoing menopause, in which an increase of serum lipids is already known to be associated with a higher cardiovascular risk. PMID:26937904

  9. Sleep restriction worsens mood and emotion regulation in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Katherine T.; Desai, Anjali; Field, Julie; Miller, Lauren E.; Rausch, Joseph; Beebe, Dean W.

    2013-01-01

    Background The relationship between inadequate sleep and mood has been well-established in adults and is supported primarily by correlational data in younger populations. Given that adolescents often experience shortened sleep on school nights, we sought to better understand the effect of experimentally-induced chronic sleep restriction on adolescents’ mood and mood regulation. Methods Fifty healthy adolescents, ages 14 to 17, completed a three-week sleep manipulation protocol involving a baseline week, followed by a sleep restriction (SR) condition (6.5 hours in bed per night for five nights) and healthy sleep duration (HS) condition (10 hours in bed per night for five nights). The study used a randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over experimental design. Participants’ sleep was monitored at home via self-report and actigraphy. At the end of each condition, participants and their parents completed questionnaires of mood and mood regulation. To assess for expectancy effects, we also analyzed parent and teen ratings of hyperactivity/impulsivity, which prior research suggests is not sensitive to SR in adolescents. Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests compared questionnaire outcomes across the two conditions. Results Participants averaged 2.5 more hours of sleep per night during HS relative to SR. Compared to HS, adolescents rated themselves as significantly more tense/anxious, angry/hostile, confused, and fatigued, and as less vigorous (p = .001–.01) during SR. Parents and adolescents also reported greater oppositionality/irritability and poorer emotional regulation during SR compared to HS (p < .05). There were no cross condition differences in depression or hyperactivity/impulsivity (p > .05). Conclusions Findings complement prior correlational study results to show that after only a few days of shortened sleep, at a level of severity that is experienced regularly by millions of adolescents on school nights, adolescents have worsened mood and decreased ability to

  10. The Worsening Profile of Alcoholic Hepatitis in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; DeShazo, Jonathan P.; Thacker, Leroy R.; Puri, Puneet; Sanyal, Arun J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is a major cause of liver-related hospitalization. The profile, treatment patterns, and outcomes of subjects admitted for AH in routine clinical practice are unknown. Also, it is not known whether these are changing over time. This study is thus aimed to identify temporal trends in hospitalization rates, clinical characteristics, treatment patterns, and outcomes of subjects admitted for AH in a routine clinical setting. Methods A retrospective analysis of adults admitted for AH from 2000 to 2011 was performed using an anonymized EMR database of patient-level data from 169 U.S. medical centers. Results (i) Epidemiology: The proportion of baby boomers admitted for AH increased from 2000 to 2011 (26 to 31%, p < 0.0001). (ii) Clinical: The median Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score increased over time from 12 to 14 (p = 0.0014) driven mainly by increased international normalized ratio (1.2 to 1.4, p < 0.0001). The median Charlson Comorbidity Index increased from 0 to 1 (p < 0.0001) with increased diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and heart disease. (iii) Complications: The following increased from 2001 to 2011: Gastrointestinal bleed—7 to 10% (p = 0.03); hepatic encephalopathy—7 to 13% (p < 0.0001); hepatorenal syndrome—1.8 to 2.8% (p = 0.0003); sepsis—0 to 6% (p < 0.0001); and pancreatitis—11 to 16% (p = 0.0061). (iv) Treatment patterns and mortality: Eight to 9% of subjects received steroids while pentoxifylline use increased to 2.2%. In those with MELD ≥ 22, mortality remained between 19 and 20% and only steroids modestly improved survival in this subset. Conclusions Severe AH continues to have a high mortality. The severity and comorbidities and complications associated with AH have worsened. Drug therapy remains suboptimal. PMID:27147285

  11. Outcomes and worsening renal function in patients hospitalized with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kavita; Hill, Terence; Grams, Morgan; Daya, Natalie R; Hays, Allison G; Fine, Derek; Thiemann, David R; Weiss, Robert G; Tedford, Ryan J; Kass, David A; Schulman, Steven P; Russell, Stuart D

    2015-11-15

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) has been described as a disease of elderly subjects with female predominance and hypertension. Our clinical experience suggests patients with HFpEF from an urban population are far more heterogenous, with greater co-morbidities and significant inhospital morbidity. There are limited data on the hospitalization course and outcomes in acute decompensated HFpEF. Hospitalizations for acute heart failure at our institution from July 2011 to June 2012 were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes and physician review for left ventricular ejection fraction ≥50% and were reviewed for patient characteristics and clinical outcomes. Worsening renal function (WRF) was defined as creatinine increase of ≥0.3 mg/dl by 72 hours after admission. Hospital readmission and mortality data were captured from electronic medical records and the Social Security Death Index. Of 434 heart failure admissions, 206 patients (47%) with HFpEF were identified. WRF developed in 40%, the highest reported in HFpEF to date, and was associated with higher blood pressure and lower volume of diuresis. Compared to previous reports, hospitalized patients with HFpEF were younger (mean age 63.2 ± 13.6 years), predominantly black (74%), and had more frequent and severe co-morbidities: hypertension (89%), diabetes (56%), and chronic kidney disease (55%). There were no significant differences in 1- and 12-month outcomes by gender, race, or WRF. In conclusion, we found hospitalized patients with HFpEF from an urban population develop a high rate of WRF are younger than previous cohorts, often black, and have greater co-morbidities than previously described. PMID:26410603

  12. Chorea-ballism associated with ketotic hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunli; Zheng, Haiping; Yang, Li; Hu, Zhiping

    2014-12-01

    Chorea-ballism is a rare movement disorder characterized by irregular, poorly patterned, and involuntary movements, which are usually unilateral but may be bilateral or involve the extremities. The most common metabolic cause of transient chorea-ballism is nonketotic or ketotic hyperglycemia (NKHG or KHG, respectively). A meta-analysis and several reviews have identified clinical characteristics of NKHG-associated chorea-ballism; however, the characteristics of KHG-associated chorea-ballism remain unknown. We performed a search for studies of patients with KHG-associated chorea-ballism, published in MEDLINE between 1960 and May 2014, and identified 13 studies of 15 patients. Despite the limited number of cases, we identified some significant differences in the clinical and radiological characteristics between patients with KHG- or NKHG-induced chorea-ballism. Patients with KHG were significantly younger than patients with NKHG, and a higher percentage of patients with KHG had atypical or negative brain imaging findings for chorea-ballism compared to patients with NKHG. We recommend that blood glucose levels be tested on admission as a key diagnostic measure, to improve the early diagnosis of chorea-ballism. The best treatment for KHG-induced chorea-ballism is rapid glucose control with an insulin drip and, possibly, neuroleptics. The mechanisms of the disease are unclear, although the GABA theory, cerebrovascular insufficiency, and alterations of dopaminergic activity in the striatum might play important roles. PMID:25262066

  13. A Novel Allosteric Insulin Receptor-Activating Antibody Reduces Hyperglycemia without Hypoglycemia in Diabetic Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Bezwada, Padma; Zhao, Jingsong; Der, Ken; Shimizu, Bob; Cao, Liching; Ahene, Ago; Rubin, Paul; Johnson, Kirk

    2016-02-01

    XMetA is a fully human, allosteric monoclonal antibody that binds the insulin receptor with high affinity and mimics the glucoregulatory, but not the mitogenic, actions of insulin. Here we evaluated the efficacy of both single and repeat s.c. administrations of XMetA in reducing hyperglycemia in obese cynomolgus monkeys with naturally developed type 2 diabetes, a model that shares many features of human diabetes. The data show that a single s.c. administration of XMetA at dose levels ranging from 1.5 to 10 mg/kg markedly reduced fasting hyperglycemia, with a peak effect occurring 1 to 2 days after administration, and sustained for up to 1 week. XMetA's effect on hyperglycemia was observed without elevations in serum insulin and was concomitant with reduced serum C-peptide levels, even at the lowest dose. Subchronic effects were evaluated via once weekly s.c. administration of XMetA, 10 mg/kg, for 6 weeks. XMetA treatment resulted in robust weekly decreases in fasting glucose levels averaging approximately 30% throughout the study, along with a significant absolute reduction from the vehicle control baseline of 1.2% in hemoglobin A1c, a marker of long-term glycemic status. XMetA treatment was well tolerated with no injection-site reactions, no body weight gain, and no episodes of clinical hypoglycemia. Thus, XMetA shows acute and subchronic improvements in glycemic control in spontaneously diabetic cynomolgus monkeys with a broad safety margin. This profile supports the development of XMetA as a novel glucose-lowering therapeutic agent for the management of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26578267

  14. The Hepatoselective Glucokinase Activator PF-04991532 Ameliorates Hyperglycemia without Causing Hepatic Steatosis in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Erion, Derek M.; Lapworth, Amanda; Amor, Paul A.; Bai, Guoyun; Vera, Nicholas B.; Clark, Ronald W.; Yan, Qingyun; Zhu, Yimin; Ross, Trenton T.; Purkal, Julie; Gorgoglione, Matthew; Zhang, Guodong; Bonato, Vinicius; Baker, Levenia; Barucci, Nicole; D’Aquila, Theresa; Robertson, Alan; Aiello, Robert J.; Yan, Jiangli; Trimmer, Jeff; Rolph, Timothy P.; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia resulting from type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is the main cause of diabetic complications such as retinopathy and neuropathy. A reduction in hyperglycemia has been shown to prevent these associated complications supporting the importance of glucose control. Glucokinase converts glucose to glucose-6-phosphate and determines glucose flux into the β-cells and hepatocytes. Since activation of glucokinase in β-cells is associated with increased risk of hypoglycemia, we hypothesized that selectively activating hepatic glucokinase would reduce fasting and postprandial glucose with minimal risk of hypoglycemia. Previous studies have shown that hepatic glucokinase overexpression is able to restore glucose homeostasis in diabetic models; however, these overexpression experiments have also revealed that excessive increases in hepatic glucokinase activity may also cause hepatosteatosis. Herein we sought to evaluate whether liver specific pharmacological activation of hepatic glucokinase is an effective strategy to reduce hyperglycemia without causing adverse hepatic lipids changes. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated a hepatoselective glucokinase activator, PF-04991532, in Goto-Kakizaki rats. In these studies, PF-04991532 reduced plasma glucose concentrations independent of changes in insulin concentrations in a dose-dependent manner both acutely and after 28 days of sub-chronic treatment. During a hyperglycemic clamp in Goto-Kakizaki rats, the glucose infusion rate was increased approximately 5-fold with PF-04991532. This increase in glucose infusion can be partially attributed to the 60% reduction in endogenous glucose production. While PF-04991532 induced dose-dependent increases in plasma triglyceride concentrations it had no effect on hepatic triglyceride concentrations in Goto-Kakizaki rats. Interestingly, PF-04991532 decreased intracellular AMP concentrations and increased hepatic futile cycling. These data suggest that hepatoselective glucokinase

  15. Coffee polyphenol consumption improves postprandial hyperglycemia associated with impaired vascular endothelial function in healthy male adults.

    PubMed

    Jokura, Hiroko; Watanabe, Isamu; Umeda, Mika; Hase, Tadashi; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that habitual coffee consumption lowers the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Postprandial hyperglycemia is a direct and independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We previously demonstrated that coffee polyphenol ingestion increased secretion of Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), which has been shown to exhibit anti-diabetic and cardiovascular effects. We hypothesized coffee polyphenol consumption may improve postprandial hyperglycemia and vascular endothelial function by increasing GLP-1 release and/or reducing oxidative stress. To examine this hypothesis, we conducted a randomized, acute, crossover, intervention study in healthy male adults, measuring blood parameters and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) after ingestion of a meal with or without coffee polyphenol extract (CPE). Nineteen subjects consumed a test meal with either a placebo- or CPE-containing beverage. Blood biomarkers and FMD were measured at fasting and up to 180 minutes postprandially. The CPE beverage led to a significantly lower peak postprandial increase in blood glucose and diacron-reactive oxygen metabolite, and significantly higher postprandial FMD than the placebo beverage. Postprandial blood GLP-1 increase tended to be higher after ingestion of the CPE beverage, compared with placebo. Subclass analysis revealed that the CPE beverage significantly improved postprandial blood GLP-1 response and reduced blood glucose increase in the subjects with a lower insulinogenic index. Correlation analysis showed postprandial FMD was negatively associated with blood glucose increase after ingestion of the CPE beverage. In conclusion, these results suggest that coffee polyphenol consumption improves postprandial hyperglycemia and vascular endothelial function, which is associated with increased GLP-1 secretion and decreased oxidative stress in healthy humans. PMID:26337017

  16. Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) Study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To examine associations of neonatal adiposity with maternal glucose levels and cord serum C-peptide in a multicenter multinational study, the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) Study, thereby assessing the Pederson hypothesis linking maternal glycemia and fetal hyperinsulinemia to neonatal adiposity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Eligible pregnant women underwent a standard 75-g oral glucose tolerance test between 24 and 32 weeks gestation (as close to 28 weeks as possible). Neonatal anthropometrics and cord serum C-peptide were measured. Associations of maternal glucose and cord serum C-peptide with neonatal adiposity (sum of skin folds >90th percentile or percent body fat >90th percentile) were assessed using multiple logistic regression analyses, with adjustment for potential confounders, including maternal age, parity, BMI, mean arterial pressure, height, gestational age at delivery, and the baby's sex. RESULTS—Among 23,316 HAPO Study participants with glucose levels blinded to caregivers, cord serum C-peptide results were available for 19,885 babies and skin fold measurements for 19,389. For measures of neonatal adiposity, there were strong statistically significant gradients across increasing levels of maternal glucose and cord serum C-peptide, which persisted after adjustment for potential confounders. In fully adjusted continuous variable models, odds ratios ranged from 1.35 to 1.44 for the two measures of adiposity for fasting, 1-h, and 2-h plasma glucose higher by 1 SD. CONCLUSIONS—These findings confirm the link between maternal glucose and neonatal adiposity and suggest that the relationship is mediated by fetal insulin production and that the Pedersen hypothesis describes a basic biological relationship influencing fetal growth. PMID:19011170

  17. Normobaric oxygen worsens outcome after a moderate traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Talley Watts, Lora; Long, Justin Alexander; Manga, Venkata Hemanth; Huang, Shiliang; Shen, Qiang; Duong, Timothy Q

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a multifaceted injury and a leading cause of death in children, young adults, and increasingly in Veterans. However, there are no neuroprotective agents clinically available to counteract damage or promote repair after brain trauma. This study investigated the neuroprotective effects of normobaric oxygen (NBO) after a controlled cortical impact in rats. The central hypothesis was that NBO treatment would reduce lesion volume and functional deficits compared with air-treated animals after TBI by increasing brain oxygenation thereby minimizing ischemic injury. In a randomized double-blinded design, animals received either NBO (n = 8) or normal air (n = 8) after TBI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed 0 to 3 hours, and 1, 2, 7, and 14 days after an impact to the primary forelimb somatosensory cortex. Behavioral assessments were performed before injury induction and before MRI scans on days 2, 7, and 14. Nissl staining was performed on day 14 to corroborate the lesion volume detected from MRI. Contrary to our hypothesis, we found that NBO treatment increased lesion volume in a rat model of moderate TBI and had no positive effect on behavioral measures. Our results do not promote the acute use of NBO in patients with moderate TBI. PMID:25690469

  18. Normobaric oxygen worsens outcome after a moderate traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Talley Watts, Lora; Long, Justin Alexander; Manga, Venkata Hemanth; Huang, Shiliang; Shen, Qiang; Duong, Timothy Q

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a multifaceted injury and a leading cause of death in children, young adults, and increasingly in Veterans. However, there are no neuroprotective agents clinically available to counteract damage or promote repair after brain trauma. This study investigated the neuroprotective effects of normobaric oxygen (NBO) after a controlled cortical impact in rats. The central hypothesis was that NBO treatment would reduce lesion volume and functional deficits compared with air-treated animals after TBI by increasing brain oxygenation thereby minimizing ischemic injury. In a randomized double-blinded design, animals received either NBO (n=8) or normal air (n=8) after TBI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed 0 to 3 hours, and 1, 2, 7, and 14 days after an impact to the primary forelimb somatosensory cortex. Behavioral assessments were performed before injury induction and before MRI scans on days 2, 7, and 14. Nissl staining was performed on day 14 to corroborate the lesion volume detected from MRI. Contrary to our hypothesis, we found that NBO treatment increased lesion volume in a rat model of moderate TBI and had no positive effect on behavioral measures. Our results do not promote the acute use of NBO in patients with moderate TBI. PMID:25690469

  19. Stress Hyperglycemia, Insulin Treatment, and Innate Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiu, Fangming; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia (HG) and insulin resistance are the hallmarks of a profoundly altered metabolism in critical illness resulting from the release of cortisol, catecholamines, and cytokines, as well as glucagon and growth hormone. Recent studies have proposed a fundamental role of the immune system towards the development of insulin resistance in traumatic patients. A comprehensive review of published literatures on the effects of hyperglycemia and insulin on innate immunity in critical illness was conducted. This review explored the interaction between the innate immune system and trauma-induced hypermetabolism, while providing greater insight into unraveling the relationship between innate immune cells and hyperglycemia. Critical illness substantially disturbs glucose metabolism resulting in a state of hyperglycemia. Alterations in glucose and insulin regulation affect the immune function of cellular components comprising the innate immunity system. Innate immune system dysfunction via hyperglycemia is associated with a higher morbidity and mortality in critical illness. Along with others, we hypothesize that reduction in morbidity and mortality observed in patients receiving insulin treatment is partially due to its effect on the attenuation of the immune response. However, there still remains substantial controversy regarding moderate versus intensive insulin treatment. Future studies need to determine the integrated effects of HG and insulin on the regulation of innate immunity in order to provide more effective insulin treatment regimen for these patients. PMID:24899891

  20. Oleanolic acid: a novel cardioprotective agent that blunts hyperglycemia-induced contractile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mapanga, Rudo F; Rajamani, Uthra; Dlamini, Nonkululeko; Zungu-Edmondson, Makhosazane; Kelly-Laubscher, Roisin; Shafiullah, Mohammed; Wahab, Athiq; Hasan, Mohamed Y; Fahim, Mohamed A; Rondeau, Philippe; Bourdon, Emmanuel; Essop, M Faadiel

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes constitutes a major health challenge. Since cardiovascular complications are common in diabetic patients this will further increase the overall burden of disease. Furthermore, stress-induced hyperglycemia in non-diabetic patients with acute myocardial infarction is associated with higher in-hospital mortality. Previous studies implicate oxidative stress, excessive flux through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) and a dysfunctional ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) as potential mediators of this process. Since oleanolic acid (OA; a clove extract) possesses antioxidant properties, we hypothesized that it attenuates acute and chronic hyperglycemia-mediated pathophysiologic molecular events (oxidative stress, apoptosis, HBP, UPS) and thereby improves contractile function in response to ischemia-reperfusion. We employed several experimental systems: 1) H9c2 cardiac myoblasts were exposed to 33 mM glucose for 48 hr vs. controls (5 mM glucose); and subsequently treated with two OA doses (20 and 50 µM) for 6 and 24 hr, respectively; 2) Isolated rat hearts were perfused ex vivo with Krebs-Henseleit buffer containing 33 mM glucose vs. controls (11 mM glucose) for 60 min, followed by 20 min global ischemia and 60 min reperfusion ± OA treatment; 3) In vivo coronary ligations were performed on streptozotocin treated rats ± OA administration during reperfusion; and 4) Effects of long-term OA treatment (2 weeks) on heart function was assessed in streptozotocin-treated rats. Our data demonstrate that OA treatment blunted high glucose-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in heart cells. OA therapy also resulted in cardioprotection, i.e. for ex vivo and in vivo rat hearts exposed to ischemia-reperfusion under hyperglycemic conditions. In parallel, we found decreased oxidative stress, apoptosis, HBP flux and proteasomal activity following ischemia-reperfusion. Long-term OA treatment also improved heart function in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. These findings are

  1. Prevalence, implication, and determinants of worsening renal function after surgery for congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Hirofumi; Kuwata, Seiko; Kurishima, Clara; Iwamoto, Yoichi; Ishido, Hirotaka; Masutani, Satoshi; Senzaki, Hideaki

    2016-08-01

    Accumulating data in adults indicate the prognostic importance of worsening renal function (WRF) during treatment of acute heart failure. Venous congestion appears to play a dominant role in WRF; however, data regarding WRF in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) are limited. The present study was conducted to elucidate the prevalence and characteristics of WRF after surgery for CHD in children. We also tested our hypothesis that, similar to adult heart failure, venous congestion is an important determinant of WRF independent of cardiac output in this population. Fifty-five consecutive pediatric patients who underwent cardiovascular surgery for CHD were studied (median age 0.7 years; range 3 days to 17 years). The degree of WRF was assessed by the difference between the maximum levels of postoperative serum creatinine (Cr) and preoperative serum Cr. There was a high prevalence of WRF in the present cohort: an increase in Cr level was observed in 47 patients (85 %) and a Cr increase ≥0.3 mg/dL was seen in 23 (42 %). Importantly, WRF was significantly associated with a worse clinical outcome of a longer stay in the intensive care unit and hospital (both p < 0.05), even after controlling for age and operative factors. In addition, multivariate regression analysis revealed that central venous pressure, rather than cardiac output, was an independent determinant of WRF. Postoperative management to relieve venous congestion may help ameliorate or prevent WRF and thereby improve outcomes in patients with CHD. PMID:26266633

  2. CT and MR Unilateral Brain Features Secondary to Nonketotic Hyperglycemia Presenting as Hemichorea-Hemiballism

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Vega, Víctor Manuel; Sánchez Almaraz, Carlos; Bernardo, Ana Isabel; Rodríguez-Díaz, Ricardo; Díez Barrio, Ana; Martín Gil, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Hemichorea-hemiballism is an unusual hyperkinetic movement disorder characterized by continuous involuntary movements of an entire limb or both limbs on one side of the body. The acute onset of this disorder occurs with an insult in contralateral basal ganglia. Ischemic events represent the most common cause. Nonketotic hyperglycemia comes in second place. Nonketotic hyperglycemic hemichorea-hemiballism (NHH) is a rare cause of unilateral brain abnormalities on imaging studies confined to basal ganglia (mainly putaminal region as well as caudate nucleus). Subtle hyperdensity in striatal region can be found on CT studies whereas brain MR imaging typically shows T1 hyperintensity and T2 hypointensity in the basal ganglia contralateral to the movements. Diagnosis is based on both glucose levels and neuroimaging findings. Elevated blood glucose and hemoglobin A1c levels occur with poorly controlled diabetes. In this case report, our aim is to present neuroimaging CT and MR unilateral findings in an elderly woman secondary to nonketotic hyperglycemia presenting as hemichorea-hemiballism. PMID:27247821

  3. Diabetes and mitochondrial function: Role of hyperglycemia and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Rolo, Anabela P.; Palmeira, Carlos M. . E-mail: palmeira@ci.uc.pt

    2006-04-15

    Hyperglycemia resulting from uncontrolled glucose regulation is widely recognized as the causal link between diabetes and diabetic complications. Four major molecular mechanisms have been implicated in hyperglycemia-induced tissue damage: activation of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms via de novo synthesis of the lipid second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG), increased hexosamine pathway flux, increased advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation, and increased polyol pathway flux. Hyperglycemia-induced overproduction of superoxide is the causal link between high glucose and the pathways responsible for hyperglycemic damage. In fact, diabetes is typically accompanied by increased production of free radicals and/or impaired antioxidant defense capabilities, indicating a central contribution for reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the onset, progression, and pathological consequences of diabetes. Besides oxidative stress, a growing body of evidence has demonstrated a link between various disturbances in mitochondrial functioning and type 2 diabetes. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and decreases in mtDNA copy number have been linked to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. The study of the relationship of mtDNA to type 2 diabetes has revealed the influence of the mitochondria on nuclear-encoded glucose transporters, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, and nuclear-encoded uncoupling proteins (UCPs) in {beta}-cell glucose toxicity. This review focuses on a range of mitochondrial factors important in the pathogenesis of diabetes. We review the published literature regarding the direct effects of hyperglycemia on mitochondrial function and suggest the possibility of regulation of mitochondrial function at a transcriptional level in response to hyperglycemia. The main goal of this review is to include a fresh consideration of pathways involved in hyperglycemia-induced diabetic complications.

  4. Hyperglycemia associated dissociative fugue (organic dissociative disorder) in an elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Dushad; Ashoka, H. G; Gowdappa, Basavnna

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate glycemic control in patients with diabetes is known to be associated with psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety disorder, and cognitive impairment. However, dissociative syndrome has not been reported so far. Here we are reporting a case of repeated dissociative fugue associated with hyperglycemia, in an elderly with type II diabetes. Possible neurobiological mechanism has been discussed. PMID:26286620

  5. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) reverses hyperglycemia in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Luguang Luo, John Z.Q. Jackson, Ivor M.D.

    2008-09-12

    Hyperglycemia in thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) null mice indicates that TRH is involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Further, TRH levels in the pancreas peak during the stages of late embryonic and early neonatal {beta} cell development. These observations are consistent in linking TRH to islet cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we examined the effect of TRH administration in damaged pancreatic rat (streptozotocin, STZ) to determine whether TRH could improve damaged pancreatic {beta} cells function. We hypothesize that TRH is able to reverse STZ-induced hyperglycemia by increasing pancreatic islet insulin content, preventing apoptosis, and potentially induce islet regeneration. It was found that following intra-peritoneal (ip) injection, TRH (10 {mu}g/kg body weight (bwt)) reverses STZ (65 mg/kg bwt)-induced hyperglycemia (TRH given 3 days after STZ injection). Increased circulating insulin levels and insulin content in extracted pancreas suggests that TRH reversed STZ-induced hyperglycemia through improving pancreatic islet {beta} cell function. Further studies show a significantly lower level of apoptosis in islets treated with TRH as well as the presence of proliferation marker nestin and Brdu, suggesting that the TRH has the potential to prevent apoptosis and stimulate islet proliferation.

  6. High-Intensity Interval Training for Improving Postprandial Hyperglycemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Jonathan P.; Francois, Monique E.

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has garnered attention in recent years as a time-efficient exercise option for improving cardiovascular and metabolic health. New research demonstrates that HIIT may be particularly effective for improving postprandial hyperglycemia in individuals with, or at risk for, type 2 diabetes (T2D). These findings…

  7. Hypertension, Hyperglycemia, and Hyperlipemia among Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Pei-Ying; Lin, Lan-Ping; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2010-01-01

    The present paper aims to assess the hypertension, hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia prevalence of adolescents with intellectual disabilities, and to recognize the health disparities between the study participants and the general population. This study conducted a cross-sectional medical chart analysis of 856 students who participated in school…

  8. Characterization of a Mouse Model of Hyperglycemia and Retinal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Rakoczy, Elizabeth P.; Rahman, Ireni S. Ali; Binz, Nicolette; Li, Cai-Rui; Vagaja, Nermina N.; de Pinho, Marisa; Lai, Chooi-May

    2010-01-01

    One of the limitations of research into diabetic retinopathy is the lack of suitable animal models. To study how the two important factors—hyperglycemia and vascular endothelial growth factor—interact in diabetic retinopathy, the Akimba mouse (Ins2AkitaVEGF+/−) was generated by crossing the Akita mouse (Ins2Akita) with the Kimba mouse (VEGF+/+). C57Bl/6 and the parental and Akimba mouse lines were characterized by biometric measurements, histology, immunohistochemistry, and Spectralis Heidelberg retinal angiography and optical coherence tomography. The Akimba line not only retained the characteristics of the parental strains, such as developing hyperglycemia and retinal neovascularization, but developed higher blood glucose levels at a younger age and had worse kidney-body weight ratios than the Akita line. With aging, the Akimba line demonstrated enhanced photoreceptor cell loss, thinning of the retina, and more severe retinal vascular pathology, including more severe capillary nonperfusion, vessel constriction, beading, neovascularization, fibroses, and edema, compared with the Kimba line. The vascular changes were associated with major histocompatibility complex class II+ cellular staining throughout the retina. Together, these observations suggest that hyperglycemia resulted in higher prevalences of edema and exacerbated the vascular endothelial growth factor-driven neovascular and retinal changes in the Akimba line. Thus, the Akimba line could become a useful model for studying the interplay between hyperglycemia and vascular endothelial growth factor and for testing treatment strategies for potentially blinding complications, such as edema. PMID:20829433

  9. Hemichorea/Hemiballism Associated with Hyperglycemia: Report of 20 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Cosentino, Carlos; Torres, Luis; Nuñez, Yesenia; Suarez, Rafael; Velez, Miriam; Flores, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemichorea/hemiballism associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia is a well-recognized syndrome, but few case series have been reported in the literature. Case Report We describe 20 patients with hemichorea/hemiballism associated with hyperglycemia (9 males and 11 females) with mean age of 67.8 years. Ten patients had a previous diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and one had type 1 diabetes mellitus. Six of them had documentation of poor diabetic control over at least the last 3 months. Nine patients had new-onset hyperglycemia with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus made after discharge. Seventeen patients had unilateral chorea/ballism, while three had bilateral chorea/ballism. Eighteen cases had striatal hyperdensities on computed tomography (CT) and/or hyperintense signals on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The putamen was affected in all cases, and the caudate nucleus was involved in nine. Discussion Hemichorea/hemiballism associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia can be the presenting sign of diabetes mellitus in almost half of cases or can occur after a few months of poor glycemic control in patients with diagnosed diabetes. This case series is one of the largest to date and adds valuable information about clinical and neuroimaging features that are comparable with published data but also emphasize the role of adequate diabetes mellitus control. PMID:27536463

  10. Nicotine worsens the severity of nephropathy in diabetic mice: implications for the progression of kidney disease in smokers

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Ping; Feng, Wenguang; Ji, Shaonin; Raij, Leopoldo

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have established the role of cigarette smoking as a risk factor in the progression of chronic kidney disease, including diabetic nephropathy. We have previously reported that nicotine promotes mesangial cell proliferation and hypertrophy via activation of nonneuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and that nicotine worsens renal injury in a model of acute glomerulonephritis (Jaimes E, Tian RX, Raij L. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 292: H76–H82, 2007; Jaimes EA, Tian RX, Joshi M, Raij L. Am J Nephrol 29: 319–326, 2009). These studies were designed to test the hypothesis that nicotine worsens renal injury in db/db mice, a well-established model of diabetic nephropathy, and that reactive oxygen species play an important as mediators of these effects. For these studies, nicotine (100 μg/ml) was administered in the drinking water to control and db/db mice for 10 wk. Blood pressure was measured by the tail-cuff method, and urine was collected for proteinuria. At death, kidneys were collected for histology and molecular biology. The administration of nicotine did not result in significant changes in blood pressure or blood glucose and resulted in cotinine levels similar to those found in the plasma of smokers. In diabetic mice, the administration of nicotine significantly increased urinary protein excretion (1-fold), glomerular hypertrophy, and mesangial area (∼20%). These changes were accompanied by significant increases in NADPH oxidase 4 (∼30%) and increased nitrotyrosine and Akt expression. In vitro, we determined that nicotine has additive effects to high glucose on reactive oxygen species generation and Akt phosphorylation in human mesangial cells. These findings unveil novel mechanisms that may result in the development of novel strategies in the treatment and prevention of diabetic nephropathy in smokers. PMID:20685820

  11. The acute cardiorenal syndrome: burden and mechanisms of disease.

    PubMed

    Nijst, Petra; Mullens, Wilfried

    2014-12-01

    Worsening renal function during the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure, so-called acute cardio-renal syndrome, is very common and complicates the treatment course. The underlying pathophysiology of worsening renal function (WRF) involves variable contributions of renal hemodynamics, neurohormonal activity, and oxidative stress. Historically, WRF has been associated with adverse outcomes. However, emerging data support therapeutic strategies that permit WRF while effectively treating congestion as they are associated with improved outcomes. PMID:25135470

  12. Severe instead of mild hyperglycemia inhibits neurogenesis in the subventricular zone of adult rats after transient focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Tan, S; Zhi, P K; Luo, Z K; Shi, J

    2015-09-10

    Accumulated evidence suggests that enhanced neurogenesis stimulated by ischemic injury contributes to stroke outcome. However, it is unclear whether hyperglycemia, which is frequently tested positive in patients with acute ischemic stroke, influences stroke-induced neurogenesis. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of hyperglycemia on stroke-induced neurogenesis in a rat model of transient focal cerebral ischemia. For this purpose, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (220-250 g) were subjected to 90 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Glucose was administered during ischemia to produce target blood levels ranging from 4.83 ± 0.94 mM (normoglycemia) to 20.76 ± 1.56 mM. To label proliferating cells in ischemic ipsilateral subventricular zone (SVZ) of lateral ventricles, 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was injected 24h after MCAO. Brains were harvested 2h post-BrdU to evaluate the effects of hyperglycemia on infarct volume and SVZ cell proliferation. Rats that were severely hyperglycemic (19.26 ± 1.48 mM to 20.76 ± 1.56 mM) during ischemia had 24.26% increase in infarct volume (P<0.05) and more serious neurological function deficits (P<0.05). The severe hyperglycemic rats also showed dramatically decreased proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) (P<0.05) and down-regulation of the phosphorylation of cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) (P<0.05)and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (P<0.05) in ipsilateral SVZ. But the above-mentioned detrimental effects were not observed in rats that were rendered with mild hyperglycemia (9.43 ± 1.39-10.13 ± 1.24 mM). Our findings indicate that severe instead of mild hyperglycemia exacerbates ischemic injury and inhibits stroke-induced SVZ neurogenesis by a mechanism involving suppression of CREB and BDNF signaling. PMID:26126927

  13. Erythropoietin ameliorates hyperglycemia in type 1-like diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Ho-Shan; Chang, Chin-Hong; Niu, Chiang-Shan; Cheng, Juei-Tang; Lee, Kung-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Background Erythropoietin (EPO) is widely used in diabetic patients receiving hemodialysis. The role of EPO in glucose homeostasis remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the effect of EPO on hyperglycemia in rats with type 1-like diabetes. Methods Rats with streptozotocin-induced type 1-like diabetes (STZ rats) were used to estimate the blood glucose-lowering effects of EPO, and changes in the expression levels of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and the hepatic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) were identified by Western blot analysis. Results EPO attenuated the hyperglycemia in the STZ rats in a dose-dependent manner without altering the hematopoietic parameters, including the hematocrit and number of red blood cells. The involvement of the EPO receptor (EPOR) was identified using EPOR-specific antibodies. In addition, injection of EPO enhanced the glucose utilization, which was assessed using an intravenous glucose tolerance test in rats. However, blood insulin was not changed by EPO in this assay, showing the insulinotropic action of EPO. Moreover, EPO treatment increased the insulin sensitivity. Western blots indicated that the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase was enhanced by EPO to support the signaling caused by EPOR activation. Furthermore, the decrease in the GLUT4 level in skeletal muscle was reversed by EPO, and the increase in the PEPCK expression in liver was reduced by EPO, as shown in STZ rats. Conclusion Taken together, the results show that EPO injection may reduce hyperglycemia in diabetic rats through activation of EPO receptors. Therefore, EPO is useful for managing diabetic disorders, particularly hyperglycemia-associated changes. In addition, EPO receptor will be a good target for the development of antihyperglycemic agent(s) in the future. PMID:27350742

  14. Diabetic hyperglycemia aggravates seizures and status epilepticus-induced hippocampal damage.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chin-Wei; Cheng, Juei-Tang; Tsai, Jing-Jane; Wu, Sheng-Nan; Huang, Chao-Ching

    2009-01-01

    Epileptic seizures in diabetic hyperglycemia (DH) are not uncommon. This study aimed to determine the acute behavioral, pathological, and electrophysiological effects of status epilepticus (SE) on diabetic animals. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were first divided into groups with and without streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes, and then into treatment groups given a normal saline (NS) (STZ-only and NS-only) or a lithium-pilocarpine injection to induce status epilepticus (STZ + SE and NS + SE). Seizure susceptibility, severity, and mortality were evaluated. Serial Morris water maze test and hippocampal histopathology results were examined before and 24 h after SE. Tetanic stimulation-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) in a hippocampal slice was recorded in a multi-electrode dish system. We also used a simulation model to evaluate intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and neuroexcitability. The STZ + SE group had a significantly higher percentage of severe seizures and SE-related death and worse learning and memory performances than the other three groups 24 h after SE. The STZ + SE group, and then the NS + SE group, showed the most severe neuronal loss and mossy fiber sprouting in the hippocampal CA3 area. In addition, LTP was markedly attenuated in the STZ + SE group, and then the NS + SE group. In the simulation, increased intracellular ATP concentration promoted action potential firing. This finding that rats with DH had more brain damage after SE than rats without diabetes suggests the importance of intensively treating hyperglycemia and seizures in diabetic patients with epilepsy. PMID:19384590

  15. Insulin Therapy for the Management of Hyperglycemia in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, Marie E.; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.

    2013-01-01

    It has long been established that hyperglycemia with or without a prior diagnosis of diabetes increases both mortality and disease-specific morbidity in hospitalized patients1–4 and that goal-directed insulin therapy can improve outcomes.5–9 During the past decade, since the widespread institutional adoption of intensified insulin protocols after the publication of a landmark trial,5,10 the pendulum in the inpatient diabetes literature has swung away from achieving intensive glucose control and toward more moderate and individualized glycemic targets.11,12 This change in clinical practice is the result of several factors, including challenges faced by hospitals to coordinate glycemic control across all levels of care,13,14 publication of negative prospective trials,15,16 revised recommendations from professional organizations,17,18 and increasing evidence on the deleterious effect of hypoglycemia.19–22 This article reviews the pathophysiology of hyperglycemia during illness, the mechanisms for increased complications and mortality due to hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, beneficial mechanistic effects of insulin therapy and provides updated recommendations for the inpatient management of diabetes in the critical care setting and in the general medicine and surgical settings.23,24 PMID:22575413

  16. MicroRNAs in Hyperglycemia Induced Endothelial Cell Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Silambarasan, Maskomani; Tan, Jun Rong; Karolina, Dwi Setyowati; Armugam, Arunmozhiarasi; Kaur, Charanjit; Jeyaseelan, Kandiah

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is closely associated with prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Hyperglycemia increases the risk of vascular complications such as diabetic retinopathy, diabetic nephropathy, peripheral vascular disease and cerebro/cardiovascular diseases. Under hyperglycemic conditions, the endothelial cells become dysfunctional. In this study, we investigated the miRNA expression changes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to different glucose concentrations (5, 10, 25 and 40 mM glucose) and at various time intervals (6, 12, 24 and 48 h). miRNA microarray analyses showed that there is a correlation between hyperglycemia induced endothelial dysfunction and miRNA expression. In silico pathways analyses on the altered miRNA expression showed that the majority of the affected biological pathways appeared to be associated to endothelial cell dysfunction and apoptosis. We found the expression of ten miRNAs (miR-26a-5p, -26b-5p, 29b-3p, -29c-3p, -125b-1-3p, -130b-3p, -140-5p, -192-5p, -221-3p and -320a) to increase gradually with increasing concentration of glucose. These miRNAs were also found to be involved in endothelial dysfunction. At least seven of them, miR-29b-3p, -29c-3p, -125b-1-3p, -130b-3p, -221-3p, -320a and -192-5p, can be correlated to endothelial cell apoptosis. PMID:27070575

  17. Hepatic immunophenotyping for streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Sun; Eun, Hyuk Soo; Kim, So Yeon; Jeong, Jong-Min; Seo, Wonhyo; Byun, Jin-Seok; Jeong, Won-Il; Yi, Hyon-Seung

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence revealed that diabetes induces abnormal immune responses that result in serious complications in organs. However, the effect of hyperglycemia on hepatic immunity remains obscure. We evaluated the population and function of hepatic immune cells in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced hyperglycemic mice. CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2)-knockout mice and mice with a depletion of regulatory T cells (DEREG) were used to investigate the migration and role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in hyperglycemic mice. The inflammatory cytokines and hepatic transaminase levels were significantly increased in the hyperglycemic mice. The population and number of infiltrating monocytes, granulocytes, and Tregs were enhanced in the livers of the hyperglycemic mice. Hepatic monocytes other than macrophages showed the increased expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the hyperglycemic mice. The CCR2 knockout and DEREG chimeric mice exhibited increased populations of activated T cells and neutrophils compared to the WT chimeric mice, which promoted hepatic inflammation in the hyperglycemic mice. The migration of CCR2 knockout Tregs into the liver was significantly reduced compared to the WT Tregs. We demonstrated that hyperglycemia contributes to increase in infiltrating monocytes and Tregs, which are associated with hepatic immune dysfunction in mice. CCR2-mediated migration of Tregs regulates hyperglycemia-induced hepatic inflammation. PMID:27464894

  18. MicroRNAs in Hyperglycemia Induced Endothelial Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Silambarasan, Maskomani; Tan, Jun Rong; Karolina, Dwi Setyowati; Armugam, Arunmozhiarasi; Kaur, Charanjit; Jeyaseelan, Kandiah

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is closely associated with prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Hyperglycemia increases the risk of vascular complications such as diabetic retinopathy, diabetic nephropathy, peripheral vascular disease and cerebro/cardiovascular diseases. Under hyperglycemic conditions, the endothelial cells become dysfunctional. In this study, we investigated the miRNA expression changes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to different glucose concentrations (5, 10, 25 and 40 mM glucose) and at various time intervals (6, 12, 24 and 48 h). miRNA microarray analyses showed that there is a correlation between hyperglycemia induced endothelial dysfunction and miRNA expression. In silico pathways analyses on the altered miRNA expression showed that the majority of the affected biological pathways appeared to be associated to endothelial cell dysfunction and apoptosis. We found the expression of ten miRNAs (miR-26a-5p, -26b-5p, 29b-3p, -29c-3p, -125b-1-3p, -130b-3p, -140-5p, -192-5p, -221-3p and -320a) to increase gradually with increasing concentration of glucose. These miRNAs were also found to be involved in endothelial dysfunction. At least seven of them, miR-29b-3p, -29c-3p, -125b-1-3p, -130b-3p, -221-3p, -320a and -192-5p, can be correlated to endothelial cell apoptosis. PMID:27070575

  19. Hepatic immunophenotyping for streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Sun; Eun, Hyuk Soo; Kim, So Yeon; Jeong, Jong-Min; Seo, Wonhyo; Byun, Jin-Seok; Jeong, Won-Il; Yi, Hyon-Seung

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence revealed that diabetes induces abnormal immune responses that result in serious complications in organs. However, the effect of hyperglycemia on hepatic immunity remains obscure. We evaluated the population and function of hepatic immune cells in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced hyperglycemic mice. CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2)-knockout mice and mice with a depletion of regulatory T cells (DEREG) were used to investigate the migration and role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in hyperglycemic mice. The inflammatory cytokines and hepatic transaminase levels were significantly increased in the hyperglycemic mice. The population and number of infiltrating monocytes, granulocytes, and Tregs were enhanced in the livers of the hyperglycemic mice. Hepatic monocytes other than macrophages showed the increased expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the hyperglycemic mice. The CCR2 knockout and DEREG chimeric mice exhibited increased populations of activated T cells and neutrophils compared to the WT chimeric mice, which promoted hepatic inflammation in the hyperglycemic mice. The migration of CCR2 knockout Tregs into the liver was significantly reduced compared to the WT Tregs. We demonstrated that hyperglycemia contributes to increase in infiltrating monocytes and Tregs, which are associated with hepatic immune dysfunction in mice. CCR2-mediated migration of Tregs regulates hyperglycemia-induced hepatic inflammation. PMID:27464894

  20. Thyroid-induced worsening of parkinsonian tremor resistant to drugs and subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Minár, Michal; Valkovič, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Symptoms of both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis can be easily overlooked in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We report on a patient whose parkinsonian tremor worsened and proved refractory not only to common treatment, but also to deep brain stimulation (DBS). Case Presentation. A 61-year-old woman with advanced PD underwent bilateral subthalamic DBS, with an excellent outcome. Twenty-one months after the surgery, however, patient's resting/postural tremor markedly worsened. There was a slight improvement for 1 month after repeated adjustments of DBS parameters, but then the tremor worsened again. Since even a minimal increase of the dose of dopaminergic drugs caused extremely severe dyskinesias, an anticholinergic drug biperiden and benzodiazepine clonazepam were introduced, what helped for another month. With the onset of severe diarrhoea, a laboratory workup was performed. Thyrotoxicosis was detected. During treatment with the antithyroid agent carbimazole, the parkinsonian tremor clearly improved within two weeks. Conclusion. A hyperthyroid state can markedly exaggerate all forms of tremor, as well as other types of movement disorders. This condition can be overlooked or masked by other symptoms. Therefore, if the tremor in a patient with PD gradually worsens and proves resistant to the usual treatment, examine the thyroid gland. PMID:25628904

  1. Psychosis or Obsessions? Clozapine Associated with Worsening Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Leung, Jonathan G; Palmer, Brian A

    2016-01-01

    One underrecognized adverse event of clozapine is the emergence or worsening of obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS). OCS, particularly violent thoughts, can be inaccurately described as psychosis and result in a misdiagnosis. We report a case of a 42-year-old man, initially diagnosed with schizoaffective, who was placed on clozapine for the management of "violent delusions." However, clozapine led to a worsening of these violent thoughts resulting in suicidal ideation and hospitalization. After exploration of the intrusive thoughts and noting these to be egodystonic, clearly disturbing, and time consuming, an alternative diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) was made. Clozapine was inevitably discontinued resulting in a significant reduction of the intrusive thoughts without emergence of psychosis or adverse events. While an overlapping phenomenology between OCD and psychotic disorders has been described, clozapine and other antiserotonergic antipsychotics have been implicated with the emergence or worsening of OCS. Unique to our case is that the patient's obsessions had been treated as psychosis leading to the inadequate treatment of his primary illness, OCD. This case highlights the potential for OCD to masquerade as a psychotic disorder and reminds clinicians that clozapine may worsen OCS. PMID:27313938

  2. Psychosis or Obsessions? Clozapine Associated with Worsening Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    One underrecognized adverse event of clozapine is the emergence or worsening of obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS). OCS, particularly violent thoughts, can be inaccurately described as psychosis and result in a misdiagnosis. We report a case of a 42-year-old man, initially diagnosed with schizoaffective, who was placed on clozapine for the management of “violent delusions.” However, clozapine led to a worsening of these violent thoughts resulting in suicidal ideation and hospitalization. After exploration of the intrusive thoughts and noting these to be egodystonic, clearly disturbing, and time consuming, an alternative diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) was made. Clozapine was inevitably discontinued resulting in a significant reduction of the intrusive thoughts without emergence of psychosis or adverse events. While an overlapping phenomenology between OCD and psychotic disorders has been described, clozapine and other antiserotonergic antipsychotics have been implicated with the emergence or worsening of OCS. Unique to our case is that the patient's obsessions had been treated as psychosis leading to the inadequate treatment of his primary illness, OCD. This case highlights the potential for OCD to masquerade as a psychotic disorder and reminds clinicians that clozapine may worsen OCS. PMID:27313938

  3. DIETARY HYPERGLYCEMIA, GLYCEMIC INDEX AND METABOLIC RETINAL DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chung-Jung; Taylor, Allen

    2014-01-01

    The glycemic index (GI) indicates how fast blood glucose is raised after consuming a carbohydrate-containing food. Human metabolic studies indicate that GI is related to patho-physiological responses after meals. Compared with a low-GI meal, a high-GI meal is characterized with hyperglycemia during the early postprandial stage (0~2 h) and a compensatory hyperlipidemia associated with counter-regulatory hormone responses during late postprandial stage (4~6 h). Over the past three decades, several human health disorders have been related to GI. The strongest relationship suggests that consuming low-GI foods prevents diabetic complications. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a complication of diabetes. In this aspect, GI appears to be useful as a practical guideline to help diabetic people choose foods. Abundant epidemiological evidence also indicates positive associations between GI and risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and more recently, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in people without diabetes. Although data from randomized controlled intervention trials are scanty, these observations are strongly supported by evolving molecular mechanisms which explain the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia. This wide range of evidence implies that dietary hyperglycemia is etiologically related to human aging and diseases, including DR and AMD. In this context, these diseases can be considered metabolic retinal diseases. Molecular theories that explain hyperglycemic pathogenesis involve a mitochondria-associated pathway and four glycolysis-associated pathways, including advanced glycation end products formation, protein kinase C activation, polyol pathway, and hexosamine pathway. While the four glycolysis-associated pathways appear to be universal for both normoxic and hypoxic conditions, the mitochondria-associated mechanism appears to be most relevant to the hyperglycemic, normoxic pathogenesis. For diseases that affect tissues with highly active metabolism and that

  4. The Relationship and Potential Mechanistic Pathways Between Sleep Disturbances and Maternal Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Izci-Balserak, Bilgay; Pien, Grace W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews recent work investigating the influence of sleep disturbances on maternal hyperglycemia, particularly gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The incidence and prevalence of hyperglycemia are increasing worldwide, which is cause for concern because GDM and even mild hyperglycemia are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. A better understanding of sleep-related risk factors for maternal hyperglycemia is an important health matter. Evidence demonstrates associations between sleep disturbances, especially sleep-disordered breathing, and hyperglycemia, but causal effects and the underlying mechanisms linking these conditions have not been fully elucidated. Subjective sleep assessments show associations between sleep disturbances and maternal hyperglycemia. There are, however, few studies using objective measures to support these findings. Large prospective studies are required to examine causal relationships between sleep disturbances and maternal hyperglycemia. There is also a need for smaller mechanistic studies to understand the pathophysiology. Furthermore, interventional studies are required to address whether improvement of sleep parameters can prevent/decrease the risk of developing maternal hyperglycemia. Taken together, the data suggests that sleep disturbances during pregnancy are important to identify and manage in order to minimize maternal hyperglycemia and GDM, and improve maternal and fetal well-being. PMID:24398662

  5. Sudden worsening after subdural haematoma surgery: will there be a corpus callosum injury?

    PubMed Central

    Panciani, Pier Paolo; Roca, Elena; Lodoli, Giovanni; Fontanella, Marco Maria

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of mild encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS) which occurred after chronic subdural haematoma (CSDH) surgery. The patient was admitted to our hospital for drowsiness and marked asthenia. The cerebral CT scan revealed a CSDH and surgery allowed to improve the symptoms, but after several days we observed a sudden worsening. The patient developed left-sided myoclonic seizures followed by left hemiplegia and worsening drowsiness. Electrolytes imbalance and inflammatory causes were excluded. The CT scan showed a right cerebral swelling and the subsequent MRI revealed a single lesion in the splenium of the corpus callosum, hyperintense on diffusion-weighted images. After osmotic therapy the patient improved and on day 10 of admission the MRI showed a complete resolution of the lesion. This is the first report that described an association between CSDH and MERS. Possible aetiopathogenetic mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24862419

  6. Hyperglycemia decreases mitochondrial function: The regulatory role of mitochondrial biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeira, Carlos M. Rolo, Anabela P.; Berthiaume, Jessica; Bjork, James A.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2007-12-01

    Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in 'glucose toxicity' in diabetes. However, little is known about the action of glucose on the expression of transcription factors in hepatocytes, especially those involved in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and transcription. Since mitochondrial functional capacity is dynamically regulated, we hypothesized that stressful conditions of hyperglycemia induce adaptations in the transcriptional control of cellular energy metabolism, including inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism. Cell viability, mitochondrial respiration, ROS generation and oxidized proteins were determined in HepG2 cells cultured in the presence of either 5.5 mM (control) or 30 mM glucose (high glucose) for 48 h, 96 h and 7 days. Additionally, mtDNA abundance, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcripts were evaluated by real time PCR. High glucose induced a progressive increase in ROS generation and accumulation of oxidized proteins, with no changes in cell viability. Increased expression of PAI-1 was observed as early as 96 h of exposure to high glucose. After 7 days in hyperglycemia, HepG2 cells exhibited inhibited uncoupled respiration and decreased MitoTracker Red fluorescence associated with a 25% decrease in mtDNA and 16% decrease in TFAM transcripts. These results indicate that glucose may regulate mtDNA copy number by modulating the transcriptional activity of TFAM in response to hyperglycemia-induced ROS production. The decrease of mtDNA content and inhibition of mitochondrial function may be pathogenic hallmarks in the altered metabolic status associated with diabetes.

  7. Neuropathological Correlates of Hyperglycemia During Prolonged Polymicrobial Sepsis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sonneville, Romain; Derese, Inge; Marques, Mirna Bastos; Langouche, Lies; Derde, Sarah; Chatre, Laurent; Chrétien, Fabrice; Annane, Djillali; Sharshar, Tarek; Van den Berghe, Greet; Vanhorebeek, Ilse

    2015-09-01

    Glucose toxicity may play a crucial role in evoking neurologic complications of critical illness. We studied whether the neuropathological alterations in fatal human critical illness observed under hyperglycemia are present and can be attenuated by maintaining normoglycemia in a mouse model of prolonged sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture. Mice were randomized to moderate hyperglycemia (>8.3 mmol/L, n = 8) or normoglycemia (4.4-6.7 mmol/L, n = 8). After 5 days, hippocampus and frontal cortex from septic mice were compared with those from healthy controls (n = 8). Blood glucose was 7.8 ± 1.3 mmol/L in hyperglycemic and 6.1 ± 0.7 mmol/L in normoglycemic critically ill mice (P = 0.007). The percentage of damaged neurons was twofold higher in frontal cortex (P = 0.01) and hippocampus (P = 0.06) of hyperglycemic ill mice than that of healthy mice. In frontal cortex, neuronal damage was attenuated under normoglycemia (P = 0.04). Critical illness reduced astrocyte density and activation status fourfold in hippocampus (P ≤ 0.02), but not in frontal cortex, irrespective of glycemic control. Microglia were twofold to fourfold more abundant in both brain areas of hyperglycemic critically ill mice (P ≤ 0.002), but only in frontal cortex were they reduced in number with normoglycemia (P = 0.0008). The density of apoptotic cells and abundance of carbonylated proteins were significantly higher than normal in frontal cortex of hyperglycemic ill mice only (P = 0.05). In a mouse model of prolonged polymicrobial sepsis, remarkable neuropathological changes develop with neuronal damage, impaired astrocyte activation, increased microglia, apoptosis, and accumulation of carbonylated proteins. These changes were partially prevented or attenuated when hyperglycemia was prevented with insulin. Frontal cortex appeared more vulnerable to hyperglycemic insults than hippocampus. PMID:26009823

  8. Carotid body denervation prevents fasting hyperglycemia during chronic intermittent hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mi-Kyung; Yao, Qiaoling; Jun, Jonathan C.; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Yoo, Doo-Young; Han, Woobum; Mesarwi, Omar; Richardson, Ria; Fu, Ya-Yuan; Pasricha, Pankaj J.; Schwartz, Alan R.; Shirahata, Machiko

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea causes chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) and is associated with impaired glucose metabolism, but mechanisms are unknown. Carotid bodies orchestrate physiological responses to hypoxemia by activating the sympathetic nervous system. Therefore, we hypothesized that carotid body denervation would abolish glucose intolerance and insulin resistance induced by chronic IH. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent carotid sinus nerve dissection (CSND) or sham surgery and then were exposed to IH or intermittent air (IA) for 4 or 6 wk. Hypoxia was administered by decreasing a fraction of inspired oxygen from 20.9% to 6.5% once per minute, during the 12-h light phase (9 a.m.–9 p.m.). As expected, denervated mice exhibited blunted hypoxic ventilatory responses. In sham-operated mice, IH increased fasting blood glucose, baseline hepatic glucose output (HGO), and expression of a rate-liming hepatic enzyme of gluconeogenesis phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), whereas the whole body glucose flux during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp was not changed. IH did not affect glucose tolerance after adjustment for fasting hyperglycemia in the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. CSND prevented IH-induced fasting hyperglycemia and increases in baseline HGO and liver PEPCK expression. CSND trended to augment the insulin-stimulated glucose flux and enhanced liver Akt phosphorylation at both hypoxic and normoxic conditions. IH increased serum epinephrine levels and liver sympathetic innervation, and both increases were abolished by CSND. We conclude that chronic IH induces fasting hyperglycemia increasing baseline HGO via the CSN sympathetic output from carotid body chemoreceptors, but does not significantly impair whole body insulin sensitivity. PMID:25103977

  9. Carotid body denervation prevents fasting hyperglycemia during chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mi-Kyung; Yao, Qiaoling; Jun, Jonathan C; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Yoo, Doo-Young; Han, Woobum; Mesarwi, Omar; Richardson, Ria; Fu, Ya-Yuan; Pasricha, Pankaj J; Schwartz, Alan R; Shirahata, Machiko; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2014-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea causes chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) and is associated with impaired glucose metabolism, but mechanisms are unknown. Carotid bodies orchestrate physiological responses to hypoxemia by activating the sympathetic nervous system. Therefore, we hypothesized that carotid body denervation would abolish glucose intolerance and insulin resistance induced by chronic IH. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent carotid sinus nerve dissection (CSND) or sham surgery and then were exposed to IH or intermittent air (IA) for 4 or 6 wk. Hypoxia was administered by decreasing a fraction of inspired oxygen from 20.9% to 6.5% once per minute, during the 12-h light phase (9 a.m.-9 p.m.). As expected, denervated mice exhibited blunted hypoxic ventilatory responses. In sham-operated mice, IH increased fasting blood glucose, baseline hepatic glucose output (HGO), and expression of a rate-liming hepatic enzyme of gluconeogenesis phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), whereas the whole body glucose flux during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp was not changed. IH did not affect glucose tolerance after adjustment for fasting hyperglycemia in the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. CSND prevented IH-induced fasting hyperglycemia and increases in baseline HGO and liver PEPCK expression. CSND trended to augment the insulin-stimulated glucose flux and enhanced liver Akt phosphorylation at both hypoxic and normoxic conditions. IH increased serum epinephrine levels and liver sympathetic innervation, and both increases were abolished by CSND. We conclude that chronic IH induces fasting hyperglycemia increasing baseline HGO via the CSN sympathetic output from carotid body chemoreceptors, but does not significantly impair whole body insulin sensitivity. PMID:25103977

  10. Reversible worsening of Parkinson disease motor symptoms after oral intake of Uncaria tomentosa (cat's claw).

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Carlos; Torres, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Uncaria tomentosa (UT), also known as cat's claw, isa Peruvian Rubiaceae species widely used in traditional medicine for the treatment of a wide range of health problems. There is no report about the use, safety, and efficacy of UT in neurological disorders. We describe reversible worsening of motor signs in a patient with Parkinson disease after oral intake of UT, and some possible explanations are discussed. PMID:18836348

  11. Blood-Brain Glucose Transfer: Repression in Chronic Hyperglycemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjedde, Albert; Crone, Christian

    1981-10-01

    Diabetic patients with increased plasma glucose concentrations may develop cerebral symptoms of hypoglycemia when their plasma glucose is rapidly lowered to normal concentrations. The symptoms may indicate insufficient transport of glucose from blood to brain. In rats with chronic hyperglycemia the maximum glucose transport capacity of the blood-brain barrier decreased from 400 to 290 micromoles per 100 grams per minute. When plasma glucose was lowered to normal values, the glucose transport rate into brain was 20 percent below normal. This suggests that repressive changes of the glucose transport mechanism occur in brain endothelial cells in response to increased plasma glucose.

  12. Anticholinesterase Therapy Worsening Head Drop and Limb Weakness Due to a Novel DOK7 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Lozowska, Dominika; Ringel, Steven P; Winder, Thomas L; Liu, Jie; Liewluck, Teerin

    2015-12-01

    Dok-7 myasthenia is an autosomal recessive congenital myasthenic syndrome due to DOK7 mutations. Anticholinesterase therapy is ineffective and may worsen the weakness in patients with Dok-7 myasthenia or few other forms of congenital myasthenic syndromes. We describe a 31-year-old man previously diagnosed with seronegative myasthenia gravis. Repetitive stimulation of the right spinal accessory nerve showed 51% decrement. Needle electromyography revealed myopathic changes in clinically affected muscles. Muscle biopsy was normal. The patient was referred to us for worsening weakness after taking pyridostigmine. We searched for DOK7 mutations and identified compound heterozygous mutations of a common c.1124_1127dupTGCC mutation and a novel splice site mutation, c.772+2_+4delinsCCGGGCAGGCGGGCA. Discontinuation of pyridostigmine improved weakness. He further regained strength with oral albuterol therapy and decrement was reduced to 25%. Worsening of symptoms with anticholinesterase therapy in patients with "seronegative myasthenia gravis" should prompt clinicians to consider a possibility of congenital myasthenic syndromes to avoid unnecessary use of immunosuppressive therapy. Patients with Dok-7 myasthenia respond well to oral albuterol treatment. PMID:26583494

  13. Nerve growth factor partially recovers inflamed skin from stress-induced worsening in allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Peters, Eva M J; Liezmann, Christiane; Spatz, Katharina; Daniltchenko, Maria; Joachim, Ricarda; Gimenez-Rivera, Andrey; Hendrix, Sven; Botchkarev, Vladimir A; Brandner, Johanna M; Klapp, Burghard F

    2011-03-01

    Neuroimmune dysregulation characterizes atopic disease, but its nature and clinical impact remain ill-defined. Induced by stress, the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF) may worsen cutaneous inflammation. We therefore studied the role of NGF in the cutaneous stress response in a mouse model for atopic dermatitis-like allergic dermatitis (AlD). Combining several methods, we found that stress increased cutaneous but not serum or hypothalamic NGF in telogen mice. Microarray analysis showed increased mRNAs of inflammatory and growth factors associated with NGF in the skin. In stress-worsened AlD, NGF-neutralizing antibodies markedly reduced epidermal thickening together with NGF, neurotrophin receptor (tyrosine kinase A and p75 neurotrophin receptor), and transforming growth factor-β expression by keratinocytes but did not alter transepidermal water loss. Moreover, NGF expression by mast cells was reduced; this corresponded to reduced cutaneous tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA levels but not to changes in mast cell degranulation or in the T helper type 1 (Th1)/Th2 cytokine balance. Also, eosinophils expressed TNF receptor type 2, and we observed reduced eosinophil infiltration after treatment with NGF-neutralizing antibodies. We thus conclude that NGF acts as a local stress mediator in perceived stress and allergy and that increased NGF message contributes to worsening of cutaneous inflammation mainly by enhancing epidermal hyperplasia, pro-allergic cytokine induction, and allergy-characteristic cellular infiltration. PMID:21085186

  14. Low-carbohydrate diet combined with SGLT2 inhibitor for refractory hyperglycemia caused by insulin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Shigeno, Riyoko; Horie, Ichiro; Ando, Takao; Abiru, Norio; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    A low-carbohydrate diet is effective to improve hyperglycemia via insulin-independent actions. We report here that a low-carbohydrate diet combined with an SGLT2 inhibitor was effective and safe to treat refractory hyperglycemia in the perioperative period in a type 2 diabetes patient complicated with a high titer of insulin antibodies. PMID:27321315

  15. Importance of genetics in fetal alcohol effects: null mutation of the nNOS gene worsens alcohol-induced cerebellar neuronal losses and behavioral deficits

    PubMed Central

    Bonthius, Daniel J.; Winters, Zachary; Karacay, Bahri; Bousquet, Samantha Larimer; Bonthius, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is a major target of alcohol-induced damage in the developing brain. However, the cerebella of some children are much more seriously affected than others by prenatal alcohol exposure. As a consequence of in utero alcohol exposure, some children have substantial reductions in cerebellar volume and corresponding neurodevelopmental problems, including microencephaly, ataxia, and balance deficits, while other children who were exposed to similar alcohol quantities are spared. One factor that likely plays a key role in determining the impact of alcohol on the fetal cerebellum is genetics. However, no specific gene variant has yet been identified that worsens cerebellar function as a consequence of developmental alcohol exposure. Previous studies have revealed that mice carrying a homozygous mutation of the gene for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS−/− mice) have more severe acute alcohol-induced neuronal losses from the cerebellum than wild type mice. Therefore, the goals of this study were to determine whether alcohol induces more severe cerebellum-based behavioral deficits in nNOS−/− mice than in wild type mice and to determine whether these worsened behavior deficits are associated with worsened cerebellar neuronal losses. nNOS−/− mice and their wild type controls received alcohol (0.0, 2.2, or 4.4 mg/g) daily over postnatal days 4–9. In adulthood, the mice underwent behavioral testing, followed by neuronal quantification. Alcohol caused dose-related deficits in rotarod and balance beam performance in both nNOS−/− and wild type mice. However, the alcohol-induced behavioral deficits were substantially worse in the nNOS−/− mice than in wild type. Likewise, alcohol exposure led to losses of Purkinje cells and cerebellar granule cells in mice of both genotypes, but the cell losses were more severe in the nNOS−/− mice than in wild type. Behavioral performances were correlated with neuronal number in the nNOS−/− mice, but not

  16. Visual integration dysfunction in schizophrenia arises by the first psychotic episode and worsens with illness duration.

    PubMed

    Keane, Brian P; Paterno, Danielle; Kastner, Sabine; Silverstein, Steven M

    2016-05-01

    Visual integration dysfunction characterizes schizophrenia, but prior studies have not yet established whether the problem arises by the first psychotic episode or worsens with illness duration. To investigate the issue, we compared chronic schizophrenia patients (SZs), first episode psychosis patients (FEs), and well-matched healthy controls on a brief but sensitive psychophysical task in which subjects attempted to locate an integrated shape embedded in noise. Task difficulty depended on the number of noise elements co-presented with the shape. For half of the experiment, the entire display was scaled down in size to produce a high spatial frequency (HSF) condition, which has been shown to worsen patient integration deficits. Catch trials-in which the circular target appeared without noise-were also added so as to confirm that subjects were paying adequate attention. We found that controls integrated contours under noisier conditions than FEs, who, in turn, integrated better than SZs. These differences, which were at times large in magnitude (d = 1.7), clearly emerged only for HSF displays. Catch trial accuracy was above 95% for each group and could not explain the foregoing differences. Prolonged illness duration predicted poorer HSF integration across patients, but age had little effect on controls, indicating that the former factor was driving the effect in patients. Taken together, a brief psychophysical task efficiently demonstrates large visual integration impairments in schizophrenia. The deficit arises by the first psychotic episode, worsens with illness duration, and may serve as a biomarker of illness progression. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27030995

  17. Worsening of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Associated with Catheter-Related Superior Vena Cava Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jouvenot, Marie; Willoteaux, Serge; Meslier, Nicole; Gagnadoux, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that fluid accumulation in the neck contributes to the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We describe a case of catheter-related superior v ena cava (SVC) thrombosis revealed by rapid onset of typical symptoms of OSA. A marked improvement in OSA severity was observed after central venous catheter removal, anticoagulant therapy, and SVC angioplasty Citation: Jouvenot M, Willoteaux S, Meslier N, Gagnadoux F. Worsening of obstructive sleep apnea associated with catheter-related superior vena cava syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(6):681–682. PMID:25766698

  18. Persistent impaired glucose metabolism in a zebrafish hyperglycemia model.

    PubMed

    Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Antonioli, Régis; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Bonan, Carla Denise; Da Silva, Rosane Souza

    2014-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) affects over 10% of the world's population. Hyperglycemia is the main feature for the diagnosis of this disease. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an established model organism for the study of various metabolic diseases. In this paper, hyperglycemic zebrafish, when immersed in a 111 mM glucose solution for 14 days, developed increased glycation of proteins from the eyes, decreased mRNA levels of insulin receptors in the muscle, and a reversion of high blood glucose level after treatment with anti-diabetic drugs (glimepiride and metformin) even after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. Additionally, hyperglycemic zebrafish developed an impaired response to exogenous insulin, which was recovered after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. These data suggest that the exposure of adult zebrafish to high glucose concentration is able to induce persistent metabolic changes probably underlined by a hyperinsulinemic state and impaired peripheral glucose metabolism. PMID:24704522

  19. Worsening renal function in patients with baseline renal impairment treated with intravenous voriconazole: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Turner, R Brigg; Martello, Jay L; Malhotra, Ashim

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this paper was to review the risk of worsening renal function in patients with pre-existing renal impairment receiving intravenous voriconazole (IVV). Controversy exists regarding the cause and risk of renal dysfunction in patients treated with IVV. Whilst some studies implicate renally excreted cyclodextrin, a pharmaceutical formulation stabiliser, as the cause of renal dysfunction following voriconazole administration, others provide contradicting evidence. Here we analyse the available literature to gain an insight into the significance of renal toxicity in patients treated with IVV. PubMed was searched for relevant studies to December 2014. To account for publication bias, abstracts from the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, the Infectious Diseases Society of America/ID Week, and the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases from 2008-2014 were reviewed. Bibliographies of all identified articles were reviewed and cross-referenced for additional sources. Seven retrospective studies were identified for inclusion in the review; no prospective studies were identified. Based on the available evidence, we conclude that there is no strong evidence suggesting an increased incidence of worsening renal function with IVV use. No study thus far has provided direct conclusive evidence for cellular and physiological renal toxicity due to IVV at clinically prevalent doses. PMID:26253129

  20. Is Perioperative Fluid and Salt Balance a Contributing Factor in Postoperative Worsening of Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

    PubMed

    Lam, Thach; Singh, Mandeep; Yadollahi, Azadeh; Chung, Frances

    2016-05-01

    An understanding of the potential mechanisms underlying recurrent upper airway collapse may help anesthesiologists better manage patients in the postoperative period. There is convincing evidence in the sleep medicine literature to suggest that a positive fluid and salt balance can worsen upper airway collapse in patients with obstructive sleep apnea through the redistribution of fluid from the legs into the neck and upper airway while supine, in a process known as "rostral fluid shift." According to this theory, during the day the volume from a fluid bolus or from fluid overload states (i.e., heart failure and chronic kidney disease) accumulates in the legs due to gravity, and when a person lies supine at night, the fluid shifts rostrally to the neck, also owing to gravity. The fluid in the neck can increase the extraluminal pressure around the upper airways, causing the upper airways to narrow and predisposing to upper airway collapse. Similarly, surgical patients also incur large fluid and salt balance shifts, and when recovered supine, this may promote fluid redistribution to the neck and upper airways. In this commentary, we summarize the sleep medicine literature on the impact of fluid and salt balance on obstructive sleep apnea severity and discuss the potential anesthetic implications of excessive fluid and salt volume on worsening sleep apnea. PMID:27101494

  1. [Poor medication adherence and worsening of heart failure--a vicious circle].

    PubMed

    Fikenzer, K; Knoll, A; Lenski, D; Schulz, M; Böhm, M; Laufs, U

    2014-11-01

    Despite of markedly improved options for treatment, chronic heart failure is associated with recurrent worsening of symptoms. Poor medication adherence has adverse effects on frequency and progression of congestive heart failure. There are three relevant areas of problems that could be aggravated by each other:There is the problem of changes in pharmacokinetics in worsening heart failure. Proportional to the severity of heart failure, there is an existing intestinal edema and changes of intestinal bacterial colonization that may affect a drug's absorption and, hence, its efficacy.Depression and impaired cognitive function is quite common in patients with chronic heart failure. Depression both predicts hospitalization and mortality rate as well as poor medication adherence in CHF. Compared to stable CHF patients, cognitive function deteriorates significantly while decompensation leading to impaired medication adherence.Shown by recent studies, there is a higher risk for poor medication adherence after a cardiovascular event.Poor medication adherence is associated with an increased rate of cardiovascular events not only in heart failure, but also in all cardiovascular diseases. Hence, there is a need for specific and long term interventions to improve medication adherence at an early stage. PMID:25390627

  2. Hyperglycemia induces iNOS gene expression and consequent nitrosative stress via JNK activation

    PubMed Central

    YANG, Peixin; CAO, Yuanning; LI, Hua

    2010-01-01

    Objective Maternal diabetes adversely impacts embryonic development. We test the hypothesis that hyperglycemia-induced JNK1/2 activation mediates iNOS induction. Study Design Levels of iNOS mRNA and nitrosylated protein were determined in cultured C57BL/6J conceptuses exposed to hyperglycemia (300 mg/dl glucose) and C57BL/6J embryos exposed to streptozotocin-induced diabetes. iNOS-luciferase activity and endogenous reactive nitrogen species were determined in transfected PYS-2 (mouse teratocarcinoma) cells exposed to hyperglycemia (450 mg/dl glucose). Results Hyperglycemia increased iNOS mRNA and SP600125, a potent JNK1/2 inhibitor, abolished this effect. Hyperglycemia increased iNOS-luciferase activities and SP600125 blocked this effect. Diabetes increased iNOS mRNA and jnk2 gene deletion abrogated this effect. Correlated with iNOS gene induction, both hyperglycemia in vitro and diabetes in vivo enhanced the production of reactive nitrogen species and increased protein nitrosylation. jnk2 gene deletion blocked diabetes-induced protein nitrosylation. Conclusion JNK1/2 activation mediates hyperglycemia-induced iNOS gene expression and consequent nitrosative stress in diabetic embryopathy. PMID:20541731

  3. Treatment of hypophosphatemic rickets in generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) without worsening of vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Carlos R; Ziegler, Shira G; Gupta, Ashutosh; Groden, Catherine; Hsu, Kevin S; Gahl, William A

    2016-05-01

    Patients with generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) develop vascular calcifications early in life. About half of them die within the first 6 months despite optimal medical care. A subset of those who survive eventually develop hypophosphatemic rickets. Since hypophosphatemia and hyperphosphaturia have been previously associated with increased survival in GACI patients, physicians often avoid phosphate repletion as treatment for rickets. As a consequence, GACI patients develop severe rachitic complications such as short stature and skeletal deformities. It appears that the recognition of hypophosphatemia later in life in some GACI patients is a consequence of having survived the first few months of life, and not the cause of their survival per se. Here, we report the long-term follow-up of a GACI patient who was phosphate-repleted for his rickets for more than 7 years without worsening of vascular calcification. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26857895

  4. Ventricular Tachycardia and Resembling Acute Coronary Syndrome During Pheochromocytoma Crisis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Li, Shi-Jun; Wang, Tao; Wang, Lin; Pang, Zhan-Qi; Ma, Ben; Li, Ya-Wen; Yang, Jian; Dong, He

    2016-04-01

    Pheochromocytomas are neuroendocrine tumors, and its cardiac involvement may include transient myocardial dysfunction, acute coronary syndrome (ACS), and even ventricular arrhythmias.A patient was referred for evaluation of stuttering chest pain, and his electrocardiogram showed T-wave inversion over leads V1 to V4. Coronary angiography showed 90% stenosis in the mid-left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), which was stented. Five days later, the patient had ventricular tachycardia, and severe hypertension, remarkable blood pressure fluctuation between 224/76 and 70/50 mm Hg. The patient felt abdominal pain and his abdominal ultrasound showed suspicious right adrenal gland tumor. Enhanced computed tomography of adrenal gland conformed that there was a tumor in right adrenal gland accompanied by an upset level of aldosterone.The tumor was removed by laparoscope, and the pathological examination showed pheochromocytoma. After the surgery, the blood pressure turned normal gradually. There was no T-wave inversion in lead V1-V4. Our case illustrates a rare pheochromocytoma presentation with a VT and resembling ACS. In our case, the serious stenosis in the mid of LAD could be explained by worsen the clinical course of myocardial ischemia or severe coronary vasospasm by the excessive amounts of catecholamines released from the tumor. Coronary vasospasm was possible because he had no classic coronary risk factors (e.g. family history and smoking habit, essential hypertension, hyperglycemia and abnormal serum lipoprotein, high body mass index). Thus, pheochromocytoma was missed until he revealed the association of his symptoms with abdominalgia.As phaeochromocytomas that present with cardiovascular complications can be fatal, it is necessary to screen for the disease when patients present with symptoms indicating catecholamine excess. PMID:27057898

  5. Hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning attenuates hyperglycemia-enhanced hemorrhagic transformation by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases in focal cerebral ischemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Soejima, Yoshiteru; Hu, Qin; Krafft, Paul R.; Fujii, Mutsumi; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperglycemia dramatically aggravates brain infarct and hemorrhagic transformation (HT) after ischemic stroke. Oxidative stress and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an important role in the pathophysiology of HT. Hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning (HBO-PC) has been proved to decrease oxidative stress and be neuroprotective in experimental stroke models. The present study determined whether HBO-PC would ameliorate HT by a pre-ischemic increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and a suppression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in hyperglycemic middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rats. Rats were pretreated with HBO (100% O2, 2.5 atmospheres absolute) 1 h daily for 5 days before MCAO. Acute hyperglycemia was induced by an injection of 50% dextrose. Neurological deficits, infarction volume and hemorrhagic volume were assessed 24 h and 7 days after ischemia. ROS scavenger n-acetyl cysteine (NAC), hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) inhibitor 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) and activator cobalt chloride (CoCl2), and MMPs inhibitor SB-3CT were administrated for mechanism study. The activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9, and the expression HIF-1α were measured. HBO-PC improved neurological deficits, and reduced hemorrhagic volume; the expression of HIF-1α was significantly decreased, and the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 was reduced by HBO-PC compared with vehicle group. Our results suggested that HBO-PC attenuated HT via decreasing HIF-1α and its downstream MMP-2 and MMP-9 in hyperglycemic MCAO rats. PMID:23537951

  6. Neonatal Hyperglycemia due to Transient Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Fargas-Berríos, N.; García-Fragoso, L.; García-García, I.; Valcárcel, M.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hyperglycemia is a metabolic disorder found in the neonatal intensive care units. Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) is a very uncommon cause of hyperglycemia in the newborn, occurring in 1 in every 400,000 births. There are two subtypes of neonatal diabetes mellitus: permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) and transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (TNDM). We describe a term, small for gestational age, female neonate with transient neonatal diabetes mellitus who presented with poor feeding tolerance and vomiting associated with hyperglycemia (385 mg/dL), glycosuria, and metabolic acidosis within the first 12 hours of life. The neonate was treated with intravenous insulin, obtaining a slight control of hyperglycemia. An adequate glycemia was achieved at 5 weeks of life. The molecular studies showed complete loss of maternal methylation at the TND differentially methylated region on chromosome 6q24. The etiology of this neonate's hyperglycemia was a hypomethylation of the maternal TND locus. A rare cause of neonatal diabetes mellitus must be considered if a neonate presents refractory hyperglycemia. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in Puerto Rico of transient neonatal mellitus due to the uncommon mechanism of maternal hypomethylation of the TND locus. Its prevalence in Puerto Rico is unknown. PMID:26576310

  7. Neonatal Hyperglycemia due to Transient Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Fargas-Berríos, N; García-Fragoso, L; García-García, I; Valcárcel, M

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hyperglycemia is a metabolic disorder found in the neonatal intensive care units. Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) is a very uncommon cause of hyperglycemia in the newborn, occurring in 1 in every 400,000 births. There are two subtypes of neonatal diabetes mellitus: permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) and transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (TNDM). We describe a term, small for gestational age, female neonate with transient neonatal diabetes mellitus who presented with poor feeding tolerance and vomiting associated with hyperglycemia (385 mg/dL), glycosuria, and metabolic acidosis within the first 12 hours of life. The neonate was treated with intravenous insulin, obtaining a slight control of hyperglycemia. An adequate glycemia was achieved at 5 weeks of life. The molecular studies showed complete loss of maternal methylation at the TND differentially methylated region on chromosome 6q24. The etiology of this neonate's hyperglycemia was a hypomethylation of the maternal TND locus. A rare cause of neonatal diabetes mellitus must be considered if a neonate presents refractory hyperglycemia. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in Puerto Rico of transient neonatal mellitus due to the uncommon mechanism of maternal hypomethylation of the TND locus. Its prevalence in Puerto Rico is unknown. PMID:26576310

  8. Hyperglycemia Interacts with Ischemia in a Synergistic Way on Wound Repair and Myofibroblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Lévigne, Dominik; Modarressi, Ali; Atashi, Fatemeh; Villard, Frederic; Hinz, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hyperglycemia is known to adversely affect the outcome of ischemic insults, but its interaction with ischemia has not been investigated in wound repair yet. In this study, we develop a new animal model allowing to investigate the interaction between hyperglycemia and ischemia during the wound repair process. We focus on myofibroblast differentiation, a key element of wound repair. Methods: Ischemia was inflicted in Wistar rats by resection of the femoral to popliteal arteries on the left side, whereas arteries were dissected without resection on the right side. Full-thickness skin wounds (1 cm2) were created on both feet. Hyperglycemia was induced by injection of streptozotocin. Normoglycemic animals served as control (n = 23/group). Blood flow, wound closure, and myofibroblast expression were measured. Results: Wound closure was significantly delayed in ischemic compared with nonischemic wounds in all rats. This delay was almost 5-fold exacerbated in hyperglycemic rats compared with normoglycemic rats, while hyperglycemia alone showed only a slight effect on wound repair. Delayed wound repair was associated with impaired wound contraction and myofibroblast differentiation. Conclusions: Our model allows to specifically quantify the effect of hyperglycemia and ischemia alone or in combination on wound repair. We show that hyperglycemia amplifies the inhibitory effect of ischemia on wound repair and myofibroblast expression. Our data reveal for the first time the synergic aspect of this interaction and therefore stress the importance of a strict glycemic control in the management of ischemic wounds. PMID:26301160

  9. Bacterial Respiratory Tract Infections are Promoted by Systemic Hyperglycemia after Severe Burn Injury in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N; Mlcak, Ronald P; Finnerty, Celeste C; Cox, Robert A; Williams, Felicia N; Jeschke, Marc G

    2014-01-01

    Background Burn injuries are associated with hyperglycemia leading to increased incidence of infections with pneumonia being one of the most prominent and adverse complication. Recently, various studies in critically ill patients indicated that increased pulmonary glucose levels with airway/blood glucose threshold over 150 mg/dl lead to an overwhelming growth of bacteria in the broncho-pulmonary system, subsequently resulting in an increased risk of pulmonary infections. The aim of the present study was to determine whether a similar cutoff value exists for severely burned pediatric patients. Methods One-hundred six severely burned pediatric patients were enrolled in the study. Patients were divided in two groups: high (H) defined as daily average glucose levels >75% of LOS >150 mg/dl), and low (L) with daily average glucose levels >75% of the LOS <150 mg/dl). Incidences of pneumonia, atelectasis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) were assessed. Incidence of infections, sepsis, and respiratory parameters were recorded. Blood was analyzed for glucose and insulin levels. Statistical analysis was performed using Student’s t-test and chi-square test. Significance was set at p<0.05. Results Patient groups were similar in demographics and injury characteristics. Pneumonia in patients on the mechanical ventilation (L: 21% H: 32%) and off mechanical ventilation (L: 5% H: 15%), as well as ARDS were significantly higher in the high group (L: 3% H: 19%), p<0.05, while atelectasis was not different. Patients in the high group required significantly longer ventilation compared to low patients (p<0.05). Furthermore, incidence of infection and sepsis were significantly higher in the high group, p<0.05. Conclusion Our results indicate that systemic glucose levels over 150 mg/dl are associated with a higher incidence of pneumonia confirming the previous studies in critically ill patients. PMID:24074819

  10. Fractalkine Receptor Deficiency Is Associated with Early Protection but Late Worsening of Outcome following Brain Trauma in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zanier, Elisa R; Marchesi, Federica; Ortolano, Fabrizio; Perego, Carlo; Arabian, Maedeh; Zoerle, Tommaso; Sammali, Eliana; Pischiutta, Francesca; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia

    2016-06-01

    An impaired ability to regulate microglia activation by fractalkine (CX3CL1) leads to microglia chronic sub-activation. How this condition affects outcome after acute brain injury is still debated, with studies showing contrasting results depending on the timing and the brain pathology. Here, we investigated the early and delayed consequences of fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) deletion on neurological outcome and on the phenotypical features of the myeloid cells present in the lesions of mice with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Wild type (WT) and CX3CR1(-/-) C57Bl/6 mice were subjected to sham or controlled cortical impact brain injury. Outcome was assessed at 4 days and 5 weeks after TBI by neuroscore, neuronal count, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Compared with WT mice, CX3CR1(-/-) TBI mice showed a significant reduction of sensorimotor deficits and lower cellular damage in the injured cortex 4 days post-TBI. Conversely, at 5 weeks, they showed a worsening of sensorimotor deficits and pericontusional cell death. Microglia (M) and macrophage (μ) activation and polarization were assessed by quantitative immunohistochemistry for CD11b, CD68, Ym1, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-markers of M/μ activation, phagocytosis, M2, and M1 phenotypes, respectively. Morphological analysis revealed a decreased area and perimeter of CD11b(+) cells in CX3CR1(-/-) mice at 4 days post-TBI, whereas, at 5 weeks, both parameters were significantly higher, compared with WT mice. At 4 days, CX3CR1(-/-) mice showed significantly decreased CD68 and iNOS immunoreactivity, while at 5 weeks post-injury, they showed a selective increase of iNOS. Gene expression on CD11b(+) sorted cells revealed an increase of interleukin 10 and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) at 1 day and a decrease of IGF1 4 days and 5 weeks post-TBI in CX3CR1(-/-), compared with WT mice. These data show an early protection followed by a chronic exacerbation of

  11. Hyperglycemia and mechanical stress: targeting the renal podocyte.

    PubMed

    Lewko, Barbara; Stepinski, Jan

    2009-11-01

    Hyperglycemia and deriving from glomerular hypertension mechanical stress are the key factors underlying pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Multiple direct and secondary effects of both these factors are mediated by complex signaling pathways with extensive interactions. The common signaling pathways stimulated by high glucose and mechanical insult may act in an additive manner, thereby accelerating the cell damage. Podocytes, the cells covering the outer aspect of glomerular basement membrane (GBM), are subjected not only to the load of filtered glucose but also to diverse mechanical forces. Bulging into the Bowman's space, they have no support from the apical side, which makes them particularly susceptible to the effects of mechanical strain. Both high glucose and mechanical stress may impair the protein systems anchoring the podocyte foot processes in GBM, therefore blunting resistance of these cells to mechanical forces. Modulation by these factors of expression and activity of numerous structural and functional proteins results in the (auto)inflammatory responses, dysfunction, apoptosis or necrosis of the podocytes. Loss of the podocytes is irreversible due to their inability to proliferate and to replenish damaged cells. Podocytes are injured early in the course of DN, which, most likely, underlies further glomerular and renal damage in diabetes. This review summarizes the effects of elevated glucose and mechanical stress that seem to be involved in podocyte impairment in diabetes, with particular focus on the possible interactions between these factors. PMID:19562677

  12. Ketogenesis prevents diet-induced fatty liver injury and hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, David G.; Ercal, Baris; Huang, Xiaojing; Leid, Jamison M.; d’Avignon, D. André; Graham, Mark J.; Dietzen, Dennis J.; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Patti, Gary J.; Crawford, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) spectrum disorders affect approximately 1 billion individuals worldwide. However, the drivers of progressive steatohepatitis remain incompletely defined. Ketogenesis can dispose of much of the fat that enters the liver, and dysfunction in this pathway could promote the development of NAFLD. Here, we evaluated mice lacking mitochondrial 3-hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA synthase (HMGCS2) to determine the role of ketogenesis in preventing diet-induced steatohepatitis. Antisense oligonucleotide–induced loss of HMGCS2 in chow-fed adult mice caused mild hyperglycemia, increased hepatic gluconeogenesis from pyruvate, and augmented production of hundreds of hepatic metabolites, a suite of which indicated activation of the de novo lipogenesis pathway. High-fat diet feeding of mice with insufficient ketogenesis resulted in extensive hepatocyte injury and inflammation, decreased glycemia, deranged hepatic TCA cycle intermediate concentrations, and impaired hepatic gluconeogenesis due to sequestration of free coenzyme A (CoASH). Supplementation of the CoASH precursors pantothenic acid and cysteine normalized TCA intermediates and gluconeogenesis in the livers of ketogenesis-insufficient animals. Together, these findings indicate that ketogenesis is a critical regulator of hepatic acyl-CoA metabolism, glucose metabolism, and TCA cycle function in the absorptive state and suggest that ketogenesis may modulate fatty liver disease. PMID:25347470

  13. Acute bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sudhanshu; Jindal, Atul; Bansal, Arun; Singhi, Sunit C

    2011-11-01

    Acute asthma is the third commonest cause of pediatric emergency visits at PGIMER. Typically, it presents with acute onset respiratory distress and wheeze in a patient with past or family history of similar episodes. The severity of the acute episode of asthma is judged clinically and categorized as mild, moderate and severe. The initial therapy consists of oxygen, inhaled beta-2 agonists (salbutamol or terbutaline), inhaled budesonide (three doses over 1 h, at 20 min interval) in all and ipratropium bromide and systemic steroids (hydrocortisone or methylprednisolone) in acute severe asthma. Other causes of acute onset wheeze and breathing difficulty such as pneumonia, foreign body, cardiac failure etc. should be ruled out with help of chest radiography and appropriate laboratory investigations in first time wheezers and those not responding to 1 h of inhaled therapy. In case of inadequate response or worsening, intravenous infusion of magnesium sulphate, terbutaline or aminophylline may be used. Magnesium sulphate is the safest and most effective alternative among these. Severe cases may need ICU care and rarely, ventilatory support. PMID:21769523

  14. Expression of mutant bone morphogenetic protein receptor II worsens pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Linda J.; Moore, Christy S.; Blackwell, Thomas R.; Gladson, Santhi; Penner, Niki L.; Burman, Ankita; McClellan, Lucas J.; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.; Tanjore, Harikrishna; McConaha, Melinda E.; Gleaves, Linda A.; Talati, Megha A.; Hemnes, Anna R.; Fessel, Joshua P.; Lawson, William E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; West, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary fibrosis is often complicated by pulmonary hypertension (PH), and previous studies have shown a potential link between bone morphogenetic protein receptor II (BMPR2) and PH secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. We exposed transgenic mice expressing mutant BMPR2 and control mice to repetitive intraperitoneal injections of bleomycin for 4 weeks. The duration of transgene activation was too short for mutant BMPR2 mice to develop spontaneous PH. Mutant BMPR2 mice had increased right ventricular systolic pressure compared to control mice, without differences in pulmonary fibrosis. We found increased hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1-α stabilization in lungs of mutant-BMPR2-expressing mice compared to controls following bleomycin treatment. In addition, expression of the hypoxia response element protein connective tissue growth factor was increased in transgenic mice as well as in a human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell line expressing mutant BMPR2. In mouse pulmonary vascular endothelial cells, mutant BMPR2 expression resulted in increased HIF1-α and reactive oxygen species production following exposure to hypoxia, both of which were attenuated with the antioxidant TEMPOL. These data suggest that expression of mutant BMPR2 worsens secondary PH through increased HIF activity in vascular endothelium. This pathway could be therapeutically targeted in patients with PH secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26697175

  15. Obesity is associated with worsening cardiovascular risk factor profiles and proteinuria progression in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Kirsten A; Campbell, Scott B; Hawley, Carmel M; Nicol, David L; Johnson, David W; Isbel, Nicole M

    2005-11-01

    Obesity is associated with adverse cardiovascular (CV) parameters and may be involved in the pathogenesis of allograft dysfunction in renal transplant recipients (RTR). We sought the spectrum of body mass index (BMI) and the relationships between BMI, CV parameters and allograft function in prevalent RTR. Data were collected at baseline and 2 years on 90 RTR (mean age 51 years, 53% male, median transplant duration 7 years), categorized by BMI (normal, BMI < or = 24.9 kg/m2; pre-obese, BMI 25-29.9 kg/m2; obese, BMI > or = 30 kg/m2). Proteinuria and glomerular filtration rate (eGFR(MDRD)) were determined. Nine percent RTR were obese pre-transplantation compared to 30% at baseline (p < 0.001) and follow-up (25 +/- 2 months). As BMI increased, prevalence of metabolic syndrome and central obesity increased (12 vs 48 vs 85%, p < 0.001 and 3 vs 42 vs 96%, p < 0.001, respectively). Systolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose and lipid parameters changed significantly with BMI category and over time. Proteinuria progression occurred in 65% obese RTR (23 (13-59 g/mol creatinine) to 59 (25-120 g/mol creatinine)). BMI was independently associated with proteinuria progression (beta 0.01, p = 0.008) but not with changing eGFR(MDRD.) In conclusion, obesity is common in RTR and is associated with worsening CV parameters and proteinuria progression. PMID:16212631

  16. Prediction of death, myocardial infarction, and worsening chest pain using thallium scintigraphy and exercise electrocardiography

    SciTech Connect

    Staniloff, H.M.; Forrester, J.S.; Berman, D.S.; Swan, H.J.

    1986-12-01

    Although used extensively, there is little published information on the prognostic ability of exercise /sup 201/Tl scintigraphy. Accordingly, 1 yr after testing we contacted 819 patients without previous MI or CABG seen in our laboratory during a 2-yr period. Events were defined as death from a cardiovascular cause, nonfatal MI, or worsening clinical state requiring CABG. The event rate was 3.9 events per 100 patients per year. There was univariate prognostic information when comparing the highest and lowest categories as risk ratios for chest pain characteristics (2.7), sex (2.3), exercise duration (3.1), ST slope (2.5), and thallium pattern (11.6), intensity of perfusion defect (17.2), and number of abnormal regions (8.7). However, the strongest predictors were also the least common. Prognostic ability was improved by combining the results categorically, as the number of abnormal tests (13.9). The highest risk ratio, 20.5:1, was obtained by combining results through discriminant function analysis. We conclude that exercise thallium scintigraphy provides prognostic information, although the most predictive patterns are uncommon. Combining the results of multiple test results improves the prognostic ability.

  17. Hydrocarbon exposure may cause glomerulonephritis and worsen renal function: evidence based on Hill's criteria for causality.

    PubMed

    Ravnskov, U

    2000-08-01

    Many observational and experimental studies point to hydrocarbon exposure as an important pathogenic factor in glomerulonephritis. The findings have made little impact on current concepts and patient care, possibly because the hypothesis of a direct causal effect of the exposure and the hypothesis that the exposure worsens renal function have not been considered separately. This review examines these two hypotheses using Hill's criteria for causality. The results from 14 cross-sectional, 18 case-control studies, two cohort studies, 15 experiments on laboratory animals and two on human beings together with many case reports satisfy all but one of Hill's criteria for both hypotheses. Of particular importance is the finding in the case-control and follow-up studies of an association between degree of exposure and stage of renal disease, and an inverse association between degree of exposure and renal function, indicating that the most important effect of hydrocarbon exposure is its effect on renal function. End-stage renal failure may be preventable in many patients with glomerulonephritis provided a possible exposure to toxic chemicals is discontinued. PMID:10924538

  18. Amyloid beta immunization worsens iron deposits in the choroid plexus and cerebral microbleeds.

    PubMed

    Joseph-Mathurin, Nelly; Dorieux, Olène; Trouche, Stéphanie G; Boutajangout, Allal; Kraska, Audrey; Fontès, Pascaline; Verdier, Jean-Michel; Sigurdsson, Einar M; Mestre-Francés, Nadine; Dhenain, Marc

    2013-11-01

    Anti-amyloid beta (Aβ) immunotherapy provides potential benefits in Alzheimer's disease patients. Nevertheless, strategies based on Aβ1-42 peptide induced encephalomyelitis and possible microhemorrhages. These outcomes were not expected from studies performed in rodents. It is critical to determine if other animal models better predict side effects of immunotherapies. Mouse lemur primates can develop amyloidosis with aging. Here we used old lemurs to study immunotherapy based on Aβ1-42 or Aβ-derivative (K6Aβ1-30). We followed anti-Aβ40 immunoglobulin G and M responses and Aβ levels in plasma. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging and histology were used to evaluate amyloidosis, neuroinflammation, vasogenic edema, microhemorrhages, and brain iron deposits. The animals responded mainly to the Aβ1-42 immunogen. This treatment induced immune response and increased Aβ levels in plasma and also microhemorrhages and iron deposits in the choroid plexus. A complementary study of untreated lemurs showed iron accumulation in the choroid plexus with normal aging. Worsening of iron accumulation is thus a potential side effect of Aβ-immunization at prodromal stages of Alzheimer's disease, and should be monitored in clinical trials. PMID:23796662

  19. Aβ immunization worsens iron deposits in the choroid plexus and cerebral microbleeds

    PubMed Central

    Joseph-Mathurin, Nelly; Dorieux, Olène; Trouche, Stéphanie G.; Boutajangout, Allal; Kraska, Audrey; Fontès, Pascaline; Verdier, Jean-Michel; Sigurdsson, Einar M.; Mestre-Francés, Nadine; Dhenain, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Anti-Aβ immunotherapy provides potential benefits in Alzheimer’s disease patients. Nevertheless, strategies based on Aβ1-42 peptide induced encephalomyelitis and possible microhemorrhages. These outcomes were not expected from studies performed in rodents. It is critical to determine if other animal models better predict side effects of immunotherapies. Mouse lemur primates can develop amyloidosis with aging. Here we used old lemurs to study immunotherapy based on Aβ1-42 or Aβ-derivative (K6Aβ1-30). We followed anti-Aβ40 IgG and IgM responses as well as Aβ levels in plasma. In-vivo magnetic resonance imaging and histology were used to evaluate amyloidosis, neuroinflammation, vasogenic edema, microhemorrhages, and brain iron deposits. The animals responded mainly to the Aβ1-42 immunogen. This treatment induced immune response and increased Aβ levels in plasma but also microhemorrhages and iron deposits in the choroid plexus. A complementary study of untreated lemurs showed iron accumulation in the choroid plexus with normal aging. Worsening of iron accumulation is thus a potential side effect of Aβ-immunization at prodromal stages of Alzheimer’s disease, and should be monitored in clinical trials. PMID:23796662

  20. Only adding stationary storage to vaccine supply chains may create and worsen transport bottlenecks.

    PubMed

    Haidari, Leila A; Connor, Diana L; Wateska, Angela R; Brown, Shawn T; Mueller, Leslie E; Norman, Bryan A; Schmitz, Michelle M; Paul, Proma; Rajgopal, Jayant; Welling, Joel S; Leonard, Jim; Claypool, Erin G; Weng, Yu-Ting; Chen, Sheng-I; Lee, Bruce Y

    2013-01-01

    Although vaccine supply chains in many countries require additional stationary storage and transport capacity to meet current and future needs, international donors tend to donate stationary storage devices far more often than transport equipment. To investigate the impact of only adding stationary storage equipment on the capacity requirements of transport devices and vehicles, we used HERMES (Highly Extensible Resource for Modeling Supply Chains) to construct a discrete event simulation model of the Niger vaccine supply chain. We measured the transport capacity requirement for each mode of transport used in the Niger vaccine cold chain, both before and after adding cold rooms and refrigerators to relieve all stationary storage constraints in the system. With the addition of necessary stationary storage, the average transport capacity requirement increased from 88% to 144% for cold trucks, from 101% to 197% for pickup trucks, and from 366% to 420% for vaccine carriers. Therefore, adding stationary storage alone may worsen or create new transport bottlenecks as more vaccines flow through the system, preventing many vaccines from reaching their target populations. Dynamic modeling can reveal such relationships between stationary storage capacity and transport constraints. PMID:23903398

  1. Only Adding Stationary Storage to Vaccine Supply Chains May Create and Worsen Transport Bottlenecks

    PubMed Central

    Haidari, Leila A.; Connor, Diana L.; Wateska, Angela R.; Brown, Shawn T.; Mueller, Leslie E.; Norman, Bryan A.; Schmitz, Michelle M.; Paul, Proma; Rajgopal, Jayant; Welling, Joel S.; Leonard, Jim; Claypool, Erin G.; Weng, Yu-Ting; Chen, Sheng-I; Lee, Bruce Y.

    2015-01-01

    Although vaccine supply chains in many countries require additional stationary storage and transport capacity to meet current and future needs, international donors tend to donate stationary storage devices far more often than transport equipment. To investigate the impact of only adding stationary storage equipment on the capacity requirements of transport devices and vehicles, we used HERMES (Highly Extensible Resource for Modeling Supply Chains) to construct a discrete event simulation model of the Niger vaccine supply chain. We measured the transport capacity requirement for each mode of transport used in the Niger vaccine cold chain, both before and after adding cold rooms and refrigerators to relieve all stationary storage constraints in the system. With the addition of necessary stationary storage, the average transport capacity requirement increased from 88% to 144% for cold trucks, from 101% to 197% for pickup trucks, and from 366% to 420% for vaccine carriers. Therefore, adding stationary storage alone may worsen or create new transport bottlenecks as more vaccines flow through the system, preventing many vaccines from reaching their target populations. Dynamic modeling can reveal such relationships between stationary storage capacity and transport constraints. PMID:23903398

  2. Desiccating Stress-Induced MMP Production and Activity Worsens Wound Healing in Alkali-Burned Corneas

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Fang; Pelegrino, Flavia S. A.; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Volpe, Eugene A.; Li, De-Quan; de Paiva, Cintia S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of dry eye on ocular surface protease activity and sight threatening corneal complications following ocular surface chemical injury. Methods C57BL/6 mice were subjected to unilateral alkali burn (AB) with or without concomitant dry eye for 2 or 5 days. Mice were observed daily for appearance of corneal perforation. Whole corneas were harvested and lysed for RNA extraction. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to measure expression of inflammation cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). Matrix metalloproteinase–9 activity, gelatinase activity, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were evaluated in corneal lysates. Presence of infiltrating neutrophils was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Results Eyes subjected to the combined model of AB and dry eye (CM) had 20% sterile corneal perforation rate as soon as 1 day after the initial injury, which increased to 35% by 5 days, delayed wound closure and increased corneal opacity. Increased levels of IL-1β, -6, and MMPs-1, -3, -8, -9, and -13, and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CSCL1) transcripts were found after 2 days in CM compared with AB corneas. Increased MMP-1, -3, -9, and -13 immunoreactivity and gelatinolytic activity were seen in CM corneas compared with AB. Increased neutrophil infiltration and MPO activity was noted in the CM group compared with AB 2 days post injury. Conclusions Desiccating stress worsens outcome of ocular AB, creating a cytokine and protease storm with greater neutrophil infiltration, increasing the risk of corneal perforation. PMID:26225631

  3. Paraneoplastic syndrome and underlying breast cancer: a worsening rash despite initiation of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Shradha; Makkar, Priyanka; Gupta, Sorab; Vigoda, Ivette

    2016-05-01

    Skin may show the first clinical evidence of systemic disease and can be the first clue to malignancy in 1% of cases. Dermatomyositis is an immunologically mediated inflammatory myopathy characterized by proximal muscle weakness, muscle inflammation, and characteristic skin findings. It has an incidence of 1 in 100,000 patients. In 15%-30% cases of dermatomyositis, an underlying malignancy is the cause of paraneoplastic syndrome. Ovarian and breast cancer in women and lung cancer in men are the most common malignancies associated with dermatomyositis. Here we report the case of a 55-year-old postmenopausal woman who initially presented with a facial rash. She was treated for chemical dermatitis without resolution of symptoms and was subsequently found to have dermatomyositis associated with stage IV invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. In most cases, the skin changes resolve after treatment for the underlying malignancy has been initiated, but in this case of paraneoplastic dermatomyositis, the rash worsened with initiation of treatment for underlying breast cancer. PMID:27258056

  4. Hyperglycemia induces memory impairment linked to increased acetylcholinesterase activity in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; De Moraes, Daiani Almeida; Menezes, Fabiano Peres; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Da Silva, Rosane Souza

    2014-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus, which causes hyperglycemia, affects the central nervous system and can impairs cognitive functions, such as memory. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hyperglycemia on memory as well as on the activity of acethylcholinesterase. Hyperglycemia was induced in adult zebrafish by immersion in glucose 111mM by 14 days. The animals were divided in 4 groups: control, glucose-treated, glucose-washout 7-days and glucose-washout 14-days. We evaluated the performance in inhibitory avoidance task and locomotor activity. We also determined acethylcholinesterase activity and gene expression from whole brain. In order to counteract the effect of hyperglycemia underlined by effects on acethylcholinesterase activity, we treated the animals with galantamine (0.05ng/g), an inhibitor of this enzyme. Also we evaluated the gene expression of insulin receptor and glucose transporter from zebrafish brain. The hyperglycemia promoted memory deficit in adult zebrafish, which can be explained by increased AChE activity. The ache mRNA levels from zebrafish brain were decrease in 111mM glucose group and returned to normal levels after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. Insulin receptors (insra-1, insra-2, insrb-1 and insrb-2) and glut-3 mRNA levels were not significantly changed. Our results also demonstrated that galantamine was able to reverse the memory deficit caused by hyperglycemia, demonstrating that these effects involve modulation of AChE activity. These data suggest that the memory impairment induced by hyperglycemia is underlined by the cholinergic dysfunction caused by the mechanisms involving the control of acetylcholinesterase function and gene expression. PMID:25157430

  5. Effect of Hyperglycemia on Gene Expression during Early Organogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Hakvoort, Theodorus B. M.; Willemsen, A. Marcel; Jongejan, Aldo; Sokolovic, Milka; Bradley, Edward J.; de Boer, Vincent C. J.; Baas, Frank; van Kampen, Antoine H. C.; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular and neural malformations are common sequels of diabetic pregnancies, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. We hypothesized that maternal hyperglycemia would affect the embryos most shortly after the glucose-sensitive time window at embryonic day (ED) 7.5 in mice. Methods Mice were made diabetic with streptozotocin, treated with slow-release insulin implants and mated. Pregnancy aggravated hyperglycemia. Gene expression profiles were determined in ED8.5 and ED9.5 embryos from diabetic and control mice using Serial Analysis of Gene Expression and deep sequencing. Results Maternal hyperglycemia induced differential regulation of 1,024 and 2,148 unique functional genes on ED8.5 and ED9.5, respectively, mostly in downward direction. Pathway analysis showed that ED8.5 embryos suffered mainly from impaired cell proliferation, and ED9.5 embryos from impaired cytoskeletal remodeling and oxidative phosphorylation (all P ≤ E-5). A query of the Mouse Genome Database showed that 20–25% of the differentially expressed genes were caused by cardiovascular and/or neural malformations, if deficient. Despite high glucose levels in embryos with maternal hyperglycemia and a ~150-fold higher rate of ATP production from glycolysis than from oxidative phosphorylation on ED9.5, ATP production from both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation was reduced to ~70% of controls, implying a shortage of energy production in hyperglycemic embryos. Conclusion Maternal hyperglycemia suppressed cell proliferation during gastrulation and cytoskeletal remodeling during early organogenesis. 20–25% of the genes that were differentially regulated by hyperglycemia were associated with relevant congenital malformations. Unexpectedly, maternal hyperglycemia also endangered the energy supply of the embryo by suppressing its glycolytic capacity. PMID:27433804

  6. Acute Exacerbations of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Collard, Harold R.; Moore, Bethany B.; Flaherty, Kevin R.; Brown, Kevin K.; Kaner, Robert J.; King, Talmadge E.; Lasky, Joseph A.; Loyd, James E.; Noth, Imre; Olman, Mitchell A.; Raghu, Ganesh; Roman, Jesse; Ryu, Jay H.; Zisman, David A.; Hunninghake, Gary W.; Colby, Thomas V.; Egan, Jim J.; Hansell, David M.; Johkoh, Takeshi; Kaminski, Naftali; Kim, Dong Soon; Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Lynch, David A.; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Myers, Jeffrey L.; Nicholson, Andrew G.; Selman, Moisés; Toews, Galen B.; Wells, Athol U.; Martinez, Fernando J.

    2007-01-01

    The natural history of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) has been characterized as a steady, predictable decline in lung function over time. Recent evidence suggests that some patients may experience a more precipitous course, with periods of relative stability followed by acute deteriorations in respiratory status. Many of these acute deteriorations are of unknown etiology and have been termed acute exacerbations of IPF. This perspective is the result of an international effort to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding acute exacerbations of IPF. Acute exacerbations of IPF are defined as acute, clinically significant deteriorations of unidentifiable cause in patients with underlying IPF. Proposed diagnostic criteria include subjective worsening over 30 days or less, new bilateral radiographic opacities, and the absence of infection or another identifiable etiology. The potential pathobiological roles of infection, disordered cell biology, coagulation, and genetics are discussed, and future research directions are proposed. PMID:17585107

  7. Hyperglycemia-induced diaphragm weakness is mediated by oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A major consequence of ICU-acquired weakness (ICUAW) is diaphragm weakness, which prolongs the duration of mechanical ventilation. Hyperglycemia (HG) is a risk factor for ICUAW. However, the mechanisms underlying HG-induced respiratory muscle weakness are not known. Excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) injure multiple tissues during HG, but only one study suggests that excessive ROS generation may be linked to HG-induced diaphragm weakness. We hypothesized that HG-induced diaphragm dysfunction is mediated by excessive superoxide generation and that administration of a specific superoxide scavenger, polyethylene glycol superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD), would ameliorate these effects. Methods HG was induced in rats using streptozotocin (60 mg/kg intravenously) and the following groups assessed at two weeks: controls, HG, HG + PEG-SOD (2,000U/kg/d intraperitoneally for seven days), and HG + denatured (dn)PEG-SOD (2000U/kg/d intraperitoneally for seven days). PEG-SOD and dnPEG-SOD were administered on day 8, we measured diaphragm specific force generation in muscle strips, force-pCa relationships in single permeabilized fibers, contractile protein content and indices of oxidative stress. Results HG reduced diaphragm specific force generation, altered single fiber force-pCa relationships, depleted troponin T, and increased oxidative stress. PEG-SOD prevented HG-induced reductions in diaphragm specific force generation (for example 80 Hz force was 26.4 ± 0.9, 15.4 ± 0.9, 24.0 ± 1.5 and 14.9 ± 0.9 N/cm2 for control, HG, HG + PEG-SOD, and HG + dnPEG-SOD groups, respectively, P <0.001). PEG-SOD also restored HG-induced reductions in diaphragm single fiber force generation (for example, Fmax was 182.9 ± 1.8, 85.7 ± 2.0, 148.6 ± 2.4 and 90.9 ± 1.5 kPa in control, HG, HG + PEG-SOD, and HG + dnPEG-SOD groups, respectively, P <0.001). HG-induced troponin T depletion, protein nitrotyrosine formation

  8. Hyperglycemia Promotes the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Pancreatic Cancer via Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and pancreatic cancer are intimately related, as approximately 85% of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer have impaired glucose tolerance or even DM. Our previous studies have indicated that high glucose could promote the invasive and migratory abilities of pancreatic cancer cells. We therefore explored the underlying mechanism that hyperglycemia modulates the metastatic potential of pancreatic cancer. Our data showed that streptozotocin- (STZ-) treated diabetic nude mice exhibit larger tumor size than that of the euglycemic mice. The number of nude mice that develop liver metastasis or ascites is much more in the STZ-treated group than that in the euglycemic group. Hyperglycemic mice contain a higher plasma H2O2-level than that from euglycemic mice. The injection of polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase (PEG-CAT), an H2O2 scavenger, may reverse hyperglycemia-induced tumor metastasis. In addition, hyperglycemia could also modulate the expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition- (EMT-) related factors in pancreatic tumor tissues, as the E-cadherin level is decreased and the expression of mesenchymal markers N-cadherin and vimentin as well as transcription factor snail is strongly increased. The injection of PEG-CAT could also reverse hyperglycemia-induced EMT. These results suggest that the association between hyperglycemia and poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer can be attributed to the alterations of EMT through the production of hydrogen peroxide. PMID:27433288

  9. Posttraumatic Stress Related to Hyperglycemia: Prevalence in Adults with Type I Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Renna, Chelsea P; Boyer, Bret A; Prout, Maurice F; Scheiner, Gary

    2016-09-01

    Prevalence of hyperglycemia-related posttraumatic stress (PTS) was assessed in 239 adults with type 1 diabetes using the posttraumatic stress diagnostic scale (PDS; Foa, Posttraumatic stress diagnostic scale manual, National Computer Systems, Inc., Minneapolis, 1995) by an anonymous online survey. Additionally, this study aimed to identify variables related to hyperglycemia-related PTS. Over 30 % of participants reported symptoms consistent with PTSD related to hyperglycemia with standard PDS scoring, and 10 % with more conservative scoring. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that diabetes self-management behavior and perceived helplessness about hyperglycemia predicted PTSD with standard scoring. Perceived death threat, self-management behavior, helplessness about hyperglycemia, and severity of hypoglycemia in past month predicted PTSD using more conservative scoring. Perceived helplessness, hypoglycemia severity, perceived death-threat, HbA1c, and self-management behavior predicted PTS severity. When fear, helplessness, and perceived death-threat were combined to represent an overall cognitive appraisal factor, this variable was the strongest predictor of PTSD and PTS severity. Scores for PTSD symptom clusters appeared similar to data on hypoglycemia-related PTS. PMID:27469991

  10. Perioperative Management of Patients with Diabetes and Hyperglycemia Undergoing Elective Surgery.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Bithika M; Stearns, Joshua D; Apsey, Heidi A; Schlinkert, Richard T; Cook, Curtiss B

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and hyperglycemia are associated with increased surgical morbidity and mortality. Hyperglycemia is a determinant of risk of surgical complications and should be addressed across the continuum of surgical care. While data support the need to address hyperglycemia in patients with DM in the ambulatory setting prior to surgery and in the inpatient setting, data are less certain about hyperglycemia occurring during the perioperative period-that part of the process occurring on the day of surgery itself. The definition of "perioperative" varies in the literature. This paper proposes a standardized definition for the perioperative period as spanning the time of patient admission to the preoperative area through discharge from the recovery area. Available information about the impact of perioperative hyperglycemia on surgical outcomes within the framework of that definition is summarized, and the authors' approach to standardizing perioperative care for patients with DM is outlined, including the special case of patients receiving insulin pump therapy. The discussion is limited to adult ambulatory non-obstetric patients undergoing elective surgical procedures under general anesthesia. PMID:26699765

  11. Hyperglycemia is a predictor of mortality and morbidity in low birth weight newborn.

    PubMed

    Banik, S K; Baki, M A; Sarker, S; Rahat, F; Akhter, S; Nahar, N

    2014-07-01

    Early onset of hyperglycemia is common among low birth weight neonates. Increased risk for death and major morbidities has been observed among hyperglycemic low birth weight infants. This prospective observational study was done to find out hyperglycemia as a predictor of increased morbidity and mortality in the low birth weight sick newborn and was conducted among the hospitalized newborn of Special Care Baby Unit (SCABU), BIRDEM hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh from July 2009 to December 2009. A total of 198 LBW neonates were included in this study. One third (30.8%) LBW neonates were found hyperglycemic. The mean gestational age was 33.2±3.6 weeks and mean birth weight was 1535.8±780gm in the hyperglycemic neonates. In this study, highest prevalence of hyperglycemia was observed in birth weight <1000gm (38.46%) and in gestational age ≤28 weeks (46.15%). Apnoea, confirmed sepsis and suspected sepsis, confirmed necrotizing enterocollitis (NEC) and neonatal jaundice showed statistically significant association with hyperglycemia than that of non hyperglycemic group. Mortality of neonates in hyperglycemic group was higher (31.15%) than that of non hyperglycemic neonates (10.22%) and the difference in mortality between two groups were found statistically significant (p<0.002). From this study it can be concluded that hyperglycemia in early neonatal period is related to increased morbidity and mortality in low birth weight newborn. PMID:25178599

  12. Hyperglycemia Induces Cellular Hypoxia through Production of Mitochondrial ROS Followed by Suppression of Aquaporin-1

    PubMed Central

    Sada, Kiminori; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Kukidome, Daisuke; Yoshinaga, Tomoaki; Kajihara, Nobuhiro; Sonoda, Kazuhiro; Senokuchi, Takafumi; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Takeshi; Araki, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    We previously proposed that hyperglycemia-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation is a key event in the development of diabetic complications. Interestingly, some common aspects exist between hyperglycemia and hypoxia-induced phenomena. Thus, hyperglycemia may induce cellular hypoxia, and this phenomenon may also be involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. In endothelial cells (ECs), cellular hypoxia increased after incubation with high glucose (HG). A similar phenomenon was observed in glomeruli of diabetic mice. HG-induced cellular hypoxia was suppressed by mitochondria blockades or manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) overexpression, which is a specific SOD for mtROS. Overexpression of MnSOD also increased the expression of aquaporin-1 (AQP1), a water and oxygen channel. AQP1 overexpression in ECs suppressed hyperglycemia-induced cellular hypoxia, endothelin-1 and fibronectin overproduction, and apoptosis. Therefore, hyperglycemia-induced cellular hypoxia and mtROS generation may promote hyperglycemic damage in a coordinated manner. PMID:27383386

  13. Lysophosphatidic Acid-Induced Transcriptional Profile Represents Serous Epithelial Ovarian Carcinoma and Worsened Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Murph, Mandi M.; Liu, Wenbin; Yu, Shuangxing; Lu, Yiling; Hall, Hassan; Hennessy, Bryan T.; Lahad, John; Schaner, Marci; Helland, Åslaug; Kristensen, Gunnar; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Mills, Gordon B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) governs a number of physiologic and pathophysiological processes. Malignant ascites fluid is rich in LPA, and LPA receptors are aberrantly expressed by ovarian cancer cells, implicating LPA in the initiation and progression of ovarian cancer. However, there is an absence of systematic data critically analyzing the transcriptional changes induced by LPA in ovarian cancer. Methodology and Principal Findings In this study, gene expression profiling was used to examine LPA-mediated transcription by exogenously adding LPA to human epithelial ovarian cancer cells for 24 h to mimic long-term stimulation in the tumor microenvironment. The resultant transcriptional profile comprised a 39-gene signature that closely correlated to serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma. Hierarchical clustering of ovarian cancer patient specimens demonstrated that the signature is associated with worsened prognosis. Patients with LPA-signature-positive ovarian tumors have reduced disease-specific and progression-free survival times. They have a higher frequency of stage IIIc serous carcinoma and a greater proportion is deceased. Among the 39-gene signature, a group of seven genes associated with cell adhesion recapitulated the results. Out of those seven, claudin-1, an adhesion molecule and phenotypic epithelial marker, is the only independent biomarker of serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma. Knockdown of claudin-1 expression in ovarian cancer cells reduces LPA-mediated cellular adhesion, enhances suspended cells and reduces LPA-mediated migration. Conclusions The data suggest that transcriptional events mediated by LPA in the tumor microenvironment influence tumor progression through modulation of cell adhesion molecules like claudin-1 and, for the first time, report an LPA-mediated expression signature in ovarian cancer that predicts a worse prognosis. PMID:19440550

  14. Prehospital Resuscitation of Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock with Hypertonic Solutions Worsens Hypocoagulation and Hyperfibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Delano, Matthew J; Rizoli, Sandro B; Rhind, Shawn G; Cuschieri, Joseph; Junger, Wolfgang; Baker, Andrew J; Dubick, Michael A; Hoyt, David B; Bulger, Eileen M

    2015-07-01

    Impaired hemostasis frequently occurs after traumatic shock and resuscitation. The prehospital fluid administered can exacerbate subsequent bleeding and coagulopathy. Hypertonic solutions are recommended as first-line treatment of traumatic shock; however, their effects on coagulation are unclear. This study explores the impact of resuscitation with various hypertonic solutions on early coagulopathy after trauma. We conducted a prospective observational subgroup analysis of large clinical trial on out-of-hospital single-bolus (250 mL) hypertonic fluid resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock trauma patients (systolic blood pressure, ≤70 mmHg). Patients received 7.5% NaCl (HS), 7.5% NaCl/6% Dextran 70 (HSD), or 0.9% NaCl (normal saline [NS]) in the prehospital setting. Thirty-four patients were included: 9 HS, 8 HSD, 17 NS. Treatment with HS/HSD led to higher admission systolic blood pressure, sodium, chloride, and osmolarity, whereas lactate, base deficit, fluid requirement, and hemoglobin levels were similar in all groups. The HSD-resuscitated patients had higher admission international normalized ratio values and more hypocoagulable patients, 62% (vs. 55% HS, 47% NS; P < 0.05). Prothrombotic tissue factor was elevated in shock treated with NS but depressed in both HS and HSD groups. Fibrinolytic tissue plasminogen activator and anti-fibrinolytic plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 were increased by shock but not thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor. The HSD patients had the worst imbalance between procoagulation/anticoagulation and profibrinolysis/antifibrinolysis, resulting in more hypocoagulability and hyperfibrinolysis. We concluded that resuscitation with hypertonic solutions, particularly HSD, worsens hypocoagulability and hyperfibrinolysis after hemorrhagic shock in trauma through imbalances in both procoagulants and anticoagulants and both profibrinolytic and antifibrinolytic activities. PMID:25784523

  15. Lung-specific loss of α3 laminin worsens bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Morales-Nebreda, Luisa I; Rogel, Micah R; Eisenberg, Jessica L; Hamill, Kevin J; Soberanes, Saul; Nigdelioglu, Recep; Chi, Monica; Cho, Takugo; Radigan, Kathryn A; Ridge, Karen M; Misharin, Alexander V; Woychek, Alex; Hopkinson, Susan; Perlman, Harris; Mutlu, Gokhan M; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moises; Jones, Jonathan C R; Budinger, G R Scott

    2015-04-01

    Laminins are heterotrimeric proteins that are secreted by the alveolar epithelium into the basement membrane, and their expression is altered in extracellular matrices from patients with pulmonary fibrosis. In a small number of patients with pulmonary fibrosis, we found that the normal basement membrane distribution of the α3 laminin subunit was lost in fibrotic regions of the lung. To determine if these changes play a causal role in the development of fibrosis, we generated mice lacking the α3 laminin subunit specifically in the lung epithelium by crossing mice expressing Cre recombinase driven by the surfactant protein C promoter (SPC-Cre) with mice expressing floxed alleles encoding the α3 laminin gene (Lama3(fl/fl)). These mice exhibited no developmental abnormalities in the lungs up to 6 months of age, but, compared with control mice, had worsened mortality, increased inflammation, and increased fibrosis after the intratracheal administration of bleomycin. Similarly, the severity of fibrosis induced by an adenovirus encoding an active form of transforming growth factor-β was worse in mice deficient in α3 laminin in the lung. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of α3 laminin in the lung epithelium does not affect lung development, but plays a causal role in the development of fibrosis in response to bleomycin or adenovirally delivered transforming growth factor-β. Thus, we speculate that the loss of the normal basement membrane organization of α3 laminin that we observe in fibrotic regions from the lungs of patients with pulmonary fibrosis contributes to their disease progression. PMID:25188360

  16. Lung-Specific Loss of α3 Laminin Worsens Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Nebreda, Luisa I.; Rogel, Micah R.; Eisenberg, Jessica L.; Hamill, Kevin J.; Soberanes, Saul; Nigdelioglu, Recep; Chi, Monica; Cho, Takugo; Radigan, Kathryn A.; Ridge, Karen M.; Misharin, Alexander V.; Woychek, Alex; Hopkinson, Susan; Perlman, Harris; Mutlu, Gokhan M.; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moises; Jones, Jonathan C. R.

    2015-01-01

    Laminins are heterotrimeric proteins that are secreted by the alveolar epithelium into the basement membrane, and their expression is altered in extracellular matrices from patients with pulmonary fibrosis. In a small number of patients with pulmonary fibrosis, we found that the normal basement membrane distribution of the α3 laminin subunit was lost in fibrotic regions of the lung. To determine if these changes play a causal role in the development of fibrosis, we generated mice lacking the α3 laminin subunit specifically in the lung epithelium by crossing mice expressing Cre recombinase driven by the surfactant protein C promoter (SPC-Cre) with mice expressing floxed alleles encoding the α3 laminin gene (Lama3fl/fl). These mice exhibited no developmental abnormalities in the lungs up to 6 months of age, but, compared with control mice, had worsened mortality, increased inflammation, and increased fibrosis after the intratracheal administration of bleomycin. Similarly, the severity of fibrosis induced by an adenovirus encoding an active form of transforming growth factor-β was worse in mice deficient in α3 laminin in the lung. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of α3 laminin in the lung epithelium does not affect lung development, but plays a causal role in the development of fibrosis in response to bleomycin or adenovirally delivered transforming growth factor-β. Thus, we speculate that the loss of the normal basement membrane organization of α3 laminin that we observe in fibrotic regions from the lungs of patients with pulmonary fibrosis contributes to their disease progression. PMID:25188360

  17. Worsening Cognitive Impairment and Neurodegenerative Pathology Progressively Increase Risk for Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Daniel H.J.; Skelly, Donal T.; Murray, Carol; Hennessy, Edel; Bowen, Jordan; Norton, Samuel; Brayne, Carol; Rahkonen, Terhi; Sulkava, Raimo; Sanderson, David J.; Rawlins, J. Nicholas; Bannerman, David M.; MacLullich, Alasdair M.J.; Cunningham, Colm

    2015-01-01

    Background Delirium is a profound neuropsychiatric disturbance precipitated by acute illness. Although dementia is the major risk factor this has typically been considered a binary quantity (i.e., cognitively impaired versus cognitively normal) with respect to delirium risk. We used humans and mice to address the hypothesis that the severity of underlying neurodegenerative changes and/or cognitive impairment progressively alters delirium risk. Methods Humans in a population-based longitudinal study, Vantaa 85+, were followed for incident delirium. Odds for reporting delirium at follow-up (outcome) were modeled using random-effects logistic regression, where prior cognitive impairment measured by Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) (exposure) was considered. To address whether underlying neurodegenerative pathology increased susceptibility to acute cognitive change, mice at three stages of neurodegenerative disease progression (ME7 model of neurodegeneration: controls, 12 weeks, and 16 weeks) were assessed for acute cognitive dysfunction upon systemic inflammation induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg/kg). Synaptic and axonal correlates of susceptibility to acute dysfunction were assessed using immunohistochemistry. Results In the Vantaa cohort, 465 persons (88.4 ± 2.8 years) completed MMSE at baseline. For every MMSE point lost, risk of incident delirium increased by 5% (p = 0.02). LPS precipitated severe and fluctuating cognitive deficits in 16-week ME7 mice but lower incidence or no deficits in 12-week ME7 and controls, respectively. This was associated with progressive thalamic synaptic loss and axonal pathology. Conclusion A human population-based cohort with graded severity of existing cognitive impairment and a mouse model with progressing neurodegeneration both indicate that the risk of delirium increases with greater severity of pre-existing cognitive impairment and neuropathology. PMID:25239680

  18. Occipital seizures and subcortical T2 hypointensity in the setting of hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Putta, Swapna L.; Weisholtz, Daniel; Milligan, Tracey A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Occipital lobe seizures are a recognized manifestation of diabetic nonketotic hyperglycemia, though not as common as focal motor seizures. Occipital lobe white matter T2 hypointensity may suggest this diagnosis. Methods We present a case of a 66-year-old man with hyperglycemia-related occipital lobe seizures who presented with confusion, intermittent visual hallucinations, and homonymous hemianopia. Results Magnetic resonance imaging showed subcortical T2 hypointensity within the left occipital lobe with adjacent leptomeningeal enhancement. These findings were transient with disappearance in a follow-up MRI. The EEG captured frequent seizures originating in the left occipital region. HbA1c level was 13.4% on presentation, and finger stick blood glucose level was 400 mg/dl. Conclusion Hyperglycemia should be considered in the etiology of differential diagnosis of patients with visual abnormalities suspicious for seizures, especially when the MRI shows focal subcortical T2 hypointensity with or without leptomeningeal enhancement. PMID:25667880

  19. Nitrones reverse hyperglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction in bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Headley, Colwyn A; DiSilvestro, David; Bryant, Kelsey E; Hemann, Craig; Chen, Chun-An; Das, Amlan; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana; Durand, Grégory; Villamena, Frederick A

    2016-03-15

    Hyperglycemia has been implicated in the development of endothelial dysfunction through heightened ROS production. Since nitrones reverse endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) dysfunction, increase antioxidant enzyme activity, and suppress pro-apoptotic signaling pathway and mitochondrial dysfunction from ROS-induced toxicity, the objective of this study was to determine whether nitrone spin traps DMPO, PBN and PBN-LA were effective at duplicating these effects and improving glucose uptake in an in vitro model of hyperglycemia-induced dysfunction using bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). BAEC were cultured in DMEM medium with low (5.5mM glucose, LG) or high glucose (50mM, HG) for 14 days to model in vivo hyperglycemia as experienced in humans with metabolic disease. Improvements in cell viability, intracellular oxidative stress, NO and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4)​ levels, mitochondrial membrane potential, glucose transport, and activity of antioxidant enzymes were measured from single treatment of BAEC with nitrones for 24h after hyperglycemia. Chronic hyperglycemia significantly increased intracellular ROS by 50%, decreased cell viability by 25%, reduced NO bioavailability by 50%, and decreased (BH4) levels by 15% thereby decreasing NO production. Intracellular glucose transport and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were also decreased by 50% and 25% respectively. Nitrone (PBN and DMPO, 50 μM) treatment of BAEC grown in hyperglycemic conditions resulted in the normalization of outcome measures except for SOD and catalase activities. Our findings demonstrate that the nitrones reverse the deleterious effects of hyperglycemia in BAEC. We believe that in vivo testing of these nitrone compounds in models of cardiometabolic disease is warranted. PMID:26774452

  20. Hyperglycemia and xerostomia are key determinants of tooth decay in type 1 diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chih-Ko; Harris, Stephen E; Mohan, Sumathy; Horn, Diane; Fajardo, Roberto; Chun, Yong-Hee Patricia; Jorgensen, James; MacDougall, Mary; Abboud-Werner, Sherry

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) and oral diseases are closely interrelated. Poor metabolic control in diabetics is associated with a high risk of gingivitis, periodontitis and tooth loss. Salivary flow declines in diabetics and patients suffer from xerostomia. Reduced saliva predisposes to enamel hypomineralization and caries formation; however, the mechanisms that initiate and lead to progression of tooth decay and periodontitis in type 1 DM have not been explored. To address this issue, we analyzed tooth morphology in Akita −/− mice that harbor a point mutation in the Ins2 insulin gene, which leads to progressive hyperglycemia. Mandibles from Akita −/− and wild-type littermates were analyzed by microCT, scanning EM and histology; teeth were examined for amelogenin (Amel) and ameloblastin (Ambn) expression. Mice were injected with pilocarpine to assess saliva production. As hyperglycemia may alter pulp repair, the effect of high glucose levels on the proliferation/differentiation of cultured MD10-F2 pulp cells was also analyzed. Results showed that Akita −/− mice at 6 weeks of age showed chalky white incisors that correlated with marked hyperglycemia and impaired saliva production. MicroCT of Akita −/− teeth revealed excessive enamel wearing and hypomineralization; immunostaining for Amel and Ambn was decreased. A striking feature was invasion of dentinal tubules with Streptococcus mitis and microabcesses that originated in the coronal pulp and progressed to pulp necrosis and periapical periodontitis. High levels of glucose also inhibited MD10-F2 cell proliferation and differentiation. Our findings provide the first evidence that hyperglycemia in combination with reduced saliva in a model of type1 DM leads to decreased enamel mineralization/matrix proteins and predisposes to excessive wearing and decay. Importantly, hyperglycemia adversely affects enamel matrix proteins and pulp repair. Early detection and treatment of hyperglycemia

  1. Insulin, Hyperglycemia, and Severe Retinopathy of Prematurity in Extremely Low-Birth-Weight Infants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jan Hau; Hornik, Christoph P; Testoni, Daniela; Laughon, Matthew M; Cotten, C Michael; Maldonado, Ramiro S; Belcastro, Marc R; Clark, Reese H; Smith, P Brian

    2016-03-01

    Objective This study aims to determine the association between hyperglycemia, insulin therapy, and severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in extremely low-birth-weight (ELBW) infants. Study Design In this retrospective database study, we included all ELBW infants who were ≤ 32 weeks gestational age (GA). We excluded infants without any ophthalmology evaluation and infants who died before 28 days of life. A multivariable model was constructed to determine the association between hyperglycemia, insulin use, and severe ROP. We defined hyperglycemia as blood glucose (BG) > 180 mg/dL. Covariates were GA, small for GA status, discharge year, sex, Apgar score at 5 minutes, mechanical ventilation, oxygen use, bacteremia, and postnatal steroid exposure. We defined severe ROP as ROP requiring bevacizumab, cryotherapy, laser therapy, or vitrectomy. Sensitivity analysis using BG > 150 mg/dL and > 200 mg/dL was performed. Results A total of 24,548 infants were included; 2,547 (10%) had severe ROP. Hyperglycemia alone was not associated with severe ROP (odds ratio [OR], 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66-1.17). Hyperglycemia and insulin use were not associated with severe ROP (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 0.91-2.23). BG > 150 mg/dL and insulin use were associated with severe ROP (OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.02-1.76). Conclusions Hyperglycemia alone was not associated with severe ROP in ELBW infants. However, we did observe a possible trend between the use of insulin and severe ROP. PMID:26485249

  2. Early COPD Exacerbation Treatment with Combination of ICS and LABA for Patients Presenting with Mild-to-Moderate Worsening of Dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Bourbeau, Jean; Sedeno, Maria Fernanda; Metz, Katrina; Li, Pei Zhi; Pinto, Lancelot

    2016-08-01

    This is a proof of concept study that aims to establish feasibility and safety of a new strategy that includes an action plan for early treatment of acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) with doubling dose of a combination of a long-acting beta2 agonist and an inhaled corticosteroid, and to explore its potential for avoiding the requirement of prednisone and its safety. Thirty-seven COPD outpatients with previous exacerbations were enrolled and followed-up for 12 months. The written action plan included a standing prescription to be used in the event of an AECOPD: Antibiotic, for 5 days (for purulent exacerbations) and doubling a combination of Salmeterol and Fluticasone Propionate for 10 days. The primary outcome was "treatment success" defined as "no need of prednisone within 30 days of the onset." Twenty-seven patients experienced an AECOPD and doubled their combination dose. Among the 27 patients, there were 21 patients (78%) who did not require prednisone, and none of those had cardiovascular events, pneumonia, ER and hospital admissions. We have assessed that an early treatment of AECOPD with doubling the dose of a combination of Salmeterol and Fluticasone Propionate appears to be safe, well-tolerated and adhered to, and results in no requirement of systemic corticosteroid in a large proportion of patients presenting with mild-to-moderate worsening of dyspnea. This trial has the potential to change the approach of treatment of AECOPD and reduce the use of oral corticosteroids. PMID:26752024

  3. Metabolic disturbances and worsening of atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE-/- mice after cola beverages drinking

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is a major health burden. Metabolic disorders had been associated with large consumption of soft drinks. The rising incidence of atherosclerosis and metabolic alterations warrants the study of long-term soft drink consumption’ effects on metabolism and atherosclerosis in genetic deficiency of apolipoprotein E which typically develops spontaneous atherosclerosis and metabolic alterations. Methods ApoE-/- mice were randomized in 3 groups accordingly with free access to: water (W), regular cola (C) or light cola (L). After 8 weeks, 50% of the animals in each group were euthanized (Treatment: W8, C8, L8). The remaining mice (all groups) drank water for 8 weeks and were euthanized (Washout: W16, C16, L16). Body weight and food and drink consumption were periodically measured. Blood was collected (biochemistry). At autopsy, transverse aortic sinus sections were serially cut and stained (histomorphometry); livers and kidneys were processed (microscopy). MANOVA (identification of variance factors) was followed by ANOVA and LSD tests (within-factor differences between levels). Conventionally a p< 0.05 was considered significant. Results Treatment increased drinking volumes (vs W8: 4 fold C8, p<0.0001; +47% L8, p<0.02). Only C reduced eating amounts (–54%, p<0.05 vs W8). I). Compared with W8: C8 developed hyperglycemia (+43%, p<0.03) and increased non-HDL cholesterol (+54%, p<0.05); L8 showed decreased glycemia (–15%, p<0.05 vs W8) and increased creatinine (2.5 fold, p<0.04), urea (+74, p<0.03) and aspartate-aminotransferase (2.8 fold, p<0.05). Hypercreatininemia was observed in L16 (2.7 fold vs W16, p<0.05). Hypertriglyceridemia (+91%, p<0.008) and hyperuremia (+68%, p<0.03) developed over time of study (age). II). Treatment caused plaque area increase (vs W8: 28% C8, p<0.02 and 50% L8, p<0.01; vs W16: 43% C16, p<0.05 and 68% L16, p<0.02) and stenosis (vs W8: 38% C8, p<0.04 and 57% L8, p<0.01; vs W16: 71% C16, p<0.01 and 46% L16, p<0

  4. Diabetic Hyperglycemia: Link to Impaired Glucose Transport in Pancreatic β Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, Roger H.

    1991-03-01

    Glucose uptake into pancreatic β cells by means of the glucose transporter GLUT-2, which has a high Michaelis constant, is essential for the normal insulin secretory response to hyperglycemia. In both autoimmune and nonautoimmune diabetes, this glucose transport is reduced as a consequence of down-regulation of the normal β-cell transporter. In autoimmune diabetes, circulating immunoglobulins can further impair this glucose transport by inhibiting functionally intact transporters. Insights into mechanisms of the unresponsiveness of β cells to hyperglycemia may improve the management and prevention of diabetes.

  5. Hyperglycemia is a risk factor for early death and morbidity in extremely low-birth weight infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVES. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of hyperglycemia in extremely low birth-weight infants and to determine whether hyperglycemia increases the risk of early adverse outcomes (death or intraventricular hemorrhage of grade 3 or 4) and/or affects the length of hos...

  6. Inhibition of IKKß in enterocytes exacerbates sepsis-induced intestinal injury and worsens mortality

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Jessica A.; Samocha, Alexandr J.; Liang, Zhe; Burd, Eileen M.; Farris, Alton B.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2013-01-01

    -kB has a beneficial role in sepsis by partially preventing sepsis-induced increases in apoptosis and permeability, which are associated with worsening mortality. PMID:23939348

  7. Does parity worsen diabetes-related chronic complications in women with type 1 diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Marilia Brito; Negrato, Carlos Antonio; Almeida, Ana; de Leon, Antonio Ponce

    2016-01-01

    and micro or macrovascular chronic complications. Future prospective evaluations must be conducted to clarify the relationship between parity, appearance or worsening of diabetes-related chronic complications. PMID:27350848

  8. Acute Pancreatitis and Diabetic Ketoacidosis following L-Asparaginase/Prednisone Therapy in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Quintanilla-Flores, Dania Lizet; Flores-Caballero, Miguel Ángel; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, René; Tamez-Pérez, Héctor Eloy; González-González, José Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis are unusual adverse events following chemotherapy based on L-asparaginase and prednisone as support treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We present the case of a 16-year-old Hispanic male patient, in remission induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia on treatment with mitoxantrone, vincristine, prednisone, and L-asparaginase. He was hospitalized complaining of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Hyperglycemia, acidosis, ketonuria, low bicarbonate levels, hyperamylasemia, and hyperlipasemia were documented, and the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis was made. Because of uncertainty of the additional diagnosis of acute pancreatitis as the cause of abdominal pain, a contrast-enhanced computed tomography was performed resulting in a Balthazar C pancreatitis classification. PMID:24716037

  9. Concepts and controversies in nonketotic hyperglycemia-induced hemichorea: further evidence from susceptibility-weighted MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Ajith; Thomas, Bejoy; Baheti, Neeraj N; Chemmanam, Thomas; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan

    2009-03-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced hemichorea can show T1 hyperintensity of the contralateral striatum on MRI. This is thought to be due to petechial hemorrhages or gemistocytic astrocyte accumulation. This study explores the utility of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in identifying the nature of these lesions. Three patients underwent MR imaging of the brain with SE T1, F SE T2, DWI, and SWI. T1 images showed hyperintensity predominantly involving the contralateral striatum, where mild (two cases) to moderate (one case) restricted diffusion (low apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC]) was detected on DWI. SWI demonstrated bilateral symmetrical hypointensities in the first two cases, suggesting age associated mineralization. In addition, increased susceptibility change (hypointensity) was also noted in the right putamen in the first and the third cases, suggesting paramagnetic mineral deposition. T1 hyperintensity may be from the protein hydration layer inside the cytoplasm of swollen gemistocytes appearing after an acute cerebral injury. These astrocytes also express metallothionein with zinc, which is thought to be the cause of asymmetric hypointensity of the posterior putamen on SWI. ADC values were thought to be useful for prognostication; however, they should be interpreted cautiously in the presence of susceptibility changes. PMID:19243044

  10. The effects of acute and chronic stress on diabetes control.

    PubMed

    Marcovecchio, M Loredana; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2012-10-23

    Stress is an important contributor to pathological conditions in humans. Hormonal changes that occur during acute and chronic stress situations can affect glucose homeostasis in both healthy people and in those with diabetes. Several studies have reported a negative effect of acute stress on maintenance of blood glucose concentrations in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The effect of stress on glycemic control in people with diabetes may be related to a direct effect of stress hormones on blood glucose levels and an indirect effect of stress on patient behaviors related to diabetes treatment and monitoring and meal and exercise plans. In contrast, there is no clear evidence that stressful life events promote the development of diabetes in children or in adults. Stress hyperglycemia, the development of hyperglycemia during acute illness, represents another interesting connection between the stress system and glucose homeostasis. A large body of evidence supports an association between stress hyperglycemia and increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Interestingly, there is some evidence supporting a beneficial effect of insulin in reducing morbidity and mortality in patients admitted to intensive care units. Finally, stress can influence the development of type 2 diabetes indirectly by promoting obesity and metabolic syndrome. PMID:23092890

  11. Worsening of hypertension in a pregnant woman with renal arteriovenous malformation: a successful superselective embolization after delivery.

    PubMed

    Allione, A; Pomero, F; Valpreda, S; Porta, M; Mallone, R; Rabbia, C; Cavallo Perin, P

    2003-09-01

    A 30-year-old female presented with uncontrolled hypertension due to arteriovenous malformation in the upper third of the right kidney, which worsened during pregnancy. The arteriovenous malformation was detected by color-coded Doppler sonography, confirmed by angiography, and the fistula was sealed by superselective arterial embolization with metallic coils. Superselective embolization is the most effective and safe treatment for this rare and complex pathology. PMID:14524586

  12. Worsening anatomic outcomes following aflibercept for neovascular age-related macular degeneration in eyes previously well controlled with ranibizumab

    PubMed Central

    Nudleman, Eric; Wolfe, Jeremy D; Woodward, Maria A; Yonekawa, Yoshihiro; Williams, George A; Hassan, Tarek S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Antivascular endothelial growth factor injection is the mainstay of treating neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Previous studies have shown that switching treatment from ranibizumab to aflibercept led to an improvement in eyes with recalcitrant activity. Herein, we identify a unique subset of patients whose eyes with neovascular AMD were previously well controlled with ranibizumab injections were then worsened after being switched to aflibercept. Methods This is a retrospective interventional case series. Eyes with neovascular AMD, previously well controlled with monthly injections of ranibizumab, which then developed worsening of subretinal fluid after being switched to aflibercept were included. Results A total of 17 eyes were included. All eyes developed increased subretinal fluid when switched from ranibizumab to aflibercept. Fourteen patients were switched back to ranibizumab after a single injection of aflibercept and had subsequent rapid resolution of subretinal fluid. Three patients continued with monthly aflibercept injections for two subsequent months and demonstrated the persistence of the increased subretinal fluid until they were switched back to treatment with ranibizumab at which time the fluid resolved. No eye had persistent decline in visual acuity. Conclusion Switching from intravitreal ranibizumab to aflibercept in eyes with well-controlled neovascular AMD may result in worsening in a subset of patients and resolves when therapy is switched back to ranibizumab. PMID:27354759

  13. Dietary hyperglycemia, glycemic index and age-related metabolic retinal diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The glycemic index (GI) indicates how fast blood glucose is raised after consuming a carbohydrate-containing food. Human metabolic studies indicate that GI is related to patho-physiological responses after meals. Compared with a low-GI meal, a high-GI meal is characterized with hyperglycemia during ...

  14. Levels of the inflammation marker YKL-40 in young adults exposed to intrauterine hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Kelstrup, Louise; Dejgaard, Thomas F; Clausen, Tine D; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Hansen, Torben; Vestergaard, Henrik; Damm, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Plasma levels of the inflammatory marker YKL-40 were investigated in 597 adult offspring born to women with and without diabetes during pregnancy. No association between fetal exposure to maternal hyperglycemia and levels of YKL-40 was found. However, female sex and increasing BMI in the offspring were associated to YKL-40. PMID:27103369

  15. Hyperglycemia Impairs Neutrophil-Mediated Bacterial Clearance in Mice Infected with the Lyme Disease Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Javid, Ashkan; Zlotnikov, Nataliya; Pětrošová, Helena; Tang, Tian Tian; Zhang, Yang; Bansal, Anil K.; Ebady, Rhodaba; Parikh, Maitry; Ahmed, Mijhgan; Sun, Chunxiang; Newbigging, Susan; Kim, Yae Ram; Santana Sosa, Marianna; Glogauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-insufficient type 1 diabetes is associated with attenuated bactericidal function of neutrophils, which are key mediators of innate immune responses to microbes as well as pathological inflammatory processes. Neutrophils are central to immune responses to the Lyme pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi. The effect of hyperglycemia on host susceptibility to and outcomes of B. burgdorferi infection has not been examined. The present study investigated the impact of sustained obesity-independent hyperglycemia in mice on bacterial clearance, inflammatory pathology and neutrophil responses to B. burgdorferi. Hyperglycemia was associated with reduced arthritis incidence but more widespread tissue colonization and reduced clearance of bacterial DNA in multiple tissues including brain, heart, liver, lung and knee joint. B. burgdorferi uptake and killing were impaired in neutrophils isolated from hyperglycemic mice. Thus, attenuated neutrophil function in insulin-insufficient hyperglycemia was associated with reduced B. burgdorferi clearance in target organs. These data suggest that investigating the effects of comorbid conditions such as diabetes on outcomes of B. burgdorferi infections in humans may be warranted. PMID:27340827

  16. Hyperglycemia Impairs Neutrophil-Mediated Bacterial Clearance in Mice Infected with the Lyme Disease Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Javid, Ashkan; Zlotnikov, Nataliya; Pětrošová, Helena; Tang, Tian Tian; Zhang, Yang; Bansal, Anil K; Ebady, Rhodaba; Parikh, Maitry; Ahmed, Mijhgan; Sun, Chunxiang; Newbigging, Susan; Kim, Yae Ram; Santana Sosa, Marianna; Glogauer, Michael; Moriarty, Tara J

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-insufficient type 1 diabetes is associated with attenuated bactericidal function of neutrophils, which are key mediators of innate immune responses to microbes as well as pathological inflammatory processes. Neutrophils are central to immune responses to the Lyme pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi. The effect of hyperglycemia on host susceptibility to and outcomes of B. burgdorferi infection has not been examined. The present study investigated the impact of sustained obesity-independent hyperglycemia in mice on bacterial clearance, inflammatory pathology and neutrophil responses to B. burgdorferi. Hyperglycemia was associated with reduced arthritis incidence but more widespread tissue colonization and reduced clearance of bacterial DNA in multiple tissues including brain, heart, liver, lung and knee joint. B. burgdorferi uptake and killing were impaired in neutrophils isolated from hyperglycemic mice. Thus, attenuated neutrophil function in insulin-insufficient hyperglycemia was associated with reduced B. burgdorferi clearance in target organs. These data suggest that investigating the effects of comorbid conditions such as diabetes on outcomes of B. burgdorferi infections in humans may be warranted. PMID:27340827

  17. Hyperglycemia in the absence of cilia accelerates cystogenesis and induces renal damage.

    PubMed

    Sas, Kelli M; Yin, Hong; Fitzgibbon, Wayne R; Baicu, Catalin F; Zile, Michael R; Steele, Stacy L; Amria, May; Saigusa, Takamitsu; Funk, Jason; Bunni, Marlene A; Siegal, Gene P; Siroky, Brian J; Bissler, John J; Bell, P Darwin

    2015-07-01

    In polycystic kidney disease (PKD), the rate of cyst formation and disease progression is highly variable. The lack of predictability in disease progression may be due to additional environmental factors or pathophysiological processes called "third hits." Diabetes is a growing epidemic, and recent studies suggest that PKD patients may be at an increased risk for this disease. We sought to determine if hyperglycemia enhances the initiation and rate of cystogenesis. Tamoxifen was administered to adult Ift88 conditional floxed allele mice to induce cilia loss in the presence of Cre. Subsequent administration of streptozotocin resulted in equivalent hyperglycemia in cilia(+) and cilia(-) mice. Hyperglycemia with loss of cilia increased the rate of cyst formation and cell proliferation. Structural and functional alterations in the kidney, including focal glomerular foot process effacement, interstitial inflammation, formation of primitive renal tubules, polyuria, and increased proteinuria, were also observed in hyperglycemic cilia(-) mice. Gene array analysis indicated enhanced Wnt and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition signaling in the kidney of hyperglycemic cilia(-) mice. These data show that hyperglycemia, in the absence of cilia, results in renal structural and functional damage and accelerates cystogenesis, suggesting that diabetes is a risk factor in the progression of PKD. PMID:25904703

  18. Hyperglycemia inhibits complement-mediated immunological control of S. aureus in a rat model of peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Mauriello, Clifford T; Hair, Pamela S; Rohn, Reuben D; Rister, Nicholas S; Krishna, Neel K; Cunnion, Kenji M

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia from diabetes is associated with increased risk of infection from S. aureus and increased severity of illness. Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that elevated glucose (>6 mM) dramatically inhibited S. aureus-initiated complement-mediated immune effectors. Here we report in vivo studies evaluating the extent to which a hyperglycemic environment alters complement-mediated control of S. aureus infection in a rat peritonitis model. Rats were treated with streptozocin to induce diabetes or sham-treated and then inoculated i.p. with S. aureus. Rats were euthanized and had peritoneal lavage at 2 or 24 hours after infection to evaluate early and late complement-mediated effects. Hyperglycemia decreased the influx of IgG and complement components into the peritoneum in response to S. aureus infection and decreased anaphylatoxin generation. Hyperglycemia decreased C4-fragment and C3-fragment opsonization of S. aureus recovered in peritoneal fluids, compared with euglycemic or insulin-rescued rats. Hyperglycemic rats showed decreased phagocytosis efficiency compared with euglycemic rats, which correlated inversely with bacterial survival. These results suggest that hyperglycemia inhibited humoral effector recruitment, anaphylatoxin generation, and complement-mediated opsonization of S. aureus, suggesting that hyperglycemic inhibition of complement effectors may contribute to the increased risk and severity of S. aureus infections in diabetic patients. PMID:25610878

  19. Hyperglycemia Inhibits Complement-Mediated Immunological Control of S. aureus in a Rat Model of Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Mauriello, Clifford T.; Hair, Pamela S.; Rohn, Reuben D.; Rister, Nicholas S.; Krishna, Neel K.; Cunnion, Kenji M.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia from diabetes is associated with increased risk of infection from S. aureus and increased severity of illness. Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that elevated glucose (>6 mM) dramatically inhibited S. aureus-initiated complement-mediated immune effectors. Here we report in vivo studies evaluating the extent to which a hyperglycemic environment alters complement-mediated control of S. aureus infection in a rat peritonitis model. Rats were treated with streptozocin to induce diabetes or sham-treated and then inoculated i.p. with S. aureus. Rats were euthanized and had peritoneal lavage at 2 or 24 hours after infection to evaluate early and late complement-mediated effects. Hyperglycemia decreased the influx of IgG and complement components into the peritoneum in response to S. aureus infection and decreased anaphylatoxin generation. Hyperglycemia decreased C4-fragment and C3-fragment opsonization of S. aureus recovered in peritoneal fluids, compared with euglycemic or insulin-rescued rats. Hyperglycemic rats showed decreased phagocytosis efficiency compared with euglycemic rats, which correlated inversely with bacterial survival. These results suggest that hyperglycemia inhibited humoral effector recruitment, anaphylatoxin generation, and complement-mediated opsonization of S. aureus, suggesting that hyperglycemic inhibition of complement effectors may contribute to the increased risk and severity of S. aureus infections in diabetic patients. PMID:25610878

  20. Low-level laser irradiation effect on endothelial cells under conditions of hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Góralczyk, Krzysztof; Szymańska, Justyna; Szot, Katarzyna; Fisz, Jacek; Rość, Danuta

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered to be a very serious lifestyle disease leading to cardiovascular complications and impaired wound healing observed in the diabetic foot syndrome. Chronic hyperglycemia is the source of the endothelial activation. The inflammatory process in diabetes is associated with the secretion of inflammatory cytokines by endothelial cells, e.g., tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6). The method of phototherapy using laser beam of low power (LLLT-low-level laser therapy) effectively supports the conventional treatment of diabetic vascular complications such as diabetic foot syndrome. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of low-power laser irradiation at two wavelengths (635 and 830 nm) on the secretion of inflammatory factors (TNF-α and IL-6) by the endothelial cell culture-HUVEC line (human umbilical vein endothelial cell)-under conditions of hyperglycemia. It is considered that adverse effects of hyperglycemia on vascular endothelial cells may be corrected by the action of LLLT, especially with the wavelength of 830 nm. It leads to the reduction of TNF-α concentration in the supernatant and enhancement of cell proliferation. Endothelial cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes; however, a small number of studies evaluate an impact of LLLT on these cells under conditions of hyperglycemia. Further work on this subject is warranted. PMID:26861982

  1. Depletion of Cultivatable Gut Microbiota by Broad-Spectrum Antibiotic Pretreatment Worsens Outcome After Murine Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Winek, Katarzyna; Engel, Odilo; Koduah, Priscilla; Heimesaat, Markus M.; Fischer, André; Bereswill, Stefan; Dames, Claudia; Kershaw, Olivia; Gruber, Achim D.; Curato, Caterina; Oyama, Naoki; Meisel, Christian; Meisel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Antibiotics disturbing microbiota are often used in treatment of poststroke infections. A bidirectional brain–gut microbiota axis was recently suggested as a modulator of nervous system diseases. We hypothesized that gut microbiota may be an important player in the course of stroke. Methods— We investigated the outcome of focal cerebral ischemia in C57BL/6J mice after an 8-week decontamination with quintuple broad-spectrum antibiotic cocktail. These microbiota-depleted animals were subjected to 60 minutes middle cerebral artery occlusion or sham operation. Infarct volume was measured using magnetic resonance imaging, and mice were monitored clinically throughout the whole experiment. At the end point, tissues were preserved for further analysis, comprising histology and immunologic investigations using flow cytometry. Results— We found significantly decreased survival in the middle cerebral artery occlusion microbiota-depleted mice when the antibiotic cocktail was stopped 3 days before surgery (compared with middle cerebral artery occlusion specific pathogen-free and sham-operated microbiota-depleted mice). Moreover, all microbiota-depleted animals in which antibiotic treatment was terminated developed severe acute colitis. This phenotype was rescued by continuous antibiotic treatment or colonization with specific pathogen-free microbiota before surgery. Further, infarct volumes on day one did not differ between any of the experimental groups. Conclusions— Conventional microbiota ensures intestinal protection in the mouse model of experimental stroke and prevents development of acute and severe colitis in microbiota-depleted mice not given antibiotic protection after cerebral ischemia. Our experiments raise the clinically important question as to whether microbial colonization or specific microbiota are crucial for stroke outcome. PMID:27056982

  2. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin worsens ischemia/reperfusion damage of kidney cells by autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjing; Yang, Shuo; Cui, Liyan; Zhang, Jie

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to explore the influence of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin on autophagy and its role in ischemia/reperfusion injury in human kidney-2 (HK-2) cells during acute kidney injury (AKI). HK-2 cells were given hypoxia/reoxygenation treatment for different times to simulate ischemia/reperfusion injury. Autophagy was evaluated by western blot and immunofluorescence of GFP-LC3. Cell viability was tested to reflect the degree of cell damage. The autophagy inhibitor 3-MA was used to inhibit autophagy and determine the role of autophagy in ischemia/reperfusion injury. HK-2 cells were hypoxia for 1 h, followed by reoxygenation treatment for 24 h. These cells were then exposed to human recombinant protein neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) (50, 100, 200, 400, or 1000 ng/mL) with or without 3-MA. Our results showed that autophagy was induced by hypoxia treatment and was further enhanced by reoxygenation after hypoxia treatment. Cell viability was decreased with the inhibition of autophagy in the process. Autophagic flux was further induced with NGAL (>200 ng/mL), while cell viability declined in this condition. Cell viability was recovered when autophagy was inhibited. These results indicate that autophagy plays, in part, a protective role in renal ischemia/reperfusion injury. Furthermore, the data suggest that NGAL strengthens the level of autophagy in this process. Overall, a large quantity of NGAL produced by renal proximal tubular epithelial cells may induce excessive autophagy and increase renal ischemia/reperfusion injury in acute kidney injury. PMID:27380103

  3. Risk factors for worsened muscle strength after the surgical treatment of arteriovenous malformations of the eloquent motor area.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fuxin; Zhao, Bing; Wu, Jun; Wang, Lijun; Jin, Zhen; Cao, Yong; Wang, Shuo

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Case selection for the surgical treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the eloquent motor area remains challenging. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors for worsened muscle strength after surgery in patients with this disorder. METHODS At their hospital the authors retrospectively studied 48 consecutive patients with AVMs involving motor cortex and/or the descending pathway. All patients had undergone preoperative functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), followed by resection. Both functional and angioarchitectural factors were analyzed with respect to the change in muscle strength. Functional factors included lesion-to-corticospinal tract distance (LCD) on DTI and lesion-to-activation area distance (LAD) and cortical reorganization on fMRI. Based on preoperative muscle strength, the changes in muscle strength at 1 week and 6 months after surgery were defined as short-term and long-term surgical outcomes, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed using the statistical package SPSS (version 20.0.0, IBM Corp.). RESULTS Twenty-one patients (43.8%) had worsened muscle strength 1 week after surgery. However, only 10 patients (20.8%) suffered from muscle strength worsening 6 months after surgery. The LCD was significantly correlated with short-term (p < 0.001) and long-term (p < 0.001) surgical outcomes. For long-term outcomes, patients in the 5 mm ≥ LCD > 0 mm (p = 0.009) and LCD > 5 mm (p < 0.001) categories were significantly associated with a lower risk of permanent motor worsening in comparison with patients in the LCD = 0 mm group. No significant difference was found between patients in the 5 mm ≥ LCD > 0 mm group and LCD > 5 mm group (p = 0.116). Nidus size was the other significant predictor of short-term (p = 0.021) and long-term (p = 0.016) outcomes. For long-term outcomes, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.728, and the cutoff point was 3.6 cm. Spetzler-Martin grade was not associated with

  4. Go-6976 reverses hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance independently of cPKC inhibition in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Katherine A; Hegyi, Krisztina; Hannun, Yusuf A; Buse, Maria G; Sethi, Jaswinder K

    2014-01-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia induces insulin resistance by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. One model of hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance involves chronic preincubation of adipocytes in the presence of high glucose and low insulin concentrations. We have previously shown that the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) plays a partial role in the development of insulin resistance in this model. Here, we demonstrate that treatment with Go-6976, a widely used "specific" inhibitor of cPKCs, alleviates hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance. However, the effects of mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin and Go-6976 were not additive and only rapamycin restored impaired insulin-stimulated AKT activation. Although, PKCα, (but not -β) was abundantly expressed in these adipocytes, our studies indicate cPKCs do not play a major role in causing insulin-resistance in this model. There was no evidence of changes in the expression or phosphorylation of PKCα, and PKCα knock-down did not prevent the reduction of insulin-stimulated glucose transport. This was also consistent with lack of IRS-1 phosphorylation on Ser-24 in hyperglycemia-induced insulin-resistant adipocytes. Treatment with Go-6976 did inhibit a component of the mTORC1 pathway, as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein. Raptor knock-down enhanced the effect of insulin on glucose transport in insulin resistant adipocytes. Go-6976 had the same effect in control cells, but was ineffective in cells with Raptor knock-down. Taken together these findings suggest that Go-6976 exerts its effect in alleviating hyperglycemia-induced insulin-resistance independently of cPKC inhibition and may target components of the mTORC1 signaling pathway. PMID:25330241

  5. Hydrogen sulfide replacement therapy protects the vascular endothelium in hyperglycemia by preserving mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kunihiro; Olah, Gabor; Modis, Katalin; Coletta, Ciro; Kulp, Gabriella; Gerö, Domokos; Szoleczky, Petra; Chang, Tuanjie; Zhou, Zongmin; Wu, Lingyun; Wang, Rui; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Szabo, Csaba

    2011-08-16

    The goal of the present studies was to investigate the role of changes in hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) homeostasis in the pathogenesis of hyperglycemic endothelial dysfunction. Exposure of bEnd3 microvascular endothelial cells to elevated extracellular glucose (in vitro "hyperglycemia") induced the mitochondrial formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which resulted in an increased consumption of endogenous and exogenous H(2)S. Replacement of H(2)S or overexpression of the H(2)S-producing enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) attenuated the hyperglycemia-induced enhancement of ROS formation, attenuated nuclear DNA injury, reduced the activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and improved cellular viability. In vitro hyperglycemia resulted in a switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, an effect that was partially corrected by H(2)S supplementation. Exposure of isolated vascular rings to high glucose in vitro induced an impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations, which was prevented by CSE overexpression or H(2)S supplementation. siRNA silencing of CSE exacerbated ROS production in hyperglycemic endothelial cells. Vascular rings from CSE(-/-) mice exhibited an accelerated impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations in response to in vitro hyperglycemia, compared with wild-type controls. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats resulted in a decrease in the circulating level of H(2)S; replacement of H(2)S protected from the development of endothelial dysfunction ex vivo. In conclusion, endogenously produced H(2)S protects against the development of hyperglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction. We hypothesize that, in hyperglycemic endothelial cells, mitochondrial ROS production and increased H(2)S catabolism form a positive feed-forward cycle. H(2)S replacement protects against these alterations, resulting in reduced ROS formation, improved endothelial metabolic state, and maintenance of normal endothelial function. PMID:21808008

  6. Even a Chronic Mild Hyperglycemia Affects Membrane Fluidity and Lipoperoxidation in Placental Mitochondria in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-García, María del Consuelo; Espinosa-García, María Teresa; Martinez-Montes, Federico; Palomar-Morales, Martín; Mejía-Zepeda, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    It is known the deleterious effects of diabetes on embryos, but the effects of diabetes on placenta and its mitochondria are still not well known. In this work we generated a mild hyperglycemia model in female wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin in 48 hours-old rats. The sexual maturity onset of the female rats was delayed around 6-7 weeks and at 16 weeks-old they were mated, and sacrificed at day 19th of pregnancy. In placental total tissue and isolated mitochondria, the fatty acids composition was analyzed by gas chromatography, and lipoperoxidation was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Membrane fluidity in mitochondria was measured with the excimer forming probe dipyrenylpropane and mitochondrial function was measured with a Clark-type electrode. The results show that even a chronic mild hyperglycemia increases lipoperoxidation and decreases mitochondrial function in placenta. Simultaneously, placental fatty acids metabolism in total tissue is modified but in a different way than in placental mitochondria. Whereas the chronic mild hyperglycemia induced a decrease in unsaturated to saturated fatty acids ratio (U/S) in placental total tissue, the ratio increased in placental mitochondria. The measurements of membrane fluidity showed that fluidity of placenta mitochondrial membranes increased with hyperglycemia, showing consistency with the fatty acids composition through the U/S index. The thermotropic characteristics of mitochondrial membranes were changed, showing lower transition temperature and activation energies. All of these data together demonstrate that even a chronic mild hyperglycemia during pregnancy of early reproductive Wistar rats, generates an increment of lipoperoxidation, an increase of placental mitochondrial membrane fluidity apparently derived from changes in fatty acids composition and consequently, mitochondrial malfunction. PMID:26630275

  7. Even a Chronic Mild Hyperglycemia Affects Membrane Fluidity and Lipoperoxidation in Placental Mitochondria in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-García, María del Consuelo; Espinosa-García, María Teresa; Martinez-Montes, Federico; Palomar-Morales, Martín; Mejía-Zepeda, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    It is known the deleterious effects of diabetes on embryos, but the effects of diabetes on placenta and its mitochondria are still not well known. In this work we generated a mild hyperglycemia model in female wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin in 48 hours-old rats. The sexual maturity onset of the female rats was delayed around 6–7 weeks and at 16 weeks-old they were mated, and sacrificed at day 19th of pregnancy. In placental total tissue and isolated mitochondria, the fatty acids composition was analyzed by gas chromatography, and lipoperoxidation was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Membrane fluidity in mitochondria was measured with the excimer forming probe dipyrenylpropane and mitochondrial function was measured with a Clark-type electrode. The results show that even a chronic mild hyperglycemia increases lipoperoxidation and decreases mitochondrial function in placenta. Simultaneously, placental fatty acids metabolism in total tissue is modified but in a different way than in placental mitochondria. Whereas the chronic mild hyperglycemia induced a decrease in unsaturated to saturated fatty acids ratio (U/S) in placental total tissue, the ratio increased in placental mitochondria. The measurements of membrane fluidity showed that fluidity of placenta mitochondrial membranes increased with hyperglycemia, showing consistency with the fatty acids composition through the U/S index. The thermotropic characteristics of mitochondrial membranes were changed, showing lower transition temperature and activation energies. All of these data together demonstrate that even a chronic mild hyperglycemia during pregnancy of early reproductive Wistar rats, generates an increment of lipoperoxidation, an increase of placental mitochondrial membrane fluidity apparently derived from changes in fatty acids composition and consequently, mitochondrial malfunction. PMID:26630275

  8. Postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Role of hepatic and extrahepatic tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Firth, R G; Bell, P M; Marsh, H M; Hansen, I; Rizza, R A

    1986-01-01

    Patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) have both preprandial and postprandial hyperglycemia. To determine the mechanism responsible for the postprandial hyperglycemia, insulin secretion, insulin action, and the pattern of carbohydrate metabolism after glucose ingestion were assessed in patients with NIDDM and in matched nondiabetic subjects using the dual isotope and forearm catheterization techniques. Prior to meal ingestion, hepatic glucose release was increased (P less than 0.001) in the diabetic patients measured using [2-3H] or [3-3H] glucose. After meal ingestion, patients with NIDDM had excessive rates of systemic glucose entry (1,316 +/- 56 vs. 1,018 +/- 65 mg/kg X 7 h, P less than 0.01), primarily owing to a failure to suppress adequately endogenous glucose release (680 +/- 50 vs. 470 +/- 32 mg/kg X 7 h, P less than 0.01) from its high preprandial level. Despite impaired suppression of endogenous glucose production during a hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp (P less than 0.001) and decreased postprandial C-peptide response (P less than 0.05) in NIDDM, percent suppression of hepatic glucose release after oral glucose was comparable in the diabetic and nondiabetic subjects (45 +/- 3 vs. 39 +/- 2%). Although new glucose formation from meal-derived three-carbon precursors (53 +/- 3 vs. 40 +/- 7 mg/kg X 7 h, P less than 0.05) was greater in the diabetic patients, it accounted for only a minor part of this excessive postprandial hepatic glucose release. Postprandial hyperglycemia was exacerbated by the lack of an appropriate increase in glucose uptake whether measured isotopically or by forearm glucose uptake. Thus as has been proposed for fasting hyperglycemia, excessive hepatic glucose release and impaired glucose uptake are involved in the pathogenesis of postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with NIDDM. Images PMID:3517067

  9. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or though physical contact (for example, on unwashed hands). Being exposed to tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts, vapors, and fumes can also cause acute bronchitis. Less often, bacteria can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute ...

  10. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  11. I.v. lidocaine worsens histamine-induced bronchoconstriction in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hirota, K; Hashimoto, Y; Sato, T; Yoshioka, H; Kudo, T; Ishihara, H; Matsuki, A

    1999-01-01

    We have assessed the effect of lidocaine (lignocaine) on histamine-induced bronchoconstriction by direct visualization with a superfine fibreoptic bronchoscope. Seven mongrel dogs were anaesthetized with pentobarbital (pentobarbitone) 30 mg kg-1 followed by 2 mg kg-1 h-1 and pancuronium 200 micrograms kg-1 h-1. The trachea was intubated with a tracheal tube containing a second lumen for insertion of a 2.2-mm fibreoptic bronchoscope. This allowed estimation of the bronchial cross-sectional area (BCA) of the third bronchial bifurcation of the right lung. We used NIH image, a public domain image processing and analysis program. Bronchoconstriction was produced with a bolus dose of histamine 10 micrograms kg-1 i.v. followed by continuous infusion of 500 micrograms kg-1 h-1. After 30 min the following i.v. doses of lidocaine were given: lidocaine 0 (saline), 0.01, 0.1, 1.0 and 10 mg kg-1 at 10-min intervals. BCA was assessed 90 s after each dose. Arterial blood sampling was performed for measurement of plasma catecholamines. Lidocaine 1.0 and 10 mg kg-1 significantly reduced histamine-decreased BCA from 69.7 (SEM 4.1)% to 59.8 (7.3)% and 34.3 (6.8)%, respectively. Plasma concentrations of catecholamines decreased significantly after lidocaine 10 mg kg-1 i.v. In addition, there was a significant correlation between percentage decreases in plasma concentrations of epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline) and reduction in %BCA (epinephrine-BCA, P < 0.01, r = 0.674; norepinephrine-BCA, P < 0.01, r = 0.510). This study suggests that i.v. lidocaine may exacerbate histamine-induced bronchoconstriction by a sympatholytic effect. This may have therapeutic implications for patients with acute asthma or anaphylactic shock who may become dependent on circulating catecholamines. PMID:10325842

  12. Lansoprazole Is Associated with Worsening Asthma Control in Children with the CYP2C19 Poor Metabolizer Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Janet T.; Mougey, Edward B.; Wei, Christine Y.; Wise, Robert A.; Teague, W. Gerald; Lima, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Gastric acid blockade in children with asymptomatic acid reflux has not improved asthma control in published studies. There is substantial population variability regarding metabolism of and response to proton pump inhibitors based on metabolizer phenotype. How metabolizer phenotype affects asthma responses to acid blockage is not known. Objectives: To determine how metabolizer phenotype based on genetic analysis of CYP2C19 affects asthma control among children treated with a proton pump inhibitor. Methods: Asthma control as measured by the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) and other questionnaires from a 6-month clinical trial of lansoprazole in children with asthma was analyzed for associations with surrogates of lansoprazole exposure (based on treatment assignment and metabolizer phenotype). Groups included placebo-treated children; lansoprazole-treated extensive metabolizers (EMs); and lansoprazole-treated poor metabolizers (PMs). Metabolizer phenotypes were based on CYP2C19 haplotypes. Carriers of the CYP2C19*2, *3, *8, *9, or *10 allele were PMs; carriers of two wild-type alleles were extensive metabolizers (EMs). Measurements and Main Results: Asthma control through most of the treatment period was unaffected by lansoprazole exposure or metabolizer phenotype. At 6 months, PMs displayed significantly worsened asthma control compared with EMs (+0.16 vs. –0.13; P = 0.02) and placebo-treated children (+0.16 vs. –0.23; P < 0.01). Differences in asthma control were not associated with changes in gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Recent upper respiratory infection worsened asthma control, and this upper respiratory infection effect may be more pronounced among lansoprazole-treated PMs. Conclusions: Children with the PM phenotype developed worse asthma control after 6 months of lansoprazole treatment for poorly controlled asthma. Increased exposure to proton pump inhibitor may worsen asthma control by altering responses to respiratory

  13. Allergic contact cheilitis from a lipstick misdiagnosed as herpes labialis: Subsequent worsening due to Zovirax contact allergy.

    PubMed

    Ozkaya, Esen; Topkarci, Zeynep; Ozarmağan, Güzin

    2007-08-01

    A 29-year-old Turkish woman with allergic contact cheilitis from a lipstick was misdiagnosed as herpes labialis and subsequently worsened with the application of Zovirax cream. Patch tests were positive to Zovirax cream, propylene glycol, the patient's favourite lipstick and propyl gallate. No reaction was seen with Zovirax ophthalmic ointment and Zovirax tablet. The propylene glycol component of the Zovirax cream and the propyl gallate component of the lipstick were regarded as the responsible contact sensitizers. The differential diagnosis was challenging due to concomitant contact sensitization with these agents. PMID:17680974

  14. Hyperglycemia-Induced Changes in Hyaluronan Contribute to Impaired Skin Wound Healing in Diabetes: Review and Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Sajina; Wang, Yan; Mack, Judith A.; Maytin, Edward V.

    2015-01-01

    Ulcers and chronic wounds are a particularly common problem in diabetics and are associated with hyperglycemia. In this targeted review, we summarize evidence suggesting that defective wound healing in diabetics is causally linked, at least in part, to hyperglycemia-induced changes in the status of hyaluronan (HA) that resides in the pericellular coat (glycocalyx) of endothelial cells of small cutaneous blood vessels. Potential mechanisms through which exposure to high glucose levels causes a loss of the glycocalyx on the endothelium and accelerates the recruitment of leukocytes, creating a proinflammatory environment, are discussed in detail. Hyperglycemia also affects other cells in the immediate perivascular area, including pericytes and smooth muscle cells, through exposure to increased cytokine levels and through glucose elevations in the interstitial fluid. Possible roles of newly recognized, cross-linked forms of HA, and interactions of a major HA receptor (CD44) with cytokine/growth factor receptors during hyperglycemia, are also discussed. PMID:26448756

  15. Identification of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia in type 1 diabetic patients using ECG parameters.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Linh Lan; Su, Steven; Nguyen, Hung T

    2012-01-01

    Hypoglycemia and Hyperglycemia are both serious diseases related to diabetes mellitus. Among Type 1 Diabetic patients, there are who experience both hypoglycemic and hyperglycemic events. The aim of this study was to identify of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia based on ECG changes in this population. An ECG Acquisition and Analysis System based on LabVIEW software has been developed for collecting ECG signals and extracting features with abnormal changes. ECG parameters included Heart rate (HR), corrected QT interval (QTeC), PR interval, corrected RT interval (RTC) and corrected TpTe interval (TpTe(C)). Blood glucose levels were used to classify glycemic states in subjects as hypoglycemic state (≤ 60 mml/l, Hypo), as normoglycemic state (80 to 110 mmol/l, Normo), and as hyperglycemic state 150 mml/l, Hyper). The results indicated that hypoglycemic and hyperglycemic states produce significant inverse changes on those ECG parameters. PMID:23366486

  16. How do I manage hyperglycemia/post-transplant diabetes mellitus after allogeneic HSCT.

    PubMed

    Fuji, S; Rovó, A; Ohashi, K; Griffith, M; Einsele, H; Kapp, M; Mohty, M; Majhail, N S; Engelhardt, B G; Tichelli, A; Savani, B N

    2016-08-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) recipients frequently develop glucose intolerance and post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM). The clinical importance of PTDM and its detrimental impact on HSCT outcomes are under-recognized. After allo-HSCT, various mechanisms can contribute to the development of PTDM. Here we review information about hyperglycemia and PTDM after allo-HSCT as well as PTDM after solid organ transplantation and describe ways to manage hyperglycemia/PTDM after allogeneic HSCT. Taking into consideration a lack of well-established evidence in the field of allo-HSCT, more studies should be conducted in the future, which will require closer multidisciplinary collaboration between hematologists, endocrinologists and nutritionists. PMID:27042848

  17. Steroid hyperglycemia: Prevalence, early detection and therapeutic recommendations: A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Tamez-Pérez, Héctor Eloy; Quintanilla-Flores, Dania Lizet; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, René; González-González, José Gerardo; Tamez-Peña, Alejandra Lorena

    2015-01-01

    Steroids are drugs that have been used extensively in a variety of conditions. Although widely prescribed for their anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties, glucocorticoids have several side effects, being hyperglycemia one of the most common and representative. In the present review, we discuss the main epidemiologic characteristics associated with steroid use, with emphasis on the identification of high risk populations. Additionally we present the pathophysiology of corticosteroid induced hyperglycemia as well as the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics associated with steroid use. We propose a treatment strategy based on previous reports and the understanding of the mechanism of action of both, the different types of glucocorticoids and the treatment options, in both the ambulatory and the hospital setting. Finally, we present some of the recent scientific advances as well as some options for future use of glucocorticoids. PMID:26240704

  18. Managing hyperglycemia and diabetes in patients receiving enteral feedings: A health system approach.

    PubMed

    Mabrey, Melanie E; Barton, Anna Beth; Corsino, Leonor; Freeman, Susan B; Davis, Ellen D; Bell, Elizabeth L; Setji, Tracy L

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of poor outcomes in hospitalized patients with hyperglycemia has led to new and revised guidelines for inpatient management of diabetes. As providers become more aware of the need for better blood glucose control, they are finding limited guidance in the management of patients receiving enteral nutrition. To address the lack of guidelines in this population, Duke University Health System has developed a consistent practice for managing such patients. Here, we present our practice strategies for insulin use in patients receiving enteral nutrition. Essential factors include assessing the patients' history of diabetes, hyperglycemia, or hypoglycemia and timing and type of feedings. Insulin practices are then designed to address these issues keeping in mind patient safety in the event of abrupt cessation of nutrition. The outcome of the process is a consistent and safe method for glucose control with enteral nutrition. PMID:25744356

  19. Steroid hyperglycemia: Prevalence, early detection and therapeutic recommendations: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Tamez-Pérez, Héctor Eloy; Quintanilla-Flores, Dania Lizet; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, René; González-González, José Gerardo; Tamez-Peña, Alejandra Lorena

    2015-07-25

    Steroids are drugs that have been used extensively in a variety of conditions. Although widely prescribed for their anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties, glucocorticoids have several side effects, being hyperglycemia one of the most common and representative. In the present review, we discuss the main epidemiologic characteristics associated with steroid use, with emphasis on the identification of high risk populations. Additionally we present the pathophysiology of corticosteroid induced hyperglycemia as well as the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics associated with steroid use. We propose a treatment strategy based on previous reports and the understanding of the mechanism of action of both, the different types of glucocorticoids and the treatment options, in both the ambulatory and the hospital setting. Finally, we present some of the recent scientific advances as well as some options for future use of glucocorticoids. PMID:26240704

  20. [The current aspects of the pharmacological correction of hyperglycemia in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (type 2)].

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, N I

    1999-01-01

    Data on the mechanisms of developing of hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes mellitus (type 2) are analyzed and reviewed. The current concept of hypoglycemic therapy aimed both at amelioration of hyperglycemia symptoms and reduction of the risk of diabetic micro- and macroangiopathies is considered. The main directions of pharmacological action of hypoglycemic drugs (both in use and in the stage of design) and data of the efficiency and possible incidental action are presented. PMID:10572759

  1. Environmental Circadian Disruption Worsens Neurologic Impairment and Inhibits Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Adult Rats After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongpeng; Ma, Shanshan; Guo, Dewei; Cheng, Tian; Li, Hongwei; Tian, Yi; Li, Jianbin; Guan, Fangxia; Yang, Bo; Wang, Jian

    2016-10-01

    Circadian rhythms modulate many physiologic processes and behaviors. Therefore, their disruption causes a variety of potential adverse effects in humans and animals. Circadian disruption induced by constant light exposure has been discovered to produce pathophysiologic consequences after brain injury. However, the underlying mechanisms that lead to more severe impairment and disruption of neurophysiologic processes are not well understood. Here, we evaluated the effect of constant light exposure on the neurobehavioral impairment and survival of neurons in rats after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Sixty adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a weight-drop model of TBI and then exposed to either a standard 12-/12-h light/dark cycle or a constant 24-h light/light cycle for 14 days. Our results showed that 14 days of constant light exposure after TBI significantly worsened the sensorimotor and cognitive deficits, which were associated with decreased body weight, impaired water and food intake, increased cortical lesion volume, and decreased neuronal survival. Furthermore, environmental circadian disruption inhibited cell proliferation and newborn cell survival and decreased immature cell production in rats subjected to the TBI model. We conclude that circadian disruption induced by constant light exposure worsens histologic and neurobehavioral impairment and inhibits neurogenesis in adult TBI rats. Our novel findings suggest that light exposure should be decreased and circadian rhythm reestablished in hospitalized TBI patients and that drugs and strategies that maintain circadian rhythm would offer a novel therapeutic option. PMID:26886755

  2. The use of digoxin in patients with worsening chronic heart failure: reconsidering an old drug to reduce hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Ambrosy, Andrew P; Butler, Javed; Ahmed, Ali; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Colucci, Wilson S; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2014-05-13

    Digoxin is the oldest cardiac drug still in contemporary use, yet its role in the management of patients with heart failure (HF) remains controversial. A purified cardiac glycoside derived from the foxglove plant, digoxin increases ejection fraction, augments cardiac output, and reduces pulmonary capillary wedge pressure without causing deleterious increases in heart rate or decreases in blood pressure. Moreover, it is also a neurohormonal modulator at low doses. In the pivotal DIG (Digitalis Investigation Group) trial, digoxin therapy was shown to reduce all-cause and HF-specific hospitalizations but had no effect on survival. With the discovery of neurohormonal blockers capable of reducing mortality in HF with reduced ejection fraction, the results of the DIG trial were viewed as neutral, and the use of digoxin declined precipitously. Although modern drug and device-based therapies have dramatically improved the survival of ambulatory patients with HF, outcomes for patients with worsening chronic HF, defined as deteriorating signs and symptoms on standard therapy often leading to unscheduled clinic or emergency department visits or hospitalization, have largely remained unchanged over the past 2 decades. The available data suggest that a therapeutic trial of digoxin may be appropriate in patients with worsening chronic heart failure who remain symptomatic. PMID:24613328

  3. Relationship between cerebral sodium-glucose transporter and hyperglycemia in cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yui; Harada, Shinichi; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2015-09-14

    Post-ischemic hyperglycemia exacerbates the development of cerebral ischemia. To elucidate this exacerbation mechanism, we focused on sodium-glucose transporter (SGLT) as a mediator that lead hyperglycemia to cerebral ischemia. SGLT transport glucose into the cell, together with sodium ion, using the sodium concentration gradient. We have previously reported that suppression of cerebral SGLT ameliorates cerebral ischemic neuronal damage. However, detail relationship cerebral between SGLT and post-ischemic hyperglycemia remain incompletely defined. Therefore, we examined the involvement of cerebral SGLT on cerebral ischemic neuronal damage with or without hyperglycemic condition. Cell survival rate of primary cultured neurons was assessed by biochemical assay. A mouse model of focal ischemia was generated using a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Neuronal damage was assessed with histological and behavioral analyses. Concomitant hydrogen peroxide/glucose treatment exacerbated hydrogen peroxide alone-induced cell death. Although a SGLT family-specific inhibitor, phlorizin had no effect on developed hydrogen peroxide alone-induced cell death, it suppressed cell death induced by concomitant hydrogen peroxide/glucose treatment. α-MG induced a concentration-dependent and significant decrease in neuronal survival. PHZ administered on immediately after reperfusion had no effect, but PHZ given at 6h after reperfusion had an effect. Our in vitro study indicates that SGLT is not involved in neuronal cell death in non-hyperglycemic condition. We have already reported that post-ischemic hyperglycemia begins to develop at 6h after MCAO. Therefore, current our in vivo study show post-ischemic hyperglycemic condition may be necessary for the SGLT-mediated exacerbation of cerebral ischemic neuronal damage. PMID:26254165

  4. Effect of thiamine pyrophosphate on retinopathy induced by hyperglycemia in rats: A biochemical and pathological evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cinici, Emine; Ahiskali, Ibrahim; Cetin, Nihal; Suleyman, Bahadir; Kukula, Osman; Altuner, Durdu; Coban, Abdulkadir; Balta, Hilal; Kuzucu, Mehmet; Suleyman, Halis

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Information is lacking on the protective effects of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) against hyperglycemia-induced retinopathy in rats. This study investigated the biochemical and histopathological aspects of the effect of TPP on hyperglycemia-induced retinopathy induced by alloxan in rats. Materials and Methods: The rats were separated into a diabetic TPP-administered group (DTPG), a diabetes control group (DCG) and a healthy group (HG). While the DTPG was given TPP, the DCG and HG were administered distilled water as a solvent at the same concentrations. This procedure was repeated daily for 3 months. At the end of this period, all of the rats were euthanized under thiopental sodium anesthesia, and biochemical and histopathological analyses of the ocular retinal tissues were performed. The results of the DTPG were compared with those of the DCG and HG. Results: TPP prevented hyperglycemia by increasing the amount of malondialdehyde and decreasing endogen antioxidants, including total glutathione, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase and superoxide dismutase. In addition, the amounts of the DNA oxidation product 8-hydroxyguanine were significantly lower in the retinas of the DTPG compared to the DCG. In the retinas of the DCG, there was a marked increase in vascular structures and congestion, in addition to edema. In contrast, little vascularization and edema were observed in the DTPG, and there was no congestion. The results suggest that TPP significantly reduced the degree of hyperglycemia-induced retinopathy. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that TPP may be useful for prophylaxis against diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27488151

  5. The classification of hospitalized patients with hyperglycemia and its implication on outcome: results from a prospective observational study in Internal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Pieralli, Filippo; Bazzini, Cristina; Fabbri, Alessia; Casati, Carlotta; Crociani, Andrea; Corradi, Francesco; Pignone, Alberto Moggi; Morettini, Alessandro; Nozzoli, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    The relevance of classifying hyperglycemic hospitalized subjects (HS) as known diabetes (D), newly discovered diabetes (ND), and stress hyperglycemia (SH) is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, in-hospital mortality, and length of stay (LOS) of three different phenotypes of HS. Fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or random blood glucose ≥200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) defined HS who were categorized into three groups: D; ND (no history of diabetes and HbA1c ≥48 mmol/mol); SH (no history of diabetes and HbA1c <48 mmol/mol). The end points of the study were in-hospital mortality and LOS. Of 1447 consecutive enrolled subjects, the prevalence of HS was 28.6 % (415/1447), of these 71.6 % had D, 21.2 % SH, and 7.2 % ND, respectively. In-hospital death was 3.9 % in normoglycemic and 6.0 % in hyperglycemic subjects. Individuals with SH had an increased risk of in-hospital death (7.9 %) (HR 2.17, 95 % CI 1.18-4.9; p = 0.039), while this was not observed for D and ND patients. The mean LOS was greater in ND and SH subjects. Hyperglycemia is common, and is associated with an increased risk of in-hospital mortality and extension of hospital stay. HbA1c along with clinical history is a useful tool to identify subgroups of hyperglycemic hospitalized subjects. Individuals with SH have a longer LOS, and a double risk of in-hospital mortality. Additionally, identifying previously unknown diabetes represents a remarkable opportunity for prevention of diabetes-related acute and chronic complications. PMID:26612762

  6. Management of hyperglycemia from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) targeting T790M-mediated resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ersek, Jennifer L.; Fong, Mei Ka; Sirianno, Lindsey; Story, Ellen S.

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients are associated with sensitivity to small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as erlotinib, gefitinib, and afatinib. Although studies show an increased progression free survival (PFS) with use of EGFR TKIs in the first-line setting, most patients will develop resistance to therapy after the first 8-16 months. T790M is an acquired resistance mutation reported in 60-70% of patients who initially responded to a prior EGFR TKI. Recently, EGFR TKIs targeting T790M have been developed to overcome resistance with positive results in PFS and objective response rate in patients who have had disease progression on at least one TKI. Two EGFR TKIs targeting T790M, AZD9291 and rociletinib, are new active treatment options for NSCLC but differ in adverse effect profiles. Dose-limiting hyperglycemia has been reported with rociletinib and has required dose reduction, an oral antihyperglycemic, or both, without discontinuation of therapy. This suggests that patients may be effectively treated chronically for hyperglycemia associated with EGFR TKIs targeting T790M, however, guidelines for treatment of hyperglycemia in this setting have not been published. We discuss mechanisms of hyperglycemia associated with TKIs and initial management of hyperglycemia, including benefits and limitations of oral antihyperglycemic options, adjustment of therapy based on grade of hyperglycemia, and recommendations for follow-up glucose monitoring. PMID:26629426

  7. Management of hyperglycemia from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) targeting T790M-mediated resistance.

    PubMed

    Villadolid, Jeryl; Ersek, Jennifer L; Fong, Mei Ka; Sirianno, Lindsey; Story, Ellen S

    2015-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients are associated with sensitivity to small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as erlotinib, gefitinib, and afatinib. Although studies show an increased progression free survival (PFS) with use of EGFR TKIs in the first-line setting, most patients will develop resistance to therapy after the first 8-16 months. T790M is an acquired resistance mutation reported in 60-70% of patients who initially responded to a prior EGFR TKI. Recently, EGFR TKIs targeting T790M have been developed to overcome resistance with positive results in PFS and objective response rate in patients who have had disease progression on at least one TKI. Two EGFR TKIs targeting T790M, AZD9291 and rociletinib, are new active treatment options for NSCLC but differ in adverse effect profiles. Dose-limiting hyperglycemia has been reported with rociletinib and has required dose reduction, an oral antihyperglycemic, or both, without discontinuation of therapy. This suggests that patients may be effectively treated chronically for hyperglycemia associated with EGFR TKIs targeting T790M, however, guidelines for treatment of hyperglycemia in this setting have not been published. We discuss mechanisms of hyperglycemia associated with TKIs and initial management of hyperglycemia, including benefits and limitations of oral antihyperglycemic options, adjustment of therapy based on grade of hyperglycemia, and recommendations for follow-up glucose monitoring. PMID:26629426

  8. A new gestational diabetes mellitus model: hyperglycemia-induced eye malformation via inhibition of Pax6 in the chick embryo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shi-Jie; Li, Yi-Fang; Tan, Rui-Rong; Tsoi, Bun; Huang, Wen-Shan; Huang, Yi-Hua; Tang, Xiao-Long; Hu, Dan; Yao, Nan; Yang, Xuesong; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Wang, Qi; He, Rong-Rong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the leading causes of fetal malformations. However, few models have been developed to study the underlying mechanisms of GDM-induced fetal eye malformation. In this study, a high concentration of glucose (0.2 mmol per egg) was injected into the air sac of chick embryos on embryo development day (EDD) 1 to develop a hyperglycemia model. Results showed that 47.3% of embryonic eye malformation happened on EDD 5. In this model, the key genes regulating eye development, Pax6, Six3 and Otx2, were downregulated by hyperglycemia. Among these genes, the expression of Pax6 was the most vulnerable to hyperglycemia, being suppressed by 70%. A reduction in Pax6 gene expression induced eye malformation in chick embryos. However, increased expression of Pax6 in chick embryos could rescue hyperglycemia-induced eye malformation. Hyperglycemia stimulated O-linked N-acetylglucosaminylation, which caused oxidative stress in chick embryos. Pax6 was found to be vulnerable to free radicals, but the antioxidant edaravone could restore Pax6 expression and reverse eye malformation. These results illustrated a successful establishment of a new chick embryo model to study the molecular mechanism of hyperglycemia-induced eye malformation. The suppression of the Pax6 gene is probably mediated by oxidative stress and could be a crucial target for the therapy of GDM-induced embryonic eye malformation. PMID:26744353

  9. Hyperglycemia-induced metabolic compensation inhibits metformin sensitivity in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Litchfield, Lacey M.; Mukherjee, Abir; Eckert, Mark A.; Johnson, Alyssa; Mills, Kathryn A.; Pan, Shawn; Shridhar, Viji; Lengyel, Ernst; Romero, Iris L.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing interest in repurposing the diabetic medication metformin for cancer treatment has raised important questions about the translation of promising preclinical findings to therapeutic efficacy, especially in non-diabetic patients. A significant limitation of the findings to date is the use of supraphysiologic metformin doses and hyperglycemic conditions in vitro. Our goals were to determine the impact of hyperglycemia on metformin response and to address the applicability of metformin as a cancer therapeutic in non-diabetic patients. In normoglycemic conditions, lower concentrations of metformin were required to inhibit cell viability, while metformin treatment in hyperglycemic conditions resulted in increased glucose uptake and glycolytic flux, contributing to cell survival. Mechanistically, maintenance of c-Myc expression under conditions of hyperglycemia or via gene amplification facilitated metabolic escape from the effects of metformin. In vivo, treatment of an ovarian cancer mouse model with metformin resulted in greater tumor weight reduction in normoglycemic vs. hyperglycemic mice, with increased c-Myc expression observed in metformin-treated hyperglycemic mice. These findings indicate that hyperglycemia inhibits the anti-cancer effects of metformin in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, our results suggest that metformin may elicit stronger responses in normoglycemic vs. hyperglycemic patients, highlighting the need for prospective clinical testing in patients without diabetes. PMID:26172303

  10. Glucocorticoid-Induced Preterm Birth and Neonatal Hyperglycemia Alter Ovine β-Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Amita; Bloomfield, Frank H; Connor, Kristin L; Dragunow, Mike; Thorstensen, Eric B; Oliver, Mark H; Sloboda, Deborah M; Harding, Jane E; Alsweiler, Jane M

    2015-10-01

    Adults born preterm are at increased risk of impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. Late gestation fetuses exposed to high blood glucose concentration also are at increased risk of impaired glucose tolerance as adults. Preterm babies commonly become hyperglycemic and are thus exposed to high blood glucose concentration at an equivalent stage of pancreatic maturation. It is not known whether preterm birth itself, or complications of prematurity, such as hyperglycemia, alter later pancreatic function. To distinguish these, we made singleton preterm lambs hyperglycemic (HYPER) for 12 days after birth with a dextrose infusion and compared them with vehicle-treated preterm and term controls and with HYPER lambs made normoglycemic with an insulin infusion. Preterm birth reduced β-cell mass, apparent by 4 weeks after term and persisting to adulthood (12 mo), and was associated with reduced insulin secretion at 4 months (juvenile) and reduced insulin mRNA expression in adulthood. Hyperglycemia in preterm lambs further down-regulated key pancreatic gene expression in adulthood. These findings indicate that reduced β-cell mass after preterm birth may be an important factor in increased risk of diabetes after preterm birth and may be exacerbated by postnatal hyperglycemia. PMID:26204462

  11. Maternal hyperglycemia leads to fetal cardiac hyperplasia and dysfunction in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Lehtoranta, Lara; Vuolteenaho, Olli; Laine, V Jukka; Koskinen, Anna; Soukka, Hanna; Kytö, Ville; Määttä, Jorma; Haapsamo, Mervi; Ekholm, Eeva; Räsänen, Juha

    2013-09-01

    Accelerated fetal myocardial growth with altered cardiac function is a well-documented complication of human diabetic pregnancy, but its pathophysiology is still largely unknown. Our aim was to explore the mechanisms of fetal cardiac remodeling and cardiovascular hemodynamics in a rat model of maternal pregestational streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia. The hyperglycemic group comprised 107 fetuses (10 dams) and the control group 219 fetuses (20 dams). Fetal cardiac function was assessed serially by Doppler ultrasonography. Fetal cardiac to thoracic area ratio, newborn heart weight, myocardial cell proliferative and apoptotic activities, and cardiac gene expression patterns were determined. Maternal hyperglycemia was associated with increased cardiac size, proliferative, apoptotic and mitotic activities, upregulation of genes encoding A- and B-type natriuretic peptides, myosin heavy chain types 2 and 3, uncoupling proteins 2 and 3, and the angiogenetic tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 12A. The genes encoding Kv channel-interacting protein 2, a regulator of electrical cardiac phenotype, and the insulin-regulated glucose transporter 4 were downregulated. The heart rate was lower in fetuses of hyperglycemic dams. At 13-14 gestational days, 98% of fetuses of hyperglycemic dams had holosystolic atrioventricular valve regurgitation and decreased outflow mean velocity, indicating diminished cardiac output. Maternal hyperglycemia may lead to accelerated fetal myocardial growth by cardiomyocyte hyperplasia. In fetuses of hyperglycemic dams, expression of key genes that control and regulate cardiomyocyte electrophysiological properties, contractility, and metabolism are altered and may lead to major functional and clinical implications on the fetal heart. PMID:23839525

  12. Inhibitory effects of hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis) extracts on intestinal alpha-glucosidase activity and postprandial hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hiroyuki; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Yanagiya, Chikako; Mizutani, Junya; Tsuji, Masayoshi; Ishihara, Chiaki

    2003-10-01

    It has been known that Hyssopus officinalis (hyssop) is a herb that grows in the wild and is a source of natural antioxidants. We previously reported that a-glucosidase inhibitors, (2S, 3S)1-O-beta-D-6'-O-cinnamoylglucopyranosyl-3-(3", 5"-dimethoxy-4"-hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,3-propanetriol and (2S, 3S)1-O-beta-D-glucopranosyl-3-(3", 5"-dimethoxy-4"-hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,3-propanetriol, from the dry leaves of hyssop, were isolated. This study examined the alpha-glucosidase inhibitory effects of hyssop extracts on intestinal carbohydrate absorption in rat everted gut sac and carbohydrate-loaded hyperglycemia in mice. In the everted gut sac experiment, 10 mM sucrose- and 5 mM maltose-treated increases in glucose concentration in the serosal compartment were inhibited in the presence of 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ mL hyssop extracts, although a 10 mM glucose-induced increase in serosal glucose was not inhibited by the extracts. Additionally, hyperglycemia in sucrose- and maltose-loaded mice was significantly suppressed at an early stage, within 30 to 60 min by oral pre-administration of 300 and 100 mg/kg hyssop extracts, respectively. These findings suggest that hyssop extracts inhibited the digestion of complex carbohydrates, but not that of absorbable monosaccharide, and might be a useful supplemental food for hyperglycemia. PMID:14703310

  13. Aqueous Extract of Nypa fruticans Wurmb. Vinegar Alleviates Postprandial Hyperglycemia in Normoglycemic Rats †

    PubMed Central

    Yusoff, Nor Adlin; Ahmad, Mariam; Al-Hindi, Bassel; Widyawati, Tri; Yam, Mun Fei; Mahmud, Roziahanim; Abdul Razak, Khairul Niza; Asmawi, Mohd Zaini

    2015-01-01

    Nypa fruticans Wurmb. vinegar, commonly known as nipa palm vinegar (NPV) has been used as a folklore medicine among the Malay community to treat diabetes. Early work has shown that aqueous extract (AE) of NPV exerts a potent antihyperglycemic effect. Thus, this study is conducted to evaluate the effect of AE on postprandial hyperglycemia in an attempt to understand its mechanism of antidiabetic action. AE were tested via in vitro intestinal glucose absorption, in vivo carbohydrate tolerance tests and spectrophotometric enzyme inhibition assays. One mg/mL of AE showed a comparable outcome to the use of phloridzin (1 mM) in vitro as it delayed glucose absorption through isolated rat jejunum more effectively than acarbose (1 mg/mL). Further in vivo confirmatory tests showed AE (500 mg/kg) to cause a significant suppression in postprandial hyperglycemia 30 min following respective glucose (2 g/kg), sucrose (4 g/kg) and starch (3 g/kg) loadings in normal rats, compared to the control group. Conversely, in spectrophotometric enzymatic assays, AE showed rather a weak inhibitory activity against both α-glucosidase and α-amylase when compared with acarbose. The findings suggested that NPV exerts its anti-diabetic effect by delaying carbohydrate absorption from the small intestine through selective inhibition of intestinal glucose transporters, therefore suppressing postprandial hyperglycemia. PMID:26308046

  14. Aqueous Extract of Nypa fruticans Wurmb. Vinegar Alleviates Postprandial Hyperglycemia in Normoglycemic Rats.

    PubMed

    Yusoff, Nor Adlin; Ahmad, Mariam; Al-Hindi, Bassel; Widyawati, Tri; Yam, Mun Fei; Mahmud, Roziahanim; Razak, Khairul Niza Abdul; Asmawi, Mohd Zaini

    2015-08-01

    Nypa fruticans Wurmb. vinegar, commonly known as nipa palm vinegar (NPV) has been used as a folklore medicine among the Malay community to treat diabetes. Early work has shown that aqueous extract (AE) of NPV exerts a potent antihyperglycemic effect. Thus, this study is conducted to evaluate the effect of AE on postprandial hyperglycemia in an attempt to understand its mechanism of antidiabetic action. AE were tested via in vitro intestinal glucose absorption, in vivo carbohydrate tolerance tests and spectrophotometric enzyme inhibition assays. One mg/mL of AE showed a comparable outcome to the use of phloridzin (1 mM) in vitro as it delayed glucose absorption through isolated rat jejunum more effectively than acarbose (1 mg/mL). Further in vivo confirmatory tests showed AE (500 mg/kg) to cause a significant suppression in postprandial hyperglycemia 30 min following respective glucose (2 g/kg), sucrose (4 g/kg) and starch (3 g/kg) loadings in normal rats, compared to the control group. Conversely, in spectrophotometric enzymatic assays, AE showed rather a weak inhibitory activity against both α-glucosidase and α-amylase when compared with acarbose. The findings suggested that NPV exerts its anti-diabetic effect by delaying carbohydrate absorption from the small intestine through selective inhibition of intestinal glucose transporters, therefore suppressing postprandial hyperglycemia. PMID:26308046

  15. Temporary prenatal hyperglycemia leads to postnatal neuronal 'glucose-resistance' in the chicken hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Tzschentke, Barbara; Bogatyrev, Semjon; Schellong, Karen; Rancourt, Rebecca C; Plagemann, Andreas

    2015-08-27

    Prenatal exposures may have a distinct impact for long-term health. Exposure to maternal 'diabesity' during pregnancy increases offspring 'diabesity' risk, e.g. by malprogramming the central nervous regulation of body weight, food intake and metabolism. Critical mechanisms and concrete disrupting factors still remain unclear. Due to the independent development, from the mother, the chicken embryo could provide a valuable model to distinctively establish causal factors. Aim of this study was to determine effects of temporary prenatal hyperglycemia on postnatal hypothalamic neuronal glucose sensitivity in the chicken. To induce hyperglycemia in chicken embryos, 0.5 ml glucose solution (concentration 30 mmol/l) were daily administered via catheter into a vessel of the chorioallantoic egg membrane from days 14 to 17 of incubation. On day 21 of postnatal age, body weight, body fat content, blood glucose, neuroelectrophysiological glucose sensitivity as well as glucose transporter expression were determined in hypothalamic brain slices. No significant changes in morphometric and metabolic parameters were observed. However, strongly decreased neuronal glucose sensitivity and glucose transporter expression occurred, indicating prenatally acquired hypothalamic 'glucose-resistance'. In conclusion, temporary late prenatal hyperglycemia induces lasting changes in central glucose sensing. The prenatally glucose-treated chicken provides a valuable new model for investigating early central nervous origins of 'diabesity' and related disorders. PMID:26054304

  16. EFFECTS OF HYPERGLYCEMIA ON RAT CAVERNOUS NERVE AXONS: A FUNCTIONAL AND ULTRASTRUCTURAL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Zotova, Elena G.; Schaumburg, Herbert H.; Raine, Cedric S.; Cannella, Barbara; Tar, Moses; Melman, Arnold; Arezzo, Joseph C.

    2008-01-01

    The present study explored parallel changes in the physiology and structure of myelinated (Aδ) and unmyelinated (C) small diameter axons in the cavernous nerve of rats associated with streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia. Damage to these axons is thought to play a key role in diabetic autonomic neuropathy and erectile dysfunction, but their pathophysiology has been poorly studied. Velocities in slow conducting fibers were measured by applying multiple unit procedures; histopathology was evaluated with both light and electron microscopy. To our knowledge, these are the initial studies of slow nerve conduction velocities in the distal segments of the cavernous nerve. We report that hyperglycemia is associated with a substantial reduction in the amplitude of the slow conducting response, as well as a slowing of velocities within this very slow range (<2.5 m/sec). Even with prolonged hyperglycemia (> 4 months), histopathological abnormalities were mild and limited to the distal segments of the cavernous nerve. Structural findings included dystrophic changes in nerve terminals, abnormal accumulations of glycogen granules in unmyelinated and preterminal axons, and necrosis of scattered smooth muscle fibers. The onset of slowing of velocity in the distal cavernous nerve occurred subsequent to slowing in somatic nerves in the same rats. The functional changes in the cavernous nerve anticipated and exceeded the axonal degeneration detected by morphology. The physiologic techniques outlined in these studies are feasible in most electrophysiologic laboratories and could substantially enhance our sensitivity to the onset and progression of small fiber diabetic neuropathy. PMID:18687329

  17. Severe acute pancreatitis: nutritional management in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Neeraj; O'Keefe, Stephen J D

    2004-02-01

    Patients with acute pancreatitis have elevated nutritional needs due to increased energy expenditure and catabolism. It is a clinical challenge to provide adequate nutrition to these patients while maintaining gut function, preventing pancreatic stimulation, and minimizing the risk of septic and metabolic complications associated with nutritional support. We present the case of a patient who had severe acute pancreatitis and was initially given total parenteral nutrition. After a period of initial improvement, he developed hyperglycemia, bacteremia, and sepsis. Parenteral nutrition was discontinued and infection was treated with antibiotics. Subsequent nutritional support consisted of enteral feeding with an elemental diet infused via a nasojejunal feeding tube. His condition improved gradually and he made a full recovery. This case illustrates the difficulties encountered while managing a case of severe acute pancreatitis and provides an evidence based approach to the nutritional management of severe acute pancreatitis in the intensive care unit setting. PMID:16215093

  18. Acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: shifting the paradigm.

    PubMed

    Ryerson, Christopher J; Cottin, Vincent; Brown, Kevin K; Collard, Harold R

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this review is to summarise the clinical features, management, and prognosis of acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (AE-IPF). AE-IPF has previously been defined based on clinical and radiological features that include the subacute onset of dyspnoea, bilateral ground glass changes on chest high-resolution computed tomography, and the absence of an identifiable aetiology. The annual incidence of AE-IPF is typically reported at 5-15%, but is less common in mild disease. Features of diffuse alveolar damage are present when a biopsy is performed. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients with acute respiratory worsening are often initially treated with high dose corticosteroids and antimicrobials; however, there are no clear data to support these therapies, and the short-term mortality of AE-IPF is ~50%. Recent studies have shown that the features and prognosis of AE-IPF are similar to other causes of acute respiratory worsening, including infection, aspiration, air pollution and mechanical injury to the alveolar epithelium. Based on this emerging evidence, we propose a novel approach to the classification of acute respiratory worsening events in patients with IPF that focuses on clinical and radiological findings consistent with an underlying pathobiology of diffuse alveolar damage. PMID:26232481

  19. Genetic absence of nNOS worsens fetal alcohol effects in mice. II: Microencephaly and neuronal losses

    PubMed Central

    Karacay, Bahri; Mahoney, Jo; Plume, Jeffrey; Bonthius, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Prenatal alcohol exposure can kill developing neurons, leading to microencephaly and mental retardation. However, not all fetuses are equally vulnerable to alcohol’s neurotoxic effects. While some fetuses are severely affected and are ultimately diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), others have no evidence of neuropathology and are behaviorally normal. These widely different outcomes among alcohol-exposed fetuses are likely due, in part, to genetic differences. Some fetuses possess genotypes that make them much more vulnerable than others to alcohol’s teratogenic effects. However, to date, only one gene has been identified whose mutation can worsen alcohol-induced behavioral deficits in an animal model of FAS. That gene is neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). The purpose of this study was to determine whether mutation of nNOS can likewise worsen alcohol-induced microencephaly and lead to permanent neuronal deficits. Methods Wild type and nNOS−/− mice received alcohol (0.0, 2.2, or 4.4 mg/g) daily over postnatal days (PD) 4–9. Beginning on PD 85, the mice underwent a series of behavioral tests, the results of which are reported in the companion paper. The brains were then weighed, and stereological cell counts were performed on the cerebral cortex and hippocampal formation, which are the brain regions that mediate the aforementioned behavioral tasks. Results Alcohol caused dose-dependent microencephaly, but only in the nNOS−/− mice and not in wild type mice. Alcohol-induced neuronal losses were more severe in the nNOS−/− mice than in the wild type mice in all of the brain regions examined, including the cerebral cortex, hippocampal CA3 subregion, hippocampal CA1 subregion, and dentate gyrus. Conclusions Targeted mutation of the nNOS gene increases the vulnerability of the developing brain to alcohol-induced growth restriction and neuronal losses. This increased neuropathology is associated with worsened behavioral dysfunction

  20. Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Heart Failure: Revisiting Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Julio; Miñana, Gema; Santas, Enrique; Bertomeu-González, Vicente

    2015-05-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome has been defined as the simultaneous dysfunction of both the heart and the kidney. Worsening renal function that occurs in patients with acute heart failure has been classified as cardiorenal syndrome type 1. In this setting, worsening renal function is a common finding and is due to complex, multifactorial, and not fully understood processes involving hemodynamic (renal arterial hypoperfusion and renal venous congestion) and nonhemodynamic factors. Traditionally, worsening renal function has been associated with worse outcomes, but recent findings have revealed mixed and heterogeneous results, perhaps suggesting that the same phenotype represents a diversity of pathophysiological and clinical situations. Interpreting the magnitude and chronology of renal changes together with baseline renal function, fluid overload status, and clinical response to therapy might help clinicians to unravel the clinical meaning of renal function changes that occur during an episode of heart failure decompensation. In this article, we critically review the contemporary evidence on the pathophysiology and clinical aspects of worsening renal function in acute heart failure. PMID:25758162

  1. Developmental progression to early adult binge drinking and marijuana use from worsening versus stable trajectories of adolescent ADHD and delinquency

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Andrea L.; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Swanson, James M.; Hinshaw, Stephen P.; Belendiuk, Katherine A.; Harty, Seth C.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Abikoff, Howard B.; Hechtman, Lily; Stehli, Annamarie; Greenhill, Laurence L.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Wigal, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Aims To examine the association between developmental trajectories of inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity, and delinquency through childhood and adolescence (ages 8-16) and subsequent binge drinking and marijuana use in early adulthood (age 21). Design Prospective naturalistic follow-up of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) previously enrolled in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Treatment-phase assessments occurred at 3, 9, and 14 months after randomization; follow-up assessments occurred at 24 months, 36 months, and 6, 8, and 12 years after randomization. Setting Secondary analysis of data from the Multimodal Treatment Study of ADHD (MTA), a multi-site RCT comparing the effects of careful medication management, intensive behavior therapy, their combination, and referral to usual community care. Participants 579 children with DSM-IV ADHD combined type, aged 7.0 and 9.9 years old at baseline (M=8.5, SD=.80). Measurements Ratings of inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity, and delinquency were collected from multiple informants at baseline and through the 8-year follow-up. Self-reports of binge drinking and marijuana use were collected at the 12-year follow-up (M age 21). Findings Trajectories of worsening inattention symptoms and delinquency (and less apparent improvement in hyperactivity-impulsivity) were associated with higher rates of early adult binge drinking and marijuana use, compared with trajectories of stable or improving symptoms and delinquency (of 24 comparisons, 22 p-values <.05), even when symptom levels in stable trajectories were high. Conclusions Worsening inattention symptoms and delinquency during adolescence are associated with increased-levels of early adult substance use; this pattern may reflect a developmental course of vulnerability to elevated substance use in early adulthood. PMID:25664657

  2. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  3. Acute Warfarin Toxicity as Initial Manifestation of Metastatic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Nihar; Niazi, Masooma; Lvovsky, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Near complete infiltration of the liver secondary to metastasis from the head and neck cancer is a rare occurrence. The prognosis of liver failure associated with malignant infiltration is extremely poor; the survival time of patients is extremely low. We present a case of acute warfarin toxicity as initial manifestation of metastatic liver disease. Our patient is a 64-year-old woman presenting with epigastric pain and discomfort, found to have unrecordable International Normalized Ratio. She rapidly deteriorated with acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation, profound shock requiring high dose vasopressor infusion, severe coagulopathy, worsening liver enzymes with worsening of lactic acidosis and severe metabolic abnormalities, and refractory to aggressive supportive care and died in less than 48 hours. Autopsy revealed that >90% of the liver was replaced by tumor masses. PMID:27042361

  4. Hyperglycemia has a greater impact on left ventricle function in South Asians than in Europeans.

    PubMed

    Park, Chloe M; Tillin, Therese; March, Katherine; Ghosh, Arjun K; Jones, Siana; Wright, Andrew; Heasman, John; Francis, Darrel; Sattar, Naveed; Mayet, Jamil; Chaturvedi, Nish; Hughes, Alun D

    2014-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetes is associated with left ventricular (LV) diastolic and systolic dysfunction. South Asians may be at particular risk of developing LV dysfunction owing to a high prevalence of diabetes. We investigated the role of diabetes and hyperglycemia in LV dysfunction in a community-based cohort of older South Asians and white Europeans. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Conventional and Doppler echocardiography was performed in 999 participants (542 Europeans and 457 South Asians aged 58-86 years) in a population-based study. Anthropometry, fasting bloods, coronary artery calcification scoring, blood pressure, and renal function were measured. RESULTS Diabetes and hyperglycemia across the spectrum of HbA1c had a greater adverse effect on LV function in South Asians than Europeans (N-terminal-probrain natriuretic peptide β ± SE 0.09 ± 0.04, P = 0.01, vs. -0.04 ± 0.05, P = 0.4, P for HbA1c/ethnicity interaction 0.02), diastolic function (E/e' 0.69 ± 0.12, P < 0.0001, vs. 0.09 ± 0.2, P = 0.6, P for interaction 0.005), and systolic function (s' -0.11 ± 0.06, P = 0.04, vs. 0.14 ± 0.09, P = 0.1, P for interaction 0.2). Multivariable adjustment for hypertension, microvascular disease, LV mass, coronary disease, and dyslipidemia only partially accounted for the ethnic differences. Adverse LV function in diabetic South Asians could not be accounted for by poorer glycemic control or longer diabetes duration. CONCLUSIONS Diabetes and hyperglycemia have a greater adverse effect on LV function in South Asians than Europeans, incompletely explained by adverse risk factors. South Asians may require earlier and more aggressive treatment of their cardiometabolic risk factors to reduce risks of LV dysfunction. PMID:24241789

  5. Specific MAPK inhibitors prevent hyperglycemia-induced renal diseases in type 1 diabetic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhe; Hong, Zongyuan; Wu, Denglong; Nie, Hezhongrong

    2016-08-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) play critical roles in the process of renal diseases, but their interaction has not been comprehensively discussed. In the present studies, we investigated the renoprotective effects of MPAK inhibitors on renal diseases in type 1 diabetic mouse model, and clarify the crosstalk among MAPK signaling. Type 1 diabetic mouse model was established in male C57BL/6 J mice, and treated with or without 10 mg/kg MAPK blockers, including ERK inhibitor PD98059, p38 inhibitor SB203850, and JNK inhibitor SP600125 for four weeks. Hyperglycemia induced renal injuries, but treating them with MAPK inhibitors significantly decreased glomerular volume and glycogen in renal tissues. Although slightly changed body weight and fasting blood glucose levels, MAPK inhibitors attenuated blood urea nitrogen, urea protein, and microalbuminuria. Administration also reduced the diabetes-induced RAS activation, including angiotensin II converting enzyme (c) and Ang II, which contributed to its renal protective effects in the diabetic mice. In addition, the anti-RAS of MAPK inhibitor treatment markedly reduced gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and inducible nitric oxide synthase, fibrotic accumulation, and transforming growth factor-β1 levels in renal tissues. Furthermore, chemical inhibitors and genetic siRNA results identified the crosstalk among the three MAPK signaling, and proved JNK signaling played a critical role in MAPK-mediated ACE pathway in hyperglycemia state. Collectively, these results support the therapeutic effects of MAPK-specific inhibitors, especially JNK inactivation, on hyperglycemia-induced renal damages. PMID:27389030

  6. Hsp70 plays an important role in high-fat diet induced gestational hyperglycemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Xing, Baoheng; Wang, Lili; Li, Qin; Cao, Yalei; Dong, Xiujuan; Liang, Jun; Wu, Xiaohua

    2015-12-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has emerged as an epidemic disease during the last decade, affecting about 2 to 5% pregnant women. Even among women who have gestational hyperglycemia may also be positively related to adverse outcomes as GDM. Since heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 has been reported to be associated with diabetes and insulin resistance and its expression was reported to be negatively regulated by the membrane-permeable Hsp70 inhibitor MAL3-101 while positively regulated by the Hsp70 activator BGP-15, we investigated whether Hsp70 played a role in a gestational hyperglycemia mouse model. Mice were divided into non-pregnant and pregnant groups, and each comprised three subgroups: control, high-fat diet (HFD) + MAL3-101, and HFD + BGP-15. We examined the serum levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, glucose, and insulin, as well as conducted thermal detection of brown adipose tissue (BAT). The role of Hsp70 in BAT apoptosis was also investigated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and caspase-3 staining. Higher serum level of Hsp70 was associated with increased bodyweight gain after pregnancy in mice fed HFD. Circulating Hsp70 was elevated in control pregnant mice compared to control non-pregnant mice. BGP-induced serum Hsp70 expression reduced triglycerides, total cholesterol, glucose, and insulin levels in the serum. Additionally, thermal detection of BAT, TUNEL, and caspase-3 staining revealed relationship correlation between Hsp70 and BAT functions. Hsp70 level is associated with hyperglycemia during pregnancy. Our results support the role of Hsp70 in facilitating BAT activities and protecting BAT cells from apoptosis via caspase-3 pathway. PMID:26318018

  7. Robust Brain Hyperglycemia during General Anesthesia: Relationships with Metabolic Brain Inhibition and Vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Bola, R. Aaron; Kiyatkin, Eugene A.

    2016-01-01

    Glucose is the main energetic substrate for the metabolic activity of brain cells and its proper delivery into the extracellular space is essential for maintaining normal neural functions. Under physiological conditions, glucose continuously enters the extracellular space from arterial blood via gradient-dependent facilitated diffusion governed by the GLUT-1 transporters. Due to this gradient-dependent mechanism, glucose levels rise in the brain after consumption of glucose-containing foods and drinks. Glucose entry is also accelerated due to local neuronal activation and neuro-vascular coupling, resulting in transient hyperglycemia to prevent any metabolic deficit. Here, we explored another mechanism that is activated during general anesthesia and results in significant brain hyperglycemia. By using enzyme-based glucose biosensors we demonstrate that glucose levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) strongly increase after iv injection of Equthesin, a mixture of chloral hydrate and sodium pentobarbital, which is often used for general anesthesia in rats. By combining electrochemical recordings with brain, muscle, and skin temperature monitoring, we show that the gradual increase in brain glucose occurring during the development of general anesthesia tightly correlate with decreases in brain-muscle temperature differentials, suggesting that this rise in glucose is related to metabolic inhibition. While the decreased consumption of glucose by brain cells could contribute to the development of hyperglycemia, an exceptionally strong positive correlation (r = 0.99) between glucose rise and increases in skin-muscle temperature differentials was also found, suggesting the strong vasodilation of cerebral vessels as the primary mechanism for accelerated entry of glucose into brain tissue. Our present data could explain drastic differences in basal glucose levels found in awake and anesthetized animal preparations. They also suggest that glucose entry into brain tissue could be

  8. Robust Brain Hyperglycemia during General Anesthesia: Relationships with Metabolic Brain Inhibition and Vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Bola, R Aaron; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2016-01-01

    Glucose is the main energetic substrate for the metabolic activity of brain cells and its proper delivery into the extracellular space is essential for maintaining normal neural functions. Under physiological conditions, glucose continuously enters the extracellular space from arterial blood via gradient-dependent facilitated diffusion governed by the GLUT-1 transporters. Due to this gradient-dependent mechanism, glucose levels rise in the brain after consumption of glucose-containing foods and drinks. Glucose entry is also accelerated due to local neuronal activation and neuro-vascular coupling, resulting in transient hyperglycemia to prevent any metabolic deficit. Here, we explored another mechanism that is activated during general anesthesia and results in significant brain hyperglycemia. By using enzyme-based glucose biosensors we demonstrate that glucose levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) strongly increase after iv injection of Equthesin, a mixture of chloral hydrate and sodium pentobarbital, which is often used for general anesthesia in rats. By combining electrochemical recordings with brain, muscle, and skin temperature monitoring, we show that the gradual increase in brain glucose occurring during the development of general anesthesia tightly correlate with decreases in brain-muscle temperature differentials, suggesting that this rise in glucose is related to metabolic inhibition. While the decreased consumption of glucose by brain cells could contribute to the development of hyperglycemia, an exceptionally strong positive correlation (r = 0.99) between glucose rise and increases in skin-muscle temperature differentials was also found, suggesting the strong vasodilation of cerebral vessels as the primary mechanism for accelerated entry of glucose into brain tissue. Our present data could explain drastic differences in basal glucose levels found in awake and anesthetized animal preparations. They also suggest that glucose entry into brain tissue could be

  9. Incidental mild hyperglycemia in children: two MODY 2 families identified in Brazilian subjects.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Lílian A; Jorge, Alexander A L; Malaquias, Alexsandra C; Trarbach, Ericka B; Queiroz, Márcia S; Nery, Márcia; Teles, Milena G

    2012-11-01

    Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is characterized by an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance, early onset of hyperglycemia, and defects of insulin secretion. MODY subtypes described present genetic, metabolic, and clinical differences. MODY 2 is characterized by mild asymptomatic fasting hyperglycemia, and rarely requires pharmacological treatment. Hence, precise diagnosis of MODY is important for determining management and prognosis. We report two heterozygous GCK mutations identified during the investigation of short stature. Case 1: a prepubertal 14-year-old boy was evaluated for constitutional delay of growth and puberty. During follow-up, he showed abnormal fasting glucose (113 mg/dL), increased level of HbA1c (6.6%), and negative β-cell antibodies. His father and two siblings also had slightly elevated blood glucose levels. The mother had normal glycemia. A GCK heterozygous missense mutation, p.Arg191Trp, was identified in the proband. Eighteen family members were screened for this mutation, and 11 had the mutation in heterozygous state. Case 2: a 4-year-old boy investigated for short stature revealed no other laboratorial alterations than elevated glycemia (118 mg/dL); β-cell antibodies were negative. His father, a paternal aunt, and the paternal grandmother also had slightly elevated glycemia, whereas his mother had normal glycemia. A GCK heterozygous missense mutation, p.Glu221Lys, was identified in the index patient and in four family members. All affected patients had mild elevated glycemia. Individuals with normal glycemia did not harbor mutations. GCK mutation screening should be considered in patients with chronic mild early-onset hyperglycemia, family history of impaired glycemia, and negative β-cell antibodies. PMID:23295292

  10. MicroRNA-29a Promotion of Nephrin Acetylation Ameliorates Hyperglycemia-Induced Podocyte Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Liang; Lee, Pei-Hsien; Hsu, Yung-Chien; Lei, Chen-Chou; Ko, Jih-Yang; Chuang, Pei-Chin; Huang, Yu-Ting; Wang, Shao-Yu; Wu, Shin-Long; Chen, Yu-Shan; Chiang, Wen-Chih; Reiser, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Podocyte dysfunction is a detrimental feature in diabetic nephropathy, with loss of nephrin integrity contributing to diabetic podocytopathy. MicroRNAs (miRs) reportedly modulate the hyperglycemia-induced perturbation of renal tissue homeostasis. This study investigated whether regulation of histone deacetylase (HDAC) actions and nephrin acetylation by miR-29 contributes to podocyte homeostasis and renal function in diabetic kidneys. Hyperglycemia accelerated podocyte injury and reduced nephrin, acetylated nephrin, and miR-29a levels in primary renal glomeruli from streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Diabetic miR-29a transgenic mice had better nephrin levels, podocyte viability, and renal function and less glomerular fibrosis and inflammation reaction compared with diabetic wild-type mice. Overexpression of miR-29a attenuated the promotion of HDAC4 signaling, nephrin ubiquitination, and urinary nephrin excretion associated with diabetes and restored nephrin acetylation. Knockdown of miR-29a by antisense oligonucleotides promoted HDAC4 action, nephrin loss, podocyte apoptosis, and proteinuria in nondiabetic mice. In vitro, interruption of HDAC4 signaling alleviated the high glucose–induced apoptosis and inhibition of nephrin acetylation in podocyte cultures. Furthermore, HDAC4 interference increased the acetylation status of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9Ac), the enrichment of H3K9Ac in miR-29a proximal promoter, and miR-29a transcription in high glucose–stressed podocytes. In conclusion, hyperglycemia impairs miR-29a signaling to intensify HDAC4 actions that contribute to podocyte protein deacetylation and degradation as well as renal dysfunction. HDAC4, via epigenetic H3K9 hypoacetylation, reduces miR-29a transcription. The renoprotective effects of miR-29a in diabetes-induced loss of podocyte integrity and renal homeostasis highlights the importance of post-translational acetylation reactions in podocyte microenvironments. Increasing miR-29a action may

  11. Low Vitamin D Levels Do Not Predict Hyperglycemia in Elderly Endurance Athletes (but in Controls)

    PubMed Central

    Nistler, Sonja; Batmyagmar, Delgerdalai; Ponocny-Seliger, Elisabeth; Perkmann, Thomas; Scherzer, Thomas M.; Kundi, Michael; Endler, Georg; Ratzinger, Franz; Pilger, Alexander; Wagner, Oswald F.; Winker, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Recent studies revealed a link between hypovitaminosis D3 and the risk for hyperglycemia. Further mechanistic and interventional investigations suggested a common reason for both conditions rather than a causal relationship. Exposure to sunlight is the most relevant source of vitamin D3 (25(OH)D), whereas adipose tissue is able to store relevant amounts of the lipophilic vitamin. Since running/bicycling leads to increased out-door time and alters physiological response mechanisms, it can be hypothesized that the correlation between hypovitaminosis D3 and hyperglycemia might be disturbed in outdoor athletes. Methods 47 elderly marathoners/bicyclists and 47 age/sex matched controls were studied in a longitudinal setting at baseline and after three years. HbA1c as a surrogate for (pre-)diabetic states was quantified via HPLC, 25(OH)D levels were measured by means of chemiluminescent assays. Physical performance was assessed by ergometry. Results When adjusted for seasonal variations, 25(OH)D was significantly higher in athletes than in controls. 25(OH)D levels inversely correlated with triglycerides in both groups, whereas only in controls an association between high BMI or low physical performance with hypovitaminosis D3 had been found. Likewise, the presence of hypovitaminosis D3 at baseline successfully predicted hyperglycemia at the follow up examinations within the control group (AUC = 0.85, 95% CI [0.74, 0.96], p < .001, statistically independent from BMI), but not in athletes. Conclusion Our data suggest that mechanisms of HbA1c elevation might differ between athletes and controls. Thus, intense physical activity must be taken into account as a potential pre-analytic confounder when it is aimed to predict metabolic risk by vitamin D3 levels. PMID:27304888

  12. Hemiparesis, encephalopathy, and extrapontine osmotic myelinolysis in the setting of hyperosmolar hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Waldo R; Dababneh, Haitham; Nadeau, Stephen E

    2013-06-01

    Osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS) is a recognized complication of rapid correction of hyponatremia. However, other medical conditions have been associated recently with the development of ODS in the absence of changes in serum sodium. We present a 23-year-old man who developed left hemiparesis and encephalopathy after treatment of hyperglycemia. MRI demonstrated changes in the splenium of the corpus callosum and the posterior limb of the right internal capsule. This report, together with others, suggests that the full spectrum of lesions of ODS, pontine and extrapontine, can occur in the setting of any rapid change in osmolar state. PMID:23477877

  13. HYPERGLYCEMIA IS ASSOCIATED WITH RELATIVELY LOWER LEAN BODY MASS IN OLDER ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    KALYANI, RITA R.; TRA, Y.; EGAN, J.M.; FERRUCCI, L.; BRANCATI, F.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives Older adults with known diabetes are vulnerable to accelerated loss of lean body mass. However, the relationship of hyperglycemia per se with lean body mass is not fully understood. We sought to examine the independent relationship of hyperglycemia with relative lean body mass in older persons without a reported history of diabetes. Design Cross-sectional nationally representative survey. Setting United States. Participants We studied U.S. adults >50 years without known diabetes (n=5434) in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999–2004). Measurements In linear regression models, we studied the relationship of measured HbA1c (<5.0%, 5.0–5.4%, 5.5–5.9%, 6.0–6.4%, ≥6.5%) with percent lean body mass, measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, after accounting for potential confounders. Results Among older U.S. men and women, progressively higher HbA1c was associated with relatively lower total, appendicular, and trunk percent lean mass, independent of demographics and height (all p<0.05). Accounting for physical activity, C-reactive protein, and diabetes-related comorbidities (heart disease, peripheral arterial disease, arthritis, neuropathy, hip fracture, amputation, cancer, pulmonary disease), undiagnosed diabetes (i.e. HbA1c ≥6.5%) versus reference (<5.0%) in both men and women was associated with lower total (−3.5±0.8% and −2.9±0.8%), appendicular (−1.8±0.5% and −1.2±0.4%), and trunk percent lean mass (−1.2±0.4% and −1.3±0.5%), respectively (all p<0.05). Persons at increased risk for diabetes (i.e. HbA1c 6.0–6.4%) also had significant decrements at these sites versus reference. Conclusions Hyperglycemia is associated with relatively lower lean mass in a nationally representative population of older adults without history of diabetes. Future longitudinal studies are needed to investigate the relationship of hyperglycemia with the accelerated decline of skeletal muscle mass in older persons

  14. Two cases of hemichorea-hemiballism with nonketotic hyperglycemia: a new point of view.

    PubMed

    Battisti, Carla; Forte, Francesca; Rubenni, Elisa; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Bartali, Anna; Gennari, Paola; Federico, Antonio; Cerase, Alfonso

    2009-06-01

    Hemichorea-hemiballism (HCHB) is an usually continuous, nonpatterned, involuntary movement disorder caused by basal ganglia dysfunction, commonly due to a vascular lesion, described in nonketotic hyperglycemic patients. Particular computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings have been described. The pathogenic mechanism of chorea arising during hyperglycemia and the nature of neuroimaging findings are unclear. In this paper we describe two elderly women with onset of HCHB during a hyperglycemic episode. The symptoms persisted in one of them after recovery of normal glycemia. The pathophysiological mechanism of the disease is discussed in the light of clinical and neuroradiological follow-up. PMID:19305947

  15. India's Worsening Uranium Shortage

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Michael M.

    2007-01-15

    As a result of NSG restrictions, India cannot import the natural uranium required to fuel its Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs); consequently, it is forced to rely on the expediency of domestic uranium production. However, domestic production from mines and byproduct sources has not kept pace with demand from commercial reactors. This shortage has been officially confirmed by the Indian Planning Commission’s Mid-Term Appraisal of the country’s current Five Year Plan. The report stresses that as a result of the uranium shortage, Indian PHWR load factors have been continually decreasing. The Uranium Corporation of India Ltd (UCIL) operates a number of underground mines in the Singhbhum Shear Zone of Jharkhand, and it is all processed at a single mill in Jaduguda. UCIL is attempting to aggrandize operations by establishing new mines and mills in other states, but the requisite permit-gathering and development time will defer production until at least 2009. A significant portion of India’s uranium comes from byproduct sources, but a number of these are derived from accumulated stores that are nearing exhaustion. A current maximum estimate of indigenous uranium production is 430t/yr (230t from mines and 200t from byproduct sources); whereas, the current uranium requirement for Indian PHWRs is 455t/yr (depending on plant capacity factor). This deficit is exacerbated by the additional requirements of the Indian weapons program. Present power generation capacity of Indian nuclear plants is 4350 MWe. The power generation target set by the Indian Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) is 20,000 MWe by the year 2020. It is expected that around half of this total will be provided by PHWRs using indigenously supplied uranium with the bulk of the remainder provided by breeder reactors or pressurized water reactors using imported low-enriched uranium.

  16. Hyperglycemia - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... low amounts. This causes poor control of the blood sugar. There can be specific causes of ineffective or low insulin. Causes may include infection, liver problems, hormone problems, and some medications. Rarely, babies ...

  17. Chronic methamphetamine exposure prior to middle cerebral artery occlusion increases infarct volume and worsens cognitive injury in Male mice.

    PubMed

    Zuloaga, Damian G; Wang, Jianming; Weber, Sydney; Mark, Gregory P; Murphy, Stephanie J; Raber, Jacob

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that methamphetamine (MA) abuse can impact cardiovascular disease. In humans, MA abuse is associated with an increased risk of stroke as well as an earlier age at which the stroke occurs. However, little is known about how chronic daily MA exposure can impact ischemic outcome in either humans or animal models. In the present study, mice were injected with MA (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline once daily for 10 consecutive days. Twenty-four hours after the final injection, mice were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) for one hour followed by reperfusion. Mice were tested for novel object memory at 96 h post-reperfusion, just prior to removal of brains for quantification of infarct volume using 2,3,5-Triphenyltetrazolium Chloride (TTC) staining. Mice treated with MA prior to tMCAO showed decreased object memory recognition and increased infarct volume compared to saline-treated mice. These findings indicate that chronic MA exposure can worsen both cognitive and morphological outcomes following cerebral ischemia. PMID:27021292

  18. ACE2 Deficiency Worsens Epicardial Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Cardiac Dysfunction in Response to Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vaibhav B; Mori, Jun; McLean, Brent A; Basu, Ratnadeep; Das, Subhash K; Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Parajuli, Nirmal; Penninger, Josef M; Grant, Maria B; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is increasing in prevalence and is strongly associated with metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has emerged as a key pathogenic mechanism for these disorders; angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) negatively regulates RAS by metabolizing Ang II into Ang 1-7. We studied the role of ACE2 in obesity-mediated cardiac dysfunction. ACE2 null (ACE2KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or a control diet and studied at 6 months of age. Loss of ACE2 resulted in decreased weight gain but increased glucose intolerance, epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) inflammation, and polarization of macrophages into a proinflammatory phenotype in response to HFD. Similarly, human EAT in patients with obesity and heart failure displayed a proinflammatory macrophage phenotype. Exacerbated EAT inflammation in ACE2KO-HFD mice was associated with decreased myocardial adiponectin, decreased phosphorylation of AMPK, increased cardiac steatosis and lipotoxicity, and myocardial insulin resistance, which worsened heart function. Ang 1-7 (24 µg/kg/h) administered to ACE2KO-HFD mice resulted in ameliorated EAT inflammation and reduced cardiac steatosis and lipotoxicity, resulting in normalization of heart failure. In conclusion, ACE2 plays a novel role in heart disease associated with obesity wherein ACE2 negatively regulates obesity-induced EAT inflammation and cardiac insulin resistance. PMID:26224885

  19. VEGF-B inhibits hyperglycemia- and Macugen-induced retinal apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Delong; Zhao, Chen; Ju, Rong; Kumar, Anil; Tian, Geng; Huang, Lijuan; Zheng, Lei; Li, Xianglin; Liu, Lixian; Wang, Shasha; Ren, Xiangrong; Ye, Zhimin; Chen, Wei; Xing, Liying; Chen, Qishan; Gao, Zhiqin; Mi, Jia; Tang, Zhongshu; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Shuping; Lee, Chunsik; Li, Xuri

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor B (VEGF-B) was discovered a long time ago. However, its role in hyperglycemia- and VEGF-A inhibition-induced retinal apoptosis remains unknown thus far. Yet, drugs that can block VEGF-B are being used to treat patients with diabetic retinopathy and other ocular neovascular diseases. It is therefore urgent to have a better understanding of the function of VEGF-B in these pathologies. Here, we report that both streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in rats and Macugen intravitreal injection in mice leads to retinal apoptosis in retinal ganglion cell and outer nuclear layers respectively. Importantly, VEGF-B treatment by intravitreal injection markedly reduced retinal apoptosis in both models. We further reveal that VEGF-B and its receptors, vascular endothelial growth factor 1 (VEGFR1) and neuropilin 1 (NP1), are abundantly expressed in rat retinae and choroids and are upregulated by high glucose with concomitant activation of Akt and Erk. These data highlight an important function of VEGF-B in protecting retinal cells from apoptosis induced by hyperglycemia and VEGF-A inhibition. VEGF-B may therefore have a therapeutic potential in treating various retinal degenerative diseases, and modulation of VEGF-B activity in the eye needs careful consideration. PMID:27189805

  20. Leptin recruits Creb-regulated transcriptional coactivator 1 to improve hyperglycemia in insulin-deficient diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Geun Hyang; Szabo, Andras; King, Emily M.; Ayala, Jennifer; Ayala, Julio E.; Altarejos, Judith Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Leptin alleviates hyperglycemia in rodent models of Type 1 diabetes by activating leptin receptors within the central nervous system. Here we delineate whether non-canonical leptin signaling through the Creb-regulated transcriptional coactivator 1 (Crtc1) contributes to leptin-dependent improvements in diabetic glucose metabolism. Methods We employed mice with a targeted genetic disruption of Crtc1, tracer dilution techniques and neuroanatomical studies to interrogate whether Crtc1 enables leptin to improve glucose metabolism in streptozotocin-induced (STZ) diabetes. Results Here we show that leptin improves diabetic glucose metabolism through Crtc1-dependent and independent mechanisms. We find that leptin reduces diabetic hyperglycemia, hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression and selectively increases glucose disposal to brown adipose tissue and heart, in STZ-diabetic Crtc1WT mice but not Crtc1+/− mice. By contrast, leptin decreases circulating glucagon levels in both STZ-diabetic Crtc1WT and Crtc1+/− mice. We also demonstrate that leptin promotes Crtc1 nuclear translocation in pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc) and non-Pomc neurons within the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). Accordingly, leptin's ability to induce Pomc gene expression in the ARC is blunted in STZ-diabetic Crtc1+/− mice. Conclusions Our study reveals that Crtc1 functions as a conduit for leptin's glucoregulatory actions in insulin-dependent diabetes. This study also highlights a new role for Crtc1 in modulating peripheral glucose metabolism. PMID:25737949

  1. Polyopes lancifolia Extract, a Potent α-Glucosidase Inhibitor, Alleviates Postprandial Hyperglycemia in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Min, Seong Won; Han, Ji Sook

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the inhibitory effects of Polyopes lancifolia extract (PLE) on α-glucosidase activity, α-amylase activitiy, and postprandial hyperglycemia in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. The results of this study revealed a marked inhibitory effect of PLE on α-glucosidase and α-amylase activities. The IC50s of PLE against α-glucosidase and α-amylase were 0.20 mg/mL and 0.35 mg/mL, respectively. PLE was a more effective inhibitor of α-glucosidase and α-amylase activities than acarbose, the positive control. The postprandial blood glucose levels of STZ-induced diabetic mice were significantly lower in the PLE treated group than in the control group. Moreover, PLE administration was associated with a decreased area under the curve for the glucose response in diabetic mice. These results indicate that PLE may be a potent inhibitor of α-glucosidase and α-amylase activities and may suppress postprandial hyperglycemia. PMID:24772403

  2. Hypo and hyperglycemia among tramadol overdose patients in Loghman Hakim Hospital, Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Nasouhi, Soheil; Talaie, Haleh; Pajoumand, Abdolkarim; Aghapour, Sevil; Rahimi, Mitra; Khorasani, Ahmad Ghochani; Mashayekhian, Mohammad; Aghabiklooei, Abbas; Razi, Parmis; Mahdavinejad, Arezou

    2015-11-01

    Tramadol is a synthetic and centrally active analgesic. Hypoglycemia as another possible major side effect among abusers has not been known well. Our objective is evaluation of the Blood Glucose Level (BGL) among tramadol-overdosed patients. This prospective cross-sectional study was performed from Feb to June 2013; BGL was measured at the time of admission, 8 and 12 hours later. All patients with hypoglycemia received infusion of 0.5-1 gr/kg of hypertonic dextrose and their BGL was checked every hour until normal BGL. Patients' demographic, clinical and paraclinical data were collected. Totally, 128 patients with a mean (SD) age of 24.5 (6.9) years were recruited; 127 (99.2%) were male. Seizure occurred in 59.4% cases. Mean ± SD admission BGL was 94.88 ± 21.5mg/dL. Fourteen patients experienced hypoglycemia within 12 hours period. Hyperglycemia was experienced in 8 patients (6.25%) on admission day. There was no significant relation between the dose of tramadol and BGL. In conclusion, hypoglycemia must be considered as an important side effect of tramadol-overdose. It is suggested that serial BGL monitoring in cases of Tramadol-overdose should be done for early recognition of hypoglycemia and its timely management. Also hyperglycemia may be revealed. PMID:26639492

  3. Failure of Hyperglycemia and Hyperinsulinemia to Compensate for Impaired Metabolic Response to an Oral Glucose Load

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M; Janghorbani, M; Schuette, S; Considine, RV; Chisholm, RL; Mather, KJ

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether the augmented insulin and glucose response to a glucose challenge is sufficient to compensate for defects in glucose utilization in obesity and type 2 diabetes, using a breath test measurement of integrated glucose metabolism. Methods Non-obese, obese normoglycemic and obese Type 2 diabetic subjects were studied on 2 consecutive days. A 75g oral glucose load spiked with 13C-glucose was administered, measuring exhaled breath 13CO2 as an integrated measure of glucose metabolism and oxidation. A hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp was performed, measuring whole body glucose disposal rate. Body composition was measured by DEXA. Multivariable analyses were performed to evaluate the determinants of the breath 13CO2. Results Breath 13CO2 was reduced in obese and type 2 diabetic subjects despite hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. The primary determinants of breath response were lean mass, fat mass, fasting FFA concentrations, and OGTT glucose excursion. Multiple approaches to analysis showed that hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia were not sufficient to compensate for the defect in glucose metabolism in obesity and diabetes. Conclusions Augmented insulin and glucose responses during an OGTT are not sufficient to overcome the underlying defects in glucose metabolism in obesity and diabetes. PMID:25511878

  4. KIDNEY HYPOXIA, DUE TO INCREASED OXYGEN CONSUMPTION, INDUCES NEPHROPATHY INDEPENDENTLY OF HYPERGLYCEMIA AND OXIDATIVE STRESS

    PubMed Central

    Friederich-Persson, Malou; Thörn, Erik; Hansell, Peter; Nangaku, Masaomi; Levin, Max; Palm, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is strongly associated with both increased oxidative stress and kidney tissue hypoxia. The increased oxidative stress causes increased kidney oxygen consumption resulting in kidney tissue hypoxia. It has so far been difficult to determine the role of kidney hypoxia per se for the development of nephropathy. We tested the hypothesis that kidney hypoxia, without confounding factors such as hyperglycemia or elevated oxidative stress, results in nephropathy. To induce kidney hypoxia, dinitrophenol (30 mg/day/kg by gavage), a mitochondrial uncoupler that increases oxygen consumption and causes kidney hypoxia, was administered for 30 consecutive days to rats. Thereafter, glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow, kidney oxygen consumption, kidney oxygen tension, kidney concentrations of glucose and glycogen, markers of oxidative stress, urinary protein excretion and histology were determined and compared to vehicle-treated controls. Dinitrophenol did not affect arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, blood glucose or markers of oxidative stress, but increased kidney oxygen consumption and reduced cortical and medullary concentrations of glucose and glycogen and resulted in intrarenal tissue hypoxia. Furthermore, dinitrophenol treatment increased urinary protein excretion, kidney vimentin expression and infiltration of inflammatory cells. In conclusion, increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption results in kidney hypoxia and subsequent nephropathy. Importantly, these results demonstrate that kidney tissue hypoxia per se, without confounding hyperglycemia or oxidative stress, may be sufficient to initiate the development of nephropathy and therefore demonstrate a new interventional target for treating kidney disease. PMID:24019401

  5. Extracts of black bean peel and pomegranate peel ameliorate oxidative stress-induced hyperglycemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Yun; Zhu, Chuang; Qian, Tian-Wei; Guo, Hao; Wang, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Fan; Yin, Xiaoxing

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress has a central role in the progression of diabetes mellitus (DM), which can directly result in the injury of islet β cells and consequent hyperglycemia. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible protective effects of black bean peel extract (BBPE), pomegranate peel extract (PPE) and a combination of the two (PPE + BBPE) on streptozotocin-induced DM mice. Oxidative stress was assessed by the levels of total antioxidative capability and glutathione in the serum. Fasting blood glucose and insulin levels, as well as the pancreas weight index and the histological changes in the pancreas, were also determined. The results showed that, after fours weeks of treatment with PPE, BBPE or PPE + BBPE, DM mice showed, to different degrees, a decrease in blood glucose, increases in insulin secretion and the pancreas weight index, and an increase in antioxidative activity. These changes were particularly evident in the DM mice subjected to the combined intervention strategy of PPE + BBPE. The histological findings indicated that the injury to the pancreatic islets in DM mice was also ameliorated following treatment. In conclusion, PPE and BBPE, particularly the combination of the two, have the ability to ameliorate hyperglycemia by inhibiting oxidative stress-induced pancreatic damage; this finding may be useful in the prevention and treatment of DM. PMID:25452774

  6. Graptopetalum paraguayense and resveratrol ameliorates carboxymethyllysine (CML)-induced pancreas dysfunction and hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao-Hong; Lee, Chia-Chen; Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Wu, She-Ching

    2013-12-01

    Hyperglycemia is associated with advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Recently, AGEs were found to cause pancreatic damage, oxidative stress, and hyperglycemia through the AGE receptor. Carboxymethyllysine (CML) is an AGE but whether it induces pancreatic dysfunction remains unclear. Graptopetalum paraguayense, a vegetable consumed in Taiwan, has been used in folk medicine and is an antioxidant that protects against liver damage. We investigated the protective properties of G. paraguayense 95% ethanol extracts (GPEs) against CML-induced pancreatic damage. The results indicated that resveratrol, GPE, and gallic acid (the active compound of GPE) increased insulin synthesis via upregulation of pancreatic peroxisome proliferator activated-receptor-γ (PPARγ) and pancreatic-duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) but inhibited the expression of CML-mediated CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-β (C/EBPβ), a negative regulator of insulin production. Moreover, resveratrol and GPE also strongly activated nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) to attenuate oxidative stress and improve insulin sensitivity in the liver and muscle of CML-injected C57BL/6 mice and resulted in reduced blood glucose levels. Taken together, these findings suggested that GPE and gallic acid could potentially be used as a food supplement to protect against pancreatic damage and the development of diabetes. PMID:24036142

  7. VEGF-B inhibits hyperglycemia- and Macugen-induced retinal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Delong; Zhao, Chen; Ju, Rong; Kumar, Anil; Tian, Geng; Huang, Lijuan; Zheng, Lei; Li, Xianglin; Liu, Lixian; Wang, Shasha; Ren, Xiangrong; Ye, Zhimin; Chen, Wei; Xing, Liying; Chen, Qishan; Gao, Zhiqin; Mi, Jia; Tang, Zhongshu; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Shuping; Lee, Chunsik; Li, Xuri

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor B (VEGF-B) was discovered a long time ago. However, its role in hyperglycemia- and VEGF-A inhibition-induced retinal apoptosis remains unknown thus far. Yet, drugs that can block VEGF-B are being used to treat patients with diabetic retinopathy and other ocular neovascular diseases. It is therefore urgent to have a better understanding of the function of VEGF-B in these pathologies. Here, we report that both streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in rats and Macugen intravitreal injection in mice leads to retinal apoptosis in retinal ganglion cell and outer nuclear layers respectively. Importantly, VEGF-B treatment by intravitreal injection markedly reduced retinal apoptosis in both models. We further reveal that VEGF-B and its receptors, vascular endothelial growth factor 1 (VEGFR1) and neuropilin 1 (NP1), are abundantly expressed in rat retinae and choroids and are upregulated by high glucose with concomitant activation of Akt and Erk. These data highlight an important function of VEGF-B in protecting retinal cells from apoptosis induced by hyperglycemia and VEGF-A inhibition. VEGF-B may therefore have a therapeutic potential in treating various retinal degenerative diseases, and modulation of VEGF-B activity in the eye needs careful consideration. PMID:27189805

  8. Insulin-producing cells from embryonic stem cells rescues hyperglycemia via intra-spleen migration

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Meng; Shang, Changzhen; Zhong, Xiaomei; Guo, Ruomi; Lao, Guojuan; Wang, Xiaoyi; Cheng, Hua; Min, Jun; Yan, Li; Shen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Implantation of embryonic stem cells (ESC)-derived insulin-producing cells has been extensively investigated for treatment of diabetes in animal models. However, the in vivo behavior and migration of transplanted cells in diabetic models remains unclear. Here we investigated the location and migration of insulin-producing cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) using a dynamic MRI tracking method. SPIO labeled cells showed hypointense signal under the kidney subcapsules of diabetic mice on MRI, and faded gradually over the visiting time. However, new hypointense signal appeared in the spleen 1 week after transplantation, and became obvious with the time prolongation. Further histological examination proved the immigrated cells were insulin and C-peptide positive cells which were evenly distributed throughout the spleen. These intra-spleen insulin-producing cells maintained their protective effects against hyperglycemia in vivo, and these effects were reversed upon spleen removal. Transplantation of insulin-producing cells through spleen acquired an earlier blood glucose control as compared with that through kidney subcapsules. In summary, our data demonstrate that insulin-producing cells transplanted through kidney subcapsules were not located in situ but migrated into spleen, and rescues hyperglycemia in diabetic models. MRI may provide a novel tracking method for preclinical cell transplantation therapy of diabetes continuously and non-invasively. PMID:25533571

  9. Phlorofucofuroeckol A isolated from Ecklonia cava alleviates postprandial hyperglycemia in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    You, Han-Nui; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Park, Mi-Hwa; Lee, Ji-Hyeok; Han, Ji-Sook

    2015-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether phlorofucofuroeckol A inhibited α-glucosidase and α-amylase activities and alleviated postprandial hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. Phlorofucofuroeckol A that was isolated from Ecklonia cava (brown algae) demonstrated prominent inhibitory effects against α-glucosidase and α-amylase activities. The IC50 values of phlorofucofuroeckol A against α-glucosidase and α-amylase were 19.52 and 6.34μM, respectively. These inhibitory activities of phlorofucofuroeckol A were higher than those of acarbose, which was used as a positive control. Increases in postprandial blood glucose levels were significantly more suppressed in the group administered phlorofucofuroeckol A compared to the control group in both diabetic and normal mice. Moreover, the area under the curve was significantly lower after phlorofucofuroeckol A administration (2296 versus 2690mmolmin/l) in the diabetic mice. These results suggested that phlorofucofuroeckol A is a potent α-glucosidase inhibitor and can alleviate the postprandial hyperglycemia that is caused by starch. PMID:25680946

  10. Alleviating Effects of Baechu Kimchi Added Ecklonia cava on Postprandial Hyperglycemia in Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Ah; Song, Yeong-Ok; Jang, Mi-Soon; Han, Ji-Sook

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of Baechu kimchi added Ecklonia cava on the activities of α-glucosidase and α-amylase and its alleviating effect on the postprandial hyperglycemia in STZ-induced diabetic mice. Baechu kimchi added Ecklonia cava (BKE, 15%) was fermented at 5°C for 28 days. Optimum ripened BKE was used in this study as it showed the strongest inhibitory activities on α-glucosidase and α-amylase by fermentation time among the BKEs in our previous study. The BKE was extracted with 80% methanol and the extract solution was concentrated, and then used in this study. The BKE extract showed higher inhibitory activities than Baechu kimchi extract against α-glucosidase and α-amylase. The IC50 values of the BKE extract against α-glucosidase and α-amylase were 0.58 and 0.35 mg/mL, respectively; BKE exhibited a lower α-glucosidase inhibitory activity but a higher α-amylase inhibitory activity than those of acarbose. The BKE extract alleviated postprandial hyperglycemia caused by starch loading in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Furthermore, the BKE extract significantly lowered the incremental area under the curve in both normal and diabetic mice (P<0.05). These results indicated that the BKE extract may delay carbohydrate digestion and thus glucose absorption. PMID:24471127

  11. Alleviating Effects of Baechu Kimchi Added Ecklonia cava on Postprandial Hyperglycemia in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Ah; Song, Yeong-Ok; Jang, Mi-Soon; Han, Ji-Sook

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of Baechu kimchi added Ecklonia cava on the activities of α-glucosidase and α-amylase and its alleviating effect on the postprandial hyperglycemia in STZ-induced diabetic mice. Baechu kimchi added Ecklonia cava (BKE, 15%) was fermented at 5°C for 28 days. Optimum ripened BKE was used in this study as it showed the strongest inhibitory activities on α-glucosidase and α-amylase by fermentation time among the BKEs in our previous study. The BKE was extracted with 80% methanol and the extract solution was concentrated, and then used in this study. The BKE extract showed higher inhibitory activities than Baechu kimchi extract against α-glucosidase and α-amylase. The IC50 values of the BKE extract against α-glucosidase and α-amylase were 0.58 and 0.35 mg/mL, respectively; BKE exhibited a lower α-glucosidase inhibitory activity but a higher α-amylase inhibitory activity than those of acarbose. The BKE extract alleviated postprandial hyperglycemia caused by starch loading in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Furthermore, the BKE extract significantly lowered the incremental area under the curve in both normal and diabetic mice (P<0.05). These results indicated that the BKE extract may delay carbohydrate digestion and thus glucose absorption. PMID:24471127

  12. ICER induced by hyperglycemia represses the expression of genes essential for insulin exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Abderrahmani, Amar; Cheviet, Séverine; Ferdaoussi, Mourad; Coppola, Thierry; Waeber, Gérard; Regazzi, Romano

    2006-01-01

    The GTPases Rab3a and Rab27a and their effectors Granuphilin/Slp4 and Noc2 are essential regulators of neuroendocrine secretion. Chronic exposure of pancreatic β-cells to supraphysiological glucose levels decreased selectively the expression of these proteins. This glucotoxic effect was mimicked by cAMP-raising agents and blocked by PKA inhibitors. We demonstrate that the transcriptional repressor ICER, which is induced in a PKA-dependent manner by chronic hyperglycemia and cAMP-raising agents, is responsible for the decline of the four genes. ICER overexpression diminished the level of Granuphilin, Noc2, Rab3a and Rab27a by binding to cAMP responsive elements located in the promoters of these genes and inhibited exocytosis of β-cells in response to secretagogues. Moreover, the loss in the expression of the genes of the secretory machinery caused by glucose and cAMP-raising agents was prevented by an antisense construct that reduces ICER levels. We propose that induction of inappropriate ICER levels lead to defects in the secretory process of pancreatic β-cells possibly contributing, in conjunction with other known deleterious effects of hyperglycemia, to defective insulin release in type 2 diabetes. PMID:16498408

  13. ICER induced by hyperglycemia represses the expression of genes essential for insulin exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Abderrahmani, Amar; Cheviet, Séverine; Ferdaoussi, Mourad; Coppola, Thierry; Waeber, Gérard; Regazzi, Romano

    2006-03-01

    The GTPases Rab3a and Rab27a and their effectors Granuphilin/Slp4 and Noc2 are essential regulators of neuroendocrine secretion. Chronic exposure of pancreatic beta-cells to supraphysiological glucose levels decreased selectively the expression of these proteins. This glucotoxic effect was mimicked by cAMP-raising agents and blocked by PKA inhibitors. We demonstrate that the transcriptional repressor ICER, which is induced in a PKA-dependent manner by chronic hyperglycemia and cAMP-raising agents, is responsible for the decline of the four genes. ICER overexpression diminished the level of Granuphilin, Noc2, Rab3a and Rab27a by binding to cAMP responsive elements located in the promoters of these genes and inhibited exocytosis of beta-cells in response to secretagogues. Moreover, the loss in the expression of the genes of the secretory machinery caused by glucose and cAMP-raising agents was prevented by an antisense construct that reduces ICER levels. We propose that induction of inappropriate ICER levels lead to defects in the secretory process of pancreatic beta-cells possibly contributing, in conjunction with other known deleterious effects of hyperglycemia, to defective insulin release in type 2 diabetes. PMID:16498408

  14. Insulin-producing cells from embryonic stem cells rescues hyperglycemia via intra-spleen migration.

    PubMed

    Ren, Meng; Shang, Changzhen; Zhong, Xiaomei; Guo, Ruomi; Lao, Guojuan; Wang, Xiaoyi; Cheng, Hua; Min, Jun; Yan, Li; Shen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Implantation of embryonic stem cells (ESC)-derived insulin-producing cells has been extensively investigated for treatment of diabetes in animal models. However, the in vivo behavior and migration of transplanted cells in diabetic models remains unclear. Here we investigated the location and migration of insulin-producing cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) using a dynamic MRI tracking method. SPIO labeled cells showed hypointense signal under the kidney subcapsules of diabetic mice on MRI, and faded gradually over the visiting time. However, new hypointense signal appeared in the spleen 1 week after transplantation, and became obvious with the time prolongation. Further histological examination proved the immigrated cells were insulin and C-peptide positive cells which were evenly distributed throughout the spleen. These intra-spleen insulin-producing cells maintained their protective effects against hyperglycemia in vivo, and these effects were reversed upon spleen removal. Transplantation of insulin-producing cells through spleen acquired an earlier blood glucose control as compared with that through kidney subcapsules. In summary, our data demonstrate that insulin-producing cells transplanted through kidney subcapsules were not located in situ but migrated into spleen, and rescues hyperglycemia in diabetic models. MRI may provide a novel tracking method for preclinical cell transplantation therapy of diabetes continuously and non-invasively. PMID:25533571

  15. Hyperglycemia downregulates Connexin36 in pancreatic islets via the upregulation of ICER-1/ICER-1γ.

    PubMed

    Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Caille, Dorothée; Charollais, Anne; Meda, Paolo; Allagnat, Florent

    2013-01-01

    Channels formed by the gap junction protein Connexin36 (CX36) contribute to the proper control of insulin secretion. We previously demonstrated that chronic exposure to glucose decreases Cx36 levels in insulin-secreting cells in vitro. Here, we investigated whether hyperglycemia also regulates Cx36 in vivo. Using a model of continuous glucose infusion in adult rats, we showed that prolonged (24-48 h) hyperglycemia reduced the Cx36 gene Gjd2 mRNA levels in pancreatic islets. Accordingly, prolonged exposure to high glucose concentrations also reduced the expression and function of Cx36 in the rat insulin-producing INS-1E cell line. The glucose effect was blocked after inhibition of the cAMP/PKA pathway and was associated with an overexpression of the inducible cAMP early repressor ICER-1/ICER-1γ, which binds to a functional cAMP-response element in the promoter of the Cx36 gene Gjd2. The involvement of this repressor was further demonstrated using an antisense strategy of ICER-1 inhibition, which prevented glucose-induced downregulation of Cx36. The data indicate that chronic exposure to glucose alters the in vivo expression of Cx36 by the insulin-producing β-cells through ICER-1/ICER-1γ overexpression. This mechanism may contribute to the reduced glucose sensitivity and altered insulin secretion, which contribute to the pathophysiology of diabetes. PMID:23613279

  16. Acute Versus Progressive Onset of Diabetes in NOD Mice: Potential Implications for Therapeutic Interventions in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Clayton E; Xue, Song; Posgai, Amanda; Lightfoot, Yaima L; Li, Xia; Lin, Andrea; Wasserfall, Clive; Haller, Michael J; Schatz, Desmond; Atkinson, Mark A

    2015-11-01

    Most natural history models for type 1 diabetes (T1D) propose that overt hyperglycemia results after a progressive loss of insulin-secreting β-cell mass and/or function. To experimentally address this concept, we prospectively determined morning blood glucose measurements every other day in multiple cohorts (total n = 660) of female NOD/ShiLtJ mice starting at 8 weeks of age until diabetes onset or 26 weeks of age. Consistent with this notion, a majority of mice that developed diabetes (354 of 489 [72%]) displayed a progressive increase in blood glucose with transient excursions >200 mg/dL, followed by acute and persistent hyperglycemia at diabetes onset. However, 135 of the 489 (28%) diabetic animals demonstrated normal glucose values followed by acute (i.e., sudden) hyperglycemia. Interestingly, diabetes onset occurred earlier in mice with acute versus progressive disease onset (15.37 ± 0.3207 vs. 17.44 ± 0.2073 weeks of age, P < 0.0001). Moreover, the pattern of onset (i.e., progressive vs. acute) dramatically influenced the ability to achieve reversal of T1D by immunotherapeutic intervention, with increased effectiveness observed in situations of a progressive deterioration in euglycemia. These studies highlight a novel natural history aspect in this animal model, one that may provide important guidance for the selection of subjects participating in human trials seeking disease reversal. PMID:26216853

  17. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  18. Lack of EC-SOD worsens alveolar and vascular development in a neonatal mouse model of bleomycin-induced bronchopulmonary dysplasia and pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Cassidy; Wright, Rachel H.; Tang, Jen-Ruey; Woods, Crystal; Villegas, Leah; Sherlock, Laurie; Savani, Rashmin C.; Abman, Steven H.; Nozik-Grayck, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) worsens clinical outcomes in former preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Oxidant stress disrupts alveolar and vascular development in models of BPD. Bleomycin causes oxidative stress and induces BPD and PAH in neonatal rats. Disruption in the VEGF and nitric oxide signaling pathways contributes to BPD. We hypothesized that loss of EC-SOD would worsen PAH associated with BPD in a neonatal mouse model of bleomycin-induced BPD by disrupting the VEGF/NO signaling pathway. Methods Neonatal wild-type mice (WT), and mice lacking EC-SOD (EC-SOD KO) received intraperitoneal bleomycin (2 units/kg) or PBS three times weekly and were evaluated at week 3 or 4. Results Lack of EC-SOD impaired alveolar development and resulted in PH (elevated right ventricular systolic pressures, right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH)), decreased vessel density and an increased small vessel muscularization. Exposure to bleomycin further impaired alveolar development, worsened RVH and vascular remodeling. Lack of EC-SOD and bleomycin treatment decreased lung total and phosphorylated VEGFR2 and eNOS protein expression. Conclusion EC-SOD is critical in preserving normal lung development and loss of EC-SOD results in disrupted alveolar development, PAH and vascular remodeling at baseline, which is further worsened with bleomycin and associated with decreased activation of VEGFR2. PMID:26322414

  19. General Medical Considerations for the Wilderness Adventurer: Medical Conditions That May Worsen With or Present Challenges to Coping With Wilderness Exposure.

    PubMed

    Cushing, Tracy A; Roberts, William O; Hackett, Peter; Dexter, William W; Brent, Jeff S; Young, Craig C; Fudge, Jessie R; Hawkins, Seth C; DeLoughery, Thomas G; Thomas, Benjamin J; Tabin, Geoffrey C; Jacoby, Leah E; Asplund, Chad A

    2015-09-01

    Participation in wilderness and adventure sports is on the rise, and as such, practitioners will see more athletes seeking clearance to participate in these events. The purpose of this article is to describe specific medical conditions that may worsen or present challenges to the athlete in a wilderness environment. PMID:26340731

  20. General Medical Considerations for the Wilderness Adventurer: Medical Conditions That May Worsen With or Present Challenges to Coping With Wilderness Exposure.

    PubMed

    Cushing, Tracy A; Roberts, William O; Hackett, Peter; Dexter, William W; Brent, Jeff S; Young, Craig C; Fudge, Jessie R; Hawkins, Seth C; DeLoughery, Thomas G; Thomas, Benjamin J; Tabin, Geoffrey C; Jacoby, Leah E; Asplund, Chad A

    2015-12-01

    Participation in wilderness and adventure sports is on the rise, and as such, practitioners will see more athletes seeking clearance to participate in these events. The purpose of this article is to describe specific medical conditions that may worsen or present challenges to the athlete in a wilderness environment. PMID:26617375

  1. Serum Calcium Increase Correlates With Worsening of Lipid Profile: An Observational Study on a Large Cohort From South Italy.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Luigia; Faniello, Maria C; Canino, Giovanni; Tripolino, Cesare; Gnasso, Agostino; Cuda, Giovanni; Costanzo, Francesco S; Irace, Concetta

    2016-02-01

    Despite the well-documented role of calcium in cell metabolism, its role in the development of cardiovascular disease is still under heavy debate. Several studies suggest that calcium supplementation might be associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, whereas others underline a significant effect on lowering high blood pressure and hyperlipidemia. The purpose of this study was to investigate, in a large nonselected cohort from South Italy, if serum calcium levels correlate with lipid values and can therefore be linked to higher individual cardiovascular risk.Eight-thousand-six-hundred-ten outpatients addressed to the Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, University of Magna Græcia, Catanzaro, Italy from January 2012 to December 2013 for routine blood tests, were enrolled in the study. Total HDL-, LDL- and non-HDL colesterol, triglycerides, and calcium were determined with standard methods.We observed a significant association between total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and serum calcium in men and postmenopause women. Interestingly, in premenopause women, we only found a direct correlation between serum calcium, total cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol. Calcium significantly increased while increasing total cholesterol and triglycerides in men and postmenopause women.Our results confirm that progressive increase of serum calcium level correlates with worsening of lipid profile in our study population. Therefore, we suggest that a greater caution should be used in calcium supplement prescription particularly in men and women undergoing menopause, in which an increase of serum lipids is already known to be associated with a higher cardiovascular risk. PMID:26937904

  2. Worsening Hypoxemia in the Face of Increasing PEEP: A Case of Large Pulmonary Embolism in the Setting of Intracardiac Shunt.

    PubMed

    Granati, Glen T; Teressa, Getu

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patent foramen ovale (PFO) are common, normally resulting in a left-to-right shunt or no net shunting. Pulmonary embolism (PE) can cause sustained increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and right atrial pressure. Increasing positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) improves oxygenation at the expense of increasing intrathoracic pressures (ITP). Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) decreases shunt fraction, improves ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) matching, increases cardiac output, and decreases right atrial pressure by facilitating low airway pressure. CASE REPORT A 40-year-old man presented with dyspnea and hemoptysis. Oxygen saturation (SaO2) 80% on room air with A-a gradient of 633 mmHg. Post-intubation SaO2 dropped to 71% on assist control, FiO2 100%, and PEEP of 5 cmH20. Successive PEEP dropped SaO2 to 60-70% and blood pressure plummeted. APRV was initaiated with improvement in SaO2 to 95% and improvement in blood pressure. Hemiparesis developed and CT head showed infarction. CT pulmonary angiogram found a large pulmonary embolism. Transthoracic echocardiogram detected right-to left intracardiac shunt, with large PFO. CONCLUSIONS There should be suspicion for a PFO when severe hypoxemia paradoxically worsens in response to increasing airway pressures. Concomitant venous and arterial thromboemboli should prompt evaluation for intra-cardiac shunt. Patients with PFO and hypoxemia should be evaluated for causes of sustained right-to-left pressure gradient, such as PE. Management should aim to decrease PVR and optimize V/Q matching by treating the inciting incident (e.g., thrombolytics in PE) and by minimizing ITP. APRV can minimize PVR and maximize V/Q ratios and should be considered in treating patients similar to the one whose case is presented here. PMID:27377010

  3. Infrared warming reduced winter wheat yields and some physiological parameters, which were mitigated by irrigation and worsened by delayed sowing.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shibo; Su, Hua; Liu, Wei; Tan, Kaiyan; Ren, Sanxue

    2013-01-01

    Winter wheat has a central role in ensuring the food security and welfare of 1.3 billion people in China. Extensive previous studies have concluded that winter wheat yields would decrease with higher temperatures, owing to warming-induced soil drying or shortening of phenophase. Temperature in China is predicted to increase by 1-5°C by 2100, which may greatly impact plant production and cause other negative effects. We performed a manipulative field experiment, creating diverse growth regimes for wheat by infrared radiation (IR) warming day and night, including IR warming only (DW), IR warming + delayed sowing dates (DS), IR warming + increased irrigation (IW), and a control (CK). The results show that IR warming increased daily average wheat canopy and soil temperatures by 2.0°C and 2.3°C, respectively. DW was associated with an advanced maturity of 10 days and yield reduction of 8.2%. IR-warming effects on the photosynthetic apparatus of wheat varied with season as well as significant differences were found in the booting stage. DS represented a worsened situation, lowering yield per plant by 16.4%, with a significant decline in aboveground biomass and functional leaf area. Wheat under DS showed double-peak patterns of diurnal gas exchange during booting stages and, consequently, lower photosynthetic capacity with high transpiration for cooling. Significantly lower actual water use efficiency and intrinsic water use efficiency from jointing to anthesis stages were also found under DS. However, IW had no significant difference from CK, irrespective of yield and photosynthesis. Therefore, we concluded that delayed sowing date may not be a good choice for winter wheat, whereas a thoroughly-watered wheat agroecosystem should be promoted in the context of global warming. PMID:23874424

  4. Fructose consumption does not worsen bone deficits resulting from high-fat feeding in young male rats.

    PubMed

    Yarrow, Joshua F; Toklu, Hale Z; Balaez, Alex; Phillips, Ean G; Otzel, Dana M; Chen, Cong; Wronski, Thomas J; Aguirre, J Ignacio; Sakarya, Yasemin; Tümer, Nihal; Scarpace, Philip J

    2016-04-01

    Dietary-induced obesity (DIO) resulting from high-fat (HF) or high-sugar diets produces a host of deleterious metabolic consequences including adverse bone development. We compared the effects of feeding standard rodent chow (Control), a 30% moderately HF (starch-based/sugar-free) diet, or a combined 30%/40% HF/high-fructose (HF/F) diet for 12weeks on cancellous/cortical bone development in male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 8weeks. Both HF feeding regimens reduced the lean/fat mass ratio, elevated circulating leptin, and reduced serum total antioxidant capacity (tAOC) when compared with Controls. Distal femur cancellous bone mineral density (BMD) was 23-34% lower in both HF groups (p<0.001) and was characterized by lower cancellous bone volume (BV/TV, p<0.01), lower trabecular number (Tb.N, p<0.001), and increased trabecular separation versus Controls (p<0.001). Cancellous BMD, BV/TV, and Tb.N were negatively associated with leptin and positively associated with tAOC at the distal femur. Similar cancellous bone deficits were observed at the proximal tibia, along with increased bone marrow adipocyte density (p<0.05), which was negatively associated with BV/TV and Tb.N. HF/F animals also exhibited lower osteoblast surface and reduced circulating osteocalcin (p<0.05). Cortical thickness (p<0.01) and tissue mineral density (p<0.05) were higher in both HF-fed groups versus Controls, while whole bone biomechanical characteristics were not different among groups. These results demonstrate that "westernized" HF diets worsen cancellous, but not cortical, bone parameters in skeletally-immature male rats and that fructose incorporation into HF diets does not exacerbate bone loss. In addition, they suggest that leptin and/or oxidative stress may influence DIO-induced alterations in adolescent bone development. PMID:26855373

  5. When Mood Worsens after Gastric Bypass Surgery: Characterization of Bariatric Patients with Increases in Depressive Symptoms Following Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Grilo, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression levels generally decrease substantially following bariatric surgery; however, little is known about bariatric patients who might experience increases in depression following surgery. We examined the frequency of bariatric patients who experienced discernible increases in depression levels following surgery and explored their correlates. Methods Participants were 107 patients with extreme obesity who underwent gastric bypass surgery and were followed up at 6 and 12 months postsurgery. Participants completed self-report questionnaires about depression (BDI), eating disorder psychopathology (EDE-Q), self-esteem (RSES), and social functioning (SF-36) at baseline and again at 6 and 12 months postsurgery. Results Fourteen (13.1 %) participants reported discernible increases (BDI-Increase), 14 (13.1 %) reported discernible decreases (BDI-Decrease), and 79 (73.8 %) did not report discernible changes (no change) in BDI scores from 6 to 12 months postsurgery. Presurgically, there were no differences between the three groups. By 12 months postsurgery, the BDI-Increase group had significantly higher depression scores and significantly lower self-esteem and SF-36 mental component scores than did the other groups. For the BDI-Increase group, BDI Change was significantly associated with body mass index, self-esteem, and SF-36 physical component scores. Conclusions Findings highlight that a subgroup of individuals report discernible increases in depressive scores postsurgery and may differ in potentially clinically meaningful ways from those who do not report discernible increases in depressive symptoms. Future research is needed to better understand the long-term trajectory of patients with discernible worsening mood following gastric bypass surgery. PMID:25190520

  6. Does the worsening galactic cosmic radiation environment observed by CRaTER preclude future manned deep space exploration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Blake, J. B.; Case, A. W.; Joyce, C. J.; Kasper, J.; Mazur, J.; Petro, N.; Quinn, M.; Porter, J. A.; Smith, C. W.; Smith, S.; Spence, H. E.; Townsend, L. W.; Turner, R.; Wilson, J. K.; Zeitlin, C.

    2014-11-01

    The Sun and its solar wind are currently exhibiting extremely low densities and magnetic field strengths, representing states that have never been observed during the space age. The highly abnormal solar activity between cycles 23 and 24 has caused the longest solar minimum in over 80 years and continues into the unusually small solar maximum of cycle 24. As a result of the remarkably weak solar activity, we have also observed the highest fluxes of galactic cosmic rays in the space age and relatively small solar energetic particle events. We use observations from the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter to examine the implications of these highly unusual solar conditions for human space exploration. We show that while these conditions are not a show stopper for long-duration missions (e.g., to the Moon, an asteroid, or Mars), galactic cosmic ray radiation remains a significant and worsening factor that limits mission durations. While solar energetic particle events in cycle 24 present some hazard, the accumulated doses for astronauts behind 10 g/cm2 shielding are well below current dose limits. Galactic cosmic radiation presents a more significant challenge: the time to 3% risk of exposure-induced death (REID) in interplanetary space was less than 400 days for a 30 year old male and less than 300 days for a 30 year old female in the last cycle 23-24 minimum. The time to 3% REID is estimated to be ˜20% lower in the coming cycle 24-25 minimum. If the heliospheric magnetic field continues to weaken over time, as is likely, then allowable mission durations will decrease correspondingly. Thus, we estimate exposures in extreme solar minimum conditions and the corresponding effects on allowable durations.

  7. Medial Posterior Meniscal Root Tears Are Associated with Development or Worsening of Medial Tibiofemoral Cartilage Damage: The Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Daichi; Jarraya, Mohamed; Roemer, Frank W.; Zhang, Yuqing; Niu, Jingbo; Crema, Michel D.; Englund, Martin; Lynch, John A.; Nevitt, Michael C.; Torner, James C.; Lewis, Cora E.; Felson, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the association of meniscal root tear with the development or worsening of tibiofemoral cartilage damage. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval and written informed consent from all subjects were obtained. A total of 596 knees with radiographically depicted osteoarthritis were randomly selected from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis study cohort. Cartilage damage was semiquantitatively assessed by using the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (WORMS) system (grades 0–6). Subjects were separated into three groups: root tear only, meniscal tear without root tear, and neither meniscal nor root tear. A log-binomial regression model was used to calculate the relative risks for knees to develop incident or progressing cartilage damage in the root tear group and the meniscal tear group, with the no tear group serving as a reference. Results: In the medial tibiofemoral joint, there were 37 knees with isolated medial posterior root tear, 294 with meniscal tear without root tear, and 264 without meniscal or root tear. There were only two lateral posterior root tears, and no anterior root tears were found. Thus, the focus was on the medial posterior root tear. The frequency of severe cartilage damage (WORMS ≥5) was higher in the group with root tear than in the group without root or meniscal tear (76.7% vs 19.7%, P < .0001) but not in the group with meniscal but no root tear (76.7% vs 65.2%, P = .055). Longitudinal analyses included 33 knees with isolated medial posterior root tear, 270 with meniscal tear, and 245 with no tear. Adjusted relative risk of cartilage loss was 2.03 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.18, 3.48) for the root tear group and 1.84 (95% CI: 1.32, 2.58) for the meniscal tear group. Conclusion: Isolated medial posterior meniscal root tear is associated with incident and progressive medial tibiofemoral cartilage loss. © RSNA, 2013 PMID:23696679

  8. Predictors of Significant Worsening of Patient-Reported Fatigue over a One-Month Timeframe in Ambulatory Patients with Common Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Fisch, Michael J.; Zhao, Fengmin; O'Mara, Ann M.; Wang, Xin Shelley; Cella, David; Cleeland, Charles S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Understanding the determinants of fatigue worsening may help distinguish between different fatigue phenotypes and inform clinical trial designs. Patients and Methods Patients with invasive cancer of the breast, prostate, colon/rectum, or lung were enrolled from multiple sites. At enrollment during an outpatient visit and 4–5 weeks later patients rated their symptoms on a 0–10 numerical rating scale. A 2-point change was considered clinically significant for fatigue change. Effects of demographic and clinical factors on patient-reported fatigue were examined using logistic regression models. Results 3123 patients were enrolled at baseline and 3032 were analyzable for fatigue change. At baseline, 23% had no fatigue, 35% mild, 25% moderate, and 17% severe. Key parameters in our model of fatigue worsening includes fatigue at baseline (OR 0.75), disease status (OR 1.99), performance status (OR 1.38), history of depression (OR 1.28), patient perception of bother due to comorbidity (OR 1.26) and treatment exposures including recent cancer treatment (OR 1.77), and use of corticosteroids (1.37). The impact of gender was examined only in colorectal and lung cancer patients, and it was a significant factor with men most likely to experience worsening of fatigue (OR=1.46). Conclusions Predictors of fatigue worsening include multiple factors that are difficult to modify: baseline fatigue level, gender, disease status, performance status, recent cancer treatment, bother due to comorbidity, and history of depression. Future fatigue prevention and treatment trial designs should account for key predictors of worsening fatigue. PMID:24151111

  9. Hyperglycemia Differentially Affects Maternal and Fetal DNA Integrity and DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Moreli, Jusciele B.; Santos, Janine H.; Lorenzon-Ojea, Aline Rodrigues; Corrêa-Silva, Simone; Fortunato, Rodrigo S.; Rocha, Clarissa Ribeiro; Rudge, Marilza V.; Damasceno, Débora C.; Bevilacqua, Estela; Calderon, Iracema M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Investigate the DNA damage and its cellular response in blood samples from both mother and the umbilical cord of pregnancies complicated by hyperglycemia. Methods: A total of 144 subjects were divided into 4 groups: normoglycemia (ND; 46 cases), mild gestational hyperglycemia (MGH; 30 cases), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM; 45 cases) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (DM2; 23 cases). Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) isolation and/or leukocytes from whole maternal and umbilical cord blood were obtained from all groups at delivery. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage were measured by gene-specific quantitative PCR, and the expression of mRNA and proteins involved in the base excision repair (BER) pathway were assessed by real-time qPCR and Western blot, respectively. Apoptosis was measured in vitro experiments by caspase 3/7 activity and ATP levels. Results: GDM and DM2 groups were characterized by an increase in oxidative stress biomarkers, an increase in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage, and decreased expression of mRNA (APE1, POLβ and FEN1) and proteins (hOGG1, APE1) involved in BER. The levels of hyperglycemia were associated with the in vitro apoptosis pathway. Blood levels of DNA damage in umbilical cord were similar among the groups. Newborns of diabetic mothers had increased expression of BER mRNA (APE1, POLβ and FEN1) and proteins (hOGG1, APE1, POLβ and FEN1). A diabetes-like environment was unable to induce apoptosis in the umbilical cord blood cells. Conclusions: Our data show relevant asymmetry between maternal and fetal blood cell susceptibility to DNA damage and apoptosis induction. Maternal cells seem to be more predisposed to changes in an adverse glucose environment. This may be due to differential ability in upregulating multiple genes involved in the activation of DNA repair response, especially the BER mechanism. However if this study shows a more effective adaptive response by the fetal organism, it also calls for

  10. Acute sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Rimar, Doron; Boulman, Nina; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Rosner, Itzhak; Odeh, Majed

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the data on the etiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, and diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis. A Pubmed search utilizing the indexing term "acute sacroiliitis" was conducted and the data pertinent to the aim of the review was extracted and organized in accordance with the preplanned structure of the manuscript. The diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis is often challenging because of both the relative rarity of this presentation and diverse character of acute sacroiliac pain, frequently mimicking other, more prevalent disorders. Technetium bone scintigraphy can localize the disease process to the sacroiliac joint, while computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detailed characterization and the extent of the disease as well as the diagnosis of complications. Pyogenic sacroiliitis is by far the most common cause of acute sacroiliitis. Brucellosis, acute sacroiliitis in the course of reactive arthritis, and crystalline-induced sacroiliitis frequently imitate pyogenic sacroiliitis. Acute sacroiliitis can rarely be also related to hematological malignancies or treatment with isotretinoin. Awareness to the possibility of acute sacroiliitis and a thorough physical examination are the necessary prerequisites to its timely diagnosis, while the appropriate laboratory and imaging studies should confirm the precise diagnosis and direct the appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26847855

  11. Reversal of islet GIP receptor down-regulation and resistance to GIP by reducing hyperglycemia in the Zucker rat

    SciTech Connect

    Piteau, Shalea; Olver, Amy; Kim, Su-Jin; Winter, Kyle; Pospisilik, John Andrew; Lynn, Francis; Manhart, Susanne; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Speck, Madeleine; Pederson, Raymond A.; McIntosh, Christopher H.S.

    2007-11-03

    In type 2 diabetes (T2DM) {beta}-cell responsiveness to glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is reduced. In a model of T2DM, the VDF Zucker rat, GIP receptor mRNA and protein levels were shown to be down-regulated. Possible restoration of responsiveness to GIP in Zucker rats by reducing hyperglycemia has been examined. ZDF rats with extreme hyperglycemia demonstrated greater islet GIP receptor mRNA down-regulation (94.3 {+-} 3.8%) than ZF rats (48.8 {+-} 22.8%). GIP receptor mRNA levels in ZDF rats returned to 83.0 {+-} 17.9% of lean following normalization of hyperglycemia by phlorizin treatment and pancreas perfusions demonstrated markedly improved GIP responsiveness. Treatment of VDF rats with a DP IV inhibitor (P32/98) resulted in improved glucose tolerance and restored sensitivity to GIP in isolated pancreata. These findings support the proposal that GIP receptor down-regulation in rodent T2DM is secondary to chronic hyperglycemia and that normalization of glycemia can restore GIP sensitivity.

  12. Transgenerational Glucose Intolerance of Tumor Necrosis Factor with Epigenetic Alteration in Rat Perirenal Adipose Tissue Induced by Intrauterine Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Su, Rina; Yan, Jie; Yang, Huixia

    2016-01-01

    Changes in DNA methylation may play a role in the genetic mechanism underlying glucose intolerance in the offspring of mothers with diabetes. Here, we established a rat model of moderate intrauterine hyperglycemia induced by streptozotocin to detect glucose and lipid metabolism of first-generation (F1) and second-generation (F2) offspring. Moderate intrauterine hyperglycemia induced high body weight in F1 and F2 offspring of diabetic mothers. F1 offspring had impaired glucose tolerance and abnormal insulin level. Additionally, F1 and F2 offspring that were exposed to intrauterine hyperglycemia had impaired insulin secretion from the islets. The tumor necrosis factor (Tnf) gene was upregulated in perirenal adipose tissue from F1 offspring and relatively increased in F2 offspring. Both F1 and F2 offspring showed similar hypomethylation level at the −1952 site of Tnf. We confirmed that DNA methylation occurs in offspring exposed to intrauterine hyperglycemia and that the DNA methylation is intergenerational and inherited. PMID:26881249

  13. Punica granatum flower extract, a potent alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, improves postprandial hyperglycemia in Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhao; Wen, Suping; Kota, Bhavani Prasad; Peng, Gang; Li, George Qian; Yamahara, Johji; Roufogalis, Basil D

    2005-06-01

    Postprandial hyperglycemia plays an important role in the development of type 2 diabetes and has been proposed as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The flowering part of Punica granatum Linn. (Punicaceae) (PGF) has been recommended in Unani literature as a remedy for diabetes. We investigated the effect and action mechanism of a methanolic extract from PGF on hyperglycemia in vivo and in vitro. Oral administration of PGF extract markedly lowered plasma glucose levels in non-fasted Zucker diabetic fatty rats (a genetic model of obesity and type 2 diabetes), whereas it had little effect in the fasted animals, suggesting it affected postprandial hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. In support of this conclusion the extract was found to markedly inhibit the increase of plasma glucose levels after sucrose loading, but not after glucose loading in mice, and it had no effect on glucose levels in normal mice. In vitro, PGF extract demonstrated a potent inhibitory effect on alpha-glucosidase activity (IC50: 1.8 microg/ml). The inhibition is dependent on the concentration of enzyme and substrate, as well as on the length of pretreatment with the enzyme. These findings strongly suggest that PGF extract improves postprandial hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes and obesity, at least in part, by inhibiting intestinal alpha-glucosidase activity. PMID:15894133

  14. Widespread blunting of hypothalamic and amygdala-septal activity and behavior in rats with long-term hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Cortés, M L; Gutiérrez-García, A G; Guillén-Ruiz, G; Romo-González, T; Contreras, C M

    2016-09-01

    Anxiety and depression in diabetic patients contributes to a poor prognosis, but possible causal relationships have been controversial. Anxiety, fear, and anhedonia are mediated by interactions between different deep structures of the temporal lobe (e.g., amygdala complex and hippocampus) and other forebrain-related structures (e.g., lateral septal nucleus). Connections between these structures and the hypothalamic orexinergic system are necessary for the maintenance of energy and wakefulness. However, few studies have explored the impact of long-term hyperglycemia in these structures on anxiety. We induced long-term hyperglycemia (glucose levels of ∼500mg/dl) in Wistar rats by injecting them with alloxan and simultaneously protecting them from hyperglycemia by injecting them daily with a low dose of insulin (i.e., just enough insulin to avoid death), thus maintaining hyperglycemia and ketonuria for as long as 6 weeks. Compared with controls, long-term hyperglycemic rats exhibited a significant reduction of Fos expression in the lateral septal nucleus and basolateral amygdala, but no differences were found in cerebellar regions. Orexin-A cells appeared to be inactive in the lateral hypothalamus. No differences were found in sucrose consumption or behavior in the elevated plus maze compared with the control group, but a decrease in general locomotion was observed. These data indicate a generalized blunting of the metabolic brain response, accompanied by a decrease in locomotion but no changes in hedonic- or anxiety-like behavior. PMID:27173433

  15. Evidence That in Uncontrolled Diabetes, Hyperglucagonemia Is Required for Ketosis but Not for Increased Hepatic Glucose Production or Hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Meek, Thomas H; Dorfman, Mauricio D; Matsen, Miles E; Fischer, Jonathan D; Cubelo, Alexis; Kumar, Monica R; Taborsky, Gerald J; Morton, Gregory J

    2015-07-01

    Several lines of evidence implicate excess glucagon secretion in the elevated rates of hepatic glucose production (HGP), hyperglycemia, and ketosis characteristic of uncontrolled insulin-deficient diabetes (uDM), but whether hyperglucagonemia is required for hyperglycemia in this setting is unknown. To address this question, adult male Wistar rats received either streptozotocin (STZ) to induce uDM (STZ-DM) or vehicle and remained nondiabetic. Four days later, animals received daily subcutaneous injections of either the synthetic GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide in a dose-escalating regimen to reverse hyperglucagonemia or its vehicle for 10 days. As expected, plasma glucagon levels were elevated in STZ-DM rats, and although liraglutide treatment lowered glucagon levels to those of nondiabetic controls, it failed to attenuate diabetic hyperglycemia, elevated rates of glucose appearance (Ra), or increased hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression. In contrast, it markedly reduced levels of both plasma ketone bodies and hepatic expression of the rate-limiting enzyme involved in ketone body production. To independently confirm this finding, in a separate study, treatment of STZ-DM rats with a glucagon-neutralizing antibody was sufficient to potently lower plasma ketone bodies but failed to normalize elevated levels of either blood glucose or Ra. These data suggest that in rats with uDM, hyperglucagonemia is required for ketosis but not for increased HGP or hyperglycemia. PMID:25633417

  16. Incident hyperglycemia, parenteral nutrition administration and adverse outcomes in patients with myeloma admitted for initial auto-SCT.

    PubMed

    Sheean, P M; Kilkus, J M; Liu, D; Maciejewski, J; Braunschweig, C A

    2013-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) exacerbates hyperglycemia, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in various cancer populations. By using a retrospective design, we examined incident hyperglycemia in PN and non-PN recipients and the associations with clinical events and 5-year survival in a cohort treated for myeloma with melphalan and auto-SCT (n=112). Clinical comparisons were made at admission, and 'before' and 'after' initiating PN to discern differences and temporality. Actual infusion times were used for PN patients; time frames based on mean PN infusion days were created for the non-PN recipients. Oral intake was lower 'before' in PN vs non-PN patients (P<0.001); however, no differences in mucositis, emesis, infections or transfusions were detected 'before.' Incident hyperglycemia (≥7.0 mmol/L) was significant 'after' PN initiation, and PN recipients experienced delays in WBC (P<0.05) and platelet engraftment (P=0.009), and required significantly greater RBC (P=0.0014) and platelet (P=0.001) support 'after' than non-PN patients. Neutropenic fever and longer hospital stay were more frequent among PN vs non-PN recipients (P<0.001). Differences in 5-year mortality were not apparent. The findings fail to support clinical benefits of PN administration during auto-SCT for myeloma. Further study is needed to discern if hyperglycemia or feeding per se was deleterious in this patient population. PMID:23419432

  17. MicroRNA-155 deficiency promotes nephrin acetylation and attenuates renal damage in hyperglycemia-induced nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xu; You, Yanwu; Wang, Jie; Qin, Youling; Huang, Peng; Yang, Fafen

    2015-04-01

    MiR-155 has been reported to be involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses. But the role of miR-155 in hyperglycemia-induced nephropathy is still unknown. In our current study, 3-month-old male wild-type C57 mice and Mir-155(-/-) mice were used to establish hyperglycemia-induced nephropathy. In our hyperglycemia-induced nephropathy model, the expression of podocyte injury marker desmin was markedly increased in the diabetes group when compared with control. Diabetes also significantly decreased the levels of nephrin and acetylated nephrin, whereas the expression of miR-155 was markedly increased in diabetes group when compared with control. MiR-155(-/-) mice showed significantly increased expression of nephrin, acetylated nephrin, and Wilm's tumor-1 protein (WT-1) when compared with wild-type control. MiR-155 deficiency results in significantly decrease in IL-17A expression both in vivo and in vitro. And the increased expression of WT-1, nephrin, and ac-nephrin was reversed with additional treatment of rmIL-17. Furthermore, we found that the inhibited Th17 differentiation induced by miR-155 deficiency was dependent on increased expression of SOCS1. In conclusion, miR-155 deficiency promotes nephrin acetylation and attenuates renal damage in hyperglycemia-induced nephropathy. This was associated with inhibited IL-17 production through enhancement of SOCS1 expression. PMID:24969676

  18. Proinsulin-producing, hyperglycemia-induced adipose tissue macrophages underlie insulin resistance in high fat-fed diabetic mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adipose tissue macrophages play an important role in the pathogenesis of obese type 2 diabetes. High-fat diet-induced obesity has been shown to lead to adipose tissue macrophages accumulation in rodents;however, the impact of hyperglycemia on adipose tissue macrophages dynamics in high-fat diet-fed ...

  19. Cadmium and naphthalene-induced hyperglycemia in the fiddler crab, Uca pugilator: Differential modes of action on the neutroendocrine system

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, P.S.; Katyayani, R.V.; Fingerman, M.

    1996-03-01

    Hyperglycemia is a typical response of aquatic organisms to heavy metals. In crustaceans, the medulla terminalis X-organ-sinus gland neuroendocrine complex in the eyestalk is the source of the crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH). The role of CHH in pollutant-induced b1ood glucose changes has only recently begun to be studied. Reddy provided evidence that CHH mediates cadmium-induced hyperglycemia in the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii. In a study of another hormonally-regulated function, color changes, cadmium exposure resulted in pigment in the melanophores of the fiddler crab, Uca pugilator, becoming less dispersed than in unexposed crabs. Earlier studies showed that, like cadmium, both a PCB, Aroclor 1242, and naphthalene induced black pigment aggregation in Uca poor. In general, when crabs are exposed to a pollutant, hydrocarbon or cadmium, they aggregate the pigment in their melanophores, but apparently by different mechanisms. Hydrocarbons appear to inhibit release of black pigment-dispersing hormone (BDPH), whereas cadmium appears to inhibit its synthesis. These apparent different modes of action of cadmium and naphthalene on the color change mechanism led us to compare the impact of these pollutants on the hormonal regulation of blood glucose in Uca pugilator. The present study was performed to determine (1) whether cadmium and naphthalene induce hyperglycemia in Uca pugilator, (2) whether CH has a role, if naphthalene and cadmium do induce hyperglycemia, and (3) the effects, if any, of cadmium and naphthalene on CHH activity in the eyestalk neuroendocrine complex.

  20. Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis with atypical features.

    PubMed

    Catalan, Mauro; Naccarato, Marcello; Grandi, Fabio Chiodo; Capozzoli, Francesca; Koscica, Nadia; Pizzolato, Gilberto

    2009-02-01

    Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis (AHL) is a rare demyelinating disease mainly affecting children, characterized by acute onset, progressive course and high mortality. A 62-year-old man was admitted to our Unit for diplopia and ataxia ensuing 2 weeks after the onset of pneumonia. MRI T2-weighted images showed signal hyperintensities in the brainstem. Antibodies against Mycoplasma Pneumoniae and cold agglutinins were found. Two weeks later the patient had a worsening of his conditions: he developed left hemiplegia with motor focal seizures and the day after he was deeply comatose (GCS = 4). A second MRI scan showed extensive hyperintensities involving the whole right hemisphere white matter with a small parietal hemorrhagic area. The clinical and neuroimaging features suggested the diagnosis of AHL, Aciclovir in association with steroid therapy were administered and then plasmapheresis was started. After 30 days of coma, the patient gradually reacquired consciousness and motor functions; anyway a left hemiplegia persisted. PMID:19145402

  1. Perioperative glycemic control: use of a hospital-wide protocol to safely improve hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Michaelian, Nancy; Joshi, Renu; Gillman, Ed; Kratz, Ronald; Helmuth, Amy; Zimmerman, Karen; Klahre, Denise; Warner, Sandy; McBride, Vickie; Bailey, M Judy; Houseal, Linda

    2011-08-01

    Perioperative hyperglycemia impairs immunity and contributes to increased susceptibility to infection, higher incidence of multiorgan dysfunction, and greater mortality. Strict glycemic control is associated with lower infection rates, decreased length of stay (LOS), and faster recovery. A protocol that standardized preoperative education, testing, and treatment of elevated blood glucose (BG) safely improved perioperative glycemic control. Preoperative average BG improved from 191 to 155 mg/dL (P=.016); postoperative average BG decreased from 189 to 168 mg/dL (P=.094). The percentage of patients presenting with BG greater than 180 mg/dL preoperatively and achieving BG less than 180 mg/DL postoperatively increased from 21% to 43% (P = .09). Even though some results were statistically non-significant, the data showed a trend toward improvement with the new protocol. Good perioperative glycemic control, without an increased risk of hypoglycemia, is achievable. PMID:21803272

  2. Complexity of heart rate variability in type 2 diabetes - effect of hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, Mika P; Cornforth, David J; Kuoppa, Pekka; Lipponen, Jukka A; Jelinek, Herbert F

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is reduced in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients, suggesting dysfunction of cardiac autonomic regulation which has been associated with increased risk for pathological cardiac events. In this paper, we examined changes in HRV complexity in association to blood glucose level (BGL) and duration of diabetes. Resting HRV and BGL measurements of 32 healthy controls and 54 type 2 DM (T2DM) patients were analyzed. HRV complexity was assessed using Shannon entropy, sample entropy (SampEn), multiscale entropy (MSE), and multiscale Renyi entropy. HRV complexity increased with hyperglycemia indicated by increases in Shannon entropy and MSE and decreases in Renyi entropy for negative orders. Diabetes duration was strongly associated with Renyi entropy which increased for positive orders and decreased for negative orders as a function of disease duration. Shannon entropy, SampEn and MSE did not correlate with disease duration. PMID:24110996

  3. Hyper-G stress-induced hyperglycemia in rats mediated by glucoregulatory hormones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daligcon, B. C.; Oyama, J.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with possible relations of the hyperglycemic response of rats exposed to hyper-G stress to (1) alterations in blood levels of the glucoregulatory hormones and gluconeogenic substrates, and (2) changes in insulin response on muscle glucose uptake. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 250-300 g were used in the study. The results of the experiments indicate that the initial rapid rise in blood glucose of rats exposed to hyper-G stress is mediated by increases in circulating catecholamines and glucagon, both potent stimulators of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Lactate, derived from epinephrine stimulation of muscle glycogenolysis, appears to be a major precursor for the initial rise in blood glucose. The inhibition of the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by muscle tissues may be a factor in the observed sustained hyperglycemia.

  4. In vivo bioluminescence imaging of hyperglycemia exacerbating stem cells on choroidal neovascularization in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang; Wang, Yu; Hou, Hui-Yuan; Lyu, Yang; Wang, Hai-Yan; Yao, Li-Bo; Zhang, Jian; Cao, Feng; Wang, Yu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the influence of hyperglycemia on the severity of choroidal neovascularization (CNV), especially the involvement of bone marrow-derived cells (BMCs) and underlying mechanisms. METHODS BMCs from firefly luciferase (Fluc)/green fluorescent protein (GFP) double transgenic mice were transplanted into C57BL/6J wide-type mice. The recipient mice were injected intraperitoneally with streptozotocin (STZ) daily for 5 consecutive days to induce diabetes mellitus (DM), followed by CNV laser photocoagulation. The BMCs recruitment in CNV exposed to hyperglycemia was firstly examined in Fluc/GFP chimeric mice by in vivo optical bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and in vitro Fluc assays. The CNV severity was evaluated by H&E staining and choroidal flatmount. The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) was detected by Western Blot. RESULTS BLI showed that the BMCs exerted dynamic effects in CNV model in Fluc/GFP chimeric mice exposed to hyperglycemia. The signal intensity of transplanted Fluc+GFP+ BMCs in the DM chimeric mice was significantly higher than that in the control chimeric mice with CNV induction at days 5, 7, 14 and 21 (121861.67±9948.81 vs 144998.33±13787.13 photons/second/cm2/sr for control and DM mice, P5d<0.05; 178791.67±30350.8 vs 240166.67±22605.3, P7d<0.05; 124176.67±16253.52 vs 196376.67±18556.79, P14d<0.05; 97951.60±10343.09 vs 119510.00±14383.76, P21d<0.05), which was consistent with in vitro Fluc assay at day 7 [relative light units of Fluc (RLU1)], 215.00±52.05 vs 707.33±88.65, P<0.05; RLU1/ relative light units of renilla luciferase (RLU2), 0.90±0.17 vs 1.83±0.17, P<0.05]. The CNVs in the DM mice were wider than those in the control group at days 5, 7, 14 and 21 (147.83±17.36 vs 220.33±20.17 µm, P5d<0.05; 212.17±24.63 vs 326.83±19.49, P7d<0.05; 163.17±18.24 vs 265.17±20.55, P14d<0.05; 132.00±10.88 vs 205.33±12.98, P21d<0.05). The average area of CNV in the DM

  5. N-hydroxycinnamide derivatives of osthole ameliorate hyperglycemia through activation of AMPK and p38 MAPK.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Hwa; Wu, Hsueh-Hsia; Huang, Wei-Jan; Li, Yi-Ning; Lin, Ren-Jye; Lin, Shyr-Yi; Liang, Yu-Chih

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies found that osthole markedly reduced blood glucose levels in both db/db and ob/ob mice. To improve the antidiabetic activity of osthole, a series of N-hydroxycinnamide derivatives of osthole were synthesized, and their hypoglycemia activities were examined in vitro and in vivo. Both N-hydroxycinnamide derivatives of osthole, OHC-4p and OHC-2m, had the greatest potential for activating AMPK and increasing glucose uptake by L6 skeletal muscle cells. In addition, OHC-4p and OHC-2m time- and dose-dependently increased phosphorylation levels of AMPK and p38 MAPK. The AMPK inhibitor, compound C, and the p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, significantly reversed activation of AMPK and p38 MAPK, respectively, in OHC-4p- and OHC-2m-treated cells. Compound C and SB203580 also inhibited glucose uptake induced by OHC-4p and OHC-2m. Next, we found that OHC-4p and OHC-2m significantly increased glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation to plasma membranes and counteracted hyperglycemia in mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. These results suggest that activation of AMPK and p38 MAPK by OHC-4p and OHC-2m is associated with increased glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation and subsequently led to amelioration of hyperglycemia. Therefore, OHC-4p and OHC-2m might have potential as antidiabetic agents for treating type 2 diabetes. Our previous studies found that osthole markedly reduced blood glucose levels in both db/db and ob/ob mice. To improve the antidiabetic activity of osthole, a series of N-hydroxycinnamide derivatives of osthole were synthesized, and their hypoglycemia activities were examined in vitro and in vivo. Both N-hydroxycinnamide derivatives of osthole, OHC-4p and OHC-2m, had the greatest potential for activating AMPK and increasing glucose uptake by L6 skeletal muscle cells. In addition, OHC-4p and OHC-2m time- and dose-dependently increased phosphorylation levels of AMPK and p38 MAPK. The AMPK inhibitor, compound C, and the p38 MAPK inhibitor

  6. Current understanding of metformin effect on the control of hyperglycemia in diabetes.

    PubMed

    An, Hongying; He, Ling

    2016-03-01

    Metformin is a first-line oral anti-diabetic agent that has been used clinically to treat patients with type 2 diabetes for over 60 years. Due to its efficacy in therapy and affordable price, metformin is taken by more than 150 million people each year. Metformin improves hyperglycemia mainly through the suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis along with the improvement of insulin signaling. However, its mechanism of action remains partially understood and controversial, especially in regard to the role of AMPK in metformin's action and the mechanism of AMPK activation. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the understanding of metformin's suppression of hepatic glucose production and the mechanism related to the improvement of insulin signaling. PMID:26743209

  7. Low molecular weight heparin restores antithrombin III activity from hyperglycemia induced alterations.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Marchi, E; Palazzni, E; Quatraro, A; Giugliano, D

    1990-01-01

    Alteration of antithrombin III (ATIII) activity, glycemia level dependent, exists in diabetes mellitus. In this study the ability of a low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) (Fluxum, Alfa-Wassermann S.p.A., Bologna, Italy), as well as unfractioned héparin, to preserve ATIII activity from glucose-induced alterations, both in vitro and in vivo, is reported. The subcutaneous and intravenous LMWH and heparin administration increases basal depressed ATIII activity in diabetic patients. Heparin shows an equivalent effect on both anti-IIa and anti-Xa activity of ATIII, while LMWH is more effective in preserving the anti-Xa activity. Similarity, heparin preserves ATIII activity from hyperglycemia-induced alterations, during hyperglycemic clamp, and LMWH infusion is able to preserve a significant amount of anti-Xa activity from glucose-induced alterations. Since diabetic patients show a high incidence of thrombotic accidents, LMWH appears to be a promising innovation for the prevention of diabetic thrombophylia. PMID:2196192

  8. Relationship between hyperglycemia, hormone disturbances, and clinical evolution in severely hyperglycemic post surgery critically ill children: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To study hormonal changes associated with severe hyperglycemia in critically ill children and the relationship with prognosis and length of stay in intensive care. Methods Observational study in twenty-nine critically ill children with severe hyperglycemia defined as 2 blood glucose measurements greater than 180 mg/dL. Severity of illness was assessed using pediatric index of mortality (PIM2), pediatric risk of mortality (PRISM) score, and pediatric logistic organ dysfunction (PELOD) scales. Blood glucose, glycosuria, insulin, C-peptide, cortisol, corticotropin, insulinlike growth factor-1, growth hormone, thyrotropin, thyroxine, and treatment with insulin were recorded. β-cell function and insulin sensitivity and resistance were determined on the basis of the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), using blood glucose and C-peptide levels. Results The initial blood glucose level was 249 mg/dL and fell gradually to 125 mg/dL at 72 hours. Initial β-cell function (49.2%) and insulin sensitivity (13.2%) were low. At the time of diagnosis of hyperglycemia, 50% of the patients presented insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction, 46% presented isolated insulin resistance, and 4% isolated β-cell dysfunction. β-cell function improved rapidly but insulin resistance persisted. Initial glycemia did not correlate with any other factor, and there was no relationship between glycemia and mortality. Patients who died had higher cortisol and growth hormone levels at diagnosis. Length of stay was correlated by univariate analysis, but not by multivariate analysis, with C-peptide and glycemic control at 24 hours, insulin resistance, and severity of illness scores. Conclusions Critically ill children with severe hyperglycemia initially present decreased β-cell function and insulin sensitivity. Nonsurvivors had higher cortisol and growth hormone levels and developed hyperglycemia later than survivors. PMID:24628829

  9. Sympathetic nervous dysregulation in the absence of systolic left ventricular dysfunction in a rat model of insulin resistance with hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is strongly associated with cardiovascular dysfunction, derived in part from impairment of sympathetic nervous system signaling. Glucose, insulin, and non-esterified fatty acids are potent stimulants of sympathetic activity and norepinephrine (NE) release. We hypothesized that sustained hyperglycemia in the high fat diet-fed streptozotocin (STZ) rat model of sustained hyperglycemia with insulin resistance would exhibit progressive sympathetic nervous dysfunction in parallel with deteriorating myocardial systolic and/or diastolic function. Methods Cardiac sympathetic nervous integrity was investigated in vivo via biodistribution of the positron emission tomography radiotracer and NE analogue [11C]meta-hydroxyephedrine ([11C]HED). Cardiac systolic and diastolic function was evaluated by echocardiography. Plasma and cardiac NE levels and NE reuptake transporter (NET) expression were evaluated as correlative measurements. Results The animal model displays insulin resistance, sustained hyperglycemia, and progressive hypoinsulinemia. After 8 weeks of persistent hyperglycemia, there was a significant 13-25% reduction in [11C]HED retention in myocardium of STZ-treated hyperglycemic but not euglycemic rats as compared to controls. There was a parallel 17% reduction in immunoblot density for NE reuptake transporter, a 1.2 fold and 2.5 fold elevation of cardiac and plasma NE respectively, and no change in sympathetic nerve density. No change in ejection fraction or fractional area change was detected by echocardiography. Reduced heart rate, prolonged mitral valve deceleration time, and elevated transmitral early to atrial flow velocity ratio measured by pulse-wave Doppler in hyperglycemic rats suggest diastolic impairment of the left ventricle. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that sustained hyperglycemia is associated with elevated myocardial NE content and dysregulation of sympathetic nervous system signaling in the absence of

  10. [Etiology and pathogenesis of acute respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Ziliene, Violeta; Kondrotas, Anatolijus Juozas; Kevelaitis, Egidijus

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine factors influencing acute respiratory failure and pathogenesis according to literature and clinical findings in critically ill patients. The term "respiratory failure" implies the inability to maintain either the normal delivery of oxygen to tissues and release or the normal removal of carbon dioxide from the tissues. There are many patients suffering from acute respiratory failure caused by nosocomial pneumonia, septic syndrome, aspiration, interstitial or alveolar lung edema, thromboembolism of a. pulmonalis, polytrauma and lung contusion, acute respiratory distress syndrome, long-term mechanical ventilation of the lungs, acute lung injury, status asthmaticus, rather massive transfusions of blood products, and lipid embolism in the intensive care unit. There are actually three processes involved: the transfer of oxygen across the alveolus, the transport to the tissues (by cardiac output), and the removal of carbon dioxide from blood into the alveolus with subsequent exhalation into the environment. Failure of any step in this process can lead to respiratory failure. Long-term hypoxia causes ischemic changes and dysfunction of brain, heart, kidney, lungs and can worsen the course of disease or cause higher mortality. It is important to determine the pathogenetic mechanisms of acute respiratory failure, estimate the main parameters and their interrelations and prescribe proper treatment. PMID:15064552

  11. Effects of hyperglycemia on the cerebrovascular response to rhythmic handgrip exercise.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Sok; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Rasmussen, Peter; Plomgaard, Peter; Ogoh, Shigehiko; Secher, Niels H; van Lieshout, Johannes J

    2007-07-01

    Dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA) is challenged by exercise and may become less effective when exercise is exhaustive. Exercise may increase arterial glucose concentration, and we evaluated whether the cerebrovascular response to exercise is affected by hyperglycemia. The effects of a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (EU) and hyperglycemic clamp (HY) on the cerebrovascular (CVRI) and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) responses were evaluated in seven healthy subjects at rest and during rhythmic handgrip exercise. Transfer function analysis of the dynamic relationship between beat-to-beat changes in mean arterial pressure and middle cerebral artery (MCA) mean blood flow velocity (V(mean)) was used to assess dynamic CA. At rest, SVRI decreased with HY and EU (P < 0.01). CVRI was maintained with EU but became reduced with HY [11% (SD 3); P < 0.01], and MCA V(mean) increased (P < 0.05), whereas brain catecholamine uptake and arterial Pco(2) did not change significantly. HY did not affect the normalized low-frequency gain between mean arterial pressure and MCA V(mean) or the phase shift, indicating maintained dynamic CA. With HY, the increase in CVRI associated with exercise was enhanced (19 +/- 7% vs. 9 +/- 7%; P < 0.05), concomitant with a larger increase in heart rate and cardiac output and a larger reduction in SVRI (22 +/- 4% vs. 14 +/- 2%; P < 0.05). Thus hyperglycemia lowered cerebral vascular tone independently of CA capacity at rest, whereas dynamic CA remained able to modulate cerebral blood flow around the exercise-induced increase in MCA V(mean). These findings suggest that elevated blood glucose does not explain that dynamic CA is affected during intense exercise. PMID:17369470

  12. Hyperglycemia reduces functional expression of astrocytic Kir4.1 channels and glial glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Aponte, D E; Méndez-González, M P; Rivera-Pagán, A F; Kucheryavykh, Y V; Kucheryavykh, L Y; Skatchkov, S N; Eaton, M J

    2015-12-01

    Diabetics are at risk for a number of serious health complications including an increased incidence of epilepsy and poorer recovery after ischemic stroke. Astrocytes play a critical role in protecting neurons by maintaining extracellular homeostasis and preventing neurotoxicity through glutamate uptake and potassium buffering. These functions are aided by the presence of potassium channels, such as Kir4.1 inwardly rectifying potassium channels, in the membranes of astrocytic glial cells. The purpose of the present study was to determine if hyperglycemia alters Kir4.1 potassium channel expression and homeostatic functions of astrocytes. We used q-PCR, Western blot, patch-clamp electrophysiology studying voltage and potassium step responses and a colorimetric glutamate clearance assay to assess Kir4.1 channel levels and homeostatic functions of rat astrocytes grown in normal and high glucose conditions. We found that astrocytes grown in high glucose (25 mM) had an approximately 50% reduction in Kir4.1 mRNA and protein expression as compared with those grown in normal glucose (5mM). These reductions occurred within 4-7 days of exposure to hyperglycemia, whereas reversal occurred between 7 and 14 days after return to normal glucose. The decrease in functional Kir channels in the astrocytic membrane was confirmed using barium to block Kir channels. In the presence of 100-μM barium, the currents recorded from astrocytes in response to voltage steps were reduced by 45%. Furthermore, inward currents induced by stepping extracellular [K(+)]o from 3 to 10mM (reflecting potassium uptake) were 50% reduced in astrocytes grown in high glucose. In addition, glutamate clearance by astrocytes grown in high glucose was significantly impaired. Taken together, our results suggest that down-regulation of astrocytic Kir4.1 channels by elevated glucose may contribute to the underlying pathophysiology of diabetes-induced CNS disorders and contribute to the poor prognosis after stroke

  13. Effect of Algorithm Aggressiveness on the Performance of the Hypoglycemia-Hyperglycemia Minimizer (HHM) System

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Thomas W.; Rhein, Kathleen; Dassau, Eyal; Breton, Marc D.; Patek, Stephen D.; Anhalt, Henry; Kovatchev, Boris P.; Doyle, Francis J.; Anderson, Stacey M.; Zisser, Howard; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Hypoglycemia-Hyperglycemia Minimizer (HHM) System aims to mitigate glucose excursions by preemptively modulating insulin delivery based on continuous glucose monitor (CGM) measurements. The “aggressiveness factor” is a key parameter in the HHM System algorithm, affecting how readily the system adjusts insulin infusion in response to changing CGM levels. Methods: Twenty adults with type 1 diabetes were studied in closed-loop in a clinical research center for approximately 26 hours. This analysis focused on the effect of the aggressiveness factor on the insulin dosing characteristics of the algorithm and, to a lesser extent, on the glucose control results observed. Results: As the aggressiveness factor increased from conservative to medium to aggressive: the maximum observed insulin dose delivered by the algorithm—which is designed to give doses that are corrective in nature every 5 minutes—increased (1.00 vs 1.15 vs 2.20 U, respectively); tendency to adhere to the subject’s nominal basal dose decreased (61.9% vs 56.6% vs 53.4%); and readiness to decrease insulin below basal also increased (18.4% vs 19.4% vs 25.2%). Glucose analyses by both CGM and Yellow Springs Instruments (YSI) indicated that the aggressive setting of the algorithm resulted in the least time spent at levels >180 mg/dL, and the most time spent between 70-180 mg/dL. There was no severe hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, or severe hypoglycemia for any of the aggressiveness values investigated. Conclusions: These analyses underscore the importance of investigating the sensitivity of the HHM System to its key parameters, such as the aggressiveness factor, to guide future development decisions. PMID:24876443

  14. Effect of algorithm aggressiveness on the performance of the Hypoglycemia-Hyperglycemia Minimizer (HHM) System.

    PubMed

    Finan, Daniel A; McCann, Thomas W; Rhein, Kathleen; Dassau, Eyal; Breton, Marc D; Patek, Stephen D; Anhalt, Henry; Kovatchev, Boris P; Doyle, Francis J; Anderson, Stacey M; Zisser, Howard; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna

    2014-07-01

    The Hypoglycemia-Hyperglycemia Minimizer (HHM) System aims to mitigate glucose excursions by preemptively modulating insulin delivery based on continuous glucose monitor (CGM) measurements. The "aggressiveness factor" is a key parameter in the HHM System algorithm, affecting how readily the system adjusts insulin infusion in response to changing CGM levels. Twenty adults with type 1 diabetes were studied in closed-loop in a clinical research center for approximately 26 hours. This analysis focused on the effect of the aggressiveness factor on the insulin dosing characteristics of the algorithm and, to a lesser extent, on the glucose control results observed. As the aggressiveness factor increased from conservative to medium to aggressive: the maximum observed insulin dose delivered by the algorithm—which is designed to give doses that are corrective in nature every 5 minutes—increased (1.00 vs 1.15 vs 2.20 U, respectively); tendency to adhere to the subject's nominal basal dose decreased (61.9% vs 56.6% vs 53.4%); and readiness to decrease insulin below basal also increased (18.4% vs 19.4% vs 25.2%). Glucose analyses by both CGM and Yellow Springs Instruments (YSI) indicated that the aggressive setting of the algorithm resulted in the least time spent at levels >180 mg/dL, and the most time spent between 70-180 mg/dL. There was no severe hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, or severe hypoglycemia for any of the aggressiveness values investigated. These analyses underscore the importance of investigating the sensitivity of the HHM System to its key parameters, such as the aggressiveness factor, to guide future development decisions. PMID:24876443

  15. Naringin Reduces Hyperglycemia-Induced Cardiac Fibrosis by Relieving Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Adebiyi, Olubunmi A.; Adebiyi, Oluwafeyisetan O.; Owira, Peter M. O.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hyperglycemia promotes myocardial fibrotic lesions through upregulation of PKC and p38 in response to redox changes. The effects of naringin on hyperglycemia-induced myocardial fibrotic changes and its putative effects on PKC-β and p38 protein expression in type 1 rat model of diabetes are hereby investigated. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups I-VI. Groups I and II, were orally treated with distilled water {3.0 ml/kg body weight (BW)} and naringin (50 mg/kg BW), respectively. Groups III, IV, V and VI were rendered diabetic by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg, BW) and were similarly treated with subcutaneous insulin (8.0 I.U/kg BW, twice daily), naringin (50 mg/kg BW), distilled water (3.0 ml/Kg BW) and ramipril (3.0 mg/kg/BW), respectively. The animals were sacrificed after 56 days by halothane overdose; blood and heart samples removed for further analysis. Results The untreated diabetic rats exhibited significantly increased oxidative stress, NADPH oxidase activity, increased cardiac fibrosis, PKC-β and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase expression compared to controls. Naringin treatment significantly ameliorated these changes in diabetic rats compared to the untreated diabetic controls. Conclusions Naringin’s amelioration of myocardial fibrosis by modulating p38 and PKC-β protein expression possibly through its known antioxidant actions and may therefore be useful in retarding the progression of fibrosis in a diabetic heart. PMID:26967518

  16. Hyperglycemia Reduces Efficiency of Brain Networks in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Jin; Yu, Ji Hee; Shin, Mi-Seon

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that the brain is an important target of diabetic complications. Since brain regions are interconnected to form a large-scale neural network, we investigated whether severe hyperglycemia affects the topology of the brain network in people with type 2 diabetes. Twenty middle-aged (average age: 54 years) individuals with poorly controlled diabetes (HbA1c: 8.9−14.6%, 74−136 mmol/mol) and 20 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy volunteers were recruited. Graph theoretic network analysis was performed with axonal fiber tractography and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) using diffusion tensor imaging. Associations between the blood glucose level and white matter network characteristics were investigated. Individuals with diabetes had lower white matter network efficiency (P<0.001) and longer white matter path length (P<0.05) compared to healthy individuals. Higher HbA1c was associated with lower network efficiency (r = −0.53, P = 0.001) and longer network path length (r = 0.40, P<0.05). A disruption in local microstructural integrity was found in the multiple white matter regions and associated with higher HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose levels (corrected P<0.05). Poorer glycemic control is associated with lower efficiency and longer connection paths of the global brain network in individuals with diabetes. Chronic hyperglycemia in people with diabetes may disrupt the brain’s topological integration, and lead to mental slowing and cognitive impairment. PMID:27336309

  17. Musa sapientum with exercises attenuates hyperglycemia and pancreatic islet cells degeneration in alloxan-diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Akinlolu, Adelaja Abdulazeez; Salau, Bamidele A.; Ekor, Martins; Otulana, Jubril

    2015-01-01

    Aim: We tested the hypothesis that administrations of methanolic extracts of Musa sapientum sucker (MEMS) with exercises attenuated hyperglycemia in alloxan-diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 adult male rats were divided into equal eight groups. Normoglycemic Group A was Control. Alloxan (180 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered to rats in Groups B - H to induce diabetes. Group B (diabetic control) received physiological saline. Groups C - H received MEMS (5 mg/kg), MEMS (10 mg/kg), Glibenclamide (5 mg/kg), MEMS (5 mg/kg) + exercises, MEMS (10 mg/kg) + exercises and Exercises only, respectively. Changes in body weight, blood glucose levels (BGL) and pancreatic histology were evaluated during or at the end of experiment. Body weights and BGL of rats were expressed as mean ± standard deviation and analyzed using the statistical software program SPSS 15. Statistical comparisons were done using the Student’s t-test for unpaired samples. Differences between groups were determined as significant at P ≤ 0.05. Results: Significantly (P < 0.05) decreased bodyweight was observed in B and H compared to A and C - G. Treatment with MEMS significantly (P < 0.05) decreased elevated BGL in C and D. Hypoglycemic effect of MEMS appeared enhanced with exercises in F and G. Exercises regimen alone (H) resulted in percentage reduction in BGL lower than those of C - G. Histopathological examinations revealed normal pancreas (A), atrophied islet cells (B), hyperplasia with adequate population of islet cells (C - G), and reduced hyperplasia of islet cells (H). Conclusion: MEMS with exercises attenuated hyperglycemia in alloxan-diabetic rats. PMID:26401408

  18. Pathogenesis and management of postprandial hyperglycemia: role of incretin-based therapies

    PubMed Central

    Gerich, John

    2013-01-01

    Postprandial plasma glucose concentrations are an important contributor to glycemic control. There is evidence suggesting that postprandial hyperglycemia may be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are antidiabetic agents that predominantly reduce postprandial plasma glucose levels. DPP-4 inhibitors are associated with fewer gastrointestinal side effects than GLP-1 receptor agonists and are administered orally, unlike GLP-1 analogs, which are administered as subcutaneous injections. GLP-1 receptor agonists are somewhat more effective than DPP-4 inhibitors in reducing postprandial plasma glucose and are usually associated with significant weight loss. For these reasons, GLP-1 receptor agonists are generally preferred over DPP-4 inhibitors as part of combination treatment regimens in patients with glycated hemoglobin levels above 8.0%. This article reviews the pathogenesis of postprandial hyperglycemia, the mechanisms by which GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors reduce postprandial plasma glucose concentrations, and the results of recent clinical trials (ie, published 2008 to October 2012) that evaluated the effects of these agents on postprandial plasma glucose levels when evaluated as monotherapy compared with placebo or as add-on therapy to metformin, a sulfonylurea, or insulin. Findings from recent clinical studies suggest that both GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors could become valuable treatment options for optimizing glycemic control in patients unable to achieve glycated hemoglobin goals on basal insulin, with the added benefits of weight loss and a low risk of hypoglycemia. PMID:24403842

  19. Short-term diabetic hyperglycemia suppresses celiac ganglia neurotransmission, thereby impairing sympathetically mediated glucagon responses.

    PubMed

    Mundinger, Thomas O; Cooper, Ellis; Coleman, Michael P; Taborsky, Gerald J

    2015-08-01

    Short-term hyperglycemia suppresses superior cervical ganglia neurotransmission. If this ganglionic dysfunction also occurs in the islet sympathetic pathway, sympathetically mediated glucagon responses could be impaired. Our objectives were 1) to test for a suppressive effect of 7 days of streptozotocin (STZ) diabetes on celiac ganglia (CG) activation and on neurotransmitter and glucagon responses to preganglionic nerve stimulation, 2) to isolate the defect in the islet sympathetic pathway to the CG itself, and 3) to test for a protective effect of the WLD(S) mutation. We injected saline or nicotine in nondiabetic and STZ-diabetic rats and measured fos mRNA levels in whole CG. We electrically stimulated the preganglionic or postganglionic nerve trunk of the CG in nondiabetic and STZ-diabetic rats and measured portal venous norepinephrine and glucagon responses. We repeated the nicotine and preganglionic nerve stimulation studies in nondiabetic and STZ-diabetic WLD(S) rats. In STZ-diabetic rats, the CG fos response to nicotine was suppressed, and the norepinephrine and glucagon responses to preganglionic nerve stimulation were impaired. In contrast, the norepinephrine and glucagon responses to postganglionic nerve stimulation were normal. The CG fos response to nicotine, and the norepinephrine and glucagon responses to preganglionic nerve stimulation, were normal in STZ-diabetic WLD(S) rats. In conclusion, short-term hyperglycemia's suppressive effect on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of the CG impairs sympathetically mediated glucagon responses. WLD(S) rats are protected from this dysfunction. The implication is that this CG dysfunction may contribute to the impaired glucagon response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia seen early in type 1 diabetes. PMID:26037249

  20. Pathogenesis of hyperglycemia in genetically obese-hyperglycemic rats, Wistar fatty: presence of hepatic insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Y; Shimura, Y; Ikeda, H

    1989-02-01

    The present studies were designed to clarify the contribution of the liver to the development of hyperglycemia in Wistar fatty rats. The hepatic activities of insulin-inducible enzymes involved in glycolysis (glucokinase; GK and pyruvate kinase) and lipogenesis (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), were higher in fatty rats than in lean rats at 4 and 8 weeks of age because of the higher insulin levels in the former. Thereafter, the GK activities of fatty rats decreased slightly in spite of severe hyperinsulinemia, and did not differ from those of lean rats. In addition, fatty rats had higher levels of insulin-suppressible gluconeogenic enzymes, glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and fructose-1, 6-diphosphatase. These findings indicate that the hepatic enzymes of fatty rats are resistant to insulin. This postulation was supported by the fact that the hepatic enzyme activities of fatty rats showed a lower response to changes in plasma insulin levels produced by fasting and refeeding. The G6Pase/GK ratio, which indicates net glucose handling in the liver, increased in fatty rats and decreased in lean rats with advancing age, suggesting that hepatic glucose production in fatty rats becomes dominant with advancing age. The changes in hepatic glycolytic intermediates supported this suggestion; the glycolytic steps both from glucose to glucose-6-phosphate and from phospho-enolpyruvate to pyruvate in fatty rats were accelerated at 5 weeks of age, but suppressed at 12 weeks of age. These results indicate that insulin resistance in the hepatic enzyme regulation may contribute to the development of hyperglycemia in Wistar fatty rats. PMID:2543549

  1. Worsening Hypoxemia in the Face of Increasing PEEP: A Case of Large Pulmonary Embolism in the Setting of Intracardiac Shunt

    PubMed Central

    Granati, Glen T.; Teressa, Getu

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 40 Final Diagnosis: Patent foramen ovale Symptoms: Dyspnea exertional • hemoptysis • shortness of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Airway pressure release ventilation Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Patent foramen ovale (PFO) are common, normally resulting in a left to right shunt or no net shunting. Pulmonary embolism (PE) can cause sustained increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and right atrial pressure. Increasing positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) improves oxygenation at the expense of increasing intrathoracic pressures (ITP). Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) decreases shunt fraction, improves ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) matching, increases cardiac output, and decreases right atrial pressure by facilitating low airway pressure. Case Report: A 40-year-old man presented with dyspnea and hemoptysis. Oxygen saturation (SaO2) 80% on room air with A a gradient of 633 mmHg. Post-intubation SaO2 dropped to 71% on assist control, FiO2 100%, and PEEP of 5 cmH20. Successive PEEP dropped SaO2 to 60–70% and blood pressure plummeted. APRV was initaiated with improvement in SaO2 to 95% and improvement in blood pressure. Hemiparesis developed and CT head showed infarction. CT pulmonary angiogram found a large pulmonary embolism. Transthoracic echocardiogram detected right-to left intracardiac shunt, with large PFO. Conclusions: There should be suspicion for a PFO when severe hypoxemia paradoxically worsens in response to increasing airway pressures. Concomitant venous and arterial thromboemboli should prompt evaluation for intra cardiac shunt. Patients with PFO and hypoxemia should be evaluated for causes of sustained right-to left pressure gradient, such as PE. Management should aim to decrease PVR and optimize V/Q matching by treating the inciting incident (e.g., thrombolytics in PE) and by minimizing ITP. APRV can minimize PVR and maximize V/Q ratios and

  2. Acute malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Dupont, John S

    2006-01-01

    Acute malocclusion can result from disturbances in the maxillary/mandibular tooth relationship. These alterations in the occlusal position can result from high fillings, sinus problems, abscesses, periodontal disease, and moving or erupting teeth. Conditions seen less frequently include acute malocclusions secondary to an event (such as trauma) that make a stable dental relationship an unstable one. Patients can demonstrate any of a number of clinical conditions that interfere with their comfort and ability to function. This article provides information on some of the less familiar causes of acute malocclusion. PMID:16689064

  3. Prevalence of unrecognized diabetes mellitus in patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abdullatef, W K; Al-Aqeedi, R F; Dabdoob, W; Hajar, H A; Bener, A; Gehani, A A

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the prevalence of unrecognized diabetes mellitus (DM) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) as determined by elevated glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and random plasma glucose (RPG) levels. This prospective study recruited 583 patients admitted with ACS without previous diagnosis of DM during 1-year period. Glycosylated hemoglobin was checked for most patients especially those with high values of FPG and or RPG. Patients were classified according to their glycemic state into 123 (21.1%) with DM, 82 (14.1%) with prediabetes, and 57(9.8%) with stress hyperglycemia, while 321 (55%) were classified as nondiabetics. Glycosylated hemoglobin estimation in the setting of ACS was helpful in the diagnosis of DM to eliminate the effect of stress-induced hyperglycemia that might accompany this condition. PMID:22550348

  4. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by viruses that attack the lining of the bronchial tree ... infection. As your body fights back against these viruses, more swelling occurs and more mucus is produced. ...

  5. Acute Pericarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... large pericardial effusions). Acute pericarditis usually responds to colchicine or NSAIDs (such as aspirin and ibuprofen ) taken ... reduce pain but relieves it by reducing inflammation. Colchicine also decreases the chance of pericarditis returning later. ...

  6. Exposure to the Chinese Famine in Early Life and the Risk of Hyperglycemia and Type 2 Diabetes in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanping; He, Yuna; Qi, Lu; Jaddoe, Vincent W.; Feskens, Edith J.M.; Yang, Xiaoguang; Ma, Guansheng; Hu, Frank B.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Early developmental adaptations in response to undernutrition may play an essential role in susceptibility to type 2 diabetes, particularly for those experiencing a “mismatched rich nutritional environment” in later life. We examined the associations of exposure to the Chinese famine (1959–1961) during fetal life and childhood with the risk of hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes in adulthood. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used the data for 7,874 rural adults born between 1954 and 1964 in selected communities from the cross-sectional 2002 China National Nutrition and Health Survey. Hyperglycemia was defined as fasting plasma glucose ≥6.1 mmol/l and/or 2-h plasma glucose ≥7.8 mmol/l and/or a previous clinical diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. RESULTS Prevalences of hyperglycemia among adults in nonexposed, fetal exposed, early-childhood, mid-childhood, and late-childhood exposed cohorts were 2.4%, 5.7%, 3.9%, 3.4%, and 5.9%, respectively. In severely affected famine areas, fetal-exposed subjects had an increased risk of hyperglycemia compared with nonexposed subjects (odds ratio = 3.92; 95% CI: 1.64–9.39; P = 0.002); this difference was not observed in less severely affected famine areas (odds ratio = 0.57; 95% CI: 0.25–1.31; P = 0.185). The odds ratios were significantly different between groups from the severe and less severe famine areas (P for interaction = 0.001). In severely affected famine areas, fetal-exposed subjects who followed an affluent/Western dietary pattern (odds ratios = 7.63; 95% CI: 2.41–24.1; P = 0.0005) or who had a higher economic status in later life experienced a substantially elevated risk of hyperglycemia (odds ratios = 6.20; 95% CI: 2.08–18.5; P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Fetal exposure to the severe Chinese famine increases the risk of hyperglycemia in adulthood. This association appears to be exacerbated by a nutritionally rich environment in later life. PMID:20622161

  7. Do changes in subjective sleep and biological rhythms predict worsening in postpartum depressive symptoms? A prospective study across the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Krawczak, Elizabeth M; Minuzzi, Luciano; Hidalgo, Maria Paz; Frey, Benicio N

    2016-08-01

    Abnormalities of sleep and biological rhythms have been widely implicated in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD). However, less is known about the influence of biological rhythm disruptions across the perinatal period on postpartum depression (PPD). The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the relationship between subjective changes in both sleep and biological rhythms and worsening of depressive symptoms from pregnancy to the postpartum period in women with and without mood disorders. Eighty-three participants (38 euthymic women with a history of a mood disorder and 45 healthy controls) were studied. Participants completed subjective assessments of sleep (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), biological rhythm disturbances (Biological Rhythms Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry), and depressive symptoms (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale) prospectively at two time points: third trimester of pregnancy and at 6-12 weeks postpartum. Multivariate regression analyses showed that changes in biological rhythms across the perinatal period predicted worsening of depressive symptoms in both groups. Moreover, women with a history of a mood disorder showed higher levels of sleep and biological rhythm disruption during both pregnancy and the postpartum period. These findings suggest that disruptions in biological rhythms during the perinatal period increase the risk for postpartum mood worsening in healthy pregnant as well as in pregnant women with a history of mood disorders. PMID:26920913

  8. PDX1-engineered embryonic stem cell-derived insulin producing cells regulate hyperglycemia in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Type 1 diabetes can be treated by the transplantation of cadaveric whole pancreata or isolated pancreatic islets. However, this form of treatment is hampered by the chronic shortage of cadaveric donors. Embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived insulin producing cells (IPCs) offer a potentially novel source of unlimited cells for transplantation to treat type 1 and possibly type 2 diabetes. However, thus far, the lack of a reliable protocol for efficient differentiation of ES cells into IPCs has hindered the clinical exploitation of these cells. Methods To efficiently generate IPCs using ES cells, we have developed a double transgenic ES cell line R1Pdx1AcGFP/RIP-Luc that constitutively expresses pancreatic β-cell-specific transcription factor pancreatic and duodenal homeobox gene 1 (Pdx1) as well as rat insulin promoter (RIP) driven luciferase reporter. We have established several protocols for the reproducible differentiation of ES cells into IPCs. The differentiation of ES cells into IPCs was monitored by immunostaining as well as real-time quantitative RT-PCR for pancreatic β-cell-specific markers. Pancreatic β-cell specific RIP became transcriptionally active following the differentiation of ES cells into IPCs and induced the expression of the luciferase reporter. Glucose stimulated insulin secretion by the ES cell-derived IPCs was measured by ELISA. Further, we have investigated the therapeutic efficacy of ES cell-derived IPCs to correct hyperglycemia in syngeneic streptozotocin (STZ)-treated diabetic mice. The long term fate of the transplanted IPCs co-expressing luciferase in syngeneic STZ-induced diabetic mice was monitored by real time noninvasive in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Results We have recently demonstrated that spontaneous in vivo differentiation of R1Pdx1AcGFP/RIP-Luc ES cell-derived pancreatic endoderm-like cells (PELCs) into IPCs corrects hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. Here, we investigated whether R1Pdx1AcGFP/RIP-Luc ES cells

  9. Hyperinsulinemia prevents prolonged hyperglycemia after intense exercise in insulin-dependent diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Sigal, R J; Purdon, C; Fisher, S J; Halter, J B; Vranic, M; Marliss, E B

    1994-10-01

    Hyperglycemia with accompanying hyperinsulinemia occurs after brief, greater than 85% maximum oxygen consumption exercise to exhaustion in normal subjects and persists up to 60 min of recovery. To determine the importance of endogenous insulin secretion during and after intense exercise, responses to exercise of lean fit male post-absorptive insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) subjects, aged 18-34 yr, were compared with those of control subjects (C; n = 6). Three iv insulin protocols were employed: hyperglycemic (HG; n = 7) and euglycemic (EG1; n = 6) with constant insulin infusion, and euglycemic with doubled insulin infusion during recovery (EG2; n = 6). Overnight iv insulin was adjusted to achieve prolonged euglycemia (5.4 +/- 0.3 mmol/L) or hyperglycemia (8.6 +/- 0.3 mmol/L) before exercise. This allowed for comparisons between HG and EG1 (constant infusion) and between C and EG2 (to approximate physiological hyperinsulinemia by doubling the infusion rates at exhaustion for 56 +/- 7 min during recovery). Subjects exercised to 89-98% of their individual maximum oxygen consumption for 12.8 +/- 0.3 min. Glycemia increased to maximum values at 6 min of recovery (9.8 +/- 0.5 in HG, 6.9 +/- 0.4 in EG1, 7.3 +/- 0.3 in EG2, and 6.9 +/- 0.4 mmol/L in C). Whereas in EG2 and C, glucose returned to resting values in 50-80 min, it remained elevated at 120 min recovery in HG and EG1. During exercise, [3-3H]-glucose-determined glucose production increased markedly and exceeded disappearance in all groups, but less so in the HG subjects than in the other groups. An early recovery decline in glucose production did not differ among groups, but MCR (rate of glucose disappearance/glycemia) were markedly lower in HG and EG1, in whom plasma free insulin remained unchanged from 15 min of recovery onward (MCR, 1.6-1.9 vs. 2.3-2.8 mL/kg.min in C). Doubling the insulin infusion rate in EG2 restored the MCR response to that of C subjects. In summary, constant insulin infusion is

  10. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePlus

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  11. Contribution of abnormal muscle and liver glucose metabolism to postprandial hyperglycemia in NIDDM

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrakou, A.; Kelley, D.; Veneman, T.; Jenssen, T.; Pangburn, T.; Reilly, J.; Gerich, J. )

    1990-11-01

    To assess the role of muscle and liver in the pathogenesis of postprandial hyperglycemia in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), we administered an oral glucose load enriched with (14C)glucose to 10 NIDDM subjects and 10 age- and weight-matched nondiabetic volunteers and compared muscle glucose disposal by measuring forearm balance of glucose, lactate, alanine, O2, and CO2. In addition, we used the dual-lable isotope method to compare overall rates of glucose appearance (Ra) and disappearance (Rd), suppression of endogenous glucose output, and splanchnic glucose sequestration. During the initial 1-1.5 h after glucose ingestion, plasma glucose increased by approximately 8 mM in NIDDM vs. approximately 3 mM in nondiabetic subjects (P less than 0.01); overall glucose Ra was nearly 11 g greater in NIDDM than nondiabetic subjects, but glucose Rd was not significantly different in NIDDM and nondiabetic subjects. The greater overall glucose Ra of NIDDM subjects was due to 6.8 g greater endogenous glucose output (13.7 +/- 1.1 vs. 6.8 +/- 1.0 g, P less than 0.01) and 3.8 g less oral glucose splanchnic sequestration of the oral load (31.4 +/- 1.5 vs. 27.5 +/- 0.9 g, P less than 0.05). Although glucose taken up by muscle was not significantly different in NIDDM and nondiabetic subjects (39.3 +/- 3.5 vs. 41.0 +/- 2.5 g/5 h), a greater amount of the glucose taken up by muscle in NIDDM was released as lactate and alanine (11.7 +/- 1.0 vs. 5.2 +/- 0.3 g in nondiabetic subjects, P less than 0.01), and less was stored (11.7 +/- 1.3 vs. 16.9 +/- 1.5 g, P less than 0.05). We conclude that increased systemic glucose delivery, due primarily to reduced suppression of endogenous hepatic glucose output and, to a lesser extent, reduced splanchnic glucose sequestration, is the predominant factor responsible for postprandial hyperglycemia in NIDDM.

  12. Hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia and glycemic variability in the elderly: a fatal triad?

    PubMed

    Monami, Matteo; Aleffi, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most important causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality; the incidence of chronic complications of diabetes appears to be closely related to the degree of hyperglycaemia. However, results of clinical trials showed that intensive treatment of hyperglycaemia prevents microvascular complications, but has little or no effect on the incidence of cardiovascular events. Different hypoglycaemic drugs show different effects on cardiovascular risk. However, those trials have shown a neutral effect on cardiovascular mortality. This paradoxical result could be explained with the frequent use, in the past, of glucose-lowering agents capable of increasing the risk of hypoglicemia, glycemic variability and weight gain. In conclusion, an adequate glycemic control, in particular in elderly patients, should be achieved, whenever possible, using agents not inducing hypogycemia, glucose fluctuations, and weight gain. In fact, hypoglycaemia and glucose variability should be considered as independent cardiovascular risk factors to a similar extent to hyperglycemia. In this article, the author will review literature supporting the hypothesis that hyperglycemia, hypoglycaemia and glycemic variability are a fatal triad capable of increasing morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus. RiassuntoIl diabete mellito è una delle più importanti cause di morbilità e mortalità cardiovascolare, ed è stata dimostrata una stretta correlazione tra compenso glicometabolico ed incidenza di complicanze croniche del diabete mellito. Tuttavia, negli studi di intervento, il controllo accurato dell'iperglicemia sembra poter prevenire le complicanze microvascolari, ma ha effetti soltanto marginali sull'incidenza di eventi cardiovascolari secondari a malattia macrovascolare. Inoltre, i grandi trial di intervento hanno mostrato come la riduzione degli eventi cardiovascolari non si accompagni ad una riduzione della mortalità cardiovascolare. Tale

  13. Starting bedtime glargine versus NPH insulin in poorly controlled type 2 diabetic patients with various hyperglycemia types (fasting type or postprandial type).

    PubMed

    Vähätalo, Markku A; Viikari, Jorma; Rönnemaa, Tapani

    2014-04-01

    Our aim was to compare the effects of an intermediate acting human insulin (NPH) and a long-acting insulin analog, insulin glargine, in insulin naïve type 2 diabetes patients, stratified by the type of hyperglycemia (fasting or postprandial type). Based on different action profiles, we hypothesized that patients having different hyperglycemia types would react differently when treated with these insulins. This is a post hoc analysis of the Lanmet study data. The Lanmet study was a randomized, 36-week controlled insulin initiation study in type 2 diabetes patients. 109 subjects with baseline HbA1c >8.0% (64 mmol/mol) completed the study. The patients were divided into two groups according to fasting glucose (mmol/l)/HbA1c (%) ratio. Patients with a ratio ≥1.3 were defined as having fasting type and those with a ratio <1.3 as having postprandial type hyperglycemia. The main outcome measures were change in HbA1c and body weight, and final insulin dose. Independently of insulin type, compared to patients with postprandial type hyperglycemia, those with fasting type hyperglycemia had 2.1 kg/m(2) greater initial BMI (p = 0.044), gained 2.0 kg more weight (p = 0.020, adjusted for baseline BMI p = 0.035), and had 36% greater final insulin dose/kg (p = 0.001). With respect to hyperglycemia type, there was no difference between NPH and glargine in their effects on HbA1c. When starting bedtime insulin in type 2 diabetes patients, those with fasting type hyperglycemia are prone to greater weight gain. Hyperglycemia type does not help in identifying patients who would benefit specially from either NPH insulin or insulin glargine. PMID:23880900

  14. Recurrent Acute Liver Failure Because of Acute Hepatitis Induced by Organic Solvents: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ito, Daisuke; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Ito, Kyoji; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Nakagawa, Hayato; Fujinaga, Hidetaka; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    The authors present a case of recurrent acute liver failure because of occupational exposure to organic solvents. A 35-year-old man with a 3-week history of worsening jaundice and flu-like symptoms was admitted to our hospital. Viral hepatitis serology and autoimmune factors were negative. The authors considered liver transplantation, but the patient's liver function spontaneously recovered. Liver biopsy revealed massive infiltration of neutrophils, but the cause of the acute hepatitis was not identified. Four months after discharge, the patient's liver function worsened again. The authors considered the possibility of antinuclear antibody-negative autoimmune hepatitis and initiated steroid treatment, which was effective. Four months after discharge, the patient was admitted for repeated liver injury. The authors started him on steroid pulse therapy, but this time it was not effective. Just before the first admission, he had started his own construction company where he was highly exposed to organic solvents, and thus the authors considered organic solvent-induced hepatitis. Although urine test results for organic solvents were negative, a second liver biopsy revealed severe infiltration of neutrophils, compatible with toxic hepatitis. Again, his liver function spontaneously improved. Based on the pathology and detailed clinical course, including the patient's high exposure to organic solvents since just before the first admission, and the spontaneous recovery of his liver damage in the absence of the exposure, he was diagnosed with toxic hepatitis. The authors strongly advised him to avoid organic solvents. Since then, he has been in good health without recurrence. This is the first report of recurrent acute liver failure because of exposure to organic solvents, which was eventually diagnosed through a meticulous medical history and successfully recovered by avoiding the causative agents. In acute liver failure with an undetermined etiology, clinicians should rule

  15. Recurrent Acute Liver Failure Because of Acute Hepatitis Induced by Organic Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Daisuke; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Ito, Kyoji; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Nakagawa, Hayato; Fujinaga, Hidetaka; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The authors present a case of recurrent acute liver failure because of occupational exposure to organic solvents. A 35-year-old man with a 3-week history of worsening jaundice and flu-like symptoms was admitted to our hospital. Viral hepatitis serology and autoimmune factors were negative. The authors considered liver transplantation, but the patient's liver function spontaneously recovered. Liver biopsy revealed massive infiltration of neutrophils, but the cause of the acute hepatitis was not identified. Four months after discharge, the patient's liver function worsened again. The authors considered the possibility of antinuclear antibody-negative autoimmune hepatitis and initiated steroid treatment, which was effective. Four months after discharge, the patient was admitted for repeated liver injury. The authors started him on steroid pulse therapy, but this time it was not effective. Just before the first admission, he had started his own construction company where he was highly exposed to organic solvents, and thus the authors considered organic solvent-induced hepatitis. Although urine test results for organic solvents were negative, a second liver biopsy revealed severe infiltration of neutrophils, compatible with toxic hepatitis. Again, his liver function spontaneously improved. Based on the pathology and detailed clinical course, including the patient's high exposure to organic solvents since just before the first admission, and the spontaneous recovery of his liver damage in the absence of the exposure, he was diagnosed with toxic hepatitis. The authors strongly advised him to avoid organic solvents. Since then, he has been in good health without recurrence. This is the first report of recurrent acute liver failure because of exposure to organic solvents, which was eventually diagnosed through a meticulous medical history and successfully recovered by avoiding the causative agents. In acute liver failure with an undetermined etiology, clinicians

  16. mRNA and Protein levels of rat pancreas specific protein disulphide isomerase are downregulated during Hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajani; Bhar, Kaushik; Sen, Nandini; Bhowmick, Debajit; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Panda, Koustubh; Siddhanta, Anirban

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes (Type I and Type II) which affects nearly every organ in the body is a multi-factorial non-communicable disorder. Hyperglycemia is the most characteristic feature of this disease. Loss of beta cells is common in both types of diabetes whose detailed cellular and molecular mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. As this disease is complex, identification of specific biomarkers for its early detection, management and devising new therapies is challenging. Based on the fact that functionally defective proteins provide the biochemical basis for many diseases, in this study, we tried to identify differentially expressed proteins during hyperglycemia. For that, hyperglycemia was induced in overnight fasted rats by intra-peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). The pancreas was isolated from control and treated rats for subsequent analyses. The 2D-gel electrophoresis followed by MALDI-TOF-MS-MS analyses revealed several up- and down-regulated proteins in hyperglycemic rat pancreas including the downregulation of a pancreas specific isoform of protein disulphide isomerase a2 (Pdia2).This observation was validated by western blot. Quantitative PCR experiments showed that the level of Pdia2 mRNA is also proportionally reduced in hyperglycemic pancreas. PMID:26934777

  17. The effect of hyperglycemia on the pharmacokinetics of valproic acid studied by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Akira; Kotani, Tomoko; Ishii, Nana; Hakamata, Hideki; Kusu, Fumiyo

    2014-08-01

    The effects of hyperglycemia on the pharmacokinetics of valproic acid (VPA) were examined by time-concentration profiles of plasma VPA accompanied with blood glucose (BG) changing. In addition, time-concentration profiles of plasma free fatty acids (FFAs) were also obtained to examine the interaction between VPA and FFAs in vivo. For the experiments in vivo, normal rats, given multiple doses of maltose orally, and diabetic rats, which were made to maintain hyperglycemia, were used. Plasma VPA and FFA were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) systems based on the reduction of quinone for the selective determination of acids, respectively. BG was determined by pocket-size glucose meter. The maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) of VPA in normal rats given multiple doses of maltose orally and in diabetic rats were remarkably decreased in comparison with those in the control rats. From the present study, it was shown that the metabolism of plasma VPA is accelerated under hyperglycemia. Moreover, we also found that VPA was preferentially metabolized in comparison with the plasma FFA in vivo. PMID:24814995

  18. Eicosapentaenoic acid ameliorates hyperglycemia in high-fat diet-sensitive diabetes mice in conjunction with restoration of hypoadiponectinemia

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, M; Lee, E-Y; Zhang, X; Inaba, Y; Inoue, H; Ogawa, M; Shirasawa, T; Yokosuka, O; Miki, T

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective: Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) exerts pleiotropic effects on metabolic disorders such as atherosclerosis and dyslipidemia, but its effectiveness in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus remains controversial. Methods: We examined the antidiabetic effect of EPA in insulin receptor mutant (InsrP1195L/+) mice that exhibit high-fat diet (HFD)-dependent hyperglycemia. Results: EPA supplementation was found to alleviate hyperglycemia of InsrP1195L/+ mice fed HFD (InsrP1195L/+/HFD mice), which was accompanied by amelioration of increased gluconeogenesis and impaired insulin signaling, as assessed by glucose-6-phosphatase (G6pc) expression on refeeding and insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt in the liver, respectively. We found that serum levels of adiponectin, the antidiabetic adipokine, were decreased by HFD along with the body weight gain in InsrP1195L/+ mice but not in wild-type mice, suggesting that InsrP1195L/+ mice are prone to hypoadiponectinemia in response to obesity. Interestingly, the blood glucose levels of InsrP1195L/+ mice were in reverse proportion to their serum adiponectin levels and EPA supplementation ameliorated their hyperglycemia in conjunction with the restoration of hypoadiponectinemia. Conclusions: EPA exerts an antidiabetic effect in InsrP1195L/+/HFD mice, an HFD-sensitive, insulin-resistant animal model, possibly through its action against hypoadiponectinemia. PMID:27348201

  19. Contribution of hyperglycemia on diabetic complications in obese type 2 diabetic SDT fatty rats: effects of SGLT inhibitor phlorizin.

    PubMed

    Katsuda, Yoshiaki; Sasase, Tomohiko; Tadaki, Hironobu; Mera, Yasuko; Motohashi, Yu; Kemmochi, Yusuke; Toyoda, Kaoru; Kakimoto, Kochi; Kume, Shinichi; Ohta, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The spontaneously diabetic torii (SDT) fatty rat is a new model of type 2 diabetes showing overt obesity, hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. With early onset of diabetes mellitus, diabetic microvascular complications, including nephropathy, peripheral neuropathy and retinopathy, are observed at young ages. In the present study, blood glucose levels of female SDT fatty rats were controlled with phlorizin, a non-selective SGLT inhibitor, to examine whether and how these complications are caused by hyperglycemia. Phlorizin treatment adequately controlled plasma glucose levels during the experiment. At 29 weeks of age, urinary albumin excretion considerably increased in SDT fatty rats. Glomerulosclerosis and tubular pathological findings also indicate diabetic nephropathy. These renal parameters tended to decrease with phlorizin; however, effects were partial. Sciatic nerve conduction velocities were significantly delayed in SDT fatty rats compared with Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Intraepidermal nerve fiber density, an indicator of subclinical small nerve fiber neuropathy, significantly decreased in SDT fatty rats. Retinal dysfunction (prolongation of peak latency for oscillatory potential in electroretinograms) and histopathological eye abnormalities, including retinal folding and mature cataracts were also observed. Both nerve and eye disorders were prevented with phlorizin. These findings indicate that severe hyperglycemia mainly causes diabetic complications in SDT fatty rats. However, other factors, such as hyperlipidemia and hypertension, may affect diabetic nephropathy. These characteristics of diabetic complications will become helpful in evaluating new drugs for diabetic complications using SDT fatty rats. PMID:25736710

  20. Growth factors and medium hyperglycemia induce Sox9+ ductal cell differentiation into β cells in mice with reversal of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingfeng; Lin, Qing; Qi, Tong; Wang, Tiankun; Chen, Ching-Cheng; Riggs, Arthur D.; Zeng, Defu

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that long-term administration of a low dose of gastrin and epidermal growth factor (GE) augments β-cell neogenesis in late-stage diabetic autoimmune mice after eliminating insulitis by induction of mixed chimerism. However, the source of β-cell neogenesis is still unknown. SRY (sex-determining region Y)-box 9+ (Sox9+) ductal cells in the adult pancreas are clonogenic and can give rise to insulin-producing β cells in an in vitro culture. Whether Sox9+ ductal cells in the adult pancreas can give rise to β cells in vivo remains controversial. Here, using lineage-tracing with genetic labeling of Insulin- or Sox9-expressing cells, we show that hyperglycemia (>300 mg/dL) is required for inducing Sox9+ ductal cell differentiation into insulin-producing β cells, and medium hyperglycemia (300–450 mg/dL) in combination with long-term administration of low-dose GE synergistically augments differentiation and is associated with normalization of blood glucose in nonautoimmune diabetic C57BL/6 mice. Short-term administration of high-dose GE cannot augment differentiation, although it can augment preexisting β-cell replication. These results indicate that medium hyperglycemia combined with long-term administration of low-dose GE represents one way to induce Sox9+ ductal cell differentiation into β cells in adult mice. PMID:26733677

  1. Growth factors and medium hyperglycemia induce Sox9+ ductal cell differentiation into β cells in mice with reversal of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingfeng; Lin, Qing; Qi, Tong; Wang, Tiankun; Chen, Ching-Cheng; Riggs, Arthur D; Zeng, Defu

    2016-01-19

    We previously reported that long-term administration of a low dose of gastrin and epidermal growth factor (GE) augments β-cell neogenesis in late-stage diabetic autoimmune mice after eliminating insulitis by induction of mixed chimerism. However, the source of β-cell neogenesis is still unknown. SRY (sex-determining region Y)-box 9(+) (Sox9(+)) ductal cells in the adult pancreas are clonogenic and can give rise to insulin-producing β cells in an in vitro culture. Whether Sox9(+) ductal cells in the adult pancreas can give rise to β cells in vivo remains controversial. Here, using lineage-tracing with genetic labeling of Insulin- or Sox9-expressing cells, we show that hyperglycemia (>300 mg/dL) is required for inducing Sox9(+) ductal cell differentiation into insulin-producing β cells, and medium hyperglycemia (300-450 mg/dL) in combination with long-term administration of low-dose GE synergistically augments differentiation and is associated with normalization of blood glucose in nonautoimmune diabetic C57BL/6 mice. Short-term administration of high-dose GE cannot augment differentiation, although it can augment preexisting β-cell replication. These results indicate that medium hyperglycemia combined with long-term administration of low-dose GE represents one way to induce Sox9(+) ductal cell differentiation into β cells in adult mice. PMID:26733677

  2. Proinsulin-producing, hyperglycemia-induced adipose tissue macrophages underlie insulin resistance in high fat-fed diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Buras, Eric Dale; Yang, Lina; Saha, Pradip; Kim, Jongoh; Mehta, Pooja; Yang, Yisheng; Hilsenbeck, Susan; Kojima, Hideto; Chen, Wenhao; Smith, C Wayne; Chan, Lawrence

    2015-08-01

    Adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of obese type 2 diabetes. High-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity has been shown to lead to ATM accumulation in rodents; however, the impact of hyperglycemia on ATM dynamics in HFD-fed type 2 diabetic models has not been studied. We previously showed that hyperglycemia induces the appearance of proinsulin (PI)-producing proinflammatory bone marrow (BM)-derived cells (PI-BMDCs) in rodents. We fed a 60% HFD to C57BL6/J mice to produce an obese type 2 diabetes model. Absent in chow-fed animals, PI-BMDCs account for 60% of the ATMs in the type 2 diabetic mice. The PI-ATM subset expresses TNF-α and other inflammatory markers, and is highly enriched within crownlike structures (CLSs). We found that amelioration of hyperglycemia by different hypoglycemic agents forestalled PI-producing ATM accumulation and adipose inflammation in these animals. We developed a diphtheria toxin receptor-based strategy to selectively ablate PI-BMDCs among ATMs. Application of the maneuver in HFD-fed type 2 diabetic mice was found to lead to near total disappearance of complex CLSs and reversal of insulin resistance and hepatosteatosis in these animals. In sum, we have identified a novel ATM subset in type 2 diabetic rodents that underlies systemic insulin resistance. PMID:25953849

  3. Inhibition of diabetic-cataract by vitamin K1 involves modulation of hyperglycemia-induced alterations to lens calcium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Sai Varsha, M K N; Raman, Thiagarajan; Manikandan, Ramar

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the potential of vitamin K1 against streptozotocin-induced diabetic cataract in Wistar rats. A single, intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (35 mg/kg) resulted in hyperglycemia, accumulation of sorbitol and formation of advanced glycation end product (AGE) in eye lens. Hyperglycemia in lens also resulted in superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical generation and less reduced glutathione suggesting oxidative stress in lens. Hyperglycemia also resulted in increase in lens Ca2+ and significant inhibition of lens Ca2+ ATPase activity. These changes were associated with cataract formation in diabetic animals. By contrast treatment of diabetic rats with vitamin K1 (5 mg/kg, sc, twice a week) resulted in animals with partially elevated blood glucose and with transparent lenses having normal levels of sorbitol, AGE, Ca2+ ATPase, Ca2+, and oxidative stress. Vitamin K 1 may function to protect against cataract formation in the STZ induced diabetic rat by affecting the homeostasis of blood glucose and minimizing subsequent oxidative and osmotic stress. Thus, these results show that Vitamin K1 inhibits diabetic-cataract by modulating lens Ca2+ homeostasis and its hypoglycemic effect through its direct action on the pancreas. PMID:25257692

  4. Acute Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Hammad; Fasanya, Adebayo; Cheema, Tariq; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Acute pneumonia is an active infection of the lungs that results when an individual at risk gets exposed to a particular microbiological pathogen. Acute pneumonia is the leading cause of death in the United States that is attributable to an infection. The risk factors, pathogenesis, and microbiological organisms involved differ if the pneumonia develops in the community versus health care-associated environment. The development of concise and comprehensive guidelines has led to an improvement in the management of the problem. However, the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms and the increase in the percentage of elderly population keep mortality risk very substantial. PMID:26919676

  5. Esculetin attenuates alterations in Ang II and acetylcholine mediated vascular reactivity associated with hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Kadakol, Almesh; Malek, Vajir; Goru, Santosh Kumar; Pandey, Anuradha; Bagal, Shreyas; Gaikwad, Anil Bhanudas

    2015-05-29

    Esculetin (6, 7- dihydroxycoumarin) was found to be protective against hepatic and renal damage associated with Streptozotocin (STZ) induced type 1 diabetes, because of its radical scavenging property. However, there are no reports regarding its effect on vascular dysfunction under hyperinsulinemic and hyperglycemic conditions. Hence, the present study aimed to investigate the effect of esculetin on vascular dysfunction under these conditions. Non-genetic model of hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia were developed by high fat diet (HFD) feeding and HFD + Streptozotocin (STZ, 35 mg/kg, I.P) treatment in Wistar rats, respectively. Esculetin was administered at 50 and 100 mg/kg/day (P.O, 2 weeks) doses and biochemical, vascular reactivity and immunohistochemical experiments were performed to assess the effect of esculetin on vascular dysfunctions. Esculetin treatment significantly attenuates metabolic perturbations, alleviates insulin levels in hyperinsulinemic condition. Thoracic aorta of hyperinsulinemic and hyperglycemic rats showed hyper-responsiveness to Ang II mediated contraction and impaired acetylcholine mediated relaxation, and esculetin attenuates alterations in vascular reactivity to Ang II and acetylcholine challenges. In addition, immunohistochemical evaluations revealed that esculetin prevents increase in AT1R, AT2R, Keap1, TGF-β, and decrease in ACE2 expression in aorta of hyperinsulinemic and hyperglycemic rats. PMID:25887801

  6. Cytomorphometric study of epithelial cells in normal and cataractous human lenses in relation with hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Laspias, Georgios A; Thomopoulou, Georgia-Heleni; Lazaris, Andreas C; Kavantzas, Nikolaos; Koutselini, Helen; Pagonis, Nikolaos; Tsapeli, Eugenia; Politi, Ekaterini

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate and correlate the morphology and cell density of epithelial cells adhering to lens capsule surgically removed from the anterior central region with lens clarity and type of cataract present in patients with or without type 2 diabetes. Capsulorhexis specimens were obtained from patients who had undergone phacoemulsification cataract surgery. All the samples were centrifuged and stained by the aid of Papanicolaou technique and were observed under light microscope. We determinated the mean cell density, the degree of epithelial damage, and morphological indicators of cells such as cell area and the nucleus-plasma ratio. Patients with cataract demonstrated a statistical significant decrease in cell density and an heterogeneous cell picture in which enlarged cells dominated. In addition, type 2 diabetics with cataract had a significantly even lower mean epithelial cell density by the presence of larger cell area with smaller nucleus-plasma ratio. More pronounced alterations in the lens epithelium were correlated not only with the presence of cortical cataract, increased fasting blood sugar, and increased HbA1c but also with the prolonged duration of diabetes and the co-existence of diabetic retinopathy. It seems that density and morphology of the anterior lens epithelial cells determine the lens epithelium damage which is more profound in hyperglycemia and in cortical cataracts. The changes in lens epithelium seem to play an important role in cataractogenesis. PMID:26073139

  7. Carbon tetrachloride-induced lipid peroxidation and hyperglycemia in rat: a novel study.

    PubMed

    Khan, Rahmat Ali; Khan, Muhammad Rashid; Sahreen, Sumaira; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Shah, Naseer Ali

    2015-06-01

    Launaea procumbens methanol extract (LPME) was evaluated against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced pancreatic oxidative damage and hyperglycemia in rats. Various doses of the extract were administered to rats after 48 h of CCl4 treatment (3 ml/kg bodyweight (bw); intraperitoneally, 20% CCl4/olive oil) twice a week for 4 weeks. Coadministration of various concentrations of LPME (100, 150 and 200 mg/kg) ameliorated the toxicity of CCl4 and reversed the serum level of enzymes (amylase and lipase), glucose and hormone (insulin). The extract was able to reduce thiobarbituric acid reactive substance but increased the glutathione contents in pancreatic tissue. Depletion of antioxidant enzyme activities (catalase, peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione-S-reductase) and DNA damages induced with CCl4 were restored by LPME supplement. It is suggested that LPME effectively protects the liver against the CCl4-induced oxidative damage in rats, possibly through antioxidant and/or free radical scavenging effects of flavonoids and phenolic compounds in the extract. PMID:23416881

  8. Spontaneous hyperglycemia and impaired glucose tolerance in athymic nude BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Zeidler, A; Tosco, C; Kumar, D; Slavin, B; Parker, J

    1982-09-01

    Basal plasma glucose, glucose tolerance, and insulin secretion were investigated in young and mature athymic nude BALB/c mice and in age-matched controls. Basal plasma glucose levels in male athymic nude mice were similar to those of controls at 1, 3, and 4 wk of age. At 6, 8, and 12 wk of age, male athymic nudes had significantly higher basal plasma glucose levels when compared with controls (P less than 0.01). Plasma immunoreactive insulin concentrations were similar in athymic nudes and controls at 1 wk of age, but at 3 wk of age and subsequently at 6, 8, and 12 wk athymic nude mice had significantly decreased insulin levels when compared with their age-matched controls (P less than 0.05). We found impaired glucose tolerance in male athymic nude mice at all age groups when compared with both female athymic nudes and control BALB/c mice. The discovery of a spontaneous diabetic syndrome (hyperglycemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and decreased insulin secretion) in a colony of athymic nude mice may provide an excellent model for studying the genetics and interactions between the immune and endocrine systems. PMID:6761217

  9. Pancreatic islet blood flow in conscious rats during hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Iwase, M; Tashiro, K; Uchizono, Y; Goto, D; Yoshinari, M

    2001-06-01

    Anesthesia affects general hemodynamics and regulation of organ perfusion. We used colored microspheres to measure pancreatic islet blood flow in conscious rats at two time points, during either hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. This method, using black and green microspheres, was validated by comparison with previous microsphere experiments and by lack of effect of a nonmetabolizable glucose analog, 3-O-methylglucose, on islet perfusion. Basal and glucose-stimulated islet blood flow levels were similar in pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized and conscious rats. However, the basal distribution of pancreatic blood flow was altered by anesthesia (fractional islet blood flow 5.8 +/- 0.4% in conscious rats, 7.9 +/- 0.8% in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats, P < 0.05). Insulin-induced hypoglycemia significantly increased whole pancreatic blood flow in conscious rats, whereas islet blood flow remained unchanged and fractional islet blood flow was decreased (5.8 +/- 0.5% in the basal state, 4.2 +/- 0.4% during hypoglycemia, P < 0.001). Methylatropine pretreatment significantly increased islet blood flow during hypoglycemia by 181%. This result suggests that prevention of hypoglycemia-induced increase in islet perfusion may be mediated, at least in part, by a cholinergic, vagal muscarinic mechanism. PMID:11353660

  10. Hyperglycemia- and neuropathy-induced changes in mitochondria within sensory nerves

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Hussein S; Mervak, Colin M; Münch, Alexandra E; Robell, Nicholas J; Hayes, John M; Porzio, Michael T; Singleton, J Robinson; Smith, A Gordon; Feldman, Eva L; Lentz, Stephen I

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study focused on altered mitochondrial dynamics as a potential mechanism for diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). We employed both an in vitro sensory neuron model and an in situ analysis of human intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) from cutaneous biopsies to measure alterations in the size distribution of mitochondria as a result of hyperglycemia and diabetes, respectively. Methods Neurite- and nerve-specific mitochondrial signals within cultured rodent sensory neurons and human IENFs were measured by employing a three-dimensional visualization and quantification technique. Skin biopsies from distal thigh (DT) and distal leg (DL) were analyzed from three groups of patients; patients with diabetes and no DPN, patients with diabetes and confirmed DPN, and healthy controls. Results This analysis demonstrated an increase in mitochondria distributed within the neurites of cultured sensory neurons exposed to hyperglycemic conditions. Similar changes were observed within IENFs of the DT in DPN patients compared to controls. This change was represented by a significant shift in the size frequency distribution of mitochondria toward larger mitochondria volumes within DT nerves of DPN patients. There was a length-dependent difference in mitochondria within IENFs. Distal leg IENFs from control patients had a significant shift toward larger volumes of mitochondrial signal compared to DT IENFs. Interpretation The results of this study support the hypothesis that altered mitochondrial dynamics may contribute to DPN pathogenesis. Future studies will examine the potential mechanisms that are responsible for mitochondrial changes within IENFs and its effect on DPN pathogenesis. PMID:25493271

  11. Consensus Statement on Management of Post-Prandial Hyperglycemia in Clinical Practice in India.

    PubMed

    Aravind, Sr; Saboo, Banshi; Sadikot, Shaukat; Shah, Siddharth N; Makkar, Bm; Kalra, Sanjay; Kannampilly, Johnny; Kesavadev, Jothydev; Ghoshal, Samit; Zargar, Ah; Nigam, Anant; Hazra, Dk; Tripathi, Kamlakar; Dharmalingam, Mala; Shah, Parag; Gandhi, Pramod; Sahay, Rakesh; Unnikrishnan, Ranjit; Gupta, Sachin; Bajaj, Sarita; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Kale, Shailaja

    2015-08-01

    Postprandial hyperglycemia (PPHG) is a detrimental factor in the evolution of diabetes related complications. Numerous studies have established the role of PPHG in development of atherosclerosis and associated cardiovascular conditions. It is seen that management of PPHG can be more troublesome than fasting plasma glucose (FPG). Currently, there are various strategies both monitoring as well as therapeutic to control PPHG but there is no uniformity in practicing these strategies. In the absence of any standard guidelines, widespread variations in the management of PPHG are observed among physicians and diabetologists. The objective of this document is to set forth uniform guidelines to manage PPHG. This will not only result in optimal management and prevention of long term complications of diabetes but also better co-ordination and collaboration among the care providers. Moreover, an Indian perspective that can take into consideration the issues relevant to Indian patient pool will be effective. An expert committee comprising of prominent physicians and researchers associated with diabetes care provided their inputs to provide a basic platform for the formulations of guidelines. Their inputs were supplemented by extensive literature search to collect the relevant evidences. An initial draft was prepared which was reviewed by the core committee. Inputs from other experts were also sought and an initial guideline version was formulated that was presented in a conference, discussed and debated among experts. The guidelines on PPHG were then finalized and published. PMID:27604435

  12. Increased intrinsic mitochondrial respiratory capacity in skeletal muscle from rats with streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Steen; Scheede-Bergdahl, Celena; Whitesell, Thomas; Boushel, Robert; Bergdahl, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a chronic disorder, characterized by an almost or complete insulin deficiency. Widespread tissue dysfunction and deleterious diabetes-complications are associated with long-term elevations of blood glucose. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of type I diabetes, as induced by streptozotocin, on the mitochondria in skeletal muscles that predominantly consist of either slow or fast twitch fibers. Soleus (primarily slow twitch fiber type) and the plantaris muscle (mainly fast twitch fiber type) were removed in order to measure mitochondrial protein expression and integrated mitochondrial respiratory function. Mitochondrial capacity for oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) was found to be higher in the slow (more oxidative) soleus muscle from STZ rats when evaluating lipid and complex I linked OXPHOS capacity, whereas no difference was detected between the groups when evaluating the more physiological complex I and II linked OXPHOS capacity. These findings indicate that chronic hyperglycemia results in an elevated intrinsic mitochondrial respiratory capacity in both soleus and, at varying degree, plantaris muscle, findings that are consistent with human T1DM patients. PMID:26197936

  13. [Advantages and disadvantages of insulin therapy in elderly diabetics with asymptomatic hyperglycemia].

    PubMed

    Straumann, M; Staffelbach, O; Sonnenberg, G E; Keller, U; Berger, W

    1979-12-01

    15 elderly diabetic patients with fasting blood glucose levels above 160 mg/100 ml, without hyperglycemic symptoms and previously treated with oral antidiabetic agents, were put on insulin. The change of treatment regimen was made in the outpatient department. Frequent clinical and laboratory controls were performed and the patients were given full instructions for injection technique and diet. On the insulin regimen a prompt and lasting improvement was observed in the metabolic parameters (blood glucose levels both fasting and after food intake, Hb A1c, serum insulin, glucagon and serum lipid concentrations). The so-called "asymptomatic" patients noticed a marked improvement in their general status and performance. Three months after insulin therapy was started 13 of our 15 patients preferred the insulin treatment to oral agents. However, weight gain and a tendency to hypoglycemia were noticed in less disciplined patients. In addition, considerable time was spent on instruction of the patients. Bearing these factors in mind, insulin therapy in elderly diabetics with so-called "sysmptomatic hyperglycemia" can be regarded as worthwhile. PMID:515719

  14. Pleurotus tuber-regium Polysaccharides Attenuate Hyperglycemia and Oxidative Stress in Experimental Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui-Yu; Korivi, Mallikarjuna; Chaing, Ying-Ying; Chien, Ting-Yi; Tsai, Ying-Chieh

    2012-01-01

    Pleurotus tuber-regium contains polysaccharides that are responsible for pharmacological actions, and medicinal effects of these polysaccharides have not yet been studied in diabetic rats. We examined the antidiabetic, antihyperlipidemic, and antioxidant properties of P. tuber-regium polysaccharides in experimental diabetic rats. Forty rats were equally assigned as diabetic high-fat (DHF) diet and polysaccharides treated DHF groups (DHF+1P, DHF+2P, and DHF+3P, 20 mg/kg bodyweight/8-week). Diabetes was induced by chronic low-dose streptozotocin injections and a high-fat diet to mimic type 2 diabetes. Polysaccharides (1P, 2P, and 3P) were extracted from three different strains of P. tuber-regium. Fasting blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels substantially decreased, while serum insulin levels were restored by polysaccharides treatment compared to DHF. Furthermore, plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein levels were significantly (P < 0.01) lower in polysaccharide groups. High-density lipoprotein levels were attenuated with polysaccharides against diabetes condition. Polysaccharides inhibited (P < 0.01) the lipid peroxidation index (malondialdehyde), and restored superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities in the liver of diabetic rats. The antihyperglycemic property of polysaccharides perhaps boosts the antioxidant system that attenuates oxidative stress. We emphasize that P. tuber-regium polysaccharides can be considered as an alternative medicine to treat hyperglycemia and oxidative stress in diabetic rats. PMID:22973406

  15. β-Cell Specific Overexpression of GPR39 Protects against Streptozotocin-Induced Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Egerod, Kristoffer L.; Jin, Chunyu; Petersen, Pia Steen; Wierup, Nils; Sundler, Frank; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W.

    2011-01-01

    Mice deficient in the zinc-sensor GPR39, which has been demonstrated to protect cells against endoplasmatic stress and cell death in vitro, display moderate glucose intolerance and impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion. Here, we use the Tet-On system under the control of the proinsulin promoter to selectively overexpress GPR39 in the β cells in a double transgenic mouse strain and challenge them with multiple low doses of streptozotocin, which in the wild-type littermates leads to a gradual increase in nonfasting glucose levels and glucose intolerance observed during both food intake and OGTT. Although the overexpression of the constitutively active GPR39 receptor in animals not treated with streptozotocin appeared by itself to impair the glucose tolerance slightly and to decrease the β-cell mass, it nevertheless totally protected against the gradual hyperglycemia in the steptozotocin-treated animals. It is concluded that GPR39 functions in a β-cell protective manner and it is suggested that it is involved in some of the beneficial, β-cell protective effects observed for Zn++ and that GPR39 may be a target for antidiabetic drug intervention. PMID:22164158

  16. Germinated Pigeon Pea (Cajanus cajan): a novel diet for lowering oxidative stress and hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Uchegbu, Nneka N; Ishiwu, Charles N

    2016-09-01

    This work studied the antioxidant activity of extract of germinated pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Germination was carried out in a dark chamber under room temperature (28°C). The total phenolic, 1,1,diphenyl-2-picrylhy-drazyl free radical (DPPH) scavenging, the inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase were done in vitro and blood glucose levels of the animal were investigated. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were analyzed spectrophotometrically. The total phenolic and DPPH scavenging activity increased by 30% and 63%, respectively, after germinating pigeon pea. Also after germination there was an increase in the inhibitory potential of pigeon pea extract against α-glucosidase compared with the nongerminated pigeon pea extract. There was a significant increase (P < 0.05) in fasting blood glucose level of alloxan-induced rats. Consumption of germinated pigeon pea extract gave rise to a reduced fasting blood glucose level in diabetic rats. On administration of germinated pigeon pea extract, LPO reduced drastically but there was an increase in the level of GSH. This study concluded that intake of germinated pigeon pea is a good dietary supplement for controlling hyperglycemia and LPO. PMID:27625782

  17. Central injection of fibroblast growth factor 1 induces sustained remission of diabetic hyperglycemia in rodents.

    PubMed

    Scarlett, Jarrad M; Rojas, Jennifer M; Matsen, Miles E; Kaiyala, Karl J; Stefanovski, Darko; Bergman, Richard N; Nguyen, Hong T; Dorfman, Mauricio D; Lantier, Louise; Wasserman, David H; Mirzadeh, Zaman; Unterman, Terry G; Morton, Gregory J; Schwartz, Michael W

    2016-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is among the most common and costly disorders worldwide. The goal of current medical management for T2D is to transiently ameliorate hyperglycemia through daily dosing of one or more antidiabetic drugs. Hypoglycemia and weight gain are common side effects of therapy, and sustained disease remission is not obtainable with nonsurgical approaches. On the basis of the potent glucose-lowering response elicited by activation of brain fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors, we explored the antidiabetic efficacy of centrally administered FGF1, which, unlike other FGF peptides, activates all FGF receptor subtypes. We report that a single intracerebroventricular injection of FGF1 at a dose one-tenth of that needed for antidiabetic efficacy following peripheral injection induces sustained diabetes remission in both mouse and rat models of T2D. This antidiabetic effect is not secondary to weight loss, does not increase the risk of hypoglycemia, and involves a novel and incompletely understood mechanism for increasing glucose clearance from the bloodstream. We conclude that the brain has an inherent potential to induce diabetes remission and that brain FGF receptors are potential pharmacological targets for achieving this goal. PMID:27213816

  18. Effect of hyperglycemia on the tumor response to irradiation given alone or in combination with hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Urano, M.; Todoroki, T.; Kahn, J.; Okunieff, P.

    1987-09-01

    The effect of hyperglycemia (elevated blood glucose level) on the response of a murine tumor to irradiation given alone or in combination with hyperthermia was studied. Tumors were early generation isotransplants of a spontaneous C3H/Sed mouse fibrosarcoma, FSa-II. Single-cell suspensions were transplanted into the foot, and irradiation was given when each tumor reached an average diameter of 7 mm. Following irradiation, the tumor growth time to reach 1000 mm3 was studied and the dose-response curve between the tumor growth time and radiation dose was fitted. Preadministration of glucose increased the size of the hypoxic and chronically hypoxic cell fractions without altering the slope of the dose-response curve where the chronically hypoxic cell fraction is determined as the fraction of cells which were not oxygenated under hyperbaric oxygen conditions. Hyperthermia given prior to irradiation enhanced the tumor response to irradiation, but simultaneously increased the size of the hypoxic and chronically hypoxic cell fractions. Similar results were observed following hyperthermia given after irradiation. When hyperthermia at 43.5 degrees C was given 24 h before irradiation, the size of the hypoxic cell fraction increased with increasing treatment time, while a substantial decrease in the chronically hypoxic cell fraction was observed. Administration of glucose 60 min before hyperthermia further increased the size of the hypoxic cell fraction. Possible mechanisms explaining why glucose administration increases the hypoxic cell fractions are discussed.

  19. Relationship among Short and Long Term of Hypoinsulinemia-Hyperglycemia, Dermatophytosis, and Immunobiology of Mononuclear Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fraga-Silva, Thais F. C.; Marchetti, Camila M.; Mimura, Luiza A. N.; Locachevic, Gisele A.; Golim, Márjorie A.; Venturini, James; Arruda, Maria S. P.

    2015-01-01

    Dermatophytes are fungi responsible for causing superficial infections. In patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), dermatophytosis is usually more severe and recurrent. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the influence of short and long term hypoinsulinemia-hyperglycemia (HH) during experimental infection by Trichophyton mentagrophytes as well as alterations in the mononuclear phagocytes. Our results showed two distinct profiles of fungal outcome and immune response. Short term HH induced a discrete impaired proinflammatory response by peritoneal adherent cells (PAC) and a delayed fungal clearance. Moreover, long term HH mice showed low and persistent fungal load and a marked reduction in the production of TNF-α by PAC. Furthermore, while the inoculation of TM in non-HH mice triggered high influx of Gr1+ monocytes into the peripheral blood, long term HH mice showed low percentage of these cells. Thus, our results demonstrate that the time of exposure of HH interferes with the TM infection outcome as well as the immunobiology of mononuclear phagocytes, including fresh monocyte recruitment from bone marrow and PAC activity. PMID:26538824

  20. Therapeutic Potential of Moringa oleifera Leaves in Chronic Hyperglycemia and Dyslipidemia: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mbikay, Majambu

    2012-01-01

    Moringa oleifera (M. oleifera) is an angiosperm plant, native of the Indian subcontinent, where its various parts have been utilized throughout history as food and medicine. It is now cultivated in all tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. The nutritional, prophylactic, and therapeutic virtues of this plant are being extolled on the Internet. Dietary consumption of its part is therein promoted as a strategy of personal health preservation and self-medication in various diseases. The enthusiasm for the health benefits of M. oleifera is in dire contrast with the scarcity of strong experimental and clinical evidence supporting them. Fortunately, the chasm is slowly being filled. In this article, I review current scientific data on the corrective potential of M. oleifera leaves in chronic hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia, as symptoms of diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Reported studies in experimental animals and humans, although limited in number and variable in design, seem concordant in their support for this potential. However, before M. oleifera leaf formulations can be recommended as medication in the prevention or treatment of diabetes and CVD, it is necessary that the scientific basis of their efficacy, the therapeutic modalities of their administration and their possible side effects be more rigorously determined. PMID:22403543

  1. Misdiagnosis of Extensive Maxillofacial Infection and Its Relationship with Periodontal Problems and Hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Statkievicz, Cristian; Faverani, Leonardo P; Gomes-Ferreira, Pedro Henrique Silva; Ramalho-Ferreira, Gabriel; Garcia-Junior, Idelmo Rangel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Complex dental infections can reach distant areas of the alveolar process, invading the secondary fascial spaces. Objectives. This case report aims to show a misdiagnosis of odontogenic infection and a great need for dentist in the hospital environment. Case Report. A male patient presented facial asymmetry and trismus, while the facial CT examination showed a hyperdense mass involving the left masseteric, pterygomandibular, and superficial temporal regions. The patient was then referred to oral oncology center by emergency physician with cancer suspicion. After 15 days, the patient returned to the same emergency room and was attended by the surgical and maxillofacial trauma team, presenting tachycardia, tachypnea, dysphagia, and trismus. During anamnesis, the patient reported being an uncontrolled diabetic. In intraoral exam, a poor oral condition and generalized periodontitis were observed. Results. Correct diagnosis of odontogenic infection was established and adequately treated. Conclusions. Symptomatology bland may mask the severity of an infection; every increase in volume associated with trismus, poor oral hygiene with or without hyperglycemia should be heavily investigated for the presence of an infectious process. It emphasizes the importance of a dentist working with the physician in emergency room. PMID:26885412

  2. Male Men1 heterozygous mice exhibit fasting hyperglycemia in the early stage of MEN1.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhongxiuzi; Zhang, Li; Xie, Wenting; Wang, Siqi; Bao, Xiaorui; Guo, Yuli; Zhang, Houjian; Hu, Qingzhong; Chen, Yi; Wang, Zeen; Xue, Maoqiang; Jin, Guanghui

    2016-09-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an autosomal dominant inherited syndrome characterized by multiple tumors in the parathyroid glands, endocrine pancreas and anterior pituitary. Recent clinical studies have revealed a strong association between MEN1 syndrome and the risk of developing diabetes mellitus; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, heterozygous Men1 knockout (Men1(+/-)) mice were used as MEN1 models to investigate MEN1-associated glucose metabolic phenotypes and mechanisms. Heterozygous deficiency of Men1 in 12-month-old male mice induced fasting hyperglycemia, along with increased serum insulin levels. However, male Men1(+/-) mice did not show insulin resistance, as evidenced by Akt activation in hepatic tissues and an insulin tolerance test. Increased glucose levels following pyruvate challenge and expression of key gluconeogenic genes suggested increased hepatic glucose output in the male Men1(+/-) mice. This effect could be partly due to higher basal serum glucagon levels, which resulted from pancreatic islet cell proliferation induced by heterozygous loss of Men1 Taken together, our results indicate that fasted male Men1(+/-) mice, in the early stage of development of MEN1, display glucose metabolic disorders. These disorders are caused not by direct induction of insulin resistance, but via increased glucagon secretion and the consequent stimulation of hepatic glucose production. PMID:27432891

  3. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  4. Antioxidant rich grape pomace extract suppresses postprandial hyperglycemia in diabetic mice by specifically inhibiting alpha-glucosidase

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Postprandial hyperglycemia is an early defect of type 2 diabetes and one of primary anti-diabetic targets. Treatment of postprandial hyperglycemia can be achieved by inhibiting intestinal α-glucosidase, the key enzyme for oligosaccharide digestion and further glucose absorption. Grape pomace is winemaking byproduct rich in bioactive food compounds such as phenolic antioxidants. This study evaluated the anti-diabetic potential of two specific grape pomace extracts by determining their antioxidant and anti-postprandial hyperglycemic activities in vitro and in vivo. Methods The extracts of red wine grape pomace (Cabernet Franc) and white wine grape pomace (Chardonnay) were prepared in 80% ethanol. An extract of red apple pomace was included as a comparison. The radical scavenging activities and phenolic profiles of the pomace extracts were determined through the measurement of oxygen radical absorbance capacity, DPPH radical scavenging activity, total phenolic content and flavonoids. The inhibitory effects of the pomace extracts on yeast and rat intestinal α-glucosidases were determined. Male 6-week old C57BLKS/6NCr mice were treated with streptozocin to induce diabetes. The diabetic mice were then treated with vehicle or the grape pomace extract to determine whether the oral intake of the extract can suppress postprandial hyperglycemia through the inhibition of intestinal α-glucosidases. Results The red grape pomace extract contained significantly higher amounts of flavonoids and phenolic compounds and exerted stronger oxygen radical absorbance capacity than the red apple pomace extract. Both the grape pomace extracts but not the apple pomace extract exerted significant inhibition on intestinal α-glucosidases and the inhibition appears to be specific. In the animal study, the oral intake of the grape pomace extract (400 mg/kg body weight) significantly suppressed the postprandial hyperglycemia by 35% in streptozocin-induced diabetic mice following

  5. Pazopanib-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Hata, Hiroo; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Kuwatani, Masaki; Kawahata, Shuhei; Kubo, Kimitoshi; Imafuku, Keisuke; Kitamura, Shinya; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    Pazopanib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, platelet-derived growth factor receptors, and c-Kit approved for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma and soft tissue sarcoma. Nonselective kinase inhibitors, such as sunitinib and sorafenib, are known to be associated with acute pancreatitis. There are few case reports of severe acute pancreatitis induced by pazopanib treatment. We present a case of severe acute pancreatitis caused by pazopanib treatment for cutaneous angiosarcoma. The patient was an 82-year-old female diagnosed with cutaneous angiosarcoma. She had been refractory to docetaxel treatment and began pazopanib therapy. Three months after pazopanib treatment, CT imaging of the abdomen showed the swelling of the pancreas and surrounding soft tissue inflammation without abdominal pain. After she continued pazopanib treatment for 2 months, she presented with nausea and appetite loss. Abdominal CT showed the worsening of the surrounding soft tissue inflammation of the pancreas. Serum amylase and lipase levels were 296 and 177 IU/l, respectively. She was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis induced by pazopanib treatment and was managed conservatively with discontinuation of pazopanib, but the symptoms did not improve. Subsequently, an abdominal CT scan demonstrated the appearance of a pancreatic pseudocyst. She underwent endoscopic ultrasound-guided pseudocyst drainage using a flared-end fully covered self-expandable metallic stent. Then, the symptoms resolved without recurrence. Due to the remarkable progress of molecular targeted therapy, the oncologist should know that acute pancreatitis was recognized as a potential adverse event of pazopanib treatment and could proceed to severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:26464570

  6. Lack of the lectin-like domain of thrombomodulin worsens Shiga toxin-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome in mice.

    PubMed

    Zoja, Carlamaria; Locatelli, Monica; Pagani, Chiara; Corna, Daniela; Zanchi, Cristina; Isermann, Berend; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Conway, Edward M; Noris, Marina

    2012-10-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli is a primary cause of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a disorder of thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. The pathophysiology of renal microvascular thrombosis in Stx-HUS is still ill-defined. Based on evidence that abnormalities in thrombomodulin (TM), an anticoagulant endothelial glycoprotein that modulates complement and inflammation, predispose to atypical HUS, we assessed whether impaired TM function may adversely affect evolution of Stx-HUS. Disease was induced by coinjection of Stx2/LPS in wild-type mice (TM(wt/wt)) and mice that lack the lectin-like domain of TM (TM(LeD/LeD)), which is critical for its anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective properties. After Stx2/LPS, TM(LeD/LeD) mice exhibited more severe thrombocytopenia and renal dysfunction than TM(wt/wt) mice. Lack of lectin-like domain of TM resulted in a stronger inflammatory reaction after Stx2/LPS with more neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages infiltrating the kidney, associated with PECAM-1 and chemokine upregulation. After Stx2/LPS, intraglomerular fibrin(ogen) deposits were detected earlier in TM(LeD/LeD) than in TM(wt/wt) mice. More abundant fibrin(ogen) deposits were also found in brain and lungs. Under basal conditions, TM(LeD/LeD) mice exhibited excess glomerular C3 deposits, indicating impaired complement regulation in the kidney that could lead to local accumulation of proinflammatory products. TM(LeD/LeD) mice with HUS had a higher mortality rate than TM(wt/wt) mice. If applicable to humans, these findings raise the possibility that genetic or acquired TM defects might have an impact on the severity of microangiopathic lesions after exposure to Stx-producing E. coli infections and raise the potential for using soluble TM in the treatment of Stx-HUS. PMID:22942429

  7. The role of glycemia in acute heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Seferović, Jelena P; Milinković, Ivan; Tešić, Milorad; Ristić, Arsen; Lalić, Nebojša; Simeunović, Dejan; Zivković, Ivana; Di Somma, Salvatore; Seferovic, Petar M

    2014-10-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is one of the most important cardiovascular syndromes associated with high cardiovascular morbidity, and is the major cause of admission in emergency departments worldwide. The clinical complexity of AHF has significantly increased, mostly due to the comorbidities: diabetes, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, peripheral vascular disease, renal insufficiency and anemia. Numerous clinical trials have demonstrated a frequent association of AHF and diabetes. Since AHF is a very heterogeneous condition, it is important to identify clinical and laboratory parameters useful for risk stratification of these populations. Hyperglycemia may be one of the most convenient, since it is widely measured, easily interpreted, and inexpensive. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS), arrhythmias and poor compliance to chronic medications are considered to be the most frequent precipitating factors of AHF in diabetics. Several studies identified diabetes as the most prominent independent predictor of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic heart failure (HF) patients. The following parameters were identified as the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with AHF and diabetes: older age, systolic blood pressure <100 mmHg, ACS, non-compliance, history of hypertension, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <50%, serum creatinine >1.5 mg/dL, marked elevation of natriuretic peptides, hyponatremia, treatment at admission without ACE inhibitors/ARBs/β-blockers, and no percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) as a treatment modality. The most frequent cause of AHF is ACS, both with ST segment elevation (STEMI) or without (NSTEMI). Hyperglycemia is very common in these patients and although frequently unrecognized and untreated, has a large in-hospital and mortality significance. PMID:24988247

  8. β3-Adrenoceptor activation relieves oxidative inhibition of the cardiac Na+-K+ pump in hyperglycemia induced by insulin receptor blockade

    PubMed Central

    Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan; Liu, Chia-Chi; Garcia, Alvaro; Fry, Natasha A.; Hamilton, Elisha J.; Figtree, Gemma A.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated nitric oxide (NO)- and superoxide (O2·−)-dependent signaling contributes to the pathobiology of diabetes-induced cardiovascular complications. We examined if stimulation of β3-adrenergic receptors (β3-ARs), coupled to endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activation, relieves oxidative inhibition of eNOS and the Na+-K+ pump induced by hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia was established in male New Zealand White rabbits by infusion of the insulin receptor antagonist S961 for 7 days. Hyperglycemia increased tissue and blood indexes of oxidative stress. It induced glutathionylation of the Na+-K+ pump β1-subunit in cardiac myocytes, an oxidative modification causing pump inhibition, and reduced the electrogenic pump current in voltage-clamped myocytes. Hyperglycemia also increased glutathionylation of eNOS, which causes its uncoupling, and increased coimmunoprecipitation of cytosolic p47phox and membranous p22phox NADPH oxidase subunits, consistent with NADPH oxidase activation. Blocking translocation of p47phox to p22phox with the gp91ds-tat peptide in cardiac myocytes ex vivo abolished the hyperglycemia-induced increase in glutathionylation of the Na+-K+ pump β1-subunit and decrease in pump current. In vivo treatment with the β3-AR agonist CL316243 for 3 days eliminated the increase in indexes of oxidative stress, decreased coimmunoprecipitation of p22phox with p47phox, abolished the hyperglycemia-induced increase in glutathionylation of eNOS and the Na+-K+ pump β1-subunit, and abolished the decrease in pump current. CL316243 also increased coimmunoprecipitation of glutaredoxin-1 with the Na+-K+ pump β1-subunit, which may reflect facilitation of deglutathionylation. In vivo β3-AR activation relieves oxidative inhibition of key cardiac myocyte proteins in hyperglycemia and may be effective in targeting the deleterious cardiac effects of diabetes. PMID:26063704

  9. β3-Adrenoceptor activation relieves oxidative inhibition of the cardiac Na+-K+ pump in hyperglycemia induced by insulin receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan; Liu, Chia-Chi; Garcia, Alvaro; Fry, Natasha A; Hamilton, Elisha J; Figtree, Gemma A; Rasmussen, Helge H

    2015-09-01

    Dysregulated nitric oxide (NO)- and superoxide (O2 (·-))-dependent signaling contributes to the pathobiology of diabetes-induced cardiovascular complications. We examined if stimulation of β3-adrenergic receptors (β3-ARs), coupled to endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activation, relieves oxidative inhibition of eNOS and the Na(+)-K(+) pump induced by hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia was established in male New Zealand White rabbits by infusion of the insulin receptor antagonist S961 for 7 days. Hyperglycemia increased tissue and blood indexes of oxidative stress. It induced glutathionylation of the Na(+)-K(+) pump β1-subunit in cardiac myocytes, an oxidative modification causing pump inhibition, and reduced the electrogenic pump current in voltage-clamped myocytes. Hyperglycemia also increased glutathionylation of eNOS, which causes its uncoupling, and increased coimmunoprecipitation of cytosolic p47(phox) and membranous p22(phox) NADPH oxidase subunits, consistent with NADPH oxidase activation. Blocking translocation of p47(phox) to p22(phox) with the gp91ds-tat peptide in cardiac myocytes ex vivo abolished the hyperglycemia-induced increase in glutathionylation of the Na(+)-K(+) pump β1-subunit and decrease in pump current. In vivo treatment with the β3-AR agonist CL316243 for 3 days eliminated the increase in indexes of oxidative stress, decreased coimmunoprecipitation of p22(phox) with p47(phox), abolished the hyperglycemia-induced increase in glutathionylation of eNOS and the Na(+)-K(+) pump β1-subunit, and abolished the decrease in pump current. CL316243 also increased coimmunoprecipitation of glutaredoxin-1 with the Na(+)-K(+) pump β1-subunit, which may reflect facilitation of deglutathionylation. In vivo β3-AR activation relieves oxidative inhibition of key cardiac myocyte proteins in hyperglycemia and may be effective in targeting the deleterious cardiac effects of diabetes. PMID:26063704

  10. Analysis of the risk factors for the short-term prognosis of acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jin; Liu, Wenbo; Sun, Jianping; Gu, Xinyi; Ma, Qiang; Tong, Weijun

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the risk factors for the short-term prognosis of acute ischemic stroke to provide a scientific evidence for improving prevention and treatment. A total of 2557 cases of acute ischemic stroke were included in the study. We collected the data on demographic characteristics, life style-related risk factors, clinical feature, and other clinical characteristics for all the participants. The outcomes were assessed using the modified Rankin scale (mRs) on day 14 or at discharge. According to the mRs score, the subjects were divided into three groups, namely, the control group (0≤ mRs ≤2), the disability group (3≤ mRs ≤5), and the death group (mRs = 6). The general conditions of these three groups were compared. An mRs score of 3≤ mRs ≤6 belonged to the composite outcome group. Logistic regression was also applied to analyze the risk factors of short-term prognosis. Monovariant logistic regression showed that age, on-set admission, hospital stays, temperature, heart rate, stroke subtype, hypertension, hyperglycemia, history of heart disease, history of atrial fibrillation, history of cerebral stroke, drinking, count of WBC, count of mononuclear leucocyte, and rate of neutrophile granulocyte were statically significant. To further control the confounding factors, multivariant logistic regression analysis was carried out. The result showed that age, on-set admission, hospital stays, temperature, heart rate, hyperglycemia, history of atrial fibrillation, and cerebral stroke history were related to the short-term prognosis. Age, on-set admission, hospital stays, temperature, heart rate, hyperglycemia, history of atrial fibrillation, and cerebral stroke history were the risk factors of the short-term prognosis of acute ischemic stroke. PMID:26885162

  11. How to Best Manage Glycemia and Non-Glycemia During the Time of Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Kevin D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is common in patients with diabetes. Reasons for this are multifactorial, but all relate to a variety of maladaptive responses to acute hyperglycemia. Persistent hyperglycemia is associated with worse left ventricular function and higher mortality during AMI, but intervention data are far from clear. Although there is a theoretical basis for the use of glucose-insulin-potassium infusion during AMI, lack of outcome efficacy (and inability to reach glycemic targets) in recent randomized trials has resulted in little enthusiasm for this strategy. Based on the increasing understanding of the dangers of hypoglycemia, while at the same time appreciating the role of hyperglycemia in AMI patients, goal glucose levels of 140–180 mg/dL using an intravenous insulin infusion while not eating seem reasonable for most patients and hospital systems. Non-glycemic therapy for patients with diabetes and AMI has benefited from more conclusive data, as this population has greater morbidity and mortality than those without diabetes. For ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), reperfusion therapy with primary percutaneous coronary intervention or fibrinolysis, antithrombotic therapy to prevent acute stent thrombosis following percutaneous coronary intervention or rethrombosis following thrombolysis, and initiation of β-blocker therapy are the current standard of care. Emergency coronary artery bypass graft surgery is reserved for the most critically ill. For those with non-STEMI, initial reperfusion therapy or fibrinolysis is not routinely indicated. Overall, there have been dramatic advances for the treatment of people with AMI and diabetes. The use of continuous glucose monitoring in this population may allow better ability to safely reach glycemic targets, which it is hoped will improve glycemic control. PMID:22650221

  12. Mendelian randomization supports causality between maternal hyperglycemia and epigenetic regulation of leptin gene in newborns.

    PubMed

    Allard, C; Desgagné, V; Patenaude, J; Lacroix, M; Guillemette, L; Battista, M C; Doyon, M; Ménard, J; Ardilouze, J L; Perron, P; Bouchard, L; Hivert, M F

    2015-01-01

    Leptin is an adipokine that acts in the central nervous system and regulates energy balance. Animal models and human observational studies have suggested that leptin surge in the perinatal period has a critical role in programming long-term risk of obesity. In utero exposure to maternal hyperglycemia has been associated with increased risk of obesity later in life. Epigenetic mechanisms are suspected to be involved in fetal programming of long term metabolic diseases. We investigated whether DNA methylation levels near LEP locus mediate the relation between maternal glycemia and neonatal leptin levels using the 2-step epigenetic Mendelian randomization approach. We used data and samples from up to 485 mother-child dyads from Gen3G, a large prospective population-based cohort. First, we built a genetic risk score to capture maternal glycemia based on 10 known glycemic genetic variants (GRS10) and showed it was an adequate instrumental variable (β = 0.046 mmol/L of maternal fasting glucose per additional risk allele; SE = 0.007; P = 7.8 × 10(-11); N = 467). A higher GRS10 was associated with lower methylation levels at cg12083122 located near LEP (β = -0.072 unit per additional risk allele; SE = 0.04; P = 0.05; N = 166). Direction and effect size of association between the instrumental variable GRS10 and methylation at cg12083122 were consistent with the negative association we observed using measured maternal glycemia. Lower DNA methylation levels at cg12083122 were associated with higher cord blood leptin levels (β = -0.17 log of cord blood leptin per unit; SE = 0.07; P = 0.01; N = 170). Our study supports that maternal glycemia is part of causal pathways influencing offspring leptin epigenetic regulation. PMID:25800063

  13. Cutaneous approach towards clinical and pathophysiological aspects of hyperglycemia by ATR FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eikje, Natalja Skrebova; Sota, Takayuki; Aizawa, Katsuo

    2007-07-01

    Attempts were made to non-invasively detect glucose-specific spectral signals in the skin by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. In vivo spectra were collected from the inner wrists of healthy, prediabetes and diabetes subjects in the 750-4000 cm -1 region, with a closer assessment of the glucose-related region between 1000 and 1180 cm -1. Spectra in vivo showed glucose-specific peaks at 1030, 1080, 1118 and 1151 cm -1, as a variety of glucose solutions are found in vitro. Based on the differences of intensities at 1030 and 1118 cm -1 two spectral patterns were seen: I 1118 > I 1030 for a diabetes and I 1030> I 1118 for non-diabetes subjects. The peak at 1030 cm -1 was used to assess glucose concentrations in the skin due to its good correlation with glucose concentrations in vitro. Calculated mean values of the peak at 1030 cm -1 showed evidence of correlation with blood glucose levels when grouped as <= 140, 140-200 and >= 200 mg/dL, though there was no constant correlation between them when compared before/after OGTT or at the fasting/postprandial states. Absorbances at 1030 cm -1 were not only increased in a dose-dependent manner in a diabetes patient, but were also generally higher than in non-diabetes subjects at 30 min OGTT assessment. Also we could monitor absorbances at 1030 cm -1 and determine their changes in the skin tissue at different times of OGTT. We assume that our approach to in vivo measurement and monitoring of glucose concentrations at 1030 cm -1 may be one of the indicators to assess glucose activity level and its changes in the skin tissue, and has further implications in the study of clinical and pathophysiological aspects of hyperglycemia in diabetes and non-diabetes subjects by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

  14. Activation of endogenous angiotensin converting enzyme 2 prevents early injuries induced by hyperglycemia in rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Foureaux, G.; Nogueira, B. S.; Coutinho, D. C. O.; Raizada, M. K.; Nogueira, J. C.; Ferreira, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus that may result in blindness. We evaluated the effects of activation of endogenous angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) 2 on the early stages of DR. Rats were administered an intravenous injection of streptozotocin to induce hyperglycemia. The ACE2 activator 1-[[2-(dimethylamino) ethyl] amino]-4-(hydroxymethyl)-7-[[(4-methylphenyl) sulfonyl] oxy]-9H-xanthone 9 (XNT) was administered by daily gavage. The death of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) was evaluated in histological sections, and retinal ACE2, caspase-3, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expressions were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. XNT treatment increased ACE2 expression in retinas of hyperglycemic (HG) rats (control: 13.81±2.71 area%; HG: 14.29±4.30 area%; HG+XNT: 26.87±1.86 area%; P<0.05). Importantly, ACE2 activation significantly increased the RCG number in comparison with HG animals (control: 553.5±14.29; HG: 530.8±10.3 cells; HG+XNT: 575.3±16.5 cells; P<0.05). This effect was accompanied by a reduction in the expression of caspase-3 in RGC of the HG+XNT group when compared with untreated HG rats (control: 18.74±1.59; HG: 38.39±3.39 area%; HG+XNT: 27.83±2.80 area%; P<0.05). Treatment with XNT did not alter the VEGF expression in HG animals (P>0.05). Altogether, these findings indicate that activation of ACE2 reduced the death of retinal ganglion cells by apoptosis in HG rats. PMID:26421871

  15. Aspects of Hyperglycemia Contribution to Arterial Stiffness and Cardiovascular Complications in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gordin, Daniel; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2016-09-01

    Controlling the blood glucose level is of outmost importance for the prevention of the micro- and macrovascular diabetic complications observed in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Although the pathogenesis behind the complex cascade of complications is far from solved, one possible mechanism could be a negative effect of glucose on the arteries resulting in a stiffening of the arteries and ultimately in vascular complications. Intriguingly, patients with T1D have been shown to suffer from premature arterial aging compared to nondiabetic subjects-an association that is even more evident in the presence of diabetic complications such as diabetic nephropathy. Arterial stiffness has in several patient populations been shown to independently predict cardiovascular disease. However, interventional studies aimed at attenuating arterial stiffness to reduce cardiovascular disease in T1D are yet to come. Moreover, most of the data on pharmacological treatments of arterial stiffening are directed toward pathophysiological pathways other than hyperglycemia. Interestingly, the sodium-glucose transport-2 (SGLT2) inhibitor empagliflozin was recently shown to reduce both blood pressure and arterial stiffness in patients with type 2 diabetes. Whether, these effects can also be replicated in patients with T1D is an intriguing question. Tight metabolic and antihypertensive control are still of central importance for the prevention and the treatment of diabetic complications. However, the need for a noninvasive intermediate marker to identify at risk patients for aggressive treatment is evident. One such tool might be arterial stiffness linking diabetes to increased cardiovascular risk. Future research efforts exploring large-scale databases will play a key role in the identification of other clinically useful markers. PMID:26956240

  16. Hyperglycemia-Induced Abnormalities in Rat and Human Corneas: The Potential of Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Latour, Gaël; Kowalczuk, Laura; Savoldelli, Michèle; Bourges, Jean-Louis; Plamann, Karsten; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2012-01-01

    Background Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy recently appeared as an efficient optical imaging technique to probe unstained collagen-rich tissues like cornea. Moreover, corneal remodeling occurs in many diseases and precise characterization requires overcoming the limitations of conventional techniques. In this work, we focus on diabetes, which affects hundreds of million people worldwide and most often leads to diabetic retinopathy, with no early diagnostic tool. This study then aims to establish the potential of SHG microscopy for in situ detection and characterization of hyperglycemia-induced abnormalities in the Descemet’s membrane, in the posterior cornea. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied corneas from age-matched control and Goto-Kakizaki rats, a spontaneous model of type 2 diabetes, and corneas from human donors with type 2 diabetes and without any diabetes. SHG imaging was compared to confocal microscopy, to histology characterization using conventional staining and transmitted light microscopy and to transmission electron microscopy. SHG imaging revealed collagen deposits in the Descemet’s membrane of unstained corneas in a unique way compared to these gold standard techniques in ophthalmology. It provided background-free images of the three-dimensional interwoven distribution of the collagen deposits, with improved contrast compared to confocal microscopy. It also provided structural capability in intact corneas because of its high specificity to fibrillar collagen, with substantially larger field of view than transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, in vivo SHG imaging was demonstrated in Goto-Kakizaki rats. Conclusions/Significance Our study shows unambiguously the high potential of SHG microscopy for three-dimensional characterization of structural abnormalities in unstained corneas. Furthermore, our demonstration of in vivo SHG imaging opens the way to long-term dynamical studies. This method should be easily generalized to

  17. Activation of spinal α2 adrenergic receptors induces hyperglycemia in mouse though activating sympathetic outflow.

    PubMed

    Sim, Yun-Beom; Park, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Su; Lim, Su-Min; Jung, Jun-Sub; Suh, Hong-Won

    2014-10-15

    The roles of α2-adrenergic receptors located in the spinal cord in the regulation of blood glucose levels were studied in imprinting control region (ICR) mice. Mice were treated intrathecally (i.t.) with clonidine or yohimbine, and the blood glucose levels were measured at 0, 30, 60 and 120min after i.t. administration. The i.t. injection with clonidine caused a pronounced elevation of the blood glucose levels in a dose-dependent manner. Clonidine-induced hyperglycemic effect was dose-dependently attenuated by i.t. pretreatment with yohimbine. Furthermore, plasma insulin level was attenuated by clonidine, and yohimbine pretreatment reversed partially, but significantly, clonidine-induced down-regulation of the plasma insulin level. I.t. pretreatment with pertussis toxin (PTX) almost abolished the hyperglycemic effect induced by clonidine. PTX pretreatment reversed the induced down-regulation of the insulin level. In addition, i.t. pretreatment with N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) or intraperitoneal (i.p.) pretreatment with mifepristone, hexamethonium and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) attenuated the hyperglycemic effect induced by clonidine. I.t. injected clonidine significantly increased plasma corticosterone level. The elevated blood glucose level induced by clonidine was significantly decreased in adrenalectomized (ADX) mice. Our results suggest that the α2-adrenergic receptors located in the spinal cord play important roles for the elevation of the blood glucose level. The hyperglycemic effect induced by clonidine appears to be mediated by a reduction of the plasma insulin level. In addition, glucocortioid system appears to be involved in clonidine-induced hyperglycemic effect. Furthermore, the clonidine-induced hyperglycemia appears to be mediated via activating the spinal nerves or peripheral sympathetic nervous system. PMID:25179570

  18. All-Cause Mortality for Diabetics or Individuals with Hyperglycemia Applying for Life Insurance.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Stephen A; MacKenzie, Ross; Wylde, David N; Roudebush, Bradley T; Bergstrom, Richard L; Holowaty, J Carl; Hart, Anna; Rigatti, Steven J; Gill, Stacy J

    2016-01-01

    Diabetics and individuals with lab results consistent with a diagnosis of diabetes or hyperglycemia were extracted from data covering US residents who applied for life insurance between January 2007 and January 2014. Information about these applicants was matched to the Social Security Death Master File (SSDMF) and another commercially available death source file to determine vital status. Due to the inconsistencies of reporting within the death files, there were two cohorts of death cases, one including the imputed year of birth (full cohort of deaths), and the second where the date of birth was known (reduced cohort of deaths). The study had approximately 8.5 million person-years of exposure. Actual to expected (A/E) mortality ratios were calculated using the Society of Actuaries 2008 Valuation Basic Table (2008VBT) select table, age last birthday and the 2010 US population as expected mortality rates. With the 2008VBT as an expected basis, the overall A/E mortality ratio was 3.15 for the full cohort of deaths and 2.56 for the reduced cohort of deaths. Using the US population as the expected basis, the overall A/E mortality ratio was 0.98 for the full cohort of deaths and 0.79 for the reduced cohort. Since there was no smoking status information in this study, all expected bases were not smoker distinct. A/E mortality ratios varied by disease treatment category and were considerably higher in individuals using insulin. A/E mortality ratios decreased with increasing age and took on a J-shaped distribution with increasing BMI (Body Mass Index). The lowest mortality ratios were observed for overweight and obese individuals. The A/E mortality ratio based on the 2008VBT decreased with the increase in applicant duration, which was defined as the time since initial life insurance application. PMID:27562107

  19. POST-TRANSPLANT HYPERGLYCEMIA IS ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED RISK OF LIVER ALLOGRAFT REJECTION

    PubMed Central

    Wallia, Amisha; Parikh, Neehar D; Molitch, Mark E; Mahler, Eileen; Tian, Lu; Huang, Jie Jenny; Levitsky, Josh

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Intensive glycemic control has been shown to positively impact outcomes in an intensive care setting. Whether this practice is beneficial after liver transplantation (LT) is not known. METHODS A retrospective review of patients undergoing LT from 2/02-07/04 was conducted to analyze the association between peri-operative hyperglycemia and outcomes after LT. Covariates included pre-existing diabetes, mean glucose three months pre-LT, need for insulin drip post-LT, mean total glucose during the post-LT hospitalization, age, gender, type of transplant, and MELD score. Outcomes within one year of LT included rejection, infection, re-hospitalization, prolonged ventilation, and patient/graft survival. RESULTS 113 LT and 31 liver-kidney recipients were included. By multivariate logistic regression adjusting for covariates, the rejection rate was significantly lower for patients with postoperative glucose levels < 200 mg/dL (n=114) vs. > 200 mg/dL (n=30) (OR 0.055, 95%CI [0.0154, 0.200], p<0.001). The need for prolonged ventilation was more common in patients with glucose < 200 vs. > 200 mg/dL (OR 4.30, 95%CI [1.284, 14.388], p=0.018). While other outcomes, infection, re-hospitalization, patient/graft survival, were not different among the glucose control groups, rejection was associated with increased re-hospitalizations and infections. CONCLUSION Our data demonstrate an association between immediate post-transplant glycemic control and the development of subsequent rejection. Prospective trials investigating the effects of perioperative glycemic control on outcomes and morbidity after LT are warranted. PMID:20098286

  20. Renal Dysfunction in Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong Woo

    2011-01-01

    During treatment of acute heart failure (AHF), worsening renal function is often complicated and results in a complex clinical course. Furthermore, renal dysfunction is a strong independent predictor of long-term adverse outcomes in patients with AHF. Traditionally, the predominant cause of renal dysfunction has been attributed to impairment of cardiac output and relative underfilling of arterial perfusion. Recently, emerging data have led to the importance of venous congestion and elevated intra-abdominal pressure rather than confining it to impaired forward cardiac output as the primary driver of renal impairment. Relief of congestion is a major objective of AHF treatment but therapy is still based on the administration of loop diuretics. The results of the recently performed controlled studies for the assessment of new treatments to overcome resistance to diuretic treatment to protect kidneys from untoward effects have been mostly neutral. Better treatment of congestion in heart failure remains a major problem. PMID:22125554

  1. Acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Barr, Wendy; Smith, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Acute diarrhea in adults is a common problem encountered by family physicians. The most common etiology is viral gastroenteritis, a self-limited disease. Increases in travel, comorbidities, and foodborne illness lead to more bacteria-related cases of acute diarrhea. A history and physical examination evaluating for risk factors and signs of inflammatory diarrhea and/or severe dehydration can direct any needed testing and treatment. Most patients do not require laboratory workup, and routine stool cultures are not recommended. Treatment focuses on preventing and treating dehydration. Diagnostic investigation should be reserved for patients with severe dehydration or illness, persistent fever, bloody stool, or immunosuppression, and for cases of suspected nosocomial infection or outbreak. Oral rehydration therapy with early refeeding is the preferred treatment for dehydration. Antimotility agents should be avoided in patients with bloody diarrhea, but loperamide/simethicone may improve symptoms in patients with watery diarrhea. Probiotic use may shorten the duration of illness. When used appropriately, antibiotics are effective in the treatment of shigellosis, campylobacteriosis, Clostridium difficile, traveler's diarrhea, and protozoal infections. Prevention of acute diarrhea is promoted through adequate hand washing, safe food preparation, access to clean water, and vaccinations. PMID:24506120

  2. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1−5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to August 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides, different doses [amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides], long-course regimens), antihistamines, cephalosporins or macrolides, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), doxycycline, saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intra-nasal). PMID:19450327

  3. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1% to 5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and in people with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, amoxicillin–clavulanic acid [co-amoxiclav], doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides; different doses, long-course regimens), antihistamines, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intranasal). PMID:22189346

  4. Acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, N

    2000-09-01

    Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) is a representative disease of acute nephritic syndrome characterized by the sudden appearance of edema, hematuria, proteinuria, and hypertension. The prototype of AGN is acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). "Nephritogenic streptococci" are defined as organisms that are cultured from a patient who develops AGN. Although only a limited number of M-types of streptococci have been recognized as "nephritogenic streptococci", all M-types of streptococci may have nephritogenic potential because the genes for major putative nephritogenic antigens such as SPEB and NAPIr are found to be present in all group A streptococci thus far examined. Pathogenic mechanisms for APSGN involving both humoral and cell-mediated immunity have been recently proposed. The role of humoral immunity is presumed to be mediated by the in situ formation of nephritogenic streptococcal antigen-antibody complexes and circulating immune complexes. While in the cellular immune component a role for delayed-type hypersensitivity has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of APSGN. PMID:10969898

  5. Risk factors for neurological worsening and symptomatic watershed infarction in internal carotid artery aneurysm treated by extracranial-intracranial bypass using radial artery graft.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Hidetoshi; Tanikawa, Rokuya; Kamiyama, Hiroyasu; Tsuboi, Toshiyuki; Noda, Kosumo; Ota, Nakao; Miyata, Shiro; Oda, Jumpei; Takeda, Rihee; Tokuda, Sadahisa; Kamada, Kyousuke

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT The revascularization technique, including bypass created using the external carotid artery (ECA), radial artery (RA), and M2 portion of middle cerebral artery (MCA), has remained indispensable for treatment of complex aneurysms. To date, it remains unknown whether diameters of the RA, superficial temporal artery (STA), and C2 portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and intraoperative MCA blood pressure have influences on the outcome and the symptomatic watershed infarction (WI). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the factors for the symptomatic WI and neurological worsening in patients treated by ECA-RA-M2 bypass for complex ICA aneurysm with therapeutic ICA occlusion. METHODS The authors measured the sizes of vessels (RA, C2, M2, and STA) and intraoperative MCA blood pressure (initial, after ICA occlusion, and after releasing the RA graft bypass) in 37 patients. Symptomatic WI was defined as presence of the following: postoperative new neurological deficits, WI on postoperative diffusion-weighted imaging, and ipsilateral cerebral blood flow reduction on SPECT. Neurological worsening was defined as the increase in 1 or more modified Rankin Scale scores. First, the authors performed receiver operating characteristic curve analysis for continuous variables and the binary end point of the symptomatic WI. The clinical, radiological, and physiological characteristics of patients with and without the symptomatic WI were compared using the log-rank test. Then, the authors compared the variables between patients with and without neurological worsening at discharge and at the 12-month follow-up examination or last hospital visit. RESULTS Symptomatic WI was observed in 2 (5.4%) patients. The mean MCA pressure after releasing the RA graft (< 55 mm Hg; p = 0.017), mean (MCA pressure after releasing the RA graft)/(initial MCA pressure) (< 0.70 mm Hg; p = 0.032), and mean cross-sectional area ratio ([RA/C2 diameter](2) < 0.40 mm [p < 0.0001] and [STA/C2

  6. [Diagnostics of acute cervical lymphadenitis and adenophlegmona in patients with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Nazarochkin, Iu V; Mazurin, O E; Fernando, D R; Proskurin, A I

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to optimize diagnostics of acute cervical lymphadenitis and adenophlegmona in patients with diabetes. A total of 146 patients with suppurative diseases of the head and the neck were available for examination of whom 63 presented with complicated clinical condition. It was shown that evaluation of the interleukin status (IL-8, IL-10), early diagnosis of systemic inflammatory reaction and compensatory anti-inflammatory response as well as the use of the ultrasound visualization technique make it possible to objectively assess the patient's condition and predict the outcome of the disease taking into consideration effects of hyperglycemia in diabetic patients. PMID:20517272

  7. Suspected acute interstitial nephritis induced by colistin.

    PubMed

    Kallel, Hatem; Hamida, Chokri Ben; Ksibi, Hichem; Bahloul, Mabrouk; Hergafi, Leila; Chaari, Anis; Chelly, Hedi; Bouaziz, Mounir

    2005-01-01

    We describe a 35-year-old male admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). He developed ventilator-associated pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and was treated with imipenem and colistin without any renal toxicity. The patient was readmitted to the ICU for a 2nd and a 3rd exacerbation of COPD and was again treated with imipenem and colistin. In both episodes, he developed rapid worsening in renal function, which improved following colistin withdrawal. Use of the Naranjo ADR probability scale indicated a probable relationship between the renal failure and the colistin therapy. In addition, the time course of events suggested that colistin was the cause of acute interstitial nephritis in this patient. We conclude that our patient had a possible acute allergic reaction to colistin since the 1st introduction was not associated with any renal toxicity and renal failure was observed on the 1st day of the 2nd and the 3rd initiation of colistin therapy, respectively. PMID:16013023

  8. Eosinophilic presentation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rezamand, Azim; Ghorashi, Ziaaedin; Ghorashi, Sona; Nezami, Nariman

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 5 Primary Diagnosis: Rule-out appendicitis Co-existing Diseases: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) Medication: Chemiotherapy Clinical Procedure: Chest CT • flow cytometry Specialty: Pediatrics’ oncology • infection diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: Leukemias are among the most common childhood malignancies. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) accounts for 77% of all leukemias. In rare cases, ALL patients may present with eosinophilia. Case Report: Here, a 5-year old boy was admitted to our hospital with a possible diagnosis of appendicitis. This patient’s complete blood cell count demonstrated leukocytosis with severe eosinophilia. Following a 1-month clinical investigation, 2 bone marrow aspirations, and flow cytometry analysis, a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia was proposed. Finally, the patient was transferred to the oncology ward to receive standard therapeutic protocol, which resulted in disease remission. After chemotherapy for 2 years, patient is successfully treated. Conclusions: ALL is diagnosed by eosinophilia in rare cases. These patients need immediate diagnosis and intensive therapy due to worsened prognosis of ALL presenting as hypereosinophilia. PMID:23869247

  9. Acute renal dysfunction in acetaminophen poisoning.

    PubMed

    Mour, Girish; Feinfeld, Donald A; Caraccio, Thomas; McGuigan, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Although acetaminophen (APAP)-associated liver injury is well recognized, there are few reports describing APAP nephrotoxicity, and most of them are single cases. It has also been suggested that N-acetylcysteine (NAC), used to treat the hepatotoxicity, may be harmful to the kidneys. To examine this contention and to determine whether renal involvement in APAP poisoning is at all common, we analyzed the incidence and outcome of acute renal dysfunction in patients hospitalized for APAP overdose reported to our regional poison center over a year. Eleven APAP-poisoned patients had elevated liver function tests; nine of them had azotemia. Those with higher AST levels tended to be younger and to have lower APAP levels on admission. Two patients with acute renal injury died after admission. The other seven patients with renal dysfunction recovered in 2 to 7 days. Six of these received NAC; their mean serum creatinine fell from 3.2 +/- 2.0 versus 1.7 +/- 0.9 mg/dL (p < 0.05). We conclude that acute renal failure is not uncommon in APAP poisoning and appears to be unrelated to the degree of liver injury. NAC therapy did not seem to worsen nephrotoxicity. PMID:16060123

  10. Current Concepts in Adult Acute Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Aring, Ann M; Chan, Miriam M

    2016-07-15

    Acute rhinosinusitis is one of the most common conditions that physicians treat in ambulatory care. Most cases of acute rhinosinusitis are caused by viral upper respiratory infections. A meta-analysis based on individual patient data found that common clinical signs and symptoms were not effective for identifying patients with rhinosinusitis who would benefit from antibiotics. C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate are somewhat useful tests for confirming acute bacterial maxillary sinusitis. Four signs and symptoms that significantly increase the likelihood of a bacterial cause when present are double sickening, purulent rhinorrhea, erythrocyte sedimentation rate greater than 10 mm per hour, and purulent secretion in the nasal cavity. Although cutoffs vary depending on the guideline, antibiotic therapy should be considered when rhinosinusitis symptoms fail to improve within seven to 10 days or if they worsen at any time. First-line antibiotics include amoxicillin with or without clavulanate. Current guidelines support watchful waiting within the first seven to 10 days after upper respiratory symptoms first appear. Evidence on the use of analgesics, intranasal corticosteroids, and saline nasal irrigation for the treatment of acute rhinosinusitis is poor. Nonetheless, these therapies may be used to treat symptoms within the first 10 days of upper respiratory infection. Radiography is not recommended in the evaluation of uncomplicated acute rhinosinusitis. For patients who do not respond to treatment, computed tomography of the sinuses without contrast media is helpful to evaluate for possible complications or anatomic abnormalities. Referral to an otolaryngologist is indicated when symptoms persist after maximal medical therapy and if any rare complications are suspected. PMID:27419326

  11. Rhein Protects Pancreatic β-Cells From Dynamin-Related Protein-1–Mediated Mitochondrial Fission and Cell Apoptosis Under Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Zhaohong; Zhang, Yujing; Zhang, Mingchao; Zhu, Xiaodong; Fan, Yun; Shi, Shaolin; Zen, Ke; Liu, Zhihong

    2013-01-01

    Rhein, an anthraquinone compound isolated from rhubarb, has been shown to improve glucose metabolism disorders in diabetic mice. The mechanism underlying the protective effect of rhein, however, remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that rhein can protect the pancreatic β-cells against hyperglycemia-induced cell apoptosis through stabilizing mitochondrial morphology. Oral administration of rhein for 8 or 16 weeks in db/db mice significantly reduced fasting blood glucose (FBG) level and improved glucose tolerance. Cell apoptosis assay using both pancreatic sections and cultured pancreatic β-cells indicated that rhein strongly inhibited β-cell apoptosis. Morphological study showed that rhein was mainly localized at β-cell mitochondria and rhein could preserve mitochondrial ultrastructure by abolishing hyperglycemia-induced mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) expression. Western blot and functional analysis confirmed that rhein protected the pancreatic β-cells against hyperglycemia-induced apoptosis via suppressing mitochondrial Drp1 level. Finally, mechanistic study further suggested that decreased Drp1 level by rhein might be due to its effect on reducing cellular reactive oxygen species. Taken together, our study demonstrates for the first time that rhein can serve as a novel therapeutic agent for hyperglycemia treatment and rhein protects pancreatic β-cells from apoptosis by blocking the hyperglycemia-induced Drp1 expression. PMID:23919963

  12. Evaluation Series on Safety and Efficacy of Nutritional Supplements in Newly Diagnosed Hyperglycemia: A Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Hemant; Bantwal, Ganapati; Jain, Sunil; Kalra, Sanjay; Kale, Shailaja; Saboo, Banshi; Gupta, Jugal B.; Sivam, Sakthivel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is endemic with developing economies contributing to the bulk of this pandemic. Despite the evidence of incremental benefit of glycemic control starting early in life, acceptance of and adherence to modern medications remain suboptimal. Aims: To determine the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c)-lowering efficacy and safety of nutritional supplement, PreCrea®, in adult Indians with newly diagnosed hyperglycemia. Materials and Methods: Double-blind, randomized study conducted in six diabetes centers in India. A total of 193 treatment-naïve subjects with newly diagnosed hyperglycemia and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) >100 mg/dL were randomized into either PreCrea® 600 mg (n = 90) or matched placebo (n = 89) capsules twice daily, along with lifestyle modification, for 12 weeks. The main outcomes were changes in HbA1c and FPG levels, attainment of the American Diabetes Association (ADA)-defined goals for HbA1c, and clinical and biochemical measures of safety. Results: At 12 weeks, mean HbA1c in PreCrea® group reduced by 0.91% compared with 0.08% increase in the placebo group (P < .001). The reductions in the mean FPG at week 4 (P < .001) and week 12 (P = 0.04) were significant compared to the baseline. ADA goal of HbA1c <7% increased from 15.5% at the baseline to 35.6% at week 12 in PreCrea® subjects. Clinical safety and biochemical safety did not change. Hypoglycemia and weight gain were not observed with PreCrea®. Conclusions: Nearly 1% point reduction in HbA1c at week 12 with PreCrea® is comparable with most first-line glucose-lowering drugs. The safety and tolerability of PreCrea® highlights its potential as a first-line therapy in newly detected hyperglycemia. PMID:27042609

  13. A Family History of Diabetes Modifies the Association between Elevated Urine Albumin Concentration and Hyperglycemia in Nondiabetic Mexican Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Corona, Aida; Ávila-Hermosillo, Antonio; Nelson, Robert G.; Ramírez-López, Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    We examined the frequency of elevated urine albumin concentration (UAC) and its association with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and metabolic markers in 515 nondiabetic Mexican adolescents stratified by family history of diabetes (FHD). UAC was measured in a first morning urine sample and considered elevated when excretion was ≥20 mg/mL. MetS was defined using International Diabetes Federation criteria. Fasting insulin, insulin resistance, and lipids were evaluated. Multivariate logistic regression was performed. Elevated UAC was present in 12.4% and MetS was present in 8.9% of the adolescents. No association was found between elevated UAC and MetS. Among adolescents with FHD, 18.4% were overweight and 20.7% were obese, whereas, among those without a FHD, 15.9% were overweight and 7.5% were obese. Hyperglycemia was higher in those with elevated UAC than in those without (44.4% versus 5.1%, p = 0.003). Hyperglycemia (OR = 9.8, 95% CI 1.6–59.4) and number of MetS components (OR = 4.5, 95% CI 1.5–13.3) were independently associated with elevated UAC. Among female participants, abdominal obesity was associated with elevated UAC (OR = 4.5, 95% CI 1.2–16.9). Conclusion. Elevated UAC was associated neither with MetS nor with any metabolic markers in nondiabetic adolescents. However, FHD modified the association of elevated UAC with hyperglycemia and the number of MetS components. PMID:26347891

  14. Effects of hyperglycemia on lonidamine-induced acidification and de-energization of human melanoma xenografts and sensitization to melphalan

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Kavindra; Nelson, David S.; Heitjan, Daniel F.; Zhou, Rong; Leeper, Dennis B.; Glickson, Jerry D.

    2015-01-01

    We seek to exploit the natural tendency of melanomas and other tumors to convert glucose to lactate as a method for selective intracellular acidification of cancer cells and for potentiating the activity of N-mustard antineoplastic agents. We performed this study to evaluate whether induction of hyperglycemia (26 mM) could enhance the effects of lonidamine (LND, 100 mg/kg; i.p.) on inducing intracellular acidification, bioenergetic decline and potentiation of the activity of melphalan (LPAM) against DB-1 melanoma xenografts in mice. Intracellular pH (pHi), extracellular pH (pHe) and bioenergetics (βNTP/Pi) were reduced by 0.7 units (p<0.001), 0.3 units (p>0.05) and 51.4% (p<0.05), respectively. Therapeutic response to LPAM (7.5 mg/kg; i.v.) + LND (100 mg/kg; i.p.) was reduced by about a factor of 3 under hyperglycemic conditions compared to normoglycemia, producing a growth delay of 7.76 d (tumor doubling time = 5.31 d, cell kill = 64%) compared to LND alone of 1.70 d and LPAM alone of 0.29 d. Under normoglycemic conditions LND plus LPAM produced a growth delay of 17.75 d, corresponding to a cell kill of 90 % at the same doses for each of these agents. The decrease in tumor cell kill under hyperglycemic conditions correlates with an increase in tumor ATP levels resulting from increased glycolytic activity. However, hyperglycemia substantially increases lactic acid production in tumors by a factor of ~6 (p<0.05), but hyperglycemia did not increase the effects of LND on acidification of the tumor most likely because of the strong buffering action of carbon dioxide (the pKa of carbonic acid is 6.4). Therefore, this study demonstrates that addition of glucose during treatment with LND diminishes the activity of this agent. PMID:25702942

  15. Impetigo presenting as an acute necrotizing swelling of the lower lip in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Ghafoor, Mohammed; Halsnad, Moorthy; Fowell, Christopher; Millar, Brian G

    2012-06-01

    The authors present an unusual case of an acute swelling of the lower lip and septicemia in a 35-year-old, recent immigrant male arriving from India. The patient presented in our emergency department with a 48-hour history of a worsening, painful swelling of the lower lip. On presentation, he was pyrexial and the lip was found to be acutely inflamed with honey-colored crusting, pustular lesions, and induration . A diagnosis of impetigo leading to necrosis of the lip was established, a rare phenomenon potentially resulting in significant tissue destruction. Appropriate medical management achieved a good outcome and prevented disabling tissue loss of the orofacial region. PMID:22677026

  16. Acute fibrinous organising pneumonia: a manifestation of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Jamous, Fady; Ayaz, Syed Zain; Choate, Jacquelyn

    2014-01-01

    A 50-year-old man was treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) for acute arthritis of his right big toe. Within a few days, he developed dyspnoea, hypoxaemia and diffuse pulmonary infiltrates. Symptoms improved with discontinuation of the antibiotic but worsened again with its reintroduction. An open lung biopsy was performed. We describe the workup performed and the factors that pointed to a final diagnosis of TMP-SMX-related pulmonary toxicity in the form of acute fibrinous organising pneumonia. PMID:25355746

  17. [Update on current care guidelines. Current care guideline: Acute lower respiratory tract infection in adults].

    PubMed

    Honkanen, Pekka; Broas, Markku; Hedman, Jouni; Jartti, Airi; Järvinen, Asko; Koskela, Markku; Meinander, Tuula; Puolijoki, Hannu; Rautakorpi, Ulla; Syrjälä, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is recognised in patients suffering from acute cough or deteriorated general condition. Patients with acute cough without pneumonia-related symptoms or clinical findings do not benefit from antimicrobial treatment. Those with suspected or confirmed pneumonia are treated with antibiotics, amoxicillin being the first choice. Most patients with pneumonia can be treated at home. Those with severe symptoms are referred to hospital. Patients are always encouraged to contact his/her physician if the symptoms worsen or do not ameliorate within 2-3 days. Patients aged 50 years or older and smokers are controlled by thoracic radiography in 6-8 weeks. PMID:26237912

  18. Depression in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes: associations with hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and poor treatment adherence

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuying; Ting, Rose ZW; Yang, Wenying; Jia, Weiping; Li, Wenhui; Ji, Linong; Guo, Xiaohui; Kong, Alice PS; Wing, Yun‐Kwok; Luk, Andrea OY; Sartorius, Norman; Morisky, Donald E; Oldenburg, Brian; Weng, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background We hypothesize that depression in type 2 diabetes might be associated with poor glycemic control, in part due to suboptimal self‐care. We tested this hypothesis by examining the associations of depression with clinical and laboratory findings in a multicenter survey of Chinese type 2 diabetic patients. Method 2538 patients aged 18–75 years attending hospital‐based clinics in four cities in China underwent detailed clinical‐psychological‐behavioral assessment during a 12‐month period between 2011 and 2012. Depression was diagnosed if Patient Health Questionnaire‐9 (PHQ‐9) score ≥10. Diabetes self‐care and medication adherence were assessed using the Summary of Diabetes Self‐care Activities and the 4‐item Morisky medication adherence scale respectively. Results In this cross‐sectional study (mean age: 56.4 ± 10.5[SD] years, 53% men), 6.1% (n = 155) had depression. After controlling for study sites, patients with depression had higher HbA 1c (7.9 ± 2.0 vs. 7.7 ± 2.0%, P = 0.008) and were less likely to achieve HbA 1c goal of <7.0% (36.2% vs 45.6%, P = 0.004) than those without depression. They were more likely to report hypoglycemia and to have fewer days of being adherent to their recommended diet, exercise, foot care and medication. In logistic regression, apart from young age, poor education, long disease duration, tobacco use, high body mass index, use of insulin, depression was independently associated with failure to attain HbA 1c target (Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.56, 95%CI:1.05–2.32, P = 0.028). The association between depression and glycemic control became non‐significant after inclusion of adherence to diet, exercise and medication (OR = 1.48, 95% CI 0.99–2.21, P = 0.058). Conclusion Depression in type 2 diabetes was closely associated with hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, which might be partly mediated through poor treatment adherence. PMID:25349949

  19. Marked hyperglycemia attenuates anesthetic preconditioning in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Canfield, Scott G.; Sepac, Ana; Sedlic, Filip; Muravyeva, Maria Y.; Bai, Xiaowen; Bosnjak, Zeljko J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Anesthetic preconditioning protects cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress-induced injury, but it is ineffective in patients with diabetes mellitus. To address the role of hyperglycemia in the inability of diabetic individuals to be preconditioned, we used human cardiomyocytes differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells generated from patients with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-iPSC- and N-iPSC-CMs, respectively) to investigate the efficacy of preconditioning in varying glucose conditions (5, 11, and 25 mM). Methods Induced pluripotent stem cells were induced to generate cardiomyocytes by directed differentiation. For subsequent studies, cardiomyocytes were identified by genetic labeling with enhanced green fluorescent protein driven by a cardiac-specific promoter. Cell viability was analyzed by lactate dehydrogenase assay. Confocal microscopy was utilized to measure opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and the mitochondrial adenosine-5′-triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels. Results Isoflurane (0.5 mM) preconditioning protected N-iPSC- and DM-iPSC-CMs from oxidative stress-induced lactate dehydrogenase release and mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening in 5 mM and 11 mM glucose. Isoflurane triggered mitochondrial adenosine-5′-triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opening in N-iPSC-CMs in 5 mM and 11 mM glucose and in DM-iPSC-CMs in 5 mM glucose. 25 mM glucose disrupts anesthetic preconditioning-mediated protection in DM-iPSC- and N-iPSC-CMs. Conclusions The opening of mitochondrial adenosine-5′-triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels are disrupted in DM-iPSC-CMs in 11 mM and 25 mM glucose and in N-iPSC-CMs in 25 mM glucose. Cardiomyocytes derived from healthy donors and patients with a specific disease, such as diabetes in this study, open possibilities in studying genotype and phenotype related pathologies in a human relevant model. PMID:22820846

  20. Administration of Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium bifidum Ameliorated Hyperglycemia, Dyslipidemia, and Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Poonam; Bhardwaj, Priyanka; Singh, Rambir

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present work was planned to evaluate the antihyperglycemic, lipid-lowering, and antioxidant effect of Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium bifidum in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Methods: Single daily dose of 1 × 107 cfu/ml of L. casei and B. bifidum alone and in combination of both was given to Wistar rats orally by gavaging for 28 days. Glucose tolerance test, fasting blood glucose (FBG), lipid profile, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were measured from blood. Glycogen from thigh muscles and liver and oxidative stress parameters from pancreas were analyzed. Results: Administration of L. casei and B. bifidum alone and in combination of both to diabetic rats decreased serum FBG (60.47%, 55.89%, and 56.49%, respectively), HbA1c (28.11%, 28.61%, and 28.28%), total cholesterol (171.69%, 136.47%, and 173.58%), triglycerides (9.935%, 8.58%, and 7.91%), low-density lipoproteins (53.27%, 53.35%, and 52.91%) and very low-density lipoproteins (10%, 8.58%, and 11.15%, respectively) and increased high-density lipoproteins (13.73%, 15.47%, and 15.47%), and insulin (19.50%, 25.80%, and 29.47%, respectively). The treatment also resulted in increase in muscle (171.69%, 136.47%, and 173.58%) and liver (25.82%, 6.63%, and 4.02%) glycogen level. The antioxidant indexes in pancreas of diabetic rats returned to normal level with reduction in lipid peroxidation (30.89%, 46.46%, and 65.36%) and elevation in reduced glutathione (104.5%, 161.34%, and 179.04%), superoxide dismutase (38.65%, 44.32%, and 53.35%), catalase (13.08%, 27%, and 31.52%), glutathione peroxidase (55.56%, 72.23%, and 97.23%), glutathione reductase (49.27%, 88.40%, and 110.86%), and glutathione-S-transferase (140%, 220%, and 246.6%, respectively) on treatment with L. casei, B. bifidum, and combination treatment. Conclusions: Administration of L. casei and B. bifidum alone and in combination of both ameliorated hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and oxidative stress in STZ

  1. Lesser than diabetes hyperglycemia in pregnancy is related to perinatal mortality: a cohort study in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes related morbidity increases along the continuum of the glycemic spectrum. Perinatal mortality, as a complication of gestational diabetes, has been little investigated. In early studies, an association was found, but in more recent ones it has not been confirmed. The Brazilian Study of Gestational Diabetes, a cohort of untreated pregnant women enrolled in the early 1990's, offers a unique opportunity to investigate this question. Thus, our objective is to evaluate whether perinatal mortality increases in a continuum across the maternal glycemic spectrum. Methods We prospectively enrolled and followed 4401 pregnant women attending general prenatal care clinics in six Brazilian state capitals, without history of diabetes outside of pregnancy, through to birth, and their offspring through the early neonatal period. Women answered a structured questionnaire and underwent a standardized 2-hour 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Obstetric care was maintained according to local protocols. We obtained antenatal, delivery and neonatal data from hospital records. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated using logistic regression. Results We ascertained 97 perinatal deaths (67 fetal and 31 early neonatal). Odds of dying increased according to glucose levels, statistically significantly so only for women delivering at gestational age ≥34 weeks (p < 0.05 for glycemia-gestational age interaction). ORs for a 1 standard deviation difference in glucose, when analyzed continuously, were for fasting 1.47 (95% CI 1.12, 1.92); 1-h 1.55 (95% CI 1.15, 2.07); and 2-h 1.53 (95% CI 1.15, 2.02). The adjusted OR for IADPSG criteria gestational diabetes was 2.21 (95% CI 1.15, 4.27); and for WHO criteria gestational diabetes, 3.10 (95% CI 1.39, 6.88). Conclusions In settings of limited detection and treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus, women across a spectrum of lesser than diabetes hyperglycemia, experienced a continuous rise in perinatal death with

  2. Proliferation, Migration, and Production of Nitric Oxide by Bone Marrow Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Wistar Rats in Hypoxia and Hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Lykov, A P; Nikonorova, Yu V; Bondarenko, N A; Poveshchenko, O V; Kim, I I; Poveshchenko, A F; Konenkov, V I

    2015-08-01

    We studied proliferation, migration, and secretion of NO by bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells from Wistar rats during conditioning under hypoxic and hyperglycemic conditions and the effect of erythropoietin on these parameters. A stimulating effect of erythropoietin on cell proliferation under normal conditions and activation of cell proliferation under conditions of hypoxia and hyperglycemia were demonstrated. Erythropoietin abolishes suppression of cell proliferation in culture with normal glucose level under conditions of H2O2-induced hypoxia, while under conditions of hyperglycemia, inhibition of cell proliferation becomes more pronounced. Hypoxia promotes activation of cell migration along the growth factor concentration gradient and addition of erythropoietin to the nutrient medium leads to a decrease in cell migration activity. Erythropoietin stimulates NO production by cells cultured under the conditions of hypoxia and hyperglycemia. PMID:26388580

  3. [Acute myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Combes, Alain

    2012-06-01

    Myocarditis is defined as inflammation of the myocardium accompanied by myocellular necrosis. Acute myocarditis must be considered in patients who present with recent-onset of cardiac failure or arrhythmia. Fulminant myocarditis is a distinct entity characterized by sudden onset of severe congestive heart failure or cardiogenic shock, usually following a flu-like illness, parvovirus B19, human herpesvirus 6, coxsackievirus and adenovirus being the most frequently viruses responsible for the disease. Treatment of myocarditis remains largely supportive, since immunosuppression has not been proven to be beneficial for acute lymphocytic myocarditis. Trials of antiviral therapies, or immunostimulants such as interferons, suggest a potential therapeutic role but require further investigation. Lastly, early recognition of patients rapidly progressing to refractory cardiac failure and their immediate transfer to a medical-surgical center experienced in mechanical circulatory support is warranted. In this setting, ECMO should be the first-line mechanical assistance. For highly unstable patients, a Mobile Cardiac Assistance Unit, that rapidly travels to primary care hospitals with a portable ECMO system and hooks it up before refractory multiorgan failure takes hold, is the preferred option. PMID:22515999

  4. [Acute myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Combes, Alain

    2013-05-01

    Myocarditis is defined as inflammation of the myocardium accompanied by myocellular necrosis. Acute myocarditis must be considered in patients who present with recent onset of cardiac failure or arrhythmia. Fulminant myocarditis is a distinct entity characterized by sudden onset of severe congestive heart failure or cardiogenic shock, usually following a flu-like illness, parvovirus B19, human herpesvirus 6, coxsackievirus and adenovirus being the most frequently viruses responsible for the disease. Treatment of myocarditis remains largely supportive, since immunosuppression has not been proven to be beneficial for acute lymphocytic myocarditis. Trials of antiviral therapies, or immunostimulants such as interferons, suggest a potential therapeutic role but require further investigation. Lastly, early recognition of patients rapidly progressing to refractory cardiac failure and their immediate transfer to a medical-surgical center experienced in mechanical circulatory support is warranted. In this setting, ECMO should be the first-line mechanical assistance. For highly unstable patients, a Mobile Cardiac Assistance Unit, that rapidly travels to primary care hospitals with a portable ECMO system and hooks it up before refractory multiorgan failure takes hold, is the preferred option. PMID:23789482

  5. Autonomic dysfunction in acute ischemic stroke: an underexplored therapeutic area?

    PubMed

    De Raedt, Sylvie; De Vos, Aurelie; De Keyser, Jacques

    2015-01-15

    Impaired autonomic function, characterized by a predominance of sympathetic activity, is common in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This review describes methods to measure autonomic dysfunction in stroke patients. It summarizes a potential relationship between ischemic stroke-associated autonomic dysfunction and factors that have been associated with worse outcome, including cardiac complications, blood pressure variability changes, hyperglycemia, immune depression, sleep disordered breathing, thrombotic effects, and malignant edema. Involvement of the insular cortex has been suspected to play an important role in causing sympathovagal imbalance, but its exact role and that of other brain regions remain unclear. Although sympathetic overactivity in patients with ischemic stroke appears to be a negative prognostic factor, it remains to be seen whether therapeutic strategies that reduce sympathetic activity or increase parasympathetic activity might improve outcome. PMID:25541326

  6. O-GlcNAc Modification of Transcription Factor Sp1 Mediates Hyperglycemia-Induced VEGF-A Upregulation in Retinal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Kelly; Alekseev, Oleg; Qi, Xin; Cho, William; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Proangiogenic protein VEGF-A contributes significantly to retinal lesions and neovascularization in diabetic retinopathy (DR). In preclinical DR, hyperglycemia can upregulate VEGF-A in retinal cells. The VEGF-A promoter is responsive to the transcription factor specificity protein 1 (Sp1). The O-GlcNAc modification is driven by glucose concentration and has a profound effect on Sp1 activity. This study investigated the effects of hyperglycemia on Sp1-mediated expression of VEGF-A in the retinal endothelium and pigment epithelium. Methods. Hyperglycemia-exposed ARPE-19 (human retinal pigment epithelial cells) and TR-iBRB (rat retinal microendothelial cells) were assayed for levels of VEGF-A by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and ELISA. Small molecule inhibitors of O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) or O-GlcNAcase (OGA) were used to manipulate O-GlcNAc levels. Vascular endothelial growth factor–A protein and transcript were measured in cells depleted of OGT or Sp1 by shRNA. The proximal VEGF-A promoter was analyzed for glucose sensitivity by luciferase assay. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) was used to assess Sp1 occupancy on the VEGF-A promoter. Results. Hyperglycemia increased VEGF-A promoter activity and upregulated VEGF-A transcript and protein. Elevation of O-GlcNAc by OGA inhibitors was sufficient to increase VEGF-A. O-GlcNAc transferase inhibition abrogated glucose-driven VEGF-A. Cellular depletion of OGT or Sp1 by shRNA significantly abrogated glucose-induced changes in VEGF-A. ChIP analysis showed that hyperglycemia significantly increased binding of Sp1 to the VEGF-A promoter. Conclusions. Hyperglycemia-driven VEGF-A production is mediated by elevated O-GlcNAc modification of the Sp1 transcription factor. This mechanism may be significant in the pathogenesis of preclinical DR through VEGF-A upregulation. PMID:25352121

  7. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, especially younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  8. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Otitis media - acute; Infection - inner ear; Middle ear infection - acute ... Casselbrandt ML, Mandel EM. Acute otitis media and otitis media with effusion. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. ...

  9. Changes in serum potassium levels during hospitalization in patients with worsening heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (from the EVEREST trial).

    PubMed

    Khan, Sadiya S; Campia, Umberto; Chioncel, Ovidiu; Zannad, Faiez; Rossignol, Patrick; Maggioni, Aldo P; Swedberg, Karl; Konstam, Marvin A; Senni, Michele; Nodari, Savina; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Subacius, Haris; Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2015-03-15

    Both hyperkalemia and hypokalemia may be related to heart failure (HF) therapy and are associated with adverse outcomes. Abnormalities in serum potassium levels in hospitalized patients with HF and reduced ejection fraction (EF) have not been previously investigated. A post hoc analysis was performed in 1,907 hospitalized patients with worsening HF and reduced EF in the placebo arm of the Efficacy of Vasopressin Antagonism in HF Outcome Study with Tolvaptan (EVEREST) trial. Serum potassium was measured at randomization and at discharge or day 7. The co-primary end points were all-cause mortality (ACM) and cardiovascular mortality or the first HF hospitalization (CVM + HFH). The association between inhospital change in potassium levels and time to outcomes was evaluated using multivariate Cox regression models. Study participants had a mean age of 65.6 ± 12.0 years and were on optimal guideline-directed medical therapies, including β blockers (77%), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (85%), and aldosterone antagonists (55%). Baseline potassium concentration was 4.3 ± 0.6 mEq/l, and hyperkalemia or hypokalemia was seen in 6.5% of the participants. On average, serum potassium level increased by 0.21 ± 0.66 mEq/l, p <0.0001, during hospitalization. Inhospital potassium change was not associated with either the primary or the secondary end point over a median follow-up of 9.9 months. In conclusion, in patients with reduced EF hospitalized for worsening HF, serum potassium abnormalities are common at baseline (within 48 hours of admission) and potassium levels increase during hospitalization, despite aggressive diuretic therapy. However, they are not associated with all-cause or CVM or HFH. Inhospital changes in potassium may limit the implementation of evidence-based therapies such as mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists. PMID:25728846

  10. β-Caryophyllene, a natural sesquiterpene lactone attenuates hyperglycemia mediated oxidative and inflammatory stress in experimental diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Basha, Rafeek Hidhayath; Sankaranarayanan, Chandrasekaran

    2016-02-01

    Oxidative and inflammatory stress has been implicated in the onset and progression of diabetes mellitus and its complications. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of β-Caryophyllene (BCP) on hyperglycemia mediated oxidative and inflammatory stress in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in experimental rats by a single intraperitoneal injection of STZ (40 mg/kg b.w.) dissolved in 0.1 M citrate buffer (pH 4.5). Diabetic rats exhibited increased blood glucose with significant decrease in plasma insulin levels. The activities of antioxidant enzymes and the levels of non-enzymic antioxidants were decreased while increases in the levels of lipidperoxidative markers, protein carbonyls and conjugated dienes were observed in pancreatic tissues of diabetic rats. An elevation of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 were observed in plasma and pancreatic tissues of diabetic rats. Intragastric administration of BCP (200 mg/kg b.w) for 45 days significantly decreased glucose and increased insulin levels in diabetic rats. BCP administration significantly restored antioxidant status and decreased proinflammatory cytokines in diabetic rats. These findings were supported by histological and immunohistochemical studies. Thus, we conclude that oral administration of BCP effectively rescued β-cells by mitigating hyperglycemia through enhancing insulin release and also averted oxidative/inflammatory stress in pancreatic tissue of diabetic rats. The efficacy of BCP was compared with glibenclamide, a standard antidiabetic drug. PMID:26748309

  11. Abnormalities of serum potassium concentration in dialysis-associated hyperglycemia and their correction with insulin: review of published reports.

    PubMed

    Tzamaloukas, Antonios H; Ing, Todd S; Elisaf, Moses S; Raj, Dominic S C; Siamopoulos, Kostas C; Rohrscheib, Mark; Murata, Glen H

    2011-06-01

    The main difference between dialysis-associated hyperglycemia (DH) and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) or nonketotic hyperglycemia (NKH) occurring in patients with preserved renal function is the absence of osmotic diuresis in DH, which eliminates the need for large fluid and solute (including potassium) replacement. We analyzed published reports of serum potassium (K(+)) abnormalities and their treatment in DH. Hyperkalemia was often present at presentation of DH with higher frequency and severity than in hyperglycemic syndromes in patients with preserved renal function. The frequency and severity of hyperkalemia were higher in DH episodes with DKA than those with NKH in both hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. For DKA, the frequency and severity of hyperkalemia were similar in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. For NKH, hyperkalemia was more severe and frequent in hemodialysis than in peritoneal dialysis. Insulin infusion corrected the hyperkalemia of DH in most cases. Additional measures for the management of hyperkalemia or modest potassium infusions for hypokalemia were needed in a few DH episodes. The predictors of the decrease in serum K(+) during treatment of DH with insulin included the starting serum K(+) level, the decreases in serum values of glucose concentration and tonicity, and the increase in serum total carbon dioxide level. DH represents a risk factor for hyperkalemia. Insulin infusion is the only treatment for hyperkalemia usually required. PMID:20827508

  12. Dietary polyherbal supplementation decreases CD3+ cell infiltration into pancreatic islets and prevents hyperglycemia in nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Burke, Susan J; Karlstad, Michael D; Conley, Caroline P; Reel, Danielle; Whelan, Jay; Collier, J Jason

    2015-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus results from autoimmune-mediated destruction of pancreatic islet β-cells, a process associated with inflammatory signals. We hypothesized that dietary supplementation with botanicals known to contain anti-inflammatory properties would prevent losses in functional β-cell mass in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, a rodent model of autoimmune-mediated islet inflammation that spontaneously develops diabetes. Female NOD mice, a model of spontaneous autoimmune diabetes, were fed a diet supplemented with herbal extracts (1.916 g total botanical extracts per 1 kg of diet) over a 12-week period. The mice consumed isocaloric matched diets without (controls) and with polyherbal supplementation (PHS) ad libitum starting at a prediabetic stage (age 6 weeks) for 12 weeks. Control mice developed hyperglycemia (>180 mg/dL) within 16 weeks (n = 9). By contrast, mice receiving the PHS diet did not develop hyperglycemia by 18 weeks (n = 8). Insulin-positive cell mass within pancreatic islets was 31.9% greater in PHS mice relative to controls. We also detected a 26% decrease in CD3(+) lymphocytic infiltration in PHS mice relative to mice consuming a control diet. In vitro assays revealed reduced β-cell expression of the chemokines CCL2 and CXCL10 after overnight PHS addition to the culture media. We conclude that dietary PHS delays initiation of autoimmune-mediated β-cell destruction and subsequent onset of diabetes mellitus by diminishing islet inflammatory responses. PMID:25640963

  13. Green Synthesis of Oxovanadium(IV)/chitosan Nanocomposites and Its Ameliorative Effect on Hyperglycemia, Insulin Resistance, and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanjun; Jie, Xu; Guo, Yongli; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Jingfeng; Xue, Changhu

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the preparation, characterization, and ameliorative effect on high-fat high-sucrose diet-induced hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, oxidative stress in mice of novel oxovanadium(IV)/chitosan (OV/CS) nanocomposites were investigated. The nanobiocomposite was produced by chemical reduction by chitosan and L-ascorbic acid using microwave heating, under environment-friendly conditions, using aqueous solutions, and notably, by using both mediators as reducing and stabilizing agents. In addition, OV/CS nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, particle size, and zeta potential measurements. In vivo experiments were designed to examine whether the OV/CS nanocomposites would provide additional benefits on oxidative stress, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance in mice with type 2 diabetes. The results rendered insulin resistant by treating with OV/CS nanocomposites alleviate insulin resistance and improve oxidative stress. Such nanocomposite seem to be a valuable therapy to achieve and/or maintain glycemic control and therapeutic agents in the treatment arsenal for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26144273

  14. Hyperglycemia repression of miR-24 coordinately upregulates endothelial cell expression and secretion of von Willebrand factor

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yaozu; Cheng, Jijun; Wang, Dandan; Hu, Xiaoyue; Xie, Yi; Stitham, Jeremiah; Atteya, Gourg; Du, Jing; Tang, Wai Ho; Lee, Seung Hee; Leslie, Kristen; Spollett, Geralyn; Liu, Zejian; Herzog, Erica; Herzog, Raimund I.; Lu, Jun; Martin, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    An elevated level of von Willebrand factor (VWF) in diabetic patients is associated with increased risk of thrombotic cardiovascular events. The underlying mechanism of how VWF expression is upregulated in diabetes mellitus is poorly understood. We now report that hyperglycemia-induced repression of microRNA-24 (miR-24) increases VWF expression and secretion in diabetes mellitus. In diabetic patients and diabetic mouse models (streptozotocin/high-fat diet-induced and db/db mice), miR-24 is reduced in both tissues and plasma. Knockdown of miR-24 in mice leads to increased VWF mRNA and protein levels and enhanced platelet tethering (spontaneous thrombosis). miR-24 tightly controls VWF levels through pleiotropic effects, including direct binding to the 3′ untranslated region of VWF and targeting FURIN and the histamine H1 receptor, known regulators of VWF processing and secretion in endothelial cells. We present a novel mechanism for miR-24 downregulation through hyperglycemia-induced activation of aldose reductase, reactive oxygen species, and c-Myc. These findings support a critical role for hyperglycemic repression of miR-24 in VWF-induced pathology. miR-24 represents a novel therapeutic target to prevent adverse thrombotic events in patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:25814526

  15. Liver-specific overexpression of LPCAT3 reduces postprandial hyperglycemia and improves lipoprotein metabolic profile in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cash, J G; Hui, D Y

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that group 1B phospholipase A2-mediated absorption of lysophospholipids inhibits hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation and contributes directly to postprandial hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, leading to increased risk of cardiometabolic disease. The current study tested the possibility that increased expression of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase-3 (LPCAT3), an enzyme that converts lysophosphatidylcholine to phosphatidylcholine in the liver, may alleviate the adverse effects of lysophospholipids absorbed after a lipid-glucose mixed meal. The injection of an adenovirus vector harboring the human LPCAT3 gene into C57BL/6 mice increased hepatic LPCAT3 expression fivefold compared with mice injected with a control LacZ adenovirus. Postprandial glucose tolerance tests after feeding these animals with a bolus lipid-glucose mixed meal revealed that LPCAT3 overexpression improved postprandial hyperglycemia and glucose tolerance compared with control mice with LacZ adenovirus injection. Mice with LPCAT3 overexpression also showed reduced very low density lipoprotein production and displayed elevated levels of the metabolic- and cardiovascular-protective large apoE-rich high density lipoproteins in plasma. The mechanism underlying the metabolic benefits of LPCAT3 overexpression was shown to be due to the alleviation of lysophospholipid inhibition of fatty acid β-oxidation in hepatocytes. Taken together, these results suggest that specific LPCAT3 induction in the liver may be a viable strategy for cardiometabolic disease intervention. PMID:27110687

  16. Hyperglycemia repression of miR-24 coordinately upregulates endothelial cell expression and secretion of von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yaozu; Cheng, Jijun; Wang, Dandan; Hu, Xiaoyue; Xie, Yi; Stitham, Jeremiah; Atteya, Gourg; Du, Jing; Tang, Wai Ho; Lee, Seung Hee; Leslie, Kristen; Spollett, Geralyn; Liu, Zejian; Herzog, Erica; Herzog, Raimund I; Lu, Jun; Martin, Kathleen A; Hwa, John

    2015-05-28

    An elevated level of von Willebrand factor (VWF) in diabetic patients is associated with increased risk of thrombotic cardiovascular events. The underlying mechanism of how VWF expression is upregulated in diabetes mellitus is poorly understood. We now report that hyperglycemia-induced repression of microRNA-24 (miR-24) increases VWF expression and secretion in diabetes mellitus. In diabetic patients and diabetic mouse models (streptozotocin/high-fat diet-induced and db/db mice), miR-24 is reduced in both tissues and plasma. Knockdown of miR-24 in mice leads to increased VWF mRNA and protein levels and enhanced platelet tethering (spontaneous thrombosis). miR-24 tightly controls VWF levels through pleiotropic effects, including direct binding to the 3' untranslated region of VWF and targeting FURIN and the histamine H1 receptor, known regulators of VWF processing and secretion in endothelial cells. We present a novel mechanism for miR-24 downregulation through hyperglycemia-induced activation of aldose reductase, reactive oxygen species, and c-Myc. These findings support a critical role for hyperglycemic repression of miR-24 in VWF-induced pathology. miR-24 represents a novel therapeutic target to prevent adverse thrombotic events in patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:25814526

  17. Lectin from Crataeva tapia Bark Improves Tissue Damages and Plasma Hyperglycemia in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Amanda Alves; Araújo, Tiago Ferreira da Silva; da Fonseca, Caíque Silveira Martins; da Mota, Diógenes Luís; de Medeiros, Paloma Lys; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso; Correia, Maria Tereza dos Santos; Lima, Vera Lúcia de Menezes

    2013-01-01

    Crataeva tapia is a plant popularly used for diabetes treatment, in Brazil. Progressive decline in renal and hepatic functions has been described in patients with diabetes mellitus, and mortality rate is increased in patients with chronic liver and renal disease. This study aimed to evaluate whether Crataeva tapia bark lectin (CrataBL) improves hyperglycemia and renal and hepatic damage in diabetic mice. CrataBL was purified by ion exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose, and intraperitoneal administration of CrataBL to alloxan-induced diabetic mice at dose of 10 mg/Kg/day and 20 mg/Kg/day for 10 days significantly reduced serum glucose levels by 14.9% and 55.9%, respectively. Serum urea, creatinine, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase were also significantly reduced after treatment with both doses of CrataBL. Furthermore, histological analysis of liver, kidney, and pancreas revealed an improvement in the tissue morphology upon treatment with CrataBL. The results suggest that CrataBL has a beneficial hypoglycemic activity and improves the renal and hepatic complications of diabetes. Therefore, this lectin may be a promising agent for the treatment of diabetes, and this might be the basis for its use in the folk medicine as an alternative treatment to manage diabetes-related complications such as hyperglycemia and tissue damage. PMID:24324521

  18. Antihyperglycemic Potential of Grewia asiatica Fruit Extract against Streptozotocin-Induced Hyperglycemia in Rats: Anti-Inflammatory and Antioxidant Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Khattab, Hala A. H.; El-Shitany, Nagla A.; Abdallah, Inas Z. A.; Yousef, Fatimah M.; Alkreathy, Huda M.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is regarded as a serious chronic disease that carries a high risk for considerable complications. In folk medicine, the edible Grewia asiatica fruit is used in a number of pathological conditions. This study aimed to investigate the possible curative effect of G. asiatica fruit ethanolic extract against streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced hyperglycemia in rats. Furthermore, mechanism of antihyperglycemic action is investigated. Hyperglycemic rats are either treated with 100 or 200 mg/kg/day G. asiatica fruits extract. Serum glucose, liver glycogen, malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), interleukin- (IL-) 1β, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α are measured. G. asiatica fruits extract reduces blood glucose and pancreatic MDA levels. It increases liver glycogen and pancreatic GSH contents and SOD enzyme activity. Furthermore, Grewia asiatica fruits extract decreases serum IL-1β and TNF-α. The treatment also protects against STZ-induced pathological changes in the pancreas. The results of this study indicated that G. asiatica fruit extract exerts antihyperglycemic activity against STZ-induced hyperglycemia. The improvement in the pancreatic β-cells and antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of G. asiatica fruit extract may explain the antihyperglycemic effect. PMID:26347423

  19. Antihyperglycemic Potential of Grewia asiatica Fruit Extract against Streptozotocin-Induced Hyperglycemia in Rats: Anti-Inflammatory and Antioxidant Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Khattab, Hala A H; El-Shitany, Nagla A; Abdallah, Inas Z A; Yousef, Fatimah M; Alkreathy, Huda M

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is regarded as a serious chronic disease that carries a high risk for considerable complications. In folk medicine, the edible Grewia asiatica fruit is used in a number of pathological conditions. This study aimed to investigate the possible curative effect of G. asiatica fruit ethanolic extract against streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced hyperglycemia in rats. Furthermore, mechanism of antihyperglycemic action is investigated. Hyperglycemic rats are either treated with 100 or 200 mg/kg/day G. asiatica fruits extract. Serum glucose, liver glycogen, malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), interleukin- (IL-) 1β, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α are measured. G. asiatica fruits extract reduces blood glucose and pancreatic MDA levels. It increases liver glycogen and pancreatic GSH contents and SOD enzyme activity. Furthermore, Grewia asiatica fruits extract decreases serum IL-1β and TNF-α. The treatment also protects against STZ-induced pathological changes in the pancreas. The results of this study indicated that G. asiatica fruit extract exerts antihyperglycemic activity against STZ-induced hyperglycemia. The improvement in the pancreatic β-cells and antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of G. asiatica fruit extract may explain the antihyperglycemic effect. PMID:26347423

  20. Kolaviron, a Garcinia biflavonoid complex ameliorates hyperglycemia-mediated hepatic injury in rats via suppression of inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation plays a crucial role in hyperglycemia-induced liver injury. Kolaviron (KV), a natural biflavonoid from Garcinia kola seeds have been shown to possess anti- inflammatory properties which has not been explored in diabetes. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the effect of KV on pro-inflammatory proteins in the liver of diabetic rats. Methods Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (50 mg/kg) in male Wistar rats. Kolaviron (100 mg/kg) was administered orally five times a week for six weeks. The concentrations of cytokines and chemokine were measured using Bio-plex Pro™ magnetic bead-based assays (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Hercules, USA). Plasma glucose and serum biomarkers of liver dysfunction were analyzed with diagnostic kits in an automated clinical chemistry analyzer. Insulin concentration was estimated by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Result Kolaviron (100mg/kg) treatment significantly ameliorated hyperglycemia and liver dysfunction. Serum levels of hepatic marker enzymes were significantly reduced in kolaviron treated diabetic rats. Kolaviron prevented diabetes induced increase in the hepatic levels of proinflammatory cytokines; interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α) and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1). Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate that the hepatoprotective effects of kolaviron in diabetic rats may be partly associated with its modulating effect on inflammatory responses. PMID:24359406

  1. Spirulina versicolor improves insulin sensitivity and attenuates hyperglycemia-mediated oxidative stress in fructose-fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Hozayen, Walaa G.; Mahmoud, Ayman M.; Soliman, Hanan A.; Mostafa, Sanura R.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The current study aimed to investigate the anti-hyperglycemic, anti-hyperlipidemic and insulin sensitizing effects of the cyanobacterium Spirulina versicolor extract in fructose-fed rats. Materials and Methods: Rats were fed 30% fructose solution in drinking water for 4 weeks. Animals exhibited hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia were selected for further investigations. Diabetic and control rats were orally supplemented with 50 mg/kg body weight S. versicolor extract for 4 weeks. Results: At the end of 8 weeks, fructose-fed rats showed a significant increase in serum glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, cardiovascular risk indices and insulin resistance. Treatment of the fructose-fed rats with S. versicolor extract improved this metabolic profile. Fructose feeding produced a significant increase in serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and a decrease in adiponectin levels. In addition, fructose-fed rats exhibited a significant increase in liver, kidney and heart lipid peroxidation levels, and declined antioxidant defenses. Supplementation of the fructose-fed rats with S. versicolor extract reversed these alterations. Conclusion: S. versicolor attenuates hyperglycemia-mediated oxidative stress and inflammation, and is thus effective in improving insulin sensitivity in fructose-fed rats. PMID:27069726

  2. Dietary obacunone supplementation stimulates muscle hypertrophy, and suppresses hyperglycemia and obesity through the TGR5 and PPARγ pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Horiba, Taro; Katsukawa, Masahiro; Mita, Moeko; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-08-07

    Obacunone is a limonoid that is predominantly found in Citrus. Although various biological activities of limonoids have been reported, little is known about the beneficial effects of obacunone on metabolic disorders. In the present study, we examined the effects of dietary obacunone supplementation on obese KKAy mice, to clarify the function of obacunone in metabolic regulation. Mice were pair-fed a normal diet either alone or supplemented with 0.1% w/w obacunone for 28 days. Compared with the control, obacunone-fed mice had lower glycosylated hemoglobin, blood glucose, and white adipose tissue weight, although there was no significant difference in body weight. Obacunone treatment also significantly increased the weight of the gastrocnemius and quadriceps muscles. Reporter gene assays revealed that obacunone stimulated the transcriptional activity of the bile acids-specific G protein-coupled receptor, TGR5, in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, obacunone inhibited adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells and antagonized ligand-stimulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) transcriptional activity. These results suggest that obacunone stimulates muscle hypertrophy and prevents obesity and hyperglycemia, and that these beneficial effects are likely to be mediated through the activation of TGR5 and inhibition of PPARγ transcriptional activity. - Highlights: • Citrus limonoid obacunone prevents hyperglycemia in obese, diabetic KKAy mice. • Obacunone reduces fat content and stimulates muscle hypertrophy in KKAy mice. • Obacunone stimulates TGR5 transcriptional activities. • Obacunone antagonizes PPARγ and inhibits lipid accumulation in adipocytes.

  3. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Associated with Refractory Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Silvia R.; Tornes, Leticia; Maldonado, Janice; Hernandez, Jeffrey; Campos, Yesica; Rammohan, Kottil

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a young man who was transferred to our hospital with worsening acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) despite treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin and plasma exchange. He developed neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) without the use of dopamine-modulating drugs. His progressive clinical improvement started after treatment with intravenous cyclophosphamide and methylprednisolone. In our patient, acute demyelination with severe bilateral inflammation of the basal ganglia could have caused a state of central dopamine depletion, creating proper conditions for the development of NMS. Significant clinical improvement of our case after treatment with intravenous cyclophosphamide and steroids provides further evidence for a possible role of the inflammatory lesions in the pathogenesis of NMS in association with ADEM. PMID:27239186

  4. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Associated with Refractory Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Silvia R; Tornes, Leticia; Maldonado, Janice; Hernandez, Jeffrey; Campos, Yesica; Rammohan, Kottil

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a young man who was transferred to our hospital with worsening acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) despite treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin and plasma exchange. He developed neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) without the use of dopamine-modulating drugs. His progressive clinical improvement started after treatment with intravenous cyclophosphamide and methylprednisolone. In our patient, acute demyelination with severe bilateral inflammation of the basal ganglia could have caused a state of central dopamine depletion, creating proper conditions for the development of NMS. Significant clinical improvement of our case after treatment with intravenous cyclophosphamide and steroids provides further evidence for a possible role of the inflammatory lesions in the pathogenesis of NMS in association with ADEM. PMID:27239186

  5. [Acute pulmonary embolism: beware of the wolf in sheep's clothing].

    PubMed

    Klok, Frederikus A; Vahl, Jelmer E; Huisman, Menno V; van Dijkman, Paul R M

    2012-01-01

    Two male patients aged 57 and 73 were referred to the cardiologist because of progressive dyspnoea. In one patient, the general practitioner had previously adopted an expectative policy because of a clean chest X-ray. At presentation after 4 weeks, the patient was diagnosed with and treated for acute coronary syndrome because of minor ECG abnormalities. Additional CT scanning showed a large saddle embolus. Despite adequate treatment, the patient suffered an electrical asystole and died. The other patient underwent ECG, bicycle ergometry, MRI adenosine, echocardiography and lung function tests over a period of 5 weeks before pulmonary embolism (PE) was diagnosed. As the signs and symptoms of PE are largely non-specific, diagnostic delay is common, with risk of poor clinical outcome. PE should at least be considered whenever a patient presents with acute or worsening breathlessness, chest pain, circulatory collapse or coughing, particularly in the presence of known thrombotic risk factors or when there is no clear alternative. PMID:22296892

  6. Acute Splenic Sequestration Crisis in a 70-Year-Old Patient With Hemoglobin SC Disease.

    PubMed

    Squiers, John J; Edwards, Anthony G; Parra, Alberto; Hofmann, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old African American female with a past medical history significant for chronic bilateral shoulder pain and reported sickle cell trait presented with acute-onset bilateral thoracolumbar pain radiating to her left arm. Two days after admission, Hematology was consulted for severely worsening microcytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Examination of the patient's peripheral blood smear from admission revealed no cell sickling, spherocytes, or schistocytes. Some targeting was noted. A Coombs test was negative. The patient was eventually transferred to the medical intensive care unit in respiratory distress. Hemoglobin electrophoresis confirmed a diagnosis of hemoglobin SC disease. A diagnosis of acute splenic sequestration crisis complicated by acute chest syndrome was crystallized, and red blood cell exchange transfusion was performed. Further research is necessary to fully elucidate the pathophysiology behind acute splenic sequestration crisis, and the role of splenectomy to treat hemoglobin SC disease patients should be better defined. PMID:27047980

  7. Acute Splenic Sequestration Crisis in a 70-Year-Old Patient With Hemoglobin SC Disease

    PubMed Central

    Squiers, John J.; Edwards, Anthony G.; Parra, Alberto; Hofmann, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old African American female with a past medical history significant for chronic bilateral shoulder pain and reported sickle cell trait presented with acute-onset bilateral thoracolumbar pain radiating to her left arm. Two days after admission, Hematology was consulted for severely worsening microcytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Examination of the patient’s peripheral blood smear from admission revealed no cell sickling, spherocytes, or schistocytes. Some targeting was noted. A Coombs test was negative. The patient was eventually transferred to the medical intensive care unit in respiratory distress. Hemoglobin electrophoresis confirmed a diagnosis of hemoglobin SC disease. A diagnosis of acute splenic sequestration crisis complicated by acute chest syndrome was crystallized, and red blood cell exchange transfusion was performed. Further research is necessary to fully elucidate the pathophysiology behind acute splenic sequestration crisis, and the role of splenectomy to treat hemoglobin SC disease patients should be better defined. PMID:27047980

  8. Acute pain.

    PubMed

    Good, M

    1999-01-01

    The review of acute pain describes the problem of unresolved pain and its effects on the neural, autonomic, and immune systems. Conceptualizations and mechanisms of pain are reviewed as well as theories of pain management. Descriptive studies of patient and nurse factors that inhibit effective pain management are discussed, followed by studies of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. Critical analysis reveals that most studies were atheoretical, and therefore, this proliferation of information lacked conceptual coherence and organization. Furthermore, the nature and extent of barriers to pain management were described, but few intervention studies have been devised, as yet, to modify the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of nurses and patients that are barriers to pain management. Although some of the complementary therapies have sufficient research support to be used in clinical pain management, the physiological mechanisms and outcomes need to be studied. It is critical at this time to design studies of interventions to improve assessment, decision making, attentive care, and patient teaching. PMID:10418655

  9. Acute Lipotoxicity Regulates Severity of Biliary Acute Pancreatitis without Affecting Its Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Patel, Krutika; Cline, Rachel; Trivedi, Ram N.; DeLany, James P.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Papachristou, Georgios I.; Lee, Kenneth; Acharya, Chathur; Jaligama, Deepthi; Navina, Sarah; Murad, Faris; Singh, Vijay P.

    2015-01-01

    Obese patients have worse outcomes during acute pancreatitis (AP). Previous animal models of AP have found worse outcomes in obese rodents who may have a baseline proinflammatory state. Our aim was to study the role of acute lipolytic generation of fatty acids on local severity and systemic complications of AP. Human postpancreatitis necrotic collections were analyzed for unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) and saturated fatty acids. A model of biliary AP was designed to replicate the human variables by intraductal injection of the triglyceride glyceryl trilinoleate alone or with the chemically distinct lipase inhibitors orlistat or cetilistat. Parameters of AP etiology and outcomes of local and systemic severity were measured. Patients with postpancreatitis necrotic collections were obese, and 13 of 15 had biliary AP. Postpancreatitis necrotic collections were enriched in UFAs. Intraductal glyceryl trilinoleate with or without the lipase inhibitors resulted in oil red O–positive areas, resembling intrapancreatic fat. Both lipase inhibitors reduced the glyceryl trilinoleate–induced increase in serum lipase, UFAs, pancreatic necrosis, serum inflammatory markers, systemic injury, and mortality but not serum alanine aminotransferase, bilirubin, or amylase. We conclude that UFAs are enriched in human necrotic collections and acute UFA generation via lipolysis worsens pancreatic necrosis, systemic inflammation, and injury associated with severe AP. Inhibition of lipolysis reduces UFA generation and improves these outcomes of AP without interfering with its induction. PMID:24854864

  10. An Elevated Glycemic Gap is Associated with Adverse Outcomes in Diabetic Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wen-I; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Wu, Ya-Chieh; Chang, Wei-Chou; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Wang, Jen-Chun; Tsai, Shih-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Acute hyperglycemia is a frequent finding in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The prognostic role of hyperglycemia in diabetic patients with AMI remains controversial. We retrospectively reviewed patients' medical records to obtain demographic data, clinical presentation, major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), several clinical scores and laboratory data, including the plasma glucose level at initial presentation and HbA1c levels. The glycemic gap, which represents changes in serum glucose levels during the index event, was calculated from the glucose level upon ED admission minus the HbA1c-derived average glucose (ADAG). We enrolled 331 patients after the review of medical records. An elevated glycemic gap between admission serum glucose levels and ADAG were associated with an increased risk of mortality in patients. The glycemic gap showed superior discriminative power regarding the development of MACEs when compared with the admission glucose level. The calculation of the glycemic gap may increase the discriminative powers of established clinical scoring systems in diabetic patients presenting to the ED with AMI. In conclusion, the glycemic gap could be used as an adjunct parameter to assess the severity and prognosis of diabetic patients presenting with AMI. However, the usefulness of the glycemic gap should be further explored in prospective longitudinal studies. PMID:27291987

  11. An Elevated Glycemic Gap is Associated with Adverse Outcomes in Diabetic Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wen-I; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Wu, Ya-Chieh; Chang, Wei-Chou; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Wang, Jen-Chun; Tsai, Shih-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Acute hyperglycemia is a frequent finding in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The prognostic role of hyperglycemia in diabetic patients with AMI remains controversial. We retrospectively reviewed patients’ medical records to obtain demographic data, clinical presentation, major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), several clinical scores and laboratory data, including the plasma glucose level at initial presentation and HbA1c levels. The glycemic gap, which represents changes in serum glucose levels during the index event, was calculated from the glucose level upon ED admission minus the HbA1c-derived average glucose (ADAG). We enrolled 331 patients after the review of medical records. An elevated glycemic gap between admission serum glucose levels and ADAG were associated with an increased risk of mortality in patients. The glycemic gap showed superior discriminative power regarding the development of MACEs when compared with the admission glucose level. The calculation of the glycemic gap may increase the discriminative powers of established clinical scoring systems in diabetic patients presenting to the ED with AMI. In conclusion, the glycemic gap could be used as an adjunct parameter to assess the severity and prognosis of diabetic patients presenting with AMI. However, the usefulness of the glycemic gap should be further explored in prospective longitudinal studies. PMID:27291987

  12. Quetiapine-induced hypertriglyceridaemia causing acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Franco, John Mark; Vallabhajosyula, Saraschandra; Griffin, Timothy John

    2015-01-01

    Second-generation antipsychotics have well-known metabolic side effects such as hyperlipidaemia and hyperglycaemia. A middle-aged man presented with epigastric and flank pain associated with nausea, and was noted to have elevated triglycerides (3590 mg/dL or 40.53 mmol/L), lipase and glucose. Haematological parameters revealed neutropenia with pancytopaenia. The patient was started on conservative management for acute pancreatitis, and on intravenous insulin and oral gemfibrozil for lowering of his triglycerides. He gradually improved and was transitioned to oral atorvastatin and fenofibrate. His triglycerides, glucose and leucocyte counts normalised at discharge and he was transitioned to ziprasidone. The combination of hypertriglyceridaemia, worsening hyperglycaemia and neutropenia made us suspect quetiapine as the causative agent. Medications cause only 0.1-7% of acute pancreatitis cases, with quetiapine implicated in only five-reported cases. Hypertriglyceridaemia (>600 mg/dL or 6.77 mmol/L) is frequently reported with quetiapine use, but severe hypertriglyceridaemia (>1000 mg/dL or 11.29 mmol/L) has been reported in <10 patients. PMID:25976202

  13. Contradictory effects of short- and long-term hyperglycemias on ischemic injury of myocardium via intracellular signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang; Takashi, En; Kudo, Mitsuhiro; Ishiwata, Toshiyuki; Naito, Zenya

    2004-02-01

    Although clinical diabetes mellitus is obviously a high risk factor for myocardial infarction, there is disagreement about the sensitivity of ischemic injury of an infarcted myocardium in experimental studies. The present study evaluated the influences of different durations of hyperglycemia on ischemic and reperfusion injuries of the myocardium, and focused on extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), which plays an important role in the intracellular signaling pathway and is reported to be associated with myocardial protection against heart injury. Short- and long-term hyperglycemias were induced in rats by streptozotocin (STZ) injection and the rats were examined 4 (4WDM) and 20 weeks (20WDM) after the treatment. Ischemia and reperfusion were induced by occlusion and reperfusion (I/R) of the left coronary artery (LCA). I/R-induced infarct size was determined using triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. After 20 weeks of STZ treatment (20WDM+I/R), the infarct size in the rat heart increased by 65.2 +/- 4.3%, whereas after 4 weeks of STZ treatment (4WDM+I/R), the infarct size decreased compared with the time-matched I/R group (43.1 +/- 3.6% and 59.5 +/- 5.6%, respectively). The number of dead myocytes including necrotic and apoptotic cells was determined using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and terminal deoxynucleotide nick-end labeling (TUNEL) methods. The number of dead myocytes decreased in the 4WDM+I/R group, while the number of dead myocytes increased markedly in the 20WDM+I/R group, compared with the time-matched I/R group. The increment of ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the 4WDM group and the slight enhancement of this phosphorylation by I/R treatment were observed by western blotting. However, in the 20WDM group, the level of ERK1/2 phosphorylation reduced by approximately 1/3 compared with the time-matched control group; moreover, I/R treatment did not enhance the phosphorylation level. This study demonstrated that short- and long

  14. Does a reduced glucose intake prevent hyperglycemia in children early after cardiac surgery? a randomized controlled crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Hyperglycemia in children after cardiac surgery can be treated with intensive insulin therapy, but hypoglycemia is a potential serious side effect. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of reducing glucose intake below standard intakes to prevent hyperglycemia, on blood glucose concentrations, glucose kinetics and protein catabolism in children after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methods Subjects received a 4-hour low glucose (LG; 2.5 mg/kg per minute) and a 4-hour standard glucose (SG; 5.0 mg/kg per minute) infusion in a randomized blinded crossover setting. Simultaneously, an 8-hour stable isotope tracer protocol was conducted to determine glucose and leucine kinetics. Data are presented as mean ± SD or median (IQR); comparison was made by paired samples t test. Results Eleven subjects (age 5.1 (20.2) months) were studied 9.5 ± 1.9 hours post-cardiac surgery. Blood glucose concentrations were lower during LG than SG (LG 7.3 ± 0.7 vs. SG 9.3 ± 1.8 mmol/L; P < 0.01), although the glycemic target (4.0-6.0 mmol/L) was not achieved. No hypoglycemic events occurred. Endogenous glucose production was higher during LG than SG (LG 2.9 ± 0.8 vs. SG 1.5 ± 1.1 mg/kg per minute; P = 0.02), due to increased glycogenolysis (LG 1.0 ± 0.6 vs. SG 0.0 ± 1.0 mg/kg per minute; P < 0.05). Leucine balance, indicating protein balance, was negative but not affected by glucose intake (LG -54.8 ± 14.6 vs. SG -58.8 ± 16.7 μmol/kg per hour; P = 0.57). Conclusions Currently recommended glucose intakes aggravated hyperglycemia in children early after cardiac surgery with CPB. Reduced glucose intake decreased blood glucose concentrations without causing hypoglycemia or affecting protein catabolism, but increased glycogenolysis. Trial registration Dutch trial register NTR2079. PMID:23031354

  15. Therapeutic effect of vagus nerve stimulation on depressive-like behavior, hyperglycemia and insulin receptor expression in Zucker fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoyuan; Zhai, Xu; Rong, Peijing; McCabe, Michael F; Wang, Xing; Zhao, Jingjun; Ben, Hui; Wang, Shuxing

    2014-01-01

    Depression and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are common comorbid diseases and highly prevalent in the clinical setting with an unclarified mechanism. Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF, fa/fa) rats natively develop T2D with hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. Here we studied whether ZDF rats also innately develop depression, what a correlation is between depression and T2D, whether insulin receptor (IR) expression is involved in, and whether transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (taVNS) would be beneficial in amelioration of the comorbidity. Six week old male ZDF and Zucker lean (ZL, fa/+) littermates were randomly divided into naïve (ZDF, n = 6; ZL, n = 7) and taVNS (ZDF-taVNS, n = 8; ZL-taVNS, n = 6) groups. Once daily 30 min-taVNS sessions were administrated under anesthesia for 34 consecutive days in taVNS groups. Blood glucose levels were tested weekly, and plasma glycosylated hemoglobin (HbAlc) level and immobility time in forced swimming test were determined on day 35 in all groups. The expression of insulin receptor (IR) in various tissues was also detected by immunostaining and Western blot. We found that naïve ZDF rats developed hyperglycemia steadily. These ZDF rats showed a strong positive correlation between longer immobility time and higher plasma HbAlC level. Long term taVNS treatment simultaneously prevented the development of depression-like behavior and progression of hyperglycemia in ZDF rats. The expression of IR in various tissues of naïve ZDF rats is lower than in naïve ZL and long-term taVNS treated ZDF rats. Collectively, our results indicate that in ZDF rats, i) depression and T2D develop simultaneously, ii) immobility time and HbAlc concentrations are highly and positively correlated, iii) a low expression of IR may be involved in the comorbidity of depression and T2D, and iv) taVNS is antidiabetic and antidepressive possibly through IR expression upregulation. PMID:25365428

  16. The association between maternal hyperglycemia and perinatal outcomes in gestational diabetes mellitus patients: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee Young; Jung, Inkyung; Kim, So Jung

    2016-09-01

    Pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are associated with increased risks of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. The risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes differ depending on the glucose values among GDM patients. For accurate and effective prenatal counseling, it is necessary to understand the relationship between different maternal hyperglycemia values and the severity of adverse outcomes. With this objective, this study reexamines the relationship between maternal hyperglycemia versus maternal and perinatal outcomes in GDM patients. For this study, maternal hyperglycemia was diagnosed using the 2-step diagnostic approach.Medical records of 3434 pregnant women, who received the 50-g glucose challenge test (GCT) between March 2001 and April 2013, were reviewed. As a result, 307 patients were diagnosed with GDM, and they were divided into 2 groups according to their fasting glucose levels. A total of 171 patients had normal fasting glucose level (<95 mg/dL), and 136 patients had abnormal fasting glucose level (≥95 mg/dL). The 50-g GCT results were subdivided by 20-unit increments (140-159, n = 123; 160-179, n = 84; 180-199, n = 50; and ≥200, n = 50), and the maternal and perinatal outcomes were compared against the normal 50-g GCT group (n = 307).Maternal fasting blood glucose (FBG) level showed clear association with adverse perinatal outcomes. The odds ratio (OR) of macrosomia was 6.72 (95% CI: 2.59-17.49, P < 0.001) between the 2 groups. The ORs of large for gestational age (LGA) and neonatal hypoglycemia were 3.75 (95% CI: 1.97-7.12, P < 0.001) and 1.65 (95% CI: 0.79-3.43, P  =  0.183), respectively. Also, the results of the 50-g GCT for each category showed strong association with increased risks of adverse perinatal outcomes compared to the normal 50-g GCT group. The OR of macrosomia (up to 20.31-fold), LGA (up to 6.15-fold), and neonatal hypoglycemia (up to 84.00-fold) increased with increasing 50-g GCT result

  17. Comparison of the efficacy of cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum) with pioglitazone on dexamethasone-induced hepatic steatosis, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Nitasha Bhat, G M; Nayak, Nagendra; Vinodraj, K; Chandralekha, N; Mathai, Paul; Cherian, J

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of cardamom with pioglitazone on dexamethasone-induced hepatic steatosis, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia in albino rats. There were four groups of 6 rats each. First group received dexamethasone alone in a dose of 8 mg/kg intraperitoneally for 6 days to induce metabolic changes and considered as dexamethasone control. Second group received cardamom suspension 1 g/kg/10 mL of 2% gum acacia orally 6 days before dexamethasone and 6 days during dexamethasone administration. Third group received pioglitazone 45 mg/kg orally 6 days before dexamethasone and 6 days during dexamethasone administration. Fourth group did not receive any medication and was considered as normal control. Fasting blood sugar, lipid profile, blood sugar 2 h after glucose load, liver weight, liver volume were recorded, and histopathological analysis was done. The effects of cardamom were compared with that of pioglitazone. Dexamethasone caused hepatomegaly, dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia. Both pioglitazone and cardamom significantly reduced hepatomegaly, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia (P < 0.01). Reduction of blood sugar levels after glucose load was significant with pioglitazone in comparison to cardamom (P < 0.01). Cardamom has comparable efficacy to pioglitazone in preventing dexamethasone-induced hepatomegaly, dyslipidemia, and fasting hyperglycemia. PMID:26317079

  18. Comparison of the efficacy of cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum) with pioglitazone on dexamethasone-induced hepatic steatosis, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Nitasha Bhat, G. M.; Nayak, Nagendra; Vinodraj, K.; Chandralekha, N.; Mathai, Paul; Cherian, J.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of cardamom with pioglitazone on dexamethasone-induced hepatic steatosis, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia in albino rats. There were four groups of 6 rats each. First group received dexamethasone alone in a dose of 8 mg/kg intraperitoneally for 6 days to induce metabolic changes and considered as dexamethasone control. Second group received cardamom suspension 1 g/kg/10 mL of 2% gum acacia orally 6 days before dexamethasone and 6 days during dexamethasone administration. Third group received pioglitazone 45 mg/kg orally 6 days before dexamethasone and 6 days during dexamethasone administration. Fourth group did not receive any medication and was considered as normal control. Fasting blood sugar, lipid profile, blood sugar 2 h after glucose load, liver weight, liver volume were recorded, and histopathological analysis was done. The effects of cardamom were compared with that of pioglitazone. Dexamethasone caused hepatomegaly, dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia. Both pioglitazone and cardamom significantly reduced hepatomegaly, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia (P < 0.01). Reduction of blood sugar levels after glucose load was significant with pioglitazone in comparison to cardamom (P < 0.01). Cardamom has comparable efficacy to pioglitazone in preventing dexamethasone-induced hepatomegaly, dyslipidemia, and fasting hyperglycemia. PMID:26317079

  19. Phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity and in vitro inhibitory potential against key enzymes relevant for hyperglycemia and hypertension of commonly used medicinal plants, herbs and spices in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Ranilla, Lena Galvez; Kwon, Young-In; Apostolidis, Emmanouil; Shetty, Kalidas

    2010-06-01

    Traditionally used medicinal plants, herbs and spices in Latin America were investigated to determine their phenolic profiles, antioxidant activity and in vitro inhibitory potential against key enzymes relevant for hyperglycemia and hypertension. High phenolic and antioxidant activity-containing medicinal plants and spices such as Chancapiedra (Phyllantus niruri L.), Zarzaparrilla (Smilax officinalis), Yerba Mate (Ilex paraguayensis St-Hil), and Huacatay (Tagetes minuta) had the highest anti-hyperglycemia relevant in vitro alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activities with no effect on alpha-amylase. Molle (Schinus molle), Maca (Lepidium meyenii Walp), Caigua (Cyclanthera pedata) and ginger (Zingiber officinale) inhibited significantly the hypertension relevant angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE). All evaluated pepper (Capsicum) genus exhibited both anti-hyperglycemia and anti-hypertension potential. Major phenolic compounds in Matico (Piper angustifolium R.), Guascas (Galinsoga parviflora) and Huacatay were chlorogenic acid and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives. Therefore, specific medicinal plants, herbs and spices from Latin America have potential for hyperglycemia and hypertension prevention associated with Type 2 diabetes. PMID:20185303

  20. Brain Activation and Psychomotor Speed in Middle-Aged Patients with Type 1 Diabetes: Relationships with Hyperglycemia and Brain Small Vessel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Misun; Tudorascu, Dana L.; Nunley, Karen; Karim, Helmet; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Orchard, Trevor J.; Rosano, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Slower psychomotor speed is very common in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D), but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. We propose that hyperglycemia is associated with slower psychomotor speed via disruption of brain activation. Eighty-five adults (48% women, mean age: 49.0 years, mean duration: 40.8) with childhood onset T1D were recruited for this cross-sectional study. Median response time in seconds (longer = worse performance) and brain activation were measured while performing a psychomotor speed task. Exposure to hyperglycemia, measured as glycosylated hemoglobin A1c, was associated with longer response time and with higher activation in the inferior frontal gyrus and primary sensorimotor and dorsal cingulate cortex. Higher activation in inferior frontal gyrus, primary sensorimotor cortex, thalamus, and cuneus was related to longer response times; in contrast, higher activation in the superior parietal lobe was associated with shorter response times. Associations were independent of small vessel disease in the brain or other organs. In this group of middle-aged adults with T1D, the pathway linking chronic hyperglycemia with slower processing speed appears to include increased brain activation, but not small vessel disease. Activation in the superior parietal lobe may compensate for dysregulation in brain activation in the presence of hyperglycemia. PMID:26998494

  1. A randomized controlled study of finerenone vs. eplerenone in patients with worsening chronic heart failure and diabetes mellitus and/or chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Filippatos, Gerasimos; Anker, Stefan D.; Böhm, Michael; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Køber, Lars; Krum, Henry; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Voors, Adriaan A.; Zannad, Faiez; Kim, So-Young; Nowack, Christina; Palombo, Giovanni; Kolkhof, Peter; Kimmeskamp-Kirschbaum, Nina; Pieper, Alexander; Pitt, Bertram

    2016-01-01

    Aims To evaluate oral doses of the non-steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist finerenone given for 90 days in patients with worsening heart failure and reduced ejection fraction and chronic kidney disease and/or diabetes mellitus. Methods and results Miner Alocorticoid Receptor antagonist Tolerability Study-Heart Failure (ARTS-HF) was a randomized, double-blind, phase 2b multicentre study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01807221). Of 1286 screened patients, 1066 were randomized. Patients received oral, once-daily finerenone (2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, or 15 mg, uptitrated to 5, 10, 15, 20, or 20 mg, respectively, on Day 30) or eplerenone (25 mg every other day, increased to 25 mg once daily on Day 30, and to 50 mg once daily on Day 60) for 90 days. The primary endpoint was the percentage of individuals with a decrease of >30% in plasma N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) from baseline to Day 90. A key exploratory endpoint was a composite clinical endpoint of death from any cause, cardiovascular hospitalizations, or emergency presentation for worsening HF until Day 90. Mean age ranged from 69.2 to 72.5 years in different treatment groups (standard deviation 9.7–10.6 years). Decreases in NT-proBNP of >30% from baseline occurred in 37.2% of patients in the eplerenone group and 30.9, 32.5, 37.3, 38.8, and 34.2% in the 2.5→5, 5→10, 7.5→15, 10→20, and 15→20 mg finerenone groups, respectively (P = 0.42–0.88). Except for the 2.5→5 mg finerenone group, the composite clinical endpoint occurred numerically less frequently in finerenone-treated patients compared with eplerenone; this difference reached nominal statistical significance in the 10→20 mg group (hazard ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval, CI, 0.35; 0.90; nominal P = 0.02), despite the fact that this phase 2 study was not designed to detect statistical significant differences. A potassium level increase to ≥5.6 mmol/L at any time point occurred in 4.3% of patients, with a balanced

  2. Laser induced injury caused hyperglycemia-like effect in Drosophila larva: a possible insect model for posttraumatic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Fumio; Nakagiri, Yoko; Yamada, Takahisa; Kose, Hiroyuki

    2015-05-01

    Diabetic patients need particular care in case of infection, digestive disorder or external injury, because external stress often exasperates the glucose metabolism, which is known as "sick day management". In addition, severe trauma can be a cause of hyperglycemia with insulin resistance. In spite of critical component of the treatment, the precise mechanisms of how trauma develops posttraumatic diabetes remain unknown. Here, we ablated body wall muscles in Drosophila larvae by laser beam and found that the level of trehalose, the principal sugar circulating in the hemolymph or in the tissues of most insects, was increased. The model may provide a helpful tool to understand the relationship between trauma and sugar metabolism. PMID:25649060

  3. Elevation in blood flow and shear rate prevents hyperglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction in healthy subjects and those with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Greyling, Arno; Schreuder, Tim H A; Landman, Thijs; Draijer, Richard; Verheggen, Rebecca J H M; Hopman, Maria T E; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2015-03-01

    Hyperglycemia, commonly present after a meal, causes transient impairment in endothelial function. We examined whether increases in blood flow (BF) protect against the hyperglycemia-mediated decrease in endothelial function in healthy subjects and patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Ten healthy subjects and 10 age- and sex-matched patients with T2DM underwent simultaneous bilateral assessment of brachial artery endothelial function by means of flow-mediated dilation (FMD) using high-resolution echo-Doppler. FMD was examined before and 60, 120, and 150 min after a 75-g oral glucose challenge. We unilaterally manipulated BF by heating one arm between minute 30 and minute 60. Oral glucose administration caused a statistically significant, transient increase in blood glucose in both groups (P < 0.001). Forearm skin temperature, brachial artery BF, and shear rate significantly increased in the heated arm (P < 0.001), and to a greater extent compared with the nonheated arm in both groups (interaction effect P < 0.001). The glucose load caused a transient decrease in FMD% (P < 0.05), whereas heating significantly prevented the decline (interaction effect P < 0.01). Also, when correcting for changes in diameter and shear rate, we found that the hyperglycemia-induced decrease in FMD can be prevented by local heating (P < 0.05). These effects on FMD were observed in both groups. Our data indicate that nonmetabolically driven elevation in BF and shear rate can similarly prevent the hyperglycemia-induced decline in conduit artery endothelial function in healthy volunteers and in patients with type 2 diabetes. Additional research is warranted to confirm that other interventions that increase BF and shear rate equally protect the endothelium when challenged by hyperglycemia. PMID:25593286

  4. Resveratrol protects against hyperglycemia-induced oxidative damage to mitochondria by activating SIRT1 in rat mesangial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ying; Nie, Ling; Yin, Yang-Guang; Tang, Jian-Lin; Zhou, Ji-Yin; Li, Dan-Dan; Zhou, Shi-Wen

    2012-03-15

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Resveratrol has potent protective effects on diabetes and diabetic complications including diabetic nephropathy. We aimed to investigate the protective effects of resveratrol on mitochondria and the underlying mechanisms by using an in vitro model of hyperglycemia. We exposed primary cultured rat mesangial cells to high glucose (30 mM) for 48 h. We found that pretreatment with resveratrol (10 μM) 6 h prior to high glucose treatment significantly reduced hyperglycemia-induced increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial superoxide generation, as well as stimulated MnSOD activity. In addition, resveratrol pretreatment significantly reversed the decrease of mitochondrial complex III activity in glucose-treated mesangial cells, which is considered to be the major source of mitochondrial oxidative stress in glucose-treated cells. Furthermore, resveratrol pretreatment efficiently restored the hyperpolarization of ∆Ψm, increased ATP production and preserved the mtDNA content. All of these protective effects of resveratrol were successfully blocked by siRNA targeting SIRT1 and EX-527, a specific inhibitor of SIRT1 activity. Our results indicated that resveratrol efficiently reduced oxidative stress and maintained mitochondrial function related with activating SIRT1 in glucose-treated mesangial cells. It suggested that resveratrol is pharmacologically promising for treating diabetic nephropathy. -- Highlights: ► We treat mesangial cells with glucose as an in vitro model of diabetic nephropathy. ► We find that the nephroprotective effects of resveratrol relate with mitochondria. ► The beneficial effect of resveratrol was prevented by siRNA SIRT1 or its inhibitor.

  5. Insulin-Producing Cells Differentiated from Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro Ameliorate Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Ying; Jiang, Xin; Wang, Yishu; Su, Xuejin; Sun, Meiyu; Zhang, Lihong; Tan, Yi; Wintergerst, Kupper A.; Li, Yan; Li, Yulin

    2016-01-01

    Background The two major obstacles in the successful transplantation of islets for diabetes treatment are inadequate supply of insulin-producing tissue and immune rejection. Induction of the differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into insulin-producing cells (IPCs) for autologous transplantation may alleviate those limitations. Methods hMSCs were isolated and induced to differentiate into IPCs through a three-stage differentiation protocol in a defined media with high glucose, nicotinamide, and exendin-4. The physiological characteristics and functions of IPCs were then evaluated. Next, about 3 × 106 differentiated cells were transplanted into the renal sub-capsular space of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic nude mice. Graft survival and function were assessed by immunohistochemistry, TUNEL staining and measurements of blood glucose levels in the mice. Results The differentiated IPCs were characterized by Dithizone (DTZ) positive staining, expression of pancreatic β-cell markers, and human insulin secretion in response to glucose stimulation. Moreover, 43% of the IPCs showed L-type Ca2+ channel activity and similar changes in intracellular Ca2+ in response to glucose stimulation as that seen in pancreatic β-cells in the process of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Transplantation of functional IPCs into the renal subcapsular space of STZ-induced diabetic nude mice ameliorated the hyperglycemia. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that transplanted IPCs sustainably expressed insulin, c-peptide, and PDX-1 without apparent apoptosis in vivo. Conclusions IPCs derived from hMSCs in vitro can ameliorate STZ-induced diabetic hyperglycemia, which indicates that these hMSCs may be a promising approach to overcome the limitations of islet transplantation. PMID:26756576

  6. Correction of Diabetic Hyperglycemia and Amelioration of Metabolic Anomalies by Minicircle DNA Mediated Glucose-Dependent Hepatic Insulin Production

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Tausif; Wai, Philip; Held, Dustie; Vakili, Sahar Taba Taba; Forsberg, Erik; Sollinger, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is caused by immune destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. Commonly used insulin injection therapy does not provide a dynamic blood glucose control to prevent long-term systemic T1DM-associated damages. Donor shortage and the limited long-term success of islet transplants have stimulated the development of novel therapies for T1DM. Gene therapy-based glucose-regulated hepatic insulin production is a promising strategy to treat T1DM. We have developed gene constructs which cause glucose-concentration–dependent human insulin production in liver cells. A novel set of human insulin expression constructs containing a combination of elements to improve gene transcription, mRNA processing, and translation efficiency were generated as minicircle DNA preparations that lack bacterial and viral DNA. Hepatocytes transduced with the new constructs, ex vivo, produced large amounts of glucose-inducible human insulin. In vivo, insulin minicircle DNA (TA1m) treated streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats demonstrated euglycemia when fasted or fed, ad libitum. Weight loss due to uncontrolled hyperglycemia was reversed in insulin gene treated diabetic rats to normal rate of weight gain, lasting ∼1 month. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGT) demonstrated in vivo glucose-responsive changes in insulin levels to correct hyperglycemia within 45 minutes. A single TA1m treatment raised serum albumin levels in diabetic rats to normal and significantly reduced hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia. Elevated serum levels of aspartate transaminase, alanine aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase were restored to normal or greatly reduced in treated rats, indicating normalization of liver function. Non-viral insulin minicircle DNA-based TA1m mediated glucose-dependent insulin production in liver may represent a safe and promising approach to treat T1DM. PMID:23826312

  7. Congenital myasthenic syndrome due to mutation in CHRNE gene with clinical worsening and thymic hyperplasia attributed to association with autoimmune-myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ernestina; Moreira, Isabel; Coutinho, Ester; Gonçalves, Guilherme; Lopes, Carlos; Lopes Lima, José; Leite, M Isabel

    2015-12-01

    We report a patient with congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) due to mutation in CHRNE with symptoms since the age of 4; mild to moderate fatigable weakness involved mainly ocular, bulbar and limb muscles; functional impact of the disease in their development and physical activity was modest. By the age of 34, the patient experienced gradual worsening of fatigue with dyspnoea and pronounced limb weakness, requiring significant increase of pyridostigmine. Further, a remarkable and sustained clinical improvement followed thymectomy with hyperplastic thymus. Despite of the absence of detectable antibodies to acetyl-choline receptor (AChR) (including clustered-AChR), muscle-specific kinase and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-4 antibodies in the serum obtained nine years after thymectomy, the clinical, genetic and histological features are in keeping with the extremely rare association of two rare neuromuscular junction disorders - CMS and myasthenia gravis (MG). The inexistence of other conditions that could potentially associate with thymic hyperplasia also supports the diagnosis of MG. PMID:26363966

  8. Overexpression of ALS-associated p.M337V human TDP-43 in mice worsens disease features compared to wild-type human TDP-43 mice.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Jonathan; Wils, Hans; Kleinberger, Gernot; Joris, Geert; Cuijt, Ivy; Ceuterick-de Groote, Chantal; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Kumar-Singh, Samir

    2013-08-01

    Mutations in TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) are associated with familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), while wild-type TDP-43 is a pathological hallmark of patients with sporadic ALS and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Various in vitro and in vivo studies have also demonstrated toxicity of both mutant and wild-type TDP-43 to neuronal cells. To study the potential additional toxicity incurred by mutant TDP-43 in vivo, we generated mutant human TDP-43 (p.M337V) transgenic mouse lines driven by the Thy-1.2 promoter (Mt-TAR) and compared them in the same experimental setting to the disease phenotype observed in wild-type TDP-43 transgenic lines (Wt-TAR) expressing comparable TDP-43 levels. Overexpression of mutant TDP-43 leads to a worsened dose-dependent disease phenotype in terms of motor dysfunction, neurodegeneration, gliosis, and development of ubiquitin and phosphorylated TDP-43 pathology. Furthermore, we show that cellular aggregate formation or accumulation of TDP-43 C-terminal fragments (CTFs) are not primarily responsible for development of the observed disease phenotype in both mutant and wild-type TDP-43 mice. PMID:23475610

  9. Repairing DNA damage by XRCC6/KU70 reverses TLR4-deficiency-worsened HCC development via restoring senescence and autophagic flux.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziyan; Lin, Heng; Hua, Fang; Hu, Zhuo-wei

    2013-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is among the most lethal and prevalent cancers in the human population. The initiation and progression of HCC is closely associated with chronic liver inflammation. Recent research indicates that nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), one of the DNA repair mechanisms, autophagy and senescence are all involved in the pathogenesis of HCC induced by carcinogens or oxidative stress. DNA repair proteins including XRCC6/KU70 and XRCC5/KU80 are the critical NHEJ factors that play pivotal roles in genome-maintenance issues such as DNA replication and repair, telomere maintenance and chromosomal instability. Our studies indicate that a deficiency of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated immune activities results in a decreased expression of XRCC5 and XRCC6 in response to insult by the carcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DEN). This effect causes a failure in DNA repair, and promotes the transformation of precancerous hepatocytes and HCC development. Ectopic expression of XRCC6 protects against HCC initiation and progression by restoring the cellular senescent response and activation of immune networks, which induces an effective autophagic degradation, removes the accumulated reactive oxygen species (ROS), decreases DNA damage, attenuates proliferation, and promotes programmed cell death in TLR4-deficient livers. Our work indicates that repairing DNA damage by XRCC6 reverses TLR4-deficiency-worsened HCC development via restoring immunity to support senescence and autophagy in liver cells. PMID:23518600

  10. From the Cover: Zinc Deficiency Worsens and Supplementation Prevents High-Fat Diet Induced Vascular Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Pathological Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Shudong; Luo, Manyu; Zhang, Zhiguo; Dai, Xiaozhen; Kong, Maiying; Cai, Lu; Wang, Yuehui; Shi, Bingyin; Tan, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Obesity has become a common public health problem in the world and raises the risk of various cardiovascular diseases. Zinc is essential for multiple organs in terms of normal structure and function. The present study investigated the effects of high fat diet (HFD) induced obesity on the aorta in mice, and evaluated whether it can be affected by zinc deficiency or supplementation. Four-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were fed HFD with varied amounts of zinc (deficiency, adequate and supplementation) for 3 and 6 months. Results showed that HFD feeding induced a time-dependent aortic remodeling, demonstrated by increased vessel wall thickness, tunica cell proliferation and fibrotic responses, and inflammatory response, reflected by increased expression of inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1). HFD feeding also caused aortic oxidative damage, reflected by 3-nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal accumulation, and down-regulated nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) expression and function, shown by down-regulation of its downstream antioxidants, catalase, NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (quinone 1), and metallothionein expression. The vascular effects of obesity-induced by HFD was exacerbated by zinc deficiency but significantly improved by zinc supplementation. In addition, down-regulation of Nrf2 function and associated antioxidants expression were also worsened by zinc deficiency but improved by zinc supplementation. These results suggest that HFD induces aortic remodeling, which can be exacerbated by zinc deficiency and improved by zinc supplementation. PMID:27370414

  11. Acute intermittent porphyria leading to posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES): a rare cause of abdominal pain and seizures.

    PubMed

    Dagens, Andrew; Gilhooley, Michael James

    2016-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an inherited deficiency in the haem biosynthesis pathway. AIP is rare, affecting around 1 in 75 000 people. Acute attacks are characterised by abdominal pain associated with autonomic, neurological and psychiatric symptoms. AIP is rarely associated with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). PRES is a clinicoradiological condition caused by the failure of the posterior circulation to autoregulate, resulting in cerebral oedema, headaches, nausea and seizures. This association is important because drugs used in the management of seizures may worsen an attack of AIP. This article describes a case of AIP and PRES in a young woman. PMID:27277587

  12. [Diagnosis of acute respiratory failure and nosocomial pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Ziliene, Violeta; Reingardiene, Dagmara; Tereseviciūte, Neringa; Slavinskas, Ricardas

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine diagnosis and factors influencing acute respiratory failure and nosocomial pneumonia according to literature and clinical findings in critically ill patients. The term "respiratory failure" implies the inability to maintain either normal delivery of oxygen to tissues or normal removal of carbon dioxide from the tissues. There are many patients suffering from acute respiratory failure caused by nosocomial pneumonia, septic syndrome, aspiration, interstitial or alveolar lung edema, thromboembolism of a. pulmonalis, polytrauma and contusion of the lungs, acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute lung injury, status asthmaticus, rather massive transfusions of blood products, and lipid embolism in the intensive care unit. There are actually three processes involved: transfer of oxygen across the alveolus, transport to the tissues (by cardiac output), and removal of carbon dioxide from the blood into the alveolus with subsequent exhalation into the environment. Failure of any step in this process can lead to respiratory failure. Long-term hypoxia causes ischemic changes and dysfunction of brain, heart, kidney, lungs and can worsen the outcome of disease or can cause higher mortality. PMID:15547315

  13. Polychlorinated Biphenyl 153 Is a Diet-dependent Obesogen Which Worsens Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease In Male C57BL6/J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wahlang, Banrida; Falkner, K. Cameron; Gregory, Bonnie; Ansert, Douglas; Young, David; Conklin, Daniel J.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; McClain, Craig J.; Cave, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Background Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental pollutants which are detectable in the serum of all American adults. Amongst PCB congeners, PCB 153 has the highest serum level. PCBs have been dose-dependently associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in epidemiological studies. Objective The purpose of this study is to determine mechanisms by which PCB 153 worsens diet-induced obesity and NAFLD in male mice fed a high fat diet (HFD). Methods Male C57BL6/J mice were fed either control or 42% milk fat diet for 12 weeks with or without PCB 153 co-exposure (50 mg/kg i.p. × 4). Glucose tolerance test was performed, and plasma and tissues were obtained at necropsy for measurements of adipocytokine levels, histology and gene expression. Results In control diet-fed mice, addition of PCB 153 had minimal effects on any of the measured parameters. However, PCB 153 treatment in high fat-fed mice was associated with increased visceral adiposity, hepatic steatosis and plasma adipokines including adiponectin, leptin, resistin and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels. Likewise, co-exposure reduced expression of hepatic genes implicated in β-oxidation while increasing the expression of genes associated with lipid biosynthesis. Regardless of diet, PCB 153 had no effect on insulin resistance or tumor necrosis factor alpha levels. Conclusion PCB 153 is an obesogen which exacerbates hepatic steatosis; alters adipocytokines; and disrupts normal hepatic lipid metabolism when administered with HFD, but not control diet. Because all U.S. adults have been exposed to PCB 153, this particular nutrient-toxicant interaction potentially impacts human obesity/NAFLD. PMID:23618531

  14. Brain Injury and Inflammatory Response to Umbilical Cord Occlusions Is Limited With Worsening Acidosis in the Near-Term Ovine Fetus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Alex; Matushewski, Brad; Nygard, Karen; Hammond, Robert; Frasch, Martin G; Richardson, Bryan S

    2016-07-01

    We hypothesized that repetitive umbilical cord occlusions (UCOs) with worsening fetal acidemia will lead to an inflammatory response within the brain and thereby brain injury which will be exacerbated by chronic hypoxemia and low-grade infection. Chronically instrumented fetal sheep served as controls (N = 10) or underwent repeated UCOs for up to 4 hours or until arterial pH was <7.00. Normoxic-UCO (N = 9) and hypoxic-UCO (N = 5) fetuses had arterial O2 saturation pre-UCOs of >55% and <55%, respectively, whereas lipopolysaccharide (LPS) UCO fetuses (N = 6) received LPS intra-amniotic (2 mg/h) starting 1 hour pre-UCOs. Animals were euthanized at 48 hours of recovery with fetal brains processed for assessment of inflammation (microglia and mast cell counts) and injury (necrosis-hematoxylin and eosin-and apoptosis-cleaved caspase-3 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling [TUNEL]). Repetitive UCOs resulted in severe acidemia in most animals with pH approaching 7.00 for all 3 UCO groups. However, there was no significant effect on measures of brain inflammation or injury, except in the LPS-UCO animals where TUNEL-positive cells were increased in the hippocampus, although small animal numbers in the hypoxic-UCO group may have limited the ability to detect significance in their TUNEL cell findings. We were therefore unable to confirm our working hypothesis since the near-term ovine fetal brain showed remarkable tolerance for these cord occlusion insults and likely involving protective metabolic mechanisms, despite the severe acidemia noted. PMID:26704527

  15. Repetitive concussive traumatic brain injury interacts with post-injury foot shock stress to worsen social and depression-like behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Klemenhagen, Kristen C; O'Brien, Scott P; Brody, David L

    2013-01-01

    The debilitating effects of repetitive concussive traumatic brain injury (rcTBI) have been increasingly recognized in both military and civilian populations. rcTBI may result in significant neurological, cognitive, and affective sequelae, and is often followed by physical and/or psychological post-injury stressors that may exacerbate the effects of the injury and prolong the recovery period for injured patients. However, the consequences of post-injury stressors and their subsequent effects on social and emotional behavior in the context of rcTBI have been relatively little studied in animal models. Here, we use a mouse model of rcTBI with two closed-skull blunt impacts 24 hours apart and social and emotional behavior testing to examine the consequences of a stressor (foot shock fear conditioning) following brain injury (rcTBI). rcTBI alone did not affect cued or contextual fear conditioning or extinction compared to uninjured sham animals. In the sucrose preference test, rcTBI animals had decreased preference for sucrose, an anhedonia-like behavior, regardless of whether they experienced foot shock stress or were non-shocked controls. However, rcTBI and post-injury foot shock stress had synergistic effects in tests of social recognition and depression-like behavior. In the social recognition test, animals with both injury and shock were more impaired than either non-shocked injured mice or shocked but uninjured mice. In the tail suspension test, injured mice had increased depression-like behavior compared with uninjured mice, and shock stress worsened the depression-like behavior only in the injured mice with no effect in the uninjured mice. These results provide a model of subtle emotional behavioral deficits after combined concussive brain injury and stress, and may provide a platform for testing treatment and prevention strategies for social behavior deficits and mood disorders that are tailored to patients with traumatic brain injury. PMID:24058581

  16. Increment of body mass index is positively correlated with worsening of endothelium-dependent and independent changes in forearm blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kraemer-Aguiar, Luiz G; de Miranda, Marcos L; Bottino, Daniel A; Lima, Ronald de A; de Souza, Maria das Graças C; Balarini, Michelle de Moura; Villela, Nivaldo R; Bouskela, Eliete

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with the impairment of endothelial function leading to the initiation of the atherosclerotic process. As obesity is a multiple grade disease, we have hypothesized that an increasing impairment of endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell functions occurs from lean subjects to severe obese ones, creating a window of opportunities for preventive measures. Thus, the present study was carried out to investigate the grade of obesity in which endothelial dysfunction can be detected and if there is an increasing impairment of endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell functions as body mass index increases. According to body mass index, subjects were allocated into five groups: Lean controls (n = 9); Overweight (n = 11); Obese class I (n = 26); Obese class II (n = 15); Obese class III (n = 19). Endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell functions were evaluated measuring forearm blood flow responses to increasing intra-arterial infusions of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside using venous occlusion plethysmography. We observed that forearm blood flow was progressively impaired from lean controls to severe obese and found no significant differences between Lean controls and Overweight groups. Known determinants of endothelial dysfunction, such as inflammatory response, insulin resistance, and diagnosis of metabolic syndrome, did not correlate with forearm blood flow response to vasodilators. Moreover, several risk factors for atherosclerosis were excluded as independent predictors after confounder-adjusted analysis. Our data suggests that obesity per se could be sufficient to promote impairment of vascular reactivity, that obesity class I is the first grade of obesity in which endothelial dysfunction can be detected, and that body mass index positively correlates with the worsening of endothelium-dependent and independent changes in forearm blood flow. PMID:26913005

  17. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  18. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  19. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury ...

  20. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  1. The relationship between ethanol-induced hyperglycemia and hypothermia: evidence of genetic correlation.

    PubMed

    Risinger, F O; Cunningham, C L

    1991-08-01

    The hyperglycemic and hypothermic responses to acute ethanol exposure (0, 2, 4, 6 g/kg, intraperitoneally) were examined in non-fasted mice selectively bred for sensitivity (COLD line) or insensitivity (HOT line) to ethanol-induced hypothermia. Blood samples and rectal temperatures were obtained immediately before injection and hourly for 4 hr after injection. As expected, COLD mice demonstrated greater and more prolonged reductions in body temperature than HOT mice, especially at the 4 g/kg dose (HOT: -2.58 degrees C, COLD: -5.08 degrees C). Ethanol produced significant dose-dependent elevations in blood glucose levels over the 4-hr sampling period in both lines. The greatest elevations in blood glucose levels were seen at 4 g/kg, with COLD mice (mean = 225.1 mg/dl) showing significantly greater elevations in blood glucose levels compared to HOT mice (mean = 177.0 mg/dl). These results support the hypothesis that the thermic and glycemic effects produced by ethanol are due to related neural processes that share a common genetic component. PMID:1928651

  2. Acute Metabolic Effects of Olanzapine Depend on Dose and Injection Site

    PubMed Central

    Stipanovic, Michelle E.; Hajnal, Andras; Lynch, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics (AAPs), such as olanzapine (OLZ), are associated with metabolic side effects, including hyperglycemia. Although a central mechanism of action for the acute effects on glycemia has been suggested, evidence for peripheral versus central effects of AAPs has been mixed and has not been explored for an effect of OLZ on the respiratory exchange ratio (RER). Here, we tested the hypothesis that some inconsistencies in the glycemic responses are likely a result of different doses and central sites of injection. We also compared the effects of central versus peripherally administered OLZ on the RER of unsedated rats. Third ventricle infusion of OLZ at 0.3 mg/kg caused hyperglycemia within 30 minutes, with a higher dose (1.8 mg/kg) needed to elicit a similar response in the lateral ventricles. In contrast, 3 mg/kg of OLZ was needed to raise blood glucose within 30 minutes when given intragastrically, and 10 mg/kg resulted in a prolonged hyperglycemia lasting at least 60 minutes. Third ventricle injection of OLZ significantly decreased RER after 75 minutes, whereas intragastric OLZ resulted in a faster drop in RER after 30 minutes. Since changes in glycemia were most sensitive when OLZ was infused into the third ventricle, but effects on RER were more rapidly and efficaciously observed when the drug was given peripherally, these results raise the likelihood of a dual mechanism of action involving hypothalamic and peripheral mechanisms. Some discrepancies in the literature arising from central administration appear to result from the injection site and dose. PMID:26740814

  3. Evidence That Multiple Defects in Lipid Regulation Occur before Hyperglycemia during the Prodrome of Type-2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Moulinath; Brown, Marie; Broadhurst, David I.; Goodacre, Royston; Cooper, Garth J. S.; Kell, Douglas B.; Cruickshank, J. Kennedy

    2014-01-01

    Background Blood-vessel dysfunction arises before overt hyperglycemia in type-2 diabetes (T2DM). We hypothesised that a metabolomic approach might identify metabolites/pathways perturbed in this pre-hyperglycemic phase. To test this hypothesis and for specific metabolite hypothesis generation, serum metabolic profiling was performed in young women at increased, intermediate and low risk of subsequent T2DM. Methods Participants were stratified by glucose tolerance during a previous index pregnancy into three risk-groups: overt gestational diabetes (GDM; n = 18); those with glucose values in the upper quartile but below GDM levels (UQ group; n = 45); and controls (n = 43, below the median glucose values). Follow-up serum samples were collected at a mean 22 months postnatally. Samples were analysed in a random order using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to an electrospray hybrid LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Statistical analysis included principal component (PCA) and multivariate methods. Findings Significant between-group differences were observed at follow-up in waist circumference (86, 95%CI (79–91) vs 80 (76–84) cm for GDM vs controls, p<0.05), adiponectin (about 33% lower in GDM group, p = 0.004), fasting glucose, post-prandial glucose and HbA1c, but the latter 3 all remained within the ‘normal’ range. Substantial differences in metabolite profiles were apparent between the 2 ‘at-risk’ groups and controls, particularly in concentrations of phospholipids (4 metabolites with p≤0.01), acylcarnitines (3 with p≤0.02), short- and long-chain fatty acids (3 with p< = 0.03), and diglycerides (4 with p≤0.05). Interpretation Defects in adipocyte function from excess energy storage as relatively hypoxic visceral and hepatic fat, and impaired mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation may initiate the observed perturbations in lipid metabolism. Together with evidence from the failure of glucose-directed treatments to improve

  4. Selected Tea and Tea Pomace Extracts Inhibit Intestinal α-Glucosidase Activity in Vitro and Postprandial Hyperglycemia in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jungbae; Jo, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Justin S.; Ha, Kyoung-Soo; Lee, Jung-Yun; Choi, Hwang-Yong; Yu, Seok-Yeong; Kwon, Young-In; Kim, Young-Cheul

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by postprandial hyperglycemia, which is an early defect of T2DM and thus a primary target for anti-diabetic drugs. A therapeutic approach is to inhibit intestinal α-glucosidase, the key enzyme for dietary carbohydrate digestion, resulting in delayed rate of glucose absorption. Although tea extracts have been reported to have anti-diabetic effects, the potential bioactivity of tea pomace, the main bio waste of tea beverage processing, is largely unknown. We evaluated the anti-diabetic effects of three selected tea water extracts (TWE) and tea pomace extracts (TPE) by determining the relative potency of extracts on rat intestinal α-glucosidase activity in vitro as well as hypoglycemic effects in vivo. Green, oolong, and black tea bags were extracted in hot water and the remaining tea pomace were dried and further extracted in 70% ethanol. The extracts were determined for intestinal rat α-glucosidases activity, radical scavenging activity, and total phenolic content. The postprandial glucose-lowering effects of TWE and TPE of green and black tea were assessed in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and compared to acarbose, a known pharmacological α-glucosidase inhibitor. The IC50 values of all three tea extracts against mammalian α-glucosidase were lower or similar in TPE groups than those of TWE groups. TWE and TPE of green tea exhibited the highest inhibitory effects against α-glucosidase activity with the IC50 of 2.04 ± 0.31 and 1.95 ± 0.37 mg/mL respectively. Among the specific enzymes tested, the IC50 values for TWE (0.16 ± 0.01 mg/mL) and TPE (0.13 ± 0.01 mg/mL) of green tea against sucrase activity were the lowest compared to those on maltase and glucoamylase activities. In the animal study, the blood glucose level at 30 min after oral intake (0.5 g/kg body wt) of TPE and TWE of both green and black tea was significantly reduced compared to the control in sucrose-loaded SD rats. The TPE

  5. Randomized Controlled Trial of Insulin Supplementation for Correction of Bedtime Hyperglycemia in Hospitalized Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Vellanki, Priyathama; Bean, Rachel; Oyedokun, Festus A.; Pasquel, Francisco J.; Smiley, Dawn; Farrokhi, Farnoosh; Newton, Christopher; Peng, Limin

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Clinical guidelines recommend point-of-care glucose testing and the use of supplemental doses of rapid-acting insulin before meals and at bedtime for correction of hyperglycemia. The efficacy and safety of this recommendation, however, have not been tested in the hospital setting. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In this open-label, randomized controlled trial, 206 general medicine and surgery patients with type 2 diabetes treated with a basal-bolus regimen were randomized to receive either supplemental insulin (n = 106) at bedtime for blood glucose (BG) >7.8 mmol/L or no supplemental insulin (n = 100) except for BG >19.4 mmol/L. Point-of-care testing was performed before meals, at bedtime, and at 3:00 a.m. The primary outcome was the difference in fasting BG. In addition to the intention-to-treat analysis, an as-treated analysis was performed where the primary outcome was analyzed for only the bedtime BG levels between 7.8 and 19.4 mmol/L. RESULTS There were no differences in mean fasting BG for the intention-to-treat (8.8 ± 2.4 vs. 8.6 ± 2.2 mmol/L, P = 0.76) and as-treated (8.9 ± 2.4 vs. 8.8 ± 2.4 mmol/L, P = 0.92) analyses. Only 66% of patients in the supplement and 8% in the no supplement groups received bedtime supplemental insulin. Hypoglycemia (BG <3.9 mmol/L) did not differ between groups for either the intention-to-treat (30% vs. 26%, P = 0.50) or the as-treated (4% vs. 8%, P = 0.37) analysis. CONCLUSIONS The use of insulin supplements for correction of bedtime hyperglycemia was not associated with an improvement in glycemic control. We conclude that routine use of bedtime insulin supplementation is not indicated for management of inpatients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25665812

  6. Selected tea and tea pomace extracts inhibit intestinal α-glucosidase activity in vitro and postprandial hyperglycemia in vivo.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jungbae; Jo, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Justin S; Ha, Kyoung-Soo; Lee, Jung-Yun; Choi, Hwang-Yong; Yu, Seok-Yeong; Kwon, Young-In; Kim, Young-Cheul

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by postprandial hyperglycemia, which is an early defect of T2DM and thus a primary target for anti-diabetic drugs. A therapeutic approach is to inhibit intestinal α-glucosidase, the key enzyme for dietary carbohydrate digestion, resulting in delayed rate of glucose absorption. Although tea extracts have been reported to have anti-diabetic effects, the potential bioactivity of tea pomace, the main bio waste of tea beverage processing, is largely unknown. We evaluated the anti-diabetic effects of three selected tea water extracts (TWE) and tea pomace extracts (TPE) by determining the relative potency of extracts on rat intestinal α-glucosidase activity in vitro as well as hypoglycemic effects in vivo. Green, oolong, and black tea bags were extracted in hot water and the remaining tea pomace were dried and further extracted in 70% ethanol. The extracts were determined for intestinal rat α-glucosidases activity, radical scavenging activity, and total phenolic content. The postprandial glucose-lowering effects of TWE and TPE of green and black tea were assessed in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and compared to acarbose, a known pharmacological α-glucosidase inhibitor. The IC50 values of all three tea extracts against mammalian α-glucosidase were lower or similar in TPE groups than those of TWE groups. TWE and TPE of green tea exhibited the highest inhibitory effects against α-glucosidase activity with the IC50 of 2.04 ± 0.31 and 1.95 ± 0.37 mg/mL respectively. Among the specific enzymes tested, the IC50 values for TWE (0.16 ± 0.01 mg/mL) and TPE (0.13 ± 0.01 mg/mL) of green tea against sucrase activity were the lowest compared to those on maltase and glucoamylase activities. In the animal study, the blood glucose level at 30 min after oral intake (0.5 g/kg body wt) of TPE and TWE of both green and black tea was significantly reduced compared to the control in sucrose-loaded SD rats. The TPE

  7. Boldine protects endothelial function in hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress through an antioxidant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yeh Siang; Tian, Xiao Yu; Huang, Yu; Murugan, Dharmani; Achike, Francis I; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2013-02-01

    Increased oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis and progression of diabetes. Antioxidants are therapeutically beneficial for oxidative stress-associated diseases. Boldine ([s]-2,9-dihydroxy-1,10-dimethoxyaporphine) is a major alkaloid present in the leaves and bark of the boldo tree (Peumus boldus Molina), with known an antioxidant activity. This study examined the protective effects of boldine against high glucose-induced oxidative stress in rat aortic endothelial cells (RAEC) and its mechanisms of vasoprotection related to diabetic endothelial dysfunction. In RAEC exposed to high glucose (30 mM) for 48 h, pre-treatment with boldine reduced the elevated ROS and ni