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Sample records for acute mucosal pathogenesis

  1. Acute mucosal pathogenesis of feline immunodeficiency virus is independent of viral dose in vaginally infected cats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The mucosal pathogenesis of HIV has been shown to be an important feature of infection and disease progression. HIV-1 infection causes depletion of intestinal lamina propria CD4+ T cells (LPL), therefore, intestinal CD4+ T cell preservation may be a useful correlate of protection in evaluating vaccine candidates. Vaccine studies employing the cat/FIV and macaque/SIV models frequently use high doses of parenterally administered challenge virus to ensure high plasma viremia in control animals. However, it is unclear if loss of mucosal T cells would occur regardless of initial viral inoculum dose. The objective of this study was to determine the acute effect of viral dose on mucosal leukocytes and associated innate and adaptive immune responses. Results Cats were vaginally inoculated with a high, middle or low dose of cell-associated and cell-free FIV. PBMC, serum and plasma were assessed every two weeks with tissues assessed eight weeks following infection. We found that irrespective of mucosally administered viral dose, FIV infection was induced in all cats. However, viremia was present in only half of the cats, and viral dose was unrelated to the development of viremia. Importantly, regardless of viral dose, all cats experienced significant losses of intestinal CD4+ LPL and CD8+ intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL). Innate immune responses by CD56+CD3- NK cells correlated with aviremia and apparent occult infection but did not protect mucosal T cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in viremic cats were more likely to produce cytokines in response to Gag stimulation, whereas aviremic cats T cells tended to produce cytokines in response to Env stimulation. However, while cell-mediated immune responses in aviremic cats may have helped reduce viral replication, they could not be correlated to the levels of viremia. Robust production of anti-FIV antibodies was positively correlated with the magnitude of viremia. Conclusions Our results indicate that mucosal immune

  2. Microbiota and their role in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Vanhoecke, B; De Ryck, T; Stringer, A; Van de Wiele, T; Keefe, D

    2015-01-01

    Oral mucositis in patients undergoing cancer therapy is a significant problem. Its prevalence ranges between 20 and 100%, depending on treatment type and protocols and patient-based variables. Mucositis is self-limiting when uncomplicated by infection. Unfortunately, the incidence of developing a local or systemic infection during the course of the treatment is very high. At this stage, it is unclear which role oral microbiota play in the onset, duration, and severity of oral mucositis. Nevertheless, there is growing interest in this underexplored topic, and new studies are being undertaken to unravel their impact on the pathogenesis of mucositis. PMID:24456144

  3. Pathogenesis of mucosal biofilm infections: challenges and progress

    PubMed Central

    Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Living-tissue biofilms remained unrecognized until very recently, mainly as a result of traditional microbial sampling techniques or histologic processing, which disrupt the spatial organization of the tissue microorganisms. Thus, the biofilm nature of certain mucosal infections was frequently unintentionally missed or disregarded. To a large extent, the study of human tissue biofilms is still in its infancy. However, with the advent of newer methodologies, such as fluorescent in situ hybridization and endoscopic confocal laser scanning microscopy, which combine the identification of microbes with in situ, direct visualization of their relationships with each other and with their substratum, mucosal tissue biofilms are becoming easier to study and, thus, their role in human infections is becoming more apparent. This review summarizes the challenges in the study of tissue biofilms, proposes two inflammation-centered – albeit opposite – pathogenetic models of mucosal tissue biofilm infections and suggests directions for future research and novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:18380602

  4. Mucosal transmission and pathogenesis of chronic wasting disease in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Perrott, Matthew R; Sigurdson, Christina J; Mason, Gary L; Hoover, Edward A

    2013-02-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) of cervids is almost certainly transmitted by mucosal contact with the causative prion, whether by direct (animal-to-animal) or indirect (environmental) means. Yet the sites and mechanisms of prion entry remain to be further understood. This study sought to extend this understanding by demonstrating that ferrets exposed to CWD via several mucosal routes developed infection, CWD prion protein (PrP(CWD)) amplification in lymphoid tissues, neural invasion and florid transmissible spongiform encephalopathy lesions resembling those in native cervid hosts. The ferrets developed extensive PrP(CWD) accumulation in the nervous system, retina and olfactory epithelium, with lesser deposition in tongue, muscle, salivary gland and the vomeronasal organ. PrP(CWD) accumulation in mucosal sites, including upper respiratory tract epithelium, olfactory epithelium and intestinal Peyer's patches, make the shedding of prions by infected ferrets plausible. It was also observed that regionally targeted exposure of the nasopharyngeal mucosa resulted in an increased attack rate when compared with oral exposure. The latter finding suggests that nasal exposure enhances permissiveness to CWD infection. The ferret model has further potential for investigation of portals for initiation of CWD infection. PMID:23100363

  5. Oropharyngeal mucositis in cancer therapy. Review of pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Joel B; Schubert, Mark M

    2003-12-01

    Oropharyngeal mucositis is a common and treatment-limiting side effect of cancer therapy. Severe oral mucositis can lead to the need to interrupt or discontinue cancer therapy and thus may have an impact on cure of the primary disease. Mucositis may also increase the risk of local and systemic infection and significantly affects quality of life and cost of care. Current care of patients with mucositis is essentially palliative and includes appropriate oral hygiene, nonirritating diet and oral care products, topical palliative mouth rinses, topical anesthetics, and opioid analgesics. Systemic analgesics are the mainstay of pain management. Topical approaches to pain management are under investigation. The literature supports use of benzydamine for prophylaxis of mucositis caused by conventional fractionationated head and neck radiotherapy, and cryotherapy for short-half-life stomatoxic chemotherapy, such as bolus fluorouracil. Continuing studies are investigating the potential use of biologic response modifiers and growth factors, including topical and systemic delivery of epithelial growth factors and agents. Progress in the prevention and management of mucositis will improve quality of life, reduce cost of care, and facilitate completion of more intensive cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy protocols. In addition, improved management of mucositis may allow implementation of cancer treatment protocols that are currently excessively mucotoxic but may produce higher cure rates. Continuing research related to the pathogenesis and management of mucositis will undoubtedly lead to the development of potential interventions and improved patient care. PMID:14723014

  6. Effects of Mycotoxins on Mucosal Microbial Infection and Related Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Dongwook; Kim, Juil; Moon, Yuseok

    2015-01-01

    Mycotoxins are fungal secondary metabolites detected in many agricultural commodities and water-damaged indoor environments. Susceptibility to mucosal infectious diseases is closely associated with immune dysfunction caused by mycotoxin exposure in humans and other animals. Many mycotoxins suppress immune function by decreasing the proliferation of activated lymphocytes, impairing phagocytic function of macrophages, and suppressing cytokine production, but some induce hypersensitive responses in different dose regimes. The present review describes various mycotoxin responses to infectious pathogens that trigger mucosa-associated diseases in the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts of humans and other animals. In particular, it focuses on the effects of mycotoxin exposure on invasion, pathogen clearance, the production of cytokines and immunoglobulins, and the prognostic implications of interactions between infectious pathogens and mycotoxin exposure. PMID:26529017

  7. [Etiology and pathogenesis of acute respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Ziliene, Violeta; Kondrotas, Anatolijus Juozas; Kevelaitis, Egidijus

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine factors influencing acute respiratory failure and pathogenesis according to literature and clinical findings in critically ill patients. The term "respiratory failure" implies the inability to maintain either the normal delivery of oxygen to tissues and release or the normal removal of carbon dioxide from the tissues. There are many patients suffering from acute respiratory failure caused by nosocomial pneumonia, septic syndrome, aspiration, interstitial or alveolar lung edema, thromboembolism of a. pulmonalis, polytrauma and lung contusion, acute respiratory distress syndrome, long-term mechanical ventilation of the lungs, acute lung injury, status asthmaticus, rather massive transfusions of blood products, and lipid embolism in the intensive care unit. There are actually three processes involved: the transfer of oxygen across the alveolus, the transport to the tissues (by cardiac output), and the removal of carbon dioxide from blood into the alveolus with subsequent exhalation into the environment. Failure of any step in this process can lead to respiratory failure. Long-term hypoxia causes ischemic changes and dysfunction of brain, heart, kidney, lungs and can worsen the course of disease or cause higher mortality. It is important to determine the pathogenetic mechanisms of acute respiratory failure, estimate the main parameters and their interrelations and prescribe proper treatment. PMID:15064552

  8. Treatment and pathogenesis of acute hyperkalemia

    PubMed Central

    Mushiyakh, Yelena; Dangaria, Harsh; Qavi, Shahbaz; Ali, Noorjahan; Pannone, John; Tompkins, David

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and various treatment modalities for acute hyperkalemia and presents a systematic approach to selecting a treatment strategy. Hyperkalemia, a life-threatening condition caused by extracellular potassium shift or decreased renal potassium excretion, usually presents with non-specific symptoms. Early recognition of moderate to severe hyperkalemia is vital in preventing fatal cardiac arrhythmias and muscle paralysis. Management of hyperkalemia includes the elimination of reversible causes (diet, medications), rapidly acting therapies that shift potassium into cells and block the cardiac membrane effects of hyperkalemia, and measures to facilitate removal of potassium from the body (saline diuresis, oral binding resins, and hemodialysis). Hyperkalemia with potassium level more than 6.5 mEq/L or EKG changes is a medical emergency and should be treated accordingly. Treatment should be started with calcium gluconate to stabilize cardiomyocyte membranes, followed by insulin injection, and b-agonists administration. Hemodialysis remains the most reliable method to remove potassium from the body and should be used in cases refractory to medical treatment. Prompt detection and proper treatment are crucial in preventing lethal outcomes. PMID:23882341

  9. Acute appendicitis following endoscopic mucosal resection of cecal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Yukako; Tokuhisa, Junya; Shimada, Nagasato; Gomi, Tatsuya; Maetani, Iruru

    2015-07-21

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) allows the removal of flat or sessile lesions, laterally spreading tumors, and carcinoma of the colon or the rectum limited to the mucosa or the superficial submucosa. Acute appendicitis is the most common abdominal emergency requiring emergency surgery, and it is also a rare complication of diagnostic colonoscopy and therapeutic endoscopy, including EMR. In the case presented here, a 53-year-old female underwent colonoscopy due to a positive fecal occult blood test and was diagnosed with cecal adenoma. She was referred to our hospital and admitted for treatment. The patient had no other symptoms. EMR was performed, and 7 h after the surgery, the patient experienced right -lower abdominal pain. Laboratory tests performed the following day revealed a WBC count of 16000/mm(3), a neutrophil count of 14144/mm(3), and a C-reactive protein level of 2.20 mg/dL, indicating an inflammatory response. Computed tomography also revealed appendiceal wall thickening and swelling, so acute appendicitis following EMR was diagnosed. Antibiotics were initiated leading to total resolution of the symptoms, and the patient was discharged on the sixth post-operative day. Pathological analysis revealed a high-grade cecal tubular adenoma. Such acute appendicitis following EMR is extremely rare, and EMR of the cecum may be a rare cause of acute appendicitis. PMID:26217100

  10. Acute appendicitis following endoscopic mucosal resection of cecal adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Yukako; Tokuhisa, Junya; Shimada, Nagasato; Gomi, Tatsuya; Maetani, Iruru

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) allows the removal of flat or sessile lesions, laterally spreading tumors, and carcinoma of the colon or the rectum limited to the mucosa or the superficial submucosa. Acute appendicitis is the most common abdominal emergency requiring emergency surgery, and it is also a rare complication of diagnostic colonoscopy and therapeutic endoscopy, including EMR. In the case presented here, a 53-year-old female underwent colonoscopy due to a positive fecal occult blood test and was diagnosed with cecal adenoma. She was referred to our hospital and admitted for treatment. The patient had no other symptoms. EMR was performed, and 7 h after the surgery, the patient experienced right -lower abdominal pain. Laboratory tests performed the following day revealed a WBC count of 16000/mm3, a neutrophil count of 14144/mm3, and a C-reactive protein level of 2.20 mg/dL, indicating an inflammatory response. Computed tomography also revealed appendiceal wall thickening and swelling, so acute appendicitis following EMR was diagnosed. Antibiotics were initiated leading to total resolution of the symptoms, and the patient was discharged on the sixth post-operative day. Pathological analysis revealed a high-grade cecal tubular adenoma. Such acute appendicitis following EMR is extremely rare, and EMR of the cecum may be a rare cause of acute appendicitis. PMID:26217100

  11. Interplay between Helicobacter pylori and immune cells in immune pathogenesis of gastric inflammation and mucosal pathology

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hwei-Fang; Hsu, Ping-Ning

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with an inflammatory response in the gastric mucosa, leading to chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric carcinoma and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas. Recent studies have shown that apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells is increased during H. pylori infection. Apoptosis induced by microbial infections are factors implicated in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. The enhanced gastric epithelial cell apoptosis in H. pylori infection has been suggested to play an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic gastritis and gastric pathology. In addition to directly triggering apoptosis, H. pylori induces sensitivity to tumor-necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-mediated apoptosis in gastric epithelial cells via modulation of TRAIL apoptosis signaling. Moreover, H. pylori infection induces infiltration of T lymphocytes and triggers inflammation to augment apoptosis. In H. pylori infection, there was significantly increased CCR6+CD3+ T-cell infiltration in the gastric mucosa, and the CCR6 ligand, CCL20 chemokine, was selectively expressed in inflamed gastric tissues. These results implicate that the interaction between CCL20 and CCR6 may play a role in recruiting T cells to the sites of inflammation in the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter infection. Through these mechanisms, chemokine-mediated T lymphocyte trafficking into inflamed epithelium is initiated and the mucosal injury in Helicobacter infection is induced. This article will review the recent novel findings on the interactions of H. pylori with diverse host epithelial signaling pathways and events involved in the initiation of gastric pathology, including gastric inflammation, mucosal damage and development of MALT lymphomas. PMID:20190789

  12. Gut barrier structure, mucosal immunity and intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis and treatment of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Tincati, Camilla; Douek, Daniel C; Marchetti, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, extensive work has been carried out in the field of microbial translocation in HIV infection, ranging from studies on its clinical significance to investigations on its pathogenic features. In the present work, we review the most recent findings on this phenomenon, focusing on the predictive role of microbial translocation in HIV-related morbidity and mortality, the mechanisms by which it arises and potential therapeutic approaches. From a clinical perspective, current work has shown that markers of microbial translocation may be useful in predicting clinical events in untreated HIV infection, while conflicting data exist on their role in cART-experienced subjects, possibly due to the inclusion of extremely varied patient populations in cohort studies. Results from studies addressing the pathogenesis of microbial translocation have improved our knowledge of the damage of the gastrointestinal epithelial barrier occurring in HIV infection. However, the extent to which mucosal impairment translates directly to increased gastrointestinal permeability remains an open issue. In this respect, novel work has established a role for IL-17 and IL-22-secreting T cell populations in limiting microbial translocation and systemic T-cell activation/inflammation, thus representing a possible target of immune-therapeutic interventions shown to be promising in the animal model. Further, recent reports have not only confirmed the presence of a dysbiotic intestinal community in the course of HIV infection but have also shown that it may be linked to mucosal damage, microbial translocation and peripheral immune activation. Importantly, technical advances have also shed light on the metabolic activity of gut microbes, highlighting the need for novel therapeutic approaches to correct the function, as well as the composition, of the gastrointestinal microbiota. PMID:27073405

  13. Candida albicans VPS4 contributes differentially to epithelial and mucosal pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rane, Hallie S; Hardison, Sarah; Botelho, Claudia; Bernardo, Stella M; Wormley, Floyd; Lee, Samuel A

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the C. albicans pre-vacuolar protein sorting gene VPS4 is required for extracellular secretion of the secreted aspartyl proteases Sap2p and Saps4–6p. Furthermore, the vps4Δ null mutant has been shown to be markedly hypovirulent in a murine tail vein model of disseminated candidiasis. In these experiments, we sought to further define the role of the pre-vacuolar secretion pathway mediated by the pre-vacuolar sorting gene VPS4 in the pathogenesis of epithelial and mucosal infection using a broad range of virulence models. The C. albicans vps4Δ mutant demonstrates reduced tolerance of cell wall stresses compared to its isogenic, complemented control strain. In an in vitro oral epithelial model (OEM) of tissue invasion, the vps4Δ mutant caused reduced tissue damage compared to controls. Further, the vps4Δ mutant was defective in macrophage killing in vitro, and was attenuated in virulence in an in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans model representative of intestinal epithelial infection. In contrast, the vps4Δ mutant caused a similar degree of tissue damage in an in vitro uroepithelial model of Candida infection compared with controls. Furthermore, in an in vivo murine model of vaginal candidiasis there was no reduction in fungal colony burden and no differences in vaginal histopathology compared to wild-type and complemented controls. These results suggest that VPS4 contributes to several key aspects of oral epithelial but not uroepithelial infection, and in contrast to systemic infection, plays no major role in the pathogenesis of Candida vaginitis. By using a wide range of virulence models, we demonstrate that C. albicans VPS4 contributes to virulence according to the specific tissue that is infected. Thus, in order to gain a full understanding of C. albicans virulence in relation to a particular gene or pathway of interest, a selected range of infection models may need to be utilized. PMID:25483774

  14. [Polonium-210 acute and chronic pathomorphology and pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Kvacheva, Yu E

    2015-01-01

    In the present review, the data on the pathology of acute and chronic polonium injuries available from the an open-access domestic and foreign literature are primarily systemized and analyzed. The historical background of the research is presented in brief. On the basis of clinical and experimental generalizations, the current concept regarding the pathogenesis of polonium intoxication has been developed. PMID:26856053

  15. OCT visualization of acute radiation mucositis: pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkova, Natalia; Maslennikova, Anna; Terentieva, Anna; Fomina, Yulia; Khomutinnikova, Nina; Balalaeva, Irina; Vyseltseva, Yulia; Larin, Roman; Kornoukhova, Natalia; Shakhov, Andrey; Shakhova, Natalia; Gelikonov, Grigory; Kamensky, Vladislav; Feldchtein, Felix

    2005-08-01

    We present pilot results in optical coherence tomography (OCT) visualization of normal mucosa radiation damage. 15 patients undergoing radiation treatment of head and neck cancer were enrolled. OCT was used to monitor the mucositis development during and after treatment. OCT can see stages of radiation mucositis development, including hidden ones, before any clinical manifestations.

  16. Oral Administration of Escin Inhibits Acute Inflammation and Reduces Intestinal Mucosal Injury in Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Li, Minmin; Lu, Chengwen; Zhang, Leiming; Zhang, Jianqiao; Du, Yuan; Duan, Sijin; Wang, Tian; Fu, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of escin on acute inflammation and intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. The effects of escin on carrageenan-induced paw edema in a rat model of acute inflammation, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) induced intestinal mucosal injury in a mouse model, were observed. It was shown that oral administration of escin inhibits carrageenan-induced paw edema and decreases the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2. In CLP model, low dose of escin ameliorates endotoxin induced liver injury and intestinal mucosal injury and increases the expression of tight junction protein claudin-5 in mice. These findings suggest that escin effectively inhibits acute inflammation and reduces intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. PMID:26199634

  17. Oral Administration of Escin Inhibits Acute Inflammation and Reduces Intestinal Mucosal Injury in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minmin; Lu, Chengwen; Zhang, Leiming; Zhang, Jianqiao; Du, Yuan; Duan, Sijin; Wang, Tian; Fu, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of escin on acute inflammation and intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. The effects of escin on carrageenan-induced paw edema in a rat model of acute inflammation, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) induced intestinal mucosal injury in a mouse model, were observed. It was shown that oral administration of escin inhibits carrageenan-induced paw edema and decreases the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2. In CLP model, low dose of escin ameliorates endotoxin induced liver injury and intestinal mucosal injury and increases the expression of tight junction protein claudin-5 in mice. These findings suggest that escin effectively inhibits acute inflammation and reduces intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. PMID:26199634

  18. Pathogenesis of Acute Kidney Injury: Foundation for Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kinsey, Gilbert R.; Okusa, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of acute kidney injury (AKI) is complex, involving factors such as vasoconstriction, leukostasis, vascular congestion, cell death, and abnormal immune modulators and growth factors. Many targeted clinical therapies have failed, are inconclusive, or have yet to be tested. Given the complexity of the pathogenesis of AKI, it may be naïve to expect one therapeutic intervention would have success. Some examples of detrimental processes that can be blocked in pre-clinical models to improve kidney function and survival are apoptotic cell death in tubular epithelial cells, complement-mediated immune system activation, and impairment of cellular homeostasis and metabolism. Modalities with potential to reduce morbidity and mortality in AKI include vasodilators, growth factors, anti-inflammatory agents, and cell-based therapies. Pharmacological agents that target these diverse pathways are being used clinically for other indications. Using combinatorial approaches in future clinical trials may improve our ability to prevent and treat AKI. PMID:21530035

  19. The Adaptor Protein Myd88 Is a Key Signaling Molecule in the Pathogenesis of Irinotecan-Induced Intestinal Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Deysi V. T.; Lima-Júnior, Roberto C. P.; Carvalho, Cibele B. M.; Borges, Vanessa F.; Wanderley, Carlos W. S.; Bem, Amanda X. C.; Leite, Caio A. V. G.; Teixeira, Maraiza A.; Batista, Gabriela L. P.; Silva, Rangel L.; Cunha, Thiago M.; Brito, Gerly A. C.; Almeida, Paulo R. C.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal mucositis is a common side effect of irinotecan-based anticancer regimens. Mucositis causes cell damage, bacterial/endotoxin translocation and production of cytokines including IL–1 and IL–18. These molecules and toll-like receptors (TLRs) activate a common signaling pathway that involves the Myeloid Differentiation adaptor protein, MyD88, whose role in intestinal mucositis is unknown. Then, we evaluated the involvement of TLRs and MyD88 in the pathogenesis of irinotecan-induced intestinal mucositis. MyD88-, TLR2- or TLR9-knockout mice and C57BL/6 (WT) mice were given either saline or irinotecan (75 mg/kg, i.p. for 4 days). On day 7, animal survival, diarrhea and bacteremia were assessed, and following euthanasia, samples of the ileum were obtained for morphometric analysis, myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay and measurement of pro-inflammatory markers. Irinotecan reduced the animal survival (50%) and induced a pronounced diarrhea, increased bacteremia, neutrophil accumulation in the intestinal tissue, intestinal damage and more than twofold increased expression of MyD88 (200%), TLR9 (400%), TRAF6 (236%), IL–1β (405%), IL–18 (365%), COX–2 (2,777%) and NF-κB (245%) in the WT animals when compared with saline-injected group (P<0.05). Genetic deletion of MyD88, TLR2 or TLR9 effectively controlled the signs of intestinal injury when compared with irinotecan-administered WT controls (P<0.05). In contrast to the MyD88-/- and TLR2-/- mice, the irinotecan-injected TLR9-/- mice showed a reduced survival, a marked diarrhea and an enhanced expression of IL–18 versus irinotecan-injected WT controls. Additionally, the expression of MyD88 was reduced in the TLR2-/- or TLR9-/- mice. This study shows a critical role of the MyD88-mediated TLR2 and TLR9 signaling in the pathogenesis of irinotecan-induced intestinal mucositis. PMID:26440613

  20. Human immunodeficiency virus-associated disruption of mucosal barriers and its role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis of HIV/AIDS disease.

    PubMed

    Tugizov, Sharof

    2016-01-01

    Oral, intestinal and genital mucosal epithelia have a barrier function to prevent paracellular penetration by viral, bacterial and other pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). HIV can overcome these barriers by disrupting the tight and adherens junctions of mucosal epithelia. HIV-associated disruption of epithelial junctions may also facilitate paracellular penetration and dissemination of other viral pathogens. This review focuses on possible molecular mechanisms of HIV-associated disruption of mucosal epithelial junctions and its role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis of HIV and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). PMID:27583187

  1. Update on pathogenesis and clinical management of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Santamaría, Dulce M; Taxonera, Carlos; Giner, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP), defined as the acute nonbacterial inflammatory condition of the pancreas, is derived from the early activation of digestive enzymes found inside the acinar cells, with variable compromise of the gland itself, nearby tissues and other organs. So, it is an event that begins with pancreatic injury, elicits an acute inflammatory response, encompasses a variety of complications and generally resolves over time. Different conditions are known to induce this disorder, although the innermost mechanisms and how they act to develop the disease are still unknown. We summarize some well established aspects. A phase sequence has been proposed: etiology factors generate other conditions inside acinar cells that favor the AP development with some systemic events; genetic factors could be involved as susceptibility and modifying elements. AP is a disease with extremely different clinical expressions. Most patients suffer a mild and limited disease, but about one fifth of cases develop multi organ failure, accompanied by high mortality. This great variability in presentation, clinical course and complications has given rise to the confusion related to AP related terminology. However, consensus meetings have provided uniform definitions, including the severity of the illness. The clinical management is mainly based on the disease´s severity and must be directed to correct the underlying predisposing factors and control the inflammatory process itself. The first step is to determine if it is mild or severe. We review the principal aspects to be considered in this treatment, as reflected in several clinical practice guidelines. For the last 25 years, there has been a global increase in incidence of AP, along with many advances in diagnosis and treatment. However, progress in knowledge of its pathogenesis is scarce. PMID:22737590

  2. Oxidative Stress: An Essential Factor in the Pathogenesis of Gastrointestinal Mucosal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Asima; Chattopadhyay, Ranajoy; Mitra, Sankar

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated as by-products of normal cellular metabolic activities. Superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase are the enzymes involved in protecting cells from the damaging effects of ROS. ROS are produced in response to ultraviolet radiation, cigarette smoking, alcohol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, ischemia-reperfusion injury, chronic infections, and inflammatory disorders. Disruption of normal cellular homeostasis by redox signaling may result in cardiovascular, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. ROS are produced within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, but their roles in pathophysiology and disease pathogenesis have not been well studied. Despite the protective barrier provided by the mucosa, ingested materials and microbial pathogens can induce oxidative injury and GI inflammatory responses involving the epithelium and immune/inflammatory cells. The pathogenesis of various GI diseases including peptic ulcers, gastrointestinal cancers, and inflammatory bowel disease is in part due to oxidative stress. Unraveling the signaling events initiated at the cellular level by oxidative free radicals as well as the physiological responses to such stress is important to better understand disease pathogenesis and to develop new therapies to manage a variety of conditions for which current therapies are not always sufficient. PMID:24692350

  3. Role of duodenogastroesophageal reflux in the pathogenesis of esophageal mucosal injury and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-rong; Li, Zhao-shen; Zou, Duo-wu; Xu, Guo-ming; Ye, Ping; Sun, Zhen-xing; Wang, Qing; Zeng, Yan-jun

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) usually suffer from acid reflux and duo-denogastroesophageal reflux (DGER) simultaneously. The question of whether DGER has an important effect on the development of GERD remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of DGER in the pathogenesis of GERD and its value for the diagnosis of nonerosive reflux disease (NERD). METHODS GERD was initially diagnosed using the reflux disease questionnaire. For further diagnosis, results of the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (excluding a diagnosis of Barrett’s esophagus) were considered in conjunction with simultaneous 24 h esophageal pH and bilirubin monitoring. RESULTS According to endoscopic findings, 95 patients (43 men, 50±10 years of age) were divided into two groups: the reflux esophagitis (RE) group (n=51) and the NERD group (n=44). Three DGER parameters, the percentage of time with absorbance greater than 0.14, the total number of reflux episodes and the number of bile reflux episodes lasting longer than 5 min, were evaluated in the study. For the RE group, the values of the DGER parameters (19.05%±23.44%, 30.56±34.04 and 5.90±6.37, respectively) were significantly higher than those of the NERD group (7.26%±11.08%, 15.68±20.92 and 2.59±3.57, respectively, P<0.05 for all) but no significant difference was found in acid reflux. Of NERD patients, 18.5% were diagnosed with simple DGER. The positive diagnosis rate of NERD could be significantly elevated from 65.9% to 84.1% (P<0.05), if bilirubin monitoring was employed in diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS DGER may occur independently but plays an important role in the development of RE and GERD symptoms. Simultaneous 24 h esophageal pH and bilirubin monitoring is superior to simple pH monitoring in helping identify patients at risk for NERD. PMID:16482234

  4. Influence of plasma GSH level on acute radiation mucositis of the oral cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattathiri, V.N.; Nair, M.K.; Sreelekha, T.T.; Sebastian, P.; Remani, P.; Chandini, R.; Vijayakumar, T. )

    1994-05-15

    The purpose of the study was to see how pretreatment plasma GSH level influences the severity of acute radiation mucositis of the oral cavity during therapeutic irradiation in patients with oral cancer. Thirteen patients with squamous cell circinoma of the oral cavity form the subject material. Radical radiotherapy (60 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks) was given using telecobalt. Pretreatment plasma GSH level was measured by Beutler's method. The normal tissue reaction during radiotherapy was monitored and graded. The GSH levels ranged from 10.6-90.5 [mu]M/L (mean 30.6 [mu]M/L). Those who had higher GSH levels developed less severe mucositis. The mean GSH levels in the groups with different severity of reactions were: Grade 2 (four patients) = 50.7 [mu]M/L; Grade 3 (five patients) = 26.1 [mu]M/L; Grade 4 (two patients) = 20.4 [mu]M/L and Grade 5 (two patients) = 26.1 [mu]M/L; Grade 4 (two patients) = 20.4 [mu]M/L and Grade 5 (two patients) = 13.6 [mu]M/L. Plasma GSH estimation has the potential to predict individual sensitivity to acute radiation mucositis and may particularly be useful in hyperfractionated regimes. The study also affirms the radioprotective role of GSH and suggests that this effect is either due to protection against membrane lipid perodixation (since GSH does not enter the cell freely) or DNA damage (fractionated radiotherapy may permit freer entry of GSH into cell). 26 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  5. Pathogenesis and clinical presentation of acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A

    2015-04-01

    Acute heart failure constitutes a heterogeneous clinical syndrome, whose pathophysiology is complex and not completely understood. Given the diversity of clinical presentations, several different pathophysiological mechanisms along with factors triggering circulatory decompensation are involved. This article discusses the available evidence on the pathophysiological phenomena attributed or/and associated with episodes of acute heart failure and describes different clinical profiles, which, from a clinical perspective, constitute a key element for therapeutic decision-making. PMID:25743769

  6. Acute gastroduodenal mucosal injury after cisplatin plus etoposide chemotherapy. Clinical and endoscopic study.

    PubMed

    Sartori, S; Nielsen, I; Maestri, A; Beltrami, D; Trevisani, L; Pazzi, P

    1991-01-01

    The effects on gastric and duodenal mucosa induced by cisplatin plus etoposide (PE) chemotherapy were investigated in 32 patients with lung cancer. They were submitted to gastroduodenoscopy before receiving cisplatin 100 mg/m2 (day 1) plus etoposide at a mean dose of 107 mg/m2 (days 1, 3 and 5). Endoscopic examination was repeated on day 8. Before chemotherapy, 22 patients showed normal endoscopic appearance and 10 minimal lesions (3 or fewer erosions). After chemotherapy, 16 remained normal, 1 had minimal lesions and 15 developed major lesions: 11 gastric or duodenal multiple erosions, 1 diffuse erosive gastritis, 2 gastric and 1 duodenal ulcer (p less than 0.001). No difference was observed in the number of vomiting episodes nor in severity of upper gastrointestinal symptoms between the patients who remained normal and those who developed mucosal injury. We conclude that PE chemotherapy can have a properly called gastroduodenal toxicity, leaving nausea and vomiting out which are rather due to central than peripheral mechanisms. Some trials are necessary to investigate which kind of drugs (H2-receptor blockers, sucralfate, prostaglandin E analogues) may be useful in preventing acute gastroduodenal mucosal injury induced by PE chemotherapy. PMID:1745480

  7. Protective Effects of the Traditional Herbal Formula Oryeongsan Water Extract on Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Mucosal Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Woo-Young; Lee, Mee-Young; Shin, In-Sik; Lim, Hye-Sun; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the protective effect and safety of Oryeongsan water extract (OSWE) on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury and an acute toxicity study in rats. Acute gastric lesions were induced via intragastric oral administration of absolute ethanol at a dose of 5 mL/kg. OSWE (100 and 200 mg/kg) was administered to rats 2 h prior to the oral administration of absolute ethanol. The stomach of animal models was opened and gastric mucosal lesions were examined. Gastric mucosal injuries were evaluated by measuring the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), and the activity of antioxidant enzymes. In the acute toxicity study, no adverse effects of OSWE were observed at doses up to 2000 mg/kg/day. Administration of OSWE reduced the damage by conditioning the gastric mucosa against ethanol-induced acute gastric injury, which included hemorrhage, hyperemia, and loss of epithelial cells. The level of MDA was reduced in OSWE-treated groups compared with the ethanol-induced group. Moreover, the level of GSH and the activity of antioxidant enzymes were significantly increased in the OSWE-treated groups. Our findings suggest that OSWE has a protective effect on the gastric mucosa against ethanol-induced acute gastric injury via the upregulation of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:23118790

  8. Pattern Analysis of Acute Mucosal Reactions in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer Treated With Conventional and Accelerated Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wygoda, Andrzej Maciejewski, Boguslaw; Skladowski, Krzysztof; Hutnik, Marcin; Pilecki, Boleslaw; Golen, Maria; Rutkowski, Tomasz

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate severity of acute mucosal reactions (AMR) caused by conventional (CF) and accelerated fractionation (AF) regimens using a modified Dische system and to analyze differences in incidence and severity of AMR according to frequency and regularity of scoring. Methods and Materials: Sixty-six consecutive patients (33 CF, 33 AF) with head and neck cancer irradiated with 5 fractions in 5 days per week (CF) or with 7 fractions in 7 days (AF) to a total dose of 70 Gy. A modified Dische system was used for daily quantitation of AMR during radiotherapy until complete healing. Results: Confluent mucositis (CM) was noted in 79% of patients in the CF group and 85% in the AF group. In 24% of the CF group and 18% of the AF group the CM presented a wave-like pattern. In 55% of CF and 67% of AF a classic triphasic pattern was noted. In 12 patients acute reactions did not transgress the level of spotted mucositis. The present study clearly shows that quantitation of the incidence and severity of acute mucosal effects strongly depends on frequent and regular scoring. A significant difference in the incidence of CM between the CF and AF groups was noted, mainly in weeks 4-6 of irradiation. When once-weekly irregular instead of daily scoring was evaluated, the incidence of CM was underestimated by approximately 20-36%. Conclusions: Acute mucosal reactions occur as a complex of morphologic and functional disorders with individual intensity, even among patients treated with the same fractionation regimen. In some cases they present a 'wave-like' pattern during irradiation. Therefore, precise quantitation of acute effects requires regular and frequent scoring.

  9. Initiation of ART during Early Acute HIV Infection Preserves Mucosal Th17 Function and Reverses HIV-Related Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Schuetz, Alexandra; Deleage, Claire; Sereti, Irini; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Phuang-Ngern, Yuwadee; Estes, Jacob D.; Sandler, Netanya G.; Sukhumvittaya, Suchada; Marovich, Mary; Jongrakthaitae, Surat; Akapirat, Siriwat; Fletscher, James L. K.; Kroon, Eugene; Dewar, Robin; Trichavaroj, Rapee; Chomchey, Nitiya; Douek, Daniel C.; O′Connell, Robert J.; Ngauy, Viseth; Robb, Merlin L.; Phanuphak, Praphan; Michael, Nelson L.; Excler, Jean-Louis; Kim, Jerome H.; de Souza, Mark S.; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal Th17 cells play an important role in maintaining gut epithelium integrity and thus prevent microbial translocation. Chronic HIV infection is characterized by mucosal Th17 cell depletion, microbial translocation and subsequent immune-activation, which remain elevated despite antiretroviral therapy (ART) correlating with increased mortality. However, when Th17 depletion occurs following HIV infection is unknown. We analyzed mucosal Th17 cells in 42 acute HIV infection (AHI) subjects (Fiebig (F) stage I-V) with a median duration of infection of 16 days and the short-term impact of early initiation of ART. Th17 cells were defined as IL-17+ CD4+ T cells and their function was assessed by the co-expression of IL-22, IL-2 and IFNγ. While intact during FI/II, depletion of mucosal Th17 cell numbers and function was observed during FIII correlating with local and systemic markers of immune-activation. ART initiated at FI/II prevented loss of Th17 cell numbers and function, while initiation at FIII restored Th17 cell numbers but not their polyfunctionality. Furthermore, early initiation of ART in FI/II fully reversed the initially observed mucosal and systemic immune-activation. In contrast, patients treated later during AHI maintained elevated mucosal and systemic CD8+ T-cell activation post initiation of ART. These data support a loss of Th17 cells at early stages of acute HIV infection, and highlight that studies of ART initiation during early AHI should be further explored to assess the underlying mechanism of mucosal Th17 function preservation. PMID:25503054

  10. The influence of acute or chronic nicotine treatment on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Cho, C H; Chen, B W; Hui, W M; Lam, S K

    1990-01-01

    The influences of acute or chronic nicotine pretreatment on ethanol-induced changes on gastric secretion, mucosal blood flow (GMBF), and glandular mucosal damage were studied in anesthetized rats. Ethanol administration decreased gastric acid secretion and GMBF, which were accompanied by a marked increase in gastric mucosal damage. Acute nicotine incubation 2 or 4 mg dose-dependently elevated both the titratable acid in the luminal solution and the gastric secretory volume; it also prevented the depressive action on GMBF and gastric mucosal damage in ethanol-treated animals. Chronic nicotine treatment for 10 days reduced the inhibitory action of ethanol on gastric acid secretion; the higher dose (25 micrograms/ml drinking water) potentiated the decrease of GMBF and the ulcerogenic property of ethanol. However, chronic treatment with the lower dose (5 micrograms/ml drinking water) had the opposite effects; it also markedly increased the gastric secretory volume. It is concluded that acute nicotine pretreatment elevates, whereas chronic nicotine pretreatment differentially affects GMBF. These effects could account for their protective or preventive actions on ethanol ulceration. The increase in nonacid gastric secretory volume by nicotine could partially explain its antiulcer effect. Furthermore, the acid secretory state of the stomach appears unrelated to the ulcerogenic property of ethanol. PMID:2295286

  11. Effect of low-power (He-Ne) laser on acute mucosal ulceration induced by indomethacin in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djavid, Gholam-reza E.; Erfani, Rebecca; Amoohashemi, Nasim; Pazoki, Mahbobeh; Aghaee, Sanaz; Toroudi, Hamidreza P.

    2002-10-01

    Background: Low-level laser has been used for treatment of ulcer, as well as, pain relief and inflammatory processes. In the present work, the effect of low power laser on mucosal gastric ulceration-induced by indomethacin in rats has been investigated. Materials and Methods: 16 male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into control (8 rats) and laser exposed group (8 rats). After using ether for anesthesia, 30 mg/kg indomethacin was injected subcutaneously. Exposed stomachs received 30 J He-Ne laser. Five hours later animals were killed and their stomachs were checked and observed for presence of ulceration. Results and Discussion: Gastric mucosal ulceration index was significantly greater in the laser-exposed group than control group. (P=0.02) This experiment suggests that low power He-Ne laser intensified acute mucosal ulcer formation by indomethacin. Changes in the prostaglandin content ofthe stomach may be responsible for these results.

  12. Acute Kidney Injury by Radiographic Contrast Media: Pathogenesis and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Faga, Teresa; Pisani, Antonio; Michael, Ashour

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that iodinated radiographic contrast media may cause kidney dysfunction, particularly in patients with preexisting renal impairment associated with diabetes. This dysfunction, when severe, will cause acute renal failure (ARF). We may define contrast-induced Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) as ARF occurring within 24–72 hrs after the intravascular injection of iodinated radiographic contrast media that cannot be attributed to other causes. The mechanisms underlying contrast media nephrotoxicity have not been fully elucidated and may be due to several factors, including renal ischaemia, particularly in the renal medulla, the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduction of nitric oxide (NO) production, and tubular epithelial and vascular endothelial injury. However, contrast-induced AKI can be prevented, but in order to do so, we need to know the risk factors. We have reviewed the risk factors for contrast-induced AKI and measures for its prevention, providing a long list of references enabling readers to deeply evaluate them both. PMID:25197639

  13. Acute kidney injury by radiographic contrast media: pathogenesis and prevention.

    PubMed

    Andreucci, Michele; Faga, Teresa; Pisani, Antonio; Sabbatini, Massimo; Michael, Ashour

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that iodinated radiographic contrast media may cause kidney dysfunction, particularly in patients with preexisting renal impairment associated with diabetes. This dysfunction, when severe, will cause acute renal failure (ARF). We may define contrast-induced Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) as ARF occurring within 24-72 hrs after the intravascular injection of iodinated radiographic contrast media that cannot be attributed to other causes. The mechanisms underlying contrast media nephrotoxicity have not been fully elucidated and may be due to several factors, including renal ischaemia, particularly in the renal medulla, the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduction of nitric oxide (NO) production, and tubular epithelial and vascular endothelial injury. However, contrast-induced AKI can be prevented, but in order to do so, we need to know the risk factors. We have reviewed the risk factors for contrast-induced AKI and measures for its prevention, providing a long list of references enabling readers to deeply evaluate them both. PMID:25197639

  14. Effect of diallyl disulfide on acute gastric mucosal damage induced by alcohol in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, I-C; Baek, H-S; Kim, S-H; Moon, C; Park, S-H; Kim, S-H; Shin, I-S; Park, S-C; Kim, J-C

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the gastroprotective effects of diallyl disulfide (DADS), a secondary organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L.) on experimental model of ethanol (EtOH)-induced gastric ulcer in rats. The antiulcerogenic activity of DADS was evaluated by gross/histopathological inspection, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and lipid peroxidation with antioxidant enzyme activities in the stomach. DADS (100 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage 2 h prior to EtOH treatment (5 ml/kg). The animals were killed 1 h after receiving EtOH treatment. Pretreatment with DADS attenuated EtOH-induced gastric mucosal injury, as evidenced by decreased severity of hemorrhagic lesions and gastric ulcer index upon visual inspection. DADS also prevented histopathological alterations and gastric apoptotic changes caused by EtOH. An increase in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and inducible nitric oxide synthase was observed in the gastric tissues of EtOH-treated rats that coincided with increased serum TNF-α and interleukin 6 levels. In contrast, DADS effectively suppressed production of pro-inflammatory mediators induced by EtOH. Furthermore, DADS prevented the formation of gastric malondialdehyde and the depletion of reduced glutathione content and restored antioxidant enzyme activities, such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase in the gastric tissues of EtOH-treated rats. These results indicate that DADS prevents gastric mucosal damage induced by acute EtOH administration in rats and that the protective effects of DADS may be due to its potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:24972622

  15. Reduced gastric acid production in burn shock period and its significance in the prevention and treatment of acute gastric mucosal lesions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Yang, Zhong-Cheng; Li, Ao; Cheng, De-Chang

    2000-02-01

    AIM:To investigate the changes of gastric acid production and its mechanism in shock period of severe burn in rats.METHODS:A rat model with 30% TBSA full thickness burn injury was employed and the gastric acid production,together with gastric mucosal blood flow (GMBF) and energy charge (EC) were measured serially within 48h postburn.RESULTS:The gastric acid production in the acute shock period was markedly inhibited after severe burn injury.At the 3rd h postburn,the gastric juice volume, total acidity and acid output were already significantly decreased (P < 0.01 =, and reached the lowest point, 0.63mL/L ± 0.20mL/L, 10.81mmol/L ± 2.58mmol/L and 2.23mmol/h ± 0.73mmol/h respectively, at the 12th h postburn. Although restored to some degree 24h after thermal injury, the variables above were still statistically lower, compared with those of control animals at the 48th h postburn. The GMBF and EC were also significantly reduced after severe burns, consistent with the trend of gastric acid production changes.CONCLUSION:Gastric acid production, as well as GMBF and EC was predominantly decreased in the early postburn stage, suggesting that gastric mucosal ischemia and hypoxia with resultant disturbance in energy metabolism, but not gastric acid proper, might be the decisive factor in the pathogenesis of AGML after thermal injury, and that the preventive use of anti-acid drugs during burn shock period was unreasonable in some respects. Therefore, taking effective measures to improve gastric mucosal blood perfusion as early as possible postburn might be more preferable for the AGML prevention and treatment. PMID:11819529

  16. The acute lymphoblastic leukemia of Down Syndrome - Genetics and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Izraeli, Shai

    2016-03-01

    Children with Down Syndrome (DS) are at markedly increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The ALL is of B cell precursor (BCP) phenotype. T-ALL is only rarely diagnosed as well as infant leukemia. Gene expression profiling and cytogenetics suggest that DS-ALL is an heterogeneous disease. More than half of the leukemias are characterized by aberrant expression of the thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) receptor CRLF2 caused by genomic rearrangements. These rearrangements are often associated with somatic activating mutations in the receptors or in the downstream components of the JAK-STAT pathway. The activation of JAK-STAT pathway suggests that targeted therapy with JAK or downstream inhibitors may be effective for children with DS-ALL. The basis of the increased risk of BCP-ALL and in particular of the CRLF2 aberrations is presently unknown. Neither is it known which genes on the trisomic chromosome 21 are involved. PMID:26631987

  17. The role of parvovirus B19 and the immune response in the pathogenesis of acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Jonathan R; Mattey, Derek L

    2015-05-01

    In this article, we review the evidence suggesting a possible role for B19 virus in the pathogenesis of a subset of cases of acute leukemia. Human parvovirus B19 infection may complicate the clinical course of patients with acute leukemia and may also precede the development of acute leukemia by up to 180 days. Parvovirus B19 targets erythroblasts in the bone marrow and may cause aplastic crisis in patients with shortened-red cell survival. Aplastic crisis represents a prodrome of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in 2% patients. There is a significant overlap between those HLA classes I and II alleles that are associated with a vigorous immune response and development of symptoms during B19 infection and those HLA alleles that predispose to development of acute leukemia. Acute symptomatic B19 infection is associated with low circulating IL-10 consistent with a vigorous immune response; deficient IL-10 production at birth was recently found to be associated with subsequent development of acute leukemia. Anti-B19 IgG has been associated with a particular profile of methylation of human cancer genes in patients with acute leukemia, suggesting an additional hit and run mechanism. The proposed role for parvovirus B19 in the pathogenesis of acute leukemia fits well with the delayed infection hypothesis and with the two-step mutation model, which describes carriage of the first mutation prior to birth, followed by suppression of hematopoiesis, which allows rapid proliferation of cells harboring the first mutation, acquisition of a second activating mutation, and expansion of cells carrying both mutations, resulting in acute leukemia. PMID:25855476

  18. Pathogenesis of acute ischemic mitral regurgitation in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Gorman, R C; McCaughan, J S; Ratcliffe, M B; Gupta, K B; Streicher, J T; Ferrari, V A; St John-Sutton, M G; Bogen, D K; Edmunds, L H

    1995-04-01

    Changes in the geometric and intravalvular relationships between subunits of the ovine mitral valve were measured before and after acute posterior wall myocardial infarction in three dimensions by means of sonomicrometry array localization. In 13 sheep, nine sonomicrometer transducers were attached around the mitral anulus and to the tip and base of each papillary muscle. Five additional transducers were placed on the epicardium. Snares were placed around three branches of the circumflex coronary artery. One to 2 weeks later, echocardiograms, dimension measurements, and left ventricular pressures were obtained before and after the coronary arteries were occluded. Data were obtained from seven sheep. Coronary occlusion infarcted 32% of the posterior left ventricle and produced 2 to 3+ mitral regurgitation by Doppler color flow mapping. Multidimensional scaling of dimension measurements obtained from sonomicrometry transducers produced three-dimensional spatial coordinates of each transducer location throughout the cardiac cycle before and after infarction and onset of mitral regurgitation. After posterior infarction, the mitral anulus enlarges asymmetrically along the posterior anulus, and the tip of the posterior papillary muscle moves 1.5 +/- 0.3 mm closer to the posterior commissure at end-systole. The posterior papillary muscle also elongates 1.9 +/- 0.3 mm at end-systole. The left ventricle enlarges asymmetrically and ventricular torsion along the long axis changes. The development of postinfarction mitral regurgitation appears to be the consequence of multiple small changes in ventricular shape and contractile deformation and in the spatial relationship of mitral valvular subunits. PMID:7715215

  19. Gastroprotective activity of Nigella sativa L oil and its constituent, thymoquinone against acute alcohol-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kanter, Mehmet; Demir, Halit; Karakaya, Cengiz; Ozbek, Hanefi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the role of reactive oxygen species in the pathogenesis of acute ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions and the effect of Nigella sativa L oil (NS) and its constituent thymoquinone (TQ) in an exper-imental model. METHODS: Male Wistar albino rats were assigned into 4 groups. Control group was given physiologic saline orally (10 mL/kg body weight) as the vehicle (gavage); ethanol group was administrated 1 mL (per rat) absolute alcohol by gavage; the third and fourth groups were given NS (10 mL/kg body weight) and TQ (10 mg/kg body weight p.o) respectively 1 h prior to alcohol intake. One hour after ethanol administration, stomach tissues were excised for macroscopic examination and biochemical analysis. RESULTS: NS and TQ could protect gastric mucosa against the injurious effect of absolute alcohol and promote ulcer healing as evidenced from the ulcer index (UI) values. NS prevented alcohol-induced increase in thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), an index of lipid peroxidation. NS also increased gastric glutathione content (GSH), enzymatic activities of gastric superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Likewise, TQ protected against the ulcerating effect of alcohol and mitigated most of the biochemical adverse effects induced by alcohol in gastric mucosa, but to a lesser extent than NS. Neither NS nor TQ affected catalase activity in gastric tissue. CONCLUSION: Both NS and TQ, particularly NS can partly protect gastric mucosa from acute alcohol-induced mucosal injury, and these gastroprotective effects might be induced, at least partly by their radical scavenging activity. PMID:16425361

  20. Prediction of Acute Radiation Mucositis using an Oral Mucosal Dose Surface Model in Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Musha, Atsushi; Shimada, Hirofumi; Shirai, Katsuyuki; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Yokoo, Satoshi; Chikamatsu, Kazuaki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the dose-response relationship for development of acute radiation mucositis (ARM) using an oral mucosal dose surface model (OMDS-model) in carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) for head and neck tumors. Methods Thirty-nine patients receiving C-ion RT for head and neck cancer were evaluated for ARM (once per week for 6 weeks) according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 4.0, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring systems. The irradiation schedule typically used was 64 Gy [relative biological effectiveness (RBE)] in 16 fractions for 4 weeks. Maximum point doses in the palate and tongue were compared with ARM in each patient. Results The location of the ARM coincided with the high-dose area in the OMDS-model. There was a clear dose-response relationship between maximum point dose and ARM grade assessed using the RTOG criteria but not the CTCAE. The threshold doses for grade 2–3 ARM in the palate and tongue were 43.0 Gy(RBE) and 54.3 Gy(RBE), respectively. Conclusions The OMDS-model was useful for predicting the location and severity of ARM. Maximum point doses in the model correlated well with grade 2–3 ARM. PMID:26512725

  1. Divergent mucosal and systemic responses in children in response to acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, D; Pichichero, M E

    2014-10-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM), induced by respiratory bacteria, is a significant cause of children seeking medical attention worldwide. Some children are highly prone to AOMs, suffering three to four recurrent infections per year (prone). We previously determined that this population of children could have diminished anti-bacterial immune responses in peripheral blood that could fail to limit bacterial colonization in the nasopharynx (NP). Here, we examined local NP and middle ear (ME) responses and compared them to peripheral blood to examine whether the mucosa responses were similar to the peripheral blood responses. Moreover, we examined differences in effector cytokine responses between these two populations in the NP, ME and blood compartments at the onset of an AOM caused by either Streptococcus pneumoniae or non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae. We found that plasma effector cytokines patterned antigen-recall responses of CD4 T cells, with lower responses detected in prone children. ME cytokine levels did not mirror blood, but were more similar to the NP. Interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17 in the NP were similar in prone and non-prone children, while IL-2 production was higher in prone children. The immune responses diverged in the mucosal and blood compartments at the onset of a bacterial ME infection, thus highlighting differences between local and systemic immune responses that could co-ordinate anti-bacterial immune responses in young children. PMID:24889648

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi Entrance through Systemic or Mucosal Infection Sites Differentially Modulates Regional Immune Response Following Acute Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    de Meis, Juliana; Barreto de Albuquerque, Juliana; Silva dos Santos, Danielle; Farias-de-Oliveira, Désio Aurélio; Berbert, Luiz Ricardo; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinícius; Savino, Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Acute Chagas disease is characterized by a systemic infection that leads to the strong activation of the adaptive immune response. Outbreaks of oral contamination by the infective protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi are frequent in Brazil and other Latin American countries, and an increased severity of clinical manifestations and mortality is observed in infected patients. These findings have elicited questions about the specific responses triggered after T. cruzi entry via mucosal sites, possibly modulating local immune mechanisms, and further impacting regional and systemic immunity. Here, we provide evidence for the existence of differential lymphoid organ responses in experimental models of acute T. cruzi infection. PMID:23898334

  3. Antibody blockade of IL-17 family cytokines in immunity to acute murine oral mucosal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Whibley, Natasha; Tritto, Elaine; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Kolbinger, Frank; Moulin, Pierre; Brees, Dominique; Coleman, Bianca M; Mamo, Anna J; Garg, Abhishek V; Jaycox, Jillian R; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Kammüller, Michael; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2016-06-01

    Antibodies targeting IL-17A or its receptor, IL-17RA, are approved to treat psoriasis and are being evaluated for other autoimmune conditions. Conversely, IL-17 signaling is critical for immunity to opportunistic mucosal infections caused by the commensal fungus Candida albicans, as mice and humans lacking the IL-17R experience chronic mucosal candidiasis. IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-17AF bind the IL-17RA-IL-17RC heterodimeric complex and deliver qualitatively similar signals through the adaptor Act1. Here, we used a mouse model of acute oropharyngeal candidiasis to assess the impact of blocking IL-17 family cytokines compared with specific IL-17 cytokine gene knockout mice. Anti-IL-17A antibodies, which neutralize IL-17A and IL-17AF, caused elevated oral fungal loads, whereas anti-IL-17AF and anti-IL-17F antibodies did not. Notably, there was a cooperative effect of blocking IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F together. Termination of anti-IL-17A treatment was associated with rapid C. albicans clearance. IL-17F-deficient mice were fully resistant to oropharyngeal candidiasis, consistent with antibody blockade. However, IL-17A-deficient mice had lower fungal burdens than anti-IL-17A-treated mice. Act1-deficient mice were much more susceptible to oropharyngeal candidiasis than anti-IL-17A antibody-treated mice, yet anti-IL-17A and anti-IL-17RA treatment caused equivalent susceptibilities. Based on microarray analyses of the oral mucosa during infection, only a limited number of genes were associated with oropharyngeal candidiasis susceptibility. In sum, we conclude that IL-17A is the main cytokine mediator of immunity in murine oropharyngeal candidiasis, but a cooperative relationship among IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F exists in vivo. Susceptibility displays the following hierarchy: IL-17RA- or Act1-deficiency > anti-IL-17A + anti-IL-17F antibodies > anti-IL-17A or anti-IL-17RA antibodies > IL-17A deficiency. PMID:26729813

  4. Spatiotemporal interplay of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and respiratory mucosal cells drives viral dissemination in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Wei, Q; Nishiura, K; Peng, J; Wang, H; Midkiff, C; Alvarez, X; Qin, C; Lackner, A; Chen, Z

    2016-07-01

    Innate immune responses have a critical role in the control of early virus replication and dissemination. It remains unknown, however, how severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) evades respiratory innate immunity to establish a systemic infection. Here we show in Chinese macaques that SARS-CoV traversed the mucosa through the respiratory tract within 2 days, resulting in extensive mucosal infiltration by T cells, MAC387(+), and CD163(+) monocytes/macrophages followed by limited viral replication in the lung but persistent viral shedding into the upper airway. Mucosal monocytes/macrophages sequestered virions in intracellular vesicles together with infected Langerhans cells and migrated into the tonsils and/or draining lymph nodes within 2 days. In lymphoid tissues, viral RNA and proteins were detected in infected monocytes upon differentiation into dendritic cells (DCs) within 3 days. Systemic viral dissemination was observed within 7 days. This study provides a comprehensive overview of the spatiotemporal interactions of SARS-CoV, monocytes/macrophages, and the DC network in mucosal tissues and highlights the fact that, while these innate cells contribute to viral clearance, they probably also serve as shelters and vehicles to provide a mechanism for the virus to escape host mucosal innate immunity and disseminate systemically. PMID:26647718

  5. Acute bovine viral diarrhea associated with extensive mucosal lesions, high morbidity, and mortality in a commercial feedlot.

    PubMed

    Hessman, Bill E; Sjeklocha, David B; Fulton, Robert W; Ridpath, Julia F; Johnson, Bill J; McElroy, Diana R

    2012-03-01

    In 2008, a northwest Texas feedlot underwent an outbreak of Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) causing high morbidity and mortality involving 2 lots of calves (lots A and B). Severe mucosal surface lesions were observed grossly in the oral cavity, larynx, and esophagus. Mucosal lesions varied from small (1-3 mm) infrequent mucosal ulcerations to large (5 mm to 1 cm) and coalescing ulcerations. Necrotic debris was present in ulcerations of some mortalities with some having plaque-like debris, but other mortalities presented more proliferative lesions. A calf persistently infected with BVDV arrived with one lot and the isolated virus was genotyped as BVDV-1b. Identical BVDV-1b strains were isolated from 2 other mortalities. A BVDV-2a genotype was also isolated in this outbreak. This genotype was identical to all BVDV-2a strains isolated in both lots. Serum samples were collected from exposed and unexposed animals and tested for antibodies for multiple viral pathogens. Seropositivity ranged from zero percent for calicivirus to 100% positive to Pseudocowpox virusx. At the end of the feeding period, the morbidity and mortality for the 2 lots involved was 76.2% and 30.8%, respectively, for lot A, and 49.0% and 5.6%, respectively, for lot B. Differential diagnoses included vesicular stomatitis viruses, Bovine papular stomatitis virus, and Foot-and-mouth disease virus. Based on the present case, acute BVDV should be considered when mucosal lesions are observed grossly. PMID:22379057

  6. Methotrexate-induced mucositis in acute leukemia patients is not associated with the MTHFR 677T allele in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J; Coconi-Linares, Lucia Nancy; Garcés-Eisele, Javier; Reyes-Núñez, Virginia

    2007-10-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) has two common variants with reduced activity due to polymorphisms at nucleotides 677 and 1298. Both affect folate metabolism and thus remethylation of homocysteine, but are also thought to affect nucleotide synthesis and DNA methylation. Methotrexate (MTX), which interrupts folate metabolism, is used in the treatment of a variety of diseases including acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but exerts in some patients toxic effects on fast dividing tissues such as mucosal epithelia. The enhanced toxicity may be due to cooperative effects between MTX and MTHFR variants. Accordingly, it has been reported that carrying the 677T allele of the MTHFR is a risk factor for MTX-associated mucositis. As in the Mexican population, which is characterized by a high prevalence of the 677T MTHFR variant, several of its commonly associated defects have not been observed, we investigated the relationship between MTX toxicity and the 677T allele. Out of 28 patients with ALL (CC: 2, CT: 10, TT: 16), 16 had episodes of MTX-associated mucositis (CC: 0, CT: 6, TT: 10). Neither at the gene level nor at the genotype level was a significant association with mucositis found. It may be postulated that the risk of higher MTX toxicity in patients with decreased MTHFR activity could be neutralized by the normally folate rich diet in Mexico. PMID:17891601

  7. Mucosal immunization with PsaA protein, using chitosan as a delivery system, increases protection against acute otitis media and invasive infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Xu, J-H; Dai, W-J; Chen, B; Fan, X-Y

    2015-03-01

    As infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (mainly via the mucosal route) is a leading cause of acute otitis media, sinus and bacterial pneumonia, the mucosal immunity plays an important role in the prevention of pneumococcal diseases. Therefore, intranasal vaccination may be an effective immunization strategy, but requires appropriate mucosal vaccine delivery systems. In this work, chitosan was used as a mucosal delivery system to form chitosan-PsaA nanoparticles based on ionotropic gelation methods and used to immunize BALB/c mice intranasally. Compared to mice immunized with naked PsaA, levels of IFN-γ, IL-17A and IL-4 in spleen lymphocytes, the systemic (IgG in serum) and mucosal (IgA in mucosal lavage) specific antibodies were enhanced significantly in mice inoculated with chitosan-PsaA. Furthermore, increased protection against acute otitis media following middle ear challenge with pneumococcus serotype 14, and improved survival following intraperitoneal challenge with pneumococcus serotype 3 or serotype 14, was found in the mice immunized with chitosan-PsaA nanoparticles. Thus, intranasal immunization with chitosan-PsaA can successfully induce mucosal and systemic immune responses and increase protection against pneumococcal acute otitis media and invasive infections. Hence, intranasal immunization with PsaA protein, based on chitosan as a delivery system, is an efficient immunization strategy for preventing pneumococcal infections. PMID:25565478

  8. The effect of Aloe vera A. Berger (Liliaceae) on gastric acid secretion and acute gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Sadiq; Agunu, Abdulkarim; Diana, Mshelia

    2004-07-01

    The effect of varying doses of ethanol extract of Aloe vera (Liliaceae) on acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by 0.6 M HCl and acid output was studied in the pylorus ligated and lumen perfuse rats, respectively. Acid secretion was determined by titration of the collected gastric juice to pH 7.0. Intraperitoneal injection of Aloe vera, dose dependently inhibited gastric acid secretion. The plant was more active as a gastroprotective agent at lower concentration against mucosal injury induced by 0.6 M HCl. In conclusion, Aloe vera is endowed with gastric acid anti-secretory activity and could protect the gastric mucosa at low concentrations against injurious agents. PMID:15182901

  9. Assessment of the effect of local application of amifostine on acute radiation-induced oral mucositis in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Chang Jiang; Wang, Sheng Zi; Wang, Shu Yi; Zhang, Yan Ping

    2014-09-01

    The aim of present study was to assess the radioprotective effects of the local application of amifostine to treat acute buccal mucositis in guinea pigs. A total of 32 guinea pigs were randomized into four groups: (Group A) topically administered 50 mg of amifostine plus radiotherapy (RT); (Group B) 100 mg amifostine plus RT; (Group C) normal saline plus RT; and (Group D) normal saline plus sham RT. The opportunity for administration was 15 min before irradiation. When administered, the cotton pieces that had been soaked with 0.5 ml amifostine solution or saline were applied gently on the buccal mucosa of each guinea pig for 30 min. The animals in Groups A, B and C were irradiated individually with a single dose of 30 Gy to the bilateral buccal mucosa. Eight days after irradiation, the animals were scored macroscopically; they were then euthanized, and the buccal mucosal tissues were processed for hematoxylin-eosin staining and ICAM-1 immunohistochemical analysis. In Groups A and B, the mean macroscopic scores were 2.9 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 1.1, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). However, when they were separately compared with Group C (4.4 ± 0.7), a noticeable difference was obtained (P < 0.05). No mucositis was observed in Group D. Comparisons of the expression of ICAM-1 were in agreement with the macroscopic data. Histologically, superficial erosion, exudate and ulcer formation were all observed in the RT groups; only the severity and extent were different. The microscopic observations in the amifostine-treated groups were better than in Group C. The results demonstrated that topical administration of amifostine to the oral mucosa is effective treatment of acute radiation-induced mucositis. PMID:24706999

  10. Pathogenesis of acute and chronic lung injury induced by foreign compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.P.; Lindenschmidt, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    The lung may become damaged by both airborne or bloodborne agents. Mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of lung injury include formation of highly reactive metabolites formed by pulmonary mixed function oxidases or formation of free oxygen radicals. Acute and chronic damage can be evaluated by several methods, such as histology and quantitative morphometry, non-invasive and non-destructive respiratory function tests, and with biochemical techniques that include measuring lavage enzyme levels or quantitating the presence of macromolecules such as collagen. In addition, cell kinetics provide an additional method to explore events following lung damage. 34 references.

  11. Role of inflammation and infection in the pathogenesis of human acute liver failure: Clinical implications for monitoring and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Mhairi C; Hayes, Peter C; Simpson, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a rare and devastating clinical condition. At present, emergency liver transplantation is the only life-saving therapy in advanced cases, yet the feasibility of transplantation is affected by the presence of systemic inflammation, infection and resultant multi-organ failure. The importance of immune dysregulation and acquisition of infection in the pathogenesis of acute liver failure and its associated complications is now recognised. In this review we discuss current thinking regarding the role of infection and inflammation in the pathogenesis of and outcome in human acute liver failure, the implications for the management of such patients and suggest directions for future research. PMID:27468190

  12. Role of inflammation and infection in the pathogenesis of human acute liver failure: Clinical implications for monitoring and therapy.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Mhairi C; Hayes, Peter C; Simpson, Kenneth J

    2016-07-14

    Acute liver failure is a rare and devastating clinical condition. At present, emergency liver transplantation is the only life-saving therapy in advanced cases, yet the feasibility of transplantation is affected by the presence of systemic inflammation, infection and resultant multi-organ failure. The importance of immune dysregulation and acquisition of infection in the pathogenesis of acute liver failure and its associated complications is now recognised. In this review we discuss current thinking regarding the role of infection and inflammation in the pathogenesis of and outcome in human acute liver failure, the implications for the management of such patients and suggest directions for future research. PMID:27468190

  13. Coronavirus Pathogenesis and the Emerging Pathogen Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Susan R.; Navas-Martin, Sonia

    2005-01-01

    Coronaviruses are a family of enveloped, single-stranded, positive-strand RNA viruses classified within the Nidovirales order. This coronavirus family consists of pathogens of many animal species and of humans, including the recently isolated severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). This review is divided into two main parts; the first concerns the animal coronaviruses and their pathogenesis, with an emphasis on the functions of individual viral genes, and the second discusses the newly described human emerging pathogen, SARS-CoV. The coronavirus part covers (i) a description of a group of coronaviruses and the diseases they cause, including the prototype coronavirus, murine hepatitis virus, which is one of the recognized animal models for multiple sclerosis, as well as viruses of veterinary importance that infect the pig, chicken, and cat and a summary of the human viruses; (ii) a short summary of the replication cycle of coronaviruses in cell culture; (iii) the development and application of reverse genetics systems; and (iv) the roles of individual coronavirus proteins in replication and pathogenesis. The SARS-CoV part covers the pathogenesis of SARS, the developing animal models for infection, and the progress in vaccine development and antiviral therapies. The data gathered on the animal coronaviruses continue to be helpful in understanding SARS-CoV. PMID:16339739

  14. Gastroprotection Studies of Schiff Base Zinc (II) Derivative Complex against Acute Superficial Hemorrhagic Mucosal Lesions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Golbabapour, Shahram; Gwaram, Nura Suleiman; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Hajrezaie, Maryam; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Hadi, A. Hamid A; Majid, Nazia Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Background The study was carried out to assess the gastroprotective effect of the zinc (II) complex against ethanol-induced acute hemorrhagic lesions in rats. Methodology/Principal Finding The animals received their respective pre-treatments dissolved in tween 20 (5% v/v), orally. Ethanol (95% v/v) was orally administrated to induce superficial hemorrhagic mucosal lesions. Omeprazole (5.790×10−5 M/kg) was used as a reference medicine. The pre-treatment with the zinc (II) complex (2.181×10−5 and 4.362×10−5 M/kg) protected the gastric mucosa similar to the reference control. They significantly increased the activity levels of nitric oxide, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione and prostaglandin E2, and decreased the level of malondialdehyde. The histology assessments confirmed the protection through remarkable reduction of mucosal lesions and increased the production of gastric mucosa. Immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis indicated that the complex might induced Hsp70 up-regulation and Bax down-regulation. The complex moderately increased the gastroprotectiveness in fine fettle. The acute toxicity approved the non-toxic characteristic of the complex (<87.241×10−5 M/kg). Conclusion/Significance The gastroprotective effect of the zinc (II) complex was mainly through its antioxidant activity, enzymatic stimulation of prostaglandins E2, and up-regulation of Hsp70. The gastric wall mucus was also a remarkable protective mechanism. PMID:24058648

  15. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modelling using spatial dose metrics and machine learning methods for severe acute oral mucositis resulting from head and neck radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Jamie A; Wong, Kee H; Welsh, Liam C; Jones, Ann-Britt; Schick, Ulrike; Newbold, Kate L; Bhide, Shreerang A; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M; Gulliford, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Severe acute mucositis commonly results from head and neck (chemo)radiotherapy. A predictive model of mucositis could guide clinical decision-making and inform treatment planning. We aimed to generate such a model using spatial dose metrics and machine learning. Material and Methods Predictive models of severe acute mucositis were generated using radiotherapy dose (dose-volume and spatial dose metrics) and clinical data. Penalised logistic regression, support vector classification and random forest classification (RFC) models were generated and compared. Internal validation was performed (with 100-iteration cross-validation), using multiple metrics, including area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and calibration slope, to assess performance. Associations between covariates and severe mucositis were explored using the models. Results The dose-volume-based models (standard) performed equally to those incorporating spatial information. Discrimination was similar between models, but the RFCstandard had the best calibration. The mean AUC and calibration slope for this model were 0.71 (s.d.=0.09) and 3.9 (s.d.=2.2), respectively. The volumes of oral cavity receiving intermediate and high doses were associated with severe mucositis. Conclusions The RFCstandard model performance is modest-to-good, but should be improved, and requires external validation. Reducing the volumes of oral cavity receiving intermediate and high doses may reduce mucositis incidence. PMID:27240717

  16. Tonometry revisited: perfusion-related, metabolic, and respiratory components of gastric mucosal acidosis in acute cardiorespiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Jakob, Stephan M; Parviainen, Ilkka; Ruokonen, Esko; Kogan, Alexander; Takala, Jukka

    2008-05-01

    Mucosal pH (pHi) is influenced by local perfusion and metabolism (mucosal-arterial pCO2 gradient, DeltapCO2), systemic metabolic acidosis (arterial bicarbonate), and respiration (arterial pCO2). We determined these components of pHi and their relation to outcome during the first 24 h of intensive care. We studied 103 patients with acute respiratory or circulatory failure (age, 63+/-2 [mean+/-SEM]; Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, 20+/-1; Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score, 8+/-0). pHi, and the effects of bicarbonate and arterial and mucosal pCO2 on pHi, were assessed at admission, 6, and 24 h. pHi was reduced (at admission, 7.27+/-0.01) due to low arterial bicarbonate and increased DeltapCO2. Low pHi (<7.32) at admission (n=58; mortality, 29% vs. 13% in those with pHi>or=7.32 at admission; P=0.061) was associated with an increased DeltapCO2 in 59% of patients (mortality, 47% vs. 4% for patients with low pHi and normal DeltapCO2; P=0.0003). An increased versus normal DeltapCO2, regardless of pHi, was associated with increased mortality at admission (51% vs. 5%; P<0.0001; n=39) and at 6 h (34% vs. 13%; P=0.016; n=45). A delayed normalization or persistently low pHi (n=47) or high DeltapCO2 (n=25) was associated with high mortality (low pHi [34%] vs. high DeltapCO2 [60%]; P=0.046). In nonsurvivors, hypocapnia increased pHi at baseline, 6, and 24 h (all Pmucosal acidosis. Inadequate tissue perfusion may persist despite stable hemodynamics and contributes to poor outcome. PMID:18004228

  17. Beta-defensin 1 plays a role in acute mucosal defense to Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Tomalka, Jeffrey; Azodi, Elaheh; Narra, Hema P.; Patel, Krupen; O’Neill, Samantha; Cardwell, Cisley; Hall, Brian A.; Wilson, James M.; Hise, Amy G.

    2015-01-01

    Candida is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that colonizes the mucosal tract of humans. Pathogenic infection occurs in the presence of conditions causing perturbations to the commensal microbiota or host immunity. Early innate immune responses by the epithelium, including antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and cytokines, are critical for protection against overgrowth. Reduced salivary AMP levels are associated with oral Candida infection and certain AMPs, including human beta-defensins 1 - 3, have direct fungicidal activity. Here we demonstrate that murine β-Defensin 1 (mBD1) is important for control of early mucosal Candida infection and plays a critical role in the induction of innate inflammatory mediators. Mice deficient in mBD1 exhibit elevated oral and systemic fungal burdens as compared to wild-type mice. Neutrophil infiltration to the sites of mucosal Candida invasion, an important step in limiting fungal infection, is significantly reduced in mBD1 deficient mice. These mice also exhibit defects in the expression of other antimicrobial peptides, including mBD2 and mBD4, which may have direct anti-Candida activity. We also show that mBD1 deficiency impacts the production of important anti-fungal inflammatory mediators including IL-1β, IL-6, KC, and IL-17. Collectively, these studies demonstrate a role for the mBD1 peptide in early control of Candida infection in a murine model of mucosal candidiasis, as well as on the modulation of host immunity through augmentation of leukocyte infiltration and inflammatory gene induction. PMID:25595775

  18. Mucosal immunisation with novel Streptococcus pneumoniae protein antigens enhances bacterial clearance in an acute mouse lung infection model.

    PubMed

    Jomaa, Maha; Kyd, Jennelle M; Cripps, Allan W

    2005-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae contains many proteins that have not been evaluated as potential protective vaccine antigens. In this study we isolated proteins from a serotype 3 strain of S. pneumoniae for use in mouse immunisation studies. Separation of the protein mix was achieved by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis followed by electro-elution to isolate individual proteins. This procedure successfully separated 21 fractions from which six proteins were selected based on purity and quantity and were initially denoted by their molecular masses: 14-, 34-, 38-, 48-, 57- and 75-kDa. The immunogenicity of these proteins was investigated in a mucosal immunisation model in mice involving a primary inoculation to the intestinal Peyer's patches followed by an intra-tracheal boost two weeks later. The immune response was assessed by enhancement of pulmonary clearance of infection, recruitment of phagocytes to the lungs and induction of an antibody response. Two of the proteins, the 14-kDa identified as a L7/L12 ribosomal protein, and the 34-kDa identified as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase resulted in up to 99% and 94%, respectively, enhanced clearance of infection within 5 h following pulmonary challenge with S. pneumoniae. This study has shown that novel pneumococcal proteins have the potential to be vaccine candidates to enhance clearance of an acute mucosal S. pneumoniae infection. PMID:15780579

  19. The role of leukocytes in the pathogenesis of fibrin deposition in bovine acute lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Car, B. D.; Suyemoto, M. M.; Neilsen, N. R.; Slauson, D. O.

    1991-01-01

    The peculiarly fibrinous nature of bovine acute lung injury due to infection with Pasteurella haemolytica A1 suggests an imbalance between leukocyte-directed procoagulant and profibrinolytic influences in the inflamed bovine lung. Calves with experimental pneumonia produced by intratracheal inoculation with P. haemolytica A1 developed acute locally extensive cranioventral fibrinopurulent bronchopneumonia. Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) recovered by segmental lavage from affected lung lobes were 30 times more procoagulant than PAM obtained from unaffected lung lobes and 37-fold more procoagulant than PAM from control calf lungs. Unlike the enhancement of procoagulant activity, profibrinolytic activity (plasminogen activator amidolysis) of total lung leukocytes (PAM and plasminogen activator neutrophils [PMN]) was decreased 23 times in cells obtained from affected lung lobes and also was decreased four times in cells obtained from unaffected lobes of infected animals. This marked imbalance in cellular procoagulant and fibrinolytic activity probably contributes significantly to enhanced fibrin deposition and retarded fibrin removal. In addition, PAM from inflamed lungs were strongly positive for bovine tissue factor antigen as demonstrated by immunocytochemistry. Intensely tissue factor-positive PAM enmeshed in fibrinocellular exudates and positive alveolar walls were situated such that they were likely to have, in concert, initiated extrinsic activation of coagulation in the acutely inflamed lung. These data collectively suggest that enhanced PAM-directed procoagulant activity and diminished PAM- and PMN-directed profibrinolytic activity represent important modifications of local leukocyte function in bovine acute lung injury that are central to the pathogenesis of lesion development with extensive fibrin deposition and retarded fibrin removal. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2024707

  20. Acute Hendra virus infection: Analysis of the pathogenesis and passive antibody protection in the hamster model

    SciTech Connect

    Guillaume, Vanessa; Wong, K. Thong; Looi, R.Y.; Georges-Courbot, Marie-Claude; Barrot, Laura; Buckland, Robin; Wild, T. Fabian; Horvat, Branka

    2009-05-10

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are recently-emerged, closely related and highly pathogenic paramyxoviruses. We have analysed here the pathogenesis of the acute HeV infection using the new animal model, golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus), which is highly susceptible to HeV infection. HeV-specific RNA and viral antigens were found in multiple organs and virus was isolated from different tissues. Dual pathogenic mechanism was observed: parenchymal infection in various organs, including the brain, with vasculitis and multinucleated syncytia in many blood vessels. Furthermore, monoclonal antibodies specific for the NiV fusion protein neutralized HeV in vitro and efficiently protected hamsters from HeV if given before infection. These results reveal the similarities between HeV and NiV pathogenesis, particularly in affecting both respiratory and neuronal system. They demonstrate that hamster presents a convenient novel animal model to study HeV infection, opening new perspectives to evaluate vaccine and therapeutic approaches against this emergent infectious disease.

  1. Host immune response and acute disease in a zebrafish model of francisella pathogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vojtech, L.N.; Sanders, G.E.; Conway, C.; Ostland, V.; Hansen, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the bacterial genus Francisella are highly virulent and infectious pathogens. New models to study Francisella pathogenesis in evolutionarily distinct species are needed to provide comparative insight, as the mechanisms of host resistance and pathogen virulence are not well understood. We took advantage of the recent discovery of a novel species of Francisella to establish a zebrafish/Francisella comparative model of pathogenesis and host immune response. Adult zebraflsh were susceptible to acute Francisella-induced disease and suffered mortality in a dose-dependent manner. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we localized bacterial antigens primarily to lymphoid tissues and livers of zebraflsh following infection by intraperitoneal injection, which corresponded to regions of local cellular necrosis. Francisella sp. bacteria replicated rapidly in these tissues beginning 12 h postinfection, and bacterial titers rose steadily, leveled off, and then decreased by 7 days postinfection. Zebraflsh mounted a significant tissue-specific proinflammatory response to infection as measured by the upregulation of interleukin-l?? (IL-1??), gamma interferon, and tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA beginning by 6 h postinfection and persisting for up to 7 days postinfection. In addition, exposure of zebraflsh to heat-killed bacteria demonstrated that the significant induction of IL-?? was highly specific to live bacteria. Taken together, the pathology and immune response to acute Francisella infection in zebraflsh share many features with those in mammals, highlighting the usefulness of this new model system for addressing both general and specific questions about Francisella host-pathogen interactions via an evolutionary approach. Copyright ?? 2009, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Acute-on-chronic liver failure: Pathogenesis, prognostic factors and management

    PubMed Central

    Blasco-Algora, Sara; Masegosa-Ataz, José; Gutiérrez-García, María Luisa; Alonso-López, Sonia; Fernández-Rodríguez, Conrado M

    2015-01-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is increasingly recognized as a complex syndrome that is reversible in many cases. It is characterized by an acute deterioration of liver function in the background of a pre-existing chronic liver disease often associated with a high short-term mortality rate. Organ failure (OF) is always associated, and plays a key role in determining the course, and the outcome of the disease. The definition of ACLF remains controversial due to its overall ambiguity, with several disparate criteria among various associations dedicated to the study of liver diseases. Although the precise pathogenesis needs to be clarified, it appears that an altered host response to injury might be a contributing factor caused by immune dysfunction, ultimately leading to a pro-inflammatory status, and eventually to OF. The PIRO concept (Predisposition, Insult, Response and Organ Failure) has been proposed to better approach the underlying mechanisms. It is accepted that ACLF is a different and specific form of liver failure, where a precipitating event is always involved, even though it cannot always be ascertained. According to several studies, infections and active alcoholism often trigger ACLF. Viral hepatitis, gastrointestinal haemorrhage, or drug induced liver injury, which can also provoke the syndrome. This review mainly focuses on the physiopathology and prognostic aspects. We believe these features are essential to further understanding and providing the rationale for improveddisease management strategies. PMID:26576097

  3. Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis: Pathogenesis, Genetic Background, Clinical Variants and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Feldmeyer, Laurence; Heidemeyer, Kristine; Yawalkar, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a severe, usually drug-related reaction, characterized by an acute onset of mainly small non-follicular pustules on an erythematous base and spontaneous resolution usually within two weeks. Systemic involvement occurs in about 20% of cases. The course is mostly benign, and only in rare cases complications lead to life-threatening situations. Recent studies highlight the importance of genetic variations in interleukin-36 receptor antagonist gene (IL-36RN) in the pathogenesis of this disease. The physiopathology of AGEP remains unclear, but an involvement of innate and acquired immune cells together with resident cells (keratinocytes), which recruit and activate neutrophils via production of cytokines/chemokines such as IL-17, IL-36, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8)/IL-8, has been postulated. Treatment is based on the removal of the causative drug, supportive care, infection prevention and use of potent topical or systemic steroids. PMID:27472323

  4. Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis: Pathogenesis, Genetic Background, Clinical Variants and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Feldmeyer, Laurence; Heidemeyer, Kristine; Yawalkar, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a severe, usually drug-related reaction, characterized by an acute onset of mainly small non-follicular pustules on an erythematous base and spontaneous resolution usually within two weeks. Systemic involvement occurs in about 20% of cases. The course is mostly benign, and only in rare cases complications lead to life-threatening situations. Recent studies highlight the importance of genetic variations in interleukin-36 receptor antagonist gene (IL-36RN) in the pathogenesis of this disease. The physiopathology of AGEP remains unclear, but an involvement of innate and acquired immune cells together with resident cells (keratinocytes), which recruit and activate neutrophils via production of cytokines/chemokines such as IL-17, IL-36, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8)/IL-8, has been postulated. Treatment is based on the removal of the causative drug, supportive care, infection prevention and use of potent topical or systemic steroids. PMID:27472323

  5. Efficacy and effects of palifermin for the treatment of oral mucositis in patients affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, Alessandra; Matarese, Giovanni; Ghislanzoni, Luis Huanca; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Manuelli, Maurizio; Gherlone, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    This randomized-controlled trial studied the efficacy of palifermin, administered as a dose during hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) therapy, as primary prophylaxis on pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in order to reduce oral mucositis (OM). Patients in the palifermin group were randomly assigned to receive palifermin, 60 μg/kg, intravenously as a single dose 3 days before and 0, +1, and +2 post autologous HSCT infusion. The patients in the control group received only a placebo treatment. OM-related assessments were the WHO oral-toxicity scale and the patient-reported outcomes. There was a statistically significant reduction in the incidence of OM grade 3 and 4 in the palifermin group compared to the control group. There was also a reduction in the degree of severity of OM in the palifermin group (1.65 grade respect to 2.33 in the control group). Palifermin could prevent the recurrence of severe OM and improve the quality of life in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). PMID:26428409

  6. The Insect Peptide Coprisin Prevents Clostridium difficile-Mediated Acute Inflammation and Mucosal Damage through Selective Antimicrobial Activity▿

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jin Ku; Hwang, Jae Sam; Nam, Hyo Jung; Ahn, Keun Jae; Seok, Heon; Kim, Sung-Kuk; Yun, Eun Young; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Lamont, John Thomas; Kim, Ho

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis are typically treated with vancomycin or metronidazole, but recent increases in relapse incidence and the emergence of drug-resistant strains of C. difficile indicate the need for new antibiotics. We previously isolated coprisin, an antibacterial peptide from Copris tripartitus, a Korean dung beetle, and identified a nine-amino-acid peptide in the α-helical region of it (LLCIALRKK) that had antimicrobial activity (J.-S. Hwang et al., Int. J. Pept., 2009, doi:10.1155/2009/136284). Here, we examined whether treatment with a coprisin analogue (a disulfide dimer of the nine peptides) prevented inflammation and mucosal damage in a mouse model of acute gut inflammation established by administration of antibiotics followed by C. difficile infection. In this model, coprisin treatment significantly ameliorated body weight decreases, improved the survival rate, and decreased mucosal damage and proinflammatory cytokine production. In contrast, the coprisin analogue had no apparent antibiotic activity against commensal bacteria, including Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, which are known to inhibit the colonization of C. difficile. The exposure of C. difficile to the coprisin analogue caused a marked increase in nuclear propidium iodide (PI) staining, indicating membrane damage; the staining levels were similar to those seen with bacteria treated with a positive control for membrane disruption (EDTA). In contrast, coprisin analogue treatment did not trigger increases in the nuclear PI staining of Bifidobacterium thermophilum. This observation suggests that the antibiotic activity of the coprisin analogue may occur through specific membrane disruption of C. difficile. Thus, these results indicate that the coprisin analogue may prove useful as a therapeutic agent for C. difficile infection-associated inflammatory diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. PMID:21807975

  7. Probiotics Prevent Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction in Acute Pancreatitis in Rats via Induction of Ileal Mucosal Glutathione Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lutgendorff, Femke; Nijmeijer, Rian M.; Sandström, Per A.; Trulsson, Lena M.; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Timmerman, Harro M.; van Minnen, L. Paul; Rijkers, Ger T.; Gooszen, Hein G.; Akkermans, Louis M. A.; Söderholm, Johan D.

    2009-01-01

    Background During acute pancreatitis (AP), oxidative stress contributes to intestinal barrier failure. We studied actions of multispecies probiotics on barrier dysfunction and oxidative stress in experimental AP. Methodology/Principal Findings Fifty-three male Spraque-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into five groups: 1) controls, non-operated, 2) sham-operated, 3) AP, 4) AP and probiotics and 5) AP and placebo. AP was induced by intraductal glycodeoxycholate infusion and intravenous cerulein (6 h). Daily probiotics or placebo were administered intragastrically, starting five days prior to AP. After cerulein infusion, ileal mucosa was collected for measurements of E. coli K12 and 51Cr-EDTA passage in Ussing chambers. Tight junction proteins were investigated by confocal immunofluorescence imaging. Ileal mucosal apoptosis, lipid peroxidation, and glutathione levels were determined and glutamate-cysteine-ligase activity and expression were quantified. AP-induced barrier dysfunction was characterized by epithelial cell apoptosis and alterations of tight junction proteins (i.e. disruption of occludin and claudin-1 and up-regulation of claudin-2) and correlated with lipid peroxidation (r>0.8). Probiotic pre-treatment diminished the AP-induced increase in E. coli passage (probiotics 57.4±33.5 vs. placebo 223.7±93.7 a.u.; P<0.001), 51Cr-EDTA flux (16.7±10.1 vs. 32.1±10.0 cm/s10−6; P<0.005), apoptosis, lipid peroxidation (0.42±0.13 vs. 1.62±0.53 pmol MDA/mg protein; P<0.001), and prevented tight junction protein disruption. AP-induced decline in glutathione was not only prevented (14.33±1.47 vs. 8.82±1.30 nmol/mg protein, P<0.001), but probiotics even increased mucosal glutathione compared with sham rats (14.33±1.47 vs. 10.70±1.74 nmol/mg protein, P<0.001). Glutamate-cysteine-ligase activity, which is rate-limiting in glutathione biosynthesis, was enhanced in probiotic pre-treated animals (probiotics 2.88±1.21 vs. placebo 1.94±0.55 nmol/min/mg protein; P<0

  8. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus envelope protein ion channel activity promotes virus fitness and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L; DeDiego, Marta L; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M; Regla-Nava, Jose A; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Alcaraz, Antonio; Torres, Jaume; Aguilella, Vicente M; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-05-01

    Deletion of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) envelope (E) gene attenuates the virus. E gene encodes a small multifunctional protein that possesses ion channel (IC) activity, an important function in virus-host interaction. To test the contribution of E protein IC activity in virus pathogenesis, two recombinant mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs, each containing one single amino acid mutation that suppressed ion conductivity, were engineered. After serial infections, mutant viruses, in general, incorporated compensatory mutations within E gene that rendered active ion channels. Furthermore, IC activity conferred better fitness in competition assays, suggesting that ion conductivity represents an advantage for the virus. Interestingly, mice infected with viruses displaying E protein IC activity, either with the wild-type E protein sequence or with the revertants that restored ion transport, rapidly lost weight and died. In contrast, mice infected with mutants lacking IC activity, which did not incorporate mutations within E gene during the experiment, recovered from disease and most survived. Knocking down E protein IC activity did not significantly affect virus growth in infected mice but decreased edema accumulation, the major determinant of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) leading to death. Reduced edema correlated with lung epithelia integrity and proper localization of Na+/K+ ATPase, which participates in edema resolution. Levels of inflammasome-activated IL-1β were reduced in the lung airways of the animals infected with viruses lacking E protein IC activity, indicating that E protein IC function is required for inflammasome activation. Reduction of IL-1β was accompanied by diminished amounts of TNF and IL-6 in the absence of E protein ion conductivity. All these key cytokines promote the progression of lung damage and ARDS pathology. In conclusion, E protein IC activity represents a new determinant for SARS-CoV virulence. PMID:24788150

  9. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Envelope Protein Ion Channel Activity Promotes Virus Fitness and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L.; DeDiego, Marta L.; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M.; Regla-Nava, Jose A.; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Alcaraz, Antonio; Torres, Jaume; Aguilella, Vicente M.; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Deletion of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) envelope (E) gene attenuates the virus. E gene encodes a small multifunctional protein that possesses ion channel (IC) activity, an important function in virus-host interaction. To test the contribution of E protein IC activity in virus pathogenesis, two recombinant mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs, each containing one single amino acid mutation that suppressed ion conductivity, were engineered. After serial infections, mutant viruses, in general, incorporated compensatory mutations within E gene that rendered active ion channels. Furthermore, IC activity conferred better fitness in competition assays, suggesting that ion conductivity represents an advantage for the virus. Interestingly, mice infected with viruses displaying E protein IC activity, either with the wild-type E protein sequence or with the revertants that restored ion transport, rapidly lost weight and died. In contrast, mice infected with mutants lacking IC activity, which did not incorporate mutations within E gene during the experiment, recovered from disease and most survived. Knocking down E protein IC activity did not significantly affect virus growth in infected mice but decreased edema accumulation, the major determinant of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) leading to death. Reduced edema correlated with lung epithelia integrity and proper localization of Na+/K+ ATPase, which participates in edema resolution. Levels of inflammasome-activated IL-1β were reduced in the lung airways of the animals infected with viruses lacking E protein IC activity, indicating that E protein IC function is required for inflammasome activation. Reduction of IL-1β was accompanied by diminished amounts of TNF and IL-6 in the absence of E protein ion conductivity. All these key cytokines promote the progression of lung damage and ARDS pathology. In conclusion, E protein IC activity represents a new determinant for SARS-CoV virulence. PMID:24788150

  10. Beneficial effects of Foeniculum vulgare on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Birdane, Fatih Mehmet; Cemek, Mustafa; Birdane, Yavuz Osman; Gülçin, İlhami; Büyükokuroğlu, Mehmet Emin

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To examine the anti-ulcerogenic and antioxidant effects of aqueous extracts of Foeniculum vulgare (FVE) on ethanol-induced gastric lesions in rats. METHODS: FVE was administered by gavage at doses of 75, 150 and 300 mg/kg, and famotidine was used at the dose of 20 mg/kg. Following a 60 min period, all the rats were given 1 mL of ethanol (80%) by gavage. One hour after the administration of ethanol, all groups were sacrificed, and the gastric ulcer index was calculated; whole blood malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH), serum nitrate, nitrite, ascorbic acid, retinol and β-carotene levels were measured in all the groups. RESULTS: It was found that pretreatment with FVE significantly reduced ethanol-induced gastric damage. This effect of FVE was highest and statistically significant in 300 mg/kg group compared with the control (4.18 ± 2.81 vs 13.15 ± 4.08, P < 0.001). Also, pretreatment with FVE significantly reduced the MDA levels, while significantly increased GSH, nitrite, nitrate, ascorbic acid, retinol and β-carotene levels. CONCLUSION: FVE has clearly a protective effect against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesion, and this effect, at least in part, depends upon the reduction in lipid peroxidation and augmentation in the antioxidant activity. PMID:17278229

  11. Acute hematologic and mucosal toxicities in head and neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy: a comparison of 3D-CRT, IMRT, and helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kruser, Tim J; Rice, Stephanie R; Cleary, Kevin P; Geye, Heather M; Tome, Wolfgang A; Harari, Paul M; Kozak, Kevin R

    2013-10-01

    IMRT and helical tomotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment are associated with higher doses to certain non-target tissues than traditional static beam techniques. We hypothesized that this may lead to higher acute mucosal and hematologic toxicities. This analysis was limited to 178 patients receiving ≥60 Gy with concurrent weekly cisplatin. Radiation delivery used 3D-CRT in 41 patients (23%), conventional IMRT in 56 patients (31%), and helical tomotherapy in 81 patients (46%). Acute mucositis rates, weekly hematologic parameters, and ability to deliver planned chemotherapy cycles were examined for each patient during their course of chemoradiotherapy. Analysis showed patients were well balanced with regard to sex, age, and stage. Treatment time, as assessed by delivered monitor units, varied significantly between the 3D-CRT (median = 502), IMRT (median = 1087), and tomotherapy (median = 6757) cohorts. Acute mucositis grades did not significantly differ between the three subsets. Through six weeks of chemoradiotherapy, the median decline in hemoglobin was 15.6%, the median decline in platelets was 30.6%, and the median decline in leukocytes was 51.5%, but these drops were not significantly different between treatment cohorts. Chemotherapy was discontinued or held secondary to hematologic toxicity in 12% of 3D-CRT patients, 5% of IMRT patients and 15% of tomotherapy patients (p = 0.14). In conclusion, HNC patients undergoing high dose radiation with concurrent weekly cisplatin chemotherapy, the longer beam-on times and larger volumes of low-to-moderate radiation doses to non-target tissues associated with modern IMRT delivery techniques do not appear to result in increased acute hematologic or mucosal toxicities. PMID:23547974

  12. Gastric mucosal cell proliferation in ethanol-induced chronic mucosal injury is related to oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in rats.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Muñoz, R; Montiel-Ruíz, C; Vázquez-Martínez, O

    2000-08-01

    The oxygen free radicals-induced lipid peroxidation (LP) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions. However, the role of LP in the generation of chronic gastric mucosal injury is unknown. We have developed a model of chronic mucosal injury induced by continuous ethanol ingestion for 5 days and characterized by marked alterations in plasma membranes from gastric mucosa. Therefore, LP was evaluated in this experimental model. Indicators of peroxidative activity, mucosal glutathione content, thymidine kinase activity (an index of cell proliferation), and histamine H2-receptor (H2R) binding constants were quantified in animals undergoing gastric mucosal damage. The effect of famotidine, a H2R antagonist that readily ameliorates the chronic mucosal injury, was also tested. Increased free radicals and LP levels were detected during gastritis; however, a second, higher peak of LP was noted in mucosal plasma membranes after ethanol withdrawal (recovery period). This further increase of LP coincided with active cell proliferation, decreased mucosal glutathione levels, and diminished specific cimetidine binding by H2R. Administration of famotidine accelerated the mucosal proliferative process, inducing the second lipoperoxidative episode sooner, and preserved the content of glutathione. In addition, LP correlated directly with cell proliferation and inversely with mucosal membrane cimetidine binding. In conclusion, LP seems to be involved in chronic ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury. However, a further enhancement of plasma membrane LP occurred, associated with increased DNA synthesis and diminished cimetidine binding by membrane H2R. Therefore, increased LP could also participate in the compensatory mucosal proliferation initiated after ethanol withdrawal. PMID:10950107

  13. MicroRNA signature of intestinal acute cellular rejection in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded mucosal biopsies.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, T; Sotolongo, B; Island, E R; Tryphonopoulos, P; Selvaggi, G; Moon, J; Tekin, A; Amador, A; Levi, D M; Garcia, J; Smith, L; Nishida, S; Weppler, D; Tzakis, A G; Ruiz, P

    2012-02-01

    Despite continuous improvement of immunosuppression, small bowel transplantation (SBT) is plagued by a high incidence of acute cellular rejection (ACR) that is frequently intractable. Therefore, there is a need to uncover novel insights that will lead to strategies to achieve better control of ACR. We hypothesized that particular miRNAs provide critical regulation of the intragraft immune response. The aim of our study was to identify miRNAs involved in intestinal ACR. We examined 26 small intestinal mucosal biopsies (AR/NR group; 15/11) obtained from recipients after SBT or multivisceral transplantation. We investigated the expression of 384 mature human miRNAs and 280 mRNAs associated with immune, inflammation and apoptosis processes. We identified differentially expressed 28 miRNAs and 58 mRNAs that characterized intestinal ACR. We found a strong positive correlation between the intragraft expression levels of three miRNAs (miR-142-3p, miR-886-3p and miR-132) and 17 mRNAs including CTLA4 and GZMB. We visualized these miRNAs within cells expressing CD3 and CD14 proteins in explanted intestinal allografts with severe ACR. Our data suggested that miRNAs have a critical role in the activation of infiltrating cells during intestinal ACR. These differences in miRNA expression patterns can be used to identify novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets for immunosuppressive agents. PMID:22026534

  14. A New Model for Predicting Acute Mucosal Toxicity in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy With Altered Schedules

    SciTech Connect

    Strigari, Lidia; Pedicini, Piernicola; D'Andrea, Marco; Pinnaro, Paola; Marucci, Laura; Giordano, Carolina; Benassi, Marcello

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: One of the worst radiation-induced acute effects in treating head-and-neck (HN) cancer is grade 3 or higher acute (oral and pharyngeal) mucosal toxicity (AMT), caused by the killing/depletion of mucosa cells. Here we aim to testing a predictive model of the AMT in HN cancer patients receiving different radiotherapy schedules. Methods and Materials: Various radiotherapeutic schedules have been reviewed and classified as tolerable or intolerable based on AMT severity. A modified normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model has been investigated to describe AMT data in radiotherapy regimens, both conventional and altered in dose and overall treatment time (OTT). We tested the hypothesis that such a model could also be applied to identify intolerable treatment and to predict AMT. This AMT NTCP model has been compared with other published predictive models to identify schedules that are either tolerable or intolerable. The area under the curve (AUC) was calculated for all models, assuming treatment tolerance as the gold standard. The correlation between AMT and the predicted toxicity rate was assessed by a Pearson correlation test. Results: The AMT NTCP model was able to distinguish between acceptable and intolerable schedules among the data available for the study (AUC = 0.84, 95% confidence interval = 0.75-0.92). In the equivalent dose at 2 Gy/fraction (EQD2) vs OTT space, the proposed model shows a trend similar to that of models proposed by other authors, but was superior in detecting some intolerable schedules. Moreover, it was able to predict the incidence of {>=}G3 AMT. Conclusion: The proposed model is able to predict {>=}G3 AMT after HN cancer radiotherapy, and could be useful for designing altered/hypofractionated schedules to reduce the incidence of AMT.

  15. Comparative genomics reveals multistep pathogenesis of E2A-PBX1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Duque-Afonso, Jesús; Feng, Jue; Scherer, Florian; Lin, Chiou-Hong; Wong, Stephen H.K.; Wang, Zhong; Iwasaki, Masayuki; Cleary, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer; however, its genetic diversity limits investigation into the molecular pathogenesis of disease and development of therapeutic strategies. Here, we engineered mice that conditionally express the E2A-PBX1 fusion oncogene, which results from chromosomal translocation t(1;19) and is present in 5% to 7% of pediatric ALL cases. The incidence of leukemia in these mice varied from 5% to 50%, dependent on the Cre-driving promoter (Cd19, Mb1, or Mx1) used to induce E2A-PBX1 expression. Two distinct but highly similar subtypes of B cell precursor ALLs that differed by their pre–B cell receptor (pre-BCR) status were induced and displayed maturation arrest at the pro-B/large pre–B II stages of differentiation, similar to human E2A-PBX1 ALL. Somatic activation of E2A-PBX1 in B cell progenitors enhanced self-renewal and led to acquisition of multiple secondary genomic aberrations, including prominent spontaneous loss of Pax5. In preleukemic mice, conditional Pax5 deletion cooperated with E2A-PBX1 to expand progenitor B cell subpopulations, increasing penetrance and shortening leukemia latency. Recurrent secondary activating mutations were detected in key signaling pathways, most notably JAK/STAT, that leukemia cells require for proliferation. These data support conditional E2A-PBX1 mice as a model of human ALL and suggest targeting pre-BCR signaling and JAK kinases as potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:26301816

  16. Mucosal and Parenteral Vaccination against Acute and Latent Murine Cytomegalovirus (MCMV) Infection by Using an Attenuated MCMV Mutant

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Margaret R.; Li, Xi-Yang; Stenberg, Richard M.; Campbell, Ann E.; Virgin, Herbert W.

    1998-01-01

    We used a live attenuated murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) mutant to analyze mechanisms of vaccination against acute and latent CMV infection. We selected MCMV mutant RV7 as a vaccine candidate since this virus grows well in tissue culture but is profoundly attenuated for growth in normal and severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice (V. J. Cavanaugh et al., J. Virol. 70:1365–1374, 1996). BALB/c mice were immunized twice (0 and 14 days) subcutaneously (s.c.) with tissue culture-passaged RV7 and then challenged with salivary gland-passaged wild-type MCMV (sgMCMV) intraperitoneally (i.p.) on day 28. RV7 vaccination protected mice against challenge with 105 PFU of sgMCMV, a dose that killed 100% of mock-vaccinated mice. RV7 vaccination reduced MCMV replication 100- to 500-fold in the spleen between 1 and 8 days after challenge. We used the capacity to control replication of MCMV in the spleen 4 days after challenge as a surrogate for protection. Protection was antigen specific and required both live RV7 and antigen-specific lymphocytes. Interestingly, RV7 was effective when administered s.c., i.p., perorally, intranasally, and intragastrically, demonstrating that attenuated CMV applied to mucosal surfaces can elicit protection against parenteral virus challenge. B cells and immunoglobulin G were not essential for RV7-induced immunity since B-cell-deficient mice were effectively vaccinated by RV7. CD8 T cells, but not CD4 T cells, were critical for RV7-induced protection. Depletion of CD8 T cells by passive transfer of monoclonal anti-CD8 (but not anti-CD4) antibody abrogated RV7-mediated protection, and RV7 vaccination was less efficient in CD8 T-cell-deficient mice with a targeted mutation in the β2-microglobulin gene. Although gamma interferon is important for innate resistance to MCMV, it was not essential for RV7 vaccination since gamma interferon receptor-deficient mice were protected by RV7 vaccination. Establishment of and/or reactivation from latency by sg

  17. Acute bovine viral diarrhea associated with extensive mucosal lesions, high morbidity, and mortality in a commercial feedlot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2008, a northwest Texas feedlot underwent an outbreak of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) disease causing high morbidity and mortality involving two lots of calves (Lots A and B). Severe mucosal surface lesions were observed grossly in the oral cavity, larynx and esophagus. Mucosal lesions vari...

  18. Dietary flaxseed intake exacerbates acute colonic mucosal injury and inflammation induced by dextran sodium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Zarepoor, Leila; Lu, Jenifer T; Zhang, Claire; Wu, Wenqing; Lepp, Dion; Robinson, Lindsay; Wanasundara, Janitha; Cui, Steve; Villeneuve, Sébastien; Fofana, Bourlaye; Tsao, Rong; Wood, Geoffrey A; Power, Krista A

    2014-06-15

    Flaxseed (FS), a dietary oilseed, contains a variety of anti-inflammatory bioactives, including fermentable fiber, phenolic compounds (lignans), and the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) α-linolenic acid. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of FS and its n-3 PUFA-rich kernel or lignan- and soluble fiber-rich hull on colitis severity in a mouse model of acute colonic inflammation. C57BL/6 male mice were fed a basal diet (negative control) or a basal diet supplemented with 10% FS, 6% kernel, or 4% hull for 3 wk prior to and during colitis induction via 5 days of 2% (wt/vol) dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in their drinking water (n = 12/group). An increase in anti-inflammatory metabolites (hepatic n-3 PUFAs, serum mammalian lignans, and cecal short-chain fatty acids) was associated with consumption of all FS-based diets, but not with anti-inflammatory effects in DSS-exposed mice. Dietary FS exacerbated DSS-induced acute colitis, as indicated by a heightened disease activity index and an increase in colonic injury and inflammatory biomarkers [histological damage, apoptosis, myeloperoxidase, inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and IL-1β), and NF-κB signaling-related genes (Nfkb1, Ccl5, Bcl2a1a, Egfr, Relb, Birc3, and Atf1)]. Additionally, the adverse effect of the FS diet was extended systemically, as serum cytokines (IL-6, IFNγ, and IL-1β) and hepatic cholesterol levels were increased. The adverse effects of FS were not associated with alterations in fecal microbial load or systemic bacterial translocation (endotoxemia). Collectively, this study demonstrates that although consumption of a 10% FS diet enhanced the levels of n-3 PUFAs, short-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, and lignans in mice, it exacerbated DSS-induced colonic injury and inflammation. PMID:24763556

  19. Mucosal Immunization with Surface-Displayed Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Protein on Lactobacillus casei Induces Neutralizing Antibodies in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Soo; Poo, Haryoung; Han, Dong P.; Hong, Seung-Pyo; Kim, Kwang; Cho, Michael W.; Kim, Eun; Sung, Moon-Hee; Kim, Chul-Joong

    2006-01-01

    Induction of mucosal immunity may be important for preventing SARS-CoV infections. For safe and effective delivery of viral antigens to the mucosal immune system, we have developed a novel surface antigen display system for lactic acid bacteria using the poly-γ-glutamic acid synthetase A protein (PgsA) of Bacillus subtilis as an anchoring matrix. Recombinant fusion proteins comprised of PgsA and the Spike (S) protein segments SA (residues 2 to 114) and SB (residues 264 to 596) were stably expressed in Lactobacillus casei. Surface localization of the fusion protein was verified by cellular fractionation analyses, immunofluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. Oral and nasal inoculations of recombinant L. casei into mice resulted in high levels of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mucosal IgA, as demonstrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays using S protein peptides. More importantly, these antibodies exhibited potent neutralizing activities against severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) pseudoviruses. Orally immunized mice mounted a greater neutralizing-antibody response than those immunized intranasally. Three new neutralizing epitopes were identified on the S protein using a peptide neutralization interference assay (residues 291 to 308, 520 to 529, and 564 to 581). These results indicate that mucosal immunization with recombinant L. casei expressing SARS-associated coronavirus S protein on its surface provides an effective means for eliciting protective immune response against the virus. PMID:16571824

  20. Defining and Regulating Acute Inflammatory Lesion Formation during the Pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis and Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Christopher; Smith, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The primary pathology of the human central nervous system disease multiple sclerosis (MS) and the animal counterpart experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) includes immunological and inflammatory events. Immune system involvement in MS has been widely debated but the role of inflammation has received less attention. Classic acute inflammation features vasculitis, resident tissue macrophage and mast cell participation plus the involvement of circulatory-derived neutrophils and platelets. Pre-lesion development in MS incorporates cerebral vasculitis, activated resident microglia in normal appearing white matter together with infiltrating cell types and factors indicative of an acute inflammatory reaction. Similarly, the formation of perivascular lesions during early EAE includes characteristic neurovasculitis, the participation of central nervous system microglial phenotypes plus haemopoietic cells and mediators, signifying an ongoing acute inflammatory response. EAE has been extensively used as a screen to select drugs for MS treatment but has been criticised as unrepresentative of the human condition due to fundamental differences in disease induction and pathogenesis. The review provides compelling evidence for a distinct acute inflammatory phase in MS lesion formation that is convincingly reproduced in early EAE pathology. Moreover, consideration of drug efficacy studies undertaken during initial EAE validates the occurrence of an acute inflammatory phase in disease pathogenesis. Critical appraisal, recognition and acceptance of the mutual acute inflammatory components inherent in the primary pathology of MS and EAE reveals new targets and encourages confident and reliable employment of the animal model in the assessment of novel compounds for the control of key primary pathological events in human demyelinating disease. PMID:26177741

  1. Effect of acid secretion blockade on acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by Tityus serrulatus scorpion toxin in anaesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Melo, Júnio Rios; de Araújo, Gnana Keith Marques; da Luz, Magda Maria Profeta; da Conceição, Sérgio Alexandre; Lisboa, Felipe Assis; Moraes-Santos, Tasso; Cunha-Melo, José Renan

    2006-10-01

    Scorpion venom (TX) promotes gastric acid and pepsin secretion leading to acute gastric mucosal lesions (AGML), when injected in animals. The goal of the present study was to observe the effects of acid gastric secretion blockers over the incidence of TX-induced AGML in vivo. To verify this model, we used male albino rats, fasted 18-20 h (n=122) and anaesthetized with urethane (1.4 g/kg, i.p.). Their trachea and left femoral vein were both cannulated; the first to avoid airway obstructions during scorpion intoxication and the second for administration of saline, TX and acid blockers. Following the surgical procedure, the animals were divided in 10 groups of at least 10 animals each. Control groups were injected with NaCl 0.9% 1 ml/kg (n=10) or TX 375 microg/kg (n=32). Test groups (n=10, each) received atropine 5 mg/kg, cimetidine 10mg/kg, ranitidine 2.5mg/kg, ranitidine 5mg/kg, omeprazol 1 mg/kg, omeprazol 4 mg/kg, octreotide 80 and octreotide 100 microg/kg 10 min before the TX was injected. After 1h of intoxication, the stomach was resected for macroscopic study and the gastric secretion was collected for volume, pH and acid output assessment. We observed that all blockers were able to completely or partially prevent the TX-induced acid secretion as well as the AGML (p<0.05). Our data suggest the TX-induced AGML can be prevented by different class of acid blockers injected before the intoxication. PMID:16926041

  2. Mucosal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis CS; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites. PMID:25424921

  3. Effects of near-infrared laser radiation on the survival and inflammatory potential of Candida spp. involved in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Clemente, A M; Rizzetto, L; Castronovo, G; Perissi, E; Tanturli, M; Cozzolino, F; Cavalieri, D; Fusi, F; Cialdai, F; Vignali, L; Torcia, M G; Monici, M

    2015-10-01

    Candida spp. usually colonize ulcerative lesions of atrophic mucosa in patients with chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis inducing severe inflammation. The spread of antifungal-resistant strains strongly encouraged the search of complementary or alternative therapeutic strategies to cure inflamed mucosa. In this paper, we studied the effects of a near-infrared (NIR) laser system with dual-wavelength emission (808 nm + 904 nm) on the survival and inflammatory potential of C. albicans, C. glabrata, and C. parapsilosis. Laser treatment was performed with a Multiwave Locked System laser. Survival and apoptosis of fungal strains were evaluated by colony-forming units (CFU) counting and annexin V staining. Cytokine production was evaluated by ImmunoPlex array. Laser treatment significantly affected the survival of Candida spp. by inducing apoptosis and induced a lower production of inflammatory cytokines by dendritic cells compared to untreated fungi. No differences in the survival and inflammatory potential were recorded in treated or untreated Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, used as the control non-pathogenic microorganism. Laser treatment altered the survival and inflammatory potential of pathogenic Candida spp. These data provide experimental support to the use of NIR laser radiation as a co-adjuvant of antifungal therapy in patients with oral mucositis (OM) complicated by Candida infections. PMID:26173694

  4. LeuX tRNA-dependent and -independent mechanisms of Escherichia coli pathogenesis in acute cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Thomas J.; Mysorekar, Indira U.; Chen, Swaine L.; Walker, Jennifer N.; Jones, Jennifer M.; Pinkner, Jerome S.; Hultgren, Scott J.; Seed, Patrick C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) contain multiple horizontally acquired pathogenicity-associated islands (PAI) implicated in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection. In a murine model of cystitis, type 1 pili-mediated bladder epithelial invasion and intracellular proliferation are key events associated with UPEC virulence. In this study, we examined the mechanisms by which a conserved PAI contributes to UPEC pathogenesis in acute cystitis. In the human UPEC strain UTI89, spontaneous excision of PAI IIUTI89 disrupts the adjacent leuX tRNA locus. Loss of wild-type leuX-encoded tRNA5Leu significantly delayed, but did not eliminate, FimB recombinase-mediated phase variation of type 1 pili. FimX, an additional FimB-like, leuX-independent recombinase, was also found to mediate type 1 pili phase variation. However, whereas FimX activity is relatively slow in vitro, it is rapid in vivo as a non-piliated strain lacking the other fim recombinases rapidly expressed type 1 pili upon experimental infection. Finally, we found that disruption of leuX, but not loss of PAI IIUTI89 genes, reduced bladder epithelial invasion and intracellular proliferation, independent of type 1 piliation. These findings indicate that the predominant mechanism for preservation of PAI IIUTI89 during the establishment of acute cystitis is maintenance of wild-type leuX, and not PAI IIUTI89 gene content. PMID:18036139

  5. A C-type lectin receptor pathway is responsible for the pathogenesis of acute cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Dejima, Takashi; Shibata, Kensuke; Yamada, Hisakata; Takeuchi, Ario; Hara, Hiromitsu; Eto, Masatoshi; Naito, Seiji; Yoshikai, Yasunobu

    2013-12-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis often arises after cyclophosphamide (CYP) administration. As yet, however, the mechanism involved in its pathogenesis is unknown. In this study, it was found that the Fc receptor γ chain (FcRγ)- caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9)-dependent pathway rather than the myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)-dependent pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of acute CYP-induced cystitis in mice. Rapid and transient production of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β was detected in the bladder at 4 hr, preceding IL-23 and IL-17A production and an influx of neutrophils, which reached a peak at 24 hr after injection. As assessed by weight, edema and neutrophil infiltration, cystitis was significantly attenuated in CARD9 knockout (KO) and FcRγKO mice, this attenuation being accompanied by impaired production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-23 and IL-17A. The major source of IL-17A is the vesical γδ T cell population: IL-17AKO, CδKO and Tyk2KO mice showed little IL-17A production and reduced neutrophil infiltration in the bladder after CYP injection. These results suggest that FcRγ-CARD9-dependent production of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-23 and the subsequent activation of IL-17A-producing γδ T cells are at least partly involved in the pathogenesis of acute CYP-induced cystitis in mice. PMID:24102807

  6. Wilms tumor 1 mutations in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rampal, Raajit; Figueroa, Maria E.

    2016-01-01

    Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) has long been implicated in acute myeloid leukemia. It has been described to be both overexpressed and mutated in different forms of acute myeloid leukemia, and overexpression has been reported to play a prognostic role in this disease. However, the precise mechanism through which WT1 may play a role in leukemogenesis has remained elusive. In recent years, new evidence has emerged that points towards a novel role of WT1 mutations in the deregulation of epigenetic programs in leukemic cells through its interaction with TET proteins. Herein we review the current status of the field and its therapeutic and prognostic implications in acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27252512

  7. Acute Toxicity and Gastroprotective Role of M. pruriens in Ethanol-Induced Gastric Mucosal Injuries in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hassandarvish, Pouya; Abdul Majid, Nazia; Hadi, A. Hamid A.; Nordin, Noraziah; Abdulla, Mahmood A.

    2013-01-01

    The investigation was to evaluate gastroprotective effects of ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injuries in rats. Forty-eight rats were divided into 8 groups: negative control, extract control, ulcer control, reference control, and four experimental groups. As a pretreatment, the negative control and the ulcer control groups were orally administered carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). The reference control was administered omeprazole orally (20 mg/kg). The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was given orally to the extract control group (500 mg/kg) and the experimental groups (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg). After 1 h, CMC was given orally to the negative and the extract control groups. The other groups received absolute ethanol. The rats were sacrificed after 1 h. The ulcer control group exhibited significant mucosal injuries with decreased gastric wall mucus and severe damage to the gastric mucosa. The extract caused upregulation of Hsp70 protein, downregulation of Bax protein, and intense periodic acid schiff uptake of glandular portion of stomach. Gastric mucosal homogenate showed significant antioxidant properties with increase in synthesis of PGE2, while MDA was significantly decreased. The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was nontoxic (<5 g/kg) and could enhance defensive mechanisms against hemorrhagic mucosal lesions. PMID:23781513

  8. Spatiotemporal Interplay of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus and Respiratory Mucosal Cells Drives Viral Dissemination in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Wei, Qiang; Nishiura, Kenji; Peng, Jie; Wang, Haibo; Midkiff, Cecily; Alvarez, Xavier; Qin, Chuan; Lackner, Andrew; Chen, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Innate immune responses play a critical role in the control of early virus replication and dissemination. It remains unknown, however, how SARS-CoV evades respiratory innate immunity to establish a systemic infection. Here, we show in Chinese macaques that SARS-CoV traversed the mucosa through the respiratory tract within 2 days, resulting in extensive mucosal infiltration by T cells, MAC387+ and CD163+ monocytes/macrophages followed by limited viral replication in the lung but persistent viral shedding into the upper airway. Mucosal monocytes/macrophages sequestered virions in intracellular vesicles together with infected Langerhans cells (LCs) and migrated into the tonsils and/or draining lymph nodes (LNs) within 2 days. In lymphoid tissues, viral RNA and proteins were detected in infected monocytes upon differentiation into dendritic cells (DCs) within 3 days. Systemic viral dissemination was observed within 7 days. This study provides a comprehensive overview of the spatiotemporal interactions of SARS-CoV, monocytes/macrophages and the dendritic cell network in mucosal tissues and highlights the fact that while these innate cells contribute to viral clearance, they probably also serve as shelters and vehicles to provide a mechanism for the virus to escape host mucosal innate immunity and disseminate systemically. PMID:26647718

  9. Acute toxicity and gastroprotective role of M. pruriens in ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injuries in rats.

    PubMed

    Golbabapour, Shahram; Hajrezaie, Maryam; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Abdul Majid, Nazia; Hadi, A Hamid A; Nordin, Noraziah; Abdulla, Mahmood A

    2013-01-01

    The investigation was to evaluate gastroprotective effects of ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injuries in rats. Forty-eight rats were divided into 8 groups: negative control, extract control, ulcer control, reference control, and four experimental groups. As a pretreatment, the negative control and the ulcer control groups were orally administered carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). The reference control was administered omeprazole orally (20 mg/kg). The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was given orally to the extract control group (500 mg/kg) and the experimental groups (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg). After 1 h, CMC was given orally to the negative and the extract control groups. The other groups received absolute ethanol. The rats were sacrificed after 1 h. The ulcer control group exhibited significant mucosal injuries with decreased gastric wall mucus and severe damage to the gastric mucosa. The extract caused upregulation of Hsp70 protein, downregulation of Bax protein, and intense periodic acid schiff uptake of glandular portion of stomach. Gastric mucosal homogenate showed significant antioxidant properties with increase in synthesis of PGE2, while MDA was significantly decreased. The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was nontoxic (<5 g/kg) and could enhance defensive mechanisms against hemorrhagic mucosal lesions. PMID:23781513

  10. The NOTCH signaling pathway: role in the pathogenesis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and implication for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tosello, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-ALL) is characterized by aberrant activation of NOTCH1 in over 60% of T-ALL cases. The high prevalence of activating NOTCH1 mutations highlights the critical role of NOTCH signaling in the pathogenesis of this disease and has prompted the development of therapeutic approaches targeting the NOTCH signaling pathway. Small molecule gamma secretase inhibitors (GSIs) can effectively inhibit oncogenic NOTCH1 and are in clinical testing for the treatment of T-ALL. Treatment with GSIs and glucocorticoids are strongly synergistic and may overcome the gastrointestinal toxicity associated with systemic inhibition of the NOTCH pathway. In addition, emerging new anti-NOTCH1 therapies include selective inhibition of NOTCH1 with anti-NOTCH1 antibodies and stapled peptides targeting the NOTCH transcriptional complex in the nucleus. PMID:23730497

  11. [Changes in the management of acute pancreatitis as related to its pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Bodnár, Zoltán

    2005-03-13

    Although acute pancreatitis runs a benign self limiting course in 80% of cases, acute necrotizing form of it still remained a severe disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Severity assessment thus plays an important role in identifying patients with high risk of local and/or systemic complications. Locally, development of necrosis especially if it becomes infected accounts for high mortality, but systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ failure (MOF) following necrosis further increases the risk of fatal outcome. Several scoring systems, contrast-enhanced CT scan can help to recognize patients requiring early intensive management. Prophylactic systemic antibiotic treatment and nasojejunal feeding improves prognosis by decreasing the gut derived infection of necrosis. CT guided fine needle aspiration sample must be cultured to detect infection. Conservative therapy should be continued while necrosis remains sterile, but surgical and/or CT guided percutaneous catheter drainage is mandatory when infected necrosis developed. Results of therapeutic influence on the proinflammatory cytokine cascade in acute pancreatitis are still controversial. Enteral feeding seems to be the only proven tool in attenuating acute phase response and improving disease severity. PMID:15813188

  12. Molecular pathogenesis of plasminogen Hakodate: the second Japanese family case of severe type I plasminogen deficiency manifested late-onset multi-organic chronic pseudomembranous mucositis.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Tsukasa; Souri, Masayoshi; Song, Young-Seok; Izumi, Naohiro; Law, Ruby; Ichinose, Akitada

    2016-08-01

    A 64-year-old man first developed ligneous conjunctivitis at the age of 58 years after right pulmonary resection because of suspected cancer; otherwise, he had been healthy. Since then, he began to suffer from various forms of chronic pseudomembranous mucositis. Laboratory tests demonstrated that he had 7.8 % of plasminogen activity and 5.9 % of the normal antigen level. Thus, he was diagnosed as having severe type I plasminogen deficiency, making him the third case in Japan. DNA sequencing and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses revealed that this patient was a compound heterozygote of a G-to-A missense mutation (G266E) in exon VIII and a g-to-a mutation at the obligatory splicing acceptor site in intron 12 (IVS12-1g>a). These two mutations were confirmed to be novel. Molecular modeling and splice site strength calculation predicted conformational disorder(s) for the Glu266 mutant and a drastic decrease in splicing efficiency for intron 12, respectively. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the patient contained a small amount of the normal-sized plasminogen protein. Mass spectrometric analysis of the patient's plasminogen revealed a peptide containing the wild-type Gly266 residue and no peptides with mutations at Glu266. However, he had never suffered from thrombosis. Low levels of fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products (FDP), D-dimer, and plasmin-α2-plasmin inhibitor complex clearly indicated a hypo-fibrinolytic condition. However, his plasma concentration of elastase-digested crosslinked FDPs was 4.8 U/mL, suggesting the presence of an on-going plasmin(ogen)-independent "alternative" fibrinolytic system, which may protect the patient from thrombosis. The patient has been free from recurrence of ligneous conjunctivitis for approximately 2.5 years. PMID:27193180

  13. Efficacy of famotidine in patients with acute gastric mucosal injury after continuous infusion of cisplatin plus vindesine.

    PubMed

    Mori, K; Tominaga, K; Yokoyama, K; Suga, Y; Kishiro, I; Tsurui, M

    1995-01-01

    The effect of famotidine (H2 blocker) on the gastroduodenal mucosal injury induced by chemotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer patients was prospectively evaluated from the clinical and endoscopic findings obtained in a randomized double-blind study. The patients, who were administered cisplatin (25 mg/m2/day, continuous infusion, days 1-5) and vindesine (3 mg/m2, bolus, days 1 and 8), were randomized into two groups, those administered famotidine (40 mg/day, oral) and those administered the placebo. The patients were examined by gastroduodenoscopy within 7 days before and after chemotherapy. There were 27 patients in the famotidine group and 28 patients in the placebo group. The gastric mucosal score after chemotherapy was significantly lower in the famotidine group than in the placebo group (P < 0.01), and in the 42 patients without symptoms than in the 13 patients (placebo group: 8, famotidine group: 5) with upper gastrointestinal symptoms (P < 0.01). The pH of the gastric juice after the chemotherapy significantly decreased in the placebo group (P < 0.05), and was significantly lower in the placebo group than in the famotidine group (P = 0.01). The co-administration of famotidine was effective in the prevention and control of chemotherapy-induced gastric mucosal injury. PMID:7797602

  14. The Role of Different Monocyte Subsets in the Pathogenesis of Atherosclerosis and Acute Coronary Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Idzkowska, E; Eljaszewicz, A; Miklasz, P; Musial, W J; Tycinska, A M; Moniuszko, M

    2015-09-01

    The inflammation underlying both atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndromes is strongly related to monocyte-related actions. However, different monocyte subsets can play differential roles in the formation and destabilization of atherosclerotic plaque as well as healing of damaged myocardial tissue. Monocytes are currently being divided into three functionally distinct subsets with different levels of CD14 (cluster of differentiation 14) and CD16 expression. Thus, there are classical CD14++CD16-, intermediate CD14++CD16+ and non-classical CD14+CD16++ monocytes. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on complex activities of different monocyte subsets in atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndromes. Moreover, we discuss which monocyte subsets can serve either as predictive biomarkers of cardiovascular risk or as potential targets used in atherosclerosis and its complications. PMID:25997925

  15. Central role of neutrophil in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi-wen; Meng, Xiao-xiao; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is an acute abdominal disease with the strong systemic inflammatory response, and rapidly progresses from a local pancreatic damage into multiple organ dysfunction. For many decades, the contributions of neutrophils to the pathology of SAP were traditionally thought to be the chemokine and cytokine cascades that accompany inflammation. In this review, we focus mainly on those recently recognized aspects of neutrophils in SAP processes. First, emerging evidence suggests that therapeutic interventions targeting neutrophils significantly lower tissue damage and protect against the occurrence of pancreatitis. Second, trypsin activation promotes the initial neutrophils recruitment into local pancreas, and subsequently neutrophils infiltration in turn triggers trypsin production. Finally, neutrophils have the unique ability to release neutrophil extracellular traps even in the absence of pathogens. PMID:26249268

  16. Central role of neutrophil in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Wen; Meng, Xiao-Xiao; Xu, Ping

    2015-11-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is an acute abdominal disease with the strong systemic inflammatory response, and rapidly progresses from a local pancreatic damage into multiple organ dysfunction. For many decades, the contributions of neutrophils to the pathology of SAP were traditionally thought to be the chemokine and cytokine cascades that accompany inflammation. In this review, we focus mainly on those recently recognized aspects of neutrophils in SAP processes. First, emerging evidence suggests that therapeutic interventions targeting neutrophils significantly lower tissue damage and protect against the occurrence of pancreatitis. Second, trypsin activation promotes the initial neutrophils recruitment into local pancreas, and subsequently neutrophils infiltration in turn triggers trypsin production. Finally, neutrophils have the unique ability to release neutrophil extracellular traps even in the absence of pathogens. PMID:26249268

  17. Novel roles of reactive oxygen species in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fuling; Shen, Qiang; Claret, François X.

    2013-01-01

    It has become apparent that regulation of ROS is important in cell signaling and homeostasis. Accumulation of ROS triggers oxidative stress in various cell types and contributes to the development, progression, and persistence of cancer. Recent research has demonstrated that redox dysregulation caused by ROS promotes proliferation, differentiation, genomic, and epigenetic alterations; immune evasion; and survival in leukemic cells. ROS act as signaling molecules to regulate redox-sensitive transcriptional factors, enzymes, oncogenes, and other downstream effectors. Thus, a thorough understanding the role of ROS as key mediators in leukemogenesis is likely to provide opportunities for improved pharmacological intervention. In this review, we summarize the recent findings that support a role for ROS in the pathogenesis of AML and outline innovative approaches in the implementation of redox therapies for myeloid malignancies. PMID:23715741

  18. Molecular determinants of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus pathogenesis and virulence in young and aged mouse models of human disease.

    PubMed

    Frieman, Matthew; Yount, Boyd; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Page, Carly; Donaldson, Eric; Roberts, Anjeanette; Vogel, Leatrice; Woodruff, Becky; Scorpio, Diana; Subbarao, Kanta; Baric, Ralph S

    2012-01-01

    SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) causes severe acute respiratory tract disease characterized by diffuse alveolar damage and hyaline membrane formation. This pathology often progresses to acute respiratory distress (such as acute respiratory distress syndrome [ARDS]) and atypical pneumonia in humans, with characteristic age-related mortality rates approaching 50% or more in immunosenescent populations. The molecular basis for the extreme virulence of SARS-CoV remains elusive. Since young and aged (1-year-old) mice do not develop severe clinical disease following infection with wild-type SARS-CoV, a mouse-adapted strain of SARS-CoV (called MA15) was developed and was shown to cause lethal infection in these animals. To understand the genetic contributions to the increased pathogenesis of MA15 in rodents, we used reverse genetics and evaluated the virulence of panels of derivative viruses encoding various combinations of mouse-adapted mutations. We found that mutations in the viral spike (S) glycoprotein and, to a much less rigorous extent, in the nsp9 nonstructural protein, were primarily associated with the acquisition of virulence in young animals. The mutations in S likely increase recognition of the mouse angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor not only in MA15 but also in two additional, independently isolated mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs. In contrast to the findings for young animals, mutations to revert to the wild-type sequence in nsp9 and the S glycoprotein were not sufficient to significantly attenuate the virus compared to other combinations of mouse-adapted mutations in 12-month-old mice. This panel of SARS-CoVs provides novel reagents that we have used to further our understanding of differential, age-related pathogenic mechanisms in mouse models of human disease. PMID:22072787

  19. Molecular Determinants of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Pathogenesis and Virulence in Young and Aged Mouse Models of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yount, Boyd; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Page, Carly; Donaldson, Eric; Roberts, Anjeanette; Vogel, Leatrice; Woodruff, Becky; Scorpio, Diana; Subbarao, Kanta; Baric, Ralph S.

    2012-01-01

    SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) causes severe acute respiratory tract disease characterized by diffuse alveolar damage and hyaline membrane formation. This pathology often progresses to acute respiratory distress (such as acute respiratory distress syndrome [ARDS]) and atypical pneumonia in humans, with characteristic age-related mortality rates approaching 50% or more in immunosenescent populations. The molecular basis for the extreme virulence of SARS-CoV remains elusive. Since young and aged (1-year-old) mice do not develop severe clinical disease following infection with wild-type SARS-CoV, a mouse-adapted strain of SARS-CoV (called MA15) was developed and was shown to cause lethal infection in these animals. To understand the genetic contributions to the increased pathogenesis of MA15 in rodents, we used reverse genetics and evaluated the virulence of panels of derivative viruses encoding various combinations of mouse-adapted mutations. We found that mutations in the viral spike (S) glycoprotein and, to a much less rigorous extent, in the nsp9 nonstructural protein, were primarily associated with the acquisition of virulence in young animals. The mutations in S likely increase recognition of the mouse angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor not only in MA15 but also in two additional, independently isolated mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs. In contrast to the findings for young animals, mutations to revert to the wild-type sequence in nsp9 and the S glycoprotein were not sufficient to significantly attenuate the virus compared to other combinations of mouse-adapted mutations in 12-month-old mice. This panel of SARS-CoVs provides novel reagents that we have used to further our understanding of differential, age-related pathogenic mechanisms in mouse models of human disease. PMID:22072787

  20. On the dynamics of acute EBV infection and the pathogenesis of infectious mononucleosis

    PubMed Central

    Hadinoto, Vey; Shapiro, Michael; Greenough, Thomas C.; Sullivan, John L.; Luzuriaga, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Memory B cells latently infected with Epstein-Barr virus (mBLats) in the blood disappear rapidly on presentation with acute symptomatic primary infection (acute infectious mononucleosis [AIM]). They undergo a simple exponential decay (average half-life: 7.5 ± 3.7 days) similar to that of normal memory B cells. The cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to immediate early (IE) lytic antigens (CTLIEs) also decays over this time period, but no such correlation was observed for the CTL response to lytic or latent antigens or to the levels of virions shed into saliva. We have estimated the average half-life of CTLIEs to be 73 (± 23) days. We propose that cycles of infection and reactivation occur in the initial stages of infection that produce high levels of mBLats in the circulation. Eventually the immune response arises and minimizes these cycles leaving the high levels of mBLats in the blood to decay through simple memory B-cell homeostasis mechanisms. This triggers the cells to reactivate the virus whereupon most are killed by CTLIEs before they can release virus and infect new cells. The release of antigens caused by this large-scale destruction of infected cells may trigger the symptoms of AIM and be a cofactor in other AIM-associated diseases. PMID:17991806

  1. Effects of acute chemotherapy-induced mucositis on spontaneous behaviour and the grimace scale in laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, A L; Leach, M C; Preston, F L; Lymn, K A; Howarth, G S

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal mucositis is a frequent side-effect of chemotherapy treatment. Many oncological research programs aim to identify novel treatments for this distressing condition, and these programs frequently use rat models. Little is known about the presence and progression of pain in these models and how this can best be treated by analgesic therapy. We used a number of behaviour-based methods of pain assessment to determine which tools were best suited for pain identification. Baseline measures for behavioural assessment, rat grimace score and sociability were determined through analysis of continuously recorded video data and an applied social interaction test (n = 16). Mucositis was then induced by intraperitoneal injection of 5-fluorouracil (150 mg/kg) and further behavioural analyses undertaken. An assessment of enrichment interaction was also made by determining the mass of a plastic chew toy gnawed both pre- and post-chemotherapy injection. Behavioural scoring was performed 1, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after injection, with facial expression being scored at the 12, 24 and 48 h time-points. Sociability testing was performed once during the post-injection period. No significant differences were found in grimace scores between baseline and later daily measures. Behaviours similar to those previously reported post-laparotomy were observed. Writhing, twitching and back-arching behaviours were most evident in rats affected by mucositis and were increased in frequency (respectivePvalues: 0.002, 0.004 and 0.008) 48 h after chemotherapy injection compared with baseline, implying that pain onset occurred around this time-point. Social investigatory behaviour was also increased (P = 0.002) following disease onset. Each day, rats post-5FU injection gnawed a greater percentage of their nylabone enrichment by weight than the saline-injected control rats (P = 0.046). These data suggest that, of the tools tested, behavioural assessment scoring may find greatest

  2. The role of acetaldehyde in the pathogenesis of acute alcoholic pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Nordback, I H; MacGowan, S; Potter, J J; Cameron, J L

    1991-01-01

    Acetaldehyde (AA), the first product of ethanol metabolism, has been suggested as an important mediator in alcoholic pancreatitis, but experimental evidence has not been convincing. Prior work using the isolated perfused canine pancreas preparation has suggested that toxic oxygen metabolites generated by xanthine oxidase (XO) may mediate the early injury in pancreatitis. Xanthine oxidase is capable of oxidizing AA, and during this oxidation free radicals are released. The hypothesis that acute alcoholic pancreatitis may be initiated by AA in the presence of active XO (converted from xanthine dehydrogenase [XD]) was tested in the authors' experimental preparation by converting XD to XO by a period of ischemia, and infusing AA. Control preparations remained normal throughout the 4-hour perfusion (weight gain, 7 +/- 4 g; amylase activity, 1162 +/- 202 U/dL). One hour of ischemia or infusion of AA at 25 mg/hr or at 50 mg/hr without ischemia did not induce changes in the preparation. Acetaldehyde at 250 mg/hr induced minimal edema and weight gain (16 +/- 4 g; p less than 0.05), but not significant hyperamylasemia. Changes also were not observed when 1-hour ischemia was followed by a bolus of ethanol (1.5 g) or sodium acetate (3.0 g), or by infusion of 25 mg/hr of AA. One hour of ischemia followed by infusion of AA at 50 mg/hr or at 250 mg/hr induced edema, hemorrhage, weight gain (22 +/- 7 g [p less than 0.05] and 26 +/- 17 g [p less than 0.05]) and hyperamylasemia (2249 +/- 1034 U/dL [p less than 0.05] and 2602 +/- 1412 U/dL [p less than 0.05]). Moreover infusion of AA at 250 mg/hr after 2 hours of ischemia potentiated the weight gain (62 +/- 20 g versus 30 +/- 14 g [p less than 0.05]), but not the hyperamylasemia (3404 +/- 589 U/dL versus 2862 +/- 1525 U/dL) as compared with 2 hours of ischemia alone. Pancreatitis induced by 1 hour of ischemia followed by AA at 50 mg/hr could be inhibited by pretreatment with the free radical scavengers superoxide dismutase and

  3. Mouse Models for the Study of Mucosal Vaccination Against Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Sabirov, Albert; Metzger, Dennis W.

    2008-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is one of the most common infectious diseases in humans. The pathogenesis of OM involves nasopharyngeal colonization (NP) and retrograde ascension of the pathogen up the Eustachian tube into the middle ear (ME). Due to increasing rates of antibiotic resistance, there is an urgent need for vaccines to prevent infections caused by the most common causes of bacterial OM, including nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Moraxella catarrhalis. Current vaccine strategies aim to diminish bacterial NP carriage, thereby reducing the likelihood of developing acute OM. To be effective, vaccination should induce local mucosal mmunity both in the ME and in the NP. Studies in animal models have demonstrated that the intranasal route of vaccination is particularly effective at inducing immune responses in the nasal passage and ME for protection against OM. The mouse is increasingly used in these models, because of the availability of murine reagents and the existence of technology to manipulate murine models of disease immunologically and genetically. Previous studies confirmed the suitability of the mouse as a model for inflammatory processes in acute OM. Here, we discuss various murine models of OM and review the applicability of these models to assess the efficacy of mucosal vaccination and the mechanisms responsible for protection. In addition, we discuss various mucosal vaccine antigens, mucosal adjuvants and mucosal delivery systems. PMID:18295938

  4. Primary mucosal melanomas: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Mihajlovic, Marija; Vlajkovic, Slobodan; Jovanovic, Predrag; Stefanovic, Vladisav

    2012-01-01

    Primary mucosal melanomas arise from melanocytes located in mucosal membranes lining respiratory, gastrointestinal and urogenital tract. Although a majority of mucosal melanomas originate from the mucosa of the nasal cavity and accessory sinuses, oral cavity, anorectum, vulva and vagina, they can arise in almost any part of mucosal membranes. Most of mucosal melanomas occur in occult sites, which together with the lack of early and specific signs contribute to late diagnosis, and poor prognosis. Because of their rareness the knowledge about their pathogenesis and risk factors is insufficient, and also there are not well established protocols for staging and treatment of mucosal melanomas. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, with trends toward more conservative treatment since radical surgery did not show an advantage for survival. Radiotherapy can provide better local control in some locations, but did not show improvement in survival. There is no effective systemic therapy for these aggressive tumors. Compared with cutaneous and ocular melanoma, mucosal melanomas have lowest percent of five-year survival. Recently revealed molecular changes underlying mucosal melanomas offer new hope for development of more effective systemic therapy for mucosal melanomas. Herein we presented a comprehensive review of various locations of primary melanoma along mucosal membranes, their epidemiological and clinical features, and treatment options. We also gave a short comparison of some characteristics of cutaneous and mucosal melanomas. PMID:23071856

  5. An overview of animal models for investigating the pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies in acute hepatic failure

    PubMed Central

    Tuñón, María Jesús; Alvarez, Marcelino; Culebras, Jesús M; González-Gallego, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Acute hepatic failure (AHF) is a severe liver injury accompanied by hepatic encephalopathy which causes multiorgan failure with an extremely high mortality rate, even if intensive care is provided. Management of severe AHF continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. Liver transplantation has been shown to be the most effective therapy, but the procedure is limited by shortage of donor organs. Although a number of clinical trials testing different liver assist devices are under way, these systems alone have no significant effect on patient survival and are only regarded as a useful approach to bridge patients with AHF to liver transplantation. As a result, reproducible experimental animal models resembling the clinical conditions are still needed. The three main approaches used to create an animal model for AHF are: surgical procedures, toxic liver injury and infective procedures. Most common models are based on surgical techniques (total/partial hepatectomy, complete/transient devascularization) or the use of hepatotoxic drugs (acetaminophen, galactosamine, thioacetamide, and others), and very few satisfactory viral models are available. We have recently developed a viral model of AHF by means of the inoculation of rabbits with the virus of rabbit hemorrhagic disease. This model displays biochemical and histological characteristics, and clinical features that resemble those in human AHF. In the present article an overview is given of the most widely used animal models of AHF, and their main advantages and disadvantages are reviewed. PMID:19575487

  6. Israeli acute paralysis virus: epidemiology, pathogenesis and implications for honey bee health.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan Ping; Pettis, Jeffery S; Corona, Miguel; Chen, Wei Ping; Li, Cong Jun; Spivak, Marla; Visscher, P Kirk; DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Boncristiani, Humberto; Zhao, Yan; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Delaplane, Keith; Solter, Leellen; Drummond, Francis; Kramer, Matthew; Lipkin, W Ian; Palacios, Gustavo; Hamilton, Michele C; Smith, Barton; Huang, Shao Kang; Zheng, Huo Qing; Li, Ji Lian; Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Ai Fen; Wu, Li You; Zhou, Ji Zhong; Lee, Myeong-L; Teixeira, Erica W; Li, Zhi Guo; Evans, Jay D

    2014-07-01

    Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) is a widespread RNA virus of honey bees that has been linked with colony losses. Here we describe the transmission, prevalence, and genetic traits of this virus, along with host transcriptional responses to infections. Further, we present RNAi-based strategies for limiting an important mechanism used by IAPV to subvert host defenses. Our study shows that IAPV is established as a persistent infection in honey bee populations, likely enabled by both horizontal and vertical transmission pathways. The phenotypic differences in pathology among different strains of IAPV found globally may be due to high levels of standing genetic variation. Microarray profiles of host responses to IAPV infection revealed that mitochondrial function is the most significantly affected biological process, suggesting that viral infection causes significant disturbance in energy-related host processes. The expression of genes involved in immune pathways in adult bees indicates that IAPV infection triggers active immune responses. The evidence that silencing an IAPV-encoded putative suppressor of RNAi reduces IAPV replication suggests a functional assignment for a particular genomic region of IAPV and closely related viruses from the Family Dicistroviridae, and indicates a novel therapeutic strategy for limiting multiple honey bee viruses simultaneously and reducing colony losses due to viral diseases. We believe that the knowledge and insights gained from this study will provide a new platform for continuing studies of the IAPV-host interactions and have positive implications for disease management that will lead to mitigation of escalating honey bee colony losses worldwide. PMID:25079600

  7. Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis and Implications for Honey Bee Health

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan Ping; Pettis, Jeffery S.; Corona, Miguel; Chen, Wei Ping; Li, Cong Jun; Spivak, Marla; Visscher, P. Kirk; DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Boncristiani, Humberto; Zhao, Yan; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Delaplane, Keith; Solter, Leellen; Drummond, Francis; Kramer, Matthew; Lipkin, W. Ian; Palacios, Gustavo; Hamilton, Michele C.; Smith, Barton; Huang, Shao Kang; Zheng, Huo Qing; Li, Ji Lian; Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Ai Fen; Wu, Li You; Zhou, Ji Zhong; Lee, Myeong-L.; Teixeira, Erica W.; Li, Zhi Guo; Evans, Jay D.

    2014-01-01

    Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) is a widespread RNA virus of honey bees that has been linked with colony losses. Here we describe the transmission, prevalence, and genetic traits of this virus, along with host transcriptional responses to infections. Further, we present RNAi-based strategies for limiting an important mechanism used by IAPV to subvert host defenses. Our study shows that IAPV is established as a persistent infection in honey bee populations, likely enabled by both horizontal and vertical transmission pathways. The phenotypic differences in pathology among different strains of IAPV found globally may be due to high levels of standing genetic variation. Microarray profiles of host responses to IAPV infection revealed that mitochondrial function is the most significantly affected biological process, suggesting that viral infection causes significant disturbance in energy-related host processes. The expression of genes involved in immune pathways in adult bees indicates that IAPV infection triggers active immune responses. The evidence that silencing an IAPV-encoded putative suppressor of RNAi reduces IAPV replication suggests a functional assignment for a particular genomic region of IAPV and closely related viruses from the Family Dicistroviridae, and indicates a novel therapeutic strategy for limiting multiple honey bee viruses simultaneously and reducing colony losses due to viral diseases. We believe that the knowledge and insights gained from this study will provide a new platform for continuing studies of the IAPV–host interactions and have positive implications for disease management that will lead to mitigation of escalating honey bee colony losses worldwide. PMID:25079600

  8. Pathogenesis and early management of non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Tomas H; Schulman, Steven P

    2006-02-01

    NSTE ACS is a clinically significant problem. Endothelial dysfunction triggered by traditional cardiovascular risk factors (and perhaps by other as yet unidentified risks) in the susceptible host leads to the formation and development of atherosclerotic plaque. Inflammatory mediators and mechanical stresses contribute to plaque rupture by disrupting the protective fibrous cap. In about 25% of patients who have ACS, typically those who are younger, female, or smokers, plaque erosion seems to be the main underlying pathologic mechanism. Endothelial alteration, inflammation,or exposure of the lipid core results in the release of TF, vWF, and PAF. The release of these factors leads to platelet activation and aggregation as well as to the formation of a fibrin clot, resulting in arterial thrombosis that occludes the vessel. A variety of factors, including circulating catecholamines, LDL levels, blood glucose levels, and systemic thrombogenic factors, can affect the extent and stability of the thrombus, thereby determining whether the occlusion is complete and fixed, labile and nonocclusive (NSTE ACS),or clinically silent resulting in a mural thrombus and plaque growth. The acute treatment of NSTEACS is directed at interrupting the prothrombotic environment surrounding the ruptured plaque; thus, antiplatelet agents such as aspirin, clopidogrel, and glycoprotein IIb/IIla receptor antagonists,as well as anticoagulants such as heparin, are the mainstays of early therapy. PMID:16326254

  9. A murine model of obesity implicates the adipokine milieu in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zyromski, Nicholas J; Mathur, Abhishek; Pitt, Henry A; Lu, Debao; Gripe, John T; Walker, Julia J; Yancey, Kyle; Wade, Terence E; Swartz-Basile, Deborah A

    2008-09-01

    Obesity is clearly an independent risk factor for increased severity of acute pancreatitis (AP), although the mechanisms underlying this association are unknown. Adipokines (including leptin and adiponectin) are pleiotropic molecules produced by adipocytes that are important regulators of the inflammatory response. We hypothesized that the altered adipokine milieu observed in obesity contributes to the increased severity of pancreatitis. Lean (C57BL/6J), obese leptin-deficient (LepOb), and obese hyperleptinemic (LepDb) mice were subjected to AP by six hourly intraperitoneal injections of cerulein (50 microg/kg). Severity of AP was assessed by histology and by measuring pancreatic concentration of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and IL-6, the chemokine MCP-1, and the marker of neutrophil activation MPO. Both congenitally obese strains of mice developed significantly more severe AP than wild-type lean animals. Severity of AP was not solely related to adipose tissue volume: LepOb mice were heaviest; however, LepDb mice developed the most severe AP both histologically and biochemically. Circulating adiponectin concentrations inversely mirrored the severity of pancreatitis. These data demonstrate that congenitally obese mice develop more severe AP than lean animals when challenged by cerulein hyperstimulation and suggest that alteration of the adipokine milieu exacerbates the severity of AP in obesity. PMID:18583460

  10. Do we know enough about the immune pathogenesis of acute coronary syndromes to improve clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Matusik, Pawel; Guzik, Bartlomiej; Weber, Christian; Guzik, Tomasz J

    2012-09-01

    Morbidities related to atherosclerosis, such as acute coronary syndromes (ACS) including unstable angina and myocardial infarction, remain leading causes of mortality. Unstable plaques are inflamed and infiltrated with macrophages and T lymphocytes. Activated dendritic cells interact with T cells, yielding predominantly Th1 responses involving interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), while the role of interleukin 17 (IL-17) is questionable. The expansion of CD28nullCD4 or CD8 T cells as well as pattern recognition receptors activation (especially Toll-like receptors; TLR2 and TLR4) is characteristic for unstable plaque. Inflammation modifies platelet and fibrin clot characteristics, which are critical for ACS. Understanding of the inflammatory mechanisms of atherothrombosis, bridging inflammation, oxidative stress and immune regulation, will allow for the detection of subjects at risk, through the use of novel biomarkers and imaging techniques including intravascular ultrasound, molecular targeting, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Moreover, understanding the specific inflammatory pathways of plaque rupture and atherothrombosis may allow for immunomodulation of ACS. Statins and anti-platelet drugs are anti-inflammatory, but importance of immune events in ACS warrants the introduction of novel, specific treatments directed either on cytokines, TLRs or inflammasomes. While the prime time for the introduction of immunologically inspired diagnostic tests and treatments for atherosclerosis have not come yet, we are closer than ever before to finally being able to benefit from this vast body of experimental and clinical evidence. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the role of the immune system and inflammation in ACS. PMID:22872109

  11. Mechanism of the beneficial effects of dantrolene sodium on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Büyükokuroğlu, Mehmet Emin; Taysi, Seyithan; Polat, Fevzi; Göçer, Fatma

    2002-05-01

    In our study, we examined anti-ulcerogen and antioxidant effects of dantrolene sodium on ethanol-induced gastric lesions in rats. Dantrolene sodium was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) in several doses, and famotidine was used at a dose of 20 mg kg (-1). It was found that pretreatment with dantrolene sodium at doses of 1, 5 and 10 mg kg(-1) significantly reduced ethanol-induced gastric damage and malondialdehyde levels, and significantly increased antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities. We conclude that dantrolene sodium clearly has antioxidant properties and that the protective effect of dantrolene sodium against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesion, at least in part, depends upon the reduction in the lipid peroxidation and an increase in the activity of antioxidant enzymes SOD and GSH-Px. PMID:12123631

  12. Mucosal immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Woof, Jenny M; Mestecky, Jiri

    2005-08-01

    Due to their vast surface area, the mucosal surfaces of the body represent a major site of potential attack by invading pathogens. The secretions that bathe mucosal surfaces contain significant levels of immunoglobulins (Igs), which play key roles in immune defense of these surfaces. IgA is the predominant antibody class in many external secretions and has many functional attributes, both direct and indirect, that serve to prevent infective agents such as bacteria and viruses from breaching the mucosal barrier. This review details current understanding of the structural and functional characteristics of IgA, including interaction with specific receptors (such as Fc(alpha)RI, Fc(alpha)/microR, and CD71) and presents examples of the means by which certain pathogens circumvent the protective properties of this important Ig. PMID:16048542

  13. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury: Incidence, Pathogenesis and the Role of Multicomponent Apheresis in Its Prevention.

    PubMed

    Popovsky, Mark A

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY: Although transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is now appreciated as the most common cause of death from transfusion, its incidence remains unknown. The most frequently cited figure is 1:5,000 plasma-containing components. Certain patient groups may be at significantly higher risk. TRALI is both underdiagnosed and un-derreported. It is misdiagnosed as transfusion-associated circulatory overload. Several mechanisms have been proposed for its pathogenesis-leukocyte antibodies and the 2-hit model. These may overlap, and both involve transfusion of leukocyte antibodies. Passive transfusion of leukocyte antibodies is strongly associated with TRALI; these are identified in 60-85% of cases. Multiparous blood donors are the most frequent source of these antibody-containing components. The antibodies are HLA class I and II and/or granulocyte-specific. In 50% of cases the antibody corresponds to an epitope in the patient. HLA class I antibodies have been shown to prime and activate neutrophils. Clinical reports and animal models link HNA-3a antibodies with severe lung injury. A number of TRALI prevention and risk mitigation strategies have been proposed. In the UK and the USA, these strategies have centered upon excluding 'high risk' (HLA/HNA antibody containing) plasma from fresh frozen plasma and platelet products. Multicomponent apheresis collection of platelets, plasma and red blood cells is a means of accomplishing this objective. PMID:21512631

  14. Antioxidant Properties and Gastroprotective Effects of 2-(Ethylthio)Benzohydrazones on Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Mucosal Lesions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ariffin, Azhar; Abdulla, Mahmood A.; Abdullah, Zanariah

    2016-01-01

    A series of new 2-(ethylthio)benzohydrazone derivatives (1–6) were prepared and characterised by IR, 1H NMR, and 13C NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The newly prepared compounds were screened for their in vitro antioxidant activities using free radical scavenging 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Among them, most powerful antioxidant, compound 1 has been selected in order to illustrate anti-ulcer effect on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions in rats. Four groups of Sprague Dawley rats were respectively treated with 10% Tween 20 as ulcer control group, 20 mg/kg omeprazole as reference group, 50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg compound 1 as experimental animals. Macroscopically, ulcer control group showed extensive hemorrhagic lesions of gastric mucosa compared with omeprazole or compound 1. Rats pre-treated with compound 1 showed increased in gastric pH and gastric mucus. Histologically, ulcer control group showed severe damage to gastric mucosa with edema and leucocytes infiltration of submucosal layer. In immunohistochemical analysis, rats which were pre-treated with compound 1 showed up-regulation of HSP70 and down-regulation of Bax proteins. In conclusion, the gastroprotective effect of compound 1 may be due to its antioxidant activity, and/or due to up-regulation of HSP70 and down-regulation of Bax protein in stained tissue section. PMID:27272221

  15. Endoscopic measurements of canine colonic mucosal blood flow using hydrogen gas clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Soybel, D.I.; Wan, Y.L.; Ashley, S.W.; Yan, Z.Y.; Ordway, F.S.; Cheung, L.Y.

    1987-04-01

    We have examined the feasibility of hydrogen (H/sub 2/) clearance for endoscopic measurements of colonic mucosal blood flow in anesthetized dogs. In 6 animals, measurements of H2 clearance did not differ significantly in different regions of the sigmoid colon and they were highly reproducible on different days. In a total of 12 dogs, measurements of H2 clearance correlated closely with those obtained using radioactive microspheres under resting conditions and, in 4 dogs, during infusion of vasopressin. In 8 dogs, ligation of the major arteries supplying the sigmoid colon resulted in an acute 60% decrease in sigmoid mucosal blood flow; however, in 5 animals that survived the procedure, mucosal blood flow returned nearly to control levels as early as 3 days after operation. Endoscopic H/sub 2/ clearance thus appears to be feasible for measuring mucosal blood flow in the colon. Serial measurements of H/sub 2/ clearance may prove useful in characterizing the role of mucosal blood flow in the pathogenesis of various forms of human colonic disease.

  16. Identification of the interaction of VP1 with GM130 which may implicate in the pathogenesis of CVB3-induced acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuzhen; Xia, Yanhua; Huang, Shengping; Liu, Fadi; Ying, Ying; Xu, Qiufang; Liu, Xin; Jin, Guili; Papasian, Christopher J.; Chen, Jack; Fu, Mingui; Huang, Xiaotian

    2015-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is a causative agent of viral myocarditis, pancreatitis, and meningitis in humans. Although the susceptibility of CVB3-induced acute pancreatitis is age-dependent, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we identified the host factor Golgi matrix protein 130 (GM130) as a novel target of CVB3 during CVB3-induced acute pancreatitis. The viral protein VP1 interacted with GM130, disrupted GM130-GRASP65 complexes, and caused GM130 degradation, which may lead to disruption of the Golgi ribbon and development of acute pancreatitis in mice. Interestingly, the expression level of GM130 in mouse pancreas was age-dependent, which was nicely correlated with the age-associated susceptibility of CVB3-induced acute pancreatitis. Furthermore, interference RNA-mediated knockdown of GM130 significantly reduced CVB3 replication in HeLa cells. Taken together, the study identified GM130 as a novel target of CVB3, which may implicate in the pathogenesis of CVB3-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:26314804

  17. Targeting α4β7 integrin reduces mucosal transmission of SIV and protects GALT from infection

    PubMed Central

    Byrareddy, Siddappa N.; Kallam, Brianne; Arthos, James; Cicala, Claudia; Nawaz, Fatima; Hiatt, Joseph; Kersh, Ellen N.; McNicholl, Janet M.; Hanson, Debra; Reimann, Keith A.; Brameier, Markus; Walter, Lutz; Rogers, Kenneth; Mayne, Ann E.; Dunbar, Paul; Villinger, Tara; Little, Dawn; Parslow, Tristram G.; Santangelo, Philip J.; Villinger, Francois; Fauci, Anthony S.; Ansari, Aftab A.

    2014-01-01

    α4β7 integrin expressing CD4+ T cells preferentially traffic to gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) and play a key role in HIV/SIV pathogenesis. The administration of an anti-α4β7 monoclonal antibody during acute infection protects macaques from transmission following repeated low-dose intra-vaginal challenges with SIVmac251. In treated animals that became infected the GALT was significantly protected and CD4+ T–cell numbers were maintained. Thus, targeting α4β7 reduces mucosal transmission of SIV in macaques. PMID:25419708

  18. In Vivo and Cadaver Studies of the Canalicular/Lacrimal Sac Mucosal Folds

    PubMed Central

    You, Yongsheng; Cao, Jing; Zhang, Xiaogang; Wu, Wencan; Xiao, Tianlin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The study aimed to investigate canalicular/lacrimal sac mucosal folds (CLS-MFs) in vivo and in cadavers in order to explore their functional roles in the lacrimal drainage system. Method. The observations of CLS-MFs in vivo were performed on 16 patients with chronic dacryocystitis after undergoing an endonasal endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (EE-DCR). The lacrimal sacs and common canaliculi of 19 adult cadavers were dissected. The opening/closing of an orifice and mucosal fold was recorded. All of the specimens were subjected to a histological examination. Results. The upper and lower lacrimal canaliculi in all of the samples united to form a common canaliculus that opened to the lacrimal sac. CLS-MFs were observed in 10 of the 16 patients (62.5%) and 9 of the 19 cadavers (47.4%). The orifices or mucosal folds could be opened or closed when related muscles contracted or relaxed. Histological sections showed a mucosal fold at one side of an orifice. Conclusion. Common canaliculus is the most common type that the canaliculus opens to lacrimal sac. CLS-MFs exist in a certain ratio that can be opened/closed with the movement of the orifices. They may be involved in the drainage of tears or the pathogenesis of acute dacryocystitis or lacrimal sac mucocele. PMID:27242921

  19. Replacing the acetyl linkage in aspirin with choline and magnesium moieties reduces the occurrence of gastric mucosal injury.

    PubMed

    Danesh, B J; Nelson, L M; Russell, R I; Docherty, C

    1987-02-01

    The acetyl moiety in aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid: ASA) is considered to play a major part in the pathogenesis of ASA-induced mucosal injury. At equivalent salicylate doses and pH values, the induction of acute gastric mucosal haemorrhagic erosions in rats by ASA and choline magnesium trisalicylate (CMT), a new non-acetylated salicylate, with and without the potentiating damaging effect of taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA) were compared. Test solutions were administered by per oral intubation to five groups of fasting Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 24). Gastric mucosa were examined after 4 hours and mucosal injury assessed by a lesion-scoring system. The incidence and severity (median lesion scores with quartiles) of the lesions were 83% and 13 (7:20) respectively for ASA (128 mg kg-1) compared with 17% and 0 (0:0) for CMT (128 mg kg-1) (P less than 0.001 and P less than 0.001). TDCA increased mucosal damage to 100% and 29 (20:34) for ASA compared with 30% and 0 (0:4) for CMT (P less than 0.001) and P less than 0.001). Serum salicylate levels (median values of 1.4 for ASA and 1.5 mmol litre-1 for CMT) were not significantly different. It is concluded that replacing the acetyl moiety in ASA with choline and magnesium moieties reduces the ASA-induced mucosal injury, without affecting blood salicylate concentrations. PMID:2979212

  20. Protective effects of alginate–chitosan microspheres loaded with alkaloids from Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. (Zuojin Pill) against ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang-Song; Zhu, Xiao-Ning; Jiang, Heng-Li; Wang, Gui-Fang; Cui, Yuan-Lu

    2015-01-01

    Zuojin Pill (ZJP), a traditional Chinese medicine formula, consists of Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. in a ratio of 6:1 (w/w) and was first recorded in “Danxi’s experiential therapy” for treating gastrointestinal disorders in the 15th century. However, the poor solubility of alkaloids from ZJP restricted the protective effect in treating gastritis and gastric ulcer. The aim of the study was to investigate the protective mechanism of mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids from C. chinensis Franch. and E. rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats. Surface morphology, particle size, drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, mucoadhesiveness, and fluorescent imaging of the microspheres in gastrointestinal tract were studied. The results showed that the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could sustain the release of drugs beyond 12 hours and had gastric mucoadhesive property with 82.63% retention rate in vitro. The fluorescence tracer indicated high retention of mucoadhesive microspheres within 12 hours in vivo. The mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could reduce the gastric injury by decreasing the mucosal lesion index, increasing the percentage of inhibition and increasing the amount of mucus in the gastric mucosa in an ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury rat model. Moreover, the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids reduce the inflammatory response by decreasing the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), downregulating the mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, TNF-α, and IL-1β in gastric mucosa. All the results indicate that mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could not only increase the residence time of alkaloids in rat stomach, but also exert gastroprotective effects through reducing the inflammatory response on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage. Thus

  1. Neutrophil elastase mediates acute pathogenesis and is a determinant of long-term behavioral recovery after traumatic injury to the immature brain

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Bridgette D; Trivedi, Alpa; Gimlin, Kayleen; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    , WT mice treated acutely with the NE inhibitor showed no long-term behavioral or structural improvements. Together, these findings validate the central role of NE in both acute pathogenesis and chronic functional recovery, and support future exploration of the therapeutic window, taking into account the prolonged period of neutrophil trafficking into the injured immature brain. PMID:25497734

  2. Neutrophil elastase mediates acute pathogenesis and is a determinant of long-term behavioral recovery after traumatic injury to the immature brain.

    PubMed

    Semple, Bridgette D; Trivedi, Alpa; Gimlin, Kayleen; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J

    2015-02-01

    , WT mice treated acutely with the NE inhibitor showed no long-term behavioral or structural improvements. Together, these findings validate the central role of NE in both acute pathogenesis and chronic functional recovery, and support future exploration of the therapeutic window, taking into account the prolonged period of neutrophil trafficking into the injured immature brain. PMID:25497734

  3. Oral mucositis - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer treatment - mucositis; Cancer treatment - mouth pain; Cancer treatment - mouth sores; Chemotherapy - mucositis; Chemotherapy - mouth pain; Chemotherapy - mouth sores; Radiation therapy - mucositis; Radiation therapy - mouth pain; Radiation ...

  4. Sirt1-Positive Lymphocytes in Acute Cellular Cardiac Allograft Rejection: Contributor to Pathogenesis and a Therapeutic Target.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Kerry J; Zhao, Bihong; Buja, L Maximilian; Brown, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac allograft rejection remains a problem, despite advances with immunosuppressants. Understanding the mechanisms behind rejection is essential for developing targeted therapies. The goal of this investigation is to explore Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) as a therapeutic target for cardiac allograft rejection. Thirteen endomyocardial biopsy specimens with acute cellular rejection (grade 2R or 3R) were selected. CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20, CD68, T-cell intracytoplasmic antigen (TIA-1), and Sirt1 expressions were determined by immunohistochemical stains. Comparison of Sirt1 expression was made with 10 cases of grade 0R and grade 1R. Quantitative image analysis was performed. There were 2 cases of grade 3R and 11 cases of grade 2R acute cellular rejection. Sirtuin 1 expression was present in the majority of mononuclear cells (median percentage, 73.5; interquartile range, 51.2-100%); staining was also observed in cardiomyocytes. Twelve of the 13 cases (92.3%) had an elevated CD8/FoxP3 ratio, coinciding with acute cellular rejection. Sirtuin 1 expression in the nuclei of FoxP3+ cells can lead to deacetylation and inactivation of FoxP3 rendering the T-suppressor cells inactive and promoting acute cellular rejection. The use of a Sirt1 inhibitor may be a therapeutic option in expanding the functionality of the FoxP3+ T-suppressor cells and moderating the severity of such rejection. PMID:26771391

  5. Israeli acute paralysis virus: epidemiology, pathogenesis and implications for honey bee health and Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) is a widespread RNA virus that was linked with honey bee Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), the sudden and massive die-off of honey bee colonies in the U.S. in 2006-2007. Here we describe the transmission, prevalence and genetic diversity of IAPV, host transcripti...

  6. Antibodies against acute phase proteins and their functions in the pathogenesis of disease: a collective profile of 25 different antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lakota, Katja; Zigon, Polona; Mrak-Poljsak, Katjusa; Rozman, Blaz; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Sodin-Semrl, Snezna

    2011-10-01

    The acute phase response is a defense system in which the innate immune response is activated following injury or infection. Positive and negative acute phase proteins (APPs) are crucial for protecting the host organism, as well as returning it to homeostatic levels, the first with elevated concentrations and the latter with decreased concentrations during the acute phase. Reports about the presence of antibodies against APPs are known, however their individual, as well as potentially collective, pathological or physiological roles are still emerging. Some of these autoantibodies are specifically connected with diseases (such as pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor and C3, C4 nephritic factors), while others have been reported as natural antibodies. The persistent presence (even if only minor) of autoantibodies in healthy blood donors indicates an overlapping category of autoantibodies, which could become pathogenic, depending on the autoantibody characteristics such as avidity, epitope specificity, changes in the microenvironment leading to different oxidative status and others. This review uses the novel approach of studying the overall autoantibody population against APPs, their functions and connections to diseases. The primary function of autoantibodies against APPs (anti-APPs) is thought to promote their clearance, however autoantibodies against negative APPs have also been found and applying the same role to those is doubtful. There is also the theory of consumption in the stage of inflammation, which could be relevant to anti-APPs. Reports about protective roles of autoantibodies are also emerging, showing lowered levels of antibodies in diseases, which could be interesting for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21718807

  7. Impact of Mucosal Inflammation on Oral Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui-Ling; Hodara, Vida L.; Chu, Lianrui; Parodi, Laura M.; Smith, Lisa M.; Sexton, Valerie; Cappelli, David; Sodora, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Mucosal tissues are the primary route of transmission for most respiratory and sexually transmitted diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). There is epidemiological evidence that genital mucosal inflammation leads to enhanced HIV type 1 (HIV-1) transmission. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of periodontal inflammation on oral HIV transmission using a nonhuman primate model of teeth ligature-induced periodontitis. Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) was nontraumatically applied to the gingiva after moderate gingivitis was identified through clinical and immunologic analyses (presence of inflammatory cytokines). Overall oral SIV infection rates were similar in the gingivitis-induced and control groups (5 infections following 12 SIV administrations for each), although more macaques were infected with multiple viral variants in the gingivitis group. SIV infection also affected the levels of antiviral and inflammatory cytokines in the gingival crevicular fluid, and a synergistic effect was observed, with alpha interferon and interferon-inducible protein 10 undergoing significant elevations following SIV infection in macaques with gingivitis compared to controls. These increases in antiviral and inflammatory immune modulators in the SIV-infected gingivitis macaques could also be observed in blood plasma, although the effects at both compartments were generally restricted to the acute phase of the infection. In conclusion, while moderate gingivitis was not associated with increased susceptibility to oral SIV infection, it resulted in elevated levels of cytokines in the oral mucosa and plasma of the SIV-infected macaques. These findings suggest a synergy between mucosal inflammation and SIV infection, creating an immune milieu that impacts the early stages of the SIV infection with potential implications for long-term pathogenesis. PMID:23175379

  8. The molecular mechanism of acute lung injury caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: from bacterial pathogenesis to host response.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common gram-negative pathogen causing pneumonia in immunocompromised patients. Acute lung injury induced by bacterial exoproducts is associated with a poor outcome in P. aeruginosa pneumonia. The major pathogenic toxins among the exoproducts of P. aeruginosa and the mechanism by which they cause acute lung injury have been investigated: exoenzyme S and co-regulated toxins were found to contribute to acute lung injury. P. aeruginosa secretes these toxins through the recently defined type III secretion system (TTSS), by which gram-negative bacteria directly translocate toxins into the cytosol of target eukaryotic cells. TTSS comprises the secretion apparatus (termed the injectisome), translocators, secreted toxins, and regulatory components. In the P. aeruginosa genome, a pathogenic gene cluster, the exoenzyme S regulon, encodes genes underlying the regulation, secretion, and translocation of TTSS. Four type III secretory toxins, namely ExoS, ExoT, ExoU, and ExoY, have been identified in P. aeruginosa. ExoS is a 49-kDa form of exoenzyme S, a bifunctional toxin that exerts ADP-ribosyltransferase and GTPase-activating protein (GAP) activity to disrupt endocytosis, the actin cytoskeleton, and cell proliferation. ExoT, a 53-kDa form of exoenzyme S with 75% sequence homology to ExoS, also exerts GAP activity to interfere with cell morphology and motility. ExoY is a nucleotidal cyclase that increases the intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine and guanosine monophosphates, resulting in edema formation. ExoU, which exhibits phospholipase A2 activity activated by host cell ubiquitination after translocation, is a major pathogenic cytotoxin that causes alveolar epithelial injury and macrophage necrosis. Approximately 20% of clinical isolates also secrete ExoU, a gene encoded within an insertional pathogenic gene cluster named P. aeruginosa pathogenicity island-2. The ExoU secretory phenotype is associated with a poor clinical outcome in P

  9. Histopathology and pathogenesis of caerulein-, duct ligation-, and arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL6 mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Rouse, Rodney L

    2014-09-01

    Three classical rodent models of acute pancreatitis were created in an effort to identify potential pre-clinical models of drug-induced pancreatitis (DIP) and candidate non-invasive biomarkers for improved detection of DIP. Study objectives included designing a lexicon to minimize bias by capturing normal variation and spontaneous and injury-induced changes while maintaining the ability to statistically differentiate degrees of change, defining morphologic anchors for novel pancreatic injury biomarkers, and improved understanding of mechanisms responsible for pancreatitis. Models were created in male Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL6 mice through: 1) administration of the cholecystokinin analog, caerulein; 2) administration of arginine; 3) surgical ligation of the pancreatic duct. Nine morphologically detectable processes were used in the lexicon; acinar cell hypertrophy; acinar cell autophagy; acinar cell apoptosis; acinar cell necrosis; vascular injury; interstitial edema, inflammation and hemorrhage; fat necrosis; ductal changes; acinar cell atrophy. Criteria were defined for scoring levels (0 = absent, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate, 3 = severe) for each lexicon component. Consistent with previous studies, histopathology scores were significant greater in rats compared to mice at baseline and after treatment. The histopathology scores in caerulein and ligation-treated rats and mice were significantly greater than those of arginine-treated rats and mice. The present study supports a multifaceted pathogenesis for acute pancreatitis in which intra-acinar trypsinogen activation, damage to acinar cells, fat cells, and vascular cells as well as activation/degranulation of mast cells and activated macrophages all contribute to the initiation and/or progression of acute inflammation of the exocrine pancreas. PMID:24585404

  10. Phase 3 Trial of Domiciliary Humidification to Mitigate Acute Mucosal Toxicity During Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: First Report of Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 07.03 RadioHUM Study

    SciTech Connect

    Macann, Andrew; Fua, Tsien; Milross, Chris G.; Porceddu, Sandro V.; Penniment, Michael; Wratten, Chris; Krawitz, Hedley; Poulsen, Michael; Tang, Colin I.; Morton, Randall P.; Hay, K. David; Thomson, Vicki; Bell, Melanie L.; King, Madeleine T.; Fraser-Browne, Carol L.; Hockey, Hans-Ulrich P.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of domicile-based humidification on symptom burden during radiation therapy (RT) for head-and-neck (H and N) cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2007 through June 2011, 210 patients with H and N cancer receiving RT were randomized to either a control arm or to receive humidification using the Fisher and Paykel Healthcare MR880 humidifier. Humidification commenced on day 1 of RT and continued until Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0, clinical mucositis (CMuc) grade ≤1 occurred. Forty-three patients (42%) met a defined benchmark for humidification compliance and contributed to per protocol (PP) analysis. Acute toxicities, hospitalizations, and feeding tube events were recorded prospectively. The McMaster University Head and Neck Radiotherapy Questionnaire (HNRQ) was used for patient-reported outcomes. The primary endpoint was area under the curve (AUC) for CMuc grade ≥2. Results: There were no significant differences in AUC for CMuc ≥2 between the 2 arms. Humidification patients had significantly fewer days in hospital (P=.017). In compliant PP patients, the AUC for CTCAE functional mucositis score (FMuc) ≥2 was significantly reduced (P=.009), and the proportion who never required a feeding tube was significantly greater (P=.04). HNRQ PP analysis estimates also in the direction favoring humidification with less symptom severity, although differences at most time points did not reach significance. Conclusions: TROG 07.03 has provided efficacy signals consistent with a role for humidification in reducing symptom burden from mucositis, but the influence of humidification compliance on the results moderates recommendations regarding its practical utility.

  11. Mucosal dendritic cells shape mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sun-Young; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Kweon, Mi-Na

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key modulators that shape the immune system. In mucosal tissues, DCs act as surveillance systems to sense infection and also function as professional antigen-presenting cells that stimulate the differentiation of naive T and B cells. On the basis of their molecular expression, DCs can be divided into several subsets with unique functions. In this review, we focus on intestinal DC subsets and their function in bridging the innate signaling and adaptive immune systems to maintain the homeostasis of the intestinal immune environment. We also review the current strategies for manipulating mucosal DCs for the development of efficient mucosal vaccines to protect against infectious diseases. PMID:24626170

  12. Role of lysosomal enzymes released by alveolar macrophages in the pathogenesis of the acute phase of hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, M. N.; Martín, T.; Sánchez, M. L.; Buitrago, J. M. González; Jiménez, A.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrolytic enzymes are the major constituents of alveolar macrophages (AM) and have been shown to be involved in many aspects of the inflammatory pulmonary response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of lysosomal enzymes in the acute phase of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HPs). An experimental study on AM lysosomal enzymes of an HP-guinea-pig model was performed. The results obtained both in vivo and in vitro suggest that intracellular enzymatic activity decrease is, at least partly, due to release of lysosomal enzymes into the medium. A positive but slight correlation was found between extracellular lysosomal activity and four parameters of lung lesion (lung index, bronchoalveolar fluid total (BALF) protein concentration, BALF LDH and BALF alkaline phosphatase activities). All the above findings suggest that the AM release of lysosomal enzymes during HP is a factor involved, although possibly not the only one, in the pulmonary lesions appearing in this disease. PMID:18475615

  13. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ciećko-Michalska, Irena; Szczepanek, Małgorzata; Słowik, Agnieszka; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:23316223

  14. Aberrant nuclear factor-kappa B activity in acute myeloid Leukemia: from molecular pathogenesis to therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jianbiao; Ching, Ying Qing; Chng, Wee-Joo

    2015-01-01

    The overall survival of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not been improved significantly over the last decade. Molecularly targeted agents hold promise to change the therapeutic landscape in AML. The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) controls a plethora of biological process through switching on and off its long list of target genes. In AML, constitutive NF-κB has been detected in 40% of cases and its aberrant activity enable leukemia cells to evade apoptosis and stimulate proliferation. These facts suggest that NF-κB signaling pathway plays a fundamental role in the development of AML and it represents an attractive target for the intervention of AML. This review summarizes our current knowledge of NF-κB signaling transduction including canonical and non-canonical NF-κB pathways. Then we specifically highlight what factors contribute to the aberrant activation of NF-κB activity in AML, followed by an overview of 8 important clinical trials of the first FDA approved proteasome inhibitor, Bortezomib (Velcade®), which is a NF-κB inhibitor too, in combination with other therapeutic agents in patients with AML. Finally, this review discusses the future directions of NF-κB inhibitor in treatment of AML, especially in targeting leukemia stem cells (LSCs). PMID:25823927

  15. Aberrant nuclear factor-kappa B activity in acute myeloid leukemia: from molecular pathogenesis to therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianbiao; Ching, Ying Qing; Chng, Wee-Joo

    2015-03-20

    The overall survival of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not been improved significantly over the last decade. Molecularly targeted agents hold promise to change the therapeutic landscape in AML. The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) controls a plethora of biological process through switching on and off its long list of target genes. In AML, constitutive NF-κB has been detected in 40% of cases and its aberrant activity enable leukemia cells to evade apoptosis and stimulate proliferation. These facts suggest that NF-κB signaling pathway plays a fundamental role in the development of AML and it represents an attractive target for the intervention of AML. This review summarizes our current knowledge of NF-κB signaling transduction including canonical and non-canonical NF-κB pathways. Then we specifically highlight what factors contribute to the aberrant activation of NF-κB activity in AML, followed by an overview of 8 important clinical trials of the first FDA approved proteasome inhibitor, Bortezomib (Velcade), which is a NF-κB inhibitor too, in combination with other therapeutic agents in patients with AML. Finally, this review discusses the future directions of NF-κB inhibitor in treatment of AML, especially in targeting leukemia stem cells (LSCs). PMID:25823927

  16. Mucosal Lesions in an Allergy Practice.

    PubMed

    Kohorst, John J; Bruce, Alison J; Torgerson, Rochelle R

    2016-04-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of mucosal disease with an allergic pathogenesis are challenging. Oral allergy is often a hypersensitivity reaction with variable symptoms and physical exam findings. Clinical diagnosis requires a history of prior allergen exposure, a delay from exposure to clinical findings, and improvement following allergen removal. The past decades have seen great contributions to the field of oral allergy. The aim of this review is to provide an approach to the diagnosis and treatment of oral dermatologic disease with a focus on diseases with an investigated allergic pathogenesis. PMID:26922434

  17. The pathogenesis of arthritis associated with acute hepatitis-B surface antigen-positive hepatitis. Complement activation and characterization of circulating immune complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Wands, J R; Mann, E; Alpert, E; Isselbacher, K J

    1975-01-01

    Circulating immune complexes were identified in cryoproteins isolated from serial samples of serum from six patients with acute viral hepatitis with and without arthritic symptoms. Cryoprecipitates were analyzed for the presence of hepatitis-B surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis-B surface antibody (anti-HBs) by hemagglutination inhibition and hemagglutination. Complement components were detected by counter electrophoresis, and immunoglobulins were detected by gel diffusion. HBsAg, IgG, and IgM were identified in cryoprecipitates from all hepatitis patients, but were higher in concentration in patients with arthritis. Only cryoprecipitates from hepatitis patients with arthritis contained IgA and complement components C3, C4, and C5 as well as IgG and IgM, which disappear with resolution of the arthritis. The subtypes of IgG in these cryoprecipitates were predominantly the complement-fixing IgG1 and IgG3, HBsAg and anti-HBs were concentrated several-fold in the cryoprecipitates when compared to the serum concentration. Sequential studies in two patients demonstrated that the initial appearance of anti-HBs in the cryoprotein complex was associated with the detection in the complex of IgM suggesting a primary immune response to HBsAg. The C3 activator fragment (C3A) of the properdin complex was found in fresh serum obtained from three hepatitis patients with arthritis and not in uncomplicated hepatitis. The cryoprecipitable immune complexes from patients with arthritis converted C3PA in fresh normal sera to C3A in vitro whereas cryoprotein isolated from patients with uncomplicated hepatitis had no such effect. Thus, the transient appearance of circulating complement-fixing immune complexes in patients with the arthritis of acute hepatitis is associated with activation of both classical and alternate complement pathways and suggests that they play an important role in the pathogenesis of these serum sickness-like extrahepatic symptoms. Images PMID:1123429

  18. The PDZ-Binding Motif of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Envelope Protein Is a Determinant of Viral Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M.; Nieto-Torres, Jose L.; DeDiego, Marta L.; Regla-Nava, Jose A.; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-01-01

    A recombinant severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) lacking the envelope (E) protein is attenuated in vivo. Here we report that E protein PDZ-binding motif (PBM), a domain involved in protein-protein interactions, is a major determinant of virulence. Elimination of SARS-CoV E protein PBM by using reverse genetics caused a reduction in the deleterious exacerbation of the immune response triggered during infection with the parental virus and virus attenuation. Cellular protein syntenin was identified to bind the E protein PBM during SARS-CoV infection by using three complementary strategies, yeast two-hybrid, reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy assays. Syntenin redistributed from the nucleus to the cell cytoplasm during infection with viruses containing the E protein PBM, activating p38 MAPK and leading to the overexpression of inflammatory cytokines. Silencing of syntenin using siRNAs led to a decrease in p38 MAPK activation in SARS-CoV infected cells, further reinforcing their functional relationship. Active p38 MAPK was reduced in lungs of mice infected with SARS-CoVs lacking E protein PBM as compared with the parental virus, leading to a decreased expression of inflammatory cytokines and to virus attenuation. Interestingly, administration of a p38 MAPK inhibitor led to an increase in mice survival after infection with SARS-CoV, confirming the relevance of this pathway in SARS-CoV virulence. Therefore, the E protein PBM is a virulence domain that activates immunopathology most likely by using syntenin as a mediator of p38 MAPK induced inflammation. PMID:25122212

  19. Involvement of leukotrienes in acute gastric damage.

    PubMed

    Boughton-Smith, N K

    1989-01-01

    The leukotrienes have potent inflammatory actions which could be of importance in gastric mucosal integrity. In animals, LTC4 produces vasoconstriction in the gastric mucosa. Furthermore, acute gastric damage produced by ethanol is accompanied by marked increases in the mucosal formation of LTC4 and LTB4. Depending on the extent of protection, prostaglandins either have no effect or prevent the increases in leukotriene formation which accompany ethanol-induced damage. Various non-specific inhibitors of leukotriene synthesis prevent ethanol and indomethacin-induced damage to the gastric mucosa. However, a novel selective 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor (BW A4C) had no effect on these models of acute gastric damage at doses which completely inhibited gastric mucosal leukotriene synthesis. These studies cast doubt on the role of the leukotrienes in these models of acute gastric damage. However, the potent biological actions of the leukotrienes may be of importance in the pathogenesis of other forms of gastric damage, or as mediators of chronic gastric ulceration or inflammation. PMID:2657289

  20. Pathogenesis of acute avian malaria. II. Anemia mediated by a cold-active autohemagglutinin from the blood of chickens with acute Plasmodium gallinaceum infection.

    PubMed

    Soni, J L; Cox, H W

    1975-03-01

    A cold-active hemagglutinin for trypsinized human type "O" erythrocytes (CAH) from blood of chickens with acute Plasmodium gallinaceum malaria was found to be associated with 19 S and 7 S globulin fractions of malarious chicken blood, but cleavage with 2-mercaptoethanol indicated that it was primarily of the IgM class of antibody. In serologic tests CAH reacted with trypsinized erythrocytes, and anti-chicken globulin. It did not react with other of the antigens or antibodies detected in the blood of malarious chickens. When the absorbed and eluted CAH was injected into normal chickens it produced an anaphylactic-like shock and caused a 25% reduction in red blood cell counts within 48 hours. Plasma samples collected during this interval showed signs of hemolysis. Reactions of blood cells from the recipient birds with fluorescein conjugated anti-chicken globulin indicated that CAH reacted with erythrocytes. The absence of fluorescent activity 3 days after injection suggested that these erythrocytes had been removed from the circulation. When normal chickens were injected with trypsinized autologous blood cells, CAH was detected within 3 days. The agglutination test again was active at temperatures below 22 degrees C and was negative when tested at 37 degrees C. In these birds the appearance of CAH was accompanied by reductions in red blood cell counts and by hemolysis. The results of these experiments suggest that CAH was not stimulated by plasmodial parasite antigen, but rather by autoantigens, which appear to be common to heterologous animal species, and which were in some manner expressed by the presence of the intracellular parasites, or by trypsin treatment. The experiments further suggest that this autohemagglutinin was partially causal of malarial anemia. The presence of other anemia factor(s) was indicated by anemia following injection of plasma that had been absorbed free of CAH. PMID:804265

  1. Why mucosal health?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquaculture species depend more heavily on mucosal barriers than their terrestrial agricultural counterparts as they are continuously interacting with the aquatic microbiota. Unlike classical immune centers, such as the spleen and kidney, the accessibility of mucosal surfaces through immersion/dip t...

  2. Organ distribution of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in SARS patients: implications for pathogenesis and virus transmission pathways.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yanqing; He, Li; Zhang, Qingling; Huang, Zhongxi; Che, Xiaoyan; Hou, Jinlin; Wang, Huijun; Shen, Hong; Qiu, Liwen; Li, Zhuguo; Geng, Jian; Cai, Junjie; Han, Huixia; Li, Xin; Kang, Wei; Weng, Desheng; Liang, Ping; Jiang, Shibo

    2004-06-01

    We previously identified the major pathological changes in the respiratory and immune systems of patients who died of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) but gained little information on the organ distribution of SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV). In the present study, we used a murine monoclonal antibody specific for SARS-CoV nucleoprotein, and probes specific for a SARS-CoV RNA polymerase gene fragment, for immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, respectively, to detect SARS-CoV systematically in tissues from patients who died of SARS. SARS-CoV was found in lung, trachea/bronchus, stomach, small intestine, distal convoluted renal tubule, sweat gland, parathyroid, pituitary, pancreas, adrenal gland, liver and cerebrum, but was not detected in oesophagus, spleen, lymph node, bone marrow, heart, aorta, cerebellum, thyroid, testis, ovary, uterus or muscle. These results suggest that, in addition to the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal tract and other organs with detectable SARS-CoV may also be targets of SARS-CoV infection. The pathological changes in these organs may be caused directly by the cytopathic effect mediated by local replication of the SARS-CoV; or indirectly as a result of systemic responses to respiratory failure or the harmful immune response induced by viral infection. In addition to viral spread through a respiratory route, SARS-CoV in the intestinal tract, kidney and sweat glands may be excreted via faeces, urine and sweat, thereby leading to virus transmission. This study provides important information for understanding the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV infection and sheds light on possible virus transmission pathways. This data will be useful for designing new strategies for prevention and treatment of SARS. PMID:15141376

  3. Endothelial microparticles carrying hedgehog-interacting protein induce continuous endothelial damage in the pathogenesis of acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Nie, Di-Min; Wu, Qiu-Ling; Zheng, Peng; Chen, Ping; Zhang, Ran; Li, Bei-Bei; Fang, Jun; Xia, Ling-Hui; Hong, Mei

    2016-05-15

    Accumulating evidence suggests that endothelial microparticles (EMPs), a marker of endothelial damage, are elevated in acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), and that endothelial damage is implicated in the pathogenesis of aGVHD, but the mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we detected the plasma EMP levels and endothelial damage in patients and mice with aGVHD in vivo and then examined the effects of EMPs derived from injured endothelial cells (ECs) on endothelial damage and the role of hedgehog-interacting protein (HHIP) carried by EMPs in these effects in vitro. Our results showed that EMPs were persistently increased in the early posttransplantation phase in patients and mice with aGVHD. Meanwhile, endothelial damage was continuous in aGVHD mice, but was temporary in non-aGVHD mice after transplantation. In vitro, EMPs induced endothelial damage, including increased EC apoptosis, enhanced reactive oxygen species, decreased nitric oxide production and impaired angiogenic activity. Enhanced expression of HHIP, an antagonist for the Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway, was observed in patients and mice with aGVHD and EMPs from injured ECs. The endothelial damage induced by EMPs was reversed when the HHIP incorporated into EMPs was silenced with an HHIP small interfering RNA or inhibited with the SHH pathway agonist, Smoothened agonist. This work supports a feasible vicious cycle in which EMPs generated during endothelial injury, in turn, aggravate endothelial damage by carrying HHIP into target ECs, contributing to the continuously deteriorating endothelial damage in the development of aGVHD. EMPs harboring HHIP would represent a potential therapeutic target for aGVHD. PMID:27009877

  4. Gasoline-induced mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.L.; Swanson, B.Z. Jr.; Lutins, N.D.

    1980-02-01

    Gasoline-induced mucositis may become more common because of fuel shortages or increased fuel cost. Dentists should, therefore, consider this oral irritant in the differential diagnosis of oral lesions.

  5. Mucosal Health in Aquaculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract The mucosal surfaces (skin, gill, and intestine) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient absorption, osmoregulation, and waste excretion. Aquaculture specie...

  6. Nasal mucosal biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - nasal mucosa; Nose biopsy ... to fast for a few hours before the biopsy. ... Nasal mucosal biopsy is usually done when abnormal tissue is seen during examination of the nose. It may also be done ...

  7. Protective effects of Ankaferd blood stopper on aspirin-induced oxidative mucosal damage in a rat model of gastric injury.

    PubMed

    Hasgul, Rukiye; Uysal, Sema; Haltas, Hacer; Akyol, Sumeyye; Yuksel, Yasemin; Gurel, Ayse; Armutcu, Ferah

    2014-11-01

    The exposure of gastric mucosa to damaging factors, such as ethanol and some therapeutic drugs, produces pathological changes: inflammatory process, hemorrhagic erosions and even acute ulcers. Ankaferd blood stopper (ABS) comprises a standardized mixture of five different plant extracts. The purpose of our present investigations is to explain the participation of reactive oxygen species in acute gastric mucosal damage by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and the effects of new hemostatic agent ABS. Experiments were carried out on 23 male Wistar rats. To assess gastric mucosal damage, biochemical and histopathological data were used. The colorimetric assays were used to determine the malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. The level of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, the level of nitric oxide (NO) and the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique. We demonstrated that the biological effects of ROS were estimated by measuring the tissue and plasma levels of MDA, the products of lipid peroxidation, as well as the activity of SOD and the scavenger of ROS produced by ASA in the experiment group. Moreover, it was found that MPO activity as well as NO and TNF-α levels also demonstrated significant improvement by ABS treatment. The pathogenesis of experimental ASA-induced mucosal damage in rat stomach includes the generation of ROS that seems to play an important role, due to the generation of lipid peroxides, accompanied by the impairment of antioxidative enzyme activity of cells. ABS appeared to attenuate the oxidative and inflammatory changes caused by ASA-induced gastric mucosal damage in rats. PMID:23114375

  8. Mucosal delivery of vaccines.

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, G; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R

    1999-09-01

    Oral delivery represents one of the most pursued approaches for large-scale human vaccination. Due to the different characteristics of mucosal immune response, as compared with systemic response, oral immunization requires particular methods of antigen preparation and selective strategies of adjuvanticity. In this paper, we describe the preparation and use of genetically detoxified bacterial toxins as mucosal adjuvants and envisage the possibility of their future exploitation for human oral vaccines. PMID:10525451

  9. Oral mucositis in myelosuppressive cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Epstein, J B; Schubert, M M

    1999-09-01

    -inflammatory medications. These approaches to management have undergone initial study, but additional investigation is needed to determine their effectiveness with respect to the prevention of mucositis and symptom management and to determine appropriate doses and frequencies of intervention. Current studies and our increasing understanding of the pathogenesis of oral mucositis will lead to new approaches to management and improved quality of life for these patients. PMID:10503852

  10. Oral mucositis complicating chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy: options for prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Köstler, W J; Hejna, M; Wenzel, C; Zielinski, C C

    2001-01-01

    Chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis represents a therapeutic challenge frequently encountered in cancer patients. This side effect causes significant morbidity and may delay the treatment plan, as well as increase therapeutic expenses. The pathogenesis of this debilitating side effect can be attributed to the direct mucosal toxicity of cytotoxic agents and ionizing radiation and to indirect mucosal damage caused by a concomitant inflammatory reaction exacerbated in the presence of neutropenia, and the emergence of bacterial, mycotic, and viral infections. The prophylactic and therapeutic armamentarium for the treatment of oral mucositis consists of locally and systemically applied nonpharmacological measures and pharmacotherapeutics. PMID:11577493

  11. Pathogenesis of Candida vulvovaginitis.

    PubMed

    Sobel, J D

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence of candida vulvovaginitis (CVV) has been estimated based on statistical data from Great Britain to be an increase to 200/100,000 over 10 years to 1984. CVV in the US is the 2nd commonest cause of vaginal infection, with bacterial vaginosis occurring twice as often. 85-90% of the yeasts isolated from the vagina are candida albicans, based on biotyping rather that the newer methods of DNA hybridization. The pathogenesis of CVV is discussed in terms of the microbiology (virulence factors, adherence, germ tube and mycelium formation, proteinase secretion, and switching colonies), asymptomatic vaginal colonization, transformation to symptomatic vaginitis, host predisposing factors (pregnancy, oral contraceptives, diabetes mellitus, antimicrobes, and other), vaginal defense mechanisms (humoral system, phagocytic system, cell mediated immunity, vaginal flora, other), and pathogenesis of recurrent and chronic CVV (internal reservoir, sexual transmission, vaginal relapse, and experimental models) The discussion of the development of virulent symptoms is capsuled in the following comments. Vaginal cell receptivity varies among individuals, but all strains of C. Albicans adhere to both exfoliated vaginal and buccal epithelial cells, or mucosal surfaces, through the yeast surface mannoprotein. It is suggested from in vitro studies that germ tube and mycelium formation facilitates vaginal mucosal invasion. Exogenous and endogenous factors may enhance germination and precipitate symptomatic vaginitis, or inhibit germination. Increased proteinase secretion may be a result of the transformation from the blastoconidium/colonization phase to the germinated invasive vaginitis stage or an independent virulence factor. It is reported that hereditable spontaneous switching may occur spontaneously in vivo also. Colonizing yeasts with a change in environment can transform to a more virulent phase. Colonization rates vary from 10-25%, and the critical issue is understanding

  12. Radiation induced oral mucositis: a review of current literature on prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Supriya; Benson, Rony; Rath, G K

    2016-09-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a major limiting acute side effect of radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. The spectrum of problems associated with mucositis includes oral pain, odynophagia, reduced oral intake, and secondary infections. Incidence of mucositis is increased with addition of concurrent chemotherapy as well as altered fractionation schedules. This leads to treatment interruption and suboptimal disease control. Hence, prevention as well as timely management of OM is necessary for optimum tumor control. We reviewed the English literature with key words "Radiation induced mucositis, Mucositis, Oral Mucositis" to find relevant articles describing incidence, pathophysiology, prophylaxis, and treatment of oral mucositis. Prevention and treatment of OM is an active area of research. Maintenance of oral hygiene is an important part in prevention of OM. A battery of agents including normal saline and alkali (soda bicarbonate) mouth washes, low level laser therapy, and benzydamine (non-steroidal analgesic and anti-inflammatory) have effectiveness in the prevention and treatment of radiation induced oral mucositis. Chlorhexidine mouth gargles are recommended for prevention of chemotherapy induced oral mucositis but is not recommended for radiotherapy associated mucositis. Treatment of co-existing infection is also important and both topical (povidone iodine) and systemic anti fungals should be used judiciously. Radiation induced oral mucositis is a common problem limiting the efficacy of radiation by increasing treatment breaks. Adequate prophylaxis and treatment may limit the severity of radiation mucositis and improve compliance to radiation which may translate in better disease control and survival. PMID:26116012

  13. Induction of apoptosis of lymphocytes in rat mucosal immune system

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xue-Qing; Zhang, Wan-Dai; Song, Yu-Gang; Zhou, Dian-Yuan

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To undergo apoptosis during negative and positive selection processes in rat mucosal immune system which are implicated in the pathogenesis of various mucosal diseases. METHODS: Female Sprague-Dawley rats were given protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, intravenously or intraperitoneally, an apoptosis was recognized by morphological hallmark under light and electronmicroscopy, and the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen was visualized immunohistochemically. RESULTS: The apoptosis of mucosal lymphocytes in the digestive tract, as well as in trachea, uterus and lacrimal gland was induced by cycloheximide ( > 1.0 mg·kg-1 body weight), which were located mainly in lamina propria and germinal centers of lymphoid nodules. At the same time, a portion of crypt epithelial cells of proliferating zone in small and large intestine, and the epithelial cells in genital tract were also found to undergo apoptosis. Immunostainings showed that apoptotic cells expressed proliferating cell nuclear antigen. CONCLUSION: Apoptosis of lymphocytes in mucosal immune system can be induced by cycloheximide. This model will facilitate the understanding of normal mucosal immune system and its role in the pathogenesis of related diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:11819221

  14. Pathogenesis of rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Eifan, A O; Durham, S R

    2016-09-01

    Rhinitis is a heterogeneous condition that has been associated with inflammatory responses as in allergic rhinitis but can also occur in the absence of inflammation such as in so-called idiopathic (previously 'vasomotor') rhinitis. Allergic rhinitis affects approximately one in four of the population of westernized countries and is characterized by typical symptoms of nasal itching, sneezing, watery discharge and congestion. The intention of this review is to illustrate key concepts of the pathogenesis of rhinitis. Imbalance in innate and adaptive immunity together with environmental factors is likely to play major roles. In allergic rhinitis, initial allergen exposure and sensitization involves antigen-presenting cells, T and B lymphocytes and results in the generation of allergen-specific T cells and allergen-specific IgE antibodies. On re-exposure to relevant allergens, cross-linking of IgE on mast cells results in the release of mediators of hypersensitivity such as histamine and immediate nasal symptoms. Within hours, there is an infiltration by inflammatory cells, particularly Th2 T lymphocytes, eosinophils and basophils into nasal mucosal tissue that results in the late-phase allergic response. Evidence for nasal priming and whether or not remodelling may be a feature of allergic rhinitis will be reviewed. The occurrence of so-called local allergic rhinitis in the absence of systemic IgE will be discussed. Non-allergic (non-IgE-mediated) rhinitis will be considered in the context of inflammatory and non-inflammatory disorders. PMID:27434218

  15. Oral mucosal manifestations of autoimmune skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mayson B; Porter, Stephen R; Smoller, Bruce R; Sitaru, Cassian

    2015-10-01

    A group of autoimmune diseases is characterised by autoantibodies against epithelial adhesion structures and/or tissue-tropic lymphocytes driving inflammatory processes resulting in specific pathology at the mucosal surfaces and the skin. The most frequent site of mucosal involvement in autoimmune diseases is the oral cavity. Broadly, these diseases include conditions affecting the cell-cell adhesion causing intra-epithelial blistering and those where autoantibodies or infiltration lymphocytes cause a loss of cell-matrix adhesion or interface inflammation. Clinically, patients present with blistering, erosions and ulcers that may affect the skin as well as further mucosal surfaces of the eyes, nose and genitalia. While the autoimmune disease may be suspected based on clinical manifestations, demonstration of tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies, or lymphocytic infiltrates, by various methods including histological examination, direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative immunoassay is a prerequisite for definitive diagnosis. Given the frequency of oral involvement and the fact that oral mucosa is the initially affected site in many cases, the informed practitioner should be well acquainted with diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of autoimmune dermatosis with oral involvement. This paper reviews the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of these conditions in the oral cavity with a specific emphasis on their differential diagnosis and current management approaches. PMID:26117595

  16. Mucosal immunoregulation: transcription factors as possible therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Doganci, Aysefa; Neurath, Markus F; Finotto, Susetta

    2005-10-01

    Much progress has been recently made with regard to our understanding of the mucosal immune system in health and disease. In particular, it has been shown that uncontrolled mucosal immune responses driven by lymphocytes or non-lymphoid cells may lead to immunological diseases such as allergy, hypersensitivity and inflammation. Thus, a more detailed understanding of mucosal immune regulation and decision making at mucosal surfaces is essential for a better understanding of mucosal immune responses in health and disease. Antigen presenting cells and T lymphocytes play a key role in controlling mucosal immune responses. To deal with this key task, T helper cells differentiate into functionally distinct subsets: TH1 (CD4+ T Helper cells), TH2, TH3, Tr1, and CD4+CD25+ T (Treg) cells. This review summarizes the role of antigen presenting cells, eosinophils, mast cells and T-cell subsets in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation and intestinal inflammation. Furthermore, we discuss novel immunological treatment modalities for allergic inflammation (e.g. allergic asthma) and chronic intestinal inflammation (e.g. inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD)) such as the control of the expression of transcription factors to redirect pathological immune responses. PMID:16248825

  17. Mucosal Immunology of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huanbin; Wang, Xiaolei; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Recent advances in the immunology, pathogenesis, and prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection continue to reveal clues to the mechanisms involved in the progressive immunodeficiency attributed to infection but more importantly have shed light on the correlates of immunity to infection and disease progression. HIV selectively infects, eliminates, and/or dysregulates several key cells of the human immune system, thwarting multiple arms of the host immune response, and inflicting severe damage to mucosal barriers, resulting in tissue infiltration of ‘symbiotic’ intestinal bacteria and viruses that essentially become opportunistic infections promoting systemic immune activation. This leads to activation and recruitment or more target cells for perpetuating HIV infection, resulting in persistent, high level viral replication in lymphoid tissues, rapid evolution of resistant strains, and continued evasion of immune responses. However, vaccine studies and studies of spontaneous controllers are finally providing correlates of immunity from protection and disease progression, including virus-specific CD4+ T-cell responses, binding antibodies, innate immune responses, and generation of antibodies with potent antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity activity. Emerging correlates of immunity indicate that prevention of HIV infection may be possible through effective vaccine strategies that protect and stimulate key regulatory cells and immune responses in susceptible hosts. Further, immune therapies specifically directed towards boosting specific aspects of the immune system may eventually lead to a cure for HIV-infected patients. PMID:23772612

  18. Anthrax Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Leppla, Stephen H; Vrentas, Catherine; Pomerantsev, Andrei P; Liu, Shihui

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax is caused by the spore-forming, gram-positive bacterium Bacillus anthracis. The bacterium's major virulence factors are (a) the anthrax toxins and (b) an antiphagocytic polyglutamic capsule. These are encoded by two large plasmids, the former by pXO1 and the latter by pXO2. The expression of both is controlled by the bicarbonate-responsive transcriptional regulator, AtxA. The anthrax toxins are three polypeptides-protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor (EF)-that come together in binary combinations to form lethal toxin and edema toxin. PA binds to cellular receptors to translocate LF (a protease) and EF (an adenylate cyclase) into cells. The toxins alter cell signaling pathways in the host to interfere with innate immune responses in early stages of infection and to induce vascular collapse at late stages. This review focuses on the role of anthrax toxins in pathogenesis. Other virulence determinants, as well as vaccines and therapeutics, are briefly discussed. PMID:26195305

  19. Temporal pathogenesis of experimental neonatal woodchuck hepatitis virus infection: increased initial viral load and decreased severity of acute hepatitis during the development of chronic viral infection.

    PubMed

    Cote, P J; Toshkov, I; Bellezza, C; Ascenzi, M; Roneker, C; Ann Graham, L; Baldwin, B H; Gaye, K; Nakamura, I; Korba, B E; Tennant, B C; Gerin, J L

    2000-10-01

    Acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections either resolve or progress to chronicity. Identification of early deviations in host-virus responses associated with these outcomes can further differentiate cause-effect mechanisms that initiate and maintain chronicity. Neonatal woodchucks were infected experimentally with the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) at 3 days of age. At 8 or 14 weeks of age (i.e. , the early- or mid-acute stage of infection), whole blood and large surgical biopsies of the liver were obtained from infected animals and uninfected controls. These were stored for later correlating histopathologic responses and viral load with the subsequently determined outcome of infection. As of 1 year postinfection, half of the surgically treated infected woodchucks had developed self-limited infections, while the other half developed chronic infections. The self-limited outcome was characterized by decreased viral load in acute-phase liver and plasma and a generally robust acute hepatic inflammatory response. Comparisons at the same early time points revealed that the chronic outcome was characterized by increasing initial viral load in liver and plasma, and a detectable, but diminished, acute hepatic inflammation. These cotemporal comparisons indicate that there is an early host-response deviation during the acute phase of a developing chronic infection. Continued analysis of the tissues banked from this study will facilitate further temporal characterization of acute-phase mechanisms that determine resolution versus chronicity in WHV infection. Understanding such mechanisms may be useful in the rational design of therapy for established chronic HBV infection. PMID:11003627

  20. Gut Check: IFNγ Delays Mucosal Recovery during Antibiotic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chung, Lawton K; Bliska, James B

    2016-08-10

    Antibiotic therapy has been largely ineffective in improving clinical outcomes following Salmonellosis, yet the reasons why remain obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Dolowschiak et al. (2016) report that IFNγ produced by NK and T cells following antibiotic treatment of acute Salmonella infection limits mucosal remission. PMID:27512899

  1. Prevention and treatment of oropharyngeal mucositis following cancer therapy: are there new approaches?

    PubMed

    Kwong, Karis K F

    2004-01-01

    Oropharyngeal mucositis is an acute and distressing toxic effect of chemotherapy and head and neck irradiation. This oral sequela significantly impairs the daily functioning and quality of life of patients. The biological basis of mucositis is quite complex, involving sequential interaction of chemotherapeutic drugs or irradiation on mitosis of proliferating epithelium, a number of cytokines, and elements of oral microbial environment. Various interventions based on biological attenuation have been tested for mucositis. Such interventions have been reviewed elsewhere; however, most reviews focus on biomedical outcomes. Little attention has been paid to mucositis outcomes with oral morbidity or psychosocial aspects. The purpose of this article is to review the current research studies on the prevention and treatment of oropharyngeal mucositis following chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and bone marrow transplantation with an emphasis on biomedical, oral symptomatic, and functional impairment outcomes. In addition, further avenues of mucositis management, including psychotherapeutic intervention and integrated and stage-based treatment approaches are discussed. PMID:15238805

  2. Topical cocaine for relief of mucosal pain.

    PubMed

    Newport, Kristina; Coyne, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    Painful mucosal lesions negatively affect quality of life. When located in the oral cavity, they can cause pain that interferes with speech and swallowing. Acute pain from intra-oral lesions is difficult to treat with conventional methods such as systemic opioids or viscous lidocaine. These cases exemplify a safe, fast and effective method for treating painful mouth lesions that are not responsive to standard treatments. Mr. D and Mr. G had from painful oral lesions caused by squamous cell carcinoma. Severe pain interfered with their ability to speak and swallow, resulting in poor nutrition and dehydration. 4% liquid cocaine, self-applied topically to the open mouth sores, resulted in relief within minutes in both cases. Repeated dosing every six hours allowed both patients to restart oral nutrition without any reported side effects. Topical cocaine has not been described for repeated dosing for oral or other mucosal pain. Potential side effects of mucosal administration include gingival recession and erythematous lesions. If the recommended topical doses are exceeded, liquid cocaine may be absorbed systemically causing a stimulant response or addiction. When used appropriately, however, this intervention can result in a dramatic improvement in quality of life and functional status. PMID:20504138

  3. Collaborative studies in mucosal immunology in Goroka.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A collaborative program between the Papua New Guinea (PNG) Institute of Medical Research and the Hunter Mucosal Group has completed studies relevant to protection of the airways against bacterial infection. Specifically, these studies addressed the mucosal capacity to produce local immunoglobulins and the capacity of the airways to respond to an oral vaccine containing inactivated nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). The mucosal IgA response to NTHi antigens was blunted in both children and adults in PNG compared with that found in Australian children and adults, whose airways are colonized only intermittently. Despite this, when oral NTHi is given to Papua New Guinean adults with chronic airways disease, it is followed by a significant (50%) reduction in incidence of acute bronchitic episodes, and a 3-log reduction in density of colonization, which persisted about 10 months. The implications of these key findings are discussed with respect to both mechanism and wider control of pathology emanating from abnormal airways colonization in a PNG environment. PMID:23163182

  4. C-Reactive Protein Levels and Radiation-Induced Mucositis in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Wontaek Nam, Jiho; Kim, Donghyun; Park, Dahl; Kim, Dongwon

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between C-reactive protein (CRP) levels or the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and the grade of acute radiation-induced mucositis in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: This study was performed in 40 patients who received intensity-modulated radiation therapy as a radical treatment of primary laryngo-pharyngeal cancer. Serum CRP level and ESR were initially checked on the day of radiotherapy simulation and were measured every week during the irradiation schedule and two times biweekly after radiotherapy. Mucosal reactions were evaluated by radiation oncologists on days of blood sampling. Results: The distribution of the most severe mucositis was Grade I mucositis in 10% of the patients, Grade II in 60% of the patients and Grade III in 30% of the patients. Statistical analysis indicated a significant rise in the CRP level (p < 0.001) according to radiation fraction number and grade of mucositis. A change of the mean CRP level was correlated with progression of mean grade of mucositis according to fraction number. The ESR did not show any statistically significant relationship with radiotherapy fraction number and grade of acute mucositis. Conclusions: There was a significant correlation between the presence of acute mucositis and CRP level in this study. The CRP level could be conveniently determined along with evaluation of mucosal reactions during or after radiotherapy to provide further information on radiation-induced mucositis.

  5. Poxvirus pathogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Buller, R M; Palumbo, G J

    1991-01-01

    Poxviruses are a highly successful family of pathogens, with variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, being the most notable member. Poxviruses are unique among animal viruses in several respects. First, owing to the cytoplasmic site of virus replication, the virus encodes many enzymes required either for macromolecular precursor pool regulation or for biosynthetic processes. Second, these viruses have a very complex morphogenesis, which involves the de novo synthesis of virus-specific membranes and inclusion bodies. Third, and perhaps most surprising of all, the genomes of these viruses encode many proteins which interact with host processes at both the cellular and systemic levels. For example, a viral homolog of epidermal growth factor is active in vaccinia virus infections of cultured cells, rabbits, and mice. At least five virus proteins with homology to the serine protease inhibitor family have been identified and one, a 38-kDa protein encoded by cowpox virus, is thought to block a host pathway for generating a chemotactic substance. Finally, a protein which has homology with complement components interferes with the activation of the classical complement pathway. Poxviruses infect their hosts by all possible routes: through the skin by mechanical means (e.g., molluscum contagiosum infections of humans), via the respiratory tract (e.g., variola virus infections of humans), or by the oral route (e.g., ectromelia virus infection of the mouse). Poxvirus infections, in general, are acute, with no strong evidence for latent, persistent, or chronic infections. They can be localized or systemic. Ectromelia virus infection of the laboratory mouse can be systemic but inapparent with no mortality and little morbidity, or highly lethal with death in 10 days. On the other hand, molluscum contagiosum virus replicates only in the stratum spinosum of the human epidermis, with little or no involvement of the dermis, and does not spread systemically from the site of

  6. Hydrophobicity of mucosal surface and its relationship to gut barrier function.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaofa; Caputo, Francis J; Xu, Da-Zhong; Deitch, Edwin A

    2008-03-01

    Loss of the gut barrier has been implicated in the pathogenesis of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and, thus, understanding the intestinal barrier is of potential clinical importance. An important, but relatively neglected, component of the gut barrier is the unstirred mucus layer, which through its hydrophobic and other properties serves as an important barrier to bacterial and other factors within the gut lumen. Thus, the goal of this study was to establish a reproducible method of measuring mucosal hydrophobicity and test the hypothesis that conditions that decrease mucosal hydrophobicity are associated with increased gut permeability. Hydrophobicity was measured in various segments of normal gut by measuring the contact angle of an aqueous droplet placed on the mucosal surface using a commercial goniometer. Second, the effect of the mucolytic agent N-acetyl cysteine on mucosal hydrophobicity and gut permeability was measured, as was the effects of increasing periods of in vivo gut ischemia on these parameters. Gut ischemia was induced by superior mesenteric artery occlusion, and gut permeability was measured by the mucosal-to-serosal passage of fluoresceine isothiocyanate-dextran (4.3 kDa) (FD4) across the everted sacs of ileum. Intestinal mucosal hydrophobicity showed a gradual increase from the duodenum to the end of the ileum and remained at high level in the cecum, colon, and rectum. Both N-acetyl cysteine treatment and ischemia caused a dose-dependent decrease in mucosal hydrophobicity, which significantly correlated increased gut permeability. Mucosal hydrophobicity of the intestine can be reproducibly measured, and decreases in mucosal hydrophobicity closely correlate with increased gut permeability. These results suggest that mucosal hydrophobicity can be a reliable method of measuring the barrier function of the unstirred mucus layer and a useful parameter in evaluating the pathogenesis of gut barrier dysfunction. PMID:17693944

  7. Head and neck mucosal melanoma: a review.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Silvia V; Fernandes, Juliana D; Hsieh, Ricardo; Coutinho-Camillo, Claudia M; Bologna, Sheyla; Sangueza, Martin; Nico, Marcello M S

    2014-07-01

    Head and neck mucosal melanoma (MM) is an aggressive and rare neoplasm of melanocytic origin. To date, few retrospective series and case reports have been reported on MM. This article reviews the current evidence on head and neck MM and the molecular pathways that mediate the pathogenesis of this disease. Head and neck MM accounts for 0.7%-3.8% of all melanomas and involve (in decreasing order of frequency) the sinonasal cavity, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, and upper esophagus. Although many studies have examined MM of the head and neck and the underlying molecular pathways, individual genetic and molecular alterations were less investigated. Further studies are needed to complement existing data and to increase our understanding of melanocytes tumorigenesis. PMID:24423929

  8. Renal Distribution Volumes of Indocyanine Green, [51Cr]EDTA, and 24Na in Man during Acute Renal Failure after Shock. IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PATHOGENESIS OF ANURIA

    PubMed Central

    Reubi, F. C.; Vorburger, C.; Tuckman, J.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for the anuria in acute renal failure after shock is still controversial. Suppressed glomerular filtration and/or tubular back-diffusion of the filtrate are major possible causes. In the present investigation, seven patients with acute anuria, three of these seven again in the polyuric phase, six patients with moderate renal impairment, four patients with chronic renal failure, and eight subjects with normal renal function were studied by a multiple indicator-dilution method in which the total renal blood flow and renal distribution volumes of indocyanine green, [51Cr]EDTA, and 24Na were determined. In normal subjects the average values for one kidney were 582 ml/min, 42 ml, 92 ml, and 139 ml, respectively. The measurements in the patients with moderate renal impairment were similar to those in the normal subjects, but were decreased in chronic renal failure. In acute anuria, the average values were 269 ml/min, 40 ml, 101 ml, and 114 ml and the kidney volume, estimated radiographically, was increased by 40%. When expressed as milliliters per milliliters kidney, the average distribution volume of 24Na was decreased from 0.64 to 0.38. This decrease is consistent with the hypothesis that suppressed filtration is largely responsible for the anuria and that back-diffusion is, at most, a contributory factor. The apparent contradiction between the relatively well-preserved total blood flow and the suppressed filtration may be due to a combination of afferent vasoconstriction and efferent vasodilatation. This view is supported by the observation that low filtration fractions were found in clearance measurements performed during the polyuric phase. PMID:4630601

  9. Experience with registered mucosal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Guido; Griot-Wenk, Monika; Metcalfe, Ian C; Lang, Alois B; Viret, Jean-François

    2003-01-30

    Most pathogens gain access to their host through mucosal surfaces. It is therefore desirable to develop vaccination strategies that lead to mucosal immune responses. Ideally, a vaccine should be administered mucosally in order to elicit mucosal protection. Several attenuated live viral and bacterial pathogens are registered as oral vaccines for human use, including the oral polio vaccine (Sabin) as well as attenuated strains of Salmonella typhi and Vibrio cholerae. These attenuated bacterial live vaccines-S. typhi Ty21a as well as V. cholerae CVD 103-HgR-are employed as vaccines against typhoid and cholera, respectively. In this manuscript, we review the immune responses that are induced by these vaccines, with a focus on mucosal immunity. PMID:12531339

  10. Mucosal biofilms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Shantanu; Mitchell, Aaron P

    2011-08-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that form on surfaces and are embedded in an extracellular matrix. C. albicans forms pathogenic mucosal biofilms that are evoked by changes in host immunity or mucosal ecology. Mucosal surfaces are inhabited by many microbial species; hence these biofilms are polymicrobial. Several recent studies have applied paradigms of biofilm analysis to study mucosal C. albicans infections. These studies reveal that the Bcr1 transcription factor is a master regulator of C. albicans biofilm formation under diverse conditions, though the most relevant Bcr1 target genes can vary with the biofilm niche. An important determinant of mucosal biofilm formation is the interaction with host defenses. Finally, studies of interactions between bacterial species and C. albicans provide insight into the communication mechanisms that endow polymicrobial biofilms with unique properties. PMID:21741878

  11. The Role of Intestinal Microbiota in the Development and Severity of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    van Vliet, Michel J.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Tissing, Wim J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Mucositis, also referred to as mucosal barrier injury, is one of the most debilitating side effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment. Clinically, mucositis is associated with pain, bacteremia, and malnutrition. Furthermore, mucositis is a frequent reason to postpone chemotherapy treatment, ultimately leading towards a higher mortality in cancer patients. According to the model introduced by Sonis, both inflammation and apoptosis of the mucosal barrier result in its discontinuity, thereby promoting bacterial translocation. According to this five-phase model, the intestinal microbiota plays no role in the pathophysiology of mucositis. However, research has implicated a prominent role for the commensal intestinal microbiota in the development of several inflammatory diseases like inflammatory bowel disease, pouchitis, and radiotherapy-induced diarrhea. Furthermore, chemotherapeutics have a detrimental effect on the intestinal microbial composition (strongly decreasing the numbers of anaerobic bacteria), coinciding in time with the development of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. We hypothesize that the commensal intestinal microbiota might play a pivotal role in chemotherapy-induced mucositis. In this review, we propose and discuss five pathways in the development of mucositis that are potentially influenced by the commensal intestinal microbiota: 1) the inflammatory process and oxidative stress, 2) intestinal permeability, 3) the composition of the mucus layer, 4) the resistance to harmful stimuli and epithelial repair mechanisms, and 5) the activation and release of immune effector molecules. Via these pathways, the commensal intestinal microbiota might influence all phases in the Sonis model of the pathogenesis of mucositis. Further research is needed to show the clinical relevance of restoring dysbiosis, thereby possibly decreasing the degree of intestinal mucositis. PMID:20523891

  12. Reverse Genetics for Fusogenic Bat-Borne Orthoreovirus Associated with Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Humans: Role of Outer Capsid Protein σC in Viral Replication and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kawagishi, Takahiro; Kanai, Yuta; Tani, Hideki; Shimojima, Masayuki; Saijo, Masayuki; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Nelson Bay orthoreoviruses (NBVs) are members of the fusogenic orthoreoviruses and possess 10-segmented double-stranded RNA genomes. NBV was first isolated from a fruit bat in Australia more than 40 years ago, but it was not associated with any disease. However, several NBV strains have been recently identified as causative agents for respiratory tract infections in humans. Isolation of these pathogenic bat reoviruses from patients suggests that NBVs have evolved to propagate in humans in the form of zoonosis. To date, no strategy has been developed to rescue infectious viruses from cloned cDNA for any member of the fusogenic orthoreoviruses. In this study, we report the development of a plasmid-based reverse genetics system free of helper viruses and independent of any selection for NBV isolated from humans with acute respiratory infection. cDNAs corresponding to each of the 10 full-length RNA gene segments of NBV were cotransfected into culture cells expressing T7 RNA polymerase, and viable NBV was isolated using a plaque assay. The growth kinetics and cell-to-cell fusion activity of recombinant strains, rescued using the reverse genetics system, were indistinguishable from those of native strains. We used the reverse genetics system to generate viruses deficient in the cell attachment protein σC to define the biological function of this protein in the viral life cycle. Our results with σC-deficient viruses demonstrated that σC is dispensable for cell attachment in several cell lines, including murine fibroblast L929 cells but not in human lung epithelial A549 cells, and plays a critical role in viral pathogenesis. We also used the system to rescue a virus that expresses a yellow fluorescent protein. The reverse genetics system developed in this study can be applied to study the propagation and pathogenesis of pathogenic NBVs and in the generation of recombinant NBVs for future vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:26901882

  13. Pathogenesis of nasal polyps: an update.

    PubMed

    Pawliczak, Rafal; Lewandowska-Polak, Anna; Kowalski, Marek L

    2005-11-01

    The cause of nasal polyp formation is still unknown. Genetic predisposition has been suggested, but there are scanty data to support such theories. Activated epithelial cells may be the major source of mediators inducing influx of inflammatory cells (mostly eosinophils) and proliferation and activation of fibroblasts leading to nasal polyp formation. Infectious agents (including viruses, bacteria, or fungi) may be potential primary factors activating nasal epithelial cells. Proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors play important roles in the persistence of mucosal inflammation associated with nasal polyps. Arachidonic acid metabolites seem to be particularly important in the pathogenesis of nasal polyps in patients with aspirin hypersensitivity rhinosinusitis/asthma syndrome. PMID:16216171

  14. Pathogenesis of arenavirus hemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Kunz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) caused by arenaviruses belong to the most devastating emerging human diseases and represent serious public health problems. Arenavirus VHFs in humans are acute diseases characterized by fever and, in severe cases, different degrees of hemorrhages associated with a shock syndrome in the terminal stage. Over the past years, much has been learned about the pathogenesis of arenaviruses at the cellular level, in particular their ability to subvert the host cell's innate antiviral defenses. Clinical studies and novel animal models have provided important new information about the interaction of hemorrhagic arenaviruses with the host's adaptive immune system, in particular virus-induced immunosuppression, and have provided the first hints towards an understanding of the terminal hemorrhagic shock syndrome. The scope of this article is to review our current knowledge on arenavirus VHF pathogenesis with an emphasis on recent developments. PMID:21171877

  15. Alteration of the Redox State with Reactive Oxygen Species for 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Oral Mucositis in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Takahashi, Shun-suke; Lee, Masaichi Chang-il

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucositis is often induced in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy treatment. It has been reported that oral mucositis can reduce quality of life, as well as increasing the incidence of mortality. The participation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis is well known, but no report has actually demonstrated the presence of ROS. Thus, the purpose of this study was thus to demonstrate the involvement of ROS and the alteration of the redox state in oral mucositis using an in vivo L-band electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. An oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with 10% acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch was used. Lipid peroxidation was measured as the level of malondialdehyde determined by the thiobarbituric acid reaction. The rate constants of the signal decay of nitroxyl compounds using in vivo L-band ESR were calculated from the signal decay curves. Firstly, we established the oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch. An increased level of lipid peroxidation in oral mucositis was found by measuring malondialdehyde using isolated hamster cheek pouch ulcer. In addition, as a result of in vivo L-band ESR measurements using our model animals, the decay rate constants of carbamoyl-PROXYL, which is a reagent for detecting the redox balance in tissue, were decreased. These results suggest that a redox imbalance might occur by excessive generation of ROS at an early stage of oral mucositis and the consumption of large quantities of antioxidants including glutathione in the locality of oral mucositis. These findings support the presence of ROS involved in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis with anti-cancer therapy, and is useful for the development of novel therapies drugs for oral mucositis. PMID:24376587

  16. Novel insights into phosgene-induced acute lung injury in rats: role of dysregulated cardiopulmonary reflexes and nitric oxide in lung edema pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenli; Liu, Fangfang; Wang, Chen; Truebel, Hubert; Pauluhn, Juergen

    2013-02-01

    Phosgene gas is a lower respiratory tract irritant. As such, it stimulates nociceptive vagal C-fiber-related reflexes in a dose-rate and concentration × exposure duration (C × t)-dependent manner. In rats, this reflex is characterized by extended apnea time periods, bradycardia, and hypothermia. Although inhalation exposures at nonlethal C × t products show rapid reversibility of reflexively induced changes in respiratory patterns, lethal C × t products seem to cause prolonged stimulation after discontinued exposure to phosgene. This observation has been taken as indirect evidence that phosgene-induced lethal lung edema is likely to be associated with a dysfunctional neurogenic control of cardiopulmonary and microvascular physiology. In order to verify this hypothesis, data from respiratory function measurements during and after the inhalation exposure to phosgene gas were compared with time-course measurements of cardiac function over 20 h post-phosgene exposure. These data were complemented by time-course analyses of nitric oxide (NO(e)) and carbon dioxide in exhaled breath, including time-dependent changes of extravasated protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and hemoglobin in blood. The nitric oxidase synthetase inhibitors L-NAME and L-NIL were used to further elucidate the role of NO(e) in this type of acute lung injury and whether its analysis can serve as an early biomarker of pulmonary injury. Collectively, the sequence and time course of pathological events in phosgene-induced lung edema appear to suggest that overstimulated, continued sensorimotor vagal reflexes affect cardiopulmonary hemodynamics. A continued parasympathetic tone appears to be involved in this etiopathology. PMID:23143928

  17. Molecular Pathogenesis of Post-Transplant Acute Kidney Injury: Assessment of Whole-Genome mRNA and MiRNA Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Wilflingseder, Julia; Sunzenauer, Judith; Toronyi, Eva; Heinzel, Andreas; Kainz, Alexander; Mayer, Bernd; Perco, Paul; Telkes, Gábor; Langer, Robert M.; Oberbauer, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects roughly 25% of all recipients of deceased donor organs. The prevention of post-transplant AKI is still an unmet clinical need. We prospectively collected zero-hour, indication as well as protocol kidney biopsies from 166 allografts between 2011 and 2013. In this cohort eight cases with AKI and ten matched allografts without pathology serving as control group were identified with a follow-up biopsy within the first twelve days after engraftment. For this set the zero-hour and follow-up biopsies were subjected to genome wide microRNA and mRNA profiling and analysis, followed by validation in independent expression profiles of 42 AKI and 21 protocol biopsies for strictly controlling the false discovery rate. Follow-up biopsies of AKI allografts compared to time-matched protocol biopsies, further baseline adjustment for zero-hour biopsy expression level and validation in independent datasets, revealed a molecular AKI signature holding 20 mRNAs and two miRNAs (miR-182-5p and miR-21-3p). Next to several established biomarkers such as lipocalin-2 also novel candidates of interest were identified in the signature. In further experimental evaluation the elevated transcript expression level of the secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor (SLPI) in AKI allografts was confirmed in plasma and urine on the protein level (p<0.001 and p = 0.003, respectively). miR-182-5p was identified as a molecular regulator of post-transplant AKI, strongly correlated with global gene expression changes during AKI. In summary, we identified an AKI-specific molecular signature providing the ground for novel biomarkers and target candidates such as SLPI and miR-182-5p in addressing AKI. PMID:25093671

  18. Pathogenesis of Alcoholic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Winston; Shah, Vijay H

    2016-08-01

    Alcoholic liver disease includes a broad clinical-histological spectrum from simple steatosis, cirrhosis, acute alcoholic hepatitis with or without cirrhosis to hepatocellular carcinoma as a complication of cirrhosis. The pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can be conceptually divided into (1) ethanol-mediated liver injury, (2) inflammatory immune response to injury, (3) intestinal permeability and microbiome changes. Corticosteroids may improve outcomes, but this is controversial and probably only impacts short-term survival. New pathophysiology-based therapies are under study, including antibiotics, caspase inhibition, interleukin-22, anakinra, FXR agonist and others. These studies provide hope for better future outcomes for this difficult disease. PMID:27373608

  19. Pathogenesis of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus infection: effects of suppression of antibody response on viral mRNA levels and on development of acute disease.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandersen, S; Storgaard, T; Kamstrup, N; Aasted, B; Porter, D D

    1994-01-01

    We suppressed the B-cell development and antibody response in mink by using treatment with polyclonal anti-immunoglobulin M (anti-IgM) to study the effects of antiviral antibodies on development of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV)-induced disease in more detail. Newborn mink kits were injected intraperitoneally with 1 mg of either anti-IgM or a control preparation three times a week for 30 to 34 days. At 21 days after birth, groups of mink kits were infected with the highly virulent United isolate of ADV. At selected time points, i.e., postinfection days 9, 13, 29, and 200, randomly chosen mink kits were sacrificed, and blood and tissues were collected for analyses. The efficacy of immunosuppressive treatment was monitored by electrophoretic techniques and flow cytometry. Effects of treatment on viral replication, on viral mRNA levels, and on development of acute or chronic disease were determined by histopathological, immunoelectrophoretic, and molecular hybridization techniques. Several interesting findings emerged from these studies. First, antiviral antibodies decreased ADV mRNA levels more than DNA replication. Second, suppression of B-cell development and antibody response in mink kits infected at 21 days of age resulted in production of viral inclusion bodies in alveolar type II cells. Some of these kits showed mild clinical signs of respiratory disease, and one kit died of respiratory distress; however, clinical signs were seen only after release of immunosuppression, suggesting that the production of antiviral antibodies, in combination with the massive amounts of free viral antigen present, somehow is involved in the induction of respiratory distress. It is suggested that the antiviral antibody response observed in mink older than approximately 14 days primarily, by a yet unknown mechanism, decreases ADV mRNA levels which, if severe enough, results in restricted levels of DNA replication and virion production. Furthermore, such a restricted ADV

  20. Microbiome and mucosal inflammation as extra-articular triggers for rheumatoid arthritis and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Brusca, Samuel B; Abramson, Steven B; Scher, Jose U

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Despite progress towards understanding the molecular pathogenesis of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), its etiology remains elusive. Genes are important but rather insufficient to explain the majority of RA cases. This review describes novel data supporting the microbiome and its interactions with the human host as potential en(‘in’)vironmental factors in RA pathogenesis. Recent Findings Animal models of inflammatory arthritis have shown that the presence of bacteria in mucosal surfaces is sufficient to alter local and systemic host immune responses and elicit joint inflammation. Human RA studies have focused on three mucosal sites: the gut, the gingival, and the respiratory tree. The oral microbiome, and specifically Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), has long been implicated. Novel sequencing technologies have allowed investigations into the role of the gut microbiome in the development of autoimmune arthritis. Most recently, the pulmonary parenchyma has also been described as yet another possible mucosal site of initiation of autoimmunity in RA. Summary Emerging data implicates the microbiome in RA pathogenesis. Mucosal sites exposed to a high load of bacterial antigens - such as the periodontium, lung, and gut - may represent the initial site of autoimmune generation. If validated, these findings could lead to the discovery of potential biomarkers and therapeutic approaches in the pre-clinical and clinical phases of RA. PMID:24247114

  1. Mucosal leishmaniasis: an underestimated presentation of a neglected disease.

    PubMed

    Strazzulla, Alessio; Cocuzza, Salvatore; Pinzone, Marilia Rita; Postorino, Maria Concetta; Cosentino, Stefano; Serra, Agostino; Cacopardo, Bruno; Nunnari, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    We present a review of current knowledge about mucosal leishmaniasis (ML). Although involvement of mucous membranes is classically admitted in New World leishmaniasis, particularly occurring in infection by Leishmania (L.) braziliensis species complex, ML is also a possible presentation of Old World leishmaniasis, in either L. donovani or L. major species complex infections. Thus, ML has to be considered not only as a Latin American disease but as an Old and New World disease. We describe ML epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinics, diagnosis, and therapy. Considering both its highly disfiguring lesions and its possible lethal outcome, ML should not be underestimated by physicians. Moreover, leishmaniasis is expected to increase its burden in many countries as sandfly vector distribution is widespreading towards non-endemic areas. Finally, the lack of clear understanding of ML pathogenesis and the absence of effective human vaccines strongly claim for more research. PMID:23853773

  2. Intestinal mucosal tolerance and impact of gut microbiota to mucosal tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.; Kozarov, Emil; Sobenin, Igor A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.

    2015-01-01

    The mucosal barriers are very sensitive to pathogenic infection, thereby assuming the capacity of the mucosal immune system to induce protective immunity to harmful antigens and tolerance against harmless substances. This review provides current information about mechanisms of induction of mucosal tolerance and about impact of gut microbiota to mucosal tolerance. PMID:25628617

  3. Mechanism-based management for mucositis: option for treating side effects without compromising the efficacy of cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Youngjoo

    2016-01-01

    Mucositis is a major side effect induced by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Although mucositis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer patients, management is largely limited to controlling symptoms, and few therapeutic agents are available for treatment. Since mucositis could be inhibited by the modulation of radiotherapy- or chemotherapy-induced pathways independently of cancer treatment, there is an opportunity for the development of more targeted therapies and interventions. This article examined potential therapeutic agents that have been investigated for the prevention and/or inhibition of mucositis induced by conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. They can be classified according to their mechanisms of action: scavenging reactive oxygen species, inhibition of specific cytokine production or inflammation, and inhibition of apoptosis. These early events may be good target pathways for preventing the pathogenesis of mucositis. Considering that both cancer therapy and therapeutic agents for mucositis act on both normal and cancer cells, agents that inhibit mucositis should act through mechanisms that selectively protect normal cells without compromising cancer treatment. Therefore, mechanism-based guidance for the treatment of mucositis is critical to prevent risky treatments for cancer patients and to relieve detrimental side effects effectively from cancer therapy. PMID:27103826

  4. Mechanism-based management for mucositis: option for treating side effects without compromising the efficacy of cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Youngjoo

    2016-01-01

    Mucositis is a major side effect induced by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Although mucositis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer patients, management is largely limited to controlling symptoms, and few therapeutic agents are available for treatment. Since mucositis could be inhibited by the modulation of radiotherapy- or chemotherapy-induced pathways independently of cancer treatment, there is an opportunity for the development of more targeted therapies and interventions. This article examined potential therapeutic agents that have been investigated for the prevention and/or inhibition of mucositis induced by conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. They can be classified according to their mechanisms of action: scavenging reactive oxygen species, inhibition of specific cytokine production or inflammation, and inhibition of apoptosis. These early events may be good target pathways for preventing the pathogenesis of mucositis. Considering that both cancer therapy and therapeutic agents for mucositis act on both normal and cancer cells, agents that inhibit mucositis should act through mechanisms that selectively protect normal cells without compromising cancer treatment. Therefore, mechanism-based guidance for the treatment of mucositis is critical to prevent risky treatments for cancer patients and to relieve detrimental side effects effectively from cancer therapy. PMID:27103826

  5. Immunology of Gut Mucosal Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Pasetti, Marcela F.; Simon, Jakub K.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Levine, Myron M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Understanding the mechanisms underlying the induction of immunity in the gastrointestinal mucosa following oral immunization and the cross-talk between mucosal and systemic immunity should expedite the development of vaccines to diminish the global burden caused by enteric pathogens. Identifying an immunological correlate of protection in the course of field trials of efficacy, animal models (when available), or human challenge studies is also invaluable. In industrialized country populations, live attenuated vaccines (e.g. polio, typhoid, and rotavirus) mimic natural infection and generate robust protective immune responses. In contrast, a major challenge is to understand and overcome the barriers responsible for the diminished immunogenicity and efficacy of the same enteric vaccines in underprivileged populations in developing countries. Success in developing vaccines against some enteric pathogens has heretofore been elusive (e.g. Shigella). Different types of oral vaccines can selectively or inclusively elicit mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A and serum immunoglobulin G antibodies and a variety of cell-mediated immune responses. Areas of research that require acceleration include interaction between the gut innate immune system and the stimulation of adaptive immunity, development of safe yet effective mucosal adjuvants, better understanding of homing to the mucosa of immunologically relevant cells, and elicitation of mucosal immunologic memory. This review dissects the immune responses elicited in humans by enteric vaccines. PMID:21198669

  6. Preventive and therapeutic effects of Smad7 on radiation-induced oral mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Gangwen; Bian, Li; Li, Fulun; Cotrim, Ana; Wang, Donna; Lu, Jian Bo; Deng, Yu; Bird, Gregory; Sowers, Anastasia; Mitchell, James B.; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Zhao, Rui; Raben, David; Dijke, Peter ten; Refaeli, Yosef; Zhang, Qinghong; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2013-01-01

    We report that K5.Smad7 mice, which express Smad7 transgene by a keratin-5 promoter, were resistant to radiation-induced oral mucositis, a painful oral ulceration. In addition to NF-κB activation known to contribute to oral mucositis, we found activated TGF-β signaling in oral mucositis. Smad7 dampened both pathways to attenuate inflammation, growth inhibition and apoptosis. Additionally, Smad7 promoted oral epithelial migration to close the wound. Further analyses revealed that TGF-β signaling Smads and their co-repressor CtBP1 transcriptionally repressed Rac1, and Smad7 abrogated this repression. Knocking down Rac1 in mouse keratinocytes abrogated Smad7-induced migration. Topically applying Smad7 protein with a cell permeable Tat-tag (Tat-Smad7) to oral mucosa showed preventive and therapeutic effects on radiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. Thus, we have identified novel molecular mechanisms involved in oral mucositis pathogenesis and our data suggest an alternative therapeutic strategy to block multiple pathological processes of oral mucositis. PMID:23475202

  7. Prevention and treatment of chemo- and radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Demarosi, F; Bez, C; Carrassi, A

    2002-05-01

    The administration of many chemo-radiotherapy regimens in patients with cancer may be complicated by toxicities that limit the clinicians' abilities to deliver the most effective doses of active agents. Oral mucositis is a major dose-limiting toxic effect and the most important cause of morbidity in patients undergoing chemo-radiotherapy for head and neck cancers, in patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation and those receiving certain chemotherapeutic agents for a variety of human malignancies. The intent of this paper is to review preventive strategies and treatment approaches for patients with established oral mucositis. Many agents of differing mechanisms of action have been used in the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis induced by anticancer therapies. Currently, no intervention is completely successful at preventing or treating oral mucositis. The several solutions, drugs and methods used and studied in the prophylaxis and therapy of chemotherapy or radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis reflects the need of new, more efficient tools in the management of this complication. Current studies and our increasing understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of oral mucositis will lead to new approaches to the management and improved quality of life for these patients. PMID:12070468

  8. Immune Responses to HIV and SIV in Mucosal Tissues: “Location, Location, Location”

    PubMed Central

    Shacklett, Barbara L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review This review summarizes research literature regarding mucosal immunity to HIV and SIV, with an emphasis on work published within the past 18 months. Recent findings Notable recent studies have focused on the pivotal events occurring within mucosal tissues during acute HIV/SIV infection that serve to establish a balance between detrimental immune activation and beneficial adaptive responses. In cervicovaginal mucosa, an early inflammatory response leads to recruitment of susceptible target cells. At this acute stage, the in vivo ratio between CD8+ effector cells and infected CD4+ T-cells may be critical for limiting viral dissemination. Acute infection is also accompanied by loss of germinal center architecture and T/B cell apoptosis in Peyer’s patches of the gastrointestinal tract. During chronic infection, mucosal CD8+ T-cells may play a role in immune control, as suggested by studies of elite controllers. Summary Mucosal tissues serve as the major portal of entry for HIV, and house a majority of the body’s lymphocytes, including CD4+ T-cells that are targets for infection. Recent studies have focused renewed attention on events occurring immediately after transmission, and underscore the concept that the balance between inflammation and protective immunity is established by host responses in mucosal tissues. PMID:20543589

  9. The Mucosal Immune System of Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Teleost fish possess an adaptive immune system associated with each of their mucosal body surfaces. Evidence obtained from mucosal vaccination and mucosal infection studies reveal that adaptive immune responses take place at the different mucosal surfaces of teleost. The main mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) of teleosts are the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), the gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT) and the recently discovered nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). Teleost MALT includes diffuse B cells and T cells with specific phenotypes different from their systemic counterparts that have co-evolved to defend the microbe-rich mucosal environment. Both B and T cells respond to mucosal infection or vaccination. Specific antibody responses can be measured in the gills, gut and skin mucosal secretions of teleost fish following mucosal infection or vaccination. Rainbow trout studies have shown that IgT antibodies and IgT+ B cells are the predominant B cell subset in all MALT and respond in a compartmentalized manner to mucosal infection. Our current knowledge on adaptive immunity in teleosts is limited compared to the mammalian literature. New research tools and in vivo models are currently being developed in order to help reveal the great intricacy of teleost mucosal adaptive immunity and help improve mucosal vaccination protocols for use in aquaculture. PMID:26274978

  10. Viral diseases and pathogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It includes classification of viral infection. It describes common ways of virus entry, replication, and transmission. It introduces the routes of viral invasion and molecular basis for viral pathogenesis....

  11. Dendritic cell-targeting DNA-based mucosal adjuvants for the development of mucosal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Kosuke; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2009-01-01

    In order to establish effective mucosal immunity against various mucosal pathogens, vaccines must be delivered via the mucosal route and contain effective adjuvant(s). Since mucosal adjuvants can simply mix with the antigen, it is relatively easy to adapt them for different types of vaccine development. Even in simple admixture vaccines, the adjuvant itself must be prepared without any complications. Thus, CpG oligodeoxynucleotides or plasmids encoding certain cDNA(s) would be potent mucosal adjuvant candidates when compared with other substances that can be used as mucosal adjuvants. The strategy of a DNA-based mucosal adjuvant facilitates the targeting of mucosal dendritic cells, and thus is an effective and safe approach. It would also provide great flexibility for the development of effective vaccines for various mucosal pathogens. PMID:19722892

  12. Arterivirus molecular biology and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Snijder, Eric J; Kikkert, Marjolein; Fang, Ying

    2013-10-01

    Arteriviruses are positive-stranded RNA viruses that infect mammals. They can cause persistent or asymptomatic infections, but also acute disease associated with a respiratory syndrome, abortion or lethal haemorrhagic fever. During the past two decades, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and, to a lesser extent, equine arteritis virus (EAV) have attracted attention as veterinary pathogens with significant economic impact. Particularly noteworthy were the 'porcine high fever disease' outbreaks in South-East Asia and the emergence of new virulent PRRSV strains in the USA. Recently, the family was expanded with several previously unknown arteriviruses isolated from different African monkey species. At the molecular level, arteriviruses share an intriguing but distant evolutionary relationship with coronaviruses and other members of the order Nidovirales. Nevertheless, several of their characteristics are unique, including virion composition and structure, and the conservation of only a subset of the replicase domains encountered in nidoviruses with larger genomes. During the past 15 years, the advent of reverse genetics systems for EAV and PRRSV has changed and accelerated the structure-function analysis of arterivirus RNA and protein sequences. These systems now also facilitate studies into host immune responses and arterivirus immune evasion and pathogenesis. In this review, we have summarized recent advances in the areas of arterivirus genome expression, RNA and protein functions, virion architecture, virus-host interactions, immunity, and pathogenesis. We have also briefly reviewed the impact of these advances on disease management, the engineering of novel candidate live vaccines and the diagnosis of arterivirus infection. PMID:23939974

  13. Doxepin Rinse Versus Placebo in the Treatment of Acute Oral Mucositis Pain in Patients Receiving Head and Neck Radiotherapy With or Without Chemotherapy: A Phase III, Randomized, Double-Blind Trial (NCCTG-N09C6 [Alliance])

    PubMed Central

    Leenstra, James L.; Miller, Robert C.; Qin, Rui; Martenson, James A.; Dornfeld, Kenneth J.; Bearden, James D.; Puri, Dev R.; Stella, Philip J.; Mazurczak, Miroslaw A.; Klish, Marie D.; Novotny, Paul J.; Foote, Robert L.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Painful oral mucositis (OM) is a significant toxicity during radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. The aim of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was to test the efficacy of doxepin hydrochloride in the reduction of radiotherapy-induced OM pain. Patients and Methods In all, 155 patients were randomly allocated to a doxepin oral rinse or a placebo for the treatment of radiotherapy-related OM pain. Patients received a single dose of doxepin or placebo on day 1 and then crossed over to receive the opposite agent on a subsequent day. Pain questionnaires were administered at baseline and at 5, 15, 30, 60, 120, and 240 minutes. Patients were then given the option to continue doxepin. The primary end point was pain reduction as measured by the area under the curve (AUC) of the pain scale using data from day 1. Results Primary end point analysis revealed that the AUC for mouth and throat pain reduction was greater for doxepin (−9.1) than for placebo (−4.7; P < .001). Crossover analysis of patients completing both phases confirmed that patients experienced greater mouth and throat pain reduction with doxepin (intrapatient changes of 4.1 for doxepin-placebo arm and −2.8 for placebo-doxepin arm; P < .001). Doxepin was associated with more stinging or burning, unpleasant taste, and greater drowsiness than the placebo rinse. More patients receiving doxepin expressed a desire to continue treatment than did patients with placebo after completion of each of the randomized phases of the study. Conclusion A doxepin rinse diminishes OM pain. Further studies are warranted to determine its role in the management of OM. PMID:24733799

  14. Mucosal vaccination: lung versus nose.

    PubMed

    Vujanic, Ana; Sutton, Philip; Snibson, Kenneth J; Yen, Hung-Hsun; Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre Y

    2012-07-15

    The induction of potent mucosal immune responses able to prevent the establishment of infection at the onset of mucosal pathogen colonisation represents a desirable but challenging goal for vaccine development. Here we compare nasal vaccine delivery with intra-pulmonary vaccination using a sheep lymphatic cannulation model. Our results demonstrate that nasal delivery of a non-infective ISCOMATRIX(®) influenza vaccine does not induce primary immune responses in the lymph draining the nasal lymph nodes, suggesting that local immune responses in the lymph nodes draining the nasal cavity are relatively weak. However, this mode of delivery can boost existing immunity in the nasal lymph. Using the same adjuvant we were able to induce very potent immune responses in both blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), following intra-pulmonary delivery of ISCOMATRIX(®) influenza vaccine, even when very small doses of antigen were employed. Lung delivery could also induce comparable immune responses against other recombinant antigens mixed with ISCOMATRIX(®) adjuvant and could therefore become a method of choice for the induction of immunity to mucosal pathogens infecting the lower respiratory tract. PMID:21492942

  15. Cryopreservation of Human Mucosal Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Zhiquan; Levy, Claire N.; Ferre, April L.; Hartig, Heather; Fang, Cifeng; Lentz, Gretchen; Fialkow, Michael; Kirby, Anna C.; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.; Veazey, Ronald S.; Germann, Anja; von Briesen, Hagen; McElrath, M. Juliana; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Baker, Chris A. R.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Gao, Dayong; Hladik, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding how leukocytes in the cervicovaginal and colorectal mucosae respond to pathogens, and how medical interventions affect these responses, is important for developing better tools to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. An effective cryopreservation protocol for these cells following their isolation will make studying them more feasible. Methods and Findings To find an optimal cryopreservation protocol for mucosal mononuclear leukocytes, we compared cryopreservation media and procedures using human vaginal leukocytes and confirmed our results with endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Specifically, we measured the recovery of viable vaginal T cells and macrophages after cryopreservation with different cryopreservation media and handling procedures. We found several cryopreservation media that led to recoveries above 75%. Limiting the number and volume of washes increased the fraction of cells recovered by 10–15%, possibly due to the small cell numbers in mucosal samples. We confirmed that our cryopreservation protocol also works well for both endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Cryopreserved leukocytes had slightly increased cytokine responses to antigenic stimulation relative to the same cells tested fresh. Additionally, we tested whether it is better to cryopreserve endocervical cells on the cytobrush or in suspension. Conclusions Leukocytes from cervicovaginal and colorectal tissues can be cryopreserved with good recovery of functional, viable cells using several different cryopreservation media. The number and volume of washes has an experimentally meaningful effect on the percentage of cells recovered. We provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol with best practices for cryopreservation of mucosal leukocytes. PMID:27232996

  16. Mucosal Immunology of Food Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Berin, M. Cecilia; Sampson, Hugh A.

    2013-01-01

    Food allergies are increasing in prevalence at a higher rate than can be explained by genetic factors, suggesting a role for as yet unidentified environmental factors. In this review, we summarize the state of knowledge about the healthy immune response to antigens in the diet and the basis of immune deviation that results in IgE sensitization and allergic reactivity to foods. The intestinal epithelium forms the interface between the external environment and the mucosal immune system, and emerging data suggest that the interaction between intestinal epithelial cells and mucosal dendritic cells is of particular importance in determining the outcome of immune responses to dietary antigens. Exposure to food allergens through non-oral routes, in particular through the skin, is increasingly recognized as a potentially important factor in the increasing rate of food allergy. There are many open questions on the role of environmental factors such as dietary factors and microbiota in the development of food allergy, but data suggest that both have an important modulatory effect on the mucosal immune system. Finally, we discuss recent developments in our understanding of immune mechanisms of clinical manifestations of food allergy. New experimental tools, particularly in the field of genomics and microbiome, are likely to shed light on factors responsible for the growing clinical problem of food allergy. PMID:23660362

  17. Serum zinc levels in 368 patients with oral mucosal diseases: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zhe-Xuan; Yang, Xiao-Wen; Shi, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the serum zinc levels in patients with common oral mucosal diseases by comparing these to healthy controls. Material and Methods A total of 368 patients, which consisted of 156 recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) patients, 57 oral lichen planus (OLP) patients, 55 burning mouth syndrome (BMS) patients, 54 atrophic glossitis (AG) patients, 46 xerostomia patients, and 115 sex-and age-matched healthy control subjects were enrolled in this study. Serum zinc levels were measured in all participants. Statistical analysis was performed using a one-way ANOVA, t-test, and Chi-square test. Results The mean serum zinc level in the healthy control group was significantly higher than the levels of all other groups (p < 0.001). No individual in the healthy control group had a serum zinc level less than the minimum normal value. However, up to 24.7% (13/54) of patients with AG presented with zinc deficiency, while 21.2% (33/156) of patients with RAS, 16.4% (9/55) of patients with BMS, 15.2% (7/46) of patients with xerostomia, and 14.0% (8/57) of patients with OLP were zinc deficient. Altogether, the zinc deficiency rate was 19.02% (70/368) in the oral mucosal diseases (OMD) group (all patients with OMD). The difference between the OMD and healthy control group was significant (p <0.001). Gender differences in serum zinc levels were also present, although not statistically significant. Conclusions Zinc deficiency may be involved in the pathogenesis of common oral mucosal diseases. Zinc supplementation may be a useful treatment for oral mucosal diseases, but this requires further investigation; the optimal serum level of zinc, for the prevention and treatment of oral mucosal diseases, remains to be determined. Key words:Oral mucosal diseases, Zinc deficiency, pathogenesis. PMID:27031065

  18. Acute Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Hammad; Fasanya, Adebayo; Cheema, Tariq; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Acute pneumonia is an active infection of the lungs that results when an individual at risk gets exposed to a particular microbiological pathogen. Acute pneumonia is the leading cause of death in the United States that is attributable to an infection. The risk factors, pathogenesis, and microbiological organisms involved differ if the pneumonia develops in the community versus health care-associated environment. The development of concise and comprehensive guidelines has led to an improvement in the management of the problem. However, the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms and the increase in the percentage of elderly population keep mortality risk very substantial. PMID:26919676

  19. Management of chemo/radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer: A review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Moslemi, Dariush; Nokhandani, Akram Mohammadi; Otaghsaraei, Mahsa Taheri; Moghadamnia, Yasaman; Kazemi, Sohrab; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar

    2016-07-01

    Oropharyngeal mucositis is an important complication in non-surgical cancer treatments. It represents the major complication in radiotherapy of tumors located in head and neck areas. Many results have been published in order to define the best clinical protocol for prophylaxis or treatment of mucositis, but a consensus has not been attained yet. In this review, some recent topics in prophylaxis and treatment of mucositis related to radiation therapy are reconsidered using PUBMED and GOOGLE SCHOOLAR search engines from 2000 to 2015. In this review, more than 100 clinical studies have been selected and divided into the prophylactic or therapeutic uses of the evaluated treatment agents. The number of patients and kind of study design, the clinical features, prevalence, risk factors, pathogenesis, diagnosis, complication, prophylaxis and the treatment of mucositis were also specified. Nevertheless, it has not been truly achieved a consensus protocol of prophylaxis and treatment of oral mucositis. PMID:27113797

  20. Pathogenesis of Castleman's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Li, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Castleman's disease (CD) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder that comprises at least two distinct clinical subtypes (unicentric and multicentric). Three pathologic variants (hyaline vascular variant, plasma cell variant, and mixed variant) have been recognized. In addition to interleukin-6 and human herpes virus 8, some other cytokines and viruses may also be involved in the pathogenesis of CD. This review summarizes the recent advances in the underlying pathogenesis of CD, with an attempt to provide evidence for new treatment options that may change the current treatment strategies and improve patients' outcomes. PMID:26956866

  1. Pathogenesis of Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Boyapati, Ray; Satsangi, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Significant progress in our understanding of Crohn's disease (CD), an archetypal common, complex disease, has now been achieved. Our ability to interrogate the deep complexities of the biological processes involved in maintaining gut mucosal homeostasis is a major over-riding factor underpinning this rapid progress. Key studies now offer many novel and expansive insights into the interacting roles of genetic susceptibility, immune function, and the gut microbiota in CD. Here, we provide overviews of these recent advances and new mechanistic themes, and address the challenges and prospects for translation from concept to clinic. PMID:26097717

  2. Pathogenesis of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Boyapati, Ray; Satsangi, Jack; Ho, Gwo-Tzer

    2015-01-01

    Significant progress in our understanding of Crohn's disease (CD), an archetypal common, complex disease, has now been achieved. Our ability to interrogate the deep complexities of the biological processes involved in maintaining gut mucosal homeostasis is a major over-riding factor underpinning this rapid progress. Key studies now offer many novel and expansive insights into the interacting roles of genetic susceptibility, immune function, and the gut microbiota in CD. Here, we provide overviews of these recent advances and new mechanistic themes, and address the challenges and prospects for translation from concept to clinic. PMID:26097717

  3. A Metaproteomic Approach to Study Human-Microbial Ecosystems at the Mucosal Luminal Interface

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoxiao; LeBlanc, James; Truong, Allison; Vuthoori, Ravi; Chen, Sharon S.; Lustgarten, Jonathan L.; Roth, Bennett; Allard, Jeff; Ippoliti, Andrew; Presley, Laura L.; Borneman, James; Bigbee, William L.; Gopalakrishnan, Vanathi; Graeber, Thomas G.; Elashoff, David

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant interactions between the host and the intestinal bacteria are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of many digestive diseases. However, studying the complex ecosystem at the human mucosal-luminal interface (MLI) is challenging and requires an integrative systems biology approach. Therefore, we developed a novel method integrating lavage sampling of the human mucosal surface, high-throughput proteomics, and a unique suite of bioinformatic and statistical analyses. Shotgun proteomic analysis of secreted proteins recovered from the MLI confirmed the presence of both human and bacterial components. To profile the MLI metaproteome, we collected 205 mucosal lavage samples from 38 healthy subjects, and subjected them to high-throughput proteomics. The spectral data were subjected to a rigorous data processing pipeline to optimize suitability for quantitation and analysis, and then were evaluated using a set of biostatistical tools. Compared to the mucosal transcriptome, the MLI metaproteome was enriched for extracellular proteins involved in response to stimulus and immune system processes. Analysis of the metaproteome revealed significant individual-related as well as anatomic region-related (biogeographic) features. Quantitative shotgun proteomics established the identity and confirmed the biogeographic association of 49 proteins (including 3 functional protein networks) demarcating the proximal and distal colon. This robust and integrated proteomic approach is thus effective for identifying functional features of the human mucosal ecosystem, and a fresh understanding of the basic biology and disease processes at the MLI. PMID:22132074

  4. Irritable bowel syndrome: diagnosis and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy

    2012-10-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal (GI) disorder that considerably reduces the quality of life. It further represents an economic burden on society due to the high consumption of healthcare resources and the non-productivity of IBS patients. The diagnosis of IBS is based on symptom assessment and the Rome III criteria. A combination of the Rome III criteria, a physical examination, blood tests, gastroscopy and colonoscopy with biopsies is believed to be necessary for diagnosis. Duodenal chromogranin A cell density is a promising biomarker for the diagnosis of IBS. The pathogenesis of IBS seems to be multifactorial, with the following factors playing a central role in the pathogenesis of IBS: heritability and genetics, dietary/intestinal microbiota, low-grade inflammation, and disturbances in the neuroendocrine system (NES) of the gut. One hypothesis proposes that the cause of IBS is an altered NES, which would cause abnormal GI motility, secretions and sensation. All of these abnormalities are characteristic of IBS. Alterations in the NES could be the result of one or more of the following: genetic factors, dietary intake, intestinal flora, or low-grade inflammation. Post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease-associated IBS (IBD-IBS) represent a considerable subset of IBS cases. Patients with PI- and IBD-IBS exhibit low-grade mucosal inflammation, as well as abnormalities in the NES of the gut. PMID:23066308

  5. Helicobacter pylori virulence and cancer pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamaoka, Yoshio; Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is human gastric pathogen that causes chronic and progressive gastric mucosal inflammation and is responsible for the gastric inflammation-associated diseases, gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease. specific outcomes reflect the interplay between host-, environmental- and bacterial-specific factors. Progress in understanding putative virulence factors in disease pathogenesis has been limited and many false leads have consumed scarce resources. Few in vitro–in vivo correlations or translational applications have proved clinically relevant. Reported virulence factor-related outcomes reflect differences in relative risk of disease rather than specificity for any specific outcome. Studies of individual virulence factor associations have provided conflicting results. Since virulence factors are linked, studies of groups of putative virulence factors are needed to provide clinically useful information. Here, the authors discuss the progress made in understanding the role of H. pylori virulence factors CagA, vacuolating cytotoxin, OipA and DupA in disease pathogenesis and provide suggestions for future studies. PMID:25052757

  6. Irritable bowel syndrome: Diagnosis and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    El-Salhy, Magdy

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal (GI) disorder that considerably reduces the quality of life. It further represents an economic burden on society due to the high consumption of healthcare resources and the non-productivity of IBS patients. The diagnosis of IBS is based on symptom assessment and the Rome III criteria. A combination of the Rome III criteria, a physical examination, blood tests, gastroscopy and colonoscopy with biopsies is believed to be necessary for diagnosis. Duodenal chromogranin A cell density is a promising biomarker for the diagnosis of IBS. The pathogenesis of IBS seems to be multifactorial, with the following factors playing a central role in the pathogenesis of IBS: heritability and genetics, dietary/intestinal microbiota, low-grade inflammation, and disturbances in the neuroendocrine system (NES) of the gut. One hypothesis proposes that the cause of IBS is an altered NES, which would cause abnormal GI motility, secretions and sensation. All of these abnormalities are characteristic of IBS. Alterations in the NES could be the result of one or more of the following: genetic factors, dietary intake, intestinal flora, or low-grade inflammation. Post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease-associated IBS (IBD-IBS) represent a considerable subset of IBS cases. Patients with PI- and IBD-IBS exhibit low-grade mucosal inflammation, as well as abnormalities in the NES of the gut. PMID:23066308

  7. Voice Disorders in Mucosal Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Ruas, Ana Cristina Nunes; Lucena, Márcia Mendonça; da Costa, Ananda Dutra; Vieira, Jéssica Rafael; de Araújo-Melo, Maria Helena; Terceiro, Benivaldo Ramos Ferreira; de Sousa Torraca, Tania Salgado; de Oliveira Schubach, Armando; Valete-Rosalino, Claudia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Leishmaniasis is considered as one of the six most important infectious diseases because of its high detection coefficient and ability to produce deformities. In most cases, mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) occurs as a consequence of cutaneous leishmaniasis. If left untreated, mucosal lesions can leave sequelae, interfering in the swallowing, breathing, voice and speech processes and requiring rehabilitation. Objective To describe the anatomical characteristics and voice quality of ML patients. Materials and Methods A descriptive transversal study was conducted in a cohort of ML patients treated at the Laboratory for Leishmaniasis Surveillance of the Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases - Fiocruz, between 2010 and 2013. The patients were submitted to otorhinolaryngologic clinical examination by endoscopy of the upper airways and digestive tract and to speech-language assessment through directed anamnesis, auditory perception, phonation times and vocal acoustic analysis. The variables of interest were epidemiologic (sex and age) and clinic (lesion location, associated symptoms and voice quality. Results 26 patients under ML treatment and monitored by speech therapists were studied. 21 (81%) were male and five (19%) female, with ages ranging from 15 to 78 years (54.5+15.0 years). The lesions were distributed in the following structures 88.5% nasal, 38.5% oral, 34.6% pharyngeal and 19.2% laryngeal, with some patients presenting lesions in more than one anatomic site. The main complaint was nasal obstruction (73.1%), followed by dysphonia (38.5%), odynophagia (30.8%) and dysphagia (26.9%). 23 patients (84.6%) presented voice quality perturbations. Dysphonia was significantly associated to lesions in the larynx, pharynx and oral cavity. Conclusion We observed that vocal quality perturbations are frequent in patients with mucosal leishmaniasis, even without laryngeal lesions; they are probably associated to disorders of some resonance

  8. Hepatitis E Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lhomme, Sébastien; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Chapuy-Regaud, Sabine; Kamar, Nassim; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Although most hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are asymptomatic, some can be severe, causing fulminant hepatitis and extra-hepatic manifestations, including neurological and kidney injuries. Chronic HEV infections may also occur in immunocompromised patients. This review describes how our understanding of the pathogenesis of HEV infection has progressed in recent years. PMID:27527210

  9. Inflammatory bowel disease: Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Zhen; Li, Yong-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, is characterized by chronic relapsing intestinal inflammation. It has been a worldwide health-care problem with a continually increasing incidence. It is thought that IBD results from an aberrant and continuing immune response to the microbes in the gut, catalyzed by the genetic susceptibility of the individual. Although the etiology of IBD remains largely unknown, it involves a complex interaction between the genetic, environmental or microbial factors and the immune responses. Of the four components of IBD pathogenesis, most rapid progress has been made in the genetic study of gut inflammation. The latest internationally collaborative studies have ascertained 163 susceptibility gene loci for IBD. The genes implicated in childhood-onset and adult-onset IBD overlap, suggesting similar genetic predispositions. However, the fact that genetic factors account for only a portion of overall disease variance indicates that microbial and environmental factors may interact with genetic elements in the pathogenesis of IBD. Meanwhile, the adaptive immune response has been classically considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of IBD, as new studies in immunology and genetics have clarified that the innate immune response maintains the same importance in inducing gut inflammation. Recent progress in understanding IBD pathogenesis sheds lights on relevant disease mechanisms, including the innate and adaptive immunity, and the interactions between genetic factors and microbial and environmental cues. In this review, we provide an update on the major advances that have occurred in above areas. PMID:24415861

  10. Hepatitis E Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lhomme, Sébastien; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Chapuy-Regaud, Sabine; Kamar, Nassim; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Although most hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are asymptomatic, some can be severe, causing fulminant hepatitis and extra-hepatic manifestations, including neurological and kidney injuries. Chronic HEV infections may also occur in immunocompromised patients. This review describes how our understanding of the pathogenesis of HEV infection has progressed in recent years. PMID:27527210

  11. [Pathogenesis of hypophosphatemia].

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2016-02-01

    Chronic hypophosphatemia is seriously involved in several disorders of musculoskeletal system. Symptoms of patients are usually non-specific, such as pain with or without muscle weakness on lower extremities and are often hard to be correctly diagnosed. It is clinically important for physicians to understand pathogenesis and clinical features of hypophosphatemia and its related diseases. PMID:26813499

  12. Eosinophils in mucosal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Travers, J; Rothenberg, M E

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils, multifunctional cells that contribute to both innate and adaptive immunity, are involved in the initiation, propagation and resolution of immune responses, including tissue repair. They achieve this multifunctionality by expression of a diverse set of activation receptors, including those that directly recognize pathogens and opsonized targets, and by their ability to store and release preformed cytotoxic mediators that participate in host defense, to produce a variety of de novo pleotropic mediators and cytokines and to interact directly and indirectly with diverse cell types, including adaptive and innate immunocytes and structural cells. Herein, we review the basic biology of eosinophils and then focus on new emerging concepts about their role in mucosal immune homeostasis, particularly maintenance of intestinal IgA. We review emerging data about their development and regulation and describe new concepts concerning mucosal eosinophilic diseases. We describe recently developed therapeutic strategies to modify eosinophil levels and function and provide collective insight about the beneficial and detrimental functions of these enigmatic cells. PMID:25807184

  13. Biology and Mucosal Immunity to Myxozoans

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Daniela; Bartholomew, Jerri; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2014-01-01

    Myxozoans are among the most abundant parasites in nature. Their life cycles involve two hosts: an invertebrate, usually an annelid, and a vertebrate, usually a fish. They affect fish species in their natural habitats but also constitute a menace for fish aquaculture. Using different strategies they are able to parasitize and cause damage in multiple organs, including mucosal tissues, which they use also as portals of entry. In fish, the main mucosal sites include the intestine, skin and gills. Recently the finding of a specific mucosal immunoglobulin in teleost (IgT), analogous to mammalian IgA, and the capacity of fish to develop a specific mucosal immune response against different pathogens, has highlighted the importance of studying immune responses at mucosal sites. In this review, we describe the major biological characteristics of myxozoan parasites and present the data available regarding immune responses for species that infect mucosal sites. As models for mucosal immunity we review the responses to Enteromyxum spp. and Ceratomyxa shasta, both of which parasitize the intestine. The immune response at the skin and gills is also described, as these mucosal tissues are used by myxozoans as attaching surfaces and portal of entry, and some species also parasitize these sites. Finally, the development of immunoprophylactic strategies is discussed. PMID:23994774

  14. Vaccination Strategies for Mucosal Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ogra, Pearay L.; Faden, Howard; Welliver, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Mucosal administration of vaccines is an important approach to the induction of appropriate immune responses to microbial and other environmental antigens in systemic sites and peripheral blood as well as in most external mucosal surfaces. The development of specific antibody- or T-cell-mediated immunologic responses and the induction of mucosally induced systemic immunologic hyporesponsiveness (oral or mucosal tolerance) depend on complex sets of immunologic events, including the nature of the antigenic stimulation of specialized lymphoid structures in the host, antigen-induced activation of different populations of regulatory T cells (Th1 versus Th2), and the expression of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines. Availability of mucosal vaccines will provide a painless approach to deliver large numbers of vaccine antigens for human immunization. Currently, an average infant will receive 20 to 25 percutaneous injections for vaccination against different childhood infections by 18 months of age. It should be possible to develop for human use effective, nonliving, recombinant, replicating, transgenic, and microbial vector- or plant-based mucosal vaccines to prevent infections. Based on the experience with many dietary antigens, it is also possible to manipulate the mucosal immune system to induce systemic tolerance against environmental, dietary, and possibly other autoantigens associated with allergic and autoimmune disorders. Mucosal immunity offers new strategies to induce protective immune responses against a variety of infectious agents. Such immunization may also provide new prophylactic or therapeutic avenues in the control of autoimmune diseases in humans. PMID:11292646

  15. An outbreak of mucosal disease in a dairy herd.

    PubMed

    Løken, T; Gamlem, H; Lysbakken, O

    1989-01-01

    An outbreak of mucosal disease (MD) was studied in a dairy herd, comprising 12 cows, 9 heifers and 18 calves. During a period of 1 month, six 5 to 8 month-old calves showed typical signs of MD. They all died or were killed in extremis after 2-8 days with progressively worsening clinical signs. Post mortem lesions were examined in one calf. Non-cytopathogenic MD virus was isolated from serum or tissues from 3 clinically affected calves and from 1 healthy heifer. All cows and heifers except for the viremic one possessed neutralizing antibodies against bovine pestivirus. According to the current MD-pathogenesis concept, the affected calves were probably infected transplacentally during the first half of foetal life with pestivirus from the persistently infected heifer in the herd. PMID:2629507

  16. Schwannomas and their pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hilton, David A; Hanemann, Clemens Oliver

    2014-04-01

    Schwannomas may occur spontaneously, or in the context of a familial tumor syndrome such as neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), schwannomatosis and Carney's complex. Schwannomas have a variety of morphological appearances, but they behave as World Health Organization (WHO) grade I tumors, and only very rarely undergo malignant transformation. Central to the pathogenesis of these tumors is loss of function of merlin, either by direct genetic change involving the NF2 gene on chromosome 22 or secondarily to merlin inactivation. The genetic pathways and morphological features of schwannomas associated with different genetic syndromes will be discussed. Merlin has multiple functions, including within the nucleus and at the cell membrane, and this review summarizes our current understanding of the mechanisms by which merlin loss is involved in schwannoma pathogenesis, highlighting potential areas for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24450866

  17. Chronic rhinosinusitis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Whitney W; Lee, Robert J; Schleimer, Robert P; Cohen, Noam A

    2015-12-01

    There are a variety of medical conditions associated with chronic sinonasal inflammation, including chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and cystic fibrosis. In particular, CRS can be divided into 2 major subgroups based on whether nasal polyps are present or absent. Unfortunately, clinical treatment strategies for patients with chronic sinonasal inflammation are limited, in part because the underlying mechanisms contributing to disease pathology are heterogeneous and not entirely known. It is hypothesized that alterations in mucociliary clearance, abnormalities in the sinonasal epithelial cell barrier, and tissue remodeling all contribute to the chronic inflammatory and tissue-deforming processes characteristic of CRS. Additionally, the host innate and adaptive immune responses are also significantly activated and might be involved in pathogenesis. Recent advancements in the understanding of CRS pathogenesis are highlighted in this review, with special focus placed on the roles of epithelial cells and the host immune response in patients with cystic fibrosis, CRS without nasal polyps, or CRS with nasal polyps. PMID:26654193

  18. [Pathogenesis of psoriasis].

    PubMed

    Schäkel, K; Schön, M P; Ghoreschi, K

    2016-06-01

    Psoriasis is an inflammatory T cell-mediated autoimmune disease of skin and joints that affects 2-4 % of the adult population and 0.1-1 % of children. Genetic susceptibility, environmental triggering factors, and innate immune processes initiate psoriasis pathogenesis that results in an adaptive autoreactive response. The T cell response is orchestrated by CD 8(+) T cells in the epidermis and by CD 4(+) T cells in the dermis that predominantly produce interleukin-17 (IL‑17). Research of the past 15 years unraveled cellular and molecular mechanisms as well as cytokines like TNF-α or IL‑23 that contribute to psoriatic inflammation. This knowledge has been translated into clinical practice and a number of antipsoriatic small molecules and immunobiologics are now available. Here, we discuss the current principles of psoriasis pathogenesis in the context of modern therapies. PMID:27246016

  19. Mucosal Antibodies Induced by Intranasal but Not Intramuscular Immunization Block Norovirus GII.4 Virus-Like Particle Receptor Binding.

    PubMed

    Tamminen, Kirsi; Malm, Maria; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2016-06-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) account for the majority of diagnosed cases of viral acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccines against NoV are currently under development. Serum antibodies that block the binding of NoV VLPs to histo-blood group antigens, the putative receptors for NoV, correlate with protection against NoV infection. The role of functional mucosal antibodies in protection is largely unknown, even though the intestinal mucosa is the entry port for NoV. Balb/c mice were immunized intramuscularly (IM) or intranasally (IN) with NoV GII.4 VLPs, and systemic and mucosal blocking antibody responses were studied. IN immunization elicited NoV-specific serum and mucosal IgG and IgA antibodies, whereas IM immunized animals completely lacked IgA. Both immunization routes induced similar blocking activity in serum but only IN route generated blocking antibodies in mucosa. The level of IgA in the mucosal (nasal) lavages strongly correlated (r = 0.841) with the blocking activity, suggesting that IgA, but not IgG, is the major NoV blocking antibody on mucosal surfaces. The results indicate that only mucosal immunization route induces the development of functional anti-NoV IgA on mucosal surface. PMID:27135874

  20. An NK Cell Perforin Response Elicited via IL-18 Controls Mucosal Inflammation Kinetics during Salmonella Gut Infection.

    PubMed

    Müller, Anna A; Dolowschiak, Tamas; Sellin, Mikael E; Felmy, Boas; Verbree, Carolin; Gadient, Sandra; Westermann, Alexander J; Vogel, Jörg; LeibundGut-Landmann, Salome; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2016-06-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium (S.Tm) is a common cause of self-limiting diarrhea. The mucosal inflammation is thought to arise from a standoff between the pathogen's virulence factors and the host's mucosal innate immune defenses, particularly the mucosal NAIP/NLRC4 inflammasome. However, it had remained unclear how this switches the gut from homeostasis to inflammation. This was studied using the streptomycin mouse model. S.Tm infections in knockout mice, cytokine inhibition and -injection experiments revealed that caspase-1 (not -11) dependent IL-18 is pivotal for inducing acute inflammation. IL-18 boosted NK cell chemoattractants and enhanced the NK cells' migratory capacity, thus promoting mucosal accumulation of mature, activated NK cells. NK cell depletion and Prf-/- ablation (but not granulocyte-depletion or T-cell deficiency) delayed tissue inflammation. Our data suggest an NK cell perforin response as one limiting factor in mounting gut mucosal inflammation. Thus, IL-18-elicited NK cell perforin responses seem to be critical for coordinating mucosal inflammation during early infection, when S.Tm strongly relies on virulence factors detectable by the inflammasome. This may have broad relevance for mucosal defense against microbial pathogens. PMID:27341123

  1. An NK Cell Perforin Response Elicited via IL-18 Controls Mucosal Inflammation Kinetics during Salmonella Gut Infection

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Anna A.; Dolowschiak, Tamas; Sellin, Mikael E.; Felmy, Boas; Verbree, Carolin; Gadient, Sandra; Westermann, Alexander J.; Vogel, Jörg; LeibundGut-Landmann, Salome; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium (S.Tm) is a common cause of self-limiting diarrhea. The mucosal inflammation is thought to arise from a standoff between the pathogen's virulence factors and the host's mucosal innate immune defenses, particularly the mucosal NAIP/NLRC4 inflammasome. However, it had remained unclear how this switches the gut from homeostasis to inflammation. This was studied using the streptomycin mouse model. S.Tm infections in knockout mice, cytokine inhibition and –injection experiments revealed that caspase-1 (not -11) dependent IL-18 is pivotal for inducing acute inflammation. IL-18 boosted NK cell chemoattractants and enhanced the NK cells' migratory capacity, thus promoting mucosal accumulation of mature, activated NK cells. NK cell depletion and Prf-/- ablation (but not granulocyte-depletion or T-cell deficiency) delayed tissue inflammation. Our data suggest an NK cell perforin response as one limiting factor in mounting gut mucosal inflammation. Thus, IL-18-elicited NK cell perforin responses seem to be critical for coordinating mucosal inflammation during early infection, when S.Tm strongly relies on virulence factors detectable by the inflammasome. This may have broad relevance for mucosal defense against microbial pathogens. PMID:27341123

  2. Respiratory mucosal permeability in asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Elwood, R.K.; Kennedy, S.; Belzberg, A.; Hogg, J.C.; Pare, P.D.

    1983-09-01

    The permeability of respiratory mucosa to technetium-labeled diethylenetriamine pentacetic acid (/sup 99m/Tc-DTPA) was measured in 10 clinically stable chronic asthmatics and the results were compared with those in 9 nonasthmatic control subjects. Nonspecific bronchial reactivity was measured using methacholine, and the PC20 was calculated. The intrapulmonary distribution and dose of the inhaled /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA was determined by a gamma camera and the half-life of the aerosolized label in the lung was calculated. The accumulation of radioactivity in the blood was monitored and a permeability index was calculated at 10, 25, and 60 min after aerosolization. Despite marked differences in airway reactivity, no differences in either parameter of permeability could be detected between the asthmatics and the control group. It is concluded that clinically stable asthmatics do not demonstrate increase mucosal permeability to small solutes when compared with normal subjects.

  3. Treatment of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bagán-Sebastián, José V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of oral mucositis is a challenge, due to its complex biological nature. Over the last 10 years, different strategies have been developed for the management of oral mucositis caused by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Material and Methods An exhaustive search was made of the PubMed-Medline, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases, crossing the key words “oral mucositis”, “prevention” and “treatment” with the terms “chemotherapy” and “radiotherapy” by means of the boolean operators “AND” and “NOT”. A total of 268 articles were obtained, of which 96 met the inclusion criteria. Results Several interventions for the prevention of oral mucositis, such as oral hygiene protocols, amifostine, benzidamine, calcium phosphate, cryotherapy and iseganan, among others, were found to yield only limited benefits. Other studies have reported a decrease in the appearance and severity of mucositis with the use of cytoprotectors (sucralfate, oral glutamine, hyaluronic acid), growth factors, topical polyvinylpyrrolidone, and low power laser irradiation. Conclusions Very few interventions of confirmed efficacy are available for the management of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy. However, according to the reviewed literature, the use of palifermin, cryotherapy and low power laser offers benefits, reducing the incidence and severity of oral mucositis – though further studies are needed to confirm the results obtained. Key words:Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis Treatment. PMID:27034762

  4. The mucosal immune system for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Aayam; Azegamia, Tatsuhiko; Kiyonoa, Hiroshi

    2014-11-20

    Mucosal surfaces are continuously exposed to the external environment and therefore represent the largest lymphoid organ of the body. In the mucosal immune system, gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs), including Peyer's patches and isolated lymphoid follicles, play an important role in the induction of antigen-specific immune responses in the gut. GALTs have unique organogenesis characteristics and interact with the network of dendritic cells and T cells for the simultaneous induction and regulation of IgA responses and oral tolerance. In these lymphoid tissues, antigens are up taken by M cells in the epithelial layer, and antigen-specific immune responses are subsequently initiated by GALT cells. Nasopharynx- and tear-duct-associated lymphoid tissues (NALTs and TALTs) are key organized lymphoid structures in the respiratory tract and ocular cavities, respectively, and have been shown to interact with each other. Mucosal surfaces are also characterized by host-microbe interactions that affect the genesis and maturation of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues and the induction and regulation of innate and acquired mucosal immune responses. Because most harmful pathogens enter the body through mucosal surfaces by ingestion, inhalation, or sexual contact, the mucosa is a candidate site for vaccination. Mucosal vaccination has some physiological and practical advantages, such as decreased costs and reduced risk of needle-stick injuries and transmission of bloodborne diseases, and it is painless. Recently, the application of modern bioengineering and biochemical engineering technologies, including gene transformation and manipulation systems, resulted in the development of systems to express vaccine antigens in transgenic plants and nanogels, which will usher in a new era of delivery systems for mucosal vaccine antigens. In this review, based on some of our research group's thirty seven years of progress and effort, we highlight the unique features of mucosal immune

  5. Hepatitis E: Molecular Virology and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Subrat K.; Varma, Satya P.K.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus is a single, positive-sense, capped and poly A tailed RNA virus classified under the family Hepeviridae. Enteric transmission, acute self-limiting hepatitis, frequent epidemic and sporadic occurrence, high mortality in affected pregnants are hallmarks of hepatitis E infection. Lack of an efficient culture system and resulting reductionist approaches for the study of replication and pathogenesis of HEV made it to be a less understood agent. Early studies on animal models, sub-genomic expression of open reading frames (ORF) and infectious cDNA clones have helped in elucidating the genome organization, important stages in HEV replication and pathogenesis. The genome contains three ORF's and three untranslated regions (UTR). The 5′ distal ORF, ORF1 is translated by host ribosomes in a cap dependent manner to form the non-structural polyprotein including the viral replicase. HEV replicates via a negative-sense RNA intermediate which helps in the formation of the positive-sense genomic RNA and a single bi-cistronic sub-genomic RNA. The 3′ distal ORF's including the major structural protein pORF2 and the multifunctional host interacting protein pORF3 are translated from the sub-genomic RNA. Pathogenesis in HEV infections is not well articulated, and remains a concern due to the many aspects like host dependent and genotype specific variations. Animal HEV, zoonosis, chronicity in immunosuppressed patients, and rapid decompensation in affected chronic liver diseased patients warrants detailed investigation of the underlying pathogenesis. Recent advances about structure, entry, egress and functional characterization of ORF1 domains has furthered our understanding about HEV. This article is an effort to review our present understanding about molecular biology and pathogenesis of HEV. PMID:25755485

  6. Imbalanced secondary mucosal antioxidant response in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Kruidenier, Laurens; Kuiper, Ineke; Van Duijn, Wim; Mieremet-Ooms, Marij A C; van Hogezand, Ruud A; Lamers, Cornelis B H W; Verspaget, Hein W

    2003-09-01

    Intestinal mucosal damage in the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) involves reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs). ROMs are neutralized by endogenous antioxidant enzymes in a carefully balanced two-step pathway. Superoxide dismutases (SODs) convert superoxide anion to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), which is subsequently neutralized to water by catalase (CAT) or glutathione peroxidase (GPO). Remarkably changed expression levels of the three isoforms of SOD in paired non-inflamed and inflamed mucosae from CD and UC patients have been previously reported in comparison to normal control mucosa. Most notable was the strong up-regulation of Mn-SOD in inflamed epithelium. It was hypothesized that in order to provide optimal protection against ROM-mediated damage, these changes should be coordinately counterbalanced by an increased H(2)O(2)-neutralizing capacity. Therefore, the same tissue samples were used to assess the levels, activities, and/or localization of the most prominent mucosal H(2)O(2)-related antioxidants CAT, GPO, glutathione (GSH), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and metallothionein (MT). Quantitative measurements showed that in both CD and UC patients, intestinal inflammation was associated with increased activities of CAT, GPO, and MPO, whereas the mucosal GSH content was unaffected and the concentration of MT was decreased. Despite this overall increase in mucosal H(2)O(2)-metabolizing enzyme capacity, immunohistochemical analysis revealed a differentially disturbed antioxidant balance in IBD epithelium and lamina propria. In the lamina propria, the risk of direct H(2)O(2)-mediated damage seemed to be restrained by the increasing numbers of CAT- and MPO-positive monocytes/macrophages and neutrophils that infiltrated the inflamed areas. On the other hand, MPO overexpression might increase the lamina propria levels of hypochlorous acid, a stable ROM with multiple pro-inflammatory effects. In the epithelium, the number of

  7. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1−5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to August 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides, different doses [amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides], long-course regimens), antihistamines, cephalosporins or macrolides, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), doxycycline, saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intra-nasal). PMID:19450327

  8. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1% to 5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and in people with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, amoxicillin–clavulanic acid [co-amoxiclav], doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides; different doses, long-course regimens), antihistamines, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intranasal). PMID:22189346

  9. Perinatal Asphyxia I: Pathogenesis of Multisystemic Sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Fomufod, Antoine K.; Rahbar, Fariborz; White, Penny L.; Holloway, Albert Z.; Rampersaud, Swami R.; Henry, Lionel A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes the clinical and pathologic sequelae of perinatal asphyxia manifested by 17 neonates treated at Howard University Hospital over an 18-month period. Multiple systemic complications, occurring in 76.5 percent of the patients, were the rule rather than the exception. All vital organs were involved, singly or in combination. Understanding the pathogenesis and extent of these complications is of utmost importance not only to those rendering health care to acutely ill newborns, but also to those responsible for prenatal and maternal intrapartum care. PMID:537116

  10. Palliation of radiation-related mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, B.R.; Spektor, W.S.

    1990-01-01

    Oral mucositis associated with head and neck radiotherapy can substantially hinder completion of cancer therapy. Alleviation of this often severe stomatitis can provide enhanced patient comfort and facilitate appropriate care. A double-blind format was used in a pilot project to measure, against a control rinse, the effectiveness of an oral rinse consisting of hydrocortisone, nystatin, tetracycline, and diphenhydramine in controlling radiation-related mucositis. A combination of clinical evaluation and patient responses to a questionnaire was used to judge the results of the topical medications. Patients using the experimental medication developed less mucositis than did patients in the control group.

  11. Oral mucositis. A complication of radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, C.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Oral mucositis is a complication of head and neck radiotherapy. It is understood what causes the inflammation and what biological tissue changes occur, however, a definite cure for oral mucositis has not yet been found. Supportive treatments, analgesics, antimicrobials and anti-inflammatory agents have been prescribed, none of which has been a thorough measure of treatment. An effective cure for oral mucositis is still in the midst of scientific research. In the interim local palliative treatments will help to alleviate the patients', debilitating symptoms.

  12. Pathogenesis of Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Scott M.; Berryhill, Taylor F.; Ellenburg, James L.; Jilling, Tamas; Cleveland, Dava S.; Lorenz, Robin G.; Martin, Colin A.

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. The pathophysiology is likely secondary to innate immune responses to intestinal microbiota by the premature infant's intestinal tract, leading to inflammation and injury. This review provides an updated summary of the components of the innate immune system involved in NEC pathogenesis. In addition, we evaluate the animal models that have been used to study NEC with regard to the involvement of innate immune factors and histopathological changes as compared to those seen in infants with NEC. Finally, we discuss new approaches to studying NEC, including mathematical models of intestinal injury and the use of humanized mice. PMID:25447054

  13. Complement and Viral Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stoermer, Kristina A.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The complement system functions as an immune surveillance system that rapidly responds to infection. Activation of the complement system by specific recognition pathways triggers a protease cascade, generating cleavage products that function to eliminate pathogens, regulate inflammatory responses, and shape adaptive immune responses. However, when dysregulated, these powerful functions can become destructive and the complement system has been implicated as a pathogenic effector in numerous diseases, including infectious diseases. This review highlights recent discoveries that have identified critical roles for the complement system in the pathogenesis of viral infection. PMID:21292294

  14. The Pathogenesis and Immunobiology of Mousepox.

    PubMed

    Sigal, Luis J

    2016-01-01

    Ectromelia virus is a mouse-specific orthopoxvirus that, following footpad infection or natural transmission, causes mousepox in most strains of mice, while a few strains, such as C57BL/6, are resistant to the disease but not to the infection. Mousepox is an acute, systemic, highly lethal disease of remarkable semblance to smallpox, caused by the human-specific variola virus. Starting in 1929 with its discovery by Marchal, work with ECTV has provided essential information for our current understanding on how viruses spread lympho-hematogenously, the genetic control of antiviral resistance, the role of different components of the innate and adaptive immune system in the control of primary and secondary infections with acute viruses, and how the mechanisms of immune evasion deployed by the virus affect virulence in vivo. Here, I review the literature on the pathogenesis and immunobiology of ECTV infection in vivo. PMID:26791861

  15. Tissular senescence and modifications of oral ecosystem in the elderly: risk factors for mucosal pathologies.

    PubMed

    Bodineau, Agnès; Folliguet, Marysette; Séguier, Sylvie

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this present review is to describe the pathogenesis and mechanisms behind mucosal pathologies in the elderly including a description of the risk factors for these pathologies. The oral cavity - and particularly oral mucosae - is exposed to many stresses as well as physical, chemical, thermic and pathogenic agents. In the elderly, mucosae are less resistant to the insults, and this increases the occurrence of diseases. Several factors contribute to the prevalence of mucosal pathologies with aging. There are two categories: intrinsic factors linked to the senescence of the tissues and functions, and extrinsic factors related to the older people general health status. The intrinsic factors are: 1) mucosal senescence which induces fragility 2) immunosenescence which causes a decrease in the host response against micro-organisms and an increase in the autoimmune diseases and 3) senescence of salivary glands and reduction of the saliva protective function. Furthermore, there are extrinsic factors which contribute to change the oral ecosystem during aging, such as polypathologies and polymedications, malnutrition, degradation of oral hygiene, pathogen proliferation (mainly bacteria and Candida species) and old or ill-fitted removable dentures. In the elderly several diseases occur on the oral mucosae: inflammation, bacterial infections or candidiasis, ulcerations, autoimmune dermatosis, tumoral processes. This review describes some common oral mucosal pathologies in the older people, which illustrate the impact of different risk factors described in the first part. PMID:20021405

  16. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Autoimmune or Immune-mediated Pathogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Zhonghui

    2004-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), is still unclear, but both autoimmune and immune-mediated phenomena are involved. Autoimmune phenomena include the presence of serum and mucosal autoantibodies against intestinal epithelial cells in either form of IBD, and against human tropomyosin fraction five selectively in UC. In addition, perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA) are common in UC, whereas antibodies against Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA) are frequently found in CD. Immune-mediate phenomena include a variety of abnormalities of humoral and cell-mediated immunity, and a generalized enhanced reactivity against intestinal bacterial antigens in both CD and UC. It is currently believed that loss of tolerance against the indigenous enteric flora is the central event in IBD pathogenesis. Various complementary factors probably contribute to the loss of tolerance to commensal bacteria in IBD. They include defects in regulatory T-cell function, excessive stimulation of mucosal dendritic cells, infections or variants of proteins critically involved in bacterial antigen recognition, such as the products of CD-associated NOD2/CARD15 mutations. PMID:15559364

  17. Update on mucormycosis pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Mucormycosis is an increasingly common fungal infection with unacceptably high mortality. The recent sequencing genome projects of Mucorales and the development of gene manipulation have enabled significant advances in understanding the pathogenesis of mucormycosis. Therefore, we review the pathogenesis of mucormycosis and highlight potential development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities against this lethal disease. Recent findings Much of the work has been focused on the role of iron uptake in the virulence of Mucorales. Additionally, host receptors and fungal ligands involved in the process of tissue invasion as well as sporangiospore size and sex loci and their contribution to virulence of Mucorales are discussed. Finally, the role of innate and adaptive immunity in protection against Mucorales and new evidence about drug-induced apoptosis in these fungi are discussed. Summary Recent discoveries introduce several potentially novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities, which are likely to improve management and outcome for mucormycosis. Future preclinical and clinical research is warranted to develop these diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:24126718

  18. Pathogenesis of Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Asimaki, Angeliki; Kleber, Andre G; Saffitz, Jeffrey E

    2015-11-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM) is a primary myocardial disease. It is characterized by frequent ventricular arrhythmias and increased risk of sudden cardiac death typically arising as an early manifestation before the onset of significant myocardial remodelling. Myocardial degeneration, often confined to the right ventricular free wall, with replacement by fibrofatty scar tissue, develops in many patients. ACM is a familial disease but genetic penetrance can be low and disease expression is highly variable. Inflammation might promote disease progression. It also appears that exercise increases disease penetrance and accelerates its development. More than 60% of probands harbour mutations in genes that encode desmosomal proteins, which has raised the possibility that defective cell-cell adhesion might play a role in disease pathogenesis. Recent advances have implicated changes in the canonical wingless-type mouse mammary tumour virus integration site (Wnt)/β-catenin and Hippo signalling pathways and defects in forwarding trafficking of ion channels and other proteins to the intercalated disk in cardiac myocytes. In this review we summarize the current understanding of the pathogenesis of ACM and highlight future research directions. PMID:26199027

  19. Mucosal barrier, bacteria and inflammatory bowel disease: possibilities for therapy.

    PubMed

    Merga, Yvette; Campbell, Barry J; Rhodes, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal barrier has three major components, the mucus layer, the epithelial glycocalyx and the surface epithelium itself, whose integrity largely depends on tight junction function. In health, there is relatively little direct interaction between the luminal microbiota and the epithelium - the continuous mucus layer in the colon keeps the surface epithelium out of contact with bacteria and the ileo-caecal valve ensures that the distal small intestine is relatively microbe free. Most interaction takes place at the Peyer's patches in the distal ileum and their smaller colonic equivalents, the lymphoid follicles. Peyer's patches are overlain by a 'dome' epithelium, 5% of whose cells are specialised M (microfold) epithelial cells, which act as the major portal of entry for bacteria. There are no goblet cells in the dome epithelium and M cells have a very sparse glycocalyx allowing easy microbial interaction. It is intriguing that the typical age range for the onset of Crohn's disease (CD) is similar to the age at which the number of Peyer's patches is greatest. Peyer's patches are commonly the sites of the initial lesions in CD and the 'anti-pancreatic' antibody associated with CD has been shown to have as its epitope the glycoprotein 2 that is the receptor for type-1 bacterial fimbrial protein (fimH) on M cells. There are many reasons to believe that the mucosal barrier is critically important in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These include (i) associations between both CD and ulcerative colitis (UC) with genes that are relevant to the mucosal barrier; (ii) increased intestinal permeability in unaffected relatives of CD patients; (iii) increased immune reactivity against bacterial antigens, and (iv) animal models in which altered mucosal barrier, e.g. denudation of the mucus layer associated with oral dextran sulphate in rodents, induces colitis. Whilst some IBD patients may have genetic factors leading to weakening of the mucosal barrier

  20. Microbiota and Mucosal Immunity in Amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Bruno M.; Scalvenzi, Thibault; Benlamara, Sarah; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last 20 years, we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacteria, archeas, and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet, the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: (i) the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and (ii) the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small-animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota. PMID:25821449

  1. Exploiting Mucosal Immunity for Antiviral Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-05-20

    Mucosal surfaces provide a remarkably effective barrier against potentially dangerous pathogens. Therefore, enhancing mucosal immunity through vaccines-strengthening that first line of defense-holds significant promise for reducing the burden of viral diseases. The large and varied class of viral pathogens, however, continues to present thorny challenges to vaccine development. Two primary difficulties exist: Viruses exhibit a stunning diversity of strategies for evading the host immune response, and even when we understand the nature of effective immune protection against a given virus, eliciting that protection is technically challenging. Only a few mucosal vaccines have surmounted these obstacles thus far. Recent developments, however, could greatly improve vaccine design. In this review, we first sketch out our understanding of mucosal immunity and then compare the herpes simplex virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and influenza virus to illustrate the distinct challenges of developing successful vaccines and to outline potential solutions. PMID:27168245

  2. Efficiency of Cell-Free and Cell-Associated Virus in Mucosal Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hulot, Sandrine L.; Korioth-Schmitz, Birgit; Gombos, Randi B.; Zheng, Yi; Owuor, Joshua; Lifton, Michelle A.; Ayeni, Christian; Najarian, Robert M.; Yeh, Wendy W.; Asmal, Mohammed; Zamir, Gideon; Letvin, Norman L.

    2013-01-01

    Effective strategies are needed to block mucosal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Here, we address a crucial question in HIV-1 pathogenesis: whether infected donor mononuclear cells or cell-free virus plays the more important role in initiating mucosal infection by HIV-1. This distinction is critical, as effective strategies for blocking cell-free and cell-associated virus transmission may be different. We describe a novel ex vivo model system that utilizes sealed human colonic mucosa explants and demonstrate in both the ex vivo model and in vivo using the rectal challenge model in rhesus monkeys that HIV-1-infected lymphocytes can transmit infection across the mucosa more efficiently than cell-free virus. These findings may have significant implications for our understanding of the pathogenesis of mucosal transmission of HIV-1 and for the development of strategies to prevent HIV-1 transmission. PMID:24109227

  3. Localized Pemphigus Vegetans without Mucosal Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Jain, VK; Jindal, N; Imchen, S

    2014-01-01

    Pemphigus vegetans is a rare variant of pemphigus vulgaris. A 62-year-old woman presented with erythematous moist vegetative plaque on the left breast and left groin. There was no mucosal involvement. Histopathological and direct immunofluorescence findings were suggestive of pemphigus vegetans. She showed excellent response to oral steroids. Literature is scarcely available on the limited involvement with pemphigus vegetans without mucosal involvement. PMID:24700958

  4. Intestinal inflammation and mucosal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Sánchez de Medina, Fermín; Romero-Calvo, Isabel; Mascaraque, Cristina; Martínez-Augustin, Olga

    2014-12-01

    Intestinal mucosal barrier function is the capacity of the intestine to provide adequate containment of luminal microorganisms and molecules while preserving the ability to absorb nutrients. The central element is the epithelial layer, which physically separates the lumen and the internal milieu and is in charge of vectorial transport of ions, nutrients, and other substances. The secretion of mucus-forming mucins, sIgA, and antimicrobial peptides reinforces the mucosal barrier on the extraepithelial side, while a variety of immune cells contributes to mucosal defense in the inner side. Thus, the mucosal barrier is of physical, biochemical, and immune nature. In addition, the microbiota may be viewed as part of this system because of the mutual influence occurring between the host and the luminal microorganisms. Alteration of the mucosal barrier function with accompanying increased permeability and/or bacterial translocation has been linked with a variety of conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease. Genetic and environmental factors may converge to evoke a defective function of the barrier, which in turn may lead to overt inflammation of the intestine as a result of an exacerbated immune reaction toward the microbiota. According to this hypothesis, inflammatory bowel disease may be both precipitated and treated by either stimulation or downregulation of the different elements of the mucosal barrier, with the outcome depending on timing, the cell type affected, and other factors. In this review, we cover briefly the elements of the barrier and their involvement in functional defects and the resulting phenotype. PMID:25222662

  5. Role of bombesin on gut mucosal growth.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, K U; Evers, B M; Ishizuka, J; Townsend, C M; Thompson, J C

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors examined the effects of exogenous bombesin (BBS) on gut mucosal growth in chow-fed rats and the mucosal regeneration after gut atrophy brought about by feeding an elemental diet and after intestinal injury produced by methotrexate (MTX). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Bombesin is one of many gastrointestinal peptides implicated in the regulation of gut mucosal growth. Although BBS is known to stimulate growth of normal pancreatic tissue, the trophic effect of BBS on gut mucosa is less clear and its exact role in gut mucosal regeneration and repair is not known. METHODS: Rats were fed a regular chow diet (control) or an elemental diet plus either saline or BBS (10 micrograms/kg). In another experiment, rats fed a chow diet and treated with saline or BBS were given MTX (20 micrograms/kg) or a single intraperitoneal injection. In all experiments, small and large bowel mucosa and pancreas were removed and analyzed for BBS-mediated proliferation. RESULTS: Bombesin produced significant mucosal proliferation of the small bowel at day 14, but not at day 7, in rats fed regular chow. In contrast, BBS treatment for 7 days produced significant proliferation in both the atrophic and injured gut mucosa of rats given elemental diet or MTX. CONCLUSIONS: Bombesin may be an important enterotrophic factor for normal mucosal proliferation and may be clinically beneficial as an agent to restore or maintain gut mucosa during periods of atrophy or injury. PMID:7618976

  6. Gut Mucosal FOXP3+ Regulatory CD4+ T Cells and Nonregulatory CD4+ T Cells Are Differentially Affected by Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Rhesus Macaques▿

    PubMed Central

    Allers, Kristina; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Hofmann, Jörg; Unbehaun, Anett; Kunkel, Désirée; Moos, Verena; Kaup, Franz-Josef; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Sauermann, Ulrike; Epple, Hans-Jörg; Schneider, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract represents a major site for human and simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV and SIV) replication and CD4+ T-cell depletion. Despite severe depletion of mucosal CD4+ T cells, FOXP3+ regulatory CD4+ T cells (Treg) are highly increased in the gut mucosa of chronically HIV-infected individuals and may contribute to HIV pathogenesis, either by their immunosuppressive function or as a significant target cell population for virus production. Little is known about the susceptibility of mucosal Treg to viral infection and the longitudinal effect of HIV/SIV infection on Treg dynamics. In this study, we determined the level of SIV infection in Treg and nonregulatory CD4+ T cells (non-Treg) isolated from the colon of SIV-infected rhesus macaques. The dynamics of mucosal Treg and alterations in the mucosal CD4+ T-cell pool were examined longitudinally. Our findings indicate that mucosal Treg were less susceptible to productive SIV infection than non-Treg and thus were selectively spared from SIV-mediated cell death. In addition to improved survival, local expansion of Treg by SIV-induced proliferation of the mucosal CD4+ T-cell pool facilitated the accumulation of mucosal Treg during the course of infection. High frequency of mucosal Treg in chronic SIV infection was strongly related to a reduction of perforin-expressing cells. In conclusion, this study suggests that mucosal Treg are less affected by productive SIV infection than non-Treg and therefore spared from depletion. Although SIV production is limited in mucosal Treg, Treg accumulation may indirectly contribute to viral persistence by suppressing antiviral immune responses. PMID:20071575

  7. Fungal Aflatoxins Reduce Respiratory Mucosal Ciliary Function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Robert J; Workman, Alan D; Carey, Ryan M; Chen, Bei; Rosen, Phillip L; Doghramji, Laurel; Adappa, Nithin D; Palmer, James N; Kennedy, David W; Cohen, Noam A

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins secreted by Aspergillus flavus, which can colonize the respiratory tract and cause fungal rhinosinusitis or bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. A. flavus is the second leading cause of invasive aspergillosis worldwide. Because many respiratory pathogens secrete toxins to impair mucociliary immunity, we examined the effects of acute exposure to aflatoxins on airway cell physiology. Using air-liquid interface cultures of primary human sinonasal and bronchial cells, we imaged ciliary beat frequency (CBF), intracellular calcium, and nitric oxide (NO). Exposure to aflatoxins (0.1 to 10 μM; 5 to 10 minutes) reduced baseline (~6-12%) and agonist-stimulated CBF. Conditioned media (CM) from A. fumigatus, A. niger, and A. flavus cultures also reduced CBF by ~10% after 60 min exposure, but effects were blocked by an anti-aflatoxin antibody only with A. flavus CM. CBF reduction required protein kinase C but was not associated with changes in calcium or NO. However, AFB2 reduced NO production by ~50% during stimulation of the ciliary-localized T2R38 receptor. Using a fluorescent reporter construct expressed in A549 cells, we directly observed activation of PKC activity by AFB2. Aflatoxins secreted by respiratory A. flavus may impair motile and chemosensory functions of airway cilia, contributing to pathogenesis of fungal airway diseases. PMID:27623953

  8. Pathogenesis of Group A Streptococcal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Madeleine W.

    2000-01-01

    Group A streptococci are model extracellular gram-positive pathogens responsible for pharyngitis, impetigo, rheumatic fever, and acute glomerulonephritis. A resurgence of invasive streptococcal diseases and rheumatic fever has appeared in outbreaks over the past 10 years, with a predominant M1 serotype as well as others identified with the outbreaks. emm (M protein) gene sequencing has changed serotyping, and new virulence genes and new virulence regulatory networks have been defined. The emm gene superfamily has expanded to include antiphagocytic molecules and immunoglobulin-binding proteins with common structural features. At least nine superantigens have been characterized, all of which may contribute to toxic streptococcal syndrome. An emerging theme is the dichotomy between skin and throat strains in their epidemiology and genetic makeup. Eleven adhesins have been reported, and surface plasmin-binding proteins have been defined. The strong resistance of the group A streptococcus to phagocytosis is related to factor H and fibrinogen binding by M protein and to disarming complement component C5a by the C5a peptidase. Molecular mimicry appears to play a role in autoimmune mechanisms involved in rheumatic fever, while nephritis strain-associated proteins may lead to immune-mediated acute glomerulonephritis. Vaccine strategies have focused on recombinant M protein and C5a peptidase vaccines, and mucosal vaccine delivery systems are under investigation. PMID:10885988

  9. Controversies in dengue pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Halstead, Scott B

    2012-05-01

    Research into the pathogenesis of dengue fever has exploded over the last half-century, with issues that were considered simple becoming more complex as additional data are found. This has led to the development of a number of controversies that are being studied across the globe and debated in the literature. In this paper, the following six controversies are analysed and, where possible, resolved: the 1997 World Health Organization (WHO) case definition of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) is not useful; DHF is not significantly associated with secondary dengue infection; DHF results from infection with a 'virulent' dengue virus; DHF is owing to abnormal T-cell responses; DHF results from auto-immune responses; and DHF results from direct infection of endothelial cells. PMID:22668442

  10. Molecular pathogenesis of emphysema.

    PubMed

    Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laimute; Voelkel, Norbert F

    2008-02-01

    Emphysema is one manifestation of a group of chronic, obstructive, and frequently progressive destructive lung diseases. Cigarette smoking and air pollution are the main causes of emphysema in humans, and cigarette smoking causes emphysema in rodents. This review examines the concept of a homeostatically active lung structure maintenance program that, when attacked by proteases and oxidants, leads to the loss of alveolar septal cells and airspace enlargement. Inflammatory and noninflammatory mechanisms of disease pathogenesis, as well as the role of the innate and adaptive immune systems, are being explored in genetically altered animals and in exposure models of this disease. These recent scientific advances support a model whereby alveolar destruction resulting from a coalescence of mechanical forces, such as hyperinflation, and more recently recognized cellular and molecular events, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, and failed lung tissue repair, produces the clinically recognized syndrome of emphysema. PMID:18246188

  11. Pathogenesis of glomerular haematuria

    PubMed Central

    Yuste, Claudia; Gutierrez, Eduardo; Sevillano, Angel Manuel; Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Amaro-Villalobos, Juan Manuel; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesus; Praga, Manuel; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Haematuria was known as a benign hallmark of some glomerular diseases, but over the last decade, new evidences pointed its negative implications on kidney disease progression. Cytotoxic effects of oxidative stress induced by hemoglobin, heme, or iron released from red blood cells may account for the tubular injury observed in human biopsy specimens. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for haematuria remain unclear. The presence of red blood cells (RBCs) with irregular contours and shape in the urine indicates RBCs egression from the glomerular capillary into the urinary space. Therefore glomerular haematuria may be a marker of glomerular filtration barrier dysfunction or damage. In this review we describe some key issues regarding epidemiology and pathogenesis of haematuric diseases as well as their renal morphological findings. PMID:25949932

  12. Pathogenesis of Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Khosla, Sundeep

    2013-01-01

    As for most multifactorial disorders, the pathogenesis of osteoporosis is complex, and a different set of mechanisms may be operative in any given individual. However, there are certain common causes of bone loss and increased fracture risk with aging in most people. These include genetic factors contributing to the acquisition of peak bone mass, illnesses affecting skeletal growth and development, sex steroid deficiency following the menopause in women and with aging in men, and intrinsic, age-related changes in bone metabolism. Superimposed on these factors are specific secondary causes of bone loss, such as corticosteroid use or other illnesses affecting bone metabolism that may contribute to fracture risk in individuals exposed to these factors. The past decade has witnessed tremendous advances in our understanding of each of these various causes of bone loss, leading to the development of novel, mechanism-based therapeutic approaches to prevent and treat this important public health disorder. PMID:25243055

  13. Pathogenesis of pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Run; Melmed, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary tumors are common and mostly benign neoplasia which cause excess or deficiency of pituitary hormones and compressive damage to adjacent organs. Oncogene activation [e.g. PTTG (pituitary tumor-transforming gene) and HMGA2], tumor suppressor gene inactivation (e.g. MEN1 and PRKAR1A), epigenetic changes (e.g. methylation) and humoral factors (e.g. ectopic production of stimulating hormones) are all possible pituitary tumor initiators; the micro-environment of pituitary tumors including steroid milieu, angiogenesis and abnormal cell adhesion further promote tumor growth. Senescence, a cellular defence mechanism against malignant transformation, may explain the benign nature of at least some pituitary tumors. We suggest that future research on pituitary tumor pathogenesis should incorporate systems approaches, and address regulatory mechanisms for pituitary cell proliferation, development of new animal models of pituitary tumor and isolation of functional human pituitary tumor cell lines. PMID:20541667

  14. Microbial pathogenesis meets biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Charles-Orszag, Arthur; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Tran Van Nhieu, Guy; Duménil, Guillaume

    2016-02-01

    Introducing concepts from soft matter physics and mechanics has largely contributed to our understanding of a variety of biological processes. In this review, we argue that this holds true for bacterial pathogenesis. We base this argument on three examples of bacterial pathogens and their interaction with host cells during infection: (i) Shigella flexneri exploits actin-dependent forces to come into close contact with epithelial cells prior to invasion of the epithelium; (ii) Neisseria meningitidis manipulates endothelial cells to resist shear stress during vascular colonization; (iii) bacterial toxins take advantage of the biophysical properties of the host cell plasma membrane to generate transcellular macroapertures in the vascular wall. Together, these examples show that a multidisciplinary approach integrating physics and biology is more necessary than ever to understand complex infectious phenomena. Moreover, this avenue of research will allow the exploration of general processes in cell biology, highlighted by pathogens, in the context of other non-communicable human diseases. PMID:26849533

  15. Molecular pathogenesis of emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laimute; Voelkel, Norbert F.

    2008-01-01

    Emphysema is one manifestation of a group of chronic, obstructive, and frequently progressive destructive lung diseases. Cigarette smoking and air pollution are the main causes of emphysema in humans, and cigarette smoking causes emphysema in rodents. This review examines the concept of a homeostatically active lung structure maintenance program that, when attacked by proteases and oxidants, leads to the loss of alveolar septal cells and airspace enlargement. Inflammatory and noninflammatory mechanisms of disease pathogenesis, as well as the role of the innate and adaptive immune systems, are being explored in genetically altered animals and in exposure models of this disease. These recent scientific advances support a model whereby alveolar destruction resulting from a coalescence of mechanical forces, such as hyperinflation, and more recently recognized cellular and molecular events, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, and failed lung tissue repair, produces the clinically recognized syndrome of emphysema. PMID:18246188

  16. Pathogenesis of Lassa Fever

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Nadezhda E.; Walker, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host’s immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents. PMID:23202452

  17. Pathogenesis of Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Walker, David H

    2012-10-01

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host's immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents. PMID:23202452

  18. Pathogenesis of nasal polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Hulse, K. E.; Stevens, W. W.; Tan, B. K.; Schleimer, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is a complex inflammatory condition that affects a large proportion of the population world-wide and is associated with high cost of management and significant morbidity. Yet, there is a lack of population-based epidemiologic studies using current definitions of CRSwNP, and the mechanisms that drive pathogenesis in this disease remain unclear. In this review, we summarize the current evidence for the plethora of factors that likely contribute to CRSwNP pathogenesis. Defects in the innate function of the airway epithelial barrier, including diminished expression of antimicrobial products and loss of barrier integrity, combined with colonization by fungi and bacteria likely play a critical role in the development of chronic inflammation in CRSwNP. This chronic inflammation is characterized by elevated expression of many key inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-5, thymic stromal lymphopoietin and CCL11, that help to initiate and perpetuate this chronic inflammatory response. Together, these factors likely combine to drive the influx of a variety of immune cells, including eosinophils, mast cells, group 2 innate lymphoid cells and lymphocytes, which participate in the chronic inflammatory response within the nasal polyps. Importantly, however, future studies are needed to demonstrate the necessity and sufficiency of these potential drivers of disease in CRSwNP. In addition to the development of new tools and models to aid mechanistic studies, the field of CRSwNP research also needs the type of robust epidemiologic data that has served the asthma community so well. Given the high prevalence, costs and morbidity, there is a great need for continued research into CRS that could facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies to improve treatment for patients who suffer from this disease. PMID:25482020

  19. Pathogenesis of nasal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Hulse, K E; Stevens, W W; Tan, B K; Schleimer, R P

    2015-02-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is a complex inflammatory condition that affects a large proportion of the population world-wide and is associated with high cost of management and significant morbidity. Yet, there is a lack of population-based epidemiologic studies using current definitions of CRSwNP, and the mechanisms that drive pathogenesis in this disease remain unclear. In this review, we summarize the current evidence for the plethora of factors that likely contribute to CRSwNP pathogenesis. Defects in the innate function of the airway epithelial barrier, including diminished expression of antimicrobial products and loss of barrier integrity, combined with colonization by fungi and bacteria likely play a critical role in the development of chronic inflammation in CRSwNP. This chronic inflammation is characterized by elevated expression of many key inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-5, thymic stromal lymphopoietin and CCL11, that help to initiate and perpetuate this chronic inflammatory response. Together, these factors likely combine to drive the influx of a variety of immune cells, including eosinophils, mast cells, group 2 innate lymphoid cells and lymphocytes, which participate in the chronic inflammatory response within the nasal polyps. Importantly, however, future studies are needed to demonstrate the necessity and sufficiency of these potential drivers of disease in CRSwNP. In addition to the development of new tools and models to aid mechanistic studies, the field of CRSwNP research also needs the type of robust epidemiologic data that has served the asthma community so well. Given the high prevalence, costs and morbidity, there is a great need for continued research into CRS that could facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies to improve treatment for patients who suffer from this disease. PMID:25482020

  20. Nitro-arginine methyl ester, a non-selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase reduces ibuprofen-induced gastric mucosal injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Premila; K, Indirani; K, Desigamani

    2005-09-01

    Ibuprofen is a commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions from ibuprofen usage include gastric mucosal ulcers and bleeding. The mechanism by which ibuprofen induces gastric mucosal damage is not clear. The present study is an attempt to examine the role of nitric oxide in the pathogenesis of ibuprofen-induced gastric mucosal damage. Ibuprofen administered orally at the dose of 100 mg/kg body weight for 6 days to the rats resulted in gastric mucosal injury. Serum nitrite and nitrosothiol were increased significantly as compared with the controls, which were treated with the vehicle alone. In the gastric mucosa, lipid peroxidation and protein thiols were increased, and the activity of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a nitric oxide sensitive enzyme was decreased significantly. Pretreatment of the rats daily with nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, nitro-arginine methyl ester (30 mg/kg body weight) 1 hr before treatment with ibuprofen reduced the gastric mucosal injury. Biochemically, it prevented the rise in serum nitrite levels and the increase in lipid peroxidation and protein thiol levels and the loss of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in the gastric mucosa. The results of the present study suggest that increased nitric oxide production may be one of the mechanisms by which ibuprofen produces gastric mucosal injury and that inhibition of nitric oxide synthase reduces gastric mucosal injury. PMID:16133962

  1. [Immunoglobulin for prevention of radiogenic mucositis].

    PubMed

    Mose, S; Adamietz, I A; Thilmann, C; Saran, F; Heyd, R; Knecht, R; Böttcher, H D

    1995-07-01

    Among various therapies administered during radiation-induced mucositis, treatment with immunoglobulin has proven clinically successful. In this study the efficacy of prophylactic applications of immunoglobulin was investigated from January 1992 through August 1993. Forty-two patients with histologically-proven head and neck cancer were given postoperative radiation treatment. In cases with macroscopic tumor residues or inoperability, combined radio-chemotherapy was given. This included 51.3 Gy at 1.9 Gy 5x/week, boosted to 10-26 Gy at 2 Gy 5x/week and carboplatin 60 mg/m2 at days 1-5 and 29-33. Panthenol (4x10 ml/day) and nystatin (4 x 1 ml/day) were given to 20 patients as prophylactic treatment for mucositis. Twenty-two subsequent patients also received intramuscular 800 mg (5 ml) human immunoglobulin (1x/week). According to the Seegenschmiedt/Sauer classification the extent of mucositis was determined 3x/week. Comparison of the distribution of maximal mucositis revealed a slightly more severe mucosal reaction in the control group (n.s.). Analysis of the mean degree of mucositis in both groups demonstrated statistically significant differences (p = 0.031) related to the whole collective and patients receiving concomitant chemotherapy while no effect of immunoglobulin was found in patients treated by radiation alone. In the immunoglobulin-treated-group, the time from the beginning of therapy to the first interruption was prolonged 5 days (37.5 +/- 13.1 vs. 42.7 +/- 13.3 days), but this difference was not significant. Although prophylactic application of immunoglobulin seemed to lower the degree of radiation-induced mucositis, this effect was less significant when compared to the immunoglobulin given in a therapeutic manner. PMID:7672999

  2. Intestinal Permeability in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Pathogenesis, Clinical Evaluation, and Therapy of Leaky Gut

    PubMed Central

    Michielan, Andrea; D'Incà, Renata

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is multifactorial with data suggesting the role of a disturbed interaction between the gut and the intestinal microbiota. A defective mucosal barrier may result in increased intestinal permeability which promotes the exposition to luminal content and triggers an immunological response that promotes intestinal inflammation. IBD patients display several defects in the many specialized components of mucosal barrier, from the mucus layer composition to the adhesion molecules that regulate paracellular permeability. These alterations may represent a primary dysfunction in Crohn's disease, but they may also perpetuate chronic mucosal inflammation in ulcerative colitis. In clinical practice, several studies have documented that changes in intestinal permeability can predict IBD course. Functional tests, such as the sugar absorption tests or the novel imaging technique using confocal laser endomicroscopy, allow an in vivo assessment of gut barrier integrity. Antitumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) therapy reduces mucosal inflammation and restores intestinal permeability in IBD patients. Butyrate, zinc, and some probiotics also ameliorate mucosal barrier dysfunction but their use is still limited and further studies are needed before considering permeability manipulation as a therapeutic target in IBD. PMID:26582965

  3. Alterations of the Ileal and Colonic Mucosal Microbiota in Canine Chronic Enteropathies

    PubMed Central

    Cassmann, Eric; White, Robin; Atherly, Todd; Wang, Chong; Sun, Yaxuan; Khoda, Samir; Mosher, Curtis; Ackermann, Mark; Jergens, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background The intestinal microbiota is increasingly linked to the pathogenesis of chronic enteropathies (CE) in dogs. While imbalances in duodenal and fecal microbial communities have been associated with mucosal inflammation, relatively little is known about alterations in mucosal bacteria seen with CE involving the ileum and colon. Aim To investigate the composition and spatial organization of mucosal microbiota in dogs with CE and controls. Methods Tissue sections from endoscopic biopsies of the ileum and colon from 19 dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), 6 dogs with granulomatous colitis (GC), 12 dogs with intestinal neoplasia, and 15 controls were studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on a quantifiable basis. Results The ileal and colonic mucosa of healthy dogs and dogs with CE is predominantly colonized by bacteria localized to free and adherent mucus compartments. CE dogs harbored more (P < 0.05) mucosal bacteria belonging to the Clostridium-coccoides/Eubacterium rectale group, Bacteroides, Enterobacteriaceae, and Escherichia coli versus controls. Within the CE group, IBD dogs had increased (P < 0.05) Enterobacteriaceae and E. coli bacteria attached onto surface epithelia or invading within the intestinal mucosa. Bacterial invasion with E. coli was observed in the ileal and colonic mucosa of dogs with GC (P < 0.05). Dogs with intestinal neoplasia had increased (P < 0.05) adherent (total bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, E. coli) and invasive (Enterobacteriaceae, E. coli, and Bacteroides) bacteria in biopsy specimens. Increased numbers of total bacteria adherent to the colonic mucosa were associated with clinical disease severity in IBD dogs (P < 0.05). Conclusion Pathogenic events in canine CE are associated with different populations of the ileal and colonic mucosal microbiota. PMID:26840462

  4. No longer an innocent bystander: epithelial toll-like receptor signaling in the development of mucosal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gribar, Steven C; Richardson, Ward M; Sodhi, Chhinder P; Hackam, David J

    2008-01-01

    Diseases of mucosal inflammation represent important causes of morbidity and mortality, and have led to intense research efforts to understand the factors that lead to their development. It is well accepted that a breakdown of the normally impermeant epithelial barrier of the intestine, the lung, and the kidney is associated with the development of inflammatory disease in these organs, yet significant controversy exists as to how this breakdown actually occurs, and how such a breakdown may lead to inflammation. In this regard, much work has focused upon the role of the epithelium as an "innocent bystander," a target of a leukocyte-mediated inflammatory cascade that leads to its destruction in the mucosal inflammatory process. However, recent evidence from a variety of laboratories indicates that the epithelium is not merely a passive component in the steps that lead to mucosal inflammation, but is a central participant in the process. In addressing this controversy, we and others have determined that epithelial cells express Toll-like receptors (TLRs) of the innate immune system, and that activation of TLRs by endogenous and exogenous ligands may play a central role in determining the balance between a state of "mucosal homeostasis," as is required for optimal organ function, and "mucosal injury," leading to mucosal inflammation and barrier breakdown. In particular, activation of TLRs within intestinal epithelial cells leads to the development of cellular injury and impairment in mucosal repair in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation, while activation of TLRs in the lung and kidney may participate in the development of pneumonitis and nephritis respectively. Recent work in support of these concepts is extensively reviewed, while essential areas of further study that are required to determine the significance of epithelial TLR signaling during states of health and disease are outlined. PMID:18584047

  5. Pharmacokinetics of Antiretrovirals in Mucosal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, M.L.; Srinivas, N.; Kashuba, A.D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In the absence of an HIV vaccine or cure, antiretroviral (ARV) based prevention strategies are being investigated to reduce HIV incidence. These prevention strategies depend on achieving effective drug concentrations at the site HIV exposure which is most commonly the mucosal tissues of the lower gastrointestinal tract and the female genital tract. Areas covered This article collates all known data regarding drug exposure in these vulnerable mucosal tissues, and reviews important mechanisms of ARV drug distribution. Research papers and abstracts describing antiretroviral pharmacokinetics in the female genital tract and lower gastrointestinal mucosal tissues available in MEDLINE® or presented at scientific conferences prior to December 2014 are reviewed in detail. Important influences on ARV mucosal tissue distribution, including protein binding, active drug transport, and endogenous hormones, are also reviewed. Expert opinion ARVs exhibit highly variable pharmacokinetics in mucosal tissues. In general, antiretroviral exposure is higher in the lower gastrointestinal tract compared to the female genital tract, but concentrations required for protective efficacy are largely unknown. The expected site of HIV exposure represents an important consideration when designing and optimizing antiretroviral based prevention strategies. PMID:25797064

  6. A piglet Model of Acute gastroenteritis induced by Shigella dysenteriae type 1

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kwang-il; Zhang, Quanshun; Nunnari, John; Tzipori, Saul

    2009-01-01

    Background The lack of a standardized laboratory animal model that mimics key aspects of human shigellosis remains major obstacle to addressing questions on pathogenesis, screening therapeutics and evaluating vaccines. Methods We characterize a piglet model for Shigella dysenteriae type 1. Results Piglets developed acute diarrhea, anorexia, dehydration and often fatal, with severity depending on age and dose. Bacteria were apparent in the lumen and on surface epithelium throughout the gut initially, but severe mucosal damage and bacterial cellular invasion were most profound in the colon. Detached necrotic colonocytes were present in the lumen, with inflammatory cells outpouring from damaged mucosa. High levels of IL-8 and IL-12, were followed by other proinflammatory cytokines. Elevated TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 were detected in feces and in gut segments of infected animals. Bacteria were present inside epithelial cells and within colonic lamina propria. In contrast, an isogenic strain lacking Shiga toxin, induced similar but milder symptoms, with moderate mucosal damage and lower cytokine levels. Conclusion We conclude that piglets are highly susceptible to shigellosis providing a useful tool to compare vaccine candidates for immunogenicity, reactogenicity and response to challenge, investigate the role of virulence factors and test the efficacy of microbial agents. PMID:20136414

  7. Prospective Evaluation to Establish a Dose Response for Clinical Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Head-and-Neck Conformal Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, Samir Lehmann, Joerg; Coleman, Matthew A.; Vaughan, Andrew; Yang, Claus Chunli; Enepekides, Danny; Farwell, Gregory; Purdy, James A.; Laredo, Grace; Nolan, Kerry A.S.; Pearson, Francesca S.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: We conducted a clinical study to correlate oral cavity dose with clinical mucositis, perform in vivo dosimetry, and determine the feasibility of obtaining buccal mucosal cell samples in patients undergoing head-and-neck radiation therapy. The main objective is to establish a quantitative dose response for clinical oral mucositis. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients undergoing radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively studied. Four points were chosen in separate quadrants of the oral cavity. Calculated dose distributions were generated by using AcQPlan and Eclipse treatment planning systems. MOSFET dosimeters were used to measure dose at each sampled point. Each patient underwent buccal sampling for future RNA analysis before and after the first radiation treatment at the four selected points. Clinical and functional mucositis were assessed weekly according to National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, Version 3. Results: Maximum and average doses for sampled sites ranged from 7.4-62.3 and 3.0-54.3 Gy, respectively. A cumulative point dose of 39.1 Gy resulted in mucositis for 3 weeks or longer. Mild severity (Grade {<=} 1) and short duration ({<=}1 week) of mucositis were found at cumulative point doses less than 32 Gy. Polymerase chain reaction consistently was able to detect basal levels of two known radiation responsive genes. Conclusions: In our sample, cumulative doses to the oral cavity of less than 32 Gy were associated with minimal acute mucositis. A dose greater than 39 Gy was associated with longer duration of mucositis. Our technique for sampling buccal mucosa yielded sufficient cells for RNA analysis using polymerase chain reaction.

  8. Pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Ce; Zhang, Quan-Bao; Qiao, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is the final pathological result of various chronic liver diseases, and fibrosis is the precursor of cirrhosis. Many types of cells, cytokines and miRNAs are involved in the initiation and progression of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is a pivotal event in fibrosis. Defenestration and capillarization of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells are major contributing factors to hepatic dysfunction in liver cirrhosis. Activated Kupffer cells destroy hepatocytes and stimulate the activation of HSCs. Repeated cycles of apoptosis and regeneration of hepatocytes contribute to pathogenesis of cirrhosis. At the molecular level, many cytokines are involved in mediation of signaling pathways that regulate activation of HSCs and fibrogenesis. Recently, miRNAs as a post-transcriptional regulator have been found to play a key role in fibrosis and cirrhosis. Robust animal models of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, as well as the recently identified critical cellular and molecular factors involved in the development of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis will facilitate the development of more effective therapeutic approaches for these conditions. PMID:24966602

  9. Pathogenesis of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Machado, Mariana Verdelho; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2016-06-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a necro-inflammatory response that ensues when hepatocytes are injured by lipids (lipotoxicity). NASH is a potential outcome of nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL), a condition that occurs when lipids accumulate in hepatocytes. NASH may be reversible, but it can also result in cirrhosis and primary liver cancer. We are beginning to learn about the mechanisms of progression of NAFL and NASH. NAFL does not inevitably lead to NASH because NAFL is a heterogeneous condition. This heterogeneity exists because different types of lipids with different cytotoxic potential accumulate in the NAFL, and individuals with NAFL differ in their ability to defend against lipotoxicity. There are no tests that reliably predict which patients with NAFL will develop lipotoxicity. However, NASH encompasses the spectrum of wound-healing responses induced by lipotoxic hepatocytes. Differences in these wound-healing responses among individuals determine whether lipotoxic livers regenerate, leading to stabilization or resolution of NASH, or develop progressive scarring, cirrhosis, and possibly liver cancer. We review concepts that are central to the pathogenesis of NASH. PMID:26928243

  10. Pathogenesis of Mucormycosis

    PubMed Central

    Spellberg, Brad; Walsh, Thomas J.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2012-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a life-threatening infection that occurs in patients who are immunocompromised because of diabetic ketoacidosis, neutropenia, organ transplantation, and/or increased serum levels of available iron. Because of the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus, cancer, and organ transplantation, the number of patients at risk for this deadly infection is increasing. Despite aggressive therapy, which includes disfiguring surgical debridement and frequently adjunctive toxic antifungal therapy, the overall mortality rate is high. New strategies to prevent and treat mucormycosis are urgently needed. Understanding the pathogenesis of mucormycosis and the host response to invading hyphae ultimately will provide targets for novel therapeutic interventions. In this supplement, we review the current knowledge about the virulence traits used by the most common etiologic agent of mucormycosis, Rhizopus oryzae. Because patients with elevated serum levels of available iron are uniquely susceptible to mucormycosis and these infections are highly angioinvasive, emphasis is placed on the ability of the organism to acquire iron from the host and on its interactions with endothelial cells lining blood vessels. Several promising therapeutic strategies in preclinical stages are identified. PMID:22247441

  11. Recent progress in melasma pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ai-Young

    2015-11-01

    Melasma is a common skin pigmentation condition. Given therapeutic difficulty as one of the biggest concerns, understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of melasma becomes essential. UV irradiation, female sex hormones, and inflammatory processes are addressed as triggering factors with genetic predisposition. The mechanism of UV-induced melanogenesis has been extensively investigated as a model system to study melasma pathogenesis. Hitherto, treatment modalities for melasma are similar to other hyperpigmentation disorders. However, individual triggering factors induce a separate pigmentation disease, whose pathogenic mechanisms and clinical phenotypes are different from the ones encountered in melasma. Fortunately, there have been ongoing updates on melasma pathogenesis with regard to major triggering factors. Presence of certain factors working independently of UV exposure and role of dermal factors and microRNAs are being identified as novel discoveries about melasma pathogenesis. In this review, the melasma pathogenesis is reviewed in association with updated and new findings. PMID:26230865

  12. Transition metal ions at the crossroads of mucosal immunity and microbial pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Ochoa, Vladimir E.; Jellbauer, Stefan; Klaus, Suzi; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    Transition metal ions are essential micronutrients for all living organisms. In mammals, these ions are often protein-bound and sequestered within cells, limiting their availability to microbes. Moreover, in response to infection, mammalian hosts further reduce the availability of metal nutrients by activating epithelial cells and recruiting neutrophils, both of which release metal-binding proteins with antimicrobial function. Microorganisms, in turn, have evolved sophisticated systems to overcome these limitations and acquire the metal ions essential for their growth. Here we review some of the mechanisms employed by the host and by pathogenic microorganisms to compete for transition metal ions, with a discussion of how evading “nutritional immunity” benefits pathogens. Furthermore, we provide new insights on the mechanisms of host-microbe competition for metal ions in the mucosa, particularly in the inflamed gut. PMID:24478990

  13. Biliary Mucosal Barrier and Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Verdier, Julien; Luedde, Tom; Sellge, Gernot

    2015-01-01

    Background The biliary system is in continuous contact with the complex microbiota of the intestine. Microbial products have recently been proposed as potential triggers for biliary diseases. Methods The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the current knowledge regarding the role of the biliary and intestinal microbiome in biliary inflammatory diseases. Results Previously, it was suggested that the healthy biliary system is a sterile organ, while acute cholangitis and cholecystitis may occur from ascending infections. Although non-inflammatory biliary colonization by certain bacteria such as Salmonella spp. has been already recognized since several decades, human and animal studies indicated only very recently that the gallbladder harbors a complex microbiota also under non-pathologic conditions. Novel findings suggested that – similar to the situation in the intestine – the biliary mucosa features a chemical, mechanical, and immunological barrier, ensuring immunological tolerance against commensals. However, microbial triggers might influence acute and chronic inflammatory disease of the biliary system and the whole liver. Conclusion Although yet undefined, dysbiosis of the biliary or intestinal microbiota rather than a single microorganism may influence disease progression. PMID:26468308

  14. [Direct and indirect mucosal wave imaging techniques].

    PubMed

    Krasnodębska, Paulina; Szkiełkowska, Agata

    2016-04-01

    The vocal folds play a key role in the process of phonation. Cyclical movements of the vocal folds model a space called glottis, what leads to voice formation. The space contains surface between the vocal folds and the inner surface of the arytenoid cartilages. The best indicator of the vocal folds vibratory function is the mucosal wave. The presence and size of the mucosal wave is widely recognized as an indicator of tension and plasticity of vocal folds. It is also essential in the process of creating a proper, resonant voice. In the article, current knowledge of mucosal wave imaging techniques is given. Imaging can be carried out directly and indirectly. Among the direct methods, the following are distinguished: laryngostroboscopy, laryngovideostroboscopy, videokymography and high-speed digital imaging. Indirect methods include: electroglottography, photoglottography and ultrasonography. PMID:27137829

  15. Novel vaccine development strategies for inducing mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Fujkuyama, Yoshiko; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Kataoka, Kosuke; Gilbert, Rebekah S; McGhee, Jerry R; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2012-01-01

    To develop protective immune responses against mucosal pathogens, the delivery route and adjuvants for vaccination are important. The host, however, strives to maintain mucosal homeostasis by responding to mucosal antigens with tolerance, instead of immune activation. Thus, induction of mucosal immunity through vaccination is a rather difficult task, and potent mucosal adjuvants, vectors or other special delivery systems are often used, especially in the elderly. By taking advantage of the common mucosal immune system, the targeting of mucosal dendritic cells and microfold epithelial cells may facilitate the induction of effective mucosal immunity. Thus, novel routes of immunization and antigen delivery systems also show great potential for the development of effective and safe mucosal vaccines against various pathogens. The purpose of this review is to introduce several recent approaches to induce mucosal immunity to vaccines, with an emphasis on mucosal tissue targeting, new immunization routes and delivery systems. Defining the mechanisms of mucosal vaccines is as important as their efficacy and safety, and in this article, examples of recent approaches, which will likely accelerate progress in mucosal vaccine development, are discussed. PMID:22380827

  16. Pathogenesis of Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Gundy, Karl Van; Sharma, Om P.

    1987-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown etiology. The organs that are involved by sarcoidosis include the lungs in which the granuloma is seen in more than 90% of patients to the pituitary, which is only rarely affected. There are many hypotheses as to the cause of sarcoidosis. Some of them rely on the similarities seen between sarcoidosis and the other granuloma-forming diseases such as tuberculosis, berylliosis, pine pollen inhalation and acute and chronic bacterial and viral infections, while others find similarities between sarcoidosis and immune reactions observed in autoimmune disorders. Still other explanations implicate a genetic predisposition or a still-unknown agent as the underlying cause of the granuloma formation. Images PMID:3310401

  17. Gastric Mucosal Energy Metabolism and “Stress Ulceration,”

    PubMed Central

    Menguy, Rene; Masters, Y. F.

    1974-01-01

    Acute gastric erosions following hemorrhagic shock (stress ulceration) have been attributed to gastric hyperacidity, altered gastric secretion of mucus and an abnormal permeability of the gastric mucosa to H+. This report aims at presenting evidence supporting an alternate hypothesis: the event linking shock-induced gastric mucosal ischemia to mucosal necrosis is a deficit in gastric mucosal energy metabolism. Our experimental procedure consisted of harvesting the stomachs of rats and rabbits by “stop-freeze” (liquid N2) at different intervals after the induction of hemorrhagic shock. Levels of adenosine-phosphates and of glycolytic intermediates in gastric mucosa were measured. We studied the changes in the levels of these substrates produced by shock as well as by factors capable, when combined with shock, of rendering the gastric mucosa more vulnerable to stress ulceration. The influence of shock and of these modifying factors were evaluated by comparison with data from appropriately designed control experiments. In parallel experiments we examined the frequency of stress ulceration (gross and microscopic) under these same standard conditions. There have emerged from these studies a number of observations all based upon data with the highest statistical significance. The data are consonant with the hypothesis stated above: an energy deficit severe enough to cause cellular necrosis is the event linking shock-induced gastric mucosal ischemia and stress ulceration. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2. PMID:4278107

  18. The pathogenesis of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bone, R C

    1991-09-15

    Sepsis and its sequelae (sepsis syndrome and septic shock) are increasingly common and are still potentially lethal diagnoses. Many mediators of the pathogenesis of sepsis have recently been described. These include tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), interleukins, platelet activating factor, leukotrienes, thromboxane A2, and activators of the complement cascade. Neutrophil and platelet activation may also play a role. Other agents that may participate in the sepsis cascade include adhesion molecules, kinins, thrombin, myocardial depressant substance, beta-endorphin, and heat shock proteins. Endothelium-derived relaxing factor and endothelin-1 are released from the endothelium and seem to exert a regulatory effect, counterbalancing each other. A central mediator of sepsis does not seem to exist, although TNF alpha has been commonly proposed for this role. Animal studies are difficult to extrapolate to the clinical setting because of cross-species differences and variations in experimental design. Rather than being caused by any single pathogenic mechanism, it is more likely that sepsis is related to the state of activation of the target cell, the nearby presence of other mediators, and the ability of the target cell to release other mediators. Also important is the downregulation or negative feedback of these mediators or the generation of natural inflammation inhibitors, such as interleukin-4 and interleukin-8. Endothelial damage in sepsis probably results from persistent and repetitive inflammatory insults. Eventually, these insults produce sufficient damage that downregulation can no longer occur; this leads to a state of metabolic anarchy in which the body can no longer control its own inflammatory response. PMID:1872494

  19. Oral mucosal diseases: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Stoopler, Eric T; Sollecito, Thomas P

    2014-11-01

    Oral mucosal diseases encompass several common conditions that affect the general population. Some of these disorders present with signs and symptoms that are pathognomonic for the condition, whereas others present with similar features that can make clinical diagnosis difficult to achieve. It is important for physicians to have a clear understanding of these disorders to provide appropriate care to patients. This article reviews clinical aspects of common oral mucosal disorders, including candidiasis, herpes simplex viral infections, aphthous stomatitis, lichen planus, pemphigus vulgaris, and mucous membrane pemphigoid. PMID:25443679

  20. Acute Lung Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mac Sweeney, Rob; McAuley, Daniel F.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Lung failure is the most common organ failure seen in the intensive care unit. The pathogenesis of acute respiratory failure (ARF) can be classified as (1) neuromuscular in origin, (2) secondary to acute and chronic obstructive airway diseases, (3) alveolar processes such as cardiogenic and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema and pneumonia, and (4) vascular diseases such as acute or chronic pulmonary embolism. This article reviews the more common causes of ARF from each group, including the pathological mechanisms and the principles of critical care management, focusing on the supportive, specific, and adjunctive therapies for each condition. PMID:21989697

  1. Plasma Cell Mucositis of Oro- and Hypopharynx: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Puvanendran, Mark; Lieder, Anja; Issing, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To raise awareness of plasma cell mucositis as a rare differential diagnosis for oral mucosal ulceration and its macroscopic similarity to malignancy. Method. We report a patient who presented with oral features suggestive of malignancy. A biopsy revealed plasma cell mucositis. Results. The patient successfully had a full excision of one lesion and a spontaneous resolution of the other. Conclusion. With the increasing incidence of oral mucosal pathology, physicians should be aware of this differential diagnosis. PMID:22953106

  2. Acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, N

    2000-09-01

    Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) is a representative disease of acute nephritic syndrome characterized by the sudden appearance of edema, hematuria, proteinuria, and hypertension. The prototype of AGN is acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). "Nephritogenic streptococci" are defined as organisms that are cultured from a patient who develops AGN. Although only a limited number of M-types of streptococci have been recognized as "nephritogenic streptococci", all M-types of streptococci may have nephritogenic potential because the genes for major putative nephritogenic antigens such as SPEB and NAPIr are found to be present in all group A streptococci thus far examined. Pathogenic mechanisms for APSGN involving both humoral and cell-mediated immunity have been recently proposed. The role of humoral immunity is presumed to be mediated by the in situ formation of nephritogenic streptococcal antigen-antibody complexes and circulating immune complexes. While in the cellular immune component a role for delayed-type hypersensitivity has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of APSGN. PMID:10969898

  3. Pathogenesis of Thrombotic Microangiopathies

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, X. Long; Sadler, J. Evan

    2008-01-01

    Profound thrombocytopenia and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia characterize thrombotic microangiopathy, which includes two major disorders: thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). TTP has at least three types: congenital or familial, idiopathic, and nonidiopathic. The congenital and idiopathic TTP syndromes are caused primarily by deficiency of ADAMTS13, owing to mutations in the ADAMTS13 gene or autoantibodies that inhibit ADAMTS13 activity. HUS is similar to TTP, but is associated with acute renal failure. Diarrhea-associated HUS accounts for more than 90% of cases and is usually caused by infection with Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (O157:H7). Diarrhea-negative HUS is associated with complement dysregulation in up to 50% of cases, caused by mutations in complement factor H, membrane cofactor protein, factor I or factor B, or by autoanti-bodies against factor H. The incomplete penetrance of mutations in either ADAMTS13 or complement regulatory genes suggests that precipitating events or triggers may be required to cause thrombotic microangiopathy in many patients. PMID:18215115

  4. Advances in the Pathogenesis of Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 3

    PubMed Central

    Clementi, Anna; Virzì, Grazia Maria; Brocca, Alessandra; de Cal, Massimo; Pastori, Silvia; Clementi, Maurizio; Granata, Antonio; Vescovo, Giorgio; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) type 3 is a subclassification of the CRS whereby an episode of acute kidney injury (AKI) leads to the development of acute cardiac injury or dysfunction. In general, there is limited understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in CRS type 3. An episode of AKI may have effects that depend on the severity and duration of AKI and that both directly and indirectly predispose to an acute cardiac event. Experimental data suggest that cardiac dysfunction may be related to immune system activation, inflammatory mediators release, oxidative stress, and cellular apoptosis which are well documented in the setting of AKI. Moreover, significant derangements, such as fluid and electrolyte imbalance, metabolic acidosis, and uremia, which are typical features of acute kidney injury, may impair cardiac function. In this review, we will focus on multiple factors possibly involved in the pathogenesis issues regarding CRS type 3. PMID:25821551

  5. Epidemiology, Genetic Recombination, and Pathogenesis of Coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Su, Shuo; Wong, Gary; Shi, Weifeng; Liu, Jun; Lai, Alexander C K; Zhou, Jiyong; Liu, Wenjun; Bi, Yuhai; Gao, George F

    2016-06-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) were first described in the 1960s for patients with the common cold. Since then, more HCoVs have been discovered, including those that cause severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), two pathogens that, upon infection, can cause fatal respiratory disease in humans. It was recently discovered that dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia harbor three different HCoV species, including a dominant MERS HCoV lineage that was responsible for the outbreaks in the Middle East and South Korea during 2015. In this review we aim to compare and contrast the different HCoVs with regard to epidemiology and pathogenesis, in addition to the virus evolution and recombination events which have, on occasion, resulted in outbreaks amongst humans. PMID:27012512

  6. Highlights in pathogenesis of vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Ghada F; Gomaa, Amal Ha; Al-Dhubaibi, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-03-16

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder. Many studies across decades and all over the world have attempted to illustrate the pathogenesis behind it; however, the pathogenesis of vitiligo remains elusive. This review article, we present the findings behind the most and updated theories behind this psychologically debilitating and disfiguring disease. The discussion begun with the role of genetic predisposition followed by neural theory first proposed in the 1950s. We highlight the autoimmune hypothesis, followed by the reactive oxygen species model, zinc-α2-glycoprotein deficiency hypothesis, viral theory, intrinsic theory and biochemical, molecular and cellular alterations accounting for loss of functioning melanocytes in vitiligo. Many theories were elaborated to clarify vitiligo pathogenesis. It is a multifactorial disease involving the interplay of several factors. Future research is needed to clarify the interaction of these factors for better understanding of vitiligo pathogenesis and subsequent successful treatment. PMID:25789295

  7. Highlights in pathogenesis of vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Ghada F; Gomaa, Amal HA; Al-Dhubaibi, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder. Many studies across decades and all over the world have attempted to illustrate the pathogenesis behind it; however, the pathogenesis of vitiligo remains elusive. This review article, we present the findings behind the most and updated theories behind this psychologically debilitating and disfiguring disease. The discussion begun with the role of genetic predisposition followed by neural theory first proposed in the 1950s. We highlight the autoimmune hypothesis, followed by the reactive oxygen species model, zinc-α2-glycoprotein deficiency hypothesis, viral theory, intrinsic theory and biochemical, molecular and cellular alterations accounting for loss of functioning melanocytes in vitiligo. Many theories were elaborated to clarify vitiligo pathogenesis. It is a multifactorial disease involving the interplay of several factors. Future research is needed to clarify the interaction of these factors for better understanding of vitiligo pathogenesis and subsequent successful treatment. PMID:25789295

  8. Mechanisms of Neonatal Mucosal Antibody Protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following an abrupt transition at birth from the sterile uterus to an environment with abundant commensal and pathogenic microbes, neonatal mammals are protected by maternal antibodies at mucosal surfaces. We show in mice that different antibody isotypes work in distinct ways to protect the neonatal...

  9. New frontiers in mucosal health in aquaculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dramatic decline in sequencing costs brought about by a shift in the last 5-10 years to massively parallel sequencing platforms has far-reaching consequences for the study of mucosal health in aquaculture. Transcriptome sequencing and gene expression profiling (RNA-seq) offer a rapid approach t...

  10. CpG DNA as mucosal adjuvant.

    PubMed

    McCluskie, M J; Davis, H L

    1999-09-01

    We have previously found synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing immunostimulatory CpG motifs to be a potent adjuvant to protein administered by intramuscular injection or intranasal inhalation to BALB/c mice. Herein we have further evaluated the potential of CpG ODN as a mucosal adjuvant to purified hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) when administered alone or with cholera toxin (CT). CpG ODN and CT both augmented systemic (humoral and cellular) and mucosal immune responses against HBsAg, and these could be further enhanced with higher doses of adjuvant or boosting. Overall, antibody isotypes with CT alone were predominantly IgG1 (Th2-like) whereas they were predominantly IgG2a (Th1-like) with CpG ODN alone or in combination with CT. Results from this study indicate that stimulatory CpG ODN are promising new adjuvants for mucosal vaccination strategies, whether used alone or in combination with other mucosal adjuvants. PMID:10506647

  11. A mucosal model to study microbial biofilm development and anti-biofilm therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Michele J.; Parks, Patrick J.; Peterson, Marnie L.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are a sessile colony of bacteria which adhere to and persist on surfaces. The ability of bacteria to form biofilms is considered a virulence factor, and in fact is central to the pathogenesis of some organisms. Biofilms are inherently resistant to chemotherapy and host immune responses. Clinically, biofilms are considered a primary cause of a majority of infections, such as otitis media, pneumonia in cystic fibrosis patients and endocarditis. However, the vast majority of the data on biofilm formation comes from traditional microtiter-based or flow displacement assays with no consideration given to host factors. These assays, which have been a valuable tool in high-throughput screening for biofilm-related factors, do not mimic a host-pathogen interaction and may contribute to an inappropriate estimation of the role of some factors in clinical biofilm formation. We describe the development of a novel ex vivo model of biofilm formation on a mucosal surface by an important mucosal pathogen, methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA). This model is being used for the identification of microbial virulence factors important in mucosal biofilm formation and novel anti-biofilm therapies. PMID:23246911

  12. Concepts in viral pathogenesis II

    SciTech Connect

    Notkins, A.L.; Oldstone, M.B.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper contains papers divided among 10 sections. The section titles are: Viral Structure and Function; Viral Constructs; Oncogenes, Transfection, and Differentiation; Viral Tropism and Entry into Cells; Immune Recognition of Viruses; Evolving Concepts in Viral Pathogenesis Illustrated by Selected Plant and Animal Models; Evolving Concepts in Viral Pathogenesis Illustrated by Selected Diseases in Humans; New Trends in Diagnosis and Epidemiology; and Vaccines and Antiviral Therapy.

  13. Inflammation in the pathogenesis of lyme neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Geeta; Didier, Peter J; England, John D; Santana-Gould, Lenay; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A; Martin, Dale S; Jacobs, Mary B; Philipp, Mario T

    2015-05-01

    Lyme neuroborreliosis, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, affects both peripheral and central nervous systems. We assessed a causal role for inflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis pathogenesis by evaluating the induced inflammatory changes in the central nervous system, spinal nerves, and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of rhesus macaques that were inoculated intrathecally with live B. burgdorferi and either treated with dexamethasone or meloxicam (anti-inflammatory drugs) or left untreated. ELISA of cerebrospinal fluid showed significantly elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8, chemokine ligand 2, and CXCL13 and pleocytosis in all infected animals, except dexamethasone-treated animals. Cerebrospinal fluid and central nervous system tissues of infected animals were culture positive for B. burgdorferi regardless of treatment. B. burgdorferi antigen was detected in the DRG and dorsal roots by immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy. Histopathology revealed leptomeningitis, vasculitis, and focal inflammation in the central nervous system; necrotizing focal myelitis in the cervical spinal cord; radiculitis; neuritis and demyelination in the spinal roots; and inflammation with neurodegeneration in the DRG that was concomitant with significant neuronal and satellite glial cell apoptosis. These changes were absent in the dexamethasone-treated animals. Electromyography revealed persistent abnormalities in F-wave chronodispersion in nerve roots of a few infected animals; which were absent in dexamethasone-treated animals. These results suggest that inflammation has a causal role in the pathogenesis of acute Lyme neuroborreliosis. PMID:25892509

  14. Inflammation in the Pathogenesis of Lyme Neuroborreliosis

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Geeta; Didier, Peter J.; England, John D.; Santana-Gould, Lenay; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A.; Martin, Dale S.; Jacobs, Mary B.; Philipp, Mario T.

    2016-01-01

    Lyme neuroborreliosis, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, affects both peripheral and central nervous systems. We assessed a causal role for inflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis pathogenesis by evaluating the induced inflammatory changes in the central nervous system, spinal nerves, and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of rhesus macaques that were inoculated intrathecally with live B. burgdorferi and either treated with dexamethasone or meloxicam (anti-inflammatory drugs) or left untreated. ELISA of cerebrospinal fluid showed significantly elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8, chemokine ligand 2, and CXCL13 and pleocytosis in all infected animals, except dexamethasone-treated animals. Cerebrospinal fluid and central nervous system tissues of infected animals were culture positive for B. burgdorferi regardless of treatment. B. burgdorferi antigen was detected in the DRG and dorsal roots by immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy. Histopathology revealed leptomeningitis, vasculitis, and focal inflammation in the central nervous system; necrotizing focal myelitis in the cervical spinal cord; radiculitis; neuritis and demyelination in the spinal roots; and inflammation with neurodegeneration in the DRG that was concomitant with significant neuronal and satellite glial cell apoptosis. These changes were absent in the dexamethasone-treated animals. Electromyography revealed persistent abnormalities in F-wave chronodispersion in nerve roots of a few infected animals; which were absent in dexamethasone-treated animals. These results suggest that inflammation has a causal role in the pathogenesis of acute Lyme neuroborreliosis. PMID:25892509

  15. Induction of mucosal and systemic antibody responses against the HIV coreceptor CCR5 upon intramuscular immunization and aerosol delivery of a Virus-like Particle based vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Z; Smyth, HD; Durfee, P; Chackerian, B

    2009-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) can be exploited as platforms to increase the immunogenicity of poorly immunogenic antigens, including self-proteins. We have developed VLP-based vaccines that target two domains of the HIV coreceptor CCR5 that are involved in HIV binding. These vaccines induce anti-CCR5 antibodies that bind to native CCR5 and inhibit SIV infection in vitro. Given the role of mucosal surfaces in HIV transmission and replication, we also asked whether an aerosolized, VLP-based pulmonary vaccine targeting CCR5 could induce a robust mucosal response in addition to a systemic response. In rats, both intramuscular and pulmonary immunization induced high titer IgG and IgA against the vaccine in the serum, but only aerosol vaccination induced IgA antibodies at local mucosal sites. An intramuscular prime followed by an aerosol boost resulted in strong serum and mucosal antibody responses. These results show that VLP-based vaccines targeting CCR5 induce high-titer systemic antibodies, and can elicit both local and systemic mucosal response when administered via an aerosol. Vaccination against a self-molecule that is critically involved during HIV transmission and pathogenesis is an alternative to targeting the virus itself. More generally, our results provide a general method for inducing broad systemic and mucosal antibody responses using VLP-based immunogens. PMID:19849995

  16. Mucosal vaccines: non toxic derivatives of LT and CT as mucosal adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Pizza, M; Giuliani, M M; Fontana, M R; Monaci, E; Douce, G; Dougan, G; Mills, K H; Rappuoli, R; Del Giudice, G

    2001-03-21

    Most vaccines are still delivered by injection. Mucosal vaccination would increase compliance and decrease the risk of spread of infectious diseases due to contaminated syringes. However, most vaccines are unable to induce immune responses when administered mucosally, and require the use of strong adjuvant on effective delivery systems. Cholera toxin (CT) and Escherichia coli enterotoxin (LT) are powerful mucosal adjuvants when co-administered with soluble antigens. However, their use in humans is hampered by their extremely high toxicity. During the past few years, site-directed mutagenesis has permitted the generation of LT and CT mutants fully non toxic or with dramatically reduced toxicity, which still retain their strong adjuvanticity at the mucosal level. Among these mutants, are LTK63 (serine-to-lysine substitution at position 63 in the A subunit) and LTR72 (alanine-to-arginine substitution at position 72 in the A subunit). The first is fully non toxic, whereas the latter retains some residual enzymatic activity. Both of them are extremely active as mucosal adjuvants, being able to induce very high titers of antibodies specific for the antigen with which they are co-administered. Both mutants have now been tested as mucosal adjuvants in different animal species using a wide variety of antigens. Interestingly, mucosal delivery (nasal or oral) of antigens together with LTK63 or LTR72 mutants also conferred protection against challenge in appropriate animal models (e.g. tetanus, Helicobacter pylori, pertussis, pneumococci, influenza, etc). In conclusion, these LTK63 and LTR72 mutants are safe adjuvants to enhance the immunogenicity of vaccines at the mucosal level, and will be tested soon in humans. PMID:11257389

  17. Understanding dengue pathogenesis: implications for vaccine design.

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, John R.

    2005-01-01

    In the second half of the twentieth century dengue spread throughout the tropics, threatening the health of a third of the world's population. Dengue viruses cause 50-100 million cases of acute febrile disease every year, including more than 500,000 reported cases of the severe forms of the disease--dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Attempts to create conventional vaccines have been hampered by the lack of suitable experimental models, the need to provide protection against all four serotypes simultaneously and the possible involvement of virus-specific immune responses in severe disease. The current understanding of dengue pathogenesis is outlined in this review, with special emphasis on the role of the immune response. The suspected involvement of the immune system in increased disease severity and vascular damage has raised concerns about every vaccine design strategy proposed so far. Clearly more research is needed on understanding the correlates of protection and mechanisms of pathogenesis. There is, however, an urgent need to provide a solution to the escalating global public health problems caused by dengue infections. Better disease management, vector control and improved public health measures will help reduce the current disease burden, but a safe and effective vaccine is probably the only long-term solution. Although concerns have been raised about the possible safety and efficacy of both conventional and novel vaccine technologies, the situation is now so acute that it is not possible to wait for the perfect vaccine. Consequently the careful and thorough evaluation of several of the current candidate vaccines may be the best approach to halting the spread of disease. PMID:15868023

  18. Defensins as anti-inflammatory compounds and mucosal adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Kohlgraf, Karl G; Pingel, Lindsey C; Dietrich, Deborah E; Brogden, Kim A

    2010-01-01

    Human neutrophil peptide α-defensins and human β-defensins are small, well-characterized peptides with broad antimicrobial activities. In mixtures with microbial antigens, defensins attenuate proinflammatory cytokine responses by dendritic cells in culture, attenuate proinflammatory cytokine responses in the nasal fluids of exposed mice and enhance antibody responses in the serum of vaccinated mice. Although the exact mechanisms are unknown, defensins first start by binding to microbial antigens and adhesins, often attenuating toxic or inflammatory-inducing capacities. Binding is not generic; it appears to be both defensin-specific and antigen-specific with high affinities. Binding of defensins to antigens may, in turn, alter the interaction of antigens with epithelial cells and antigen-presenting cells attenuating the production of proinflammatory cytokines. The binding of defensins to antigens may also facilitate the delivery of bound antigen to antigen-presenting cells in some cases via specific receptors. These interactions enhance the immunogenicity of the bound antigen in an adjuvant-like fashion. Future research will determine the extent to which defensins can suppress early events in inflammation and enhance systemic antibody responses, a very recent and exciting concept that could be exploited to develop therapeutics to prevent or treat a variety of oral mucosal infections, particularly where inflammation plays a role in the pathogenesis of disease and its long-term sequelae. PMID:20020832

  19. Intestinal Innate Immunity and the Pathogenesis of Salmonella Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Srikanth, Chittur V.; Cherayil, Bobby J.

    2011-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis caused by Salmonella typhimurium infection is a clinical problem with significant public health impact. The availability of several experimental models of this condition has allowed detailed investigation of the cellular and molecular interactions involved in its pathogenesis. Such studies have shed light on the roles played by bacterial virulence factors and host innate immune mechanisms in the development of intestinal inflammation. PMID:17496347

  20. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome: Pathogenesis and Clinical Picture.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Du, Hong; Wang, Li M; Wang, Ping Z; Bai, Xue F

    2016-01-01

    Hantaan virus (HTNV) causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), which is a zoonosis endemic in eastern Asia, especially in China. The reservoir host of HTNV is field mouse (Apodemus agraricus). The main manifestation of HFRS, including acute kidney injury, increases vascular permeability, and coagulation abnormalities. In this paper, we review the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of HFRS including virus factor, immunity factor and host genetic factors. Furthermore, the treatment and prevention will be discussed. PMID:26870699

  1. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome: Pathogenesis and Clinical Picture

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Du, Hong; Wang, Li M.; Wang, Ping Z.; Bai, Xue F.

    2016-01-01

    Hantaan virus (HTNV) causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), which is a zoonosis endemic in eastern Asia, especially in China. The reservoir host of HTNV is field mouse (Apodemus agraricus). The main manifestation of HFRS, including acute kidney injury, increases vascular permeability, and coagulation abnormalities. In this paper, we review the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of HFRS including virus factor, immunity factor and host genetic factors. Furthermore, the treatment and prevention will be discussed. PMID:26870699

  2. Pathogenesis, clinical features and management of hidradenitis suppurativa.

    PubMed Central

    Parks, R. W.; Parks, T. G.

    1997-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa is a chronic skin condition involving the apocrine glandular zones. Affected patients may present with acute abscesses, but the condition often progresses to a chronic state with persistent pain, sepsis, sinus tract and fistula formation, purulent discharge and dermal scarring. Treatment of patients with severe disease can be difficult and may require complex surgical intervention. This review encompasses the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations and management options for patients with hidradenitis suppurativa. Images Figure 2 PMID:9135232

  3. HVEM is a TNF Receptor with Multiple Regulatory Roles in the Mucosal Immune System.

    PubMed

    Shui, Jr-Wen; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2014-04-01

    The herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF), and therefore it is also known as TNFRSF14 or CD270 (1,2). In recent years, we have focused on understanding HVEM function in the mucosa of the intestine, particularly on the role of HVEM in colitis pathogenesis, host defense and regulation of the microbiota (2,3,4). HVEM is an unusual TNF receptor because of its high expression levels in the gut epithelium, its capacity to bind ligands that are not members of the TNF super family, including immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily members BTLA and CD160, and its bi-directional functionality, acting as a signaling receptor or as a ligand for the receptor BTLA. Clinically, Hvem recently was reported as an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) risk gene as a result of genome wide association studies (5,6). This suggests HVEM could have a regulatory role influencing the regulation of epithelial barrier, host defense and the microbiota. Consistent with this, using mouse models, we have revealed how HVEM is involved in colitis pathogenesis, mucosal host defense and epithelial immunity (3,7). Although further studies are needed, our results provide the fundamental basis for understanding why Hvem is an IBD risk gene, and they confirm that HVEM is a mucosal gatekeeper with multiple regulatory functions in the mucosa. PMID:24851095

  4. Mimicking the host and its microenvironment in vitro for studying mucosal infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Crabbé, Aurélie; Ledesma, Maria A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    Why is a healthy person protected from Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections, while individuals with cystic fibrosis or damaged epithelium are particularly susceptible to this opportunistic pathogen? In order to address this question, it is essential to thoroughly understand the dynamic interplay between the host microenvironment and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, using modeI systems that represent key aspects of human mucosal tissues in health and disease allows recreating in vivo host-pathogen interactions in a physiologically relevant manner. In this review, we discuss how factors of mucosal tissues, such as apical-basolateral polarity, junctional complexes, extracellular matrix proteins, mucus, multicellular complexity (including indigenous microbiota), and other physicochemical factors affect P. aeruginosa pathogenesis and are thus important to mimic in vitro. We highlight in vitro cell and tissue culture model systems of increasing complexity that have been used over the past 35 years to study the infectious disease process of P. aeruginosa, mainly focusing on lung models, and their respective advantages and limitations. Continued improvements of in vitro models based on our expanding knowledge of host microenvironmental factors that participate in P. aeruginosa pathogenesis will help advance fundamental understanding of pathogenic mechanisms and increase the translational potential of research findings from bench to the patient’s bedside. PMID:24737619

  5. A Mouse Model of Otitis Media Identifies HB-EGF as a Mediator of Inflammation-Induced Mucosal Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Kwang; Chavez, Eduardo; Kurabi, Arwa; Baird, Andrew; Wasserman, Stephen I.; Ryan, Allen F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Otitis media is one of the most common pediatric infections. While it is usually treated without difficulty, up to 20% of children may progress to long-term complications that include hearing loss, impaired speech and language development, academic underachievement, and irreversible disease. Hyperplasia of middle ear mucosa contributes to the sequelae of acute otitis media and is of important clinical significance. Understanding the role of growth factors in the mediation of mucosal hyperplasia could lead to the development of new therapeutic interventions for this disease and its sequelae. Methods From a whole genome gene array analysis of mRNA expression during acute otitis media, we identified growth factors with expression kinetics temporally related to hyperplasia. We then tested these factors for their ability to stimulate mucosal epithelial growth in vitro, and determined protein levels and histological distribution in vivo for active factors. Results From the gene array, we identified seven candidate growth factors with upregulation of mRNA expression kinetics related to mucosal hyperplasia. Of the seven, only HB-EGF (heparin-binding-epidermal growth factor) induced significant mucosal epithelial hyperplasia in vitro. Subsequent quantification of HB-EGF protein expression in vivo via Western blot analysis confirmed that the protein is highly expressed from 6 hours to 24 hours after bacterial inoculation, while immunohistochemistry revealed production by middle ear epithelial cells and infiltrating lymphocytes. Conclusion Our data suggest an active role for HB-EGF in the hyperplasia of the middle ear mucosal epithelium during otitis media. These results imply that therapies targeting HB-EGF could ameliorate mucosal growth during otitis media, and thereby reduce detrimental sequelae of this childhood disease. PMID:25033458

  6. Management of Mucositis During Chemotherapy: From Pathophysiology to Pragmatic Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Van Sebille, Ysabella Z A; Stansborough, Romany; Wardill, Hannah R; Bateman, Emma; Gibson, Rachel J; Keefe, Dorothy M

    2015-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis is a common condition caused by the breakdown of the mucosal barrier. Symptoms can include pain, vomiting and diarrhoea, which can often necessitate chemotherapy treatment breaks or dose reductions, thus compromising survival outcomes. Despite the significant impact of mucositis, there are currently limited clinically effective pharmacological therapies for the pathology. New emerging areas of research have been proposed to play key roles in the development of mucositis, providing rationale for potential new therapeutics for the prevention, treatment or management of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. This review aims to address these new areas of research and to comment on the therapeutics arising from them. PMID:26384312

  7. Mucosal immunity: its role in defense and allergy.

    PubMed

    Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena; Tucková, Ludmila; Lodinová-Zádniková, Rája; Stepánková, Renata; Cukrowska, Bozena; Funda, David P; Striz, Ilja; Kozáková, Hana; Trebichavský, Ilja; Sokol, Dan; Reháková, Zuzana; Sinkora, Jirí; Fundová, Petra; Horáková, Dana; Jelínková, Lenka; Sánchez, Daniel

    2002-06-01

    The interface between the organism and the outside world, which is the site of exchange of nutrients, export of products and waste components, must be selectively permeable and at the same time, it must constitute a barrier equipped with local defense mechanisms against environmental threats (e.g. invading pathogens). The boundaries with the environment (mucosal and skin surfaces) are therefore covered with special epithelial layers which support this barrier function. The immune system, associated with mucosal surfaces covering the largest area of the body (200-300 m(2)), evolved mechanisms discriminating between harmless antigens and commensal microorganisms and dangerous pathogens. The innate mucosal immune system, represented by epithelial and other mucosal cells and their products, is able to recognize the conserved pathogenic patterns on microbes by pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors, CD14 and others. As documented in experimental gnotobiotic models, highly protective colonization of mucosal surfaces by commensals has an important stimulatory effect on postnatal development of immune responses, metabolic processes (e.g. nutrition) and other host activities; these local and systemic immune responses are later replaced by inhibition, i.e. by induction of mucosal (oral) tolerance. Characteristic features of mucosal immunity distinguishing it from systemic immunity are: strongly developed mechanisms of innate defense, the existence of characteristic populations of unique types of lymphocytes, colonization of the mucosal and exocrine glands by cells originating from the mucosal organized tissues ('common mucosal system') and preferential induction of inhibition of the responses to nondangerous antigens (mucosal tolerance). Many chronic diseases, including allergy, may occur as a result of genetically based or environmentally induced changes in mechanisms regulating mucosal immunity and tolerance; this leads to impaired mucosal barrier

  8. Emu Oil Combined with Lyprinol™ Reduces Small Intestinal Damage in a Rat Model of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis.

    PubMed

    Mashtoub, Suzanne; Lampton, Lorrinne S; Eden, Georgina L; Cheah, Ker Y; Lymn, Kerry A; Bajic, Juliana E; Howarth, Gordon S

    2016-10-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis is characterized by inflammation and ulcerating lesions lining the alimentary tract. Emu Oil and Lyprinol™ have independently demonstrated their therapeutic potential in intestinal inflammatory disorders, including mucositis. We investigated Emu Oil and Lyprinol™ in combination for their further potential to alleviate chemotherapy-induced mucositis in rats. Rats were gavaged with (1 ml) water, Olive Oil, Emu Oil + Olive Oil, Lyprinol™ + Olive Oil or Emu Oil + Lyprinol™ from Days 0 to 7, injected with saline (control) or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) on Day 5 and euthanized on Day 8. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity (indicative of acute inflammation), histological severity scores, and intestinal architecture were quantified. Myeloperoxidase activity was significantly increased in the jejunum and ileum following 5-FU, compared to saline controls. Both Olive Oil and Emu Oil + Lyprinol™ significantly reduced jejunal MPO levels (1.8-fold and 1.7-fold, respectively), whereas only Emu Oil + Lyprinol™ significantly decreased ileal MPO levels, relative to 5-FU controls. All oil treatments decreased histological severity scores in the jejunum and ileum, and normalized crypt depth in the mid small intestine, relative to 5-FU controls. Emu Oil combined with Lyprinol™ partially reduced acute small intestinal inflammation. Isolating bioactive constituents of these naturally sourced oils could provide a more targeted strategy to protect against intestinal mucositis. PMID:27618153

  9. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed. PMID:24212642

  10. Mucosal production of uric acid by airway epithelial cells contributes to particulate matter-induced allergic sensitization.

    PubMed

    Gold, M J; Hiebert, P R; Park, H Y; Stefanowicz, D; Le, A; Starkey, M R; Deane, A; Brown, A C; Liu, G; Horvat, J C; Ibrahim, Z A; Sukkar, M B; Hansbro, P M; Carlsten, C; VanEeden, S; Sin, D D; McNagny, K M; Knight, D A; Hirota, J A

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM), a major component of air pollution, contributes to increased morbidity and mortality worldwide. PM induces innate immune responses and contributes to allergic sensitization, although the mechanisms governing this process remain unclear. Lung mucosal uric acid has also been linked to allergic sensitization. The links among PM exposure, uric acid, and allergic sensitization remain unexplored. We therefore investigated the mechanisms behind PM-induced allergic sensitization in the context of lung mucosal uric acid. PM10 and house dust mite exposure selectively induced lung mucosal uric acid production and secretion in vivo, which did not occur with other challenges (lipopolysaccharide, virus, bacteria, or inflammatory/fibrotic stimuli). PM10-induced uric acid mediates allergic sensitization and augments antigen-specific T-cell proliferation, which is inhibited by uricase. We then demonstrate that human airway epithelial cells secrete uric acid basally and after stimulation through a previously unidentified mucosal secretion system. Our work discovers a previously unknown mechanism of air pollution-induced, uric acid-mediated, allergic sensitization that may be important in the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:26509876

  11. Mucosal malignant melanoma of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Norhafizah, M; Mustafa, W M B W; Sabariah, A R; Shiran, M S; Pathmanathan, R

    2010-09-01

    Mucosal malignant melanoma (MMM) is an aggressive tumour occurring in the upper respiratory tract. It is rare compared to malignant melanoma of the skin. We report a case of a 53-year-old man with left paranasal swelling. A biopsy showed high-grade spindle cell tumour. Subsequently a subtotal maxillectomy was performed. Histopathological examination revealed a hypercellular tumour composed of mixed spindle and epitheloid cells with very occasional intracytoplasmic melanin pigment. The malignant cells were immunopositive for vimentin, S-100 protein and HMB-45. It was diagnosed as mucosal malignant melanoma (MMM). This article illustrates a rare case of MMM where the diagnosis may be missed or delayed without proper histopathological examination that include meticulous search for melanin pigment and appropriate immunohistochemical stains to confirm the diagnosis. Malignant melanoma can mimic many other types of high-grade malignancy and should be considered as a differential diagnosis in many of these instances. PMID:21939172

  12. Probiotics as Antifungals in Mucosal Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Victor H; Bandara, H M H N; Mayer, Marcia P A; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-05-01

    Candidais an opportunistic pathogen that causes mucosal and deep systemic candidiasis. The emergence of drug resistance and the side effects of currently available antifungals have restricted their use as long-term prophylactic agents for candidal infections. Given this scenario, probiotics have been suggested as a useful alternative for the management of candidiasis. We analyzed the available data on the efficacy of probiotics in candidal colonization of host surfaces. A number of well-controlled studies indicate that probiotics, particularly lactobacilli, suppressCandidagrowth and biofilm development in vitro.A few clinical trials have also shown the beneficial effects of probiotics in reducing oral, vaginal, and enteric colonization byCandida; alleviation of clinical signs and symptoms; and, in some cases, reducing the incidence of invasive fungal infection in critically ill patients. Probiotics may serve in the future as a worthy ally in the battle against chronic mucosal candidal infections. PMID:26826375

  13. Cough-induced Tracheobronchial Mucosal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hira, Harmanjit Singh

    2011-01-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with moderate hemoptysis. It was preceded by a severe bout of cough. Flexible bronchoscopy showed diffuse tracheobronchial mucosal petechiae and bleeding. The patient was not suffering with any coagulopathies. He did not receive antiplatelet drugs. Hemoptysis resolved with cough suppressant. Subsequent bronchoscopy revealed the complete resolution of petechiae. The mechanism of bleeding after the bout of coughing is discussed. PMID:23169019

  14. The microbiome and regulation of mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Andrew J; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2014-05-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is a mucosal surface constantly exposed to foreign antigens and microbes, and is protected by a vast array of immunologically active structures and cells. Epithelial cells directly participate in immunological surveillance and direction of host responses in the gut and can express numerous pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5), TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR9, and nucleotide oligomerization domain 2, as well as produce chemotactic factors for both myeloid and lymphoid cells following inflammatory stimulation. Within the epithelium and in the underlying lamina propria resides a population of innate lymphoid cells that, following stimulation, can become activated and produce effector cytokines and exert both protective and pathogenic roles during inflammation. Lamina propria dendritic cells play a large role in determining whether the response to a particular antigen will be inflammatory or anti-inflammatory. It is becoming clear that the composition and metabolic activity of the intestinal microbiome, as a whole community, exerts a profound influence on mucosal immune regulation. The microbiome produces short-chain fatty acids, polysaccharide A, α-galactosylceramide and tryptophan metabolites, which can induce interleukin-22, Reg3γ, IgA and interleukin-17 responses. However, much of what is known about microbiome-host immune interactions has come from the study of single bacterial members of the gastrointestinal microbiome and their impact on intestinal mucosal immunity. Additionally, evidence continues to accumulate that alterations of the intestinal microbiome can impact not only gastrointestinal immunity but also immune regulation at distal mucosal sites. PMID:24329495

  15. Supersaturated Calcium Phosphate Rinse in Preventing Oral Mucositis in Young Patients Undergoing Autologous or Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mucositis; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  16. [Milestones in understanding the pathogenesis of immunmediated intestinal disorders. Evolution of their diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Arató, András

    2013-09-22

    In the last decades our knowledge has been enormously broadened about the structure and function of the gut associated lymphoid system. It was recognized how intricate and finely tuned connection exists between the gut bacterial flora and the intestinal mucosa. This subtle balance ensures mucosal homeostasis, which has a key role in organ defence against pathogens. However, at the same time this system makes possible the development of oral tolerance toward the commensals and the food antigens. In case of any disturbances in this finely tuned process, immunmediated intestinal disorders may easily develop. The first part of this paper reviews the structure and function of the mucosal immune system, while the second part surveys the pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy of coeliac disease, inflammatory bowel disease and cow's milk allergy induced enteropathy. PMID:24036019

  17. Chitosan-based mucosal adjuvants: Sunrise on the ocean.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yufei; Fan, Qingze; Hao, Dongxia; Wu, Jie; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2015-11-01

    Mucosal vaccination, which is shown to elicit systemic and mucosal immune responses, serves as a non-invasive and convenient alternative to parenteral administration, with stronger capability in combatting diseases at the site of entry. The exploration of potent mucosal adjuvants is emerging as a significant area, based on the continued necessity to amplify the immune responses to a wide array of antigens that are poorly immunogenic at the mucosal sites. As one of the inspirations from the ocean, chitosan-based mucosal adjuvants have been developed with unique advantages, such as, ability of mucosal adhesion, distinct trait of opening the junctions to allow the paracellular transport of antigen, good tolerability and biocompatibility, which guaranteed the great potential in capitalizing on their application in human clinical trials. In this review, the state of art of chitosan and its derivatives as mucosal adjuvants, including thermo-sensitive chitosan system as mucosal adjuvant that were newly developed by author's group, was described, as well as the clinical application perspective. After a brief introduction of mucosal adjuvants, chitosan and its derivatives as robust immune potentiator were discussed in detail and depth, in regard to the metabolism, safety profile, mode of actions and preclinical and clinical applications, which may shed light on the massive clinical application of chitosan as mucosal adjuvant. PMID:26271831

  18. Early diagnosis and regional evaluation of radiation mucositis by newly developed TC-99M DTPA labelled agent

    SciTech Connect

    Tamamura, H.; Ohguchi, M.; Higashi, K.

    1994-05-01

    We have developed a new drug for treating acute radiation mucositis which consists of a steroid with potent localized anti-inflammatory effect, and sodium alginate with strong adherence to mucosal surface, and since then we have treated many patients with success. In the present study, we labelled this agent with Tc-99m DTPA, and administered to 10 healthy volunteers and 35 patients with acute radiation mucositis, and determined the values of mean transit time (MTT) and T1/2 from the dynamic phase and the time taken for the mixture to reach to cardia according to Talliefer`s method. Abnormal radionuclide (RN) accumulation in the esophagus was evaluated at 10 minutes after the administration and, the ratio of abnormal RN accumulation count were calculated. In the healthy volunteers, the MTT was 2.67 seconds, T1/2 14.0 seconds, and the time for the drug to reach the stomach 5.25 seconds. Even in the patients with acute radiation mucositis, these values were not significantly different from the healthy controls. However, the images taken at 10 minutes after the administration revealed abnormal RN accumulation corresponding to the irradiated region in all patients. The ratio of this abnormal RN accumulation to the total RN count in the esophagus was 52.48%, the pre-administration RN ratio was 6.45%. None of the healthy volunteers produced abnormal RN accumulation. The ratio of total RN count in the esophagus to pre-administration RN count was only 1.87% in the healthy volunteers, whereas 11.39% in the radiation mucositis group. When Tc-99m DTPA-labelled water was used similarly, the region of radiation esophagitis was not identified on scintigraphy. It was thus suggested that diagnosis of radiation mucositis could be made only with this new agent of high viscosity and very strong mucous adhesive property. Owing to its repeatability and simplicity, this new agent seemed to be useful to make the early diagnosis and regional evaluation of radiation mucositis possible.

  19. Pathogenesis of anemia in Trypanosoma brucei-infected mice.

    PubMed Central

    Amole, B O; Clarkson, A B; Shear, H L

    1982-01-01

    The pathogenesis of anemia was studied in trypanosome-infected mice. A strain of Trypanosoma brucei, TREU 667, was used which first produces an acute phase marked by waves of parasitemia. Erythrocytes from infected animals were coated with immunoglobulin M during or just before the waves of anemia and parasitological crises. Erythrocytes from normal animals could be sensitized with "precrisis" sera presumably containing antigen and antibody. These data suggest that anemia during the acute phase is due to sensitization of erythrocytes with immunoglobulin M-antigen complexes. The anemia is partially compensated by a strong erythropoietic response. The acute phase is followed by a chronic phase marked by a constant high parasitemia and immunosuppression. The less marked anemia occurring during this latter phase is due to hemodilution and perhaps a low but significant immune response to the parasites, which causes continuing erythrocyte sensitization by immunoglobulin M-antigen complexes. PMID:7201455

  20. Acute genital ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  1. Dietary cysteine is used more efficiently by children with severe acute malnutrition with edema compared with those without edema

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Children with edematous severe acute malnutrition (SAM) produce less cysteine than do their nonedematous counterparts. They also have marked glutathione (GSH) depletion, hair loss, skin erosion, gut mucosal atrophy, and depletion of mucins. Because GSH, skin, hair, mucosal, and mucin proteins are ri...

  2. Roles of M cells in infection and mucosal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Miao; Gao, Zeqian; Zhang, Zhongwang; Pan, Li; Zhang, Yongguang

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system plays a crucial part in the control of infection. Exposure of humans and animals to potential pathogens generally occurs through mucosal surfaces, thus, strategies that target the mucosa seem rational and efficient vaccination measures. Vaccination through the mucosal immune system can induce effective systemic immune responses simultaneously with mucosal immunity compared with parenteral vaccination. M cells are capable of transporting luminal antigens to the underlying lymphoid tissues and can be exploited by pathogens as an entry portal to invade the host. Therefore, targeting M-cell-specific molecules might enhance antigen entry, initiate the immune response, and induce protection against mucosal pathogens. Here, we outline our understanding of the distribution and function of M cells, and summarize the advances in mucosal vaccine strategies that target M cells. PMID:25483705

  3. Mucosal vaccines: novel advances in technology and delivery.

    PubMed

    Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2009-08-01

    Mucosal vaccines are considered the most suitable type of vaccines to combat emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases because of their ability to induce both mucosal and systemic immunity. Considerable advances have been made toward the development of mucosal vaccines against influenza virus and rotavirus. Many additional mucosal vaccines are in development, including vaccines against cholera, typhoid, traveler's diarrhea and respiratory infections. In addition to oral and nasal vaccines, transcutaneous (or skin patch) and sublingual immunizations are now part of a new generation of mucosal vaccines. Furthermore, a rice-based oral vaccine (MucoRice) has been receiving global attention as a new form of cold chain-free vaccine, because it is stable at room temperature for a prolonged period. This review describes recent developments in mucosal vaccines with promising preclinical and clinical results. PMID:19627189

  4. Antibodies and Their Receptors: Different Potential Roles in Mucosal Defense

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Rachel E.; Vidarsson, Gestur

    2013-01-01

    Over recent years it has become increasingly apparent that mucosal antibodies are not only restricted to the IgM and IgA isotypes, but that also other isotypes and particularly IgG can be found in significant quantities at some mucosal surfaces, such as in the genital tract. Their role is more complex than traditionally believed with, among other things, the discovery of novel function of mucosal immunoglobulin receptors. A thorough knowledge in the source and function and mucosal immunoglobulins is particularly important in development of vaccines providing mucosal immunity, and also in the current climate of microbicide development, to combat major world health issues such as HIV. We present here a comprehensive review of human antibody mediated mucosal immunity. PMID:23882268

  5. Effect of capsaicin and chilli on ethanol induced gastric mucosal injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kang, J Y; Teng, C H; Wee, A; Chen, F C

    1995-05-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of chilli, is gastroprotective against experimental gastric injury when given intragastrically. Epidemiological and clinical data suggest that chilli ingestion may have a beneficial effect on human peptic ulcer disease. This study showed a gastroprotective effect of intragastric capsaicin, in doses of 2 and 5 mg, on ethanol induced gastric mucosal injury using macroscopic, histological, scanning electron microscopic, and biochemical indices. Subcutaneous administration of 2 mg of capsaicin had the same gastroprotective effect as intragastric administration. Acute intragastric administration and chronic ingestion of chilli powder in doses comparable with that consumed in humans (up to 200 mg in single doses or 200 mg daily for four weeks) likewise protected the gastric mucosa. Both the mucosa and gastric juice had higher mucus contents when capsaicin or chilli rather than saline or solvent was used before ethanol challenge. In control animals capsaicin also increased gastric juice mucus content although the mucosal content was unaffected. Increased gastric mucus production may therefore be one mechanism by which capsaicin and chilli exert their gastroprotective effect although an alternative explanation is that the reduction in mucosal mucus depletion is secondary to the protective effect of capsaicin and chilli. PMID:7541007

  6. Effect of capsaicin and chilli on ethanol induced gastric mucosal injury in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kang, J Y; Teng, C H; Wee, A; Chen, F C

    1995-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of chilli, is gastroprotective against experimental gastric injury when given intragastrically. Epidemiological and clinical data suggest that chilli ingestion may have a beneficial effect on human peptic ulcer disease. This study showed a gastroprotective effect of intragastric capsaicin, in doses of 2 and 5 mg, on ethanol induced gastric mucosal injury using macroscopic, histological, scanning electron microscopic, and biochemical indices. Subcutaneous administration of 2 mg of capsaicin had the same gastroprotective effect as intragastric administration. Acute intragastric administration and chronic ingestion of chilli powder in doses comparable with that consumed in humans (up to 200 mg in single doses or 200 mg daily for four weeks) likewise protected the gastric mucosa. Both the mucosa and gastric juice had higher mucus contents when capsaicin or chilli rather than saline or solvent was used before ethanol challenge. In control animals capsaicin also increased gastric juice mucus content although the mucosal content was unaffected. Increased gastric mucus production may therefore be one mechanism by which capsaicin and chilli exert their gastroprotective effect although an alternative explanation is that the reduction in mucosal mucus depletion is secondary to the protective effect of capsaicin and chilli. Images p665-a PMID:7541007

  7. Concurrent Mucosal Melanoma and Angiofibroma of the Nose

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Hyung; Ha, Jin Bu; Lee, Junguee; Lee, Joohyung

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma rarely develops in the paranasal sinuses, and generally has a poor prognosis. However, mucosal melanoma can masquerade both clinically and histopathologically as a benign lesion, rendering accurate early diagnosis difficult. On the other hand, angiofibroma, a benign tumor, is more easily diagnosed than a mucosal melanoma, because the former exhibits specific histopathological features. No cases of concurrent angiofibroma and mucosal melanoma have been reported to date. We describe such a case below. PMID:27095516

  8. Mucosal and systemic adjuvant activity of alphavirus replicon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Joseph M.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Konopka, Jennifer L.; Collier, Martha L.; Richmond, Erin M. B.; Davis, Nancy L.; Staats, Herman F.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2006-03-01

    Vaccination represents the most effective control measure in the fight against infectious diseases. Local mucosal immune responses are critical for protection from, and resolution of, infection by numerous mucosal pathogens. Antigen processing across mucosal surfaces is the natural route by which mucosal immunity is generated, as peripheral antigen delivery typically fails to induce mucosal immune responses. However, we demonstrate in this article that mucosal immune responses are evident at multiple mucosal surfaces after parenteral delivery of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP). Moreover, coinoculation of null VRP (not expressing any transgene) with inactivated influenza virions, or ovalbumin, resulted in a significant increase in antigen-specific systemic IgG and fecal IgA antibodies, compared with antigen alone. Pretreatment of VRP with UV light largely abrogated this adjuvant effect. These results demonstrate that alphavirus replicon particles possess intrinsic systemic and mucosal adjuvant activity and suggest that VRP RNA replication is the trigger for this activity. We feel that these observations and the continued experimentation they stimulate will ultimately define the specific components of an alternative pathway for the induction of mucosal immunity, and if the activity is evident in humans, will enable new possibilities for safe and inexpensive subunit and inactivated vaccines. vaccine vector | Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus | viral immunology | RNA virus

  9. Topical protection of human esophageal mucosal integrity.

    PubMed

    Woodland, P; Batista-Lima, F; Lee, C; Preston, S L; Dettmar, P; Sifrim, D

    2015-06-15

    Patients with nonerosive reflux disease exhibit impaired esophageal mucosal integrity, which may underlie enhanced reflux perception. In vitro topical application of an alginate solution can protect mucosal biopsies against acid-induced changes in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). We aimed to confirm this finding in a second model using 3D cell cultures and to assess prolonged protection in a biopsy model. We assessed the protective effect of a topically applied alginate solution 1 h after application. 3D cell cultures were grown by using an air-liquid interface and were studied in Ussing chambers. The apical surface was "protected" with 200 μl of either alginate or viscous control or was unprotected. The tissue was exposed to pH 3 + bile acid solution for 30 min and TER change was calculated. Distal esophageal mucosal biopsies were taken from 12 patients and studied in Ussing chambers. The biopsies were coated with either alginate or viscous control solution. The biopsies were then bathed in pH 7.4 solution for 1 h. The luminal chamber solution was replaced with pH 2 solution for 30 min. Percentage changes in TER were recorded. In five biopsies fluorescein-labeled alginate solution was used to allow immunohistological localization of the alginate after 1 h. In the cell culture model, alginate solution protected tissue against acid-induced change in TER. In biopsies, 60 min after protection with alginate solution, the acidic exposure caused a -8.3 ± 2.2% change in TER compared with -25.1 ± 4.5% change after protection with the viscous control (P < 0.05). Labeled alginate could be seen coating the luminal surface in all cases. In vitro, alginate solutions can adhere to the esophageal mucosa for up to 1 h and exert a topical protectant effect. Durable topical protectants can be further explored as first-line/add-on therapies for gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:25907692

  10. Multiscale modeling of mucosal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling techniques are playing increasingly important roles in advancing a systems-level mechanistic understanding of biological processes. Computer simulations guide and underpin experimental and clinical efforts. This study presents ENteric Immune Simulator (ENISI), a multiscale modeling tool for modeling the mucosal immune responses. ENISI's modeling environment can simulate in silico experiments from molecular signaling pathways to tissue level events such as tissue lesion formation. ENISI's architecture integrates multiple modeling technologies including ABM (agent-based modeling), ODE (ordinary differential equations), SDE (stochastic modeling equations), and PDE (partial differential equations). This paper focuses on the implementation and developmental challenges of ENISI. A multiscale model of mucosal immune responses during colonic inflammation, including CD4+ T cell differentiation and tissue level cell-cell interactions was developed to illustrate the capabilities, power and scope of ENISI MSM. Background Computational techniques are becoming increasingly powerful and modeling tools for biological systems are of greater needs. Biological systems are inherently multiscale, from molecules to tissues and from nano-seconds to a lifespan of several years or decades. ENISI MSM integrates multiple modeling technologies to understand immunological processes from signaling pathways within cells to lesion formation at the tissue level. This paper examines and summarizes the technical details of ENISI, from its initial version to its latest cutting-edge implementation. Implementation Object-oriented programming approach is adopted to develop a suite of tools based on ENISI. Multiple modeling technologies are integrated to visualize tissues, cells as well as proteins; furthermore, performance matching between the scales is addressed. Conclusion We used ENISI MSM for developing predictive multiscale models of the mucosal immune system during gut

  11. Research controversies in management of oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Biron, P; Sebban, C; Gourmet, R; Chvetzoff, G; Philip, I; Blay, J Y

    2000-01-01

    The management of mucositis is the subject of many controversies, and the optimal treatment is still not known. Several evaluation scoring systems have been described, but no one of these is appropriate to all clinical situations: a simple scale such as that devised by the WHO can be used routinely, and more sophisticated ones can be implemented by trained experimenters working in research. We have considered the impact of each of the treatments currently available on each stage of mucositis. In attempts at prevention, self-care, in the sense of oral hygiene, must remain atraumatic. It is probably advisable to differentiate patients with good previous oral care, in whom tooth brushing is beneficial, from others, in whom the risk of hemorrhage and infection excludes any brushing. Before the dosage of chemotherapy is reduced, the curative or palliative intent of the strategy must be carefully evaluated. In the vascular phase protection of the proliferating cells is attempted by means of vasoconstriction (cryotherapy), cytoprotection (prostaglandin E2 and other antioxidants) or epithelial cell-inhibiting factors such as TGF-B3. Treatments applied in the epithelial phase are directed at increasing the cell proliferation to accelerate epithelial restoration by sucralfate and several growth factors: hematopoietic GF, which has demonstrated a direct effect on the mucosa (GM-CSF), or epithelial growth factors such as keratinocyte GF. In the ulcerative and bacteriological phase attempts are made to attenuate sepsis by means of antiseptics (chlorhexidine), amphotericin B and antiviral agents or antibiotic lozenges. In the healing phase application of the low-energy helium-neon laser has demonstrably been followed by a later time of onset, less pronounced peak severity and shorter duration of oral mucositis. After cancer treatment, oral hygiene, inhibition of oral flora, and pain relief are the main goals. Physiopathogen-specific treatment is the next step, with the emphasis

  12. Gastric Mucosal Protection by Aegle Marmelos Against Gastric Mucosal Damage: Role of Enterochromaffin Cell and Serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Purnima; Dutta, Shubha R.; Guha, Debjani

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) released from enterochromaffin (EC) cells in gastric mucosa inhibits gastric acidity by increasing the gastric mucus secretion. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of aqueous extract of Aegle marmelos (AM) ripe fruit pulp (250 mg/kg body weight) on mean ulcer index (MUI), EC cells, 5-HT content, and adherent mucosal thickness of ulcerated gastric tissue in adult albino rats. Material and Methods: Ulceration was induced by using aspirin (500 mg/kg, p.o.), cerebellar nodular lesion and applying cold-restraint stress. Results: In all cases increased MUI in gastric tissue along with decreased EC cell count was observed with concomitant decrease of 5-HT content and adherent mucosal thickness (P < 0.05). Pretreatment with AM for 14 days decreased MUI, increased EC cell count, and 5-HT content as well as adherent mucosal thickness in all ulcerated group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: AM produces gastric mucosal protection mediated by increased EC cell count and 5-HT levels. PMID:25672237

  13. Evaluation of a suspicious oral mucosal lesion.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Michele; Poh, Catherine F; Hovan, Allan J; Ng, Samson; Rosin, Miriam P

    2008-04-01

    Dentists who encounter a change in the oral mucosa of a patient must decide whether the abnormality requires further investigation. In this paper, we describe a systematic approach to the assessment of oral mucosal conditions that are thought likely to be premalignant or an early cancer. These steps, which include a comprehensive history, step-by-step clinical examination (including use of adjunctive visual tools), diagnostic testing and formulation of diagnosis, are routinely used in clinics affiliated with the British Columbia Oral Cancer Prevention Program (BC OCPP) and are recommended for consideration by dentists for use in daily practice. PMID:18387268

  14. Peptic activity and gastroduodenal mucosal damage.

    PubMed Central

    Raufman, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    This contribution reviews briefly the history of the discovery and characterization of peptic activity; secretory models and current concepts regarding the regulation of pepsinogen secretion; and evidence that pepsin is a necessary co-factor for gastroduodenal mucosal injury. Several animal studies indicate that peptic activity is required for acid- and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastroduodenal ulceration. A more vigorous approach to the development of anti-peptic drugs for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease is encouraged. Images Figure 1 PMID:9041694

  15. Mucosal Imprinting of Vaccine-Induced CD8+ T Cells Is Crucial to Inhibit the Growth of Mucosal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Federico; Bureau, Michel-Francis; Freyburger, Ludovic; Clement, Olivier; Marcheteau, Elie; Gey, Alain; Fraisse, Guillaume; Bouguin, Cécilia; Merillon, Nathalie; Dransart, Estelle; Tran, Thi; Quintin-Colonna, Françoise; Autret, Gwennhael; Thiebaud, Marine; Suleman, Muhammad; Riffault, Sabine; Wu, Tzyy-Choou; Launay, Odile; Danel, Claire; Taieb, Julien; Richardson, Jennifer; Zitvogel, Laurence; Fridman, Wolf H.; Johannes, Ludger; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Although many human cancers are located in mucosal sites, most cancer vaccines are tested against subcutaneous tumors in preclinical models. We therefore wondered whether mucosa-specific homing instructions to the immune system might influence mucosal tumor outgrowth. We showed that the growth of orthotopic head and neck or lung cancers was inhibited when a cancer vaccine was delivered by the intranasal mucosal route but not the intramuscular route. This antitumor effect was dependent on CD8+ T cells. Indeed, only intranasal vaccination elicited mucosal-specific CD8+ T cells expressing the mucosal integrin CD49a. Blockade of CD49a decreased intratumoral CD8+ T cell infiltration and the efficacy of cancer vaccine on mucosal tumor. We then showed that after intranasal vaccination, dendritic cells from lung parenchyma, but not those from spleen, induced the expression of CD49a on cocultured specific CD8+ T cells. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes from human mucosal lung cancer also expressed CD49a, which supports the relevance and possible extrapolation of these results in humans. We thus identified a link between the route of vaccination and the induction of a mucosal homing program on induced CD8+ T cells that controlled their trafficking. Immunization route directly affected the efficacy of the cancer vaccine to control mucosal tumors. PMID:23408053

  16. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy. PMID:24216997

  17. Acute and chronic traumatic encephalopathies: pathogenesis and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    DeKosky, Steven T; Blennow, Kaj; Ikonomovic, Milos D; Gandy, Sam

    2013-04-01

    Over the past decade, public awareness of the long-term pathological consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has increased. Such awareness has been stimulated mainly by reports of progressive neurological dysfunction in athletes exposed to repetitive concussions in high-impact sports such as boxing and American football, and by the rising number of TBIs in war veterans who are now more likely to survive explosive blasts owing to improved treatment. Moreover, the entity of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)--which is marked by prominent neuropsychiatric features including dementia, parkinsonism, depression, agitation, psychosis, and aggression--has become increasingly recognized as a potential late outcome of repetitive TBI. Annually, about 1% of the population in developed countries experiences a clinically relevant TBI. The goal of this Review is to provide an overview of the latest understanding of CTE pathophysiology, and to delineate the key issues that are challenging clinical and research communities, such as accurate quantification of the risk of CTE, and development of reliable biomarkers for single-incident TBI and CTE. PMID:23558985

  18. The Etiology and Pathogenesis of Chronic Rhinosinusitis: a Review of Current Hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Lam, Kent; Schleimer, Robert; Kern, Robert C

    2015-07-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a broad clinical syndrome that is characterized by prolonged mucosal inflammation of the nose and paranasal sinuses, and is typically divided into two subtypes based on the presence or absence of nasal polyps. The etiology and pathogenesis of both forms remain areas of active research. Over the last 15 years, a number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain all or part of the clinical CRS spectrum. These hypotheses reflect the concept that CRS results from a dysfunctional interplay between individual host characteristics and factors exogenous to the host. Six broad theories on CRS etiology and pathogenesis are discussed as follows: (1) the "fungal hypothesis," (2) the "superantigen hypothesis," (3) the "biofilm hypothesis," and (4) the "microbiome hypothesis," all of which emphasize key environmental factors, and (5) the "eicosanoid hypothesis" and (6) the "immune barrier hypothesis," which describe specific host factors. These theories are reviewed, and the evidence supporting them is critically appraised. PMID:26143392

  19. Dexmedetomidine decreases the oral mucosal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Yoshida, Kenji; Tanaka, Eri; Togami, Kohei; Tada, Hitoshi; Ganzberg, Steven; Yamazaki, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    There is an abundance of blood vessels in the oral cavity, and intraoperative bleeding can disrupt operations. There have been some interesting reports about constriction of vessels in the oral cavity, one of which reported that gingival blood flow in cats is controlled by sympathetic α-adrenergic fibres that are involved with vasoconstriction. Dexmedetomidine is a sedative and analgesic agent that acts through the α-2 adrenoceptor, and is expected to have a vasoconstrictive action in the oral cavity. We have focused on the relation between the effects of α-adrenoceptors by dexmedetomidine and vasoconstriction in oral tissues, and assessed the oral mucosal blood flow during sedation with dexmedetomidine. The subjects comprised 13 healthy male volunteers, sedated with dexmedetomidine in a loading dose of 6 μg/kg/h for 10 min and a continuous infusion of 0.7 μg/kg/h for 32 min. The mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and palatal mucosal blood flow (PMBF) were measured at 0, 5, 10, 12, 22, and 32 min after the start of the infusion. The HR, CO, and PBMF decreased significantly during the infusion even though there were no differences in the SV. The SVR increased significantly but the PMBF decreased significantly. In conclusion, PMBF was reduced by the mediating effect of dexmedetomidine on α-2 adrenoceptors. PMID:23958351

  20. Gastrointestinal mucosal barrier function and diseases.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Tadayuki; Miwa, Hiroto

    2016-08-01

    The gastrointestinal mucosal barrier plays an essential role in the separation of the inside of the body from the outside environment. Tight junctions (TJs) are the most important component for construction of a constitutive barrier of epithelial cells, and they regulate the permeability of the barrier by tightly sealing the cell-cell junctions. TJ proteins are represented by claudins, occludin, junctional adhesion molecules, and scaffold protein zonula occludens. Among these TJ proteins, claudins are the major components of TJs and are responsible for the barrier and the polarity of the epithelial cells. Gastrointestinal diseases including reflux esophagitis, inflammatory bowel disease, functional gastrointestinal disorders, and cancers may be regulated by these molecules, and disruption of their functions leads to chronic inflammatory conditions and chronic or progressive disease. Therefore, regulation of the barrier function of epithelial cells by regulating the expression and localization of TJ proteins is a potential new target for the treatment of these diseases. Treatment strategies for these diseases might thus be largely altered if symptom generation and/or immune dysfunction could be regulated through improvement of mucosal barrier function. Since TJ proteins may also modify tumor infiltration and metastasis, other important goals include finding a good TJ biomarker of cancer progression and patient prognosis, and developing TJ protein-targeted therapies that can modify patient prognosis. This review summarizes current understanding of gastrointestinal barrier function, TJ protein expression, and the mechanisms underlying epithelial barrier dysregulation in gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27048502

  1. Canine oral mucosal mast cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Elliott, J W; Cripps, P; Blackwood, L; Berlato, D; Murphy, S; Grant, I A

    2016-03-01

    Mast cell tumours (MCTs) are the most common cutaneous tumours of dogs, however rarely they can arise from the oral mucosa. This subset of MCT is reported to demonstrate a more aggressive clinical course than those tumours on the haired skin and the authors hypothesised that dogs with oral, mucosal MCT would have a high incidence of local lymph node metastasis at presentation and that this would be a negative prognostic factor. An additional hypothesis was that mitotic index (MI) would be prognostic. This retrospective study examines 33 dogs with MCTs arising from the oral mucosa. The results suggest that oral mucosal MCTs in the dog have a high incidence of lymph node metastasis at diagnosis (55%) which results in a poor prognosis. MI and nodal metastasis is highly prognostic. Loco-regional progression is common in these patients and dogs with adequate local control of their tumour had an improved outcome. Despite a more aggressive clinical course, treatment can result in protracted survivals, even when metastasis is present. PMID:24215587

  2. Prophylaxis of mucosal toxicity by oral propantheline and cryotherapy in children with malignancies undergoing myeloablative chemo-radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsushi; Saisho-Hattori, Takako; Koizumi, Yoshitsugu; Minegishi, Masayoshi; Iinuma, Kazuie; Imaizumi, Masue

    2006-12-01

    Mucosal toxicity is an incapacitating complication of intensive chemo-radiotherapy for children with malignant disorders, and is physically and psychologically distressful. It is therefore important to minimize mucosal toxicity in those patients. In this report, the effects of the combined prophylaxis of oral cooling (cryotherapy) and administration of propantheline, an anticholinergic drug, were studied in patients (aged 2-16 year) with acute leukemias or solid tumors, who underwent myeloablative chemo-radiotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell rescue from 1993 to 1997. Patients were pretreated with the combined prophylaxis (n = 12) or single prophylaxis (n = 5), or left untreated (n = 7). The combined prophylaxis significantly reduced the severe mucositis (combined, 8.3%; single, 20.0%; and untreated, 42.9%) and severe diarrhea (combined, 16.7%; single, 60.0%; and untreated, 57.1%). Moreover, the combined prophylaxis tended to shorten the periods of febrile episodes defined as temperature > 38 degrees C (combined, 3.8 days; single, 4.6 days; and untreated, 5.6 days). Therefore, the combination of propantheline and oral cryotherapy may be feasible and effective for reduction of mucosal toxicity in patients with malignancy who undergo high-dose chemotherapy. PMID:17146197

  3. Pathogenesis of Malaria and Clinically Similar Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Ian A.; Alleva, Lisa M.; Mills, Alison C.; Cowden, William B.

    2004-01-01

    There is now wide acceptance of the concept that the similarity between many acute infectious diseases, be they viral, bacterial, or parasitic in origin, is caused by the overproduction of inflammatory cytokines initiated when the organism interacts with the innate immune system. This is also true of certain noninfectious states, such as the tissue injury syndromes. This review discusses the historical origins of these ideas, which began with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and spread from their origins in malaria research to other fields. As well the more established proinflammatory mediators, such as TNF, interleukin-1, and lymphotoxin, the roles of nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, which are chiefly inhibitory, are discussed. The established and potential roles of two more recently recognized contributors, overactivity of the enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) and the escape of high-mobility-group box 1 (HMGB1) protein from its normal location into the circulation, are also put in context. The pathogenesis of the disease caused by falciparum malaria is then considered in the light of what has been learned about the roles of these mediators in these other diseases, as well as in malaria itself. PMID:15258091

  4. The hepatitis delta virus: Replication and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sureau, Camille; Negro, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a defective virus and a satellite of the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Its RNA genome is unique among animal viruses, but it shares common features with some plant viroids, including a replication mechanism that uses a host RNA polymerase. In infected cells, HDV genome replication and formation of a nucleocapsid-like ribonucleoprotein (RNP) are independent of HBV. But the RNP cannot exit, and therefore propagate, in the absence of HBV, as the latter supplies the propagation mechanism, from coating the HDV RNP with the HBV envelope proteins for cell egress to delivery of the HDV virions to the human hepatocyte target. HDV is therefore an obligate satellite of HBV; it infects humans either concomitantly with HBV or after HBV infection. HDV affects an estimated 15 to 20 million individuals worldwide, and the clinical significance of HDV infection is more severe forms of viral hepatitis--acute or chronic--, and a higher risk of developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in comparison to HBV monoinfection. This review covers molecular aspects of HDV replication cycle, including its interaction with the helper HBV and the pathogenesis of infection in humans. PMID:27084031

  5. Failure of the inhibition of rat gastric mucosal 5-lipoxygenase by novel acetohydroxamic acids to prevent ethanol-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Boughton-Smith, N K; Whittle, B J

    1988-09-01

    1. The role of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and LTC4 as mediators of gastric mucosal damage following ethanol challenge in vivo has been investigated using two selective 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors, BW A4C and BW A137C. 2. Oral administration of ethanol to rats in vivo, induced macroscopic damage to the gastric mucosa and markedly increased the formation of the 5-lipoxygenase products, LTB4 and LTC4, from the mucosa ex vivo. 3. Pretreatment with the acetohydroxamic acids BW A4C and BW A137C (5-50 mg kg-1 p.o.) dose-dependently reduced ethanol-stimulated LTB4 and LTC4 formation by the gastric mucosa, with an ID50 of approximately 5 mg kg-1 p.o. 4. A single oral dose of BW A4C (20 mg kg-1) induced near-maximal inhibition of mucosal LTB4 formation within 30 min, which was well maintained for 5 h, whereas BW A137C (20 mg kg-1 p.o.) induced maximal inhibition between 30 and 60 min after administration, which then diminished over the subsequent 5 h. 5. The mucosal formation of the cyclo-oxygenase product, 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha, which was unaltered following ethanol challenge, was not inhibited by the acetohydroxamic acids. Likewise, the small increase in mucosal thromboxane B2 formation following challenge was not inhibited by BW A4C. 6. Neither BW A4C nor BW A137C, at doses that almost completely inhibited the mucosal synthesis of LTB4 or LTC4, reduced the macroscopic gastric mucosal damage induced by ethanol. 7. Pretreatment with the lipoxygenase inhibitor BW 755C (5-50 mg kg-1 p.o.) did reduce mucosal damage, but there was a dissociation between the degree of protection and the inhibition of leukotriene biosynthesis. 8. Oral administration of high doses of either BW A4C or BW A137C (300mgkg-1) did not induce macroscopic gastric damage over a 3 h period. 9. These findings suggest that the leukotrienes, LTB4 and LTC4 are not the primary mediators of ethanol-induced acute mucosal damage, but do not exclude their role in more chronic gastric damage and inflammation. PMID

  6. Acute Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shirtliff, Mark E.; Mader, Jon T.

    2002-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection. PMID:12364368

  7. Induction of mucosal immunity through systemic immunization: Phantom or reality?

    PubMed

    Su, Fei; Patel, Girishchandra B; Hu, Songhua; Chen, Wangxue

    2016-04-01

    Generation of protective immunity at mucosal surfaces can greatly assist the host defense against pathogens which either cause disease at the mucosal epithelial barriers or enter the host through these surfaces. Although mucosal routes of immunization, such as intranasal and oral, are being intensely explored and appear promising for eliciting protective mucosal immunity in mammals, their application in clinical practice has been limited due to technical and safety related challenges. Most of the currently approved human vaccines are administered via systemic (such as intramuscular and subcutaneous) routes. Whereas these routes are acknowledged as being capable to elicit antigen-specific systemic humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, they are generally perceived as incapable of generating IgA responses or protective mucosal immunity. Nevertheless, currently licensed systemic vaccines do provide effective protection against mucosal pathogens such as influenza viruses and Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, whether systemic immunization induces protective mucosal immunity remains a controversial topic. Here we reviewed the current literature and discussed the potential of systemic routes of immunization for the induction of mucosal immunity. PMID:26752023

  8. Effects of mucosal loading on vocal fold vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Chao; Jiang, Jack J.

    2009-06-01

    A chain model was proposed in this study to examine the effects of mucosal loading on vocal fold vibration. Mucosal loading was defined as the loading caused by the interaction between the vocal folds and the surrounding tissue. In the proposed model, the vocal folds and the surrounding tissue were represented by a series of oscillators connected by a coupling spring. The lumped masses, springs, and dampers of the oscillators modeled the tissue properties of mass, stiffness, and viscosity, respectively. The coupling spring exemplified the tissue interactions. By numerically solving this chain model, the effects of mucosal loading on the phonation threshold pressure, phonation instability pressure, and energy distribution in a voice production system were studied. It was found that when mucosal loading is small, phonation threshold pressure increases with the damping constant Rr, the mass constant Rm, and the coupling constant Rμ of mucosal loading but decreases with the stiffness constant Rk. Phonation instability pressure is also related to mucosal loading. It was found that phonation instability pressure increases with the coupling constant Rμ but decreases with the stiffness constant Rk of mucosal loading. Therefore, it was concluded that mucosal loading directly affects voice production.

  9. Role of Capsule and Suilysin in Mucosal Infection of Complement-Deficient Mice with Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Maren; Beineke, Andreas; Singpiel, Alena; Willenborg, Jörg; Dutow, Pavel; Goethe, Ralph; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Klos, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Virulent Streptococcus suis serotype 2 strains are invasive extracellular bacteria causing septicemia and meningitis in piglets and humans. One objective of this study was to elucidate the function of complement in innate immune defense against S. suis. Experimental infection of wild-type (WT) and C3−/− mice demonstrated for the first time that the complement system protects naive mice against invasive mucosal S. suis infection. S. suis WT but not an unencapsulated mutant caused mortality associated with meningitis and other pathologies in C3−/− mice. The capsule contributed also substantially to colonization of the upper respiratory tract. Experimental infection of C3−/− mice with a suilysin mutant indicated that suilysin expression facilitated an early disease onset and the pathogenesis of meningitis. Flow cytometric analysis revealed C3 antigen deposition on the surface of ca. 40% of S. suis WT bacteria after opsonization with naive WT mouse serum, although to a significantly lower intensity than on the unencapsulated mutant. Ex vivo multiplication in murine WT and C3−/− blood depended on capsule but not suilysin expression. Interestingly, S. suis invasion of inner organs was also detectable in C5aR−/− mice, suggesting that chemotaxis and activation of immune cells via the anaphylatoxin receptor C5aR is, in addition to opsonization, a further important function of the complement system in defense against mucosal S. suis infection. In conclusion, we unequivocally demonstrate here the importance of complement against mucosal S. suis serotype 2 infection and that the capsule of this pathogen is also involved in escape from complement-independent immunity. PMID:24686060

  10. Microbial Activation of Gut Dendritic Cells and the Control of Mucosal Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Current data support a role for gut colonization in maintaining balanced mucosal and systemic immune responses and have suggested aberrant innate immune recognition of enteric bacteria as an initiator of the adaptive immune damage associated with inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis). In fact, data from human studies and experimental mouse models have implicated transformation of the gut microbiota from a beneficial symbiotic state to one of imbalance or “dysbiosis” in the pathogenesis of several autoinflammatory diseases, including allergic skin and respiratory disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, type I diabetes, and colorectal cancer. The host has evolved to co-exist and maintain a mutualistic relationship with the commensal microbes of the gut, and it is the function of the host innate immune system to initiate and maintain this homeostasis, while retaining the ability to respond appropriately to pathogenic organisms. In this review, we discuss the molecular and cellular interactions of the mucosal immune system that decide this delicate balance of mutualism. Furthermore, we will highlight the role of dendritic cells in preserving this precarious balance and how gene products of commensal microbes may play an integral role in re-establishing this balance once it has gone awry. PMID:23962004

  11. Mucosal Correlates of Protection in HIV-1-Exposed Seronegative Persons

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ruizhong; Smith, Phillip D.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to HIV-1 infection in HIV-1-exposed seronegative (HESN) persons offers a promising opportunity to identify mechanisms of “natural” protection. Unique features of the mucosa in particular may contribute to this protection. Here we highlight several key issues pertaining to the mucosal correlates of protection in HESN persons, including humoral immune responses, mechanisms of mucosal HIV-1-neutralization, immune cell activation, and role of the microbiota in mucosal responses. We also discuss mucosal model systems that can be used to investigate the mechanisms of resistance in HESN subjects. A clear understanding of the mucosal correlates of protection against HIV-1 in HESN persons will provide critical new insights for the development of effective vaccine and microbicide strategies for the prevention of HIV-1 transmission. PMID:24428610

  12. New Paradigms in the Pathogenesis of Otitis Media in Children

    PubMed Central

    Coticchia, James Mark; Chen, Michael; Sachdeva, Livjot; Mutchnick, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a multifactorial disease with a significant socioeconomic impact. The pathogenesis of AOM is attributed to a variety of well-established internal and extrinsic factors. Recent evidence strongly points to bacterial biofilm formation as an important contributor to this disease entity. The nasopharynx is a likely reservoir for infection with subsequent seeding of pathogens to the middle ear via planktonic shedding. Various modalities have been used to directly detect biofilm formation in the middle ear mucosa of children with AOM. Further insights into this disease may lead to new strategies for prevention and treatment. PMID:24400296

  13. Dysbiosis of Gut Fungal Microbiota is Associated With Mucosal Inflammation in Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenyang; Tang, Chun; He, Qin; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2014-01-01

    Goals: We aim to characterize the fungal microbiota in the intestinal mucosa and feces in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD). Background: Fungi represent a diverse microbial community in the human intestine and might play a role in the pathogenesis of CD; however, little is known about the structure and composition of the fungal microbiota especially adhering to the intestinal mucosa in CD patient. Study: Nineteen patients with active CD and 7 healthy individuals were recruited in this study. The mucosa-associated and fecal fungal microbiotas in CD patients were analyzed using culture-independent community fingerprint techniques. Results: The fungal richness and diversity were significantly elevated in the inflamed mucosa compared with the noninflamed mucosa. The predominant fungal composition in the inflamed mucosa was strikingly altered, mainly characterized by expansion in the proportions of Candida spp., Gibberella moniliformis, Alternaria brassicicola, and Cryptococcus neoformans. The fecal fungal community was perturbed in CD patients as accompanied by increased fungal diversity and prevalence in Candida albicans, Aspergillus clavatus, and C. neoformans. The species richness and diversity of the mucosal fungal community were associated with the expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ, or IL-10 (P<0.05). The diversity of the fecal fungal microbiota positively correlated with serum C-reactive protein and CD activity index (P<0.05). Conclusions: This study first demonstrates that the fungal microbiota in the inflamed mucosa is distinguishable from that of the noninflamed area. Shifts of gut fungal microbiota composition may be associated with mucosal inflammation and disease activity of CD. Our data would provide novel insights into understanding the potential of gut fungal microbiota in the pathogenesis of CD. PMID:24275714

  14. Autologous Transplantation of Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cell Sheets Cultured on an Amniotic Membrane Substrate for Intraoral Mucosal Defects

    PubMed Central

    Amemiya, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Kanamura, Narisato

    2015-01-01

    The human amniotic membrane (AM) is a thin intrauterine placental membrane that is highly biocompatible and possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-scarring properties. Using AM, we developed a novel method for cultivating oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets. We investigated the autologous transplantation of oral mucosal epithelial cells cultured on AM in patients undergoing oral surgeries. We obtained specimens of AM from women undergoing cesarean sections. This study included five patients without any history of a medical disorder who underwent autologous cultured oral epithelial transplantation following oral surgical procedures. Using oral mucosal biopsy specimens obtained from these patients, we cultured oral epithelial cells on an AM carrier. We transplanted the resultant cell sheets onto the oral mucosal defects. Patients were followed-up for at least 12 months after transplantation. After 2–3 weeks of being cultured on AM, epithelial cells were well differentiated and had stratified into five to seven layers. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the cultured cells expressed highly specific mucosal epithelial cell markers and basement membrane proteins. After the surgical procedures, no infection, bleeding, rejection, or sheet detachment occurred at the reconstructed sites, at which new oral mucous membranes were evident. No recurrence was observed in the long-term follow-up, and the postoperative course was excellent. Our results suggest that AM-cultured oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets represent a useful biomaterial and feasible method for oral mucosal reconstruction. However, our primary clinical study only evaluated their effects on a limited number of small oral mucosal defects. PMID:25915046

  15. [The role of defensins in the pathogenesis of chronic-inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Schmid, M; Fellermann, K; Wehkamp, J; Herrlinger, K; Stange, E F

    2004-04-01

    Defensins are endogenous antimicrobial peptides with a broad activity spectrum. Even at micromolar concentrations gramnegative and grampositive bacteria, but also mycobacteria, as well as fungi (candida), viruses (herpes) and protozoa (giardia lamblia) are destroyed. As part of the innate immune system defensins are expressed by the intestinal epithelium and contribute to the maintenance of the mucosal barrier. This barrier appears to be defective in inflammatory bowel diseases since on one hand, the immune response is directed against the "normal" luminal bacterial flora and on the other hand, mucosal adherent and invasive bacteria have been observed in these diseases. A defective defensin expression may well explain these phenomena. Indeed, Crohn's disease of the terminal ileum, especially if associated with a NOD2 mutation, is characterised by a diminished alpha-defensin (human defensin 5 and 6) expression, and in inflamed Crohn's colitis, in contrast to ulcerative colitis, the beta-defensin (human beta-defensins 2 and 3) response is reduced. Through a deficient chemical mucosal barrier this defect could lead to increased bacterial invasion into the intestinal mucosa and might well explain an adequate inflammatory response. Although the final proof that this deficient defensin response leads to a reduced antibacterial activity of the intestinal mucosa is still lacking, the most plausible concept of pathogenesis of Crohn's disease is a defensin deficiency syndrome. PMID:15095125

  16. FAMMM syndrome: pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    Czajkowski, Rafał; Placek, Waldemar; Drewa, Gerard; Czajkowska, Aldona; Uchańska, Grazyna

    2004-02-01

    Familial atypical multiple mole melanoma (FAMMM) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder with variable incomplete penetrance of the clinical phenotypes. Pathogenesis of this syndrome has not been fully investigated. Across multiple studies, germline mutations in the INK4a antioncogene encoding p16 protein were found on average in approximately 40% of the FAMMM syndrome. Patients with the FAMMM syndrome are genetically loaded with an increased risk of developing melanoma and other malignant neoplasms, for example, a pancreatic cancer. Melanoma can develop from numerous atypical moles as well as de novo. A proper diagnosis of the syndrome and early application of prophylactics decreases the risk of neoplastic transformation of melanocytes. PMID:14871223

  17. Biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living protist pathogen, capable of causing a blinding keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis. The factors that contribute to Acanthamoeba infections include parasite biology, genetic diversity, environmental spread and host susceptibility, and are highlighted together with potential therapeutic and preventative measures. The use of Acanthamoeba in the study of cellular differentiation mechanisms, motility and phagocytosis, bacterial pathogenesis and evolutionary processes makes it an attractive model organism. There is a significant emphasis on Acanthamoeba as a Trojan horse of other microbes including viral, bacterial, protists and yeast pathogens. PMID:22229971

  18. Molecular pathogenesis of hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingqi; Pu, Chunwen; Lang, Lang; Qiao, Liang; Abdullahi, Mohanud Abukar Haji; Jiang, Chunmeng

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is an inherited iron overload disorder characterized by normal iron-driven erythropoiesis and abnormal iron metabolism, leading to excess iron deposited in parenchymal cells of liver, heart, and endocrine glands. Iron hormone, hepcidin, plays a critical role in iron homeostasis through interaction with ferroportin (FPN), a major cellular iron exporter. Hepcidin is encoded by hepcidin antimicrobial peptide (HAMP). Mutations in hepcidin and any genes that regulate the biology of hepcidin, including hemochromatosis genes (HFE), Hemojuvelin (HJV), transferring receptor 2 (TFR2) and FPN, result in hemochromatosis. The identification of hepcidin and its role will provide a better understanding for pathogenesis of HH. PMID:27031690

  19. [Pathogenesis of atypical femoral fracture].

    PubMed

    Iwata, Ken; Mashiba, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated microdamage accumulation in the fracture sites in the patients of subtrochanteric atypical femoral fracture with long term bisphosphonate therapy and of incomplete shaft fracture of lateral femoral bowing without bisphosphonate therapy. Based on these findings, pathogenesis of atypical femoral fracture is revealed stress fracture caused by accumulation of microdamages between distal to the lesser trochanter and proximal to the supracondylar flare in the femur in association with severely suppressed bone turnover and/or abnormal lower limb alignment, that causes stress concentration on the lateral side cortex of the femur. PMID:26728533

  20. Acquired Bilateral Nevus of ota-like Macules with Mucosal Involvement: A New Variant of Hori's Nevus

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Ramesh M; Pinto, Hyacinth Peter; Dandekeri, Sukumar; Ambil, Srinath Madapally

    2014-01-01

    Acquired bilateral nevus of Ota-like macules (ABNOM) or Hori's nevus, a rare form of acquired dermal melanocytoses, presents as bilateral facial blue-gray macules without ocular or mucosal involvement. This condition is mostly found in women of Asian descent and usually appears in the fourth or fifth decade of life. Pathogenesis is unknown, though few theories have been proposed. Effective treatment has been found to be achieved with pigment-specific lasers. Herein, we report a case of Hori's nevus with mucosal involvement. A 42-year-old male patient, presented to us with blue-gray discoloration on either side of his face, both eyes, and in the mouth since the age of one year. Histopathological examination showed clusters and singly dispersed pigmented melanocytes within the upper and mid-dermis regions. Special staining of melanocytes using Masson-Fontana stain was positive. Diagnosis of Hori's nevus was made by correlating clinical and histopathological findings. Patient was informed of his treatment options, but refused treatment. A similar case of Hori's nevus with mucosal involvement has not been reported so far. PMID:24891664

  1. The role of Octenidol®, Glandomed® and chlorhexidine mouthwash in the prevention of mucositis and in the reduction of the oropharyngeal flora: a double-blind randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mutters, Nico T.; Neubert, Thomas R.; Nieth, Rudolf; Mutters, Reinier

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The oropharyngeal flora is of importance for the development of oral mucositis, which is a frequent complication in oncologic practice. It also plays a role in the pathogenesis of ventilator-associated pneumonia. Mucositis is associated with significantly worse clinical and economic outcomes. The aim of our study was to assess the efficacy of Octenidol®, Glandomed® and chlorhexidine mouthwash in the prevention of mucositis and reduction of the oropharyngeal flora. Methods: A prospective, double-blinded RCT including two strata was conducted between October 2008 and November 2010. Stratum i consisted of ventilated cardiothoracic surgical patients. Stratum ii consisted of medical patients with haemato-oncological malignancies requiring stem cell transplantation. The primary outcome measures were development of mucositis regarding to OMAS/WHO score and reduction of the oropharyngeal flora. Results: Both strata showed low OMAS/WHO scores which did not differ significantly between the groups. The overall mean reduction of colony forming units was significantly higher in the Octenidol® group compared to the chlorhexidine and the Glandomed® groups. Conclusions: No significant differences in the development of mucositis were found, thus all solutions proved successful in the prevention of mucositis. However, Octenidol® was superior in the reduction of the oropharyngeal flora. Hence, the preventive effect on nosocomial infections might be higher in patients using Octenidol® rather than chlorhexidine or Glandomed®. PMID:25699228

  2. Cyclosporin metabolism by human gastrointestinal mucosal microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Webber, I R; Peters, W H; Back, D J

    1992-01-01

    The in vitro metabolism of the immunosuppressant cyclosporin (CsA) by human gastrointestinal mucosal microsomes has been studied. Macroscopically normal intestinal (n = 4) and liver (n = 2) tissue was obtained from kidney transplant donors, and microsomes prepared. Intestinal metabolism was most extensive with duodenal protein (15% conversion to metabolites M1/M17 after 2 h incubation at 37 degrees C; metabolite measurement by h.p.l.c). Western blotting confirmed the presence of P-4503A (enzyme subfamily responsible for CsA metabolism) in duodenum and ileum tissue, but not in colon tissue. The results of this study indicate that the gut wall may play a role in the first-pass metabolism of CsA, and could therefore be a contributory factor to the highly variable oral bioavailability of CsA. PMID:1389941

  3. Topical and mucosal liposomes for vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Romero, Eder Lilia; Morilla, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal (and in minor extent transcutanous) stimulation can induce local or distant mucosa secretory IgA. Liposomes and other vesicles as mucosal and transcutaneous adjuvants are attractive alternatives to parenteral vaccination. Liposomes can be massively produced under good manufacturing practices and stored for long periods, at high antigen/vesicle mass ratios. However, their uptake by antigen-presenting cells (APC) at the inductive sites remains as a major challenge. As neurotoxicity is a major concern in intranasal delivery, complexes between archaeosomes and calcium as well as cationic liposomes complexed with plasmids encoding for antigenic proteins could safely elicit secretory and systemic antigen-specific immune responses. Oral bilosomes generate intense immune responses that remain to be tested against challenge, but the admixing with toxins or derivatives is mandatory to reduce the amount of antigen. Most of the current experimental designs, however, underestimate the mucus blanket 100- to 1000-fold thicker than a 100-nm diameter liposome, which has first to be penetrated to access the underlying M cells. Overall, designing mucoadhesive chemoenzymatic resistant liposomes, or selectively targeted to M cells, has produced less relevant results than tailoring the liposomes to make them mucus penetrating. Opposing, the nearly 10 µm thickness stratum corneum interposed between liposomes and underlying APC can be surpassed by ultradeformable liposomes (UDL), with lipid matrices that penetrate up to the limit with the viable epidermis. UDL made of phospholipids and detergents, proved to be better transfection agents than conventional liposomes and niosomes, without the toxicity of ethosomes, in the absence of classical immunomodulators. PMID:21360692

  4. Infection and mucosal injury in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Khan, S A; Wingard, J R

    2001-01-01

    The oral and gastrointestinal mucosa acts as an important mechanical barrier that prevents local or systemic invasion by microorganisms. Cytotoxic chemotherapy-induced mucosal injury (MI) of oral cavity and intestinal epithelium occurs in many patients treated for malignancy. Compromise of the mucosal barrier can contribute to local invasion by colonizing microorganisms and, subsequently, to systemic infection. Historically, gram-negative bacteremia has been the most problematic bacterial infection in neutropenic patients, but its incidence has reduced over time because of the use of prophylactic antibiotics. There has been a shift in the type of infecting organisms responsible for bacteremia in these patients, from predominantly gram-negative organisms to gram-positive cocci. The viridans group of streptococci is composed of the most frequent bacterial pathogens associated with MI. When speciated, oral colonizers such as Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus sangulis II are the most frequently identified pathogens. Other systemic infections caused by vancomycin-resistant enterococci, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Candida species have also been associated with MI after cancer treatment. Infection can also exacerbate MI after cancer treatment. The best recognized example is herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Latent virus is frequently reactivated in HSV-seropositive patients; this reactivation leads to stomatitis, which can be indistinguishable from MI caused by cytoreductive therapies. Antiviral prophylaxis or treatment can control the virus-induced MI and bring about overall amelioration of MI. Recognition of this infectious cause of MI is important in order for clinicians to anticipate and minimize oral toxicity and to facilitate optimal delivery of the antineoplastic regimen. PMID:11694563

  5. Pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis: inflammation.

    PubMed

    Van Crombruggen, Koen; Zhang, Nan; Gevaert, Philippe; Tomassen, Peter; Bachert, Claus

    2011-10-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a heterogeneous group of inflammatory diseases of the nasal and paranasal cavities either accompanied by polyp formation (CRSwNP) or without polyps (CRSsNP). CRSsNP and CRSwNP are prevalent medical conditions associated with substantial impaired quality of life, reduced workplace productivity, and serious medical treatment costs. Despite recent research evidence that contributes to further unveiling the pathophysiology of these chronic airway conditions, the cause remains poorly understood and appears to be multifactorial. A diverse spectrum of alterations involving histopathology, inflammatory cell and T-cell patterns, remodeling parameters (eg, TGF-β), eicosanoid and IgE production, microorganisms, and epithelial barrier malfunctions is reported in the search to describe the pathogenesis of this heterogeneous group of upper airway diseases. Furthermore, novel evidence indicates considerable heterogeneity within the CRSwNP subgroup determining the risk of comorbid asthma. The characterization of specific disease subgroups is a challenging scientific and clinical task of utmost importance in the development of diagnostic tools and application of individualized treatments. This review focuses on recent evidence that sheds new light on our current knowledge regarding the inflammatory process of CRS to further unravel its pathogenesis. PMID:21868076

  6. Molecular pathogenesis of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jesper B

    2015-02-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is an orphan cancer of the hepatobiliary tract, the incidence of which has increased in the past decade. The molecular pathogenesis of this treatment-refractory disease is poorly understood. Desmoplasia is a key causal feature of CCA; however, a majority of tumors develop with no apparent etiological background. The impact of the stromal compartment on tumor progression as well as resistance to therapy is in vogue, and the epithelial-stromal crosstalk may present a target for novel treatment strategies. As such, the complexity of tumor cellularity and the molecular mechanisms underlying the diversity of growth patterns of this malignancy remain a clinical concern. It is crucial to advance our present understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CCA to improve current clinical strategies and patient outcome. This will facilitate the delineation of patient subsets and individualization for precision therapies. Many questions persevere as to the evolutionary process and cellular origin of the initial transforming event, the context of intratumoral plasticity and the causal driver action. Next-generation sequencing has begun to underline the persistent alterations, which may be the trigger of acquired drug resistance, and the cause of metastasis and disease recurrence. A complex issue that remains is to account for the heterogeneous pool of "backseat" aberrations, which in chromosomal proximity to the causative variant are likely to influence, for example, drug response. This review explores the recent advances in defining the molecular pathways implicated in the development of this devastating disease and, which present putative clinical strategies. PMID:25174625

  7. Pathogenesis of Varicelloviruses in primates

    PubMed Central

    Ouwendijk, Werner J.D.; Verjans, Georges M.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Varicelloviruses in primates comprise the prototypic human varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and its non-human primate homologue simian varicella virus (SVV). Both viruses cause varicella as a primary infection, establish latency in ganglionic neurons and reactivate later in life to cause herpes zoster in their respective hosts. VZV is endemic worldwide and although varicella is usually a benign disease in childhood, VZV reactivation is a significant cause of neurological disease in the elderly and in immunocompromised individuals. The pathogenesis of VZV infection remains ill-defined, mostly due to the species restriction of VZV that impedes studies in experimental animal models. SVV infection of non-human primates parallels virological, clinical, pathological and immunological features of human VZV infection, thereby providing an excellent model to study the pathogenesis of varicella and herpes zoster in its natural host. In this review, we discuss recent studies that provided novel insight in both the virus and host factors involved in the three elementary stages of Varicellovirus infection in primates: primary infection, latency and reactivation. PMID:25255989

  8. Pathogenesis and Immunobiology of Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    de Figueiredo, Paul; Ficht, Thomas A.; Rice-Ficht, Allison; Rossetti, Carlos A.; Adams, L. Garry

    2016-01-01

    This review of Brucella–host interactions and immunobiology discusses recent discoveries as the basis for pathogenesis-informed rationales to prevent or treat brucellosis. Brucella spp., as animal pathogens, cause human brucellosis, a zoonosis that results in worldwide economic losses, human morbidity, and poverty. Although Brucella spp. infect humans as an incidental host, 500,000 new human infections occur annually, and no patient-friendly treatments or approved human vaccines are reported. Brucellae display strong tissue tropism for lymphoreticular and reproductive systems with an intracellular lifestyle that limits exposure to innate and adaptive immune responses, sequesters the organism from the effects of antibiotics, and drives clinical disease manifestations and pathology. Stealthy brucellae exploit strategies to establish infection, including i) evasion of intracellular destruction by restricting fusion of type IV secretion system-dependent Brucella-containing vacuoles with lysosomal compartments, ii) inhibition of apoptosis of infected mononuclear cells, and iii) prevention of dendritic cell maturation, antigen presentation, and activation of naive T cells, pathogenesis lessons that may be informative for other intracellular pathogens. Data sets of next-generation sequences of Brucella and host time-series global expression fused with proteomics and metabolomics data from in vitro and in vivo experiments now inform interactive cellular pathways and gene regulatory networks enabling full-scale systems biology analysis. The newly identified effector proteins of Brucella may represent targets for improved, safer brucellosis vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:25892682

  9. Humoral immune responses in periodontal disease may have mucosal and systemic immune features

    PubMed Central

    Kinane, D F; Lappin, D F; Koulouri, O; Buckley, A

    1999-01-01

    The humoral immune response, especially IgG and IgA, is considered to be protective in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease, but the precise mechanisms are still unknown. Immunoglobulins arriving at the periodontal lesion are from both systemic and local tissue sources. In order to understand better the local immunoglobulin production, we examined biopsy tissue from periodontitis lesions for the expression of IgM, IgG, IgA, IgE and in addition the IgG and IgA subclasses and J-chain by in situ hybridization. Tissues examined were superficial inflamed gingiva and the deeper granulation tissue from periodontal sites. These data confirm that IgM, and IgG and IgA subclass proteins and J-chain can be locally produced in the periodontitis tissues. IgG1 mRNA-expressing cells were predominant in the granulation tissues and in the gingiva, constituting approx. 65% of the total IgG-expressing plasma cells. There was a significantly increased proportion of IgA-expressing plasma cells in the gingiva compared with the granulation tissue (P < 0.01). Most of the IgA-expressing plasma cells were IgA1, but a greater proportion expressed IgA2 mRNA and J-chain mRNA in the gingival tissues (30.5% and 7.5%, respectively) than in the periodontal granulation tissues (19% and 0–4%, respectively). The J-chain or dimeric IgA2-expressing plasma cells were located adjacent to the epithelial cells, suggesting that this tissue demonstrates features consistent with a mucosal immune response. Furthermore, we were able to detect the secretory component in gingival and junctional epithelial cells, demonstrating that the periodontal epithelium shares features with mucosal epithelium. In contrast, deeper tissues had more plasma cells that expressed IgM, and less expressing IgA, a response which appears more akin to the systemic immune response. In conclusion, this study suggests that immune mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis may involve features of both the mucosal and

  10. Dental students' ability to detect and diagnose oral mucosal lesions.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammad A; Joseph, Bobby K; Sundaram, Devipriya B

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the ability of dental students in the screening clinic of the Kuwait University Dental Center to detect and diagnose oral mucosal lesions. Clinical examinations performed by dental students between January 2009 and February 2011 were included. All their findings regarding the oral mucosal lesions and dental carious lesions detected were recorded, after which the patients were re-examined by faculty examiners. The students rated their own ability to detect mucosal and carious lesions before each examination. Among the 341 patients screened, 375 oral mucosal lesions were found by the faculty examiners. Of those, the students detected 178 (47.5%). Out of the 375 lesions, including the ones they failed to detect, the students diagnosed 272 (72.5%) correctly. The students were more likely (p≤0.01) to correctly diagnose a mucosal lesion when they themselves had detected it (n=169/178) than when they failed to detect it and had it subsequently pointed out by the faculty examiners (n=103/197). The students were more competent in detecting carious lesions (p≤0.001) than in detecting mucosal lesions. A significantly higher proportion of students who felt confident in detecting mucosal lesions were actually more competent in detecting the lesions than those who were not confident (p≤0.001). Further educational strategies are needed to motivate Kuwait University dental students to develop the knowledge, skills, and judgment necessary to integrate a complete intraoral examination into their routine practice. PMID:25640618

  11. Oral Mucosal Lesions in Indians From Northeast Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Patricia Ramos; Porto, Lia Pontes Arruda; dos Santos, Jean Nunes; e Ribeiro, Livia Silva Figueiredo; de Aquino Xavier, Flavia Caló; Figueiredo, Andreia Leal; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions, and their risk indicators in adult Kiriri Indians from Northeast Brazil. Clinical oral examination was performed on a representative sample of 223 Indians (age ≥19 years). A systematic evaluation of lips, labial mucosa and sulcus, commissures, buccal mucosa and sulcus, gingiva and alveolar ridge, tongue, floor of the mouth, and soft and hard palate was performed. Bivariate analysis was conducted to assess associations between mucosal conditions and age, gender, income, educational level, diabetic status, and smoking status. Mucosal lesions were found in 50 participants (22.4%). The most prevalent lesions were fistulae (6.2%) and traumatic ulcers (4.48%). Oral mucosal was associated with higher age (≥35 years; odds ratio [OR] = 1.99, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05–3.76, P = 0.03) and lower education level (<9 years; OR = 2.13, 95% CI: 0.96–4.71, P = 0.06). Mucosal conditions are prevalent in Kiriri Indians and the presence of mucosal lesions is associated with advanced age and lower education. A public health program aimed at preventing and treating mucosal lesions and targeted toward the high-risk group is vital to improve the oral health status of this population. PMID:25501053

  12. The mucosal immune system: From dentistry to vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    KIYONO, Hiroshi; AZEGAMI, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is the beginning of the aero-digestive tract, which is covered by mucosal epithelium continuously under the threat of invasion of pathogens, it is thus protected by the mucosal immune system. In the early phase of our scientific efforts for the demonstration of mucosal immune system, dental science was one of major driving forces due to their foreseeability to use oral immunity for the control of oral diseases. The mucosal immune system is divided functionally into, but interconnected inductive and effector sites. Intestinal Peyer’s patches (PPs) are an inductive site containing antigen-sampling M cells and immunocompetent cells required to initiate antigen-specific immune responses. At effector sites, PP-originated antigen-specific IgA B cells become plasma cells to produce polymeric IgA and form secretory IgA by binding to poly-Ig receptor expressed on epithelial cells for protective immunity. The development of new-generation mucosal vaccines, including the rice-based oral vaccine MucoRice, on the basis of the coordinated mucosal immune system is a promising strategy for the control of mucosal infectious diseases. PMID:26460320

  13. Modeling mucosal candidiasis in larval zebrafish by swimbladder injection.

    PubMed

    Gratacap, Remi L; Bergeron, Audrey C; Wheeler, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    Early defense against mucosal pathogens consists of both an epithelial barrier and innate immune cells. The immunocompetency of both, and their intercommunication, are paramount for the protection against infections. The interactions of epithelial and innate immune cells with a pathogen are best investigated in vivo, where complex behavior unfolds over time and space. However, existing models do not allow for easy spatio-temporal imaging of the battle with pathogens at the mucosal level. The model developed here creates a mucosal infection by direct injection of the fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, into the swimbladder of juvenile zebrafish. The resulting infection enables high-resolution imaging of epithelial and innate immune cell behavior throughout the development of mucosal disease. The versatility of this method allows for interrogation of the host to probe the detailed sequence of immune events leading to phagocyte recruitment and to examine the roles of particular cell types and molecular pathways in protection. In addition, the behavior of the pathogen as a function of immune attack can be imaged simultaneously by using fluorescent protein-expressing C. albicans. Increased spatial resolution of the host-pathogen interaction is also possible using the described rapid swimbladder dissection technique. The mucosal infection model described here is straightforward and highly reproducible, making it a valuable tool for the study of mucosal candidiasis. This system may also be broadly translatable to other mucosal pathogens such as mycobacterial, bacterial or viral microbes that normally infect through epithelial surfaces. PMID:25490695

  14. Modeling Mucosal Candidiasis in Larval Zebrafish by Swimbladder Injection

    PubMed Central

    Gratacap, Remi L.; Bergeron, Audrey C.; Wheeler, Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    Early defense against mucosal pathogens consists of both an epithelial barrier and innate immune cells. The immunocompetency of both, and their intercommunication, are paramount for the protection against infections. The interactions of epithelial and innate immune cells with a pathogen are best investigated in vivo, where complex behavior unfolds over time and space. However, existing models do not allow for easy spatio-temporal imaging of the battle with pathogens at the mucosal level. The model developed here creates a mucosal infection by direct injection of the fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, into the swimbladder of juvenile zebrafish. The resulting infection enables high-resolution imaging of epithelial and innate immune cell behavior throughout the development of mucosal disease. The versatility of this method allows for interrogation of the host to probe the detailed sequence of immune events leading to phagocyte recruitment and to examine the roles of particular cell types and molecular pathways in protection. In addition, the behavior of the pathogen as a function of immune attack can be imaged simultaneously by using fluorescent protein-expressing C. albicans. Increased spatial resolution of the host-pathogen interaction is also possible using the described rapid swimbladder dissection technique. The mucosal infection model described here is straightforward and highly reproducible, making it a valuable tool for the study of mucosal candidiasis. This system may also be broadly translatable to other mucosal pathogens such as mycobacterial, bacterial or viral microbes that normally infect through epithelial surfaces. PMID:25490695

  15. Mucosal healing in inflammatory bowel diseases: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Neurath, Markus F; Travis, Simon P L

    2012-11-01

    Recent studies have identified mucosal healing on endoscopy as a key prognostic parameter in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), thus highlighting the role of endoscopy for monitoring of disease activity in IBD. In fact, mucosal healing has emerged as a key treatment goal in IBD that predicts sustained clinical remission and resection-free survival of patients. The structural basis of mucosal healing is an intact barrier function of the gut epithelium that prevents translocation of commensal bacteria into the mucosa and submucosa with subsequent immune cell activation. Thus, mucosal healing should be considered as an initial event in the suppression of inflammation of deeper layers of the bowel wall, rather than as a sign of complete healing of gut inflammation. In this systematic review, the clinical studies on mucosal healing are summarised and the effects of anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive drugs such as 5-aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, azathioprine, ciclosporin and anti-TNF antibodies (adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, infliximab) on mucosal healing are discussed. Finally, the implications of mucosal healing for subsequent clinical management in patients with IBD are highlighted. PMID:22842618

  16. The activation of Wnt signaling by a STAT6-dependent macrophage phenotype promotes mucosal repair in murine IBD.

    PubMed

    Cosín-Roger, J; Ortiz-Masiá, D; Calatayud, S; Hernández, C; Esplugues, J V; Barrachina, M D

    2016-07-01

    The complete repair of the mucosa constitutes a key goal in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treatment. The Wnt signaling pathway mediates mucosal repair and M2 macrophages that coordinate efficient healing have been related to Wnt ligand expression. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) mediates M2 polarization in vitro and we hypothesize that a STAT6-dependent macrophage phenotype mediates mucosal repair in acute murine colitis by activating the Wnt signaling pathway. Our results reveal an impaired mucosal expression of M2 macrophage-associated genes and delayed wound healing in STAT6(-/-) mice treated with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). These mice also exhibited decreased mucosal expression of Wnt2b, Wnt7b, and Wnt10a, diminished protein levels of nuclear β-catenin that is mainly located in crypts adjacent to damage, and reduced mRNA expression of two Wnt/β-catenin target molecules Lgr5 and c-Myc when compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Murine peritoneal macrophages treated with interleukin-4 (IL-4) and polarized toward an M2a phenotype overexpressed Wnt2b, Wnt7b, and Wnt10a in a STAT6-dependent manner. Administration of a Wnt agonist as well as transfer of properly polarized M2a macrophages to STAT6(-/-) mice activated the Wnt signaling pathway in the damaged mucosa and accelerated wound healing. Our results demonstrate that a STAT6-dependent macrophage phenotype promotes mucosal repair in TNBS-treated mice through activation of the Wnt signaling pathway. PMID:26601901

  17. Concept of the pathogenesis and treatment of cholelithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich

    2012-01-01

    Gallstone disease (GD) is a chronic recurrent hepatobiliary disease, the basis for which is the impaired metabolism of cholesterol, bilirubin and bile acids, which is characterized by the formation of gallstones in the hepatic bile duct, common bile duct, or gallbladder. GD is one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal diseases with a substantial burden to health care systems. GD can result in serious outcomes, such as acute gallstone pancreatitis and gallbladder cancer. The epidemiology, pathogenesis and treatment of GD are discussed in this review. The prevalence of GD varies widely by region. The prevalence of gallstone disease has increased in recent years. This is connected with a change in lifestyle: reduction of motor activity, reduction of the physical load and changes to diets. One of the important benefits of early screening for gallstone disease is that ultrasonography can detect asymptomatic cases, which results in early treatment and the prevention of serious outcomes. The pathogenesis of GD is suggested to be multifactorial and probably develops from complex interactions between many genetic and environmental factors. It suggests that corticosteroids and oral contraceptives, which contain hormones related to steroid hormones, may be regarded as a model system of cholelithiasis development in man. The achievement in the study of the physiology of bile formation and the pathogenesis of GD has allowed expanding indications for therapeutic treatment of GD. PMID:22400083

  18. Caspase-11 Modulates Inflammation and Attenuates Toxoplasma gondii Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Coutermarsh-Ott, Sheryl L.; Doran, John T.; Campbell, Caroline; Williams, Tere M.; Lindsay, David S.; Allen, Irving C.

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that is the etiologic agent responsible for toxoplasmosis. Infection with T. gondii results in activation of nucleotide binding domain and leucine rich repeat containing receptors (NLRs). NLR activation leads to inflammasome formation, the activation of caspase-1, and the subsequent cleavage of IL-1β and IL-18. Recently, a noncanonical inflammasome has been characterized which functions through caspase-11 and appears to augment many biological functions previously considered to be dependent upon the canonical inflammasome. To better elucidate the function of this noncanonical inflammasome in toxoplasmosis, we utilized Asc−/− and Casp11−/− mice and infected these animals with T. gondii. Our data indicates that caspase-11 modulates the innate immune response to T. gondii through a mechanism which is distinct from that currently described for the canonical inflammasome. Asc−/− mice demonstrated increased disease pathogenesis during the acute phase of T. gondii infection, whereas Casp11−/− mice demonstrated significantly attenuated disease pathogenesis and reduced inflammation. This attenuated host response was associated with reduced local and systemic cytokine production, including diminished IL-1β. During the chronic phase of infection, caspase-11 deficiency resulted in increased neuroinflammation and tissue cyst burden in the brain. Together, our data suggest that caspase-11 functions to protect the host by enhancing inflammation during the early phase of infection in an effort to minimize disease pathogenesis during later stages of toxoplasmosis. PMID:27378827

  19. Caspase-11 Modulates Inflammation and Attenuates Toxoplasma gondii Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Coutermarsh-Ott, Sheryl L; Doran, John T; Campbell, Caroline; Williams, Tere M; Lindsay, David S; Allen, Irving C

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that is the etiologic agent responsible for toxoplasmosis. Infection with T. gondii results in activation of nucleotide binding domain and leucine rich repeat containing receptors (NLRs). NLR activation leads to inflammasome formation, the activation of caspase-1, and the subsequent cleavage of IL-1β and IL-18. Recently, a noncanonical inflammasome has been characterized which functions through caspase-11 and appears to augment many biological functions previously considered to be dependent upon the canonical inflammasome. To better elucidate the function of this noncanonical inflammasome in toxoplasmosis, we utilized Asc (-/-) and Casp11 (-/-) mice and infected these animals with T. gondii. Our data indicates that caspase-11 modulates the innate immune response to T. gondii through a mechanism which is distinct from that currently described for the canonical inflammasome. Asc (-/-) mice demonstrated increased disease pathogenesis during the acute phase of T. gondii infection, whereas Casp11 (-/-) mice demonstrated significantly attenuated disease pathogenesis and reduced inflammation. This attenuated host response was associated with reduced local and systemic cytokine production, including diminished IL-1β. During the chronic phase of infection, caspase-11 deficiency resulted in increased neuroinflammation and tissue cyst burden in the brain. Together, our data suggest that caspase-11 functions to protect the host by enhancing inflammation during the early phase of infection in an effort to minimize disease pathogenesis during later stages of toxoplasmosis. PMID:27378827

  20. Polaprezinc (Zinc L-carnosine) is a potent inducer of anti-oxidative stress enzyme, heme oxygenase (HO)-1 - a new mechanism of gastric mucosal protection.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Kazuki; Ueyama, Takashi; Oka, Masashi; Ito, Takao; Tsuruo, Yoshihiro; Ichinose, Masao

    2009-07-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is implicated in cytoprotection in various organs. We tested a possibility that polaprezinc (PZ), an anti-ulcer drug, could induce HO-1 in the gastric mucosa. Male 6-week-old Wistar rats were intragastrically administered PZ. Gastric expression of HO-1 was assessed by real time RT-PCR and western blotting, and localization of HO-1 was observed by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. The levels of HO-1 mRNA were increased in a dose-dependent manner. The levels of HO-1 mRNA were increased 4-fold by PZ at the dose of 200 mg/kg at 3 h as compared with control levels. The levels of immunoreactive HO-1 were increased 3-fold at 6 h. Signals for HO-1 mRNA and immunoreactivity were detected strongly in the surface gastric mucosal cells and moderately in the gastric macrophages. Treatment with an HO-1 inhibitor, stannous mesoporphyrin (SnMP) significantly worsened the HCl-induced acute gastric mucosal lesions and increased the apoptosis of mucosal cells. Mucosal lesions were decreased by pretreatment with PZ, while they were increased by co-administration with SnMP. These data indicate for the first time that PZ is an effective inducer of HO-1 in the stomach. PZ-induced HO-1 functions as a part of the mucosal protective effects of PZ. PMID:19542683

  1. Chitosan-based nanoparticles for mucosal delivery of RNAi therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Alina; Olesen, Morten Jarlstad; Howard, Kenneth A

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) gene silencing by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) offers a potent and highly specific therapeutic strategy; however, enabling technologies that overcome extracellular and intracellular barriers are required. Polycation-based nanoparticles (termed polyplexes) composed of the polysaccharide chitosan have been used to facilitate delivery of siRNA across mucosal surfaces following local administration. This chapter describes the mucosal barriers that need to be addressed in order to design an effective mucosal delivery strategy and the utilization of the mucoadhesive properties of chitosan. Focus is given to preparation methods and the preclinical application of chitosan nanoparticles for respiratory and oral delivery of siRNA. PMID:25409611

  2. Tolerance of gastric mucosal flap to postoperative irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Devineni, V.R.; Hayden, R.; Fredrickson, J.; Sicard, G. )

    1991-05-01

    When malignant lesions of the oral cavity, base of tongue, and oropharynx are treated with radical resection, adequate reconstruction is required. The free gastric mucosal flap with microvascular transfer is being used with increasing frequency at Washington University Medical Center. Because of the advanced nature of the primary lesions, most patients also require postoperative radiation therapy. In this paper the tolerance of the gastric mucosal flap to postoperative radiation therapy is reviewed. The changes resulting from radiation therapy in the mucosal flap were found to be acceptable, and no major complications were encountered.

  3. Mucosal disease of cattle: a late sequel to fetal infection.

    PubMed

    Roeder, P L; Drew, T W

    1984-03-31

    The introduction of a heifer which was persistently infected with bovine virus diarrhoea-mucosal disease virus into groups of pregnant cattle resulted in abortion, neonatal death, persistent infection and, subsequently, mucosal disease in the surviving progeny. Cattle affected with mucosal disease were invariably seronegative at the time of investigation and subsequent cases occurred only in calves previously identified as seronegative and persistently infected. The detection of virus antigen by immunofluorescent staining of cells obtained from the nasopharynx was shown to be an efficient and rapid method for identifying persistently infected cattle, correlating perfectly with virus isolation. PMID:6328725

  4. Chikungunya virus pathogenesis and immunity.

    PubMed

    Gasque, Philippe; Couderc, Therese; Lecuit, Marc; Roques, Pierre; Ng, Lisa F P

    2015-04-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arbovirus associated with acute and chronic arthralgia that re-emerged in the Indian Ocean islands in 2005-2006 and is currently responsible for the ongoing outbreaks in the Caribbean islands and the Americas. We describe here the acute and chronic clinical manifestations of CHIKV in patients that define the disease. We also review the various animal models that have been developed to study CHIKV infection and pathology and further strengthened the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of CHIKV infection and immunity. A complete understanding of the immunopathogenesis of CHIKV infection will help develop the needed preventive and therapeutic approaches to combat this arbovirosis. PMID:25897810

  5. The oral mucosal and salivary microbial community of Behçet's syndrome and recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Seoudi, Noha; Bergmeier, Lesley A.; Drobniewski, Francis; Paster, Bruce; Fortune, Farida

    2015-01-01

    Background Behçet's syndrome (BS) is a multisystem immune-related disease of unknown etiology. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is characterized by the presence of idiopathic oral ulceration without extraoral manifestation. The interplay between the oral microbial communities and the immune response could play an important role in the etiology and pathogenesis of both BS and RAS. Objective To investigate the salivary and oral mucosal microbial communities in BS and RAS. Methods Purified microbial DNA isolated from saliva samples (54 BS, 25 healthy controls [HC], and 8 RAS) were examined by the human oral microbe identification microarray. Cultivable salivary and oral mucosal microbial communities from ulcer and non-ulcer sites were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight analysis. Mycobacterium spp. were detected in saliva and in ulcer and non-ulcer oral mucosal brush biopsies following culture on Lowenstein-Jensen slopes and Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tubes. Results There was increased colonization with Rothia denticariosa of the non-ulcer sites of BS and RAS patients (p<0.05). Ulcer sites in BS were highly colonized with Streptococcus salivarius compared to those of RAS (p<0.05), and with Streptococcus sanguinis compared to HC (p<0.0001). Oral mucosa of HC were more highly colonized with Neisseria and Veillonella compared to all studied groups (p<0.0001). Conclusions Despite the uncertainty whether the reported differences in the oral mucosal microbial community of BS and RAS are of causative or reactive nature, it is envisaged that restoring the balance of the oral microbial community of the ulcer sites may be used in the future as a new treatment modality for oral ulceration. PMID:26037240

  6. Pathogenesis of Brain Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    KOMIYAMA, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformations (bAVMs) represent a high risk of intracranial hemorrhages, which are substantial causes of morbidity and mortality of bAVMs, especially in children and young adults. Although a variety of factors leading to hemorrhages of bAVMs are investigated extensively, their pathogenesis is still not well elucidated. The author has reviewed the updated data of genetic aspects of bAVMs, especially focusing on clinical and experimental knowledge from hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, which is the representative genetic disease presenting with bAVMs caused by loss-of-function in one of the two genes: endoglin and activin receptor-like kinase 1. This knowledge may allow us to infer the pathogensis of sporadic bAVMs and in the development of new medical therapies for them. PMID:27076383

  7. Melioidosis: Molecular Aspects of Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Joshua K.; DeShazer, David; Brett, Paul J.; Burtnick, Mary N.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes melioidosis, a multifaceted disease that is highly endemic in Southeast Asia and northern Australia. This facultative intracellular pathogen possesses a large genome that encodes a wide array of virulence factors that promote survival in vivo by manipulating host cell processes and disarming elements of the host immune system. Antigens and systems that play key roles in B. pseudomallei virulence include capsular polysaccharide, lipopolysaccharide, adhesins, specialized secretion systems, actin-based motility and various secreted factors. This review provides an overview of the current and steadily expanding knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms used by this organism to survive within a host and their contribution to the pathogenesis of melioidosis. PMID:25312349

  8. Neuroblastoma: Molecular Pathogenesis and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Chrystal U; Shohet, Jason M

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a developmental tumor of young children arising from the embryonic sympathoadrenal lineage of the neural crest. Currently neuroblastoma is the primary cause of death from pediatric cancer for children between the age of 1 and 5 years and accounts for approximately 13% of all pediatric cancer mortality. Its clinical impact and its unique biology have made this aggressive malignancy the focus of a large concerted translational research effort. New insights into tumor biology are driving the development of new classification schemas; novel targeted therapeutic approaches include small molecule inhibitors, epigenetic, non-coding RNA, and cell-based immunologic therapies. Recent insights regarding the pathogenesis and biology of neuroblastoma will be placed in context with the current understanding of tumor biology and tumor/host interactions. Systematic classification of patients coupled with therapeutic advances point to a future of improved clinical outcomes for this biologically distinct and highly aggressive pediatric malignancy. PMID:25386934

  9. Henipavirus pathogenesis and antiviral approaches.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Cyrille; Horvat, Branka

    2015-03-01

    Hendra virus and Nipah virus are closely related, recently emerged zoonotic paramyxoviruses, belonging to the Henipavirus genus. Both viruses induce generalized vasculitis affecting particularly the respiratory tract and CNS. The exceptionally broad species tropism of Henipavirus, the high case fatality rate and person-to-person transmission associated with Nipah virus outbreaks emphasize the necessity of effective antiviral strategies for these intriguing threatening pathogens. Current therapeutic approaches, validated in animal models, target early steps in viral infection; they include the use of neutralizing virus-specific antibodies and blocking membrane fusion with peptides that bind the viral fusion protein. A better understanding of Henipavirus pathogenesis is critical for the further advancement of antiviral treatment, and we summarize here the recent progress in the field. PMID:25634624

  10. Lymphocyte Activation during Acute Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus SHIV89.6PD Infection in Macaques†

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Marianne; Waterman, Paul M.; Mitchen, Jacque L.; Djavani, Mahmoud; Brown, Charles; Trivedi, Parul; Horejsh, Douglas; Dykhuizen, Marta; Kitabwalla, Moiz; Pauza, C. David

    1999-01-01

    Host-virus interactions control disease progression in human immunodeficiency virus-infected human beings and in nonhuman primates infected with simian or simian/human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIV). These interactions evolve rapidly during acute infection and are key to the mechanisms of viral persistence and AIDS. SHIV89.6PD infection in rhesus macaques can deplete CD4+ T cells from the peripheral blood, spleen, and lymph nodes within 2 weeks after exposure and is a model for virulent, acute infection. Lymphocytes isolated from blood and tissues during the interval of acute SHIV89.6PD infection have lost the capacity to proliferate in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA). T-cell unresponsiveness to mitogen occurred within 1 week after mucosal inoculation yet prior to massive CD4+ T-cell depletion and extensive virus dissemination. The lack of mitogen response was due to apoptosis in vitro, and increased activation marker expression on circulating T cells in vivo coincided with the appearance of PHA-induced apoptosis in vitro. Inappropriately high immune stimulation associated with rapid loss of mature CD4+ T cells suggested that activation-induced cell death is a mechanism for helper T-cell depletion in the brief period before widespread virus dissemination. Elevated levels of lymphocyte activation likely enhance SHIV89.6PD replication, thus increasing the loss of CD4+ T cells and diminishing the levels of virus-specific immunity that remain after acute infection. The level of surviving immunity may dictate the capacity to control virus replication and disease progression. We describe this level of immune competence as the host set point to show its pivotal role in AIDS pathogenesis. PMID:10559340

  11. (C2) Saliva, breast milk, and mucosal fluids in HIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Page-Shafer, K; Sweet, S; Kassaye, S; Ssali, C

    2006-01-01

    The oral environment has received various amounts of attention in association with HIV infection and pathogenesis. Since HIV infection occurs through mucosal tissue, oral factors-including tissue, fluids, and compartments-are of interest in furthering our understanding of the diagnosis, infectivity, transmission, and pathogenesis of disease. This report reviews: (1) HIV testing and diagnoses with oral fluids; (2) post-natal acquisition of HIV in association with breast-feeding from HIV-positive mothers; and (3) oral sex and HIV transmission. In the first, we examine how oral fluids are used to detect HIV infection and review current consensus on the role of salivary molecules as markers for immunosuppression. Second, lactation-associated HIV acquisition is reviewed, with special consideration of emerging issues associated with the impact of anti-retroviral therapies. Last, we consider current data on the risk of HIV infection in association with oral sex. Investigation of these diverse topics has a common goal: understanding how HIV presents in the oral environment, with an aim to rapid and accessible HIV diagnosis, and improved prevention and treatment of infection. PMID:16672566

  12. Non-IgE mediated food allergy - update of recent progress in mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Jyonouchi, Harumi

    2012-10-01

    As opposed to IgE mediated food allergy (IFA) which can cause fatal outcomes, non-IgE mediated FA (NFA) was initially thought to be a benign condition mediated by cellular immune responses, primarily affecting the GI mucosa. NFA children were thought to recover well upon avoidance of offending food. Although pathogenesis of NFA is still not well understood, recent studies indicate widely variable clinical manifestations of NFA. In parallel to our better appreciation of clinical features of NFA, complex regulatory mechanisms of gut immune homeostasis have become known with progress in our understanding of the gut mucosal immune system. In addition, a role of gut commensal flora on the gut immune system has also become better understood along with the effects of dietary components. Subtle changes in interactions between environmental factors (microbiota, dietary components, etc.) and the gut immune responses can affect gut immune homeostasis, which can result in undesired adverse reactions to food proteins (FPs). This review discusses recent progress in our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of gut immune homeostasis and recently revealed widely variable clinical presentations of NFA with respect to it pathogenesis. PMID:22680623

  13. Pathogenesis of infection in surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ping; Fang, Xiangming

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Despite the application of prophylactic antimicrobial therapy and advanced technologies, infection remains one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. Understanding the pathogenesis of surgical infection would offer new insights into the development of biomarkers to predict and stratify infection in patients, and to explore specific strategies to minimize this serious postoperative complication. Recent findings The acute nonspecific inflammatory response triggered by endogenous danger signals evoked by surgical insult is beneficial, while paradoxically associated with reduced resistance to infection. There is growing evidence indicating that primed inflammation by surgical insult exaggerates the dysregulation of the immune-inflammatory response to the invasion of pathogens postoperatively. Innate immune receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), contribute to detecting both pathogen-associated molecular patterns and endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns, and to further amplifying inflammatory responses to infection. Current evidence shows the fascinating role of non-TLRs in the process of infection. Non-TLRs, such as membrane-associated triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells family, cytosolic nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors and nuclear receptor nuclear family 4 subgroup A receptors, are also crucial in triggering the immune responses and mounting an effective defense against surgical insults and the second hit of infection. Summary Understanding the pivotal role of non-TLRs in sensing exogenous and endogenous molecules, and the influence of primed systemic inflammation and depressed immune status on the defense against pathogen after surgical insult, would be helpful to fully explore the relevant sophisticated phenomena of surgical infection, and to elucidate the occurrence of heterogeneous constellations of clinical signs and symptoms among this special population

  14. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or though physical contact (for example, on unwashed hands). Being exposed to tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts, vapors, and fumes can also cause acute bronchitis. Less often, bacteria can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute ...

  15. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  16. Physiology and immunology of mucosal barriers in catfish (Ictalurus spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mucosal barriers of catfish (Ictalurus spp.) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient adsorption, osmoregulation, waste excretion, and environmental sensing. Catf...

  17. Sevelamer crystals in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT): a new entity associated with mucosal injury.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Benjamin J; Limketkai, Berkeley N; Liu, Ta-Chiang; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Nazari, Kamran; Park, Jason Y; Santangelo, William C; Torbenson, Michael S; Voltaggio, Lysandra; Yearsley, Martha M; Arnold, Christina A

    2013-11-01

    We report the first description of sevelamer crystals (Renagel and Renvela, Genzyme; phosphate-lowering agents) in the gastrointestinal tract. We prospectively collected cases with novel, histologically identical crystals from 4 major academic centers over a 1-year period and studied pertinent clinicopathologic features. Sevelamer usage in the setting of chronic kidney disease was demonstrated in all cases (n=15 total cases, 7 patients). Sites of involvement included the esophagus (n=2), small bowel (n=2), and colon (n=11). The background mucosa was normal in only 1 case. Notable mucosal abnormality included chronic mucosal damage (n=5), acute inflammation (n=4), inflammatory polyp (n=2), extensive ulceration (n=2), ischemia (n=1), and necrosis (n=1). In general, sevelamer crystals displayed broad, curved, and irregularly spaced "fish scales" with a variably eosinophilic to rusty brown color on hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and violet color on periodic acid-Schiff-alcian special staining with diastase (PAS/D). To validate these findings, sevelamer tablets (Renvela) were crushed and submitted for histologic processing; the findings were identical to those in the patient specimens. The possibility of Kayexalate (sodium polystyrene sulfonate) and cholestyramine had been raised in error. However, Kayexalate has narrow, rectangular "fish scales" and is violet on H&E and magenta on PAS/D; cholestyramine lacks internal "fish scales," is bright orange on H&E, variably gray or hot pink on PAS/D, and is unassociated with mucosal injury. Further study is required to determine whether sevelamer plays a causal role in these injuries; however, its crystal is an important mimic of both Kayexalate and choleystyramine. As the history of sevelamer administration was not documented in any pathology requisition, awareness of sevelamer's characteristic morphology is crucial to avoid the diagnostic pitfalls of its mimics. PMID:24061514

  18. Sodium glucose cotransporter 1 ligand BLF501 as a novel tool for management of gastrointestinal mucositis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies demonstrated that engagement of sodium glucose transporter 1 (SGLT-1) by orally administered D-glucose protects the intestinal mucosa from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced injury. We tested whether SGLT-1 engagement might protect the intestinal mucosa from doxorubicin (DXR)- and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced injury in animal models mimicking acute or chronic mucositis. Methods Mice were treated intraperitoneally with DXR, alone or in combination with 5-FU, and orally with BLF501, a glucose-derived synthetic compound with high affinity for SGLT-1. Intestinal mucosal epithelium integrity was assessed by histological analysis, cellular proliferation assays, real-time PCR gene expression assays and Western blot assays. Student’s t-test (paired two-tailed) and χ2 analyses were used for comparisons between groups. Differences were considered significant at p < 0.05. Results BLF501 administration in mice treated with DXR and/or 5-FU decreased the injuries to the mucosa in terms of epithelial integrity and cellular proliferative ability. Co-treatment with BLF501 led to a normal expression and distribution of both zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and beta-catenin, which were underexpressed after treatment with either chemotherapeutic agent alone. BLF501 administration also restored normal expression of caspase-3 and ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM), which were overexpressed after treatment with DXR and 5-FU. In SGLT1-/- mice, BLF501 had no detectable effects. BLF501 administration in wild-type mice with growing A431 tumors did not modify antitumor activity of DXR. Conclusions BLF501-induced protection of the intestinal mucosa is a promising novel therapeutic approach to reducing the severity of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. PMID:24495286

  19. Polymeric penetration enhancers promote humoral immune responses to mucosal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Klein, Katja; Mann, Jamie F S; Rogers, Paul; Shattock, Robin J

    2014-06-10

    Protective mucosal immune responses are thought best induced by trans-mucosal vaccination, providing greater potential to generate potent local immune responses than conventional parenteral vaccination. However, poor trans-mucosal permeability of large macromolecular antigens limits bioavailability to local inductive immune cells. This study explores the utility of polymeric penetration enhancers to promote trans-mucosal bioavailability of insulin, as a biomarker of mucosal absorption, and two vaccine candidates: recombinant HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (CN54gp140) and tetanus toxoid (TT). Responses to vaccinating antigens were assessed by measurement of serum and the vaginal humoral responses. Polyethyleneimine (PEI), Dimethyl-β-cyclodextrin (DM-β-CD) and Chitosan enhanced the bioavailability of insulin following intranasal (IN), sublingual (SL), intravaginal (I.Vag) and intrarectal (IR) administration. The same penetration enhancers also increased antigen-specific IgG and IgA antibody responses to the model vaccine antigens in serum and vaginal secretions following IN and SL application. Co-delivery of both antigens with PEI or Chitosan showed the highest increase in systemic IgG and IgA responses following IN or SL administration. However the highest IgA titres in vaginal secretions were achieved after IN immunisations with PEI and Chitosan. None of the penetration enhancers were able to increase antibody responses to gp140 after I.Vag immunisations, while in contrast PEI and Chitosan were able to induce TT-specific systemic IgG levels following I.Vag administration. In summary, we present supporting data that suggest appropriate co-formulation of vaccine antigens with excipients known to influence mucosal barrier functions can increase the bioavailability of mucosally applied antigens promoting the induction of mucosal and systemic antibody responses. PMID:24657807

  20. Use of Transparent Film Dressing for Dermoscopy of Mucosal Lesions.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, Jennifer; Lauren, Christine T

    2016-01-01

    Genital and mucosal nevi are not uncommonly encountered in children. These type of nevi highlight challenges in performing a thorough dermoscopic examination. Contact dermoscopy can provide additional information about a nevus that non-contact dermoscopy cannot. We propose applying a sterile transparent film dressing over the dermatoscope to act as a waterproof barrier that is also impermeable to bacteria and viruses. This provides a sanitary way to evaluate nevi in genital skin as well as on other mucosal surfaces. PMID:26250593

  1. Using Light to Treat Mucositis and Help Wounds Heal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignatius, Robert W.; Martin, Todd S.; Kirk, Charles

    2008-01-01

    A continuing program of research and development is focusing on the use of controlled illumination by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to treat mucositis and to accelerate healing of wounds. The basic idea is to illuminate the affected area of a patient with light of an intensity, duration, and wavelength (or combination of wavelengths) chosen to produce a therapeutic effect while generating only a minimal amount of heat. This method of treatment was originally intended for treating the mucositis that is a common complication of chemotherapy and radiation therapy for cancer. It is now also under consideration as a means to accelerate the healing of wounds and possibly also to treat exposure to chemical and radioactive warfare agents. Radiation therapy and many chemotherapeutic drugs often damage the mucosal linings of the mouth and gastrointestinal tract, leading to mouth ulcers (oral mucositis), nausea, and diarrhea. Hyperbaric-oxygen therapy is currently the standard of care for ischemic, hypoxic, infected, and otherwise slowlyhealing problem wounds, including those of oral mucositis. Hyperbaric-oxygen therapy increases such cellular activities as collagen production and angiogenesis, leading to an increased rate of healing. Biostimulation by use of laser light has also been found to be effective in treating mucositis. For hyperbaricoxygen treatment, a patient must remain inside a hyperbaric chamber for an extended time. Laser treatment is limited by laser-wavelength capabilities and by narrowness of laser beams, and usually entails the generation of significant amounts of heat.

  2. Inside the brachycephalic nose: intranasal mucosal contact points.

    PubMed

    Schuenemann, Riccarda; Oechtering, Gerhard U

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of intranasal mucosal contact points in brachycephalic and normocephalic dogs. In total, 82 brachycephalic dogs (42 pugs and 40 French bulldogs) were evaluated by rhinoscopy for their intranasal mucosal contact and 25 normocephalic dogs were evaluated as a control group. Of those, 162 brachycephalic nasal cavities were evaluable and 140 had contact between intranasal structures (87%). Intraconchal and septoconchal mucosal contact points were the most commonly detected sites of contact. French bulldogs had a significantly higher prevalence of mucosal contact and had 3 mean contact points compared with 1.7 mean contact points per nasal cavity in pugs. Septal deviations were present in 62% of brachycephalic dogs. In the control group, mucosal contact points were present in only 7 of 50 nasal cavities (14%), and septal deviations occurred in 16% of those cases. Contact point average was 0.1 in large and 0.3 in small normocephalic dogs. Intranasal mucosal contact was identified as a common and previously unreported problem in brachycephalic dogs. Numerous contact points reduce the lumen of the intranasal passageways and indicate potential intranasal obstruction. Affected dogs might benefit from removal of obstructing conchae, potentially using laser-assisted turbinectomy. PMID:24659729

  3. Cancer therapy and oral mucositis. An appraisal of drug prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Verdi, C J

    1993-09-01

    Oral mucositis as a consequence of cytotoxic therapy is a major cause of morbidity in cancer patients. Cancer therapy-induced tissue damage leading to mucositis can occur through either direct or indirect stomatotoxicity. Once mucositis has occurred, treatment consists of measures to palliate symptoms. The prevention of cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis is less standardised. Numerous drugs have been used as prophylactic agents to prevent chemo- and radiotherapy-induced mucositis. Controlled trials have shown some degree of prophylactic efficacy for sucralfate, chlorhexidine and benzydamine. Positive but non-placebo-controlled trials requiring more study have been conducted with dinoprostone (prostaglandin E2), silver nitrate, beta-carotene, pentoxifylline and lozenges containing polymixin B, tobramycin and amphotericin B. Current studies have shown a lack of efficacy with allopurinol and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Nonpharmacological methods such as oral cryotherapy and helium-neon laser treatments have shown some promise. At the present time no agent has been shown to be uniformly efficacious and can be accepted as standard therapy. Additional studies combining several agents or incorporating nonpharmacological manoeuvres for mucositis prevention are needed. PMID:8240724

  4. Successful endoscopic submucosal dissection for mucosal cancer of the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Masahiro; Makino, Atsushi; Wada, Masahiro; Kabeshima, Yasuo; Takahashi, Tsunehiro; Kawakubo, Hirofumi; Shito, Masaya; Sugiura, Hitoshi; Omori, Tai

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of mucosal duodenal cancer in a 62-year-old woman, which was successfully removed en bloc by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). The patient underwent an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy at our hospital, which revealed an elevated flat mucosal lesion (type IIa) measuring 10 mm in diameter in the second portion of the duodenum. Histopathological examination of a biopsy specimen revealed features suggestive of a tubulovillous adenoma with severe atypia. As the findings suggested that the lesion had an adenocarcinoma component but was confined to the mucosal layer, we decided to carry out ESD and successfully removed the tumor in one piece. The resected tumor was 20 x 15 mm in size. Histopathological examination revealed that the lesion was a well-differentiated mucosal adenocarcinoma with no lymphovascular invasion. Mucosal duodenal cancer is extremely rare, and ESD of a lesion in the duodenum requires a high level of skill. To the best of our knowledge, this case is the first report of successful ESD carried out in a case of mucosal duodenal cancer. PMID:20078665

  5. Novel strategies using DNA for the induction of mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    McCluskie, M J; Davis, H L

    1999-01-01

    The mucosal surfaces are the primary sites for transmission of most infectious diseases. However, most conventional vaccines are administered parenterally [e.g., by intramuscular (IM) or intradermal (ID) injection] and induce systemic but rarely mucosal immunity. Novel vaccination strategies capable of inducing both systemic and mucosal immune responses could greatly reduce infection and morbidity worldwide. One of the most exciting advances in vaccine technology in recent years has been the development of DNA vaccines, through which the antigen is synthesized in vivo after direct introduction of its encoding sequences. The vast majority of DNA vaccines have been delivered parenterally; however, in recent years a number of studies have reported successful mucosal immunization with DNA vaccines. The induction of strong immune responses following the introduction of DNA appears to be partly due to the potent adjuvant effect of unmethylated immunostimulatory CpG motifs present in the DNA backbone. Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing such immunostimulatory CpG motifs are potent adjuvants systemically and mucosally in mice, and have synergistic action with other adjuvants, such as alum and cholera toxin (CT). This article highlights the recent advances in vaccination strategies using DNA delivered to mucosal surfaces either as an antigen-encoding plasmid or as an adjuvant. PMID:10530431

  6. Clotrimazole nanoparticle gel for mucosal administration.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Elisabetta; Ravani, Laura; Contado, Catia; Costenaro, Andrea; Drechsler, Markus; Rossi, Damiano; Menegatti, Enea; Grandini, Alessandro; Cortesi, Rita

    2013-01-01

    In this study a formulation suitable to be applied on oral and/or vaginal mucosa has been developed for the treatment of fungal infections. The aim of the research is a comparison between clotrimazole (CLO) containing semisolid formulations based on monoolein aqueous dispersion (MAD) or nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC). MAD and NLC have been characterized in terms of morphology and dimensional distribution by cryogenic Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM) and Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS). CLO was encapsulated with high entrapment efficiency both in MAD and in NLC, according to Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation (SdFFF) combined with HPLC. CLO recovery in MAD and NLC has been investigated by time. In order to obtain formulations with suitable viscosity for mucosal application, MAD was diluted with a carbomer gel, while NLC was directly viscosized by the addition of poloxamer 407 in the dispersion. The rheological properties of MAD and NLC after viscosizing have been investigated. Franz cell has been employed to study CLO diffusion from the different vehicles, evidencing diffusion rates from MAD and NLC superimposable to that obtained using Canesten(®). An anticandidal activity study demonstrated that both CLO-MAD and CLO-NLC were more active against Candida albicans with respect to the pure drug. PMID:25428089

  7. Mucosal effects of tenofovir 1% gel.

    PubMed

    Hladik, Florian; Burgener, Adam; Ballweber, Lamar; Gottardo, Raphael; Vojtech, Lucia; Fourati, Slim; Dai, James Y; Cameron, Mark J; Strobl, Johanna; Hughes, Sean M; Hoesley, Craig; Andrew, Philip; Johnson, Sherri; Piper, Jeanna; Friend, David R; Ball, T Blake; Cranston, Ross D; Mayer, Kenneth H; McElrath, M Juliana; McGowan, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Tenofovir gel is being evaluated for vaginal and rectal pre-exposure prophylaxis against HIV transmission. Because this is a new prevention strategy, we broadly assessed its effects on the mucosa. In MTN-007, a phase-1, randomized, double-blinded rectal microbicide trial, we used systems genomics/proteomics to determine the effect of tenofovir 1% gel, nonoxynol-9 2% gel, placebo gel or no treatment on rectal biopsies (15 subjects/arm). We also treated primary vaginal epithelial cells from four healthy women with tenofovir in vitro. After seven days of administration, tenofovir 1% gel had broad-ranging effects on the rectal mucosa, which were more pronounced than, but different from, those of the detergent nonoxynol-9. Tenofovir suppressed anti-inflammatory mediators, increased T cell densities, caused mitochondrial dysfunction, altered regulatory pathways of cell differentiation and survival, and stimulated epithelial cell proliferation. The breadth of mucosal changes induced by tenofovir indicates that its safety over longer-term topical use should be carefully monitored. PMID:25647729

  8. Mucosal effects of tenofovir 1% gel

    PubMed Central

    Hladik, Florian; Burgener, Adam; Ballweber, Lamar; Gottardo, Raphael; Vojtech, Lucia; Fourati, Slim; Dai, James Y; Cameron, Mark J; Strobl, Johanna; Hughes, Sean M; Hoesley, Craig; Andrew, Philip; Johnson, Sherri; Piper, Jeanna; Friend, David R; Ball, T Blake; Cranston, Ross D; Mayer, Kenneth H; McElrath, M Juliana; McGowan, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Tenofovir gel is being evaluated for vaginal and rectal pre-exposure prophylaxis against HIV transmission. Because this is a new prevention strategy, we broadly assessed its effects on the mucosa. In MTN-007, a phase-1, randomized, double-blinded rectal microbicide trial, we used systems genomics/proteomics to determine the effect of tenofovir 1% gel, nonoxynol-9 2% gel, placebo gel or no treatment on rectal biopsies (15 subjects/arm). We also treated primary vaginal epithelial cells from four healthy women with tenofovir in vitro. After seven days of administration, tenofovir 1% gel had broad-ranging effects on the rectal mucosa, which were more pronounced than, but different from, those of the detergent nonoxynol-9. Tenofovir suppressed anti-inflammatory mediators, increased T cell densities, caused mitochondrial dysfunction, altered regulatory pathways of cell differentiation and survival, and stimulated epithelial cell proliferation. The breadth of mucosal changes induced by tenofovir indicates that its safety over longer-term topical use should be carefully monitored. Clinical trial registration: NCT01232803. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04525.001 PMID:25647729

  9. Reflectance confocal microscopy for mucosal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cinotti, E; Labeille, B; Cambazard, F; Thuret, G; Gain, P; Perrot, J L

    2015-10-01

    Non-invasive, real-time microscopic imaging using in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) has been demonstrated to be a useful tool for the evaluation of skin diseases and in particular for skin neoplasms. Recently, the RCM devices dedicated to the skin have also been applied to perform "virtual biopsies" of the oral, genital and ocular mucosa. In fact, mucosa is a sensitive area where non invasive imaging techniques are of high interest in order to spare biopsies and excisions. Mucosa is particularly suitable for RCM because of its thin or absent cornified layer and its thin epithelium that allows a deeper penetration of the laser with the consequent possibility of exploring deeper tissue levels. Besides, being useful for the diagnosis, RCM may be helpful to identify the area to be biopsied in case of large or multifocal lesions and may be regarded as a complementary technique for non invasive assessment of treatment efficacy. The RCM features of healthy mucosa are described and a revision of the literature of the mucosal diseases that can be diagnosed by RCM has been performed. PMID:26099354

  10. Mucosal immune responses following intestinal nematode infection

    PubMed Central

    Zaph, C; Cooper, P J; Harris, N L

    2014-01-01

    In most natural environments, the large majority of mammals harbour parasitic helminths that often live as adults within the intestine for prolonged periods (1–2 years) 1. Although these organisms have been eradicated to a large extent within westernized human populations, those living within rural areas of developing countries continue to suffer from high infection rates. Indeed, recent estimates indicate that approximately 2·5 billion people worldwide, mainly children, currently suffer from infection with intestinal helminths (also known as geohelminths and soil-transmitted helminths) 2. Paradoxically, the eradication of helminths is thought to contribute to the increased incidence of autoimmune diseases and allergy observed in developed countries. In this review, we will summarize our current understanding of host–helminth interactions at the mucosal surface that result in parasite expulsion or permit the establishment of chronic infections with luminal dwelling adult worms. We will also provide insight into the adaptive immune mechanisms that provide immune protection against re-infection with helminth larvae, a process that is likely to be key to the future development of successful vaccination strategies. Lastly, the contribution of helminths to immune modulation and particularly to the treatment of allergy and inflammatory bowel disease will be discussed. PMID:25201407

  11. Mucosal Inflammatory Response to Salmonella typhimurium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Samir; McCormick, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    The human intestinal epithelium consists of a single layer of epithelial cells that forms a barrier against food antigens and the resident microbiota within the lumen. This delicately balanced organ functions in a highly sophisticated manner to uphold the fidelity of the intestinal epithelium and to eliminate pathogenic microorganisms. On the luminal side, this barrier is fortified by a thick mucus layer, and on the serosal side exists the lamina propria containing a resident population of immune cells. Pathogens that are able to breach this barrier disrupt the healthy epithelial lining by interfering with the regulatory mechanisms that govern the normal balance of intestinal architecture and function. This disruption results in a coordinated innate immune response deployed to eliminate the intruder that includes the release of antimicrobial peptides, activation of pattern-recognition receptors, and recruitment of a variety of immune cells. In the case of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection, induction of an inflammatory response has been linked to its virulence mechanism, the type III secretion system (T3SS). The T3SS secretes protein effectors that exploit the host’s cell biology to facilitate bacterial entry and intracellular survival, and to modulate the host immune response. As the role of the intestinal epithelium in initiating an immune response has been increasingly realized, this review will highlight recent research that details progress made in understanding mechanisms underlying the mucosal inflammatory response to Salmonella infection, and how such inflammatory responses impact pathogenic fitness of this organism. PMID:25071772

  12. Innate signals in mucosal immunoglobulin class switching.

    PubMed

    Puga, Irene; Cols, Montserrat; Cerutti, Andrea

    2010-11-01

    The intestinal mucosa contains large communities of commensal bacteria that process otherwise indigestible food components, synthesize essential vitamins, stimulate the maturation of the immune system, and form an ecologic niche that prevents the growth of pathogenic species. Conversely, the intestine provides the commensals with a stable habitat rich in energy derived from the ingested food. A delicate homeostatic balance maintains this mutualistic relationship without triggering a destructive inflammatory response. Commensals orchestrate intestinal homeostasis by entertaining an intimate dialogue with epithelial cells and immune cells lodged in the mucosa. Such a dialogue generates finely tuned signaling programs that ensure a state of hyporesponsiveness against noninvasive commensals and a state of active readiness against invasive pathogens. In this dialogue epithelial cells function as "interpreters" that continuously translate microbial messages to "instruct" immune cells as to the antigenic composition of the intestinal lumen. This education process initiates sophisticated defensive strategies that comprise massive production of IgA, a noninflammatory mucosal antibody class that generates immunity while preserving homeostasis. PMID:21050939

  13. Rhabdomyolysis: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Patrick A.; Helmstetter, John A.; Kaye, Adam M.; Kaye, Alan David

    2015-01-01

    Background Rhabdomyolysis is a complex medical condition involving the rapid dissolution of damaged or injured skeletal muscle. Methods This review focuses on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, causes, presentation, diagnosis, complications, management, and anesthetic considerations related to rhabdomyolysis. Results Any form of muscle damage––and by extension any entity that causes muscle damage––can initiate rhabdomyolysis. One of the most important treatment goals when rhabdomyolysis is suspected is avoiding acute kidney injury. Conclusion All clinicians should be aware of common causes, diagnosis, and treatment options. PMID:25829882

  14. Effects of propranolol and sucralfate on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage in chronic portal hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, P; Duchateau, A; Thiéfin, G; Zeitoun, P

    1987-10-01

    In a rat model of chronic portal hypertension we studied ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage and the effects of pretreatment by propranolol and sucralfate. Susceptibility to ethanol was increased in chronic portal hypertensive rats compared with sham-operated rats (55 +/- 8% vs. 25 +/- 4%). Both acute pretreatment (10 min) and chronic pretreatment (3 weeks) with propranolol reduced gastric mucosal injury induced by ethanol in portal hypertensive rats, compared with saline-treated rats. Acute and chronic pretreatment with propranolol had no protective effect in sham-operated rats. In portal hypertensive rats, sucralfate in two different doses (500 and 125 mg/kg) protected the gastric mucosa against ethanol-induced gastric injury compared with animals receiving saline (2 +/- 1% and 3 +/- 2% vs. 25 +/- 3%). Sucralfate at the higher dose did not reduce portal pressure in portal hypertensive rats. We conclude that: (1) chronic portal hypertension increases ethanol-induced gastric damage; (2) acute and chronic propranolol treatment reduces ethanol-induced gastric injury in portal hypertensive rats, probably by decreasing portal hypertension; (3) sucralfate has a cytoprotective effect in portal hypertensive rats without reducing portal pressure. These results suggest a potential application of sucralfate in patients otherwise treated by sclerotherapy. PMID:3693860

  15. Protein profiles in mucosal and systemic compartments in response to Vibrio cholerae in a mouse pulmonary infection model.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seok-Seong; Baik, Jung Eun; Yang, Jae Seung; Cho, Kun; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-09-01

    We have recently shown that a mouse lung infection model resulting in acute pneumonia could be used for evaluating the protective immunity induced by mucosal vaccines against Vibrio cholerae. In order to gain insight and better understanding of the pathogenicity of V. cholerae infection, we identified and compared proteins induced by V. cholerae in nasal washes, bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL), and sera. Intranasal administration of V. cholerae increased the concentration of total proteins in nasal washes and BAL fluids, but not in sera. LTQ-Orbitrap hybrid Fourier transform mass spectrometry showed that cytoskeletal proteins, protease inhibitors and anti-inflammatory mediators were present in nasal washes from uninfected mice. The distinctly expressed proteins in nasal washes in response to V. cholerae mainly consisted of protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory proteins, and anti-microbial proteins. A number of protease inhibitors and anti-inflammatory proteins were selectively expressed in BAL fluids from V. cholerae-infected mice, while cytoskeletal proteins and heat shock proteins were mainly observed in BAL fluids from uninfected mice. A large number of serum complements, protease inhibitors, and acute phase proteins were expressed in V. cholerae-infected mice. Collectively, these results suggest that intranasal administration of V. cholerae leading to acute pneumonia elicited alterations of protein profiles associated with immune homeostasis and host protection in both the mucosal and systemic compartments. PMID:26150210

  16. Endothelial Glycocalyx: Shedding Light on Malaria Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Casper; Pasini, Erica M; Kurtzhals, Jørgen A L

    2016-06-01

    Malaria is estimated to kill 438 000 people annually, mostly due to severe malaria, which is closely associated with microcirculatory vasculopathy, although its pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. Here, we propose that the largely ignored glycocalyx of the vascular endothelium plays an important role in facilitating the pathogenesis of severe malaria. PMID:27161599

  17. Prevailing Sydney like Norovirus GII.4 VLPs induce systemic and mucosal immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yuqi; Wan, Xin; Ling, Tong; Wu, Jie; Wang, Zejun; Meng, Shengli; Shen, Shuo

    2015-12-01

    The newly emerged Norovirus (NoV) Sydney 2012 strain has been sweeping all over the world, causing acute non-bacterial gastroenteritis in adults and children. Due to a lack of cell culture system, virus like particles (VLPs) has been assembled and used as vaccine candidates in preclinical and clinical studies. Expression of the major capsid protein of NoVs using recombinant baculovirus expression system in Sf9 cells leads to formation of VLPs that are morphologically and antigenically similar to true virions. In this study, VLPs were successfully produced using the VP1 of Sydney-2012-like strain and its immunogenicity was evaluated by different routes and its capability in inducing mucosal immune responses in the presence and absence of adjuvants in BALB/c mice. Administration of NoV VLPs in the presence of Al(OH)3 or monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL-A) led to high titers of VLP-specific IgG antibodies. Administration of VLPs orally in the presence of cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) didn't enhance mucosal immune response as less fecal IgA positive mice were observed when compared with those given VLPs only. Our study represents the first immunogenicity study of VLPs derived from current pandemic Sydney 2012 strain and which might have implications in the development of NoVs vaccine in china. PMID:26375574

  18. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Backert, Steffen; Neddermann, Matthias; Maubach, Gunter; Naumann, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is estimated to infect more than half of the worlds human population and represents a major risk factor for chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, MALT lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma. H. pylori infection and clinical consequences are controlled by highly complex interactions between the host, colonizing bacteria, and environmental parameters. Important bacterial determinants linked with gastric disease development include the cag pathogenicity island encoding a type IV secretion system (T4SS), the translocated effector protein CagA, vacuolating cytotoxin VacA, adhesin BabA, urease, serine protease HtrA, secreted outer membrane vesicles, and many others. The high quantity of these factors and allelic changes in the corresponding genes reveals a sophisticated picture and problems in evaluating the impact of each distinct component. Extensive work has been performed to pinpoint molecular processes related to H. pylori-triggered pathogenesis using Mongolian gerbils, mice, primary tissues, as well as novel in vitro model systems such as gastroids. The manipulation of host signaling cascades by the bacterium appears to be crucial for inducing pathogenic downstream activities and gastric disease progression. Here, we review the most recent advances in this important research area. PMID:27531534

  19. Candida albicans, plasticity and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Poulain, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    The yeast Candida albicans has emerged as a major public health problem during the past two decades. The spectrum of diseases caused by this species ranges from vaginal infections, which affect up to 75% of the women at least once in their lifetime, to deep infections in hospitalized patients which lead to high morbidity and mortality rates. Candida albicans may also play a role in the persistence or worsening of some chronic inflammatory bowel diseases. Active research is now improving our understanding of the molecular mechanisms and genetic factors in the yeast and its host which influence the development of disease. Despite these advances and the availability of a more extensive therapeutic arsenal, current progress in the control of nosocomial infections due to Candida remains limited, mainly due to the difficulties in diagnosing these infections. The biologist has a key role to play in establishing a dialogue with the clinician in order to identify the saprophyte/pathogen transition in patients as early as possible. This review provides a quick synopsis of the modern concepts of Candida pathogenesis with some representative examples illustrating the specifics traits of this yeast in terms of pathogenic adaptation. PMID:23962107

  20. CELLULAR PATHOGENESIS OF DIABETIC GASTROENTEROPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Ördög, Tamás; Hayashi, Yujiro; Gibbons, Simon J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Gastroenteropathy manifesting in upper gastrointestinal symptoms, delayed gastric emptying, constipation, diarrhea and fecal incontinence occurs frequently in patients with diabetes mellitus and represents a significant health care burden. Current treatments are largely symptomatic and ineffective. Better understanding of the cellular and molecular pathogenesis of these disorders is required for the development of more effective therapies. Recent advances in our understanding of the inherent, high-level complexities of the control systems that execute and regulate gastrointestinal motility, together with the utilization of new experimental models and sophisticated physiological, morphological and molecular techniques have lead to the realization that diabetic gastroenteropathies cannot be ascribed to any singular defect or dysfunction. In fact, these disorders are multifactorial and involve a spectrum of metabolic and dystrophic changes that can potentially affect all key components of motor control including the systemic autonomic and enteric nervous systems, interstitial cells of Cajal and smooth muscle cells. Candidate pathomechanisms are also varied and include imbalance between pro- and anti-oxidative factors, altered trophic stimuli to mature cells and their progenitors, and, possibly, autoimmune factors. The goal of this paper is to review the cellular changes underlying diabetic gastroenteropathies and their potential causes, with particular focus on functional interactions between various cell types. It is proposed that diabetic gastroenteropathies should be considered a form of gastrointestinal neuromuscular dystrophy rather than a “functional” disorder. Future research should identify ways to block cytotoxic factors, support the regeneration of damaged cells and translate the experimental findings into new treatment modalities. PMID:19829287

  1. Pathogenesis of benign adrenocortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Vezzosi, Delphine; Bertherat, Jérôme; Groussin, Lionel

    2010-12-01

    Most adrenocortical tumors (ACT) are benign unilateral adrenocortical adenomas, often discovered incidentally. Exceptionally, ACT are bilateral. However bilateral ACT have been very helpful to progress in the pathophysiology of ACT. Although most ACT are of sporadic origin, they may also be part of syndromic and/or hereditary disorders. The identification of the genetics of familial diseases associated with benign ACT has been helpful to define somatic alterations in sporadic ACT: for example, identification of PRKAR1A mutations in Carney complex or alterations of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Coli. Components of the cAMP signaling pathway-for example, adrenocorticotropic-hormone receptors and other membrane receptors, Gs protein, phosphodiesterases and protein kinase A-can be altered to various degrees in benign cortisol-secreting ACT. These progress have been important for the understanding of the pathogenesis of benign ACT, but already have profound implications for clinical management, for example in unraveling the genetic origin of disease in some patients with ACT. They also have therapeutic consequences, and should help to develop new therapeutic options. PMID:21115158

  2. Pathogenicity Islands in Bacterial Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Herbert; Hensel, Michael

    2004-01-01

    In this review, we focus on a group of mobile genetic elements designated pathogenicity islands (PAI). These elements play a pivotal role in the virulence of bacterial pathogens of humans and are also essential for virulence in pathogens of animals and plants. Characteristic molecular features of PAI of important human pathogens and their role in pathogenesis are described. The availability of a large number of genome sequences of pathogenic bacteria and their benign relatives currently offers a unique opportunity for the identification of novel pathogen-specific genomic islands. However, this knowledge has to be complemented by improved model systems for the analysis of virulence functions of bacterial pathogens. PAI apparently have been acquired during the speciation of pathogens from their nonpathogenic or environmental ancestors. The acquisition of PAI not only is an ancient evolutionary event that led to the appearance of bacterial pathogens on a timescale of millions of years but also may represent a mechanism that contributes to the appearance of new pathogens within a human life span. The acquisition of knowledge about PAI, their structure, their mobility, and the pathogenicity factors they encode not only is helpful in gaining a better understanding of bacterial evolution and interactions of pathogens with eukaryotic host cells but also may have important practical implications such as providing delivery systems for vaccination, tools for cell biology, and tools for the development of new strategies for therapy of bacterial infections. PMID:14726454

  3. FVIII inhibitors: pathogenesis and avoidance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inhibitory antibodies has been the focus of major scientific interest over the last decades, and several studies on underlying immune mechanisms and risk factors for formation of these antibodies have been performed with the aim of improving the ability to both predict and prevent their appearance. It seems clear that the decisive factors for the immune response to the deficient factor are multiple and involve components of both a constitutional and therapy-related nature. A scientific concern and obstacle for research in the area of hemophilia is the relatively small cohorts available for studies and the resulting risk of confounded and biased results. Careful interpretation of data is recommended to avoid treatment decisions based on a weak scientific platform. This review will summarize current concepts of the underlying immunological mechanisms and risk factors for development of inhibitory antibodies in patients with hemophilia A and discuss how these findings may be interpreted and influence our clinical management of patients. PMID:25712994

  4. Systems approaches to coronavirus pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Alexandra; Baric, Ralph S.; Ferris, Martin T.

    2014-01-01

    Coronaviruses comprise a large group of emergent human and animal pathogens, including the highly pathogenic SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV strains that cause significant morbidity and mortality in infected individuals, especially the elderly. As emergent viruses may cause episodic outbreaks of disease over time, human samples are limited. Systems biology and genetic technologies maximize opportunities for identifying critical host and viral genetic factors that regulate susceptibility and virus-induced disease severity. These approaches provide discovery platforms that highlight and allow targeted confirmation of critical targets for prophylactics and therapeutics, especially critical in an outbreak setting. Although poorly understood, it has long been recognized that host regulation of virus-associated disease severity is multigenic. The advent of systems genetic and biology resources provide new opportunities for deconvoluting the complex genetic interactions and expression networks that regulate pathogenic or protective host response patterns following virus infection. Using SARS-CoV as a model, dynamic transcriptional network changes and disease-associated phenotypes have been identified in different genetic backgrounds, leading to the promise of population-wide discovery of the underpinnings of Coronavirus pathogenesis. PMID:24842079

  5. Comparison of Systemic and Mucosal Immunization with Helper-Dependent Adenoviruses for Vaccination against Mucosal Challenge with SHIV

    PubMed Central

    Nehete, Bharti P.; Yang, Guojun; Buchl, Stephanie J.; Hanley, Patrick W.; Palmer, Donna; Montefiori, David C.; Ferrari, Guido; Ng, Philip; Sastry, K. Jagannadha; Barry, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Most HIV-1 infections are thought to occur at mucosal surfaces during sexual contact. It has been hypothesized that vaccines delivered at mucosal surfaces may mediate better protection against HIV-1 than vaccines that are delivered systemically. To test this, rhesus macaques were vaccinated by intramuscular (i.m.) or intravaginal (ivag.) routes with helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vectors expressing HIV-1 envelope. Macaques were first immunized intranasally with species C Ad serotype 5 (Ad5) prior to serotype-switching with species C HD-Ad6, Ad1, Ad5, and Ad2 vectors expressing env followed by rectal challenge with CCR5-tropic SHIV-SF162P3. Vaccination by the systemic route generated stronger systemic CD8 T cell responses in PBMC, but weaker mucosal responses. Conversely, mucosal immunization generated stronger CD4 T cell central memory (Tcm) responses in the colon. Intramuscular immunization generated higher levels of env-binding antibodies, but neither produced neutralizing or cytotoxic antibodies. After mucosal SHIV challenge, both groups controlled SHIV better than control animals. However, more animals in the ivag. group had lower viral set points than in in the i.m. group. These data suggest mucosal vaccination may have improve protection against sexually-transmitted HIV. These data also demonstrate that helper-dependent Ad vaccines can mediate robust vaccine responses in the face of prior immunity to Ad5 and during four rounds of adenovirus vaccination. PMID:23844034

  6. Differential Gene Expression and Infection Profiles of Cutaneous and Mucosal Leishmania braziliensis Isolates from the Same Patient

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Ferreira, Eliza V. C.; Toledo, Juliano S.; De Oliveira, Arthur H. C.; Ferreira, Tiago R.; Ruy, Patricia C.; Pinzan, Camila F.; Santos, Ramon F.; Boaventura, Viviane; Rojo, David; López-Gonzálvez, Ángelez; Rosa, Jose C.; Barbas, Coral; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Barral, Aldina; Cruz, Angela K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Leishmaniasis is a complex disease in which clinical outcome depends on factors such as parasite species, host genetics and immunity and vector species. In Brazil, Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis is a major etiological agent of cutaneous (CL) and mucosal leishmaniasis (MCL), a disfiguring form of the disease, which occurs in ~10% of L. braziliensis-infected patients. Thus, clinical isolates from patients with CL and MCL may be a relevant source of information to uncover parasite factors contributing to pathogenesis. In this study, we investigated two pairs of L. (V.) braziliensis isolates from mucosal (LbrM) and cutaneous (LbrC) sites of the same patient to identify factors distinguishing parasites that migrate from those that remain at the primary site of infection. Methodology/Principal Findings We observed no major genomic divergences among the clinical isolates by molecular karyotype and genomic sequencing. RT-PCR revealed that the isolates lacked Leishmania RNA virus (LRV). However, the isolates exhibited distinct in vivo pathogenesis in BALB/c mice; the LbrC isolates were more virulent than the LbrM isolates. Metabolomic analysis revealed significantly increased levels of 14 metabolites in LbrC parasites and 31 metabolites in LbrM parasites that were mainly related to inflammation and chemotaxis. A proteome comparative analysis revealed the overexpression of LbrPGF2S (prostaglandin f2-alpha synthase) and HSP70 in both LbrC isolates. Overexpression of LbrPGF2S in LbrC and LbrM promastigotes led to an increase in infected macrophages and the number of amastigotes per cell at 24–48 h post-infection (p.i.). Conclusions/Significance Despite sharing high similarity at the genome structure and ploidy levels, the parasites exhibited divergent expressed genomes. The proteome and metabolome results indicated differential profiles between the cutaneous and mucosal isolates, primarily related to inflammation and chemotaxis. BALB/c infection revealed that

  7. Oral mucosal disease: recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Scully, Crispian; Porter, Stephen

    2008-04-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS; aphthae; canker sores) is common worldwide. Characterised by multiple, recurrent, small, round, or ovoid ulcers with circumscribed margins, erythematous haloes, and yellow or grey floors, it usually presents first in childhood or adolescence. Its aetiology and pathogenesis is not entirely clear, but there is genetic predisposition, with strong associations with interleukin genotypes, and sometimes a family history. Diagnosis is on clinical grounds alone, and must be differentiated from other causes of recurrent ulceration, particularly Behçet disease - a systemic disorder in which aphthous-like ulcers are associated with genital ulceration, and eye disease (particularly posterior uveitis). Management remains unsatisfactory, as topical corticosteroids and most other treatments only reduce the severity of the ulceration, but do not stop recurrence. PMID:17850936

  8. IFN-γ Hinders Recovery from Mucosal Inflammation during Antibiotic Therapy for Salmonella Gut Infection.

    PubMed

    Dolowschiak, Tamas; Mueller, Anna Angelika; Pisan, Lynn Joanna; Feigelman, Rounak; Felmy, Boas; Sellin, Mikael Erik; Namineni, Sukumar; Nguyen, Bidong Dinh; Wotzka, Sandra Yvonne; Heikenwalder, Mathias; von Mering, Christian; Mueller, Christoph; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2016-08-10

    Salmonella Typhimurium (S.Tm) causes acute enteropathy resolving after 4-7 days. Strikingly, antibiotic therapy does not accelerate disease resolution. We screened for factors blocking remission using a S.Tm enterocolitis model. The antibiotic ciprofloxacin clears pathogen stool loads within 3-24 hr, while gut pathology resolves more slowly (ψ50: ∼48 hr, remission: 6-9 days). This delayed resolution is mediated by an interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-dependent response that is triggered during acute infection and continues throughout therapy. Specifically, IFN-γ production by mucosal T and NK cells retards disease resolution by maintaining signaling through the transcriptional regulator STAT1 and boosting expression of inflammatory mediators like IL-1β, TNF, and iNOS. Additionally, sustained IFN-γ fosters phagocyte accumulation and hampers antimicrobial defense mediated by IL-22 and the lectin REGIIIβ. These findings reveal a role for IFN-γ in delaying resolution of intestinal inflammation and may inform therapies for acute Salmonella enteropathy, chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, or disease resolution during antibiotic treatment. PMID:27453483

  9. Mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of Teleost fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene; Zhang, Yong-An; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2012-01-01

    As physical barriers that separate teleost fish from the external environment, mucosae are also active immunological sites that protect them against exposure to microbes and stressors. In mammals, the sites where antigens are sampled from mucosal surfaces and where stimulation of naive T and B lymphocytes occurs are known as inductive sites and are constituted by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). According to anatomical location, the MALT in teleost fish is subdivided into gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT). All MALT contain a variety of leukocytes, including, but not limited to, T cells, B cells, plasma cells, macrophages and granulocytes. Secretory immunoglobulins are produced mainly by plasmablasts and plasma cells, and play key roles in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Until recently, teleost fish B cells were thought to express only two classes of immunoglobulins, IgM and IgD, in which IgM was thought to be the only one responding to pathogens both in systemic and mucosal compartments. However, a third teleost immunoglobulin class, IgT/IgZ, was discovered in 2005, and it has recently been shown to behave as the prevalent immunoglobulin in gut mucosal immune responses. The purpose of this review is to summarise the current knowledge of mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of fish MALT. Moreover, we attempt to integrate the existing knowledge on both basic and applied research findings on fish mucosal immune responses, with the goal to provide new directions that may facilitate the development of novel vaccination strategies that stimulate not only systemic, but also mucosal immunity. PMID:22133710

  10. Nociceptor sensitization in pain pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Michael S; Gebhart, Gerald F

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of chronic pain is estimated to be 20–25% worldwide. Few patients with chronic pain obtain complete relief from the drugs that are currently available, and more than half report inadequate relief. Underlying the challenge of developing better drugs to manage chronic pain is incomplete understanding of the heterogeneity of mechanisms that contribute to the transition from acute tissue insult to chronic pain and to pain conditions for which the underlying pathology is not apparent. An intact central nervous system (CNS) is required for the conscious perception of pain, and changes in the CNS are clearly evident in chronic pain states. However, the blockage of nociceptive input into the CNS can effectively relieve or markedly attenuate discomfort and pain, revealing the importance of ongoing peripheral input to the maintenance of chronic pain. Accordingly, we focus here on nociceptors: their excitability, their heterogeneity and their role in initiating and maintaining pain. PMID:20948530

  11. Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus infection: Etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and immunoprophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwonil; Saif, Linda J

    2015-05-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), a member of the genera Alphacoronavirus in the family Coronaviridae, causes acute diarrhea/vomiting, dehydration and high mortality in seronegative neonatal piglets. For the last three decades, PEDV infection has resulted in significant economic losses in the European and Asian pig industries, but in 2013-2014 the disease was also reported in the US, Canada and Mexico. The PED epidemic in the US, from April 2013 to the present, has led to the loss of more than 10% of the US pig population. The disappearance and re-emergence of epidemic PED indicates that the virus is able to escape from current vaccination protocols, biosecurity and control systems. Endemic PED is a significant problem, which is exacerbated by the emergence (or potential importation) of multiple PEDV variants. Epidemic PEDV strains spread rapidly and cause a high number of pig deaths. These strains are highly enteropathogenic and acutely infect villous epithelial cells of the entire small and large intestines although the jejunum and ileum are the primary sites. PEDV infections cause acute, severe atrophic enteritis accompanied by viremia that leads to profound diarrhea and vomiting, followed by extensive dehydration, which is the major cause of death in nursing piglets. A comprehensive understanding of the pathogenic characteristics of epidemic or endemic PEDV strains is needed to prevent and control the disease in affected regions and to develop an effective vaccine. This review focuses on the etiology, epidemiology, disease mechanisms and pathogenesis as well as immunoprophylaxis against PEDV infection. PMID:25841898

  12. Redox biology of tuberculosis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Abhishek; Singh, Nisha; Bhat, Shabir Ahmed; Gupta, Pawan; Kumar, Ashwani

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is one of the most successful human pathogens. Mtb is persistently exposed to numerous oxidoreductive stresses during its pathogenic cycle of infection and transmission. The distinctive ability of Mtb, not only to survive the redox stress manifested by the host but also to use it for synchronizing the metabolic pathways and expression of virulence factors, is central to its success as a pathogen. This review describes the paradigmatic redox and hypoxia sensors employed by Mtb to continuously monitor variations in the intracellular redox state and the surrounding microenvironment. Two component proteins, namely, DosS and DosT, are employed by Mtb to sense changes in oxygen, nitric oxide, and carbon monoxide levels, while WhiB3 and anti-sigma factor RsrA are used to monitor changes in intracellular redox state. Using these and other unidentified redox sensors, Mtb orchestrates its metabolic pathways to survive in nutrient-deficient, acidic, oxidative, nitrosative, and hypoxic environments inside granulomas or infectious lesions. A number of these metabolic pathways are unique to mycobacteria and thus represent potential drug targets. In addition, Mtb employs versatile machinery of the mycothiol and thioredoxin systems to ensure a reductive intracellular environment for optimal functioning of its proteins even upon exposure to oxidative stress. Mtb also utilizes a battery of protective enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (KatG), alkyl hydroperoxidase (AhpC), and peroxiredoxins, to neutralize the redox stress generated by the host immune system. This chapter reviews the current understanding of mechanisms employed by Mtb to sense and neutralize redox stress and their importance in TB pathogenesis and drug development. PMID:22633061

  13. Rethinking Mechanisms of Autoimmune Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Shiv

    2016-01-01

    Why exactly some individuals develop autoimmune disorders remains unclear. The broadly accepted paradigm is that genetic susceptibility results in some break in immunological tolerance, may enhance the availability of autoantigens, and may enhance inflammatory responses. Some environmental insults that occur on this background of susceptibility may then contribute to autoimmunity. In this review we discuss some aspects related to inhibitory signaling and rare genetic variants, as well as additional factors that might contribute to autoimmunity including the possible role of clonal somatic mutations, the role of epigenetic events and the contribution of the intestinal microbiome. Genetic susceptibility alleles generally contribute to the loss of immunological tolerance, the increased availability of asutoantigens, or an increase in inflammation. Apart from common genetic variants, rare loss-of-function genetic variants may also contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. Studies of an inhibitory signaling pathway in B cells helped identify a negative regulatory enzyme called sialic acid acetyl esterase. The study of rare genetic variants of this enzyme provides an illustrative example showing the importance of detailed functional analyses of variant alleles and the need to exclude functionally normal common or rare genetic variants from analysis. It has also become clear that pathways that are functionally impacted by either common or rare defective variants can also be more significantly compromised by gene expression changes that may result from epigenetic alterations. Another important and evolving area that has been discussed relates to the role of the intestinal microbiome in influencing helper T cell polarization and the development of autoimmunity. PMID:23809879

  14. Effect of methanolic extract of Pongamia pinnata Linn seed on gastro-duodenal ulceration and mucosal offensive and defensive factors in rats.

    PubMed

    Prabha, T; Dorababu, M; Goel, Shalini; Agarwal, P K; Singh, A; Joshi, V K; Goel, R K

    2009-08-01

    Pongamia pinnata has been advocated in Ayurveda for the treatment of various inflammatory conditions and dyspepsia. The present work includes initial phytochemical screening and study of ulcer protective and healing effects of methanolic extract of seeds of P. pinnata (PPSM) in rats. Phytochemical tests indicated the presence of flavonoids in PPSM. PPSM when administered orally (po) showed dose-dependent (12.5-50 mg/kg for 5 days) ulcer protective effects against gastric ulcer induced by 2 h cold restraint stress. Optimal effective dose of PPSM (25 mg/kg) showed antiulcerogenic activity against acute gastric ulcers (GU) induced by pylorus ligation and aspirin and duodenal ulcer induced by cysteamine but not against ethanol-induced GU. It healed chronic gastric ulcer induced by acetic acid when given for 5 and 10 days. Further, its effects were studied on various parameters of gastric offensive acid-pepsin secretion, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and nitric oxide (NO) and defensive mucosal factors like mucin secretion and mucosal cell shedding, glycoproteins, proliferation and antioxidants; catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) levels. PPSM tended to decrease acid output and increased mucin secretion and mucosal glycoproteins, while it decreased gastric mucosal cell shedding without any effect on cell proliferation. PPSM significantly reversed the increase in gastric mucosal LPO, NO and SOD levels caused by CRS near to the normal level while it tended to increase CAT and GSH level decreased by CRS and ethanol respectively. Thus, the ulcer protective effects of PPSM may be attributed to the presence of flavonoids and the actions may be due to its effects both on mucosal offensive and defensive factors. PMID:19775071

  15. The Pathogenesis of Foot-and-Mouth Disease in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Stenfeldt, Carolina; Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; de Los Santos, Teresa; Rodriguez, Luis L; Arzt, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The greatest proportion of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) clinical research has been dedicated to elucidating pathogenesis and enhancing vaccine protection in cattle with less efforts invested in studies specific to pigs. However, accumulated evidence from FMD outbreaks and experimental investigations suggest that critical components of FMD pathogenesis, immunology, and vaccinology cannot be extrapolated from investigations performed in cattle to explain or to predict outcomes of infection or vaccination in pigs. Furthermore, it has been shown that failure to account for these differences may have substantial consequences when FMD outbreaks occur in areas with dense pig populations. Recent experimental studies have confirmed some aspects of conventional wisdom by demonstrating that pigs are more susceptible to FMD virus (FMDV) infection via exposure of the upper gastrointestinal tract (oropharynx) than through inhalation of virus. The infection spreads rapidly within groups of pigs that are housed together, although efficiency of transmission may vary depending on virus strain and exposure intensity. Multiple investigations have demonstrated that physical separation of pigs is sufficient to prevent virus transmission under experimental conditions. Detailed pathogenesis studies have recently demonstrated that specialized epithelium within porcine oropharyngeal tonsils constitute the primary infection sites following simulated natural virus exposure. Furthermore, epithelium of the tonsil of the soft palate supports substantial virus replication during the clinical phase of infection, thus providing large amounts of virus that can be shed into the environment. Due to massive amplification and shedding of virus, acutely infected pigs constitute a considerable source of contagion. FMDV infection results in modulation of several components of the host immune response. The infection is ultimately cleared in association with a strong humoral response and, in contrast to

  16. The Pathogenesis of Foot-and-Mouth Disease in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Stenfeldt, Carolina; Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; de los Santos, Teresa; Rodriguez, Luis L.; Arzt, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The greatest proportion of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) clinical research has been dedicated to elucidating pathogenesis and enhancing vaccine protection in cattle with less efforts invested in studies specific to pigs. However, accumulated evidence from FMD outbreaks and experimental investigations suggest that critical components of FMD pathogenesis, immunology, and vaccinology cannot be extrapolated from investigations performed in cattle to explain or to predict outcomes of infection or vaccination in pigs. Furthermore, it has been shown that failure to account for these differences may have substantial consequences when FMD outbreaks occur in areas with dense pig populations. Recent experimental studies have confirmed some aspects of conventional wisdom by demonstrating that pigs are more susceptible to FMD virus (FMDV) infection via exposure of the upper gastrointestinal tract (oropharynx) than through inhalation of virus. The infection spreads rapidly within groups of pigs that are housed together, although efficiency of transmission may vary depending on virus strain and exposure intensity. Multiple investigations have demonstrated that physical separation of pigs is sufficient to prevent virus transmission under experimental conditions. Detailed pathogenesis studies have recently demonstrated that specialized epithelium within porcine oropharyngeal tonsils constitute the primary infection sites following simulated natural virus exposure. Furthermore, epithelium of the tonsil of the soft palate supports substantial virus replication during the clinical phase of infection, thus providing large amounts of virus that can be shed into the environment. Due to massive amplification and shedding of virus, acutely infected pigs constitute a considerable source of contagion. FMDV infection results in modulation of several components of the host immune response. The infection is ultimately cleared in association with a strong humoral response and, in contrast to

  17. Protective mucosal immunity mediated by epithelial CD1d and IL-10.

    PubMed

    Olszak, Torsten; Neves, Joana F; Dowds, C Marie; Baker, Kristi; Glickman, Jonathan; Davidson, Nicholas O; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Jobin, Christian; Brand, Stephan; Sotlar, Karl; Wada, Koichiro; Katayama, Kazufumi; Nakajima, Atsushi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Kunito; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Müller, Werner; Snapper, Scott B; Schreiber, Stefan; Kaser, Arthur; Zeissig, Sebastian; Blumberg, Richard S

    2014-05-22

    The mechanisms by which mucosal homeostasis is maintained are of central importance to inflammatory bowel disease. Critical to these processes is the intestinal epithelial cell (IEC), which regulates immune responses at the interface between the commensal microbiota and the host. CD1d presents self and microbial lipid antigens to natural killer T (NKT) cells, which are involved in the pathogenesis of colitis in animal models and human inflammatory bowel disease. As CD1d crosslinking on model IECs results in the production of the important regulatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 (ref. 9), decreased epithelial CD1d expression--as observed in inflammatory bowel disease--may contribute substantially to intestinal inflammation. Here we show in mice that whereas bone-marrow-derived CD1d signals contribute to NKT-cell-mediated intestinal inflammation, engagement of epithelial CD1d elicits protective effects through the activation of STAT3 and STAT3-dependent transcription of IL-10, heat shock protein 110 (HSP110; also known as HSP105), and CD1d itself. All of these epithelial elements are critically involved in controlling CD1d-mediated intestinal inflammation. This is demonstrated by severe NKT-cell-mediated colitis upon IEC-specific deletion of IL-10, CD1d, and its critical regulator microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP), as well as deletion of HSP110 in the radioresistant compartment. Our studies thus uncover a novel pathway of IEC-dependent regulation of mucosal homeostasis and highlight a critical role of IL-10 in the intestinal epithelium, with broad implications for diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:24717441

  18. Effect of Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy on the Risk of Mucositis During Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Sormani, Maria Pia; Marur, Shanthi; Gunn, G. Brandon; Rao, Nikhil; Cianchetti, Marco; Ricchetti, Francesco; McNutt, Todd; Wu Binbin; Forastiere, Arlene

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To define the roles of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on the risk of Grade 3+ mucositis during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: 164 consecutive patients treated with IMRT at two institutions in nonoverlapping treatment eras were selected. All patients were treated with a dose painting approach, three dose levels, and comprehensive bilateral neck treatment under the supervision of the same radiation oncologist. Ninety-three patients received concomitant chemotherapy (cCHT) and 14 received induction chemotherapy (iCHT). Individual information of the dose received by the oral mucosa (OM) was extracted as absolute cumulative dose-volume histogram (DVH), corrected for the elapsed treatment days and reported as weekly (w) DVH. Patients were seen weekly during treatment, and peak acute toxicity equal to or greater than confluent mucositis at any point during the course of IMRT was considered the endpoint. Results: Overall, 129 patients (78.7%) reached the endpoint. The regions that best discriminated between patients with/without Grade 3+ mucositis were found at 10.1 Gy/w (V10.1) and 21 cc (D21), along the x-axis and y-axis of the OM-wDVH, respectively. On multivariate analysis, D21 (odds ratio [OR] = 1.016, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.009-1.023, p < 0.001) and cCHT (OR = 4.118, 95% CI, 1.659-10.217, p = 0.002) were the only independent predictors. However, V10.1 and D21 were highly correlated (rho = 0.954, p < 0.001) and mutually interchangeable. cCHT would correspond to 88.4 cGy/w to at least 21 cc of OM. Conclusions: Radiotherapy and chemotherapy act independently in determining acute mucosal toxicity; cCHT increases the risk of mucosal Grade 3 toxicity Almost-Equal-To 4 times over radiation therapy alone, and it is equivalent to an extra Almost-Equal-To 6.2 Gy to 21 cc of OM over a 7-week course.

  19. Functional changes of intestinal mucosal barrier in surgically critical patients

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuan-yuan; Liu, Mu-lin; He, Xian-di; Jiang, Cong-qiao; Liu, Rui-lin

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The gut is capable of inducing multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). In the diagnosis and treatment of critical ill patients, doctors should pay particular attention to the protection or recovery of intestinal barrier function. However, no reliable diagnostic criteria are available clinically. This study aimed to assess the changes of intestinal mucosal barrier function in surgically critical ill patients as well as their significance. METHODS: Thirty-eight surgically critical ill patients were enrolled as a study group (APACHE II>8 scores), and 15 non-critical ill patients without intestinal dysfunction were selected as a control group (APACHE II<6). General information, symptoms, physical signs, and APACHE II scores of the patients were recorded. The patients in the study group were subdivided into an intestinal dysfunction group (n=26) and a non-intestinal dysfunction group (n=12). Three ml venous blood was collected from the control group on admission and the same volume of plasma was collected from the study group both on admission and in the period of recovery. The plasma concentrations of endotoxin, diamine oxidase (DAO), D-lactate, and intestinal fatty-acid binding protein (iFABP) were detected respectively. The data collected were analyzed by the SPSS 17.0 software for Windows. RESULTS: The levels of variables were significantly higher in the study group than in the control group (P<0.01). They were higher in the intestinal dysfunction group than in the non-intestinal dysfunction group (DAO P<0.05, endotoxin, D-lactate, iFABP P<0.01). In the non-intestinal dysfunction group compared with the control group, the level of endotoxin was not significant (P>0.05), but the levels of DAO, D-lactate and iFABP were statistically significant (P<0.05). The levels of variables in acute stage were higher than those in recovery stage (P<0.01). The death group showed higher levels of variables than the survival group (endotoxin and D-lactate P<0.01, DAO

  20. Prevention and Treatment of Oral Mucositis in Children with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Misty M.; Donald, David V.; Hagemann, Tracy M.

    2012-01-01

    Oral mucositis affects more than three-fourths of patients undergoing chemotherapy and represents a significant burden to patients and caregivers. Lesions develop as a result of chemotherapeutic agents attacking the rapidly dividing cells of the gastrointestinal tract. Severity can range from mild, painless tissue changes to bleeding ulcerations that prevent oral intake and require narcotic pain relievers. Oral mucositis also leads to an increased risk of infection and can often delay further chemotherapy treatment. A number of assessment scales have been developed to better qualify the symptoms associated with this condition. Few pharmacologic agents have been approved to either prevent the development or alleviate the symptoms of oral mucositis. Current options include the use of antimicrobial mouthwashes, amino acid rinses, and topical healing agents. Palifermin, a keratinocyte growth factor, may be a future option after its use in children is explored. With achievements in other areas of supportive care in patients undergoing chemotherapy, oral mucositis should represent the forefront of new research. This review will provide a comprehensive examination of available options for children who have oral mucositis. PMID:23413048

  1. Physiology and immunology of mucosal barriers in catfish (Ictalurus spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Peatman, Eric; Lange, Miles; Zhao, Honggang; Beck, Benjamin H

    2015-01-01

    The mucosal barriers of catfish (Ictalurus spp) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient adsorption, osmoregulation, waste excretion, and environmental sensing. Catfish depend more heavily on mucosal barriers than their terrestrial counterparts as they are continuously interacting with the aquatic microbiota. Our understanding of these barriers, while growing, is still limited relative to that of mammalian model systems. Nevertheless, a combination of molecular and cellular studies in catfish over the last few decades, and particularly within the last few years, has helped to elucidate many of the primary actors and pathways critical to their mucosal health. Here we describe aspects of innate and adaptive immune responses in the primary mucosal tissues (skin, gill, and intestine) of catfish, focusing on mucus-driven responses, pathogen recognition, soluble mediators, and immunoglobulin and T-cell derived immunity. Modulation of mucosal barriers will be critical moving forward for crafting better diets, improving vaccine delivery, enhancing water quality, and ensuring sustainable production practices in catfish. PMID:26716071

  2. Awareness assessment in Turkish subpopulation with chronic oral mucosal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Okumus, Ozlem; Kalkan, Sevda; Keser, Gaye; Pekiner, Filiz Namdar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the awareness of group Turkish patients with chronic oral mucosal diseases by chronic oral mucosal diseases questionnaires (COMDQ). Materials and Methods: Eighty patients with chronic oral mucosal diseases were participated in the study. A detailed medical history of each patient was taken, and all the COMDQ questions, which were translated from English version, were filled out. The data were analyzed with the IBM Statistical Package for Social Sciences Statistics 22.0. Results: The mean ages of patients were 48.91 ± 13.36 years. Of the total 80 cases of chronic oral mucosal diseases identified 52 (65%) were female and 28 (35%) male. The standardized mean scores for COMDQ were 1.72 ± 1.11 for “pain and functional limitation,” 1.09 ± 0.94 for “medication and treatment,” 2.31 ± 1.06 for “social and emotional,” and 2.27 ± 0.83 for “patient support,” respectively. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that the Turkish version of the COMDQ has the profitable psychometric peculiarity and comfortable to patients with chronic oral mucosal diseases in Turkey. PMID:26929697

  3. Management of a large mucosal defect after duodenal endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Fujihara, Shintaro; Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Nishiyama, Noriko; Matsunaga, Tae; Ayaki, Maki; Yachida, Tatsuo; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Duodenal endoscopic resection is the most difficult type of endoscopic treatment in the gastrointestinal tract (GI) and is technically challenging because of anatomical specificities. In addition to these technical difficulties, this procedure is associated with a significantly higher rate of complication than endoscopic treatment in other parts of the GI tract. Postoperative delayed perforation and bleeding are hazardous complications, and emergency surgical intervention is sometimes required. Therefore, it is urgently necessary to establish a management protocol for preventing serious complications. For instance, the prophylactic closure of large mucosal defects after endoscopic resection may reduce the risk of hazardous complications. However, the size of mucosal defects after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is relatively large compared with the size after endoscopic mucosal resection, making it impossible to achieve complete closure using only conventional clips. The over-the-scope clip and polyglycolic acid sheets with fibrin gel make it possible to close large mucosal defects after duodenal ESD. In addition to the combination of laparoscopic surgery and endoscopic resection, endoscopic full-thickness resection holds therapeutic potential for difficult duodenal lesions and may overcome the disadvantages of endoscopic resection in the near future. This review aims to summarize the complications and closure techniques of large mucosal defects and to highlight some directions for management after duodenal endoscopic treatment. PMID:27547003

  4. Chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis. Prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Knox, J J; Puodziunas, A L; Feld, R

    2000-10-01

    Oral mucositis is a frequent and potentially severe complication of chemotherapy which has a considerable impact on patient quality of life. While the management of other chemotherapy-related toxicities has improved, the incidence of mucositis is increasing. A critical review of the literature published between 1985 and 1999 reveals very few strategies or agents with proven efficacy, leaving few recommendations for the standard care in the prevention and treatment of mucositis at this time. Recommendations that can be made include: reducing patient risk factors, implementing proven preventative interventions such as utilising oral ice chips with fluorouracil chemotherapy, and optimising supportive care practices individualised to the patients' needs and symptoms. Progress in understanding the pathophysiology of mucositis at the molecular level has led to the evaluation of a number of new investigational agents, specifically those directed to the epithelial mucosa, such as mitogens and epithelial growth factors. These appear to be very promising in preclinical studies. Randomised clinical trials with these agents may finally demonstrate an impact on the clinical practice of mucositis management in the coming years. PMID:11087004

  5. Mucosal Immune Development in Early Life: Setting the Stage.

    PubMed

    Brugman, Sylvia; Perdijk, Olaf; van Neerven, R J Joost; Savelkoul, Huub F J

    2015-08-01

    Our environment poses a constant threat to our health. To survive, all organisms must be able to discriminate between good (food ingredients and microbes that help digest our food) and bad (pathogenic microbes, viruses and toxins). In vertebrates, discrimination between beneficial and harmful antigens mainly occurs at the mucosal surfaces of the respiratory, digestive, urinary and genital tract. Here, an extensive network of cells and organs form the basis of what we have come to know as the mucosal immune system. The mucosal immune system is composed of a single epithelial cell layer protected by a mucus layer. Different immune cells monitor the baso-lateral side of the epithelial cells and dispersed secondary lymphoid organs, such as Peyer's patches and isolated lymphoid follicles are equipped with immune cells able to mount appropriate and specific responses. This review will focus on the current knowledge on host, dietary and bacterial-derived factors that shape the mucosal immune system before and after birth. We will discuss current knowledge on fetal immunity (both responsiveness and lymphoid organ development) as well as the impact of diet and microbial colonization on neonatal immunity and disease susceptibility. Lastly, inflammatory bowel disease will be discussed as an example of how the composition of the microbiota might predispose to disease later in life. A fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in mucosal immune development and tolerance will aid nutritional intervention strategies to improve health in neonatal and adult life. PMID:25666708

  6. Muc-2-deficient mice display a sex-specific, COX-2-related impairment of gastric mucosal repair.

    PubMed

    Wallace, John L; Vong, Linda; Dharmani, Poonam; Srivastava, Vikas; Chadee, Kris

    2011-03-01

    Mucus is known to contribute significantly to the prevention and repair of mucosal damage throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Although not normally expressed in the stomach, mucin-2 (MUC-2, encoded by the MUC2 gene) is expressed in certain disease states. The aim of this study was to determine in a mouse model whether the absence of Muc-2 would result in impaired susceptibility to and healing of gastric mucosal injury. Acute gastric damage was induced in mice deficient in Muc-2 and in wild-type controls, through oral administration of indomethacin. Chronic gastric ulcers were induced by serosal application of acetic acid. The extent of injury and the extent of healing of the damage over time were examined in both models. Indomethacin administration caused similar levels of gastric damage in Muc-2-deficient and wild-type mice, but the erosions healed more slowly in the former. Acetic acid-induced gastric ulcers were initially similar in size in Muc-2-deficient and wild-type mice of both sexes, but ulcer healing was significantly impaired in male Muc-2-deficient mice. Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 in the stomach, in response to indomethacin- or acetic acid-induced ulceration, was significantly reduced in male Muc-2-deficient mice. This phenomenon, and the sex specificity, was also apparent in bone marrow-derived macrophages stimulated with endotoxin. These results demonstrate a marked impairment of gastric mucosal repair in male Muc-2-deficient mice that may be related to an insufficient induction of cyclooxygenase-2, an enzyme known to contribute to mucosal repair. PMID:21356364

  7. Acute acalculous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Barie, Philip S; Eachempati, Soumitra R

    2003-08-01

    Acute cholecystitis can develop without gallstones in critically ill or injured patients. However, the development of acute acalculous cholecystitis is not limited to surgical or injured patients, or even to the intensive care unit. Diabetes, malignant disease, abdominal vasculitis, congestive heart failure, cholesterol embolization, and shock or cardiac arrest have been associated with acute acalculous cholecystitis. Children may also be affected, especially after a viral illness. The pathogenesis of acute acalculous cholecystitis is a paradigm of complexity. Ischemia and reperfusion injury, or the effects of eicosanoid proinflammatory mediators, appear to be the central mechanisms, but bile stasis, opioid therapy, positive-pressure ventilation, and total parenteral nutrition have all been implicated. Ultrasound of the gallbladder is the most accurate diagnostic modality in the critically ill patient, with gallbladder wall thickness of 3.5 mm or greater and pericholecystic fluid being the two most reliable criteria. The historical treatment of choice for acute acalculous cholecystitis has been cholecystectomy, but percutaneous cholecystostomy is now the mainstay of therapy, controlling the disease in about 85% of patients. Rapid improvement can be expected when the procedure is performed properly. The mortality rates (historically about 30%) for percutaneous and open cholecystostomy appear to be similar, reflecting the severity of illness, but improved resuscitation and critical care may portend a decreased risk of death. Interval cholecystectomy is usually not indicated after acute acalculous cholecystitis in survivors; if the absence of gallstones is confirmed and the precipitating disorder has been controlled, the cholecystostomy tube can be pulled out after the patient has recovered. PMID:12864960

  8. Ophthalmic lymphoma: epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sjö, Lene Dissing

    2009-02-01

    with relapse. Furthermore, we found that the frequency of translocations involving the MALT1- and IGH-gene loci is low in ocular region MALT lymphoma (2 of 42, 5%), but may predict increased risk of relapse (Sjo et al. 2008b). In conclusion the incidence of ophthalmic lymphoma is increasing at a high rate in Denmark. Ophthalmic lymphoma consists primarily of MALT lymphoma. The molecular pathogenesis of MALT lymphoma arising in the ocular region rarely involves translocations in the MALT1- and IGH-gene loci. PMID:19178392

  9. An Odyssey to Viral Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oldstone, Michael B A

    2016-05-23

    polishing by Karl Habel (a superb senior virologist who left the National Institutes of Health and came to Scripps), and the gifted postdoctoral fellows who joined my laboratory over four decades form the log of my scientific voyage. The strong friendships and collaborations developed with other young but growing experimentalists like Bernie Fields and Abner Notkins are the fabric of the tale I will weave and were pivotal in the establishment of viral pathogenesis as a discipline. PMID:26514062

  10. Alveolar surfactant homeostasis and the pathogenesis of pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Wert, Susan E; Weaver, Timothy E

    2010-01-01

    The alveolar region of the lung creates an extensive epithelial surface that mediates the transfer of oxygen and carbon dioxide required for respiration after birth. Maintenance of pulmonary function depends on the function of type II epithelial cells that synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant lipids and proteins, reducing the collapsing forces created at the air-liquid interface in the alveoli. Genetic and acquired disorders associated with the surfactant system cause both acute and chronic lung disease. Mutations in the ABCA3, SFTPA, SFTPB, SFTPC, SCL34A2, and TERT genes disrupt type II cell function and/or surfactant homeostasis, causing neonatal respiratory failure and chronic interstitial lung disease. Defects in GM-CSF receptor function disrupt surfactant clearance, causing pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Abnormalities in the surfactant system and disruption of type II cell homeostasis underlie the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic, providing the basis for improved diagnosis and therapies of these rare lung diseases. PMID:19824815

  11. Alveolar Surfactant Homeostasis and the Pathogenesis of Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Wert, Susan E.; Weaver, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    The alveolar region of the lung creates an extensive epithelial surface that mediates the transfer of oxygen and carbon dioxide required for respiration after birth. Maintenance of pulmonary function depends on the function of type II epithelial cells that synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant lipids and proteins, reducing the collapsing forces created at the air-liquid interface in the alveoli. Genetic and acquired disorders associated with the surfactant system cause both acute and chronic lung disease. Mutations in the ABCA3, SFTPA, SFTPB, SFTPC, SCL34A2, and TERT genes disrupt type II cell function and/or surfactant homeostasis, causing neonatal respiratory failure and chronic interstitial lung disease. Defects in GM-CSF receptor function disrupt surfactant clearance, causing pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Abnormalities in the surfactant system and disruption of type II cell homeostasis underlie the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic, providing the basis for improved diagnosis and therapies of these rare lung diseases. PMID:19824815

  12. Chronic Ethanol Exposure: Pathogenesis of Pulmonary Disease and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Traphagen, Nicole; Tian, Zhi; Allen-Gipson, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) is the world’s most commonly used drug, and has been widely recognized as a risk factor for developing lung disorders. Chronic EtOH exposure affects all of the organ systems in the body and increases the risk of developing pulmonary diseases such as acute lung injury and pneumonia, while exacerbating the symptoms and resulting in increased mortality in many other lung disorders. EtOH and its metabolites inhibit the immune response of alveolar macrophages (AMs), increase airway leakage, produce damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS), and disrupt the balance of antioxidants/oxidants within the lungs. In this article, we review the role of EtOH exposure in the pathogenesis and progression of pulmonary disease. PMID:26492278

  13. Alcoholic hepatitis: A comprehensive review of pathogenesis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chayanupatkul, Maneerat; Liangpunsakul, Suthat

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is an acute hepatic inflammation associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Current evidence suggests that the pathogenesis is the end result of the complex interplay between ethanol metabolism, inflammation and innate immunity. Several clinical scoring systems have been derived to predict the clinical outcomes of patients with AH; such as Child-Turcotte-Pugh score, the Maddrey discriminant function, the Lille Model, the model for end stage liver disease scores, and the Glasgow alcoholic hepatitis score. At present, Corticosteroids or pentoxifylline are the current pharmacologic treatment options; though the outcomes from the therapies are poor. Liver transplantation as the treatment of alcoholic hepatitis remains controversial, and in an era of organ shortage current guidelines do not recommend transplantation as the treatment option. Because of the limitations in the therapeutic options, it is no doubt that there is a critical need for the newer and more effective pharmacological agents to treat AH. PMID:24876748

  14. Alcoholic hepatitis: a comprehensive review of pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Chayanupatkul, Maneerat; Liangpunsakul, Suthat

    2014-05-28

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is an acute hepatic inflammation associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Current evidence suggests that the pathogenesis is the end result of the complex interplay between ethanol metabolism, inflammation and innate immunity. Several clinical scoring systems have been derived to predict the clinical outcomes of patients with AH; such as Child-Turcotte-Pugh score, the Maddrey discriminant function, the Lille Model, the model for end stage liver disease scores, and the Glasgow alcoholic hepatitis score. At present, Corticosteroids or pentoxifylline are the current pharmacologic treatment options; though the outcomes from the therapies are poor. Liver transplantation as the treatment of alcoholic hepatitis remains controversial, and in an era of organ shortage current guidelines do not recommend transplantation as the treatment option. Because of the limitations in the therapeutic options, it is no doubt that there is a critical need for the newer and more effective pharmacological agents to treat AH. PMID:24876748

  15. Felid Herpesvirus Type 1 Infection in Cats: A Natural Host Model for Alphaherpesvirus Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Feline herpesvirus 1 (FeHV-1) is an alphaherpesvirus that causes feline viral rhinotracheitis, an important viral disease of cats on a worldwide basis. Acute FeHV-1 infection is associated with both upper respiratory and ocular signs. Following the acute phase of the disease lifelong latency is established, primarily in sensory neuronal cells. As is the case with human herpes simplex viruses, latency reactivation can result in recrudescence, which can manifest itself in the form of serious ocular lesions. FeHV-1 infection in cats is a natural host model that is useful for the identification of viral virulence genes that play a role in replication at the mucosal portals of entry or are mediators of the establishment, maintenance, or reactivation of latency. It is also a model system for defining innate and adaptive immunity mechanisms and for immunization strategies that can lead to better protection against this and other alphaherpesvirus infections. PMID:23762586

  16. Pathogenesis and Management of Buerger's Disease.

    PubMed

    Liew, Ngoh Chin; Lee, Limi; Nor Hanipah, Zubaidah; Gee, Tikfu; Jabar, Mohd Faisal

    2015-09-01

    Buerger's disease or thromboangiitis obliterans causes pain, ulceration, or gangrene in the lower or upper extremity. It is associated with chronic cigarette smoking and is believed to be an immune mediated vasculitis. The pathogenesis is still unknown but recent postulate of its association with odontal bacteria has generated much renewed interest. Despite its recognition more than a century ago, little progress has been made in its treatment. Until the pathogenesis is elucidated, abstinence from cigarette is the only effective therapy. PMID:26264874

  17. Role of Macrophages in the Pathogenesis of Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kasraie, Sadaf; Werfel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is one of the most common and most intensively studied chronic inflammatory skin diseases. Several cofactors, such as an impaired skin barrier function, modifications of the immune system, and a complex genetic background, direct the course of AD. Within this complex network, macrophages play a pivotal role in enhanced susceptibility to cutaneous infections and act as central connecting components in the pathogenesis of AD on the cellular level. In AD, macrophages are known to accumulate in acutely and chronically inflamed skin. During the early and short inflammatory phase, macrophages exert proinflammatory functions like antigen-presenting phagocytosis and the production of inflammatory cytokines and growth factors that facilitate the resolution of inflammation. However, persistence of pro-inflammatory activity and altered function of macrophages result in the development of chronic inflammatory diseases such as AD. The exact mechanism of macrophages activation in these processes is not yet completely understood. Further studies should be performed to clarify the dysregulated mechanism of macrophages activation in AD, and this would allow us to target these cells with versatile functions for therapeutic purpose and improve and control the disease. In this paper, we highlight the new findings on dysregulated function of macrophages and the importance of these cells in the pathogenesis of AD in general and the contribution of these cells in enhanced susceptibility against microbial infections in particular. PMID:23533313

  18. Mucosal tissue transglutaminase expression in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Villanacci, Vincenzo; Not, Tarcisio; Sblattero, Daniele; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Chirdo, Fernando; Galletti, Anna; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) plays an important role in celiac disease pathogenesis and antibodies to tTG are a diagnostic marker of gluten-sensitive enteropathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the localization of tTG in the duodenal mucosa in control tissues and in different histological stages of celiac disease by using a commercial and a novel set of anti-tTG monoclonal antibodies, to see whether this assessment can be useful for diagnostic purpose. The distribution of tTG was firstly evaluated in 18 untreated celiac patients by using a commercial monoclonal antibody (CUB7402) against tissue transglutaminase enzyme and directed against the loop-core region of the enzyme. Thereafter, in further 30 untreated celiac patients we employed three newly characterized anti-tTG monoclonal antibodies produced against recombinant human-tTG. The epitopes recognized are located in three distinct domains of the protein corresponding to the core, C1 and C2 protein structure. Eleven age- and sex-matched patients with chronic duodenitis acted as controls. All subjects underwent upper endoscopy to obtain biopsy samples from the duodenum. Overall, we found that (i) tTG is equally expressed in CD at different stages of disease; (ii) tTG is expressed, at similar level, in CD and controls with duodenitis. Assessment of tTG level in biopsy samples by immunohistochemical methods is not useful in the clinical diagnostic work-up of CD. PMID:18373732

  19. STARVATION INDUCED PROXIMAL GUT MUCOSAL ATROPHY DIMINISHED WITH AGING

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juquan; Wolf, Steven E.; Wu, Xiao-Wu; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Gauglitz, Gerd G.; Herndon, David N.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Starvation induces small bowel atrophy with increased intestinal epithelial apoptosis and decreased proliferation. Here, we examined these parameters after starvation in aged animals. Methods Sixty-four 6 week-old and 26 month-old C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to either an ad libitum fed or fasted group. The small bowel was harvested at 12, 48, and 72 hours following starvation. Proximal gut mucosal height was measured and epithelial cells counted. Apoptosis was identified by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Proliferation was determined by immunohistochemical staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Comparison of fed vs. fasted and adult vs. old groups was done by one-way ANOVA with Tukey’s test and unpaired t-test. Significance was accepted at p<0.05. Results Aged mice had higher proximal gut weights, mucosal heights and cell numbers at baseline compared with the adult group (p<0.05). The rate of apoptosis was lower in the aged (p<0.05) while proliferation was not different between groups before starvation. After starvation, proximal gut wet weight decreased only in adult mice (p<0.05); Gut mucosal height and mucosal cell number decreased greater in adult than in aged mice (p<0.05). This was related to decreased proliferation only in the adult group (p<0.05). The fold of epithelial apoptosis increased was higher in the aged group than in the adult after starvation (p<0.05). Conclusions Gut mucosal kinetics change with age had lower rates of apoptosis and greater mucosal mass; the character of starvation-induced atrophy is diminished with aging. PMID:19126762

  20. Mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity in provoked vestibulodynia

    PubMed Central

    Witzeman, Kathryn; Nguyen, Ruby HN; Eanes, Alisa; As-Sanie, Sawsan; Zolnoun, Denniz

    2015-01-01

    Background An estimated 8.3%—16% of women experience vulvovaginal discomfort during their lifetime. Frequently these patients report provoked pain on contact or with attempted intercourse, commonly referred to as provoked vestibulodynia (PVD). Despite the burden of this condition, little is known about its potential etiologies including pelvic floor muscular dysfunction and mucosal components. This knowledge would be beneficial in developing targeted therapies including physical therapy. Objective To explore the relative contribution of mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity on pain report from intercourse among women with PVD. Design In this proof of concept study, 54 women with PVD underwent a structured examination assessing mucosal and pelvic muscle sensitivity. Methods We examined three mucosal sites in the upper and lower vestibule. Patients were asked to rate their pain on cotton swab palpation of the mucosa using a 10-point visual analog scale. Muscle pain was assessed using transvaginal application of pressure on right and left puborectalis, and the perineal muscle complex. The Gracely pain scale (0–100) was used to assess the severity of pain with intercourse, with women rating the lowest, average, and highest pain levels; a 100 rating the highest level of pain. Results The lower vestibule’s mucosa 5.81 (standard deviation =2.83) was significantly more sensitive than the upper vestibule 2.52 (standard deviation =2.6) (P<0.01) on exam. However, mucosal sensitivity was not associated with intercourse pain, while muscle sensitivity was moderately associated with both average and highest intensity of intercourse pain (r=−0.46, P=0.01 and r=−0.42, P=0.02), respectively. Conclusion This preliminary study suggests that mucosal measures alone may not sufficiently capture the spectrum of clinical pain report in women with PVD, which is consistent with the empirical success of physical therapy in this population. PMID:26316805

  1. Enhanced mucosal reactions in AIDS patients receiving oropharyngeal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, E.B.; Findlay, P.; Gelmann, E.; Lane, H.C.; Zabell, A.

    1987-09-01

    The oropharynx and hypopharynx are common sites of involvement in AIDS patients with mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. The radiotherapist is often asked to intervene with these patients due to problems with pain, difficulty in swallowing, or impending airway obstruction. We have noted an unexpected decrease in normal tissue tolerance of the oropharyngeal mucosa to irradiation in AIDS patients treated in our department. Data on 12 patients with AIDS and Kaposi's sarcoma receiving oropharyngeal irradiation are presented here. Doses ranged from 1000 cGy to 1800 cGy delivered in 150-300 cGy fractions. Seven of eight patients receiving doses of 1200 cGy or more developed some degree of mucositis, four of these developed mucositis severe enough to require termination of treatment. All patients in this study received some form of systemic therapy during the course of their disease, but no influence on mucosal response to irradiation was noted. Four patients received total body skin electron treatments, but no effect on degree of mucositis was seen. Presence or absence of oral candidiasis was not an obvious factor in the radiation response of the oral mucosa in these patients. T4 counts were done on 9 of the 12 patients. Although the timing of the T4 counts was quite variable, no correlation with immune status and degree of mucositis was found. The degree of mucositis seen in these patients occurred at doses much lower than expected based on normal tissue tolerances seen in other patient populations receiving head and neck irradiations. We believe that the ability of the oral mucosa to repair radiation damage is somehow altered in patients with AIDS.

  2. Autophagy in lung disease pathogenesis and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ryter, Stefan W.; Choi, Augustine M.K.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, a cellular pathway for the degradation of damaged organelles and proteins, has gained increasing importance in human pulmonary diseases, both as a modulator of pathogenesis and as a potential therapeutic target. In this pathway, cytosolic cargos are sequestered into autophagosomes, which are delivered to the lysosomes where they are enzymatically degraded and then recycled as metabolic precursors. Autophagy exerts an important effector function in the regulation of inflammation, and immune system functions. Selective pathways for autophagic degradation of cargoes may have variable significance in disease pathogenesis. Among these, the autophagic clearance of bacteria (xenophagy) may represent a crucial host defense mechanism in the pathogenesis of sepsis and inflammatory diseases. Our recent studies indicate that the autophagic clearance of mitochondria, a potentially protective program, may aggravate the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by activating cell death programs. We report similar findings with respect to the autophagic clearance of cilia components, which can contribute to airways dysfunction in chronic lung disease. In certain diseases such as pulmonary hypertension, autophagy may confer protection by modulating proliferation and cell death. In other disorders, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and cystic fibrosis, impaired autophagy may contribute to pathogenesis. In lung cancer, autophagy has multiple consequences by limiting carcinogenesis, modulating therapeutic effectiveness, and promoting tumor cell survival. In this review we highlight the multiple functions of autophagy and its selective autophagy subtypes that may be of significance to the pathogenesis of human disease, with an emphasis on lung disease and therapeutics. PMID:25617802

  3. Pathogenesis of NSAID-induced gastric damage: Importance of cyclooxygenase inhibition and gastric hypermotility

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Koji

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the pathogenic mechanism of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced gastric damage, focusing on the relation between cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition and various functional events. NSAIDs, such as indomethacin, at a dose that inhibits prostaglandin (PG) production, enhance gastric motility, resulting in an increase in mucosal permeability, neutrophil infiltration and oxyradical production, and eventually producing gastric lesions. These lesions are prevented by pretreatment with PGE2 and antisecretory drugs, and also via an atropine-sensitive mechanism, not related to antisecretory action. Although neither rofecoxib (a selective COX-2 inhibitor) nor SC-560 (a selective COX-1 inhibitor) alone damages the stomach, the combined administration of these drugs provokes gastric lesions. SC-560, but not rofecoxib, decreases prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and causes gastric hypermotility and an increase in mucosal permeability. COX-2 mRNA is expressed in the stomach after administration of indomethacin and SC-560 but not rofecoxib. The up-regulation of indomethacin-induced COX-2 expression is prevented by atropine at a dose that inhibits gastric hypermotility. In addition, selective COX-2 inhibitors have deleterious influences on the stomach when COX-2 is overexpressed under various conditions, including adrenalectomy, arthritis, and Helicobacter pylori-infection. In summary, gastric hypermotility plays a primary role in the pathogenesis of NSAID-induced gastric damage, and the response, causally related with PG deficiency due to COX-1 inhibition, occurs prior to other pathogenic events such as increased mucosal permeability; and the ulcerogenic properties of NSAIDs require the inhibition of both COX-1 and COX-2, the inhibition of COX-1 upregulates COX-2 expression in association with gastric hypermotility, and PGs produced by COX-2 counteract the deleterious effect of COX-1 inhibition. PMID:22611307

  4. Antiretroviral Therapy Partly Reverses the Systemic and Mucosal Distribution of NK Cell Subsets that is Altered by SIVmac251 Infection of Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Liyanage, Namal P. M.; Gordon, Shari N.; Doster, Melvin N.; Pegu, Poonam; Vaccari, Monica; Shukur, Nebiyu; Schifanella, Luca; Pise-Masison, Cynthia A.; Lipinska, Danuta; Grubczak, Kamil; Moniuszko, Marcin; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2016-01-01

    We characterized three subsets of NK cells in blood, and two subsets in mucosal tissues. SIVmac251 infection increased total and CD16+ NK cells in the blood. In the rectum, we observed a significant increase in total and NKG2A+ NK cells during SIV infection. In contrast, the NKp44+ subset significantly depleted in acute infection and continued to decline in frequency during chronic phase. During SIV infection, blood CD16 and mucosal NKG2A+ subsets had increased cytotoxic potential. Intriguingly, the NKp44+ NK cell subtype that likely mediates mucosal homeostasis via the production of cytokines, acquired cytotoxicity. Antiretroviral therapy significantly increased the frequency of mucosal NKG2A+ NK cells and peripheral CD16+ NK cells. However, it failed to restore the normal frequency of NKp44+ NK cells in the rectum. Thus, SIVmac251 infection causes changes in the distribution and function of NK cells and antiretroviral therapy during chronic infection only partially restores NK homeostasis and function. PMID:24503100

  5. Adaptive response of growing rat small intestine to acute Adriamycin injury.

    PubMed

    Buts, J P; De Meyer, R; Van Craynest, M P; Maldague, P

    1983-01-01

    The response of the intestinal mucosa to Adriamycin (ADR) was studied in the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum of 25-day-old rats. A single injection of ADR resulted in decreases in mucosal DNA per centimeter of length and in sucrase activity, which were proportional to the doses given (2, 5, and 8 mg/kg). ADR at 2 mg/kg had no significant effect on body weight, gut length, epithelial structure, or mucosal protein content per unit length. The morphological modifications occurred mostly in the proximal intestine and consisted of villous atrophy and degenerative changes of villus and crypt cells. A single dose of 5 mg ADR/kg acutely affected the gut. At 48 and 96 h the changes were characterized by marked decreases in mucosal weight, DNA per centimeter, sucrase activity, and villous shortening. At 144 h, the ADR-treated intestine entered a highly proliferative state and showed increased villous height, mucosal weight, and DNA per centimeter. Although villous hyperplasia was observed at 144 and 192 h, the mucosal weight and DNA concentrations did not exceed the corresponding levels in the control. During the period of active epithelial proliferation, sucrase activity remained depressed. We conclude that in the growing rat: (a) the acute intestinal injury of ADR is short-lived, dose dependent, and predominates in the proximal small intestine; (b) the enteric mucosa reacts to cytotoxic injury by excessive proliferation of immature enterocytes; and (c) the hyperplastic response to ADR is confined to the mucosal epithelium. PMID:6886938

  6. Mucosal wrinkling in animal antra induced by volumetric growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Cao, Yan-Ping; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Yu, Shou-Wen

    2011-04-01

    Surface wrinkling of animal mucosas is crucial for the biological functions of some tissues, and the change in their surface patterns is a phenotypic characteristic of certain diseases. Here we develop a biomechanical model to study the relationship between morphogenesis and volumetric growth, either physiological or pathological, of mucosas. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations are performed to unravel the critical characteristics of mucosal wrinkling in a spherical antrum. It is shown that the thicknesses and elastic moduli of mucosal and submucosal layers dictate the surface buckling morphology. The results hold clinical relevance for such diseases as inflammation and gastritis.

  7. The presence of bacteria within tissue provides insights into the pathogenesis of oral lichen planus

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun Sik; Kim, Yunji; Yoon, Hye-Jung; Baek, Keum Jin; Alam, Jehan; Park, Hee Kyung; Choi, Youngnim

    2016-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic T cell-mediated mucocutaneous disease of unknown etiopathogenesis. Although various antigens have been considered, what actually triggers the inflammatory response of T cells is unknown. In the present study, we propose that intracellular bacteria present within tissues trigger T cell infiltration and provide target antigens. Sections of OLP (n = 36) and normal (n = 10) oral mucosal tissues were subjected to in situ hybridization using a universal probe targeting the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and immunohistochemistry with anti-CD3, anti-CD4, anti-CD8, and anti-macrophage-specific antibodies. Bacteria were abundant throughout the epithelium and the lamina propria of OLP tissues, which exhibited positive correlations with the levels of infiltrated CD3+, CD4+, and CD8+ cells. Furthermore, bacteria were detected within the infiltrated T cells. Pyrosequencing analysis of the mucosal microbiota from OLP patients (n = 13) and control subjects (n = 11) revealed a decrease in Streptococcus and increases in gingivitis/periodontitis-associated bacteria in OLP lesions. Using the selected bacterial species, we demonstrated that certain oral bacteria damage the epithelial physical barrier, are internalized into epithelial cells or T cells, and induce production of T cell chemokines CXCL10 and CCL5. Our findings provide insights into the pathogenesis of OLP. PMID:27383402

  8. The presence of bacteria within tissue provides insights into the pathogenesis of oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun Sik; Kim, Yunji; Yoon, Hye-Jung; Baek, Keum Jin; Alam, Jehan; Park, Hee Kyung; Choi, Youngnim

    2016-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic T cell-mediated mucocutaneous disease of unknown etiopathogenesis. Although various antigens have been considered, what actually triggers the inflammatory response of T cells is unknown. In the present study, we propose that intracellular bacteria present within tissues trigger T cell infiltration and provide target antigens. Sections of OLP (n = 36) and normal (n = 10) oral mucosal tissues were subjected to in situ hybridization using a universal probe targeting the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and immunohistochemistry with anti-CD3, anti-CD4, anti-CD8, and anti-macrophage-specific antibodies. Bacteria were abundant throughout the epithelium and the lamina propria of OLP tissues, which exhibited positive correlations with the levels of infiltrated CD3(+), CD4(+), and CD8(+) cells. Furthermore, bacteria were detected within the infiltrated T cells. Pyrosequencing analysis of the mucosal microbiota from OLP patients (n = 13) and control subjects (n = 11) revealed a decrease in Streptococcus and increases in gingivitis/periodontitis-associated bacteria in OLP lesions. Using the selected bacterial species, we demonstrated that certain oral bacteria damage the epithelial physical barrier, are internalized into epithelial cells or T cells, and induce production of T cell chemokines CXCL10 and CCL5. Our findings provide insights into the pathogenesis of OLP. PMID:27383402

  9. Mucosal MicroRNAs Expression Profiles before and after Exclusive Enteral Nutrition Therapy in Adult Patients with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhen; Gong, Jianfeng; Li, Yi; Gu, Lili; Cao, Lei; Wang, Zhiming; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to be important for the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD). Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is an effective therapy for inducing remission in CD. We aimed to investigate the alteration of miRNAs expression profile in the terminal ileal mucosa of CD patients before and after EEN. Twenty-five patients and ten healthy individuals were included. MiRNAs expression profile was firstly assessed using microarray technology and then validation was performed by qRT-PCR. The correlations between miRNAs and CD activity index (CDAI) score and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) level were also evaluated. Microarray analysis showed that mucosal miRNAs expression profile after EEN therapy was significantly changed compared with inflamed mucosa before treatment, and was most similar to the healthy one among all CD groups. Altered expressions of hsa-miR-192-5p, hsa-miR-423-3p, hsa-miR-99a-5p, hsa-miR-124-3p, hsa-miR-301a-5p, hsa-miR-495-5p, and hsa-let-7b-5p were confirmed by qRT-PCR. hsa-let-7b-5p was significantly correlated with serum CRP levels before and after EEN treatment (r = -0.518, p = 0.008, and r = -0.569, p = 0.003). Our study showed EEN induction therapy was associated with a trend for normalizing of the mucosal miRNAs expression profile, and expression of mucosal hsa-let-7b-5p was correlated with serum CRP level in patients with CD. PMID:27556489

  10. Sphingosine-1-phosphate phosphatase 2 promotes disruption of mucosal integrity, and contributes to ulcerative colitis in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Ching; Liang, Jie; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Avni, Dorit; Yamada, Akimitsu; Maceyka, Michael; Wolen, Aaron R; Kordula, Tomasz; Milstien, Sheldon; Takabe, Kazuaki; Oravecz, Tamas; Spiegel, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    The bioactive sphingolipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and the kinase that produces it have been implicated in inflammatory bowel diseases in mice and humans; however, little is known about the role of the 2 S1P-specific phosphohydrolase isoforms, SGPP1 and SGPP2, which catalyze dephosphorylation of S1P to sphingosine. To elucidate their functions, we generated specific knockout mice. Deletion of Sgpp2, which is mainly expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, significantly reduced dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis severity, whereas deletion of ubiquitously expressed Sgpp1 slightly worsened colitis. Moreover, Sgpp1 deletion enhanced expression of multifunctional proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β, activation of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, and immune cell infiltration into the colon. Conversely, Sgpp2-null mice failed to mount a DSS-induced systemic inflammatory response. Of interest, Sgpp2 deficiency suppressed DSS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis and improved mucosal barrier integrity. Furthermore, down-regulation of Sgpp2 attenuated LPS-induced paracellular permeability in cultured cells and enhanced expression of the adherens junction protein E-cadherin. Finally, in patients with ulcerative colitis, SGPP2 expression was elevated in colitis tissues relative to that in uninvolved tissues. These results indicate that induction of SGPP2 expression contributes to the pathogenesis of colitis by promoting disruption of the mucosal barrier function. SGPP2 may represent a novel therapeutic target in inflammatory bowel disease.-Huang, W.-C., Liang, J., Nagahashi, M., Avni, D., Yamada, A., Maceyka, M., Wolen, A. R., Kordula, T., Milstien, S., Takabe, K., Oravecz, T., Spiegel, S. Sphingosine-1-phosphate phosphatase 2 promotes disruption of mucosal integrity, and contributes to ulcerative colitis in mice and humans. PMID:27130484

  11. Differential Blood and Mucosal Immune Responses against an HIV-1 Vaccine Administered via Inguinal or Deltoid Injection

    PubMed Central

    Price, Charles; Hultin, Lance E.; Elliott, Julie; Hultin, Patricia M.; Shih, Roger; Hausner, Mary Ann; Ng, Hwee L.; Hoffman, Jennifer; Jamieson, Beth D.

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal immunity is central to sexual transmission and overall pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection, but the ability of vaccines to induce immune responses in mucosal tissue compartments is poorly defined. Because macaque vaccine studies suggest that inguinal (versus limb) vaccination may better target sexually-exposed mucosa, we performed a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled Phase I trial in HIV-1-uninfected volunteers, using the recombinant Canarypox (CP) vaccine vCP205 delivered by different routes. 12 persons received vaccine and 6 received placebo, divided evenly between deltoid-intramuscular (deltoid-IM) or inguinal-subcutaneous (inguinal-SC) injection routes. The most significant safety events were injection site reactions (Grade 3) in one inguinal vaccinee. CP-specific antibodies were detected in the blood of all 12 vaccinees by Day 24, while HIV-1-specific antibodies were observed in the blood and gut mucosa of 1/9 and 4/9 evaluated vaccinees respectively, with gut antibodies appearing earlier in inguinal vaccinees (24–180 versus 180–365 days). HIV-1-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTLs) were observed in 7/12 vaccinees, and blood and gut targeting were distinct. Within blood, both deltoid and inguinal responders had detectable CTL responses by 17–24 days; inguinal responders had early responses (within 10 days) while deltoid responders had later responses (24–180 days) in gut mucosa. Our results demonstrate relative safety of inguinal vaccination and qualitative or quantitative compartmentalization of immune responses between blood and gut mucosa, and highlight the importance of not only evaluating early blood responses to HIV-1 vaccines but also mucosal responses over time. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00076817 PMID:24558403

  12. The plasma levels of soluble ST2 as a marker of gut mucosal damage in early HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Mehraj, Vikram; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Ponte, Rosalie; Lebouché, Bertrand; Costiniuk, Cecilia; Thomas, Réjean; Baril, Jean-Guy; LeBlanc, Roger; Cox, Joseph; Tremblay, Cécile; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Following tissue barrier breaches, interleukin-33 (IL-33) is released as an ‘alarmin’ to induce inflammation. Soluble suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (sST2), as an IL-33 decoy receptor, contributes to limit inflammation. We assessed the relationship between the IL-33/ST2 axis and markers of gut mucosal damage in patients with early (EHI) and chronic HIV infection (CHI) and elite controllers. Design: Analyses on patients with EHI and CHI were conducted to determine IL-33/sST2 changes over time. Methods: IL-33 and sST2 levels were measured in plasma. Correlations between sST2 levels and plasma viral load, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell counts, expression of T-cell activation/exhaustion markers, gut mucosal damage, microbial translocation and inflammation markers, as well as kynurenine/tryptophan ratio were assessed. Results: Plasma sST2 levels were elevated in EHI compared with untreated CHI and uninfected controls, whereas IL-33 levels were comparable in all groups. In EHI, sST2 levels were positively correlated with the CD8+ T-cell count and the percentage of T cells expressing activation and exhaustion markers, but not with viral load or CD4+ T-cell count. Plasma sST2 levels also correlated with plasma levels of gut mucosal damage, microbial translocation and kynurenine/tryptophan ratio and for some markers of inflammation. Prospective analyses showed that early antiretroviral therapy had no impact on sST2 levels, whereas longer treatment duration initiated during CHI normalized sST2. Conclusion: As sST2 levels were elevated in EHI and were correlated with CD8+ T-cell count, immune activation, and microbial translocation, sST2 may serve as a marker of disease progression, gut damage and may directly contribute to HIV pathogenesis. PMID:27045377

  13. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  14. Comparative Proteomic Analysis Reveals Activation of Mucosal Innate Immune Signaling Pathways during Cholera

    PubMed Central

    LaRocque, Regina C.; Uddin, Taher; Krastins, Bryan; Mayo-Smith, Leslie M.; Sarracino, David; Karlsson, Elinor K.; Rahman, Atiqur; Shirin, Tahmina; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur R.; Chowdhury, Fahima; Khan, Ashraful Islam; Ryan, Edward T.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Qadri, Firdausi

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 is a major cause of acute watery diarrhea in over 50 countries. Evidence suggests that V. cholerae O1 may activate inflammatory pathways, and a recent study of a Bangladeshi population showed that variants in innate immune genes play a role in mediating susceptibility to cholera. We analyzed human proteins present in the small intestine of patients infected with V. cholerae O1 to characterize the host response to this pathogen. We collected duodenal biopsy specimens from patients with acute cholera after stabilization and again 30 days after initial presentation. Peptides extracted from biopsy specimens were sequenced and quantified using label-free mass spectrometry and SEQUEST. Twenty-seven host proteins were differentially abundant between the acute and convalescent stages of infection; the majority of these have known roles in innate defense, cytokine production, and apoptosis. Immunostaining confirmed that two proteins, WARS and S100A8, were more abundant in lamina propria cells during the acute stage of cholera. Analysis of the differentially abundant proteins revealed the activation of key regulators of inflammation by the innate immune system, including Toll-like receptor 4, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and caspase-dependent inflammasomes. Interleukin-12β (IL-12β) was a regulator of several proteins that were activated during cholera, and we confirmed that IL-12β was produced by lymphocytes recovered from duodenal biopsy specimens of cholera patients. Our study shows that a broad inflammatory response is generated in the gut early after onset of cholera, which may be critical in the development of long-term mucosal immunity against V. cholerae O1. PMID:25561705

  15. Comparative proteomic analysis reveals activation of mucosal innate immune signaling pathways during cholera.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Crystal N; LaRocque, Regina C; Uddin, Taher; Krastins, Bryan; Mayo-Smith, Leslie M; Sarracino, David; Karlsson, Elinor K; Rahman, Atiqur; Shirin, Tahmina; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur R; Chowdhury, Fahima; Khan, Ashraful Islam; Ryan, Edward T; Calderwood, Stephen B; Qadri, Firdausi; Harris, Jason B

    2015-03-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 is a major cause of acute watery diarrhea in over 50 countries. Evidence suggests that V. cholerae O1 may activate inflammatory pathways, and a recent study of a Bangladeshi population showed that variants in innate immune genes play a role in mediating susceptibility to cholera. We analyzed human proteins present in the small intestine of patients infected with V. cholerae O1 to characterize the host response to this pathogen. We collected duodenal biopsy specimens from patients with acute cholera after stabilization and again 30 days after initial presentation. Peptides extracted from biopsy specimens were sequenced and quantified using label-free mass spectrometry and SEQUEST. Twenty-seven host proteins were differentially abundant between the acute and convalescent stages of infection; the majority of these have known roles in innate defense, cytokine production, and apoptosis. Immunostaining confirmed that two proteins, WARS and S100A8, were more abundant in lamina propria cells during the acute stage of cholera. Analysis of the differentially abundant proteins revealed the activation of key regulators of inflammation by the innate immune system, including Toll-like receptor 4, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and caspase-dependent inflammasomes. Interleukin-12β (IL-12β) was a regulator of several proteins that were activated during cholera, and we confirmed that IL-12β was produced by lymphocytes recovered from duodenal biopsy specimens of cholera patients. Our study shows that a broad inflammatory response is generated in the gut early after onset of cholera, which may be critical in the development of long-term mucosal immunity against V. cholerae O1. PMID:25561705

  16. Interactions Between Bacteria and the Gut Mucosa: Do Enteric Neurotransmitters Acting on the Mucosal Epithelium Influence Intestinal Colonization or Infection?

    PubMed

    Green, Benedict T; Brown, David R

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is a critical barrier between the internal and external milieux of the mammalian host. Epithelial interactions between these two host environments have been shown to be modulated by several different, cross-communicating cell types residing in the gut mucosa. These include enteric neurons, whose activity is influenced by bacterial pathogens, and their secreted products. Neurotransmitters appear to influence epithelial associations with bacteria in the intestinal lumen. For example, internalization of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli O157:H7 into the Peyer's patch mucosa of the small intestine is altered after the inhibition of neural activity with saxitoxin, a neuronal sodium channel blocker. Catecholamine neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and norepinephrine, also alter bacterial internalization in Peyer's patches. In the large intestine, norepinephrine increases the mucosal adherence of E. coli. These neurotransmitter actions are mediated by well-defined catecholamine receptors situated on the basolateral membranes of epithelial cells rather than through direct interactions with luminal bacteria. Investigations of the involvement of neuroepithelial communication in the regulation of interactions between the intestinal mucosa and luminal bacteria will provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying bacterial colonization and pathogenesis at mucosal surfaces. PMID:26589216

  17. Modulating the natural history of type 1 diabetes in children at high genetic risk by mucosal insulin immunization.

    PubMed

    Achenbach, Peter; Barker, Jennifer; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2008-04-01

    Mucosal administration of insulin represents an attractive antigen-specific therapeutic approach to preventing type 1 diabetes. It can prevent autoimmune diabetes in animal models, but although it has been shown to be safe, it has not yet been proven effective in human studies. Efficacy may depend on the dose and route at which insulin is administered, the stage in type 1 diabetes pathogenesis at which treatment is initiated, and the study cohort that is treated. We have proposed Pre-POINT (Primary Oral/intranasal INsulin Trial), a dose-finding safety and immune efficacy pilot study for primary mucosal insulin therapy in islet autoantibody-negative children at high genetic risk for type 1 diabetes who naturally first develop autoimmunity to insulin. Pre-POINT aims to identify an optimal insulin dose and route of application (orally or intranasally) that is well tolerated and can induce an immune response to insulin for additional use in a phase II/III primary prevention trial in children at risk. PMID:18445349

  18. Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells in Multiple Sclerosis: The Jury is Still Out

    PubMed Central

    Treiner, Emmanuel; Liblau, Roland S.

    2015-01-01

    The immune system is strongly implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS), as demonstrated by the efficacy of therapies targeting various components of adaptive immunity. However, the disease still progresses despite these treatments in many patients, while others experience life-threatening adverse effects, urging for the discovery of new immune-targeting medications. Among the immune cell types participating to MS pathogenesis, decades of work have highlighted the prominent role of CD4 T cells. More recent data demonstrate the involvement of CD8 T cells as well. The existence of both pathogenic and protective CD8 T cells subsets has been suggested, adding an additional layer of complexity to the picture. Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are innate-like lymphocytes that make up to 25% of CD8 T cells in healthy subjects. They are specific for conserved microbial ligands and may constitute an important barrier against invasive bacterial and fungal infection. An increasing number of reports also suggest their possible involvement in chronic inflammatory diseases, including MS. MAIT cells could participate through their ability to produce IFNγ and/or IL-17, two major cytokines in the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory/autoimmune diseases. However, the mechanisms by which MAIT cells could be activated in these sterile conditions are not known. Furthermore, contradictory observations have been made, reporting either a protective or a pro-inflammatory behavior of MAIT cells in MS or its murine model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In this review article, we will describe the current knowledge on MAIT cell biology in health and disease, and discuss the possible mechanisms behind their role in MS. The specific features of this new non-conventional T cell subset make it an interesting candidate as a biomarker or as the target of immune-mediated intervention. PMID:26483793

  19. Intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction participates in the progress of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jing-Wei; Tang, Hai-Ying; Zhao, Ting; Tan, Xiao-Yan; Bi, Jian; Wang, Bing-Yuan; Wang, Ying-De

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction is closely related to liver diseases, which implies impaired gut-liver axis may play a role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. In our study, rats were divided into three groups: normal chow diet (NCD) group, high-fat diet (HFD) group and TNBS-induced colitis with high-fat diet (C-HFD) group. Liver tissues were obtained for histological observation and TNF-α, IL-6 mRNA determination and blood samples were collected for liver enzymes and LPS analysis. Ultrastructural changes of jejuna epithelium, SIBO and amounts of CD103(+)MHCII(+)DCs and CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+)T-regs in terms of percentage in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) were observed by electron microscope, bacterial cultivation and flow cytometry, respectively. The results demonstrated the pathological characteristics accorded with nonalcoholic simple fatty liver (NAFL) and NASH in HFD group by week 8 and 12, respectively. Besides, the degree of hepatic steatosis and steatohepatitis was more severe in C-HFD group compared with HFD-group at the same time point. NAFLD activity score (NAS), liver enzymes, concentration of LPS and mRNA expressions of TNF-α, IL-6 were higher significantly in C-HFD group compared with HFD and NCD group at week 4, 8 and 12, respectively. In HFD group, epithelium microvilli atrophy, disruptive tight junctions and SIBO were present, and these changes were more severe in NASH compared with NAFL. The percentage of CD103+MHCII+DCs and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+T-regs decreased significantly in NAFL and NASH compared with NCD group. Our conclusion was that gut-liver axis was impaired in NAFLD, which played crucial role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. PMID:26097546

  20. Intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction participates in the progress of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jing-Wei; Tang, Hai-Ying; Zhao, Ting; Tan, Xiao-Yan; Bi, Jian; Wang, Bing-Yuan; Wang, Ying-De

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction is closely related to liver diseases, which implies impaired gut-liver axis may play a role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. In our study, rats were divided into three groups: normal chow diet (NCD) group, high-fat diet (HFD) group and TNBS-induced colitis with high-fat diet (C-HFD) group. Liver tissues were obtained for histological observation and TNF-α, IL-6 mRNA determination and blood samples were collected for liver enzymes and LPS analysis. Ultrastructural changes of jejuna epithelium, SIBO and amounts of CD103+MHCII+DCs and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+T-regs in terms of percentage in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) were observed by electron microscope, bacterial cultivation and flow cytometry, respectively. The results demonstrated the pathological characteristics accorded with nonalcoholic simple fatty liver (NAFL) and NASH in HFD group by week 8 and 12, respectively. Besides, the degree of hepatic steatosis and steatohepatitis was more severe in C-HFD group compared with HFD-group at the same time point. NAFLD activity score (NAS), liver enzymes, concentration of LPS and mRNA expressions of TNF-α, IL-6 were higher significantly in C-HFD group compared with HFD and NCD group at week 4, 8 and 12, respectively. In HFD group, epithelium microvilli atrophy, disruptive tight junctions and SIBO were present, and these changes were more severe in NASH compared with NAFL. The percentage of CD103+MHCII+DCs and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+T-regs decreased significantly in NAFL and NASH compared with NCD group. Our conclusion was that gut-liver axis was impaired in NAFLD, which played crucial role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. PMID:26097546

  1. Mucosal Immunization with Iron Receptor Antigens Protects against Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sara N.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2009-01-01

    Uncomplicated infections of the urinary tract, caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli, are among the most common diseases requiring medical intervention. A preventive vaccine to reduce the morbidity and fiscal burden these infections have upon the healthcare system would be beneficial. Here, we describe the results of a large-scale selection process that incorporates bioinformatic, genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic screens to identify six vaccine candidates from the 5379 predicted proteins encoded by uropathogenic E. coli strain CFT073. The vaccine candidates, ChuA, Hma, Iha, IreA, IroN, and IutA, all belong to a functional class of molecules that is involved in iron acquisition, a process critical for pathogenesis in all microbes. Intranasal immunization of CBA/J mice with these outer membrane iron receptors elicited a systemic and mucosal immune response that included the production of antigen-specific IgM, IgG, and IgA antibodies. The cellular response to vaccination was characterized by the induction and secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17. Of the six potential vaccine candidates, IreA, Hma, and IutA provided significant protection from experimental infection. In immunized animals, class-switching from IgM to IgG and production of antigen-specific IgA in the urine represent immunological correlates of protection from E. coli bladder colonization. These findings are an important first step toward the development of a subunit vaccine to prevent urinary tract infections and demonstrate how targeting an entire class of molecules that are collectively required for pathogenesis may represent a fundamental strategy to combat infections. PMID:19806177

  2. Arecoline-induced myofibroblast transdifferentiation from human buccal mucosal fibroblasts is mediated by ZEB1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Chao; Tsai, Chung-Hung; Lai, You-Liang; Yu, Cheng-Chia; Chi, Wan-Yu; Li, Jung Jung; Chang, Wen-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is considered as a pre-cancerous condition of the oral mucosa and is highly associated with habitual areca quid chewing. Arecoline is the major alkaloid in areca quid and is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of OSF. Our previous studies have demonstrated that arecoline could induce epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related factors in primary human buccal mucosal fibroblasts (BMFs). Therefore, we investigated the expression of zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1), which is a well-known transcriptional factor in EMT, in OSF tissues and its role in arecoline-induced myofibroblast transdifferentiation from BMFs. The expression of ZEB1, as well as the myofibroblast marker α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), was significantly increased in OSF tissues, respectively. With immunofluorescence analysis, arecoline induced the formation of α-SMA-positive stress fibres in BMFs expressing nuclear ZEB1. Arecoline also induced collagen contraction of BMFs in vitro. By chromatin immunoprecipitation, the binding of ZEB1 to the α-SMA promoter in BMFs was increased by arecoline. The promoter activity of α-SMA in BMFs was also induced by arecoline, while knockdown of ZEB1 abolished arecoline-induced α-SMA promoter activity and collagen contraction of BMFs. Long-term exposure of BMFs to arecoline induced the expression of fibrogenic genes and ZEB1. Silencing of ZEB1 in fibrotic BMFs from an OSF patient also suppressed the expression of α-SMA and myofibroblast activity. Inhibition of insulin-like growth factor receptor-1 could suppress arecoline-induced ZEB1 activation in BMFs. Our data suggest that ZEB1 may participate in the pathogenesis of areca quid–associated OSF by activating the α-SMA promoter and inducing myofibroblast transdifferentiation from BMFs. PMID:24400868

  3. New Concepts in the Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Control of Diseases Caused by the Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus

    PubMed Central

    Radostits, Otto M.; Littlejohns, Ian R.

    1988-01-01

    The new information on the pathogenesis and epidemiology of mucosal disease of cattle is reviewed. It is now known that clinical mucosal disease occurs only in cattle which were infected with a pestivirus in early gestation and were born with persistent viral infection and specific immunotolerance. These animals may be clinically normal at birth but may develop fatal mucosal disease, perhaps following superinfection with another pestivirus, usually between 6 and 24 months of age. They may also remain clinically normal indefinitely and breed successfully. The progeny from persistently infected females will similarly be persistently viremic, and maternal families of such animals may be established. Congenital defects may occur when infection of the fetus occurs in mid-gestation. Although fetuses may be infected in utero in late gestation, the infections do not persist, the fetuses develop antibodies, and they appear to suffer no ill-effects. Postnatal infection can result in subclinical disease (bovine viral diarrhea) with a normal immune response; the virus may also be responsible for enhanced susceptibility to other infections, diarrhea in newborn calves, and reproductive failure. Prevention of the economically important diseases caused by the virus is dependent upon the identification and elimination of persistently viremic animals, which are reservoirs of infection, and the vaccination of immunocompetent females at least three weeks before breeding. However, because of serotypic differences between strains, there is some doubt whether vaccination will reliably provide protection against the transplacental fetal infections that are important in the pathogenesis of this disease. There is no substantial evidence to warrant the vaccination of feedlot cattle. PMID:17423063

  4. Why Chitosan? From properties to perspective of mucosal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashwini; Vimal, Archana; Kumar, Awanish

    2016-10-01

    Non-parenteral drug delivery routes primarily remove the local pain at the injection site. The drugs administered through the oral route encounter the process of hepatic first pass metabolism. Among the alternative delivery routes, mucosal route is being investigated as the most preferred route. Different mucosal routes include the gastrointestinal tract (oral), vagina, buccal cavity and nasal cavity. Novel formulations are being developed using natural and synthetic polymers that could increase the residence time of the drug at mucosal surface in order to facilitate permeation and reduce (or bypass) the first pass metabolism. For recombinant drugs, the formulations are accompanied by enzyme inhibitors and penetration enhancers. Buccal cavity (buccal and sublingual mucosa) has smaller surface area than the gastrointestinal tract but the drugs can easily escape the first pass metabolism. Chitosan is the most applied natural polymer while synthetic polymers include Carbopol and Eudragit. Chitosan has inherent properties of mucoadhesion and penetration enhancement apart from biodegradability and efflux pump inhibition. This review hoards the important research purview of chitosan as a compatible drug carrier macromolecule for mucosal delivery on single platform. PMID:27196368

  5. The Mucosal Immune System and Its Regulation by Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Kabat, Agnieszka M.; Pott, Johanna; Maloy, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract presents a unique challenge to the mucosal immune system, which has to constantly monitor the vast surface for the presence of pathogens, while at the same time maintaining tolerance to beneficial or innocuous antigens. In the intestinal mucosa, specialized innate and adaptive immune components participate in directing appropriate immune responses toward these diverse challenges. Recent studies provide compelling evidence that the process of autophagy influences several aspects of mucosal immune responses. Initially described as a “self-eating” survival pathway that enables nutrient recycling during starvation, autophagy has now been connected to multiple cellular responses, including several aspects of immunity. Initial links between autophagy and host immunity came from the observations that autophagy can target intracellular bacteria for degradation. However, subsequent studies indicated that autophagy plays a much broader role in immune responses, as it can impact antigen processing, thymic selection, lymphocyte homeostasis, and the regulation of immunoglobulin and cytokine secretion. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of mucosal immune cells and discuss how autophagy influences many aspects of their physiology and function. We focus on cell type-specific roles of autophagy in the gut, with a particular emphasis on the effects of autophagy on the intestinal T cell compartment. We also provide a perspective on how manipulation of autophagy may potentially be used to treat mucosal inflammatory disorders. PMID:27446072

  6. Mucosal malignant melanoma - a clinical, oncological, pathological and genetic survey.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Lauge H; Larsen, Ann-Cathrine; von Buchwald, Christian; Drzewiecki, Krzysztof T; Prause, Jan U; Heegaard, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    Mucosal melanomas constitute 1.3% of all melanomas and they may develop in any mucosal membrane. Conjunctival melanomas (0.5/million/year) and melanomas in the sinonasal cavity (0.5/million/year) are the most common, followed by anorectal melanomas (0.4/million/year) and melanomas in the oral cavity (0.2/million/year). Anorectal melanoma occurs slightly more often in females, whereas oral melanoma has a male predilection. Mucosal melanoma most commonly develops in a patient's sixth or seventh decade of life, and no differences between races have been found except for sinonasal melanoma and conjunctival melanoma, which are very rare in Black people. The symptoms are not tumour-specific and are related to the organ system affected, and the disease is most often diagnosed at an advanced clinical stage. The diagnosis of a primary tumour is difficult, and metastatic cutaneous melanoma and choroidal melanoma must be excluded. Mutations in KIT are frequently found, while BRAF and NRAS mutations are rarely found - except in conjunctival melanomas that carry BRAF mutations. Mutations in the TERT promotor region are also found in mucosal melanomas. Complete surgical resection with free margins is the treatment of choice. The prognosis is poor, with the 5-year survival rate ranging from 0% (gastric melanoma) to 80% (conjunctival melanoma). PMID:27004972

  7. Photobiomodulation reduces oral mucositis by modulating NF-kB.

    PubMed

    Curra, Marina; Pellicioli, Ana Carolina Amorim; Filho, Nélson Alexandre Kretzmann; Ochs, Gustavo; Matte, Úrsula; Filho, Manoel Sant'Ana; Martins, Marco Antonio Trevizani; Martins, Manoela Domingues

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate NF-kB during 5-fluorouracil (FU)-induced oral mucositis and ascertain whether photobiomodulation (PBM), as a preventive and/or therapeutic modality, influences this transcription factor. Ninety-six male golden Syrian hamsters were allocated into four groups: control (no treatment); PBM therapeutic, PBM preventive, and PBM combined. Animals received an injection of 5-FU on days 0 and 2. On days 3 and 4, the buccal mucosa was scratched. Irradiation was carried out using a 660-nm, 40-mW diode laser at 6  J/cm(2) during 6  s/point, 0.24  J/point, for a total dose of 1.44  J/day of application. Animals were euthanized on days 0, 5, 10, and 15 (n=6). Buccal mucosa was removed for protein quantification by Western blot. Clinical analysis revealed that PBM groups exhibited less mucositis than controls on day 10. Control animals exhibited lower levels of NF-kB during mucositis development and healing. The preventive and combined protocols were associated with higher NF-kB levels at day 5; however, the therapeutic group had higher levels at days 10 and 15. These findings suggest that the preventive and/or therapeutic PBM protocols reduced the severity of oral mucositis by activating the NF-kB pathway. PMID:26720873

  8. Photobiomodulation reduces oral mucositis by modulating NF-kB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curra, Marina; Pellicioli, Ana Carolina Amorim; Filho, Nélson Alexandre Kretzmann; Ochs, Gustavo; Matte, Úrsula; Filho, Manoel Sant'Ana; Martins, Marco Antonio Trevizani; Martins, Manoela Domingues

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate NF-kB during 5-fluorouracil (FU)-induced oral mucositis and ascertain whether photobiomodulation (PBM), as a preventive and/or therapeutic modality, influences this transcription factor. Ninety-six male golden Syrian hamsters were allocated into four groups: control (no treatment); PBM therapeutic, PBM preventive, and PBM combined. Animals received an injection of 5-FU on days 0 and 2. On days 3 and 4, the buccal mucosa was scratched. Irradiation was carried out using a 660-nm, 40-mW diode laser at 6 J/cm2 during 6 s/point, 0.24 J/point, for a total dose of 1.44 J/day of application. Animals were euthanized on days 0, 5, 10, and 15 (n=6). Buccal mucosa was removed for protein quantification by Western blot. Clinical analysis revealed that PBM groups exhibited less mucositis than controls on day 10. Control animals exhibited lower levels of NF-kB during mucositis development and healing. The preventive and combined protocols were associated with higher NF-kB levels at day 5; however, the therapeutic group had higher levels at days 10 and 15. These findings suggest that the preventive and/or therapeutic PBM protocols reduced the severity of oral mucositis by activating the NF-kB pathway.

  9. Pharmacological Protection From Radiation {+-} Cisplatin-Induced Oral Mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Cotrim, Ana P.; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Sunshine, Abraham N.; Zheng Changyu; Sowers, Anastasia L.; Thetford, Angela D.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B.; Baum, Bruce J.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate if two pharmacological agents, Tempol and D-methionine (D-met), are able to prevent oral mucositis in mice after exposure to ionizing radiation {+-} cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Female C3H mice, {approx}8 weeks old, were irradiated with five fractionated doses {+-} cisplatin to induce oral mucositis (lingual ulcers). Just before irradiation and chemotherapy, mice were treated, either alone or in combination, with different doses of Tempol (by intraperitoneal [ip] injection or topically, as an oral gel) and D-met (by gavage). Thereafter, mice were sacrificed and tongues were harvested and stained with a solution of Toluidine Blue. Ulcer size and tongue epithelial thickness were measured. Results: Significant lingual ulcers resulted from 5 Multiplication-Sign 8 Gy radiation fractions, which were enhanced with cisplatin treatment. D-met provided stereospecific partial protection from lingual ulceration after radiation. Tempol, via both routes of administration, provided nearly complete protection from lingual ulceration. D-met plus a suboptimal ip dose of Tempol also provided complete protection. Conclusions: Two fairly simple pharmacological treatments were able to markedly reduce chemoradiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. This proof of concept study suggests that Tempol, alone or in combination with D-met, may be a useful and convenient way to prevent the severe oral mucositis that results from head-and-neck cancer therapy.

  10. Canine gastric mucosal vasodilation with prostaglandins and histamine analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, J.G.; Nies, A.S.

    1982-10-01

    The effect of direct intragastric artery infusion of prostaglandins E2 and I2, arachidonic acid, dimaprit (histamine H2 agonist), and 2',2'-pyridylethylamine (histamine H1 agonist) on gastric mucosal blood flow was examined in dogs to elucidate the relationship between gastric secretory state and mucosal blood flow in dogs. These compounds were chosen because of their diverse effect on gastric acid secretion. Gastric fundus blood flow was measured both electromagnetically with a flow probe around the left gastric artery which supplies the fundus almost exclusively, and by the radioactive microsphere technique. Intraarterial infusion of all the compounds resulted in gastric mucosal vasodilation even though PGE2, PGI2, and arachidonic acid inhibit gastric acid secretion, dimaprit stimulated gastric acid secretion, and 2',2'-pyridylethylamine does not affect gastric acid secretion. There was total agreement in the blood flow measurements by the two different techniques. Our data suggest that gastric acid secretion and gastric vasodilation are independently regulated. In addition, the validity of the studies in which the aminopyrine clearance indicates that prostaglandins are mucosal vasoconstrictors needs to be questioned because of the reliance of those measurements on the secretory state of the stomach.

  11. Individual mammalian mucosal glucosidase subunits digest various starch structures differently

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch digestion in the human body requires two luminal enzymes,salivary and pancreatic alpha-amylase (AMY), and four small intestinal mucosal enzyme activities related to the maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM) and sucrase-isomaltase (SI) complexes. Starch consists of two polysaccharides, amylose (AM) and ...

  12. Palifermin: new drug. Prevention of oral mucositis: inappropriate evaluation.

    PubMed

    2007-08-01

    (1) Patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy combined with total body irradiation (myeloablative therapy) often develop oral mucositis. Prevention is based mainly on sucking ice during chemotherapy. (2) Palifermin is a growth factor marketed for the prevention of severe oral mucositis in adults with malignant haemopathies who are receiving myeloablative therapy followed by peripheral stem cell autografting. (3) Palifermin has not been compared with sucking ice, despite the efficacy of this simple treatment. (4) In a randomised placebo-controlled double-blind trial involving 212 adult patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy and total body irradiation, palifermin reduced the incidence of severe oral mucositis (63% versus 98%) and its duration (about 3 days versus 9 days). The myeloablative regimen used in this trial is not that commonly used in Europe. The efficacy of palifermin during less aggressive regimens, which cause less severe oral mucositis, is not known. (5) The main adverse events noted in clinical trials were erythema and cutaneous oedema. It is not known whether palifermin increases the long-term risk of cancer. (6) Treatment with palifermin is expensive, 4800.00 euros in France); the optimal dosing schedule is not known and the unit dose chosen by the manufacturer is wastefully large. (7) In practice, it remains to be demonstrated that palifermin is more effective than simply sucking ice. PMID:17724832

  13. Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) mucosal infection in Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Aamelfot, Maria; McBeath, Alastair; Christiansen, Debes H; Matejusova, Iveta; Falk, Knut

    2015-01-01

    All viruses infecting fish must cross the surface mucosal barrier to successfully enter a host. Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV), the causative agent of the economically important infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., has been shown to use the gills as its entry point. However, other entry ports have not been investigated despite the expression of virus receptors on the surface of epithelial cells in the skin, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and the conjunctiva. Here we investigate the ISAV mucosal infection in Atlantic salmon after experimental immersion (bath) challenge and in farmed fish collected from a confirmed outbreak of ISA in Norway. We show for the first time evidence of early replication in several mucosal surfaces in addition to the gills, including the pectoral fin, skin and GI tract suggesting several potential entry points for the virus. Initially, the infection is localized and primarily infecting epithelial cells, however at later stages it becomes systemic, infecting the endothelial cells lining the circulatory system. Viruses of low and high virulence used in the challenge revealed possible variation in virus progression during infection at the mucosal surfaces. PMID:26490835

  14. Mucosal vaccination by adenoviruses displaying reovirus sigma 1

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Eric A.; Camacho, Zenaido T.; Hillestad, Matthew L.; Crosby, Catherine M.; Turner, Mallory A.; Guenzel, Adam J.; Fadel, Hind J.; Mercier, George T.; Barry, Michael A.

    2015-08-15

    We developed adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying the sigma 1 protein from reovirus as mucosal vaccines. Ad5-sigma retargets to JAM-1 and sialic acid, but has 40-fold reduced gene delivery when compared to Ad5. While weaker at transduction, Ad5-sigma generates stronger T cell responses than Ad5 when used for mucosal immunization. In this work, new Ad5-fiber-sigma vectors were generated by varying the number of fiber β-spiral shaft repeats (R) between the fiber tail and sigma. Increasing chimera length led to decreasing insertion of these proteinsAd5 virions. Ad-R3 and R14 vectors effectively targeted JAM-1 in vitro while R20 did not. When wereused to immunize mice by the intranasal route, Ad5-R3-sigma produced higher serum and vaginal antibody responses than Ad5. These data suggest optimized Ad-sigma vectors may be useful vectors for mucosal vaccination. - Highlights: • Constructed adenoviruses (Ads) displaying different reovirus sigma 1 fusion proteins. • Progressively longer chimeras were more poorly encapsidated onto Ad virions. • Ad5-R3-sigma mediated better systemic and mucosal immune responses than Ad5.

  15. Transmigrating neutrophils shape the mucosal microenvironment through localized oxygen depletion to influence resolution of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Eric L; Bruyninckx, Walter J; Kelly, Caleb J; Glover, Louise E; McNamee, Eóin N; Bower