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Sample records for acute inflammatory arthritis

  1. Autoantibodies in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Conigliaro, P; Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Sunzini, F; Novelli, L; Perricone, C; Perricone, R

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone with joint destruction. The lack of immunological tolerance in RA represents the first step toward the development of autoimmunity. Susceptible individuals, under the influence of environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, and silica exposure, develop autoimmune phenomena that result in the presence of autoantibodies. HLA and non-HLA haplotypes play a major role in determining the development of specific autoantibodies differentiating anti-citrullinated antibodies (ACPA)-positive and negative RA patients. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and ACPA are the serological markers for RA, and during the preclinical immunological phase, autoantibody titers increase with a progressive spread of ACPA antigens repertoire. The presence of ACPA represents an independent risk factor for developing RA in patients with undifferentiated arthritis or arthralgia. Moreover, anti-CarP antibodies have been identified in patients with RA as well as in individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms of RA. Several autoantibodies mainly targeting post-translational modified proteins have been investigated as possible biomarkers to improve the early diagnosis, prognosis and response to therapy in RA patients. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is distinguished from RA by infrequent positivity for RF and ACPA, together with other distinctive clinical features. Actually, specific autoantibodies have not been described. Recently, anti-CarP antibodies have been reported in sera from PsA patients with active disease. Further investigations on autoantibodies showing high specificity and sensibility as well as relevant correlation with disease severity, progression, and response to therapy are awaited in inflammatory arthritides. PMID:26970491

  2. Acute Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shirtliff, Mark E.; Mader, Jon T.

    2002-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection. PMID:12364368

  3. Severe inflammatory arthritis and lymphadenopathy in the absence of TNF.

    PubMed

    Campbell, I K; O'Donnell, K; Lawlor, K E; Wicks, I P

    2001-06-01

    It has been postulated that TNF has a pivotal role in a cytokine cascade that results in joint inflammation and destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To evaluate this, we examined the response of TNF-deficient (Tnf(-/-)) mice in two models of RA. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced by injection of chick type II collagen (CII) in CFA. Tnf(-/-) mice had some reduction in the clinical parameters of CIA and, on histology, significantly more normal joints. However, severe disease was evident in 54% of arthritic Tnf(-/-) joints. Tnf(-/-) mice had impaired Ig class switching, but preserved T cell proliferative responses to CII and enhanced IFN-gamma production. Interestingly, CII-immunized Tnf(-/-) mice developed lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly associated with increased memory CD4(+) T cells and activated lymph node B cells. Acute inflammatory arthritis was also reduced in Tnf(-/-) mice, although again some mice exhibited severe disease. We conclude that TNF is important but not essential for inflammatory arthritis; in each model, severe arthritis could proceed even in the complete absence of TNF. These results call into doubt the concept that TNF is obligatory for chronic autoimmune and acute inflammatory arthritis and provide a rationale for further studies into TNF-independent cytokine pathways in arthritis. PMID:11413159

  4. Severe inflammatory arthritis and lymphadenopathy in the absence of TNF

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Ian K.; O’Donnell, Kristy; Lawlor, Kate E.; Wicks, Ian P.

    2001-01-01

    It has been postulated that TNF has a pivotal role in a cytokine cascade that results in joint inflammation and destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To evaluate this, we examined the response of TNF-deficient (Tnf–/–) mice in two models of RA. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced by injection of chick type II collagen (CII) in CFA. Tnf–/– mice had some reduction in the clinical parameters of CIA and, on histology, significantly more normal joints. However, severe disease was evident in 54% of arthritic Tnf–/– joints. Tnf–/– mice had impaired Ig class switching, but preserved T cell proliferative responses to CII and enhanced IFN-γ production. Interestingly, CII-immunized Tnf–/– mice developed lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly associated with increased memory CD4+ T cells and activated lymph node B cells. Acute inflammatory arthritis was also reduced in Tnf–/– mice, although again some mice exhibited severe disease. We conclude that TNF is important but not essential for inflammatory arthritis; in each model, severe arthritis could proceed even in the complete absence of TNF. These results call into doubt the concept that TNF is obligatory for chronic autoimmune and acute inflammatory arthritis and provide a rationale for further studies into TNF-independent cytokine pathways in arthritis. PMID:11413159

  5. Photoacoustic tomography to identify inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2012-09-01

    Identifying neovascularity (angiogenesis) as an early feature of inflammatory arthritis can help in early accurate diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality which relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. PAT is used to identify changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis in a rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, on rats revealed that there is a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histology images obtained from both the normal and the arthritis affected rats correlated well with the PAT findings. Results support the fact that the emerging PAT could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis.

  6. Inhibition of Inflammatory Arthritis Using Fullerene Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Dellinger, Anthony L.; Cunin, Pierre; Lee, David; Kung, Andrew L.; Brooks, D. Bradford; Zhou, Zhiguo; Nigrovic, Peter A.; Kepley, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis; RA) is a complex disease driven by the interplay of multiple cellular lineages. Fullerene derivatives have previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory capabilities mediated, in part, by their ability to prevent inflammatory mediator release by mast cells (MC). Recognizing that MC can serve as a cellular link between autoantibodies, soluble mediators, and other effector populations in inflammatory arthritis, it was hypothesized that fullerene derivatives might be used to target this inflammatory disease. A panel of fullerene derivatives was tested for their ability to affect the function of human skin-derived MC as well as other lineages implicated in arthritis, synovial fibroblasts and osteoclasts. It is shown that certain fullerene derivatives blocked FcγR- and TNF-α-induced mediator release from MC; TNF-α-induced mediator release from RA synovial fibroblasts; and maturation of human osteoclasts. MC inhibition by fullerene derivatives was mediated through the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and FcγR-mediated increases in cellular reactive oxygen species and NF-κB activation. Based on these in vitro data, two fullerene derivatives (ALM and TGA) were selected for in vivo studies using K/BxN serum transfer arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1 mice. Dye-conjugated fullerenes confirmed localization to affected joints in arthritic animals but not in healthy controls. In the K/BxN moldel, fullerenes attenuated arthritis, an effect accompanied by reduced histologic inflammation, cartilage/bone erosion, and serum levels of TNF-α. Fullerenes remained capable of attenuating K/BxN arthritis in mast cell-deficient mice Cre-Master mice, suggesting that lineages beyond the MC represent relevant targets in this system. These studies suggest that fullerene derivatives may hold promise both as an assessment tool and as anti-inflammatory therapy of arthritis. PMID:25879437

  7. Abnormal bone remodelling in inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bogoch, Earl R.; Moran, Erica

    1998-01-01

    Osteopenia is responsible for substantial comorbidity in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and is an important factor in the surgical management of joint disease. In animal models of bone loss stimulated by inflammatory arthritis, increased bone remodelling and altered microstructure of bone have been documented. The subchondral bone plate near the joint surface is narrow and perforated by vascular inflammatory invasion, and in the shaft the thin cortices are weakened by giant resorption defects. Biomechanical tests and a mathematical model of bone strength suggest that cortical defects, much larger than those found in normal osteonal remodelling, are principally responsible for the experimentally observed loss of strength. Similarly, these defects may explain the increased femoral fracture risk in rheumatoid arthritis. The osteoclast, the cell resorbing bone, is demonstrated in increased number and activity in rheumatoid arthritis and in animal models. Bisphosphonates, drugs that inhibit osteoclast function, have been shown experimentally to reduce both focal and generalized osteopenia and to prevent loss of bone strength. Bisphosphonates also protect articular cartilage from damage characteristic of inflammatory arthritis. The mechanism of chondroprotection may be prevention of subchondral bone resorption by the osteoclast and also an altered distribution of bone marrow cells. Thus, bisphosphonates, currently in clinical use for other bone metabolic diseases, appear to have potential as prophylaxis and treatment for osteopenia and joint damage in inflammatory arthritis. PMID:9711159

  8. [Novel immunodiagnostics for inflammatory arthritis].

    PubMed

    Wahle, M; Kling, E

    2016-05-01

    Immunodiagnostics play an important role in the differential diagnostics of arthritis but the test results must be interpreted with respect to the clinical context. The detection of antibodies against citrullinated proteins has significantly improved the immunodiagnostics of arthritis, whereas the importance of testing for rheumatoid factor has decreased due to the low specificity. Antibodies against carbamylated or oxidized proteins will expand the immunodiagnostics of arthritis (especially rheumatoid arthritis) in the future. In contrast, the determination of cytokine concentrations in plasma or synovial fluid plays a subordinate role in the differential diagnostics of arthritis. Indirect immunofluorescence continues to be the gold standard in the detection of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and in the case of positive results further testing for antigen specificity should be carried out. The presence of ANA is not necessarily associated with autoimmune diseases. An example of a non-pathogenic ANA is anti-DFS70 antibodies. PMID:27142378

  9. Glycosylation as a marker for inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Simone; Unwin, Louise; Muniyappa, Mohankumar; Rudd, Pauline M

    2014-01-01

    Changes in serum protein glycosylation play an important role in inflammatory arthritis. Altered galactosylation of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in rheumatoid arthritis attracts special attention due to the devastating nature of the disease. Studying glycosylation changes of serum proteins has been recognized as a potential strategy to provide added value regarding diagnostics, aetiopathology and therapy of inflammatory arthritic diseases. Key questions, which are approached in these fields of research, are whether or not glycosylation can be used as a complementary pre-clinical and clinical marker for disease differentiation, diagnosis, the prediction of disease course and severity as well as for the evaluation of disease therapies. These studies mainly focus on TNF antagonists, which present a new and promising way of treating inflammatory arthritis. The recent availability of new high-throughput glycoanalytical tools enables a more profound and efficient investigation in large patient cohorts and helps to gain new insights in the complex mechanism of the underlying disease pathways. PMID:24643039

  10. Spondylitic psoriatic arthritis presenting as acute urinary retention

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Tom Edward Ngo; Que, Mary Lareine V; Tee, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a seronegative arthropathy occurring in the presence of psoriasis. In majority of cases, typical psoriatic skin lesions precede joint disease, making diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis without typical skin lesions, a diagnostic challenge. Nail lesions are commonly seen in patients affected by this condition, making it a useful clue in the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. This is a case of a 58-year-old Filipino woman presenting with sudden acute urinary retention and weakness of both lower extremities accompanied with active polyarthritis. Onycholytic nail changes initially thought to be a fungal nail infection led to the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis involving the spine. The patient was eventually treated with methotrexate and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs leading to full resolution of symptoms. The patient is currently ambulatory and on regular follow-up. This case report highlights the importance of clinical and physical findings particularly the nails that would lead to a diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. PMID:24789155

  11. Acute pseudoseptic arthritis and palmoplantar pustulosis.

    PubMed

    Chamot, A M; Vion, B; Gerster, J C

    1986-01-01

    The case of a 60-year-old woman who developed acute peripheral arthritis of a pseudoseptic character (high synovial leucocytosis and fever) associated to a palmoplantar pustulosis is reported. PMID:3514079

  12. Acute pseudo-septic arthritis following viscosuplementation of the knee.

    PubMed

    Idrissi, Zineb; Benbouazza, Karima; Fourtassi, Maryam; Raissouni, Hanae; El Aadmi, Meriem; Zanat, Fatima; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2012-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman with a history of medial femoro-tibial compartment of knee osteoarthritis was admitted for acute arthritis six days after a second intra-articular injection of Hyaluronic acid. The joint fluid was inflammatory, with no crystals, and laboratory tests showed marked inflammation leading to antibiotic treatment for suspected septic arthritis. The persistent symptoms and negative results of joint fluid and blood cultures led to discontinuation of the antibiotic therapy after 10 days. Anti-inflammatory with rehabilitation therapy of the knee relieved the symptoms, and the patient was discharged home 3 weeks after her admission. Aseptic arthritis induced by repeated Hyaluronic acid injection is the most likely diagnosis. Physicians should be conscious of this extremely severe complication. PMID:22937184

  13. Acute pseudo-septic arthritis following viscosuplementation of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Idrissi, Zineb; Benbouazza, Karima; Fourtassi, Maryam; Raissouni, Hanae; El Aadmi, Meriem; Zanat, Fatima; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2012-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman with a history of medial femoro-tibial compartment of knee osteoarthritis was admitted for acute arthritis six days after a second intra-articular injection of Hyaluronic acid. The joint fluid was inflammatory, with no crystals, and laboratory tests showed marked inflammation leading to antibiotic treatment for suspected septic arthritis. The persistent symptoms and negative results of joint fluid and blood cultures led to discontinuation of the antibiotic therapy after 10 days. Anti-inflammatory with rehabilitation therapy of the knee relieved the symptoms, and the patient was discharged home 3 weeks after her admission. Aseptic arthritis induced by repeated Hyaluronic acid injection is the most likely diagnosis. Physicians should be conscious of this extremely severe complication. PMID:22937184

  14. Food-induced (allergic) arthritis. Inflammatory arthritis exacerbated by milk.

    PubMed

    Panush, R S; Stroud, R M; Webster, E M

    1986-02-01

    Suggestive, but largely unproven, observations have associated arthritis with environmental antigens, including foods. We studied a patient with inflammatory arthritis in a prospective, "blinded," controlled fashion to determine whether her symptoms were associated with food sensitivities. This 52-year-old white woman with 11 years of class I, stage I, active disease, had symptomatic exacerbations allegedly associated with meat, milk, and beans. We observed an increase in symptoms following an unblinded food challenge and then studied her in our clinical research unit. On her normal diet for 6 days, she averaged 30 minutes of morning stiffness, 9 tender joints, 3 swollen joints, 87% subjective assessment (100% = best possible), and 89% examiner assessment. While she was fasting (3 days) or taking Vivonex (2 days), we noted no morning stiffness, tender joint score of 1, swollen joint score of 0, and assessments of 100% (P less than 0.05 versus normal diet). She was then nourished with Vivonex for 33 days without difficulty and challenged in a blinded fashion at mealtimes with lyophilized foods placed into opaque capsules. Four milk challenges (equivalent to greater than or equal to 8 ounces per meal) produced up to 30 minutes of morning stiffness, 14 tender joints, 4 swollen joints, subjective assessment of 85%, and objective assessment of 80% (P less than 0.05 versus fasting-Vivonex), peaking 24-48 hours postchallenge. Placebo and other foods (lettuce and carrots) were without effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3513771

  15. Angiogenic and Inflammatory Properties of Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory arthropathy associated with psoriasis and included in seronegative spondyloarthropathy. PsA has several unique characteristics different from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), such as enthesopathy, dactylitis, and abnormal bone remodeling. As compared with synovitis of RA (pannus), proliferation of PsA synovium is mild and characterized by hypervascularity and increased infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the synovial tissues. Angiogenesis plays a crucial role in cutaneous psoriasis, and several angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor, interleukin-8, angiopoietin, tumor necrosis factor-α and transforming growth factor-β, are suggested to play an important role also in the pathophysiology of PsA. Further, IL-17 has various functions such as upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, attraction of neutrophils, stimulation of keratinocytes, endothelial cell migration, and osteoclast formation via RANKL from activated synovial fibroblasts. Thus, IL-17 may be important in angiogenesis, fibrogenesis, and osteoclastogenesis in PsA. In this paper, roles of angiogenesis in the psoriatic synovium are discussed, which may strengthen the understanding of the pathogenesis of PsA. PMID:23819059

  16. Th2 and eosinophil responses suppress inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhu; Andreev, Darja; Oeser, Katharina; Krljanac, Branislav; Hueber, Axel; Kleyer, Arnd; Voehringer, David; Schett, Georg; Bozec, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Th2–eosinophil immune responses are well known for mediating host defence against helminths. Herein we describe a function of Th2–eosinophil responses in counteracting the development of arthritis. In two independent models of arthritis, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection leads to Th2 and eosinophil accumulation in the joints associated with robust inhibition of arthritis and protection from bone loss. Mechanistically, this protective effect is dependent on IL-4/IL-13-induced STAT6 pathway. Furthermore, we show that eosinophils play a central role in the modulation of arthritis probably through the increase of anti-inflammatory macrophages into arthritic joints. The presence of these pathways in human disease is confirmed by detection of GATA3-positive cells and eosinophils in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Taken together, these results demonstrate that eosinophils and helminth-induced activation of the Th2 pathway axis effectively mitigate the course of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:27273006

  17. Th2 and eosinophil responses suppress inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhu; Andreev, Darja; Oeser, Katharina; Krljanac, Branislav; Hueber, Axel; Kleyer, Arnd; Voehringer, David; Schett, Georg; Bozec, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Th2-eosinophil immune responses are well known for mediating host defence against helminths. Herein we describe a function of Th2-eosinophil responses in counteracting the development of arthritis. In two independent models of arthritis, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection leads to Th2 and eosinophil accumulation in the joints associated with robust inhibition of arthritis and protection from bone loss. Mechanistically, this protective effect is dependent on IL-4/IL-13-induced STAT6 pathway. Furthermore, we show that eosinophils play a central role in the modulation of arthritis probably through the increase of anti-inflammatory macrophages into arthritic joints. The presence of these pathways in human disease is confirmed by detection of GATA3-positive cells and eosinophils in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Taken together, these results demonstrate that eosinophils and helminth-induced activation of the Th2 pathway axis effectively mitigate the course of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:27273006

  18. Morin, a dietary bioflavonol suppresses monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation in an animal model of acute gouty arthritis with reference to NLRP3 inflammasome, hypo-xanthine phospho-ribosyl transferase, and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekar, Chitra; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-09-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of morin, a dietary bioflavanol was explored on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced inflammation in rats, an experimental model for acute gouty arthritis. Morin treatment (30mg/kg b.wt) significantly attenuated the ankle swelling and the levels of lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and articular elastase along with an increased anti-oxidant status (catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) in the joint homogenate of MSU crystal-induced rats. Histological assessment revealed that morin limited the diffusion of joint space, synovial hyperplasia, and inflammatory cell infiltrations. The mRNA expression of NLRP3 (nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3) inflammasome, caspase-1, pro-inflammatory cytokines, MCP-1, inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65 was found downregulated and HPRT (hypo-xanthine phospho-ribosyl transferase) mRNA expression was upregulated in morin treated MSU crystal-induced rats. In addition, morin treatment reduced the protein expression of NF-κB p65, p-NF-κB p65, iNOS, COX-2, and TNF-α. The results clearly demonstrated that morin exert a potent anti-inflammatory effect on MSU crystal-induced inflammation in rats. PMID:27268719

  19. Avenues to autoimmune arthritis triggered by diverse remote inflammatory challenges.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Nina; Tan, Jian K; Mason, Linda J; Robert, Remy; McKenzie, Craig I; Lim, Florence; Wong, Connie H; Macia, Laurence; Thorburn, Alison N; Russ, Brendan E; Masters, Seth L; Mackay, Charles R

    2016-09-01

    Environmental factors contribute to development of autoimmune diseases. For instance, human autoimmune arthritis can associate with intestinal inflammation, cigarette smoking, periodontal disease, and various infections. The cellular and, molecular pathways whereby such remote challenges might precipitate arthritis or flares remain unclear. Here, we used a transfer model of self-reactive arthritis-inducing CD4(+) cells from KRNtg mice that, upon transfer, induce a very mild form of autoinflammatory arthritis in recipient animals. This model enabled us to identify external factors that greatly aggravated disease. We show that several distinct challenges precipitated full-blown arthritis, including intestinal inflammation through DSS-induced colitis, and bronchial stress through Influenza infection. Both triggers induced strong IL-17 expression primarily in self-reactive CD4(+) cells in lymph nodes draining the site of inflammation. Moreover, treatment of mice with IL-1β greatly exacerbated arthritis, while transfer of KRNtg CD4(+) cells lacking IL-1R significantly reduced disease and IL-17 expression. Thus, IL-1β enhances the autoaggressive potential of self-reactive CD4(+) cells, through increased Th17 differentiation, and this influences inflammatory events in the joints. We propose that diverse challenges that cause remote inflammation (lung infection or colitis, etc.) result in IL-1β-driven Th17 differentiation, and this precipitates arthritis in genetically susceptible individuals. Thus the etiology of autoimmune inflammatory arthritis likely relates to diverse triggers that converge to a common pathway involving IL-1β production and Th17 cell distribution. PMID:27427404

  20. Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiangtao; Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu; Zheng, Yanping

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). •Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. •Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. •Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-κB-dependent genes, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

  1. 78 FR 36305 - Proposed Information Collection (Non-Degenerative Arthritis (Including Inflammatory, Autoimmune...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Non-Degenerative Arthritis (Including Inflammatory, Autoimmune, Crystalline and Infectious Arthritis) and Dysbaric Osteonecrosis Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity... disability benefits related to a claimant's diagnosis of a non-degenerative arthritis or...

  2. Anti cytokine therapy in chronic inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Charlotte; Davies, Ruth; Choy, Ernest

    2016-10-01

    This is a review looking at anti cytokine therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Psoriatic Arthritis (PSA) and Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS). The review explores the similarities and differences in the clinical features, as well as treatments and cytokines involved in the development and propagation of the disease. Particular attention is paid to TNFα inhibitors IL-1ra, IL-6 and JAK kinase Inhibitors, anti IL23 and IL-12 and the new developments with anti-IL-17. PMID:27497159

  3. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging for inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Chamberland, David; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, affecting 46 million of the population in the U.S. Rendering new optical contrast in articular tissues at high spatial and temporal resolution, emerging photoacoustic imaging (PAI) combined with more established ultrasound (US) imaging technologies provides unique opportunities for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. In addition to capturing peripheral bone and soft tissue images, PAI has the capability to quantify hemodynamic properties including regional blood oxygenation and blood volume, both abnormal in synovial tissues affected by arthritis. Therefore, PAI, especially when performed together with US, should be of considerable help for further understanding the pathophysiology of arthritis as well as assisting in therapeutic decisions, including assessing the efficacy of new pharmacological therapies. In this paper, we will review our recent work on the development of PAI for application to the diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. We will present the imaging results from a home-built imaging system and another one based on a commercial US. The performance of PAI in evaluating pharmacological therapy on animal model of arthritis will be shown. Moreover, our resent work on PAI and US dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo will also be presented.

  4. Atypical arthritis revisited: Acute rheumatic fever

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Binoy; Bhutia, Euden; Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    A 13-year-old boy presented with vague musculoskeletal pain and involvement of multiple small and large joints along with axial skeleton for the last 3 years, poorly responsive to aspirin. However, on account of presence of carditis and fulfilment of Jones criteria, a diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) with atypical arthritis was made. We report this case to break the myth and sensitize pediatricians and rheumatologists to keep the possibility of atypical articular presentations, as in our case, in patients with ARF and prevent delayed diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27212853

  5. Antiarthritic effects of Ajuga bracteosa Wall ex Benth. in acute and chronic models of arthritis in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaithwas, Gaurav; Gautam, Raju; Jachak, Sanjay M; Saklani, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antiarthritic activity of Ajuga bracteosa using albino rats. Methods The antiarthritic activity of 70% ethanolic extract of Ajuga bracteosa (EEAB) was evaluated against turpentine oil- and formaldehyde- induced acute non immunological and complete freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced chronic immunological arthritis in albino rats. Results EEAB showed a significant (P<0.05) and dose dependent inhibitory effect against acute and chronic models of arthritis. EEAB exhibited better antiarthritic activity than the standard aspirin. Conclusions EEAB exhibits a significant and promising antiarthritic activity against acute and chronic arthritis and supports the traditional use of Ajuga bracteosa for rheumatism and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:23569895

  6. Divergent T-Cell Cytokine Patterns in Inflammatory Arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A. K.; Seipelt, E.; Sieper, J.

    1994-08-01

    A major immunoregulatory mechanism in inflammatory infections and allergic diseases is the control of the balance of cytokines secreted by Th1/Th2 subsets of T helper (Th) cells. This might also be true in autoimmune diseases; a Th2 pattern that prevents an effective immune response in infections with intracellular bacteria may favor immunosuppression in autoimmune diseases. The pattern of cytokine expression was compared in the synovial tissue from patients with a typical autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and with a disorder with similar synovial pathology but driven by persisting exogenous antigen, reactive arthritis. We screened 12 rheumatoid and 9 reactive arthritis synovial tissues by PCR and in situ hybridization for their expression of T-cell cytokines. The cytokine pattern differs significantly between the two diseases; rheumatoid arthritis samples express a Th1-like pattern whereas in reactive arthritis interferon γ expression is accompanied by that of interleukin 4. Studying the expression of cytokines by in situ hybridization confirmed the results found by PCR; they also show an extremely low frequency of cytokine-transcribing cells. In a double-staining experiment, it was demonstrated that interleukin 4 is made by CD4 cells. These experiments favor the possibility of therapeutic intervention in inflammatory rheumatic diseases by means of inhibitory cytokines.

  7. Inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Boughton-Smith, N K; Tinker, A C

    1998-07-01

    There is considerable evidence that excessive nitric oxide (NO) synthesized from L-arginine by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) plays an important pathological role in inflammatory arthritis. Since NO synthesized by constitutive isoforms of NOS has a physiological role, a great deal of activity has been directed at identifying inhibitors of NOS that are selective for the induced isoform. The major chemical areas that have been described so far in the search for such selective iNOS inhibitors and the activity of some of these compounds in animal models of arthritis are reviewed. PMID:18465556

  8. Antigen-specific suppression of inflammatory arthritis using liposomes.

    PubMed

    Capini, Christelle; Jaturanpinyo, Montree; Chang, Hsin-I; Mutalik, Srinivas; McNally, Alice; Street, Shayna; Steptoe, Raymond; O'Sullivan, Brendan; Davies, Nigel; Thomas, Ranjeny

    2009-03-15

    Existing therapies for rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases are not Ag specific, which increases the likelihood of systemic toxicity. We show that egg phosphatidylcholine liposomes loaded with Ag (OVA or methylated BSA) and a lipophilic NF-kappaB inhibitor (curcumin, quercetin, or Bay11-7082) suppress preexisting immune responses in an Ag-specific manner. We injected loaded liposomes into mice primed with Ag or into mice suffering from Ag-induced inflammatory arthritis. The liposomes targeted APCs in situ, suppressing the cells' responsiveness to NF-kappaB and inducing Ag-specific FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. This regulatory mechanism suppressed effector T cell responses and the clinical signs of full-blown Ag-induced arthritis. Thus, liposomes encapsulate Ags and NF-kappaB inhibitors stably and efficiently and could be readily adapted to deliver Ags and inhibitors for Ag-specific suppression of other autoimmune and allergic diseases. PMID:19265134

  9. 78 FR 65450 - Agency Information Collection (Non-Degenerative Arthritis (Including Inflammatory, Autoimmune...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Non-Degenerative Arthritis (Including Inflammatory, Autoimmune, Crystalline and Infectious Arthritis) and Dysbaric Osteonecrosis Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity... oira_submission@omb.eop.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900- NEW (Non-Degenerative...

  10. Acute Arthritis in Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Ahmeti, Salih; Ajazaj-Berisha, Lindita; Halili, Bahrije; Shala, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever is a severe viral disease caused by a Nairovirus. An atypical manifestation in the form of acute arthritis was found in a confirmed Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus Kosova-Hoti strain positive patient. Acute arthritis in Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) may be as a result of immune mechanisms or the bleeding disorder underlying CCHF. PMID:24926169

  11. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Arthritis Associated Lymphomas: Who Is at Risk?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Specific autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with an increased risk of malignant lymphomas. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), dermatomyositis, and celiac disease have been consistently linked to malignant lymphomas. Isolated cases of lymphomas associated with spondyloarthropathies and autoinflammatory diseases have also been reported. Direct association between autoimmunity and lymphomagenesis has been reinforced by large epidemiological studies. It is still uncertain whether disease specific determinants or phenotypic or treatment related characteristics increase likelihood of lymphomagenesis in these patients. For example, recent literature has indicated a positive correlation between severity of inflammation and risk of lymphomas among RA and Sjögren's syndrome patients. It is also debated whether specific lymphoma variants are more commonly seen in accordance with certain chronic autoimmune arthritis. Previous studies have revealed a higher incidence of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas in RA and SLE patients, whereas pSS has been linked with increased risk of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. This review summarizes recent literature evaluating risk of lymphomas in arthritis patients and disease specific risk determinants. We also elaborate on the association of autoimmune arthritis with specific lymphoma variants along with genetic, environmental, and therapeutic risk factors.

  12. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Arthritis Associated Lymphomas: Who Is at Risk?

    PubMed

    Yadlapati, Sujani; Efthimiou, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Specific autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with an increased risk of malignant lymphomas. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), dermatomyositis, and celiac disease have been consistently linked to malignant lymphomas. Isolated cases of lymphomas associated with spondyloarthropathies and autoinflammatory diseases have also been reported. Direct association between autoimmunity and lymphomagenesis has been reinforced by large epidemiological studies. It is still uncertain whether disease specific determinants or phenotypic or treatment related characteristics increase likelihood of lymphomagenesis in these patients. For example, recent literature has indicated a positive correlation between severity of inflammation and risk of lymphomas among RA and Sjögren's syndrome patients. It is also debated whether specific lymphoma variants are more commonly seen in accordance with certain chronic autoimmune arthritis. Previous studies have revealed a higher incidence of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas in RA and SLE patients, whereas pSS has been linked with increased risk of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. This review summarizes recent literature evaluating risk of lymphomas in arthritis patients and disease specific risk determinants. We also elaborate on the association of autoimmune arthritis with specific lymphoma variants along with genetic, environmental, and therapeutic risk factors. PMID:27429984

  13. K/BxN Serum-Transfer Arthritis as a Model for Human Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Anne D.; Haase, Claus; Cook, Andrew D.; Hamilton, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The K/BxN serum-transfer arthritis (STA) model is a murine model in which the immunological mechanisms occurring in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other arthritides can be studied. To induce K/BxN STA, serum from arthritic transgenic K/BxN mice is transferred to naive mice and manifestations of arthritis occur a few days later. The inflammatory response in the model is driven by autoantibodies against the ubiquitously expressed self-antigen, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6PI), leading to the formation of immune complexes that drive the activation of different innate immune cells such as neutrophils, macrophages, and possibly mast cells. The pathogenesis further involves a range of immune mediators including cytokines, chemokines, complement factors, Toll-like receptors, Fc receptors, and integrins, as well as factors involved in pain and bone erosion. Hence, even though the K/BxN STA model mimics only the effector phase of RA, it still involves a wide range of relevant disease mediators. Additionally, as a murine model for arthritis, the K/BxN STA model has some obvious advantages. First, it has a rapid and robust onset of arthritis with 100% incidence in genetically identical animals. Second, it can be induced in a wide range of strain backgrounds and can therefore also be induced in gene-deficient strains to study the specific importance of disease mediators. Even though G6PI might not be an essential autoantigen, for example, in RA, the K/BxN STA model is a useful tool to understand how autoantibodies, in general, drive the progression of arthritis by interacting with downstream components of the innate immune system. Finally, the model has also proven useful as a model wherein arthritic pain can be studied. Taken together, these features make the K/BxN STA model a relevant one for RA, and it is a potentially valuable tool, especially for the preclinical screening of new therapeutic targets for RA and perhaps other forms of inflammatory arthritis. Here, we

  14. Photoacoustic imaging of inflammatory arthritis in human joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Xu, Guan; Marquardt, April; Francis, Sheeja; Yuan, Jie; Girish, Dhanuj; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2016-02-01

    The ducal imaging with photoacoustic imaging (PAI) that is an emerging technology and clinical ultrasound imaging that is an established modality is developed for the imaging of early inflammatory arthritis. PAI is sensitive to blood volume, not limited by flow like ultrasound, holding great promise for the earliest detection of increase in blood volume and angiogenesis - a key early finding inflammation PAI has the capability of assessing inflammation in superficial human soft tissues, offering potential benefits in diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. PAI combined with ultrasonography (US), is a real time dual-modality system developed and tested to identify active synovitis in metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of 10 arthritis patients and 10 normal volunteers. Photoacoustic images of the joints were acquired at 580-nm laser wavelength, which provided the desired balance between the optical contrast of hemoglobin over bone cortex and the imaging depth. Confirmed by US Doppler imaging, the results from ten patients and ten normal volunteers demonstrated satisfactory sensitivity of PAI in assessing enhanced blood flow due to active synovitis. This preliminary study suggests that photoacoustic imaging, by identifying early increase in blood volume, related to increased vascularity, a hallmark of joint inflammation, could be a valuable supplement to musculoskeletal US.

  15. Modulating the Th1/Th2 balance in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Müller, B; Gimsa, U; Mitchison, N A; Radbruch, A; Sieper, J; Yin, Z

    1998-01-01

    The balance between Th1 and Th2 cells regulates the choice between inflammatory and antibody-mediated immune responses. To an increasing extent this balance is thought to involve the participation of antigen-presenting cells, rather than the entirely autonomous activity of T cells and their cytokines. Here we survey current opinion concerning the working of this balance, and its condition in rheumatoid arthritis and the other inflammatory arthritides. The contrast between Lyme arthritis and reactive arthritis is particularly illuminating, since one is triggered by extracellular and the other by intracellular infection. We describe current approaches to the modulation of this balance. Guided by the principles that genetic polymorphism is likely to identify relevant genes, that any cytokine gene picked up by a virus must matter and that natural immunosuppressive activity at mucosal surfaces should be worth exploiting, we identify as particularly worthy of attention: (i) IL-10, (ii) inhibitors of IL-12 production, (iii) inhibitors of CD40 ligand expression and (iv) oral and nasal tolerance. Other protective T cell subsets are touched on, and the impact of oligonucleotide arrays mentioned. PMID:9836376

  16. Inflammatory arthritis in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes: a multicenter retrospective study and literature review of 68 cases.

    PubMed

    Mekinian, Arsène; Braun, Thorsten; Decaux, Olivier; Falgarone, Géraldine; Toussirot, Eric; Raffray, Loic; Omouri, Mohamed; Gombert, Bruno; De Wazieres, Benoit; Buchdaul, Anne-Laure; Ziza, Jean-Marc; Launay, David; Denis, Guillaume; Madaule, Serge; Rose, Christian; Grignano, Eric; Fenaux, Pierre; Fain, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    We describe the characteristics and outcome of inflammatory arthritis in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in a French multicenter retrospective study. Twenty-two patients with MDS (median age, 77.5 yr [interquartile range, 69-81]; 10 women) were included. Inflammatory arthritis presented as polyarthritis in 17 cases (77%) and with symmetric involvement in 15 cases (68%). At diagnosis, the median disease activity score 28 based on C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) was 4.5 [2-6.5]. Two patients had anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs), and 1 had radiologic erosions. The median time between the diagnoses of arthritis and MDS was 10 months [6-42], with a median articular symptom duration of 3 months [2-8]. The diagnosis of both diseases was concomitant in 6 cases (27%); arthritis preceded MDS in 12 cases (55%), and occurred after MDS in 4 (18%). While the number of swollen and tender joints significantly decreased during follow-up, as did the median DAS28-CRP (from 4.3 [3.8-4.6] at baseline to 2.9 [1.75-3.3]; p < 0.05), CRP remained elevated (CRP >20 mg/L) in 8 patients (42%). Nevertheless, radiographic progression and new ACPA positivity were not observed during a median follow-up of 29 months [9-76]. While most of the patients were treated with steroids (n = 16) for arthritis, additional treatment was administered in only 4 patients (hydroxychloroquine, n = 2; sulfasalazine [Salazopyrin] and etanercept, n = 1, respectively). Eleven patients died during follow-up from acute myeloid leukemia (n = 5); infections (n = 3); or cerebral bleeding, cardiorespiratory failure, or undetermined cause (n = 1, respectively). Inflammatory arthritis associated with MDS can have various presentations and is often seronegative and nonerosive. Steroids alone are the most common treatment in MDS-associated arthritis, but that treatment is insufficient to control arthritis. Steroid-sparing strategies need to be identified. PMID:24378738

  17. Stem cells in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tyndall, Alan; van Laar, Jacob M

    2010-08-01

    Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) resulted in a positive short-term outcome clinically with low treatment-related toxicity. However, early conditioning regimens were of low immunoablative intensity and most patients relapsed. Mechanistic studies suggest that residual lesional effector cells may have been responsible for the relapses. The introduction of biopharmaceuticals has, for the moment, reduced the need for further experimental studies. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients, mostly of the systemic subgroup, have shown nearly 33% durable drug-free remission, but with significant toxicity, including fatal macrophage-activation syndrome early in the programme. Later modifications to the protocol have reduced this toxicity. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), derived from several sources including bone marrow and adipose tissue, are being tested as tissue-regenerative and immunomodulating agents in many autoimmune diseases and animal models of inflammatory arthritis have been positive. MSCs and other stromal cells derived from actively inflamed synovium and peripheral blood of RA patients do not always demonstrate a full range of differentiation potential compared with healthy MSCs, although their immunomodulalatory capacity is unimpaired. PMID:20732653

  18. Keratan sulphate in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Spector, T D; Woodward, L; Hall, G M; Hammond, A; Williams, A; Butler, M G; James, I T; Hart, D J; Thompson, P W; Scott, D L

    1992-01-01

    Serum concentrations of antigenic keratan sulphate determined by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with a monoclonal antibody were studied in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, other inflammatory diseases, and a large control group of women without arthritis. Mean keratan sulphate concentrations were low in 117 women with RA compared with 227 female control subjects matched for age drawn from a community survey. There were significant correlations between serum keratan sulphate concentrations in patients with RA and serum C reactive protein and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Serum keratan sulphate concentrations were also low in 29 men and women with ankylosing spondylitis and 29 patients with arthritis and high concentrations of C reactive protein. In 98 women undergoing an operation for benign breast disease there were decreases in serum keratan sulphate concentrations after the operation which correlated with doses in serum C reactive protein. No differences were found in keratan sulphate concentrations in 137 women with osteoarthritis compared with controls. Within the group with osteoarthritis there were no differences for the various joint groups and there was no obvious correlation with radiographic severity or progression. These findings suggest serum keratan sulphate is unlikely to be useful as a diagnostic marker in osteoarthritis or RA but indicate a role for inflammation in the regulation of cartilage loss. PMID:1444626

  19. Obesity and inflammatory arthritis: impact on occurrence, disease characteristics and therapeutic response

    PubMed Central

    Daïen, Claire I; Sellam, Jérémie

    2015-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are increasing worldwide and now reach about one-third of the world's population. Obesity also involves patients with inflammatory arthritis. Knowing the impact of obesity on rheumatic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis) is thus an important issue. This article first reviews the epidemiological and clinical data available on obesity in inflammatory rheumatic diseases, that is, its impact on incident disease, disease characteristics and the therapeutic response. The second part of this review gives an overview of the factors potentially involved in the specifics of inflammatory arthritis in patients with obesity, such as limitations in the clinical assessment, diet, microbiota and adipokines. PMID:26509048

  20. Inflammatory Cell Migration in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Nevius, Erin; Gomes, Ana Cordeiro; Pereira, João P

    2016-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that primarily affects the joints. Self-reactive B and T lymphocytes cooperate to promote antibody responses against self proteins and are major drivers of disease. T lymphocytes also promote RA independently of B lymphocytes mainly through the production of key inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-17, that promote pathology. While the innate signals that initiate self-reactive adaptive immune responses are poorly understood, the disease is predominantly caused by inflammatory cellular infiltration and accumulation in articular tissues, and by bone erosions driven by bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Osteoclasts are giant multinucleated cells formed by the fusion of multiple myeloid cells that require short-range signals, such as the cytokines MCSF and RANKL, for undergoing differentiation. The recruitment and positioning of osteoclast precursors to sites of osteoclast differentiation by chemoattractants is an important point of control for osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. Recently, the GPCR EBI2 and its oxysterol ligand 7a, 25 dihydroxycholesterol, were identified as important regulators of osteoclast precursor positioning in proximity to bone surfaces and of osteoclast differentiation under homeostasis. In chronic inflammatory diseases like RA, osteoclast differentiation is also driven by inflammatory cytokines such as TNFa and IL-1, and can occur independently of RANKL. Finally, there is growing evidence that the chemotactic signals guiding osteoclast precursors to inflamed articular sites contribute to disease and are of great interest. Furthering our understanding of the complex osteoimmune cell interactions should provide new avenues of therapeutic intervention for RA. PMID:26511861

  1. Prolactin promotes cartilage survival and attenuates inflammation in inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Adán, Norma; Guzmán-Morales, Jessica; Ledesma-Colunga, Maria G.; Perales-Canales, Sonia I.; Quintanar-Stéphano, Andrés; López-Barrera, Fernando; Méndez, Isabel; Moreno-Carranza, Bibiana; Triebel, Jakob; Binart, Nadine; Martínez de la Escalera, Gonzalo; Thebault, Stéphanie; Clapp, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the only cells in cartilage, and their death by apoptosis contributes to cartilage loss in inflammatory joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A putative therapeutic intervention for RA is the inhibition of apoptosis-mediated cartilage degradation. The hormone prolactin (PRL) frequently increases in the circulation of patients with RA, but the role of hyperprolactinemia in disease activity is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that PRL inhibits the apoptosis of cultured chondrocytes in response to a mixture of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ) by preventing the induction of p53 and decreasing the BAX/BCL-2 ratio through a NO-independent, JAK2/STAT3–dependent pathway. Local treatment with PRL or increasing PRL circulating levels also prevented chondrocyte apoptosis evoked by injecting cytokines into the knee joints of rats, whereas the proapoptotic effect of cytokines was enhanced in PRL receptor–null (Prlr–/–) mice. Moreover, eliciting hyperprolactinemia in rats before or after inducing the adjuvant model of inflammatory arthritis reduced chondrocyte apoptosis, proinflammatory cytokine expression, pannus formation, bone erosion, joint swelling, and pain. These results reveal the protective effect of PRL against inflammation-induced chondrocyte apoptosis and the therapeutic potential of hyperprolactinemia to reduce permanent joint damage and inflammation in RA. PMID:23908112

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rheumatoid Arthritis What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? An Inflammatory, Autoimmune Disease Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disease that causes ... sometimes feverish. Rheumatoid arthritis is classified as an autoimmune disease. An autoimmune disease occurs when the immune system ...

  3. Gouty Arthritis: A Review of Acute Management and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Liza; Saseen, Joseph J

    2016-08-01

    Gouty arthritis is one of the most common rheumatic diseases. The clinical burden of gouty arthritis has historically been well recognized; however, gout is often misdiagnosed and mismanaged. The prevalence of gout is rising and is likely attributed to several factors including increased incidence of comorbidities, lifestyle factors, and increased use of causative medications. With the increasing prevalence, there have been several innovations and evidence-based updates related to the diagnosis and management of gout. Acute gouty arthritis should be treated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), colchicine, or corticosteroids, or a combination of two agents. Xanthine oxidase inhibitor therapy remains the consensus first-line treatment option for the prevention of recurrent gout. Add-on therapies that reduce serum urate concentration include traditional uricosuric agents and a novel uric acid reabsorption inhibitor. Prophylaxis of acute gout with NSAIDs, colchicine, or corticosteroids is universally recommended when initiating any urate-lowering therapy in order to prevent acute gouty arthritis for a period of at least 6 months. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology and risk factors for gouty arthritis and evaluate diagnostic strategies and therapeutic regimens for the management of gout, including a new drug approval. PMID:27318031

  4. Inflammatory arthritis as a novel risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    John, Holly; Kitas, George

    2012-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) comorbidity is a significant issue for the inflammatory arthritides (IA). There is a wealth of mortality studies showing increased cardiovascular mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the evidence suggests that the same is likely to be true of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). CVD co-morbidity is due to ischaemic pathologies driven by accelerated atherosclerosis and relates to the increased prevalence and clustering of classical risk factors, which may also be affected by treatments for IA, and their interplay with novel risk factors, namely systemic inflammation. Currently we are unable to quantify the contribution that classical and novel risk factors make to an individuals' CVD risk and specific algorithms need to be developed and validated in RA, PsA and AS to facilitate clinical management. Furthermore, large clinical trials are required to assess the effect of lifestyle modifications, primary prevention strategies and effective immunosuppression on hard CVD endpoints. However, in the meantime, a pragmatic approach should be adopted towards CVD risk management. Consensus opinion has generated guidelines for the management of CVD risk in IA and we discuss the importance of assessing each individual for CVD risk and establishing a system for routine risk factor identification alongside a commitment to treat identified risk factors to specific targets. PMID:22841864

  5. [Vaccines and preventive activities in patients with inflammatory arthritis].

    PubMed

    Casals-Sánchez, J L; Casals Vázquez, C; Vázquez Sánchez, M Á; Giménez Basallote, S

    2013-10-01

    Patients with inflammatory arthritis and eligible for immunosuppressive therapy account for more than 1% of general population, and represents a significant workload on family doctors. They are prone to other comorbidities, with an increased cardiovascular risk and a higher incidence of infections than the general population, especially skin infections and pneumonitis. This comorbidity can be considered vulnerable to a prevention program-prevention of cardiovascular risk, cancer screening, vaccination schedule for adults. As for prevention through vaccination, importance should be given to pneumococcal infection - significant in adults aged 50 or over, especially amongst immunosuppressed patients. The 13-valent conjugate vaccine, which has been recently approved for adults, must be considered. An attempt has been made to write a simple, applicable document on preventive measures that should be implemented both at primary and secondary care level for those adults. PMID:24095166

  6. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Vitis thunbergii var. taiwaniana on Knee Damage Associated with Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ching-Fent; Wang, Kun-Teng; Chen, Lih-Geeng; Lee, Chia-Jung; Tseng, Sung-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Vitis thunbergii Sieb. et Zucc. var. taiwaniana Lu (VT) is an indigenous plant in Taiwan that is traditionally used for promoting joint health. In this study, we used in vitro primary human chondrocytes (PHCs) and two in vivo animal models to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of VT on arthritis. Results showed that the water extract of the stems and roots from VT (VT-SR) was rich in flavones and phenols with 1.1 mg/g of resveratrol, 6.7 mg/g of hopeaphenol, and 5.1 mg/g of (+)-ɛ-viniferin. VT-SR significantly scavenged DPPH radicals and inhibited prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PHCs without exhibiting significant cytotoxicity. In in vivo models, the VT-SR (500 mg/kg) significantly decreased serum PGE2 and knee 2-18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) levels in LPS-induced acute inflammatory arthritis in rabbits. In addition, dietary supplementation with VT-SR for 28 days significantly alleviated type II collagenase-induced rat osteoarthritis with improvements in weight bearing and range of motion tests. In conclusion, our results suggest that the VT-SR is a good candidate for developing dietary supplements to prevent joint deterioration and inhibit inflammation. PMID:24720858

  7. Repeated, but Not Acute, Stress Suppresses Inflammatory Plasma Extravasation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strausbaugh, Holly J.; Dallman, Mary F.; Levine, Jon D.

    1999-12-01

    Clinical findings suggest that inflammatory disease symptoms are aggravated by ongoing, repeated stress, but not by acute stress. We hypothesized that, compared with single acute stressors, chronic repeated stress may engage different physiological mechanisms that exert qualitatively different effects on the inflammatory response. Because inhibition of plasma extravasation, a critical component of the inflammatory response, has been associated with increased disease severity in experimental arthritis, we tested for a potential repeated stress-induced inhibition of plasma extravasation. Repeated, but not single, exposures to restraint stress produced a profound inhibition of bradykinin-induced synovial plasma extravasation in the rat. Experiments examining the mechanism of inhibition showed that the effect of repeated stress was blocked by adrenalectomy, but not by adrenal medullae denervation, suggesting that the adrenal cortex mediates this effect. Consistent with known effects of stress and with mediation by the adrenal cortex, restraint stress evoked repeated transient elevations of plasma corticosterone levels. This elevated corticosterone was necessary and sufficient to produce inhibition of plasma extravasation because the stress-induced inhibition was blocked by preventing corticosterone synthesis and, conversely, induction of repeated transient elevations in plasma corticosterone levels mimicked the effects of repeated stress. These data suggest that repetition of a mild stressor can induce changes in the physiological state of the animal that enable a previously innocuous stressor to inhibit the inflammatory response. These findings provide a potential explanation for the clinical association between repeated stress and aggravation of inflammatory disease symptoms and provide a model for study of the biological mechanisms underlying the stress-induced aggravation of chronic inflammatory diseases.

  8. Cutaneous abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis compared with non‐inflammatory rheumatic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, K M J; Ladoyanni, E; Treharne, G J; Hale, E D; Erb, N; Kitas, G D

    2006-01-01

    Background Cutaneous abnormalities are common in rheumatoid arthritis, but exact prevalence estimates are yet to be established. Some abnormalities may be independent and coincidental, whereas others may relate to rheumatoid arthritis or its treatment. Objectives To determine the exact nature and point prevalence of cutaneous abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared with those in patients with non‐inflammatory rheumatic disease. Methods 349 consecutive outpatients for rheumatology (205 with rheumatoid arthritis and 144 with non‐inflammatory rheumatic conditions) were examined for skin and nail signs by a dermatologist. Histories of rheumatology, dermatology, drugs and allergy were noted in detail. Results Skin abnormalities were reported by more patients with rheumatoid arthritis (61%) than non‐inflammatory controls (47%). More patients with rheumatoid arthritis (39%) than controls (10%) attributed their skin abnormality to drugs. Cutaneous abnormalities observed by the dermatologist were also more common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (76%) than in the group with non‐inflammatory disease (60%). Specifically, bruising, athlete's foot, scars, rheumatoid nodules and vasculitic lesions were more common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis than in controls. The presence of bruising was predicted only by current steroid use. The presence of any other specific cutaneous abnormalities was not predicted by any of the variables assessed. In the whole group, current steroid use and having rheumatoid arthritis were the only important predictors of having any cutaneous abnormality. Conclusions Self‐reported and observed cutaneous abnormalities are more common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis than in controls with non‐inflammatory disease. These include cutaneous abnormalities related to side effects of drugs or to rheumatoid arthritis itself and other abnormalities previously believed to be independent but which may be of clinical

  9. The cellular composition of lymph nodes in the earliest phase of inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    van Baarsen, L G M; de Hair, M J H; Ramwadhdoebe, T H; Zijlstra, IJ A J; Maas, M; Gerlag, D M; Tak, P P

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an immune-mediated inflammatory disease of unknown aetiology. Recent work has shown that systemic autoimmunity precedes synovial inflammation, and animal models have suggested that changes in the lymph nodes may precede those in the synovial tissue. Therefore, we investigated the cellular composition of the lymph node in the earliest phases of inflammatory arthritis. Methods Thirteen individuals positive for immunoglobulin M (IgM) rheumatoid factor and/or anticitrullinated protein antibodies without arthritis were included. Additionally, we studied 14 early arthritis patients (arthritis duration ≤6 months, naïve for disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs), and eight healthy controls. All subjects underwent ultrasound-guided inguinal lymph node biopsy. Different T- and B-lymphocyte subsets were analysed by multicolour flow cytometry. Results There was an increase in activated CD69 CD8 T cells and CD19 B cells in early arthritis patients compared with healthy controls. We also observed a trend towards increased CD19 B cells in autoantibody-positive individuals without arthritis compared with healthy controls. Conclusions This exploratory study suggests that there is increased immune cell activation within lymph nodes of early arthritis patients as well as in autoantibody-positive individuals at risk of developing RA. This method provides a unique tool to investigate immunological changes in the lymph node compartment in the earliest phases of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:23661491

  10. Biologic Therapy in Inflammatory and Immunomediated Arthritis: Safety Profile.

    PubMed

    Luchetti, Michele Maria; Balloni, Andrea; Gabrielli, Armando

    2016-01-01

    The increasing insights into the pathogenetic mechanisms of inflammatory autoimmune arthritis and the development of innovative systems of industrial production have led to discover molecules that are able to target/block other molecules that play a critical role in the immune system functioning, and that have been introduced in clinical practice alone and/or in addiction with other "old" disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. For this reason, such drugs are currently known as "biological drugs" and include molecules that induce the immunosuppression acting on several immune pathways. However, though the biological drugs have been employed from more than a decade, there still exist some drawbacks of their use, in particular about the high costs of this therapy and their overall safety, including the route of administration for the intravenous use. In this review we provide an update on the correct use and current therapeutic indications of such drugs, including some of the new biologic therapies that will be soon available for the clinical use, focusing on these biological drugs: • Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) inhibitors (adalimumab, certolizumab-pegol, etanercept, golimumab and infliximab); • The T cell co-stimulation inhibitor, abatacept; • The anti-CD20 receptor monoclonal B cell agent, rituximab; • The interlukin-6 (IL-6) receptor-blocking monoclonal antibody, tocilizumab; • The interlukin-1 (IL-1) inhibitor, anakinra; • The interlukin-IL17 (IL-17) pathway inhibitors (ustekinumab, secukinumab, brodalumab). PMID:26463246

  11. Characterization and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis by photoacoustic imaging: a study on adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Rajian, Justin; Shao, Xia; Chamberland, David L.; Girish, Gandikota

    2014-03-01

    Neovascularity also known as angiogenesis is an early feature of inflammatory arthritis disease. Therefore, identifying the development of neovascularity is one way to potentially detect and characterize arthritis. Laser-based photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging biomedical imaging modality which may aid in detection of both early and continued development of neovascularity. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of PAI to measure angiogenesis, for the purpose of evaluating and monitoring inflammatory arthritis after treatment. The imaging results on an arthritis rat model demonstrate that 1) there is noticeable enhancement in image intensity in the arthritic ankle joints when compared to the normal joints, and 2) there is noticeable decrease in image intensity in the arthritic ankle joints after treatment when compared to the untreated arthritic joints. In order to validate the findings from PAI, we performed positron emission tomography (PET) and histology on the same joints. The diameters of the ankle joints, as a clinical score of the arthritis, were also measured at each time point.

  12. JNK1, but Not JNK2, Is Required in Two Mechanistically Distinct Models of Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Denninger, Katja; Rasmussen, Susanne; Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Ørskov, Catrine; Seier Poulsen, Steen; Sørensen, Poul; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Illges, Harald; Ødum, Niels; Labuda, Tord

    2011-01-01

    The roles of the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) in inflammatory arthritis have been investigated; however, the roles of each isotype (ie, JNK1 and JNK2) in rheumatoid arthritis and conclusions about whether inhibition of one or both is necessary for amelioration of disease are unclear. By using JNK1- or JNK2-deficient mice in the collagen-induced arthritis and the KRN T-cell receptor transgenic mouse on C57BL/6 nonobese diabetic (K/BxN) serum transfer arthritis models, we demonstrate that JNK1 deficiency results in protection from arthritis, as judged by clinical score and histological evaluation in both models of inflammatory arthritis. In contrast, abrogation of JNK2 exacerbates disease. In collagen-induced arthritis, the distinct roles of the JNK isotypes can, at least in part, be explained by altered regulation of CD86 expression in JNK1- or JNK2-deficient macrophages in response to microbial products, thereby affecting T-cell–mediated immunity. The protection from K/BxN serum–induced arthritis in Jnk1−/− mice can also be explained by inept macrophage function because adoptive transfer of wild-type macrophages to Jnk1−/− mice restored disease susceptibility. Thus, our results provide a possible explanation for the modest therapeutic effects of broad JNK inhibitors and suggest that future therapies should selectively target the JNK1 isoform. PMID:21839715

  13. Transforming growth factor beta 1 suppresses acute and chronic arthritis in experimental animals.

    PubMed Central

    Brandes, M E; Allen, J B; Ogawa, Y; Wahl, S M

    1991-01-01

    Systemic administration of the cytokine, TGF beta 1, profoundly antagonized the development of polyarthritis in susceptible rats. TGF beta 1 administration (1 or 5 micrograms/animal), initiated one day before an arthritogenic dose of streptococcal cell wall (SCW) fragments, virtually eliminated the joint swelling and distortion typically observed during both the acute phase (articular index, AI = 2.5 vs. 11; P less than 0.025) and the chronic phase (AI = 0 vs. 12.5) of the disease. Moreover, TGF beta 1 suppressed the evolution of arthritis even when administration was begun after the acute phase of the disease. Histopathological examination of the joint revealed the systemic TGF beta 1 treatment greatly reduced inflammatory cell infiltration, pannus formation, and joint erosion. Consistent with the inhibition of inflammatory cell recruitment into the synovium, TGF beta 1 reversed the leukocytosis associated with the chronic phase of the arthritis. Control animals subjected to the same TGF beta 1 dosing regimen displayed no discernable immunosuppressive or toxic effects even after 4 wk of treatment. These observations not only provide insight into the immunoregulatory effects of TGF beta, but also implicate this cytokine as a potentially important therapeutic agent. Images PMID:1999490

  14. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina C.; Tavares, Luciana P.; Vago, Juliana P.; Batista, Nathália V.; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M.; Vieira, Angelica T.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Amaral, Flávio A.; Ferreira, Adaliene V. M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  15. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina C; Tavares, Luciana P; Vago, Juliana P; Batista, Nathália V; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Vieira, Angelica T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Sousa, Lirlândia P; van de Loo, Fons A J; Teixeira, Mauro M; Amaral, Flávio A; Ferreira, Adaliene V M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  16. A review of current knowledge of the complement system and the therapeutic opportunities in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, M

    2006-01-01

    The complement activation system, a key component of the innate immune system, protects the host from microorganisms such as bacteria, and other foreign threats including abnormal cells. However, it is also double-edged in that it can have negative effects in the host; excessive complement activation damages the host and can even kill in anaphylactic shock and septic shock. Regulation of the complement system is a useful strategy to control inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory disease worldwide. Many medicines are developed to control inflammation, including recently developed biological response modifiers such as anti-TNF and IL-6 agents. Nevertheless, in some patients disease remains difficult to control because of complications, side effects and tolerance of medicines. In inflammatory arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, there is abundant evidence implicating complement activation in humans and animal models. Therefore, anti-complement agents might be beneficial as part of clinical treatment. However, at present, there are still no applicable agents for therapeutic regulation of excessive complement activation in chronic disease. Novel agents in development might be useful as a strategy to control complement activation. Here I describe recent knowledge of the complement system in inflammatory arthritis, the recent developments in anti-complement agents and their considerable potential for the future. PMID:16787214

  17. Identification of novel antiacetylated vimentin antibodies in patients with early inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Juarez, Maria; Bang, Holger; Hammar, Friederike; Reimer, Ulf; Dyke, Bernard; Sahbudin, Ilfita; Buckley, Christopher D; Fisher, Benjamin; Filer, Andrew; Raza, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate serum antibody reactivity against a panel of post-translationally modified vimentin peptides (PTMPs) in patients with early inflammatory arthritis. Methods A panel of PTMPs was developed. Microtitre plates were coated with peptides derived from vimentin that were identical in length and composition except at one amino acid that was changed to introduce one of three post-translational modifications (PTMs)—either a citrullinated, carbamylated or acetylated residue. Sera of 268 treatment-naive patients with early inflammatory arthritis and symptoms ≤3 months' duration were tested. Patients were assigned to one of three outcome categories at 18-month follow-up (rheumatoid arthritis (RA), persistent non-RA arthritis and resolving arthritis). Results Antibodies against citrullinated, carbamylated and acetylated vimentin peptides were detected in the sera of patients with early inflammatory arthritis. The proportion of patients seropositive for all antibody types was significantly higher in the RA group than in the other groups. Anti cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP)-positive patients with RA had higher numbers of peptides recognised and higher levels of antibodies against those peptides, representing a distinct profile compared with the other groups. Conclusions We show for the first time that antibodies against acetylated vimentin are present in the sera of patients with early RA and confirm and extend previous observations regarding anticitrullinated and anticarbamylated antibodies. PMID:26160441

  18. Therapeutic Effects of Acetone Extract of Saraca asoca Seeds on Rats with Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Attenuating Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mradu; Sasmal, Saumyakanti; Mukherjee, Arup

    2014-01-01

    Saraca asoca has been traditionally used in Indian system for treatment of uterine, genital, and other reproductive disorders in women, fever, pain, and inflammation. The hypothesis of this study is that acetone extract of Saraca asoca seeds is an effective anti-inflammatory treatment for arthritis in animal experiments. The antiarthritic effect of its oral administration on Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis has been studied in Wistar albino rats after acute and subacute toxicities. Phytochemical analysis revealed presence of high concentrations of phenolic compounds such as flavonoids and tannins, while no mortality or morbidity was observed up to 1000 mg/kg dose during acute and subacute toxicity assessments. Regular treatment up to 21 days of adjuvant-induced arthritic rats with Saraca asoca acetone extract (at 300 and 500 mg/kg doses) increases RBC and Hb, decreases WBC, ESR, and prostaglandin levels in blood, and restores body weight when compared with control (normal saline) and standard (Indomethacin) groups. Significant (P < 0.05) inhibitory effect was observed especially at higher dose on paw edema, ankle joint inflammation, and hydroxyproline and glucosamine concentrations in urine. Normal radiological images of joint and histopathological analysis of joint, liver, stomach, and kidney also confirmed its significant nontoxic, antiarthritic, and anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:24729890

  19. Therapeutic Effects of Acetone Extract of Saraca asoca Seeds on Rats with Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Attenuating Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mradu; Sasmal, Saumyakanti; Mukherjee, Arup

    2014-01-01

    Saraca asoca has been traditionally used in Indian system for treatment of uterine, genital, and other reproductive disorders in women, fever, pain, and inflammation. The hypothesis of this study is that acetone extract of Saraca asoca seeds is an effective anti-inflammatory treatment for arthritis in animal experiments. The antiarthritic effect of its oral administration on Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis has been studied in Wistar albino rats after acute and subacute toxicities. Phytochemical analysis revealed presence of high concentrations of phenolic compounds such as flavonoids and tannins, while no mortality or morbidity was observed up to 1000 mg/kg dose during acute and subacute toxicity assessments. Regular treatment up to 21 days of adjuvant-induced arthritic rats with Saraca asoca acetone extract (at 300 and 500 mg/kg doses) increases RBC and Hb, decreases WBC, ESR, and prostaglandin levels in blood, and restores body weight when compared with control (normal saline) and standard (Indomethacin) groups. Significant (P < 0.05) inhibitory effect was observed especially at higher dose on paw edema, ankle joint inflammation, and hydroxyproline and glucosamine concentrations in urine. Normal radiological images of joint and histopathological analysis of joint, liver, stomach, and kidney also confirmed its significant nontoxic, antiarthritic, and anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:24729890

  20. αvβ3-Targeted nanotherapy suppresses inflammatory arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hui-fang; Chan, Happy W.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Lanza, Gregory M.; Pham, Christine T. N.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether an alternative treatment approach that targets angiogenesis, delivered through ligand-targeted nanotherapy, would ameliorate inflammatory arthritis. Arthritis was induced using the K/BxN mouse model of inflammatory arthritis. After arthritis was clearly established, mice received three consecutive daily doses of αvβ3-targeted fumagillin nanoparticles. Control groups received no treatment or αvβ3-targeted nanoparticles without drugs. Disease score and paw thickness were measured daily. Mice that received αvβ3-targeted fumagillin nanoparticles showed a significantly lower disease activity score (mean score of 1.4±0.4; P<0.001) and change in ankle thickness (mean increase of 0.17±0.05 mm; P<0.001) 7 d after arthritis induction, whereas the group that received αvβ3-targeted nanoparticles without drugs exhibited a mean arthritic score of 9.0 ± 0.3 and mean change in ankle thickness of 1.01 ± 0.09 mm. Meanwhile, the group that received no treatment showed a mean arthritic score of 9.8 ± 0.5 and mean change in ankle thickness of 1.05 ± 0.10 mm. Synovial tissues from animals treated with targeted fumagillin nanoparticles also showed significant decrease in inflammation and angiogenesis and preserved proteoglycan integrity. Ligand-targeted nanotherapy to deliver antiangiogenic agents may represent an effective way to treat inflammatory arthritis.—Zhou, H.-F., Chan, H. W., Wickline, S. A., Lanza, G. M., Pham, C. T. N. αvβ3-Targeted nanotherapy suppresses inflammatory arthritis in mice. PMID:19376816

  1. Denervation protects limbs from inflammatory arthritis via an impact on the microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Stangenberg, Lars; Burzyn, Dalia; Binstadt, Bryce A.; Weissleder, Ralph; Mahmood, Umar; Mathis, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Two-way communication between the mammalian nervous and immune systems is increasingly recognized and appreciated. An intriguing example of such crosstalk comes from clinical observations dating from the 1930s: Patients who suffer a stroke and then develop rheumatoid arthritis atypically present with arthritis on only one side, the one not afflicted with paralysis. Here we successfully modeled hemiplegia-induced protection from arthritis using the K/BxN serum-transfer system, focused on the effector phase of inflammatory arthritis. Experiments entailing pharmacological inhibitors, genetically deficient mouse strains, and global transcriptome analyses failed to associate the protective effect with a single nerve quality (i.e., with the sympathetic, parasympathetic, or sensory nerves). Instead, there was clear evidence that denervation had a long-term effect on the limb microvasculature: The rapid and joint-localized vascular leak that typically accompanies and promotes serum-transferred arthritis was compromised in denervated limbs. This defect was reflected in the transcriptome of endothelial cells, the expression of several genes impacting vascular leakage or transendothelial cell transmigration being altered in denervated limbs. These findings highlight a previously unappreciated pathway to dissect and eventually target in inflammatory arthritis. PMID:25049388

  2. The Role of Intracellular Organisms in the Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritis is a condition which is characterised by recurrent episodes of joint pain and swelling. It encompasses a spectrum of disorders ranging from rheumatoid arthritis to ankylosing spondylitis. In these conditions, for reasons that are poorly understood, the immune system raises an inflammatory response within the joint space. In some cases, autoantigens have been identified (e.g., anticitrullinated peptides in rheumatoid arthritis), but the absence of these, in the seronegative arthritides, for example, raises question as to the underlying pathogenesis. Interest has, therefore, turned to host-pathogen interactions and whether aberrant immune responses to these could explain the development of arthritis. This has been most widely studied in reactive arthritis (ReA), where an infectious episode precedes the development of the joint symptoms. In this review, we present the evidence for the role of host-bacterial interactions in the pathogenesis of joint inflammation with particular emphasis on ReA. We discuss a range of possible mechanisms including molecular mimicry, persistent low grade infections, and abnormal host responses to common bacterial causes of reactive arthritis as well as discussing some of the clinical challenges that we face in making the diagnosis and in treatment of persistent symptoms. PMID:24995143

  3. Inflammatory sequences in acute pulmonary radiation injury.

    PubMed Central

    Slauson, D. O.; Hahn, F. F.; Benjamin, S. A.; Chiffelle, T. L.; Jones, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    The histopathologic events in the developing acute pulmonary inflammatory reaction to inhaled particles of Yttrium 90 are detailed. In animals that died or were sacrificed during the first year after inhalation exposure, microscopic findings of acute inflammation predominated and included vascular congestion; stasis, focal hemorrhage; edema; various inflammatory cell infiltrates; cytolysis and desquamation of bronchiolar and alveolar epithelium followed by regeneration; vascular injury and repair; and the eventual development of pulmonary fibrosis. Accumulation of alveolar fibrin deposits was an additional characteristic, though not a constant feature of the early stages of radiation pneumonitis. In addition to the direct effects of radiation on pulmonary cell populations, the histopathologic findings were suggestive of diverse activation of various cellular and humoral mediation systems in their pathogenesis. The potential interrelationships of systems responsible for increased vascular permeability, coagulation and fibrinolysis, chemotaxis, and direct cellular injury were discussed and related to the pathogenesis of the microscopic findings characteristic of early pulmonary radiation injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:1258976

  4. Infections and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; Ravindran, Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites can all cause arthritis of either acute or chronic nature, which can be divided into infective/septic, reactive, or inflammatory. Considerable advances have occurred in diagnostic techniques in the recent decades resulting in better treatment outcomes in patients with infective arthritis. Detection of emerging arthritogenic viruses has changed the epidemiology of infection-related arthritis. The role of viruses in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory arthritides such as rheumatoid arthritis is increasingly being recognized. We discuss the various causative agents of infective arthritis and emphasize on the approach to each type of arthritis, highlighting the diagnostic tests, along with their statistical accuracy. Various investigations including newer methods such as nucleic acid amplification using polymerase chain reaction are discussed along with the pitfalls in interpreting the tests. PMID:26096095

  5. Lithothamnion muelleri Treatment Ameliorates Inflammatory and Hypernociceptive Responses in Antigen-Induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Vivian V.; Amaral, Flavio A.; Coelho, Fernanda M.; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M.; Malagoli, Bruna G.; Gomes, Jose Hugo S.; Lopes, Fernando; Silveira, Kátia D.; Sachs, Daniela; Fagundes, Caio T.; Tavares, Lívia D.; Pinho, Vanessa; Silva, Tarcilia A.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Braga, Fernão C.; Souza, Danielle G.

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease characterized by persistent inflammation and pain. Alternative therapies to reduce these symptoms are needed. Marine algae are valuable sources of diverse bioactive compounds. Lithothamnion muelleri (Hapalidiaceae) is a marine algae with anti-inflammatory, antitumor, and immunomodulatory properties. Here, we investigated the potential anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of L. muelleri in a murine model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in mice. Our results demonstrate that treatment with L. muelleri prevented inflammation and hypernociception in arthritic mice. Mechanistically, the crude extract and the polysaccharide-rich fractions of L. muelleri may act impairing the production of the chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL2, and consequently inhibit neutrophil influx to the knee joint by dampening the adhesion step of leukocyte recruitment in the knee microvessels. Altogether our results suggest that treatment with L.muelleri has a potential therapeutic application in arthritis treatment. PMID:25793994

  6. Equol suppresses inflammatory response and bone erosion due to rheumatoid arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, I-Chian; Yamashita, Shuya; Murata, Motoki; Kumazoe, Motofumi; Tachibana, Hirofumi

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and systemic autoimmune inflammatory disease. Typical pathological findings of RA include persistent synovitis and bone degradation in the peripheral joints. Equol, a metabolite of the major soybean isoflavone daidzein, shows superior bioactivity than other isoflavones. We investigated the effects of equol administration on inflammatory response and bone erosion in mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The severity of arthritis symptoms was significantly low in the equol-administered CIA mice. In addition, equol administration improved the CIA-induced bone mineral density decline. In the inflamed area of CIA mice, equol administration suppressed the expression of interleukin-6 and its receptor. Furthermore, equol reduced the expression of genes associated with bone formation inhibition, osteoclast and immature osteoblast specificity and cartilage destruction. These results suggest that equol suppresses RA development and RA-induced bone erosion by regulating inflammation and bone metabolism. PMID:27142742

  7. Acute Painful Stress and Inflammatory Mediator Production

    PubMed Central

    Griffis, Charles A.; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb; Compton, Peggy; Goldberg, Alyssa; Witarama, Tuff; Kotlerman, Jenny; Irwin, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory pathways may be activated under conditions of painful stress, which is hypothesized to worsen the pain experience and place medically-vulnerable populations at risk for increased morbidity. Objectives To evaluate the effects of pain and subjective pain-related stress on pro-inflammatory activity. Methods A total of 19 healthy control subjects underwent a single standard cold-pressor pain test (CPT) and a no-pain control condition. Indicators of pain and stress were measured and related to inflammatory immune responses (CD811a, IL-1RA, and IL-6) immediately following the painful stimulus, and compared to responses under non-pain conditions. Heart rate and mean arterial pressure were measured as indicators of sympathetic stimulation. Results CPT was clearly painful and generated an activation of the sympathetic nervous system. CD811a increased in both conditions, but with no statistically significant greater increase following CPT (p < .06). IL-1RA demonstrated a non-statistically significant increase following CPT (p < .07). The change in IL-6 following CPT differed significantly from the response seen in the control condition (p < .02). Conclusions These findings suggest that CP acute pain may affect proinflammatory pathways, possibly through mechanisms related to adrenergic activation. PMID:23407214

  8. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or have trouble moving around, you might have arthritis. Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints ... joint can become severely damaged. Some kinds of arthritis can also cause problems in your organs, such ...

  9. Photoacoustic tomography to identify angiogenesis for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Rajian, Justin; Girish, Gandikota; Chamberland, David

    2013-03-01

    Identifying neovascularity, i.e. angiogenesis, as a feature of inflammatory arthritis, can help in early diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT), as a hybrid imaging modality, relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. In this study, we used PAT to identify the changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis, through the study on a well-established adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, revealed that there was a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histological analysis of both the normal and the arthritic rats correlated well with the imaging findings. The results from this study suggest that the emerging PAT technology could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory joint diseases.

  10. Boswellia serrata extract attenuates inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress in collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Umar, Sadiq; Umar, Khalid; Sarwar, Abu Hasnath Md Golam; Khan, Altaf; Ahmad, Niyaz; Ahmad, Sayeed; Katiyar, Chandra Kant; Husain, Syed Akhtar; Khan, Haider A

    2014-05-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease which leads to destruction of joints. Current treatment modalities for RA either produce symptomatic relief (NSAIDs) or modify the disease process (DMARDs). Though effective, their use is also limited by their side effects. As a result, the interest in alternative, well tolerated anti-inflammatory remedies has re-emerged. Our aim was to evaluate the antioxidant and antiarthritic activity of Boswellia serrata gum resin extract (BSE) in collagen induced arthritis. Arthritis was induced in male Wistar rats by collagen induced arthritis (CIA) method. BSE was administered at doses of 100 and 200mg/kg body weight once daily for 21 days. The effects of treatment in the rats were assessed by biochemical (articular elastase, MPO, LPO, GSH, catalase, SOD and NO), inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10, IFN-γ and PGE2), and histological studies in joints. BSE was effective in bringing significant changes on all the parameters (articular elastase, MPO, LPO, GSH, catalase, SOD and NO) studied. Oral administration of BSE resulted in significantly reduced levels of inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ and PGE2), and increased level of IL-10. The protective effects of BSE against RA were also evident from the decrease in arthritis scoring and bone histology. The abilities to inhibit proinflammatory cytokines and modulation of antioxidant status suggest that the protective effect of Boswellia serrata extract on arthritis in rats might be mediated via the modulation of immune system. PMID:24667331

  11. Biologic agents-a panacea for inflammatory arthritis or not?

    PubMed

    Ninan, J; Smith, Malcolm D; Dugar, M; O'Brien, Karen; Ahern, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Aim. To describe the retention rates for biological therapies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in a clinical setting. Methods. All patients managed in a dedicated biological therapy clinic in a teaching hospital in Australia were assessed for continuation on biological treatments and reasons for switching to an alternative biological agent or cessation of treatment. Results. There was a lower retention rate for RA patients on biological therapies compared to PsA and AS patients and the retention rate for RA patients was lower than that reported in RCTs. Conclusions. The retention rate on biological therapies for RA patients was lower in the clinic setting than what is reported in RCTs. The reasons for the lower retention rate in the clinical setting are discussed but no clear determinants for nonresponse to biological agents were identifiable. These agents have very limited steroid sparing effects. PMID:20130798

  12. The inextricable link between atherosclerosis and prototypical inflammatory diseases rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Full, Louise E; Ruisanchez, Cristina; Monaco, Claudia

    2009-01-01

    The increased burden of cardiovascular disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus has recently become the focus of intense investigation. Proatherogenic risk factors and dysregulated inflammation are the main culprits, leading to enhanced atherosclerosis in subgroups of patients with inflammatory diseases. Common molecular pathways shared by atherosclerosis and inflammatory disease may be involved. In this review we map the key determinants of the increased incidence of cardiovascular disease in patients with inflammatory diseases at each step of the atherogenesis. PMID:19435478

  13. Differential Anti-inflammatory Activity of HDAC Inhibitors in Human Macrophages and Rat Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Rink-Jan; Iyer, Abishek; Fairlie, Thomas J; Cotterell, Adam; Gupta, Praveer; Reid, Robert C; Vesey, David A; Sweet, Matthew J; Fairlie, David P

    2016-02-01

    Vorinostat and other inhibitors of different histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes are currently being sought to modulate a variety of human conditions, including chronic inflammatory diseases. Some HDAC inhibitors are anti-inflammatory in rodent models of arthritis and colitis, usually at cytotoxic doses that may cause side effects. Here, we investigate the dose-dependent pro- and anti-inflammatory efficacy of two known inhibitors of multiple HDACs, vorinostat and BML281, in human macrophages and in a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis by monitoring effects on disease progression, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry. Both HDAC inhibitors differentially modulated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine release from human macrophages, suppressing release of some inflammatory mediators (IL12p40, IL6) at low concentrations (<3 µM) but amplifying production of others (TNF, IL1β) at higher concentration (>3 μΜ). This trend translated in vivo to rat arthritis, with anti-inflammatory activity inversely correlating with dose. Both compounds were efficacious only at a low dose (1 mg⋅kg(-1)⋅day(-1) s.c.), whereas a higher dose (5 mg⋅kg(-1)⋅day(-1) s.c.) showed no positive effects on reducing pathology, even showing signs of exacerbating disease. These striking effects suggest a smaller therapeutic window than previously reported for HDAC inhibition in experimental arthritis. The findings support new investigations into repurposing HDAC inhibitors for anti-inflammatory therapeutic applications. However, HDAC inhibitors should be reinvestigated at lower, rather than higher, doses for enhanced efficacy in chronic diseases that require long-term treatment, with careful management of efficacy and long-term safety. PMID:26660228

  14. Interleukin-1β and Interleukin-6 in Arthritis Animal Models: Roles in the Early Phase of Transition from Acute to Chronic Inflammation and Relevance for Human Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Bracci-Laudiero, Luisa; Alivernini, Stefano; Gremese, Elisa; Tolusso, Barbara; De Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is the major target of the therapeutic approach in rheumatoid arthritis. A key issue in the approach to chronic arthritis is the understanding of the crucial molecules driving the transition from the acute phase to the chronic irreversible phase of the disease. In this review we analyzed five experimental arthritis animal models (antigen-induced arthritis, adjuvant-induced arthritis, streptococcal cell wall arthritis, collagen-induced arthritis and SKG) considered as possible scenarios to facilitate interpretation of the biology of human rheumatoid arthritis. The SKG model is strictly dependent on interleukin (IL)-6. In the other models, IL-1β and IL-6, more than TNF-α, appear to be relevant in driving the transition, which suggests that these should be the targets of an early intervention to stop the course toward the chronic form of the disease. PMID:20683549

  15. Reactive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Keat, A

    1999-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is one of the spondyloarthropathy family of clinical syndromes. The clinical features are those shared by other members of the spondyloarthritis family, though it is distinguished by a clear relationship with a precipitating infection. Susceptibility to reactive arthritis is closely linked with the class 1 HLA allele B27; it is likely that all sub-types pre-dispose to this condition. The link between HLA B27 and infection is mirrored by the development of arthritis in HLA B27-transgenic rats. In this model, arthritis does not develop in animals maintained in a germ-free environment. Infections of the gastrointestinal, genitourinary and respiratory tract appear to provoke reactive arthritis and a wide range of pathogens has now been implicated. Although mechanistic parallels may exist, reactive arthritis is distinguished from Lyme disease, rheumatic fever and Whipple's disease by virtue of the distinct clinical features and the link with HLA B27. As in these conditions both antigens and DNA of several micro-organisms have been detected in joint material from patients with reactive arthritis. The role of such disseminated microbial elements in the provocation or maintenance of arthritis remains unclear. HLA B27-restricted T-cell responses to microbial antigens have been demonstrated and these may be important in disease pathogenesis. The importance of dissemination of bacteria from sites of mucosal infection and their deposition in joints has yet to be fully understood. The role of antibiotic therapy in the treatment of reactive arthritis is being explored; in some circumstances, both the anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial effects of certain antibiotics appear to be valuable. The term reactive arthritis should be seen as a transitory one, reflecting a concept which may itself be on the verge of replacement, as our understanding of the condition develops. Nevertheless it appropriately describes arthritis that is associated with demonstrable

  16. Cytokines as therapeutic targets in rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Stefan; Tsoukas, Alexander; Robertson, Jamie; McInnes, Iain

    2015-01-01

    The human immune system involves highly complex and coordinated processes in which small proteins named cytokines play a key role. Cytokines have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Cytokines are therefore attractive therapeutic targets in these conditions. Anticytokine therapy for inflammatory diseases became a clinical reality with the introduction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors for the treatment of severe rheumatoid arthritis. Although these therapies have transformed the treatment of patients with severe inflammatory arthritis, there remain significant limiting factors: treatment failure is commonly seen in the clinic; safety concerns remain; there is uncertainty regarding the relevance of immunogenicity; the absence of biomarkers to direct therapy decisions and high drug costs limit availability in some healthcare systems. In this article, we provide an overview of the key efficacy and safety trials for currently approved treatments in rheumatoid arthritis and review the major lessons learned from a decade of use in clinical practice, focusing mainly on anti-TNF and anti-interleukin (IL)-6 agents. We also describe the clinical application of anticytokine therapies for other inflammatory diseases, particularly within the spondyloarthritis spectrum, and highlight differential responses across diseases. Finally, we report on the current state of trials for newer therapeutic targets, focusing mainly on the IL-17 and IL-23 pathways. PMID:25697599

  17. Substance P ameliorates collagen II-induced arthritis in mice via suppression of the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Son, Youngsook

    2014-10-10

    Current rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapies such as biologics inhibiting pathogenic cytokines substantially delay RA progression. However, patient responses to these agents are not always complete and long lasting. This study explored whether substance P (SP), an 11 amino acids long endogenous neuropeptide with the novel ability to mobilize mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and modulate injury-mediated inflammation, can inhibit RA progression. SP efficacy was evaluated by paw swelling, clinical arthritis scoring, radiological analysis, histological analysis of cartilage destruction, and blood levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-17 in vivo. SP treatment significantly reduced local inflammatory signs, mean arthritis scores, degradation of joint cartilage, and invasion of inflammatory cells into the synovial tissues. Moreover, the SP treatment markedly reduced the size of spleens enlarged by excessive inflammation in CIA, increased IL-10 levels, and decreased TNF-α and IL-17 levels. Mobilization of stem cells and induction of T(reg) and M2 type macrophages in the circulation were also increased by the SP treatment. These effect of SP might be associated with the suppression of inflammatory responses in RA and, furthermore, blockade of RA progression. Our results propose SP as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases. PMID:25264193

  18. Evaluation of Anti-Inflammatory Potential of the New Ganghwaljetongyeum on Adjuvant-Induced Inflammatory Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wangin; Park, Sangbin; Kim, Youg Ran; Shin, Wook; Lee, Yumi; Choi, Donghee; Kim, Mirae; Lee, Hyunju; Kim, Seonjong; Na, Changsu

    2016-01-01

    Ganghwaljetongyeum (GHJTY) has been used as a standard treatment for arthritis for approximately 15 years at the Korean Medicine Hospital of Dongshin University. GHJTY is composed of 18 medicinal herbs, of which five primary herbs were selected and named new Ganghwaljetongyeum (N-GHJTY). The purpose of the present study was to observe the effect of N-GHJTY on arthritis and to determine its mechanism of action. After confirming arthritis induction using complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in rats, N-GHJTY (62.5, 125, and 250 mg/kg/day) was administered once a day for 10 days. In order to determine pathological changes, edema of the paws and weight were measured before and for 10 days after N-GHJTY administration. Cytokine (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) levels and histopathological lesions in the knee joint were also examined. Edema in the paw and knee joint of N-GHJTY-treated rats was significantly decreased at 6, 8, and 10 days after administration, compared to that in the CFA-control group, while weight consistently increased. Rats in N-GHJTY-treated groups also recovered from the CFA-induced pathological changes and showed a significant decline in cytokine levels. Taken together, our results showed that N-GHJTY administration was effective in inhibiting CFA-induced arthritis via anti-inflammatory effects while promoting cartilage recovery by controlling cytokine levels. PMID:27382402

  19. Update on the Management of Pediatric Acute Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Castellazzi, Luca; Mantero, Marco; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis are two infections whose frequencies are increasing in pediatric patients. Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis need to be carefully assessed, diagnosed, and treated to avoid devastating sequelae. Traditionally, the treatment of acute osteoarticular infection in pediatrics was based on prolonged intravenous anti-infective therapy. However, results from clinical trials have suggested that in uncomplicated cases, a short course of a few days of parenteral antibiotics followed by oral therapy is safe and effective. The aim of this review is to provide clinicians an update on recent controversies and advances regarding the management of acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in children. In recent years, the emergence of bacterial species resistant to commonly used antibiotics that are particularly aggressive highlights the necessity for further research to optimize treatment approaches and to develop new molecules able to fight the war against acute osteoarticular infection in pediatric patients. PMID:27258258

  20. Update on the Management of Pediatric Acute Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Castellazzi, Luca; Mantero, Marco; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis are two infections whose frequencies are increasing in pediatric patients. Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis need to be carefully assessed, diagnosed, and treated to avoid devastating sequelae. Traditionally, the treatment of acute osteoarticular infection in pediatrics was based on prolonged intravenous anti-infective therapy. However, results from clinical trials have suggested that in uncomplicated cases, a short course of a few days of parenteral antibiotics followed by oral therapy is safe and effective. The aim of this review is to provide clinicians an update on recent controversies and advances regarding the management of acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in children. In recent years, the emergence of bacterial species resistant to commonly used antibiotics that are particularly aggressive highlights the necessity for further research to optimize treatment approaches and to develop new molecules able to fight the war against acute osteoarticular infection in pediatric patients. PMID:27258258

  1. The role of T helper type 17 cells in inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, S; Cooney, L A; Fox, D A

    2010-01-01

    While T cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis for more than three decades, the focus on the T helper type 17 (Th17) subset of CD4 T cells and their secreted cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-17, is much more recent. Proinflammatory actions of IL-17 were first identified in the 1990s, but the delineation of a distinct Th17 subset in late 2005 has sparked great interest in the role of these cells in a broad range of immune-mediated diseases. This review summarizes current understanding of the role of Th17 cells and their products in both animal models of inflammatory arthritis and human immune-driven arthritides. PMID:19758374

  2. IRF4 and its regulators: evolving insights into the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Partha S.; Bhagat, Govind; Pernis, Alessandra B.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Accumulating evidence from murine and human studies supports a key role for interleukin-17 (IL-17) and IL-21 in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis. The pathways and molecular mechanisms that underlie the production of IL-17 and IL-21 are being rapidly elucidated. This review focuses on interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4), a member of the IRF family of transcription factors, which has emerged as a crucial controller of both IL-17 and IL-21 production. We first outline the complex role of IRF4 in the function of CD4+ T cells and then discuss recent studies from our laboratory that have revealed a surprising role for components of Rho guanosine triphosphatase-mediated pathways in controlling the activity of IRF4. A better understanding of these novel pathways will hopefully provide new insights into mechanisms responsible for the development of inflammatory arthritis and potentially guide the design of novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:20192994

  3. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... when taking arthritis medicines . Over-the-counter medicines: Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is often the first medicine tried. Take up to 4000 mg a day (two arthritis-strength Tylenol every 8 hours). To prevent damage to your ...

  4. Inflammatory infratentorial progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lach, Boleslaw; Connolly, Barbara; Wüthrich, Christian; Koralnik, Igor J

    2014-02-01

    An 84-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with methotrexate, developed progressive confusion and cerebellar symptoms, and died approximately 2 months later. Neuropathological examination revealed progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) involving the cerebellum and brainstem. The affected tissues displayed intense infiltrations by CD8+ T-cells and microglia. JC virus was localized in oligodendroglia and cerebellar granule cells. This case illustrates unusual localization of inflammatory PML in a patient with RA treated with methotrexate. PMID:23683127

  5. Effect of methotrexate on inflammatory cells redistribution in experimental adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Feketeová, Lucia; Jančová, Petra; Moravcová, Petra; Janegová, Andrea; Bauerová, Katarína; Poništ, Silvester; Mihalová, Danica; Janega, Pavol; Babál, Pavel

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphological changes in the spleen, the thymus and the knee joints of rats with experimental adjuvant arthritis induced by Mycobacterium butyricum in the incomplete Freund's adjuvant and the effect of treatment with methotrexate (MTX). Particular attention was aimed on the redistribution of granulocytes in the tissues during the inflammatory process. Clinical parameters, e.g., joint edema, body weight and of gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) activity as an inflammatory marker, have also been determined. Induction of adjuvant arthritis caused a significant decrease in granulocyte number in the spleen and vice versa a significant increase in the knee joints, but without significant changes in the thymus. Treatment with methotrexate reversed this phenomenon by increasing the granulocyte number in the spleen and decreasing it in knee joints. MTX decreased the joint edema as well as the activity of GGT in the spleen, modified the size of the white pulp of the spleen and increased the cortex/medulla ratio in the thymus. The observed changes support the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of MTX supporting its use as the first-line medication in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22083611

  6. IL-6 promotes acute and chronic inflammatory disease in the absence of SOCS3

    PubMed Central

    Croker, Ben A; Kiu, Hiu; Pellegrini, Marc; Toe, Jesse; Preston, Simon; Metcalf, Donald; O’Donnell, Joanne A; Cengia, Louise H; McArthur, Kate; Nicola, Nicos A; Alexander, Warren S; Roberts, Andrew W

    2011-01-01

    The lack of expression of the Suppressor of Cytokine Signalling-3 (SOCS3) or inactivation of the negative regulatory capacity of SOCS3 has been well documented in rheumatoid arthritis, viral hepatitis and cancer. The specific qualitative and quantitative consequences of SOCS3-deficiency on IL-6-mediated pro- and anti-inflammatory responses remain controversial in vitro and unknown in vivo. Mice with a conditional deletion of SOCS3 in hematopoietic cells develop lethal inflammatory disease during adult life and develop gross histopathological changes during experimental arthritis, typified by elevated IL-6 levels. To clarify the nature of the IL-6 responses in vivo, we generated mice deficient in SOCS3 (SOCS3−/Δvav) or both SOCS3 and IL-6 (IL-6−/−/SOCS3−/Δ vav) and examined responses in models of acute and chronic inflammation. Acute responses to IL-1β were lethal to SOCS3−/Δ vav mice but not IL-6−/−/SOCS3−/Δ vav mice, indicating that IL-6 was required for the lethal inflammation induced by IL-1β. Administration of IL-1β to SOCS3−/Δ vav mice induced systemic apoptosis of lymphocytes in the thymus, spleen and lymph nodes that was dependent on the presence of IL-6. IL-6-deficiency prolonged survival of SOCS3−/Δ vav mice and ameliorated spontaneous inflammatory disease developing during adult life. Infection of SOCS3−/Δ vav mice with LCMV induced a lethal inflammatory response that was dependent on IL-6, despite SOCS3−/Δ vav mice controlling viral replication. We conclude that SOCS3 is required for survival during inflammatory responses and is a critical regulator of IL-6 in vivo. PMID:21519345

  7. Substance P ameliorates collagen II-induced arthritis in mice via suppression of the inflammatory response

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Son, Youngsook

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • SP can increase IL-10 levels and reduce TNF-α and IL-17 levels in RA. • SP causes the increase in T{sub reg}, M2 macrophage, and MSCs in RA. • SP-induced immune suppression leads to the blockade of RA progression. • SP can be used as the therapeutics for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases. - Abstract: Current rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapies such as biologics inhibiting pathogenic cytokines substantially delay RA progression. However, patient responses to these agents are not always complete and long lasting. This study explored whether substance P (SP), an 11 amino acids long endogenous neuropeptide with the novel ability to mobilize mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and modulate injury-mediated inflammation, can inhibit RA progression. SP efficacy was evaluated by paw swelling, clinical arthritis scoring, radiological analysis, histological analysis of cartilage destruction, and blood levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-17 in vivo. SP treatment significantly reduced local inflammatory signs, mean arthritis scores, degradation of joint cartilage, and invasion of inflammatory cells into the synovial tissues. Moreover, the SP treatment markedly reduced the size of spleens enlarged by excessive inflammation in CIA, increased IL-10 levels, and decreased TNF-α and IL-17 levels. Mobilization of stem cells and induction of T{sub reg} and M2 type macrophages in the circulation were also increased by the SP treatment. These effect of SP might be associated with the suppression of inflammatory responses in RA and, furthermore, blockade of RA progression. Our results propose SP as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases.

  8. Rofecoxib: a review of its use in the management of osteoarthritis, acute pain and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Matheson, A J; Figgitt, D P

    2001-01-01

    Rofecoxib is a selective cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor which has little or no effect on the COX-1 isoenzyme at doses up to 1000 mg/day. Rofecoxib has greater selectivity for COX-2 than celecoxib, meloxicam, diclofenac and indomethacin. In well-controlled clinical trials, rofecoxib 12.5 to 500 mg/day has been evaluated for its efficacy in the treatment of osteoarthritis, acute pain and rheumatoid arthritis [lower dosages (5 to 125 mg/day) were generally used in the chronic pain indications]. In the treatment of patients with osteoarthritis, rofecoxib was more effective in providing symptomatic relief than placebo, paracetamol (acetaminophen) and celecoxib and was similar in efficacy to ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen and nabumetone. Overall, both the physician's assessment of disease status and the patient's assessment of response to therapy tended to favour rofecoxib. In patients with postsurgical dental pain, pain after spinal fusion or orthopaedic surgery, or primary dysmenorrhoea, rofecoxib provided more rapid and more sustained pain relief and reduced requirements for supplemental morphine use after surgery than placebo. Rofecoxib was more efficacious than celecoxib in patients with acute dental pain and pain after spinal fusion surgery, although celecoxib may have been used at a subtherapeutic dose. In comparison with traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) ibuprofen, diclofenac and naproxen sodium, rofecoxib was similar in efficacy in the treatment of acute pain. Although naproxen sodium provided more rapid pain relief than rofecoxib in patients with primary dysmenorrhoea, the reverse was true after orthopaedic surgery: rofecoxib provided more rapid pain relief and less supplemental morphine was needed. Rofecoxib was as effective as naproxen in providing symptomatic relief for over 8700 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Compared with traditional NSAID therapy, rofecoxib had a significantly lower incidence of endoscopically confirmed

  9. Inhibition of CDK9 as a therapeutic strategy for inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hellvard, Annelie; Zeitlmann, Lutz; Heiser, Ulrich; Kehlen, Astrid; Niestroj, André; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Koziel, Joanna; Delaleu, Nicolas; Jan Potempa; Mydel, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by synovial inflammation and proliferation of fibroblast-like synoviocytes. The induction of apoptosis has long been proposed as a target for proliferative autoimmune diseases, and has further been shown to act as a successful treatment of experimental models of arthritis, such as collagen-induced arthritis. Here we examined the effects of specific oral small-molecule inhibitors of the transcription regulating cyclin-dependent kinase 9 on the development and progression of collagen-induced arthritis. DBA/1 mice were immunised with bovine collagen type II and treated orally with specific CDK9 inhibitors. The effects of CDK9 inhibition on RNA levels and protein expression, apoptosis induction, caspase activation and lymphocyte phenotype were further analysed. Mice showed a significant delay in disease onset and a reduction in disease severity following treatment with CDK9 inhibitors. Inhibiting CDK9 activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells resulted in the loss of Mcl-1 expression at both the protein and RNA levels, along with a subsequent increase in apoptosis. CDK9 specific inhibitors may be a potential alternative treatment not only of cancer, but also for autoimmune- and inflammatory diseases. Taken together, these results show that transient inhibition of CDK9 induces apoptosis in leukocyte subsets and modulates the immune response. PMID:27511630

  10. Inhibition of CDK9 as a therapeutic strategy for inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hellvard, Annelie; Zeitlmann, Lutz; Heiser, Ulrich; Kehlen, Astrid; Niestroj, André; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Koziel, Joanna; Delaleu, Nicolas; Jan Potempa; Mydel, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by synovial inflammation and proliferation of fibroblast-like synoviocytes. The induction of apoptosis has long been proposed as a target for proliferative autoimmune diseases, and has further been shown to act as a successful treatment of experimental models of arthritis, such as collagen-induced arthritis. Here we examined the effects of specific oral small-molecule inhibitors of the transcription regulating cyclin-dependent kinase 9 on the development and progression of collagen-induced arthritis. DBA/1 mice were immunised with bovine collagen type II and treated orally with specific CDK9 inhibitors. The effects of CDK9 inhibition on RNA levels and protein expression, apoptosis induction, caspase activation and lymphocyte phenotype were further analysed. Mice showed a significant delay in disease onset and a reduction in disease severity following treatment with CDK9 inhibitors. Inhibiting CDK9 activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells resulted in the loss of Mcl-1 expression at both the protein and RNA levels, along with a subsequent increase in apoptosis. CDK9 specific inhibitors may be a potential alternative treatment not only of cancer, but also for autoimmune- and inflammatory diseases. Taken together, these results show that transient inhibition of CDK9 induces apoptosis in leukocyte subsets and modulates the immune response. PMID:27511630

  11. Psoriatic arthritis: treatment strategies using anti-inflammatory drugs and classical DMARDs.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, E; Scarpa, R

    2012-01-01

    Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory disease typically characterized by arthritis and psoriasis variably associated with other extra-articular manifestations. PsA has been considered a milder and less disabling disease compared with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), even if some studies showed that PsA had joint erosions and damage. In addition, about 20-40% of PsA patients have axial skeleton involvement that may lead to functional limitation and deformity. The treatment of PsA ranged from initial treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to one or more disease-modifying anti-rheumatic agents (DMARDs) for the suppression of inflammation in patients with recalcitrant peripheral joint disease. In clinical practice, the most widely used DMARDs are methotrexate (level of evidence B), sulfasalazine (level of evidence A), leflunomide (level of evidence A), and ciclosporin (level of evidence B). However, the efficacy of these agents in inhibiting joint erosions has not been assessed in controlled studies. Finally, the effectiveness of DMARDs in treating enthesitis and dactylitis is controversial. The present paper revised the evidence-based results on treatment with "conventional" therapy for PsA. The revision was based on all the subsets of the diseases, namely the various manifestations of the articular involvement (peripheral, axial, enthesitis, dactylitis) as well as the skin and nail involvement. PMID:22690387

  12. Proresolving and cartilage-protective actions of resolvin D1 in inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Norling, Lucy V.; Headland, Sarah E.; Dalli, Jesmond; Arnardottir, Hildur H.; Haworth, Oliver; Jones, Hefin R.; Irimia, Daniel; Serhan, Charles N.; Perretti, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a debilitating disease characterized by persistent accumulation of leukocytes within the articular cavity and synovial tissue. Metabololipidomic profiling of arthritic joints from omega-3 supplemented mice identified elevated levels of specialized proresolving lipid mediators (SPM) including resolvin D1 (RvD1). Profiling of human RA synovial fluid revealed physiological levels of RvD1, which — once applied to human neutrophils — attenuated chemotaxis. These results prompted analyses of the antiarthritic properties of RvD1 in a model of murine inflammatory arthritis. The stable epimer 17R-RvD1 (100 ng/day) significantly attenuated arthritis severity, cachexia, hind-paw edema, and paw leukocyte infiltration and shortened the remission interval. Metabololipidomic profiling in arthritic joints revealed 17R-RvD1 significantly reduced PGE2 biosynthesis, while increasing levels of protective SPM. Molecular analyses indicated that 17R-RvD1 enhanced expression of genes associated with cartilage matrix synthesis, and direct intraarticular treatment induced chondroprotection. Joint protective actions of 17R-RvD1 were abolished in RvD1 receptor–deficient mice termed ALX/fpr2/3−/−. These investigations open new therapeutic avenues for inflammatory joint diseases, providing mechanistic substance for the benefits of omega-3 supplementation in RA. PMID:27158677

  13. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis the same as Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis? Yes, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is a new ... of chronic inflammatory diseases that affect children. Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is the older term that was used ...

  14. Glucocorticoids in nano-liposomes administered intravenously and subcutaneously to adjuvant arthritis rats are superior to the free drugs in suppressing arthritis and inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Ulmansky, Rina; Turjeman, Keren; Baru, Moshe; Katzavian, Galia; Harel, Michal; Sigal, Alex; Naparstek, Yaakov; Barenholz, Yechezkel

    2012-06-10

    We have previously shown that intravenous (i.v.) treatment with sterically stabilized nano-liposomes (NSSL) actively remote-loaded with the glucocorticoid (GC) methylprednisolone hemisuccinate (NSSL-MPS) or betamethasone hemisuccinate (NSSL-BMS) significantly decreased severity of adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats (a model of human rheumatoid arthritis) throughout all disease stages. Here, we compared i.v. or subcutaneous (s.c.) weekly treatment with each of the two NSSL-GC to weekly or daily treatment with the free drugs or with the TNF-α antagonists Infliximab and Etanercept. Therapeutic efficacy and effects on the profile of pro-inflammatory (IL-6, TNF-α, and INF-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10 and TGF-β) cytokines in rat sera and splenocyte tissue culture supernatants were compared to those of the liposomal and free drugs. Both s.c. and i.v. NSSL-GC suppressed arthritis significantly, compared to higher doses of the free drugs or to TNF-α antagonists. NSSL-GC also suppressed the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but did not change the levels of TGF- β. The highly efficacious anti-inflammatory therapeutic feature of these nano-drugs makes them candidates for treatment of human rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22226777

  15. DMSO Represses Inflammatory Cytokine Production from Human Blood Cells and Reduces Autoimmune Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Elisia, Ingrid; Nakamura, Hisae; Lam, Vivian; Hofs, Elyse; Cederberg, Rachel; Cait, Jessica; Hughes, Michael R; Lee, Leora; Jia, William; Adomat, Hans H; Guns, Emma S; McNagny, Kelly M; Samudio, Ismael; Krystal, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is currently used as an alternative treatment for various inflammatory conditions as well as for cancer. Despite its widespread use, there is a paucity of data regarding its safety and efficacy as well as its mechanism of action in human cells. Herein, we demonstrate that DMSO has ex-vivo anti-inflammatory activity using Escherichia coli- (E. coli) and herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1)-stimulated whole human blood. Specifically, we found that between 0.5%- 2%, DMSO significantly suppressed the expression of many pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, a significant reduction in monocyte viability was also observed at 2% DMSO, suggesting a narrow window of efficacy. Anti-inflammatory concentrations of DMSO suppressed E. coli-induced ERK1/2, p38, JNK and Akt phosphorylation, suggesting DMSO acts on these signaling pathways to suppress inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production. Although DMSO induces the differentiation of B16/F10 melanoma cells in vitro, topical administration of DMSO to mice subcutaneously implanted with B16 melanoma cells was ineffective at reducing tumor growth, DMSO was also found to block mouse macrophages from polarizing to either an M1- or an M2-phenotype, which may contribute to its inability to slow tumor growth. Topical administration of DMSO, however, significantly mitigated K/BxN serum-induced arthritis in mice, and this was associated with reduced levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the joints and white blood cell levels in the blood. Thus, while we cannot confirm the efficacy of DMSO as an anti-cancer agent, the use of DMSO in arthritis warrants further investigation to ascertain its therapeutic potential. PMID:27031833

  16. DMSO Represses Inflammatory Cytokine Production from Human Blood Cells and Reduces Autoimmune Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Elisia, Ingrid; Nakamura, Hisae; Lam, Vivian; Hofs, Elyse; Cederberg, Rachel; Cait, Jessica; Hughes, Michael R.; Lee, Leora; Jia, William; Adomat, Hans H.; Guns, Emma S.; McNagny, Kelly M.; Samudio, Ismael; Krystal, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is currently used as an alternative treatment for various inflammatory conditions as well as for cancer. Despite its widespread use, there is a paucity of data regarding its safety and efficacy as well as its mechanism of action in human cells. Herein, we demonstrate that DMSO has ex-vivo anti-inflammatory activity using Escherichia coli- (E. coli) and herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1)-stimulated whole human blood. Specifically, we found that between 0.5%– 2%, DMSO significantly suppressed the expression of many pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, a significant reduction in monocyte viability was also observed at 2% DMSO, suggesting a narrow window of efficacy. Anti-inflammatory concentrations of DMSO suppressed E. coli-induced ERK1/2, p38, JNK and Akt phosphorylation, suggesting DMSO acts on these signaling pathways to suppress inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production. Although DMSO induces the differentiation of B16/F10 melanoma cells in vitro, topical administration of DMSO to mice subcutaneously implanted with B16 melanoma cells was ineffective at reducing tumor growth, DMSO was also found to block mouse macrophages from polarizing to either an M1- or an M2-phenotype, which may contribute to its inability to slow tumor growth. Topical administration of DMSO, however, significantly mitigated K/BxN serum-induced arthritis in mice, and this was associated with reduced levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the joints and white blood cell levels in the blood. Thus, while we cannot confirm the efficacy of DMSO as an anti-cancer agent, the use of DMSO in arthritis warrants further investigation to ascertain its therapeutic potential. PMID:27031833

  17. Appearance of acute gouty arthritis on indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Palestro, C.J.; Vega, A.; Kim, C.K.; Swyer, A.J.; Goldsmith, S.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy was performed on a 66-yr-old male with polyarticular acute gouty arthritis. Images revealed intense labeled leukocyte accumulation in a pattern indistinguishable from septic arthritis, in both knees and ankles, and the metatarsophalangeal joint of both great toes, all of which were involved in the acute gouty attack. Joint aspirate as well as blood cultures were reported as no growth; the patient was treated with intravenous colchicine and ACTH for 10 days with dramatic improvement noted. Labeled leukocyte imaging, repeated 12 days after the initial study, revealed near total resolution of joint abnormalities, concordant with the patient's clinical improvement. This case demonstrates that while acute gouty arthritis is a potential pitfall in labeled leukocyte imaging, in the presence of known gout, it may provide a simple, objective, noninvasive method of evaluating patient response to therapy.

  18. Anti-inflammatory effects of systemic anti-tumour necrosis factor α treatment in human/murine SCID arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Schadlich, H.; Ermann, J.; Biskop, M.; Falk, W.; Sperling, F.; Jungel, A.; Lehmann, J.; Emmrich, F.; Sack, U.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To evaluate in vivo the contribution of tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) to the chimeric transfer model of human rheumatoid arthritis synovial membrane into SCID mice (hu/mu SCID arthritis), systemic anti-TNFα treatment was performed and the clinical, serological, and histopathological effects of this treatment assessed.
METHODS—Animals were treated with the rat-antimouse TNFα monoclonal antibody V1q, starting on day 1 after hu/mu engraftment, twice weekly for 12 weeks. Joint swelling, serum concentrations of human and murine interleukin 6 (IL6), and serum amyloid P (SAP) were measured. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses of the joints were also performed at the end of treatment.
RESULTS—Neutralisation of murine TNFα induced the following effects: (a) reduction of extent and duration of the acute arthritis phase, with significant reduction of joint swelling at two weeks; (b) decrease of murine SAP concentrations after the first antibody administration; and (c) increase of murine IL6 in the serum. At the end of treatment, there was a significant reduction of the inflammatory infiltration in the engrafted joints. Because of the mild degree of joint erosion, no treatment effects could be demonstrated on the destructive process.
CONCLUSION—In the lymphocyte independent hu/mu SCID arthritis, anti-TNFα treatment reduces local and systemic signs of inflammation.

 PMID:10381487

  19. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 positively affects both non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent-induced gastrointestinal lesions and adjuvant arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Grabarevic, Z; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Jagic, V; Turkovic, B; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Zoricic, I; Konjevoda, P; Perovic, D; Simicevic, V; Separovic, J; Hanzevacki, M; Ljubanovic, D; Artukovic, B; Bratulic, M; Tisljar, M; Rekic, B; Gjurasin, M; Miklic, P; Buljat, G

    1997-01-01

    Besides a superior protection of the pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (an essential fragment of an organoprotective gastric juice peptide BPC) against different gastrointestinal and liver lesions, an acute anti-inflammatory and analgetic activity was also noted. Consequently, its effect on chronic inflammation lesions, such as adjuvant arthritis, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIAs)-induced gastrointestinal lesions was simultaneously studied in rats. In gastrointestinal lesions (indomethacin (30 mg/kg s.c.), aspirin (400 mg/kg i.g.) and diclofenac (125 mg/kg i.p.) studies, BPC 157 (10 micrograms or 10 ng/kg i.p.) was regularly given simultaneously and/or 1 h prior to drug application (indomethacin). In the adjuvant arthritis (tail-application of 0.2 mL of Freund's adjuvant) studies (14 days, 30 days, 1 year) BPC 157 (10 micrograms or 10 ng/kg i.p.), it was given as a single application (at 1 h either before or following the application of Freund's adjuvant) or in a once daily regimen (0-14th day, 14-30th day, 14th day-1 year). Given with the investigated NSAIAs, BPC 157 consistently reduced the otherwise prominent lesions in the stomach of the control rats, as well as the lesions in the small intestine in the indomethacin groups. In the adjuvant arthritis studies, the lesion's development seems to be considerably reduced after single pentadecapeptide medication, and even more attenuated in rats daily treated with BPC 157. As a therapy of already established adjuvant arthritis, its salutary effect consistently appeared already after 2 weeks of medication and it could be clearly seen also after 1 year of application. Taking together all these results, the data likely point to a special anti-inflammatory and mucosal integrity protective effect. PMID:9403784

  20. Androgens and estrogens modulate the immune and inflammatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Seriolo, Bruno; Villaggio, Barbara; Pizzorni, Carmen; Craviotto, Chiara; Sulli, Alberto

    2002-06-01

    Generally, androgens exert suppressive effects on both humoral and cellular immune responses and seem to represent natural anti-inflammatory hormones; in contrast, estrogens exert immunoenhancing activities, at least on humoral immune response. Low levels of gonadal androgens (testosterone/dihydrotestosterone) and adrenal androgens (dehydroepiandrosterone and its sulfate), as well as lower androgen/estrogen ratios, have been detected in body fluids (that is, blood, synovial fluid, smears, salivary) of both male and female rheumatoid arthritis patients, supporting the possibility of a pathogenic role for the decreased levels of the immune-suppressive androgens. Several physiological, pathological, and therapeutic conditions may change the sex hormone milieu and/or peripheral conversion, including the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, the postpartum period, menopause, chronic stress, and inflammatory cytokines, as well as use of corticosteroids, oral contraceptives, and steroid hormonal replacements, inducing altered androgen/estrogen ratios and related effects. Therefore, sex hormone balance is still a crucial factor in the regulation of immune and inflammatory responses, and the therapeutical modulation of this balance should represent part of advanced biological treatments for rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune rheumatic diseases. PMID:12114267

  1. Prednisolone reduces experimental arthritis, and inflammatory tissue destruction in SCID mice infected with Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Hurtenbach, U; Böggemeyer, E; Stehle, T; Museteanu, C; Del Pozo, E; Simon, M M

    1996-05-01

    Glucocorticosteroids (GC) are widely used as anti-inflammatory agents. The effects of Prednisolone on the development of Borrelia (B.) burgdorferi-induced clinical arthritis and organ inflammation was studied in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. The drug was administered orally at a dose of 3, 10 and 30 mg/kg, starting shortly before experimental infection of the mice. A dose dependent inhibition of arthritic joint swelling was observed. Full protection was obtained with 30 mg/kg until 21 days after infection, subsequently, mild joint swelling developed but progression and severity of the disease was considerably less than in the other treated as well as in the untreated mice. Inhibition of clinical arthritis coincided with reduction of inflammatory cell infiltration in the joints, liver and muscle. Prednisolone was ineffective when application was initiated after arthritis was fully developed, i.e., 22 days after infection. Since the activated endothelium plays a critical role in development of inflammatory lesions, the expression of the cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) E-selectin, P-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 was determined in vitro using the bEnd3 endothelial cell line. Stimulation with a sonicated B. burgdorferi preparation in the presence of the water-soluble compound Prednisolone-21-hemisuccinate considerably reduced expression of ICAM-1, and marginally also of E-selectin, whereas the level of P-selectin and VCAM-1 remained unaltered. Thus, downregulation of ICAM-1 might be a critical factor in Prednisolone-mediated inhibition of B. burgdorferi-induced inflammation; the flare up of the disease after the initial protection indicates that additional therapy, e.g. with antibiotics, is necessary. PMID:8933206

  2. Hyposecretion of the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and its relation to clinical variables in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Dessein, P H; Joffe, B I; Stanwix, A E; Moomal, Z

    2001-01-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal underactivity has been reported in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This phenomenon has implications with regard to the pathogenesis and treatment of the disease. The present study was designed to evaluate the secretion of the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) and its relation to clinical variables in RA, spondyloarthropathy (Spa), and undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis (UIA). Eighty-seven patients (38 with RA, 29 with Spa, and 20 with UIA) were studied, of whom 54 were women. Only 12 patients (14%) had taken glucocorticoids previously. Age-matched, healthy women (134) and men (149) served as controls. Fasting blood samples were taken for determination of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), serum DHEAS and insulin, and plasma glucose. Insulin resistance was estimated by the homeostasis-model assessment (HOMAIR). DHEAS concentrations were significantly decreased in both women and men with inflammatory arthritis (IA) (P < 0.001). In 24 patients (28%), DHEAS levels were below the lower extreme ranges found for controls. Multiple intergroup comparisons revealed similarly decreased concentrations in each disease subset in both women and men. After the ESR, previous glucocorticoid usage, current treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, duration of disease and HOMAIR were controlled for, the differences in DHEAS levels between patients and controls were markedly attenuated in women (P = 0.050) and were no longer present in men (P = 0.133). We concluded that low DHEAS concentrations are commonly encountered in IA and, in women, this may not be fully explainable by disease-related parameters. The role of hypoadrenalism in the pathophysiology of IA deserves further elucidation. DHEA replacement may be indicated in many patients with IA, even in those not taking glucocorticoids. PMID:11299059

  3. [EULAR recommendations for patient education of people with inflammatory arthritis. Translation and evaluation in Germany].

    PubMed

    Patermann, J; Ehlebracht-König, I; Lind-Albrecht, G; Genth, E; Reusch, A; Küffner, R; Müller-Ladner, U; Braun, J

    2016-03-01

    In 2015 EULAR published recommendations for patient education of people with inflammatory arthritis. The recommendations included two superior principles and eight recommendations based on the level of evidence and expert knowledge. The German translation of the recommendations was evaluated by 15 German experts. Experts graded the strength of the recommendations (SOR) on an 11 point numerical rating scale (from 0 = no agreement to 10 = total agreement). The mean score was 8,8 ± 0,49. PMID:26744185

  4. Regulation of autoimmune arthritis by the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eugene Y.; Chi, Howard H.; Bouziane, Mohammed; Gaur, Amitabh; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis of T cell-mediated diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has typically been explained in the context of the Th1-Th2 paradigm: the initiation/propagation by pro-inflammatory cytokines, and downregulation by Th2 cytokines. However, in our study based on the adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) model of RA, we observed that Lewis (LEW) (RT.1l) rats at the recovery phase of AA showed the highest level of IFN-γ in recall response to mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 (Bhsp65), whereas AA-resistant Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) (RT.1l) rats secreted high levels of IFN-γ much earlier following disease induction. However, no significant secretion of IL-10 or TGF-β was observed in either strain. Furthermore, pre-treatment of LEW rats with a peptide of self (rat) hsp65 (R465), which induced T cells secreting predominantly IFN-γ, afforded protection against AA and decreased IL-17 expression by the arthritogenic epitope-restimulated T cells. These results provide a novel perspective on the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis. PMID:18276192

  5. Is the risk of cardiovascular disease altered with anti-inflammatory therapies? Insights from rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kraakman, Michael J; Dragoljevic, Dragana; Kammoun, Helene L; Murphy, Andrew J

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Atherosclerosis is the most common form of CVD, which is complex and multifactorial with an elevated risk observed in people with either metabolic or inflammatory diseases. Accumulating evidence now links obesity with a state of chronic low-grade inflammation and has renewed our understanding of this condition and its associated comorbidities. An emerging theme linking disease states with atherosclerosis is the increased production of myeloid cells, which can initiate and exacerbate atherogenesis. Although anti-inflammatory drug treatments exist and have been successfully used to treat inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a commonly observed side effect is dyslipidemia, inadvertently, a major risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. The mechanisms leading to dyslipidemia associated with anti-inflammatory drug use and whether CVD risk is actually increased by this dyslipidemia are of great therapeutic importance and currently remain poorly understood. Here we review recent data providing links between inflammation, hematopoiesis, dyslipidemia and CVD risk in the context of anti-inflammatory drug use. PMID:27350883

  6. Is the risk of cardiovascular disease altered with anti-inflammatory therapies? Insights from rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kraakman, Michael J; Dragoljevic, Dragana; Kammoun, Helene L; Murphy, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Atherosclerosis is the most common form of CVD, which is complex and multifactorial with an elevated risk observed in people with either metabolic or inflammatory diseases. Accumulating evidence now links obesity with a state of chronic low-grade inflammation and has renewed our understanding of this condition and its associated comorbidities. An emerging theme linking disease states with atherosclerosis is the increased production of myeloid cells, which can initiate and exacerbate atherogenesis. Although anti-inflammatory drug treatments exist and have been successfully used to treat inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a commonly observed side effect is dyslipidemia, inadvertently, a major risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. The mechanisms leading to dyslipidemia associated with anti-inflammatory drug use and whether CVD risk is actually increased by this dyslipidemia are of great therapeutic importance and currently remain poorly understood. Here we review recent data providing links between inflammation, hematopoiesis, dyslipidemia and CVD risk in the context of anti-inflammatory drug use. PMID:27350883

  7. Herbal medicinal products target defined biochemical and molecular mediators of inflammatory autoimmune arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesha, Shivaprasad H.; Berman, Brian M.; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2010-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating disease characterized by synovial inflammation, damage to cartilage and bone, and deformities of the joints. Several drugs possessing anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties are being used in the conventional (allopathic) system of medicine to treat RA. However, the long-term use of these drugs is associated with harmful side effects. Therefore, newer drugs with low or no toxicity for the treatment of RA are actively being sought. Interestingly, several herbs demonstrate anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity. In this review, we describe the role of the major biochemical and molecular mediators in the pathogenesis of RA, and highlight the sites of action of herbal medicinal products that have anti-arthritic activity. With the rapidly increasing use of CAM products by patients with RA and other inflammation-related disorders, our review presents timely information validating the scientific rationale for the use of natural therapeutic products. PMID:21115252

  8. Non-inflammatory Causes of Pain in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Boyden, Sean D; Hossain, Imtiyaz N; Wohlfahrt, Alyssa; Lee, Yvonne C

    2016-06-01

    Although pain in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is frequently thought to be inflammatory in nature, the association between measures of inflammation and pain intensity is low. This observation is likely due to the multifactorial nature of pain. In addition to pain from joint inflammation, RA patients may also have pain due to structural damage or central etiologies, such as aberrancies in the central nervous system (CNS) pain regulatory pathways. These CNS pathways include mechanisms that facilitate pain, as well as mechanisms that inhibit pain. Other factors, such as sleep disturbances, depression, anxiety, and catastrophizing, may also impact the perception of pain in RA patients. Since pain is frequently used as a proxy for inflammation in the assessment of RA disease activity, it is important that patients and physicians recognize that not all pain is inflammatory, and alternative management strategies, other than escalating disease-modifying antirheumatic drug treatment, may need to be considered. PMID:27097817

  9. Imaging of inflammatory arthritis with technetium-99m-labeled IgG

    SciTech Connect

    Breedveld, F.C.; van Kroonenburgh, M.J.; Camps, J.A.; Feitsma, H.I.; Markusse, H.M.; Pauwels, E.K. )

    1989-12-01

    The accumulation of nonspecific polyclonal human immunoglobulin G (IgG) radiolabeled with 99mTc was compared to that of (99mTc)albumin and (99mTc)nanocolloid in rats with collagen induced arthritis. Serial scintigrams were acquired directly, 4 and 24 hr after injection. A clearly discernable image of the site of synovitis was seen with (99mTc)IgG as early as 4 hr postinjection. The relative intensity of the inflammatory lesion was maximal at 24 hr. Discrimination between arthritic and nonarthritic joints as well as correlations between the relative intensity of the arthritic joint and clinical indices of joint inflammation were superior with IgG compared to albumin or nanocolloid. These studies show that localization and severity of inflammatory joint disease can be detected with radiolabeled nonspecific IgG.

  10. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Difficulty moving a joint (called "limited range of motion") Some types of arthritis may cause joint deformity. ... exercise). Walking is a good example. Range of motion exercises for flexibility. Strength training for muscle tone. ...

  11. Inflammatory markers in ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Seropian, Ignacio M; Sonnino, Chiara; Van Tassell, Benjamin W; Biasucci, Luigi M; Abbate, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    After acute myocardial infarction, ventricular remodeling is characterized by changes at the molecular, structural, geometrical and functional level that determine progression to heart failure. Inflammation plays a key role in wound healing and scar formation, affecting ventricular remodeling. Several, rather different, components of the inflammatory response were studied as biomarkers in ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction. Widely available and inexpensive tests, such as leukocyte count at admission, as well as more sophisticated immunoassays provide powerful predictors of adverse outcome in patients with ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction. We review the value of inflammatory markers in ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction and their association with ventricular remodeling, heart failure and sudden death. In conclusion, the use of these biomarkers may identify subjects at greater risk of adverse events and perhaps provide an insight into the mechanisms of disease progression. PMID:25681486

  12. LACC1 polymorphisms in inflammatory bowel disease and juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Assadi, G; Saleh, R; Hadizadeh, F; Vesterlund, L; Bonfiglio, F; Halfvarson, J; Törkvist, L; Eriksson, A S; Harris, H E; Sundberg, E; D'Amato, M

    2016-06-01

    The function of the Laccase domain-containing 1 (LACC1) gene is unknown, but genetic variation at this locus has been reported to consistently affect the risk of Crohn's disease (CD) and leprosy. Recently, a LACC1 missense mutation was found in patients suffering from monogenic forms of CD, but also systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. We tested the hypothesis that LACC1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in addition to CD, are associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, non-systemic), and another major form of inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis (UC). We selected 11 LACC1 tagging SNPs, and tested their effect on disease risk in 3855 Swedish individuals from three case-control cohorts of CD, UC and JIA. We detected false discovery rate corrected significant associations with individual markers in all three cohorts, thereby expanding previous results for CD also to UC and JIA. LACC1's link to several inflammatory diseases suggests a key role in the human immune system and justifies further characterization of its function(s). PMID:27098602

  13. Optimizing the optical wavelength for the photoacoustic imaging of inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Xu, Guan; Hu, Jack; Francis, Sheeja; Marquardt, April; Yuan, Jie; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    With the capability of assessing high resolution optical information in soft tissues at imaging depth up to several centimeters, innovative biomedical photoacoustic imaging (PAI) offers benefits to diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis, particularly in combination with more established ultrasonography (US). In this work, a PAI and US dual-modality system facilitating both imaging functions in a real-time fashion was developed and initially tested for its clinical performance on patients with active inflammatory arthritis. Photoacoustic (PA) images of metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints were acquired at 580-nm wavelength that provides a desired balance between optical absorption of blood and attenuation in background tissue. The results from six patients and six normal volunteers used as a control demonstrated the satisfactory sensitivity of PAI in assessing the physiological changes in the joints, specifically enhanced blood flow as a result of active synovitis. This preliminary study suggests that PAI, by revealing vascular features suggestive of joint inflammation, could be a valuable supplement to musculoskeletal US for rheumatology clinic.

  14. Anti-inflammatory effects of intravenous methotrexate associated with lipid nanoemulsions on antigen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Suzana B V; Tavares, Elaine R; Guido, Maria Carolina; Bonfá, Eloisa; Maranhão, Raul C

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that intravenous use of methotrexate associated with lipid nanoemulsions can achieve superior anti-inflammatory effects in the joints of rabbits with antigen-induced arthritis compared with commercial methotrexate. METHODS: Arthritis was induced in New Zealand rabbits sensitized with methylated bovine serum albumin and subsequently intra-articularly injected with the antigen. A nanoemulsion of methotrexate labeled with 3H-cholesteryl ether (4 mg/kg methotrexate) was then intravenously injected into four rabbits to determine the plasma decaying curves and the biodistribution of the methotrexate nanoemulsion by radioactive counting. Additionally, the pharmacokinetics of the methotrexate nanoemulsion were determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Twenty-four hours after arthritis induction, the animals were allocated into three groups, with intravenous injection with saline solution (n=9), methotrexate nanoemulsion (0.5 µmol/kg methotrexate, n=7), or commercial methotrexate (0.5 µmol/kg, n=4). The rabbits were sacrificed 24 h afterward. Synovial fluid was then collected for protein leakage and cell content analyses and synovial membranes were collected for histopathological analysis. RESULTS: The methotrexate nanoemulsion was taken up mainly by the liver and the uptake by arthritic joints was two-fold greater than that by control joints. The methotrexate nanoemulsion treatment reduced leukocyte influx into the synovial fluid by nearly 65%; in particular, mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells were reduced by 47 and 72%, respectively. In contrast, cell influx was unaffected following treatment with commercial methotrexate. Protein leakage into the arthritic knees of the rabbits was also more limited following methotrexate nanoemulsion treatment than following commercial methotrexate treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The intravenous methotrexate nanoemulsion showed anti-inflammatory effects on the synovia of arthritic joints that were

  15. Development of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia in a Patient With Gouty Arthritis on Long Term Colchicine.

    PubMed

    Buyukkurt, Nurhilal; Korur, Asli; Boga, Can

    2016-06-01

    Colchicine is a frequently used drug in rheumatological diseases. Acute promyelocytic leukemia developed in a patient who used colchicine for gouty arthritis since 10 years is presented and the possible relation between the long term use of colchicine and hematological malignancies is discussed. PMID:27408362

  16. NETs are a source of citrullinated autoantigens and stimulate inflammatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Khandpur, Ritika; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Vivekanandan-Giri, Anuradha; Gizinski, Alison; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Knight, Jason S.; Friday, Sean; Li, Sam; Patel, Rajiv M.; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Thompson, Paul; Chen, Pojen; Fox, David A.; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2013-01-01

    The early events leading to the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remain unclear but formation of autoantibodies to citrullinated antigens (ACPA) is considered a key pathogenic phenomenon. Neutrophils isolated from patients with various autoimmune diseases display enhanced extracellular trap formation (NETs), a phenomenon that externalizes autoantigens and immunostimulatory molecules. We investigated whether aberrant NETosis occurs in RA, determined its triggers and examined its deleterious inflammatory consequences. Enhanced NETosis was observed in circulating and synovial fluid RA neutrophils, compared to neutrophils from healthy controls and from patients with osteoarthritis. Further, netting neutrophils infiltrated RA synovial tissue, rheumatoid nodules and skin. NETosis correlated with ACPA presence and levels and with systemic inflammatory markers. RA sera and immunoglobulin fractions from RA patients with high levels of ACPA and/or rheumatoid factor significantly enhanced NETosis, and the NETs induced by these autoantibodies displayed distinct protein content. During NETosis, neutrophils externalized citrullinated autoantigens implicated in RA pathogenesis, whereas anti-citrullinated vimentin antibodies potently induced NET formation. The inflammatory cytokines IL-17A and TNF-α induced NETosis in RA neutrophils. In turn, NETs significantly augmented inflammatory responses in RA and OA synovial fibroblasts, including induction of IL-6, IL-8, chemokines and adhesion molecules. These observations implicate accelerated NETosis in RA pathogenesis, through externalization of citrullinated autoantigens and immunostimulatory molecules that may promote aberrant adaptive and innate immune responses in the joint and in the periphery, and perpetuate pathogenic mechanisms in this disease. PMID:23536012

  17. Multifocal inflammatory demyelination in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and treatment complications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian-Qiang; Ringrose, Jennifer; Gross, Donald; Emery, Derek; Blevins, Gregg; Power, Christopher

    2016-08-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and multiple sclerosis (MS) are both autoimmune diseases that share similar pathogenesis, but the development of MS in RA patients without the treatment of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha is rarely reported, which might be attributed to the use of other medications with potential immunosuppressive effects in the treatment of RA. Since MS can be clinically silent and autopsy examination of the central nervous system in RA patients is rarely described, the association of MS with RA may be possibly under-recognized. We report an autopsy case revealing multifocal inflammatory demyelination in a RA patient who had a prolonged use of methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine resulting in hydroxychloroquine-induced myopathies and heart failure. The neuropathological features of this case are consistent with MS, although there are some altered inflammatory demyelinating features such as relatively smaller lesions and less infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly T-cells. Our present case, in combination with literature review, suggests that the RA treatment especially with hydroxychloroquine and methotrexate is likely to alter the characteristics of inflammatory demyelination and disease course. PMID:27423608

  18. Involvement of IL-23 in enteropathic arthritis patients with inflammatory bowel disease: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Gheita, Tamer A; El Gazzar, Iman I; El-Fishawy, Hussein S; Aboul-Ezz, Mohamed A; Kenawy, Sanaa A

    2014-05-01

    The role of interleukin (IL)-23 in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains unclear. The aim of this work was to study the serum level of IL-23 in IBD with and without arthritis and determine its relation to the subsets and clinical features of the disease. Thirty-seven patients with IBD including 11 with arthritis were included in the study with a mean age of 30.86 ± 4.66 years. Twenty healthy subjects served as control. Seronegative spondyloarthropathy was present in 11 (29.73 %) of the IBD patients; Crohn's disease (CD) was present in 23 and 14 had ulcerative colitis (UC). Serum level of IL-23 was measured in all patients and control by ELISA. IL-23 was significantly higher in IBD patients (46.24 ± 27.19 pg/ml) compared to control (24.1 ± 2.31 pg/ml) (p < 0.0001) being higher in CD patients (52.57 ± 32.78 pg/ml) compared to those with UC (35.86 ± 6.41 pg/ml) (p = 0.026). Furthermore, it was significantly higher in those with peripheral and/or axial arthritis (67.73 ± 40.85 pg/ml) compared to patients without (37.15 ± 10.37 pg/ml) (p = 0.03). There was a tendency to a higher level in males (49.15 ± 30.97 pg/ml) compared to females (38.4 ± 9.54 pg/ml). Serum IL-23 is increased in IBD especially those with CD associated with arthritis and sacroiliitis. The IL-23 could be added to the biomarkers of development of arthritis in IBD patients. These results also confirm the findings of previous studies on the critical role played by IL-23 in the pathogenesis of IBD making it an important new therapeutic target for these patients. PMID:24384828

  19. Reactive Arthritis Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Of Spondylitis The Heart In Spondyloarthritis Inflammatory vs. Mechanical Back ... Arthritis Symptoms Because there is no specific laboratory test for reactive arthritis, doctors sometimes find it difficult ...

  20. Smac127 Has Proapoptotic and Anti-Inflammatory Effects on Rheumatoid Arthritis Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes.

    PubMed

    Lattuada, D; Gualtierotti, R; Crotta, K; Seneci, P; Ingegnoli, F; Corradini, C; Viganò, R; Marelli, O; Casnici, C

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by synovial inflammation and hyperplasia. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) are apoptosis-resistant and contribute to the pathogenesis of RA by producing cytokines and proteolytic enzymes, which degrade the extracellular matrix. We evaluated the proapoptotic and anti-inflammatory activity of the small molecule Smac127 on RA-FLSs cultured in synovial fluid (SF), in order to reproduce the physiopathological environmental characteristic of RA joints. In this context, Smac127 induces apoptosis by inhibiting apoptosis proteins (IAPs). This inhibition activates caspase 3 and restores the apoptotic pathway. In addition, Smac127 induces a significant inhibition of the secretion of IL-15 and IL-6, stimulation of pannus formation, and damage of bone and cartilage in RA. Also the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 is dramatically increased in the presence of Smac127. The cartilage destruction in RA patients is partly mediated by metalloproteinases; here we show that the MMP-1 production by fibroblasts cultured in SF is significantly antagonized by Smac127. Conversely, this molecule has no significant effects on RANKL and OPG production. Our observations demonstrate that Smac127 has beneficial regulatory effects on inflammatory state of RA-FLSs and suggest a potential use of Smac127 for the control of inflammation and disease progression in RA. PMID:26989333

  1. Anti-inflammatory effects and pharmacokinetics study of geniposide on rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Yun; Wu, Hong; Li, Hui; Hu, Shun-Li; Dai, Miao-miao; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the anti-inflammatory effects of Geniposide (GE), an iridoid glycoside compound extracted from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis (GJ) fruit in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) rats and its pharmacokinetic (PK) basis. AA was induced by injecting with Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA). Male SD rats were subjected to treatment with GE (30, 60 and 120mg/kg) from day 17 to 24 after immunization. Fibroblast-like synoviocyte (FLS) proliferation was assessed by MTT. Interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-10 were determined using double-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38MAPKs) related proteins in FLS was detected by Western blotting. PK profiles were simultaneously detected by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS/MS) in AA rat plasma after oral administration of GE on day 17 after immunization. As a result, GE promoted the recovery of arthritis and inhibited the colonic inflammation damage in AA rats by decreasing the expression level of TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-6, increasing the production of IL-10 and inhibiting the expression of phospho-p38 (p-p38) related proteins in FLS. PK parameters (AUC, Cmax and t1/2) tended to be associated with dosage-related decreasing of efficacy index. PMID:25434608

  2. Association between Periodontal Disease and Inflammatory Arthritis Reveals Modulatory Functions by Melanocortin Receptor Type 3

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Madeira, Mila F.M.; Norling, Lucy V.; Alsam, Asil; Curtis, Michael A.; da Silva, Tarcília A.; Perretti, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Because there is clinical evidence for an association between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis, it is important to develop suitable experimental models to explore pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities. The K/BxN serum model of inflammatory arthritis was applied using distinct protocols, and modulation of joint disruption afforded by dexamethasone and calcitonin was established in comparison to the melanocortin (MC) receptor agonist DTrp8–γ-melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH; DTrp). Wild-type and MC receptor type 3 (MC3)-null mice of different ages were also used. There was significant association between severity of joint disease, induced with distinct protocols and volumes of the arthritogenic K/BxN serum, and periodontal bone damage. Therapeutic treatment with 10 μg dexamethasone, 30 ng elcatonin, and 20 μg DTrp per mouse revealed unique and distinctive pharmacological properties, with only DTrp protecting both joint and periodontal tissue. Further analyses in nonarthritic animals revealed higher susceptibility to periodontal bone loss in Mc3r−/− compared with wild-type mice, with significant exacerbation at 14 weeks of age. These data reveal novel protective properties of endogenous MC3 on periodontal status in health and disease and indicate that MC3 activation could lead to the development of a new genus of anti-arthritic bone-sparing therapeutics. PMID:24979595

  3. TRPM8 is the principal mediator of menthol-induced analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boyi; Fan, Lu; Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Sui, Aiwei; Morris, John B; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2013-10-01

    Menthol, the cooling natural product of peppermint, is widely used in medicinal preparations for the relief of acute and inflammatory pain in sports injuries, arthritis, and other painful conditions. Menthol induces the sensation of cooling by activating TRPM8, an ion channel in cold-sensitive peripheral sensory neurons. Recent studies identified additional targets of menthol, including the irritant receptor, TRPA1, voltage-gated ion channels and neurotransmitter receptors. It remains unclear which of these targets contribute to menthol-induced analgesia, or to the irritating side effects associated with menthol therapy. Here, we use genetic and pharmacological approaches in mice to probe the role of TRPM8 in analgesia induced by L-menthol, the predominant analgesic menthol isomer in medicinal preparations. L-menthol effectively diminished pain behavior elicited by chemical stimuli (capsaicin, acrolein, acetic acid), noxious heat, and inflammation (complete Freund's adjuvant). Genetic deletion of TRPM8 completely abolished analgesia by L-menthol in all these models, although other analgesics (acetaminophen) remained effective. Loss of L-menthol-induced analgesia was recapitulated in mice treated with a selective TRPM8 inhibitor, AMG2850. Selective activation of TRPM8 with WS-12, a menthol derivative that we characterized as a specific TRPM8 agonist in cultured sensory neurons and in vivo, also induced TRPM8-dependent analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain. L-menthol- and WS-12-induced analgesia was blocked by naloxone, suggesting activation of endogenous opioid-dependent analgesic pathways. Our data show that TRPM8 is the principal mediator of menthol-induced analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain. In contrast to menthol, selective TRPM8 agonists may produce analgesia more effectively, with diminished side effects. PMID:23820004

  4. TRPM8 is the Principal Mediator of Menthol-induced Analgesia of Acute and Inflammatory Pain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Boyi; Fan, Lu; Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Sui, Aiwei; Morris, John B.; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2013-01-01

    Menthol, the cooling natural product of peppermint, is widely used in medicinal preparations for the relief of acute and inflammatory pain in sports injuries, arthritis and other painful conditions. Menthol induces the sensation of cooling by activating TRPM8, an ion channel in cold-sensitive peripheral sensory neurons. Recent studies identified additional targets of menthol, including the irritant receptor, TRPA1, voltage-gated ion channels and neurotransmitter receptors. It remains unclear which of these targets contribute to menthol-induced analgesia, or to the irritating side effects associated with menthol therapy. Here, we use genetic and pharmacological approaches in mice to probe the role of TRPM8 in analgesia induced by L-menthol, the predominant analgesic menthol isomer in medicinal preparations. L-menthol effectively diminished pain behavior elicited by chemical stimuli (capsaicin, acrolein, acetic acid), noxious heat and inflammation (complete Freund's adjuvant). Genetic deletion of TRPM8 completely abolished analgesia by L-menthol in all these models, while other analgesics (acetaminophen) remained effective. Loss of L-menthol-induced analgesia was recapitulated in mice treated with a selective TRPM8 inhibitor, AMG2850. Selective activation of TRPM8 with WS-12, a menthol derivative we characterized as a specific TRPM8 agonist in cultured sensory neurons and in vivo, also induced TRPM8-dependent analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain. L-menthol and WS-12 induced analgesia was blocked by naloxone, suggesting activation of endogenous opioid-dependent analgesic pathways. Our data show that TRPM8 is the principal mediator of menthol-induced analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain. In contrast to menthol, selective TRPM8 agonists may produce analgesia more effectively with diminished side effects. PMID:23820004

  5. Specific accumulation of cholesterol-rich liposomes in the inflammatory tissue of rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Love, W G; Amos, N; Kellaway, I W; Williams, B D

    1990-01-01

    High performance liquid chromatography has shown that after intravenous injection cholesterol-poor liposomes (100 nm) are unstable and their phospholipid is redistributed. Under identical conditions cholesterol-rich liposomes remain structurally intact within the circulation. When injected intravenously cholesterol-rich liposomes accumulate within the inflamed paws of rats with adjuvant induced arthritis to the same extent as cholesterol-poor liposomes. Uptake in inflamed tissue of three cholesterol-rich liposome preparations was always significantly greater than the uptake noted in normal tissue. The degree of accumulation in inflamed tissue was found to depend on the size of the liposome, with the greatest uptake, 7% of the injected dose, achieved by the smallest vesicle (100 nm). These results indicate that intact liposomes accumulate at inflamed joint tissue sites. Therefore the passive targeting of anti-inflammatory drugs encapsulated within these liposomes could be contemplated. PMID:2396866

  6. Development of a self-administered early inflammatory arthritis detection tool

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Barriers to care limit the potential benefits of pharmacological intervention for inflammatory arthritis. A self-administered questionnaire for early inflammatory arthritis (EIA) detection may complement contemporary triage interventions to further reduce delays to rheumatologic care. The objective of this study was to develop a self-administered EIA detection tool for implementation in pre-primary care settings. Methods A core set of dimensions and constructs for EIA detection were systematically derived from the literature and augmented by investigative team arbitration. Identified constructs were formulated into lay language questions suitable for self-administration. A three-round Delphi consensus panel of EIA experts and stakeholders evaluated the relevance of each question to EIA detection and suggested additional items. Questions accepted by less than 70% of respondents in rounds one or two were eliminated. In round three, questions accepted by at least 80% of the panel were selected for the tool. Results Of 584 citations identified, data were extracted from 47 eligible articles. Upon arbitration of the literature synthesis, 30 constructs encompassing 13 dimensions were formulated into lay language questions and posed to the Delphi panel. A total of 181 EIA experts and stakeholders participated on the Delphi panel: round one, 60; round two, 59; and, round three, 169; 48 participated in all three rounds. The panel evaluated the 30 questions derived from the literature synthesis, suggested five additional items, and eliminated a total of 24. The eleven-question instrument developed captured dimensions of articular pain, swelling, and stiffness, distribution of joint involvement, function, and diagnostic and family history. Conclusions An eleven-question, EIA detection tool suitable for self-administration was developed to screen subjects with six to 52 weeks of musculoskeletal complaints. Psychometric and performance property testing of the tool is

  7. Mast cells mediate acute inflammatory responses to implanted biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Liping; Jennings, Timothy A.; Eaton, John W.

    1998-01-01

    Implanted biomaterials trigger acute and chronic inflammatory responses. The mechanisms involved in such acute inflammatory responses can be arbitrarily divided into phagocyte transmigration, chemotaxis, and adhesion to implant surfaces. We earlier observed that two chemokines—macrophage inflammatory protein 1α/monocyte chemoattractant protein 1—and the phagocyte integrin Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18)/surface fibrinogen interaction are, respectively, required for phagocyte chemotaxis and adherence to biomaterial surfaces. However, it is still not clear how the initial transmigration of phagocytes through the endothelial barrier into the area of the implant is triggered. Because implanted biomaterials elicit histaminic responses in the surrounding tissue, and histamine release is known to promote rapid diapedesis of inflammatory cells, we evaluated the possible role of histamine and mast cells in the recruitment of phagocytes to biomaterial implants. Using i.p. and s.c. implantation of polyethylene terephthalate disks in mice we find: (i) Extensive degranulation of mast cells, accompanied by histamine release, occurs adjacent to short-term i.p. implants. (ii) Simultaneous administration of H1 and H2 histamine receptor antagonists (pyrilamine and famotidine, respectively) greatly diminishes recruitment and adhesion of both neutrophils (<20% of control) and monocytes/macrophages (<30% of control) to implants. (iii) Congenitally mast cell-deficient mice also exhibit markedly reduced accumulation of phagocytes on both i.p. and s.c implants. (iv) Finally, mast cell reconstitution of mast cell-deficient mice restores “normal” inflammatory responses to biomaterial implants. We conclude that mast cells and their granular products, especially histamine, are important in recruitment of inflammatory cells to biomaterial implants. Improved knowledge of such responses may permit purposeful modulation of both acute and chronic inflammation affecting implanted biomaterials. PMID

  8. Immune regulation and anti-inflammatory effects of isogarcinol extracted from Garcinia mangostana L. against collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yanxia; Zhou, Hailing; Wang, Mengqi; Cen, Juren; Wei, Qun

    2014-05-01

    Isogarcinol is a natural compound that we extracted from Garcinia mangostana L., and we were the first to report that it is a new immunosuppressant. In the present study, we investigated the immune regulation and anti-inflammatory effects of isogarcinol on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and explored its potential mechanism in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The oral administration of isogarcinol significantly reduced clinical scores, alleviated cartilage and bone erosion, and reduced the levels of serum inflammatory cytokines in CIA mice. Isogarcinol inhibited xylene-induced mouse ear edema in vivo. In vitro, isogarcinol decreased iNOS and COX-2 mRNA expression and NO content by inhibiting NF-κB expression. Furthermore, isogarcinol decreased the activity of NFAT and inhibited IL-2 expression. The mechanism of action of isogarcinol is associated with down-regulation of both autoimmune and inflammatory reactions. PMID:24738849

  9. Characterization of the Inflammatory Properties of Actively Released HMGB1 in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Stridh, Pernilla; Klevenvall, Lena; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Fischer, Marie; Sundberg, Erik; Andersson, Ulf; Antoine, Daniel J.; Harris, Helena Erlandsson

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Pathogenic effects of the endogenous inflammatory mediator high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) have been described in several inflammatory diseases. Recent reports have underlined the importance of post-translational modifications (PTMs) in determination of HMGB1 function and release mechanisms. We investigated the occurrence of PTMs of HMGB1 obtained from synovial fluid (SF) of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Results: Analyses of 17 JIA patients confirmed high HMGB1 levels in SF. Liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses of PTMs revealed that total HMGB1 levels were not associated with increased lactate dehydrogenase activity but strongly correlated with nuclear location sequence 2 (NLS2) hyperacetylation, indicating active release of HMGB1. The correlation between total HMGB1 levels and NLS2 hypoacetylation suggests additional, acetylation-independent release mechanisms. Monomethylation of lysine 43 (K43), a proposed neutrophil-specific PTM, was strongly associated with high HMGB1 levels, implying that neutrophils are a source of released HMGB1. Analysis of cysteine redox isoforms, fully reduced HMGB1, disulfide HMGB1, and oxidized HMGB1, revealed that HMGB1 acts as both a chemotactic and a cytokine-inducing mediator. These properties were associated with actively released HMGB1. Innovation: This is the first report that characterizes HMGB1-specific PTMs during a chronic inflammatory condition. Conclusion: HMGB1 in SF from JIA patients is actively released through both acetylation-dependent and -nondependent manners. The presence of various functional HMGB1 redox isoforms confirms the complexity of their pathogenic role during chronic inflammation. Defining HMGB1 release pathways and redox isoforms is critical for the understanding of the contribution of HMGB1 during inflammatory processes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 605–619. PMID:25532033

  10. Anti-inflammatory Effect of Isaria sinclairii Glycosaminoglycan in an Adjuvant-treated Arthritis Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Sang Duck; Hwang, Jae Sam; Yun, Eun Young; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2013-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) derived from Isaria sinclairii (IS) and of IS extracts were investigated in a complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-treated chronic arthritis rat model. Groups of rats were treated orally with 30 mg/kg one of the following: [1] saline control, extracts of [2] water-IS, [3] methanol-IS, [4] butanol-IS, [5] ethyl acetate-IS, or [6] Indomethacin® as the positive control for a period of two weeks. The anti-paw edema effects of the individual extracts were in the following order: water-IS ex. > methanol ex. > butanol ex. > ethyl acetate ex. The water/methanol extract from I. sinclairii remarkably inhibited UV-mediated upregulation of NF-κB activity in transfected HaCaT cells. GAG as a water-soluble alcohol precipitated fraction also produced a noticeable anti-edema effect. This GAG also inhibited the pro-inflammatory cytokine levels of prostaglandin E2-stimulated lipopolysaccharide in LAW 264.7 cells, cytokine TNF-α production in splenocytes, and atherogenesis cytokine levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in HUVEC cells in a dose-dependent manner. In the histological analysis, the LV dorsal root ganglion, including the articular cartilage, and linked to the paw-treated IS GAG, was repaired against CFA-induced cartilage destruction. Combined treatment with Indomethacin® (5 mg/kg) and IS GAG (10 mg/kg) also more effectively inhibited CFA-induced paw edema at 3 hr, 24 hr, and 48 hr to levels comparable to the anti-inflammatory drug, indomethacin. Thus, the IS GAG described here holds great promise as an anti-inflammatory drug in the future. PMID:24386520

  11. Inflammatory stimuli acutely modulate peripheral taste function.

    PubMed

    Kumarhia, Devaki; He, Lianying; McCluskey, Lynnette Phillips

    2016-06-01

    Inflammation-mediated changes in taste perception can affect health outcomes in patients, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In the present work, we hypothesized that proinflammatory cytokines directly modulate Na(+) transport in taste buds. To test this, we measured acute changes in Na(+) flux in polarized fungiform taste buds loaded with a Na(+) indicator dye. IL-1β elicited an amiloride-sensitive increase in Na(+) transport in taste buds. In contrast, TNF-α dramatically and reversibly decreased Na(+) flux in polarized taste buds via amiloride-sensitive and amiloride-insensitive Na(+) transport systems. The speed and partial amiloride sensitivity of these changes in Na(+) flux indicate that IL-1β and TNF-α modulate epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) function. A portion of the TNF-mediated decrease in Na(+) flux is also blocked by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine, although TNF-α further reduced Na(+) transport independently of both amiloride and capsazepine. We also assessed taste function in vivo in a model of infection and inflammation that elevates these and additional cytokines. In rats administered systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS), CT responses to Na(+) were significantly elevated between 1 and 2 h after LPS treatment. Low, normally preferred concentrations of NaCl and sodium acetate elicited high response magnitudes. Consistent with this outcome, codelivery of IL-1β and TNF-α enhanced Na(+) flux in polarized taste buds. These results demonstrate that inflammation elicits swift changes in Na(+) taste function, which may limit salt consumption during illness. PMID:27009163

  12. Mass-Spectrometric Identification of T-Kininogen I/Thiostatin as an Acute-Phase Inflammatory Protein Suppressed by Curcumin and Capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    Joe, Bina; Nagaraju, Anitha; Gowda, Lalitha R.; Basrur, Venkatesha; Lokesh, Belur R.

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin and capsaicin are dietary xenobiotics with well-documented anti-inflammatory properties. Previously, the beneficial effect of these spice principles in lowering chronic inflammation was demonstrated using a rat experimental model for arthritis. The extent of lowering of arthritic index by the spice principles was associated with a significant shift in macrophage function favoring the reduction of pro-inflammatory molecules such as reactive oxygen species and production and release of anti-inflammatory metabolites of arachidonic acid. Beyond the cellular effects on macrophage function, oral administration of curcumin and capsaicin caused alterations in serum protein profiles of rats injected with adjuvant to develop arthritis. Specifically, a 72 kDa acidic glycoprotein, GpA72, which was elevated in pre-arthritic rats, was significantly lowered by feeding either curcumin or capsaicin to the rats. Employing the tandem mass spectrometric approach for direct sequencing of peptides, here we report the identification of GpA72 as T-kininogen I also known as Thiostatin. Since T-kininogen I is an early acute-phase protein, we additionally tested the efficiency of curcumin and capsaicin to mediate the inflammatory response in an acute phase model. The results demonstrate that curcumin and capsaicin lower the acute-phase inflammatory response, the molecular mechanism for which is, in part, mediated by pathways associated with the lowering of T-kininogen I. PMID:25299597

  13. Mass-spectrometric identification of T-kininogen I/thiostatin as an acute-phase inflammatory protein suppressed by curcumin and capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Joe, Bina; Nagaraju, Anitha; Gowda, Lalitha R; Basrur, Venkatesha; Lokesh, Belur R

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin and capsaicin are dietary xenobiotics with well-documented anti-inflammatory properties. Previously, the beneficial effect of these spice principles in lowering chronic inflammation was demonstrated using a rat experimental model for arthritis. The extent of lowering of arthritic index by the spice principles was associated with a significant shift in macrophage function favoring the reduction of pro-inflammatory molecules such as reactive oxygen species and production and release of anti-inflammatory metabolites of arachidonic acid. Beyond the cellular effects on macrophage function, oral administration of curcumin and capsaicin caused alterations in serum protein profiles of rats injected with adjuvant to develop arthritis. Specifically, a 72 kDa acidic glycoprotein, GpA72, which was elevated in pre-arthritic rats, was significantly lowered by feeding either curcumin or capsaicin to the rats. Employing the tandem mass spectrometric approach for direct sequencing of peptides, here we report the identification of GpA72 as T-kininogen I also known as Thiostatin. Since T-kininogen I is an early acute-phase protein, we additionally tested the efficiency of curcumin and capsaicin to mediate the inflammatory response in an acute phase model. The results demonstrate that curcumin and capsaicin lower the acute-phase inflammatory response, the molecular mechanism for which is, in part, mediated by pathways associated with the lowering of T-kininogen I. PMID:25299597

  14. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Zerumbone against Mono-Iodoacetate-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Ting-Yi; Huang, Steven Kuan-Hua; Lee, Chia-Jung; Tsai, Po-Wei; Wang, Ching-Chiung

    2016-01-01

    The fresh rhizome of Zingiber zerumbet Smith (Zingiberaceae) is used as a food flavoring and also serves as a folk medicine as an antipyretic and for analgesics in Taiwan. Zerumbone, a monocyclic sesquiterpene was isolated from the rhizome of Z. zerumbet and is the major active compound. In this study, the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of zerumbone on arthritis were explored using in vitro and in vivo models. Results showed that zerumbone inhibited inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expressions, and NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production, but induced heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression in a dose-dependent manner in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. When zerumbone was co-treated with an HO-1 inhibitor (tin protoporphyrin (SnPP)), the NO inhibitory effects of zerumbone were recovered. The above results suggest that zerumbone inhibited iNOS and COX-2 through induction of the HO-1 pathway. Moreover, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and COX-2 expressions of interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated primary rat chondrocytes were inhibited by zerumbone. In an in vivo assay, an acetic acid-induced writhing response in mice was significantly reduced by treatment with zerumbone. Furthermore, zerumbone reduced paw edema and the pain response in a mono-iodoacetate (MIA)-induced rat osteoarthritis model. Therefore, we suggest that zerumbone possesses anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects which indicate zerumbone could be a potential candidate for osteoarthritis treatment. PMID:26901193

  15. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Zerumbone against Mono-Iodoacetate-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chien, Ting-Yi; Huang, Steven Kuan-Hua; Lee, Chia-Jung; Tsai, Po-Wei; Wang, Ching-Chiung

    2016-01-01

    The fresh rhizome of Zingiber zerumbet Smith (Zingiberaceae) is used as a food flavoring and also serves as a folk medicine as an antipyretic and for analgesics in Taiwan. Zerumbone, a monocyclic sesquiterpene was isolated from the rhizome of Z. zerumbet and is the major active compound. In this study, the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of zerumbone on arthritis were explored using in vitro and in vivo models. Results showed that zerumbone inhibited inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expressions, and NO and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) production, but induced heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression in a dose-dependent manner in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. When zerumbone was co-treated with an HO-1 inhibitor (tin protoporphyrin (SnPP)), the NO inhibitory effects of zerumbone were recovered. The above results suggest that zerumbone inhibited iNOS and COX-2 through induction of the HO-1 pathway. Moreover, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and COX-2 expressions of interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated primary rat chondrocytes were inhibited by zerumbone. In an in vivo assay, an acetic acid-induced writhing response in mice was significantly reduced by treatment with zerumbone. Furthermore, zerumbone reduced paw edema and the pain response in a mono-iodoacetate (MIA)-induced rat osteoarthritis model. Therefore, we suggest that zerumbone possesses anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects which indicate zerumbone could be a potential candidate for osteoarthritis treatment. PMID:26901193

  16. Inflammatory mediators and radiographic changes in temporomandibular joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Voog, Ulle; Alstergren, Per; Eliasson, Sören; Leibur, Edvitar; Kallikorm, Riina; Kopp, Sigvard

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between the inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and serotonin (5-HT), the inflammatory markers erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP), as well as rheumatoid factor (RF) and thrombocyte particle concentration (TPC) in blood versus temporomandibular joint (TMJ) radiographic changes in patients with clinical TMJ involvement by rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty patients were included. Venous blood was collected for quantification of the mediators, markers, and TPC. The radiographic signs of erosion, flattening, sclerosis, subchondral pseudocyst, and osteophyte as well as radiographic grade were investigated with computed tomography. The median (IQR) plasma levels of TNFalpha and 5-HT were 0 (13) pg/ mL and 13 (22) nmol/L, respectively, while serum level of 5-HT was 1360 874) nmol/L ESR, CRP, and TPC were abnormally high in 53%, 250%, and 15% of the patients, respectively. The most frequent radiographic signs were sclerosis (75%), erosion (50%), and flattening (30%). Erosion was found to be associated with high TPC and flattening with high plasma level of TNFalpha. In conclusion, patients with clinical TMJ involvement by RA show an association between high level of TPC and TNFalpha in plasma versus radiographic signs of joint bone destruction. PMID:12635783

  17. Reduced Acute Inflammatory Responses to Microgel Conformal Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Amanda W.; Singh, Neetu; Burns, Kellie L.; Babensee, Julia E.; Lyon, L. Andrew; García, Andrés J.

    2008-01-01

    Implantation of synthetic materials into the body elicits inflammatory host responses that limit medical device integration and biological performance. This inflammatory cascade involves protein adsorption, leukocyte recruitment and activation, cytokine release, and fibrous encapsulation of the implant. We present a coating strategy based on thin films of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel microparticles (i.e. microgels) cross-linked with poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate. These particles were grafted onto a clinically relevant polymeric material to generate conformal coatings that significantly reduced in vitro fibrinogen adsorption and primary human monocytes/macrophage adhesion and spreading. These microgel coatings also reduced leukocyte adhesion and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1) in response to materials implanted acutely in the murine intraperitoneal space. These microgel coatings can be applied to biomedical implants as a protective coating to attenuate biofouling, leukocyte adhesion and activation, and adverse host responses for biomedical and biotechnological applications. PMID:18804859

  18. Synovial explant inflammatory mediator production corresponds to rheumatoid arthritis imaging hallmarks: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Despite the widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Doppler ultrasound for the detection of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity, little is known regarding the association of imaging-detected activity and synovial pathology. The purpose of this study was to compare site-specific release of inflammatory mediators and evaluate the corresponding anatomical sites by examining colour Doppler ultrasound (CDUS) and MRI scans. Methods RA patients were evaluated on the basis of CDUS and 3-T MRI scans and subsequently underwent synovectomy using a needle arthroscopic procedure of the hand joints. The synovial tissue specimens were incubated for 72 hours, and spontaneous release of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6), macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP-1β) and IL-8 was measured by performing multiplex immunoassays. Bone marrow oedema (BME), synovitis and erosion scores were estimated on the basis of the rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance imaging score (RAMRIS). Mixed models were used for the statistical analyses. Parsimony was achieved by omitting covariates with P > 0.1 from the statistical model. Results Tissue samples from 58 synovial sites were obtained from 25 patients. MCP-1 was associated with CDUS activity (P = 0.009, approximate Spearman’s ρ = 0.41), RAMRIS BME score (P = 0.01, approximate Spearman’s ρ = 0.42) and RAMRIS erosion score (P = 0.03, approximate Spearman’s ρ = 0.31). IL-6 was associated with RAMRIS synovitis score (P = 0.04, approximate Spearman’s ρ = 0.50), BME score (P = 0.04, approximate Spearman’s ρ = 0.31) and RAMRIS erosion score (P = 0.03, approximate Spearman’s ρ = 0.35). MIP-1β was associated with CDUS activity (P = 0.02, approximate Spearman’s ρ = 0.38) and RAMRIS synovitis scores (P = 0.02, approximate Spearman’s ρ = 0.63). IL-8 associations with imaging outcome measures did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions The association between

  19. The effects of combined therapy of rheumatoid arthritis on the acute phase reactants.

    PubMed

    Rexhepi, Sylejman; Rexhepi, Mjellma; Sahatçiu-Meka, Vjollca; Pllana, Ejup; Dragusha, Gani; Gashi, Masar; Rexhepi, Blerta

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents the results of studies of acute phase reactants in the 60 treated patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Patients were divided into two groups, depending on the applied treatment: group I (n = 30) was treated with methotrexate, sulfasalazine and hydroxychloroquine, and group II (n = 30) with methotrexate. The results of our study shows that there is a statistically significant reduction in the value of acute phase reactants and clinical parameters after treatment in both investigated groups of patients, and also a significant statistical difference between the first and second group of treated patients. PMID:20429264

  20. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Orally Administrated Denatured Naja Naja Atra Venom on Murine Rheumatoid Arthritis Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kou-Zhu; Liu, Yan-Li; Gu, Jin-Hua; Qin, Zheng-Hong

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the denatured Naja Naja atra venom (NNAV) in rheumatoid arthritis-associated models, the denatured NNAV (heat treated; 30, 90, 270 μg/kg), the native NNAV (untreated with heat; 90 μg/kg), and Tripterygium wilfordii polyglycoside (TWP, 15 mg/kg) were administrated orally either prophylactically or therapeutically. We measured time of licking the affected paw in formaldehyde-induced inflammatory model, paw volume in egg-white-induced inflammation, and granuloma weight in formalin-soaked filter paper-induced granuloma. For adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats, paw edema, mechanical withdrawal threshold, serum levels of TNF-α and IL-10, and histopathological changes of the affected paw were assessed. We found that the denatured NNAV (90, 270 μg/kg) significantly reduced time of licking paw, paw volume, and granuloma weight in above inflammatory models and also attenuated paw edema, mechanical hyperalgesia, and histopathology changes in AIA rats. Additionally, the increase in serum TNF-α and the decrease in serum IL-10 in AIA rats were reversed by the denatured NNAV. Although the native NNAV and TWP rendered the similar pharmacological actions on the above four models with less potency than that of the denatured NNAV, these findings demonstrate that oral administration of the denatured NNAV produces antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities on rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:23634171

  1. Carvedilol alleviates adjuvant-induced arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema: Modulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Arab, Hany H.; El-Sawalhi, Maha M.

    2013-04-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease with cardiovascular complications as the leading cause of morbidity. Carvedilol is an adrenergic antagonist which has been safely used in treatment of several cardiovascular disorders. Given that carvedilol has powerful antioxidant/anti-inflammatory properties, we aimed to investigate its protective potential against arthritis that may add further benefits for its clinical usefulness especially in RA patients with concomitant cardiovascular disorders. Two models were studied in the same rat; adjuvant arthritis and subcutaneous air pouch edema. Carvedilol (10 mg/kg/day p.o. for 21 days) effectively suppressed inflammation in both models with comparable efficacy to the standard anti-inflammatory diclofenac (5 mg/kg/day p.o.). Notably, carvedilol inhibited paw edema and abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates. The latter observation was confirmed by the histopathological assessment of the pouch lining that revealed mitigation of immuno-inflammatory cell influx. Carvedilol reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxides, nitric oxide and protein thiols) and lowered the release of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6), and eicosanoids (PGE{sub 2} and LTB{sub 4}) in sera and exudates of arthritic rats. Interestingly, carvedilol, per se, didn't present any effect on assessed biochemical parameters in normal rats. Together, the current study highlights evidences for the promising anti-arthritic effects of carvedilol that could be mediated through attenuation of leukocyte migration, alleviation of oxidative stress and suppression of proinflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids. - Highlights: ► Carvedilol possesses promising anti-arthritic properties. ► It markedly suppressed inflammation in adjuvant arthritis and air pouch edema. ► It abrogated the leukocyte invasion to air pouch exudates and linings. ► It reduced/normalized oxidative stress markers in sera and exudates of

  2. Near infrared lymphatic imaging demonstrates the dynamics of lymph flow and lymphangiogenesis during the acute vs. chronic phases of arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Quan; Wood, Ronald; Schwarz, Edward M.; Wang, Yong-Jun; Xing, Lianping

    2010-01-01

    Objective Development of an in vivo imaging method to assess lymphatic draining function in the K/B×N mouse model of inflammatory arthritis. Methods Indocyanine green (ICG), a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, was injected intradermally into the footpad of wild-type mice, the limb was illuminated with an 806 nm NIR laser, and the movement of ICG from the injection site to the draining popliteal lymph node (PLN) was recorded with a CCD camera. ICG-NIR images were analyzed to obtain 5 measures of lymphatic function across time. K/B×N arthritic mice and control non-arthritic littermates were imaged at one-month of age when acute joint inflammation commenced, and repeated at 3 months when joint inflammation became chronic. Lymphangiogenesis in PLNs was assessed by immunochemistry. Results ICG and its transport within lymphatic vessels were readily visualized and quantitative measures derived. During the acute phase of arthritis, the lymphatic vessels were dilated with increased ICG signal intensity and lymphatic pulses, and PLNs became fluorescent quickly. During the chronic phase, new lymphatic vessels were present near the foot. However, ICG appearance in lymphatic vessels was delayed. The size and area of PLN lymphatic sinuses progressively increased in the K/B×N mice. Conclusion ICG-NIR lymphatic imaging is a valuable method to assess the lymphatic draining function in mice with inflammatory arthritis. ICG-NIR imaging of K/B×N mice identified two distinct lymphatic phenotypes during the acute and chronic phase of inflammation. This technique can be used to assess new therapies for lymphatic disorders. PMID:20309866

  3. Anti-inflammatory effects of polyphenolic-enriched red raspberry extract in an antigen-induced arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Jean-Gilles, Dinorah; Li, Liya; Ma, Hang; Yuan, Tao; Chichester, Clinton O; Seeram, Navindra P

    2012-06-13

    The red raspberry ( Rubus idaeus ) fruit contains bioactive polyphenols including anthocyanins and ellagitannins with reported anti-inflammatory properties. This study sought to investigate the cartilage-protecting and anti-inflammatory effects of a polyphenolic-enriched red raspberry extract (RRE; standardized to total polyphenol, anthocyanin, and ellagitannin contents) using (1) an in vitro bovine nasal explant cell culture model and (2) an in vivo adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model. RRE contained 20% total polyphenols (as gallic acid equivalents), 5% anthocyanins (as cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalents), and 9.25% ellagitannins (as ellagic acid equivalents). In the in vitro studies, bovine nasal explants were stimulated with 10 ng/mL IL-1β to induce the release of proteoglycan and type II collagen. On treatment with RRE (50 μg/mL), there was a decrease in the rate of degradation of both proteoglycan and type II collagen. In the in vivo antigen-induced arthritis rat model, animals were gavaged daily with RRE (at doses of 30 and 120 mg/kg, respectively) for 30 days after adjuvant injection (750 μg of Mycobacterium tuberculosis suspension in squalene). At the higher dose, animals treated with RRE had a lower incidence and severity of arthritis compared to control animals. Also, histological analyses revealed significant inhibition of inflammation, pannus formation, cartilage damage, and bone resorption by RRE. This study suggests that red raspberry polyphenols may afford cartilage protection and/or modulate the onset and severity of arthritis. PMID:22111586

  4. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus With Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangling; Wang, Yanqiang

    2016-01-01

    We recently encountered a patient with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) that was associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A 34-year-old Chinese female with a 3-year history of SLE presented with acute bilateral leg weakness and paraparesis, and lost the ability to walk 1 day after noticing bilateral leg numbness and pain for 12 days. Physical examination revealed bilateral facial muscle paralysis, muscle strength in the legs with graded 1/5 proximally and 2/5 distally bilaterally and absence of deep tendon reflex in both knees and ankles. Paresthesia was observed in distal limbs with glove and stocking distribution. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis demonstrated albuminocytologic dissociation. Electrophysiologic survey also indicated sensory-motor demyelinating polyneuropathy. The diagnosis of SLE was established based on her initial symptoms including intermittent fevers, hair loss, oral ulcers, malar rash and arthritis affecting the elbow, wrist and hand joints; positive immunologic findings for antinuclear antibody (ANA), anti-DNA antibody, anti-Smith (anti-Sm) antibody, low serum complement levels, and the kidney biopsy specimen showed glomerular mesangial proliferation with focal endothelial cell proliferation (ISN/PPS 2004 classification lupus nephritis, class III). Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide resulted in clinical and electrophysiological improvement. PMID:27298667

  5. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus With Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangling; Wang, Yanqiang

    2016-07-01

    We recently encountered a patient with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) that was associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A 34-year-old Chinese female with a 3-year history of SLE presented with acute bilateral leg weakness and paraparesis, and lost the ability to walk 1 day after noticing bilateral leg numbness and pain for 12 days. Physical examination revealed bilateral facial muscle paralysis, muscle strength in the legs with graded 1/5 proximally and 2/5 distally bilaterally and absence of deep tendon reflex in both knees and ankles. Paresthesia was observed in distal limbs with glove and stocking distribution. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis demonstrated albuminocytologic dissociation. Electrophysiologic survey also indicated sensory-motor demyelinating polyneuropathy. The diagnosis of SLE was established based on her initial symptoms including intermittent fevers, hair loss, oral ulcers, malar rash and arthritis affecting the elbow, wrist and hand joints; positive immunologic findings for antinuclear antibody (ANA), anti-DNA antibody, anti-Smith (anti-Sm) antibody, low serum complement levels, and the kidney biopsy specimen showed glomerular mesangial proliferation with focal endothelial cell proliferation (ISN/PPS 2004 classification lupus nephritis, class III). Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide resulted in clinical and electrophysiological improvement. PMID:27298667

  6. Adalimumab-induced acute interstitial lung disease in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Olívia Meira; Pereira, Daniel Antunes Silva; Baldi, Bruno Guedes; Costa, André Nathan; Athanazio, Rodrigo Abensur; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    The use of immunobiological agents for the treatment of autoimmune diseases is increasing in medical practice. Anti-TNF therapies have been increasingly used in refractory autoimmune diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis, with promising results. However, the use of such therapies has been associated with an increased risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. In addition, the use of anti-TNF agents can cause pulmonary complications, such as reactivation of mycobacterial and fungal infections, as well as sarcoidosis and other interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). There is evidence of an association between ILD and the use of anti-TNF agents, etanercept and infliximab in particular. Adalimumab is the newest drug in this class, and some authors have suggested that its use might induce or exacerbate preexisting ILDs. In this study, we report the first case of acute ILD secondary to the use of adalimumab in Brazil, in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and without a history of ILD. PMID:24626274

  7. Sulfasalazine and its metabolites inhibit platelet function in patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    MacMullan, Paul A; Madigan, Anne M; Paul, Nevin; Peace, Aaron J; Alagha, Ahmed; Nolan, Kevin B; McCarthy, Geraldine M; Kenny, Dermot

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of sulfasalazine and its metabolites on platelet function in patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA). One hundred thirty-five consecutive patients with an established diagnosis of IA were screened. Those with a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD), taking anti-platelet agents or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were excluded. A total of 32 patients were investigated, 15 taking sulfasalazine and 17 taking other disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and no sulfasalazine. These two cohorts were compared to 15 patients with stable CVD on long-term aspirin. The effect of sulfasalazine and its metabolites on arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregation was also tested in vitro in samples from healthy donors (n = 18). Demographics, CVD risk factors and disease activity indices were similar in the sulfasalazine and other DMARD groups. AA-induced platelet aggregation was significantly inhibited in the sulfasalazine group (9 ± 7 %) and comparable to that in the aspirin group (10 ± 6 %). In contrast, there was no effect on AA-induced platelet aggregation in the other DMARDs group (77 ± 12 %) (p < 0.001). Furthermore, sulfasalazine therapy had no effect on platelet aggregation in response to multiple other agonists. Sulfasalazine and its metabolites (5-aminosalicylic acid and sulfapyridine) exerted an additive and dose-dependent inhibitory effect on AA-induced platelet aggregation in vitro (p < 0.001). The inhibition of AA-induced platelet aggregation by sulfasalazine is comparable to that achieved by aspirin and is dependent on both sulfasalazine and its metabolites. This represents a potential mechanism that may contribute to the known cardioprotective effect of sulfasalazine in patients with IA. PMID:25253538

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis – inflammatory and infectious connections. Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rutger Persson, G.

    2012-01-01

    An association between oral disease/periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been considered since the early 1820s. The early treatment was tooth eradication. Epidemiological studies suggest that the prevalence of RA and periodontitis may be similar and about 5% of the population are aged 50 years or older. RA is considered as an autoimmune disease whereas periodontitis has an infectious etiology with a complex inflammatory response. Both diseases are chronic and may present with bursts of disease activity. Association studies have suggested odds ratios of having RA and periodontitis varying from 1.8:1 (95% CI: 1.0–3.2, NS) to 8:1 (95% CI: 2.9–22.1, p<0.001). Genetic factors are driving the host responses in both RA and periodontitis. Tumor necrosis factor-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, regulates a cascade of inflammatory events in both RA and periodontitis. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a common pathogen in periodontal infection. P. gingivalis has also been identified in synovial fluid. The specific abilities of P. gingivalis to citrullinate host peptides by proteolytic cleavage at Arg-X peptide bonds by arginine gingipains can induce autoimmune responses in RA through development of anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies. In addition, P. gingivalis carries heat shock proteins (HSPs) that may also trigger autoimmune responses in subjects with RA. Data suggest that periodontal therapies combined with routine RA treatments further improve RA status. Conclusions Periodontal infection (P. gingivalis) carries a unique risk for development of autoimmune antibodies associated with RA. Patients with RA have either lost many teeth or usually have severe periodontitis. Additional research, both in regards to basic mechanisms as well as clinical studies, are necessary before it can be said that there are causative links between RA and periodontitis. Cross-disciplinary research in well-defined populations should be performed to further enhance knowledge and

  9. Development of simple clinical criteria for the definition of inflammatory arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and spondylitis: a report from the GRAPPA 2012 annual meeting.

    PubMed

    Mease, Philip J; Garg, Amit; Gladman, Dafna D; Helliwell, Philip S

    2013-08-01

    Dermatologist and primary care clinicians are in an ideal position to identify the emergence of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in patients with psoriasis. Yet these clinicians are not well trained to distinguish inflammatory musculoskeletal disease from other more common problems such as osteoarthritis, traumatic or degenerative tendonitis and back pain, or fibromyalgia. A simple set of clinical criteria to identify inflammatory disease would aid recognition of PsA. At its 2012 annual meeting, the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) discussed development of evidence-based, practical, and reliable definitions of inflammatory arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and spondylitis. This project will be a sequential process of expert clinician nominal-group technique, patient surveys and focus groups, and Delphi exercises to identify core features of inflammatory disease, testing these in a small group of patients with and without inflammatory disease, and finally validating these criteria in larger groups of patients. PMID:23908542

  10. Anti-inflammatory Effect of Methyl Gallate on Experimental Arthritis: Inhibition of Neutrophil Recruitment, Production of Inflammatory Mediators, and Activation of Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Correa, Luana Barbosa; Pádua, Tatiana Almeida; Seito, Leonardo Noboru; Costa, Thadeu Estevam Moreira Maramaldo; Silva, Magaiver Andrade; Candéa, André Luis Peixoto; Rosas, Elaine Cruz; Henriques, Maria G

    2016-06-24

    Methyl gallate (MG) is a prevalent phenolic acid in the plant kingdom, and its presence in herbal medicines might be related to its remarkable biological effects, such as its antioxidant, antitumor, and antimicrobial activities. Although some indirect evidence suggests anti-inflammatory activity for MG, there are no studies demonstrating this effect in animal models. Herein, we demonstrated that MG (0.7-70 mg/kg) inhibited zymosan-induced experimental arthritis in a dose-dependent manner. The oral administration of MG (7 mg/kg) attenuates arthritis induced by zymosan, affecting edema formation, leukocyte migration, and the production of inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, CXCL-1, LTB4, and PGE2). Pretreatment with MG inhibited in vitro neutrophil chemotaxis elicited by CXCL-1, as well as the adhesion of these cells to TNF-α-primed endothelial cells. MG also impaired zymosan-stimulated macrophages by inhibiting IL-6 and NO production, COX-2 and iNOS expression, and intracellular calcium mobilization. Thus, MG is likely to present an anti-inflammatory effect by targeting multiple cellular events such as the production of various inflammatory mediators, as well as leukocyte activation and migration. PMID:27227459

  11. The role of the lymphatic system in inflammatory-erosive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bouta, Echoe M; Li, Jie; Ju, Yawen; Brown, Edward B; Ritchlin, Christopher T; Xing, Lianping; Schwarz, Edward M

    2015-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a prevalent inflammatory joint disease with enigmatic flares, which causes swelling, pain, and irreversible connective tissue damage. Recently, it has been demonstrated in murine models of RA that the popliteal lymph node (PLN) is a biomarker of arthritic flare, as it "expands" in size and contrast enhancement during a prolonged asymptomatic phase, prior to when it "collapses" with accelerated synovitis and joint erosion. This PLN collapse is associated with adjacent knee flare, decreases in PLN volume and contrast enhancement, lymphatic pulse and pumping pressure, and an increase in PLN pressure. Currently, it is known that PLN collapse is accompanied by a translocation of B cells from the follicles to the sinuses, effectively clogging the lymphatic sinuses of the PLN, and that B cell depletion therapy ameliorates arthritic flare by eliminating these B cells and restoring passive lymphatic flow from inflamed joints. Here we review the technological advances that have launched this area of research, describe future directions to help elucidate the potential mechanism of PLN collapse, and speculate on clinical translation towards new diagnostics and therapies for RA. PMID:25598390

  12. Genetic linkage of familial granulomatous inflammatory arthritis, skin rash, and uveitis to chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Tromp, G.; Kuivaniemi, H.; Ala-Kokko, L.

    1996-11-01

    Blau syndrome (MIM 186580), first described in a large, three-generation kindred, is an autosomal, dominantly inherited disease characterized by multiorgan, tissue-specific inflammation. Its clinical phenotype includes granulomatous arthritis, skin rash, and uveitis and probably represents a subtype of a group of clinical entities referred to as {open_quotes}familial granulomatosis.{close_quotes} It is the sole human model with recognizably Mendelian inheritance for a variety of multisystem inflammatory diseases affecting a significant percentage of the population. A genomewide search for the Blau susceptibility locus was undertaken after karyotypic analysis revealed no abnormalities. Sixty-two of the 74-member pedigree were genotyped with dinucleotide-repeat markers. Linkage analysis was performed under dominant model of inheritance with reduced penetrance. The marker D16S298 gave a maximum LOD score of 3.75 at {theta} = .04, with two-point analysis. LOD scores for flanking markers were consistent and placed the Blau susceptibility locus within the 16p12-q21 interval. 46 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Isolated septic facet joint arthritis as a rare cause of acute and chronic low back pain – a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Klekot, Dominika; Zimny, Anna; Czapiga, Bogdan; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: The most common cause of low back pain is degenerative disease of the intervertebral disc and other structures of the lumbar spine. However, in some cases other less frequent causes of such pain can be seen, for example septic facet joint arthritis. Until now, only 40 cases of such inflammatory changes within the spine have been reported in the literature. The disease is probably underestimated due to improper diagnostic pathway. Case Report: The authors describe a case of a 53-year-old woman who was repeatedly hospitalized during a five-month period because of an acute, severe low back pain, with sphincter dysfunction, partially resembling sciatic symptoms. Physical examinations revealed also focal tenderness in the area of the lumbar spine. Inflammatory markers (ESR – erythrocyte sedimentation rate, CRP – C-reactive protein) were elevated. Conservative analgetic treatment brought only partial and temporary relief of the pain and symptoms. The final accurate diagnosis of isolated septic facet joint arthritis at the level of L5/S1 was established after several months from the onset of the first symptoms, after performing various imaging examinations, including bone scintigraphy as well as CT and MRI of the lumbosacral spine. The patient fully recovered after antibiotic therapy and surgery, which was proven in several follow-up examinations showing no relevant pathology of the lumbar spine. The authors broadly describe the etiology and clinical symptoms of the septic facet joint arthritis as well as the significant role of imaging methods, especially MRI, in diagnostic process. The authors also discuss currently available treatment options, both conservative and surgical. Conclusions: The diagnostic procedure of septic facet joint arthritis requires several steps to be taken. Establishing a correct diagnosis may be difficult, that is why it is important to remember about rare causes of low back pain and to perform detailed physical

  14. Laparoscopic surgery for inflammatory complications of acute sigmoid diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Fine, A P

    2001-01-01

    From March 1995 through March 2000, we treated patients with the laparoscopic approach who had emergent and urgent indications for surgery. We report a series of 17 procedures in 16 patients in the acute category excluding those with active bleeding. One case of morbidity (DVT) but no moralities occurred, with 3 of 17 patients converted to an open approach. The postoperative course and subsequent recoveries compare favorably with the open approach to this disease process. Three other series are discussed for comparison, all showing similar favorable results. We concluded that given sufficient experience in minimally invasive colon surgery, surgeons can manage acute inflammatory complications of sigmoid diverticulitis laparoscopically with potential benefit to the patient. PMID:11548828

  15. Laparoscopic Surgery for Inflammatory Complications of Acute Sigmoid Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    2001-01-01

    From March 1995 through March 2000, we treated patients with the laparoscopic approach who had emergent and urgent indications for surgery. We report a series of 17 procedures in 16 patients in the acute category excluding those with active bleeding. One case of morbidity (DVT) but no moralities occurred, with 3 of 17 patients converted to an open approach. The postoperative course and subsequent recoveries compare favorably with the open approach to this disease process. Three other series are discussed for comparison, all showing similar favorable results. We concluded that given sufficient experience in minimally invasive colon surgery, surgeons can manage acute inflammatory complications of sigmoid diverticulitis laparoscopically with potential benefit to the patient. PMID:11548828

  16. Acute Pelvic Inflammatory Disease and Clinical Response to Parenteral Doxycycline

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Anthony W.; Malkasian, Kay L.; Marshall, John R.; Guze, Lucien B.

    1975-01-01

    The bacteriology of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and clinical response to parenteral doxycycline were evaluated in 30 patients. Only 3 of 21 cul-de-sac cultures from PID patients were sterile, whereas all 8 normal control subjects yielded negative results (P< 0.005). Poor correlation was observed between cervical and cul-de-sac cultures. Neisseria gonorrhoeae, isolated from the cervix in 17 patients (57%), was recovered from the cul-de-sac only once. Streptococcus, Peptococcus, Peptostreptococcus, coliforms, and other organisms normally present in the vagina were the predominant isolates recovered from the cul-de-sac. Parenteral doxycycline resulted in rapid resolution of signs and symptoms (within 48 h) in 20 of 27 evaluable patients (74%). In five others, signs and symptoms of infection abated within 4 days. The remaining two patients failed to respond; in both cases, adnexal masses developed during doxycycline therapy. Gonococci were eradicated from the cervix in all but one patient who, nevertheless, had a rapid defervescence of symptoms. There was no clear-cut correlation between the clinical response and in vitro susceptibility of cul-de-sac isolates to doxycycline. These data confirm the usefulness of broad-spectrum antibiotics in acute PID. Culdocentesis is a reliable means of obtaining material for the bacteriological diagnosis of acute PID; however, the pathogenetic role and relative importance of gonococci and various other bacteria in acute PID need to be clarified further. PMID:1169908

  17. Pathophysiological role of the acute inflammatory response during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Cover, Cathleen; Liu Jie; Farhood, Anwar; Malle, Ernst; Waalkes, Michael P.; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut . E-mail: jaeschke@email.arizona.edu

    2006-10-01

    Neutrophils are recruited into the liver after acetaminophen (AAP) overdose but the pathophysiological relevance of this acute inflammatory response remains unclear. To address this question, we compared the time course of liver injury, hepatic neutrophil accumulation and inflammatory gene mRNA expression for up to 24 h after treatment with 300 mg/kg AAP in C3Heb/FeJ and C57BL/6 mice. Although there was no relevant difference in liver injury (assessed by the increase of plasma alanine aminotransferase activities and the areas of necrosis), the number of neutrophils and the expression of several pro-inflammatory genes (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-1{beta} and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) was higher in C3Heb/FeJ than in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, the expression of the anti-inflammatory genes interleukin-10 and heme oxygenase-1 was higher in C57BL/6 mice. Despite substantial hepatic neutrophil accumulation, none of the liver sections from both strains stained positive for hypochlorite-modified proteins, a specific marker for a neutrophil-induced oxidant stress. In addition, treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium chloride or apocynin or the anti-neutrophil antibody Gr-1 did not protect against AAP hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, although intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was previously shown to be important for neutrophil extravasation and tissue injury in several models, ICAM-1-deficient mice were not protected against AAP-mediated liver injury. Together, these data do not support the hypothesis that neutrophils aggravate liver injury induced by AAP overdose.

  18. Pathophysiological role of the acute inflammatory response during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Cover, Cathleen; Liu, Jie; Farhood, Anwar; Malle, Ernst; Waalkes, Michael P; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2006-10-01

    Neutrophils are recruited into the liver after acetaminophen (AAP) overdose but the pathophysiological relevance of this acute inflammatory response remains unclear. To address this question, we compared the time course of liver injury, hepatic neutrophil accumulation and inflammatory gene mRNA expression for up to 24 h after treatment with 300 mg/kg AAP in C3Heb/FeJ and C57BL/6 mice. Although there was no relevant difference in liver injury (assessed by the increase of plasma alanine aminotransferase activities and the areas of necrosis), the number of neutrophils and the expression of several pro-inflammatory genes (e.g., tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta and macrophage inflammatory protein-2) was higher in C3Heb/FeJ than in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, the expression of the anti-inflammatory genes interleukin-10 and heme oxygenase-1 was higher in C57BL/6 mice. Despite substantial hepatic neutrophil accumulation, none of the liver sections from both strains stained positive for hypochlorite-modified proteins, a specific marker for a neutrophil-induced oxidant stress. In addition, treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium chloride or apocynin or the anti-neutrophil antibody Gr-1 did not protect against AAP hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, although intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was previously shown to be important for neutrophil extravasation and tissue injury in several models, ICAM-1-deficient mice were not protected against AAP-mediated liver injury. Together, these data do not support the hypothesis that neutrophils aggravate liver injury induced by AAP overdose. PMID:16781746

  19. Investigation of Antiarthritic Potential of Plumeria alba L. Leaves in Acute and Chronic Models of Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vipin; Gupta, Pankaj; Singh, Surender

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The present investigation was designed to evaluate antiarthritic potential of fractions of hydroalcoholic extract from leaves of P. alba. Materials and Methods. Plumeria alba L. leaves were extracted with hydroalcohol (30 : 70) to obtain hydroalcoholic extract of P. alba. This extract was further fractionated with solvents ethyl acetate and n-butanol to obtain EAPA and BPA, respectively. These fractions were tested against formaldehyde and Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) induced arthritis. Arthritis assessment, paw volume, body weight, motor incoordination, and nociceptive threshold were measured. On day 21, the animals were sacrificed and histopathology was done. Results. The 100 and 200 mg/kg doses of EAPA and BPA caused a significant (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) reduction in paw swelling in both models. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and spleen weight decreased significantly (P < 0.01) in arthritic rats treated with extracts. There was significant (P < 0.05) improvement in thymus weight in EAPA treated rats whereas significant (P < 0.01) improvement was also seen in haemoglobin level (Hb) in diclofenac treated group. Motor incoordination and nociceptive threshold were also significantly (P ≤ 0.05–0.01) improved. Conclusion. The present study suggests that Plumeria alba L. has protective activity against arthritis and supports the traditional use of P. alba for rheumatism and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:25025056

  20. Triptolide Modulates TREM-1 Signal Pathway to Inhibit the Inflammatory Response in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Danping; He, Xiaojuan; Bian, Yanqin; Guo, Qingqing; Zheng, Kang; Zhao, Yukun; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Baoqin; Xu, Xuegong; Zhang, Ge; Lu, Aiping

    2016-01-01

    Triptolide (TP), an active component isolated from Tripterygiumwilfordii Hook F, has therapeutic potential against rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the underlying molecular mechanism has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanisms of TP acting on RA by combining bioinformatics analysis with experiment validation. The human protein targets of TP and the human genes of RA were found in the PubChem database and NCBI, respectively. These two dataset were then imported into Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software online, and then the molecular network of TP on RA could be set up and analyzed. After that, both in vitro and in vivo experiments were done to further verify the prediction. The results indicated that the main canonical signal pathways of TP protein targets networks were mainly centered on cytokine and cellular immune signaling, and triggering receptors expressed on myeloid cells (TREM)-1 signaling was searched to be the top one shared signaling pathway and involved in the cytokine and cellular immune signaling. Further in vitro experiments indicated that TP not only remarkably lowered the levels of TREM-1 and DNAX-associated protein (DAP)12, but also significantly suppressed the activation of janus activating kinase (JAK)2 and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)3. The expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-stimulated U937 cells also decreased after treatment with TP. Furthermore, TREM-1 knockdown was able to interfere with the inhibition effects of TP on these cytokines production. In vivo experiments showed that TP not only significantly inhibited the TREM-1 mRNA and DAP12 mRNA expression, and activation of JAK2 and STAT3 in ankle of rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), but also remarkably decreased production of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in serum and joint. These findings demonstrated that TP could modulate the TREM1 signal

  1. Triptolide Modulates TREM-1 Signal Pathway to Inhibit the Inflammatory Response in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Danping; He, Xiaojuan; Bian, Yanqin; Guo, Qingqing; Zheng, Kang; Zhao, Yukun; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Baoqin; Xu, Xuegong; Zhang, Ge; Lu, Aiping

    2016-01-01

    Triptolide (TP), an active component isolated from Tripterygiumwilfordii Hook F, has therapeutic potential against rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the underlying molecular mechanism has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanisms of TP acting on RA by combining bioinformatics analysis with experiment validation. The human protein targets of TP and the human genes of RA were found in the PubChem database and NCBI, respectively. These two dataset were then imported into Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software online, and then the molecular network of TP on RA could be set up and analyzed. After that, both in vitro and in vivo experiments were done to further verify the prediction. The results indicated that the main canonical signal pathways of TP protein targets networks were mainly centered on cytokine and cellular immune signaling, and triggering receptors expressed on myeloid cells (TREM)-1 signaling was searched to be the top one shared signaling pathway and involved in the cytokine and cellular immune signaling. Further in vitro experiments indicated that TP not only remarkably lowered the levels of TREM-1 and DNAX-associated protein (DAP)12, but also significantly suppressed the activation of janus activating kinase (JAK)2 and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)3. The expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-stimulated U937 cells also decreased after treatment with TP. Furthermore, TREM-1 knockdown was able to interfere with the inhibition effects of TP on these cytokines production. In vivo experiments showed that TP not only significantly inhibited the TREM-1 mRNA and DAP12 mRNA expression, and activation of JAK2 and STAT3 in ankle of rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), but also remarkably decreased production of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in serum and joint. These findings demonstrated that TP could modulate the TREM1 signal

  2. Performance of the Existing Classification Criteria for Gout in Thai Patients Presenting With Acute Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jatuworapruk, Kanon; Lhakum, Panomkorn; Pattamapaspong, Nuttaya; Kasitanon, Nuntana; Wangkaew, Suparaporn; Louthrenoo, Worawit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently, there are 5 existing classification criteria for gout: the Rome, New York, American Rheumatism Association (ARA), Mexico, and Netherlands criteria. This study was carried out to determine the performance of these classification criteria in Thai patients presenting with acute arthritis. All consecutive patients presenting with acute arthritis and being consulted at the Rheumatology Unit, Chiang Mai University Hospital from January 2013 to May 2015 were invited to join the study. Gout was defined by the presence of monosodium urate crystals in the synovial fluid or tissue examined by experienced rheumatologists. The 5 existing gout classification criteria were performed and evaluated in all of the patients, who were divided in subgroups of early disease (≤2 years), established disease (>2 years), and those without tophus. There were 136 gout and 97 nongout patients. Sensitivity and specificity across all criteria ranged from 75.7% to 97.1% and 68.0% to 84.5%, respectively. Overall, the Mexico criteria had the highest sensitivity (97.1%), and the ARA survey criteria the highest specificity (84.5%), whereas the Mexico criteria performed well in early disease with sensitivity and specificity of 97.1% and 81.7%, respectively. All 5 criteria showed high sensitivity (from 76.4% to 99.1%) but low specificity (from 30.8% to 65.4%) in established disease. In patients without tophus, the sensitivity and specificity ranged from 64.1% to 95.7% and 68.8% to 85.4%, respectively. The ARA survey criteria across all groups showed consistently high specificity for gout. The 5 existing classification criteria for gout had limited sensitivity and specificity in Thai patients presenting with acute arthritis. The ARA survey criteria are the most suitable for diagnosing gout in Thai people when crystal identification is not available. PMID:26844519

  3. Grisel syndrome, acute otitis media, and temporo-mandibular reactive arthritis: A rare association.

    PubMed

    Martins, J; Almeida, S; Nunes, P; Prata, F; Lobo, M L; Marques, J G

    2015-08-01

    We present a case report of a four-year-old boy with torcicollis and trismus after acute otitis media. Grisel Syndrome diagnosis in association with temporo-mandibular reactive arthritis was admitted, leading to early conservative treatment. GS should be suspected in a child presenting with torticollis after an upper respiratory tract infection or an ENT surgical procedure. The association with temporo-mandibular reactive findings is somehow rarer but not impossible, due to the close vascular communication between retropharyngeal and pterigoid spaces. PMID:26060148

  4. Post-streptococcal reactive arthritis in children: a distinct entity from acute rheumatic fever

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    There is a debate whether post-streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA) is a separate entity or a condition on the spectrum of acute rheumatic fever (ARF). We believe that PSRA is a distinct entity and in this paper we review the substantial differences between PSRA and ARF. We show how the demographic, clinical, genetic and treatment characteristics of PSRA differ from ARF. We review diagnostic criteria and regression formulas that attempt to classify patients with PSRA as opposed to ARF. The important implication of these findings may relate to the issue of prophylactic antibiotics after PSRA. However, future trials will be necessary to conclusively answer that question. PMID:22013970

  5. Innate immune inflammatory response in the acutely ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Angelidis, Christos; Bouras, Georgios; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Gerckens, Ulrich; Cleman, Michael W; Giannopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    The "holy grail" of modern interventional cardiology is the salvage of viable myocardial tissue in the distribution of an acutely occluded coronary artery. Thrombolysis and percutaneous coronary interventions, provided they can be delivered on time, can interrupt the occlusion and save tissue. At the same time restoring the patency of the coronary vessels and providing the ischemic myocardium with blood can cause additional tissue damage. A key element of ischemic and reperfusion injury and major determinant of the evolution of damage in the injured myocardium is the inflammatory response. The innate immune system initiates and directs this response which is a prerequisite for subsequent healing. The complement cascade is set in motion following the release of subcellular membrane constituents. Endogenous 'danger' signals known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released from ischemic and dying cells alert the innate immune system and activate several signal transduction pathways through interactions with the highly conserved Toll like receptors (TLRs). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation directly induces pro-inflammatory cascades and triggers formation of the inflammasome. The challenge lies into designing strategies that specifically block the inflammatory cascades responsible for tissue damage without affecting those concerned with tissue healing. PMID:25102201

  6. “Employment and arthritis: making it work” a randomized controlled trial evaluating an online program to help people with inflammatory arthritis maintain employment (study protocol)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arthritis and musculoskeletal conditions are the leading cause of long-term work disability (WD), an outcome with a major impact on quality of life and a high cost to society. The importance of decreased at-work productivity has also recently been recognized. Despite the importance of these problems, few interventions have been developed to reduce the impact of arthritis on employment. We have developed a novel intervention called “Making It Work”, a program to help people with inflammatory arthritis (IA) deal with employment issues, prevent WD and improve at-work productivity. After favorable results in a proof-of-concept study, we converted the program to a web-based format for broader dissemination and improved accessibility. The objectives of this study are: 1) to evaluate in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) the effectiveness of the program at preventing work cessation and improving at-work productivity; 2) to perform a cost-utility analysis of the intervention. Methods/Design 526 participants with IA will be recruited from British Columbia, Alberta, and Ontario in Canada. The intervention consists of a) 5 online group sessions; b) 5 web-based e-learning modules; c) consultations with an occupational therapist for an ergonomic work assessment and a vocational rehabilitation counselor. Questionnaires will be administered online at baseline and every 6 months to collect information about demographics, disease measures, costs, work-related risk factors for WD, quality of life, and work outcomes. Primary outcomes include at-work productivity and time to work cessation of > 6 months for any reason. Secondary outcomes include temporary work cessation, number of days missed from work per year, reduction in hours worked per week, quality adjusted life year for the cost utility analysis, and changes from baseline in employment risk factors. Analysis of Variance will evaluate the intervention’s effect on at-work productivity, and multivariable

  7. Anti-inflammatory activities of light emitting diode irradiation on collagen-induced arthritis in mice (a secondary publication)

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Yusuke; Abiko, Yoshimitsu

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an auto-immune disease afflicting multiple joints of the body, where as a result of the increase in inflammatory cytokines and tissue destructive factors such as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3, deterioration of the bones and cartilages of the joints occurs. The present investigation was carried out to study the anti-inflammatory activities of light emitting diode (LED) irradiation on hind paw inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice models. Materials and method: RA in the CIA mouse model was induced by immunization of DBA/1J mice with intradermal injections of an emulsion of bovine type II collagen and complete Freund's adjuvant. A total of 20 CIA mice were subdivided into the following groups: control group, CIA group and 2 groups of LED irradiated CIA mice (LED groups) (n=5 per group). The mouse knee joint area in the LED groups (the 570 nm and 940 nm groups) was irradiated with LED energy, three times a week for 500 s per session over 8 weeks at a dose of 5 J/cm2. The hind paw swelling was assessed by the increase in hind paw thickness. The serum levels of the inflammatory cytokines and arthritic factor MMP-3 were determined with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: In the LED-570 and LED-940 groups at 4 weeks after arthritis induction, the swelling inhibition index was 18.1±4.9 and 29.3±4.0 respectively. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and MMP-3 serum levels were significantly lower in the LED-940 group. Conclusions: LED irradiation, particularly in the near-infrared was effective for inhibition of the inflammatory reactions caused by RA. PMID:25368445

  8. Role of anaerobes in acute pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Saini, S; Gupta, N; Batra, G; Arora, D R

    2003-01-01

    Pouch of Douglas aspirates were collected from 50 women with history and examination suggestive of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and 20 healthy women admitted for tubal ligation served as control. A total of 57 microorganisms were isolated from 37 patients out of 50 in study group. Of 37 positive cultures 21(56.7%) were monomicrobial and 16(43.2%) were polymicrobial. Most common symptom in study group was lower abdominal pain (90%), vaginal discharge (70%) and irregular bleeding (40%) and 30% patients had history of intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) implantation. The predominant aerobic isolates were Escherichia coli, Coagulase Negative Staphylococcus (CONS), Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae while common anaerobes were Bacteroides fragilis, Prevotella melaninogenica, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Peptostreptococcus spp. Our study shows that cefotaxime, cefuroxime and gentamicin may be used for gram negative aerobic bacilli; cloxacillin, cephaloridine and erythromycin for aerobic gram positive cocci and amikacin and ceftazidime for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus for optimum therapy of acute PID it is beneficial to keep in mind major conceptual changes and therapeutic realities that have influenced current understanding of acute PID and have affected the choice of therapy. PMID:17643017

  9. Psoriatic arthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cantini, Fabrizio; Niccoli, Laura; Nannini, Carlotta; Kaloudi, Olga; Bertoni, Michele; Cassarà, Emanuele

    2010-10-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory rheumatic disorder of unknown etiology occurring in patients with psoriasis. The Classification Criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis study group has recently developed a validated set of classification criteria for psoriatic arthritis with a sensitivity of 91.4% and a specificity of 98.7%. Three main clinical patterns have been identified: oligoarticular (≤ 4 involved joints) or polyarticular (≥ 5 involved joints) peripheral disease and axial disease with or without associated peripheral arthritis. In this context distal interphalangeal arthritis and arthritis mutilans may occur. According to other reports, also in our centre, asymmetric oligoarthritis is the most frequent pattern at onset. Axial disease has been estimated between 5% and 36% of patients. It is characterized by an irregular involvement of the axial skeleton with a predilection for the cervical spine. Recurrent episodes of enthesitis and dactylitis represent a hallmark of psoriatic arthritis. In around 20% of cases distal extremity swelling with pitting edema of the hands or feet is observed. Unilateral acute iridocyclitis, usually recurrent in alternate fashion, is the most frequent extra-articular manifestation, and accelerated atherosclerosis is the prominent comorbidity. The clinical course of peripheral and axial psoriatic arthritis is usually less severe than rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, respectively. Local corticosteroid injections and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are recommended in milder forms. Sulphasalazine and methotrexate are effective in peripheral psoriatic arthritis. Recent studies have provided evidence on the efficacy of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α drugs to control symptoms and to slow or arrest radiological disease progression. PMID:21199465

  10. Comparison of the suppressive effects of soluble CR1 and C5a receptor antagonist in acute arthritis induced in rats by blocking of CD59

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, M; Nishikawa, K; Morgan, B P; Matsuo, S

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the effects of suppression of complement activation at C3 level and inhibition of C5a on acute synovitis in rats. Acute synovitis was induced in Wistar rats by intra-articular (i.a.) injection into one knee of 0.3 mg of MoAb 6D1 (anti-rat CD59 antibody). In the treatment groups, soluble CR1 (sCR1) or C5a receptor (C5aR) antagonist was administered intra-articularly or intravenously and effects on the course of the acute synovitis were monitored. Synovitis induced by 6D1 was characterized by joint swelling, thickening of synovial tissue, cellular infiltration and deposition of membrane attack complex (MAC) on the synovial surface. Neither inflammatory change nor MAC deposition was found in rats which received an i.a. injection of sCR1 to suppress complement activity in the joint. Intra-articular injection of sCR1 did not reduce plasma complement activity. Intravenous administration of sCR1 suppressed plasma complement activity but had no effect on the course of the arthritis and synovitis with MAC deposition was observed. Neither i.a. nor i.v. injection of C5aR antagonist had any suppressive effects on inflammatory change or MAC deposition in synovium. The data show that inflammatory change induced by 6D1 was mediated by local complement activation and was not accompanied by systemic complement activation. C5a generation was not responsible for the observed inflammation, suggesting that other complement activation products, possibly MAC, mediate the inflammatory change observed in this model of acute synovitis in rats. PMID:10632677

  11. Identifying real and perceived barriers to therapeutic education programs for individuals with inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bain, Lorna; Sangrar, Ruheena; Bornstein, Carolyn; Lukmanji, Sara; Hapuhennedige, Sandani; Thorne, Carter; Beattie, Karen A

    2016-09-01

    Therapeutic Education Programs (TEPs) grounded in self-management principles have been shown to improve quality of life of patients with chronic conditions and reduce patient-related healthcare costs. Though these programs are becoming more readily available, patients often experience barriers in participating. This study sought to identify barriers faced by inflammatory arthritis (IA) patients in attending a TEP and understand how patients overcame perceived barriers. A mixed-method study design was used. Questionnaires were distributed to individuals with IA who were invited to attend a TEP between 2010 and 2013. Respondents were those that chose not to attend (group A), individuals who attended ≤4 of 10 sessions (group B), individuals who attended ≥5 of 10 sessions prior to May 2013 (group C), and individuals who attended ≥5 of 10 sessions from June 2013 to November 2013 (group D). Individuals in group D were also invited to participate in focus groups to discuss how they had overcome perceived barriers. Real barriers identified by individuals in groups A and B included time, distance, and cost associated with attendance. Individuals who overcame perceived barriers (groups C and D) discussed strategies they used to do so. Aspects of the overall program experience and access to clinic and program also contributed to patients being able to overcome barriers. Time, distance, and cost are external barriers that prevented individuals from utilizing self-management education opportunities. These barriers were overcome if and when individuals had resources available to them. Readiness for behavior change also influenced commitment to participate in the program. PMID:26511967

  12. Complementary and alternative medicine use in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) is potentially prevalent among paediatric patients with chronic diseases but with variable rates among different age groups, diseases and countries. There are no recent reports on CAM use among paediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in Europe. We hypothesized that CAM use associates with a more severe disease in paediatric IBD and JIA. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire study among adolescent outpatients with IBD and JIA addressing the frequency and type of CAM use during the past year. The patients were recruited at the Children’s Hospital, University of Helsinki, Finland. Results Of the 147 respondents, 97 had IBD (Crohn’s disease: n = 46; median age 15.5, disease duration 3.4 years) and 50 had JIA (median age 13.8, disease duration 6.9 years). During the past 12 months, 48% regularly used CAM while 81% reported occasional CAM use. Compared to patients with JIA, the use of CAM in IBD patients tended to be more frequent. The most commonly used CAM included probiotics, multivitamins, and mineral and trace element supplements. Self-imposed dietary restrictions were common, involving 27.6% of the non-CAM users but 64.8% of all CAM users. Disease activity was associated with CAM use in JIA but not in IBD. Conclusions CAM use is frequent among adolescents with IBD and JIA and associates with self-imposed dietary restrictions. Reassuringly, adherence to disease modifying drugs is good in young CAM users. In JIA, patients with active disease used more frequently CAM than patients with inactive disease. As CAM use is frequent, physicians should familiarise themselves with the basic concepts of CAM. The potential pharmacological interaction or the toxicity of certain CAM products warrants awareness and hence physicians should actively ask their patients about CAM use. PMID:24708564

  13. Acute hypoxemia in humans enhances the neutrophil inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Douglas Y; Moore, Ernest E; Partrick, David A; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Offner, Patrick J; Silliman, Christopher C

    2002-04-01

    The neutrophil (PMN) is regarded as a key component in the hyperinflammatory response known as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and subsequent multiple organ failure (MOF) are related to the severity of this hyperinflammation. ICU patients who are at highest risk of developing MOF may have acute hypoxic events that complicate their hospital course. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of acute hypoxia and subsequent hypoxemia on circulating PMNs in human volunteers. Healthy subjects were exposed to a changing O2/N2 mixture until their O2 saturation (SaO2) reached a level of 68% saturation. These subjects were then exposed to room air and then returned to their baseline SaO2. PMNs were isolated from pre- and post-hypoxemic arterial blood samples and were then either stimulated with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) or PMA alone, or they were primed with L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine, beta-acetyl-gamma-O-alkyl (PAF) followed by fMLP activation. Reactive oxygen species generation as measured by superoxide anion production was enhanced in primed PMNs after hypoxemia. Protease degranulation as measured by elastase release was enhanced in both quiescent PMNs and primed PMNs after fMLP activation following the hypoxemic event. Adhesion molecule upregulation as measured by CD11b/CD18, however, was not significantly changed after hypoxemia. Apoptosis of quiescent PMNs was delayed after the hypoxemic event. TNFalpha, IL-1, IL-6, and IL-8 cytokine levels were unchanged following hypoxemia. These results indicate that relevant acute hypoxemic events observed in the clinical setting enhance several PMN cytotoxic functions and suggest that a transient hypoxemic insult may promote hyperinflammation. PMID:11954825

  14. Anti-inflammatory functions of Houttuynia cordata Thunb. and its compounds: A perspective on its potential role in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    LI, JUN; ZHAO, FUTAO

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review was to take a look at the anti-inflammatory functions of Houttuynia cordata Thunb. (HCT) that have been illustrated in the literature and to explore new fields in which HCT could be used in the future. The use of HCT has been described in broad inflammatory domains, where it has exhibited a variety of activities, including antiviral, antibacterial, antiparasitic and immunostimulant activity, with high efficiency, mild features and definite therapeutic effects. The numerous anti-inflammatory functions of HCT have demonstrated that HCT has wide application prospects. New uses of HCT and the full extent of its utilization await further investigation. The basic pathological change of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is synovial proliferation which leads to joint destruction in the long-term. There are types of drugs that have been used clinically for patients with RA, however, due to their side-effects or high prices their broad usage is limited. A safe and low-cost drug is urgently required to be developed for the clinical usage of patients with RA. Thus, HCT has the potential to be a good candidate in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26170903

  15. Anti-inflammatory activity of lycopene isolated from Chlorella marina on type II collagen induced arthritis in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Renju, G L; Muraleedhara Kurup, G; Saritha Kumari, C H

    2013-04-01

    The role of commercially available lycopene (all-trans) from tomato in controlling arthritis has been reported. Even though many reports are available that the cis form of lycopene is more biologically active, no report seems to be available on lycopene (cis and trans) isolated from an easily available and culturable sources. In the present study, the anti-arthritic effect of lycopene (cis and trans) from the algae Chlorella marina (AL) has been compared with lycopene (all-trans) from tomato (TL) and indomethacin (Indo). Arthritis (CIA) was developed in male Sprague dawley rats by collagen and the following parameters were studied. The activities of inflammatory marker enzymes like cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were found to be decreased on treatment with AL when compared to TL and Indo. Changes in Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cells (RBC) count, hemoglobin (Hb), C-reactive protein (CRP), rheumatoid factor (RF), and ceruloplasmin levels observed in the blood of arthritic animals were brought back to normal by AL when compared to TL and Indo. Histopathology of paw and joint tissues showed marked reduction in edema on supplementation of AL. Thus these results indicate the potential beneficiary effect of algal lycopene on collagen induced arthritis in rats when compared to TL and even to the commonly used anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin. Therefore lycopene from C. marina would be recommended as a better natural source with increased activity and without side effects in the treatment of anti-inflammatory diseases. PMID:23237458

  16. Psoriatic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that often occurs with a skin condition called psoriasis . ... inflammatory condition. About 1 in 20 people with psoriasis may develop arthritis with the skin condition. In most cases, psoriasis ...

  17. Psoriatic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that often occurs with a skin condition called psoriasis . Causes Psoriasis is a common skin problem that causes red ... inflammatory condition. About 1 in 20 people with psoriasis may develop arthritis with the skin condition. In ...

  18. Gait changes precede overt arthritis and strongly correlate with symptoms and histopathological events in pristane-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) in the rat has been described as an animal model of inflammatory arthritis which exhibits features similar to rheumatoid arthritis in humans, such as a chronic, destructive, and symmetrical involvement of peripheral joints. However, so far little is known about the earliest inflammatory events and their influence on locomotor behaviour during the course of PIA. To investigate this issue a detailed analysis of the pathologic changes occurring during the prodromal and early stages of PIA was performed. Methods Arthritis was induced in DA.rats by injection of 150 μl 2,6,10,4-tetramethyl-pentadecane (pristane) at the base of the tail and changes in locomotor behaviour of the affected paws were monitored using the CatWalk quantitative gait analysis system. The pathologic events occurring in the joints of pristane-injected animals were studied before onset, at onset, and during acute phase of arthritis by histological methods. Results Gait analysis revealed that changes in locomotion such as reduced paw print areas and stance phase time are already apparent before the onset of clinically discernible arthritis symptoms (erythema, paw swelling) and correlate with PIA scores. In agreement with these findings, inflammatory tenosynovitis could be observed by histology already before the onset of erythema and swelling of the respective paws. In the most heavily affected rats also irregularities in step sequence patterns occurred A kinetic analysis of clinical and histological findings demonstrated that gait changes precede the pathological changes occurring during the acute phase of pristane-induced arthritis. Conclusions Gait analysis allows for pinpointing the initial inflammatory changes in experimental arthritis models such as pristane-induced arthritis. Analysis of early clinically relevant symptoms in arthritis models may facilitate the search for novel therapeutics to interfere with pain, inflammation and joint destruction

  19. β-Glucuronidase, a Regulator of Lyme Arthritis Severity, Modulates Lysosomal Trafficking and MMP-9 Secretion in Response to Inflammatory Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Bramwell, Kenneth K C; Mock, Kelton; Ma, Ying; Weis, John H; Teuscher, Cory; Weis, Janis J

    2015-08-15

    The lysosomal enzyme β-glucuronidase (Gusb) is a key regulator of Lyme-associated and K/B×N-induced arthritis severity. The luminal enzymes present in lysosomes provide essential catabolic functions for the homeostatic degradation of a variety of macromolecules. In addition to this essential catabolic function, lysosomes play important roles in the inflammatory response following infection. Secretory lysosomes and related vesicles can participate in the inflammatory response through fusion with the plasma membrane and release of bioactive contents into the extracellular milieu. In this study, we show that GUSB hypomorphism potentiates lysosomal exocytosis following inflammatory stimulation. This leads to elevated secretion of lysosomal contents, including glycosaminoglycans, lysosomal hydrolases, and matrix metalloproteinase 9, a known modulator of Lyme arthritis severity. This mechanistic insight led us to test the efficacy of rapamycin, a drug known to suppress lysosomal exocytosis. Both Lyme and K/B×N-associated arthritis were suppressed by this treatment concurrent with reduced lysosomal release. PMID:26170381

  20. Autoantibodies to type II collagen: occurrence in rheumatoid arthritis, other arthritides, autoimmune connective tissue diseases, and chronic inflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, E K; Gatenby, P A; McGill, N W; Bateman, J F; Cole, W G; York, J R

    1988-01-01

    Serum IgG antibodies to native and denatured human type II collagen (Col II) were measured using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). One hundred and thirty one patients with various forms of arthritis such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriatic arthritis (PSA). Reiter's Syndrome (RS), osteoarthritis (OA), and gout, 60 with autoimmune connective tissue disease, and 37 with the chronic inflammatory conditions--graft versus host disease and leprosy--were studied. With the exception of RS, PSA, OA, and gout, significant levels of Col II antibodies were detected in each disease group. Blocking studies with types I and II collagen on selected serum samples confirmed the specificity to native Col II, though some cross reactivity was apparent with denatured collagen. The patients with RA who were Col II antibody positive tended to fall into stage III of disease progression. There was, however, no correlation with rheumatoid factor, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, or disease duration and this, together with the finding that Col II antibodies are present in a wide array of diseases, makes their role in the pathogenesis of RA questionable. They may arise as a secondary disease perpetuating mechanism in some patients, or in turn may be an epiphenomenon secondary to generalised disturbed immunoregulation or B cell hyperreactivity, or both, that characterises these clinical conditions. PMID:3365030

  1. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... children with arthritis Preventing anemia in children with chronic inflammatory diseases such as arthritis Whether daily calcium supplements ... density in children with arthritis The impact of chronic and recurrent pain on ... role of an inflammatory chemical called interleukin-15 (IL-15). For More ...

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease-related arthritis – clinical evaluation and possible role of cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Kontny, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), characterized by chronic mucosal inflammation, rheumatic abnormalities ranging from arthralgia to spondyloarthritis (SpA) are the most common extraintestinal manifestations. The pathogenesis of IBD-related arthritis is unclear. In this study, we search for clinical and immunological differences between patients with IBD-associated spondyloarthritis and IBD patients without SpA symptoms. Material and methods Patients with an established diagnosis of IBD, suffering from Leśniowski-Crohn disease (L-CD, n = 24) or ulcerative colitis (UC, n = 27), were enrolled in the study. Clinical evaluation of patients, based on medical history, blood tests, physical and radiological examinations, allowed two subgroups of patients to be established. One subgroup comprised patients fulfilling criteria for both IBD and SpA (IBD + SpA, n = 29), while the other included IBD patients with arthralgia only (IBD, n = 22). Serum concentrations of interleukins (IL-6, IL-10, IL-21, IL-22, IL-23) and interferon γ (IFN-γ) were measured by specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Results Patients with IBD + SpA were characterized by shorter disease duration (3 vs. 9 years), higher frequency of HLA-B27 positivity (60.7% vs. 4.5%) and uveitis (20.7% vs. 0%), compared with the IBD subgroup. The serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) and tested cytokines did not differ between IBD + SpA and IBD patients, or between L-CD and UC groups. However, in the IBD + SpA subgroup there was weak to moderate positive correlation between serum concentrations of CRP and several cytokines (IL-6, IL-21, IFN-γ), and additional moderate positive correlation between serum concentrations of IL-23 and clinical activity of SpA. By contrast, in IBD subgroup a strong inverse correlation between serum concentrations of Interleukin 23 and CRP was found. Conclusions IBD-related spondyloarthritis occurs relatively early, affects mostly HLA-B27

  3. Characterization of the acute and persistent pain state present in K/BxN serum transfer arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, Christina A.; Corr, Maripat; Firestein, Gary S.; Mobargha, Anahita; Yaksh, Tony L.; Svensson, Camilla I.

    2010-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune arthritis that affects approximately 1% of the population. Synovial inflammation cannot fully explain the level of pain reported by patients and facilitation of pain processing at the spinal level has been implicated. We characterized the K/BxN serum transfer arthritis model as a model of joint inflammation-induced pain and examine pharmacologic responsiveness and spinal glia activation. Mechanical allodynia developed congruently with joint swelling. Surprisingly, allodynia persisted after resolution of inflammation. At the peak of joint inflammation, (days 4–10) hypersensitivity was attenuated with i.p. etanercept, gabapentin, and ketorolac. Following resolution of synovial inflammation (day 19–28), only gabapentin relieved allodynia. The superficial dorsal horn of arthritic mice displayed increased staining of microglia at early and late time points, but astrocyte staining increased only during the inflammatory phase. ATF3, a marker of nerve injury, was significantly increased in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia during the late phase (day 28). Hence, serum transfer in the K/BxN serum transfer arthritis model produces a persistent pain state, where the allodynia during the inflammatory state is attenuated by TNF and prostaglandin inhibitors, and the pharmacology and histochemistry data suggest a transition from an inflammatory state to a state that resembles a neuropathic condition over time. Therefore, the K/BxN serum transfer model represents a multifaceted model for studies exploring pain mechanisms in conditions of joint inflammation and may serve as a platform for exploring novel treatment strategies for pain in human arthritic conditions. K/BxN serum transfer arthritis produces persistent mechanical hypersensitivity despite resolution of clinical signs with evidence of transition from an inflammatory to neuropathic pain state. PMID:20739123

  4. Single-walled carbon nanohorns as drug carriers: adsorption of prednisolone and anti-inflammatory effects on arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Maki; Tahara, Yoshio; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Murakami, Tatsuya; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Iijima, Sumio; Waga, Iwao; Yudasaka, Masako

    2011-11-01

    Prednisolone (PSL), an anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid drug, was adsorbed on oxidized single-walled carbon nanohorns (oxSWNHs) in ethanol-water solvent. The quantity of adsorbed PSL on the oxSWNHs was 0.35-0.54 g/g depending on the sizes and numbers of holes on the oxSWNHs. PSL was adsorbed on both the outside and the inside of the oxSWNHs, and released quickly in a couple of hours and slowly within about one day from the respective places. The released quantity in culture medium strongly depended on the concentration of the PSL-oxSWNH complexes, suggesting that PSL adsorbing on oxSWNHs and PSL in the culture medium were in concentration equilibrium. The local injection of PSL-oxSWNHs into the tarsal joint of rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) slightly retarded the progression of the arthritis compared with controls. By histological analysis of the ankle joint, the anti-inflammatory effect of PSL-oxSWNHs was also observed.

  5. Syndecan-3 is selectively pro-inflammatory in the joint and contributes to antigen-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Syndecans are heparan sulphate proteoglycans expressed by endothelial cells. Syndecan-3 is expressed by synovial endothelial cells of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients where it binds chemokines, suggesting a role in leukocyte trafficking. The objective of the current study was to examine the function of syndecan-3 in joint inflammation by genetic deletion in mice and compare with other tissues. Methods Chemokine C-X-C ligand 1 (CXCL1) was injected in the joints of syndecan-3−/−and wild-type mice and antigen-induced arthritis performed. For comparison chemokine was administered in the skin and cremaster muscle. Intravital microscopy was performed in the cremaster muscle. Results Administration of CXCL1 in knee joints of syndecan-3−/−mice resulted in reduced neutrophil accumulation compared to wild type. This was associated with diminished presence of CXCL1 at the luminal surface of synovial endothelial cells where this chemokine clustered and bound to heparan sulphate. Furthermore, in the arthritis model syndecan-3 deletion led to reduced joint swelling, leukocyte accumulation, cartilage degradation and overall disease severity. Conversely, CXCL1 administration in the skin of syndecan-3 null mice provoked increased neutrophil recruitment and was associated with elevated luminal expression of E-selectin by dermal endothelial cells. Similarly in the cremaster, intravital microscopy showed increased numbers of leukocytes adhering and rolling in venules in syndecan-3−/−mice in response to CXCL1 or tumour necrosis factor alpha. Conclusions This study shows a novel role for syndecan-3 in inflammation. In the joint it is selectively pro-inflammatory, functioning in endothelial chemokine presentation and leukocyte recruitment and cartilage damage in an RA model. Conversely, in skin and cremaster it is anti-inflammatory. PMID:25015005

  6. Target effector role of vascular endothelium in the inflammatory response: insights from the clinical trial of anti-TNF alpha antibody in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Paleolog, E

    1997-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterised by chronic joint inflammation and infiltration by cells from the blood, especially activated T cells and macrophages, together with formation of new blood vessels. The overgrowth of the synovial lesion results eventually in destruction of cartilage and bone. Cytokines play a major role in RA, both in systemic inflammatory processes, such as induction of acute phase protein synthesis, and in the stimulation of new blood vessel development and recruitment of leucocytes to developing lesions. The focus for the interplay of many cytokines is the endothelium, the lining layer of the vasculature. This is the primary target for circulating mediators, and it controls the traffic of cells and molecules from the bloodstream into underlying tissues. Targeting the action of individual cytokines--for example, using antibody against tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), has been shown to be very effective in the treatment of RA. Blockade of TNF alpha activity results in deactivation of the endothelium, manifested as reduced expression of adhesion molecules and chemoattractant cytokines, leading to diminished trafficking of inflammatory cells to synovial joints. In addition anti-TNF alpha decreases circulating levels of the potent angiogenic cytokine VEGF, suggesting that new blood vessel formation, and hence the supply of nutrients to the growing synovial lesion, is also affected. These observations lend further support to the hypothesis that interruption of a component of the cytokine network in RA may modulate disease progression, and point the way towards the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease states. PMID:9497911

  7. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis.

  8. CAPing inflammation and acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Rosin, Diane L; Okusa, Mark D

    2016-09-01

    The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway has been shown to modulate inflammation in disease models such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. A recent study demonstrated a protective effect of vagus nerve stimulation with activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in the ischemia reperfusion model of acute kidney injury. PMID:27521104

  9. Assessing the likelihood of new-onset inflammatory bowel disease following tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitor therapy for rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Asha; Stobaugh, Derrick J; Deepak, Parakkal

    2015-04-01

    The association between inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and the onset of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is unclear. We sought to evaluate this association by analyzing adverse events (AEs) reported to the Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) with a standardized scoring tool for drug-induced AEs. A search of the FAERS for RA or JRA (January 2003-December 2011) reported with adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, golimumab, or infliximab was performed. This dataset was then queried for cases indicating IBD. Full-length reports were accessed using the Freedom of Information Act and organized by age, sex, concomitant medications, co-morbidities, type of TNF-α inhibitor used, and diagnosis/treatment details. The Naranjo score was used to determine whether the drug-induced AEs were definite, probable, possible, or doubtful. There were 158 cases of IBD after TNF-α inhibitor exposure in RA or JRA patients. Use of the Naranjo score revealed that, in a majority of the cases (71.5 %), TNF-α inhibitor exposure was considered a 'possible' cause. A majority of the 'probable cases' in JRA were reported with etanercept (40 patients, 90.91 %). There were no 'definite' cases of anti-TNF-induced IBD. After applying the Naranjo scale, a weak association between new-onset IBD and TNF-α inhibitor therapy in RA patients and a moderately strong association especially with etanercept exposure in JRA patients was observed. However, causality cannot be determined due to limitations of the FAERS and the Naranjo score. PMID:25228459

  10. Temporal profile of serum anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory interleukins in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Perini, F; Morra, M; Alecci, M; Galloni, E; Marchi, M; Toso, V

    2001-08-01

    The presence of an inflammatory response in the pathophysiology of acute brain ischemia is relatively well established, but less is known about the anti-inflammatory mechanisms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate part of the immune response in acute stroke patients and to analyze a possible correlation with other hematological parameters, clinical outcome, size of infarct and subtypes of strokes. We prospectively studied 42 stroke patients, without signs of infections or inflammatory diseases, at days 0, 1, 3, 7 and 14, and 39 healthy control subjects. We measured serum levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) and the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) by ELISA method. We observed a highly inverse correlation between these two molecules in control subjects (r=-0.78, p=0.0000001), and this correlation was lost in stroke patients. Patients had significantly lowered IL-10 serum levels soon after the acute event (p=0.00005), with a slight increase at the seventh day. On the other hand, patients had increased IL-6 serum levels compared with controls after day one until day 14 (p<0.04), with a maximum increase at day 3. Interleukin-6 correlated with clinical outcome whereas interleukin-10 did not. Low levels of interleukin-10 indicate that the antiinflammatory response is down-regulated in acute stroke patients. The pro-inflammatory response begins 24 hours after the onset of acute cerebral ischemia, as indicated by the increased serum levels of interleukin-6. The physiological balance between these two molecules is altered in acute stroke patients. PMID:11808851

  11. A novel therapeutic approach targeting rheumatoid arthritis by combined administration of morin, a dietary flavanol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin with reference to pro-inflammatory cytokines, inflammatory enzymes, RANKL and transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Farhath; Rasool, MahaboobKhan

    2015-03-25

    The present study was designed to assess the combined efficacy of morin, a dietary flavanol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin against adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats, an experimental model for rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete freund's adjuvant (0.1 ml) into the right hind paw of the Wistar albino rats. Morin (30 mg/kg b.wt), indomethacin (3 mg/kg b.wt) and combination of morin and indomethacin were administered intraperitoneally (from 11th to 20th day) after adjuvant injection. We have found that the activities/levels of lysosomal acid hydrolases (acid phosphatase, β-galactosidase, N-acetyl glucosaminidase and cathepsin-D), glycoproteins (hexose and hexosamine), urinary constituents (hydroxyproline and glycosaminoglycans), reactive oxygen species (LPO and NO), elastase, inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, VEGF and PGE2) and paw edema were significantly increased in arthritic rats compared to controls. Whereas, the anti-oxidant status (SOD, CAT, GPx, glutathione, and ceruloplasmin), body weight and bone collagen was found to be decreased. The mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-17, IL-6 and MCP-1), inflammatory enzymes (iNOS and COX-2), RANKL, and transcription factors (NF-kB p65 and AP-1) was found upregulated in the ankle joints of arthritic rats in qRT-PCR analysis. In addition, the increased protein expression of NF-kB p65 and COX-2 was also detected by immunohistochemical analysis. On the other hand, the above said imbalances were regulated back effectively to near normal as evidenced by the histopathological and radiological analysis on combined treatment with morin and indomethacin. Our study indicates that the combination therapy was more effective than either single drug alone in suppressing the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:25698669

  12. Colchicine Acutely Suppresses Local Cardiac Production of Inflammatory Cytokines in Patients With an Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Gonzalo J; Robertson, Stacy; Barraclough, Jennifer; Xia, Qiong; Mallat, Ziad; Bursill, Christina; Celermajer, David S; Patel, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18, and downstream IL-6 are key inflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease. Colchicine is believed to block the NLRP3 inflammasome, a cytosolic complex responsible for the production of IL-1β and IL-18. In vivo effects of colchicine on cardiac cytokine release have not been previously studied. This study aimed to (1) assess the local cardiac production of inflammatory cytokines in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), stable coronary artery disease and in controls; and (2) determine whether acute administration of colchicine inhibits their production. Methods and Results Forty ACS patients, 33 with stable coronary artery disease, and 10 controls, were included. ACS and stable coronary artery disease patients were randomized to oral colchicine treatment (1 mg followed by 0.5 mg 1 hour later) or no colchicine, 6 to 24 hours prior to cardiac catheterization. Blood samples from the coronary sinus, aortic root (arterial), and lower right atrium (venous) were collected and tested for IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 using ELISA. In ACS patients, coronary sinus levels of IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 were significantly higher than arterial and venous levels (P=0.017, <0.001 and <0.001, respectively). Transcoronary (coronary sinus-arterial) gradients for IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 were highest in ACS patients and lowest in controls (P=0.077, 0.033, and 0.014, respectively). Colchicine administration significantly reduced transcoronary gradients of all 3 cytokines in ACS patients by 40% to 88% (P=0.028, 0.032, and 0.032, for IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6, respectively). Conclusions ACS patients exhibit increased local cardiac production of inflammatory cytokines. Short-term colchicine administration rapidly and significantly reduces levels of these cytokines. PMID:26304941

  13. Viral arthritis.

    PubMed

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-04-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  14. Co-existence of acute myeloid leukemia with multilineage dysplasia and Epstein-Barr virus-associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhira, Michihide; Hanzawa, Kyoko; Watanabe, Reiko; Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Nemoto, Tomoe; Toyozumi, Yasuo; Tamaru, Jun-ichi; Itoyama, Shinji; Suzuki, Katsuya; Kameda, Hideto; Mori, Shigehisa; Kizaki, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease mediated by inflammatory processes mainly at the joints. Recently, awareness of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (T-LPD) has been heightened for its association with methotraxate usage in RA patients. In the contrary, acute myeloid leukemia with multilineage dysplasia (AML-MLD) has never been documented to be present concomitantly with the above two conditions. In this report we present a case of an autopsy-proven co-existence of AML-MLD and EBV-associated T-LPD in a patient with RA. PMID:19566938

  15. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint as a complication of acute otitis media in a child: A rare case and the importance of real-time PCR for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Bast, F; Collier, S; Chadha, P; Collier, J

    2015-11-01

    We document the case of a 7-year-old boy who presented with pain in his left ear and trismus after a diagnosis of acute otitis media one week previously. His blood inflammatory markers were raised and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed significant left temporomandibular joint effusion and partial attenuation of the left mastoid. A clinical diagnosis of septic arthritis of the TMJ was made and the patient was commenced on broad-spectrum antibiotics. Analysis using real time PCR enabled identification of the offending organism, confirmation of the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment to be specifically tailored for treatment. PMID:26340928

  16. The anti-inflammatory target A(3) adenosine receptor is over-expressed in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ochaion, A; Bar-Yehuda, S; Cohen, S; Barer, F; Patoka, R; Amital, H; Reitblat, T; Reitblat, A; Ophir, J; Konfino, I; Chowers, Y; Ben-Horin, S; Fishman, P

    2009-01-01

    The Gi protein associated A(3) adenosine receptor (A(3)AR) was recently defined as a novel anti-inflammatory target. The aim of this study was to look at A(3)AR expression levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with autoimmune inflammatory diseases and to explore transcription factors involved receptor expression. Over-expression of A(3)AR was found in PBMCs derived from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis and Crohn's disease compared with PBMCs from healthy subjects. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated the presence of DNA binding sites for nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) in the A(3)AR gene promoter. Up-regulation of NF-kappaB and CREB was found in the PBMCs from patients with RA, psoriasis and Crohn's disease. The PI3K-PKB/Akt signaling pathway, known to regulate both the NF-kappaB and CREB, was also up-regulated in the patients' PBMCs. Taken together, NF-kappaB and CREB are involved with the over-expression of A(3)AR in patients with autoimmune inflammatory diseases. The receptor may be considered as a specific target to combat inflammation. PMID:19426966

  17. Nanomedicines for Inflammatory Arthritis: Head-To-Head Comparison of Glucocorticoid-Containing Polymers, Micelles and Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Crielaard, Bart J.; Dusad, Anand; Lele, Subodh M.; Rijcken, Cristianne J. F.; Metselaar, Josbert M; Kostková, Hana; Etrych, Tomáš; Ulbrich, Karel; Kiessling, Fabian; Mikuls, Ted R.; Hennink, Wim E.; Storm, Gert; Lammers, Twan; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    As an emerging research direction, nanomedicine has been increasingly utilized to treat inflammatory diseases. In this head-to-head comparison study, four established nanomedicine formulations of dexamethasone, including liposomes (L-Dex), core-crosslinked micelles (M-Dex), slow releasing polymeric prodrugs (P-Dex-slow) and fast releasing polymeric prodrugs (P-Dex-fast), were evaluated in an adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model with an equivalent dose treatment design. It was found that after a single i.v. injection, the formulations with the slower drug release kinetics (i.e. M-Dex and P-Dex-slow) maintained longer duration of therapeutic activity than those with relatively faster drug release kinetics, resulting in better joint protection. This finding will be instructional in the future development and optimization of nanomedicines for the clinical management of rheumatoid arthritis. The outcome of this study also illustrates the value of such head-to-head comparison studies in translational nanomedicine research. PMID:24341611

  18. Extracts of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. attenuate the inflammatory response in a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    XU, WEI; HUANG, MINGQING; ZHANG, YUQIN; LI, HUANG; ZHENG, HAIYIN; YU, LISHUANG; CHU, KEDAN; LIN, YU; CHEN, LIDIAN

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is considered a serious public health problem, which is commonly treated with traditional Chinese or herbal medicine. The present study evaluated the effects of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. extraction (BCBE) on a type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Wistar rats with CIA received either 125 or 500 mg/kg BCBE, after which, paw swelling was markedly suppressed compared with in the model group. In addition, BCBE significantly ameliorated pathological joint alterations, including synovial hyperplasia, and cartilage and bone destruction. The protein and mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α and nuclear factor-κB in synovial tissue were determined by immunohistochemical staining, western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that the expression levels of these factors were significantly downregulated in the BCBE-treated group compared with in the model group. These results indicated that BCBE may exert an inhibitory effect on the CIA rat model, and its therapeutic potential is associated with its anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27035125

  19. Anti-inflammatory and joint protective effects of extra-virgin olive-oil polyphenol extract in experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rosillo, María Ángeles; Alcaraz, María José; Sánchez-Hidalgo, Marina; Fernández-Bolaños, José G; Alarcón-de-la-Lastra, Catalina; Ferrándiz, María Luisa

    2014-12-01

    The consumption of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) in Mediterranean countries has shown beneficial effects. A wide range of evidence indicates that phenolic compounds present in EVOO are endowed with anti-inflammatory properties. In this work, we evaluated the effects of EVOO-polyphenol extract (PE) in a model of rheumatoid arthritis, the collagen-induced arthritis model in mice. On day 0, DBA-1/J mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen. On day 21, mice received a booster injection. PE (100 and 200 mg/kg) was orally administered once a day from days 29 to 41 to arthritic mice. We have demonstrated that PE decreases joint edema, cell migration, cartilage degradation and bone erosion. PE significantly reduced the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin E2 in the joint as well as the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1. Our data indicate that PE inhibits c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3. In addition, PE decreases nuclear factor κB translocation leading to the down-regulation of the arthritic process. These results support the interest of natural diet components in the development of therapeutic products for arthritic conditions. PMID:25294776

  20. Exacerbated inflammatory arthritis in response to hyperactive gp130 signalling is independent of IL-17A

    PubMed Central

    Jones, G W; Greenhill, C J; Williams, J O; Nowell, M A; Williams, A S; Jenkins, B J; Jones, S A

    2013-01-01

    Objective Interleukin (IL)-17A producing CD4 T-cells (TH-17 cells) are implicated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). IL-6/STAT3 signalling drives TH-17 cell differentiation, and hyperactive gp130/STAT3 signalling in the gp130F/F mouse promotes exacerbated pathology. Conversely, STAT1-activating cytokines (eg, IL-27, IFN-γ) inhibit TH-17 commitment. Here, we evaluate the impact of STAT1 ablation on TH-17 cells during experimental arthritis and relate this to IL-17A-associated pathology. Methods Antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) was established in wild type (WT), gp130F/F mice displaying hyperactive gp130-mediated STAT signalling and the compound mutants gp130F/F:Stat1−/− and gp130F/F:Il17a−/− mice. Joint pathology and associated peripheral TH-17 responses were compared. Results Augmented gp130/STAT3 signalling enhanced TH-17 commitment in vitro and exacerbated joint pathology. Ablation of STAT1 in gp130F/F mice (gp130F/F:Stat1−/−) promoted the hyperexpansion of TH-17 cells in vitro and in vivo during AIA. Despite this heightened peripheral TH-17 cell response, disease severity and the number of joint-infiltrating T-cells were comparable with that of WT mice. Thus, gp130-mediated STAT1 activity within the inflamed synovium controls T-cell trafficking and retention. To determine the contribution of IL-17A, we generated gp130F/F:IL-17a−/− mice. Here, loss of IL-17A had no impact on arthritis severity. Conclusions Exacerbated gp130/STAT-driven disease in AIA is associated with an increase in joint infiltrating T-cells but synovial pathology is IL-17A independent. PMID:23894061

  1. Smelling the Diagnosis: The Electronic Nose as Diagnostic Tool in Inflammatory Arthritis. A Case-Reference Study

    PubMed Central

    Brekelmans, Marjolein P.; Fens, Niki; Brinkman, Paul; Bos, Lieuwe D.; Sterk, Peter J.; Tak, Paul P.; Gerlag, Daniëlle M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether exhaled breath analysis using an electronic nose can identify differences between inflammatory joint diseases and healthy controls. Methods In a cross-sectional study, the exhaled breath of 21 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 18 psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients with active disease was compared to 21 healthy controls using an electronic nose (Cyranose 320; Smiths Detection, Pasadena, CA, USA). Breathprints were analyzed with principal component analysis, discriminant analysis, and area under curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and relationships between breathprints and markers of disease activity were explored. Results Breathprints of RA patients could be distinguished from controls with an accuracy of 71% (AUC 0.75, 95% CI 0.60–0.90, sensitivity 76%, specificity 67%). Breathprints from PsA patients were separated from controls with 69% accuracy (AUC 0.77, 95% CI 0.61–0.92, sensitivity 72%, specificity 71%). Distinction between exhaled breath of RA and PsA patients exhibited an accuracy of 69% (AUC 0.72, 95% CI 0.55–0.89, sensitivity 71%, specificity 72%). There was a positive correlation in RA patients of exhaled breathprints with disease activity score (DAS28) and number of painful joints. GC-MS identified seven key VOCs that significantly differed between the groups. Conclusions Exhaled breath analysis by an electronic nose may play a role in differential diagnosis of inflammatory joint diseases. Data from this study warrant external validation. PMID:26982569

  2. Kaempferol, a dietary flavonoid, ameliorates acute inflammatory and nociceptive symptoms in gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shi Hyoung; Park, Jae Gwang; Sung, Gi-Ho; Yang, Sungjae; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Eunji; Kim, Jun Ho; Ha, Van Thai; Kim, Han Gyung; Yi, Young-Su; Kim, Ji Hye; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Sung, Nak Yoon; Lee, Mi-nam; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-07-01

    Kaempferol (KF) is the most abundant polyphenol in tea, fruits, vegetables, and beans. However, little is known about its in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy and mechanisms of action. To study these, several acute mouse inflammatory and nociceptive models, including gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain were employed. Kaempferol was shown to attenuate the expansion of inflammatory lesions seen in ethanol (EtOH)/HCl- and aspirin-induced gastritis, LPS/caerulein (CA) triggered pancreatitis, and acetic acid-induced writhing. PMID:25917334

  3. Acute Cryptococcal Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome in a Patient on Natalizumab

    PubMed Central

    Gundacker, Nathan D.; Jordan, Stephen J.; Jones, Benjamin A.; Drwiega, Joseph C.; Pappas, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Presented is the first case of acute immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS)-associated cryptococcal meningoencephalitis in a patient on natalizumab for multiple sclerosis. The patient developed acute cerebral edema after initiation of amphotericin B. We propose several mechanisms that explain the acuity of IRIS in this specific patient population and suggest possible therapies. PMID:27006962

  4. Modulation of Th1 cytokines and inflammatory mediators by Euphorbia hirta in animal model of adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fayaz Ahmad, Sheikh; Sultan, Phalisteen; Ashour, Abdelkader E; Khan, Tajdar Husain; Attia, Sabry M; Bakheet, Saleh A; Abd-Allah, Adel R A

    2013-10-01

    Euphorbia hirta L. (Euphorbiaceae) (E. hirta) is a tree locally used as a traditional medicine in Africa and Australia to treat numerous diseases such as hypertension, respiratory ailments, tumors, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study, we investigated the anti-arthritic activity of fresh leaves of E. hirta ethanol extract that was found to inhibit the production of inflammatory mediators and cytokines of adjuvant arthritis in rats. Adjuvant arthritis was induced in rats (Wistar) by the subplantar injection of 0.05 ml freshly prepared suspension (5.0 mg/ml) of steam killed Mycobacterium tuberculli in liquid paraffin. Animals were treated with graded doses of 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg of E. hirta ethanol extract, p.o. E. hirta significantly inhibited the swelling of the adjuvant-induced arthritis. Moreover, E. hirta at higher dose (200 mg/kg) showed 40.54 ± 1.09 % of CD3+, 15.1 ± 0.76 % of CD4+, 12.2 ± 1.18 % of CD8+ T cell receptor and 17.6 ± 1.11 % gated of CD19+ B cell receptor revealing a down regulation of adjuvant-induced arthritis as compared to the corresponding valves of the arthritic control rats. According to the results shown in Tables 1, 2, the production of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-2 and IFN-γ were increased in splenocytes of arthritic rats and this increased level was reduced by E. hirta. Also, E. hirta significantly down regulated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of nitric oxide production in peritoneal macrophages. These results suggest that E. hirta exhibits an improvement in adjuvant-induced arthritis through down regulation of activated macrophages and T lymphocytes functions. Such unique effects of E. hirta shown on adjuvant arthritis rat model may be advantageous to the long-term treatment of clinical rheumatoid arthritis. Table 1 Effect of E. hirta and prednisolone (Pred) on LPS-induced IL-1β and TNF-α productions from splenocytes in Mycobacterium tuberculli-induced inflammatory arthritic rats Treatment

  5. Fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, a high-energy intermediate of glycolysis, attenuates experimental arthritis by activating anti-inflammatory adenosinergic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Veras, Flávio P.; Peres, Raphael S.; Saraiva, André L. L.; Pinto, Larissa G.; Louzada-Junior, Paulo; Cunha, Thiago M.; Paschoal, Jonas A. R.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Alves-Filho, José C.

    2015-01-01

    Fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) is an endogenous intermediate of the glycolytic pathway. Exogenous administration of FBP has been shown to exert protective effects in a variety of ischemic injury models, which are attributed to its ability to sustain glycolysis and increase ATP production. Here, we demonstrated that a single treatment with FBP markedly attenuated arthritis, assessed by reduction of articular hyperalgesia, joint swelling, neutrophil infiltration and production of inflammatory cytokines, TNF and IL-6, while enhancing IL-10 production in two mouse models of arthritis. Our mechanistic studies showed that FBP reduces joint inflammation through the systemic generation of extracellular adenosine and subsequent activation of adenosine receptor A2a (A2aR). Moreover, we showed that FBP-induced adenosine generation requires hydrolysis of extracellular ATP through the activity of the ectonucleosides triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1 (ENTPD1, also known as CD39) and ecto-5′-nucleotidase (E5NT, also known as CD73). In accordance, inhibition of CD39 and CD73 abolished anti-arthritic effects of FBP. Taken together, our findings provide a new insight into the molecular mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory effect of FBP, showing that it effectively attenuates experimental arthritis by activating the anti-inflammatory adenosinergic pathway. Therefore, FBP may represent a new therapeutic strategy for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PMID:26478088

  6. Zisheng Shenqi decoction ameliorates monosodium urate crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jieru; Xie, Ying; Sui, Fangyu; Liu, Chunhong; Du, Xiaowei; Liu, Chenggang; Feng, Xiaoling; Jiang, Deyou

    2016-01-01

    Based on traditional Chinese medicinal theories on gouty arthritis, Zisheng Shenqi decoction (ZSD), a novel Chinese medicinal formula, was developed due to its multiple functions, including reinforcing renal function, promoting blood circulation and relieving pain. In the present study, the effect of ZSD on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats was investigated and the underlying mechanisms were examined. The data from these investigations showed that the injection of MSU crystals into the ankle joint cavity caused significant elevations in ankle swelling and inflammatory cell infiltration into the synovium, whereas these abnormal changes were markedly suppressed by oral administration of ZSD (40 mg/kg) for 7 days. Mechanically, ZSD treatment prevented MSU crystal-induced inflammatory responses, as evidenced by downregulation in the expression levels of NACHT domain, leucine-rich repeat and pyrin domain containing protein (NALP) 1 and NALP6 inflammasomes, decreased serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β, and inhibited activation of nuclear factor-κB. In addition, ZSD administration markedly enhanced the anti-oxidant status in MSU crystal-induced rats by the increase in the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, and the levels of reduced glutathione. These results indicated that ZSD effectively prevented MSU crystal-induced gouty arthritis via modulating multiple anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory pathways, suggesting a promising herbal formula for the prevention and treatment of gouty arthritis. PMID:27432278

  7. Zisheng Shenqi decoction ameliorates monosodium urate crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects.

    PubMed

    Han, Jieru; Xie, Ying; Sui, Fangyu; Liu, Chunhong; Du, Xiaowei; Liu, Chenggang; Feng, Xiaoling; Jiang, Deyou

    2016-09-01

    Based on traditional Chinese medicinal theories on gouty arthritis, Zisheng Shenqi decoction (ZSD), a novel Chinese medicinal formula, was developed due to its multiple functions, including reinforcing renal function, promoting blood circulation and relieving pain. In the present study, the effect of ZSD on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced gouty arthritis in rats was investigated and the underlying mechanisms were examined. The data from these investigations showed that the injection of MSU crystals into the ankle joint cavity caused significant elevations in ankle swelling and inflammatory cell infiltration into the synovium, whereas these abnormal changes were markedly suppressed by oral administration of ZSD (40 mg/kg) for 7 days. Mechanically, ZSD treatment prevented MSU crystal‑induced inflammatory responses, as evidenced by downregulation in the expression levels of NACHT domain, leucine‑rich repeat and pyrin domain containing protein (NALP) 1 and NALP6 inflammasomes, decreased serum levels of tumor necrosis factor‑α and interleukin‑1β, and inhibited activation of nuclear factor‑κB. In addition, ZSD administration markedly enhanced the anti-oxidant status in MSU crystal‑induced rats by the increase in the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, and the levels of reduced glutathione. These results indicated that ZSD effectively prevented MSU crystal-induced gouty arthritis via modulating multiple anti‑oxidative and anti‑inflammatory pathways, suggesting a promising herbal formula for the prevention and treatment of gouty arthritis. PMID:27432278

  8. [Anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects of laser therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Tupikin, G V

    1985-01-01

    The clinical and laboratory findings were examined of 10 patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with a first applied technique of intravenous irradiation of the circulating blood with helium-neon laser combined with external irradiation of the inflamed joints. A distinct antiinflammatory and immunosuppressant effect was attained in all the RA patients. In 80% of the test subjects, the rheumatoid blood factor reduced to 1:20 titres. The treatment method did not cause any side effects or complications and shortened the time of the patients' stay at hospital. PMID:4071434

  9. Effect of Mesenchymal Precursor Cells on the Systemic Inflammatory Response and Endothelial Dysfunction in an Ovine Model of Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Laura M.; Abdalmula, Anwar; Washington, Elizabeth A.; Kaufman, Claire; Tudor, Elizabeth M.; Ghosh, Peter; Itescu, Silviu; Kimpton, Wayne G.; Bailey, Simon R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim Mesenchymal precursor cells (MPC) are reported to possess immunomodulatory properties that may prove beneficial in autoimmune and other inflammatory conditions. However, their mechanism of action is poorly understood. A collagen-induced arthritis model has been previously developed which demonstrates local joint inflammation and systemic inflammatory changes. These include not only increased levels of inflammatory markers, but also vascular endothelial cell dysfunction, characterised by reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation. This study aimed to characterise the changes in systemic inflammatory markers and endothelial function following the intravenous administration of MPC, in the ovine model. Methods Arthritis was induced in sixteen adult sheep by administration of bovine type II collagen into the hock joint following initial sensitisation. After 24h, sheep were administered either 150 million allogeneic ovine MPCs intravenously, or saline only. Fibrinogen and serum amyloid-A were measured in plasma to assess systemic inflammation, along with pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Animals were necropsied two weeks following arthritis induction. Coronary and digital arterial segments were mounted in a Mulvaney-Halpern wire myograph. The relaxant response to endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilators was used to assess endothelial dysfunction. Results and Conclusion Arthritic sheep treated with MPC demonstrated a marked spike in plasma IL-10, 24h following MPC administration. They also showed significantly reduced plasma levels of the inflammatory markers, fibrinogen and serum amyloid A, and increased HDL. Coronary arteries from RA sheep treated with MPCs demonstrated a significantly greater maximal relaxation to bradykinin when compared to untreated RA sheep (253.6 ± 17.1% of pre-contracted tone vs. 182.3 ± 27.3% in controls), and digital arteries also demonstrated greater endothelium-dependent vasodilation

  10. Safety of celecoxib and nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: results of the phase 4 registry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to assess long-term safety and developmental data on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients treated in routine clinical practice with celecoxib or nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nsNSAIDs). Methods Children aged ≥2 to <18 years with rheumatoid-factor–positive or –negative polyarthritis, persistent or extended oligoarthritis, or systemic arthritis were enrolled into this prospective, observational, multicenter standard-of-care registry. Eligible patients were newly or recently prescribed (≤6 months) an nsNSAID or celecoxib. Enrolled patients were followed to the end of the study, whether they remained on the original NSAID, switched, or discontinued therapy altogether. All adverse events (AEs) regardless of severity were captured in the database. Results A total of 274 patients (nsNSAID, n = 219; celecoxib, n = 55) were observed for 410 patient-years of observation. Naproxen, meloxicam, and nabumetone were the most frequently used nsNSAIDs. At baseline, the celecoxib group was older, had a numerically longer median time since diagnosis, and a numerically higher proportion of patients with a history of gastrointestinal-related NSAID intolerance. AEs reported were those frequently observed with NSAID treatment and were similar across groups (nsNSAIDs: 52.0%; celecoxib: 52.9%). Twelve unique patients experienced a total of 18 serious AEs; the most frequent were infections, and none was attributed to NSAID use. Conclusions The safety profile of celecoxib and nsNSAIDs appears similar overall. The results from this registry, ongoing pharmacovigilance, and the phase 3 trial that led to the approval of celecoxib for children with JIA provide evidence that the benefit-risk for celecoxib treatment in JIA remains positive. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00688545. PMID:25057265

  11. Curcumin attenuates inflammatory response in IL-1beta-induced human synovial fibroblasts and collagen-induced arthritis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dong-Oh; Kim, Mun-Ok; Choi, Yung Hyun; Park, Yung-Min; Kim, Gi-Young

    2010-05-01

    Curcumin, a major component of turmeric, has been shown to exhibit anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The present study was performed to determine whether curcumin is efficacious against both collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice and IL-1beta-induced activation in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs). DBA/1 mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen (CII) and treated with curcumin every other day for 2weeks after the initial immunization. For arthritis, we evaluated the incidence of disease and used an arthritis index based on paw thickness. In vitro proliferation of CII- or concanavalin A-induced splenic T cells was examined using IFN-gamma production. Pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1beta were examined in the mouse ankle joint and serum IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes were analyzed. The expression levels of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in human FLSs were also determined. The results showed that compared with untreated CIA mice, curcumin-treated mice downregulated clinical arthritis score, the proliferation of splenic T cells, expression levels of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in the ankle joint, and expression levels of IgG2a in serum. Additionally, by altering nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB transcription activity in FLSs, curcumin inhibited PGE(2) production, COX-2 expression, and MMP secretion. These results suggest that curcumin can effectively suppress inflammatory response by inhibiting pro-inflammatory mediators and regulating humoral and cellular immune responses. PMID:20188213

  12. Animal Models of Bone Loss in Inflammatory Arthritis: from Cytokines in the Bench to Novel Treatments for Bone Loss in the Bedside-a Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Alves, C Henrique; Farrell, Eric; Vis, Marijn; Colin, Edgar M; Lubberts, Erik

    2016-08-01

    Throughout life, bone is continuously remodelled. Bone is formed by osteoblasts, from mesenchymal origin, while osteoclasts induce bone resorption. This process is tightly regulated. During inflammation, several growth factors and cytokines are increased inducing osteoclast differentiation and activation, and chronic inflammation is a condition that initiates systemic bone loss. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory auto-immune disease that is characterised by active synovitis and is associated with early peri-articular bone loss. Peri-articular bone loss precedes focal bone erosions, which may progress to bone destruction and disability. The incidence of generalised osteoporosis is associated with the severity of arthritis in RA and increased osteoporotic vertebral and hip fracture risk. In this review, we will give an overview of different animal models of inflammatory arthritis related to RA with focus on bone erosion and involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, a humanised endochondral ossification model will be discussed, which can be used in a translational approach to answer osteoimmunological questions. PMID:26634933

  13. Septic arthritis in the era of immunosuppressive treatments.

    PubMed

    Salar, O; Baker, B; Kurien, T; Taylor, A; Moran, C

    2014-03-01

    Immunosuppressants have been the mainstay of treatment for certain inflammatory joint conditions for many years. Developments in this field, namely biological treatments, have led to a change in the classical presentation of acute bone, joint and soft tissue infections. The normal findings of severe pain and tenderness on examination may be absent or simply mimic a typical exacerbation of the chronic joint condition. A minimally raised white cell count and elevated C-reactive protein in the absence of systemic signs of infection may be interpreted as further evidence for the diagnosis of an exacerbation of inflammatory arthritis. We present a unique case of recurrent polyarticular septic arthritis in a patient treated with immunosuppression for refractory rheumatoid arthritis. We hope this article will enable doctors to appreciate and recognise the changing face of septic arthritis in the modern era of immunosuppressant treatments. PMID:24780657

  14. The patterns of toxicity and management of acute nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) overdose

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Laura J; Wood, David M; Dargan, Paul I

    2011-01-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used for their analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic actions. They are commonly taken in overdose in many areas of the world. The majority of patients with acute NSAID overdose will remain asymptomatic or develop minor self-limiting gastrointestinal symptoms. However, serious clinical sequelae have been reported in patients with acute NSAID overdose and these include convulsions, metabolic acidosis, coma and acute renal failure. There appear to be some differences between the NSAIDs in terms of the relative risk of these complications; in particular mefenamic acid is most commonly associated with convulsions. The management of these serious clinical features is largely supportive and there are no specific antidotes for acute NSAID toxicity. PMID:27147851

  15. Assessment of inflammatory activity in rheumatoid arthritis: a comparative study of clinical evaluation with grey scale and power Doppler ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Naredo, E; Bonilla, G; Gamero, F; Uson, J; Carmona, L; Laffon, A

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the clinical assessment of overall inflammatory activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with grey scale and power Doppler (PD) ultrasonography (US). Methods: Ninety four consecutive patients with RA were included. Demographic and clinical data, C reactive protein (CRP) level, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were recorded for each patient. The presence of tenderness, swelling, and a subjective swelling score from 1 to 3 were independently assessed by two rheumatologists, who reached a consensus in 60 joints examined in each patient. All patients underwent a US examination by a third blinded rheumatologist, using PD. US joint effusion, synovitis, and PD signal were graded from 1 to 3 in the 60 joints. Joint count and joint index for effusion, synovitis, and PD signal were recorded. A 28 joint count for clinical and US variables was calculated. Interobserver reliability of the US examination was evaluated by a fourth blinded rheumatologist. Results: US showed significantly more joints with effusion (mean 15.2) and synovitis (mean 14.6) than clinical examination (mean 11.5, p<0.05). A significant correlation was found between joint count and joint index for swelling, US effusion, synovitis, and PD signal. The 28 joint count for effusion, synovitis, and PD signal correlated highly with the corresponding 60 joint counts. US findings correlated better with CRP and ESR than clinical measures. Interobserver reliability was better for US findings than for clinical assessment. Conclusion: US is a sensitive method for assessing joint inflammatory activity in RA, complementary to clinical evaluation. PMID:15708891

  16. Lack of cardiovascular risk assessment in inflammatory arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus patients at a tertiary care center.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Stephanie O; Teo, Michelle; Fung, Daisy

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate cardiovascular risk assessment at a Canadian rheumatology center and describe the cardiovascular risk of inflammatory arthritis (IA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients using the Framingham risk score. A retrospective chart review of 504 patients attending nine rheumatology practices at the University of Alberta Hospital was performed. A pre-specified case report form detailed patient demographics, cardiac risk factors, variables for the Framingham 2008 score, disease activity, and medication use. In this group of 504 patients, 64 (12.7%) had SLE (male (M) to female (F) ratio = 60:4) and 440 (87.3%) had an IA (M to F ratio = 117:323). Of the SLE patients, 31 (48.4%) met four or more American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, 33 (51.6%) had less than four ACR criteria. Of the IA patients, 156 (35.5%) were CCP positive and 257 (58.4%) were RF positive. Utilizing the chart data, retrospective Framingham risk scores were calculable for one (1.6%) SLE patient and three (0.68%) IA patients. The most common cardiac risk factors not documented in the medical records of both the SLE and IA patients included: (1) positive family history of MI, (2) diabetes, and (3) lipid status. The blood pressure was more frequently documented in the SLE patients (93.8%) compared to the IA patients (56.1%). While traditional cardiac risk factors only partially contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk in these patients, cardiovascular risk assessment was suboptimally performed amongst a large group of rheumatologists. A dedicated cardiovascular risk reduction clinic for inflammatory rheumatic diseases has been established at this site to fulfill this need and evaluate treatment strategies. PMID:21503617

  17. Mosaic chromosomal aberrations in synovial fibroblasts of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and other inflammatory joint diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kinne, Raimund W; Liehr, Thomas; Beensen, Volkmar; Kunisch, Elke; Zimmermann, Thomas; Holland, Heidrun; Pfeiffer, Robert; Stahl, Hans-Detlev; Lungershausen, Wolfgang; Hein, Gert; Roth, Andreas; Emmrich, Frank; Claussen, Uwe; Froster, Ursula G

    2001-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations were comparatively assessed in nuclei extracted from synovial tissue, primary-culture (P-0) synovial cells, and early-passage synovial fibroblasts (SFB; 98% enrichment; P-1, P-4 [passage 1, passage 4]) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 21), osteoarthritis (OA; n = 24), and other rheumatic diseases. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and skin fibroblasts (FB) (P-1, P-4) from the same patients, as well as SFB from normal joints and patients with joint trauma (JT) (n = 4), were used as controls. Analyses proceeded by standard GTG-banding and interphase centromere fluorescence in situ hybridization. Structural chromosomal aberrations were observed in SFB (P-1 or P-4) from 4 of 21 RA patients (19%), with involvement of chromosome 1 [e.g. del(1)(q12)] in 3 of 4 cases. In 10 of the 21 RA cases (48%), polysomy 7 was observed in P-1 SFB. In addition, aneusomies of chromosomes 4, 6, 8, 9, 12, 18, and Y were present. The percentage of polysomies was increased in P-4. Similar chromosomal aberrations were detected in SFB of OA and spondylarthropathy patients. No aberrations were detected in i) PBL or skin FB from the same patients (except for one OA patient with a karyotype 45,X[10]/46,XX[17] in PBL and variable polysomies in long-term culture skin FB); or ii) synovial tissue and/or P-1 SFB of normal joints or of patients with joint trauma. In conclusion, qualitatively comparable chromosomal aberrations were observed in synovial tissue and early-passage SFB of patients with RA, OA, and other inflammatory joint diseases. Thus, although of possible functional relevance for the pathologic role of SFB in RA, these alterations probably reflect a common response to chronic inflammatory stress in rheumatic diseases. PMID:11549374

  18. Economic evaluation of gastric ulcer prophylaxis in patients with arthritis receiving non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Knill-Jones, R.; Drummond, M.; Kohli, H.; Davies, L.

    1990-01-01

    This study assesses the economic benefits of misoprostol in the prophylaxis of gastric ulcers larger than 0.3 cm in patients with osteoarthritis receiving non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Independent epidemiological data were obtained for patients in Scotland and the West Midlands. Co-diagnosis of arthritis with gastric ulcer recorded in the routine data was substantially less (4% Scotland, 10% West Midlands) than the 21% found at case review. These data were combined with cost and patient management data in a decision analysis model to explore whether prophylactic use of misoprostol altered substantially the average cost of managing gastric ulcer. Using conservative assumptions and a daily dose of 400 micrograms, cost savings per patient to the National Health Service of 5-8 pounds over a 3-month period are expected in the groups of patients studied, while at the 800 micrograms dose there would be a net cost of 23-25 pounds. Sensitivity analysis showed that under many assumptions misoprostol is expected to be cost saving or cost neutral. PMID:2120690

  19. Concentrations of glycosaminoglycans in synovial fluids and their relation with immunological and inflammatory mediators in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Bensouyad, A; Hollander, A P; Dularay, B; Bedwell, A E; Cooper, R A; Hutton, C W; Dieppe, P A; Elson, C J

    1990-01-01

    The dimethylmethylene blue assay showed higher concentrations of glycosaminoglycans in many synovial fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) than in autologous sera or sera or synovial fluids from normal subjects. These results were taken to suggest that the glycosaminoglycans in RA synovial fluid were abnormally raised and derived from cartilage. To discover what stimulated such glycosaminoglycan release in RA joints relations were sought between synovial fluid concentrations of glycosaminoglycans and immunological and inflammatory mediators. It was shown that RA synovial fluid glycosaminoglycan concentrations correlated with synovial fluid C3d concentrations but not with synovial fluid rheumatoid factor concentrations, polymorphonuclear leucocyte numbers, myeloperoxidase concentrations, or the ability of the synovial fluids to release free radicals from normal polymorphonuclear leucocytes. A correlation was found between synovial fluid C3d and interleukin 1 concentrations as judged by both lymphocyte activating factor activity and immunoassay, but no significant correlation was detected between interleukin 1 and glycosaminoglycan concentrations. It is suggested that in the rheumatoid joint locally produced cytokines, in addition to interleukin 1, together stimulate glycosaminoglycan release from cartilage and render it vulnerable to attack by other processes. PMID:2344209

  20. Regulatory Effect of Iguratimod on the Balance of Th Subsets and Inhibition of Inflammatory Cytokines in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yunzhi; Zhu, Qi; Song, Jinglve; Liu, Hongli; Miao, Yutong; Yang, Fan; Wang, Feiyan; Cheng, Wenjing; Xi, Yebin; Niu, Xiaoyin; He, Dongyi; Chen, Guangjie

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To expand upon the role of iguratimod (T-614) in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we investigated whether the Th1, Th17, follicular helper T cells (Tfh), and regulatory T cells (Treg) imbalance could be reversed by iguratimod and the clinical implications of this reversal. Methods. In this trial, 74 patients were randomized into iguratimod-treated (group A) and control (broup B) group for a 24-week treatment period. In the subsequent 28 weeks, both groups were given iguratimod. Frequencies of Th1, Th17, Tfh, and Treg were quantified using flow cytometry, and serum cytokines were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. mRNA expression of cytokines and transcriptional factor were quantified by RT-PCR. The composite Disease Activity Score, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein were assessed at each visit. Result. The clinical scores demonstrated effective suppression of disease after treatment with iguratimod. In addition, iguratimod downregulated Th1, Th17-type response and upregulated Treg. Furthermore, the levels of Th1, Th17, and Tfh associated inflammatory cytokines and transcription factors were reduced after treatment with iguratimod, while the levels of Treg associated cytokines and transcription factors were increased. PMID:26713003

  1. The influence of corticosteroids on sequential clinical and synovial fluid parameters in joints with acute infectious arthritis in the horse.

    PubMed

    Tulamo, R M; Bramlage, L R; Gabel, A A

    1989-09-01

    Infectious arthritis was induced experimentally in one tarsocrural joint of six horses by intra-articular injection of 1 ml Staphylococcus aureus-saline suspension with the addition of 200 mg methylprednisolone acetate. The corresponding contralateral joint was injected with 1 ml of saline with the addition of 200 mg methylprednisolone acetate, and served as a control. The purpose of the experiment was to examine the effect of corticosteroids on the acute clinical signs of infectious arthritis, and the associated changes in synovial fluid, to separate the effects of a steroid injection from those of infection alone. This should aid early diagnosis of infection. The progression of the infectious arthritis was assessed over nine days by clinical examination and sequential synovial fluid analysis. The corticosteroids masked the clinical signs in some horses for up to the third day although changes in the synovial fluid were present earlier. Cellular changes preceded biochemical changes initially. Leucocyte counts showed a significant increase in cell numbers after infection was established. Persistent neutrophilia, over 90 per cent, together with a pH under 6.9 were the most consistent findings in the infected synovia. Total protein values were lower in infected joints with, than those without, corticosteroids; although there was a progressive rise in total protein concentration throughout the experiment in both groups. Serum and synovial glucose difference and synovial lactate had very little diagnostic value because significant increases due to the corticosteroids were documented in the control joints. PMID:2776719

  2. Bioassay-guided evaluation of Dioscorea villosa – an acute and subchronic toxicity, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dioscorea villosa (DV) has been used in Brazil as an alternative medicine to attenuate menopause symptoms, as well as for the treatment of joint pain and rheumatoid arthritis. In spite of the popular use of DV for the treatment of various disorders, there are limited scientific data regarding safety aspects of this herb. In this regard, we carried out to evaluated both antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in experimental models and assess the toxic effects of the acute (single dose) and subchronic (30 days) oral administration of dry extract of Dioscorea villosa in rodents. Methods The LC analyses were performed to assess the presence of the diosgenin in samples of DV. The antinociceptive study of DV was performed using models of acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin-induced pain in mice. The anti-inflammatory study was accomplished by leukocyte migration to the peritoneal cavity. A dry extract of DV was tested at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg (per os or p.o.). The toxicological properties of the dry extract were evaluated by toxicity assays of acute (5 g/kg, single dose) and subchronic (1 g/kg/day, 30 days) treatment. Haematological, biochemical, and histopathological parameters were studied. The results are expressed as mean ± S.D., and statistical analysis of the data were performed with the Student’s t-test or one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey’s test. In all cases differences were considered significant if p < 0.05. Results HPLC-DAD analysis of the extract from DV revealed the presence of diosgenin as the major compound. Doses of 200 and 400 mg⁄kg significantly reduced the amount of acetic acid-induced writhing in relation to the vehicle (p < 0.0001). In the first phase, using the formalin-induced neurogenic pain test, only the 400 mg/kg dose of DV showed significant inhibition of neurogenic pain (p < 0.001). In the second phase, 200 and 400 mg/kg of DV showed significant

  3. Human milk anti-inflammatory component contents during acute mastitis.

    PubMed

    Buescher, E S; Hair, P S

    2001-06-15

    Mastitis is a common complication of human lactation. We examined milk specimens from eight women with clinical mastitis to determine their content of anti-inflammatory components. Antioxidant activity (spontaneous cytochrome c reducing activity), selected pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-1beta), selected endogenous cytokine control molecules (sIL-6R, sIL-1RII, and sTNFRI), lactoferrin, Na(+):K(+) ratios, and milk bioactivities that cause shedding of sIL-1RII from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), suppress PMN aggregation, and suppress PMN adherence responses were not increased compared to normal milks. Neither the bioactivities that deplete PMN intracellular Ca(2+) stores nor those that block Ca(2+) influx into fMLP-stimulated PMN were significantly increased in mastitis milks. In contrast, levels of TNFalpha, sTNFRII, and IL-1RA and bioactivities that cause shedding of sTNFRI from human PMN were significantly increased compared to normal milks. Mastitis milk has the same anti-inflammatory components and characteristics of normal milk, with elevations in selected components/activities that may help protect the nursing infant from developing clinical illness due to feeding on mastitis milk. PMID:11520075

  4. Management of gouty arthritis in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Abdul A; Elkhalili, Naser

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a comorbid condition that affects, based on recent estimates, between 47% and 54% of patients with gouty arthritis. However, data from randomized controlled trials in patients with gouty arthritis and CKD are limited, and current gouty arthritis treatment guidelines do not address the challenges associated with managing this patient population. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine are recommended first-line treatments for acute gouty arthritis attacks. However, in patients with CKD, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are not recommended because their use can exacerbate or cause acute kidney injury. Also, colchicine toxicity is increased in patients with CKD, and dosage reduction is required based on level of kidney function. Allopurinol, febuxostat, and pegloticase are all effective treatments for controlling elevated uric acid levels after the treatment of an acute attack. However, in patients with CKD, required allopurinol dosage reductions may limit efficacy; pegloticase requires further investigation in this population, and febuxostat has not been studied in patients with creatinine clearance<30 mL/min. This article reviews the risks and benefits associated with currently available pharmacologic agents for the management of acute and chronic gouty arthritis including urate-lowering therapy in patients with CKD. Challenges specific to primary care providers are addressed, including guidance to help them decide when to collaborate with, or refer patients to, rheumatology and nephrology specialists based on the severity of gout and CKD. PMID:22960848

  5. (p40)2-Fc reduces immune-inflammatory response through the activation of T cells in collagen induced arthritis mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seon-Yeong; Lee, Seung Hoon; Park, Seong-Jeong; Kim, Doo-Jin; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Yang, Se-Hwan; Park, Sung-Hwan; Sung, Young-Chul; Kim, Ho-Youn; Cho, Mi-La

    2016-08-01

    IL-12p40 homodimer, a natural antagonist of IL-12 and IL-23, performs an important role in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines that is essential for Th1 and Th17 immune responses. Here, we reveal the therapeutic and immunosuppressive effect of the IL-12p40 subunit ((p40)2-Fc) in an experimental autoimmune arthritis model. We hypothesized that (p40)2-Fc may reduce the inflammatory response and the activation of T cells. In this study, we intraperitoneally injected (p40)2-Fc into collagen induced arthritis (CIA) mice to identify whether (p40)2-Fc attenuates CIA severity. (p40)2-Fc reduced the development of CIA, joint inflammation and cartilage destruction. (p40)2-Fc also significantly decreased the concentration of serum immunoglobulin as well as the number of T cells and C II specific T cells. In addition, osteoclastogenesis in (p40)2-Fc treated mice was down-regulated compared to the mice treated with (p40)2-Fc control. We observed that (p40)2-Fc treatment alleviates arthritis in mice with CIA, reducing inflammation and osteoclast differentiation. These findings suggest that (p40)2-Fc can be a potential therapeutic approach for autoimmune arthritis. PMID:27229912

  6. Therapeutic effects of topical netrin-4 in a corneal acute inflammatory model

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yun; Shao, Yi; Liu, Ting-Ting; Li, Sang-Ming; Li, Wei; Liu, Zu-Guo

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the therapeutic effect of netrin-4 on the early acute phase of inflammation in the alkali-burned eye. METHODS Eye drops containing netrin-4 or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were administered to a alkali-burn-induced corneal acute inflammatory model four times daily. The clinical evaluations, including fluorescein staining and inflammatory index, were performed on day 1, 4 and 7 using slit lamp microscopy. Global specimens were collected on day 7 and processed for immunofluorescent staining. The levels of inflammatory mediators in the corneas were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RESULTS Exogenous netrin-4 administered on rat ocular surfaces showed more improvements in decreasing fluorescein staining on day 4 and 7, and resolved alkali burn-induced corneal inflammation index on day 7 (P<0.01). The levels of IL-1β, IL-6, intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 (MIP-1) in corneas were decreased in netrin-4-treated groups (P<0.05). In addition, netrin-4 significantly reduced the expression of leukocyte common antigen 45 (CD45) in the alkali-burn cornea (P<0.001). CONCLUSION Topical netrin-4 accelerated wound healing and reduced the inflammation on alkali-burn rat model, suggesting a potential as an anti-inflammatory agent in the clinical to treat the acute inflammation. PMID:25938032

  7. Administration of Reconstituted Polyphenol Oil Bodies Efficiently Suppresses Dendritic Cell Inflammatory Pathways and Acute Intestinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, Elisabetta; Vadrucci, Elisa; Delvecchio, Francesca Romana; Addabbo, Francesco; Bettini, Simona; Liou, Rachel; Monsurrò, Vladia; Huang, Alex Yee-Chen; Pizarro, Theresa Torres

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenols are natural compounds capable of interfering with the inflammatory pathways of several in vitro model systems. In this study, we developed a stable and effective strategy to administer polyphenols to treat in vivo models of acute intestinal inflammation. The in vitro suppressive properties of several polyphenols were first tested and compared for dendritic cells (DCs) production of inflammatory cytokines. A combination of the polyphenols, quercetin and piperine, were then encapsulated into reconstituted oil bodies (OBs) in order to increase their stability. Our results showed that administration of low dose reconstituted polyphenol OBs inhibited LPS-mediated inflammatory cytokine secretion, including IL-6, IL-23, and IL-12, while increasing IL-10 and IL-1Rα production. Mice treated with the polyphenol-containing reconstituted OBs (ROBs) were partially protected from dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis and associated weight loss, while mortality and inflammatory scores revealed an overall anti-inflammatory effect that was likely mediated by impaired DC immune responses. Our study indicates that the administration of reconstituted quercetin and piperine-containing OBs may represent an effective and potent anti-inflammatory strategy to treat acute intestinal inflammation. PMID:24558444

  8. Acute paretic syndrome in juvenile White Leghorn chickens resembles late stages of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies in humans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sudden limb paresis is a common problem in White Leghorn flocks, affecting about 1% of the chicken population before achievement of sexual maturity. Previously, a similar clinical syndrome has been reported as being caused by inflammatory demyelination of peripheral nerve fibres. Here, we investigated in detail the immunopathology of this paretic syndrome and its possible resemblance to human neuropathies. Methods Neurologically affected chickens and control animals from one single flock underwent clinical and neuropathological examination. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) alterations were characterised using standard morphological techniques, including nerve fibre teasing and transmission electron microscopy. Infiltrating cells were phenotyped immunohistologically and quantified by flow cytometry. The cytokine expression pattern was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). These investigations were accomplished by MHC genotyping and a PCR screen for Marek's disease virus (MDV). Results Spontaneous paresis of White Leghorns is caused by cell-mediated, inflammatory demyelination affecting multiple cranial and spinal nerves and nerve roots with a proximodistal tapering. Clinical manifestation coincides with the employment of humoral immune mechanisms, enrolling plasma cell recruitment, deposition of myelin-bound IgG and antibody-dependent macrophageal myelin-stripping. Disease development was significantly linked to a 539 bp microsatellite in MHC locus LEI0258. An aetiological role for MDV was excluded. Conclusions The paretic phase of avian inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuritis immunobiologically resembles the late-acute disease stages of human acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and is characterised by a Th1-to-Th2 shift. PMID:20109187

  9. Risk of tuberculosis during infliximab therapy for inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and spondyloarthropathy: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Zhenzhen; Cao, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Infliximab is a promising drug with good outcomes demonstrated for diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondyloarthropathy (SpA). However, treatment with this drug may increase the risk of tuberculosis infection. The aim of the present study was to investigate infliximab-associated tuberculosis infection. Literature searches in PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were performed. Randomized controlled trials with >95% of the patients >18 years-old were included. Meta-analysis was performed to investigate the incidence of tuberculosis infection after infliximab infusion. A total of 24 RCTs were included in the present meta-analysis. In total, 21 (0.51%) tuberculosis infections were detected among 4,111 patients administered infliximab therapy, compared with 0 (0%) among 2,229 patients assigned to the placebo group. Pooled odds ratio (OR) of developing tuberculosis infection was significantly higher with infliximab therapy than with placebo [2.86; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09–7.52]. The OR of tuberculosis infection was 3.93 (95% CI, 0.91–16.91) in RA, 2.46 (95% CI, 0.38–15.92) in SpA and 1.66 (95% CI, 0.26–10.57) in IBD. Rates of tuberculosis infection with infliximab therapy in RA, SpA and IBD were 0.70, 0.22 and 0.52%, respectively. Compared with placebo, infliximab therapy may increase the risk of developing tuberculosis. However, the ORs for the risk of infliximab-associated tuberculosis were not demonstrated to be significant in IBD, RA and SpA; therefore, these findings should be interpreted with caution. The risk of developing tuberculosis demonstrates the importance of the prevention and management of tuberculosis infection with infliximab therapy. PMID:27588089

  10. Differences in pharmacokinetics and hepatobiliary transport of a novel anti-inflammatory agent between normal and adjuvant arthritis rats.

    PubMed

    Achira, M; Totsuka, R; Kume, T

    2002-12-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics, particularly the hepatobiliary transport of T-5557 ((3-methyl-2-oxo-piperadin-3-yl)-acetic acid N'-(3-thieophen-2-yl-8-methoxy-quinazolin-1-yl)-hydrazide), a novel anti-inflammatory agent, has been examined in normal and adjuvant arthritis (AA) rats. 2. Following oral administration of T-5557, the absolute bioavailability in AA rats was increased by sixfold compared with normal rats. The extent of binding T-5557 to plasma proteins obtained from AA rats was markedly greater than in normal rats (97.0 versus 88.2%). The biliary clearance in AA rats was significantly lower than that in normal rats (1.186 versus 5.621 ml min(-1) kg(-1)), and lower intrinsic biliary clearance was also observed in AA rats (40.33 versus 69.83 ml min(-1) kg(-1)). 3. Concomitant administration of T-5557 with quinidine, a potent P-glycoprotein inhibitor, to normal rats caused a significant decrease in the biliary clearance of T-5557 by 37.9%. Moreover, the transport of T-5557 for the apical-to-basal compartment in a Caco-2 cells' monolayer was fourfold lower than that for the opposite direction, and was increased in the presence of quinidine and verapamil. 4. These results suggest that P-glycoprotein is involved in the biliary excretion of T-5557 and the decrease in the transport activity as well as the increase in plasma protein binding caused the elevated plasma concentration and bioavailability of T-5557 in AA rats. PMID:12593761

  11. The effects of levan on the acute inflammatory response.

    PubMed Central

    Sedgwick, A. D.; Rutman, A.; Sin, Y. M.; Mackay, A. R.; Willoughby, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The fructose polymer levan has been shown to affect the accumulation of leucocytes in inflammatory lesions. The present study has investigated the effect of levan on experimental pleurisy induced by carrageenan and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals. Total pleural polymorphonuclear leucocyte counts and exudate volumes were significantly reduced by levan treatment. We were, however, unable to detect any effect on mononuclear cell numbers. Furthermore, levan treatment significantly reduced peripheral leucocyte numbers. The counter-irritant activity of levan was compared with that of a known counter-irritant, dextran. The ability of levan to reduce pleural polymorph numbers and exudate volume could not be accounted for totally by counter-irritation. Studies using an in-vitro leucocyte adhesion assay system indicate that levan affects leucocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium. PMID:6201184

  12. Therapeutic effect of an altered peptide ligand derived from heat-shock protein 60 by suppressing of inflammatory cytokines secretion in two animal models of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, N; Barberá, A; Domínguez, M C; Torres, A M; Hernandez, M V; Hernandez, I; Gil, R; Ancizar, J; Garay, H; Reyes, O; Altruda, F; Silengo, L; Padrón, G

    2012-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic autoimmune disease mediated by T cells. Productive engagement of T cell receptors by major histocompatibility complex-peptide leads to proliferation, differentiation and the definition of effector functions. Altered peptide ligands (APL) generated by amino acid substitutions in the antigenic peptide have diverse effects on T cell response. We predicted a novel T cell epitope from human heat-shock protein 60, an autoantigen involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Three APLs were designed from this epitope and it was demonstrated that these peptides induce the activation of T cells through their ability to modify cell cycle phase's distribution of CD4+T cells from RA patients. Also, IL-17, TNF-α and IL-10 levels were determined in PBMC from these patients. Unlike the wild-type peptide and the other two APLs, APL2 increased the IL-10 level and suppressed IL-17 secretion in these assays. Therapeutic effect of this APL in adjuvant arthritis (AA) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) models was also evaluated. Clinical score, histopathology, inflammatory and regulatory cytokine concentration were monitored in the animals. APL2 efficiently inhibited the progression of AA and CIA with a significant reduction of the clinical and histopathologic score. Therapeutic effect of APL2 on CIA was similar to that obtained with MTX; the standard treatment for RA. This effect was associated with a decrease of TNF-α and IL-17 levels. These results suggest that the therapeutic effect of APL2 is mediated in part by down-regulation of inflammatory cytokines and support the potential use of APL2 as a therapeutic drug in RA patients. PMID:22686732

  13. The skin tissue is adversely affected by TNF-alpha blockers in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis: a 5-year prospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Natalia P.; dos Reis Neto, Edgard Torres; Soares, Maria Roberta M. P.; Freitas, Daniele S.; Porro, Adriana; Ciconelli, Rozana M.; Pinheiro, Marcelo M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the incidence of and the main risk factors associated with cutaneous adverse events in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis following anti-TNF-α therapy. METHODS: A total of 257 patients with active arthritis who were taking TNF-α blockers, including 158 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 87 with ankylosing spondylitis and 12 with psoriatic arthritis, were enrolled in a 5-year prospective analysis. Patients with overlapping or other rheumatic diseases were excluded. Anthropometric, socioeconomic, demographic and clinical data were evaluated, including the Disease Activity Score-28, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index and Psoriasis Area Severity Index. Skin conditions were evaluated by two dermatology experts, and in doubtful cases, skin lesion biopsies were performed. Associations between adverse cutaneous events and clinical, demographic and epidemiological variables were determined using the chi-square test, and logistic regression analyses were performed to identify risk factors. The significance level was set at p<0.05. RESULTS: After 60 months of follow-up, 71 adverse events (73.85/1000 patient-years) were observed, of which allergic and immune-mediated phenomena were the most frequent events, followed by infectious conditions involving bacterial (47.1%), parasitic (23.5%), fungal (20.6%) and viral (8.8%) agents. CONCLUSION: The skin is significantly affected by adverse reactions resulting from the use of TNF-α blockers, and the main risk factors for cutaneous events were advanced age, female sex, a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, disease activity and the use of infliximab. PMID:24141833

  14. CT appearance of acute inflammatory disease of the renal interstitium

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, R.P.; McClennan, B.L.; Rottenberg, R.R.

    1983-08-01

    Today, infection remains the most common disease of the urinary tract and constitutes almost 75% of patient problems requiring urologic evaluation. There have been several major factors responsible for our better understanding of the nature and pathophysiology of urinary tract infection. One has been quantitated urine bacteriology and another, the discovery that a significant part of the apparently healthy adult female population has asymptomatic bacteriuria. Abnormal conditions such as neurogenic bladder, bladder malignancy, prolonged catheter drainage and reflux, altered host resistance, diabetes mellitus, and urinary tract obstruction, as well as pregnancy, may either predispose to or be implicated in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection. There is a wide range of conditions that result in acute renal inflammation and those under discussion affect primarily the interstitium. This term refers to the connective tissue elements separating the tubules in the cortex and medulla. Hence, the interstitial nephritides are to be distinguished from the glomerulonephritides and fall into two general etiologic categories: infectious and noninfectious.

  15. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: Updates on an inflammatory CNS syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Daniela; Alper, Gulay; Van Haren, Keith; Kornberg, Andrew J; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Tenembaum, Silvia; Belman, Anita L

    2016-08-30

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an immune-mediated demyelinating CNS disorder with predilection to early childhood. ADEM is generally considered a monophasic disease. However, recurrent ADEM has been described and defined as multiphasic disseminated encephalomyelitis. ADEM often occurs postinfectiously, although a causal relationship has never been established. ADEM and multiple sclerosis are currently viewed as distinct entities, generally distinguishable even at disease onset. However, pathologic studies have demonstrated transitional cases of yet unclear significance. ADEM is clinically defined by acute polyfocal neurologic deficits including encephalopathy. MRI typically demonstrates reversible, ill-defined white matter lesions of the brain and often also the spinal cord, along with frequent involvement of thalami and basal ganglia. CSF analysis may reveal a mild pleocytosis and elevated protein, but is generally negative for intrathecal oligoclonal immunoglobulin G synthesis. In the absence of a specific diagnostic test, ADEM is considered a diagnosis of exclusion, and ADEM mimics, especially those requiring a different treatment approach, have to be carefully ruled out. The role of biomarkers, including autoantibodies like anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of ADEM is currently under debate. Based on the presumed autoimmune etiology of ADEM, the current treatment approach consists of early immunotherapy. Outcome of ADEM in pediatric patients is generally favorable, but cognitive deficits have been reported even in the absence of other neurologic sequelae. This review summarizes the current knowledge on epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, neuroimaging features, CSF findings, differential diagnosis, therapy, and outcome, with a focus on recent advances and controversies. PMID:27572859

  16. Association of inflammatory bowel disease risk loci with sarcoidosis, and its acute and chronic subphenotypes.

    PubMed

    Fischer, A; Nothnagel, M; Franke, A; Jacobs, G; Saadati, H R; Gaede, K I; Rosenstiel, P; Schürmann, M; Müller-Quernheim, J; Schreiber, S; Hofmann, S

    2011-03-01

    Sarcoidosis is a complex granulomatous inflammatory disorder that shares several clinical and pathogenic features with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Postulating a common genetic basis of inflammatory diseases, we tested 106 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are known or have been suggested to be associated with IBD for a potential association with sarcoidosis and its acute and chronic subphenotypes. We genotyped 1,996 German sarcoidosis patients, comprising 648 acutely and 1,161 chronically affected individuals, 2,622 control subjects, and 342 German trios with affected offspring using SNPlex™ technology. The nonsynonymous SNP rs11209026 (Arg381Gln) in the interleukin (IL)-23 receptor (IL23R) gene was associated with chronic sarcoidosis (OR 0.63; p = 5.58×10(-5)), which was supported by the result of a transmission disequilibrium test analysis in the independent family sample (OR 0.50; p = 0.031). Marker rs12035082 located at chromosome 1q24.3 was found to be associated with the acute subphenotype (OR 1.36; p = 6.80×10(-7)) and rs916977 (HERC2 locus; OR 1.30; p = 4.49×10(-5)) was associated with sarcoidosis. Our results highlight the potential importance of the IL-23 signalling pathway for the development of chronic sarcoidosis. The finding links sarcoidosis pathogenesis to other inflammatory conditions and may contribute to new hypotheses on disease mechanisms. PMID:20650992

  17. Meta-analysis of short term low dose prednisolone versus placebo and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether short term, oral low dose prednisolone (⩽15 mg daily) is superior to placebo and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Design: Meta-analysis of randomised trials of oral corticosteroids compared with placebo or a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Setting: Trials conducted anywhere in the world. Subjects: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Main outcome measures: Joint tenderness, pain, and grip strength. Outcomes measured on different scales were combined by using the standardised effect size (difference in effect divided by SD of the measurements). Results: Ten studies were included in the meta-analysis. Prednisolone had a marked effect over placebo on joint tenderness (standardised effect size 1.31; 95% confidence interval 0.78 to 1.83), pain (1.75; 0.87 to 2.64), and grip strength (0.41; 0.13 to 0.69). Measured in the original units the differences were 12 (6 to 18) tender joints and 22 mm Hg (5 mm Hg to 40 mm Hg) for grip strength. Prednisolone also had a greater effect than non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on joint tenderness (0.63; 0.11 to 1.16) and pain (1.25; 0.26 to 2.24), whereas the difference in grip strength was not significant (0.31; −0.02 to 0.64). Measured in the original units the differences were 9 (5 to 12) tender joints and 12 mm Hg (−6 mm Hg to 31 mm Hg). The risk of adverse effects during moderate and long term use seemed acceptable. Conclusion: Prednisolone in low doses (⩽15 mg daily) may be used intermittently in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, particularly if the disease cannot be controlled by other means. Key messages Prednisolone in low doses—that is, no more than 15 mg daily—is highly effective in patients with rheumatoid arthritis The risk of adverse effects is acceptable in short, moderate, or long term use Oral low dose prednisolone may be used intermittently in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, particularly if

  18. Hippocampal protection in mice with an attenuated inflammatory monocyte response to acute CNS picornavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Charles L.; LaFrance-Corey, Reghann G.; Sundsbak, Rhianna S.; Sauer, Brian M.; LaFrance, Stephanie J.; Buenz, Eric J.; Schmalstieg, William F.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal injury during acute viral infection of the brain is associated with the development of persistent cognitive deficits and seizures in humans. In C57BL/6 mice acutely infected with the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus, hippocampal CA1 neurons are injured by a rapid innate immune response, resulting in profound memory deficits. In contrast, infected SJL and B6xSJL F1 hybrid mice exhibit essentially complete hippocampal and memory preservation. Analysis of brain-infiltrating leukocytes revealed that SJL mice mount a sharply attenuated inflammatory monocyte response as compared to B6 mice. Bone marrow transplantation experiments isolated the attenuation to the SJL immune system. Adoptive transfer of B6 inflammatory monocytes into acutely infected B6xSJL hosts converted these mice to a hippocampal damage phenotype and induced a cognitive deficit marked by failure to recognize a novel object. These findings show that inflammatory monocytes are the critical cellular mediator of hippocampal injury during acute picornavirus infection of the brain. PMID:22848791

  19. Ozone oxidative postconditioning ameliorates joint damage and decreases pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and oxidative stress in PG/PS-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Vaillant, Jaqueline Dranguet; Fraga, Angela; Díaz, María Teresa; Mallok, A; Viebahn-Hänsler, Renate; Fahmy, Ziad; Barberá, Ariana; Delgado, Liván; Menéndez, Silvia; Fernández, Olga Sonia León

    2013-08-15

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is the most prevalent chronic condition present in ~1% of the adult population. Many pro-inflammatory mediators are increased in RA, including Reactive Oxygen Species such as nitric oxide NO, pro-inflammatory cytokines as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and other molecules. Ozone oxidative postconditioning has regulatory effects on some pathological targets associated with RA. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of ozone therapy in PG/PS-induced arthritis in rats in point of joints inflammation and morphology. Moreover, cytokines, nitric oxide and oxidative stress levels in spleen homogenates were evaluated. Ozone treatment ameliorated joint damage, reduced TNF-α concentrations as well as TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA levels. Besides, cellular redox balance, nitric oxide and fructolysine levels were reestablished after ozone oxidative postconditioning. It was concluded that pleiotropic ozone's effects clarify its therapeutic efficacy in RA. Decreasing inflammation and joint injury, reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-1β transcripts and re-establishment of cellular redox balance after ozone treatment were demonstrated. PMID:23911887

  20. Enhanced therapeutic anti-inflammatory effect of betamethasone on topical administration with low-frequency, low-intensity (20 kHz, 100 mW/cm(2)) ultrasound exposure on carrageenan-induced arthritis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Gadi; Natsheh, Hiba; Sunny, Youhan; Bawiec, Christopher R; Touitou, Elka; Lerman, Melissa A; Lazarovici, Philip; Lewin, Peter A

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether low-frequency, low-intensity (20 kHz, <100 mW/cm(2), spatial-peak, temporal-peak intensity) ultrasound, delivered with a lightweight (<100 g), tether-free, fully wearable, battery-powered applicator, is capable of reducing inflammation in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis. The therapeutic, acute, anti-inflammatory effect was estimated from the relative swelling induced in mice hindlimb paws. In an independent, indirect approach, the inflammation was bio-imaged by measuring glycolytic activity with near-infrared labeled 2-deoxyglucose. The outcome of the experiments indicated that the combination of ultrasound exposure and topical application of 0.1% (w/w) betamethasone gel resulted in statistically significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced anti-inflammatory activity in comparison with drug or ultrasound treatment alone. The present study underscores the potential benefits of low-frequency, low-intensity ultrasound-assisted drug delivery. However, the proof of concept presented indicates the need for additional experiments to systematically evaluate and optimize the potential of, and the conditions for, tolerable low-frequency, low-intensity ultrasound-promoted non-invasive drug delivery. PMID:26003010

  1. Berberine inhibits inflammatory mediators and attenuates acute pancreatitis through deactivation of JNK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun-Bok; Bae, Gi-Sang; Jo, Il-Joo; Wang, Shaofan; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2016-06-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a life-threatening disease. Berberine (BBR), a well-known plant alkaloid, is reported to have anti-inflammatory activity in many diseases. However, the effects of BBR on AP have not been clearly elucidated. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of BBR on cerulein-induced AP in mice. AP was induced by either cerulein or l-arginine. In the BBR treated group, BBR was administered intraperitoneally 1h before the first cerulein or l-arginine injection. Blood samples were obtained to determine serum amylase and lipase activities and nitric oxide production. The pancreas and lung were rapidly removed for examination of histologic changes, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, the regulating mechanisms of BBR were evaluated. Treatment of mice with BBR reduced pancreatic injury and activities of amylase, lipase, and pancreatitis-associated lung injury, as well as inhibited several inflammatory parameters such as the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and inducible nitric oxide synthesis (iNOS). Furthermore, BBR administration significantly inhibited c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the cerulein-induced AP. Deactivation of JNK resulted in amelioration of pancreatitis and the inhibition of inflammatory mediators. These results suggest that BBR exerts anti-inflammatory effects on AP via JNK deactivation on mild and severe acute pancreatitis model, and could be a beneficial target in the management of AP. PMID:27148818

  2. Bcr and Abr Cooperate in Negatively Regulating Acute Inflammatory Responses▿

    PubMed Central

    Cunnick, Jess M.; Schmidhuber, Sabine; Chen, Gang; Yu, Min; Yi, Sun-Ju; Cho, Young Jin; Kaartinen, Vesa; Minoo, Parviz; Warburton, David; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2009-01-01

    Bcr and Abr are GTPase-activating proteins for the small GTPase Rac. Both proteins are expressed in cells of the innate immune system, including neutrophils and macrophages. The function of Bcr has been linked to the negative regulation of neutrophil reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, but the function of Abr in the innate immune system was unknown. Here, we report that mice lacking both proteins are severely affected in two models of experimental endotoxemia, including exposure to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide and polymicrobial sepsis, with extensive microvascular leakage, resulting in severe pulmonary edema and hemorrhage. Additionally, in vivo-activated neutrophils of abr and bcr null mutant mice produced excessive tissue-damaging myeloperoxidase (MPO), elastase, and ROS. Moreover, the secretion of the tissue metalloproteinase MMP9 by monocytes and ROS by elicited macrophages was abnormally high. In comparison, ROS production from bone marrow monocytes was not significantly different from that of controls, and the exocytosis of neutrophil secondary and tertiary granule products, including lactoferrin, was normal. These data show that Abr and Bcr normally curb very specific functions of mature tissue innate immune cells, and that each protein has distinct as well as partly overlapping functions in the downregulation of inflammatory processes. PMID:19703997

  3. Acute inflammatory response in spinal cord following impact injury.

    PubMed

    Carlson, S L; Parrish, M E; Springer, J E; Doty, K; Dossett, L

    1998-05-01

    Numerous factors are involved in the spread of secondary damage in spinal cord after traumatic injury, including ischemia, edema, increased excitatory amino acids, and oxidative damage to the tissue from reactive oxygen species. Neutrophils and macrophages can produce reactive oxygen species when activated and thus may contribute to the lipid peroxidation that is known to occur after spinal cord injury. This study examined the rostral-caudal distribution of neutrophils and macrophages/microglia at 4, 6, 24, and 48 h after contusion injury to the T10 spinal cord of rat (10 g weight, 50 mm drop). Neutrophils were located predominantly in necrotic regions, with a time course that peaked at 24 h as measured with assays of myeloperoxidase activity (MPO). The sharpest peak of MPO activity was localized between 4 mm rostral and caudal to the injury. Macrophages/microglia were visualized with antibodies against ED1 and OX-42. Numerous cells with a phagocytic morphology were present by 24 h, with a higher number by 48 h. These cells were predominantly located within the gray matter and dorsal funiculus white matter. The number of cells gradually declined through 6 mm rostral and caudal to the lesion. OX-42 staining also revealed reactive microglia with blunt processes, particularly at levels distant to the lesion. The number of macrophages/microglia was significantly correlated with the amount of tissue damage at each level. Treatments to decrease the inflammatory response are likely to be beneficial to recovery of function after traumatic spinal cord injury. PMID:9582256

  4. Identification of the major fibroblast growth factors released spontaneously in inflammatory arthritis as platelet derived growth factor and tumour necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, S C; Por, S B; Penny, R; Richter, M; Shelley, L; Breit, S N

    1991-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by chronic inflammation and proliferation of a number of important elements within the joint including the synovial fibroblasts. Elevated levels of a number of cytokines such as Il-1, IL-2, IL-6, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), transforming growth factor-beta and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) have been detected in the synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory arthritides. It seems likely that local release of such mediators may be responsible for the proliferation and overgrowth of connective tissue elements in these disorders. In order to ascertain whether there was evidence to suggest local production or release of fibroblast growth factors in the joint in inflammatory arthritis, and to determine their identity, cells were obtained from the synovial fluid of 15 patients with chronic inflammatory arthritides. All subjects' synovial fluid cells spontaneously released growth factor activity for fibroblasts. This was present in large amounts, being detectable in culture supernatants diluted to a titre of at least 1/625. By a series of depletion experiments using solid-phase bound antibodies to cytokines, it was possible to demonstrate that this activity was due to TNF-alpha and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Thus, this study showed for the first time that functionally active PDGF was released from synovial fluid cells. Both PDGF and TNF-alpha appeared to contribute in approximately equal amounts to this fibroblast growth factor activity, and were synergistic in effect. Thus this study provides evidence for the local production and release of these two cytokines and suggests that together they are the dominant factors in fibroblast proliferation within the synovial cavity. PMID:1914237

  5. Role of vascular channels as a novel mechanism for subchondral bone damage at cruciate ligament entheses in osteoarthritis and inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Binks, D A; Gravallese, E M; Bergin, D; Hodgson, R J; Tan, A L; Matzelle, M M; McGonagle, D; Radjenovic, A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this work was to test whether normal peri-entheseal vascular anatomy at anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PCL) was associated with distribution of peri-entheseal bone erosion/bone marrow lesions (BMLs) in inflammatory arthritis (IA) and osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Normal microanatomy was defined histologically in mice and by 3 T MRI and histology in 21 cadaveric knees. MRI of 89 patients from the Osteoarthritis Initiative and 27 patients with IA was evaluated for BMLs at ACL and PCL entheses. Antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in mice was evaluated to ascertain whether putative peri-entheseal vascular regions influenced osteitis and bone erosion. Results Vascular channels penetrating cortical bone were identified in knees of non-arthritic mice adjacent to the cruciate ligaments. On MRI of normal cadavers, vascular channels adjacent to the ACL (64% of cases) and PCL (71%) entheses were observed. Histology of 10 macroscopically normal cadaveric specimens confirmed the location of vascular channels and associated subclinical changes including subchondral bone damage (80% of cases) and micro-cyst formation (50%). In the AIA model, vascular channels clearly provided a site for inflammatory tissue entry and osteoclast activation. MRI showed BMLs in the same topographic locations in both patients with early OA (41% ACL, 59% PCL) and IA (44%, 33%). Conclusion The findings show that normal ACL and PCL entheses have immediately adjacent vascular channels which are common sites of subtle bone marrow pathology in non-arthritic joints. These channels appear to be key determinants in bone damage in inflammatory and degenerative arthritis. PMID:24095939

  6. Methyl salicylate lactoside inhibits inflammatory response of fibroblast-like synoviocytes and joint destruction in collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Wenyu; Huang, Chao; Zhang, Xue; Xin, Sheng; Zhou, Yiming; Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Dan; Li, Yongjie; Zhou, Sibai; Zhang, Dongming; Zhang, Tiantai; Du, Guanhua

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Methyl salicylate 2-O-β-d-lactoside (MSL), whose chemical structure is similar to that of salicylic acid, is a natural product derivative isolated from a traditional Chinese herb. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of MSL in mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and explore its underlying mechanism. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The anti-arthritic effects of MSL were evaluated on human rheumatoid fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in vitro and CIA in mice in vivo by obtaining clinical scores, measuring hind paw thickness and inflammatory cytokine levels, radiographic evaluations and histopathological assessments. KEY RESULTS Treatment with MSL after the onset of arthritis significantly prevented the progression and development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in CIA mice without megascopic gastric mucosa damage. In addition, MSL inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory mediators, the phosphorylation and translocation of NF-κB, and cell proliferation induced by TNF-α in FLS. MSL non-selectively inhibited the activity of COX in vitro, but was a more potent inhibitor of COX-2 than COX-1. MSL also inhibited the phosphorylation of inhibitor of NF-κB kinase, IκBα and p65, thus blocking the nuclear translocation of NF-κB in TNF-α-stimulated FLS. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS MSL exerts therapeutic effects on CIA mice, suppressing the inflammatory response and joint destruction by non-selectively inhibiting the activity of COX and suppressing activation of the NF-κB signalling pathway, but without damaging the gastric mucosa. Therefore, MSL has great potential to be developed into a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA. PMID:24712652

  7. Acute inflammatory responses of nanoparticles in an intra-tracheal instillation rat model.

    PubMed

    Armstead, Andrea L; Minarchick, Valerie C; Porter, Dale W; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R; Li, Bingyun

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to hard metal tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) "dusts" in enclosed industrial environments is known to contribute to the development of hard metal lung disease and an increased risk for lung cancer. Currently, the influence of local and systemic inflammation on disease progression following WC-Co exposure remains unclear. To better understand the relationship between WC-Co nanoparticle (NP) exposure and its resultant effects, the acute local pulmonary and systemic inflammatory responses caused by WC-Co NPs were explored using an intra-tracheal instillation (IT) model and compared to those of CeO2 (another occupational hazard) NP exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats were given an IT dose (0-500 μg per rat) of WC-Co or CeO2 NPs. Following 24-hr exposure, broncho-alveolar lavage fluid and whole blood were collected and analyzed. A consistent lack of acute local pulmonary inflammation was observed in terms of the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid parameters examined (i.e. LDH, albumin, and macrophage activation) in animals exposed to WC-Co NP; however, significant acute pulmonary inflammation was observed in the CeO2 NP group. The lack of acute inflammation following WC-Co NP exposure contrasts with earlier in vivo reports regarding WC-Co toxicity in rats, illuminating the critical role of NP dose and exposure time and bringing into question the potential role of impurities in particle samples. Further, we demonstrated that WC-Co NP exposure does not induce acute systemic effects since no significant increase in circulating inflammatory cytokines were observed. Taken together, the results of this in vivo study illustrate the distinct differences in acute local pulmonary and systemic inflammatory responses to NPs composed of WC-Co and CeO2; therefore, it is important that the outcomes of pulmonary exposure to one type of NPs may not be implicitly extrapolated to other types of NPs. PMID:25738830

  8. Acute Inflammatory Responses of Nanoparticles in an Intra-Tracheal Instillation Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Armstead, Andrea L.; Minarchick, Valerie C.; Porter, Dale W.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.; Li, Bingyun

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to hard metal tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) “dusts” in enclosed industrial environments is known to contribute to the development of hard metal lung disease and an increased risk for lung cancer. Currently, the influence of local and systemic inflammation on disease progression following WC-Co exposure remains unclear. To better understand the relationship between WC-Co nanoparticle (NP) exposure and its resultant effects, the acute local pulmonary and systemic inflammatory responses caused by WC-Co NPs were explored using an intra-tracheal instillation (IT) model and compared to those of CeO2 (another occupational hazard) NP exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats were given an IT dose (0-500 μg per rat) of WC-Co or CeO2 NPs. Following 24-hr exposure, broncho-alveolar lavage fluid and whole blood were collected and analyzed. A consistent lack of acute local pulmonary inflammation was observed in terms of the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid parameters examined (i.e. LDH, albumin, and macrophage activation) in animals exposed to WC-Co NP; however, significant acute pulmonary inflammation was observed in the CeO2 NP group. The lack of acute inflammation following WC-Co NP exposure contrasts with earlier in vivo reports regarding WC-Co toxicity in rats, illuminating the critical role of NP dose and exposure time and bringing into question the potential role of impurities in particle samples. Further, we demonstrated that WC-Co NP exposure does not induce acute systemic effects since no significant increase in circulating inflammatory cytokines were observed. Taken together, the results of this in vivo study illustrate the distinct differences in acute local pulmonary and systemic inflammatory responses to NPs composed of WC-Co and CeO2; therefore, it is important that the outcomes of pulmonary exposure to one type of NPs may not be implicitly extrapolated to other types of NPs. PMID:25738830

  9. Genetic or Pharmacologic Amplification of Nrf2 Signaling Inhibits Acute Inflammatory Liver Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Osburn, William O.; Yates, Melinda S.; Dolan, Patrick D.; Liby, Karen T.; Sporn, Michael B.; Taguchi, Keiko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative stress-mediated destruction of normal parenchymal cells during hepatic inflammatory responses contributes to the pathogenesis of immune-mediated hepatitis and is implicated in the progression of acute inflammatory liver injury to chronic inflammatory liver disease. The transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates the expression of a battery of antioxidative enzymes and Nrf2 signaling can be activated by small-molecule drugs that disrupt Keap1-mediated repression of Nrf2 signaling. Therefore, genetic and pharmacologic approaches were used to activate Nrf2 signaling to assess protection against inflammatory liver injury. Profound increases in ind of cell death were observed in both Nrf2 wild-type (Nrf2-WT) mice and Nrf2-disrupted (Nrf2-KO) mice 24-hr following intravenous injection of concanavalin A (12.5 mg/kg, ConA), a model for T cell-mediated acute inflammatory liver injury. However, hepatocyte-specific conditional Keap1 null (Alb-Cre:Keap1flox/−, cKeap1-KO) mice with constitutively enhanced expression of Nrf2-regulated antioxidative genes as well as Nrf2-WT mice but not Nrf2-KO mice pretreated with three daily doses of a triterpenoid that potently activates Nrf2 (30 µmole/kg, CDDO-Im) were highly resistant to ConA-mediated inflammatory liver injury. CDDO-Im pretreatment of both Nrf2-WT and Nrf2-KO mice resulted in equivalent suppression of serum pro-inflammatory soluble proteins suggesting that the hepatoprotection afforded by CDDO-Im pretreatment of Nrf2-WT mice but not Nrf2-KO mice was not due to suppression of systemic pro-inflammatory signaling, but instead was due to activation of Nrf2 signaling in the liver. Enhanced hepatic expression of Nrf2-regulated antioxidative genes inhibited inflammation-mediated oxidative stress, thereby preventing hepatocyte necrosis. Attenuation of hepatocyte death in cKeap1-KO mice and CDDO-Im pretreated Nrf2-WT mice resulted in decreased late-phase pro-inflammatory gene expression in the liver

  10. Chuanhu Anti-Gout Mixture versus Colchicine for Acute Gouty Arthritis: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Double-Dummy, Non-Inferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wang, YanGang; Wang, Luan; Li, EnZe; Li, Yang; Wang, ZhongChao; Sun, XiaoFang; Yu, XiaoLong; Ma, Lin; Wang, YunLong; Wang, YouXin

    2014-01-01

    Background The Chuanhu anti-gout mixture has been used for many years in the treatment of gout in Chinese Traditional Medicine, and current methods for treatments for acute gouty arthritis have been either less effective or have had serious side effects. Methods In this 12-week, double-blind, double-dummy, non-inferiority study, outpatient individuals with newly diagnosed acute gouty arthritis were randomly assigned to receive Chuanhu anti-gout mixture or colchicine. Both the study investigators and the participants were masked to the treatment assignments. The primary outcome was the recurrence rate of acute gouty arthritis, and the secondary outcomes were changes in white blood cells (WHC) and C-reactive protein (CRP). This trial is registered at ISRCTN.org as trial ISRCTN65219941. Results A total of 176 patients were randomly assigned to receive either the Chuanhu anti-gout mixture or Colchicine. The overall recurrence rates in the Chuanhu anti-gout mixture group (CH group) and the Colchicine group (Col group) were 12.50% vs 14.77% (difference -2.22%, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): -10.78%~6.23%), meeting the predefined non-inferiority criterion of 15%, as did the data for WHC and CRP. The incidence of adverse events (mainly diarrhea) was less in the Col group than in the CH group (2.27% vs 28.41%, 95% CI 0.01~0.26). In addition, changes in blood uric acid, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and creatinine in the CH group were significantly larger compared to those in the Col group (P<0.05). Conclusions The Chuanhu anti-gout mixture was non-inferior to colchicine for the treatment of acute gouty arthritis. The study suggested that the Chuanhu anti-gout mixture can be considered an alternative choice for the treatment of acute gouty arthritis because of its lower incidence of adverse events and its protection of kidney and renal function. PMID:25013367