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Sample records for acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis

  1. Pathogenic mechanism of acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Nordstrand, A; Norgren, M; Holm, S E

    1999-01-01

    Considerable knowledge has been accumulated regarding the characteristics of acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN), and many attempts have been made to identify a streptococcal factor or factors responsible for triggering this disease. However, the pathogenic mechanism behind APSGN remains largely unknown. As glomerular deposition of C3 is generally demonstrated before that of IgG in the disease process, it is likely that the inflammatory response is initiated by renal deposition of a streptococcal product, rather than by deposition of antibodies or pre-formed immune complexes. During recent years, a number of streptococcal products have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenic process. In this review, possible roles of these factors are discussed in the context of the clinical and renal findings most often demonstrated in patients with APSGN. Streptokinase was observed to be required in order to induce signs of APSGN in mice, and a number of findings suggest that the initiation of the disease may occur as a result of renal binding by certain nephritis-associated variants of this protein. However, additional factors may be required for the development of the disease. PMID:10680980

  2. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in a patient with acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis caused by impetigo.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masahiro; Yamakawa, Hideaki; Yabe, Masami; Ishikawa, Takeo; Takagi, Masamichi; Matsumoto, Kei; Hamaguchi, Akihiko; Ogura, Makoto; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    We herein report a case of pulmonary renal syndrome with nephritis in a 17-year-old boy with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) associated with acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). The patient exhibited hemoptysis two weeks after developing impetigo, and DAH was diagnosed on bronchoscopy. Respiratory failure progressed, and high-dose methylprednisolone therapy was administered; the respiratory failure regressed immediately after the onset of therapy. Streptococcus pyogenes was detected in an impetigo culture, and, together with the results of the renal biopsy, a diagnosis of APSGN was made. This case demonstrates the effects of high-dose methylprednisolone therapy in improving respiratory failure. PMID:25876581

  3. IgA-dominant acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis with concomitant rheumatic fever successfully treated with steroids: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Rus, Rina R; Toplak, Nataša; Vizjak, Alenka; Mraz, Jerica; Ferluga, Dušan

    2015-01-01

    There are only a few reports of the co-occurrence of acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APGN) and acute rheumatic fever. We report an unusual case of a 3-year-old boy with nephrotic syndrome and acute renal failure with the transitional need for peritoneal dialysis, biopsy-proven atypical IgA-dominant APGN, and concomitant acute rheumatic fever, successfully treated by steroids. Aggressive treatment with pulses of methylprednisolone proved to be successful and we recommend its use in this type of cases. PMID:26718763

  4. IgA-dominant acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis with concomitant rheumatic fever successfully treated with steroids: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rus, Rina R; Toplak, Nataša; Vizjak, Alenka; Mraz, Jerica; Ferluga, Dušan

    2015-12-01

    There are only a few reports of the co-occurrence of acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APGN) and acute rheumatic fever. We report an unusual case of a 3-year-old boy with nephrotic syndrome and acute renal failure with the transitional need for peritoneal dialysis, biopsy-proven atypical IgA-dominant APGN, and concomitant acute rheumatic fever, successfully treated by steroids. Aggressive treatment with pulses of methylprednisolone proved to be successful and we recommend its use in this type of cases. PMID:26718763

  5. Acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, N

    2000-09-01

    Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) is a representative disease of acute nephritic syndrome characterized by the sudden appearance of edema, hematuria, proteinuria, and hypertension. The prototype of AGN is acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). "Nephritogenic streptococci" are defined as organisms that are cultured from a patient who develops AGN. Although only a limited number of M-types of streptococci have been recognized as "nephritogenic streptococci", all M-types of streptococci may have nephritogenic potential because the genes for major putative nephritogenic antigens such as SPEB and NAPIr are found to be present in all group A streptococci thus far examined. Pathogenic mechanisms for APSGN involving both humoral and cell-mediated immunity have been recently proposed. The role of humoral immunity is presumed to be mediated by the in situ formation of nephritogenic streptococcal antigen-antibody complexes and circulating immune complexes. While in the cellular immune component a role for delayed-type hypersensitivity has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of APSGN. PMID:10969898

  6. Staphylococcus-related glomerulonephritis and poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis: why defining "post" is important in understanding and treating infection-related glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Glassock, Richard J; Alvarado, Anthony; Prosek, Jason; Hebert, Courtney; Parikh, Samir; Satoskar, Anjali; Nadasdy, Tibor; Forman, John; Rovin, Brad; Hebert, Lee A

    2015-06-01

    A spate of recent publications describes a newly recognized form of glomerulonephritis associated with active staphylococcal infection. The key kidney biopsy findings, glomerular immunoglobulin A (IgA) deposits dominant or codominant with IgG deposits, resemble those of IgA nephritis. Many authors describe this condition as "postinfectious" and have termed it "poststaphylococcal glomerulonephritis." However, viewed through the prism of poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis, the prefix "post" in poststaphylococcal glomerulonephritis is historically incorrect, illogical, and misleading with regard to choosing therapy. There are numerous reports describing the use of high-dose steroids to treat poststaphylococcal glomerulonephritis. The decision to use steroid therapy suggests that the treating physician believed that the dominant problem was a postinfectious glomerulonephritis, not the infection itself. Unfortunately, steroid therapy in staphylococcus-related glomerulonephritis can precipitate severe staphylococcal sepsis and even death and provides no observable benefits. Poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis is an authentic postinfectious glomerulonephritis; poststaphylococcal glomerulonephritis is not. Making this distinction is important from the perspective of history, pathogenesis, and clinical management. PMID:25890425

  7. Post-streptococcal reactive arthritis in children: a distinct entity from acute rheumatic fever

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    There is a debate whether post-streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA) is a separate entity or a condition on the spectrum of acute rheumatic fever (ARF). We believe that PSRA is a distinct entity and in this paper we review the substantial differences between PSRA and ARF. We show how the demographic, clinical, genetic and treatment characteristics of PSRA differ from ARF. We review diagnostic criteria and regression formulas that attempt to classify patients with PSRA as opposed to ARF. The important implication of these findings may relate to the issue of prophylactic antibiotics after PSRA. However, future trials will be necessary to conclusively answer that question. PMID:22013970

  8. Properdin and C3 Proactivator: Alternate Pathway Components in Human Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Robert H.; Michael, Alfred F.

    1973-01-01

    Serological and immunopathological studies of human glomerulonephritis have suggested that alternate pathways of activation of the third component of complement may be important in some forms of glomerulonephritis. We have investigated the role of two alternate pathway proteins, properdin and C3 proactivator, in 22 patients with chronic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, 21 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, 20 patients with acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis, and 19 patients with other forms of renal disease. C3 (measured at β1A), properdin, and C3 proactivator were assayed by single radial immunodiffusion. In sera with low β1A (< 2 SD), mean properdin was most significantly decreased in patients with acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis but was also significantly decreased in chronic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and in untreated systemic lupus erythematosus. Properdin levels in other renal disease, acute glomerulonephritis, and chronic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with normal β1A levels were not significantly different from normal. A positive correlation between β1A and properdin levels in individual sera was present in all diseases except systemic lupus erythematosus. Serum C3 proactivator was markedly decreased in active systemic lupus erythematosus and there was a positive correlation between β1A and C3 proactivator levels in systemic lupus erythematosus and other renal diseases but not acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis. Properdin in fresh sera from four patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and five with chronic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis showed increased migration toward the cathode on immunoelectrophoresis, suggesting in vivo change of the properdin molecule. The observation of reduced serum levels of properdin and C3 proactivator and altered electrophoretic migration of properdin in some patients with glomerulonephritis provide new evidence for participation of these

  9. Glomerulonephritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that suppress the immune system A procedure called plasmapheresis may sometimes be used for glomerulonephritis caused by ... Saunders; 2012:chap 32. Cattran DC, Reigh HN. Overview of therapy for glomerular disease. In: Taal MW, ...

  10. Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (GN)

    MedlinePlus

    ... following: Decreased urine output Rust-colored urine Swelling (edema), general swelling, swelling of the abdomen, swelling of ... A physical examination shows swelling (edema), especially in the ... to the heart and lungs with a stethoscope ( auscultation ). Blood ...

  11. Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (GN)

    MedlinePlus

    ... following: Decreased urine output Rust-colored urine Swelling (edema), general swelling, swelling of the abdomen, swelling of ... Exams and Tests A physical examination shows swelling (edema), especially in the face. Abnormal sounds may be ...

  12. Cerebral venous thrombosis in a patient with acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Morkhandikar, S; Priyamvada, P S; Srinivas, B H; Parameswaran, S

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis of the cerebral venous sinuses (CVT) is described in nephrotic syndrome. A 13-year-old girl was admitted with acute post-infectious glomerulonephritis (APIGN). Subsequently she developed recurrent seizures with focal neurological deficits. On evaluation, she was found to have CVT. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of CVT in APIGN. Identifying this complication is imperative, as timely diagnosis and treatment could be lifesaving. PMID:27194837

  13. Streptococcal Infection-related Nephritis (SIRN) Manifesting Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis Type I.

    PubMed

    Iseri, Ken; Iyoda, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Yasutaka; Kobayashi, Naoto; Oda, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Yutaka; Shibata, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the case of an 18-year-old boy who developed nephrotic syndrome and hypertension after upper airway inflammation. Post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis was diagnosed on the basis of a high antistreptolysin O titer, hypocomplementemia, proteinuria, and microscopic hematuria. A renal biopsy was performed due to persistent proteinuria, and the pathological diagnosis was membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) type I. Glomeruli showed positive staining for nephritis-associated plasmin receptor (NAPlr), a nephritogenic group A streptococcal antigen, and plasmin activity was found in a similar distribution as NAPlr deposition. This rare case of streptococcal infection-related nephritis (SIRN) manifesting MPGN type I supports the histological diversity of SIRN. PMID:26984084

  14. HBV-Associated Postinfectious Acute Glomerulonephritis: A Report of 10 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Junxia; Peng, Weihua; Yu, Guoqing; Wang, Liping; Chen, Jian; Zheng, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Postinfectious acute glomerulonephritis (PIGN) may occur after various bacterial and viral infections. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a cause of chronic glomerulonephritis. We report here 10 cases (ages 7–20 years-old) of chronic HBV carriers with acute glomerulonephritis, with positive glomerular staining of hepatitis B surface antigen, and detectable presence of HBV DNA in the glomeruli. This form of PIGN, HBV-PIGN, has not been previously identified. To further characterize clinical and pathological features of HBV- PIGN, we selected 10 cases of age-matched non-HBV PIGN for comparison. While both HBV associated PIGN and non-HBV PIGN similarly presented as proteinuria, hematuria, and hypertension, there was a trend of higher acute kidney injury and worsened prognosis in HBV-PIGN. 6 months after the onset, 4 patients with HBV associated PIGN did not show improvement from the disease, whereas all patients with non-HBV PIGN had complete or partial recovery. Pathologically, both HBV associated PIGN and non-HBV PIGN showed typical diffuse glomerular endocapillary proliferation, but HBV associated PIGN differed from classical PIGN with much fewer sub-epithelial glomerular “hump-shape” immune complex depositions. In conclusion, we have identified a novel association of HBV infection with acute glomerulonephritis. PMID:27512989

  15. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis

    MedlinePlus

    Membranoproliferative GN I; Membranoproliferative GN II; Mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis; Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis; Lobular GN; Glomerulonephritis - membranoproliferative; MPGN type I; MPGN type ...

  16. Coexistence of Acute Crescent Glomerulonephritis and IgG4-Related Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zeyuan; Yin, Jianyong; Bao, Hongda; Jiao, Qiong; Wu, Huijuan; Wu, Rui; Xue, Qin; Wang, Niansong; Zhang, Zhigang; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a fibroinflammatory disorder that may involve almost each organ or system. IgG4-related kidney disease (IgG4-RKD) refers to renal lesions associated with IgG4-RD. The most frequent morphological type of renal lesions is IgG4-related tubulointerstitial nephritis (IgG4-TIN) which is associated with increased IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration and interstitial fibrosis. Case Report Herein, we present a rare case with coexisting IgG4-RKD and acute crescent glomerulonephritis with concomitant severe tubulointerstitial lesions instead of classic IgG4-TIN. Conclusion IgG4-RKD and acute crescent glomerulonephritis can occur in the same patient. This case may give us a clearer viewpoint of the disease. PMID:27504450

  17. Acute glomerulonephritis in children of the Niger Delta region of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    McGil Ugwu, G I

    2015-09-01

    A three-year retrospective study was conducted to determine the incidence, pattern of presentation and other clinical and biochemical features as well as outcome of treatment of patients admitted with acute glomerulonephritis at the Delta State University Teaching Hospital, Oghara and GN Children's Clinic, Warri. The case notes of all the children who presented with renal diseases from January 2010 to December 2012 were retrieved and those with acute glomerulonephritis were analyzed. A total of 20 patients (13 male and seven female) with acute glomerulonephritis were seen during the three-year period under review. Twelve patients (60%) were from the low socioeconomic class, six (30%) from the middle class and only two (10%) were from the high-income group. The presentation of the illness was most common between October and January. The age range of the patients was three to 13 years, with an average age of eight years. Seventeen (85%) of the patients were in the school-going age group (>5 years to 10 years). The most common symptom/sign noted was anemia in 90% of the patients, followed by oliguria/anuria and edema seen in 80% of the patients. Seventy percent of the patients had cola-colored urine, while 55% had hypertension. Some patients gave a history suggestive of previous streptococcal infection. More patients had sore throat (25%) than skin infection (10%). All the patients had proteinuria, while 90% had hematuria. The most common complication was acute kidney injury, seen in eight (40%) of the patients, followed by hypertensive encephalopathy, which occurred in three (15%) patients. Most patients (60%) were hospitalized for one to two weeks. The outcome of the management of these patients showed 14 (70%) of the patients recovered fully while three (15%) had persistent hematuria and two (10%) had persistent proteinuria. Ninety-five percent of the patients recovered from the acute illness and one patient (5%), a boy aged nine years old, died. PMID:26354592

  18. IL-17 Expression in the Time Course of Acute Anti-Thy1 Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Loof, Tanja; Krämer, Stephanie; Gaedeke, Jens; Neumayer, Hans-Hellmut; Peters, Harm

    2016-01-01

    Background Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is a new pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in immune response and inflammatory disease. The main source of IL-17 is a subset of CD4+ T-helper cells, but is also secreted by non-immune cells. The present study analyzes expression of IL-17 in the time course of acute anti-thy1 glomerulonephritis and the role of IL-17 as a potential link between inflammation and fibrosis. Methods Anti-thy1 glomerulonephritis was induced into male Wistar rats by OX-7 antibody injection. After that, samples were taken on days 1, 5, 10 (matrix expansion phase), 15 and 20 (resolution phase). PBS-injected animals served as controls. Proteinuria and histological matrixes score served as the main markers for disease severity. In in vitro experiments, NRK-52E cells were used. For cytokine expressions, mRNA and protein levels were analyzed by utilizing RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence. Results Highest IL-17 mRNA-expression (6.50-fold vs. con; p<0.05) was found on day 5 after induction of anti-thy1 glomerulonephritis along the maximum levels of proteinuria (113 ± 13 mg/d; p<0.001), histological glomerular-matrix accumulation (82%; p<0.001) and TGF-β1 (2.2-fold; p<0.05), IL-6 mRNA expression (36-fold; p<0.05). IL-17 protein expression co-localized with the endothelial cell marker PECAM in immunofluorescence. In NRK-52E cells, co-administration of TGF-β1 and IL-6 synergistically up-regulated IL-17 mRNA 4986-fold (p<0.001). Conclusions The pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 is up-regulated in endothelial cells during the time course of acute anti-thy1 glomerulonephritis. In vitro, NRK-52E cells secrete IL-17 under pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory conditions. PMID:27243813

  19. Mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis with acute tubule interstitial nephritis leading to acute kidney injury in influenza A (H1N1) infection

    PubMed Central

    Kute, V. B.; Vanikar, A. V.; Shah, P. R.; Gumber, M. R.; Patel, H. V.; Trivedi, H. L.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory complications and renal failure are the leading causes for morbidity and mortality due to influenza (H1N1) virus infection. There has been limited information on histopathology of H1N1 influenza-related acute kidney injury (AKI). We describe AKI with H1N1 infection in a 52-year-old female. Renal biopsy showed mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis with acute tubule interstitial nephritis. Her condition improved rapidly with oseltamivir, fluid replacement, steroid and dialysis. Our case suggests that H1N1 infection may have a causative link to the development of mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis with acute tubulointerstitial nephritis. PMID:24701045

  20. Acute Glomerulonephritis in a Child with Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Falsaperla, Raffaele; Giunta, Leandra; Spataro, Giuseppina; Rapisarda, Venerando; Velardita, Mario; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Pavone, Piero

    2013-01-01

    Background. Infectious diseases seem to be an important and independent risk factor for renal failure, but the underlying mechanism of renal involvement during some kinds of infectious diseases is still unclear, even if the literature data report immunomediated and/or autoimmune mechanisms to explain the pathogenic relationship between the two diseases. In paediatric patients, Chlamydia pneumoniae is a rare cause of renal complications and it may manifest in several ways, mainly involving the respiratory system, even if also renal and glomerulalr complications, have been described. Case Diagnosis/Treatment. Herein we report a case of a 3-year-old child who developed an acute glomerulonephritis that was chronologically, clinically, and biologically related to a previous Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. On our knowledge, in the literature it is the youngest patient with renal involvement during course of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection ever reported. Conclusions. The present case supports the hypothesis of a rather close causal relationship between this infective agent and renal and glomerular symptoms occurred in this child, during an acute episode of respiratory disease. PMID:23970901

  1. Acute Glomerulonephritis in a Child with Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Vitaliti, Giovanna; Falsaperla, Raffaele; Giunta, Leandra; Spataro, Giuseppina; Rapisarda, Venerando; Velardita, Mario; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Pavone, Piero

    2013-01-01

    Background. Infectious diseases seem to be an important and independent risk factor for renal failure, but the underlying mechanism of renal involvement during some kinds of infectious diseases is still unclear, even if the literature data report immunomediated and/or autoimmune mechanisms to explain the pathogenic relationship between the two diseases. In paediatric patients, Chlamydia pneumoniae is a rare cause of renal complications and it may manifest in several ways, mainly involving the respiratory system, even if also renal and glomerulalr complications, have been described. Case Diagnosis/Treatment. Herein we report a case of a 3-year-old child who developed an acute glomerulonephritis that was chronologically, clinically, and biologically related to a previous Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. On our knowledge, in the literature it is the youngest patient with renal involvement during course of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection ever reported. Conclusions. The present case supports the hypothesis of a rather close causal relationship between this infective agent and renal and glomerular symptoms occurred in this child, during an acute episode of respiratory disease. PMID:23970901

  2. Focal mesangial-sclerosing glomerulonephritis and acute-spontaneous infectious canine hepatitis: structural, immunohistochemical and subcellular studies.

    PubMed

    Hervás, J; Gómez-Villamandos, J C; Pérez, J; Carrasco, L; Sierra, M A

    1997-06-01

    The glomerular alterations observed in a dog with acute spontaneous infectious canine hepatitis (ICH) are described. Histologic changes of the glomeruli were enlargement of the mesangium with presence of intranuclear inclusion bodies and without proliferation of mesangial cells. Electron microscopy revealed adenovirus replication sites in glomerular mesangial cells and in endothelial cells of glomerular capillaries, as well as a focal mesangial-sclerosing glomerulonephritis associated with electron dense deposits which were closely related with extracellular ICH viral particles and immunohistochemically reactive for immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgA, IgM and C3c complement components. PMID:9239835

  3. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  4. The Role of Nephritis-Associated Plasmin Receptor (NAPlr) in Glomerulonephritis Associated with Streptococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Takashi; Yoshizawa, Nobuyuki; Yamakami, Kazuo; Sakurai, Yutaka; Takechi, Hanako; Yamamoto, Kojiro; Oshima, Naoki; Kumagai, Hiroo

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that glomerulonephritis can occur after streptococcal infection, which is classically referred to as acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). The pathogenic mechanism of APSGN has been described by so-called immune complex theory, which involves glomerular deposition of nephritogenic streptococcal antigen and subsequent formation of immune complexes in situ and/or the deposition of circulating antigen-antibody complexes. However, the exact entity of the causative antigen has remained a matter of debate. We isolated a nephritogenic antigen for APSGN from the cytoplasmic fractions of group A streptococcus (GAS) depending on the affinity for IgG of APSGN patients. The amino acid and the nucleotide sequences of the isolated protein revealed to be highly identical to those of reported plasmin(ogen) receptor of GAS. Thus, we termed this antigen nephritis-associated plasmin receptor (NAPlr). Immunofluorescence staining of the renal biopsy tissues with anti-NAPlr antibody revealed glomerular NAPlr deposition in essentially all patients with early-phase APSGN. Furthermore, glomerular plasmin activity was detected by in situ zymography in the distribution almost identical to NAPlr deposition in renal biopsy tissues of APSGN patients. These data suggest that NAPlr has a direct, nonimmunologic function as a plasmin receptor and may contribute to the pathogenesis of APSGN by maintaining plasmin activity. PMID:23118507

  5. New trends of an old disease: the acute post infectious glomerulonephritis at the beginning of the new millenium.

    PubMed

    Stratta, Piero; Musetti, Claudio; Barreca, Antonella; Mazzucco, Gianna

    2014-06-01

    The association between acute renal disease and infection has been known since the mid '800s: acute post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) is a reactive immunological process against the kidney secondary to an infection, classically caused by a Streptococcus. The typical clinical presentation of PIGN is an acute nephritic syndrome with macro- or microscopic hematuria, proteinuria, hypertension, edema and renal function impairment of variable degree. The histology is characterized by an intracapillary glomerular proliferation, but may rarely be associated with an extracapillary proliferation. The classical childhood form is still present nowadays, even with severe cases, in developing countries, while in the last decades it almost disappeared in industrialized countries, where post-infectious GN are often found in elderly patients with multiple comorbidities. These clinical variants are usually related to other infective agents, like Staphylococcus aureus, both methicillin resistant (MRSA) and susceptible, and may be characterized by an IgA-dominant deposition. Kidney biopsy is rarely needed, especially in the child, while in the adult or old patient a biopsy is warranted if there is an atypical presentation or evolution, like rapidly progressive renal failure, absent or delayed function recovery, persisting low C3, nephrotic range proteinuria and persisting high proteinuria. Current therapy strategies rely on culture-guided systemic antibiotics, especially in the old patient, in which MRSA are relatively frequent, support therapy and only in very selected cases on steroids. These latter cases include the rare PIGN with crescents and those with a severe interstitial inflammation. PMID:24777751

  6. Temporal Changes in Post-Infectious Glomerulonephritis in Japan (1976-2009)

    PubMed Central

    Usui, Joichi; Tawara-Iida, Takashi; Takada, Kenji; Ebihara, Itaru; Ueda, Atsushi; Iwabuchi, Satoshi; Ishizu, Takashi; Iitsuka, Tadashi; Takemura, Katsumi; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Kaneko, Shuzo; Sakai, Kentaro; Kai, Hirayasu; Gomibuchi, Tomoka; Nagata, Michio; Kobayashi, Masaki; Koyama, Akio; Suka, Machi; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Yamagata, Kunihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) in developed countries has decreased over the last 50 years. Here we identified the trends of the incidence of PIGN in Japan during the past four decades. Methods We explored the frequency, clinicopathological findings, and prognosis of PIGN based on 6,369 cases from the Renal Biopsy Database of our institute in the Kanto region of Japan, diagnosed histologically from 1976 to 2009. Results The numbers of PIGN cases were 131 (2.1%) in total, and 2.4%, 1.1%, 2.6% and 2.1% identified in the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s, respectively. Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN), including post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN), accounted for almost all of the PIGN cases in the 1970s, but decreased to approx. 40%–50% since the 1990s. In the 1990s, Staphylococcus aureus infection-related nephritis (SARN) showed a rapid increase in rate, reaching 30%. The incidence of hepatitis C virus infection-associated GN (HCVGN) has increased since the 1990s. The average age at onset rose from 33 to 51 years over the study period. These transitions can be summarized as increases in SARN and HCVGN and decreases in PSGN and other types of AGN, since SARN and HCVGN have older onsets compared to PSGN and other AGN types. The clinicopathological features were marked for each PIGN. Regarding the prognosis, the renal death rates of both the SARN and HCVGN groups were significantly higher than those of other PIGN. Conclusion Based on our analysis of the Renal Biopsy Database, the incidence of PIGN in Japan reached its peak in the 1990s. The temporal changes in the incidence of PIGN reflected the trends in infectious diseases of each decade and the continual aging of the population, with a related higher susceptibility to infections. PMID:27286043

  7. Post-streptococcal reactive arthritis: where are we now.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Himanshu; Marshall, Tarnya

    2016-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with polyarthritis and constitutional symptoms, and a recent history of multiple tick bites and skin rash on trekking holiday. He did not respond to oral doxycycline and cephalexine for presumed Lyme's disease. Further investigation confirmed strongly positive streptococcal serology. There was absence of clinical or echocardiography evidence of heart involvement and immunological screening for inflammatory arthritis was negative. In the absence of other major Jones criteria for acute rheumatic fever, besides polyarthritis and the serological evidence of a recent streptococcal infection, a diagnosis of post-streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA) was also made. He responded well to penicillin therapy and has been started on oral penicillin prophylaxis as per available guidance. As streptococcal infections in the adult population are increasingly reported, it is a timely opportunity to revisit PSRA, and develop comprehensive treatment and antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines. PMID:27520996

  8. Post-streptococcal reactive arthritis: where are we now

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Himanshu; Marshall, Tarnya

    2016-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with polyarthritis and constitutional symptoms, and a recent history of multiple tick bites and skin rash on trekking holiday. He did not respond to oral doxycycline and cephalexine for presumed Lyme's disease. Further investigation confirmed strongly positive streptococcal serology. There was absence of clinical or echocardiography evidence of heart involvement and immunological screening for inflammatory arthritis was negative. In the absence of other major Jones criteria for acute rheumatic fever, besides polyarthritis and the serological evidence of a recent streptococcal infection, a diagnosis of post-streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA) was also made. He responded well to penicillin therapy and has been started on oral penicillin prophylaxis as per available guidance. As streptococcal infections in the adult population are increasingly reported, it is a timely opportunity to revisit PSRA, and develop comprehensive treatment and antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines. PMID:27520996

  9. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... and adolescents include: Hemolytic uremic syndrome Henoch-Schönlein purpura IgA nephropathy Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis Common causes in ... Heart failure - overview Hemolytic-uremic syndrome Henoch-Schönlein purpura Hepatitis High blood pressure Hypersensitivity vasculitis IgA nephropathy ...

  10. Recurrent Glomerulonephritis after Renal Transplantation: An Unsolved Problem

    PubMed Central

    Golgert, William A.; Appel, Gerald B.; Hariharan, Sundaram

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Despite advances in prevention of acute rejection and improved short- and long-term kidney graft survival, recurrent glomerulonephritis remains problematic and poorly characterized. This study analyzed prevalence and outcome of recurrent glomerulonephritis from various registries. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Definition, classification, and limitations in evaluating epidemiology of native and recurrent glomerulonephritis are discussed. Epidemiology of native glomerulonephritis as the cause of end-stage renal failure and subsequent recurrence of individual glomerulonephritis was evaluated using data from various registries, and pathogenesis of individual glomerulonephritis is discussed. Results: Analysis of data from transplant registries revealed that glomerulonephritis is an important cause of end-stage renal disease in white and pediatric recipients; however, glomerulonephritis as the cause of end-stage renal disease is not characterized well in black recipients, and many of them are perhaps labeled to have hypertensive nephrosclerosis as the cause of renal disease without renal biopsy. A systematic approach toward urinalysis after transplantation and utility of immunofluorescence and electron microscopic examination of renal biopsy tissues will identify the true prevalence of recurrent glomerulonephritis. Data on recurrent glomerulonephritis should be compiled by either using registry analysis or pooling data from multiple centers. This will provide true data on prevalence and outcome and could potentially initiate translational research studies. Conclusions: The understanding of the pathogenesis of recurrent glomerulonephritis is critical to optimize prevention as well as to treat individual recurrent glomerulonephritis, which can enhance long-term graft survival. PMID:18272827

  11. Granulomatous uveitis and reactive arthritis as manifestations of post-streptococcal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abderrahim, Kais; Chebil, Ahmed; Falfoul, Yosra; Bouladi, Mejda; El Matri, Leila

    2015-10-01

    To report a case of bilateral granulomatous post-streptococcal syndrome uveitis in association with reactive arthritis as manifestation of post-streptococcal syndrome. To our knowledge, this could represent the first reported case in the literature. A 9-year-old girl, with no past ocular history, presented with a 5-day history of bilateral blurred vision, red eyes, photophobia and walking difficulties because of a right ankle pain. Ophthalmic examination disclosed a visual acuity limited to hand motion, mutton-fat keratic precipitates, anterior chamber cells and posterior synechiae in both eyes. Ocular pressure was normal. Physical examination showed a fever (38 °C), inflammatory ankle arthritis and scarlet fever (streptococcal lesion). Anti-streptococcal lysine O titer was 419 μ/ml. The patient was treated with topical steroids, cycloplegics, high-dose oral steroids and preventive course of penicillin with total improvement and no recurrence. Post-streptococcal syndrome should be considered in the etiology of acute bilateral granulomatous uveitis in children, and anti-streptococcal lysine O titer should be considered in serodiagnostic testing. PMID:22986580

  12. Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B antibodies in a mouse model of glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Y-H; Kuo, C-F; Huang, K-J; Wu, J-J; Lei, H-Y; Lin, M T; Chuang, W-J; Liu, C-C; Lin, C-F; Lin, Y-S

    2007-09-01

    Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B is an extracellular cysteine protease. Only nephritis-associated strains of group A streptococci secrete this protease and this may be involved in the pathogenesis of post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Mice were actively immunized with a recombinant protease inactive exotoxin B mutant or passively immunized with exotoxin B antibody. Characteristics of glomerulonephritis were measured using histology, immunoglobulin deposition, complement activation, cell infiltration, and proteinuria. None of the mice given bovine serum albumin or exotoxin A as controls showed any marked changes. Immunoglobulin deposition, complement activation, and leukocyte infiltration occurred only in the glomeruli of exotoxin B-hyperimmunized mice. One particular anti-exotoxin B monoclonal antibody, 10G, was cross-reactive with kidney endothelial cells and it caused kidney injury and proteinuria when infused into mice. This cross-reactivity may be involved in the pathogenesis of glomerulonephritis following group A streptococcal infection. PMID:17637712

  13. Acute tubular necrosis as a part of vancomycin induced drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome with coincident postinfectious glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Min; Sung, Kyoung; Yang, Hea Koung; Kim, Seong Heon; Kim, Hye Young; Ban, Gil Ho; Park, Su Eun; Lee, Hyoung Doo

    2016-01-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a rare and potentially fatal condition characterized by skin rash, fever, eosinophilia, and multiorgan involvement. Various drugs may be associated with this syndrome including carbamazepine, allopurinol, and sulfasalazine. Renal involvement in DRESS syndrome most commonly presents as acute kidney injury due to interstitial nephritis. An 11-year-old boy was referred to the Children's Hospital of Pusan National University because of persistent fever, rash, abdominal distension, generalized edema, lymphadenopathy, and eosinophilia. He previously received vancomycin and ceftriaxone for 10 days at another hospital. He developed acute kidney injury with nephrotic range proteinuria and hypocomplementemia. A subsequent renal biopsy indicated the presence of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) and late exudative phase of postinfectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN). Systemic symptoms and renal function improved with corticosteroid therapy after the discontinuation of vancomycin. Here, we describe a biopsy-proven case of severe ATN that manifested as a part of vancomycin-induced DRESS syndrome with coincident PIGN. It is important for clinicians to be aware of this syndrome due to its severity and potentially fatal nature. PMID:27186222

  14. Adalimumab (TNFα Inhibitor) Therapy Exacerbates IgA Glomerulonephritis Acute Renal Injury and Induces Lupus Autoantibodies in a Psoriasis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Wei, S. S.; Sinniah, R.

    2013-01-01

    Adalimumab (Humira) is a tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, Crohn's disease, ankylosing spondylitis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (Sullivan and Preda (2009), Klinkhoff (2004), and Medicare Australia). Use of TNFα inhibitors is associated with the induction of autoimmunity (systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitis, and sarcoidosis or sarcoid-like granulomas) (Ramos-Casals et al. (2010)). We report a patient with extensive psoriasis presenting with renal failure and seropositive lupus markers without classical lupus nephritis after 18 months treatment with adalimumab. He has renal biopsy proven IgA nephritis instead. Renal biopsy is the key diagnostic tool in patients presenting with adalimumab induced nephritis and renal failure. He made a remarkable recovery after adalimumab cessation and steroid treatment. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of a psoriasis patient presenting with seropositive lupus markers without classical lupus nephritis renal failure and had renal biopsy proven IgA glomerulonephritis after receiving adalimumab. PMID:24558628

  15. Post-streptococcal autoimmune disorders of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Dale, Russell C

    2005-11-01

    Group A Streptococcus can induce autoimmune disease in humans with particular involvement of the heart, joints, and brain. The spectrum of post-streptococcal disease of the central nervous system (CNS) has been widened recently and includes movement disorders (chorea, tics, dystonia, and Parkinsonism), psychiatric disorders (particularly emotional disorders), and associated sleep disorders. Neuroimaging and pathological studies indicate that the most vulnerable brain region is the basal ganglia. The immunopathogenesis of the disease is incompletely defined, and although there is some support for autoantibody-mediated disease, several conflicting studies cast doubt on the autoantibody hypothesis. It has been speculated that post-streptococcal autoimmunity has a role in common neuropsychiatric disease but the evidence is conflicting and routine screening of patients with Tourette syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder for post-streptococcal autoimmune abnormalities is not be recommended at present. However, post-streptococcal disorders of the CNS remain a useful model of neuropsychiatric disease, which may improve our understanding of abnormal movements and behaviours in children. PMID:16225745

  16. [Glomerulonephritis in dogs and cats].

    PubMed

    Reinacher, M; Frese, K

    1991-04-01

    Immunohistology and special staining of plastic sections allow diagnosis and differentiation of subtypes of glomerulonephritis in dogs. Frequency and clinical importance of these forms of glomerulonephritis vary significantly. In cats, glomerulonephritis occurs frequently in FIV-positive cats but is rare in animals suffering from persistent FeLV infection or FIP. PMID:2068715

  17. Factor VIII and glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, M; Nilsson, I M

    1975-05-17

    To find out if determination of factor VIII,which most probably is synthetised in the intima of blood-vessesls, is of value for predicting the severity of vessel damge in glomerulonephritis, factor-VIII activity, factor-VIII-related antigen, and glomerular filtration-ratewere esto,ated om 85 patients with early glomerulonephritis on admission, and in 70 of these at follow-up for up to 4 years. The levels of factor-VIII activity and factor-VIII-related antigen on admission were normal in those patients who recovered. Where renal function was impaired on admission or becaome so during follow-up, factor VIII was high. Determination of factor VIII might thus be of prognostic value in early glomerulonephritis. PMID:49471

  18. Update on endocarditis-associated glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Boils, Christie L; Nasr, Samih H; Walker, Patrick D; Couser, William G; Larsen, Christopher P

    2015-06-01

    Glomerulonephritis (GN) due to infective endocarditis (IE) is well documented, but most available data are based on old autopsy series. To update information, we now present the largest biopsy-based clinicopathologic series on IE-associated GN. The study group included 49 patients (male-to-female ratio of 3.5:1) with a mean age of 48 years. The most common presenting feature was acute kidney injury. Over half of the patients had no known prior cardiac abnormality. However, the most common comorbidities were cardiac valve disease (30%), intravenous drug use (29%), hepatitis C (20%), and diabetes (18%). The cardiac valve infected was tricuspid in 43%, mitral in 33%, and aortic in 29% of patients. The two most common infective bacteria were Staphylococcus (53%) and Streptococcus (23%). Hypocomplementemia was found in 56% of patients tested and ANCA antibody in 28%. The most common biopsy finding was necrotizing and crescentic GN (53%), followed by endocapillary proliferative GN (37%). C3 deposition was prominent in all cases, whereas IgG deposition was seen in <30% of cases. Most patients had immune deposits detectable by electron microscopy. Thus, IE-associated GN most commonly presents with AKI and complicates staphylococcal tricuspid valve infection. Contrary to infection-associated glomerulonephritis in general, the most common pattern of glomerular injury in IE-associated glomerulonephritis was necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis. PMID:25607109

  19. Neutrophils: game changers in glomerulonephritis?

    PubMed Central

    Mayadas, Tanya N.; Rosetti, Florencia; Ernandez, Thomas; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2010-01-01

    Glomerulonephritides represent a diverse array of diseases that have in common immune cell-mediated effector mechanisms that cause organ damage. The contribution of neutrophils to the pathogenesis of proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) is not well recognized. Most equate neutrophils with killing pathogens and causing collateral tissue damage during acute inflammation. However, these phagocytes are endowed with additional characteristics that have been traditionally reserved for cells of the adaptive immune system. They communicate with other cells, exhibit plasticity in their responses and have the potential to coordinate and inform the subsequent immune response, thus countering the notion that they arrive, destroy and then disappear. Therefore, neutrophils, which are the first to arrive at a site of inflammation, are potential game changers in GN. PMID:20667782

  20. Streptococcal acute pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Anjos, Lais Martins Moreira; Marcondes, Mariana Barros; Lima, Mariana Ferreira; Mondelli, Alessandro Lia; Okoshi, Marina Politi

    2014-07-01

    Acute pharyngitis/tonsillitis, which is characterized by inflammation of the posterior pharynx and tonsils, is a common disease. Several viruses and bacteria can cause acute pharyngitis; however, Streptococcus pyogenes (also known as Lancefield group A β-hemolytic streptococci) is the only agent that requires an etiologic diagnosis and specific treatment. S. pyogenes is of major clinical importance because it can trigger post-infection systemic complications, acute rheumatic fever, and post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Symptom onset in streptococcal infection is usually abrupt and includes intense sore throat, fever, chills, malaise, headache, tender enlarged anterior cervical lymph nodes, and pharyngeal or tonsillar exudate. Cough, coryza, conjunctivitis, and diarrhea are uncommon, and their presence suggests a viral cause. A diagnosis of pharyngitis is supported by the patient's history and by the physical examination. Throat culture is the gold standard for diagnosing streptococcus pharyngitis. However, it has been underused in public health services because of its low availability and because of the 1- to 2-day delay in obtaining results. Rapid antigen detection tests have been used to detect S. pyogenes directly from throat swabs within minutes. Clinical scoring systems have been developed to predict the risk of S. pyogenes infection. The most commonly used scoring system is the modified Centor score. Acute S. pyogenes pharyngitis is often a self-limiting disease. Penicillins are the first-choice treatment. For patients with penicillin allergy, cephalosporins can be an acceptable alternative, although primary hypersensitivity to cephalosporins can occur. Another drug option is the macrolides. Future perspectives to prevent streptococcal pharyngitis and post-infection systemic complications include the development of an anti-Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine. PMID:25229278

  1. Hypercoagulation in glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Salem, H H; Whitworth, J A; Koutts, J; Kincaid-Smith, P S; Firkin, B G

    1981-01-01

    The clotting values of 50 patients with glomerulonephritis were examined. Three different coagulation groups were recognised: those with normal clotting values (group 1); those with high concentrations of factor VIII but otherwise normal clotting results (group 2); and patients who showed the presence of an activator of the intrinsic coagulation pathway, indicated by the presence of a short activated partial thromboplastin time or the ability of patients' plasma to shorten control clotting time in mixing studies (group 3). Patients in group 2 either had a uniform rise in all three components of the factor VIII molecule or a disproportionately higher concentration of factor-VIII-related antigen. In contrast, the level of VIII clotting activity in patients in group 3 was always higher than concentrations of either VIIIAg or VIIIWF. A significantly high incidence of thrombotic complications was observed in patients with group 3 but in none of the patients in either group 1 or group 2. Impaired renal function was more common in patients in groups 2 and 3, with higher mean serum creatinine concentrations in those with group 3. Patients with glomerulonephritis who have a short partial thromboplastin time with kaolin or who shorten control clotting time form a subgroup in whom hypercoagulation could adversely affect the course of their disease. The value of antiplatelet or anticoagulant treatment in these patients needs to be explored. PMID:6788212

  2. Cryoglobulinemic Glomerulonephritis as a Presentation of Atypical Post-Infectious Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Boumitri, Christine; Haddad, Fady G.; Rondla, Chetana; El-Sayegh, Suzanne; El-Charabaty, Elie

    2016-01-01

    Post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) usually occurs within few days to weeks following an infection. Clinical presentation is variable, but in general, it is considered a benign entity with good prognosis. It rarely requires kidney biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. We present a case of a 55-year-old, previously healthy, male who presented for worsening shortness of breath, persistent cough, and right-sided pleuritic chest pain. Initial workup revealed a right exudative effusion with empyema. Hospital course was complicated by acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy with a peak creatinine of 10.2 mg/dL from a baseline of 1.18 mg/dL. On kidney biopsy, findings were compatible with a diagnosis of cryoglobulinemic glomerulonephritis or an atypical form of PIGN. While a wide variety of histopathological findings on renal biopsies have been described to complement the usual diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis pattern, cryoglobulinemic features with negative cryoglobulin have never been reported. Our case is unique not only by having an atypical histological presentation but also by meeting the criteria of atypical PIGN with persistent hypertension and microscopic hematuria. PMID:26668683

  3. Hypertension in Chronic Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Ihm, Chun-Gyoo

    2015-12-01

    Chronic glomerulonephritis (GN), which includes focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and proliferative forms of GN such as IgA nephropathy, increases the risk of hypertension. Hypertension in chronic GN is primarily volume dependent, and this increase in blood volume is not related to the deterioration of renal function. Patients with chronic GN become salt sensitive as renal damage including arteriolosclerosis progresses and the consequent renal ischemia causes the stimulation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system(RAAS). Overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system also contributes to hypertension in chronic GN. According to the KDIGO guideline, the available evidence indicates that the target BP should be ≤140mmHg systolic and ≤90mmHg diastolic in chronic kidney disease patients without albuminuria. In most patients with an albumin excretion rate of ≥30mg/24 h (i.e., those with both micro-and macroalbuminuria), a lower target of ≤130mmHg systolic and ≤80mmHg diastolic is suggested. The use of agents that block the RAAS system is recommended or suggested in all patients with an albumin excretion rate of ≥30mg/ 24 h. The combination of a RAAS blockade with a calcium channel blocker and a diuretic may be effective in attaining the target BP, and in reducing the amount of urinary protein excretion in patients with chronic GN. PMID:26848302

  4. Comparative pathology of glomerulonephritis in animals.

    PubMed

    Slauson, D O; Lewis, R M

    1979-03-01

    Glomerulonephritis constitutes an important category of renal diseases in animals and has been recognized with increasing frequency in the last decade. We report here the comparative morphologic aspects of glomerulonephritis as a naturally occurring disease of animals. We briefly review the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritis. The morphology of renal lesions occurring in glomerulonephritis in dogs, cats, cattle, sheep, horses and swine has been reviewed with emphasis on the range and specificity of various glomerular lesions and on the comparison of lesions between various species. A distinction was made between glomerulonephritis as a primary disease entity and glomerulonephritis associated with other disease processes. Primary idiopathic glomerulonephritis occurred in all species but was most commonly recognized as a clinically important disease in dogs and cats. Glomerulonephritis also occurred in association with other diseases such as equine infectious anemia, chronic hog cholera, canine pyometra, dirofilariasis, feline leukemia virus infection and canine systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:442447

  5. From juvenile parkinsonism to encephalitis lethargica, a new phenotype of post-streptococcal disorders: case report.

    PubMed

    Beleza, Pedro; Soares-Fernandes, João; Jordão, Maria J; Almeida, Fátima

    2008-11-01

    We report the case of a 16-year-old boy presented with a mild akinetic-rigid parkinsonism shortly after a post-streptococcal infection. After stopping corticoids, he had a rapid neurological deterioration to a fatal encephalitis lethargica-like syndrome. Serum analysis demonstrated consistently elevated anti-streptolysin-O. This case illustrates a new severe phenotype in the spectrum of the post-streptococcal disorders. This etiology should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a movement disorder with a rapid detrimental evolution. PMID:18221898

  6. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with essential cryoglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Satish, S.; Rajesh, R.; George, K.; Elango, E. M.; Unni, V. N.

    2008-01-01

    Cryoglobulinemia is an uncommon cause of renal disease and often occurs in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We report a case of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in a patient with cryoglobulinemia, which was not associated with HCV infection or any identifiable etiology. PMID:20142909

  7. Protracted Clinical Course of Postinfectious Glomerulonephritis in a Previously Healthy Child

    PubMed Central

    Grøndahl, Camilla; Rittig, Søren; Povlsen, Johan Vestergaard; Kamperis, Kostantinos

    2016-01-01

    Acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) affects children typically after upper respiratory tract or skin infections with streptococci but can complicate the course of other infections. In children, it is generally a self-limiting disease with excellent prognosis. This paper reports a previously healthy 4-year-old boy who experienced a protracted course of PIGN with persisting episodes of gross haematuria, proteinuria, decreased complement C3c levels but normal P-creatinine levels. Due to the protracted course and the nephrotic-range proteinuria, a renal biopsy was performed 6 months after the initial presentation and the overall pathology was consistent with acute endocapillary glomerulonephritis. PMID:27226969

  8. [Hypertension and primary glomerulonephritis in adults. A study of 302 cases].

    PubMed

    Seba, A; Rayane, T; Kaci, L; Haddoum, F; Benabadji, M

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of the present work was to show the place of hypertension in primary glomerulonephritis in adults. Hypertension was defined as diastolic blood pressure above 90 mmHg and renal insufficiency as serum creatinine above 135 mc mol/L. Secondary glomerulonephritis was excluded. The study was performed in 302 patients with primary glomerulonephritis biopsied between March 1994 and March 1996. They were 183 males and 119 females, aged from 16 to 63 years (mean: 29.8 years). The incidence of hypertension at the time of admission was 46.6%: 141/302 cases. The only consideration of prolonged hypertension (excluded transient hypertension of acute nephritic syndrome) shows an incidence of 31.4%: 95/302 cases (table). Frequency of hypertension (HT) in different types of primary glomerulonephritis (GN): [table: see text] The histological types observed in these cases of hypertension were represented essentially by the proliferative lesions: 73% (72/95 cases) who were grouped mainly in proliferative glomerulonephritis postinfectious and IgA nephropathy. No proliferative lesions: 24% (23/95 cases) were especially represented by focal segmental sclerosis. Renal insufficiency noted in 69 cases on 95 hypertensions was probably the result of the parallel evolution of hypertension renal lesions and those belonging to these histologic types. In conclusion, this study shows a narrow correlation between the hypertension and proliferative glomerulonephritis in our young adults population. PMID:9404432

  9. Post-streptococcal 'complex' movement disorders: unusual concurrence of psychogenic and organic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Squintani, Giovanna; Tinazzi, Michele; Gambarin, Mattia; Bravi, Elena; Moretto, Giuseppe; Buttiglione, Maura; Defazio, Giovanni; Martino, Davide

    2010-01-15

    Post-streptococcal neuropsychiatric disorders encompass a broad spectrum of movement disorders, including tics, stereotypies, dystonia and tremor. We report the case of a 15-year-old boy who presented with a relapsing-remitting combination of psychogenic and organic movement disorders. Both relapses occurred after an episode of streptococcal pharyngitis and consisted in motor and phonic tics, an atypical gait disorder, and severe worsening of a pre-existing psychogenic tremor of the right hand. After each relapse, both psychogenic and 'organic' symptoms concomitantly remitted after the administration of an association of oral steroids and antibiotics. The peculiarity of this case consists in the coexistence of psychogenic and organic symptoms subsequent to streptococcal infection, and broadens the clinical spectrum of post-streptococcal neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:19896680

  10. Haematuria on the Spanish Registry of Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Yuste, Claudia; Rivera, Francisco; Moreno, Juan Antonio; López-Gómez, Juan Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest a pathogenic role for glomerular haematuria among renal function. However, there is no data on the prevalence of haematuria from a large renal biopsy registry. We analysed the prevalence of gross (GH) and microscopic (mH) haematuria in 19,895 patients that underwent native renal biopsies from the Spanish Registry of Glomerulonephritis. Haematuria’s overall incidence was 63% (GH 8.6% and mH 55.1%), being more frequent in males (64.7% vs. 62.4%). GH was more prevalent in patients <18 years (21.3% vs. 7.7%). The commonest clinical presentation associated with GH was acute kidney injury (31.5%) and IgA Nephropathy (IgAN) (33.6%) was the most frequent histological finding. GH patients showed a significantly (p < 0.05) lower eGFR and proteinuria levels as compared with patients with mH and without haematuria. Moreover, mH was more prevalent in adults (56.3%). Nephrotic syndrome was the commonest clinical presentation in mH patients (32.2%) and IgAN (18.5%) the most frequent histological finding. In conclusion, haematuria, is a frequent urinalysis finding in patients underwent native renal biopsy. The most frequent histological finding in both GH and mH is IgAN. Whereas, GH is more frequent in young males with acute kidney injury, mH is commoner among adults with nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26818712

  11. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome presenting with glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Kanegane, Hirokazu; Vilela, Maria Marluce dos Santos; Wang, Yue; Futatani, Takeshi; Matsukura, Hiroyoshi; Miyawaki, Toshio

    2003-05-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized clinically by chronic non-malignant lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity and is caused by a genetic defect in programmed cell death (apoptosis). Most patients with ALPS have heterozygous mutations in the Fas gene. We describe an 11-year-old Brazilian boy with hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, hemolytic anemia, and hypergammaglobulinemia since early infancy. T cell lines from the patient were defective in Fas-mediated apoptosis. He was diagnosed as having ALPS and found to have a novel Fas gene mutation (IVS4+1G>A). In addition, he presented with glomerulonephritis in infancy. An aunt and uncle who had the same Fas mutations also had histories of glomerulonephritis. Although glomerulonephritis is common in Fas-deficient mice, it is infrequent in human ALPS. Corticosteroid therapy ameliorated the glomerulonephritis in our patient, as well as his lymphoproliferation, anemia, and hypergammaglobulinemia. This study suggests that glomerulonephritis is one of the characteristic features of ALPS. PMID:12736807

  12. Membranous glomerulonephritis: a morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Paraskevakou, H; Kavantzas, N; Pavlopoulos, P M; Voudiklari, S; Zerefos, N; Papagalanis, N; Davaris, P

    2000-01-01

    Archival material from 45 renal biopsies with a diagnosis of idiopathic membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) were studied by computer-aided image analysis in order to evaluate the prognostic significance of glomerular and interstitial morphometry in MGN. The control group consisted of thirty seven normal renal biopsy specimens. The surface area, the perimeter, the major axis length and the shape factor of renal glomeruli as well as the percentage of the interstitial fibrosis were measured. All the morphometric parameters related to the size of glomeruli had significantly higher values in the patient group (p = 0.000 for all the parameters). However, no significant difference of the glomerular size between different stages of MGN was observed. In contrast, the percentage of interstitial fibrosis increased as the MGN stage rose (median values: 10.3% in stage 1, 14.2% in stage II, 26.9% in stage III, 28.9% in stage IV and 34.2% in stage V, Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA H = 37.645, p = 0.000). In the multivariate analysis the percentage of interstitial fibrosis was the only independent prognostic factor (p = 0.013). Our findings suggest that, in membraneous glomerulonephritis, the interstitial fibrosis increases as the MGN stage progresses, while the size of renal glomeruli has increased at a very early stage of the disease. This fact may indicate that interstitial fibrosis, not glomerular lesions, is mainly responsible for the reduction of renal function. PMID:10729917

  13. Glomerulonephritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... seen, including: Nerve inflammation (polyneuropathy) Signs of fluid overload, including abnormal heart and lung sounds Swelling ( edema ) ... to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A. ...

  14. Glomerulonephritis associated with arteritis in marmosets infected with hepatitis A virus.

    PubMed Central

    Morita, M.; Kitajima, K.; Yoshizawa, H.; Itoh, Y.; Iwakiri, S.; Shibata, C.; Mayumi, M.

    1981-01-01

    Seven of 8 marmosets (Saguinus oedipus and Saguinus labiatus) injected i.v. with different inocula of hepatitis A virus isolated from patients in the acute phase of disease developed proliferative glomerulonephritis associated with arteritis. The glomerulonephritis was characterized by immunofluorescent and electron-dense deposits and hypercellularity. Although no antigenic component of the glomerular immune complex was detected, this glomerulonephritis and arteritis may be diagnosed morphologically as an immune complex disease. These findings show the possibility of the appearance of exohepatic disease as an immunologically mediated disease in human hepatitis A virus infection. Images Figs. 2-5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Figs. 10-15 Figs. 16-18 PMID:6452891

  15. Gastric Syphilis and Membranous Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Roh, Min; Sohn, Joo Hyun; Kim, Tae Yeob; Kim, Sung Jong; Kim, Ji Soong; Chung, Sung Jun; Pyo, Ju Yeon; Oh, Young-Ha

    2015-05-01

    Syphilis is a chronic systemic infectious disease caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum. Gastric involvement and nephrotic syndrome are uncommon but well documented complications of syphilis, but the co-occurrence of these two complications in the same patient is extremely rare. Thus, because of their nonspecific presentation, suspicion of gastric syphilis (GS) and nephrotic syndrome is essential for diagnosis. Patients should be investigated thoroughly and a diagnosis made based on clinical, endoscopic, and histological findings, in order to initiate appropriate therapy. We report of a 34-year-old male patient with a history of epigastric pain and a diagnosis of GS and syphilis-associated membranous glomerulonephritis confirmed by gastroscopy and kidney biopsy, who was treated successfully with penicillin G benzathine. This case report provides information on the typical features of GS that should help raise awareness of this rare disease entity among clinicians, resulting in earlier diagnosis and administration of appropriate therapy. PMID:26064828

  16. Gastric Syphilis and Membranous Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Min; Kim, Tae Yeob; Kim, Sung Jong; Kim, Ji Soong; Chung, Sung Jun; Pyo, Ju Yeon; Oh, Young-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis is a chronic systemic infectious disease caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum. Gastric involvement and nephrotic syndrome are uncommon but well documented complications of syphilis, but the co-occurrence of these two complications in the same patient is extremely rare. Thus, because of their nonspecific presentation, suspicion of gastric syphilis (GS) and nephrotic syndrome is essential for diagnosis. Patients should be investigated thoroughly and a diagnosis made based on clinical, endoscopic, and histological findings, in order to initiate appropriate therapy. We report of a 34-year-old male patient with a history of epigastric pain and a diagnosis of GS and syphilis-associated membranous glomerulonephritis confirmed by gastroscopy and kidney biopsy, who was treated successfully with penicillin G benzathine. This case report provides information on the typical features of GS that should help raise awareness of this rare disease entity among clinicians, resulting in earlier diagnosis and administration of appropriate therapy. PMID:26064828

  17. Neuronal surface glycolytic enzymes are autoantigen targets in post-streptococcal autoimmune CNS disease.

    PubMed

    Dale, Russell C; Candler, Paul M; Church, Andrew J; Wait, Robin; Pocock, Jennifer M; Giovannoni, Gavin

    2006-03-01

    Infection with the Group A Streptococcus (GAS) can result in immune mediated brain disease characterised by a spectrum of movement and psychiatric disorders. We have previously described anti-neuronal antibodies in patients that bind to a restricted group of brain antigens with molecular weights 40 kDa, 45 kDa (doublet) and 60 kDa. The aim of this study was to define these antigens using 2-dimensional electrophoresis or ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, followed by mass spectrometry. The findings were confirmed using commercial antibodies, commercial antigens and recombinant human antigens. The autoantigens were neuronal glycolytic enzymes--NGE (pyruvate kinase M1, aldolase C, neuronal-specific and non-neuronal enolase). These are multifunctional proteins that are all expressed intracellularly and on the neuronal cell surface. On the neuronal plasma membrane, NGE are involved in energy metabolism, cell signalling and synaptic neurotransmission. Anti-NGE antibodies were more common in the 20 unselected post-streptococcal CNS patients compared to 20 controls. In vitro experiments using cultured neurons showed that commercial anti-NGE antibodies induced apoptosis compared to blank incubation and control anti-HuD antibody. GAS also expresses glycolytic enzymes on cell surfaces that have 0-49% identity with human NGE, suggesting molecular mimicry and autoimmune cross-reactivity may be the pathogenic mechanism in post-streptococcal CNS disease. PMID:16356555

  18. Crescentic Glomerulonephritis Associated with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Vanikar, A.V.; Patel, R.D.; Suthar, K. S.; Trivedi, H. L.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis of kidney and urinary tract is caused by members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Kidney is usually infected by haematogenous spread of bacilli from focus of infection in the lungs. Glomerular involvement in tuberculosis presenting as a rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis is a rare entity. We report a rare case of crescentic glomerulonephritis associated with pulmonary tuberculosis in a 26-year-old man. Patient was treated with corticosteroids, haemodialysis, intravenous immunoglobulin and four cycles of plasmapheresis. He did not respond to 4-drug anti-tuberculosis treatment for renal pathology and was switched over to maintenance haemodialysis. However, he responded to pulmonary TB. PMID:26894074

  19. Paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia, post-streptococcal syndromes and psychogenic movement disorders: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Peila, Elena; Mortara, Paolo; Cicerale, Alessandro; Pinessi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 15-year-old boy presenting with sudden attacks of hyperkinetic movements of the limbs, trunk and neck. Clinical features were suggestive of paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia, but the elevated antistreptolysin O antibody titre and history of recurrent upper airways infection led us to consider a post-streptococcal syndrome as a possible diagnosis. The patient started therapy with benzathine penicillin, sodium valproate and clonazepam without any significant improvement. A successive psychiatric assessment revealed the presence of a psychogenic movement disorder. Psychodynamic psychotherapy and individual counselling were started with progressive improvement of psychological symptoms and gradual resolution of hyperkinetic episodes, without any recurrence recorded during the follow-up (10 months). PMID:25795754

  20. Monoclonal immunoglobulin G1-kappa fibrillary glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Grove, P; Neale, P H; Peck, M; Schiller, B; Haas, M

    1998-01-01

    We report here a case of fibrillary glomerulonephritis arising in a 43-year-old man with a polyclonal gammopathy, who presented with progressive renal insufficiency, microscopic hematuria, and mild proteinuria (0.7 g/d). Ultrastructural studies showed deposits of randomly oriented fibrils in the glomerular mesangium and adjacent portions of some glomerular basement membranes, with a mean fibril thickness of 14.3 nm, highly consistent with fibrillary glomerulonephritis. The Congo red stain was negative on histologic sections. Immunofluorescence studies revealed strong mesangial and focal glomerular capillary staining for immunoglobulin (Ig) G, complement (C) 3, and kappa light chains, with minimal staining for IgA, IgM, C1q, or lambda light chains. The IgG present was entirely of the IgG1 subclass. This case is quite unusual for fibrillary glomerulonephritis, which typically presents with polyclonal IgG deposits and IgG4 as the dominant IgG subclass present. Monoclonal deposits are more frequently associated with immunotactoid glomerulopathy, characterized ultrastructurally by microtubule-like structures 30 to 50 nmn thick, often in parallel arrays. The present case illustrates that although fibrillary glomerulonephritis and immunotactoid glomerulopathy might be distinguishable on ultrastructural grounds, there is overlap between these two entities with respect to the potential composition of the glomerular deposits present. PMID:9556416

  1. Clinical, Pathological, and Prognostic Characteristics of Glomerulonephritis Related to Staphylococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Si-Yang; Bu, Ru; Zhang, Qi; Liang, Shuang; Wu, Jie; Liu, Xue-Guang Zhang Shu-Wen; Cai, Guang-Yan; Chen, Xiang-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Staphylococcal infection has become a common cause of postinfectious glomerulonephritis in the past 3 decades. Because few investigations focus on this disease, the demographics and clinicopathological features of glomerulonephritis related to staphylococcal infection are not well characterized. We conducted a pooled analysis of published literature in electronic databases and analyzed the clinical features, laboratory findings, and histopathological changes. The patients were divided into 4 groups based on their prognosis: remission, persistent renal dysfunction, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), or death. A logistic regression model was used to identify the determinants of disease outcome. A total of 83 (64 men) patients with glomerulonephritis related to staphylococcal infection from 31 reports were analyzed. The mean age was 58 years (58 ± 17). Majority of the reports originated from Taiwan, Japan, and the United States. Clinical characteristics of the cases were hematuria (82/83), proteinuria (78/83), and acute kidney injury (75/83). Visceral abscesses (26/83) and skin infections (24/83) were the common sites of infection. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen. The dominant or codominant deposition of IgA or C3 along the glomeruli was an important feature identified by immunofluorescence. There were 19 patients (22.9%) that progressed to dialysis-dependent ESRD. Twelve patients (14.5%) died. A univariate regression analysis indicated that diabetes mellitus (DM) (odds ratio [OR] 2.96; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03–8.48; P = 0.04) and age (OR 4.80; 95% CI 1.84–12.53; P = 0.001) were risk factors for ESRD or death. A multivariate regression analysis also revealed that age (OR 4.90; 95% CI 1.82–13.18; P = 0.002) and DM (OR 3.07; 95% CI 0.98–9.59; P = 0.05) were independent risk factors for unfavorable prognosis. Glomerulonephritis related to staphylococcal infection has different features

  2. Clinical, Pathological, and Prognostic Characteristics of Glomerulonephritis Related to Staphylococcal Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si-Yang; Bu, Ru; Zhang, Qi; Liang, Shuang; Wu, Jie; Liu, Xue-Guang Zhang Shu-Wen; Cai, Guang-Yan; Chen, Xiang-Mei

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcal infection has become a common cause of postinfectious glomerulonephritis in the past 3 decades. Because few investigations focus on this disease, the demographics and clinicopathological features of glomerulonephritis related to staphylococcal infection are not well characterized.We conducted a pooled analysis of published literature in electronic databases and analyzed the clinical features, laboratory findings, and histopathological changes. The patients were divided into 4 groups based on their prognosis: remission, persistent renal dysfunction, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), or death. A logistic regression model was used to identify the determinants of disease outcome.A total of 83 (64 men) patients with glomerulonephritis related to staphylococcal infection from 31 reports were analyzed. The mean age was 58 years (58 ± 17). Majority of the reports originated from Taiwan, Japan, and the United States. Clinical characteristics of the cases were hematuria (82/83), proteinuria (78/83), and acute kidney injury (75/83). Visceral abscesses (26/83) and skin infections (24/83) were the common sites of infection. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen. The dominant or codominant deposition of IgA or C3 along the glomeruli was an important feature identified by immunofluorescence. There were 19 patients (22.9%) that progressed to dialysis-dependent ESRD. Twelve patients (14.5%) died. A univariate regression analysis indicated that diabetes mellitus (DM) (odds ratio [OR] 2.96; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03-8.48; P = 0.04) and age (OR 4.80; 95% CI 1.84-12.53; P = 0.001) were risk factors for ESRD or death. A multivariate regression analysis also revealed that age (OR 4.90; 95% CI 1.82-13.18; P = 0.002) and DM (OR 3.07; 95% CI 0.98-9.59; P = 0.05) were independent risk factors for unfavorable prognosis.Glomerulonephritis related to staphylococcal infection has different features than typical

  3. Noncongophilic fibrillary glomerulonephritis in a cat.

    PubMed

    Cavana, P; Capucchio, M T; Bovero, A; Ripanti, D; Catalano, D; Scaglione, F E; Miller, J; Blunden, T; Farca, A M

    2008-05-01

    This report describes an uncommon case of nonamyloidotic fibrillary glomerulonephritis. A 5-year-old female European cat was presented with nephrotic syndrome. Serum biochemistry and urinalysis revealed a mild increase in cholesterol, low total protein, severe hypoalbuminemia, and high proteinuria with a high protein-to-creatinine ratio. An histologic examination revealed an interstitial nephritis and a diffuse glomerulonephritis, with multifocal thickening of the Bowman's capsule. Transmission electron microscopy showed widespread fibrillary deposits in the glomerular basement membrane and in the mesangium. These fibrils ranged between 18 and 26 nm in diameter and were Congo red negative, which allowed their differentiation from amyloid. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated expression for immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) within the mesangium. Renal deposits of Congo red-negative amyloid-like fibrils have been described in humans, horses, monkeys, and dogs. This is the first report of noncongophilic fibrillary glomerulopathy in a cat. PMID:18487491

  4. Atypical membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in a cat.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Kami-ie, J; Ohtake, S; Wakui, S; Machida, S; Shirota, K

    2001-07-01

    Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis was observed in a 2-year-old male Japanese domestic cat with clinical renal failure. In the glomeruli, moderate mesangial hypercellularity with an increased mesangial matrix and thickening of the capillary walls were prominent. In addition, frequent duplication of the capillary walls, splitting, and spike formation were observed in the glomerular basement membrane. Granular cat IgG and complement component deposition were detected globally along the glomerular capillary walls and in the mesangium. Transmission electron microscopy revealed dense deposits in the subendothelial and subepithelial regions and the mesangium. Mesangial interposition was also observed. These glomerular lesions are also found in humans with membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type III, which has not been reported in animals. PMID:11467485

  5. Forty years abuse of baking soda, rhabdomyolysis, glomerulonephritis, hypertension leading to renal failure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Terje; Koistinen, Arvo; Anttinen, Jorma; Wagner, Bodo; Miettinen, Marja

    2008-01-01

    We present a patient who had ingested sodium bicarbonate for treatment of alcoholic dyspepsia during forty years at increasing doses. During the last year he had used more than 50 grams daily. He presented with metabolic alkalosis, epileptic convulsions, subdural hematoma, hypertension and rhabdomyolysis with end stage renal failure, for which he had to be given regular intermittent hemodialysis treatment. Untreated hypertension and glomerulonephritis was probably present prior to all these acute incidents. Examination of the kidney biopsy revealed mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis and arterial wall thickening causing nephrosclerosis together with interstitial calcinosis. The combination of all these pathologic changes might be responsible for the development of progressive chronic renal failure ending up with the need for continuous intermittent hemodialysis treatment. PMID:24179353

  6. Nephrotic Syndrome without Hematuria due to Infection-Related Glomerulonephritis Mimicking Minimal-Change Disease in a Child.

    PubMed

    Iwafuchi, Yoichi; Morioka, Tetsuo; Morita, Takashi; Watanabe, Kanako; Oyama, Yuko; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome without hematuria due to infection-related glomerulonephritis is uncommon. The present report describes a case of nephrotic syndrome due to infection-related glomerulonephritis without hematuria and hypertension in an older child. A 14-year-old boy was referred to our hospital because of a 5-day history of fever, nausea, weight gain and recent leg edema without hypertension. Laboratory data showed nephrotic-range proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, mild hypocomplementemia and acute renal injury without hematuria. Although, due to the clinical presentation, minimal-change nephrotic syndrome was mostly suspected, a renal biopsy showed endocapillary hypercellularity mainly of mononuclear cells with segmental mesangiolytic changes. Fine granular IgG and C3 deposits were noted by an immunofluorescent study; many relatively small electron-dense deposits were observed electron-microscopically. These findings led to the diagnosis of nephrotic syndrome due to infection-related endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis, although the causative organism of his nephritis was not detected. He recovered with rest and dietary cure. When we examine an acute nephrotic child, infection-related glomerulonephritis should be considered as the differential diagnosis to avoid unnecessary use of corticosteroids. PMID:26889476

  7. A protective role for endothelial nitric oxide synthase in glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Heeringa, Peter; Steenbergen, Eric; van Goor, Harry

    2002-03-01

    In acute glomerulonephritis (GN), increased nitric oxide (NO) production occurs, suggesting a pathophysiological role for NO in the disease process. Although NO potentially could have both toxic as well as protective effects, its exact role in the pathophysiology of GN is unclear and may depend on the NOS isoform generating NO. The protective effects of NO such as prevention of leukocyte and platelet activation and adhesion have been attributed to NO generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Evidence for a beneficial role for eNOS includes the demonstration of reduced eNOS expression in experimental models of GN as well as human biopsy specimens that is mostly likely due to endothelial cell necrosis. Reduced NO production in GN also may occur through reaction of NO with superoxide anions or the myeloperoxidase (MPO)/hypochlorous acid (HOCL) system. Further evidence has been provided by the observation that in several experimental models of GN, glomerular injury is exacerbated following treatment with non-selective NO inhibitors. Finally, the development of GN is severely aggravated in mice lacking a functional gene for eNOS as compared to wild-type mice, providing direct support for a protective role of eNOS-derived NO in acute GN. PMID:11849432

  8. Post-infectious glomerulonephritis following infective endocarditis: Amenable to immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Mantan, M.; Sethi, G. R.; Batra, V. V.

    2013-01-01

    Glomerulonephritis develops in about 20% patients with infective endocarditis (IE), but is mostly asymptomatic. Heavy proteinuria or derangement of kidney functions is uncommon. We report here a child with IE and proliferative glomerulonephritis who manifested as significant proteinuria that recovered on treatment with immunosupressants. PMID:24049276

  9. Conditional Deletion of Smad1 Ameliorates Glomerular Injury in Progressive Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Makoto; Matsubara, Takeshi; Abe, Hideharu; Torikoshi, Kazuo; Mima, Akira; Iehara, Noriyuki; Fukatsu, Atsushi; Kita, Toru; Arai, Hidenori; Doi, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Matrix expansion and cell proliferation are concomitantly observed in various glomerular injuries. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for these changes have not been fully elucidated. We have reported that Smad1 is a key signalling molecule that regulates the transcription of type IV collagen (Col4) in mesangial matrix expansion and is thereby involved in glomerular injury in an acute model of glomerulonephritis. In this study, we addressed the role of Smad1 signalling in accelerated nephrotoxic nephritis (NTN), a model of progressive glomerulonephritis, using conditional deletion of Smad1 in Rosa26CreERT2 mice (Smad1-CKO). Mesangial matrix expansion in the Smad1-CKO mice with NTN was significantly inhibited compared with that in wild type mice with NTN, which was consistent with the decrease in Col4 expression level. On the other hand, STAT3 activation and cell proliferation were not influenced by Smad1 deletion in the NTN model. Therefore, we investigated another factor that activates cell proliferation in the absence of Smad1. Id2 induced VEGF secretion and subsequent STAT3 activation, independently of Smad1 expression in mouse mesangial cells. Here we show that Smad1 plays an important role in the development of glomerular injury without affecting cell proliferation, in progressive glomerulonephritis. PMID:27492138

  10. Conditional Deletion of Smad1 Ameliorates Glomerular Injury in Progressive Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Araki, Makoto; Matsubara, Takeshi; Abe, Hideharu; Torikoshi, Kazuo; Mima, Akira; Iehara, Noriyuki; Fukatsu, Atsushi; Kita, Toru; Arai, Hidenori; Doi, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Matrix expansion and cell proliferation are concomitantly observed in various glomerular injuries. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for these changes have not been fully elucidated. We have reported that Smad1 is a key signalling molecule that regulates the transcription of type IV collagen (Col4) in mesangial matrix expansion and is thereby involved in glomerular injury in an acute model of glomerulonephritis. In this study, we addressed the role of Smad1 signalling in accelerated nephrotoxic nephritis (NTN), a model of progressive glomerulonephritis, using conditional deletion of Smad1 in Rosa26CreERT2 mice (Smad1-CKO). Mesangial matrix expansion in the Smad1-CKO mice with NTN was significantly inhibited compared with that in wild type mice with NTN, which was consistent with the decrease in Col4 expression level. On the other hand, STAT3 activation and cell proliferation were not influenced by Smad1 deletion in the NTN model. Therefore, we investigated another factor that activates cell proliferation in the absence of Smad1. Id2 induced VEGF secretion and subsequent STAT3 activation, independently of Smad1 expression in mouse mesangial cells. Here we show that Smad1 plays an important role in the development of glomerular injury without affecting cell proliferation, in progressive glomerulonephritis. PMID:27492138

  11. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with masked monotypic immunoglobulin deposits

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Christopher P; Messias, Nidia C; Walker, Patrick D; Fidler, Mary E; Cornell, Lynn D; Hernandez, Loren H; Alexander, Mariam P; Sethi, Sanjeev; Nasr, Samih H

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) has recently undergone change from an electron microscopy-based classification scheme to one based largely on immunofluorescence findings. This change is due to the recognition that many of these cases are driven by abnormalities of the alternative complement cascade, resulting in the concept of C3 glomerulopathy. Here we reviewed our case files to identify those with an MPGN pattern that show false negative staining for monoclonal immunoglobulins by routine immunofluorescence. Monoclonal immunoglobulin deposits were unmasked by performing immunofluorescence on formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue after protease digestion. Clinico-pathological details of 16 such cases with a mean serum creatinine of 2.7 mg/dl and mean 24 h proteinuria of 7.1 g were then determined. Hypocomplementemia was present in two-thirds of patients. Fourteen patients had a paraprotein on serum immunofixation, all of which matched the biopsy immunofluorescence staining pattern. Bone marrow biopsy showed plasma cell dyscrasia or B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder in 13 patients. Ten of these patients had findings on biopsy most consistent with C3 glomerulonephritis prior to performing paraffin immunofluorescence. Thus a high index of suspicion is necessary to avoid misdiagnosis in these cases, as many would have been mistakenly diagnosed as C3 glomerulopathy or unclassified MPGN if paraffin immunofluorescence was not performed. PMID:26154922

  12. [Immune complex glomerulonephritis associated with pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Villar, I; Hernández, E; Cozzi, J; Paletta, C; Mathurín, S

    1994-01-01

    A 32 year old man was admitted for dyspnea, hemoptysis, macroscopic hematuria, hypertension (140/100), peripheral edema and hemodynamic decompensation. Lung Xrays revealed pulmonary edema and a cavity in the left apex. Laboratory determinations revealed an altered renal function with increased creatinine and urea levels and nephrotic syndrome. There was leucocyturia, hematuria and cylindruria. The sputum showed a large number of acid-fast bacilli. The patient began anti-tuberculosis treatment with three drugs (isoniacid, rifampicin, pirazinamide). On ultrasonography, both kidneys revealed ecogenic lesions with size, shape and cortico-medular relationship preserved. The patient persisted with altered renal function, steady levels of urea nitrogen, creatinine and potassium, preserved diuresis and hypertension. Bidimensional echocardiogram: LVDD 55 mm, hypoquinetic septum, pericardic effusion, thickened pericardium, pleural effusion, shortening fraction decreased. He received treatment for this congestive cardiac failure and hypertension with enalapril, nifedipine and fursemide. A percutaneous renal biopsy was performed with anatomopathologic diagnosis of diffuse encocapillar proliferative glomerulonephritis with crescents (15%) and total glomerular sclerosis (33%). Immunofluorescence: positive, immune-complexes with IgM and C3. The patient gradually recovered his normal renal function, improved his pleural effusions and normalized his cardiac function. He was discharged in good clinical condition on the 69th day of anti-tuberculosis treatment. An association between pulmonary tuberculosis and glomerulonephritis is discussed. It is proposed that renal lesions might be the consequence of the tuberculosis due to the sedimentation of circulating immune-complexes. PMID:7854090

  13. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis masquerading as rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis with pseudo-linear glomerular basement membrane staining.

    PubMed

    El-Husseini, Amr; Aycinena, Juan-Carlos; George, Bennet; Jennings, Stuart; Cornea, Virgilius; Sawaya, B Peter

    2015-10-01

    Fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN) is a rare disorder with poor renal prognosis. It is a heterogeneous disease associated with significant risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Its etiology and pathogenesis have not been clearly identified. We report a case of a patient presenting with hypertensive crisis, nephrotic range proteinuria, and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN). The kidney biopsy demonstrates crescentic GN on light microscopy (LM) and strong pseudo-linear/globular glomerular basement membrane (GBM) staining for immunoglobulin G on immunofluorescence (IF), suggestive of anti-GBM disease. However, circulating anti-GBM antibodies were negative. Electron microscopy (EM) revealed fibrillary deposits in the GBM, confirming the diagnosis of FGN. Review of the literature revealed very few reported similar cases. It appears that severe hypertension and heavy proteinuria, while uncommon in anti-GBM disease, are consistent findings in RPGN form of FGN. PMID:26249548

  14. Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis due to coexistent anti-glomerular basement membrane disease and fibrillary glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Zacharek, Claudia C.; Fervenza, Fernando C.; Cornell, Lynn D.; Sethi, Sanjeev; Herrera Hernandez, Loren P.; Nasr, Samih H.; Alexander, Mariam P.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease is a major cause of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN). On the other hand, fibrillary glomerulonephritis (GN) typically presents as proteinuria, hematuria and renal insufficiency, but rarely as RPGN. Without electron microscopy, the diagnosis of fibrillary GN can be missed. We report a 68-year-old white woman who presented with RPGN with kidney biopsy demonstrating diffuse crescentic GN on light microscopy. By immunofluorescence, there was bright linear staining of the GBMs and smudgy mesangial staining for immunoglobulin G, C3, and kappa and lambda light chain. Electron microscopy revealed fibrillary deposits in the GBM and mesangium. A serum test for anti-GBM antibody was positive. To our knowledge, this is the first report of coexistence of fibrillary GN in a patient with anti-GBM disease. Electron microscopy is critical to identify the coexistence of other GN in patients presenting with crescentic GN. PMID:26798468

  15. De novo C3 glomerulonephritis in a renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Nahm, Ji Hae; Song, Seung Hwan; Kim, Yu Seun; Cheong, Hae-Il; Lim, Beom Jin; Kim, Beom Seok; Jeong, Hyeon Joo

    2016-01-01

    C3 glomerulonephritis (C3GN) is a recently described, rare glomerular disease characterized by predominant or sole glomerular C3 deposits. Morphologic features of C3GN are similar to those of dense deposit disease (DDD); however, ribbon-like intramembranous electron-dense deposits are absent in the former. We report a case of de novo C3GN in a renal allograft with morphologic transformation to DDD. A 6-year-old boy presented with congenital left renal agenesis and right ureteropelvic junction obstruction. The patient underwent pyeloplasty but experienced recurrent urinary tract infections. At the age of 22 years, he received a renal allograft from a living related donor. C3GN was diagnosed after 1 year of transplantation; initial histology showed minimal mesangiopathy and this progressed to mesangial proliferation and membranoproliferative features over the next 7 years. Serum creatinine levels were stabilized with anti-rejection treatments for combating repeated episodes of acute rejection; however, glomerular and tubular band-like electron-dense deposits became evident. PMID:26986539

  16. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in a young cat.

    PubMed

    Asano, Tomoko; Tsukamoto, Atsushi; Ohno, Koichi; Ogihara, Kikumi; Kamiie, Junichi; Shirota, Kinji

    2008-12-01

    A 9-month-old male Japanese domestic cat showed pleural effusion, ascites, azotemia, hypoproteinemia and severe proteinuria. Histopathology of the percutaneous renal biopsy specimen revealed that all glomeruli showed intense mesangial hypercellularity with an increased mesangial matrix and thickening of the capillary walls, resulting in lobular accentuation of the glomerular tufts. Frequent duplication of the capillary walls was also observed. Immunostaining for alpha-smooth muscle actin distinctly revealed mesangial interposition. Diffuse global and linear deposition of C3 and IgG was observed mostly along the peripheral capillary loops. Electron microscopy confirmed frequent circumferential mesangial interposition and subendothelial dense-deposits in the glomerulus. The glomerular lesion was consistent with human membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type I, and might be a rare case that developed at young age. PMID:19122409

  17. Experimental proliferative glomerulonephritis in the cat.

    PubMed

    Bishop, S A; Stokes, C R; Lucke, V M

    1992-01-01

    A model of chronic serum sickness was used to induce immune-complex glomerulonephritis in seven experimental cats, by daily intravenous inoculation of an increasing dose (5 to 35 mg) of human serum albumin (HSA). At week four, two of the seven animals developed anterior uveitis. At week 23, two different animals developed the subcutaneous oedema characteristic of the nephrotic syndrome (NS), whilst the other five cats appeared clinically normal. The kidneys were examined at necropsy by light microscopy and by transmission electron microscopy. The glomeruli of four animals (three with both proteinuria and uraemia, and one with proteinuria only) showed morphological changes under light microscopy. The abnormalities suggested that a diffuse mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) had been induced in three cats and diffuse membranoproliferative GN induced in another. Ultrastructural studies revealed electron-dense deposits (immune-complexes) in six of the seven cats. Two cats without glomerular abnormalities by light microscopy had mesangial deposits and three cats with mesangial proliferative GN had deposits at mesangial, subendothelial and/or subepithelial sites. The single cat with membranoproliferative GN had deposits at mesangial, subendothelial, subepithelial and intramembranous sites. Immunohistological examination (peroxidase-antiperoxidase technique) showed that HSA and immunoglobulin (IgG and IgM) were deposited in the glomeruli of these cats. Deposits were the most dense in cats with more severe renal lesions. Deposits of IgM were most abundant. An extensive cellular infiltrate, comprising macrophages, neutrophils and plasma cells, was observed only in the four animals which showed abnormalities in glomerular ultrastructure. The disease induced in these cats thus appears to differ from the membranous nephropathy previously described in the cat and bears a close resemblance to immune complex (IC) disease in man. In view of the relatively few specific

  18. Membranous glomerulonephritis associated with Mycobacterium shimoidei pulmonary infection

    PubMed Central

    Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Kushida, Yoshio; Bandoh, Shuji; Ishii, Tomoya; Haba, Reiji; Tadokoro, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki; Takahama, Takayuki; Kita, Nobuyuki; Dobashi, Hiroaki; Matsunaga, Takuya

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 83 Final Diagnosis: Membranous glomerulonephritis Symptoms: Producting cough Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Rare disease Background: Membranous glomerulonephritis can occur secondarily from infectious diseases. There are no reports describing membranous glomerulonephritis caused by non-tuberculous mycobacterium infection. However, several cases with membranous glomerulonephritis due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been reported. Mycobacterium shimoidei is an uncommon pathogen, and less than 20 cases with this species have been reported. A therapeutic regimen for this infection has not been established yet. Case Report: An 83-year-old Japanese man presented with productive cough for 6 months. Computed tomography scan showed multiple cavities in the bilateral pulmonary fields. Acid-fast bacilli were evident in his sputum by Ziehl-Neelsen staining (Gaffky 3). PCR amplifications for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium, and Mycobacterium intracellulare were all negative. Finally, Mycobacterium shimoidei was identified by rpoB sequencing and 16S rRNA sequencing. Urine examination showed a sub-nephrotic range of proteinuria and histology of the kidney showed membranous glomerulonephritis. Antimycobacterial treatment with clarithromycin, rifampicin, and ethambutol dramatically improved not only the pulmonary disease, but also the proteinuria. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, the presented case is the first report showing non-tuberculous mycobacterium-induced secondary membranous glomerulonephritis. A combination with clarithromycin, ethambutol, and rifampicin might be effective for treatment of Mycobacterium shimoidei infection. PMID:24367720

  19. Murine Double Minute-2 Inhibition Ameliorates Established Crescentic Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Mulay, Shrikant R; Romoli, Simone; Desai, Jyaysi; Honarpisheh, Mohammad Mohsen; Kumar, Santhosh V; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Thomasova, Dana

    2016-06-01

    Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis is characterized by glomerular necroinflammation and crescent formation. Its treatment includes unspecific and toxic agents; therefore, the identification of novel therapeutic targets is required. The E3-ubiquitin ligase murine double minute (MDM)-2 is a nonredundant element of NF-κB signaling and the negative regulator of tumor suppressor gene TP53-mediated cell cycle arrest and cell death. We hypothesized that the MDM2 would drive crescentic glomerulonephritis by NF-κB-dependent glomerular inflammation and by p53-dependent parietal epithelial cell hyperproliferation. Indeed, the pre-emptive MDM2 blockade by nutlin-3a ameliorated all aspects of crescentic glomerulonephritis. MDM2 inhibition had identical protective effects in Trp53-deficient mice, with the exception of crescent formation, which was not influenced by nutlin-3a treatment. In vitro experiments confirmed the contribution of MDM2 for induction of NF-κB-dependent cytokines in murine glomerular endothelial cells and for p53-dependent parietal epithelial cell proliferation. To evaluate MDM2 blockade as a potential therapeutic intervention in rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis, we treated mice with established glomerulonephritis with nutlin-3a. Delayed onset of nutlin-3a treatment was equally protective as the pre-emptive treatment in abrogating crescentic glomerulonephritis. Together, the pathogenic effects of MDM2 are twofold, that is, p53-independent NF-κB activation increasing intraglomerular inflammation and p53-dependent parietal epithelial cell hyperplasia and crescent formation. We therefore propose MDM2 blockade as a potential novel therapeutic strategy in rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. PMID:27102769

  20. Treatment of experimental mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis with non-anticoagulant heparin: therapeutic efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Burg, M; Ostendorf, T; Mooney, A; Koch, K M; Floege, J

    1997-04-01

    Treatment with conventional heparin is effective in experimental mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis. However, the long-term effects and safety of this therapy, in particular in the presence of mesangiolysis, have not been assessed. In addition, this therapy has been hampered by bleeding complications. In the present study, therefore, we investigated the long-term effects of a short course of non-anticoagulant (NA) heparin treatment in the anti-Thy 1.1 mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis, in which early immune-mediated mesangiolysis subsequently leads to mesangial hyperproliferation. Rats received continuous ip NA-heparin or vehicle during the active mesangioproliferative phase (Days 2 to 9; early treatment) or during the early resolution phase (Days 10 to 17; late treatment). Whereas NA-heparin in the early treatment group did not affect the glomerular macrophage, lymphocyte, or platelet influx, it did lead to significantly decreased glomerular cellularity, mesangial cell proliferation, alpha-smooth muscle actin, desmin expression (ie, markers of activated mesangial cells), and matrix accumulation as well as to persistent mesangiolytic lesions including microaneurysms. Despite this latter finding, at Day 120, NA-heparin-treated rats of the early treatment group showed significantly better renal function and less proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis than vehicle-infused rats. In contrast, late therapy with NA-heparin neither accelerated resolution of the nephritis or otherwise affected the course of the disease. We conclude that transient NA-heparin therapy is effective in mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis, both acutely and long term, when it is initiated during the active phase of the disease. Also, NA-heparin therapy is safe even in glomerular diseases accompanied by mesangiolysis. PMID:9111513

  1. Eculizumab and Recurrent C3 Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Gurkan, Sevgi; Fyfe, Billie; Weiss, Lynne; Xiao, Xue; Zhang, Yuzhou; Smith, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Hyperactivity of the alternative complement pathway is the principle defect in the C3 glomerulopathies (C3G). Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody that binds to C5 to prevent formation of the membrane attack complex, has been shown to be beneficial in some patients with this disease. Design, setting, participants & measurements In this open-label, proof-of-concept efficacy-and-safety study, a patient with the initial diagnosis of Dense Deposit Disease (DDD) and allograft recurrence of C3 (C3GN) glomerulonephritis was treated with eculizumab every-other-week for 1 year. The patient had pathological evidence of C3GN and proteinuria >1 g/d at enrollment. He underwent graft biopsy before enrollment and repeat biopsy at 6 months and 12 months. Results Although no mutations were identified in complement genes, functional studies were positive for C3 nephritic factors and elevated levels of soluble membrane attack complex (sMAC). On therapy, sMAC levels normalized and although proteinuria initially decreased, during therapy it increased reaching pre-treatment levels at 12 months. Although serum creatinine remained stable, repeat allograft biopsies showed progression of disease. Conclusions Clinical and histopathologic data suggest a partial response to eculizumab in this patient. While eculizumab blocked activation of the terminal complement cascade, persistent dysregulation of alternative pathway remained, showing that eculizumab alone cannot control disease in this patient. Additional research is required to identify effective anticomplement therapy for this group of C3G patients. PMID:23689905

  2. siRNA-Based Therapy Ameliorates Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Hideki; Hori, Yuichi; Kaname, Shinya; Yamada, Koei; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Matsumoto, Satoru; Miyata, Kanjiro; Oba, Makoto; Yamada, Akira; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2010-01-01

    RNA interference by short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) holds promise as a therapeutic strategy, but use of siRNAs in vivo remains limited. Here, we developed a system to target delivery of siRNAs to glomeruli via poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(l-lysine)-based vehicles. The siRNA/nanocarrier complex was approximately 10 to 20 nm in diameter, a size that would allow it to move across the fenestrated endothelium to access to the mesangium. After intraperitoneal injection of fluorescence-labeled siRNA/nanocarrier complexes, we detected siRNAs in the blood circulation for a prolonged time. Repeated intraperitoneal administration of a mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) siRNA/nanocarrier complex suppressed glomerular MAPK1 mRNA and protein expression in a mouse model of glomerulonephritis; this improved kidney function, reduced proteinuria, and ameliorated glomerular sclerosis. Furthermore, this therapy reduced the expression of the profibrotic markers TGF-β1, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and fibronectin. In conclusion, we successfully silenced intraglomerular genes with siRNA using nanocarriers. This technique could aid the investigation of molecular mechanisms of renal disease and has potential as a molecular therapy of glomerular diseases. PMID:20203158

  3. Metabolic Syndrome in IgA Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Kaartinen, Kati; Syrjänen, Jaana; Pörsti, Ilkka; Harmoinen, Aimo; Huhtala, Heini; Mustonen, Jukka

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Metabolic syndrome (MetS) may have an independent impact on the development of chronic kidney disease. This study examines the prevalence of MetS in subjects with IgA glomerulonephritis (IgAGN) and its impact on disease progression in a retrospective fashion. Patients and Methods Altogether, 174 subjects (104 males) were examined 11 years (first visit) after IgAGN diagnosis and again after 16 years (second visit; 144 subjects responded). Different glomerular filtration markers were utilized. The MetS criteria by Alberti et al. [Circulation 2009;120:1640-1645] were applied, in which the presence of any three of five risk factors (elevated waist circumference, triglycerides, glucose, existence of hypertension, or reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) constitutes the diagnosis. Results The prevalence of MetS at the first visit was 39%, corresponding to that of the general Finnish population. In univariate analyses, MetS was significantly associated with the progression of IgAGN at the second visit. However, in multivariate analyses, the existence of MetS was not a significant prognostic determinant. Conclusion The number of subjects with MetS among IgAGN patients and the general population is equal in Finland. MetS does not seem to be an independent prognostic variable. PMID:25337083

  4. Ten-Year Follow-up of Patients with Epidemic Post Infectious Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Sergio Wyton L.; Mastroianni-Kirsztajn, Gianna; Sesso, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Background Scarce information on outcomes of epidemic post infectious glomerulonephritis is available. This is a 10-year follow-up of the patients that developed acute glomerulonephritis in an epidemic outbreak caused by group C Streptococcus zooepidemicus in Brazil in 1998, that were also previously evaluated 2 and 5 years after the acute episode. Methods In this prospective study 60 cases (out of 134 in 1998) were reevaluated after 10 years, as well as community controls matched by gender and age. They underwent clinical and renal function evaluation, including serum creatinine and cystatin C, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), albuminuria and hematuria. Results Comparisons of clinical and renal function aspects of 60 patients and 48 community controls have not shown significant differences (eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73m2 and/or albuminuria >30mg/g creatinine: 13.8% vs. 12.2%, respectively, p = 0.817) except for a higher frequency of hypertension in the cases (45.0% vs. 20.8%, p = 0.009). Comparing the same patients affected in the acute episode, 2, 5 and 10 years later, it was observed an improvement of median eGFR levels at 2 years and a trend toward subsequent stabilization in these levels, associated with decrease in albuminuria and increased hypertension rates in the last survey. At 10 years it was not observed additional reduction of renal function using serum creatinine, eGFR and cystatin C. Conclusions During the acute episode of epidemic GN a considerable proportion of patients presented hypertension and reduced renal function; after 2 years and particularly at this 10-year follow-up survey there was no worsening of renal function parameters, except for persistent higher frequency of hypertension. Nevertheless, a longer follow up is necessary to confirm that progressive loss of renal function will not occur. PMID:25962068

  5. Partial lipodystrophy, C3 nephritic factor and clinically inapparent mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, W M; Bardana, E J; Wuepper, K; Houghton, D; Border, W A; Götze, O; Schreiber, R

    1977-05-01

    A case of partial lipodystrophy with C3 nephritic factor was found to be associated with mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis although all clinical parameters of renal function were normal. Diagnosis of mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis required renal biopsy. Nephriti factor obtained from this patient was immunochemically related to nephritic factor isolated from the serum of patients with typical mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis without partial lipodystrophy. PMID:860726

  6. Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis Presenting as Pauci-Immune Crescentic Glomerulonephritis in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kunjal, Ryan; Makary, Raafat; Poenariu, Andreea

    2016-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis rarely affects females of reproductive age. A 28-year-old African American woman presented at 8 weeks of gestation with intractable vomiting attributed to hyperemesis gravidarum. She was found to have acute kidney injury that was unresponsive to vigorous fluid resuscitation and urine sediment examination was suggestive of an underlying glomerulonephritis. Serum c-ANCA and PR3 were elevated and there was no peripheral eosinophilia. During her course she also developed one episode of small volume hemoptysis with right upper lobe infiltrates on CT Chest. There were no cutaneous manifestations of vasculitis or upper respiratory symptoms. Renal biopsy revealed a pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis (PICGN). The diagnosis was consistent with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). Management initially comprised teratogen sparing agents; steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin; and plasma exchange. The response was suboptimal and she became dependent on daily renal replacement therapy. Ultimately the pregnancy was terminated allowing for traditional treatment approaches with dramatic effect. This is the first case of GPA presenting as PICGN in pregnancy and highlights the challenges of its management. PMID:27293925

  7. Classifying murine glomerulonephritis using optical coherence tomography and optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Du, Yong; Singh, Manmohan; Wu, Chen; Han, Zhaolong; Li, Jiasong; Chang, Anthony; Mohan, Chandra; Larin, Kirill V

    2016-08-01

    Acute glomerulonephritis caused by antiglomerular basement membrane marked by high mortality. The primary reason for this is delayed diagnosis via blood examination, urine analysis, tissue biopsy, or ultrasound and X-ray computed tomography imaging. Blood, urine, and tissue-based diagnoses can be time consuming, while ultrasound and CT imaging have relatively low spatial resolution, with reduced sensitivity. Optical coherence tomography is a noninvasive and high-resolution imaging technique that provides superior spatial resolution (micrometer scale) as compared to ultrasound and CT. Changes in tissue properties can be detected based on the optical metrics analyzed from the OCT signals, such as optical attenuation and speckle variance. Furthermore, OCT does not rely on ionizing radiation as with CT imaging. In addition to structural changes, the elasticity of the kidney can significantly change due to nephritis. In this work, OCT has been utilized to quantify the difference in tissue properties between healthy and nephritic murine kidneys. Although OCT imaging could identify the diseased tissue, its classification accuracy is clinically inadequate. By combining optical metrics with elasticity, the classification accuracy improves from 76% to 95%. These results show that OCT combined with OCE can be a powerful tool for identifying and classifying nephritis. Therefore, the OCT/OCE method could potentially be used as a minimally invasive tool for longitudinal studies during the progression and therapy of glomerulonephritis as well as complement and, perhaps, substitute highly invasive tissue biopsies. Elastic-wave propagation in mouse healthy and nephritic kidneys. PMID:26791097

  8. Fundus changes in mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis type II: vitreous fluorophotometry.

    PubMed Central

    Raines, M F; Duvall-Young, J; Short, C D

    1989-01-01

    We have described a complex abnormality of retinal pigment epithelium, Bruch's membrane, and choriocapillaris in mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis (MCGN) type II. Patients with MCGN type II were examined by vitreous fluorophotometry which reveals that there is a breakdown of the blood retinal barrier (BRB) in those patients with the typical fundus lesions. The function of this barrier was calculated as a penetration ratio and was statistically greater in these patients when compared with a group of (a) normal persons, (b) patients with drusen, and (c) patients with other forms of glomerulonephritis. Images PMID:2605145

  9. Pauci-Immune Crescentic Glomerulonephritis: An ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Rafeel; Rehman, Amina; Valecha, Gautam; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) is a syndrome signified by a precipitous loss of renal function, with features of glomerulonephritis including dysmorphic erythrocyturia and glomerular proteinuria. RPGN is associated with extensive crescent formation, and, thus, the clinical term RPGN is often used interchangeably with the pathologic term crescentic glomerulonephritis (CGN). From an immunopathologic standpoint, primary RPGN is divided into pauci-immune GN (PICG), anti-GBM GN, and immune complex GN. PICG, the most common etiology of primary RPGN, refers to a necrotizing glomerulonephritis with few or no immune deposits by immunofluorescence (IF) or electron microscopy (EM). In most patients, pauci-immune CGN is a component of a systemic small vessel vasculitis such as granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). Approximately 90% of patients with PICG have circulating ANCA antibodies, leading to the nomenclature ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). Recent research has identified several other antibodies associated with PICG, which is now understood to be a complex spectrum of disease with considerable overlap in terms of clinical phenotype and outcomes. In addition, several genetic and environmental factors have recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of this disorder. With new prognostic classifications, enhanced understanding of immunopathologic mechanisms, and novel treatment paradigms, clinical and experimental interest in PICG remains high. PMID:26688808

  10. Th1 and Th17 Cells Induce Proliferative Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Shaun A.; Steinmetz, Oliver M.; Li, Ming; Kausman, Joshua Y.; Semple, Timothy; Edgtton, Kristy L.; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Braley, Hal; Holdsworth, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    Th1 effector CD4+ cells contribute to the pathogenesis of proliferative and crescentic glomerulonephritis, but whether effector Th17 cells also contribute is unknown. We compared the involvement of Th1 and Th17 cells in a mouse model of antigen-specific glomerulonephritis in which effector CD4+ cells are the only components of adaptive immunity that induce injury. We planted the antigen ovalbumin on the glomerular basement membrane of Rag1−/− mice using an ovalbumin-conjugated non-nephritogenic IgG1 monoclonal antibody against α3(IV) collagen. Subsequent injection of either Th1- or Th17-polarized ovalbumin-specific CD4+ effector cells induced proliferative glomerulonephritis. Mice injected with Th1 cells developed progressive albuminuria over 21 d, histologic injury including 5.5 ± 0.9% crescent formation/segmental necrosis, elevated urinary nitrate, and increased renal NOS2, CCL2, and CCL5 mRNA. Mice injected with Th17 cells developed albuminuria by 3 d; compared with Th1-injected mice, their glomeruli contained more neutrophils and greater expression of renal CXCL1 mRNA. In conclusion, Th1 and Th17 effector cells can induce glomerular injury. Understanding how these two subsets mediate proliferative forms of glomerulonephritis may lead to targeted therapies. PMID:19820122

  11. Th1 and Th17 cells induce proliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Summers, Shaun A; Steinmetz, Oliver M; Li, Ming; Kausman, Joshua Y; Semple, Timothy; Edgtton, Kristy L; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Braley, Hal; Holdsworth, Stephen R; Kitching, A Richard

    2009-12-01

    Th1 effector CD4+ cells contribute to the pathogenesis of proliferative and crescentic glomerulonephritis, but whether effector Th17 cells also contribute is unknown. We compared the involvement of Th1 and Th17 cells in a mouse model of antigen-specific glomerulonephritis in which effector CD4+ cells are the only components of adaptive immunity that induce injury. We planted the antigen ovalbumin on the glomerular basement membrane of Rag1(-/-) mice using an ovalbumin-conjugated non-nephritogenic IgG1 monoclonal antibody against alpha3(IV) collagen. Subsequent injection of either Th1- or Th17-polarized ovalbumin-specific CD4+ effector cells induced proliferative glomerulonephritis. Mice injected with Th1 cells developed progressive albuminuria over 21 d, histologic injury including 5.5 +/- 0.9% crescent formation/segmental necrosis, elevated urinary nitrate, and increased renal NOS2, CCL2, and CCL5 mRNA. Mice injected with Th17 cells developed albuminuria by 3 d; compared with Th1-injected mice, their glomeruli contained more neutrophils and greater expression of renal CXCL1 mRNA. In conclusion, Th1 and Th17 effector cells can induce glomerular injury. Understanding how these two subsets mediate proliferative forms of glomerulonephritis may lead to targeted therapies. PMID:19820122

  12. A possible post-streptococcal movement disorder with chorea and tics.

    PubMed

    Kerbeshian, J; Burd, L; Pettit, R

    1990-07-01

    A 14-year-old girl developed a movement disorder after a streptococcal infection. In the acute phase of the illness she exhibited simple and complex motor tics and chorea, but all abnormal movements ceased over the following eight months, without recurrence. This case raises questions about the relationship between tics, chorea and auto-immune reactivity. PMID:2391015

  13. Urinary Thrombin: A Novel Marker of Glomerular Inflammation for the Diagnosis of Crescentic Glomerulonephritis (Prospective Observational Study)

    PubMed Central

    Kitamoto, Yasunori; Arizono, Kenji; Fukui, Hiroyoshi; Tomita, Kimio; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Taguma, Yoshio; Imamura, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Crescentic glomerulonephritis (CresGN), an uncommon rapidly progressive disease, is characterized by severe glomerular inflammation with fibrin deposition. The lack of specific CresGN biomarkers delays diagnosis and threatens life. Because fibrin deposits in CresGN glomeruli indicate thrombin generation, we hypothesized that thrombin is excreted in urine and is a specific CresGN biomarker. Methods We measured urinary thrombin activity in 200 untreated patients (17 with CresGN, 183 with primary glomerulonephritis) and controls (8 patients with healed CresGN, 11 with nephrosclerosis, and 10 with tubulointerstitial nephritis, and 66 healthy volunteers). CresGN types included 15 pauci-immune and 2 immune complex. We assessed the diagnostic accuracy of thrombinuria in 169 patients with hematuria and proteinuria. Renal biopsy tissues were immunostained for tissue factor and fibrin. We analyzed the relationship of thrombinuria to plasma thrombin-antithrombin complex, hematuria, proteinuria, glomerular filtration rate, glomerular fibrin deposition, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs), and C-reactive protein (CRP). We studied changes in thrombin activities after glucocorticoid treatment in 12 patients with thrombinuria. Results The highest thrombinuria occurrence was in CresGN (70.6%), followed by membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (41.7%), IgA nephropathy (9.2%), and acute glomerulonephritis (0%). More than 75% of patients with nonproliferative glomerulonephritis manifested no thrombinuria. No controls had thrombinuria. Thrombinuria showed high CresGN specificity (90.1%) and moderate sensitivity (70.6%) and was detected in 4 of 7 patients with ANCA-negative CresGN. In CresGN, thrombinuria was associated with fibrin deposition in glomerular extracapillary tissue, where monocytes/macrophages expressed tissue factor. Thrombinuria in CresGN was unrelated to plasma thrombin-antithrombin complex, hematuria, proteinuria, glomerular filtration rate, and

  14. Congenital syphilis and glomerulonephritis with evidence for immune pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wiggelinkhuizen, J.; Kaschula, R. O. C.; Uys, C. J.; Kuijten, R. H.; Dale, J.

    1973-01-01

    In 3 infants with congenital syphilis the dominant clinical manifestation of syphilitic kidney disease was the nephrotic syndrome. Mesangioendothelial proliferation was present in 2 cases and mixed proliferative glomerulonephritis with crescent formation in the third. The severity of the clinical and histopathological abnormalities could be related to the apparent duration of the illness. In all 3 cases immune complex deposition could be shown within and along the epithelial aspect of the glomerular basement membrane on light, electron, and immunofluorescent microscopy. These features, together with a reduced total serum haemolytic complement, suggest an immune pathogenesis of the glomerulonephritis associated with early congenital syphilis. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4267344

  15. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated glomerulonephritis in children.

    PubMed

    Hattori, M; Kurayama, H; Koitabashi, Y

    2001-07-01

    Aretrospective investigation was conducted by members of the Japanese Society for Pediatric Nephrology from 1990 to 1997 to define the clinical features and outcome of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated glomerulonephritis in children. Thirty-four ANCA-seropositive Japanese pediatric patients with biopsy-proven pauci-immune necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis were identified. Of these, 3 cases associated with Wegener's granulomatosis were excluded because of the small sample size. Among the 31 patients studied, 10 had a diagnosis of necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis alone and 21 had microscopic polyangiitis. Females predominated (87%), and the median age at onset was 12 yr. Twenty-six patients received treatment with cyclophosphamide and corticosteroids, and five patients received treatment with corticosteroids alone; 84% of patients achieved remission, and 39% of responders relapsed in a median of 24 mo. ANCA titers correlated with response to treatment and disease activity, with some exceptions. Patients were followed for a median of 42 mo (range, 3 to 96 mo). Nine of 31 patients (29.0%) progressed to end-stage renal disease, 6 (19.4%) had reduced renal function, and 15 (48.4%) had normal renal function at the last observation. One patient (3.2%) died from cytomegalovirus infection 3 mo after initiation of therapy. Life-table analysis showed 75% renal survival at 39 mo. Patients who subsequently developed end-stage renal disease (n = 9) had significantly higher average peak serum creatinine levels and more chronic pathologic lesions at diagnosis compared with patients with favorable renal outcome (n = 15). In conclusion, our clinical experience suggests that the clinical disease spectrum of ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis is similar in pediatric and adult patients, but there is a female predominance in children. PMID:11423578

  16. Crescentic glomerulonephritis in a child with Heiner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Sevgi; Karabay-Bayazıt, Aysun; Yılmaz, Mustafa; Gönlüşen, Gülfiliz; Anarat, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Heiner syndrome is a food-induced pulmonary hypersensitivity disease that predominantly affects infants. Chronic respiratory symptoms with pulmonary infiltrates on radiography, positive milk precipitins and resolution of findings upon removal of cow's milk constitute the main features. Severe cases may present with pulmonary hemosiderosis. Few renal manifestations associated with this syndrome have been reported so far. Here we report the first case of Heiner syndrome complicated by crescentic glomerulonephritis after 5 years of follow-up. PMID:26388600

  17. Posterior segment findings in a patient with immunotactoid glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aditi; Prabhu, Rangarajan Venugopal; Patel, Amit K.; Sivaraj, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To present a case with posterior segment findings in a patient with cloudy corneas secondary to immunotactoid glomerulonephritis (ITG). Methods: A 57-year-old female was known to have bilateral cloudy corneas diagnosed 12 years ago secondary to immunotactoid glomerulonephritis. Clinically, fundus examination was difficult to visualise due to the density of her corneal opacities. Results: B-scan ultrasound revealed significant retino-choroidal & non-inflammatory scleral thickening. The macula also showed signs of thickening in both eyes. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) showed thinning of the inner retinal layers and significant choroidal folds in both eyes. Electrodiagnostic tests (EDT) concluded loss of retinal ganglion cells with preservation of retinal function in both eyes. Conclusion: This case widens the spectrum of findings seen in patients diagnosed with Immunotactoid Glomerulonephritis and alerts us to undertake detailed posterior segment examination where possible. Ocular coherence tomography (OCT) and B-scan ultrasonography are important adjuvants to help assess the posterior segment in patients with corneal opacities secondary to ITG.

  18. Hydrogen Peroxide–Inducible Clone-5 Regulates Mesangial Cell Proliferation in Proliferative Glomerulonephritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jamba, Ariunbold; Kondo, Shuji; Urushihara, Maki; Nagai, Takashi; Kim-Kaneyama, Joo-ri; Miyazaki, Akira; Kagami, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide-inducible clone-5 (Hic-5) is a transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-inducible focal adhesion protein. We previously demonstrated that Hic-5 was localized in mesangial cells and its expression was associated with glomerular cell proliferation and matrix expansion in human and rat glomerulonephritis (GN). In the present study, we first assessed the role of Hic-5 in mesangioproliferative GN by injecting Habu venom into heminephrectomized wild type (Hic-5+/+) and Hic-5-deficient (Hic-5-/-) mice. Hic-5+/+ GN mice exhibited glomerular cell proliferation on day 7. Surprisingly, glomerular cell number and Ki-67-positive cells in Hic-5-/- GN mice were significantly greater than those in Hic-5+/+ GN mice on day 7, although the number of glomerular apoptotic cells and the expression of growth factors (platelet-derived growth factor-BB and TGF-β1) and their receptors were similarly increased in both Hic-5+/+ and Hic-5-/- GN mice. In culture experiments, proliferation assays showed that platelet-derived growth factor-BB and TGF-β1 enhanced the proliferation of Hic-5-/- mesangial cells compared with Hic-5+/+ mesangial cells. In addition, mitogenic regulation by Hic-5 was associated with altered and coordinated expression of cell cycle-related proteins including cyclin D1 and p21. The present results suggest that Hic-5 might regulate mesangial cell proliferation in proliferative GN in mice. In conclusion, modulation of Hic-5 expression might have a potential to prevent mesangial cell proliferation in the acute mitogenic phase of glomerulonephritis. PMID:25835392

  19. [Autoimmune hepatitis and membranous glomerulonephritis under immune therapy in chronic hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Paparoupa, Maria; Huy Ho, Ngoc Ahn; Schuppert, Frank

    2016-05-01

    A 63-year-old patient is evaluated for an unclear weight loss with general malaise and fatigue for several months. Serological examination reveales the first diagnosis of a hepatitis-C-virus-genotype-1b-infection with an initial viral load of 980 000 IU / ml. The duration of the infection is suggested to be more than 6 months. Because of the initially elevated anti-nuclear-antibodies (ANA) the diagnosis of an autoimmune hepatitis needs to be excluded. All other liver related autoantibodies and the immunoglobulins (Ig) IgG, IgA and IgM are normal. A liver biopsy is conducted. After a short test with non-pegylated interferon (IFN) liver enzymes remain stable and treatment with pegylated IFN-alfa-2a and ribavirin (RBV) is initiated. The patient is a "rapid viral responder" and his viral load is found under the detection limit within 4 weeks under therapy. On the 16th week, liver enzymes increase rapidly. ANA's and IgG-immunoglobulins are positive. A second lever biopsy does not confirm the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis and the treatment is continued under careful observation of all relevant liver parameters. 21 weeks after the initiation of the treatment, massive peripheral edema, hypoproteinemia and proteinuria are observed. The renal biopsy reveales membranous glomerulonephritis. Because of the preserved renal function, no acute immunosuppression is initiated and the treatment gets completed after overall 24 weeks. Liver and renal parameters return quickly back to normal after treatment discharge. This is the first report of a combined autoimmune reaction with development of autoimmune hepatitis and glomerulonephritis under INF and RBV antiviral therapy for a chronic hepatitis-C-infection. The occurrence of autoimmune manifestations should especially be considered in genetically susceptible individuals or those with positive autoimmunity markers. The initiation of INF for the treatment of chronic hepatitis-C-infection has to be critically evaluated since

  20. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and glomerulonephritis in lysinuric protein intolerance: case reports and autopsy findings of four pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Parto, K; Kallajoki, M; Aho, H; Simell, O

    1994-04-01

    Lysinuric protein intolerance is an autosomal recessive disease caused by defective transport of cationic amino acids. Of the 38 lysinuric protein intolerance patients diagnosed in Finland since 1965, four pediatric patients have died. We describe the clinical courses and autopsy findings for these patients. All patients developed acute respiratory insufficiency. In addition to pulmonary hemorrhages, three of the patients had pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and one had cholesterol granulomas. Three patients had a clinically obvious renal insufficiency, but all four showed histologic signs of immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. The patients also developed hepatic insufficiency with fatty degeneration or cirrhosis. All patients showed anemia, thrombocytopenia, and a severe bleeding tendency. The bone marrow of three patients was hypercellular, but the amount of megakaryocytes was decreased in two cases. Amyloid was present in the lymph nodes and the spleen. Bone specimens showed osteoporosis. We conclude that pediatric patients with lysinuric protein intolerance are predisposed to develop pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and glomerulonephritis. They are also at risk of protein malnutrition in the active growth phase, probably due to higher requirements for total nitrogen and amino acids. PMID:8163273

  1. Proliferative Glomerulonephritis with Monoclonal IgG Deposits

    PubMed Central

    Satoskar, Anjali; Markowitz, Glen S.; Valeri, Anthony M.; Appel, Gerald B.; Stokes, Michael B.; Nadasdy, Tibor; D'Agati, Vivette D.

    2009-01-01

    Dysproteinemias that result in monoclonal glomerular deposits of IgG are relatively uncommon. Here, we report the largest series of proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits, a form of renal involvement by monoclonal gammopathy that mimics immune-complex glomerulonephritis. We retrospectively identified 37 patients, most of whom were white (81%), female (62%), or older than 50 yr (65%). At presentation, 49% had nephrotic syndrome, 68% had renal insufficiency, and 77% had hematuria. In 30% of the patients, we identified a monoclonal serum protein with the same heavy- and light-chain isotypes as the glomerular deposits (mostly IgG1 or IgG2), but only one patient had myeloma. Histologic patterns were predominantly membranoproliferative (57%) or endocapillary proliferative (35%) with membranous features. Electron microscopy revealed granular, nonorganized deposits, and immunofluorescence demonstrated glomerular deposits that stained for a single light-chain isotype and a single heavy-chain subtype, most commonly IgG3κ (53%). During an average of 30.3 mo of follow-up for 32 patients with available data, 38% had complete or partial recovery, 38% had persistent renal dysfunction, and 22% progressed to ESRD. Correlates of ESRD on univariate analysis were higher creatinine at biopsy, percentage of glomerulosclerosis, and degree of interstitial fibrosis but not immunomodulatory treatment or presence of a monoclonal spike. On multivariate analysis, higher percentage of glomerulosclerosis was the only independent predictor of ESRD. Only one patient lacking a monoclonal spike at presentation subsequently developed a monoclonal spike and no patient with a monoclonal spike at presentation subsequently developed a hematologic malignancy. We conclude that proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits does not seem to be a precursor of myeloma in the vast majority of patients. PMID:19470674

  2. Monoclonal gammopathy associated membranous glomerulonephritis: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, K. K.; Joshi, K.; Ramachandran, R.; Nada, R.

    2015-01-01

    A 40-year-old male presented with nephrotic syndrome. Light microscopic analysis of the renal biopsy showed thickening of the glomerular capillary wall. Immunofluorescence examination revealed granular deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) G3-kappa and complement C3 along the glomerular basement membrane. Electron microscopy showed subepithelial electron dense deposits, thus confirming membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) with monoclonal gammopathy. MGN with monoclonal gammopathy is an extremely rare but distinctive entity. This patient was treated with a combination of bortezomib, thalidomide and dexamethasone and showed partial remission of his nephrotic state and dysproteinemia. PMID:25684873

  3. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis associated with limited scleroderma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nakhoul, Georges N; Simon, James F

    2016-04-01

    Fibrillary glomerulonephritis (GN) is a rare glomerular disorder that has been associated with monoclonal gammopathies, malignancies, chronic infections, and autoimmune disorders. We present the case of a 56-year-old woman with limited-type scleroderma and remote discoid lupus, evaluated for dipstick positive hematuria and preserved kidney function. Serologies were negative. Kidney biopsy revealed fibrillary GN. Her renal function and proteinuria remain stable 4 years after her initial diagnosis. This case is unusual both in its presentation and evolution, but mostly because it is the first reported case of fibrillary GN in association with limited type scleroderma. PMID:26709524

  4. A Pediatric Case of Acute Generalized Pustular Eruption without Streptococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, Nobuko; Yoshizawa, Hideka

    2016-01-01

    Generalized pustular lesions characterized by acute onset with fever occur in pustulosis acuta generalisata, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, and generalized pustular psoriasis. In the present report, we describe a pediatric case of generalized pustular eruption that was not completely consistent with clinical features. Our patient had no evidence of a post-streptococcal infection. We observed scattered symmetric eruption of discrete pustules with an inflammatory halo on normal skin. The eruption was absent on her palms and soles of the feet. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports in the English literature of cases with clinical features similar to those of our patient. PMID:27462226

  5. Effect of cyclosporin on immune complex deposition in murine glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, D G; Fennell, J S; Sheils, O; Gaffney, E F; Feighery, C F

    1991-01-01

    Chronic glomerulonephritis (GN) was induced in N/M mice by daily injections of human serum albumin (HSA). The glomerular lesion was similar to that observed in human membranous GN and was characterized by intense mesangial and capillary loop immunofluorescent staining for HSA, IgG and C3. Electron microscopic examination revealed numerous electron-dense deposits in the mesangium and along the subepithelial side of the glomerular basement membrane, the latter deposits being associated with membranous spikes. Chronically injected mice that had been treated with cyclosporin (CsA) from Day 1 had different patterns of immune complex deposition. Mesangial deposition was apparently unaltered but no subepithelial deposits or spikes were evident. In addition, only two out of 21 HSA-injected mice which began CsA treatment on Day 21 had subepithelial deposits. There was no significant difference in serum levels of HSA-specific IgG between the three groups of mice. CsA treatment would therefore appear to ameliorate the immunopathology of antigen-induced glomerulonephritis in this model without affecting serum antibody levels, and may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of human membranous GN. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1828056

  6. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis: the role for laser microdissection and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepika; Green, Jamie A; Bastacky, Sheldon; Theis, Jason D; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2014-02-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy is increasingly recognized as a common cause of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN); however, establishing this diagnosis can be challenging. We report the case of a 58-year-old asymptomatic woman who presented with proteinuria with protein excretion of 5,000mg/d, microscopic hematuria, and normal kidney function. Kidney biopsy was consistent with MPGN pattern of injury. Immunofluorescence studies were positive for nonspecific segmental immunoglobulin M (IgM) and C3 staining. Electron microscopy showed subendothelial, subepithelial, and mesangial electron-dense deposits. The workup excluded an infectious or autoimmune disease, but IgG κ monoclonal protein was detected in serum at a concentration of 0.4mg/dL. Because there was a mismatch between the serum monoclonal protein (IgG κ) and immunofluorescence staining pattern (nonspecific IgM, no light chain restriction), laser microdissection and mass spectrometry were performed on the kidney biopsy tissue. This identified the deposits as monoclonal IgG κ, thereby leading to the diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy-associated MPGN. Our case emphasizes the importance of searching for an underlying cause of MPGN, reviews the technique of laser microdissection-mass spectrometry, and highlights its application as a pathology tool for the evaluation of monoclonal gammopathy-related glomerulonephritis. PMID:24145022

  7. Pauci-Immune Crescentic Glomerulonephritis in Connective Tissue Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Mary; Robin, Adam; Lorna, Campbell; Rosenthal, Ann K.

    2016-01-01

    Pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis is commonly seen in ANCA-associated vasculitis but it is rarely seen during the course of other connective tissue diseases like lupus or Sjogren's syndrome or MCTD. We report 3 cases of pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis in patients with connective tissue disease other than vasculitis. We reviewed literature and made summary of previously reported cases of this rare entity. Clinical and laboratory features of these patients varied widely, but most of patients have met criteria for lupus. In this small population of patients there is no correlation with ANCAs. Most of the patients were treated with aggressive immunosuppression and did well if they were treated early in the course of their disease. One of our patients required renal transplant, but she presented late in the course of her disease, as evidenced by chronicity on her renal biopsy. Whether these patients are overlap of vasculitis and other connective tissue diseases or to be considered as a separate entity is yet to be described. Clinicians must be aware of these presentations because initial presentation can be severe. PMID:27504208

  8. Rituximab therapy for primary glomerulonephritis: Report on two cases

    PubMed Central

    Fabrizi, Fabrizio; Cresseri, Donata; Fogazzi, Giovanni B; Moroni, Gabriella; Passerini, Patrizia; Martin, Paul; Messa, Piergiorgio

    2015-01-01

    The evidence in the medical literature on the efficacy and safety of rituximab therapy for primary glomerulonephritis is limited and controversial. We describe two male Caucasian patients with rapidly progressive kidney failure due to primary proliferative glomerulonephritis. Both of them received high-dose intravenous corticosteroids and oral cyclophosphamide with limited benefit. The first patient (hepatitis C virus-negative mixed cryoglobulinemia) underwent plasma-exchange with intravenous immunoglobulins; he showed significant benefit on kidney function (he became dialysis independent with serum creatinine going back to 1.6 mg/dL) after one rituximab pulse even if urinary abnormalities were still present. No improvement in renal function or urinary changes occurred in the second patient. Both these individuals developed sepsis over the follow-up, the first patient died two months after rituximab therapy. This report is in keeping with the occurrence of severe infections after rituximab therapy in patients with renal impairment at baseline and concomitant high-dose steroids. PMID:26301235

  9. Pauci-Immune Crescentic Glomerulonephritis in Connective Tissue Disease.

    PubMed

    Yeturi, Supraja; Cronin, Mary; Robin, Adam; Lorna, Campbell; Rosenthal, Ann K

    2016-01-01

    Pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis is commonly seen in ANCA-associated vasculitis but it is rarely seen during the course of other connective tissue diseases like lupus or Sjogren's syndrome or MCTD. We report 3 cases of pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis in patients with connective tissue disease other than vasculitis. We reviewed literature and made summary of previously reported cases of this rare entity. Clinical and laboratory features of these patients varied widely, but most of patients have met criteria for lupus. In this small population of patients there is no correlation with ANCAs. Most of the patients were treated with aggressive immunosuppression and did well if they were treated early in the course of their disease. One of our patients required renal transplant, but she presented late in the course of her disease, as evidenced by chronicity on her renal biopsy. Whether these patients are overlap of vasculitis and other connective tissue diseases or to be considered as a separate entity is yet to be described. Clinicians must be aware of these presentations because initial presentation can be severe. PMID:27504208

  10. Spontaneous remission of membranous glomerulonephritis with successful fetal outcome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan-Mei; Zhou, Hui-Rong; Zhang, Ling; Yang, Ke-Ke; Luo, Jiang-Xi; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) represents an immunologically mediated disease characterized by deposition of immune complexes in the glomerular subepithelial space. Persistent proteinuria at diagnosis predicts poor prognosis. Pregnancy with MGN is a risk of fetal loss and may worsen maternal renal function. Here, we report a lady with MGN and proteinuria achieved spontaneous remission and successful fetal outcome naive to any medications. The 26-year old woman had 1-year history of persistent proteinuria (5.5–12.56 g/24 hours) and biopsy-proven MGN. Histopathological characteristics included glomerular basement membrane spikes, subepithelial monoclonal IgG immunofluorescence, and diffuse electron dense deposits. She was sticking to a regular morning exercise routine without any medications. After successful delivery of a full-term baby girl, the mother had improved proteinuria (0.56 g/24 hours) and albuminuria (351.96 g/24 hours contrasting 2281.6 g/24 hours before pregnancy). The baby had normal height and body weight at 4 months old. We identified more pregnancies with MGN in 5 case reports and 5 clinical series review articles (7–33 cases included). Spontaneous remission of maternal MGN with good fetal outcome rarely occurred in mothers on immunosuppressive therapy. Mothers naive to immunosuppressive therapy may achieve spontaneous remission of maternal membranous glomerulonephritis and successful fetal outcome. Theoretically, fetus might donate stem cells to heal mother's kidney. PMID:27368022

  11. Familial C4B Deficiency and Immune Complex Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Soto, K; Wu, YL; Ortiz, A; Aparício, SR; Yu, CY

    2010-01-01

    Homozygous complement C4B deficiency is described in a Southern European young female patient with Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis (MPGN) type III characterized by renal biopsies with strong complement C4 and IgG deposits. Low C4 levels were independent of clinical evolution or type of immunosuppression and were found in three other family members without renal disease or infections. HLA typing revealed that the patient has homozygous A*02, Cw*06, B*50 at the class I region, and DRB1*08 and DQB1*03 at the class II region. Genotypic and phenotypic studies demonstrated that the patient has homozygous monomodular RCCX in the HLA class III region, with single long C4A genes coding for C4A3 and complete C4B deficiency. Her father, mother, son and niece have heterozygous C4B deficiency. The patient’s deceased brother had a history of Henoch-Schönlein Purpura (HSP), an immune complex-mediated proliferative glomerulonephritis. These findings challenge the putative pathophysiological roles of C4A and C4B and underscore the need to perform functional assays, C4 allotyping and genotyping on patients with persistently low serum levels of a classical pathway complement component and glomerulopathy associated with immune deposits. PMID:20580617

  12. Bilateral renal vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism secondary to membranous glomerulonephritis treated with percutaneous catheter thrombectomy and localized thrombolytic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Janda, S. P.

    2010-01-01

    Renal vein thrombosis (RVT) is a rare event but is prevalent in patients with nephrotic syndrome. Bilateral RVT is even rarer. The literature is relatively sparse in terms of the management of RVT because of its rarity and consists of a few case reports and case series. We present a case with bilateral RVT complicated by a pulmonary embolism in a patient with membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN). A 19-year-old female presented with acute flank pain and worsening renal function after a couple of weeks in hospital while being treated with diuretics for anasarca secondary to MGN. Venography was used for diagnosis. The patient underwent percutaneous catheter thrombectomy and localized thrombolysis achieving resolution of pain and improvement of renal function. The patient was then anticoagulated for life with warfarin. PMID:21072156

  13. Combined optical coherence tomography and optical coherence elastography for glomerulonephritis classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Du, Yong; Singh, Manmohan; Wu, Chen; Han, Zhaolong; Li, Jiasong; Mohammadzai, Qais; Raghunathan, Raksha; Hsu, Thomas; Noorani, Shezaan; Chang, Anthony; Mohan, Chandra; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    Acute Glomerulonephritis caused by anti-glomerular basement membrane disease has a high mortality due to delayed diagnosis. Thus, an accurate and early diagnosis is critical for preserving renal function. Currently, blood, urine, and tissue-based diagnoses can be time consuming, while ultrasound and CT imaging have relatively low spatial resolution. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive imaging technique that provides superior spatial resolution (micron scale) as compared to ultrasound and CT. Pathological changes in tissue properties can be detected based on the optical metrics analyzed from the OCT signal, such as optical attenuation and speckle variance. Moreover, OCT does not rely on ionizing radiation as with CT imaging. In addition to structural changes, the elasticity of the kidney can significantly change due to nephritis. In this work, we utilized OCT to detect the difference in tissue properties between healthy and nephritic murine kidneys. Although OCT imaging could identify the diseased tissue, classification accuracy using only optical metrics was clinically inadequate. By combining optical metrics with elasticity, the classification accuracy improved from 76% to 95%. These results show that OCT combined with OCE can be potentially useful for nephritis detection.

  14. Outcome of glomerulonephritis in live-donor renal transplant recipients: A single-centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Ahmed Ibrahim; Adel, Hany; Rahim, Mona Abdel; Wafa, Ehab Wahba; Shokeir, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the frequency and risk factors affecting the incidence of post-transplantation glomerulonephritis (GN) and the impact of GN on the survival of the graft and the patient. Patients and methods Patients were classified based on histological findings into three groups. Graft survival was ascertained using the Kaplan–Meier method and significance calculated using log-rank tests. For multivariate analysis the Cox model was used. Results Transplant glomerulopathy was the most prevalent glomerular disease in our series followed by recurrent GN and lastly de novo GN. In all, 50% of the de novo GN group had diabetes. The worst graft outcomes were in the recurrent GN group (P = 0.044). Multivariate analysis revealed ageing of the graft and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) immunosuppression as risk factors for development of GN. While, the age of the recipient and donor, anti-lymphocyte globulin induction therapy, and acute rejection were risk factors for poor graft outcomes. Conclusions GN is an important issue after transplantation. Tracking the incidence and progression of histological findings in the graft may help to guide proper management and improve graft outcome. PMID:26609451

  15. Mesangial Localization of Immune Complexes in Experimental Canine Adenovirus Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, N. G.; Morrison, W. I.; Thompson, H.; Cornwell, H. J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Each of a group of 14 dogs was infected experimentally by an intravenous dose of canine adenovirus calculated to allow survival until the initial stages of antibody production; the kidneys of infected dogs were examined during the period of 4-14 days after administration of virus. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with localization of IgG, C3 and viral antigen in mesangial regions was demonstrated. With the electron microscope, electron dense deposits were found scattered throughout the mesangium. There was proliferation of mesangial cells, infiltration into the glomerular tuft of polymorphonuclear leucocytes and, in some cases, focal glomerular necrosis with intracapsular and tubular haemorrhage. By means of an indirect immunofluorescence test, anti-viral antibody was detected in kidney eluates; anti-kidney antibody was not present. ImagesFigs. 5-8Figs. 9-10Figs. 1-4 PMID:4375485

  16. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis combined with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Woo Kyung; Jeong, Jin Uk; Bang, Ki Tae; Shin, Jong Ho; Yoo, Ji Hyung; Kim, Nak Min; Park, Jun Hyung; Kim, Joo Heon

    2015-01-01

    A 58-yr-old man presented with leg edema and subacute weakness of his bilateral lower extremities. Urinary and serum immunoelectrophoresis revealed the presence of lambda-type Bence Jones proteins. He was ultimately diagnosed with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). A renal biopsy specimen showed fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN), which was randomly arranged as 12–20 m nonbranching fibrils in the basement membranes. Immunofluorescence studies were negative for immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgM, IgA, C3, and kappa light chains in the capillary walls and mesangial areas. A Congo red stain for amyloid was negative. Electromyography and nerve conduction velocity examinations results were compatible with the presence of demyelinating polyneuropathy. This case showed a rare combination of FGN, without Ig deposition, and MGUS combined with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). PMID:26484033

  17. Crescentic glomerulonephritis in a polar bear (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Baba, Hiroshi; Kudo, Tomoo; Makino, Yoshinori; Mochizuki, Yasumasa; Takagi, Takayo; Une, Yumi

    2013-11-01

    Spontaneous crescentic glomerulonephritis (CrGN) in animals has only been reported in dog and sheep. We report the pathological features of CrGN in a 17-year-old male polar bear that died due to renal failure. Histologically, the lesions were characterized by fibrocellular crescents, adhesion between Bowman's capsule and the glomerular capillary tuft and an increase in the mesangial matrix in glomeruli. The proliferating cells in the crescent were partly immunopositive for cytokeratin and intensely positive for vimentin, WT-1 and α-smooth muscle actin, suggesting they originated from parietal epithelial cells. Ultrastructually, thickening of the glomerular basement membrane and loss of epithelial cell foot processes were observed with electron-dense deposits. PMID:23856758

  18. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis combined with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sung, Woo Kyung; Jeong, Jin Uk; Bang, Ki Tae; Shin, Jong Ho; Yoo, Ji Hyung; Kim, Nak Min; Park, Jun Hyung; Kim, Joo Heon

    2015-06-01

    A 58-yr-old man presented with leg edema and subacute weakness of his bilateral lower extremities. Urinary and serum immunoelectrophoresis revealed the presence of lambda-type Bence Jones proteins. He was ultimately diagnosed with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). A renal biopsy specimen showed fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN), which was randomly arranged as 12-20 m nonbranching fibrils in the basement membranes. Immunofluorescence studies were negative for immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgM, IgA, C3, and kappa light chains in the capillary walls and mesangial areas. A Congo red stain for amyloid was negative. Electromyography and nerve conduction velocity examinations results were compatible with the presence of demyelinating polyneuropathy. This case showed a rare combination of FGN, without Ig deposition, and MGUS combined with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). PMID:26484033

  19. [Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis: a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency].

    PubMed

    Halfon, Matthieu; Teta, Daniel; Rotman, Samuel; Pruijm, Menno; Humbert, Antoine

    2014-02-26

    Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPG) is a rare clinical syndrome characterized by kidney damage that can lead to irreversible kidney failure. RPG can be caused by primary glomerular disease or can be part of a systemic autoimmune disorder. All RPG have a similar pathophysiology (proliferation of cells in Bowman's capsule and formation of crescents) and clinical evolution (rapidly progressive kidney failure with proteinuria and an active urine sediment). Immunosuppressive therapy and sometimes plasma exchanges are required. Overall- and kidney survival are closely linked to the blood creatinine level at presentation, the percentage of damaged glomeruli, and to the underlying cause. RPG is therefore a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency that needs quick referral to a nephrologist. PMID:24665657

  20. The nephrotic syndrome in a heifer due to glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, A; Spencer, A; Petrie, L

    1980-05-01

    An 18-month-old Friesian heifer, which was admitted in November with a history of weight loss, diarrhoea and submandibular oedema, was found to have an enlarged left kidney and a massive proteinuria. Laboratory investigations revealed that there was a marked hypoalbuminaemia and that the range and the proportions of the individual proteins in the urine were almost identical to those in the serum. Consequently, the nephrotic syndrome was diagnosed. On gross and histopathological examination of the kidneys, there was evidence of pyelonephritis. However, immunofluorescence studies revealed a striking diffuse deposition of immunoglobulin in a predominantly linear pattern along the glomerular basement membranes. Abnormalities of the basement membranes. Abnormalities of the basement membranes were seen on ultrastructural examination and evidence of a flomerular protein leak was detected but changes typical of immune-complex deposition were absent. The immunofluorescence findings suggested a diagnosis of glomerulonephritis mediated by antiglomerular basement membrane antibody. PMID:7414086

  1. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin in renal allografts

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rabadi, Laith; Francis, Jean M.; Henderson, Joel; Ghai, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Glomerulopathy due to dysproteinemia can have a wide spectrum of pathologic and clinical features based on specific characteristics of the abnormal protein and the response induced within the parenchymal tissue. Monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) deposition can manifest as a different glomerular disease. Proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) is a unique entity mimicking immune complex GN that does not conform to any of those subtypes. IgG monoclonal granular deposition in the glomeruli with a pattern similar to immune complex disease suggested by C3 and C1q deposition should prompt consideration of PGNMID. Literature is scarce in terms of recurrence of disease in renal allografts. In this article we present the clinical–pathologic features of three cases of PGNMID in the renal allograft showing the variable course and manifestation of the disease. PMID:26613031

  2. White-blue pyelocalyceal cyst with hydrotic glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Chaurasia, Jai Kumar; Soni, Mayank; Ahmed, Murad; Naim, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    A 5-month-old male infant presented with a 15 day history of distension of abdomen. On clinical examination, a soft lump was palpable in the left lumbar region. Radiological findings suggested an enlarged non-functional left kidney with ureteropelvic adhesive obstruction. The left renal mass was excised and submitted for histopathological examination. The excised renal mass was cystic with its wall partly white and partly blue. Gross and histopathological findings were diagnostic of a white-blue pyelocalyceal cyst with hydrotic glomerulonephritis. This entity needs to be differentiated from a large number of other cystic diseases of the kidney. Intrauterine screening and diagnosis may be significant for a possible early intrauterine uro-laparoscopic recanalisation of the pyeloureteral obstruction to save the affected kidney. PMID:24347451

  3. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease: The utility of routine staining with immunoglobulin light chains

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, K. K.; Nada, R.; Ramachandran, R.; Joshi, K.; Tewari, R.; Kohli, H. S.; Jha, V.; Gupta, K. L.

    2015-01-01

    Proliferative glomerulonephritis occurring as a consequence of monoclonal glomerular deposits of IgG is uncommon. It is a form of renal involvement in monoclonal gammopathy that mimics immune complex glomerulonephritis. Here, we report the first series of proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) from the Indian subcontinent highlighting use of light chain immunofluorescence (IF) in routine renal biopsy interpretation. We retrieved 6 patients diagnosed as proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) out of 160 biopsies (3.7%) with membranoproliferative patterns over 5 1/2 years (2009–2014), one of whom had recurrence 6 months post-renal transplant. Four (67%) patients presented with rapidly progressive renal failure and two (33%) with nephrotic syndrome. None of these patients had overt multiple myeloma. The predominant histologic pattern was membranoproliferative with all the biopsies showing IgG3 Kappa deposits on IF. The deposits were primarily subendothelial on electron microscopy. PMID:26664209

  4. [Aplastic anemia combined with an autoimmune disease (eosinophilic fasciitis or glomerulonephritis)].

    PubMed

    Stebler, C; Tichelli, A; Gratwohl, A; Dazzi, H; Nissen, C; Steiger, U; Speck, B

    1991-06-01

    We describe 3 patients with aplastic anemia and an autoimmune disease. Two had eosinophilic fasciitis and 1 glomerulonephritis. In all patients both diseases were successfully treated by immunosuppressive therapy. Pathophysiological aspects of this association are discussed. PMID:1857945

  5. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease: The utility of routine staining with immunoglobulin light chains.

    PubMed

    Gowda, K K; Nada, R; Ramachandran, R; Joshi, K; Tewari, R; Kohli, H S; Jha, V; Gupta, K L

    2015-01-01

    Proliferative glomerulonephritis occurring as a consequence of monoclonal glomerular deposits of IgG is uncommon. It is a form of renal involvement in monoclonal gammopathy that mimics immune complex glomerulonephritis. Here, we report the first series of proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) from the Indian subcontinent highlighting use of light chain immunofluorescence (IF) in routine renal biopsy interpretation. We retrieved 6 patients diagnosed as proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) out of 160 biopsies (3.7%) with membranoproliferative patterns over 5 1/2 years (2009-2014), one of whom had recurrence 6 months post-renal transplant. Four (67%) patients presented with rapidly progressive renal failure and two (33%) with nephrotic syndrome. None of these patients had overt multiple myeloma. The predominant histologic pattern was membranoproliferative with all the biopsies showing IgG3 Kappa deposits on IF. The deposits were primarily subendothelial on electron microscopy. PMID:26664209

  6. Necrotizing ANCA-Positive Glomerulonephritis Secondary to Culture-Negative Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Van Haare Heijmeijer, Sophie; Wilmes, Dunja; Aydin, Selda; Clerckx, Caroline; Labriola, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) and small-vessel vasculitis may have similar clinical features, including glomerulonephritis. Furthermore the association between IE and ANCA positivity is well documented, making differential diagnosis between IE- and ANCA-associated vasculitis particularly difficult, especially in case of culture-negative IE. We report on one patient with glomerulonephritis secondary to culture-negative IE caused by Bartonella henselae which illustrates this diagnostic difficulty. PMID:26819786

  7. Fundus changes in mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis type II: clinical and fluorescein angiographic findings.

    PubMed Central

    Duvall-Young, J; Short, C D; Raines, M F; Gokal, R; Lawler, W

    1989-01-01

    Previously we have demonstrated a deposit in Bruch's membrane in a single case of mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis type II. We studied a group of patients with this disease and described extensive clinical and fluorescein angiographic abnormalities, which were in marked contrast to the findings in a group of patients with other forms of glomerulonephritis. This finding contributes to our understanding of the pathophysiology of the complex of the retinal pigment epithelium, Bruch's membrane, and choriocapillaris. Images PMID:2605144

  8. CXCR3 Is Involved in Tubulointerstitial Injury in Human Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Segerer, Stephan; Banas, Bernhard; Wörnle, Markus; Schmid, Holger; Cohen, Clemens D.; Kretzler, Matthias; Mack, Matthias; Kiss, Eva; Nelson, Peter J.; Schlöndorff, Detlef; Gröne, Hermann-Josef

    2004-01-01

    Chemokines play pivotal roles in the recruitment of inflammatory cells into the kidney. The chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR5 are expressed on activated T lymphocytes, and expression of CXCR3 by mesangial cells has been suggested. Detailed description of CXCR3 expression might form a rational basis for use as a diagnostic marker and for therapeutic CXCR3 targeting in human glomerulonephritis. We studied the expression of CXCR3 in renal biopsies by immunohistochemistry (n = 45), and real time RT-PCR (n = 78). Biopsies were from patients with IgA nephropathy, lupus nephritis, and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. Furthermore, cultured human mesangial cells (HMC) were studied for CXCR3 expression, and for functional responses to the ligands CXCL10/IP-10 and CXCL9/Mig. CXCR3-positive cells were rarely found in glomerular tufts, but formed a major part of the tubulointerstitial infiltrates. Consistently, CXCR3 mRNA expression was too low to be quantified in glomerular compartments, and was not detectable in HMC. The published staining for CXCR3 of mesangial cells could be traced to cross-reactivity of an antibody for CXCR3 with a potentially related chemokine receptor as revealed by FACS analysis. Despite an absence of CXCR3 expression, mesangial cells reacted to CXCR3 ligands by proliferation and migration, which was blocked by pertussis toxin but not by an anti-CXCR3 antibody. These results indicate that HMC do not express the classical CXCR3, but may potentially express a related receptor with shared ligand specificity. By immunohistochemistry the number of CXCR3-positive cells, mainly interstitial T cells, correlated with renal function, proteinuria, and percentage of globally sclerosed glomeruli. A significant morphological and numerical correlation between CD3, CXCR3, and CCR5-positive cells indicated a CXCR3/CCR5 double-positive T cell population. No apparent difference in the CXCR3 expression pattern was found between disease entities. CXCR3 expression

  9. Glomerulonephritis in a ferret with feline coronavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yuta; Tochitani, Tomoaki; Kouchi, Mami; Matsumoto, Izumi; Yamada, Toru; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2015-09-01

    A male domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo), which was purchased from outside of Japan at 13 weeks of age, was euthanized at 18 months of age because of poor health. At autopsy, the liver, spleen, and mesenteric lymph node were enlarged, and white foci were observed on the outer surface of the liver. The outer surface of the mesenteric lymph node was dark red. Histologically, granulomas were observed in the liver, spleen, bone marrow, and lymph nodes, composed mainly of aggregated epithelioid macrophages, some of which were positive to an anti-feline coronavirus (FCoV; Alphacoronavirus 1) antibody in immunohistochemistry. Mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis was observed, and periodic acid-Schiff-positive deposits were observed along glomerular capillary walls. These deposits stained pale red with periodic acid-methenamine silver stain and red with Masson trichrome stain, and were also observed in the mesangial matrix. In affected glomeruli, glomerular capillary walls and mesangial areas were positive for anti-ferret immunoglobulin G. By electron microscopy, subepithelial and mesangial electron-dense deposits were observed consistent with immune complex deposition. The deposition of immune complexes may have been associated with FCoV infection. PMID:26319601

  10. Sjögren Syndrome and Cryoglobulinemic Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Anand, Ananya; Krishna, Gopal G; Sibley, Richard K; Kambham, Neeraja

    2015-09-01

    We report the case of a 53-year-old woman with Sjögren syndrome and cryoglobulinemia. The patient presented with nephrotic syndrome, hematuria, and reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate. The kidney biopsy revealed diffuse endocapillary proliferation and leukocyte exudation with focal intraluminal hyaline thrombi, prominent tubulointerstitial inflammation, and vasculitis. Diffuse granular mesangial and segmental to global capillary wall staining was observed on immunofluorescence with antisera to C3 and immunoglobulin M (IgM), with less intense staining indicative of IgG and κ and λ light chains. A biopsy diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome-related cryoglobulinemic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and vasculitis was rendered. Subsequent investigations revealed the presence of circulating type II cryoglobulins with cryocrit of 9%. Although rare, Sjögren syndrome is the most common cause of non-hepatitis C virus-related mixed cryoglobulinemia. We discuss the possible pathogenic mechanisms involved in the development of mixed cryoglobulinemia and its evolution to lymphoma, as best described in the setting of hepatitis C virus infection. Although the specific antigen involved is unknown, it is likely that the mixed cryoglobulinemia in Sjögren syndrome is triggered by the long-term B-cell stimulation, resulting in clonal proliferation of B cells. Additional chromosomal aberrations and cytokine milieu alterations, as seen in hepatitis C virus infection, may result in prolonged B-cell survival and progression to non-Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:25661680

  11. What is new in the management of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis?

    PubMed

    Greenhall, George H B; Salama, Alan D

    2015-04-01

    Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) results from severe crescentic damage to glomeruli and leads to irreversible kidney failure if not diagnosed and managed in a timely fashion. Traditional treatment has relied on glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide, with additional plasmapheresis for certain conditions. Here we describe updates in the management of RPGN, according to the underlying renal pathology. However, there remains a paucity of trials that have enrolled patients with more advanced renal disease, dialysis dependence or with RPGN, and we are therefore still reliant on extrapolation of data from studies of patients with a less severe form of disease. In addition, reporting bias results in publication of cases or cohorts showing benefit for newer agents in advanced disease or RPGN, but it remains unclear how many unsuccessful outcomes in these circumstances take place. Since clinical trials specifically in RPGN are unlikely, use of biologic registries or combination of sufficient sized cohort series may provide indications of benefit outside of a clinical trial setting and should be encouraged, in order to provide some evidence for the efficacy of therapeutic regimens in RPGN and advanced renal disease. PMID:25815169

  12. Incidence of post-transplant glomerulonephritis and its impact on graft outcome

    PubMed Central

    An, Jung Nam; Lee, Jung Pyo; Oh, Yun Jung; Oh, Yun Kyu; Ha, Jong-won; Chae, Dong-Wan; Kim, Yon Su; Lim, Chun Soo

    2012-01-01

    Background Herein, the significance of post-transplant glomerulonephritis (PTGN) has been revisited to investigate whether PTGN induces allograft failure. The aim of this study was to identify the incidence of PTGN and its association with allograft failure, as well as to analyze the risk factors for PTGN. Methods Among the 996 Korean patients who underwent kidney transplantation in a multicenter cohort from 1995 to 2010, 764 patients were enrolled in this study. Results The incidence rate of PTGN was 9.7% and 17.0% at 5 and 10 years of follow-up, respectively. PTGN was diagnosed in 17.8% of the recipients with results of biopsy tests or clinical diagnosis identifying glomerular diseases as the underlying cause, compared with 0.0%, 4.4%, 4.9%, 5.5%, and 5.7% of the recipients with renal vascular diseases, renal interstitial diseases/pyelonephritis/uropathy, diabetic renal disease, hereditary renal diseases, and diseases with unknown etiologies, respectively. Allograft survival was significantly decreased in patients with PTGN. PTGN was associated with a fourfold increase in graft failure with a hazard ratio of 7.11 for both acute rejection and PTGN. Results of the risk factor analysis for PTGN revealed that the underlying glomerular renal diseases and treatment methods using drugs such as tacrolimus and basiliximab significantly increased PTGN development, after adjusting for other risk factors. Conclusion We conclude that PTGN is strongly associated with poor kidney allograft survival. Therefore, optimal management of recurrent or de novo GN should be the critical focus of post-transplant care. PMID:26889425

  13. Understanding the complement-mediated glomerular diseases: focus on membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and C3 glomerulopathies.

    PubMed

    Lionaki, Sophia; Gakiopoulou, Hara; Boletis, John N

    2016-09-01

    An enhanced understanding of the role of complement in the pathogenesis of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis has led to reclassification of the latter into immunoglobulin-mediated and non-immunoglobulin-mediated disease. The new classification schema resulted in improved diagnostic clinical algorithms, while it brought into light again the diseases, which are characterized by the presence of glomerular deposits, composed predominantly by C3, in the absence of significant amounts of immunoglobulins in renal biopsy, namely, C3 glomerulopathies (dense deposit disease and C3 glomerulonephritis). Despite the lack of randomized controlled trials following the advances in the understanding of the pathogenetic pathways involved in membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, it is important that the new mechanistic approach has opened new roads for the exploration and discovery of targeted therapies. PMID:27356907

  14. [The function of the hypophyseal-gonadal system in different variants of glomerulonephritis in children].

    PubMed

    Korovina, N A; Gavriushova, L P; Ametov, A S; Tvorogova, T M; Mumladze, E B; Toritsina, L K

    1990-01-01

    A total of 28 children with different varieties of glomerulonephritis were examined for the pituitary-gonadal system (PGS). The examination included measurements of follicle-stimulating and luteinizing hormones, prolactin, estradiol, progesterone and testosterone. To define standards of the content of the hormones under study, 45 children of the control group were examined. The relationship was analyzed between the content of hormones and the disease activity and gravity. The most active phase of glomerulonephritis was characterized by maximal alterations in the content of pituitary and gonadal hormones. The content of the latter ones appeared to be considerably changed in patients with the mixed pattern of glomerulonephritis, attesting to profound functional derangements in the PGS. The intensity of those derangements was determined by the severity of the pathological process. PMID:2259596

  15. Structural characterization of the mesangial cell type IV collagenase and enhanced expression in a model of immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Lovett, D. H.; Johnson, R. J.; Marti, H. P.; Martin, J.; Davies, M.; Couser, W. G.

    1992-01-01

    Secretion of glomerular cell-derived matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their specific inhibitors, TIMP-1,2, may play an important role in the turnover of the glomerular extracellular matrix under basal and pathologic conditions. A 66-68 kd MMP secreted by cultured mesangial cells (MC) with activity against Type IV collagen and gelatin was purified and shown by amino-acid sequence analysis to be identical with a Type IV collagenase/gelatinase secreted by certain transformed tumor cell lines. The expression of the mesangial MMP in vivo was limited within the kidney to a small subset of the intrinsic glomerular mesangial cell population. After induction of acute anti-Thy 1.1 glomerulonephritis, there was a large increment in the number of Type IV collagenase-secreting MC, temporally coincident with the development of mesangial hypercellularity. The expression of the MMP inhibitor protein, TIMP-1, was not changed over this period. Ultrastructural studies localized the mesangial MMP to areas of evolving mesangiolysis and at sites of glomerular basement membrane disruption. Enhanced expression of the mesangial cell-derived Type IV collagenase may contribute to the evolution of glomerular injury in this model of immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis or may be involved in the extensive matrix remodeling process that accompanies this form of glomerular injury. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 and Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:1321565

  16. Glomerulonephritis-induced changes in kidney gene expression in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pavkovic, Mira; Riefke, Björn; Frisk, Anna-Lena; Gröticke, Ina; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated a glomerulonephritis (GN) model in rats induced by nephrotoxic serum (NTS) which contains antibodies against the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). The anti-GBM GN model in rats is widely used since its biochemical and histopathological characteristics are similar to crescentic nephritis and Goodpasture's disease in humans (Pusey, 2003[2]). Male Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were dosed once with 1, 2.5 and 5 ml/kg nephrotoxic serum (NTS) or 1.5 and 5 ml/kg NTS, respectively. GN and tubular damage were observed histopathologically in all treated rats after 14 days. To obtain insight into molecular processes during GN pathogenesis, mRNA expression was investigated in WKY and SD kidneys using Affymetrix's GeneChip Rat genome 230_2.0 arrays (GSE64265). The immunopathological processes during GN are still not fully understood and likely involve both innate and adaptive immunity. In the present study, several hundred mRNAs were found deregulated, which functionally were mostly associated with inflammation and regeneration. The β-chain of the major histocompatibility complex class II RT1.B (Rt1-Bb) and complement component 6 (C6) were identified as two mRNAs differentially expressed between WKY and SD rat strains which could be related to known different susceptibilities to NTS of different rat strains; both were increased in WKY and decreased in SD rats (Pavkovic et al., 2015 [1]). Increased Rt1-Bb expression in WKY rats could indicate a stronger and more persistent cellular reaction of the adaptive immune system in this strain, in line with findings indicating adaptive immune reactions during GN. The complement cascade is also known to be essential for GN development, especially terminal cascade products like C6. PMID:26697341

  17. Immune complex erythrocyte complement receptor interactions in vivo during induction of glomerulonephritis in nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Birmingham, D.J.; Hebert, L.A.; Cosio, F.G.; VanAman, M.E. )

    1990-08-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that the erythrocyte complement receptor (E-CR) system, which is unique to the primate, may play an important role in the clearing of immune complexes (ICs) from the circulation. However, all previous investigations of IC/E-CR interactions in vivo have involved the study of small amounts of preformed or passively formed ICs interacting with E-CR that were numerically in vast excess. The present study was undertaken to assess IC/E-CR interactions under conditions in which large amounts of ICs were formed in the circulation, amounts that when sustained for several weeks by daily intravenous administration of antigen resulted in the development of active glomerulonephritis. Twelve cynomolgus monkeys with E-CR levels ranging from 25 to 5000 mean CRs per erythrocyte (CR/E) were actively immunized to BGG, and 6 to 12 weeks later they were studied first at low levels of IC formation in vivo and then at high levels of IC formation in vivo (H-Protocol experiments, mean 125I-labeled BGG dose 4.9 mg/kg given over 10 minutes, a state approximating antigen-antibody equivalence). Cynomolgus monkeys with fewer than 100 CR/E showed no evidence of binding of ICs to erythrocytes with either low-dose or high-dose 125I-labeled BGG. However, cynomolgus monkeys with greater than 450 CR/E showed significant binding of ICs to erythrocytes: mean peak binding of 125I-labeled BGG to erythrocytes was 22.1% +/- 1.1% in the L-Protocol experiments and 33.4% +/- 8.0% in the H-Protocol experiments. During H-Protocol experiments, mean CR/E, measured by using a monoclonal anti-human CR1 antibody, decreased acutely, with recovery of E-CR levels within the next 24 to 72 hours. The acute decrease in E-CR levels could not be accounted for by occupancy of E-CR by ICs or by change in hematocrit.

  18. Preferential effectiveness of cyclosporin in patients receiving kidney transplants after glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Cats, S; Terasaki, P I; Perdue, S; Mickey, M R

    1985-03-01

    Glomerulonephritis patients transplanted with cadaver kidneys had a significantly higher one-year graft survival when immunosuppressed with cyclosporin rather than standard therapy (80% versus 59%, p less than 10(-5]. For nephrosclerosis patients the corresponding rates were 70% and 59% (p greater than 0.05); and in those with antecedent diabetes mellitus, polycystic kidney, and pyelonephritis the differences were negligible. In glomerulonephritis patients, but not in the other groups, cyclosporin was additive to the effect of transfusions and of HLA-A, B and HLA-Dr matching. PMID:2857855

  19. Influenza vaccination induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis and pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yanai-Berar, N; Ben-Itzhak, O; Gree, J; Nakhoul, F

    2002-09-01

    Influenza vaccination is a widely accepted practice, particularly among the elderly and high-risk individuals. Minor and transitory side effects following the vaccination are common, while systemic complications are infrequently reported. We describe here a case of a patient who presented to the emergency room with arthralgia, myalgias and purpura, following influenza vaccination. Necrotizing vasculitis associated with pauci-immune glomerulonephritis was observed on kidney biopsy. With increasing use of influenza vaccination, attention should be drawn to the possible expression of systemic adverse effects such as vasculitis and glomerulonephritis. PMID:12356192

  20. Membranous glomerulonephritis in rheumatoid arthritis unrelated to gold, D-penicillamine or other connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Zarza, L P; Sanchez, E N; Acin, P A; Ara, J M; Baños, J G

    1996-07-01

    We report a 58-year-old woman with classical rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who developed a membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN). She had never been treated with gold or D-penicillamine; other connective tissue diseases as well as hepatitis B were excluded. We suggest that the responsible cause of MGN is RA. PMID:8853174

  1. Immunopathology of glomerulonephritis associated with chronic woodchuck hepatitis virus infection in woodchucks (Marmota monax).

    PubMed Central

    Peters, D. N.; Steinberg, H.; Anderson, W. I.; Hornbuckle, W. E.; Cote, P. J.; Gerin, J. L.; Lewis, R. M.; Tennant, B. C.

    1992-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of necropsy findings of 705 woodchucks was performed to determine the prevalence and morphology of immune-mediated glomerulonephritis, its relationship to woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) infection, and the presence of major WHV antigens. Twenty-six woodchucks had glomerular lesions. Renal tissue of the 26 animals was evaluated histologically and immunohistochemically for immune-mediated glomerulonephritis. Of these 26 animals, immune-mediated glomerulonephritis was diagnosed in six, all of which were chronic WHV carriers. Membranous glomerulonephritis was identified in three animals, two of which also had mesangial proliferation. Host immunoglobulin was present within the mesangium and along capillary loops in all three. Woodchuck hepatitis virus core antigen (WHcAg) was present along capillary loops of two of these animals, one membranous and one mixed, and in the mesangium of all three. Woodchuck hepatitis virus surface antigen (WHsAg) deposition was similar to WHcAg deposition but was only present along capillaries in those animals with mixed nephritis. The remaining three animals had mesangial proliferation. WHsAg and host immunoglobulin deposition were predominately mesangial; WHcAg was not detected. Transmission electron microscopy showed thickening of the capillary loop basement membranes and subepithelial electron-dense deposits in animal one, and deposits in the mesangium in animal six. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:1632459

  2. The Occurrence or Fibrillary Glomerulonephritis in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus May Not Be Coincidental: A Report of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    González-Cabrera, Fayna; Henríquez-Palop, Fernando; Ramírez-Puga, Ana; Santana-Estupiñán, Raquel; Plaza-Toledano, Celia; Antón-Pérez, Gloria; Marrero-Robayna, Silvia; Ramírez-Medina, Davinia; Gallego-Samper, Roberto; Vega-Díaz, Nicanor; Camacho-Galan, Rafael; Rodríguez-Pérez, José C.

    2013-01-01

    Although clinical presentation of fibrillary glomerulonephritis is similar to most forms of glomerulonephritis, it is usually difficult to make the diagnosis. Clinical manifestations include proteinuria, microscopic haematuria, nephrotic syndrome, and impairment of renal function. A diagnosis of fibrillary glomerulonephritis is only confirmed by renal biopsy and it must comprise electronmicroscopy-verified ultrastructural findings. We report four cases between 45–50 years old with documented type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and arterial hypertension. All patients were found to have fibrils on kidney biopsy. The differential diagnosis of fibrils in the setting of diabetes mellitus is also discussed. PMID:23762079

  3. Nephrotic range proteinuria in c-ANCA-positive crescentic glomerulonephritis with linear immune deposits

    PubMed Central

    Singh, N. P.; Gulati, S.; Garg, V.; Beniwal, P.; Garg, S.

    2008-01-01

    The three broad groups of rapidly progressing glomerulonephritis are anti glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease, renal vasculitis characterized by antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody positivity, and a heterogeneous group with granular immune deposits. Anti-GBM disease with cytoplasmic antineutrophilic antibodies (c-ANCA) positivity (type III disease) is not known to present with nephrotic syndrome. We report here a rare presentation of nephrotic syndrome in Type III disease. Larger studies are warranted to determine whether the amount and/or type of immune deposits decide the range of proteinuria. These studies are also required to elucidate the impact of immune complex deposition on renal disease in c-ANCA-positive glomerulonephritis and to outline its pathogenetic mechanism. PMID:20142931

  4. Heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) disease and glomerulonephritis in a black-footed cat (Felis nigripes).

    PubMed

    Deem, S L; Heard, D J; LaRock, R

    1998-06-01

    A 6-yr-old, 1.36-kg, intact female black-footed cat (Felis nigripes) was presented to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of Florida, with a history of depression, lethargy, and anorexia. Cardiac dysfunction and renal failure were diagnosed on the basis of antemortem and postmortem findings. At necropsy, heartworms (Dirofilaria immitis), glomerulonephritis, and endometritis were present. The glomerulonephritis could have been immune mediated and may have been associated with the heartworm infection or the chronic endometritis or both. Heartworm disease should be included in the list of differential diagnoses for any exotic cat housed outdoors in an endemic heartworm region that dies peracutely or has suggestive gastrointestinal or respiratory signs. Heartworm prophylaxis and annual serologic testing in exotic cats housed outdoors in heartworm endemic regions are recommended. PMID:9732037

  5. Familial C3 glomerulonephritis associated with mutations in the gene for complement factor B.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Hideaki; Konomoto, Takao; Tanaka, Etsuko; Hisano, Satoshi; Yoshida, Yoko; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Miyata, Toshiyuki; Nunoi, Hiroyuki

    2015-05-01

    We report the first case of familial C3 glomerulonephritis (C3GN) associated with mutations in the gene for complement factor B (CFB). A 12-year-old girl was diagnosed with biopsy-proven C3GN. Her mother had a history of treatment for membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, and her brother had hypocomplementemia without urinary abnormalities. DNA analysis revealed heterozygosity for CFB p.S367R in the patient, mother and brother. Evaluation of the structure-function relationship supports that this mutation has gain-of-function effects in CFB. The present case suggests that CFB has an important role in the etiology of C3GN and provides a new insight into anticomplement therapy approaches. PMID:25758434

  6. Hepatitis E Virus-Induced Cryoglobulinemic Glomerulonephritis in a Nonimmunocompromised Person.

    PubMed

    Guinault, Damien; Ribes, David; Delas, Audrey; Milongo, David; Abravanel, Florence; Puissant-Lubrano, Bénédicte; Izopet, Jacques; Kamar, Nassim

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV)-related kidney disease and symptomatic cryoglobulinemia have been observed in solid-organ transplant recipients. However, HEV RNA in the cryoprecipitate has not yet been assessed. We report what to our knowledge is the first documented case of autochthonous HEV-induced cryoglobulinemic crescentic and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in an immunocompetent man with no notable medical history. He presented with edema, hypertension, increased serum creatinine level, and nephrotic syndrome. Type II cryoglobulinemia with monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) κ light chain was detected. Anti-HEV IgG and IgM, as well as HEV RNA, were detected in serum and cryoprecipitate. Histologic analysis of a kidney biopsy specimen revealed features of crescentic and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. After HEV clearance, kidney and liver parameters improved and HEV RNA and cryoglobulinemia were undetectable. Hence, we conclude that HEV can cause severe kidney disease and should be considered in cases of unexplained glomerular disease. PMID:26682764

  7. Ameliorative effects of arctiin from Arctium lappa on experimental glomerulonephritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Guo; Wu, Jin-Zhong; Sun, Lian-Na; Han, Ting; Du, Jian; Ye, Qi; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yu-Guang

    2009-11-01

    Membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) remains the most common cause of adult-onset nephrotic syndrome in the world and up to 40% of untreated patients will progress to end-stage renal disease. Although the treatment of MGN with immunosuppressants or steroid hormones can attenuate the deterioration of renal function, numerous treatment-related complications have also been established. In this study, the ameliorative effects of arctiin, a natural compound isolated from the fruits of Arctium lappa, on rat glomerulonephritis induced by cationic bovine serum albumin (cBSA) were determined. After oral administration of arctiin (30, 60, 120 mg/kgd) for three weeks, the levels of serum creatinine (Scr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and 24-h urine protein content markedly decreased, while endogenous creatinine clearance rate (ECcr) significantly increased. The parameters of renal lesion, hypercellularity, infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN), fibrinoid necrosis, focal and segmental proliferation and interstitial infiltration, were reversed. In addition, we observed that arctiin evidently reduced the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), suppressed nuclear factor-kappaB p65 (NF-kappaB) DNA binding activity, and enhanced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. These findings suggest that the ameliorative effects of arctiin on glomerulonephritis is carried out mainly by suppression of NF-kappaB activation and nuclear translocation and the decreases in the levels of these pro-inflammatory cytokines, while SOD is involved in the inhibitory pathway of NF-kappaB activation. Arctiin has favorable potency for the development of an inhibitory agent of NF-kappaB and further application to clinical treatment of glomerulonephritis, though clinical studies are required. PMID:19524415

  8. CCR6 Recruits Regulatory T Cells and Th17 Cells to the Kidney in Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Jan-Eric; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Steinmetz, Oliver M.; Peters, Anett; Riedel, Jan-Hendrik; Erhardt, Annette; Wegscheid, Claudia; Velden, Joachim; Fehr, Susanne; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Tiegs, Gisa; Stahl, Rolf A.K.

    2010-01-01

    T cells recruited to the kidney contribute to tissue damage in crescentic and proliferative glomerulonephritides. Chemokines and their receptors regulate T cell trafficking, but the expression profile and functional importance of chemokine receptors for renal CD4+ T cell subsets are incompletely understood. In this study, we observed that renal FoxP3+CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and IL-17–producing CD4+ T (Th17) cells express the chemokine receptor CCR6, whereas IFNγ-producing Th1 cells are CCR6−. Induction of experimental glomerulonephritis (nephrotoxic nephritis) in mice resulted in upregulation of the only CCR6 ligand, CCL20, followed by T cell recruitment, renal tissue injury, albuminuria, and loss of renal function. CCR6 deficiency aggravated renal injury and increased mortality (from uremia) among nephritic mice. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, CCR6 deficiency reduced infiltration of Tregs and Th17 cells but did not affect recruitment of Th1 cells in the setting of glomerulonephritis. Adoptive transfer of WT but not CCR6-deficient Tregs attenuated morphologic and functional renal injury in nephritic mice. Furthermore, reconstitution with WT Tregs protected CCR6−/− mice from aggravated nephritis. Taken together, these data suggest that CCR6 mediates renal recruitment of both Tregs and Th17 cells and that the reduction of anti-inflammatory Tregs in the presence of a fully functional Th1 response aggravates experimental glomerulonephritis. PMID:20299360

  9. P2X7 Deficiency Attenuates Renal Injury in Experimental Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Simon R.J.; Turner, Clare M.; Elliott, James I.; McDaid, John; Hewitt, Reiko; Smith, Jennifer; Pickering, Matthew C.; Whitehouse, Darren L.; Cook, H. Terence; Burnstock, Geoffrey; Pusey, Charles D.; Unwin, Robert J.; Tam, Frederick W.K.

    2009-01-01

    The P2X7 receptor is a ligand-gated cation channel that is normally expressed by a variety of immune cells, including macrophages and lymphocytes. Because it leads to membrane blebbing, release of IL-1β, and cell death by apoptosis or necrosis, it is a potential therapeutic target for a variety of inflammatory diseases. Although the P2X7 receptor is usually not detectable in normal renal tissue, we previously reported increased expression of both mRNA and protein in mesangial cells and macrophages infiltrating the glomeruli in animal models of antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis. In this study, we used P2X7-knockout mice in the same experimental model of glomerulonephritis and found that P2X7 deficiency was significantly renoprotective compared with wild-type controls, evidenced by better renal function, a striking reduction in proteinuria, and decreased histologic glomerular injury. In addition, the selective P2X7 antagonist A-438079 prevented the development of antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis in rats. These results support a proinflammatory role for P2X7 in immune-mediated renal injury and suggest that the P2X7 receptor is a potential therapeutic target. PMID:19389853

  10. Mast Cell Stabilization Ameliorates Autoimmune Anti-Myeloperoxidase Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Gan, Poh-Yi; O'Sullivan, Kim M; Ooi, Joshua D; Alikhan, Maliha A; Odobasic, Dragana; Summers, Shaun A; Kitching, A Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen R

    2016-05-01

    Observations in experimental murine myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) show mast cells degranulate, thus enhancing injury as well as producing immunomodulatory IL-10. Here we report that, compared with biopsy specimens from control patients, renal biopsy specimens from 44 patients with acute AAV had more mast cells in the interstitium, which correlated with the severity of tubulointerstitial injury. Furthermore, most of the mast cells were degranulated and spindle-shaped in patients with acute AAV, indicating an activated phenotype. We hypothesized that the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate would attenuate mast cell degranulation without affecting IL-10 production. We induced anti-MPO GN by immunizing mice with MPO and a low dose of anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody. When administered before or after induction of MPO autoimmunity in these mice, disodium cromoglycate attenuated mast cell degranulation, development of autoimmunity, and development of GN, without diminishing IL-10 production. In contrast, administration of disodium cromoglycate to mast cell-deficient mice had no effect on the development of MPO autoimmunity or GN. MPO-specific CD4(+) effector T cell proliferation was enhanced by co-culture with mast cells, but in the presence of disodium cromoglycate, proliferation was inhibited and IL-10 production was enhanced. These results indicate that disodium cromoglycate blocks injurious mast cell degranulation specifically without affecting the immunomodulatory role of these cells. Thus as a therapeutic, disodium cromoglycate may substantially enhance the regulatory role of mast cells in MPO-AAV. PMID:26374606

  11. Complication of Corticosteroid Treatment by Acute Plasmodium malariae Infection Confirmed by Small-Subunit rRNA Sequencing▿

    PubMed Central

    To, Kelvin K. W.; Teng, Jade L. L.; Wong, Samson S. Y.; Ngan, Antonio H. Y.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of acute Plasmodium malariae infection complicating corticosteroid treatment for membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in a patient from an area where P. malariae infection is not endemic. A peripheral blood smear showed typical band-form trophozoites compatible with P. malariae or Plasmodium knowlesi. SSU rRNA sequencing confirmed the identity to be P. malariae. PMID:20739487

  12. T cells, adhesion molecules and modulation of apoptosis in visceral leishmaniasis glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Immune complex deposition is the accepted mechanism of pathogenesis of VL glomerulopathy however other immune elements may participate. Further in the present study, no difference was seen between immunoglobulin and C3b deposit intensity in glomeruli between infected and non-infected dogs thus T cells, adhesion molecules and parameters of proliferation and apoptosis were analysed in dogs with naturally acquired VL from an endemic area. The dog is the most important domestic reservoir of the protozoa Leishmania (L.) chagasi that causes visceral leishmaniasis (VL). The similarity of VL manifestation in humans and dogs renders the study of canine VL nephropathy of interest with regard to human pathology. Methods From 55 dogs with VL and 8 control non-infected dogs from an endemic area, kidney samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for immunoglobulin and C3b deposits, staining for CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, ICAM-1, P-selectin and quantified using morphometry. Besides proliferation marker Ki-67, apoptosis markers M30 and TUNEL staining, and related cytokines TNF-α, IL-1α were searched and quantified. Results We observed similar IgG, IgM and IgA and C3b deposit intensity in dogs with VL and non-infected control dogs. However we detected the Leishmania antigen in cells in glomeruli in 54, CD4+ T cells in the glomeruli of 44, and CD8+ T cells in 17 of a total of 55 dogs with VL. Leishmania antigen was absent and T cells were absent/scarse in eight non-infected control dogs. CD 4+ T cells predominate in proliferative patterns of glomerulonephritis, however the presence of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were not different in intensity in different patterns of glomerulonephritis. The expression of ICAM-1 and P-selectin was significantly greater in the glomeruli of infected dogs than in control dogs. In all patterns of glomerulonephritis the expression of ICAM-1 ranged from minimum to moderately severe and P-selectin from absent to severe. In the control animals the

  13. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-associated Vasculitis Superimposed on Infection-related Glomerulonephritis Secondary to Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium Complex Infection.

    PubMed

    Asano, Shuichi; Mizuno, Shige; Okachi, Shotaro; Aso, Hiromichi; Wakahara, Keiko; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Ito, Satoru; Kozaki, Yohei; Katsuno, Takayuki; Maruyama, Shoichi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman was diagnosed with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection and received no treatment. Disease progression was evident one year later with the development of myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) titers and systemic symptoms of a fever, polyarthritis, purpura, and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Her symptoms did not improve with antibiotic treatment. A renal biopsy revealed crescentic glomerulonephritis with immunodeposition. According to these findings, she was diagnosed with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) superimposed on infection-related glomerulonephritis (IRGN). Although there was a risk of aggravating an underlying infection, the combination therapy of corticosteroid and antibiotics improved AAV, IRGN, and even the lung radiological findings. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of AAV and IRGN secondary to pulmonary MAC infection. PMID:27580547

  14. Novel Role of Toll-Like Receptor 3 in Hepatitis C-Associated Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Wörnle, Markus; Schmid, Holger; Banas, Bernhard; Merkle, Monika; Henger, Anna; Roeder, Maximilian; Blattner, Simone; Bock, Elisabeth; Kretzler, Matthias; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Schlöndorff, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is frequently complicated by glomerulonephritis with immune complexes containing viral RNA. We examined the potential influence of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), specifically TLR3 recognition of viral dsRNA exemplified by polyriboinosinic:polyribocytidylic acid [poly(I:C) RNA]. Normal human kidney stained positive for TLR3 on mesangial cells (MCs), vascular smooth muscle cells, and collecting duct epithelium. Cultured MCs have low TLR3 mRNA levels with predominant intracellular protein localization, which was increased by tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, interferon (IFN)-γ, and the TLR3 ligand poly(I:C) RNA. Poly(I:C) RNA stimulation of MCs increased mRNA and protein synthesis of IL-6, IL-1β, M-CSF, IL-8/CXCL8, RANTES/CCL5, MCP-1/CCL2, and ICAM-I; it also increased anti-proliferative and proapoptotic effects, the latter of which was decreased by inhibiting caspase-8. In microdissected glomeruli of normal and non-HCV membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis biopsies, TLR3 mRNA expression was low. In contrast TLR3 mRNA expression was significantly increased in hepatitis C-positive glomerulonephritis and was associated with enhanced mRNA for RANTES/CCL5 and MCP-1/CCL2. We hypothesize that immune complexes containing viral RNA activate mesangial TLR3 during HCV infection, thereby contributing to chemokine/cytokine release and effecting proliferation and apoptosis. Thus, TLR3 expression on renal cells, and especially MCs, may establish a link between viral infections and glomerular diseases. PMID:16436653

  15. The immunodominant myeloperoxidase T-cell epitope induces local cell-mediated injury in antimyeloperoxidase glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Joshua D; Chang, Janet; Hickey, Michael J; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Fugger, Lars; Holdsworth, Stephen R; Kitching, A Richard

    2012-09-25

    Microscopic polyangiitis is an autoimmune small-vessel vasculitis that often manifests as focal and necrotizing glomerulonephritis and renal failure. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic Abs (ANCAs) specific for myeloperoxidase (MPO) play a role in this disease, but the role of autoreactive MPO-specific CD4(+) T cells is uncertain. By screening overlapping peptides of 20 amino acids spanning the MPO molecule, we identified an immunodominant MPO CD4(+) T-cell epitope (MPO(409-428)). Immunizing C57BL/6 mice with MPO(409-428) induced focal necrotizing glomerulonephritis similar to that seen after whole MPO immunization, when MPO was deposited in glomeruli. Transfer of an MPO(409-428)-specific CD4(+) T-cell clone to Rag1(-/-) mice induced focal necrotizing glomerulonephritis when glomerular MPO deposition was induced either by passive transfer of MPO-ANCA and LPS or by planting MPO(409-428) conjugated to a murine antiglomerular basement membrane mAb. MPO(409-428) also induced biologically active anti-MPO Abs in mice. The MPO(409-428) epitope has a minimum immunogenic core region of 11 amino acids, MPO(415-426), with several critical residues. ANCA-activated neutrophils not only induce injury but lodged the autoantigen MPO in glomeruli, allowing autoreactive anti-MPO CD4(+) cells to induce delayed type hypersensitivity-like necrotizing glomerular lesions. These studies identify an immunodominant MPO T-cell epitope and redefine how effector responses can induce injury in MPO-ANCA-associated microscopic polyangiitis. PMID:22955884

  16. IgA-dominant post-infectious glomerulonephritis presenting as a fatal pulmonary-renal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saad, Marc; Daoud, Magda; Nasr, Patricia; Syed, Rafeel; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, post-infectious glomerulonephritis underwent major changes in its epidemiology, pathophysiology, and outcomes. We are reporting a case of IgA-dominant post-infectious glomerulonephritis (IgA-PIGN) presenting as a fatal pulmonary-renal syndrome. An 86-year-old Filipino man presented with worsening dyspnea, hemoptysis, and decreased urine output over 2 weeks. Past medical history is significant for hypertension, chronic kidney disease stage III, and pneumonia 3 weeks prior treated with intravenous cefazolin for methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Physical examination was remarkable for heart rate of 109/min and respiratory rate of 25/min saturating 99% on 3 liters via nasal cannula. There were bibasilar rales in the lungs and bilateral ankle edema. A chest radiograph showed bibasilar opacifications. Blood work was significant for hemoglobin of 8.3 g/dL and creatinine of 9.2 mg/dL (baseline of 1.67). TTE showed EF 55%. Urinalysis revealed large blood and red blood cell casts. Kidney ultrasound showed bilateral echogenicity compatible with renal disease. Pulse methylprednisolone therapy and hemodialysis were initiated with patient's condition precluding kidney biopsy. Serology workup for rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis was negative. On day 7, the patient required mechanical ventilation; bronchoscopy showed alveolar hemorrhage and plasmapheresis was initiated. Renal biopsy revealed IgA-PIGN with endocapillary and focal extracapillary proliferative and exudative features. IgA-PIGN occurs in diabetic elderly (mean age of 60 years), 0-16 weeks after an infection mainly by Staphylococcus. However, this nondiabetic patient had normal complement IgA-PIGN with fatal pulmonary-renal syndrome. Understanding the pathogenesis and identifying the nephrotoxic bacteria species and the aberrant IgA molecule will open new insights toward prevention and treatment. PMID:26347210

  17. IgA-dominant post-infectious glomerulonephritis presenting as a fatal pulmonary-renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Marc; Daoud, Magda; Nasr, Patricia; Syed, Rafeel; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, post-infectious glomerulonephritis underwent major changes in its epidemiology, pathophysiology, and outcomes. We are reporting a case of IgA-dominant post-infectious glomerulonephritis (IgA-PIGN) presenting as a fatal pulmonary-renal syndrome. An 86-year-old Filipino man presented with worsening dyspnea, hemoptysis, and decreased urine output over 2 weeks. Past medical history is significant for hypertension, chronic kidney disease stage III, and pneumonia 3 weeks prior treated with intravenous cefazolin for methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Physical examination was remarkable for heart rate of 109/min and respiratory rate of 25/min saturating 99% on 3 liters via nasal cannula. There were bibasilar rales in the lungs and bilateral ankle edema. A chest radiograph showed bibasilar opacifications. Blood work was significant for hemoglobin of 8.3 g/dL and creatinine of 9.2 mg/dL (baseline of 1.67). TTE showed EF 55%. Urinalysis revealed large blood and red blood cell casts. Kidney ultrasound showed bilateral echogenicity compatible with renal disease. Pulse methylprednisolone therapy and hemodialysis were initiated with patient’s condition precluding kidney biopsy. Serology workup for rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis was negative. On day 7, the patient required mechanical ventilation; bronchoscopy showed alveolar hemorrhage and plasmapheresis was initiated. Renal biopsy revealed IgA-PIGN with endocapillary and focal extracapillary proliferative and exudative features. IgA-PIGN occurs in diabetic elderly (mean age of 60 years), 0–16 weeks after an infection mainly by Staphylococcus. However, this nondiabetic patient had normal complement IgA-PIGN with fatal pulmonary-renal syndrome. Understanding the pathogenesis and identifying the nephrotoxic bacteria species and the aberrant IgA molecule will open new insights toward prevention and treatment. PMID:26347210

  18. Clinical spectrum and outcomes of crescentic glomerulonephritis: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Rampelli, S. K.; Rajesh, N. G.; Srinivas, B. H.; Harichandra Kumar, K. T.; Swaminathan, R. P.; Priyamvada, P. S.

    2016-01-01

    There is limited data on the etiology, clinical and histopathological spectrum and outcomes of crescentic glomerulonephritis (CrGN) in adult Indian population. This prospective study was done to evaluate the etiology, clinicohistological patterns and predictors of outcome of CrGN in South Indian population. All the patients received standard protocol based immunosuppression in addition to supportive care. Immune-complex glomerulonephritis (ICGN) was the most common etiology (n = 31; 77.5%) followed by pauci-immune glomerulonephritis (PauciGN; n = 8; 20%) and anti-glomerular basement membrane disease (n = 1; 2.5%). The most common etiology of ICGN was IgA nephropathy (n = 11; 27.5%) followed by lupus nephritis (n = 7; 17.5%) and post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) (n = 7; 17.5%). The patients with PauciGN were significantly older compared to those with ICGN (44.5 ± 15 years vs. 31.8 ± 11 years; P = 0.01). The patients with PauciGN presented with significantly higher serum creatinine (9.7 ± 4.4 vs. 6.6 ± 3.3 mg/dl; P = 0.03). The histopathologic parameters of ICGN and PauciGN were comparable except for a higher proportion of sclerosed glomeruli in ICGN. At the end of 3 months follow-up, only two patients went into complete remission (5.4%). Majority of the patients had end-stage renal failure (48.6%) and were dialysis dependent and seven patients (18.9%) expired. There was no signifi difference in the renal survival (10.9 ± 1.9 vs. 9.6 ± 3.3 months) or patient survival (17.5 ± 2.1 vs. 17.3 ± 4.3 months). The parameters associated with adverse outcomes at 3 months were hypertension (odds ratio [OR]: 0.58; confidence interval [CI]: 0.36–0.94), need for renal replacement therapy (OR: 0.19; CI: 0.04–0.9), serum creatinine at admission (P = 0.019), estimated glomerular filtration rate (P = 0.022) and percentage of fibrocellular crescents (P = 0.022). PMID:27512296

  19. Clinical spectrum and outcomes of crescentic glomerulonephritis: A single center experience.

    PubMed

    Rampelli, S K; Rajesh, N G; Srinivas, B H; Harichandra Kumar, K T; Swaminathan, R P; Priyamvada, P S

    2016-01-01

    There is limited data on the etiology, clinical and histopathological spectrum and outcomes of crescentic glomerulonephritis (CrGN) in adult Indian population. This prospective study was done to evaluate the etiology, clinicohistological patterns and predictors of outcome of CrGN in South Indian population. All the patients received standard protocol based immunosuppression in addition to supportive care. Immune-complex glomerulonephritis (ICGN) was the most common etiology (n = 31; 77.5%) followed by pauci-immune glomerulonephritis (PauciGN; n = 8; 20%) and anti-glomerular basement membrane disease (n = 1; 2.5%). The most common etiology of ICGN was IgA nephropathy (n = 11; 27.5%) followed by lupus nephritis (n = 7; 17.5%) and post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) (n = 7; 17.5%). The patients with PauciGN were significantly older compared to those with ICGN (44.5 ± 15 years vs. 31.8 ± 11 years; P = 0.01). The patients with PauciGN presented with significantly higher serum creatinine (9.7 ± 4.4 vs. 6.6 ± 3.3 mg/dl; P = 0.03). The histopathologic parameters of ICGN and PauciGN were comparable except for a higher proportion of sclerosed glomeruli in ICGN. At the end of 3 months follow-up, only two patients went into complete remission (5.4%). Majority of the patients had end-stage renal failure (48.6%) and were dialysis dependent and seven patients (18.9%) expired. There was no signifi difference in the renal survival (10.9 ± 1.9 vs. 9.6 ± 3.3 months) or patient survival (17.5 ± 2.1 vs. 17.3 ± 4.3 months). The parameters associated with adverse outcomes at 3 months were hypertension (odds ratio [OR]: 0.58; confidence interval [CI]: 0.36-0.94), need for renal replacement therapy (OR: 0.19; CI: 0.04-0.9), serum creatinine at admission (P = 0.019), estimated glomerular filtration rate (P = 0.022) and percentage of fibrocellular crescents (P = 0.022). PMID:27512296

  20. Characterization of feline glomerulonephritis associated with viral-induced hematopoietic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Glick, A D; Horn, R G; Holscher, M

    1978-08-01

    Light, electron, and immunofluorescence microscopy on tissues from 63 domestic cats revealed that glomerulonephritis occurred in almost one third of cats with hematopoietic neoplasms of the type linked with feline leukemia virus (FeLV). Glomerular lesions were of the immune complex type with subepithelial, subendothelial, and mesangial dense deposits and reticular aggregates, similar to the nephropathy associated with systemic lupus erythematosus in humans. Evidence that the glomerular lesions may be viral-induced raises the possibility of similar pathogenetic mechanisms in human disease. PMID:677265

  1. Intestinal Intravascular Large B-cell Lymphoma Mimicking Ulcerative Colitis with Secondary Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Kaneyuki, Daisuke; Komeno, Yukiko; Yoshimoto, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Naoki; Iihara, Kuniko; Ryu, Tomiko

    2016-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman with ulcerative colitis (UC) was admitted to our hospital for renal dysfunction and progressive anemia. Colonoscopy revealed intestinal lesions and pathological findings showed intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL). According to the polymerase chain reaction analysis of sequential rectal specimens, we concluded that she suffered from intestinal BCL, not UC. After chemotherapy, her renal function progressed to nephrotic syndrome. The pathological findings of renal biopsy specimens indicated membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN). Chemotherapy was continued and led to the remission of BCL and MPGN. We herein describe the first case of intestinal IVLBCL mimicking UC with secondary MPGN. PMID:27580553

  2. Hydralazine-induced pauci-immune glomerulonephritis: intriguing case series with misleading diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Babar, Faizan; Posner, Jeffery N.; Obah, Eugene A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydralazine has been used since the 1950s for the management of hypertension. Evidence for hydralazine-associated vasculitis dates to pre-ANCA (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) era. This abstract describes two cases of ANCA-positive pauci-immune glomerulonephritis (GN) in challenging scenarios where diagnosis was misconstrued. A comprehensive literature review was done to understand the pathogenesis of drug-induced pauci-immune GN. We have described key diagnostic features that are helpful in distinguishing idiopathic ANCA vasculitis from drug-induced vasculitis. Additionally, we have also described different treatments meant to provide therapy options with the least side effects. PMID:27124161

  3. Renal granuloma and immunoglobulin M-complex glomerulonephritis: a case of common variable immunodeficiency?

    PubMed

    Benoit, Geneviève; Lapeyraque, Anne-Laure; Sartelet, Hervé; Saint-Cyr, Claire; Le Deist, Françoise; Haddad, Elie

    2009-03-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is characterized by reduced serum immunoglobulin levels and recurrent bacterial infections. Granulomatous infiltrations are occasionally found in the lymphoid or solid organs of affected patients, but renal involvement is rare. We present a case of possible CVID with interstitial noncaseating granuloma and immunoglobulin (IgM)-complex glomerulonephritis with a membranoproliferative pattern and with a favorable response to corticosteroids, intravenously administered immunoglobulins (IVIGs) and rituximab. CVID must be included in the differential diagnosis of renal granuloma and should be differentiated from sarcoidosis to ensure appropriate therapy. PMID:18696117

  4. Necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis with membranous nephropathy in a patient exposed to levamisole-adulterated cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Camillo; Emili, Stefano; Lin, Mercury; Alpers, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    Levamisole is an antihelminthic agent widely used as an adulterant of illicit cocaine recently implicated as a cause of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)–associated microscopic polyangiitis in cocaine abusers. An isolated case of membranous nephropathy (MN) associated with levamisole exposure has also been reported. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of a patient with both microscopic polyangiitis manifest as a pauci-immune necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis and concurrent MN in the setting of chronic cocaine abuse and presumed levamisole exposure, raising the hypothesis that levamisole was the causative agent in the development of this rare dual glomerulopathy. PMID:26985374

  5. Membranous glomerulonephritis and cellular crescents induced by levamisole-adulterated cocaine abuse: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Moll-Guillen, Jose-Luis; Espí-Reig, Jordi; Blanes-Julia, Marino; García-Martínez, Ana-María; Pujol-Marco, Conrad; Hernández-Jaras, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Levamisole is illicitly employed as a cocaine adulterant. The consumption of levamisole-adulterated cocaine can provoke anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated syndromes. Patients carrying an HLAB27 allele are known to be at higher risk of developing agranulocytosis when treated with levamisole. Likewise, patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and internal organ involvement have typically been exposed to offending agents for prolonged periods of time, often on the order of years. Here, we report an unusual case of a patient in which kidney biopsy showed membranous glomerulonephritis with cellular crescents associated with levamisole-contaminated cocaine use. PMID:26605317

  6. Nephrotic Syndrome Secondary to Proliferative Glomerulonephritis with Monoclonal Immunoglobulin Deposits of Lambda Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seongseok; Braunhut, Beth L.; Walker, Courtney N.; Bhati, Waheed; Sussman, Amy N.; Anwer, Faiz

    2014-01-01

    We describe a rare case of a 46-year-old woman with history of refractory nephrotic syndrome and hypertension who presented with worsening proteinuria and kidney function. Work-up for both autoimmune and infectious diseases and hematologic malignancies including multiple myeloma were negative. Kidney biopsy demonstrated glomerular sclerotic change with lambda light chain deposits in the subendothelial space, which is consistent with proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin deposit (PGNMID). The patient was treated with bortezomib and dexamethasone without clinical improvement and eventually became hemodialysis dependent. PMID:25136462

  7. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies-Negative Pauci-Immune Crescentic Glomerulonephritis Associated with Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Anaele, Cyriacus Uzoma; Srisung, Weeraporn; Tomacruz, Yvette; Laski, Melvin

    2015-01-01

    Pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis (PICGN) is most commonly associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). We report a case of chronic, sclerosing ANCA-negative PICGN discovered when a patient presented with multiple myeloma. A 57-year-old woman presented with complaints of nausea, emesis and weakness. She was found to be in renal failure with a serum creatinine of 9.4 mg/dl, mild hyperkalemia and acidosis. She was noted to have normochromic, normocytic anemia with normal platelet and white cell counts, normal plasma proteins and serum protein electrophoresis. Further studies revealed increased concentrations of κ and λ light chains in a ratio of 34.89; a bone marrow biopsy found 12% plasma cells. Serum protein electrophoresis revealed no spike. ANCA, anti-glomerular basement membrane, antineutrophil antibody, hepatitis panel and serum complements were normal. A kidney biopsy result showed chronic sclerosing PICGN plus tubular necrosis, severe tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis and severe arteriosclerosis. Congo red stains were negative and electron microscopy showed no intraglomerular deposits. The patient was subsequently treated for myeloma with bortezomib and dexamethasone with good hematologic response but never recovered renal function. She remains on outpatient hemodialysis. Renal manifestations of myeloma often involve glomerular deposition disease, tubulointerstitial disease, with characteristic proteinaceous casts, or both. In contrast, our patient demonstrated neither of these findings but had chronic sclerosing PICGN. Crescentic glomerulonephritis occurring in patients with plasma cell dyscrasias has been previously reported, but the association remains extremely rare. PMID:26120578

  8. Spontaneous remission of membranous glomerulonephritis with successful fetal outcome: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Mei; Zhou, Hui-Rong; Zhang, Ling; Yang, Ke-Ke; Luo, Jiang-Xi; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-06-01

    Membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) represents an immunologically mediated disease characterized by deposition of immune complexes in the glomerular subepithelial space. Persistent proteinuria at diagnosis predicts poor prognosis. Pregnancy with MGN is a risk of fetal loss and may worsen maternal renal function.Here, we report a lady with MGN and proteinuria achieved spontaneous remission and successful fetal outcome naive to any medications. The 26-year old woman had 1-year history of persistent proteinuria (5.5-12.56 g/24 hours) and biopsy-proven MGN. Histopathological characteristics included glomerular basement membrane spikes, subepithelial monoclonal IgG immunofluorescence, and diffuse electron dense deposits. She was sticking to a regular morning exercise routine without any medications. After successful delivery of a full-term baby girl, the mother had improved proteinuria (0.56 g/24 hours) and albuminuria (351.96 g/24 hours contrasting 2281.6 g/24 hours before pregnancy). The baby had normal height and body weight at 4 months old.We identified more pregnancies with MGN in 5 case reports and 5 clinical series review articles (7-33 cases included). Spontaneous remission of maternal MGN with good fetal outcome rarely occurred in mothers on immunosuppressive therapy.Mothers naive to immunosuppressive therapy may achieve spontaneous remission of maternal membranous glomerulonephritis and successful fetal outcome. Theoretically, fetus might donate stem cells to heal mother's kidney. PMID:27368022

  9. The changing pattern of primary glomerulonephritis in Singapore and other countries over the past 3 decades.

    PubMed

    Woo, K-T; Chan, C-M; Mooi, C Y; -L-Choong, H; Tan, H-K; Foo, M; Lee, G S L; Anantharaman, V; Lim, C-H; Tan, C-C; Lee, E J C; Chiang, G S C; Tan, P H; Boon, T H; Fook-Chong, S; Wong, K-S

    2010-11-01

    This review of 2,586 renal biopsies over the past 3 decades in Singapore documents the changing pattern of glomerulonephritis (GN) from that of a third world country to that of a developed nation. In the 1st decade, mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis was the most common form of primary GN, just as it was in the surrounding Asian countries. In the 2nd decade, the prevalence of mesangial proliferative GN decreased with a rise in membranous, GN which is also seen in China and Thailand. In the 3rd decade, there was a dramatic increase in focal sclerosing glomerulosclerosis. This increase reflects aging and obesity in keeping with more developed countries like Australia, India, Thailand and the United States of America. IgA nephritis remains the most common GN. Apart from the geographical influence, other socioeconomic factors play a significant role in the evolution of the renal biopsy pattern. Mesangial proliferative GN remains prevalent in many Asian countries, but in Singapore the prevalence is decreasing just as it is in Japan, Korea and Malaysia. Worldwide, the prevalence of focal sclerosing glomerulosclerosis continues to increase in many countries. PMID:20979946

  10. CD34+ fibroblast-like cells in the interstitial infiltrates in glomerulonephritis - an immunohistochemical observation.

    PubMed

    Gluhovschi, Cristina; Potencz, Elena; Lazar, Elena; Petrica, Ligia; Bozdog, Gheorghe; Gadalean, Florica; Bob, Flaviu; Gluhovschi, Adrian; Cioca, Daniel; Velciov, Silvia

    2012-12-01

    CD34 cells in the interstitial infiltrates in glomerulonephritis (GN) could be the turning point between regenerative processes and interstitial fibrosis. The aim of our study was to assess the presence of CD34+ cells in the interstitial infiltrates in GN. A cross-sectional study of 33 patients with glomerulonephritis, mean age: 43.3 ±11.31 years, 20 male and 13 female, was conducted. Conventional stains, as well as immunohistochemistry for the CD34 antigen were employed on kidney biopsies. Strength of immunohistochemical reaction was assessed semi-quantitatively. Regarding the percentage of cases with CD34+ cells in the interstitial infiltrates out of 33 patients: cells of interstitial infiltrates were 27.3% positive. The percentage of cases showing CD34+ cells at the level of interstitial infiltrates was: 44.4% in FSGS, 14.3% in membranoproliferative GN, 28.6% in membranous nephropathy, 20% in mesangial proliferative GN, 0% in minimal change disease, and 50% in crescentic GN. With the exception of minimal change disease, CD34+ cells were found in the interstitial infiltrates in all histopathological forms of GN. Some of these cells were spindle-shaped fibroblast-like cells. As inflammation in the tubulointerstitial compartment either resolves or proceeds to fibrosis, aims at reversing this process will benefit from analyses of the interstitial infiltrates harboring CD34+ cells. PMID:23359197

  11. Hydrocarbon exposure may cause glomerulonephritis and worsen renal function: evidence based on Hill's criteria for causality.

    PubMed

    Ravnskov, U

    2000-08-01

    Many observational and experimental studies point to hydrocarbon exposure as an important pathogenic factor in glomerulonephritis. The findings have made little impact on current concepts and patient care, possibly because the hypothesis of a direct causal effect of the exposure and the hypothesis that the exposure worsens renal function have not been considered separately. This review examines these two hypotheses using Hill's criteria for causality. The results from 14 cross-sectional, 18 case-control studies, two cohort studies, 15 experiments on laboratory animals and two on human beings together with many case reports satisfy all but one of Hill's criteria for both hypotheses. Of particular importance is the finding in the case-control and follow-up studies of an association between degree of exposure and stage of renal disease, and an inverse association between degree of exposure and renal function, indicating that the most important effect of hydrocarbon exposure is its effect on renal function. End-stage renal failure may be preventable in many patients with glomerulonephritis provided a possible exposure to toxic chemicals is discontinued. PMID:10924538

  12. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies-Negative Pauci-Immune Crescentic Glomerulonephritis Associated with Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Anaele, Cyriacus Uzoma; Srisung, Weeraporn; Tomacruz, Yvette; Laski, Melvin

    2015-01-01

    Pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis (PICGN) is most commonly associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). We report a case of chronic, sclerosing ANCA-negative PICGN discovered when a patient presented with multiple myeloma. A 57-year-old woman presented with complaints of nausea, emesis and weakness. She was found to be in renal failure with a serum creatinine of 9.4 mg/dl, mild hyperkalemia and acidosis. She was noted to have normochromic, normocytic anemia with normal platelet and white cell counts, normal plasma proteins and serum protein electrophoresis. Further studies revealed increased concentrations of κ and λ light chains in a ratio of 34.89; a bone marrow biopsy found 12% plasma cells. Serum protein electrophoresis revealed no spike. ANCA, anti-glomerular basement membrane, antineutrophil antibody, hepatitis panel and serum complements were normal. A kidney biopsy result showed chronic sclerosing PICGN plus tubular necrosis, severe tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis and severe arteriosclerosis. Congo red stains were negative and electron microscopy showed no intraglomerular deposits. The patient was subsequently treated for myeloma with bortezomib and dexamethasone with good hematologic response but never recovered renal function. She remains on outpatient hemodialysis. Renal manifestations of myeloma often involve glomerular deposition disease, tubulointerstitial disease, with characteristic proteinaceous casts, or both. In contrast, our patient demonstrated neither of these findings but had chronic sclerosing PICGN. Crescentic glomerulonephritis occurring in patients with plasma cell dyscrasias has been previously reported, but the association remains extremely rare. PMID:26120578

  13. Revisiting post-infectious glomerulonephritis in the emerging era of C3 glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Khalighi, Mazdak A.; Wang, Shihtien; Henriksen, Kammi J.; Bock, Margret; Keswani, Mahima; Meehan, Shane M.; Chang, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) is an immune complex-mediated glomerular injury that typically resolves. Dominant C3 deposition is characteristic of PIGN, but with the emergence of C3 glomerulonephritis (C3GN) as a distinct entity, it is unclear how the pathologic similarities between PIGN and C3GN should be reconciled. Therefore, nephrologists and nephropathologists need additional guidance at the time of biopsy. Methods We studied 23 pediatric and young adult patients diagnosed with PIGN. Patients were divided into two groups, one with co-dominance between C3 and immunoglobulins and the other meeting proposed diagnostic criteria for C3GN. Clinical and pathological features were compared. Results No clinical and/or pathological features could distinguish between those with C3-co-dominant deposits and those with C3 dominance. Nearly all patients in both groups regained their baseline renal function without clinical intervention. Conclusions Although the identification of abnormalities of the alternative pathway of complement is characteristic of C3GN, testing is not widely available and the turnaround time often exceeds 1 month. Our study found that PIGN with either co-dominant or dominant C3 deposition in a cohort of young patients has excellent short-term outcomes. Close clinical observation for persistent abnormalities, such as hypocomplementemia, prolonged hematuria or proteinuria, is recommended to single out patients that may harbor intrinsic complement abnormalities. PMID:27274823

  14. The role of Th1 and Th17 cells in glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Azadegan-Dehkordi, Fatemeh; Bagheri, Nader; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Context: T helper (Th) cells as an important part of the immune is responsible for elimination of invading pathogens. But, if Th cell responses are not regulated effectively, the autoimmune diseases might develop. The Th17 subset usually produces interleukin-17A which in experimental models of organ-specific autoimmune inflammation is very important. Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of open access journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Embase, Scopus, PubMed and Web of Science have been searched. Results: Fifty-six articles were found and searched. In the present review article, we tried to summarize the recently published data about characteristics and role of Th1 and Th17 cells and discuss in detail, the potential role of these T helpers immune responses in renal inflammation and renal injury, focusing on glomerulonephritis. Published papers in animal and human studies indicated that autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, classically believed to be Th1-mediated, are mainly derived from a Th17 immune response. Identification of the Th17 subgroup has explained seemingly paradoxical observations and improved our understanding of immune-mediated inflammatory responses. Conclusions: Secretion of IL-17A, as well as IL-17F, IL-21, IL-22, suggests that Th17 subset may play a crucial role as a pleiotropic pro-inflammatory Th subset. There is experimental evidence to support the notion that Th1 and Th17 cells contribute to kidney injury in renal inflammatory diseases like glomerulonephritis. PMID:25964886

  15. A case of infectious endocarditis-associated crescentic glomerulonephritis with intracranial hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Eri; Nakayama, Masaru; Amano, Kazushi; Hirano, Tadashi; Uesugi, Noriko

    2010-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of fever and renal impairment. The patient had undergone a tooth extraction 11 months prior to admission. Echocardiography demonstrated vegetation on the mitral valve, and Streptococcus mitis was detected on blood culture. Accordingly, infectious endocarditis (IE) was diagnosed. Renal biopsy showed crescentic glomerulonephritis. Based on the negative staining for immunoglobulins and complement components in immunofluorescence study and lack of dense deposits on electron microscopy, the renal involvement was considered to be of the pauci-immune type. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and subdural hematoma (SDH) developed simultaneously following commencement of antibiotic therapy. The intracranial involvement improved by conservative therapy. Antibiotic treatment resulted in gradual control of IE infection and improvement of renal function. A repeated renal biopsy, performed about 5 months after the first biopsy, showed amelioration of glomerular injury and interstitial damage. To our knowledge, our case was the second to report simultaneous developments of both SAH and SDH secondary to IE. We postulate that the glomerular injury was associated with IE. We report here a rare case of IE-associated crescentic glomerulonephritis with complications of SAH and SDH. PMID:20155718

  16. Renal infarction and immune-mediated glomerulonephritis in sheep (Ovis aries) chronically implanted with indwelling catheters.

    PubMed

    Rao, Varada P; Poutahidis, Theofilos; Marini, Robert P; Holcombe, Hilda; Rogers, Arlin B; Fox, James G

    2006-07-01

    Microbial infections are common sequelae in humans and animals implanted with long-term intravascular catheters. Understanding the pathophysiology of infectious morbidity is critical to improving quality of care in catheterized subjects. Here, we describe findings in 6 clinically healthy, male sheep implanted with indwelling aortic or cardiac catheters for 6 to 10 mo. We isolated multiple bacterial species including Serratia spp., Enterobacter agglomerans, Eschericia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, and K. pneumoniae in aerobic cultures from catheter tips. Although sheep were clinically asymptomatic, 1 or both kidneys from all animals contained wedge-shaped infarcts of varying size and number. Microscopic examination revealed (a) marked fibrosis with mild inflammatory cell infiltrate consistent with chronic foreign body reaction around catheters; (b) moderate to severe, diffuse, subacute to chronic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and mild, multifocal chronic interstitial nephritis; and (c) mesangial immune-complex deposition as demonstrated by direct immunofluorescence technique. The finding of bacterial colonization of catheters together with chronic glomerulonephritis and immune-complex deposits in kidneys in clinically asymptomatic sheep underscores the need for close microbiologic monitoring of catheter implants and assessment of kidney function in animals instrumented for long-term vascular access. PMID:16884173

  17. Lutheran/basal cell adhesion molecule accelerates progression of crescentic glomerulonephritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jin; Filipe, Anne; Rahuel, Cécile; Bonnin, Philippe; Mesnard, Laurent; Guérin, Coralie; Wang, Yu; Le Van Kim, Caroline; Colin, Yves; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Migration of circulating leukocytes from the vasculature into the surrounding tissue is an important component of the inflammatory response. Among the cell surface molecules identified as contributing to leukocyte extravasation is VCAM-1, expressed on activated vascular endothelium, which participates in all stages of leukocyte–endothelial interaction by binding to leukocyte surface expressed integrin VLA-4. However, not all VLA-4-mediated events can be linked to VCAM-1. A novel interaction between VLA-4 and endothelial Lutheran (Lu) blood group antigens and basal cell adhesion molecule (BCAM) proteins has been recently shown, suggesting that Lu/BCAM may have a role in leukocyte recruitments in inflamed tissues. Here, we assessed the participation of Lu/BCAM in the immunopathogenesis of crescentic glomerulonephritis. High expression of Lu/BCAM in glomeruli of mice with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis suggests a potential role for the local expression of Lu/BCAM in nephritogenic recruitment of leukocytes. Genetic deficiency of Lu/BCAM attenuated glomerular accumulation of T cells and macrophages, crescent formation, and proteinuria, correlating with reduced fibrin and platelet deposition in glomeruli. Furthermore, we found a pro-adhesive interaction between human monocyte α4β1 integrin and Lu/BCAM proteins. Thus, Lu/BCAM may have a critical role in facilitating the accumulation of monocytes and macrophages, thereby exacerbating renal injury. PMID:24429403

  18. An immune-complex glomerulonephritis of Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum).

    PubMed

    Lumsden, J S; Russell, S; Huber, P; Wybourne, B A; Ostland, V E; Minamikawa, M; Ferguson, H W

    2008-12-01

    Chinook salmon from New Zealand were shown to have a generalized membranous glomerulonephritis that was most severe in large fish. Marked thickening of the glomerular basement membrane was the most consistent lesion, with the presence of an electron-dense deposit beneath the capillary endothelium.Severely affected glomeruli also had expansion of the mesangium and loss of capillaries,synechiae of the visceral and parietal epithelium and mild fibrosis of Bowmans capsule. Chinook salmon from British Columbia, Canada with bacterial kidney disease caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum had similar histological lesions. They also had thickened glomerular basement membranes that were recognized by rabbit antiserum to rainbow trout immunoglobulin. This was true only when frozen sections of kidney were used and not formalin-fixed tissue. An attempt to experimentally produce a glomerulopathy in rainbow trout by repeated immunization with killed R. salmoninarum was not successful. Case records from the Fish Pathology Laboratory at the University of Guelph over a 10-year period revealed that a range of species were diagnosed with glomerulopathies similar to those seen in Chinook salmon. The majority of these cases were determined to have chronic inflammatory disease. This report has identified the presence of immunoglobulin within thickened basement membranes of Chinook salmon with glomerulonephritis and supports the existence of type III hypersensitivity in fish. PMID:18752546

  19. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome in childhood: report of nine cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gümüş, Hakan; Per, Hüseyin; Kumandaş, Sefer; Yikilmaz, Ali

    2010-04-01

    Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS) is recently described disorder with typical radiological findings in the posterior regions of the cerebral hemisphere and cerebellum. Its clinical symptoms include headache, decreased alertness, mental abnormalities, such as confusion, diminished spontaneity of speech, and changed behavior ranging from drowsiness to stupor, seizures, vomiting and abnormalities of visual perception like cortical blindness. RPLS is caused by various heterogeneous factors, the commonest being hypertension, followed by non-hypertensive causes such as eclampsia, renal diseases and immunosuppressive therapy. We presented nine patients with RPLS who had primary diagnoses such as acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, idiopathic hypertension, the performing of intravenous immunoglobulin for infection with crescentic glomerulonephritis, erythrocyte transfusion for severe iron deficiency, L: -asparaginase treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia and performing of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for ulcerative colitis due to neutropenia. Early recognition of RPLS as complication during different diseases and therapy in childhood may facilitate precise diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:19809787

  20. [Acute rheumatic fever, Sydenham's chorea and psychopathology].

    PubMed

    Gimzal, Aylan; Topçuoğlu, Volkan; Yazgan, M Yanki

    2002-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is an autoimmune disorder that is triggered by group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infections. ARF consists of several combinations of carditis, polyarthritis and Sydenham's chorea, and rarely seen erythema marginatum and subcutaneous nodules. Sydenham's chorea is seen in about 20% of patients with ARF. As a late symptom of ARF, Sydenham's chorea usually occurs 3 months or longer after the streptococcal infection. Sydenham's chorea is a neuropsychiatric disorder that may present with emotional lability, anxiety, obsessive compulsive symptoms, attention deficit and hyperactivity symptoms or tics. Obsessive-compulsive symptoms occur in 70% of patients with Sydenham's chorea. The role of the autoimmune mechanisms and the dysfunction of the basal ganglia have been demonstrated in Sydenham's chorea. Antibodies against group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus cross-react with basal ganglia. Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS) shares the same mechanism with Sydenham's chorea, but PANDAS has not been shown to require penicillin prophylaxis. Thus it is important to distinguish between them. Sydenham's chorea is associated with adulthood OCD, Tourette syndrome and schizophrenia. These features make Sydenham's chorea an explanatory model for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and related disorders. This poststreptococcal disorder provides a treatment opportunity with new therapies like antibiotic therapy, plasma exchange and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for psychiatric disorders. In this paper we summarize the phenomenological and treatment studies of OCD, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and tic disorders in subjects with ARF, with or without Sydenham's chorea. PMID:12794666

  1. Genetic factors influence level of proteinuria in cationic antigen-induced immune complex glomerulonephritis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, A; Thaiss, F; Oite, T; Günther, E; Batsford, S; Vogt, A

    1985-01-01

    The influence of genetic factors on the susceptibility of the rat to cationic antigen-induced in situ immune complex glomerulonephritis was investigated. The levels of proteinuria developing in 11 inbred strains of rats differing in MHC and in genetic background varied markedly. Susceptibility was not MHC associated but resided in the genetic background. PMID:3159528

  2. α-1-Antitrypsin detected by MALDI imaging in the study of glomerulonephritis: Its relevance in chronic kidney disease progression.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew; L'Imperio, Vincenzo; De Sio, Gabriele; Ferrario, Franco; Scalia, Carla; Dell'Antonio, Giacomo; Pieruzzi, Federico; Pontillo, Claudia; Filip, Szymon; Markoska, Katerina; Granata, Antonio; Spasovski, Goce; Jankowski, Joachim; Capasso, Giovambattista; Pagni, Fabio; Magni, Fulvio

    2016-06-01

    Idiopathic glomerulonephritis (GN), such as membranous glomerulonephritis, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and IgA nephropathy (IgAN), represent the most frequent primary glomerular kidney diseases (GKDs) worldwide. Although the renal biopsy currently remains the gold standard for the routine diagnosis of idiopathic GN, the invasiveness and diagnostic difficulty related with this procedure highlight the strong need for new diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers to be translated into less invasive diagnostic tools. MALDI-MS imaging MALDI-MSI was applied to fresh-frozen bioptic renal tissue from patients with a histological diagnosis of FSGS (n = 6), IgAN, (n = 6) and membranous glomerulonephritis (n = 7), and from controls (n = 4) in order to detect specific molecular signatures of primary glomerulonephritis. MALDI-MSI was able to generate molecular signatures capable to distinguish between normal kidney and pathological GN, with specific signals (m/z 4025, 4048, and 4963) representing potential indicators of chronic kidney disease development. Moreover, specific disease-related signatures (m/z 4025 and 4048 for FSGS, m/z 4963 and 5072 for IgAN) were detected. Of these signals, m/z 4048 was identified as α-1-antitrypsin and was shown to be localized to the podocytes within sclerotic glomeruli by immunohistochemistry. α-1-Antitrypsin could be one of the markers of podocyte stress that is correlated with the development of FSGS due to both an excessive loss and a hypertrophy of podocytes. PMID:26749278

  3. IgA-dominant post-infectious glomerulonephritis; making another case in support of renal biopsy in type 2 diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nayer, Ali; Davda, Gargi; Pai, Rima; Ortega, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Approximately one-third of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus will eventually develop diabetic nephropathy (DN). Impaired renal function in type 2 diabetics may also be secondary to non-diabetic renal disease (NDRD). NDRD in type 2 diabetics may occur alone in the absence of DN or may be superimposed on DN. Renal biopsy maybe indicated to establish the correct diagnosis and to ascertain the severity of glomerular and tubulointerstitial pathology. Case: We report a patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic renal insufficiency who developed worsening of renal function in the setting of staphylococcal infection and antibiotic use. Conclusion: Renal biopsy revealed IgA-dominant post-infectious glomerulonephritis and acute interstitial nephritis superimposed on diabetic glomerulosclerosis. Accumulating evidence indicates that, NDRD accounts for impaired renal function in a significant number of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The presence of clinical, biochemical, and radiological features that suggest NDRD should prompt pathological evaluation of the kidney. PMID:27069968

  4. Independent associations of urine neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin and serum uric acid with interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy in primary glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Lertrit, Amornpan; Worawichawong, Suchin; Vanavanan, Somlak; Chittamma, Anchalee; Muntham, Dittapol; Radinahamed, Piyanuch; Nampoon, Aumporn; Kitiyakara, Chagriya

    2016-01-01

    The degree of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IFTA) is one of the strongest prognostic factors in glomerulonephritis (GN). In experimental models, high serum uric acid (UA) could contribute to IFTA through direct effects on the renal tubules, but the significance of this process has not been evaluated in patients. Urine neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin (NGAL) is produced by renal tubules following acute or chronic damage. We investigated the relationship between UA and NGAL excretion in primary GN and tested whether these biomarkers are independently associated with IFTA. Urine and blood were collected from patients on the day of kidney biopsy. IFTA was assessed semi-quantitatively. Fifty-one patients with primary GN were enrolled. NGAL/creatinine correlated significantly with proteinuria but not with glomerular filtration rate (GFR). By contrast, UA correlated with GFR but not with proteinuria. NGAL/creatinine did not correlate with UA. Both NGAL/creatinine and UA increased with the severity of IFTA. By multivariate analysis, GFR, NGAL/creatinine, and UA were independently associated with moderate-to-severe IFTA. Combining UA and NGAL/creatinine with classical predictors (proteinuria and GFR) tended to improve discrimination for moderate-to-severe IFTA. Findings that UA was unrelated to urinary NGAL excretion suggest that the two biomarkers reflect different pathways related to the development of IFTA in primary GN. Both NGAL/creatinine and UA were independently associated with moderate-to-severe IFTA. PMID:27143950

  5. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... glomeruli. The glomeruli of the kidney help filter wastes and fluids from the blood to form urine. ... the glomerular basement membrane. This membrane helps filter wastes and extra fluids from the blood. Damage to ...

  6. Phospholipase A2 Receptor-Positive Idiopathic Membranous Glomerulonephritis with Onset at 95 Years: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Keiichi; Hoshino, Junichi; Ueno, Toshiharu; Mise, Koki; Hazue, Ryo; Sekine, Akinari; Yabuuchi, Junko; Yamanouchi, Masayuki; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Kikuchi, Koichi; Sumida, Keiichi; Hayami, Noriko; Sawa, Naoki; Takaichi, Kenmei; Fujii, Takeshi; Ohashi, Kenichi; Akiyama, Shinichi; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ubara, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    A 95-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for evaluation of bilateral lower-limb edema persisting for 3 months. Serum creatinine was 1.55 mg/dl, and urinary protein excretion was 9.1 g/day. Renal biopsy revealed stage 1 membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) with immunoglobulin G4-dominant staining. This patient did not have any underlying disease such as infection with hepatitis B or C virus or malignancy, and anti-phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) antibody was detected in the serum. Accordingly, idiopathic MGN was diagnosed. Corticosteroid therapy was avoided, but hemodialysis was required to treat generalized edema. The patient is currently doing well. This is the oldest reported case of idiopathic MGN with positivity for anti-PLA2R antibody. PMID:27390744

  7. Clinicopathologic correlations in a series of 143 patients with IgA glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Mustonen, J; Pasternack, A; Helin, H; Nikkilä, M

    1985-01-01

    In an unselected series of patients with IgA glomerulonephritis, old age, high blood pressure, and high urinary protein excretion at the time of renal biopsy were found to correlate with impaired renal function, whereas sex, estimated duration of the disease, or high serum IgA levels did not. The following clinical features were favorable prognostic signs: asymptomatic proteinuria, macroscopic hematuria, and isolated microscopic hematuria. The degree of diffuse mesangial alteration and the presence of segmental glomerular lesions correlated clearly with the subsequent clinical outcome. Vascular lesions, i.e. arteriosclerosis and renal vascular deposition of C3, were most often present in patients with severe glomerulopathy. The presence of electron-dense deposits in glomerular capillary walls was also an unfavorable prognostic finding. Renal biopsy findings of interstitial infiltrates of inflammatory cells and IgA distributed along glomerular capillary walls were usually associated with extrarenal manifestations of the disease. PMID:4014321

  8. An immunohistological study of feline glomerulonephritis using the peroxidase-antiperoxidase method.

    PubMed

    Arthur, J E; Lucke, V M; Newby, T J; Bourne, F J

    1984-07-01

    Twenty-two cases of feline glomerulonephritis were investigated for the presence of immune complexes within the glomerulus using the peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) method. This method was used with formalin-fixed paraffin-wax embedded tissues which were pretreated with trypsin and with frozen sections of kidney tissue. Of a total of 25 kidney specimens examined (two cats had repeated biopsies) the composition of the deposits was 23/25 IgG, 17/25 C3, 11/25 IgM and 2/25 IgA. Serial studies of two cats showed a progression of the disease from initial nephrotic syndrome to chronic renal failure. With the more severe form of the disease there was a tendency for the deposition of complement and more than one class of immunoglobulin within the glomeruli. PMID:6382492

  9. Treatment of choroidal neovascularisation secondary to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type II with intravitreal ranibizumab

    PubMed Central

    McCullagh, Donal; Silvestri, Giuliana; Maxwell, Alexander P

    2014-01-01

    Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type II (MPGN II) is characterised by electron-dense deposits of complement components in the glomerular basement membrane and retinal pigment epithelium. Approximately, 10% of affected individuals develop serious ocular complications similar to age-related macular degeneration such as choroidal neovascularisation (CNV), which has been managed with photocoagulation or photodynamic therapy; however, these treatments can impact visual acuity. We report the case of a 42-year-old woman with MPGN II presenting with decreased visual acuity and paracentral scotoma in her left eye due to an extrafoveal choroidal neovascular membrane (growth of new vessels under the retina). The patient was successfully treated with intravitreal ranibizumab (Lucentis) with restoration of visual function. This case highlights the successful management of CNV secondary to MPGN II with the antivascular endothelial growth factor agent ranibizumab and emphasises the importance of early referral of patients with MPGN II who are reporting of visual ‘distortion’. PMID:24895384

  10. Reclassification of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis: Identification of a new GN: C3GN

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Rosso, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    This review revises the reclassification of the membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) after the consensus conference that by 2015 reclassified all the glomerulonephritis basing on etiology and pathogenesis, instead of the histomorphological aspects. After reclassification, two types of MPGN are to date recognized: The immunocomplexes mediated MPGN and the complement mediated MPGN. The latter type is more extensively described in the review either because several of these entities are completely new or because the improved knowledge of the complement cascade allowed for new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Overall the complement mediated MPGN are related to acquired or genetic cause. The presence of circulating auto antibodies is the principal acquired cause. Genetic wide association studies and family studies allowed to recognize genetic mutations of different types as causes of the complement dysregulation. The complement cascade is a complex phenomenon and activating factors and regulating factors should be distinguished. Genetic mutations causing abnormalities either in activating or in regulating factors have been described. The diagnosis of the complement mediated MPGN requires a complete study of all these different complement factors. As a consequence, new therapeutic approaches are becoming available. Indeed, in addition to a nonspecific treatment and to the immunosuppression that has the aim to block the auto antibodies production, the specific inhibition of complement activation is relatively new and may act either blocking the C5 convertase or the C3 convertase. The drugs acting on C3 convertase are still in different phases of clinical development and might represent drugs for the future. Overall the authors consider that one of the principal problems in finding new types of drugs are both the rarity of the disease and the consequent poor interest in the marketing and the lack of large international cooperative studies. PMID:27458560

  11. Reclassification of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis: Identification of a new GN: C3GN.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Rosso, Giuseppina

    2016-07-01

    This review revises the reclassification of the membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) after the consensus conference that by 2015 reclassified all the glomerulonephritis basing on etiology and pathogenesis, instead of the histomorphological aspects. After reclassification, two types of MPGN are to date recognized: The immunocomplexes mediated MPGN and the complement mediated MPGN. The latter type is more extensively described in the review either because several of these entities are completely new or because the improved knowledge of the complement cascade allowed for new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Overall the complement mediated MPGN are related to acquired or genetic cause. The presence of circulating auto antibodies is the principal acquired cause. Genetic wide association studies and family studies allowed to recognize genetic mutations of different types as causes of the complement dysregulation. The complement cascade is a complex phenomenon and activating factors and regulating factors should be distinguished. Genetic mutations causing abnormalities either in activating or in regulating factors have been described. The diagnosis of the complement mediated MPGN requires a complete study of all these different complement factors. As a consequence, new therapeutic approaches are becoming available. Indeed, in addition to a nonspecific treatment and to the immunosuppression that has the aim to block the auto antibodies production, the specific inhibition of complement activation is relatively new and may act either blocking the C5 convertase or the C3 convertase. The drugs acting on C3 convertase are still in different phases of clinical development and might represent drugs for the future. Overall the authors consider that one of the principal problems in finding new types of drugs are both the rarity of the disease and the consequent poor interest in the marketing and the lack of large international cooperative studies. PMID:27458560

  12. Autoantibodies to ribosomal P antigens with immune complex glomerulonephritis in SJL mice treated with pristane.

    PubMed

    Satoh, M; Hamilton, K J; Ajmani, A K; Dong, X; Wang, J; Kanwar, Y S; Reeves, W H

    1996-10-01

    BALB/c ByJ mice develop a lupus-like syndrome characterized by anti-nRNP/Sm and Su autoantibodies and immune complex glomerulonephritis after a single i.p. pristane injection. In contrast, mercuric chloride induces anti-fibrillarin Abs only in SJL and other H-2s mice, and not in BALB/c (H-2d) mice. In the present study, the specificities of autoantibodies induced by pristane and HgCl2 were compared in SJL and BALB/c mice to examine whether these strains are "programmed" to make different sets of autoantibodies in response to nonspecific immune stimulation. Unexpectedly, the predominant autoantibodies induced by pristane in SJL mice were neither those characteristic of HgCl2-treated SJL mice nor those associated with pristane-induced disease in BALB/c mice but, rather, anti-ribosomal P, another lupus-related specificity. The autoantibodies were strongly reactive with the C-terminal 22 amino acids of the ribosomal P2 protein, indicating that they exhibited similar fine specificities to anti-P Abs in human SLE and MRL/Ipr mice. Like BALB/c mice, pristane-treated SJL mice developed severe glomerulonephritis characterized by proteinuria, mesangial proliferation, and glomerular immune complex deposits. This is the first evidence that the induction of a lupus-like syndrome by pristane is not restricted to BALB/c mice. The predominance of anti-P Abs in SJL mice contrasts sharply with the predominance of anti-nRNP/Sm and Su, in pristane-treated BALB/c mice, even though the renal lesions were similar in both strains. The data suggest that H-2s does not program mice to produce anti-fibrillarin Abs in response to nonspecific immune stimulation, arguing that autoantibody induction by pristane involves Ag-specific mechanisms. PMID:8816434

  13. Anaerococcus urinomassiliensis sp. nov., isolated from a urine sample of a 17-year-old boy affected by autoimmune hepatitis and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Morand, A; Cornu, F; Tsimaratos, M; Lagier, J-C; Cadoret, F; Fournier, P-E; Raoult, D

    2016-09-01

    We report the main characteristics of 'Anaerococcus urinomassiliensis' strain FC4(T) (CSURP2143) that was isolated from a urine sample of a 17-year-old boy affected by autoimmune hepatitis and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. PMID:27408746

  14. Postinfectious glomerulonephritis secondary to Erythrovirus B19 (Parvovirus B19): case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Marco, Helena; Guermah, Imane; Matas, Lurdes; Hernández, Alba; Navarro, Maruja; Lopez, Dolores; Bonet, Josep

    2016-04-01

    A previously healthy 32-yearold woman developed arterial hypertension, proteinuria, and hematuria (nephritic syndrome) with normal renal function and was diagnosed with post-infectious glomerulonephritis secondary to parvovirus B19 infection. The renal biopsy showed endocapillary glomerulonephritis, with positive IgG, C3, and C1q immunoreactivity in the capillary walls and ultrastructural evidence of subendothelial deposits. The diagnosis of parvovirus B19 infection was confirmed by IgG/IgM serological positivity and parvovirus DNA demonstration in both peripheral blood and kidney tissue. Glomerular involvement improved spontaneously. To be noted are the atypical signs and symptoms of our patient who, unlike previously reported cases, failed to show fever, skin rash, or affected relatives. PMID:26833301

  15. Proteomics and glomerulonephritis: A complementary approach in renal pathology for the identification of chronic kidney disease related markers.

    PubMed

    L'Imperio, Vincenzo; Smith, Andrew; Chinello, Clizia; Pagni, Fabio; Magni, Fulvio

    2016-04-01

    Glomerulonephritis (GN) is one of the most common origins of chronic kidney disease and its careful evaluation is crucial for prognostic and therapeutic purposes, with the renal biopsy still playing a central role for the diagnosis. However, due to its invasiveness, it is not devoid of complications and many investigations have focused on identifying biomarkers for chronic kidney diseases using less-invasive and easy-to-collect samples, such as urine and blood. In this context, proteomics has played a crucial role in determining the molecular changes related to disease progression and early pathological glomerular modifications. Here, we report a review of selected literature for each GN, based on selected works published in the last 10 years, showing how these approaches have generated clinically relevant findings in the study of glomerulonephritis. We also describe several proteomic strategies, highlighting their technical advantages and limitations, future perspectives for proteomic applications in the study of GNs, and their possible application in routine practice. PMID:26642820

  16. Gamma globulin, Evan's blue, aprotinin A PLA2 inhibitor, tetracycline and antioxidants protect epithelial cells against damage induced by synergism among streptococcal hemolysins, oxidants and proteinases: relation to the prevention of post-streptococcal sequelae and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, I; Sadovnic, M

    1998-11-01

    An in vitro model was employed to study the potential role of streptococcal extra-cellular products, rich in streptolysin O, in cellular injury as related to streptococcal infections and post-streptococcal sequelae. Extra-cellular products (EXPA) rich in streptolysin O were isolated from type 4, group A hemolytic streptococci grown in a chemostat, in a synthetic medium. EXPA induced moderate cytopathogenic changes in monkey kidney epithelial cells and in rat heart cells pre-labeled with 3H-arachidonate. However very strong toxic effects were induced when EXP was combined with oxidants (glucose oxides generated H2O2, AAPH-induced peroxyl radical (ROO.), NO generated by sodium nitroprusside) and proteinases (plasmin, trypsin). Cell killing was distinctly synergistic in nature. Cell damage induced by the multi-component cocktails was strongly inhibited either by micromolar amounts of gamma globulin, and Evan's blue which neutralized SLO activity, by tetracycline, trasylol (aprotinin), epsilon amino caproic acid and by soybean trypsin inhibitor, all proteinase inhibitors as well as by a non-penetrating PLA2 inhibitor A. The results suggest that fasciitis, myositis and sepsis resulting from infections with hemolytic streptococci might be caused by a coordinated 'cross-talk' among microbial, leukocyte and additional host-derived pro-inflammatory agents. Since attempts to prolong lives of septic patients by the exclusive administration of single antagonists invariably failed, it is proposed that the administration of 'cocktails' of putative inhibitors against major pro-inflammatory agonizes generated in inflammation and infection might protect against the deleterious effects caused by the biochemical and pharmacological cascades which are known to be activated in sepsis. PMID:9848686

  17. Renal interstitial mast cell count is significantly higher in membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis than in class IV lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Karolina; Musiał, Jacek; Soja, Jerzy; Kuźniewski, Marek; Gala-Błądzińska, Agnieszka; Białas, Magdalena; Okoń, Krzysztof

    2015-06-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a severe manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus; in LN class IV morphologic lesions may be similar to the lesions in primary membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN). The aim of the study was to compare the counts of tryptase-positive and chymase-positive mast cells between LN class IV and MPGN. The material consisted of 61 renal biopsies: 32 with lupus nephritis class IV, and 29 with membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. Chymase- and tryptase-positive cells were stained by immunohistochemistry and subsequently counted. The mean count of chymase-positive mast cells was 21.94 for the whole group, 12.66 for LN class IV and 32.18 for MPGN. The mean count of tryptase-positive cells was 34.94 hpf for the entire group, 22.98 for LN class IV and 48. 13 for MPGN. The differences between lupus nephritis and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis were significant both for chymase- and tryptase-positive cells. Both chymase-positive MC counts and tryptase-positive MC counts correlated with relative interstitial volume (RIV) (R=0.35 and R=0.28, respectively) and with creatinine level (R=0.35 and R=0.43, respectively). There was also a significant correlation between age, creatinine level and RIV (R=0.28 and R=0.26, respectively). PMID:26247528

  18. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis with small fibrils in a patient with the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome successfully treated with immunosuppressive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Javaid, Muhammad M; Denley, Helen; Tagboto, Senyo

    2007-01-01

    Background Fibrillary glomerulonephritis is a rare cause of progressive renal dysfunction, often leading to the need for dialysis within a few years. The role of immunosuppressive treatment is still uncertain although this has been tried with variable success. Case presentation A 56 year old woman with the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (IgM anticardiolipin antibodies) was seen in the nephrology clinic with haematuria, proteinuria, and worsening renal function. A renal biopsy demonstrated a mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis on light microscopy and smaller fibrils (10.6–13.8 nm in diameter) than is usual for fibrillary glomerulonephritis (typically 18–22 nm) on electron microscopy. Amyloidosis was excluded following detailed evaluation. On account of rapidly worsening renal failure she was started on cyclophosphamide and prednisolone which led to the partial recovery and stabilization of her renal function. Conclusion This case highlights the need for routine electron microscopy in native renal biopsies, where the differential diagnosis is wide and varied and the light and immunofluorescence microscopic findings may be non specific. PMID:17490479

  19. Th1, Th2 and Treg/T17 cytokines in two types of proliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Stangou, M; Bantis, C; Skoularopoulou, M; Korelidou, L; Kouloukouriotou, D; Scina, M; Labropoulou, I T; Kouri, N M; Papagianni, A; Efstratiadis, G

    2016-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and focal segmental necrotizing glomerulonephritis (FSNGN) are characterized by proliferation of native glomerular cells and infiltration by inflammatory cells. Several cytokines act as mediators of kidney damage in both diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Th1, Th2 and Treg/T17 cytokines in these types of proliferative glomerulonephritis. Simultaneous measurement of Th1 interleukin (IL-2, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-α], interferon-gamma [INF-γ]), Th2 (IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13), Treg/T17 transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], IL-17) cytokines and C-C chemokines Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1 [MIP-1] β) was performed in first-morning urine samples, at the day of renal biopsy, using a multiplex cytokine assay. Cytokine concentrations were correlated with histological findings and renal function outcome. Urinary excretion of Th1, Th2 and Treg/Th17 cytokines were significantly higher in FSNGN compared to IgAN patients. In IgAN patients (n = 50, M/F: 36/14, M age: 40.7 [17-67] years), Th1, Th2 and T17 cytokines correlated significantly with the presence of endocapillary proliferation, while in FSNGN patients (n = 40, M/F: 24/16, M age: 56.5 [25-80] years), MCP-1 and TGF-β1 had a positive correlation with severe extracapillary proliferation (P = 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively). Urinary IL-17 was the only independent parameter associated with endocapillary proliferation in IgAN and with MCP-1 urinary excretion in FSNGN. Response to treatment was mainly predicted by IL-6 in IgAN, and by Th2 (IL-4, IL-6), Treg (GM-CSF) cytokines and MIP-1 β in FSNGN. Th1, Th2 and T17 cytokines were directly implicated in renal pathology in IgAN and possibly through MCP-1 production in FSNGN. IL-17 and IL-6 seem to have a central role in inflammation and progression of kidney injury. PMID:27194829

  20. Expression of alternatively spliced fibronectin variants during remodeling in proliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, J. L.; Torres, E. S.; Mitchell, R. J.; Peters, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) plays an important role in tissue remodeling during embryogenesis, wound repair, and vascular disease, and is thought to regulate cellular processes such as cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation through specialized domains within the molecule. In addition, Fn can be alternatively spliced at three regions: extradomains EIIIA, EIIIB, and a variable segment V, potentially giving rise to functionally distinct variants of the molecule. We have previously shown a sequential expression of cellular Fn first by platelets, followed by macrophages, then mesangial cells in habu snake venom-induced proliferative glomerulonephritis (Am J Pathol 145: 585-597, 1994). These studies examined the cellular sources and glomerular localization of Fn in general but did not distinguish between the various alternatively spliced isoforms. In this study, we examine by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry the temporal expression and cellular sources of EIIIA, EIIIB, and V in a model of proliferation glomerulonephritis that has cell migration, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis as features of tissue remodeling. Macrophages were the first cells to express Fn mRNA showing an EIIIA+, EIIIB-, and V95+ pattern beginning at 8 hours after habu snake venom injection. Migrating mesangial cells at the margins of early lesions (8 and 24 hours) did not overexpress mRNA encoding these Fn variants, but immunofluorescence microscopy revealed V95 and EIIIA protein at the margins of lesions. EIIIB was absent in lesions at this time. At 48 hours and peaking at 72 hours after habu snake venom injection, mesangial cells in central aspects of glomerular lesions expressed abundant mRNA and protein for V95 and EIIIA. EIIIB mRNA and protein was slight in the mesangium at these times. Parietal epithelial cells, particularly adjacent to glomerular lesions, also expressed abundant mRNA and protein for all three variants throughout the course of the disease

  1. Th1, Th2 and Treg/T17 cytokines in two types of proliferative glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Stangou, M.; Bantis, C.; Skoularopoulou, M.; Korelidou, L.; Kouloukouriotou, D.; Scina, M.; Labropoulou, I. T.; Kouri, N. M.; Papagianni, A.; Efstratiadis, G.

    2016-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and focal segmental necrotizing glomerulonephritis (FSNGN) are characterized by proliferation of native glomerular cells and infiltration by inflammatory cells. Several cytokines act as mediators of kidney damage in both diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Th1, Th2 and Treg/T17 cytokines in these types of proliferative glomerulonephritis. Simultaneous measurement of Th1 interleukin (IL-2, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-α], interferon-gamma [INF-γ]), Th2 (IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13), Treg/T17 transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], IL-17) cytokines and C-C chemokines Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1 [MIP-1] β) was performed in first-morning urine samples, at the day of renal biopsy, using a multiplex cytokine assay. Cytokine concentrations were correlated with histological findings and renal function outcome. Urinary excretion of Th1, Th2 and Treg/Th17 cytokines were significantly higher in FSNGN compared to IgAN patients. In IgAN patients (n = 50, M/F: 36/14, M age: 40.7 [17–67] years), Th1, Th2 and T17 cytokines correlated significantly with the presence of endocapillary proliferation, while in FSNGN patients (n = 40, M/F: 24/16, M age: 56.5 [25–80] years), MCP-1 and TGF-β1 had a positive correlation with severe extracapillary proliferation (P = 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively). Urinary IL-17 was the only independent parameter associated with endocapillary proliferation in IgAN and with MCP-1 urinary excretion in FSNGN. Response to treatment was mainly predicted by IL-6 in IgAN, and by Th2 (IL-4, IL-6), Treg (GM-CSF) cytokines and MIP-1 β in FSNGN. Th1, Th2 and T17 cytokines were directly implicated in renal pathology in IgAN and possibly through MCP-1 production in FSNGN. IL-17 and IL-6 seem to have a central role in inflammation and progression of kidney injury. PMID:27194829

  2. Expression of AIM2 is high and correlated with inflammation in hepatitis B virus associated glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background & aims Innate immunity is the first line of defense against invasive microbial infection, and AIM2 plays an important role in this process by sensing double-stranded DNA viruses. However, the role of AIM2 in regulating the immune response to viruses in vivo, especially in sensing hepatitis B virus (HBV), has not been examined. We hypothesized that the expression of AIM2 increases corresponding to HBV-mediated inflammation in patients with hepatitis B virus associated glomerulonephritis (HBV-GN), a condition which activates inflammatory mechanisms and causes renal damage. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the expression of AIM2 in HBV-GN patients in relation to the inflammatory response to HBV infection. Methods A total of 79 patients diagnosed with chronic nephritis (CN) were enrolled in this study, including 54 HBV-GN patients as the experimental group and 24 chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) patients as the negative control group. Six patients diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) were also enrolled as positive controls. Each CN patient received renal biopsy, and immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of AIM2 and inflammatory factors caspase-1 and IL-1β in the biopsy specimens. CHB patients received liver puncture biopsy, and immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of AIM2 in these specimens. Expression of AIM 2 among different groups and in relation to inflammatory factors caspase-1 and IL-1β was analyzed. Results The expression of AIM2 in HBV-GN patients (81.4%) was significantly higher than in CGN patients (4.0%). Among the HBV-GN patients, expression of AIM2 was significantly higher in the high HBV replication group than in the low HBV replication group. AIM2 expression was not correlated with age, gender, HBeAg status in serum, HBV-antigen type deposited in renal tissue or pathological type of HBV-GN. However, AIM2 levels were positively correlated with the expression of caspase-1 and IL-1β in HBV-GN patients

  3. Acute and Chronic Allograft Dysfunction in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Ryan J; Weng, Francis L; Kandula, Praveen

    2016-05-01

    Allograft dysfunction after a kidney transplant is often clinically asymptomatic and is usually detected as an increase in serum creatinine level with corresponding decrease in glomerular filtration rate. The diagnostic evaluation may include blood tests, urinalysis, transplant ultrasonography, radionuclide imaging, and allograft biopsy. Whether it occurs early or later after transplant, allograft dysfunction requires prompt evaluation to determine its cause and subsequent management. Acute rejection, medication toxicity from calcineurin inhibitors, and BK virus nephropathy can occur early or later. Other later causes include transplant glomerulopathy, recurrent glomerulonephritis, and renal artery stenosis. PMID:27095641

  4. Long-term follow-up of atypical membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis: are steroids indicated?

    PubMed

    Fujita, Teruo; Nozu, Kandai; Iijima, Kazumoto; Kamioka, Ichiro; Yoshiya, Kunihiko; Tanaka, Ryojiro; Hamahira, Kiyoshi; Nakanishi, Koichi; Yoshikawa, Norishige; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2006-02-01

    Atypical membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) has been reported to have a good prognosis when treated with corticosteroids. However, this recommendation is based on uncontrolled trials and is associated with many complications. The purpose of our study is to determine whether steroid therapy is indicated for atypical MPGN. The cases of seven patients with atypical MPGN are reported in this study. Urinary abnormalities of five of them were detected by urine screening at school, of two because of macrohematuria. Hypocomplementemia was noted in six patients. All but one patient were treated without corticosteroids, and five with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and/or the Chinese herbal medicine Sairei-to (TJ-114). One patient recovered spontaneously from proteinuria and was therefore not treated, and one who developed severe proteinuria during observation was treated with corticosteroids. After an average follow-up period of 10.0 years, five patients showed normal urinary findings, one had hematuria and one proteinuria. At the most recent follow-up, the renal function of all patients remained within the normal range, and serum C3 had returned to normal levels in five out of six. These findings suggest that the indication of steroid therapy for atypical MPGN should be re-examined, since most of the patients with atypical MPGN seem to have an excellent prognosis without treatment with corticosteroids. PMID:16247645

  5. Volatile Organic Metabolites Identify Patients with Mesangial Proliferative Glomerulonephritis, IgA Nephropathy and Normal Controls

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changsong; Feng, Yue; Wang, Mingao; Pi, Xin; Tong, Hongshuang; Wang, Yue; Zhu, Lin; Li, Enyou

    2015-01-01

    Urinary volatile organic compounds (VOCs) analysis for kidney diseases has attracted a large amount of scientific interest recently, and urinary metabolite analysis has already been applied to many diseases. Urine was collected from 15 mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis (MsPGN) patients, 21 IgA nephropathy (IgAN) patients and 15 healthy controls. Solid phase microextraction–chromatography– mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) was used to analyse the urinary metabolites. The statistical methods principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLSDA) were performed to process the final data. Five metabolites were significantly greater in the group of MsPGN patients than in the normal control group (P < 0.05) while three metabolites were found at increased levels in the group of IgAN patients compared with the normal controls (P < 0.05). In addition, five metabolites were significantly increased in the group of IgAN patients compared with the MsPGN patients (P < 0.05). These five metabolites may be specific biomarkers for distinguishing between MsPGN and IgAN. The analysis of urinary VOCs appears to have potential clinical applications as a diagnostic tool. PMID:26443483

  6. Volatile Organic Metabolites Identify Patients with Mesangial Proliferative Glomerulonephritis, IgA Nephropathy and Normal Controls.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changsong; Feng, Yue; Wang, Mingao; Pi, Xin; Tong, Hongshuang; Wang, Yue; Zhu, Lin; Li, Enyou

    2015-01-01

    Urinary volatile organic compounds (VOCs) analysis for kidney diseases has attracted a large amount of scientific interest recently, and urinary metabolite analysis has already been applied to many diseases. Urine was collected from 15 mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis (MsPGN) patients, 21 IgA nephropathy (IgAN) patients and 15 healthy controls. Solid phase microextraction-chromatography- mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) was used to analyse the urinary metabolites. The statistical methods principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLSDA) were performed to process the final data. Five metabolites were significantly greater in the group of MsPGN patients than in the normal control group (P < 0.05) while three metabolites were found at increased levels in the group of IgAN patients compared with the normal controls (P < 0.05). In addition, five metabolites were significantly increased in the group of IgAN patients compared with the MsPGN patients (P < 0.05). These five metabolites may be specific biomarkers for distinguishing between MsPGN and IgAN. The analysis of urinary VOCs appears to have potential clinical applications as a diagnostic tool. PMID:26443483

  7. Plasma and urine biochemical changes in cats with experimental immune complex glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Bishop, S A; Lucke, V M; Stokes, C R; Gruffydd-Jones, T J

    1991-01-01

    Biochemical changes in plasma and urine were monitored in six cats before and during the induction of immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN) by daily intravenous administration of human serum albumin (HSA). The earliest indication of renal dysfunction in the cats was hypoalbuminaemia, which occurred as early as 13 weeks before cats developed clinical signs of renal disease. Proteinuria occurred 2 to 3 weeks before clinical disease, but was sensitive in predicting renal pathology in two cats that did not develop clinical signs of disease. In addition, increased activities of several urinary enzymes were detected in affected cats, with measurement of N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase and gamma-glutamyl transferase providing the earliest and most sensitive indication of renal damage. These plasma and urine measurements correlated more closely with the renal pathology, observed at postmortem, than clinical assessment of disease. It was concluded that ICGN in the cat could be diagnosed earliest by measurement of plasma protein concentration, whilst disease progress could be effectively monitored by including assays to measure urine protein and urine enzymes. PMID:1826913

  8. Differentiating Glomerular Inflammation from Fibrosis in A Bone Marrow Chimera for Rat Anti-GBM Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cindy; Lou, Kristie; Tatum, Kiana; Funk, Jeremiah; Wu, Jean; Bartkowiak, Todd; Kagan, David; Lou, Yahuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Many types of glomerulonephritis (GN) undergo tandem connected phases: inflammation and fibrosis. Fibrosis in human GNs leads to irreversible end stage disease. This study investigated how these two phases were controlled. Methods Using a rat anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) GN model, we established bone marrow (BM) chimeras between GN-resistant Lewis (LEW) and GN-susceptible Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. Glomerular inflammation and fibrosis were compared between chimeras. Results LEW’s BM to WKY (WKYLEW) chimeras with or without co-transfer of host WKY’s T cells were GN-resistant. On the other hand, WKY’s BM to LEW (LEWWKY) chimeras developed glomerular inflammation and albuminuria upon immunization. Quantitative analysis showed that the number and composition of inflammatory cells in glomeruli of immunized LEWWKY chimeras were similar to those in immunized WKY rats at their inflammatory peak. Thus, glomerular inflammation was controlled by BM derived non-T cell populations. However, unlike WKY rats, LEWWKY rats did not develop fibrosis until the end of experiments (84 days) in spite of persistent inflammation and albuminuria. Conclusion Inflammation alone was not sufficient to trigger fibrosis, suggesting a critical role of glomerular cells in the fibrotic process. As LEWWKY chimera allows us to separate glomerular inflammation from fibrosis, this model provides a useful tool to study how fibrosis is initiated following inflammation. PMID:26337665

  9. Renal participation of myeloperoxidase in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Kim M; Lo, Camden Y; Summers, Shaun A; Elgass, Kirstin D; McMillan, Paul J; Longano, Anthony; Ford, Sharon L; Gan, Poh-Yi; Kerr, Peter G; Kitching, A Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen R

    2015-11-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an important neutrophil lysosomal enzyme, a major autoantigen, and a potential mediator of tissue injury in MPO-ANCA-associated vasculitis (MPO-AAV) and glomerulonephritis. Here we examined MPO deposition in kidney biopsies from 47 patients with MPO-AAV. Leukocyte accumulation and fibrin deposition consistent with cell-mediated immunity was a major feature. Tubulointerstitial macrophage, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell, and neutrophil numbers correlated with low presenting eGFR. MPO was not detected in kidneys from patients with minimal change or thin basement membrane disease, but was prominent in glomerular, periglomerular, and tubulointerstitial regions in MPO-AAV. Extracellular MPO released from leukocytes was pronounced in all MPO-AAV patients. Similar numbers of neutrophils and macrophages expressed MPO in the kidneys, but colocalization studies identified neutrophils as the major source of extracellular MPO. Extraleukocyte MPO was prominent in neutrophil extracellular traps in the majority of patients; most of which had traps in half or more glomeruli. These traps were associated with more neutrophils and more MPO within glomeruli. Glomerular MPO-containing macrophages generated extracellular trap-like structures. MPO also localized to endothelial cells and podocytes. The presence of the most active glomerular lesions (both segmental necrosis and cellular crescents) correlated with intraglomerular CD4+ cells and MPO+ macrophages. Thus, cellular and extracellular MPO may cause glomerular and interstitial injury. PMID:26176828

  10. KDOQI US commentary on the 2012 KDIGO clinical practice guideline for glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Beck, Laurence; Bomback, Andrew S; Choi, Michael J; Holzman, Larry B; Langford, Carol; Mariani, Laura H; Somers, Michael J; Trachtman, Howard; Waldman, Meryl

    2013-09-01

    Glomerulonephritis (GN) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients of all ages throughout the world. Because these disorders are relatively rare, it is difficult to perform randomized clinical trials to define optimal treatment for many of the specific glomerulopathies. In the absence of high-grade evidence to guide the care of glomerular diseases, in June 2012, KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) published an international clinical guideline for GN. The Work Group report represents an important review of the literature in this area and offers valid and useful guidelines for the most common situations that arise in the management of patients with glomerular disease. This commentary, developed by a panel of clinical experts convened by the National Kidney Foundation, attempts to put the GN guideline into the context of the US health care system. Overall, we support the vast majority of the recommendations and highlight select areas in which epidemiological factors and medical practice patterns in this country justify modifications and adjustments in order to achieve favorable outcomes. There remain large gaps in our knowledge of the best approaches to treat glomerular disease and we strongly endorse an expanded clinical research effort to improve the health and long-term outcomes of children and adults with GN. PMID:23871408

  11. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. A prospective clinical trial of platelet-inhibitor therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Donadio, J.V. Jr.; Anderson, C.F.; Mitchell, J.C.; Holley, K.E.; Ilstrup, D.M.; Fuster, V.; Chesebro, J.H.

    1984-05-31

    Forty patients with Type I membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis were treated for one year with dipyridamole, 225 mg per day, and aspirin, 975 mg per day, in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. At the base line, the half-life of /sup 51/Cr-labeled platelets was reduced in 12 of 17 patients. The platelet half-life became longer and renal function stabilized in the treated group, as compared with the placebo group, suggesting a relation between platelet consumption and the glomerulopathy. The glomerular filtration rate, determined by iothalamate clearance, was better maintained in the treated group (average decrease, 1.3 ml per minute per 1.73 m/sup 2/ of body-surface area per 12 months) than in the placebo group (average decrease, 19.6). Fewer patients in the treated group than in the placebo group had progression to end-stage renal disease (3 of 21 after 62 months as compared with 9 of 19 after 33 months). The data suggest that dipyridamole and aspirin slowed the deterioration of renal function and the development of end-stage renal disease.

  12. Clinical and Immunologic Characteristics of Patients With ANCA-Associated Glomerulonephritis Combined With Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Rong; Liu, Gang; Cui, Zhao; Chen, Min; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The concurrent antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated glomerulonephritis (ANCA-GN) and membranous nephropathy (MN) have been increasingly documented, mainly in case studies and case series; however, the differences of clinical and pathologic characteristics as well as outcomes between ANCA-GN patients with and without MN remain unclear. The current study investigated the clinical and immunologic features of patients with combined ANCA-GN and MN in a large cohort. Twenty-seven of 223 patients had combined ANCA-GN and MN; they had significantly higher levels of initial serum creatinine, higher Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score and poorer renal outcome than ANCA-GN patients without MN (P < 0.05). ANCA-GN patients with MN could recognize the light chain of myeloperoxidase more frequently than those without MN (P < 0.05). The prevalence of circulating anti-PLA2R antibodies and glomerular PLA2R deposits was significantly lower in patients with combined ANCA-GN and MN than that in patients with idiopathic MN (P < 0.05). Compared with the idiopathic MN patients, the patients with combined ANCA-GN and MN had significantly higher recognition frequency of immunoglobulin (Ig) G2 and IgG3, and significantly lower recognition frequency of IgG4 (P < 0.05). Patients with combined ANCA-GN and MN had distinct clinical features and a different pathogenesis of MN. PMID:26376387

  13. Renal parenchymal resistance in patients with biopsy proven glomerulonephritis: Correlation with histological findings.

    PubMed

    Gigante, Antonietta; Barbano, Biagio; Di Mario, Francesca; Rosato, Edoardo; Simonelli, Marzia; Rocca, Anna Rachele; Conti, Fabrizio; Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Giannakakis, Konstantinos; Valesini, Guido; Cianci, Rosario

    2016-09-01

    Renal Doppler ultrasound is increasingly used in nephrology for the evaluation of renovascular disease, allograft dysfunction, and chronic nephropathies. We compared intrarenal hemodynamic parameters to biopsy findings of glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, crescents, arteriolosclerosis, and clinical variables in 100 patients. A positive correlation exists between renal function and percentage of glomerular sclerosis (P <0.01, r = 0.26), conversely a negative correlation exists between glomerular filtrate rate and percentage of glomerular sclerosis(P <0.0001, r = -0.35). The percentage of glomerular sclerosis correlate positively with pulsatile index (PI) (P <0.05, r = 0.21) and renal resistive index (RI) (P <0.05, r = 0.20). The percentage of crescents correlates positively with PI(P <0.05, r = 0.21) and RI (P <0.05, r = 0.20). Classifying arteriolosclerosis in four groups according to a severity scale, from absence to severe, PI (P <0.05) and RI (P <0.01) were significantly different. In the post hoc analysis, the median values of PI and RI are significantly different in patients with severe arteriolosclerosis than others. Ultrasound examination is a non-invasive diagnostic technique used on patients with suspected or established renal disease. Our study shows a close correlation between kidney function, ultrasound parameters, and histological findings. Measurement of renal parenchymal resistance by ultrasound could be used in association with biopsy and glomerular function for the evaluation of renal damage in patients with glomerulonephritis. PMID:27091839

  14. The interstitial expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin in glomerulonephritis is associated with renal function

    PubMed Central

    Novakovic, Zana Saratlija; Durdov, Merica Glavina; Puljak, Livia; Saraga, Marijan; Ljutic, Dragan; Filipovic, Tomislav; Pastar, Zvonimir; Bendic, Antonia; Vukojevic, Katarina

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background In a healthy kidney, contractile protein alpha-smooth muscle actin (ASMA) is immunohistochemically strongly expressed only in the blood vessels, while in pathological conditions it can be visualized in glomerular mesangial cells and interstitial myofibroblasts. The aim of this study was to explore the possible correlation between expression of ASMA in glomerulonephritis (GN) and indicators of renal function. Material/Methods We analyzed expression of ASMA in percutaneous renal biopsy of 142 adult and pediatric patients with GN and its correlation with blood pressure, serum creatinine, creatinine clearance and 24-hour urine protein at the time of biopsy. Immunoexpression of ASMA was analyzed quantitatively using computer-assisted morphometric analysis. Relative surface of ASMA expression in all glomeruli and interstitium was calculated for each patient. Results In adults and children, greater expression of ASMA in interstitium was associated with higher serum creatinine and reduced creatinine clearance. Conversely, greater ASMA expression in glomeruli was associated with normal or decreased serum creatinine in adults and increased creatinine clearance in children. In children, correlation was found between high blood pressure and ASMA expression in interstitium. Conclusions We confirmed that interstitial expression of ASMA is associated with reduced renal function at time of biopsy. The connection of ASMA expression in glomeruli with lower serum creatinine and normal or increased creatinine clearance suggests a favorable role of this phenotypic change in glomerular filtration rate; further investigation is needed. PMID:22460095

  15. Recurrence of ANCA-negative renal-limited pauci-immune glomerulonephritis in the renal allograft

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, Venkatesh; Gowda, Kiran Krishne; Jha, Vivekanand; Kohli, Harbir Singh; Kumar, Vivek; Ramachandran, Raja

    2013-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) due to pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis (PICGN). A small subgroup of patients with PICGN are anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) negative. We report a case of a patient with ANCA-negative renal-limited form of PICGN who developed ESRD despite treatment. He underwent live-related renal allograft transplantation after 12 months on haemodialysis. In the eighth post-transplant month, he developed graft dysfunction, which on evaluation turned out to be a graft recurrence of the basic disease in the form of PICGN. He received treatment with methylprednisolone, cyclophosphamide and plasmapheresis. However, his renal functions did not improve and he developed graft loss in the 11th post-transplant month and was started on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. We report a rare recurrence of renal-limited PICGN in the allograft. Patients with PICGN undergoing renal transplantation should be followed up carefully, and an early biopsy should be performed in the case of graft dysfunction to deal with this potentially graft-threatening complication. PMID:26064517

  16. Antibody response and antibody affinity maturation in cats with experimental proliferative immune complex glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Bishop, S A; Bailey, M; Lucke, V M; Stokes, C R

    1992-07-01

    An experimental model of proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) in the cat, which closely resembles human proliferative forms of GN, has been used to study the role of antibody and antibody affinity in the development of immune complex-mediated renal disease. The serum IgG and IgM antibody response to antigen, average antibody affinity (avidity) and affinity heterogeneity of the IgG and IgM populations was assessed at varying times after commencement of chronic immunization with the antigen, human serum albumin (HSA), by enzyme immunoassay. Cats could be classified according to whether they were "low", "intermediate" or "high" IgG responders, by quantification of serum IgG values. Cats with the lowest serum IgG values failed to develop glomerulonephritis. However, there was no relationship between actual IgG values and the severity of the induced disease. In contrast to IgG, there was no division of cats into low or high IgM anti-HSA responders. Again, cats with the lowest IgM values failed to develop GN, but, more interestingly, a late, marked increase in serum IgM anti-HSA occurred only in cats that developed clinical signs of GN (anterior uveitis and nephrotic syndrome). Maturation of average, functional IgG affinity (avidity) for HSA following chronic immunization was clearly demonstrated for all cats. At the end of the experiment, all cats had IgG of high affinity for HSA and the average affinity heterogeneity of the IgG populations was less than in measurements taken earlier. Values of IgG affinity at the end of the experiment were very similar both in cats which developed GN and in those which remained clinically, biochemically and pathologically normal. In contrast to IgG antibody, some cats developed IgM of increased affinity, whilst others produced antibody of reduced affinity, following chronic immunization. There was no correlation between the development of disease and the production of either low or high affinity IgM antibody. Data indicated that an

  17. Antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis in mice: the role of endotoxin, complement and genetic background

    PubMed Central

    ROBSON, M G; COOK, H T; PUSEY, C D; WALPORT, M J; DAVIES, K A

    2003-01-01

    Antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis in man may be exacerbated by infection and this effect may be mediated by bacterial endotoxin. There is evidence supporting a role for endotoxin in heterologous nephrotoxic nephritis in rats, but the role of endotoxin in this model in mice has not previously been explored. Previous data in mice on the role of complement in this model are conflicting and this may be due to the mixed genetic background of mice used in these studies. We used the model of heterologous nephrotoxic nephritis in mice and explored the role of endotoxin, complement and genetic background. In this study we show a synergy between antibody and endotoxin in causing a neutrophil influx. We also show that C1q-deficient mice have an increased susceptibility to glomerular inflammation but this is seen only on a mixed 129/Sv × C57BL/6 genetic background. On a C57BL/6 background we did not find any differences in disease susceptibility when wildtype, C1q, factor B or factor B/C2 deficient mice were compared. We also demonstrate that C57BL/6 mice are more susceptible to glomerular inflammation than 129/Sv mice. These results show that endotoxin is required in this model in mice, and that complement does not play a major role in glomerular inflammation in C57BL/6 mice. C1q may play a protective role in mixed-strain 129/Sv × C57BL/6 mice, but the data may also be explained by systematic bias in background genes, as there is a large difference in disease susceptibility between C57BL/6 and 129/Sv mice. PMID:12930357

  18. Cocaine/levamisole-induced systemic vasculitis with retiform purpura and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Veronese, F.V.; Dode, R.S.O.; Friderichs, M.; Thomé, G.G.; da Silva, D.R.; Schaefer, P.G.; Sebben, V.C.; Nicolella, A.R.; Barros, E.J.G.

    2016-01-01

    Levamisole has been increasingly used as an adulterant of cocaine in recent years, emerging as a public health challenge worldwide. Levamisole-associated toxicity manifests clinically as a systemic vasculitis, consisting of cutaneous, hematological, and renal lesions, among others. Purpura retiform, cutaneous necrosis, intravascular thrombosis, neutropenia, and less commonly crescentic nephritis have been described in association with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) and other autoantibodies. Here we report the case of a 49-year-old male who was a chronic cocaine user, and who presented spontaneous weight loss, arthralgia, and 3 weeks before admission purpuric skin lesions in the earlobes and in the anterior thighs. His laboratory tests on admission showed serum creatinine of 4.56 mg/dL, white blood count 3,800/μL, hemoglobin 7.3 g/dL, urinalysis with 51 white blood cells/μL and 960 red blood cells/μL, and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio 1.20. Serum ANCA testing was positive (>1:320), as well as serum anti-myeloperoxidase and anti-proteinase 3 antibodies. Urine toxicology screen was positive for cocaine and levamisole, with 62.8% of cocaine, 32.2% of levamisole, and 5% of an unidentified substance. Skin and renal biopsies were diagnostic for leukocytoclastic vasculitis and pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis, respectively. The patient showed a good clinical response to cocaine abstinence, and use of corticosteroids and intravenous cyclophosphamide. Last serum creatinine was 1.97 mg/dL, white blood cell count 7,420/μL, and hemoglobin level 10.8 g/dL. In levamisole-induced systemic vasculitis, the early institution of cocaine abstinence, concomitant with the use of immunosuppressive drugs in severe cases, may prevent permanent end organ damage and associate with better clinical outcomes. PMID:27119429

  19. Association of Retinoid X Receptor Alpha Gene Polymorphism with Clinical Course of Chronic Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Grzegorzewska, Alicja E; Ostromecki, Grzegorz; Zielińska, Paulina; Mostowska, Adrianna; Niemir, Zofia; Polcyn-Adamczak, Magdalena; Pawlik, Magdalena; Sowińska, Anna; Jagodziński, Paweł P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Vitamin D (VD), VD binding protein, VD receptor (VDR), and retinoids are involved in pathogenesis of chronic glomerulonephritis (ChGN). We aimed to compare distribution of VD pathway gene polymorphisms in ChGN patients showing glomerular filtration rate (GFR) category 1-3, GFR category 5D, and healthy controls in order to elucidate the role of VD-related polymorphisms in the course of ChGN. MATERIAL AND METHODS GFR category 1-3 ChGN patients (n=195), GFR category 5D ChGN patients (n=178), and controls (n=751) underwent testing for polymorphisms of genes encoding VD binding protein (GC, rs2298849, rs7041, rs1155563), VDR (VDR, rs2228570, rs1544410), and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRA, rs10776909, rs10881578, rs749759). RESULTS Among GFR 1-3 subjects possessing TT genotype of RXRA rs10776909, 75% of patients had nephrotic syndrome, and 37.5% had glomerular hyperfiltration defined as GFR >140 ml/min/1.73 m2, and, consequently, serum creatinine was lower in these patients compared to the remaining subjects (0.67±0.26 vs. 0.94±0.34, P=0.014). In GFR category 5D ChGN patients, frequencies of RXRA rs10776909 allele T (25% vs. 19%) and CT+TT (46% vs. 34%) were higher compared to frequencies of respective variants in controls (Ptrend=0.004, Pgenotype=0.008). CONCLUSIONS RXRA rs10776909 allele T is specifically involved in the pathogenesis of ChGN. This risk allele may be also associated with worse clinical course of ChGN. PMID:26610845

  20. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin G deposits complicated by immunoglobulin A nephropathy in the renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Anri; Kawanishi, Kunio; Horita, Shigeru; Koike, Junki; Honda, Kazuho; Ochi, Ayami; Komoda, Mizuki; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Unagami, Kohei; Okumi, Masayoshi; Shimizu, Tomokazu; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari; Nagashima, Yoji; Nitta, Kosaku

    2016-07-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) A nephropathy (IgAN) is a known autoimmune disease due to abnormal glycosylation of IgA1, and occasionally, IgG co-deposition occurs. The prognosis of IgG co-deposition with IgAN is adverse, as shown in the previous studies. However, in the clinical setting, monoclonality of IgG co-deposition with IgAN has not been observed. We describe a case of proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) combined with IgAN in a renal allograft. A-21-year-old man developed end-stage renal failure with unknown aetiology and underwent living-donor kidney transplantation from his mother 2 years after being diagnosed. One year after kidney transplantation, proteinuria 2+ and haematuria 2+ were detected; allograft biopsy revealed mesangial IgA and C3 deposits, indicating a diagnosis of IgAN. After tonsillectomy and steroid pulse therapy, proteinuria and haematuria resolved. However, 4 years after transplantation, pedal oedema, proteinuria (6.89 g/day) and allograft dysfunction (serum creatinine (sCr) 203.3 µmol/L) appeared. A second allograft biopsy showed mesangial expansion and focal segmental proliferative endocapillary lesions with IgA1λ and monoclonal IgG1κ depositions. Electron microscopic analysis revealed a massive amount of deposits, located in the mesangial and subendothelial lesions. A diagnosis of PGNMID complicated with IgAN was made, and rituximab and plasmapheresis were added to steroid pulse therapy. With this treatment, proteinuria was alleviated to 0.5 g/day, and the allograft dysfunction recovered to sCr 132.6 µmol/L. This case suggests a necessity for investigation of PGNMID and IgA nephropathy in renal allografts to detect monoclonal Ig deposition disease. PMID:26971743

  1. A Case of Fibrillary Glomerulonephritis Associated with Thrombotic Microangiopathy and Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Momose, Akishi; Nakajima, Taku; Chiba, Shigetoshi; Kumakawa, Kenjirou; Shiraiwa, Yasuo; Sasaki, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Kazuo; Kitano, Etsuko; Hatanaka, Mitiyo; Kitamura, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    We present the first report of a case of fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN) associated with thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) and anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody (anti-GBM antibody). A 54-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for high fever and anuria. On the first hospital day, we initiated hemodialysis for renal dysfunction. Laboratory data revealed normocytic-normochromic anemia with schistocytes in the peripheral smear, thrombocytopenia, increased serum lactate dehydrogenase, decreased serum haptoglobin, and negative results for both direct and indirect Coombs tests. Based on these results, we diagnosed TMA. Assays conducted several days later indicated a disintegrin-like and metalloprotease with a thrombospondin motif 13 (ADAMTS13) activity of 31.6%, and ADAMTS13 inhibitors were negative. We started plasma exchange using fresh frozen plasma and steroid pulse therapy. Anti-GBM antibody was found to be positive. Renal biopsy showed FGN. Blood pressure rose on the 46th hospital day, and mild convulsions developed. Based on magnetic resonance imaging of the head, the patient was diagnosed with reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. Hypertension persisted despite administration of multiple antihypertensive agents, and the patient experienced a sudden generalized seizure. Computed tomography of the head showed multiple cerebral hemorrhages. However, his blood pressure subsequently decreased and the platelet count increased. TMA remitted following 36 plasma exchange sessions, but renal function was not restored, and maintenance hemodialysis was continued. The patient was discharged on the 119th day of hospitalization. In conclusion, it was shown that TMA, FGN and anti-GBM antibody were closely related. PMID:25873933

  2. Embryonic fibronectin isoforms are synthesized in crescents in experimental autoimmune glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Nickeleit, V.; Zagachin, L.; Nishikawa, K.; Peters, J. H.; Hynes, R. O.; Colvin, R. B.

    1995-01-01

    Crescents are a severe and stereotyped glomerular response to injury that occur in several forms of glomerulonephritis that progress to renal failure. The key pathogenetic step that leads to glomerular scarring in unknown, but fibronectin (FN), the clotting system, macrophages, and proliferating parietal epithelial cells are known to participate. This study was designed to determine whether FN is synthesized locally, and in what molecular isoform, and whether cytokines known to promote FN synthesis are present in the crescent. Rats immunized with bovine glomerular basement membrane develop cellular crescents by 14 days and fibrous crescents and glomerulosclerosis by 35 days. In situ hybridization was performed with oligonucleotides specific for sequences common to all FN isoforms (total FN) or sequences specific for the alternatively spliced segments (EIIIA, EIIIB, and V). Throughout the time period (14, 21, and 35 days) all crescents and glomerular tufts contained cells with strong ISH signals for total and V+ mRNA, with the strongest signals present in large cellular crescents at day 21. In contrast, EIIIA+ and EIIIB+ mRNAs showed maximal abundance within sclerosing crescents at 35 days. Protein deposition of EIIIA+, EIIIB+, and V+ FN isoforms was confirmed by immunofluorescence with segment-specific FN antibodies. Transforming growth factor-beta and interleukin-1 beta, both known to promote FN synthesis, were found in cellular crescents (days 14 and 21) and were still present, but greatly diminished, in the sclerotic phase (day 35). In summary, EIIIA-, EIIIB-, and V+ FN mRNA plasma isoforms predominate in cellular crescents, whereas in the fibrosing stage, mainly the oncofetal EIIIA+, EIIIB+, and V+ isoforms are synthesized and accumulate. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7573372

  3. Renal tubular angiogenic dysregulation in anti-Thy1.1 glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Cina, Davide P; Xu, Hui; Liu, Limin; Farkas, Laszlo; Farkas, Daniela; Kolb, Martin; Margetts, Peter J

    2011-02-01

    Peritubular vascular changes and hypoxia after glomerular injury may explain subsequent tubulointerstitial injury and fibrosis. Several studies suggested that the expected tubulointerstitial angiogenic response is actively suppressed in this setting. The mechanism of this aberrant response has not been clearly identified. We used a common model of glomerular injury in rats to assess vascular changes and to identify potential factors associated with this aberrant response. Anti-Thy1.1 antibody administration (1 or 4 weekly doses) led to a dose-dependent renal damage characterized by elevated urea and tubulointerstitial fibrosis as assessed by Picro-Sirius Red staining. We quantified peritubular capillaries using CD31 and CD34 immunohistochemistry and showed that tubular angiogenic dysregulation was associated with peritubular capillary rarefaction. Using laser capture microdissection, we demonstrated an early induction of fibrogenic and angiogenic factors in the glomeruli and a subsequent dysregulated angiogenic response in the tubulointerstitial compartment. Proximal tubules of anti-Thy1.1-treated animals had increased pigment epithelial-derived factor (PEDF) expression by immunohistochemistry. Protein taken by laser capture microdissection also showed that PEDF was upregulated. Temporally associated with PEDF expression was a transient downregulation of tubular hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1α. In a human proximal tubular cell culture, we show that PEDF downregulates HIF1α protein and gene expression in cells exposed to 1% oxygen. In anti-Thy1.1 glomerulonephritis, there is aberrent tubular angiogenesis associated with glomerular injury and tubulointersititial fibrosis. We showed that PEDF may be involved by downregulating HIF1α. Further work is needed to elucidate the mechanism of PEDF upregulation and action in the tubules. PMID:21048020

  4. Green Tea Polyphenol (−)-Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Restores Nrf2 Activity and Ameliorates Crescentic Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jason K.; Peng, Ai; Vaziri, Nosratola D.; Mohan, Chandra; Xu, Yan; Zhou, Xin J.

    2015-01-01

    Crescentic glomerulonephritis (GN) is the most severe form of GN and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality despite aggressive immunotherapy with steroids, cytotoxic drugs, and plasmapheresis. We examined the therapeutic efficacy of the green tea polyphenol (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, 50 mg/kg BW/day x3weeks), a potent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant agent, on experimental crescentic GN induced in 129/svJ mice by administration of rabbit anti-mouse glomerular basement membrane sera. Routine histology and key molecules involved in inflammatory and redox signaling were studied. EGCG treatment significantly reduced mortality, decreased proteinuria and serum creatinine, and markedly improved renal histology when compared with vehicle-treated mice. The improvements in renal function and histology were accompanied by the restoration of Nrf2 signaling (which was impaired in vehicle-treated mice) as shown by increased nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and cytoplasmic glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit, glutamate cysteine ligase modifier subunit, and glutathione peroxidase. EGCG-treated mice also showed reduction in p-Akt, p-JNK, p-ERK1/2 and p-P38 as well as restoration of PPARγ and SIRT1 levels. Lower dose of EGCG (25 mg/kg BW/day x2 weeks) treatment also significantly decreased proteinuria and serum creatinine, and markedly improved renal histology when compared with vehicle-treated mice. Thus, our data illustrate the efficacy of EGCG in reversing the progression of crescentic GN in mice by targeting multiple signaling and inflammatory pathways as well as countering oxidative stress. PMID:25785827

  5. Cooperation of ETV6/RUNX1 and BCL2 enhances immunoglobulin production and accelerates glomerulonephritis in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Eva; Schlederer, Michaela; Scheicher, Ruth; Horvath, Jaqueline; Aigner, Petra; Schiefer, Ana-Iris; Kain, Renate; Regele, Heinz; Hoermann, Gregor; Steiner, Günter; Kenner, Lukas; Sexl, Veronika; Villunger, Andreas; Moriggl, Richard; Stoiber, Dagmar

    2016-03-15

    The t(12;21) translocation generating the ETV6/RUNX1 fusion gene represents the most frequent chromosomal rearrangement in childhood leukemia. Presence of ETV6/RUNX1 alone is usually not sufficient for leukemia onset, and additional genetic alterations have to occur in ETV6/RUNX1-positive cells to cause transformation. We have previously generated an ETV6/RUNX1 transgenic mouse model where the expression of the fusion gene is restricted to CD19-positive B cells. Since BCL2 family members have been proposed to play a role in leukemogenesis, we investigated combined effects of ETV6/RUNX1 with exogenous expression of the antiapoptotic protein BCL2 by crossing ETV6/RUNX1 transgenic animals with Vav-BCL2 transgenic mice. Strikingly, co-expression of ETV6/RUNX1 and BCL2 resulted in significantly shorter disease latency in mice, indicating oncogene cooperativity. This was associated with faster development of follicular B cell lymphoma and exacerbated immune complex glomerulonephritis. ETV6/RUNX1-BCL2 double transgenic animals displayed increased B cell numbers and immunoglobulin titers compared to Vav-BCL2 transgenic mice. This led to pronounced deposition of immune complexes in glomeruli followed by accelerated development of immune complex glomerulonephritis. Thus, our study reveals a previously unrecognized synergism between ETV6/RUNX1 and BCL2 impacting on malignant disease and autoimmunity. PMID:26919255

  6. Cooperation of ETV6/RUNX1 and BCL2 enhances immunoglobulin production and accelerates glomerulonephritis in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Eva; Schlederer, Michaela; Scheicher, Ruth; Horvath, Jaqueline; Aigner, Petra; Schiefer, Ana-Iris; Kain, Renate; Regele, Heinz; Hoermann, Gregor; Steiner, Günter; Kenner, Lukas; Sexl, Veronika; Villunger, Andreas; Moriggl, Richard; Stoiber, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    The t(12;21) translocation generating the ETV6/RUNX1 fusion gene represents the most frequent chromosomal rearrangement in childhood leukemia. Presence of ETV6/RUNX1 alone is usually not sufficient for leukemia onset, and additional genetic alterations have to occur in ETV6/RUNX1-positive cells to cause transformation. We have previously generated an ETV6/RUNX1 transgenic mouse model where the expression of the fusion gene is restricted to CD19-positive B cells. Since BCL2 family members have been proposed to play a role in leukemogenesis, we investigated combined effects of ETV6/RUNX1 with exogenous expression of the antiapoptotic protein BCL2 by crossing ETV6/RUNX1 transgenic animals with Vav-BCL2 transgenic mice. Strikingly, co-expression of ETV6/RUNX1 and BCL2 resulted in significantly shorter disease latency in mice, indicating oncogene cooperativity. This was associated with faster development of follicular B cell lymphoma and exacerbated immune complex glomerulonephritis. ETV6/RUNX1-BCL2 double transgenic animals displayed increased B cell numbers and immunoglobulin titers compared to Vav-BCL2 transgenic mice. This led to pronounced deposition of immune complexes in glomeruli followed by accelerated development of immune complex glomerulonephritis. Thus, our study reveals a previously unrecognized synergism between ETV6/RUNX1 and BCL2 impacting on malignant disease and autoimmunity. PMID:26919255

  7. [A case of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis in the course of Wegener's granulomatosis].

    PubMed

    Idasiak-Piechocka, I; Oko, A; Łochyńska, K; Woźniak, A; Czekalski, S

    2000-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is characterized by granulomatous vasculitis of the respiratory tract and glomerulonephritis (GN). Prognosis of this disease is poor and about 20% of untreated patients die after one year from the onset. WG was recognized in 45-year-old patient on the basis of: 1) clinical symptoms (joint pain and swollen, purpura on the skin which appeared one week after respiratory tract infection, ulceration of the tonsils and lingula), 2) results of additional testing (X-chest-ray-infiltrates of both lungs), positive results of the cANCA (titre 1:640) and rapidly progressive renal failure [the increase of serum creatinine level (Pcr) from 123.7 to 707 mumol/l (1.4 to 8.0 mg/dl) during one week]. Renal biopsy revealed extracapillary GN (cellular crescents in 7 out of 8 glomeruli and scattered foci of fibrinoid necrosis of capillary walls in all). At the beginning of the treatment Pcr raised to 884 mumol/l (10 mg/dl) and the patient required hemodialysis. He was treated with methylprednisolone (M) at flash doses of 1000 mg/24 h by three days followed by 125 mg/24 h i.v.--because of peptic ulcer, with cyclophosphamide (C-150 mg/24 h p.p.), with trimetoprim/sulphametoxazole, with pentoxifylline and omeprazol. After six weeks of the treatment in the control kidney biopsy sclerotic changes in 10 out of 13 glomeruli and diffuse interstitial fibrosis were found. However, during the same time, we observed clinical remission of the disease and the decrease of Pcr to 176.8 mumol/l (2 mg/dl). The M dosis was reduced by 5 mg every weeks and the C dosis--to 50 mg (because of the increase of aminotransferase levels) After six months of the treatment Pcr was 132.6 mumol/l (1.5 mg/dl) and CANCA titer was 1:16. In this case of RPGN, despite off the progression of the morphological changes in the kidney, we obtained the clinical remission of the disease and significant decrease of Pcr level. These results suggest that aggressive treatment of WG is justified even in

  8. Podocyte Detachment Is Associated with Renal Prognosis in ANCA-Associated Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Rong; Wang, Su-xia; Liu, Gang; Yu, Feng; Chen, Min; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The prognosis of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated glomerulonephritis (ANCA-GN) is unfavorable despite immunosuppressive therapy. It has been suggested that the loss of podocytes is a hallmark of progressive kidney disease. However, it is unclear about podocyte injuries and their predictive values on the prognosis in ANCA-GN. Therefore, the current study aimed to investigate the podocyte injury in renal histopathology and its association with renal prognosis of patients with ANCA-GN. A total of 170 patients with ANCA-GN were recruited in this study. Morphometric investigation of podocytes by electron microscopy including foot process width (FPW), podocyte density per glomerulus (Nv), and glomerular basement membrane (GBM) width were measured and calculated in ANCA-GN patients. Cox regression analysis was used to analyze the association between podocyte injuries and prognosis of patients with ANCA-GN. Foot processes broadening, podocyte detachment, and GBM thickening could be observed in electron micrographs in the specimens of 158/170 (92.9%), 142/170 (83.5%), and 150/170 (88.2%) patients, respectively. Compared with normal controls, FPW and GBM width in ANCA-GN patients was significantly higher (1269.39 ± 680.19 vs 585.81 ± 77.16, P = 0.004; 668.23 ± 208.73 vs 354.23 ± 52.70, P = 0.000, respectively), while the podocyte density was significantly lower (55.90 ± 36.32 vs 255.23 ± 47.29, P = 0.000). The podocyte density was independently associated with the recovery of renal function in logistic regression analysis (OR, 1.083; 95% CI, 1.025–1.440; P = 0.005). Furthermore, multivariate analysis revealed that podocyte density was an independent predictor of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (model A: HR, 0.950; 95% CI, 0.919–1.982; P = 0.002; model B: HR, 0.953; 95% CI, 0.922–0.985; P = 0.004). Podocyte structural damage and detachment occurred frequently in patients with ANCA

  9. Epidemiology of Histologically Proven Glomerulonephritis in Africa: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Okpechi, Ikechi G.; Ameh, Oluwatoyin I.; Bello, Aminu K.; Ronco, Pierre; Swanepoel, Charles R.; Kengne, Andre P.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Glomerulonephritis (GN) is a leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Africa. Data on epidemiology and outcomes of glomerular diseases from Africa is still limited. We conducted a systematic review on the epidemiology of histologically proven glomerular diseases in Africa between 1980 and 2014. Materials and methods We searched literature using PubMed, AfricaWide, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature on EBSCO Host, Scopus, African Journals online databases, and the African Index Medicus, for relevant studies. The review was conducted using standard methods and frameworks using only biopsy-confirmed data. Results Twenty four (24) studies comprising 12,093 reported biopsies from 13 countries were included in this analysis. The median number of biopsies per study was 127.0 (50–4436), most of the studies (70.0%) originated from North Africa and the number of performed kidney biopsies varied from 5.2 to 617 biopsies/year. Nephrotic syndrome was the commonest indication of renal biopsy. The frequency of reported primary pathologic patterns included, minimal change disease (MCD); 16.5% (95%CI: 11.2–22.6), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS); 15.9% (11.3–21.1), mesangiocapillary GN (MCGN); 11.8% (9.2–14.6), crescentic GN; 2.0% (0.9–3.5) and IgA nephropathy 2.8% (1.3–4.9). Glomerular diseases related to hepatitis B and systemic lupus erythematosus had the highest prevalence among assessed secondary diseases: 8.4% (2.0–18.4) and 7.7% (4.5–11.7) respectively. There was no evidence of publication bias and regional differences were seen mostly for secondary GNs. Conclusions Glomerular diseases remain poorly characterized in sub-Saharan Africa due to declining renal biopsy rates and consequent paucity of data on pathologic patterns of key renal diseases. Development of renal biopsy registries in Africa is likely to enable adequate characterization of the prevalence and patterns of glomerular diseases

  10. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist ameliorates experimental anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody-associated glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, W W; Feng, L; Vannice, J L; Wilson, C B

    1994-01-01

    The contribution of IL-1 to leukocyte infiltration in anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody (Ab) glomerulonephritis (GN) was examined by the administration of a specific IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra). Lewis rats received anti-GBM Ab or normal rabbit serum and were treated with either 0.9% saline or 6 mg IL-1ra over a 24-h time period. Plasma IL-1ra concentration was 2,659 +/- 51 ng/ml 4 h after anti-GBM Ab and IL-1ra administration. PMN and monocyte/macrophage infiltration declined 39% (9.8 +/- 1.9 to 6.0 +/- 1.5 PMN/glomerulus, P < 0.001) and 29% (4.9 +/- 0.8 to 3.5 +/- 0.8 ED-1 cells/glomerulus, P = 0.002) with IL-1ra treatment at 4 h, respectively. Similarly, the number of glomerular cells staining for lymphocyte function-associated molecule-1 beta (CD18) declined 39% from 16.7 +/- 1.9 to 10.7 +/- 1.6 cells/glomerulus at 4 h (P = 0.0001). This was associated with a decrease in glomerular intracellular adhesion molecule-1 expression. The mean glomerular intracellular adhesion molecule-1 score in anti-GBM Ab GN rats treated with IL-1ra was less than that of rats administered anti-GBM Ab and 0.9% saline at 4 (2.0 +/- 0.2 vs 2.5 +/- 0.2, P < 0.05) and 24 (2.5 +/- 0.1 vs 3.1 +/- 0.2, P = 0.0001) h. These immunopathologic changes correlated with a 50% reduction in proteinuria from 147 +/- 34 to 75 +/- 25 mg/d (P < 0.002). Treatment with IL-1ra did not affect the steady state mRNA expression of either IL-1 beta or TNF alpha. An increase in the IL-1ra dose to 30 mg given within the initial 4 h provided no additional benefit. The decline in PMN and monocyte/macrophage infiltration of the glomerulus at 4 h was similar to that found in the initial study. Furthermore, the protective benefit of IL-1ra was abrogated by doubling the dose of the anti-GBM Ab GN, despite administering high dose IL-1ra (30 mg). In these studies, detectable IL-1ra was found in the serum of untreated anti-GBM Ab GN controls. These data suggest a positive yet limited role for IL-1ra in

  11. Serum levels of 12 renal function and injury markers in patients with glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Serwin, Natalia M; Wiśniewska, Magda; Jesionowska, Anna; Skwirczyńska, Edyta; Marcinowska, Zuzanna; Dołęgowska, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    INTRODUCTION    Glomerulonephritis (GN) is a complex disease that affects the function of the whole nephron. There are few data on the serum levels of the most common biomarkers of kidney function and injury in GN, or the studies provide ambiguous results. OBJECTIVES    The aim of the study was to evaluate the levels of known kidney-specific and nonspecific markers of renal function or injury in the serum of patients with diagnosed primary or secondary GN, with or without the presence of nephrotic syndrome (NS) and arterial hypertension (AH). PATIENTS AND METHODS    The study included 58 patients with diagnosed GN and 6 patients with congenital defects (CD) of the kidney and AH (CD+AH). The serum levels of β2-microglobulin (β2M), neutrophil‑gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL), osteopontin, trefoil factor 3 (TFF-3), calbindin, glutathione-S‑transferase- π (GST-π), interleukin 18 (IL-18), kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1), and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) were measured with Kidney Toxicity Panels 1 and 2 using the Bio-Plex method. Renalase levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS    In the whole group and in the subgroups (GN, GN+AH, GN+NS, CD+AH), NGAL, KIM-1, TFF-3, IL-18, β2M, and calbindin levels correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). In patients with NS, this correlation for calbindin was reversed. Renalase, MCP-1, GST-π, and osteopontin levels were independent of eGFR. Increase in IL-18 levels in the group with GN was assiociated with lower odds of the kidney disease. When this group was divided according to eGFR into subgroups G1-G5, TFF-3, NGAL, and β2M levels increased with the stage of the disease. CONCLUSIONS In patients with NS, renalase and MCP-1 might regulate each other's levels. Further studies are needed to investigate associations between renalase, MCP-1, and osteopontin as factors unrelated to eGFR in GN. NS may contribute to the loss of calbindin from

  12. Geoepidemiological hints about Streptococcus pyogenes strains in relationship with acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Bianchini, Sonia; Fastiggi, Michele; Fumagalli, Monica; Andreozzi, Laura; Rigante, Donato

    2015-07-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) strains are lately classified on the basis of sequence variations in the emm gene encoding the M protein, but despite the high number of distinct emm genotypes, the spectrum of phenotypes varying from invasive suppurative to non-suppurative GAS-related disorders has still to be defined. The relationship of GAS types with the uprising of acute rheumatic fever (ARF), a multisystemic disease caused by misdirected anti-GAS response in predisposed people, is also obscure. Studies published over the last 15 years were retrieved from PubMed using the keywords: "Streptococcus pyogenes" or "group A Streptococcus" and "acute rheumatic fever": the prevalence of peculiar emm types across different countries of the world is highly variable, depending on research designs, year of observation, country involved, patients' age, and gender. Most studies revealed that a relatively small number of specific emm/M protein types can be considered "rheumatogenic", as potentially characterized by the possibility of inducing ARF, with remarkable differences between developing and developed countries. The association between emm types and post-streptococcal manifestations is challenging, however surveillance of disease-causing variants in a specific community with high rate of ARF should be reinforced with the final goal of developing a potential primary prophylaxis against GAS infections. PMID:25772310

  13. Urinary Immunoglobulin G to Albumin Ratio and N-Acetyl-Beta-D-Glucosaminidase as Early Predictors of Therapeutic Response in ANCA-Associated Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Mravljak, Marija; Vizjak, Alenka; Ferluga, Dusan; Pajek, Jernej; Kovac, Damjan; Skoberne, Andrej; Ales Rigler, Andreja; Kveder, Radoslav; Kosir, Andrej; Lindic, Jelka

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of our study was to evaluate the prognostic value of glomerular and tubular proteinuria and tubular enzymuria as early indicators of therapeutic response to induction therapy with i.v. pulse cyclophosphamide (CyC) and methylprednisolone (MP) in patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated glomerulonephritis. Methods and Findings An observational single-center study was conducted in 30 patients with ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis. Patients were divided into subgroups with good or poor response to CyC therapy according to clinical and laboratory parameters. The diagnosis of ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis was based on the Chapel-Hill disease definitions. Good response to induction therapy was significantly associated with higher absolute values of urine N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) to creatinine ratio (above 14.83 microcat/mol) and urine immunoglobulin G (IgG) to albumin ratio (above 0.09) at the time of diagnosis, while albuminuria or proteinuria did not have any early predictive value. The remission of renal disease was anticipated as early as 3 months after introduction of induction therapy in patients with reduction of urine NAG to creatinine ratio below the baseline value and in patients with at least 24% rise in eGFR. Conclusions Urine IgG to albumin and urine NAG to creatinine ratio are better early predictors of treatment response in patients with ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis than proteinuria or albuminuria. PMID:24349116

  14. Dual anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis in a patient with Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Hee; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Kim, Min-Kyung

    2016-09-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that primarily affects exocrine glands. Renal involvement of Sjögren's syndrome may lead to tubulointerstitial disease, whereas secondary glomerulopathies such as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-related pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis are rarely observed. In addition, crescent glomerulonephritis that is simultaneously positive for both myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA and proteinase 3 (PR3)-ANCA has never been reported in Sjögren's syndrome. Here, we report a case of pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis exhibiting positivity for both MPO- and PR3-ANCAs in a patient with primary Sjögren's syndrome. A 71-year-old female was hospitalized for cough, blood-tinged sputum, and dyspnea two weeks after diagnosis with Sjögren's syndrome. On admission, serum anti-nuclear antibody, anti-Ro/SS-A antibody, MPO-ANCA, and PR3-ANCA were all positive, and serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine (Cr) levels were 42.7 and 2.9 mg/dL, respectively. On the seventh day of hospitalization, the patient's serum Cr level was 5.7 mg/dL, indicating rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Renal biopsy resulted in the diagnosis of ANCA-related pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis, for which intravenous methylprednisolone (7 mg/kg/day) was administered for three consecutive days, followed by combination therapy with oral prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day) and intravenous cyclophosphamide (500 mg/m(2)). The patient was positive in the Schirmer's I test, and a salivary gland biopsy showed sialadenitis with lympho-plasmacytic infiltrations. On day 28 of hospitalization, the patient was discharged after amelioration of respiratory symptoms and azotemia. At 6 months after discharge, the patient continued to receive appropriate daily medications and was negative for both MPO- and PR3-ANCAs, with a slight elevation in serum Cr levels. PMID:27384449

  15. Autoepitopes and alloepitopes of type IV collagen: role in the molecular pathogenesis of anti-GBM antibody glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2007-01-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibodies elicited by autoimmune or alloimmune mechanisms are associated with aggressive forms of rapid progressive glomerulonephritis. Pathogenic anti-GBM autoantibodies and alloantibodies target the noncollagenous (NC1) domains of the alpha3alpha4alpha5(IV) collagen, a major GBM component. In autoimmune anti-GBM glomerulonephritis, a breakdown of immune self-tolerance leads to the activation of autoreactive B and T cells recognizing epitopes within the alpha3NC1 subunit. In the GBM, the conformational epitopes targeted by anti-GBM autoantibodies are structurally sequestered within the alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamer complex formed upon assembly of collagen IV chains into trimeric molecules and networks. Autoantibodies selectively bind to and dissociate a subset of alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers composed of monomer subunits, whereas hexamers containing NC1 dimer subunits are resistant to dissociation by autoantibodies. The crypticity of alpha3NC1 autoepitopes suggests that self-tolerance to alpha3(IV) collagen is broken by structural alterations of the native alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamer that unmask normally sequestered epitopes, triggering an autoimmune reaction. Post-transplant anti-GBM nephritis in the renal allograft of transplanted Alport patients is mediated by an alloimmune reaction to the NC1 domains of alpha3alpha4alpha5(IV) collagen, present in the allograft GBM but absent from Alport basement membranes. Alloantibodies from patients with autosomal-recessive Alport syndrome predominantly bind to the alpha3NC1 domain, whereas alloantibodies from X-linked Alport patients target preferentially, though not exclusively, epitopes within the alpha5NC1 subunit. The accessibility of the alloantigenic sites within the alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers, contrasting with the crypticity of autoantigenic sites, suggest that different molecular forms of alpha3alpha4alpha5(IV) collagen initiate the immunopathogenic responses in

  16. [Acute kidney injury in children].

    PubMed

    Amira-Peco-Antić; Paripović, Dusan

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a clinical condition considered to be the consequence of a sudden decrease (> 25%) or discontinuation of renal function. The term AKI is used instead of the previous term acute renal failure, because it has been demonstrated that even minor renal lesions may cause far-reaching consequences on human health. Contemporary classifications of AKI (RIFLE and AKIN) are based on the change of serum creatinine and urinary output. In the developed countries, AKI is most often caused by renal ischemia, nephrotoxins and sepsis, rather than a (primary) diffuse renal disease, such as glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis, renovascular disorder and thrombotic microangiopathy. The main risk factors for hospital AKI are mechanical ventilation, use of vasoactive drugs, stem cell transplantation and diuretic-resistant hypervolemia. Prerenal and parenchymal AKI (previously known as acute tubular necrosis) jointly account for 2/3 of all AKI causes. Diuresis and serum creatinine concentration are not early diagnostic markers of AKI. Potential early biomarkers of AKI are neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), cystatin C, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), interleukins 6, 8 and 18, and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP). Early detection of kidney impairment, before the increase of serum creatinine, is important for timely initiated therapy and recovery. The goal of AKI treatment is to normalize the fluid and electrolyte status, as well as the correction of acidosis and blood pressure. Since a severe fluid overload resistant to diuretics and inotropic agents is associated with a poor outcome, the initiation of dialysis should not be delayed. The mortality rate of AKI is highest in critically ill children with multiple organ failure and hemodynamically unstable patients. PMID:25033598

  17. Hepatitis C eradication and improvement of cryoglobulinemia-associated rash and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with interferon and ribavirin after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zeman, Marilyn; Campbell, Patricia; Bain, Vincent G

    2006-01-01

    Postrenal transplant hepatitis C is increasing in frequency due to the high prevalence of hepatitis C among patients with renal failure. Despite this, there is still no standard hepatitis C treatment available for renal transplanted recipients. Combination antiviral hepatitis C therapy, the standard of care in the nontransplant population, is generally avoided because of documented renal graft rejection secondary to interferon treatment. A case of a male patient with postrenal transplant hepatitis C, which was associated with cryoglobulinemia and glomerulonephritis of the graft, is presented. He was treated with standard interferon with ribavirin. Sustained viral clearance was achieved despite ongoing evidence of cryoglobulinemia. Renal function, which had been deteriorating before treatment, improved as evidenced by the stabilization of serum creatinine and marked improvement of proteinuria. In conclusion, in selected patients, combination antiviral therapy may still be a viable option postrenal transplant. PMID:16779461

  18. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or though physical contact (for example, on unwashed hands). Being exposed to tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts, vapors, and fumes can also cause acute bronchitis. Less often, bacteria can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute ...

  19. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  20. Long-term graft outcomes and patient survival are lower posttransplant in patients with a primary renal diagnosis of glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Pruthi, Rishi; McClure, Mark; Casula, Anna; Roderick, Paul J; Fogarty, Damian; Harber, Mark; Ravanan, Rommel

    2016-04-01

    Glomerulonephritis (GN) is the primary diagnosis in 20% to 40% of patients receiving a renal transplant. Here we studied patient survival and graft outcomes in patients with GN transplanted in the UK. UK Renal Registry data were used to analyze patient survival and graft failure in incident transplant patients between 1997 to 2009 who had a diagnosis of primary GN, in comparison to patients transplanted with adult polycystic kidney disease (APKD) or diabetes. Multivariable regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, donor type, ethnicity, donor age, time on dialysis, human leukocyte antigen mismatch, cold ischemic time, and graft failure (for patient survival). Patients were followed up through December 2012. Of 4750 patients analyzed, 2975 had GN and 1775 APKD. Graft failure was significantly higher in membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) type II (hazard ratio: 3.5, confidence interval: 1.9-6.6), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (2.4, 1.8-3.2), MPGN type I (2.3, 1.6-3.3), membranous nephropathy (2.0, 1.4-2.9), and IgA nephropathy (1.6, 1.3-2.0) compared to APKD. Survival was significantly reduced in patients with MPGN type II (4.7, 2.0-10.8), and those with lupus nephritis (1.8, 1.1-2.9). Overall graft failure for patients with GN was similar to those with diabetes. Thus, in comparison to outcomes in APKD, graft survival is significantly lower in most GNs, with variation in outcomes between different GNs. This information should assist in pretransplant counseling of patients. Further study is required to understand the reduced survival seen in lupus nephritis and MPGN type II, and to improve overall graft outcomes. PMID:26924061

  1. Alport alloantibodies but not Goodpasture autoantibodies induce murine glomerulonephritis: protection by quinary crosslinks locking cryptic α3(IV) collagen autoepitopes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wentian; Wang, Xu-Ping; Kashtan, Clifford E; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2010-09-15

    The noncollagenous (NC1) domains of alpha3alpha4alpha5(IV) collagen in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) are targets of Goodpasture autoantibodies or Alport posttransplant nephritis alloantibodies mediating rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Because the autoepitopes but not the alloepitopes become cryptic upon assembly of alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers, we investigated how the accessibility of B cell epitopes in vivo influences the development of glomerulonephritis in mice passively immunized with human anti-GBM Abs. Alport alloantibodies, which bound to native murine alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers in vitro, deposited linearly along the mouse GBM in vivo, eliciting crescentic glomerulonephritis in Fcgr2b(-/-) mice susceptible to Ab-mediated inflammation. Goodpasture autoantibodies, which bound to murine alpha3NC1 monomer and dimer subunits but not to native alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers in vitro, neither bound to the mouse GBM in vivo nor induced experimental glomerulonephritis. This was due to quinary NC1 crosslinks, recently identified as sulfilimine bonds, which comprehensively locked the cryptic Goodpasture autoepitopes in the mouse GBM. In contrast, non-crosslinked alpha3NC1 subunits were identified as a native target of Goodpasture autoantibodies in the GBM of squirrel monkeys, a species susceptible to Goodpasture autoantibody-mediated nephritis. Thus, crypticity of B cell autoepitopes in tissues uncouples potentially pathogenic autoantibodies from autoimmune disease. Crosslinking of alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers represents a novel mechanism averting autoantibody binding and subsequent tissue injury by posttranslational modifications of an autoantigen. PMID:20709951

  2. Alport alloantibodies but not Goodpasture autoantibodies induce murine glomerulonephritis: Protection by quinary crosslinks locking cryptic α3(IV) collagen autoepitopes in vivo 1

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wentian; Wang, Xu-Ping; Kashtan, Clifford E.; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2010-01-01

    The noncollagenous (NC1) domains of α3α4α5(IV) collagen in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) are targets of Goodpasture autoantibodies or Alport post-transplant nephritis alloantibodies mediating rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Because the autoepitopes but not the alloepitopes become cryptic upon assembly of α3α4α5NC1 hexamers, we investigated how the accessibility of B cell epitopes in vivo influences the development of glomerulonephritis in mice passively immunized with human anti-GBM antibodies. Alport alloantibodies, which bound to native murine α3α4α5NC1 hexamers in vitro, deposited linearly along the mouse GBM in vivo, eliciting crescentic glomerulonephritis in Fcgr2b−/− mice susceptible to antibody-mediated inflammation. Goodpasture autoantibodies, which bound to murine α3NC1 monomer and dimer subunits but not to native α3α4α5NC1 hexamers in vitro, neither bound to the mouse GBM in vivo nor induced experimental glomerulonephritis. This was due to quinary NC1 cross-links, recently identified as sulfilimine bonds, which comprehensively locked the cryptic Goodpasture autoepitopes in the mouse GBM. In contrast, non-crosslinked α3NC1 subunits were identified as a native target of Goodpasture autoantibodies in the GBM of squirrel monkeys—a species susceptible to Goodpasture autoantibody-mediated nephritis. Thus, crypticity of B cell autoepitopes in tissues uncouples potentially pathogenic autoantibodies from autoimmune disease. Crosslinking of α3α4α5NC1 hexamers represents a novel mechanism averting autoantibody binding and subsequent tissue injury by post-translational modifications of an autoantigen. PMID:20709951

  3. Skimmin, a Coumarin from Hydrangea paniculata, Slows down the Progression of Membranous Glomerulonephritis by Anti-Inflammatory Effects and Inhibiting Immune Complex Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hongqi; Li, Yan; Zhang, Dongming; Shi, Jing; Yang, Jingzhi

    2013-01-01

    Skimmin is one of the major pharmacologically active molecules present in Hydrangea paniculata, a medical herb used in the traditional Chinese medicine as an anti-inflammatory agent. In the current study, we attempted to investigate its renoprotective activity and underlying mechanisms in a rat model of membranous glomerulonephritis induced by cationic bovine serum albumin (c-BSA). Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into five groups, including normal control, model control, Mycophenolate Mofetil-treated group, and two skimming-treated groups (15 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg). Our research showed that treatment with skimmin significantly reduced the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary albumin excretion (UAE), and serum creatinine (Scr) as compared with model control after experimental induction of membranous glomerulonephritis (P < 0.01). Moreover, glomerular hypercellularity, tubulointerstitial injury, and glomerular deposition of IgG were less intense after skimmin treatment. By immunochemistry analysis, we demonstrated that skimmin could significantly inhibit interleukin-1β (IL1β) and IL-6 expression (P < 0.05), reduce the loss of nephrin and podocin, and suppress the infiltration of renal interstitium by CD3-positive T cell and CD20-positive B cell. These results suggest that treatment with skimmin can significantly improve renal function and suppress the IgG deposition as well as the development of glomerular lesions in a rat model of membranous glomerulonephritis. PMID:23990847

  4. Therapeutic effects and mechanism of conditioned media from human mesenchymal stem cells on anti-GBM glomerulonephritis in WKY rats.

    PubMed

    Iseri, Ken; Iyoda, Masayuki; Ohtaki, Hirokazu; Matsumoto, Kei; Wada, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Taihei; Yamamoto, Yasutaka; Saito, Tomohiro; Hihara, Kei; Tachibana, Shohei; Honda, Kazuho; Shibata, Takanori

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that conditioned media derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSC-CM) have therapeutic effects in various experimental diseases. However, the therapeutic mechanism is not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic effects and mechanism of MSC-CM in experimental antiglomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis. We administered either MSC-CM or vehicle from day 0 to day 10 after the induction of nephrotoxic serum nephritis in Wistar-Kyoto rats. In vitro, we analyzed the effects of MSC-CM on TNF-α-mediated cytokine production in cultured normal human mesangial cells, proximal tubular (HK-2) cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and monocytes (THP-1 and peripheral blood mononuclear cells). Compared with vehicle treatment, MSC-CM treatment improved proteinuria and renal dysfunction. Histologically, MSC-CM-treated rats had reduced crescent formation and glomerular ED1(+) macrophage infiltration and increased glomerular ED2(+) macrophage infiltration. Increased serum monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 levels were observed in MSC-CM-treated rats. Renal cortical mRNA expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6, and of the T helper cell 1 cytokine interferon-γ were greatly decreased by MSC-CM treatment. In vitro, pretreatment with MSC-CM blocked TNF-α-mediated IL-8 release in normal human mesangial cells and HK-2 cells. TNF-α-mediated MCP-1 release was enhanced by pretreatment with MSC-CM in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and HK-2 cells and was strikingly enhanced in THP-1 cells. Stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with a combination of MCP-1 and IL-4 enhanced the expression of M2-associated genes compared with IL-4 alone. We demonstrated that MSC-CM had therapeutic effects in experimental antiglomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis that were mediated through anti-inflammatory effects that were partly due to acceleration of M2 macrophage

  5. [Drug-induced acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Derungs, Adrian

    2015-12-01

    Due to their physiological function, the kidneys are exposed to high concentrations of numerous drugs and their metabolites, making them vulnerable to drug-related injuries. This article provides an overview of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in nephrotoxicity, the most common nephrotoxic drugs, and the risk factors for the occurrence of drug-induced acute kidney injuries. NSAIDs, diuretics, ACE inhibitors, and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs} are the most frequent prerenal causes of an acute elevation in creatinine levels. Primary vascular damage arises from thrombotic microangiopathy (e. g. due to cic/osporin, tacrolimus, muromonab-CD3, mitomycin C, quinine, ticlopidine, clopidogrel}. Anticoagulants and thrombolytic medications lead to secondary blood vessel damage by cholesterol emboli, embolism of thrombus material into the periphery or bleeding. Tubulopathies can be observed on treatment with ifosfamide and cisplatin (rarely with cyclophosphamide or carboplatin), aminoglycosides, vancomycin, and radiocontrast agents. Immunological mechanisms underlie interstitial nephritides, which are induced by drugs in about 85% of cases. In drug-induced glomerulopathies;- renal biopsy allows closer identification of the triggering medication. Drug-induced systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE} represents a special form of immune complex glomerulonephritis and can be triggered by procainamide, hydralazine, isoniazid, methyldopa, quinidine, chlorpromazine, and propylthiouracil. Crystal-induced kidney injury is caused by precipitation of drugs (e. g. aciclovir, sulfonamide antibiotics, methotrexate, indinavir) in the renal tubules and the urine-conducting organs with consecutive obstruction thereof. PMID:26654816

  6. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  7. Clonal diversity of Streptococcus pyogenes within some M-types revealed by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Haase, A. M.; Melder, A.; Mathews, J. D.; Kemp, D. J.; Adams, M.

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-two reference isolates and 30 local isolates of group A Streptococci were classified into 36 electrophoretic types (ET) on the basis of allozyme variation at 27 enzyme loci. Local isolates were characterized by a high frequency of M-non typable strains. M-type and ET were more closely associated in local isolates from an endemically-infected population; nevertheless, amongst the local isolates there were also strains of the same ET type with different M-types. A possible explanation is that genetic exchange between strains may introduce different M-types into strains of defined ET when these are exposed to strong selection in the presence of heavy loads of infection. In contrast to the reported clustering of strains associated with toxic shock-like syndrome into two closely related ET clones, we found no relationship of ET phenotype to acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis or rheumatic fever. PMID:7995355

  8. The combination of tacrolimus and entecavir improves the remission of HBV-associated glomerulonephritis without enhancing viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lifen; Ye, Zhiming; Liang, Huaban; Zhang, Bin; Xu, Lixia; Feng, Zhonglin; Liu, Shuangxin; Shi, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tacrolimus inhibits hepatitis B virus entry into hepatocytes through targeting the HBV receptor, sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide. This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Tacrolimus combined with entecavir antiviral therapy for HBV-associated glomerulonephritis patients with biopsy-proven membranous nephropathy. Method: A cohort of 42 patients was enrolled in this retrospective study. Twenty-three patients received Tacrolimus (0.05 mg/kg/day) in combination entecavir over 24 weeks, whereas the other 19 patients only received entecavir monotherapy. Results: The probability of proteinuria remission in the Tacrolimus+entecavir group was 69 and 87% after 12 and 24 weeks, whereas was only 26 and 42%, respectively, in the entecavir group. The mean time to partial or complete remission was 18.6 weeks in the Tacrolimus+entecavir group and 34.3 weeks in the entecavir group (P<0.001). A decrease in the HBV DNA titer was observed in all patients with active HBV replication. None of the HBV carriers in the Tacrolimus+entecavir group showed evidence of HBV reactivation. The serum creatinine and alanine aminotransferase levels remained stable in both groups. The Tacrolimus target trough concentration was 5-10 ng/mL. Conclusion: Tacrolimus combined with entecavir rapidly and effectively induced remission of HBV-GN in Chinese adults. Furthermore, Tacrolimus may have a synergistic antiviral effect with entecavir.

  9. Mucosal Tolerance Induced by an Immunodominant Peptide from Rat α3(IV)NC1 in Established Experimental Autoimmune Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, John; Abbott, Danielle S.; Karegli, Julieta; Evans, David J.; Pusey, Charles D.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune glomerulonephritis (EAG), an animal model of Goodpasture’s disease, can be induced in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats by immunization with the noncollagenous domain of the α 3 chain of type IV collagen, α3(IV)NC1. Recent studies have identified an immunodominant peptide, pCol (24-38), from the N-terminus of rat α3(IV)NC1; this peptide contains the major B- and T-cell epitopes in EAG and can induce crescentic nephritis. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of mucosal tolerance in EAG by examining the effects of the nasal administration of this peptide after the onset of disease. A dose-dependent effect was observed: a dose of 300 μg had no effect, a dose of 1000 μg resulted in a moderate reduction in EAG severity, and a dose of 3000 μg produced a marked reduction in EAG severity accompanied by diminished antigen-specific, T-cell proliferative responses. These results demonstrate that mucosal tolerance in EAG can be induced by nasal administration of an immunodominant peptide from the N-terminus of α3(IV)NC1 and should be of value in designing new therapeutic strategies for patients with Goodpasture’s disease and other autoimmune disorders. PMID:19406992

  10. Increased risk for lymphoma and glomerulonephritis in a closed population of cats exposed to feline leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Francis, D P; Essex, M; Jakowski, R M; Cotter, S M; Lerer, T J; Hardy, W D

    1980-03-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-associated diseases were observed in a household in eastern Connecticut having 134 cats over a period of five and a half years. FeLV-positive cats had a much higher mortality rate (34.6 deaths per 1000 cat-months of follow-up) than did FeLV-negative cats (8.9 deaths per 1000 cat-months of follow-up). The leading cause of death was glomerulonephritis followed by lymphoma. The relative risk for virus-positive cats as compared to virus-negative cats for the two diseases was 9.9 and 9.6, respectively. The major risk factors for the development of lymphoma were virus positivity and low antibody titer to the feline oncornavirus-associated cell membrane antigen (FOCMA). No significant differences in cancer incidence were seen between the two major breeds (Abyssinian and Burmese) in the household. An older age at arrival in the house decreased death rates for all causes in the household, but it did not significantly affect death rates from lymphoma, although there was a positive trend. PMID:6244730

  11. The Effects of a Selective CK2 Inhibitor on Anti-glomerular Basement Membrane Glomerulonephritis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Junfeng; Liu, Ning; Xiao, Ying; Takei, Yoshinori; Yasue, Misato; Suzuki, Yamato; Hou, Zengye; Ohno, Hiroaki; Yamada, Masateru; Fuchi, Nobuhiro; Oshida, Keiyu; Miyamoto, Yohei; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Hirasawa, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 ("casein kinase II") is a protein serine/threonine kinase that plays critical roles in biological processes such as cell growth, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. So far, we have identified that one catalytic isozyme of CK2, CK2α, is over-expressed in the kidney during the progression of glomerulonephritis (GN). Moreover, we have shown that in vivo inhibition of CK2 by administration of CK2 inhibitors was effective in the treatment of experimental GN. Hence the development of potent CK2 inhibitors should be considered in therapeutic strategies for GN. In the present study we identified compound 13, a pyrazine derivative, as a potent CK2 inhibitor. By performing enzyme kinetics analysis in vitro, we characterized the inhibition of compound 13 toward each CK2 catalytic isozyme. Furthermore, in vivo, we demonstrated that compound 13 is effective in attenuating proteinuria, decreasing the enhanced level of blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, and ameliorating glomerular crescent formation in an experimental GN rat model. On the other hand, cellular apoptosis was detected in the rat testis following administration of compound 13. This study provides clues for new strategies for developing applicable compounds into CK2-targeted GN treatments. PMID:26328489

  12. Cordyceps militaris fruit body extract ameliorates membranous glomerulonephritis by attenuating oxidative stress and renal inflammation via the NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Song, Jingjing; Wang, Yingwu; Liu, Chungang; Huang, Yan; He, Liying; Cai, Xueying; Lu, Jiahui; Liu, Yan; Wang, Di

    2016-04-01

    Membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) is a common pathogenesis of nephritic syndrome in adult patients. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) serves as the main transcription factor for the inflammatory response mediated nephropathy. Cordyceps militaris, containing various pharmacological components, has been used as a kind of crude drug and folk tonic food for improving immunity and reducing inflammation. The current study aims to investigate the renoprotective activity of Cordyceps militaris aqueous extract (CM) in the cationic bovine serum albumin (C-BSA)-induced rat model of membranous glomerulonephritis. Significant renal dysfunction was observed in MGN rats; comparatively, 4-week CM administration strongly decreased the levels of 24 h urine protein, total cholesterol, triglyceride, blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, and increased the levels of serum albumin and total serum protein. Strikingly, recovery of the kidney histological architecture was noted in CM-treated MGN rats. A significant improvement in the glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase levels, and a reduced malondialdehyde concentration were observed in the serum and kidney of CM-treated rats. Altered levels of inflammatory cytokines including interleukins, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, vascular adhesion molecule 1, tumor necrosis factor-α, 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α, and nuclear transcriptional factor subunit NF-κB p65 reverted to normal levels upon treatment with CM. The present data suggest that CM protects rats against membranous glomerulonephritis via the normalization of NF-κB activity, thereby inhibiting oxidative damage and reducing inflammatory cytokine levels, which further provide experimental evidence in support of the clinical use of CM as an effective renoprotective agent. PMID:27008597

  13. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis Overlap Syndrome in Patients With Biopsy-Proven Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Jarrot, Pierre-Andre; Chiche, Laurent; Hervier, Baptiste; Daniel, Laurent; Vuiblet, Vincent; Bardin, Nathalie; Bertin, Daniel; Terrier, Benjamin; Amoura, Zahir; Andrés, Emmanuel; Rondeau, Eric; Hamidou, Mohamed; Pennaforte, Jean-Loup; Halfon, Philippe; Daugas, Eric; Dussol, Bertrand; Puéchal, Xavier; Kaplanski, Gilles; Jourde-Chiche, Noemie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to report the clinical, biological, and pathological characteristics of patients with glomerulonephritis (GN) secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)/antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) overlap syndrome. A nationwide survey was conducted to identify cases of SLE/AAV overlap syndrome. Data were collected from SLE and AAV French research groups. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of both SLE and AAV according to international classification criteria and biopsy-proven GN between 1995 and 2014. Additional cases were identified through a systematic literature review. A cohort of consecutive biopsy-proven GN was used to study the prevalence of overlapping antibodies and/or overlap syndrome. The national survey identified 8 cases of SLE/AAV overlap syndrome. All patients were female; median age was 40 years. AAV occurred before SLE (n = 3), after (n = 3), or concomitantly (n = 2). Six patients had rapidly progressive GN and 3/8 had alveolar hemorrhage. All patients had antinuclear antibodies (ANA); 7/8 had p-ANCA antimyeloperoxidase (MPO) antibodies. Renal biopsies showed lupus nephritis (LN) or pauci-immune GN. Remission was obtained in 4/8 patients. A literature review identified 31 additional cases with a similarly severe presentation. In the GN cohort, ANCA positivity was found in 30% of LN, ANA positivity in 52% of pauci-immune GN, with no correlation with pathological findings. The estimated prevalence for SLE/AAV overlap syndrome was 2/101 (2%). In patients with GN, SLE/AAV overlap syndrome may occur but with a low prevalence. Most patients have an aggressive renal presentation, with usually both ANA and anti-MPO antibodies. Further studies are needed to assess shared pathogenesis and therapeutic options. PMID:27258503

  14. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis Overlap Syndrome in Patients With Biopsy-Proven Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Jarrot, Pierre-Andre; Chiche, Laurent; Hervier, Baptiste; Daniel, Laurent; Vuiblet, Vincent; Bardin, Nathalie; Bertin, Daniel; Terrier, Benjamin; Amoura, Zahir; Andrés, Emmanuel; Rondeau, Eric; Hamidou, Mohamed; Pennaforte, Jean-Loup; Halfon, Philippe; Daugas, Eric; Dussol, Bertrand; Puéchal, Xavier; Kaplanski, Gilles; Jourde-Chiche, Noemie

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to report the clinical, biological, and pathological characteristics of patients with glomerulonephritis (GN) secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)/antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) overlap syndrome.A nationwide survey was conducted to identify cases of SLE/AAV overlap syndrome. Data were collected from SLE and AAV French research groups. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of both SLE and AAV according to international classification criteria and biopsy-proven GN between 1995 and 2014. Additional cases were identified through a systematic literature review. A cohort of consecutive biopsy-proven GN was used to study the prevalence of overlapping antibodies and/or overlap syndrome.The national survey identified 8 cases of SLE/AAV overlap syndrome. All patients were female; median age was 40 years. AAV occurred before SLE (n = 3), after (n = 3), or concomitantly (n = 2). Six patients had rapidly progressive GN and 3/8 had alveolar hemorrhage. All patients had antinuclear antibodies (ANA); 7/8 had p-ANCA antimyeloperoxidase (MPO) antibodies. Renal biopsies showed lupus nephritis (LN) or pauci-immune GN. Remission was obtained in 4/8 patients. A literature review identified 31 additional cases with a similarly severe presentation. In the GN cohort, ANCA positivity was found in 30% of LN, ANA positivity in 52% of pauci-immune GN, with no correlation with pathological findings. The estimated prevalence for SLE/AAV overlap syndrome was 2/101 (2%).In patients with GN, SLE/AAV overlap syndrome may occur but with a low prevalence. Most patients have an aggressive renal presentation, with usually both ANA and anti-MPO antibodies. Further studies are needed to assess shared pathogenesis and therapeutic options. PMID:27258503

  15. Tissue factor initiates glomerular fibrin deposition and promotes major histocompatibility complex class II expression in crescentic glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Erlich, J. H.; Holdsworth, S. R.; Tipping, P. G.

    1997-01-01

    Increased glomerular tissue factor (TF) expression is associated with glomerular fibrin deposition and renal failure in human and experimental crescentic glomerulonephritis (GN). However, the in vivo functional contribution of TF to the development of glomerular fibrin deposition, crescent formation, and renal failure in GN has not been established. The contribution of TF to fibrin deposition and renal injury was studied in a rabbit model of crescentic GN in which glomerular macrophage infiltration, augmented TF expression, and fibrin deposition are prominent. Administration of anti-TF antibody inhibited glomerular TF activity in nephritic glomeruli by 96%, without affecting macrophage accumulation or systemic indices of coagulation. Anti-TF antibody significantly reduced glomerular fibrin deposition (fibrin scores, 0.43 +/- 0.10 (treated) and 1.40 +/- 0.19 (control); P < 0.0005), crescent formation (0.33 +/- 0.05 (treated) and 1.0 +/- 0.06 (control); P < 0.0005), and development of renal failure (serum creatinine, 168 +/- 22 mumol/l (treated) and 267 +/- 35 mumol/l (control); P < 0.04). This was associated with significant reduction in proteinuria (1189 +/- 277 mg/24 hours (treated) and 2060 +/- 336 mg/24 hours (control); P < 0.03) and expression of MHC class II antigen in glomeruli (1.25 +/- 0.41 (treated) and 2.83 +/- 0.53 (control); P < 0.03) and in tubules and interstitial areas. These data demonstrate that TF is the major in vivo initiator of fibrin deposition in crescentic GN. The reduction in proteinuria and glomerular major histocompatibility class II antigen expression by TF inhibition suggests that TF may also activate other mediators that contribute to glomerular injury. Images Figure 1 PMID:9060825

  16. Acute ST elevation myocardial infarction in fulminant systemic p-ANCA vasculitis: a rare catastrophic complication.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Kanupriya; Saini, Aditya; Bah, Tonjeh; Katikaneni, Pavan

    2016-01-01

    A 45-year-old Caucasian man presented to the hospital with a 3-month history of fatigue, bilateral upper and lower limb paresthesias and gradually worsening ascending paralysis. A few weeks later, he developed acute renal failure requiring haemodialysis. Investigations revealed presence of myeloperoxidase (MPO) perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). Renal biopsy was conclusive for rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis with crescents. Treatment for ANCA positive vasculitis was initiated with pulsed steroids, cyclophosphamide and plasmapheresis. The hospital course took an unexpected turn when the patient developed acute chest pain with an EKG consistent with inferior ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Urgent left heart catheterisation revealed distal occlusions in multivessel coronary distribution. Coronary involvement is rare in ANCA vasculitis and STEMI has not been reported in MPO-ANCA positive vasculitis, to the best of our knowledge. PMID:27358099

  17. Acute sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Rimar, Doron; Boulman, Nina; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Rosner, Itzhak; Odeh, Majed

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the data on the etiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, and diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis. A Pubmed search utilizing the indexing term "acute sacroiliitis" was conducted and the data pertinent to the aim of the review was extracted and organized in accordance with the preplanned structure of the manuscript. The diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis is often challenging because of both the relative rarity of this presentation and diverse character of acute sacroiliac pain, frequently mimicking other, more prevalent disorders. Technetium bone scintigraphy can localize the disease process to the sacroiliac joint, while computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detailed characterization and the extent of the disease as well as the diagnosis of complications. Pyogenic sacroiliitis is by far the most common cause of acute sacroiliitis. Brucellosis, acute sacroiliitis in the course of reactive arthritis, and crystalline-induced sacroiliitis frequently imitate pyogenic sacroiliitis. Acute sacroiliitis can rarely be also related to hematological malignancies or treatment with isotretinoin. Awareness to the possibility of acute sacroiliitis and a thorough physical examination are the necessary prerequisites to its timely diagnosis, while the appropriate laboratory and imaging studies should confirm the precise diagnosis and direct the appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26847855

  18. Transgene therapy for rat anti-Thy1.1 glomerulonephritis via mesangial cell vector with a polyethylenimine/decorin nanocomplex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian-Yong; Sun, Yu; Wu, Hui-Juan; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Zhao, Zhong-Hua; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2012-08-01

    Polyethylenimine (PEI), a cationic polymer, is one of the most efficient non-viral vectors for transgene therapy. Decorin (DCN), a leucine-rich proteoglycan secreted by glomerular mesangial cells (MC), is a promising anti-fibrotic agent for the treatment of glomerulonephritis. In this study, we used PEI-DCN nanocomplexes with different N/P ratios to transfect MC in vitro and deliver the MC vector with PEI-DCN expressing into rat anti-Thy1.1 nephritis kidney tissue via injection into the left renal artery in vivo. The PEI-plasmid DNA complex at N/P 20 had the highest level of transfection efficiency and the lowest level of cytotoxicity in cultured MC. Following injection, the ex vivo gene was transferred successfully into the glomeruli of the rat anti-Thy1.1 nephritis model by the MC vector with the PEI-DCN complex. The exogenous MC with DCN expression was located mainly in the mesangium and the glomerular capillary. Over-expression of DCN in diseased glomeruli could result in the inhibition of collagen IV deposition and MC proliferation. The pathological changes of rat nephritis were alleviated following injection of the vector. These findings demonstrate that the DCN gene delivered by the PEI-DNA nanocomplex with the MC vector is a promising therapeutic method for the treatment of glomerulonephritis.

  19. Determination of 6-thioguanine and 6-methylmercaptopurine metabolites in renal transplantation recipients and patients with glomerulonephritis treated with azathioprine.

    PubMed

    Chrzanowska, M; Krzymański, M

    1999-04-01

    The metabolism of azathioprine (AZA) was studied by monitoring the concentrations of red blood cell (RBC) 6-thioguanine nucleotides (6-TGN) and of 6-methylmercaptopurine metabolites (6-mMP) in 27 renal transplantation recipients and in 10 patient subjects with glomerulonephritis (GN). Concentrations of 6-TGNs and 6-mMP metabolites were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Six patients from the group of renal transplantation recipients were also administered allopurinol. Median values of RBC 6-TGN and of 6-mMP metabolites concentrations in 21 renal transplantation recipients (without allopurinol) were 122 pmol/8x10(8) RBCs (range, <60-298) and 280 pmol/8x10(8) RBC (range, <150-1330), respectively; there was no correlation between concentrations of 6-TGN and of 6-mMP metabolites. The group of 21 renal transplantation recipients received different AZA doses (100 or 50 mg/d) related to clinical symptoms of AZA intolerance. The median values of 6-TGN concentrations in these subgroups were 131 and 122 pmol/8x10(8) RBCs and were not significantly different. Median values of 6-TGN concentrations in patients given allopurinol were significantly higher, despite AZA dose reduction, compared with the group without allopurinol and were equal to 363 and 122 pmol/8x10(8) RBC, p < 0.004, respectively. No significant differences were found between the concentrations of 6-mMP metabolites in either group. In the group of renal transplantation recipients, a significant correlation between white blood cell (WBC) count and 6-TGN concentration was established (r(s) = -0.59, p < 0.005). In the group of GN patients, the median values of 6-TGN and of 6-mMP metabolites concentrations were 108 pmol/8x10(8) RBCs (range, 0-297) and 420 pmol/8x10(8) RBC (range, 0-1440), respectively. There were no significant correlations between either the WBC count and 6-TGN concentrations or between 6-TGN concentrations and 6-mMP metabolites. We expect the results of our study to

  20. Outcome of Patients with Primary Immune-Complex Type Mesangiocapillary Glomerulonephritis (MCGN) in Cape Town South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Okpechi, Ikechi G.; Dlamini, Thandiwe A. L.; Duffield, Maureen; Rayner, Brian L.; Moturi, George; Swanepoel, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim Mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis (MCGN) is a common cause of chronic kidney disease in developing countries. Data on the renal outcome of patients with idiopathic MCGN is limited. The aim of this study is to investigate the outcome of patients with idiopathic MCGN presenting to the Groote Schuur Hospital (GSH) Renal Unit in Cape Town. Materials and Methods A retrospective study of patients with idiopathic MCGN followed up at our clinic. Seventy-nine patients with no identifiable cause of MCGN were included for analysis. A composite renal outcome of persistent doubling of serum creatinine or end stage renal disease (ESRD) was used. Kaplan Meier survival and Cox regression analysis were used to assess survival and identify factors predicting the outcome. Results The mean age at biopsy was 33.9±13.6 years and 41.8% were black. Mean duration of follow up was 13.5±18.8 months. Twenty-three patients (34.2%) reached the composite endpoint. Overall, median renal survival was 38.7±11.7 months (95% CI 15.7–61.8) with 2-year and 5-year renal survival of 61% and 40.3% respectively. No significant difference was found for renal survival between males and females, treatment or non-treatment with immunosuppression, presence or absence of crescents or histological type of MCGN (p>0.05). On univariate Cox-regression analysis, factors found to be associated with the outcome were the estimated glomerular filtration rate at biopsy (OR 0.97 [95%CI: 0.95–0.99], p<0.0001), black race (OR 3.03 [95%CI: 1.27–7.21], p = 0.012) and presence of interstitial fibrosis in the biopsy (OR 2.64 [95%CI: 1.07–6.48], p = 0.034). Age, systolic blood pressure and attaining complete or partial remission approached significant values with the endpoint. Conclusions The outcome of idiopathic MCGN in Cape Town is poor and requires further prospective studies to improve our understanding of this common disease. PMID:25411791

  1. Acute malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Dupont, John S

    2006-01-01

    Acute malocclusion can result from disturbances in the maxillary/mandibular tooth relationship. These alterations in the occlusal position can result from high fillings, sinus problems, abscesses, periodontal disease, and moving or erupting teeth. Conditions seen less frequently include acute malocclusions secondary to an event (such as trauma) that make a stable dental relationship an unstable one. Patients can demonstrate any of a number of clinical conditions that interfere with their comfort and ability to function. This article provides information on some of the less familiar causes of acute malocclusion. PMID:16689064

  2. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by viruses that attack the lining of the bronchial tree ... infection. As your body fights back against these viruses, more swelling occurs and more mucus is produced. ...

  3. Acute Pericarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... large pericardial effusions). Acute pericarditis usually responds to colchicine or NSAIDs (such as aspirin and ibuprofen ) taken ... reduce pain but relieves it by reducing inflammation. Colchicine also decreases the chance of pericarditis returning later. ...

  4. Glomerulonephritis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... organs in the back that are shaped like kidney beans. They filter blood and help remove waste products from the body. Tiny filtering units within the kidneys do this with the help of blood vessels ...

  5. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePlus

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  6. A pilot study of leukocyte expression patterns for drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter transcripts in autoimmune glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Melanie S.; Roberts, Brittney V.; Wang, Jinzhao; Hu, Yichun; Hogan, Susan L.; Falk, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Leukocyte mRNA expression patterns of drug metabolizing enzyme genes and transporter genes that are relevant for the disposition of cyclophosphamide and mycophenolate were studied. The relationships between expression and patient-level data and pharmacokinetics were evaluated. Methods: The study included patients with glomerulonephritis secondary to lupus nephritis (SLE, n = 36), small vessel vasculitis (SVV, n = 35), healthy controls (HC, n = 10), and disease controls (VC, n = 5; LC, n = 5). Transcript assays targeted metabolizing enzymes (UGT1A7, UGT1A9, UGT2B7, CYP3A4, CYP2C9, CYP2B6) and transporters (ABCB1, ABCC2, ABCG2, SLCO1A2). Genotyping for specific variants was conducted. Group transcript fold-changes were evaluated. Patient level data was evaluated for transcript fold-change and disease, treatment, gender, race, and genotype. Results: Significant differences were noted in expression of UGT1A7, ABCB1, and ABCC2; for UGT1A7, SVV (0.17 ± 0.42; p < 0.05) and SLE (0.03 ± 0.1; p < 0.05) groups had lower expression than HC (0.79 ± 2.02). For ABCB1, SLE had a lower expression (0.33 ± 0.21; p < 0.05) than HCs (1 ± 0.82). For ABCG2, SVV group had a lower expression (0.17 ± 0.14; p < 0.05) than HCs (1 ± 1.82). Differences in expression of ABCC2 approached statistical significance with VC patients (2.02 ± 1.13) exhibiting higher expression than SVV patients (1.06 ± 1.11; p = 0.05). The relationships between transcript expression and patient-level data demonstrated; ABCC2 expression was different by race (1.26 ± 1.82 Caucasian versus 1.37 ± 0.86 non-Caucasian; p = 0.049) and CYP2B6 expression was different by treatment (2.07 ± 2.94 cyclophosphamide versus 0.45 ± 0.5 mycophenolate; p = 0.01). Conclusions: The current study showed differential expression of drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter transcripts and contributes to the literature on transcript expression of drug transporters in

  7. Epoetin beta pegol alleviates oxidative stress and exacerbation of renal damage from iron deposition, thereby delaying CKD progression in progressive glomerulonephritis rats.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Michinori; Tashiro, Yoshihito; Aizawa, Ken; Kawasaki, Ryohei; Shimonaka, Yasushi; Endo, Koichi

    2015-12-01

    The increased deposition of iron in the kidneys that occurs with glomerulopathy hinders the functional and structural recovery of the tubules and promotes progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Here, we evaluated whether epoetin beta pegol (continuous erythropoietin receptor activator: CERA), which has a long half-life in blood and strongly suppresses hepcidin-25, exerts renoprotection in a rat model of chronic progressive glomerulonephritis (cGN). cGN rats showed elevated urinary total protein excretion (uTP) and plasma urea nitrogen (UN) from day 14 after the induction of kidney disease (day 0) and finally declined into end-stage kidney disease (ESKD), showing reduced creatinine clearance with glomerulosclerosis, tubular dilation, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. A single dose of CERA given on day 1, but not on day 16, alleviated increasing uTP and UN, thereby delaying ESKD. In the initial disease phase, CERA significantly suppressed urinary 8-OHdG and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), a tubular damage marker. CERA also inhibited elevated plasma hepcidin-25 levels and alleviated subsequent iron accumulation in kidneys in association with elevated urinary iron excretion and resulted in alleviation of growth of Ki67-positive tubular and glomerular cells. In addition, at day 28 when the exacerbation of uTP occurs, a significant correlation was observed between iron deposition in the kidney and urinary L-FABP. In our study, CERA mitigated increasing kidney damage, thereby delaying CKD progression in this glomerulonephritis rat model. Alleviation by CERA of the exacerbation of kidney damage could be attributable to mitigation of tubular damage that might occur with lowered iron deposition in tubules. PMID:26634903

  8. AIM2 Mediates Inflammation-Associated Renal Damage in Hepatitis B Virus-Associated Glomerulonephritis by Regulating Caspase-1, IL-1β, and IL-18

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Junhui; Zhang, Le; Pan, Jiachao; Ma, Shumin; Yu, Xiaojian; Li, Xiaobo; Chen, Shijun; Du, Wenjun

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims. AIM2 plays an important role in innate immunity, but its role in regulating the immune response to hepatitis B virus (HBV) is unknown. We hypothesized that AIM2 expression is positively correlated with HBV-mediated inflammation in patients with HBV-associated glomerulonephritis (HBV-GN), potentiating inflammation and leading to renal damage. We therefore analyzed the expression of AIM2 and inflammatory factors in HBV-GN tissues and cell lines relative to the inflammatory response to HBV infection and HBV status. Methods. Seventy-nine patients with chronic nephritis (CN) were included: 54 with HBV-GN and 24 with chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN). Expression of AIM2, caspase-1, and IL-1β was detected by immunohistochemistry in renal biopsies from each patient. Following siRNA-mediated knockdown of AIM2 in HBV-infected and HBV-uninfected human glomerular mesangial (HGM) cells, expression of caspase-1, IL-1β, and IL-18 was detected by qRT-PCR and Western blot. Results. AIM2 expression in HBV-GN biopsies (81.4%) was significantly higher than in CGN (4.0%) and positively correlated with caspase-1 and IL-1β expression in HBV-GN. In vitro, AIM2 knockdown reduced caspase-1, IL-1β, and IL-18 expression in HBV-infected and HBV-uninfected HGM cells. Conclusion. AIM2 elevation during HBV infection or replication may contribute to inflammatory damage, thus providing a putative therapeutic target for HBV-GN. PMID:24701032

  9. Silica Triggers Inflammation and Ectopic Lymphoid Neogenesis in the Lungs in Parallel with Accelerated Onset of Systemic Autoimmunity and Glomerulonephritis in the Lupus-Prone NZBWF1 Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Melissa A.; Brandenberger, Christina; Langohr, Ingeborg; Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Harkema, Jack R.; Holian, Andrij; Pestka, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic predisposition and environmental factors influence the development of human autoimmune disease. Occupational exposure to crystalline silica (cSiO2) has been etiologically linked to increased incidence of autoimmunity, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that early repeated short-term cSiO2 exposure will modulate both latency and severity of autoimmunity in the lupus-prone female NZBWF1 mouse. Weekly intranasal exposure to cSiO2 (0.25 and 1.0 mg) for 4 wk beginning at 9 wk of age both reduced latency and increased intensity of glomerulonephritis. cSiO2 elicited robust inflammatory responses in the lungs as evidenced by extensive perivascular and peribronchial lymphoplasmacytic infiltration consisting of IgG-producing plasma cells, and CD45R+ and CD3+ lymphocytes that were highly suggestive of ectopic lymphoid tissue (ELT). In addition, there were elevated concentrations of immunoglobulins and the cytokines MCP-1, TNF-α and IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. cSiO2-associated kidney and lung effects paralleled dose-dependent elevations of autoantibodies and proinflammatory cytokines in plasma. Taken together, cSiO2-induced pulmonary inflammation and ectopic lymphoid neogenesis in the NZBWF1 mouse corresponded closely to systemic inflammatory and autoimmune responses as well as the early initiation of pathological outcomes in the kidney. These findings suggest that following airway exposure to crystalline silica, in mice genetically prone to SLE, the lung serves as a platform for triggering systemic autoimmunity and glomerulonephritis. PMID:25978333

  10. Acute Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Hammad; Fasanya, Adebayo; Cheema, Tariq; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Acute pneumonia is an active infection of the lungs that results when an individual at risk gets exposed to a particular microbiological pathogen. Acute pneumonia is the leading cause of death in the United States that is attributable to an infection. The risk factors, pathogenesis, and microbiological organisms involved differ if the pneumonia develops in the community versus health care-associated environment. The development of concise and comprehensive guidelines has led to an improvement in the management of the problem. However, the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms and the increase in the percentage of elderly population keep mortality risk very substantial. PMID:26919676

  11. A Rare Case of Polyneuropathy and Monoclonalgammopathy with Recurrent Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Jung; Shin, Dong Ho; Jeon, Hee Jung; Rhee, So Yon; Nam, Eun Sook; Park, Ji Young

    2016-01-01

    POEMS syndrome is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome and there are few reports of polyneuropathy and monoclonal gammopathy associated with kidney dysfunction. Here, we report a case of POEMS syndrome with recurrent acute kidney injury (AKI). A 52-year-old man presented with bilateral aggravating paresthesia and latermotor weakness of the lower extremities accompanied by repeated elevation of serum creatinine. The patient was finally diagnosed with POEMS syndrome on the basis of fulfilling the two mandatory major criteria (polyneuropathy and monoclonal gammopathy), one other major criterion (sclerotic bone lesion), and several minor criteria. A renal biopsy was performed to clarify the cause of AKI and showed membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis-like lesions with mesangiolysis and endothelial cell injury. This case illustrates that renal manifestations, not included in the diagnostic criteria for POEMS, can be apparent before various other systemic symptoms. PMID:27453713

  12. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  13. [Unexpected cause of acute renal failure in an 85-year-old woman].

    PubMed

    Fabbian, F; Stabellini, N; Catizone, L

    2008-01-01

    Acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis (APIGN) is usually diagnosed in young people, while in elderly people rapidly progressive forms appear to be the most important glomerular disease causing acute renal failure. We report on a 85-year-old woman with acute renal failure due to APIGN. An 85-year-old woman with a history of hypertension and cerebrovascular disease was hospitalized because of diarrhea and syncope associated with atrial fibrillation. She was found to have left lower lobe pneumonia. Serum creatinine was over 2 mg/dL. Fluids were given, without improvement in renal function but leading to volume overload instead. Within a few days serum creatinine reached a level of 5.4 mg/dL with reduction of urine output despite administration of diuretics. The patient developed hematuria and purpura of the feet. Serum IgA was high and the urine sediment showed casts. Methylprednisolone 125 mg i.v. was given for three days followed by prednisone 50 mg daily. The patient's clinical condition gradually improved and serum creatinine decreased to 1.9 mg/dL. Renal biopsy showed APIGN. During hospitalization, three major complications occurred: hemodynamic instability due to atrial fibrillation, Clostridium difficile colitis and urinary tract infections due to Enterococcus faecalis and Candida tropicans, all successfully treated. APIGN should be taken into account as a cause of acute renal failure in hospitalized elderly patients with many comorbidities. PMID:19048577

  14. Activation of Autophagy and Nucleotide-Binding Domain Leucine-Rich Repeat–Containing-Like Receptor Family, Pyrin Domain–Containing 3 Inflammasome during Leishmania infantum–Associated Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Esch, Kevin J.; Schaut, Robert G.; Lamb, Ian M.; Clay, Gwendolyn; Morais Lima, Ádila L.; do Nascimento, Paulo R.P.; Whitley, Elizabeth M.; Jeronimo, Selma M.B.; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S.; Haynes, Joseph S.; Petersen, Christine A.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a major contributor to human and companion animal morbidity and mortality. Renal complications are sequelae of canine and human visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Despite the high incidence of infection-mediated glomerulonephritis, little is known about pathogenesis of VL-associated renal disease. Leishmania infantum–infected dogs are a naturally occurring model of VL-associated glomerulonephritis. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type I [24 of 25 (96%)], with interstitial lymphoplasmacytic nephritis [23 of 25 (92%)], and glomerular and interstitial fibrosis [12 of 25 (48%)] were predominant lesions. An ultrastructural evaluation of glomeruli from animals with VL identified mesangial cell proliferation and interposition. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated significant Leishmania antigen, IgG, and C3b deposition in VL dog glomeruli. Asymptomatic and symptomatic dogs had increased glomerular nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat–containing-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 and autophagosome-associated microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 associated with glomerular lesion severity. Transcriptional analyses from symptomatic dogs confirmed induction of autophagy and inflammasome genes within glomeruli and tubules. On the basis of temporal VL staging, glomerulonephritis was initiated by IgG and complement deposition. This deposition preceded presence of nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat–containing-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3–associated inflammasomes and increased light chain 3 puncta indicative of autophagosomes in glomeruli from dogs with clinical VL and renal failure. These findings indicate potential roles for inflammasome complexes in glomerular damage during VL and autophagy in ensuing cellular responses. PMID:26079813

  15. Acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Barr, Wendy; Smith, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Acute diarrhea in adults is a common problem encountered by family physicians. The most common etiology is viral gastroenteritis, a self-limited disease. Increases in travel, comorbidities, and foodborne illness lead to more bacteria-related cases of acute diarrhea. A history and physical examination evaluating for risk factors and signs of inflammatory diarrhea and/or severe dehydration can direct any needed testing and treatment. Most patients do not require laboratory workup, and routine stool cultures are not recommended. Treatment focuses on preventing and treating dehydration. Diagnostic investigation should be reserved for patients with severe dehydration or illness, persistent fever, bloody stool, or immunosuppression, and for cases of suspected nosocomial infection or outbreak. Oral rehydration therapy with early refeeding is the preferred treatment for dehydration. Antimotility agents should be avoided in patients with bloody diarrhea, but loperamide/simethicone may improve symptoms in patients with watery diarrhea. Probiotic use may shorten the duration of illness. When used appropriately, antibiotics are effective in the treatment of shigellosis, campylobacteriosis, Clostridium difficile, traveler's diarrhea, and protozoal infections. Prevention of acute diarrhea is promoted through adequate hand washing, safe food preparation, access to clean water, and vaccinations. PMID:24506120

  16. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1−5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to August 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides, different doses [amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides], long-course regimens), antihistamines, cephalosporins or macrolides, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), doxycycline, saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intra-nasal). PMID:19450327

  17. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1% to 5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and in people with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, amoxicillin–clavulanic acid [co-amoxiclav], doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides; different doses, long-course regimens), antihistamines, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intranasal). PMID:22189346

  18. [Acute myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Combes, Alain

    2012-06-01

    Myocarditis is defined as inflammation of the myocardium accompanied by myocellular necrosis. Acute myocarditis must be considered in patients who present with recent-onset of cardiac failure or arrhythmia. Fulminant myocarditis is a distinct entity characterized by sudden onset of severe congestive heart failure or cardiogenic shock, usually following a flu-like illness, parvovirus B19, human herpesvirus 6, coxsackievirus and adenovirus being the most frequently viruses responsible for the disease. Treatment of myocarditis remains largely supportive, since immunosuppression has not been proven to be beneficial for acute lymphocytic myocarditis. Trials of antiviral therapies, or immunostimulants such as interferons, suggest a potential therapeutic role but require further investigation. Lastly, early recognition of patients rapidly progressing to refractory cardiac failure and their immediate transfer to a medical-surgical center experienced in mechanical circulatory support is warranted. In this setting, ECMO should be the first-line mechanical assistance. For highly unstable patients, a Mobile Cardiac Assistance Unit, that rapidly travels to primary care hospitals with a portable ECMO system and hooks it up before refractory multiorgan failure takes hold, is the preferred option. PMID:22515999

  19. [Acute myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Combes, Alain

    2013-05-01

    Myocarditis is defined as inflammation of the myocardium accompanied by myocellular necrosis. Acute myocarditis must be considered in patients who present with recent onset of cardiac failure or arrhythmia. Fulminant myocarditis is a distinct entity characterized by sudden onset of severe congestive heart failure or cardiogenic shock, usually following a flu-like illness, parvovirus B19, human herpesvirus 6, coxsackievirus and adenovirus being the most frequently viruses responsible for the disease. Treatment of myocarditis remains largely supportive, since immunosuppression has not been proven to be beneficial for acute lymphocytic myocarditis. Trials of antiviral therapies, or immunostimulants such as interferons, suggest a potential therapeutic role but require further investigation. Lastly, early recognition of patients rapidly progressing to refractory cardiac failure and their immediate transfer to a medical-surgical center experienced in mechanical circulatory support is warranted. In this setting, ECMO should be the first-line mechanical assistance. For highly unstable patients, a Mobile Cardiac Assistance Unit, that rapidly travels to primary care hospitals with a portable ECMO system and hooks it up before refractory multiorgan failure takes hold, is the preferred option. PMID:23789482

  20. Membrane cofactor protein mutations in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), fatal Stx-HUS, C3 glomerulonephritis, and the HELLP syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Celia J.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Liszewski, M. Kathryn; Pianetti, Gaia; Noris, Marina; Goodship, Timothy H. J.

    2008-01-01

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a triad of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal impairment. Genetic studies demonstrate that heterozygous mutations of membrane cofactor protein (MCP;CD46) predispose to atypical HUS (aHUS), which is not associated with exposure to Shiga toxin (Stx). Among the initial 25 MCP mutations in patients with aHUS were 2, R69W and A304V, that were expressed normally and for which no dysfunction was found. The R69W mutation is in complement control protein module 2, while A304V is in the hydrophobic transmembrane domain. In addition to 3 patients with aHUS, the A304V mutation was identified in 1 patient each with fatal Stx-HUS, the HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets) syndrome, and glomerulonephritis with C3 deposits. A major goal was to assess if these putative mutations lead to defective complement regulation. Permanent cell lines expressing the mutated proteins were complement “challenged,” and membrane control of C3 fragment deposition was monitored. Both the R69W and A304V MCP mutations were deficient in their ability to control the alternative pathway of complement activation on a cell surface, illustrating the importance of modeling transmembrane proteins in situ. PMID:17914026

  1. Zhen-wu-tang attenuates cationic bovine serum albumin-induced inflammatory response in membranous glomerulonephritis rat through inhibiting AGEs/RAGE/NF-κB pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junbiao; Liu, Bihao; Liang, Chunling; Ouyang, Hui; Lin, Jin; Zhong, Yanchun; He, Yu; Zhou, Jie; Zhou, Yuan; Zhou, Jiuyao

    2016-04-01

    Zhen-wu-tang (ZWT), a traditional Chinese compound formula recorded in the Treatise on Febrile Diseases, has significant inhibitory effects on inflammatory damage and oxidative lesions in rats, but its mechanism of action remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to explore whether the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects of ZWT were mediated by the AGEs/RAGE/NF-κB signaling pathway in rats with cationic bovine serum albumin (C-BSA)-induced membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN). We found that ZWT significantly reduced the production of malondialdehyde (MDA), but enhanced the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. The ELISA results showed that ZWT not only reduced the serum levels of AGEs but also decreased the release of inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6). Meanwhile, HE staining showed that pathological kidney injury was alleviated by ZWT. In addition, ZWT suppressed the expression of RAGE1 and NF-κB p65, as well as the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65. The accumulation of AGEs, oxidative lesions and inflammation damage were reduced by an AGE inhibitor. Thus, the present study demonstrates that AGEs play a role in the pathogenesis of MGN and that AGE inhibition could reduce the inflammatory reactions and oxidative lesions in MGN. In general, ZWT attenuated MGN, in part, by inhibiting the AGEs/RAGE/NF-κB pathway. PMID:26851631

  2. The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Promotes Glomerular Injury and Renal Failure in Rapidly Progressive Crescentic Glomerulonephritis; the Identification of Possible Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bollée, Guillaume; Flamant, Martin; Schordan, Sandra; Fligny, Cécile; Rumpel, Elisabeth; Milon, Marine; Schordan, Eric; Sabaa, Nathalie; Vandermeersch, Sophie; Galaup, Ariane; Rodenas, Anita; Casal, Ibrahim; Sunnarborg, Susan W; Salant, David J; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Threadgill, David W; Quaggin, Susan E; Dussaule, Jean-Claude; Germain, Stéphane; Mesnard, Laurent; Endlich, Karlhans; Boucheix, Claude; Belenfant, Xavier; Callard, Patrice; Endlich, Nicole; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) is a clinical a morphological expression of severe glomerular injury. Glomerular injury manifests as a proliferative histological pattern (“crescents”) with accumulation of T cells and macrophages, and proliferation of intrinsic glomerular cells. We show de novo induction of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) in intrinsic glomerular epithelial cells (podocytes) from both mice and humans with RPGN. HB-EGF induction increases phosphorylation of the EGFR/ErbB1 receptor in mice with RPGN. In HB-EGF-deficient mice, EGFR activation in glomeruli is absent and the course of RPGN is improved. Autocrine HB-EGF induces a phenotypic switch in podocytes in vitro. Conditional deletion of the Egfr gene from podocytes of mice alleviates the severity of RPGN. Pharmacological blockade of EGFR also improves the course of RPGN, even when started 4 days after the induction of experimental RPGN. This suggests that targeting the HB-EGF/EGFR pathway could also be beneficial for treatment of human RPGN. PMID:21946538

  3. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, especially younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  4. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Otitis media - acute; Infection - inner ear; Middle ear infection - acute ... Casselbrandt ML, Mandel EM. Acute otitis media and otitis media with effusion. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. ...

  5. Drug-induced acute tubulointerstitial nephritis: a case with elevated urinary cadmium.

    PubMed

    Subat-Dezulović, Mirna; Slavić, Irena; Rozmanić, Vojko; Persić, Mladen; Medjimurec, Branka; Sćukanec-Spoljar, Mira

    2002-05-01

    Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (ATIN) has many different causes, but is most frequently caused by drugs. We report a 13-year-old vegetarian girl with drug-induced ATIN, confirmed by renal biopsy, and simultaneous occurrence of elevated urinary cadmium. Four weeks prior to admission she had been treated with antibiotics and acetaminophen for respiratory infection, and remaining febrile, was treated with different "home-made" herbal mixtures. She presented with acute non-oliguric renal failure, tubular dysfunction, and sterile pyuria, but without skin rash or edema. Laboratory data showed a raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate, normal white blood count with eosinophilia, and a serum creatinine of 245 micromol/l. Urinalysis was remarkable for glycosuria, tubular proteinuria, and elevated beta(2)-microglobulin and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase excretion. Immunoserological tests characteristic of acute glomerulonephritis and systemic diseases were negative. She was treated with steroids and her renal function improved. Follow-up analyses disclosed normal urinary cadmium and enzyme excretion within 6 months. Heavy metal analysis of herbal preparations that she had taken confirmed the presence of cadmium, but within approved concentrations. In conclusion, elevated urinary cadmium in the case of drug-induced ATIN may be assumed to be an accidental finding. However, consumption of different herbs containing cadmium and cadmium-induced nephro-toxicity could be the reason for such serious renal damage. PMID:12042900

  6. Post-streptococcal vasculopathy with evolution to Degos' disease.

    PubMed

    Pati, Sandipan; Muley, Suraj A; Grill, Marie F; Coons, Stephen; Walker, Russell

    2011-01-15

    Degos' disease or malignant atrophic papulosis is a rare disseminated occlusive vasculopathy affecting the skin, gastrointestinal tract, central nervous system, and less often other organ systems. The exact etiology of this vasculopathy has not been established. Infections, autoimmune disease and coagulation defects have been proposed as underlying pathogenic mechanisms, but none have been confirmed. Here, we report the clinical, radiological and histopathologic features of Degos' disease in a 41-year-old man following streptococcal throat infection. Prior postulated hypothesis as post-infectious immunologic mechanism may be further supported by this case. PMID:21035145

  7. Acute pain.

    PubMed

    Good, M

    1999-01-01

    The review of acute pain describes the problem of unresolved pain and its effects on the neural, autonomic, and immune systems. Conceptualizations and mechanisms of pain are reviewed as well as theories of pain management. Descriptive studies of patient and nurse factors that inhibit effective pain management are discussed, followed by studies of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. Critical analysis reveals that most studies were atheoretical, and therefore, this proliferation of information lacked conceptual coherence and organization. Furthermore, the nature and extent of barriers to pain management were described, but few intervention studies have been devised, as yet, to modify the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of nurses and patients that are barriers to pain management. Although some of the complementary therapies have sufficient research support to be used in clinical pain management, the physiological mechanisms and outcomes need to be studied. It is critical at this time to design studies of interventions to improve assessment, decision making, attentive care, and patient teaching. PMID:10418655

  8. The Role of BCL-2 Family Members in Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Borkan, Steven C

    2016-05-01

    B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) family proteins gather at the biologic cross-roads of renal cell survival: the outer mitochondrial membrane. Despite shared sequence and structural features, members of this conserved protein family constantly antagonize each other in a life-and-death battle. BCL-2 members innocently reside within renal cells until activated or de-activated by physiologic stresses caused by common nephrotoxins, transient ischemia, or acute glomerulonephritis. Recent experimental data not only illuminate the intricate mechanisms of apoptosis, the most familiar form of BCL-2-mediated cell death, but emphasizes their newfound roles in necrosis, necroptosis, membrane pore transition regulated necrosis, and other forms of acute cell demise. A major paradigm shift in non-cell death roles of the BCL-2 family has occurred. BCL-2 proteins also regulate critical daily renal cell housekeeping functions including cell metabolism, autophagy (an effective means for recycling cell components), mitochondrial morphology (organelle fission and fusion), as well as mitochondrial biogenesis. This article considers new concepts in the biochemical and structural regulation of BCL-2 proteins that contribute to membrane pore permeabilization, a universal feature of cell death. Despite these advances, persistent BCL-2 family mysteries continue to challenge cell biologists. Given their interface with many intracellular functions, it is likely that BCL-2 proteins determine cell viability under many pathologic circumstances relevant to the nephrologist and, as a consequence, represent an ideal therapeutic target. PMID:27339388

  9. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  10. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  11. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury ...

  12. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  13. Disease Manifestations and Pathogenic Mechanisms of Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Timothy C.; McArthur, Jason D.; Cole, Jason N.; Gillen, Christine M.; Henningham, Anna; Sriprakash, K. S.; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L.; Nizet, Victor

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), causes mild human infections such as pharyngitis and impetigo and serious infections such as necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Furthermore, repeated GAS infections may trigger autoimmune diseases, including acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis, acute rheumatic fever, and rheumatic heart disease. Combined, these diseases account for over half a million deaths per year globally. Genomic and molecular analyses have now characterized a large number of GAS virulence determinants, many of which exhibit overlap and redundancy in the processes of adhesion and colonization, innate immune resistance, and the capacity to facilitate tissue barrier degradation and spread within the human host. This improved understanding of the contribution of individual virulence determinants to the disease process has led to the formulation of models of GAS disease progression, which may lead to better treatment and intervention strategies. While GAS remains sensitive to all penicillins and cephalosporins, rising resistance to other antibiotics used in disease treatment is an increasing worldwide concern. Several GAS vaccine formulations that elicit protective immunity in animal models have shown promise in nonhuman primate and early-stage human trials. The development of a safe and efficacious commercial human vaccine for the prophylaxis of GAS disease remains a high priority. PMID:24696436

  14. Disease manifestations and pathogenic mechanisms of Group A Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Walker, Mark J; Barnett, Timothy C; McArthur, Jason D; Cole, Jason N; Gillen, Christine M; Henningham, Anna; Sriprakash, K S; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L; Nizet, Victor

    2014-04-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), causes mild human infections such as pharyngitis and impetigo and serious infections such as necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Furthermore, repeated GAS infections may trigger autoimmune diseases, including acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis, acute rheumatic fever, and rheumatic heart disease. Combined, these diseases account for over half a million deaths per year globally. Genomic and molecular analyses have now characterized a large number of GAS virulence determinants, many of which exhibit overlap and redundancy in the processes of adhesion and colonization, innate immune resistance, and the capacity to facilitate tissue barrier degradation and spread within the human host. This improved understanding of the contribution of individual virulence determinants to the disease process has led to the formulation of models of GAS disease progression, which may lead to better treatment and intervention strategies. While GAS remains sensitive to all penicillins and cephalosporins, rising resistance to other antibiotics used in disease treatment is an increasing worldwide concern. Several GAS vaccine formulations that elicit protective immunity in animal models have shown promise in nonhuman primate and early-stage human trials. The development of a safe and efficacious commercial human vaccine for the prophylaxis of GAS disease remains a high priority. PMID:24696436

  15. A one-year study of streptococcal infections and their complications among Ethiopian children.

    PubMed Central

    Tewodros, W.; Muhe, L.; Daniel, E.; Schalén, C.; Kronvall, G.

    1992-01-01

    Post-streptococcal complications are known to be common among Ethiopian children. Little is known, however, about the epidemiology of beta-haemolytic streptococci in Ethiopia. A total of 816 children were studied during a one-year period: 24 cases of acute rheumatic fever (ARF), 44 chronic rheumatic heart disease (CRHD), 44 acute post streptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN), 143 tonsillitis, 55 impetigo, and 506 were apparently healthy children. Both ARF and APSGN occurred throughout the year with two peaks during the rainy and cold seasons. The female:male ratio among ARF patients was 1.4:1 and 1:1.9 among APSGN. The monthly carrier rate of beta-haemolytic streptococci group A varied from 7.5-39%, average being 17%. T type 2 was the most frequent serotype. Marked seasonal fluctuations were noted in the distribution of serogroups among apparently healthy children. Beta-haemolytic streptococci group A dominated during the hot and humid months of February-May. Strains were susceptible to commonly used antibiotics, except for tetracycline. PMID:1397112

  16. Accelerating the development of a group A Streptococcus vaccine: an urgent public health need

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) infections cause substantial worldwide morbidity and mortality, mostly associated with suppurative complications such as pharyngitis, impetigo, and non-suppurative immune syndromes such as acute rheumatic fever, rheumatic heart disease, and acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Deaths occur mostly in children, adolescents, and young adults in particular pregnant women in low- and middle-income countries. GAS strains are highly variable, and a GAS vaccine would need to overcome the issue of multiple strains. Several approaches have been used multivalent vaccines using N-terminal polypeptides of different M protein; conserved M protein vaccines with antigens from the conserved C-repeat portion of the M protein; incorporation selected T- and B-cell epitopes from the C-repeat region in a synthetic polypeptide or shorter single minimal B-cell epitopes from this same region; and non-M protein approaches utilizing highly conserved motives of streptococcal C5a peptidase, GAS carbohydrate and streptococcal fibronectin-binding proteins. A GAS vaccine represents urgent need for this neglected disease and should therefore deserve the greatest attention of international organizations, donors, and vaccine manufacturers. PMID:27489799

  17. Accelerating the development of a group A Streptococcus vaccine: an urgent public health need.

    PubMed

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Kim, Jerome H

    2016-07-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) infections cause substantial worldwide morbidity and mortality, mostly associated with suppurative complications such as pharyngitis, impetigo, and non-suppurative immune syndromes such as acute rheumatic fever, rheumatic heart disease, and acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Deaths occur mostly in children, adolescents, and young adults in particular pregnant women in low- and middle-income countries. GAS strains are highly variable, and a GAS vaccine would need to overcome the issue of multiple strains. Several approaches have been used multivalent vaccines using N-terminal polypeptides of different M protein; conserved M protein vaccines with antigens from the conserved C-repeat portion of the M protein; incorporation selected T- and B-cell epitopes from the C-repeat region in a synthetic polypeptide or shorter single minimal B-cell epitopes from this same region; and non-M protein approaches utilizing highly conserved motives of streptococcal C5a peptidase, GAS carbohydrate and streptococcal fibronectin-binding proteins. A GAS vaccine represents urgent need for this neglected disease and should therefore deserve the greatest attention of international organizations, donors, and vaccine manufacturers. PMID:27489799

  18. Haemodialysis for paediatric acute kidney injury in a low resource setting: experience from a tertiary hospital in South West Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Asinobi, Adanze O.; Ademola, Adebowale D.; Alao, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important cause of preventable mortality among children. Management of AKI may require renal replacement therapy (RRT) but access to RRT for children in low resource settings is limited. Our study explored the role of haemodialysis in the management of children with AKI in a low resource setting in terms of aetiology and outcomes. Methods A review of patients managed in the Paediatric Nephrology Unit, University College Hospital Ibadan, South-West Nigeria, who underwent haemodialysis for AKI from January 2006 to December 2014. Results Sixty-eight patients (55.9% males), aged 3–16 (mean ± standard deviation, 9.0 ± 3.4) years were studied. The causes of AKI were sepsis (22.1%), malaria (17.6%) and glomerulonephritis (17.6%), intravascular haemolysis—cause unknown (16.2%), G6PDH deficiency (7.4%), malignancy (8.8%) and haemoglobinopathy (5.9%). The number of sessions of haemodialysis ranged from 1 to 10 (mode = 2 sessions) over a period of 1–55 days. Mortality was 27.9% (n = 19) and was related to the aetiology of AKI (P = 0.000): no deaths among patients with intravascular haemolysis or malaria, six deaths among patients with sepsis (40%), six (50%) among the patients with glomerulonephritis, while all the patients with malignancies died. Conclusions The outcome of haemodialysis for AKI in Nigeria is relatively good and is related to the underlying aetiology of AKI. In addition to peritoneal dialysis, intermittent haemodialysis may have a role in the management of paediatric AKI in low resource settings and should be supported. PMID:26798463

  19. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist. PMID:26526433

  20. Acute loss of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Tristán, Bekinschtein; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Manes, Facundo

    2015-01-01

    Acute loss of consciousness poses a fascinating scenario for theoretical and clinical research. This chapter introduces a simple yet powerful framework to investigate altered states of consciousness. We then explore the different disorders of consciousness that result from acute brain injury, and techniques used in the acute phase to predict clinical outcome in different patient populations in light of models of acute loss of consciousness. We further delve into post-traumatic amnesia as a model for predicting cognitive sequels following acute loss of consciousness. We approach the study of acute loss of consciousness from a theoretical and clinical perspective to conclude that clinicians in acute care centers must incorporate new measurements and techniques besides the classic coma scales in order to assess their patients with loss of consciousness. PMID:25702218

  1. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Georgios K; Harissis, Haralampos; Mitsis, Michalis; Batsis, Haralampos; Fatouros, Michalis

    2012-04-28

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of "chyle" occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation, appendicitis or visceral ischemia. Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported. Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis. This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis, and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer, since, due to hypertriglyceridemia, serum amylase values appeared within the normal range. Moreover, abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis. Following abdominal lavage and drainage, the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide. PMID:22563182

  3. Acute Arterial Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Dagnone, L. E.; Brown, P. M.

    1983-01-01

    The response of the primary care physician in the initial assessment and management of acute arterial injuries will often be the deciding factor in survival of life, limb or organ system. Most arterial emergencies occur as a result of trauma, disruption of vessel wall and/or occlusion of flow. The common clinical syndromes of acute arterial emergencies are injuries to and beyond the aorta, acute aortic dissection, ruptured aortic aneurysm, and thromboembolic occlusive arterial disease. The role of arteriography and the urgency of definitive surgical repair in acute arterial emergencies is summarized. PMID:21283323

  4. Acute phase reaction and acute phase proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Gruys, E.; Toussaint, M.J.M.; Niewold, T.A.; Koopmans, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    A review of the systemic acute phase reaction with major cytokines involved, and the hepatic metabolic changes, negative and positive acute phase proteins (APPs) with function and associated pathology is given. It appears that APPs represent appropriate analytes for assessment of animal health. Whereas they represent non-specific markers as biological effect reactants, they can be used for assessing nutritional deficits and reactive processes, especially when positive and negative acute phase variables are combined in an index. When such acute phase index is applied to separate healthy animals from animals with some disease, much better results are obtained than with single analytes and statistically acceptable results for culling individual animals may be reached. Unfortunately at present no cheap, comprehensive and easy to use system is available for assessing various acute phase proteins in serum or blood samples at the same time. Protein microarray or fluid phase microchip technology may satisfy this need; and permit simultaneous analysis of numerous analytes in the same small volume sample and enable integration of information derived from systemic reactivity and nutrition with disease specific variables. Applying such technology may help to solve health problems in various countries not only in animal husbandry but also in human populations. PMID:16252337

  5. Acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Lang, Joanna; Zuber, Kim; Davis, Jane

    2016-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) complicates up to 20% of all hospital admissions. Responding to the increase in admissions, complications, mortality, morbidity, and cost of AKI, Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes convened an expert panel to study the issue, review the literature, and publish guidelines to evaluate and treat patients with AKI in the acute setting. This article reviews those guidelines. PMID:27023656

  6. Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Gray, Matthew Philip; Gorelick, Marc H

    2016-06-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a primarily pediatric, immune-mediated disease characterized by demyelination and polyfocal neurologic symptoms that typically occur after a preceding viral infection or recent immunization. This article presents the pathophysiology, diagnostic criteria, and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. We also present evaluation and management strategies. PMID:27253358

  7. Poznan acute Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    This Poznan acute Astronomical Observatory is a unit of the Adam Mickiewicz University, located in Poznan acute, Poland. From its foundation in 1919, it has specialized in astrometry and celestial mechanics (reference frames, dynamics of satellites and small solar system bodies). Recently, research activities have also included planetary and stellar astrophysics (asteroid photometry, catalysmic b...

  8. Skin infections and infestations in Aboriginal communities in northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Currie, B J; Carapetis, J R

    2000-08-01

    The most important skin infections in Aboriginal communities in central and northern Australia are scabies and streptococcal pyoderma. Scabies is endemic in many remote Aboriginal communities, with prevalences in children up to 50%. The cycles of scabies transmission underlie much of the pyoderma. Up to 70% of children have skin sores, with group A streptococcus (GAS) the major pathogen. Group A streptococcus is responsible for the continuing outbreaks of post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis and acute rheumatic fever (ARF). The cycles of scabies transmission in dogs and humans do not appear to significantly overlap. Guidelines have been developed for community control of scabies and skin sores and successful community initiated coordinated programmes have occurred. The anthropophilic dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum is ubiquitous in many communities, again reflecting living conditions. Other skin infections related to the tropical environment include melioidosis, nocardiosis, Chromobacterium violaceum and chromoblastomycosis. Sustainable and long-term improvements in scabies, skin sores and GAS-related disease and tinea require fundamental changes that address social and economic inequities and, in particular, living conditions and overcrowding. PMID:10954983

  9. Scabies.

    PubMed

    Heukelbach, Jörg; Feldmeier, Hermann

    2006-05-27

    Scabies is a neglected parasitic disease that is a major public health problem in many resource-poor regions. It causes substantial morbidity from secondary infections and post-infective complications such as acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Disease control requires treatment of the affected individual and all people they have been in contact with, but is often hampered by inappropriate or delayed diagnosis, poor treatment compliance, and improper use of topical compounds such as permethrin, lindane, or benzyl benzoate. In addition to concerns over toxicity with such compounds, parasite resistance seems to be increasing. Oral ivermectin is an alternative that has been used successfully in community control programmes. Plant derivatives such as turmeric, neem, and tea tree oil are also promising future treatments. The disease is strongly associated with poverty and overcrowding, and the associated stigma can ostracise affected individuals. Treatment of scabies in poor countries needs to integrate drug treatment programmes with efforts to improve the socioeconomic conditions and education programmes to reduce stigma. We expect the future to bring more sensitive and specific clinical and laboratory-based diagnostic methods, as well as new therapeutic strategies. PMID:16731272

  10. Post-infectious group A streptococcal autoimmune syndromes and the heart.

    PubMed

    Martin, William John; Steer, Andrew C; Smeesters, Pierre Robert; Keeble, Joanne; Inouye, Michael; Carapetis, Jonathan; Wicks, Ian P

    2015-08-01

    There is a pressing need to reduce the high global disease burden of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and its harbinger, acute rheumatic fever (ARF). ARF is a classical example of an autoimmune syndrome and is of particular immunological interest because it follows a known antecedent infection with group A streptococcus (GAS). However, the poorly understood immunopathology of these post-infectious diseases means that, compared to much progress in other immune-mediated diseases, we still lack useful biomarkers, new therapies or an effective vaccine in ARF and RHD. Here, we summarise recent literature on the complex interaction between GAS and the human host that culminates in ARF and the subsequent development of RHD. We contrast ARF with other post-infectious streptococcal immune syndromes - post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN) and the still controversial paediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS), in order to highlight the potential significance of variations in the host immune response to GAS. We discuss a model for the pathogenesis of ARF and RHD in terms of current immunological concepts and the potential for application of in depth "omics" technologies to these ancient scourges. PMID:25891492

  11. Acute Hepatic Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Bissell, D. Montgomery; Wang, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The porphyrias comprise a set of diseases, each representing an individual defect in one of the eight enzymes mediating the pathway of heme synthesis. The diseases are genetically distinct but have in common the overproduction of heme precursors. In the case of the acute (neurologic) porphyrias, the cause of symptoms appears to be overproduction of a neurotoxic precursor. For the cutaneous porphyrias, it is photosensitizing porphyrins. Some types have both acute and cutaneous manifestations. The clinical presentation of acute porphyria consists of abdominal pain, nausea, and occasionally seizures. Only a small minority of those who carry a mutation for acute porphyria have pain attacks. The triggers for an acute attack encompass certain medications and severely decreased caloric intake. The propensity of females to acute attacks has been linked to internal changes in ovarian physiology. Symptoms are accompanied by large increases in delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen in plasma and urine. Treatment of an acute attack centers initially on pain relief and elimination of inducing factors such as medications; glucose is administered to reverse the fasting state. The only specific treatment is administration of intravenous hemin. An important goal of treatment is preventing progression of the symptoms to a neurological crisis. Patients who progress despite hemin administration have undergone liver transplantation with complete resolution of symptoms. A current issue is the unavailability of a rapid test for urine porphobilinogen in the urgent-care setting. PMID:26357631

  12. Acute Lung Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mac Sweeney, Rob; McAuley, Daniel F.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Lung failure is the most common organ failure seen in the intensive care unit. The pathogenesis of acute respiratory failure (ARF) can be classified as (1) neuromuscular in origin, (2) secondary to acute and chronic obstructive airway diseases, (3) alveolar processes such as cardiogenic and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema and pneumonia, and (4) vascular diseases such as acute or chronic pulmonary embolism. This article reviews the more common causes of ARF from each group, including the pathological mechanisms and the principles of critical care management, focusing on the supportive, specific, and adjunctive therapies for each condition. PMID:21989697

  13. Acute porphyric disorders.

    PubMed

    Moore, A W; Coke, J M

    2000-09-01

    Acute porphyrias are classified into 3 distinct groups of rare genetic disorders of metabolic enzyme biosynthesis. Acute porphyrias can significantly impact multiple organ systems, which often provides a challenge to the dentist presented with such a patient. A case of hereditary coproporphyria is reported in a patient with many of the classical signs and symptoms. The patient also had complex dental needs that required special medical and pharmacotherapeutic modifications. The acute porphyrias are reviewed by the authors with presentation of this challenging case. Recommendations for other dental health care professionals encountering these patients are then presented. PMID:10982942

  14. Weight Loss & Acute Porphyria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sale You are here Home Diet and Nutrition Weight loss & acute Porphyria Being overweight is a particular problem ... one of these diseases before they enter a weight-loss program. Also, they should not participate in a ...

  15. Acute mountain sickness

    MedlinePlus

    High altitude cerebral edema; Altitude anoxia; Altitude sickness; Mountain sickness; High altitude pulmonary edema ... Acute mountain sickness is caused by reduced air pressure and lower oxygen levels at high altitudes. The faster you ...

  16. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... chap 33. Lee WL, Slutsky AS. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and ARDS. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  17. Acute coronary syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Heart attack-ACS; Myocardial infarction-ACS; MI-ACS; Acute MI-ACS; ST-elevation myocardial infarction-ACS; Non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction-ACS; Unstable angina-ACS; Accelerating angina-ACS; New- ...

  18. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk factors for acute ear infections include: Attending day care (especially centers with more than 6 children) Changes ... hands and toys often. If possible, choose a day care that has 6 or fewer children. This can ...

  19. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden inflammation of the pancreas manifested clinically by abdominal pain, nausea and dehydration that is usually self-limiting ... room for evaluation should they develop any abnormal abdominal pain symptoms. Conclusions While a rare event, acute pancreatitis ...

  20. Acute Flaccid Myelitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) is a condition that affects the nervous system, ... from a variety of causes including viral infections. AFM is characterized by a sudden weakness in one ...

  1. Acute genital ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  2. Acute Radiation Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary Radiation Emergencies & Your Health Possible Health Effects Contamination and Exposure Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) Cutaneous Radiation ... Decision Making in Radiation Emergencies Protective Actions Internal Contamination Clinical Reference (ICCR) Application Psychological First Aid in ...

  3. Feigning Acute Intermittent Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Elkhatib, Rania; Idowu, Modupe; Brown, Gregory S.; Jaber, Yasmeen M.; Reid, Matthew B.; Person, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal dominant genetic defect in heme synthesis. Patients with this illness can have episodic life-threatening attacks characterized by abdominal pain, neurological deficits, and psychiatric symptoms. Feigning this illness has not been reported in the English language literature to date. Here, we report on a patient who presented to the hospital with an acute attack of porphyria requesting opiates. Diligent assessment of extensive prior treatment records revealed thirteen negative tests for AIP. PMID:25525547

  4. Peritoneal Dialysis in Childhood Acute Kidney Injury: Experience in Southwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ademola, Adebowale Dele; Asinobi, Adanze Onyenonachi; Ogunkunle, Oluwatoyin Olufunmilayo; Yusuf, Bamidele Nurudeen; Ojo, Olalekan Ezekiel

    2012-01-01

    ♦ Background: The choices for renal replacement therapy (RRT) in childhood acute kidney injury (AKI) are limited in low-resource settings. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) appears to be the most practical modality for RRT in young children with AKI in such settings. Data from sub-Saharan Africa on the use of PD in childhood AKI are few. ♦ Methods: We performed a retrospective study of children who underwent PD for AKI at a tertiary-care hospital in southwest Nigeria from February 2004 to March 2011 (85 months). ♦ Results: The study included 27 children (55.6% female). Mean age was 3.1 ± 2.6 years, with the youngest being 7 days, and the oldest, 9 years. The causes of AKI were intravascular hemolysis (n = 11), septicemia (n = 8), acute glomerulonephritis (n = 3), gastroenteritis (n = 3), and hemolytic uremic syndrome (n = 2). Peritoneal dialysis was performed manually using percutaneous or adapted catheters. Duration of PD ranged from 6 hours to 12 days (mean: 5.0 ± 3.3 days). The main complications were peritonitis (n = 10), pericatheter leakage (n = 9), and catheter outflow obstruction (n = 5). Of the 27 patients, 19 (70%) survived till discharge. ♦ Conclusions: In low-resource settings, PD can be successfully performed for the management of childhood AKI. In our hospital, the use of adapted catheters may have contributed to the high complication rates. Peritoneal dialysis should be promoted for the management of childhood AKI in low-resource settings, and access to percutaneous or Tenckhoff catheters, dialysis fluid, and automated PD should be increased. PMID:22550119

  5. Differentiating Acute Otitis Media and Acute Mastoiditis in Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Jero, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Acute otitis media is a common infection in children. Most acute otitis media episodes can be treated at an outpatient setting with antimicrobials, or only expectant observation. Hospital treatment with parenteral medication, and myringotomy or tympanostomy, may be needed to treat those with severe, prolonged symptoms, or with complications. The most common intratemporal complication of acute otitis media is acute mastoiditis. If a child with acute mastoiditis does not respond to this treatment, or if complications develop, further examinations and other surgical procedures, including mastoidectomy, are considered. Since the treatment of complicated acute otitis media and complicated acute mastoiditis differs, it is important to differentiate these two conditions. This article focuses on the differential diagnostics of acute otitis media and acute mastoiditis in children. PMID:27613655

  6. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Outcome of Acute Kidney Injury in Sudanese Children — An Experience from a Sub-Saharan African Unit

    PubMed Central

    Abdelraheem, Mohamed; Ali, El-Tigani; Osman, Rania; Ellidir, Rashid; Bushara, Amna; Hussein, Rasha; Elgailany, Shiraz; Bakhit, Yassir; Karrar, Mohamed; Watson, Alan; Abu-Aisha, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    ♦ Background: Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Although continuous renal replacement therapy is gaining more popularity worldwide, peritoneal dialysis (PD) in children remains an appropriate therapy for AKI in children for all age groups including neonates. ♦ Methodology: We retrospectively reviewed all children who have been admitted with AKI at the pediatric nephrology unit, Soba University Hospital, Khartoum, during the period from January 2005 to December 2011. ♦ Results: Over 7 years we recorded 659 children of whom 362 (54.9%) were male. The spectrum of age was variable with the majority being neonates, 178 (27.1%). The average patient admission rate was 94 patients per year, with an estimated incidence of 9.8 patients/million population/year. Common causes of AKI were sepsis 202 (30.8%), acute glomerulonephritis 75 (11.5%) and obstructive uropathy due to stones 56 (8.5%). The most common dialysis modality used was PD, 343 (52.4%), and peritonitis was reported in 53 (15.4%) patients. Recovery from AKI was achieved in 450 (68.9%) children, 37 (5.7%) went into chronic kidney disease (CKD), 33 (5.1%) referred to the pediatric surgery and 194 (29.7%) died. ♦ Conclusion: In the setting of developing countries where AKI is a common cause of morbidity and mortality, reasonably equipped renal units with adequately trained medical staff may save many lives. International funding programs for communicable diseases and charity organizations should include AKI management in their programs. Acute PD remains the treatment modality of choice for AKI in developing countries. PMID:24584611

  8. Acute bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sudhanshu; Jindal, Atul; Bansal, Arun; Singhi, Sunit C

    2011-11-01

    Acute asthma is the third commonest cause of pediatric emergency visits at PGIMER. Typically, it presents with acute onset respiratory distress and wheeze in a patient with past or family history of similar episodes. The severity of the acute episode of asthma is judged clinically and categorized as mild, moderate and severe. The initial therapy consists of oxygen, inhaled beta-2 agonists (salbutamol or terbutaline), inhaled budesonide (three doses over 1 h, at 20 min interval) in all and ipratropium bromide and systemic steroids (hydrocortisone or methylprednisolone) in acute severe asthma. Other causes of acute onset wheeze and breathing difficulty such as pneumonia, foreign body, cardiac failure etc. should be ruled out with help of chest radiography and appropriate laboratory investigations in first time wheezers and those not responding to 1 h of inhaled therapy. In case of inadequate response or worsening, intravenous infusion of magnesium sulphate, terbutaline or aminophylline may be used. Magnesium sulphate is the safest and most effective alternative among these. Severe cases may need ICU care and rarely, ventilatory support. PMID:21769523

  9. Acute Appendicitis Secondary to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Eduardo A.; Lopez, Marvin A.; Valluri, Kartik; Wang, Danlu; Fischer, Andrew; Perdomo, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 43 Final Diagnosis: Myeloid sarcoma appendicitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chills • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic appendectomy, bone marrow biopsy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The gastrointestinal tract is a rare site for extramedullary involvement in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Case Report: A 43-year-old female with no past medical history presented complaining of mild abdominal pain, fever, and chills for the past day. On examination, she was tachycardic and febrile, with mild tenderness of her right lower quadrant and without signs of peritoneal irritation. Laboratory examination revealed pancytopenia and DIC, with a fibrinogen level of 290 mg/dL. CT of the abdomen showed a thickened and hyperemic appendix without perforation or abscess, compatible with acute appendicitis. The patient was given IV broad-spectrum antibiotics and was transfused with packed red blood cells and platelets. She underwent uncomplicated laparoscopic appendectomy and bone marrow biopsy, which revealed neo-plastic cells of 90% of the total bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometry indicated presence of 92.4% of immature myeloid cells with t (15: 17) and q (22: 12) mutations, and FISH analysis for PML-RARA demonstrated a long-form fusion transcript, positive for APL. Appendix pathology described leukemic infiltration with co-expression of myeloperoxidase and CD68, consistent with myeloid sarcoma of the appendix. The patient completed a course of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and all trans-retinoic acid. Repeat bone marrow biopsy demonstrated complete remission. She will follow up with her primary care physician and hematologist/oncologist. Conclusions: Myeloid sarcoma of the appendix in the setting of APL is very rare and it might play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Urgent management, including bone marrow biopsy for definitive diagnosis and urgent surgical intervention

  10. Suppression of development of anti-nuclear antibody and glomerulonephritis in NZB x NZWF1 mice by persistent infection with lactic dehydrogenase virus: possible involvement of superoxide anion as a progressive effector.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, T.; Noguchi, Y.; Kameyama, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The development of anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and glomerulonephritis (GN) in autoimmune NZB x NZWF1 mice was suppressed by persistent lactic dehydrogenase virus (LDV) infection. This observation was used to study a possible pathogenetic role for the toxic oxygen radical, superoxide anion (O2-), in the progression of ANA and GN. Compared to macrophages from NZB x NZWF1 mice with LDV infection, macrophages from uninfected NZB x NZWF1 mice exhibited an age-related and drastic increase in O2- production in association with the development of the ANA and GN (representing the late stage of disease). NZB x NZWF1 mice with or without LDV infection were then given the O2- scavenger superoxide dismutase (SOD) during the late stage of the disease. Treatment of uninfected NZB x NZWF1 mice with SOD (10,000 units/mouse/day for 3 weeks) protected animals from the development of ANA and GN. SOD treatment also suppressed the development of the lesions in NZB x NZWF1 mice with LDV infection. Our findings suggest that O2- may, at least in part, contribute to the development of ANA and GN in the late stage of disease, and that decreased O2- production in NZB x NZWF1 mice with LDV infection may be responsible for the suppression of the development of ANA and GN in the late stage of the disease. Images Figure 7 Figure 9 PMID:8292553

  11. Suppression of development of glomerulonephritis in NZB x NZWF1 mice by persistent infection with lactic dehydrogenase virus: relations between intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression on endothelial cells and leucocyte accumulation in glomeruli.

    PubMed Central

    Kameyama, Y.; Hayashi, T.

    1994-01-01

    The development of glomerulonephritis (GN) in autoimmune NZB x NZWF1 mice was suppressed by persistent lactic dehydrogenase virus (LDV) infection. In this study the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on endothelial cells in glomeruli was examined during the development of GN. ICAM-1 expression on endothelial cells preceded the accumulation of leucocytes within glomeruli. The uninfected mice exhibited an age-related and profound increase in ICAM-1 expression associated with the development of a GN as evidenced by deposits of IgG and C3. Uninfected mice also showed increased accumulation of leucocytes, such as polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs), macrophages, T and CD4+ cells, which express the lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) within glomeruli during the development of GN. These changes were strongly suppressed by LDV infection. Our findings suggest that the expression of ICAM-1 in glomerular endothelial cells may, at least in part, contribute to the development of GN. Suppressed expression of ICAM-1 in LDV-infected mice may be responsible for the suppression of GN seen in these animals. Thus there may be a pathogenetic role for ICAM-1 expression and for intraglomerular accumulation of leucocytes, especially PMNs, which express LFA-1 in the development of GN. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 7 Figure 9 Figure 11 PMID:7947231

  12. The endothelial cell markers von Willebrand Factor (vWF), CD31 and CD34 are lost in glomerulonephritis and no longer correlate with the morphological indices of glomerular sclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, activity and chronicity.

    PubMed

    Gluhovschi, Cristina; Gluhovschi, Gheorghe; Potencz, Elena; Herman, Diana; Trandafirescu, Virginia; Petrica, Ligia; Velciov, Silvia; Bozdog, Gheorghe; Bob, Flaviu; Vernic, Corina; Cioca, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are active participants of an inflammatory process in glomeruli. EC damage has been shown to play an important role in the progression of glomerulonephritis (GN). The degree of glomerular and peritubular capillary loss in models of progressive renal disease correlates with the severity of glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis. The aim of our study was to analyze the association of vWF, CD31 and CD34 immunoreactivity with the morphological indices of glomerular sclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, activity and chronicity in GN. A cross-sectional study of 22 patients with GN was conducted. Conventional stains (hematoxylin-eosin, periodic acid Schiff and Trichrome Gömöri stains) and immunohistochemistry (vWF, CD31 and CD34) were employed on kidney biopsies. Activity and chronicity of GN, as well as glomerular segmental sclerosis and interstitial fibrosis, were evaluated according to a scoring system initially used for lupus nephritis and antineutrophil-cytoplasmic-antibody-associated vasculitis. Immunohistochemistry was assessed using a semi-quantitative score. Statistical analysis was performed using EpiInfo 6.04. The mean patient age was 46.68+/-14.09; 14 patients were male, and eight were female. Performing Spearman's rank correlation test, no correlation was found between each marker and glomerular segmental sclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, activity and chronicity, which suggests a loss of these markers and microvasculature involvement. PMID:20675279

  13. [Acute pancreatitis in children].

    PubMed

    Rottier, B L; Holl, R A; Draaisma, J M

    1998-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is probably commoner in children than was previously thought. In children it is most commonly associated with trauma or viral infection. The presentation may be subtler than in adults, requiring a high index of suspicion in the clinician. In three children, two boys aged 4 and 10 and a girl of 15 years, acute pancreatitis was suspected because of the findings at ultrasonography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography performed when the disease recurred (the boy aged 4), apathy and immobility without dehydration or other obvious causes (the boy aged 10), and severe abdominal pain in combination with vomiting (the girl). All three patients had severely increased (urinary) amylase levels. Most often, acute pancreatitis in children tends to be a self-limiting disease which responds well to conservative treatment. PMID:9562770

  14. Acute acalculous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Barie, Philip S; Eachempati, Soumitra R

    2003-08-01

    Acute cholecystitis can develop without gallstones in critically ill or injured patients. However, the development of acute acalculous cholecystitis is not limited to surgical or injured patients, or even to the intensive care unit. Diabetes, malignant disease, abdominal vasculitis, congestive heart failure, cholesterol embolization, and shock or cardiac arrest have been associated with acute acalculous cholecystitis. Children may also be affected, especially after a viral illness. The pathogenesis of acute acalculous cholecystitis is a paradigm of complexity. Ischemia and reperfusion injury, or the effects of eicosanoid proinflammatory mediators, appear to be the central mechanisms, but bile stasis, opioid therapy, positive-pressure ventilation, and total parenteral nutrition have all been implicated. Ultrasound of the gallbladder is the most accurate diagnostic modality in the critically ill patient, with gallbladder wall thickness of 3.5 mm or greater and pericholecystic fluid being the two most reliable criteria. The historical treatment of choice for acute acalculous cholecystitis has been cholecystectomy, but percutaneous cholecystostomy is now the mainstay of therapy, controlling the disease in about 85% of patients. Rapid improvement can be expected when the procedure is performed properly. The mortality rates (historically about 30%) for percutaneous and open cholecystostomy appear to be similar, reflecting the severity of illness, but improved resuscitation and critical care may portend a decreased risk of death. Interval cholecystectomy is usually not indicated after acute acalculous cholecystitis in survivors; if the absence of gallstones is confirmed and the precipitating disorder has been controlled, the cholecystostomy tube can be pulled out after the patient has recovered. PMID:12864960

  15. Acute Prevertebral Calcific Tendinitis

    PubMed Central

    Tamm, Alexander; Jeffery, Caroline C; Ansari, Khalid; Naik, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of neck pain in a middle-aged woman, initially attributed to a retropharyngeal infection and treated with urgent intubation. With the help of computed tomography, the diagnosis was later revised to acute prevertebral calcific tendinitis, a self-limiting condition caused by abnormal calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the longus colli muscles. It is critical to differentiate between these two disease entities due to dramatic differences in management. A discussion of acute prevertebral calcific tendinitis and its imaging findings is provided below. PMID:27252789

  16. The Acute Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Mellnick, Vincent M; Heiken, Jay P

    2015-11-01

    Acute disorders of the abdominal aorta are potentially lethal conditions that require prompt evaluation and treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is the primary imaging method for evaluating these conditions because of its availability and speed. Volumetric CT acquisition with multiplanar reconstruction and three-dimensional analysis is now the standard technique for evaluating the aorta. MR imaging may be useful for select applications in stable patients in whom rupture has been excluded. Imaging is indispensable for diagnosis and treatment planning, because management has shifted toward endoluminal repair. Acute abdominal aortic conditions most commonly are complications of aneurysms and atherosclerosis. PMID:26526434

  17. Acute acalculous cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.S.; Wilk, P.J.; Weissmann, H.S.; Freeman, L.M.; Gliedman, M.L.

    1984-07-01

    Sixty-eight patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis were reviewed. The results of history and physical examinations were usually nondiagnostic. IDA cholescintigraphy (93 per cent accuracy rate) was the only reliable diagnostic modality. The results of oral cholecystography, intravenous cholangiography and ultrasonography were considerably less reliable. One-half of the patients had gangrenous cholecystitis. Cholecystectomy was the preferred operation with an over-all mortality of 9 per cent. IDA cholescintigraphy is an important new modality for the diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis which, in the past, has often been difficult to diagnose.

  18. Acute Gynecologic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Carolyn K

    2015-11-01

    Premenopausal women with acute pelvic pain comprise a significant percentage of patients who present to the emergency room. Etiologies can be gynecologic, urologic, gastrointestinal, or vascular. Signs and symptoms are often nonspecific and overlapping. The choice of imaging modality is determined by the clinically suspected differential diagnosis. Ultrasound (US) is the preferred imaging modality for suspected obstetric or gynecologic disorders. CT is more useful when gastrointestinal or urinary tract pathology is likely. MR imaging is rarely used in the emergent setting, except to exclude appendicitis in pregnant women. This article presents a comprehensive review of imaging of acute gynecologic disorders. PMID:26526439

  19. Acute oral ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Julia S; Rogers, Roy S

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of acute oral ulcers can be challenging. Important historic details include the pattern of recurrence, anatomic areas of involvement within the mouth and elsewhere on the mucocutaneous surface, associated medical symptoms or comorbidities, and symptomology. Careful mucocutaneous examination is essential. When necessary, biopsy at an active site without ulceration is generally optimal. Depending on the clinical scenario, supplemental studies that may be useful include cultures; perilesional biopsy for direct immunofluorescence testing; and evaluation for infectious diseases, gluten sensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, connective tissue diseases, or hematinic deficiencies. Clinicians should maintain a broad differential diagnosis when evaluating patients with acute oral ulcers. PMID:27343961

  20. Dengue-induced Acute Kidney Injury (DAKI): A Neglected and Fatal Complication of Dengue Viral Infection--A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Mallhi, Tauqeer Hussain; Sarriff, Azmi; Adnan, Azreen Syazril; Khan, Yusra Habib; Hamzah, Azhar Amir; Jummaat, Fauziah; Khan, Amer Hayat

    2015-11-01

    Dengue Viral Infection (DVI) imperils an estimated 2.5 billion people living in tropical and subtropical regions. World Health Organization (2011) guidelines also classified dengue as 'Expanded Dengue Syndrome' to incorporate wide spectrum of unusual manifestations of dengue infection affecting various organ systems - including liver, kidney, heart and brain. Renal involvements are least appreciated area of dengue infection, therefore, we systematically reviewed studies describing renal disorders in dengue infection, with emphasis on Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). The purpose of current review is to underscore clinicians’attention to this neglected intricacy of DVI. It suggests that dengue induced renal involvements vary from glomerulonephritis, nephrotic range proteinuria and AKI. We observed great disparity in incidence of AKI among dengue patients, based upon criteria used to define AKI. AKI among dengue patients was found to be associated with significant morbidity, mortality and longer hospitalization, adding financial burden to patients and healthcare system. Additionally, we identified several predictors of AKI in dengue patients including old age, obesity, severe dengue infection and concurrent bacterial or viral infection. Direct viral injury and deposition of antigen-antibody complex in glomerulus were found to be possible causes of renal disorders in dengue infection. Prior knowledge of clinico-laboratory characteristics and risk factors with early detection of AKI by using appropriate criteria would not only reduce morbidity and mortality but also decrease burden to patients and healthcare system. PMID:26577971

  1. What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... about acute myeloid leukemia? What is acute myeloid leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in a part of ... the body from doing their jobs. Types of leukemia Not all leukemias are the same. There are ...

  2. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  3. Acute Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shirtliff, Mark E.; Mader, Jon T.

    2002-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection. PMID:12364368

  4. Acute coronary care 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Califf, R.M.; Wagner, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the titles are: The measurement of acute myocardial infarct size by CT; Magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of myocardial ischemia and infarction; Poistron imaging in the evaluation of ischemia and myocardial infarction; and New inotropic agents.

  5. Acute radiation risk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Olga

    Biologically motivated mathematical models, which describe the dynamics of the major hematopoietic lineages (the thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems) in acutely/chronically irradiated humans are developed. These models are implemented as systems of nonlinear differential equations, which variables and constant parameters have clear biological meaning. It is shown that the developed models are capable of reproducing clinical data on the dynamics of these systems in humans exposed to acute radiation in the result of incidents and accidents, as well as in humans exposed to low-level chronic radiation. Moreover, the averaged value of the "lethal" dose rates of chronic irradiation evaluated within models of these four major hematopoietic lineages coincides with the real minimal dose rate of lethal chronic irradiation. The demonstrated ability of the models of the human thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems to predict the dynamical response of these systems to acute/chronic irradiation in wide ranges of doses and dose rates implies that these mathematical models form an universal tool for the investigation and prediction of the dynamics of the major human hematopoietic lineages for a vast pattern of irradiation scenarios. In particular, these models could be applied for the radiation risk assessment for health of astronauts exposed to space radiation during long-term space missions, such as voyages to Mars or Lunar colonies, as well as for health of people exposed to acute/chronic irradiation due to environmental radiological events.

  6. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Scollo, P; Licitra, G

    1993-12-01

    Aetiologic factors (gallstones, hyperlipidemia I-IV, hypertriglyceridaemia) make their occurrence, mainly, in the third trimester of gestation. Two cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are described; in both cases patients referred healthy diet, no habit to smoke and no previous episode of pancreatitis. An obstructive pathology of biliary tract was the aetiologic factor. Vomiting, upper abdominal pain are aspecific symptoms that impose a differential diagnosis with acute appendicitis, cholecystitis and obstructive intestinal pathology. Laboratory data (elevated serum amylase and lipase levels) and ultrasonography carry out an accurate diagnosis. The management of acute pancreatitis is based on the use of symptomatic drugs, a low fat diet alternated to the parenteral nutrition when triglycerides levels are more than 28 mmol/L. Surgical therapy, used only in case of obstructive pathology of biliary tract, is optimally collected in the third trimester or immediately after postpartum. Our patients, treated only medically, delivered respectively at 38th and 40th week of gestation. Tempestivity of diagnosis and appropriate therapy permit to improve prognosis of a pathology that, although really associated with pregnancy, presents high maternal mortality (37%) cause of complications (shock, coagulopathy, acute respiratory insufficiency) and fetal (37.9%) by occurrence of preterm delivery. PMID:8139793

  7. [Acute blood pressure elevations].

    PubMed

    Chamontin, B; Amar, J; Chollet, F; Rouge, P; Bonetti-d'Esteve, L; Guittard, J; Salvador, M

    2000-11-01

    Blood pressure (BP) elevations may correspond to different clinical situations. Hypertensives emergencies are situations that require immediate reduction in BP because of acute or rapidly progressing target organ damage: accelerated malignant hypertension, hypertensive encephalopathy, acute myocardial infarction, acute aortic dissection, acute left ventricular failure, and eclampsia. Hypertensive urgencies are those with marked elevated BP in which it is desirable to reduce BP progressively within few hours, such as severe hypertension, progressive target organ damage, perioperative hypertension. Cerebrovascular accidents have to be individualized. In most patients in the immediate post-stroke period, BP should not be lowered. Caution is advised in lowering BP in these patients because excessive falls may precipitate cerebral ischemia. In situations without symptoms or progressive target organ it is necessary to exclude proximate causes of elevated BP such as pain and elevated BP alone rarely requires antihypertensive treatment. Among parenteral antihypertensive (AH) drugs labetalol, nicardipine, urapidil, and nitroprussiate are generally used, and the choice of AH drug depends on the clinical situation. It is not required to normalize BP immediately but to reduce mean BP no more than 25%, then toward 160/100 mmHg as recommended by JNC VI, in order to avoid an impairment of renal, cerebral or coronary ischemia. Oral long-acting dihydropyridines are often subsequently administrated, except in myocardial ischemia. Therapeutic attitudes vary considerably according to the clinical situation: abstention, immediate decrease or progressive decrease in BP have to be decided. PMID:11190294

  8. Allosuppressor- and allohelper-T cells in acute and chronic graft-vs. -host (GVH) disease. III. Different Lyt subsets of donor T cells induce different pathological syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Rolink, A.G.; Gleichmann, E.

    1983-08-01

    Previous work from this laboratory has led to the hypothesis that the stimulatory pathological symptoms of chronic graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) are caused by alloreactive donor T helper (TH) cells, whereas the suppressive pathological symptoms of acute GVHD are caused by alloreactive T suppressor (TS) cells of the donor. We analyzed the Lyt phenotypes of B10 donor T cells required for the induction of either acute or chronic GVHD in H-2-different (B10 X DBA/2)F1 recipients. When nonirradiated F1 mice were used as the recipients, we found unseparated B10 T cells induced only a moderate formation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like autoantibodies, but a high percentage of lethal GVHD (LGVHD). In contrast, Lyt-1+2- donor T cells were unable to induce LGVHD in these recipients but were capable of inducing a vigorous formation of SLE-like autoantibodies and severe immune-complex glomerulonephritis. Lyt-1-2+ T cells were incapable of inducing either acute or chronic GVHD. The sensitivity and accuracy of the GVH system were increased by using irradiated F1 mice as recipients and then comparing donor-cell inocula that contained similar numbers of T lymphocytes. Donor-cell inocula were used that had been tested for their allohelper and allosuppressor effects on F1 B cells in vitro. In the irradiated F1 recipients unseparated donor T cells were superior to T cell subsets in inducing LGVHD. In contrast Lyt-1+2- T cells, but neither unseparated T cells nor Lyt-1-2+ T cells, were capable of inducing a vigorous formation of SLE-like auto-antibodies. We conclude that the stimulatory pathological symptoms of chronic GVHD are caused by Lyt-1+2- allohelper T cells. In contrast, the development of the suppressive pathological symptoms of acute GVHD appears to involve alloreactive Lyt-1+2+ T suppressor cells.

  9. Gadolinium induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Blasco-Perrin, H; Glaser, B; Pienkowski, M; Peron, J M; Payen, J L

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a sudden swelling and inflammation of the pancreas. The two most common causes are alcohol use and biliary stones. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis are rare (1.4-2%). In this present study, we present a case of recurrent acute pancreatitis induced by a specific magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) contrast agent called gadobenate dimeglumine. PMID:23395575

  10. Acute hepatitis E complicated by acute pancreatitis and multiorgan dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Karanth, Suman S; Khan, Zohaib; Rau, Nileshwar Radhakrishna; Rao, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    We report this rare case of a 27-year-old man who presented with acute hepatitis E and went on to develop acute epigastric pain. He was diagnosed to have acute severe pancreatitis with shock and acute renal failure due to hepatitis E. Such a phenomenon has rarely been reported in the literature, with patients following a benign course and complete recovery after conservative management and analgesia. Awareness of this potentially life-threatening complication, especially in young men from endemic areas with acute hepatitis E presenting with abdomen pain has been highlighted. PMID:24899005

  11. Acute gangrenous cholecystitis: radionuclide diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Brachman, M.B.; Tanasescu, D.E.; Ramanna, L.; Waxman, A.D.

    1984-04-01

    Radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging with Tc-99m IDA is a useful procedure for the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. Visualization of the gallbladder essentially rules out acute cholecystitis. Nonvisualization suggest acute cholecystitis but may also be associated with chronic gallbladder disease or other conditions. The authors recently observed five patients in whom a rim of increased parenchymal liver activity was seen adjacent to the gallbladder fossa. All five patients had acute gangrenous cholecystitis. The rim of increased activity appears to be a useful secondary sign of acute cholecystitis.

  12. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Bahiyah; Kathiresan Pillai, Thanikasalam; Cheen, Lim Huay; Ryan, Ray Joshua

    2015-01-01

    This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes. PMID:25628906

  13. Acute chylous ascites mimicking acute appendicitis in a patient with pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily K; Ek, Edmund; Croagh, Daniel; Spain, Lavinia A; Farrell, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous peritonitis mimicking acute appendicitis in a man with acute on chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatitis, both acute and chronic, causing the development of acute chylous ascites and peritonitis has rarely been reported in the English literature. This is the fourth published case of acute chylous ascites mimicking acute appendicitis in the literature. PMID:19824123

  14. Acute Heart Failure Treatment.

    PubMed

    Levy, Phillip D; Bellou, Abdel

    2013-06-01

    Dyspnea is the predominant symptom for patients with acute heart failure and initial treatment is largely directed towards the alleviation of this. Contrary to conventional belief, not all patients present with fluid overload and the approach to management is rapidly evolving from a solitary focus on diuresis to one that more accurately reflects the complex interplay of underlying cardiac dysfunction and acute precipitant. Effective treatment thus requires an understanding of divergent patient profiles and an appreciation of various therapeutic options for targeted patient stabilization. The key principle within this paradigm is directed management that aims to diminish the work of breathing through situation appropriate ventillatory support, volume reduction and hemodynamic improvement. With such an approach, clinicians can more efficiently address respiratory discomfort while reducing the likelihood of avoidable harm. PMID:24223323

  15. Acute Biliary Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Forty-seven cases of biliary tract infection with septic shock are presented. The sepsis was caused by empyema of the gallbladder in 23 cases and by cholangitis in the remainder. Gallstones were most frequently the cause of the sepsis. An appropriate diagnostic description of the syndrome of biliary tract infection and septic shock should therefore include a description of the underlying biliary disease as well as the term acute biliary shock. In this series, emergency surgical management by removal of gallstones and drainage of suppuration was felt to be the most appropriate treatment. There was a high incidence of gallbladder rupture (10.6%) and intrahepatic stones (53.2%). Of the 13 patients who died, 8 might have survived if early operation had been performed after the diagnosis of acute biliary septic shock was established. PMID:2278914

  16. Acute aortic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  17. [Acute aortic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nienaber, Christoph A

    2016-06-01

    Acute aortic syndrome is the common denominator for acute events to the aortic wall and encompasses dissection of the aorta, intramural hematoma, formation of aortic ulcers and trauma to the aorta with an annual incidence of up to 35 cases/100.000 between 65 and 75 years of age. Both, inflammation and/or microtrauma at the level of the aortic media layer, and a genetic disposition are promoting elements of AAS, while the extent and anatomic involvement of the ascending aorta call for either surgical resection/repair in the proximal part of the aorta, or an endovascular solution for pathologies in the distal aorta; in all cases of dissection (regardless of location) reconstruction/realignment has been proven to portend better long-term outcomes (in addition to medical management of blood pressure). PMID:27254622

  18. Acute aortic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corvera, Joel S

    2016-05-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  19. Acute Ischemic Stroke Intervention.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Priyank; Yavagal, Dileep R; Sacco, Ralph L

    2016-06-01

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is the leading cause of disability worldwide and among the leading causes of mortality. Although intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-rtPA) was approved nearly 2 decades ago for treatment of AIS, only a minority of patients receive it due to a narrow time window for administration and several contraindications to its use. Endovascular approaches to recanalization in AIS developed in the 1980s, and recently, 5 major randomized trials showed an overwhelming superior benefit of combining endovascular mechanical thrombectomy with IV-rtPA over IV-rtPA alone. In this paper, we discuss the evolution of catheter-based treatment from first-generation thrombectomy devices to the game-changing stent retrievers, results from recent trials, and the evolving stroke systems of care to provide timely access to acute stroke intervention to patients in the United States. PMID:27256835

  20. [Acute Chest Pain].

    PubMed

    Gmür, Christian

    2016-02-17

    Acute chest pain is a frequent consultation reason in general practice as well as in emergency departments. With the help of history, physical examination, ECG, laboratory and newly developed risk scores, potentially life-threatening diseases and high-risk patients may be detected and treated early, quickly and cost-effectively. New biomarkers and their combination with risk scores can increase the negative predictive value to exclude certain diseases. PMID:26886697

  1. Diarrhoea in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction An estimated 4000 million cases of diarrhoea occurred worldwide in 1996, resulting in 2.5 million deaths. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for acute diarrhoea in adults living in resource-rich countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults from resource-rich countries traveling to resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute severe diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to January 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 71 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, antimotility agents, antisecretory agents, bismuth subsalicylate, diet, intravenous rehydration, nasogastric tube rehydration, and oral rehydration solutions (amino acid oral rehydration solution, bicarbonate oral rehydration solution, reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution, rice-based oral rehydration solution, standard oral rehydration solution). PMID:19450323

  2. Diarrhoea in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction An estimated 4.6 billion cases of diarrhoea occurred worldwide in 2004, resulting in 2.2 million deaths. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for acute diarrhoea in adults living in resource-rich countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults from resource-rich countries travelling to resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute severe diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to January 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 72 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, antimotility agents, antisecretory agents, bismuth subsalicylate, diet, intravenous rehydration, nasogastric tube rehydration, oral rehydration solutions (amino acid oral rehydration solution, bicarbonate oral rehydration solution, reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution, rice-based oral rehydration solution, standard oral rehydration solution), vitamin A supplementation, and zinc supplementation. PMID:21718555

  3. Acupuncture for acute hordeolum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ke; Wang, Xue; Guo, Menghu; Wieland, L. Susan; Shen, Xueyong; Lao, Lixing

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The objective of this review is to determine the effects and, when possible, the safety of acupuncture for the treatment of acute hordeola, in comparison to no specific treatment (e.g., observation), sham acupuncture, or other active treatments. Acupuncture as an adjuvant to another treatment also will be compared to that treatment alone. PMID:25214814

  4. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in immunotherapy of cancer may represent a successful example in translational research, in which progress in knowledge and technology in immunology has lead to new strategies of immunotherapy, and even past failure in many clinical trials have led to a better understanding of basic cancer immunobiology. This article reviews the latest concepts in antitumor immunology and its application in the treatment of cancer, with particular focus on acute leukemia. PMID:19100371

  5. [Acute coronary syndromes: epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Alev Arat

    2013-04-01

    Coronary heart disease is the main cause of death in the world as well as in Turkey. It's not only a health issue but also a social problem with a high economic burden and negative impact on quality of life. The majority of deaths are attributable to acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and their complications.This review summarizes some important facts regarding ACS epidemiology in the world and in Turkey. PMID:27323430

  6. Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Ulinski, Tim; Sellier-Leclerc, Anne-Laure; Tudorache, Elena; Bensman, Albert; Aoun, Bilal

    2012-07-01

    Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) is a frequent cause of acute renal failure, characterised by the presence of inflammatory cell infiltrate in the interstitium of the kidney. Immuno-allergic reaction to certain medications, mainly non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics are by far the most important etiology for TIN today, but other situations such as infections, toxins, and vasculitis are known to induce TIN. Incidence of TIN is increasing, probably due to prescription habits and NSAID overuse, representing 3-7% of acute kidney injury in biopsies in children. Avoidance of the causal substance and rapid steroid therapy are hallmarks for patient care, but spontaneous initial recovery is very frequent and the general prognosis seems satisfactory. However, development of chronic TIN, without response to steroid or other immunosuppressive treatment, is possible. As the largest part of TIN is secondary to certain drugs, clear indications in particular for NSAID or antibiotics should be respected to reduce the number of TIN cases. PMID:21638156

  7. Acute lung injury review.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Kenji; King, Landon S; Aggarwal, Neil R; De Gorordo, Antonio; D'Alessio, Franco R; Kubo, Keishi

    2009-01-01

    The first report of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was published in 1967, and even now acute lung injury (ALI) and ARDS are severe forms of diffuse lung disease that impose a substantial health burden all over the world. Recent estimates indicate approximately 190,000 cases per year of ALI in the United States each year, with an associated 74,500 deaths per year. Common causes of ALI/ARDS are sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, aspiration pneumonia, pancreatitis, and so on. Several pathologic stages of ALI/ARDS have been described: acute inflammation with neutrophil infiltration, fibroproliferative phase with hyaline membranes, with varying degrees of interstitial fibrosis, and resolution phase. There has been intense investigation into the pathophysiologic events relevant to each stage of ALI/ARDS, and much has been learned in the alveolar epithelial, endobronchial homeostasis, and alveolar cell immune responses, especially neutrophils and alveolar macrophages in an animal model. However, these effective results in the animal models are not equally adoptive to those in randomized, controlled trials. The clinical course of ALI/ARDS is variable with the likely pathophysiologic complexity of human ALI/ARDS. In 1994, the definition was recommended by the American-European Consensus Conference Committee, which facilitated easy nomination of patients with ALI/ARDS for a randomized, clinical trial. Here, we review the recent randomized, clinical trials of ALI/ARDS. PMID:19420806

  8. Acute Cardiac Tamponade: An Unusual Cause of Acute Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Gautam; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Dalal, Pranavkumar; Markley, John; Rich, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We are reporting a case of acute renal failure after cardiac surgery due to acute pericardial effusion. The patient had normal baseline renal function but developed acute oliguric renal failure with a significant increase in serum creatinine postoperatively. Pericardiotomy led to an improvement in blood pressure, immediate diuresis and quick recovery of renal function back to baseline. Pericardial tamponade should be included in the consideration of causes of the cardiorenal syndrome. PMID:22619656

  9. Rationale and design of the African group A streptococcal infection registry: the AFROStrep study

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Dylan D; Engel, Mark E; Whitelaw, Andrew; Alemseged, Abdissa; Sadoh, Wilson E; Ali, Sulafa K M; Sow, Samba O; Dale, James; Mayosi, Bongani M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Group A β-haemolytic Streptococcus (GAS), a Gram-positive bacterium, also known as Streptococcus pyogenes, causes pyoderma, pharyngitis and invasive disease. Repeated GAS infections may lead to autoimmune diseases such as acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Invasive GAS (iGAS) disease is an important cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The burden of GAS infections is, however, unknown in Africa because of lack of surveillance systems. Methods and analysis The African group A streptococcal infection registry (the AFROStrep study) is a collaborative multicentre study of clinical, microbiological, epidemiological and molecular characteristics for GAS infection in Africa. The AFROStrep registry comprises two components: (1) active surveillance of GAS pharyngitis cases from sentinel primary care centres (non-iGAS) and (2) passive surveillance of iGAS disease from microbiology laboratories. Isolates will also be subjected to DNA isolation to allow for characterisation by molecular methods and cryopreservation for long-term storage. The AFROStrep study seeks to collect comprehensive data on GAS isolates in Africa. The biorepository will serve as a platform for vaccine development in Africa. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval for the AFROStrep registry has been obtained from the Human Research Ethics Committee at the University of Cape Town (HREC/REF: R006/2015). Each recruiting site will seek ethics approval from their local ethics’ committee. All participants will be required to provide consent for inclusion into the registry as well as for the storage of isolates and molecular investigations to be conducted thereon. Strict confidentiality will be applied throughout. Findings and updates will be disseminated to collaborators, researchers, health planners and colleagues through peer-reviewed journal articles, conference publications and proceedings. PMID:26916694

  10. Targeted Therapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-28

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  11. Cholescintigraphy in acute acalculous cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanna, L.; Brachman, M.B.; Tanasescu, D.E.; Berman, D.S.; Waxman, A.D.

    1984-08-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a relatively rare but potentially lethal condition if not treated promptly. Since stones are not present, diagnostic procedures such as ultrasound or other radiological procedures are frequently not helpful. Tc-99m iminodiacetic acid scan results were analyzed in 11 proven cases of acute acalculous cholecystitis. All had positive tests with nonvisualization of the gallbladder giving a sensitivity of 100%. Tc-99m iminodiacetic acid cholescintigraphy is a highly reliable test and is easily performed even in acutely ill patients and should be the test of choice in all patients predisposed to and suspected of acute acalculous cholecystitis.

  12. [Acute abdomen in gynecology].

    PubMed

    von Hugo, R; Meyer, B; Loos, W; Dirmeier, H

    1988-09-01

    The aim of the present study is, to describe the morbidity and mortality of 196 patients with an acute abdominal condition who underwent surgery at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics of the TU Munich between 1982 and 1986. This is a percentage of 2.7 of all 7,167 operations carried out during this period. 118 of these patients had an extrauterine pregnancy and were therefore excluded from the study. The second group of 79 patients, mostly with inflammatory diseases, were analyzed. In most of these cases the acute abdominal condition was caused by a tuboovarian abscess (48.1%), followed by peritonitis because of a bowel-disease (11.4%). 6 patients suffered from an abscessing endometritis due to a caesarean section with sepsis in 5 cases. A generalized peritonitis occurred in 5 cases and was treated with a planned relaparatomy with lavage. 63% of the patients had no complications within 28 days after operation, 13% developed a subileus; in 7% a relaparatomy was necessary. 6% of the patients had problems of wound-healing. One patient with stomach-cancer died 3 weeks after the operation because of a fulminant lung-embolism. Thus the mortality rate was 1.5%. A further 27% were treated at the intensive care-unit and 18% needed artificial respiration. The average postoperative period of hospitalisation was 15 days. In comparison, patients with elective operations remained 13 days. The morbidity and mortality of patients due to surgery of an acute abdominal condition was relatively small; postoperative complications could be well treated in all cases and is probably the result of a positive and early indication for surgical intervention. PMID:3181709

  13. [Acute toxic pneumopathies].

    PubMed

    Garnier, R

    1998-06-15

    The nature and extent of the acute injury due to toxic inhalants depend on the inhalant's solubility in water pH and chemical reactivity, on the aerodynamic diameter of particles (when the inhalant is an aerosol), and on the degree of exposure. Initial signs and symptoms indicate upper airways and bronchial irritation. Laryngeal oedema and (or) severe bronchospasm may be rapidly lethal. After cessation of exposure a transient improvement is generally observed; however a delayed pulmonary oedema may occur within the first 48 hours. On the following days, bacterial surinfection is a common complication. Possible long-term sequelae are reactive airways dysfunction syndrome and bronchiolitis obliterans. PMID:9781191

  14. Acute Compartment Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Andrew H

    2016-07-01

    Acute compartment syndrome (ACS) is a well-known pathophysiologic complication of trauma or tissue ischemia. ACS affects the appearance, function, and even the viability of the involved limb, and demands immediate diagnosis and treatment. However, ACS is difficult to diagnose and the only effective treatment is decompressive surgical fasciotomy. The clinical signs and symptoms may easily be attributed to other aspects of the injury, which further complicates the diagnosis. This article highlights the latest information regarding the diagnosis of ACS, how to perform fasciotomies, how to manage fasciotomy wounds, and also reviews complications and outcomes of ACS. PMID:27241376

  15. Feedlot Acute Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Woolums, Amelia R

    2015-11-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) of feedlot cattle is a sporadically occurring respiratory condition that is often fatal. Affected cattle have a sudden onset of labored breathing. There is no confirmed effective treatment of feedlot AIP; however, administration of antibiotics effective against common bacterial respiratory pathogens and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, especially aspirin, has been recommended. Protective strategies are not well defined, but efforts to limit dust exposure and heat stress; to ensure consistent formulation, mixing, and delivery of feed; and to identify and treat infectious respiratory disease in a timely manner may decrease rates of feedlot AIP. PMID:26253266

  16. Acute Alcoholic Hepatitis: Therapy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Paulina K; Lucey, Michael R

    2016-08-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) causes great morbidity and mortality in the United States and throughout the world. Advances in therapy have proven difficult. In part, this reflects challenges in diagnosis, including the distinction between AH and acute-on-chronic liver failure. Liver biopsy is the best method to clarify the cause in circumstances whereby conflicting clinical data confound the diagnosis. All treatment of AH begins with abstinence from alcohol. All patients with AH should be given sufficient nutrition. Prednisolone has become the principal agent for treating patients with severe AH. PMID:27373613

  17. Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Zuk, Anna; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a global public health concern associated with high morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. Other than dialysis, no therapeutic interventions reliably improve survival, limit injury, or speed recovery. Despite recognized shortcomings of in vivo animal models, the underlying pathophysiology of AKI and its consequence, chronic kidney disease (CKD), is rich with biological targets. We review recent findings relating to the renal vasculature and cellular stress responses, primarily the intersection of the unfolded protein response, mitochondrial dysfunction, autophagy, and the innate immune response. Maladaptive repair mechanisms that persist following the acute phase promote inflammation and fibrosis in the chronic phase. Here macrophages, growth-arrested tubular epithelial cells, the endothelium, and surrounding pericytes are key players in the progression to chronic disease. Better understanding of these complex interacting pathophysiological mechanisms, their relative importance in humans, and the utility of biomarkers will lead to therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat AKI or impede progression to CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD). PMID:26768243

  18. Acute traumatic patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Duthon, V B

    2015-02-01

    Inaugural traumatic patellar dislocation is most often due to trauma sustained during physical or sports activity. Two-thirds of acute patellar dislocations occur in young active patients (less than 20 years old). Non-contact knee sprain in flexion and valgus is the leading mechanism in patellar dislocation, accounting for as many as 93% of all cases. The strong displacement of the patella tears the medial stabilizing structures, and notably the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), which is almost always injured in acute patellar dislocation, most frequently at its femoral attachment. Lateral patellar glide can be assessed with the knee in extension or 20° flexion. Displacement by more than 50% of the patellar width is considered abnormal and may induce apprehension. Plain X-ray and CT are mandatory to diagnose bony risk factors for patellar dislocation, such as trochlear dysplasia or increased tibial tubercle-trochlear groove distance (TT-TG), and plan correction. MRI gives information on cartilage and capsulo-ligamentous status for treatment planning: free bodies or osteochondral fracture have to be treated surgically. If patellar dislocation occurs in an anatomically normal knee and osteochondral fracture is ruled out on MRI, non-operative treatment is usually recommended. PMID:25592052

  19. Acute Bacterial Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Vincent; Lammert, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute bacterial cholangitis for the most part owing to common bile duct stones is common in gastroenterology practice and represents a potentially life-threatening condition often characterized by fever, abdominal pain, and jaundice (Charcot's triad) as well as confusion and septic shock (Reynolds' pentad). Methods This review is based on a systematic literature review in PubMed with the search items ‘cholangitis’, ‘choledocholithiasis’, ‘gallstone disease’, ‘biliary infection’, and ‘biliary sepsis’. Results Although most patients respond to empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment, timely endoscopic biliary drainage depending on the severity of the disease is required to eliminate the underlying obstruction. Specific recommendations have been derived from the Tokyo guideline working group consensus 2006 and its update in 2013, albeit poorly evidence-based, providing a comprehensive overview of diagnosis, classification, risk stratification, and treatment algorithms in acute bacterial cholangitis. Conclusion Prompt clinical recognition and accurate diagnostic workup including adequate laboratory assessment and (aetiology-oriented) imaging are critical steps in the management of cholangitis. Treatment is directed at the two major interrelated pathophysiologic components, i.e. bacterial infection (immediate antimicrobial therapy) and bile duct obstruction (biliary drainage). As for the latter, transpapillary endoscopic drainage by stent or nasobiliary drain and/or same-session bile duct clearance, depending on individual disease severity, represent first-line treatment approaches. PMID:26468310

  20. Imaging acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    González, R Gilberto; Schwamm, Lee H

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is common and often treatable, but treatment requires reliable information on the state of the brain that may be provided by modern neuroimaging. Critical information includes: the presence of hemorrhage; the site of arterial occlusion; the size of the early infarct "core"; and the size of underperfused, potentially threatened brain parenchyma, commonly referred to as the "penumbra." In this chapter we review the major determinants of outcomes in ischemic stroke patients, and the clinical value of various advanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging methods that may provide key physiologic information in these patients. The focus is on major strokes due to occlusions of large arteries of the anterior circulation, the most common cause of a severe stroke syndrome. The current evidence-based approach to imaging the acute stroke patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital is presented, which is applicable for all stroke types. We conclude with new information on time and stroke evolution that imaging has revealed, and how it may open the possibilities of treating many more patients. PMID:27432672

  1. Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Edwin C.; Durie, Brian G. M.; Garewal, Harinder S.

    1987-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of acute myelogenous leukemia frequently associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Data on 11 patients with APL treated at our institution were analyzed and compared with those of 147 published cases. Most had a bleeding diathesis at presentation and evidence of DIC eventually developed in all. Seven patients (64%) showed the t(15;17)(q22;q21) karyotype or a similar translocation. Using a chemotherapy induction regimen containing an anthracycline, complete remission, requiring a total of 14 courses of treatment, was achieved in six patients (55%). The median duration of response and median survival for complete responders were 10 and 15 months, respectively. Three patients (27%) died of bleeding complications during induction therapy. The tritiated-thymidine labeling index of leukemia cells predicted which patients would achieve a complete remission. Review of six studies of 147 patients with APL from the past 12 years supports the use of a chemotherapy induction regimen containing anthracycline or amsacrine and heparin for the treatment of DIC. PMID:3472414

  2. Acute pyelonephritis in children.

    PubMed

    Morello, William; La Scola, Claudio; Alberici, Irene; Montini, Giovanni

    2016-08-01

    Acute pyelonephritis is one of the most serious bacterial illnesses during childhood. Escherichia coli is responsible in most cases, however other organisms including Klebsiella, Enterococcus, Enterobacter, Proteus, and Pseudomonas species are being more frequently isolated. In infants, who are at major risk of complications such as sepsis and meningitis, symptoms are ambiguous and fever is not always useful in identifying those at high risk. A diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis is initially made on the basis of urinalysis; dipstick tests for nitrites and/or leukocyte esterase are the most accurate indicators of infection. Collecting a viable urine sample for urine culture using clean voided methods is feasible, even in young children. No gold standard antibiotic treatment exists. In children appearing well, oral therapy and outpatient care is possible. New guidelines suggest less aggressive imaging strategies after a first infection, reducing radiation exposure and costs. The efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in preventing recurrence is still a matter of debate and the risk of antibiotic resistance is a warning against its widespread use. Well-performed randomized controlled trials are required in order to better define both the imaging strategies and medical options aimed at preserving long-term renal function. PMID:26238274

  3. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... key statistics about acute lymphocytic leukemia? What is acute lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... leukemias). The rest of this document focuses on acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in adults. For information on ALL in ...

  4. Acute diabetic abdomen in childhood.

    PubMed

    Valerio, D

    1976-01-10

    Three children presented as acute surgical emergencies due to undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. Where diabetic ketoacidosis mimicks the acute abdomen three clinical features are important in reaching the right diagnosis-namely, a history of polydipsia, polyuria, and anorexia preceding the abdominal pain, the deep sighing and rapid respirations, and severe dehydration. PMID:54584

  5. Retrotransposon Insertion in the T-cell Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia 1 (Tal1) Gene Is Associated with Severe Renal Disease and Patchy Alopecia in Hairpatches (Hpt) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Burzenski, Lisa M.; Riding, Rebecca L.; Alley, Lynn; Lyons, Bonnie L.; Kavirayani, Anoop; Martin, Kimberly A.; Cox, Gregory A.; Johnson, Kenneth R.; Shultz, Leonard D.

    2013-01-01

    “Hairpatches” (Hpt) is a naturally occurring, autosomal semi-dominant mouse mutation. Hpt/Hpt homozygotes die in utero, while Hpt/+ heterozygotes exhibit progressive renal failure accompanied by patchy alopecia. This mutation is a model for the rare human disorder “glomerulonephritis with sparse hair and telangiectases" (OMIM 137940). Fine mapping localized the Hpt locus to a 6.7 Mb region of Chromosome 4 containing 62 known genes. Quantitative real time PCR revealed differential expression for only one gene in the interval, T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia 1 (Tal1), which was highly upregulated in the kidney and skin of Hpt/+ mice. Southern blot analysis of Hpt mutant DNA indicated a new EcoRI site in the Tal1 gene. High throughput sequencing identified an endogenous retroviral class II intracisternal A particle insertion in Tal1 intron 4. Our data suggests that the IAP insertion in Tal1 underlies the histopathological changes in the kidney by three weeks of age, and that glomerulosclerosis is a consequence of an initial developmental defect, progressing in severity over time. The Hairpatches mouse model allows an investigation into the effects of Tal1, a transcription factor characterized by complex regulation patterns, and its effects on renal disease. PMID:23301070

  6. [MPO-ANCA related vasculitis complicating mucinous cystadenoma of the pancreas and severe acute pancreatitis after steroid pulse therapy: a case report].

    PubMed

    Tsuruoka, Kayori; Sekiya, Syuusuke; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Koitabashi, Kenichirou; Shimazaki, Minako; Sakurada, Tsutomu; Shirai, Sayuri; Yasuda, Takashi; Kimura, Kenjirou

    2008-01-01

    A 72-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of massive proteinuria of 2.2 g/day. She had seen a general practitioner for management of Basedow disease, diabetes mellitus and hypertension for 24 years. On admission, she complained of anorexia and nausea. Laboratory data showed serum creatinine of 3.62 mg/dL and MPO-ANCA of 68 EU. Renal biopsy revealed crescentic glomerulonephritis complicated with membranous nephropathy. Thiamazole (MMI), which was being given for Basedow disease for years, was withdrawn on the suspicion as a cause of MPO-ANCA. Three years after the withdrawal of MMI, renal failure slowly progressed to the end-stage, while MPO-ANCA was negative. She was introduced onto hemodialysis. At that time, MPO-ANCA became positive again, the titer being 12.9 EU. Therefore, we suspected a relapse of ANCA-related vasculitis and performed steroid pulse therapy on the patient with methylprednisolone at 0.5 g/day for 3 days. On hospital day 14, MPO-ANCA became negative. On day 25, however, severe acute pancreatitis developed and a pancreatic tumor lesion was found on CT. In spite of amelioration of the pancreatitis by medical treatment, the pancreatic tumor lesion did not show any significant change. On day 48, she died of multiple organ failure. Autopsy showed a mucinous cyst adenoma of pancreas and necrotizing pancreatitis. We suspected steroid therapy as the cause of the pancreatic lesions. PMID:19069154

  7. The elimination of scabies: a task for our generation.

    PubMed

    McLean, Florence E

    2013-10-01

    Scabies prevalence remains unacceptably high in many regions throughout the world. Infestation with scabies significantly impacts quality of life and is linked to pyoderma and consequently to severe long-term sequelae such as post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. In the past, control programs using topical treatments have met with poor compliance; however, the highly effective oral agent ivermectin may offer a new paradigm in scabies management. Problems still exist with insensitive diagnostic tests, questions concerning mite reservoirs, and restrictions on who can receive ivermectin. Despite these difficulties, the elimination of scabies in communities worst affected may soon be possible. PMID:23834401

  8. Acute recurrent appendicitis with appendicolith.

    PubMed

    Hollerman, J J; Bernstein, M A; Kottamasu, S R; Sirr, S A

    1988-11-01

    Appendiceal disease can be acute, acute recurrent, or chronic. Acute appendicitis is the most common form. Acute recurrent appendicitis is more common than chronic appendicitis. In children the clinical manifestations of appendicitis are variable. Patients who have an appendicolith usually develop appendicitis, often with perforation. A case is presented of 3-year follow-up of a patient with an appendicolith and acute recurrent appendicitis. The literature about appendicoliths is reviewed. In the appropriate clinical setting, a history of prior episodes of similar right lower quadrant pain does not preclude the diagnosis of appendiceal disease. Awareness of the less common forms of appendicitis is important so that appropriate treatment is not delayed. PMID:3052484

  9. Cytokines in Acute Chikungunya

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, Anuradha; Ghorpade, Ravi P.; Chopra, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute chikungunya (CHIKV) is predominantly an acute onset of excruciatingly painful, self-limiting musculoskeletal (MSK) arbovirus illness and this was further reported by us during the 2006 Indian epidemic [Chopra et al. Epidemiol Infect 2012]. Selected serum cytokines profile in subjects within one month of onset of illness is being presented. Methods Out of 509 clinical CHIKV cases (43% population) identified during a rural population survey, 225 subjects consented blood investigations. 132 examined within 30 days of febrile onset are the study cohort. Anti-CHIKV IgM and IgG antibodies tested by immunochromatography and indirect immunofluorescence respectively. Interferons (IFN)-α, -β and -γ, Interferon Gamma-Induced Protein-10 (CXCL-10/IP-10), Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α), Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-13 (IL-13), Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1), Interleukin–4 (IL-4) and Interleukin–10 (IL-10) performed by ELISA. Samples collected from neighboring community a year prior to the epidemic used as healthy controls. Results Seropositivity for anti-CHIKV IgM and IgG was 65% and 52% respectively. IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ, CXCL10/IP-10 and IL-1β showed intense response in early acute phase. Cytokines (particularly TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10) was maximum in extended symptomatic phase and remained elevated in recovered subjects. Higher (p<0.05) IFN and IL-4 seen in patients seropositive for anti-CHIKV IgG. Elderly cases (≥65 years) showed elevated cytokines (except IFN) and anti-CHIKV antibodies near similar to younger subjects. Significant correlations (p<0.05) found between cytokines and clinical features (fatigue, low back ache, myalgia) and anti-CHIKV antibodies. Conclusion An intense cytokine milieu was evident in the early and immediate persistent symptomatic phase and in recovered subjects. Early persistent IgM and lower IgG to anti-CHKV and intense Th2 cytokine phenotype seem to be

  10. Acute epiploic appendagitis and its mimics.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay K; Gervais, Debra A; Hahn, Peter F; Sagar, Pallavi; Mueller, Peter R; Novelline, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    Acute epiploic appendagitis most commonly manifests with acute lower quadrant pain. Its clinical features are similar to those of acute diverticulitis or, less commonly, acute appendicitis. The conditions that may mimic acute epiploic appendagitis at computed tomography (CT) include acute omental infarction, mesenteric panniculitis, fat-containing tumor, and primary and secondary acute inflammatory processes in the large bowel (eg, diverticulitis and appendicitis). Whereas the location of acute epiploic appendagitis is most commonly adjacent to the sigmoid colon, acute omental infarction is typically located in the right lower quadrant and often is mistaken for acute appendicitis. It is important to correctly diagnose acute epiploic appendagitis and acute omental infarction on CT images because these conditions may be mistaken for acute abdomen, and the mistake may lead to unnecessary surgery. The CT features of acute epiploic appendagitis include an oval lesion 1.5-3.5 cm in diameter, with attenuation similar to that of fat and with surrounding inflammatory changes, that abuts the anterior sigmoid colon wall. The CT features of acute omental infarction include a well-circumscribed triangular or oval heterogeneous fatty mass with a whorled pattern of concentric linear fat stranding between the anterior abdominal wall and the transverse or ascending colon. As CT increasingly is used for the evaluation of acute abdomen, radiologists are likely to see acute epiploic appendagitis and its mimics more often. Recognition of these conditions on CT images will allow appropriate management of acute abdominal pain and may help to prevent unnecessary surgery. PMID:16284132

  11. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Acute and persistent diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Grimwood, Keith; Forbes, David A

    2009-12-01

    Socially disadvantaged Indigenous infants and children living in western industrialized countries experience high rates of infectious diarrhea, no more so than Aboriginal children from remote and rural regions of Northern Australia. Diarrheal disease, poor nutrition, and intestinal enteropathy reflect household crowding, inadequate water and poor sanitation and hygiene. Acute episodes of watery diarrhea are often best managed by oral glucose-electrolyte solutions with continuation of breastfeeding and early reintroduction of feeding. Selective use of lactose-free milk formula, short-term zinc supplementation and antibiotics may be necessary for ill children with poor nutrition, persistent symptoms, or dysentery. Education, high standards of environmental hygiene, breastfeeding, and immunization with newly licensed rotavirus vaccines are all needed to reduce the unacceptably high burden of diarrheal disease encountered in young children from Indigenous communities. PMID:19962025

  13. [Acute intermittent porphyria].

    PubMed

    Catania, A; Caimi, G

    1983-11-10

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a congenital disease which as its name suggests, runs intermittently. Biochemically it is characterised by over-production of hepatic ALA synthetase (ALA-s), inducible mitochondrial enzyme and an increase in prophyrinic precursors (PBG, ac S-ALA). Clinically it is characterised by an abdominal nervous symptomatology. The primary metabolic error has been identified as a deficiency in enzyme activity which partially blocks haem biosynthesis. During the appearance of clinical manifestations, certain factors are present which have the capacity of inducing hepatic ALA-s production in vitro. Apart from some preventive measures treatment is mainly of symptomatology and complications. More recently the use of ALA-s inhibitors has been introduced. PMID:6657112

  14. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hiroto; Greaves, Mel; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is seen in both children and adults, but its incidence peaks between ages 2 and 5 years. The causation of ALL is considered to be multi-factorial, including exogenous or endogenous exposures, genetic susceptibility, and chance. The survival rate of paediatric ALL has improved to approximately 90% in recent trials with risk stratification by biologic features of leukaemic cells and response to therapy, therapy modification based on patient pharmacodynamics and pharmacogenomics, and improved supportive care. However, innovative approaches are needed to further improve survival while reducing adverse effects. While most children can be cured, the prognosis of infants and adults with ALL remains poor. Recent genome-wide profiling of germline and leukaemic cell DNA has identified novel submicroscopic structural genetic alterations and sequence mutations that contribute to leukaemogenesis, define new ALL subtypes, influence responsiveness to treatment, and may provide novel prognostic markers and therapeutic targets for personalized medicine. PMID:23523389

  15. Acute Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorguner, Metin; Akgun, Metin

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled substances may cause injury in pulmonary epithelium at various levels of respiratory tract, leading from simple symptoms to severe disease. Acute inhalation injury (AII) is not uncommon condition. There are certain high risk groups but AII may occur at various places including home or workplace. Environmental exposure is also possible. In addition to individual susceptibility, the characteristics of inhaled substances such as water solubility, size of substances and chemical properties may affect disease severity as well as its location. Although AII cases may recover in a few days but AII may cause long-term complications, even death. We aimed to discuss the effects of short-term exposures (minutes to hours) to toxic substances on the lungs. PMID:25610115

  16. Massive acute arsenic poisonings.

    PubMed

    Lech, Teresa; Trela, Franciszek

    2005-07-16

    Arsenic poisonings are still important in the field of toxicology, though they are not as frequent as about 20-30 years ago. In this paper, the arsenic concentrations in ante- and post-mortem materials, and also forensic and anatomo-pathological aspects in three cases of massive acute poisoning with arsenic(III) oxide (two of them with unexplained criminalistic background, in which arsenic was taken for amphetamine and one suicide), are presented. Ante-mortem blood and urine arsenic concentrations ranged from 2.3 to 6.7 microg/ml, respectively. Post-mortem tissue total arsenic concentrations were also detected in large concentrations. In case 3, the contents of the duodenum contained as much as 30.1% arsenic(III) oxide. The high concentrations of arsenic detected in blood and tissues in all presented cases are particularly noteworthy in that they are very rarely detected at these concentrations in fatal arsenic poisonings. PMID:15939162

  17. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Matthew; Lobo, Alan J

    2015-10-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is a frequently encountered medical emergency with an incidence of 84-160/100000 and associated with mortality of approximately 10%. Guidelines from the National Institute for Care and Care Excellence outline key features in the management of AUGIB. Patients require prompt resuscitation and risk assessment using validated tools. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy provides accurate diagnosis, aids in estimating prognosis and allows therapeutic intervention. Endoscopy should be undertaken immediately after resuscitation in unstable patients and within 24 hours in all other patients. Interventional radiology may be required for bleeding unresponsive to endoscopic intervention. Drug therapy depends on the cause of bleeding. Intravenous proton pump inhibitors should be used in patients with high-risk ulcers. Terlipressin and broad-spectrum antibiotics should be used following variceal haemorrhage. Hospitals admitting patients with AUGIB need to provide well organised services and ensure access to relevant services for all patients, and particularly to out of hours endoscopy. PMID:26430191

  18. [Acute retinal necrosis].

    PubMed

    Lucke, K; Reinking, U; el-Hifnawi, E; Dennin, R H; Laqua, H

    1988-12-01

    The authors report on three patients with acute retinal necrosis who were treated with the virostatic agent Acyclovir and who underwent vitreoretinal surgery with silicone oil filling for total retinal detachment. In two eyes the retina was reattached, but useful vision was only preserved in one patient. Titers from blood and the vitreous, as well as microscopic findings in retinal biopsies, support the view that the necrosis is caused by a herpes simplex virus infection. After therapy with Acyclovir was instituted no further progression on the necrosis was observed. However, the development of retinal detachment could not be prevented. Early diagnosis and antiviral therapy are essential to improve the otherwise poor prognosis in this rare syndrome. PMID:3221657

  19. [Acute epiglottitis in adults].

    PubMed

    Castillo, A

    1992-09-01

    The author presents the clinical history of 14 patients, from 21 to 48 years of age, 10 men and 4 women, with a final diagnosis of acute epiglottitis who were hospitalized at Gorgas Army Hospital or at the San Fernando Clinic. All the patients had pharyngitis and dysphagia, a few with nasal voice, stridor and difficulty breathing, as the chief complaint. All the patients were initially intubated orally for diagnostic purposes and immediately after nasotracheal intubation was done until the patient improved in 2 or 3 days (one patient remained intubated for 5 days). All patients were kept in the Intensive Care Unit and were treated with Ampicillin and Chloramphenicol IV and lately with a second generation cephalosporin (Cefamandole). The patients allergic to Penicillin were treated with Clindamycin and Chloramphenicol. Corticosteroids were not used in any of the patients. There were no sequelae and none of the patients expired. PMID:1439005

  20. Acute Methylenedioxypyrovalerone Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Froberg, Blake A; Levine, Michael; Beuhler, Michael C; Judge, Bryan S; Moore, Philip W; Engebretsen, Kristin M; Mckeown, Nathanael J; Rosenbaum, Christopher D; Young, Amy C; Rusyniak, Daniel E

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the acute clinical effects, laboratory findings, complications, and disposition of patients presenting to the hospital after abusing synthetic cathinone. We conducted a retrospective multicenter case series of patients with synthetic cathinone abuse by searching for the terms bath salts, MDPV, methylenedioxypyrovalerone, mephedrone, methcathinone, methylone, methedrone, and cathinone within the "agent" field of a national clinical toxicology database (ToxIC). The medical records of these patients were obtained and abstracted by investigators at each study site. Patients with confirmatory testing that identified a synthetic cathinone in either blood or urine were included in the series. Patients who had either an undetectable synthetic cathinone test or no confirmatory testing were excluded. A data abstraction sheet was used to obtain information on each patient. We entered data into an Excel spreadsheet and calculated descriptive statistics. We identified 23 patients with confirmed synthetic cathinone exposure--all were positive for methylenedioxyprovalerone (MDPV). Eighty-three percent were male and 74 % had recreational intent. The most common reported clinical effects were tachycardia (74 %), agitation (65 %), and sympathomimetic syndrome (65 %). Acidosis was the most common laboratory abnormality (43 %). Seventy-eight percent of patients were treated with benzodiazepines and 30 % were intubated. Ninety-six percent of patients were hospitalized and 87 % were admitted to the ICU. The majority (61 %) of patients was discharged home but 30 % required inpatient psychiatric care. There was one death in our series. The majority of patients presenting to the hospital after abusing MDPV have severe sympathomimetic findings requiring hospitalization. A number of these patients require inpatient psychiatric care after their acute presentation. PMID:25468313

  1. Asthma in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction About 10% of adults have suffered an attack of asthma, and up to 5% of these have severe disease that responds poorly to treatment. Patients with severe disease have an increased risk of death, but patients with mild to moderate disease are also at risk of exacerbations. Most guidelines about the management of asthma follow stepwise protocols. This review does not endorse or follow any particular protocol, but presents the evidence about specific interventions. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for acute asthma? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 100 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: beta2 agonists (plus ipratropium bromide, pressured metered-dose inhalers, short-acting continuous nebulised, short-acting intermittent nebulised, short-acting iv, and inhaled formoterol); corticosteroids (inhaled); corticosteroids (single oral, combined inhaled, and short courses); education about acute asthma; generalist care; helium–oxygen mixture (heliox); magnesium sulphate (iv and adding isotonic nebulised magnesium to inhaled beta2 agonists); mechanical ventilation; oxygen supplementation (controlled 28% oxygen and controlled 100% oxygen); and specialist care. PMID:21463536

  2. [Acute acromioclavicular dislocations].

    PubMed

    Riand, N; Sadowski, C; Hoffmeyer, P

    1999-12-01

    Acromioclavicular dislocations represent over 10% of acute traumatic injuries to the shoulder girdle. The mechanism is usually a direct impact on the shoulder with the arm in adduction, producing rupture of the acromioclavicular (AC) ligaments, then of the coracoclavicular (CC) ligament, with displacement of the lateral end of the clavicle. Rockwood described 6 grades of injury. Physical examination usually provides the diagnosis, which is confirmed by radiological examination. X-rays centered on the AC joint, if necessary with forceful adduction of both shoulders or under traction, are useful to evaluate the severity of the lesion. Grade I and II lesions are usually treated conservatively by simply immobilizing the arm for 3 to 4 weeks. Surgical treatment is usually advocated for grade IV, V and VI lesions: AC or CC fixation, sometimes associated with ligament repair, depending on the surgeons. AC pinning or C-C screw fixation are the techniques most often used. Management of grade III lesions remains controversial. Some authors advocate immediate surgical treatment in young, active patients, in heavy laborers and even in slender individuals. The choice of the operative technique is controversial, as no single technique has clearly proved to be superior to others. Other authors advocate conservative treatment, which gives functional results which patients consider quite acceptable, with faster recovery; patients should be informed that results are essentially similar, whatever the treatment. The possibility of performing secondary operations with good results in cases with failure of conservative management is a further argument in favor of applying conservative therapy first in acute injuries. PMID:10675933

  3. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Estenssoro, Elisa; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an acute respiratory failure produced by an inflammatory edema secondary to increased lung capillary permeability. This causes alveolar flooding and subsequently deep hypoxemia, with intrapulmonary shunt as its most important underlying mechanism. Characteristically, this alteration is unresponsive to high FIO2 and only reverses with end-expiratory positive pressure (PEEP). Pulmonary infiltrates on CXR and CT are the hallmark, together with decreased lung compliance. ARDS always occurs within a week of exposition to a precipitating factor; most frequently pneumonia, shock, aspiration of gastric contents, sepsis, and trauma. In CT scan, the disease is frequently inhomogeneous, with gravitational infiltrates coexisting with normal-density areas and also with hyperaerated parenchyma. Mortality is high (30-60%) especially in ARDS associated with septic shock and neurocritical diseases. The cornerstone of therapy lies in the treatment of the underlying cause and in the use mechanical ventilation which, if inappropriately administered, can lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. Tidal volume = 6 ml/kg of ideal body weight to maintain an end-inspiratory (plateau) pressure = 30 cm H2O ("protective ventilation") is the only variable consistently associated with decreased mortality. Moderate-to-high PEEP levels are frequently required to treat hypoxemia, yet no specific level or titration strategy has improved outcomes. Recently, the use of early prone positioning in patients with PaO2/FIO2 = 150 was associated with increased survival. In severely hypoxemic patients, it may be necessary to use adjuvants of mechanical ventilation as recruitment maneuvers, pressure-controlled modes, neuromuscular blocking agents, and extracorporeal-membrane oxygenation. Fluid restriction appears beneficial. PMID:27576283

  4. Acute management of migraine.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Debashish

    2010-04-01

    Migraine is a brain disease whose principal symptom is episodic intense throbbing pain in the head which is often accompanied by photophobia, phonophobia, nausea and vomiting. Primary objectives of migraine treatment are to abort the acute attacks, treat associated symptoms and prevent future attacks. With a majority of migraine patients being young, they will need a treatment plan to suit their professional work, leisure and reproductive concerns. Non specific anti-migraine drugs like non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-emetics, narcotics, and sympathomimetics are usually helpful in mild to moderate attacks. Specific drugs like triptans and ergots are useful for moderate to severe attacks. In step care approach, the patients are started with the simplest options like simple analgesics first followed by non-steroidal agents, then ergot preparations and eventually triptans if they do not respond. In stratified care approach, the attacks and the patients are stratified according to the severity and therapeutic response. Those with severe disabling episodes are given specific anti-migraine medications like triptans whereas patients with mild or low disability are treated with simple analgesics. Currently, the most favored acute anti-migraine medication is a triptan. At marketed doses all triptans are effective as compared to placebos and generally well tolerated. Amongst them however, rizatriptan 10 mg, eletriptan 80 mg and almotriptan 12.5 mg provide the highest likelihood of consistent success. Triptan related adverse events are usually short lived, mild and clinically insignificant. Ergots are slowly being replaced by triptans. This is because of their adverse side-effects, low bioavailability and high potential for abuse that can lead to overuse headache. PMID:21049703

  5. Acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure complicating doxylamine succinate intoxication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang Deok; Lee, Soo Teik

    2002-06-01

    Doxylamine succinate is an antihistaminic drugwith additional hypnotic, anticholinergic and local anesthetic effects first described in 1948. In Korea and many other countries, it is a common-over-the counter medication frequently involved in overdoses. Clinical symtomatology of doxylamine succinate overdose includes somnolence, coma, seizures, mydriasis, tachycardia, psychosis, and rhabdomyolysis. A serious complication may be rhabdomyolysis with subsequent impairment of renal function and acute renal failure. We report a case of acute renal failure and acute pancreatitis complicating a doxylamine succinate intoxication. PMID:12046971

  6. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. PMID:26520203

  7. Biomarkers in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Aditi; Januzzi, James L

    2015-06-01

    The care of patients with acutely decompensated heart failure is being reshaped by the availability and understanding of several novel and emerging heart failure biomarkers. The gold standard biomarkers in heart failure are B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, which play an important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Novel biomarkers that are increasingly involved in the processes of myocardial injury, neurohormonal activation, and ventricular remodeling are showing promise in improving diagnosis and prognosis among patients with acute decompensated heart failure. These include midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide, soluble ST2, galectin-3, highly-sensitive troponin, and midregional proadrenomedullin. There has also been an emergence of biomarkers for evaluation of acute decompensated heart failure that assist in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea, such as procalcitonin (for identification of acute pneumonia), as well as markers that predict complications of acute decompensated heart failure, such as renal injury markers. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology and usefulness of established and emerging biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. PMID:25911167

  8. [Cerebrolysin for acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    iganshina, L E; Abakumova, T R

    2013-01-01

    The review discusses existing evidence of benefits and risks of cerebrolysin--a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and amino acids derived from pigs' brain tissue with proposed neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, for acute ischemic stroke. The review presents results of systematic search and analysis of randomised clinical trials comparing cerebrolysin with placebo in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Only one trial was selected as meeting quality criteria. No difference in death and adverse events between cerebrolysin and placebo was established. The authors conclude about insufficiency of evidence to evaluate the effect of cerebrolysin on survival and dependency in people with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:23805635

  9. Acute Legionella pneumophila infection masquerading as acute alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Jonathan Michael; Chan, Julian; Reid, Angeline Louise; Tan, Chistopher

    2013-01-01

    A middle-aged man had deteriorated rapidly in hospital after being misdiagnosed with acute alcoholic hepatitis. Acute Legionnaires disease (Legionellosis) was subsequently diagnosed on rapid antigen urinary testing and further confirmed serologically. This led to appropriate antibiotic treatment and complete clinical resolution. Physicians caring for patients with alcohol-related liver disease should consider Legionella pneumophila in their differential diagnosis even with a paucity of respiratory symptoms. PMID:23355576

  10. [Acute heart failure: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Marteles, Marta; Urrutia, Agustín

    2014-03-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock are two of the main forms of presentation of acute heart failure. Both entities are serious, with high mortality, and require early diagnosis and prompt and aggressive management. Acute pulmonary edema is due to the passage of fluid through the alveolarcapillary membrane and is usually the result of an acute cardiac episode. Correct evaluation and clinical identification of the process is essential in the management of acute pulmonary edema. The initial aim of treatment is to ensure hemodynamic stability and to correct hypoxemia. Other measures that can be used are vasodilators such as nitroglycerin, loop diuretics and, in specific instances, opioids. Cardiogenic shock is characterized by sustained hypoperfusion, pulmonary wedge pressure > 18 mmHg and a cardiac index < 2.2l/min/m(2). The process typically presents with hypotension (systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg or a decrease in mean arterial pressure > 30 mmHg) and absent or reduced diuresis (< 0.5 ml/kg/h). The most common cause is left ventricular failure due to acute myocardial infarction. Treatment consists of general measures to reverse acidosis and hypoxemia, as well as the use of vasopressors and inotropic drugs. Early coronary revascularization has been demonstrated to improve survival in shock associated with ischaemic heart disease. PMID:24930078

  11. Acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Domes, Trustin; Szafran, Olga; Bilous, Cheryl; Olson, Odell; Spooner, G. Richard

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the quality of care of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a rural health region. DESIGN Clinical audit employing multiple explicit criteria of care elements for emergency department and in-hospital AMI management. The audit was conducted using retrospective chart review. SETTING Twelve acute care health centres and hospitals in the East Central Health Region, a rural health region in Alberta, where medical and surgical services are provided almost entirely by family physicians. PARTICIPANTS Hospital inpatients with a confirmed discharge diagnosis of AMI (ICD-9-CM codes 410.xx) during the period April 1, 2001, to March 31, 2002, were included (177 confirmed cases). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Quality of AMI care was assessed using guidelines from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association and the Canadian Cardiovascular Outcomes Research Team and Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Quality of care indicators at three stages of patient care were assessed: at initial recognition and AMI management in the emergency department, during in-hospital AMI management, and at preparation for discharge from hospital. RESULTS In the emergency department, the quality of care was high for most procedural and therapeutic audit elements, with the exception of rapid electrocardiography, urinalysis, and provision of nitroglycerin and morphine. Average door-to-needle time for thrombolysis was 102.5 minutes. The quality of in-hospital care was high for most elements, but low for nitroglycerin and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, daily electrocardiography, and counseling regarding smoking cessation and diet. Few patients received counseling for lifestyle changes at hospital discharge. Male and younger patients were treated more aggressively than female and older patients. Sites that used care protocols achieved better results in initial AMI management than sites that did not. Stress testing was not readily available in the rural

  12. Pipazethate--acute childhood poisoning.

    PubMed

    da Silva, O A; Lopez, M

    1977-01-01

    A previously healthy child who who had accidentally ingested an unknown quantity of 20-mg tablets of pipazethate developed severe acute poisoning with neurologic, metabolic, and cardiovascular disturbances. She recovered with symptomatic and supportive therapy. PMID:589958

  13. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) -- children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leung WH, Pounds S, Cao X, e t al. Definition of cure in childhood acute myeloid leukemia. Cancer . 2014 Aug ... MD, Medical Oncologist, Fresno, CA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  14. Ultrasonography in acute gallbladder perforation.

    PubMed

    Soiva, M; Pamilo, M; Päivänsalo, M; Taavitsainen, M; Suramo, I

    1988-01-01

    The files of patients with acute cholecystitis from two large university hospitals from the years 1978-1985 were employed to find the cases with acute gallbladder perforation for this study. Only those patients (n = 9) were selected for the analysis of sonographic signs of acute gallbladder perforation who had less than 48 hours of symptoms before sonography, and were operated upon within 24 hours of the sonography. Patients (n = 10) with non-complicated acute cholecystitis and identical in regard to the duration of the symptoms and the timing of the sonography and the operation formed a control group. The sonographic findings in patients with gallbladder perforation were pericholecystic fluid collections, free peritoneal fluid, disappearance of the gallbladder wall echoes, focal highly echogenic areas with acoustic shadows in the gallbladder, and an inhomogeneous, generally echo-poor gallbladder wall. PMID:2964842

  15. Causes of acute bronchitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the bronchial tubes, the part of the respiratory system that leads into the lungs. Acute bronchitis has a sudden onset and usually appears after a respiratory infection, such as a cold, and can be ...

  16. Commonly Used Acute Migraine Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... that make headaches worse (or lead to decreased responsiveness to other drug therapies) Patient preference Goals of ... Reduce frequency, severity, and duration of attacks Improve responsiveness to treatment of acute attacks Reduce level of ...

  17. [Ascites and acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Piano, Salvatore; Tonon, Marta; Angeli, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Ascites is the most common complication of cirrhosis. Ascites develops as a consequence of an abnormal splanchnic vasodilation with reduction of effecting circulating volume and activation of endogenous vasoconstrictors system causing salt and water retention. Patients with ascites have a high risk to develop further complications of cirrhosis such as hyponatremia, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and acute kidney injury resulting in a poor survival. In recent years, new studies helped a better understanding of the pathophysiology of ascites and acute kidney injury in cirrhosis. Furthermore, new diagnostic criteria have been proposed for acute kidney injury and hepatorenal syndrome and a new algorithm for their management has been recommended with the aim of an early diagnosis and treatment. Herein we will review the current knowledge on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of ascites and acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis and we will identify the unmet needs that should be clarified in the next years. PMID:27571467

  18. ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Is ARDS? ARDS, or acute respiratory distress syndrome, is a lung condition that leads to low oxygen levels in the blood. ARDS can be life threatening because your body's organs need oxygen-rich ...

  19. [Acute gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Baumbach, Robert; Faiss, Siegbert; Cordruwisch, Wolfgang; Schrader, Carsten

    2016-04-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common major emergency (Internal medical or gastroenterological or medical), approximately 85 % of which occur in the upper GI tract. It is estimated that about a half of upper GI bleeds are caused by peptic ulcers. Upper GI bleeds are associated with more severe bleeding and poorer outcomes when compared to middle or lower GI bleeds. Prognostic determinants include bleeding intensity, patient age, comorbid conditions and the concomitant use of anticoagulants. A focused medical history can offer insight into the bleeding intensity, location and potential cause (along with early risk stratification). Initial measures should focus on rapid assessment and resuscitation of unstable patients. The oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) is the gold standard method for localizing the source of bleeding and for interventional therapy. Bleeding as a result of peptic ulcers is treated endoscopically with mechanical and / or thermal techniques in combination with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. When variceal bleeding is suspected, pre-interventional use of vasopressin analogues and antibiotic therapies are recommended. Endoscopically, the first line treatment of esophageal varices is endoscopic ligature therapy, whereas that for gastric varices is the use of Histoacryl injection sclerotherapy. When persistent and continued massive hemorrhage occurs in a patient with known or suspected aortic disease the possibility of an aorto-enteric fistula must be considered. PMID:27078246

  20. Acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Khwaja, Asim; Bjorkholm, Magnus; Gale, Rosemary E; Levine, Ross L; Jordan, Craig T; Ehninger, Gerhard; Bloomfield, Clara D; Estey, Eli; Burnett, Alan; Cornelissen, Jan J; Scheinberg, David A; Bouscary, Didier; Linch, David C

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a disorder characterized by a clonal proliferation derived from primitive haematopoietic stem cells or progenitor cells. Abnormal differentiation of myeloid cells results in a high level of immature malignant cells and fewer differentiated red blood cells, platelets and white blood cells. The disease occurs at all ages, but predominantly occurs in older people (>60 years of age). AML typically presents with a rapid onset of symptoms that are attributable to bone marrow failure and may be fatal within weeks or months when left untreated. The genomic landscape of AML has been determined and genetic instability is infrequent with a relatively small number of driver mutations. Mutations in genes involved in epigenetic regulation are common and are early events in leukaemogenesis. The subclassification of AML has been dependent on the morphology and cytogenetics of blood and bone marrow cells, but specific mutational analysis is now being incorporated. Improvements in treatment in younger patients over the past 35 years has largely been due to dose escalation and better supportive care. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation may be used to consolidate remission in those patients who are deemed to be at high risk of relapse. A plethora of new agents - including those targeted at specific biochemical pathways and immunotherapeutic approaches - are now in trial based on improved understanding of disease pathophysiology. These advances provide good grounds for optimism, although mortality remains high especially in older patients. PMID:27159408

  1. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yadam, Suman; Bihler, Eric; Balaan, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious inflammatory disorder with high mortality. Its main pathologic mechanism seems to result from increased alveolar permeability. Its definition has also changed since first being described according to the Berlin definition, which now classifies ARDS on a severity scale based on PaO2 (partial pressure of oxygen, arterial)/FIO2 (fraction of inspired oxygen) ratio. The cornerstone of therapy was found to be a low tidal volume strategy featuring volumes of 6 to 8 mL per kg of ideal body weight that has been shown to have decreased mortality as proven by the ARDSnet trials. There are other areas of treatment right now that include extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, as well for severe refractory hypoxemia. Other methods that include prone positioning for ventilation have also shown improvements in oxygenation. Positive end-expiratory pressure with lung recruitment maneuvers has also been found to be helpful. Other therapies that include vasodilators and neuromuscular agents are still being explored and need further studies to define their role in ARDS. PMID:26919679

  2. Acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Patschan, Daniel; Müller, Gerhard Anton

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a frequent and serious complication in hospitalized patients. Mortality rates have not substantially been decreased during the last 20 years. In most patients AKI results from transient renal hypoperfusion or ischemia. The consequences include tubular cell dysfunction/damage, inflammation of the organ, and post-ischemic microvasculopathy. The two latter events perpetuate kidney damage in AKI. Clinical manifestations result from diminished excretion of water, electrolytes, and endogenous / exogenous waste products. Patients are endangered by cardiovascular complications such as hypertension, heart failure, and arrhythmia. In addition, the whole organism may be affected by systemic toxification (uremia). The diagnostic approach in AKI involves several steps with renal biopsy inevitable in some patients. The current therapy focuses on preventing further kidney damage and on treatment of complications. Different pharmacological strategies have failed to significantly improve prognosis in AKI. If dialysis treatment becomes mandatory, intermittent and continuous renal replacement therapies are equally effective. Thus, new therapies are urgently needed in order to reduce short- and long-term outcome in AKI. In this respect, stem cell-based regimens may offer promising perspectives. PMID:25618438

  3. Acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Gerhard Anton

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Acute kidney injury is a frequent and serious complication in hospitalized patients. Mortality rates have not substantially been decreased during the last 20 years. In most patients AKI results from transient renal hypoperfusion or ischemia. The consequences include tubular cell dysfunction/damage, inflammation of the organ, and post-ischemic microvasculopathy. The two latter events perpetuate kidney damage in AKI. Clinical manifestations result from diminished excretion of water, electrolytes, and endogenous / exogenous waste products. Patients are endangered by cardiovascular complications such as hypertension, heart failure, and arrhythmia. In addition, the whole organism may be affected by systemic toxification (uremia). The diagnostic approach in AKI involves several steps with renal biopsy inevitable in some patients. The current therapy focuses on preventing further kidney damage and on treatment of complications. Different pharmacological strategies have failed to significantly improve prognosis in AKI. If dialysis treatment becomes mandatory, intermittent and continuous renal replacement therapies are equally effective. Thus, new therapies are urgently needed in order to reduce short- and long-term outcome in AKI. In this respect, stem cell-based regimens may offer promising perspectives. PMID:25618438

  4. Acute pain transfusion reaction.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Jody; Osswald, Michael; Walker, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    A 34-year-old woman with a diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis (HLH) received a double umbilical cord blood transplantation following a myeloablative chemotherapy preparative regimen with busulfan and cyclophosphamide. HLH is a rare, potentially fatal hematologic disorder characterized by the overactivation of histocytes and T lymphocytes, leading to organ infiltration and acute illness. On day 25 post-transplantation, the patient required a platelet transfusion for a platelet count of 6,000 per ml (normal range = 150,000-450,000 per ml). The patient's blood type prior to the cord blood transplantation was B positive and, although both umbilical cord blood donors were O positive, the patient was still B positive per blood bank testing on that day. Although the recipient of an allogenic stem cell transplantation will eventually become the blood type of the donor, the time for this process to occur varies for each person. That process must be monitored by the blood bank for the purpose of cross-matching blood products to decrease hemolysis as much as possible. The patient was premedicated with the facility's standard for platelet transfusions: acetaminophen 650 mg and diphenhydramine 25 mg about 30 minutes prior to the platelet transfusion. PMID:24161631

  5. Acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jawaid, Saad; Chaudary, Adeel

    2014-01-01

    The paramedics brought a 60-year-old man to the emergency department after a sudden onset of shortness of breath with a subsequent drop in the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). On arrival the patient looked peri-arrest. His O2 saturations were 84% on 15 L of oxygen. He had gasping breathing with a completely silent chest and the GCS was 6/15 (E=1, V=1, M=4). The blood gas revealed type-2 respiratory failure. The chest X-ray was unremarkable and ECG was not indicative for cardiac catheterisation lab activation. Bedside shock scan was done which showed global hypokinesia of the left ventricle. In spite of unconvincing ECG and chest X-ray, an acute cardiac event was diagnosed in view of an abnormal bedside echo. The patient was transferred to the cardiac catheterisation lab for urgent percutaneous coronary intervention which revealed critical stenosis of the left main stem coronary artery, which was successfully stented. The patient had a good recovery from the life-threatening event. PMID:24913081

  6. Acute Diarrhea in Children.

    PubMed

    Radlović, Nedeljko; Leković, Zoran; Vuletić, Biljana; Radlović, Vladimir; Simić, Dušica

    2015-01-01

    Acute diarrhea (AD) is the most frequent gastroenterological disorder, and the main cause of dehydration in childhood. It is manifested by a sudden occurrence of three or more watery or loose stools per day lasting for seven to 10 days, 14 days at most. It mainly occurs in children until five years of age and particularly in neonates in the second half-year and children until the age of three years. Its primary causes are gastrointestinal infections, viral and bacterial, and more rarely alimentary intoxications and other factors. As dehydration and negative nutritive balance are the main complications of AD, it is clear that the compensation of lost body fluids and adequate diet form the basis of the child's treatment. Other therapeutic measures, except antipyretics in high febrility, antiparasitic drugs for intestinal lambliasis, anti-amebiasis and probiotics are rarely necessary. This primarily regards uncritical use of antibiotics and intestinal antiseptics in the therapy of bacterial diarrhea.The use of antiemetics, antidiarrhetics and spasmolytics is unnecessary and potentially risky, so that it is not recommended for children with AD. PMID:26946776

  7. Uveitis (acute anterior)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Anterior uveitis is rare, with an annual incidence of 12/100,000 population, although it is more common in Finland (annual incidence of 23/100,000), probably because of genetic factors, such as high frequency of HLA–B27 in the population. It is often self-limiting, but can, in some cases, lead to complications such as posterior synechiae, cataract, glaucoma, and chronic uveitis. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of anti-inflammatory eye drops on acute anterior uveitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to November 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found six systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: corticosteroids, mydriatics, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug eye drops. PMID:21736765

  8. Acute optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Galetta, Steven L.; Villoslada, Pablo; Levin, Netta; Shindler, Kenneth; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Parr, Edward; Cadavid, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic demyelinating optic neuritis (ON) most commonly presents as acute unilateral vision loss and eye pain and is frequently associated with multiple sclerosis. Although emphasis is often placed on the good recovery of high-contrast visual acuity, persistent deficits are frequently observed in other aspects of vision, including contrast sensitivity, visual field testing, color vision, motion perception, and vision-related quality of life. Persistent and profound structural and functional changes are often revealed by imaging and electrophysiologic techniques, including optical coherence tomography, visual-evoked potentials, and nonconventional MRI. These abnormalities can impair patients' abilities to perform daily activities (e.g., driving, working) so they have important implications for patients' quality of life. In this article, we review the sequelae from ON, including clinical, structural, and functional changes and their interrelationships. The unmet needs in each of these areas are considered and the progress made toward meeting those needs is examined. Finally, we provide an overview of past and present investigational approaches for disease modification in ON. PMID:26236761

  9. Canagliflozin-Associated Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajanshu

    2016-01-01

    Canagliflozin is a new drug in class of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors used for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We describe a patient who developed moderately severe acute pancreatitis as an untoward consequence after being initiated on this drug. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of canagliflozin-associated acute pancreatitis in clinical literature. PMID:25187092

  10. Acute Scorpion Pancreatitis in Trinidad

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomew, Courtenay

    1970-01-01

    Over a two-month period 30 patients were admitted to hospital following stings of the scorpion of Trinidad, the Tityus trinitatis. In 24 cases acute pancreatitis developed soon after the sting, but in nine of these no abdominal pain occurred. All the patients made an uneventful recovery. Although such complications have been reported no pseudocyst formations or acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis occurred in this series. PMID:5443968

  11. Amebiasis presenting as acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Javier E; Mederos, Raul; Rivero, Haidy; Sendzischew, Morgan A; Soaita, Mauela; Robinson, Morton J; Sendzischew, Harry; Danielpour, Payman

    2007-11-01

    Amebiasis presenting as acute appendicitis is extremely rare. The case of a 38-year-old Hispanic man who presented to the hospital with symptoms and signs suggestive of acute appendicitis is reported. He underwent laparoscopic appendectomy and the pathologic examination of the appendix revealed multiple trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica. The patient was treated postoperatively with metronidazole for amebiasis, and follow-up stool studies showed no sign of residual infection. The patient has remained asymptomatic. PMID:17984748

  12. Acute Acquired Concomitant Esotropia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingchang; Deng, Daming; Sun, Yuan; Shen, Tao; Cao, Guobin; Yan, Jianhua; Chen, Qiwen; Ye, Xuelian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute acquired concomitant esotropia (AACE) is a rare, distinct subtype of esotropia. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the clinical characteristics and discuss the classification and etiology of AACE. Charts from 47 patients with AACE referred to our institute between October 2010 and November 2014 were reviewed. All participants underwent a complete medical history, ophthalmologic and orthoptic examinations, and brain and orbital imaging. Mean age at onset was 26.6 ± 12.2 years. Of the 18 cases with deviations ≤ 20 PD, 16 presented with diplopia at distance and fusion at near vision at the onset of deviation; differences between distance and near deviations were < 8 PD; all cases except one were treated with prism and diplopia resolved. Of the 29 cases with deviations > 20 PD, 5 were mild hypermetropic with age at onset between 5 and 19 years, 16 were myopic, and 8 were emmetropic with age at onset > 12 years; 24 were surgically treated and 5 cases remained under observation; all 24 cases achieved normal retinal correspondence or fusion or stereopsis on postoperative day 1 in synoptophore; in 23 cases diplopia or visual confusion resolved postoperatively. Of the 47 cases, brain and orbital imaging in 2 cases revealed a tumor in the cerebellopontine angle and 1 case involved spinocerebellar ataxia as revealed by genetic testing. AACE in this study was characterized by a sudden onset of concomitant nonaccommodative esotropia with diplopia or visual confusion at 5 years of age or older and the potential for normal binocular vision. We suggest that AACE can be divided into 2 subgroups consisting of patients with relatively small versus large angle deviations. Coexisting or underlying neurological diseases were infrequent in AACE. PMID:26705210

  13. Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kallet, Richard H; Matthay, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged breathing of very high FIO2 (FIO2 ≥ 0.9) uniformly causes severe hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) and, without a reduction of FIO2, is usually fatal. The severity of HALI is directly proportional to PO2 (particularly above 450 mm Hg, or an FIO2 of 0.6) and exposure duration. Hyperoxia produces extraordinary amounts of reactive O2 species that overwhelms natural antioxidant defenses and destroys cellular structures through several pathways. Genetic predisposition has been shown to play an important role in HALI among animals, and some genetics-based epidemiologic research suggests that this may be true for humans as well. Clinically, the risk of HALI likely occurs when FIO2exceeds 0.7, and may become problematic when FIO2 exceeds 0.8 for an extended period of time. Both high-stretch mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia potentiate lung injury and may promote pulmonary infection. During the 1960s, confusion regarding the incidence and relevance of HALI largely reflected such issues as the primitive control of FIO2, the absence of PEEP, and the fact that at the time both ALI and ventilator-induced lung injury were unknown. The advent of PEEP and precise control over FIO2, as well as lung-protective ventilation, and other adjunctive therapies for severe hypoxemia, has greatly reduced the risk of HALI for the vast majority of patients requiring mechanical ventilation in the 21st century. However, a subset of patients with very severe ARDS requiring hyperoxic therapy is at substantial risk for developing HALI, therefore justifying the use of such adjunctive therapies. PMID:23271823

  14. Acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, F R; Rowe, J M; Radich, J; Dick, J E

    2001-01-01

    Through the hard work of a large number of investigators, the biology of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is becoming increasingly well understood, and as a consequence, new therapeutic targets have been identified and new model systems have been developed for testing novel therapies. How these new therapies can be most effectively studied in the clinic and whether they will ultimately improve cure rates are questions of enormous importance. In this article, Dr. Jacob Rowe presents a summary of the current state-of-the-art therapy for adult AML. His contribution emphasizes the fact that AML is not a single disease, but a number of related diseases each distinguished by unique cytogenetic markers which in turn help determine the most appropriate treatment. Dr. Jerald Radich continues on this theme, emphasizing how these cytogenetic abnormalities, as well as other mutations, give rise to abnormal signal transduction and how these abnormal pathways may represent ideal targets for the development of new therapeutics. A third contribution by Dr. Frederick Appelbaum describes how AML might be made the target of immunologic attack. Specifically, strategies using antibody-based or cell-based immunotherapies are described including the use of unmodified antibodies, drug conjugates, radioimmunoconjugates, non-ablative allogeneic transplantation, T cell adoptive immunotherapy and AML vaccines. Finally, Dr. John Dick provides a review of the development of the NOD/SCID mouse model of human AML emphasizing both what it has taught us about the biology of the disease as well as how it can be used to test new therapies. Taken together, these reviews are meant to help us understand more about where we are in the treatment of AML, where we can go and how we might get there. PMID:11722979

  15. Acute Migraine Treatment in Adults.

    PubMed

    Becker, Werner J

    2015-06-01

    There are many options for acute migraine attack treatment, but none is ideal for all patients. This study aims to review current medical office-based acute migraine therapy in adults and provides readers with an organized approach to this important facet of migraine treatment. A general literature review includes a review of several recent published guidelines. Acetaminophen, 4 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (ibuprofen, acetylsalicylic acid [ASA], naproxen sodium, and diclofenac potassium), and 7 triptans (almotriptan, eletriptan, frovatriptan, naratriptan, rizatriptan, sumatriptan, and zolmitriptan) have good evidence for efficacy and form the core of acute migraine treatment. NSAID-triptan combinations, dihydroergotamine, non-opioid combination analgesics (acetaminophen, ASA, and caffeine), and several anti-emetics (metoclopramide, domperidone, and prochlorperazine) are additional evidence-based options. Opioid containing combination analgesics may be helpful in specific patients, but should not be used routinely. Clinical features to be considered when choosing an acute migraine medication include usual headache intensity, usual rapidity of pain intensity increase, nausea, vomiting, degree of disability, patient response to previously used medications, history of headache recurrence with previous attacks, and the presence of contraindications to specific acute medications. Available acute medications can be organized into 4 treatment strategies, including a strategy for attacks of mild to moderate severity (strategy one: acetaminophen and/or NSAIDs), a triptan strategy for patients with severe attacks and for attacks not responding to strategy one, a refractory attack strategy, and a strategy for patients with contraindications to vasoconstricting drugs. Acute treatment of migraine attacks during pregnancy, lactation, and for patients with chronic migraine is also discussed. In chronic migraine, it is particularly important that medication

  16. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Donor; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. [Acute and subacute chemical pneumonitis].

    PubMed

    Andujar, P; Nemery, B

    2009-10-01

    Acute or subacute chemical-induced lung injury is rarely compound specific and is most often caused by an accidental occupational, domestic or environmental exposure to an inhaled chemical agent. The industrial disaster that happened in Bhopal in 1984, accidental poisoning with chlorine and petroleum hydrocarbons and also vesicant gases used during conflicts, are specific examples. Rarely, a chemical agent can cause lung damage by being ingested and reaching the lung through the systemic circulation (for example accidental or deliberate paraquat ingestion). Household accidents should not be underestimated. An important cause of household accidents is chlorine inhalation resulting from mixing bleach with acids such as the scale removers used to clean toilets. Chemical agents can provoke direct and/or indirect damage to the respiratory tract. The acute or subacute clinical manifestations resulting from inhalation of chemical agents are very varied and include inhalation fevers, acute non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, adult respiratory distress syndrome, reactive airways dysfunction syndrome and acute or subacute pneumonitis. The site and the severity of chemical-induced respiratory damage caused by inhaled chemical agents depend mainly on the nature and the amount of the agent inhaled. The immediate and long-term prognosis and possible sequelae are also variable. This review excludes infectious or immunologically induced acute respiratory diseases. PMID:19953031

  18. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Unilateral acute idiopathic maculopathy. 1991.

    PubMed

    Yannuzzi, Lawrence A; Jampol, Lee M; Rabb, Maurice F; Sorenson, John A; Beyrer, Charles; Wilcox, Lloyd M

    2012-02-01

    This is a report of nine patients who experienced sudden, severe, unilateral central vision loss following a flulike illness. Each patient had an exudative detachment of the macula. All patients experienced a spontaneous resolution of the acute macular manifestations with near-complete recovery of vision. A characteristic "bull's-eye" appearance in the macula persisted. The acute manifestations of the disorder did not recur in any of the patients during the period of follow-up. The constellation of findings was suggestive of an inflammatory disease of the retinal pigment epithelium, but a specific causative agent could not be identified. The acute clinical and angiographic features, the natural course, and the residual pigment epithelial derangement were not consistent with any previously described disorder. PMID:22451959

  1. Autophagy in acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Blomgren, Klas; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily ancient mechanism that ensures the lysosomal degradation of old, supernumerary or ectopic cytoplasmic entities. Most eukaryotic cells, including neurons, rely on proficient autophagic responses for the maintenance of homeostasis in response to stress. Accordingly, autophagy mediates neuroprotective effects following some forms of acute brain damage, including methamphetamine intoxication, spinal cord injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage. In some other circumstances, however, the autophagic machinery precipitates a peculiar form of cell death (known as autosis) that contributes to the aetiology of other types of acute brain damage, such as neonatal asphyxia. Here, we dissect the context-specific impact of autophagy on non-infectious acute brain injury, emphasizing the possible therapeutic application of pharmacological activators and inhibitors of this catabolic process for neuroprotection. PMID:27256553

  2. Acute hepatitis after amiodarone infusion

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Paulo; Dias, Adelaide; Gonçalves, Helena; Albuquerque, Aníbal; Gama, Vasco

    2015-01-01

    Acute hepatitis is a very rare, but potentially fatal, adverse effect of intravenous amiodarone. We present a case of an 88-year-old man with history of ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and severely depressed left ventricular function that was admitted to our coronary care unit with diagnosis of decompensated heart failure and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. A few hours after the beginning of intravenous amiodarone he developed an acute hepatitis. There was a completely recovery within the next days after amiodarone withdrawn and other causes of acute hepatitis have been ruled out. This case highlights the need for close monitoring of hepatic function during amiodarone infusion in order to identify any potential hepatotoxicity and prevent a fatal outcome. Oral amiodarone is, apparently, a safe option in these patients. PMID:26488027

  3. Acute silicosis with bilateral pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, G N; Prasad, Rajniti; Meena, Manoj; Hussain, Moosa

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of acute silicosis with bilateral pneumothorax of a 28-year-old man working at a stone crusher factory for 1 year. He presented to the emergency department with cough, respiratory distress and diffuse chest pain. The patient was managed with bilateral intercostal tube drainage under water seal, oxygen inhalation and conservative therapy. On follow-up he showed improvement of resting dyspnoea and was doing well. This case is being reported because of the rare complications of acute silicosis as bilateral pneumothorax. PMID:24862410

  4. The acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pooja

    2015-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure. Its development leads to high rates of mortality, as well as short- and long-term complications, such as physical and cognitive impairment. Therefore, early recognition of this syndrome and application of demonstrated therapeutic interventions are essential to change the natural course of this devastating entity. In this review article, we describe updated concepts in ARDS. Specifically, we discuss the new definition of ARDS, its risk factors and pathophysiology, and current evidence regarding ventilation management, adjunctive therapies, and intervention required in refractory hypoxemia. PMID:25829644

  5. Acute Kidney Injury in Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Karvellas, Constantine J; Durand, Francois; Nadim, Mitra K

    2015-10-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication of end-stage liver disease, especially in those with acute-on-chronic liver failure, occurring in up to 50% of hospitalized patients with cirrhosis. There is no specific blood or urine biomarker that can reliably identify the cause of AKI in cirrhotic patients. This review examines studies used to assess renal dysfunction in cirrhotic patients including new diagnostic criteria and potential novel biomarkers. Although biomarker development to differentiate the cause of AKI in cirrhosis has promise, the utility of biomarkers to determine irreversible renal dysfunction with liver transplant remains lacking, warranting further investigation. PMID:26410141

  6. Acute silicosis with bilateral pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, G N; Prasad, Rajniti; Meena, Manoj; Hussain, Moosa

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of acute silicosis with bilateral pneumothorax of a 28-year-old man working at a stone crusher factory for 1 year. He presented to the emergency department with cough, respiratory distress and diffuse chest pain. The patient was managed with bilateral intercostal tube drainage under water seal, oxygen inhalation and conservative therapy. On follow-up he showed improvement of resting dyspnoea and was doing well. This case is being reported because of the rare complications of acute silicosis as bilateral pneumothorax. PMID:24862410

  7. Acute kidney injury in children.

    PubMed

    Merouani, A; Flechelles, O; Jouvet, P

    2012-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 5% of critically ill hospitalized children and is a risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality. The current review focuses on new definitions of acute kidney injury, standardized to reflect the entire spectrum of the disease, as well as on ongoing research to identify early biomarkers of kidney injury. Its also provides an overview of current practice and available therapies, with emphasis on new strategies for the prevention and pharmacological treatment of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome. Furthermore, a decision-making algorithm is presented for the use of renal replacement therapies in critically ill children with AKI. PMID:22495187

  8. Acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Pal

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication after pediatric cardiac surgery. The definition, staging, risk factors, biomarkers and management of acute kidney injury in children is detailed in the following review article. PMID:27052074

  9. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Classified?

    MedlinePlus

    ... How is acute lymphocytic leukemia treated? How is acute lymphocytic leukemia classified? Most types of cancers are assigned numbered ... ALL are now named as follows: B-cell ALL Early pre-B ALL (also called pro-B ...

  10. Glucose Effect in the Acute Porphyrias

    MedlinePlus

    ... You are here Home Diet and Nutrition The glucose effect in acute porphyrias The disorders Acute Intermittent ... are treated initially with the administration of carbohydrate/glucose. This therapy has its basis in the ability ...

  11. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  12. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  13. General Information about Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: acute promyelocytic leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute myeloid leukemia, a cancer of the blood-forming tissue ( bone marrow ). In normal bone marrow, hematopoietic ... 7186-203. Review. Citation on PubMed de Thé H, Chen Z. Acute promyelocytic leukaemia: novel insights into ...

  15. Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Monoclonal antibodies to treat acute lymphocytic leukemia Targeted therapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia In recent years, new ... These drugs are often referred to as targeted therapy. Some of these drugs can be useful in ...

  16. Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness and Headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mountain Sickness, and Headache Print Email Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness, and Headache ACHE Newsletter Sign up for ... entering your e-mail address below. Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness, and Headache David W. Dodick, MD, FAHS, ...

  17. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  18. Stages of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  20. Optical diagnosis of acute scrotum in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadgan, Babak; Macnab, Andrew; Stothers, Lynn; Nigro, Mark; Afshar, Kourosh; Kajbafzadeh, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    Acute scrotum is a urologic condition defined by scrotal pain, swelling, and redness of acute onset. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are necessary to preserve testicular viability. The history and clinical symptoms reported are key to diagnosis and proper treatment, but are not always readily obtained in children, in whom common causes of acute scrotum include testicular torsion, torsion of the appendix testis, and epididymitis. These acute conditions have different causal pathology that mandate specific treatment, hence the importance of early and accurate diagnosis.

  1. Acute treatment of migraine headaches.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Frederick R

    2010-04-01

    Optimum acute treatment of migraine requires prevention of headache as a top priority. Recognition of the multitude of migraine presentations, the frequency of total headache attacks, and number of days of headache disability are critical. Successful treatment requires excellent patient-clinician communication enhancing confidence and mutual trust based on patient needs and preferences. Optimum management of acute migraine nearly always requires pharmacologic treatment for rapid resolution. Migraine-specific triptans, dihydroergotamine, and several antiinflammatories have substantial empirical clinical efficacy. Older nonspecific drugs, particularly butalbital and opioids, contribute to medication overuse headache and are to be avoided. Clinicians should utilize evidence-based acute migraine-specific therapy stressing the imperative acute treatment goal of early intervention, but not too often with the correct drug, formulation, and dose. This therapy needs to provide cost-effective fast results, meaningful to the patient while minimizing the need for additional drugs. Migraine-ACT evaluates 2-hour pain freedom with return to normal function, comfort with treatment, and consistency of response. Employ a thoroughly educated patient, formulary, testimonials, stratification, and rational cotherapy against the race to central sensitization for optimum outcomes. PMID:20352584

  2. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-01-01

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

  3. [Acute and transient psychotic disorders].

    PubMed

    Marneros, A; Pillmann, F; Haring, A; Balzuweit, S

    2000-04-01

    Psychotic disorders with acute onset, a dramatic and polymorphous symptomatology and rapid resolution have been described in different countries and by different psychiatric schools. They have been called cycloid psychosis, bouffée délirante, psychogenic psychosis or good prognosis schizophrenia. ICD-10 has given an operational definition under the name "acute and transient psychotic disorders" (F23). Their nosological status is unclear. The Halle-Study of acute and transient psychotic disorders (ATPD) has investigated in a prospective manner clinical, para-clinical features and course of illness in 42 patients with ATPD and matched controls with positive schizophrenia, bipolar schizoaffective disorders as well as mentally healthy patients with acute surgical conditions. First results of our study show that ATPD amount to 4% of psychotic in-patients, prefer female sex, show short prodromi, marked affective disturbances within the episode and much better outcome as schizophrenic psychoses according to psychopathological, social, psychological and biographical criteria. Though ATPD may still be an inhomogeneous group, their clinical delineation from schizophrenia seems justified. PMID:10907609

  4. Hypocalcemia in acute pancreatitis revisited

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Armin; Azim, Afzal; Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Hypocalcemia is a frequent finding in acute pancreatitis. Severe hypocalcemia can present with neurological as well as cardiovascular manifestations. Correction of hypocalcemia by parenteral calcium infusion remains a controversial topic as intracellular calcium overload is the central mechanism of acinar cell injury in pancreatitis. The current article deals with the art and science of calcium correction in pancreatitis patients. PMID:27076730

  5. Sildenafil Induced Acute Interstitial Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, Ryan; Shah, Nina; Lewin, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is characterized by inflammation of the renal interstitium and usually occurs in a temporal relationship with the medication. We present a case of an Asian male who had nephrotic range proteinuria and presented with acute kidney injury. The patient reported an acute change in physical appearance and symptomatology after the ingestion of a single dose of sildenafil. Renal biopsy was notable for minimal change disease (MCD) with acute and chronic interstitial nephritis. Renal replacement and glucocorticoid therapy were initiated. Renal recovery within six weeks permitted discontinuation of dialysis. AIN superimposed on MCD is a known association of NSAID induced nephropathy. The temporal association and the absence of any new drugs suggest that the AIN was most likely due to the sildenafil. NSAIDs are less likely to have caused the AIN given their remote use. The ease of steroid responsiveness would also suggest another cause as NSAID induced AIN is often steroid resistant. The MCD was most likely idiopathic given the lack of temporal association with a secondary cause. As the number of sildenafil prescriptions increases, more cases of AIN may be identified and physician awareness for this potential drug disease association is necessary. PMID:26491581

  6. Chest physiotherapy in acute bronchiolitis.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, M S; Martin, J A; Cartlidge, P H; Ng, Y K; Wright, N A

    1985-01-01

    Forty four children with acute bronchiolitis were given twice daily chest physiotherapy in addition to standard supportive measures and were compared with 46 controls who were not given physiotherapy. There was no clinically discernable benefit on the course of their illness. PMID:3907510

  7. Acute and dramatic saxophone penis.

    PubMed

    García-Rodrigo, Carlota Gutiérrez; Maroñas-Jiménez, Lidia; Menis, Diana; Larráin, Hugo; Martínez, Lara Angulo

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of intense genital swelling because of a hereditary angioedema. This rare disease should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute and asymptomatic genital edema, because it may prevent future potentially life-threatening episodes of visceral angioedema. PMID:26752411

  8. Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Thomas; Furman, Janet

    2016-06-01

    Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD) arthropathy, also called pseudogout, is common, and becomes more prevalent as patients age. The presenting symptoms are similar to both gout and septic arthritis but may be treated differently. This article describes a typical patient presentation and management from an emergency medicine and orthopedic surgery standpoint. PMID:27228038

  9. Acute calcific tendinitis in children.

    PubMed

    Lassoued, S; Billey, T; Millet, J P; Henia, A O

    1999-01-01

    Acute calcific tendinitis is uncommon in children. Clinical manifestations are similar to those in adults. The abrupt onset, functional impairment, and frequent presence of fever suggest an infection. Radiographic findings establish the diagnosis, obviating the need for further investigations. PMID:10526384

  10. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  11. [Radionuclide diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis].

    PubMed

    Mil'ko, V I; Moskalenko, N I; Tikhonenko, E P

    1986-01-01

    Nephroscintigraphy using a 67Ga-citrate complex and 99mTc-pyrophosphate was performed in 88 patients with acute pyelonephritis. Nuclide hyperfixation was revealed in 97.8% of the cases. Three groups of patients were singled out on the basis of the intensity of incorporation and nature of the distribution of the radiopharmaceuticals (RP) in the kidneys. In the 1st group the RP incorporation was insignificant but higher than normal values; the RP distribution in the affected kidney was diffuse-inhomogenous. These changes were considered to be typical of acute serous pyelonephritis. In the 2nd and 3rd groups a sharp rise of the RP accumulation was noted, being typical of acute purulent pyelonephritis. One could distinguish between diffuse and focal lesions by the picture of the RP distribution in the renal parenchyma. Diuresis stimulation made it possible to differentiate an actual nuclide fixation during inflammation from nuclide mechanical retention as a result of urine outflow disorder. According to the authors, both radiopharmaceuticals could be applied for the diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis as well as for differential diagnosis of various forms of the disease. PMID:3001474

  12. Acute treatment of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kowey, P R; Marinchak, R A; Rials, S J; Filart, R A

    1998-03-12

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is a common clinical entity, responsible for significant morbidity and mortality, but it also accounts for a large percentage of healthcare dollar expenditures. Efforts to treat this arrhythmia in the past have focused on subacute antithrombotic therapy and eventually use of antiarrhythmic drugs for maintenance of sinus rhythm. However, there has been a growing interest in the concept of acute electrical and pharmacologic conversion. This treatment strategy has a number of benefits, including immediate alleviation of patient symptoms, avoidance of antithrombotic therapy, and prevention of electrophysiologic remodeling, which is thought to contribute to the perpetuation of the arrhythmia. There is also increasing evidence that this is a cost-effective strategy in that it may obviate admission to the hospital and the cost of long-term therapy. This article represents a summary of the treatments that may be used acutely to control the ventricular response to AFib, prevent thromboembolic events, and provide for acute conversion either pharmacologically or electrically. It includes information on modalities that are currently available and those that are under active development. We anticipate that an active, acute treatment approach to AFib and atrial flutter will become the therapeutic norm in the next few years, especially as the benefits of these interventions are demonstrated in clinical trials. PMID:9525568

  13. ACUTE HYDRONEPHROSIS MIMICKING RENAL COLIC

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Donald C.; Kaufman, Joseph J.

    1964-01-01

    Hydronephrosis may be acute, recurrent and related to ingestion of fluid. Frequently a lower polar vessel is an etiological factor. The condition is amenable to corrective operation by a variety of surgical techniques, as in the six cases here reported. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:14154288

  14. Olanzapine use in acute porphyria.

    PubMed

    Horgan, Patrick; Jones, Hugh

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the use of olanzapine in the treatment of a patient with hereditary coproporphyria. This patient suffered from paranoid delusions, poor self-care and anxiety symptoms. The patient was commenced on olanzapine with a good clinical response, and without significant adverse effects. This suggests that olanzapine is a safe and effective treatment of psychotic symptoms in acute porphyrias. PMID:24937245

  15. Thrombolysis for Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Webb, John; Thompson, Christopher

    1992-01-01

    Thrombolysis has an important role in the management of acute myocardial infarction. Early treatment can markedly reduce mortality and morbidity. This new standard of care requires knowledge of accepted indications and contraindications for thrombolysis as well as familiarity with available agents and regimens. ImagesFigure 3 PMID:21221398

  16. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Acute coronary care: Principles and practice

    SciTech Connect

    Califf, R.M.; Wagner, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 58 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radionuclide Techniques for Diagnosing and Sizing of Myocardial Infarction; The Use of Serial Radionuclide Angiography for Monitoring Function during Acute Myocardial Infarction; Hemodynamic Monitoring in Acute Myocardial Infarction; and The Valve of Radionuclide Angiography for Risk Assessment of Patients following Acute Myocardial Infarction.

  19. Cannabis-induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Howaizi, Mehran; Chahine, Mouhamad; Haydar, Fadi; Jemaa, Yassine; Lapoile, Emmanuel

    2012-12-01

    Acute pancreatitis has a large number of causes. Major causes are alcohol and gallstones. Toxic causes, mainly represented by medication-induced pancreatitis account for less than 2% of the cases. Cannabis is an anecdotally reported cause of acute pancreatitis. Six cases have previously been reported. Herein we report a new case of cannabis-induced recurrent acute pancreatitis. PMID:23402090

  20. Towards Prevention of Acute Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A.; Thongprayoon, C.; Pickering, B.W.; Akhoundi, A.; Wilson, G.; Pieczkiewicz, D.; Herasevich, V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Identifying patients at risk for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) before their admission to intensive care is crucial to prevention and treatment. The objective of this study is to determine the performance of an automated algorithm for identifying selected ARDS predisposing conditions at the time of hospital admission. Methods This secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study included 3,005 patients admitted to hospital between January 1 and December 31, 2010. The automated algorithm for five ARDS predisposing conditions (sepsis, pneumonia, aspiration, acute pancreatitis, and shock) was developed through a series of queries applied to institutional electronic medical record databases. The automated algorithm was derived and refined in a derivation cohort of 1,562 patients and subsequently validated in an independent cohort of 1,443 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of an automated algorithm to identify ARDS risk factors were compared with another two independent data extraction strategies, including manual data extraction and ICD-9 code search. The reference standard was defined as the agreement between the ICD-9 code, automated and manual data extraction. Results Compared to the reference standard, the automated algorithm had higher sensitivity than manual data extraction for identifying a case of sepsis (95% vs. 56%), aspiration (63% vs. 42%), acute pancreatitis (100% vs. 70%), pneumonia (93% vs. 62%) and shock (77% vs. 41%) with similar specificity except for sepsis and pneumonia (90% vs. 98% for sepsis and 95% vs. 99% for pneumonia). The PPV for identifying these five acute conditions using the automated algorithm ranged from 65% for pneumonia to 91 % for acute pancreatitis, whereas the NPV for the automated algorithm ranged from 99% to 100%. Conclusion A rule-based electronic data extraction can reliably and accurately identify patients at risk of ARDS at the time of hospital

  1. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-25

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. [Acute respiratory failure in neuromuscular disease].

    PubMed

    Damak, H; Décosterd, D

    2015-09-30

    Neuromuscular diseases can affect all respiratory muscles, leading to acute respiratory failure, which is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in those patients. Two situations must be distinguished. 1) Acute respiratory failure as part of a neuromuscular disorder of acute onset and possibly reversible (Guillain-Barre syndrome, myasthenic crisis...). 2) Acute respiratory failure occurring in a patient with an already advanced neuromuscular disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy...). This article describes the neuromuscular acute respiratory failure in these different aspects, discusses its initial management in the emergency department and identifies the parameters that have to be monitored. PMID:26619704

  3. Acute kidney injury in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Marenzi, Giancarlo; Cosentino, Nicola; Bartorelli, Antonio L

    2015-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly being seen in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs). This condition has a complex pathogenesis, an incidence that can reach 30% and it is associated with higher short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, AKI is still characterised by lack of a single accepted definition, unclear pathophysiology understanding and insensitive diagnostic tools that make its detection difficult, particularly in the setting of ACS. Recent data suggested that patients with AKI during ACS, even those in whom renal function seems to fully recover, face an increased, persisting risk of future AKI and may develop chronic kidney disease. Thus, in these patients, nephrology follow-up, after hospital discharge, and secondary preventive measures should possibly be implemented. In this review, we aim at providing a framework of knowledge to increase cardiologists' awareness of AKI, with the goal of improving the outcome of patients with ACS. PMID:26243789

  4. Tsutsugamushi infection-associated acute rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Young, Park Chi; Hae, Chung Choon; Lee, Kim Hyun; Hoon, Chung Jong

    2003-12-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication that emerges in a variety of infectious diseases, such as tsutsugamushi infection. In this study, we report a 71-year-old female patient with tsutsugamushi infection who exhibiting rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. On admission, an eschar, which is characteristic of tsutsugamushi infection, was found on her right flank area. Moreover, her tsutsugamushi antibody titer was 1:40960. The elevated values of serum creatinine phosphokinase (CPK), aldolase, creatinine and dark brown urine secondary to myoglobinuria are consistent with indications of rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure due to tsutsugamushi infection. Her health improved without any residual effects after treatment with doxycyclin and hydration with normal saline. PMID:14717236

  5. Glucocorticoids improve acute dizziness symptoms following acute unilateral vestibulopathy.

    PubMed

    Batuecas-Caletrío, Angel; Yañez-Gonzalez, Raquel; Sanchez-Blanco, Carmen; Pérez, Pedro Blanco; González-Sanchez, Enrique; Sanchez, Luis Alberto Guardado; Kaski, Diego

    2015-11-01

    Acute unilateral vestibulopathy (AUV) is characterized by acute vertigo, nausea, and imbalance without neurological deficits or auditory symptomatology. Here, we explore the effect of glucocorticoid treatment on the degree of canal paresis in patients with AUV, and critically, establish its relationship with dizziness symptom recovery. We recruited consecutive patients who were retrospectively assigned to one of the two groups according to whether they received glucocorticoid treatment (n = 32) or not (n = 44). All patients underwent pure-tone audiometry, bithermal caloric testing, MRI brain imaging, and were asked to complete a dizziness handicap inventory on admission to hospital and just prior to hospital discharge. In the treatment group, the canal paresis at discharge was significantly lower than in the control group (mean ± SD % 38.04 ± 21.57 versus 82.79 ± 21.51, p < 0.001). We also observed a significant reduction in the intensity of nystagmus in patients receiving glucocorticoid treatment compared to the non-treatment group (p = 0.03). DHI test score was significantly lower at discharge in the treatment group (mean ± SD % 23.15 ± 12.40 versus 64.07 ± 12.87, p < 0.001), as was the length of hospital stay (2.18 ± 1.5 days versus 3.6 ± 1.7 days, p = 0.002). Glucocorticoid treatment leads to acute symptomatic improvement, with a reduced hospital stay and reduction in the intensity of acute nystagmus. Our findings suggest that glucocorticoids may accelerate vestibular compensation via a restoration of peripheral vestibular function, and therefore has important clinical implications for the treatment of AUV. PMID:26459091

  6. Acute pyelonephritis can have serious complications.

    PubMed

    Shields, Joanne; Maxwell, Alexander P

    2010-04-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) may predominantly involve the lower urinary tract, i.e. acute cystitis, or upper urinary tract consisting of the renal pelvis and kidney,, i.e. acute pyelonephritis The incidence of acute pyelonephritis is higher in young women than in men but the incidence in men over 65 is similar to that in older women. Women have up to a 10% risk of recurrent acute pyelonephritis in the year following a first acute episode. The equivalent risk in men is 6%. Acute pyelonephritis may be uncomplicated and resolve without serious sequelae. A minority of episodes may be complicated by acute kidney injury, papillary necrosis, renal or perinephric abscess or the development of emphysematous pyelonephritis. Acute pyelonephritis is generally caused by microorganisms ascending from the urethra via the bladder into the upper urinary tract. Rarely the kidney may be seeded by blood-borne infection. Ecoli is the most common uropathogen causing pyelonephritis accounting for 70-90% of infections. Species of Enterococci, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, Proteus and Staphylococci are responsible for the remaining infections. There is a rising incidence in the community of UTI with bacteria that produce extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) enzymes. These ESBL bacteria have developed resistance to antibiotics such as penicillin, cephalosporins and increasingly to quinolones. Risk factors for uncomplicated acute pyelonephritis include recent sexual intercourse, acute cystitis, stress incontinence and diabetes and for complicated acute pyelonephritis include pregnancy, diabetes, anatomical abnormalities of the urinary tract and renal calculi. PMID:20486480

  7. Acute Respiratory Distress in Children: Croup and Acute Asthma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, B S; Shekhawat, Dhananjay S; Sharma, Prity; Meena, Chetan; Mohan, Hari

    2015-07-01

    Acute respiratory distress is one of the most common reason for emergency visits in children under 5 y of age. An accurate understanding of the epidemiology of these diseases, identification of risk factors and etiology is critical for successful treatment and prevention of related mortality. The cause of acute respiratory distress varies in etiology, and hence is amenable to different treatment modalities. Depending on the predominant symptoms and signs, a child presenting to the clinician can be divided into six groups, viz., stridor; cough, fever and difficulty in breathing or fast breathing; wheezing; mediastinal shift with severe respiratory distress; slow or irregular breathing in absence of any pulmonary sign; and respiratory distress with cardiac findings. A detailed history followed by a thorough clinical examination and laboratory evaluation assisted by imaging modalities if indicated, helps to establish the exact cause of respiratory distress in the child. Early recognition and prompt institution of appropriate management or referral can significantly improve the outcome of this illness. This article offers clinicians a brief update on the general management guidelines of respiratory distress in pediatric patients. Specific treatment depends on the exact cause, however croup and acute severe asthma have been discussed in this article. PMID:25257964

  8. Acute reference doses: theory and practical approaches.

    PubMed

    Moretto, A

    2000-07-01

    The approach of the Joint Meeting on Pesticide Residues to the establishment of the acute reference dose for pesticides is presented and related issues are discussed. Three main points seem relevant when discussing the acute reference dose: (1) what compounds should have an acute reference dose, (2) what toxicological database is required for the establishment of an acute reference dose; (3) what safety factors are to be used. It is concluded that (1) groups of compounds that need an acute reference dose can be identified, whereas general rules for identifying groups not requiring an acute reference dose cannot be easily given; (2) studies from the standard toxicological database can often be used to allocate an acute reference dose and the usefulness of refinements (by requesting specific studies) should be evaluated after intake assessment; general rules on study requirements cannot be easily given; (3) more thought should be given to what safety factors apply in certain circumstances. PMID:10983586

  9. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Advances in predicting acute GVHD

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Andrew C.; Ferrara, James L.M.; Levine, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a leading cause of non-relapse mortality following allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation. Attempts to improve treatment response in clinically-established GVHD have not improved overall survival, often due to the increased risk of infectious complications. Alternative approaches to decrease GVHD-related morbidity and mortality have focused on the ability to predict GVHD prior to clinical manifestation in an effort to provide an opportunity to abort GVHD development, and to gain new insights into GVHD pathophysiology. This review outlines the research efforts to date that have identified clinical and laboratory-based factors that are predictive of acute GVHD and describes future directions in developing algorithms that will improve the ability to predict the development of clinically relevant GVHD. PMID:23205489

  11. Exenatide induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Aijazi, Ishma; Abdulla, Fadhil M; Zuberi, Beyla J; Elhassan, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Exenatide is an incretin mimetic. It was approved by the federal drug authority in 2005 for the treatment of type-2 diabetes. Since it is a relatively new medicine clinicians have limited experience with regards to its side effects and safety profile. We report a 47 year old lady who presented with exenatide associated acute kidney injury. She had type-2 diabetes for 10 years with mild micro albuminuria and normal renal functions. She was also taking a stable dose of metformin, gliclazide, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and diuretic for over a year and there was no history of any recent use of non-steroid anti-inflammatory medications. One week after starting exenatide, she developed severe vomiting, followed by hypotension. She presented with acute renal insufficiency and severe lactic acidosis and had to be dialyzed on emergency basis. To our knowledge this is probably the first case reported in the local United Arab Emirate (U.A.E) population. PMID:25672206

  12. Acute exposure to rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Dire, D J; Wilkinson, J A

    1987-01-01

    Rhodamine B is a red colored dye that is used in cosmetic products. We report a case of 17 patients who were exposed to aerosolized Rhodamine B inside a maintenance shop. The mean duration of exposure was 26 minutes (range 2-65). Sixteen of the patients (94%) complained of acute symptoms including: burning of the eyes (82%), excessive tearing (47%), nasal burning (41%), nasal itching (35%), chest pain/tightness (35%), rhinorhea (29%), cough (29%), dyspnea (29%), burning of the throat (24%), burning/pruritic skin (24%), chest burning (12%), headache (6%), and nausea (6%). All of the patients had resolution of their symptoms within 24 hours (less than 4 hours in 63%). Acute exposure to Rhodamine B resulted in transient mucous membrane and skin irritation without evidence of serious sequellae. PMID:3446824

  13. Acute Werdnig-Hoffmann disease

    PubMed Central

    Pearn, J. H.; Wilson, J.

    1973-01-01

    76 cases of acute Werdnig-Hoffmann disease (acute infantile spinal muscular atrophy) have been reviewed. The cases comprise an unselected consecutive series in which rigid diagnostic criteria have been applied. The natural history of the disease has been investigated. In at least one-third of cases the disease is manifest before or at delivery. All cases have shown delayed milestones by 5 months of age: 95% are dead by 18 months. Cumulative frequency curves for age at onset and age at death figures are presented for use both as prognostic guidelines and as aids in the management of sibs of index cases. Diagnosis, management, and genetic implications are discussed. ImagesFIG. 1 PMID:4712772

  14. Acute onset of postoperative syringohydromyelia.

    PubMed

    Rao, K Santosh Mohan; Balasubramaniam, Chidambaram; Subramaniam, K

    2015-01-01

    Syringohydromyelia is a frequent finding in cases of tethered cord syndrome. The classical teaching is that the development and progression of a syrinx is a chronic process. We present a case report of an acute onset syringomyelia in an infant, who underwent an excision of a lumbosacral transitional lipoma and detethering of the cord. Immediately after recovery, the infant was found to have flaccid paraplegia. An emergency magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large acute onset syringomyelia for which he underwent an emergency midline myelotomy and release of fluid from the syrinx. Though the eventual recovery was good, this made us re-visit our understanding of the concept of syringohydromyelia. The case details and a plausible hypothesis for the rapid development of the syrinx are presented. PMID:26557165

  15. Clinical cases in acute intoxication.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sean B; Maguire, Jennifer; Mauck, Karen F

    2009-12-01

    Over 2.5 million accidental and intentional drug-related poisonings are reported annually in the United States. Early diagnosis and management of patients who present with acute intoxication can significantly reduce both morbidity and mortality. The initial evaluation of patients with suspected or proven intoxications should focus on hemodynamic stability, mental status, and respiratory function. However, early recognition of toxic ingestion is paramount to implementing life-saving treatments. Important historical clues are often found in a social history that considers intravenous drug use, alcohol use, and any access or exposure to illicit substances. A patient's medication list should also be scrutinized for psychoactive or sedative medications, such as tricyclic antidepressants or opioids. In this article we present case-based discussions of the specific diagnosis and management of 5 commonly occurring acute intoxication syndromes. PMID:20877175

  16. Recognising and managing acute hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Keane, Matthew

    2014-02-01

    A significant amount of clinicians' time is spent managing patients with complications arising from the use of sympatheticomimetic drugs such as cocaine and ecstasy, or MDMA. This article examines one of these complications, namely acute hyponatraemia, which can have life-threatening neurological consequences. Although there are few signs or symptoms of this condition, emergency clinicians should be able to recognise when it may have occurred, and should have a basic understanding of the role of sodium in autoregulation of cellular function, the different fluid compartments in the human body and the pathology of cerebral oedema. The article describes the importance of early recognition and swift treatment of acute hyponatraemia, as well as the methods for calculating fluid replacement to optimise chances of full recovery. PMID:24494770

  17. Acute onset of postoperative syringohydromyelia

    PubMed Central

    Rao, K. Santosh Mohan; Balasubramaniam, Chidambaram; Subramaniam, K.

    2015-01-01

    Syringohydromyelia is a frequent finding in cases of tethered cord syndrome. The classical teaching is that the development and progression of a syrinx is a chronic process. We present a case report of an acute onset syringomyelia in an infant, who underwent an excision of a lumbosacral transitional lipoma and detethering of the cord. Immediately after recovery, the infant was found to have flaccid paraplegia. An emergency magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large acute onset syringomyelia for which he underwent an emergency midline myelotomy and release of fluid from the syrinx. Though the eventual recovery was good, this made us re-visit our understanding of the concept of syringohydromyelia. The case details and a plausible hypothesis for the rapid development of the syrinx are presented. PMID:26557165

  18. Acute oesophageal necrosis (black oesophagus).

    PubMed

    Galtés, Ignasi; Gallego, María Ángeles; Esgueva, Raquel; Martin-Fumadó, Carles

    2016-03-01

    A 54-year-old man was admitted to hospital after being found unconscious in his home. He had a history of alcoholism, multiple drug addictions, and type I diabetes mellitus. At admission, he had hyperglycaemia (550 mg/dL) with glucosuria and ketone bodies in the urine, along with septic shock refractory to bilateral alveolar infiltrates and severe respiratory failure. The patient died 24 hours post admission due to multiple organ failure, with diabetic ketoacidosis decompensated by possible respiratory infection in a patient with polytoxicomania. The autopsy confirmed the presence of acute bilateral bronchopneumonia, chronic pancreatitis, severe hepatic steatosis, and generalized congestive changes. At the oesophagus, acute oesophageal necrosis was evident. PMID:26949146

  19. Acute care of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Gutman, M. B.; Lee, T. F.; Gin, K.; Ho, K.

    1996-01-01

    Patients with acute myocardial infarct (AMI) need rapid diagnosis and prompt initiation of thrombolytic therapy. Patients with suspected cardiac ischemia must receive a coordinated team response by the emergency room staff including rapid electrocardiographic analysis and a quick but thorough history and physical examination to diagnose AMI. Thrombolysis and adjunct therapies should be administered promptly when indicated. The choice of thrombolytics is predicated by the location of the infarct. PMID:8754702

  20. Acute Esophageal Necrosis: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Inayat, Faisal; Hurairah, Abu; Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN) or “black esophagus” is a rare clinical entity with an unclear etiology. It is diagnosed at upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with the presence of strikingly black necrotic esophagus. The treatment is primarily medical, but the prognosis is generally poor due to advanced age and comorbid illnesses in patients who develop AEN. Herein, we discussed the implications of poor glycemic control in regards with AEN and undertook a literature review of this rare diagnosis. PMID:27583242