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Sample records for acutely ill patients

  1. Sleep Disturbances in Acutely Ill Patients with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Ellyn E; Tanner, J Mark; Dumont, Natalie A

    2016-06-01

    Intensive care units may place acutely ill patients with cancer at additional risk for sleep loss and associated negative effects. Research suggests that communication about sleep in patients with cancer is suboptimal and sleep problems are not regularly assessed or adequately treated throughout the cancer trajectory. However, many sleep problems and fatigue can be managed effectively. This article synthesizes the current literature regarding the prevalence, cause, and risk factors that contribute to sleep disturbance in the context of acute cancer care. It describes the consequences of poor sleep and discusses appropriate assessment and treatment options. PMID:27215362

  2. Acute kidney injury in critically ill cancer patients: an update.

    PubMed

    Lameire, Norbert; Vanholder, Raymond; Van Biesen, Wim; Benoit, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cancer represent a growing group among actual ICU admissions (up to 20 %). Due to their increased susceptibility to infectious and noninfectious complications related to the underlying cancer itself or its treatment, these patients frequently develop acute kidney injury (AKI). A wide variety of definitions for AKI are still used in the cancer literature, despite existing guidelines on definitions and staging of AKI. Alternative diagnostic investigations such as Cystatin C and urinary biomarkers are discussed briefly. This review summarizes the literature between 2010 and 2015 on epidemiology and prognosis of AKI in this population. Overall, the causes of AKI in the setting of malignancy are similar to those in other clinical settings, including preexisting chronic kidney disease. In addition, nephrotoxicity induced by the anticancer treatments including the more recently introduced targeted therapies is increasingly observed. However, data are sometimes difficult to interpret because they are often presented from the oncological rather than from the nephrological point of view. Because the development of the acute tumor lysis syndrome is one of the major causes of AKI in patients with a high tumor burden or a high cell turnover, the diagnosis, risk factors, and preventive measures of the syndrome will be discussed. Finally, we will briefly discuss renal replacement therapy modalities and the emergence of chronic kidney disease in the growing subgroup of critically ill post-AKI survivors. PMID:27480256

  3. Management of Acute Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Deepali; Endicott, Jeffrey; Burry, Lisa; Ramos, Liz; Yeung, Siu Yan Amy; Devabhakthuni, Sandeep; Chan, Claire; Tobia, Anthony; Bulloch, Marilyn N

    2016-07-01

    Approximately 16-31% of patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) have an alcohol use disorder and are at risk for developing alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS). Patients admitted to the ICU with AWS have an increased hospital and ICU length of stay, longer duration of mechanical ventilation, higher costs, and increased mortality compared with those admitted without an alcohol-related disorder. Despite the high prevalence of AWS among ICU patients, no guidelines for the recognition or management of AWS or delirium tremens in the critically ill currently exist, leading to tremendous variability in clinical practice. Goals of care should include immediate management of dehydration, nutritional deficits, and electrolyte derangements; relief of withdrawal symptoms; prevention of progression of symptoms; and treatment of comorbid illnesses. Symptom-triggered treatment of AWS with γ-aminobutyric acid receptor agonists is the cornerstone of therapy. Benzodiazepines (BZDs) are most studied and are often the preferred first-line agents due to their efficacy and safety profile. However, controversy still exists as to who should receive treatment, how to administer BZDs, and which BZD to use. Although most patients with AWS respond to usual doses of BZDs, ICU clinicians are challenged with managing BZD-resistant patients. Recent literature has shown that using an early multimodal approach to managing BZD-resistant patients appears beneficial in rapidly improving symptoms. This review highlights the results of recent promising studies published between 2011 and 2015 evaluating adjunctive therapies for BZD-resistant alcohol withdrawal such as antiepileptics, baclofen, dexmedetomidine, ethanol, ketamine, phenobarbital, propofol, and ketamine. We provide guidance on the places in therapy for select agents for management of critically ill patients in the presence of AWS. PMID:27196747

  4. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Heidi L.; Leykum, Luci K.; Mattison, Melissa L. P.; Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Meltzer, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Hospitalists and others acute care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients (ACOP) Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through four steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a Partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of ten research questions in the following areas: advanced care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision-making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. PMID:25877486

  5. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient.

    PubMed

    Wald, Heidi L; Leykum, Luci K; Mattison, Melissa L P; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Meltzer, David O

    2015-05-01

    Hospitalists and others acute-care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through 4 steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of 10 research questions in the following areas: advanced-care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. PMID:25877486

  6. The economic impact of the insured patients with severe chronic and acute illnesses: a qualitative approach

    PubMed Central

    Aji, Budi; Yamamoto, Shelby Suzanne; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Background Little research has focused on the economic hardship among the insured with severe illnesses and high treatment costs, in particular, the consequence of poorer insurance coverage for high-cost illnesses. Therefore, we presented the case for identifying the experiences of insured patients with severe chronic and acute illnesses. This study identified a qualitative understanding of the economic impact of severe chronic and acute illnesses and household strategies to deal with high treatment costs. Design Interviews were conducted with 19 insured households of three different health insurance programs with a family member that had been hospitalized for severe chronic or acute illnesses in either Banyumas or Margono Sukarjo hospitals in Banyumas, Central Java, Indonesia. A thematic analysis was applied to guide the interpretation of the data. Results Insured households with a family member that had been hospitalized for severe chronic and acute illnesses were greatly affected by the high treatment costs. Four major issues emerged from this qualitative study: insured patients are still burdened with high out-of-pocket payments, households adopt various strategies to cope with the high cost of treatments, households experience financial hardships, and positive and negative perceptions of the insured regarding their health insurance coverage for acute and chronic illnesses. Conclusions Askes and Jamsostek patients faced financial burdens from high cost sharing for hospital amenities, non-covered drugs, and treatments and other indirect costs. Meanwhile, Jamkesmas beneficiaries faced no financial burden for related medical services but were rather burdened with indirect costs for the carers. Households relied on internal resources to cover hospital bills as the first strategy, which included the mobilization of savings, sale of assets, and borrowing of money. External support was tapped secondarily and included financial support from extended family members

  7. Dyschloremia Is a Risk Factor for the Development of Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Min; Li, Guangxi; Sarvottam, Kumar; Wang, Shengyu; Thongprayoon, Charat; Dong, Yue; Gajic, Ognjen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dyschloremia is common in critically ill patients, although its impact has not been well studied. We investigated the epidemiology of dyschloremia and its associations with the incidence of acute kidney injury and other intensive care unit outcomes. Material and Methods This is a single-center, retrospective cohort study at Mayo Clinic Hospital—Rochester. All adult patients admitted to intensive care units from January 1st, 2006, through December 30th, 2012 were included. Patients with known acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease stage 5 before intensive care unit admission were excluded. We evaluated the association of dyschloremia with ICU outcomes, after adjustments for the effect of age, gender, Charlson comorbidity index and severity of illness score. Results A total of 6,025 patients were enrolled in the final analysis following the implementation of eligibility criteria. From the cohort, 1,970 patients (33%) developed acute kidney injury. Of the total patients enrolled, 4,174 had a baseline serum chloride. In this group, 1,530 (37%) had hypochloremia, and 257 (6%) were hyperchloremic. The incidence of acute kidney injury was higher in hypochloremic and hyperchloremic patients compared to those with a normal serum chloride level (43% vs.30% and 34% vs. 30%, respectively; P < .001). Baseline serum chloride was lower in the acute kidney injury group vs. the non-acute kidney injury group [100 mmol/L (96–104) vs. 102 mmol/L (98–105), P < .0001]. In a multivariable logistic regression model, baseline serum chloride of ≤94 mmol/L found to be independently associated with the risk of acute kidney injury (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1–2.6; P = .01). Discussion Dyschloremia is common in critically ill patients, and severe hypochloremia is independently associated with an increased risk of development of acute kidney injury. PMID:27490461

  8. Infectious Etiologies of Acute Febrile Illness among Patients Seeking Health Care in South-Central Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Matthew R.; Blair, Patrick J.; Touch, Sok; Sokhal, Buth; Yasuda, Chadwick Y.; Williams, Maya; Richards, Allen L.; Burgess, Timothy H.; Wierzba, Thomas F.; Putnam, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    The agents of human febrile illness can vary by region and country suggesting that diagnosis, treatment, and control programs need to be based on a methodical evaluation of area-specific etiologies. From December 2006 to December 2009, 9,997 individuals presenting with acute febrile illness at nine health care clinics in south-central Cambodia were enrolled in a study to elucidate the etiologies. Upon enrollment, respiratory specimens, whole blood, and serum were collected. Testing was performed for viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. Etiologies were identified in 38.0% of patients. Influenza was the most frequent pathogen, followed by dengue, malaria, and bacterial pathogens isolated from blood culture. In addition, 3.5% of enrolled patients were infected with more than one pathogen. Our data provide the first systematic assessment of the etiologies of acute febrile illness in south-central Cambodia. Data from syndromic-based surveillance studies can help guide public health responses in developing nations. PMID:22302857

  9. Surviving Critical Illness: The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Experienced by Patients and Their Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Christopher E.; Docherty, Sharron L.; Brandon, Debra H.; Whaley, Christie; Attix, Deborah K.; Clay, Alison S.; Dore, Daniel V.; Hough, Catherine L.; White, Douglas B.; Tulsky, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Survivors of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a systemic critical illness, often report poor quality of life based on responses to standardized questionnaires. However, the experiences of ARDS survivors have not been reported. Our objective was to characterize the effects of critical illness in the daily lives and functioning of ARDS survivors. Design, Setting, and Patients We recruited consecutively 31 ARDS survivors and their informal caregivers from medical and surgical intensive care units of an academic medical center and a community hospital. Eight patients died before completing interviews. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 23 ARDS survivors and 24 caregivers three to nine months after ICU admission, stopping enrollment after thematic saturation was reached. Transcripts were analyzed using Colaizzi’s qualitative methodology to identify significant ways in which survivors’ critical illness experience impacted their lives. Measurements and Main Results Participants related five key elements of experience as survivors of ARDS: pervasive memories of critical care, day to day impact of new disability, critical illness defining the sense of self, relationship strain and change, and ability to cope with disability. Survivors described remarkable disability that persisted for months. Caregivers’ interviews revealed substantial strain from caregiving responsibilities, as well as frequent symptom minimization by patients. Conclusions The diverse and unique experiences of ARDS survivors reflect the global impact of severe critical illness. We have identified symptom domains important to ARDS patients that are not well represented in existing health outcomes measures. These insights may aid the development of targeted interventions to enhance recovery and return of function after ARDS. PMID:19865004

  10. Septic versus non-septic acute kidney injury in critically ill patients: characteristics and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Marília Galvão; Dantas, João Gabriel Athayde de Oliveira; Levi, Talita Machado; Rocha, Mário de Seixas; de Souza, Sérgio Pinto; Boa-Sorte, Ney; de Moura, Carlos Geraldo Guerreiro; Cruz, Constança Margarida Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to describe and compare the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury. Methods This study evaluated an open cohort of 117 critically ill patients with acute kidney injury who were consecutively admitted to an intensive care unit, excluding patients with a history of advanced-stage chronic kidney disease, kidney transplantation, hospitalization or death in a period shorter than 24 hours. The presence of sepsis and in-hospital death were the exposure and primary variables in this study, respectively. A confounding analysis was performed using logistic regression. Results No significant differences were found between the mean ages of the groups with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury [65.30±21.27 years versus 66.35±12.82 years, respectively; p=0.75]. In the septic and non-septic acute kidney injury groups, a predominance of females (57.4% versus 52.4%, respectively; p=0.49) and Afro-descendants (81.5% versus 76.2%, respectively; p=0.49) was observed. Compared with the non-septic patients, the patients with sepsis had a higher mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score [21.73±7.26 versus 15.75±5.98; p<0.001)] and a higher mean water balance (p=0.001). Arterial hypertension (p=0.01) and heart failure (p<0.001) were more common in the non-septic patients. Septic acute kidney injury was associated with a greater number of patients who required dialysis (p=0.001) and a greater number of deaths (p<0.001); however, renal function recovery was more common in this group (p=0.01). Sepsis (OR: 3.88; 95%CI: 1.51-10.00) and an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score >18.5 (OR: 9.77; 95%CI: 3.73-25.58) were associated with death in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Sepsis was an independent predictor of death. Significant differences were found between the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic versus non-septic acute kidney

  11. Furosemide is associated with acute kidney injury in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Levi, T.M.; Rocha, M.S.; Almeida, D.N.; Martins, R.T.C.; Silva, M.G.C.; Santana, N.C.P.; Sanjuan, I.T.; Cruz, C.M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in critically ill patients. Diuretics are used without any evidence demonstrating a beneficial effect on renal function. The objective of the present study is to determine the incidence of AKI in an intensive care unit (ICU) and if there is an association between the use of furosemide and the development of AKI. The study involved a hospital cohort in which 344 patients were consecutively enrolled from January 2010 to January 2011. A total of 132 patients (75 females and 57 males, average age 64 years) remained for analysis. Most exclusions were related to ICU discharge in the first 24 h. Laboratory, sociodemographic and clinical data were collected until the development of AKI, medical discharge or patient death. The incidence of AKI was 55% (95%CI = 46-64). The predictors of AKI found by univariate analysis were septic shock: OR = 3.12, 95%CI = 1.36-7.14; use of furosemide: OR = 3.27, 95%CI = 1.57-6.80, and age: OR = 1.02, 95%CI = 1.00-1.04. Analysis of the subgroup of patients with septic shock showed that the odds ratio of furosemide was 5.5 (95%CI = 1.16-26.02) for development of AKI. Age, use of furosemide, and septic shock were predictors of AKI in critically ill patients. Use of furosemide in the subgroup of patients with sepsis/septic shock increased (68.4%) the chance of development of AKI when compared to the sample as a whole (43.9%) PMID:22641414

  12. Epidemiological and clinical features of dengue versus other acute febrile illnesses amongst patients seen at government polyclinics.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, B; Hani, A W Asmah; Chem, Y K; Mariam, M; Khairul, A H; Abdul Rasid, K; Chua, K B

    2010-12-01

    Classical dengue fever is characterized by the clinical features of fever, headache, severe myalgia and occasionally rash, which can also be caused by a number of other viral and bacterial infections. Five hundred and fifty eight patients who fulfilled the criteria of clinical diagnosis of acute dengue from 4 government outpatient polyclinics were recruited in this prospective field study. Of the 558 patients, 190 patients were categorized as acute dengue fever, 86 as recent dengue and 282 as non-dengue febrile illnesses based on the results of a number of laboratory tests. Epidemiological features of febrile patients showed that the mean age of patients in the dengue fever group was significantly younger in comparison with patients in the non-dengue group. There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to gender but there was significant ethnic difference with foreign workers representing a higher proportion in the dengue fever group. Patients with acute dengue fever were more likely to have patient-reported rash and a history of dengue in family or neighbourhood but less likely to have respiratory symptoms, sore-throat and jaundice in comparison to patients with non-dengue febrile illnesses. As with patients with dengue fever, patients in the recent dengue group were more likely to have history of patient-reported rash and a history of dengue contact and less likely to have respiratory symptoms in comparison to patients with non-dengue febrile illnesses. In contrast to patients with dengue fever, patients in the recent dengue group were more likely to have abdominal pain and jaundice in comparison to non-dengue febrile patients. The finding strongly suggests that a proportion of patients in the recent dengue group may actually represent a subset of patients with acute dengue fever at the late stage of illness. PMID:21901948

  13. Frequency of Epstein - Barr Virus in Patients Presenting with Acute Febrile Illness in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Masakhwe, Clement; Ochanda, Horace; Nyakoe, Nancy; Ochiel, Daniel; Waitumbi, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Most acute febrile illnesses (AFI) are usually not associated with a specific diagnosis because of limitations of available diagnostics. This study reports on the frequency of EBV viremia and viral load in children and adults presenting with febrile illness in hospitals in Kenya. Methodology/Principal Findings A pathogen surveillance study was conducted on patients presenting with AFI (N = 796) at outpatient departments in 8 hospitals located in diverse regions of Kenya. Enrollment criterion to the study was fever without a readily diagnosable infection. All the patients had AFI not attributable to the common causes of fever in Kenyan hospitals, such as malaria or rickettsiae, leptospira, brucella and salmonella and they were hence categorized as having AFI of unknown etiology. EBV was detected in blood using quantitative TaqMan-based qPCR targeting a highly conserved BALF5 gene. The overall frequency of EBV viremia in this population was 29.2%, with significantly higher proportion in younger children of <5years (33.8%, p = 0.039) compared to patients aged ≥5 years (26.3% for 5–15 years or 18.8% for >15 years). With respect to geographical localities, the frequency of EBV viremia was higher in the Lake Victoria region (36.4%), compared to Kisii highland (24.6%), Coastal region (22.2%) and Semi-Arid region (25%). Furthermore, patients from the malaria endemic coastal region and the Lake Victoria region presented with significantly higher viremia than individuals from other regions of Kenya. Conclusions/Significance This study provides profiles of EBV in patients with AFI from diverse eco-regions of Kenya. Of significant interest is the high frequency of EBV viremia in younger children. The observed high frequencies of EBV viremia and elevated viral loads in residents of high malaria transmission areas are probably related to malaria induced immune activation and resultant expansion of EBV infected B-cells. PMID:27163791

  14. Disparities between black and white patients in functional improvement after hospitalization for an acute illness.

    PubMed

    Sands, Laura P; Landefeld, C Seth; Ayers, Sandra Moody; Yaffe, Kristine; Palmer, Robert; Fortinsky, Richard; Counsell, Steven R; Covinsky, Kenneth E

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether older black and white patients experience different rates of improvement in functioning after being acutely hospitalized. Of the 2,364 community-living patients in this prospective cohort study, 25% self-reported their race/ethnicity to be black. The outcomes were improvement in basic activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) from admission to discharge and 90 days postdischarge. Multivariable models that included statistical adjustment for age, illness severity, in-hospital social service referral, dementia, admission level of functioning, and change in functioning from 2 weeks before admission were computed to determine whether black and white patients experienced significantly different rates of recovery at discharge and 90 days after discharge in ADL and IADL functioning. Black patients were as likely as white patients to improve in ADL functioning by discharge (odds ratio (OR)=0.97, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.76-1.24) or by 90 days after discharge (OR=0.95, 95% CI=0.73-1.24) but significantly less likely to improve IADL functioning by discharge (OR=0.72, 95% CI=0.56-0.93) or by 90 days after discharge (OR=0.68, 95% CI=0.51-0.90). The findings suggest that differential rates of recovery in functioning after an acute hospitalization may contribute to racial/ethnic disparities in IADL functioning, which has implications for the setting of future interventions oriented toward reducing these disparities. PMID:16181184

  15. ALERT--a multiprofessional training course in the care of the acutely ill adult patient.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gary B; Osgood, Vicky M; Crane, Sue

    2002-03-01

    The Acute Life-threatening Events--Recognition and Treatment (ALERT) course is a one-day multidisciplinary course originally designed to give newly qualified doctors and nurses greater confidence and ability in the recognition and management of adult patients who have impending or established critical illness. It may also be suitable for many other groups of health service workers. ALERT was developed using principles common to many advanced life support courses and incorporates aspects of clinical governance, multidisciplinary education and interprofessional working. It incorporates pre-course reading, informal and interactive seminars, practical demonstrations and role-play during clinically based scenarios. A novel aspect of ALERT is that participants undertake role interchange during scenarios, thereby facilitating mutual understanding. At all times during the course, participants are encouraged to reflect on their actions and to pay particular attention to detail. The course focuses on those problems that lead ward nurses to call doctors for assistance, e.g. 'the blue patient', 'the hypotensive patient'. Communication skills are covered frequently in the course, during seminars and scenarios, but also as a specific session that covers three aspects--breaking bad news, writing patient notes and interpersonal/interprofessional communication. PMID:11886734

  16. Environment of care: vertical evacuation concerns for acutely ill patients and others with restricted mobility.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Yin, Chang-Yi

    2014-01-01

    This perspective paper was intended to raise awareness and the urgency of needing additional evacuation-related, hospital building design policies. We addressed the challenges to maintain the integrity of exits and inadequate hospital design considerations for individuals with restricted mobility. Hospitals are occupied by people who may have restricted mobility and visitors who are likely unfamiliar with their surroundings. A hospital fire threatens all people in the building, but especially patients in the intensive care unit who are frail and have limited mobility. Evacuating immobile patients is complex, involving horizontal and vertical evacuation approaches. Hospital design must consider the needs of individuals with restricted mobility, who are the most vulnerable in case of a hospital fire. Consequently, we urge that acutely ill patients and others with restricted mobility should occupy units located on the ground floor or Level 2. In addition, when configuring the physical environment of hospitals, providing step-free ground floor access (indoor or outdoor ramps) and evacuation aids for vertical evacuation is crucial. Step-free ground floor access between Level 2 and the ground floor should be wide enough to allow transporting patients on their beds. A standard revision to include these recommendations is desperately needed. PMID:24404945

  17. Effect of Antiplatelet Therapy on Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Mortality in Critically Ill Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijun; Li, Heng; Gu, Xiaofei; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Su; Chen, Liyong

    2016-01-01

    Background Antiplatelet agents are commonly used for cardiovascular diseases, but their pleiotropic effects in critically ill patients are controversial. We therefore performed a meta-analysis of cohort studies to investigate the effect of antiplatelet therapy in the critically ill. Methods Nine cohort studies, retrieved from PubMed and Embase before November 2015, involving 14,612 critically ill patients and 4765 cases of antiplatelet users, were meta-analysed. The main outcome was hospital or 30-day mortality. Secondary outcome was acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or acute lung injury (ALI). Random- or fixed-effect models were taken for quantitative synthesis of the data. Results Antiplatelet therapy was associated with decreased mortality (odds ratio (OR) 0.61; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.52–0.71; I2 = 0%; P <0. 001) and ARDS/ALI (OR 0.64; 95% CI, 0.50–0.82; I2 = 0%; P <0. 001). In every stratum of subgroups, similar findings on mortality reduction were consistently observed in critically ill patients. Conclusions Antiplatelet therapy is associated with reduced mortality and lower incidence of ARDS/ALI in critically ill patients, particularly those with predisposing conditions such as high-risk surgery, trauma, pneumonia, and sepsis. However, it remains unclear whether similar findings can be observed in the unselected and broad population with critical illness. PMID:27182704

  18. Safety of performing fiberoptic bronchoscopy in critically ill hypoxemic patients with acute respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Cracco, Christophe; Fartoukh, Muriel; Prodanovic, Hélène; Azoulay, Elie; Chenivesse, Cécile; Lorut, Christine; Beduneau, Gaëtan; Bui, Hoang Nam; Taille, Camille; Brochard, Laurent; Demoule, Alexandre; Maitre, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Background Safety of fibreoptic bronchoscopy (FOB) in nonintubated critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure have not been extensively evaluated. We aimed to measure the incidence of intubation and need to increase ventilatory support following FOB and to identify predictive factors of this event. Methods A prospective multicenter observational study was carried out in 8 French adult intensive care units. 169 FOB performed in patients with a PaO2/FiO2 ratio equal or less than 300 were analyzed. Our main end point was intubation rate. The secondary end point was rate of increased ventilatory support defined as greater than a 50% increase in oxygen requirement, the need to start non invasive-positive pressure ventilation (NI-PPV) or increase NI-PPV support. Results Within 24 hours, an increase in ventilatory support was required following 59 (35%) bronchoscopies, of which 25 (15%) led to endotracheal intubation. The existence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR:5.2 [1.6–17.8], p=0.007) or immunosuppression (OR : 5.4 [1.7–17.2], p=0.004) were significantly associated with the need for intubation in multivariable analysis. None of the baseline physiological parameters including the PaO2/FiO2 ratio was associated with intubation. Conclusion Bronchoscopy is often followed by an increase in ventilatory support in hypoxemic critically ill patients, but less frequently by the need for intubation. COPD, immunosuppression are associated with a need for invasive ventilation in the following 24 hours. PMID:23070123

  19. Chikungunya Fever Among Patients with Acute Febrile Illness Attending a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mumbai

    PubMed Central

    Galate, Lata Baswanna; Agrawal, Sachee R; Shastri, Jayanthi S; Londhey, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chikungunya fever (CHIK) is an arboviral disease. Dengue fever (DENG) and CHIK are indistinguishable clinically and need to be differentiated by laboratory investigations. Purpose: This study aimed at estimating the seroprevalence of CHIK mono-infection and CHIK and DENG dual infection in suspected patients. We also analyzed the age, sex distribution, joint involvement, and relation of joint movement restriction with visual analog scale (VAS). Materials and Methods: Two hundred patients clinically suspected with DENG and CHIK were enrolled from a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mumbai from April 2012 to October 2013. The detailed history and examination findings were recorded. Serum samples were subjected to DENG and CHIK immunoglobulin G (IgM) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: The seroprevalence of CHIK was 12.5%. Mono-infection of CHIK was 3%, and CHIK and DENG dual infection was 9.5%. Most affected age group in CHIK cases was 46–60 years wherein female preponderance was seen. All 6 patients with CHIK mono-infection had fever and joint involvement; knee and elbow were the most commonly affected joints. All CHIK patients had VAS score of 6–10 with restricted joint movement. Of the patients with dual infection, the majorities were from 31 to 45 years with male preponderance; all had fever and joint pain mainly affecting knee and elbow. Of patients who had VAS score 6–10 in patients with dual infection, only 5.26% had restricted joint movement. Conclusion: IgM ELISA for Chikungunya infection should be included in the routine laboratory tests for acute febrile illness. PMID:27365916

  20. Identifying critically ill patients with acute kidney injury for whom renal replacement therapy is inappropriate: an exercise in futility?

    PubMed Central

    Gabbay, Ezra; Meyer, Klemens B.

    2009-01-01

    Clinicians treating critically ill patients must consider the possibility that painful and expensive aggressive treatments might confer negligible benefit. Such treatments are often described as futile or inappropriate. We discuss the problem of deciding whether to initiate renal replacement therapy (RRT) for critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) in the context of the debate surrounding medical futility. The main problems in deciding when such treatment would be futile are that the concept itself is controversial and eludes quantitative definition, that available outcome data do not allow confident identification of patients who will not benefit from treatment and that the decision on RRT in a critically ill patient with AKI is qualitatively different from decisions on other modalities of intensive care and resuscitation, as well as from decisions on dialysis for chronic kidney disease. Despite these difficulties, nephrologists need to identify circumstances in which continued aggressive care would be futile before proceeding to initiate RRT. PMID:25949304

  1. Community-acquired pneumonia and survival of critically ill acute exacerbation of COPD patients in respiratory intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhiwei; Cheng, Yusheng; Tu, Xiongwen; Chen, Liang; Chen, Hu; Yang, Jian; Wang, Jinyan; Zhang, Liqin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to appraise the effect of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) on inhospital mortality in critically ill acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) patients admitted to a respiratory intensive care unit. Patients and methods A retrospective observational study was performed. Consecutive critically ill AECOPD patients receiving treatment in a respiratory intensive care unit were reviewed from September 1, 2012, to August 31, 2015. Categorical variables were analyzed using chi-square tests, and continuous variables were analyzed by Mann–Whitney U-test. Kaplan–Meier analysis was used to assess the association of CAP with survival of critically ill AECOPD patients for univariate analysis. Cox’s proportional hazards regression model was performed to identify risk factors for multivariate analysis. Results A total of 80 consecutive eligible individuals were reviewed. These included 38 patients with CAP and 42 patients without CAP. Patients with CAP had a higher inhospital rate of mortality than patients without CAP (42% vs 33.3%, P<0.05). Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed that patients with CAP had a worse survival rate than patients without CAP (P<0.05). Clinical characteristics, including Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score, C-reactive protein, and CAP, were found to be closely associated with survival of AECOPD individuals. Further multivariate Cox regression analysis confirmed that CAP and APACHE II were independent risk factors for inhospital mortality in critically ill AECOPD patients (CAP: hazard ratio, 5.29; 95% CI, 1.50–18.47, P<0.01 and APACHE II: hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.06–1.37, P<0.01). Conclusion CAP may be an independent risk factor for higher inhospital mortality in critically ill AECOPD patients. PMID:27563239

  2. Physicians’ Decision Making Roles for an Acutely Unstable Critically and Terminally Ill Patient

    PubMed Central

    Uy, Jamie; White, Douglas B.; Mohan, Deepika; Arnold, Robert M.; Barnato, Amber E.

    2013-01-01

    Background There is substantial variation in use of life sustaining technologies in patients near the end of life but little is known about variation in physicians’ initial ICU admission and intubation decision making processes. Objective To describe variation in hospital-based physicians’ communication behaviors and decision making roles for ICU admission and intubation decisions for an acutely unstable critically and terminally ill patient. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of transcribed simulation encounters from a multi-center observational study of physician decision making. The simulation depicted a 78 year-old man with metastatic gastric cancer and life threatening hypoxia. He has stable underlying preferences against ICU admission and intubation that he or his wife will report if asked. We coded encounters for communication behaviors (providing medical information, eliciting preferences/values, engaging the patient/surrogate in deliberation, and providing treatment recommendations) and used a previously-developed framework to classify subject physicians into four mutually-exclusive decision-making roles: informative (providing medical information only), facilitative (information + eliciting preferences/values + guiding surrogate to apply preferences/values), collaborative (information + eliciting + guiding + making a recommendation) and directive (making an independent treatment decision). Subjects 24 emergency physicians, 37 hospitalists, and 37 intensivists from 3 US academic medical centers. Results Subject physicians average 12.4 (SD 9.0) years since graduation from medical school. 38/98(39%) physicians sent the patient to the ICU, and 9/98(9%) ultimately decided to intubate. Most (93/98 (95%)) provided at least some medical information, but few explained the short-term prognosis with (26/98 (27%)) or without intubation (37/98 (38%)). Many (80/98 (82%)) elicited the patient's intubation preferences, but few (35/98 (36%)) explored the

  3. When to start renal replacement therapy in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury: comment on AKIKI and ELAIN.

    PubMed

    Bagshaw, Sean M; Lamontagne, François; Joannidis, Michael; Wald, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The dilemma of whether and when to start renal replacement therapy among critically ill patients with acute kidney injury in the absence of conventional indications has long been a vexing challenge for clinicians. The lack of high-quality evidence has undoubtedly contributed decisional uncertainty and unnecessary practice variation. Recently, two randomized trials (ELAIN and AKIKI) reported specifically on the issue of the timing of initiation of renal replacement therapy in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. In this commentary, their fundamental differences in trial design, sample size, and widely discrepant findings are considered in context. While both trials are important contributions towards informing practice on this issue, additional evidence from large multicenter randomized trials is needed. PMID:27495159

  4. Pharmacological Prophylaxis for Venous Thromboembolism Among Hospitalized Patients With Acute Medical Illness: An Electronic Medical Records Study.

    PubMed

    Rosenman, Marc; Liu, Xianchen; Phatak, Hemant; Qi, Rong; Teal, Evgenia; Nisi, Daniel; Liu, Larry Z; Ramacciotti, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Patients hospitalized with acute medical illness have an elevated risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). American College of Chest Physicians guidelines list various chronic illnesses, sepsis, advanced age, history of VTE, and immobility as risk factors and recommend prophylactic anticoagulation using fondaparinux, low-molecular weight heparin, or low-dose unfractionated heparin. The objectives of this study were to examine pharmacological prophylaxis against VTE among hospitalized medically ill patients and to assess demographic and clinical correlates related to VTE prophylaxis. A retrospective (1999-2010) electronic medical records study included patients aged 40 years and older hospitalized for at least 3 days, with significant medical illness or with a VTE hospitalization 30-365 days before admission. Each patient's first qualifying hospitalization was analyzed. Exclusions were if VTE treatment was started within 1 day of admission, or if warfarin (and not heparin or enoxaparin) was used. Prophylaxis was defined if the first inpatient dose of subcutaneous heparin or enoxaparin was at prophylaxis levels (lower than treatment levels). Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with VTE prophylaxis. Among 12,980 patients, 22.1% received prophylaxis (11.8% with enoxaparin, 10.3% with heparin). VTE prophylaxis was positively associated with year of hospitalization, subcutaneous heparin in the month before admission, aspirin, self-pay status, age, and sepsis. VTE prophylaxis was negatively associated with smoking, alcohol, warfarin in the past 30 days, and primary diagnoses of stroke, infectious disease, or inflammatory bowel disease. Pharmacological VTE prophylaxis has increased significantly over the past 12 years but is still largely underused in patients hospitalized with acute medical illness. Multiple demographic, behavioral, and clinical factors are associated with inpatient VTE prophylaxis. PMID:26720163

  5. Economics of dialysis dependence following renal replacement therapy for critically ill acute kidney injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Ethgen, Olivier; Schneider, Antoine G.; Bagshaw, Sean M.; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Kellum, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The obective of this study was to perform a cost-effectiveness analysis comparing intermittent with continuous renal replacement therapy (IRRT versus CRRT) as initial therapy for acute kidney injury (AKI) in the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods Assuming some patients would potentially be eligible for either modality, we modeled life year gained, the quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and healthcare costs for a cohort of 1000 IRRT patients and a cohort of 1000 CRRT patients. We used a 1-year, 5-year and a lifetime horizon. A Markov model with two health states for AKI survivors was designed: dialysis dependence and dialysis independence. We applied Weibull regression from published estimates to fit survival curves for CRRT and IRRT patients and to fit the proportion of dialysis dependence among CRRT and IRRT survivors. We then applied a risk ratio reported in a large retrospective cohort study to the fitted CRRT estimates in order to determine the proportion of dialysis dependence for IRRT survivors. We conducted sensitivity analyses based on a range of differences for daily implementation cost between CRRT and IRRT (base case: CRRT day $632 more expensive than IRRT day; range from $200 to $1000) and a range of risk ratios for dialysis dependence for CRRT as compared with IRRT (from 0.65 to 0.95; base case: 0.80). Results Continuous renal replacement therapy was associated with a marginally greater gain in QALY as compared with IRRT (1.093 versus 1.078). Despite higher upfront costs for CRRT in the ICU ($4046 for CRRT versus $1423 for IRRT in average), the 5-year total cost including the cost of dialysis dependence was lower for CRRT ($37 780 for CRRT versus $39 448 for IRRT on average). The base case incremental cost-effectiveness analysis showed that CRRT dominated IRRT. This dominance was confirmed by extensive sensitivity analysis. Conclusions Initial CRRT is cost-effective compared with initial IRRT by reducing the rate of long-term dialysis

  6. Urinary L-FABP predicts poor outcomes in critically ill patients with early acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Parr, Sharidan K; Clark, Amanda J; Bian, Aihua; Shintani, Ayumi K; Wickersham, Nancy E; Ware, Lorraine B; Ikizler, T Alp; Siew, Edward D

    2015-03-01

    Biomarker studies for early detection of acute kidney injury (AKI) have been limited by nonselective testing and uncertainties in using small changes in serum creatinine as a reference standard. Here we examine the ability of urine L-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), interleukin-18 (IL-18), and kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) to predict injury progression, dialysis, or death within 7 days in critically ill adults with early AKI. Of 152 patients with known baseline creatinine examined, 36 experienced the composite outcome. Urine L-FABP demonstrated an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC-ROC) of 0.79 (95% confidence interval 0.70-0.86), which improved to 0.82 (95% confidence interval 0.75-0.90) when added to the clinical model (AUC-ROC of 0.74). Urine NGAL, IL-18, and KIM-1 had AUC-ROCs of 0.65, 0.64, and 0.62, respectively, but did not significantly improve discrimination of the clinical model. The category-free net reclassification index improved with urine L-FABP (total net reclassification index for nonevents 31.0%) and urine NGAL (total net reclassification index for events 33.3%). However, only urine L-FABP significantly improved the integrated discrimination index. Thus, modest early changes in serum creatinine can help target biomarker measurement for determining prognosis with urine L-FABP, providing independent and additive prognostic information when combined with clinical predictors. PMID:25229339

  7. Mortality amongst Patients with Influenza-Associated Severe Acute Respiratory Illness, South Africa, 2009-2013

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Cheryl; Moyes, Jocelyn; Tempia, Stefano; Groome, Michelle; Walaza, Sibongile; Pretorius, Marthi; Dawood, Halima; Chhagan, Meera; Haffejee, Summaya; Variava, Ebrahim; Kahn, Kathleen; von Gottberg, Anne; Wolter, Nicole; Cohen, Adam L.; Malope-Kgokong, Babatyi; Venter, Marietjie; Madhi, Shabir A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Data on the burden and risk groups for influenza-associated mortality from Africa are limited. We aimed to estimate the incidence and risk-factors for in-hospital influenza-associated severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) deaths. Methods Hospitalised patients with SARI were enrolled prospectively in four provinces of South Africa from 2009–2013. Using polymerase chain reaction, respiratory samples were tested for ten respiratory viruses and blood for pneumococcal DNA. The incidence of influenza-associated SARI deaths was estimated at one urban hospital with a defined catchment population. Results We enrolled 1376 patients with influenza-associated SARI and 3% (41 of 1358 with available outcome data) died. In patients with available HIV-status, the case-fatality proportion (CFP) was higher in HIV-infected (5%, 22/419) than HIV-uninfected individuals (2%, 13/620; p = 0.006). CFPs varied by age group, and generally increased with increasing age amongst individuals >5 years (p<0.001). On multivariable analysis, factors associated with death were age-group 45–64 years (odds ratio (OR) 4.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01–16.3) and ≥65 years (OR 6.5, 95%CI 1.2–34.3) compared to 1–4 year age-group who had the lowest CFP, HIV-infection (OR 2.9, 95%CI 1.1–7.8), underlying medical conditions other than HIV (OR 2.9, 95%CI 1.2–7.3) and pneumococcal co-infection (OR 4.1, 95%CI 1.5–11.2). The estimated incidence of influenza-associated SARI deaths per 100,000 population was highest in children <1 year (20.1, 95%CI 12.1–31.3) and adults aged 45–64 years (10.4, 95%CI 8.4–12.9). Adjusting for age, the rate of death was 20-fold (95%CI 15.0–27.8) higher in HIV-infected individuals than HIV-uninfected individuals. Conclusion Influenza causes substantial mortality in urban South Africa, particularly in infants aged <1 year and HIV-infected individuals. More widespread access to antiretroviral treatment and influenza vaccination may reduce this

  8. An Analysis of Hematological Parameters as a Diagnostic test for Malaria in Patients with Acute Febrile Illness: An Institutional Experience

    PubMed Central

    Jairajpuri, Zeeba Shamim; Rana, Safia; Hassan, Mohd Jaseem; Nabi, Farhat; Jetley, Sujata

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hematological changes are among the most common complications encountered in malaria. This study analyzes and statistically evaluates the hematological changes as a diagnostic test for malaria in patients with acute febrile illness and whether these could guide the physician to institute specific antimalarial treatment. Methods The present study was an observational study, conducted from January to December 2012. A total of 723 patients presenting with acute febrile illness at our hospital were evaluated. A complete blood count and malarial parasite microscopy were performed for each patient. Results The findings showed that 172 out of 723 patients (24%) were diagnosed to have malaria by positive smear report. There were 121 males and 51 females with a male to female ratio of 2.3:1. Maximum number of cases were seen in the 20-30 years age group. There was a statistically significant reduction in hemoglobin (p<0.005), platelet count (p<0.001) and total leukocyte count (p<0.001) levels in patients with malaria compared to those without the disease. Likelihood ratios for a positive result of platelets (6.2) and total leukocyte count (3.4) was relevant as compared to hemoglobin (1.61) and Red cell distribution width (1.79). The negative predictive values for hemoglobin (79%), total leukocyte count (86%), platelets (94%) and Red cell distribution width (93%) were significant. Red cell distribution width values were found to be higher in patients with malaria than in patients without malaria (p<0.001). Conclusion This study revealed that routinely used laboratory findings such as hemoglobin, leukocytes, platelet counts and even red cell distribution width values can provide a diagnostic clue in a patient with acute febrile illness in endemic areas, thus increasing the probability of malaria and enhancing prompt initiation of treatment. PMID:24498476

  9. Experience with a Simplified Computer Based Intensive Care Monitoring System in the Management of Acutely Ill Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, H. Roger; Rutherford, Harold G.; Smith, Louis L.; Briggs, Burton A.; Neilsen, Ivan R.; Rau, Richard

    1979-01-01

    The need exists for a simplified and ecomonical computer based monitoring system for critically ill surgical patients. Such a system would enjoy widespread use in surgical intensive care units in regional, as well as larger community hospitals. We have assembled such a system which provides digital readout of the usual physiologic parameters, and also provide computer storage of accumulated data for review and evaluation of patient care. The computer provides graphic and digital display and digital printout for subsequent inclusion in the patient records. Most frequent indications for this system include the development of acute respiratory insufficiency or acute circulatory failure due to invasive sepsis and/or severe arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Information most beneficial in patient care included measurement of cardiac output;alveolar arterial oxygen gradient. ImagesFigure 1Figure 5Figure 9Figure 11

  10. Acute kidney injury in critically ill patients with lung disease: kidney-lung crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    de Abreu, Krasnalhia Lívia Soares; da Silva Junior, Geraldo Bezerra; Muniz, Thalita Diógenes; Barreto, Adller Gonçalves Costa; Lima, Rafael Siqueira Athayde; Holanda, Marcelo Alcântara; Pereira, Eanes Delgado Barros; Libório, Alexandre Braga; Daher, Elizabeth de Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the factors associated with acute kidney injury and outcome in patients with lung disease. Methods A prospective study was conducted with 100 consecutive patients admitted to a respiratory intensive care unit in Fortaleza (CE), Brazil. The risk factors for acute kidney injury and mortality were investigated in a group of patients with lung diseases. Results The mean age of the study population was 57 years, and 50% were male. The incidence of acute kidney injury was higher in patients with PaO2/FiO2<200 mmHg (54% versus 23.7%; p=0.02). Death was observed in 40 cases and the rate of mortality of the acute kidney injury group was higher (62.8% versus 27.6%; p=0.01). The independent factor that was found to be associated with acute kidney injury was PaO2/FiO2<200 mmHg (p=0.01), and the independent risk factors for death were PEEP at admission (OR: 3.6; 95%CI: 1.3-9.6; p=0.009) and need for hemodialysis (OR: 7.9; 95%CI: 2.2-28.3; p=0.001). Conclusion There was a higher mortality rate in the acute kidney injury group. Increased mortality was associated with mechanical ventilation, high PEEP, urea and need for dialysis. Further studies must be performed to better establish the relationship between kidney and lung injury and its impact on patient outcome. PMID:23917978

  11. Serum visfatin concentration in acutely ill and weight-recovered patients with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Maria; King, Joseph A; Ritschel, Franziska; Döpmann, Johanna; Bühren, Katharina; Seitz, Jochen; Roessner, Veit; Westphal, Sabine; Egberts, Karin; Burghardt, Roland; Wewetzer, Christoph; Fleischhaker, Christian; Hebebrand, Johannes; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    Visfatin is a recently described protein that is thought to regulate the process of adipocyte differentiation. Findings suggest that visfatin may be actively involved in the control of weight regulatory networks. However, to what extent and which role it plays in eating disorders is still poorly understood, as mixed results have been reported. The aim of the current study was to investigate serum visfatin concentrations on a cross sectional sample between acute anorexia nervosa patients (n=44), weight recovered patients (n=13) and healthy controls (n=46) and a longitudinal sample of acute patients (n=57) during weight recovery at three different time-points. Results did not show significant differences in visfatin between the three groups; however, acute patients showed a higher visfatin/BMI-SDS ratio than controls and recovered patients. Longitudinal results revealed an increase of visfatin levels during therapy. Our results suggest that high ratios of visfatin/BMI-SDS could be a state marker in acute anorexia nervosa, displaying a compensatory mechanism of the individual to maintain normal visfatin levels under malnourished conditions. PMID:25617618

  12. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation as treatment for acute respiratory failure in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Massimo; Conti, Giorgio

    2000-01-01

    Our current state of knowledge on noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) and technical aspects are discussed in the present review. In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, NPPV can be considered a valid therapeutic option to prevent endotracheal intubation. Evidence suggests that, before eventual endotracheal intubation, NPPV should be considered as first-line intervention in the early phases of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Small randomized and non-randomized studies on the application of NPPV in patients with acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure showed promising results, with reduction in complications such as sinusitis and ventilator-associated pneumonia, and in the duration of intensive care unit stay. The conventional use of NPPV in hypoxaemic acute respiratory failure still remains controversial, however. Large randomized studies are still needed before extensive clinical application in this condition. PMID:11094492

  13. Acute Kidney Injury Classification for Critically Ill Cirrhotic Patients: A Comparison of the KDIGO, AKIN, and RIFLE Classifications

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Heng-Chih; Chien, Yu-Shan; Jenq, Chang-Chyi; Tsai, Ming-Hung; Fan, Pei-Chun; Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Chang, Ming-Yang; Tian, Ya-Chung; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Yang, Chih-Wei; Chen, Yung-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Critically ill cirrhotic patients have high mortality rates, particularly when they present with acute kidney injury (AKI) on admission. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) group aimed to standardize the definition of AKI and recently published a new AKI classification. However, the efficacy of the KDIGO classification for predicting outcomes of critically ill cirrhotic patients is unclear. We prospectively enrolled 242 cirrhotic patients from a 10-bed specialized hepatogastroenterology intensive care unit (ICU) in a 2000-bed tertiary-care referral hospital. Demographic parameters and clinical variables on day 1 of admission were prospectively recorded. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 62.8%. Liver diseases were usually attributed to hepatitis B viral infection (26.9%). The major cause of ICU admission was upper gastrointestinal bleeding (38.0%). Our result showed that the KDIGO classification had better discriminatory power than RIFLE and AKIN criteria in predicting in-hospital mortality. Cumulative survival rates at the 6-month after hospital discharge differed significantly between patients with and without AKI on ICU admission day. In summary, we identified that the outcome prediction performance of KDIGO classification is superior to that of AKIN or RIFLE classification in critically ill cirrhotic patients. PMID:26983372

  14. Continuous Venovenous Hemofiltration (CVVH) Versus Conventional Treatment for Acute Severe Hypernatremia in Critically Ill Patients: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Feng; Bai, Ming; Li, Yangping; Yu, Yan; Liu, Yirong; Zhou, Meilan; Li, Li; Jing, Rui; Zhao, Lijuan; He, Lijie; Li, Rong; Huang, Chen; Wang, Hanmin; Sun, Shiren

    2015-11-01

    Patients with severe hypernatremia who receive conventional treatment are often undertreated. Data on the management of acute hypernatremia using continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) are limited to anecdotes. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CVVH treatment for acute severe hypernatremia in critically ill patients in a retrospective cohort. A total of 95 patients who were admitted to our ICU between January 2009 and January 2014 were analyzed as the original cohort. These patients were divided into CVVH and conventional treatment groups. The patients in the conventional and CVVH groups were then matched by age, reason for ICU admission, vasopressor dependency, basic serum sodium concentration, and Glasgow scores. A Cox regression model was used to adjust the confounding variables. In the original cohort, the 28-day survival rates were 41.9% and 25.0% for the CVVH and conventional treatment groups, respectively. Conventional treatment (HR = 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-3.8, P = 0.019) was an independent predictor of patient mortality in the multivariate Cox regression model. In the matched cohort, the two groups were not significantly different in baseline characteristics. The CVVH group had a significantly greater reduction in the serum sodium concentration (0.78 [0.63-1.0] mmol/L/h versus 0.13 [0.009-0.33] mmol/L/h), P < 0.001) and an improved 28-day survival rate (34.8% vs. 8.7%, P = 0.002) compared with the conventional treatment group. The two groups did not differ significantly in treatment-related complications. CVVH treatment is possibly more effective than conventional treatment for the management of acute severe hypernatremia in critically ill patients. PMID:26473438

  15. Long-Term Outcome of Critically Ill Adult Patients with Acute Epiglottitis

    PubMed Central

    Hernu, Romain; Baudry, Thomas; Bohé, Julien; Piriou, Vincent; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Disant, François; Argaud, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute epiglottitis is a potentially life threatening disease, with a growing incidence in the adult population. Its long-term outcome after Intensive Care Unit (ICU) hospitalization has rarely been studied. Methodology and Principal Findings Thirty-four adult patients admitted for acute epiglottitis were included in this retrospective multicentric study. The mean age was 44±12 years (sex ratio: 5.8). Sixteen patients (47%) had a history of smoking while 8 (24%) had no previous medical history. The average time of disease progression before ICU was 2.6±3.6 days. The main reasons for hospitalization were continuous monitoring (17 cases, 50%) and acute respiratory distress (10 cases, 29%). Microbiological documentation could be made in 9 cases (26%), with Streptococcus spp. present in 7 cases (21%). Organ failure at ICU admission occurred in 8 cases (24%). Thirteen patients (38%) required respiratory assistance during ICU stay; 9 (26%) required surgery. Two patients (6%) died following hypoxemic cardiac arrest. Five patients (15%) had sequelae at 1 year. Patients requiring respiratory assistance had a longer duration of symptoms and more frequent anti inflammatory use before ICU admission and sequelae at 1 year (p<0.05 versus non-ventilated patients). After logistic regression analysis, only exposure to anti-inflammatory drugs before admission was independently associated with airway intervention (OR, 4.96; 95% CI, 1.06-23.16). Conclusions and Significance The profile of the cases consisted of young smoking men with little comorbidity. Streptococcus spp. infection represented the main etiology. Outcome was favorable if early respiratory tract protection could be performed in good conditions. Morbidity and sequelae were greater in patients requiring airway intervention. PMID:25945804

  16. Acute Respiratory Failure in Critically Ill Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zafrani, Lara; Lemiale, Virginie; Lapidus, Nathanael; Lorillon, Gwenael; Schlemmer, Benoît; Azoulay, Elie

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic known or unknown interstitial lung disease (ILD) may present with severe respiratory flares that require intensive management. Outcome data in these patients are scarce. Patients and Methods Clinical and radiological features were collected in 83 patients with ILD-associated acute respiratory failure (ARF). Determinants of hospital mortality and response to corticosteroid therapy were identified by logistic regression. Results Hospital and 1-year mortality rates were 41% and 54% respectively. Pulmonary hypertension, computed tomography (CT) fibrosis and acute kidney injury were independently associated with mortality (odds ratio (OR) 4.55; 95% confidence interval (95%CI) (1.20–17.33); OR, 7.68; (1.78–33.22) and OR 10.60; (2.25–49.97) respectively). Response to steroids was higher in patients with shorter time from hospital admission to corticosteroid therapy. Patients with fibrosis on CT had lower response to steroids (OR, 0.03; (0.005–0.21)). In mechanically ventilated patients, overdistension induced by high PEEP settings was associated with CT fibrosis and hospital mortality. Conclusion Mortality is high in ILD-associated ARF. CT and echocardiography are valuable prognostic tools. Prompt corticosteroid therapy may improve survival. PMID:25115557

  17. Long-Term Survival in Older Critically Ill Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Jinn-Ing; Smith, Maureen A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare survival in older patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted to intensive care units (ICU) with those not requiring ICU care and to assess the impact of mechanical ventilation (MV) and percutaneous gastrostomy tubes (PEG) on long-term mortality. Design Multi-center retrospective cohort study. Setting Administrative data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services covering 93 metropolitan counties primarily in the Eastern half of the United States. Patients 31,301 patients discharged with acute ischemic stroke in 2000. Interventions None Measurements Mortality from the time of index hospitalization up to the end of the follow-up period of 12 months. Information was also gathered on use of mechanical ventilation, percutaneous gastrostomy, sociodemographic variables and a host of comorbid conditions. Main Results 26% of all patients with acute ischemic stroke required ICU admission. The crude death rate for ICU stroke patients was 21% at 30 days and 40% at 1-year follow-up. At 30 days, after adjustment of sociodemographic variables and comorbidities, ICU patients had a 29% higher mortality hazard compared to non-ICU patients. Mechanical ventilation was associated with a five-fold higher mortality hazard (hazard ratio 5.59, confidence interval 4.93–6.34). The use of PEG was not associated with mortality at 30 days. By contrast, at 1-year follow up in 30-day survivors, ICU admission was not associated with mortality hazard (hazard ratio 1.01; 95% confidence interval 0.93–1.09). Mechanical ventilation still had a higher risk of death (hazard ratio 1.88, 95% confidence interval 1.57–2.25), and PEG patients had a 2.59 fold greater mortality hazard (95% confidence interval 2.38–2.82). Conclusions Both short-term and long-term mortality in older patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted to ICUs is lower than previously reported. The need for MV and PEG are markers for poor long-term outcome. Future research should focus on the

  18. [Hepatotoxicity in the critically ill patient. The liver under an acute severe insult].

    PubMed

    García de Lorenzo y Mateos, A; Rodríguez Montes, J A

    2008-05-01

    The liver plays an essential role in the metabolism of most of the nutrients since it is a mainly metabolic organ carrying out a series of physiological and metabolic processes related with protein and energy metabolism. The intestinal tract is considered a key element in the development of Multiorgan Dysfunction (MOD) or failure by loosing its barrier function (impaired permeability) against toxins, bio-products and occasionally intraluminal bacteria secondary to hypoxia, one of the main pathophysiogenic mechanisms being the insufficient blood flow to splacnic organs. Liver dysfunction and/or impairment of liver function test are a common event in critically ill patients. They may be due to previous liver cirrhosis or to more immediate causes of liver failure such as sepsis, drugs, liver transplant or any of the multiple etiologies for hepatitis. PMID:18714407

  19. Higher serum chloride concentrations are associated with acute kidney injury in unselected critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chloride administration has been found to be harmful to the kidney in critically ill patients. However the association between plasma chloride concentration and renal function has never been investigated. Methods This was a retrospective study conducted in a tertiary 24-bed intensive care unit from September 2010 to November 2012. Data on serum chloride for each patient during their ICU stay were abstracted from electronic database. Cl0 referred to the initial chloride on ICU entry, Clmax, Clmin and Clmean referred to the maximum, minimum and mean chloride values before the onset of AKI, respectively. AKI was defined according to the conventional AKIN criteria. Univariate and multivariable analysis were performed to examine the association of chloride and AKI development. Results A total of 1221 patients were included into analysis during study period. Three hundred and fifty-seven patients (29.2%) developed AKI. Clmax was significantly higher in AKI than in non-AKI group (111.8 ± 8.1 vs 107.9 ±5.4 mmol/l; p < 0.001); Cl0 was not significantly different between AKI and non-AKI patients; Clmean was significantly higher in AKI than non-AKI (104.3 ±5.8 vs 103.4 ± 4.5; p = 0.0047) patients. Clmax remained to be associated with AKI in multivariable analysis (OR: 1.10, 95% CI: 1.08-1.13). Conclusion Chloride overload as represented by Clmean and Clmax is significantly associated with the development of AKI. PMID:24164963

  20. Prognostics factors for mortality and renal recovery in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury and renal replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gaião, Sérgio Mina; Gomes, André Amaral; Paiva, José Artur Osório de Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Objective Identify prognostic factors related to mortality and non-recovery of renal function. Methods A prospective single-center study was conducted at the intensive care medicine department of a university hospital between 2012 and 2015. Patients with acute kidney injury receiving continuous renal replacement therapy were included in the study. Clinical and analytical parameters were collected, and the reasons for initiation and discontinuation of renal replacement therapy were examined. Results A total of 41 patients were included in the study, of whom 43.9% had sepsis. The median Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPSII) was 56 and the mortality was 53.7%, with a predicted mortality of 59.8%. The etiology of acute kidney injury was often multifactorial (56.1%). Survivors had lower cumulative fluid balance (median = 3,600mL, interquartile range [IQR] = 1,175 - 8,025) than non-survivors (median = 12,000mL, IQR = 6,625 - 17,875; p = 0.004). Patients who recovered renal function (median = 51.0, IQR = 45.8 - 56.2) had lower SAPS II than those who do not recover renal function (median = 73, IQR = 54 - 85; p = 0.005) as well as lower fluid balance (median = 3,850, IQR = 1,425 - 8,025 versus median = 11,500, IQR = 6,625 - 16,275; p = 0.004). Conclusions SAPS II at admission and cumulative fluid balance during renal support therapy were risk factors for mortality and non-recovery of renal function among critically ill patients with acute kidney injury needing renal replacement therapy. PMID:27096679

  1. The influence of acute kidney injury on antimicrobial dosing in critically ill patients: are dose reductions always necessary?

    PubMed

    Blot, Stijn; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Darren M; Roberts, Jason A

    2014-05-01

    Optimal dosing of antimicrobial therapy is pivotal to increase the likelihood of survival in critically ill patients with sepsis. Drug exposure that maximizes bacterial killing, minimizes the development of antimicrobial resistance, and avoids concentration-related toxicities should be considered the target of therapy. However, antimicrobial dosing is problematic as pathophysiological factors inherent to sepsis that alter may result in reduced concentrations. Alternatively, sepsis may evolve to multiple-organ dysfunction including acute kidney injury (AKI). In this case, decreased clearance of renally cleared drugs is possible, which may lead to increased concentrations that may cause drug toxicities. Consequently, when dosing antibiotics in septic patients with AKI, one should consider factors that may lead to underdosing and overdosing. Drug-specific pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data may be helpful to guide dosing in these circumstances. Yet, because of the high interpatient variability in pharmacokinetics of antibiotics during sepsis, this issue remains a significant challenge. PMID:24602849

  2. Basal and inducible levels of Hsp70 in patients with acute heat illness induced during training

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chengfeng; Wu, Tangchun; Ren, Aiming; Pan, Qin; Chen, Sheng; Wu, Fen; Li, Xiaoying; Wang, Ruibo; Hightower, Lawrence E.; Tanguay, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) or stress proteins, and, in particular, the inducible, cytosolic Hsp70, represent a highly conserved response to heat exposure and to a variety of noxious stimuli. Many investigations have shown correlations between the aberrant expression of Hsps and disease states. Whether the basal and inducible levels of Hsp70 are of any biological significance in patients with heat-induced diseases remains unknown. In the present study, we compared the basal and inducible levels of Hsp70 by flow cytometry in lymphocytes of patients with heat-induced diseases and after recovery from this disease, and in matched controls. Both groups comprised individuals who exercised by running in the same hot environment. The level of inducible Hsp70 was also measured after a heat treatment of lymphocytes in vitro. The results show that there is variation of basal and inducible Hsp70 levels among individuals. However, the group of patients suffering from heat-induced illnesses in May shows a significantly higher basal (P = 0.02) level of Hsp70 than does the control group. Individuals who have an increased level of Hsp70 may be more sensitive to heat or may respond differently. The level of Hsp70 may represent a biomarker to evaluate whether they are more susceptible to stresses than other individuals. Interestingly, the basal level of Hsp70 is higher in both the patient group and the control group in November than in May. In fact, the basal levels of Hsp70 in the patient and control groups are essentially the same in November, perhaps reflecting the successful stress conditioning of both groups. PMID:12820658

  3. Comparison of severe acute respiratory illness (sari) and clinical pneumonia case definitions for the detection of influenza virus infections among hospitalized patients, western Kenya, 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Makokha, Caroline; Mott, Joshua; Njuguna, Henry N; Khagayi, Sammy; Verani, Jennifer R; Nyawanda, Bryan; Otieno, Nancy; Katz, Mark A

    2016-07-01

    Although the severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) case definition is increasingly used for inpatient influenza surveillance, pneumonia is a more familiar term to clinicians and policymakers. We evaluated WHO case definitions for severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) and pneumonia (Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI) for children aged <5 years and Integrated Management of Adolescent and Adult Illnesses (IMAI) for patients aged ≥13 years) for detecting laboratory-confirmed influenza among hospitalized ARI patients. Sensitivities were 84% for SARI and 69% for IMCI pneumonia in children aged <5 years and 60% for SARI and 57% for IMAI pneumonia in patients aged ≥13 years. Clinical pneumonia case definitions may be a useful complement to SARI for inpatient influenza surveillance. PMID:27219455

  4. Aetiologies of Acute Undifferentiated Febrile illness in Adult Patients – an Experience from a Tertiary Care Hospital in Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Sohaib; Agarwal, R K; Dhar, Minakshi; Mittal, Manish; Sharma, Shiwani

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AUFI) is a common clinical entity in most of the hospitals. The fever can be potentially fatal if the aetiology is not recognized and appropriately treated early. Aim To describe the aetiology of fever among patients in a tertiary care hospital in Northern India. Materials and Methods A one-year retro-prospective, observational study was conducted in adults (age>18years) presenting with undifferentiated febrile illness (of duration 5-14 days). Diagnosis was confirmed by suitable laboratory tests after exhaustive clinical examination. Results A total of 2547 patients with AUFI were evaluated. Of these, 1663 (65.3%) were males and 884 (34.7%) were females. Dengue (37.54%); enteric fever (16.5%); scrub typhus (14.42%); bacterial sepsis (10.3%); malaria (6.8%); hepatitis A (1.9%); hepatitis E (1.4%); leptospirosis (0.14%); were the main infections while no specific diagnosis could be delineated in 11%. Mixed infections were noted in 48 (1.9%) patients. Conclusion A good clinical acumen supported by the basic investigations can help diagnose the cause of fever with reasonable certainty. PMID:26816892

  5. Defining urine output criterion for acute kidney injury in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Etienne; Malhotra, Rakesh; Claure-Del Granado, Rolando; Fedullo, Peter; Mehta, Ravindra L.

    2011-01-01

    Background. The widespread use of RIFLE and AKIN classification systems for acute kidney injury (AKI) diagnosis and staging has established the association between AKI severity and adverse outcomes. However, as a result of the difficulties in measuring and recording the urine output every hour, a few prospective studies have validated the urine output criterion as stated in these classification systems. We assessed hourly urine output in ICU patients using an automated and accurate device to determine if changes in urine flow and volume could be a sensitive marker of AKI. Additionally, we assessed various definitions of oliguria to determine whether measurement of urine output using a fixed 6-h interval that matches nurses’ shifts would be equivalent to the current standard for AKI diagnosis and staging. Methods. Hourly urine output was recorded continuously using a digital monitor in a medical ICU. Serum creatinine measurements were done at least once per 24 h. We assessed changes in urine output by four different definitions of oliguria. Patients with no AKI by either criterion were compared with patients diagnosed exclusively by the urine output criterion, exclusively by serum creatinine criterion and by both criteria. Results. Fifty-five percent of patients had an episode of oliguria during the ICU stay. There was no significant difference assessing urine output every hour or the total urine volume in a 6-h period for the detection of episodes of oliguria. Twenty-one patients (28%) were diagnosed as AKI using the serum creatinine criterion, whereas additional 24 (32%) were identified by the urine output criterion. Conclusions. Episodes of oliguria occur frequently in ICU patients and identify a higher percentage of AKI patients compared to serum creatinine criterion. Alterations in urine flow may be a sensitive marker of renal dysfunction and need to be validated in larger cohorts. PMID:20562094

  6. The Relationship between Poverty and Healthcare Seeking among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Febrile Illnesses in Chittagong, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Herdman, M. Trent; Maude, Richard James; Chowdhury, Md. Safiqul; Kingston, Hugh W. F.; Jeeyapant, Atthanee; Samad, Rasheda; Karim, Rezaul; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Hossain, Md. Amir

    2016-01-01

    Delays in seeking appropriate healthcare can increase the case fatality of acute febrile illnesses, and circuitous routes of care-seeking can have a catastrophic financial impact upon patients in low-income settings. To investigate the relationship between poverty and pre-hospital delays for patients with acute febrile illnesses, we recruited a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 527 acutely ill adults and children aged over 6 months, with a documented fever ≥38.0°C and symptoms of up to 14 days’ duration, presenting to a tertiary referral hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh, over the course of one year from September 2011 to September 2012. Participants were classified according to the socioeconomic status of their households, defined by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative’s multidimensional poverty index (MPI). 51% of participants were classified as multidimensionally poor (MPI>0.33). Median time from onset of any symptoms to arrival at hospital was 22 hours longer for MPI poor adults compared to non-poor adults (123 vs. 101 hours) rising to a difference of 26 hours with adjustment in a multivariate regression model (95% confidence interval 7 to 46 hours; P = 0.009). There was no difference in delays for children from poor and non-poor households (97 vs. 119 hours; P = 0.394). Case fatality was 5.9% vs. 0.8% in poor and non-poor individuals respectively (P = 0.001)—5.1% vs. 0.0% for poor and non-poor adults (P = 0.010) and 6.4% vs. 1.8% for poor and non-poor children (P = 0.083). Deaths were attributed to central nervous system infection (11), malaria (3), urinary tract infection (2), gastrointestinal infection (1) and undifferentiated sepsis (1). Both poor and non-poor households relied predominantly upon the (often informal) private sector for medical advice before reaching the referral hospital, but MPI poor participants were less likely to have consulted a qualified doctor. Poor participants were more likely to attribute delays in

  7. The Relationship between Poverty and Healthcare Seeking among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Febrile Illnesses in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Herdman, M Trent; Maude, Richard James; Chowdhury, Md Safiqul; Kingston, Hugh W F; Jeeyapant, Atthanee; Samad, Rasheda; Karim, Rezaul; Dondorp, Arjen M; Hossain, Md Amir

    2016-01-01

    Delays in seeking appropriate healthcare can increase the case fatality of acute febrile illnesses, and circuitous routes of care-seeking can have a catastrophic financial impact upon patients in low-income settings. To investigate the relationship between poverty and pre-hospital delays for patients with acute febrile illnesses, we recruited a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 527 acutely ill adults and children aged over 6 months, with a documented fever ≥38.0°C and symptoms of up to 14 days' duration, presenting to a tertiary referral hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh, over the course of one year from September 2011 to September 2012. Participants were classified according to the socioeconomic status of their households, defined by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative's multidimensional poverty index (MPI). 51% of participants were classified as multidimensionally poor (MPI>0.33). Median time from onset of any symptoms to arrival at hospital was 22 hours longer for MPI poor adults compared to non-poor adults (123 vs. 101 hours) rising to a difference of 26 hours with adjustment in a multivariate regression model (95% confidence interval 7 to 46 hours; P = 0.009). There was no difference in delays for children from poor and non-poor households (97 vs. 119 hours; P = 0.394). Case fatality was 5.9% vs. 0.8% in poor and non-poor individuals respectively (P = 0.001)-5.1% vs. 0.0% for poor and non-poor adults (P = 0.010) and 6.4% vs. 1.8% for poor and non-poor children (P = 0.083). Deaths were attributed to central nervous system infection (11), malaria (3), urinary tract infection (2), gastrointestinal infection (1) and undifferentiated sepsis (1). Both poor and non-poor households relied predominantly upon the (often informal) private sector for medical advice before reaching the referral hospital, but MPI poor participants were less likely to have consulted a qualified doctor. Poor participants were more likely to attribute delays in

  8. Study Design of the Microcirculatory Shock Occurrence in Acutely Ill Patients (microSOAP): an International Multicenter Observational Study of Sublingual Microcirculatory Alterations in Intensive Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vellinga, Namkje A. R.; Boerma, E. Christiaan; Koopmans, Matty; Donati, Abele; Dubin, Arnaldo; Shapiro, Nathan I.; Pearse, Rupert M.; Bakker, Jan; Ince, Can

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Sublingual microcirculatory alterations are associated with an adverse prognosis in several critical illness subgroups. Up to now, single-center studies have reported on sublingual microcirculatory alterations in ICU patient subgroups, but an extensive evaluation of the prevalence of these alterations is lacking. We present the study design of an international multicenter observational study to investigate the prevalence of microcirculatory alterations in critically ill: the Microcirculatory Shock Occurrence in Acutely ill Patients (microSOAP). Methods. 36 ICU's worldwide have participated in this study aiming for inclusion of over 500 evaluable patients. To enable communication and data collection, a website, an Open Clinica 3.0 database, and image uploading software have been designed. A one-session assessment of the sublingual microcirculation using Sidestream Dark Field imaging and data collection on patient characteristics has been performed in every ICU patient >18 years, regardless of underlying disease. Statistical analysis will provide insight in the prevalence and severity of sublingual alterations, its relation to systemic hemodynamic variables, disease, therapy, and outcome. Conclusion. This study will be the largest microcirculation study ever performed. It is expected that this study will also establish a basis for future studies related to the microcirculation in critically ill. PMID:22666566

  9. FGF23 in Acute and Chronic Illness

    PubMed Central

    Schnedl, Christian; Fahrleitner-Pammer, Astrid; Pietschmann, Peter; Amrein, Karin

    2015-01-01

    FGF23 is a bone-derived phosphaturic hormone that may become a useful biomarker for the identification of high-risk patients in chronic but also acute disease. It rises early in chronic kidney disease and is strongly and independently associated with excess morbidity and mortality. Emerging data suggest that FGF23 is also elevated in different scenarios of acute illness. In this review, we give an overview on the role of this interesting disease marker and potential and proven interventional strategies and discuss a blueprint for future research. PMID:26491212

  10. Hospital-Based Surveillance for Infectious Etiologies Among Patients with Acute Febrile Illness in Georgia, 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    Kuchuloria, Tinatin; Imnadze, Paata; Mamuchishvili, Nana; Chokheli, Maiko; Tsertsvadze, Tengiz; Endeladze, Marina; Mshvidobadze, Ketevan; Gatserelia, Lana; Makhviladze, Manana; Kanashvili, Marine; Mikautadze, Teona; Nanuashvili, Alexander; Kiknavelidze, Khatuni; Kokaia, Nora; Makharadze, Manana; Clark, Danielle V; Bautista, Christian T; Farrell, Margaret; Fadeel, Moustafa Abdel; Maksoud, Mohamed Abdel; Pimentel, Guillermo; House, Brent; Hepburn, Matthew J; Rivard, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    Information on the infectious causes of undifferentiated acute febrile illness (AFI) in Georgia is essential for effective treatment and prevention. In May 2008, a hospital-based AFI surveillance was initiated at six hospitals in Georgia. Patients aged ≥ 4 years with fever ≥ 38°C for ≥ 48 hours were eligible for surveillance. Blood culture and serologic testing were conducted for Leptospira spp., Brucella spp., West Nile virus (WNV), Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Coxiella burnetii, tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), hantavirus, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), and Rickettsia typhi. Of 537 subjects enrolled, 70% were outpatients, 54% were males, and the mean age was 37 years. Patients reported having fatigue (89%), rigors (87%), sweating (83%), pain in joints (49%), and sleep disturbances (42%). Thirty-nine (7%) patients were seropositive for R. typhi, 37 (7%) for Brucella spp., 36 (7%) for TBEV, 12 (2%) for Leptospira spp., 10 (2%) for C. burnetii, and three (0.6%) for S. Typhi. None of the febrile patients tested positive for WNV antibodies. Of the patients, 73% were negative for all pathogens. Our results indicate that most of the targeted pathogens are present in Georgia, and highlight the importance of enhancing laboratory capacity for these infectious diseases. PMID:26438032

  11. Clinical impact of potentially inappropriate medications during hospitalization of acutely ill older patients with multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Kersten, Hege; Hvidsten, Lara T; Gløersen, Gløer; Wyller, Torgeir Bruun; Wang-Hansen, Marte Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs), to compare drug changes between geriatric and other medical wards, and to investigate the clinical impact of PIMs in acutely hospitalized older adults. Setting and subjects: Retrospective study of 232 home-dwelling, multimorbid older adults (aged ≥75 years) acutely admitted to Vestfold Hospital Trust, Norway. Main outcome measures. PIMs were identified by Norwegian general practice (NORGEP) criteria and Beers’ 2012 criteria. Clinical correlates were laboratory measures, functional and mental status, physical frailty, and length of stay. Results: Mean (SD) age was 86 (5.7) years, and length of stay was 6.5 (4.8) days. During the stay, the mean number of drugs used regularly changed from 7.8 (3.6) to 7.9 (3.6) (p = 0.22), and drugs used pro re nata (prn) changed from 1.4 (1.6) to 2.0 (1.7) (p < 0.001). The prevalence of any PIM changed from 39.2% to 37.9% (p = 0.076), while anticholinergics and benzodiazepines were reduced significantly (p ≤ 0.02). The geriatric ward reduced drug dosages (p < 0.001) and discontinued PIMs (p < 0.001) significantly more often than other medical wards. No relations between number of PIMS and clinical outcomes were identified, but the concomitant use of ≥3 psychotropic/opioid drugs was associated with reduced hand-grip strength (p ≤ 0.012). Conclusion: Hospitalization did not change polypharmacy or PIMs. Drug treatment was more appropriate on the geriatric than other medical wards. No clinical impact of PIMs was observed, but prescribers should be vigilant about concomitant prescription of ≥3 psychotropics/opioids.KEY POINTSAcute hospitalization of older patients with multimorbidity did not increase polypharmacy or potentially inappropriate medications.Prescription of anticholinergics and benzodiazepines was significantly reduced.The geriatric ward reduced drug dosages and discontinued potentially inappropriate medications more

  12. Quinine allergy causing acute severe systemic illness: report of 4 patients manifesting multiple hematologic, renal, and hepatic abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Quinine is widely used for the common symptom of leg cramps. Quinine tablets require a prescription, but quinine and the product from which it is derived, cinchona, are also available without prescription. They are components of over-the-counter remedies for many common symptoms, of nutrition products, and of beverages such as tonic water and bitter lemon. Although quinine has been used for centuries, initially as an extract from the bark of the cinchona tree, allergic reactions to quinine can be severe and can affect multiple organs. These allergic reactions can cause thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, anemia, disseminated intravascular coagulation, acute renal failure, liver toxicity, and neurological abnormalities. Because quinine use is often intermittent, defining quinine as a cause of an acute disorder may be difficult. Moreover, since quinine use is often self-regulated, patients may not mention it in response to direct questions about medication use, adding to diagnostic difficulty. The diversity and severity of quinine-associated disorders and the difficulties of diagnosis are illustrated by the presentation of 4 case histories. Awareness of the variety of potential quinine-associated reactions is important for accurate diagnosis and critical for prevention of recurrent illness. PMID:16278718

  13. Population Pharmacokinetics of Colistin Methanesulfonate and Colistin in Critically Ill Patients with Acute Renal Failure Requiring Intermittent Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, M; Grégoire, N; Mégarbane, B; Gobin, P; Balayn, D; Marchand, S; Mimoz, O; Couet, W

    2016-03-01

    Colistin is increasingly used as a last option for the treatment of severe infections due to Gram-negative bacteria in critically ill patients requiring intermittent hemodialysis (HD) for acute renal failure. Our objective was to characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK) of colistin and its prodrug colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) in this population and to suggest dosing regimen recommendations. Eight intensive care unit (ICU) patients who were under intermittent HD and who were treated by CMS (Colimycine) were included. Blood samples were collected between two consecutive HD sessions. CMS and colistin concentrations were measured by a specific chromatographic assay and were analyzed using a PK population approach (Monolix software). Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to predict the probability of target attainment (PTA). CMS nonrenal clearance was increased in ICU-HD patients. Compared with that of ICU patients included in the same clinical trial but with preserved renal function, colistin exposure was increased by 3-fold in ICU-HD patients. This is probably because a greater fraction of the CMS converted into colistin. To maintain colistin plasma concentrations high enough (>3 mg/liter) for high PTA values (area under the concentration-time curve for the free, unbound fraction of a drug [fAUC]/MIC of >10 and fAUC/MIC of >50 for systemic and lung infections, respectively), at least for MICs lower than 1.5 mg/liter (nonpulmonary infection) or 0.5 mg/liter (pulmonary infection), the dosing regimen of CMS should be 1.5 million international units (MIU) twice daily on non-HD days. HD should be conducted at the end of a dosing interval, and a supplemental dose of 1.5 MIU should be administered after the HD session (i.e., total of 4.5 MIU for HD days). This study has confirmed and complemented previously published data and suggests an a priori clear and easy to follow dosing strategy for CMS in ICU-HD patients. PMID:26729492

  14. Effect of sedation on short-term and long-term outcomes of critically ill patients with acute respiratory insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xue-zhong; Gao, Yong; Wang, Hai-jun; Qu, Shi-ning; Huang, Chu-lin; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Hao; Xiao, Qing-ling; Sun, Ke-lin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The present study aimed to determine the short-term and long-term outcomes of critically ill patients with acute respiratory insufficiency who had received sedation or no sedation. METHODS: The data of 91 patients who had received mechanical ventilation in the first 24 hours between November 2008 and October 2009 were retrospectively analyzed. These patients were divided into two groups: a sedation group (n=28) and a non-sedation group (n=63). The patients were also grouped in two groups: deep sedation group and daily interruption and /or light sedation group. RESULTS: Overall, the 91 patients who had received ventilation ≥48 hours were analyzed. Multivariate analysis demonstrated two independent risk factors for in-hospital death: sequential organ failure assessment score (P=0.019, RR 1.355, 95%CI 1.051–1.747, B=0.304, SE=0.130, Wald=50483) and sedation (P=0.041, RR 5.015, 95%CI 1.072–23.459, B=1.612, SE=0.787, Wald=4.195). Compared with the patients who had received no sedation, those who had received sedation had a longer duration of ventilation, a longer stay in intensive care unit and hospital, and an increased in-hospital mortality rate. The Kaplan-Meier method showed that patients who had received sedation had a lower 60-month survival rate than those who had received no sedation (76.7% vs. 88.9%, Log-rank test=3.630, P=0.057). Compared with the patients who had received deep sedation, those who had received daily interruption or light sedation showed a decreased in-hospital mortality rate (57.1% vs. 9.5%, P=0.008). The 60-month survival of the patients who had received deep sedation was significantly lower than that of those who had daily interruption or light sedation (38.1% vs. 90.5%, Log-rank test=6.783, P=0.009). CONCLUSIONS: Sedation was associated with in-hospital death. The patients who had received sedation had a longer duration of ventilation, a longer stay in intensive care unit and in hospital, and an increased in

  15. Evaluation of Intermittent Hemodialysis in Critically Ill Cancer Patients with Acute Kidney Injury Using Single-Pass Batch Equipment

    PubMed Central

    Torres da Costa e Silva, Verônica; Costalonga, Elerson C.; Oliveira, Ana Paula Leandro; Hung, James; Caires, Renato Antunes; Hajjar, Ludhmila Abrahão; Fukushima, Julia T.; Soares, Cilene Muniz; Bezerra, Juliana Silva; Oikawa, Luciane; Yu, Luis; Burdmann, Emmanuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) in cancer patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) in the intensive care unit (ICU) is scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and the adequacy of intermittent hemodialysis (IHD) in critically ill cancer patients with AKI. Methods and Findings In this observational prospective cohort study, 149 ICU cancer patients with AKI were treated with 448 single-pass batch IHD procedures and evaluated from June 2010 to June 2012. Primary outcomes were IHD complications (hypotension and clotting) and adequacy. A multiple logistic regression was performed in order to identify factors associated with IHD complications (hypotension and clotting). Patients were 62.2 ± 14.3 years old, 86.6% had a solid cancer, sepsis was the main AKI cause (51%) and in-hospital mortality was 59.7%. RRT session time was 240 (180–300) min, blood/dialysate flow was 250 (200–300) mL/min and UF was 1000 (0–2000) ml. Hypotension occurred in 25% of the sessions. Independent risk factors (RF) for hypotension were dialysate conductivity (each ms/cm, OR 0.81, CI 0.69–0.95), initial mean arterial pressure (each 10 mmHg, OR 0.49, CI 0.40–0.61) and SOFA score (OR 1.16, CI 1.03–1.30). Clotting and malfunctioning catheters (MC) occurred in 23.8% and 29.2% of the procedures, respectively. Independent RF for clotting were heparin use (OR 0.57, CI 0.33–0.99), MC (OR 3.59, CI 2.24–5.77) and RRT system pressure increase over 25% (OR 2.15, CI 1.61–4.17). Post RRT blood tests were urea 71 (49–104) mg/dL, creatinine 2.71 (2.10–3.8) mg/dL, bicarbonate 24.1 (22.5–25.5) mEq/L and K 3.8 (3.5–4.1) mEq/L. Conclusion IHD for critically ill patients with cancer and AKI offered acceptable hemodynamic stability and provided adequate metabolic control. PMID:26938932

  16. An update on prevention of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized acutely ill medical patients

    PubMed Central

    Samama, Meyer Michel; Kleber, Franz-Xaver

    2006-01-01

    Both the recently updated consensus guidelines published by the American College of Chest Physicians, and the International Union of Angiology recommend thromboprophylaxis with either low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) or unfractionated heparin (UFH) in medical patients at risk of VTE. However, no guidance is given regarding the appropriate dosing regimens that should be used for thromboprophylaxis in this patient group. LMWH (enoxaparin and dalteparin) and UFH have been shown to be effective for thromboprophylaxis in at-risk hospitalized medical patients. Although LMWH once daily (o.d.) has been shown to be as effective as UFH three times daily (t.i.d.) for thromboprophylaxis in at-risk medical patients, there are no data to show that UFH twice daily (b.i.d) is as effective as either LMWH o.d. or UFH t.i.d. On the basis of currently available evidence, the LMWHs enoxaparin and dalteparin are more attractive alternatives to UFH for the prevention of VTE in hospitalized medical patients because of their convenient once-daily administration and better safety profile, demonstrated in terms of reduced bleeding, HIT, and other adverse events. PMID:16817957

  17. Computed tomography-defined abdominal adiposity is associated with acute kidney injury in critically ill trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Shashaty, Michael G. S.; Kalkan, Esra; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Reilly, John P.; Holena, Daniel N.; Cummins, Kathleen; Lanken, Paul N.; Feldman, Harold I.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Christie, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Higher body mass index (BMI) is associated with increased risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) after major trauma. Since BMI is non-specific, reflecting lean, fluid, and adipose mass, we evaluated the use of computed tomography (CT) to determine if abdominal adiposity underlies the BMI-AKI association. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Level I Trauma Center of a university hospital. Patients Patients older than 13 years with an Injury Severity Score ≥16 admitted to the trauma intensive care unit were followed for development of AKI over five days. Those with isolated severe head injury or on chronic dialysis were excluded. Interventions None Measurements and Main Results Clinical, anthropometric, and demographic variables were collected prospectively. CT images at the level of the L4-5 intervertebral disc space were extracted from the medical record and used by two operators to quantitate visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue (VAT and SAT, respectively) areas. AKI was defined by Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) creatinine and dialysis criteria. Of 400 subjects, 327 (81.8%) had CT scans suitable for analysis: 264/285 (92.6%) blunt trauma subjects, 63/115 (54.8%) penetrating trauma subjects. VAT and SAT areas were highly correlated between operators (ICC>0.999, p<0.001 for each) and within operator (ICC>0.999, p<0.001 for each). In multivariable analysis, the standardized risk of AKI was 15.1% (95% CI 10.6%,19.6%), 18.1% (14%,22.2%), and 23.1% (18.3%,27.9%) at the 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles of VAT area, respectively (p=0.001), with similar findings when using SAT area as the adiposity measure. Conclusions Quantitation of abdominal adiposity using CT scans obtained for clinical reasons is feasible and highly reliable in critically ill trauma patients. Abdominal adiposity is independently associated with AKI in this population, confirming that excess adipose tissue contributes to the BMI-AKI association. Further studies of the potential

  18. Acute effects of physiotherapeutic respiratory maneuvers in critically ill patients with craniocerebral trauma

    PubMed Central

    de Cerqueira Neto, Manoel Luiz; Moura, Álvaro Vieira; Cerqueira, Telma Cristina Fontes; Aquim, Esperidião Elias; Reá-Neto, Álvaro; Oliveira, Mirella Cristine; da Silva Júnior, Walderi Monteiro; Santana-Filho, Valter J.; Herminia Scola, Rosana

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of physiotherapeutic respiratory maneuvers on cerebral and cardiovascular hemodynamics and blood gas variables. METHOD: A descriptive, longitudinal, prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial that included 20 critical patients with severe craniocerebral trauma who were receiving mechanical ventilation and who were admitted to the intensive care unit. Each patient was subjected to the physiotherapeutic maneuvers of vibrocompression and increased manual expiratory flow (5 minutes on each hemithorax), along with subsequent airway suctioning with prior instillation of saline solution, hyperinflation and hyperoxygenation. Variables related to cardiovascular and cerebral hemodynamics and blood gas variables were recorded after each vibrocompression, increased manual expiratory flow and airway suctioning maneuver and 10 minutes after the end of airway suctioning. RESULTS: The hemodynamic and blood gas variables were maintained during vibrocompression and increased manual expiratory flow maneuvers; however, there were increases in mean arterial pressure, intracranial pressure, heart rate, pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary capillary pressure during airway suctioning. All of the values returned to baseline 10 minutes after the end of airway suctioning. CONCLUSION: Respiratory physiotherapy can be safely performed on patients with severe craniocerebral trauma. Additional caution must be taken when performing airway suctioning because this technique alters cerebral and cardiovascular hemodynamics, even in sedated and paralyzed patients. PMID:24141836

  19. End-of-life issues in the acute and critically ill patient

    PubMed Central

    Savory, Eric A; Marco, Catherine A

    2009-01-01

    The challenges of end-of-life care require emergency physicians to utilize a multifaceted and dynamic skill set. Such skills include medical therapies to relieve pain and other symptoms near the end-of-life. Physicians must also demonstrate aptitude in comfort care, communication, cultural competency, and ethical principles. It is imperative that emergency physicians demonstrate a fundamental understanding of end-of-life issues in order to employ the versatile, multidisciplinary approach required to provide the highest quality end-of-life care for patients and their families. PMID:19386133

  20. Percutaneous cholecystostomy in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Teplick, S K; Harshfield, D L; Brandon, J C; Broadwater, J R; Cone, J B

    1991-01-01

    Sixteen critically ill patients underwent percutaneous cholecystostomy because of suspected acute cholecystitis. The procedure was technically successful, although 11 of 16 patients died subsequently because of various complications of their underlying primary disorders. We reviewed this series to reassess the value of percutaneous cholecystostomy. Four of 11 patients with definite acute cholecystitis (group 1) were cured by this technique, but three required surgery because of gallbladder wall necrosis. Two of these were among four cases which had demonstrated pericholecystic fluid collections on computed tomography (CT) or ultrasound of the abdomen. There were also five patients (group 2) in whom acute cholecystitis or its relationship to patients' symptoms were not fully determined, and four of them did not improve after percutaneous cholecystostomy. We conclude that this technique has a lower success rate in critically ill patients than reported previously. PMID:2016030

  1. Early lactate clearance for predicting active bleeding in critically ill patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Wada, Tomoki; Hagiwara, Akiyoshi; Uemura, Tatsuki; Yahagi, Naoki; Kimura, Akio

    2016-08-01

    Not all patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) require emergency endoscopy. Lactate clearance has been suggested as a parameter for predicting patient outcomes in various critical care settings. This study investigates whether lactate clearance can predict active bleeding in critically ill patients with UGIB. This single-center, retrospective, observational study included critically ill patients with UGIB who met all of the following criteria: admission to the emergency department (ED) from April 2011 to August 2014; had blood samples for lactate evaluation at least twice during the ED stay; and had emergency endoscopy within 6 h of ED presentation. The main outcome was active bleeding detected with emergency endoscopy. Classification and regression tree (CART) analyses were performed using variables associated with active bleeding to derive a prediction rule for active bleeding in critically ill UGIB patients. A total of 154 patients with UGIB were analyzed, and 31.2 % (48/154) had active bleeding. In the univariate analysis, lactate clearance was significantly lower in patients with active bleeding than in those without active bleeding (13 vs. 29 %, P < 0.001). Using the CART analysis, a prediction rule for active bleeding is derived, and includes three variables: lactate clearance; platelet count; and systolic blood pressure at ED presentation. The rule has 97.9 % (95 % CI 90.2-99.6 %) sensitivity with 32.1 % (28.6-32.9 %) specificity. Lactate clearance may be associated with active bleeding in critically ill patients with UGIB, and may be clinically useful as a component of a prediction rule for active bleeding. PMID:26837207

  2. Headache in the presentation of noncephalic acute illness

    PubMed Central

    Tzadok, Tomer; Toledano, Ronen; Fuchs, Lior; Bartal, Carmi; Novack, Victor; Ifergane, Gal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Headache is a frequent symptom of many systemic diseases that do not involve cranial structures. In this observational study, we assessed factors associated with headache in the acute presentation of systemic conditions in a nonsurgical emergency department (ED). Methods: Consecutive patients, admitted to Soroka University Medical Center ED due to noncephalic illness, were prospectively surveyed using a structured questionnaire focused on the prevalence and characteristics of headache symptoms. Medical data were extracted from the patient's charts. Results: Between 1 and 6/2012, 194 patients aged 64.69 ± 19.52 years, were evaluated. Headache was reported by 83 (42.7%) patients and was more common among patients with febrile illness (77.5% vs. 22.5%, P < 0.001). Respiratory illness and level of O2 saturation were not associated with headache. Headache in the presentation of a noncephalic illness was associated with younger age (58 vs. 69, P < 0.001) and with suffering from a primary headache disorder (48.2% vs. 10.8%, P < 0.001). Headache was also associated with higher body temperature and lower platelets count. Conclusions: Headache is a common symptom in acute noncephalic conditions and was found to be associated with younger age and febrile disease on presentation. Patients who present with primary headache disorders are more prone to have headache during acute illness. Acute obstructive respiratory disease, hypercarbia or hypoxemia were not associated with headache. PMID:26752891

  3. Nutritional demands in acute and chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Rosemary A; Davidson, H Isobel M

    2003-11-01

    Common to both acute and chronic disease are disturbances in energy homeostasis, which are evidenced by quantitative and qualitative changes in dietary intake and increased energy expenditure. Negative energy balance results in loss of fat and lean tissue. The management of patients with metabolically-active disease appears to be simple; it would involve the provision of sufficient energy to promote tissue accretion. However, two fundamental issues serve to prevent nutritional demands in disease being met. The determination of appropriate energy requirements relies on predictive formulae. While equations have been developed for critically-ill populations, accurate energy prescribing in the acute setting is uncommon. Only 25-32% of the patients have energy intakes within 10% of their requirements. Clearly, the variation in energy expenditure has led to difficulties in accurately defining the energy needs of the individual. Second, the acute inflammatory response initiated by the host can have profound effects on ingestive behaviour, but this area is poorly understood by practising clinicians. For example, nutritional targets have been set for specific disease states, i.e. pancreatitis 105-147 kJ (25-35 kcal)/kg; chronic liver disease 147-168 kJ (35-40 kcal)/kg, but given the alterations in gut physiology that accompany the acute-phase response, targets are unlikely to be met. In cancer cachexia attenuation of the inflammatory response using eicosapentaenoic acid results in improved nutritional intake and status. This strategy poses an attractive proposition in the quest to define nutritional support as a clinically-effective treatment modality in other disorders. PMID:15018475

  4. Noninvasive and invasive positive pressure ventilation for acute respiratory failure in critically ill patients: a comparative cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Meeder, Annelijn M.; Tjan, Dave H. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) for acute respiratory failure in the intensive care unit (ICU) is associated with a marked reduction in intubation rate, complications, hospital length of stay and mortality. Multiple studies have indicated that patients failing NPPV have worse outcomes compared with patients with successful NPPV treatment; however limited data is available on risks associated with NPPV failure resulting in (delayed) intubation and outcomes compared with initial intubation. The purpose of this study is to assess rates and predictors of NPPV failure and to compare hospital outcomes of patients with NPPV failure with those patients primarily intubated without a prior NPPV trial. Methods A retrospective observational study using data from patients with acute respiratory failure admitted to the ICU in the period 2013–2014. All patients treated with NPPV were evaluated. A sample of patients who were primarily intubated was randomly selected to serve as controls for the group of patients who failed NPPV. Results NPPV failure was recorded in 30.8% of noninvasively ventilated patients and was associated with longer ICU stay [OR, 1.16, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.04–1.30] and lower survival rates (OR, 0.10, 95% CI: 0.02–0.59) compared with NPPV success. Multivariate analysis showed presence of severe sepsis at study entry, higher Simplified Acute Physiology II Score (SAPS-II) score, lower ratio of arterial oxygen tension to fraction of inspired oxygen (PF-ratio) and lower plasma glucose were predictors for NPPV failure. After controlling for potential confounders, patients with NPPV failure did not show any difference in hospital outcomes compared with patients who were primarily intubated. Conclusions Patients with acute respiratory failure and NPPV failure have worse outcomes compared with NPPV success patients, however not worse than initially intubated patients. An initial trial of NPPV therefore may be suitable

  5. A feasible strategy for preventing blood clots in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (FBI): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous pharmacokinetic trials suggested that 40 mg subcutaneous enoxaparin once daily provided inadequate thromboprophylaxis for intensive care unit patients. Critically ill patients with acute kidney injury are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism and yet are often excluded from these trials. We hypothesized that for critically ill patients with acute kidney injury receiving continuous renal replacement therapy, a dose of 1 mg/kg enoxaparin subcutaneously once daily would improve thromboprophylaxis without increasing the risk of bleeding. In addition, we seek to utilize urine output prior to discontinuing dialysis, and low neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in dialysis-free intervals, as markers of renal recovery. Methods/Design In a multicenter, double-blind randomized controlled trial in progress at three intensive care units across Denmark, we randomly assign eligible critically ill adults with acute kidney injury into a treatment (1 mg/kg enoxaparin subcutaneously once daily) or control arm (40 mg enoxaparin subcutaneously once daily) upon commencement of continuous renal replacement therapy. We calculated that with 133 patients in each group, the study would have 80% power to show a 40% reduction in the relative risk of venous thromboembolism with 1 mg/kg enoxaparin, at a two-sided alpha level of 0.05. An interim analysis will be conducted after the first 67 patients have been included in each group. Enrolment began in March 2013, and will continue for two years. The primary outcome is the occurrence of venous thromboembolism. Secondary outcomes include anti-factor Xa activity, bleeding, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, filter lifespan, length of stay, ventilator free days, and mortality. We will also monitor neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and urine volume to determine whether they can be used as prognostic factors for renal recovery. Discussion Critically ill unit patients with acute kidney injury present a

  6. Fate of Central Venous Catheters Used for Acute Extracorporeal Treatment in Critically Ill Pediatric Patients: A Single Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Rus, Rina R; Premru, Vladimir; Novljan, Gregor; Grošelj-Grenc, Mojca; Ponikvar, Rafael

    2016-06-01

    Renal replacement treatment (RRT) is required in severe acute kidney injury, and a functioning central venous catheter (CVC) is crucial. Twenty-eight children younger than 16 years have been treated at the University Medical Centre Ljubljana between 2003 and 2012 with either acute hemodialysis (HD) and/or plasma exchange (PE), and were included in our study. The age of the patients ranged from 2 days to 14.1 years. Sixty-six CVCs were inserted (52% de novo, 48% guide wire). The sites of insertion were the jugular vein in 20% and the femoral vein in 80%. Catheters were in function from 1 day to 27 days. The most common cause for CVC removal or exchange was catheter dysfunction (50%). CVCs were mostly inserted in the femoral vein, which is the preferred site of insertion in acute HD/PE because of the smaller number of complications. PMID:27312920

  7. The critically ill immunosuppressed patient

    SciTech Connect

    Parrillo, J.E.; Masur, H. )

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the papers on the diagnosis and management of immunosuppressed patient. Some of the topics are: life-threatening organ failure in immunosuppressed patients; diagnosis and therapy of respiratory disease in the immunosuppressed patient; CNS complication of immunosuppression; infections; antineoplastic therapy of immunosuppressed patient; radiation therapy-issues in critically ill patient; AIDS; and management of bone marrow transplant patients.

  8. Undiagnosed Acute Viral Febrile Illnesses, Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Cynthia A.; Khan, Sheik H.; Goba, Augustine; Fair, Joseph N.

    2014-01-01

    Sierra Leone in West Africa is in a Lassa fever–hyperendemic region that also includes Guinea and Liberia. Each year, suspected Lassa fever cases result in submission of ≈500–700 samples to the Kenema Government Hospital Lassa Diagnostic Laboratory in eastern Sierra Leone. Generally only 30%–40% of samples tested are positive for Lassa virus (LASV) antigen and/or LASV-specific IgM; thus, 60%–70% of these patients have acute diseases of unknown origin. To investigate what other arthropod-borne and hemorrhagic fever viral diseases might cause serious illness in this region and mimic Lassa fever, we tested patient serum samples that were negative for malaria parasites and LASV. Using IgM-capture ELISAs, we evaluated samples for antibodies to arthropod-borne and other hemorrhagic fever viruses. Approximately 25% of LASV-negative patients had IgM to dengue, West Nile, yellow fever, Rift Valley fever, chikungunya, Ebola, and Marburg viruses but not to Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus. PMID:24959946

  9. Data on respiratory variables in critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+).

    PubMed

    Georgopoulos, Dimitris; Xirouchaki, Nectaria; Tzanakis, Nikolaos; Younes, Magdy

    2016-09-01

    The data show respiratory variables in 108 critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+) after at least 36 h on passive mechanical ventilation. PAV+ was continued for 48 h until the patients met pre-defined criteria either for switching to controlled modes or for breathing without ventilator assistance. Data during passive mechanical ventilation and during PAV+ are reported. Data are acquired from the whole population, as well as from patients with and without acute respiratory distress syndrome. The reported variables are tidal volume, driving pressure (ΔP, the difference between static end-inspiratory plateau pressure and positive end-expiratory airway pressure), respiratory system compliance and resistance, and arterial blood gasses. The data are supplemental to our original research article, which described individual ΔP in these patients and examined how it related to ΔP when the same patients were ventilated with passive mechanical ventilation using the currently accepted lung-protective strategy "Driving pressure during assisted mechanical ventilation. Is it controlled by patient brain?" [1]. PMID:27358909

  10. Intermittent high-volume predilution on-line haemofiltration versus standard intermittent haemodialysis in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury: a prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Škofic, Nataša; Arnol, Miha; Buturović-Ponikvar, Jadranka; Ponikvar, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Background The optimal modality of dialysis treatment in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unclear. Intermittent high-volume predilution on-line haemofiltration (HF) is not a well-established dialysis modality. The purpose of the study was to compare clinical outcomes between HF and standard intermittent haemodialysis (HD) in this specific population. Methods In this prospective, randomized, controlled single-centre clinical study, we compared mortality and recovery of kidney function between HF and HD in critically ill adult patients with AKI. The primary study outcome was 60-day all-cause mortality. Secondary study outcomes included 30-day and in-hospital all-cause mortality along with recovery of kidney function. Time to kidney function recovery and the number of required dialysis procedures were analyzed in the subgroup of patients with in-hospital recovery of kidney function. Results Baseline characteristics of the 273 patients in the two study groups were similar. All-cause mortality by Day 60 was 65.0% in the HF group and 65.5% in the HD group (hazard ratio, 0.98; 95% confidence interval, 0.71–1.33; P = 0.87). There were also no significant differences between the two groups in 30-day and in-hospital all-cause mortality or recovery of kidney function. Time to kidney function recovery and the number of required dialysis procedures were similar between the HF and the HD subgroup of patients with in-hospital recovery of kidney function. Conclusions Dialysis treatment with intermittent high-volume predilution on-line HF in critically ill patients with AKI did not decrease mortality, improve recovery of kidney function or reduce the need for dialysis support compared to standard intermittent HD. PMID:22513706

  11. Insulin therapy in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Ellahham, Samer

    2010-01-01

    Hyperglycemia frequently occurs with acute medical illness, especially among patients with cardiovascular disease, and has been linked to increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Even patients who are normoglycemic can develop hyperglycemia in response to acute metabolic stress. An expanding body of literature describes the benefits of normalizing hyperglycemia with insulin therapy in hospitalized patients. As a result, both the American Diabetes Association and the American College of Endocrinology have developed guidelines for optimal control of hyperglycemia, specifically targeting critically ill, hospitalized patients. Conventional blood glucose values of 140–180 mg/dL are considered desirable and safely achievable in most patients. More aggressive control to <110 mg/dL remains controversial, but has shown benefits in certain patients, such as those in surgical intensive care. Intravenous infusion is often used for initial insulin administration, which can then be transitioned to subcutaneous insulin therapy in those patients who require continued insulin maintenance. This article reviews the data establishing the link between hyperglycemia and its risks of morbidity and mortality, and describes strategies that have proven effective in maintaining glycemic control in high-risk hospitalized patients. PMID:21191429

  12. Acute kidney injury due to decompression illness.

    PubMed

    Viecelli, Andrea; Jamboti, Jagadish; Waring, Andrew; Banham, Neil; Ferrari, Paolo

    2014-08-01

    Decompression illness is a rare but serious complication of diving caused by intravascular or extravascular gas bubble formation. We report the first case of acute kidney injury in a 27-year-old diver following three rapid ascents. He presented with transient neurological symptoms and abdominal pain followed by rapidly progressive acute kidney injury (creatinine peak 1210 µmol/L) due to arterial air emboli. He received supportive care and 100% oxygen followed by hyperbaric therapy and recovered fully. Arterial air emboli caused by rapid decompression can affect multiple organs including the kidneys. Early transfer to a hyperbaric unit is important as complications may present delayed. PMID:25852912

  13. Acute kidney injury due to decompression illness

    PubMed Central

    Viecelli, Andrea; Jamboti, Jagadish; Waring, Andrew; Banham, Neil; Ferrari, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Decompression illness is a rare but serious complication of diving caused by intravascular or extravascular gas bubble formation. We report the first case of acute kidney injury in a 27-year-old diver following three rapid ascents. He presented with transient neurological symptoms and abdominal pain followed by rapidly progressive acute kidney injury (creatinine peak 1210 µmol/L) due to arterial air emboli. He received supportive care and 100% oxygen followed by hyperbaric therapy and recovered fully. Arterial air emboli caused by rapid decompression can affect multiple organs including the kidneys. Early transfer to a hyperbaric unit is important as complications may present delayed. PMID:25852912

  14. The effect of continuous versus intermittent renal replacement therapy on the outcome of critically ill patients with acute renal failure (CONVINT): a prospective randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute renal failure (ARF) requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT) occurs frequently in ICU patients and significantly affects mortality rates. Previously, few large clinical trials investigated the impact of RRT modalities on patient outcomes. Here we investigated the effect of two major RRT strategies (intermittent hemodialysis (IHD) and continuous veno-venous hemofiltration (CVVH)) on mortality and renal-related outcome measures. Methods This single-center prospective randomized controlled trial (“CONVINT”) included 252 critically ill patients (159 male; mean age, 61.5 ± 13.9 years; Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, 28.6 ± 8.8) with dialysis-dependent ARF treated in the ICUs of a tertiary care academic center. Patients were randomized to receive either daily IHD or CVVH. The primary outcome measure was survival at 14 days after the end of RRT. Secondary outcome measures included 30-day-, intensive care unit-, and intrahospital mortality, as well as course of disease severity/biomarkers and need for organ-support therapy. Results At baseline, no differences in disease severity, distributions of age and gender, or suspected reasons for acute renal failure were observed. Survival rates at 14 days after RRT were 39.5% (IHD) versus 43.9% (CVVH) (odds ratio (OR), 0.84; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.49 to 1.41; P = 0.50). 14-day-, 30-day, and all-cause intrahospital mortality rates were not different between the two groups (all P > 0.5). No differences were observed in days on RRT, vasopressor days, days on ventilator, or ICU-/intrahospital length of stay. Conclusions In a monocentric RCT, we observed no statistically significant differences between the investigated treatment modalities regarding mortality, renal-related outcome measures, or survival at 14 days after RRT. Our findings add to mounting data demonstrating that intermittent and continuous RRTs may be considered equivalent approaches

  15. CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS, OUTCOMES AND RISK FACTORS FOR DEATH AMONG CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS WITH HIV-RELATED ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY

    PubMed Central

    LUNA, Leonardo Duarte Sobreira; SOARES, Douglas de Sousa; JUNIOR, Geraldo Bezerra da SILVA; CAVALCANTE, Malena Gadelha; MALVEIRA, Lara Raissa Cavalcante; MENESES, Gdayllon Cavalcante; PEREIRA, Eanes Delgado Barros; DAHER, Elizabeth De Francesco

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Background: The aim of this study is to describe clinical characteristics, outcomes and risk factors for death among patients with HIV-related acute kidney injury (AKI) admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). Methods: A retrospective study was conducted with HIV-infected AKI patients admitted to the ICU of an infectious diseases hospital in Fortaleza, Brazil. All the patients with confirmed diagnosis of HIV and AKI admitted from January 2004 to December 2011 were included. A comparison between survivors and non-survivors was performed. Risk factors for death were investigated. Results: Among 256 AKI patients admitted to the ICU in the study period, 73 were identified as HIV-infected, with a predominance of male patients (83.6%), and the mean age was 41.2 ± 10.4 years. Non-survivor patients presented higher APACHE II scores (61.4 ± 19 vs. 38.6 ± 18, p = 0.004), used more vasoconstrictors (70.9 vs. 37.5%, p = 0.02) and needed more mechanical ventilation - MV (81.1 vs. 35.3%, p = 0.001). There were 55 deaths (75.3%), most of them (53.4%) due to septic shock. Independent risk factors for mortality were septic shock (OR = 14.2, 95% CI = 2.0-96.9, p = 0.007) and respiratory insufficiency with need of MV (OR = 27.6, 95% CI = 5.0-153.0, p < 0.001). Conclusion: Non-survivor HIV-infected patients with AKI admitted to the ICU presented higher severity APACHE II scores, more respiratory damage and hemodynamic impairment than survivors. Septic shock and respiratory insufficiency were independently associated to death. PMID:27410912

  16. A comparison of early versus late initiation of renal replacement therapy in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Our aim was to investigate the impact of early versus late initiation of renal replacement therapy (RRT) on clinical outcomes in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods Systematic review and meta-analysis were used in this study. PUBMED, EMBASE, SCOPUS, Web of Science and Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Clinical Trials, and other sources were searched in July 2010. Eligible studies selected were cohort and randomised trials that assessed timing of initiation of RRT in critically ill adults with AKI. Results We identified 15 unique studies (2 randomised, 4 prospective cohort, 9 retrospective cohort) out of 1,494 citations. The overall methodological quality was low. Early, compared with late therapy, was associated with a significant improvement in 28-day mortality (odds ratio (OR) 0.45; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.28 to 0.72). There was significant heterogeneity among the 15 pooled studies (I2 = 78%). In subgroup analyses, stratifying by patient population (surgical, n = 8 vs. mixed, n = 7) or study design (prospective, n = 10 vs. retrospective, n = 5), there was no impact on the overall summary estimate for mortality. Meta-regression controlling for illness severity (Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II)), baseline creatinine and urea did not impact the overall summary estimate for mortality. Of studies reporting secondary outcomes, five studies (out of seven) reported greater renal recovery, seven (out of eight) studies showed decreased duration of RRT and five (out of six) studies showed decreased ICU length of stay in the early, compared with late, RRT group. Early RRT did not; however, significantly affect the odds of dialysis dependence beyond hospitalization (OR 0.62 0.34 to 1.13, I2 = 69.6%). Conclusions Earlier institution of RRT in critically ill patients with AKI may have a beneficial impact on survival. However, this conclusion is based on heterogeneous studies of variable quality

  17. Acute undifferentiated febrile illness in adult hospitalized patients: the disease spectrum and diagnostic predictors - an experience from a tertiary care hospital in South India.

    PubMed

    Chrispal, Anugrah; Boorugu, Harikishan; Gopinath, Kango Gopal; Chandy, Sara; Prakash, John Antony Jude; Thomas, Elsa Mary; Abraham, Asha Mary; Abraham, O C; Thomas, Kurien

    2010-10-01

    Local prevalences of individual diseases influence the prioritization of the differential diagnoses of a clinical syndrome of acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AFI). This study was conducted in order to delineate the aetiology of AFI that present to a tertiary hospital in southern India and to describe disease-specific clinical profiles. An 1-year prospective, observational study was conducted in adults (age >16 years) who presented with an undifferentiated febrile illness of duration 5-21 days, requiring hospitalization. Blood cultures, malarial parasites and febrile serology (acute and convalescent), in addition to clinical evaluations and basic investigations were performed. Comparisons were made between each disease and the other AFIs. A total of 398 AFI patients were diagnosed with: scrub typhus (47.5%); malaria (17.1%); enteric fever (8.0%); dengue (7.0%); leptospirosis (3.0%); spotted fever rickettsiosis (1.8%); Hantavirus (0.3%); alternate diagnosis (7.3%); and unclear diagnoses (8.0%). Leucocytosis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, aseptic meningitis, mild serum transaminase elevation and hypoalbuminaemia were independently associated with scrub typhus. Normal leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia, renal failure, splenomegaly and hyperbilirubinaemia with mildly elevated serum transaminases were associated with malaria. Rash, overt bleeding manifestations, normal to low leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia and significantly elevated hepatic transaminases were associated with dengue. Enteric fever was associated with loose stools, normal to low leukocyte counts and normal platelet counts. It is imperative to maintain a sound epidemiological database of AFIs so that evidence-based diagnostic criteria and treatment guidelines can be developed. PMID:20870680

  18. Prevalence of patients with acute febrile illnesses and positive dengue NS1 tests in a tertiary hospital in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Asigau, Viola; Lavu, Evelyn K; McBride, William J H; Biloh, Eric; Naroi, Francis; Koana, Egi; Ferguson, John K; Laman, Moses

    2015-01-01

    Because the prevalence of dengue fever in urban settings in Papua New Guinea is unknown, we investigated the presence of dengue using the NS1 antigen test in an outpatient-based prospective observational study at Port Moresby General Hospital. Of 140 patients with acute febrile illnesses, dengue fever was diagnosed in 14.9% (20 of 134; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 9.6-22.4). Malaria (2 of 137; 1.5%; 95% CI = 0.3-5.7), chikungunya (3 of 140; 2.1%; 95% CI = 0.6-6.6), and bacterial bloodstream infections (0 of 80; 0%; 95% CI = 0-5.7) were uncommon. Dengue fever should no longer be considered rare in Papua New Guinea. PMID:25331803

  19. Prospective surveillance study of acute respiratory infections, influenza-like illness and seasonal influenza vaccine in a cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are frequent in children and complications can occur in patients with chronic diseases. We evaluated the frequency and impact of ARI and influenza-like illness (ILI) episodes on disease activity, and the immunogenicity and safety of influenza vaccine in a cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Methods Surveillance of respiratory viruses was conducted in JIA patients during ARI season (March to August) in two consecutive years: 2007 (61 patients) and 2008 (63 patients). Patients with ARI or ILI had respiratory samples collected for virus detection by real time PCR. In 2008, 44 patients were immunized with influenza vaccine. JIA activity index (ACRPed30) was assessed during both surveillance periods. Influenza hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers were measured before and 30-40 days after vaccination. Results During the study period 105 ARI episodes were reported and 26.6% of them were ILI. Of 33 samples collected, 60% were positive for at least one virus. Influenza and rhinovirus were the most frequently detected, in 30% of the samples. Of the 50 JIA flares observed, 20% were temporally associated to ARI. Influenza seroprotection rates were higher than 70% (91-100%) for all strains, and seroconversion rates exceeded 40% (74-93%). In general, response to influenza vaccine was not influenced by therapy or disease activity, but patients using anti-TNF alpha drugs presented lower seroconversion to H1N1 strain. No significant differences were found in ACRPed30 after vaccination and no patient reported ILI for 6 months after vaccination. Conclusion ARI episodes are relatively frequent in JIA patients and may have a role triggering JIA flares. Trivalent split influenza vaccine seems to be immunogenic and safe in JIA patients. PMID:23510667

  20. [Colorectal carcinoma as a cause of acute abdominal illness].

    PubMed

    Lipská, L; Visokai, V; Bergmann, P; Trubac, M; Cech, P; Strupová, L; Levý, M

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (KCR) is the commonest malignancy in male patients and the second commonest in female patients in the Czech Republic. During 1990-2006, 1162 patients with colorectal carcinomas were operated in the FTNsP (Faculty Thomayer Hospital) Surgical Clinic. 212 patients aged between 39 to 94 y.o.a.(the median of 70 y.o.a) were managed urgently for acute abdominal illness. In this group of urgently managed patients, the mortality rate was 17% and the morbidity rate was 38%. Future prospects of any colorectal carcinoma patient with acute abdominal illness depend on the procedure's radicality, which is limited by the overall patient's condition. The preoperative care aims to improve the patient's overall condition to such a degree, to allow for surgery fulfilling principles of oncosurgical radicality. According to this report's data, such urgent surgical procedures do not result in increased mortality or morbidity rates, compared to these in planned procedures, and show the best results in this patient group. PMID:18432070

  1. [Sleep disturbances in critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    Walder, B; Haase, U; Rundshagen, I

    2007-01-01

    Sleep is an essential part of life with many important roles which include immunologic, cognitive and muscular functions. Of the working population 20% report sleep disturbances and in critically ill patients an incidence of more than 50% has been shown. However, sleep disturbances in the intensive care unit (ICU) population have not been investigated in detail. Sleep disturbances in ICU patients have a variety of reasons: e.g. patient-related pathologies like sepsis, acute or chronic pulmonary diseases, cardiac insufficiency, stroke or epilepsy, surgery, therapeutical interventions like mechanical ventilation, noise of monitors, pain or medication. Numerous scales and questionnaires are used to quantify sleep and the polysomnogramm is used to objectify sleep architecture. To improve sleep in ICU patients concepts are needed which include in addition to pharmacological treatment (pain reduction and sedation) synchronization of ICU activities with daylight, noise reduction and music for relaxation. In order to establish evidence-based guidelines, research activities about sleep and critical illness should be intensified. Questions to be answered are: 1) Which part of sleep disturbances in critically ill patients is directly related to the illness or trauma? 2) Is the grade of sleep disturbance correlated with the severity of the illness or trauma? 3) Which part is related to the medical treatment and can be modified or controlled? In order to define non-pharmacological and pharmacological concepts to improve sleep quality, studies need to be randomized and to include different ICU populations. The rate of nosocomial infections, cognitive function and respiratory muscle function should be considered in these studies as well. This will help to answer the question, whether it is useful to monitor sleep in ICU patients as a parameter to indicate therapeutical success and short-term quality of life. Follow-up needs to be long enough to detect adverse effects of

  2. Pilot Study of the Pharmacokinetics of Cefotaxime in Critically Ill Patients with Acute Kidney Injury Treated with Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Koedijk, Joost B; Valk-Swinkels, Corinne G H; Rijpstra, Tom A; Touw, Daan J; Mulder, Paul G H; van der Voort, Peter H J; van 't Veer, Nils E; van der Meer, Nardo J M

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the pharmacokinetics of cefotaxime (CTX) in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) when treated with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in the intensive care unit (ICU). This single-center prospective observational pilot study was performed among ICU-patients with AKI receiving ≥48 h concomitant CRRT and CTX. CTX was administered intravenously 1,000 mg (bolus) every 6 h for 4 days. CRRT was performed as continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH). Plasma concentrations of CTX and its active metabolite desacetylcefotaxime (DAC) were measured during CVVH treatment. CTX plasma levels and patient data were used to construct concentration-time curves. By using this data, the duration of plasma levels above 4 mg/liter (four times the MIC) was calculated and analyzed. Twenty-seven patients were included. The median CTX peak level was 55 mg/liter (range, 19 to 98 mg/liter), the median CTX trough level was 12 mg/liter (range, 0.8 to 37 mg/liter), and the median DAC plasma level was 15 mg/liter (range, 1.5 to 48 mg/liter). Five patients (19%) had CTX plasma levels below 4 mg/liter at certain time points during treatment. In at least 83% of the time any patient was treated with CTX, the CTX plasma level stayed above 4 mg/liter. A dosing regimen of 1,000 mg of CTX given four times daily is likely to achieve adequate plasma levels in patients with AKI treated with CVVH. Dose reduction might be a risk for suboptimal treatment. PMID:27021325

  3. Managing the acutely ill adult with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, Marvelle

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an autosomal recessively inherited condition, affecting the structure of the haemoglobin. SCD is a long-term chronic condition which is manifested by periods of acute painful sickling crisis, known as vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) and is the cause of 90% of sickle cell-related hospital admissions. SCD is one of the most common genetic conditions worldwide and in the UK there are approximately 12,500 people living with it (Streetly et al,1997; Howard et al, 2008), making it more common than cystic fibrosis, yet there still remains many challenges in managing these patients when they become acutely ill. Lack of awareness and understanding of the illness, concerns regarding addiction and limited attention to the psycho-social implications of the illness, leads to less than effective care for this patient group when they are hospitalized. The aims of this article are to outline the pathophysiology of SCD, identify the causes of VOC and discuss the key principles of nursing management for patients experiencing a VOC. PMID:22306637

  4. Hemodynamic variables and progression of acute kidney injury in critically ill patients with severe sepsis: data from the prospective observational FINNAKI study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Knowledge of the association of hemodynamics with progression of septic acute kidney injury (AKI) is limited. However, some recent data suggest that mean arterial pressure (MAP) exceeding current guidelines (60–65 mmHg) may be needed to prevent AKI. We hypothesized that higher MAP during the first 24 hours in the intensive care unit (ICU), would be associated with a lower risk of progression of AKI in patients with severe sepsis. Methods We identified 423 patients with severe sepsis and electronically recorded continuous hemodynamic data in the prospective observational FINNAKI study. The primary endpoint was progression of AKI within the first 5 days of ICU admission defined as new onset or worsening of AKI by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria. We evaluated the association of hemodynamic variables with this endpoint. We included 53724 10-minute medians of MAP in the analysis. We analysed the ability of time-adjusted MAP to predict progression of AKI by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results Of 423 patients, 153 (36.2%) had progression of AKI. Patients with progression of AKI had significantly lower time-adjusted MAP, 74.4 mmHg [68.3-80.8], than those without progression, 78.6 mmHg [72.9-85.4], P < 0.001. A cut-off value of 73 mmHg for time-adjusted MAP best predicted the progression of AKI. Chronic kidney disease, higher lactate, higher dose of furosemide, use of dobutamine and time-adjusted MAP below 73 mmHg were independent predictors of progression of AKI. Conclusions The findings of this large prospective multicenter observational study suggest that hypotensive episodes (MAP under 73 mmHg) are associated with progression of AKI in critically ill patients with severe sepsis. PMID:24330815

  5. Towards the Burden of Human Leptospirosis: Duration of Acute Illness and Occurrence of Post-Leptospirosis Symptoms of Patients in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Straetemans, Masja; Alba, Sandra; Goeijenbier, Marco; van Gorp, Eric C. M.; Boer, Kimberly R.; Wagenaar, Jiri F. P.; Hartskeerl, Rudy A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is a global zoonotic disease. Although important for the assessment of the burden of leptospirosis, data on the duration of the illness and the occurrence of post-leptospirosis complaints are not well documented. Hence the main objective of this study was to estimate the occurrence of persistent complaints and duration of hospital stay in laboratory confirmed leptospirosis patients in the Netherlands during 1985 to 2010. Additionally, several risk factors potentially impacting on the occurrence of post-leptospirosis complaints were investigated. Methods/Principal Findings The duration of the acute phase of leptospirosis was 16 days (IQR 12–23); 10 days (IQR 7–16) were spent hospitalized. Eighteen fatal cases were excluded from this analysis. Complaints of leptospirosis patients by passive case investigations (CPC) derived from files on ambulant consultations occurring one month after hospital discharge, revealed persistent complaints in 108 of 236 (45.8%) laboratory confirmed cases. Data on persistent complaints after acute leptospirosis (PCAC), assessed in 225 laboratory confirmed leptospirosis cases collected through questionnaires during 1985-1993, indicated 68 (30.2%) PCAC cases. Frequently reported complaints included (extreme) fatigue, myalgia, malaise, headache, and a weak physical condition. These complaints prolonged in 21.1% of the cases beyond 24 months after onset of disease. There was no association between post-leptospirosis complaints and hospitalization. However, individuals admitted at the intensive care unit (ICU) were twice as likely to have continuing complaints after discharge adjusting for age and dialysis (OR 2.0 95% CI 0.8-4.8). No significant association could be found between prolongation of complaints and infecting serogroup, although subgroup analysis suggest that infection with serogroups Sejroe (OR 4.8, 95%CI 0.9-27.0) and icterohaemorrhagiae (OR 2.0, 95%CI 0.9-4.3 CI) are more likely to result in CPC than

  6. Multifaceted Intervention to Prevent Venous Thromboembolism in Patients Hospitalized for Acute Medical Illness: A Multicenter Cluster-Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Pierre-Marie; Rachas, Antoine; Meyer, Guy; Le Gal, Grégoire; Durieux, Pierre; El Kouri, Dominique; Honnart, Didier; Schmidt, Jeannot; Legall, Catherine; Hausfater, Pierre; Chrétien, Jean-Marie; Mottier, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Background Misuse of thromboprophylaxis may increase preventable complications for hospitalized medical patients. Objectives To assess the net clinical benefit of a multifaceted intervention in emergency wards (educational lectures, posters, pocket cards, computerized clinical decision support systems and, where feasible, electronic reminders) for the prevention of venous thromboembolism. Patients/Methods Prospective cluster-randomized trial in 27 hospitals. After a pre-intervention period, centers were randomized as either intervention (n = 13) or control (n = 14). All patients over 40 years old, admitted to the emergency room, and hospitalized in a medical ward were included, totaling 1,402 (712 intervention and 690 control) and 15,351 (8,359 intervention and 6,992 control) in the pre-intervention and intervention periods, respectively. Results Symptomatic venous thromboembolism or major bleeding (primary outcome) occurred at 3 months in 3.1% and 3.2% of patients in the intervention and control groups, respectively (adjusted odds ratio: 1.02 [95% confidence interval: 0.78–1.34]). The rates of thromboembolism (1.9% vs. 1.9%), major bleedings (1.2% vs. 1.3%), and mortality (11.3% vs. 11.1%) did not differ between the groups. Between the pre-intervention and intervention periods, the proportion of patients who received prophylactic anticoagulant treatment more steeply increased in the intervention group (from 35.0% to 48.2%: +13.2%) than the control (40.7% to 44.1%: +3.4%), while the rate of adequate thromboprophylaxis remained stable in both groups (52.4% to 50.9%: -1.5%; 49.1% to 48.8%: -0.3%). Conclusions Our intervention neither improved adequate prophylaxis nor reduced the rates of clinical events. New strategies are required to improve thromboembolism prevention for hospitalized medical patients. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01212393 PMID:27227406

  7. Monitoring the microcirculation in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Daniel; Durand, Arthur

    2014-12-01

    Alterations in microvascular perfusion have been identified in critically ill patients, especially in sepsis but also in cardiogenic shock, after cardiac arrest, and in high-risk surgery patients. These alterations seem to be implicated in the development of organ dysfunction and are associated with outcome. Even though microvascular perfusion can sometimes be homogenously decreased as in acute hemorrhage or in non-resuscitated cardiogenic shock, heterogeneity of perfusion is observed in sepsis and in resuscitated hemorrhagic/cardiogenic shock. Heterogeneity of perfusion has major implications for monitoring, as many techniques cannot detect microcirculatory alterations when heterogeneity of flow is present in significant amount. Indeed, devices such as laser Doppler or O2 electrodes and near-infrared spectroscopy have a relatively large sampling volume and measurements are affected by the highest values in the field. Using these techniques during a vascular occlusion test may help to characterize microvascular reactivity; however, microvascular reactivity sometimes fails to represent actual microvascular perfusion. Videomicroscopic techniques can nowadays be applied at bedside but are still restricted to some selected patients (quiet or sedated patients). Tissue PCO2 is an elegant alternative but is not yet broadly used. In this manuscript, we discuss the main advantages and limitations of the techniques available for bedside evaluation of the microcirculation in critically ill patients. PMID:25480773

  8. Acute high-altitude illness: a clinically orientated review

    PubMed Central

    Smedley, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Acute high-altitude illness is an encompassing term for the range of pathology that the unacclimatised individual can develop at increased altitude. This includes acute mountain sickness, high-altitude cerebral oedema and high-altitude pulmonary oedema. These conditions represent an increasing clinical problem as more individuals are exposed to the hypobaric hypoxic environment of high altitude for both work and leisure. In this review of acute high-altitude illness, the epidemiology, risk factors and pathophysiology are explored, before their prevention and treatment are discussed. Appropriate ascent rate remains the most effective acute high-altitude illness prevention, with pharmacological prophylaxis indicated in selected individuals. Descent is the definitive treatment for acute high-altitude illness, with the adjuncts of oxygen and specific drug therapies. PMID:26516505

  9. Determinants of Calcium Infusion Rate During Continuous Veno-venous Hemofiltration with Regional Citrate Anticoagulation in Critically Ill Patients with Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, De-Lin; Huang, Li-Feng; Ma, Wen-Liang; Ding, Qi; Han, Yue; Zheng, Yue; Li, Wen-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is unclear that how to decide the calcium infusion rate during continuous veno-venous hemofiltration (CVVH) with regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA). This study aimed to assess the determinants of calcium infusion rate during CVVH with RCA in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods: A total of 18 patients with AKI requiring CVVH were prospectively analyzed. Postdilution CVVH was performed with a fixed blood flow rate of 150 ml/min and a replacement fluid flow rate of 2000 ml/h for each new circuit. The infusion of 4% trisodium citrate was started at a rate of 29.9 mmol/h prefilter and adjusted according to postfilter ionized calcium. The infusion of 10% calcium gluconate was initiated at a rate of 5.5 mmol/h and adjusted according to systemic ionized calcium. The infusion rate of trisodium citrate and calcium gluconate as well as ultrafiltrate flow rate were recorded at 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 h after starting CVVH, respectively. The calcium loss rate by CVVH was also calculated. Results: Fifty-seven sessions of CVVH were performed in 18 AKI patients. The citrate infusion rate, calcium loss rate by CVVH, and calcium infusion rate were 31.30 (interquartile range: 2.70), 4.60 ± 0.48, and 5.50 ± 0.35 mmol/h, respectively. The calcium infusion rate was significantly higher than that of calcium loss rate by CVVH (P < 0.01). The correlation coefficient between the calcium and citrate infusion rates, and calcium infusion and calcium loss rates by CVVH was −0.031 (P > 0.05) and 0.932 (P < 0.01), respectively. In addition, calcium infusion rate (mmol/h) = 1.77 + 0.8 × (calcium loss rate by CVVH, mmol/h). Conclusions: The calcium infusion rate correlates significantly with the calcium loss rate by CVVH but not with the citrate infusion rate in a fixed blood flow rate during CVVH with RCA. PMID:27411455

  10. Development and validation of the Thai version of the 4 ‘A’s Test for delirium screening in hospitalized elderly patients with acute medical illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Kuladee, Sanchai; Prachason, Thanavadee

    2016-01-01

    Background The English version of the 4 ‘A’s Test (4AT) is a rapid screening tool for delirium with a high sensitivity and specificity among hospitalized elderly patients. Objective To develop the Thai version of the 4AT (4AT-T) and assess its validity. Subjects and setting A total of 97 elderly patients aged 60 years or above who were admitted to the general medical wards were included. Methods Both authors independently translated the English version of the 4AT into Thai and thereafter developed a single reconciled forward translation by consensus. Back translation was performed by a bilingual native English speaker and it was then reviewed to ensure its agreement with the original one. After 24 hours of admission, subjects were enrolled and clinical data collected. Definite diagnosis of delirium was made by a psychiatrist using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, Text-Revision criteria and the 6-item Thai Delirium Rating Scale; the 4AT was then administered to participants by nurses within 30 minutes. A 4AT score ≥4 was considered positive for delirium screening. The optimal cut-off point of the 4AT-T was identified by Youden’s index. Results In all, 24 out of 97 participants met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, Text-Revision criteria for delirium. At a cut-off score of 4 or greater, the 4AT-T exhibited satisfactory diagnostic performance with a sensitivity of 83.3% (95% confidence interval (CI): 62.6%–95.3%) and specificity of 86.3% (95% CI: 76.3%–93.2%). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.92. The specified score provided maximal Youden’s index, suggesting an optimal criterion value for delirium screening. Conclusion The 4AT-T is a valid delirium-screening instrument for hospitalized elderly patients with acute medical illnesses. PMID:26966365

  11. Predictive value of an abnormal hepatobiliary scan in patients with severe intercurrent illness

    SciTech Connect

    Kalff, V.; Froelich, J.W.; Lloyd, R.; Thrall, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    Ten patients had severe intercurrent illness and the gallbladder could not be seen on a hepatobiliary scan. In 4, surgery and pathological examination showed that the gallbladder was normal; 1 had chronic cholecystitis and 5 had acute acalculous cholecystitis. This study indicates that a positive hepatobiliary scan may not be indicative of acute gallbladder disease in the seriously ill patient.

  12. Chikungunya as a Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Southern Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; Akoroda, Ufuoma; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Devasiri, Vasantha; Kodikaarachchi, Wasantha; Strouse, John J.; Chua, Robert; Hou, Yan'an; Chow, Angelia; Sessions, October M.; Østbye, Truls; Gubler, Duane J.; Woods, Christopher W.; Bodinayake, Champica

    2013-01-01

    Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) re-emerged in Sri Lanka in late 2006 after a 40-year hiatus. We sought to identify and characterize acute chikungunya infection (CHIK) in patients presenting with acute undifferentiated febrile illness in unstudied rural and semi-urban southern Sri Lanka in 2007. Methodology/Principal Findings We enrolled febrile patients ≥ 2 years of age, collected uniform epidemiologic and clinical data, and obtained serum samples for serology, virus isolation, and real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Serology on paired acute and convalescent samples identified acute chikungunya infection in 3.5% (28/797) patients without acute dengue virus (DENV) infection, 64.3% (18/28) of which were confirmed by viral isolation and/or real-time RT-PCR. No CHIKV/DENV co-infections were detected among 54 patients with confirmed acute DENV. Sequencing of the E1 coding region of six temporally distinct CHIKV isolates (April through October 2007) showed that all isolates posessed the E1-226A residue and were most closely related to Sri Lankan and Indian isolates from the same time period. Except for more frequent and persistent musculoskeletal symptoms, acute chikungunya infections mimicked DENV and other acute febrile illnesses. Only 12/797 (1.5%) patients had serological evidence of past chikungunya infection. Conclusions/Significance Our findings suggest CHIKV is a prominent cause of non-specific acute febrile illness in southern Sri Lanka. PMID:24312651

  13. Pediatric Acute Q Fever Mimics Other Common Childhood Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Ingeborg Y.; Schabos, Yvonne; van Hout, Roeland W. N. M.; Leenders, Alexander C. A. P.; de Vries, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of Q fever has increased over the last decades, but research has mainly focused on adults. Data in children are scarce, and current knowledge is mostly based on case reports. The aim of this study was to determine predictors for acute Q fever in children in the general population. We retrospectively studied all children tested for Coxiella burnetii by serology and/or PCR upon request of their general practitioner in the regional laboratory for Medical Microbiology of the Jeroen Bosch during the Q fever outbreak in the Netherlands between 2007 and 2011. A total of 1061 patients was analyzed. Influenza-like illness and respiratory tract infection were the most common presentations of acute Q fever, mimicking other common childhood illnesses. None of the reported symptoms was significantly related to a positive test outcome and therefore presenting signs or symptoms have no predictive value in diagnosing Q-fever in children. Only diagnostic tests are reliable. As the infection generally follows a mild and uncomplicated course, we question if the difficulty of recognizing pediatric Q fever is a problem worth solving. PMID:24520412

  14. From data patterns to mechanistic models in acute critical illness.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Jean-Marie; Haddad, Wassim M; An, Gary; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2014-08-01

    The complexity of the physiologic and inflammatory response in acute critical illness has stymied the accurate diagnosis and development of therapies. The Society for Complex Acute Illness was formed a decade ago with the goal of leveraging multiple complex systems approaches to address this unmet need. Two main paths of development have characterized the society's approach: (i) data pattern analysis, either defining the diagnostic/prognostic utility of complexity metrics of physiologic signals or multivariate analyses of molecular and genetic data and (ii) mechanistic mathematical and computational modeling, all being performed with an explicit translational goal. Here, we summarize the progress to date on each of these approaches, along with pitfalls inherent in the use of each approach alone. We suggest that the next decade holds the potential to merge these approaches, connecting patient diagnosis to treatment via mechanism-based dynamical system modeling and feedback control and allowing extrapolation from physiologic signals to biomarkers to novel drug candidates. As a predicate example, we focus on the role of data-driven and mechanistic models in neuroscience and the impact that merging these modeling approaches can have on general anesthesia. PMID:24768566

  15. Pediatric acute Q fever mimics other common childhood illnesses.

    PubMed

    Bart, Ingeborg Y; Schabos, Yvonne; van Hout, Roeland W N M; Leenders, Alexander C A P; de Vries, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of Q fever has increased over the last decades, but research has mainly focused on adults. Data in children are scarce, and current knowledge is mostly based on case reports. The aim of this study was to determine predictors for acute Q fever in children in the general population. We retrospectively studied all children tested for Coxiella burnetii by serology and/or PCR upon request of their general practitioner in the regional laboratory for Medical Microbiology of the Jeroen Bosch during the Q fever outbreak in the Netherlands between 2007 and 2011. A total of 1061 patients was analyzed. Influenza-like illness and respiratory tract infection were the most common presentations of acute Q fever, mimicking other common childhood illnesses. None of the reported symptoms was significantly related to a positive test outcome and therefore presenting signs or symptoms have no predictive value in diagnosing Q-fever in children. Only diagnostic tests are reliable. As the infection generally follows a mild and uncomplicated course, we question if the difficulty of recognizing pediatric Q fever is a problem worth solving. PMID:24520412

  16. Drug Use during Acute Illness in Tigray Region, Northern Ethiopia: A Household Study

    PubMed Central

    Wondimu, Abrham; Molla, Fantahun; Abrha, Solomon; Mohammed, Jemal; Demeke, Birhanu; Eticha, Tadele; Assen, Admassu; Melkam, Wondim; Gebre-Samuel, Naod; Berhe, Derbew Fikadu; Tadese, Ebisa; Endris, Kedir

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug use study in the community enables health authorities to understand pattern of drug utilization and its related aspects. This, in turn, can help to develop rational drug policies to be harmonized in accordance to the need of the community. Objective The aim of this study was to assess drug use during acute illness by the general population in Tigray region, Northern Ethiopia. Method A community based cross-sectional study was undertaken in April 2013 in Tigray Region, Ethiopia. A total of 1034 households were interviewed in the study. A multi-stage sampling technique was used to select households. Data were collected using a pre-tested structured questionnaire. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and bivariate and multivariate logistic regression model. Results Out of 1000 households, 210(21%) reported an episode of acute illness. The prevalence of acute illnesses in rural areas 126(25%) (AOR = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.21–2.76) was significantly higher than that of urban areas 84(17%). Cough, runny nose, sore throat, earache, fever and headache added up to 155(52%) of all reported symptoms of acute illnesses. The majority of the patients 162 (77%) took modern medications for the managements of their diseases. Half 105(50%) of the consumed medications were antibiotics. The large proportions 173(83%) of medicines for acute illness were taken orally. The greater proportions 150(93%) of medications were prescribed by health professionals. Thirty-four households (21%) reported treatment discontinuation. Conclusion The prevalence of acute illnesses in this study was found to be 21%. Acute illnesses were more common in rural areas than urban areas. Antibiotics were the most frequently used drugs for acute illnesses. PMID:26658645

  17. Common complications in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Wollschlager, C M; Conrad, A R; Khan, F A

    1988-05-01

    Patients in intensive care units (ICUs) are subject to many complications connected with the advanced therapy required for their serious illnesses. Complications of ventilatory support include problems associated with short-term and long-term intubation, barotrauma, gastrointestinal tract bleeding, and weaning errors. Cardiac tachyarrhythmias can arise from a patient's intrinsic cardiac disease, as well as from drug therapy itself. Hemodynamic monitoring is crucial to careful patient management, but it is associated with technical complications during insertion such as pneumothorax, as well as interpretive errors such as those caused by positive end-inspiratory pressure. Acute renal failure can develop as a result both of therapy with drugs such as aminoglycosides and hypotension of many etiologies, as well as the use of contrast media. Nosocomial infection, which is a dreaded complication in ICU patients, usually arises from sources in the urinary tract, bloodstream, or lung. Complications frequently can arise if the interactions of drugs commonly used in the ICU are not recognized. Further, the ICU patient is subject to nutritional complications, acid base problems, and psychological disturbances. This monograph deals with the frequency, etiology, and prevention of these common ICU complications. PMID:3286162

  18. The Use of Acute Peritoneal Dialysis in Critically Ill Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Ustyol, Lokman; Peker, Erdal; Demir, Nihat; Agengin, Kemal; Tuncer, Oguz

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the efficacy, complications, and mortality rate of acute peritoneal dialysis (APD) in critically ill newborns. Material/Methods The study included 31 newborns treated in our center between May 2012 and December 2014. Results The mean birth weight, duration of peritoneal dialysis, and gestational age of the patients were determined as 2155.2±032.2 g (580–3900 g), 4 days (1–20 days), and 34 weeks (24–40 weeks), respectively. The main reasons for APD were sepsis (35.5%), postoperative cardiac surgery (16%), hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (13%), salting of the newborn (9.7%), congenital metabolic disorders (6.1%), congenital renal diseases (6.5%), nonimmune hydrops fetalis (6.5%), and acute kidney injury (AKI) due to severe dehydration (3.2%). APD-related complications were observed in 48.4% of the patients. The complications encountered were catheter leakages in nine patients, catheter obstruction in three patients, peritonitis in two patients, and intestinal perforation in one patient. The general mortality rate was 54.8%, however, the mortality rate in premature newborns was 81.3%. Conclusions APD can be an effective, simple, safe, and important therapy for renal replacement in many neonatal diseases and it can be an appropriate treatment, where necessary, for newborns. Although it may cause some complications, they are not common. However, it should be used carefully, especially in premature newborns who are vulnerable and have a high mortality risk. The recommendation of APD therapy in such cases needs to be verified by further studies in larger patient populations. PMID:27121012

  19. Shoshin Beriberi in Critically-Ill patients: case series.

    PubMed

    Dabar, George; Harmouche, Carine; Habr, Bassem; Riachi, Moussa; Jaber, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    Thiamine plays a fundamental role in cellular metabolism. The classical syndrome caused by thiamine deficiency is beriberi, and its fulminant variant, once considered an uncommon finding, is now encountered among the critically ill.We present a case series of four critically ill non-septic non-alcoholic patients with severe lactic acidosis and refractory cardio-circulatory collapse caused by acute fulminant beriberi, which drastically responded to thiamine administration.In critical care settings, increased awareness of this life-threatening but reversible condition is a requirement, especially among patients receiving parenteral nutrition and those with unexplained recalcitrant lactic acidosis. PMID:25982313

  20. Dancing Around Death: Hospitalist-Patient Communication About Serious Illness

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Wendy G.; Kools, Susan; Lyndon, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    Hospital physicians care for most seriously ill patients in the United States. We employed dimensional analysis to describe communication about death and dying in audio-recorded admission encounters between seriously ill patients and hospitalists. Acknowledging or not acknowledging the possibility of dying emerged as a key process. Acknowledgment was rare, and depended on synergistic communication behaviors between patient and physician. Facilitators included patients cuing for information and disclosing emotional distress, and physicians exploring the patient’s understanding of his or her illness and emotional distress. When hospitalists focused on acute issues, stated that they were awaiting test results, and deferred to other physicians, discussion moved away from acknowledgment. Meaningful discussion of end-of-life issues, including goals and values, fears about death and dying, prognosis, and options for palliative care followed open acknowledgment. This acknowledgment process can serve as a guide for providers to sensitively and honestly discuss essential end-of-life issues. PMID:23034778

  1. Pain management in critically ill obese patients.

    PubMed

    Astle, Sonia M

    2009-09-01

    Achieving pain control in critically ill patients is a challenging problem for the health care team, which becomes more challenging in morbidly obese patients. Obese patients may experience drug malabsorption and distribution, which may lead to either subtherapeutic or toxic drug levels. To manage pain effectively for the critically ill obese patient, nurses must have an understanding of how obesity alters a patient's physiologic response to injury and illness. In addition, nurses must be knowledgeable about physiologic pain mechanisms, types and manifestations of pain, differing patterns of drug absorption and distribution, pharmacokinetic properties of analgesic medications, and pain management strategies. This article explores factors affecting pharmacokinetics in obese patients, trends in pain management, and treatment strategies for the obese patient. PMID:19840712

  2. Optimization of psychopharmacotherapy for schizophrenia in a male, locked, non-acute unit serving for persistently ill patients over one year.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takefumi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Tsunoda, Kenichi; Ishizuki, Tomomi; Mimura, Masaru

    2015-07-30

    We describe real-world psychopharmacological treatment in a Japanese, male, closed psychiatric unit where clozapie was still unavailable. Fifty-five persistently-ill patients with schizophrenia (ICD-10), mean ± S.D. age: 57.5 ± 13.0 y.o., duration of illness and admissions: 30.9 ± 15.2 years and 20.7 ± 14.5 years, respectively) treated longitudinally were evaluated. The rule was to treat with a simplest possible psychotropic regimen without polypharmacy. Compared to the baseline, the number and dose of antipsychotics were reduced from 1.9 to 1.1 and 1012 mg/day to 607 mg/day, respectively. The number of total psychotropics was minimized from 4.7 to 2.1, with a simplified once or twice daily dosing. Overall, the CGI-Severity and FACT-Sz (global functioning) improved slightly from 5.8 to 5.5 and 28.7 to 32.6, respectively. Of note, no patients got worse in comparison with the baseline clinical presentation. Forty-four patients were successfully treated with a single antipsychotic; only seven needed two antipsychotics simultaneously while 36 had been treated with antipsychotic polypharmacy at baseline. Benzodiazepines (mostly lorazepam) and antiparkinsonian drugs were prescribed in 28 and only two, respectively. Nineteen needed adjunctive valproate (average blood levels: 99.3 ± 21.8 μg/mL) and nine used lithium (0.61 ± 0.26 mEq/L). Optimization of psychopharmacotherapy is still possible for difficult-to-treat patients and, while augmentation of an antipsychotic with mood stabilizers is frequently needed, antipsychotic polypharmacy should be exceptional. PMID:25935376

  3. The devil is in the detail: Acute Guillain–Barré syndrome camouflaged as neurosarcoidosis in a critically ill patient admitted to an Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Sarada, Pooja Prathapan; Sundararajan, Krishnaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute demyelinating polyneuropathy, usually evoked by antecedent infection. Sarcoidosis is a multisystem chronic granulomatous disorder with neurological involvement occurring in a minority. We present a case of a 43-year-old Caucasian man who presented with acute ascending polyradiculoneuropathy with a recent diagnosis of pulmonary sarcoidosis. The absence of acute flaccid paralysis excluded a clinical diagnosis of GBS in the first instance. Subsequently, a rapid onset of proximal weakness with multi-organ failure led to the diagnosis of GBS, which necessitated intravenous immunoglobulin and plasmapheresis to which the patient responded adequately, and he was subsequently discharged home. Neurosarcoidosis often masquerades as other disorders, leading to a diagnostic dilemma; also, the occurrence of a GBS-like clinical phenotype secondary to neurosarcoidosis may make diagnosing coexisting GBS a therapeutic challenge. This article not only serves to exemplify the rare association of neurosarcoidosis with GBS but also highlights the need for a high index of clinical suspicion for GBS and accurate history taking in any patient who may present with rapidly progressing weakness to an Intensive Care Unit. PMID:27303139

  4. The devil is in the detail: Acute Guillain-Barré syndrome camouflaged as neurosarcoidosis in a critically ill patient admitted to an Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Sarada, Pooja Prathapan; Sundararajan, Krishnaswamy

    2016-04-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute demyelinating polyneuropathy, usually evoked by antecedent infection. Sarcoidosis is a multisystem chronic granulomatous disorder with neurological involvement occurring in a minority. We present a case of a 43-year-old Caucasian man who presented with acute ascending polyradiculoneuropathy with a recent diagnosis of pulmonary sarcoidosis. The absence of acute flaccid paralysis excluded a clinical diagnosis of GBS in the first instance. Subsequently, a rapid onset of proximal weakness with multi-organ failure led to the diagnosis of GBS, which necessitated intravenous immunoglobulin and plasmapheresis to which the patient responded adequately, and he was subsequently discharged home. Neurosarcoidosis often masquerades as other disorders, leading to a diagnostic dilemma; also, the occurrence of a GBS-like clinical phenotype secondary to neurosarcoidosis may make diagnosing coexisting GBS a therapeutic challenge. This article not only serves to exemplify the rare association of neurosarcoidosis with GBS but also highlights the need for a high index of clinical suspicion for GBS and accurate history taking in any patient who may present with rapidly progressing weakness to an Intensive Care Unit. PMID:27303139

  5. Providing care for critically ill surgical patients: challenges and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Tisherman, Samuel A; Kaplan, Lewis; Gracias, Vicente H; Beilman, Gregory J; Toevs, Christine; Byrnes, Matthew C; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2013-07-01

    Providing optimal care for critically ill and injured surgical patients will become more challenging with staff shortages for surgeons and intensivists. This white paper addresses the historical issues behind the present situation, the need for all intensivists to engage in dedicated critical care per the intensivist model, and the recognition that intensivists from all specialties can provide optimal care for the critically ill surgical patient, particularly with continuing involvement by the surgeon of record. The new acute care surgery training paradigm (including trauma, surgical critical care, and emergency general surgery) has been developed to increase interest in trauma and surgical critical care, but the number of interested trainees remains too few. Recommendations are made for broadening the multidisciplinary training and practice opportunities in surgical critical care for intensivists from all base specialties and for maintaining the intensivist model within acute care surgery practice. Support from academic and administrative leadership, as well as national organizations, will be needed. PMID:23754675

  6. Postoperative hospital course of patients with history of severe psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S; McCartney, J R; Saravay, S M; Katz, E

    1987-09-01

    The postoperative hospital course of 54 patients with a past history of psychiatric illness was studied through chart review. Both chronic schizophrenics and chronic depressives tolerated surgical procedures well, without any unusual difficulties or exacerbation of psychiatric illness. They represented no management problems. Patients with acute, severe upset in the preoperative period (regardless of diagnosis) presented most of the management problems postoperatively. PMID:3678811

  7. [Patients' University, illness and learning].

    PubMed

    Tourette-Turgis, Catherine

    2015-10-01

    The Patients' University, a pilot project at the Université Pierre et Marie Curie, in Paris, enables patients-experts to follow a degree program in patient therapeutic education (University Diploma and Master). Recently, graduate patients and patients directly concerned proposed to co-create a new university certificate for treatment pathway coordinators for breast cancer, rounding out the 120-hour university certificate program on healthcare democracy and meeting the recommendations of the new cancer plan. PMID:26455618

  8. Patient Education for the Mentally Ill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Louise Harding

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the philosophy of the rehabilitation services department at McLean Hospital on patient education for the mentally ill, noting patient library collection and recommended resources on marital problems, sex education, drug manuals, and diagnostic and research findings. A list of magazines subscribed to, color code classification, and 23…

  9. Introduction to drug pharmacokinetics in the critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian S; Yogaratnam, Dinesh; Levasseur-Franklin, Kimberly E; Forni, Allison; Fong, Jeffrey

    2012-05-01

    Despite regular use of drugs for critically ill patients, overall data are limited regarding the impact of critical illness on pharmacokinetics (PK). Designing safe and effective drug regimens for patients with critical illness requires an understanding of PK. This article reviews general principles of PK, including absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination, and how critical illness can influence these parameters. In the area of drug absorption, we discuss the impact of vasopressor use, delayed gastric emptying and feeding tubes, and nutrient interactions. On the topic of drug distribution, we review fluid resuscitation, alterations in plasma protein binding, and tissue perfusion. With drug metabolism, we discuss hepatic enzyme activity, protein binding, and hepatic blood flow. Finally, we review drug elimination in the critically ill patient and discuss the impact of augmented renal clearance and acute kidney injury on drug therapies. In each section, we highlight select literature reviewing the PK impact of these conditions on a drug PK profile and, where appropriate, provide general suggestions for clinicians on how to modify drug regimens to manage PK challenges. PMID:22553267

  10. Measurement of sleep in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Richards, K C; O'Sullivan, P S; Phillips, R L

    2000-01-01

    Research to evaluate interventions to promote sleep in critically ill patients has been restricted by the lack of brief, inexpensive outcome measures. This article describes the development and testing of an instrument to measure sleep in critically ill patients. A convenience sample of 70 alert, oriented, critically ill males was studied using polysomnography (PSG), the gold standard for sleep measurement, for one night. In the morning the patients completed the Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire (RCSQ), a five-item visual analog scale. Internal consistency reliability of the RCSQ was .90 and principal components factor analysis revealed a single factor (Eigenvalue = 3.61, percent variance = 72.2). The RCSQ total score accounted for approximately 33% of the variance in the PSG indicator sleep efficiency index (p < .001). The data provide support for the reliability and validity of the RCSQ. PMID:11227580

  11. Intention to Receive Influenza Vaccine After an Acute Respiratory Illness

    PubMed Central

    Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Balasubramani, G. K.; Schaffer, Mallory; Lieberman, Rhett H.; Eng, Heather; Kyle, Shakala; Wisniewski, Stephen; Zimmerman, Richard K.; Middleton, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of symptoms and presence of confirmed influenza on intention to receive an influenza vaccine, specifically in patients recovering from a medically-attended acute (≤ 7 days’ duration) respiratory illness (ARI). Methods During the 2013–2014 influenza season, individuals seeking outpatient care for an ARI that included cough were tested for influenza using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays (PCR) and completed surveys. Children (6 months–18 years) and adults (≥ 18 years) were grouped by their combined current season’s influenza vaccination status (vaccinated/not vaccinated) and their vaccination intentions for next season (intend/do not intend). Results Forty-one percent (323/786) were unvaccinated at enrollment, of whom nearly half (151/323) intended to be vaccinated next season. When adjusting for demographic, health and other factors, unvaccinated individuals who intended to be vaccinated next season were approximately 1.5 times more likely to have PCR-confirmed influenza compared with vaccinated individuals who intended to be vaccinated next season. Conclusion The combined experience of not being vaccinated against influenza and seeking medical attention for an ARI seemed to influence approximately one-half of unvaccinated participants to consider influenza vaccination for next season. PMID:26018106

  12. [COMMUNICATION WITH TERMINALLY ILL PATIENT].

    PubMed

    2014-12-01

    The communication is a essential therapeutic instrument in every process of relationship in the team patient-family, and mainly in the transmission of bad news. The communication is not just a simple transmission of information. It is a process whose goal is to enable the adaptation of the patient and family to their actual situation and where the "what", "how" and "how much do you want to know", are belonged to the own patient. Along this article, we will expose some thoughts that the team has to take into account when informing the patient. We are going to explain the SPIKES protocol, or its Spanish version EPICEE. 6-step protocol, based on those recommended by the experts to deliver bad news procedures. And finally we'll talk about the conspiracy of silence, one of the most common and difficult situations to handle in day to day due to paternalism by professionals and families, in which they prefer to hide the situation to the patient, thinking it's the best for him. PMID:26121886

  13. Prognosis for long-term survival and renal recovery in critically ill patients with severe acute renal failure: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Bagshaw, Sean M; Laupland, Kevin B; Doig, Christopher J; Mortis, Garth; Fick, Gordon H; Mucenski, Melissa; Godinez-Luna, Tomas; Svenson, Lawrence W; Rosenal, Tom

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Severe acute renal failure (sARF) is associated with considerable morbidity, mortality and use of healthcare resources; however, its precise epidemiology and long-term outcomes have not been well described in a non-specified population. Methods Population-based surveillance was conducted among all adult residents of the Calgary Health Region (population 1 million) admitted to multidisciplinary and cardiovascular surgical intensive care units between May 1 1999 and April 30 2002. Clinical records were reviewed and outcome at 1 year was assessed. Results sARF occurred in 240 patients (11.0 per 100,000 population/year). Rates were highest in males and older patients (≥65 years of age). Risk factors for development of sARF included previous heart disease, stroke, pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, cancer, connective tissue disease, chronic renal dysfunction, and alcoholism. The annual mortality rate was 7.3 per 100,000 population with rates highest in males and those ≥65 years. The 28-day, 90-day, and 1-year case-fatality rates were 51%, 60%, and 64%, respectively. Increased Charlson co-morbidity index, presence of liver disease, higher APACHE II score, septic shock, and need for continuous renal replacement therapy were independently associated with death at 1 year. Renal recovery occurred in 78% (68/87) of survivors at 1 year. Conclusion sARF is common and males, older patients, and those with underlying medical conditions are at greatest risk. Although the majority of patients with sARF will die, most survivors will become independent from renal replacement therapy within a year. PMID:16280066

  14. Medical illness in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Goldman, L S

    1999-01-01

    Research into the relationship between physical illness and schizophrenia has revealed that patients with schizophrenia may be at decreased risk for certain disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and allergies, but at increased risk for others, including substance abuse and polydipsia. Although such knowledge may ultimately help determine the underlying causes of schizophrenia, the principal concern of practicing clinicians should be to diagnose and treat medical comorbidity in individual patients. Nearly 50% of patients with schizophrenia have a comorbid medical condition, but many of these illnesses are misdiagnosed or undiagnosed. A fragmented health care system, lack of access to care, patient inability to clearly appreciate or describe a medical problem, and patient reluctance to discuss such problems all contribute to the lack of attention to medical problems in patients with schizophrenia. Psychiatrists and primary care practitioners who treat patients with schizophrenia should make an effort to uncover medical illnesses by using a structured interview or routine physical examination whenever a patient is seen for care. PMID:10548136

  15. [Hyperprolactinemia in mentally ill patients].

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Manuel Maria de; Góis, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Hyperprolactinemia is a common, but neglected, adverse effect of conventional antipschycotics and of some of the atypical antipshycotics. It occurs in almost 42% of men and in 75% of women with schizophrenia who are treated with prolactin-raising antipshycotics, even though it has aroused minimal interest within the scientific community when compared with extra-pyramidal effects. Conventional antipsychotics and some of the atypical antipsychotics, such as risperidone, paliperidone, amisulpride and zotepine, are frequently associated with the raise in prolactin plasma levels. Because of this increment in prolactin secretion, they are usually known as prolactin-raising antipshycotics. On the contrary, some of the atypical antipsychotics, such as clozapine, quetiapine, olanzapine, aripiprazole and ziprazidone, have a minimal or no significant effect in prolactin levels, being known as prolactin-sparing antipsychotics. Hyperprolactinemia clinical symptoms include gynaecomastia, galactorrhoea, menstrual irregularities, infertility, sexual dysfunction, acne and hirsutism. Some of these symptoms are due to the prolactin direct action in body tissues, while a couple of them can be due to a hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis dysregulation mediated by the elevation of prolactin. Some studies seem to point the evidence of an association between hyperprolactinemia and long-term consequences, such as bone mineral density decrement and breast cancer. However, these results must be confirmed through further studies. Antipsychotic treatment is the most common cause of hyperprolactinemia in psychiatric patients. However, the evidence of a prolactin increased plasma level demands the differential diagnosis with other pathologies, such as hyphotalamic and pituitary neoplasic disease. The management of a patient with antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia must be adapted to each patient and it may include a reduction in the dosage of the offending antipsychotic, switching to a

  16. Management of Infections in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hranjec, Tjasa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Critically ill patients have an increased risk of developing infections and infectious complications, sometimes followed by death. Despite a substantial investment of resources in outcomes improvement, optimum treatment for such patients remains unclear for practicing intensivists. Methods: We conducted a review that highlights the most recent developments in the prevention, diagnosis, and management of infection and the evaluation of its outcomes. The review examines the prevention of infection, such as through daily bathing with chlorhexidine and the addition of probiotics to treatment regimens, and questions the previous standards of care, including the monitoring of gastric residuals and treatment of severely ill patients with drotrecogin alfa (activated). It also discusses novel approaches to the treatment of severely ill infected patients with extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation and the earlier normalization of body temperature. Results: The development of new antibiotics continues at a slow pace, with the likelihood that alternative approaches to the management of infection, including changes in the quality of patient care, are producing needed improvements. Conclusions: Clinical outcomes of infection are improving slowly as medical teams strive for better patient care. Lack of reimbursement is unnecessary as a punitive approach to infectious diseases. PMID:24841214

  17. Communication with older, seriously ill patients.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, Liesbeth M; Lindenberger, Elizabeth; van Weert, Julia C M

    2015-05-01

    This article describes effective communication strategies in caring for older, seriously ill patients and their surrogates/caregivers. Specific skills in three core functions are highlighted: (i) empathic communication (ii) information provision and (iii) enabling decision making. Empathy skills include using 'NURSE' statements and assuring a continuous relationship. Tailored information and empathic communication can be used to facilitate information processing and overcome age-related communication barriers. Eliciting patients' goals of care is critical in decision making. Surrogates need assistance when making decisions for patients and often themselves have support and information needs. Suggestions are made to ensure patients' and caregivers' needs are met. PMID:25920057

  18. Is albumin administration in the acutely ill associated with increased mortality? Results of the SOAP study

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Sakr, Yasser; Reinhart, Konrad; Sprung, Charles L; Gerlach, Herwig; Ranieri, V Marco

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Albumin administration in the critically ill has been the subject of some controversy. We investigated the use of albumin solutions in European intensive care units (ICUs) and its relationship to outcome. Methods In a cohort, multicenter, observational study, all patients admitted to one of the participating ICUs between 1 May and 15 May 2002 were followed up until death, hospital discharge, or for 60 days. Patients were classified according to whether or not they received albumin at any time during their ICU stay. Results Of 3,147 admitted patients, 354 (11.2%) received albumin and 2,793 (88.8%) did not. Patients who received albumin were more likely to have cancer or liver cirrhosis, to be surgical admissions, and to have sepsis. They had a longer length of ICU stay and a higher mortality rate, but were also more severely ill, as manifested by higher simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores than the other patients. A Cox proportional hazard model indicated that albumin administration was significantly associated with decreased 30-day survival. Moreover, in 339 pairs matched according to a propensity score, ICU and hospital mortality rates were higher in the patients who had received albumin than in those who had not (34.8 versus 20.9% and 41.3 versus 27.7%, respectively, both p < 0.001). Conclusion Albumin administration was associated with decreased survival in this population of acutely ill patients. Further prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to examine the effects of albumin administration in sub-groups of acutely ill patients. PMID:16356223

  19. Effects of acute critical illnesses on the performance of interferon-gamma release assay

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Ta; Ruan, Sheng-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Kuo, Ping-Hung; Ku, Shih-Chi; Lee, Pei-Lin; Kuo, Lu-Cheng; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Huang, Chun-Kai; Yang, Ching-Yao; Chien, Ying-Chun; Wang, Jann-Yuan; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Performance of interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) is influenced by preanalytical, laboratory and host factors. The data regarding how critical illnesses influence IGRA results are limited. This study aimed to investigate IGRA performance among critically ill patients. Patients admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) were prospectively enrolled, and underwent QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube testing on admission and discharge. The associations between patient factors and IGRA results were explored. In total, 118 patients were included. IGRA results on admission were positive, negative and indeterminate for 10(9%), 36(31%) and 72(61%) patients. All indeterminate results were due to a low mitogen response. Indeterminate results were associated with higher disease severity and lower serum albumin levels. Ninety(76%) patients survived to ICU discharge and had repeat IGRA testing 13.3 ± 10.1 days after first ones. Of those, 43(48%) had indeterminate results, and no IGRA conversion or reversion was observed. The majority (35/51, 69%) of ICU survivors with initial indeterminate results still had indeterminates on follow-up testing. Acute critical illnesses exert a significant impact on IGRA performance and a high proportion of indeterminate results was seen in ICU patients. This study highlights limitation of IGRAs in the critically ill and judicious selection of patients to be tested should be considered. PMID:26804487

  20. Effects of acute critical illnesses on the performance of interferon-gamma release assay.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Ta; Ruan, Sheng-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Kuo, Ping-Hung; Ku, Shih-Chi; Lee, Pei-Lin; Kuo, Lu-Cheng; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Huang, Chun-Kai; Yang, Ching-Yao; Chien, Ying-Chun; Wang, Jann-Yuan; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Performance of interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) is influenced by preanalytical, laboratory and host factors. The data regarding how critical illnesses influence IGRA results are limited. This study aimed to investigate IGRA performance among critically ill patients. Patients admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) were prospectively enrolled, and underwent QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube testing on admission and discharge. The associations between patient factors and IGRA results were explored. In total, 118 patients were included. IGRA results on admission were positive, negative and indeterminate for 10 (9%), 36 (31%) and 72 (61%) patients. All indeterminate results were due to a low mitogen response. Indeterminate results were associated with higher disease severity and lower serum albumin levels. Ninety (76%) patients survived to ICU discharge and had repeat IGRA testing 13.3 ± 10.1 days after first ones. Of those, 43 (48%) had indeterminate results, and no IGRA conversion or reversion was observed. The majority (35/51, 69%) of ICU survivors with initial indeterminate results still had indeterminates on follow-up testing. Acute critical illnesses exert a significant impact on IGRA performance and a high proportion of indeterminate results was seen in ICU patients. This study highlights limitation of IGRAs in the critically ill and judicious selection of patients to be tested should be considered. PMID:26804487

  1. Bleeding complications in critically ill patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jaeyoung; Choi, Sun Mi; Yu, Su Jong; Park, Young Sik; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Min; Yim, Jae-Joon; Yoo, Chul-Gyu; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Lee, Jinwoo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Patients with liver cirrhosis (LC) are at risk for critical events leading to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission. Coagulopathy in cirrhotic patients is complex and can lead to bleeding as well as thrombosis. The aim of this study was to investigate bleeding complications in critically ill patients with LC admitted to a medical ICU (MICU). Methods: All adult patients admitted to our MICU with a diagnosis of LC from January 2006 to December 2012 were retrospectively assessed. Patients with major bleeding at the time of MICU admission were excluded from the analysis. Results: A total of 205 patients were included in the analysis. The median patient age was 62 years, and 69.3% of the patients were male. The most common reason for MICU admission was acute respiratory failure (45.4%), followed by sepsis (27.3%). Major bleeding occurred in 25 patients (12.2%). The gastrointestinal tract was the most common site of bleeding (64%), followed by the respiratory tract (20%). In a multivariate analysis, a low platelet count at MICU admission (odds ratio [OR], 0.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97 to 0.99) and sepsis (OR, 8.35; 95% CI, 1.04 to 67.05) were independent risk factors for major bleeding. The ICU fatality rate was significantly greater among patients with major bleeding (84.0% vs. 58.9%, respectively; p = 0.015). Conclusions: Major bleeding occurred in 12.2% of critically ill cirrhotic patients admitted to the MICU. A low platelet count at MICU admission and sepsis were associated with an increased risk of major bleeding during the MICU stay. Further study is needed to better understand hemostasis in critically ill patients with LC. PMID:26805633

  2. Working as a doctor when acutely ill: comments made by doctors responding to United Kingdom surveys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Fay; Goldacre, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives We undertook multi-purpose surveys of doctors who qualified in the United Kingdom between 1993 and 2012. Doctors were asked specific questions about their careers and were asked to comment about any aspect of their training or work. We report doctors’ comments about working whilst acutely ill. Design Self-completed questionnaire surveys. Setting United Kingdom. Participants Nine cohorts of doctors, comprising all United Kingdom medical qualifiers of 1993, 1996, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2005, 2008, 2009 and 2012. Main outcome measures Comments made by doctors about working when ill, in surveys one, five and 10 years after graduation. Results The response rate, overall, was 57.4% (38,613/67,224 doctors). Free-text comments were provided by 30.7% (11,859/38,613). Three-hundred and twenty one doctors (2.7% of those who wrote comments) wrote about working when feeling acutely ill. Working with Exhaustion/fatigue was the most frequent topic raised (195 doctors), followed by problems with Taking time off for illness (112), and general comments on Physical/mental health problems (66). Other topics raised included Support from others, Leaving or adapting/coping with the situation, Bullying, the Doctor’s ability to care for patients and Death/bereavement. Arrangements for cover due to illness were regarded as insufficient by some respondents; some wrote that doctors were expected to work harder and longer to cover for colleagues absent because of illness. Conclusions We recommend that employers ensure that it is not unduly difficult for doctors to take time off work when ill, and that employers review their strategies for covering ill doctors who are off work. PMID:27066264

  3. Reversing oliguria in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    DePriest, J

    1997-09-01

    Oliguria is a common occurrence in the ICU setting. In patients with preserved renal function, fluid challenges or low doses of diuretics are generally successful. In patients with oliguric renal failure, it is still essential to ensure adequate intravascular fluid volume, especially in critically ill patients. Loop diuretics remain the mainstay of treatment. When diuretic resistance is encountered, physicians should consider further optimization of hemodynamics, alternative loop diuretics, and combined drug therapy. In some cases, continuous renal replacement therapy can be very effective. Yet, while these interventions can help reduce the morbidity of severe volume overload, they have not been shown to improve mortality rates. PMID:9300031

  4. [Role of anidulafungin in critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    Borges Sá, Márcio; Garnacho Montero, José

    2008-12-01

    The most frequent invasive fungal infections in critically ill patients are invasive candidiasis, among which is candidemia. In the last few years, these infections have become more common in intensive care units (ICU), including those produced by species other than Candida albicans. This phenomenon may lead to the development of species resistant to antifungal agents. To start the most appropriate treatment, early diagnosis of the infection is essential, which would reduce empirical antibiotic treatment and increase the proportion of advanced or directed antibiotic therapy. Given the poor reliability of the available diagnostic techniques, new strategies are currently being employed in the ICU, such as the use of scores to evaluate the presence of fungal infections. The therapeutic arsenal against these infections has been increased and the introduction of anidulafungin represents the addition of a highly appropriate drug for the treatment of invasive candidiasis in immunocompetent critically ill patients. PMID:19572433

  5. Physiology in Medicine: A physiologic approach to prevention and treatment of acute high-altitude illnesses.

    PubMed

    Luks, Andrew M

    2015-03-01

    With the growing interest in adventure travel and the increasing ease and affordability of air, rail, and road-based transportation, increasing numbers of individuals are traveling to high altitude. The decline in barometric pressure and ambient oxygen tensions in this environment trigger a series of physiologic responses across organ systems and over a varying time frame that help the individual acclimatize to the low oxygen conditions but occasionally lead to maladaptive responses and one or several forms of acute altitude illness. The goal of this Physiology in Medicine article is to provide information that providers can use when counseling patients who present to primary care or travel medicine clinics seeking advice about how to prevent these problems. After discussing the primary physiologic responses to acute hypoxia from the organ to the molecular level in normal individuals, the review describes the main forms of acute altitude illness--acute mountain sickness, high-altitude cerebral edema, and high-altitude pulmonary edema--and the basic approaches to their prevention and treatment of these problems, with an emphasis throughout on the physiologic basis for the development of these illnesses and their management. PMID:25539941

  6. Unsuspected Leptospirosis Is a Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; Wunder, Elsio A.; Miles, Jeremy J.; Flom, Judith E.; Mayorga, Orlando; Woods, Christopher W.; Ko, Albert I.; Dumler, J. Stephen; Matute, Armando J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemic severe leptospirosis was recognized in Nicaragua in 1995, but unrecognized epidemic and endemic disease remains unstudied. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine the burden of and risk factors associated with symptomatic leptospirosis in Nicaragua, we prospectively studied patients presenting with fever at a large teaching hospital. Epidemiologic and clinical features were systematically recorded, and paired sera tested by IgM-ELISA to identify patients with probable and possible acute leptospirosis. Microscopic Agglutination Test and PCR were used to confirm acute leptospirosis. Among 704 patients with paired sera tested by MAT, 44 had acute leptospirosis. Patients with acute leptospirosis were more likely to present during rainy months and to report rural residence and fresh water exposure. The sensitivity of clinical impression and acute-phase IgM detected by ELISA were poor. Conclusions/Significance Leptospirosis is a common (6.3%) but unrecognized cause of acute febrile illness in Nicaragua. Rapid point-of-care tests to support early diagnosis and treatment as well as tests to support population-based studies to delineate the epidemiology, incidence, and clinical spectrum of leptospirosis, both ideally pathogen-based, are needed. PMID:25058149

  7. Bilateral Diaphragmatic Paralysis in a Patient With Critical Illness Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Chen, Hung-Chen; Lin, Meng-Chih; Liaw, Mei-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis (BDP) manifests as respiratory muscle weakness, and its association with critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP) was rarely reported. Here, we present a patient with BDP related to CIP, who successfully avoided tracheostomy after diagnosis and management. A 71-year-old male presented with acute respiratory failure after sepsis adequately treated. Repeated intubation occurred because of carbon dioxide retention after each extubation. After eliminating possible factors, septic shock-induced respiratory muscle weakness was suspected. Physical examination, a nerve conduction study, and chest ultrasound confirmed our impression. Pulmonary rehabilitation and reconditioning exercises were arranged, and the patient was discharged with a diagnosis of BDP. The diagnosis of BDP is usually delayed, and there are only sporadic reports on its association with polyneuropathy, especially in patients with preserved limb muscle function. Therefore, when physicians encounter patients that are difficult to wean from mechanical ventilation, CIP associated with BDP should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26252301

  8. Forearm and upper-arm oscillometric blood pressure comparison in acutely ill adults.

    PubMed

    Schell, Kathleen; Morse, Kate; Waterhouse, Julie K

    2010-04-01

    When patients' upper arms are not accessible and/or when cuffs do not fit large upper arms, the forearm site is often used for blood pressure (BP) measurement. The purpose of this study is to compare forearm and upper-arm BPs in 70 acutely ill adults, admitted to a community hospital's 14-bed ICU. Using Philips oscillometric monitors, three repeated measures of forearm and upper-arm BPs are obtained with head of bed flat and with head of bed elevated at 30 degrees. Arms are resting on the bed. Paired t tests show statistically significant differences in systolic BPs, diastolic BPs, and mean arterial pressures in the supine and head-elevated positions. Bland-Altman analyses indicate that forearm and upper-arm oscillometric BPs are not interchangeable in acutely ill adults. PMID:20581399

  9. Immunoinflammatory Response in Critically Ill Patients: Severe Sepsis and/or Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Nada; Djordjevic, Dragan

    2013-01-01

    Immunoinflammatory response in critically ill patients is very complex. This review explores some of the new elements of immunoinflammatory response in severe sepsis, tumor necrosis factor-alpha in severe acute pancreatitis as a clinical example of immune response in sepsis, immune response in severe trauma with or without secondary sepsis, and genetic aspects of host immuno-inflammatory response to various insults in critically ill patients. PMID:24371374

  10. Asthmatics with exacerbation during acute respiratory illness exhibit unique transcriptional signatures within the nasal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory illness is the leading cause of asthma exacerbations yet the mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear. To address the deficiencies in our understanding of the molecular events characterizing acute respiratory illness-induced asthma exacerbations, we undertook a transcriptional profiling study of the nasal mucosa over the course of acute respiratory illness amongst individuals with a history of asthma, allergic rhinitis and no underlying respiratory disease. Methods Transcriptional profiling experiments were performed using the Agilent Whole Human Genome 4X44K array platform. Time point-based microarray and principal component analyses were conducted to identify and distinguish acute respiratory illness-associated transcriptional profiles over the course of our study. Gene enrichment analysis was conducted to identify biological processes over-represented within each acute respiratory illness-associated profile, and gene expression was subsequently confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results We found that acute respiratory illness is characterized by dynamic, time-specific transcriptional profiles whose magnitudes of expression are influenced by underlying respiratory disease and the mucosal repair signature evoked during acute respiratory illness. Most strikingly, we report that people with asthma who experience acute respiratory illness-induced exacerbations are characterized by a reduced but prolonged inflammatory immune response, inadequate activation of mucosal repair, and the expression of a newly described exacerbation-specific transcriptional signature. Conclusion Findings from our study represent a significant contribution towards clarifying the complex molecular interactions that typify acute respiratory illness-induced asthma exacerbations. PMID:24433494

  11. Hyperglycemia and acute kidney injury in critically ill children

    PubMed Central

    Gordillo, Roberto; Ahluwalia, Tania; Woroniecki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyperglycemia and acute kidney injury (AKI) are common in critically ill children and have been associated with higher morbidity and mortality. The incidence of AKI in children is difficult to estimate because of the lack of a standard definition for AKI. The pediatric RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, and End-stage kidney disease) criteria can be used to define AKI in children. Various biomarkers in urine and blood have been studied to detect AKI in critically ill children. However, it is not clear whether hyperglycemia is associated with AKI. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of hyperglycemia on kidney function and its effect on neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in children. Methods We studied retrospective and prospective cohorts of pediatric critically ill subjects admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). We analyzed data from admission that included estimated glomerular filtration rate, plasma and urine NGAL, serum glucose and peak glycemia (highest glycemia during PICU admission), and length of hospital and PICU stay from two different institutions. Results We found that the prevalence of hyperglycemia was 89% in the retrospective cohort and 86% in the prospective cohort, P=0.99. AKI was associated with peak glycemia, P=0.03. There was a statistically significant correlation between peak glycemia and hospital and PICU stays, P=<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively. Urine NGAL and plasma NGAL were not statistically different in subjects with and without hyperglycemia, P=0.99 and P=0.85, respectively. Subjects on vasopressors had lower estimated glomerular filtration rate and higher glycemia, P=0.01 and P=0.04, respectively. Conclusion We conclude that in critically ill children, hyperglycemia is associated with AKI and longer PICU stays. PMID:27601931

  12. Use of Platelet Indices for Determining Illness Severity and Predicting Prognosis in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Cui, Yun-Liang; Diao, Meng-Yuan; Chen, Deng-Chang; Lin, Zhao-Fen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Decreased platelet (PLT) count is one of the independent risk factors for mortality in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. This study was to investigate the relationship between PLT indices and illness severity and their performances in predicting hospital mortality. Methods: Adult patients who admitted to ICU of Changzheng Hospital from January 2011 to September 2012 and met inclusion criteria were included in this study. Univariate analysis was used to identify potential independent risk factors for mortality. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to calculate adjusted odds ratio for mortality in patients with normal or abnormal PLT indices. The relationship between PLT indices and illness severity were assessed by the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scores or sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores in patients with normal and abnormal PLT indices. The performances of PLT indices in predicting mortality were assessed by receiver operating curves and diagnostic parameters. The survival curves between patients with normal and abnormal PLT indices were compared using Kaplan–Meier method. Results: From January 2011 to September 2012, 261 of 361 patients (204 survivors and 57 nonsurvivors) met the inclusion criteria. After adjustment for clinical variables, PLT count <100 × 1012/L (P = 0.011), plateletcrit (PCT) <0.108 (P = 0.002), mean platelet volume (MPV) >11.3 fL (P = 0.023) and platelet distribution width (PDW) percentage >17% (P = 0.009) were identified as independent risk factors for mortality. The APACHE II and SOFA scores were 14.0 (9.0–20.0) and 7.0 (5.0–10.5) in the “low PLT” tertile, 13.0 (8.0–16.0) and 7.0 (4.0–11.0) in the “low PCT” tertile, 14.0 (9.3–19.0) and 7.0 (4.0–9.8) in the “high MPV” tertile, 14.0 (10.5–20.0) and 7.0 (5.0–11.0) in the “high PDW” tertile, all of which were higher than those in patients with normal indices. Patients with decreased PLT

  13. Hypercalcemia in critically ill surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Forster, J; Querusio, L; Burchard, K W; Gann, D S

    1985-01-01

    Critical surgical illness, commonly accompanied by shock, sepsis, multiple transfusions, and renal failure, is usually associated with low total calcium and/or low or normal ionized calcium. A seminal case of hypercalcemia in a surgical intensive care unit (SICU) patient prompted the review of 100 patients with longer than average SICU days (greater than 12) to determine the incidence, associated factors, and possible etiologies of this condition. Ten patients had elevated measured, and five others had elevated calculated, ionized calcium (5.9 +/- 0.25 mg%), an incidence of 15%. Compared to the 85 patients who did not develop hypercalcemia, this population had a significantly higher frequency of the following: renal failure, dialysis, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) usage greater than 21 days, bacteremic days greater than 1, transfusions greater than 24 units, shock greater than 1 day, SICU days greater than 36, and antibiotics used greater than 7. In addition, this group had significantly more days of hypocalcemia early in their hospital course. There was no difference in sex, age, mortality, or incidence of respiratory failure. Two patients studied in depth had renal failure requiring dialysis and no malignancy, milk-alkali syndrome, hyperthyroidism, or hypoadrenalism. Parathormone (PTH) concentrations were high normal or elevated (N terminal 20 and 21 pg/ml; C terminal 130 microliters Eq/ml and 1009 pg/ml) at the time of elevated calcium (total 9.2 to 14.6 mg%; ionized 4.9 to 8.2 mg%). Immobilization does not increase PTH. In renal failure, PTH elevation is a consequence of hypocalcemia rather than hypercalcemia. Moreover, five patients did not have renal failure. Shock, sepsis, and multiple transfusions containing citrate may lower total and/or ionized calcium and thus stimulate PTH secretion. Whatever the mechanism, approximately 15% of critically ill surgical patients develop hypercalcemia, which may represent a new form of hyperparathyroidism. PMID:3931594

  14. Optimizing antimicrobial therapy in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Vitrat, Virginie; Hautefeuille, Serge; Janssen, Cécile; Bougon, David; Sirodot, Michel; Pagani, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Critically ill patients with infection in the intensive care unit (ICU) would certainly benefit from timely bacterial identification and effective antimicrobial treatment. Diagnostic techniques have clearly improved in the last years and allow earlier identification of bacterial strains in some cases, but these techniques are still quite expensive and not readily available in all institutions. Moreover, the ever increasing rates of resistance to antimicrobials, especially in Gram-negative pathogens, are threatening the outcome for such patients because of the lack of effective medical treatment; ICU physicians are therefore resorting to combination therapies to overcome resistance, with the direct consequence of promoting further resistance. A more appropriate use of available antimicrobials in the ICU should be pursued, and adjustments in doses and dosing through pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have recently shown promising results in improving outcomes and reducing antimicrobial resistance. The aim of multidisciplinary antimicrobial stewardship programs is to improve antimicrobial prescription, and in this review we analyze the available experiences of such programs carried out in ICUs, with emphasis on results, challenges, and pitfalls. Any effective intervention aimed at improving antibiotic usage in ICUs must be brought about at the present time; otherwise, we will face the challenge of intractable infections in critically ill patients in the near future. PMID:25349478

  15. Optimizing antimicrobial therapy in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Vitrat, Virginie; Hautefeuille, Serge; Janssen, Cécile; Bougon, David; Sirodot, Michel; Pagani, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Critically ill patients with infection in the intensive care unit (ICU) would certainly benefit from timely bacterial identification and effective antimicrobial treatment. Diagnostic techniques have clearly improved in the last years and allow earlier identification of bacterial strains in some cases, but these techniques are still quite expensive and not readily available in all institutions. Moreover, the ever increasing rates of resistance to antimicrobials, especially in Gram-negative pathogens, are threatening the outcome for such patients because of the lack of effective medical treatment; ICU physicians are therefore resorting to combination therapies to overcome resistance, with the direct consequence of promoting further resistance. A more appropriate use of available antimicrobials in the ICU should be pursued, and adjustments in doses and dosing through pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have recently shown promising results in improving outcomes and reducing antimicrobial resistance. The aim of multidisciplinary antimicrobial stewardship programs is to improve antimicrobial prescription, and in this review we analyze the available experiences of such programs carried out in ICUs, with emphasis on results, challenges, and pitfalls. Any effective intervention aimed at improving antibiotic usage in ICUs must be brought about at the present time; otherwise, we will face the challenge of intractable infections in critically ill patients in the near future. PMID:25349478

  16. Nitrogen Balance and Protein Requirements for Critically Ill Older Patients.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Roland N

    2016-01-01

    Critically ill older patients with sarcopenia experience greater morbidity and mortality than younger patients. It is anticipated that unabated protein catabolism would be detrimental for the critically ill older patient. Healthy older subjects experience a diminished response to protein supplementation when compared to their younger counterparts, but this anabolic resistance can be overcome by increasing protein intake. Preliminary evidence suggests that older patients may respond differently to protein intake than younger patients during critical illness as well. If sufficient protein intake is given, older patients can achieve a similar nitrogen accretion response as younger patients even during critical illness. However, there is concern among some clinicians that increasing protein intake in older patients during critical illness may lead to azotemia due to decreased renal functional reserve which may augment the propensity towards worsened renal function and worsened clinical outcomes. Current evidence regarding protein requirements, nitrogen balance, ureagenesis, and clinical outcomes during nutritional therapy for critically ill older patients is reviewed. PMID:27096868

  17. Nitrogen Balance and Protein Requirements for Critically Ill Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Roland N.

    2016-01-01

    Critically ill older patients with sarcopenia experience greater morbidity and mortality than younger patients. It is anticipated that unabated protein catabolism would be detrimental for the critically ill older patient. Healthy older subjects experience a diminished response to protein supplementation when compared to their younger counterparts, but this anabolic resistance can be overcome by increasing protein intake. Preliminary evidence suggests that older patients may respond differently to protein intake than younger patients during critical illness as well. If sufficient protein intake is given, older patients can achieve a similar nitrogen accretion response as younger patients even during critical illness. However, there is concern among some clinicians that increasing protein intake in older patients during critical illness may lead to azotemia due to decreased renal functional reserve which may augment the propensity towards worsened renal function and worsened clinical outcomes. Current evidence regarding protein requirements, nitrogen balance, ureagenesis, and clinical outcomes during nutritional therapy for critically ill older patients is reviewed. PMID:27096868

  18. Tobacco use treatment in primary care patients with psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Cerimele, Joseph M; Halperin, Abigail C; Saxon, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of smoking is higher in patients with psychiatric illness compared with the general population. Smoking causes chronic illnesses, which lead to premature mortality in those with psychiatric illness, is associated with greater burden of psychiatric symptoms, and contributes to the social isolation experienced by individuals with psychiatric disorders. Most patients with a psychiatric illness present initially to primary care rather than specialty care settings, and some patients receive care exclusively in the primary care setting. Therefore, family physicians and other primary care clinicians have an important role in the recognition and treatment of tobacco use disorders in patients with psychiatric illnesses. In this article we review common myths associated with smoking and psychiatric illness, techniques for implementing evidence-based tobacco use treatments, the evidence base for tobacco use treatment for patients with specific psychiatric diagnoses, and factors to consider when treating tobacco use disorders in patients with psychiatric illness. PMID:24808119

  19. Nutritional Assessment in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hejazi, Najmeh; Mazloom, Zohreh; Zand, Farid; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Amini, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition is an important factor in the survival of critically ill patients. The purpose of the present study was to assess the nutritional status of patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) on the days of admission and discharge via a detailed nutritional assessment. Methods: Totally, 125 patients were followed up from admission to discharge at 8ICUs in Shiraz, Iran. The patients’ nutritional status was assessed using subjective global assessment (SGA), anthropometric measurements, biochemical indices, and body composition indicators. Diet prescription and intake was also evaluated. Results: Malnutrition prevalence significantly increased on the day of discharge (58.62%) compared to the day of admission (28.8%) according to SGA (P<0.001). The patients’ weight, mid-upper-arm circumference, mid-arm muscle circumference, triceps skinfold thickness, and calf circumference decreased significantly as well (P<0.001). Lean mass weight and body cell mass also decreased significantly (P<0.001). Biochemical indices showed no notable changes except for magnesium, which decreased significantly (P=0.013). A negative significant correlation was observed between malnutrition on discharge day and anthropometric measurements. Positive and significant correlations were observed between the number of days without enteral feeding, days delayed from ICU admission to the commencement of enteral feeding, and the length of ICU stay and malnutrition on discharge day. Energy and protein intakes were significantly less than the prescribed diet (26.26% and 26.48%, respectively). Conclusion: Malnutrition on discharge day increased in the patients in the ICU according to SGA. Anthropometric measurements were better predictors of the nutritional outcome of our critically ill patients than were biochemical tests. PMID:27217600

  20. Nutritional support in critically ill patients.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, J P

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The author reviews the newer nutritional substrates in use or under investigation for enteral and parenteral nutrition. Management of the critically ill patient remains a significant challenge to clinicians, and it is hoped that dietary manipulations, such as those outlined, may augment host barriers and immune function and improve survival. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The role of nutrition in patient well-being has long been recognized, but until the past 25 years, the technology to artificially provide nutrients when patients could not eat was not developed. With current, new methods for enteral and vascular access, patients can be fed nonvolitionally with little difficulty. Continued efforts have been directed toward identifying optimal feeding formulations, which have resulted in a multitude of commercially available products. In the past several years, attention has been turned to evaluation of four specialized nutrients and the use of other substrates as pharmacologic agents. METHODS: Pertinent laboratory and clinical data were reviewed to present the pros and cons for each nutritive substrate. CONCLUSIONS: Medium-chain fatty acids, branched-chain amino acids, and glutamine have been shown to be of clinical benefit and should be in common use in the near future. Short-chain fatty acids still are under investigation. Albumin, vitamins E and C, arginine, glutamine, and omega-3 fatty acids show great promise as pharmacologic agents to manipulate the stress response. Nucleotides remain investigational. CONTENTS SUMMARY: The application of some new nutritional substrates for use in critically ill patients, both as caloric sources and as pharmacologic agents, are reviewed. PMID:7979608

  1. Infections in critically ill burn patients.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, F; Mas, D; Rubio, M; Garcia-Hierro, P

    2016-04-01

    Severe burn patients are one subset of critically patients in which the burn injury increases the risk of infection, systemic inflammatory response and sepsis. The infections are usually related to devices and to the burn wound. Most infections, as in other critically ill patients, are preceded by colonization of the digestive tract and the preventative measures include selective digestive decontamination and hygienic measures. Early excision of deep burn wound and appropriate use of topical antimicrobials and dressings are considered of paramount importance in the treatment of burns. Severe burn patients usually have some level of systemic inflammation. The difficulty to differentiate inflammation from sepsis is relevant since therapy differs between patients with and those without sepsis. The delay in prescribing antimicrobials increases morbidity and mortality. Moreover, the widespread use of antibiotics for all such patients is likely to increase antibiotic resistance, and costs. Unfortunately the clinical usefulness of biomarkers for differential diagnosis between inflammation and sepsis has not been yet properly evaluated. Severe burn injury induces physiological response that significantly alters drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. These alterations impact antimicrobials distribution and excretion. Nevertheless the current available literature shows that there is a paucity of information to support routine dose recommendations. PMID:27013315

  2. Serious Mental Illness and Acute Hospital Readmission in Diabetic Patientsa

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Jennifer S.; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Goldberg, Richard; Langenberg, Patricia; Day, Hannah R.; Morgan, Daniel J.; Comer, Angela C.; Harris, Anthony D.; Furuno, Jon P.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with serious mental illness (SMI), particularly those with other chronic illnesses, may be vulnerable to unplanned hospital readmission. We hypothesized that SMI would be associated with increased 30-day hospital readmission in a cohort of adult patients with comorbid diabetes admitted to a tertiary-care facility from 2005–2009. SMI was defined by ICD-9 discharge diagnosis codes for schizophrenia, schizo-affective, bipolar, manic, or major depressive disorders, or other psychosis. The primary outcome was 30-day readmission to the index hospital. Among 26,878 eligible admissions, prevalence of SMI was 6% and incidence of 30-day hospital admission was 16%. Among patients aged <35 years, SMI was significantly associated with decreased odds of 30-day hospital readmission (OR 0.39, 95% CI: 0.17, 0.91). However, among patients ≥35 years, SMI was not significantly associated with 30-day hospital readmission (OR 1.11, 95%CI: 0.86, 1.42). SMI may not be associated with increased odds of 30-day hospital readmission in this population. PMID:22539798

  3. Evaluating illness representations in heart transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Janelle, Caroline; O'Connor, Kieron; Dupuis, Gilles

    2016-09-01

    The aim was to see whether qualitative analysis improved quantitative measurement of illness perception after heart transplant. Two methods of evaluating illness representations were compared: one quantitative (administration of the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised) and one qualitative (phenomenological reduction). The qualitative analysis provided greater insight into the idiosyncratic and dynamic nature of the concept of illness representations. Adjustments to the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised are suggested to improve the evaluation of illness perception in terms of dispersion of scores, emotional impact, coping strategies and treatment, and social support, and ultimately to enhance interventions designed to promote treatment compliance. PMID:25626700

  4. Plasticity of the Systemic Inflammatory Response to Acute Infection during Critical Illness: Development of the Riboleukogram

    PubMed Central

    Burykin, Anton; Ruan, Jianhua; Li, Qing; Schierding, William; Lin, Nan; Dixon, David; Zhang, Weixiong; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Dunne, W. Michael; Colonna, Marco; Ghosh, Bijoy K.; Cobb, J. Perren

    2008-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of acute infection in the critically ill remains a challenge. We hypothesized that circulating leukocyte transcriptional profiles can be used to monitor the host response to and recovery from infection complicating critical illness. Methodology/Principal Findings A translational research approach was employed. Fifteen mice underwent intratracheal injections of live P. aeruginosa, P. aeruginosa endotoxin, live S. pneumoniae, or normal saline. At 24 hours after injury, GeneChip microarray analysis of circulating buffy coat RNA identified 219 genes that distinguished between the pulmonary insults and differences in 7-day mortality. Similarly, buffy coat microarray expression profiles were generated from 27 mechanically ventilated patients every two days for up to three weeks. Significant heterogeneity of VAP microarray profiles was observed secondary to patient ethnicity, age, and gender, yet 85 genes were identified with consistent changes in abundance during the seven days bracketing the diagnosis of VAP. Principal components analysis of these 85 genes appeared to differentiate between the responses of subjects who did versus those who did not develop VAP, as defined by a general trajectory (riboleukogram) for the onset and resolution of VAP. As patients recovered from critical illness complicated by acute infection, the riboleukograms converged, consistent with an immune attractor. Conclusions/Significance Here we present the culmination of a mouse pneumonia study, demonstrating for the first time that disease trajectories derived from microarray expression profiles can be used to quantitatively track the clinical course of acute disease and identify a state of immune recovery. These data suggest that the onset of an infection-specific transcriptional program may precede the clinical diagnosis of pneumonia in patients. Moreover, riboleukograms may help explain variance in the host response due to differences in ethnic background, gender, and

  5. Access to medicines for acute illness in middle income countries in Central America

    PubMed Central

    Emmerick, Isabel Cristina Martins; Luiza, Vera Lucia; Camacho, Luiz Antonio Bastos; Ross-Degnan, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the main predictors of access to medicines for persons who experienced acute health conditions. METHODS This was a cross-sectional analytic study, based on data from household surveys. We examined the predictors of: (1) seeking care for acute illness in the formal health care system and (2) obtaining all medicines sought for the acute condition. RESULTS The significant predictors of seeking health care for acute illnesses were urban geographic location, head of household with secondary school education or above, age under 15, severity of illness perceived by the respondent, and having health insurance. The most important predictor of obtaining full access to medicines was seeking care in the formal health care system. People who sought care in the formal system were three times more likely to receive all the medicines sought (OR 3.0, 95%CI 2.3;4.0). For those who sought care in the formal health system, the strongest predictors of full access to medicines were seeking care in the private sector, having secondary school education or above, and positive perceptions of quality of health care and medicines in public sector health facilities. For patients who did not seek care in the formal health system, full access to medicines was more likely in Honduras or Nicaragua than in Guatemala. Urban geographic location, higher economic status, and male gender were also significant predictors. CONCLUSIONS A substantial part of the population in these three countries sought and obtained medicines outside of the formal health care system, which may compromise quality of care and pose a risk to patients. Determinants of full access to medicines inside and outside the formal health care system differ, and thus may require different strategies to improve access to medicines.  PMID:24626545

  6. Can nutrition support interfere with recovery from acute critical illness?

    PubMed

    Schulman, Rifka C; Mechanick, Jeffrey I

    2013-01-01

    Malnutrition, following critical illness-related metabolic and immune neuroendocrine derangements, is exacerbated by energy and protein deficits beginning early in the intensive care unit (ICU) stay. While nutrition support is an important component of ICU care, adverse effects can occur. Underfeeding, due to insufficient energy and/or protein is associated with poor patient outcomes. Overfeeding carbohydrates, lipids, and/or protein can result in hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hepatic dysfunction, and/or azotemia. Individualization of the nutritional prescription with clinical monitoring and repeated adjustment is necessary to avoid harm. Appropriate use of tight glycemic control protocols in combination with nutrition support can prevent hyperglycemia, while minimizing glycemic variability and hypoglycemic events. While the enteral route is favored for nutrition support, early supplemental parenteral nutrition should be considered in selected high-risk patients. Thus, risk stratification of patients upon admission to the ICU can be helpful to design individualized nutritional prescriptions maximizing benefit while avoiding potential interference with recovery. PMID:23075588

  7. Adaptation to different noninvasive ventilation masks in critically ill patients*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Renata Matos; Timenetsky, Karina Tavares; Neves, Renata Cristina Miranda; Shigemichi, Liane Hirano; Kanda, Sandra Sayuri; Maekawa, Carla; Silva, Eliezer; Eid, Raquel Afonso Caserta

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify which noninvasive ventilation (NIV) masks are most commonly used and the problems related to the adaptation to such masks in critically ill patients admitted to a hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: An observational study involving patients ≥ 18 years of age admitted to intensive care units and submitted to NIV. The reason for NIV use, type of mask, NIV regimen, adaptation to the mask, and reasons for non-adaptation to the mask were investigated. RESULTS: We evaluated 245 patients, with a median age of 82 years. Acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use (in 71.3%). Total face masks were the most commonly used (in 74.7%), followed by full face masks and near-total face masks (in 24.5% and 0.8%, respectively). Intermittent NIV was used in 82.4% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to the mask was found in 76% of the patients. Masks had to be replaced by another type of mask in 24% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to total face masks and full face masks was found in 75.5% and 80.0% of the patients, respectively. Non-adaptation occurred in the 2 patients using near-total facial masks. The most common reason for non-adaptation was the shape of the face, in 30.5% of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: In our sample, acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use, and total face masks were the most commonly used. The most common reason for non-adaptation to the mask was the shape of the face, which was resolved by changing the type of mask employed. PMID:24068269

  8. Pathophysiology of airway colonization in critically ill COPD patient.

    PubMed

    Nseir, Saad; Ader, Florence; Lubret, Rémy; Marquette, Charles-Hugo

    2011-04-01

    Although noninvasive ventilation (NIV) use in severe acute exacerbation of COPD has substantially reduced the need for intubation, an important number of COPD patients still are mechanically ventilated through a tracheal tube in the ICU. Intubation is a major risk factor for lower respiratory tract colonization (LRTC) in ICU patients. Other risk factors for LRTC include colonization of the oral cavity, nasopharynx, and gastric content. Aspiration of contaminated oropharyngeal secretions is increased by supine position, underinflation of tracheal cuff, coma, and sedation. Tracheal tube biofilm formation plays an important role as a reservoir for microorganisms. Reduced cough reflex, altered mucocilliary clearance, hypersecretion and retention of mucus are frequent in COPD patients. In addition, malnutrition and corticosteroid use are common in this population resulting in altered cellular, and humoral immunity and higher risk for LRTC. Incidence of LRTC varies from 22-95% of intubated patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most frequently isolated microorganism at day 3 after intubation in COPD patients. LRTC is a major risk factor for ventilator-associated pneumonia, which is associated with increased mortality and morbidity in ICU patients. Several measures could be suggested to reduce LRTC in critically ill COPD patients. NIV use in severe acute exacerbations reduces the need for intubation. In addition, the early use of NIV averts respiratory failure after extubation and could reduce the duration of invasive mechanical ventilation. Other measures might be efficient in preventing LRTC such as semirecumbent position, avoidance of gastric distension, polyurethane-cuffed tracheal tubes, silver-coated tracheal tubes, subglottic aspiration, and continuous control of cuff pressure. Further studies should determine the impact of preventive measures aiming at preventing LRTC on outcome of COPD patients requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation in the ICU. PMID

  9. Acute gastrointestinal illness in two Inuit communities: burden of illness in Rigolet and Iqaluit, Canada.

    PubMed

    Harper, S L; Edge, V L; Ford, J; Thomas, M K; Pearl, D L; Shirley, J; McEwen, S A

    2015-10-01

    Food- and waterborne disease is thought to be high in some Canadian Indigenous communities; however, the burden of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) is not well understood due to limited availability and quality of surveillance data. This study estimated the burden of community-level self-reported AGI in the Inuit communities of Rigolet, Nunatsiavut, and Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada. Cross-sectional retrospective surveys captured information on AGI and potential environmental risk factors. Multivariable logistic regression models identified potential AGI risk factors. The annual incidence of AGI ranged from 2·9-3·9 cases/person per year in Rigolet and Iqaluit. In Rigolet, increased spending on obtaining country foods, a homeless person in the house, not visiting a cabin recently, exposure to puppies, and alternative sources of drinking water were associated with increased odds of AGI. In Iqaluit, eating country fish often, exposure to cats, employment status of the person responsible for food preparation, not washing the countertop with soap after preparing meat, a homeless person in the house, and overcrowding were associated with increased odds of AGI. The results highlight the need for systematic data collection to better understand and support previously anecdotal indications of high AGI incidence, as well as insights into unique AGI environmental risk factors in Indigenous populations. PMID:25697261

  10. Acute respiratory failure in scrub typhus patients

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Jyoti Narayan; Gurjar, Mohan; Harde, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure is a serious complication of scrub typhus. In this prospective study, all patients with a diagnosis of scrub typhus were included from a single center Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory, and imaging parameters of these patients at the time of ICU admission were compared. Of the 55 scrub typhus patients, 27 (49%) had an acute respiratory failure. Seventeen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome, and ten had cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Respiratory supported patients were older had significant chronic lungs disease and high severity illness scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score). At ICU admission, these patients presented with more deranged laboratory markers, including high bilirubin, high creatine kinase, high lactate, metabolic acidosis, low serum albumin, and presence of ascites. The average ICU and hospital stay were 4.27 ± 2.74 and 6.53 ± 3.52 days, respectively, in the respiratory supported group. Three patients died in respiratory failure group, while only one patient died in nonrespiratory failure group.

  11. The chronic illness problem inventory: problem-oriented psychosocial assessment of patients with chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Kames, L D; Naliboff, B D; Heinrich, R L; Schag, C C

    1984-01-01

    Two studies are presented which describe the development of a problem-oriented psychosocial screening instrument for use in health care settings. Reliability and validity data are presented on the Chronic Illness Problem Inventory (CIPI) which demonstrate its ability to document accurately patient's specific problems in areas of physical limitations, psychosocial functioning, health care behaviors and marital adjustment. A study is also presented which compares the problems of patients with three distinct chronic illnesses: pain, obesity, and respiratory ailments. Results indicate a significantly greater severity of problems for pain patients and especially patients with multiple pain complaints. Problem areas common to all three illness groups are discussed in the context of providing better comprehensive treatment for chronically ill patients. PMID:6735596

  12. Zuclopenthixol acetate for acute schizophrenia and similar serious mental illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Jayakody, Kaushadh; Gibson, Roger Carl; Kumar, Ajit; Gunadasa, Shalmini

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication used for acute aggression in psychiatry must have rapid onset of effect, low frequency of administration and low levels of adverse effects. Zuclopenthixol acetate is said to have these properties. Objectives To estimate the clinical effects of zuclopenthixol acetate for the management of acute aggression or violence thought to be due to serious mental illnesses, in comparison to other drugs used to treat similar conditions. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia’s Group Trials Register (July 2011). We supplemented this by citation searching and personal contact with authors and relevant pharmaceutical companies. Selection criteria All randomised clinical trials involving people thought to have serious mental illnesses comparing zuclopenthixol acetate with other drugs. Data collection and analysis Two review authors extracted and cross-checked data independently. We calculated fixed-effect relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous data. We analysed by intention-to-treat. We used mean differences (MD) for continuous variables. Main results We found no data for the primary outcome, tranquillisation. Compared with haloperidol, zuclopenthixol acetate was no more sedating at two hours (n = 40, 1 RCT, RR 0.60, 95% CI 0.27 to 1.34). People given zuclopenthixol acetate were not at reduced risk of being given supplementary antipsychotics (n = 134, 3 RCTs, RR 1.49, 95% CI 0.97 to 2.30) although additional use of benzodiazepines was less (n = 50, 1 RCT, RR 0.03, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.47). People given zuclopenthixol acetate had fewer injections over seven days compared with those allocated to haloperidol IM (n = 70, 1 RCT, RR 0.39, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.84, NNT 4, CI 3 to 14). We found no data on more episodes of aggression or harm to self or others. One trial (n = 148) reported no significant difference in adverse effects for people receiving zuclopenthixol acetate compared with those allocated haloperidol at one, three

  13. Secondary sclerosing cholangitis in a critically ill patient

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Krista E.; Willmann, Juergen K.; Jeffrey, R. Brooke

    2016-01-01

    Critically ill patients are commonly imaged for liver dysfunction. An often fatal condition, secondary sclerosing cholangitis, is an important and likely under-recognized hepatic condition in these patients. In presenting this case report, we hope to raise awareness of this condition amongst radiologists as well as other physicians caring for the critically ill. PMID:27190777

  14. The association of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism with acute brain dysfunction during critical illness*

    PubMed Central

    Adams Wilson, Jessica R.; Morandi, Alessandro; Girard, Timothy D.; Thompson, Jennifer L.; Boomershine, Chad S.; Shintani, Ayumi K.; Ely, E. Wesley; Pandharipande, Pratik P.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Plasma tryptophan levels are associated with delirium in critically ill patients. Although tryptophan has been linked to the pathogenesis of other neurocognitive diseases through metabolism to neurotoxins via the kynurenine pathway, a role for kynurenine pathway activity in intensive care unit brain dysfunction (delirium and coma) remains unknown. This study examined the association between kynurenine pathway activity as determined by plasma kynurenine concentrations and kynurenine/tryptophan ratios and presence or absence of acute brain dysfunction (defined as delirium/coma-free days) in intensive care unit patients. Design, Setting, and Patients This was a prospective cohort study that utilized patient data and blood samples from the Maximizing Efficacy of Targeted Sedation and Reducing Neurologic Dysfunction trial, which compared sedation with dexmedetomidine vs. lorazepam in mechanically ventilated patients. Measurements and Main Results Baseline plasma kynurenine and tryptophan concentrations were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with or without tandem mass spectrometry. Delirium was assessed daily using the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit. Linear regression examined associations between kynurenine pathway activity and delirium/coma-free days after adjusting for sedative exposure, age, and severity of illness. Among 84 patients studied, median age was 60 yrs and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score was 28.5. Elevated plasma kynurenine and kynurenine/tryptophan ratio were both independently associated with significantly fewer delirium/coma-free days (i.e., fewer days without acute brain dysfunction). Specifically, patients with plasma kynurenine or kynurenine/tryptophan ratios at the 75th percentile of our population had an average of 1.8 (95% confidence interval 0.6–3.1) and 2.1 (95% confidence interval 1.0–3.2) fewer delirium/coma-free days than those patients with values at the 25

  15. Attitudes of Jordanian mental health nurses toward mental illness and patients with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Wardam, Lina A

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Jordanian mental health nurses' attitudes toward mental illness and patients with mental illness. A descriptive correlational design was utilized to collect data from 92 mental health nurses in Jordan. Data was collected on nurses' attitudes toward mental illness and patients with mental disorder and their satisfaction with nursing care delivery. The Jordanian mental health nurses who participated in this study had negative attitudes toward mental illness and toward patients with mental disorders. About 60% of the mental health nurses had perceived patients with mental illness to be dangerous, immature, dirty, cold hearted, harmful, and pessimistic. In only two descriptions-being polite and adult-did nurses have positive perception about patients with mental illness. Mental health nurse were not satisfied with nursing care delivery. More than 70% of nurses were proud to be a mental health nurse. Age and gender were significant influential factors in forming the nurses' attitudes or satisfaction. Immediate intervention is needed to improve the quality of patient care provided by mental health nurses. PMID:19874099

  16. Risk of viral acute gastrointestinal illness from non-disinfected drinking water distribution systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) resulting from pathogens directly entering the piping of drinking water distribution systems is insufficiently understood. Here, we estimate AGI incidence attributable to virus intrusions into non-disinfecting municipal distribution systems. Viruses were enumerat...

  17. Illness Beliefs Predict Mortality in Patients with Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Vedhara, Kavita; Dawe, Karen; Miles, Jeremy N. V.; Wetherell, Mark A.; Cullum, Nicky; Dayan, Colin; Drake, Nicola; Price, Patricia; Tarlton, John; Weinman, John; Day, Andrew; Campbell, Rona; Reps, Jenna; Soria, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients’ illness beliefs have been associated with glycaemic control in diabetes and survival in other conditions. Objective We examined whether illness beliefs independently predicted survival in patients with diabetes and foot ulceration. Methods Patients (n = 169) were recruited between 2002 and 2007. Data on illness beliefs were collected at baseline. Data on survival were extracted on 1st November 2011. Number of days survived reflected the number of days from date of recruitment to 1st November 2011. Results Cox regressions examined the predictors of time to death and identified ischemia and identity beliefs (beliefs regarding symptoms associated with foot ulceration) as significant predictors of time to death. Conclusions Our data indicate that illness beliefs have a significant independent effect on survival in patients with diabetes and foot ulceration. These findings suggest that illness beliefs could improve our understanding of mortality risk in this patient group and could also be the basis for future therapeutic interventions to improve survival. PMID:27096609

  18. Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Complicated Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Prasanta Kumar; Lynrah, Kryshan G; Ete, Tony; Issar, Neel Kanth

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most common protozoan diseases, especially in tropical countries. The clinical manifestation of malaria, especially falciparum malaria varies from mild acute febrile illness to life threatening severe systemic complications involving one or more organ systems. We would like to report a case of complicated falciparum malaria involving cerebral, renal, hepatic system along with acute pancreatitis. The patient was successfully treated with anti malarial and other supportive treatment. To the best of our knowledge there are very few reports of acute pancreatitis due to malaria. Falciparum malaria therefore should be added to the list of infectious agents causing acute pancreatitis especially in areas where malaria is endemic. PMID:26894117

  19. [Chronic critically ill patients from a gastroenterological perspective].

    PubMed

    Bittinger, M; Messmann, H

    2013-05-01

    From a gastroenterological point of view, for chronic critically ill patients a differentiation has to be made between general gastroenterological problems, which are important in many or all chronic critically ill patients and patients with gastroenterological diseases which are the reason for the chronic critically ill status. General gastroenterological problems are, for example the nutrition of these patients and also considerations about ulcer prophylaxis or gastroenterological complications, such as antibiotic-associated colitis. Gastroenterological diseases as the reason for a chronic critically ill status are more in the minority. Diseases which should be taken into consideration are advanced liver cirrhosis and short bowel syndrome. This manuscript is intended to discuss gastroenterological problems in this selected group of patients and to show possible solutions and treatment options. PMID:23423578

  20. Retrospective review on obstetric cases of critically ill and dead patients in Dongguan.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li-Han; Fang, Yun-Yong; Zheng, Yan-Bing; Xiao, Li-Juan; Huang, Su-Ran; Liu, Xi-Zhen; Cai, Li-Hua

    2015-03-01

    This retrospective analysis was set to understand the epidemiological status of the critically ill obstetric patients in Dongguan city, Guangdong, China. Understanding the risk factors for the death cases can provide scientific evidences for future preventive strategies to decrease the maternal mortality rate. This retrospective included the statistical data and clinical data on the cases of critically ill and dead obstetric patients admitted to Dongguan People's Hospital and Dongguan Maternal & Child Health Hospital from September 1st, 2009 to August 31st, 2013. Data included numbers of the critically ill maternal and obstetric women, common obstetric and maternal comorbidities and complications in the critically ill patients, the basic characteristics of maternal and obstetric deaths, records of regular prenatal examinations, the time intervals between onset of acute symptoms and ICU admission, blood purification, and the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) score. During the 5-year period, there were increasing trend of critically ill pregnant and obstetric patients, and the prevalence rate of critically ill obstetric patients was 8.99-9.28 %. The most common obstetric causes of admission were massive postpartum hemorrhage (63.54 %), followed by pregnancy-associated hypertension (15.85 %) and placenta previa (8.92 %). The most common non-obstetric causes of admission were acute heart failure (1.98 %). In the observed period, 20 critically ill obstetric patients died in these two hospitals (mortality rate 0.24 %, 20/8,129). The mean age of dead women was (30.3 ± 6.6) years old and mean gestational age was (30.1 ± 9.3) weeks. 75 % of the patient had more than two pregnancies. Over 90 % of the patients received education below junior high school level. 85 % of the patients were non-Dongguan natives and regular prenatal care rate was only 15 % on dead cases. The most common causes of death were pregnancy-associated hypertension, acute

  1. Acute occupational disinfectant-related illness among youth, 1993-1998.

    PubMed Central

    Brevard, Theresa A; Calvert, Geoffrey M; Blondell, Jerome M; Mehler, Louise N

    2003-01-01

    Working youths face many safety and health risks. Among these risks are those posed by disinfectant exposures. In this study we describe acute occupational disinfectant-related illness among youth. Data on U.S. children younger than 18 years with acute occupational disinfectant-related illnesses between 1993 and 1998 were collected from the Toxic Exposure Surveillance System and from the California Department of Pesticide Regulation. We analyzed data from persons with exposures who met the case definition for acute occupational disinfectant-related illness. The case definition required onset of new adverse health effects that were both temporally related to a disinfectant exposure and consistent with the known toxicology of the disinfectant. We calculated incidence rates of acute occupational disinfectant-related illness among youths 15-17 years old and incidence rate ratios to compare these rates with those of adults 25-44 years old. We found 307 children with disinfectant-related illnesses. The average annual incidence rate was 16.8/billion hours worked with a relative risk compared with adults of 4.14 (95% confidence interval, 3.66-4.68). Most illnesses were of mild severity (78%). There were no fatalities. Hypochlorites (e.g., bleach) were responsible for 45% of the illnesses. Among the 206 cases where the responsible disinfectant's U.S. Environmental Protection Agency toxicity category was known, 80% were in category I (highest toxicity level). These findings suggest the need for greater efforts to prevent adolescent acute occupational disinfectant-related illness. This may require strengthening regulations and enforcement as well as increased educational efforts directed at employers, youths, parents, school officials, and physicians. Better mechanisms for reporting and tracking chemical illnesses among working adolescents are also needed. PMID:14527846

  2. Clinical Research in Acute Fatal Illness: Lessons From Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Robert H

    2016-08-01

    Clinical research to evaluate the effectiveness of life support systems in acute fatal illness has unique problems of logistics, ethics, and consent. There have been 10 prospective comparative trials of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in acute fatal respiratory failure, utilizing different study designs. The trial designs were prospective controlled randomized, prospective adaptive randomized, sequential, and matched pairs. The trials were reviewed with regard to logistics, ethics, consent, statistical methods, economics, and impact. The matched pairs method is the best study design for evaluation of life support systems in acute fatal illness. PMID:25223826

  3. The design and rationale for the Acute Medically Ill Venous Thromboembolism Prevention with Extended Duration Betrixaban (APEX) study.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander T; Harrington, Robert; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Hull, Russell; Gibson, C Michael; Hernandez, Adrian F; Kitt, Michael M; Lorenz, Todd J

    2014-03-01

    Randomized clinical trials have identified a population of acute medically ill patients who remain at risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) beyond the standard duration of therapy and hospital discharge. The aim of the APEX study is to determine whether extended administration of oral betrixaban (35-42 days) is superior to a standard short course of prophylaxis with subcutaneous enoxaparin (10 ± 4 days followed by placebo) in patients with known risk factors for post-discharge VTE. Patients initially are randomized to receive either betrixaban or enoxaparin (and matching placebo) in a double dummy design. Following a standard duration period of enoxaparin treatment (with placebo tablets) or betrixaban (with placebo injections), patients receive only betrixaban (or alternative matching placebo). Patients are considered for enrollment if they are older than 40 years, have a specified medical illness, and restricted mobility. They must also meet the APEX criteria for increased VTE risk (aged ≥75 years, baseline D-Dimer ≥2× upper the limit of "normal", or 2 additional ancillary risk factors for VTE). The primary efficacy end point is the composite of asymptomatic proximal deep venous thrombosis, symptomatic deep venous thrombosis, non-fatal (pulmonary embolus) pulmonary embolism, or VTE-related death through day 35. The primary safety outcome is the occurrence of major bleeding. We hypothesize that extended duration betrixaban VTE prophylaxis will be safe and more effective than standard short duration enoxaparin in preventing VTE in acute medically ill patients with known risk factors for post hospital discharge VTE. PMID:24576517

  4. The pharmacologic approach to the critically ill patient

    SciTech Connect

    Chernow, B. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains papers addressing the pharmacologic approach to the critically ill patient. Chapter topics include: Radiation injury; Red cell substitutes: a current appraisal; and Psychopharmacology in the ICU.

  5. Urinary Biomarkers Indicative of Apoptosis and Acute Kidney Injury in the Critically Ill

    PubMed Central

    Vaara, Suvi T.; Lakkisto, Päivi; Immonen, Katariina; Tikkanen, Ilkka; Ala-Kokko, Tero; Pettilä, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Background Apoptosis is a key mechanism involved in ischemic acute kidney injury (AKI), but its role in septic AKI is controversial. Biomarkers indicative of apoptosis could potentially detect developing AKI prior to its clinical diagnosis. Methods As a part of the multicenter, observational FINNAKI study, we performed a pilot study among critically ill patients who developed AKI (n = 30) matched to critically ill patients without AKI (n = 30). We explored the urine and plasma levels of cytokeratin-18 neoepitope M30 (CK-18 M30), cell-free DNA, and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) at intensive care unit (ICU) admission and 24h thereafter, before the clinical diagnosis of AKI defined by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes -creatinine and urine output criteria. Furthermore, we performed a validation study in 197 consecutive patients in the FINNAKI cohort and analyzed the urine sample at ICU admission for CK-18 M30 levels. Results In the pilot study, the urine or plasma levels of measured biomarkers at ICU admission, at 24h, or their maximum value did not differ significantly between AKI and non-AKI patients. Among 20 AKI patients without severe sepsis, the urine CK-18 M30 levels were significantly higher at 24h (median 116.0, IQR [32.3–233.0] U/L) than among those 20 patients who did not develop AKI (46.0 [0.0–54.0] U/L), P = 0.020. Neither urine cell-free DNA nor HSP70 levels significantly differed between AKI and non-AKI patients regardless of the presence of severe sepsis. In the validation study, urine CK-18 M30 level at ICU admission was not significantly higher among patients developing AKI compared to non-AKI patients regardless of the presence of severe sepsis or CKD. Conclusions Our findings do not support that apoptosis detected with CK-18 M30 level would be useful in assessing the development of AKI in the critically ill. Urine HSP or cell-free DNA levels did not differ between AKI and non-AKI patients. PMID:26918334

  6. Assessing Hopelessness in Terminally Ill Cancer Patients: Development of the Hopelessness Assessment in Illness Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Lewis, Charles; Abbey, Jennifer; Olden, Megan; Sachs, Emily; Amakawa, Lia; Kolva, Elissa; Brescia, Robert; Breitbart, William

    2013-01-01

    Hopelessness has become an increasingly important construct in palliative care research, yet concerns exist regarding the utility of existing measures when applied to patients with a terminal illness. This article describes a series of studies focused on the exploration, development, and analysis of a measure of hopelessness specifically intended for use with terminally ill cancer patients. The 1st stage of measure development involved interviews with 13 palliative care experts and 30 terminally ill patients. Qualitative analysis of the patient interviews culminated in the development of a set of potential questionnaire items. In the 2nd study phase, we evaluated these preliminary items with a sample of 314 participants, using item response theory and classical test theory to identify optimal items and response format. These analyses generated an 8-item measure that we tested in a final study phase, using a 3rd sample (n = 228) to assess reliability and concurrent validity. These analyses demonstrated strong support for the Hopelessness Assessment in Illness Questionnaire providing greater explanatory power than existing measures of hopelessness and found little evidence that this assessment was confounded by illness-related variables (e.g., prognosis). In summary, these 3 studies suggest that this brief measure of hopelessness is particularly useful for palliative care settings. Further research is needed to assess the applicability of the measure to other populations and contexts. PMID:21443366

  7. Comparing the validity of different measures of illness severity: a hospital-level analysis for acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gandjour, Afschin; Ku-Goto, Meei-Hsiang; Ho, Vivian

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the validity of three measures of illness severity (prior year's hospital expenditures, Charlson and Elixhauser indices), by analysing the effect of introducing report cards on hospitals treating patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Medicare claims data were obtained for 1992-1997 for AMI patients aged 65+. We used differences-in-differences regression analysis to assess the impact of report cards introduced in New Jersey and Pennsylvania on the illness severity of AMI patients with and without coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery (relative to states without report cards). The analysis was conducted at the hospital level. For validation we used raw mortality and re-admission trends for AMI patients. While prior hospital expenditures suggest a considerable change in the illness severity of AMI patients in Pennsylvania relative to other states, raw mortality and re-admission trends in Pennsylvania are relatively consistent with the trend in the rest of the USA. In line with raw mortality and re-admission data, the Charlson and Elixhauser indices do not imply a considerable change in the severity of AMI patients in Pennsylvania. For CABG patients, illness severity - as measured by all three severity measurement methods - decreased after introduction of report cards, particularly in Pennsylvania. In conclusion, for AMI patients the Charlson and Elixhauser indices are a more valid measure of illness severity than prior year's hospital expenditures. After report cards were introduced, healthier AMI patients were more likely to receive CABG surgery, while sicker patients were avoided. PMID:23135888

  8. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in medically ill patients: a clinical update

    PubMed Central

    Turpie, Alexander G G; Leizorovicz, Alain

    2006-01-01

    The risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in hospitalised medically ill patients is often underestimated, despite the fact that it remains a major cause of preventable morbidity and mortality in this group. It is not well recognised that the risk of VTE in many hospitalised medically ill patients is at least as high as in populations after surgery. This may partly be attributed to the clinically silent nature of VTE in many patients, and the difficulty in predicting which patients might develop symptoms or fatal pulmonary embolism. Two large studies, Prospective Evaluation of Dalteparin Efficacy for Prevention of VTE in Immobilized Patients Trial and prophylaxis in MEDical patients with ENOXaparin, have shown that low‐molecular‐weight heparins provide effective thromboprophylaxis in medically ill patients, without increasing bleeding risk. Recent guidelines from the American College of Chest Physicians recommend that acutely medically ill patients admitted with congestive heart failure or severe respiratory disease, or those who are confined to bed and have at least one additional risk factor for VTE, should receive thromboprophylaxis. PMID:17148703

  9. Update: outbreak of acute febrile illness among athletes participating in Eco-Challenge-Sabah 2000--Borneo, Malaysia, 2000.

    PubMed

    2001-01-19

    During September 7-11, 2000, CDC was notified by the Idaho Department of Health, the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services, and the GeoSentinel Global Surveillance Network of at least 20 cases of acute febrile illness in three countries; all ill patients had participated in the Eco-Challenge-Sabah 2000 multisport expedition race in Borneo, Malaysia, during August 21-September 3, 2000. Participants included athletes from 29 U.S. states and 26 countries. This report updates the ongoing investigation of this outbreak through December 2, which suggests that Leptospira were the cause of illness and that water from the Segama River was the primary source of infection. Participants in adventure sports and exotic tourism should be aware of potential exposure to unusual and emerging infectious agents. PMID:11215718

  10. Acute coronary syndrome and decompression illness: a challenge for the diving physician.

    PubMed

    Brauzzi, Marco; Andreozzi, Fabio; De Fina, Laura; Tanasi, Paolo; Falini, Stefano

    2013-12-01

    Decompression illness (DCI) is a syndrome with diverse clinical manifestations but in which cardiac symptoms are rare. In the presence of cardiac symptoms, the necessity to rule out an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) which requires prompt treatment may result in delay to appropriate recompression treatment. We describe three cases with cardiologic symptoms referred to our centre by the Emergency Department (ED) of our facility. The first was a 48-year-old woman who lost consciousness during a dive and required cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The final diagnosis was acute myocardial infarction and the patient did not undergo recompression treatment. The second case was that of a 27-year-old man who complained of tachycardia, dyspnoea and vertigo soon after a dive. He was referred by helicopter ambulance and in the ED was diagnosed with new-onset atrial fibrillation. Recompression resulted in disappearance of his vertigo, and sinus rhythm was restored pharmacologically. The third case was a 43-year-old man, with a history of coronary artery disease, who had undergone coronary artery bypass grafting three years previously. After a repetitive dive without adequate decompression, he complained of crushing retrosternal pain and numbness in the upper left arm. All cardiovascular examinations were negative and the patient was recompressed, with resolution of his symptoms. Features to consider in arriving at the correct differential diagnosis in divers presenting with cardiac symptoms are discussed in the light of these three illustrative cases. PMID:24510330

  11. Two episodes of acute illness in a machine shop

    SciTech Connect

    Sinks, T.; Kerndt, P.R.; Wallingford, K.M.

    1989-08-01

    Following an explosion in a machine shop and temporary plant closure, on the day the plant returned to full operations a degreaser malfunctioned. Workers in the assembly room were exposed to trichloroethylene levels later estimated to have exceeded 220 ppm (OSHA PEL 100 ppm). The plant was evacuated and the degreaser taken out of operation. Blood testing for carbon monoxide (CO) on five employees found carboxyhemoglobin levels in excess of normal. The plant reopened the following morning. Over the next two weeks, 15 employees were seen by the plant nurses for similar complaints; although all returned to work, their carboxyhemoglobin levels, later found to be inaccurate, were reported by a local medical clinic to range from 13.7 to 20.0 percent. At the end of the second week, another outbreak of illness occurred, but carboxyhemoglobin, trichloroethylene, fluorocarbons, and methylene chloride were not elevated in all 17 persons tested; plant-wide monitoring for CO found no elevated levels. During the first outbreak of illness, cases were 2.26 times as likely to have entered the assembly room as noncases. During the second outbreak, cases were no more likely than noncases to have entered the assembly room. We believe the explosion, earlier toxic exposures and illness, and the misleading blood test results led to plant-wide anxiety which culminated in a collective stress reaction and the second outbreak. An open meeting with all employees, informing them of our findings, provided reassurance and no further episodes of illness occurred in this workforce.

  12. [The nutrition of acute phase in patients with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Rie; Sebe, Mayu

    2016-03-01

    In this session, we describe the acute phase in patients with metabolic syndrome from two sides; acute disease that occurs higher in patients with metabolic syndrome such as colonary heart disease and stroke, and acute aggravation of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome. The electrolyte imbalance is frequently detected in critical ill patients. It is reported that the extreme abnormalities of ionized calcium concentrations are independent predictors of mortality. In addition, from clinical database MIMIC-Ⅱ,calcium supplementation improves clinical outcome in intensive care unit patients. Although metabolic syndrome; lifestyle-related disease, is a chronic disease, the possibility of falling into acute disease by having it becomes very high and improvement of electrolyte imbalance, especially hypocalcaemia is expected to effective on clinical outcome. PMID:26923986

  13. Evaluation of activity of hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis in postmenopausal women suffering from severe acute illness

    PubMed Central

    Raj, M. Neelima; Suresh, V.; Mukka, Arun; Reddy, Amaresh; Sachan, Alok; Mohan, Alladi; Vengamma, B.; Rao, P.V.L.N. Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Postmenopausal women constitute an ideal model for studying the extent of hypothalamo-pituitary gonadal (HPG) axis suppression in critical illness as the gonadotropins are normally high and non-cyclical in them. The objective was to assess the impact of acute severe illness in postmenopausal women on the HPG axis and the activities of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA), the hypothalamo- pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axes; and levels of serum prolactin, by comparison between critically ill postmenopausal women and otherwise healthy postmenopausal women. Methods: Thirty five consecutive postmenopausal women older than 60 yr admitted to medical intensive care with a Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II) more than 30 were included. On day five of their in-hospital stay, blood samples were collected for oestradiol, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), cortisol, androstenedione, prolactin and thyroid profile. Thirty five apparently healthy postmenopausal women were selected as controls. Results: Levels of LH, FSH, thyrotropin, free thyroxin (fT4) and free tri-iodothyronine (fT3) were lower while oestradiol, cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone were higher among patients in comparison to healthy controls. Prolactin levels were similar in patients and controls. Among sick patients both FSH and fT4 showed a negative correlation (P<0.05) with the SAPS II score. Interpretation & conclusions: In critically ill postmenopausal women, paradoxically elevated oestrogen levels despite gonadotropin suppression suggests a non-ovarian origin. Prolactin remained unaltered in patients despite their illness, possibly reflecting atrophy of lactotrophs in menopause. PMID:26997016

  14. Assessing Hopelessness in Terminally Ill Cancer Patients: Development of the Hopelessness Assessment in Illness Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Lewis, Charles; Abbey, Jennifer; Olden, Megan; Sachs, Emily; Amakawa, Lia; Kolva, Elissa; Brescia, Robert; Breitbart, William

    2011-01-01

    Hopelessness has become an increasingly important construct in palliative care research, yet concerns exist regarding the utility of existing measures when applied to patients with a terminal illness. This article describes a series of studies focused on the exploration, development, and analysis of a measure of hopelessness specifically intended…

  15. Nutritional support in critically ill patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong, P W; Enriquez, A; Barrera, R

    2001-07-01

    Nutritional depletion is a common problem seen in critically ill patients with cancer and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Infection and injury activate a cascade of metabolic events that leads to a poor nutritional state and wasteful energy consumption. The goals of nutritional support entail minimizing starvation, preventing nutrient deficiencies, supporting or improving immune function, and facilitating tissue repair and wound healing. Further understanding of the metabolic changes of illness will improve effective regulation of the inflammatory events occurring in critically ill patients. Multiple clinical parameters are available to assess the nutritional status in critically ill patients, but no standard recommendations can be made at this time. The use of these parameters can be appropriate, provided that their limitations are understood clearly. The development and standardization of objective parameters to identify patients at risk or with subclinical malnutrition are needed. Enteral and parenteral feedings are safe and effective methods to deliver nutrients to critically ill patients with cancer who are unable to ingest adequate amounts orally. Early nutritional support should be instituted in the appropriate clinical setting. Specialized nutritional solutions and supplements require careful consideration in patients with renal, hepatic, cardiac, or pulmonary disorders. The unselective use of nutritional support is not indicated in well-nourished patients with cancer undergoing surgery, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy in whom adequate oral intake is anticipated. Nutritional support remains an important adjunctive therapy in the overall management of critically ill patients. Continued clinical investigations in nutrition are necessary to identify other groups of patients who can benefit from nutritional interventions. PMID:11525056

  16. Difficulties of Diabetic Patients in Learning about Their Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Caroline; Gagnayre, Remi; d'Ivernois, Jean Francois

    2001-01-01

    Examines the difficulties experienced by diabetic patients in learning about their illness. Diabetic people (N=138) were questioned by means of a closed answer questionnaire. Results reveal that patients easily acquired manual skills, yet numerous learning difficulties were associated with the skills required to solve problems and make decisions,…

  17. The Creative Use of Psychotherapy with Terminally Ill AIDS Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraenkel, William A.

    One clinical psychologist who worked with terminally ill, end-stage Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients in a hospice type setting experienced more than 150 deaths over an 18-month time period. Many of the patients denied that they had AIDS; some distinguished between having AIDS and testing positive for Human Immunodeficiency Virus…

  18. Incidence of high altitude illnesses among unacclimatized persons who acutely ascended to Tibet.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yusheng; Fu, Zhongming; Shen, Weimin; Jiang, Ping; He, Yanlin; Peng, Shaojun; Wu, Zonggui; Cui, Bo

    2010-01-01

    High altitude illnesses pose health threats to unwary travelers after their acute ascent to high altitude locations. The incidence of high altitude illnesses among unacclimatized persons who acutely ascend to Tibet has not been previously reported. In the present study, we surveyed the incidence of high altitude illness among 3628 unacclimatized persons who had no previous high altitude experience and who traveled to Tibet by air to an altitude of 3600 m. These subjects were asked to answer questions in a written questionnaire about symptoms associated with high altitude illnesses that occurred within 2 weeks of their first arrival, their severity, and possible contributing factors. Physical examination and appropriate laboratory tests were also performed for hospitalized subjects. We found that 2063 respondents had mild acute mountain sickness with an incidence of 57.2%, and 249 (12.07%) of them were hospitalized for treatment. The incidence of high altitude pulmonary edema was 1.9%, while no case of high altitude cerebral edema was found. Additionally, there was no report of death. Psychological stresses and excessive physical exertions possibly contributed to the onset of HAPE. Acute mountain sickness is common among unacclimatized persons after their acute ascent to Tibet. The incidence of HAPE and HACE, however, is very low among them. PMID:20367487

  19. [Repatriation of patients fallen ill abroad].

    PubMed

    Felkai, Péter; Gorove, László

    2009-08-30

    Due to our medical ethics, welfare of the patient is the first to consider. The therapy applied should not be influenced by any financial, administrative or political considerations. Yet, patient repatriation is such a special medical field, where the interest of an insurance company can often owerwrite medical considerations. The missing protocol of long-distance patient transportation and of repatriation in general, the by-passing of medical responsibility enables malpractice. Unfortunately, practitioners know little about the basic terms of repatriation. The authors review the indications and basic terms of patient repatriation, and the basic considerations on the fit-for-transportation of the patient. The patient transportation vehicles and their availability for the different forms of repatriation modalities are analysed as well. It was found that the form and timing of repatriation should be carefully selected, in order to prevent further deterioration of the patient's status; it must ensure maximum protection of the patient during the transport. The patient's interest must be the first, all the other considerations (financial, social etc.) may come afterwards. PMID:19692312

  20. Being in a process of transition to psychosis, as narrated by adults with psychotic illnesses acutely admitted to hospital

    PubMed Central

    Sebergsen, K; Norberg, A; Talseth, A-G

    2014-01-01

    Accessible summary Early intervention to prevent and reduce new episodes of psychosis involves patients, relatives and mental health personnel recognizing the early signs of psychosis. Twelve participants with psychotic illnesses narrated how they experienced becoming psychotic before they were admitted to acute psychiatric wards. The results of this study demonstrate that participants and their close others who sensed, understood and articulated experienced changes as signs of psychosis established a dialogue with mental health personnel and initiated treatment and care. Participants who did not perceive the experienced changes as signs of psychosis articulated the experienced changes as an awareness of a poor health condition and illness. These participants, who had no other people to advocate for them, appeared to experience poor communication and coercion during intervention. Abstract To assist in improving early interventions for psychosis, this study explored how adult people narrated their experience of becoming psychotic, and how contact with mental health personnel was established. Narrative interviews were conducted with 12 participants with psychotic illnesses recruited from acute psychiatric wards. The interviews were content analysed. Participants described being in a process of transition to psychosis as follows: experiencing changes as well-known signs of psychosis, experiencing sudden unexpected changes as signs of psychosis and experiencing unidentified changes as signs of illness. Our results show that participants and their close others who knew the signs of psychosis established a dialogue with mental health personnel and were better equipped to prevent and mitigate the psychosis. Our results demonstrate that participants who did not perceive the signs of psychosis and did not have other people to advocate for them were at risk for delayed treatment, poor communication and coercive interventions. Furthermore, participants who did not know the

  1. Early Mobilization and Rehabilitation of Patients Who Are Critically Ill.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Mohamed D; Parker, Ann M; Needham, Dale M

    2016-09-01

    Neuromuscular disorders are increasingly recognized as a cause of both short- and long-term physical morbidity in survivors of critical illness. This recognition has given rise to research aimed at better understanding the risk factors and mechanisms associated with neuromuscular dysfunction and physical impairment associated with critical illness, as well as possible interventions to prevent or treat these issues. Among potential risk factors, bed rest is an important modifiable risk factor. Early mobilization and rehabilitation of patients who are critically ill may help prevent or mitigate the sequelae of bed rest and improve patient outcomes. Research studies and quality improvement projects have demonstrated that early mobilization and rehabilitation are safe and feasible in patients who are critically ill, with potential benefits including improved physical functioning and decreased duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care, and hospital stay. Despite these findings, early mobilization and rehabilitation are still uncommon in routine clinical practice, with many perceived barriers. This review summarizes potential risk factors for neuromuscular dysfunction and physical impairment associated with critical illness, highlights the potential role of early mobilization and rehabilitation in improving patient outcomes, and discusses some of the commonly perceived barriers to early mobilization and strategies for overcoming them. PMID:26997241

  2. ILLNESS IS WORK: Revisiting the concept of illness careers and recognizing the identity work of patients with ME/CFS.

    PubMed

    Grue, Jan

    2016-07-01

    The concept of careers has an extensive history in the sociology of health and illness. Among other things, the notion of a career has been used to describe the changing identities of patients diagnosed with mental illness, to identify distinct stages in the progression of various illnesses, and to recognize the cooperative efforts of hospitalized patients. However, the career concept may be reanalyzed as part of an analytical metaphor that makes salient both the agency of people with illnesses and the social structures in which they are enmeshed. This metaphor, ILLNESS IS WORK, can valorize and aid understanding of the identity work and actions of patients with chronic illnesses, particularly illnesses with a low degree of social recognition and medical prestige such as myalgic encephalopathy and chronic fatigue syndrome. PMID:26843550

  3. [Effect of exercise training on rehabilitation of the chronic critical illness patients].

    PubMed

    Gu, Guosheng; Ren, Jianan

    2016-07-01

    Over the past decades, the evolution of the techniques used in the intensive care has led on one side to better survival rates in ICU patients. On the other side, it has resulted in a growing number of patients who survive an acute event to chronic condition, and who then become dependent on one or more life support treatments. Such patients are called chronic critical illness(CCI) patients. Even these patients can dismiss from intensive care unit (ICU) or transfer to specialized rehabilitation care settings, the mortality of these patients is still very high. Therefore, how to promote the rehabilitation of CCI patients is one of the most important research points of epidemiology, public health and social economics. Exercise training can promote rehabilitation, improve quality of life and independent functional status in these patients, which should be used as one of the standard treatment protocols for CCI patients. PMID:27452749

  4. [Patient-caregiver relationship: when illness blogs step in].

    PubMed

    Rondi, Céline; Berney, Alexandre

    2014-02-12

    The use of social media as a communication tool is rapidly growing in the community, and more specifically in patients, through illness blogs. This has been true for several years in North America, but is becoming a reality in Europe as well. We report here the first results of studies on the putative psychological benefits and risks of illness blogs for their authors. We also explore the possible impact of blogging on the patient-caregiver relationship. Social media are expected to have a growing influence in certain areas of health care. Physicians should therefore stay informed about them, take advantage of their benefits, and anticipate their risks. PMID:24620462

  5. Diminishing willingness to pay per quality-adjusted life year: valuing acute foodborne illness.

    PubMed

    Haninger, Kevin; Hammitt, James K

    2011-09-01

    We design and conduct a stated-preference survey to estimate willingness to pay (WTP) to reduce foodborne risk of acute illness and to test whether WTP is proportional to the corresponding gain in expected quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). If QALYs measure utility for health, then economic theory requires WTP to be nearly proportional to changes in both health quality and duration of illness and WTP could be estimated by multiplying the expected change in QALYs by an appropriate monetary value. WTP is elicited using double-bounded, dichotomous-choice questions in which respondents (randomly selected from the U.S. general adult population, n = 2,858) decide whether to purchase a more expensive food to reduce the risk of foodborne illness. Health risks vary by baseline probability of illness, reduction in probability, duration and severity of illness, and conditional probability of mortality. The expected gain in QALYs is calculated using respondent-assessed decrements in health-related quality of life if ill combined with the duration of illness and reduction in probability specified in the survey. We find sharply diminishing marginal WTP for severity and duration of illness prevented. Our results suggest that individuals do not have a constant rate of WTP per QALY, which implies that WTP cannot be accurately estimated by multiplying the change in QALYs by an appropriate monetary value. PMID:21488924

  6. Parents' help-seeking behaviours during acute childhood illness at home: A contribution to explanatory theory.

    PubMed

    Neill, Sarah J; Jones, Caroline H D; Lakhanpaul, Monica; Roland, Damian T; Thompson, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Uncertainty and anxiety surround parents' decisions to seek medical help for an acutely ill child. Consultation rates for children are rising, yet little is known about factors that influence parents' help-seeking behaviours. We used focus groups and interviews to examine how 27 parents of children under five years, from a range of socioeconomic groups in the East Midlands of England, use information to make decisions during acute childhood illness at home. This article reports findings elucidating factors that influence help-seeking behaviours. Parents reported that decision-making during acute childhood illness was influenced by a range of personal, social and health service factors. Principal among these was parents' concern to do the right thing for their child. Their ability to assess the severity of the illness was influenced by knowledge and experience of childhood illness. When parents were unable to access their general practitioner (GP), feared criticism from or had lost trust in their GP, some parents reported using services elsewhere such as Accident and Emergency. These findings contribute to explanatory theory concerning parents' help-seeking behaviours. Professional and political solutions have not reduced demand; therefore, collaborative approaches involving the public and professionals are now needed to improve parents' access to information. PMID:25296933

  7. Impaired High-Density Lipoprotein Anti-Oxidant Function Predicts Poor Outcome in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schrutka, Lore; Goliasch, Georg; Meyer, Brigitte; Wurm, Raphael; Koller, Lorenz; Kriechbaumer, Lukas; Heinz, Gottfried; Pacher, Richard; Lang, Irene M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oxidative stress affects clinical outcome in critically ill patients. Although high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles generally possess anti-oxidant capacities, deleterious properties of HDL have been described in acutely ill patients. The impact of anti-oxidant HDL capacities on clinical outcome in critically ill patients is unknown. We therefore analyzed the predictive value of anti-oxidant HDL function on mortality in an unselected cohort of critically ill patients. Method We prospectively enrolled 270 consecutive patients admitted to a university-affiliated intensive care unit (ICU) and determined anti-oxidant HDL function using the HDL oxidant index (HOI). Based on their HOI, the study population was stratified into patients with impaired anti-oxidant HDL function and the residual study population. Results During a median follow-up time of 9.8 years (IQR: 9.2 to 10.0), 69% of patients died. Cox regression analysis revealed a significant and independent association between impaired anti-oxidant HDL function and short-term mortality with an adjusted HR of 1.65 (95% CI 1.22–2.24; p = 0.001) as well as 10-year mortality with an adj. HR of 1.19 (95% CI 1.02–1.40; p = 0.032) when compared to the residual study population. Anti-oxidant HDL function correlated with the amount of oxidative stress as determined by Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (r = 0.38; p<0.001). Conclusion Impaired anti-oxidant HDL function represents a strong and independent predictor of 30-day mortality as well as long-term mortality in critically ill patients. PMID:26978526

  8. Emergency room visits for acute gastrointestinal illness following flooding: A case-crossover study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate change may alter the frequency of precipitation and flooding which can increase fecal-oral transmission of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) through contact with contaminated items or water. Few studies have quantified the risk associated with flood events in the Unite...

  9. Respiratory Viral Testing and Influenza Antiviral Prescriptions During Hospitalization for Acute Respiratory Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Rolfes, Melissa A.; Yousey-Hindes, Kimberly M.; Meek, James I.; Fry, Alicia M.; Chaves, Sandra S.

    2016-01-01

    We examined respiratory viral testing and influenza antiviral prescriptions at a US tertiary care hospital. During the 2010–11 to 2012–13 influenza seasons, antiviral prescriptions among acute respiratory illness (ARI) hospitalizations were associated with viral testing (rate ratio = 15.0), and empiric prescriptions were rare (<1% of ARI hospitalizations). PMID:26885545

  10. Parents' difficulties and information needs in coping with acute illness in preschool children: a qualitative study.

    PubMed Central

    Kai, J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify and explore difficulties parents experience with acute illness in young children and the information they seek to help them. DESIGN: Qualitative study using semi-structured one t one and group interviews with parents of preschool children. SETTING: Disadvantaged inner city community. SUBJECTS: 95 parents of preschool children. RESULTS: Parents felt disempowered when dealing with acute illness in their children because of difficulties making sense of the illness. Central to parents' difficulties were their experiences of inadequate information sharing by their general practitioners and variations in their doctors' decisions and behaviour. Disparity between parents' beliefs and expectations about illness and treatment and professionals' behaviour further frustrated parents' attempts to understand illness. Parents expressed a need for a range of accessible and specific information to support them through their negotiation of children's illness. CONCLUSIONS: Communication with parents requires greater recognition of parents' difficulties. Professionals have considerable potential to empower parents by sharing more information and skills. Such information should be consistent and address parents' concerns, beliefs, and expressed needs if this potential is to be realised. PMID:8892421

  11. Spiritual Care For Jewish Patients Facing A Life Threatening Illness

    PubMed Central

    Bluman, Rabbi Olga F.; Klein, Linda; Thomas, Jay; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Providing biopsychosocial/spiritual care for patients facing a life threatening illness can be complex, and this complexity can be amplified when a patient identifies as Jewish. A common but incorrect assumption is that a person who identifies him or herself as Jewish abides by the tenets of the Jewish religion. However, many Jews consider themselves Jewish in an ethnic or cultural sense rather than connected to a religion or belief in God. This case report presents an ethnic/cultural Jew with a life threatening illness of advanced lung cancer. Despite evidence of spiritual/existential suffering, this patient declined spiritual care. From an analysis of this case and clinical experience, we suggest exploratory questions that clinicians can use in response to common questions or statements made by such patients. This exploration may lead to a chaplain referral and we highlight interventions that chaplains and clinicians may find helpful as they come alongside Jewish patients. PMID:23614173

  12. The epidemiology and prognostic factors of mortality in critically ill children with acute kidney injury in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jei-Wen; Jeng, Mei-Jy; Yang, Ling-Yu; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chiang, Shu-Chiung; Soong, Wen-Jue; Wu, Keh-Gong; Lee, Yu-Sheng; Wang, Hsin-Hui; Yang, Chia-Feng; Tsai, Hsin-Lin

    2015-03-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill children varies among countries. Here we used claims data from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance program from 2006 to 2010 to investigate the epidemiological features and identify factors that predispose individuals to developing AKI and mortality in critically ill children with AKI. Of 60,338 children in this nationwide cohort, AKI was identified in 850, yielding an average incidence rate of 1.4%. Significant independent risk factors for AKI were the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, mechanical ventilation or vasopressors, intrinsic renal diseases, sepsis, and age more than 1 year. Overall, of the AKI cases, 46.5% were due to sepsis, 36.1% underwent renal replacement therapy, and the mortality rate was 44.2%. Multivariate analysis showed that the use of vasopressors, mechanical ventilation, and hemato-oncological disorders were independent predictors of mortality in AKI patients. Thirty-two of the 474 patients who survived had progression to chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease. Thus, although not common, AKI in critically ill children still has a high mortality rate associated with a variety of factors. Long-term close follow-up to prevent progressive chronic kidney disease in survivors of critical illnesses with AKI is mandatory. PMID:25252027

  13. Care Coordination for the Chronically Ill: Understanding the Patient's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Maeng, Daniel D; Martsolf, Grant R; Scanlon, Dennis P; Christianson, Jon B

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify factors associated with perception of care coordination problems among chronically ill patients. Methods Patient-level data were obtained from a random-digit dial telephone survey of adults with chronic conditions. The survey measured respondents' self-report of care coordination problems and level of patient activation, using the Patient Activation Measure (PAM-13). Logistic regression was used to assess association between respondents' self-report of care coordination problems and a set of patient characteristics. Results Respondents in the highest activation stage had roughly 30–40 percent lower odds of reporting care coordination problems compared to those in the lowest stage (p < .01). Respondents with multiple chronic conditions were significantly more likely to report coordination problems than those with hypertension only. Respondents' race/ethnicity, employment, insurance status, income, and length of illness were not significantly associated with self-reported care coordination problems. Conclusion We conclude that patient activation and complexity of chronic illness are strongly associated with patients' self-report of care coordination problems. Developing targeted strategies to improve care coordination around these patient characteristics may be an effective way to address the issue. PMID:22985032

  14. Molecular mechanisms of hyperglycemia and cardiovascular-related events in critically ill patients: rationale for the clinical benefits of insulin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ellahham, Samer

    2010-01-01

    Newly recognized hyperglycemia frequently occurs with acute medical illness, especially among patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Hyperglycemia has been linked to increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients, especially when it is newly recognized. Increased rates of reinfarction, rehospitalization, major cardiovascular events, and death in CVD patients have also been found. An expanding body of literature describes the benefits of normalizing hyperglycemia with insulin therapy in hospitalized patients. This article reviews several underlying mechanisms thought to be responsible for the association between hyperglycemia and poor outcomes in critically ill patients and those with cardiovascular events, as well as the biologic rationale for the benefits of insulin therapy in these patients. PMID:21270967

  15. Communicating with Terminally Ill Cancer Patients and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjorleifsdottir, Elisabet; Carter, Diana E.

    2000-01-01

    Interviews with 12 fourth-year student nurses in Scotland indicated that they found communicating with terminally ill and dying patients and their families difficult. Although lectures on death and dying were helpful, support and guidance for dealing with these issues in clinical practice were needed. (SK)

  16. Human factors in the management of the critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Bion, J F; Abrusci, T; Hibbert, P

    2010-07-01

    Unreliable delivery of best practice care is a major component of medical error. Critically ill patients are particularly susceptible to error and unreliable care. Human factors analysis, widely used in industry, provides insights into how interactions between organizations, tasks, and the individual worker impact on human behaviour and affect systems reliability. We adopt a human factors approach to examine determinants of clinical reliability in the management of critically ill patients. We conducted a narrative review based on a Medline search (1950-March 2010) combining intensive/critical care (units) with medical errors, patient safety, or delivery of healthcare; keyword and Internet search 'human factors' or 'ergonomics'. Critical illness represents a high-risk, complex system spanning speciality and geographical boundaries. Substantial opportunities exist for improving the safety and reliability of care of critically ill patients at the level of the task, the individual healthcare provider, and the organization or system. Task standardization (best practice guidelines) and simplification (bundling or checklists) should be implemented where scientific evidence is strong, or adopted subject to further research ('dynamic standardization'). Technical interventions should be embedded in everyday practice by the adjunctive use of non-technical (behavioural) interventions. These include executive 'adoption' of clinical areas, systematic methods for identifying hazards and reflective learning from error, and a range of techniques for improving teamworking and communication. Human factors analysis provides a useful framework for understanding and rectifying the causes of error and unreliability, particularly in complex systems such as critical care. PMID:20511333

  17. Gerontology & Policies for Not Treating Terminally Ill Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrett, William H.

    Proposals have been developed to clarify physician responsibility in withholding treatment to terminally ill patients. These proposals seek to provide a legal shield against malpractice proceedings and to reduce confusion over how to resolve high medical costs through standardizing procedures for withholding treatment. When first published,…

  18. Consent for Dental Therapy in Severely Ill Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litch, C. Scott; Liggett, Martha L.

    1992-01-01

    Legal standards for informed consent are discussed in the context of dental care for the elderly and severely ill. Variations in state common law and legislation are analyzed, focusing on differences between practitioner-oriented and patient-oriented approaches to informed consent. Implications for educators and practitioners are examined.…

  19. Parenteral Nutrition in the Critically Ill Patient

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    A 67-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus undergoes extensive resection of the small bowel and right colon with a jejunostomy and colostomy because of mesenteric ischemia. In the surgical intensive care unit, severe systemic inflammatory response syndrome with possible sepsis develops. The patient is treated with volume resuscitation, vasopressor support, mechanical ventilation, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and intravenous insulin infusion. Low-dose tube feedings are initiated postoperatively through a nasogastric tube. However, these feedings are discontinued after the development of escalating vasopressor requirements, worsening abdominal distention, and increased gastric residual volume, along with an episode of emesis. The hospital nutritional-support service is consulted for feeding recommendations. A discussion with the patient's family reveals that during the previous 6 months, she lost approximately 15% of her usual body weight and decreased her food intake because of abdominal pain associated with eating. Her preoperative body weight was 51 kg (112 lb), or 90% of her ideal body weight. The physical examination reveals mild wasting of skeletal muscle and fat. Blood tests show hypomagnesemia, hypophosphatemia, and normal hepatic and renal function. Central venous parenteral nutrition is recommended. PMID:19741230

  20. Distinct Features of Nonthyroidal Illness in Critically Ill Patients With Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Kyung; Hwang, Sena; Kim, Daham; Lee, Seul Gi; Jeong, Seonhyang; Seol, Mi-Youn; Kim, Hyunji; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Shin, Dong Yeop; Chung, Woong Youn; Lee, Eun Jig; Lee, Jandee; Jo, Young Suk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nonthyroidal illness (NTI), often observed in critically ill patients, arises through diverse alterations in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. However, the causal relationship between underlying disease and NTI diversity in critically ill patients is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to examine NTI severity and adverse outcomes in critically ill patients with respect to their underlying disease(s). The medical records of 616 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) between January 2009 and October 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with known diseases or taking medications that affect thyroid function were excluded. All-cause mortality (ACM) and length of stay (LOS) in the ICU were assessed as adverse outcomes. The enrolled patients (n = 213) were divided into the following 4 groups according to the severity of NTI at the nadir of their thyroid function test (TFT): normal (n = 11, 5.2%), mild NTI (n = 113, 53.1%), moderate NTI (n = 78, 36.6%), and severe NTI (n = 11, 5.2%). There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of age and gender. NTI severity showed a significantly strong association with ACM (P < 0.0001) and a significant positive association with LOS in the ICU (P = 0.031). After adjusting for age, gender, and current medications affecting TFT, increasing NTI severity led to increased ACM (odds ratio = 3.101; 95% confidence interval = 1.711–5.618; P < 0.0001). Notably, the prevalence of moderate-to-severe NTI was markedly higher in patients with infectious disease than in those with noninfectious disease (P = 0.012). Consistent with this, serum C-reactive protein levels were higher in patients with moderate-to-severe NTI (P = 0.016). NTI severity is associated with increased ACM, LOS, and underlying infectious disease. Future studies will focus on the biological and clinical implications of infectious disease on the HPT axis. PMID

  1. Acute Febrile Illness Surveillance in a Tertiary Hospital Emergency Department: Comparison of Influenza and Dengue Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Olga D.; Gregory, Christopher J.; Santiago, Luis Manuel; Acosta, Héctor; Galarza, Ivonne E.; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Muñoz, Jorge; Bui, Duy M.; Oberste, M. Steven; Peñaranda, Silvia; García-Gubern, Carlos; Tomashek, Kay M.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, an increased proportion of suspected dengue cases reported to the surveillance system in Puerto Rico were laboratory negative. As a result, enhanced acute febrile illness (AFI) surveillance was initiated in a tertiary care hospital. Patients with fever of unknown origin for 2–7 days duration were tested for Leptospira, enteroviruses, influenza, and dengue virus. Among the 284 enrolled patients, 31 dengue, 136 influenza, and 3 enterovirus cases were confirmed. Nearly half (48%) of the confirmed dengue cases met clinical criteria for influenza. Dengue patients were more likely than influenza patients to have hemorrhage (81% versus 26%), rash (39% versus 9%), and a positive tourniquet test (52% versus 18%). Mean platelet and white blood cell count were lower among dengue patients. Clinical diagnosis can be particularly difficult when outbreaks of other AFI occur during dengue season. A complete blood count and tourniquet test may be useful to differentiate dengue from other AFIs. PMID:23382160

  2. Acute febrile illness surveillance in a tertiary hospital emergency department: comparison of influenza and dengue virus infections.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Olga D; Gregory, Christopher J; Santiago, Luis Manuel; Acosta, Héctor; Galarza, Ivonne E; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Muñoz, Jorge; Bui, Duy M; Oberste, M Steven; Peñaranda, Silvia; García-Gubern, Carlos; Tomashek, Kay M

    2013-03-01

    In 2009, an increased proportion of suspected dengue cases reported to the surveillance system in Puerto Rico were laboratory negative. As a result, enhanced acute febrile illness (AFI) surveillance was initiated in a tertiary care hospital. Patients with fever of unknown origin for 2-7 days duration were tested for Leptospira, enteroviruses, influenza, and dengue virus. Among the 284 enrolled patients, 31 dengue, 136 influenza, and 3 enterovirus cases were confirmed. Nearly half (48%) of the confirmed dengue cases met clinical criteria for influenza. Dengue patients were more likely than influenza patients to have hemorrhage (81% versus 26%), rash (39% versus 9%), and a positive tourniquet test (52% versus 18%). Mean platelet and white blood cell count were lower among dengue patients. Clinical diagnosis can be particularly difficult when outbreaks of other AFI occur during dengue season. A complete blood count and tourniquet test may be useful to differentiate dengue from other AFIs. PMID:23382160

  3. Air pollution and acute respiratory illness in five German communities

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J. ); Spix, C.; Wichmann, H.E. ); Malin, E. )

    1991-10-01

    To assess the impact of short-term exposure to air pollution on respiratory illness in children, the authors recruited pediatricians and hospitals in five German cities to report daily counts of children's visits for croup symptoms and obstructive bronchitis. Data were collected for at least 2 years in each location. These symptoms are predominantly found in very young children, with the croup reporting peaking at 2 years of age and obstructive bronchitis at 1 year. A total of 6,330 cases of croup and 4,755 cases of obstructive bronchitis were observed during the study. The distributions of these events were quite skewed and were modeled as a Poisson process. To focus the analysis on short-term correlations and avoid seasonal confounding, biannual, annual (seasonal), and six shorter term cycles were controlled for in the regression models. After controlling for short-term weather factors, total suspended particulate matter (TSP) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) were associated with croup cases. An increase in TSAP levels from 10 {mu}g/m{sup 3} to 70 {mu}g/m{sup 3} was associated with a 27% increase in cases of croup; the same increase in NO{sub 2} levels resulted in a 28% increase in cases. No pollutant was associated with daily cases of obstructive bronchitis.

  4. Effect of obesity on the pharmacokinetics of antimicrobials in critically ill patients: A structured review.

    PubMed

    Alobaid, Abdulaziz S; Hites, Maya; Lipman, Jeffrey; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Roberts, Jason A

    2016-04-01

    The increased prevalence of obesity presents challenges for clinicians aiming to provide optimised antimicrobial dosing in the intensive care unit. Obesity is likely to exacerbate the alterations to antimicrobial pharmacokinetics when the chronic diseases associated with obesity exist with the acute pathophysiological changes associated with critical illness. The purpose of this paper is to review the potential pharmacokinetic (PK) changes of antimicrobials in obese critically ill patients and the implications for appropriate dosing. We found that hydrophilic antimicrobials (e.g. β-lactams, vancomycin, daptomycin) were more likely to manifest altered pharmacokinetics in critically ill patients who are obese. In particular for β-lactam antibiotics, obesity is associated with a larger volume of distribution (Vd). In obese critically ill patients, piperacillin is also associated with a lower drug clearance (CL). For doripenem, these PK changes have been associated with reduced achievement of pharmacodynamic (PD) targets when standard drug doses are used. For vancomycin, increases in Vd are associated with increasing total body weight (TBW), meaning that the loading dose should be based on TBW even in obese patients. For daptomycin, an increased Vd is not considered to be clinically relevant. For antifungals, little data exist in obese critically ill patients; during fluconazole therapy, an obese patient had a lower Vd and higher CL than non-obese comparators. Overall, most studies suggested that standard dosage regimens of most commonly used antimicrobials are sufficient to achieve PD targets. However, it is likely that larger doses would be required for pathogens with higher minimum inhibitory concentrations. PMID:26988339

  5. Metabolic syndrome in patients with severe mental illness in Gorgan

    PubMed Central

    Kamkar, Mohammad Zaman; Sanagoo, Akram; Zargarani, Fatemeh; Jouybari, Leila; Marjani, Abdoljalal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Metabolic syndrome is commonly associated with cardiovascular diseases and psychiatric mental illness. Hence, we aimed to assess the metabolic syndrome among severe mental illness (SMI). Materials and Methods: The study included 267 patients who were referred to the psychiatric unit at 5th Azar Education Hospital of Golestan University of Medical Sciences in Gorgan, Iran. Results: The mean waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride and fasting blood glucose levels were significantly higher in the SMI with metabolic syndrome, but the high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol was significantly lower. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in SMI patients was 20.60%. There were significant differences in the mean of waist circumference, systolic (except for women) and diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride, HDL-cholesterol and fasting blood glucose in men and women with metabolic syndrome when compared with subjects without metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in SMI women was higher than men. The most age distribution was in range of 30-39 years old. The most prevalence of metabolic syndrome was in age groups 50-59 years old. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was increased from 30 to 59 years old. Conclusion: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with SMI in Gorgan is almost similar to those observed in Asian countries. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was lower than western countries. These observations may be due to cultural differences in the region. It should be mention that the families of mental illness subjects in our country believe that their patients must be cared better than people without mental illness. These findings of this study suggest that mental illness patients are at risk of metabolic syndrome. According to our results, risk factors such as age and gender differences may play an important role in the presence of metabolic syndrome. In our country, women do less

  6. Psychiatric complications in the critically ill cardiac patient.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, K M; Cassem, E H

    1993-01-01

    Psychiatric consultation to the critically ill cardiac patient focuses on several common problems: anxiety, delirium, depression, personality reactions, and behavioral disturbances. A review of the causes and treatment of anxiety in the coronary care unit is followed by a discussion of delirium in the critically ill cardiac patient. A description of delirium associated with the use of the intraaortic balloon pump and its treatment with high doses of intravenous haloperidol is also included. After the initial crisis has been stabilized in the critical care unit, the premorbid personality traits of the patient may emerge as behavioral disturbances--particularly as the duration of stay increases. The use of psychiatric consultation completes the discussion. PMID:8219821

  7. How music-inspired weeping can help terminally ill patients.

    PubMed

    Norton, Kay

    2011-09-01

    Music's power to improve the 'human condition' has been acknowledged since ancient times. Something as counter-intuitive as weeping in response to music can ameliorate suffering for a time even for terminally ill patients. Several benefits-including catharsis, communication, and experiencing vitality-can be associated with grieving in response to "sad" music. In addressing the potential rewards of such an activity for terminally ill patients, this author combines concepts from philosopher Jerrold R. Levinson's article, entitled "Music and Negative Emotion," an illustration from a major motion picture, and supporting research from medical reports and aesthetic writings. Carefully offering this experience is recommended for patients who retain the capacity to express preference. PMID:21626088

  8. Clinical use of lactate monitoring in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Increased blood lactate levels (hyperlactataemia) are common in critically ill patients. Although frequently used to diagnose inadequate tissue oxygenation, other processes not related to tissue oxygenation may increase lactate levels. Especially in critically ill patients, increased glycolysis may be an important cause of hyperlactataemia. Nevertheless, the presence of increased lactate levels has important implications for the morbidity and mortality of the hyperlactataemic patients. Although the term lactic acidosis is frequently used, a significant relationship between lactate and pH only exists at higher lactate levels. The term lactate associated acidosis is therefore more appropriate. Two recent studies have underscored the importance of monitoring lactate levels and adjust treatment to the change in lactate levels in early resuscitation. As lactate levels can be measured rapidly at the bedside from various sources, structured lactate measurements should be incorporated in resuscitation protocols. PMID:23663301

  9. Studying nursing interventions in acutely ill, cognitively impaired older adults

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Kathleen; Bradway, Christine; Hirschman, Karen B; Naylor, Mary D

    2015-01-01

    Background Between one and two of every five hospitalized older adults have cognitive deficits, often not accurately assessed or well managed. Cognitive impairment adds substantially to the complexity of these patients’ care, places them at high risk for poor outcomes and increases the cost of health care. Methods We describe three evidence-based interventions, each capitalizing on the unique contributions of nurses and designed to improve outcomes of hospitalized older adults who have cognitive deficits. Interventions of varying intensity were compared across three hospitals (Phase I) and subsequently within the same hospitals (Phase II). All enrolled patients were screened during their index hospitalizations and cognitive deficits were communicated to relevant health care team members (Augmented Standard Care-ASC, lowest intensity). At one hospital, ASC was the only intervention. Patients at a second hospital also had care influenced by specially prepared registered nurses (Resource Nurse Care-RNC, medium intensity). Finally, patients at third hospital also received advanced practice nurse coordinated care (Transitional Care Model-TCM, higher intensity). In Phase II, newly enrolled patients at these same hospitals all received the TCM. We summarize major themes from review of multiple data sources and researcher recollections related to facilitators and barriers to implementing a complex research study. Findings Effective implementation of the three intervention strategies depended on clinician engagement and communication; degree of participation by nurses in the educational program with subsequent practice improvement; and success of advanced practice nurses in implementing the TCM with both with patients, family caregivers and clinicians. Implications Based on lessons learned in implementing complex research studies within the “real world” of clinical practice settings, recommendations focus on strengthening facilitators, minimizing barriers and gaining

  10. Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury in Older Adults With Critical Illness: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kane-Gill, Sandra L.; Sileanu, Florentina E.; Murugan, Raghavan; Trietley, Gregory S.; Handler, Steven M.; Kellum, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Risk for acute kidney injury (AKI) in older adults has not been systematically evaluated. We sought to delineate the determinants of risk for AKI in older compared to younger adults. Study Design Retrospective analysis of patients hospitalized in July 2000–September 2008. Setting & Participants We identified all adult patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) (n=45,655) in a large tertiary care university hospital system. We excluded patients receiving dialysis or kidney transplant prior to hospital admission, and patients with baseline creatinine ≥ 4 mg/dl, liver transplantation, indeterminate AKI status, or unknown age, leaving 39,938 patients. Predictor We collected data on multiple susceptibilities and exposures including age, sex, race, body mass, comorbid conditions, severity of illness, baseline kidney function, sepsis, and shock. Outcomes We defined AKI according to KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) criteria. We examined susceptibilities and exposures across age strata for impact on development of AKI. Measurements We calculated area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for prediction of AKI across age groups. Results 25,230 patients (63.2%) were aged 55 years or older. Overall 25,120 patients (62.9%) developed AKI (69.2% aged 55 years or older). Examples of risk factors for AKI in the oldest age category (75 years or older) were drugs (vancomycin, aminoglycosides, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories), history of hypertension (OR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.02–1.25) and sepsis (OR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.68–2.67). Fewer variables remained predictive of AKI as age increased and the model for older patients was less predictive (p<0.001). For the age categories 18–54, 55–64, 65–74, and 75 years or older, the AUCs were 0.744 (95% CI, 0.735–0.752), 0.714 (95% CI, 0.702–0.726), 0.706 (95% CI, 0.693–0.718), and 0.673 (95% CI, 0.661–0.685), respectively. Limitations Analysis may not apply to non-ICU patients

  11. Lactate and lactate clearance in acute cardiac care patients

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Picariello, Claudio; Dini, Carlotta Sorini; Gensini, Gian Franco; Valente, Serafina

    2012-01-01

    Hyperlactataemia is commonly used as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in intensive care settings. Recent studies documented that serial lactate measurements over time (or lactate clearance), may be clinically more reliable than lactate absolute value for risk stratification in different pathological conditions. While the negative prognostic role of hyperlactataemia in several critical ill diseases (such as sepsis and trauma) is well established, data in patients with acute cardiac conditions (i.e. acute coronary syndromes) are scarce and controversial. The present paper provides an overview of the current available evidence on the clinical role of lactic acid levels and lactate clearance in acute cardiac settings (acute coronary syndromes, cardiogenic shock, cardiac surgery), focusing on its prognostic role. PMID:24062898

  12. Basal glucosuria is ubiquitous in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Richard; Kurz, Annabella; Adelsmayr, Gabriel; Holzinger, Ulrike

    2015-04-01

    The 'renal threshold for glucose' has never been evaluated in critically ill patients. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the renal glucose threshold in this patient group using high-sensitivity urine glucose assays. In this retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data, we analysed 100 consecutive critically ill patients from a medical intensive care unit (ICU). Arterial blood glucose and spot urine glucose were simultaneously quantified daily during the first week after ICU admission. Three hundred seventy-three pairs of blood/urine glucose were plotted in five pre-defined categories of blood glucose (<80, 80-109, 110-139, 140-179 and ≥180 mg/dL). Urine glucose values of the five categories were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test to assess the relation with blood glucose. Urine glucose was detected in virtually all of the urine samples. Urine glucose showed a positive nonlinear correlation with blood glucose and was significantly elevated at blood glucose levels of 140-179 and ≥180 mg/dL compared with lower blood glucose ranges. Basal glucosuria is ubiquitous in critically ill patients. A 'soft' renal threshold for glucose is present at blood glucose levels in the range of 140-179 mg/dL. PMID:25810226

  13. Endocrine emergencies in critically ill patients: Challenges in diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Jindal, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Endocrine emergencies pose unique challenges for the attending intensivist while managing critically ill patients. Besides taking care of primary disease state, one has to divert an equal attention to the possible associated endocrinopathies also. One of the common reasons for inability to timely diagnose an endocrinal failure in critically ill patients being the dominance of other severe systemic diseases and their clinical presentation. The timely diagnosis and administration of therapeutic interventions for these endocrine disorders can improve the outcome in critically ill patients. The timely diagnosis and administration of timely therapeutics in common endocrine disorders like severe thyroid disease, acute adrenal insufficiency and diabetic ketoacidosis significantly influence the outcome and prognosis. Careful evaluation of clinical history and a high degree of suspicion are the corner stone to diagnose such problems. Aggressive management of the patient is equally important as the complications are devastating and can prove highly fatal. The present article is an attempt to review some of the common endocrine emergencies in intensive care unit and the challenges associated with their diagnosis and management. PMID:23087855

  14. [ABCDE--a systematic approach to critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    Thim, Troels; Krarup, Niels Henrik; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Løfgren, Bo

    2010-11-22

    This systematic approach to the immediate assessment and treatment of the critically ill or injured patient is applicable in all clinical emergencies. The aim of the ABCDE approach is to facilitate immediate life-saving treatment and thus buy time for definite diagnosis and treatment by breaking down complex clinical situations into manageable parts. Application of the ABCDE approach may improve treatment quality. PMID:21092723

  15. Tainted water on tap: what to tell patients about preventing illness from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Chalupka, Stephanie

    2005-11-01

    Annual cases of waterborne illness in the United States are estimated to number about 900,000, but most experts believe the incidence to be much higher. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulates the nation's drinking water supply, setting maximum allowable levels for 87 known natural and synthetic contaminants; but thousands more go unregulated. This article describes selected contaminants and their known health effects, which range from acute gastroenteritis to cancer and reproductive and developmental effects. It discusses which populations are more vulnerable, outlines assessment, and elucidates nurses' roles in patient education and as community advocates for safer drinking water. PMID:16264302

  16. Acute, Severe Cryptosporidiosis in an Immunocompetent Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Tallant, Caitlin; Huddleston, Patrick; Alshanberi, Asim

    2016-01-01

    Severe diarrheal illness in children can be attributed to a number of different microbiological agents. Without appropriate microbiological testing of stool samples, patients who present with multiple days of severe diarrhea might have a delay in proper diagnosis and treatment. Here, we report a case of an immunocompetent pediatric patient presenting with acute cryptosporidiosis. Humans and bovine species are known hosts of cryptosporidium and several studies have evaluated the zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidium from cattle to humans. Adding diagnostic tests for cryptosporidium like Ziehl-Neelsen staining of stool or fecal rapid antigen detection techniques should be considered in the workup of patients presenting with undifferentiated, severe diarrheal illness, especially in those who have close contact with livestock. PMID:27478580

  17. Enteral nutrition intolerance in critically ill septic burn patients.

    PubMed

    Lavrentieva, Athina; Kontakiotis, Theodore; Bitzani, Militsa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency of enteral feeding intolerance in critically ill septic burn patients, the effect of enteral feeding intolerance on the efficacy of feeding, the correlation between the infection marker (procalcitonin [PCT]) and the nutrition status marker (prealbumin) and the impact of feeding intolerance on the outcome of septic burn patients. From January 2009 to December 2012 the data of all burn patients with the diagnosis of sepsis who were placed on enteral nutrition were analyzed. Septic patients were divided into two groups: group A, septic patients who developed feeding intolerance; group B, septic patients who did not develop feeding intolerance. Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients were analyzed and compared. The diagnosis of sepsis was applied to 29% of all patients. Of these patients 35% developed intolerance to enteral feeding throughout the septic period. A statistically significant increase in mean PCT level and a decrease in prealbumin level was observed during the sepsis period. Group A patients had statistically significant lower mean caloric intake, higher PCT:prealbumin ratio, higher pneumonia incidence, higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Maximum Score, a longer duration of mechanical ventilation, and a higher mortality rate in comparison with the septic patients without gastric feeding intolerance. The authors concluded that a high percentage of septic burn patients developed enteral feeding intolerance. Enteral feeding intolerance seems to have a negative impact on the patients' nutritional status, morbidity, and mortality. PMID:24879397

  18. Concepts of trust among patients with serious illness.

    PubMed

    Mechanic, D; Meyer, S

    2000-09-01

    This paper examines conceptions of trust among three groups of respondents diagnosed with either breast cancer, Lyme disease or mental illness. Interviews were carried out using an open-ended interview guide to explore how patients made assessments of trust in their doctors and health care plans. The guide followed a conceptual approach that asked questions about competence, agency/fiduciary responsibility, control, disclosure and confidentiality. Respondents were given ample opportunity to raise other areas of concern. The data were organized using the NUDIST software package for the analysis of non-numerical and unstructured qualitative data. Patients viewed trust as an iterative process and commonly tested their physicians against their knowledge and expectations. Interpersonal competence, involving caring, concern and compassion, was the most common aspect of trust reported, with listening as a central focus. Most patient comments referred to learnable skills and not simply to personality characteristics. Technical competence also received high priority but was often assessed by reputation or interpersonal cues. Patients were much concerned that doctors be their agents and fight for their interests with health care plans. Disclosure and confidentiality were less common concerns; most patients anticipated that doctors would be honest with them and respect their confidences. Patients' responses also appeared to vary by their disease, their socio-demographic characteristics, their involvement with self-help groups, and how their illness conditions unfolded. PMID:10975226

  19. Acute Undifferentiated Febrile Illness in Rural Cambodia: A 3-Year Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Tara C.; Siv, Sovannaroth; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Fleischmann, Erna; Ariey, Frédéric; Buchy, Philippe; Guillard, Bertrand; González, Iveth J.; Christophel, Eva-Maria; Abdur, Rashid; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Bell, David; Menard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, malaria control has been successfully implemented in Cambodia, leading to a substantial decrease in reported cases. Wide-spread use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) has revealed a large burden of malaria-negative fever cases, for which no clinical management guidelines exist at peripheral level health facilities. As a first step towards developing such guidelines, a 3-year cross-sectional prospective observational study was designed to investigate the causes of acute malaria-negative febrile illness in Cambodia. From January 2008 to December 2010, 1193 febrile patients and 282 non-febrile individuals were recruited from three health centers in eastern and western Cambodia. Malaria RDTs and routine clinical examination were performed on site by health center staff. Venous samples and nasopharyngeal throat swabs were collected and analysed by molecular diagnostic tests. Blood cultures and blood smears were also taken from all febrile individuals. Molecular testing was applied for malaria parasites, Leptospira, Rickettsia, O. tsutsugamushi, Dengue- and Influenza virus. At least one pathogen was identified in 73.3% (874/1193) of febrile patient samples. Most frequent pathogens detected were P. vivax (33.4%), P. falciparum (26.5%), pathogenic Leptospira (9.4%), Influenza viruses (8.9%), Dengue viruses (6.3%), O. tsutsugamushi (3.9%), Rickettsia (0.2%), and P. knowlesi (0.1%). In the control group, a potential pathogen was identified in 40.4%, most commonly malaria parasites and Leptospira. Clinic-based diagnosis of malaria RDT-negative cases was poorly predictive for pathogen and appropriate treatment. Additional investigations are needed to understand their impact on clinical disease and epidemiology, and the possible role of therapies such as doxycycline, since many of these pathogens were seen in non-febrile subjects. PMID:24755844

  20. Inflammation biomarkers and delirium in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Delirium is a common occurrence in critically ill patients and is associated with an increase in morbidity and mortality. Septic patients with delirium may differ from a general critically ill population. The aim of this investigation was to study the relationship between systemic inflammation and the development of delirium in septic and non-septic critically ill patients. Methods We performed a prospective cohort study in a 20-bed mixed intensive care unit (ICU) including 78 (delirium = 31; non-delirium = 47) consecutive patients admitted for more than 24 hours. At enrollment, patients were allocated to septic or non-septic groups according to internationally agreed criteria. Delirium was diagnosed using the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit (CAM-ICU) during the first 72 hours of ICU admission. Blood samples were collected within 12 hours of enrollment for determination of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, soluble TNF Receptor (STNFR)-1 and -2, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and adiponectin. Results Out of all analyzed biomarkers, only STNFR1 (P = 0.003), STNFR2 (P = 0.005), adiponectin (P = 0.005) and IL-1β (P < 0.001) levels were higher in delirium patients. Adjusting for sepsis and sedation, these biomarkers were also independently associated with delirium occurrence. However, none of them were significant influenced by sepsis. Conclusions STNFR1, STNFR2, adiponectin and IL-1β were associated with delirium. Sepsis did not modify the relationship between the biomarkers and delirium occurrence. PMID:24886875

  1. New-onset atrial fibrillation in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Sibley, Stephanie; Muscedere, John

    2015-01-01

    New-onset atrial fibrillation is a common problem in critically ill patients, with reported incidence ranging from 5% to 46%. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The present review summarizes studies investigating new-onset atrial fibrillation conducted in the critical care setting, focusing on the etiology, management of the hemodynamically unstable patient, rate versus rhythm control, ischemic stroke risk and anticoagulation. Recommendations for an approach to management in the intensive care unit are drawn from the results of these studies. PMID:26057373

  2. Selective Plasma Exchange for Critically Ill Patients Accompanied With Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Hajime; Fukuda, Hirokazu; Okuyama, Manabu; Igarashi, Toshiko

    2016-08-01

    Selective plasma exchange is a blood purification therapy in which simple plasma exchange is performed using a selective membrane plasma separator (pore size of 0.03 µm). Seven critically ill patients accompanied with thrombocytopenia were treated with selective plasma exchange using fresh frozen plasma. The total bilirubin levels and prothrombin time international normalized ratios decreased significantly after treatment. The total protein, albumin, and fibrinogen levels increased significantly after treatment. Selective plasma exchange may be a useful blood purification therapy for removing causal substances and retaining coagulation factors in patients accompanied with thrombocytopenia. PMID:27523072

  3. Pain and Agitation Management in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Julie; Wright, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Pain and agitation may be difficult to assess in a critically ill patient. Pain is best assessed by self-reporting pain scales; but in patients who are unable to communicate, behavioral pain scales seem to have benefit. Patients' sedation level should be assessed each shift and preferably by a validated ICU tool, such as the RASS or SAS scale. Pain is most appropriately treated with the use of opiates, and careful consideration should be given to the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of various analgesics to determine the optimal agent for each individual patient. Sedation levels should preferably remain light or with the use of a daily awakening trial. Preferred treatment of agitation is analgosedation with the addition of nonbenzodiazepine sedatives if necessary. There are risks associated with each agent used in the treatment of pain and agitation, and it is important to monitor patients for effectiveness, signs of toxicity, and adverse drug reactions. PMID:26897427

  4. Illness perceptions among cardiac patients: Relation to depressive symptomatology and sex

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Sherry L.; Krepostman, Suzan; Brooks, Dina; Arthur, Heather; Scholely, Pat; Suskin, Neville; Jaglal, Susan; Abramson, Beth L.; Stewart, Donna E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study examined cardiovascular disease (CVD) illness perceptions and how they relate to depressive symptomatology among women and men. Methods Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients at two hospitals were approached, and 661 consented to participate (504 men, 157 women; 75% response rate). Participants completed a survey including the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ). Results Women perceived a significantly more chronic course (P<.001) and more cyclical episodes (P<.05)than men did, while men perceived greater personal control (P<.001) and treatability (P<.05)than women did. Participants perceived diet, heredity, and stress as the greatest CVD causes. For women (F=5.49, P<.001), greater depressive symptomatology was significantly related to younger age (P<.05), lower activity status (P<.001), and perceiving a chronic time course (P<.01). For men (F=7.68, P<.001), greater depressive symptomatology was significantly related to being non-white (P<.05), lower activity status (P<.001), less exercise behavior (P=.01), and three illness perceptions, namely, perceiving a chronic course (P<.05), greater consequences (P<.001), and lower treatability (P<.05). Conclusion Women, compared with men, are more likely to attribute CVD to causes beyond their control and to perceive CVD as a chronic, untreatable condition. Illness perceptions were related to depressive symptomatology, which suggests that interventions to reframe these perceptions may be warranted to improve emotional health in the context of CVD. PMID:16198188

  5. Evidence to Support Tooth Brushing in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Nancy J.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth brushing in critically ill patients has been advocated by many as a standard of care despite the limited evidence to support this practice. Attention has been focused on oral care as the evidence accumulates to support an association between the bacteria in the oral microbiome and those respiratory pathogens that cause pneumonia. It is plausible to assume that respiratory pathogens originating in the oral cavity are aspirated into the lungs, causing infection. A recent study of the effects of a powered toothbrush on the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia was stopped early because of a lack of effect in the treatment group. This review summarizes the evidence that supports the effectiveness of tooth brushing in critically ill adults and children receiving mechanical ventilation. Possible reasons for the lack of benefit of tooth brushing demonstrated in clinical trials are discussed. Recommendations for future trials in critically ill patients are suggested. With increased emphasis being placed on oral care, the evidence that supports this intervention must be evaluated carefully. PMID:21532045

  6. Acute viral hepatitis E presenting with haemolytic anaemia and acute renal failure in a patient with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Laxmikant Ramkumarsingh; Aggarwal, Amitesh; Jain, Piyush; Rajpal, Surender; Agarwal, Mukul P

    2015-10-01

    The association of acute hepatitis E viral (HEV) infection with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency leading to extensive intravascular haemolysis is a very rare clinical entity. Here we discuss such a patient, who presented with acute HEV illness, developed severe intravascular haemolysis and unusually high levels of bilirubin, complicated by acute renal failure (ARF), and was later on found to have a deficiency of G6PD. The patient recovered completely with haemodialysis and supportive management. PMID:25500531

  7. [Endoscopic treatment in critically ill patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Kheladze, Z S; Dzhaiani, S V; Tsutskiridze, B N; Kheladze, Zv Z; Chakhunashvili, G K; Chakhunashvili, D K

    2010-03-01

    The goal of the current research was to ascertain the optimal methods of an endoscopic haemostasis in critical care patients with GDB. The research was conducted on critically ill patients. The different endoscopic methods of treatment: injectional hemostasis, irrigation with local hemostatics, thermo coagulation, and combined method were used. Treatment with injectional hemostasis resulted in hemostasis in 75% of patients. Irrigation with local hemostatics was conducted using the local hemostatic agent caprofer and (or) 10% solution of epsylonaminocapronal acid. The final hemostasis was achieved in the 90% of the cases; bleeding was stopped in 85% of the cases when the hemorrhages occurred from chronic ulcers. The effect of thermo coagulation method was 80-85%. Combined method of treatment (combination of the irrigation with caprofer and thermo coagulation) helped to achieve 95% of the final hemostasis in critically ill patients. The achieved results certify that the combined use of caprofer and method of electro coagulation in critical care patients with GDB is very perspective. Simultaneously with this, it is also recommended to use anti-segregation therapy with blockers of proton pomp and boosting the defense of the mucous tissue with high doses of mucogen. PMID:20413810

  8. Acute Neurological Illness in a Kidney Transplant Recipient Following Infection With Enterovirus-D68: An Emerging Infection?

    PubMed

    Wali, R K; Lee, A H; Kam, J C; Jonsson, J; Thatcher, A; Poretz, D; Ambardar, S; Piper, J; Lynch, C; Kulkarni, S; Cochran, J; Djurkovic, S

    2015-12-01

    We report the first case of enterovirus-D68 infection in an adult living-donor kidney transplant recipient who developed rapidly progressive bulbar weakness and acute flaccid limb paralysis following an upper respiratory infection. We present a 45-year-old gentleman who underwent pre-emptive living-donor kidney transplantation for IgA nephropathy. Eight weeks following transplantation, he developed an acute respiratory illness from enterovirus/rhinovirus that was detectable in nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs. Within 24 h of onset of respiratory symptoms, the patient developed binocular diplopia which rapidly progressed to multiple cranial nerve dysfunctions (acute bulbar syndrome) over the next 24 h. Within the next 48 h, asymmetric flaccid paralysis of the left arm and urinary retention developed. While his neurological symptoms were evolving, the Centers for Disease Control reported that the enterovirus strain from the NP swabs was, in fact, Enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68). Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain demonstrated unique gray matter and anterior horn cell changes in the midbrain and spinal cord, respectively. Constellation of these neurological symptoms and signs was suggestive for postinfectious encephalomyelitis (acute disseminated encephalomyelitis [ADEM]) from EV-D68. Treatment based on the principles of ADEM included intensive physical therapy and other supportive measures, which resulted in a steady albeit slow improvement in his left arm and bulbar weakness, while maintaining stable allograft function. PMID:26228743

  9. Clinical review: Helmet and non-invasive mechanical ventilation in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) has proved to be an excellent technique in selected critically ill patients with different forms of acute respiratory failure. However, NIV can fail on account of the severity of the disease and technical problems, particularly at the interface. The helmet could be an alternative interface compared to face mask to improve NIV success. We performed a clinical review to investigate the main physiological and clinical studies assessing the efficacy and related issues of NIV delivered with a helmet. A computerized search strategy of MEDLINE/PubMed (January 2000 to May 2012) and EMBASE (January 2000 to May 2012) was conducted limiting the search to retrospective, prospective, nonrandomized and randomized trials. We analyzed 152 studies from which 33 were selected, 12 physiological and 21 clinical (879 patients). The physiological studies showed that NIV with helmet could predispose to CO2 rebreathing and increase the patients' ventilator asynchrony. The main indications for NIV were acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, hypoxemic acute respiratory failure (community-acquired pneumonia, postoperative and immunocompromised patients) and hypercapnic acute respiratory failure. In 9 of the 21 studies the helmet was compared to a face mask during either continous positive airway pressure or pressure support ventilation. In eight studies oxygenation was similar in the two groups, while the intubation rate was similar in four and lower in three studies for the helmet group compared to face mask group. The outcome was similar in six studies. The tolerance was better with the helmet in six of the studies. Although these data are limited, NIV delivered by helmet could be a safe alternative to the face mask in patients with acute respiratory failure. PMID:23680299

  10. Flucytosine Pharmacokinetics in a Critically Ill Patient Receiving Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kunka, Megan E.; Cady, Elizabeth A.; Woo, Heejung C.; Thompson Bastin, Melissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. A case report evaluating flucytosine dosing in a critically ill patient receiving continuous renal replacement therapy. Summary. This case report outlines an 81-year-old male who was receiving continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) for acute renal failure and was being treated with flucytosine for the treatment of disseminated Cryptococcus neoformans infection. Due to patient specific factors, flucytosine was empirically dose adjusted approximately 50% lower than intermittent hemodialysis (iHD) recommendations and approximately 33% lower than CRRT recommendations. Peak and trough levels were obtained, which were supratherapeutic, and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. The patient experienced thrombocytopenia, likely due to elevated flucytosine levels, and flucytosine was ultimately discontinued. Conclusion. Despite conservative flucytosine dosing for a patient receiving CVVH, peak and trough serum flucytosine levels were supratherapeutic (120 μg/mL at 2 hours and 81 μg/mL at 11.5 hours), which increased drug-related adverse effects. The results indicate that this conservative dosing regimen utilizing the patient's actual body weight was too aggressive. This case report provides insight into flucytosine dosing in CVVH, a topic that has not been investigated previously. Further pharmacokinetic studies of flucytosine dosing in critically ill patients receiving CVVH are needed in order to optimize pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters while avoiding toxic flucytosine exposure. PMID:26246919

  11. Acute Cholecystitis in Patients with Scrub Typhus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun; Ji, Misuk; Hwang, Jeong-Hwan; Lee, Ja-Yeon; Lee, Ju-Hyung; Chung, Kyung Min; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2015-11-01

    Acute cholecystitis is a rare complication of scrub typhus. Although a few such cases have been reported in patients with scrub typhus, the clinical course is not well described. Of 12 patients, acute cholecystitis developed in 66.7% (8/12) of patients older than 60 yr. The scrub typhus group with acute cholecystitis had marginal significant longer hospital stay and higher cost than the group without cholecystitis according to propensity score matching. Scrub typhus should be kept in mind as a rare etiology of acute cholecystitis in endemic areas because the typical signs of scrub typhus such as skin rash and eschar can present after the abdominal pain. PMID:26539017

  12. Terminally ill cancer patients' wish to hasten death.

    PubMed

    Kelly, B; Burnett, P; Pelusi, D; Badger, S; Varghese, F; Robertson, M

    2002-07-01

    This exploratory study investigated factors associated with the wish to hasten death among a sample of terminally ill cancer patients. Semi-structured interviews conducted on a total of 72 hospice and home palliative care patients were subjected to qualitative analysis using QSR-NUDIST. The main themes to emerge suggested that patients with a high wish to hasten death had greater concerns with physical symptoms and psychological suffering, perceived themselves to be more of a burden to others, and experienced higher levels of demoralization, while also reporting less confidence in symptom control, fewer social supports, less satisfaction with life experiences and fewer religious beliefs when compared with patients who had a moderate or no wish to hasten death. The implications of these findings will be discussed. PMID:12132547

  13. Relationship between glycated hemoglobin, Intensive Care Unit admission blood sugar and glucose control with ICU mortality in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoodpoor, Ata; Hamishehkar, Hadi; Shadvar, Kamran; Beigmohammadi, Mohammadtaghi; Iranpour, Afshin; Sanaie, Sarvin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The association between hyperglycemia and mortality is believed to be influenced by the presence of diabetes mellitus (DM). In this study, we evaluated the effect of preexisting hyperglycemia on the association between acute blood glucose management and mortality in critically ill patients. The primary objective of the study was the relationship between HbA1c and mortality in critically ill patients. Secondary objectives of the study were relationship between Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission blood glucose and glucose control during ICU stay with mortality in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: Five hundred patients admitted to two ICUs were enrolled. Blood sugar and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) concentrations on ICU admission were measured. Age, sex, history of DM, comorbidities, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, sequential organ failure assessment score, hypoglycemic episodes, drug history, mortality, and development of acute kidney injury and liver failure were noted for all patients. Results: Without considering the history of diabetes, nonsurvivors had significantly higher HbA1c values compared to survivors (7.25 ± 1.87 vs. 6.05 ± 1.22, respectively, P < 0.001). Blood glucose levels in ICU admission showed a significant correlation with risk of death (P < 0.006, confidence interval [CI]: 1.004–1.02, relative risk [RR]: 1.01). Logistic regression analysis revealed that HbA1c increased the risk of death; with each increase in HbA1c level, the risk of death doubled. However, this relationship was not statistically significant (P: 0.161, CI: 0.933–1.58, RR: 1.2). Conclusions: Acute hyperglycemia significantly affects mortality in the critically ill patients; this relation is also influenced by chronic hyperglycemia. PMID:27076705

  14. Focus on peripherally inserted central catheters in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Cotogni, Paolo; Pittiruti, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Venous access devices are of pivotal importance for an increasing number of critically ill patients in a variety of disease states and in a variety of clinical settings (emergency, intensive care, surgery) and for different purposes (fluids or drugs infusions, parenteral nutrition, antibiotic therapy, hemodynamic monitoring, procedures of dialysis/apheresis). However, healthcare professionals are commonly worried about the possible consequences that may result using a central venous access device (CVAD) (mainly, bloodstream infections and thrombosis), both peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and centrally inserted central catheters (CICCs). This review aims to discuss indications, insertion techniques, and care of PICCs in critically ill patients. PICCs have many advantages over standard CICCs. First of all, their insertion is easy and safe -due to their placement into peripheral veins of the arm- and the advantage of a central location of catheter tip suitable for all osmolarity and pH solutions. Using the ultrasound-guidance for the PICC insertion, the risk of hemothorax and pneumothorax can be avoided, as well as the possibility of primary malposition is very low. PICC placement is also appropriate to avoid post-procedural hemorrhage in patients with an abnormal coagulative state who need a CVAD. Some limits previously ascribed to PICCs (i.e., low flow rates, difficult central venous pressure monitoring, lack of safety for radio-diagnostic procedures, single-lumen) have delayed their start up in the intensive care units as common practice. Though, the recent development of power-injectable PICCs overcomes these technical limitations and PICCs have started to spread in critical care settings. Two important take-home messages may be drawn from this review. First, the incidence of complications varies depending on venous accesses and healthcare professionals should be aware of the different clinical performance as well as of the different risks

  15. [Pulmonary-renal crosstalk in the critically ill patient].

    PubMed

    Donoso F, Alejandro; Arriagada S, Daniela; Cruces R, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the development of renal replacement therapy, mortality of acute renal failure remains high, especially when occurring simultaneously with distant organic failure as it is in the case of the acute respiratory distress syndrome. In this update, birideccional deleterious relationship between lung and kidney on the setting of organ dysfunction is reviewed, which presents important clinical aspects of knowing. Specifically, the renal effects of acute respiratory distress syndrome and the use of positive-pressure mechanical ventilation are discussed, being ventilator induced lung injury one of the most common models for studying the lung-kidney crosstalk. The role of renal failure induced by mechanical ventilation (ventilator-induced kidney injury) in the pathogenesis of acute renal failure is emphasized. We also analyze the impact of the acute renal failure in the lung, recognizing an increase in pulmonary vascular permeability, inflammation, and alteration of sodium and water channels in the alveolar epithelial. This conceptual model can be the basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies to use in patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. PMID:26338439

  16. Should Health Care Providers Uphold the DNR of a Terminally Ill Patient Who Attempts Suicide?

    PubMed

    Campo-Engelstein, Lisa; Jankowski, Jane; Mullen, Marcy

    2016-06-01

    An individual's right to refuse life-sustaining treatment is a fundamental expression of patient autonomy; however, supporting this right poses ethical dilemmas for healthcare providers when the patient has attempted suicide. Emergency physicians encounter patients who have attempted suicide and are likely among the first medical providers to face the dilemma of honoring the patient's DNR or intervening to reverse the effects of potentially fatal actions. We illustrate this issue by introducing a case example in which the DNR of a terminally ill woman was not honored because the cause of her cardiac arrest was suicide. We argue that although a terminal diagnosis should change the way health care providers respond to a suicide attempt, many of the theoretical underpinnings for how one should treat suicide attempts-especially the criterion of external reasonability, that is the action to withhold or withdraw life-sustaining measures is reasonable independent of the precipitating event-are common to all situations (Brown et al. in Am J Bioeth 13(3):3-12, 2013). The presumption that patients who attempt suicide lack capacity due to acute mental illness is flawed because it fails to account for a competent individual's reasonable preference to not be forced to live in an unbearable, terminal condition. In states without legislation allowing physician aid in dying, patients and providers must grapple with these limitations on a case-by-case basis. In cases where the patient has a limited life expectancy and there is not concern for psychiatric illness as the primary cause of the suicidal action, we argue that the negative right to refuse life-sustaining treatment should prevail. PMID:26223360

  17. How do terminally ill patients at home take their medication?

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, G

    1999-11-01

    Compliance with prescribed medication was assessed in 111 terminally ill patients referred to a community palliative care team using semistructured interviews and pill counting. One-hundred-and-six patients were prescribed a total of 597 drugs; of these patients, 64 (60%) were noncompliant. Thirty-five patients (33%) took less medication than prescribed, usually due to experiencing, or anxieties about, adverse events; the commonest drugs involved were analgesics. Seventeen patients (16%) took additional medication, usually purchased over the counter in response to inadequate symptom control or to adverse events from other drugs; the most common preparations were vitamins and analgesics. Twelve patients (11%) both took less medication than prescribed and also purchased medication over the counter. Most patients (90%) had two or more prescribers; patients who saw their general practitioners as their main prescriber were more likely to adhere to their prescribed medication. Patients who omitted and/or reduced their medication were more likely to see the hospital as their main prescriber. Drugs prescribed four times daily were most likely to be omitted and/or reduced. PMID:10715753

  18. Prognostic value of circulating DNA levels in critically ill and trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues Filho, Edison Moraes; Ikuta, Nilo; Simon, Daniel; Regner, Andrea Pereira

    2014-01-01

    The number of studies investigating circulating nucleic acids as potential biomarkers has increased in recent years. The detection of such biomarkers is a minimally invasive alternative for the diagnosis and prognosis of various clinical conditions. The value of circulating DNA levels as a predictive biomarker has been demonstrated in patients suffering from numerous acute pathologies that have a high risk of intensive care needs and in-hospital deaths. The mechanism by which circulating DNA levels increase in patients with these conditions remains unclear. In this review, we focused on the potential use of this biomarker for prognosis prediction in critically ill and trauma patients. The literature review was performed by searching MedLine using PubMed in the English language. PMID:25295826

  19. The central role of hypothalamic inflammation in the acute illness response and cachexia.

    PubMed

    Burfeind, Kevin G; Michaelis, Katherine A; Marks, Daniel L

    2016-06-01

    When challenged with a variety of inflammatory threats, multiple systems across the body undergo physiological responses to promote defense and survival. The constellation of fever, anorexia, and fatigue is known as the acute illness response, and represents an adaptive behavioral and physiological reaction to stimuli such as infection. On the other end of the spectrum, cachexia is a deadly and clinically challenging syndrome involving anorexia, fatigue, and muscle wasting. Both of these processes are governed by inflammatory mediators including cytokines, chemokines, and immune cells. Though the effects of cachexia can be partially explained by direct effects of disease processes on wasting tissues, a growing body of evidence shows the central nervous system (CNS) also plays an essential mechanistic role in cachexia. In the context of inflammatory stress, the hypothalamus integrates signals from peripheral systems, which it translates into neuroendocrine perturbations, altered neuronal signaling, and global metabolic derangements. Therefore, we will discuss how hypothalamic inflammation is an essential driver of both the acute illness response and cachexia, and why this organ is uniquely equipped to generate and maintain chronic inflammation. First, we will focus on the role of the hypothalamus in acute responses to dietary and infectious stimuli. Next, we will discuss the role of cytokines in driving homeostatic disequilibrium, resulting in muscle wasting, anorexia, and weight loss. Finally, we will address mechanisms and mediators of chronic hypothalamic inflammation, including endothelial cells, chemokines, and peripheral leukocytes. PMID:26541482

  20. [Subjective feeling of patient on his illness and his treatment].

    PubMed

    Llorca, P-M

    2013-09-01

    Subjective feeling of schizophrenic patients has been underestimated in the study of this illness. Subjective experience associated with the onset of the disease is of interest in a clinical point of view but also in the study of the underlying mechanisms. The fields of cognitive psychology, but also neuroscientific inputs, provide new paradigms to understand schizophrenia. In a more global perspective, subjective experience has an important impact on quality of life and is highly related to symptomatology and treatments. Identification of these subjective dimensions is needed to develop more efficacious strategies. PMID:24084429

  1. Echocardiographic Hemodynamic Monitoring in the Critically Ill Patient

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Bermejo, Francisco J; Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; Guerrero-De-Mier, Manuel; López-Álvaro, Julián

    2011-01-01

    Echocardiography has shown to be an essential diagnostic tool in the critically ill patient's assessment. In this scenario the initial fluid therapy, such as it is recommended in the actual clinical guidelines, not always provides the desired results and maintains a considerable incidence of cardiorrespiratory insufficiency. Echocardiography can council us on these patients' clinical handling, not only the initial fluid therapy but also on the best-suited election of the vasoactive/inotropic treatment and the early detection of complications. It contributes as well to improving the etiological diagnosis, allowing one to know the heart performance with more precision. The objective of this manuscript is to review the more important parameters that can assist the intensivist in theragnosis of hemodynamically unstable patients. PMID:22758613

  2. Concept analysis of good death in terminally ill patients.

    PubMed

    Granda-Cameron, Clara; Houldin, Arlene

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this concept analysis of good death was to examine the attributes of a good death and explore the changes of the concept over time and its impact on terminally ill patients. The method used for this analysis was the Rodgers' evolutionary method. A literature search was completed using Medline Ovid and Journal Storage (JSTOR).The findings describe the evolution of the good death concept over time from the prehistoric era followed by premodern, modern, and postmodern times. In addition, information is presented about surrogate terms, attributes, antecedents, and consequences associated with good death followed by analysis and discussion of the findings. General attributes of a good death include pain and symptom management, awareness of death, patient's dignity, family presence, family support, and communication among patient, family, and health care providers. PMID:22363039

  3. Baseline acetylcholinesterase activity and serotonin plasma levels are not associated with delirium in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Tomasi, Cristiane Damiani; Salluh, Jorge; Soares, Márcio; Vuolo, Francieli; Zanatta, Francieli; Constantino, Larissa de Souza; Zugno, Alexandra Ioppi; Ritter, Cristiane; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate whether plasma serotonin levels or acetylcholinesterase activities determined upon intensive care unit admission could predict the occurrence of acute brain dysfunction in intensive care unit patients. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted with a sample of 77 non-consecutive patients observed between May 2009 and September 2010. Delirium was determined using the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit tool, and the acetylcholinesterase and serotonin measurements were determined from blood samples collected up to a maximum of 24 h after the admission of the patient to the intensive care unit. Results In the present study, 38 (49.6%) patients developed delirium during their intensive care unit stays. Neither serum acetylcholinesterase activity nor serotonin level was independently associated with delirium. No significant correlations of acetylcholinesterase activity or serotonin level with delirium/coma-free days were observed, but in the patients who developed delirium, there was a strong negative correlation between the acetylcholinesterase level and the number of delirium/coma-free days, indicating that higher acetylcholinesterase levels are associated with fewer days alive without delirium or coma. No associations were found between the biomarkers and mortality. Conclusions Neither serum acetylcholinesterase activity nor serotonin level was associated with delirium or acute brain dysfunction in critically ill patients. Sepsis did not modify these relationships. PMID:26340158

  4. Acute Monocytic Leukemia Masquerading Behçet's Disease-Like Illness at Onset in an Elderly Female.

    PubMed

    Koba, Shigeru; Sekioka, Toshio; Takeda, Sorou; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Nishimura, Keisuke; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 74-year-old Japanese female was hospitalized with fever and high C-reactive protein. She developed palatal herpangina-like aphthous ulcers, localized intestinal wall thickening, terminal ileum ulcers, and an erythematous acneiform rash; thus Behçet's disease-like illness was suspected. Significant peripheral blood acute monocytosis developed during her hospitalization and acute monocytic leukemia (FAB M5b) with normal karyotype was diagnosed. By immunostaining, the infiltrating cells in the skin and the terminal ileum were identified as monocytic leukemic cells. This case exhibited a unique initial presentation of Behçet's disease-like illness associated with acute monocytic leukemia. PMID:27610252

  5. Acute Monocytic Leukemia Masquerading Behçet's Disease-Like Illness at Onset in an Elderly Female

    PubMed Central

    Koba, Shigeru; Sekioka, Toshio; Takeda, Sorou; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Nishimura, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 74-year-old Japanese female was hospitalized with fever and high C-reactive protein. She developed palatal herpangina-like aphthous ulcers, localized intestinal wall thickening, terminal ileum ulcers, and an erythematous acneiform rash; thus Behçet's disease-like illness was suspected. Significant peripheral blood acute monocytosis developed during her hospitalization and acute monocytic leukemia (FAB M5b) with normal karyotype was diagnosed. By immunostaining, the infiltrating cells in the skin and the terminal ileum were identified as monocytic leukemic cells. This case exhibited a unique initial presentation of Behçet's disease-like illness associated with acute monocytic leukemia. PMID:27610252

  6. Burden and viral aetiology of influenza-like illness and acute respiratory infection in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Tramuto, Fabio; Maida, Carmelo Massimo; Napoli, Giuseppe; Mammina, Caterina; Casuccio, Alessandra; Cala', Cinzia; Amodio, Emanuele; Vitale, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the viral aetiology of influenza-like illness (ILI) and acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI) among patients requiring intensive care unit admission. A cross-sectional retrospective study was carried out in Sicily over a 4-year period. A total of 233 respiratory samples of patients with ILI/ARTI admitted to intensive care units were molecularly analyzed for the detection of a comprehensive panel of aetiologic agents of viral respiratory infections. About 45% of patients was positive for at least one pathogen. Single aetiology occurred in 75.2% of infected patients, while polymicrobial infection was found in 24.8% of positive subjects. Influenza was the most common aetiologic agent (55.7%), especially among adults. Most of patients with multiple aetiology (76.9%) were adults and elderly. Mortality rates among patients with negative or positive aetiology did not significantly differ (52.4% and 47.6%, respectively). Highly transmissible respiratory pathogens are frequently detected among patients with ILI/ARTI admitted in intensive care units, showing the occurrence of concurrent infections by different viruses. The knowledge of the circulation of several types of microorganisms is of crucial importance in terms of appropriateness of therapies, but also for the implication in prevention strategies and hospital epidemiology. PMID:26706819

  7. Differences in hospital glycemic control and insulin requirements in patients recovering from critical illness and those without prior critical illness

    PubMed Central

    Miller, April D; Phillips, Leslie M; Schulz, Richard M; Bookstaver, P Brandon; Rudisill, Celeste N

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Hospital patients recovering from critical illness on general floors often receive insulin therapy based on protocols designed for patients admitted directly to general floors. The objective of this study is to compare glycemic control and insulin dosing in patients recovering from critical illness and those without prior critical illness. Methods Medical record review of blood glucose measurements and insulin dosing in 25 patients under general ward care while transitioning from the intensive care unit (transition group) and 25 patients admitted directly to the floor (direct floor group). Results Average blood glucose did not differ significantly between groups (transition group 9.49 mmol/L, direct floor group 9.6 mmol/L; P = 0.83). Significant differences in insulin requirements were observed between groups with average daily doses of 55.9 units in patients transitioning from the intensive care unit (ICU) versus 25.6 units in the direct floor group (P = 0.004). Conclusions Patients recovering from critical illness required significantly larger doses of insulin than those patients admitted directly to the floor. Managing insulin therapy in patients transitioning from the ICU may require greater insulin doses. PMID:22291498

  8. Practice of strict glycemic control in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Marcus J; de Graaff, Mart J; Royakkers, Annic A N M; van Braam Houckgeest, Floris; van der Sluijs, Johannes P; Kieft, Hans; Spronk, Peter E

    2008-11-01

    Blood glucose control aiming at normoglycemia, frequently referred to as "strict glycemic control", decreases mortality and morbidity of critically ill patients. We searched the medical literature for export opinions, surveys, and clinical reports on blood glucose control in intensive care medicine. While strict glycemic control has been recommended standard of care for critically ill patients, the risk of severe hypoglycemia with strict glycemic control is frequently mentioned by experts. Some rationalize this risk, though others strongly point out the high incidence of hypoglycemia to be (one) reason not to perform strict glycemic control. Implementation of strict glycemic control is far from complete in intensive care units across the world. Frequently local guidelines accept higher blood glucose levels than those with strict glycemic control. Only a minority of retrieved manuscripts are on blood glucose regimens with the lower targets as with strict glycemic control. Hypoglycemia certainly is encountered with blood glucose control, in particular with strict glycemic control. Reports show intensive care-nurses can adequately and safely perform strict glycemic control. Implementation of strict glycemic control is far from complete, at least in part because of the feared risks of hypoglycemia. The preference for hyperglycemia over intermittent hypoglycemia is irrational, however, because there is causal evidence of harm for the former but only associative evidence of harm for the latter. For several reasons it is wise to have strict glycemic control being a nurse-based strategy. PMID:18971884

  9. Altered hippocampal morphology in unmedicated patients with major depressive illness.

    PubMed

    Bearden, Carrie E; Thompson, Paul M; Avedissian, Christina; Klunder, Andrea D; Nicoletti, Mark; Dierschke, Nicole; Brambilla, Paolo; Soares, Jair C

    2009-01-01

    Despite converging evidence that major depressive illness is associated with both memory impairment and hippocampal pathology, findings vary widely across studies and it is not known whether these changes are regionally specific. In the present study we acquired brain MRIs (magnetic resonance images) from 31 unmedicated patients with MDD (major depressive disorder; mean age 39.2+/-11.9 years; 77% female) and 31 demographically comparable controls. Three-dimensional parametric mesh models were created to examine localized alterations of hippocampal morphology. Although global volumes did not differ between groups, statistical mapping results revealed that in MDD patients, more severe depressive symptoms were associated with greater left hippocampal atrophy, particularly in CA1 (cornu ammonis 1) subfields and the subiculum. However, previous treatment with atypical antipsychotics was associated with a trend towards larger left hippocampal volume. Our findings suggest effects of illness severity on hippocampal size, as well as a possible effect of past history of atypical antipsychotic treatment, which may reflect prolonged neuroprotective effects. This possibility awaits confirmation in longitudinal studies. PMID:19843010

  10. PHARMACOEPIDEMIOLOGY OF QT-INTERVAL PROLONGING DRUG ADMINISTRATION IN CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Bradley D.; Dixon, David J.; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Zehnbauer, Barbara A.; Buchman, Timothy G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Commonly prescribed medications produce QT-prolongation and are associated with torsades de pointes in non-acutely ill patients. We examined patterns of QT-prolonging drug use in critically ill individuals. Methods An administrative critical care database was utilized to identify patients receiving drugs associated with QT-interval prolongation or torsades de pointes for ≥24 hours. Results Data from 212,016 individuals collected over a 63-month period was examined to identify 6,125 patients (2.9%) receiving QT-interval prolonging drugs. These individuals had a mean (±SE) age of 63.0 (±0.2) years, were predominately male (55.4%) and Caucasian (84.4%), and were exposed to QT-interval prolonging agents for a mean (±SE) 53.1 (±0.4) % of their ICU length of stay. Respiratory and cardiovascular illnesses were the most common reasons for ICU admission (17.2%, 12.0%, respectively). The most frequently administered agents were Amiodarone (23.5%), Haloperidol (19.8%), and Levofloxacin (19.7%); no other single agent accounted for more than 10% of QT-interval prolonging drugs prescribed. Coadministration of QT-prolonging drugs occurred in 1,139 patients (18.6%). These patients had higher ICU mortality rate and longer ICU lengths of stay, compared to patients not receiving coadministered drugs (p<0.001 for both). For patients receiving coadministered drugs, overlap occurred for 71.4 (±0.8) % of the time that the drugs were given. Amiodarone coadministration with antibiotics, Haloperidol coadministration with antibiotics, and Haloperidol coadministration with Amiodarone, comprised 15.2%, 13.7%, and 9.4%, of all coadministered agents, respectively. Conclusions QT-prolonging drugs were used in a minority of critically ill patients. Prospective evaluation in the ICU environment is necessary to determine whether administration of these agents is associated with adverse cardiac events comparable to those reported in ambulatory patients. PMID:18693297