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Sample records for acutely disturbed patients

  1. Sleep Disturbances in Acutely Ill Patients with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Ellyn E; Tanner, J Mark; Dumont, Natalie A

    2016-06-01

    Intensive care units may place acutely ill patients with cancer at additional risk for sleep loss and associated negative effects. Research suggests that communication about sleep in patients with cancer is suboptimal and sleep problems are not regularly assessed or adequately treated throughout the cancer trajectory. However, many sleep problems and fatigue can be managed effectively. This article synthesizes the current literature regarding the prevalence, cause, and risk factors that contribute to sleep disturbance in the context of acute cancer care. It describes the consequences of poor sleep and discusses appropriate assessment and treatment options. PMID:27215362

  2. Development and Validation of Sleep Disturbance Questionnaire in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sepahvand, Elham; Khaledi Paveh, Behnam; Rezaei, Mansour

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Severe sleep disturbance is a common problem among patients in cardiac care units (CCUs). There are questionnaires to measure sleep disturbances. Therefore, the present study seeks to design a valid and reliable questionnaire to assess sleep disturbance in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) hospitalized in CCUs. Materials and Methods. In the present methodological research, items of the questionnaire were extracted through a systematic review. The validity and reliability of the questionnaires was assessed by face validity, content validity, construct validity, Cronbach's alpha coefficient, and test-retest methods. Results. Factor analysis provided a questionnaire of 23 items on 5 dimensions of sleep disturbance in coronary patients: “sleep onset and continuity disorder,” “disorder in daytime functioning,” “sleep disturbance caused by environmental factors,” “sleep disturbance as a result of cardiac diseases,” and “respiratory disorders during sleep.” Furthermore, test-retest analysis showed a reliability correlation coefficient of r = 0.766 and α Cronbach's reliability (α = 0.855). Conclusion. Sleep disturbance questionnaire for patients with ACS hospitalized in coronary care unit (CCU) was identified in 5 dimensions and assessed for validity and reliability. To control and improve the sleep quality of CCU hospitalized patients, we need to identify and remove predisposing factors.

  3. Electrolyte and mineral disturbances in septic acute kidney injury patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Su-Young; Kim, Hyunwook; Park, Seohyun; Jhee, Jong Hyun; Yun, Hae-Ryong; Kim, Hyoungnae; Kee, Youn Kyung; Yoon, Chang-Yun; Oh, Hyung Jung; Chang, Tae Ik; Park, Jung Tak; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kang, Shin-Wook; Lee, Hajeong; Kim, Dong Ki; Han, Seung Hyeok

    2016-09-01

    Electrolyte and mineral disturbances remain a major concern in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT); however, it is not clear whether those imbalances are associated with adverse outcomes in patients with septic acute kidney injury (AKI) undergoing CRRT. We conducted a post-hoc analysis of data from a prospective randomized controlled trial. A total of 210 patients with a mean age of 62.2 years (136 [64.8%] males) in 2 hospitals were enrolled. Levels of sodium, potassium, calcium, and phosphate measured before (0 hour) and 24 hours after CRRT initiation. Before starting CRRT, at least 1 deficiency and excess in electrolytes or minerals were observed in 126 (60.0%) and 188 (67.6%) patients, respectively. The excess in these parameters was greatly improved, whereas hypokalemia and hypophosphatemia became more prevalent at 24 hours after CRRT. However, 1 and 2 or more deficiencies in those parameters at the 2 time points were not associated with mortality. However, during 28 days, 89 (71.2%) deaths occurred in patients with phosphate levels at 0 hour of ≥4.5 mg/dL as compared with 49 (57.6%) in patients with phosphate levels <4.5 mg/dL. The 90-day mortality was also significantly higher in patients with hyperphosphatemia. Similarly, in 184 patients who survived at 24 hours after CRRT, hyperphosphatemia conferred a 2.2-fold and 2.6-fold increased risk of 28- and 90-day mortality, respectively. The results remained unaltered when the serum phosphate level was analyzed as a continuous variable. Electrolyte and mineral disturbances are common, and hyperphosphatemia may predict poor prognosis in septic AKI patients undergoing CRRT. PMID:27603344

  4. [Marked hyponatremia with consciousness disturbance probably caused by linezolid in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kei; Ohishi, Kohshi; Ino, Kazuko; Sugawara, Yumiko; Sekine, Takao

    2008-01-01

    We report the case of a 75-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia who developed hyponatremia after linezolid administration. Because induction therapy did not achieve complete remission for this man, we initiated re-induction therapy with enocitabin and daunomycin. Seven days after chemotherapy, the patient experienced a catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI) due to methicilin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). When treatment with albekacin and fosfomycin was in effective, linezolid was administrated intravenously and he became afebrile. On day 8 after linezolid administration, however, he reported general fatigue and slight consciousness disturbance. His serum sodium concentration was 119 mEq/L and his urinary sodium excretion rose to 143 mEq/day, although intravenous sodium intake was 98 mEq/day. Because of the sufficiency of urine volume and weight loss, we surmise that inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH) syndrome was unlikely. We diagnosed renal salt wasting syndrome (RSWS) based on calculation of the amount of sodium intake and the amount of sodium excreted from the kidneys. After linezolid was discontinued and aggressive treatment with sodium supplement begun, his consciousness cleared as his low serum sodium level rose. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first case reported on the development of RSWS after linezolid treatment. Although the process remains unclear, our case suggests that linezolid may induce RSWS after intensive chemotherapy. PMID:18306678

  5. The hemostatic disturbance in patients with acute aortic dissection: A prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xinliang; Li, Jiachen; Gong, Ming; Lan, Feng; Zhang, Hongjia

    2016-09-01

    Coagulopathy is still a frequent complication in the surgical treatment of acute aortic dissection. However, the physiopathology of surgically induced coagulopathy has never been systematically and comprehensively studied in patients with acute aortic dissection. The aim of the present study was to describe the perioperative hemostatic system in patients with acute aortic dissection.The 87 patients who underwent aortic arch surgery for acute Stanford type A aortic dissection from January 2013 to September 2015 were enrolled in this study. The perioperative biomarkers of hemostatic system were evaluated using standard laboratory tests and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) at 5 time points: anesthesia induction (T1), lowest nasopharyngeal temperature (T2), protamine reversal (T3), 4 hours after surgery (T4), and 24 hours after surgery (T5).The ELISAs biomarkers revealed activation of coagulation (thrombin-antithrombin III complex [TAT] and prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 [F1 + 2] were elevated), suppression of anticoagulation (antithrombin III [AT III] levels were depressed), and activation of fibrinolysis (plasminogen was decreased and plasmin-antiplasmin complex [PAP] was elevated). The standard laboratory tests also demonstrated that surgery resulted in a significant reduction in platelet counts and fibrinogen concentration.Systemic activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis, and inhibition of anticoagulation were observed during the perioperative period in patients with acute aortic dissection. Indeed, these patients exhibited consumption coagulopathy and procoagulant state perioperatively. Therefore, we believe that this remarkable disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)-like coagulopathy has a high risk of bleeding and may influence postoperative outcome of patients with acute aortic dissection. PMID:27603366

  6. Correlates and Escitalopram Treatment Effects on Sleep Disturbance in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome: K-DEPACS and EsDEPACS

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Min; Stewart, Robert; Bae, Kyung-Yeol; Kang, Hee-Ju; Kim, Sung-Wan; Shin, Il-Seon; Hong, Young Joon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the correlates of sleep disturbance and to assess escitalopram treatment effects of depression on sleep disturbance in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Design: A cross-sectional study in patients with ACS within 2 w post-ACS, and a 24-w double-blind controlled trial of escitalopram against placebo for patients with ACS who have comorbid depressive disorders. Setting: A university hospital in South Korea. Participants: There were 1,152 patients with ACS who were consecutively recruited. Of 446 patients with comorbid depressive disorders, 300 were randomized to the trial. Measurements and Results: Sleep disturbance was evaluated by the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire. Demographic and clinical characteristics were assessed, including cardiovascular risk factors, current cardiac status, and depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms were most strongly and consistently associated with sleep disturbance. In addition, older age, female sex, hypertension, and more severe ACS status were associated with certain aspects of sleep disturbance. Escitalopram was significantly superior to placebo for improving sleep disturbance over the 24-w treatment period. These effects were substantially explained by improvement in depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Depression screening is indicated in patients with acute coronary syndrome with sleep disturbance. Successful treatment of depression has beneficial effects on sleep outcomes in these patients. Clinical Trials Information: ClinicalTrial.gov identifier for the 24-w drug trial, NCT00419471. Citation: Kim JM, Stewart R, Bae KY, Kang HJ, Kim SW, Shin IS, Hong YJ, Ahn Y, Jeong MH, Yoon JS. Correlates and escitalopram treatment effects on sleep disturbance in patients with acute coronary syndrome: K-DEPACS and EsDEPACS. SLEEP 2015;38(7):1105–1111. PMID:25581916

  7. Acute Symptomatic Seizures Caused by Electrolyte Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    In this narrative review we focus on acute symptomatic seizures occurring in subjects with electrolyte disturbances. Quite surprisingly, despite its clinical relevance, this issue has received very little attention in the scientific literature. Electrolyte abnormalities are commonly encountered in clinical daily practice, and their diagnosis relies on routine laboratory findings. Acute and severe electrolyte imbalances can manifest with seizures, which may be the sole presenting symptom. Seizures are more frequently observed in patients with sodium disorders (especially hyponatremia), hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia. They do not entail a diagnosis of epilepsy, but are classified as acute symptomatic seizures. EEG has little specificity in differentiating between various electrolyte disturbances. The prominent EEG feature is slowing of the normal background activity, although other EEG findings, including various epileptiform abnormalities may occur. An accurate and prompt diagnosis should be established for a successful management of seizures, as rapid identification and correction of the underlying electrolyte disturbance (rather than an antiepileptic treatment) are of crucial importance in the control of seizures and prevention of permanent brain damage. PMID:26754778

  8. Acute Symptomatic Seizures Caused by Electrolyte Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, Raffaele; Brigo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In this narrative review we focus on acute symptomatic seizures occurring in subjects with electrolyte disturbances. Quite surprisingly, despite its clinical relevance, this issue has received very little attention in the scientific literature. Electrolyte abnormalities are commonly encountered in clinical daily practice, and their diagnosis relies on routine laboratory findings. Acute and severe electrolyte imbalances can manifest with seizures, which may be the sole presenting symptom. Seizures are more frequently observed in patients with sodium disorders (especially hyponatremia), hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia. They do not entail a diagnosis of epilepsy, but are classified as acute symptomatic seizures. EEG has little specificity in differentiating between various electrolyte disturbances. The prominent EEG feature is slowing of the normal background activity, although other EEG findings, including various epileptiform abnormalities may occur. An accurate and prompt diagnosis should be established for a successful management of seizures, as rapid identification and correction of the underlying electrolyte disturbance (rather than an antiepileptic treatment) are of crucial importance in the control of seizures and prevention of permanent brain damage. PMID:26754778

  9. [Sleep disturbances in critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    Walder, B; Haase, U; Rundshagen, I

    2007-01-01

    Sleep is an essential part of life with many important roles which include immunologic, cognitive and muscular functions. Of the working population 20% report sleep disturbances and in critically ill patients an incidence of more than 50% has been shown. However, sleep disturbances in the intensive care unit (ICU) population have not been investigated in detail. Sleep disturbances in ICU patients have a variety of reasons: e.g. patient-related pathologies like sepsis, acute or chronic pulmonary diseases, cardiac insufficiency, stroke or epilepsy, surgery, therapeutical interventions like mechanical ventilation, noise of monitors, pain or medication. Numerous scales and questionnaires are used to quantify sleep and the polysomnogramm is used to objectify sleep architecture. To improve sleep in ICU patients concepts are needed which include in addition to pharmacological treatment (pain reduction and sedation) synchronization of ICU activities with daylight, noise reduction and music for relaxation. In order to establish evidence-based guidelines, research activities about sleep and critical illness should be intensified. Questions to be answered are: 1) Which part of sleep disturbances in critically ill patients is directly related to the illness or trauma? 2) Is the grade of sleep disturbance correlated with the severity of the illness or trauma? 3) Which part is related to the medical treatment and can be modified or controlled? In order to define non-pharmacological and pharmacological concepts to improve sleep quality, studies need to be randomized and to include different ICU populations. The rate of nosocomial infections, cognitive function and respiratory muscle function should be considered in these studies as well. This will help to answer the question, whether it is useful to monitor sleep in ICU patients as a parameter to indicate therapeutical success and short-term quality of life. Follow-up needs to be long enough to detect adverse effects of

  10. Identity disturbance in distant patients.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Irwin

    2013-04-01

    Chronically distant, emotionally isolated patients often present with identity disturbance. Identity, it is argued, develops as a thematic pattern of narcissism, shaped by the nature of the mother's early libidinal influences on the child's sense of self. Identity provides a form of self-definition that addresses the question, Who am I? In the treatment of these patients, resistances to narcissistic vulnerabilities (narcissistic resistances) provide an illusory sense of security and induce the analyst to avoid attention to a central pathological problem: primitive and frightening needs for, and unconscious fantasies of, dependence on, and functionality for, another. Patients' avoidance of material and therapeutic interactions that deal with their dependencies are aspects of a tacit contract with the analyst to foreclose examination of their considerable problems with inner stability. Among these problems are anxieties regarding intrusion and loss of separateness. As analysis proceeds, elements of such a patient's identity become clarified and are used to understand and organize the material for both analyst and patient. This can allow the patient to articulate a more embodied and vital experience of individuality. A case is presented to illustrate the analysis of a patient using this approach. PMID:23526544

  11. Sleep disturbance in older ICU patients.

    PubMed

    Sterniczuk, Roxanne; Rusak, Benjamin; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining a stable and adequate sleeping pattern is associated with good health and disease prevention. As a restorative process, sleep is important for supporting immune function and aiding the body in healing and recovery. Aging is associated with characteristic changes to sleep quantity and quality, which make it more difficult to adjust sleep-wake rhythms to changing environmental conditions. Sleep disturbance and abnormal sleep-wake cycles are commonly reported in seriously ill older patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). A combination of intrinsic and extrinsic factors appears to contribute to these disruptions. Little is known regarding the effect that sleep disturbance has on health status in the oldest of old (80+), a group, who with diminishing physiological reserve and increasing prevalence of frailty, is at a greater risk of adverse health outcomes, such as cognitive decline and mortality. Here we review how sleep is altered in the ICU, with particular attention to older patients, especially those aged ≥80 years. Further work is required to understand what impact sleep disturbance has on frailty levels and poor outcomes in older critically ill patients. PMID:25018625

  12. Assessing and Managing Sleep Disturbance in Patients with Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Cheatle, Martin D; Foster, Simmie; Pinkett, Aaron; Lesneski, Matthew; Qu, David; Dhingra, Lara

    2016-06-01

    Chronic pain is associated with symptoms that may impair a patient's quality of life, including emotional distress, fatigue, and sleep disturbance. There is a high prevalence of concomitant pain and sleep disturbance. Studies support the hypothesis that sleep and pain have a bidirectional and reciprocal relationship. Clinicians who manage patients with chronic pain often focus on interventions that relieve pain, and assessing and treating sleep disturbance are secondary or not addressed. This article reviews the literature on pain and co-occurring sleep disturbance, describes the assessment of sleep disturbance, and outlines nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment strategies to improve sleep in patients with chronic pain. PMID:27208716

  13. The Assessment of Electroencephalographic Changes and Memory Disturbances in Acute Intoxications with Industrial Poisons

    PubMed Central

    Chalupa, B.; Synková, J.; Ševčík, M.

    1960-01-01

    A report is given of the results of the electroencephalogram (EEG) and of an experimental memory examination in a group of 22 cases of acute carbon monoxide and solvents poisoning of varying severity. An abnormal EEG recording, most often in the form of theta activity 5-6 sec., was found in 12 patients; memory disturbances were found in 13 cases. There was correlation between the results of the two examinations as well as with the clinical classification of the degree of intoxication. The methods are suitable for the solving of various theoretical and practical questions in industrial toxicology. PMID:13692202

  14. Body Image Disturbance in Patients with Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Bowe, Whitney P.; Crerand, Canice E.; Margolis, David J.; Shalita, Alan R.

    2011-01-01

    Psychosocial outcome measures, which attempt to examine acne from the patient's perspective, have become increasingly important in dermatology research. One such measure is the Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire. The authors' primary aim was to determine the validity and internal consistency of the Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire in patients with acne vulgaris. The secondary aim was to investigate the relationship between body image disturbance and quality of life. This cross-sectional investigation included 52 consecutive acne patients presenting to an outpatient dermatology clinic. Subjects completed the Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire, Skindex-16, and other body image and psychosocial functioning measures. An objective assessment of acne was performed. The Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire was internally consistent and converged with other known body image indices. Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire scores also correlated with Skindex-16 scores, confirming that quality of life and body image are related psychosocial constructs. The Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire appears to be an accurate instrument that can assess appearance-related concern and impairment in patients with acne vulgaris. Limitations include a small sample size and the cross-sectional design. PMID:21779418

  15. Body image disturbance in patients with acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Bowe, Whitney P; Doyle, Amanda K; Crerand, Canice E; Margolis, David J; Shalita, Alan R

    2011-07-01

    Psychosocial outcome measures, which attempt to examine acne from the patient's perspective, have become increasingly important in dermatology research. One such measure is the Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire. The authors' primary aim was to determine the validity and internal consistency of the Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire in patients with acne vulgaris. The secondary aim was to investigate the relationship between body image disturbance and quality of life. This cross-sectional investigation included 52 consecutive acne patients presenting to an outpatient dermatology clinic. Subjects completed the Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire, Skindex-16, and other body image and psychosocial functioning measures. An objective assessment of acne was performed. The Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire was internally consistent and converged with other known body image indices. Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire scores also correlated with Skindex-16 scores, confirming that quality of life and body image are related psychosocial constructs. The Body Image Disturbance Questionnaire appears to be an accurate instrument that can assess appearance-related concern and impairment in patients with acne vulgaris. Limitations include a small sample size and the cross-sectional design. PMID:21779418

  16. [Electrolyte disturbances in geriatric patients with focus on hyponatremia].

    PubMed

    Grundmann, F

    2016-08-01

    Disturbances of water and electrolyte balance are commonly encountered in older patients due to a multitude of physiological changes and preexisting morbidities with hyponatremia being the most common disorder. Even mild chronic hyponatremia can lead to cognitive deficits and gait instability and is associated with an increased rate of falls and fractures. Additionally, experimental and epidemiological data suggest that hyponatremia promotes bone resorption and therefore increases the risk of osteoporosis. Furthermore, osteoporosis and sarcopenia can be stimulated by hypomagnesemia. Hypernatremia often only results in unspecific symptoms but the condition is associated with a clearly increased mortality. As electrolyte disturbances have a high prevalence in the geriatric population and can contribute to geriatric syndromes and frailty, relevant electrolyte alterations should be excluded in all geriatric patients, in particular after a change in medication schedules. PMID:27464739

  17. Mood disturbance and depression in Arab women following hospitalisation from acute cardiac conditions: a cross-sectional study from Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Tam Truong; Al Suwaidi, Jassim Mohd; Al-Qahtani, Awad; Asaad, Nidal; Fung, Tak; Singh, Rajvir; Qader, Najlaa Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Depression is associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates among cardiovascular patients. Depressed patients have three times higher risk of death than those who are not. We sought to determine the presence of depressive symptoms, and whether gender and age are associated with depression among Arab patients hospitalised with cardiac conditions in a Middle Eastern country. Setting Using a non-probability convenient sampling technique, a cross-sectional survey was conducted with 1000 Arab patients ≥20 years who were admitted to cardiology units between 2013 and 2014 at the Heart Hospital in Qatar. Patients were interviewed 3 days after admission following the cardiac event. Surveys included demographic and clinical characteristics, and the Arabic version of the Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition (BDI-II). Depression was assessed by BDI-II clinical classification scale. Results 15% of the patients had mild mood disturbance and 5% had symptoms of clinical depression. Twice as many females than males suffered from mild mood disturbance and clinical depression symptoms, the majority of females were in the age group 50 years and above, whereas males were in the age group 40–49 years. χ2 Tests and multivariate logistic regression analyses indicated that gender and age were statistically significantly related to depression (p<0.001 for all). Conclusions Older Arab women are more likely to develop mood disturbance and depression after being hospitalised with acute cardiac condition. Gender and age differences approach, and routine screening for depression should be conducted with all cardiovascular patients, especially for females in the older age groups. Mental health counselling should be available for all cardiovascular patients who exhibit depressive symptoms. PMID:27388362

  18. Managing distressed and disturbed patients: the thoughts and feelings experienced by Italian nurses.

    PubMed

    Camuccio, C A; Chambers, M; Välimäki, M; Farro, D; Zanotti, R

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study to identify Italian nurses' feelings and emotions towards the management of distressed and disturbed psychiatric patients in acute inpatient settings. Four focus groups were carried out involving 33 nurses from seven acute psychiatric services in a region of Italy. Data were analysed using content analysis. Findings highlight that fear is the prevailing feeling experienced by nurses in the management of distressed patients. This includes both fear of being physically harmed and concerns about doing harm or damage to patients. The unpredictability of aggressive behaviour from unknown patients was described as especially frightening. Known patients, namely those previously admitted to the unit, induced less fear, as their behaviour was considered more predictable. Patients with dual diagnosis were also a worry for many nurses, who considered themselves lacking in the personal relational skills needed to manage an individual in crisis. Nurses reported that they try to understand the reasons for a patient's aggressive behaviour and are empathetic to his or her suffering. When such empathy is lacking, nurses experience conflicting feelings of counter-aggressiveness. The paper concludes by emphasizing the need to increase availability of education related to patient management, in particular team working and its internal relationships. PMID:22296342

  19. Circadian Rhythm Disturbances in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Weldemichael, Dawit A.; Grossberg, George T.

    2010-01-01

    Circadian Rhythm Disturbances (CRDs) affect as many as a quarter of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients during some stage of their illness. Alterations in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and melatonin secretion are the major factors linked with the cause of CRDs. As a result, the normal physiology of sleep, the biological clock, and core body temperature are affected. This paper systematically discusses some of the causative factors, typical symptoms, and treatment options for CRDs in patients with AD. This paper also emphasizes the implementation of behavioral and environmental therapies before embarking on medications to treat CRDs. Pharmacotherapeutic options are summarized to provide symptomatic benefits for the patient and relieve stress on their families and professional care providers. As of today, there are few studies relative to CRDs in AD. Large randomized trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of treatments such as bright light therapy and engaging activities in the reduction of CRDs in AD patients. PMID:20862344

  20. Impacts of camping on vegetation: response and recovery following acute and chronic disturbance.

    PubMed

    Cole, David N; Monz, Christopher A

    2003-12-01

    Experiments with controlled levels of recreational camping were conducted on previously undisturbed sites in two different plant communities in the subalpine zone of the Wind River Mountains, Wyoming, USA. The plant communities were coniferous forest with understory dominated by the low shrub Vaccinium scoparium and a riparian meadow of intermixed grasses and forbs, of which Deschampsia cespitosa was most abundant. Sites were camped on at intensities of either one or four nights per year, for either one (acute disturbance) or three consecutive years (chronic disturbance). Recovery was followed for three years on sites camped on for one year and for one year on sites camped on for three years. Reductions in vegetation cover and vegetation height were much more pronounced on sites in the forest than on sites in the meadow. In both plant communities, increases in vegetation impact were not proportional to increases in either years of camping or nights per year of camping. Close to the center of campsites, near-maximum levels of impact occurred after the first year of camping on forested sites and after the second year on meadow sites. Meadow sites recovered completely within a year, at the camping intensities employed in the experiments. Forest sites, even those camped on for just one night, did not recover completely within three years. Differences between acute and chronic disturbance were not pronounced. PMID:15160895

  1. Acute Cholecystitis in Patients with Scrub Typhus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun; Ji, Misuk; Hwang, Jeong-Hwan; Lee, Ja-Yeon; Lee, Ju-Hyung; Chung, Kyung Min; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2015-11-01

    Acute cholecystitis is a rare complication of scrub typhus. Although a few such cases have been reported in patients with scrub typhus, the clinical course is not well described. Of 12 patients, acute cholecystitis developed in 66.7% (8/12) of patients older than 60 yr. The scrub typhus group with acute cholecystitis had marginal significant longer hospital stay and higher cost than the group without cholecystitis according to propensity score matching. Scrub typhus should be kept in mind as a rare etiology of acute cholecystitis in endemic areas because the typical signs of scrub typhus such as skin rash and eschar can present after the abdominal pain. PMID:26539017

  2. Topical Application of Ketoprofen Improves Gait Disturbance in Rat Models of Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Akane; Matsuda, Akira; Oida, Kumiko; Jung, Kyungsook; Nishikawa, Sho; Jang, Hyosun; Ishizaka, Saori; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Arthritis is a disabling health problem and commonly develops in the late stages of life; the condition is typically accompanied by chronic pain. For the assessment of pain severity and therapeutic effects of analgesic drugs, we recently developed a gait analysis system, which provides an index of pain severity based on walking stride disturbance. Using this system, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in rat models of acute inflammation. We found that the gait analysis system is more sensitive than conventional evaluation methods, such as measurement of swelling or analgesia, which indicated the superiority of our system for drug screening. The approach also indicated that ketoprofen is superior to other NSAIDs for providing pain relief because of its higher skin permeability. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the effectiveness of topical NSAIDs in experimental animal models of acute inflammation. PMID:23991419

  3. Psychological Disturbance and Life Event Differences Among Patients With Low Back Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leavitt, Frank; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Results of this study emphasized the importance of considering psychological disturbance in assessing functional components of low back pain. Psychologically disturbed patients had higher life-event scores regardless of organic pathology. (Author/BEF)

  4. Acute Suicidal Affective Disturbance (ASAD): A confirmatory factor analysis with 1442 psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Ian H; Rufino, Katrina A; Rogers, Megan L; Ellis, Thomas E; Joiner, Thomas E

    2016-09-01

    Acute Suicidal Affective Disturbance (ASAD) is a newly proposed diagnostic entity that characterizes rapid onset suicidal intent. This study aims to confirm the factor structure of ASAD among psychiatric inpatients, and to determine the clinical utility of ASAD in predicting suicide attempt status. Overall, 1442 psychiatric inpatients completed a battery of self-report questionnaires assessing symptoms theorized to comprise the ASAD construct. Utilizing these data, a confirmatory factor analysis with a one-factor solution was performed. Regression analyses were employed to determine if the ASAD construct predicted past suicide attempts, and analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were employed to determine if ASAD symptoms differed by the presence and number of past suicide attempts. The one-factor solution indicated good fit: χ(2)(77) = 309.1, p < 0.001, Tucker-Lewis Index (TLI) = 0.96, comparative fit index (CFI) = 0.97, root-mean-square error of approximation (RMSEA) = 0.05. Controlling for depressive disorders and current symptoms, the ASAD construct significantly predicted the presence of a past suicide attempt. Moreover, ASAD differentiated in the expected directions between individuals with a history of multiple suicide attempts, individuals with a single suicide attempt, and individuals with no history of a suicide attempt. Acute Suicidal Affective Disturbance (ASAD) appears to be a unified construct that predicts suicidal behavior and is distinct from an already-defined mood disorder. PMID:27344228

  5. Acute kidney injury in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Marenzi, Giancarlo; Cosentino, Nicola; Bartorelli, Antonio L

    2015-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly being seen in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs). This condition has a complex pathogenesis, an incidence that can reach 30% and it is associated with higher short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, AKI is still characterised by lack of a single accepted definition, unclear pathophysiology understanding and insensitive diagnostic tools that make its detection difficult, particularly in the setting of ACS. Recent data suggested that patients with AKI during ACS, even those in whom renal function seems to fully recover, face an increased, persisting risk of future AKI and may develop chronic kidney disease. Thus, in these patients, nephrology follow-up, after hospital discharge, and secondary preventive measures should possibly be implemented. In this review, we aim at providing a framework of knowledge to increase cardiologists' awareness of AKI, with the goal of improving the outcome of patients with ACS. PMID:26243789

  6. Request for assistance in preventing vision disturbances and acute physical distress due to dimethylethylamine (DMEA) exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    Methods were sought to reduce exposure to dimethylethylamine (DMEA) among foundry owners, operators, and workers and manufacturers of polyamides, due to possible vision disturbances and acute physical distress which may result. An investigation was made at an aluminum-casting foundry where blurring, fogging, and halo visual disturbances had been reported among workers exposed to DMEA, along with headaches, nausea, stomach pain, and increased heart rate. Medical and environmental studies were made. Exposure concentrations causing effects were measured at equal to or greater than 6 mg/cu m, or 2 parts per million (ppm), 8 hour time-weighted average. Exposures as high as 29 mg/cu m, (9.7 ppm) for 15 minutes also may have caused adverse effects. There was no current permissible exposure limit for DMEA. Leakage around pressure-tight seals in corebox machine gaskets may have accounted for some excessive exposure. It was recommended that more-frequent maintenance of these gaskets be undertaken along with other engineering controls. Work practices should be adjusted so as to reduce the pressure that delivers DMEA to coreboxes and to avoid excess gaseous DMEA in the corebox machine. Protective gloves should be worn. Evacuation plans should be developed in the event of a spill, leak, or other serious accident that may cause high concentrations of DMEA in the workplace.

  7. Approach to the elderly patient with gait disturbance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary The prevalence of gait disturbances and falls increases dramatically with age, but these problems are not universal in the elderly. They should trigger a systematic search for underlying disease states, many of which can be treated medically or surgically, or significantly ameliorated through provision of physical therapy focused on gait training and aids to ambulation, removal of safety hazards in the environment, and the elimination of polypharmacy. While cardiovascular, orthopedic, and rheumatologic diseases account for the majority of gait disturbances in the elderly, the aim here is to outline an approach to the diagnosis and treatment of a broad array of neurologic conditions causing gait disturbance in the elderly. PMID:23634361

  8. Acute handling disturbance modulates plasma insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of acute stressor exposure on proximal (growth hormone; GH) and distal (insulin-like growth factor-I; IGF-I and IGF-binding proteins) components of the somatotropic axis are poorly understood in finfish. We exposed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to a 5-minute handling disturbance to...

  9. Relationship between Eating Disturbance and Dementia Severity in Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Kyoko; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Amano, Koichiro; Tanaka, Hibiki; Fukuhara, Ryuji; Ikeda, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Background Eating is one of the most important daily activities in managing patients with dementia. Although various eating disturbance occur as dementia progresses, to our knowledge, most of the studies focused on a part of eating disturbance such as swallowing and appetite. There have been few comprehensive studies including eating habits and food preference in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The aims of this study were to investigate almost all eating disturbance and to examine the relationship of eating disturbance to dementia stage in AD. Methods A total of 220 patients with AD and 30 normal elderly (NE) subjects were recruited. Eating disturbance was assessed by a comprehensive questionnaire that had been previously validated. Potential relationships between the characteristics of eating disturbance and dementia stage as classified by the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) were assessed. Results Overall, 81.4% of patients with AD showed some eating and swallowing disturbance, whereas only 26.7% of the NE subjects had such a disturbance. Even in an early stage, patients with AD had many types of eating disturbance; “Appetite change” was shown in nearly half of the mild AD patients (49.5%). In the moderate stage, the scores of “change of eating habits and food preference” were highest, and in the severe stage “swallowing disturbance” became critical. Conclusion In AD, the relationship of dementia stage to eating disturbance differs according to the type of eating disturbance. The relationships between various eating disturbance and the severity of dementia should be considered. PMID:26266531

  10. Patient satisfaction after acute admission for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Bø, Beate; Ottesen, Øyvind H; Gjestad, Rolf; Jørgensen, Hugo A; Kroken, Rune A; Løberg, Else-Marie; Johnsen, Erik

    2016-07-01

    Background Measuring patient satisfaction in mental health care potentially provides valuable information, but studies in acutely admitted psychosis patients are scarce. Aims The aims were to assess satisfaction among patients acutely admitted with psychosis, to compare satisfaction in voluntarily versus involuntarily admitted patients, and to assess the influence of symptom load and insight. Methods The UKU Consumer Satisfaction Rating Scale (UKU-ConSat) was used. A total of 104 patients completed the UKU-ConSat at discharge/follow-up (between 6-11 weeks after admittance if not discharged earlier) (mean duration of stay 4 weeks), thus corresponding to the end of the acute treatment phase. Results A total of 88.4% had total scores above zero (satisfied). Only three of the eight single items were statistically significantly different among patients admitted voluntarily versus involuntarily, and only the information item score remained significantly different in adjusted analyses. Insight level at admittance, and an increasing level of insight during the acute phase were positively associated with patient satisfaction, whereas levels and changes in positive and negative psychosis symptoms were indirectly related to satisfaction via this process of insight. Conclusions The vast majority of the acutely admitted patients were satisfied with treatment. There were few differences between the involuntarily and voluntarily admitted patient groups, except that the involuntary care group was clearly less satisfied with the information provided. Poor insight had a major negative impact on treatment satisfaction in psychosis. The provision of sufficient and adequate information is an important target for mental health care service improvement. PMID:26750532

  11. Physiologic imaging in acute stroke: Patient selection

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Clinton D; Stephens, Marcus; Zuckerman, Scott L; Waitara, Magarya S; Morone, Peter J; Dewan, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of acute stroke is changing, as endovascular intervention becomes an important adjunct to tissue plasminogen activator. An increasing number of sophisticated physiologic imaging techniques have unique advantages and applications in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment-decision making of acute ischemic stroke. In this review, we first highlight the strengths, weaknesses, and possible indications for various stroke imaging techniques. How acute imaging findings in each modality have been used to predict functional outcome is discussed. Furthermore, there is an increasing emphasis on using these state-of-the-art imaging modalities to offer maximal patient benefit through IV therapy, endovascular thrombolytics, and clot retrieval. We review the burgeoning literature in the determination of stroke treatment based on acute, physiologic imaging findings. PMID:26063695

  12. Acute respiratory failure in scrub typhus patients

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Jyoti Narayan; Gurjar, Mohan; Harde, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure is a serious complication of scrub typhus. In this prospective study, all patients with a diagnosis of scrub typhus were included from a single center Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory, and imaging parameters of these patients at the time of ICU admission were compared. Of the 55 scrub typhus patients, 27 (49%) had an acute respiratory failure. Seventeen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome, and ten had cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Respiratory supported patients were older had significant chronic lungs disease and high severity illness scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score). At ICU admission, these patients presented with more deranged laboratory markers, including high bilirubin, high creatine kinase, high lactate, metabolic acidosis, low serum albumin, and presence of ascites. The average ICU and hospital stay were 4.27 ± 2.74 and 6.53 ± 3.52 days, respectively, in the respiratory supported group. Three patients died in respiratory failure group, while only one patient died in nonrespiratory failure group.

  13. Body-Image Disturbance: A Comparative Study among Haemodialysis and Kidney Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghian, Jaleh; Seyedfatemi, Naeimeh; Rafiei, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Introduction As a chronic disease, End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) changes the patients’ body and affects their body image negatively. Although the changes in body image are expected in all types of renal replacement therapies, different renal replacement therapy methods could represent different levels of impact on body image. Aim Present study was conducted to examine and compare the level of body-image disturbance between haemodialysis and kidney transplant patients. Materials and Methods This descriptive study was conducted in two teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Using convenient sampling, 84 patients (42 patients under haemodialysis and 42 patients with transplant) were invited to participate in the study. A self-designed questionnaire was developed to examine the level of body-image disturbance. Results Out of 42 haemodialysis patients, 64.3%, 19% and 16.7% of patients reported low, moderate and high level of body-image disturbance respectively. The mean score of body-image disturbance was 21.1±18.3(rang=1–71) in haemodialysis patients. Of 42 transplant patients, 69%, 26.2% and 4.8% reported low, moderate and high level of body-image disturbance respectively. The mean score of body-image disturbance was 17.1±13.3 (rang=1–48). According to the results of independent t-test, difference between mean score of body-image disturbance in two groups was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusion The findings of the present study showed that both haemodialysis and renal transplant patients experienced some levels of body-image disturbance. This problem was more prevalent among haemodialysis patients as compared to kidney transplant ones. We recommend more studies may be conducted in this regard. PMID:27437264

  14. New Insights Found in Pain Processing and Sleep Disturbance Among Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical) New Insights Found in Pain Processing and Sleep Disturbance Among Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients People with rheumatoid ... in the journal Arthritis and Rheumatism. In addition, sleep disruptions, which are common among people with RA, ...

  15. Ventricular enlargement due to acute hypernatremia in a patient with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

    PubMed

    Andres, Robert H; Pendharkar, Arjun V; Kuhlen, Dominique; Mariani, Luigi

    2010-07-01

    Patients requiring CSF shunts frequently have comorbidities that can influence water and electrolyte balances. The authors report on a case involving a ventriculoperitoneal shunt in a patient who underwent intravenous hyperhydration and withdrawal of vasopressin substitution prior to scheduled high-dose chemotherapy regimen for a metastatic suprasellar germinoma. After acute neurological deterioration, the patient underwent CT scanning that demonstrated ventriculomegaly. A shunt tap revealed no flow and negative opening pressure. Due to suspicion of proximal shunt malfunction, the comatose patient underwent immediate surgical exploration of the ventricle catheter, which was found to be patent. However, acute severe hypernatremia was diagnosed during the procedure. After correction of the electrolyte disturbances, the patient regained consciousness and made a good recovery. Although rare, the effects of acute severe hypernatremia on brain volume and ventricular size should be considered in the differential diagnosis of ventriculoperitoneal shunt failure. PMID:19911884

  16. Acute Kidney Injury in Patients with Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Kirk B.; Stevens, Todd M; Singal, Ashwani K.

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs commonly in patients with advanced cirrhosis and negatively impacts pre- and post-transplant outcomes. Physiologic changes that occur in patients with decompensated cirrhosis with ascites, place these patients at high risk of AKI. The most common causes of AKI in cirrhosis include prerenal injury, acute tubular necrosis (ATN), and the hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), accounting for more than 80% of AKI in this population. Distinguishing between these causes is particularly important for prognostication and treatment. Treatment of Type 1 HRS with vasoconstrictors and albumin improves short term survival and renal function in some patients while awaiting liver transplantation. Patients with HRS who fail to respond to medical therapy or those with severe renal failure of other etiology may require renal replacement therapy. Simultaneous liver kidney transplant (SLK) is needed in many of these patients to improve their post-transplant outcomes. However, the criteria to select patients who would benefit from SLK transplantation are based on consensus and lack strong evidence to support them. In this regard, novel serum and/or urinary biomarkers such as neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, interleukins-6 and 18, kidney injury molecule-1, fatty acid binding protein, and endothelin-1 are emerging with a potential for accurately differentiating common causes of AKI. Prospective studies are needed on the use of these biomarkers to predict accurately renal function recovery after liver transplantation alone in order to optimize personalized use of SLK. PMID:26623266

  17. Cerebral perfusion and neuropsychological follow up in mild traumatic brain injury: acute versus chronic disturbances?

    PubMed

    Metting, Zwany; Spikman, Jacoba M; Rödiger, Lars A; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2014-04-01

    In a subgroup of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) residual symptoms, interfering with outcome and return to work, are found. With neuropsychological assessment cognitive deficits can be demonstrated although the pathological underpinnings of these cognitive deficits are not fully understood. As the admission computed tomography (CT) often is normal, perfusion CT imaging may be a useful indicator of brain dysfunction in the acute phase after injury in these patients. In the present study, directly after admission perfusion CT imaging was performed in mild TBI patients with follow-up neuropsychological assessment in those with complaints and a normal non-contrast CT. Neuropsychological tests comprised the 15 Words test Immediate Recall, Trailmaking test part B, Zoo Map test and the FEEST, which were dichotomized into normal and abnormal. Perfusion CT results of patients with normal neuropsychological test scores were compared to those with abnormal test scores. In total eighteen patients were included. Those with an abnormal score on the Zoo Map test had a significant lower CBV in the right frontal and the bilateral parieto-temporal white matter. Patients with an abnormal score on the FEEST had a significant higher MTT in the bilateral frontal white matter and a significant decreased CBF in the left parieto-temporal grey matter. No significant relation between the perfusion CT parameters and the 15 Words test and the Trailmaking test part B was present. In conclusion, impairments in executive functioning and emotion perception assessed with neuropsychological tests during follow up were related to differences in cerebral perfusion at admission in mild TBI. The pathophysiological concept of these findings is discussed. PMID:24556319

  18. Acute lower gastrointestinal hemorrhages in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Antonio; Montoya, Mariano J; Rodríguez, José Manuel; Serrano, Andrés; Molina, Joaquín; Parrilla, Pascual

    2005-05-01

    Age is a risk factor in acute lower gastrointestinal hemorrhages (LGIH). The objectives here were to analyze: (1) diagnostic and therapeutic handling, (2) related morbidity and mortality, (3) the indications for surgery, and (4) the evolution of acute LGIH in patients > or =80 years. Forty-three patients >80 years with acute LGIH were reviewed retrospectively. In 86% (n = 37) related comorbidities were found, in 9% (n = 4) there had been prior colorectal surgery, 19% (n = 8) were antiaggregated, and 7% (n = 3) were anticoagulated. One hundred thirty-two cases of acute LGIH in patients <80 years were used as a control group. Student's t test and the chi-square test were applied. On arrival at the emergency ward 11 cases (26%) had hemodynamic instability and 8 of these were stabilized using conservative measures. In 39 cases an endoscopy was performed, allowing for an etiological diagnosis in 59% (n = 23) of cases, above all in those carried out in an urgent or semiurgent way. The arteriography permitted an etiological diagnosis in two of the four cases in which it was carried out. In seven patients (16%) urgent surgery was indicated: three were hemorrhoidectomies, three were subtotal colectomies, and one was a resection of the small intestine. The morbidity rate was 10% (n = 4) in the patients who were not treated and 14% (n = 1) in those treated, with a mortality rate of 8% (n = 3) and 14% (n = 1), respectively. The rate of relapse of bleeding after discharge from hospital was 42% (n = 18), with nine of these needing to be readmitted into hospital. In comparison with the control group, they present a different bleeding etiology (diverticulosis as opposed to the benign anal-rectal and small intestinal pathology in the younger population; P = 0.017), surgery is indicated with less frequency (9 versus 33%; P = 0.007), and there is a higher relapse rate (42 versus 26%; P = 0.045). Acute LGIH in geriatric patients relents in most cases with the use of conservative

  19. Diabetes and glucose disturbances in patients with psychosis in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Eric; Westman, Jeanette; Sudic Hukic, Dzana; Eriksson, Sven V; Edman, Gunnar; Bodén, Robert; Jedenius, Erik; Reutfors, Johan; Berntsson, Anders; Hilding, Agneta; Schalling, Martin; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Ösby, Urban

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to (1) analyze the prevalence of diabetes, prediabetes, and antidiabetic medication in patients with psychosis compared with control subjects and (2) determine what factors in patients with psychosis were associated with antidiabetic medication. Method We studied 977 patients with psychosis recruited from outpatient clinics in Stockholm County, Sweden, and they were compared with 3908 non-psychotic control subjects for fasting plasma glucose levels; prevalence of diabetes, prediabetes, antidiabetic treatment, and tobacco use; and blood pressure, weight, height, and waist circumference. Group differences were evaluated with analysis of variance and χ2 test, and factors associated with antidiabetic treatment were evaluated with logistic regression. Results Diabetes was observed in 94 (10%) patients with psychosis, 2.7 times the prevalence observed in control subjects. Among patients with psychosis, 87 (10%) had prediabetes (fasting glucose, 6.1–6.9 mmol/L) compared with 149 (3.8%) control subjects. Most patients with psychosis (77%) who had prediabetes fulfilled criteria for metabolic syndrome. In patients with psychosis, both lipid-lowering medication and fasting glucose were significantly associated with antidiabetic treatment. There was no significant relation between antidiabetic treatment and lifestyle factors such as smoking or degree of psychiatric illness. Conclusions The high prevalence of impaired fasting glucose and metabolic syndrome in patients with psychosis warrants further clinical research in preventing or delaying the onset of diabetes in these patients by pharmacotherapy and/or lifestyle intervention. PMID:26468398

  20. Prehospital care of the acute stroke patient.

    PubMed

    Rajajee, Venkatakrishna; Saver, Jeffrey

    2005-06-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) is the first medical contact for most acute stroke patients, thereby playing a pivotal role in the identification and treatment of acute cerebrovascular brain injury. The benefit of thrombolysis and interventional therapies for acute ischemic stroke is highly time dependent, making rapid and effective EMS response of critical importance. In addition, the general public has suboptimal knowledge about stroke warning signs and the importance of activating the EMS system. In the past, the ability of EMS dispatchers to recognize stroke calls has been documented to be poor. Reliable stroke identification in the field enables appropriate treatment to be initiated in the field and potentially inappropriate treatment avoided; the receiving hospital to be prenotified of a stroke patient's imminent arrival, rapid transport to be initiated; and stroke patients to be diverted to stroke-capable receiving hospitals. In this article we discuss research studies and educational programs aimed at improving stroke recognition by EMS dispatchers, prehospital personnel, and emergency department (ED) physicians and how this has impacted stroke treatment. In addition public educational programs and importance of community awareness of stroke symptoms will be discussed. For example, general public's utilization of 911 system for stroke victims has been limited in the past. However, it has been repeatedly shown that utilization of the 911 system is associated with accelerated arrival times to the ED, crucial to timely treatment of stroke patients. Finally, improved stroke recognition in the field has led investigators to study in the field treatment of stroke patients with neuroprotective agents. The potential impact of this on future of stroke treatment will be discussed. PMID:16194754

  1. Assessment of hemodynamic disturbances in aphasic patients by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Pendefunda, L

    1989-01-01

    The author presents a study of Doppler cerebrovascular ultrasonography carried out in 38 aphasie patients (forms ranging from transient speech disturbances to severe, persistent disturbances of motor, sensory or mixed aphasia) after ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. In these cases, the clinical symptoms were dominated by speech impairment and neurological deficits (mainly pyramidal), of low intensity or transient. The angiographic study revealed stenotic or occlusive disturbances at various levels of the cerebral arterial trunks. The prevalence of some clinical aspects of aphasia correlated with Doppler velocimetric images is discussed and the use of transcranial Doppler method in idiopathic aphasia, possible consequence of a transient ischemic attack, is suggested. PMID:2479971

  2. Sleeping on a problem: the impact of sleep disturbance on intensive care patients - a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Lori J; Van Haren, Frank; Lopez, Violeta

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is commonly encountered amongst intensive care patients and has significant psychophysiological effects, which protract recovery and increases mortality. Bio-physiological monitoring of intensive care patients reveal alterations in sleep architecture, with reduced sleep quality and continuity. The etiological causes of sleep disturbance are considered to be multifactorial, although environmental stressors namely, noise, light and clinical care interactions have been frequently cited in both subjective and objective studies. As a result, interventions are targeted towards modifiable factors to ameliorate their impact. This paper reviews normal sleep physiology and the impact that sleep disturbance has on patient psychophysiological recovery, and the contribution that the clinical environment has on intensive care patients' sleep. PMID:25852963

  3. A case of recurrent arrhythmia in an acute pancreatitis patient--pathophysiological explanation using shortage of 'repolarization reserve'.

    PubMed

    Uvelin, Arsen; Hajduković, Danica; Vrsajkov, Vladimir; Kolak, Radmila; Lazukić, Aleksandra; Vicković, Sanja; Gojković, Zoran

    2013-12-01

    We report a case of a patient with acute pancreatitis who developed serious heart rhythm abnormalities on three occasions, two of which were associated with administration of the first generation antihistamine chloropyramine, and the third one with hypomagnesemia and hypokalemia. Dysrhythmic events consisted of bigeminy, multifocal ventricular extrasystoles and torsades de pointes-like ventricular tachycardia. Electrocardiographic changes in acute pancreatitis in the absence of previous heart disease can occur in more than half of the cases. Antihistamines are medications that are known to produce heart rhythm disturbances, especially the second generation drugs astemizole and terfenadine. This is the first report of chloropyramine causing dysrhythmia. It seems that acute pancreatitis patients are especially prone to heart dysrhythmia caused by different factors such as electrolyte disturbances and pronounced vagal tone. Acute pancreatitis may be added to the list of risk factors with altered 'repolarization reserve', predisposing to drug-induced QT interval prolongation and possible torsades de pointes occurrence. PMID:24697004

  4. Acute myocardial infarction in the obstetric patient

    PubMed Central

    Firoz, Tabassum; Magee, Laura A

    2012-01-01

    Acute myocardial infraction (AMI) in the obstetric patient is a rare event, although the incidence is rising due to advancing maternal age and pre-existing cardiac risk factors and medical co-morbidities. While atherosclerotic disease is the leading cause of AMI, coronary artery dissection is an important consideration in pregnancy and in the postpartum period. The physiological changes of pregnancy as well as pregnancy-specific risk factors can predispose the obstetric patient to AMI. Diagnosis of AMI can be challenging as symptoms may be atypical. Furthermore, diagnostic tests must be interpreted in the context of pregnancy. While the overall management of the obstetric patient with AMI is similar to that outside of pregnancy, drug therapy requires modification as some medications may be contraindicated in pregnancy and breastfeeding. There is limited information about prognosis and risk stratification but it is anticipated that future studies will address this issue.

  5. GASTRIC MOTOR DISTURBANCES IN PATIENTS WITH IDIOPATHIC RAPID GASTRIC EMPTYING

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Manduca, Armando; Lake, David S.; Fidler, Jeff; Edwards, Phillip; Grimm, Roger C.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Riederer, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The mechanisms of “idiopathic” rapid gastric emptying, which is associated with functional dyspepsia and functional diarrhea, are not understood. Our hypotheses were that increased gastric motility and reduced postprandial gastric accommodation contribute to rapid gastric emptying. Methods Fasting and postprandial (300kCal nutrient meal) gastric volumes were measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 20 healthy people and 17 with functional dyspepsia; 7 had normal and 10 had rapid gastric emptying. In 17 healthy people and patients, contractility was analyzed by spectral analysis of a time-series of gastric cross-sectional areas. Logistic regression models analyzed whether contractile parameters, fasting volume, and postprandial volume change could discriminate between health and patients with normal or rapid gastric emptying. Results While upper gastrointestinal symptoms were comparable, patients with rapid emptying had a higher (p = 0.002) body mass index (BMI) than normal gastric emptying. MRI visualized propagating contractions at ~ 3 cpm in healthy people and patients. Compared to controls (0.16 ± 0.02, Mean ± SEM), the amplitude of gastric contractions in the entire stomach was higher (OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.2–14.0) in patients with rapid (0.24 ± 0.03) but not normal gastric emptying (0.10 ± 0.03). Similar differences were observed in the distal stomach. However, the propagation velocity, fasting gastric volume, and the postprandial volume change were not significantly different between patients and controls. Conclusions MRI provides a noninvasive and refined assessment of gastric volumes and contractility in humans. Increased gastric contractility may contribute to rapid gastric emptying in functional dyspepsia. PMID:21470342

  6. Acute Kidney Injury in the Surgical Patient.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Charles; Singhania, Girish; Bihorac, Azra

    2015-10-01

    Perioperative acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common, morbid, and costly surgical complication. Current efforts to understand and manage AKI in surgical patients focus on prevention, mitigation of further injury when AKI has occurred, treatment of associated conditions, and facilitation of renal recovery. Lesser severity AKI is now understood to be much more common, and more morbid, than was previously thought. The ability to detect AKI within hours of onset would be helpful in protecting the kidney and in preserving renal function, and several imaging and biomarker modalities are currently being evaluated. PMID:26410139

  7. Diagnostic imaging of the acutely injured patient

    SciTech Connect

    Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides an analysis of pathophysiologic concepts of trauma and reviews the effectiveness of the available imaging modalities in acute trauma of various organ system. Topics covered are chest injuries; abdominal trauma; fractures of long bones; the foot and ankle; the knee; hand and wrist; the elbow; the shoulder; the pelvis hips; the spine; the skull and facial trauma and the clinical assessment of multiple injuries patients. Comparative evaluation of diagnostic techniques of radiography is discussed. Normal anatomy and bone fractures along with soft-tissue injuries are described.

  8. Acute myeloid leukemia in the older patient.

    PubMed

    Godwin, John E; Smith, Scott E

    2003-10-15

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an extremely heterogeneous disorder. The biology of AML is incompletely understood, but much data indicates that older patients have a more biologically diverse and chemotherapy resistant form of AML that is quite different from that seen in the younger patients. Approximately 60% of AML cases are in patients greater than 60 years of age, so the predominant burden is in older patients. This problem will be magnified in the future, because the US population is both growing and aging. When one examines the treatment outcomes of older AML patients over the last three decades, there is little progress in long-term survival. Nine major published randomized placebo controlled trials of myeloid growth factors given during induction for AML have been conducted. All of these trials with one exception demonstrated no significant impact on the clinical outcomes of complete response (CR) rate, disease-free, and overall survival. However, the duration of neutropenia was consistently and uniformly reduced by the use of growth factor in all nine of these trials. Because of the favorable impact of the colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) on resource use, antibiotic days, hospital days, etc., it can be more economical and beneficial to use CSFs in AML than to withhold use. The overall dismal outlook for the older AML patient can only be altered by clinical trials with new therapeutic agents. New cellular and molecularly targeted agents are entering clinical trials and bring hope for progress to this area of cancer therapy. PMID:14563517

  9. [PREVALENCE OF ATRIAL RHYTHM DISTURBANCES IN CARDIAC PATIENTS WITH COMORBIDITIES].

    PubMed

    Velichko, V L; Naychuk, O V; Lagoda, D O; Amirova, G U

    2015-01-01

    Atrial arrhythmias are the most common among all cardiac arrhythmias. The prevalence of atrial arrhythmias is increasing worldwide and has an impact on health indicators such as the loss of ability to work and mortality and increases the overall cardiovascular risk and/or heart disease occurence. This study indicates a high prevalence of atrial arthythmias in patients with ischemic heart disease and requires more detailed study in order to develop methods of preventing the onset of cardiac rhythm disorders. PMID:26118041

  10. [Positioning of patients with acute respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Bein, T

    2012-11-01

    The collapse of lung tissue, edema and intrapulmonary shunt are the main symptoms in patients with acute respiratory insufficiency. The techniques of ventilation in a prone position and continuous lateral rotational therapy (CLRT) are based on these pathophysiological changes. Ventilation in a prone position was found to improve ventilation and perfusion relationships and reduction in the pleural pressure gradient. In hypoxemic lung failure (PaO(2)/FIO(2) <100) a prone position was found to improve oxygenation as a rescue measure and to improve survival. In contrast CLRT is considered to be an early therapeutic or prophylactic measure aimed at prevention of ventilation-associated complications. In trauma patients these beneficial effects were demonstrated in several studies. Positioning therapy can be accompanied by potentially serious complications (e.g. face and skin ulceration, accidental loss of tubes and catheters and cardiac arrhythmias) and its use requires routine management and exact knowledge of indications and risks. PMID:23086293

  11. Neuroendoscopic Removal of Acute Subdural Hematoma with Contusion: Advantages for Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Ryota; Kuroshima, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Background. Large craniotomy for acute subdural hematoma is sometimes too invasive. We report good outcomes for two cases of neuroendoscopic evacuation of hematoma and contusion by 1 burr hole surgery. Case Presentation. Both patients arrived by ambulance at our hospital with disturbed consciousness after falling. Case 1 was an 81-year-old man who took antiplatelet drugs for brain infarction. Case 2 was a 73-year-old alcoholic woman. CT scanning showed acute subdural hematoma and frontal contusion in both cases. In the acute stage, glycerol was administered to reduce edema; CTs after 48 and 72 hours showed an increase of subdural hematoma and massive contusion of the frontal lobe. Disturbed consciousness steadily deteriorated. The subdural hematoma and contusion were removed as soon as possible by neuroendoscopy under local anesthesia, because neither patient was a good candidate for large craniotomy considering age and past history. 40%~70% of the hematoma was removed, and the consciousness level improved. Conclusion. Neuroendoscopic removal of acute subdural hematoma and contusion has advantages and disadvantages. For patients with underlying medical issues or other risk factors, it is likely to be effective. PMID:26981295

  12. Post-Cataract Surgery Visual Disturbance in a Retinitis Pigmentosa Patient with Asteroid Hyalosis

    PubMed Central

    Jingami, Yoko; Otani, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroshi; Makiyama, Yukiko; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2011-01-01

    A patient with retinitis pigmentosa showed visual disturbances following successful cataract surgery. He had a dense asteroid hyalosis in the eye before cataract surgery. After the surgery he noticed that his vision became worse. The visual disturbance was explained as being caused by the progression of retinal degeneration. Although the electroretinogram was non-recordable, the degeneration of macular area appeared relatively small. We considered that dense asteroid hyalosis was responsible for his visual disturbances, and pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) was performed to remove the asteroid hyalosis. After the PPV, rapid improvement of his visual acuity was observed. Cataract surgery may affect the status of asteroid hyalosis and cause rapid visual loss. PPV should be considered for retinitis pigmentosa patients with dense asteroid hyalosis, especially when a large decrease in visual acuity is noted shortly after cataract surgery. PMID:21941506

  13. Pulmonary embolism and acute cytomegalovirus infection in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Del Borgo, Cosmo; Gianfreda, Romina; Belvisi, Valeria; Citton, Rita; Soscia, Fabrizio; Notarianni, Ermanno; Tieghi, Tiziana; Mastroianni, Claudio Maria

    2010-12-01

    A case of an immunocompetent man with acute CMV infection associated with a pulmonary embolism is described. Acute CMV infection could be a risk factor for developing thromboembolism. Pulmonary embolism should be included in differential diagnosis in patients with acute CMV infections and pulmonary opacities. PMID:21196823

  14. S1P prophylaxis mitigates acute hypobaric hypoxia-induced molecular, biochemical, and metabolic disturbances: A preclinical report.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Sonam; Rahar, Babita; Saxena, Shweta

    2016-05-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is emerging to have hypoxic preconditioning potential in various preclinical studies. The study aims to evaluate the preclinical preconditioning efficacy of exogenously administered S1P against acute hypobaric hypoxia (HH)-induced pathological disturbances. Male Sprague Dawley rats (200 ± 20 g) were preconditioned with 1, 10, and 100 μg/kg body weight (b.w.) S1P (i.v.) for three consecutive days. On the third day, S1P preconditioned animals, along with hypoxia control animals, were exposed to HH equivalent to 7,620 m (280 mm Hg) for 6 h. Postexposure status of cardiac energy production, circulatory vasoactive mediators, pulmonary and cerebral oxidative damage, and inflammation were assessed. HH exposure led to cardiac energy deficit indicated by low ATP levels and pronounced AMPK activation levels, raised circulatory levels of brain natriuretic peptide and endothelin-1 with respect to total nitrate (NOx), redox imbalance, inflammation, and alterations in NOx levels in the pulmonary and cerebral tissues. These pathological precursors have been routinely reported to be coincident with high-altitude diseases. Preconditioning with S1P, especially 1 µg/kg b.w. dose, was seen to reverse the manifestation of these pathological disturbances. The protective efficacy could be attributed, at least in part, to enhanced activity of cardioprotective protein kinase C and activation of small GTPase Rac1, which led to further induction of hypoxia-adaptive molecular mediators: hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and Hsp70. This is a first such report, to the best of our knowledge, elucidating the mechanism of exogenous S1P-mediated HIF-1α/Hsp70 induction. Conclusively, systemic preconditioning with 1 μg/kg b.w. S1P in rats protects against acute HH-induced pathological disturbances. © 2016 IUBMB Life 68(5):365-375, 2016. PMID:26959531

  15. Managing patients with acute urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, Shanggar; Gillatt, David

    2011-04-01

    Acute urinary retention (AUR) is more than ten times more common in men than women. In men it tends to occur in the elderly; the risk of AUR is higher in men > 70 years. The causes in men can be divided into precipitated or occurring spontaneously. These can be further divided according to the mechanism i.e. obstructive, neurological and myogenic. Spontaneous AUR, caused by progression of BPH leading to a mechanical obstruction of the bladder outlet, is the most common cause of AUR. The typical presentation of AUR is a patient complaining of a sudden inability to urinate associated with progressive abdominal distension which is usually painful. The pain increases in intensity with increasing distension of the bladder. An abdominal examination should reveal a distended bladder which can be confirmed by a dull percussion note. A digital rectal examination is vital to gain information on prostatic enlargement (benign or malignant), faecal load in rectum, anal tone and presence of other masses. Urinalysis and culture should be carried out on a sample obtained after catheterisation to rule out infection. Renal function should be assessed to see if there has been damage to the upper tracts. It is better not to perform a PSA test in this situation as it will invariably be raised due to distension of the bladder and catheter insertion. If catheter insertion fails then a urological consultation is required for insertion of a suprapubic catheter. Admission is essential if the patient is: unwell with urosepsis; has abnormal renal function needing investigation and fluid monitoring; has acute neurological problems; or cannot take care of the catheter. Trial without catheter needs to be planned and the ideal time to do this is within 2-3 days so that the patient can pass urine naturally. PMID:21789984

  16. Relationship between sleep disturbance and recovery in patients with borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Plante, David T.; Frankenburg, Frances R.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Zanarini, Mary C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) frequently experience sleep disturbance, however, the role of sleep quality in the course of BPD is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cross-sectional association between sleep quality and recovery status (symptomatic remission plus good concurrent psychosocial functioning) in a well-characterized cohort of patients with BPD to examine the role of sleep disturbance in the course of the disorder. Methods 223 patients with BPD participating in the McLean Study of Adult Development (MSAD) were administered the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) as part of the 16-year follow-up wave. Sleep quality was compared between recovered (n=105) and non-recovered (n=118) BPD participants, including adjustment for age, sex, depression, anxiety, and primary sleep disorders. Results Non-recovered BPD patients had significantly worse sleep quality than recovered BPD participants as measured by the global PSQI score (adjusted means 12.01 vs. 10.73, p=0.03). In addition, non-recovered BPD participants had longer sleep onset latency (adjusted means 39.20 vs. 28.11 minutes, p=0.04), as well as increased odds of using sleeping medication (adjusted OR 1.49, p=0.009) and experiencing daytime dysfunction as a result of their sleep disturbance (adjusted OR 1.48, p=0.008). Conclusion These results demonstrate an association between subjective sleep disturbance and recovery status among BPD patients. Further research is indicated to evaluate the mechanisms underlying sleep disturbance in BPD, and whether treatment of sleep complaints improves the symptomatic and psychosocial course of the disorder. PMID:23497827

  17. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    AlSibai, Ahmad; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2016-07-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction. PMID:27366297

  18. Assessing and Treating the Patient with Acute Psychotic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Lisa; Clough, Rebecca

    2016-06-01

    Patients with acute psychosis often present to emergency departments. Management of acute agitation and psychosis can be a challenge for the staff. Medical stabilization, appropriate assessment, and diagnosis are important. Verbal de-escalation and other psychosocial interventions are helpful in creating a safe and therapeutic environment. Psychiatric and emergency room nurses are poised to treat patients presenting with acute psychosis and must be knowledgeable of evidence-based approaches to treat these complex disorders. PMID:27229275

  19. Sleep disturbances in Parkinson’s disease patients and management options

    PubMed Central

    Claassen, Daniel O; Kutscher, Scott J

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are among the most common nonmotor complaints of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), and can have a great impact on quality of life. These disturbances manifest in a variety of ways; for instance, insomnia, sleep fragmentation, and excessive daytime sleepiness. Sleep-related movement disorders such as restless legs syndrome and periodic leg movements may share a common pathophysiology, and occurrence of rapid eye movement behavior disorder may predate the onset of PD or other synucleinopathies by several years. Medications for PD can have a significant impact on sleep, representing a great challenge to the treating physician. Awareness of the complex relationship between PD and sleep disorders, as well as the varied way in which sleep disturbances appear, is imperative for successful long-term management. PMID:23616723

  20. Depression and sleep disturbances in patients with multiple sclerosis and correlation with associated fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Karthik; Taly, Arun B.; Gupta, Anupama; Prasad, Chandrajit; Christopher, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To observe prevalence of depression and sleep disturbances in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and their correlation with associated fatigue. Study Design and Setting: Prospective observation study in a university tertiary research hospital in India. Materials and Methods: Thirty-one patients (6 male and 25 female) with definite MS (McDonald's criteria) presented in out-patient/admitted in the department of neurology (between February 2010 and December 2011) were included in the study. Depression was assessed using Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI). Sleep quality was assessed using Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Disease severity was evaluated using the Kurtzke's expanded disability status scale (EDSS). Fatigue was assessed using Krupp's fatigue severity scale (FSS). We tried to observe correlation of depression and sleep disturbance with associated fatigue in MS patients. Results: The age of patients varied between 16 and 50 years (30.1 ± 9.1). The mean age at first symptom was 25.2 ± 6.4 years (range 14-39 years). The prevalence of sleep disturbance and depression was 51.6% (16/31) each and fatigue 58.1% (18/31) in the study group. The PSQI scores were significantly greater in the patients with fatigue as compared with those without fatigue indicating poorer sleep quality is associated with fatigue in MS (P = 0.005). The BDI scores were also significantly higher in the fatigue group showing that severity of depression also strongly correlated with fatigue (P = 0.001). Conclusions: Depression and sleep disturbance in patients with MS is significantly correlated with associated fatigue. PMID:24347942

  1. Sleep disturbance and cognitive disorder: epidemiological analysis in a cohort of 263 patients.

    PubMed

    Pistacchi, Michele; Gioulis, Manuela; Contin, Franco; Sanson, Flavio; Marsala, Sandro Zambito

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and describe frequency and characteristics of sleep disorders in a large cohort of community dwelling persons with several degrees and typologies of cognitive disorders. 236 patients (78 men and 158 women) were enrolled with different subtypes of dementia: Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular dementia (VaD), mixed dementia, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), respectively. The sleep disturbances evaluated were: insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), REM behavior disorder (RBD), restless legs syndrome (RLS), and nightmares. Every type of sleep disorder was present in each type of dementia but with significant differences. Insomnia is found to be more present and specific for AD; EDS was associated with the presence of dementia in the elderly with LBD or PDD; RLS and nightmares that were recognized mainly in FTD, LBD, and PDD patients scores; patients with MCI had a frequency of sleep disturbances of any type equal to that of patients with AD presenting mostly insomnia, nightmares or RLS more frequently; nightmares were more frequent among LBD and PDD patients. Frequency of RDB was more frequent in FTD, AD, and VaD. Our findings demonstrate that sleep disturbance was related to dementia. A careful clinical evaluation of sleep disorders should be performed routinely in the clinical setting of persons with cognitive decline. PMID:25034185

  2. Acute Hypoxic Test in Patients with Prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Shatylo, Valerii B; Serebrovska, Tatiana V; Gavalko, Anna V; Egorov, Egor; Korkushko, Oleg V

    2016-06-01

    Shatylo, Valerii B., Tetiana V. Serebrovska, Anna V. Gavalko, Egor Egorov, and Oleg V. Korkushko. Acute hypoxic test in patients with prediabetes. High Alt Med Biol. 17:101-107, 2016.-Prediabetes is a state of impaired carbohydrate metabolism when not all of the symptoms required to label a person as diabetic are present, but blood glucose is higher than in healthy subjects. Recent evidence suggests that intermittent hypoxia training (IHT) might provide a cost-effective strategy for improving metabolic functioning. One of the most important aspects of the successful IHT application is individualized approach to hypoxic dose and regimen prescription. To establish the relationships between indices of carbohydrate metabolism and individual resistance to hypoxia, the acute hypoxic test (AHT, breathing gas mixture with 12% O2 during 20 minutes) was performed in 33 healthy volunteers (mean age, 63.0, range, 44-76; fasting plasma glucose (FPG) less than 5.6 mmol/L and 2 hours postoral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) glycemia less than 7.8 mmol/L) and 30 patients with impaired glucose metabolism (mean age, 65.5, range, 44-75; FPG from 5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L and 2 hours post-OGTT glycemia from 7.8 to 11 mmol/L). Negative correlation was found between the SaO2 level at 20th minute AHT and FPG (r = -0.83; p < 0.01) and insulin (r = -0.27; p < 0.05), as well as 2 hours post-OGTT glucose and insulin levels (r = -0.75 and -0.40, respectively). Longer recovery time and less effective functioning of respiratory and cardiovascular systems were also registered in patients with prediabetes showing that their cardiovascular resilience is impaired compared to normoglycemic controls. These patterns of relationship must be considered when assigning the individual modes of IHT. PMID:27213550

  3. Neurologic Disorders in Immunocompetent Patients with Autochthonous Acute Hepatitis E

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, H. Blasco; Cintas, P.; Abravanel, F.; Gérolami, R.; d'Alteroche, L.; Raynal, J.-N.; Alric, L.; Dupuis, E.; Prudhomme, L.; Vaucher, E.; Couzigou, P.; Liversain, J.-M.; Bureau, C.; Vinel, J.-P.; Kamar, N.; Izopet, J.

    2015-01-01

    Neurologic disorders, mainly Guillain-Barré syndrome and Parsonage–Turner syndrome (PTS), have been described in patients with hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in industrialized and developing countries. We report a wider range of neurologic disorders in nonimmunocompromised patients with acute HEV infection. Data from 15 French immunocompetent patients with acute HEV infection and neurologic disorders were retrospectively recorded from January 2006 through June 2013. The disorders could be divided into 4 main entities: mononeuritis multiplex, PTS, meningoradiculitis, and acute demyelinating neuropathy. HEV infection was treated with ribavirin in 3 patients (for PTS or mononeuritis multiplex). One patient was treated with corticosteroids (for mononeuropathy multiplex), and 5 others received intravenous immunoglobulin (for PTS, meningoradiculitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, or Miller Fisher syndrome). We conclude that pleiotropic neurologic disorders are seen in HEV-infected immunocompetent patients. Patients with acute neurologic manifestations and aminotransferase abnormalities should be screened for HEV infection. PMID:26490255

  4. Emergency pulpotomy in relieving acute dental pain among Tanzanian patients

    PubMed Central

    Nyerere, Joachim W; Matee, Mecky I; Simon, Elison NM

    2006-01-01

    Background In Tanzania, oral health services are mostly in the form of dental extractions aimed at alleviating acute dental pain. Conservative methods of alleviating acute dental pain are virtually non-existent. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to determine treatment success of emergency pulpotomy in relieving acute dental pain. Methods Setting: School of Dentistry, Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Study design: Longitudinal study. Participants: 180 patients who presented with dental pain due to acute irreversible pulpitis during the study period between July and August 2001. Treatment and evaluation: Patients were treated by emergency pulpotomy on permanent posterior teeth and were evaluated for pain after one, three and six week's post-treatment. Pain, if present, was categorised as either mild or acute. Results Of the patients with treated premolars, 25 (13.9%) patients did not experience pain at all while 19 (10.6%) experienced mild pain. None of the patients with treated premolars experienced acute pain. Among 136 patients with treated molars 56 (31%) did not experience any pain, 76 (42.2%) experienced mild pain and the other 4 (2.2%) suffered acute pain. Conclusion The short term treatment success of emergency pulpotomy was high being 100% for premolars and 97.1% for molars, suggesting that it can be recommended as a measure to alleviate acute dental pain while other conservative treatment options are being considered. PMID:16426455

  5. Pulmonary embolism in an immunocompetent patient with acute cytomegalovirus colitis

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Jen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Acute cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection occurs commonly in immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients, but is usually asymptomatic in the latter. Vascular events associated with acute CMV infection have been described, but are rare. Hence, such events are rarely reported in the literature. We report a case of pulmonary embolism secondary to acute CMV colitis in an immunocompetent 78-year-old man. The patient presented with fever and diarrhea. Colonic ulcers were diagnosed based on colonoscopy findings, and CMV was the proven etiology on pathological examination. The patient subsequently experienced acute respiratory failure. Pulmonary embolism was diagnosed based on the chest radiography and computed tomography findings. A diagnosis of acute CMV colitis complicated by pulmonary embolism was made. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous administration of unfractionated heparin and intravenous ganciclovir. PMID:27175121

  6. Metabolic Disturbances Independent of Body Mass in Patients with Schizophrenia Taking Atypical Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Il

    2015-01-01

    Objective Atypical antipsychotic (AAP) treatment is associated with weight gain and metabolic disturbances such as dyslipidemia and dysglycemia. The metabolic disturbances are usually considered to develop secondary to weight gain. We performed the comparison of metabolic disturbances of three AAP group with different risk of metabolic side effect after adjusting for body mass to investigate whether any metabolic disturbances develop independently from body mass index (BMI). Methods This cross-sectional study included 174 subjects with schizophrenia who were on 1) monotherapy with clozapine (CL), olanzapine (OL), or quetiapine (QT) (n=61), 2) monotherapy with risperidone (RSP) (n=89), or 3) monotherapy with aripiprizole (ARP), or ziprasidone (ZPS) (n=24) more than 1 year. Association between the prevalence of metabolic disturbances and groups were analysed using logistic regression after adjusting confounding variables including BMI. Analysese of covariance were used to compare the AAP groups in terms of the levels of metabolic parameters. Results There were significant differences among groups in terms of the prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia (p=0.015), low HDL-cholesterol (p=0.017), and hyperglycemia (p=0.022) after adjusting for BMI. Triglyceride level (p=0.014) and the ratio of triglyceride to HDL-cholesterol (p=0.004) were significantly different among groups after adjusting for BMI. Conclusion In conclusion, metabolic disturbances are significantly different in AAP groups even after adjusting BMI. AAPs may have direct effect on metabolic parameters. Blood lipid and glucose levels should be monitored regularly regardless of whether patients tend to gain weight. PMID:25866526

  7. Major depressive disorder and sleep disturbance in patients with chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Patricia C; Wilson, Keith G; Kowal, John

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Disturbed sleep is a common problem in both chronic pain and major depressive disorder (MDD). Moreover, many patients with chronic pain are depressed. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of depression on the sleep behaviour of chronic pain patients by comparing patients who did or did not meet diagnostic criteria for MDD. METHODS: A total of 60 patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain underwent structured diagnostic interviews for MDD and insomnia, and completed questionnaires assessing pain severity, disability, sleep quality, beliefs and attitudes about sleep, and sleep hygiene. For four consecutive days, they also completed a sleep diary, and reported on sleep hygiene practices and presleep arousal. RESULTS: Thirty-three patients (55%) met diagnostic criteria for MDD, most of whom (n=32 [97%]) also fulfilled criteria for insomnia disorder. Insomnia was also common among patients without MDD (21 of 27 [78%]). Participants with MDD had higher self-reports of pain, disability, dysfunctional beliefs about sleep, and, on a prospective basis, greater presleep arousal and poorer sleep hygiene. However, diary assessments of specific sleep parameters (eg, sleep onset latency, total sleep time, sleep efficiency) did not differ between the groups. DISCUSSION: Chronic pain patients with comorbid MDD exhibited more dysfunctional beliefs about sleep, poorer sleep hygiene practices and greater presleep arousal; however, diary-recorded sleep characteristics may not differ from those of patients without MDD. Chronic pain itself may disturb sleep so extensively that MDD introduces little additive effect. CONCLUSION: MDD in chronic pain may be related to the cognitive and behavioural aspects of insomnia, rather than to an incremental disturbance in the initiation or maintenance of sleep. PMID:24367795

  8. Admission glucose and left ventricular systolic function in non-diabetic patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gierach, Joanna; Gierach, Marcin; Świątkiewicz, Iwona; Woźnicki, Marek; Grześk, Grzegorz; Sukiennik, Adam; Koziñski, Marek; Kubica, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    Carbohydrate metabolism disorder in patients hospitalized due to acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is associated with poor outcome. The association is even stronger in non-diabetic patients compared to the diabetics. Poor outcome of patients with elevated parameters of carbohydrate metabolism may be associated with negative impact of these disorders on left ventricular (LV) function. The aim of the study was to determine the impact of admission glycemia on LV systolic function in acute phase and 6 months after myocardial infarction in STEMI patients treated with primary angioplasty, without carbohydrate disorders. The study group consisted of 52 patients (9 female, 43 male) aged 35-74 years, admitted to the Department of Cardiology and Internal Medicine, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, due to the first STEMI treated with primary coronary angioplasty with stent implantation, without diabetes in anamnesis and carbohydrate metabolism disorders diagnosed during hospitalization. Echocardiography was performed in all patients in acute phase and 6 months after MI. Plasma glucose were measured at hospital admission. In the subgroup with glycemia ≥7.1 mmol/l, in comparison to patients with glycemia <7.1 mmol/l, significantly lower ejection fraction (EF) was observed in acute phase of MI (44.4 ± 5.4 vs. 47.8 ± 6.3 %, p = 0.04) and trend to lower EF 6 months after MI [47.2 ± 6.5 vs. 50.3 ± 6.3 %, p = 0.08 (ns)]. Higher admission glycemia in patients with STEMI and without carbohydrate metabolism disturbances, may be a marker of poorer prognosis resulting from lower LV ejection fraction in the acute phase and in the long-term follow-up. PMID:25539622

  9. Substance P and Acute Pain in Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lisowska, Barbara; Siewruk, Katarzyna; Lisowski, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is a limited information about the role of Substance P (SP) in acute pain nociception following surgical stimulation in patients with a chronic inflammatory state not to mention the link between this neuropeptide level changes and intensity of pain. The goal of the research was to find the correlation between SP level changes and acute pain intensity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis undergoing elective orthopedic surgery. Material and Methods Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were enrolled in the study. The correlation between acute pain intensity and concentration of SP in serum as well as in drainage fluid from postoperative wound was assessed in patients with RA who underwent Total Knee Replacement (TKA) under spinal anesthesia. Results In patients with RA a correlation between intensity of acute pain and serum SP was found postoperatively, whereas there was no correlation between intensity of acute pain and concentration of SP in drainage fluid. Conclusions 1. The correlation between acute pain intensity and SP serum concentration was found postoperatively in patients with RA. 2. The correlation between acute pain intensity and SP concentration in drainage fluid was not found postoperatively in patients with RA. PMID:26731421

  10. Hyperintense Acute Reperfusion Marker on FLAIR in a Patient with Transient Ischemic Attack

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Alex; Wenz, Holger; Groden, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM) has initially been described in acute ischemic stroke. The phenomenon is caused by blood-brain barrier disruption following acute reperfusion and consecutive delayed gadolinium enhancement in the subarachnoid space on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. Here we report the case of an 80-year-old man who presented with transient paresis and sensory loss in the right arm. Initial routine stroke MRI including diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging demonstrated no acute pathology. Follow-up MRI after three hours demonstrated subarachnoid gadolinium enhancement in the left middle cerebral artery territory consistent with HARM that completely resolved on follow-up MRI three days later. This case illustrates that even in transient ischemic attack patients disturbances of the blood-brain barrier may be present which significantly exceed the extent of acute ischemic lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging. Inclusion of FLAIR images with delayed acquisition after intravenous contrast agent application in MRI stroke protocols might facilitate the diagnosis of a recent acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27127673

  11. Acute renal failure in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D J; Sherman, W H; Osserman, E F; Appel, G B

    1984-02-01

    In the past, patients with multiple myeloma and acute renal failure have had a poor prognosis. Few patients recovered renal function and fewer still survived for prolonged time periods. This report describes the course of 10 patients with multiple myeloma and true acute renal failure treated during the decade 1970 to 1980, and reviews recent reports concerning this association. The use of radiographic contrast agents is no longer the primary predisposing factor to acute renal failure in the myeloma population. Rather, infection, hypercalcemia, and dehydration in the presence of light chain excretion are the major conditions precipitating the renal failure. Despite severe renal failure requiring dialysis, many patients may regain good renal function. Factors associated with a good or poor prognosis in this population are reviewed. The prognosis in patients with myeloma and acute renal failure has greatly improved in recent years, and prolonged survival may occur. PMID:6695948

  12. Delayed recurrent stroke in a young patient with acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy.

    PubMed

    Matamala, José Manuel; Feuerhake, Walter; Verdugo, Renato

    2013-11-01

    Acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (APMPPE) is a chorioretinal disease that causes acute binocular visual disturbance with characteristic funduscopic lesions at the level of the retinal pigment epithelium. APMPPE has been associated with multiple neurologic complications, including cerebrovascular diseases. We report a 15-year-old patient who had bilateral APMPPE, which was successfully treated with corticosteroids. One year later he presented with transient dysarthria and right hemiparesis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed bilateral ischemic lesions in both lenticular nuclei and corona radiata. Brain MRI performed 3 months later revealed a new asymptomatic ischemic lesion. Cerebral angiography showed diffuse multifocal segmental vessel narrowing. The cerebrospinal fluid showed mononuclear pleocytosis in keeping with vasculitis. We started corticosteroid treatment, which lasted 10 months. Currently, after 2 years of clinical and neuroradiologic follow-up, the patient is asymptomatic and shows no worsening of the cerebrovascular lesions. PMID:23186913

  13. Prevalence and prognostic role of various conduction disturbances in patients with the Brugada syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maury, Philippe; Rollin, Anne; Sacher, Frédéric; Gourraud, Jean-Baptiste; Raczka, Franck; Pasquié, Jean-Luc; Duparc, Alexandre; Mondoly, Pierre; Cardin, Christelle; Delay, Marc; Derval, Nicolas; Chatel, Stéphanie; Bongard, Vanina; Sadron, Marie; Denis, Arnaud; Davy, Jean-Marc; Hocini, Mélèze; Jaïs, Pierre; Jesel, Laurence; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Probst, Vincent

    2013-11-01

    Prevalence and prognostic value of conduction disturbances in patients with the Brugada syndrome (BrS) remains poorly known. Electrocardiograms (ECGs) from 325 patients with BrS (47 ± 13 years, 258 men) with spontaneous (n = 143) or drug-induced (n = 182) type 1 ECG were retrospectively reviewed. Two hundred twenty-six patients (70%) were asymptomatic, 73 patients (22%) presented with unexplained syncope, and 26 patients (8%) presented with sudden death or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator appropriated therapies at diagnosis or during a mean follow-up of 48 ± 34 months. P-wave duration of ≥120 ms was present in 129 patients (40%), first degree atrioventricular block (AVB) in 113 (35%), right bundle branch block (BBB) in 90 (28%), and fascicular block in 52 (16%). Increased P-wave duration, first degree AVB, and right BBB were more often present in patients after drug challenge than in patients with spontaneous type 1 ST elevation. Left BBB was present in 3 patients. SCN5A mutation carriers had longer P-wave duration and longer PR and HV intervals. In multivariate analysis, first degree AVB was independently associated with sudden death or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator appropriated therapies (odds ratio 2.41, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 5.73, p = 0.046) together with the presence of syncope and spontaneous type 1 ST elevation. In conclusion, conduction disturbances are frequent and sometimes diffuse in patients with BrS. First degree AVB is independently linked to outcome and may be proposed to be used for individual risk stratification. PMID:24011739

  14. Extracorporeal support for patients with acute and acute on chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Aron, Jonathan; Agarwal, Banwari; Davenport, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The number of patients developing liver failure; acute on chronic liver failure and acute liver failure continues to increase, along with the demand for donor livers for transplantation. As such there is a clinical need to develop effective extracorporeal devices to support patients with acute liver failure or acute-on-chronic liver failure to allow time for hepatocyte regeneration, and so avoiding the need for liver transplantation, or to bridge the patient to liver transplantation, and also potentially to provide symptomatic relief for patients with cirrhosis not suitable for transplantation. Currently devices can be divided into those designed to remove toxins, including plasma exchange, high permeability dialyzers and adsorption columns or membranes, coupled with replacement of plasma proteins; albumin dialysis systems; and bioartificial devices which may provide some of the biological functions of the liver. In the future we expect combinations of these devices in clinical practice, due to the developments in bioartificial scaffolds. PMID:26894968

  15. Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Complicated Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Prasanta Kumar; Lynrah, Kryshan G; Ete, Tony; Issar, Neel Kanth

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most common protozoan diseases, especially in tropical countries. The clinical manifestation of malaria, especially falciparum malaria varies from mild acute febrile illness to life threatening severe systemic complications involving one or more organ systems. We would like to report a case of complicated falciparum malaria involving cerebral, renal, hepatic system along with acute pancreatitis. The patient was successfully treated with anti malarial and other supportive treatment. To the best of our knowledge there are very few reports of acute pancreatitis due to malaria. Falciparum malaria therefore should be added to the list of infectious agents causing acute pancreatitis especially in areas where malaria is endemic. PMID:26894117

  16. Training in mental singing while walking improves gait disturbance in Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Masayuki; Kuzuhara, Shigeki

    2008-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have various types of gait disturbance that are thought to result from impairments in motor timing. Gait disturbances are markedly improved with the use of appropriate visual and auditory cues. In this study, patients suffering from mild to moderate PD underwent a structured music therapy session in which they were trained to walk while mentally singing. The patients were trained in 7 progressive tasks, with a final goal of walking while mentally singing. Before and after the training session, they were videotaped. The video was analyzed for time and steps while walking straight paths and while turning. After a single session of training, the time and steps were significantly improved in both situations. Follow-up interviews with the patients indicated that they effectively utilized mental singing while walking in their daily lives. We propose that singing regulates basal ganglia function and allows patients with PD to keep time regularly. The task used in the present study was simple, required no special tools, and could be utilized anytime and anyplace. Thus, walking while mentally singing has potential for improving the gait of individuals with PD. PMID:18756088

  17. [Urinalysis in patients at the early stage of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Rybak, Katarzyna; Sporek, Mateusz; Gala-Błądzińska, Agnieszka; Mazur-Laskowska, Małgorzata; Dumnicka, Paulina; Walocha, Jerzy; Drożdż, Ryszard; Kuźniewski, Marek; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Urinalysis is a routine and cheap laboratory test that provides clinically useful information in patients with acute abdominal conditions, including acute pancreatitis. The aim of the study was to assess the relationships between the results of urinalysis and the course of the disease among 65 patients with acute pancreatitis (34 men and 31 women, mean age 61 ± 19 years) at the early phase of the disease, i.e. during the first 72 hours from the onset of symptoms. Mild acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in 47 patients, moderately severe in 13 and severe in 5. The most prevalent abnormalities were proteinuria (43% of patients), high urinary bilirubin (20%), erythrocytes (18%), glucose (18%) and leukocytes (17%). High urinary protein and low specific gravity were associated with more severe acute disease and with acute kidney injury. The severity of bilirubinuria and proteinuria were positively correlated with urine concentrations of neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL). Urinalysis should be routinely performed in patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:27197429

  18. Sleep Disturbances and Predictive Factors in Caregivers of Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongwhane; Heo, Sung Hyuk; Yoon, Sung-Sang; Chang, Dae-Il; Lee, Sangeui; Rhee, Hak-Young; Ku, Bon D.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose We examined the characteristics of sleep disturbances and sleep patterns in the caregivers of patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and dementia. Methods We prospectively studied 132 patients (60 with aMCI and 72 with dementia) and their caregivers, and 52 noncaregiver controls. All caregivers and controls completed several sleep questionnaires, including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). The patients were administered neuropsychological tests and the neuropsychiatric inventory to evaluate their behavioral and neuropsychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD). Results The PSQI global score was 6.25±3.88 (mean±SD) for the dementia caregivers and 5.47±3.53 for the aMCI caregivers. The Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) and short form of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-S) predicted higher PSQI global scores in aMCI caregivers, and higher scores for the ISI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and GDS-S in dementia caregivers. BPSD, including not only agitation, depression, and appetite change in dementia patients, but also depression, apathy, and disinhibition in aMCI patients, was related to impaired sleep quality of caregivers, but nighttime behavior was not. Age and gender were not risk factors for disturbed sleep quality. Conclusions Dementia and aMCI caregivers exhibit impaired quality of sleep versus non-caregivers. ISI, GDS-S, and ESS scores are strong indicators of poor sleep in dementia caregivers. In addition, some BPSD and parts of the neuropsychological tests may be predictive factors of sleep disturbance in dementia caregivers. PMID:25324879

  19. [The nutrition of acute phase in patients with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Rie; Sebe, Mayu

    2016-03-01

    In this session, we describe the acute phase in patients with metabolic syndrome from two sides; acute disease that occurs higher in patients with metabolic syndrome such as colonary heart disease and stroke, and acute aggravation of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome. The electrolyte imbalance is frequently detected in critical ill patients. It is reported that the extreme abnormalities of ionized calcium concentrations are independent predictors of mortality. In addition, from clinical database MIMIC-Ⅱ,calcium supplementation improves clinical outcome in intensive care unit patients. Although metabolic syndrome; lifestyle-related disease, is a chronic disease, the possibility of falling into acute disease by having it becomes very high and improvement of electrolyte imbalance, especially hypocalcaemia is expected to effective on clinical outcome. PMID:26923986

  20. Splenic actinomycotic abscess in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-Y; Chen, Y-C; Tang, J-L; Lin, W-C; Su, I-J; Tien, H-F

    2002-09-01

    Actinomycosis is a gram-positive anaerobic bacterium. Actinomyces organisms are important constituents of the normal flora of mucous membranes and are considered opportunistic pathogens. The three major clinical presentations of actinomycosis include the cervicofacial, thoracic, and abdominopelvic regions. Actinomycosis infection in patients with febrile neutropenia is uncommon and actinomycosis splenic involvement in acute leukemia patients is very rare. We describe a man with acute myeloid leukemia and splenic actinomycotic abscess that developed after chemotherapy following prolonged neutropenia. PMID:12373356

  1. Clinical management of patients with acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rossano, Joseph W

    2015-08-01

    Acute heart failure is a common and serious complication of congenital and acquired heart disease, and it is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and costs. When a patient is admitted to the hospital with acute heart failure, there are several important goals for the hospital admission, including maintaining adequate perfusion, establishing the underlying aetiology for the heart failure, patient and family education, and discharge from the hospital in a stable condition. The pathway to home discharge is variable and may include inotropic therapy, mechanical circulatory support, and/or heart transplantation. This review will cover the epidemiology, presentation, and management of acute heart failure in children. PMID:26377712

  2. Application values of clinical nursing pathway in patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    LI, WEIHUA; GAO, JIANMEI; WEI, SHUFANG; WANG, DONGHAI

    2016-01-01

    Acute cerebral hemorrhage accounts for approximately 25% of strokes for elderly patients. Consequently, treatments to improve prognosis should be identified. The aim of the present study was to examine the clinical values of the application of clinical nursing pathway for patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage. Between January 2013 and January 2015, 92 patients diagnosed with acute intracerebral hemorrhage were enrolled in the study based on the guidelines recommended for providing appropriate surgical or conservative treatment and the sequence of admission. The 92 patients were randomly divided into the control and observation groups. Patients in the control group underwent routine nursing mode prior to and after admission, and underwent clinical nursing path model (hierarchical partitioning prior to admission to hospital plus general professional program of nursing in hospital) was applied to the observation group. Barthel index scores for the observation group were significantly higher than that of the control group. The length of hospital stay for patients in the observation group was significantly lower while the average score for patients' satisfaction on nursing care while in hospital was significantly higher than that of the control group, with statistically significant differences (P<0.05). The incidence of complications such as fever, infection, bedsore, gastrointestinal function, electrolyte disturbances, and malnutrition, in the observation group was significantly lower, with statistically significant differences (P<0.05). The functional independence measure (FIM) and Fugl-Meyer scores after 6 months for the observation group were significantly higher, with statistically significant differences (P<0.05). In conclusion, application of the clinical nursing pathway for patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage significantly improved the clinical effects and nursing satisfaction, reduced adverse reactions, and had a greater clinical application value. PMID

  3. Acute Porphyria in a Patient with Arnold Chiari Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jianbin; O’Keefe, Kevin; Webb, Lisa B.; DeGirolamo, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 33 Final Diagnosis: Acute porphyria Symptoms: Abdominal pain • alternating bowel habits Medication: Metronidazole • bactrim • oxybutynin Clinical Procedure: EMG • porhyria workup Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Acute porphyria and Arnold Chiari malformation are both uncommon genetic disorders without known association. The insidious onset, non-specific clinical manifestations, and precipitating factors often cause diagnosis of acute porphyria to be missed, particularly in patients with comorbidities. Case Report: A women with Arnold Chiari malformation type II who was treated with oxybutynin and antibiotics, including Bactrim for neurogenic bladder and recurrent urinary tract infection, presented with non-specific abdominal pain, constipation, and diarrhea. After receiving Flagyl for C. difficile colitis, the patient developed psychosis, ascending paralysis, and metabolic derangements. She underwent extensive neurological workup due to her congenital neurological abnormalities, most of which were unremarkable. As a differential diagnosis of Guillain Barré syndrome, acute porphyria was then considered and ultimately proved to be the diagnosis. After hematin administration and intense rehabilitation, the patient slowly recovered from the full-blown acute porphyria attack. Conclusions: This case report, for the first time, documents acute porphyria attack as a result of a sequential combination of 3 common medications. This is the first case report of the concomitant presence of both acute porphyria and Arnold Chiari malformation, 2 genetic disorders with unclear association. PMID:25697467

  4. Parkinson syndrome. A significant risk factor in the patient with acute surgical disorder.

    PubMed

    Simon, D; Shapira, O M; Mor, E; Pfefferman, R

    1992-01-01

    Ten Parkinsonic patients presenting with acute surgical disease were studied to determine the effects of both conditions on each other and the patient's outcome. Severe motion and communication disturbances led, invariably, to a delay in seeking medical assistance, with most of the patients' presenting symptoms and signs being non-specific and misleading. As a result half the patients presented already in a state of septic shock, and a correct preoperative diagnosis could be achieved in three patients only. The functional status significantly deteriorated in six patients, in four of whom a prolonged rehabilitation course was necessary. Although there was no immediate perioperative mortality, morbidity was significant as 50% and 100% major "surgery-related" and "Parkinson-related" complications accordingly. It is concluded that the coexistence of acute surgical disease with Parkinson syndrome has a profound adverse effect on the patient's outcome. High index of suspicion, early mobilisation, intense physiotherapy and early resumption of the anti-Parkinson drugs are the key points in the management of these patients. PMID:1478816

  5. A study of the presentation of somatic symptoms in general practice by patients with psychiatric disturbance.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, A F

    1990-01-01

    A computerized questionnaire was used to collect information on the presentation of symptoms in all 125 new patients presenting to one general practitioner in the course of one year who were considered to be suffering clinically significant psychiatric disturbance. Comparison was made between the 73 (58%) patients presenting with psychological symptoms and the 52 (42%) patients presenting with somatic symptoms for which no physical explanation was evident at the time of the consultation. Important differences emerged between the groups. Those patients presenting somatic symptoms had lower scores on the tests of psychiatric distress (indicating severity), fewer individual symptoms and fewer severe symptoms than patients presenting with psychological problems. This group also had statistically significant differences in personality profile and reported significantly fewer social problems. Prognosis for both groups was similar in that patients in both groups were equally likely to have a normal psychiatric distress score after six months. Adequate management of somatizing patients calls for vigilance and for improved detection and negotiating skills. Reviewing the computer results with patients helped them discuss their symptoms and the system allowed the general practitioner not only a clinical assessment of these patients' problems but a measure of psychological, social and personality components. PMID:2271279

  6. Identifying and managing patients with delirium in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Bond, Penny; Goudie, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is an acute medical emergency affecting about one in eight acute hospital inpatients. It is associated with poor outcomes, is more prevalent in older people and it is estimated that half of all patients receiving intensive care or surgery for a hip fracture will be affected. Despite its prevalence and impact, delirium is not reliably identified or well managed. Improving the identification and management of patients with delirium has been a focus for the national improving older people's acute care work programme in NHS Scotland. A delirium toolkit has been developed, which includes the 4AT rapid assessment test, information for patients and carers and a care bundle for managing delirium based on existing guidance. This toolkit has been tested and implemented by teams from a range of acute care settings to support improvements in the identification and immediate management of delirium. PMID:26511424

  7. Risk Factors and Outcomes of Acute Kidney Injury in Patients With Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Tujios, Shannan R.; Hynan, Linda S.; Vazquez, Miguel A.; Larson, Anne M.; Seremba, Emmanuel; Sanders, Corron M.; Lee, William M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Patients with acute liver failure (ALF) frequently develop renal dysfunction, yet its overall incidence and outcomes have not been fully assessed. We investigated the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) among patients with ALF, using defined criteria to identify risk factors and to evaluate its effect on overall outcomes. METHODS We performed a retrospective review of data from 1604 patients enrolled in the Acute Liver Failure Study Group, from 1998 through 2010. Patients were classified by the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria, as well as for etiology of liver failure (acetaminophen-based, ischemic, and all others). RESULTS Seventy percent of patients with ALF developed AKI, and 30% received renal replacement therapy (RRT). Patients with severe AKI had higher international normalized ratio values than those without renal dysfunction (P < .001), and a higher proportion had advanced-grade coma (coma grades 3 or 4; P < .001) or presented with hypotension requiring vasopressor therapy (P < .001). A greater proportion of patients with acetaminophen-induced ALF had severe kidney injury than of patients with other etiologies of ALF; 34% required RRT, compared with 25% of patients with ALF not associated with acetaminophen or ischemia (P < .002). Of the patients with ALF who were alive at 3 weeks after study entry, significantly fewer with AKI survived for 1 year. Although AKI reduced the overall survival time, more than 50% of patients with acetaminophen-associated or ischemic ALF survived without liver transplantation (even with RRT), compared with 19% of patients with ALF attribute to other causes (P < .001). Only 4% of patients requiring RRT became dependent on dialysis. CONCLUSIONS Based on a retrospective analysis of data from more than 1600 patients, AKI is common in patients with ALF and affects short- and long-term outcomes, but rarely results in chronic kidney disease. Acetaminophen-induced kidney injury is frequent, but patients have

  8. A prospective analysis of sleep deprivation and disturbance in surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Ross; Huh, Jae; Tiwari, Neil; Sproat, Tom; Camilleri-Brennan, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sleep deprivation has a potentially deleterious effect on postoperative recovery. The aim of our prospective study was to identify the factors contributing to postoperative sleep deprivation and disturbance in order to recommend improvements in postoperative care. Methods 102 consecutive patients attending for elective general and orthopaedic surgery were interviewed preoperatively (baseline) and postoperatively on their duration of sleep, number of wakenings during the night, factors contributing to sleep loss and the use of analgesia and night sedation. Results Patients woke up a median of 5 times in the first postoperative night compared to a median of 3 times preoperatively (p = 0.01). Pain was the predominant factor preventing sleep, affecting 39% of patients preoperatively and 48% of patients on the first postoperative day. Other factors included noise from other patients and nursing staff, and using the toilet. Analgesia was taken by more than 90% of patients in the first two days, this number gradually reducing over the postoperative period. On the other hand, in the first two postoperative days, only about 5% of patients had night sedation. Discussion and conclusions Apart from highlighting the need for effective pain management postoperatively, we believe that our study supports the drive towards single bed bays, where steps can be taken to minimize the impact of environmental factors on sleep. PMID:26909151

  9. [Sequential changes in acute phase reactant proteins and complement activation in patients with acute head injuries].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Y; Matsuura, H; Nakazawa, S

    1987-12-01

    The role of immunological mechanisms in head injury is not clearly defined. In this study we investigated the immunological function in patients with acute head injuries. Serum acute phase reactant proteins (APRP), complement activation and immunoglobulines as immunological parameters were studied. APRP are produced in the liver and increase in cancer patients as well as those with acute and chronic inflammations, trauma and autoimmune diseases. APRP are known to be one of the immunosuppressive factors in the serum. Forty patients with acute head injuries were studied. Thirty-four patients were male and six patients were female, ages ranged from 12 to 81 years. Serial blood samples were obtained during the first seven days of trauma. The Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) were recorded at the time of admission for all patients. Clinical outcome was assessed at the time of discharge according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale. The "good" group consisted of patients with good recovery or moderate disability. The "bad" group consisted of patients with severe disability, persistent vegetative state and death. The concentrations of immunoglobulines (IgG, IgM, IgA) were within normal range and humoral immunity was not affected. Complement activation at the time of admission was closely related to GCS (p less than 0.01), but the levels of C4, C3, and C3 activator except for these of CH50 were within normal range.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2451531

  10. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. [Equilibrium function in patients with acute sensorineural hearing loss].

    PubMed

    Pal'chun, V T; Ganichkina, I Ia; Luchikhin, L A; Derevianko, S N

    2002-01-01

    Equilibrium function was investigated with computer-assisted stabilography (CS) in patients with acute neurosensory hypoacusis. This new diagnostic tool was employed in combination with extended vestibulometric and audiologic examinations. Correlations were found between stabilographic and vestibulometric findings. CS is recommended as a method of screening diagnosis in examination of patients with imbalanced equilibrium. PMID:12227024

  12. Acute ethanol intoxication and the trauma patient: hemodynamic pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Bilello, John; McCray, Victor; Davis, James; Jackson, Lascienya; Danos, Leigh Ann

    2011-09-01

    Many trauma patients are acutely intoxicated with alcohol. Animal studies have demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication inhibits the normal release of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and vasopressin in response to acute hemorrhage. Ethanol also increases nitric oxide release and inhibits antidiuretic hormone secretion. This article studies the effects of alcohol intoxication (measured by blood alcohol level, BAL) on the presentation and resuscitation of trauma patients with blunt hepatic injuries. A retrospective registry and chart review was conducted of all patients who presented with blunt liver injuries at an ACS-verified, level I trauma center. Data collected included admission BAL, systolic blood pressure, hematocrit, International Normalized Ratio (INR), liver injury grade, Injury Severity Score (ISS), intravenous fluid and blood product requirements, base deficit, and mortality. From September 2002 to May 2008, 723 patients were admitted with blunt hepatic injuries. Admission BAL was obtained in 569 patients, with 149 having levels >0.08%. Intoxicated patients were more likely to be hypotensive on admission (p = 0.01) despite a lower liver injury grade and no significant difference in ISS. There was no significant difference in the percent of intoxicated patients requiring blood transfusion. However, when blood was given, intoxicated patients required significantly more units of packed red blood cells (PRBC) than their nonintoxicated counterparts (p = 0.01). Intoxicated patients also required more intravenous fluid during their resuscitation (p = 0.002). Alcohol intoxication may impair the ability of blunt trauma patients to compensate for acute blood loss, making them more likely to be hypotensive on admission and increasing their PRBC and intravenous fluid requirements. All trauma patients should have BAL drawn upon admission and their resuscitation should be performed with an understanding of the physiologic alterations associated with acute alcohol

  13. Cerebral metabolic disturbances in the brain during acute liver failure: from hyperammonemia to energy failure and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Ott, Peter; Clemmesen, Otto; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2005-07-01

    Several observations suggest that patients with fulminant hepatic failure may suffer from disturbances in cerebral metabolism that can be related to elevated levels of arterial ammonia. One effect of ammonia is the inhibition of the rate limiting TCA cycle enzyme alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (alphaKGDH) and possibly also pyruvate dehydrogenase, but this has been regarded to be of no quantitative importance. However, recent studies justify a revision of this point of view. Based on published data, the following sequence of events is proposed. Inhibition of alphaKGDH both enhances the detoxification of ammonia by formation of glutamine from alpha-ketoglutarate and reduces the rate of NADH and oxidative ATP production in astrocytic mitochondria. In the astrocytic cytosol this will lead to formation of lactate even in the presence of sufficient oxygen supply. Since the aspartate-malate shuttle is compromised, there is a risk of depletion of mitochondrial NADH and ATP unless compensatory mechanisms are recruited. One likely compensatory mechanism is the use of amino acids for energy production. Branched chain amino acids, like isoleucine and valine can supply carbon skeletons that bypass the alphaKGDH inhibition and maintain TCA cycle activity. Large-scale consumption of certain amino acids can only be maintained by cerebral proteolysis, as has been observed in these patients. This hypothesis provides a link between hyperammonemia, ammonia detoxification by glutamine production, cerebral lactate production, and cerebral catabolic proteolysis in patients with FHF. PMID:15921824

  14. Acute myeloid leukemia developing in patients with autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Safaa M.; Fouad, Tamer M; Summa, Valentina; Hasan, Syed KH; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia is an unfortunate complication of cancer treatment, particularly for patients with highly curable primary malignancies and favorable life expectancy. The risk of developing therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia also applies to patients with non-malignant conditions, such as autoimmune diseases treated with cytotoxic and/or immunosuppressive agents. There is considerable evidence to suggest that there is an increased occurrence of hematologic malignancies in patients with autoimmune diseases compared to the general population, with a further increase in risk after exposure to cytotoxic therapies. Unfortunately, studies have failed to reveal a clear correlation between leukemia development and exposure to individual agents used for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Given the dismal outcome of secondary acute myeloid leukemia and the wide range of available agents for treatment of autoimmune diseases, an increased awareness of this risk and further investigation into the pathogenetic mechanisms of acute leukemia in autoimmune disease patients are warranted. This article will review the data available on the development of acute myeloid leukemia in patients with autoimmune diseases. Possible leukemogeneic mechanisms in these patients, as well as evidence supporting the association of their primary immunosuppressive status and their exposure to specific therapies, will also be reviewed. This review also supports the idea that it may be misleading to label leukemias that develop in patients with autoimmune diseases who are exposed to cytotoxic agents as ‘therapy-related leukemias’. A better understanding of the molecular defects in autoimmune disease patients who develop acute leukemia will lead to a better understanding of the association between these two diseases entities. PMID:22180424

  15. Rapid eye movement-sleep is reduced in patients with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis—an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Alamili, Mahdi; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Sleep disturbances are commonly found in patients in the postoperative period. Sleep disturbances may give rise to several complications including cardiopulmonary instability, transient cognitive dysfunction and prolonged convalescence. Many factors including host inflammatory responses are believed to cause postoperative sleep disturbances, as inflammatory responses can alter sleep architecture through cytokine-brain interactions. Our aim was to investigate alteration of sleep architecture during acute infection and its relationships to inflammation and clinical symptoms. Materials & Methods. In this observational study, we included patients with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis as a model to investigate the isolated effects of inflammatory responses on sleep. Eleven patients completed the study. Patients were admitted and treated with antibiotics for two nights, during which study endpoints were measured by polysomnography recordings, self-reported discomfort scores and blood samples of cytokines. One month later, the patients, who now were in complete remission, were readmitted and the endpoints were re-measured (the baseline values). Results. Total sleep time was reduced 4% and 7% the first (p = 0.006) and second (p = 0.014) nights of diverticulitis, compared to baseline, respectively. The rapid eye movement sleep was reduced 33% the first night (p = 0.016), compared to baseline. Moreover, plasma IL-6 levels were correlated to non-rapid eye movement sleep, rapid eye movement sleep and fatigue. Conclusion. Total sleep time and rapid eye movement sleep were reduced during nights with active diverticulitis and correlated with markers of inflammation. PMID:26290799

  16. Effect of acute acid-base disturbances on ErbB1/2 tyrosine phosphorylation in rabbit renal proximal tubules

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Lara A.

    2013-01-01

    The renal proximal tubule (PT) is a major site for maintaining whole body pH homeostasis and is responsible for reabsorbing ∼80% of filtered HCO3−, the major plasma buffer, into the blood. The PT adapts its rate of HCO3− reabsorption (JHCO3−) in response to acute acid-base disturbances. Our laboratory previously showed that single isolated perfused PTs adapt JHCO3− in response to isolated changes in basolateral (i.e., blood side) CO2 and HCO3− concentrations but, surprisingly, not to pH. The response to CO2 concentration can be blocked by the ErbB family tyrosine kinase inhibitor PD-168393. In the present study, we exposed enriched rabbit PT suspensions to five acute acid-base disturbances for 5 and 20 min using a panel of phosphotyrosine (pY)-specific antibodies to determine the influence of each disturbance on pan-pY, ErbB1-specific pY (four sites), and ErbB2-specific pY (two sites). We found that each acid-base treatment generated a distinct temporal pY pattern. For example, the summated responses of the individual ErbB1/2-pY sites to each disturbance showed that metabolic acidosis (normal CO2 concentration and reduced HCO3− concentration) produced a transient summated pY decrease (5 vs. 20 min), whereas metabolic alkalosis produced a transient increase. Respiratory acidosis (normal HCO3− concentration and elevated CO2 concentration) had little effect on summated pY at 5 min but produced an elevation at 20 min, whereas respiratory alkalosis produced a reduction at 20 min. Our data show that ErbB1 and ErbB2 in the PT respond to acute acid-base disturbances, consistent with the hypothesis that they are part of the signaling cascade. PMID:24133121

  17. Reduced functional connectivity in the thalamo-insular subnetwork in patients with acute anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Stefan; Lord, Anton R; Geisler, Daniel; Borchardt, Viola; Boehm, Ilka; Seidel, Maria; Ritschel, Franziska; Schulze, Anne; King, Joseph A; Weidner, Kerstin; Roessner, Veit; Walter, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The neural underpinnings of anorexia nervosa (AN) are poorly understood. Results from existing functional brain imaging studies using disorder-relevant food- or body-stimuli have been heterogeneous and may be biased due to varying compliance or strategies of the participants. In this study, resting state functional connectivity imaging was used. To explore the distributed nature and complexity of brain function we characterized network patterns in patients with acute AN. Thirty-five unmedicated female acute AN patients and 35 closely matched healthy female participants underwent resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging. We used a network-based statistic (NBS) approach [Zalesky et al., 2010a] to identify differences between groups by isolating a network of interconnected nodes with a deviant connectivity pattern. Group comparison revealed a subnetwork of connections with decreased connectivity including the amygdala, thalamus, fusiform gyrus, putamen and the posterior insula as the central hub in the patient group. Results were not driven by changes in intranodal or global connectivity. No network could be identified where AN patients had increased coupling. Given the known involvement of the identified thalamo-insular subnetwork in interoception, decreased connectivity in AN patients in these nodes might reflect changes in the propagation of sensations that alert the organism to urgent homeostatic imbalances and pain-processes that are known to be severely disturbed in AN and might explain the striking discrepancy between patient's actual and perceived internal body state. PMID:25611053

  18. Neurocognition, psychopathology, and subjective disturbances in schizophrenia: a comparison between short-term and remitted patients.

    PubMed

    Comparelli, Anna; De Carolis, Antonella; Corigliano, Valentina; Romano, Silvia; Kotzalidis, Giorgio; Brugnoli, Roberto; Tamorri, Stefano; Curto, Martina; Tatarelli, Roberto; Ferracuti, Stefano; Girardi, Paolo

    2012-10-01

    Patients with schizophrenia present deficits in multiple domains of cognition. The study of the relationship between cognitive performance and symptoms of schizophrenia has yielded heterogeneous results. The purposes of this study were to examine the extent of the relationship between psychopathologic symptoms, cognitive function, and subjective disturbances in a group of patients affected by schizophrenia spectrum disorders and to compare short-term with remitted patients. Seventy-nine patients meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, criteria for schizophrenia, schizophreniform disorder, and schizoaffective disorder were assessed through the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire, and a neuropsychologic battery exploring the 7 Measurement and Treatment Research to improve Cognition in Schizophrenia cognitive domains (speed of processing, attention/vigilance, working memory, verbal learning, visual learning, reasoning and problem solving, and social cognition) plus executive control. Neuropsychologic and psychopathologic variables were compared and correlated. Treatment groups did not differ in neuropsychologic and psychopathologic measures. The cognitive factor of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale correlated with worse performance on cognitive tasks and with higher scores on the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire 24 in the short-term, remitted, and combined groups. Subjective disturbances correlated with impaired executive control, reasoning and problem solving, and social cognition but not during the short-term phase. Both "objective" and subjective psychopathology are intertwined with cognitive function, suggesting some common underlying neural bases. The condition of being in a short-term or a remitted phase of the illness influences this interrelationship, regardless of the type of antipsychotic medication taken. PMID:22444951

  19. Acute HCV/HIV Coinfection Is Associated with Cognitive Dysfunction and Cerebral Metabolite Disturbance, but Not Increased Microglial Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Lucy J.; Pavese, Nicola; Ramlackhansingh, Anil; Thomson, Emma; Allsop, Joanna M.; Politis, Marios; Kulasegaram, Ranjababu; Main, Janice; Brooks, David J.; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D.; Winston, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Background Microglial cell activation and cerebral function impairment are described in both chronic hepatitis C viral (HCV) and Human-Immune-Deficiency viral (HIV) infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute HCV infection upon cerebral function and microglial cell activation in HIV-infected individuals. Methods A case-control study was conducted. Subjects with acute HCV and chronic HIV coinfection (aHCV) were compared to matched controls with chronic HIV monoinfection (HIVmono). aHCV was defined as a new positive plasma HCV RNA within 12 months of a negative RNA test. Subjects underwent neuro-cognitive testing (NCT), cerebral proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) and positron emission tomography (PET) using a 11C-radiolabeled ligand (PK11195), which is highly specific for translocator protein 18 kDA receptors on activated microglial cells. Differences between cases and controls were assessed using linear regression modelling. Results Twenty-four aHCV cases completed NCT and 1H-MRS, 8 underwent PET. Of 57 HIVmono controls completing NCT, 12 underwent 1H-MRS and 8 PET. Subjects with aHCV demonstrated on NCT, significantly poorer executive function (mean (SD) error rate 26.50(17.87) versus 19.09(8.12), p = 0.001) and on 1H-MRS increased myo-inositol/creatine ratios (mI/Cr, a marker of cerebral inflammation) in the basal ganglia (ratio of 0.71(0.22) versus 0.55(0.23), p = 0.03), compared to subjects with HIVmono. On PET imaging, no difference in 11C-PK11195 binding potential (BP) was observed between study groups (p>0.10 all cerebral locations), however lower BPs were associated with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) use in the parietal (p = 0.01) and frontal (p = 0.03) cerebral locations. Discussion Poorer cognitive performance and disturbance of cerebral metabolites are observed in subjects with aHC,V compared to subjects with HIVmono. Higher 11C-PK11195 BP was not observed in subjects with aHCV, but was

  20. [Analysis of a disturbance of trace element balance in patients with ischemic stroke with arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Kuramshina, D B; Novikova, L B; Nikonov, A A; Torshin, I Iu; Gromova, O A

    2012-01-01

    Disturbance of trace element balance increases the risk of cerebrovascular disease and, above all, ischemic stroke (IS). A comparative analysis of clinical and demographic parameters and trace element composition of hair was performed in the group of 30 ischemic stroke patients with arterial hypertension (AH) and 30 stroke patients without hypertension (mean age 55±7 years). The stroke patients with hypertension were characterized by the elevated body mass index (28.5±4.1 kg/m2, AI, 26.0±2.9 kg/m2, p=0.006), higher incidence of coronary heart disease (p=0.04). Alcohol consumption more than 3 drinks a week was associated with a 5-fold increase of the risk of stroke with hypertension (95% CI 1.0-27, p=0.035). The results revealed a number of statistically significant differences in trace element profile in the studied groups of patients: deficits of essential magnesium, manganese, cobalt, copper, zinc, a statistically significant increase in sodium levels, toxic and conditionally toxic trace elements (cadmium, mercury, bismuth, barium, etc.). One of the probable factors that lead to the accumulation of toxic trace elements in stroke patients is the increased consumption of alcohol including that of substandard quality. The data obtained also show the feasibility of implementing screening programs to assess micronutrient status (including trace elements) for early detection of pathological abnormalities in the elemental homeostasis that might lead to an increased risk of ischemic stroke and hypertension. PMID:22677769

  1. Disturbance of time orientation, attention, and verbal memory in amnesic patients with confabulation.

    PubMed

    Shingaki, Honoka; Park, Paeksoon; Ueda, Keita; Murai, Toshiya; Tsukiura, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Confabulation is often observed in amnesic patients after brain damage. However, evidence regarding the relationship between confabulation and other neuropsychological functions is scarce. In addition, previous studies have proposed two possibilities of the relationship between confabulation and false memory, in which patients with confabulation are likely to retrieve false memories, or confabulations are relatively independent of false memories. The present study investigated how confabulation is related to various cognitive functions, including orientation, attention, frontal lobe function, memory, and mental status, and to false memories, as assessed by the Deese-Roediger-Mcdermott (DRM) paradigm. Patients with organic amnesia participated, and confabulations were evaluated using the Confabulation Battery. Amnestic patients were classified into two groups: confabulating (CP) and nonconfabulating patients (NCP). The CP group was significantly impaired in time orientation, attention, and verbal memory, compared to the NCP group and age-matched healthy controls (HC). Results of the DRM paradigm revealed no significant difference in false memory retrieval induced by critical lures across CP, NCP, and HC groups. Confabulating responses in organic amnesia could be in part induced by disturbance of time consciousness and attention control in severe impairment of verbal memories, and confabulation and false memory could be modulated by different cognitive systems. PMID:26588602

  2. Quick identification of acute chest pain patients study (QICS)

    PubMed Central

    Willemsen, Hendrik M; de Jong, Gonda; Tio, René A; Nieuwland, Wybe; Kema, Ido P; van der Horst, Iwan CC; Oudkerk, Mattijs; Zijlstra, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Background Patients with acute chest pain are often referred to the emergency ward and extensively investigated. Investigations are costly and could induce unnecessary complications, especially with invasive diagnostics. Nevertheless, chest pain patients have high mortalities. Fast identification of high-risk patients is crucial. Therefore several strategies have been developed including specific symptoms, signs, laboratory measurements, and imaging. Methods/Design The Quick Identification of acute Chest pain Study (QICS) will investigate whether a combined use of specific symptoms and signs, electrocardiography, routine and new laboratory measures, adjunctive imaging including electron beam (EBT) computed tomography (CT) and contrast multislice CT (MSCT) will have a high diagnostic yield for patients with acute chest pain. All patients will be investigated according a standardized protocol in the Emergency Department. Serum and plasma will be frozen for future analysis for a wide range of biomarkers at a later time point. The primary endpoint is the safe recognition of low-risk chest pain patients directly at presentation. Secondary endpoint is the identification of a wide range of sensitive predictive clinical markers, chemical biomarkers and radiological markers in acute chest pain patients. Chemical biomarkers will be compared to quantitative CT measurements of coronary atherosclerosis as a surrogate endpoint. Chemical biomarkers will also be compared in head to head comparison and for their additional value. Discussion This will be a very extensive investigation of a wide range of risk predictors in acute chest pain patients. New reliable fast and cheap diagnostic algorithm resulting from the test results might improve chest pain patients' prognosis, and reduce unnecessary costs and diagnostic complications. PMID:19527487

  3. What do patients want from acute migraine treatment?

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Rm

    2004-01-01

    Clinical observations have shown that migraine is a progressive disorder, both within an acute attack, and within the disease itself. Rates of diagnosis for migraine have increased in the last decade, but more than half of migraineurs remain undiagnosed. Patient expectations of migraine therapies have also increased (patients require rapid and sustained pain relief with a treatment that has good tolerability), and can differ greatly from those of physicians. Management decisions should be made with these expectations in mind, to enhance patient outcomes and compliance with treatment. Improved understanding of acute migraine attack pathophysiology has led to the strategy of early treatment to modify both the progression of the current attack and, potentially, the progression of the disease itself in the individual. The triptans are effective acute migraine therapies. Each agent has its own distinct profile of efficacy and tolerability, enabling individualization of treatment. PMID:15595989

  4. Acute malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Dupont, John S

    2006-01-01

    Acute malocclusion can result from disturbances in the maxillary/mandibular tooth relationship. These alterations in the occlusal position can result from high fillings, sinus problems, abscesses, periodontal disease, and moving or erupting teeth. Conditions seen less frequently include acute malocclusions secondary to an event (such as trauma) that make a stable dental relationship an unstable one. Patients can demonstrate any of a number of clinical conditions that interfere with their comfort and ability to function. This article provides information on some of the less familiar causes of acute malocclusion. PMID:16689064

  5. Acute diverticulitis. Comparison of treatment in immunocompromised and nonimmunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Perkins, J D; Shield, C F; Chang, F C; Farha, G J

    1984-12-01

    The clinical course and required treatment of diverticulitis were reviewed in 76 nonimmunocompromised patients and 10 immunocompromised patients. The immunocompromised patients presented with either minimal or no symptoms and findings. Therefore, to make the diagnosis of acute diverticulitis in this group, a high index of suspicion must be maintained. The required treatment varied considerably between the two groups. In 45 nonimmunocompromised patients (76 percent), medical therapy was successful. Medical treatment failed in the other 14 patients (24 percent). However, the compromised group had no patients in whom medical therapy was successful (100 percent failure rate). Thirty-one of the nonimmunocompromised patients (41 percent) required an operation, whereas 100 percent of the immunocompromised patients with acute diverticulitis required an operation. By relating postoperative complications, we were unable to determine the initial operative procedure of choice in the nonimmunocompromised group; however, in the immunocompromised group, colostomy and resection had fewer surgical complications than colostomy and drainage. The immunocompromised patient with acute diverticulitis requires operation. We believe the operation of choice is colostomy and resection of the involved segment. PMID:6507744

  6. Diagnosis of acute abdominal pain in older patients.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Corey; Clark, Dwayne C

    2006-11-01

    Acute abdominal pain is a common presenting complaint in older patients. Presentation may differ from that of the younger patient and is often complicated by coexistent disease, delays in presentation, and physical and social barriers. The physical examination can be misleadingly benign, even with catastrophic conditions such as abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture and mesenteric ischemia. Changes that occur in the biliary system because of aging make older patients vulnerable to acute cholecystitis, the most common indication for surgery in this population. In older patients with appendicitis, the initial diagnosis is correct only one half of the time, and there are increased rates of perforation and mortality when compared with younger patients. Medication use, gallstones, and alcohol use increase the risk of pancreatitis, and advanced age is an indicator of poor prognosis for this disease. Diverticulitis is a common cause of abdominal pain in the older patient; in appropriately selected patients, it may be treated on an outpatient basis with oral antibiotics. Small and large bowel obstructions, usually caused by adhesive disease or malignancy, are more common in the aged and often require surgery. Morbidity and mortality among older patients presenting with acute abdominal pain are high, and these patients often require hospitalization with prompt surgical consultation. PMID:17111893

  7. Correlation of scintigraphic phase maps with intraoperative epicardial/endocardial maps in patients with activation disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Dae, M.W.; Botvinick, E.H.; Scheinmann, M.H.; Morady, F.J.; Davis, J.A.; Schechtmann, N.; Frais, M.; Faulkner, D.; O'Connell, W.

    1984-01-01

    To assess the true accuracy of scintigraphic findings, 8 patients (PTS), 6 with pre-excitation (PEX) syndrome and 2 with intractable ventricular tachycardia (VT), were studied by phase analysis, prior to corrective surgery. Sites of earliest phase angle were determined in multiple projections during the conduction disturbance, compared to sites of early ventricular activation determined by epicardial mapping during PEX and, when performed, by endocardial mapping during VT, and to maps previously generated at conventional electrophysiologic study (EPS). Among PEX PTS, Rt and Lt lateral, Lt anterolateral, Rt and Lt posterolateral and posteroseptal bypass pathways mapped at surgery correlated with phase localization. While localization from EPS also correlated well with surgical maps in 4 PTS, 1 PT could not be mapped by EPS and another presented ambiguities. Scintigraphic localization also correlated well with surgical mapping in a PT with a RV VT focus while EPS was suggestive but uncertain. A second PT with VT mapped scintigraphically to originate in a Lt lateral focus, demonstrated a similar localization on EPS, and during surgical mapping, an incision made through the scintigraphic focus terminated VT. Incision in regions of earliest activity in the first VT PT and in PTS with PEX resolved the arrhythmia or interrupted the bypass tract. Phase mapping correlated closely with surface mapping at surgery while providing an accurate, independent method for noninvasive assessment of conduction disturbances and a complementary tool to standard EPS.

  8. Lactate and lactate clearance in acute cardiac care patients

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Picariello, Claudio; Dini, Carlotta Sorini; Gensini, Gian Franco; Valente, Serafina

    2012-01-01

    Hyperlactataemia is commonly used as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in intensive care settings. Recent studies documented that serial lactate measurements over time (or lactate clearance), may be clinically more reliable than lactate absolute value for risk stratification in different pathological conditions. While the negative prognostic role of hyperlactataemia in several critical ill diseases (such as sepsis and trauma) is well established, data in patients with acute cardiac conditions (i.e. acute coronary syndromes) are scarce and controversial. The present paper provides an overview of the current available evidence on the clinical role of lactic acid levels and lactate clearance in acute cardiac settings (acute coronary syndromes, cardiogenic shock, cardiac surgery), focusing on its prognostic role. PMID:24062898

  9. Treatment of acute bronchospasm in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Berger, William E

    2005-12-01

    Both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are often underdiagnosed and undertreated among the elderly. Patient compliance with treatments plans and medication schedules are often less than ideal. This paper presents results from clinical studies examining levalbuterol and racemic albuterol use among elderly patients who have asthma or COPD. PMID:19667714

  10. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-05

    Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

  11. Aspiration-Related Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Acute Stroke Patient

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiang-nan; Liu, Yao; Li, Huai-chen

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspiration of oral or gastric contents into the larynx and lower respiratory tract is a common problem in acute stroke patients, which significantly increases the incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, little is known about the clinical characteristics of aspiration-related ARDS in acute stroke patients. Methods Over 17-month period a retrospective cohort study was done on 1495 consecutive patients with acute stroke. The data including demographic characteristics, clinical manifestations, laboratory examinations, chest imaging, and hospital discharge status were collected to analysis. Results Aspiration-related ARDS was diagnosed in 54 patients (3.6%). The most common presenting symptom was tachypnea (respiratory rate ≥25 breaths/min) in 50 cases. Computed tomography (CT) images usually demonstrated diffuse ground-glass opacities (GGOs) and inhomogeneous patchy consolidations involving the low lobes. Age, NIHSS score, GCS score, dysphagia, dysarthria, hemoglobin concentration, serum aspertate aminotransferase (AST), serum albumin, serum sodium, and admission glucose level were independently associated with aspiration-related ARDS (odds ratio (OR) 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.04–1.07); OR 2.87, (2.68–3.63); OR 4.21, (3.57–5.09); OR 2.18, (1.23–3.86); OR 1.67, (1.31–2.14); OR 2.31, (1.11–4.84); OR 1.68, (1.01–2.80); OR 2.15, (1.19–3.90); OR 1.92, (1.10–3.36) and OR 1.14, (1.06–1.21) respectively). Conclusions Aspiration-related ARDS frequently occurs in acute stroke patient with impairment consciousness. It is advisable that performing chest CT timely may identify disease early and prompt treatment to rescue patients. PMID:25790377

  12. Resilience as a correlate of acute stress disorder symptoms in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Meister, Rebecca E; Weber, Tania; Princip, Mary; Schnyder, Ulrich; Barth, Jürgen; Znoj, Hansjörg; Schmid, Jean-Paul; von Känel, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Myocardial infarction (MI) may be experienced as a traumatic event causing acute stress disorder (ASD). This mental disorder has an impact on the daily life of patients and is associated with the development of post-traumatic stress disorder. Trait resilience has been shown to be a protective factor for post-traumatic stress disorder, but its association with ASD in patients with MI is elusive and was examined in this study. Methods We investigated 71 consecutive patients with acute MI within 48 h of having stable haemodynamic conditions established and for 3 months thereafter. All patients completed the Acute Stress Disorder Scale and the Resilience Scale to self-rate the severity of ASD symptoms and trait resilience, respectively. Results Hierarchical regression analysis showed that greater resilience was associated with lower symptoms of ASD independent of covariates (b=−0.22, p<0.05). Post hoc analysis revealed resilience level to be inversely associated with the ASD symptom clusters of re-experiencing (b=−0.05, p<0.05) and arousal (b=−0.09, p<0.05), but not with dissociation and avoidance. Conclusions The findings suggest that patients with acute MI with higher trait resilience experience relatively fewer symptoms of ASD during MI. Resilience was particularly associated with re-experiencing and arousal symptoms. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of resilience as a potentially important correlate of ASD in the context of traumatic situations such as acute MI. These results emphasise the importance of identifying patients with low resilience in medical settings and to offer them adequate support. PMID:26568834

  13. Coping Style and Quality of Life in Elderly Patients with Vision Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Oles, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. This study aims at evaluating coping style and quality of life in patients with glaucoma and cataract. Methods. The participants were patients (N = 237, 130F; mean age: M = 67,8; SD = 9,5) with low vision caused by cataract (N = 188) and glaucoma (N = 49) who answered the Quality of Life Questionnaire (QOLQ) by Schalock and Keith. The participants were divided by means of cluster analysis (k-means) according to coping styles measured by CISS (Endler and Parker) into three groups: (1) high mobilization for coping, (2) task-oriented coping, and (3) low mobilization for coping. Results. In all the group, a general quality of life was moderately lowered; however, in task-oriented group it was relatively high. Moreover, task-oriented group had significantly lower level of anxiety (STAI), hopelessness (HS), and loneliness (UCLA LS-R) and higher level of self-esteem (SES) in comparison to the patients from high mobilization and low mobilization for coping. Conclusions. In an old age, adaptive coping with vision disturbances does not necessarily mean flexibility in combining all coping styles, but rather task-oriented coping and an ability to use social support. Extreme mobilization for coping seems not adaptive similarly like low mobilization for coping because it violates balance between environmental requirements and personal resources. PMID:25215225

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid proteome of patients with acute Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Warren, H. Shaw

    2012-01-01

    During acute Lyme disease, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of meningitis and other neurologic symptoms. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing a deep view into the proteome for patients diagnosed with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified differences in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. We identified 108 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease from controls. Comparison between infected patients and control subjects revealed differences in proteins in the CSF associated with cell death localized to brain synapses and others that likely originate from brain parenchyma. PMID:22900834

  15. Sleep disturbances in patients with schizophrenia : impact and effect of antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Cohrs, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Difficulties initiating or maintaining sleep are frequently encountered in patients with schizophrenia. Disturbed sleep can be found in 30-80% of schizophrenic patients, depending on the degree of psychotic symptomatology. Measured by polysomnography, reduced sleep efficiency and total sleep time, as well as increased sleep latency, are found in most patients with schizophrenia and appear to be an important part of the pathophysiology of this disorder. Some studies also reported alterations of stage 2 sleep, slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep variables, i.e. reduced REM latency and REM density. A number of sleep parameters, such as the amount of SWS and the REM latency, are significantly correlated to clinical variables, including severity of illness, positive symptoms, negative symptoms, outcome, neurocognitive impairment and brain structure.Concerning specific sleep disorders, there is some evidence that schizophrenic patients carry a higher risk of experiencing a sleep-related breathing disorder, especially those demonstrating the known risk factors, including being overweight but also long-term use of antipsychotics. However, it is still unclear whether periodic leg movements in sleep or restless legs syndrome (RLS) are found with a higher or lower prevalence in schizophrenic patients than in healthy controls.There are no consistent effects of first-generation antipsychotics on measures of sleep continuity and sleep structure, including the percentage of sleep stages or sleep and REM latency in healthy controls. In contrast to first-generation antipsychotics, the studied atypical antipsychotics (clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone and paliperidone) demonstrate a relatively consistent effect on measures of sleep continuity, with an increase in either total sleep time (TST) or sleep efficiency, and individually varying effects on other sleep parameters, such as an increase in REM latency observed for olanzapine

  16. Acute Abdominal Pain in the Bariatric Surgery Patient.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kyle D; Takenaka, Katrin Y; Luber, Samuel D

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is present in epidemic proportions in the United States, and bariatric surgery has become more common. Thus, emergency physicians will undoubtedly encounter many patients who have undergone one of these procedures. Knowledge of the anatomic changes specific to these procedures aids the clinician in understanding potential complications and devising an organized differential diagnosis. This article reviews common bariatric surgery procedures, their complications, and the approach to acute abdominal pain in these patients. PMID:27133251

  17. The artful management of older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jay; Schiffer, Charles A

    2016-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia in older patients has historically had a dismal 10-15% long-term survival rate. Although patient frailty plays a role in this disappointing outcome, the primary driver of poor results remains the resistance of disease to current therapies. The optimal management of this difficult-to-treat disease should include a careful consideration of disease, patient and treatment factors. Disease factors include cytogenetic and molecular features and the history of an antecedent hematological disorder. Patient factors include age, performance status, comorbid conditions and individual patient preference. We favor intensive induction in most fit older patients but alternatives such as hypomethylating agents and low-dose cytarabine may be considered in patients with other comorbidities. Enrollment of patients into well designed clinical trials addressing important questions remains of utmost importance in order to advance the understanding and treatment of this disease although the best means of drug development remains a challenging dilemma. PMID:26878693

  18. Management of Patients Admitted with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Krim, Selim R.; Campbell, Patrick T.; Desai, Sapna; Mandras, Stacy; Patel, Hamang; Eiswirth, Clement; Ventura, Hector O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospital admission for the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure is an unfortunate certainty in the vast majority of patients with heart failure. Regardless of the etiology, inpatient treatment for acute decompensated heart failure portends a worsening prognosis. Methods This review identifies patients with heart failure who need inpatient therapy and provides an overview of recommended therapies and management of these patients in the hospital setting. Results Inpatient therapy for patients with acute decompensated heart failure should be directed at decongestion and symptom improvement. Clinicians should also treat possible precipitating events, identify comorbid conditions that may exacerbate heart failure, evaluate and update current guideline-directed medical therapy, and perform risk stratification for all patients. Finally, efforts should be made to educate patients about the importance of restricting salt and fluid, monitoring daily weights, and adhering to a graded exercise program. Conclusion Early discharge follow-up and continued optimization of guideline-directed medical therapy are key to preventing future heart failure readmissions. PMID:26413005

  19. Postmortem diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in patients with acute respiratory failure - demographics, etiologic and pulmonary histologic analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Matos Soeiro, Alexandre; Ruppert, Aline D; Canzian, Mauro; Capelozzi, Vera L; Serrano, Carlos V

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Acute respiratory failure is present in 5% of patients with acute myocardial infarction and is responsible for 20% to 30% of the fatal post-acute myocardial infarction. The role of inflammation associated with pulmonary edema as a cause of acute respiratory failure post-acute myocardial infarction remains to be determined. We aimed to describe the demographics, etiologic data and histological pulmonary findings obtained through autopsies of patients who died during the period from 1990 to 2008 due to acute respiratory failure with no diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction during life. METHODS: This study considers 4,223 autopsies of patients who died of acute respiratory failure that was not preceded by any particular diagnosis while they were alive. The diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction was given in 218 (4.63%) patients. The age, sex and major associated diseases were recorded for each patient. Pulmonary histopathology was categorized as follows: diffuse alveolar damage, pulmonary edema, alveolar hemorrhage and lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia. The odds ratio of acute myocardial infarction associated with specific histopathology was determined by logistic regression. RESULTS: In total, 147 men were included in the study. The mean age at the time of death was 64 years. Pulmonary histopathology revealed pulmonary edema as well as the presence of diffuse alveolar damage in 72.9% of patients. Bacterial bronchopneumonia was present in 11.9% of patients, systemic arterial hypertension in 10.1% and dilated cardiomyopathy in 6.9%. A multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant positive association between acute myocardial infarction with diffuse alveolar damage and pulmonary edema. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, we demonstrated that in autopsies of patients with acute respiratory failure as the cause of death, 5% were diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. Pulmonary histology revealed a significant inflammatory response, which has

  20. Approach to Adult Patients with Acute Dyspnea.

    PubMed

    DeVos, Elizabeth; Jacobson, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    Undifferentiated patients in respiratory distress require immediate attention in the emergency department. Using a thorough history and clinical examination, clinicians can determine the most likely causes of dyspnea. Understanding the pathophysiology of the most common diseases contributing to dyspnea guides rational testing and informed, expedited treatment decisions. PMID:26614245

  1. Clinical significance of lactate in acute cardiac patients

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Valente, Serafina; Chiostri, Marco; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2015-01-01

    Lactate, as a metabolite of easy and quick assessment, has been studied over time in critically ill patients in order to evaluate its prognostic ability. The present review is focused on the prognostic role of lactate levels in acute cardiac patients (that is with acute coronary syndrome, cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest, non including post cardiac surgery patients). In patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with mechanical revascularization, hyperlactatemia identified a subset of patients at higher risk for early death and in-hospital complications, being strictly related mainly to hemodynamic derangement. The prognostic impact of hyperlactatemia on mortality has been documented in patients with cardiogenic shock and in those with cardiac arrest even if there is no cut-off value of lactate to be associated with worse outcome or to guide resuscitation or hemodynamic management. Therapeutic hypothermia seems to affect per se lactate values which have been shown to progressively decrease during hypothermia. The mechanism(s) accounting for lactate levels during hypothemia seem to be multiple ranging from the metabolic effects of reduced temperatures to the hemodynamic effects of hypothermia (i.e., reduced need of vasopressor agents). Serial lactate measurements over time, or lactate clearance, have been reported to be clinically more reliable than lactate absolute value also in acute cardiac patients. Despite differences in study design, timing of lactate measurements and type of acute cardiac conditions (i.e., cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest, refractory cardiac arrest), available evidence strongly suggests that higher lactate levels can be observed on admission in non-survivors and that higher lactate clearance is associated with better outcome. PMID:26322188

  2. Acute Multiple Arteriovenous Thromboses in a Patient with Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Sayaka; Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Kishimoto, Miyako; Ikeda, Nahoko; Inoue, Kaori; Ihana, Noriko; Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Noto, Hiroshi; Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Kajio, Hiroshi; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is one of the most serious acute complications of diabetes mellitus. An arterial thrombotic tendency from DKA is relatively common; however, the occurrence of acute multiple arteriovenous thromboses is rare. We herein report the case of a 49-year-old man with DKA complicated by multiple thromboses. After transfer to our emergency room with DKA, the patient developed sudden abdominal pain. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed near-complete occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery, superior mesenteric vein, splenic artery, and right femoral artery. This occurrence highlights the need for considering the risk of thrombosis during the initial treatment for DKA. PMID:26278296

  3. Eruptive xanthomas and acute pancreatitis in a patient with hypertriglyceridemia.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Desirée Pérez; Díaz, Juan Oscar Fernández; Bobes, Carmen Maciá

    2008-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis and eruptive xanthomas are the only recognised direct complications of severe hypertriglyceridaemia. We present the case of a 33-years old male patient in whom the onset of a type 2 diabetes, added to an unknown familial hyperlipidemia, precipitated a dramatic raise of serum triglyceride levels, that cause in turn an acute pancreatitis and the appearance of dermic eruptive xanthomas. TRANSLATION: This article is translated from Spanish, originally published in Archivos de Medicina. The original work is at doi:10.3823/001. PMID:18474088

  4. Eruptive xanthomas and acute pancreatitis in a patient with hypertriglyceridemia

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Desirée Pérez; Díaz, Juan Óscar Fernández; Bobes, Carmen Maciá

    2008-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis and eruptive xanthomas are the only recognised direct complications of severe hypertriglyceridaemia. We present the case of a 33-years old male patient in whom the onset of a type 2 diabetes, added to an unknown familial hyperlipidemia, precipitated a dramatic raise of serum triglyceride levels, that cause in turn an acute pancreatitis and the appearance of dermic eruptive xanthomas. Translation This article is translated from Spanish, originally published in Archivos de Medicina. The original work is at doi:10.3823/001 PMID:18474088

  5. CLINICAL AND THERAPEUTIC CORRELATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH SLIGHT ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    MUNHOZ-FILHO, Clewis Henri; BATIGÁLIA, Fernando; FUNES, Hamilton Luiz Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas due to enzymatic autodigestion which can cause necrosis or multiple organ failure; its pathophysiology is not fully known yet. Aim To evaluate the correlation between clinical and therapeutic data in patients with mild acute pancreatitis. Methods A retrospective study in 55 medical records of patients admitted with acute mild pancreatitis was realized to analyze the association between age, leukocytosis, serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase and lactate dehydrogenase, glucose, antibiotics, time admission and Ranson´s scores. Results There was a positive association between less intensive care (strict hydration, analgesia and monitoring of vital signs), early antibiotic therapy (monotherapy), early return to diet after 48 hours and laboratory control of the serum amylase and lipase (high in the first week and decreasing after 10 days, without any prognostic value). Conclusions Changes in the management of patients with mild acute pancreatitis, such as enteral nutrition, rational use of lower spectrum antibiotics and intensive care, have contributed significantly to the reduction of hospitalization time and mortality. PMID:25861064

  6. Atrioventricular conduction disturbances immediately after hepatic graft reperfusion and their outcomes in patients undergoing liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hoon; Moon, Young-Jin; Lee, Sooho; Jeong, Sung-Moon; Song, Jun-Gol; Hwang, Gyu-Sam

    2016-07-01

    Hemodynamic perturbation during hepatic graft reperfusion in patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT) is challenging and is frequently accompanied by bradyarrhythmia and even asystole. However, detailed data on electrocardiographic (ECG) changes during reperfusion are almost nonexistent, although the correct diagnosis by record is important for the treatment. We aimed to identify ECG rhythm disturbances during graft reperfusion and to investigate risk factors and outcomes. Data from 1065 consecutive patients who underwent adult LT were analyzed. The incidence, type, and detailed characteristics of ECG changes immediately after graft reperfusion were assessed using an electronically archived intraoperative ECG database. We analyzed risk factors, postoperative outcomes including major cardiovascular events, 30-day and 1-year mortalities of recipients based on the occurrence of atrioventricular (AV) block, and asystole during reperfusion. The typical pattern of postreperfusion bradyarrhythmia was progressive PR interval prolongation until a Mobitz type 1 AV block occurred. The overall incidence of AV block was 5.0% (53/1065), and 30.2% of them (16/53) had initiated as AV block and then progressed into ventricular asystole. Fulminant hepatic failure was a significant predictor for occurrence of AV block (odds ratio [OR], 7.20; 95% confidence interval, 3.38-15.32; P < 0.001). Patients with AV block showed significantly higher incidence of postoperative major cardiovascular events (P < 0.001) and 30-day mortality (P = 0.002) than those without AV block, whereas the 1-year mortality was not different between the 2 groups (P = 0.10). The postreperfusion asystole was consistently preceded by a Mobitz type 1 AV block. The occurrence of AV block and asystole appears to be an important prognosticator. Therefore, maintaining an optimal range of physiological status and gradual unclamping of the vena cava to avoid sudden atrial distension are recommended in high

  7. Drug and alcohol abuse in patients with acute burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Swenson, J R; Dimsdale, J E; Rockwell, E; Carroll, W; Hansbrough, J

    1991-01-01

    We reviewed records of adult patients admitted to our burn unit who were reported to abuse drugs or alcohol from 1985 to 1988. The proportion of patients reported as abusing drugs increased significantly from 1987 to 1988, compared to previous years. However, there was no increase in the proportion of patients reported to abuse alcohol. Patients identified as abusing drugs had longer hospital stays, compared to patients who were not reported to abuse substances. Methamphetamine and cocaine were the drugs most often abused by patients who abused drugs or both drugs and alcohol. Mechanisms of burn injury in these patients included "accidental" burn injury related to acute intoxication, and self-injury due to psychosis or depression. PMID:1882020

  8. Taste and/or Odour Disturbances in Pediatric Patients Undergoing IV Flush with Normal Saline Administered by Prefilled Syringe

    PubMed Central

    Celetti, Steven J; Vaillancourt, Régis; Pascuet, Elena; Sharp, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Background: At the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, more than 6000 inpatients per year undergo IV saline flushes by prefilled syringe to assess and maintain patency of IV tubing. In studies involving adults, it has been reported that volatile substances may leach from syringe materials into the saline, leading to taste and/or odour disturbances. Objective: To determine the incidence of taste and/or odour disturbances in pediatric patients after flushing of IV tubing with 0.9% sodium chloride (normal saline [NS]) from prefilled syringes. Methods: Inpatients aged 5–18 years who had undergone routine flushing of central or peripheral IV tubing with commercially available prefilled NS syringes were interviewed. Children aged 5–10 years used a visual hedonic scale to rate taste and odour sensations, and those aged 11–18 years used a numeric rating scale. Results: During the study period (April to July 2011), a total of 104 pediatric inpatients (21 aged 5–10 years and 83 aged 11–18 years) underwent NS flushing of central (10 patients [10%]) or peripheral (94 patients [90%]) tubing. For 100 of these patients, BD Posiflush NaCl 0.9% 10-mL sterile prefilled syringes were used, and for 4 patients BD Saline XS NaCl 0.9% 10-mL sterile prefilled syringes were used. Taste and/or odour disturbances were reported by 76 (73%) of the patients. Twelve patients described more than one taste or odour sensation. Taste and odour disturbances were detected by children in both age groups. Conclusions: Flushing of IV tubing with prefilled NS syringes resulted in taste and/or odour disturbances in a pediatric population. PMID:23129865

  9. Autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy in a pediatric patient presenting with acute encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Kuki, Ichiro; Kawawaki, Hisashi; Okazaki, Shin; Hattori, Yuka; Horino, Asako; Higuchi, Osamu; Nakane, Shunya

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG) is an acquired immune-mediated disorder that leads to systemic autonomic failure. Autoantibodies to the ganglionic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (gAChR) are detected in 50% of AAG patients. We report the first pediatric case of AAG presenting with acute encephalitis. The patient was a 13-year-old boy who presented with orthostatic hypotension, followed by rapidly progressing disturbance of consciousness. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed significant pleocytosis and increased neopterin concentration. Head MRI showed hyperintensities in bilateral caudate nuclei, putamen, hippocampus, and insula cortex. Severe autonomic dysfunctions such as severe orthostatic hypotension, bradycardia, dysuria, prolonged constipation and vomiting appeared. These symptoms were successfully controlled by repeated immunomodulating therapy with intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy and intravenous immunoglobulin. Autoantibodies to the α3 subunit of gAChR were detected at neurological onset, but were undetectable five months later. This observation indicates that AAG should be suspected in patients manifesting acute encephalitis characterized by preceding and prolonged autonomic symptoms, and immunomodulating therapy from an early stage can be effective. PMID:26740077

  10. Improving patients' and staff's experiences of acute care.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Rob; Crawshaw, Jacob; Hood, Chloe

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this audit was to assess the effect of the Quality Mark programme on the quality of acute care received by older patients by comparing the experiences of staff and older adults before and after the programme. Data from 31 wards in 12 acute hospitals were collected over two stages. Patients and staff completed questionnaires on the perceived quality of care on the ward. Patients rated improved experiences of nutrition, staff availability and dignity. Staff received an increase in training and reported better access to support, increased time and skill to deliver care and improved morale, leadership and teamwork. Problems remained with ward comfort and mealtimes. Overall, results indicated an improvement in ratings of care quality in most domains during Quality Mark data collection. Further audits need to explore ways of improving ward comfort and mealtime experience. PMID:25727634

  11. Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia for Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Prebet, Thomas; Gore, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) represents a remarkable disease in which leukemogenesis is driven by the PML-RARα oncogene and for which targeted treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)–based therapy allows substantial chance of cure. APL is seen in a small subset of older patients, with age representing one of the most important prognostic factors for outcome of treatment. Unlike other acute leukemias, the inferior outcomes for APL in older patients relates less to changes in disease biology and more to increased toxicity of ATRA and chemotherapy combination regimens used to induce hematologic and molecular responses. Risk-adapted strategies that use less-toxic agents, such as arsenic trioxide, allow treatment of older patients, with greater efficiency and better chances of cure. PMID:21393443

  12. Neuroanatomical Predictors of Awakening in Acutely Comatose Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Robert G.; Buitrago, Manuel M.; Duckworth, Josh; Chonka, Zachary D.; Puttgen, H. Adrian; Stevens, Robert D.; Geocadin, Romergryko G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Lateral brain displacement has been associated with loss of consciousness and poor outcome in a range of acute neurologic disorders. We studied the association between lateral brain displacement and awakening from acute coma. Methods This prospective observational study included all new onset coma patients admitted to the Neurosciences Critical Care Unit (NCCU) over 12 consecutive months. Head computed tomography (CT) scans were analyzed independently at coma onset, after awakening, and at follow-up. Primary outcome measure was awakening, defined as the ability to follow commands before hospital discharge. Secondary outcome measures were discharge Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), modified Rankin Scale, Glasgow Outcome Scale, and hospital and NCCU lengths of stay. Results Of the 85 patients studied, the mean age was 58 ± 16 years, 51% were female, and 78% had cerebrovascular etiology of coma. Fifty-one percent of patients had midline shift on head CT at coma onset and 43 (51%) patients awakened. In a multivariate analysis, independent predictors of awakening were younger age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.039, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.002–1.079, p = 0.040), higher GCS score at coma onset (OR = 1.455, 95% CI = 1.157–1.831, p = 0.001), nontraumatic coma etiology (OR = 4.464, 95% CI = 1.011–19.608, p = 0.048), lesser pineal shift on follow-up CT (OR = 1.316, 95% CI = 1.073–1.615, p = 0.009), and reduction or no increase in pineal shift on follow-up CT (OR = 11.628, 95% CI = 2.207–62.500, p = 0.004). Interpretation Reversal and/or limitation of lateral brain displacement are associated with acute awakening in comatose patients. These findings suggest objective parameters to guide prognosis and treatment in patients with acute onset of coma. PMID:25628166

  13. Improving acute care for patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kate

    People with dementia are more likely to experience a decline in function, fall or fracture when admitted to hospital than the general hospital population. Informal carers' views were sought on the care their relative with dementia received in hospital. Participants were concerned about a lack of essential nursing care, harmful incidents, a decline in patient function, poor staff communication and carers' needs not being acknowledged. Care can be improved through further training, more effective communication, consideration of the appropriate place to care for people and more use of carers' knowledge. PMID:27017677

  14. Hemodynamic disturbances and VA/Q matching in hypoxemic cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Castaing, Y; Manier, G

    1989-11-01

    Arterial oxygen desaturation is commonly found in patients with cirrhosis of the liver, but severe hypoxemia is unusual. To investigate the mechanism of the impairment in gas exchange, six severely hypoxemic (mean PaO2, 55.9 +/- 5.9 mm Hg) cirrhotic patients (five confirmed by biopsy), without pulmonary or cardiovascular disease and in the absence of acute hepatic disease, were submitted to right heart catheterization. Inequalities of VA/Q were estimated in the respiratory steady state using the multiple inert gas technique. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure was low (7.2 +/- 2.3 mm Hg) and the cardiac output high (Q = 11.0 +/- 2.06 L/min), indicating a low PVR. The VA/Q mismatching of the ventilated and perfused units ranged from mild to moderate, but a large percentage of Q flowed through unventilated areas. Furthermore, there was a significant difference between predicted and measured PaO2 (9.27 +/- 5.9 mm Hg; p less than 0.01), which was attributed to either an unmeasured postpulmonary shunt (between portal and pulmonary vein) or a diffusion defect. The impairment in gas exchange in these patients is thus due primarily to an intrapulmonary, and possibly extrapulmonary, shunt. This was thought to be due mainly to an impaired regulatory mechanism of the microcirculation by the hepatic dysfunction. PMID:2805838

  15. Acute chylous ascites mimicking acute appendicitis in a patient with pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily K; Ek, Edmund; Croagh, Daniel; Spain, Lavinia A; Farrell, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous peritonitis mimicking acute appendicitis in a man with acute on chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatitis, both acute and chronic, causing the development of acute chylous ascites and peritonitis has rarely been reported in the English literature. This is the fourth published case of acute chylous ascites mimicking acute appendicitis in the literature. PMID:19824123

  16. Upregulation of Leukocytic Syncytin-1 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Zhu, Hongyan; Song, Jianxin; Jiang, Yaxian; Ouyang, Hongmei; Huang, Rongzhong; Zhang, Guiqian; Fan, Xin; Tao, Rui; Jiang, Jie; Niu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Syncytin-1, a cell membrane-localizing fusogen, is abnormally expressed in several cancers, including endometrial cancer, breast cancer, and leukemia. Although abnormal syncytin-1 expression has been detected in two-thirds of leukemia blood samples, its expression profile in acute leukemia patients has not yet been analyzed. MATERIAL AND METHODS Bone marrow samples from 50 acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cases and 14 B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (B-cell ALL) patients were subjected to flow cytometry to assess leukocyte type distributions and leukocytic syncytin-1 surface expression. RT-PCR was applied to assess leukocytic syncytin-1 mRNA expression. Statistical analysis was applied to compare syncytin-1 expression between AML and B-cell ALL patients across blasts, granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes as well as to determine clinical factors statistically associated with changes in syncytin-1 expression. RESULTS The leukocyte type distributions of the AML and B-cell ALL cohorts highly overlapped, with an observable difference in blast distribution between the 2 cohorts. The AML cohort displayed significantly greater syncytin-1 surface and mRNA expression (p<0.05). Syncytin-1 surface and mRNA expression was significantly increased across all 4 leukocyte types (p<0.05). The percentage of syncytin-1-expressing blasts was significantly greater in AML patients (p<0.05), with blasts showing the largest fold-change in syncytin-1 expression (p<0.05). M5, M5a, and M5b AML patients displayed significantly higher syncytin-1 surface expression relative to all other AML French-American-British (FAB) classifications (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest leukocytic syncytin-1 expression may play a role in the development and/or maintenance of the AML phenotype and the acute monocytic leukemia phenotype in particular. PMID:27393911

  17. Upregulation of Leukocytic Syncytin-1 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Zhu, Hongyan; Song, Jianxin; Jiang, Yaxian; Ouyang, Hongmei; Huang, Rongzhong; Zhang, Guiqian; Fan, Xin; Tao, Rui; Jiang, Jie; Niu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background Syncytin-1, a cell membrane-localizing fusogen, is abnormally expressed in several cancers, including endometrial cancer, breast cancer, and leukemia. Although abnormal syncytin-1 expression has been detected in two-thirds of leukemia blood samples, its expression profile in acute leukemia patients has not yet been analyzed. Material/Methods Bone marrow samples from 50 acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cases and 14 B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (B-cell ALL) patients were subjected to flow cytometry to assess leukocyte type distributions and leukocytic syncytin-1 surface expression. RT-PCR was applied to assess leukocytic syncytin-1 mRNA expression. Statistical analysis was applied to compare syncytin-1 expression between AML and B-cell ALL patients across blasts, granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes as well as to determine clinical factors statistically associated with changes in syncytin-1 expression. Results The leukocyte type distributions of the AML and B-cell ALL cohorts highly overlapped, with an observable difference in blast distribution between the 2 cohorts. The AML cohort displayed significantly greater syncytin-1 surface and mRNA expression (p<0.05). Syncytin-1 surface and mRNA expression was significantly increased across all 4 leukocyte types (p<0.05). The percentage of syncytin-1-expressing blasts was significantly greater in AML patients (p<0.05), with blasts showing the largest fold-change in syncytin-1 expression (p<0.05). M5, M5a, and M5b AML patients displayed significantly higher syncytin-1 surface expression relative to all other AML French-American-British (FAB) classifications (p<0.05). Conclusions These findings suggest leukocytic syncytin-1 expression may play a role in the development and/or maintenance of the AML phenotype and the acute monocytic leukemia phenotype in particular. PMID:27393911

  18. Correlates of syncope in patients with acute pulmonary thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Jenab, Yaser; Lotfi-Tokaldany, Masoumeh; Alemzadeh-Ansari, Mohammad-Javad; Seyyedi, Seyyed Reza; Shirani, Shapoor; Soudaee, Mehdi; Ghaffari-Marandi, Neda

    2015-11-01

    Identification of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE), as a cause of syncope, is important and may be life saving. We prospectively analyzed data on 335 patients with acute PTE. Relationships between syncope secondary to acute PTE and clinical findings, risk factors, and imaging modalities were analyzed. Of the 335 patients, 36 (10.7%) had syncope at presentation. Compared to patients without syncope, those with syncope had a higher frequency of right ventricular (RV) dysfunction (94.3% vs 72.1%, respectively; P value = .004) and saddle embolism (24.2% vs 10.9%, respectively; P value = .044). Frequency of RV dysfunction was similar between patients with and without saddle embolism. Although not significant, more patients with syncope had a history of previous PTE (P value = .086). By multivariable analysis, RV dysfunction and saddle embolism were independent correlates of syncope in patients with PTE. In-hospital mortality was not significantly different between the groups. In conclusion, among patients with PTE, RV dysfunction and saddle embolism were the independent correlates of syncope. PMID:24989710

  19. The impact of nocturnal disturbances on daily quality of life in patients with Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rwei-Ling; Tan, Chun-Hsiang; Wu, Ruey-Meei

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to explore nocturnal disturbances in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and to assess their impact on quality of life (QoL). Methods A total of 211 patients with PD were recruited for this study, and each participant was evaluated using the mini-mental state examination, PD sleep scale – second version (PDSS-2), pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), PD QoL questionnaire (PDQ), Epworth sleepiness scale, Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) staging, and unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale (UPDRS). Multiple regression analyses were performed to determine the contribution of the predictive variables on QoL. Results There were 56.4% males (mean age: 64.08 years; disease duration: 6.02 years; H&Y stage: 2.25; and UPDRS: 33.01) in this study. Our patients’ actual sleep time was 5.96±1.16 hours and the average sleep efficiency was 82.93%±12.79%. Up to 64.4% of patients were classified as “poor” sleepers and 23.8% suffered from daytime sleepiness. The final stepwise regression model revealed that UPDRS parts I and II, the sleep disturbance and daytime dysfunction components of the PSQI, the PD symptoms at night subscale of the PDSS-2, and the levodopa equivalent dose were significant predictors of the PDQ score (R2=53, F7,165=28.746; P<0.001). Conclusion Most of the PD patients have sleep problems, and nearly one-quarter of them have abnormal daytime somnolence. The nocturnal disturbances were found to result in worse QoL in PD patients. Ethnicity-specific effects of susceptibility to sleep disturbances were discussed, and these results also highlighted the direction for further studies to explore when examining effective management programs toward these disturbances. PMID:26273203

  20. Effect of Sleep Disturbances on Quality of Life, Diabetes Self-Care Behavior, and Patient-Reported Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chasens, Eileen R; Luyster, Faith S

    2016-02-01

    IN BRIEF Poor sleep quality and sleep disorders, particularly insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, and restless legs syndrome, are prevalent among people with type 2 diabetes. Evidence suggests that coexisting diabetes and sleep disturbances are associated with decreases in quality of life, diabetes self-care behaviors, and patient-reported outcomes. Additional research is required to determine the effect of treatment of sleep disorders on patient-centered outcomes in people with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26912961

  1. Mechanical ventilation of patients with acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sessler, C N

    1998-10-01

    Ventilatory management of patients with acute lung injury (ALI), particularly its most severe subset, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), is complex. Newer lung protective strategies emphasize measures to enhance alveolar recruitment and avoid alveolar overdistention, thus minimizing the risk of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Key components of such strategies include the use of smaller-than-conventional tidal volumes which maintain peak transpulmonary pressure below the pressure associated with overdistention, and titration of positive end-expiratory pressure to promote maximal alveolar recruitment. Novel techniques, including prone positioning, inverse ratio ventilation, tracheal gas insufflation, and high frequency ventilation, are considerations in severe ARDS. No single approach is best for all patients; adjustment of ventilatory parameters to individual characteristics, such as lung mechanics and gas exchange, is required. PMID:9891634

  2. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Pharmacogenetics of the metabolic disturbances and atherosclerosis associated with antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Veloso, Sergi; Peraire, Joaquim; Viladés, Consuelo; López-Dupla, Miguel; Escoté, Xavier; Olona, Montserrat; Garcia-Pardo, Graciano; Gómez-Bertomeu, Frederic; Soriano, Antoni; Sirvent, Joan-Josep; Vidal, Francesc

    2010-10-01

    The availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy has markedly improved the survival rate and quality of life in patients infected with HIV. At present, however, there is still no cure for HIV and those undergoing treatment have to do so for life. The use of antiretroviral drugs has been associated with several toxicities that limit their success. Some acute and chronic toxicities associated with these drugs include hypersensitivity reactions, neurotoxicity, nephropathy, liver damage, the appearance of body fat redistribution syndrome and the different metabolic alterations that accompany it. Some of these toxicities are family- or even drug-specific. Since not all patients that take a particular antiretroviral medication develop the adverse effect that has been attributed to that drug, it has therefore been postulated that there must be a genetically-conditioned individual predisposition to developing the adverse effect. Pharmacogenetics is the science that studies interindividual variations in the response to and toxicity of drugs due to variations in the genetic composition of individuals. Sufficient advances have been made in this discipline to allow this fertile field of research to move out of the basic science laboratory and into clinical applications. The present article reviews the investigations that have been published regarding the association between the genetic determinants of persons infected with HIV and the metabolic toxicity and chronic vascular consequences resulting from antiretroviral drugs. The influence of host genetic variants on dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, lipodystrophy and atherosclerosis are presented and discussed. PMID:20687887

  4. Effect of Thoracentesis on Intubated Patients with Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Matthew B; Serna-Gallegos, Derek; Ault, Mark; Khan, Ahsan; Chung, Rex; Ley, Eric J; Melo, Nicolas; Margulies, Daniel R

    2016-03-01

    Pleural effusions occur frequently in mechanically ventilated patients, but no consensus exists regarding the clinical benefit of effusion drainage. We sought to determine the impact of thoracentesis on gas exchange in patients with differing severities of acute lung injury (ALI). A retrospective analysis was conducted on therapeutic thoracenteses performed on intubated patients in an adult surgical intensive care unit of a tertiary center. Effusions judged by ultrasound to be 400 mL or larger were drained. Subjects were divided into groups based on their initial P:F ratios: normal >300, ALI 200 to 300, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) <200. Baseline characteristics, physiologic variables, arterial blood gases, and ventilator settings before and after the intervention were analyzed. The primary end point was the change in measures of oxygenation. Significant improvements in P:F ratios (mean ± SD) were seen only in patients with ARDS (50.4 ± 38.5, P = 0.001) and ALI (90.6 ± 161.7, P = 0.022). Statistically significant improvement was observed in the pO2 (31.1, P = 0.005) and O2 saturation (4.1, P < 0.001) of the ARDS group. The volume of effusion removed did not correlate with changes in individual patient's oxygenation. These data support the role of therapeutic thoracentesis for intubated patients with abnormal P:F ratios. PMID:27099064

  5. Acute management of poor condition subarachnoid hemorrhage patients

    PubMed Central

    Eleftherios, Archavlis; Carvi y Nievas, Mario Nazareno

    2007-01-01

    Poor condition subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients present a high mortality and morbidity. In this study, we reviewed the acute interventional (surgical and endovascular) management of 109 SAH-poor condition patients, who were treated as early as logistically possible after confirming stable circulation parameters. Patients over the age of 70 years, without clinical response to painful stimulation were excluded. We recognized at least 3 different postinterventional therapeutic approaches: (1) Norm- or hypovolemic, normotensive hemodilution in 30 patients with space-occupying intracranial hematomas as well as in 31 cases with acute cerebro-spinal-fluid obstruction. (2) Normovolemic, hypertensive hemodilution after unilateral decompressive craniotomy in 23 surgical- and 2 endovascular-treated patients with focalized space occupying lesions and reduced cerebral perfusion. (3) Hypovolemic, normo-, or hypertensive hemodilution after bilateral decompressive craniotomy in 23 cases with massive brain-swelling. We observed a reduced mortality (21%). The overall late outcome was favorable in 56% and unfavorable in 23%. Selective aggressive treatment adapted to increase the cerebral perfusion, seems to be an effective therapy to improve the survival and outcome of several poor condition SAH-patients. PMID:18200827

  6. Targeted Therapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-28

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  7. Cardiac computed tomography in patients with acute chest pain.

    PubMed

    Nieman, Koen; Hoffmann, Udo

    2015-04-14

    The efficient and reliable evaluation of patients with acute chest pain is one of the most challenging tasks in the emergency department. Coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography may play a major role, since it permits ruling out coronary artery disease with high accuracy if performed with expertise in properly selected and prepared patients. Several randomized trials have established early cardiac CT as a viable safe and potentially more efficient alternative to functional testing in the evaluation of acute chest pain. Ongoing investigations explore whether advanced anatomic and functional assessments such as high-risk coronary plaque, resting myocardial perfusion, and left ventricular function, or the simulation of the fractional coronary flow reserve will add information to the anatomic assessment for stenosis, which would allow expanding the benefits of cardiac CT from triage to treatment decisions. Especially, the combination of high-sensitive troponins and coronary computed tomography angiography may play a valuable role in future strategies for the management of patients presenting with acute chest pain. PMID:25687351

  8. The Effects of Propofol and Thiopental Continuous Infusion on Serum Potassium Disturbances in Neurosurgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Kyong; Lim, Young-Jin; Ju, Jae-Woo; Kim, Jin Wook

    2015-01-01

    Objective The potassium disturbance associated with thiopental continuous infusion in neurosurgical patients is well known. However, the effect of propofol continuous infusion on serum potassium levels has not been investigated extensively. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 60 consecutive patients who received coma therapy or deep sedation for intracranial pressure control using either thiopental or propofol between January 2010 and January 2012. Results The overall incidence of hypokalemia (K<3.5 mmol/L) was comparable between thiopental and propofol groups (89.2% vs. 82.6%). But, the incidence of moderate to severe hypokalemia (K<3.0 mmol/L) was significantly higher in thiopental group (51.4% vs. 13.0%, p=0.003). The lowest potassium level (2.9 mmol/L vs. 3.2 mmol/L, p=0.020) was lower in thiopental group. The patients in the thiopental group required greater potassium replacement than the propofol group patients (0.08 mmol/kg/h vs. 0.02 mmol/kg/h, p<0.001). On multivariate analysis, thiopental [odds ratio, 95% confidence interval, 7.31 (1.78-27.81); p=0.005] was associated with moderate to severe hypokalemia during continuous infusion. The incidence of rebound hyperkalemia (K>5.0 mmol/L, 32.4% vs. 4.3%, p=0.010) and the peak potassium concentration (4.8 mmol/L vs. 4.2 mmol/L, p=0.037) after the cessation of therapy were higher in thiopental group. On multivariate analysis, thiopental [8.82 (1.00-77.81); p=0.049] and duration of continuous infusion [1.02 (1.00-1.04); p=0.016] were associated with rebound hyperkalemia once therapy was discontinued. Conclusion Propofol was less frequently associated with moderate to severe hypokalemia after induction and rebound hyperkalemia following the cessation of continuous infusion than thiopental. PMID:25810860

  9. Feasibility of a Patient-Controlled Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Pain, Fatigue, and Sleep Disturbance in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kwekkeboom, Kristine L.; Abbott-Anderson, Kristen; Wanta, Britt

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of a patient-controlled cognitive-behavioral intervention for pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance during treatment for advanced cancer, and to assess initial efficacy of the intervention in controlling symptoms. Design One-group pretest-posttest design. Setting Outpatient oncology clinics at a Comprehensive Cancer Center in the Midwestern United States. Sample 30 adults with advanced (recurrent or metastatic) colorectal, lung, prostate, or GYN cancer receiving chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Methods Participants completed baseline measures (demographics, symptom inventory) and received education and training to use an MP3 player loaded with 12 cognitive-behavioral strategies (e.g., relaxation exercises, guided imagery, nature sound recordings). Participants used the strategies as needed for symptom management over the following 2-weeks, keeping a log of symptom ratings with each use. Following the two-week intervention, participants completed a second symptom inventory and an evaluation of the intervention. Main Research Variables Feasibility, patient-controlled cognitive-behavioral intervention, pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance. Findings 73% of the 43 eligible patients agreed to participate (N=30) and of these, 90% (n=27) completed the study. The majority of participants reported that they enjoyed the intervention, had learned useful skills, and perceived improvement in their symptoms. Symptom scores at 2-weeks did not differ significantly from baseline, however significant reductions in pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance severity were found in ratings made immediately before and after use of a cognitive-behavioral strategy. Conclusions The patient-controlled cognitive-behavioral intervention appears feasible for further study and could reduce day-to-day severity of co-occurring pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance. Implications for Nursing A randomized controlled trial is necessary to test efficacy of the intervention for co

  10. Disturbed flow in a patient-specific arteriovenous fistula for hemodialysis: Multidirectional and reciprocating near-wall flow patterns.

    PubMed

    Ene-Iordache, Bogdan; Semperboni, Cristina; Dubini, Gabriele; Remuzzi, Andrea

    2015-07-16

    Actual surgical creation of vascular access has unacceptable failure rates of which stenosis formation is a major cause. We have shown previously in idealized models of side-to-end arteriovenous fistula that disturbed flow, a near-wall hemodynamic condition characterized by low and oscillating fluid shear stress, develops in focal points that corresponds closely to the sites of future stenosis. Our present study was aimed at investigating whether disturbed flow occurs in patient-specific fistulae, too. We performed an image-based computational fluid dynamics study within a realistic model of wrist side-to-end anastomosis fistula at six weeks post-surgery, with subject-specific blood rheology and boundary conditions. We then categorized disturbed flow by means of established hemodynamic wall parameters. The numerical analysis revealed laminar flow within the arterial limbs and a complex flow field in the swing segment, featuring turbulent eddies leading to high frequency oscillation of the wall shear stress vectors. Multidirectional disturbed flow developed on the anastomosis floor and on the whole swing segment. Reciprocating disturbed flow zones were found on the distal artery near the floor and on the inner wall of the swing segment. We have found that both multidirectional and reciprocating disturbed flow develop on the inner side of the swing segment in a patient-specific side-to-end fistula used for vascular access after six weeks post-operatively. This has obvious implications for elucidating the hemodynamic forces involved in the initiation of venous wall thickening in vascular access. PMID:25920898

  11. Herpes zoster-associated acute urinary retention in immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Hortense, Juliana

    2014-01-01

    Herpes zoster-associated urinary retention is an uncommon event related to virus infection of the S2-S4 dermatome. The possible major reasons are ipsilateral hemicystitis, neuritis-induced or myelitis-associated virus infection. We report a case of a 65-year-old immunocompetent female patient who presented an acute urinary retention after four days under treatment with valacyclovir for gluteal herpes zoster. The patient had to use a vesical catheter, was treated with antibiotics and corticosteroids and fully recovered after eight weeks. PMID:25387508

  12. [Tulozin in combined treatment of patients with acute urinary retention].

    PubMed

    Avdoshin, V P; Andriukhin, M I; Mikhaĭlikov, T G; Ol'shanskaia, E V; Khunov, A Z

    2009-01-01

    There is much evidence that tulozin promotes recovery of spontaneous urination, Qmax and is effective in combined treatment of patients with acute retention of urine caused by prostatic adenoma. Tulozin produces positive changes in the lower urinary tract symptoms. Rare occurrence of side effects enables long-term treatment and achievement of good therapeutic response. Tulozin is recommended for patients of younger age, with minimal comorbid pathology, hypotonic with orthostatic reactions, history of side effects in the treatment of other alpha-adrenoblockers, in comorbid hypertention, hypercholesterolemia, retrograde ejaculation, low potention, overactive bladder, prostatitis, after prostatic TUR, transvesical adenomectomy. PMID:19824378

  13. A Perspective on the Primary Care of Patients With Behavior, Mood, and Thought Disturbances: Clinical Applications of Olanzapine

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Donald P.; Hurley, Daniel J.; McGuire, Hillary C.; Hay, Linda K.

    2001-01-01

    Primary care practitioners are in an ideal position to initiate treatment for patients with behavior, mood, and thought disturbances. It is believed that early identification and treatment of these symptomatic features of primary or secondary central nervous system disorders may significantly reduce morbidity and benefit the patient, his/her family, and involved caregivers, including the primary care physician. A broad list of central nervous system–active medications are utilized by family physicians to treat patients who exhibit symptoms of agitation, altered mood, and disordered thought. Some medications have demonstrated superiority over placebo or active medicines in reported clinical trials. This article is a brief overview of the safety and efficacy from reported studies of the use of medications frequently used to treat symptoms related to behavior, mood, and thought disturbances, with a specific focus on the clinical applicability of olanzapine. PMID:15014573

  14. Eating disorders should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with acute kidney injury and electrolyte derangement.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Ben Edward Michael; Lawman, Sarah H A

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a 40-year-old woman with a history of ongoing anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa who has required multiple admissions to hospital for management of acute kidney injury (AKI) and electrolyte derangement. This case is of interest as recent studies have highlighted the significant prevalence of disordered eating and the major public health implications this may have. We discuss the unusual finding of hypercalcaemia in this case and address the investigation and management of AKI and electrolyte disturbance in a patient with anorexia and bulimia. PMID:24654247

  15. Eating disorders should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with acute kidney injury and electrolyte derangement

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Ben Edward Michael; Lawman, Sarah H A

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a 40-year-old woman with a history of ongoing anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa who has required multiple admissions to hospital for management of acute kidney injury (AKI) and electrolyte derangement. This case is of interest as recent studies have highlighted the significant prevalence of disordered eating and the major public health implications this may have. We discuss the unusual finding of hypercalcaemia in this case and address the investigation and management of AKI and electrolyte disturbance in a patient with anorexia and bulimia. PMID:24654247

  16. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Distress in patients with acute leukemia: A concept analysis

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Tara A.; Rosenzweig, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with acute leukemia require immediate and aggressive in-patient treatment that results in many weeks to months of hospitalization. Thus, it is not surprising that distress has been found in as many as 45.5% of patients. While distress is a regularly reported outcome measure in clinical research, currently there is a lack of a clear consistent and universal definition of this concept. Objective The purpose of this article is to examine the current state of the science surrounding the concept of distress and propose a model of distress for patients with acute leukemia. Interventions/Methods The Walker and Avant framework was used to guide the analysis of the concept of distress in patients with AL. The findings from this analysis were then used to generate a model guided by the current science. Results Distress in AL is generally accepted as multi-dimensional, quantifiable, subjective and temporal. Antecedents to distress include: demographics; intrinsic factors; social support; disease progression; treatment; and communication. Consequences to distress include: decreased quality of life; patient outcomes; as well as the severity of physical and psychological symptoms. Conclusions Distress is an outcome measure that is frequently assessed and reported within the literature. The operationalization of distress varies by investigator, limiting its generalizabiliy. Implications for Practice The proposed conceptual model may be used to guide further research on distress in patients with AL at high risk for negative outcomes. Improved understanding of patient distress may guide interventions aimed at managing the psychosocial needs for patients receiving treatment for AL. PMID:23632470

  19. [MUSCLE WEAKNESS WITH NO SIGNS OF POLYNEUROPATHY IN PATIENTS WITH PROLONGED DISTURBANCE OF CONSCIOUSNESS. CASE REPORT].

    PubMed

    Kondrat'eva, E A; Kondrat'ev, S A; Ivanova, N E

    2016-01-01

    Paper present several clinical examples of prolonged tetraplegia, which could be outcome not only of polyneuromyopathy of critical states, but also of disturbances in hierarchical relationship in CNS. PMID:27468509

  20. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-25

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Dyspnoea management in acute coronary syndrome patients treated with ticagrelor

    PubMed Central

    Parodi, Guido; Storey, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of dyspnoea in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients has always been considered a challenging diagnostic and therapeutic clinical scenario. P2Y12 platelet receptor inhibitors (i.e., clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor) are currently the cornerstone of treatment of ACS patients. Thus, in the last few years, the potential association between ACS and dyspnoea has also become more challenging with the increasing use of ticagrelor in these patients due to its beneficial effects on ischaemic event prevention and mortality, since ticagrelor can induce dyspnoea as a side effect. The present article is intended to review the current literature regarding dyspnoea occurrence in ACS patients, especially those treated with ticagrelor, and to propose ticagrelor-associated dyspnoea management recommendations based on current knowledge. PMID:25267878

  3. Respect in the care of older patients in acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Koskenniemi, Jaana; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Suhonen, Riitta

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of older patients and their next of kin with regards to respect in the care given in an acute hospital. The data were collected using tape-recorded interviews (10 patients and 10 next of kin) and analysed via inductive content analysis. Based on the analysis, the concept of respect can be defined by the actions taken by nurses (polite behaviour, the patience to listen, reassurance, response to information needs, assistance in basic needs, provision of pain relief, response to wishes and time management) and next of kin (support, assistance and advocacy) and by factors related to the environment (appreciation of older people in society, management of health-care organizations, the nursing culture, the flow of information and patient placement). The information will be used to develop an instrument for assessing how well respect is maintained in the care of older patients. PMID:23131699

  4. Invasive fungal diseases in patients with acute lymphoid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nicolato, Andrea; Nouér, Simone A; Garnica, Marcia; Portugal, Rodrigo; Maiolino, Angelo; Nucci, Marcio

    2016-09-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) represents an important complication in patients with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of IFD in ALL patients with neutropenia, identify factors associated with IFD, and estimate the impact of IFD on the outcome. All patients with ALL who developed febrile neutropenia from 1987 to 2013 were evaluated. Cases of IFD were classified as proven or probable. Factors associated with IFD were evaluated by comparing episodes with and without a diagnosis of IFD. Among 350 episodes of febrile neutropenia, 31 IFDs were diagnosed (8.8%). Prolonged neutropenia was the only factor associated with IFD caused by yeasts. Factors associated with IFD caused by molds by multivariate analysis were the period after 2008, receipt of allogeneic transplant, relapsed ALL and prolonged neutropenia. Patients in relapse should receive induction chemotherapy in rooms with HEPA filter and receive antifungal prophylaxis. PMID:26949001

  5. Hemodynamics of Acute Right Heart Failure in Mechanically Ventilated Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    McLean, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    In critically ill patients with circulatory shock, the role of the left ventricle has long been appreciated and the object of measurement and therapeutic targeting. The right ventricle is often under appreciated and dysfunction may be overlooked. Generally, the right ventricle operates passively to support the ejection of the left ventricular diastolic volume. A loss of right ventricular wall compliance secondary to pulmonary pressures may result in an alteration in the normal pressure-volume relationship, ultimately affecting the stroke volume and cardiac output. Traditional right heart filling indices may increase because of decreasing compliance, further complicating the picture. The pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular dysfunction in acute respiratory distress syndrome combined with the effects of a mean airway pressure strategy may create an acute cor pulmonale. PMID:26567491

  6. Patterns of disturbed myocardial perfusion in patients with coronary artery disease. Regional myocardial perfusion in angina pectoris

    SciTech Connect

    Selwyn, A.P.; Forse, G.; Fox, K.; Jonathan, A.; Steiner, R.

    1981-07-01

    Fifty patients who presented with angina pectoris were studied to examine the disturbances of regional myocardial perfusion during stress. Each patient underwent 16-point precordial mapping of the ECG during an exercise test, and coronary and left ventricular angiography. Regional myocardial perfusion was assessed using an atrial pacing test and a short-lived radionuclide, krypton-81m. Eleven patients had negative exercise tests and uniform increases in myocardial activity of krypton-81m of 98 +/- 18.0% during pacing. Ten patients performed 30,000-43,000 J in positive exercise tests. These patients showed abnormal coronary anatomy and increases in myocardial activity of krypton-81m to remote and jeopardized myocardium at the onset of pacing. However, further pacing produced a decrease in activity in the affected segment of 68.0 +/- 9.0% accompanied by ST-segment depression and angina. Twelve patients achieved 26,000-32,000 J in positive exercise tests and had significant coronary artery disease. Atrial pacing produced increased activity of krypton-81m to remote myocardium. The jeopardized segment at first showed no change and then a decrease in regional activity of krypton-81m (89.0 +/- 17%) accompanied by ST-segment depression and chest pain. Seventeen patients achieved only 7000-22,000 J in positive exercise tests. These patients showed abnormal coronary anatomy and developed decreases in regional activity of krypton-81m to the affected segment of myocardium starting at the onset of atrial pacing and decreasing by 88 +/- 0 7.0% below control. We conclude that different patterns of disturbed myocardial distribution of krypton-81m are present during stress-induced ischemia in patients with coronary artery disease. There was a close temporal relationship between these disturbances and ST-segment depression.

  7. Methylene Blue for Acute Septic Cardiomyopathy in a Burned Patient.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Joseph J; Burger, Christina F

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this case summary was to describe the use of methylene blue (MB) in a burned patient with acute septic cardiomyopathy. A 60-year-old Caucasian man was admitted to the Burn Intensive Care Unit with 45% TBSA burns after a house explosion. During the course of his care, he experienced hypotension that was refractory to fluid therapy and vasoactive medications. Echocardiography and right heart catheterization showed new acute systolic dysfunction with concurrent elevated systemic vascular resistance (SVR). High-dose inotropic agents did not improve cardiac function, and septic shock rendered him a poor candidate for mechanical intra-aortic balloon pump support. MB was administered to sensitize the myocardium to catecholamines and improve contractility with the goal of weaning the other vasoactive medications and diuresing for afterload reduction when hemodynamic stability was achieved. MB has been described in critical care medicine predominately for vasoplegia after cardiopulmonary bypass and vasodilatory septic shock., Our patient had acute septic cardiomyopathy that was refractory to standard pharmacologic approaches to inotropy with concurrent elevated SVR. Hypothesizing the differential temporal effect of inducible nitric oxide synthase on the vasculature and myocardium, we administered MB to improve contractility and support the impending vasodilatory effects of distributive shock. Although MB is not a new drug, the application for septic cardiomyopathy with a supranormal SVR is a unique application. Because of the risk profile associated with MB, we recommend drug monitoring utilizing serial echocardiography and/or right heart catheterization. PMID:25798807

  8. Colchicine Acutely Suppresses Local Cardiac Production of Inflammatory Cytokines in Patients With an Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Gonzalo J; Robertson, Stacy; Barraclough, Jennifer; Xia, Qiong; Mallat, Ziad; Bursill, Christina; Celermajer, David S; Patel, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18, and downstream IL-6 are key inflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease. Colchicine is believed to block the NLRP3 inflammasome, a cytosolic complex responsible for the production of IL-1β and IL-18. In vivo effects of colchicine on cardiac cytokine release have not been previously studied. This study aimed to (1) assess the local cardiac production of inflammatory cytokines in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), stable coronary artery disease and in controls; and (2) determine whether acute administration of colchicine inhibits their production. Methods and Results Forty ACS patients, 33 with stable coronary artery disease, and 10 controls, were included. ACS and stable coronary artery disease patients were randomized to oral colchicine treatment (1 mg followed by 0.5 mg 1 hour later) or no colchicine, 6 to 24 hours prior to cardiac catheterization. Blood samples from the coronary sinus, aortic root (arterial), and lower right atrium (venous) were collected and tested for IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 using ELISA. In ACS patients, coronary sinus levels of IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 were significantly higher than arterial and venous levels (P=0.017, <0.001 and <0.001, respectively). Transcoronary (coronary sinus-arterial) gradients for IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 were highest in ACS patients and lowest in controls (P=0.077, 0.033, and 0.014, respectively). Colchicine administration significantly reduced transcoronary gradients of all 3 cytokines in ACS patients by 40% to 88% (P=0.028, 0.032, and 0.032, for IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6, respectively). Conclusions ACS patients exhibit increased local cardiac production of inflammatory cytokines. Short-term colchicine administration rapidly and significantly reduces levels of these cytokines. PMID:26304941

  9. Incidence, prognosis, and factors associated with cardiac arrest in patients hospitalized with acute coronary syndromes (the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events Registry)

    PubMed Central

    McManus, David D.; Aslam, Farhan; Goyal, Parag; Goldberg, Robert J.; Huang, Wei; Gore, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Contemporary data are lacking with respect to the incidence rates of, factors associated with, and impact of cardiac arrest from ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia (VF-CA) on hospital survival in patients admitted with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The objectives of this multinational study were to characterize trends in the magnitude of in-hospital VF-CA complicating an ACS and to describe its impact over time on hospital prognosis. Methods In 59 161 patients enrolled in the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events Study between 2000 and 2007, we determined the incidence, prognosis, and factors associated with VF-CA. Results Overall, 3618 patients (6.2%) developed VF-CA during their hospitalization for an ACS. Incidence rates of VF-CA declined over time. Patients who experienced VF-CA were on average older and had a greater burden of cardiovascular disease, yet were less likely to receive evidence-based cardiac therapies than patients in whom VF-CA did not occur. Hospital death rates were 55.3% and 1.5% in patients with and without VF-CA, respectively. There was a greater than 50% decline in the hospital death rates associated with VF-CA during the years under study. Patients with a VF-CA occurring after 48 h were at especially high risk for dying during hospitalization (82.8%). Conclusion Despite reductions in the magnitude of, and short-term mortality from, VF-CA, VF-CA continues to exert an adverse effect on survival among patients hospitalized with an ACS. Opportunities exist to improve the identification and treatment of ACS patients at risk for VF-CA to reduce the incidence of, and mortality from, this serious arrhythmic disturbance. PMID:22157357

  10. Sleep–wake disturbances in cancer patients: narrative review of literature focusing on improving quality of life outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Suzanne S; Connors, Laurie M; Fayad, Ameera; Dean, Grace E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Evidence suggests a high prevalence of sleep–wake disturbances in patients with cancer, occurring at diagnosis, during treatment, and continuing to survivorship. Yet associations between sleep–wake disturbances and the impact on quality of life outcomes is less clear. The purpose of this narrative review of the literature is to evaluate sleep–wake disturbances in patients with cancer, to describe the influence of poor sleep on quality of life as an outcome, and to evaluate the evidence to recommend future interventions. Framework and methods This review was guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) approach. Four databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Embase) were searched using terms “cancer OR neoplasm”, “sleep, sleep disturbance, sleep disorders or insomnia”, and “quality of life”; the search included all years, English language, and peer-reviewed articles on research studies. Studies included measurements of sleep and quality of life in cancer patients at a minimum of two time points and demonstrated relationships between sleep and quality of life. Data were collected on date, patient demographics, cancer type and treatment, timeframe, design, measurement, variables, and results. Results This narrative review demonstrates that sleep–wake disturbance is a major problem/symptom in patients with cancer. Of the 18 studies included, measurement of sleep-related variables included objective and subjective measures; however, direct measurement of the associations between sleep and quality of life was not common. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia and mind–body interventions demonstrated feasibility when implemented into cancer care settings. In addition, the majority of interventions exhibited moderate effectiveness in improving sleep–wake disturbance and quality of life outcomes. Conclusion The studies predominantly reported that poor sleep negatively impacts quality of life

  11. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Promoting patient-centred fundamental care in acute healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Feo, Rebecca; Kitson, Alison

    2016-05-01

    Meeting patients' fundamental care needs is essential for optimal safety and recovery and positive experiences within any healthcare setting. There is growing international evidence, however, that these fundamentals are often poorly executed in acute care settings, resulting in patient safety threats, poorer and costly care outcomes, and dehumanising experiences for patients and families. Whilst care standards and policy initiatives are attempting to address these issues, their impact has been limited. This discussion paper explores, through a series of propositions, why fundamental care can be overlooked in sophisticated, high technology acute care settings. We argue that the central problem lies in the invisibility and subsequent devaluing of fundamental care. Such care is perceived to involve simple tasks that require little skill to execute and have minimal impact on patient outcomes. The propositions explore the potential origins of this prevailing perception, focusing upon the impact of the biomedical model, the consequences of managerial approaches that drive healthcare cultures, and the devaluing of fundamental care by nurses themselves. These multiple sources of invisibility and devaluing surrounding fundamental care have rendered the concept underdeveloped and misunderstood both conceptually and theoretically. Likewise, there remains minimal role clarification around who should be responsible for and deliver such care, and a dearth of empirical evidence and evidence-based metrics. In explicating these propositions, we argue that key to transforming the delivery of acute healthcare is a substantial shift in the conceptualisation of fundamental care. The propositions present a cogent argument that counters the prevailing perception that fundamental care is basic and does not require systematic investigation. We conclude by calling for the explicit valuing and embedding of fundamental care in healthcare education, research, practice and policy. Without this

  13. Levels of acute inflammatory biomarkers in advanced prostate cancer patients with α2-macroglobulin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kanoh, Yuhsaku; Ohtani, Hideki; Egawa, Shin; Baba, Shiro; Akahoshi, Tohru

    2011-12-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), interleukin-6 (IL-6), α1-antitrypsin (α1AT), α1-acid glycoprotein (α1AG) and ceruloplasmin (CP) are acute inflammatory biomarkers that increase in various conditions including infection, inflammation, malignancy and tissue disturbance. In contrast, α2-macroglobulin (α2M) is involved in inflammation through its function as a carrier protein of IL-6. We had previously reported on advanced prostate cancer (PCa) patients with multiple distant bone metastases in whom serum α2M levels were markedly decreased (α2M deficiency). However, the relationship between serum levels of α2M and acute inflammatory biomarkers in PCa patients with or without α2M deficiency has not been demonstrated. In the present study, we examined serum levels of CRP, SAA, IL-6, α1AT, α1AG and CP in PCa patients with or without α2M deficiency to establish clinical significance and changes in these biomarkers during PCa disease progression. We found that upon addition of recombinant IL-6 (rIL-6) to serum from PCa patients with α2M deficiency, since a function of α2M is to bind and stabilize IL-6, the α2M-IL-6 complex and free endogenous IL-6 were not detectable. Serum levels of the α2M-independent markers, α1AT, α1AG and CP, in all PCa patients regardless of α2M deficiency were significantly higher than in healthy controls, but those of the α2M-dependent molecules, CRP, SAA and IL-6, were not increased in PCa patients with α2M deficiency. Therefore, quantitation of both α2M-dependent (CRP, SAA and IL-6) and α2M-independent (α1AT, α1AG and CP) acute inflammatory biomarkers in advanced PCa patients may be an auxiliary indicator, together with prostate-specific antigen (PSA), to monitor PCa disease progression. PMID:21894431

  14. Low-Dose Atypical Antipsychotic Risperidone Improves the 5-Year Outcome in Alzheimer's Disease Patients with Sleep Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Yin, You; Liu, Yan; Zhuang, Jianhua; Pan, Xiao; Li, Peng; Yang, Yuechang; Li, Yan-Peng; Zhao, Zheng-Qing; Huang, Liu-Qing; Zhao, Zhong-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances (SD) accelerate the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and increase the stress of caregivers. However, the long-term outcome of disturbed nocturnal sleep/wake patterns in AD and on increased stress of spousal caregivers is unclear. This study assessed the 5-year effect of nocturnal SD on the long-term outcome in AD patients. A total of 156 donepezil-treated mild-moderate AD patients (93 AD + SD and 63 AD - SD as a control group) were recruited. The AD + SD patients were formed into 4 subgroups according to the preferences of spousal caregivers for treatment with atypical antipsychotics (0.5-1 mg risperidone, n = 22), non-benzodiazepine hypnotic (5-10 mg zolpidem tartrate, n = 33), melatonin (2.55 mg, n = 9), or no-drug treatment (n = 29). SD were evaluated by polysomnography, sleep scale, and cognitive scale examinations. Moreover, all spousal caregivers of AD patients were assessed using a series of scales, including sleep, anxiety, mood, and treatment attitude scales. Our data showed that nocturnal sleep/wake disturbances were significantly associated with lower 5-year outcomes for AD patients, earlier nursing home placement, and more negative emotions of spousal caregivers. Treatment with low-dose atypical antipsychotic risperidone improved the 5-year outcome in AD + SD patients. In conclusion, low-dose atypical antipsychotic risperidone improves the 5-year outcome in AD patients with SD. Moreover, improvement of nocturnal sleep problems in AD patients will also bring better emotional stability for AD caregivers. PMID:26279176

  15. Management of acute heart failure in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Antonio; Arrigo, Mattia; Tolppanen, Heli; Gayat, Etienne; Laribi, Said; Metra, Marco; Seronde, Marie France; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is the most common cause of unplanned hospital admissions, and is associated with high mortality rates. Over the next few decades, the combination of improved cardiovascular disease survival and progressive ageing of the population will further increase the prevalence of AHF in developed countries. New recommendations on the management of AHF have been published recently, but as elderly patients are under-represented in clinical trials, and scientific evidence is often lacking, the diagnosis and management of AHF in this population is challenging. The clinical presentation of AHF, especially in patients aged>85years, differs substantially from that in younger patients, with unspecific symptoms, such as fatigue and confusion, often overriding dyspnoea. Older patients also have a different risk profile compared with younger patients: often heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and infection as the most frequent precipitating factor of AHF. Moreover, co-morbidities, disability and frailty are common, and increase morbidity, recovery time, readmission rates and mortality; their presence should be detected during a geriatric assessment. Diagnostics and treatment for AHF should be tailored according to cardiopulmonary and geriatric status, giving special attention to the patient's preferences for care. Whereas many elderly AHF patients may be managed similarly to younger patients, different strategies should be applied in the presence of relevant co-morbidities, disability and frailty. The option of palliative care should be considered at an early stage, to avoid unnecessary and harmful diagnostics and treatments. PMID:27185193

  16. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Heidi L.; Leykum, Luci K.; Mattison, Melissa L. P.; Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Meltzer, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Hospitalists and others acute care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients (ACOP) Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through four steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a Partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of ten research questions in the following areas: advanced care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision-making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. PMID:25877486

  17. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient.

    PubMed

    Wald, Heidi L; Leykum, Luci K; Mattison, Melissa L P; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Meltzer, David O

    2015-05-01

    Hospitalists and others acute-care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through 4 steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of 10 research questions in the following areas: advanced-care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. PMID:25877486

  18. Relationship of platelet indices with acute stent thrombosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Balli, Mehmet; Taşolar, Hakan; Çetin, Mustafa; Cagliyan, Caglar Emre; Gözükara, Mehmet Yavuz; Yilmaz, Mahmut; Elbasan, Zafer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite major advances in stent technology and antithrombotic therapy, the development of stent thrombosis continues to be a major problem in patients who have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Although a few studies have investigated the relationship between early stent thrombosis and platelet activity, the relationship between acute stent thrombosis (AST) (within the first 24 h) and platelet indices is unclear. Aim We investigated the relationship between AST development and platelet indices in acute coronary syndrome patients. Material and methods In our case-control study, 33 patients who underwent PCI with subsequent AST development and 59 patients without AST were selected by propensity analysis. We compared the clinical, angiographic, and laboratory data between the AST and control groups. Results Mean platelet volume (MPV) (p=0.002) and platelet distribution width (p=0.014) were significantly higher and platelet count (p=0.017) was significantly lower in the AST group. Logistic regression analyses showed that MPV was a significant independent predictor of AST (OR = 1.67; 95% CI: 1.11–2.51; p=0.013). In the ROC analyses, the cut-off value of MPV to detect AST was > 9.1 fl with a sensitivity of 90.9%, a specificity of 42.4%, a positive predictive value of 46.9% and a negative predictive value of 89.3% (AUC: 0.687, 95% CI: 0.582–0.780, p=0.001). Conclusions Our study shows that baseline MPV predicts the development of AST in patients with ACS. Mean platelet volume therefore might be an easily accessible marker in the identification of patients at high risk for the development of AST. PMID:26677364

  19. Fatigue in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: prevalence and relationships with disease-specific variables, psychological status, and sleep disturbance.

    PubMed

    Aissaoui, N; Rostom, S; Hakkou, J; Berrada Ghziouel, K; Bahiri, R; Abouqal, R; Hajjaj-Hassouni, N

    2012-07-01

    This study aims to evaluate the frequency of fatigue in Moroccan patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and its relationships with disease-specific variables, psychological status, and sleep disturbance. A cross-sectional study included patients fulfilled the modified New York classification criteria for ankylosing spondylitis. To assess fatigue, the first item of Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI) and the multidimensional assessment of fatigue (MAF) was used. The evaluation included the activity of the disease (BASDAI), global well-being (Bath ankylosing spondylitis global index), functional status (Bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index), metrologic measurements (Bath ankylosing spondylitis metrological index), and visual analog scale of axial or joint pain. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were measured. To assess psychological status, the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) was used. Sleep disturbance was assessed by the fourth item of Hamilton anxiety scale. One hundred and ten patients were included, of average age 38.0 years ± 12.6. In our data, 66.4% experienced severe fatigue (BASDAI fatigue ≥ 5). The mean total score of MAF was 26 ± 12.77. The disease-specific variables contributed significantly with both BASDAI fatigue and MAF as dependent variables, accounting for 71.3 and 65.6% of the variance, respectively. The contribution of the depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance were 24.9, 18.4 and 15.4%, respectively. This study state the importance of fatigue in AS patients. Even though disease activity was the most powerful predictor of fatigue, the effects of psychogenic factors and sleep disturbance, should be taken into consideration in the management of AS. PMID:21516494

  20. Acute, Severe Cryptosporidiosis in an Immunocompetent Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Tallant, Caitlin; Huddleston, Patrick; Alshanberi, Asim

    2016-01-01

    Severe diarrheal illness in children can be attributed to a number of different microbiological agents. Without appropriate microbiological testing of stool samples, patients who present with multiple days of severe diarrhea might have a delay in proper diagnosis and treatment. Here, we report a case of an immunocompetent pediatric patient presenting with acute cryptosporidiosis. Humans and bovine species are known hosts of cryptosporidium and several studies have evaluated the zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidium from cattle to humans. Adding diagnostic tests for cryptosporidium like Ziehl-Neelsen staining of stool or fecal rapid antigen detection techniques should be considered in the workup of patients presenting with undifferentiated, severe diarrheal illness, especially in those who have close contact with livestock. PMID:27478580

  1. Skin nodules in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Le Clech, Lenaïg; Hutin, Pascal; Le Gal, Solène; Guillerm, Gaëlle

    2014-01-01

    Opportunistic infections cause a significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. We describe the case of a patient with skin fusariosis and a probable cerebral toxoplasmosis after UCB stem cell transplantation for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Fusarium species (spp) infections are difficult to treat. To date, there has been no consensus on the treatment of fusariosis and the management of its side effects. Given the negative pretransplant Toxoplasma serology in this case, identifying the origin of the Toxoplasma infection was challenging. All usual transmission routes were screened for and ruled out. The patient's positive outcome was not consistent with that of the literature reporting 60% mortality due to each infection. PMID:24408938

  2. Patient Preferences for Information on Post-Acute Care Services.

    PubMed

    Sefcik, Justine S; Nock, Rebecca H; Flores, Emilia J; Chase, Jo-Ana D; Bradway, Christine; Potashnik, Sheryl; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the current study was to explore what hospitalized patients would like to know about post-acute care (PAC) services to ultimately help them make an informed decision when offered PAC options. Thirty hospitalized adults 55 and older in a Northeastern U.S. academic medical center participated in a qualitative descriptive study with conventional content analysis as the analytical technique. Three themes emerged: (a) receiving practical information about the services, (b) understanding "how it relates to me," and (c) having opportunities to understand PAC options. Study findings inform clinicians what information should be included when discussing PAC options with older adults. Improving the quality of discharge planning discussions may better inform patient decision making and, as a result, increase the numbers of patients who accept a plan of care that supports recovery, meets their needs, and results in improved quality of life and fewer readmissions. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2016; 9(4):175-182.]. PMID:26815304

  3. Acute Thrombotic Mesenteric Ischemia: Primary Endovascular Treatment in Eight Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gagniere, Johan; Favrolt, Gregory; Alfidja, Agaiecha; Kastler, Adrian; Chabrot, Pascal; Cassagnes, Lucie; Buc, Emmanuel; Pezet, Denis; Boyer, Louis

    2011-10-15

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate our experience with initial percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) {+-} stenting as valuable options in the acute setting. Methods: Between 2003 and 2008, eight patients with abdominal angio-MDCT-scan proven thrombotic AMI benefited from initial PTA {+-} stenting. We retrospectively assessed clinical and radiological findings and their management. Seven patients presented thrombosis of the superior mesenteric artery, and in one patient both mesenteric arteries were occluded. All patients underwent initial PTA and stenting, except one who had balloon PTA alone. One patient was treated by additional in situ thrombolysis. Results: Technical success was obtained in all patients. Three patients required subsequent surgery (37.5%), two of whom had severe radiological findings (pneumatosis intestinalis and/or portal venous gas). Two patients (25%) died: both had NIDD, an ASA score {>=}4, and severe radiologic findings. Satisfactory arterial patency was observed after a follow-up of 15 (range, 11-17) months in five patients who did not require subsequent surgery, four of whom had abdominal guarding but no severe CT scan findings. One patient had an ileocecal stenosis 60 days after the procedure. Conclusions: Initial PTA {+-} stenting is a valuable alternative to surgery for patients with thrombotic AMI even for those with clinical peritoneal irritation signs and/or severe radiologic findings. Early surgery is indicated if clinical condition does not improve after PTA. The decision of a subsequent surgery must be lead by early clinical status reevaluation. In case of underlying atherosclerotic lesion, stenting should be performed after initial balloon dilatation.

  4. Acute kidney injury in critically ill cancer patients: an update.

    PubMed

    Lameire, Norbert; Vanholder, Raymond; Van Biesen, Wim; Benoit, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cancer represent a growing group among actual ICU admissions (up to 20 %). Due to their increased susceptibility to infectious and noninfectious complications related to the underlying cancer itself or its treatment, these patients frequently develop acute kidney injury (AKI). A wide variety of definitions for AKI are still used in the cancer literature, despite existing guidelines on definitions and staging of AKI. Alternative diagnostic investigations such as Cystatin C and urinary biomarkers are discussed briefly. This review summarizes the literature between 2010 and 2015 on epidemiology and prognosis of AKI in this population. Overall, the causes of AKI in the setting of malignancy are similar to those in other clinical settings, including preexisting chronic kidney disease. In addition, nephrotoxicity induced by the anticancer treatments including the more recently introduced targeted therapies is increasingly observed. However, data are sometimes difficult to interpret because they are often presented from the oncological rather than from the nephrological point of view. Because the development of the acute tumor lysis syndrome is one of the major causes of AKI in patients with a high tumor burden or a high cell turnover, the diagnosis, risk factors, and preventive measures of the syndrome will be discussed. Finally, we will briefly discuss renal replacement therapy modalities and the emergence of chronic kidney disease in the growing subgroup of critically ill post-AKI survivors. PMID:27480256

  5. Diagnostic value of procalcitonin in acutely hospitalized elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Steichen, O; Bouvard, E; Grateau, G; Bailleul, S; Capeau, J; Lefèvre, G

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate procalcitonin as an adjunct to diagnose bacterial infections in older patients. One hundred seventy-two patients admitted to an acute-care geriatric unit during a 6-month period were prospectively included, 39 of them with an invasive bacterial infection. The best cut-off value to rule in a bacterial infection was 0.51 microg/l with sensitivity 64% and specificity 94%. The best cut-off value to rule out a bacterial infection was 0.08 microg/l with sensitivity 97% and specificity 20%. Procalcitonin was inconclusive (between 0.08 and 0.51 microg/l) for 112 admissions. Procalcitonin over 0.51 microg/l was useless 22 times out of 33 (infection already ruled in on clinical grounds) and misleading in eight of the 11 remaining cases (no infection). Procalcitonin below 0.08 microg/l was useless 23 times out of 27 (infection already ruled out on clinical grounds) and misleading in one of the four remaining cases (infection). Despite a good overall diagnostic accuracy, the clinical usefulness of PCT to diagnose invasive bacterial infections in elderly patients hospitalized in an acute geriatric ward appears to be very limited. PMID:19727867

  6. The role of glycemia in acute heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Seferović, Jelena P; Milinković, Ivan; Tešić, Milorad; Ristić, Arsen; Lalić, Nebojša; Simeunović, Dejan; Zivković, Ivana; Di Somma, Salvatore; Seferovic, Petar M

    2014-10-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is one of the most important cardiovascular syndromes associated with high cardiovascular morbidity, and is the major cause of admission in emergency departments worldwide. The clinical complexity of AHF has significantly increased, mostly due to the comorbidities: diabetes, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, peripheral vascular disease, renal insufficiency and anemia. Numerous clinical trials have demonstrated a frequent association of AHF and diabetes. Since AHF is a very heterogeneous condition, it is important to identify clinical and laboratory parameters useful for risk stratification of these populations. Hyperglycemia may be one of the most convenient, since it is widely measured, easily interpreted, and inexpensive. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS), arrhythmias and poor compliance to chronic medications are considered to be the most frequent precipitating factors of AHF in diabetics. Several studies identified diabetes as the most prominent independent predictor of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic heart failure (HF) patients. The following parameters were identified as the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with AHF and diabetes: older age, systolic blood pressure <100 mmHg, ACS, non-compliance, history of hypertension, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <50%, serum creatinine >1.5 mg/dL, marked elevation of natriuretic peptides, hyponatremia, treatment at admission without ACE inhibitors/ARBs/β-blockers, and no percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) as a treatment modality. The most frequent cause of AHF is ACS, both with ST segment elevation (STEMI) or without (NSTEMI). Hyperglycemia is very common in these patients and although frequently unrecognized and untreated, has a large in-hospital and mortality significance. PMID:24988247

  7. Ceftriaxone-Induced Acute Encephalopathy in a Peritoneal Dialysis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Safadi, Sami; Mao, Michael; Dillon, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Encephalopathy is a rare side effect of third and fourth generation cephalosporins. Renal failure and preexisting neurological disease are notable risk factors. Recognition is important as discontinuing the offending agent usually resolves symptoms. We present a case of acute encephalopathy in a patient with end stage renal disease (ESRD) treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD) who received intravenous ceftriaxone for peritonitis. This case illustrates the potential severe neurologic effects of cephalosporins, which are recommended by international guidelines as first-line antimicrobial therapy for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. PMID:25544915

  8. [Immune and enzyme disorders in patients with acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Briskin, B S; Iarovaia, G A; Savchenko, Z I; Rybakov, G S; Khalidov, O Kh; Mkhitarova, L A; Suplotova, A A

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of immune and enzyme disorders in 85 patients with acute pancreatitis shows that persistent imbalance of immunoregulatory T-lymphocytes with suppression predominance; reduction of all immunoglobulines number, imbalance in phagocytic immunity with height of absorbing activity of neutropils and stimultaneous decrease of their digestive capacity are prognostically unfavourable for high risk of pyonecrotic complications and lethal outcome. It is necessary to include immunocorrectors in combined therapy. Direct assessment of leukocytic elastase activity and alpha-IP level in blood plasma permits to evaluate spreading of inflammatory process and it severity, efficacy and prognosis of treatment. PMID:11521303

  9. Acute hemolysis in a patient with a newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Adrian G; Grossman, Stuart A

    2016-07-01

    We describe a 62-year-old of Egyptian origin who presented with sudden, severe and symptomatic anemia requiring hospitalization shortly after beginning concurrent radiation and temozolomide for his newly diagnosed glioblastoma. He had also recently been started on steroids, anticonvulsants and Pneumocystis jirovecii prophylaxis. He was ultimately diagnosed with G6PD deficiency with an acute hemolytic anemia precipitated by dapsone. Screening for G6PD deficiency should be considered in high-risk patient populations where P. jirovecii prophylaxis is planned. PMID:27230975

  10. Cognitive Status in Patients Hospitalized with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Seth N.; Hajduk, Alexandra M.; McManus, David D.; Darling, Chad E.; Gurwitz, Jerry H.; Spencer, Frederick A.; Goldberg, Robert J.; Saczynski, Jane S.

    2015-01-01

    Structured Abstract Background Cognitive impairment is highly prevalent in patients with heart failure and is associated with adverse outcomes. However, whether specific cognitive abilities (e.g., memory versus executive function) are impaired in heart failure has not been fully examined. We investigated the prevalence of impairment in three cognitive domains in patients hospitalized with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) and the associations of impairment with demographic and clinical characteristics. Methods The sample included 744 patients hospitalized with ADHF (mean age = 72 years, 46% female) at 5 medical centers. Impairment was assessed in three cognitive domains (memory, processing speed, executive function) using standardized measures. Demographic and clinical characteristics were obtained from a structured interview and medical record review. Results A total of 593 of 744 (80%) patients were impaired in at least one cognitive domain; 32%, 31%, and 17% of patients were impaired in one, two, or all three cognitive domains, respectively. Patients impaired in more than one cognitive domain were significantly older, had less formal education, and had more non-cardiac comorbidities (all p’s < 0.05). In multivariable adjusted analyses, patients with older age and lower education had higher odds of impairment in two or more cognitive domains. Depressed patients had twice the odds of being impaired in all three cognitive domains (OR = 1.98, 95% CI: 1.08, 3.64). Conclusion Impairments in executive function, processing speed and memory are common among patients hospitalized for ADHF. Recognition of these prevalent cognitive deficits is critical for the clinical management of these high risk patients. PMID:25458656

  11. Inequalities in care in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Shabnam; Simms, Alexander; Batin, Phillip; Kurian, John; Gale, Chris P

    2015-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the single largest cause of death in developed countries. Guidelines exist for the management of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), yet despite these, significant inequalities exist in the care of these patients. The elderly, deprived socioeconomic groups, females and non-caucasians are the patient populations where practice tends to deviate more frequently from the evidence base. Elderly patients often had higher mortality rates after having an AMI compared to younger patients. They also tended to present with symptoms that were not entirely consistent with an AMI, thus partially contributing to the inequalities in care that is seen between younger and older patients. Furthermore the lack of guidelines in the elderly age group presenting with AMI can often make decision making challenging and may account for the discrepancies in care that are prevalent between younger and older patients. Other patients such as those from a lower socioeconomic group, i.e., low income and less than high school education often had poorer health and reduced life expectancy compared to patients from a higher socioeconomic group after an AMI. Lower socioeconomic status was also seen to be contributing to racial and geographical variation is the care in AMI patients. Females with an AMI were treated less aggressively and had poorer outcomes when compared to males. However even when females were treated in the same way they continued to have higher in hospital mortality which suggests that gender may well account for differences in outcomes. The purpose of this review is to identify the inequalities in care for patients who present with an AMI and explore potential reasons for why these occur. Greater attention to the management and a better understanding of the root causes of these inequalities in care may help to reduce morbidity and mortality rates associated with AMI. PMID:26730295

  12. A disturbed processing of graviceptive pathways may be involved in the pathophysiology of balance disorders in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Bruna Antinori Vignola da; Pereira, Cristiana Borges; Jorge, Frederico; Simm, Renata; Apostolos-Pereira, Samira; Callegaro, Dagoberto

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between perception of verticality and balance disorders in multiple sclerosis patients. We evaluated patients and healthy controls. Patients were divided into two groups according to their risk of fall, with or without risk of fall, measured by a Dynamic Gait Index scale. Graviceptive perception was assessed using the subjective visual vertical test. Patients with risk of fall showed worse perception than those without risk of fall, p < 0.001. Misperception of verticality was correlated with the dynamic gait index scores (p < 0.001), suggesting that the larger the error for verticality judgment, the greater risk for falling. Considering that the perception of verticality is essential for postural control, our results suggested that the disturbed processing of graviceptive pathways may be involved in the pathophysiology of balance disorders in these patients. PMID:26982986

  13. Teamwork and Patient Care Teams in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Andrea; Heale, Roberta; Hunt, Elena; Parent, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The literature suggests that effective teamwork among patient care teams can positively impact work environment, job satisfaction and quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived level of nursing teamwork by registered nurses, registered practical nurses, personal support workers and unit clerks working on patient care teams in one acute care hospital in northern Ontario, Canada, and to determine if a relationship exists between the staff scores on the Nursing Teamwork Survey (NTS) and participant perception of adequate staffing. Using a descriptive cross-sectional research design, 600 staff members were invited to complete the NTS and a 33% response rate was achieved (N=200). The participants from the critical care unit reported the highest scores on the NTS, whereas participants from the inpatient surgical (IPS) unit reported the lowest scores. Participants from the IPS unit also reported having less experience, being younger, having less satisfaction in their current position and having a higher intention to leave. A high rate of intention to leave in the next year was found among all participants. No statistically significant correlation was found between overall scores on the NTS and the perception of adequate staffing. Strategies to increase teamwork, such as staff education, among patient care teams may positively influence job satisfaction and patient care on patient care units. PMID:26560255

  14. The clinical analysis of acute pancreatitis in colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy after operation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yanlei; Han, Zhen; Shao, Limei; Li, Yunling; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Yuehuan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare complication in postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 (oxaliplatin + calcium folinate +5-FU [5-fluorouracil]) chemotherapy. In this paper, a total of 62 patients with gastrointestinal cancer were observed after the burst of acute pancreatitis. Surgery of the 62 cases of colorectal cancer patients was completed successfully. But when they underwent FOLFOX6 chemotherapy, five patients got acute pancreatitis (8.06%), four (6.45%) had mild acute pancreatitis, and one (1.61%) had severe acute pancreatitis, of which two were males (3.23%) and three females (4.84%). No patients (0.00%) had acute pancreatitis on the 1st day after chemotherapy; one patient (1.61%) got it in the first 2 and 3 days after chemotherapy; and three others (4.83%) got it in the first 4 days after chemotherapy. In the 62 patients with malignant tumors, the body mass index (BMI) was less than 18 (underweight) in six of them, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (33.33%); the BMI was 18–25 (normal weight) in 34 cases, with one case (2.94%) of acute pancreatitis; the BMI was 25–30 (overweight) in 13 cases, with 0 cases (0.00%) of acute pancreatitis; and the BMI was ≥30 (obese) in nine patients, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (22.22%). After symptomatic treatment, four patients were cured and one died; the mortality rate was 1.61%. Most of them appeared in the first 4 days after chemotherapy; the probability of this complication is significantly higher in slim and obese patients than in normal weight patients. Postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 chemotherapy have a sudden onset of acute pancreatitis occult, especially in patients with severe acute pancreatitis; the symptoms are difficult to control, there is high mortality and it is worthy of clinician’s attention. PMID:26392780

  15. The clinical analysis of acute pancreatitis in colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy after operation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanlei; Han, Zhen; Shao, Limei; Li, Yunling; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Yuehuan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare complication in postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 (oxaliplatin + calcium folinate +5-FU [5-fluorouracil]) chemotherapy. In this paper, a total of 62 patients with gastrointestinal cancer were observed after the burst of acute pancreatitis. Surgery of the 62 cases of colorectal cancer patients was completed successfully. But when they underwent FOLFOX6 chemotherapy, five patients got acute pancreatitis (8.06%), four (6.45%) had mild acute pancreatitis, and one (1.61%) had severe acute pancreatitis, of which two were males (3.23%) and three females (4.84%). No patients (0.00%) had acute pancreatitis on the 1st day after chemotherapy; one patient (1.61%) got it in the first 2 and 3 days after chemotherapy; and three others (4.83%) got it in the first 4 days after chemotherapy. In the 62 patients with malignant tumors, the body mass index (BMI) was less than 18 (underweight) in six of them, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (33.33%); the BMI was 18-25 (normal weight) in 34 cases, with one case (2.94%) of acute pancreatitis; the BMI was 25-30 (overweight) in 13 cases, with 0 cases (0.00%) of acute pancreatitis; and the BMI was ≥30 (obese) in nine patients, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (22.22%). After symptomatic treatment, four patients were cured and one died; the mortality rate was 1.61%. Most of them appeared in the first 4 days after chemotherapy; the probability of this complication is significantly higher in slim and obese patients than in normal weight patients. Postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 chemotherapy have a sudden onset of acute pancreatitis occult, especially in patients with severe acute pancreatitis; the symptoms are difficult to control, there is high mortality and it is worthy of clinician's attention. PMID:26392780

  16. Assessment of depression, anxiety, sleep disturbance, and quality of life in patients with chronic low back pain in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Dong; Shin, Hyun Ho; Huh, Billy

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic low back pain (CLBP) has a significant effect on quality of life and imposes a great economical burden on society. In a number of studies, validated questionnaires had been given to CLBP patients to determine their health-associated quality of life, sleep disturbance, and psychological status. However, such outcome studies had not been performed previously in Korea. Methods We used self-report questionnaires to compare CLBP patients with an age- and sex-matched healthy control group. Between September 2012 and August 2013, we enrolled 47 patients who had CLBP for more than 3 months (group P) and 44 healthy age- and sex-matched controls (group C), who completed the following self-report questionnaires: 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Results The scores from the ODI, BDI, and BAI were significantly higher in group P than in group C. The SF-36 scores were significantly lower in group P than in group C, suggesting lower quality of life in group P. The incidence of depression and anxiety was significantly higher in group P than in group C. However, neither the PSQI score nor the incidence of sleep disturbance was significantly different between the groups. Conclusions Patients with CLBP showed considerable functional disability and significant impairment of psychological status with a low quality of life. Hence, it is important to evaluate CLBP patients to provide adequate psychological support. PMID:25006368

  17. [Surgical revascularization in patients with acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Beyersdorf, F; Sarai, K; Mitrev, Z; Eckel, L; Maul, F D; Wendt, T; Satter, P

    1993-01-01

    This retrospective study was done to assess the results of emergency revascularization in patients with acute myocardial infarction. In addition, the influence of the mode of reperfusion was investigated in terms of morbidity and mortality. Between January 1987 and May 1992, 75 consecutive patients with acute coronary occlusion (in 87% PTCA-failure) received one of two different reperfusion protocols during emergency aortocoronary bypass operation. In 36 patients, the reperfusate was normal blood given at systemic pressure (uncontrolled reperfusion); in 39 patients, the ischemic area was initially reperfused for 20 minutes with a blood cardioplegic solution (substrate-enriched, hyperosmolar, hypocalcemic, alkalotic, diltiazem-enriched) given at 37 degrees C and at a perfusion pressure of 50 mmHg. Thereafter, the heart was kept in the beating empty state for 30 minutes before extra-corporeal circulation was discontinued (controlled reperfusion). Regional contractility (echocardiography, radionuclide ventriculography), electrocardiogram (ECG), release of creatine kinase and MB-isoenzyme of creatine kinase as well as hospital mortality were assessed. Quantification of regional contractility was done with a scoring system from 0 (normokinesis) to 4 (dyskinesis). Data are expressed as mean +/- standard error of the mean (SEM). Both groups were well matched for age, sex, and the distribution of the occluded artery. In the controlled reperfusion group, there was a higher incidence of additional significant stenosis (2.2 +/- 0.1 vs 1.7 +/- 0.1) and cardiogenic shock (36% vs 17%). Furthermore, the interval between coronary occlusion and reperfusion was longer in the controlled reperfusion group (4.1 +/- 0.3 vs 3.3 +/- 0.3 hrs; p > 0.05). Regional contractility returned to normal after controlled reperfusion (score 0.8 +/- 0.2; normokinesis = 0, slight hypokinesis = 1). In contrast, regional contractility remained depressed severely after uncontrolled reperfusion with normal

  18. Prognosis and treatment of patients with acute alcoholic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, Vassilios; Burroughs, Andrew K; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A

    2014-07-01

    Despite alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is the most acute manifestation of alcohol-related liver disease, its treatment remains controversial. Corticosteroids, given either as monotherapy or together with N-acetylecysteine, have been associated with a moderate short-term survival benefit in patients with severe disease. The Maddrey's discriminant function; Glasgow alcoholic hepatitis score; age, bilirubin, INR and creatinine score; and the Model for end-stage liver disease have been proposed for stratifying prognosis in AH enabling selection of the patients to treat. Definition of treatment non-responders using the Lille model after 7 days of therapy may prevent a detrimental impact of prolonged corticosteroids. Pentoxifylline is an effective alternative reducing the occurrence of hepatorenal syndrome. Emerging evidence supports use of liver transplantation in a strictly selected subset of corticosteroid non-responders. PMID:24716632

  19. A Patient with Acute Kidney Pain and High Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Soulen, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    This case presented challenging diagnostic and management issues in a young healthy man who presented with abdominal pain and new-onset hypertension. The differential diagnosis evolved over the course of the clinical presentation. The patient had severe vascular involvement of his renal and basal cerebral arteries that initially was assumed to be due to a vasculitic process or hypercoagulable state. Finally it became apparent that the patient did not have a systemic illness but rather a localized vascular disease most likely due to segmental arterial mediolysis, a rare, under-recognized condition that can potentially be fatal. This condition is often difficult to distinguish from fibromuscular dysplasia. It is important to recognize and correctly diagnose the condition, particularly in the acute phase of the disease, because delay in diagnosis can contribute to morbidity and mortality. PMID:25583291

  20. Acute chest pain in a patient treated with capecitabine.

    PubMed

    Camaro, C; Danse, P W; Bosker, H A

    2009-08-01

    A 61-year-old male with a history of metastatic colorectal cancer was referred to our hospital for primary coronary intervention because of acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography, however, revealed no significant stenoses. When asked, the patient revealed that capecitabine (Xeloda(R)) was started by his oncologist one day before admission. It is known that this oral 5-FU analogue drug, used in metastatic colorectal cancer, can cause coronary artery spasms. The main treatment of capecitabine-induced vasospasm is discontinuation of the drug. Indeed, after cessation of the drug the patient remained free of symptoms and the ECG abnormalities normalised. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:288-91.). PMID:19789697

  1. Clinical potential of elacytarabine in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rein, Lindsay A M; Rizzieri, David A

    2014-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been treated for over four decades with standard induction chemotherapy including seven days of cytosine arabinoside (cytarabine, ara-C) infusion. Cytarabine, while effective in killing leukemic cells, is subject to development of several resistance mechanisms rendering the drug ineffective in many patients. Elacytarabine, a lipophilic 5'-elaidic acid ester or nucleoside analogue of cytosine arabinoside, was created with the intent of overcoming resistance mechanisms including reduced expression of the human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) required for cytarabine entry into cells, as well as increased activity of cytidine deaminase (CDA) which breaks down the active metabolite of cytarabine, ara-CTP. Elacytarabine enters cells independently of transporters, has a longer half life compared with cytarabine and is not subject to deactivation by CDA. Preclinical data were encouraging although subsequent clinical studies have failed to show superiority of elacytarabine compared with standard of care as monotherapy in patients with AML. Clinical trials utilizing elacytarabine in combination with anthracyclines are ongoing. Use of hENT1 expression as a predictive marker for cytarabine or elacytarabine response has been studied with no conclusive validation to date. Despite promising early results, the jury is still out in regards to this novel agent as an effective alternative to standard cytarabine therapy in acute leukemias, especially in combination with additional agents such as anthracyclines. PMID:25469211

  2. [Acute massive pulmonary embolism in a patient using clavis panax].

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Isa Oner; Arslan, Sakir; Cağırcı, Göksel; Yılmaz, Akar

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, the use of herbal combinations, plant extracts or food supplements has increased in our country and all over the world. However, there is not enough data to determine the effective doses of these substances in the composition of herbal preparations, or their effects on metabolism and drug interactions. With the widespread use of herbal combinations, life-threatening side effects and clinical manifestations that arise from them have been reported. Herein we present a case with acute massive pulmonary embolism while using an herbal combination in the context of Tribulus terrestris, Avena sativa and Panax ginseng. A 41-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department with the complaint of sudden onset of dyspnea and syncope. As a result of investigations (blood gases, echocardiography, ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy) he was diagnosed with an acute massive pulmonary embolism. The patient's use of panax did not pose as a risk factor for the pulmonary embolism. He was given thrombolytic therapy and shortness of breath improved. At the pre-discharge the patient was informed of the risks associated with the herbal combination, especially panax. Coumadin was started and he was discharged for the INR checks to come. PMID:23760126

  3. Early complications after interventions in patients with acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ai-Lin; Guo, Qiang; Wang, Ming-Jun; Hu, Wei-Ming; Zhang, Zhao-Da

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify the possible predictors of early complications after the initial intervention in acute necrotizing pancreatitis. METHODS: We collected the medical records of 334 patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis who received initial intervention in our center. Complications associated with predictors were analyzed. RESULTS: The postoperative mortality rate was 16% (53/334). Up to 31% of patients were successfully treated with percutaneous catheter drainage alone. The rates of intra-abdominal bleeding, colonic fistula, and progressive infection were 15% (50/334), 20% (68/334), and 26% (87/334), respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that Marshall score upon admission, multiple organ failure, preoperative respiratory infection, and sepsis were the predictors of postoperative progressive infection (P < 0.05). Single organ failure, systemic inflammatory response syndrome upon admission, and C-reactive protein level upon admission were the risk factors of postoperative colonic fistula (P < 0.05). Moreover, preoperative Marshall score, organ failure, sepsis, and preoperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome were the risk factors of postoperative intra-abdominal bleeding (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Marshall score, organ failures, preoperative respiratory infection, sepsis, preoperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and C-reactive protein level upon admission are associated with postoperative complications. PMID:26973421

  4. Cytomegalovirus in Plasma of Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nikitskaya, E. A.; Grivel, J.C.; Maryukhnich, E. V.; Lebedeva, A. M.; Ivanova, O. I.; Savvinova, P. P.; Shpektor, A. V.; Margolis, L. B.; Vasilieva, E. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and local and systemic inflammation, including accumulation of macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques and upregulation of blood cytokines (e.g., C-reactive protein (CRP)), has been known for more than 100 years. The atherosclerosis-associated inflammatory response has been traditionally considered as an immune system reaction to low-density lipoproteins. At the same time, some data have indicated a potential involvement of cytomegalovirus (CMV) in the activation and progression of atherosclerosis-associated inflammation, leading to ACS. However, these data have been tangential and mainly concerned the relationship between a coronary artery disease (CAD) prognosis and the anti-CMV antibody titer. We assumed that ACS might be associated with CMV reactivation and virus release into the bloodstream. The study’s aim was to test this assumption through a comparison of the plasma CMV DNA level in patients with various CAD forms and in healthy subjects. To our knowledge, no similar research has been undertaken yet. A total of 150 subjects (97 CAD patients and 53 healthy subjects) were examined. Real- time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine the number of plasma CMV DNA copies. We demonstrated that the number of plasma CMV genome copies in ACS patients was significantly higher than that in healthy subjects (p = 0.01). The CMV genome copy number was correlated with the plasma CRP level (p = 0.002). These findings indicate a potential relationship between CMV activation and atherosclerosis exacerbation that, in turn, leads to the development of unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction. Monitoring of the CMV plasma level in CAD patients may be helpful in the development of new therapeutic approaches to coronary atherosclerosis treatment. PMID:27437144

  5. Primary coronary angioplasty in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Popma, J J; Chuang, Y C; Satler, L F; Kleiber, B; Leon, M B

    1994-01-01

    In some patients with acute myocardial infarction, thrombolytic therapy may be limited by its failure to reperfuse the occluded artery, by recurrent ischemia (despite initially successful reperfusion), and by major hemorrhagic complications. Primary coronary angioplasty may circumvent these limitations. This article reviews the results of primary angioplasty reported in patients with myocardial infarction and makes recommendations for its use. The review includes pertinent articles found in the English language literature from July 1987 to July 1993 on MEDLINE. Nonrandomized series of primary angioplasty in acute myocardial infarction have demonstrated high procedural success rates (86% to 99%) and infrequent recurrent ischemia (4%). Two randomized trials comparing primary angioplasty and thrombolytic therapy have shown that primary angioplasty results in lower mortality, less recurrent ischemia, shorter length of hospital stay, and improved left ventricular function. Two other randomized studies have shown little benefit from primary angioplasty on myocardial salvage, recurrent ischemia, or ventricular function. One major limitation of primary angioplasty is that it requires 24-hour availability of a catheterization laboratory and experienced surgical personnel. Primary angioplasty may be the preferred approach in patients with extensive myocardial infarction who have immediate (< 120 min) access to a cardiac catheterization laboratory with experienced personnel. Patients having 1) contraindications to thrombolytic therapy, 2) cardiogenic shock, 3) prior coronary bypass surgery, or 4) "stuttering" onset of pain may also benefit from primary angioplasty. Poor candidates for this procedure are those with a small myocardial infarction, those in whom undue delays in access to a cardiac catheterization facility would be expected, or those with complex coronary anatomy, including left main coronary artery disease. PMID:8061539

  6. Acute Cryptococcal Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome in a Patient on Natalizumab

    PubMed Central

    Gundacker, Nathan D.; Jordan, Stephen J.; Jones, Benjamin A.; Drwiega, Joseph C.; Pappas, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Presented is the first case of acute immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS)-associated cryptococcal meningoencephalitis in a patient on natalizumab for multiple sclerosis. The patient developed acute cerebral edema after initiation of amphotericin B. We propose several mechanisms that explain the acuity of IRIS in this specific patient population and suggest possible therapies. PMID:27006962

  7. Increased NK Cell Maturation in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chretien, Anne-Sophie; Granjeaud, Samuel; Gondois-Rey, Françoise; Harbi, Samia; Orlanducci, Florence; Blaise, Didier; Vey, Norbert; Arnoulet, Christine; Fauriat, Cyril; Olive, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Understanding immune alterations in cancer patients is a major challenge and requires precise phenotypic study of immune subsets. Improvement of knowledge regarding the biology of natural killer (NK) cells and technical advances leads to the generation of high dimensional dataset. High dimensional flow cytometry requires tools adapted to complex dataset analyses. This study presents an example of NK cell maturation analysis in Healthy Volunteers (HV) and patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) with an automated procedure using the FLOCK algorithm. This procedure enabled to automatically identify NK cell subsets according to maturation profiles, with 2D mapping of a four-dimensional dataset. Differences were highlighted in AML patients compared to HV, with an overall increase of NK maturation. Among patients, a strong heterogeneity in NK cell maturation defined three distinct profiles. Overall, automatic gating with FLOCK algorithm is a recent procedure, which enables fast and reliable identification of cell populations from high-dimensional cytometry data. Such tools are necessary for immune subset characterization and standardization of data analyses. This tool is adapted to new immune cell subsets discovery, and may lead to a better knowledge of NK cell defects in cancer patients. Overall, 2D mapping of NK maturation profiles enabled fast and reliable identification of NK cell subsets. PMID:26594214

  8. Critical management decisions in patients with acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Stravitz, R Todd

    2008-11-01

    Few admissions to the ICU present a greater clinical challenge than the patient with acute liver failure (ALF), the syndrome of abrupt loss of liver function in a previously unaffected individual. Although advances in the intensive care management of patients with ALF have improved survival, the prognosis of ALF remains poor, with a 33% mortality rate and a 25% liver transplant rate in the United States. ALF adversely affects nearly every organ system, with most deaths occurring from sepsis and subsequent multiorgan system failure, and cerebral edema, resulting in intracranial hypertension (ICH) and brainstem herniation. Unfortunately, the optimal management of ALF remains poorly defined, and practices are often based on local experience and case reports rather than on randomized, controlled clinical trials. The paramount question in any patient presenting with ALF remains defining an etiology, since specific antidotes can save lives and spare the liver. This article will consider recent advances in the assignment of an etiology, the administration of etiology-specific treatment to abate the liver injury, and the management of complications (eg, infection, cerebral edema, and the bleeding diathesis) in patients with ALF. New data on the administration of N-acetylcysteine to patients with non-acetaminophen ALF, the treatment of ICH, and assessment of the need for liver transplantation will also be presented. PMID:18988787

  9. A retrospective study of acute pancreatitis in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Etiological diagnosis is an important part of the diagnosis and treatment of acute pancreatitis. Hantavirus infection is a rare cause of acute pancreatitis, which is easy to ignore. There is a need to analyze clinical features of acute pancreatitis caused by Hantavirus. Methods This is a retrospective study conducted from May 1, 2006 to May 31, 2012 on patients diagnosed with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome at our hospital. We reviewed these patients medical records, laboratory results and radiologic examinations to determine the prevalence and summarize clinical features of acute pancreatitis in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Results A total of 218 patients were diagnosed with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome during the 6-year study period. Only 2.8% (6/218) of the total hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome patients were diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. The first symptom for all six of the patients with acute pancreatitis was fever. All six patients experienced hemorrhage and thrombocytopenia during the disease course, which was different from general acute pancreatitis. In addition, we presented two misdiagnosed clinical cases. Conclusions Acute pancreatitis is not a frequent complication in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Clinicians should be alerted to the possibility of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome when acute pancreatitis patients with epidemiological data have high fever before abdominal pain. PMID:24345089

  10. Sleep Apnea Prevalence in Acute Myocardial Infarction - the Sleep Apnea in Post Acute Myocardial Infarction Patients (SAPAMI) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ludka, Ondrej; Stepanova, Radka; Vyskocilova, Martina; Galkova, Lujza; Mikolaskova, Monika; Belehrad, Milos; Kostalova, Jana; Mihalova, Zuzana; Drozdova, Adela; Hlasensky, Jiri; Gacik, Michal; Pudilova, Lucie; Mikusova, Tereza; Fischerova, Blanka; Sert-Kuniyoshi, Fatima; Kara, Tomas; Spinar, Jindrich; Somers, Virend K.

    2014-01-01

    Background While sleep apnea (SA) might be a modifiable cardiovascular risk factor, recent data suggest that SA is severely underdiagnosed in patients after acute myocardial infarction (MI). There is limited evidence about day-night variation of onset of MI on dependence of having SA. We therefore investigated the prevalence of SA and examined the day-night variation of onset of MI in acute MI patients. Methods We prospectively studied 782 consecutive patients admitted to the hospital with the diagnosis of acute MI. All subjects underwent sleep evaluations using a portable device after at least 48 hours post-admission. Using the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), groups were defined as patients without SA (<5 events/hour), mild SA (5–15 events/hour), moderate SA (15–30 events/hour), and severe SA (≥30 events/hour). Results Almost all patients (98%) underwent urgent coronary angiography and 91% of patients underwent primary PCI. Using a threshold of AHI ≥ 5 events/hour, SA was present in 65.7% of patients after acute MI. Mild SA was present in 32.6%, moderate in 20.4% and severe in 12.7%. The day-night variation in the onset of MI in all groups of SA patients was similar to that observed in non-SA patients. From 6AM–12PM, the frequency of MI was higher in both SA and non-SA patients, as compared to the interval from 12AM–6AM (all p<0.05). Conclusion There is a high prevalence of SA in patients presenting with acute MI. Peak time of MI onset in SA patients was between 6AM–noon, similar to that in the general population. Whether diagnosis and treatment of SA after MI will significantly improve outcomes in these patients remains to be determined. PMID:25064202

  11. Sleep disturbance in Moroccan patients with ankylosing spondylitis: prevalence and relationships with disease-specific variables, psychological status and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Hakkou, Jinane; Rostom, Samira; Mengat, Mariam; Aissaoui, Nawal; Bahiri, Rachid; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2013-02-01

    Sleep disturbance is often reported by the patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), with awakenings produced by inflammatory pain. There are limited studies about sleep disturbance on these patients, and especially its association with psychological state and quality of life to examine the prevalence of sleep disturbance and to assess its association with disease-specific variables, psychological status and quality of life. One hundred and ten patients were included in this cross-sectional study according to the modified New York criteria for AS. Clinical and biological parameters were evaluated. Sleep disturbance was assessed by the fourth item of Hamilton Anxiety Scale. Psychological status was assessed by The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale including depression subscale and anxiety subscale. The quality of life was evaluated by the short form-36 (SF-36). Sleep disturbance was found in 64.5 %, depression in 55.5 % and anxiety in 60.9 % amongst our patients. Significantly, worse pain, higher disease activity and functional disability were present in patients with sleep disturbance. Likewise, sleep problems were significantly higher in patients with depression, anxiety and in patients with low scores of the SF36. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the pain (OR = 1.019) and depression (OR = 1.304) were independent risk factors that influenced sleep disturbance. Sleep problems are prevalent amongst Moroccan patients with AS. Our findings suggest that pain and depression were the independent risk factors that influenced the sleep disturbance and hence, the need for evaluation and optimal management of pain and depression to improve sleep quality in AS patients. PMID:22441961

  12. Health utility indexes in patients with acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Gencer, Baris; Rodondi, Nicolas; Auer, Reto; Nanchen, David; Räber, Lorenz; Klingenberg, Roland; Pletscher, Mark; Jüni, Peter; Windecker, Stephan; Matter, Christian M; Lüscher, Thomas F; Mach, François; Perneger, Thomas V; Girardin, François R

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) have been associated with lower health utilities (HUs) compared with the general population. Given the prognostic improvements after ACS with the implementation of coronary angiography (eg, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)), contemporary HU values derived from patient-reported outcomes are needed. Methods We analysed data of 1882 patients with ACS 1 year after coronary angiography in a Swiss prospective cohort. We used the EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire (EQ-5D) and visual analogue scale (VAS) to derive HU indexes. We estimated the effects of clinical factors on HU using a linear regression model and compared the observed HU with the average values of individuals of the same sex and age in the general population. Results Mean EQ-5D HU 1-year after coronary angiography for ACS was 0.82 (±0.16) and mean VAS was 0.77 (±0.18); 40.9% of participants exhibited the highest utility values. Compared with population controls, the mean EQ-5D HU was similar (expected mean 0.82, p=0.58) in patients with ACS, but the mean VAS was slightly lower (expected mean 0.79, p<0.001). Patients with ACS who are younger than 60 years had lower HU than the general population (<0.001). In patients with ACS, significant differences were found according to the gender, education and employment status, diabetes, obesity, heart failure, recurrent ischaemic or incident bleeding event and participation in cardiac rehabilitation (p<0.01). Conclusions At 1 year, patients with ACS with coronary angiography had HU indexes similar to a control population. Subgroup analyses based on patients' characteristics and further disease-specific instruments could provide better sensitivity for detecting smaller variations in health-related quality of life. PMID:27252878

  13. [The method of biliary tracts drainage of patients with biliodigestive anastomosis at obstructive jaundice and acute cholangitis].

    PubMed

    Agaev, B A; Agaev, R M; Gasymov, R Sh

    2011-01-01

    The internal draining of biliary tracts of patients with obstructive jaundice and acute cholangitis is considered most acceptable, but deficiency of this method is anastomosis failure, stricture and purulent-septic complications hazard. The investigations performed on 79 patients with obstructive jaundice, 36 of which were included in control group, 43 - in main group. To patients of main group with internal draining intraoperatively through the nose and biliodigestive anastomosis into the biliary tract transmitted tube with quartz optical monofiber for endocholedocheal laser irradiation in one lumen and hollow other, serve for drainage and irrigation of bile-excreting way with ozonized physiological solution. The application of endocholedocheal laser radiation and ozonetherapy in combination with suggested at biliodigestive anastomosis biliary tract drainage method allowed to earlier elimination of inflammatory process biliary tract, correct the bile lipids per oxidations disturbances and elevate activity of antioxidant protection system, to reduced the time of patients stay at hospital after surgery period from 20,3±1,24 day in control group to 12,7±0,653 day in main group (p<0,001), to prevent purulent-septic and scarry complications in complex treatment of patients with obstructive jaundice and acute cholangitis. PMID:21350398

  14. [A rare case of an acute abdomen patient with gangrene of the colon as a complication of systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Dolák, S; Prochotský, A; Mifkovič, A; Škultéty, J; Ježovít, M; Koudelka, P; Bluska, P

    2015-02-01

    The authors present a case report of a 39-year-old woman with acute abdomen - a comorbid patient with systemic lupus erythematosus, chronic renal insufficiency as a complication of lupus nephritis, included in a haemodialysis programme. The patient had also undergone transplantation of the left kidney in the past. She was initially admitted to the Department of Traumatology for a total endoprosthesis procedure due to bionecrosis of the head of the thigh bone. Postoperatively, the patients condition was complicated by gangrene of the colon confirmed by CT scan and during the operation. The patient was operated on - subtotal colectomy, terminal ileostomy and left-sided ovariectomy was performed. The postoperative course was complicated by perforation of the jejunum which was sutured. The patient was admitted to ICU and, after recovery, to our surgical department. Because of the metabolic disturbance she was treated in the internal medicine department. After 60 days she was discharged in a good condition, walking and with full per os realimentation.Key words: lupus erythematosus gangrene of the colon acute abdomen. PMID:25659257

  15. [Disglycemia in patients with acute kidney injury in the ICU].

    PubMed

    Fiaccadori, E; Sabatino, A; Morabito, S; Bozzoli, L; Donadio, C; Maggiore, U; Regolisti, G

    2015-01-01

    Derangements of glucose metabolism are common among critically ill patients. Critical illness- associated hyperglycemia (CIAH) is characterized by raised blood glucose levels in association with an acute event that is reversible after resolution of the underlying disease. CIAH has many causes, such as changes in counter-regulatory hormone status, release of sepsis mediators, insulin resistance, drugs and nutritional factors. It is associated with increased mortality risk. This association appears to be strongly influenced by diabetes mellitus as a comorbidity, suggesting the need for an accurate individualization of glycemic targets according to baseline glycemic status. Hypoglycemia is also very common in this clinical context and it has a negative prognostic impact. Many studies based on intensive insulin treatment protocols targeting normal blood glucose values have in fact documented both an increased incidence of hypoglycemia and an increased mortality risk. Finally, glycemic control in the ICU is made even more complex in the presence of acute kidney injury. On one hand, there is in fact a reduction of both the renal clearance of insulin and of gluconeogenesis by the kidney. On the other hand, the frequent need for renal replacement therapy (dialysis / hemofiltration) may result in an energy intake excess, under the form of citrate, lactate and glucose in the dialysate/reinfusion fluids. With regard to the possible renal protective effects afforded by intensive glycemic control protocols, the presently available evidence does not support a reduction in the incidence of AKI and/or the need for RRT with this approach, when compared with standard glucose control. Thus, the most recent guidelines now suggest higher blood glucose targets (<180 mg/dl or 140-180 mg/dl) than in the past (80-110 mg/dl). Albeit with limited evidence, it seems reasonable to extend these indications also to patients with AKI in the intensive care unit. Further studies are needed in order

  16. The subjective assessment of the effect and satisfaction with dermocosmetics use by patients with skin disturbances

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Atopic dermatitis and different constellations and the severity of symptoms that not meet the criteria for this diagnosis are a common skin disturbances. An important component of the treatment of these diseases and the proper care of sensitive and dry skin is local dermocosmetics use. Aim To assess the frequency of skin disturbances and the effect and satisfaction with Atoperal products use as well as the source of information about these products. Material and methods A questionnaire survey about the type of skin disturbances, the subjective assessment of the effect and satisfaction with Atoperal products use and source of information about these products was performed by 787 general practitioners, internists, pediatricians, dermatologists, allergists and pulmonologists and 252 pharmacists in a group of 51 085 subjects with skin disturbances. Results In the group interviewed by doctors, the most common skin problem was atopic dermatitis (52.5%) and in the group interviewed by pharmacists, pruritus (70.0%). In both groups, respondents after Atoperal products use most frequently reported improving of the skin hydration and greasiness of the skin and reduction of itching. In both groups, over 90.0% of respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with Atoperal products use. In the group surveyed by doctors, 75.5% of respondents obtained information about these products from doctors and 17.4% from pharmacists, while in the group surveyed by pharmacists, 48.9% from pharmacists and 36.1% from doctors. Conclusions Atopic dermatitis was most frequently diagnosed in a group surveyed by doctors. The main skin disturbance that occurred in a group surveyed by pharmacists was skin pruritus. The main effect of Atoperal products use, independent of the place of the survey, included improving of skin hydration and greasiness of the skin and reduction of itching. In a study population, there was a high level of satisfaction from the use of Atoperal products. Doctors

  17. Veliparib and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Therapeutic drug monitoring of aminoglycosides in acute myeloid leukaemia patients.

    PubMed

    Mareville, Julie; Gay, Julie; Cliquennois, Emmanuel; Herbaux, Charles; Pasquier, Florence; Allorge, Delphine; Blondiaux, Nicolas; Berthon, Céline; Alfandari, Serge

    2012-05-01

    International guidelines limit the use of aminoglycosides in febrile neutropenia to severe situations. We retrospectively reviewed the use of aminoglycosides in adult acute myeloid leukaemia patients admitted in 2009. Our guidelines include precise indications (severe sepsis, shock, drug resistance), dosing regimens (once-daily 20 mg/kg/day amikacin, 5 mg/kg/day gentamicin), durations of treatment, drug monitoring timing, and target C(max) concentrations (40 mg/l amikacin, 20 mg/l gentamicin). Thirty-one patients received 46 aminoglycoside courses: 31 amikacin and 15 gentamicin. The mean prescribed dosage was 19 ± 2.8 mg/kg/day for amikacin and 4.7 ± 0.9 mg/kg/day for gentamicin. The mean duration of use was 2.9 days for both drugs. The mean C(max) for amikacin was 47 ± 13 mg/l and for gentamicin was 13.6 ± 7.5 mg/l. In compliant regimens, all amikacin patients and a third of gentamicin patients had adequate C(max). Among 23 isolated pathogens, 65.5% were susceptible to both drugs and 11.5% to amikacin only. This vindicates the 20 mg/kg/day amikacin dosage and suggests a need to increase the gentamicin dosage. PMID:22235869

  19. Ancrod causes rapid thrombolysis in patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Pollak, V E; Glas-Greenwalt, P; Olinger, C P; Wadhwa, N K; Myre, S A

    1990-05-01

    Clot lysis is desirable in patients with thrombi in arteries and arterioles by a safe rapidly-acting thrombolytic agent. Ancrod cleaves fibrinogen; the resulting circulating ancrod-fibrin stimulates fibrinolysis. Ancrod action and effect were studied in 20 patients with acute developing stroke in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Patients were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups, and received either normal saline or ancrod 0.5 mu/kg in normal saline administered as a constant-rate intravenous infusion over 6 hours. Subsequent doses of ancrod (or saline placebo) were determined daily thereafter for a total treatment period of 7 days. Neither bleeding nor re-thrombosis occurred within the 90 day follow-up period. That ancrod acted rapidly was shown by a significant decrease in functional plasminogen activator inhibitor (PA-I) within 60 minutes, and by significant elevations of fibrin(ogen) degradation products (FDP) and D-dimer within 3 and 4 hours. The biological effect of fibrinolysis in ancrod infused patients was demonstrated by a greater improvement in stroke score when compared to those infused with saline. PMID:2186630

  20. Metronidazole pharmacokinetics in patients with acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, A A; Kong, C B; Gurr, F W; Sabto, J; Spicer, W J; McLean, A J

    1984-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of intravenous metronidazole were studied in six patients with acute renal failure. In two of the patients a single dose (500 mg) of metronidazole was administered, whereas in four patients the steady-state pharmacokinetics were studied after four days therapy of 500 mg twice daily. Plasma concentrations of metronidazole and its hydroxy and acetic acid metabolites were measured by a specific and sensitive HPLC method. The volume of distribution was 0.65 +/- 0.13 l/kg (mean +/- S.D.), elimination half-life was 9.9 +/- 2.5 h and total plasma clearance was 55.5 +/- 17.7 ml/min. Renal clearance was almost non-existent (1.4 +/- 1.4 ml/min), whereas non-renal clearance was 54.0 +/- 18.2 ml/min. Steady-state plasma concentrations of metronidazole were 15.3 +/- 3.8 mg/l, the hydroxy metabolite were 17.4 +/- 2.0 mg/l and the acetic acid metabolite were 1.2 +/- 0.8 mg/l. In the patients studied, a dosing regimen of 500 mg twice daily resulted in therapeutically adequate blood levels of metronidazole. PMID:6706889

  1. AGE AND GENDER DIFFERENCES IN ACUTE STROKE HOSPITAL PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Kes, Vanja Bašić; Jurašić, Miljenka-Jelena; Zavoreo, Iris; Lisak, Marijana; Jelec, Vjekoslav; Matovina, Lucija Zadro

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death and the most important cause of adult disability worldwide and in Croatia. In the past, stroke was almost exclusively considered to be a disease of the elderly; however, today the age limit has considerably lowered towards younger age. The aim of this study was to determine age and gender impact on stroke patients in a Croatian urban area during one-year survey. The study included all acute stroke patients admitted to our Department in 2004. A compiled stroke questionnaire was fulfilled during hospitalization by medical personnel on the following items: stroke risk factors including lifestyle habits (smoking and alcohol), pre-stroke physical ability evaluation, stroke evolution data, laboratory and computed tomography findings, outcome data and post-stroke disability assessment. Appropriate statistical analysis of numerical and categorical data was performed at the level of p < 0.05. Analysis was performed on 396 patients, 24 of them from the younger adult stroke group. Older stroke patients had worse disability at hospital discharge and women had worse disabilities at both stroke onset and hospital discharge, probably due to older age at stroke onset. Younger patients recovered better, while older patients had to seek secondary medical facilities more often, as expected. The most important in-hospital laboratory findings in young stroke patients were elevated lipid levels, while older patients had elevated serum glucose and C-reactive protein. Stroke onset in younger patients most often presented with sudden onset headache; additionally, onset seizure was observed more frequently than expected. Stroke risk factor analysis showed that women were more prone to hypertension, chronic heart failure and atrial fibrillation, whereas men had carotid disease more frequently, were more often smokers and had higher alcohol intake. Additionally, age analysis showed that heart conditions and smoking were more prevalent among older

  2. Early Identification of Patients at Risk of Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gajic, Ognjen; Dabbagh, Ousama; Park, Pauline K.; Adesanya, Adebola; Chang, Steven Y.; Hou, Peter; Anderson, Harry; Hoth, J. Jason; Mikkelsen, Mark E.; Gentile, Nina T.; Gong, Michelle N.; Talmor, Daniel; Bajwa, Ednan; Watkins, Timothy R.; Festic, Emir; Yilmaz, Murat; Iscimen, Remzi; Kaufman, David A.; Esper, Annette M.; Sadikot, Ruxana; Douglas, Ivor; Sevransky, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Accurate, early identification of patients at risk for developing acute lung injury (ALI) provides the opportunity to test and implement secondary prevention strategies. Objectives: To determine the frequency and outcome of ALI development in patients at risk and validate a lung injury prediction score (LIPS). Methods: In this prospective multicenter observational cohort study, predisposing conditions and risk modifiers predictive of ALI development were identified from routine clinical data available during initial evaluation. The discrimination of the model was assessed with area under receiver operating curve (AUC). The risk of death from ALI was determined after adjustment for severity of illness and predisposing conditions. Measurements and Main Results: Twenty-two hospitals enrolled 5,584 patients at risk. ALI developed a median of 2 (interquartile range 1–4) days after initial evaluation in 377 (6.8%; 148 ALI-only, 229 adult respiratory distress syndrome) patients. The frequency of ALI varied according to predisposing conditions (from 3% in pancreatitis to 26% after smoke inhalation). LIPS discriminated patients who developed ALI from those who did not with an AUC of 0.80 (95% confidence interval, 0.78–0.82). When adjusted for severity of illness and predisposing conditions, development of ALI increased the risk of in-hospital death (odds ratio, 4.1; 95% confidence interval, 2.9–5.7). Conclusions: ALI occurrence varies according to predisposing conditions and carries an independently poor prognosis. Using routinely available clinical data, LIPS identifies patients at high risk for ALI early in the course of their illness. This model will alert clinicians about the risk of ALI and facilitate testing and implementation of ALI prevention strategies. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00889772). PMID:20802164

  3. Midostaurin: an emerging treatment for acute myeloid leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Gallogly, Molly Megan; Lazarus, Hillard M

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematologic malignancy that carries a poor prognosis and has garnered few treatment advances in the last few decades. Mutation of the internal tandem duplication (ITD) region of fms-like tyrosine kinase (FLT3) is considered high risk for decreased response and overall survival. Midostaurin is a Type III receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor found to inhibit FLT3 and other receptor tyrosine kinases, including platelet-derived growth factor receptors, cyclin-dependent kinase 1, src, c-kit, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. In preclinical studies, midostaurin exhibited broad-spectrum antitumor activity toward a wide range of tumor xenografts, as well as an FLT3-ITD-driven mouse model of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Midostaurin is orally administered and generally well tolerated as a single agent; hematologic toxicity increases substantially when administered in combination with standard induction chemotherapy. Clinical trials primarily have focused on relapsed/refractory AML and MDS and included single- and combination-agent studies. Administration of midostaurin to relapsed/refractory MDS and AML patients confers a robust anti-blast response sufficient to bridge a minority of patients to transplant. In combination with histone deacetylase inhibitors, responses appear comparable to historic controls, while the addition of midostaurin to standard induction chemotherapy may prolong survival in FLT3-ITD mutant patients. The response of some wild-type (WT)-FLT3 patients to midostaurin therapy is consistent with midostaurin’s ability to inhibit WT-FLT3 in vitro, and also may reflect overexpression of WT-FLT3 in those patients and/or off-target effects such as inhibition of kinases other than FLT3. Midostaurin represents a well-tolerated, easily administered oral agent with the potential to bridge mutant and WT-FLT3 AML patients to transplant and possibly deepen response to induction chemotherapy. Ongoing studies are

  4. Acute myocardial infarction or acute myocarditis? Discharge registry-based study of likelihood and associated features in hospitalised patients

    PubMed Central

    Kytö, Ville; Sipilä, Jussi; Rautava, Päivi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the likelihood of and patient features associated with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) versus acute myocarditis in different population segments. Design Nationwide, multihospital observational retrospective registry study of 9.6 years in Finland. Participants All consecutive patients aged ≥18 years hospitalised with a primary diagnosis of AMI (n=89 399) or acute myocarditis (n=2131) in 22 hospitals with a coronary catheterisation laboratory. Primary outcome measures Likelihood of AMI versus acute myocarditis and associated patient features. Results Men were over-represented in patients with AMI (59.8%) and in patients with acute myocarditis (76.1%). Age distributions of AMI and acute myocarditis were opposite as a majority of patients with myocarditis were aged 18–29 years, while the number of patients with AMI increased gradually up to 80 years of age. Patients aged 18–29 years were more likely to have acute myocarditis as the cause of hospitalisation (relative risk (RR)=11.4; 95% CI 7.6 to 16.1 for myocarditis, p<0.0001), but after 30 years of age the likelihood of infarction was higher with exponentially increasing RR for AMI. In youngest patients (18–29 years), the likelihood of AMI was higher in women, but men had higher odds for AMI after 40 years of age. Overall, men had OR of 1.97 (95% CI 1.74 to 2.23, p<0.0001) for AMI versus myocarditis when compared with women. Hypercholesterolaemia, chronic coronary artery disease, diabetes and hypertension predicted AMI in multivariate analysis. Odds for myocarditis were significantly higher if the patient had an otolaryngeal infection (OR 18.13; 95% CI 8.96 to 36.67, p<0.0001). Conclusions Acute myocarditis is more common than AMI in hospitalised patients aged 18–29 years, but the risk of AMI increases exponentially thereafter. Hypercholesterolaemia, diabetes and hypertension predict AMI regardless of age and gender. PMID:26009575

  5. Macroamylasemia in a patient with acute appendicitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Um, J W; Kim, K H; Kang, M S; Choe, J H; Bae, J W; Hong, Y S; Suh, S O; Kim, Y C; Whang, C W; Kim, S M

    1999-12-01

    Macroamylasemia is a condition of persistent, elevated serum amylase activity with no apparent clinical symptoms of a pancreatic disorder. In Korea, however, no such case has been reported to date. We report a case of a 17-year-old female diagnosed with macroamylasemia and acute appendicitis. One day earlier, she developed epigastric and right lower quadrant abdominal pain. She was characterized by high level of serum amylase, but normal lipase. Amylase isoenzyme analysis demonstrated increased fraction of salivary type and follow-up amylase level was persistently increased. Immunofixation disclosed the macroamylase binding with an immunoglobulin, consisting of IgA and kappa chain. The patient was treated by appendectomy, and the abdominal pain subsided. PMID:10642949

  6. Early Cerebral Circulation Disturbance in Patients Suffering from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Xenon CT and Perfusion CT Study

    PubMed Central

    HONDA, Mitsuru; ICHIBAYASHI, Ryo; YOKOMURO, Hiroki; YOSHIHARA, Katsunori; MASUDA, Hiroyuki; HAGA, Daisuke; SEIKI, Yoshikatsu; KUDOH, Chiaki; KISHI, Taichi

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widely known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following TBI. Detecting early ischemia in TBI patients is important to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cerebral circulatory disturbance during the early phase and whether it can be used to predict patient outcome. A total of 90 patients with TBI underwent a xenon-computed tomography (Xe-CT) and subsequently perfusion CT to evaluate the cerebral circulation on days 1–3. We measured CBF using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT: the width between two inflection points [maximum upward slope and maximum downward slope from inflow to outflow of the contrast agent]) using perfusion CT and calculated the cerebral blood volume (CBV) using the AZ-7000W98 computer system. The relationships of the hemodynamic parameters CBF, MTT, and CBV to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were examined. There were no significant differences in CBF, MTT, and CBV among GCS3–4, GCS5–6, and GCS7–8 groups. The patients with a favorable outcome (GR and MD) had significantly higher CBF and lower MTT than those with an unfavorable one (SD, VS, or D). The discriminant analysis of these parameters could predict patient outcome with a probability of 70.6%. During the early phase, CBF reduction and MTT prolongation might influence the clinical outcome of TBI. These parameters are helpful for evaluating the severity of cerebral circulatory disturbance and predicting the outcome of TBI patients. PMID:27356957

  7. Early Cerebral Circulation Disturbance in Patients Suffering from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Xenon CT and Perfusion CT Study.

    PubMed

    Honda, Mitsuru; Ichibayashi, Ryo; Yokomuro, Hiroki; Yoshihara, Katsunori; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Haga, Daisuke; Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Kudoh, Chiaki; Kishi, Taichi

    2016-08-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widely known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following TBI. Detecting early ischemia in TBI patients is important to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cerebral circulatory disturbance during the early phase and whether it can be used to predict patient outcome. A total of 90 patients with TBI underwent a xenon-computed tomography (Xe-CT) and subsequently perfusion CT to evaluate the cerebral circulation on days 1-3. We measured CBF using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT: the width between two inflection points [maximum upward slope and maximum downward slope from inflow to outflow of the contrast agent]) using perfusion CT and calculated the cerebral blood volume (CBV) using the AZ-7000W98 computer system. The relationships of the hemodynamic parameters CBF, MTT, and CBV to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were examined. There were no significant differences in CBF, MTT, and CBV among GCS3-4, GCS5-6, and GCS7-8 groups. The patients with a favorable outcome (GR and MD) had significantly higher CBF and lower MTT than those with an unfavorable one (SD, VS, or D). The discriminant analysis of these parameters could predict patient outcome with a probability of 70.6%. During the early phase, CBF reduction and MTT prolongation might influence the clinical outcome of TBI. These parameters are helpful for evaluating the severity of cerebral circulatory disturbance and predicting the outcome of TBI patients. PMID:27356957

  8. Acute promyelocytic leukemia transformation in a patient with aplastic anemia: a case report with literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoning; Yuan, Tingting; Wang, Wenjuan; Chen, Limei; Wang, Huaiyu; Liu, Yalin

    2015-01-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) is a hematological disorder presenting with pancytopenia in peripheral blood and hypocellularity in bone marrow. AA patients with immunosuppressive therapy and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment have a risk of development of acute leukemia including acute myeloid leukemia (M0, M1, M2, M4, M5, M6) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, AA with transformation to acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has never been reported. Here, we reported a patient initially diagnosed with AA. while 19 years later, PML/RAR αfusion gene were detected and the patient was eventually diagnosed as APL. The diagnosis and management of this interesting case are discussed. PMID:26884990

  9. Novel drugs for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Montalban-Bravo, G; Garcia-Manero, G

    2015-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the second most common form of leukemia and the most frequent cause of leukemia-related deaths in the United States. The incidence of AML increases with advancing age and the prognosis for patients with AML worsens substantially with increasing age. Many older patients are ineligible for intensive treatment and require other therapeutic approaches to optimize clinical outcome. To address this treatment gap, novel agents with varying mechanisms of action targeting different cellular processes are currently in development. Hypomethylating agents (azacitidine, decitabine, SGI-110), histone deacetylase inhibitors (vorinostat, pracinostat, panobinostat), FMS-like tyrosine kinase receptor-3 inhibitors (quizartinib, sorafenib, midostaurin, crenolanib), cytotoxic agents (clofarabine, sapacitabine, vosaroxin), cell cycle inhibitors (barasertib, volasertib, rigosertib) and monoclonal antibodies (gentuzumab ozogamicin, lintuzumab-Ac225) represent some of these promising new treatments. This review provides an overview of novel agents that have either completed or are currently in ongoing phase III trials in patients with previously untreated AML for whom intensive treatment is not an option. Other potential drugs in earlier stages of development will also be addressed in this review. PMID:25142817

  10. Infection in acute leukemia patients receiving oral nonabsorable antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Hahn, D M; Schimpff, S C; Fortner, C L; Smyth, A C; Young, V M; Wiernik, P H

    1978-06-01

    During a 20-month period all acute nonlymphocytic patients (87 patient trials) receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy were placed on an oral nonabsorbable antibiotic regimen consisting of gentamicin, vancomycin, and nystatin in addition to an intensive program of infection prevention aimed at reducing exogenously acquired and body-surface potential pathogens. Although side effects of anorexia, diarrhea, and nausea were common, gentamicin-vancomycin-nystatin was ingested 80% of the study time. Microbial growth in gingival and rectal cultures was substantially reduced. The incidence of bacteremias and other serious infections was low. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, other gram-negative bacilli, and Candida species caused few infections along the alimentary canal, whereas infections of the skin (especially Staphylococcus aureus) were not reduced compared with those occurring in former years. A total of the 104 acquired gram-negative bacilli were gentamicin resistant; 5 subsequently caused infection. Thus, despite certain definite drawbacks, the use of oral nonabsorbable antibiotics to suppress alimentary tract microbial flora in combination with other infection prevention techniques in granulocytopenic cancer patients has proven feasible and tolerable and has been associated with a low order of life-threatening infections. PMID:98107

  11. Incidence and Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury Following Mannitol Infusion in Patients With Acute Stroke: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shin-Yi; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Shen, Li-Jiuan; Wu, Fe-Lin Lin; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2015-11-01

    Mannitol, an osmotic diuretic, is commonly used to treat patients with acute brain edema, but its use also increases the risk of developing acute kidney injury (AKI). In this study, we investigated the incidence and risk factors of mannitol-related AKI in acute stroke patients.A total of 432 patients (ischemic stroke 62.3%) >20 years of age who were admitted to the neurocritical care center in a tertiary hospital and received mannitol treatment were enrolled in this study. Clinical parameters including the scores of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at admission, vascular risk factors, laboratory data, and concurrent nephrotoxic medications were registered. Acute kidney injury was defined as an absolute elevation in the serum creatinine (Scr) level of ≥0.3 mg/dL from the baseline or a ≥50% increase in Scr.The incidence of mannitol-related AKI was 6.5% (95% confidence interval, 4.5%-9.3%) in acute stroke patients, 6.3% in patients with ischemic stroke, and 6.7% in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Multivariate analysis revealed that diabetes, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate at baseline, higher initial NIHSS score, and concurrent use of diuretics increased the risk of mannitol-related AKI. When present, the combination of these elements displayed an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.839 (95% confidence interval, 0.770-0.909). In conclusion, mannitol-related AKI is not uncommon in the treatment of acute stroke patients, especially in those with vulnerable risk factors. PMID:26632702

  12. Early Identification of Acute Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions: Realistic Implications for Best Practice in Patient Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Juliet Battard; Edwards, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Acute hemolytic transfusion reactions can result in severe complications and death. Through early identification and prompt intervention, nurses can reduce the risks associated with these serious reactions. Realistic evidence-based patient monitoring protocols can help guide identification of acute hemolytic transfusion reactions and facilitate lifesaving interventions to avert critical patient situations. PMID:27323466

  13. [Language regression to the mother tongue in polyglot patients with acute psychosis].

    PubMed

    Heinemann, F; Assion, H J

    1996-07-01

    Three bilingual patients with schizophrenia are presented, who spoke almost exclusively in their native language during acute episodes of psychosis. Normal use of the foreign language, German, was again possible after remission of the acute symptoms. This phenomenon of regression is similar to speech disorders in patients with aphasia and is discussed with reference to recent biological findings. PMID:8927199

  14. Rosuvastatin Reduces Blood Viscosity in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Lae-Young; Jung, Jin-Mu; Kim, Yi-Shik; Lee, Sun-Hwa; Rhee, Kyoung-Suk; Chae, Jei-Keon; Lee, Dong-Hwan; Kim, Dal-Sik; Kim, Won-Ho; Ko, Jae-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Wall shear stress contributes to atherosclerosis progression and plaque rupture. There are limited studies for statin as a major contributing factor on whole blood viscosity (WBV) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). This study investigates the effect of statin on WBV in ACS patients. Subjects and Methods We prospectively enrolled 189 consecutive patients (mean age, 61.3±10.9 years; 132 males; ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, n=52; non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, n=84; unstable angina n=53). Patients were divided into two groups (group I: previous use of statins for at least 3 months, n=51; group II: statin-naïve patients, n=138). Blood viscosities at shear rates of 1 s-1 (diastolic blood viscosity; DBV) and 300 s-1 (systolic blood viscosity; SBV) were measured at baseline and one month after statin treatment. Rosuvastatin was administered to patients after enrollment (mean daily dose, 16.2±4.9 mg). Results Baseline WBV was significantly higher in group II ([SBV: group I vs group II, 40.8±5.9 mP vs. 44.2±7.4 mP, p=0.003], [DBV: 262.2±67.8 mP vs. 296.9±76.0 mP, p=0.002]). WBV in group II was significantly lower one month after statin treatment ([SBV: 42.0±4.7 mP, p=0.012, DBV: 281.4±52.6 mP, p=0.044]). However, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level was not associated with WBV in both baseline (SBV: R2=0.074, p=0.326; DBV: R2=0.073, p=0.337) and after one month follow up (SBV: R2=0.104, p=0.265; DBV: R2=0.112, p=0.232). Conclusion Previous statin medication is an important determinant in lowering WBV in patients with ACS. However, one month of rosuvastatin decreased WBV in statin-naïve ACS patients. PMID:27014344

  15. Lethal acute liver failure in a patient treated with sunitinib.

    PubMed

    Guillen, S S; Meijer, M; de Jongh, F E

    2016-01-01

    Sunitinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that is used as an anticancer drug in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PNETs) and gastrointestinal stromal tumour. Elevated liver enzymes are frequently observed during treatment but acute liver failure is uncommon. We describe a case of fulminant acute liver failure and acute kidney injury during treatment with sunitinib for metastatic RCC. PMID:26933184

  16. Neurodiagnostic Abnormalities in Patients with Acute Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Jerry D.; Lazarowitz, Virginia C.; Arieff, Allen I.

    1978-01-01

    Neurological abnormalities are a major cause of morbidity in patients with renal failure. The pathophysiology of these neurological changes is unclear, and the effects on them of dialysis and return of renal function have not been well studied. Studies were done in 31 patients who had acute renal failure (ARF), all of whom were either treated with dialysis within 5 days or did not survive. Studies on these patients included the electroencephalogram (EEG), motor nerve conduction velocity, and plasma Ca++ and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels. Studies were done at the time ARF was diagnosed, after stabilization on dialysis, during the diuretic phase of ARF, and 3 mo after recovery from ARF. In 16 patients with acute or chronic renal failure who did not survive and in nine patients without renal disease who died, measurements were made in brain of content of Na+, K+, Cl−, Ca++, Mg++, and water. In patients with ARF for less than 48 h, despite the fact that there were only modest increases in plasma urea and creatinine, there were striking abnormalities in the EEG. The percent EEG power < 5 Hz±SE was 41±8% (normal = 2±1%), whereas the percent of frequencies > 9 Hz was only 22±6% (normal = 62±3%). These changes were unaffected by dialysis, but became normal with return of renal function and remained normal at 3 mo follow-up. The motor nerve conduction velocity was unaffected by either ARF or dialysis. In patients with ARF, the brain Ca++ was 46.5±3.2 meq/kg dry wt, almost twice the normal value of 26.9±1.0 meq/kg dry wt (P < 0.001). The plasma PTH level was 3.2±0.6 ng/ml (normal < 1.5 ng/ml, P < 0.01). The increased brain Ca++ was not related to an increased plasma (Ca++) (PO4−−−) product (r2 = 0.14, P > 0.05). There was a small but significant decrement in brain Na+ (P < 0.05), but brain water, K+, and Mg++ were unaffected by ARF. Thus, in patients with ARF for less than 48 h, the EEG is grossly abnormal and there are elevated levels of PTH in plasma

  17. Acute Activation of Metabolic Syndrome Components in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patients Treated with Dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Warris, Lidewij T.; van den Akker, Erica L. T.; Bierings, Marc B.; van den Bos, Cor; Zwaan, Christian M.; Sassen, Sebastiaan D. T.; Tissing, Wim J. E.; Veening, Margreet A.; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2016-01-01

    Although dexamethasone is highly effective in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), it can cause serious metabolic side effects. Because studies regarding the effects of dexamethasone are limited by their small scale, we prospectively studied the direct effects of treating pediatric ALL with dexamethasone administration with respect to activation of components of metabolic syndrome (MetS); in addition, we investigated whether these side effects were correlated with the level of dexamethasone. Fifty pediatric patients (3–16 years of age) with ALL were studied during a 5-day dexamethasone course during the maintenance phase of the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group ALL-10 and ALL-11 protocols. Fasting insulin, glucose, total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triglycerides levels were measured at baseline (before the start of dexamethasone; T1) and on the fifth day of treatment (T2). Dexamethasone trough levels were measured at T2. We found that dexamethasone treatment significantly increased the following fasting serum levels (P<0.05): HDL, LDL, total cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, and insulin. In addition, dexamethasone increased insulin resistance (HOMA-IR>3.4) from 8% to 85% (P<0.01). Dexamethasone treatment also significantly increased the diastolic and systolic blood pressure. Lastly, dexamethasone trough levels (N = 24) were directly correlated with high glucose levels at T2, but not with other parameters. These results indicate that dexamethasone treatment acutely induces three components of the MetS. Together with the weight gain typically associated with dexamethasone treatment, these factors may contribute to the higher prevalence of MetS and cardiovascular risk among survivors of childhood leukemia who received dexamethasone treatment. PMID:27362350

  18. Impact of β-Adrenoceptor Blockade on Systemic Inflammation and Coagulation Disturbances in Rats with Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lin; Yu, Wen-kui; Lin, Zhi-liang; Tan, Shan-jun; Bai, Xiao-wu; Ding, Kai; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Background Sympathetic hyperactivity occurs early in acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) and is closely related to its development. β-adrenoceptor antagonists are known to alleviate adverse sympathetic effects and improve outcome in various diseases. We investigated whether β-blockers have protective effects against inflammation and endothelial and hemostatic disorders in ATC. Material/Methods ATC was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by trauma and hemorrhagic shock. Rats were randomly assigned to the sham, ATCC (ATC control), and ATCB (ATC with beta-adrenoceptor blockade) groups. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with propranolol or vehicle at baseline. Heart rate variability (HRV) and markers of inflammation, coagulation, and endothelial activation were measured, and Western blotting analysis of nuclear factor (NF)-κB was done after shock. Separate ATCC and ATCB groups were observed to compare overall mortality. Results HRV showed enhanced sympathetic tone in the ATCC group, which was reversed by propranolol. Propranolol attenuated the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6, as well as fibrinolysis markers plasmin antiplasmin complex and tissue-type plasminogen activator. The increased serum syndecan-1 and soluble thrombomodulin were inhibited by propranolol, and the NF-κB expression was also decreased by propranolol pretreatment. But propranolol did not alter overall mortality in rats with ATC after shock. Conclusions Beta-adrenoceptor blockade can alleviate sympathetic hyperactivity and exert anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrinolysis, and endothelial protective effects, confirming its pivotal role in the pathogenesis of ATC. Its mechanism in ATC should be explored further. PMID:25676919

  19. Campylobacter jejuni Bacteremia in a Patient With Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Anvarinejad, Mojtaba; Amin Shahidi, Maneli; Pouladfar, Gholam Reza; Dehyadegari, Mohammad Ali; Mardaneh, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Campylobacter jejuni is a slender, motile, non-spore-forming, helical-shaped, gram-negative bacterium. It is one of the most common causes of human gastroenteritis in the world. The aim of this study was to present a patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), who was infected with Campylobacter jejuni. Case Presentation We describe the medical records of a pediatric ALL patient with bacteremia caused by C. jejuni, who was diagnosed at Amir hospital, Shiraz, Iran. This 14-year-old male visited the emergency department of Amir hospital with night sweats, severe polar high-grade fever, reduced appetite, and nausea in August 2013. Given the suspected presence of an anaerobic or microaerophilic microorganism, aerobic and anaerobic blood cultures were performed using an automated blood cultivator, the BACTEC 9240 system. In order to characterize the isolate, diagnostic biochemical tests were used. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was done with the disk diffusion method. The primary culture was found to be positive for Campylobacter, and the subculture of the solid plate yielded a confluent growth of colonies typical for Campylobacter, which was identified as C. jejuni by morphological and biochemical tests. The isolate was resistant to ciprofloxacin, cefotaxime, cephalexin, piperacillin/tazobactam, nalidixic acid, aztreonam, cefuroxime, cefixime, ceftazidime, and tobramycin. Conclusions C. jejuni should be considered in the differential diagnosis as a potential cause of bacteremia in immunosuppressed patients. In cases where the BACTEC result is positive in aerobic conditions but the organism cannot be isolated, an anaerobic culture medium is suggested, especially in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27621914

  20. Toxicokinetics of paraquat in Korean patients with acute poisoning.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Jae; Kim, Hyung-Ki; Lee, Hwayoung; Bae, Jun-Seok; Kown, Jun-Tack; Gil, Hyo-Wook; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2016-01-01

    To conduct a kinetic study of paraquat (PQ), we investigated 9 patients with acute PQ intoxication. All of them ingested more than 20 ml of undiluted PQ herbicide to commit suicide and arrived at our hospital early, not later than 7 h after PQ ingestion. The urine dithionite test for PQ in all of the nine patients was strongly positive at emergency room. Blood samples were obtained every 30 min for the first 2~3 h and then every 1 or 2 h, as long as the clinical progression was stable among the patients for 30 h after PQ ingestion. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUCinf), which was extrapolated to infinity, was calculated using the trapezoidal rule. Toxicokinetic parameters, such as the terminal elimination half-life, apparent oral clearance, and apparent volume of distribution (Vd/F) were calculated. The maximum PQ concentration (Cmax) and the time to reach maximum PQ concentration (Tmax) were also obtained. Plasma PQ concentrations in nine patients were well described by a bi-exponential curve with a mean terminal elimination half-life of 13.1±6.8 h. Cmax and AUCinf were 20.8±25.7 mg/l and 172.5±160.3 h·mg/l, respectively. Apparent volume of distribution and apparent oral clearance were 50.9±61.3 l/kg and 173.4±111.2 l/h, respectively. There were a significant correlation (r =0.84; p<0.05) between the PQ amount ingested and Cmax. AUCinf also showed a significant correlation (r =0.83; p<0.05) with the PQ amount ingested. These correlations provide evidence that PQ has dose-linear toxicokinetic characteristics. PMID:26807021

  1. Toxicokinetics of paraquat in Korean patients with acute poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak-Jae; Kim, Hyung-Ki; Lee, Hwayoung; Bae, Jun-Seok; Kown, Jun-Tack; Gil, Hyo-Wook

    2016-01-01

    To conduct a kinetic study of paraquat (PQ), we investigated 9 patients with acute PQ intoxication. All of them ingested more than 20 ml of undiluted PQ herbicide to commit suicide and arrived at our hospital early, not later than 7 h after PQ ingestion. The urine dithionite test for PQ in all of the nine patients was strongly positive at emergency room. Blood samples were obtained every 30 min for the first 2~3 h and then every 1 or 2 h, as long as the clinical progression was stable among the patients for 30 h after PQ ingestion. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUCinf), which was extrapolated to infinity, was calculated using the trapezoidal rule. Toxicokinetic parameters, such as the terminal elimination half-life, apparent oral clearance, and apparent volume of distribution (Vd/F) were calculated. The maximum PQ concentration (Cmax) and the time to reach maximum PQ concentration (Tmax) were also obtained. Plasma PQ concentrations in nine patients were well described by a bi-exponential curve with a mean terminal elimination half-life of 13.1±6.8 h. Cmax and AUCinf were 20.8±25.7 mg/l and 172.5±160.3 h·mg/l, respectively. Apparent volume of distribution and apparent oral clearance were 50.9±61.3 l/kg and 173.4±111.2 l/h, respectively. There were a significant correlation (r =0.84; p<0.05) between the PQ amount ingested and Cmax. AUCinf also showed a significant correlation (r =0.83; p<0.05) with the PQ amount ingested. These correlations provide evidence that PQ has dose-linear toxicokinetic characteristics. PMID:26807021

  2. "Are you talking to me?" confronting behavioral disturbances in patients with headache.

    PubMed

    Saper, Joel R

    2006-10-01

    The famous question, "Are you talking to me?," was coined by Robert DeNiro in his lead role as Travis Bickle in the Martin Scorsese classic, Taxi Driver. The phrase also characterizes the troubling encounters that many headache-treating professionals confront as they attempt to discuss serious matters of care and compliance with some of their headache patients. Although most headache patients are eager to take professional advice and guidance, there exists a minority of patients whose behavior undermines a collaborative relationship between doctor and patient. In these cases, the physician may need to directly confront this behavior in order to overcome behavioral barriers that interfere with desirable treatment outcomes. This article offers explicit means and strategies to engage difficult patients, increase the likelihood of program adherence and improvement, and develop a more satisfying doctor-patient relationship, based on clinical experience in a national referral center for difficult-to-manage headache patients. PMID:17034396

  3. The Development of Neuroendocrine Disturbances over Time: Longitudinal Findings in Patients after Traumatic Brain Injury and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kopczak, Anna; Krewer, Carmen; Schneider, Manfred; Kreitschmann-Andermahr, Ilonka; Schneider, Harald Jörn; Stalla, Günter Karl

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports suggest that neuroendocrine disturbances in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) or aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may still develop or resolve months or even years after the trauma. We investigated a cohort of n = 168 patients (81 patients after TBI and 87 patients after SAH) in whom hormone levels had been determined at various time points to assess the course and pattern of hormonal insufficiencies. Data were analyzed using three different criteria: (1) patients with lowered basal laboratory values; (2) patients with lowered basal laboratory values or the need for hormone replacement therapy; (3) diagnosis of the treating physician. The first hormonal assessment after a median time of three months after the injury showed lowered hormone laboratory test results in 35% of cases. Lowered testosterone (23.1% of male patients), lowered estradiol (14.3% of female patients) and lowered insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) values (12.1%) were most common. Using Criterion 2, a higher prevalence rate of 55.6% of cases was determined, which correlated well with the prevalence rate of 54% of cases using the physicians’ diagnosis as the criterion. Intraindividual changes (new onset insufficiency or recovery) were predominantly observed for the somatotropic axis (12.5%), the gonadotropic axis in women (11.1%) and the corticotropic axis (10.6%). Patients after TBI showed more often lowered IGF-I values at first testing, but normal values at follow-up (p < 0.0004). In general, most patients remained stable. Stable hormone results at follow-up were obtained in 78% (free thyroxine (fT4) values) to 94.6% (prolactin values). PMID:26703585

  4. Identification Bracelet Precipitated Acute Compartment Syndrome during Intravenous Infusion in an Obtunded Patient

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Wahib; Chaucer, Benjamin; Felek, Suleyman; Arsura, Edward L.; Nfonoyim, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is a serious condition requiring immediate medical care. A lack of urgent medical treatment can result in serious complications such as loss of function and even amputation. While the pathophysiology of acute compartment syndrome is well understood, numerous potential causes are still being discovered. A rare cause of acute compartment syndrome is IV infiltration. We present a case of acute compartment syndrome resulting from intravenous infusion due to proximal placement of a patient identification bracelet. We conclude that both routine evaluation for IV infiltration and proximal placement of IV lines are essential for prevention of acute compartment syndrome. PMID:26904308

  5. Appendicular mass complicating acute appendicitis in a patient with dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Low, Y N; Cheong, B M K

    2016-04-01

    Abdominal pain with dengue fever can be a diagnostic challenge. Typically, pain is localised to the epigastric region or associated with hepatomegaly. Patients can also present with acute abdomen. We report a case of a girl with dengue fever and right iliac fossa pain. The diagnosis of acute appendicitis was made only after four days of admission. An appendicular mass and a perforated appendix was noted during appendectomy. The patient recovered subsequently. Features suggestive of acute appendicitis are persistent right iliac fossa pain, localised peritonism, persistent fever and leucocytosis. Repeated clinical assessment is important to avoid missing a concurrent diagnosis like acute appendicitis. PMID:27326951

  6. Acute tubular nephropathy in a patient with acute HIV infection: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ananworanich, Jintanat; Datta, Anandita A; Fletcher, James Lk; Townamchai, Natavudh; Chomchey, Nitiya; Kroon, Eugene; Sereti, Irini; Valcour, Victor; Kim, Jerome H

    2014-01-01

    We report a 57-year old man with diabetes mellitus and hypertension who presented with acute HIV infection. Routine blood tests showed an elevated blood urea nitrogen and creatinine. Renal biopsy showed acute tubular nephropathy, which has not been reported to occur during acute HIV infection, in the absence of rhabdomyolysis or multiple organ system failure. Antiretroviral therapy was initiated. His renal failure gradually resolved without further intervention. At one year of follow-up his HIV RNA was undetectable, and his renal function was normal. The case illustrates a rare manifestation of acute HIV infection - acute renal failure - in an older man with diabetes and hypertension. In this setting acute kidney injury might mistakenly have been attributed to his chronic comorbidities, and this case supports early HIV-1 testing in the setting of a high index of suspicion. PMID:25745498

  7. Optimizing sedation in patients with acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Oddo, Mauro; Crippa, Ilaria Alice; Mehta, Sangeeta; Menon, David; Payen, Jean-Francois; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Citerio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Daily interruption of sedative therapy and limitation of deep sedation have been shown in several randomized trials to reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation and hospital length of stay, and to improve the outcome of critically ill patients. However, patients with severe acute brain injury (ABI; including subjects with coma after traumatic brain injury, ischaemic/haemorrhagic stroke, cardiac arrest, status epilepticus) were excluded from these studies. Therefore, whether the new paradigm of minimal sedation can be translated to the neuro-ICU (NICU) is unclear. In patients with ABI, sedation has 'general' indications (control of anxiety, pain, discomfort, agitation, facilitation of mechanical ventilation) and 'neuro-specific' indications (reduction of cerebral metabolic demand, improved brain tolerance to ischaemia). Sedation also is an essential therapeutic component of intracranial pressure therapy, targeted temperature management and seizure control. Given the lack of large trials which have evaluated clinically relevant endpoints, sedative selection depends on the effect of each agent on cerebral and systemic haemodynamics. Titration and withdrawal of sedation in the NICU setting has to be balanced between the risk that interrupting sedation might exacerbate brain injury (e.g. intracranial pressure elevation) and the potential benefits of enhanced neurological function and reduced complications. In this review, we provide a concise summary of cerebral physiologic effects of sedatives and analgesics, the advantages/disadvantages of each agent, the comparative effects of standard sedatives (propofol and midazolam) and the emerging role of alternative drugs (ketamine). We suggest a pragmatic approach for the use of sedation-analgesia in the NICU, focusing on some practical aspects, including optimal titration and management of sedation withdrawal according to ABI severity. PMID:27145814

  8. Cognitive functions, fatigue, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbances: assessment of nonmotor features in young patients with essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Sengul, Yildizhan; Sengul, Hakan S; Yucekaya, Sevda K; Yucel, Selma; Bakim, Bahadir; Pazarcı, Nevin K; Özdemir, Gökhan

    2015-09-01

    There is a growing amount of evidence to suggest that besides motor features, patients with essential tremor (ET) may exhibit significant nonmotor features, such as mild cognitive deficits, fatigue, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and sleep disturbances. The goal of this study was to examine nonmotor features in young patients with ET and their impact on quality of life. 45 patients (24.55 ± 7.16 years old) with ET and 35 controls were evaluated using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, and Short Form-36. Cognitive functions were evaluated using the Turkish version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Battery (MoCA). We ruled out other possible causes of the tremor. The tremor rate was evaluated using the Fahn-Tolosa-Marin Tremor Rating Scale. Poor sleep quality, fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptoms were more common, and MoCA total scores were lower in the patient group. Fatigue, depressive symptoms, and higher anxiety levels were seen to have a negative effect on physical and mental health. Excessive daytime sleepiness had a negative effect on physical health. There is an emerging interest in nonmotor features of ET. This study showed that even young patients have nonmotor features that decrease their quality of life. This might tell us that nonmotor symptoms could be a part of the disease in the early stages. PMID:25471376

  9. Mitochondrial respiratory dysfunctions of blood mononuclear cells link with cardiac disturbance in patients with early-stage heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Wang, Bin; Sun, Fang; Li, Yingsha; Li, Qiang; Lang, Hongmei; Zhao, Zhigang; Gao, Peng; Zhao, Yu; Shang, Qianhui; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2015-01-01

    Patients with cardiometabolic risk factors and asymptomatic cardiac hypertrophy are hallmarks of early-stage heart failure (HF). We hypothesized that mitochondrial respiratory dysfunctions of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) may be associated with inflammation and oxidative stress in early-stage HF patients complicated with cardiometabolic risk factors. Totally 49 subjects were enrolled with 25 early-stage HF patients (stages A and B) having cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction and 24 healthy controls. It showed that excessive inflammation and reduced antioxidant capacity were closely associated with cardiac abnormalities in early-stage HF patients. Furthermore, the values of mitochondrial respiratory functional parameters R, CIOXPHOS, CIIOXPHOS, CI+IIOXPHOS, CI+IIETS and CIIETS were significantly lowered in early-stage HF patients. Interestingly, these respiratory parameters were correlated with inflammation and antioxidant capacity in participants. Finally, cardiometabolic risk factors such as salt intake and blood pressure were related to the mitochondrial respiratory dysfunctions, which were further validated by in vitro experiments. Our study indicated that cardiometabolic risk factor-mediated mitochondrial respiratory dysfunctions of PBMCs link with the cellular inflammation / oxidative stress and cardiac disturbance in early-stage HF. PMID:26018291

  10. Association of sleep disturbances with cognitive impairment and depression in maintenance memodialysis patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are few data on the relationship of sleep with measures of cognitive function and symptoms of depression in dialysis patients. We evaluated the relationship of sleep with cognitive function and symptoms of depression in 168 hemodialysis patients, using multivariable linear and logistic regress...