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Sample records for acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis

  1. Pathogenic mechanism of acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Nordstrand, A; Norgren, M; Holm, S E

    1999-01-01

    Considerable knowledge has been accumulated regarding the characteristics of acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN), and many attempts have been made to identify a streptococcal factor or factors responsible for triggering this disease. However, the pathogenic mechanism behind APSGN remains largely unknown. As glomerular deposition of C3 is generally demonstrated before that of IgG in the disease process, it is likely that the inflammatory response is initiated by renal deposition of a streptococcal product, rather than by deposition of antibodies or pre-formed immune complexes. During recent years, a number of streptococcal products have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenic process. In this review, possible roles of these factors are discussed in the context of the clinical and renal findings most often demonstrated in patients with APSGN. Streptokinase was observed to be required in order to induce signs of APSGN in mice, and a number of findings suggest that the initiation of the disease may occur as a result of renal binding by certain nephritis-associated variants of this protein. However, additional factors may be required for the development of the disease. PMID:10680980

  2. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in a patient with acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis caused by impetigo.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masahiro; Yamakawa, Hideaki; Yabe, Masami; Ishikawa, Takeo; Takagi, Masamichi; Matsumoto, Kei; Hamaguchi, Akihiko; Ogura, Makoto; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    We herein report a case of pulmonary renal syndrome with nephritis in a 17-year-old boy with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) associated with acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). The patient exhibited hemoptysis two weeks after developing impetigo, and DAH was diagnosed on bronchoscopy. Respiratory failure progressed, and high-dose methylprednisolone therapy was administered; the respiratory failure regressed immediately after the onset of therapy. Streptococcus pyogenes was detected in an impetigo culture, and, together with the results of the renal biopsy, a diagnosis of APSGN was made. This case demonstrates the effects of high-dose methylprednisolone therapy in improving respiratory failure. PMID:25876581

  3. IgA-dominant acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis with concomitant rheumatic fever successfully treated with steroids: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rus, Rina R; Toplak, Nataša; Vizjak, Alenka; Mraz, Jerica; Ferluga, Dušan

    2015-12-01

    There are only a few reports of the co-occurrence of acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APGN) and acute rheumatic fever. We report an unusual case of a 3-year-old boy with nephrotic syndrome and acute renal failure with the transitional need for peritoneal dialysis, biopsy-proven atypical IgA-dominant APGN, and concomitant acute rheumatic fever, successfully treated by steroids. Aggressive treatment with pulses of methylprednisolone proved to be successful and we recommend its use in this type of cases. PMID:26718763

  4. IgA-dominant acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis with concomitant rheumatic fever successfully treated with steroids: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Rus, Rina R; Toplak, Nataša; Vizjak, Alenka; Mraz, Jerica; Ferluga, Dušan

    2015-01-01

    There are only a few reports of the co-occurrence of acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APGN) and acute rheumatic fever. We report an unusual case of a 3-year-old boy with nephrotic syndrome and acute renal failure with the transitional need for peritoneal dialysis, biopsy-proven atypical IgA-dominant APGN, and concomitant acute rheumatic fever, successfully treated by steroids. Aggressive treatment with pulses of methylprednisolone proved to be successful and we recommend its use in this type of cases. PMID:26718763

  5. Acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, N

    2000-09-01

    Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) is a representative disease of acute nephritic syndrome characterized by the sudden appearance of edema, hematuria, proteinuria, and hypertension. The prototype of AGN is acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). "Nephritogenic streptococci" are defined as organisms that are cultured from a patient who develops AGN. Although only a limited number of M-types of streptococci have been recognized as "nephritogenic streptococci", all M-types of streptococci may have nephritogenic potential because the genes for major putative nephritogenic antigens such as SPEB and NAPIr are found to be present in all group A streptococci thus far examined. Pathogenic mechanisms for APSGN involving both humoral and cell-mediated immunity have been recently proposed. The role of humoral immunity is presumed to be mediated by the in situ formation of nephritogenic streptococcal antigen-antibody complexes and circulating immune complexes. While in the cellular immune component a role for delayed-type hypersensitivity has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of APSGN. PMID:10969898

  6. Staphylococcus-related glomerulonephritis and poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis: why defining "post" is important in understanding and treating infection-related glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Glassock, Richard J; Alvarado, Anthony; Prosek, Jason; Hebert, Courtney; Parikh, Samir; Satoskar, Anjali; Nadasdy, Tibor; Forman, John; Rovin, Brad; Hebert, Lee A

    2015-06-01

    A spate of recent publications describes a newly recognized form of glomerulonephritis associated with active staphylococcal infection. The key kidney biopsy findings, glomerular immunoglobulin A (IgA) deposits dominant or codominant with IgG deposits, resemble those of IgA nephritis. Many authors describe this condition as "postinfectious" and have termed it "poststaphylococcal glomerulonephritis." However, viewed through the prism of poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis, the prefix "post" in poststaphylococcal glomerulonephritis is historically incorrect, illogical, and misleading with regard to choosing therapy. There are numerous reports describing the use of high-dose steroids to treat poststaphylococcal glomerulonephritis. The decision to use steroid therapy suggests that the treating physician believed that the dominant problem was a postinfectious glomerulonephritis, not the infection itself. Unfortunately, steroid therapy in staphylococcus-related glomerulonephritis can precipitate severe staphylococcal sepsis and even death and provides no observable benefits. Poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis is an authentic postinfectious glomerulonephritis; poststaphylococcal glomerulonephritis is not. Making this distinction is important from the perspective of history, pathogenesis, and clinical management. PMID:25890425

  7. Post-streptococcal reactive arthritis in children: a distinct entity from acute rheumatic fever

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    There is a debate whether post-streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA) is a separate entity or a condition on the spectrum of acute rheumatic fever (ARF). We believe that PSRA is a distinct entity and in this paper we review the substantial differences between PSRA and ARF. We show how the demographic, clinical, genetic and treatment characteristics of PSRA differ from ARF. We review diagnostic criteria and regression formulas that attempt to classify patients with PSRA as opposed to ARF. The important implication of these findings may relate to the issue of prophylactic antibiotics after PSRA. However, future trials will be necessary to conclusively answer that question. PMID:22013970

  8. Properdin and C3 Proactivator: Alternate Pathway Components in Human Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Robert H.; Michael, Alfred F.

    1973-01-01

    Serological and immunopathological studies of human glomerulonephritis have suggested that alternate pathways of activation of the third component of complement may be important in some forms of glomerulonephritis. We have investigated the role of two alternate pathway proteins, properdin and C3 proactivator, in 22 patients with chronic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, 21 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, 20 patients with acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis, and 19 patients with other forms of renal disease. C3 (measured at β1A), properdin, and C3 proactivator were assayed by single radial immunodiffusion. In sera with low β1A (< 2 SD), mean properdin was most significantly decreased in patients with acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis but was also significantly decreased in chronic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and in untreated systemic lupus erythematosus. Properdin levels in other renal disease, acute glomerulonephritis, and chronic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with normal β1A levels were not significantly different from normal. A positive correlation between β1A and properdin levels in individual sera was present in all diseases except systemic lupus erythematosus. Serum C3 proactivator was markedly decreased in active systemic lupus erythematosus and there was a positive correlation between β1A and C3 proactivator levels in systemic lupus erythematosus and other renal diseases but not acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis. Properdin in fresh sera from four patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and five with chronic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis showed increased migration toward the cathode on immunoelectrophoresis, suggesting in vivo change of the properdin molecule. The observation of reduced serum levels of properdin and C3 proactivator and altered electrophoretic migration of properdin in some patients with glomerulonephritis provide new evidence for participation of these

  9. Glomerulonephritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that suppress the immune system A procedure called plasmapheresis may sometimes be used for glomerulonephritis caused by ... Saunders; 2012:chap 32. Cattran DC, Reigh HN. Overview of therapy for glomerular disease. In: Taal MW, ...

  10. Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (GN)

    MedlinePlus

    ... following: Decreased urine output Rust-colored urine Swelling (edema), general swelling, swelling of the abdomen, swelling of ... A physical examination shows swelling (edema), especially in the ... to the heart and lungs with a stethoscope ( auscultation ). Blood ...

  11. Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (GN)

    MedlinePlus

    ... following: Decreased urine output Rust-colored urine Swelling (edema), general swelling, swelling of the abdomen, swelling of ... Exams and Tests A physical examination shows swelling (edema), especially in the face. Abnormal sounds may be ...

  12. Cerebral venous thrombosis in a patient with acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Morkhandikar, S; Priyamvada, P S; Srinivas, B H; Parameswaran, S

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis of the cerebral venous sinuses (CVT) is described in nephrotic syndrome. A 13-year-old girl was admitted with acute post-infectious glomerulonephritis (APIGN). Subsequently she developed recurrent seizures with focal neurological deficits. On evaluation, she was found to have CVT. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of CVT in APIGN. Identifying this complication is imperative, as timely diagnosis and treatment could be lifesaving. PMID:27194837

  13. Streptococcal Infection-related Nephritis (SIRN) Manifesting Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis Type I.

    PubMed

    Iseri, Ken; Iyoda, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Yasutaka; Kobayashi, Naoto; Oda, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Yutaka; Shibata, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the case of an 18-year-old boy who developed nephrotic syndrome and hypertension after upper airway inflammation. Post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis was diagnosed on the basis of a high antistreptolysin O titer, hypocomplementemia, proteinuria, and microscopic hematuria. A renal biopsy was performed due to persistent proteinuria, and the pathological diagnosis was membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) type I. Glomeruli showed positive staining for nephritis-associated plasmin receptor (NAPlr), a nephritogenic group A streptococcal antigen, and plasmin activity was found in a similar distribution as NAPlr deposition. This rare case of streptococcal infection-related nephritis (SIRN) manifesting MPGN type I supports the histological diversity of SIRN. PMID:26984084

  14. HBV-Associated Postinfectious Acute Glomerulonephritis: A Report of 10 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Junxia; Peng, Weihua; Yu, Guoqing; Wang, Liping; Chen, Jian; Zheng, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Postinfectious acute glomerulonephritis (PIGN) may occur after various bacterial and viral infections. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a cause of chronic glomerulonephritis. We report here 10 cases (ages 7–20 years-old) of chronic HBV carriers with acute glomerulonephritis, with positive glomerular staining of hepatitis B surface antigen, and detectable presence of HBV DNA in the glomeruli. This form of PIGN, HBV-PIGN, has not been previously identified. To further characterize clinical and pathological features of HBV- PIGN, we selected 10 cases of age-matched non-HBV PIGN for comparison. While both HBV associated PIGN and non-HBV PIGN similarly presented as proteinuria, hematuria, and hypertension, there was a trend of higher acute kidney injury and worsened prognosis in HBV-PIGN. 6 months after the onset, 4 patients with HBV associated PIGN did not show improvement from the disease, whereas all patients with non-HBV PIGN had complete or partial recovery. Pathologically, both HBV associated PIGN and non-HBV PIGN showed typical diffuse glomerular endocapillary proliferation, but HBV associated PIGN differed from classical PIGN with much fewer sub-epithelial glomerular “hump-shape” immune complex depositions. In conclusion, we have identified a novel association of HBV infection with acute glomerulonephritis. PMID:27512989

  15. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis

    MedlinePlus

    Membranoproliferative GN I; Membranoproliferative GN II; Mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis; Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis; Lobular GN; Glomerulonephritis - membranoproliferative; MPGN type I; MPGN type ...

  16. Coexistence of Acute Crescent Glomerulonephritis and IgG4-Related Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zeyuan; Yin, Jianyong; Bao, Hongda; Jiao, Qiong; Wu, Huijuan; Wu, Rui; Xue, Qin; Wang, Niansong; Zhang, Zhigang; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a fibroinflammatory disorder that may involve almost each organ or system. IgG4-related kidney disease (IgG4-RKD) refers to renal lesions associated with IgG4-RD. The most frequent morphological type of renal lesions is IgG4-related tubulointerstitial nephritis (IgG4-TIN) which is associated with increased IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration and interstitial fibrosis. Case Report Herein, we present a rare case with coexisting IgG4-RKD and acute crescent glomerulonephritis with concomitant severe tubulointerstitial lesions instead of classic IgG4-TIN. Conclusion IgG4-RKD and acute crescent glomerulonephritis can occur in the same patient. This case may give us a clearer viewpoint of the disease. PMID:27504450

  17. Acute glomerulonephritis in children of the Niger Delta region of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    McGil Ugwu, G I

    2015-09-01

    A three-year retrospective study was conducted to determine the incidence, pattern of presentation and other clinical and biochemical features as well as outcome of treatment of patients admitted with acute glomerulonephritis at the Delta State University Teaching Hospital, Oghara and GN Children's Clinic, Warri. The case notes of all the children who presented with renal diseases from January 2010 to December 2012 were retrieved and those with acute glomerulonephritis were analyzed. A total of 20 patients (13 male and seven female) with acute glomerulonephritis were seen during the three-year period under review. Twelve patients (60%) were from the low socioeconomic class, six (30%) from the middle class and only two (10%) were from the high-income group. The presentation of the illness was most common between October and January. The age range of the patients was three to 13 years, with an average age of eight years. Seventeen (85%) of the patients were in the school-going age group (>5 years to 10 years). The most common symptom/sign noted was anemia in 90% of the patients, followed by oliguria/anuria and edema seen in 80% of the patients. Seventy percent of the patients had cola-colored urine, while 55% had hypertension. Some patients gave a history suggestive of previous streptococcal infection. More patients had sore throat (25%) than skin infection (10%). All the patients had proteinuria, while 90% had hematuria. The most common complication was acute kidney injury, seen in eight (40%) of the patients, followed by hypertensive encephalopathy, which occurred in three (15%) patients. Most patients (60%) were hospitalized for one to two weeks. The outcome of the management of these patients showed 14 (70%) of the patients recovered fully while three (15%) had persistent hematuria and two (10%) had persistent proteinuria. Ninety-five percent of the patients recovered from the acute illness and one patient (5%), a boy aged nine years old, died. PMID:26354592

  18. IL-17 Expression in the Time Course of Acute Anti-Thy1 Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Loof, Tanja; Krämer, Stephanie; Gaedeke, Jens; Neumayer, Hans-Hellmut; Peters, Harm

    2016-01-01

    Background Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is a new pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in immune response and inflammatory disease. The main source of IL-17 is a subset of CD4+ T-helper cells, but is also secreted by non-immune cells. The present study analyzes expression of IL-17 in the time course of acute anti-thy1 glomerulonephritis and the role of IL-17 as a potential link between inflammation and fibrosis. Methods Anti-thy1 glomerulonephritis was induced into male Wistar rats by OX-7 antibody injection. After that, samples were taken on days 1, 5, 10 (matrix expansion phase), 15 and 20 (resolution phase). PBS-injected animals served as controls. Proteinuria and histological matrixes score served as the main markers for disease severity. In in vitro experiments, NRK-52E cells were used. For cytokine expressions, mRNA and protein levels were analyzed by utilizing RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence. Results Highest IL-17 mRNA-expression (6.50-fold vs. con; p<0.05) was found on day 5 after induction of anti-thy1 glomerulonephritis along the maximum levels of proteinuria (113 ± 13 mg/d; p<0.001), histological glomerular-matrix accumulation (82%; p<0.001) and TGF-β1 (2.2-fold; p<0.05), IL-6 mRNA expression (36-fold; p<0.05). IL-17 protein expression co-localized with the endothelial cell marker PECAM in immunofluorescence. In NRK-52E cells, co-administration of TGF-β1 and IL-6 synergistically up-regulated IL-17 mRNA 4986-fold (p<0.001). Conclusions The pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 is up-regulated in endothelial cells during the time course of acute anti-thy1 glomerulonephritis. In vitro, NRK-52E cells secrete IL-17 under pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory conditions. PMID:27243813

  19. Mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis with acute tubule interstitial nephritis leading to acute kidney injury in influenza A (H1N1) infection

    PubMed Central

    Kute, V. B.; Vanikar, A. V.; Shah, P. R.; Gumber, M. R.; Patel, H. V.; Trivedi, H. L.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory complications and renal failure are the leading causes for morbidity and mortality due to influenza (H1N1) virus infection. There has been limited information on histopathology of H1N1 influenza-related acute kidney injury (AKI). We describe AKI with H1N1 infection in a 52-year-old female. Renal biopsy showed mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis with acute tubule interstitial nephritis. Her condition improved rapidly with oseltamivir, fluid replacement, steroid and dialysis. Our case suggests that H1N1 infection may have a causative link to the development of mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis with acute tubulointerstitial nephritis. PMID:24701045

  20. Acute Glomerulonephritis in a Child with Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Falsaperla, Raffaele; Giunta, Leandra; Spataro, Giuseppina; Rapisarda, Venerando; Velardita, Mario; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Pavone, Piero

    2013-01-01

    Background. Infectious diseases seem to be an important and independent risk factor for renal failure, but the underlying mechanism of renal involvement during some kinds of infectious diseases is still unclear, even if the literature data report immunomediated and/or autoimmune mechanisms to explain the pathogenic relationship between the two diseases. In paediatric patients, Chlamydia pneumoniae is a rare cause of renal complications and it may manifest in several ways, mainly involving the respiratory system, even if also renal and glomerulalr complications, have been described. Case Diagnosis/Treatment. Herein we report a case of a 3-year-old child who developed an acute glomerulonephritis that was chronologically, clinically, and biologically related to a previous Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. On our knowledge, in the literature it is the youngest patient with renal involvement during course of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection ever reported. Conclusions. The present case supports the hypothesis of a rather close causal relationship between this infective agent and renal and glomerular symptoms occurred in this child, during an acute episode of respiratory disease. PMID:23970901

  1. Acute Glomerulonephritis in a Child with Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Vitaliti, Giovanna; Falsaperla, Raffaele; Giunta, Leandra; Spataro, Giuseppina; Rapisarda, Venerando; Velardita, Mario; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Pavone, Piero

    2013-01-01

    Background. Infectious diseases seem to be an important and independent risk factor for renal failure, but the underlying mechanism of renal involvement during some kinds of infectious diseases is still unclear, even if the literature data report immunomediated and/or autoimmune mechanisms to explain the pathogenic relationship between the two diseases. In paediatric patients, Chlamydia pneumoniae is a rare cause of renal complications and it may manifest in several ways, mainly involving the respiratory system, even if also renal and glomerulalr complications, have been described. Case Diagnosis/Treatment. Herein we report a case of a 3-year-old child who developed an acute glomerulonephritis that was chronologically, clinically, and biologically related to a previous Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. On our knowledge, in the literature it is the youngest patient with renal involvement during course of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection ever reported. Conclusions. The present case supports the hypothesis of a rather close causal relationship between this infective agent and renal and glomerular symptoms occurred in this child, during an acute episode of respiratory disease. PMID:23970901

  2. Focal mesangial-sclerosing glomerulonephritis and acute-spontaneous infectious canine hepatitis: structural, immunohistochemical and subcellular studies.

    PubMed

    Hervás, J; Gómez-Villamandos, J C; Pérez, J; Carrasco, L; Sierra, M A

    1997-06-01

    The glomerular alterations observed in a dog with acute spontaneous infectious canine hepatitis (ICH) are described. Histologic changes of the glomeruli were enlargement of the mesangium with presence of intranuclear inclusion bodies and without proliferation of mesangial cells. Electron microscopy revealed adenovirus replication sites in glomerular mesangial cells and in endothelial cells of glomerular capillaries, as well as a focal mesangial-sclerosing glomerulonephritis associated with electron dense deposits which were closely related with extracellular ICH viral particles and immunohistochemically reactive for immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgA, IgM and C3c complement components. PMID:9239835

  3. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  4. The Role of Nephritis-Associated Plasmin Receptor (NAPlr) in Glomerulonephritis Associated with Streptococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Takashi; Yoshizawa, Nobuyuki; Yamakami, Kazuo; Sakurai, Yutaka; Takechi, Hanako; Yamamoto, Kojiro; Oshima, Naoki; Kumagai, Hiroo

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that glomerulonephritis can occur after streptococcal infection, which is classically referred to as acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). The pathogenic mechanism of APSGN has been described by so-called immune complex theory, which involves glomerular deposition of nephritogenic streptococcal antigen and subsequent formation of immune complexes in situ and/or the deposition of circulating antigen-antibody complexes. However, the exact entity of the causative antigen has remained a matter of debate. We isolated a nephritogenic antigen for APSGN from the cytoplasmic fractions of group A streptococcus (GAS) depending on the affinity for IgG of APSGN patients. The amino acid and the nucleotide sequences of the isolated protein revealed to be highly identical to those of reported plasmin(ogen) receptor of GAS. Thus, we termed this antigen nephritis-associated plasmin receptor (NAPlr). Immunofluorescence staining of the renal biopsy tissues with anti-NAPlr antibody revealed glomerular NAPlr deposition in essentially all patients with early-phase APSGN. Furthermore, glomerular plasmin activity was detected by in situ zymography in the distribution almost identical to NAPlr deposition in renal biopsy tissues of APSGN patients. These data suggest that NAPlr has a direct, nonimmunologic function as a plasmin receptor and may contribute to the pathogenesis of APSGN by maintaining plasmin activity. PMID:23118507

  5. New trends of an old disease: the acute post infectious glomerulonephritis at the beginning of the new millenium.

    PubMed

    Stratta, Piero; Musetti, Claudio; Barreca, Antonella; Mazzucco, Gianna

    2014-06-01

    The association between acute renal disease and infection has been known since the mid '800s: acute post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) is a reactive immunological process against the kidney secondary to an infection, classically caused by a Streptococcus. The typical clinical presentation of PIGN is an acute nephritic syndrome with macro- or microscopic hematuria, proteinuria, hypertension, edema and renal function impairment of variable degree. The histology is characterized by an intracapillary glomerular proliferation, but may rarely be associated with an extracapillary proliferation. The classical childhood form is still present nowadays, even with severe cases, in developing countries, while in the last decades it almost disappeared in industrialized countries, where post-infectious GN are often found in elderly patients with multiple comorbidities. These clinical variants are usually related to other infective agents, like Staphylococcus aureus, both methicillin resistant (MRSA) and susceptible, and may be characterized by an IgA-dominant deposition. Kidney biopsy is rarely needed, especially in the child, while in the adult or old patient a biopsy is warranted if there is an atypical presentation or evolution, like rapidly progressive renal failure, absent or delayed function recovery, persisting low C3, nephrotic range proteinuria and persisting high proteinuria. Current therapy strategies rely on culture-guided systemic antibiotics, especially in the old patient, in which MRSA are relatively frequent, support therapy and only in very selected cases on steroids. These latter cases include the rare PIGN with crescents and those with a severe interstitial inflammation. PMID:24777751

  6. Temporal Changes in Post-Infectious Glomerulonephritis in Japan (1976-2009)

    PubMed Central

    Usui, Joichi; Tawara-Iida, Takashi; Takada, Kenji; Ebihara, Itaru; Ueda, Atsushi; Iwabuchi, Satoshi; Ishizu, Takashi; Iitsuka, Tadashi; Takemura, Katsumi; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Kaneko, Shuzo; Sakai, Kentaro; Kai, Hirayasu; Gomibuchi, Tomoka; Nagata, Michio; Kobayashi, Masaki; Koyama, Akio; Suka, Machi; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Yamagata, Kunihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) in developed countries has decreased over the last 50 years. Here we identified the trends of the incidence of PIGN in Japan during the past four decades. Methods We explored the frequency, clinicopathological findings, and prognosis of PIGN based on 6,369 cases from the Renal Biopsy Database of our institute in the Kanto region of Japan, diagnosed histologically from 1976 to 2009. Results The numbers of PIGN cases were 131 (2.1%) in total, and 2.4%, 1.1%, 2.6% and 2.1% identified in the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s, respectively. Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN), including post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN), accounted for almost all of the PIGN cases in the 1970s, but decreased to approx. 40%–50% since the 1990s. In the 1990s, Staphylococcus aureus infection-related nephritis (SARN) showed a rapid increase in rate, reaching 30%. The incidence of hepatitis C virus infection-associated GN (HCVGN) has increased since the 1990s. The average age at onset rose from 33 to 51 years over the study period. These transitions can be summarized as increases in SARN and HCVGN and decreases in PSGN and other types of AGN, since SARN and HCVGN have older onsets compared to PSGN and other AGN types. The clinicopathological features were marked for each PIGN. Regarding the prognosis, the renal death rates of both the SARN and HCVGN groups were significantly higher than those of other PIGN. Conclusion Based on our analysis of the Renal Biopsy Database, the incidence of PIGN in Japan reached its peak in the 1990s. The temporal changes in the incidence of PIGN reflected the trends in infectious diseases of each decade and the continual aging of the population, with a related higher susceptibility to infections. PMID:27286043

  7. Post-streptococcal reactive arthritis: where are we now

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Himanshu; Marshall, Tarnya

    2016-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with polyarthritis and constitutional symptoms, and a recent history of multiple tick bites and skin rash on trekking holiday. He did not respond to oral doxycycline and cephalexine for presumed Lyme's disease. Further investigation confirmed strongly positive streptococcal serology. There was absence of clinical or echocardiography evidence of heart involvement and immunological screening for inflammatory arthritis was negative. In the absence of other major Jones criteria for acute rheumatic fever, besides polyarthritis and the serological evidence of a recent streptococcal infection, a diagnosis of post-streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA) was also made. He responded well to penicillin therapy and has been started on oral penicillin prophylaxis as per available guidance. As streptococcal infections in the adult population are increasingly reported, it is a timely opportunity to revisit PSRA, and develop comprehensive treatment and antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines. PMID:27520996

  8. Post-streptococcal reactive arthritis: where are we now.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Himanshu; Marshall, Tarnya

    2016-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with polyarthritis and constitutional symptoms, and a recent history of multiple tick bites and skin rash on trekking holiday. He did not respond to oral doxycycline and cephalexine for presumed Lyme's disease. Further investigation confirmed strongly positive streptococcal serology. There was absence of clinical or echocardiography evidence of heart involvement and immunological screening for inflammatory arthritis was negative. In the absence of other major Jones criteria for acute rheumatic fever, besides polyarthritis and the serological evidence of a recent streptococcal infection, a diagnosis of post-streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA) was also made. He responded well to penicillin therapy and has been started on oral penicillin prophylaxis as per available guidance. As streptococcal infections in the adult population are increasingly reported, it is a timely opportunity to revisit PSRA, and develop comprehensive treatment and antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines. PMID:27520996

  9. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... and adolescents include: Hemolytic uremic syndrome Henoch-Schönlein purpura IgA nephropathy Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis Common causes in ... Heart failure - overview Hemolytic-uremic syndrome Henoch-Schönlein purpura Hepatitis High blood pressure Hypersensitivity vasculitis IgA nephropathy ...

  10. Recurrent Glomerulonephritis after Renal Transplantation: An Unsolved Problem

    PubMed Central

    Golgert, William A.; Appel, Gerald B.; Hariharan, Sundaram

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Despite advances in prevention of acute rejection and improved short- and long-term kidney graft survival, recurrent glomerulonephritis remains problematic and poorly characterized. This study analyzed prevalence and outcome of recurrent glomerulonephritis from various registries. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Definition, classification, and limitations in evaluating epidemiology of native and recurrent glomerulonephritis are discussed. Epidemiology of native glomerulonephritis as the cause of end-stage renal failure and subsequent recurrence of individual glomerulonephritis was evaluated using data from various registries, and pathogenesis of individual glomerulonephritis is discussed. Results: Analysis of data from transplant registries revealed that glomerulonephritis is an important cause of end-stage renal disease in white and pediatric recipients; however, glomerulonephritis as the cause of end-stage renal disease is not characterized well in black recipients, and many of them are perhaps labeled to have hypertensive nephrosclerosis as the cause of renal disease without renal biopsy. A systematic approach toward urinalysis after transplantation and utility of immunofluorescence and electron microscopic examination of renal biopsy tissues will identify the true prevalence of recurrent glomerulonephritis. Data on recurrent glomerulonephritis should be compiled by either using registry analysis or pooling data from multiple centers. This will provide true data on prevalence and outcome and could potentially initiate translational research studies. Conclusions: The understanding of the pathogenesis of recurrent glomerulonephritis is critical to optimize prevention as well as to treat individual recurrent glomerulonephritis, which can enhance long-term graft survival. PMID:18272827

  11. Granulomatous uveitis and reactive arthritis as manifestations of post-streptococcal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abderrahim, Kais; Chebil, Ahmed; Falfoul, Yosra; Bouladi, Mejda; El Matri, Leila

    2015-10-01

    To report a case of bilateral granulomatous post-streptococcal syndrome uveitis in association with reactive arthritis as manifestation of post-streptococcal syndrome. To our knowledge, this could represent the first reported case in the literature. A 9-year-old girl, with no past ocular history, presented with a 5-day history of bilateral blurred vision, red eyes, photophobia and walking difficulties because of a right ankle pain. Ophthalmic examination disclosed a visual acuity limited to hand motion, mutton-fat keratic precipitates, anterior chamber cells and posterior synechiae in both eyes. Ocular pressure was normal. Physical examination showed a fever (38 °C), inflammatory ankle arthritis and scarlet fever (streptococcal lesion). Anti-streptococcal lysine O titer was 419 μ/ml. The patient was treated with topical steroids, cycloplegics, high-dose oral steroids and preventive course of penicillin with total improvement and no recurrence. Post-streptococcal syndrome should be considered in the etiology of acute bilateral granulomatous uveitis in children, and anti-streptococcal lysine O titer should be considered in serodiagnostic testing. PMID:22986580

  12. Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B antibodies in a mouse model of glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Y-H; Kuo, C-F; Huang, K-J; Wu, J-J; Lei, H-Y; Lin, M T; Chuang, W-J; Liu, C-C; Lin, C-F; Lin, Y-S

    2007-09-01

    Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B is an extracellular cysteine protease. Only nephritis-associated strains of group A streptococci secrete this protease and this may be involved in the pathogenesis of post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Mice were actively immunized with a recombinant protease inactive exotoxin B mutant or passively immunized with exotoxin B antibody. Characteristics of glomerulonephritis were measured using histology, immunoglobulin deposition, complement activation, cell infiltration, and proteinuria. None of the mice given bovine serum albumin or exotoxin A as controls showed any marked changes. Immunoglobulin deposition, complement activation, and leukocyte infiltration occurred only in the glomeruli of exotoxin B-hyperimmunized mice. One particular anti-exotoxin B monoclonal antibody, 10G, was cross-reactive with kidney endothelial cells and it caused kidney injury and proteinuria when infused into mice. This cross-reactivity may be involved in the pathogenesis of glomerulonephritis following group A streptococcal infection. PMID:17637712

  13. Acute tubular necrosis as a part of vancomycin induced drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome with coincident postinfectious glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Min; Sung, Kyoung; Yang, Hea Koung; Kim, Seong Heon; Kim, Hye Young; Ban, Gil Ho; Park, Su Eun; Lee, Hyoung Doo

    2016-01-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a rare and potentially fatal condition characterized by skin rash, fever, eosinophilia, and multiorgan involvement. Various drugs may be associated with this syndrome including carbamazepine, allopurinol, and sulfasalazine. Renal involvement in DRESS syndrome most commonly presents as acute kidney injury due to interstitial nephritis. An 11-year-old boy was referred to the Children's Hospital of Pusan National University because of persistent fever, rash, abdominal distension, generalized edema, lymphadenopathy, and eosinophilia. He previously received vancomycin and ceftriaxone for 10 days at another hospital. He developed acute kidney injury with nephrotic range proteinuria and hypocomplementemia. A subsequent renal biopsy indicated the presence of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) and late exudative phase of postinfectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN). Systemic symptoms and renal function improved with corticosteroid therapy after the discontinuation of vancomycin. Here, we describe a biopsy-proven case of severe ATN that manifested as a part of vancomycin-induced DRESS syndrome with coincident PIGN. It is important for clinicians to be aware of this syndrome due to its severity and potentially fatal nature. PMID:27186222

  14. Adalimumab (TNFα Inhibitor) Therapy Exacerbates IgA Glomerulonephritis Acute Renal Injury and Induces Lupus Autoantibodies in a Psoriasis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Wei, S. S.; Sinniah, R.

    2013-01-01

    Adalimumab (Humira) is a tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, Crohn's disease, ankylosing spondylitis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (Sullivan and Preda (2009), Klinkhoff (2004), and Medicare Australia). Use of TNFα inhibitors is associated with the induction of autoimmunity (systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitis, and sarcoidosis or sarcoid-like granulomas) (Ramos-Casals et al. (2010)). We report a patient with extensive psoriasis presenting with renal failure and seropositive lupus markers without classical lupus nephritis after 18 months treatment with adalimumab. He has renal biopsy proven IgA nephritis instead. Renal biopsy is the key diagnostic tool in patients presenting with adalimumab induced nephritis and renal failure. He made a remarkable recovery after adalimumab cessation and steroid treatment. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of a psoriasis patient presenting with seropositive lupus markers without classical lupus nephritis renal failure and had renal biopsy proven IgA glomerulonephritis after receiving adalimumab. PMID:24558628

  15. Post-streptococcal autoimmune disorders of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Dale, Russell C

    2005-11-01

    Group A Streptococcus can induce autoimmune disease in humans with particular involvement of the heart, joints, and brain. The spectrum of post-streptococcal disease of the central nervous system (CNS) has been widened recently and includes movement disorders (chorea, tics, dystonia, and Parkinsonism), psychiatric disorders (particularly emotional disorders), and associated sleep disorders. Neuroimaging and pathological studies indicate that the most vulnerable brain region is the basal ganglia. The immunopathogenesis of the disease is incompletely defined, and although there is some support for autoantibody-mediated disease, several conflicting studies cast doubt on the autoantibody hypothesis. It has been speculated that post-streptococcal autoimmunity has a role in common neuropsychiatric disease but the evidence is conflicting and routine screening of patients with Tourette syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder for post-streptococcal autoimmune abnormalities is not be recommended at present. However, post-streptococcal disorders of the CNS remain a useful model of neuropsychiatric disease, which may improve our understanding of abnormal movements and behaviours in children. PMID:16225745

  16. [Glomerulonephritis in dogs and cats].

    PubMed

    Reinacher, M; Frese, K

    1991-04-01

    Immunohistology and special staining of plastic sections allow diagnosis and differentiation of subtypes of glomerulonephritis in dogs. Frequency and clinical importance of these forms of glomerulonephritis vary significantly. In cats, glomerulonephritis occurs frequently in FIV-positive cats but is rare in animals suffering from persistent FeLV infection or FIP. PMID:2068715

  17. Factor VIII and glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, M; Nilsson, I M

    1975-05-17

    To find out if determination of factor VIII,which most probably is synthetised in the intima of blood-vessesls, is of value for predicting the severity of vessel damge in glomerulonephritis, factor-VIII activity, factor-VIII-related antigen, and glomerular filtration-ratewere esto,ated om 85 patients with early glomerulonephritis on admission, and in 70 of these at follow-up for up to 4 years. The levels of factor-VIII activity and factor-VIII-related antigen on admission were normal in those patients who recovered. Where renal function was impaired on admission or becaome so during follow-up, factor VIII was high. Determination of factor VIII might thus be of prognostic value in early glomerulonephritis. PMID:49471

  18. Update on endocarditis-associated glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Boils, Christie L; Nasr, Samih H; Walker, Patrick D; Couser, William G; Larsen, Christopher P

    2015-06-01

    Glomerulonephritis (GN) due to infective endocarditis (IE) is well documented, but most available data are based on old autopsy series. To update information, we now present the largest biopsy-based clinicopathologic series on IE-associated GN. The study group included 49 patients (male-to-female ratio of 3.5:1) with a mean age of 48 years. The most common presenting feature was acute kidney injury. Over half of the patients had no known prior cardiac abnormality. However, the most common comorbidities were cardiac valve disease (30%), intravenous drug use (29%), hepatitis C (20%), and diabetes (18%). The cardiac valve infected was tricuspid in 43%, mitral in 33%, and aortic in 29% of patients. The two most common infective bacteria were Staphylococcus (53%) and Streptococcus (23%). Hypocomplementemia was found in 56% of patients tested and ANCA antibody in 28%. The most common biopsy finding was necrotizing and crescentic GN (53%), followed by endocapillary proliferative GN (37%). C3 deposition was prominent in all cases, whereas IgG deposition was seen in <30% of cases. Most patients had immune deposits detectable by electron microscopy. Thus, IE-associated GN most commonly presents with AKI and complicates staphylococcal tricuspid valve infection. Contrary to infection-associated glomerulonephritis in general, the most common pattern of glomerular injury in IE-associated glomerulonephritis was necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis. PMID:25607109

  19. Neutrophils: game changers in glomerulonephritis?

    PubMed Central

    Mayadas, Tanya N.; Rosetti, Florencia; Ernandez, Thomas; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2010-01-01

    Glomerulonephritides represent a diverse array of diseases that have in common immune cell-mediated effector mechanisms that cause organ damage. The contribution of neutrophils to the pathogenesis of proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) is not well recognized. Most equate neutrophils with killing pathogens and causing collateral tissue damage during acute inflammation. However, these phagocytes are endowed with additional characteristics that have been traditionally reserved for cells of the adaptive immune system. They communicate with other cells, exhibit plasticity in their responses and have the potential to coordinate and inform the subsequent immune response, thus countering the notion that they arrive, destroy and then disappear. Therefore, neutrophils, which are the first to arrive at a site of inflammation, are potential game changers in GN. PMID:20667782

  20. Streptococcal acute pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Anjos, Lais Martins Moreira; Marcondes, Mariana Barros; Lima, Mariana Ferreira; Mondelli, Alessandro Lia; Okoshi, Marina Politi

    2014-07-01

    Acute pharyngitis/tonsillitis, which is characterized by inflammation of the posterior pharynx and tonsils, is a common disease. Several viruses and bacteria can cause acute pharyngitis; however, Streptococcus pyogenes (also known as Lancefield group A β-hemolytic streptococci) is the only agent that requires an etiologic diagnosis and specific treatment. S. pyogenes is of major clinical importance because it can trigger post-infection systemic complications, acute rheumatic fever, and post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Symptom onset in streptococcal infection is usually abrupt and includes intense sore throat, fever, chills, malaise, headache, tender enlarged anterior cervical lymph nodes, and pharyngeal or tonsillar exudate. Cough, coryza, conjunctivitis, and diarrhea are uncommon, and their presence suggests a viral cause. A diagnosis of pharyngitis is supported by the patient's history and by the physical examination. Throat culture is the gold standard for diagnosing streptococcus pharyngitis. However, it has been underused in public health services because of its low availability and because of the 1- to 2-day delay in obtaining results. Rapid antigen detection tests have been used to detect S. pyogenes directly from throat swabs within minutes. Clinical scoring systems have been developed to predict the risk of S. pyogenes infection. The most commonly used scoring system is the modified Centor score. Acute S. pyogenes pharyngitis is often a self-limiting disease. Penicillins are the first-choice treatment. For patients with penicillin allergy, cephalosporins can be an acceptable alternative, although primary hypersensitivity to cephalosporins can occur. Another drug option is the macrolides. Future perspectives to prevent streptococcal pharyngitis and post-infection systemic complications include the development of an anti-Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine. PMID:25229278

  1. Hypercoagulation in glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Salem, H H; Whitworth, J A; Koutts, J; Kincaid-Smith, P S; Firkin, B G

    1981-01-01

    The clotting values of 50 patients with glomerulonephritis were examined. Three different coagulation groups were recognised: those with normal clotting values (group 1); those with high concentrations of factor VIII but otherwise normal clotting results (group 2); and patients who showed the presence of an activator of the intrinsic coagulation pathway, indicated by the presence of a short activated partial thromboplastin time or the ability of patients' plasma to shorten control clotting time in mixing studies (group 3). Patients in group 2 either had a uniform rise in all three components of the factor VIII molecule or a disproportionately higher concentration of factor-VIII-related antigen. In contrast, the level of VIII clotting activity in patients in group 3 was always higher than concentrations of either VIIIAg or VIIIWF. A significantly high incidence of thrombotic complications was observed in patients with group 3 but in none of the patients in either group 1 or group 2. Impaired renal function was more common in patients in groups 2 and 3, with higher mean serum creatinine concentrations in those with group 3. Patients with glomerulonephritis who have a short partial thromboplastin time with kaolin or who shorten control clotting time form a subgroup in whom hypercoagulation could adversely affect the course of their disease. The value of antiplatelet or anticoagulant treatment in these patients needs to be explored. PMID:6788212

  2. Cryoglobulinemic Glomerulonephritis as a Presentation of Atypical Post-Infectious Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Boumitri, Christine; Haddad, Fady G.; Rondla, Chetana; El-Sayegh, Suzanne; El-Charabaty, Elie

    2016-01-01

    Post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) usually occurs within few days to weeks following an infection. Clinical presentation is variable, but in general, it is considered a benign entity with good prognosis. It rarely requires kidney biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. We present a case of a 55-year-old, previously healthy, male who presented for worsening shortness of breath, persistent cough, and right-sided pleuritic chest pain. Initial workup revealed a right exudative effusion with empyema. Hospital course was complicated by acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy with a peak creatinine of 10.2 mg/dL from a baseline of 1.18 mg/dL. On kidney biopsy, findings were compatible with a diagnosis of cryoglobulinemic glomerulonephritis or an atypical form of PIGN. While a wide variety of histopathological findings on renal biopsies have been described to complement the usual diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis pattern, cryoglobulinemic features with negative cryoglobulin have never been reported. Our case is unique not only by having an atypical histological presentation but also by meeting the criteria of atypical PIGN with persistent hypertension and microscopic hematuria. PMID:26668683

  3. Hypertension in Chronic Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Ihm, Chun-Gyoo

    2015-12-01

    Chronic glomerulonephritis (GN), which includes focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and proliferative forms of GN such as IgA nephropathy, increases the risk of hypertension. Hypertension in chronic GN is primarily volume dependent, and this increase in blood volume is not related to the deterioration of renal function. Patients with chronic GN become salt sensitive as renal damage including arteriolosclerosis progresses and the consequent renal ischemia causes the stimulation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system(RAAS). Overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system also contributes to hypertension in chronic GN. According to the KDIGO guideline, the available evidence indicates that the target BP should be ≤140mmHg systolic and ≤90mmHg diastolic in chronic kidney disease patients without albuminuria. In most patients with an albumin excretion rate of ≥30mg/24 h (i.e., those with both micro-and macroalbuminuria), a lower target of ≤130mmHg systolic and ≤80mmHg diastolic is suggested. The use of agents that block the RAAS system is recommended or suggested in all patients with an albumin excretion rate of ≥30mg/ 24 h. The combination of a RAAS blockade with a calcium channel blocker and a diuretic may be effective in attaining the target BP, and in reducing the amount of urinary protein excretion in patients with chronic GN. PMID:26848302

  4. Comparative pathology of glomerulonephritis in animals.

    PubMed

    Slauson, D O; Lewis, R M

    1979-03-01

    Glomerulonephritis constitutes an important category of renal diseases in animals and has been recognized with increasing frequency in the last decade. We report here the comparative morphologic aspects of glomerulonephritis as a naturally occurring disease of animals. We briefly review the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritis. The morphology of renal lesions occurring in glomerulonephritis in dogs, cats, cattle, sheep, horses and swine has been reviewed with emphasis on the range and specificity of various glomerular lesions and on the comparison of lesions between various species. A distinction was made between glomerulonephritis as a primary disease entity and glomerulonephritis associated with other disease processes. Primary idiopathic glomerulonephritis occurred in all species but was most commonly recognized as a clinically important disease in dogs and cats. Glomerulonephritis also occurred in association with other diseases such as equine infectious anemia, chronic hog cholera, canine pyometra, dirofilariasis, feline leukemia virus infection and canine systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:442447

  5. From juvenile parkinsonism to encephalitis lethargica, a new phenotype of post-streptococcal disorders: case report.

    PubMed

    Beleza, Pedro; Soares-Fernandes, João; Jordão, Maria J; Almeida, Fátima

    2008-11-01

    We report the case of a 16-year-old boy presented with a mild akinetic-rigid parkinsonism shortly after a post-streptococcal infection. After stopping corticoids, he had a rapid neurological deterioration to a fatal encephalitis lethargica-like syndrome. Serum analysis demonstrated consistently elevated anti-streptolysin-O. This case illustrates a new severe phenotype in the spectrum of the post-streptococcal disorders. This etiology should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a movement disorder with a rapid detrimental evolution. PMID:18221898

  6. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with essential cryoglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Satish, S.; Rajesh, R.; George, K.; Elango, E. M.; Unni, V. N.

    2008-01-01

    Cryoglobulinemia is an uncommon cause of renal disease and often occurs in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We report a case of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in a patient with cryoglobulinemia, which was not associated with HCV infection or any identifiable etiology. PMID:20142909

  7. Protracted Clinical Course of Postinfectious Glomerulonephritis in a Previously Healthy Child

    PubMed Central

    Grøndahl, Camilla; Rittig, Søren; Povlsen, Johan Vestergaard; Kamperis, Kostantinos

    2016-01-01

    Acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) affects children typically after upper respiratory tract or skin infections with streptococci but can complicate the course of other infections. In children, it is generally a self-limiting disease with excellent prognosis. This paper reports a previously healthy 4-year-old boy who experienced a protracted course of PIGN with persisting episodes of gross haematuria, proteinuria, decreased complement C3c levels but normal P-creatinine levels. Due to the protracted course and the nephrotic-range proteinuria, a renal biopsy was performed 6 months after the initial presentation and the overall pathology was consistent with acute endocapillary glomerulonephritis. PMID:27226969

  8. [Hypertension and primary glomerulonephritis in adults. A study of 302 cases].

    PubMed

    Seba, A; Rayane, T; Kaci, L; Haddoum, F; Benabadji, M

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of the present work was to show the place of hypertension in primary glomerulonephritis in adults. Hypertension was defined as diastolic blood pressure above 90 mmHg and renal insufficiency as serum creatinine above 135 mc mol/L. Secondary glomerulonephritis was excluded. The study was performed in 302 patients with primary glomerulonephritis biopsied between March 1994 and March 1996. They were 183 males and 119 females, aged from 16 to 63 years (mean: 29.8 years). The incidence of hypertension at the time of admission was 46.6%: 141/302 cases. The only consideration of prolonged hypertension (excluded transient hypertension of acute nephritic syndrome) shows an incidence of 31.4%: 95/302 cases (table). Frequency of hypertension (HT) in different types of primary glomerulonephritis (GN): [table: see text] The histological types observed in these cases of hypertension were represented essentially by the proliferative lesions: 73% (72/95 cases) who were grouped mainly in proliferative glomerulonephritis postinfectious and IgA nephropathy. No proliferative lesions: 24% (23/95 cases) were especially represented by focal segmental sclerosis. Renal insufficiency noted in 69 cases on 95 hypertensions was probably the result of the parallel evolution of hypertension renal lesions and those belonging to these histologic types. In conclusion, this study shows a narrow correlation between the hypertension and proliferative glomerulonephritis in our young adults population. PMID:9404432

  9. Post-streptococcal 'complex' movement disorders: unusual concurrence of psychogenic and organic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Squintani, Giovanna; Tinazzi, Michele; Gambarin, Mattia; Bravi, Elena; Moretto, Giuseppe; Buttiglione, Maura; Defazio, Giovanni; Martino, Davide

    2010-01-15

    Post-streptococcal neuropsychiatric disorders encompass a broad spectrum of movement disorders, including tics, stereotypies, dystonia and tremor. We report the case of a 15-year-old boy who presented with a relapsing-remitting combination of psychogenic and organic movement disorders. Both relapses occurred after an episode of streptococcal pharyngitis and consisted in motor and phonic tics, an atypical gait disorder, and severe worsening of a pre-existing psychogenic tremor of the right hand. After each relapse, both psychogenic and 'organic' symptoms concomitantly remitted after the administration of an association of oral steroids and antibiotics. The peculiarity of this case consists in the coexistence of psychogenic and organic symptoms subsequent to streptococcal infection, and broadens the clinical spectrum of post-streptococcal neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:19896680

  10. Haematuria on the Spanish Registry of Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Yuste, Claudia; Rivera, Francisco; Moreno, Juan Antonio; López-Gómez, Juan Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest a pathogenic role for glomerular haematuria among renal function. However, there is no data on the prevalence of haematuria from a large renal biopsy registry. We analysed the prevalence of gross (GH) and microscopic (mH) haematuria in 19,895 patients that underwent native renal biopsies from the Spanish Registry of Glomerulonephritis. Haematuria’s overall incidence was 63% (GH 8.6% and mH 55.1%), being more frequent in males (64.7% vs. 62.4%). GH was more prevalent in patients <18 years (21.3% vs. 7.7%). The commonest clinical presentation associated with GH was acute kidney injury (31.5%) and IgA Nephropathy (IgAN) (33.6%) was the most frequent histological finding. GH patients showed a significantly (p < 0.05) lower eGFR and proteinuria levels as compared with patients with mH and without haematuria. Moreover, mH was more prevalent in adults (56.3%). Nephrotic syndrome was the commonest clinical presentation in mH patients (32.2%) and IgAN (18.5%) the most frequent histological finding. In conclusion, haematuria, is a frequent urinalysis finding in patients underwent native renal biopsy. The most frequent histological finding in both GH and mH is IgAN. Whereas, GH is more frequent in young males with acute kidney injury, mH is commoner among adults with nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26818712

  11. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome presenting with glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Kanegane, Hirokazu; Vilela, Maria Marluce dos Santos; Wang, Yue; Futatani, Takeshi; Matsukura, Hiroyoshi; Miyawaki, Toshio

    2003-05-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized clinically by chronic non-malignant lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity and is caused by a genetic defect in programmed cell death (apoptosis). Most patients with ALPS have heterozygous mutations in the Fas gene. We describe an 11-year-old Brazilian boy with hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, hemolytic anemia, and hypergammaglobulinemia since early infancy. T cell lines from the patient were defective in Fas-mediated apoptosis. He was diagnosed as having ALPS and found to have a novel Fas gene mutation (IVS4+1G>A). In addition, he presented with glomerulonephritis in infancy. An aunt and uncle who had the same Fas mutations also had histories of glomerulonephritis. Although glomerulonephritis is common in Fas-deficient mice, it is infrequent in human ALPS. Corticosteroid therapy ameliorated the glomerulonephritis in our patient, as well as his lymphoproliferation, anemia, and hypergammaglobulinemia. This study suggests that glomerulonephritis is one of the characteristic features of ALPS. PMID:12736807

  12. Membranous glomerulonephritis: a morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Paraskevakou, H; Kavantzas, N; Pavlopoulos, P M; Voudiklari, S; Zerefos, N; Papagalanis, N; Davaris, P

    2000-01-01

    Archival material from 45 renal biopsies with a diagnosis of idiopathic membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) were studied by computer-aided image analysis in order to evaluate the prognostic significance of glomerular and interstitial morphometry in MGN. The control group consisted of thirty seven normal renal biopsy specimens. The surface area, the perimeter, the major axis length and the shape factor of renal glomeruli as well as the percentage of the interstitial fibrosis were measured. All the morphometric parameters related to the size of glomeruli had significantly higher values in the patient group (p = 0.000 for all the parameters). However, no significant difference of the glomerular size between different stages of MGN was observed. In contrast, the percentage of interstitial fibrosis increased as the MGN stage rose (median values: 10.3% in stage 1, 14.2% in stage II, 26.9% in stage III, 28.9% in stage IV and 34.2% in stage V, Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA H = 37.645, p = 0.000). In the multivariate analysis the percentage of interstitial fibrosis was the only independent prognostic factor (p = 0.013). Our findings suggest that, in membraneous glomerulonephritis, the interstitial fibrosis increases as the MGN stage progresses, while the size of renal glomeruli has increased at a very early stage of the disease. This fact may indicate that interstitial fibrosis, not glomerular lesions, is mainly responsible for the reduction of renal function. PMID:10729917

  13. Glomerulonephritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... seen, including: Nerve inflammation (polyneuropathy) Signs of fluid overload, including abnormal heart and lung sounds Swelling ( edema ) ... to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A. ...

  14. Glomerulonephritis associated with arteritis in marmosets infected with hepatitis A virus.

    PubMed Central

    Morita, M.; Kitajima, K.; Yoshizawa, H.; Itoh, Y.; Iwakiri, S.; Shibata, C.; Mayumi, M.

    1981-01-01

    Seven of 8 marmosets (Saguinus oedipus and Saguinus labiatus) injected i.v. with different inocula of hepatitis A virus isolated from patients in the acute phase of disease developed proliferative glomerulonephritis associated with arteritis. The glomerulonephritis was characterized by immunofluorescent and electron-dense deposits and hypercellularity. Although no antigenic component of the glomerular immune complex was detected, this glomerulonephritis and arteritis may be diagnosed morphologically as an immune complex disease. These findings show the possibility of the appearance of exohepatic disease as an immunologically mediated disease in human hepatitis A virus infection. Images Figs. 2-5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Figs. 10-15 Figs. 16-18 PMID:6452891

  15. Gastric Syphilis and Membranous Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Roh, Min; Sohn, Joo Hyun; Kim, Tae Yeob; Kim, Sung Jong; Kim, Ji Soong; Chung, Sung Jun; Pyo, Ju Yeon; Oh, Young-Ha

    2015-05-01

    Syphilis is a chronic systemic infectious disease caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum. Gastric involvement and nephrotic syndrome are uncommon but well documented complications of syphilis, but the co-occurrence of these two complications in the same patient is extremely rare. Thus, because of their nonspecific presentation, suspicion of gastric syphilis (GS) and nephrotic syndrome is essential for diagnosis. Patients should be investigated thoroughly and a diagnosis made based on clinical, endoscopic, and histological findings, in order to initiate appropriate therapy. We report of a 34-year-old male patient with a history of epigastric pain and a diagnosis of GS and syphilis-associated membranous glomerulonephritis confirmed by gastroscopy and kidney biopsy, who was treated successfully with penicillin G benzathine. This case report provides information on the typical features of GS that should help raise awareness of this rare disease entity among clinicians, resulting in earlier diagnosis and administration of appropriate therapy. PMID:26064828

  16. Gastric Syphilis and Membranous Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Min; Kim, Tae Yeob; Kim, Sung Jong; Kim, Ji Soong; Chung, Sung Jun; Pyo, Ju Yeon; Oh, Young-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis is a chronic systemic infectious disease caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum. Gastric involvement and nephrotic syndrome are uncommon but well documented complications of syphilis, but the co-occurrence of these two complications in the same patient is extremely rare. Thus, because of their nonspecific presentation, suspicion of gastric syphilis (GS) and nephrotic syndrome is essential for diagnosis. Patients should be investigated thoroughly and a diagnosis made based on clinical, endoscopic, and histological findings, in order to initiate appropriate therapy. We report of a 34-year-old male patient with a history of epigastric pain and a diagnosis of GS and syphilis-associated membranous glomerulonephritis confirmed by gastroscopy and kidney biopsy, who was treated successfully with penicillin G benzathine. This case report provides information on the typical features of GS that should help raise awareness of this rare disease entity among clinicians, resulting in earlier diagnosis and administration of appropriate therapy. PMID:26064828

  17. Neuronal surface glycolytic enzymes are autoantigen targets in post-streptococcal autoimmune CNS disease.

    PubMed

    Dale, Russell C; Candler, Paul M; Church, Andrew J; Wait, Robin; Pocock, Jennifer M; Giovannoni, Gavin

    2006-03-01

    Infection with the Group A Streptococcus (GAS) can result in immune mediated brain disease characterised by a spectrum of movement and psychiatric disorders. We have previously described anti-neuronal antibodies in patients that bind to a restricted group of brain antigens with molecular weights 40 kDa, 45 kDa (doublet) and 60 kDa. The aim of this study was to define these antigens using 2-dimensional electrophoresis or ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, followed by mass spectrometry. The findings were confirmed using commercial antibodies, commercial antigens and recombinant human antigens. The autoantigens were neuronal glycolytic enzymes--NGE (pyruvate kinase M1, aldolase C, neuronal-specific and non-neuronal enolase). These are multifunctional proteins that are all expressed intracellularly and on the neuronal cell surface. On the neuronal plasma membrane, NGE are involved in energy metabolism, cell signalling and synaptic neurotransmission. Anti-NGE antibodies were more common in the 20 unselected post-streptococcal CNS patients compared to 20 controls. In vitro experiments using cultured neurons showed that commercial anti-NGE antibodies induced apoptosis compared to blank incubation and control anti-HuD antibody. GAS also expresses glycolytic enzymes on cell surfaces that have 0-49% identity with human NGE, suggesting molecular mimicry and autoimmune cross-reactivity may be the pathogenic mechanism in post-streptococcal CNS disease. PMID:16356555

  18. Crescentic Glomerulonephritis Associated with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Vanikar, A.V.; Patel, R.D.; Suthar, K. S.; Trivedi, H. L.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis of kidney and urinary tract is caused by members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Kidney is usually infected by haematogenous spread of bacilli from focus of infection in the lungs. Glomerular involvement in tuberculosis presenting as a rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis is a rare entity. We report a rare case of crescentic glomerulonephritis associated with pulmonary tuberculosis in a 26-year-old man. Patient was treated with corticosteroids, haemodialysis, intravenous immunoglobulin and four cycles of plasmapheresis. He did not respond to 4-drug anti-tuberculosis treatment for renal pathology and was switched over to maintenance haemodialysis. However, he responded to pulmonary TB. PMID:26894074

  19. Paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia, post-streptococcal syndromes and psychogenic movement disorders: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Peila, Elena; Mortara, Paolo; Cicerale, Alessandro; Pinessi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 15-year-old boy presenting with sudden attacks of hyperkinetic movements of the limbs, trunk and neck. Clinical features were suggestive of paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia, but the elevated antistreptolysin O antibody titre and history of recurrent upper airways infection led us to consider a post-streptococcal syndrome as a possible diagnosis. The patient started therapy with benzathine penicillin, sodium valproate and clonazepam without any significant improvement. A successive psychiatric assessment revealed the presence of a psychogenic movement disorder. Psychodynamic psychotherapy and individual counselling were started with progressive improvement of psychological symptoms and gradual resolution of hyperkinetic episodes, without any recurrence recorded during the follow-up (10 months). PMID:25795754

  20. Monoclonal immunoglobulin G1-kappa fibrillary glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Grove, P; Neale, P H; Peck, M; Schiller, B; Haas, M

    1998-01-01

    We report here a case of fibrillary glomerulonephritis arising in a 43-year-old man with a polyclonal gammopathy, who presented with progressive renal insufficiency, microscopic hematuria, and mild proteinuria (0.7 g/d). Ultrastructural studies showed deposits of randomly oriented fibrils in the glomerular mesangium and adjacent portions of some glomerular basement membranes, with a mean fibril thickness of 14.3 nm, highly consistent with fibrillary glomerulonephritis. The Congo red stain was negative on histologic sections. Immunofluorescence studies revealed strong mesangial and focal glomerular capillary staining for immunoglobulin (Ig) G, complement (C) 3, and kappa light chains, with minimal staining for IgA, IgM, C1q, or lambda light chains. The IgG present was entirely of the IgG1 subclass. This case is quite unusual for fibrillary glomerulonephritis, which typically presents with polyclonal IgG deposits and IgG4 as the dominant IgG subclass present. Monoclonal deposits are more frequently associated with immunotactoid glomerulopathy, characterized ultrastructurally by microtubule-like structures 30 to 50 nmn thick, often in parallel arrays. The present case illustrates that although fibrillary glomerulonephritis and immunotactoid glomerulopathy might be distinguishable on ultrastructural grounds, there is overlap between these two entities with respect to the potential composition of the glomerular deposits present. PMID:9556416

  1. Clinical, Pathological, and Prognostic Characteristics of Glomerulonephritis Related to Staphylococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Si-Yang; Bu, Ru; Zhang, Qi; Liang, Shuang; Wu, Jie; Liu, Xue-Guang Zhang Shu-Wen; Cai, Guang-Yan; Chen, Xiang-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Staphylococcal infection has become a common cause of postinfectious glomerulonephritis in the past 3 decades. Because few investigations focus on this disease, the demographics and clinicopathological features of glomerulonephritis related to staphylococcal infection are not well characterized. We conducted a pooled analysis of published literature in electronic databases and analyzed the clinical features, laboratory findings, and histopathological changes. The patients were divided into 4 groups based on their prognosis: remission, persistent renal dysfunction, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), or death. A logistic regression model was used to identify the determinants of disease outcome. A total of 83 (64 men) patients with glomerulonephritis related to staphylococcal infection from 31 reports were analyzed. The mean age was 58 years (58 ± 17). Majority of the reports originated from Taiwan, Japan, and the United States. Clinical characteristics of the cases were hematuria (82/83), proteinuria (78/83), and acute kidney injury (75/83). Visceral abscesses (26/83) and skin infections (24/83) were the common sites of infection. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen. The dominant or codominant deposition of IgA or C3 along the glomeruli was an important feature identified by immunofluorescence. There were 19 patients (22.9%) that progressed to dialysis-dependent ESRD. Twelve patients (14.5%) died. A univariate regression analysis indicated that diabetes mellitus (DM) (odds ratio [OR] 2.96; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03–8.48; P = 0.04) and age (OR 4.80; 95% CI 1.84–12.53; P = 0.001) were risk factors for ESRD or death. A multivariate regression analysis also revealed that age (OR 4.90; 95% CI 1.82–13.18; P = 0.002) and DM (OR 3.07; 95% CI 0.98–9.59; P = 0.05) were independent risk factors for unfavorable prognosis. Glomerulonephritis related to staphylococcal infection has different features

  2. Clinical, Pathological, and Prognostic Characteristics of Glomerulonephritis Related to Staphylococcal Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si-Yang; Bu, Ru; Zhang, Qi; Liang, Shuang; Wu, Jie; Liu, Xue-Guang Zhang Shu-Wen; Cai, Guang-Yan; Chen, Xiang-Mei

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcal infection has become a common cause of postinfectious glomerulonephritis in the past 3 decades. Because few investigations focus on this disease, the demographics and clinicopathological features of glomerulonephritis related to staphylococcal infection are not well characterized.We conducted a pooled analysis of published literature in electronic databases and analyzed the clinical features, laboratory findings, and histopathological changes. The patients were divided into 4 groups based on their prognosis: remission, persistent renal dysfunction, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), or death. A logistic regression model was used to identify the determinants of disease outcome.A total of 83 (64 men) patients with glomerulonephritis related to staphylococcal infection from 31 reports were analyzed. The mean age was 58 years (58 ± 17). Majority of the reports originated from Taiwan, Japan, and the United States. Clinical characteristics of the cases were hematuria (82/83), proteinuria (78/83), and acute kidney injury (75/83). Visceral abscesses (26/83) and skin infections (24/83) were the common sites of infection. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen. The dominant or codominant deposition of IgA or C3 along the glomeruli was an important feature identified by immunofluorescence. There were 19 patients (22.9%) that progressed to dialysis-dependent ESRD. Twelve patients (14.5%) died. A univariate regression analysis indicated that diabetes mellitus (DM) (odds ratio [OR] 2.96; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03-8.48; P = 0.04) and age (OR 4.80; 95% CI 1.84-12.53; P = 0.001) were risk factors for ESRD or death. A multivariate regression analysis also revealed that age (OR 4.90; 95% CI 1.82-13.18; P = 0.002) and DM (OR 3.07; 95% CI 0.98-9.59; P = 0.05) were independent risk factors for unfavorable prognosis.Glomerulonephritis related to staphylococcal infection has different features than typical

  3. Noncongophilic fibrillary glomerulonephritis in a cat.

    PubMed

    Cavana, P; Capucchio, M T; Bovero, A; Ripanti, D; Catalano, D; Scaglione, F E; Miller, J; Blunden, T; Farca, A M

    2008-05-01

    This report describes an uncommon case of nonamyloidotic fibrillary glomerulonephritis. A 5-year-old female European cat was presented with nephrotic syndrome. Serum biochemistry and urinalysis revealed a mild increase in cholesterol, low total protein, severe hypoalbuminemia, and high proteinuria with a high protein-to-creatinine ratio. An histologic examination revealed an interstitial nephritis and a diffuse glomerulonephritis, with multifocal thickening of the Bowman's capsule. Transmission electron microscopy showed widespread fibrillary deposits in the glomerular basement membrane and in the mesangium. These fibrils ranged between 18 and 26 nm in diameter and were Congo red negative, which allowed their differentiation from amyloid. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated expression for immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) within the mesangium. Renal deposits of Congo red-negative amyloid-like fibrils have been described in humans, horses, monkeys, and dogs. This is the first report of noncongophilic fibrillary glomerulopathy in a cat. PMID:18487491

  4. Atypical membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in a cat.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Kami-ie, J; Ohtake, S; Wakui, S; Machida, S; Shirota, K

    2001-07-01

    Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis was observed in a 2-year-old male Japanese domestic cat with clinical renal failure. In the glomeruli, moderate mesangial hypercellularity with an increased mesangial matrix and thickening of the capillary walls were prominent. In addition, frequent duplication of the capillary walls, splitting, and spike formation were observed in the glomerular basement membrane. Granular cat IgG and complement component deposition were detected globally along the glomerular capillary walls and in the mesangium. Transmission electron microscopy revealed dense deposits in the subendothelial and subepithelial regions and the mesangium. Mesangial interposition was also observed. These glomerular lesions are also found in humans with membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type III, which has not been reported in animals. PMID:11467485

  5. Forty years abuse of baking soda, rhabdomyolysis, glomerulonephritis, hypertension leading to renal failure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Terje; Koistinen, Arvo; Anttinen, Jorma; Wagner, Bodo; Miettinen, Marja

    2008-01-01

    We present a patient who had ingested sodium bicarbonate for treatment of alcoholic dyspepsia during forty years at increasing doses. During the last year he had used more than 50 grams daily. He presented with metabolic alkalosis, epileptic convulsions, subdural hematoma, hypertension and rhabdomyolysis with end stage renal failure, for which he had to be given regular intermittent hemodialysis treatment. Untreated hypertension and glomerulonephritis was probably present prior to all these acute incidents. Examination of the kidney biopsy revealed mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis and arterial wall thickening causing nephrosclerosis together with interstitial calcinosis. The combination of all these pathologic changes might be responsible for the development of progressive chronic renal failure ending up with the need for continuous intermittent hemodialysis treatment. PMID:24179353

  6. Nephrotic Syndrome without Hematuria due to Infection-Related Glomerulonephritis Mimicking Minimal-Change Disease in a Child.

    PubMed

    Iwafuchi, Yoichi; Morioka, Tetsuo; Morita, Takashi; Watanabe, Kanako; Oyama, Yuko; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome without hematuria due to infection-related glomerulonephritis is uncommon. The present report describes a case of nephrotic syndrome due to infection-related glomerulonephritis without hematuria and hypertension in an older child. A 14-year-old boy was referred to our hospital because of a 5-day history of fever, nausea, weight gain and recent leg edema without hypertension. Laboratory data showed nephrotic-range proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, mild hypocomplementemia and acute renal injury without hematuria. Although, due to the clinical presentation, minimal-change nephrotic syndrome was mostly suspected, a renal biopsy showed endocapillary hypercellularity mainly of mononuclear cells with segmental mesangiolytic changes. Fine granular IgG and C3 deposits were noted by an immunofluorescent study; many relatively small electron-dense deposits were observed electron-microscopically. These findings led to the diagnosis of nephrotic syndrome due to infection-related endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis, although the causative organism of his nephritis was not detected. He recovered with rest and dietary cure. When we examine an acute nephrotic child, infection-related glomerulonephritis should be considered as the differential diagnosis to avoid unnecessary use of corticosteroids. PMID:26889476

  7. A protective role for endothelial nitric oxide synthase in glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Heeringa, Peter; Steenbergen, Eric; van Goor, Harry

    2002-03-01

    In acute glomerulonephritis (GN), increased nitric oxide (NO) production occurs, suggesting a pathophysiological role for NO in the disease process. Although NO potentially could have both toxic as well as protective effects, its exact role in the pathophysiology of GN is unclear and may depend on the NOS isoform generating NO. The protective effects of NO such as prevention of leukocyte and platelet activation and adhesion have been attributed to NO generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Evidence for a beneficial role for eNOS includes the demonstration of reduced eNOS expression in experimental models of GN as well as human biopsy specimens that is mostly likely due to endothelial cell necrosis. Reduced NO production in GN also may occur through reaction of NO with superoxide anions or the myeloperoxidase (MPO)/hypochlorous acid (HOCL) system. Further evidence has been provided by the observation that in several experimental models of GN, glomerular injury is exacerbated following treatment with non-selective NO inhibitors. Finally, the development of GN is severely aggravated in mice lacking a functional gene for eNOS as compared to wild-type mice, providing direct support for a protective role of eNOS-derived NO in acute GN. PMID:11849432

  8. Post-infectious glomerulonephritis following infective endocarditis: Amenable to immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Mantan, M.; Sethi, G. R.; Batra, V. V.

    2013-01-01

    Glomerulonephritis develops in about 20% patients with infective endocarditis (IE), but is mostly asymptomatic. Heavy proteinuria or derangement of kidney functions is uncommon. We report here a child with IE and proliferative glomerulonephritis who manifested as significant proteinuria that recovered on treatment with immunosupressants. PMID:24049276

  9. Conditional Deletion of Smad1 Ameliorates Glomerular Injury in Progressive Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Makoto; Matsubara, Takeshi; Abe, Hideharu; Torikoshi, Kazuo; Mima, Akira; Iehara, Noriyuki; Fukatsu, Atsushi; Kita, Toru; Arai, Hidenori; Doi, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Matrix expansion and cell proliferation are concomitantly observed in various glomerular injuries. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for these changes have not been fully elucidated. We have reported that Smad1 is a key signalling molecule that regulates the transcription of type IV collagen (Col4) in mesangial matrix expansion and is thereby involved in glomerular injury in an acute model of glomerulonephritis. In this study, we addressed the role of Smad1 signalling in accelerated nephrotoxic nephritis (NTN), a model of progressive glomerulonephritis, using conditional deletion of Smad1 in Rosa26CreERT2 mice (Smad1-CKO). Mesangial matrix expansion in the Smad1-CKO mice with NTN was significantly inhibited compared with that in wild type mice with NTN, which was consistent with the decrease in Col4 expression level. On the other hand, STAT3 activation and cell proliferation were not influenced by Smad1 deletion in the NTN model. Therefore, we investigated another factor that activates cell proliferation in the absence of Smad1. Id2 induced VEGF secretion and subsequent STAT3 activation, independently of Smad1 expression in mouse mesangial cells. Here we show that Smad1 plays an important role in the development of glomerular injury without affecting cell proliferation, in progressive glomerulonephritis. PMID:27492138

  10. Conditional Deletion of Smad1 Ameliorates Glomerular Injury in Progressive Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Araki, Makoto; Matsubara, Takeshi; Abe, Hideharu; Torikoshi, Kazuo; Mima, Akira; Iehara, Noriyuki; Fukatsu, Atsushi; Kita, Toru; Arai, Hidenori; Doi, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Matrix expansion and cell proliferation are concomitantly observed in various glomerular injuries. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for these changes have not been fully elucidated. We have reported that Smad1 is a key signalling molecule that regulates the transcription of type IV collagen (Col4) in mesangial matrix expansion and is thereby involved in glomerular injury in an acute model of glomerulonephritis. In this study, we addressed the role of Smad1 signalling in accelerated nephrotoxic nephritis (NTN), a model of progressive glomerulonephritis, using conditional deletion of Smad1 in Rosa26CreERT2 mice (Smad1-CKO). Mesangial matrix expansion in the Smad1-CKO mice with NTN was significantly inhibited compared with that in wild type mice with NTN, which was consistent with the decrease in Col4 expression level. On the other hand, STAT3 activation and cell proliferation were not influenced by Smad1 deletion in the NTN model. Therefore, we investigated another factor that activates cell proliferation in the absence of Smad1. Id2 induced VEGF secretion and subsequent STAT3 activation, independently of Smad1 expression in mouse mesangial cells. Here we show that Smad1 plays an important role in the development of glomerular injury without affecting cell proliferation, in progressive glomerulonephritis. PMID:27492138

  11. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with masked monotypic immunoglobulin deposits

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Christopher P; Messias, Nidia C; Walker, Patrick D; Fidler, Mary E; Cornell, Lynn D; Hernandez, Loren H; Alexander, Mariam P; Sethi, Sanjeev; Nasr, Samih H

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) has recently undergone change from an electron microscopy-based classification scheme to one based largely on immunofluorescence findings. This change is due to the recognition that many of these cases are driven by abnormalities of the alternative complement cascade, resulting in the concept of C3 glomerulopathy. Here we reviewed our case files to identify those with an MPGN pattern that show false negative staining for monoclonal immunoglobulins by routine immunofluorescence. Monoclonal immunoglobulin deposits were unmasked by performing immunofluorescence on formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue after protease digestion. Clinico-pathological details of 16 such cases with a mean serum creatinine of 2.7 mg/dl and mean 24 h proteinuria of 7.1 g were then determined. Hypocomplementemia was present in two-thirds of patients. Fourteen patients had a paraprotein on serum immunofixation, all of which matched the biopsy immunofluorescence staining pattern. Bone marrow biopsy showed plasma cell dyscrasia or B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder in 13 patients. Ten of these patients had findings on biopsy most consistent with C3 glomerulonephritis prior to performing paraffin immunofluorescence. Thus a high index of suspicion is necessary to avoid misdiagnosis in these cases, as many would have been mistakenly diagnosed as C3 glomerulopathy or unclassified MPGN if paraffin immunofluorescence was not performed. PMID:26154922

  12. [Immune complex glomerulonephritis associated with pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Villar, I; Hernández, E; Cozzi, J; Paletta, C; Mathurín, S

    1994-01-01

    A 32 year old man was admitted for dyspnea, hemoptysis, macroscopic hematuria, hypertension (140/100), peripheral edema and hemodynamic decompensation. Lung Xrays revealed pulmonary edema and a cavity in the left apex. Laboratory determinations revealed an altered renal function with increased creatinine and urea levels and nephrotic syndrome. There was leucocyturia, hematuria and cylindruria. The sputum showed a large number of acid-fast bacilli. The patient began anti-tuberculosis treatment with three drugs (isoniacid, rifampicin, pirazinamide). On ultrasonography, both kidneys revealed ecogenic lesions with size, shape and cortico-medular relationship preserved. The patient persisted with altered renal function, steady levels of urea nitrogen, creatinine and potassium, preserved diuresis and hypertension. Bidimensional echocardiogram: LVDD 55 mm, hypoquinetic septum, pericardic effusion, thickened pericardium, pleural effusion, shortening fraction decreased. He received treatment for this congestive cardiac failure and hypertension with enalapril, nifedipine and fursemide. A percutaneous renal biopsy was performed with anatomopathologic diagnosis of diffuse encocapillar proliferative glomerulonephritis with crescents (15%) and total glomerular sclerosis (33%). Immunofluorescence: positive, immune-complexes with IgM and C3. The patient gradually recovered his normal renal function, improved his pleural effusions and normalized his cardiac function. He was discharged in good clinical condition on the 69th day of anti-tuberculosis treatment. An association between pulmonary tuberculosis and glomerulonephritis is discussed. It is proposed that renal lesions might be the consequence of the tuberculosis due to the sedimentation of circulating immune-complexes. PMID:7854090

  13. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis masquerading as rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis with pseudo-linear glomerular basement membrane staining.

    PubMed

    El-Husseini, Amr; Aycinena, Juan-Carlos; George, Bennet; Jennings, Stuart; Cornea, Virgilius; Sawaya, B Peter

    2015-10-01

    Fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN) is a rare disorder with poor renal prognosis. It is a heterogeneous disease associated with significant risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Its etiology and pathogenesis have not been clearly identified. We report a case of a patient presenting with hypertensive crisis, nephrotic range proteinuria, and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN). The kidney biopsy demonstrates crescentic GN on light microscopy (LM) and strong pseudo-linear/globular glomerular basement membrane (GBM) staining for immunoglobulin G on immunofluorescence (IF), suggestive of anti-GBM disease. However, circulating anti-GBM antibodies were negative. Electron microscopy (EM) revealed fibrillary deposits in the GBM, confirming the diagnosis of FGN. Review of the literature revealed very few reported similar cases. It appears that severe hypertension and heavy proteinuria, while uncommon in anti-GBM disease, are consistent findings in RPGN form of FGN. PMID:26249548

  14. Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis due to coexistent anti-glomerular basement membrane disease and fibrillary glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Zacharek, Claudia C.; Fervenza, Fernando C.; Cornell, Lynn D.; Sethi, Sanjeev; Herrera Hernandez, Loren P.; Nasr, Samih H.; Alexander, Mariam P.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease is a major cause of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN). On the other hand, fibrillary glomerulonephritis (GN) typically presents as proteinuria, hematuria and renal insufficiency, but rarely as RPGN. Without electron microscopy, the diagnosis of fibrillary GN can be missed. We report a 68-year-old white woman who presented with RPGN with kidney biopsy demonstrating diffuse crescentic GN on light microscopy. By immunofluorescence, there was bright linear staining of the GBMs and smudgy mesangial staining for immunoglobulin G, C3, and kappa and lambda light chain. Electron microscopy revealed fibrillary deposits in the GBM and mesangium. A serum test for anti-GBM antibody was positive. To our knowledge, this is the first report of coexistence of fibrillary GN in a patient with anti-GBM disease. Electron microscopy is critical to identify the coexistence of other GN in patients presenting with crescentic GN. PMID:26798468

  15. De novo C3 glomerulonephritis in a renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Nahm, Ji Hae; Song, Seung Hwan; Kim, Yu Seun; Cheong, Hae-Il; Lim, Beom Jin; Kim, Beom Seok; Jeong, Hyeon Joo

    2016-01-01

    C3 glomerulonephritis (C3GN) is a recently described, rare glomerular disease characterized by predominant or sole glomerular C3 deposits. Morphologic features of C3GN are similar to those of dense deposit disease (DDD); however, ribbon-like intramembranous electron-dense deposits are absent in the former. We report a case of de novo C3GN in a renal allograft with morphologic transformation to DDD. A 6-year-old boy presented with congenital left renal agenesis and right ureteropelvic junction obstruction. The patient underwent pyeloplasty but experienced recurrent urinary tract infections. At the age of 22 years, he received a renal allograft from a living related donor. C3GN was diagnosed after 1 year of transplantation; initial histology showed minimal mesangiopathy and this progressed to mesangial proliferation and membranoproliferative features over the next 7 years. Serum creatinine levels were stabilized with anti-rejection treatments for combating repeated episodes of acute rejection; however, glomerular and tubular band-like electron-dense deposits became evident. PMID:26986539

  16. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in a young cat.

    PubMed

    Asano, Tomoko; Tsukamoto, Atsushi; Ohno, Koichi; Ogihara, Kikumi; Kamiie, Junichi; Shirota, Kinji

    2008-12-01

    A 9-month-old male Japanese domestic cat showed pleural effusion, ascites, azotemia, hypoproteinemia and severe proteinuria. Histopathology of the percutaneous renal biopsy specimen revealed that all glomeruli showed intense mesangial hypercellularity with an increased mesangial matrix and thickening of the capillary walls, resulting in lobular accentuation of the glomerular tufts. Frequent duplication of the capillary walls was also observed. Immunostaining for alpha-smooth muscle actin distinctly revealed mesangial interposition. Diffuse global and linear deposition of C3 and IgG was observed mostly along the peripheral capillary loops. Electron microscopy confirmed frequent circumferential mesangial interposition and subendothelial dense-deposits in the glomerulus. The glomerular lesion was consistent with human membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type I, and might be a rare case that developed at young age. PMID:19122409

  17. Experimental proliferative glomerulonephritis in the cat.

    PubMed

    Bishop, S A; Stokes, C R; Lucke, V M

    1992-01-01

    A model of chronic serum sickness was used to induce immune-complex glomerulonephritis in seven experimental cats, by daily intravenous inoculation of an increasing dose (5 to 35 mg) of human serum albumin (HSA). At week four, two of the seven animals developed anterior uveitis. At week 23, two different animals developed the subcutaneous oedema characteristic of the nephrotic syndrome (NS), whilst the other five cats appeared clinically normal. The kidneys were examined at necropsy by light microscopy and by transmission electron microscopy. The glomeruli of four animals (three with both proteinuria and uraemia, and one with proteinuria only) showed morphological changes under light microscopy. The abnormalities suggested that a diffuse mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) had been induced in three cats and diffuse membranoproliferative GN induced in another. Ultrastructural studies revealed electron-dense deposits (immune-complexes) in six of the seven cats. Two cats without glomerular abnormalities by light microscopy had mesangial deposits and three cats with mesangial proliferative GN had deposits at mesangial, subendothelial and/or subepithelial sites. The single cat with membranoproliferative GN had deposits at mesangial, subendothelial, subepithelial and intramembranous sites. Immunohistological examination (peroxidase-antiperoxidase technique) showed that HSA and immunoglobulin (IgG and IgM) were deposited in the glomeruli of these cats. Deposits were the most dense in cats with more severe renal lesions. Deposits of IgM were most abundant. An extensive cellular infiltrate, comprising macrophages, neutrophils and plasma cells, was observed only in the four animals which showed abnormalities in glomerular ultrastructure. The disease induced in these cats thus appears to differ from the membranous nephropathy previously described in the cat and bears a close resemblance to immune complex (IC) disease in man. In view of the relatively few specific

  18. Membranous glomerulonephritis associated with Mycobacterium shimoidei pulmonary infection

    PubMed Central

    Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Kushida, Yoshio; Bandoh, Shuji; Ishii, Tomoya; Haba, Reiji; Tadokoro, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki; Takahama, Takayuki; Kita, Nobuyuki; Dobashi, Hiroaki; Matsunaga, Takuya

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 83 Final Diagnosis: Membranous glomerulonephritis Symptoms: Producting cough Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Rare disease Background: Membranous glomerulonephritis can occur secondarily from infectious diseases. There are no reports describing membranous glomerulonephritis caused by non-tuberculous mycobacterium infection. However, several cases with membranous glomerulonephritis due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been reported. Mycobacterium shimoidei is an uncommon pathogen, and less than 20 cases with this species have been reported. A therapeutic regimen for this infection has not been established yet. Case Report: An 83-year-old Japanese man presented with productive cough for 6 months. Computed tomography scan showed multiple cavities in the bilateral pulmonary fields. Acid-fast bacilli were evident in his sputum by Ziehl-Neelsen staining (Gaffky 3). PCR amplifications for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium, and Mycobacterium intracellulare were all negative. Finally, Mycobacterium shimoidei was identified by rpoB sequencing and 16S rRNA sequencing. Urine examination showed a sub-nephrotic range of proteinuria and histology of the kidney showed membranous glomerulonephritis. Antimycobacterial treatment with clarithromycin, rifampicin, and ethambutol dramatically improved not only the pulmonary disease, but also the proteinuria. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, the presented case is the first report showing non-tuberculous mycobacterium-induced secondary membranous glomerulonephritis. A combination with clarithromycin, ethambutol, and rifampicin might be effective for treatment of Mycobacterium shimoidei infection. PMID:24367720

  19. Murine Double Minute-2 Inhibition Ameliorates Established Crescentic Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Mulay, Shrikant R; Romoli, Simone; Desai, Jyaysi; Honarpisheh, Mohammad Mohsen; Kumar, Santhosh V; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Thomasova, Dana

    2016-06-01

    Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis is characterized by glomerular necroinflammation and crescent formation. Its treatment includes unspecific and toxic agents; therefore, the identification of novel therapeutic targets is required. The E3-ubiquitin ligase murine double minute (MDM)-2 is a nonredundant element of NF-κB signaling and the negative regulator of tumor suppressor gene TP53-mediated cell cycle arrest and cell death. We hypothesized that the MDM2 would drive crescentic glomerulonephritis by NF-κB-dependent glomerular inflammation and by p53-dependent parietal epithelial cell hyperproliferation. Indeed, the pre-emptive MDM2 blockade by nutlin-3a ameliorated all aspects of crescentic glomerulonephritis. MDM2 inhibition had identical protective effects in Trp53-deficient mice, with the exception of crescent formation, which was not influenced by nutlin-3a treatment. In vitro experiments confirmed the contribution of MDM2 for induction of NF-κB-dependent cytokines in murine glomerular endothelial cells and for p53-dependent parietal epithelial cell proliferation. To evaluate MDM2 blockade as a potential therapeutic intervention in rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis, we treated mice with established glomerulonephritis with nutlin-3a. Delayed onset of nutlin-3a treatment was equally protective as the pre-emptive treatment in abrogating crescentic glomerulonephritis. Together, the pathogenic effects of MDM2 are twofold, that is, p53-independent NF-κB activation increasing intraglomerular inflammation and p53-dependent parietal epithelial cell hyperplasia and crescent formation. We therefore propose MDM2 blockade as a potential novel therapeutic strategy in rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. PMID:27102769

  20. Treatment of experimental mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis with non-anticoagulant heparin: therapeutic efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Burg, M; Ostendorf, T; Mooney, A; Koch, K M; Floege, J

    1997-04-01

    Treatment with conventional heparin is effective in experimental mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis. However, the long-term effects and safety of this therapy, in particular in the presence of mesangiolysis, have not been assessed. In addition, this therapy has been hampered by bleeding complications. In the present study, therefore, we investigated the long-term effects of a short course of non-anticoagulant (NA) heparin treatment in the anti-Thy 1.1 mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis, in which early immune-mediated mesangiolysis subsequently leads to mesangial hyperproliferation. Rats received continuous ip NA-heparin or vehicle during the active mesangioproliferative phase (Days 2 to 9; early treatment) or during the early resolution phase (Days 10 to 17; late treatment). Whereas NA-heparin in the early treatment group did not affect the glomerular macrophage, lymphocyte, or platelet influx, it did lead to significantly decreased glomerular cellularity, mesangial cell proliferation, alpha-smooth muscle actin, desmin expression (ie, markers of activated mesangial cells), and matrix accumulation as well as to persistent mesangiolytic lesions including microaneurysms. Despite this latter finding, at Day 120, NA-heparin-treated rats of the early treatment group showed significantly better renal function and less proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis than vehicle-infused rats. In contrast, late therapy with NA-heparin neither accelerated resolution of the nephritis or otherwise affected the course of the disease. We conclude that transient NA-heparin therapy is effective in mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis, both acutely and long term, when it is initiated during the active phase of the disease. Also, NA-heparin therapy is safe even in glomerular diseases accompanied by mesangiolysis. PMID:9111513

  1. Eculizumab and Recurrent C3 Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Gurkan, Sevgi; Fyfe, Billie; Weiss, Lynne; Xiao, Xue; Zhang, Yuzhou; Smith, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Hyperactivity of the alternative complement pathway is the principle defect in the C3 glomerulopathies (C3G). Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody that binds to C5 to prevent formation of the membrane attack complex, has been shown to be beneficial in some patients with this disease. Design, setting, participants & measurements In this open-label, proof-of-concept efficacy-and-safety study, a patient with the initial diagnosis of Dense Deposit Disease (DDD) and allograft recurrence of C3 (C3GN) glomerulonephritis was treated with eculizumab every-other-week for 1 year. The patient had pathological evidence of C3GN and proteinuria >1 g/d at enrollment. He underwent graft biopsy before enrollment and repeat biopsy at 6 months and 12 months. Results Although no mutations were identified in complement genes, functional studies were positive for C3 nephritic factors and elevated levels of soluble membrane attack complex (sMAC). On therapy, sMAC levels normalized and although proteinuria initially decreased, during therapy it increased reaching pre-treatment levels at 12 months. Although serum creatinine remained stable, repeat allograft biopsies showed progression of disease. Conclusions Clinical and histopathologic data suggest a partial response to eculizumab in this patient. While eculizumab blocked activation of the terminal complement cascade, persistent dysregulation of alternative pathway remained, showing that eculizumab alone cannot control disease in this patient. Additional research is required to identify effective anticomplement therapy for this group of C3G patients. PMID:23689905

  2. siRNA-Based Therapy Ameliorates Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Hideki; Hori, Yuichi; Kaname, Shinya; Yamada, Koei; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Matsumoto, Satoru; Miyata, Kanjiro; Oba, Makoto; Yamada, Akira; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2010-01-01

    RNA interference by short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) holds promise as a therapeutic strategy, but use of siRNAs in vivo remains limited. Here, we developed a system to target delivery of siRNAs to glomeruli via poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(l-lysine)-based vehicles. The siRNA/nanocarrier complex was approximately 10 to 20 nm in diameter, a size that would allow it to move across the fenestrated endothelium to access to the mesangium. After intraperitoneal injection of fluorescence-labeled siRNA/nanocarrier complexes, we detected siRNAs in the blood circulation for a prolonged time. Repeated intraperitoneal administration of a mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) siRNA/nanocarrier complex suppressed glomerular MAPK1 mRNA and protein expression in a mouse model of glomerulonephritis; this improved kidney function, reduced proteinuria, and ameliorated glomerular sclerosis. Furthermore, this therapy reduced the expression of the profibrotic markers TGF-β1, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and fibronectin. In conclusion, we successfully silenced intraglomerular genes with siRNA using nanocarriers. This technique could aid the investigation of molecular mechanisms of renal disease and has potential as a molecular therapy of glomerular diseases. PMID:20203158

  3. Metabolic Syndrome in IgA Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Kaartinen, Kati; Syrjänen, Jaana; Pörsti, Ilkka; Harmoinen, Aimo; Huhtala, Heini; Mustonen, Jukka

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Metabolic syndrome (MetS) may have an independent impact on the development of chronic kidney disease. This study examines the prevalence of MetS in subjects with IgA glomerulonephritis (IgAGN) and its impact on disease progression in a retrospective fashion. Patients and Methods Altogether, 174 subjects (104 males) were examined 11 years (first visit) after IgAGN diagnosis and again after 16 years (second visit; 144 subjects responded). Different glomerular filtration markers were utilized. The MetS criteria by Alberti et al. [Circulation 2009;120:1640-1645] were applied, in which the presence of any three of five risk factors (elevated waist circumference, triglycerides, glucose, existence of hypertension, or reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) constitutes the diagnosis. Results The prevalence of MetS at the first visit was 39%, corresponding to that of the general Finnish population. In univariate analyses, MetS was significantly associated with the progression of IgAGN at the second visit. However, in multivariate analyses, the existence of MetS was not a significant prognostic determinant. Conclusion The number of subjects with MetS among IgAGN patients and the general population is equal in Finland. MetS does not seem to be an independent prognostic variable. PMID:25337083

  4. Ten-Year Follow-up of Patients with Epidemic Post Infectious Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Sergio Wyton L.; Mastroianni-Kirsztajn, Gianna; Sesso, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Background Scarce information on outcomes of epidemic post infectious glomerulonephritis is available. This is a 10-year follow-up of the patients that developed acute glomerulonephritis in an epidemic outbreak caused by group C Streptococcus zooepidemicus in Brazil in 1998, that were also previously evaluated 2 and 5 years after the acute episode. Methods In this prospective study 60 cases (out of 134 in 1998) were reevaluated after 10 years, as well as community controls matched by gender and age. They underwent clinical and renal function evaluation, including serum creatinine and cystatin C, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), albuminuria and hematuria. Results Comparisons of clinical and renal function aspects of 60 patients and 48 community controls have not shown significant differences (eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73m2 and/or albuminuria >30mg/g creatinine: 13.8% vs. 12.2%, respectively, p = 0.817) except for a higher frequency of hypertension in the cases (45.0% vs. 20.8%, p = 0.009). Comparing the same patients affected in the acute episode, 2, 5 and 10 years later, it was observed an improvement of median eGFR levels at 2 years and a trend toward subsequent stabilization in these levels, associated with decrease in albuminuria and increased hypertension rates in the last survey. At 10 years it was not observed additional reduction of renal function using serum creatinine, eGFR and cystatin C. Conclusions During the acute episode of epidemic GN a considerable proportion of patients presented hypertension and reduced renal function; after 2 years and particularly at this 10-year follow-up survey there was no worsening of renal function parameters, except for persistent higher frequency of hypertension. Nevertheless, a longer follow up is necessary to confirm that progressive loss of renal function will not occur. PMID:25962068

  5. Partial lipodystrophy, C3 nephritic factor and clinically inapparent mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, W M; Bardana, E J; Wuepper, K; Houghton, D; Border, W A; Götze, O; Schreiber, R

    1977-05-01

    A case of partial lipodystrophy with C3 nephritic factor was found to be associated with mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis although all clinical parameters of renal function were normal. Diagnosis of mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis required renal biopsy. Nephriti factor obtained from this patient was immunochemically related to nephritic factor isolated from the serum of patients with typical mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis without partial lipodystrophy. PMID:860726

  6. Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis Presenting as Pauci-Immune Crescentic Glomerulonephritis in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kunjal, Ryan; Makary, Raafat; Poenariu, Andreea

    2016-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis rarely affects females of reproductive age. A 28-year-old African American woman presented at 8 weeks of gestation with intractable vomiting attributed to hyperemesis gravidarum. She was found to have acute kidney injury that was unresponsive to vigorous fluid resuscitation and urine sediment examination was suggestive of an underlying glomerulonephritis. Serum c-ANCA and PR3 were elevated and there was no peripheral eosinophilia. During her course she also developed one episode of small volume hemoptysis with right upper lobe infiltrates on CT Chest. There were no cutaneous manifestations of vasculitis or upper respiratory symptoms. Renal biopsy revealed a pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis (PICGN). The diagnosis was consistent with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). Management initially comprised teratogen sparing agents; steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin; and plasma exchange. The response was suboptimal and she became dependent on daily renal replacement therapy. Ultimately the pregnancy was terminated allowing for traditional treatment approaches with dramatic effect. This is the first case of GPA presenting as PICGN in pregnancy and highlights the challenges of its management. PMID:27293925

  7. Classifying murine glomerulonephritis using optical coherence tomography and optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Du, Yong; Singh, Manmohan; Wu, Chen; Han, Zhaolong; Li, Jiasong; Chang, Anthony; Mohan, Chandra; Larin, Kirill V

    2016-08-01

    Acute glomerulonephritis caused by antiglomerular basement membrane marked by high mortality. The primary reason for this is delayed diagnosis via blood examination, urine analysis, tissue biopsy, or ultrasound and X-ray computed tomography imaging. Blood, urine, and tissue-based diagnoses can be time consuming, while ultrasound and CT imaging have relatively low spatial resolution, with reduced sensitivity. Optical coherence tomography is a noninvasive and high-resolution imaging technique that provides superior spatial resolution (micrometer scale) as compared to ultrasound and CT. Changes in tissue properties can be detected based on the optical metrics analyzed from the OCT signals, such as optical attenuation and speckle variance. Furthermore, OCT does not rely on ionizing radiation as with CT imaging. In addition to structural changes, the elasticity of the kidney can significantly change due to nephritis. In this work, OCT has been utilized to quantify the difference in tissue properties between healthy and nephritic murine kidneys. Although OCT imaging could identify the diseased tissue, its classification accuracy is clinically inadequate. By combining optical metrics with elasticity, the classification accuracy improves from 76% to 95%. These results show that OCT combined with OCE can be a powerful tool for identifying and classifying nephritis. Therefore, the OCT/OCE method could potentially be used as a minimally invasive tool for longitudinal studies during the progression and therapy of glomerulonephritis as well as complement and, perhaps, substitute highly invasive tissue biopsies. Elastic-wave propagation in mouse healthy and nephritic kidneys. PMID:26791097

  8. Fundus changes in mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis type II: vitreous fluorophotometry.

    PubMed Central

    Raines, M F; Duvall-Young, J; Short, C D

    1989-01-01

    We have described a complex abnormality of retinal pigment epithelium, Bruch's membrane, and choriocapillaris in mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis (MCGN) type II. Patients with MCGN type II were examined by vitreous fluorophotometry which reveals that there is a breakdown of the blood retinal barrier (BRB) in those patients with the typical fundus lesions. The function of this barrier was calculated as a penetration ratio and was statistically greater in these patients when compared with a group of (a) normal persons, (b) patients with drusen, and (c) patients with other forms of glomerulonephritis. Images PMID:2605145

  9. Pauci-Immune Crescentic Glomerulonephritis: An ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Rafeel; Rehman, Amina; Valecha, Gautam; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) is a syndrome signified by a precipitous loss of renal function, with features of glomerulonephritis including dysmorphic erythrocyturia and glomerular proteinuria. RPGN is associated with extensive crescent formation, and, thus, the clinical term RPGN is often used interchangeably with the pathologic term crescentic glomerulonephritis (CGN). From an immunopathologic standpoint, primary RPGN is divided into pauci-immune GN (PICG), anti-GBM GN, and immune complex GN. PICG, the most common etiology of primary RPGN, refers to a necrotizing glomerulonephritis with few or no immune deposits by immunofluorescence (IF) or electron microscopy (EM). In most patients, pauci-immune CGN is a component of a systemic small vessel vasculitis such as granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). Approximately 90% of patients with PICG have circulating ANCA antibodies, leading to the nomenclature ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). Recent research has identified several other antibodies associated with PICG, which is now understood to be a complex spectrum of disease with considerable overlap in terms of clinical phenotype and outcomes. In addition, several genetic and environmental factors have recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of this disorder. With new prognostic classifications, enhanced understanding of immunopathologic mechanisms, and novel treatment paradigms, clinical and experimental interest in PICG remains high. PMID:26688808

  10. Th1 and Th17 Cells Induce Proliferative Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Shaun A.; Steinmetz, Oliver M.; Li, Ming; Kausman, Joshua Y.; Semple, Timothy; Edgtton, Kristy L.; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Braley, Hal; Holdsworth, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    Th1 effector CD4+ cells contribute to the pathogenesis of proliferative and crescentic glomerulonephritis, but whether effector Th17 cells also contribute is unknown. We compared the involvement of Th1 and Th17 cells in a mouse model of antigen-specific glomerulonephritis in which effector CD4+ cells are the only components of adaptive immunity that induce injury. We planted the antigen ovalbumin on the glomerular basement membrane of Rag1−/− mice using an ovalbumin-conjugated non-nephritogenic IgG1 monoclonal antibody against α3(IV) collagen. Subsequent injection of either Th1- or Th17-polarized ovalbumin-specific CD4+ effector cells induced proliferative glomerulonephritis. Mice injected with Th1 cells developed progressive albuminuria over 21 d, histologic injury including 5.5 ± 0.9% crescent formation/segmental necrosis, elevated urinary nitrate, and increased renal NOS2, CCL2, and CCL5 mRNA. Mice injected with Th17 cells developed albuminuria by 3 d; compared with Th1-injected mice, their glomeruli contained more neutrophils and greater expression of renal CXCL1 mRNA. In conclusion, Th1 and Th17 effector cells can induce glomerular injury. Understanding how these two subsets mediate proliferative forms of glomerulonephritis may lead to targeted therapies. PMID:19820122

  11. Th1 and Th17 cells induce proliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Summers, Shaun A; Steinmetz, Oliver M; Li, Ming; Kausman, Joshua Y; Semple, Timothy; Edgtton, Kristy L; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Braley, Hal; Holdsworth, Stephen R; Kitching, A Richard

    2009-12-01

    Th1 effector CD4+ cells contribute to the pathogenesis of proliferative and crescentic glomerulonephritis, but whether effector Th17 cells also contribute is unknown. We compared the involvement of Th1 and Th17 cells in a mouse model of antigen-specific glomerulonephritis in which effector CD4+ cells are the only components of adaptive immunity that induce injury. We planted the antigen ovalbumin on the glomerular basement membrane of Rag1(-/-) mice using an ovalbumin-conjugated non-nephritogenic IgG1 monoclonal antibody against alpha3(IV) collagen. Subsequent injection of either Th1- or Th17-polarized ovalbumin-specific CD4+ effector cells induced proliferative glomerulonephritis. Mice injected with Th1 cells developed progressive albuminuria over 21 d, histologic injury including 5.5 +/- 0.9% crescent formation/segmental necrosis, elevated urinary nitrate, and increased renal NOS2, CCL2, and CCL5 mRNA. Mice injected with Th17 cells developed albuminuria by 3 d; compared with Th1-injected mice, their glomeruli contained more neutrophils and greater expression of renal CXCL1 mRNA. In conclusion, Th1 and Th17 effector cells can induce glomerular injury. Understanding how these two subsets mediate proliferative forms of glomerulonephritis may lead to targeted therapies. PMID:19820122

  12. Urinary Thrombin: A Novel Marker of Glomerular Inflammation for the Diagnosis of Crescentic Glomerulonephritis (Prospective Observational Study)

    PubMed Central

    Kitamoto, Yasunori; Arizono, Kenji; Fukui, Hiroyoshi; Tomita, Kimio; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Taguma, Yoshio; Imamura, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Crescentic glomerulonephritis (CresGN), an uncommon rapidly progressive disease, is characterized by severe glomerular inflammation with fibrin deposition. The lack of specific CresGN biomarkers delays diagnosis and threatens life. Because fibrin deposits in CresGN glomeruli indicate thrombin generation, we hypothesized that thrombin is excreted in urine and is a specific CresGN biomarker. Methods We measured urinary thrombin activity in 200 untreated patients (17 with CresGN, 183 with primary glomerulonephritis) and controls (8 patients with healed CresGN, 11 with nephrosclerosis, and 10 with tubulointerstitial nephritis, and 66 healthy volunteers). CresGN types included 15 pauci-immune and 2 immune complex. We assessed the diagnostic accuracy of thrombinuria in 169 patients with hematuria and proteinuria. Renal biopsy tissues were immunostained for tissue factor and fibrin. We analyzed the relationship of thrombinuria to plasma thrombin-antithrombin complex, hematuria, proteinuria, glomerular filtration rate, glomerular fibrin deposition, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs), and C-reactive protein (CRP). We studied changes in thrombin activities after glucocorticoid treatment in 12 patients with thrombinuria. Results The highest thrombinuria occurrence was in CresGN (70.6%), followed by membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (41.7%), IgA nephropathy (9.2%), and acute glomerulonephritis (0%). More than 75% of patients with nonproliferative glomerulonephritis manifested no thrombinuria. No controls had thrombinuria. Thrombinuria showed high CresGN specificity (90.1%) and moderate sensitivity (70.6%) and was detected in 4 of 7 patients with ANCA-negative CresGN. In CresGN, thrombinuria was associated with fibrin deposition in glomerular extracapillary tissue, where monocytes/macrophages expressed tissue factor. Thrombinuria in CresGN was unrelated to plasma thrombin-antithrombin complex, hematuria, proteinuria, glomerular filtration rate, and

  13. A possible post-streptococcal movement disorder with chorea and tics.

    PubMed

    Kerbeshian, J; Burd, L; Pettit, R

    1990-07-01

    A 14-year-old girl developed a movement disorder after a streptococcal infection. In the acute phase of the illness she exhibited simple and complex motor tics and chorea, but all abnormal movements ceased over the following eight months, without recurrence. This case raises questions about the relationship between tics, chorea and auto-immune reactivity. PMID:2391015

  14. Congenital syphilis and glomerulonephritis with evidence for immune pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wiggelinkhuizen, J.; Kaschula, R. O. C.; Uys, C. J.; Kuijten, R. H.; Dale, J.

    1973-01-01

    In 3 infants with congenital syphilis the dominant clinical manifestation of syphilitic kidney disease was the nephrotic syndrome. Mesangioendothelial proliferation was present in 2 cases and mixed proliferative glomerulonephritis with crescent formation in the third. The severity of the clinical and histopathological abnormalities could be related to the apparent duration of the illness. In all 3 cases immune complex deposition could be shown within and along the epithelial aspect of the glomerular basement membrane on light, electron, and immunofluorescent microscopy. These features, together with a reduced total serum haemolytic complement, suggest an immune pathogenesis of the glomerulonephritis associated with early congenital syphilis. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4267344

  15. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated glomerulonephritis in children.

    PubMed

    Hattori, M; Kurayama, H; Koitabashi, Y

    2001-07-01

    Aretrospective investigation was conducted by members of the Japanese Society for Pediatric Nephrology from 1990 to 1997 to define the clinical features and outcome of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated glomerulonephritis in children. Thirty-four ANCA-seropositive Japanese pediatric patients with biopsy-proven pauci-immune necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis were identified. Of these, 3 cases associated with Wegener's granulomatosis were excluded because of the small sample size. Among the 31 patients studied, 10 had a diagnosis of necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis alone and 21 had microscopic polyangiitis. Females predominated (87%), and the median age at onset was 12 yr. Twenty-six patients received treatment with cyclophosphamide and corticosteroids, and five patients received treatment with corticosteroids alone; 84% of patients achieved remission, and 39% of responders relapsed in a median of 24 mo. ANCA titers correlated with response to treatment and disease activity, with some exceptions. Patients were followed for a median of 42 mo (range, 3 to 96 mo). Nine of 31 patients (29.0%) progressed to end-stage renal disease, 6 (19.4%) had reduced renal function, and 15 (48.4%) had normal renal function at the last observation. One patient (3.2%) died from cytomegalovirus infection 3 mo after initiation of therapy. Life-table analysis showed 75% renal survival at 39 mo. Patients who subsequently developed end-stage renal disease (n = 9) had significantly higher average peak serum creatinine levels and more chronic pathologic lesions at diagnosis compared with patients with favorable renal outcome (n = 15). In conclusion, our clinical experience suggests that the clinical disease spectrum of ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis is similar in pediatric and adult patients, but there is a female predominance in children. PMID:11423578

  16. Crescentic glomerulonephritis in a child with Heiner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Sevgi; Karabay-Bayazıt, Aysun; Yılmaz, Mustafa; Gönlüşen, Gülfiliz; Anarat, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Heiner syndrome is a food-induced pulmonary hypersensitivity disease that predominantly affects infants. Chronic respiratory symptoms with pulmonary infiltrates on radiography, positive milk precipitins and resolution of findings upon removal of cow's milk constitute the main features. Severe cases may present with pulmonary hemosiderosis. Few renal manifestations associated with this syndrome have been reported so far. Here we report the first case of Heiner syndrome complicated by crescentic glomerulonephritis after 5 years of follow-up. PMID:26388600

  17. Posterior segment findings in a patient with immunotactoid glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aditi; Prabhu, Rangarajan Venugopal; Patel, Amit K.; Sivaraj, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To present a case with posterior segment findings in a patient with cloudy corneas secondary to immunotactoid glomerulonephritis (ITG). Methods: A 57-year-old female was known to have bilateral cloudy corneas diagnosed 12 years ago secondary to immunotactoid glomerulonephritis. Clinically, fundus examination was difficult to visualise due to the density of her corneal opacities. Results: B-scan ultrasound revealed significant retino-choroidal & non-inflammatory scleral thickening. The macula also showed signs of thickening in both eyes. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) showed thinning of the inner retinal layers and significant choroidal folds in both eyes. Electrodiagnostic tests (EDT) concluded loss of retinal ganglion cells with preservation of retinal function in both eyes. Conclusion: This case widens the spectrum of findings seen in patients diagnosed with Immunotactoid Glomerulonephritis and alerts us to undertake detailed posterior segment examination where possible. Ocular coherence tomography (OCT) and B-scan ultrasonography are important adjuvants to help assess the posterior segment in patients with corneal opacities secondary to ITG.

  18. Hydrogen Peroxide–Inducible Clone-5 Regulates Mesangial Cell Proliferation in Proliferative Glomerulonephritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jamba, Ariunbold; Kondo, Shuji; Urushihara, Maki; Nagai, Takashi; Kim-Kaneyama, Joo-ri; Miyazaki, Akira; Kagami, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide-inducible clone-5 (Hic-5) is a transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-inducible focal adhesion protein. We previously demonstrated that Hic-5 was localized in mesangial cells and its expression was associated with glomerular cell proliferation and matrix expansion in human and rat glomerulonephritis (GN). In the present study, we first assessed the role of Hic-5 in mesangioproliferative GN by injecting Habu venom into heminephrectomized wild type (Hic-5+/+) and Hic-5-deficient (Hic-5-/-) mice. Hic-5+/+ GN mice exhibited glomerular cell proliferation on day 7. Surprisingly, glomerular cell number and Ki-67-positive cells in Hic-5-/- GN mice were significantly greater than those in Hic-5+/+ GN mice on day 7, although the number of glomerular apoptotic cells and the expression of growth factors (platelet-derived growth factor-BB and TGF-β1) and their receptors were similarly increased in both Hic-5+/+ and Hic-5-/- GN mice. In culture experiments, proliferation assays showed that platelet-derived growth factor-BB and TGF-β1 enhanced the proliferation of Hic-5-/- mesangial cells compared with Hic-5+/+ mesangial cells. In addition, mitogenic regulation by Hic-5 was associated with altered and coordinated expression of cell cycle-related proteins including cyclin D1 and p21. The present results suggest that Hic-5 might regulate mesangial cell proliferation in proliferative GN in mice. In conclusion, modulation of Hic-5 expression might have a potential to prevent mesangial cell proliferation in the acute mitogenic phase of glomerulonephritis. PMID:25835392

  19. [Autoimmune hepatitis and membranous glomerulonephritis under immune therapy in chronic hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Paparoupa, Maria; Huy Ho, Ngoc Ahn; Schuppert, Frank

    2016-05-01

    A 63-year-old patient is evaluated for an unclear weight loss with general malaise and fatigue for several months. Serological examination reveales the first diagnosis of a hepatitis-C-virus-genotype-1b-infection with an initial viral load of 980 000 IU / ml. The duration of the infection is suggested to be more than 6 months. Because of the initially elevated anti-nuclear-antibodies (ANA) the diagnosis of an autoimmune hepatitis needs to be excluded. All other liver related autoantibodies and the immunoglobulins (Ig) IgG, IgA and IgM are normal. A liver biopsy is conducted. After a short test with non-pegylated interferon (IFN) liver enzymes remain stable and treatment with pegylated IFN-alfa-2a and ribavirin (RBV) is initiated. The patient is a "rapid viral responder" and his viral load is found under the detection limit within 4 weeks under therapy. On the 16th week, liver enzymes increase rapidly. ANA's and IgG-immunoglobulins are positive. A second lever biopsy does not confirm the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis and the treatment is continued under careful observation of all relevant liver parameters. 21 weeks after the initiation of the treatment, massive peripheral edema, hypoproteinemia and proteinuria are observed. The renal biopsy reveales membranous glomerulonephritis. Because of the preserved renal function, no acute immunosuppression is initiated and the treatment gets completed after overall 24 weeks. Liver and renal parameters return quickly back to normal after treatment discharge. This is the first report of a combined autoimmune reaction with development of autoimmune hepatitis and glomerulonephritis under INF and RBV antiviral therapy for a chronic hepatitis-C-infection. The occurrence of autoimmune manifestations should especially be considered in genetically susceptible individuals or those with positive autoimmunity markers. The initiation of INF for the treatment of chronic hepatitis-C-infection has to be critically evaluated since

  20. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and glomerulonephritis in lysinuric protein intolerance: case reports and autopsy findings of four pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Parto, K; Kallajoki, M; Aho, H; Simell, O

    1994-04-01

    Lysinuric protein intolerance is an autosomal recessive disease caused by defective transport of cationic amino acids. Of the 38 lysinuric protein intolerance patients diagnosed in Finland since 1965, four pediatric patients have died. We describe the clinical courses and autopsy findings for these patients. All patients developed acute respiratory insufficiency. In addition to pulmonary hemorrhages, three of the patients had pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and one had cholesterol granulomas. Three patients had a clinically obvious renal insufficiency, but all four showed histologic signs of immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. The patients also developed hepatic insufficiency with fatty degeneration or cirrhosis. All patients showed anemia, thrombocytopenia, and a severe bleeding tendency. The bone marrow of three patients was hypercellular, but the amount of megakaryocytes was decreased in two cases. Amyloid was present in the lymph nodes and the spleen. Bone specimens showed osteoporosis. We conclude that pediatric patients with lysinuric protein intolerance are predisposed to develop pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and glomerulonephritis. They are also at risk of protein malnutrition in the active growth phase, probably due to higher requirements for total nitrogen and amino acids. PMID:8163273

  1. Proliferative Glomerulonephritis with Monoclonal IgG Deposits

    PubMed Central

    Satoskar, Anjali; Markowitz, Glen S.; Valeri, Anthony M.; Appel, Gerald B.; Stokes, Michael B.; Nadasdy, Tibor; D'Agati, Vivette D.

    2009-01-01

    Dysproteinemias that result in monoclonal glomerular deposits of IgG are relatively uncommon. Here, we report the largest series of proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits, a form of renal involvement by monoclonal gammopathy that mimics immune-complex glomerulonephritis. We retrospectively identified 37 patients, most of whom were white (81%), female (62%), or older than 50 yr (65%). At presentation, 49% had nephrotic syndrome, 68% had renal insufficiency, and 77% had hematuria. In 30% of the patients, we identified a monoclonal serum protein with the same heavy- and light-chain isotypes as the glomerular deposits (mostly IgG1 or IgG2), but only one patient had myeloma. Histologic patterns were predominantly membranoproliferative (57%) or endocapillary proliferative (35%) with membranous features. Electron microscopy revealed granular, nonorganized deposits, and immunofluorescence demonstrated glomerular deposits that stained for a single light-chain isotype and a single heavy-chain subtype, most commonly IgG3κ (53%). During an average of 30.3 mo of follow-up for 32 patients with available data, 38% had complete or partial recovery, 38% had persistent renal dysfunction, and 22% progressed to ESRD. Correlates of ESRD on univariate analysis were higher creatinine at biopsy, percentage of glomerulosclerosis, and degree of interstitial fibrosis but not immunomodulatory treatment or presence of a monoclonal spike. On multivariate analysis, higher percentage of glomerulosclerosis was the only independent predictor of ESRD. Only one patient lacking a monoclonal spike at presentation subsequently developed a monoclonal spike and no patient with a monoclonal spike at presentation subsequently developed a hematologic malignancy. We conclude that proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits does not seem to be a precursor of myeloma in the vast majority of patients. PMID:19470674

  2. Monoclonal gammopathy associated membranous glomerulonephritis: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, K. K.; Joshi, K.; Ramachandran, R.; Nada, R.

    2015-01-01

    A 40-year-old male presented with nephrotic syndrome. Light microscopic analysis of the renal biopsy showed thickening of the glomerular capillary wall. Immunofluorescence examination revealed granular deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) G3-kappa and complement C3 along the glomerular basement membrane. Electron microscopy showed subepithelial electron dense deposits, thus confirming membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) with monoclonal gammopathy. MGN with monoclonal gammopathy is an extremely rare but distinctive entity. This patient was treated with a combination of bortezomib, thalidomide and dexamethasone and showed partial remission of his nephrotic state and dysproteinemia. PMID:25684873

  3. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis associated with limited scleroderma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nakhoul, Georges N; Simon, James F

    2016-04-01

    Fibrillary glomerulonephritis (GN) is a rare glomerular disorder that has been associated with monoclonal gammopathies, malignancies, chronic infections, and autoimmune disorders. We present the case of a 56-year-old woman with limited-type scleroderma and remote discoid lupus, evaluated for dipstick positive hematuria and preserved kidney function. Serologies were negative. Kidney biopsy revealed fibrillary GN. Her renal function and proteinuria remain stable 4 years after her initial diagnosis. This case is unusual both in its presentation and evolution, but mostly because it is the first reported case of fibrillary GN in association with limited type scleroderma. PMID:26709524

  4. A Pediatric Case of Acute Generalized Pustular Eruption without Streptococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, Nobuko; Yoshizawa, Hideka

    2016-01-01

    Generalized pustular lesions characterized by acute onset with fever occur in pustulosis acuta generalisata, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, and generalized pustular psoriasis. In the present report, we describe a pediatric case of generalized pustular eruption that was not completely consistent with clinical features. Our patient had no evidence of a post-streptococcal infection. We observed scattered symmetric eruption of discrete pustules with an inflammatory halo on normal skin. The eruption was absent on her palms and soles of the feet. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports in the English literature of cases with clinical features similar to those of our patient. PMID:27462226

  5. Familial C4B Deficiency and Immune Complex Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Soto, K; Wu, YL; Ortiz, A; Aparício, SR; Yu, CY

    2010-01-01

    Homozygous complement C4B deficiency is described in a Southern European young female patient with Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis (MPGN) type III characterized by renal biopsies with strong complement C4 and IgG deposits. Low C4 levels were independent of clinical evolution or type of immunosuppression and were found in three other family members without renal disease or infections. HLA typing revealed that the patient has homozygous A*02, Cw*06, B*50 at the class I region, and DRB1*08 and DQB1*03 at the class II region. Genotypic and phenotypic studies demonstrated that the patient has homozygous monomodular RCCX in the HLA class III region, with single long C4A genes coding for C4A3 and complete C4B deficiency. Her father, mother, son and niece have heterozygous C4B deficiency. The patient’s deceased brother had a history of Henoch-Schönlein Purpura (HSP), an immune complex-mediated proliferative glomerulonephritis. These findings challenge the putative pathophysiological roles of C4A and C4B and underscore the need to perform functional assays, C4 allotyping and genotyping on patients with persistently low serum levels of a classical pathway complement component and glomerulopathy associated with immune deposits. PMID:20580617

  6. Pauci-Immune Crescentic Glomerulonephritis in Connective Tissue Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Mary; Robin, Adam; Lorna, Campbell; Rosenthal, Ann K.

    2016-01-01

    Pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis is commonly seen in ANCA-associated vasculitis but it is rarely seen during the course of other connective tissue diseases like lupus or Sjogren's syndrome or MCTD. We report 3 cases of pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis in patients with connective tissue disease other than vasculitis. We reviewed literature and made summary of previously reported cases of this rare entity. Clinical and laboratory features of these patients varied widely, but most of patients have met criteria for lupus. In this small population of patients there is no correlation with ANCAs. Most of the patients were treated with aggressive immunosuppression and did well if they were treated early in the course of their disease. One of our patients required renal transplant, but she presented late in the course of her disease, as evidenced by chronicity on her renal biopsy. Whether these patients are overlap of vasculitis and other connective tissue diseases or to be considered as a separate entity is yet to be described. Clinicians must be aware of these presentations because initial presentation can be severe. PMID:27504208

  7. Effect of cyclosporin on immune complex deposition in murine glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, D G; Fennell, J S; Sheils, O; Gaffney, E F; Feighery, C F

    1991-01-01

    Chronic glomerulonephritis (GN) was induced in N/M mice by daily injections of human serum albumin (HSA). The glomerular lesion was similar to that observed in human membranous GN and was characterized by intense mesangial and capillary loop immunofluorescent staining for HSA, IgG and C3. Electron microscopic examination revealed numerous electron-dense deposits in the mesangium and along the subepithelial side of the glomerular basement membrane, the latter deposits being associated with membranous spikes. Chronically injected mice that had been treated with cyclosporin (CsA) from Day 1 had different patterns of immune complex deposition. Mesangial deposition was apparently unaltered but no subepithelial deposits or spikes were evident. In addition, only two out of 21 HSA-injected mice which began CsA treatment on Day 21 had subepithelial deposits. There was no significant difference in serum levels of HSA-specific IgG between the three groups of mice. CsA treatment would therefore appear to ameliorate the immunopathology of antigen-induced glomerulonephritis in this model without affecting serum antibody levels, and may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of human membranous GN. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1828056

  8. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis: the role for laser microdissection and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepika; Green, Jamie A; Bastacky, Sheldon; Theis, Jason D; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2014-02-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy is increasingly recognized as a common cause of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN); however, establishing this diagnosis can be challenging. We report the case of a 58-year-old asymptomatic woman who presented with proteinuria with protein excretion of 5,000mg/d, microscopic hematuria, and normal kidney function. Kidney biopsy was consistent with MPGN pattern of injury. Immunofluorescence studies were positive for nonspecific segmental immunoglobulin M (IgM) and C3 staining. Electron microscopy showed subendothelial, subepithelial, and mesangial electron-dense deposits. The workup excluded an infectious or autoimmune disease, but IgG κ monoclonal protein was detected in serum at a concentration of 0.4mg/dL. Because there was a mismatch between the serum monoclonal protein (IgG κ) and immunofluorescence staining pattern (nonspecific IgM, no light chain restriction), laser microdissection and mass spectrometry were performed on the kidney biopsy tissue. This identified the deposits as monoclonal IgG κ, thereby leading to the diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy-associated MPGN. Our case emphasizes the importance of searching for an underlying cause of MPGN, reviews the technique of laser microdissection-mass spectrometry, and highlights its application as a pathology tool for the evaluation of monoclonal gammopathy-related glomerulonephritis. PMID:24145022

  9. Spontaneous remission of membranous glomerulonephritis with successful fetal outcome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan-Mei; Zhou, Hui-Rong; Zhang, Ling; Yang, Ke-Ke; Luo, Jiang-Xi; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) represents an immunologically mediated disease characterized by deposition of immune complexes in the glomerular subepithelial space. Persistent proteinuria at diagnosis predicts poor prognosis. Pregnancy with MGN is a risk of fetal loss and may worsen maternal renal function. Here, we report a lady with MGN and proteinuria achieved spontaneous remission and successful fetal outcome naive to any medications. The 26-year old woman had 1-year history of persistent proteinuria (5.5–12.56 g/24 hours) and biopsy-proven MGN. Histopathological characteristics included glomerular basement membrane spikes, subepithelial monoclonal IgG immunofluorescence, and diffuse electron dense deposits. She was sticking to a regular morning exercise routine without any medications. After successful delivery of a full-term baby girl, the mother had improved proteinuria (0.56 g/24 hours) and albuminuria (351.96 g/24 hours contrasting 2281.6 g/24 hours before pregnancy). The baby had normal height and body weight at 4 months old. We identified more pregnancies with MGN in 5 case reports and 5 clinical series review articles (7–33 cases included). Spontaneous remission of maternal MGN with good fetal outcome rarely occurred in mothers on immunosuppressive therapy. Mothers naive to immunosuppressive therapy may achieve spontaneous remission of maternal membranous glomerulonephritis and successful fetal outcome. Theoretically, fetus might donate stem cells to heal mother's kidney. PMID:27368022

  10. Pauci-Immune Crescentic Glomerulonephritis in Connective Tissue Disease.

    PubMed

    Yeturi, Supraja; Cronin, Mary; Robin, Adam; Lorna, Campbell; Rosenthal, Ann K

    2016-01-01

    Pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis is commonly seen in ANCA-associated vasculitis but it is rarely seen during the course of other connective tissue diseases like lupus or Sjogren's syndrome or MCTD. We report 3 cases of pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis in patients with connective tissue disease other than vasculitis. We reviewed literature and made summary of previously reported cases of this rare entity. Clinical and laboratory features of these patients varied widely, but most of patients have met criteria for lupus. In this small population of patients there is no correlation with ANCAs. Most of the patients were treated with aggressive immunosuppression and did well if they were treated early in the course of their disease. One of our patients required renal transplant, but she presented late in the course of her disease, as evidenced by chronicity on her renal biopsy. Whether these patients are overlap of vasculitis and other connective tissue diseases or to be considered as a separate entity is yet to be described. Clinicians must be aware of these presentations because initial presentation can be severe. PMID:27504208

  11. Rituximab therapy for primary glomerulonephritis: Report on two cases

    PubMed Central

    Fabrizi, Fabrizio; Cresseri, Donata; Fogazzi, Giovanni B; Moroni, Gabriella; Passerini, Patrizia; Martin, Paul; Messa, Piergiorgio

    2015-01-01

    The evidence in the medical literature on the efficacy and safety of rituximab therapy for primary glomerulonephritis is limited and controversial. We describe two male Caucasian patients with rapidly progressive kidney failure due to primary proliferative glomerulonephritis. Both of them received high-dose intravenous corticosteroids and oral cyclophosphamide with limited benefit. The first patient (hepatitis C virus-negative mixed cryoglobulinemia) underwent plasma-exchange with intravenous immunoglobulins; he showed significant benefit on kidney function (he became dialysis independent with serum creatinine going back to 1.6 mg/dL) after one rituximab pulse even if urinary abnormalities were still present. No improvement in renal function or urinary changes occurred in the second patient. Both these individuals developed sepsis over the follow-up, the first patient died two months after rituximab therapy. This report is in keeping with the occurrence of severe infections after rituximab therapy in patients with renal impairment at baseline and concomitant high-dose steroids. PMID:26301235

  12. Bilateral renal vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism secondary to membranous glomerulonephritis treated with percutaneous catheter thrombectomy and localized thrombolytic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Janda, S. P.

    2010-01-01

    Renal vein thrombosis (RVT) is a rare event but is prevalent in patients with nephrotic syndrome. Bilateral RVT is even rarer. The literature is relatively sparse in terms of the management of RVT because of its rarity and consists of a few case reports and case series. We present a case with bilateral RVT complicated by a pulmonary embolism in a patient with membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN). A 19-year-old female presented with acute flank pain and worsening renal function after a couple of weeks in hospital while being treated with diuretics for anasarca secondary to MGN. Venography was used for diagnosis. The patient underwent percutaneous catheter thrombectomy and localized thrombolysis achieving resolution of pain and improvement of renal function. The patient was then anticoagulated for life with warfarin. PMID:21072156

  13. Combined optical coherence tomography and optical coherence elastography for glomerulonephritis classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Du, Yong; Singh, Manmohan; Wu, Chen; Han, Zhaolong; Li, Jiasong; Mohammadzai, Qais; Raghunathan, Raksha; Hsu, Thomas; Noorani, Shezaan; Chang, Anthony; Mohan, Chandra; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    Acute Glomerulonephritis caused by anti-glomerular basement membrane disease has a high mortality due to delayed diagnosis. Thus, an accurate and early diagnosis is critical for preserving renal function. Currently, blood, urine, and tissue-based diagnoses can be time consuming, while ultrasound and CT imaging have relatively low spatial resolution. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive imaging technique that provides superior spatial resolution (micron scale) as compared to ultrasound and CT. Pathological changes in tissue properties can be detected based on the optical metrics analyzed from the OCT signal, such as optical attenuation and speckle variance. Moreover, OCT does not rely on ionizing radiation as with CT imaging. In addition to structural changes, the elasticity of the kidney can significantly change due to nephritis. In this work, we utilized OCT to detect the difference in tissue properties between healthy and nephritic murine kidneys. Although OCT imaging could identify the diseased tissue, classification accuracy using only optical metrics was clinically inadequate. By combining optical metrics with elasticity, the classification accuracy improved from 76% to 95%. These results show that OCT combined with OCE can be potentially useful for nephritis detection.

  14. Outcome of glomerulonephritis in live-donor renal transplant recipients: A single-centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Ahmed Ibrahim; Adel, Hany; Rahim, Mona Abdel; Wafa, Ehab Wahba; Shokeir, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the frequency and risk factors affecting the incidence of post-transplantation glomerulonephritis (GN) and the impact of GN on the survival of the graft and the patient. Patients and methods Patients were classified based on histological findings into three groups. Graft survival was ascertained using the Kaplan–Meier method and significance calculated using log-rank tests. For multivariate analysis the Cox model was used. Results Transplant glomerulopathy was the most prevalent glomerular disease in our series followed by recurrent GN and lastly de novo GN. In all, 50% of the de novo GN group had diabetes. The worst graft outcomes were in the recurrent GN group (P = 0.044). Multivariate analysis revealed ageing of the graft and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) immunosuppression as risk factors for development of GN. While, the age of the recipient and donor, anti-lymphocyte globulin induction therapy, and acute rejection were risk factors for poor graft outcomes. Conclusions GN is an important issue after transplantation. Tracking the incidence and progression of histological findings in the graft may help to guide proper management and improve graft outcome. PMID:26609451

  15. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis combined with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sung, Woo Kyung; Jeong, Jin Uk; Bang, Ki Tae; Shin, Jong Ho; Yoo, Ji Hyung; Kim, Nak Min; Park, Jun Hyung; Kim, Joo Heon

    2015-06-01

    A 58-yr-old man presented with leg edema and subacute weakness of his bilateral lower extremities. Urinary and serum immunoelectrophoresis revealed the presence of lambda-type Bence Jones proteins. He was ultimately diagnosed with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). A renal biopsy specimen showed fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN), which was randomly arranged as 12-20 m nonbranching fibrils in the basement membranes. Immunofluorescence studies were negative for immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgM, IgA, C3, and kappa light chains in the capillary walls and mesangial areas. A Congo red stain for amyloid was negative. Electromyography and nerve conduction velocity examinations results were compatible with the presence of demyelinating polyneuropathy. This case showed a rare combination of FGN, without Ig deposition, and MGUS combined with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). PMID:26484033

  16. White-blue pyelocalyceal cyst with hydrotic glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Chaurasia, Jai Kumar; Soni, Mayank; Ahmed, Murad; Naim, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    A 5-month-old male infant presented with a 15 day history of distension of abdomen. On clinical examination, a soft lump was palpable in the left lumbar region. Radiological findings suggested an enlarged non-functional left kidney with ureteropelvic adhesive obstruction. The left renal mass was excised and submitted for histopathological examination. The excised renal mass was cystic with its wall partly white and partly blue. Gross and histopathological findings were diagnostic of a white-blue pyelocalyceal cyst with hydrotic glomerulonephritis. This entity needs to be differentiated from a large number of other cystic diseases of the kidney. Intrauterine screening and diagnosis may be significant for a possible early intrauterine uro-laparoscopic recanalisation of the pyeloureteral obstruction to save the affected kidney. PMID:24347451

  17. Mesangial Localization of Immune Complexes in Experimental Canine Adenovirus Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, N. G.; Morrison, W. I.; Thompson, H.; Cornwell, H. J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Each of a group of 14 dogs was infected experimentally by an intravenous dose of canine adenovirus calculated to allow survival until the initial stages of antibody production; the kidneys of infected dogs were examined during the period of 4-14 days after administration of virus. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with localization of IgG, C3 and viral antigen in mesangial regions was demonstrated. With the electron microscope, electron dense deposits were found scattered throughout the mesangium. There was proliferation of mesangial cells, infiltration into the glomerular tuft of polymorphonuclear leucocytes and, in some cases, focal glomerular necrosis with intracapsular and tubular haemorrhage. By means of an indirect immunofluorescence test, anti-viral antibody was detected in kidney eluates; anti-kidney antibody was not present. ImagesFigs. 5-8Figs. 9-10Figs. 1-4 PMID:4375485

  18. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis combined with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Woo Kyung; Jeong, Jin Uk; Bang, Ki Tae; Shin, Jong Ho; Yoo, Ji Hyung; Kim, Nak Min; Park, Jun Hyung; Kim, Joo Heon

    2015-01-01

    A 58-yr-old man presented with leg edema and subacute weakness of his bilateral lower extremities. Urinary and serum immunoelectrophoresis revealed the presence of lambda-type Bence Jones proteins. He was ultimately diagnosed with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). A renal biopsy specimen showed fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN), which was randomly arranged as 12–20 m nonbranching fibrils in the basement membranes. Immunofluorescence studies were negative for immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgM, IgA, C3, and kappa light chains in the capillary walls and mesangial areas. A Congo red stain for amyloid was negative. Electromyography and nerve conduction velocity examinations results were compatible with the presence of demyelinating polyneuropathy. This case showed a rare combination of FGN, without Ig deposition, and MGUS combined with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). PMID:26484033

  19. Crescentic glomerulonephritis in a polar bear (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Baba, Hiroshi; Kudo, Tomoo; Makino, Yoshinori; Mochizuki, Yasumasa; Takagi, Takayo; Une, Yumi

    2013-11-01

    Spontaneous crescentic glomerulonephritis (CrGN) in animals has only been reported in dog and sheep. We report the pathological features of CrGN in a 17-year-old male polar bear that died due to renal failure. Histologically, the lesions were characterized by fibrocellular crescents, adhesion between Bowman's capsule and the glomerular capillary tuft and an increase in the mesangial matrix in glomeruli. The proliferating cells in the crescent were partly immunopositive for cytokeratin and intensely positive for vimentin, WT-1 and α-smooth muscle actin, suggesting they originated from parietal epithelial cells. Ultrastructually, thickening of the glomerular basement membrane and loss of epithelial cell foot processes were observed with electron-dense deposits. PMID:23856758

  20. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin in renal allografts

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rabadi, Laith; Francis, Jean M.; Henderson, Joel; Ghai, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Glomerulopathy due to dysproteinemia can have a wide spectrum of pathologic and clinical features based on specific characteristics of the abnormal protein and the response induced within the parenchymal tissue. Monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) deposition can manifest as a different glomerular disease. Proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) is a unique entity mimicking immune complex GN that does not conform to any of those subtypes. IgG monoclonal granular deposition in the glomeruli with a pattern similar to immune complex disease suggested by C3 and C1q deposition should prompt consideration of PGNMID. Literature is scarce in terms of recurrence of disease in renal allografts. In this article we present the clinical–pathologic features of three cases of PGNMID in the renal allograft showing the variable course and manifestation of the disease. PMID:26613031

  1. [Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis: a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency].

    PubMed

    Halfon, Matthieu; Teta, Daniel; Rotman, Samuel; Pruijm, Menno; Humbert, Antoine

    2014-02-26

    Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPG) is a rare clinical syndrome characterized by kidney damage that can lead to irreversible kidney failure. RPG can be caused by primary glomerular disease or can be part of a systemic autoimmune disorder. All RPG have a similar pathophysiology (proliferation of cells in Bowman's capsule and formation of crescents) and clinical evolution (rapidly progressive kidney failure with proteinuria and an active urine sediment). Immunosuppressive therapy and sometimes plasma exchanges are required. Overall- and kidney survival are closely linked to the blood creatinine level at presentation, the percentage of damaged glomeruli, and to the underlying cause. RPG is therefore a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency that needs quick referral to a nephrologist. PMID:24665657

  2. The nephrotic syndrome in a heifer due to glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, A; Spencer, A; Petrie, L

    1980-05-01

    An 18-month-old Friesian heifer, which was admitted in November with a history of weight loss, diarrhoea and submandibular oedema, was found to have an enlarged left kidney and a massive proteinuria. Laboratory investigations revealed that there was a marked hypoalbuminaemia and that the range and the proportions of the individual proteins in the urine were almost identical to those in the serum. Consequently, the nephrotic syndrome was diagnosed. On gross and histopathological examination of the kidneys, there was evidence of pyelonephritis. However, immunofluorescence studies revealed a striking diffuse deposition of immunoglobulin in a predominantly linear pattern along the glomerular basement membranes. Abnormalities of the basement membranes. Abnormalities of the basement membranes were seen on ultrastructural examination and evidence of a flomerular protein leak was detected but changes typical of immune-complex deposition were absent. The immunofluorescence findings suggested a diagnosis of glomerulonephritis mediated by antiglomerular basement membrane antibody. PMID:7414086

  3. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease: The utility of routine staining with immunoglobulin light chains.

    PubMed

    Gowda, K K; Nada, R; Ramachandran, R; Joshi, K; Tewari, R; Kohli, H S; Jha, V; Gupta, K L

    2015-01-01

    Proliferative glomerulonephritis occurring as a consequence of monoclonal glomerular deposits of IgG is uncommon. It is a form of renal involvement in monoclonal gammopathy that mimics immune complex glomerulonephritis. Here, we report the first series of proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) from the Indian subcontinent highlighting use of light chain immunofluorescence (IF) in routine renal biopsy interpretation. We retrieved 6 patients diagnosed as proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) out of 160 biopsies (3.7%) with membranoproliferative patterns over 5 1/2 years (2009-2014), one of whom had recurrence 6 months post-renal transplant. Four (67%) patients presented with rapidly progressive renal failure and two (33%) with nephrotic syndrome. None of these patients had overt multiple myeloma. The predominant histologic pattern was membranoproliferative with all the biopsies showing IgG3 Kappa deposits on IF. The deposits were primarily subendothelial on electron microscopy. PMID:26664209

  4. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease: The utility of routine staining with immunoglobulin light chains

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, K. K.; Nada, R.; Ramachandran, R.; Joshi, K.; Tewari, R.; Kohli, H. S.; Jha, V.; Gupta, K. L.

    2015-01-01

    Proliferative glomerulonephritis occurring as a consequence of monoclonal glomerular deposits of IgG is uncommon. It is a form of renal involvement in monoclonal gammopathy that mimics immune complex glomerulonephritis. Here, we report the first series of proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) from the Indian subcontinent highlighting use of light chain immunofluorescence (IF) in routine renal biopsy interpretation. We retrieved 6 patients diagnosed as proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) out of 160 biopsies (3.7%) with membranoproliferative patterns over 5 1/2 years (2009–2014), one of whom had recurrence 6 months post-renal transplant. Four (67%) patients presented with rapidly progressive renal failure and two (33%) with nephrotic syndrome. None of these patients had overt multiple myeloma. The predominant histologic pattern was membranoproliferative with all the biopsies showing IgG3 Kappa deposits on IF. The deposits were primarily subendothelial on electron microscopy. PMID:26664209

  5. [Aplastic anemia combined with an autoimmune disease (eosinophilic fasciitis or glomerulonephritis)].

    PubMed

    Stebler, C; Tichelli, A; Gratwohl, A; Dazzi, H; Nissen, C; Steiger, U; Speck, B

    1991-06-01

    We describe 3 patients with aplastic anemia and an autoimmune disease. Two had eosinophilic fasciitis and 1 glomerulonephritis. In all patients both diseases were successfully treated by immunosuppressive therapy. Pathophysiological aspects of this association are discussed. PMID:1857945

  6. Fundus changes in mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis type II: clinical and fluorescein angiographic findings.

    PubMed Central

    Duvall-Young, J; Short, C D; Raines, M F; Gokal, R; Lawler, W

    1989-01-01

    Previously we have demonstrated a deposit in Bruch's membrane in a single case of mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis type II. We studied a group of patients with this disease and described extensive clinical and fluorescein angiographic abnormalities, which were in marked contrast to the findings in a group of patients with other forms of glomerulonephritis. This finding contributes to our understanding of the pathophysiology of the complex of the retinal pigment epithelium, Bruch's membrane, and choriocapillaris. Images PMID:2605144

  7. Necrotizing ANCA-Positive Glomerulonephritis Secondary to Culture-Negative Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Van Haare Heijmeijer, Sophie; Wilmes, Dunja; Aydin, Selda; Clerckx, Caroline; Labriola, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) and small-vessel vasculitis may have similar clinical features, including glomerulonephritis. Furthermore the association between IE and ANCA positivity is well documented, making differential diagnosis between IE- and ANCA-associated vasculitis particularly difficult, especially in case of culture-negative IE. We report on one patient with glomerulonephritis secondary to culture-negative IE caused by Bartonella henselae which illustrates this diagnostic difficulty. PMID:26819786

  8. CXCR3 Is Involved in Tubulointerstitial Injury in Human Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Segerer, Stephan; Banas, Bernhard; Wörnle, Markus; Schmid, Holger; Cohen, Clemens D.; Kretzler, Matthias; Mack, Matthias; Kiss, Eva; Nelson, Peter J.; Schlöndorff, Detlef; Gröne, Hermann-Josef

    2004-01-01

    Chemokines play pivotal roles in the recruitment of inflammatory cells into the kidney. The chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR5 are expressed on activated T lymphocytes, and expression of CXCR3 by mesangial cells has been suggested. Detailed description of CXCR3 expression might form a rational basis for use as a diagnostic marker and for therapeutic CXCR3 targeting in human glomerulonephritis. We studied the expression of CXCR3 in renal biopsies by immunohistochemistry (n = 45), and real time RT-PCR (n = 78). Biopsies were from patients with IgA nephropathy, lupus nephritis, and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. Furthermore, cultured human mesangial cells (HMC) were studied for CXCR3 expression, and for functional responses to the ligands CXCL10/IP-10 and CXCL9/Mig. CXCR3-positive cells were rarely found in glomerular tufts, but formed a major part of the tubulointerstitial infiltrates. Consistently, CXCR3 mRNA expression was too low to be quantified in glomerular compartments, and was not detectable in HMC. The published staining for CXCR3 of mesangial cells could be traced to cross-reactivity of an antibody for CXCR3 with a potentially related chemokine receptor as revealed by FACS analysis. Despite an absence of CXCR3 expression, mesangial cells reacted to CXCR3 ligands by proliferation and migration, which was blocked by pertussis toxin but not by an anti-CXCR3 antibody. These results indicate that HMC do not express the classical CXCR3, but may potentially express a related receptor with shared ligand specificity. By immunohistochemistry the number of CXCR3-positive cells, mainly interstitial T cells, correlated with renal function, proteinuria, and percentage of globally sclerosed glomeruli. A significant morphological and numerical correlation between CD3, CXCR3, and CCR5-positive cells indicated a CXCR3/CCR5 double-positive T cell population. No apparent difference in the CXCR3 expression pattern was found between disease entities. CXCR3 expression

  9. Incidence of post-transplant glomerulonephritis and its impact on graft outcome

    PubMed Central

    An, Jung Nam; Lee, Jung Pyo; Oh, Yun Jung; Oh, Yun Kyu; Ha, Jong-won; Chae, Dong-Wan; Kim, Yon Su; Lim, Chun Soo

    2012-01-01

    Background Herein, the significance of post-transplant glomerulonephritis (PTGN) has been revisited to investigate whether PTGN induces allograft failure. The aim of this study was to identify the incidence of PTGN and its association with allograft failure, as well as to analyze the risk factors for PTGN. Methods Among the 996 Korean patients who underwent kidney transplantation in a multicenter cohort from 1995 to 2010, 764 patients were enrolled in this study. Results The incidence rate of PTGN was 9.7% and 17.0% at 5 and 10 years of follow-up, respectively. PTGN was diagnosed in 17.8% of the recipients with results of biopsy tests or clinical diagnosis identifying glomerular diseases as the underlying cause, compared with 0.0%, 4.4%, 4.9%, 5.5%, and 5.7% of the recipients with renal vascular diseases, renal interstitial diseases/pyelonephritis/uropathy, diabetic renal disease, hereditary renal diseases, and diseases with unknown etiologies, respectively. Allograft survival was significantly decreased in patients with PTGN. PTGN was associated with a fourfold increase in graft failure with a hazard ratio of 7.11 for both acute rejection and PTGN. Results of the risk factor analysis for PTGN revealed that the underlying glomerular renal diseases and treatment methods using drugs such as tacrolimus and basiliximab significantly increased PTGN development, after adjusting for other risk factors. Conclusion We conclude that PTGN is strongly associated with poor kidney allograft survival. Therefore, optimal management of recurrent or de novo GN should be the critical focus of post-transplant care. PMID:26889425

  10. Sjögren Syndrome and Cryoglobulinemic Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Anand, Ananya; Krishna, Gopal G; Sibley, Richard K; Kambham, Neeraja

    2015-09-01

    We report the case of a 53-year-old woman with Sjögren syndrome and cryoglobulinemia. The patient presented with nephrotic syndrome, hematuria, and reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate. The kidney biopsy revealed diffuse endocapillary proliferation and leukocyte exudation with focal intraluminal hyaline thrombi, prominent tubulointerstitial inflammation, and vasculitis. Diffuse granular mesangial and segmental to global capillary wall staining was observed on immunofluorescence with antisera to C3 and immunoglobulin M (IgM), with less intense staining indicative of IgG and κ and λ light chains. A biopsy diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome-related cryoglobulinemic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and vasculitis was rendered. Subsequent investigations revealed the presence of circulating type II cryoglobulins with cryocrit of 9%. Although rare, Sjögren syndrome is the most common cause of non-hepatitis C virus-related mixed cryoglobulinemia. We discuss the possible pathogenic mechanisms involved in the development of mixed cryoglobulinemia and its evolution to lymphoma, as best described in the setting of hepatitis C virus infection. Although the specific antigen involved is unknown, it is likely that the mixed cryoglobulinemia in Sjögren syndrome is triggered by the long-term B-cell stimulation, resulting in clonal proliferation of B cells. Additional chromosomal aberrations and cytokine milieu alterations, as seen in hepatitis C virus infection, may result in prolonged B-cell survival and progression to non-Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:25661680

  11. What is new in the management of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis?

    PubMed

    Greenhall, George H B; Salama, Alan D

    2015-04-01

    Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) results from severe crescentic damage to glomeruli and leads to irreversible kidney failure if not diagnosed and managed in a timely fashion. Traditional treatment has relied on glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide, with additional plasmapheresis for certain conditions. Here we describe updates in the management of RPGN, according to the underlying renal pathology. However, there remains a paucity of trials that have enrolled patients with more advanced renal disease, dialysis dependence or with RPGN, and we are therefore still reliant on extrapolation of data from studies of patients with a less severe form of disease. In addition, reporting bias results in publication of cases or cohorts showing benefit for newer agents in advanced disease or RPGN, but it remains unclear how many unsuccessful outcomes in these circumstances take place. Since clinical trials specifically in RPGN are unlikely, use of biologic registries or combination of sufficient sized cohort series may provide indications of benefit outside of a clinical trial setting and should be encouraged, in order to provide some evidence for the efficacy of therapeutic regimens in RPGN and advanced renal disease. PMID:25815169

  12. Glomerulonephritis in a ferret with feline coronavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yuta; Tochitani, Tomoaki; Kouchi, Mami; Matsumoto, Izumi; Yamada, Toru; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2015-09-01

    A male domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo), which was purchased from outside of Japan at 13 weeks of age, was euthanized at 18 months of age because of poor health. At autopsy, the liver, spleen, and mesenteric lymph node were enlarged, and white foci were observed on the outer surface of the liver. The outer surface of the mesenteric lymph node was dark red. Histologically, granulomas were observed in the liver, spleen, bone marrow, and lymph nodes, composed mainly of aggregated epithelioid macrophages, some of which were positive to an anti-feline coronavirus (FCoV; Alphacoronavirus 1) antibody in immunohistochemistry. Mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis was observed, and periodic acid-Schiff-positive deposits were observed along glomerular capillary walls. These deposits stained pale red with periodic acid-methenamine silver stain and red with Masson trichrome stain, and were also observed in the mesangial matrix. In affected glomeruli, glomerular capillary walls and mesangial areas were positive for anti-ferret immunoglobulin G. By electron microscopy, subepithelial and mesangial electron-dense deposits were observed consistent with immune complex deposition. The deposition of immune complexes may have been associated with FCoV infection. PMID:26319601

  13. Understanding the complement-mediated glomerular diseases: focus on membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and C3 glomerulopathies.

    PubMed

    Lionaki, Sophia; Gakiopoulou, Hara; Boletis, John N

    2016-09-01

    An enhanced understanding of the role of complement in the pathogenesis of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis has led to reclassification of the latter into immunoglobulin-mediated and non-immunoglobulin-mediated disease. The new classification schema resulted in improved diagnostic clinical algorithms, while it brought into light again the diseases, which are characterized by the presence of glomerular deposits, composed predominantly by C3, in the absence of significant amounts of immunoglobulins in renal biopsy, namely, C3 glomerulopathies (dense deposit disease and C3 glomerulonephritis). Despite the lack of randomized controlled trials following the advances in the understanding of the pathogenetic pathways involved in membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, it is important that the new mechanistic approach has opened new roads for the exploration and discovery of targeted therapies. PMID:27356907

  14. [The function of the hypophyseal-gonadal system in different variants of glomerulonephritis in children].

    PubMed

    Korovina, N A; Gavriushova, L P; Ametov, A S; Tvorogova, T M; Mumladze, E B; Toritsina, L K

    1990-01-01

    A total of 28 children with different varieties of glomerulonephritis were examined for the pituitary-gonadal system (PGS). The examination included measurements of follicle-stimulating and luteinizing hormones, prolactin, estradiol, progesterone and testosterone. To define standards of the content of the hormones under study, 45 children of the control group were examined. The relationship was analyzed between the content of hormones and the disease activity and gravity. The most active phase of glomerulonephritis was characterized by maximal alterations in the content of pituitary and gonadal hormones. The content of the latter ones appeared to be considerably changed in patients with the mixed pattern of glomerulonephritis, attesting to profound functional derangements in the PGS. The intensity of those derangements was determined by the severity of the pathological process. PMID:2259596

  15. Structural characterization of the mesangial cell type IV collagenase and enhanced expression in a model of immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Lovett, D. H.; Johnson, R. J.; Marti, H. P.; Martin, J.; Davies, M.; Couser, W. G.

    1992-01-01

    Secretion of glomerular cell-derived matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their specific inhibitors, TIMP-1,2, may play an important role in the turnover of the glomerular extracellular matrix under basal and pathologic conditions. A 66-68 kd MMP secreted by cultured mesangial cells (MC) with activity against Type IV collagen and gelatin was purified and shown by amino-acid sequence analysis to be identical with a Type IV collagenase/gelatinase secreted by certain transformed tumor cell lines. The expression of the mesangial MMP in vivo was limited within the kidney to a small subset of the intrinsic glomerular mesangial cell population. After induction of acute anti-Thy 1.1 glomerulonephritis, there was a large increment in the number of Type IV collagenase-secreting MC, temporally coincident with the development of mesangial hypercellularity. The expression of the MMP inhibitor protein, TIMP-1, was not changed over this period. Ultrastructural studies localized the mesangial MMP to areas of evolving mesangiolysis and at sites of glomerular basement membrane disruption. Enhanced expression of the mesangial cell-derived Type IV collagenase may contribute to the evolution of glomerular injury in this model of immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis or may be involved in the extensive matrix remodeling process that accompanies this form of glomerular injury. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 and Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:1321565

  16. Glomerulonephritis-induced changes in kidney gene expression in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pavkovic, Mira; Riefke, Björn; Frisk, Anna-Lena; Gröticke, Ina; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated a glomerulonephritis (GN) model in rats induced by nephrotoxic serum (NTS) which contains antibodies against the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). The anti-GBM GN model in rats is widely used since its biochemical and histopathological characteristics are similar to crescentic nephritis and Goodpasture's disease in humans (Pusey, 2003[2]). Male Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were dosed once with 1, 2.5 and 5 ml/kg nephrotoxic serum (NTS) or 1.5 and 5 ml/kg NTS, respectively. GN and tubular damage were observed histopathologically in all treated rats after 14 days. To obtain insight into molecular processes during GN pathogenesis, mRNA expression was investigated in WKY and SD kidneys using Affymetrix's GeneChip Rat genome 230_2.0 arrays (GSE64265). The immunopathological processes during GN are still not fully understood and likely involve both innate and adaptive immunity. In the present study, several hundred mRNAs were found deregulated, which functionally were mostly associated with inflammation and regeneration. The β-chain of the major histocompatibility complex class II RT1.B (Rt1-Bb) and complement component 6 (C6) were identified as two mRNAs differentially expressed between WKY and SD rat strains which could be related to known different susceptibilities to NTS of different rat strains; both were increased in WKY and decreased in SD rats (Pavkovic et al., 2015 [1]). Increased Rt1-Bb expression in WKY rats could indicate a stronger and more persistent cellular reaction of the adaptive immune system in this strain, in line with findings indicating adaptive immune reactions during GN. The complement cascade is also known to be essential for GN development, especially terminal cascade products like C6. PMID:26697341

  17. Immune complex erythrocyte complement receptor interactions in vivo during induction of glomerulonephritis in nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Birmingham, D.J.; Hebert, L.A.; Cosio, F.G.; VanAman, M.E. )

    1990-08-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that the erythrocyte complement receptor (E-CR) system, which is unique to the primate, may play an important role in the clearing of immune complexes (ICs) from the circulation. However, all previous investigations of IC/E-CR interactions in vivo have involved the study of small amounts of preformed or passively formed ICs interacting with E-CR that were numerically in vast excess. The present study was undertaken to assess IC/E-CR interactions under conditions in which large amounts of ICs were formed in the circulation, amounts that when sustained for several weeks by daily intravenous administration of antigen resulted in the development of active glomerulonephritis. Twelve cynomolgus monkeys with E-CR levels ranging from 25 to 5000 mean CRs per erythrocyte (CR/E) were actively immunized to BGG, and 6 to 12 weeks later they were studied first at low levels of IC formation in vivo and then at high levels of IC formation in vivo (H-Protocol experiments, mean 125I-labeled BGG dose 4.9 mg/kg given over 10 minutes, a state approximating antigen-antibody equivalence). Cynomolgus monkeys with fewer than 100 CR/E showed no evidence of binding of ICs to erythrocytes with either low-dose or high-dose 125I-labeled BGG. However, cynomolgus monkeys with greater than 450 CR/E showed significant binding of ICs to erythrocytes: mean peak binding of 125I-labeled BGG to erythrocytes was 22.1% +/- 1.1% in the L-Protocol experiments and 33.4% +/- 8.0% in the H-Protocol experiments. During H-Protocol experiments, mean CR/E, measured by using a monoclonal anti-human CR1 antibody, decreased acutely, with recovery of E-CR levels within the next 24 to 72 hours. The acute decrease in E-CR levels could not be accounted for by occupancy of E-CR by ICs or by change in hematocrit.

  18. Preferential effectiveness of cyclosporin in patients receiving kidney transplants after glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Cats, S; Terasaki, P I; Perdue, S; Mickey, M R

    1985-03-01

    Glomerulonephritis patients transplanted with cadaver kidneys had a significantly higher one-year graft survival when immunosuppressed with cyclosporin rather than standard therapy (80% versus 59%, p less than 10(-5]. For nephrosclerosis patients the corresponding rates were 70% and 59% (p greater than 0.05); and in those with antecedent diabetes mellitus, polycystic kidney, and pyelonephritis the differences were negligible. In glomerulonephritis patients, but not in the other groups, cyclosporin was additive to the effect of transfusions and of HLA-A, B and HLA-Dr matching. PMID:2857855

  19. Influenza vaccination induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis and pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yanai-Berar, N; Ben-Itzhak, O; Gree, J; Nakhoul, F

    2002-09-01

    Influenza vaccination is a widely accepted practice, particularly among the elderly and high-risk individuals. Minor and transitory side effects following the vaccination are common, while systemic complications are infrequently reported. We describe here a case of a patient who presented to the emergency room with arthralgia, myalgias and purpura, following influenza vaccination. Necrotizing vasculitis associated with pauci-immune glomerulonephritis was observed on kidney biopsy. With increasing use of influenza vaccination, attention should be drawn to the possible expression of systemic adverse effects such as vasculitis and glomerulonephritis. PMID:12356192

  20. Immunopathology of glomerulonephritis associated with chronic woodchuck hepatitis virus infection in woodchucks (Marmota monax).

    PubMed Central

    Peters, D. N.; Steinberg, H.; Anderson, W. I.; Hornbuckle, W. E.; Cote, P. J.; Gerin, J. L.; Lewis, R. M.; Tennant, B. C.

    1992-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of necropsy findings of 705 woodchucks was performed to determine the prevalence and morphology of immune-mediated glomerulonephritis, its relationship to woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) infection, and the presence of major WHV antigens. Twenty-six woodchucks had glomerular lesions. Renal tissue of the 26 animals was evaluated histologically and immunohistochemically for immune-mediated glomerulonephritis. Of these 26 animals, immune-mediated glomerulonephritis was diagnosed in six, all of which were chronic WHV carriers. Membranous glomerulonephritis was identified in three animals, two of which also had mesangial proliferation. Host immunoglobulin was present within the mesangium and along capillary loops in all three. Woodchuck hepatitis virus core antigen (WHcAg) was present along capillary loops of two of these animals, one membranous and one mixed, and in the mesangium of all three. Woodchuck hepatitis virus surface antigen (WHsAg) deposition was similar to WHcAg deposition but was only present along capillaries in those animals with mixed nephritis. The remaining three animals had mesangial proliferation. WHsAg and host immunoglobulin deposition were predominately mesangial; WHcAg was not detected. Transmission electron microscopy showed thickening of the capillary loop basement membranes and subepithelial electron-dense deposits in animal one, and deposits in the mesangium in animal six. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:1632459

  1. Membranous glomerulonephritis in rheumatoid arthritis unrelated to gold, D-penicillamine or other connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Zarza, L P; Sanchez, E N; Acin, P A; Ara, J M; Baños, J G

    1996-07-01

    We report a 58-year-old woman with classical rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who developed a membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN). She had never been treated with gold or D-penicillamine; other connective tissue diseases as well as hepatitis B were excluded. We suggest that the responsible cause of MGN is RA. PMID:8853174

  2. The Occurrence or Fibrillary Glomerulonephritis in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus May Not Be Coincidental: A Report of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    González-Cabrera, Fayna; Henríquez-Palop, Fernando; Ramírez-Puga, Ana; Santana-Estupiñán, Raquel; Plaza-Toledano, Celia; Antón-Pérez, Gloria; Marrero-Robayna, Silvia; Ramírez-Medina, Davinia; Gallego-Samper, Roberto; Vega-Díaz, Nicanor; Camacho-Galan, Rafael; Rodríguez-Pérez, José C.

    2013-01-01

    Although clinical presentation of fibrillary glomerulonephritis is similar to most forms of glomerulonephritis, it is usually difficult to make the diagnosis. Clinical manifestations include proteinuria, microscopic haematuria, nephrotic syndrome, and impairment of renal function. A diagnosis of fibrillary glomerulonephritis is only confirmed by renal biopsy and it must comprise electronmicroscopy-verified ultrastructural findings. We report four cases between 45–50 years old with documented type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and arterial hypertension. All patients were found to have fibrils on kidney biopsy. The differential diagnosis of fibrils in the setting of diabetes mellitus is also discussed. PMID:23762079

  3. Heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) disease and glomerulonephritis in a black-footed cat (Felis nigripes).

    PubMed

    Deem, S L; Heard, D J; LaRock, R

    1998-06-01

    A 6-yr-old, 1.36-kg, intact female black-footed cat (Felis nigripes) was presented to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of Florida, with a history of depression, lethargy, and anorexia. Cardiac dysfunction and renal failure were diagnosed on the basis of antemortem and postmortem findings. At necropsy, heartworms (Dirofilaria immitis), glomerulonephritis, and endometritis were present. The glomerulonephritis could have been immune mediated and may have been associated with the heartworm infection or the chronic endometritis or both. Heartworm disease should be included in the list of differential diagnoses for any exotic cat housed outdoors in an endemic heartworm region that dies peracutely or has suggestive gastrointestinal or respiratory signs. Heartworm prophylaxis and annual serologic testing in exotic cats housed outdoors in heartworm endemic regions are recommended. PMID:9732037

  4. Hepatitis E Virus-Induced Cryoglobulinemic Glomerulonephritis in a Nonimmunocompromised Person.

    PubMed

    Guinault, Damien; Ribes, David; Delas, Audrey; Milongo, David; Abravanel, Florence; Puissant-Lubrano, Bénédicte; Izopet, Jacques; Kamar, Nassim

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV)-related kidney disease and symptomatic cryoglobulinemia have been observed in solid-organ transplant recipients. However, HEV RNA in the cryoprecipitate has not yet been assessed. We report what to our knowledge is the first documented case of autochthonous HEV-induced cryoglobulinemic crescentic and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in an immunocompetent man with no notable medical history. He presented with edema, hypertension, increased serum creatinine level, and nephrotic syndrome. Type II cryoglobulinemia with monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) κ light chain was detected. Anti-HEV IgG and IgM, as well as HEV RNA, were detected in serum and cryoprecipitate. Histologic analysis of a kidney biopsy specimen revealed features of crescentic and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. After HEV clearance, kidney and liver parameters improved and HEV RNA and cryoglobulinemia were undetectable. Hence, we conclude that HEV can cause severe kidney disease and should be considered in cases of unexplained glomerular disease. PMID:26682764

  5. Nephrotic range proteinuria in c-ANCA-positive crescentic glomerulonephritis with linear immune deposits

    PubMed Central

    Singh, N. P.; Gulati, S.; Garg, V.; Beniwal, P.; Garg, S.

    2008-01-01

    The three broad groups of rapidly progressing glomerulonephritis are anti glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease, renal vasculitis characterized by antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody positivity, and a heterogeneous group with granular immune deposits. Anti-GBM disease with cytoplasmic antineutrophilic antibodies (c-ANCA) positivity (type III disease) is not known to present with nephrotic syndrome. We report here a rare presentation of nephrotic syndrome in Type III disease. Larger studies are warranted to determine whether the amount and/or type of immune deposits decide the range of proteinuria. These studies are also required to elucidate the impact of immune complex deposition on renal disease in c-ANCA-positive glomerulonephritis and to outline its pathogenetic mechanism. PMID:20142931

  6. Familial C3 glomerulonephritis associated with mutations in the gene for complement factor B.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Hideaki; Konomoto, Takao; Tanaka, Etsuko; Hisano, Satoshi; Yoshida, Yoko; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Miyata, Toshiyuki; Nunoi, Hiroyuki

    2015-05-01

    We report the first case of familial C3 glomerulonephritis (C3GN) associated with mutations in the gene for complement factor B (CFB). A 12-year-old girl was diagnosed with biopsy-proven C3GN. Her mother had a history of treatment for membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, and her brother had hypocomplementemia without urinary abnormalities. DNA analysis revealed heterozygosity for CFB p.S367R in the patient, mother and brother. Evaluation of the structure-function relationship supports that this mutation has gain-of-function effects in CFB. The present case suggests that CFB has an important role in the etiology of C3GN and provides a new insight into anticomplement therapy approaches. PMID:25758434

  7. Ameliorative effects of arctiin from Arctium lappa on experimental glomerulonephritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Guo; Wu, Jin-Zhong; Sun, Lian-Na; Han, Ting; Du, Jian; Ye, Qi; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yu-Guang

    2009-11-01

    Membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) remains the most common cause of adult-onset nephrotic syndrome in the world and up to 40% of untreated patients will progress to end-stage renal disease. Although the treatment of MGN with immunosuppressants or steroid hormones can attenuate the deterioration of renal function, numerous treatment-related complications have also been established. In this study, the ameliorative effects of arctiin, a natural compound isolated from the fruits of Arctium lappa, on rat glomerulonephritis induced by cationic bovine serum albumin (cBSA) were determined. After oral administration of arctiin (30, 60, 120 mg/kgd) for three weeks, the levels of serum creatinine (Scr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and 24-h urine protein content markedly decreased, while endogenous creatinine clearance rate (ECcr) significantly increased. The parameters of renal lesion, hypercellularity, infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN), fibrinoid necrosis, focal and segmental proliferation and interstitial infiltration, were reversed. In addition, we observed that arctiin evidently reduced the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), suppressed nuclear factor-kappaB p65 (NF-kappaB) DNA binding activity, and enhanced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. These findings suggest that the ameliorative effects of arctiin on glomerulonephritis is carried out mainly by suppression of NF-kappaB activation and nuclear translocation and the decreases in the levels of these pro-inflammatory cytokines, while SOD is involved in the inhibitory pathway of NF-kappaB activation. Arctiin has favorable potency for the development of an inhibitory agent of NF-kappaB and further application to clinical treatment of glomerulonephritis, though clinical studies are required. PMID:19524415

  8. CCR6 Recruits Regulatory T Cells and Th17 Cells to the Kidney in Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Jan-Eric; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Steinmetz, Oliver M.; Peters, Anett; Riedel, Jan-Hendrik; Erhardt, Annette; Wegscheid, Claudia; Velden, Joachim; Fehr, Susanne; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Tiegs, Gisa; Stahl, Rolf A.K.

    2010-01-01

    T cells recruited to the kidney contribute to tissue damage in crescentic and proliferative glomerulonephritides. Chemokines and their receptors regulate T cell trafficking, but the expression profile and functional importance of chemokine receptors for renal CD4+ T cell subsets are incompletely understood. In this study, we observed that renal FoxP3+CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and IL-17–producing CD4+ T (Th17) cells express the chemokine receptor CCR6, whereas IFNγ-producing Th1 cells are CCR6−. Induction of experimental glomerulonephritis (nephrotoxic nephritis) in mice resulted in upregulation of the only CCR6 ligand, CCL20, followed by T cell recruitment, renal tissue injury, albuminuria, and loss of renal function. CCR6 deficiency aggravated renal injury and increased mortality (from uremia) among nephritic mice. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, CCR6 deficiency reduced infiltration of Tregs and Th17 cells but did not affect recruitment of Th1 cells in the setting of glomerulonephritis. Adoptive transfer of WT but not CCR6-deficient Tregs attenuated morphologic and functional renal injury in nephritic mice. Furthermore, reconstitution with WT Tregs protected CCR6−/− mice from aggravated nephritis. Taken together, these data suggest that CCR6 mediates renal recruitment of both Tregs and Th17 cells and that the reduction of anti-inflammatory Tregs in the presence of a fully functional Th1 response aggravates experimental glomerulonephritis. PMID:20299360

  9. P2X7 Deficiency Attenuates Renal Injury in Experimental Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Simon R.J.; Turner, Clare M.; Elliott, James I.; McDaid, John; Hewitt, Reiko; Smith, Jennifer; Pickering, Matthew C.; Whitehouse, Darren L.; Cook, H. Terence; Burnstock, Geoffrey; Pusey, Charles D.; Unwin, Robert J.; Tam, Frederick W.K.

    2009-01-01

    The P2X7 receptor is a ligand-gated cation channel that is normally expressed by a variety of immune cells, including macrophages and lymphocytes. Because it leads to membrane blebbing, release of IL-1β, and cell death by apoptosis or necrosis, it is a potential therapeutic target for a variety of inflammatory diseases. Although the P2X7 receptor is usually not detectable in normal renal tissue, we previously reported increased expression of both mRNA and protein in mesangial cells and macrophages infiltrating the glomeruli in animal models of antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis. In this study, we used P2X7-knockout mice in the same experimental model of glomerulonephritis and found that P2X7 deficiency was significantly renoprotective compared with wild-type controls, evidenced by better renal function, a striking reduction in proteinuria, and decreased histologic glomerular injury. In addition, the selective P2X7 antagonist A-438079 prevented the development of antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis in rats. These results support a proinflammatory role for P2X7 in immune-mediated renal injury and suggest that the P2X7 receptor is a potential therapeutic target. PMID:19389853

  10. Mast Cell Stabilization Ameliorates Autoimmune Anti-Myeloperoxidase Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Gan, Poh-Yi; O'Sullivan, Kim M; Ooi, Joshua D; Alikhan, Maliha A; Odobasic, Dragana; Summers, Shaun A; Kitching, A Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen R

    2016-05-01

    Observations in experimental murine myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) show mast cells degranulate, thus enhancing injury as well as producing immunomodulatory IL-10. Here we report that, compared with biopsy specimens from control patients, renal biopsy specimens from 44 patients with acute AAV had more mast cells in the interstitium, which correlated with the severity of tubulointerstitial injury. Furthermore, most of the mast cells were degranulated and spindle-shaped in patients with acute AAV, indicating an activated phenotype. We hypothesized that the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate would attenuate mast cell degranulation without affecting IL-10 production. We induced anti-MPO GN by immunizing mice with MPO and a low dose of anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody. When administered before or after induction of MPO autoimmunity in these mice, disodium cromoglycate attenuated mast cell degranulation, development of autoimmunity, and development of GN, without diminishing IL-10 production. In contrast, administration of disodium cromoglycate to mast cell-deficient mice had no effect on the development of MPO autoimmunity or GN. MPO-specific CD4(+) effector T cell proliferation was enhanced by co-culture with mast cells, but in the presence of disodium cromoglycate, proliferation was inhibited and IL-10 production was enhanced. These results indicate that disodium cromoglycate blocks injurious mast cell degranulation specifically without affecting the immunomodulatory role of these cells. Thus as a therapeutic, disodium cromoglycate may substantially enhance the regulatory role of mast cells in MPO-AAV. PMID:26374606

  11. Complication of Corticosteroid Treatment by Acute Plasmodium malariae Infection Confirmed by Small-Subunit rRNA Sequencing▿

    PubMed Central

    To, Kelvin K. W.; Teng, Jade L. L.; Wong, Samson S. Y.; Ngan, Antonio H. Y.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of acute Plasmodium malariae infection complicating corticosteroid treatment for membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in a patient from an area where P. malariae infection is not endemic. A peripheral blood smear showed typical band-form trophozoites compatible with P. malariae or Plasmodium knowlesi. SSU rRNA sequencing confirmed the identity to be P. malariae. PMID:20739487

  12. T cells, adhesion molecules and modulation of apoptosis in visceral leishmaniasis glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Immune complex deposition is the accepted mechanism of pathogenesis of VL glomerulopathy however other immune elements may participate. Further in the present study, no difference was seen between immunoglobulin and C3b deposit intensity in glomeruli between infected and non-infected dogs thus T cells, adhesion molecules and parameters of proliferation and apoptosis were analysed in dogs with naturally acquired VL from an endemic area. The dog is the most important domestic reservoir of the protozoa Leishmania (L.) chagasi that causes visceral leishmaniasis (VL). The similarity of VL manifestation in humans and dogs renders the study of canine VL nephropathy of interest with regard to human pathology. Methods From 55 dogs with VL and 8 control non-infected dogs from an endemic area, kidney samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for immunoglobulin and C3b deposits, staining for CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, ICAM-1, P-selectin and quantified using morphometry. Besides proliferation marker Ki-67, apoptosis markers M30 and TUNEL staining, and related cytokines TNF-α, IL-1α were searched and quantified. Results We observed similar IgG, IgM and IgA and C3b deposit intensity in dogs with VL and non-infected control dogs. However we detected the Leishmania antigen in cells in glomeruli in 54, CD4+ T cells in the glomeruli of 44, and CD8+ T cells in 17 of a total of 55 dogs with VL. Leishmania antigen was absent and T cells were absent/scarse in eight non-infected control dogs. CD 4+ T cells predominate in proliferative patterns of glomerulonephritis, however the presence of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were not different in intensity in different patterns of glomerulonephritis. The expression of ICAM-1 and P-selectin was significantly greater in the glomeruli of infected dogs than in control dogs. In all patterns of glomerulonephritis the expression of ICAM-1 ranged from minimum to moderately severe and P-selectin from absent to severe. In the control animals the

  13. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-associated Vasculitis Superimposed on Infection-related Glomerulonephritis Secondary to Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium Complex Infection.

    PubMed

    Asano, Shuichi; Mizuno, Shige; Okachi, Shotaro; Aso, Hiromichi; Wakahara, Keiko; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Ito, Satoru; Kozaki, Yohei; Katsuno, Takayuki; Maruyama, Shoichi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman was diagnosed with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection and received no treatment. Disease progression was evident one year later with the development of myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) titers and systemic symptoms of a fever, polyarthritis, purpura, and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Her symptoms did not improve with antibiotic treatment. A renal biopsy revealed crescentic glomerulonephritis with immunodeposition. According to these findings, she was diagnosed with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) superimposed on infection-related glomerulonephritis (IRGN). Although there was a risk of aggravating an underlying infection, the combination therapy of corticosteroid and antibiotics improved AAV, IRGN, and even the lung radiological findings. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of AAV and IRGN secondary to pulmonary MAC infection. PMID:27580547

  14. IgA-dominant post-infectious glomerulonephritis presenting as a fatal pulmonary-renal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saad, Marc; Daoud, Magda; Nasr, Patricia; Syed, Rafeel; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, post-infectious glomerulonephritis underwent major changes in its epidemiology, pathophysiology, and outcomes. We are reporting a case of IgA-dominant post-infectious glomerulonephritis (IgA-PIGN) presenting as a fatal pulmonary-renal syndrome. An 86-year-old Filipino man presented with worsening dyspnea, hemoptysis, and decreased urine output over 2 weeks. Past medical history is significant for hypertension, chronic kidney disease stage III, and pneumonia 3 weeks prior treated with intravenous cefazolin for methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Physical examination was remarkable for heart rate of 109/min and respiratory rate of 25/min saturating 99% on 3 liters via nasal cannula. There were bibasilar rales in the lungs and bilateral ankle edema. A chest radiograph showed bibasilar opacifications. Blood work was significant for hemoglobin of 8.3 g/dL and creatinine of 9.2 mg/dL (baseline of 1.67). TTE showed EF 55%. Urinalysis revealed large blood and red blood cell casts. Kidney ultrasound showed bilateral echogenicity compatible with renal disease. Pulse methylprednisolone therapy and hemodialysis were initiated with patient's condition precluding kidney biopsy. Serology workup for rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis was negative. On day 7, the patient required mechanical ventilation; bronchoscopy showed alveolar hemorrhage and plasmapheresis was initiated. Renal biopsy revealed IgA-PIGN with endocapillary and focal extracapillary proliferative and exudative features. IgA-PIGN occurs in diabetic elderly (mean age of 60 years), 0-16 weeks after an infection mainly by Staphylococcus. However, this nondiabetic patient had normal complement IgA-PIGN with fatal pulmonary-renal syndrome. Understanding the pathogenesis and identifying the nephrotoxic bacteria species and the aberrant IgA molecule will open new insights toward prevention and treatment. PMID:26347210

  15. IgA-dominant post-infectious glomerulonephritis presenting as a fatal pulmonary-renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Marc; Daoud, Magda; Nasr, Patricia; Syed, Rafeel; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, post-infectious glomerulonephritis underwent major changes in its epidemiology, pathophysiology, and outcomes. We are reporting a case of IgA-dominant post-infectious glomerulonephritis (IgA-PIGN) presenting as a fatal pulmonary-renal syndrome. An 86-year-old Filipino man presented with worsening dyspnea, hemoptysis, and decreased urine output over 2 weeks. Past medical history is significant for hypertension, chronic kidney disease stage III, and pneumonia 3 weeks prior treated with intravenous cefazolin for methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Physical examination was remarkable for heart rate of 109/min and respiratory rate of 25/min saturating 99% on 3 liters via nasal cannula. There were bibasilar rales in the lungs and bilateral ankle edema. A chest radiograph showed bibasilar opacifications. Blood work was significant for hemoglobin of 8.3 g/dL and creatinine of 9.2 mg/dL (baseline of 1.67). TTE showed EF 55%. Urinalysis revealed large blood and red blood cell casts. Kidney ultrasound showed bilateral echogenicity compatible with renal disease. Pulse methylprednisolone therapy and hemodialysis were initiated with patient’s condition precluding kidney biopsy. Serology workup for rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis was negative. On day 7, the patient required mechanical ventilation; bronchoscopy showed alveolar hemorrhage and plasmapheresis was initiated. Renal biopsy revealed IgA-PIGN with endocapillary and focal extracapillary proliferative and exudative features. IgA-PIGN occurs in diabetic elderly (mean age of 60 years), 0–16 weeks after an infection mainly by Staphylococcus. However, this nondiabetic patient had normal complement IgA-PIGN with fatal pulmonary-renal syndrome. Understanding the pathogenesis and identifying the nephrotoxic bacteria species and the aberrant IgA molecule will open new insights toward prevention and treatment. PMID:26347210

  16. Novel Role of Toll-Like Receptor 3 in Hepatitis C-Associated Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Wörnle, Markus; Schmid, Holger; Banas, Bernhard; Merkle, Monika; Henger, Anna; Roeder, Maximilian; Blattner, Simone; Bock, Elisabeth; Kretzler, Matthias; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Schlöndorff, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is frequently complicated by glomerulonephritis with immune complexes containing viral RNA. We examined the potential influence of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), specifically TLR3 recognition of viral dsRNA exemplified by polyriboinosinic:polyribocytidylic acid [poly(I:C) RNA]. Normal human kidney stained positive for TLR3 on mesangial cells (MCs), vascular smooth muscle cells, and collecting duct epithelium. Cultured MCs have low TLR3 mRNA levels with predominant intracellular protein localization, which was increased by tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, interferon (IFN)-γ, and the TLR3 ligand poly(I:C) RNA. Poly(I:C) RNA stimulation of MCs increased mRNA and protein synthesis of IL-6, IL-1β, M-CSF, IL-8/CXCL8, RANTES/CCL5, MCP-1/CCL2, and ICAM-I; it also increased anti-proliferative and proapoptotic effects, the latter of which was decreased by inhibiting caspase-8. In microdissected glomeruli of normal and non-HCV membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis biopsies, TLR3 mRNA expression was low. In contrast TLR3 mRNA expression was significantly increased in hepatitis C-positive glomerulonephritis and was associated with enhanced mRNA for RANTES/CCL5 and MCP-1/CCL2. We hypothesize that immune complexes containing viral RNA activate mesangial TLR3 during HCV infection, thereby contributing to chemokine/cytokine release and effecting proliferation and apoptosis. Thus, TLR3 expression on renal cells, and especially MCs, may establish a link between viral infections and glomerular diseases. PMID:16436653

  17. The immunodominant myeloperoxidase T-cell epitope induces local cell-mediated injury in antimyeloperoxidase glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Joshua D; Chang, Janet; Hickey, Michael J; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Fugger, Lars; Holdsworth, Stephen R; Kitching, A Richard

    2012-09-25

    Microscopic polyangiitis is an autoimmune small-vessel vasculitis that often manifests as focal and necrotizing glomerulonephritis and renal failure. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic Abs (ANCAs) specific for myeloperoxidase (MPO) play a role in this disease, but the role of autoreactive MPO-specific CD4(+) T cells is uncertain. By screening overlapping peptides of 20 amino acids spanning the MPO molecule, we identified an immunodominant MPO CD4(+) T-cell epitope (MPO(409-428)). Immunizing C57BL/6 mice with MPO(409-428) induced focal necrotizing glomerulonephritis similar to that seen after whole MPO immunization, when MPO was deposited in glomeruli. Transfer of an MPO(409-428)-specific CD4(+) T-cell clone to Rag1(-/-) mice induced focal necrotizing glomerulonephritis when glomerular MPO deposition was induced either by passive transfer of MPO-ANCA and LPS or by planting MPO(409-428) conjugated to a murine antiglomerular basement membrane mAb. MPO(409-428) also induced biologically active anti-MPO Abs in mice. The MPO(409-428) epitope has a minimum immunogenic core region of 11 amino acids, MPO(415-426), with several critical residues. ANCA-activated neutrophils not only induce injury but lodged the autoantigen MPO in glomeruli, allowing autoreactive anti-MPO CD4(+) cells to induce delayed type hypersensitivity-like necrotizing glomerular lesions. These studies identify an immunodominant MPO T-cell epitope and redefine how effector responses can induce injury in MPO-ANCA-associated microscopic polyangiitis. PMID:22955884

  18. Renal granuloma and immunoglobulin M-complex glomerulonephritis: a case of common variable immunodeficiency?

    PubMed

    Benoit, Geneviève; Lapeyraque, Anne-Laure; Sartelet, Hervé; Saint-Cyr, Claire; Le Deist, Françoise; Haddad, Elie

    2009-03-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is characterized by reduced serum immunoglobulin levels and recurrent bacterial infections. Granulomatous infiltrations are occasionally found in the lymphoid or solid organs of affected patients, but renal involvement is rare. We present a case of possible CVID with interstitial noncaseating granuloma and immunoglobulin (IgM)-complex glomerulonephritis with a membranoproliferative pattern and with a favorable response to corticosteroids, intravenously administered immunoglobulins (IVIGs) and rituximab. CVID must be included in the differential diagnosis of renal granuloma and should be differentiated from sarcoidosis to ensure appropriate therapy. PMID:18696117

  19. Characterization of feline glomerulonephritis associated with viral-induced hematopoietic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Glick, A D; Horn, R G; Holscher, M

    1978-08-01

    Light, electron, and immunofluorescence microscopy on tissues from 63 domestic cats revealed that glomerulonephritis occurred in almost one third of cats with hematopoietic neoplasms of the type linked with feline leukemia virus (FeLV). Glomerular lesions were of the immune complex type with subepithelial, subendothelial, and mesangial dense deposits and reticular aggregates, similar to the nephropathy associated with systemic lupus erythematosus in humans. Evidence that the glomerular lesions may be viral-induced raises the possibility of similar pathogenetic mechanisms in human disease. PMID:677265

  20. Intestinal Intravascular Large B-cell Lymphoma Mimicking Ulcerative Colitis with Secondary Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Kaneyuki, Daisuke; Komeno, Yukiko; Yoshimoto, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Naoki; Iihara, Kuniko; Ryu, Tomiko

    2016-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman with ulcerative colitis (UC) was admitted to our hospital for renal dysfunction and progressive anemia. Colonoscopy revealed intestinal lesions and pathological findings showed intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL). According to the polymerase chain reaction analysis of sequential rectal specimens, we concluded that she suffered from intestinal BCL, not UC. After chemotherapy, her renal function progressed to nephrotic syndrome. The pathological findings of renal biopsy specimens indicated membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN). Chemotherapy was continued and led to the remission of BCL and MPGN. We herein describe the first case of intestinal IVLBCL mimicking UC with secondary MPGN. PMID:27580553

  1. Clinical spectrum and outcomes of crescentic glomerulonephritis: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Rampelli, S. K.; Rajesh, N. G.; Srinivas, B. H.; Harichandra Kumar, K. T.; Swaminathan, R. P.; Priyamvada, P. S.

    2016-01-01

    There is limited data on the etiology, clinical and histopathological spectrum and outcomes of crescentic glomerulonephritis (CrGN) in adult Indian population. This prospective study was done to evaluate the etiology, clinicohistological patterns and predictors of outcome of CrGN in South Indian population. All the patients received standard protocol based immunosuppression in addition to supportive care. Immune-complex glomerulonephritis (ICGN) was the most common etiology (n = 31; 77.5%) followed by pauci-immune glomerulonephritis (PauciGN; n = 8; 20%) and anti-glomerular basement membrane disease (n = 1; 2.5%). The most common etiology of ICGN was IgA nephropathy (n = 11; 27.5%) followed by lupus nephritis (n = 7; 17.5%) and post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) (n = 7; 17.5%). The patients with PauciGN were significantly older compared to those with ICGN (44.5 ± 15 years vs. 31.8 ± 11 years; P = 0.01). The patients with PauciGN presented with significantly higher serum creatinine (9.7 ± 4.4 vs. 6.6 ± 3.3 mg/dl; P = 0.03). The histopathologic parameters of ICGN and PauciGN were comparable except for a higher proportion of sclerosed glomeruli in ICGN. At the end of 3 months follow-up, only two patients went into complete remission (5.4%). Majority of the patients had end-stage renal failure (48.6%) and were dialysis dependent and seven patients (18.9%) expired. There was no signifi difference in the renal survival (10.9 ± 1.9 vs. 9.6 ± 3.3 months) or patient survival (17.5 ± 2.1 vs. 17.3 ± 4.3 months). The parameters associated with adverse outcomes at 3 months were hypertension (odds ratio [OR]: 0.58; confidence interval [CI]: 0.36–0.94), need for renal replacement therapy (OR: 0.19; CI: 0.04–0.9), serum creatinine at admission (P = 0.019), estimated glomerular filtration rate (P = 0.022) and percentage of fibrocellular crescents (P = 0.022). PMID:27512296

  2. Clinical spectrum and outcomes of crescentic glomerulonephritis: A single center experience.

    PubMed

    Rampelli, S K; Rajesh, N G; Srinivas, B H; Harichandra Kumar, K T; Swaminathan, R P; Priyamvada, P S

    2016-01-01

    There is limited data on the etiology, clinical and histopathological spectrum and outcomes of crescentic glomerulonephritis (CrGN) in adult Indian population. This prospective study was done to evaluate the etiology, clinicohistological patterns and predictors of outcome of CrGN in South Indian population. All the patients received standard protocol based immunosuppression in addition to supportive care. Immune-complex glomerulonephritis (ICGN) was the most common etiology (n = 31; 77.5%) followed by pauci-immune glomerulonephritis (PauciGN; n = 8; 20%) and anti-glomerular basement membrane disease (n = 1; 2.5%). The most common etiology of ICGN was IgA nephropathy (n = 11; 27.5%) followed by lupus nephritis (n = 7; 17.5%) and post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) (n = 7; 17.5%). The patients with PauciGN were significantly older compared to those with ICGN (44.5 ± 15 years vs. 31.8 ± 11 years; P = 0.01). The patients with PauciGN presented with significantly higher serum creatinine (9.7 ± 4.4 vs. 6.6 ± 3.3 mg/dl; P = 0.03). The histopathologic parameters of ICGN and PauciGN were comparable except for a higher proportion of sclerosed glomeruli in ICGN. At the end of 3 months follow-up, only two patients went into complete remission (5.4%). Majority of the patients had end-stage renal failure (48.6%) and were dialysis dependent and seven patients (18.9%) expired. There was no signifi difference in the renal survival (10.9 ± 1.9 vs. 9.6 ± 3.3 months) or patient survival (17.5 ± 2.1 vs. 17.3 ± 4.3 months). The parameters associated with adverse outcomes at 3 months were hypertension (odds ratio [OR]: 0.58; confidence interval [CI]: 0.36-0.94), need for renal replacement therapy (OR: 0.19; CI: 0.04-0.9), serum creatinine at admission (P = 0.019), estimated glomerular filtration rate (P = 0.022) and percentage of fibrocellular crescents (P = 0.022). PMID:27512296

  3. Membranous glomerulonephritis and cellular crescents induced by levamisole-adulterated cocaine abuse: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Moll-Guillen, Jose-Luis; Espí-Reig, Jordi; Blanes-Julia, Marino; García-Martínez, Ana-María; Pujol-Marco, Conrad; Hernández-Jaras, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Levamisole is illicitly employed as a cocaine adulterant. The consumption of levamisole-adulterated cocaine can provoke anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated syndromes. Patients carrying an HLAB27 allele are known to be at higher risk of developing agranulocytosis when treated with levamisole. Likewise, patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and internal organ involvement have typically been exposed to offending agents for prolonged periods of time, often on the order of years. Here, we report an unusual case of a patient in which kidney biopsy showed membranous glomerulonephritis with cellular crescents associated with levamisole-contaminated cocaine use. PMID:26605317

  4. Necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis with membranous nephropathy in a patient exposed to levamisole-adulterated cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Camillo; Emili, Stefano; Lin, Mercury; Alpers, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    Levamisole is an antihelminthic agent widely used as an adulterant of illicit cocaine recently implicated as a cause of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)–associated microscopic polyangiitis in cocaine abusers. An isolated case of membranous nephropathy (MN) associated with levamisole exposure has also been reported. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of a patient with both microscopic polyangiitis manifest as a pauci-immune necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis and concurrent MN in the setting of chronic cocaine abuse and presumed levamisole exposure, raising the hypothesis that levamisole was the causative agent in the development of this rare dual glomerulopathy. PMID:26985374

  5. Hydralazine-induced pauci-immune glomerulonephritis: intriguing case series with misleading diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Babar, Faizan; Posner, Jeffery N.; Obah, Eugene A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydralazine has been used since the 1950s for the management of hypertension. Evidence for hydralazine-associated vasculitis dates to pre-ANCA (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) era. This abstract describes two cases of ANCA-positive pauci-immune glomerulonephritis (GN) in challenging scenarios where diagnosis was misconstrued. A comprehensive literature review was done to understand the pathogenesis of drug-induced pauci-immune GN. We have described key diagnostic features that are helpful in distinguishing idiopathic ANCA vasculitis from drug-induced vasculitis. Additionally, we have also described different treatments meant to provide therapy options with the least side effects. PMID:27124161

  6. Nephrotic Syndrome Secondary to Proliferative Glomerulonephritis with Monoclonal Immunoglobulin Deposits of Lambda Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seongseok; Braunhut, Beth L.; Walker, Courtney N.; Bhati, Waheed; Sussman, Amy N.; Anwer, Faiz

    2014-01-01

    We describe a rare case of a 46-year-old woman with history of refractory nephrotic syndrome and hypertension who presented with worsening proteinuria and kidney function. Work-up for both autoimmune and infectious diseases and hematologic malignancies including multiple myeloma were negative. Kidney biopsy demonstrated glomerular sclerotic change with lambda light chain deposits in the subendothelial space, which is consistent with proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin deposit (PGNMID). The patient was treated with bortezomib and dexamethasone without clinical improvement and eventually became hemodialysis dependent. PMID:25136462

  7. Hydrocarbon exposure may cause glomerulonephritis and worsen renal function: evidence based on Hill's criteria for causality.

    PubMed

    Ravnskov, U

    2000-08-01

    Many observational and experimental studies point to hydrocarbon exposure as an important pathogenic factor in glomerulonephritis. The findings have made little impact on current concepts and patient care, possibly because the hypothesis of a direct causal effect of the exposure and the hypothesis that the exposure worsens renal function have not been considered separately. This review examines these two hypotheses using Hill's criteria for causality. The results from 14 cross-sectional, 18 case-control studies, two cohort studies, 15 experiments on laboratory animals and two on human beings together with many case reports satisfy all but one of Hill's criteria for both hypotheses. Of particular importance is the finding in the case-control and follow-up studies of an association between degree of exposure and stage of renal disease, and an inverse association between degree of exposure and renal function, indicating that the most important effect of hydrocarbon exposure is its effect on renal function. End-stage renal failure may be preventable in many patients with glomerulonephritis provided a possible exposure to toxic chemicals is discontinued. PMID:10924538

  8. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies-Negative Pauci-Immune Crescentic Glomerulonephritis Associated with Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Anaele, Cyriacus Uzoma; Srisung, Weeraporn; Tomacruz, Yvette; Laski, Melvin

    2015-01-01

    Pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis (PICGN) is most commonly associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). We report a case of chronic, sclerosing ANCA-negative PICGN discovered when a patient presented with multiple myeloma. A 57-year-old woman presented with complaints of nausea, emesis and weakness. She was found to be in renal failure with a serum creatinine of 9.4 mg/dl, mild hyperkalemia and acidosis. She was noted to have normochromic, normocytic anemia with normal platelet and white cell counts, normal plasma proteins and serum protein electrophoresis. Further studies revealed increased concentrations of κ and λ light chains in a ratio of 34.89; a bone marrow biopsy found 12% plasma cells. Serum protein electrophoresis revealed no spike. ANCA, anti-glomerular basement membrane, antineutrophil antibody, hepatitis panel and serum complements were normal. A kidney biopsy result showed chronic sclerosing PICGN plus tubular necrosis, severe tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis and severe arteriosclerosis. Congo red stains were negative and electron microscopy showed no intraglomerular deposits. The patient was subsequently treated for myeloma with bortezomib and dexamethasone with good hematologic response but never recovered renal function. She remains on outpatient hemodialysis. Renal manifestations of myeloma often involve glomerular deposition disease, tubulointerstitial disease, with characteristic proteinaceous casts, or both. In contrast, our patient demonstrated neither of these findings but had chronic sclerosing PICGN. Crescentic glomerulonephritis occurring in patients with plasma cell dyscrasias has been previously reported, but the association remains extremely rare. PMID:26120578

  9. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies-Negative Pauci-Immune Crescentic Glomerulonephritis Associated with Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Anaele, Cyriacus Uzoma; Srisung, Weeraporn; Tomacruz, Yvette; Laski, Melvin

    2015-01-01

    Pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis (PICGN) is most commonly associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). We report a case of chronic, sclerosing ANCA-negative PICGN discovered when a patient presented with multiple myeloma. A 57-year-old woman presented with complaints of nausea, emesis and weakness. She was found to be in renal failure with a serum creatinine of 9.4 mg/dl, mild hyperkalemia and acidosis. She was noted to have normochromic, normocytic anemia with normal platelet and white cell counts, normal plasma proteins and serum protein electrophoresis. Further studies revealed increased concentrations of κ and λ light chains in a ratio of 34.89; a bone marrow biopsy found 12% plasma cells. Serum protein electrophoresis revealed no spike. ANCA, anti-glomerular basement membrane, antineutrophil antibody, hepatitis panel and serum complements were normal. A kidney biopsy result showed chronic sclerosing PICGN plus tubular necrosis, severe tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis and severe arteriosclerosis. Congo red stains were negative and electron microscopy showed no intraglomerular deposits. The patient was subsequently treated for myeloma with bortezomib and dexamethasone with good hematologic response but never recovered renal function. She remains on outpatient hemodialysis. Renal manifestations of myeloma often involve glomerular deposition disease, tubulointerstitial disease, with characteristic proteinaceous casts, or both. In contrast, our patient demonstrated neither of these findings but had chronic sclerosing PICGN. Crescentic glomerulonephritis occurring in patients with plasma cell dyscrasias has been previously reported, but the association remains extremely rare. PMID:26120578

  10. Spontaneous remission of membranous glomerulonephritis with successful fetal outcome: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Mei; Zhou, Hui-Rong; Zhang, Ling; Yang, Ke-Ke; Luo, Jiang-Xi; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-06-01

    Membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) represents an immunologically mediated disease characterized by deposition of immune complexes in the glomerular subepithelial space. Persistent proteinuria at diagnosis predicts poor prognosis. Pregnancy with MGN is a risk of fetal loss and may worsen maternal renal function.Here, we report a lady with MGN and proteinuria achieved spontaneous remission and successful fetal outcome naive to any medications. The 26-year old woman had 1-year history of persistent proteinuria (5.5-12.56 g/24 hours) and biopsy-proven MGN. Histopathological characteristics included glomerular basement membrane spikes, subepithelial monoclonal IgG immunofluorescence, and diffuse electron dense deposits. She was sticking to a regular morning exercise routine without any medications. After successful delivery of a full-term baby girl, the mother had improved proteinuria (0.56 g/24 hours) and albuminuria (351.96 g/24 hours contrasting 2281.6 g/24 hours before pregnancy). The baby had normal height and body weight at 4 months old.We identified more pregnancies with MGN in 5 case reports and 5 clinical series review articles (7-33 cases included). Spontaneous remission of maternal MGN with good fetal outcome rarely occurred in mothers on immunosuppressive therapy.Mothers naive to immunosuppressive therapy may achieve spontaneous remission of maternal membranous glomerulonephritis and successful fetal outcome. Theoretically, fetus might donate stem cells to heal mother's kidney. PMID:27368022

  11. The changing pattern of primary glomerulonephritis in Singapore and other countries over the past 3 decades.

    PubMed

    Woo, K-T; Chan, C-M; Mooi, C Y; -L-Choong, H; Tan, H-K; Foo, M; Lee, G S L; Anantharaman, V; Lim, C-H; Tan, C-C; Lee, E J C; Chiang, G S C; Tan, P H; Boon, T H; Fook-Chong, S; Wong, K-S

    2010-11-01

    This review of 2,586 renal biopsies over the past 3 decades in Singapore documents the changing pattern of glomerulonephritis (GN) from that of a third world country to that of a developed nation. In the 1st decade, mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis was the most common form of primary GN, just as it was in the surrounding Asian countries. In the 2nd decade, the prevalence of mesangial proliferative GN decreased with a rise in membranous, GN which is also seen in China and Thailand. In the 3rd decade, there was a dramatic increase in focal sclerosing glomerulosclerosis. This increase reflects aging and obesity in keeping with more developed countries like Australia, India, Thailand and the United States of America. IgA nephritis remains the most common GN. Apart from the geographical influence, other socioeconomic factors play a significant role in the evolution of the renal biopsy pattern. Mesangial proliferative GN remains prevalent in many Asian countries, but in Singapore the prevalence is decreasing just as it is in Japan, Korea and Malaysia. Worldwide, the prevalence of focal sclerosing glomerulosclerosis continues to increase in many countries. PMID:20979946

  12. CD34+ fibroblast-like cells in the interstitial infiltrates in glomerulonephritis - an immunohistochemical observation.

    PubMed

    Gluhovschi, Cristina; Potencz, Elena; Lazar, Elena; Petrica, Ligia; Bozdog, Gheorghe; Gadalean, Florica; Bob, Flaviu; Gluhovschi, Adrian; Cioca, Daniel; Velciov, Silvia

    2012-12-01

    CD34 cells in the interstitial infiltrates in glomerulonephritis (GN) could be the turning point between regenerative processes and interstitial fibrosis. The aim of our study was to assess the presence of CD34+ cells in the interstitial infiltrates in GN. A cross-sectional study of 33 patients with glomerulonephritis, mean age: 43.3 ±11.31 years, 20 male and 13 female, was conducted. Conventional stains, as well as immunohistochemistry for the CD34 antigen were employed on kidney biopsies. Strength of immunohistochemical reaction was assessed semi-quantitatively. Regarding the percentage of cases with CD34+ cells in the interstitial infiltrates out of 33 patients: cells of interstitial infiltrates were 27.3% positive. The percentage of cases showing CD34+ cells at the level of interstitial infiltrates was: 44.4% in FSGS, 14.3% in membranoproliferative GN, 28.6% in membranous nephropathy, 20% in mesangial proliferative GN, 0% in minimal change disease, and 50% in crescentic GN. With the exception of minimal change disease, CD34+ cells were found in the interstitial infiltrates in all histopathological forms of GN. Some of these cells were spindle-shaped fibroblast-like cells. As inflammation in the tubulointerstitial compartment either resolves or proceeds to fibrosis, aims at reversing this process will benefit from analyses of the interstitial infiltrates harboring CD34+ cells. PMID:23359197

  13. A case of infectious endocarditis-associated crescentic glomerulonephritis with intracranial hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Eri; Nakayama, Masaru; Amano, Kazushi; Hirano, Tadashi; Uesugi, Noriko

    2010-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of fever and renal impairment. The patient had undergone a tooth extraction 11 months prior to admission. Echocardiography demonstrated vegetation on the mitral valve, and Streptococcus mitis was detected on blood culture. Accordingly, infectious endocarditis (IE) was diagnosed. Renal biopsy showed crescentic glomerulonephritis. Based on the negative staining for immunoglobulins and complement components in immunofluorescence study and lack of dense deposits on electron microscopy, the renal involvement was considered to be of the pauci-immune type. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and subdural hematoma (SDH) developed simultaneously following commencement of antibiotic therapy. The intracranial involvement improved by conservative therapy. Antibiotic treatment resulted in gradual control of IE infection and improvement of renal function. A repeated renal biopsy, performed about 5 months after the first biopsy, showed amelioration of glomerular injury and interstitial damage. To our knowledge, our case was the second to report simultaneous developments of both SAH and SDH secondary to IE. We postulate that the glomerular injury was associated with IE. We report here a rare case of IE-associated crescentic glomerulonephritis with complications of SAH and SDH. PMID:20155718

  14. An immune-complex glomerulonephritis of Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum).

    PubMed

    Lumsden, J S; Russell, S; Huber, P; Wybourne, B A; Ostland, V E; Minamikawa, M; Ferguson, H W

    2008-12-01

    Chinook salmon from New Zealand were shown to have a generalized membranous glomerulonephritis that was most severe in large fish. Marked thickening of the glomerular basement membrane was the most consistent lesion, with the presence of an electron-dense deposit beneath the capillary endothelium.Severely affected glomeruli also had expansion of the mesangium and loss of capillaries,synechiae of the visceral and parietal epithelium and mild fibrosis of Bowmans capsule. Chinook salmon from British Columbia, Canada with bacterial kidney disease caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum had similar histological lesions. They also had thickened glomerular basement membranes that were recognized by rabbit antiserum to rainbow trout immunoglobulin. This was true only when frozen sections of kidney were used and not formalin-fixed tissue. An attempt to experimentally produce a glomerulopathy in rainbow trout by repeated immunization with killed R. salmoninarum was not successful. Case records from the Fish Pathology Laboratory at the University of Guelph over a 10-year period revealed that a range of species were diagnosed with glomerulopathies similar to those seen in Chinook salmon. The majority of these cases were determined to have chronic inflammatory disease. This report has identified the presence of immunoglobulin within thickened basement membranes of Chinook salmon with glomerulonephritis and supports the existence of type III hypersensitivity in fish. PMID:18752546

  15. Revisiting post-infectious glomerulonephritis in the emerging era of C3 glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Khalighi, Mazdak A.; Wang, Shihtien; Henriksen, Kammi J.; Bock, Margret; Keswani, Mahima; Meehan, Shane M.; Chang, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) is an immune complex-mediated glomerular injury that typically resolves. Dominant C3 deposition is characteristic of PIGN, but with the emergence of C3 glomerulonephritis (C3GN) as a distinct entity, it is unclear how the pathologic similarities between PIGN and C3GN should be reconciled. Therefore, nephrologists and nephropathologists need additional guidance at the time of biopsy. Methods We studied 23 pediatric and young adult patients diagnosed with PIGN. Patients were divided into two groups, one with co-dominance between C3 and immunoglobulins and the other meeting proposed diagnostic criteria for C3GN. Clinical and pathological features were compared. Results No clinical and/or pathological features could distinguish between those with C3-co-dominant deposits and those with C3 dominance. Nearly all patients in both groups regained their baseline renal function without clinical intervention. Conclusions Although the identification of abnormalities of the alternative pathway of complement is characteristic of C3GN, testing is not widely available and the turnaround time often exceeds 1 month. Our study found that PIGN with either co-dominant or dominant C3 deposition in a cohort of young patients has excellent short-term outcomes. Close clinical observation for persistent abnormalities, such as hypocomplementemia, prolonged hematuria or proteinuria, is recommended to single out patients that may harbor intrinsic complement abnormalities. PMID:27274823

  16. The role of Th1 and Th17 cells in glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Azadegan-Dehkordi, Fatemeh; Bagheri, Nader; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Context: T helper (Th) cells as an important part of the immune is responsible for elimination of invading pathogens. But, if Th cell responses are not regulated effectively, the autoimmune diseases might develop. The Th17 subset usually produces interleukin-17A which in experimental models of organ-specific autoimmune inflammation is very important. Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of open access journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Embase, Scopus, PubMed and Web of Science have been searched. Results: Fifty-six articles were found and searched. In the present review article, we tried to summarize the recently published data about characteristics and role of Th1 and Th17 cells and discuss in detail, the potential role of these T helpers immune responses in renal inflammation and renal injury, focusing on glomerulonephritis. Published papers in animal and human studies indicated that autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, classically believed to be Th1-mediated, are mainly derived from a Th17 immune response. Identification of the Th17 subgroup has explained seemingly paradoxical observations and improved our understanding of immune-mediated inflammatory responses. Conclusions: Secretion of IL-17A, as well as IL-17F, IL-21, IL-22, suggests that Th17 subset may play a crucial role as a pleiotropic pro-inflammatory Th subset. There is experimental evidence to support the notion that Th1 and Th17 cells contribute to kidney injury in renal inflammatory diseases like glomerulonephritis. PMID:25964886

  17. Renal infarction and immune-mediated glomerulonephritis in sheep (Ovis aries) chronically implanted with indwelling catheters.

    PubMed

    Rao, Varada P; Poutahidis, Theofilos; Marini, Robert P; Holcombe, Hilda; Rogers, Arlin B; Fox, James G

    2006-07-01

    Microbial infections are common sequelae in humans and animals implanted with long-term intravascular catheters. Understanding the pathophysiology of infectious morbidity is critical to improving quality of care in catheterized subjects. Here, we describe findings in 6 clinically healthy, male sheep implanted with indwelling aortic or cardiac catheters for 6 to 10 mo. We isolated multiple bacterial species including Serratia spp., Enterobacter agglomerans, Eschericia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, and K. pneumoniae in aerobic cultures from catheter tips. Although sheep were clinically asymptomatic, 1 or both kidneys from all animals contained wedge-shaped infarcts of varying size and number. Microscopic examination revealed (a) marked fibrosis with mild inflammatory cell infiltrate consistent with chronic foreign body reaction around catheters; (b) moderate to severe, diffuse, subacute to chronic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and mild, multifocal chronic interstitial nephritis; and (c) mesangial immune-complex deposition as demonstrated by direct immunofluorescence technique. The finding of bacterial colonization of catheters together with chronic glomerulonephritis and immune-complex deposits in kidneys in clinically asymptomatic sheep underscores the need for close microbiologic monitoring of catheter implants and assessment of kidney function in animals instrumented for long-term vascular access. PMID:16884173

  18. Lutheran/basal cell adhesion molecule accelerates progression of crescentic glomerulonephritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jin; Filipe, Anne; Rahuel, Cécile; Bonnin, Philippe; Mesnard, Laurent; Guérin, Coralie; Wang, Yu; Le Van Kim, Caroline; Colin, Yves; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Migration of circulating leukocytes from the vasculature into the surrounding tissue is an important component of the inflammatory response. Among the cell surface molecules identified as contributing to leukocyte extravasation is VCAM-1, expressed on activated vascular endothelium, which participates in all stages of leukocyte–endothelial interaction by binding to leukocyte surface expressed integrin VLA-4. However, not all VLA-4-mediated events can be linked to VCAM-1. A novel interaction between VLA-4 and endothelial Lutheran (Lu) blood group antigens and basal cell adhesion molecule (BCAM) proteins has been recently shown, suggesting that Lu/BCAM may have a role in leukocyte recruitments in inflamed tissues. Here, we assessed the participation of Lu/BCAM in the immunopathogenesis of crescentic glomerulonephritis. High expression of Lu/BCAM in glomeruli of mice with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis suggests a potential role for the local expression of Lu/BCAM in nephritogenic recruitment of leukocytes. Genetic deficiency of Lu/BCAM attenuated glomerular accumulation of T cells and macrophages, crescent formation, and proteinuria, correlating with reduced fibrin and platelet deposition in glomeruli. Furthermore, we found a pro-adhesive interaction between human monocyte α4β1 integrin and Lu/BCAM proteins. Thus, Lu/BCAM may have a critical role in facilitating the accumulation of monocytes and macrophages, thereby exacerbating renal injury. PMID:24429403

  19. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome in childhood: report of nine cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gümüş, Hakan; Per, Hüseyin; Kumandaş, Sefer; Yikilmaz, Ali

    2010-04-01

    Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS) is recently described disorder with typical radiological findings in the posterior regions of the cerebral hemisphere and cerebellum. Its clinical symptoms include headache, decreased alertness, mental abnormalities, such as confusion, diminished spontaneity of speech, and changed behavior ranging from drowsiness to stupor, seizures, vomiting and abnormalities of visual perception like cortical blindness. RPLS is caused by various heterogeneous factors, the commonest being hypertension, followed by non-hypertensive causes such as eclampsia, renal diseases and immunosuppressive therapy. We presented nine patients with RPLS who had primary diagnoses such as acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, idiopathic hypertension, the performing of intravenous immunoglobulin for infection with crescentic glomerulonephritis, erythrocyte transfusion for severe iron deficiency, L: -asparaginase treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia and performing of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for ulcerative colitis due to neutropenia. Early recognition of RPLS as complication during different diseases and therapy in childhood may facilitate precise diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:19809787

  20. [Acute rheumatic fever, Sydenham's chorea and psychopathology].

    PubMed

    Gimzal, Aylan; Topçuoğlu, Volkan; Yazgan, M Yanki

    2002-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is an autoimmune disorder that is triggered by group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infections. ARF consists of several combinations of carditis, polyarthritis and Sydenham's chorea, and rarely seen erythema marginatum and subcutaneous nodules. Sydenham's chorea is seen in about 20% of patients with ARF. As a late symptom of ARF, Sydenham's chorea usually occurs 3 months or longer after the streptococcal infection. Sydenham's chorea is a neuropsychiatric disorder that may present with emotional lability, anxiety, obsessive compulsive symptoms, attention deficit and hyperactivity symptoms or tics. Obsessive-compulsive symptoms occur in 70% of patients with Sydenham's chorea. The role of the autoimmune mechanisms and the dysfunction of the basal ganglia have been demonstrated in Sydenham's chorea. Antibodies against group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus cross-react with basal ganglia. Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS) shares the same mechanism with Sydenham's chorea, but PANDAS has not been shown to require penicillin prophylaxis. Thus it is important to distinguish between them. Sydenham's chorea is associated with adulthood OCD, Tourette syndrome and schizophrenia. These features make Sydenham's chorea an explanatory model for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and related disorders. This poststreptococcal disorder provides a treatment opportunity with new therapies like antibiotic therapy, plasma exchange and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for psychiatric disorders. In this paper we summarize the phenomenological and treatment studies of OCD, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and tic disorders in subjects with ARF, with or without Sydenham's chorea. PMID:12794666

  1. α-1-Antitrypsin detected by MALDI imaging in the study of glomerulonephritis: Its relevance in chronic kidney disease progression.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew; L'Imperio, Vincenzo; De Sio, Gabriele; Ferrario, Franco; Scalia, Carla; Dell'Antonio, Giacomo; Pieruzzi, Federico; Pontillo, Claudia; Filip, Szymon; Markoska, Katerina; Granata, Antonio; Spasovski, Goce; Jankowski, Joachim; Capasso, Giovambattista; Pagni, Fabio; Magni, Fulvio

    2016-06-01

    Idiopathic glomerulonephritis (GN), such as membranous glomerulonephritis, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and IgA nephropathy (IgAN), represent the most frequent primary glomerular kidney diseases (GKDs) worldwide. Although the renal biopsy currently remains the gold standard for the routine diagnosis of idiopathic GN, the invasiveness and diagnostic difficulty related with this procedure highlight the strong need for new diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers to be translated into less invasive diagnostic tools. MALDI-MS imaging MALDI-MSI was applied to fresh-frozen bioptic renal tissue from patients with a histological diagnosis of FSGS (n = 6), IgAN, (n = 6) and membranous glomerulonephritis (n = 7), and from controls (n = 4) in order to detect specific molecular signatures of primary glomerulonephritis. MALDI-MSI was able to generate molecular signatures capable to distinguish between normal kidney and pathological GN, with specific signals (m/z 4025, 4048, and 4963) representing potential indicators of chronic kidney disease development. Moreover, specific disease-related signatures (m/z 4025 and 4048 for FSGS, m/z 4963 and 5072 for IgAN) were detected. Of these signals, m/z 4048 was identified as α-1-antitrypsin and was shown to be localized to the podocytes within sclerotic glomeruli by immunohistochemistry. α-1-Antitrypsin could be one of the markers of podocyte stress that is correlated with the development of FSGS due to both an excessive loss and a hypertrophy of podocytes. PMID:26749278

  2. Genetic factors influence level of proteinuria in cationic antigen-induced immune complex glomerulonephritis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, A; Thaiss, F; Oite, T; Günther, E; Batsford, S; Vogt, A

    1985-01-01

    The influence of genetic factors on the susceptibility of the rat to cationic antigen-induced in situ immune complex glomerulonephritis was investigated. The levels of proteinuria developing in 11 inbred strains of rats differing in MHC and in genetic background varied markedly. Susceptibility was not MHC associated but resided in the genetic background. PMID:3159528

  3. Independent associations of urine neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin and serum uric acid with interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy in primary glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Lertrit, Amornpan; Worawichawong, Suchin; Vanavanan, Somlak; Chittamma, Anchalee; Muntham, Dittapol; Radinahamed, Piyanuch; Nampoon, Aumporn; Kitiyakara, Chagriya

    2016-01-01

    The degree of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IFTA) is one of the strongest prognostic factors in glomerulonephritis (GN). In experimental models, high serum uric acid (UA) could contribute to IFTA through direct effects on the renal tubules, but the significance of this process has not been evaluated in patients. Urine neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin (NGAL) is produced by renal tubules following acute or chronic damage. We investigated the relationship between UA and NGAL excretion in primary GN and tested whether these biomarkers are independently associated with IFTA. Urine and blood were collected from patients on the day of kidney biopsy. IFTA was assessed semi-quantitatively. Fifty-one patients with primary GN were enrolled. NGAL/creatinine correlated significantly with proteinuria but not with glomerular filtration rate (GFR). By contrast, UA correlated with GFR but not with proteinuria. NGAL/creatinine did not correlate with UA. Both NGAL/creatinine and UA increased with the severity of IFTA. By multivariate analysis, GFR, NGAL/creatinine, and UA were independently associated with moderate-to-severe IFTA. Combining UA and NGAL/creatinine with classical predictors (proteinuria and GFR) tended to improve discrimination for moderate-to-severe IFTA. Findings that UA was unrelated to urinary NGAL excretion suggest that the two biomarkers reflect different pathways related to the development of IFTA in primary GN. Both NGAL/creatinine and UA were independently associated with moderate-to-severe IFTA. PMID:27143950

  4. IgA-dominant post-infectious glomerulonephritis; making another case in support of renal biopsy in type 2 diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nayer, Ali; Davda, Gargi; Pai, Rima; Ortega, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Approximately one-third of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus will eventually develop diabetic nephropathy (DN). Impaired renal function in type 2 diabetics may also be secondary to non-diabetic renal disease (NDRD). NDRD in type 2 diabetics may occur alone in the absence of DN or may be superimposed on DN. Renal biopsy maybe indicated to establish the correct diagnosis and to ascertain the severity of glomerular and tubulointerstitial pathology. Case: We report a patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic renal insufficiency who developed worsening of renal function in the setting of staphylococcal infection and antibiotic use. Conclusion: Renal biopsy revealed IgA-dominant post-infectious glomerulonephritis and acute interstitial nephritis superimposed on diabetic glomerulosclerosis. Accumulating evidence indicates that, NDRD accounts for impaired renal function in a significant number of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The presence of clinical, biochemical, and radiological features that suggest NDRD should prompt pathological evaluation of the kidney. PMID:27069968

  5. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... glomeruli. The glomeruli of the kidney help filter wastes and fluids from the blood to form urine. ... the glomerular basement membrane. This membrane helps filter wastes and extra fluids from the blood. Damage to ...

  6. Clinicopathologic correlations in a series of 143 patients with IgA glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Mustonen, J; Pasternack, A; Helin, H; Nikkilä, M

    1985-01-01

    In an unselected series of patients with IgA glomerulonephritis, old age, high blood pressure, and high urinary protein excretion at the time of renal biopsy were found to correlate with impaired renal function, whereas sex, estimated duration of the disease, or high serum IgA levels did not. The following clinical features were favorable prognostic signs: asymptomatic proteinuria, macroscopic hematuria, and isolated microscopic hematuria. The degree of diffuse mesangial alteration and the presence of segmental glomerular lesions correlated clearly with the subsequent clinical outcome. Vascular lesions, i.e. arteriosclerosis and renal vascular deposition of C3, were most often present in patients with severe glomerulopathy. The presence of electron-dense deposits in glomerular capillary walls was also an unfavorable prognostic finding. Renal biopsy findings of interstitial infiltrates of inflammatory cells and IgA distributed along glomerular capillary walls were usually associated with extrarenal manifestations of the disease. PMID:4014321

  7. An immunohistological study of feline glomerulonephritis using the peroxidase-antiperoxidase method.

    PubMed

    Arthur, J E; Lucke, V M; Newby, T J; Bourne, F J

    1984-07-01

    Twenty-two cases of feline glomerulonephritis were investigated for the presence of immune complexes within the glomerulus using the peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) method. This method was used with formalin-fixed paraffin-wax embedded tissues which were pretreated with trypsin and with frozen sections of kidney tissue. Of a total of 25 kidney specimens examined (two cats had repeated biopsies) the composition of the deposits was 23/25 IgG, 17/25 C3, 11/25 IgM and 2/25 IgA. Serial studies of two cats showed a progression of the disease from initial nephrotic syndrome to chronic renal failure. With the more severe form of the disease there was a tendency for the deposition of complement and more than one class of immunoglobulin within the glomeruli. PMID:6382492

  8. Phospholipase A2 Receptor-Positive Idiopathic Membranous Glomerulonephritis with Onset at 95 Years: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Keiichi; Hoshino, Junichi; Ueno, Toshiharu; Mise, Koki; Hazue, Ryo; Sekine, Akinari; Yabuuchi, Junko; Yamanouchi, Masayuki; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Kikuchi, Koichi; Sumida, Keiichi; Hayami, Noriko; Sawa, Naoki; Takaichi, Kenmei; Fujii, Takeshi; Ohashi, Kenichi; Akiyama, Shinichi; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ubara, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    A 95-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for evaluation of bilateral lower-limb edema persisting for 3 months. Serum creatinine was 1.55 mg/dl, and urinary protein excretion was 9.1 g/day. Renal biopsy revealed stage 1 membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) with immunoglobulin G4-dominant staining. This patient did not have any underlying disease such as infection with hepatitis B or C virus or malignancy, and anti-phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) antibody was detected in the serum. Accordingly, idiopathic MGN was diagnosed. Corticosteroid therapy was avoided, but hemodialysis was required to treat generalized edema. The patient is currently doing well. This is the oldest reported case of idiopathic MGN with positivity for anti-PLA2R antibody. PMID:27390744

  9. Treatment of choroidal neovascularisation secondary to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type II with intravitreal ranibizumab

    PubMed Central

    McCullagh, Donal; Silvestri, Giuliana; Maxwell, Alexander P

    2014-01-01

    Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type II (MPGN II) is characterised by electron-dense deposits of complement components in the glomerular basement membrane and retinal pigment epithelium. Approximately, 10% of affected individuals develop serious ocular complications similar to age-related macular degeneration such as choroidal neovascularisation (CNV), which has been managed with photocoagulation or photodynamic therapy; however, these treatments can impact visual acuity. We report the case of a 42-year-old woman with MPGN II presenting with decreased visual acuity and paracentral scotoma in her left eye due to an extrafoveal choroidal neovascular membrane (growth of new vessels under the retina). The patient was successfully treated with intravitreal ranibizumab (Lucentis) with restoration of visual function. This case highlights the successful management of CNV secondary to MPGN II with the antivascular endothelial growth factor agent ranibizumab and emphasises the importance of early referral of patients with MPGN II who are reporting of visual ‘distortion’. PMID:24895384

  10. Reclassification of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis: Identification of a new GN: C3GN

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Rosso, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    This review revises the reclassification of the membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) after the consensus conference that by 2015 reclassified all the glomerulonephritis basing on etiology and pathogenesis, instead of the histomorphological aspects. After reclassification, two types of MPGN are to date recognized: The immunocomplexes mediated MPGN and the complement mediated MPGN. The latter type is more extensively described in the review either because several of these entities are completely new or because the improved knowledge of the complement cascade allowed for new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Overall the complement mediated MPGN are related to acquired or genetic cause. The presence of circulating auto antibodies is the principal acquired cause. Genetic wide association studies and family studies allowed to recognize genetic mutations of different types as causes of the complement dysregulation. The complement cascade is a complex phenomenon and activating factors and regulating factors should be distinguished. Genetic mutations causing abnormalities either in activating or in regulating factors have been described. The diagnosis of the complement mediated MPGN requires a complete study of all these different complement factors. As a consequence, new therapeutic approaches are becoming available. Indeed, in addition to a nonspecific treatment and to the immunosuppression that has the aim to block the auto antibodies production, the specific inhibition of complement activation is relatively new and may act either blocking the C5 convertase or the C3 convertase. The drugs acting on C3 convertase are still in different phases of clinical development and might represent drugs for the future. Overall the authors consider that one of the principal problems in finding new types of drugs are both the rarity of the disease and the consequent poor interest in the marketing and the lack of large international cooperative studies. PMID:27458560

  11. Autoantibodies to ribosomal P antigens with immune complex glomerulonephritis in SJL mice treated with pristane.

    PubMed

    Satoh, M; Hamilton, K J; Ajmani, A K; Dong, X; Wang, J; Kanwar, Y S; Reeves, W H

    1996-10-01

    BALB/c ByJ mice develop a lupus-like syndrome characterized by anti-nRNP/Sm and Su autoantibodies and immune complex glomerulonephritis after a single i.p. pristane injection. In contrast, mercuric chloride induces anti-fibrillarin Abs only in SJL and other H-2s mice, and not in BALB/c (H-2d) mice. In the present study, the specificities of autoantibodies induced by pristane and HgCl2 were compared in SJL and BALB/c mice to examine whether these strains are "programmed" to make different sets of autoantibodies in response to nonspecific immune stimulation. Unexpectedly, the predominant autoantibodies induced by pristane in SJL mice were neither those characteristic of HgCl2-treated SJL mice nor those associated with pristane-induced disease in BALB/c mice but, rather, anti-ribosomal P, another lupus-related specificity. The autoantibodies were strongly reactive with the C-terminal 22 amino acids of the ribosomal P2 protein, indicating that they exhibited similar fine specificities to anti-P Abs in human SLE and MRL/Ipr mice. Like BALB/c mice, pristane-treated SJL mice developed severe glomerulonephritis characterized by proteinuria, mesangial proliferation, and glomerular immune complex deposits. This is the first evidence that the induction of a lupus-like syndrome by pristane is not restricted to BALB/c mice. The predominance of anti-P Abs in SJL mice contrasts sharply with the predominance of anti-nRNP/Sm and Su, in pristane-treated BALB/c mice, even though the renal lesions were similar in both strains. The data suggest that H-2s does not program mice to produce anti-fibrillarin Abs in response to nonspecific immune stimulation, arguing that autoantibody induction by pristane involves Ag-specific mechanisms. PMID:8816434

  12. Reclassification of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis: Identification of a new GN: C3GN.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Rosso, Giuseppina

    2016-07-01

    This review revises the reclassification of the membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) after the consensus conference that by 2015 reclassified all the glomerulonephritis basing on etiology and pathogenesis, instead of the histomorphological aspects. After reclassification, two types of MPGN are to date recognized: The immunocomplexes mediated MPGN and the complement mediated MPGN. The latter type is more extensively described in the review either because several of these entities are completely new or because the improved knowledge of the complement cascade allowed for new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Overall the complement mediated MPGN are related to acquired or genetic cause. The presence of circulating auto antibodies is the principal acquired cause. Genetic wide association studies and family studies allowed to recognize genetic mutations of different types as causes of the complement dysregulation. The complement cascade is a complex phenomenon and activating factors and regulating factors should be distinguished. Genetic mutations causing abnormalities either in activating or in regulating factors have been described. The diagnosis of the complement mediated MPGN requires a complete study of all these different complement factors. As a consequence, new therapeutic approaches are becoming available. Indeed, in addition to a nonspecific treatment and to the immunosuppression that has the aim to block the auto antibodies production, the specific inhibition of complement activation is relatively new and may act either blocking the C5 convertase or the C3 convertase. The drugs acting on C3 convertase are still in different phases of clinical development and might represent drugs for the future. Overall the authors consider that one of the principal problems in finding new types of drugs are both the rarity of the disease and the consequent poor interest in the marketing and the lack of large international cooperative studies. PMID:27458560

  13. Anaerococcus urinomassiliensis sp. nov., isolated from a urine sample of a 17-year-old boy affected by autoimmune hepatitis and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Morand, A; Cornu, F; Tsimaratos, M; Lagier, J-C; Cadoret, F; Fournier, P-E; Raoult, D

    2016-09-01

    We report the main characteristics of 'Anaerococcus urinomassiliensis' strain FC4(T) (CSURP2143) that was isolated from a urine sample of a 17-year-old boy affected by autoimmune hepatitis and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. PMID:27408746

  14. Postinfectious glomerulonephritis secondary to Erythrovirus B19 (Parvovirus B19): case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Marco, Helena; Guermah, Imane; Matas, Lurdes; Hernández, Alba; Navarro, Maruja; Lopez, Dolores; Bonet, Josep

    2016-04-01

    A previously healthy 32-yearold woman developed arterial hypertension, proteinuria, and hematuria (nephritic syndrome) with normal renal function and was diagnosed with post-infectious glomerulonephritis secondary to parvovirus B19 infection. The renal biopsy showed endocapillary glomerulonephritis, with positive IgG, C3, and C1q immunoreactivity in the capillary walls and ultrastructural evidence of subendothelial deposits. The diagnosis of parvovirus B19 infection was confirmed by IgG/IgM serological positivity and parvovirus DNA demonstration in both peripheral blood and kidney tissue. Glomerular involvement improved spontaneously. To be noted are the atypical signs and symptoms of our patient who, unlike previously reported cases, failed to show fever, skin rash, or affected relatives. PMID:26833301

  15. Proteomics and glomerulonephritis: A complementary approach in renal pathology for the identification of chronic kidney disease related markers.

    PubMed

    L'Imperio, Vincenzo; Smith, Andrew; Chinello, Clizia; Pagni, Fabio; Magni, Fulvio

    2016-04-01

    Glomerulonephritis (GN) is one of the most common origins of chronic kidney disease and its careful evaluation is crucial for prognostic and therapeutic purposes, with the renal biopsy still playing a central role for the diagnosis. However, due to its invasiveness, it is not devoid of complications and many investigations have focused on identifying biomarkers for chronic kidney diseases using less-invasive and easy-to-collect samples, such as urine and blood. In this context, proteomics has played a crucial role in determining the molecular changes related to disease progression and early pathological glomerular modifications. Here, we report a review of selected literature for each GN, based on selected works published in the last 10 years, showing how these approaches have generated clinically relevant findings in the study of glomerulonephritis. We also describe several proteomic strategies, highlighting their technical advantages and limitations, future perspectives for proteomic applications in the study of GNs, and their possible application in routine practice. PMID:26642820

  16. Gamma globulin, Evan's blue, aprotinin A PLA2 inhibitor, tetracycline and antioxidants protect epithelial cells against damage induced by synergism among streptococcal hemolysins, oxidants and proteinases: relation to the prevention of post-streptococcal sequelae and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, I; Sadovnic, M

    1998-11-01

    An in vitro model was employed to study the potential role of streptococcal extra-cellular products, rich in streptolysin O, in cellular injury as related to streptococcal infections and post-streptococcal sequelae. Extra-cellular products (EXPA) rich in streptolysin O were isolated from type 4, group A hemolytic streptococci grown in a chemostat, in a synthetic medium. EXPA induced moderate cytopathogenic changes in monkey kidney epithelial cells and in rat heart cells pre-labeled with 3H-arachidonate. However very strong toxic effects were induced when EXP was combined with oxidants (glucose oxides generated H2O2, AAPH-induced peroxyl radical (ROO.), NO generated by sodium nitroprusside) and proteinases (plasmin, trypsin). Cell killing was distinctly synergistic in nature. Cell damage induced by the multi-component cocktails was strongly inhibited either by micromolar amounts of gamma globulin, and Evan's blue which neutralized SLO activity, by tetracycline, trasylol (aprotinin), epsilon amino caproic acid and by soybean trypsin inhibitor, all proteinase inhibitors as well as by a non-penetrating PLA2 inhibitor A. The results suggest that fasciitis, myositis and sepsis resulting from infections with hemolytic streptococci might be caused by a coordinated 'cross-talk' among microbial, leukocyte and additional host-derived pro-inflammatory agents. Since attempts to prolong lives of septic patients by the exclusive administration of single antagonists invariably failed, it is proposed that the administration of 'cocktails' of putative inhibitors against major pro-inflammatory agonizes generated in inflammation and infection might protect against the deleterious effects caused by the biochemical and pharmacological cascades which are known to be activated in sepsis. PMID:9848686

  17. Renal interstitial mast cell count is significantly higher in membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis than in class IV lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Karolina; Musiał, Jacek; Soja, Jerzy; Kuźniewski, Marek; Gala-Błądzińska, Agnieszka; Białas, Magdalena; Okoń, Krzysztof

    2015-06-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a severe manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus; in LN class IV morphologic lesions may be similar to the lesions in primary membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN). The aim of the study was to compare the counts of tryptase-positive and chymase-positive mast cells between LN class IV and MPGN. The material consisted of 61 renal biopsies: 32 with lupus nephritis class IV, and 29 with membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. Chymase- and tryptase-positive cells were stained by immunohistochemistry and subsequently counted. The mean count of chymase-positive mast cells was 21.94 for the whole group, 12.66 for LN class IV and 32.18 for MPGN. The mean count of tryptase-positive cells was 34.94 hpf for the entire group, 22.98 for LN class IV and 48. 13 for MPGN. The differences between lupus nephritis and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis were significant both for chymase- and tryptase-positive cells. Both chymase-positive MC counts and tryptase-positive MC counts correlated with relative interstitial volume (RIV) (R=0.35 and R=0.28, respectively) and with creatinine level (R=0.35 and R=0.43, respectively). There was also a significant correlation between age, creatinine level and RIV (R=0.28 and R=0.26, respectively). PMID:26247528

  18. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis with small fibrils in a patient with the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome successfully treated with immunosuppressive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Javaid, Muhammad M; Denley, Helen; Tagboto, Senyo

    2007-01-01

    Background Fibrillary glomerulonephritis is a rare cause of progressive renal dysfunction, often leading to the need for dialysis within a few years. The role of immunosuppressive treatment is still uncertain although this has been tried with variable success. Case presentation A 56 year old woman with the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (IgM anticardiolipin antibodies) was seen in the nephrology clinic with haematuria, proteinuria, and worsening renal function. A renal biopsy demonstrated a mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis on light microscopy and smaller fibrils (10.6–13.8 nm in diameter) than is usual for fibrillary glomerulonephritis (typically 18–22 nm) on electron microscopy. Amyloidosis was excluded following detailed evaluation. On account of rapidly worsening renal failure she was started on cyclophosphamide and prednisolone which led to the partial recovery and stabilization of her renal function. Conclusion This case highlights the need for routine electron microscopy in native renal biopsies, where the differential diagnosis is wide and varied and the light and immunofluorescence microscopic findings may be non specific. PMID:17490479

  19. Th1, Th2 and Treg/T17 cytokines in two types of proliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Stangou, M; Bantis, C; Skoularopoulou, M; Korelidou, L; Kouloukouriotou, D; Scina, M; Labropoulou, I T; Kouri, N M; Papagianni, A; Efstratiadis, G

    2016-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and focal segmental necrotizing glomerulonephritis (FSNGN) are characterized by proliferation of native glomerular cells and infiltration by inflammatory cells. Several cytokines act as mediators of kidney damage in both diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Th1, Th2 and Treg/T17 cytokines in these types of proliferative glomerulonephritis. Simultaneous measurement of Th1 interleukin (IL-2, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-α], interferon-gamma [INF-γ]), Th2 (IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13), Treg/T17 transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], IL-17) cytokines and C-C chemokines Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1 [MIP-1] β) was performed in first-morning urine samples, at the day of renal biopsy, using a multiplex cytokine assay. Cytokine concentrations were correlated with histological findings and renal function outcome. Urinary excretion of Th1, Th2 and Treg/Th17 cytokines were significantly higher in FSNGN compared to IgAN patients. In IgAN patients (n = 50, M/F: 36/14, M age: 40.7 [17-67] years), Th1, Th2 and T17 cytokines correlated significantly with the presence of endocapillary proliferation, while in FSNGN patients (n = 40, M/F: 24/16, M age: 56.5 [25-80] years), MCP-1 and TGF-β1 had a positive correlation with severe extracapillary proliferation (P = 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively). Urinary IL-17 was the only independent parameter associated with endocapillary proliferation in IgAN and with MCP-1 urinary excretion in FSNGN. Response to treatment was mainly predicted by IL-6 in IgAN, and by Th2 (IL-4, IL-6), Treg (GM-CSF) cytokines and MIP-1 β in FSNGN. Th1, Th2 and T17 cytokines were directly implicated in renal pathology in IgAN and possibly through MCP-1 production in FSNGN. IL-17 and IL-6 seem to have a central role in inflammation and progression of kidney injury. PMID:27194829

  20. Expression of alternatively spliced fibronectin variants during remodeling in proliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, J. L.; Torres, E. S.; Mitchell, R. J.; Peters, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) plays an important role in tissue remodeling during embryogenesis, wound repair, and vascular disease, and is thought to regulate cellular processes such as cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation through specialized domains within the molecule. In addition, Fn can be alternatively spliced at three regions: extradomains EIIIA, EIIIB, and a variable segment V, potentially giving rise to functionally distinct variants of the molecule. We have previously shown a sequential expression of cellular Fn first by platelets, followed by macrophages, then mesangial cells in habu snake venom-induced proliferative glomerulonephritis (Am J Pathol 145: 585-597, 1994). These studies examined the cellular sources and glomerular localization of Fn in general but did not distinguish between the various alternatively spliced isoforms. In this study, we examine by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry the temporal expression and cellular sources of EIIIA, EIIIB, and V in a model of proliferation glomerulonephritis that has cell migration, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis as features of tissue remodeling. Macrophages were the first cells to express Fn mRNA showing an EIIIA+, EIIIB-, and V95+ pattern beginning at 8 hours after habu snake venom injection. Migrating mesangial cells at the margins of early lesions (8 and 24 hours) did not overexpress mRNA encoding these Fn variants, but immunofluorescence microscopy revealed V95 and EIIIA protein at the margins of lesions. EIIIB was absent in lesions at this time. At 48 hours and peaking at 72 hours after habu snake venom injection, mesangial cells in central aspects of glomerular lesions expressed abundant mRNA and protein for V95 and EIIIA. EIIIB mRNA and protein was slight in the mesangium at these times. Parietal epithelial cells, particularly adjacent to glomerular lesions, also expressed abundant mRNA and protein for all three variants throughout the course of the disease

  1. Expression of AIM2 is high and correlated with inflammation in hepatitis B virus associated glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background & aims Innate immunity is the first line of defense against invasive microbial infection, and AIM2 plays an important role in this process by sensing double-stranded DNA viruses. However, the role of AIM2 in regulating the immune response to viruses in vivo, especially in sensing hepatitis B virus (HBV), has not been examined. We hypothesized that the expression of AIM2 increases corresponding to HBV-mediated inflammation in patients with hepatitis B virus associated glomerulonephritis (HBV-GN), a condition which activates inflammatory mechanisms and causes renal damage. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the expression of AIM2 in HBV-GN patients in relation to the inflammatory response to HBV infection. Methods A total of 79 patients diagnosed with chronic nephritis (CN) were enrolled in this study, including 54 HBV-GN patients as the experimental group and 24 chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) patients as the negative control group. Six patients diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) were also enrolled as positive controls. Each CN patient received renal biopsy, and immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of AIM2 and inflammatory factors caspase-1 and IL-1β in the biopsy specimens. CHB patients received liver puncture biopsy, and immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of AIM2 in these specimens. Expression of AIM 2 among different groups and in relation to inflammatory factors caspase-1 and IL-1β was analyzed. Results The expression of AIM2 in HBV-GN patients (81.4%) was significantly higher than in CGN patients (4.0%). Among the HBV-GN patients, expression of AIM2 was significantly higher in the high HBV replication group than in the low HBV replication group. AIM2 expression was not correlated with age, gender, HBeAg status in serum, HBV-antigen type deposited in renal tissue or pathological type of HBV-GN. However, AIM2 levels were positively correlated with the expression of caspase-1 and IL-1β in HBV-GN patients

  2. Th1, Th2 and Treg/T17 cytokines in two types of proliferative glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Stangou, M.; Bantis, C.; Skoularopoulou, M.; Korelidou, L.; Kouloukouriotou, D.; Scina, M.; Labropoulou, I. T.; Kouri, N. M.; Papagianni, A.; Efstratiadis, G.

    2016-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and focal segmental necrotizing glomerulonephritis (FSNGN) are characterized by proliferation of native glomerular cells and infiltration by inflammatory cells. Several cytokines act as mediators of kidney damage in both diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Th1, Th2 and Treg/T17 cytokines in these types of proliferative glomerulonephritis. Simultaneous measurement of Th1 interleukin (IL-2, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-α], interferon-gamma [INF-γ]), Th2 (IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13), Treg/T17 transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], IL-17) cytokines and C-C chemokines Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1 [MIP-1] β) was performed in first-morning urine samples, at the day of renal biopsy, using a multiplex cytokine assay. Cytokine concentrations were correlated with histological findings and renal function outcome. Urinary excretion of Th1, Th2 and Treg/Th17 cytokines were significantly higher in FSNGN compared to IgAN patients. In IgAN patients (n = 50, M/F: 36/14, M age: 40.7 [17–67] years), Th1, Th2 and T17 cytokines correlated significantly with the presence of endocapillary proliferation, while in FSNGN patients (n = 40, M/F: 24/16, M age: 56.5 [25–80] years), MCP-1 and TGF-β1 had a positive correlation with severe extracapillary proliferation (P = 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively). Urinary IL-17 was the only independent parameter associated with endocapillary proliferation in IgAN and with MCP-1 urinary excretion in FSNGN. Response to treatment was mainly predicted by IL-6 in IgAN, and by Th2 (IL-4, IL-6), Treg (GM-CSF) cytokines and MIP-1 β in FSNGN. Th1, Th2 and T17 cytokines were directly implicated in renal pathology in IgAN and possibly through MCP-1 production in FSNGN. IL-17 and IL-6 seem to have a central role in inflammation and progression of kidney injury. PMID:27194829

  3. Acute and Chronic Allograft Dysfunction in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Ryan J; Weng, Francis L; Kandula, Praveen

    2016-05-01

    Allograft dysfunction after a kidney transplant is often clinically asymptomatic and is usually detected as an increase in serum creatinine level with corresponding decrease in glomerular filtration rate. The diagnostic evaluation may include blood tests, urinalysis, transplant ultrasonography, radionuclide imaging, and allograft biopsy. Whether it occurs early or later after transplant, allograft dysfunction requires prompt evaluation to determine its cause and subsequent management. Acute rejection, medication toxicity from calcineurin inhibitors, and BK virus nephropathy can occur early or later. Other later causes include transplant glomerulopathy, recurrent glomerulonephritis, and renal artery stenosis. PMID:27095641

  4. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. A prospective clinical trial of platelet-inhibitor therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Donadio, J.V. Jr.; Anderson, C.F.; Mitchell, J.C.; Holley, K.E.; Ilstrup, D.M.; Fuster, V.; Chesebro, J.H.

    1984-05-31

    Forty patients with Type I membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis were treated for one year with dipyridamole, 225 mg per day, and aspirin, 975 mg per day, in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. At the base line, the half-life of /sup 51/Cr-labeled platelets was reduced in 12 of 17 patients. The platelet half-life became longer and renal function stabilized in the treated group, as compared with the placebo group, suggesting a relation between platelet consumption and the glomerulopathy. The glomerular filtration rate, determined by iothalamate clearance, was better maintained in the treated group (average decrease, 1.3 ml per minute per 1.73 m/sup 2/ of body-surface area per 12 months) than in the placebo group (average decrease, 19.6). Fewer patients in the treated group than in the placebo group had progression to end-stage renal disease (3 of 21 after 62 months as compared with 9 of 19 after 33 months). The data suggest that dipyridamole and aspirin slowed the deterioration of renal function and the development of end-stage renal disease.

  5. Plasma and urine biochemical changes in cats with experimental immune complex glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Bishop, S A; Lucke, V M; Stokes, C R; Gruffydd-Jones, T J

    1991-01-01

    Biochemical changes in plasma and urine were monitored in six cats before and during the induction of immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN) by daily intravenous administration of human serum albumin (HSA). The earliest indication of renal dysfunction in the cats was hypoalbuminaemia, which occurred as early as 13 weeks before cats developed clinical signs of renal disease. Proteinuria occurred 2 to 3 weeks before clinical disease, but was sensitive in predicting renal pathology in two cats that did not develop clinical signs of disease. In addition, increased activities of several urinary enzymes were detected in affected cats, with measurement of N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase and gamma-glutamyl transferase providing the earliest and most sensitive indication of renal damage. These plasma and urine measurements correlated more closely with the renal pathology, observed at postmortem, than clinical assessment of disease. It was concluded that ICGN in the cat could be diagnosed earliest by measurement of plasma protein concentration, whilst disease progress could be effectively monitored by including assays to measure urine protein and urine enzymes. PMID:1826913

  6. Differentiating Glomerular Inflammation from Fibrosis in A Bone Marrow Chimera for Rat Anti-GBM Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cindy; Lou, Kristie; Tatum, Kiana; Funk, Jeremiah; Wu, Jean; Bartkowiak, Todd; Kagan, David; Lou, Yahuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Many types of glomerulonephritis (GN) undergo tandem connected phases: inflammation and fibrosis. Fibrosis in human GNs leads to irreversible end stage disease. This study investigated how these two phases were controlled. Methods Using a rat anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) GN model, we established bone marrow (BM) chimeras between GN-resistant Lewis (LEW) and GN-susceptible Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. Glomerular inflammation and fibrosis were compared between chimeras. Results LEW’s BM to WKY (WKYLEW) chimeras with or without co-transfer of host WKY’s T cells were GN-resistant. On the other hand, WKY’s BM to LEW (LEWWKY) chimeras developed glomerular inflammation and albuminuria upon immunization. Quantitative analysis showed that the number and composition of inflammatory cells in glomeruli of immunized LEWWKY chimeras were similar to those in immunized WKY rats at their inflammatory peak. Thus, glomerular inflammation was controlled by BM derived non-T cell populations. However, unlike WKY rats, LEWWKY rats did not develop fibrosis until the end of experiments (84 days) in spite of persistent inflammation and albuminuria. Conclusion Inflammation alone was not sufficient to trigger fibrosis, suggesting a critical role of glomerular cells in the fibrotic process. As LEWWKY chimera allows us to separate glomerular inflammation from fibrosis, this model provides a useful tool to study how fibrosis is initiated following inflammation. PMID:26337665

  7. Renal parenchymal resistance in patients with biopsy proven glomerulonephritis: Correlation with histological findings.

    PubMed

    Gigante, Antonietta; Barbano, Biagio; Di Mario, Francesca; Rosato, Edoardo; Simonelli, Marzia; Rocca, Anna Rachele; Conti, Fabrizio; Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Giannakakis, Konstantinos; Valesini, Guido; Cianci, Rosario

    2016-09-01

    Renal Doppler ultrasound is increasingly used in nephrology for the evaluation of renovascular disease, allograft dysfunction, and chronic nephropathies. We compared intrarenal hemodynamic parameters to biopsy findings of glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, crescents, arteriolosclerosis, and clinical variables in 100 patients. A positive correlation exists between renal function and percentage of glomerular sclerosis (P <0.01, r = 0.26), conversely a negative correlation exists between glomerular filtrate rate and percentage of glomerular sclerosis(P <0.0001, r = -0.35). The percentage of glomerular sclerosis correlate positively with pulsatile index (PI) (P <0.05, r = 0.21) and renal resistive index (RI) (P <0.05, r = 0.20). The percentage of crescents correlates positively with PI(P <0.05, r = 0.21) and RI (P <0.05, r = 0.20). Classifying arteriolosclerosis in four groups according to a severity scale, from absence to severe, PI (P <0.05) and RI (P <0.01) were significantly different. In the post hoc analysis, the median values of PI and RI are significantly different in patients with severe arteriolosclerosis than others. Ultrasound examination is a non-invasive diagnostic technique used on patients with suspected or established renal disease. Our study shows a close correlation between kidney function, ultrasound parameters, and histological findings. Measurement of renal parenchymal resistance by ultrasound could be used in association with biopsy and glomerular function for the evaluation of renal damage in patients with glomerulonephritis. PMID:27091839

  8. Long-term follow-up of atypical membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis: are steroids indicated?

    PubMed

    Fujita, Teruo; Nozu, Kandai; Iijima, Kazumoto; Kamioka, Ichiro; Yoshiya, Kunihiko; Tanaka, Ryojiro; Hamahira, Kiyoshi; Nakanishi, Koichi; Yoshikawa, Norishige; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2006-02-01

    Atypical membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) has been reported to have a good prognosis when treated with corticosteroids. However, this recommendation is based on uncontrolled trials and is associated with many complications. The purpose of our study is to determine whether steroid therapy is indicated for atypical MPGN. The cases of seven patients with atypical MPGN are reported in this study. Urinary abnormalities of five of them were detected by urine screening at school, of two because of macrohematuria. Hypocomplementemia was noted in six patients. All but one patient were treated without corticosteroids, and five with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and/or the Chinese herbal medicine Sairei-to (TJ-114). One patient recovered spontaneously from proteinuria and was therefore not treated, and one who developed severe proteinuria during observation was treated with corticosteroids. After an average follow-up period of 10.0 years, five patients showed normal urinary findings, one had hematuria and one proteinuria. At the most recent follow-up, the renal function of all patients remained within the normal range, and serum C3 had returned to normal levels in five out of six. These findings suggest that the indication of steroid therapy for atypical MPGN should be re-examined, since most of the patients with atypical MPGN seem to have an excellent prognosis without treatment with corticosteroids. PMID:16247645

  9. Volatile Organic Metabolites Identify Patients with Mesangial Proliferative Glomerulonephritis, IgA Nephropathy and Normal Controls

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changsong; Feng, Yue; Wang, Mingao; Pi, Xin; Tong, Hongshuang; Wang, Yue; Zhu, Lin; Li, Enyou

    2015-01-01

    Urinary volatile organic compounds (VOCs) analysis for kidney diseases has attracted a large amount of scientific interest recently, and urinary metabolite analysis has already been applied to many diseases. Urine was collected from 15 mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis (MsPGN) patients, 21 IgA nephropathy (IgAN) patients and 15 healthy controls. Solid phase microextraction–chromatography– mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) was used to analyse the urinary metabolites. The statistical methods principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLSDA) were performed to process the final data. Five metabolites were significantly greater in the group of MsPGN patients than in the normal control group (P < 0.05) while three metabolites were found at increased levels in the group of IgAN patients compared with the normal controls (P < 0.05). In addition, five metabolites were significantly increased in the group of IgAN patients compared with the MsPGN patients (P < 0.05). These five metabolites may be specific biomarkers for distinguishing between MsPGN and IgAN. The analysis of urinary VOCs appears to have potential clinical applications as a diagnostic tool. PMID:26443483

  10. Volatile Organic Metabolites Identify Patients with Mesangial Proliferative Glomerulonephritis, IgA Nephropathy and Normal Controls.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changsong; Feng, Yue; Wang, Mingao; Pi, Xin; Tong, Hongshuang; Wang, Yue; Zhu, Lin; Li, Enyou

    2015-01-01

    Urinary volatile organic compounds (VOCs) analysis for kidney diseases has attracted a large amount of scientific interest recently, and urinary metabolite analysis has already been applied to many diseases. Urine was collected from 15 mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis (MsPGN) patients, 21 IgA nephropathy (IgAN) patients and 15 healthy controls. Solid phase microextraction-chromatography- mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) was used to analyse the urinary metabolites. The statistical methods principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLSDA) were performed to process the final data. Five metabolites were significantly greater in the group of MsPGN patients than in the normal control group (P < 0.05) while three metabolites were found at increased levels in the group of IgAN patients compared with the normal controls (P < 0.05). In addition, five metabolites were significantly increased in the group of IgAN patients compared with the MsPGN patients (P < 0.05). These five metabolites may be specific biomarkers for distinguishing between MsPGN and IgAN. The analysis of urinary VOCs appears to have potential clinical applications as a diagnostic tool. PMID:26443483

  11. Clinical and Immunologic Characteristics of Patients With ANCA-Associated Glomerulonephritis Combined With Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Rong; Liu, Gang; Cui, Zhao; Chen, Min; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The concurrent antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated glomerulonephritis (ANCA-GN) and membranous nephropathy (MN) have been increasingly documented, mainly in case studies and case series; however, the differences of clinical and pathologic characteristics as well as outcomes between ANCA-GN patients with and without MN remain unclear. The current study investigated the clinical and immunologic features of patients with combined ANCA-GN and MN in a large cohort. Twenty-seven of 223 patients had combined ANCA-GN and MN; they had significantly higher levels of initial serum creatinine, higher Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score and poorer renal outcome than ANCA-GN patients without MN (P < 0.05). ANCA-GN patients with MN could recognize the light chain of myeloperoxidase more frequently than those without MN (P < 0.05). The prevalence of circulating anti-PLA2R antibodies and glomerular PLA2R deposits was significantly lower in patients with combined ANCA-GN and MN than that in patients with idiopathic MN (P < 0.05). Compared with the idiopathic MN patients, the patients with combined ANCA-GN and MN had significantly higher recognition frequency of immunoglobulin (Ig) G2 and IgG3, and significantly lower recognition frequency of IgG4 (P < 0.05). Patients with combined ANCA-GN and MN had distinct clinical features and a different pathogenesis of MN. PMID:26376387

  12. The interstitial expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin in glomerulonephritis is associated with renal function

    PubMed Central

    Novakovic, Zana Saratlija; Durdov, Merica Glavina; Puljak, Livia; Saraga, Marijan; Ljutic, Dragan; Filipovic, Tomislav; Pastar, Zvonimir; Bendic, Antonia; Vukojevic, Katarina

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background In a healthy kidney, contractile protein alpha-smooth muscle actin (ASMA) is immunohistochemically strongly expressed only in the blood vessels, while in pathological conditions it can be visualized in glomerular mesangial cells and interstitial myofibroblasts. The aim of this study was to explore the possible correlation between expression of ASMA in glomerulonephritis (GN) and indicators of renal function. Material/Methods We analyzed expression of ASMA in percutaneous renal biopsy of 142 adult and pediatric patients with GN and its correlation with blood pressure, serum creatinine, creatinine clearance and 24-hour urine protein at the time of biopsy. Immunoexpression of ASMA was analyzed quantitatively using computer-assisted morphometric analysis. Relative surface of ASMA expression in all glomeruli and interstitium was calculated for each patient. Results In adults and children, greater expression of ASMA in interstitium was associated with higher serum creatinine and reduced creatinine clearance. Conversely, greater ASMA expression in glomeruli was associated with normal or decreased serum creatinine in adults and increased creatinine clearance in children. In children, correlation was found between high blood pressure and ASMA expression in interstitium. Conclusions We confirmed that interstitial expression of ASMA is associated with reduced renal function at time of biopsy. The connection of ASMA expression in glomeruli with lower serum creatinine and normal or increased creatinine clearance suggests a favorable role of this phenotypic change in glomerular filtration rate; further investigation is needed. PMID:22460095

  13. KDOQI US commentary on the 2012 KDIGO clinical practice guideline for glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Beck, Laurence; Bomback, Andrew S; Choi, Michael J; Holzman, Larry B; Langford, Carol; Mariani, Laura H; Somers, Michael J; Trachtman, Howard; Waldman, Meryl

    2013-09-01

    Glomerulonephritis (GN) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients of all ages throughout the world. Because these disorders are relatively rare, it is difficult to perform randomized clinical trials to define optimal treatment for many of the specific glomerulopathies. In the absence of high-grade evidence to guide the care of glomerular diseases, in June 2012, KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) published an international clinical guideline for GN. The Work Group report represents an important review of the literature in this area and offers valid and useful guidelines for the most common situations that arise in the management of patients with glomerular disease. This commentary, developed by a panel of clinical experts convened by the National Kidney Foundation, attempts to put the GN guideline into the context of the US health care system. Overall, we support the vast majority of the recommendations and highlight select areas in which epidemiological factors and medical practice patterns in this country justify modifications and adjustments in order to achieve favorable outcomes. There remain large gaps in our knowledge of the best approaches to treat glomerular disease and we strongly endorse an expanded clinical research effort to improve the health and long-term outcomes of children and adults with GN. PMID:23871408

  14. Renal participation of myeloperoxidase in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Kim M; Lo, Camden Y; Summers, Shaun A; Elgass, Kirstin D; McMillan, Paul J; Longano, Anthony; Ford, Sharon L; Gan, Poh-Yi; Kerr, Peter G; Kitching, A Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen R

    2015-11-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an important neutrophil lysosomal enzyme, a major autoantigen, and a potential mediator of tissue injury in MPO-ANCA-associated vasculitis (MPO-AAV) and glomerulonephritis. Here we examined MPO deposition in kidney biopsies from 47 patients with MPO-AAV. Leukocyte accumulation and fibrin deposition consistent with cell-mediated immunity was a major feature. Tubulointerstitial macrophage, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell, and neutrophil numbers correlated with low presenting eGFR. MPO was not detected in kidneys from patients with minimal change or thin basement membrane disease, but was prominent in glomerular, periglomerular, and tubulointerstitial regions in MPO-AAV. Extracellular MPO released from leukocytes was pronounced in all MPO-AAV patients. Similar numbers of neutrophils and macrophages expressed MPO in the kidneys, but colocalization studies identified neutrophils as the major source of extracellular MPO. Extraleukocyte MPO was prominent in neutrophil extracellular traps in the majority of patients; most of which had traps in half or more glomeruli. These traps were associated with more neutrophils and more MPO within glomeruli. Glomerular MPO-containing macrophages generated extracellular trap-like structures. MPO also localized to endothelial cells and podocytes. The presence of the most active glomerular lesions (both segmental necrosis and cellular crescents) correlated with intraglomerular CD4+ cells and MPO+ macrophages. Thus, cellular and extracellular MPO may cause glomerular and interstitial injury. PMID:26176828

  15. Recurrence of ANCA-negative renal-limited pauci-immune glomerulonephritis in the renal allograft

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, Venkatesh; Gowda, Kiran Krishne; Jha, Vivekanand; Kohli, Harbir Singh; Kumar, Vivek; Ramachandran, Raja

    2013-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) due to pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis (PICGN). A small subgroup of patients with PICGN are anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) negative. We report a case of a patient with ANCA-negative renal-limited form of PICGN who developed ESRD despite treatment. He underwent live-related renal allograft transplantation after 12 months on haemodialysis. In the eighth post-transplant month, he developed graft dysfunction, which on evaluation turned out to be a graft recurrence of the basic disease in the form of PICGN. He received treatment with methylprednisolone, cyclophosphamide and plasmapheresis. However, his renal functions did not improve and he developed graft loss in the 11th post-transplant month and was started on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. We report a rare recurrence of renal-limited PICGN in the allograft. Patients with PICGN undergoing renal transplantation should be followed up carefully, and an early biopsy should be performed in the case of graft dysfunction to deal with this potentially graft-threatening complication. PMID:26064517

  16. Antibody response and antibody affinity maturation in cats with experimental proliferative immune complex glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Bishop, S A; Bailey, M; Lucke, V M; Stokes, C R

    1992-07-01

    An experimental model of proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) in the cat, which closely resembles human proliferative forms of GN, has been used to study the role of antibody and antibody affinity in the development of immune complex-mediated renal disease. The serum IgG and IgM antibody response to antigen, average antibody affinity (avidity) and affinity heterogeneity of the IgG and IgM populations was assessed at varying times after commencement of chronic immunization with the antigen, human serum albumin (HSA), by enzyme immunoassay. Cats could be classified according to whether they were "low", "intermediate" or "high" IgG responders, by quantification of serum IgG values. Cats with the lowest serum IgG values failed to develop glomerulonephritis. However, there was no relationship between actual IgG values and the severity of the induced disease. In contrast to IgG, there was no division of cats into low or high IgM anti-HSA responders. Again, cats with the lowest IgM values failed to develop GN, but, more interestingly, a late, marked increase in serum IgM anti-HSA occurred only in cats that developed clinical signs of GN (anterior uveitis and nephrotic syndrome). Maturation of average, functional IgG affinity (avidity) for HSA following chronic immunization was clearly demonstrated for all cats. At the end of the experiment, all cats had IgG of high affinity for HSA and the average affinity heterogeneity of the IgG populations was less than in measurements taken earlier. Values of IgG affinity at the end of the experiment were very similar both in cats which developed GN and in those which remained clinically, biochemically and pathologically normal. In contrast to IgG antibody, some cats developed IgM of increased affinity, whilst others produced antibody of reduced affinity, following chronic immunization. There was no correlation between the development of disease and the production of either low or high affinity IgM antibody. Data indicated that an

  17. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin G deposits complicated by immunoglobulin A nephropathy in the renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Anri; Kawanishi, Kunio; Horita, Shigeru; Koike, Junki; Honda, Kazuho; Ochi, Ayami; Komoda, Mizuki; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Unagami, Kohei; Okumi, Masayoshi; Shimizu, Tomokazu; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari; Nagashima, Yoji; Nitta, Kosaku

    2016-07-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) A nephropathy (IgAN) is a known autoimmune disease due to abnormal glycosylation of IgA1, and occasionally, IgG co-deposition occurs. The prognosis of IgG co-deposition with IgAN is adverse, as shown in the previous studies. However, in the clinical setting, monoclonality of IgG co-deposition with IgAN has not been observed. We describe a case of proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) combined with IgAN in a renal allograft. A-21-year-old man developed end-stage renal failure with unknown aetiology and underwent living-donor kidney transplantation from his mother 2 years after being diagnosed. One year after kidney transplantation, proteinuria 2+ and haematuria 2+ were detected; allograft biopsy revealed mesangial IgA and C3 deposits, indicating a diagnosis of IgAN. After tonsillectomy and steroid pulse therapy, proteinuria and haematuria resolved. However, 4 years after transplantation, pedal oedema, proteinuria (6.89 g/day) and allograft dysfunction (serum creatinine (sCr) 203.3 µmol/L) appeared. A second allograft biopsy showed mesangial expansion and focal segmental proliferative endocapillary lesions with IgA1λ and monoclonal IgG1κ depositions. Electron microscopic analysis revealed a massive amount of deposits, located in the mesangial and subendothelial lesions. A diagnosis of PGNMID complicated with IgAN was made, and rituximab and plasmapheresis were added to steroid pulse therapy. With this treatment, proteinuria was alleviated to 0.5 g/day, and the allograft dysfunction recovered to sCr 132.6 µmol/L. This case suggests a necessity for investigation of PGNMID and IgA nephropathy in renal allografts to detect monoclonal Ig deposition disease. PMID:26971743

  18. A Case of Fibrillary Glomerulonephritis Associated with Thrombotic Microangiopathy and Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Momose, Akishi; Nakajima, Taku; Chiba, Shigetoshi; Kumakawa, Kenjirou; Shiraiwa, Yasuo; Sasaki, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Kazuo; Kitano, Etsuko; Hatanaka, Mitiyo; Kitamura, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    We present the first report of a case of fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN) associated with thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) and anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody (anti-GBM antibody). A 54-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for high fever and anuria. On the first hospital day, we initiated hemodialysis for renal dysfunction. Laboratory data revealed normocytic-normochromic anemia with schistocytes in the peripheral smear, thrombocytopenia, increased serum lactate dehydrogenase, decreased serum haptoglobin, and negative results for both direct and indirect Coombs tests. Based on these results, we diagnosed TMA. Assays conducted several days later indicated a disintegrin-like and metalloprotease with a thrombospondin motif 13 (ADAMTS13) activity of 31.6%, and ADAMTS13 inhibitors were negative. We started plasma exchange using fresh frozen plasma and steroid pulse therapy. Anti-GBM antibody was found to be positive. Renal biopsy showed FGN. Blood pressure rose on the 46th hospital day, and mild convulsions developed. Based on magnetic resonance imaging of the head, the patient was diagnosed with reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. Hypertension persisted despite administration of multiple antihypertensive agents, and the patient experienced a sudden generalized seizure. Computed tomography of the head showed multiple cerebral hemorrhages. However, his blood pressure subsequently decreased and the platelet count increased. TMA remitted following 36 plasma exchange sessions, but renal function was not restored, and maintenance hemodialysis was continued. The patient was discharged on the 119th day of hospitalization. In conclusion, it was shown that TMA, FGN and anti-GBM antibody were closely related. PMID:25873933

  19. Embryonic fibronectin isoforms are synthesized in crescents in experimental autoimmune glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Nickeleit, V.; Zagachin, L.; Nishikawa, K.; Peters, J. H.; Hynes, R. O.; Colvin, R. B.

    1995-01-01

    Crescents are a severe and stereotyped glomerular response to injury that occur in several forms of glomerulonephritis that progress to renal failure. The key pathogenetic step that leads to glomerular scarring in unknown, but fibronectin (FN), the clotting system, macrophages, and proliferating parietal epithelial cells are known to participate. This study was designed to determine whether FN is synthesized locally, and in what molecular isoform, and whether cytokines known to promote FN synthesis are present in the crescent. Rats immunized with bovine glomerular basement membrane develop cellular crescents by 14 days and fibrous crescents and glomerulosclerosis by 35 days. In situ hybridization was performed with oligonucleotides specific for sequences common to all FN isoforms (total FN) or sequences specific for the alternatively spliced segments (EIIIA, EIIIB, and V). Throughout the time period (14, 21, and 35 days) all crescents and glomerular tufts contained cells with strong ISH signals for total and V+ mRNA, with the strongest signals present in large cellular crescents at day 21. In contrast, EIIIA+ and EIIIB+ mRNAs showed maximal abundance within sclerosing crescents at 35 days. Protein deposition of EIIIA+, EIIIB+, and V+ FN isoforms was confirmed by immunofluorescence with segment-specific FN antibodies. Transforming growth factor-beta and interleukin-1 beta, both known to promote FN synthesis, were found in cellular crescents (days 14 and 21) and were still present, but greatly diminished, in the sclerotic phase (day 35). In summary, EIIIA-, EIIIB-, and V+ FN mRNA plasma isoforms predominate in cellular crescents, whereas in the fibrosing stage, mainly the oncofetal EIIIA+, EIIIB+, and V+ isoforms are synthesized and accumulate. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7573372

  20. Antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis in mice: the role of endotoxin, complement and genetic background

    PubMed Central

    ROBSON, M G; COOK, H T; PUSEY, C D; WALPORT, M J; DAVIES, K A

    2003-01-01

    Antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis in man may be exacerbated by infection and this effect may be mediated by bacterial endotoxin. There is evidence supporting a role for endotoxin in heterologous nephrotoxic nephritis in rats, but the role of endotoxin in this model in mice has not previously been explored. Previous data in mice on the role of complement in this model are conflicting and this may be due to the mixed genetic background of mice used in these studies. We used the model of heterologous nephrotoxic nephritis in mice and explored the role of endotoxin, complement and genetic background. In this study we show a synergy between antibody and endotoxin in causing a neutrophil influx. We also show that C1q-deficient mice have an increased susceptibility to glomerular inflammation but this is seen only on a mixed 129/Sv × C57BL/6 genetic background. On a C57BL/6 background we did not find any differences in disease susceptibility when wildtype, C1q, factor B or factor B/C2 deficient mice were compared. We also demonstrate that C57BL/6 mice are more susceptible to glomerular inflammation than 129/Sv mice. These results show that endotoxin is required in this model in mice, and that complement does not play a major role in glomerular inflammation in C57BL/6 mice. C1q may play a protective role in mixed-strain 129/Sv × C57BL/6 mice, but the data may also be explained by systematic bias in background genes, as there is a large difference in disease susceptibility between C57BL/6 and 129/Sv mice. PMID:12930357

  1. Cocaine/levamisole-induced systemic vasculitis with retiform purpura and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Veronese, F.V.; Dode, R.S.O.; Friderichs, M.; Thomé, G.G.; da Silva, D.R.; Schaefer, P.G.; Sebben, V.C.; Nicolella, A.R.; Barros, E.J.G.

    2016-01-01

    Levamisole has been increasingly used as an adulterant of cocaine in recent years, emerging as a public health challenge worldwide. Levamisole-associated toxicity manifests clinically as a systemic vasculitis, consisting of cutaneous, hematological, and renal lesions, among others. Purpura retiform, cutaneous necrosis, intravascular thrombosis, neutropenia, and less commonly crescentic nephritis have been described in association with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) and other autoantibodies. Here we report the case of a 49-year-old male who was a chronic cocaine user, and who presented spontaneous weight loss, arthralgia, and 3 weeks before admission purpuric skin lesions in the earlobes and in the anterior thighs. His laboratory tests on admission showed serum creatinine of 4.56 mg/dL, white blood count 3,800/μL, hemoglobin 7.3 g/dL, urinalysis with 51 white blood cells/μL and 960 red blood cells/μL, and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio 1.20. Serum ANCA testing was positive (>1:320), as well as serum anti-myeloperoxidase and anti-proteinase 3 antibodies. Urine toxicology screen was positive for cocaine and levamisole, with 62.8% of cocaine, 32.2% of levamisole, and 5% of an unidentified substance. Skin and renal biopsies were diagnostic for leukocytoclastic vasculitis and pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis, respectively. The patient showed a good clinical response to cocaine abstinence, and use of corticosteroids and intravenous cyclophosphamide. Last serum creatinine was 1.97 mg/dL, white blood cell count 7,420/μL, and hemoglobin level 10.8 g/dL. In levamisole-induced systemic vasculitis, the early institution of cocaine abstinence, concomitant with the use of immunosuppressive drugs in severe cases, may prevent permanent end organ damage and associate with better clinical outcomes. PMID:27119429

  2. Association of Retinoid X Receptor Alpha Gene Polymorphism with Clinical Course of Chronic Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Grzegorzewska, Alicja E; Ostromecki, Grzegorz; Zielińska, Paulina; Mostowska, Adrianna; Niemir, Zofia; Polcyn-Adamczak, Magdalena; Pawlik, Magdalena; Sowińska, Anna; Jagodziński, Paweł P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Vitamin D (VD), VD binding protein, VD receptor (VDR), and retinoids are involved in pathogenesis of chronic glomerulonephritis (ChGN). We aimed to compare distribution of VD pathway gene polymorphisms in ChGN patients showing glomerular filtration rate (GFR) category 1-3, GFR category 5D, and healthy controls in order to elucidate the role of VD-related polymorphisms in the course of ChGN. MATERIAL AND METHODS GFR category 1-3 ChGN patients (n=195), GFR category 5D ChGN patients (n=178), and controls (n=751) underwent testing for polymorphisms of genes encoding VD binding protein (GC, rs2298849, rs7041, rs1155563), VDR (VDR, rs2228570, rs1544410), and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRA, rs10776909, rs10881578, rs749759). RESULTS Among GFR 1-3 subjects possessing TT genotype of RXRA rs10776909, 75% of patients had nephrotic syndrome, and 37.5% had glomerular hyperfiltration defined as GFR >140 ml/min/1.73 m2, and, consequently, serum creatinine was lower in these patients compared to the remaining subjects (0.67±0.26 vs. 0.94±0.34, P=0.014). In GFR category 5D ChGN patients, frequencies of RXRA rs10776909 allele T (25% vs. 19%) and CT+TT (46% vs. 34%) were higher compared to frequencies of respective variants in controls (Ptrend=0.004, Pgenotype=0.008). CONCLUSIONS RXRA rs10776909 allele T is specifically involved in the pathogenesis of ChGN. This risk allele may be also associated with worse clinical course of ChGN. PMID:26610845

  3. Green Tea Polyphenol (−)-Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Restores Nrf2 Activity and Ameliorates Crescentic Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jason K.; Peng, Ai; Vaziri, Nosratola D.; Mohan, Chandra; Xu, Yan; Zhou, Xin J.

    2015-01-01

    Crescentic glomerulonephritis (GN) is the most severe form of GN and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality despite aggressive immunotherapy with steroids, cytotoxic drugs, and plasmapheresis. We examined the therapeutic efficacy of the green tea polyphenol (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, 50 mg/kg BW/day x3weeks), a potent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant agent, on experimental crescentic GN induced in 129/svJ mice by administration of rabbit anti-mouse glomerular basement membrane sera. Routine histology and key molecules involved in inflammatory and redox signaling were studied. EGCG treatment significantly reduced mortality, decreased proteinuria and serum creatinine, and markedly improved renal histology when compared with vehicle-treated mice. The improvements in renal function and histology were accompanied by the restoration of Nrf2 signaling (which was impaired in vehicle-treated mice) as shown by increased nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and cytoplasmic glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit, glutamate cysteine ligase modifier subunit, and glutathione peroxidase. EGCG-treated mice also showed reduction in p-Akt, p-JNK, p-ERK1/2 and p-P38 as well as restoration of PPARγ and SIRT1 levels. Lower dose of EGCG (25 mg/kg BW/day x2 weeks) treatment also significantly decreased proteinuria and serum creatinine, and markedly improved renal histology when compared with vehicle-treated mice. Thus, our data illustrate the efficacy of EGCG in reversing the progression of crescentic GN in mice by targeting multiple signaling and inflammatory pathways as well as countering oxidative stress. PMID:25785827

  4. Renal tubular angiogenic dysregulation in anti-Thy1.1 glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Cina, Davide P; Xu, Hui; Liu, Limin; Farkas, Laszlo; Farkas, Daniela; Kolb, Martin; Margetts, Peter J

    2011-02-01

    Peritubular vascular changes and hypoxia after glomerular injury may explain subsequent tubulointerstitial injury and fibrosis. Several studies suggested that the expected tubulointerstitial angiogenic response is actively suppressed in this setting. The mechanism of this aberrant response has not been clearly identified. We used a common model of glomerular injury in rats to assess vascular changes and to identify potential factors associated with this aberrant response. Anti-Thy1.1 antibody administration (1 or 4 weekly doses) led to a dose-dependent renal damage characterized by elevated urea and tubulointerstitial fibrosis as assessed by Picro-Sirius Red staining. We quantified peritubular capillaries using CD31 and CD34 immunohistochemistry and showed that tubular angiogenic dysregulation was associated with peritubular capillary rarefaction. Using laser capture microdissection, we demonstrated an early induction of fibrogenic and angiogenic factors in the glomeruli and a subsequent dysregulated angiogenic response in the tubulointerstitial compartment. Proximal tubules of anti-Thy1.1-treated animals had increased pigment epithelial-derived factor (PEDF) expression by immunohistochemistry. Protein taken by laser capture microdissection also showed that PEDF was upregulated. Temporally associated with PEDF expression was a transient downregulation of tubular hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1α. In a human proximal tubular cell culture, we show that PEDF downregulates HIF1α protein and gene expression in cells exposed to 1% oxygen. In anti-Thy1.1 glomerulonephritis, there is aberrent tubular angiogenesis associated with glomerular injury and tubulointersititial fibrosis. We showed that PEDF may be involved by downregulating HIF1α. Further work is needed to elucidate the mechanism of PEDF upregulation and action in the tubules. PMID:21048020

  5. Cooperation of ETV6/RUNX1 and BCL2 enhances immunoglobulin production and accelerates glomerulonephritis in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Eva; Schlederer, Michaela; Scheicher, Ruth; Horvath, Jaqueline; Aigner, Petra; Schiefer, Ana-Iris; Kain, Renate; Regele, Heinz; Hoermann, Gregor; Steiner, Günter; Kenner, Lukas; Sexl, Veronika; Villunger, Andreas; Moriggl, Richard; Stoiber, Dagmar

    2016-03-15

    The t(12;21) translocation generating the ETV6/RUNX1 fusion gene represents the most frequent chromosomal rearrangement in childhood leukemia. Presence of ETV6/RUNX1 alone is usually not sufficient for leukemia onset, and additional genetic alterations have to occur in ETV6/RUNX1-positive cells to cause transformation. We have previously generated an ETV6/RUNX1 transgenic mouse model where the expression of the fusion gene is restricted to CD19-positive B cells. Since BCL2 family members have been proposed to play a role in leukemogenesis, we investigated combined effects of ETV6/RUNX1 with exogenous expression of the antiapoptotic protein BCL2 by crossing ETV6/RUNX1 transgenic animals with Vav-BCL2 transgenic mice. Strikingly, co-expression of ETV6/RUNX1 and BCL2 resulted in significantly shorter disease latency in mice, indicating oncogene cooperativity. This was associated with faster development of follicular B cell lymphoma and exacerbated immune complex glomerulonephritis. ETV6/RUNX1-BCL2 double transgenic animals displayed increased B cell numbers and immunoglobulin titers compared to Vav-BCL2 transgenic mice. This led to pronounced deposition of immune complexes in glomeruli followed by accelerated development of immune complex glomerulonephritis. Thus, our study reveals a previously unrecognized synergism between ETV6/RUNX1 and BCL2 impacting on malignant disease and autoimmunity. PMID:26919255

  6. Cooperation of ETV6/RUNX1 and BCL2 enhances immunoglobulin production and accelerates glomerulonephritis in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Eva; Schlederer, Michaela; Scheicher, Ruth; Horvath, Jaqueline; Aigner, Petra; Schiefer, Ana-Iris; Kain, Renate; Regele, Heinz; Hoermann, Gregor; Steiner, Günter; Kenner, Lukas; Sexl, Veronika; Villunger, Andreas; Moriggl, Richard; Stoiber, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    The t(12;21) translocation generating the ETV6/RUNX1 fusion gene represents the most frequent chromosomal rearrangement in childhood leukemia. Presence of ETV6/RUNX1 alone is usually not sufficient for leukemia onset, and additional genetic alterations have to occur in ETV6/RUNX1-positive cells to cause transformation. We have previously generated an ETV6/RUNX1 transgenic mouse model where the expression of the fusion gene is restricted to CD19-positive B cells. Since BCL2 family members have been proposed to play a role in leukemogenesis, we investigated combined effects of ETV6/RUNX1 with exogenous expression of the antiapoptotic protein BCL2 by crossing ETV6/RUNX1 transgenic animals with Vav-BCL2 transgenic mice. Strikingly, co-expression of ETV6/RUNX1 and BCL2 resulted in significantly shorter disease latency in mice, indicating oncogene cooperativity. This was associated with faster development of follicular B cell lymphoma and exacerbated immune complex glomerulonephritis. ETV6/RUNX1-BCL2 double transgenic animals displayed increased B cell numbers and immunoglobulin titers compared to Vav-BCL2 transgenic mice. This led to pronounced deposition of immune complexes in glomeruli followed by accelerated development of immune complex glomerulonephritis. Thus, our study reveals a previously unrecognized synergism between ETV6/RUNX1 and BCL2 impacting on malignant disease and autoimmunity. PMID:26919255

  7. Epidemiology of Histologically Proven Glomerulonephritis in Africa: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Okpechi, Ikechi G.; Ameh, Oluwatoyin I.; Bello, Aminu K.; Ronco, Pierre; Swanepoel, Charles R.; Kengne, Andre P.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Glomerulonephritis (GN) is a leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Africa. Data on epidemiology and outcomes of glomerular diseases from Africa is still limited. We conducted a systematic review on the epidemiology of histologically proven glomerular diseases in Africa between 1980 and 2014. Materials and methods We searched literature using PubMed, AfricaWide, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature on EBSCO Host, Scopus, African Journals online databases, and the African Index Medicus, for relevant studies. The review was conducted using standard methods and frameworks using only biopsy-confirmed data. Results Twenty four (24) studies comprising 12,093 reported biopsies from 13 countries were included in this analysis. The median number of biopsies per study was 127.0 (50–4436), most of the studies (70.0%) originated from North Africa and the number of performed kidney biopsies varied from 5.2 to 617 biopsies/year. Nephrotic syndrome was the commonest indication of renal biopsy. The frequency of reported primary pathologic patterns included, minimal change disease (MCD); 16.5% (95%CI: 11.2–22.6), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS); 15.9% (11.3–21.1), mesangiocapillary GN (MCGN); 11.8% (9.2–14.6), crescentic GN; 2.0% (0.9–3.5) and IgA nephropathy 2.8% (1.3–4.9). Glomerular diseases related to hepatitis B and systemic lupus erythematosus had the highest prevalence among assessed secondary diseases: 8.4% (2.0–18.4) and 7.7% (4.5–11.7) respectively. There was no evidence of publication bias and regional differences were seen mostly for secondary GNs. Conclusions Glomerular diseases remain poorly characterized in sub-Saharan Africa due to declining renal biopsy rates and consequent paucity of data on pathologic patterns of key renal diseases. Development of renal biopsy registries in Africa is likely to enable adequate characterization of the prevalence and patterns of glomerular diseases

  8. [A case of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis in the course of Wegener's granulomatosis].

    PubMed

    Idasiak-Piechocka, I; Oko, A; Łochyńska, K; Woźniak, A; Czekalski, S

    2000-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is characterized by granulomatous vasculitis of the respiratory tract and glomerulonephritis (GN). Prognosis of this disease is poor and about 20% of untreated patients die after one year from the onset. WG was recognized in 45-year-old patient on the basis of: 1) clinical symptoms (joint pain and swollen, purpura on the skin which appeared one week after respiratory tract infection, ulceration of the tonsils and lingula), 2) results of additional testing (X-chest-ray-infiltrates of both lungs), positive results of the cANCA (titre 1:640) and rapidly progressive renal failure [the increase of serum creatinine level (Pcr) from 123.7 to 707 mumol/l (1.4 to 8.0 mg/dl) during one week]. Renal biopsy revealed extracapillary GN (cellular crescents in 7 out of 8 glomeruli and scattered foci of fibrinoid necrosis of capillary walls in all). At the beginning of the treatment Pcr raised to 884 mumol/l (10 mg/dl) and the patient required hemodialysis. He was treated with methylprednisolone (M) at flash doses of 1000 mg/24 h by three days followed by 125 mg/24 h i.v.--because of peptic ulcer, with cyclophosphamide (C-150 mg/24 h p.p.), with trimetoprim/sulphametoxazole, with pentoxifylline and omeprazol. After six weeks of the treatment in the control kidney biopsy sclerotic changes in 10 out of 13 glomeruli and diffuse interstitial fibrosis were found. However, during the same time, we observed clinical remission of the disease and the decrease of Pcr to 176.8 mumol/l (2 mg/dl). The M dosis was reduced by 5 mg every weeks and the C dosis--to 50 mg (because of the increase of aminotransferase levels) After six months of the treatment Pcr was 132.6 mumol/l (1.5 mg/dl) and CANCA titer was 1:16. In this case of RPGN, despite off the progression of the morphological changes in the kidney, we obtained the clinical remission of the disease and significant decrease of Pcr level. These results suggest that aggressive treatment of WG is justified even in

  9. Podocyte Detachment Is Associated with Renal Prognosis in ANCA-Associated Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Rong; Wang, Su-xia; Liu, Gang; Yu, Feng; Chen, Min; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The prognosis of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated glomerulonephritis (ANCA-GN) is unfavorable despite immunosuppressive therapy. It has been suggested that the loss of podocytes is a hallmark of progressive kidney disease. However, it is unclear about podocyte injuries and their predictive values on the prognosis in ANCA-GN. Therefore, the current study aimed to investigate the podocyte injury in renal histopathology and its association with renal prognosis of patients with ANCA-GN. A total of 170 patients with ANCA-GN were recruited in this study. Morphometric investigation of podocytes by electron microscopy including foot process width (FPW), podocyte density per glomerulus (Nv), and glomerular basement membrane (GBM) width were measured and calculated in ANCA-GN patients. Cox regression analysis was used to analyze the association between podocyte injuries and prognosis of patients with ANCA-GN. Foot processes broadening, podocyte detachment, and GBM thickening could be observed in electron micrographs in the specimens of 158/170 (92.9%), 142/170 (83.5%), and 150/170 (88.2%) patients, respectively. Compared with normal controls, FPW and GBM width in ANCA-GN patients was significantly higher (1269.39 ± 680.19 vs 585.81 ± 77.16, P = 0.004; 668.23 ± 208.73 vs 354.23 ± 52.70, P = 0.000, respectively), while the podocyte density was significantly lower (55.90 ± 36.32 vs 255.23 ± 47.29, P = 0.000). The podocyte density was independently associated with the recovery of renal function in logistic regression analysis (OR, 1.083; 95% CI, 1.025–1.440; P = 0.005). Furthermore, multivariate analysis revealed that podocyte density was an independent predictor of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (model A: HR, 0.950; 95% CI, 0.919–1.982; P = 0.002; model B: HR, 0.953; 95% CI, 0.922–0.985; P = 0.004). Podocyte structural damage and detachment occurred frequently in patients with ANCA

  10. Serum levels of 12 renal function and injury markers in patients with glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Serwin, Natalia M; Wiśniewska, Magda; Jesionowska, Anna; Skwirczyńska, Edyta; Marcinowska, Zuzanna; Dołęgowska, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    INTRODUCTION    Glomerulonephritis (GN) is a complex disease that affects the function of the whole nephron. There are few data on the serum levels of the most common biomarkers of kidney function and injury in GN, or the studies provide ambiguous results. OBJECTIVES    The aim of the study was to evaluate the levels of known kidney-specific and nonspecific markers of renal function or injury in the serum of patients with diagnosed primary or secondary GN, with or without the presence of nephrotic syndrome (NS) and arterial hypertension (AH). PATIENTS AND METHODS    The study included 58 patients with diagnosed GN and 6 patients with congenital defects (CD) of the kidney and AH (CD+AH). The serum levels of β2-microglobulin (β2M), neutrophil‑gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL), osteopontin, trefoil factor 3 (TFF-3), calbindin, glutathione-S‑transferase- π (GST-π), interleukin 18 (IL-18), kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1), and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) were measured with Kidney Toxicity Panels 1 and 2 using the Bio-Plex method. Renalase levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS    In the whole group and in the subgroups (GN, GN+AH, GN+NS, CD+AH), NGAL, KIM-1, TFF-3, IL-18, β2M, and calbindin levels correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). In patients with NS, this correlation for calbindin was reversed. Renalase, MCP-1, GST-π, and osteopontin levels were independent of eGFR. Increase in IL-18 levels in the group with GN was assiociated with lower odds of the kidney disease. When this group was divided according to eGFR into subgroups G1-G5, TFF-3, NGAL, and β2M levels increased with the stage of the disease. CONCLUSIONS In patients with NS, renalase and MCP-1 might regulate each other's levels. Further studies are needed to investigate associations between renalase, MCP-1, and osteopontin as factors unrelated to eGFR in GN. NS may contribute to the loss of calbindin from

  11. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist ameliorates experimental anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody-associated glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, W W; Feng, L; Vannice, J L; Wilson, C B

    1994-01-01

    The contribution of IL-1 to leukocyte infiltration in anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody (Ab) glomerulonephritis (GN) was examined by the administration of a specific IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra). Lewis rats received anti-GBM Ab or normal rabbit serum and were treated with either 0.9% saline or 6 mg IL-1ra over a 24-h time period. Plasma IL-1ra concentration was 2,659 +/- 51 ng/ml 4 h after anti-GBM Ab and IL-1ra administration. PMN and monocyte/macrophage infiltration declined 39% (9.8 +/- 1.9 to 6.0 +/- 1.5 PMN/glomerulus, P < 0.001) and 29% (4.9 +/- 0.8 to 3.5 +/- 0.8 ED-1 cells/glomerulus, P = 0.002) with IL-1ra treatment at 4 h, respectively. Similarly, the number of glomerular cells staining for lymphocyte function-associated molecule-1 beta (CD18) declined 39% from 16.7 +/- 1.9 to 10.7 +/- 1.6 cells/glomerulus at 4 h (P = 0.0001). This was associated with a decrease in glomerular intracellular adhesion molecule-1 expression. The mean glomerular intracellular adhesion molecule-1 score in anti-GBM Ab GN rats treated with IL-1ra was less than that of rats administered anti-GBM Ab and 0.9% saline at 4 (2.0 +/- 0.2 vs 2.5 +/- 0.2, P < 0.05) and 24 (2.5 +/- 0.1 vs 3.1 +/- 0.2, P = 0.0001) h. These immunopathologic changes correlated with a 50% reduction in proteinuria from 147 +/- 34 to 75 +/- 25 mg/d (P < 0.002). Treatment with IL-1ra did not affect the steady state mRNA expression of either IL-1 beta or TNF alpha. An increase in the IL-1ra dose to 30 mg given within the initial 4 h provided no additional benefit. The decline in PMN and monocyte/macrophage infiltration of the glomerulus at 4 h was similar to that found in the initial study. Furthermore, the protective benefit of IL-1ra was abrogated by doubling the dose of the anti-GBM Ab GN, despite administering high dose IL-1ra (30 mg). In these studies, detectable IL-1ra was found in the serum of untreated anti-GBM Ab GN controls. These data suggest a positive yet limited role for IL-1ra in

  12. Geoepidemiological hints about Streptococcus pyogenes strains in relationship with acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Bianchini, Sonia; Fastiggi, Michele; Fumagalli, Monica; Andreozzi, Laura; Rigante, Donato

    2015-07-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) strains are lately classified on the basis of sequence variations in the emm gene encoding the M protein, but despite the high number of distinct emm genotypes, the spectrum of phenotypes varying from invasive suppurative to non-suppurative GAS-related disorders has still to be defined. The relationship of GAS types with the uprising of acute rheumatic fever (ARF), a multisystemic disease caused by misdirected anti-GAS response in predisposed people, is also obscure. Studies published over the last 15 years were retrieved from PubMed using the keywords: "Streptococcus pyogenes" or "group A Streptococcus" and "acute rheumatic fever": the prevalence of peculiar emm types across different countries of the world is highly variable, depending on research designs, year of observation, country involved, patients' age, and gender. Most studies revealed that a relatively small number of specific emm/M protein types can be considered "rheumatogenic", as potentially characterized by the possibility of inducing ARF, with remarkable differences between developing and developed countries. The association between emm types and post-streptococcal manifestations is challenging, however surveillance of disease-causing variants in a specific community with high rate of ARF should be reinforced with the final goal of developing a potential primary prophylaxis against GAS infections. PMID:25772310

  13. Urinary Immunoglobulin G to Albumin Ratio and N-Acetyl-Beta-D-Glucosaminidase as Early Predictors of Therapeutic Response in ANCA-Associated Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Mravljak, Marija; Vizjak, Alenka; Ferluga, Dusan; Pajek, Jernej; Kovac, Damjan; Skoberne, Andrej; Ales Rigler, Andreja; Kveder, Radoslav; Kosir, Andrej; Lindic, Jelka

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of our study was to evaluate the prognostic value of glomerular and tubular proteinuria and tubular enzymuria as early indicators of therapeutic response to induction therapy with i.v. pulse cyclophosphamide (CyC) and methylprednisolone (MP) in patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated glomerulonephritis. Methods and Findings An observational single-center study was conducted in 30 patients with ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis. Patients were divided into subgroups with good or poor response to CyC therapy according to clinical and laboratory parameters. The diagnosis of ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis was based on the Chapel-Hill disease definitions. Good response to induction therapy was significantly associated with higher absolute values of urine N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) to creatinine ratio (above 14.83 microcat/mol) and urine immunoglobulin G (IgG) to albumin ratio (above 0.09) at the time of diagnosis, while albuminuria or proteinuria did not have any early predictive value. The remission of renal disease was anticipated as early as 3 months after introduction of induction therapy in patients with reduction of urine NAG to creatinine ratio below the baseline value and in patients with at least 24% rise in eGFR. Conclusions Urine IgG to albumin and urine NAG to creatinine ratio are better early predictors of treatment response in patients with ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis than proteinuria or albuminuria. PMID:24349116

  14. Dual anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis in a patient with Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Hee; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Kim, Min-Kyung

    2016-09-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that primarily affects exocrine glands. Renal involvement of Sjögren's syndrome may lead to tubulointerstitial disease, whereas secondary glomerulopathies such as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-related pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis are rarely observed. In addition, crescent glomerulonephritis that is simultaneously positive for both myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA and proteinase 3 (PR3)-ANCA has never been reported in Sjögren's syndrome. Here, we report a case of pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis exhibiting positivity for both MPO- and PR3-ANCAs in a patient with primary Sjögren's syndrome. A 71-year-old female was hospitalized for cough, blood-tinged sputum, and dyspnea two weeks after diagnosis with Sjögren's syndrome. On admission, serum anti-nuclear antibody, anti-Ro/SS-A antibody, MPO-ANCA, and PR3-ANCA were all positive, and serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine (Cr) levels were 42.7 and 2.9 mg/dL, respectively. On the seventh day of hospitalization, the patient's serum Cr level was 5.7 mg/dL, indicating rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Renal biopsy resulted in the diagnosis of ANCA-related pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis, for which intravenous methylprednisolone (7 mg/kg/day) was administered for three consecutive days, followed by combination therapy with oral prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day) and intravenous cyclophosphamide (500 mg/m(2)). The patient was positive in the Schirmer's I test, and a salivary gland biopsy showed sialadenitis with lympho-plasmacytic infiltrations. On day 28 of hospitalization, the patient was discharged after amelioration of respiratory symptoms and azotemia. At 6 months after discharge, the patient continued to receive appropriate daily medications and was negative for both MPO- and PR3-ANCAs, with a slight elevation in serum Cr levels. PMID:27384449

  15. Autoepitopes and alloepitopes of type IV collagen: role in the molecular pathogenesis of anti-GBM antibody glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2007-01-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibodies elicited by autoimmune or alloimmune mechanisms are associated with aggressive forms of rapid progressive glomerulonephritis. Pathogenic anti-GBM autoantibodies and alloantibodies target the noncollagenous (NC1) domains of the alpha3alpha4alpha5(IV) collagen, a major GBM component. In autoimmune anti-GBM glomerulonephritis, a breakdown of immune self-tolerance leads to the activation of autoreactive B and T cells recognizing epitopes within the alpha3NC1 subunit. In the GBM, the conformational epitopes targeted by anti-GBM autoantibodies are structurally sequestered within the alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamer complex formed upon assembly of collagen IV chains into trimeric molecules and networks. Autoantibodies selectively bind to and dissociate a subset of alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers composed of monomer subunits, whereas hexamers containing NC1 dimer subunits are resistant to dissociation by autoantibodies. The crypticity of alpha3NC1 autoepitopes suggests that self-tolerance to alpha3(IV) collagen is broken by structural alterations of the native alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamer that unmask normally sequestered epitopes, triggering an autoimmune reaction. Post-transplant anti-GBM nephritis in the renal allograft of transplanted Alport patients is mediated by an alloimmune reaction to the NC1 domains of alpha3alpha4alpha5(IV) collagen, present in the allograft GBM but absent from Alport basement membranes. Alloantibodies from patients with autosomal-recessive Alport syndrome predominantly bind to the alpha3NC1 domain, whereas alloantibodies from X-linked Alport patients target preferentially, though not exclusively, epitopes within the alpha5NC1 subunit. The accessibility of the alloantigenic sites within the alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers, contrasting with the crypticity of autoantigenic sites, suggest that different molecular forms of alpha3alpha4alpha5(IV) collagen initiate the immunopathogenic responses in

  16. [Acute kidney injury in children].

    PubMed

    Amira-Peco-Antić; Paripović, Dusan

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a clinical condition considered to be the consequence of a sudden decrease (> 25%) or discontinuation of renal function. The term AKI is used instead of the previous term acute renal failure, because it has been demonstrated that even minor renal lesions may cause far-reaching consequences on human health. Contemporary classifications of AKI (RIFLE and AKIN) are based on the change of serum creatinine and urinary output. In the developed countries, AKI is most often caused by renal ischemia, nephrotoxins and sepsis, rather than a (primary) diffuse renal disease, such as glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis, renovascular disorder and thrombotic microangiopathy. The main risk factors for hospital AKI are mechanical ventilation, use of vasoactive drugs, stem cell transplantation and diuretic-resistant hypervolemia. Prerenal and parenchymal AKI (previously known as acute tubular necrosis) jointly account for 2/3 of all AKI causes. Diuresis and serum creatinine concentration are not early diagnostic markers of AKI. Potential early biomarkers of AKI are neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), cystatin C, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), interleukins 6, 8 and 18, and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP). Early detection of kidney impairment, before the increase of serum creatinine, is important for timely initiated therapy and recovery. The goal of AKI treatment is to normalize the fluid and electrolyte status, as well as the correction of acidosis and blood pressure. Since a severe fluid overload resistant to diuretics and inotropic agents is associated with a poor outcome, the initiation of dialysis should not be delayed. The mortality rate of AKI is highest in critically ill children with multiple organ failure and hemodynamically unstable patients. PMID:25033598

  17. Hepatitis C eradication and improvement of cryoglobulinemia-associated rash and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with interferon and ribavirin after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zeman, Marilyn; Campbell, Patricia; Bain, Vincent G

    2006-01-01

    Postrenal transplant hepatitis C is increasing in frequency due to the high prevalence of hepatitis C among patients with renal failure. Despite this, there is still no standard hepatitis C treatment available for renal transplanted recipients. Combination antiviral hepatitis C therapy, the standard of care in the nontransplant population, is generally avoided because of documented renal graft rejection secondary to interferon treatment. A case of a male patient with postrenal transplant hepatitis C, which was associated with cryoglobulinemia and glomerulonephritis of the graft, is presented. He was treated with standard interferon with ribavirin. Sustained viral clearance was achieved despite ongoing evidence of cryoglobulinemia. Renal function, which had been deteriorating before treatment, improved as evidenced by the stabilization of serum creatinine and marked improvement of proteinuria. In conclusion, in selected patients, combination antiviral therapy may still be a viable option postrenal transplant. PMID:16779461

  18. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or though physical contact (for example, on unwashed hands). Being exposed to tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts, vapors, and fumes can also cause acute bronchitis. Less often, bacteria can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute ...

  19. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  20. Long-term graft outcomes and patient survival are lower posttransplant in patients with a primary renal diagnosis of glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Pruthi, Rishi; McClure, Mark; Casula, Anna; Roderick, Paul J; Fogarty, Damian; Harber, Mark; Ravanan, Rommel

    2016-04-01

    Glomerulonephritis (GN) is the primary diagnosis in 20% to 40% of patients receiving a renal transplant. Here we studied patient survival and graft outcomes in patients with GN transplanted in the UK. UK Renal Registry data were used to analyze patient survival and graft failure in incident transplant patients between 1997 to 2009 who had a diagnosis of primary GN, in comparison to patients transplanted with adult polycystic kidney disease (APKD) or diabetes. Multivariable regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, donor type, ethnicity, donor age, time on dialysis, human leukocyte antigen mismatch, cold ischemic time, and graft failure (for patient survival). Patients were followed up through December 2012. Of 4750 patients analyzed, 2975 had GN and 1775 APKD. Graft failure was significantly higher in membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) type II (hazard ratio: 3.5, confidence interval: 1.9-6.6), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (2.4, 1.8-3.2), MPGN type I (2.3, 1.6-3.3), membranous nephropathy (2.0, 1.4-2.9), and IgA nephropathy (1.6, 1.3-2.0) compared to APKD. Survival was significantly reduced in patients with MPGN type II (4.7, 2.0-10.8), and those with lupus nephritis (1.8, 1.1-2.9). Overall graft failure for patients with GN was similar to those with diabetes. Thus, in comparison to outcomes in APKD, graft survival is significantly lower in most GNs, with variation in outcomes between different GNs. This information should assist in pretransplant counseling of patients. Further study is required to understand the reduced survival seen in lupus nephritis and MPGN type II, and to improve overall graft outcomes. PMID:26924061

  1. Alport alloantibodies but not Goodpasture autoantibodies induce murine glomerulonephritis: protection by quinary crosslinks locking cryptic α3(IV) collagen autoepitopes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wentian; Wang, Xu-Ping; Kashtan, Clifford E; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2010-09-15

    The noncollagenous (NC1) domains of alpha3alpha4alpha5(IV) collagen in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) are targets of Goodpasture autoantibodies or Alport posttransplant nephritis alloantibodies mediating rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Because the autoepitopes but not the alloepitopes become cryptic upon assembly of alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers, we investigated how the accessibility of B cell epitopes in vivo influences the development of glomerulonephritis in mice passively immunized with human anti-GBM Abs. Alport alloantibodies, which bound to native murine alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers in vitro, deposited linearly along the mouse GBM in vivo, eliciting crescentic glomerulonephritis in Fcgr2b(-/-) mice susceptible to Ab-mediated inflammation. Goodpasture autoantibodies, which bound to murine alpha3NC1 monomer and dimer subunits but not to native alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers in vitro, neither bound to the mouse GBM in vivo nor induced experimental glomerulonephritis. This was due to quinary NC1 crosslinks, recently identified as sulfilimine bonds, which comprehensively locked the cryptic Goodpasture autoepitopes in the mouse GBM. In contrast, non-crosslinked alpha3NC1 subunits were identified as a native target of Goodpasture autoantibodies in the GBM of squirrel monkeys, a species susceptible to Goodpasture autoantibody-mediated nephritis. Thus, crypticity of B cell autoepitopes in tissues uncouples potentially pathogenic autoantibodies from autoimmune disease. Crosslinking of alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers represents a novel mechanism averting autoantibody binding and subsequent tissue injury by posttranslational modifications of an autoantigen. PMID:20709951

  2. Alport alloantibodies but not Goodpasture autoantibodies induce murine glomerulonephritis: Protection by quinary crosslinks locking cryptic α3(IV) collagen autoepitopes in vivo 1

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wentian; Wang, Xu-Ping; Kashtan, Clifford E.; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2010-01-01

    The noncollagenous (NC1) domains of α3α4α5(IV) collagen in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) are targets of Goodpasture autoantibodies or Alport post-transplant nephritis alloantibodies mediating rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Because the autoepitopes but not the alloepitopes become cryptic upon assembly of α3α4α5NC1 hexamers, we investigated how the accessibility of B cell epitopes in vivo influences the development of glomerulonephritis in mice passively immunized with human anti-GBM antibodies. Alport alloantibodies, which bound to native murine α3α4α5NC1 hexamers in vitro, deposited linearly along the mouse GBM in vivo, eliciting crescentic glomerulonephritis in Fcgr2b−/− mice susceptible to antibody-mediated inflammation. Goodpasture autoantibodies, which bound to murine α3NC1 monomer and dimer subunits but not to native α3α4α5NC1 hexamers in vitro, neither bound to the mouse GBM in vivo nor induced experimental glomerulonephritis. This was due to quinary NC1 cross-links, recently identified as sulfilimine bonds, which comprehensively locked the cryptic Goodpasture autoepitopes in the mouse GBM. In contrast, non-crosslinked α3NC1 subunits were identified as a native target of Goodpasture autoantibodies in the GBM of squirrel monkeys—a species susceptible to Goodpasture autoantibody-mediated nephritis. Thus, crypticity of B cell autoepitopes in tissues uncouples potentially pathogenic autoantibodies from autoimmune disease. Crosslinking of α3α4α5NC1 hexamers represents a novel mechanism averting autoantibody binding and subsequent tissue injury by post-translational modifications of an autoantigen. PMID:20709951

  3. Skimmin, a Coumarin from Hydrangea paniculata, Slows down the Progression of Membranous Glomerulonephritis by Anti-Inflammatory Effects and Inhibiting Immune Complex Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hongqi; Li, Yan; Zhang, Dongming; Shi, Jing; Yang, Jingzhi

    2013-01-01

    Skimmin is one of the major pharmacologically active molecules present in Hydrangea paniculata, a medical herb used in the traditional Chinese medicine as an anti-inflammatory agent. In the current study, we attempted to investigate its renoprotective activity and underlying mechanisms in a rat model of membranous glomerulonephritis induced by cationic bovine serum albumin (c-BSA). Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into five groups, including normal control, model control, Mycophenolate Mofetil-treated group, and two skimming-treated groups (15 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg). Our research showed that treatment with skimmin significantly reduced the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary albumin excretion (UAE), and serum creatinine (Scr) as compared with model control after experimental induction of membranous glomerulonephritis (P < 0.01). Moreover, glomerular hypercellularity, tubulointerstitial injury, and glomerular deposition of IgG were less intense after skimmin treatment. By immunochemistry analysis, we demonstrated that skimmin could significantly inhibit interleukin-1β (IL1β) and IL-6 expression (P < 0.05), reduce the loss of nephrin and podocin, and suppress the infiltration of renal interstitium by CD3-positive T cell and CD20-positive B cell. These results suggest that treatment with skimmin can significantly improve renal function and suppress the IgG deposition as well as the development of glomerular lesions in a rat model of membranous glomerulonephritis. PMID:23990847

  4. Therapeutic effects and mechanism of conditioned media from human mesenchymal stem cells on anti-GBM glomerulonephritis in WKY rats.

    PubMed

    Iseri, Ken; Iyoda, Masayuki; Ohtaki, Hirokazu; Matsumoto, Kei; Wada, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Taihei; Yamamoto, Yasutaka; Saito, Tomohiro; Hihara, Kei; Tachibana, Shohei; Honda, Kazuho; Shibata, Takanori

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that conditioned media derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSC-CM) have therapeutic effects in various experimental diseases. However, the therapeutic mechanism is not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic effects and mechanism of MSC-CM in experimental antiglomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis. We administered either MSC-CM or vehicle from day 0 to day 10 after the induction of nephrotoxic serum nephritis in Wistar-Kyoto rats. In vitro, we analyzed the effects of MSC-CM on TNF-α-mediated cytokine production in cultured normal human mesangial cells, proximal tubular (HK-2) cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and monocytes (THP-1 and peripheral blood mononuclear cells). Compared with vehicle treatment, MSC-CM treatment improved proteinuria and renal dysfunction. Histologically, MSC-CM-treated rats had reduced crescent formation and glomerular ED1(+) macrophage infiltration and increased glomerular ED2(+) macrophage infiltration. Increased serum monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 levels were observed in MSC-CM-treated rats. Renal cortical mRNA expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6, and of the T helper cell 1 cytokine interferon-γ were greatly decreased by MSC-CM treatment. In vitro, pretreatment with MSC-CM blocked TNF-α-mediated IL-8 release in normal human mesangial cells and HK-2 cells. TNF-α-mediated MCP-1 release was enhanced by pretreatment with MSC-CM in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and HK-2 cells and was strikingly enhanced in THP-1 cells. Stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with a combination of MCP-1 and IL-4 enhanced the expression of M2-associated genes compared with IL-4 alone. We demonstrated that MSC-CM had therapeutic effects in experimental antiglomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis that were mediated through anti-inflammatory effects that were partly due to acceleration of M2 macrophage

  5. [Drug-induced acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Derungs, Adrian

    2015-12-01

    Due to their physiological function, the kidneys are exposed to high concentrations of numerous drugs and their metabolites, making them vulnerable to drug-related injuries. This article provides an overview of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in nephrotoxicity, the most common nephrotoxic drugs, and the risk factors for the occurrence of drug-induced acute kidney injuries. NSAIDs, diuretics, ACE inhibitors, and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs} are the most frequent prerenal causes of an acute elevation in creatinine levels. Primary vascular damage arises from thrombotic microangiopathy (e. g. due to cic/osporin, tacrolimus, muromonab-CD3, mitomycin C, quinine, ticlopidine, clopidogrel}. Anticoagulants and thrombolytic medications lead to secondary blood vessel damage by cholesterol emboli, embolism of thrombus material into the periphery or bleeding. Tubulopathies can be observed on treatment with ifosfamide and cisplatin (rarely with cyclophosphamide or carboplatin), aminoglycosides, vancomycin, and radiocontrast agents. Immunological mechanisms underlie interstitial nephritides, which are induced by drugs in about 85% of cases. In drug-induced glomerulopathies;- renal biopsy allows closer identification of the triggering medication. Drug-induced systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE} represents a special form of immune complex glomerulonephritis and can be triggered by procainamide, hydralazine, isoniazid, methyldopa, quinidine, chlorpromazine, and propylthiouracil. Crystal-induced kidney injury is caused by precipitation of drugs (e. g. aciclovir, sulfonamide antibiotics, methotrexate, indinavir) in the renal tubules and the urine-conducting organs with consecutive obstruction thereof. PMID:26654816

  6. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  7. Clonal diversity of Streptococcus pyogenes within some M-types revealed by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Haase, A. M.; Melder, A.; Mathews, J. D.; Kemp, D. J.; Adams, M.

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-two reference isolates and 30 local isolates of group A Streptococci were classified into 36 electrophoretic types (ET) on the basis of allozyme variation at 27 enzyme loci. Local isolates were characterized by a high frequency of M-non typable strains. M-type and ET were more closely associated in local isolates from an endemically-infected population; nevertheless, amongst the local isolates there were also strains of the same ET type with different M-types. A possible explanation is that genetic exchange between strains may introduce different M-types into strains of defined ET when these are exposed to strong selection in the presence of heavy loads of infection. In contrast to the reported clustering of strains associated with toxic shock-like syndrome into two closely related ET clones, we found no relationship of ET phenotype to acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis or rheumatic fever. PMID:7995355

  8. Increased risk for lymphoma and glomerulonephritis in a closed population of cats exposed to feline leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Francis, D P; Essex, M; Jakowski, R M; Cotter, S M; Lerer, T J; Hardy, W D

    1980-03-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-associated diseases were observed in a household in eastern Connecticut having 134 cats over a period of five and a half years. FeLV-positive cats had a much higher mortality rate (34.6 deaths per 1000 cat-months of follow-up) than did FeLV-negative cats (8.9 deaths per 1000 cat-months of follow-up). The leading cause of death was glomerulonephritis followed by lymphoma. The relative risk for virus-positive cats as compared to virus-negative cats for the two diseases was 9.9 and 9.6, respectively. The major risk factors for the development of lymphoma were virus positivity and low antibody titer to the feline oncornavirus-associated cell membrane antigen (FOCMA). No significant differences in cancer incidence were seen between the two major breeds (Abyssinian and Burmese) in the household. An older age at arrival in the house decreased death rates for all causes in the household, but it did not significantly affect death rates from lymphoma, although there was a positive trend. PMID:6244730

  9. The combination of tacrolimus and entecavir improves the remission of HBV-associated glomerulonephritis without enhancing viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lifen; Ye, Zhiming; Liang, Huaban; Zhang, Bin; Xu, Lixia; Feng, Zhonglin; Liu, Shuangxin; Shi, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tacrolimus inhibits hepatitis B virus entry into hepatocytes through targeting the HBV receptor, sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide. This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Tacrolimus combined with entecavir antiviral therapy for HBV-associated glomerulonephritis patients with biopsy-proven membranous nephropathy. Method: A cohort of 42 patients was enrolled in this retrospective study. Twenty-three patients received Tacrolimus (0.05 mg/kg/day) in combination entecavir over 24 weeks, whereas the other 19 patients only received entecavir monotherapy. Results: The probability of proteinuria remission in the Tacrolimus+entecavir group was 69 and 87% after 12 and 24 weeks, whereas was only 26 and 42%, respectively, in the entecavir group. The mean time to partial or complete remission was 18.6 weeks in the Tacrolimus+entecavir group and 34.3 weeks in the entecavir group (P<0.001). A decrease in the HBV DNA titer was observed in all patients with active HBV replication. None of the HBV carriers in the Tacrolimus+entecavir group showed evidence of HBV reactivation. The serum creatinine and alanine aminotransferase levels remained stable in both groups. The Tacrolimus target trough concentration was 5-10 ng/mL. Conclusion: Tacrolimus combined with entecavir rapidly and effectively induced remission of HBV-GN in Chinese adults. Furthermore, Tacrolimus may have a synergistic antiviral effect with entecavir.

  10. Mucosal Tolerance Induced by an Immunodominant Peptide from Rat α3(IV)NC1 in Established Experimental Autoimmune Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, John; Abbott, Danielle S.; Karegli, Julieta; Evans, David J.; Pusey, Charles D.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune glomerulonephritis (EAG), an animal model of Goodpasture’s disease, can be induced in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats by immunization with the noncollagenous domain of the α 3 chain of type IV collagen, α3(IV)NC1. Recent studies have identified an immunodominant peptide, pCol (24-38), from the N-terminus of rat α3(IV)NC1; this peptide contains the major B- and T-cell epitopes in EAG and can induce crescentic nephritis. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of mucosal tolerance in EAG by examining the effects of the nasal administration of this peptide after the onset of disease. A dose-dependent effect was observed: a dose of 300 μg had no effect, a dose of 1000 μg resulted in a moderate reduction in EAG severity, and a dose of 3000 μg produced a marked reduction in EAG severity accompanied by diminished antigen-specific, T-cell proliferative responses. These results demonstrate that mucosal tolerance in EAG can be induced by nasal administration of an immunodominant peptide from the N-terminus of α3(IV)NC1 and should be of value in designing new therapeutic strategies for patients with Goodpasture’s disease and other autoimmune disorders. PMID:19406992