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Sample records for acyrthosiphon pisum genome

  1. Genome Sequence of the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Aphids are important agricultural pests and also biological models for studies of insect-plant interactions, symbiosis, virus vectoring, and the developmental causes of extreme phenotypic plasticity. Here we present the 464 Mb draft genome assembly of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. This first published whole genome sequence of a basal hemimetabolous insect provides an outgroup to the multiple published genomes of holometabolous insects. Pea aphids are host-plant specialists, they can reproduce both sexually and asexually, and they have coevolved with an obligate bacterial symbiont. Here we highlight findings from whole genome analysis that may be related to these unusual biological features. These findings include discovery of extensive gene duplication in more than 2000 gene families as well as loss of evolutionarily conserved genes. Gene family expansions relative to other published genomes include genes involved in chromatin modification, miRNA synthesis, and sugar transport. Gene losses include genes central to the IMD immune pathway, selenoprotein utilization, purine salvage, and the entire urea cycle. The pea aphid genome reveals that only a limited number of genes have been acquired from bacteria; thus the reduced gene count of Buchnera does not reflect gene transfer to the host genome. The inventory of metabolic genes in the pea aphid genome suggests that there is extensive metabolite exchange between the aphid and Buchnera, including sharing of amino acid biosynthesis between the aphid and Buchnera. The pea aphid genome provides a foundation for post-genomic studies of fundamental biological questions and applied agricultural problems. PMID:20186266

  2. The power of EST sequence data: Relation to Acyrthosiphon pisum genome annotation and functional genomics initiatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genes important to aphid biology, survival and reproduction were successfully identified by use of a genomics approach. We created and described the Sequencing, compilation, and annotation of the approxiamtely 525Mb nuclear genome of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, which represents an important ...

  3. The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) genome encodes two divergent early developmental programs.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Elizabeth J; Leask, Megan P; Dearden, Peter K

    2013-05-01

    The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) can reproduce either sexually or asexually (parthenogenetically), giving rise, in each case, to almost identical adults. These two modes of reproduction are accompanied by differences in ovarian morphology and the developmental environment of the offspring, with sexual forms producing eggs that are laid, whereas asexual development occurs within the mother. Here we examine the effect each mode of reproduction has on the expression of key maternal and axis patterning genes; orthodenticle (otd), hunchback (hb), caudal (cad) and nanos (nos). We show that three of these genes (Ap-hb, Ap-otd and Ap-cad) are expressed differently between the sexually and asexually produced oocytes and embryos of the pea aphid. We also show, using immunohistochemistry and cytoskeletal inhibitors, that Ap-hb RNA is localized differently between sexually and asexually produced oocytes, and that this is likely due to differences in the 3' untranslated regions of the RNA. Furthermore, Ap-hb and Ap-otd have extensive expression domains in early sexually produced embryos, but are not expressed at equivalent stages in asexually produced embryos. These differences in expression likely correspond with substantial changes in the gene regulatory networks controlling early development in the pea aphid. These data imply that in the evolution of parthenogenesis a new program has evolved to control the development of asexually produced embryos, whilst retaining the existing, sexual, developmental program. The patterns of modification of these developmental processes mirror the changes that we see in developmental processes between species, in that early acting pathways in development are less constrained, and evolve faster, than later ones. We suggest that the evolution of the novel asexual development pathway in aphids is not a simple modification of an ancestral system, but the evolution of two very different developmental mechanisms occurring within a single

  4. Immunity and other defenses in pea aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent genomic analyses of arthropod defense mechanisms suggest conservation of key elements underlying responses to pathogens, parasites and stresses. At the center of pathogen-induced immune responses are signaling pathways triggered by the recognition of fungal, bacterial and viral signatures. These pathways result in the production of response molecules, such as antimicrobial peptides and lysozymes, which degrade or destroy invaders. Using the recently sequenced genome of the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum), we conducted the first extensive annotation of the immune and stress gene repertoire of a hemipterous insect, which is phylogenetically distantly related to previously characterized insects models. Results Strikingly, pea aphids appear to be missing genes present in insect genomes characterized to date and thought critical for recognition, signaling and killing of microbes. In line with results of gene annotation, experimental analyses designed to characterize immune response through the isolation of RNA transcripts and proteins from immune-challenged pea aphids uncovered few immune-related products. Gene expression studies, however, indicated some expression of immune and stress-related genes. Conclusions The absence of genes suspected to be essential for the insect immune response suggests that the traditional view of insect immunity may not be as broadly applicable as once thought. The limitations of the aphid immune system may be representative of a broad range of insects, or may be aphid specific. We suggest that several aspects of the aphid life style, such as their association with microbial symbionts, could facilitate survival without strong immune protection. PMID:20178569

  5. Acyrthosiphon pisum AQP2: a multifunctional insect aquaglyceroporin.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Ian S; Shakesby, Ally J; Hwang, Jin Ha; Choi, Won Gyu; Martínková, Natália; Douglas, Angela E; Roberts, Daniel M

    2012-03-01

    Annotation of the recently sequenced genome of the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) identified a gene ApAQP2 (ACYPI009194, Gene ID: 100168499) with homology to the Major Intrinsic Protein/aquaporin superfamily of membrane channel proteins. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that ApAQP2 is a member of an insect-specific clade of this superfamily. Homology model structures of ApAQP2 showed a novel array of amino acids comprising the substrate selectivity-determining "aromatic/arginine" region of the putative transport pore. Subsequent characterization of the transport properties of ApAQP2 upon expression in Xenopus oocytes supports an unusual substrate selectivity profile. Water permeability analyses show that the ApAQP2 protein exhibits a robust mercury-insensitive aquaporin activity. However unlike the water-specific ApAQP1 protein, ApAQP2 forms a multifunctional transport channel that shows a wide permeability profile to a range of linear polyols, including the potentially biologically relevant substrates glycerol, mannitol and sorbitol. Gene expression analysis indicates that ApAQP2 is highly expressed in the insect bacteriocytes (cells bearing the symbiotic bacteria Buchnera) and the fat body. Overall the results demonstrate that ApAQP2 is a novel insect aquaglyceroporin which may be involved in water and polyol transport in support of the Buchnera symbiosis and aphid osmoregulation. PMID:22166843

  6. Immunity and defense in pea aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent genomic analyses of arthropod defense mechanisms suggest conservation of key elements underlying responses to pathogens, parasites, and stresses. At the center of pathogen-induced immune response are signaling pathways triggered by the recognition of fungal, bacterial, and viral signatures. T...

  7. Antifeedant activity and high mortality in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphidae) induced by biostable insect kinin analogs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The insect kinins are multifunctional neuropeptides found in a variety of arthropod species, including the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphidae). A series of biostable insect kinin analogs based on the shared C-terminal pentapeptide core region were fed in solutions of artificial diet t...

  8. Conditional Facilitation of an Aphid Vector, Acyrthosiphon pisum, by the Plant Pathogen, Pea Enation Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, Simon; Powell, Glen

    2010-01-01

    Plant pathogens can induce symptoms that affect the performance of insect herbivores utilizing the same host plant. Previous studies examining the effects of infection of tic bean, Vicia faba L. (Fabales: Fabaceae), by pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV), an important disease of legume crops, indicated there were no changes in the growth and reproductive rate of its primary vector the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) (Hemiptera: Aphididae). Here, we report the results of laboratory experiments investigating how A. pisum responded to PEMV infection of a different host plant, Pisum sativum L., at different stages of symptom development. Aphid growth rate was negatively related to the age of the host plant, but when they were introduced onto older plants with well-developed PEMV symptoms they exhibited a higher growth rate compared to those developing on uninfected plants of the same age. In choice tests using leaf discs A. pisum showed a strong preference for discs from PEMV-infected peas, probably in response to visual cues from the yellowed and mottled infected leaves. When adults were crowded onto leaves using clip-cages they produced more winged progeny on PEMV-infected plants. The results indicate that PEMV produces symptoms in the host plant that can enhance the performance of A. pisum as a vector, modify the production of winged progeny and affect their spatial distribution. The findings provide further evidence that some insect vector/plant pathogen interactions could be regarded as mutualistic rather than commensal when certain conditions regarding the age, stage of infection and species of host plant are met. PMID:21067425

  9. Glutathione S-transferases of Aulacorthum solani and Acyrthosiphon pisum: partial purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Francis, F; Haubruge, E; Gaspar, C; Dierickx, P J

    2001-05-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GST) play an important role in the detoxification of many substances including allelochemicals from plants. Brassicaceae plants contain glucosinolates and emit volatile isothiocyanates which affect the GST system. A comparison of the GST of two aphid species, the generalist Aulacorthum solani found on Brassicaceae and the Fabaceae specialist Acyrthosiphon pisum, was made to try to explain their respective feeding behaviour. Differences of GST were determined among the two aphid species based on purification by affinity chromatography, SDS-PAGE and on kinetic studies. Purification yields using an epoxy-activated Sepharose 6B column were highly different for the two aphid species (18% and 34% for A. solani and A. pisum, respectively). These variations were confirmed by SDS-PAGE. While only a 27-kDa band was observed for A. pisum, two bands of approximately 25-kDa were visualized for the generalist aphid, A. solani. Considering the kinetic results, differences of Km and Vmax were observed following the aphid species when a range of substrates (CDNB and DCNB) and GSH concentrations were tested. Studies on the detoxification enzymes of generalist and specialist herbivores would be undertaken to determine accurately the effect of the host plant on the organisms eating them, particularly in terms of biochemical and ecological advantages. PMID:11337260

  10. Cytochrome P450 gene, CYP4G51, modulates hydrocarbon production in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nan; Fan, Yong-Liang; Bai, Yu; Li, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Zhan-Feng; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2016-09-01

    Terrestrial insects deposit a layer of hydrocarbons (HCs) as waterproofing agents on their epicuticle. The insect-specific CYP4G genes, subfamily members of P450, have been found in all insects with sequenced genomes to date. They are critical for HC biosynthesis in Drosophila; however, their functional roles in other insects including the piercing-sucking hemipterous aphids remain unknown. In this study, we presented the molecular characterization and a functional study of the CYP4G51 gene in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris). CYP4G51 transcript was detectable across the whole life cycle of A. pisum, and was prominently expressed in the aphid head and abdominal cuticle. Up-regulation of CYP4G51 under desiccation stress was more significant in the third instar nymphs compared with the adults. Also, up-regulation of CYP4G51 was observed when the aphids fed on an artificial diet compared with those fed on the broad bean plant, and was positively correlated with a high level of cuticular HCs (CHCs). RNAi knockdown of CYP4G51 significantly reduced its expression and caused reductions in both internal and external HCs. A deficiency in CHCs resulted in aphids being more susceptible to desiccation, with increased mortality under desiccation stress. The current results confirm that CYP4G51 modulates HC biosynthesis to protect aphids from desiccation. Moreover, our data also indicate that saturated and straight-chain HCs play a major role in cuticular waterproofing in the pea aphid. A. pisum CYP4G51 could be considered as a novel RNAi target in the field of insect pest management. PMID:27425674

  11. Pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum sequesters plant-derived secondary metabolite L-DOPA for wound healing and UVA resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Wang, Xing-Xing; Zhang, Zhan-Feng; Chen, Nan; Zhu, Jing-Yun; Tian, Hong-Gang; Fan, Yong-Liang; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Herbivores can ingest and store plant-synthesized toxic compounds in their bodies, and sequester those compounds for their own benefits. The broad bean, Vicia faba L., contains a high quantity of L-DOPA (L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine), which is toxic to many insects. However, the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, can feed on V. faba normally, whereas many other aphid species could not. In this study, we investigated how A. pisum utilizes plant-derived L-DOPA for their own benefit. L-DOPA concentrations in V. faba and A. pisum were analyzed to prove L-DOPA sequestration. L-DOPA toxicity was bioassayed using an artificial diet containing high concentrations of L-DOPA. We found that A. pisum could effectively adapt and store L-DOPA, transmit it from one generation to the next. We also found that L-DOPA sequestration verity differed in different morphs of A. pisum. After analyzing the melanization efficiency in wounds, mortality and deformity of the aphids at different concentrations of L-DOPA under ultraviolet radiation (UVA 365.0 nm for 30 min), we found that A. pisum could enhance L-DOPA assimilation for wound healing and UVA-radiation protection. Therefore, we conclude that A. pisum could acquire L-DOPA and use it to prevent UVA damage. This study reveals a successful co-evolution between A. pisum and V. faba. PMID:27006098

  12. Pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum sequesters plant-derived secondary metabolite L-DOPA for wound healing and UVA resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Wang, Xing-Xing; Zhang, Zhan-Feng; Chen, Nan; Zhu, Jing-Yun; Tian, Hong-Gang; Fan, Yong-Liang; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Herbivores can ingest and store plant-synthesized toxic compounds in their bodies, and sequester those compounds for their own benefits. The broad bean, Vicia faba L., contains a high quantity of L-DOPA (L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine), which is toxic to many insects. However, the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, can feed on V. faba normally, whereas many other aphid species could not. In this study, we investigated how A. pisum utilizes plant-derived L-DOPA for their own benefit. L-DOPA concentrations in V. faba and A. pisum were analyzed to prove L-DOPA sequestration. L-DOPA toxicity was bioassayed using an artificial diet containing high concentrations of L-DOPA. We found that A. pisum could effectively adapt and store L-DOPA, transmit it from one generation to the next. We also found that L-DOPA sequestration verity differed in different morphs of A. pisum. After analyzing the melanization efficiency in wounds, mortality and deformity of the aphids at different concentrations of L-DOPA under ultraviolet radiation (UVA 365.0 nm for 30 min), we found that A. pisum could enhance L-DOPA assimilation for wound healing and UVA-radiation protection. Therefore, we conclude that A. pisum could acquire L-DOPA and use it to prevent UVA damage. This study reveals a successful co-evolution between A. pisum and V. faba. PMID:27006098

  13. Determination of melatonin in Acyrthosiphon pisum aphids by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Escrivá, Laura; Manyes, Lara; Barberà, Miquel; Martínez-Torres, David; Meca, Guiseppe

    2016-03-01

    Melatonin is a hormone mainly involved in the regulation of circadian and seasonal rhythms in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Despite the identification of melatonin in many insects, its involvement in the insect seasonal response remains unclear. A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method has been developed for melatonin analysis in aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) for the first time. After comparing two different procedures and five extraction solvents, a sample preparation procedure with a mixture of methanol/water (50:50) was selected for melatonin extraction. The method was validated by analyzing melatonin recovery at three spiked concentrations (5, 50 and 100 pg/mg) and showed satisfactory recoveries (75-110%), and good repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation (<10%). Limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) were 1 pg/mg and 5 pg/mg, respectively. Eight concentration levels were used for constructing the calibration curves which showed good linearity between LOQ and 200 times LOQ. The validated method was successfully applied to 26 aphid samples demonstrating its usefulness for melatonin determination in insects. This is -to our knowledge- the first identification of melatonin in aphids by LC-MS/MS. PMID:26778054

  14. Solenopsis invicta virus 3: Mapping of Structural Proteins, Ribosomal Frameshifting, and Similarities to Acyrthosiphon pisum virus and Kelp fly virus

    PubMed Central

    Valles, Steven M.; Bell, Susanne; Firth, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3) is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that infects the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. We show that the second open reading frame (ORF) of the dicistronic genome is expressed via a frameshifting mechanism and that the sequences encoding the structural proteins map to both ORF2 and the 3' end of ORF1, downstream of the sequence that encodes the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The genome organization and structural protein expression strategy resemble those of Acyrthosiphon pisum virus (APV), an aphid virus. The capsid protein that is encoded by the 3' end of ORF1 in SINV-3 and APV is predicted to have a jelly-roll fold similar to the capsid proteins of picornaviruses and caliciviruses. The capsid-extension protein that is produced by frameshifting, includes the jelly-roll fold domain encoded by ORF1 as its N-terminus, while the C-terminus encoded by the 5' half of ORF2 has no clear homology with other viral structural proteins. A third protein, encoded by the 3' half of ORF2, is associated with purified virions at sub-stoichiometric ratios. Although the structural proteins can be translated from the genomic RNA, we show that SINV-3 also produces a subgenomic RNA encoding the structural proteins. Circumstantial evidence suggests that APV may also produce such a subgenomic RNA. Both SINV-3 and APV are unclassified picorna-like viruses distantly related to members of the order Picornavirales and the family Caliciviridae. Within this grouping, features of the genome organization and capsid domain structure of SINV-3 and APV appear more similar to caliciviruses, perhaps suggesting the basis for a "Calicivirales" order. PMID:24686475

  15. The physiology of sterol nutrition in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    PubMed

    Bouvaine, Sophie; T Behmer, Spencer; Lin, George G; Faure, Marie-Line; Grebenok, Robert J; Douglas, Angela E

    2012-11-01

    The phloem sap of fava bean (Vicia faba) plants utilized by the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum contains three sterols, cholesterol, stigmasterol and sitosterol, in a 2:2:1 ratio. To investigate the nutritional value of these sterols, pea aphids were reared on chemically-defined diets containing each sterol at 0.1, 1 and 10μgml(-1) with a sterol-free diet as control. Larval growth rate and aphid lifespan did not vary significantly across the diets, indicating that sterol reserves can buffer some performance indices against a shortfall in dietary sterol over at least one generation. However, lifetime reproductive output was depressed in aphids on diets containing stigmasterol or no sterol, relative to diets supplemented with cholesterol or sitosterol. The cholesterol density of embryos in teneral adults was significantly higher than in the total body; and the number and biomass of embryos in aphids on diets with stigmasterol and no sterols were reduced relative to diets with cholesterol or sitosterol, indicating that the reproductive output of the pea aphid can be limited by the amount and composition of dietary sterol. In a complementary RNA-seq analysis of pea aphids reared on plants and diets with different sterol contents, 7.6% of the 17,417 detected gene transcripts were differentially expressed. Transcript abundance of genes with annotated function in sterol utilization did not vary significantly among treatments, suggesting that the metabolic response to dietary sterol may be mediated primarily at the level of enzyme function or metabolite concentration. PMID:22878342

  16. Biostable multi-Aib analogs of tachykinin-related peptides demonstrate potent oral aphicidal activity in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tachykinin-related peptides (TRPs) are multifunctional neuropeptides found in a variety of arthropod species, including the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphidae). Two novel biostable TRP analogs containing multiple, sterically-hindered Aib residues were synthesized and found to exhi...

  17. Biostable and PEG polymer-conjugated insect pyrokinin analogs demonstrate antifeedant activity and induce high mortality in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pyrokinins are multifunctional neuropeptides found in a variety of arthropod species, including the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphidae). A series of biostable pyrokinin analogs based on the shared C-terminal pentapeptide core region were fed in solutions of artificial diet to the ...

  18. Selection of Reference Genes for Expression Analysis Using Quantitative Real-Time PCR in the Pea Aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) (Hemiptera, Aphidiae)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Xuguo

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate gene expression study and obtain accurate qRT-PCR analysis, normalization relative to stable expressed housekeeping genes is required. In this study, expression profiles of 11 candidate reference genes, including actin (Actin), elongation factor 1 α (EF1A), TATA-box-binding protein (TATA), ribosomal protein L12 (RPL12), β-tubulin (Tubulin), NADH dehydrogenase (NADH), vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (v-ATPase), succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB), 28S ribosomal RNA (28S), 16S ribosomal RNA (16S), and 18S ribosomal RNA (18S) from the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, under different developmental stages and temperature conditions, were investigated. A total of four analytical tools, geNorm, Normfinder, BestKeeper, and the ΔCt method, were used to evaluate the suitability of these genes as endogenous controls. According to RefFinder, a web-based software tool which integrates all four above-mentioned algorithms to compare and rank the reference genes, SDHB, 16S, and NADH were the three most stable house-keeping genes under different developmental stages and temperatures. This work is intended to establish a standardized qRT-PCR protocol in pea aphid and serves as a starting point for the genomics and functional genomics research in this emerging insect model. PMID:25423476

  19. A protein from the salivary glands of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, is essential in feeding on a host plant.

    PubMed

    Mutti, Navdeep S; Louis, Joe; Pappan, Loretta K; Pappan, Kirk; Begum, Khurshida; Chen, Ming-Shun; Park, Yoonseong; Dittmer, Neal; Marshall, Jeremy; Reese, John C; Reeck, Gerald R

    2008-07-22

    In feeding, aphids inject saliva into plant tissues, gaining access to phloem sap and eliciting (and sometimes overcoming) plant responses. We are examining the involvement, in this aphid-plant interaction, of individual aphid proteins and enzymes, as identified in a salivary gland cDNA library. Here, we focus on a salivary protein we have arbitrarily designated Protein C002. We have shown, by using RNAi-based transcript knockdown, that this protein is important in the survival of the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) on fava bean, a host plant. Here, we further characterize the protein, its transcript, and its gene, and we study the feeding process of knockdown aphids. The encoded protein fails to match any protein outside of the family Aphididae. By using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, the transcript and the protein were localized to a subset of secretory cells in principal salivary glands. Protein C002, whose sequence contains an N-terminal secretion signal, is injected into the host plant during aphid feeding. By using the electrical penetration graph method on c002-knockdown aphids, we find that the knockdown affects several aspects of foraging and feeding, with the result that the c002-knockdown aphids spend very little time in contact with phloem sap in sieve elements. Thus, we infer that Protein C002 is crucial in the feeding of the pea aphid on fava bean. PMID:18621720

  20. Characterization of non-LTR retrotransposable TRAS elements in the aphids Acyrthosiphon pisum and Myzus persicae (Aphididae, Hemiptera).

    PubMed

    Monti, Valentina; Serafini, Chiara; Manicardi, Gian Carlo; Mandrioli, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    A non-LTR TRAS retrotransposon (identified as TRASAp1) has been amplified in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum and its presence has been assessed also in the peach potato aphid Myzus persicae. This TRAS element possesses 2 overlapping ORFs (a gag-ORF1 and a pol-ORF2 containing the reverse transcriptase and the endonuclease domains) that show a similarity ranging from 40% to 48% to proteins coded by other TRAS elements identified in insects (including the beetle Tribolium castaneum and the moth Bombyx mori). The study of the TRAS chromosomal insertion sites, performed by standard fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and fiber FISH, showed that TRAS elements were located in a subtelomeric position, just before the telomeric (TTAGG) n repeats. In both the aphid species, TRAS elements were present at all termini of autosomes, but the 2 X chromosome telomeres show a clear-cut structural difference. Indeed, cromomycin A3 staining, together with FISH using a TRAS probe, revealed that TRAS signals only occur at the telomere opposite to the NOR-bearing one. Lastly, the analysis of the distribution of TRAS retrotransposons in a M. persicae strain possessing spontaneous fragmentations of the X chromosomes assessed that TRAS elements were not involved in the healing of de novo telomeres. PMID:23530141

  1. The combined effects of bacterial symbionts and aging on life history traits in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    PubMed

    Laughton, Alice M; Fan, Maretta H; Gerardo, Nicole M

    2014-01-01

    While many endosymbionts have beneficial effects on hosts under specific ecological conditions, there can also be associated costs. In order to maximize their own fitness, hosts must facilitate symbiont persistence while preventing symbiont exploitation of resources, which may require tight regulation of symbiont populations. As a host ages, the ability to invest in such mechanisms may lessen or be traded off with demands of other life history traits, such as survival and reproduction. Using the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, we measured survival, lifetime fecundity, and immune cell counts (hemocytes, a measure of immune capacity) in the presence of facultative secondary symbionts. Additionally, we quantified the densities of the obligate primary bacterial symbiont, Buchnera aphidicola, and secondary symbionts across the host's lifetime. We found life history costs to harboring some secondary symbiont species. Secondary symbiont populations were found to increase with host age, while Buchnera populations exhibited a more complicated pattern. Immune cell counts peaked at the midreproductive stage before declining in the oldest aphids. The combined effects of immunosenescence and symbiont population growth may have important consequences for symbiont transmission and maintenance within a host population. PMID:24185857

  2. Modification of Cry4Aa toward Improved Toxin Processing in the Gut of the Pea Aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, Michael A.; Chougule, Nanasaheb P.; Deist, Benjamin R.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2016-01-01

    Aphids are sap-sucking insects (order: Hemiptera) that cause extensive damage to a wide range of agricultural crops. Our goal was to optimize a naturally occurring insecticidal crystalline (Cry) toxins produced by the soil-dwelling bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis for use against the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. On the basis that activation of the Cry4Aa toxin is a rate-limiting factor contributing to the relatively low aphicidal activity of this toxin, we introduced cathepsin L and cathepsin B cleavage sites into Cry4Aa for rapid activation in the aphid gut environment. Incubation of modified Cry4Aa and aphid proteases in vitro demonstrated enhanced processing of the toxin into the active form for some of the modified constructs relative to non-modified Cry4Aa. Aphids fed artificial diet with toxin at a final concentration of 125 μg/ml showed enhanced mortality after two days for one of the four modified constructs. Although only modest toxin improvement was achieved by use of this strategy, such specific toxin modifications designed to overcome factors that limit aphid toxicity could be applied toward managing aphid populations via transgenic plant resistance. PMID:27171411

  3. Modification of Cry4Aa toward Improved Toxin Processing in the Gut of the Pea Aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Michael A; Chougule, Nanasaheb P; Deist, Benjamin R; Bonning, Bryony C

    2016-01-01

    Aphids are sap-sucking insects (order: Hemiptera) that cause extensive damage to a wide range of agricultural crops. Our goal was to optimize a naturally occurring insecticidal crystalline (Cry) toxins produced by the soil-dwelling bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis for use against the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. On the basis that activation of the Cry4Aa toxin is a rate-limiting factor contributing to the relatively low aphicidal activity of this toxin, we introduced cathepsin L and cathepsin B cleavage sites into Cry4Aa for rapid activation in the aphid gut environment. Incubation of modified Cry4Aa and aphid proteases in vitro demonstrated enhanced processing of the toxin into the active form for some of the modified constructs relative to non-modified Cry4Aa. Aphids fed artificial diet with toxin at a final concentration of 125 μg/ml showed enhanced mortality after two days for one of the four modified constructs. Although only modest toxin improvement was achieved by use of this strategy, such specific toxin modifications designed to overcome factors that limit aphid toxicity could be applied toward managing aphid populations via transgenic plant resistance. PMID:27171411

  4. Stable isotope studies reveal pathways for the incorporation of non-essential amino acids in Acyrthosiphon pisum (pea aphids).

    PubMed

    Haribal, Meena; Jander, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Plant roots incorporate inorganic nitrogen into the amino acids glutamine, glutamic acid, asparagine and aspartic acid, which together serve as the primary metabolites of nitrogen transport to other tissues. Given the preponderance of these four amino acids, phloem sap is a nutritionally unbalanced diet for phloem-feeding insects. Therefore, aphids and other phloem feeders typically rely on microbial symbionts for the synthesis of essential amino acids. To investigate the metabolism of the four main transport amino acids by the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum), and its Buchnera aphidicola endosymbionts, aphids were fed defined diets with stable isotope-labeled glutamine, glutamic acid, asparagine or aspartic acid (U-(13)C, U-(15)N; U-(15)N; α-(15)N; or γ-(15)N). The metabolic fate of the dietary (15)N and (13)C was traced using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Nitrogen was the major contributor to the observed amino acid isotopomers with one additional unit mass (M+1). However, there was differential incorporation, with the amine nitrogen of asparagine being incorporated into other amino acids more efficiently than the amide nitrogen. Higher isotopomers (M+2, M+3 and M+4) indicated the incorporation of varying numbers of (13)C atoms into essential amino acids. GC-MS assays also showed that, even with an excess of dietary labeled glutamine, glutamic acid, asparagine or aspartic acid, the overall content of these amino acids in aphid bodies was mostly the product of catabolism of dietary amino acids and subsequent re-synthesis within the aphids. Thus, these predominant dietary amino acids are not passed directly to Buchnera endosymbionts for synthesis of essential amino acids, but are rather are produced de novo, most likely by endogenous aphid enzymes. PMID:26632455

  5. Phenotypic Effect of “Candidatus Rickettsiella viridis,” a Facultative Symbiont of the Pea Aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum), and Its Interaction with a Coexisting Symbiont

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Ryuichi; Fujiwara, Akiko

    2014-01-01

    A gammaproteobacterial facultative symbiont of the genus Rickettsiella was recently identified in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. Infection with this symbiont altered the color of the aphid body from red to green, potentially affecting the host's ecological characteristics, such as attractiveness to different natural enemies. In European populations of A. pisum, the majority of Rickettsiella-infected aphids also harbor another facultative symbiont, of the genus Hamiltonella. We investigated this Rickettsiella symbiont for its interactions with the coinfecting Hamiltonella symbiont, its phenotypic effects on A. pisum with and without Hamiltonella coinfection, and its infection prevalence in A. pisum populations. Histological analyses revealed that coinfecting Rickettsiella and Hamiltonella exhibited overlapping localizations in secondary bacteriocytes, sheath cells, and hemolymph, while Rickettsiella-specific localization was found in oenocytes. Rickettsiella infections consistently altered hosts' body color from red to green, where the greenish hue was affected by both host and symbiont genotypes. Rickettsiella-Hamiltonella coinfections also changed red aphids to green; this greenish hue tended to be enhanced by Hamiltonella coinfection. With different host genotypes, Rickettsiella infection exhibited either weakly beneficial or nearly neutral effects on host fitness, whereas Hamiltonella infection and Rickettsiella-Hamiltonella coinfection had negative effects. Despite considerable frequencies of Rickettsiella infection in European and North American A. pisum populations, no Rickettsiella infection was detected among 1,093 insects collected from 14 sites in Japan. On the basis of these results, we discuss possible mechanisms for the interaction of Rickettsiella with other facultative symbionts, their effects on their hosts' phenotypes, and their persistence in natural host populations. We propose the designation “Candidatus Rickettsiella viridis” for the

  6. Larval performance and kill rate of convergent ladybird beetles, Hippodamia convergens, on black bean aphids, Aphis fabae, and pea aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    PubMed

    Hinkelman, Travis M; Tenhumberg, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Generalist predator guilds play a prominent role in structuring insect communities and can contribute to limiting population sizes of insect pest species. A consequence of dietary breadth, particularly in predatory insects, is the inclusion of low-quality, or even toxic, prey items in the predator's diet. Consumption of low-quality prey items reduces growth, development, and survival of predator larvae, thereby reducing the population sizes of generalist predators. The objective of this paper was to examine the effect of a suspected low-quality aphid species, Aphis fabae (Scopoli) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), on the larval performance of an abundant North American predator, Hippodamia convergens (Guérin-Méneville) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). For comparison, H. convergens larvae were also reared on a known high-quality aphid species Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and on a 50:50 mix of both aphid species. The proportion of H. convergens larvae surviving to the adult stage was dramatically lower (0.13) on the A. fabae diet than on the A. pisum diet (0.70); survival on the mixed diet was intermediate (0.45) to survival on the single-species diets. Similarly, surviving H. convergens larvae also developed more slowly and weighed less as adults on the A. fabae diet than on the A. pisum diet. Despite the relatively poor performance on the A. fabae diet, H. convergens larvae killed large numbers of A. fabae. Furthermore, H. convergens displayed a preference for A. fabae in the mixed diet treatment, most likely because A. fabae was easier to catch than A. pisum. The results suggest that increases in the distribution and abundance of A. fabae in North America may have negative effects on H. convergens population size. PMID:23909291

  7. Infection Dynamic of Symbiotic Bacteria in the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum Gut and Host Immune Response at the Early Steps in the Infection Process

    PubMed Central

    Renoz, François; Noël, Christine; Errachid, Abdelmounaim; Foray, Vincent; Hance, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    In addition to its obligatory symbiont Buchnera aphidicola, the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum can harbor several facultative bacterial symbionts which can be mutualistic in the context of various ecological interactions. Belonging to a genus where many members have been described as pathogen in invertebrates, Serratia symbiotica is one of the most common facultative partners found in aphids. The recent discovery of strains able to grow outside their host allowed us to simulate environmental acquisition of symbiotic bacteria by aphids. Here, we performed an experiment to characterize the A. pisum response to the ingestion of the free-living S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T in comparison to the ingestion of the pathogenic Serratia marcescens Db11 at the early steps in the infection process. We found that, while S. marcescens Db11 killed the aphids within a few days, S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T did not affect host survival and colonized the whole digestive tract within a few days. Gene expression analysis of immune genes suggests that S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T did not trigger an immune reaction, while S. marcescens Db11 did, and supports the hypothesis of a fine-tuning of the host immune response set-up for fighting pathogens while maintaining mutualistic partners. Our results also suggest that the lysosomal system and the JNK pathway are possibly involved in the regulation of invasive bacteria in aphids and that the activation of the JNK pathway is IMD-independent in the pea aphid. PMID:25811863

  8. Infection dynamic of symbiotic bacteria in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum gut and host immune response at the early steps in the infection process.

    PubMed

    Renoz, François; Noël, Christine; Errachid, Abdelmounaim; Foray, Vincent; Hance, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    In addition to its obligatory symbiont Buchnera aphidicola, the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum can harbor several facultative bacterial symbionts which can be mutualistic in the context of various ecological interactions. Belonging to a genus where many members have been described as pathogen in invertebrates, Serratia symbiotica is one of the most common facultative partners found in aphids. The recent discovery of strains able to grow outside their host allowed us to simulate environmental acquisition of symbiotic bacteria by aphids. Here, we performed an experiment to characterize the A. pisum response to the ingestion of the free-living S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T in comparison to the ingestion of the pathogenic Serratia marcescens Db11 at the early steps in the infection process. We found that, while S. marcescens Db11 killed the aphids within a few days, S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T did not affect host survival and colonized the whole digestive tract within a few days. Gene expression analysis of immune genes suggests that S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T did not trigger an immune reaction, while S. marcescens Db11 did, and supports the hypothesis of a fine-tuning of the host immune response set-up for fighting pathogens while maintaining mutualistic partners. Our results also suggest that the lysosomal system and the JNK pathway are possibly involved in the regulation of invasive bacteria in aphids and that the activation of the JNK pathway is IMD-independent in the pea aphid. PMID:25811863

  9. Gene Expression Analysis of Parthenogenetic Embryonic Development of the Pea Aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, Suggests That Aphid Parthenogenesis Evolved from Meiotic Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Dayalan G.; Abdelhady, Ahmed; Stern, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Aphids exhibit a form of phenotypic plasticity, called polyphenism, in which genetically identical females reproduce sexually during one part of the life cycle and asexually (via parthenogenesis) during the remainder of the life cycle. The molecular basis for aphid parthenogenesis is unknown. Cytological observations of aphid parthenogenesis suggest that asexual oogenesis evolved either through a modification of meiosis or from a mitotic process. As a test of these alternatives, we assessed the expression levels and expression patterns of canonical meiotic recombination and germline genes in the sexual and asexual ovaries of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. We observed expression of all meiosis genes in similar patterns in asexual and sexual ovaries, with the exception that some genes encoding Argonaute-family members were not expressed in sexual ovaries. In addition, we observed that asexual aphid tissues accumulated unspliced transcripts of Spo11, whereas sexual aphid tissues accumulated primarily spliced transcripts. In situ hybridization revealed Spo11 transcript in sexual germ cells and undetectable levels of Spo11 transcript in asexual germ cells. We also found that an obligately asexual strain of pea aphid produced little spliced Spo11 transcript. Together, these results suggest that parthenogenetic oogenesis evolved from a meiosis-like, and not a mitosis-like, process and that the aphid reproductive polyphenism may involve a modification of Spo11 gene activity. PMID:25501006

  10. Real-time monitoring of (E)-β-farnesene emission in colonies of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, under lacewing and ladybird predation.

    PubMed

    Joachim, Christoph; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2013-10-01

    Aphids (Homoptera) are constantly under attack by a variety of predators and parasitoids. Upon attack, most aphids release alarm pheromone that induces escape behavior in other colony members, such as dropping off the host plant. In the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris (Aphididae), the only component of this alarm pheromone is the sesquiterpene (E)-β-farnesene (EBF). EBF is thought to act as a kairomone by attracting various species of parasitoids and predators including lacewings and ladybirds. Lately, it also was proposed that EBF is constantly emitted in low quantities and used by aphids as a social cue. No study has focused on emission dynamics of this compound over a long time period. Here, we present the first long-time monitoring of EBF emission in aphid colonies using real-time monitoring. We used a zNose(TM) to analyze the headspace of colonies of the pea aphid, under lacewing (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) and ladybird (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) predation, over 24 hr. We found no emission of EBF in the absence of predation. When either a ladybird adult or a lacewing larva was placed in an aphid colony, EBF was detected in the headspace of the colonies in the form of emission blocks; i.e., periods in which EBF was emitted alternating with periods without EBF emission. The number of emission blocks correlated well with the number of predation events that were determined at the end of each experiment. There was no circadian rhythm in alarm pheromone emission, and both predators were active during both night and day. Our results show that alarm pheromone emission pattern within an aphid colony is driven by the feeding behavior of a predator. PMID:24158268

  11. Jumping-ship can have its costs: implications of predation and host plant species for the maintenance of pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris) colour polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Balog, Adalbert

    2013-10-01

    The interplay between the host plant of an insect herbivore and an insect predator (here two-spot ladybird beetles; Adalia bipunctata (L).; Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), feeding upon such a herbivore was examined in the laboratory as factors possibly determining the differential abundance and success of green and red host races of pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris. The experiment comprised three treatments: two host plants (bean and clover), two treatment levels (control and predation) and three colour morph levels (green alone, red alone and green and red in mixture). Green morphs had higher fitness on the general host plant, bean Vicia faba, than on the derived host, clover (Trifolium pratense), in the absence of predation. Although green morph fitness was reduced by predation when infesting bean together with reds, there was no observable net fitness loss due to predation on clover in mixed colonies with red morphs. Red morphs exhibited fitness loss alone on both bean and clover, while clover plants seemingly prevented fitness loss in the presence of predation when red morphs were mixed with green ones. According to this scenario, when colour morphs existed as a mixed colony, the net fitness of either pea aphid morph was not influenced by predation on clover. Predators had significant effects only on red morphs on broad bean either when alone or were mixed together with green morphs. Thus, only red morphs experienced the benefits of switching from the general to the derived host red clover in the presence of predation. For green morphs, there was no apparent cost of switching host plants when they faced predation. Hence, the co-existence of green-red colour polymorphism of pea aphids on single host plants appears to be maintained by the morph gaining fitness on the derived host due to a host plant– and predation–reduction effect. These findings have important implications for understanding the ecology and evolution of host switching by different colour

  12. Solenopsis invicta virus 3: mapping of structural proteins, ribosomal frameshifting, and similarities to Acyrthosiphon pisum virus and kelp fly virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3) is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that infects the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. We show that the second open reading frame (ORF) of the dicistronic genome is expressed via a frameshifting mechanism and that the sequences encoding the stru...

  13. Biostable multi-Aib analogs of tachykinin-related peptides demonstrate potent oral aphicidal activity in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphidae).

    PubMed

    Nachman, Ronald J; Mahdian, Kamran; Nässel, Dick R; Isaac, R Elwyn; Pryor, Nan; Smagghe, Guy

    2011-03-01

    The tachykinin-related peptides (TRPs) are multifunctional neuropeptides found in a variety of arthropod species, including the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphidae). Two new biostable TRP analogs containing multiple, sterically hindered Aib residues were synthesized and found to exhibit significantly enhanced resistance to hydrolysis by angiotensin converting enzyme and neprilysin, membrane-bound enzymes that degrade and inactivate natural TRPs. The two biostable analogs were also found to retain significant myostimulatory activity in an isolated cockroach hindgut preparation, the bioassay used to isolate and identify the first members of the TRP family. Indeed one of the analogs (Leuma-TRP-Aib-1) matched the potency and efficacy of the natural, parent TRP peptide in this myotropic bioassay. The two biostable TRP analogs were further fed in solutions of artificial diet to the pea aphid over a period of 3 days and evaluated for antifeedant and aphicidal activity and compared with the effect of treatment with three natural, unmodified TRPs. The two biostable multi-Aib TRP analogs were observed to elicit aphicidal effects within the first 24 h. In contrast natural, unmodified TRPs, including two that are native to the pea aphid, demonstrated little or no activity. The most active analog, double-Aib analog Leuma-TRP-Aib-1 (pEA[Aib]SGFL[Aib]VR-NH(2)), featured aphicidal activity calculated at an LC(50) of 0.0083 nmol/μl (0.0087 μg/μl) and an LT(50) of 1.4 days, matching or exceeding the potency of commercially available aphicides. The mechanism of this activity has yet to be established. The aphicidal activity of the biostable TRP analogs may result from disruption of digestive processes by interfering with gut motility patterns and/or with fluid cycling in the gut; processes shown to be regulated by the TRPs in other insects. These active TRP analogs and/or second generation analogs offer potential as environmentally friendly pest aphid control agents

  14. Pea (Pisum sativum L.) in the genomics era

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) was the original model organism for Mendel´s discovery of the laws of inheritance, making it the foundation of modern plant genetics. However, subsequent progress in pea genomics has lagged behind many other plant species, largely as a consequence of its low multiplication rat...

  15. Multimodal dynamic response of the Buchnera aphidicola pLeu plasmid to variations in leucine demand of its host, the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    PubMed

    Viñuelas, José; Febvay, Gérard; Duport, Gabrielle; Colella, Stefano; Fayard, Jean-Michel; Charles, Hubert; Rahbé, Yvan; Calevro, Federica

    2011-09-01

    Aphids, important agricultural pests, can grow and reproduce thanks to their intimate symbiosis with the γ-proteobacterium Buchnera aphidicola that furnishes them with essential amino acids lacking in their phloem sap diet. To study how B. aphidicola, with its reduced genome containing very few transcriptional regulators, responds to variations in the metabolic requirements of its host, we concentrated on the leucine metabolic pathway. We show that leucine is a limiting factor for aphid growth and it displays a stimulatory feeding effect. Our metabolic analyses demonstrate that symbiotic aphids are able to respond to leucine starvation or excess by modulating the neosynthesis of this amino acid. At a molecular level, this response involves an early important transcriptional regulation (after 12 h of treatment) followed by a moderate change in the pLeu plasmid copy number. Both responses are no longer apparent after 7 days of treatment. These experimental data are discussed in the light of a re-annotation of the pLeu plasmid regulatory elements. Taken together, our data show that the response of B. aphidicola to the leucine demand of its host is multimodal and dynamically regulated, providing new insights concerning the genetic regulation capabilities of this bacterium in relation to its symbiotic functions. PMID:21797941

  16. [Comparative genome analysis in pea Pisum sativum L. varieties and lines with chromosomal and molecular markers].

    PubMed

    Samatadze, T E; Zelenina, D A; Shostak, N G; Volkov, A A; Popov, K V; Rachinskaia, O V; Borisov, A Iu; Tikhonovich, I A; Zelenin, A V; Muravenko, O V

    2008-12-01

    C banding, Ag-NOR staining, FISH with pTa71 (45S rDNA) and pTa794 (5S rDNA), and RAPD-PCR analysis were used to study the genome and chromosome polymorphism in four varieties (Frisson, Sparkle, Rondo, and Finale) and two genetic lines (Sprint-2 and SGE) of pea Pisum sativum L. A comparison of the C-banding patterns did not reveal any polymorphism within the varieties. The most significant between-variety differences were observed for the size of C bands on satellite chromosomes 4 and 7. All grain pea varieties (Frisson, Sparkle, and Rondo) had a large C band in the satellite of chromosome 4 and a medium C band in the region adjacent to the satellite thread on chromosome 7. C bands were almost of the same size in the genetic lines and vegetable variety Finale. In all accessions, 45S rDNA mapped to the secondary constriction regions of chromosomes 1, 3, and 5. The signal from chromosome 5 in the lines was more intense than in the varieties. Ag-NOR staining showed that the transcriptional activity of the 45S rRNA genes on chromosome 7 was higher than on chromosome 4 in all accessions. No more than four Ag-NOR-positive nucleoli were observed in interphase nuclei. Statistical analysis of the total area of Ag-NOR-stained nucleoli did not detect any significant difference between the accessions examined. RAPD-PCR analysis revealed high between-variety and low within-variety genomic polymorphism. Chromosomal and molecular markers proved to be promising for genome identification in pea varieties and lines. PMID:19178083

  17. Bean pod mottle virus: a new powerful tool for functional genomics studies in Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Meziadi, Chouaib; Blanchet, Sophie; Richard, Manon M S; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Geffroy, Valérie; Pflieger, Stéphanie

    2016-08-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an important legume worldwide. The importance of pea in arable rotations and nutritional value for both human and animal consumption have fostered sustained production and different studies to improve agronomic traits of interest. Moreover, complete sequencing of the pea genome is currently underway and will lead to the identification of a large number of genes potentially associated with important agronomic traits. Because stable genetic transformation is laborious for pea, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) appears as a powerful alternative technology for determining the function of unknown genes. In this work, we present a rapid and efficient viral inoculation method using DNA infectious plasmids of Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV)-derived VIGS vector. Six pea genotypes with important genes controlling biotic and/or abiotic stresses were found susceptible to BPMV carrying a GFP reporter gene and showed fluorescence in both shoots and roots. In a second step, we investigated 37 additional pea genotypes and found that 30 were susceptible to BPMV and only 7 were resistant. The capacity of BPMV to induce silencing of endogenes was investigated in the most susceptible genotype using two visual reporter genes: PsPDS and PsKORRIGAN1 (PsKOR1) encoding PHYTOENE DESATURASE and a 1,4-β-D-glucanase, respectively. The features of the 'one-step' BPMV-derived VIGS vector include (i) the ease of rub-inoculation, without any need for biolistic or agro-inoculation procedures, (ii) simple cost-effective procedure and (iii) noninterference of viral symptoms with silencing. These features make BPMV the most adapted VIGS vector in pea to make low- to high-throughput VIGS studies. PMID:26896301

  18. Genetic diversity, population structure and genome-wide marker-trait association analysis of the USDA pea (Pisum sativum L.) core collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity, population structure and genome-wide marker-trait association analysis was conducted for the USDA pea (Pisum sativum L.) core collection. The core collection contained 285 accessions with diverse phenotypes and geographic origins. The 137 DNA markers included 102 polymorphic fra...

  19. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae strain GB30; an effective microsymbiont of Pisum sativum growing in Poland

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, Andrzej; De Meyer, Sofie E.; Tian, Rui; Wielbo, Jerzy; Zebracki, Kamil; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B.K.; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-07-16

    We report that Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae GB30 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of Pisum sativum. GB30 was isolated in Poland from a nodule recovered from the roots of Pisum sativum growing at Janow. GB30 is also an effective microsymbiont of the annual forage legumes vetch and pea. Here we describe the features of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae strain GB30, together with sequence and annotation. The 7,468,464 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 78 scaffolds of 78 contigs containing 7,227 protein-coding genes and 75 RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal.

  20. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae strain GB30; an effective microsymbiont of Pisum sativum growing in Poland

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mazur, Andrzej; De Meyer, Sofie E.; Tian, Rui; Wielbo, Jerzy; Zebracki, Kamil; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B.K.; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Pati, Amrita; et al

    2015-07-16

    We report that Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae GB30 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of Pisum sativum. GB30 was isolated in Poland from a nodule recovered from the roots of Pisum sativum growing at Janow. GB30 is also an effective microsymbiont of the annual forage legumes vetch and pea. Here we describe the features of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae strain GB30, together with sequence and annotation. The 7,468,464 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 78 scaffolds of 78 contigs containing 7,227 protein-coding genes and 75more » RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal.« less

  1. Whole-genome re-sequencing of non-model organisms: lessons from unmapped reads.

    PubMed

    Gouin, A; Legeai, F; Nouhaud, P; Whibley, A; Simon, J-C; Lemaitre, C

    2015-05-01

    Unmapped reads are often discarded from the analysis of whole-genome re-sequencing, but new biological information and insights can be uncovered through their analysis. In this paper, we investigate unmapped reads from the re-sequencing data of 33 pea aphid genomes from individuals specialized on different host plants. The unmapped reads for each individual were retrieved following mapping to the Acyrthosiphon pisum reference genome and its mitochondrial and symbiont genomes. These sets of unmapped reads were then cross-compared, revealing that a significant number of these unmapped sequences were conserved across individuals. Interestingly, sequences were most commonly shared between individuals adapted to the same host plant, suggesting that these sequences may contribute to the divergence between host plant specialized biotypes. Analysis of the contigs obtained from assembling the unmapped reads pooled by biotype allowed us to recover some divergent genomic regions previously excluded from analysis and to discover putative novel sequences of A. pisum and its symbionts. In conclusion, this study emphasizes the interest of the unmapped component of re-sequencing data sets and the potential loss of important information. We here propose strategies to aid the capture and interpretation of this information. PMID:25269379

  2. Tangible benefits of the pea aphid genome sequencing in proteomics research: enhancements in protein identification, data incorporation, and evaluation criteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, is an important agricultural pest and a model system for numerous aspects of aphid biology, including sexual and asexual reproduction, bacterial endosymbiosis, insecticide resistance, and the evolution of aphid and plant host interactions. Recently, its complete ...

  3. Genetic Mapping of a Major Resistance Gene to Pea Aphid (Acyrthosipon pisum) in the Model Legume Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, Lars G; Guo, Su-Min; Gao, Ling-Ling; Singh, Karam B

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to the Australian pea aphid (PA; Acyrthosiphon pisum) biotype in cultivar Jester of the model legume Medicago truncatula is mediated by a single dominant gene and is phloem-mediated. The genetic map position for this resistance gene, APR (Acyrthosiphon pisum resistance), is provided and shows that APR maps 39 centiMorgans (cM) distal of the A. kondoi resistance (AKR) locus, which mediates resistance to a closely related species of the same genus bluegreen aphid (A. kondoi). The APR region on chromosome 3 is dense in classical nucleotide binding site leucine-rich repeats (NLRs) and overlaps with the region harbouring the RAP1 gene which confers resistance to a European PA biotype in the accession Jemalong A17. Further screening of a core collection of M. truncatula accessions identified seven lines with strong resistance to PA. Allelism experiments showed that the single dominant resistance to PA in M. truncatula accessions SA10481 and SA1516 are allelic to SA10733, the donor of the APR locus in cultivar Jester. While it remains unclear whether there are multiple PA resistance genes in an R-gene cluster or the resistance loci identified in the other M. truncatula accessions are allelic to APR, the introgression of APR into current M. truncatula cultivars will provide more durable resistance to PA. PMID:27483247

  4. Genetic Mapping of a Major Resistance Gene to Pea Aphid (Acyrthosipon pisum) in the Model Legume Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Kamphuis, Lars G.; Guo, Su-Min; Gao, Ling-Ling; Singh, Karam B.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to the Australian pea aphid (PA; Acyrthosiphon pisum) biotype in cultivar Jester of the model legume Medicago truncatula is mediated by a single dominant gene and is phloem-mediated. The genetic map position for this resistance gene, APR (Acyrthosiphon pisum resistance), is provided and shows that APR maps 39 centiMorgans (cM) distal of the A. kondoi resistance (AKR) locus, which mediates resistance to a closely related species of the same genus bluegreen aphid (A. kondoi). The APR region on chromosome 3 is dense in classical nucleotide binding site leucine-rich repeats (NLRs) and overlaps with the region harbouring the RAP1 gene which confers resistance to a European PA biotype in the accession Jemalong A17. Further screening of a core collection of M. truncatula accessions identified seven lines with strong resistance to PA. Allelism experiments showed that the single dominant resistance to PA in M. truncatula accessions SA10481 and SA1516 are allelic to SA10733, the donor of the APR locus in cultivar Jester. While it remains unclear whether there are multiple PA resistance genes in an R-gene cluster or the resistance loci identified in the other M. truncatula accessions are allelic to APR, the introgression of APR into current M. truncatula cultivars will provide more durable resistance to PA. PMID:27483247

  5. New clues about the evolutionary history of metabolic losses in bacterial endosymbionts, provided by the genome of Buchnera aphidicola from the aphid Cinara tujafilina.

    PubMed

    Lamelas, Araceli; Gosalbes, María José; Moya, Andrés; Latorre, Amparo

    2011-07-01

    The symbiotic association between aphids (Homoptera) and Buchnera aphidicola (Gammaproteobacteria) started about 100 to 200 million years ago. As a consequence of this relationship, the bacterial genome has undergone a prominent size reduction. The downsize genome process starts when the bacterium enters the host and will probably end with its extinction and replacement by another healthier bacterium or with the establishment of metabolic complementation between two or more bacteria. Nowadays, several complete genomes of Buchnera aphidicola from four different aphid species (Acyrthosiphon pisum, Schizaphis graminum, Baizongia pistacea, and Cinara cedri) have been fully sequenced. C. cedri belongs to the subfamily Lachninae and harbors two coprimary bacteria that fulfill the metabolic needs of the whole consortium: B. aphidicola with the smallest genome reported so far and "Candidatus Serratia symbiotica." In addition, Cinara tujafilina, another member of the subfamily Lachninae, closely related to C. cedri, also harbors "Ca. Serratia symbiotica" but with a different phylogenetic status than the one from C. cedri. In this study, we present the complete genome sequence of B. aphidicola from C. tujafilina and the phylogenetic analysis and comparative genomics with the other Buchnera genomes. Furthermore, the gene repertoire of the last common ancestor has been inferred, and the evolutionary history of the metabolic losses that occurred in the different lineages has been analyzed. Although stochastic gene loss plays a role in the genome reduction process, it is also clear that metabolism, as a functional constraint, is also a powerful evolutionary force in insect endosymbionts. PMID:21571878

  6. Posterior localization of ApVas1 positions the preformed germ plasm in the sexual oviparous pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Germline specification in some animals is driven by the maternally inherited germ plasm during early embryogenesis (inheritance mode), whereas in others it is induced by signals from neighboring cells in mid or late development (induction mode). In the Metazoa, the induction mode appears as a more prevalent and ancestral condition; the inheritance mode is therefore derived. However, regarding germline specification in organisms with asexual and sexual reproduction it has not been clear whether both strategies are used, one for each reproductive phase, or if just one strategy is used for both phases. Previously we have demonstrated that specification of germ cells in the asexual viviparous pea aphid depends on a preformed germ plasm. In this study, we extended this work to investigate how germ cells were specified in the sexual oviparous embryos, aiming to understand whether or not developmental plasticity of germline specification exists in the pea aphid. Results We employed Apvas1, a Drosophila vasa ortholog in the pea aphid, as a germline marker to examine whether germ plasm is preformed during oviparous development, as has already been seen in the viviparous embryos. During oogenesis, Apvas1 mRNA and ApVas1 protein were both evenly distributed. After fertilization, uniform expression of Apvas1 remained in the egg but posterior localization of ApVas1 occurred from the fifth nuclear cycle onward. Posterior co-localization of Apvas1/ApVas1 was first identified in the syncytial blastoderm undergoing cellularization, and later we could detect specific expression of Apvas1/ApVas1 in the morphologically identifiable germ cells of mature embryos. This suggests that Apvas1/ApVas1-positive cells are primordial germ cells and posterior localization of ApVas1 prior to cellularization positions the preformed germ plasm. Conclusions We conclude that both asexual and sexual pea aphids rely on the preformed germ plasm to specify germ cells and that developmental plasticity of germline specification, unlike axis patterning, occurs in neither of the two aphid reproductive phases. Consequently, the maternal inheritance mode implicated by a preformed germ plasm in the oviparous pea aphid becomes a non-canonical case in the Hemimetabola, where so far the zygotic induction mode prevails in most other studied insects. PMID:24855557

  7. A protein from the salivary glands of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, is essential in feeding on a host plant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In feeding, aphids inject saliva into plant tissues, gaining access to phloem sap and eliciting (and sometimes overcoming) plant responses. We are examining the involvement, in this aphid-plant interaction, of individual aphid proteins and enzymes, as identified in a salivary gland cDNA library. Her...

  8. Insecticidal Activity of a Basement Membrane-Degrading Protease against Heliothis virescens (Fabricius) and Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ScathL is a cathepsin L-like cysteine protease derived from the flesh fly Sarcophaga peregrina that functions in basement membrane (BM) remodeling during insect development. A recombinant baculovirus expressing ScathL (AcMLF9.ScathL) kills larvae of the tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens, signific...

  9. Translational Genomics in Legumes Allowed Placing In Silico 5460 Unigenes on the Pea Functional Map and Identified Candidate Genes in Pisum sativum L.

    PubMed Central

    Bordat, Amandine; Savois, Vincent; Nicolas, Marie; Salse, Jérome; Chauveau, Aurélie; Bourgeois, Michael; Potier, Jean; Houtin, Hervé; Rond, Céline; Murat, Florent; Marget, Pascal; Aubert, Grégoire; Burstin, Judith

    2011-01-01

    To identify genes involved in phenotypic traits, translational genomics from highly characterized model plants to poorly characterized crop plants provides a valuable source of markers to saturate a zone of interest as well as functionally characterized candidate genes. In this paper, an integrated view of the pea genetic map was developed. A series of gene markers were mapped and their best reciprocal homologs were identified on M. truncatula, L. japonicus, soybean, and poplar pseudomolecules. Based on the syntenic relationships uncovered between pea and M. truncatula, 5460 pea Unigenes were tentatively placed on the consensus map. A new bioinformatics tool, http://www.thelegumeportal.net/pea_mtr_translational_toolkit, was developed that allows, for any gene sequence, to search its putative position on the pea consensus map and hence to search for candidate genes among neighboring Unigenes. As an example, a promising candidate gene for the hypernodulation mutation nod3 in pea was proposed based on the map position of the likely homolog of Pub1, a M. truncatula gene involved in nodulation regulation. A broader view of pea genome evolution was obtained by revealing syntenic relationships between pea and sequenced genomes. Blocks of synteny were identified which gave new insights into the evolution of chromosome structure in Papillionoids and Eudicots. The power of the translational genomics approach was underlined. PMID:22384322

  10. Genome expansion and differential expression of amino acid transporters at the aphid/Buchnera symbiotic interface.

    PubMed

    Price, Daniel R G; Duncan, Rebecca P; Shigenobu, Shuji; Wilson, Alex C C

    2011-11-01

    In insects, some of the most ecologically important symbioses are nutritional symbioses that provide hosts with novel traits and thereby facilitate exploitation of otherwise inaccessible niches. One such symbiosis is the ancient obligate intracellular symbiosis of aphids with the γ-proteobacteria, Buchnera aphidicola. Although the nutritional basis of the aphid/Buchnera symbiosis is well understood, the processes and structures that mediate the intimate interactions of symbiotic partners remain uncharacterized. Here, using a de novo approach, we characterize the complement of 40 amino acid polyamine organocation (APC) superfamily member amino acid transporters (AATs) encoded in the genome of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. We find that the A. pisum APC superfamily is characterized by extensive gene duplications such that A. pisum has more APC superfamily transporters than other fully sequenced insects, including a ten paralog aphid-specific expansion of the APC transporter slimfast. Detailed expression analysis of 17 transporters selected on the basis of their phylogenetic relationship to five AATs identified in an earlier bacteriocyte expressed sequence tag study distinguished a subset of eight transporters that have been recruited for amino acid transport in bacteriocyte cells at the symbiotic interface. These eight transporters include transporters that are highly expressed and/or highly enriched in bacteriocytes and intriguingly, the four AATs that show bacteriocyte-enriched expression are all members of gene family expansions, whereas three of the four that are highly expressed but not enriched in bacteriocytes retain one-to-one orthology with transporters in other genomes. Finally, analysis of evolutionary rates within the large A. pisum slimfast expansion demonstrated increased rates of molecular evolution coinciding with two major shifts in expression: 1) a loss of gut expression and possibly a gain of bacteriocyte expression and 2) loss of expression

  11. A new species of Acyrthosiphon (Hemiptera, Aphididae) from France and Spain.

    PubMed

    Nafría, Juan M Nieto; Aldea, Marta; Castro, Marta

    2015-01-01

    A new species in one of the largest genera of Macrosiphini (Hemiptera, Aphididae), Acyrthosiphon pilosum sp. n., is described from apterous and alate viviparous females and oviparous females from French and Spanish Mediterranean localities, living on species of Ononis (Fabaceae), mainly O. natrix. The new species is characterized by the presence of many accessory setae on the ultimate rostral segment, and usually five setae on the first tarsal segments, a combination that is not present in any other known Acyrthosiphon species; in addition marginal tubercles are present on prothorax and several of abdominal segments 2-5. PMID:25781131

  12. Genomic heterogeneity in Pea seed-borne mosaic virus isolates from Pakistan, the centre of diversity of the host species, Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Ali, A; Randles, J W

    2001-10-01

    A range of isolates of Pea seed-borne mosaic virus (PSbMV) was compared in the segments of the genome representing the partial NIb/CP/UTR and the partial P1-Pro/HC-Pro coding regions. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences, and a phylogenetic analysis of the CP region, divided isolates with available sequence information into two groups, one representing pathotype 4, the other pathotype 1. The pathotype 1 group showed greater diversity than the pathotype 4 group. A comparison of 14 isolates, S6 (a pathotype 4 isolate), US (a pathotype 1 isolate) and 12 isolates from Pakistan, by ribonuclease protection assay (RPA) using cRNA transcripts of the cloned partial NIb/CP/UTR regions of the S6, US and Pakistani isolate PK9 placed them into three distinct phylogenetic groups. RPA with a partial P1-Pro/HC-Pro cRNA probe identified a greater level of variation which was too high to be used for generating an overall phylogeny. Thus, RPA identified greater molecular diversity in PSbMV than described hitherto. We conclude that, in addition to the pathotypes 1 and 4 typified by US and S6 respectively, isolates of PSbMV from Pakistan include previously unrecognised molecular variants, and this accords with our previous recognition of new pathotypes from Pakistan. PMID:11722010

  13. Settling down: the genome of Serratia symbiotica from the aphid Cinara tujafilina zooms in on the process of accommodation to a cooperative intracellular life.

    PubMed

    Manzano-Marín, Alejandro; Latorre, Amparo

    2014-07-01

    Particularly interesting cases of mutualistic endosymbioses come from the establishment of co-obligate associations of more than one species of endosymbiotic bacteria. Throughout symbiotic accommodation from a free-living bacterium, passing through a facultative stage and ending as an obligate intracellular one, the symbiont experiences massive genomic losses and phenotypic adjustments. Here, we scrutinized the changes in the coevolution of Serratia symbiotica and Buchnera aphidicola endosymbionts in aphids, paying particular attention to the transformations undergone by S. symbiotica to become an obligate endosymbiont. Although it is already known that S. symbiotica is facultative in Acyrthosiphon pisum, in Cinara cedri it has established a co-obligate endosymbiotic consortium along with B. aphidicola to fulfill the aphid's nutritional requirements. The state of this association in C. tujafilina, an aphid belonging to the same subfamily (Lachninae) that C. cedri, remained unknown. Here, we report the genome of S. symbiotica strain SCt-VLC from the aphid C. tujafilina. While being phylogenetically and genomically very closely related to the facultative endosymbiont S. symbiotica from the aphid A. pisum, it shows a variety of metabolic, genetic, and architectural features, which point toward this endosymbiont being one step closer to an obligate intracellular one. We also describe in depth the process of genome rearrangements suffered by S. symbiotica and the role mobile elements play in gene inactivations. Finally, we postulate the supply to the host of the essential riboflavin (vitamin B2) as key to the establishment of S. symbiotica as a co-obligate endosymbiont in the aphids belonging to the subfamily Lachninane. PMID:24951564

  14. Settling Down: The Genome of Serratia symbiotica from the Aphid Cinara tujafilina Zooms in on the Process of Accommodation to a Cooperative Intracellular Life

    PubMed Central

    Manzano-Marín, Alejandro; Latorre, Amparo

    2014-01-01

    Particularly interesting cases of mutualistic endosymbioses come from the establishment of co-obligate associations of more than one species of endosymbiotic bacteria. Throughout symbiotic accommodation from a free-living bacterium, passing through a facultative stage and ending as an obligate intracellular one, the symbiont experiences massive genomic losses and phenotypic adjustments. Here, we scrutinized the changes in the coevolution of Serratia symbiotica and Buchnera aphidicola endosymbionts in aphids, paying particular attention to the transformations undergone by S. symbiotica to become an obligate endosymbiont. Although it is already known that S. symbiotica is facultative in Acyrthosiphon pisum, in Cinara cedri it has established a co-obligate endosymbiotic consortium along with B. aphidicola to fulfill the aphid’s nutritional requirements. The state of this association in C. tujafilina, an aphid belonging to the same subfamily (Lachninae) that C. cedri, remained unknown. Here, we report the genome of S. symbiotica strain SCt-VLC from the aphid C. tujafilina. While being phylogenetically and genomically very closely related to the facultative endosymbiont S. symbiotica from the aphid A. pisum, it shows a variety of metabolic, genetic, and architectural features, which point toward this endosymbiont being one step closer to an obligate intracellular one. We also describe in depth the process of genome rearrangements suffered by S. symbiotica and the role mobile elements play in gene inactivations. Finally, we postulate the supply to the host of the essential riboflavin (vitamin B2) as key to the establishment of S. symbiotica as a co-obligate endosymbiont in the aphids belonging to the subfamily Lachninane. PMID:24951564

  15. Geographic pattern of genetic diversity in the genus Pisum, with inferences about pea domestication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have analysed genetic diversity of common pea (Pisum sativum L.) focusing on wild pea and exploiting biogeographic information. Phylogenetic markers (trnSG and ITS) along with 35,647 genome-wide DARTseq generated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and PeaGene 13.2k SNP Illumina assays reveale...

  16. The genetic diversity and evolution of field pea (Pisum) studied by high throughput retrotransposon based insertion polymorphism (RBIP) marker analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The genetic diversity of crop species is the result of natural selection on the wild progenitor and human intervention by ancient and modern farmers and breeders. The genomes of modern cultivars, old cultivated landraces, ecotypes and wild relatives reflect the effects of these forces and provide insights into germplasm structural diversity, the geographical dimension to species diversity and the process of domestication of wild organisms. This issue is also of great practical importance for crop improvement because wild germplasm represents a rich potential source of useful under-exploited alleles or allele combinations. The aim of the present study was to analyse a major Pisum germplasm collection to gain a broad understanding of the diversity and evolution of Pisum and provide a new rational framework for designing germplasm core collections of the genus. Results 3020 Pisum germplasm samples from the John Innes Pisum germplasm collection were genotyped for 45 retrotransposon based insertion polymorphism (RBIP) markers by the Tagged Array Marker (TAM) method. The data set was stored in a purpose-built Germinate relational database and analysed by both principal coordinate analysis and a nested application of the Structure program which yielded substantially similar but complementary views of the diversity of the genus Pisum. Structure revealed three Groups (1-3) corresponding approximately to landrace, cultivar and wild Pisum respectively, which were resolved by nested Structure analysis into 14 Sub-Groups, many of which correlate with taxonomic sub-divisions of Pisum, domestication related phenotypic traits and/or restricted geographical locations. Genetic distances calculated between these Sub-Groups are broadly supported by principal coordinate analysis and these, together with the trait and geographical data, were used to infer a detailed model for the domestication of Pisum. Conclusions These data provide a clear picture of the major distinct gene

  17. Optimization of Agroinfiltration in Pisum sativum Provides a New Tool for Studying the Salivary Protein Functions in the Pea Aphid Complex

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Endrick; Boulain, Hélène; Aigu, Yoann; Le Pennec, Charlotte; Chawki, Khaoula; Morlière, Stéphanie; Schädel, Kristina; Kunert, Grit; Simon, Jean-Christophe; Sugio, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Aphids are piercing-sucking insect pests and feed on phloem sap. During feeding, aphids inject a battery of salivary proteins into host plant. Some of these proteins function like effectors of microbial pathogens and influence the outcome of plant–aphid interactions. The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) is the model aphid and encompasses multiple biotypes each specialized to one or a few legume species, providing an opportunity to investigate the underlying mechanisms of the compatibility between plants and aphid biotypes. We aim to identify the aphid factors that determine the compatibility with host plants, hence involved in the host plant specialization process, and hypothesize that salivary proteins are one of those factors. Agrobacterium-mediated transient gene expression is a powerful tool to perform functional analyses of effector (salivary) proteins in plants. However, the tool was not established for the legume species that A. pisum feeds on. Thus, we decided to optimize the method for legume plants to facilitate the functional analyses of A. pisum salivary proteins. We screened a range of cultivars of pea (Pisum sativum) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa). None of the M. sativa cultivars was suitable for agroinfiltration under the tested conditions; however, we established a protocol for efficient transient gene expression in two cultivars of P. sativum, ZP1109 and ZP1130, using A. tumefaciens AGL-1 strain and the pEAQ-HT-DEST1 vector. We confirmed that the genes are expressed from 3 to 10 days post-infiltration and that aphid lines of the pea adapted biotype fed and reproduced on these two cultivars while lines of alfalfa and clover biotypes did not. Thus, the pea biotype recognizes these two cultivars as typical pea plants. By using a combination of ZP1109 and an A. pisum line, we defined an agroinfiltration procedure to examine the effect of in planta expression of selected salivary proteins on A. pisum fitness and demonstrated that transient expression of

  18. Optimization of Agroinfiltration in Pisum sativum Provides a New Tool for Studying the Salivary Protein Functions in the Pea Aphid Complex.

    PubMed

    Guy, Endrick; Boulain, Hélène; Aigu, Yoann; Le Pennec, Charlotte; Chawki, Khaoula; Morlière, Stéphanie; Schädel, Kristina; Kunert, Grit; Simon, Jean-Christophe; Sugio, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Aphids are piercing-sucking insect pests and feed on phloem sap. During feeding, aphids inject a battery of salivary proteins into host plant. Some of these proteins function like effectors of microbial pathogens and influence the outcome of plant-aphid interactions. The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) is the model aphid and encompasses multiple biotypes each specialized to one or a few legume species, providing an opportunity to investigate the underlying mechanisms of the compatibility between plants and aphid biotypes. We aim to identify the aphid factors that determine the compatibility with host plants, hence involved in the host plant specialization process, and hypothesize that salivary proteins are one of those factors. Agrobacterium-mediated transient gene expression is a powerful tool to perform functional analyses of effector (salivary) proteins in plants. However, the tool was not established for the legume species that A. pisum feeds on. Thus, we decided to optimize the method for legume plants to facilitate the functional analyses of A. pisum salivary proteins. We screened a range of cultivars of pea (Pisum sativum) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa). None of the M. sativa cultivars was suitable for agroinfiltration under the tested conditions; however, we established a protocol for efficient transient gene expression in two cultivars of P. sativum, ZP1109 and ZP1130, using A. tumefaciens AGL-1 strain and the pEAQ-HT-DEST1 vector. We confirmed that the genes are expressed from 3 to 10 days post-infiltration and that aphid lines of the pea adapted biotype fed and reproduced on these two cultivars while lines of alfalfa and clover biotypes did not. Thus, the pea biotype recognizes these two cultivars as typical pea plants. By using a combination of ZP1109 and an A. pisum line, we defined an agroinfiltration procedure to examine the effect of in planta expression of selected salivary proteins on A. pisum fitness and demonstrated that transient expression of

  19. Construction and characterization of two bacterial artificial chromosome libraries of pea (Pisum sativum L.) for the isolation of economically important genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) has a genome of about 4 Gbp that appears to share conserved synteny with model legumes having genomes of 0.2-0.4 Gbp despite extensive intergenic expansion. Pea plant inventory (PI) 269818 has been used to introgress genetic diversity into the cultivated germplasm pool. The ai...

  20. Phylogeny, phylogeography and genetic diversity of Pisum genus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tribe Fabeae (formerly Vicieae) contains some of humanity's most important grain legume crops, namely Lathyrus; Lens; Pisum; Vicia and the monotypic genus Vavilovia. Our study based on molecular data, have positioned Pisum between Vicia and Lathyrus and being closely allied to Vavilovia. Study of p...

  1. High-throughput development of SSR markers from pea (Pisum sativum L.) based on next generation sequencing of a purified Chinese commercial variety

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an important food legume globally, and is the plant species that J.G. Mendel used to lay the foundation of modern genetics. However, genomics resources of pea are limited comparing to other crop species. Application of marker assisted selection (MAS) in pea breeding has lag...

  2. Glucolipids of Zea mays and Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Morohashi, Y; Bandurski, R S

    1976-06-01

    The glucolipids formed upon feeding (U-(14)C)glucose to embryos of Zea mays were partially characterized with respect to: (a) metabolic turnover, (b) acid lability, (c) phosphorus content, (d) chromatographic properties, and (e) hydrolysis products. The chloroform-methanol-soluble assimilated radioactivity was examined specifically for occurrence of a glycosylated prenol phosphate. With the extraction conditions used, no evidence was found for formation of a glucosylated prenol phosphate. Several, as yet unidentified, acid-labile glucolipids undergoing metabolic turnover were observed. Four diglycerides were characterized as hydrolysis products of a fraction that contained (14)C-glucose and phosphorus, and was subject to metabolic turnover. Examination of the 1-butanol-soluble glucolipids from pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings also demonstrated anionic glucolipids, evidencing metabolic turnover but none with the properties of glucosylated prenol phosphate. PMID:16659583

  3. Biosynthesis of the phytoalexin pisatin. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Preisig, C.L.; Bell, J.N.; Matthews, D.E.; VanEtten, H.D. ); Sun, Yuejin; Hrazdina, G. )

    1990-11-01

    NADPH-dependent reduction of 2{prime},7-dihydroxy-4{prime},5{prime}-methylenedioxyisoflavone to the isoflavanone sophorol, a proposed intermediate step in pisatin biosynthesis, was detected in extracts of Pisum sativum. This isoflavone reductase activity was inducible by treatment of pea seedlings with CuCl{sub 2}. The timing of induction coincided with that of the 6a-hydroxymaackiain 3-O-methyltransferase, which catalyzes the terminal biosynthetic step. Neither enzyme was light inducible. Further NADPH-dependent metabolism of sophorol by extracts of CuCl{sub 2}-treated seedlings was also observed; three products were radiolabeled when ({sup 3}H)sophorol was the substrate, one of which is tentatively identified as maackiain.

  4. Protein methylation in pea chloroplasts. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.J.; Adler, J.; Selman, B.R. )

    1990-07-01

    The methylation of chloroplast proteins has been investigated by incubating intact pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplasts with ({sup 3}H-methyl)-S-adenosylmethionine. Incubation in the light increases the amount of methylation in both the thylakoid and stromal fractions. Numerous thylakoid proteins serve as substrates for the methyltransfer reactions. Three of these thylakoid proteins are methylated to a significantly greater extent in the light than in the dark. The primary stromal polypeptide methylated is the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. One other stromal polypeptide is also methylated much more in the light than in the dark. Two distinct types of protein methylation occur. One methylinkage is stable to basic conditions whereas a second type is base labile. The base-stable linkage is indicative of N-methylation of amino acid residues while base-lability is suggestive of carboxymethylation of amino acid residues. Labeling in the light increases the percentage of methylation that is base labile in the thylakoid fraction while no difference is observed in the amount of base-labile methylations in light-labeled and dark-labeled stromal proteins. Also suggestive of carboxymethylation is the detection of volatile ({sup 3}H)methyl radioactivity which increases during the labeling period and is greater in chloroplasts labeled in the light as opposed to being labeled in the dark; this implies in vivo turnover of the ({sup 3}H)methyl group.

  5. Pea (Pisum sativum) cells arrested in G2 have nascent DNA with breaks between replicons and replication clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Van't Hof, J.

    1980-01-01

    DNA fiber autoradiography and alkaline sucrose sedimentation of DNA of cultured pea-root cells (Pisum sativum) arrested in G2 by carbohydrate starvation demonstrated that nascent DNA molecules of replicon (16 to 27 x 10/sup 6/D) and apparent cluster (approx. 330 x 10/sup 6/D) size were not joined. That the arrested cells were in G2 was confirmed by single-cell autoradiography and cytophotometry. In pea there are about 18 replicons per average cluster, 4.2 x 10/sup 3/ clusters, and 7.7 x 10/sup 4/ replicons per genome.

  6. Pea (Pisum sp.) genetic resources, its analysis and exploration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pea is important temperate region pulse, with feed, fodder and vegetable uses. Originated and domesticated in Middle East and Mediterranean, it formed important dietary components of early civilizations. Although Pisum is a small genus with two or three species, it is very diverse and structured, r...

  7. Pre-fractionation strategies to resolve pea (Pisum sativum) sub-proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Meisrimler, Claudia-Nicole; Menckhoff, Ljiljana; Kukavica, Biljana M.; Lüthje, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Legumes are important crop plants and pea (Pisum sativum L.) has been investigated as a model with respect to several physiological aspects. The sequencing of the pea genome has not been completed. Therefore, proteomic approaches are currently limited. Nevertheless, the increasing numbers of available EST-databases as well as the high homology of the pea and medicago genome (Medicago truncatula Gaertner) allow the successful identification of proteins. Due to the un-sequenced pea genome, pre-fractionation approaches have been used in pea proteomic surveys in the past. Aside from a number of selective proteome studies on crude extracts and the chloroplast, few studies have targeted other components such as the pea secretome, an important sub-proteome of interest due to its role in abiotic and biotic stress processes. The secretome itself can be further divided into different sub-proteomes (plasma membrane, apoplast, cell wall proteins). Cell fractionation in combination with different gel-electrophoresis, chromatography methods and protein identification by mass spectrometry are important partners to gain insight into pea sub-proteomes, post-translational modifications and protein functions. Overall, pea proteomics needs to link numerous existing physiological and biochemical data to gain further insight into adaptation processes, which play important roles in field applications. Future developments and directions in pea proteomics are discussed. PMID:26539198

  8. Pea weevil, Bruchus pisorum (L.) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), resistance in Pisum sativum x P. fulvum interspecific crosses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pea weevil, Bruchus pisorum (L.), is one of the most intractable pest problems of cultivated pea, Pisum sativum L., in the world. This study investigated the transfer of pea weevil resistance from two accessions (PI 595946, PI 343955) of wild pea, Pisum fulvum Sibth. & Sm., to interspecific pop...

  9. Can snow depth be used to predict the distribution of the high Arctic aphid Acyrthosiphon svalbardicum (Hemiptera: Aphididae) on Spitsbergen?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Svalbard endemic aphid Acyrthosiphon svalbardicum (Heikinheimo, 1968) is host specific to Dryas octopetala L. ssp octopetala (Rosaceae). It has been hypothesized that the aphid is present on those areas with a thin winter snow cover and which therefore clear of snow earlier in the season. This early snow clearance results in a longer growing period and allows the aphid to experience at least the minimum number of degree days required to complete its life cycle. However, this hypothesis lacked a detailed field validation. We aimed to test the relationship between the aphid distribution and time of snow clearance at landscape scale, mapping snow depth at peak of snow accumulation for the two succeeding years 2009 and 2010 and examining site occupancy and plant phenology the following summers. Additionally, the distribution range mapped by Strathdee & Bale (1995) was revisited to address possible changes in range along the coast of the fjord. Results A linear relation between snow depth and timing of snow melt was found but with strong inter-annual and landscape variation. Both snow depth and plant phenology were found to affect patch occupancy. In August, the aphid, at the three life stages scored (viviparae, oviparae/males and eggs), was present most frequently in those D. octopetala patches with the most advanced plant phenology and which showed shallower snow depths in spring. However, many patches predicted to contain aphids were empty. The aphid distribution range has expanded 4.7 km towards the fjord mouth from 1995. Conclusions Snow depth alone, and hence date of snow clearance, cannot precisely define species distribution at landscape scale, as this cannot explain why are they unoccupied patches under shallow snow depths with advanced plant phenology. We nonetheless present a model Arctic system that could form the basis for long term monitoring for climate- driven species shifts. PMID:21995787

  10. Immunoaffinity chromatography as a means of purifying legumin from Pisum (pea) seeds.

    PubMed

    Casey, R

    1979-02-01

    The potential of immunoaffinity chromatography as a means of purifying legumin from a wide range of Pisum (pea) types was assessed. The method required small amounts of highly purified legumin from a single Pisum type, and this was obtained by salting out with (NH4)2SO4 followed by zonal isoelectric precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation. Some physiocochemical properties of purified legumin were determined, a number of which (Strokes radius, subunit molecular weights, subunit N-terminal residues and subunit molar ratios) have not previously been reported for Pisum legumin. Examination of Pisum legumin by two-dimensional gel isoelectric focusing/electrophoresis indicated the existence of extensive subunit heterogeneity, and polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate showed apparent variation in the nature of this heterogeneity from one Pisum variety to another. Despite this variation, immunoaffinity chromatography on immobilized anti-legumin (which was prepared by affinity chromatography on the immubolized purified legumin from the single Pisum type) was shown to be a generally applicable method for the purification of undegraded legumin from a range of pisum types, including two primate lines. PMID:435248

  11. Immunoaffinity chromatography as a means of purifying legumin from Pisum (pea) seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Casey, R

    1979-01-01

    The potential of immunoaffinity chromatography as a means of purifying legumin from a wide range of Pisum (pea) types was assessed. The method required small amounts of highly purified legumin from a single Pisum type, and this was obtained by salting out with (NH4)2SO4 followed by zonal isoelectric precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation. Some physiocochemical properties of purified legumin were determined, a number of which (Strokes radius, subunit molecular weights, subunit N-terminal residues and subunit molar ratios) have not previously been reported for Pisum legumin. Examination of Pisum legumin by two-dimensional gel isoelectric focusing/electrophoresis indicated the existence of extensive subunit heterogeneity, and polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate showed apparent variation in the nature of this heterogeneity from one Pisum variety to another. Despite this variation, immunoaffinity chromatography on immobilized anti-legumin (which was prepared by affinity chromatography on the immubolized purified legumin from the single Pisum type) was shown to be a generally applicable method for the purification of undegraded legumin from a range of pisum types, including two primate lines. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:435248

  12. Genomic revelations of a mutualism: the pea aphid and its obligate bacterial symbiont.

    PubMed

    Shigenobu, Shuji; Wilson, Alex C C

    2011-04-01

    The symbiosis of the pea aphid Acyrthosphion pisum with the bacterium Buchnera aphidicola APS represents the best-studied insect obligate symbiosis. Here we present a refined picture of this symbiosis by linking pre-genomic observations to new genomic data that includes the complete genomes of the eukaryotic and prokaryotic symbiotic partners. In doing so, we address four issues central to understanding the patterns and processes operating at the A. pisum/Buchnera APS interface. These four issues include: (1) lateral gene transfer, (2) host immunity, (3) symbiotic metabolism, and (4) regulation. PMID:21390549

  13. De Novo Assembly of the Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Nodule Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Zhukov, Vladimir A.; Zhernakov, Alexander I.; Kulaeva, Olga A.; Ershov, Nikita I.; Borisov, Alexey Y.; Tikhonovich, Igor A.

    2015-01-01

    The large size and complexity of the garden pea (Pisum sativum L.) genome hamper its sequencing and the discovery of pea gene resources. Although transcriptome sequencing provides extensive information about expressed genes, some tissue-specific transcripts can only be identified from particular organs under appropriate conditions. In this study, we performed RNA sequencing of polyadenylated transcripts from young pea nodules and root tips on an Illumina GAIIx system, followed by de novo transcriptome assembly using the Trinity program. We obtained more than 58,000 and 37,000 contigs from “Nodules” and “Root Tips” assemblies, respectively. The quality of the assemblies was assessed by comparison with pea expressed sequence tags and transcriptome sequencing project data available from NCBI website. The “Nodules” assembly was compared with the “Root Tips” assembly and with pea transcriptome sequencing data from projects indicating tissue specificity. As a result, approximately 13,000 nodule-specific contigs were found and annotated by alignment to known plant protein-coding sequences and by Gene Ontology searching. Of these, 581 sequences were found to possess full CDSs and could thus be considered as novel nodule-specific transcripts of pea. The information about pea nodule-specific gene sequences can be applied for gene-based markers creation, polymorphism studies, and real-time PCR. PMID:26688806

  14. Micromonospora halotolerans sp. nov., isolated from the rhizosphere of a Pisum sativum plant.

    PubMed

    Carro, Lorena; Pukall, Rüdiger; Spröer, Cathrin; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M; Trujillo, Martha E

    2013-06-01

    A filamentous actinomycete strain designated CR18(T) was isolated on humic acid agar from the rhizosphere of a Pisum sativum plant collected in Spain. This isolate was observed to grow optimally at 28 °C, pH 7.0 and in the presence of 5 % NaCl. Phylogenetic analyses based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated a close relationship with the type strains of Micromonospora chersina and Micromonospora endolithica. A further analysis based on a concatenated DNA sequence stretch of 4,523 bp that included partial sequences of the atpD, gyrB, recA, rpoB and 16S rRNA genes clearly differentiated the new strain from recognized Micromonospora species compared. DNA-DNA hybridization studies further supported the taxonomic position of strain CR18(T) as a novel genomic species. Chemotaxonomic analyses which included whole cell sugars, polar lipids, fatty acid profiles and menaquinone composition confirmed the affiliation of the new strain to the genus Micromonospora and also highlighted differences at the species level. These studies were finally complemented with an array of physiological tests to help differentiate between the new strain and its phylogenetic neighbours. Consequently, strain CR18(T) (= CECT 7890(T) = DSM 45598(T)) is proposed as the type strain of a novel species, Micromonospora halotolerans sp. nov. PMID:23494330

  15. High-Throughput Development of SSR Markers from Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Based on Next Generation Sequencing of a Purified Chinese Commercial Variety

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Hu, Jinguo; Bao, Shiying; Hao, Junjie; Li, Ling; He, Yuhua; Jiang, Junye; Wang, Fang; Tian, Shufang; Zong, Xuxiao

    2015-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an important food legume globally, and is the plant species that J.G. Mendel used to lay the foundation of modern genetics. However, genomics resources of pea are limited comparing to other crop species. Application of marker assisted selection (MAS) in pea breeding has lagged behind many other crops. Development of a large number of novel and reliable SSR (simple sequence repeat) or microsatellite markers will help both basic and applied genomics research of this crop. The Illumina HiSeq 2500 System was used to uncover 8,899 putative SSR containing sequences, and 3,275 non-redundant primers were designed to amplify these SSRs. Among the 1,644 SSRs that were randomly selected for primer validation, 841 yielded reliable amplifications of detectable polymorphisms among 24 genotypes of cultivated pea (Pisum sativum L.) and wild relatives (P. fulvum Sm.) originated from diverse geographical locations. The dataset indicated that the allele number per locus ranged from 2 to 10, and that the polymorphism information content (PIC) ranged from 0.08 to 0.82 with an average of 0.38. These 1,644 novel SSR markers were also tested for polymorphism between genotypes G0003973 and G0005527. Finally, 33 polymorphic SSR markers were anchored on the genetic linkage map of G0003973 × G0005527 F2 population. PMID:26440522

  16. High-Throughput Development of SSR Markers from Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Based on Next Generation Sequencing of a Purified Chinese Commercial Variety.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Fang, Li; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Hu, Jinguo; Bao, Shiying; Hao, Junjie; Li, Ling; He, Yuhua; Jiang, Junye; Wang, Fang; Tian, Shufang; Zong, Xuxiao

    2015-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an important food legume globally, and is the plant species that J.G. Mendel used to lay the foundation of modern genetics. However, genomics resources of pea are limited comparing to other crop species. Application of marker assisted selection (MAS) in pea breeding has lagged behind many other crops. Development of a large number of novel and reliable SSR (simple sequence repeat) or microsatellite markers will help both basic and applied genomics research of this crop. The Illumina HiSeq 2500 System was used to uncover 8,899 putative SSR containing sequences, and 3,275 non-redundant primers were designed to amplify these SSRs. Among the 1,644 SSRs that were randomly selected for primer validation, 841 yielded reliable amplifications of detectable polymorphisms among 24 genotypes of cultivated pea (Pisum sativum L.) and wild relatives (P. fulvum Sm.) originated from diverse geographical locations. The dataset indicated that the allele number per locus ranged from 2 to 10, and that the polymorphism information content (PIC) ranged from 0.08 to 0.82 with an average of 0.38. These 1,644 novel SSR markers were also tested for polymorphism between genotypes G0003973 and G0005527. Finally, 33 polymorphic SSR markers were anchored on the genetic linkage map of G0003973 × G0005527 F2 population. PMID:26440522

  17. Burdock fructooligosaccharide induces stomatal closure in Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanling; Guo, Moran; Zhao, Wenlu; Chen, Kaoshan; Zhang, Pengying

    2013-09-12

    Burdock fructooligosaccharide (BFO) isolated from the root tissue of Arctium lappa is a reserve carbohydrate that can induce resistance against a number of plant diseases. Stomatal closure is a part of plant innate immune response to restrict bacterial invasion. In this study, the effects of BFO on stomata movement in Pisum sativum and the possible mechanisms were studied with abscisic acid (ABA) as a positive control. The results showed that BFO could induce stomatal closure accompanied by ROS and NO production, as is the case with ABA. BFO-induced stomatal closure was inhibited by pre-treatment with L-NAME (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, hydrochloride; nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) and catalase (hydrogen peroxide scavenger). Exogenous catalase completely restricted BFO-induced production of ROS and NO in guard cells. In contrast, L-NAME prevented the rise in NO levels but only partially restricted the ROS production. These results indicate that BFO-induced stomatal closure is mediated by ROS and ROS-dependent NO production. PMID:23911508

  18. Review of the health benefits of peas (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Dahl, Wendy J; Foster, Lauren M; Tyler, Robert T

    2012-08-01

    Pulses, including peas, have long been important components of the human diet due to their content of starch, protein and other nutrients. More recently, the health benefits other than nutrition associated with pulse consumption have attracted much interest. The focus of the present review paper is the demonstrated and potential health benefits associated with the consumption of peas, Pisum sativum L., specifically green and yellow cotyledon dry peas, also known as smooth peas or field peas. These health benefits derive mainly from the concentration and properties of starch, protein, fibre, vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals in peas. Fibre from the seed coat and the cell walls of the cotyledon contributes to gastrointestinal function and health, and reduces the digestibility of starch in peas. The intermediate amylose content of pea starch also contributes to its lower glycaemic index and reduced starch digestibility. Pea protein, when hydrolysed, may yield peptides with bioactivities, including angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitor activity and antioxidant activity. The vitamin and mineral contents of peas may play important roles in the prevention of deficiency-related diseases, specifically those related to deficiencies of Se or folate. Peas contain a variety of phytochemicals once thought of only as antinutritive factors. These include polyphenolics, in coloured seed coat types in particular, which may have antioxidant and anticarcinogenic activity, saponins which may exhibit hypocholesterolaemic and anticarcinogenic activity, and galactose oligosaccharides which may exert beneficial prebiotic effects in the large intestine. PMID:22916813

  19. Further characterization of ribosome binding to thylakoid membranes. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Hurewitz, J.; Jagendorf, A.T.

    1987-05-01

    Previous work indicated more polysomes bound to pea (Pisum sativum cv Progress No. 9) thylakoids in light than in the dark, in vivo. With isolated intact chloroplasts incubated in darkness, addition of MgATP had no effect but 24 to 74% more RNA was thylakoid-bound at pH 8.3 than at pH 7. Thus, the major effect of light on ribosome-binding in vivo may be due to higher stroma pH. In isolated pea chloroplasts, initiation inhibitors (pactamycin and kanamycin) decreased the extent of RNA binding, and elongation inhibitors (lincomycin and streptomycin) increased it. Thus, cycling of ribosomes is controlled by translation, initiation, and termination. Bound RNA accounted for 19 to 24% of the total chloroplast RNA and the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)leucine into thylakoids was proportional to the amount of this bound RNA. These data support the concept that stroma ribosomes are recruited into thylakoid polysomes, which are active in synthesizing thylakoid proteins.

  20. [Carl Correns' experiments with Pisum, 1896-1899].

    PubMed

    Rheinberger, H J

    2000-01-01

    The circumstances under which classical genetics became established at the turn of the nineteenth century have become an integral part of the standard narrative on the history of genetics. Yet, despite considerable scholarly efforts, it has remained a matter of debate how exactly the so-called 'rediscovery' of Mendel's laws came about around 1900. In this situation, unpublished research records can be invaluable tools to arrive at a more substantial and more satisfying picture of the order of historical events. This paper makes extended use of the research protocols covering Carl Correns' hybridisation experiments with Pisum sativum between 1896 and 1899. The resulting reconstruction sketches the portrait of a scientist following a particular research question--xenia--struggling with his experimental material, and slowly building up an epistemic regime in which questions and observations could acquire a relevance which did not strike Correns when he first took note of them. The microhistorical gaze through the magnifying glass of research notes reveals the kind of delays that appear to be constitutive for empirically-driven thinking in general. The research notes of Correns help not only to make this point, they also display some of the intricacies and material peculiarities which characterise the experimental process of hybridisation and the particular type of inferences it allows one to make. PMID:11488142

  1. Six genes strongly regulated by mercury in Pisum sativum roots.

    PubMed

    Sävenstrand, Helena; Strid, Ake

    2004-02-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridisation was used to isolate heavy metal-induced genes from Pisum sativum roots hydroponically exposed to 5 microM HgCl2 and 10 microM EDTA. Six genes were induced out of which one, PsHMIP6B, was novel. The other genes (PsSAMT, PsI2'H, PsNDA, PsAPSR, PsPOD) had not previously been isolated from pea and sequenced. All six genes were also induced after exposure to 5 microM HgCl2 in the absence of EDTA. The induction pattern was in some cases different for the two Hg species, demonstrating a quicker response to-free Hg2+ than Hg-EDTA. The stress-specificity of the gene regulation was investigated by hydroponically adding 5 microM Cd2+. Most Hg-induced cDNAs were also induced by Cd2+ but to a smaller extent than after Hg exposure. In addition, the gene expression was also probed for tissue specificity, which showed that all six genes were expressed in roots and not in leaves. PMID:15283129

  2. Glycoprotein Biosynthesis in Cotyledons of Pisum sativum L

    PubMed Central

    Beevers, Leonard; Mense, Rose M.

    1977-01-01

    Particulate preparations from developing cotyledons of Pisum sativum L. cv. Burpeeana catalyze glycosyl transfer from UDP-[14C]N-acetylglucosamine and GDP-[14C]mannose. Radioactivity is transferred to lipid components soluble in chloroform-methanol (2:1) and chloroform-methanol-water (1:1:0.3) and into a water-insoluble and lipid-free residue. The chloroform-methanol-soluble component formed from GDP-[14C]mannose appears to be a mannosyl lipid, whereas the chloroform-methanol-water-soluble fraction is probably a mixed oligosaccharide-lipid containing N-acetylglucosamine and mannose residues. The chloroform-methanol-soluble component formed from UDP-[14C]N-acetylglucosamine appears to be N,N′-diacetylchitibiosyl lipid, which may be incorporated with mannose to form the chloroform-methanol-water-soluble mixed oligosaccharide lipid. The oligosaccharide lipid appears to function as a precursor for the transfer of the oligosaccharide to the peptide moiety in the formation of the glycoproteins. The bulk of the radioactivity, arising from UDP-[14C]N-acetylglucosamine, incorporated into the insoluble residue, is associated with glycoprotein. In contrast only a small percentage of radioactivity in the insoluble residue, arising from GDP-[14C]mannose incorporation, appears to be associated with glycoprotein. The majority of the radioactivity found in the residue fraction labeled from GDP-[14C]mannose appears to be associated with oligomannosyl residues. PMID:16660168

  3. Gravitropic response and circumnutation in pea (Pisum sativum) seedling roots.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Jeong; Kobayashi, Akie; Fujii, Nobuharu; Miyazawa, Yutaka; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2016-05-01

    Plant circumnutation is a helical movement of growing organs such as shoots and roots. Gravitropic response is hypothesized to act as an external oscillator in shoot circumnutation, although this is subject to debate. The relationship between circumnutational movement and gravitropic response in roots remains unknown. In this study, we analyzed circumnutation of agravitropic roots using the ageotropum pea (Pisum sativum) mutant, and compared it with that of wild-type (cv. Alaska) pea roots. We further examined the relationship of gravitropic response to circumnutation of Alaska seedling roots by removing the gravisensing tissue (the root cap) and by treating the roots with auxin transport inhibitors. Alaska roots displayed circumnutational movements with a period of approximately 150 min, whereas ageotropum roots did not exhibit distinct circumnutational movement. Removal of the root cap in Alaska roots reduced gravitropic response and circumnutational movements. Treatment of Alaska roots with auxin transport inhibitors, 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA) and N-(1-naphthyl)phthalamic acid (NPA), dramatically reduced gravitropic response and circumnutational movements. These results suggest that a gravity-regulated auxin transport is involved in circumnutation of pea seedling roots. PMID:26565659

  4. Transient protein expression in three Pisum sativum (green pea) varieties.

    PubMed

    Green, Brian J; Fujiki, Masaaki; Mett, Valentina; Kaczmarczyk, Jon; Shamloul, Moneim; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Underkoffler, Susan; Yusibov, Vidadi; Mett, Vadim

    2009-02-01

    The expression of proteins in plants both transiently and via permanently transformed lines has been demonstrated by a number of groups. Transient plant expression systems, due to high expression levels and speed of production, show greater promise for the manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals when compared to permanent transformants. Expression vectors based on a tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) are the most commonly utilized and the primary plant used, Nicotiana benthamiana, has demonstrated the ability to express a wide range of proteins at levels amenable to purification. N. benthamiana has two limitations for its use; one is its relatively slow growth, and the other is its low biomass. To address these limitations we screened a number of legumes for transient protein expression. Using the alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and the cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) vectors, delivered via Agrobacterium, we were able to identify three Pisum sativum varieties that demonstrated protein expression transiently. Expression levels of 420 +/- 26.24 mg GFP/kgFW in the green pea variety speckled pea were achieved. We were also able to express three therapeutic proteins indicating promise for this system in the production of biopharmaceuticals. PMID:19156736

  5. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex from Chloroplasts of Pisum sativum L 1

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael; Randall, Douglas D.

    1979-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is associated with intact chloroplasts and mitochondria of 9-day-old Pisum sativum L. seedlings. The ratio of the mitochondrial complex to the chloroplast complex activities is about 3 to 1. Maximal rates observed for chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity ranged from 6 to 9 micromoles of NADH produced per milligram of chlorophyll per hour. Osmotic rupture of pea chloroplasts released 88% of the complex activity, indicating that chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is a stromal complex. The pH optimum for chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was between 7.8 and 8.2, whereas the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex had a pH optimum between 7.3 and 7.7. Chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity was specific for pyruvate, dependent upon coenzyme A and NAD and partially dependent upon Mg2+ and thiamine pyrophosphate. Chloroplast-associated pyruvate dehydrogenase complex provides a direct link between pyruvate metabolism and chloroplast fatty acid biosynthesis by providing the substrate, acetyl-CoA, necessary for membrane development in young plants. Images PMID:16661100

  6. SNP marker discovery, linkage map construction and identification of QTLs for enhanced salinity tolerance in field pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Field pea (Pisum sativum L.) is a self-pollinating, diploid, cool-season food legume. Crop production is constrained by multiple biotic and abiotic stress factors, including salinity, that cause reduced growth and yield. Recent advances in genomics have permitted the development of low-cost high-throughput genotyping systems, allowing the construction of saturated genetic linkage maps for identification of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with traits of interest. Genetic markers in close linkage with the relevant genomic regions may then be implemented in varietal improvement programs. Results In this study, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers associated with expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were developed and used to generate comprehensive linkage maps for field pea. From a set of 36,188 variant nucleotide positions detected through in silico analysis, 768 were selected for genotyping of a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population. A total of 705 SNPs (91.7%) successfully detected segregating polymorphisms. In addition to SNPs, genomic and EST-derived simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were assigned to the genetic map in order to obtain an evenly distributed genome-wide coverage. Sequences associated with the mapped molecular markers were used for comparative genomic analysis with other legume species. Higher levels of conserved synteny were observed with the genomes of Medicago truncatula Gaertn. and chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) than with soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.), Lotus japonicus L. and pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan [L.] Millsp.). Parents and RIL progeny were screened at the seedling growth stage for responses to salinity stress, imposed by addition of NaCl in the watering solution at a concentration of 18 dS m-1. Salinity-induced symptoms showed normal distribution, and the severity of the symptoms increased over time. QTLs for salinity tolerance were identified on linkage groups Ps III and VII, with flanking SNP markers suitable for

  7. Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Conflict in Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Is Associated with Nuclear and Plastidic Candidate Genes Encoding Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanova, Vera S.; Zaytseva, Olga O.; Mglinets, Anatoliy V.; Shatskaya, Natalia V.; Kosterin, Oleg E.; Vasiliev, Gennadiy V.

    2015-01-01

    In crosses of wild and cultivated peas (Pisum sativum L.), nuclear-cytoplasmic incompatibility frequently occurs manifested as decreased pollen fertility, male gametophyte lethality, sporophyte lethality. High-throughput sequencing of plastid genomes of one cultivated and four wild pea accessions differing in cross-compatibility was performed. Candidate genes for involvement in the nuclear-plastid conflict were searched in the reconstructed plastid genomes. In the annotated Medicago truncatula genome, nuclear candidate genes were searched in the portion syntenic to the pea chromosome region known to harbor a locus involved in the conflict. In the plastid genomes, a substantial variability of the accD locus represented by nucleotide substitutions and indels was found to correspond to the pattern of cross-compatibility among the accessions analyzed. Amino acid substitutions in the polypeptides encoded by the alleles of a nuclear locus, designated as Bccp3, with a complementary function to accD, fitted the compatibility pattern. The accD locus in the plastid genome encoding beta subunit of the carboxyltransferase of acetyl-coA carboxylase and the nuclear locus Bccp3 encoding biotin carboxyl carrier protein of the same multi-subunit enzyme were nominated as candidate genes for main contribution to nuclear-cytoplasmic incompatibility in peas. Existence of another nuclear locus involved in the accD-mediated conflict is hypothesized. PMID:25789472

  8. Ferric reductase activity and PsFRO1 sequence variation in pisum sps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physiological studies in pea (Pisum sativum) suggest that the reduction of iron (Fe) is the rate-limiting physiological process in Fe acquisition by dicotyledonous plants. Previous molecular work suggests that ferric reductase activity is regulated at both the transcriptional and post-translational ...

  9. Genotyping by sequencing reveals the genetic diversity of the USDA pisum diversity collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA expanded Pisum Single Plant (PSP) core collection is a unique resource that represents the breadth of the genetic diversity of the genus in an inbred format that facilitates genetic study. The collection includes inbred accessions from the refined pea core collection, parent lines of USDA r...

  10. Chromosome aberration assays in Pisum for the study of environmental mutagens.

    PubMed

    Grant, W F; Owens, E T

    2001-05-01

    From a literature survey, 117 chemicals are tabulated that have been assayed in 179 assays for their clastogenic effects in Pisum. Of the 117 chemicals that have been assayed, 65 are reported at giving a positive reaction (i.e. causing chromosome aberrations), 30 positive with a dose response, five borderline positive. Seventeen chemicals gave a negative response. Eighty-one percent of the chemicals gave a definite positive response. A c-mitotic effect was detected from treatment with 17 chemicals. In addition to the above tabulation of chemicals, 39 chemicals have been reported with an antimitotic effect. Thirteen assays have been recorded for five types of radiation, which with the exception of ultrasound reacted positively. The results of assays with 38 chemicals and/or radiations in combined treatments, as well as 15 chemicals and three types of radiations that induce somatic mutations are tabulated. The Pisum sativum (2n=14) bioassay has been shown to be a very good plant bioassay for assessing chromosome damage both in mitosis and meiosis for somatic mutations induced by chemicals, radiations, and environmental pollutants. For some chemicals, the Pisum assay is not as sensitive in assessing clastogenicity as the Allium assay, although this should be considered in relative terms. Pisum fulvum (2n=14) has been used in clastogenic studies also, but to a much lesser extent. PMID:11344039

  11. Genetic Diversity within the USDA Pisum sativum Collection for Seed Sugar Composition and Concentration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA Pisum sativum refined core collection was evaluated for concentrationa dn composition of low molceular weight carbohydrates. Six plants each from the 120 wrinkle-seeded accessions were grown ina commercial soilless mix in a greenhouse under 16hr/8hr day/night 20/15 C°. Pods were harvested...

  12. Pea (Pisum sativum) Seed Production as an Assay for Reproductive Effects Due to Herbicides.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Even though herbicide drift can affect plant reproduction, current plant testing protocols emphasize effects on vegetative growth. In this study, we determined whether a short–growing season plant can indicate potential effects of herbicides on seed production. Pea (Pisum sativum...

  13. The same allele of translation initiation factor 4E mediates resistance against two Potyvirus spp. in Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Bruun-Rasmussen, M; Møller, I S; Tulinius, G; Hansen, J K R; Lund, O S; Johansen, I E

    2007-09-01

    Pathogenicity of two sequenced isolates of Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) was established on genotypes of Pisum sativum L. reported to carry resistance genes to BYMV and other potyviruses. Resistance to the white lupin strain of BYMV (BYMV-W) is inherited as a recessive gene named wlv that maps to linkage group VI together with other Potyvirus resistances. One of these, sbm1, confers resistance to strains of Pea seedborne mosaic virus and previously has been identified as a mutant allele of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E gene (eIF4E). Sequence comparison of eIF4E from BYMV-W-susceptible and -resistant P. sativum genotypes revealed a polymorphism correlating with the resistance profile. Expression of eIF4E from susceptible plants in resistant plants facilitated BYMV-W infection in inoculated leaves. When cDNA of BYMV-W was agroinoculated, resistance mediated by the wlv gene frequently was overcome, and virus from these plants had a codon change causing an Arg to His change at position 116 of the predicted viral genome-linked protein (VPg). Accordingly, plants carrying the wlv resistance gene were infected upon inoculation with BYMV-W derived from cDNA with a His codon at position 116 of the VPg coding region. These results suggested that VPg determined pathogenicity on plants carrying the wlv resistance gene and that wlv corresponded to the sbm1 allele of eIF4E. PMID:17849710

  14. SGRL can regulate chlorophyll metabolism and contributes to normal plant growth and development in Pisum sativum L.

    PubMed

    Bell, Andrew; Moreau, Carol; Chinoy, Catherine; Spanner, Rebecca; Dalmais, Marion; Le Signor, Christine; Bendahmane, Abdel; Klenell, Markus; Domoney, Claire

    2015-12-01

    Among a set of genes in pea (Pisum sativum L.) that were induced under drought-stress growth conditions, one encoded a protein with significant similarity to a regulator of chlorophyll catabolism, SGR. This gene, SGRL, is distinct from SGR in genomic location, encoded carboxy-terminal motif, and expression through plant and seed development. Divergence of the two encoded proteins is associated with a loss of similarity in intron/exon gene structure. Transient expression of SGRL in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana promoted the degradation of chlorophyll, in a manner that was distinct from that shown by SGR. Removal of a predicted transmembrane domain from SGRL reduced its activity in transient expression assays, although variants with and without this domain reduced SGR-induced chlorophyll degradation, indicating that the effects of the two proteins are not additive. The combined data suggest that the function of SGRL during growth and development is in chlorophyll re-cycling, and its mode of action is distinct from that of SGR. Studies of pea sgrL mutants revealed that plants had significantly lower stature and yield, a likely consequence of reduced photosynthetic efficiencies in mutant compared with control plants under conditions of high light intensity. PMID:26346777

  15. Impact of dyeing industry effluent on germination and growth of pea (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Malaviya, Piyush; Hali, Rajesh; Sharma, Neeru

    2012-11-01

    Dye industry effluent was analyzed for physico-chemical characteristics and its impact on germination and growth behaviour of Pea (Pisum sativum). The 100% effluent showed high pH (10.3) and TDS (1088 mg l(-1)). The germination parameters included percent germination, delay index, speed of germination, peak value and germination period while growth parameters comprised of root and shoot length, root and shootweight, root-shoot ratio and number of stipules. The study showed the maximum values of positive germination parameters viz. speed of germination (7.85), peak value (3.28), germination index (123.87) and all growth parameters at 20% effluent concentration while the values of negative germination parameters viz. delay index (-0.14) and percent inhibition (-8.34) were found to be minimum at 20% effluent concentration. The study demonstrated that at lower concentrations the dyeing industry effluent caused a positive impact on germination and growth of Pisum sativum. PMID:23741804

  16. The Temperature Response and Aggressiveness of Peyronellaea pinodes Isolates Originating from Wild and Domesticated Pisum sp. in Israel.

    PubMed

    Golani, M; Abbo, S; Sherman, A; Frenkel, O; Shtienberg, D

    2016-08-01

    Domesticated pea fields are grown in relatively close proximity to wild pea species in Israel. Despite the major role attributed to ascochyta blight in causing yield losses in domesticated pea, very limited information is available on the pathogens prevailing in natural ecosystems. The objectives of this study were (i) to identify the species causing ascochyta blight symptoms on leaves, stems, and petioles of domesticated pea and wild Pisum plants in Israel, and (ii) to quantify the temperature response(s) and aggressiveness of such pathogens originating from Pisum plants growing in sympatric and allopatric contexts. Eighteen fungal isolates were examined and identified; three of them were sampled from Pisum sativum, 11 from Pisum fulvum, and four from Pisum elatius. All isolates were identified as Peyronellaea pinodes. Spore germination and mycelial growth took place over a wide range of temperatures, the lower and upper cardinal temperatures being 2 to 9 and 33 to 38°C, respectively; the optimal temperatures ranged from 22 to 26°C. At an optimal temperature, disease severity was significantly higher for plants maintained under moist conditions for 24 h postinoculation than for those exposed to humidity for 5 or 10 h. Analyses of the data revealed that temperature responses, spore germination rates, and aggressiveness of isolates sampled from domesticated pea plants did not differ from those of isolates sampled from adjacent or distant wild populations. Host specificity was not observed. These observations suggest that Israel may be inhabited by a single metapopulation of P. pinodes. PMID:27050578

  17. Phosphatidylinositol(4,5)bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol(4)phosphate in plant tissues. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Irvine, R.F.; Letcher, A.J.; Lander, D.J. ); Dawson, A.P. ); Musgrave, A. ); Drobak, B.K. )

    1989-03-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum) leaf discs or swimming suspensions of Chlamydomonas eugametos were radiolabeled with ({sup 3}H)myo-inositol or ({sup 32}P)Pi and the lipids were extracted, deacylated, and their glycerol moieties removed. The resulting inositol trisphosphate and bisphosphate fractions were examined by periodate degradation, reduction and dephosphorylation, or by incubation with human red cell membranes. Their likely structures were identified as D-myo-inositol(1,4,5)trisphosphate and D-myo-inositol(1,4,)-bisphosphate. It is concluded that plants contain phosphatidylinositol(4)phosphate and phosphatidylinositol(4,5)bisphosphate; no other polyphosphoinositides were detected.

  18. Fucosylation of xyloglucan: localization of the transferase in dictyosomes of pea stem cells. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Camirand, A.; Brummell, D.; MacLachlan, G.

    1987-07-01

    Microsomal membranes from elongating regions of etiolated Pisum sativum stems were separated by rate-zonal centrifugation on Renografin gradients. The transfer of labeled fucose and xylose from GDP-(/sup 14/C) fucose and UDP-(/sup 14/C)xylose to xyloglucan occurred mainly in dictyosome-enriched fractions. No transferase activity was detected in secretory vesicle fractions. Pulse-chase experiments using pea stem slices incubated with (/sup 3/H)fucose suggest that xyloglucan chains are fucosylated and their structure completed within the dictyosomes, before being transported to the cell wall by secretory vesicles.

  19. Micromonospora luteifusca sp. nov. isolated from cultivated Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Carro, Lorena; Riesco, Raúl; Spröer, Cathrin; Trujillo, Martha E

    2016-06-01

    Three novel actinobacterial strains, GUI2(T), GUI42 and CR21 isolated from nodular tissues and the rhizosphere of a sweet pea plant collected in Cañizal, Spain were identified according to their 16S rRNA gene sequences as new members of the genus Micromonospora. The closest phylogenetic members were found to be Micromonospora saelicesensis (99.2%) "Micromonospora zeae" (99.1%), "Micromonospora jinlongensis" (99%), Micromonospora lupini (98.9%) and Micromonospora zamorensis (98.8%). To resolve their full taxonomic position, four additional genes (atpD, gyrB, recA, rpoB) were partially sequenced and compared to available Micromonospora type strain sequences. DNA-DNA hybridization, BOX-PCR and ARDRA profiles confirmed that these strains represent a novel genomic species. All strains contained meso-diaminopimelic and hydroxy-diaminopimelic acids in their cell wall. Their fatty acid profiles comprised iso-C15:0, iso-C16:0 and anteiso-C15:0 as major components. The polar lipids diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol were found in the type strain GUI2(T) which also contained MK-10(H4) as the major menaquinone. Physiological and biochemical characteristics also differentiated the new isolates. Based on the integration of the above studies, strains GUI2(T), GUI42 and CR21 represent a novel Micromonospora species and we propose the name Micromonospora luteifusca sp. nov. The type strain is GUI2(T) (=CECT 8846(T); =DSM 100204(T)). PMID:27220477

  20. Rhizobium anhuiense sp. nov., isolated from effective nodules of Vicia faba and Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu Jing; Zheng, Wen Tao; Everall, Isobel; Young, J Peter W; Zhang, Xiao Xia; Tian, Chang Fu; Sui, Xin Hua; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Xin

    2015-09-01

    Four rhizobia-like strains, isolated from root nodules of Pisum sativum and Vicia faba grown in Anhui and Jiangxi Provinces of China, were grouped into the genus Rhizobium but were distinct from all recognized species of the genus Rhizobium by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA and housekeeping genes. The combined sequences of the housekeeping genes atpD, recA and glnII for strain CCBAU 23252(T) showed 86.9 to 95% similarity to those of known species of the genus Rhizobium. All four strains had nodC and nifH genes and could form effective nodules with Pisum sativum and Vicia faba, and ineffective nodules with Phaseolus vulgaris, but did not nodulate Glycine max, Arachis hypogaea, Medicago sativa, Trifolium repens or Lablab purpureus in cross-nodulation tests. Fatty acid composition, DNA-DNA relatedness and a series of phenotypic tests also separated these strains from members of closely related species. Based on all the evidence, we propose a novel species, Rhizobium anhuiense sp. nov., and designate CCBAU 23252(T) ( = CGMCC 1.12621(T) = LMG 27729(T)) as the type strain. This strain was isolated from a root nodule of Vicia faba and has a DNA G+C content of 61.1 mol% (Tm). PMID:26025940

  1. Association mapping of yield candidate gene homologs in a diverse collection of pea (Pisum sativum L.) lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Association mapping, based on linkage disequilibrium (LD), is used increasingly to describe associations between allelic variation and phenotype. Yield is a key economic trait for most field crops, including pea (Pisum sativum L.). Recent reports in plant systems have identified candidate genes fo...

  2. Identification and comparative analysis of G protein-coupled receptors in Pediculus humanus humanus.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengjun; Song, Xiaowen; Chen, Xuhong; Liu, Xing; Sang, Ming; Wu, Wei; Yun, Xiaopei; Hu, Xingxing; Li, Bin

    2014-07-01

    The body louse has the smallest genome size among the known genome-sequenced insects. Here, 81 GPCRs were identified in Pediculus humanus humanus, 56, 14, 6 and 5 GPCRs for family-A, -B, -C and -D, respectively. These GPCRs constitute the comparable repertoire of GPCRs with other insects. Moreover, it contains a more complete set of neuropeptide and protein hormone receptors not even than Acyrthosiphon pisum but also Drosophila melanogaster, for example, Sulfakinin, Corazonin, Trissin and PTHRL only presented in P. h. humanus but lost either in A. pisum or D. melanogaster. However, it has less duplication among the sub-families. Meanwhile, ACP, AVPL, HE6 receptors and Boss were also absent from P. h. humanus. These results indicated that the repertoire of GPCRs in P. h. humanus were not affected by its smallest genome size, and further suggested that P. h. humanus has a relatively original and concise GPCR regulation system. PMID:24952173

  3. Comparative phloem Mobility of nickel in nonsenescent plants. [Pisum sativa L. ; Pelargonium zonale L

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, P.M.; Chamel, A.

    1986-06-01

    /sup 63/Ni was applied to nonsenescent source leaves and found to be transported to sink tissues in pea (Pisum saativum L.) and geranium plants (Pelargonium zonale L.). The comparative mobilities (percent tracer transported out of source leaf division % /sup 86/Rb transported) for /sup 63/Ni in peas was 2.12 and in geranium 0.25. The value for the phloem mobile /sup 86/Rb was 1.00. By contrast, the comparative mobility of /sup 45/Ca, which is relatively immobile in the phloem, was low (0.05 in peas, 0.00 in geranium). Interruption of the phloem pathway between source and sink leaves by steam girdling almost completely inhibited /sup 63/Ni accumulation in the sink leaves of both species. The authors conclude that Ni is transported from nonsenescent source leaves to sink tissues via the phloem of leguminous and nonleguminous plants.

  4. Nitrogen deficiency hinders etioplast development in stems of dark-grown pea (Pisum sativum) shoot cultures.

    PubMed

    Kósa, Annamária; Preininger, Éva; Böddi, Béla

    2015-11-01

    The effects of nitrogen (N) deprivation were studied in etiolated pea plants (Pisum sativum cv. Zsuzsi) grown in shoot cultures. The average shoot lengths decreased and the stems significantly altered considering their pigment contents, 77 K fluorescence spectra and ultrastructural properties. The protochlorophyllide (Pchlide) content and the relative contribution of the 654-655 nm emitting flash-photoactive Pchlide form significantly decreased. The etioplast inner membrane structure characteristically changed: N deprivation correlated with a decrease in the size and number of prolamellar bodies (PLBs). These results show that N deficiency directly hinders the pigment production, as well as the synthesis of other etioplast inner membrane components in etiolated pea stems. PMID:25825156

  5. Measurement of the inorganic pyrophosphate in tissues of Pisum sativum L.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J; Rees, T A; Wilson, P M; Morrell, S

    1984-09-01

    Purified pyrophosphate: fructose 6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase (EC 2.7.1.90) was used to measure the inorganic pyrophosphate in unfractionated extracts of tissues of Pisum sativum L. The fructose 1,6-bisphosphate produced by the above enzyme was measured by coupling to NADH oxidation via aldolase (EC 4.1.2.13), triosephosphate isomerase (EC 5.3.1.1) and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.8). Amounts of pyrophosphate as low as 1 nmol could be measured. The contents of pyrophosphate in the developing embryo of pea, and in the apical 2 cm of the roots, were appreciable; 9.4 and 8.9 nmol g(-1) fresh weight, respectively. The possibility that pyrophosphate acts in vivo as an energy source for pyrophosphate: fructose 6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase and for UDPglucose pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.9) is considered. PMID:24254055

  6. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of a recombinant plant aminoaldehyde dehydrogenase from Pisum sativum

    PubMed Central

    Tylichová, Martina; Briozzo, Pierre; Kopečný, David; Ferrero, Julien; Moréra, Solange; Joly, Nathalie; Snégaroff, Jacques; Šebela, Marek

    2008-01-01

    Aminoaldehydes are products of polyamine degradation and are known to be reactive metabolites that are toxic to living cells at high concentrations. These compounds are catabolized by aminoaldehyde dehydrogenases, which are enzymes that contain a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide coenzyme. Amino­aldehyde dehydrogenase from Pisum sativum was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop method. A complete data set was collected to 2.8 Å resolution at 100 K. Crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 86.4, b = 216.6, c = 205.4 Å, β = 98.1°. Molecular replacement was performed and led to the identification of six dimers per asymmetric unit. PMID:18259056

  7. Fruit-set of unpollinated ovaries of Pisum sativum L. : Influence of vegetative parts.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, J; García-Martínez, J L

    1980-02-01

    The influence of removing the apical shoot and different leaves above and below the flower on the fruit-set of unpollinated pea ovaries (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) has been studied. Unpollinated ovaries were induced to set and develop either by topping or by removing certain developing leaves of the shoot. Topping had a maximum effect when carried out before or on the day of anthesis, and up to four consecutive ovaries were induced to set in the same plant. The inhibition of fruit-set was due to the developing leaves and not to the apex. The third leaf above the first flower, which had a simultaneous development to the ovary, had the stronger inhibitory effect on parthenocarpic fruit-set. The application of different plant-growth regulators (indoleacetic acid, naphthylacetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, gibberellic acid, benzyladenine and abscisic acid) did not mimic the negative effect of the shoot. PMID:24311167

  8. Identification of the 64 kilodalton chloroplast stromal phosphoprotein as phosphoglucomutase. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Salvucci, M.E.; Drake, R.R.; Broadbent, K.P.; Haley, B.E. ); Hanson, K.R.; McHale, N.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Phosphorylation of the 64 kilodalton stromal phosphoprotein by incubation of pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplast extracts with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP decreased in the presence of Glc-6-P and Glc-1,6-P{sub 2}, but was stimulated by glucose. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis following incubation of intact chloroplasts and stromal extracts with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP, or incubation of stromal extracts and partially purified phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1) with ({sup 32}P)Glc-1-P showed that the identical 64 kilodalton polypeptide was labeled. A 62 kilodalton polypeptide was phosphorylated by incubation of tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris) stromal extracts with either ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP or ({sup 32}P)Glc-1-P. In contrast, an analogous polypeptide was not phosphorylated in extracts from a tobacco mutant deficient in plastid phosphoglucomutase activity. The results indicate that the 64 (or 62) kilodalton chloroplast stromal phosphoprotein is phosphoglucomutase.

  9. Epigenetic Histone Marks of Extended Meta-Polycentric Centromeres of Lathyrus and Pisum Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Pavel; Schubert, Veit; Fuková, Iva; Manning, Jasper E; Houben, Andreas; Macas, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Species of the legume genera Lathyrus and Pisum possess chromosomes that exhibit a unique structure of their centromeric regions, which is clearly apparent during metaphase by the formation of extended primary constrictions which span up to a third of the length of the chromosome. In addition, these species express two different variants of the CenH3 protein which are co-localized in multiple domains along the poleward surface of the primary constrictions. Here, we show that the constrictions represent a distinct type of chromatin differing from the chromosome arms. In metaphase, histone phosphorylation patterns including H3S10ph, H3S28ph, and H3T3ph were observed along the entire constriction, in a way similar to holocentric chromosomes. On the other hand, distribution of phosphorylated H2AT120 was different from that previously reported from either, holocentric and monocentric chromosomes, occurring at chromatin surrounding but not overlapping CenH3 domains. Since some of these phosphorylations play a role in chromatid cohesion, it can be assumed that they facilitate correct chromosome segregation by ensuring that multiple separate CenH3 domains present on the same chromatid are oriented toward the same pole. The constrictions also displayed distinct patterns of histone methylation marks, being enriched in H3K9me2 and depleted in H3K4me3 and H3K27me2 compared to the chromosome arms. Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy revealed that although both CenH3 protein variants are present in all CenH3 domains detected on metaphase chromosomes, they are only partially co-localized while there are chromatin subdomains which are mostly made of only one CenH3 variant. Taken together, these data revealed specific features of extended primary constrictions of Lathyrus and Pisum and support the idea that they may represent an intermediate stage between monocentric and holocentric chromosomes. PMID:26973677

  10. Epigenetic Histone Marks of Extended Meta-Polycentric Centromeres of Lathyrus and Pisum Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Pavel; Schubert, Veit; Fuková, Iva; Manning, Jasper E.; Houben, Andreas; Macas, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Species of the legume genera Lathyrus and Pisum possess chromosomes that exhibit a unique structure of their centromeric regions, which is clearly apparent during metaphase by the formation of extended primary constrictions which span up to a third of the length of the chromosome. In addition, these species express two different variants of the CenH3 protein which are co-localized in multiple domains along the poleward surface of the primary constrictions. Here, we show that the constrictions represent a distinct type of chromatin differing from the chromosome arms. In metaphase, histone phosphorylation patterns including H3S10ph, H3S28ph, and H3T3ph were observed along the entire constriction, in a way similar to holocentric chromosomes. On the other hand, distribution of phosphorylated H2AT120 was different from that previously reported from either, holocentric and monocentric chromosomes, occurring at chromatin surrounding but not overlapping CenH3 domains. Since some of these phosphorylations play a role in chromatid cohesion, it can be assumed that they facilitate correct chromosome segregation by ensuring that multiple separate CenH3 domains present on the same chromatid are oriented toward the same pole. The constrictions also displayed distinct patterns of histone methylation marks, being enriched in H3K9me2 and depleted in H3K4me3 and H3K27me2 compared to the chromosome arms. Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy revealed that although both CenH3 protein variants are present in all CenH3 domains detected on metaphase chromosomes, they are only partially co-localized while there are chromatin subdomains which are mostly made of only one CenH3 variant. Taken together, these data revealed specific features of extended primary constrictions of Lathyrus and Pisum and support the idea that they may represent an intermediate stage between monocentric and holocentric chromosomes. PMID:26973677

  11. Extraction, purification, kinetic and thermodynamic properties of urease from germinating Pisum Sativum L. seeds

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Urease, one of the highly efficient known enzymes, catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea into ammonia and carbon dioxide. The present study aimed to extract urease from pea seeds (Pisum Sativum L). The enzyme was then purified in three consequence steps: acetone precipitation, DEAE-cellulose ion-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration chromatography (Sephacryl S-200 column). Results The purification fold was 12.85 with a yield of 40%. The molecular weight of the isolated urease was estimated by chromatography to be 269,000 Daltons. Maximum urease activity (190 U/g) was achieved at the optimum conditions of 40°C and pH of 7.5 after 5 min of incubation. The kinetic parameters, K m and V max , were estimated by Lineweaver-Burk fits and found to be 500 mM and 333.3 U/g, respectively. The thermodynamic constants of activation, ΔH, E a , and ΔS, were determined using Arrhenius plot and found to be 21.20 kJ/mol, 23.7 kJ/mol, and 1.18 kJ/mol/K, respectively. Conclusions Urease was purified from germinating Pisum Sativum L. seeds. The purification fold, yield, and molecular weight were determined. The effects of pH, concentration of enzyme, temperature, concentration of substrate, and storage period on urease activity were examined. This may provide an insight on the various aspects of the property of the enzyme. The significance of extracting urease from different sources could play a good role in understanding the metabolism of urea in plants. PMID:25065975

  12. Rubisco activity in guard cells compared with the solute requirement for stomatal opening. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Reckmann, U.; Scheibe, R.; Raschke, K. )

    1990-01-01

    We investigated whether the reductive pentose phosphate path in guard cells of Pisum sativum had the capacity to contribute significantly to the production of osmotica during stomatal opening in the light. Amounts of ribulose 1,5-bisphophate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) were determined by the ({sup 14}C) carboxyarabinitol bisphosphate assay. A guard cell contained about 1.2 and a mesophyll cell about 324 picograms of the enzyme; the ratio was 1:270. The specific activities of Rubisco in guard cells and in mesophyll cells were equal; there was no indication of a specific inhibitor of Rubisco in guard cells. Rubisco activity was 115 femtomol per guard-cell protoplast and hour. This value was different from zero with a probability of 0.99. After exposure of guard-cell protoplasts to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} for 2 seconds in the light, about one-half of the radioactivity was in phosphorylated compounds and <10% in malate. Guard cells in epidermal strips produced a different labelling pattern; in the light, <10% of the label was in phosphorylated compounds and about 60% in malate. The rate of solute accumulation in intact guard cells was estimated to have been 900 femto-osmol per cell and hour. If Rubisco operated at full capacity in guard cells, and hexoses were produced as osmotica, solutes could be supplied at a rate of 19femto-osmol per cell and hour, which would constitute 2% of the estimated requirement. The capacity of guard-cell Rubisco to meet the solute requirement for stomatal opening in leaves of Pisum sativum is insignificant.

  13. Conversion of Isatin to Isatate as Related to Growth Promotion in Avena Coleoptile and Pisum Stem Sections 1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H.-R.; Galston, A. W.; Milstone, L.

    1966-01-01

    Isatin, (indole 2,3-dione), which promotes elongation of Pisum stem sections at concentrations exceeding 0.1 mm, promotes elongation of Avena coleoptile sections only at higher concentrations, exceeding 1 mm. Aged isatin solutions are more active than fresh solutions, due to the slow, spontaneous conversion to isatate (o-aminophenylglyoxylate). A concentration of 0.1 mm aged isatin is as active in Avena coleoptile sections as in peas. Isatate has been independently synthesized and its auxin activity in both Avena coleoptile and Pisum stem sections confirmed. The synthetic isatate is more effective than isatin in both systems. This suggests that the auxin activity of isatin is due to its conversion to isatate. PMID:16656429

  14. Sativin: a novel antifungal miraculin-like protein isolated from legumes of the sugar snap Pisum sativum var. macrocarpon.

    PubMed

    Ye, X Y; Wang, H X; Ng, T B

    2000-07-01

    An antifungal protein designated sativin was isolated from the legumes of the sugar snap (also known as honey pea) Pisum sativum var. macrocarpon. The procedure entailed extraction, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel and ion exchange chromatography on CM-Sepharose. The protein exhibited a molecular weight of 38 kDa in SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It possessed an N-terminal amino acid sequence which showed similarity to those of miraculin (a sweet protein) and pisavin (a ribosome-inactivating protein from Pisum sativum var arvense Poir manifesting similarity to miraculin). Unlike pisavin, however, sativin demonstrated negligible ribonuclease activity and inhibited translation in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system with a very low potency (IC50= 14 microM). Sativin exerted antifungal activity against Fusarium oxysporum, Coprinus comatus and Pleurotus ostreatus but not against Rhizoctonia solani. PMID:10968407

  15. Prevalence, Development, and Significance of Ascochyta Blight Caused by Peyronellaea pinodes in Pisum elatius Populations Growing in Natural Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Golani, M; Frenkel, O; Bornstein, M; Shulhani, R; Abbo, S; Shtienberg, D

    2016-08-01

    Wild Pisum populations prevail in Israel in regions with diverse climatic conditions. A comprehensive survey was conducted in the winters of 2007-08 and 2008-09 at two sites in northern Israel, aiming to (i) document the density of Pisum elatius plants in natural ecosystems and elucidate factors related to their initial infection by Ascochyta blight and (ii) determine the factors governing disease development over time on individual plants. The surveyors identified P. elatius plants growing in designated quadrats, inspected each plant visually, and recorded the incidence and severity of its Ascochyta blight symptoms. Ascochyta blight, caused by Peyronellaea pinodes, was ubiquitous in Pisum elatius populations at both survey sites in both seasons. However, the total leaf area exhibiting disease symptoms of individual plants was very low, and stem and pod infections were rarely observed. Based on analyses of the survey data, it was suggested that, in natural ecosystems, the teleomorph stage of Peyronellaea pinodes serves as the main source of the primary and the secondary inoculum of the disease. In addition, it was found that infected leaves dropped off soon after infection, thereby precluding development of stem lesions. The plants continued growing and did not die; thus, they overcame the disease and could be considered "cured". This phenomenon was examined and confirmed in artificially inoculated, potted-plant experiments. It would be worthwhile to exploit the potential of this unique resistance mechanism as a tool for Ascochyta blight management in pea breeding. PMID:27050576

  16. Cloning, overexpression, purification and preliminary crystallographic studies of a mitochondrial type II peroxiredoxin from Pisum sativum

    PubMed Central

    Barranco-Medina, Sergio; López-Jaramillo, Francisco Javier; Bernier-Villamor, Laura; Sevilla, Francisca; Lázaro, Juan-José

    2006-01-01

    A cDNA encoding an open reading frame of 199 amino acids corresponding to a type II peroxiredoxin from Pisum sativum with its transit peptide was isolated by RT-PCR. The 171-amino-acid mature protein (estimated molecular weight 18.6 kDa) was cloned into the pET3d vector and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique. A full data set (98.2% completeness) was collected using a rotating-anode generator to a resolution of 2.8 Å from a single crystal flash-cooled at 100 K. X-ray data revealed that the protein crystallizes in space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.88, b = 66.40, c = 77.23 Å, α = 102.90, β = 104.40, γ = 99.07°, and molecular replacement using a theoretical model predicted from the primary structure as a search model confirmed the presence of six molecules in the unit cell as expected from the Matthews coefficient. Refinement of the structure is in progress. PMID:16820697

  17. Auxin effects on in vitro and in vivo protein phosphorylation in pea. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, S.R.; Ray, P.M.

    1987-04-01

    Terminal 8mm sections from the third internode of dark grown 7 day old Pisum sativum cv Alaska seedlings were separated into membrane and soluble fractions. SDS gradient PAGE identified approximately 50 in vivo phosphorylated proteins and proved superior to 2-D SDS PAGE in terms of resolution and repeatability. Addition of indoleacetic acid (IAA), fusicoccin, or 2,4 dichlorophenoxyacetic acid to membranes resulted in no detectable change in the number or phosphorylation level of the labeled proteins during in vitro phosphorylation in the presence of submicromolar concentrations of calcium. Similar results were obtained with soluble proteins. In the absence of calcium, the level of in vitro protein phosphorylation was much less, but not auxin effects could be identified. Furthermore, treatment of the sections with IAA in vivo followed by cell fractionation and in vitro phosphorylation failed to identify auxin responsive proteins. Lastly, when sections were labeled with /sup 32/P inorganic phosphate in the presence of 17 uM IAA, no auxin specific changes were found in the level of phosphorylation or in the number of phosphorylated proteins. Auxin effects on phosphorylation are thus slight or below their detection limit.

  18. NADH induces the generation of superoxide radicals in leaf peroxisomes. [Pisum sativum L

    SciTech Connect

    del Rio, L.A.; Sandalio, L.M.; Palma, J.M. ); Fernandez, V.M.; Ruperez, F.L. )

    1989-03-01

    In peroxisomes isolated from pea leaves (Pisum sativum L.) the production of superoxide free radicals (O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) by xanthine and NADH was investigated. In peroxisomal membranes, 100 micromolar NADH induced the production of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} radicals. In the soluble fractions of peroxisomes, no generation of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} radicals was observed by incubation with either NADH or xanthine, although xanthine oxidase was found located predominantly in the matrix of peroxisomes. The failure of xanthine to induce superoxide generation was probably due to the inability to fully suppress the endogenous Mn-superoxide dismutase activity by inhibitors which were inactive against xanthine oxidase. The generation of superoxide radicals in leaf peroxisomes together with the recently described production of these oxygen radicals in glyoxysomes suggests that O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} generation could be a common metabolic property of peroxisomes and further supports the existence of active oxygen-related roles for peroxisomes in cellular metabolism.

  19. Purification and characterization of ornithine transcarbamylase from pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, R. D.; Richardson, D. P.

    1991-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum) ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) was purified to homogeneity from leaf homogenates in a single-step procedure, using delta-N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-ornithine-Sepharose 6B affinity chromatography. The 1581-fold purified OTC enzyme exhibited a specific activity of 139 micromoles citrulline per minute per milligram of protein at 37 degrees C, pH 8.5. Pea OTC represents approximately 0.05% of the total soluble protein in the leaf. The molecular weight of the native enzyme was approximately 108,200, as estimated by Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration chromatography. The purified protein ran as a single molecular weight band of 36,500 in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These results suggest that the pea OTC is a trimer of identical subunits. The overall amino acid composition of pea OTC is similar to that found in other eukaryotic and prokaryotic OTCs, but the number of arginine residues is approximately twofold higher. The increased number of arginine residues probably accounts for the observed isoelectric point of 7.6 for the pea enzyme, which is considerably more basic than isoelectric point values that have been reported for other OTCs.

  20. Analysis of the state of posttranslational calmodulin methylation in developing pea plants. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sukheung; Roberts, D.M. )

    1990-07-01

    A specific calmodulin-N-methyltransferase was used in a radiometric assay to analyze the degree of methylation of lysine-115 in pea (Pisum sativum) plants. Calmodulin was isolated from dissected segments of developing roots of young etiolated and green pea plants and was tested for its ability to be methylated by incubation with the calmodulin methyltransferase in the presence of ({sup 3}H)methyl-S-adenosylmethionine. By this approach, the presence of unmethylated calmodulins were demonstrated in pea tissues, and the levels of methylation varied depending on the developmental state of the tissue tested. Calmodulin methylation levels were lower in apical root segments of both etiolated and green plants, and in the young lateral roots compared with the mature, differentiated root tissues. The incorporation of methyl groups into these calmodulin samples appears to be specific for position 115 since site-directed mutants of calmodulin with substitutions at this position competitively inhibited methyl group incorporation. The present findings, combined with previous data showing differences in the ability of methylated and unmethylated calmodulins to activate pea NAD kinase raise the possibility that posttranslational methylation of calmodulin could be another mechanism for regulating calmodulin activity.

  1. Rapid wall relaxation in elongating tissues. [Glycine max (L. ); Pisum sativum L

    SciTech Connect

    Matyssek, R.; Maruyama, S.; Boyer, J.S. )

    1988-01-01

    Reported differences in the relaxation of cell walls in enlarging stem tissues of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and pea (Pisum sativum L.) cause measurements of the yield threshold turgor, an important growth parameter, to be in doubt. Using the pressure probe and guillotine psychrometer, the authors investigated wall relaxation in these species by excising the elongating tissue in air to remove the water supply. The authors found that the rapid kinetics usually exhibited by soybean could be delayed and made similar to the slow kinetics previously reported for pea if slowly growing or mature tissue was left attached to the rapidly growing tissue when relaxation was initiated. The greater the amount of attached tissue, the slower the relaxation, suggesting that slowly growing tissue acted as a water source. Consistent with this concept was a lower water potential in the rapidly elongating tissue than in the slowly growing tissue. If this tissue was removed from pea, relaxation became as rapid as usually exhibited by soybean. It is concluded that the true relaxation of cell walls to the yield threshold requires only a few minutes and that the yield threshold in the intact plant before excision. Under these conditions, the yield threshold was close to the turgor in the intact plant regardless of the species.

  2. Characterization by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of monoclonal antibodies to Pisum and Avena phytochrome

    SciTech Connect

    Cordonnier, M.M.; Greppin, H.; Pratt, L.H.

    1984-01-01

    Nine monoclonal antibodies to pea (Pisum sativum L.) and 16 to oat (Avena sativa L.) phytochrome are characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay against phytochrome from six different sources: pea, zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.), lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), oat, rye (Secale cereale L.), and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). All antibodies were raised against phytochrome with a monomer size near 120,000 daltons. Nevertheless, none of them discriminated qualitatively between 118/114-kilodalton oat phytochrome and a photoreversible, 60-kilodalton proteolytic degradation product derived from it. In addition, none of the 23 antibodies tested discriminated substantially between phytochrome - red-absorbing form and phytochrome - far red-absorbing form. Two antibodies to pea and six to oat phytochrome also bound strongly to phytochrome from the other species, even though these two plants are evolutionarily widely divergent. Of these eight antibodies, two bound significantly to all of the six phytochrome preparations tested, indicating that these two may recognize highly conserved regions of the chromoprotein. Since the molecular function of phytochrome is unknown, these two antibodies may serve as unique probes for regions of this pigment that are important to its mode of action. 27 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  3. Micromonospora pisi sp. nov., isolated from root nodules of Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Lorena C; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; Trujillo, Martha E

    2010-02-01

    A novel actinomycete, designated strain GUI 15(T), isolated from the root nodules of a Pisum sativum plant was characterized taxonomically by using a polyphasic approach. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain GUI 15(T) showed highest similarity to Micromonospora pattaloongensis TJ2-2(T) (98.7 %) and Polymorphospora rubra TT 97-42(T) (98.5 %). Phylogenetic analysis based on the gyrase B gene also supported the close relationship of these three strains, but indicated that strain GUI 15(T) should be assigned to the genus Micromonospora. Chemotaxonomic results confirmed the position of the isolate in the genus Micromonospora, but revealed differences at the species level. The novel strain could be distinguished from recognized Micromonospora species by using a combination of physiological and biochemical tests. Based on these observations, strain GUI 15(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Micromonospora, for which the name Micromonospora pisi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GUI 15(T) (=DSM 45175(T)=LMG 24546(T)). PMID:19651739

  4. Study of effect of AC and DC magnetic fields on growth of Pisum sativum seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, Mahmood; Yasaie Mehrjardi, Yasaman; Sojoodi, Jaleh; Bayani, Hosien; Kazem Salem, Mohammad

    2013-08-01

    This paper concentrates on the effect of the AC and DC magnetic fields on plant growth. The effect of AC magnetic field with intensities of 2.25, 1.66 and 1.49 mT and DC magnetic field with intensities of 3.6, 2.41 and 2.05 mT in exposure durations of 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 min on two groups of dry and wet Pisum sativum seedlings was studied. In each experiment 10 seeds were used; the experiments were repeated three times for each group and there was a sham exposed group for comparison purposes. The light cycle was 12 h light/12 h darkness and the temperature was 25 ± 1° C. The index of growth is considered to be the root and stem elongation on the sixth day. It was observed that AC magnetic field has a positive effect on the growth in all durations and intensities. Moreover, it is highlighted that during the experiments, the mean growth of dry seedlings significantly increased by a factor of 11 in AC magnetic field with the lowest intensity of 1.49 mT (p < 0.05). It was also shown that AC magnetic fields had a more positive effect on the growth of plants in comparison to DC magnetic fields.

  5. Control of storage-protein synthesis during seed development in pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed Central

    Gatehouse, J A; Evans, I M; Bown, D; Croy, R R; Boulter, D

    1982-01-01

    The tissue-specific syntheses of seed storage proteins in the cotyledons of developing pea (Pisum sativum L.) seeds have been demonstrated by estimates of their qualitative and quantitative accumulation by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and rocket immunoelectrophoresis respectively. Vicilin-fraction proteins initially accumulated faster than legumin, but whereas legumin was accumulated throughout development, different components of the vicilin fraction had their predominant periods of synthesis at different stages of development. The translation products in vitro of polysomes isolated from cotyledons at different stages of development reflected the synthesis in vivo of storage-protein polypeptides at corresponding times. The levels of storage-protein mRNA species during development were estimated by 'Northern' hybridization using cloned complementary-DNA probes. This technique showed that the levels of legumin and vicilin (47000-Mr precursors) mRNA species increased and decreased in agreement with estimated rates of synthesis of the respective polypeptides. The relative amounts of these messages, estimated by kinetic hybridization were also consistent. Legumin mRNA was present in leaf poly(A)+ RNA at less than one-thousandth of the level in cotyledon poly(A)+ (polyadenylated) RNA, demonstrating tissue-specific expression. Evidence is presented that storage-protein mRNA species are relatively long-lived, and it is suggested that storage-protein synthesis is regulated primarily at the transcriptional level. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6897609

  6. Study of DC and AC electric field effect on Pisum sativum seeds growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Bahar; Jaleh, Sojoodi; Yasaman, Yasaie

    2014-07-01

    In this research the effect of electric field on two groups of wet and dry Pisum sativum seeds growth was studied. To generate the required electric field a parallel-plate capacitor with round copper plates of 30 cm diameter was used. The experiments were performed once in fixed exposure duration of 8 min in variable DC electric field of 0.25-1.5 kV/m. The other experiments were performed in variable fields of 50-125 kV/m in fixed exposure duration of 8 min, in two groups of AC and DC electric fields. The experiments were repeated three times. In each experiment 10 seeds were used and there was a sham exposed group for comparison, too. After application of electric field, the seeds were kept for six days in the same growth chamber with the temperature of 25 ± 1 °C and 12 h light/12 h darkness. On the 6th day length of stems and height of roots were measured. After doing statistical analysis, in low intensities of DC electric field, the highest significant increase of mean growth (The average of stem length and the height of roots) was seen in 1.5 kV/m in wet seeds. In high intensities of DC and AC electric fields, the highest significant increase of mean growth was seen in AC electric field of 100 kV/m in wet seeds.

  7. Phytochrome regulation of gibberellin metabolism in shoots of dwarf Pisum sativum L

    SciTech Connect

    Campell, B.R.

    1986-01-01

    To study the effect of light on the recessive dwarfing allele, le, of Pisum sativum L., etiolated, paclobutrazol treated LeLe (cv. Alaska) and lele (cv. Progress) pea seedlings were transferred to different light regimes. The growth response of both genotypes to applications of GA/sub 1/, GA/sub 20/, and steviol was measured over 48 hours using position transducers. Both genotypes responded to GA/sub 1/ under red irradiation and in darkness. The LeLe plants grew in response to steviol and GA/sub 20/ under red irradiation and in darkness. The lele plants responded to steviol and GA/sub 20/ in darkness, but showed a much smaller response when red irradiated. The red effect on lele plants was reversible by far-red irradiation. (/sup 3/H)GA/sub 20/ was applied to nana pea seedlings, homozygous for le, grown under different light regimes. Radioactive metabolites were later extracted from the shoots of the treated plants. Both the free acid and conjugate pools were analyzed by reversed phase HPLC, and some radioactive metabolites were tentatively identified by comparing their retention times to those of authentic (/sup 3/H)GAs.

  8. Gibberellin Substitution for the Requirement of the Cotyledons in Stem Elongation in Pisum sativum Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Shininger, T L

    1972-03-01

    The removal of the cotyledons from 8-day-old light-grown Pisum sativum cv. Alaska seedlings caused a reduction in the rate of stem elongation to 50% of the intact control value. Gibberellic acid restored the stem elongation rate of decotylized plants to the level of the intact controls. The effect of decotylization was to lower both the rate of node formation and the rate of internode elongation. The steady state rate of internode elongation was reduced to 50% of the control rate by decotylization. Applied gibberellic acid did not restore the normal rate of node formation nor the lag in internode elongation caused by decotylization, but gibberellic acid did restore the normal steady state rate of internode elongation. Analysis of variance demonstrated an interaction between the cotyledons and applied gibberellic acid. 2-Isopropyl-4-dimethylamino-5-methyl phenyl-1-piperidine carboxylate methyl chloride inhibited internode elongation to the same extent in both intact and decotylized plants. The results indicate that the cotyledons are an effective source of gibberellin for the young pea seedling. PMID:16657957

  9. Evidence that the mature leaves contribute auxin to the immature tissues of pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Jager, Corinne E; Symons, Gregory M; Glancy, Naomi E; Reid, James B; Ross, John J

    2007-07-01

    In plants such as the garden pea (Pisum sativum L.), it is widely thought that the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is synthesised mainly in the immature tissues of the apical bud and then transported basipetally to other parts of the plant. Consistent with this belief are results showing that removal of the apical bud markedly reduces the IAA content in the stem. However, it has also been suggested that the mature leaves may synthesise substantial amounts of IAA, which enters the basipetal transport stream after being transported to the shoot apex in the phloem (Cambridge and Morris in Planta 99:583-588, 1996). To examine this theory, we defoliated pea plants and measured the effect on IAA content in the remaining shoot tissues. IAA levels were reduced in the internodes, and to a lesser extent in the apical bud, after defoliation, suggesting that mature leaves are indeed an important source of auxin for the shoot. Consistent with this idea, we have demonstrated that mature, fully expanded leaves are capable of de novo IAA synthesis. Furthermore, we report evidence for the presence of IAA in the phloem sap of pea. Together these results support those of Cambridge and Morris, suggesting that mature leaves are a source of the IAA in the basipetal transport stream. PMID:17308928

  10. Marked changes in volume of mesophyll protoplasts of pea (Pisum sativum) on exposure to growth hormones.

    PubMed

    Kolla, Venkat Apparao; Suhita, Dontamala; Raghavendra, Agepati S

    2004-05-01

    The present study reports quick and significant changes induced by plant hormones in the volume of mesophyll protoplasts of pea (Pisum sativum). Four plant hormones: gibberellic acid (GA3), indole 3-acetic acid (IAA), abscisic acid (ABA)(+/-) and methyl jasmonate (MJ), caused marked changes in the volume of mesophyll protoplasts. GA3 and IAA increased the volume of the protoplasts (up to 90%) whereas the ABA and MJ decreased (by about 40%) the volume. Aquaporins or water channels appear to play an important role in swelling/shrinkage of the protoplasts as indicated by the suppression of volume changes by HgCl2 and reversal by mercaptoethanol. The possible role of secondary messengers in volume changes induced by GA3 was investigated by using selected pharmacological reagents. The GA3 induced swelling was restricted by GDP-beta-S (G-protein antagonist), U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor), and TFP (calmodulin antagonist), but was not affected by 1-butanol (phospholipase D inhibitor), GTP-gamma-S (G-protein agonist), or verapamil (calcium channel blocker). The results suggest that the mesophyll protoplasts can be a simple and useful system for further studies on volume changes in plant tissues. PMID:15202712

  11. Genetic interaction and mapping studies on the leaflet development (lld) mutant in Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sushil; Mishra, Raghvendra Kumar; Kumar, Arvind; Chaudhary, Swati; Sharma, Vishakha; Kumari, Renu

    2012-01-01

    In Pisum sativum, the completely penetrant leaflet development (lld) mutation is known to sporadically abort pinnae suborgans in the unipinnate compound leaf. Here, the frequency and morphology of abortion was studied in each of the leaf suborgans in 36 genotypes and in presence of auxin and gibberellin, and their antagonists. Various lld genotypes were constructed by multifariously recombining lld with a coch homeotic stipule mutation and with af, ins, mare, mfp, tl and uni-tac leaf morphology mutations. It was observed that the suborgans at all levels of pinna subdivisions underwent lld-led abortion events at different stages of development. As in leafblades, lld aborted the pinnae in leaf-like compound coch stipules. The lld mutation interacted with mfp synergistically and with other leaf mutations additively. The rod-shaped and trumpet-shaped aborted pea leaf suborgans mimicked the phenotype of aborted leaves in HD-ZIP-III-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. Suborganwise aborted morphologies in lld gnotypes were in agreement with basipetal differentiation of leaflets and acropetal differentiation in tendrils. Altogether, the observations suggested that LLD was the master regulator of pinna development. On the basis of molecular markers found linked to lld, its locus was positioned on the linkage group III of the P. sativum genetic map. PMID:23271018

  12. Pteroylglutamate derivatives in Pisum sativum L. Biosynthesis of cotyledonary tetrahydropteroylglutamates during germination

    PubMed Central

    Roos, A. J.; Cossins, E. A.

    1971-01-01

    1. The concentrations of pteroylglutamate derivatives in the cotyledons of pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings were determined by microbiological assay by using Lactobacillus casei (A.T.C.C. 7469), Streptococcus faecalis (A.T.C.C. 8043) and Pediococcus cerevisiae (A.T.C.C. 8081). During germination the pteroylglutamate content of the cotyledons increased rapidly from 0.2μg/g dry wt. to 4.0μg/g dry wt., the maximum values being reached approx. 120h after imbibition. 2. Approx. 50% of the pteroylglutamate pool of 3-day-old seedlings was accounted for by highly conjugated derivatives. The concentrations of such derivatives were greatest when precautions were taken to inactivate endogenous enzymes before extraction of the tissues. 3. Individual derivatives present in the tissue extracts were separated by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. Synthesis of the major derivative, 5-methyltetrahydropteroylmonoglutamate, was inhibited by administration of 0.1mm-aminopterin and -amethopterin solutions during imbibition. Under these conditions pteroylglutamic acid accumulated in the tissues. 4. Feeding experiments employing [2-14C]pteroylglutamic acid and 5[14C]-methyltetrahydro-pteroylmonoglutamic acid revealed that both compounds were incorporated into conjugated and unconjugated derivatives of the pteroylglutamate pool. PMID:5003530

  13. Internode length in pisum: do the internode length genes effect growth in dark-grown plants?

    PubMed

    Reid, J B

    1983-07-01

    Internode length in light-grown peas (Pisum sativum L.) is controlled by the interaction of genes occupying at least five major loci, Le, La, Cry, Na, and Lm. The present work shows that the genes at all of the loci examined (Le, Cry, and Na) also exert an effect on internode length in plants grown in complete darkness. Preliminary results using pure lines were verified using either segregating progenies or near isogenic lines. The major cause of the differences was due to a change in the number of cells per internode rather than to an alteration of the cell length. Since the genes occupying at least two of these loci, Le and Na, have been shown to be directly involved with gibberellin metabolism, it appears that gibberellins are not only essential for elongation in the dark but are limiting for elongation in the nana (extremely short, na), dwarf (Na le), and tall (Na Le) phenotypes. These results are supported by the large inhibitory effects of AMO 1618 treatments on stem elongation in dwarf and tall lines grown in the dark and the fact that applied gibberellic acid could overcome this inhibition and greatly promote elongation in a gibberellin-deficient na line. It is clear that the internode length genes, and in particular the alleles at the Le locus, are not acting by simply controlling the sensitivity of the plant to light. PMID:16663081

  14. Fruit-set of unpollinated ovaries of Pisum sativum L. : Influence of plant-growth regulators.

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, J L; Carbonell, J

    1980-02-01

    The development of parthenocarpic fruits of Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska was induced by the application of different plant-growth regulators in aqueous solution to the emasculated ovaries in untopped plants. At least one compound in each of the groups of auxins (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid), cytokinins (benzyladenine), and gibberellins (gibberellic acid) was found active. Gibberellic acid (GA3), however, was the only substance which produced pods similar to those of fruits with seeds. The length of the pods obtained by GA3 was a linear function of the logarithm of the concentration of GA3 in the solution. The effect of GA3 (at a concentration which produced 50% of the maximum pod length) was enhanced by a simultaneous application of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. Abscisic acid (ABA) counteracted the effect of GA3 and of topping. The results suggest that gibberellins and ABA may exert a major regulatory control in natural fruit-set. Peas can be used for the assay of fructigenic activity and is an advantageous material for the study of the mode of action of gibberellins on fruit-set. PMID:24311168

  15. Response of ultraviolet-B and nickel on pigments, metabolites and antioxidants of Pisum sativum L.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suruchi; Mishra, Shweta; Kumari, Rima; Agrawal, S B

    2009-09-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UV) though harmful but is an important and unavoidable component of terrestrial ecosystem to which plants have been exposed since their migration from aquatic to land habitat. Incoming UV-B radiation and heavy metals abundance in contaminated soils are significant environmental threat affecting metabolic functions of plants through generation of reactive oxygen species. Plants have evolved mechanisms to counteract these reactive radicals and to repair the damage caused by UV-B and heavy metals. This study describes the impact of supplemental UV-B (sUV-B) and nickel (Ni) singly and in combination on photosynthetic pigments, flavonoids, enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, metabolites and lipid peroxidation of Pisum sativum L. (pea) plants. Compared to the controls, both the stresses individually and in combination led to reductions in photosynthetic pigments, ascorbic acid, protein and catalase (CAT) activity whereas a reverse trend was observed for flavonoids, phenol, proline and thiol contents, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POX) activities and lipid peroxidation (LPO). However, flavonoids increased significantly under individual exposure of sUV-B as compared to other treatments. An increase of LPO by 81% indicated the generation of reactive oxygen species under both the stress conditions. sUV-B and Ni in combination acted synergistically with stimulation of CAT activity by 51.6%, additively on SOD activity with increase of 16.4%, while other parameters showed antagonistic action of both the stresses. PMID:20136048

  16. Nutritional assessment in vitro and in vivo of raw and extruded peas (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Alonso, R; Grant, G; Dewey, P; Marzo, F

    2000-06-01

    The effects of extrusion cooking on the nutritional properties of Pisum sativum L. have been evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The treatment greatly elevated protein and starch digestibility in vitro. Also, the amounts of intact starch diminished while total free sugars increased. In addition, the levels of antinutritional factors, such as protease inhibitors and lectins, were greatly decreased. Concentrations of methionine and cystine were low in raw peas and were further reduced by extrusion treatment. The nutritional performance of rats fed extruded pea diets for 15 days was no better than that of rats given raw pea diet. This was due to the overriding effects of amino acid deficiencies in the diets. Weight gains by rats fed extruded pea diets supplemented with amino acids were, however, much higher than those achieved by rats fed supplemented raw pea diets. Food transformation index and protein efficiency ratio values were also greatly improved. Extrusion treatment did therefore significantly improve the nutritional quality of peas. PMID:10888538

  17. The tropic response of plant roots to oxygen: oxytropism in Pisum sativum L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porterfield, D. M.; Musgrave, M. E.

    1998-01-01

    Plant roots are known to orient growth through the soil by gravitropism, hydrotropism, and thigmotropism. Recent observations of plant roots that developed in a microgravity environment in space suggested that plant roots may also orient their growth toward oxygen (oxytropism). Using garden pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Weibul's Apollo) and an agravitropic mutant (cv. Ageotropum), root oxytropism was studied in the controlled environment of a microrhizotron. A series of channels in the microrhizotron allowed establishment of an oxygen gradient of 0.8 mmol mol-1 mm-1. Curvature of seedling roots was determined prior to freezing the roots for subsequent spectrophotometric determinations of alcohol dehydrogenase activity. Oxytropic curvature was observed all along the gradient in both cultivars of pea. The normal gravitropic cultivar showed a maximal curvature of 45 degrees after 48 h, while the agravitropic mutant curved to 90 degrees. In each cultivar, the amount of curvature declined as the oxygen concentration decreased, and was linearly related to the root elongation rate. Since oxytropic curvature occurred in roots exposed to oxygen concentrations that were not low enough to induce the hypoxically responsive protein alcohol dehydrogenase, we suspect that the oxygen sensor associated with oxytropism does not control the induction of hypoxic metabolism. Our results indicate that oxygen can play a critical role in determining root orientation as well as impacting root metabolic status. Oxytropism allows roots to avoid oxygen-deprived soil strata and may also be the basis of an auto-avoidance mechanism, decreasing the competition between roots for water and nutrients as well as oxygen.

  18. Palladium uptake by Pisum sativum: partitioning and effects on growth and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Ronchini, Matteo; Cherchi, Laura; Cantamessa, Simone; Lanfranchi, Marco; Vianelli, Alberto; Gerola, Paolo; Berta, Graziella; Fumagalli, Alessandro

    2015-05-01

    Environmental palladium levels are increasing because of anthropogenic activities. The considerable mobility of the metal, due to solubilisation phenomena, and its known bioavailability may indicate interactions with higher organisms. The aim of the study was to determine the Pd uptake and distribution in the various organs of the higher plant Pisum sativum and the metal-induced effects on its growth and reproduction. P. sativum was grown in vermiculite with a modified Hoagland's solution of nutrients in the presence of Pd at concentrations ranging 0.10-25 mg/L. After 8-10 weeks in a controlled environment room, plants were harvested and dissected to isolate the roots, stems, leaves, pods and peas. The samples were analysed for Pd content using AAS and SEM-EDX. P. sativum absorbed Pd, supplied as K₂PdCl₄, beginning at seed germination and continuing throughout its life. Minimal doses (0.10-1.0 mg Pd/L) severely inhibited pea reproductive processes while showing a peculiar hormetic effect on root development. Pd concentrations ≥1 mg/L induced developmental delay, with late growth resumption, increased leaf biomass (up to 25%) and a 15-20% reduction of root mass. Unsuccessful repeated blossoming efforts led to misshapen pods and no seed production. Photosynthesis was also disrupted. The absorbed Pd (ca. 0.5 % of the supplied metal) was primarily fixed in the root, specifically in the cortex, reaching concentrations up to 200 μg/g. The metal moved through the stem (up to 1 μg/g) to the leaves (2 μg/g) and pods (0.3 μg/g). The presence of Pd in the pea fruits, together with established evidence of environmental Pd accumulation and bioavailability, suggests possible contamination of food plants and propagation in the food chain and must be the cause for concern. PMID:25639246

  19. Cell wall yield properties of growing tissue: evaluation by in vivo stress relaxation. [Pisum sativus L

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, D.J.

    1985-06-01

    Growing pea stem tissue, when isolated from an external supply of water, undergoes stress relaxation because of continued loosening of the cell wall. A theoretical analysis is presented to show that such stress relaxation should result in an exponential decrease in turgor pressure down to the yield threshold (Y), with a rate constant given by phi epsilon where phi is the metabolically maintained irreversible extensibility of the cell wall and epsilon is the volumetric elastic modulus of the cell. Stress relaxation was measured in pea (Pisum sativus L.) stem segments using the pressure microprobe technique. From the rate of stress relaxation, phi of segments pretreated with water was calculated to be 0.08 per megapascal per hour while that of auxin-pretreated tissue was 0.24 per megapascal per hour. These values agreed closely with estimates of phi made by a steady-state technique. The yield threshold (0.29 megapascal) was not affected by auxin. A theoretical analysis is also presented to show that the tissue hydraulic conductance may be estimated from the T/sub 1/2/ of tissue swelling. Experimentally, pea stems had a swelling T/sub 1/2/ of 2.0 minutes, corresponding to a relative hydraulic conductance of about 2.0 per megapascal per hour. This value is at least 8 times larger than phi. From these data and from computer modeling, it appears that the radial gradient in water potential which sustains water uptake in growing pea segments is small (0.04 megapascal). This means that hydraulic conductance does not substantially restrict growth. The results also demonstrate that the stimulation of growth by auxin can be entirely accounted for by the change in phi.

  20. The tropic response of plant roots to oxygen: oxytropism in Pisum sativum L.

    PubMed

    Porterfield, D M; Musgrave, M E

    1998-09-01

    Plant roots are known to orient growth through the soil by gravitropism, hydrotropism, and thigmotropism. Recent observations of plant roots that developed in a microgravity environment in space suggested that plant roots may also orient their growth toward oxygen (oxytropism). Using garden pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Weibul's Apollo) and an agravitropic mutant (cv. Ageotropum), root oxytropism was studied in the controlled environment of a microrhizotron. A series of channels in the microrhizotron allowed establishment of an oxygen gradient of 0.8 mmol mol-1 mm-1. Curvature of seedling roots was determined prior to freezing the roots for subsequent spectrophotometric determinations of alcohol dehydrogenase activity. Oxytropic curvature was observed all along the gradient in both cultivars of pea. The normal gravitropic cultivar showed a maximal curvature of 45 degrees after 48 h, while the agravitropic mutant curved to 90 degrees. In each cultivar, the amount of curvature declined as the oxygen concentration decreased, and was linearly related to the root elongation rate. Since oxytropic curvature occurred in roots exposed to oxygen concentrations that were not low enough to induce the hypoxically responsive protein alcohol dehydrogenase, we suspect that the oxygen sensor associated with oxytropism does not control the induction of hypoxic metabolism. Our results indicate that oxygen can play a critical role in determining root orientation as well as impacting root metabolic status. Oxytropism allows roots to avoid oxygen-deprived soil strata and may also be the basis of an auto-avoidance mechanism, decreasing the competition between roots for water and nutrients as well as oxygen. PMID:11536884

  1. Long-Term Fungal Inhibition by Pisum sativum Flour Hydrolysate during Storage of Wheat Flour Bread

    PubMed Central

    Lavecchia, Anna; Gramaglia, Valerio; Gobbetti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In order to identify antifungal compounds from natural sources to be used as ingredients in the bakery industry, water/salt-soluble extracts (WSE) from different legume flour hydrolysates obtained by the use of a fungal protease were assayed against Penicillium roqueforti DPPMAF1. The agar diffusion assays allowed the selection of the pea (Pisum sativum) hydrolysate as the most active. As shown by the hyphal radial growth rate, the WSE had inhibitory activity towards several fungi isolated from bakeries. The MIC of the WSE was 9.0 mg/ml. Fungal inhibition was slightly affected by heating and variations in pH. The antifungal activity was attributed to three native proteins (pea defensins 1 and 2 and a nonspecific lipid transfer protein [nsLTP]) and a mixture of peptides released during hydrolysis. The three proteins have been reported previously as components of the defense system of the plant. Five peptides were purified from WSE and were identified as sequences encrypted in leginsulin A, vicilin, provicilin, and the nsLTP. To confirm antifungal activity, the peptides were chemically synthesized and tested. Freeze-dried WSE were used as ingredients in leavened baked goods. In particular, breads made by the addition of 1.6% (wt/wt) of the extract and fermented by baker's yeast or sourdough were characterized for their main chemical, structural, and sensory features, packed in polyethylene bags, stored at room temperature, and compared to controls prepared without pea hydrolysate. Artificially inoculated slices of a bread containing the WSE did not show contamination by fungi until at least 21 days of storage and behaved like the bread prepared with calcium propionate (0.3%, wt/wt). PMID:25862230

  2. Sitona lineatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Larval Feeding on Pisum sativum L. Affects Soil and Plant Nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Cárcamo, Héctor A; Herle, Carolyn E; Lupwayi, Newton Z

    2015-01-01

    Adults of Sitona lineatus (pea leaf weevil, PLW) feed on foliage of several Fabaceae species but larvae prefer to feed on nodules of Pisum sativum L. and Vicia faba L. Indirectly, through their feeding on rhizobia, weevils can reduce soil and plant available nitrogen (N). However, initial soil N can reduce nodulation and damage by the weevil and reduce control requirements. Understanding these interactions is necessary to make integrated pest management recommendations for PLW. We conducted a greenhouse study to quantify nodulation, soil and plant N content, and nodule damage by weevil larvae in relation to soil N amendment with urea, thiamethoxam insecticide seed coating and crop stage. PLWs reduced the number of older tumescent (multilobed) nodules and thiamethoxam addition increased them regardless of other factors. Nitrogen amendment significantly increased soil available N (>99% nitrate) as expected and PLW presence was associated with significantly lower levels of soil N. PLW decreased plant N content at early flower and thiamethoxam increased it, particularly at late flower. The study illustrated the complexity of interactions that determine insect herbivory effects on plant and soil nutrition for invertebrates that feed on N-fixing root nodules. We conclude that effects of PLW on nodulation and subsequent effects on plant nitrogen are more pronounced during the early growth stages of the plant. This suggests the importance of timing of PLW infestation and may explain the lack of yield depression in relation to this pest observed in many field studies. Also, pea crops in soils with high levels of soil N are unlikely to be affected by this herbivore and should not require insecticide inputs. PMID:26106086

  3. Antioxidant enzymes regulate reactive oxygen species during pod elongation in Pisum sativum and Brassica chinensis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nan; Lin, Zhifang; Guan, Lanlan; Gaughan, Gerald; Lin, Guizhu

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has focused on the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cell wall loosening and cell extension in plant vegetative growth, but few studies have investigated ROS functions specifically in plant reproductive organs. In this study, ROS levels and antioxidant enzyme activities were assessed in Pisum sativum and Brassica chinensis pods at five developmental stages. In juvenile pods, the high levels of O2.- and .OH indicates that they had functions in cell wall loosening and cell elongation. In later developmental stages, high levels of .OH were also related to increases in cell wall thickness in lignified tissues. Throughout pod development, most of the O2.- was detected on plasma membranes of parenchyma cells and outer epidermis cells of the mesocarp, while most of the H2O2 was detected on plasma membranes of most cells throughout the mesocarp. This suggests that these sites are presumably the locations of ROS generation. The antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) apparently contributed to ROS accumulation in pod wall tissues. Furthermore, specifically SOD and POD were found to be associated with pod growth through the regulation of ROS generation and transformation. Throughout pod development, O2.- decreases were associated with increased SOD activity, while changes in H2O2 accumulation were associated with changes in CAT and POD activities. Additionally, high POD activity may contribute to the generation of(.)OH in the early development of pods. It is concluded that the ROS are produced in different sites of plasma membranes with the regulation of antioxidant enzymes, and that substantial ROS generation and accumulation are evident in cell elongation and cell wall loosening in pod wall cells. PMID:24503564

  4. Roles for auxin during morphogenesis of the compound leaves of pea ( Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    DeMason, Darleen A; Chawla, Rekha

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the impact of the plant growth regulator auxin on the development of compound leaves in pea. Wildtype ( WT) plantlets, as well as those of two leaf mutants, acacia ( tl) and tendrilled acacia ( uni-tac) of pea ( Pisum sativum L.), were grown on media containing the auxin-transport inhibitors 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), N-(1-naphthyl)phthalamic acid (NPA), or the auxin antagonist, p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid (PCIB). The resulting plantlets were carefully analyzed morphologically, by scanning electron microscopy and for Uni gene expression using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Auxin transport was measured in WT leaf parts using [(14)C]indole-3-acetic acid. Relative Uni gene expression was determined in shoot tips of a range of leaf-form mutants. Morphological abnormalities were observed for all genotypes examined. The terminal tendrils on WT plants were converted to leaflets, stubs or were aborted. The number of pinna pairs produced on leaves was reduced, with the distal forms being eliminated before the proximal ones. Some leaves were converted to simple, including tri-and bilobed, forms. These treatments phenocopy the uni-tac and unifoliata ( uni) mutants of pea. In the most extreme situations, leaf blades were completely lost leaving only a pair of stipules or scale leaves. Polar auxin transport was basipetal for all leaf parts. Uni gene expression in shoot tips was significantly reduced in 60 microM NPA and TIBA. Uni mRNA was more abundant in tl, af and af tl and reduced in the uni mutants compared to WT. These results indicate that an auxin gradient plays fundamental roles in controlling morphogenesis in the compound leaves of pea and specifically it: (i). is the driving force for leaf growth and pinna determination; (ii). is necessary for pinna initiation; and (iii). controls subsequent pinna development. PMID:12942326

  5. Responses of Pisum sativum L. to exogenous indole acetic acid application under manganese toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gangwar, Savita; Singh, Vijay Pratap; Maurya, Jagat Narayan

    2011-06-01

    Responses of pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings to manganese (50, 100 and 250 μM) and indole acetic acid (10 and 100 μM) treatments were investigated. Single and combined exposure of pea to manganese and 100 μM indole acetic acid decreased root and shoot fresh mass, chlorophyll, carotenoids, protein and nitrogen while ammonium content increased compared to the control. Combined treatment of pea with 250 μM manganese and 100 μM indole acetic acid decreased root and shoot fresh mass by 54% and 51%, chlorophyll and carotenoids by 31% and 26%, root and shoot protein by 47% and 44%, and root and shoot nitrogen by 44% and 40%, respectively. Activities of glutamine synthetase and glutamate synthase were decreased by the exposure of manganese and 100 μM indole acetic acid while glutamate dehydrogenase activity increased. Combined application of 250 μM manganese and 100 μM indole acetic acid decreased root and shoot glutamine synthetase activity by 44% and 39%, and glutamate synthase activity by 39% and 37% while root and shoot glutamate dehydrogenase activity increased by 47% and 42%, respectively compared to the control. In contrast, application of 10 μM indole acetic acid together with manganese decreased the negative impacts of manganese, and promoted seedling growth compared to the manganese treatments alone. This study has shown that 10 μM indole acetic acid protected pea seedlings appreciably from manganese toxicity by regulating ammonium content and the activities of enzymes of ammonium assimilation, while 100 μM of indole acetic acid exhibited opposite response under manganese toxicity. PMID:21516457

  6. Antifungal Pisum sativum defensin 1 interacts with Neurospora crassa cyclin F related to the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Denise S; Pereira, Iuri B; Fragel-Madeira, Lucianne; Medeiros, Luciano N; Cabral, Luiz M; Faria, Jane; Bellio, Maria; Campos, Reinaldo C; Linden, Rafael; Kurtenbach, Eleonora

    2007-01-30

    Plant defensins, components of the plant innate immune system, are cationic cysteine-rich antifungal peptides. Evidence from the literature [Thevissen, K., et al. (2003) Peptides 24, 1705-1712] has demonstrated that patches of fungi membrane containing mannosyldiinositolphosphorylceramide and glucosylceramides are selective binding sites for the plant defensins isolated from Dahlia merckii and Raphanus sativus, respectively. Whether plant defensins interact directly or indirectly with fungus intracellular targets is unknown. To identify physical protein-protein interactions, a GAL4-based yeast two-hybrid system was performed using the antifungal plant peptide Pisum sativum defensin 1 (Psd1) as the bait. Target proteins were screened within a Neurospora crassa cDNA library. Nine out of 11 two-hybrid candidates were nuclear proteins. One clone, detected with high frequency per screening, presented sequence similarity to a cyclin-like protein, with F-box and WD-repeat domains, related to the cell cycle control. GST pull-down assay corroborated in vitro this two-hybrid interaction. Fluorescence microscopy analysis of FITC-conjugated Psd1 and DAPI-stained fungal nuclei showed in vivo the colocalization of the plant peptide Psd1 and the nucleus. Analysis of the DNA content of N. crassa conidia using flow cytometry suggested that Psd1 directed cell cycle impairment and caused conidia to undergo endoreduplication. The developing retina of neonatal rats was used as a model to observe the interkinetic nuclear migration during proliferation of an organized tissue from the S toward the M phase of the cell cycle in the presence of Psd1. The results demonstrated that the plant defensin Psd1 regulates interkinetic nuclear migration in retinal neuroblasts. PMID:17240982

  7. Physical basis for altered stem elongation rates in internode length mutants of Pisum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behringer, F. J.; Cosgrove, D. J.; Reid, J. B.; Davies, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    Biophysical parameters related to gibberellin (GA)-dependent stem elongation were examined in dark-grown stem-length genotypes of Pisum sativum L. The rate of internode expansion in these genotypes is altered due to recessive mutations which affect either the endogenous levels of, or response to, GA. The GA deficient dwarf L181 (ls), two GA insensitive semierectoides dwarfs NGB5865 and NGB5862 (lka and lkb, respectively) and the slender' line L197 (la crys), which is tall regardless of GA content, were compared to the wild-type tall cultivar, Torsdag. Osmotic pressure, estimated by vapor pressure osmometry, and turgor pressure, measured directly with a pressure probe, did not correlate with the differences in growth rate among the genotypes. Mechanical wall properties of frozen-thawed tissue were measured using a constant force assay. GA deficiency resulted in increased wall stiffness judged both on the basis of plastic compliance and plastic extensibility normalized for equal stem circumference. Plastic compliance was not reduced in the GA insensitive dwarfs, though lka reduced circumference-normalized plasticity. In contrast, in vivo wall relaxation, determined by the pressure-block technique, differed among genotypes in a manner which did correlate with extension rates. The wall yield threshold was 1 bar or less in the tall lines, but ranged from 3 to 6 bars in the dwarf genotypes. The results with the ls mutant indicate that GA enhances stem elongation by both decreasing the wall yield threshold and increasing the wall yield coefficient. In the GA-insensitive mutants, lka and lkb, the wall yield threshold is substantially elevated. Plants possessing lka may also possess a reduced wall yield coefficient.

  8. Synthesis of Phytochelatins and Homo-Phytochelatins in Pisum sativum L.

    PubMed Central

    Klapheck, S.; Schlunz, S.; Bergmann, L.

    1995-01-01

    In the roots of pea plants (Pisum sativum L.) cultivated with 20 [mu]M CdCl2 for 3 d, synthesis of phytochelatins [PCs or ([gamma]EC)nG, where [gamma]EC is [gamma]glutamylcysteine and G is glycine] and homophytochelatins [h-PCs, ([gamma]EC)n[beta]-alanine] is accompanied by a drastic decrease in glutathione (GSH) content, but an increase in homoglutathione (h-GSH) content. In contrast, the in vitro activity of GSH synthetase increases 5-fold, whereas h-GSH synthetase activity increases regardless of Cd exposure. The consititutive enzyme PC synthase, which catalyzes the transfer of the [gamma]-EC moiety of GSH to an acceptor GSH molecule thus producing ([gamma]EC)2G, is activated by heavy metals, with Cd and Cu being strong activators and Zn being a very poor activator. Using h-GSH or hm-GSH for substrate, the synthesis rate of([gamma]EC)2[beta]-alanine and [gamma]EC)2-serine is only 2.4 and 0.3%, respectively, of the sythesis rate of ([gamma]EC)2G with GSH as substrate. However, in the presence of a constant GSH level, increasing the concentration of h-GSH or hm-GSH results in increased synthesis of ([gamma]EC)2[beta]-alanine or ([gamma]EC)2-serine, respecively; simultaneously, the synthesis of ([gamma]EC)2G is inhibited. [gamma]EC is not a substrate of PC synthase. These results are best explained by assuming that PC synthase has a [gamma]EC donor binding site, which is very specific for GSH, and a [gamma]EC acceptor binding site, which is less specific and accepts several tripeptides, namely GSH, h-GSH, and hm-GSH. PMID:12228379

  9. Growth, seed development and genetic analysis in wild type and Def mutant of Pisum sativum L

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The def mutant pea (Pisum sativum L) showed non-abscission of seeds from the funicule. Here we present data on seed development and growth pattern and their relationship in predicting this particular trait in wild type and mutant lines as well as the inheritance pattern of the def allele in F2 and F3 populations. Findings Pod length and seed fresh weight increase with fruit maturity and this may affect the abscission event in pea seeds. However, the seed position in either the distal and proximal ends of the pod did not show any difference. The growth factors of seed fresh weight (FW), width of funicles (WFN), seed width (SW) and seed height (SH) were highly correlated and their relationships were determined in both wild type and def mutant peas. The coefficient of determination R2 values for the relationship between WFN and FW, SW and SH and their various interactions were higher for the def dwarf type. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that variation of WFN was associated with SH and SW. Pearson's chi square analysis revealed that the inheritance and segregation of the Def locus in 3:1 ratio was significant in two F2 populations. Structural analysis of the F3 population was used to confirm the inheritance status of the Def locus in F2 heterozygote plants. Conclusions This study investigated the inheritance of the presence or absence of the Def allele, controlling the presence of an abscission zone (AZ) or an abscission-less zone (ALZ) forming in wild type and mutant lines respectively. The single major gene (Def) controlling this phenotype was monogenic and def mutants were characterized and controlled by the homozygous recessive def allele that showed no palisade layers in the hilum region of the seed coat. PMID:22078070

  10. Stimulation of nodulation in field peas (Pisum sativum) by low concentrations of ammonium in hydroponic culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waterer, J. G.; Vessey, J. K.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Although the inhibitory effects of high concentrations of mineral N (> 1.0 mM) on nodule development and function have often been studied, the effects of low, static concentrations of NH4+ (< 1.0 mM) on nodulation are unknown. In the present experiments we examine the effects of static concentrations of NH4+ at 0, 0.1 and 0.5 mM in flowing, hydroponic culture on nodule establishment and nitrogenase activity in field peas [Pisum sativum L. cv. Express (Svalof AB)] for the initial 28 days after planting (DAP). Peas grown in the presence of low concentrations of NH4+ had significantly greater nodule numbers (up to 4-fold) than plants grown without NH4+. Nodule dry weight per plant was significantly higher at 14, 21 and 28 DAP in plants grown in the presence of NH4+, but individual nodule mass was lower than in plants grown without NH4+. The nodulation pattern of the plants supplied with NH4+ was similar to that often reported for supernodulating mutants, however the plants did not express other growth habits associated with supernodulation. Estimates of N2 fixation indicate that the plus-NH4+ peas fixed as much or more N2 than the plants supplied with minus-NH4+ nutrient solution. There were no significant differences in nodule numbers, nodule mass or NH4+ uptake between the plants grown at the two concentrations of NH4+. Nodulation appeared to autoregulate by 14 DAP in the minus-NH4+ treatment. Plant growth and N accumulation in the minus-NH4+ plants lagged behind those of the plus-NH4+ treatments prior to N2 fixation becoming well established in the final week of the experiment. The plus-NH4+ treatments appeared not to elicit autoregulation and plants continued to initiate nodules throughout the experiment.

  11. The CRC orthologue from Pisum sativum shows conserved functions in carpel morphogenesis and vascular development

    PubMed Central

    Fourquin, Chloé; Primo, Amparo; Martínez-Fernández, Irene; Huet-Trujillo, Estefanía; Ferrándiz, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims CRABS CLAW (CRC) is a member of the YABBY family of transcription factors involved in carpel morphogenesis, floral determinacy and nectary specification in arabidopsis. CRC orthologues have been functionally characterized across angiosperms, revealing additional roles in leaf vascular development and carpel identity specification in Poaceae. These studies support an ancestral role of CRC orthologues in carpel development, while roles in vascular development and nectary specification appear to be derived. This study aimed to expand research on CRC functional conservation to the legume family in order to better understand the evolutionary history of CRC orthologues in angiosperms. Methods CRC orthologues from Pisum sativum and Medicago truncatula were identified. RNA in situ hybridization experiments determined the corresponding expression patterns throughout flower development. The phenotypic effects of reduced CRC activity were investigated in P. sativum using virus-induced gene silencing. Key Results CRC orthologues from P. sativum and M. truncatula showed similar expression patterns, mainly restricted to carpels and nectaries. However, these expression patterns differed from those of other core eudicots, most importantly in a lack of abaxial expression in the carpel and in atypical expression associated with the medial vein of the ovary. CRC downregulation in pea caused defects in carpel fusion and style/stigma development, both typically associated with CRC function in eudicots, but also affected vascular development in the carpel. Conclusions The data support the conserved roles of CRC orthologues in carpel fusion, style/stigma development and nectary development. In addition, an intriguing new aspect of CRC function in legumes was the unexpected role in vascular development, which could be shared by other species from widely diverged clades within the angiosperms, suggesting that this role could be ancestral rather than derived, as so far

  12. Long-Term Fungal Inhibition by Pisum sativum Flour Hydrolysate during Storage of Wheat Flour Bread.

    PubMed

    Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe; Lavecchia, Anna; Gramaglia, Valerio; Gobbetti, Marco

    2015-06-15

    In order to identify antifungal compounds from natural sources to be used as ingredients in the bakery industry, water/salt-soluble extracts (WSE) from different legume flour hydrolysates obtained by the use of a fungal protease were assayed against Penicillium roqueforti DPPMAF1. The agar diffusion assays allowed the selection of the pea (Pisum sativum) hydrolysate as the most active. As shown by the hyphal radial growth rate, the WSE had inhibitory activity towards several fungi isolated from bakeries. The MIC of the WSE was 9.0 mg/ml. Fungal inhibition was slightly affected by heating and variations in pH. The antifungal activity was attributed to three native proteins (pea defensins 1 and 2 and a nonspecific lipid transfer protein [nsLTP]) and a mixture of peptides released during hydrolysis. The three proteins have been reported previously as components of the defense system of the plant. Five peptides were purified from WSE and were identified as sequences encrypted in leginsulin A, vicilin, provicilin, and the nsLTP. To confirm antifungal activity, the peptides were chemically synthesized and tested. Freeze-dried WSE were used as ingredients in leavened baked goods. In particular, breads made by the addition of 1.6% (wt/wt) of the extract and fermented by baker's yeast or sourdough were characterized for their main chemical, structural, and sensory features, packed in polyethylene bags, stored at room temperature, and compared to controls prepared without pea hydrolysate. Artificially inoculated slices of a bread containing the WSE did not show contamination by fungi until at least 21 days of storage and behaved like the bread prepared with calcium propionate (0.3%, wt/wt). PMID:25862230

  13. Pea (Pisum sativum) seed production as an assay for reproductive effects due to herbicides.

    PubMed

    Olszyk, David; Pfleeger, Thomas; Lee, E Henry; Plocher, Milton

    2009-09-01

    Even though herbicide drift can affect plant reproduction, current plant testing protocols emphasize effects on vegetative growth. In this study, we determined whether a short-growing season plant can indicate potential effects of herbicides on seed production. Pea (Pisum sativum cv. Dakota) plants were grown in mineral soil in pots under greenhouse conditions. Plants were treated with a variety of herbicides (dicamba, clopyralid, glufosinate, glyphosate, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid, primisulfuron, or sulfometuron) at below standard field application rates applied at a vegetative stage of growth (approximately 14 d after emergence) or at flowering (approximately 20 d after emergence). Pea seed production was greatly reduced by sulfometuron at the minimum concentration used (0.001 x field application rate), with an effective concentration producing a 25% reduction in seed dry weight of 0.00007 x field application rate. Primisulfuron and glyphosate had a 25% reduction in seed dry weight for seed dry weight of 0.0035 and 0.0096 x field application rate, respectively. Clopyralid and dicamba reduced pea seed dry weight at a 25% reduction in seed dry weight of approximately 0.07 x field application rate. Glufosinate only reduced pea seed weight in one experiment, with a 25% reduction in seed dry weight of 0.07 and 0.008 x field application rate at vegetative growth and flowering stages, respectively. Pea seed dry weight was not affected by 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid. Plant developmental stage had no consistent effect on herbicide responses. Reduced seed production occurred with some herbicides (especially acetolactate synthase inhibitors), which caused little or no reduction in plant height or shoot biomass and little visible injury. Thus, pea may be a model species to indicate seed reproductive responses to herbicides, with seed production obtained by extending plant growth for usually only 7 d longer than the period usually used in the vegetative vigor

  14. Sitona lineatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Larval Feeding on Pisum sativum L. Affects Soil and Plant Nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Cárcamo, Héctor A.; Herle, Carolyn E.; Lupwayi, Newton Z.

    2015-01-01

    Adults of Sitona lineatus (pea leaf weevil, PLW) feed on foliage of several Fabaceae species but larvae prefer to feed on nodules of Pisum sativum L. and Vicia faba L. Indirectly, through their feeding on rhizobia, weevils can reduce soil and plant available nitrogen (N). However, initial soil N can reduce nodulation and damage by the weevil and reduce control requirements. Understanding these interactions is necessary to make integrated pest management recommendations for PLW. We conducted a greenhouse study to quantify nodulation, soil and plant N content, and nodule damage by weevil larvae in relation to soil N amendment with urea, thiamethoxam insecticide seed coating and crop stage. PLWs reduced the number of older tumescent (multilobed) nodules and thiamethoxam addition increased them regardless of other factors. Nitrogen amendment significantly increased soil available N (>99% nitrate) as expected and PLW presence was associated with significantly lower levels of soil N. PLW decreased plant N content at early flower and thiamethoxam increased it, particularly at late flower. The study illustrated the complexity of interactions that determine insect herbivory effects on plant and soil nutrition for invertebrates that feed on N-fixing root nodules. We conclude that effects of PLW on nodulation and subsequent effects on plant nitrogen are more pronounced during the early growth stages of the plant. This suggests the importance of timing of PLW infestation and may explain the lack of yield depression in relation to this pest observed in many field studies. Also, pea crops in soils with high levels of soil N are unlikely to be affected by this herbivore and should not require insecticide inputs. PMID:26106086

  15. Sequence conservation and functional constraint on intergenic spacers in reduced genomes of the obligate symbiont Buchnera.

    PubMed

    Degnan, Patrick H; Ochman, Howard; Moran, Nancy A

    2011-09-01

    Analyses of genome reduction in obligate bacterial symbionts typically focus on the removal and retention of protein-coding regions, which are subject to ongoing inactivation and deletion. However, these same forces operate on intergenic spacers (IGSs) and affect their contents, maintenance, and rates of evolution. IGSs comprise both non-coding, non-functional regions, including decaying pseudogenes at varying stages of recognizability, as well as functional elements, such as genes for sRNAs and regulatory control elements. The genomes of Buchnera and other small genome symbionts display biased nucleotide compositions and high rates of sequence evolution and contain few recognizable regulatory elements. However, IGS lengths are highly correlated across divergent Buchnera genomes, suggesting the presence of functional elements. To identify functional regions within the IGSs, we sequenced two Buchnera genomes (from aphid species Uroleucon ambrosiae and Acyrthosiphon kondoi) and applied a phylogenetic footprinting approach to alignments of orthologous IGSs from a total of eight Buchnera genomes corresponding to six aphid species. Inclusion of these new genomes allowed comparative analyses at intermediate levels of divergence, enabling the detection of both conserved elements and previously unrecognized pseudogenes. Analyses of these genomes revealed that 232 of 336 IGS alignments over 50 nucleotides in length displayed substantial sequence conservation. Conserved alignment blocks within these IGSs encompassed 88 Shine-Dalgarno sequences, 55 transcriptional terminators, 5 Sigma-32 binding sites, and 12 novel small RNAs. Although pseudogene formation, and thus IGS formation, are ongoing processes in these genomes, a large proportion of intergenic spacers contain functional sequences. PMID:21912528

  16. Isoenzymes of superoxide dismutase in nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris L. , Pisum sativum L. , and Vigna unguiculata (L. ) Walp

    SciTech Connect

    Becana, M.; Paris, F.J.; Sandalio, L.M.; Del Rio, L.A. Unidad de Bioquimica Vegetal, Granada )

    1989-08-01

    The activity and isozymic composition of superoxide dismutase were determined in nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris L., Pisum sativum L., and Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. A Mn-SOD was present in Rhizobium and two in Bradyrhizobium and bacteroids. Nodule mitochondria from all three legume species had a single Mn-SOD with similar relative mobility, whereas the cytosol contained several CuZn-SODs: two in Phaseolus and Pisum, and four in Vigna. In the cytoplasm of V. unguiculata nodules, a Fe-containing SOD was also present, with an electrophoretic mobility between those of CuZn- and Mn-SODs, and an estimated molecular weight of 57,000. Total SOD activity of the soluble fraction of host cells, expressed on a nodule fresh weight basis, exceeded markedly that of bacteroids. Likewise, specific SOD activities of free-living bacteria were superior or equal to those of their symbiotic forms. Soluble extracts of bacteria and bacteroids did not show peroxidase activity, but the nodule cell cytoplasm contained diverse peroxidase isozymes which were readily distinguishable from leghemoglobin components by electrophoresis. Data indicated that peroxidases and leghemoglobins did not significantly interfere with SOD localization on gels. Treatment with chloroform-ethanol scarcely affected the isozymic pattern of SODs and peroxidases, and had limited success in the removal of leghemoglobin.

  17. Evaluation of expression stability of candidate references genes among green and yellow pea cultivars (Pisum sativum L.) subjected to abiotic and biotic stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dry pea (Pisum sativum) is grown as human and animal feed throughout the world. Large yield losses in pea due to biotic and abiotic stresses compel an improved understanding of mechanisms of stress tolerance and genetic determinants conditioning these tolerances. The availability of stably expressed...

  18. Large-scale evaluation of pea (Pisum sativum L.) germplasm for cold tolerance in the open field during winter in Qingdao.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a cool season crop, pea (Pisum sativum L.) can tolerate frost at the vegetative stage but has yield loss when freezing stress occurs at reproductive stage. Cold tolerance improvement of pea varieties is important for the stable yield and the expansion of winter pea planting area. Under the natura...

  19. Kinetic features of gravicurvature of pea (Pisum sativum) and cress (Lepidium sativum) roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polishchuk, O. V.

    The upper sides of roots oriented horizontally grow more rapidly than the lower sides, causing the root ultimately to grow downward; this phenomenon is known as positive gravitropism. This ability is based on implicit mechanism which is being extensively investigated. Elaborate analysis of kinetic features of gravicurvature may complement the investigation. Pea and cress roots have positive gravitropism as roots of majority of higher plants. Mainly we investigated dependence of gravicurvature angle on time of gravistimulation. Two-day-old seedlings of cress (Lepidium sativum L. cv. P896) and four-day-old pea ones (Pisum sativum L. cv. Damir-2) were placed on 1% agar medium in Petri dishes and turned on angle of gravistimulation. Then they were photographed at the same position each hour of gravistimulation. Photographs were analyzed with the help of Image Tool software program. Both pea and cress roots showed two phases of gravitropic response during gravistimulation for 6 hours when the initial angle of gravistimulation was 135 degrees. Two peaks of the rate of bending were observed. In cress roots, the first peak was much lower and the distance between the two peaks was greater than in pea roots. Curves of gravitropic bending of cress roots grown in agar had one or two inflections while in the case of roots grown on filter paper curves had no inflections. These data are in agreement with the effect of the external medium on the gravitropic curvature of rice roots reported by Staves et al. (1997). Our results may reflect the fact that at least two systems that contribute to gravicurvature may exist in roots. These systems may be ligand-receptor complexes that may be formed with different kinetics in two different regions of the root. The most probable ligand is auxin and the regions appear to be central elongation zone (CEZ) and distal elongation zone (DEZ), that were reported to be centers of tropic bending in roots. Thus, dependence of rate of root bending on

  20. Callose deposition during gravitropism of Zea mays and Pisum sativum and its inhibition by 2-deoxy-D-glucose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, M. J.; Leopold, A. C.

    1984-01-01

    In etiolated corn (Zea mays L.) and etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings, a gravitropic stimulation induces the deposition of callose. In the corn coleoptiles this occurs within 5 min of gravity stimulation, and prior to the beginning of curvature. Both gravitropic curvature and callose deposition reach their maxima by 12 h. Within the first 2 h more callose is deposited on the upper (concave) side, but after 2-3 h, this deposition pattern is reversed. An inhibitor of protein glycosylation, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (DDG), inhibits callose production and considerably retards gravitropic bending in both species of plants. Mannose can relieve the inhibition of gravitropic bending by DDG. The pea mutant "Ageotropum", which does not respond to gravity when etiolated, also fails to produce callose in response to a gravitic stimulus. These correlations indicate that callose deposition may be a biochemical component of gravitropism in plant shoots.

  1. Nucleotide sequence of a complementary DNA encoding pea cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase. [Pisum sativum L

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.A.; Zilinskas, B.A. )

    1991-08-01

    The authors now report the nucleotide sequence of the cytosolic Cu/Zn SOD cloned from a {lambda}gt11 cDNA library constructed from mRNA extracted from leaves of 7- to 10-d pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L.). The clone was isolated using a 22-base synthetic oligonucleotide complementary to the amino acid sequence CGIIGLQG. This sequence, found at the protein's carboxy terminus, is highly conserved among plant cytosolic Cu/Zn SODs but not chloroplastic Cu/Zn SODs. The 738-base pair sequence contains an open reading frame specifying 152 codons and a predicted M{sub r} of 18,024 D. The deduced amino acid sequence is highly homologous (79-82% identity) with the sequences of other known plant cytosolic Cu/Zn SODs but less highly conserved (63-65%) when compared with several chloroplastic Cu/Zn SODs including pea (10).

  2. Localization of Hydrogen Peroxide Production in Pisum sativum L. Using Epi-Polarization Microscopy to Follow Cerium Perhydroxide Deposition.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, L.; Eriksson, KEL.; Dean, JFD.

    1995-01-01

    Cerium is becoming an increasingly popular reagent for histochemical localization of oxidases and phosphatases because it combines directly with reaction products to form fine precipitates of electron-dense materials that can be easily detected using transmission electron microscopy or laser confocal scanning microscopy. We used epi-polarization microscopy to detect cerium perhydroxide deposits formed when H2O2 was produced by diamine oxidase in pea (Pisum sativum L.) epicotyls exposed to exogenous putrescine. Diamine oxidase activity was abundant in cortical cell walls but showed little, if any, association with vascular tissues. Maps of cerium deposition generated using scanning electron microscopy/x-ray microanalysis verified these observations. This study demonstrates the use of epi-polarization microscopy to follow cerium deposition, and the ready accessibility of this microscopy technique should facilitate more widespread use of cerium for plant histochemistry and cytochemistry. PMID:12228377

  3. Identification of enzyme activity that conjugates indole-3-acetic acid to aspartate in immature seeds of pea (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Jakubowska, Anna

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the first identification of plant enzyme activity catalyzing the conjugation of indole-3-acetic acid to amino acids. Enzymatic synthesis of indole-3-acetylaspartate (IAA-Asp) by a crude enzyme preparation from immature seeds of pea (Pisum sativum) was observed. The reaction yielded a product with the same Rf as IAA-Asp standard after thin layer chromatography. The identity of IAA-Asp was verified by HPLC analysis. IAA-Asp formation was dependent on ATP and Mg2+, and was linear during a 60 min period. The enzyme preparation obtained after poly(ethylene glycol) 6000 fractionation showed optimum activity at pH 8.0, and the temperature optimum for IAA-Asp synthesis was 30 degrees C. PMID:17920159

  4. Differential changes in size distribution of xyloglucan in the cell walls of gravitropically responding Pisum sativum epicotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbott, L. D.; Pickard, B. G.

    1994-01-01

    Growth-related change in the size distribution of hemicellulosic wall polymers during the gravitropic curvature response of intact pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska) epicotyls was examined by gel-filtration chromatography. The gravitropic response was characterized by the appearance of curvature 20 to 30 min after horizontal placement, with 35 degrees of curvature attained by 80 min. Correlated with the onset of curvature, on the upper side of the epicotyl, there was a conspicuous transient increase in the abundance of relatively large hemicellulosic xyloglucan polymers, similar to increases previously found under conditions where diminished wall extensibility was expected. On the lower side there was a moderate, slower, and longer-term increase in abundance of small xyloglucan, similar to changes previously found in connection with auxin-stimulated growth responses. Both shifts occurred primarily in the epidermis. They appear to represent two coordinated physiological mechanisms contributing to differential growth.

  5. The effect of propionic acid and valeric acid on the cell cycle in root meristems of Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Tramontano, W.A.; Yang, Shauyu; Delillo, A.R. )

    1990-01-01

    Propionic acid and valeric acid at 1mM reduced the mitotic index of root meristem cells of Pisum sativum to < 1% after 12 hr in aerated White's medium. This effect varied with different acid concentrations. After a 12 hr exposure to either acid, seedlings transferred to fresh medium without either acid, resumed their normal mitotic index after 12 hr, with a burst of mitosis 8 hr post-transfer. Exposure of root meristem cells to either acid also inhibited ({sup 3}H)-TdR incorporation. Neither acid significantly altered the distribution of meristematic cells in G1 and G2 after 12 hr. The incorporation of ({sup 3}H) - uridine was also unaltered by the addition of either acid. This information suggests that propionic acid and valeric acid, limit progression through the cell cycle by inhibiting DNA synthesis and arresting cells in G1 and G2. These results were consistent with previous data which utilized butyric acid.

  6. Cell Wall Pectin and its Methyl-esterification in Transition Zone Determine Al Resistance in Cultivars of Pea (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Li, Xuewen; Li, Yalin; Qu, Mei; Xiao, Hongdong; Feng, Yingming; Liu, Jiayou; Wu, Lishu; Yu, Min

    2016-01-01

    The initial response of plants to aluminum (Al) is the inhibition of root elongation, while the transition zone is the most Al sensitive zone in the root apex, which may sense the presence of Al and regulate the responses of root to Al toxicity. In the present study, the effect of Al treatment (30 μM, 24 h) on root growth, Al accumulation, and properties of cell wall of two pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivars, cv Onward (Al-resistant) and cv Sima (Al-sensitive), were studied to disclose whether the response of root transition zone to Al toxicity determines Al resistance in pea cultivars. The lower relative root elongation (RRE) and higher Al content were founded in cv Sima compared with cv Onward, which were related to Al-induced the increase of pectin in root segments of both cultivars. The increase of pectin is more prominent in Al-sensitive cultivar than in Al-resistant cultivar. Aluminum toxicity also induced the increase of pectin methylesterases (PME), which is 2.2 times in root transition zone in Al-sensitive cv Sima to that of Al resistant cv Onward, thus led to higher demethylesterified pectin content in root transition zone of Al-sensitive cv Sima. The higher demethylesterified pectin content in root transition zone resulted in more Al accumulation in the cell wall and cytosol in Al-sensitive cv Sima. Our results provide evidence that the increase of pectin content and PME activity under Al toxicity cooperates to determine Al sensitivity in root transition zone that confers Al resistance in cultivars of pea (Pisum sativum). PMID:26870060

  7. Cell Wall Pectin and its Methyl-esterification in Transition Zone Determine Al Resistance in Cultivars of Pea (Pisum sativum)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuewen; Li, Yalin; Qu, Mei; Xiao, Hongdong; Feng, Yingming; Liu, Jiayou; Wu, Lishu; Yu, Min

    2016-01-01

    The initial response of plants to aluminum (Al) is the inhibition of root elongation, while the transition zone is the most Al sensitive zone in the root apex, which may sense the presence of Al and regulate the responses of root to Al toxicity. In the present study, the effect of Al treatment (30 μM, 24 h) on root growth, Al accumulation, and properties of cell wall of two pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivars, cv Onward (Al-resistant) and cv Sima (Al-sensitive), were studied to disclose whether the response of root transition zone to Al toxicity determines Al resistance in pea cultivars. The lower relative root elongation (RRE) and higher Al content were founded in cv Sima compared with cv Onward, which were related to Al-induced the increase of pectin in root segments of both cultivars. The increase of pectin is more prominent in Al-sensitive cultivar than in Al-resistant cultivar. Aluminum toxicity also induced the increase of pectin methylesterases (PME), which is 2.2 times in root transition zone in Al-sensitive cv Sima to that of Al resistant cv Onward, thus led to higher demethylesterified pectin content in root transition zone of Al-sensitive cv Sima. The higher demethylesterified pectin content in root transition zone resulted in more Al accumulation in the cell wall and cytosol in Al-sensitive cv Sima. Our results provide evidence that the increase of pectin content and PME activity under Al toxicity cooperates to determine Al sensitivity in root transition zone that confers Al resistance in cultivars of pea (Pisum sativum). PMID:26870060

  8. The molecular correlates of organ loss: the case of insect Malpighian tubules

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xiangfeng; White, Thomas A.; Yang, Xiaowei; Douglas, Angela E.

    2015-01-01

    Malpighian tubules play an essential role in excretion, osmoregulation and immunity of most insects. Exceptionally, aphids lack Malpighian tubules, providing the opportunity to investigate the fate of genes expressed in an organ that has undergone evolutionary reduction and loss. Making use of the sequenced genomes of Drosophila melanogaster and the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, we demonstrated that more than 50% of Drosophila genes expressed specifically in the Malpighian tubules had orthologues in the pea aphid genome and that most of the pea aphid orthologues with detectable expression were identified in the gut transcriptome. Relative to the whole genome, genes functioning in amino acid metabolism are significantly over-represented among the pea aphid orthologues of Malpighian tubule genes, likely reflecting the central importance of amino acid acquisition and metabolism in aphids. This study demonstrates that the evolutionary loss of a key insect organ, the Malpighian tubules, has not been associated with the coupled loss of molecular functions. PMID:25972400

  9. GyDB mobilomics

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Pomer, Alfonso; Domínguez-Escribá, Laura; Covelli, Laura; Bernad, Lucía; Ramasamy, Sukanya; Futami, Ricardo; Sempere, Jose M; Moya, Andrés; Llorens, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The Gypsy Database concerning Mobile Genetic Elements (release 2.0) is a wiki-style project devoted to the phylogenetic classification of LTR retroelements and their viral and host gene relatives characterized from distinct organisms. Furthermore, GyDB 2.0 is concerned with studying mobile elements within genomes. Therefore, an in-progress repository was created for databases with annotations of mobile genetic elements from particular genomes. This repository is called Mobilomics and the first uploaded database contains 549 LTR retroelements and related transposases which have been annotated from the genome of the Pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. Mobilomics is accessible from the GyDB 2.0 project using the URL: http://gydb.org/index.php/Mobilomics. PMID:22016855

  10. Effects of Arsenite, Sulfite, and Sulfate on Photosynthetic Carbon Metabolism in Isolated Pea (Pisum sativum L., cv Little Marvel) Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Ivano A.; Anderson, Louise E.

    1986-01-01

    Photosynthetic CO2-fixation in isolated pea (Pisum sativum L., cv Little Marvel) chloroplasts during induction is markedly inhibited by 0.4 millimolar sulfite. Sulfate at the same concentration has almost no effect. The 14CO2-fixation pattern indicates that the primary effect of sulfite is inhibition of the reaction catalyzed by ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase and a stimulation of export of intermediates out of the chloroplasts. Inhibition of light modulation of stromal enzyme activity does not appear to account for the toxicity of SO2 in this Pisum variety. Arsenite at 0.2 millimolar concentrations inhibits light activation and inhibits photosynthetic CO2 fixation. The 14CO2-fixation pattern indicates that the primary effect of arsenite is inhibition of light activation of reductive pentose phosphate pathway enzyme activity. PMID:16665056

  11. Genomic Tools in Pea Breeding Programs: Status and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Tayeh, Nadim; Aubert, Grégoire; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Lejeune-Hénaut, Isabelle; Warkentin, Thomas D.; Burstin, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an annual cool-season legume and one of the oldest domesticated crops. Dry pea seeds contain 22–25% protein, complex starch and fiber constituents, and a rich array of vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals which make them a valuable source for human consumption and livestock feed. Dry pea ranks third to common bean and chickpea as the most widely grown pulse in the world with more than 11 million tons produced in 2013. Pea breeding has achieved great success since the time of Mendel's experiments in the mid-1800s. However, several traits still require significant improvement for better yield stability in a larger growing area. Key breeding objectives in pea include improving biotic and abiotic stress resistance and enhancing yield components and seed quality. Taking advantage of the diversity present in the pea genepool, many mapping populations have been constructed in the last decades and efforts have been deployed to identify loci involved in the control of target traits and further introgress them into elite breeding materials. Pea now benefits from next-generation sequencing and high-throughput genotyping technologies that are paving the way for genome-wide association studies and genomic selection approaches. This review covers the significant development and deployment of genomic tools for pea breeding in recent years. Future prospects are discussed especially in light of current progress toward deciphering the pea genome. PMID:26640470

  12. Genomic Tools in Pea Breeding Programs: Status and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Tayeh, Nadim; Aubert, Grégoire; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Lejeune-Hénaut, Isabelle; Warkentin, Thomas D; Burstin, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an annual cool-season legume and one of the oldest domesticated crops. Dry pea seeds contain 22-25% protein, complex starch and fiber constituents, and a rich array of vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals which make them a valuable source for human consumption and livestock feed. Dry pea ranks third to common bean and chickpea as the most widely grown pulse in the world with more than 11 million tons produced in 2013. Pea breeding has achieved great success since the time of Mendel's experiments in the mid-1800s. However, several traits still require significant improvement for better yield stability in a larger growing area. Key breeding objectives in pea include improving biotic and abiotic stress resistance and enhancing yield components and seed quality. Taking advantage of the diversity present in the pea genepool, many mapping populations have been constructed in the last decades and efforts have been deployed to identify loci involved in the control of target traits and further introgress them into elite breeding materials. Pea now benefits from next-generation sequencing and high-throughput genotyping technologies that are paving the way for genome-wide association studies and genomic selection approaches. This review covers the significant development and deployment of genomic tools for pea breeding in recent years. Future prospects are discussed especially in light of current progress toward deciphering the pea genome. PMID:26640470

  13. Identification of Critical Conditions for Immunostaining in the Pea Aphid Embryos: Increasing Tissue Permeability and Decreasing Background Staining.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gee-Way; Chang, Chun-che

    2016-01-01

    The pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, with a sequenced genome and abundant phenotypic plasticity, has become an emerging model for genomic and developmental studies. Like other aphids, A. pisum propagate rapidly via parthenogenetic viviparous reproduction, where the embryos develop within egg chambers in an assembly-line fashion in the ovariole. Previously we have established a robust platform of whole-mount in situ hybridization allowing detection of mRNA expression in the aphid embryos. For analyzing the expression of protein, though, established protocols for immunostaining the ovarioles of asexual viviparous aphids did not produce satisfactory results. Here we report conditions optimized for increasing tissue permeability and decreasing background staining, both of which were problems when applying established approaches. Optimizations include: (1) incubation of proteinase K (1 µg/ml, 10 min), which was found essential for antibody penetration in mid- and late-stage aphid embryos; (2) replacement of normal goat serum/bovine serum albumin with a blocking reagent supplied by a Digoxigenin (DIG)-based buffer set and (3) application of methanol rather hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for bleaching endogenous peroxidase; which significantly reduced the background staining in the aphid tissues. These critical conditions optimized for immunostaining will allow effective detection of gene products in the embryos of A. pisum and other aphids. PMID:26862939

  14. A proposed interplay between peroxidase, amine oxidase and lipoxygenase in the wounding-induced oxidative burst in Pisum sativum seedlings.

    PubMed

    Roach, Thomas; Colville, Louise; Beckett, Richard P; Minibayeva, Farida V; Havaux, Michel; Kranner, Ilse

    2015-04-01

    Plant surfaces form the barrier between a plant and its environment. Upon damage, the wound healing process begins immediately and is accompanied by a rapid production of extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), essential in deterring pathogens, signalling responses and cell wall restructuring. Although many enzymes produce extracellular ROS, it is unclear if ROS-producing enzymes act synergistically. We characterised the oxidative burst of superoxide (O2(·-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) that follows wounding in pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings. Rates of ROS production were manipulated by exogenous application of enzyme substrates and inhibitors. The results indicate significant roles for di-amine oxidases (DAO) and peroxidases (Prx) rather than NADPH oxidase. The burst of O2(·-) was strongly dependent on the presence of H2O2 produced by DAO. Potential substrates released from wounded seedlings included linoleic acid that, upon exogenous application, strongly stimulated catalase-sensitive O2(·-) production. Moreover, a 65kD plasma membrane (PM) guaiacol Prx was found in the secretome of wounded seedlings and showed dependence on linoleic acid for O2(·-) production. Lipoxygenases are suggested to modulate O2(·-) production by consuming polyunsaturated fatty acids in the apoplast. Overall, a O2(·-)-producing mechanism involving H2O2-derived from DAO, linoleic acid and a PM-associated Prx is proposed. PMID:24996671

  15. Genetic control and identification of QTLs associated with visual quality traits of field pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Ubayasena, Lasantha; Bett, Kirstin; Tar'an, Bunyamin; Warkentin, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Visual quality of field pea (Pisum sativum L.) is one of the most important determinants of the market value of the harvested crop. Seed coat color, seed shape, and seed dimpling are the major components of visual seed quality of field pea and are considered as important breeding objectives. The objectives of this research were to study the genetics and to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with seed coat color, seed shape, and seed dimpling of green and yellow field peas. Two recombinant inbred line populations (RILs) consisting of 120 and 90 lines of F(5)-derived F(7) (F(5:7)) yellow pea (P. sativum 'Alfetta' × P. sativum 'CDC Bronco') and green pea (P. sativum 'Orb' × P. sativum 'CDC Striker'), respectively, were evaluated over two years at two locations in Saskatchewan, Canada. Quantitative inheritance with polygenic control and transgressive segregation were observed for all visual quality traits studied. All 90 RILs of the green pea population and 92 selected RILs from the yellow pea population were screened using AFLP and SSR markers and two linkage maps were developed. Nine QTLs controlling yellow seed lightness, 3 for yellow seed greenness, 15 for seed shape, and 9 for seed dimpling were detected. Among them, five QTLs located on LG II, LG IV, and LG VII were consistent in at least two environments. The QTLs and their associated markers will be useful tools to assist pea breeding programs attempting to pyramid positive alleles for the traits. PMID:21491970

  16. Evidence for Phytochrome Regulation of Gibberellin A(20) 3beta-Hydroxylation in Shoots of Dwarf (lele) Pisum sativum L.

    PubMed

    Campell, B R; Bonner, B A

    1986-12-01

    The effect of light on the dwarfing allele, le, in Pisum sativum L. was tested as the growth response to gibberellins prior to or beyond the presumed block in the gibberellin biosynthetic pathway. The response to the substrate (GA(20)), the product (GA(1)), and a nonendogenous early precursor (steviol) was compared in plants bearing the normal Le and the deficient lele genotypes in plants made low in gibberellin content genetically (nana lines) or by paclobutrazol treatment to tall (cv Alaska) and dwarf (cv Progress) peas. Both genotypes responded to GA(1) under red irradiation and in darkness. The lele plants grew in response to GA(20) and steviol in darkness but showed a much smaller response when red irradiated. The Le plants responded to GA(20) and steviol in both light and darkness. The red effects on lele plants were largely reversible by far-red irradiation. It is concluded that the deficiency in 3beta-hydroxylation of GA(20) to GA(1) in genotype lele is due to a Pfr-induced blockage in the expression of that activity. PMID:16665165

  17. Products of dark CO sub 2 fixation in pea root nodules support bacteroid metabolism. [Pisum sativum L

    SciTech Connect

    Rosendahl, L.; Pedersen, W.B. ); Vance, C.P. )

    1990-05-01

    Products of the nodule cytosol in vivo dark ({sup 14}C)CO{sub 2} fixation were detected in the plant cytosol as well as in the bacteroids of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Bodil) nodules. The distribution of the metabolites of the dark CO{sub 2} fixation products was compared in effective (fix{sup +}) nodules infected by a wild-type Rhizobium leguminosarum (MNF 300), and ineffective (fix{sup {minus}}) nodules of the R. leguminosarum mutant MNF 3080. The latter has a defect in the dicarboxylic acid transport system of the bacterial membrane. The {sup 14}C incorporation from ({sup 14}C)CO{sub 2} was about threefold greater in the wild-type nodules than in the mutant nodules. Similarly, in wild-type nodules the in vitro phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity was substantially greater than that of the mutant. Almost 90% of the {sup 14}C label in the cytosol was found in organic acids in both symbioses. The results indicate a central role for nodule cytosol dark CO{sub 2} fixation in the supply of the bacteroids with dicarboxylic acids.

  18. Hydroxamate-Stimulated O2 Uptake in Roots of Pisum sativum and Zea mays, Mediated by a Peroxidase 1

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Koos Spreen; van Valen, Ties; Day, David A.; Lambers, Hans

    1986-01-01

    Low concentrations of salicylhydroxamic acid (<5 millimolar) stimulate O2 uptake in intact roots of Pisum sativum. We demonstrate that the hydroxamate-stimulated O2 uptake does not reside in the mitochondria. We also show that the hydroxamate-stimulated O2 uptake is due to the activation of a peroxidase catalyzing reduction of O2. This peroxidase, which can use both NADH and NADPH as a substrate, is stimulated by low concentrations of monophenols, e.g. salicylhydroxamic acid and 2-methoxyphenol. It is inhibited by high (20 millimolar) concentrations of salicylhydroxamic acid, cyanide, and scavengers of the superoxide free radical ion, e.g. ascorbate, gentisic acid, and catechol. In the presence of gentisic acid, O2 uptake by intact pea roots was no longer stimulated by low concentrations of salicylhydroxamic acid. The consequence of the present finding for in vivo respiration measurements is that the use of low concentrations of salicylhydroxamic acid and uncoupler is reliable only in the presence of a suitable superoxide free radical scavenger which prevents activation of the peroxidase. It also confirms that high concentrations of salicylhydroxamic acid (20-25 millimolar) can be safely used in short-term experiments to assess the activity of the alternative path in intact roots. PMID:16664999

  19. Functional properties of purified vicilins from cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) and pea (Pisum sativum) and cowpea protein isolate.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Alessandra; Domont, Gilberto B; Pedrosa, Cristiana; Ferreira, Sérgio T

    2003-09-10

    The major storage globulins (vicilins) of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) and pea (Pisum sativum) seeds were purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, and a semipurified cowpea protein isolate (CPI) was prepared by isoelectric precipitation. Some of the functional properties of these proteins, including solubility, foaming, and emulsifying capacities, were investigated and compared. The solubility of purified cowpea vicilin was reduced at pH 5.0, increasing markedly below and above this value. Pea vicilin exhibited poor solubility between pH 5.0 and pH 6.0, and CPI was little soluble in the pH range from 4.0 to 6.0. At neutral pH, the emulsifying activity indexes (EAI) of purified pea vicilin and CPI were 194 and 291 m(2)/g, respectively, which compare quite favorably to EAIs of 110 and 133 m(2)/g for casein and albumin, respectively. Remarkably, purified cowpea vicilin exhibited an EAI of 490 m(2)/g, indicating a very high emulsifying activity. Purified cowpea and pea vicilins exhibited lower foaming capacities and foam stablity indexes (FSI) than CPI. FSI values of 80 and 260 min were obtained for purified pea and cowpea vicilin, respectively, whereas a FSI value of 380 min was obtained for CPI. These results are discussed in terms of the possible utilization of purified vicilins or protein isolates from pea and cowpea in the food processing industry. PMID:12952435

  20. Foliar Application of Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria Increases Antifungal Compounds in Pea (Pisum sativum) Against Erysiphe pisi

    PubMed Central

    Bahadur, A.; Sarma, B. K.; Singh, D. P.; Singh, K. P.; Singh, A.

    2007-01-01

    Systemic effect of two plant growth-promoting rhizobacterial (PGPR) strains,viz., Pseudomonas fluorescens (Pf4) and P. aeruginosa (Pag), was evaluated on pea (Pisum sativum) against the powdery mildew pathogen Erysiphe pisi. Foliar spray of the two PGPR strains was done on specific nodal leaves of pea and conidial germination of E. pisi was observed on other nodal leaves,distal to the treated ones. Conidial germination was reduced on distant leaves and at the same time,specific as well as total phenolic compounds increased in the leaves distal to those applied with PGPR strains,thereby indicating a positive correlation. The strains induced accumulation of phenolic compounds in pea leaves and the amount increased when such leaves were get inoculated with E. pisi conidia. Between the two strains, Pag was found to be more effective than Pf4 as its effect was more persistent in pea leaves. Foliar application of PGPR strains for the control of powdery mildew of pea is demonstrated in vitro while correlating it with the increased accumulation of plant phenolics. PMID:24015083

  1. Gibberellic Acid-Promoted Lignification and Phenylalanine Ammonia-lyase Activity in a Dwarf Pea (Pisum sativum) 1

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Christina K.-C.; Marsh, H. V.

    1968-01-01

    The effects of gibberellic acid on lignification in seedlings of a dwarf and a tall cultivar of pea (Pisum sativum) grown under red or white light or in the darkness, were studied. Gibberellic acid (10−6-10−4 m) promoted stem elongation in both light and dark and increased the percentage of lignin in the stems of the light-grown dwarf pea. The gibberellin had no effect on the lignin content of the tall pea although high concentrations (10−4 m) promoted growth of the tall plants. Time course studies indicated that the enhanced lignification in the gibberellin-treated dwarf plants occurred only after a lag period of several days. It was concluded that gibberellic acid-enhanced ligmification had no direct relation to gibberellic acid-promoted growth. The activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (E.C. 4.3.1.5) was higher in gibberellin-treated dwarf plants grown under white or red light than in untreated dwarf plants. Gibberellic acid had no detectable effect on the activity of this enzyme when the plants were grown in darkness, just as it had no effect on lignification under dark conditions. The data suggest that in gibberellin-deficient peas the activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase is one of the limiting factors in lignification. PMID:16656968

  2. Physiological Characteristics of Fe Accumulation in the `Bronze' Mutant of Pisum sativum L., cv `Sparkle' E107 (brz brz) 1

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Ross M.; LaRue, Thomas A.

    1990-01-01

    The pea (Pisum sativum L.) mutant, E107 (brz, brz) accumulated extremely high concentrations of Fe in its older leaves when grown in light rooms in either defined nutrient media or potting mix, or outdoors in soil. Leaf symptoms (bronze color and necrosis) were correlated with very high Fe concentrations. When E107 plants were grown in nutrient solutions supplied 10 μm Fe, as the Fe(III)-N,N′-ethylenebis[2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)glycine] chelate, their roots released higher concentrations of Fe(III) reducing substances to the nutrient media than did roots of the normal parent cv, `Sparkle.' Reciprocal grafting experiments demonstrated that the high concentrations of Fe in the shoot was controlled by the genotype of the root. In short-term 59Fe uptake studies, 15-day-old E107 seedlings exhibited higher rates of Fe absorption than did `Sparkle' seedlings under Fe-adequate growth conditions. Iron deficiency induced accelerated short-term Fe absorption rates in both mutant and normal genotypes. Iron-treated E107 roots also released larger amounts of both protons and Fe(III) reductants into their nutrient media than did iron-treated `Sparkle' roots. Furthermore, the mutant translocated proportionately more Fe to its shoot than did the parent regardless of Fe status. PMID:16667529

  3. Sucrose Loading in Isolated Veins of Pisum sativum: Regulation by Abscisic Acid, Gibberellic Acid, and Cell Turgor.

    PubMed

    Estruch, J J; Peretó, J G; Vercher, Y; Beltrán, J P

    1989-09-01

    Enzymatically isolated vein networks from mature pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska) leaves were employed to investigate the properties of sucrose loading and the effect of phytohormones and cell turgor on this process. The sucrose uptake showed two components: a saturable and a first-order kinetics system. The high affinity system (K(m), 3.3 millimolar) was located at the plasmalemma (p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and orthovanadate sensitivity). Further characterization of this system, including pH dependence and effects of energy metabolism inhibitors, supported the H(+)-sugar symport concept for sucrose loading. Within a physiological range (0.1-100 micromolar) and after 90 min, abscisic acid (ABA) inhibited and gibberellic acid (GA(3)) promoted 1 millimolar sucrose uptake. These responses were partially (ABA) or totally (GA(3)) turgor-dependent. In experiments of combined hormonal treatments, ABA counteracted the GA(3) positive effects on sucrose uptake. The abolishment of these responses by p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and experiments on proton flux suggest that both factors (cell turgor and hormones) are modulating the H(+) ATPase plasmalemma activity. The results are discussed in terms of their physiological relevance. PMID:16667007

  4. Auxin-cytokinin and auxin-gibberellin interactions during morphogenesis of the compound leaves of pea (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    DeMason, Darleen A

    2005-09-01

    A number of mutations that alter the form of the compound leaf in pea (Pisum sativum) has proven useful in elucidating the role that auxin might play in pea leaf development. The goals of this study were to determine if auxin application can rescue any of the pea leaf mutants and if gibberellic acid (GA) plays a role in leaf morphogenesis in pea. A tissue culture system was used to determine the effects of various auxins, GA or a GA biosynethesis inhibitor (paclobutrazol) on leaf development. The GA mutant, nana1 (na1) was analyzed. The uni-tac mutant was rescued by auxin and GA and rescue involved both a conversion of the terminal leaflet into a tendril and an addition of a pair of lateral tendrils. This rescue required the presence of cytokinin. The auxins tested varied in their effectiveness, although methyl-IAA worked best. The terminal tendrils of wildtype plantlets grown on paclobutrazol were converted into leaflets, stubs or were aborted. The number of lateral pinna pairs produced was reduced and leaf initiation was impaired. These abnormalities resembled those caused by auxin transport inhibitors and phenocopy the uni mutants. The na1 mutant shared some morphological features with the uni mutants; including, flowering late and producing leaves with fewer lateral pinna pairs. These results show that both auxin and GA play similar and significant roles in pea leaf development. Pea leaf morphogenesis might involve auxin regulation of GA biosynthesis and GA regulation of Uni expression. PMID:15809864

  5. Ultraviolet-B induced changes in morphological, physiological and biochemical parameters of two cultivars of pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Krishna Kumar; Agrawal, S B

    2014-02-01

    Increase in perception of solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation on Earth's surface due to anthropogenic activities has potential in causing detrimental effects on plants. The present study was performed to evaluate the effect of elevated UV-B on Pisum sativum L., a leguminous plant with emphasis on nitrogen metabolism, flavonoids and hormonal changes. Elevated UV-B (ambient+7.2 kJ m(-2) day(-1)) negatively affected the growth, biomass, yield and its quality by generating oxidative stress directly or due to elevation of salicylic acid in two cultivars with higher magnitude being observed in HUP-2 as compared to HUDP-15. The increased accumulation of flavonoids (quercetin and kaempferol) under elevated UV-B neither provided sufficient protection to the photosynthetic machinery nor helped in elevation of biological nitrogen fixation. Nitrogen fixation and its assimilation were negatively affected under elevated UV-B as observed by the decline in nitrogenase, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase activities and leghaemoglobin contents. Higher accumulation of salicylic acid in HUP-2 might be associated with its higher degree of sensitivity against UV-B, while higher induction of jasmonic acid and antioxidative enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activities) provided resistance to HUDP-15 against applied stress vis-a-vis exhibited less reduction in biomass, yield and quality of produce. PMID:24268741

  6. Gibberellic Acid-Promoted Lignification and Phenylalanine Ammonia-lyase Activity in a Dwarf Pea (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Cheng, C K; Marsh, H V

    1968-11-01

    The effects of gibberellic acid on lignification in seedlings of a dwarf and a tall cultivar of pea (Pisum sativum) grown under red or white light or in the darkness, were studied. Gibberellic acid (10(-6)-10(-4)m) promoted stem elongation in both light and dark and increased the percentage of lignin in the stems of the light-grown dwarf pea. The gibberellin had no effect on the lignin content of the tall pea although high concentrations (10(-4)m) promoted growth of the tall plants. Time course studies indicated that the enhanced lignification in the gibberellin-treated dwarf plants occurred only after a lag period of several days. It was concluded that gibberellic acid-enhanced ligmification had no direct relation to gibberellic acid-promoted growth. The activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (E.C. 4.3.1.5) was higher in gibberellin-treated dwarf plants grown under white or red light than in untreated dwarf plants. Gibberellic acid had no detectable effect on the activity of this enzyme when the plants were grown in darkness, just as it had no effect on lignification under dark conditions. The data suggest that in gibberellin-deficient peas the activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase is one of the limiting factors in lignification. PMID:16656968

  7. Bean [alpha]-Amylase Inhibitor Confers Resistance to the Pea Weevil (Bruchus pisorum) in Transgenic Peas (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, H. E.; Gollasch, S.; Moore, A.; Tabe, L. M.; Craig, S.; Hardie, D. C.; Chrispeels, M. J.; Spencer, D.; Higgins, TJV.

    1995-01-01

    Bruchid larvae cause major losses of grain legume crops through-out the world. Some bruchid species, such as the cowpea weevil and the azuki bean weevil, are pests that damage stored seeds. Others, such as the pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum), attack the crop growing in the field. We transferred the cDNA encoding the [alpha]-amylase inhibitor ([alpha]-AI) found in the seeds of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) into pea (Pisum sativum) using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Expression was driven by the promoter of phytohemagglutinin, another bean seed protein. The [alpha]-amylase inhibitor gene was stably expressed in the transgenic pea seeds at least to the T5 seed generation, and [alpha]-AI accumulated in the seeds up to 3% of soluble protein. This level is somewhat higher than that normally found in beans, which contain 1 to 2% [alpha]-AI. In the T5 seed generation the development of pea weevil larvae was blocked at an early stage. Seed damage was minimal and seed yield was not significantly reduced in the transgenic plants. These results confirm the feasibility of protecting other grain legumes such as lentils, mungbean, groundnuts, and chickpeas against a variety of bruchids using the same approach. Although [alpha]-AI also inhibits human [alpha]-amylase, cooked peas should not have a negative impact on human energy metabolism. PMID:12228429

  8. Remote sensing study of the influence of herbicides on the spectral reflectance of pea plant leaves (Pisum sativum L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhova, D.; Alexieva, V.; Yanev, T.; Ivanov, S.

    Results from a remote sensing study of spectral reflectance of leaves of pea plants Pisum sativum L treated by the herbicides atrazine 2 4-D glyphosate fluridone and chlorsulfuron are reported According to the classification of the Herbicide Action Committee reflecting their mode of action they belong to different groups photosystem II bloker - C1 atrazine synthetic auxins - O 2 4-D inhibition of EPSP synthase - G glyphosate photobleaching - F1 fluridone and inhibition of acetoctate synthase - B chlorsulfuron The plants studied were grown hydroponically in a growth chamber in a nutritious medium to which every herbicide was added at three low concentrations 1 mu M 0 1 mu M and 0 01 mu M with respect to the field dose applied in the agricultural practice The spectral measurements of the leaf spectral reflectance were carried out in laboratory using a multichannel spectrometer in the visible and near infrared regions of the spectrum 480 div 810 nm Data was registered in 128 channels at a high spectral resolution of 2 6 nm halfwidth and a spatial resolution of 2 mm 2 The reflectance spectra were obtained from the leaf-reflected radiation referenced against a standard white screen To assess the changes arising in the leaf spectral reflectance under the herbicide action the developed by us approach based on discriminant analysis and other statistical methods was applied The spectral reflectance characteristics SRC were investigated in three spectral intervals 520 div 580 nm region of maximal

  9. Genome walking.

    PubMed

    Shapter, Frances M; Waters, Daniel L E

    2014-01-01

    Genome walking is a method for determining the DNA sequence of unknown genomic regions flanking a region of known DNA sequence. The Genome walking has the potential to capture 6-7 kb of sequence in a single round. Ideal for identifying gene promoter regions where only the coding region. Genome walking also has significant utility for capturing homologous genes in new species when there are areas in the target gene with strong sequence conservation to the characterized species. The increasing use of next-generation sequencing technologies will see the principles of genome walking adapted to in silico methods. However, for smaller projects, PCR-based genome walking will remain an efficient method of characterizing unknown flanking sequence. PMID:24243201

  10. Prophage Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Canchaya, Carlos; Proux, Caroline; Fournous, Ghislain; Bruttin, Anne; Brüssow, Harald

    2003-01-01

    The majority of the bacterial genome sequences deposited in the National Center for Biotechnology Information database contain prophage sequences. Analysis of the prophages suggested that after being integrated into bacterial genomes, they undergo a complex decay process consisting of inactivating point mutations, genome rearrangements, modular exchanges, invasion by further mobile DNA elements, and massive DNA deletion. We review the technical difficulties in defining such altered prophage sequences in bacterial genomes and discuss theoretical frameworks for the phage-bacterium interaction at the genomic level. The published genome sequences from three groups of eubacteria (low- and high-G+C gram-positive bacteria and γ-proteobacteria) were screened for prophage sequences. The prophages from Streptococcus pyogenes served as test case for theoretical predictions of the role of prophages in the evolution of pathogenic bacteria. The genomes from further human, animal, and plant pathogens, as well as commensal and free-living bacteria, were included in the analysis to see whether the same principles of prophage genomics apply for bacteria living in different ecological niches and coming from distinct phylogenetical affinities. The effect of selection pressure on the host bacterium is apparently an important force shaping the prophage genomes in low-G+C gram-positive bacteria and γ-proteobacteria. PMID:12794192

  11. Aquaculture Genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genomics chapter covers the basics of genome mapping and sequencing and the current status of several relevant species. The chapter briefly describes the development and use of (cDNA, BAC, etc.) libraries for mapping and obtaining specific sequence information. Other topics include comparative ...

  12. Determination of cadmium and lead species and phytochelatins in pea (Pisum sativum) by HPLC-ICP-MS and HPLC-ESI-MSn.

    PubMed

    Barałkiewicz, Danuta; Kózka, Małgorzata; Piechalak, Aneta; Tomaszewska, Barbara; Sobczak, Paweł

    2009-07-15

    An analytical approach based on hyphenated techniques was used for studying the speciation of cadmium and lead in Pisum sativum. Proper preservation conditions were employed to avoid the oxidation of -SH groups and corresponding decomposition of metal-binding complexes. SEC column was washed with 5 mM beta-mercaptoethanol and then samples were analysed using ICP-MS as a detector. Results showed that cadmium is the inhibitor of lead uptake. HPLC-ESI-MS(n) assays revealed fragmentation pathways of phytochelatins. PMID:19559910

  13. Effect of CO sub 2 enriched air on the kinetics of leaf expansion. [Pisum sativa; Glycine max

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J.R. )

    1991-05-01

    Vegetative plants of Pisum sativum (pea) and Glycine max (soybean) were transferred from 350 to 1,200 ppm CO{sub 2} when they had one (pea) or two (soybean) mature leaves and several developing leaves. Controls were kept at 350 ppm. For pea, high CO{sub 2} for 8 days increased dry mass of root, stem, and leaf fractions by 30-50%. Leaf dry mass increase was due primarily to carbohydrate, particularly starch. Dawn levels of starch increased 10-fold within 1 day at high CO{sub 2} and 20-fold at 2 days. At 2 days after transfer leaf starch levels were 1.0 mg cm{sup {minus}2} of leaf area or nearly 30% of leaf dry weight. Soybean data are less complete, but 10 days at high CO{sub 2} increased leaf + stem dry mass by 50% and leaf weight per unit area increased by 14 and 48% at dawn within 1 and 2 days, respectively, at high CO{sub 2}. However 8-10 days at high CO{sub 2} increased total leaf area only slightly (about 15%) for both species, with all the leaf area increase occurring at nodes that were nearly microscopic at the time of transfer. For soybean, most of the increased leaf area due to high CO{sub 2} was from lateral bud break despite a high CO{sub 2} did not stimulated more leaves per plant. Apparently, extra photosynthate had a delayed effect on leaf expansion and did not increase nodes along the main axis. Leaf expansion under high CO{sub 2} was not limited by photosynthate.

  14. Recessive resistance in Pisum sativum and potyvirus pathotype resolved in a gene-for-cistron correspondence between host and virus.

    PubMed

    Johansen, I E; Lund, O S; Hjulsager, C K; Laursen, J

    2001-07-01

    Pea seed-borne mosaic potyvirus (PSbMV) isolates are divided into pathotypes P-1, P-2, and P-4 according to their infection profile on a panel of Pisum sativum lines. P. sativum PI 269818 is resistant to P-1 and P-2 isolates and is susceptible to P-4 isolates. Resistance to P-1 is inherited as a single recessive gene, denoted sbm-1, and the pathogenicity determinant has previously been mapped to the virus-coded protein VPg. In the cultivar Bonneville, a second recessive gene, sbm-2, confers specific resistance to P-2. By exchanging cistrons between a P-2 and a P-4 isolate, the P3-6k1 cistron was identified as the PSbMV host-specific pathogenicity determinant on Bonneville. Exchange of P3-6k1 did not affect infection on PI 269818, and infection of Bonneville was not altered by substitution of the VPg cistron, indicating that P3-6k1 and VPg are independent determinants of pathotype-specific infectivity. On PI 269818 the pathogenicity determinant of both P-1 and P-2 mapped to the N terminus of VPg. This suggests that VPg from the P-1 and P-2 isolates are functionally similar on this host and that resistance to P-1 and P-2 in PI 269818 may operate by the same mechanism. Identification of VPg-sbm-1 and P3-6k1-sbm-2 as independent pairs of genetic interactors between PSbMV and P. sativum provides a simple explanation of the three known pathotypes of PSbMV. Furthermore, analysis of beta-glucuronidase-tagged P-2 virus indicated that sbm-2 resistance affected an early step in infection, implying that the P3-6k1 region plays a critical role in potyvirus replication or cell-to-cell movement. PMID:11413328

  15. Xyloglucan oligosaccharides promote growth and activate cellulase: Evidence for a role of cellulase in cell expansion. [Pisum sativum L

    SciTech Connect

    McDougall, G.J.; Fry, S.C. )

    1990-07-01

    Oligosaccharides produced by the action of fungal cellulase on xyloglucans promoted the elongation of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) stem segments in a straight-growth bioassay designed for the determination of auxins. The oligosaccharides were most active at about 1 micromolar. We tested the relative growth-promoting activities of four HPLC-purified oligosaccharides which shared a common glucose{sub 4} {center dot} xylose{sub 3} (XG7) core. The substituted oligosaccharides XG8 (glucose{sub 4} {center dot} xylose{sub 3} {center dot} galactose) and XG9n (glucose{sub 4} {center dot} xylose{sub 3} {center dot} galactose{sub 2}) were more effective than XG7 itself and XG9 (glucose{sub 4} {center dot} xylose{sub 3} {center dot} galactose {center dot} fucose). The same oligosaccharides also promoted the degradation, assayed viscometrically, of xyloglucan by an acidic cellulase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) leaves. The oligosaccharides were highly active at 10{sup {minus}4} molar, causing up to a fourfold increase in activity, but the effect was still detectable at 1 micromolar. Those oligosaccharides (XG8 and XG9n) which best promoted growth, stimulated cellulase activity to the greatest extent. The oligosaccharides did not stimulate the action of the cellulase in an assay based on the conversion of ({sup 3}H)xyloglucan to ethanol-soluble fragments. This suggests that the oligosaccharides enhanced the midchain hydrolysis of xyloglucan molecules (which would rapidly reduce the viscosity of the solution), at the expense of cleavage near the termini (which would yield ethanol-soluble products).

  16. Primary and Secondary Abscission in Pisum sativum and Euphorbia pulcherrima-How Do They Compare and How Do They Differ?

    PubMed

    Hvoslef-Eide, Anne K; Munster, Cristel M; Mathiesen, Cecilie A; Ayeh, Kwadwo O; Melby, Tone I; Rasolomanana, Paoly; Lee, YeonKyeong

    2015-01-01

    Abscission is a highly regulated and coordinated developmental process in plants. It is important to understand the processes leading up to the event, in order to better control abscission in crop plants. This has the potential to reduce yield losses in the field and increase the ornamental value of flowers and potted plants. A reliable method of abscission induction in poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima) flowers has been established to study the process in a comprehensive manner. By correctly decapitating buds of the third order, abscission can be induced in 1 week. AFLP differential display (DD) was used to search for genes regulating abscission. Through validation using qRT-PCR, more information of the genes involved during induced secondary abscission have been obtained. A study using two pea (Pisum sativum) mutants in the def (Developmental funiculus) gene, which was compared with wild type peas (tall and dwarf in both cases) was performed. The def mutant results in a deformed, abscission-less zone instead of normal primary abscission at the funiculus. RNA in situ hybridization studies using gene sequences from the poinsettia differential display, resulted in six genes differentially expressed for abscission specific genes in both poinsettia and pea. Two of these genes are associated with gene up- or down-regulation during the first 2 days after decapitation in poinsettia. Present and previous results in poinsettia (biochemically and gene expressions), enables a more detailed division of the secondary abscission phases in poinsettia than what has previously been described from primary abscission in Arabidopsis. This study compares the inducible secondary abscission in poinsettia and the non-abscising mutants/wild types in pea demonstrating primary abscission zones. The results may have wide implications on the understanding of abscission, since pea and poinsettia have been separated for 94-98 million years in evolution, hence any genes or processes in common

  17. Enhancing Neoplasm Expression in Field Pea (Pisum sativum) via Intercropping and Its Significance to Pea Weevil (Bruchus pisorum) Management.

    PubMed

    Teshome, Abel; Bryngelsson, Tomas; Mendesil, Esayas; Marttila, Salla; Geleta, Mulatu

    2016-01-01

    Neoplasm formation, a non-meristematic tissue growth on young field pea (Pisum sativum L.) pods is triggered in the absence of UV light and/or in response to oviposition by pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum L.). This trait is expressed in some genotypes [neoplastic (Np) genotypes] of P. sativum and has the capacity to obstruct pea weevil larval entry into developing seeds. In the present study, 26% of the tested accessions depicted the trait when grown under greenhouse conditions. However, UV light inhibits full expression of this trait and subsequently it is inconspicuous at the field level. In order to investigate UV light impact on the expression of neoplasm, particular Np genotypes were subjected to UV lamp light exposure in the greenhouse and sunlight at the field level. Under these different growing conditions, the highest mean percentage of Np pods was in the control chamber in the greenhouse (36%) whereas in single and double UV lamp chambers, the percentage dropped to 10 and 15%, respectively. Furthermore, when the same Np genotypes were grown in the field, the percentage of Np pods dropped significantly (7%). In order to enhance Np expression at the field level, intercropping of Np genotypes with sorghum was investigated. As result, the percentage of Np pods was threefold in intercropped Np genotypes as compared to those without intercropping. Therefore, intercropping Np genotypes with other crops such as sorghum and maize can facilitate neoplasm formation, which in turn can minimize the success rate of pea weevil larvae entry into developing seeds. Greenhouse artificial infestation experiments showed that pea weevil damage in Np genotypes is lower in comparison to wild type genotypes. Therefore, promoting Np formation under field conditions via intercropping can serve as part of an integrated pea weevil management strategy especially for small scale farming systems. PMID:27242855

  18. Hypoxic stress triggers a programmed cell death pathway to induce vascular cavity formation in Pisum sativum roots.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Purbasha; Gladish, Daniel K

    2012-12-01

    Flooding at warm temperatures induces hypoxic stress in Pisum sativum seedling roots. In response, some undifferentiated cells in the primary root vascular cylinder start degenerating and form a longitudinal vascular cavity. Changes in cellular morphology and cell wall ultrastructure detected previously in the late stages of cavity formation suggest possible involvement of programmed cell death (PCD). In this study, cytological events occurring in the early stages of cavity formation were investigated. Systematic DNA fragmentation, a feature of many PCD pathways, was detected in the cavity-forming roots after 3 h of flooding in situ by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay and in isolated total DNA by gel electrophoresis. High molecular weight DNA fragments of about 20-30 kb were detected by pulse-field gel electrophoresis, but no low-molecular weight internucleosomal DNA fragments were detected by conventional gel electrophoresis. Release of mitochondrial cytochrome c protein into the cytosol, an integral part of mitochondria-dependent PCD pathways, was detected in the cavity-forming roots within 2 h of flooding by fluorescence microscopy of immunolabeled cytochrome c in situ and in isolated mitochondrial and cytosolic protein fractions by western blotting. DNA fragmentation and cytochrome c release remained confined to the undifferentiated cells in center of the root vascular cylinders, even after 24 h of flooding, while outer vascular cylinder cells and cortical cells maintained cellular integrity and normal activity. These findings confirm that hypoxia-induced vascular cavity formation in P. sativum roots involves PCD, and provides a chronological model of cytological events involved in this rare and understudied PCD system. PMID:22486732

  19. Enhancing Neoplasm Expression in Field Pea (Pisum sativum) via Intercropping and Its Significance to Pea Weevil (Bruchus pisorum) Management

    PubMed Central

    Teshome, Abel; Bryngelsson, Tomas; Mendesil, Esayas; Marttila, Salla; Geleta, Mulatu

    2016-01-01

    Neoplasm formation, a non-meristematic tissue growth on young field pea (Pisum sativum L.) pods is triggered in the absence of UV light and/or in response to oviposition by pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum L.). This trait is expressed in some genotypes [neoplastic (Np) genotypes] of P. sativum and has the capacity to obstruct pea weevil larval entry into developing seeds. In the present study, 26% of the tested accessions depicted the trait when grown under greenhouse conditions. However, UV light inhibits full expression of this trait and subsequently it is inconspicuous at the field level. In order to investigate UV light impact on the expression of neoplasm, particular Np genotypes were subjected to UV lamp light exposure in the greenhouse and sunlight at the field level. Under these different growing conditions, the highest mean percentage of Np pods was in the control chamber in the greenhouse (36%) whereas in single and double UV lamp chambers, the percentage dropped to 10 and 15%, respectively. Furthermore, when the same Np genotypes were grown in the field, the percentage of Np pods dropped significantly (7%). In order to enhance Np expression at the field level, intercropping of Np genotypes with sorghum was investigated. As result, the percentage of Np pods was threefold in intercropped Np genotypes as compared to those without intercropping. Therefore, intercropping Np genotypes with other crops such as sorghum and maize can facilitate neoplasm formation, which in turn can minimize the success rate of pea weevil larvae entry into developing seeds. Greenhouse artificial infestation experiments showed that pea weevil damage in Np genotypes is lower in comparison to wild type genotypes. Therefore, promoting Np formation under field conditions via intercropping can serve as part of an integrated pea weevil management strategy especially for small scale farming systems. PMID:27242855

  20. Studies of Rapidly Induced Wound Ethylene Synthesis by Excised Sections of Etiolated Pisum sativum L., cv. Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Saltveit, Mikal E.; Dilley, David R.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of wound ethylene synthesis was reduced by more than 85% when 9-millimeter subapical sections of etiolated 7-day-old Pisum sativum L., cv. Alaska seedlings were incubated in water during the 26-minute induction period prior to wound ethylene synthesis, but the rate of synthesis was unaffected if sections were incubated in water during the actual synthesis of wound ethylene. The characteristic timing of the wound response was unaffected by either treatment. The ability of various chemical solutions and aqueous plant extracts to alter the rate of wound ethylene synthesis was studied by first incubating subapical pea stem sections in solutions under anaerobic conditions (anaerobiosis delays the induction and synthesis of wound ethylene; Plant Physiol 61: 675-679), and then measuring wound ethylene synthesis after the tissue was transferred to air. Solutions of several reported precursors of ethylene synthesis, such as methionine, homoserine, or propanal, did not reverse the water-caused reduction of wound ethylene synthesis. A water-soluble, heat-stable factor in extracts from pea seedlings, and solutions of 23 nanomolar triacontanol, 10 micromolar kinetin, or 10 micromolar benzyladenine prevented the reduction of wound ethylene synthesis, but were ineffective if administered after an initial 15-minute anaerobic water incubation. This suggested that the active solutions may have only prevented the loss of some ephemeral, though necessary factor, rather than actually containing the substrate or inducer of wound ethylene synthesis. Attempts to isolate and characterize the active fraction from aqueous tissue extracts were unsuccessful. Free radical quenchers, inhibitors of protein synthesis, and rhizobitoxine, an inhibitor of ethylene synthesis from methionine, all reduced wound ethylene synthesis when administered in solutions which previously had maintained wound ethylene synthesis. PMID:16660978

  1. Primary and Secondary Abscission in Pisum sativum and Euphorbia pulcherrima—How Do They Compare and How Do They Differ?

    PubMed Central

    Hvoslef-Eide, Anne K.; Munster, Cristel M.; Mathiesen, Cecilie A.; Ayeh, Kwadwo O.; Melby, Tone I.; Rasolomanana, Paoly; Lee, YeonKyeong

    2016-01-01

    Abscission is a highly regulated and coordinated developmental process in plants. It is important to understand the processes leading up to the event, in order to better control abscission in crop plants. This has the potential to reduce yield losses in the field and increase the ornamental value of flowers and potted plants. A reliable method of abscission induction in poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima) flowers has been established to study the process in a comprehensive manner. By correctly decapitating buds of the third order, abscission can be induced in 1 week. AFLP differential display (DD) was used to search for genes regulating abscission. Through validation using qRT-PCR, more information of the genes involved during induced secondary abscission have been obtained. A study using two pea (Pisum sativum) mutants in the def (Developmental funiculus) gene, which was compared with wild type peas (tall and dwarf in both cases) was performed. The def mutant results in a deformed, abscission-less zone instead of normal primary abscission at the funiculus. RNA in situ hybridization studies using gene sequences from the poinsettia differential display, resulted in six genes differentially expressed for abscission specific genes in both poinsettia and pea. Two of these genes are associated with gene up- or down-regulation during the first 2 days after decapitation in poinsettia. Present and previous results in poinsettia (biochemically and gene expressions), enables a more detailed division of the secondary abscission phases in poinsettia than what has previously been described from primary abscission in Arabidopsis. This study compares the inducible secondary abscission in poinsettia and the non-abscising mutants/wild types in pea demonstrating primary abscission zones. The results may have wide implications on the understanding of abscission, since pea and poinsettia have been separated for 94–98 million years in evolution, hence any genes or processes in common

  2. The cadmium-tolerant pea (Pisum sativum L.) mutant SGECdt is more sensitive to mercury: assessing plant water relations.

    PubMed

    Belimov, Andrey A; Dodd, Ian C; Safronova, Vera I; Malkov, Nikita V; Davies, William J; Tikhonovich, Igor A

    2015-04-01

    Heavy metals have multiple effects on plant growth and physiology, including perturbation of plant water status. These effects were assessed by exposing the unique Cd-tolerant and Cd-accumulating pea (Pisum sativum L.) mutant SGECd(t) and its wild-type (WT) line SGE to either cadmium (1, 4 μM CdCl2) or mercury (0.5, 1, 2 μM HgCl2) in hydroponic culture for 12 days. When exposed to Cd, SGECd(t) accumulated more Cd in roots, xylem sap, and shoot, and had considerably more biomass than WT plants. WT plants lost circa 0.2 MPa turgor when grown in 4 μM CdCl2, despite massive decreases in whole-plant transpiration rate and stomatal conductance. In contrast, root Hg accumulation was similar in both genotypes, but WT plants accumulated more Hg in leaves and had a higher stomatal conductance, and root and shoot biomass compared with SGECd(t). Shoot excision resulted in greater root-pressure induced xylem exudation of SGECd(t) in the absence of Cd or Hg and following Cd exposure, whereas the opposite response or no genotypic differences occurred following Hg exposure. Exposing plants that had not been treated with metal to 50 μM CdCl2 for 1h increased root xylem exudation of WT, whereas 50 μM HgCl2 inhibited and eliminated genotypic differences in root xylem exudation, suggesting differences between WT and SGECd(t) plants in aquaporin function. Thus, root water transport might be involved in mechanisms of increased tolerance and accumulation of Cd in the SGECd(t) mutant. However, the lack of cross-tolerance to Cd and Hg stress in the mutant indicates metal-specific mechanisms related to plant adaptation. PMID:25694548

  3. Natural occurrence of entomophthoroid fungi of aphid pests on Medicago sativa L. in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Manfrino, Romina G; Zumoffen, Leticia; Salto, César E; Lastra, Claudia C López

    2014-01-01

    Four species of entomophthoroid fungi, Pandora neoaphidis (Entomophthorales: Entomophthoraceae), Zoophthora radicans (Entomophthorales: Entomophthoraceae), Entomophthora planchoniana (Entomophthorales: Entomophthoraceae) and Neozygites fresenii (Neozygitales: Neozygitaceae) were found to infect Aphis craccivora, Therioaphis trifolii, and Acyrthosiphon pisum and unidentified species of Acyrthosiphon on lucerne in Argentina. Samples were collected from five sites (Ceres, Rafaela, Sarmiento, Monte Vera and Bernardo de Irigoyen) in the province of Santa Fe. In this study, Zoophthora radicans was the most important pathogen and was recorded mainly on Acyrthosiphon sp. Zoophthora radicans was successfully isolated and maintained in pure cultures. This study is the first report of entomophthoroid fungi infecting lucerne (Medicago sativa L.) aphids in Argentina. PMID:24721275

  4. Antarctic Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Andrew; Cockell, Charles S.; Convey, Peter; Detrich III, H. William; Fraser, Keiron P. P.; Johnston, Ian A.; Methe, Barbara A.; Murray, Alison E.; Peck, Lloyd S.; Römisch, Karin; Rogers, Alex D.

    2004-01-01

    With the development of genomic science and its battery of technologies, polar biology stands on the threshold of a revolution, one that will enable the investigation of important questions of unprecedented scope and with extraordinary depth and precision. The exotic organisms of polar ecosystems are ideal candidates for genomic analysis. Through such analyses, it will be possible to learn not only the novel features that enable polar organisms to survive, and indeed thrive, in their extreme environments, but also fundamental biological principles that are common to most, if not all, organisms. This article aims to review recent developments in Antarctic genomics and to demonstrate the global context of such studies. PMID:18629155

  5. Serratia symbiotica from the aphid Cinara cedri: a missing link from facultative to obligate insect endosymbiont.

    PubMed

    Lamelas, Araceli; Gosalbes, María José; Manzano-Marín, Alejandro; Peretó, Juli; Moya, Andrés; Latorre, Amparo

    2011-11-01

    The genome sequencing of Buchnera aphidicola BCc from the aphid Cinara cedri, which is the smallest known Buchnera genome, revealed that this bacterium had lost its symbiotic role, as it was not able to synthesize tryptophan and riboflavin. Moreover, the biosynthesis of tryptophan is shared with the endosymbiont Serratia symbiotica SCc, which coexists with B. aphidicola in this aphid. The whole-genome sequencing of S. symbiotica SCc reveals an endosymbiont in a stage of genome reduction that is closer to an obligate endosymbiont, such as B. aphidicola from Acyrthosiphon pisum, than to another S. symbiotica, which is a facultative endosymbiont in this aphid, and presents much less gene decay. The comparison between both S. symbiotica enables us to propose an evolutionary scenario of the transition from facultative to obligate endosymbiont. Metabolic inferences of B. aphidicola BCc and S. symbiotica SCc reveal that most of the functions carried out by B. aphidicola in A. pisum are now either conserved in B. aphidicola BCc or taken over by S. symbiotica. In addition, there are several cases of metabolic complementation giving functional stability to the whole consortium and evolutionary preservation of the actors involved. PMID:22102823

  6. Genomic Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Working Group Independent Web site Informing the effective integration of genomics into health practice—Lynch syndrome ACCE Model for Evaluating Genetic Tests Recommendations by the EGAPP Working Group Top of ... ...

  7. Light- induced electron transfer and ATP synthesis in a carotene synthesizing insect.

    PubMed

    Valmalette, Jean Christophe; Dombrovsky, Aviv; Brat, Pierre; Mertz, Christian; Capovilla, Maria; Robichon, Alain

    2012-01-01

    A singular adaptive phenotype of a parthenogenetic insect species (Acyrthosiphon pisum) was selected in cold conditions and is characterized by a remarkable apparition of a greenish colour. The aphid pigments involve carotenoid genes well defined in chloroplasts and cyanobacteria and amazingly present in the aphid genome, likely by lateral transfer during evolution. The abundant carotenoid synthesis in aphids suggests strongly that a major and unknown physiological role is related to these compounds beyond their canonical anti-oxidant properties. We report here that the capture of light energy in living aphids results in the photo induced electron transfer from excited chromophores to acceptor molecules. The redox potentials of molecules involved in this process would be compatible with the reduction of the NAD+ coenzyme. This appears as an archaic photosynthetic system consisting of photo-emitted electrons that are in fine funnelled into the mitochondrial reducing power in order to synthesize ATP molecules. PMID:22900140

  8. Light- induced electron transfer and ATP synthesis in a carotene synthesizing insect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valmalette, Jean Christophe; Dombrovsky, Aviv; Brat, Pierre; Mertz, Christian; Capovilla, Maria; Robichon, Alain

    2012-08-01

    A singular adaptive phenotype of a parthenogenetic insect species (Acyrthosiphon pisum) was selected in cold conditions and is characterized by a remarkable apparition of a greenish colour. The aphid pigments involve carotenoid genes well defined in chloroplasts and cyanobacteria and amazingly present in the aphid genome, likely by lateral transfer during evolution. The abundant carotenoid synthesis in aphids suggests strongly that a major and unknown physiological role is related to these compounds beyond their canonical anti-oxidant properties. We report here that the capture of light energy in living aphids results in the photo induced electron transfer from excited chromophores to acceptor molecules. The redox potentials of molecules involved in this process would be compatible with the reduction of the NAD+ coenzyme. This appears as an archaic photosynthetic system consisting of photo-emitted electrons that are in fine funnelled into the mitochondrial reducing power in order to synthesize ATP molecules.

  9. Discovery of a Novel er1 Allele Conferring Powdery Mildew Resistance in Chinese Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Landraces

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Suli; Fu, Haining; Wang, Zhongyi; Duan, Canxing; Zong, Xuxiao; Zhu, Zhendong

    2016-01-01

    Pea powdery mildew, caused by Erysiphe pisi D.C., is an important disease worldwide. Deployment of resistant varieties is the main way to control this disease. This study aimed to screen Chinese pea (Pisum sativum L.) landraces resistant to E. pisi, and to characterize the resistance gene(s) at the er1 locus in the resistant landraces, and to develop functional marker(s) specific to the novel er1 allele. The 322 landraces showed different resistance levels. Among them, 12 (3.73%), 4 (1.24%) and 17 (5.28%) landraces showed immunity, high resistance and resistance to E. pisi, respectively. The other landraces appeared susceptible or highly susceptible to E. pisi. Most of the immune and highly resistant landraces were collected from Yunnan province. To characterize the resistance gene at the er1 locus, cDNA sequences of PsMLO1 gene were determined in 12 immune and four highly resistant accessions. The cDNAs of PsMLO1 from the immune landrace G0005576 produced three distinct transcripts, characterized by a 129-bp deletion, and 155-bp and 220-bp insertions, which were consistent with those of er1-2 allele. The PsMLO1 cDNAs in the other 15 resistant landraces produced identical transcripts, which had a new point mutation (T→C) at position 1121 of PsMLO1, indicating a novel er1 allele, designated as er1-6. This mutation caused a leucine to proline change in the amino acid sequence. Subsequently, the resistance allele er1-6 in landrace G0001778 was confirmed by resistance inheritance analysis and genetic mapping on the region of the er1 locus using populations derived from G0001778 × Bawan 6. Finally, a functional marker specific to er1-6, SNP1121, was developed using the high-resolution melting technique, which could be used in pea breeding via marker-assisted selection. The results described here provide valuable genetic information for Chinese pea landraces and a powerful tool for pea breeders. PMID:26809053

  10. Geographical Gradient of the eIF4E Alleles Conferring Resistance to Potyviruses in Pea (Pisum) Germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Konečná, Eva; Šafářová, Dana; Navrátil, Milan; Hanáček, Pavel; Coyne, Clarice; Flavell, Andrew; Vishnyakova, Margarita; Ambrose, Mike; Redden, Robert; Smýkal, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Background The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E was shown to be involved in resistance against several potyviruses in plants, including pea. We combined our knowledge of pea germplasm diversity with that of the eIF4E gene to identify novel genetic diversity. Methodology/Principal findings Germplasm of 2803 pea accessions was screened for eIF4E intron 3 length polymorphism, resulting in the detection of four eIF4EA-B-C-S variants, whose distribution was geographically structured. The eIF4EA variant conferring resistance to the P1 PSbMV pathotype was found in 53 accessions (1.9%), of which 15 were landraces from India, Afghanistan, Nepal, and 7 were from Ethiopia. A newly discovered variant, eIF4EB, was present in 328 accessions (11.7%) from Ethiopia (29%), Afghanistan (23%), India (20%), Israel (25%) and China (39%). The eIF4EC variant was detected in 91 accessions (3.2% of total) from India (20%), Afghanistan (33%), the Iberian Peninsula (22%) and the Balkans (9.3%). The eIF4ES variant for susceptibility predominated as the wild type. Sequencing of 73 samples, identified 34 alleles at the whole gene, 26 at cDNA and 19 protein variants, respectively. Fifteen alleles were virologically tested and 9 alleles (eIF4EA-1-2-3-4-5-6-7, eIF4EB-1, eIF4EC-2) conferred resistance to the P1 PSbMV pathotype. Conclusions/Significance This work identified novel eIF4E alleles within geographically structured pea germplasm and indicated their independent evolution from the susceptible eIF4ES1 allele. Despite high variation present in wild Pisum accessions, none of them possessed resistance alleles, supporting a hypothesis of distinct mode of evolution of resistance in wild as opposed to crop species. The Highlands of Central Asia, the northern regions of the Indian subcontinent, Eastern Africa and China were identified as important centers of pea diversity that correspond with the diversity of the pathogen. The series of alleles identified in this study provides the basis

  11. Differential Toxicity of Bare and Hybrid ZnO Nanoparticles in Green Pea (Pisum sativum L.): A Life Cycle Study

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Sun, Youping; Morelius, Erving; Tamez, Carlos; Bandyopadhyay, Susmita; Niu, Genhua; White, Jason C.; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of surface or lattice modification of nanoparticles (NPs) on terrestrial plants is poorly understood. We investigated the impact of different zinc oxide (ZnO) NPs on green pea (Pisum sativum L.), one of the highest consumed legumes globally. Pea plants were grown for 65 d in soil amended with commercially available bare ZnO NPs (10 nm), 2 wt% alumina doped (Al2O3@ZnO NPs, 15 nm), or 1 wt% aminopropyltriethoxysilane coated NPs (KH550@ZnO NP, 20 nm) at 250 and 1000 mg NP/kg soil inside a greenhouse. Bulk (ZnO) and ionic Zn (zinc chloride) were included as controls. Plant fresh and dry biomass, changes in leaf pigment concentrations, elements (Zn, Al, Si), and protein and carbohydrate profile of green pees were quantified upon harvest at 65 days. With the exception of the coated 1000 mg/kg NP treatment, fresh and dry weight were unaffected by Zn exposure. Although, all treated plants showed higher tissue Zn than controls, those exposed to Al2O3@ZnO NPs at 1000 mg/kg had greater Zn concentration in roots and seeds, compared to bulk Zn and the other NP treatments, keeping Al and Si uptake largely unaffected. Higher Zn accumulation in green pea seeds were resulted in coated ZnO at 250 mg/kg treatments. In leaves, Al2O3@ZnO NP at 250 mg/kg significantly increased Chl-a and carotenoid concentrations relative to the bulk, ionic, and the other NP treatments. The protein and carbohydrate profiles remained largely unaltered across all treatments with the exception of Al2O3@ZnO NPs at 1000 mg/kg where sucrose concentration of green peas increased significantly, which is likely a biomarker of stress. Importantly, these findings demonstrate that lattice and surface modification can significantly alter the fate and phytotoxic effects of ZnO NPs in food crops and seed nutritional quality. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a life cycle study on comparative toxicity of bare, coated, and doped ZnO NPs on a soil-grown food crop. PMID:26793219

  12. Genome databases

    SciTech Connect

    Courteau, J.

    1991-10-11

    Since the Genome Project began several years ago, a plethora of databases have been developed or are in the works. They range from the massive Genome Data Base at Johns Hopkins University, the central repository of all gene mapping information, to small databases focusing on single chromosomes or organisms. Some are publicly available, others are essentially private electronic lab notebooks. Still others limit access to a consortium of researchers working on, say, a single human chromosome. An increasing number incorporate sophisticated search and analytical software, while others operate as little more than data lists. In consultation with numerous experts in the field, a list has been compiled of some key genome-related databases. The list was not limited to map and sequence databases but also included the tools investigators use to interpret and elucidate genetic data, such as protein sequence and protein structure databases. Because a major goal of the Genome Project is to map and sequence the genomes of several experimental animals, including E. coli, yeast, fruit fly, nematode, and mouse, the available databases for those organisms are listed as well. The author also includes several databases that are still under development - including some ambitious efforts that go beyond data compilation to create what are being called electronic research communities, enabling many users, rather than just one or a few curators, to add or edit the data and tag it as raw or confirmed.

  13. Listeria Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra; Cossart, Pascale

    The opportunistic intracellular foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has become a paradigm for the study of host-pathogen interactions and bacterial adaptation to mammalian hosts. Analysis of L. monocytogenes infection has provided considerable insight into how bacteria invade cells, move intracellularly, and disseminate in tissues, as well as tools to address fundamental processes in cell biology. Moreover, the vast amount of knowledge that has been gathered through in-depth comparative genomic analyses and in vivo studies makes L. monocytogenes one of the most well-studied bacterial pathogens. This chapter provides an overview of progress in the exploration of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data in Listeria spp. to understand genome evolution and diversity, as well as physiological aspects of metabolism used by bacteria when growing in diverse environments, in particular in infected hosts.

  14. Genome Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, Raimond L.; Boguski, Mark S.

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in genomics and informatics relevant to cardiovascular research. In particular, we review the status of (1) whole genome sequencing efforts in human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and dog; (2) the development of data mining and analysis tools; (3) the launching of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Programs for Genomics Applications and Proteomics Initiative; (4) efforts to characterize the cardiac transcriptome and proteome; and (5) the current status of computational modeling of the cardiac myocyte. In each instance, we provide links to relevant sources of information on the World Wide Web and critical appraisals of the promises and the challenges of an expanding and diverse information landscape. PMID:12750305

  15. Das Lektin aus der Erbse Pisum sativum : Bindungsstudien, Monomer-Dimer-Gleichgewicht und Rückfaltung aus Fragmenten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küster, Frank

    2002-11-01

    Das Lektin aus Pisum sativum, der Gartenerbse, ist Teil der Familie der Leguminosenlektine. Diese Proteine haben untereinander eine hohe Sequenzhomologie, und die Struktur ihrer Monomere, ein all-ß-Motiv, ist hoch konserviert. Dagegen gibt es innerhalb der Familie eine große Vielfalt an unterschiedlichen Quartärstrukturen, die Gegenstand kristallographischer und theoretischer Arbeiten waren. Das Erbsenlektin ist ein dimeres Leguminosenlektin mit einer Besonderheit in seiner Struktur: Nach der Faltung in der Zelle wird aus einem Loop eine kurze Aminosäuresequenz herausgeschnitten, so dass sich in jeder Untereinheit zwei unabhängige Polypeptidketten befinden. Beide Ketten sind aber stark miteinander verschränkt und bilden eine gemeinsame strukturelle Domäne. Wie alle Lektine bindet Erbsenlektin komplexe Oligosaccharide, doch sind seine physiologische Rolle und der natürliche Ligand unbekannt. In dieser Arbeit wurden Versuche zur Entwicklung eines Funktionstests für Erbsenlektin durchgeführt und seine Faltung, Stabilität und Monomer-Dimer-Gleichgewicht charakterisiert. Um die spezifische Rolle der Prozessierung für Stabilität und Faltung zu untersuchen, wurde ein unprozessiertes Konstrukt in E. coli exprimiert und mit der prozessierten Form verglichen. Beide Proteine zeigen die gleiche kinetische Stabilität gegenüber chemischer Denaturierung. Sie denaturieren extrem langsam, weil nur die isolierten Untereinheiten entfalten können und das Monomer-Dimer-Gleichgewicht bei mittleren Konzentrationen an Denaturierungsmittel auf der Seite der Dimere liegt. Durch die extrem langsame Entfaltung zeigen beide Proteine eine apparente Hysterese im Gleichgewichtsübergang, und es ist nicht möglich, die thermodynamische Stabilität zu bestimmen. Die Stabilität und die Geschwindigkeit der Assoziation und Dissoziation in die prozessierten bzw. nichtprozessierten Untereinheiten sind für beide Proteine gleich. Darüber hinaus konnte gezeigt werden, dass auch unter

  16. In silico prediction of proteins related to xyloglucan fucosyltransferases in Solanaceae genomes.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Arnaud; Menu-Bouaouiche, Laurence; Dardelle, Flavien; Le Mauff, François; Driouich, Azeddine; Lerouge, Patrice; Mollet, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Two independent studies have shown that the cell wall of pollen tubes from tobacco and tomato species contained fucosylated xyloglucan (XyG). These findings are intriguing as many reports have shown that XyG of somatic cells of these species is not fucosylated but instead is arabinosylated. In order to produce fucosylated XyG, plants must express a functional galactoside α-2-fucosyltransferase. Here, using a bioinformatics approach, we show that several candidate genes coding for XyG fucosyltransferases are present in the genome of coffee and several Solanaceae species including tomato, tobacco, potato, eggplant and pepper. BLAST and protein alignments with the 2 well-characterized XyG fucosyltransferases from Arabidopsis thaliana and Pisum sativum revealed that at least 6 proteins from different Solanaceae species and from coffee displayed the 3 conserved motifs required for XyG fucosyltransferase activity. PMID:26176901

  17. In silico prediction of proteins related to xyloglucan fucosyltransferases in Solanaceae genomes

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Arnaud; Menu-Bouaouiche, Laurence; Dardelle, Flavien; Le Mauff, François; Driouich, Azeddine; Lerouge, Patrice; Mollet, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Two independent studies have shown that the cell wall of pollen tubes from tobacco and tomato species contained fucosylated xyloglucan (XyG). These findings are intriguing as many reports have shown that XyG of somatic cells of these species is not fucosylated but instead is arabinosylated. In order to produce fucosylated XyG, plants must express a functional galactoside α-2-fucosyltransferase. Here, using a bioinformatics approach, we show that several candidate genes coding for XyG fucosyltransferases are present in the genome of coffee and several Solanaceae species including tomato, tobacco, potato, eggplant and pepper. BLAST and protein alignments with the 2 well-characterized XyG fucosyltransferases from Arabidopsis thaliana and Pisum sativum revealed that at least 6 proteins from different Solanaceae species and from coffee displayed the 3 conserved motifs required for XyG fucosyltransferase activity. PMID:26176901

  18. Population Genomics Analysis of Legume Host Preference for Specific Rhizobial Genotypes in the Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae Symbioses.

    PubMed

    Jorrin, Beatriz; Imperial, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae establishes root nodule symbioses with several legume genera. Although most isolates are equally effective in establishing symbioses with all host genera, previous evidence suggests that hosts select specific rhizobial genotypes among those present in the soil. We have used population genomics to further investigate this observation. Pisum sativum, Lens culinaris, Vicia sativa, and V. faba plants were used to trap rhizobia from a well-characterized soil, and pooled genomic DNA from 100 isolates from each plant were sequenced. Sequence reads were aligned to the R. leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841 reference genome. High overall conservation of sequences was observed in all subpopulations, although several multigenic regions were absent from the soil population. A large fraction (16 to 22%) of sequence reads could not be recruited to the reference genome, suggesting that they represent sequences specific to that particular soil population. Although highly conserved, the 16S to 23S ribosomal RNA gene region presented single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) regarding the reference genome, but no striking differences could be found among plant-selected subpopulations. Plant-specific SNP patterns were, however, clearly observed within the nod gene cluster, supporting the existence of a plant preference for specific rhizobial genotypes. This was also shown after genome-wide analysis of SNP patterns. PMID:25514682

  19. Comparative genomics of Serratia spp.: two paths towards endosymbiotic life.

    PubMed

    Manzano-Marín, Alejandro; Lamelas, Araceli; Moya, Andrés; Latorre, Amparo

    2012-01-01

    Symbiosis is a widespread phenomenon in nature, in which insects show a great number of these associations. Buchnera aphidicola, the obligate endosymbiont of aphids, coexists in some species with another intracellular bacterium, Serratia symbiotica. Of particular interest is the case of the cedar aphid Cinara cedri, where B. aphidicola BCc and S. symbiotica SCc need each other to fulfil their symbiotic role with the insect. Moreover, various features seem to indicate that S. symbiotica SCc is closer to an obligate endosymbiont than to other facultative S. symbiotica, such as the one described for the aphid Acirthosyphon pisum (S. symbiotica SAp). This work is based on the comparative genomics of five strains of Serratia, three free-living and two endosymbiotic ones (one facultative and one obligate) which should allow us to dissect the genome reduction taking place in the adaptive process to an intracellular life-style. Using a pan-genome approach, we have identified shared and strain-specific genes from both endosymbiotic strains and gained insight into the different genetic reduction both S. symbiotica have undergone. We have identified both retained and reduced functional categories in S. symbiotica compared to the Free-Living Serratia (FLS) that seem to be related with its endosymbiotic role in their specific host-symbiont systems. By means of a phylogenomic reconstruction we have solved the position of both endosymbionts with confidence, established the probable insect-pathogen origin of the symbiotic clade as well as the high amino-acid substitution rate in S. symbiotica SCc. Finally, we were able to quantify the minimal number of rearrangements suffered in the endosymbiotic lineages and reconstruct a minimal rearrangement phylogeny. All these findings provide important evidence for the existence of at least two distinctive S. symbiotica lineages that are characterized by different rearrangements, gene content, genome size and branch lengths. PMID:23077583

  20. Whither genomics?

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Andrew W

    2000-01-01

    The flood of data from genome-wide analysis is transforming biology. We need to develop new, interdisciplinary approaches to convert these data into information about the components and structures of individual biological pathways and to use the resulting information to yield knowledge about general principles that explain the functions and evolution of life. PMID:11104516

  1. Influence of s-Triazines on Some Enzymes of Carbohydrates and Nitrogen Metabolism in Leaves of Pea (Pisum sativum L.) and Sweet Corn (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wu, M. T.; Singh, B.; Salunkhe, D. K.

    1971-01-01

    Foliar applications of 2 milligrams per liter of 2-chloro-4,6-bis (ethylamino)-s-triazine, 2-methylmercapto-4-ethylamino-6-isobutylamino-s-triazine, and 2-methoxy-4-isopropylamino-6-butylamino-s-triazine caused increases in the activities of starch phosphorylase, pyruvate kinase, cytochrome oxidase, and glutamate dehydrogenase 5, 10, and 15 days after treatment in the leaves of 3-week-old seedlings of pea (Pisum sativum L.) and sweet corn (Zea mays L.). The results indicate that sublethal concentrations of s-triazine compounds affect the physiological and biochemical events in plants which favor more utilization of carbohydrates for nitrate reduction and synthesis of amino acids and proteins. PMID:16657830

  2. Light Microscopy Study of Nodule Initiation in Pisum sativum L. cv Sparkle and in Its Low-Nodulating Mutant E2 (sym 5) 1

    PubMed Central

    Guinel, Frédérique C.; LaRue, Thomas A.

    1991-01-01

    We compared nodule initiation in lateral roots of Pisum sativum (L.) cv Sparkle and in a low-nodulating mutant E2 (sym 5). In Sparkle, about 25% of the infections terminated in the epidermis, a similar number stopped in the cortex, and 50% resulted in the formation of a nodule meristem or an emerged nodule. The mutant E2 (sym 5) was infected as often as was the parent, and it formed a normal infection thread. In the mutant, cell divisions rarely occurred in advance of the infection thread, and few nodule primordia were produced. Growing the mutant at a low root temperature or adding Ag+ to the substrate increased the number of cell divisions and nodule primordia. We conclude that, in the E2 line, the infection process is arrested in the cortex, at the stage of initial cell divisions before the establishment of a nodule primordium. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:16668510

  3. First report of the inhibition of arbuscular mycorrhizal infection of Pisum sativum by specific and irreversible inhibition of polyamine biosynthesis or by gibberellic acid treatment.

    PubMed

    El Ghachtouli, N; Martin-Tanguy, J; Paynot, M; Gianinazzi, S

    1996-05-01

    DFMO (alpha-DL-difluoromethylornithine), a specific irreversible inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), a polyamine biosynthetic pathway enzyme, strongly inhibits root growth and arbuscular mycorrhizal infection of Pisum sativum (P56 myc+, isogenic mutant of cv. Frisson). This inhibition is reversed when exogenous polyamine (putrescine) is included in the DFMO treatment, showing that the effect of DFMO on arbuscular mycorrhizal infection is indeed due to putrescine limitation and suggesting that ODC may have a role in root growth and mycorrhizal infection. However, treatment with gibberellic acid (GA3) which increased root titers of polyamines strongly inhibited arbuscular mycorrhizal development. The possible role of polyamines in the regulation of the development of arbuscular mycorrhizal infection is discussed. PMID:8647248

  4. Polysaccharide fraction from higher plants which strongly interacts with the cytosolic phosphorylase isozyme. I. Isolation and characterization. [Spinacia oleracea L. ; Pisum sativum L

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yi; Steup, M. )

    1990-11-01

    From leaves of Spinacia oleracea L. or from Pisum sativum L. and from cotyledons of germinating pea seeds a high molecular weight polysaccharide fraction was isolated. The apparent size of the fraction, as determined by gel filtration, was similar to that of dextran blue. Following acid hydrolysis the monomer content of the polysaccharide preparation was studied using high pressure liquid and thin layer chromatography. Glucose, galactose, arabinose, and ribose were the main monosaccharide compounds. The native polysaccharide preparation interacted strongly with the cytosolic isozyme of phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1). Interaction with the plastidic phosphorylase isozyme(s) was by far weaker. Interaction with the cytosolic isozyme was demonstrated by affinity electrophoresis, kinetic measurements, and by {sup 14}C-labeling experiments in which the glucosyl transfer from ({sup 14}C)glucose 1-phosphate to the polysaccharide preparation was monitored.

  5. Influence of peas (Pisum sativum) as a dietary ingredient and flavomycin supplementation on the performance and intestinal microflora of broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Brenes, A; Treviño, J; Centeno, C; Yuste, P

    1989-03-01

    1. Two experiments were carried out to study the effects of diets containing various concentrations of pea meal (Pisum sativum L.), with or without flavomycin supplementation, on the performance and intestinal microflora of broiler chicks. 2. During the 7 to 28-d period, chicks fed on diets containing 300, 600 and 800 g pea meal/kg consumed more food and gained more weight than chicks receiving a maize-isolated soyabean protein control diet. The addition of flavomycin to the diets had similar effects on the performance of both the control and the pea groups. 3. Pea diets, with and without supplemental flavomycin, had little influence on the composition of intestinal microflora. The counts of enterococci in the small intestine and Clostridium perfringens and coliforms in the caeca of pea-fed chicks exceeded those of control chicks. PMID:2787194

  6. Pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pea belongs to the Leguminosae plant family, the third largest flowering plant family with 800 genera and over 18,000 species. Tribe Fabeae is considered one of the youngest groups in the legumes and Bayesian molecular clock and ancestral range analysis suggest a crown age of 23 – 16 Mya, in the mi...

  7. Citrus Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Talon, Manuel; Gmitter Jr., Fred G.

    2008-01-01

    Citrus is one of the most widespread fruit crops globally, with great economic and health value. It is among the most difficult plants to improve through traditional breeding approaches. Currently, there is risk of devastation by diseases threatening to limit production and future availability to the human population. As technologies rapidly advance in genomic science, they are quickly adapted to address the biological challenges of the citrus plant system and the world's industries. The historical developments of linkage mapping, markers and breeding, EST projects, physical mapping, an international citrus genome sequencing project, and critical functional analysis are described. Despite the challenges of working with citrus, there has been substantial progress. Citrus researchers engaged in international collaborations provide optimism about future productivity and contributions to the benefit of citrus industries worldwide and to the human population who can rely on future widespread availability of this health-promoting and aesthetically pleasing fruit crop. PMID:18509486

  8. Ancient genomics

    PubMed Central

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Allentoft, Morten E.; Ávila-Arcos, María C.; Barnett, Ross; Campos, Paula F.; Cappellini, Enrico; Ermini, Luca; Fernández, Ruth; da Fonseca, Rute; Ginolhac, Aurélien; Hansen, Anders J.; Jónsson, Hákon; Korneliussen, Thorfinn; Margaryan, Ashot; Martin, Michael D.; Moreno-Mayar, J. Víctor; Raghavan, Maanasa; Rasmussen, Morten; Velasco, Marcela Sandoval; Schroeder, Hannes; Schubert, Mikkel; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Wales, Nathan; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed a revolution in ancient DNA (aDNA) research. Although the field's focus was previously limited to mitochondrial DNA and a few nuclear markers, whole genome sequences from the deep past can now be retrieved. This breakthrough is tightly connected to the massive sequence throughput of next generation sequencing platforms and the ability to target short and degraded DNA molecules. Many ancient specimens previously unsuitable for DNA analyses because of extensive degradation can now successfully be used as source materials. Additionally, the analytical power obtained by increasing the number of sequence reads to billions effectively means that contamination issues that have haunted aDNA research for decades, particularly in human studies, can now be efficiently and confidently quantified. At present, whole genomes have been sequenced from ancient anatomically modern humans, archaic hominins, ancient pathogens and megafaunal species. Those have revealed important functional and phenotypic information, as well as unexpected adaptation, migration and admixture patterns. As such, the field of aDNA has entered the new era of genomics and has provided valuable information when testing specific hypotheses related to the past. PMID:25487338

  9. Genomic Imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Bajrami, Emirjeta; Spiroski, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genomic imprinting is the inheritance out of Mendelian borders. Many of inherited diseases and human development violates Mendelian law of inheritance, this way of inheriting is studied by epigenetics. AIM: The aim of this review is to analyze current opinions and options regarding to this way of inheriting. RESULTS: Epigenetics shows that gene expression undergoes changes more complex than modifications in the DNA sequence; it includes the environmental influence on the gametes before conception. Humans inherit two alleles from mother and father, both are functional for the majority of the genes, but sometimes one is turned off or “stamped” and doesn’t show in offspring, that gene is imprinted. Imprinting means that that gene is silenced, and gene from other parent is expressed. The mechanisms for imprinting are still incompletely defined, but they involve epigenetic modifications that are erased and then reset during the creation of eggs and sperm. Genomic imprinting is a process of silencing genes through DNA methylation. The repressed allele is methylated, while the active allele is unmethylated. The most well-known conditions include Prader-Willi syndrome, and Angelman syndrome. Both of these syndromes can be caused by imprinting or other errors involving genes on the long arm of chromosome 15. CONCLUSIONS: Genomic imprinting and other epigenetic mechanisms such as environment is shown that plays role in offspring neurodevelopment and autism spectrum disorder. PMID:27275355

  10. Evaluation of Artificial Diets for Rearing Aphis Glycines (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Artificial aphid diets have been previously developed for the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, and the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae. The ability to rear aphids on an artificial diet allows for selectively adding or subtracting compounds from an aphid's food source to determine the effect on fec...

  11. The effects of diet on herbivory by a predaceous lady beetle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prey and non-prey foods often contain different nutrients, and optimal diets for predatory insects often contain both food classes. We tested whether late instars of Coleomegilla maculata DeGeer (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) reared on prey- Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris (Hemiptera: Aphididae) or eggs of ...

  12. Detection and decay rates of prey and prey symbionts in the gut of a predator through metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Paula, Débora P; Linard, Benjamin; Andow, David A; Sujii, Edison R; Pires, Carmen S S; Vogler, Alfried P

    2015-07-01

    DNA methods are useful to identify ingested prey items from the gut of predators, but reliable detection is hampered by low amounts of degraded DNA. PCR-based methods can retrieve minute amounts of starting material but suffer from amplification biases and cross-reactions with the predator and related species genomes. Here, we use PCR-free direct shotgun sequencing of total DNA isolated from the gut of the harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis at five time points after feeding on a single pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. Sequence reads were matched to three reference databases: Insecta mitogenomes of 587 species, including H. axyridis sequenced here; A. pisum nuclear genome scaffolds; and scaffolds and complete genomes of 13 potential bacterial symbionts. Immediately after feeding, multicopy mtDNA of A. pisum was detected in tens of reads, while hundreds of matches to nuclear scaffolds were detected. Aphid nuclear DNA and mtDNA decayed at similar rates (0.281 and 0.11 h(-1) respectively), and the detectability periods were 32.7 and 23.1 h. Metagenomic sequencing also revealed thousands of reads of the obligate Buchnera aphidicola and facultative Regiella insecticola aphid symbionts, which showed exponential decay rates significantly faster than aphid DNA (0.694 and 0.80 h(-1) , respectively). However, the facultative aphid symbionts Hamiltonella defensa, Arsenophonus spp. and Serratia symbiotica showed an unexpected temporary increase in population size by 1-2 orders of magnitude in the predator guts before declining. Metagenomics is a powerful tool that can reveal complex relationships and the dynamics of interactions among predators, prey and their symbionts. PMID:25545417

  13. Genomes on ice.

    PubMed

    Parkhill, Julian

    2016-03-01

    This month's Genome Watch discusses the analysis of a Helicobacter pylori genome from the preserved Copper-Age mummy known as the Iceman and how ancient genomes shed light on the history of bacterial pathogens. PMID:26853114

  14. Whole Genome Sequencing

    MedlinePlus

    ... you want to learn. Search form Search Whole Genome Sequencing You are here Home Testing & Services Testing ... the full story, click here . What is whole genome sequencing? Whole genome sequencing is the mapping out ...

  15. Ensembl Genomes 2016: more genomes, more complexity.

    PubMed

    Kersey, Paul Julian; Allen, James E; Armean, Irina; Boddu, Sanjay; Bolt, Bruce J; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Christensen, Mikkel; Davis, Paul; Falin, Lee J; Grabmueller, Christoph; Humphrey, Jay; Kerhornou, Arnaud; Khobova, Julia; Aranganathan, Naveen K; Langridge, Nicholas; Lowy, Ernesto; McDowall, Mark D; Maheswari, Uma; Nuhn, Michael; Ong, Chuang Kee; Overduin, Bert; Paulini, Michael; Pedro, Helder; Perry, Emily; Spudich, Giulietta; Tapanari, Electra; Walts, Brandon; Williams, Gareth; Tello-Ruiz, Marcela; Stein, Joshua; Wei, Sharon; Ware, Doreen; Bolser, Daniel M; Howe, Kevin L; Kulesha, Eugene; Lawson, Daniel; Maslen, Gareth; Staines, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    Ensembl Genomes (http://www.ensemblgenomes.org) is an integrating resource for genome-scale data from non-vertebrate species, complementing the resources for vertebrate genomics developed in the context of the Ensembl project (http://www.ensembl.org). Together, the two resources provide a consistent set of programmatic and interactive interfaces to a rich range of data including reference sequence, gene models, transcriptional data, genetic variation and comparative analysis. This paper provides an update to the previous publications about the resource, with a focus on recent developments. These include the development of new analyses and views to represent polyploid genomes (of which bread wheat is the primary exemplar); and the continued up-scaling of the resource, which now includes over 23 000 bacterial genomes, 400 fungal genomes and 100 protist genomes, in addition to 55 genomes from invertebrate metazoa and 39 genomes from plants. This dramatic increase in the number of included genomes is one part of a broader effort to automate the integration of archival data (genome sequence, but also associated RNA sequence data and variant calls) within the context of reference genomes and make it available through the Ensembl user interfaces. PMID:26578574

  16. Ensembl genomes 2016: more genomes, more complexity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ensembl Genomes (http://www.ensemblgenomes.org) is an integrating resource for genome-scale data from non-vertebrate species, complementing the resources for vertebrate genomics developed in the context of the Ensembl project (http://www.ensembl.org). Together, the two resources provide a consistent...

  17. Ensembl Genomes 2016: more genomes, more complexity

    PubMed Central

    Kersey, Paul Julian; Allen, James E.; Armean, Irina; Boddu, Sanjay; Bolt, Bruce J.; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Christensen, Mikkel; Davis, Paul; Falin, Lee J.; Grabmueller, Christoph; Humphrey, Jay; Kerhornou, Arnaud; Khobova, Julia; Aranganathan, Naveen K.; Langridge, Nicholas; Lowy, Ernesto; McDowall, Mark D.; Maheswari, Uma; Nuhn, Michael; Ong, Chuang Kee; Overduin, Bert; Paulini, Michael; Pedro, Helder; Perry, Emily; Spudich, Giulietta; Tapanari, Electra; Walts, Brandon; Williams, Gareth; Tello–Ruiz, Marcela; Stein, Joshua; Wei, Sharon; Ware, Doreen; Bolser, Daniel M.; Howe, Kevin L.; Kulesha, Eugene; Lawson, Daniel; Maslen, Gareth; Staines, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Ensembl Genomes (http://www.ensemblgenomes.org) is an integrating resource for genome-scale data from non-vertebrate species, complementing the resources for vertebrate genomics developed in the context of the Ensembl project (http://www.ensembl.org). Together, the two resources provide a consistent set of programmatic and interactive interfaces to a rich range of data including reference sequence, gene models, transcriptional data, genetic variation and comparative analysis. This paper provides an update to the previous publications about the resource, with a focus on recent developments. These include the development of new analyses and views to represent polyploid genomes (of which bread wheat is the primary exemplar); and the continued up-scaling of the resource, which now includes over 23 000 bacterial genomes, 400 fungal genomes and 100 protist genomes, in addition to 55 genomes from invertebrate metazoa and 39 genomes from plants. This dramatic increase in the number of included genomes is one part of a broader effort to automate the integration of archival data (genome sequence, but also associated RNA sequence data and variant calls) within the context of reference genomes and make it available through the Ensembl user interfaces. PMID:26578574

  18. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Cancer.gov

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  19. Discriminant Analysis of Defective and Non-Defective Field Pea (Pisum sativum L.) into Broad Market Grades Based on Digital Image Features.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Linda S; Panozzo, Joseph F; Salisbury, Phillip A; Ford, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Field peas (Pisum sativum L.) are generally traded based on seed appearance, which subjectively defines broad market-grades. In this study, we developed an objective Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) model to classify market grades of field peas based on seed colour, shape and size traits extracted from digital images. Seeds were imaged in a high-throughput system consisting of a camera and laser positioned over a conveyor belt. Six colour intensity digital images were captured (under 405, 470, 530, 590, 660 and 850nm light) for each seed, and surface height was measured at each pixel by laser. Colour, shape and size traits were compiled across all seed in each sample to determine the median trait values. Defective and non-defective seed samples were used to calibrate and validate the model. Colour components were sufficient to correctly classify all non-defective seed samples into correct market grades. Defective samples required a combination of colour, shape and size traits to achieve 87% and 77% accuracy in market grade classification of calibration and validation sample-sets respectively. Following these results, we used the same colour, shape and size traits to develop an LDA model which correctly classified over 97% of all validation samples as defective or non-defective. PMID:27176469

  20. Identification of Phenolic Compounds from Seed Coats of Differently Colored European Varieties of Pea (Pisum sativum L.) and Characterization of Their Antioxidant and In Vitro Anticancer Activities.

    PubMed

    Stanisavljević, Nemanja S; Ilić, Marija D; Matić, Ivana Z; Jovanović, Živko S; Čupić, Tihomir; Dabić, Dragana Č; Natić, Maja M; Tešić, Živoslav Lj

    2016-01-01

    To date little has been done on identification of major phenolic compounds responsible for anticancer and antioxidant properties of pea (Pisum sativum L.) seed coat extracts. In the present study, phenolic profile of the seed coat extracts from 10 differently colored European varieties has been determined using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-linear trap quadrupole orbitrap mass spectrometer technique. Extracts of dark colored varieties with high total phenolic content (up to 46.56 mg GAE/g) exhibited strong antioxidant activities (measured by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl or DPPH assay, and ferric ion reducing and ferrous ion chelating capacity assays) which could be attributed to presence of gallic acid, epigallocatechin, naringenin, and apigenin. The aqueous extracts of dark colored varieties exert concentration-dependent cytotoxic effects on all tested malignant cell lines (human colon adenocarcinoma LS174, human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-453, human lung carcinoma A594, and myelogenous leukemia K562). Correlation analysis revealed that intensities of cytotoxic activity of the extracts strongly correlated with contents of epigallocatechin and luteolin. Cell cycle analysis on LS174 cells in the presence of caspase-3 inhibitor points out that extracts may activate other cell death modalities besides caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. The study provides evidence that seed coat extracts of dark colored pea varieties might be used as potential cancer-chemopreventive and complementary agents in cancer therapy. PMID:27348025

  1. [Features of Expression of the PsSst] and PsIgn1 Genes in Nodules of Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Symbiotic Mutants].

    PubMed

    Zhukova, V A; Rychagova, T S; Fedorina, Ya V; Pinaeva, A G; Andronova, E E; Borisova, A Yu; Tikhonovich, I A

    2016-04-01

    The sequences of the PsSst1 and PsIgn1 genes of pea (Pisum sativum L.) homologous to the symbiotic LjSST1 and LjIGN1 genes of Lotusjaponicus (Regel.) K. Larsen are determined. The expression level of PsSst1 and PsIgn1 genes is determined by real-time PCR in nodules of several symbiotic mutants and original lines of pea. Lines with increased (Sprint-2Fix⁻ (Pssym31)) and decreased (P61 (Pssym25)) expression level of both genes are revealed along with the lines characterized by changes in the expression level of only one of these genes. The revealed features of the PsSst1 and PsIgn1 expression allow us to expand the phenotypic characterization of pea symbiotic mutants. In addition, PsSst1 and PsIgn1 cDNA is sequenced in selected mutant lines, characterized by a decreased expression level of these genes in nodules, but no mutations are found. PMID:27529974

  2. Role of cyanide-resistant respiration in the response of two pea hybrids to CO/sub 2/ enrichment. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Musgrave, M.E.; Strain, B.R.; Siedow, J.N.

    1986-04-01

    Two cultivars of pea (Pisum sativum L., cvs. Alaska and Progress No. 9) were reciprocally crossed to yield hybrids differing in the presence or absence of the cyanide-resistant (alternative) pathway of respiration. The growth of this material in greenhouses maintained at either 350 or 650 ppm CO/sub 2/ was compared. The objective was to assess the significance of the alternative pathway to whole plant carbon budgets and further to use CO/sub 2/ enrichment as a means of testing the hypothesis that the alternative pathway might be important in oxidizing excess carbohydrates. More structural and storage carbohydrates were available in the cross lacking the pathway than in the reciprocal cross as shown by greater plant height, leaf area, specific leaf weight, branching, total dry matter and seed production. Specific leaf weight increased strongly under CO/sub 2/ enrichment in the hybrid lacking the pathway while it was the same at 350 and 650 ppm in the reciprocal cross. These results suggest that respiration via the alternative pathway may be energetically wasteful in terms of whole plant carbon budgets.

  3. Comparative analysis of the tubulin cytoskeleton organization in nodules of Medicago truncatula and Pisum sativum: bacterial release and bacteroid positioning correlate with characteristic microtubule rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Kitaeva, Anna B; Demchenko, Kirill N; Tikhonovich, Igor A; Timmers, Antonius C J; Tsyganov, Viktor E

    2016-04-01

    In this study we analyzed and compared the organization of the tubulin cytoskeleton in nodules of Medicago truncatula and Pisum sativum. We combined antibody labeling and green fluorescent protein tagging with laser confocal microscopy to observe microtubules (MTs) in nodules of both wild-type (WT) plants and symbiotic plant mutants blocked at different steps of nodule development. The 3D MT organization of each histological nodule zone in both M. truncatula and P. sativum is correlated to specific developmental processes. Endoplasmic MTs appear to support infection thread growth, infection droplet formation and bacterial release into the host cytoplasm in nodules of both species. No differences in the organization of the MT cytoskeleton between WT and bacterial release mutants were apparent, suggesting both that the phenotype is not linked to a defect in MT organization and that the growth of hypertrophied infection threads is supported by MTs. Strikingly, bacterial release coincides with a change in the organization of cortical MTs from parallel arrays into an irregular, crisscross arrangement. After release, the organization of endoplasmic MTs is linked to the distribution of symbiosomes. The 3D MT organization of each nodule histological zone in M. truncatula and P. sativum was analyzed and linked to specific developmental processes. PMID:26682876

  4. Regulation of gene expression by low levels of ultraviolet-B radiation in Pisum sativum: isolation of novel genes by suppression subtractive hybridisation.

    PubMed

    Sävenstrand, Helena; Brosché, Mikael; Strid, Ake

    2002-04-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridisation was used to isolate genes differentially regulated by low levels (UV-B(BE,300) 0.13 W m(-2)) of ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B; 290-320 nm) in Pisum sativum. Six genes were regulated, two of which were novel. The mRNA levels for these two (PsTSDC and PsUOS1) were increased and depressed by UV-B treatment, respectively. Domains in the PsTSDC translation product was similar to TIR (Toll-Interleukin-1 receptor-similar) domains and a NB-ARC domain (nucleotide-binding domain in APAF-1, R gene products and CED-4). The PsUOS1 translation product was similar to an open reading frame in Arabidopsis. Genes encoding embryo-abundant protein (PsEMB) and S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthase (PsSAMS) were induced by UV-B, whereas the transcript levels for genes encoding sucrose transport protein (PsSUT) or ribulose-5-phosphate 3-epimerase (PsR5P3E) were decreased. These regulation patterns are novel, and the PsEMB and PsR5P3E sequences are reported for the first time. The stress-specificity of regulation of these genes were tested by ozone fumigation (100 ppb O(3)). Qualitatively, the similarity of expression after both UV-B and ozone exposure suggests that, for these genes, similar stress-response pathways are in action. PMID:11978868

  5. The involvement of indole-3-acetic acid in the control of stem elongation in dark- and light-grown pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sorce, Carlo; Picciarelli, Piero; Calistri, Gianni; Lercari, Bartolomeo; Ceccarelli, Nello

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the role of auxin on stem elongation in pea (Pisum sativum L.) grown for 10d in continuous darkness or under low-irradiance blue, red, far red and white light. The third internode of treated seedlings was peeled and the tissues (epidermis and cortex+central cylinder) were separately analyzed for the concentration of free and conjugated indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Under red, far red and white light internode elongation was linearly related with the free IAA content of all internode tissues, suggesting that phytochrome-dependent inhibition of stem growth may be mediated by a decrease of free IAA levels in pea seedlings. The correlation between IAA and internode elongation, however, did not hold for blue light-grown seedlings. The hypothesis that the growth response under low-irradiance blue light might be correlated with the lack of phytochrome B signalling and changes in gibberellin metabolism is discussed in view of current knowledge on hormonal control of stem growth. PMID:17706834

  6. Pisum sativum wild-type and mutant stipules and those induced by an auxin transport inhibitor demonstrate the entire diversity of laminated stipules observed in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arvind; Sharma, Vishakha; Khan, Moinuddin; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Kumar, Sushil

    2013-02-01

    About a quarter of angiosperm species are stipulate. They produce stipule pairs at stem nodes in association with leaves. Stipule morphology is treated as a species-specific characteristic. Many species bear stipules as laminated organs in a variety of configurations, including laterally free large foliaceous, small, or wholly leaf-like stipules, and as fused intrapetiolar, opposite, ochreate or interpetiolar stipules. In Pisum sativum, the wild-type and stipule-reduced and cochleata mutants are known to form free large, small, and leaf-like stipules, respectively. Auxin controls initiation and development of plant organs and perturbations in its availability and distribution in the meristems, caused by auxin transport inhibitor(s) (ATIs), lead to aberrations in leaf development. The effect(s) of ATI(s) on stipule development are unexplored. To study the effect of the ATI 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) on stipule morphogenesis, P. sativum explants were grown in vitro in presence of a sublethal concentration of NPA. The NPA-treated shoots produced fused stipules of all the different types described in angiosperms. The observations indicate that (a) the gene sets for stipule differentiation may be common in angiosperms and (b) the interspecies stipule architectural differences are due to mutations, affecting gene expression or activity that got selected in the course of evolution. PMID:22456952

  7. Molecular cloning of isoflavone reductase from pea (Pisum sativum L.): evidence for a 3R-isoflavanone intermediate in (+)-pisatin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Paiva, N L; Sun, Y; Dixon, R A; VanEtten, H D; Hrazdina, G

    1994-08-01

    Isoflavone reductase (IFR) reduces achiral isoflavones to chiral isoflavanones during the biosynthesis of chiral pterocarpan phytoalexins. A cDNA clone for IFR from pea (Pisum sativum) was isolated using the polymerase chain reaction and expressed in Escherichia coli. Analysis of circular dichroism (CD) spectra of the reduction product sophorol obtained using the recombinant enzyme indicated that the isoflavanone possessed the 3R stereochemistry, in contrast to previous reports indicating a 3S-isoflavanone as the product of the pea IFR. Analysis of CD spectra of sophorol produced using enzyme extracts of CuCl2-treated pea seedlings confirmed the 3R stereochemistry. Thus, the stereochemistry of the isoflavanone intermediate in (+)-pisatin biosynthesis in pea is the same as that in (-)-medicarpin biosynthesis in alfalfa, although the final pterocarpans have the opposite stereochemistry. At the amino acid level the pea IFR cDNA was 91.8 and 85.2% identical to the IFRs from alfalfa and chickpea, respectively. IFR appears to be encoded by a single gene in pea. Its transcripts are highly induced in CuCl2-treated seedlings, consistent with the appearance of IFR enzyme activity and pisatin accumulation. PMID:8037464

  8. The major nucleoside triphosphatase in pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei and in rat liver nuclei share common epitopes also present in nuclear lamins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, C. G.; Dauwalder, M.; Clawson, G. A.; Hatem, C. L.; Roux, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    The major nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) activities in mammalian and pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei are associated with enzymes that are very similar both biochemically and immunochemically. The major NTPase from rat liver nuclei appears to be a 46-kD enzyme that represents the N-terminal portion of lamins A and C, two lamina proteins that apparently arise from the same gene by alternate splicing. Monoclonal antibody (MAb) G2, raised to human lamin C, both immunoprecipitates the major (47 kD) NTPase in pea nuclei and recognizes it in western blot analyses. A polyclonal antibody preparation raised to the 47-kD pea NTPase (pc480) reacts with the same lamin bands that are recognized by MAb G2 in mammalian nuclei. The pc480 antibodies also bind to the same lamin-like bands in pea nuclear envelope-matrix preparations that are recognized by G2 and three other MAbs known to bind to mammalian lamins. In immunofluorescence assays, pc480 and anti-lamin antibodies stain both cytoplasmic and nuclear antigens in plant cells, with slightly enhanced staining along the periphery of the nuclei. These results indicate that the pea and rat liver NTPases are structurally similar and that, in pea nuclei as in rat liver nuclei, the major NTPase is probably derived from a lamin precursor by proteolysis.

  9. Etioplasts with protochlorophyll and protochlorophyllide forms in the under-soil epicotyl segments of pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings grown under natural light conditions.

    PubMed

    Vitányi, Beáta; Kósa, Annamária; Solymosi, Katalin; Böddi, Béla

    2013-06-01

    To study if etiolation symptoms exist in plants grown under natural illumination conditions, under-soil epicotyl segments of light-grown pea (Pisum sativum) plants were examined and compared to those of hydroponically dark-grown plants. Light-, fluorescence- and electron microscopy, 77 K fluorescence spectroscopy, pigment extraction and pigment content determination methods were used. Etioplasts with prolamellar bodies and/or prothylakoids, protochlorophyll (Pchl) and protochlorophyllide (Pchlide) forms (including the flash-photoactive 655 nm emitting form) were found in the (pro)chlorenchyma of epicotyl segments under 3 cm soil depth; their spectral properties were similar to those of hydroponically grown seedlings. However, differences were found in etioplast sizes and Pchlide:Pchl molar ratios, which indicate differences in the developmental rates of the under-soil and of hydroponically developed cells. Tissue regions closer to the soil surface showed gradual accumulation of chlorophyll, and in parallel, decrease of Pchl and Pchlide. These results proved that etioplasts and Pchlide exist in soil-covered parts of seedlings even if they have a 3-4-cm long photosynthetically active shoot above the soil surface. This underlines that etiolation symptoms do develop under natural growing conditions, so they are not merely artificial, laboratory phenomena. Consequently, dark-grown laboratory plants are good models to study the early stages of etioplast differentiation and the Pchlide-chlorophyllide phototransformation. PMID:23067197

  10. Characterization of a rapid, blue light-mediated change in detectable phosphorylation of a plasma membrane protein from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. ) seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Short, T.W.; Briggs, W.R. )

    1990-01-01

    When crude microsomal membranes from apical stem segments of etiolated Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska are mixed in vitro with {gamma}-({sup 32}P)ATP, a phosphorylated band of apparent molecular mass 120 kilodaltons can be detected on autoradiographs of sodium dodecyl sulfate electrophoresis gels. If the stem sections are exposed to blue light immediately prior to membrane isolation, this band is not evident. Comparisons of the kinetics, tissue distribution, and dark recovery of the phosphorylation response with those published for blue light mediated phototropism or rapid growth inhibition indicate that the phosphorylation could be linked to one or both of the reactions described. However, the fluence-response relationships for the change in detectable phosphorylation match quite closely those reported for phototropism but not those for growth inhibition. Blue light has also been found to regulate the capacity for in vitro phosphorylation of a second protein. It has an apparent molecular mass of 84 kilodaltons and is localized primarily in basal stem sections.

  11. Discriminant Analysis of Defective and Non-Defective Field Pea (Pisum sativum L.) into Broad Market Grades Based on Digital Image Features

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Linda S.; Panozzo, Joseph F.; Salisbury, Phillip A.; Ford, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Field peas (Pisum sativum L.) are generally traded based on seed appearance, which subjectively defines broad market-grades. In this study, we developed an objective Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) model to classify market grades of field peas based on seed colour, shape and size traits extracted from digital images. Seeds were imaged in a high-throughput system consisting of a camera and laser positioned over a conveyor belt. Six colour intensity digital images were captured (under 405, 470, 530, 590, 660 and 850nm light) for each seed, and surface height was measured at each pixel by laser. Colour, shape and size traits were compiled across all seed in each sample to determine the median trait values. Defective and non-defective seed samples were used to calibrate and validate the model. Colour components were sufficient to correctly classify all non-defective seed samples into correct market grades. Defective samples required a combination of colour, shape and size traits to achieve 87% and 77% accuracy in market grade classification of calibration and validation sample-sets respectively. Following these results, we used the same colour, shape and size traits to develop an LDA model which correctly classified over 97% of all validation samples as defective or non-defective. PMID:27176469

  12. Enabling functional genomics with genome engineering

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Isaac B.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in genome engineering technologies have made the precise control over genome sequence and regulation possible across a variety of disciplines. These tools can expand our understanding of fundamental biological processes and create new opportunities for therapeutic designs. The rapid evolution of these methods has also catalyzed a new era of genomics that includes multiple approaches to functionally characterize and manipulate the regulation of genomic information. Here, we review the recent advances of the most widely adopted genome engineering platforms and their application to functional genomics. This includes engineered zinc finger proteins, TALEs/TALENs, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system as nucleases for genome editing, transcription factors for epigenome editing, and other emerging applications. We also present current and potential future applications of these tools, as well as their current limitations and areas for future advances. PMID:26430154

  13. Angiotensin-converting enzymes modulate aphid-plant interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Luo, Lan; Lu, Hong; Chen, Shaoliang; Kang, Le; Cui, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzymes (ACEs) are key components of the renin-angiotensin system in mammals. However, the function of ACE homologs in insect saliva is unclear. Aphids presumably deliver effector proteins via saliva into plant cells to maintain a compatible insect-plant interaction. In this study, we showed that ACE modulates aphid-plant interactions by affecting feeding behavior and survival of aphids on host plants. Three ACE genes were identified from the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum genome. ACE1 and ACE2 were highly expressed in the salivary glands and are predicted to function as secretory proteins. The ACE2 transcript level decreased in aphids fed on artificial diet compared with aphids fed on Vicia faba. The knockdown of the expression of each ACE by RNAi failed to affect aphid survival. When ACE1 and ACE2 were simultaneously knocked down, aphid feeding was enhanced. Aphids required less time to find the phloem sap and showed longer passive ingestion. However, the simultaneous knockdown of ACE1 and ACE2 resulted in a higher mortality rate than the control group when aphids were fed on plants. These results indicated that ACE1 and ACE2 function together to modulate A. pisum feeding and survival on plants. PMID:25744345

  14. Proteomic Profiling of Cereal Aphid Saliva Reveals Both Ubiquitous and Adaptive Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Tom L.

    2013-01-01

    The secreted salivary proteins from two cereal aphid species, Sitobion avenae and Metopolophium dirhodum, were collected from artificial diets and analysed by tandem mass spectrometry. Protein identification was performed by searching MS data against the official protein set from the current pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) genome assembly and revealed 12 and 7 proteins in the saliva of S. avenae and M. dirhodum, respectively. When combined with a comparable dataset from A. pisum, only three individual proteins were common to all the aphid species; two paralogues of the GMC oxidoreductase family (glucose dehydrogenase; GLD) and ACYPI009881, an aphid specific protein previously identified as a putative component of the salivary sheath. Antibodies were designed from translated protein sequences obtained from partial cDNA sequences for ACYPI009881 and both saliva associated GLDs. The antibodies detected all parent proteins in secreted saliva from the three aphid species, but could only detect ACYPI009881, and not saliva associated GLDs, in protein extractions from the salivary glands. This result was confirmed by immunohistochemistry using whole and sectioned salivary glands, and in addition, localised ACYPI009881 to specific cell types within the principal salivary gland. The implications of these findings for the origin of salivary components and the putative role of the proteins identified are discussed in the context of our limited understanding of the functional relationship between aphid saliva and the plants they feed on. The mass spectrometry data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange and can be accessed under the identifier PXD000113. PMID:23460852

  15. Angiotensin-converting enzymes modulate aphid–plant interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Luo, Lan; Lu, Hong; Chen, Shaoliang; Kang, Le; Cui, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzymes (ACEs) are key components of the renin–angiotensin system in mammals. However, the function of ACE homologs in insect saliva is unclear. Aphids presumably deliver effector proteins via saliva into plant cells to maintain a compatible insect–plant interaction. In this study, we showed that ACE modulates aphid–plant interactions by affecting feeding behavior and survival of aphids on host plants. Three ACE genes were identified from the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum genome. ACE1 and ACE2 were highly expressed in the salivary glands and are predicted to function as secretory proteins. The ACE2 transcript level decreased in aphids fed on artificial diet compared with aphids fed on Vicia faba. The knockdown of the expression of each ACE by RNAi failed to affect aphid survival. When ACE1 and ACE2 were simultaneously knocked down, aphid feeding was enhanced. Aphids required less time to find the phloem sap and showed longer passive ingestion. However, the simultaneous knockdown of ACE1 and ACE2 resulted in a higher mortality rate than the control group when aphids were fed on plants. These results indicated that ACE1 and ACE2 function together to modulate A. pisum feeding and survival on plants. PMID:25744345

  16. Exploring Other Genomes: Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2001-01-01

    Points out the importance of genomes other than the human genome project and provides information on the identified bacterial genomes Pseudomonas aeuroginosa, Leprosy, Cholera, Meningitis, Tuberculosis, Bubonic Plague, and plant pathogens. Considers the computer's use in genome studies. (Contains 14 references.) (YDS)

  17. Navigating yeast genome maintenance with functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Measday, Vivien; Stirling, Peter C

    2016-03-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity is a fundamental requirement of all organisms. To address this, organisms have evolved extremely faithful modes of replication, DNA repair and chromosome segregation to combat the deleterious effects of an unstable genome. Nonetheless, a small amount of genome instability is the driver of evolutionary change and adaptation, and thus a low level of instability is permitted in populations. While defects in genome maintenance almost invariably reduce fitness in the short term, they can create an environment where beneficial mutations are more likely to occur. The importance of this fact is clearest in the development of human cancer, where genome instability is a well-established enabling characteristic of carcinogenesis. This raises the crucial question: what are the cellular pathways that promote genome maintenance and what are their mechanisms? Work in model organisms, in particular the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has provided the global foundations of genome maintenance mechanisms in eukaryotes. The development of pioneering genomic tools inS. cerevisiae, such as the systematic creation of mutants in all nonessential and essential genes, has enabled whole-genome approaches to identifying genes with roles in genome maintenance. Here, we review the extensive whole-genome approaches taken in yeast, with an emphasis on functional genomic screens, to understand the genetic basis of genome instability, highlighting a range of genetic and cytological screening modalities. By revealing the biological pathways and processes regulating genome integrity, these analyses contribute to the systems-level map of the yeast cell and inform studies of human disease, especially cancer. PMID:26323482

  18. Coconut genome size determined by flow cytometry: Tall versus Dwarf types.

    PubMed

    Freitas Neto, M; Pereira, T N S; Geronimo, I G C; Azevedo, A O N; Ramos, S R R; Pereira, M G

    2016-01-01

    Coconuts (Cocos nucifera L.) are tropical palm trees that are classified into Tall and Dwarf types based on height, and both types are diploid (2n = 2x = 32 chromosomes). The reproduction mode is autogamous for Dwarf types and allogamous for Tall types. One hypothesis for the origin of the Dwarf coconut suggests that it is a Tall variant that resulted from either mutation or inbreeding, and differences in genome size between the two types would support this hypothesis. In this study, we estimated the genome sizes of 14 coconut accessions (eight Tall and six Dwarf types) using flow cytometry. Nuclei were extracted from leaf discs and stained with propidium iodide, and Pisum sativum (2C = 9.07 pg DNA) was used as an internal standard. Histograms with good resolution and low coefficients of variation (2.5 to 3.2%) were obtained. The 2C DNA content ranged from 5.72 to 5.48 pg for Tall accessions and from 5.58 to 5.52 pg for Dwarf accessions. The mean genome sizes for Tall and Dwarf specimens were 5.59 and 5.55 pg, respectively. Among all accessions, Rennel Island Tall had the highest mean DNA content (5.72 pg), whereas West African Tall had the lowest (5.48 pg). The mean coconut genome size (2C = 5.57 pg, corresponding to 2723.73 Mbp/haploid set) was classified as small. Only small differences in genome size existed among the coconut accessions, suggesting that the Dwarf type did not evolve from the Tall type. PMID:26909966

  19. Genome Maps, a new generation genome browser.

    PubMed

    Medina, Ignacio; Salavert, Francisco; Sanchez, Rubén; de Maria, Alejandro; Alonso, Roberto; Escobar, Pablo; Bleda, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2013-07-01

    Genome browsers have gained importance as more genomes and related genomic information become available. However, the increase of information brought about by new generation sequencing technologies is, at the same time, causing a subtle but continuous decrease in the efficiency of conventional genome browsers. Here, we present Genome Maps, a genome browser that implements an innovative model of data transfer and management. The program uses highly efficient technologies from the new HTML5 standard, such as scalable vector graphics, that optimize workloads at both server and client sides and ensure future scalability. Thus, data management and representation are entirely carried out by the browser, without the need of any Java Applet, Flash or other plug-in technology installation. Relevant biological data on genes, transcripts, exons, regulatory features, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, karyotype and so forth, are imported from web services and are available as tracks. In addition, several DAS servers are already included in Genome Maps. As a novelty, this web-based genome browser allows the local upload of huge genomic data files (e.g. VCF or BAM) that can be dynamically visualized in real time at the client side, thus facilitating the management of medical data affected by privacy restrictions. Finally, Genome Maps can easily be integrated in any web application by including only a few lines of code. Genome Maps is an open source collaborative initiative available in the GitHub repository (https://github.com/compbio-bigdata-viz/genome-maps). Genome Maps is available at: http://www.genomemaps.org. PMID:23748955

  20. Genome Maps, a new generation genome browser

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Ignacio; Salavert, Francisco; Sanchez, Rubén; de Maria, Alejandro; Alonso, Roberto; Escobar, Pablo; Bleda, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    Genome browsers have gained importance as more genomes and related genomic information become available. However, the increase of information brought about by new generation sequencing technologies is, at the same time, causing a subtle but continuous decrease in the efficiency of conventional genome browsers. Here, we present Genome Maps, a genome browser that implements an innovative model of data transfer and management. The program uses highly efficient technologies from the new HTML5 standard, such as scalable vector graphics, that optimize workloads at both server and client sides and ensure future scalability. Thus, data management and representation are entirely carried out by the browser, without the need of any Java Applet, Flash or other plug-in technology installation. Relevant biological data on genes, transcripts, exons, regulatory features, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, karyotype and so forth, are imported from web services and are available as tracks. In addition, several DAS servers are already included in Genome Maps. As a novelty, this web-based genome browser allows the local upload of huge genomic data files (e.g. VCF or BAM) that can be dynamically visualized in real time at the client side, thus facilitating the management of medical data affected by privacy restrictions. Finally, Genome Maps can easily be integrated in any web application by including only a few lines of code. Genome Maps is an open source collaborative initiative available in the GitHub repository (https://github.com/compbio-bigdata-viz/genome-maps). Genome Maps is available at: http://www.genomemaps.org. PMID:23748955

  1. Genomic Encyclopedia of Fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-08-10

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 150 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  2. JGI Fungal Genomics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2011-03-14

    Genomes of energy and environment fungi are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 50 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such 'parts' suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here

  3. Structure of the coding region and mRNA variants of the apyrase gene from pea (Pisum sativum)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibata, K.; Abe, S.; Davies, E.

    2001-01-01

    Partial amino acid sequences of a 49 kDa apyrase (ATP diphosphohydrolase, EC 3.6.1.5) from the cytoskeletal fraction of etiolated pea stems were used to derive oligonucleotide DNA primers to generate a cDNA fragment of pea apyrase mRNA by RT-PCR and these primers were used to screen a pea stem cDNA library. Two almost identical cDNAs differing in just 6 nucleotides within the coding regions were found, and these cDNA sequences were used to clone genomic fragments by PCR. Two nearly identical gene fragments containing 8 exons and 7 introns were obtained. One of them (H-type) encoded the mRNA sequence described by Hsieh et al. (1996) (DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank Z32743), while the other (S-type) differed by the same 6 nucleotides as the mRNAs, suggesting that these genes may be alleles. The six nucleotide differences between these two alleles were found solely in the first exon, and these mutation sites had two types of consensus sequences. These mRNAs were found with varying lengths of 3' untranslated regions (3'-UTR). There are some similarities between the 3'-UTR of these mRNAs and those of actin and actin binding proteins in plants. The putative roles of the 3'-UTR and alternative polyadenylation sites are discussed in relation to their possible role in targeting the mRNAs to different subcellular compartments.

  4. Genomics and Health Impact Update

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genomics in Practice Newborn Screening Pharmacogenomics Reproductive Health Tools and Databases About the Genomics & Health Impact Update The Office of Public Health Genomics provides updated and credible ...

  5. Transcription factors, chromatin proteins and the diversification of Hemiptera.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Newton M; Grazziotin, Ana Laura; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Aravind, L; Venancio, Thiago M

    2016-02-01

    Availability of complete genomes provides a means to explore the evolution of enormous developmental, morphological, and behavioral diversity among insects. Hemipterans in particular show great diversity of both morphology and life history within a single order. To better understand the role of transcription regulators in the diversification of hemipterans, using sequence profile searches and hidden Markov models we computationally analyzed transcription factors (TFs) and chromatin proteins (CPs) in the recently available Rhodnius prolixus genome along with 13 other insect and 4 non-insect arthropod genomes. We generated a comprehensive collection of TFs and CPs across arthropods including 303 distinct types of domains in TFs and 139 in CPs. This, along with the availability of two hemipteran genomes, R. prolixus and Acyrthosiphon pisum, helped us identify possible determinants for their dramatic morphological and behavioral divergence. We identified five domain families (i.e. Pipsqueak, SAZ/MADF, THAP, FLYWCH and BED finger) as having undergone differential patterns of lineage-specific expansion in hemipterans or within hemipterans relative to other insects. These expansions appear to be at least in part driven by transposons, with the DNA-binding domains of transposases having provided the raw material for emergence of new TFs. Our analysis suggests that while R. prolixus probably retains a state closer to the ancestral hemipteran, A. pisum represents a highly derived state, with the emergence of asexual reproduction potentially favoring genome duplication and transposon expansion. Both hemipterans are predicted to possess active DNA methylation systems. However, in the course of their divergence, aphids seem to have expanded the ancestral hemipteran DNA methylation along with a distinctive linkage to the histone methylation system, as suggested by expansion of SET domain methylases, including those fused to methylated CpG recognition domains. Thus

  6. Integrating sequence, evolution and functional genomics in regulatory genomics

    PubMed Central

    Vingron, Martin; Brazma, Alvis; Coulson, Richard; van Helden, Jacques; Manke, Thomas; Palin, Kimmo; Sand, Olivier; Ukkonen, Esko

    2009-01-01

    With genome analysis expanding from the study of genes to the study of gene regulation, 'regulatory genomics' utilizes sequence information, evolution and functional genomics measurements to unravel how regulatory information is encoded in the genome. PMID:19226437

  7. Integrated effect of microbial antagonist, organic amendment and fungicide in controlling seedling mortality (Rhizoctonia solani) and improving yield in pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Akhter, Wasira; Bhuiyan, Mohamed Khurshed Alam; Sultana, Farjana; Hossain, Mohamed Motaher

    2015-01-01

    The study evaluated the comparative performance of a few microbial antagonists, organic amendments and fungicides and their integration for the management of seedling mortality (Rhizoctonia solani Kühn) and yield improvement in pea (Pisum sativum L.). Before setting the experiment in field microplots, a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted to select a virulent isolate of R. solani, an effective antagonistic isolate of Trichoderma harzianum, a fungitoxic organic amendment and an appropriate fungicide. A greenhouse pathogenicity test compared differences in seedling mortality in pea inoculated by four isolates of R. solani and identified the isolate RS10 as the most virulent one. Among the 20 isolates screened in dual culture assay on PDA, T. harzianum isolate T-3 was found to show the highest (77.22%) inhibition of the radial growth of R. solani. A complete inhibition (100.00%) of colony growth of R. solani was observed when fungicide Bavistin 50 WP and Provax-200 at the rate of 100 and 250 ppm, respectively, were used, while Provax-200 was found to be highly compatible with T. harzianum. Mustard oilcake gave maximum inhibition (60.28%) of the radial growth of R. solani at all ratios, followed by sesame oilcake and tea waste. Integration of soil treatment with T. harzianum isolate T-3 and mustard oilcake and seed treatment with Provax-200 appeared to be significantly superior in reducing seedling mortality and improving seed yield in pea in comparison to any single or dual application of them in the experimental field. The research results will help growers develop integrated disease management strategies for the control of Rhizoctonia disease in pea. The research results show the need for an integrating selective microbial antagonist, organic amendment and fungicide to achieve appropriate management of seedling mortality (R. solani) and increase of seed yield in pea. PMID:25528673

  8. Iron absorption from experimental infant formulas based on pea (Pisum sativum)-protein isolate: the effect of phytic acid and ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Davidsson, L; Dimitriou, T; Walczyk, T; Hurrell, R F

    2001-01-01

    Infant formula based on pea (Pisum sativum)-protein isolate has been suggested as an alternative to soybean formula in countries where soybean is not a native crop, or when soybean protein cannot be used due to allergic reactions or intolerances. In the present study, Fe absorption from experimental infant formulas based on pea-protein isolate was measured in healthy non-anaemic young women. The influence of phytic acid and ascorbic acid on Fe absorption was evaluated, using a stable-isotope technique based on incorporation of Fe stable-isotope labels into erythrocytes 14 d after administration. Geometric mean Fe absorption increased from 20.7 (+1 SD 41.6, -1 SD 10.3) % to 33.1 (+1 SD 58.6, -1 SD 18.7) %; (P < 0.0001; n 10) after enzymic degradation of virtually all phytic acid. Doubling the molar ratio Fe:ascorbic acid from 1:2.1 to 1:4.2 in the infant formula with native phytic acid content also increased Fe absorption significantly (P < 0.0001; n 10); geometric mean Fe absorption increased from 14.8 (+1 SD 32.1, -1 SD 6.8) % to 22.1 (+1 SD 47.2, -1 SD 10.4) %. These results confirm the inhibitory and enhancing effects of phytic acid and ascorbic acid respectively on Fe absorption, but also indicate relatively high fractional Fe absorption from the pea-protein-based formulas. After adjusting for differences in Fe status, our data indicate that Fe absorption from dephytinised pea protein might be less inhibitory than dephytinised soybean protein as measured in a previous study (Hurrell et al. 1998). PMID:11227034

  9. Multiple impacts of the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Variovorax paradoxus 5C-2 on nutrient and ABA relations of Pisum sativum

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Ian C.

    2012-01-01

    Resolving the physiological mechanisms by which rhizobacteria enhance plant growth is difficult, since many such bacteria contain multiple plant growth-promoting properties. To understand further how the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase (ACCd)-containing rhizobacterium Variovorax paradoxus 5C-2 affects plant growth, the flows and partitioning of mineral nutrients and abscisic acid (ABA) and ABA metabolism were studied in pea (Pisum sativum) plants following rhizosphere bacterial inoculation. Although root architecture was not affected, inoculation increased root and shoot biomass, and stomatal conductance, by 20, 15, and 24%, respectively, and increased N, P, K, Ca, and Mg uptake by 16, 81, 50, 46, and 58%, respectively. P deposition in inoculated plant roots was 4.9 times higher than that in uninoculated controls. Rhizobacterial inoculation increased root to shoot xylem flows and shoot to root phloem flows of K by 1.8- and 2.1-fold, respectively. In control plants, major sinks for K deposition were the roots and upper shoot (43% and 49% of total uptake, respectively), while rhizobacterial inoculation increased K distribution to the lower shoot at the expense of other compartments (xylem, phloem, and upper shoot). Despite being unable to metabolize ABA in vitro, V. paradoxus 5C-2 decreased root ABA concentrations and accumulation by 40–60%. Although inoculation decreased xylem ABA flows, phloem ABA flows increased. Whether bacterial ACCd attenuates root to shoot ABA signalling requires further investigation, since ABA is critical to maintain growth of droughted plants, and ACCd-containing organisms have been advocated as a means of minimizing growth inhibition of plants in drying soil. PMID:23136167

  10. Production of the active antifungal Pisum sativum defensin 1 (Psd1) in Pichia pastoris: overcoming the inefficiency of the STE13 protease.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Kátia M S; Almeida, Marcius S; Valente, Ana Paula; Almeida, Fábio C L; Kurtenbach, Eleonora

    2003-09-01

    Plant defensins are small cysteine-rich proteins that present high activity against fungi and bacteria and inhibition of insect proteases and alpha-amylases. Here, we present the expression in Pichia pastoris, purification and characterization of the recombinant Pisum sativum defensin 1(rPsd1); a pea defensin which presents four disulfide bridges and high antifungal activity. For this, we had to overcome the inefficiency of the STE13 protease. Our strategy was to clone the corresponding cDNA directly in-frame with a variant of the widely used secretion signal from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-mating factor, devoid of the STE13 proteolytic signal cleavage sequence. Using an optimized expression protocol, which included a buffered basal salt media formulation, it was possible to obtain about 63.0mg/L of 15N-labeled and unlabeled rPsd1. The recombinants were purified to homogeneity by gel filtration chromatography, followed by reversed-phase HPLC. Mass spectrometry of native and recombinant Psd1 revealed that the protein expressed heterologously was post-translationally processed to the same mature protein as the native one. Circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis indicated that the recombinant protein had the same folding when compared to native Psd1. In addition, the rPsd1 was fully active against Aspergillus niger, if compared with native Psd1. To our knowledge, this is the first heterologous expression of a fully active plant defensin in a high-yield flask. PMID:12963348

  11. Studies on the Control of Ascochyta Blight in Field Peas (Pisum sativum L.) Caused by Ascochyta pinodes in Zhejiang Province, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Xu, Shengchun; Yao, Xiefeng; Zhang, Guwen; Mao, Weihua; Hu, Qizan; Feng, Zhijuan; Gong, Yaming

    2016-01-01

    Ascochyta blight, an infection caused by a complex of Ascochyta pinodes, Ascochyta pinodella, Ascochyta pisi, and/or Phoma koolunga, is a destructive disease in many field peas (Pisum sativum L.)-growing regions, and it causes significant losses in grain yield. To understand the composition of fungi associated with this disease in Zhejiang Province, China, a total of 65 single-pycnidiospore fungal isolates were obtained from diseased pea samples collected from 5 locations in this region. These isolates were identified as Ascochyta pinodes by molecular techniques and their morphological and physiological characteristics. The mycelia of ZJ-1 could penetrate pea leaves across the stomas, and formed specific penetration structures and directly pierced leaves. The resistance level of 23 available pea cultivars was tested against their representative isolate A. pinodes ZJ-1 using the excised leaf-assay technique. The ZJ-1 mycelia could penetrate the leaves of all tested cultivars, and they developed typical symptoms, which suggested that all tested cultivars were susceptible to the fungus. Chemical fungicides and biological control agents were screened for management of this disease, and their efficacies were further determined. Most of the tested fungicides (11 out of 14) showed high activity toward ZJ-1 with EC50 < 5 μg/mL. Moreover, fungicides, including tebuconazole, boscalid, iprodione, carbendazim, and fludioxonil, displayed more than 80% disease control efficacy under the recorded conditions. Three biocontrol strains of Bacillus sp. and one of Pantoea agglomerans were isolated from pea-related niches and significantly reduced the severity of disease under greenhouse and field conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first study on ascochyta blight in field peas, and results presented here will be useful for controlling the disease in this area. PMID:27148177

  12. E151 (sym15), a pleiotropic mutant of pea (Pisum sativum L.), displays low nodule number, enhanced mycorrhizae, delayed lateral root emergence, and high root cytokinin levels

    PubMed Central

    Jones, James M. C.; Clairmont, Lindsey; Macdonald, Emily S.; Weiner, Catherine A.; Emery, R. J. Neil; Guinel, Frédérique C.

    2015-01-01

    In legumes, the formation of rhizobial and mycorrhizal root symbioses is a highly regulated process which requires close communication between plant and microorganism. Plant mutants that have difficulties establishing symbioses are valuable tools for unravelling the mechanisms by which these symbioses are formed and regulated. Here E151, a mutant of Pisum sativum cv. Sparkle, was examined to characterize its root growth and symbiotic defects. The symbioses in terms of colonization intensity, functionality of micro-symbionts, and organ dominance were compared between the mutant and wild type. The endogenous cytokinin (CK) and abscisic acid (ABA) levels and the effect of the exogenous application of these two hormones were determined. E151 was found to be a low and delayed nodulator, exhibiting defects in both the epidermal and cortical programmes though a few mature and functional nodules develop. Mycorrhizal colonization of E151 was intensified, although the fungal functionality was impaired. Furthermore, E151 displayed an altered lateral root (LR) phenotype compared with that of the wild type whereby LR emergence is initially delayed but eventually overcome. No differences in ABA levels were found between the mutant and the wild type, but non-inoculated E151 exhibited significantly high CK levels. It is hypothesized that CK plays an essential role in differentially mediating the entry of the two micro-symbionts into the cortex; whereas it would inhibit the entry of the rhizobia in that tissue, it would promote that of the fungus. E151 is a developmental mutant which may prove to be a useful tool in further understanding the role of hormones in the regulation of beneficial root symbioses. PMID:25948707

  13. Stomatal response and leaf injury of Pisum sativum L. with SO/sub 2/ and O/sub 3/ exposures. I. Influence of pollutant level and leaf maturity

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyk, D.M.; Tibbitts, T.W.

    1981-03-01

    Plants of Pisum sativum L. Alsweet were grown under a controlled environment and exposed to SO/sub 2/ and O/sub 3/ to determine whether changes in stomatal aperture during exposure were related to subsequent leaf injury. Stomata consistently closed with injurious levels of SO/sub 2/ and O/sub 3/. Measurements with diffusion porometers demonstrated approx. = 75 and 25% lower conductance with SO/sub 2/ and O/sub 3/ exposures, respectively, compared to the conductance of control plants. Stomata also showed a closing response with noninjurious levels of SO/sub 2/ but an opening response with noninjurious levels of O/sub 3/. Stomata closed to the same degree with combinations of SO/sub 2/ plus O/sub 3/ as with SO/sub 2/ alone. Stomata of expanding leaves closed more during pollutant exposures than stomata of expanded leaves. The abaxial and adaxial stomata both exhibited closure with SO/sub 2/ and combinations of SO/sub 2/ plus O/sub 3/, but abaxial stomata tended to close and adaxial stomata tended to open with exposure to O/sub 3/ alone. The changes in stomatal aperture were not closely correlated with the amount of leaf injury produced by different pollutant levels. Stomata closed, not only with exposure to pollutant levels that caused severe necrosis, but also with levels that caused only a trace of injury. There was no evidence of a reduced amount of closure or even stomatal opening with combinations of SO/sub 2/ and O/sub 3/ compared to plants exposed to the pollutants alone to explain the large amount of injury to plants exposed to pollutant combinations.

  14. Studies on the Control of Ascochyta Blight in Field Peas (Pisum sativum L.) Caused by Ascochyta pinodes in Zhejiang Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Xu, Shengchun; Yao, Xiefeng; Zhang, Guwen; Mao, Weihua; Hu, Qizan; Feng, Zhijuan; Gong, Yaming

    2016-01-01

    Ascochyta blight, an infection caused by a complex of Ascochyta pinodes, Ascochyta pinodella, Ascochyta pisi, and/or Phoma koolunga, is a destructive disease in many field peas (Pisum sativum L.)-growing regions, and it causes significant losses in grain yield. To understand the composition of fungi associated with this disease in Zhejiang Province, China, a total of 65 single-pycnidiospore fungal isolates were obtained from diseased pea samples collected from 5 locations in this region. These isolates were identified as Ascochyta pinodes by molecular techniques and their morphological and physiological characteristics. The mycelia of ZJ-1 could penetrate pea leaves across the stomas, and formed specific penetration structures and directly pierced leaves. The resistance level of 23 available pea cultivars was tested against their representative isolate A. pinodes ZJ-1 using the excised leaf-assay technique. The ZJ-1 mycelia could penetrate the leaves of all tested cultivars, and they developed typical symptoms, which suggested that all tested cultivars were susceptible to the fungus. Chemical fungicides and biological control agents were screened for management of this disease, and their efficacies were further determined. Most of the tested fungicides (11 out of 14) showed high activity toward ZJ-1 with EC50 < 5 μg/mL. Moreover, fungicides, including tebuconazole, boscalid, iprodione, carbendazim, and fludioxonil, displayed more than 80% disease control efficacy under the recorded conditions. Three biocontrol strains of Bacillus sp. and one of Pantoea agglomerans were isolated from pea-related niches and significantly reduced the severity of disease under greenhouse and field conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first study on ascochyta blight in field peas, and results presented here will be useful for controlling the disease in this area. PMID:27148177

  15. Bean α-amylase inhibitor 1 in transgenic peas (Pisum sativum) provides complete protection from pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum) under field conditions

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Roger L.; Schroeder, Hart E.; Bateman, Kaye S.; Chrispeels, Maarten J.; Armstrong, Eric; Higgins, Thomas J. V.

    2000-01-01

    Two α-amylase inhibitors, called αAI-1 and αAI-2, that share 78% amino acid sequence identity and have a differential specificity toward mammalian and insect α-amylases are present in different accessions of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Using greenhouse-grown transgenic peas (Pisum sativum), we have shown previously that expression of αAI-1 in pea seeds can provide complete protection against the pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum). Here, we report that αAI-1 also protects peas from the weevil under field conditions. The high degree of protection is explained by our finding that αAI-1 inhibits pea bruchid α-amylase by 80% over a broad pH range (pH 4.5–6.5). αAI-2, on the other hand, is a much less effective inhibitor of pea bruchid α-amylase, inhibiting the enzyme by only 40%, and only in the pH 4.0–4.5 range. Nevertheless, this inhibitor was still partially effective in protecting field-grown transgenic peas against pea weevils. The primary effect of αAI-2 appeared to be a delay in the maturation of the larvae. This contrasts with the effect of αAI-1, which results in larval mortality at the first or second instar. These results are discussed in relationship to the use of amylase inhibitors with different specificities to bring about protection of crops from their insect pests or to decrease insect pest populations below the economic injury level. PMID:10759552

  16. Isolation of high salinity stress tolerant genes from Pisum sativum by random overexpression in Escherichia coli and their functional validation.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Amita; Dang, Hung Quang; Vaid, Neha; Tuteja, Narendra

    2009-05-01

    Salinity stress is one of the major factors which reduce crop plants growth and productivity resulting in significant economic losses worldwide. Therefore, it would be fruitful to isolate and functionally identify new salinity stress-induced genes for understanding the mechanism and developing salinity stress tolerant plants. Based on functional gene screening assay, we have isolated few salinity tolerant genes out of one million Escherichia coli (SOLR) transformants containing pea cDNAs. Sequence analysis of three of these genes revealed homology to Ribosomal-L30E (RPL30E), Chlorophyll-a/b-binding protein (Chla/bBP) and FIDDLEHEAD (FDH). The salinity tolerance of these genes in bacteria was further confirmed by using another strain of E. coli (DH5alpha) transformants. The homology based computational modeling of these proteins suggested the high degree of conservation with the conserved domains of their homologous partners. The reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that the expression of these cDNAs (except the FDH) was upregulated in pea plants in response to NaCl stress. We observed that there was no significant effect of Li(+) ion on the expression level of these genes, while an increase in response to K(+) ion was observed. Overall, this study provides an evidence for a novel function of these genes in high salinity stress tolerance. The PsFDH showed constitutive expression in planta suggesting that it can be used as constitutively expressed marker gene for salinity stress tolerance in plants. This study brings new direction in identifying novel function of unidentified genes in abiotic stress tolerance without previous knowledge of the genome sequence. PMID:19816097

  17. Genomic Data Commons | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI’s Center for Cancer Genomics launches the Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a unified data sharing platform for the cancer research community. The mission of the GDC is to enable data sharing across the entire cancer research community, to ultimately support precision medicine in oncology.

  18. Harvesting rice's dispensable genome.

    PubMed

    Wing, Rod A

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and cost-effective approach has been developed to harvest and map the dispensable genome, that is, population-level natural sequence variation within a species that is not present in static genome assemblies. PMID:26429765

  19. Libraries for genomic SELEX.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, B S; Shtatland, T; Brown, D; Gold, L

    1997-01-01

    An increasing number of proteins are being identified that regulate gene expression by binding specific nucleic acidsin vivo. A method termed genomic SELEX facilitates the rapid identification of networks of protein-nucleic acid interactions by identifying within the genomic sequences of an organism the highest affinity sites for any protein of the organism. As with its progenitor, SELEX of random-sequence nucleic acids, genomic SELEX involves iterative binding, partitioning, and amplification of nucleic acids. The two methods differ in that the variable region of the nucleic acid library for genomic SELEX is derived from the genome of an organism. We have used a quick and simple method to construct Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and human genomic DNA PCR libraries that can be transcribed with T7 RNA polymerase. We present evidence that the libraries contain overlapping inserts starting at most of the positions within the genome, making these libraries suitable for genomic SELEX. PMID:9016629

  20. Genomic Data Commons launches

    Cancer.gov

    The Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a unified data system that promotes sharing of genomic and clinical data between researchers, launched today with a visit from Vice President Joe Biden to the operations center at the University of Chicago.

  1. GENOMICS AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of recently developed and emerging genomics technologies on environmental sciences has significant implications for human and ecological risk assessment issues. The linkage of data generated from genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabalomics, and ecology can be ...

  2. Exploiting the genome

    SciTech Connect

    Block, S.; Cornwall, J.; Dyson, F.; Koonin, S.; Lewis, N.; Schwitters, R.

    1998-09-11

    In 1997, JASON conducted a DOE-sponsored study of the human genome project with special emphasis on the areas of technology, quality assurance and quality control, and informatics. The present study has two aims: first, to update the 1997 Report in light of recent developments in genome sequencing technology, and second, to consider possible roles for the DOE in the ''post-genomic" era, following acquisition of the complete human genome sequence.

  3. COMPARATIVE GENOMICS IN LEGUMES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The legume plant family will soon include three sequenced genomes. The majority of the gene-containing portions of the model legumes Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus have been sequenced in clone-by-clone projects, and the sequencing of the soybean genome is underway in a whole-genome shotgun ...

  4. Whole Genome Selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whole genome selection (WGS) is an approach to using DNA markers that are distributed throughout the entire genome. Genes affecting most economically-important traits are distributed throughout the genome and there are relatively few that have large effects with many more genes with progressively sm...

  5. Genomics and functional genomics with haloarchaea.

    PubMed

    Soppa, J; Baumann, A; Brenneis, M; Dambeck, M; Hering, O; Lange, C

    2008-09-01

    The first haloarchaeal genome was published in 2000 and today five genome sequences are available. Transcriptome and proteome analyses have been established for two and three haloarchaeal species, respectively, and more than 20 studies using these functional genomic approaches have been published in the last two years. These studies gave global overviews of metabolic regulation (aerobic and anaerobic respiration, phototrophy, carbon source usage), stress response (UV, X-rays, transition metals, osmotic and temperature stress), cell cycle-dependent transcript level regulation, and transcript half-lives. The only translatome analysis available for any prokaryotic species revealed that 10 and 20% of all transcripts are translationally regulated in Haloferax volcanii and Halobacterium salinarum, respectively. Very effective methods for the construction of in frame deletion mutants have been established recently for haloarchaea and are intensively used to unravel the biological roles of genes in this group. Bioinformatic analyses include both cross-genome comparisons as well as integration of genomic data with experimental results. The first systems biology approaches have been performed that used experimental data to construct predictive models of gene expression and metabolism, respectively. In this contribution the current status of genomics, functional genomics, and molecular genetics of haloarchaea is summarized and selected examples are discussed. PMID:18493745

  6. Chromium and Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Sandra S.; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-01-01

    Many metals serve as micronutrients which protect against genomic instability. Chromium is most abundant in its trivalent and hexavalent forms. Trivalent chromium has historically been considered an essential element, though recent data indicate that while it can have pharmacological effects and value, it is not essential. There are no data indicating that trivalent chromium promotes genomic stability and, instead may promote genomic instability. Hexavalent chromium is widely accepted as highly toxic and carcinogenic with no nutritional value. Recent data indicate that it causes genomic instability and also has no role in promoting genomic stability. PMID:22192535

  7. The Genomic Medicine Game.

    PubMed

    Tran, Elvis; de Andrés-Galiana, Enrique J; Benitez, Sonia; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Lopez-Campos, Guillermo H

    2016-01-01

    With advancements in genomics technology, health care has been improving and new paradigms of medicine such as genomic medicine have evolved. The education of clinicians, researchers and students to face the challenges posed by these new approaches, however, has been often lagging behind. From this the Genomic Medicine Game, an educational tool, was created for the purpose of conceptualizing the key components of Genomic Medicine. A number of phenotype-genotype associations were found through a literature review, which was used to be a base for the concepts the Genomic Medicine Game would focus on. Built in Java, the game was successfully tested with promising results. PMID:27577486

  8. Microbial genomic taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Cristiane C; Chimetto, Luciane; Edwards, Robert A; Swings, Jean; Stackebrandt, Erko; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2013-01-01

    A need for a genomic species definition is emerging from several independent studies worldwide. In this commentary paper, we discuss recent studies on the genomic taxonomy of diverse microbial groups and a unified species definition based on genomics. Accordingly, strains from the same microbial species share >95% Average Amino Acid Identity (AAI) and Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI), >95% identity based on multiple alignment genes, <10 in Karlin genomic signature, and > 70% in silico Genome-to-Genome Hybridization similarity (GGDH). Species of the same genus will form monophyletic groups on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, Multilocus Sequence Analysis (MLSA) and supertree analysis. In addition to the established requirements for species descriptions, we propose that new taxa descriptions should also include at least a draft genome sequence of the type strain in order to obtain a clear outlook on the genomic landscape of the novel microbe. The application of the new genomic species definition put forward here will allow researchers to use genome sequences to define simultaneously coherent phenotypic and genomic groups. PMID:24365132

  9. The Bluejay genome browser.

    PubMed

    Soh, Jung; Gordon, Paul M K; Sensen, Christoph W

    2012-03-01

    The Bluejay genome browser is a stand-alone visualization tool for the multi-scale viewing of annotated genomes and other genomic elements. Bluejay allows users to customize display features to suit their needs, and produces publication-quality graphics. Bluejay provides a multitude of ways to interrelate biological data at the genome scale. Users can load gene expression data into a genome display for expression visualization in context. Multiple genomes can be compared concurrently, including time series expression data, based on Gene Ontology labels. External, context-sensitive biological Web Services are linked to the displayed genomic elements ad hoc for in-depth genomic data analysis and interpretation. Users can mark multiple points of interest in a genome by creating waypoints, and exploit them for easy navigation of single or multiple genomes. Using this comprehensive visual environment, users can study a gene not just in relation to its genome, but also its transcriptome and evolutionary origins. Written in Java, Bluejay is platform-independent and is freely available from http://bluejay.ucalgary.ca. PMID:22389011

  10. Bacterial Genome Instability

    PubMed Central

    Darmon, Elise

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial genomes are remarkably stable from one generation to the next but are plastic on an evolutionary time scale, substantially shaped by horizontal gene transfer, genome rearrangement, and the activities of mobile DNA elements. This implies the existence of a delicate balance between the maintenance of genome stability and the tolerance of genome instability. In this review, we describe the specialized genetic elements and the endogenous processes that contribute to genome instability. We then discuss the consequences of genome instability at the physiological level, where cells have harnessed instability to mediate phase and antigenic variation, and at the evolutionary level, where horizontal gene transfer has played an important role. Indeed, this ability to share DNA sequences has played a major part in the evolution of life on Earth. The evolutionary plasticity of bacterial genomes, coupled with the vast numbers of bacteria on the planet, substantially limits our ability to control disease. PMID:24600039

  11. UCSC genome browser tutorial.

    PubMed

    Zweig, Ann S; Karolchik, Donna; Kuhn, Robert M; Haussler, David; Kent, W James

    2008-08-01

    The University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Bioinformatics website consists of a suite of free, open-source, on-line tools that can be used to browse, analyze, and query genomic data. These tools are available to anyone who has an Internet browser and an interest in genomics. The website provides a quick and easy-to-use visual display of genomic data. It places annotation tracks beneath genome coordinate positions, allowing rapid visual correlation of different types of information. Many of the annotation tracks are submitted by scientists worldwide; the others are computed by the UCSC Genome Bioinformatics group from publicly available sequence data. It also allows users to upload and display their own experimental results or annotation sets by creating a custom track. The suite of tools, downloadable data files, and links to documentation and other information can be found at http://genome.ucsc.edu/. PMID:18514479

  12. Variations in genome mass.

    PubMed

    Wachtel, S S; Tiersch, T R

    1993-02-01

    1. Genome size varies considerably among vertebrates, ranging from less than 1 pg to more than 200 pg; the amount of DNA differing among individuals in a population can equal the amount in the entire structural gene complement. 2. Recent technological advances permit evaluation of genome size variation at several levels including sub-chromosomal, chromosomal and cellular. 3. Genome size variation may also be viewed from taxonomic levels, and across evolutionary time frames. 4. As sources of genome size variation are identified and studied, the conundrum of the C-value paradox (lack of correlations among genome size, genomic complexity and phylogenetic status of organisms) may prove to be more apparent than real. 5. For example, the limited and relatively constant genome size of avians may be related to the physiological constraints of flight. PMID:8462275

  13. Anthocyanin Inhibits Propidium Iodide DNA Fluorescence in Euphorbia pulcherrima: Implications for Genome Size Variation and Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Michael D.; Price, H. James; Johnston, J. Spencer

    2008-01-01

    Background Measuring genome size by flow cytometry assumes direct proportionality between nuclear DNA staining and DNA amount. By 1997 it was recognized that secondary metabolites may affect DNA staining, thereby causing inaccuracy. Here experiments are reported with poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima) with green leaves and red bracts rich in phenolics. Methods DNA content was estimated as fluorescence of propidium iodide (PI)-stained nuclei of poinsettia and/or pea (Pisum sativum) using flow cytometry. Tissue was chopped, or two tissues co-chopped, in Galbraith buffer alone or with six concentrations of cyanidin-3-rutinoside (a cyanidin-3-rhamnoglucoside contributing to red coloration in poinsettia). Key Results There were large differences in PI staining (35–70 %) between 2C nuclei from green leaf and red bract tissue in poinsettia. These largely disappeared when pea leaflets were co-chopped with poinsettia tissue as an internal standard. However, smaller (2·8–6·9 %) differences remained, and red bracts gave significantly lower 1C genome size estimates (1·69–1·76 pg) than green leaves (1·81 pg). Chopping pea or poinsettia tissue in buffer with 0–200 µm cyanidin-3-rutinoside showed that the effects of natural inhibitors in red bracts of poinsettia on PI staining were largely reproduced in a dose-dependent way by this anthocyanin. Conclusions Given their near-ubiquitous distribution, many suspected roles and known affects on DNA staining, anthocyanins are a potent, potential cause of significant error variation in genome size estimations for many plant tissues and taxa. This has important implications of wide practical and theoretical significance. When choosing genome size calibration standards it seems prudent to select materials producing little or no anthocyanin. Reviewing the literature identifies clear examples in which claims of intraspecific variation in genome size are probably artefacts caused by natural variation in anthocyanin levels or

  14. Molecular basis of processing-induced changes in protein structure in relation to intestinal digestion in yellow and green type pea (Pisum sativum L.): A molecular spectroscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gloria Qingyu; Warkentin, Tom; Niu, Zhiyuan; Khan, Nazir A; Yu, Peiqiang

    2015-12-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to quantify the protein inherent molecular structural features of green cotyledon (CDC Striker) and yellow cotyledon (CDC Meadow) pea (Pisum sativum L.) seeds using molecular spectroscopic technique (FT/IR-ATR); (2) measure the denaturation of protein molecular makeup in the two types of pea during dry roasting (120°C for 60 min), autoclaving (120°C for 60 min) or microwaving (for 5 min); and (3) correlate the heat-induced changes in protein molecular makeup to the corresponding changes in protein digestibility determined using modified three-step in vitro procedure. Compared with yellow-type, the green-type peas had higher (P<0.05) ratios of amide I to II peak height (1.698 vs. 1.805) and area (1.843 vs. 2.017). A significant correlation was observed between the amide I and II peak height (r=0.48) and peak area (r=-0.42) ratio with protein content. Compared with yellow-type, the green-type peas had lower (P<0.05) α-helix:β-sheet ratio (1.015 vs. 0.926), indicating varietal difference in protein secondary structure makeup. All processing applications increased α-helix:β-sheet ratio, with the largest (P<0.05) increase being observed with roasting and microwaving. The heat-induced changes in α-helix:β-sheet ratio was strongly correlated to intestinal digestibility of protein within the green (r=-0. 86) and yellow (r=0.81) pea-types. However, across the pea types the correlation was not significant. Principal component and hierarchical cluster analyses on the entire spectral data from the amide region (ca. 1727-1480 cm(-1)) were able to visualize and discriminate the structural difference between pea varieties and processing treatments. This study shows that the molecular spectroscopy can be used as a rapid tool to screen the protein value of raw and heat-treated peas. PMID:26188704

  15. Remote Sensing Study of the Influence of Different Herbicides on the Leaf Spectral Reflectance and Fluorescence of Pea Plants (Pisum sativum L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhova, Dora; Yanev, Tony; Iliev, Ilko; Alexieva, Vera; Tsaneva, Mariana

    The effective use of airborne and satellite-based remote sensor systems in resource management, agriculture, mineral exploration and environmental monitoring requires an understanding of the nature and limitations of the high-resolution remote sensing data and of various strategies for processing and interpreting it. In developing the necessary knowledge base, ground-based measurements are the expedient source of information. In this study, remote sensing techniques were applied in laboratory for detection of the influence of herbicides 2.4-D, glyphosate, fluridone and acifluorfen on the leaf spectral reflectance and fluorescence of pea plants (Pisum sativum L.). According to the classification of the Herbicide Resistance Action Committee with reference to their mode of action they belong to different groups: synthetic auxins - O (2.4-D), inhibition of EPSP synthase - G (glyphosate), photobleaching - F1 (fluridone), and inhibition of PPO - E (acifluorfen). During the last 40 years, these herbicides are among the ones used most widely in agriculture worldwide. The plants studied were grown hydroponically in a growth chamber in a nutritious medium to which every herbicide was added at two low concentrations (1 µM, 0.1 µM) with respect to the field dose applied in the agricultural practice. High-resolution spectral data for leaf spectral reflectance and fluorescence were collected from freshly detached leaves using three multichannel spectrometers. Spectral reflectance characteristics were obtained from the leaf reflectance referenced against a standard (white diffuse screen) in the visible and near infrared ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum (450÷850 nm). Fluorescence spectra were taken in the spectral range 650-850 nm. To assess the changes arising in leaf spectral reflectance under the herbicide action we developed and applied an analytical approach based on discriminant analysis and other statistical methods. The spectral characteristics were analyzed in

  16. Genomics of sorghum.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Andrew H

    2008-01-01

    Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) is a subject of plant genomics research based on its importance as one of the world's leading cereal crops, a biofuels crop of high and growing importance, a progenitor of one of the world's most noxious weeds, and a botanical model for many tropical grasses with complex genomes. A rich history of genome analysis, culminating in the recent complete sequencing of the genome of a leading inbred, provides a foundation for invigorating progress toward relating sorghum genes to their functions. Further characterization of the genomes other than Saccharinae cereals may shed light on mechanisms, levels, and patterns of evolution of genome size and structure, laying the foundation for further study of sugarcane and other economically important members of the group. PMID:18483564

  17. The tiniest tiny genomes.

    PubMed

    Moran, Nancy A; Bennett, Gordon M

    2014-01-01

    Starting in 2006, surprisingly tiny genomes have been discovered from numerous bacterial symbionts of insect hosts. Despite their size, each retains some genes that enable provisioning of limiting nutrients or other capabilities required by hosts. Genome sequence analyses show that genome reduction is an ongoing process, resulting in a continuum of sizes, with the smallest genome currently known at 112 kilobases. Genome reduction is typical in host-restricted symbionts and pathogens, but the tiniest genomes are restricted to symbionts required by hosts and restricted to specialized host cells, resulting from long coevolution with hosts. Genes are lost in all functional categories, but core genes for central informational processes, including genes encoding ribosomal proteins, are mostly retained, whereas genes underlying production of cell envelope components are especially depleted. Thus, these entities retain cell-like properties but are heavily dependent on coadaptation of hosts, which continuously evolve to support the symbionts upon which they depend. PMID:24995872

  18. Querying genomic databases

    SciTech Connect

    Baehr, A.; Hagstrom, R.; Joerg, D.; Overbeek, R.

    1991-09-01

    A natural-language interface has been developed that retrieves genomic information by using a simple subset of English. The interface spares the biologist from the task of learning database-specific query languages and computer programming. Currently, the interface deals with the E. coli genome. It can, however, be readily extended and shows promise as a means of easy access to other sequenced genomic databases as well.

  19. Genome Aliquoting Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Robert; Sankoff, David

    We prove that the genome aliquoting problem, the problem of finding a recent polyploid ancestor of a genome, with breakpoint distance can be solved in polynomial time. We propose an aliquoting algorithm that is a 2-approximation for the genome aliquoting problem with double cut and join distance, improving upon the previous best solution to this problem, Feijão and Meidanis' 4-approximation algorithm.

  20. Physician Assistant Genomic Competencies.

    PubMed

    Goldgar, Constance; Michaud, Ed; Park, Nguyen; Jenkins, Jean

    2016-09-01

    Genomic discoveries are increasingly being applied to the clinical care of patients. All physician assistants (PAs) need to acquire competency in genomics to provide the best possible care for patients within the scope of their practice. In this article, we present an updated version of PA genomic competencies and learning outcomes in a framework that is consistent with the current medical education guidelines and the collaborative nature of PAs in interprofessional health care teams. PMID:27490287

  1. Large-scale label-free quantitative proteomics of the pea aphid-Buchnera symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Poliakov, Anton; Russell, Calum W; Ponnala, Lalit; Hoops, Harold J; Sun, Qi; Douglas, Angela E; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2011-06-01

    Many insects are nutritionally dependent on symbiotic microorganisms that have tiny genomes and are housed in specialized host cells called bacteriocytes. The obligate symbiosis between the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum and the γ-proteobacterium Buchnera aphidicola (only 584 predicted proteins) is particularly amenable for molecular analysis because the genomes of both partners have been sequenced. To better define the symbiotic relationship between this aphid and Buchnera, we used large-scale, high accuracy tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-LTQ-Orbtrap) to identify aphid and Buchnera proteins in the whole aphid body, purified bacteriocytes, isolated Buchnera cells and the residual bacteriocyte fraction. More than 1900 aphid and 400 Buchnera proteins were identified. All enzymes in amino acid metabolism annotated in the Buchnera genome were detected, reflecting the high (68%) coverage of the proteome and supporting the core function of Buchnera in the aphid symbiosis. Transporters mediating the transport of predicted metabolites were present in the bacteriocyte. Label-free spectral counting combined with hierarchical clustering, allowed to define the quantitative distribution of a subset of these proteins across both symbiotic partners, yielding no evidence for the selective transfer of protein among the partners in either direction. This is the first quantitative proteome analysis of bacteriocyte symbiosis, providing a wealth of information about molecular function of both the host cell and bacterial symbiont. PMID:21421797

  2. Effect of Host Genotype on Symbiont Titer in the Aphid-Buchnera Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Kevin J; Moran, Nancy A

    2011-01-01

    Obligate nutritional symbioses require balance between the energetic needs of the host and the symbiont. The resident symbiont population size within a host may have major impacts on host fitness, as both host and symbiont consume and supply metabolites in a shared metabolite pool. Given the massive genome degradation that is a hallmark of bacterial endosymbionts of insects, it is unclear at what level these populations are regulated, and how regulation varies among hosts within natural populations. We measured the titer of the endosymbiont Buchnera aphidicola from different clones of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, and found significant variation in titer, measured as Buchnera genomes per aphid genome, among aphid clones. Additionally, we found that titer can change with the age of the host, and that the number of bacteriocytes within an aphid is one factor likely controlling Buchnera titer. Buchnera titer measurements in clones from a sexual cross indicate that the symbiont genotype is not responsible for variation in titer and that this phenotype is likely non-heritable across sexual reproduction. Symbiont titer is more variable among lab-produced F₁ aphid clones than among field-collected ones, suggesting that intermediate titer is favored in natural populations. Potentially, a low heritability of titer during the sexual phase may generate clones with extreme and maladaptive titers each season. PMID:26467737

  3. Filarial and Wolbachia genomics.

    PubMed

    Scott, A L; Ghedin, E; Nutman, T B; McReynolds, L A; Poole, C B; Slatko, B E; Foster, J M

    2012-01-01

    Filarial nematode parasites, the causative agents for a spectrum of acute and chronic diseases including lymphatic filariasis and river blindness, threaten the well-being and livelihood of hundreds of millions of people in the developing regions of the world. The 2007 publication on a draft assembly of the 95-Mb genome of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi- representing the first helminth parasite genome to be sequenced - has been followed in rapid succession by projects that have resulted in the genome sequencing of six additional filarial species, seven nonfilarial nematode parasites of animals and nearly 30 plant parasitic and free-living species. Parallel to the genomic sequencing, transcriptomic and proteomic projects have facilitated genome annotation, expanded our understanding of stage-associated gene expression and provided a first look at the role of epigenetic regulation of filarial genomes through microRNAs. The expansion in filarial genomics will also provide a significant enrichment in our knowledge of the diversity and variability in the genomes of the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia leading to a better understanding of the genetic principles that govern filarial-Wolbachia mutualism. The goal here is to provide an overview of the trends and advances in filarial and Wolbachia genomics. PMID:22098559

  4. Fungal Genomics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-12

    The JGI Fungal Genomics Program aims to scale up sequencing and analysis of fungal genomes to explore the diversity of fungi important for energy and the environment, and to promote functional studies on a system level. Combining new sequencing technologies and comparative genomics tools, JGI is now leading the world in fungal genome sequencing and analysis. Over 120 sequenced fungal genomes with analytical tools are available via MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a web-portal for fungal biologists. Our model of interacting with user communities, unique among other sequencing centers, helps organize these communities, improves genome annotation and analysis work, and facilitates new larger-scale genomic projects. This resulted in 20 high-profile papers published in 2011 alone and contributing to the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, which targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts). Our next grand challenges include larger scale exploration of fungal diversity (1000 fungal genomes), developing molecular tools for DOE-relevant model organisms, and analysis of complex systems and metagenomes.

  5. Genomics of Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Holger; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Chapeton-Montes, Diana; Plourde, Lucile; Speck, Denis; Popoff, Michel R

    2015-05-01

    Genomic information about Clostridium tetani, the causative agent of the tetanus disease, is scarce. The genome of strain E88, a strain used in vaccine production, was sequenced about 10 years ago. One additional genome (strain 12124569) has recently been released. Here we report three new genomes of C. tetani and describe major differences among all five C. tetani genomes. They all harbor tetanus-toxin-encoding plasmids that contain highly conserved genes for TeNT (tetanus toxin), TetR (transcriptional regulator of TeNT) and ColT (collagenase), but substantially differ in other plasmid regions. The chromosomes share a large core genome that contains about 85% of all genes of a given chromosome. The non-core chromosome comprises mainly prophage-like genomic regions and genes encoding environmental interaction and defense functions (e.g. surface proteins, restriction-modification systems, toxin-antitoxin systems, CRISPR/Cas systems) and other fitness functions (e.g. transport systems, metabolic activities). This new genome information will help to assess the level of genome plasticity of the species C. tetani and provide the basis for detailed comparative studies. PMID:25638019

  6. Between two fern genomes.

    PubMed

    Sessa, Emily B; Banks, Jo Ann; Barker, Michael S; Der, Joshua P; Duffy, Aaron M; Graham, Sean W; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Langdale, Jane; Li, Fay-Wei; Marchant, D Blaine; Pryer, Kathleen M; Rothfels, Carl J; Roux, Stanley J; Salmi, Mari L; Sigel, Erin M; Soltis, Douglas E; Soltis, Pamela S; Stevenson, Dennis W; Wolf, Paul G

    2014-01-01

    Ferns are the only major lineage of vascular plants not represented by a sequenced nuclear genome. This lack of genome sequence information significantly impedes our ability to understand and reconstruct genome evolution not only in ferns, but across all land plants. Azolla and Ceratopteris are ideal and complementary candidates to be the first ferns to have their nuclear genomes sequenced. They differ dramatically in genome size, life history, and habit, and thus represent the immense diversity of extant ferns. Together, this pair of genomes will facilitate myriad large-scale comparative analyses across ferns and all land plants. Here we review the unique biological characteristics of ferns and describe a number of outstanding questions in plant biology that will benefit from the addition of ferns to the set of taxa with sequenced nuclear genomes. We explain why the fern clade is pivotal for understanding genome evolution across land plants, and we provide a rationale for how knowledge of fern genomes will enable progress in research beyond the ferns themselves. PMID:25324969

  7. [Landscape and ecological genomics].

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    Landscape genomics is the modern version of landscape genetics, a discipline that arose approximately 10 years ago as a combination of population genetics, landscape ecology, and spatial statistics. It studies the effects of environmental variables on gene flow and other microevolutionary processes that determine genetic connectivity and variations in populations. In contrast to population genetics, it operates at the level of individual specimens rather than at the level of population samples. Another important difference between landscape genetics and genomics and population genetics is that, in the former, the analysis of gene flow and local adaptations takes quantitative account of landforms and features of the matrix, i.e., hostile spaces that separate species habitats. Landscape genomics is a part of population ecogenomics, which, along with community genomics, is a major part of ecological genomics. One of the principal purposes of landscape genomics is the identification and differentiation of various genome-wide and locus-specific effects. The approaches and computation tools developed for combined analysis of genomic and landscape variables make it possible to detect adaptation-related genome fragments, which facilitates the planning of conservation efforts and the prediction of species' fate in response to expected changes in the environment. PMID:25508669

  8. [Landscape and ecological genomics].

    PubMed

    Tetushkin, E Ia

    2013-10-01

    Landscape genomics is the modern version of landscape genetics, a discipline that arose approximately 10 years ago as a combination of population genetics, landscape ecology, and spatial statistics. It studies the effects of environmental variables on gene flow and other microevolutionary processes that determine genetic connectivity and variations in populations. In contrast to population genetics, it operates at the level of individual specimens rather than at the level of population samples. Another important difference between landscape genetics and genomics and population genetics is that, in the former, the analysis of gene flow and local adaptations takes quantitative account of landforms and features of the matrix, i.e., hostile spaces that separate species habitats. Landscape genomics is a part of population ecogenomics, which, along with community genomics, is a major part of ecological genomics. One of the principal purposes of landscape genomics is the identification and differentiation of various genome-wide and locus-specific effects. The approaches and computation tools developed for combined analysis of genomic and landscape variables make it possible to detect adaptation-related genome fragments, which facilitates the planning of conservation efforts and the prediction of species' fate in response to expected changes in the environment. PMID:25474890

  9. Between Two Fern Genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ferns are the only major lineage of vascular plants not represented by a sequenced nuclear genome. This lack of genome sequence information significantly impedes our ability to understand and reconstruct genome evolution not only in ferns, but across all land plants. Azolla and Ceratopteris are ideal and complementary candidates to be the first ferns to have their nuclear genomes sequenced. They differ dramatically in genome size, life history, and habit, and thus represent the immense diversity of extant ferns. Together, this pair of genomes will facilitate myriad large-scale comparative analyses across ferns and all land plants. Here we review the unique biological characteristics of ferns and describe a number of outstanding questions in plant biology that will benefit from the addition of ferns to the set of taxa with sequenced nuclear genomes. We explain why the fern clade is pivotal for understanding genome evolution across land plants, and we provide a rationale for how knowledge of fern genomes will enable progress in research beyond the ferns themselves. PMID:25324969

  10. Genomics of Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This edited book represents the 23rd symposium in the Stadler Genetics Symposia series, and the general theme of this conference was "The Genomics of Disease." The 24 national and international speakers were invited to discuss their world-class research into the advances that genomics has made on c...

  11. Genomics for Weed Science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous genomic-based studies have provided insight to the physiological and evolutionary processes involved in developmental and environmental processes of model plants such as arabidopsis and rice. However, far fewer efforts have been attempted to use genomic resources to study physiological and ...

  12. Unlocking the bovine genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The draft genome sequence of cattle (Bos taurus) has now been analyzed by the Bovine Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium and the Bovine HapMap Consortium, which together represent an extensive collaboration involving more than 300 scientists from 25 different countries. ...

  13. Genetics and Genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Good progress is being made on genetics and genomics of sugar beet, however it is in process and the tools are now being generated and some results are being analyzed. The GABI BeetSeq project released a first draft of the sugar beet genome of KWS2320, a dihaploid (see http://bvseq.molgen.mpg.de/Gen...

  14. Development of Genomic GMACE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of genomics to enhance national genetic evaluation systems of dairy cattle is quickly becoming standard practice. The current MACE procedure used by Interbull may not accommodate these new “genomically-enhanced” national evaluations. An important assumption in MACE may no longer be valid in ...

  15. GENOME OF HORSEPOX VIRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we present the genomic sequence of horsepox virus (HSPV) isolate MNR-76, an orthopoxvirus (OPV) isolated in 1976 from diseased Mongolian horses. The 212 kbp genome contained 7.5 kbp inverted terminal repeats (ITR) and lacked extensive terminal tandem repetition. HSPV contained 236 ORFs with sim...

  16. Genomic Instability and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yixin; Dai, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Genomic instability is a characteristic of most cancer cells. It is an increased tendency of genome alteration during cell division. Cancer frequently results from damage to multiple genes controlling cell division and tumor suppressors. It is known that genomic integrity is closely monitored by several surveillance mechanisms, DNA damage checkpoint, DNA repair machinery and mitotic checkpoint. A defect in the regulation of any of these mechanisms often results in genomic instability, which predisposes the cell to malignant transformation. Posttranslational modifications of the histone tails are closely associated with regulation of the cell cycle as well as chromatin structure. Nevertheless, DNA methylation status is also related to genomic integrity. We attempt to summarize recent developments in this field and discuss the debate of driving force of tumor initiation and progression. PMID:25541596

  17. Microbial Genomes Multiply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    2002-01-01

    The publication of the first complete sequence of a bacterial genome in 1995 was a signal event, underscored by the fact that the article has been cited more than 2,100 times during the intervening seven years. It was a marvelous technical achievement, made possible by automatic DNA-sequencing machines. The feat is the more impressive in that complete genome sequencing has now been adopted in many different laboratories around the world. Four years ago in these columns I examined the situation after a dozen microbial genomes had been completed. Now, with upwards of 60 microbial genome sequences determined and twice that many in progress, it seems reasonable to assess just what is being learned. Are new concepts emerging about how cells work? Have there been practical benefits in the fields of medicine and agriculture? Is it feasible to determine the genomic sequence of every bacterial species on Earth? The answers to these questions maybe Yes, Perhaps, and No, respectively.

  18. Phytozome Comparative Plant Genomics Portal

    SciTech Connect

    Goodstein, David; Batra, Sajeev; Carlson, Joseph; Hayes, Richard; Phillips, Jeremy; Shu, Shengqiang; Schmutz, Jeremy; Rokhsar, Daniel

    2014-09-09

    The Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Institute is a genomics user facility supporting DOE mission science in the areas of Bioenergy, Carbon Cycling, and Biogeochemistry. The Plant Program at the JGI applies genomic, analytical, computational and informatics platforms and methods to: 1. Understand and accelerate the improvement (domestication) of bioenergy crops 2. Characterize and moderate plant response to climate change 3. Use comparative genomics to identify constrained elements and infer gene function 4. Build high quality genomic resource platforms of JGI Plant Flagship genomes for functional and experimental work 5. Expand functional genomic resources for Plant Flagship genomes

  19. Genome size evolution: sizing mammalian genomes.

    PubMed

    Redi, C A; Capanna, E

    2012-01-01

    The study of genome size (GS) and its variation is so fascinating to the scientific community because it constitutes the link between the present-day analytical and molecular studies of the genome and the old trunk of the holistic and synthetic view of the genome. The GS of several taxa vary over a broad range and do not correlate with the complexity of the organisms (the C-value paradox). However, the biology of transposable elements has let us reach a satisfactory view of the molecular mechanisms that give rise to GS variation and novelties, providing a less perplexing view of the significance of the GS (C-enigma). The knowledge of the composition and structure of a genome is a pre-requisite for trying to understand the evolution of the main genome signature: its size. The radiation of mammals provides an approximately 180-million-year test case for theories of how GS evolves. It has been found from data-mining GS databases that GS is a useful cyto-taxonomical instrument at the level of orders/superorders, providing genomic signatures characterizing Monotremata, Marsupialia, Afrotheria, Xenarthra, Laurasiatheria, and Euarchontoglires. A hypothetical ancestral mammalian-like GS of 2.9-3.7 pg has been suggested. This value appears compatible with the average values calculated for the high systematic levels of the extant Monotremata (∼2.97 pg) and Marsupialia (∼4.07 pg), suggesting invasion of mobile DNA elements concurrently with the separation of the older clades of Afrotheria (∼5.5 pg) and Xenarthra (∼4.5 pg) with larger GS, leaving the Euarchontoglires (∼3.4 pg) and Laurasiatheria (∼2.8 pg) genomes with fewer transposable elements. However, the paucity of GS data (546 mammalian species sized from 5,488 living species) for species, genera, and families calls for caution. Considering that mammalian species may be vanished even before they are known, GS data are sorely needed to phenotype the effects brought about by their variation and to validate any

  20. Evolution of genome architecture.

    PubMed

    Koonin, Eugene V

    2009-02-01

    Charles Darwin believed that all traits of organisms have been honed to near perfection by natural selection. The empirical basis underlying Darwin's conclusions consisted of numerous observations made by him and other naturalists on the exquisite adaptations of animals and plants to their natural habitats and on the impressive results of artificial selection. Darwin fully appreciated the importance of heredity but was unaware of the nature and, in fact, the very existence of genomes. A century and a half after the publication of the "Origin", we have the opportunity to draw conclusions from the comparisons of hundreds of genome sequences from all walks of life. These comparisons suggest that the dominant mode of genome evolution is quite different from that of the phenotypic evolution. The genomes of vertebrates, those purported paragons of biological perfection, turned out to be veritable junkyards of selfish genetic elements where only a small fraction of the genetic material is dedicated to encoding biologically relevant information. In sharp contrast, genomes of microbes and viruses are incomparably more compact, with most of the genetic material assigned to distinct biological functions. However, even in these genomes, the specific genome organization (gene order) is poorly conserved. The results of comparative genomics lead to the conclusion that the genome architecture is not a straightforward result of continuous adaptation but rather is determined by the balance between the selection pressure, that is itself dependent on the effective population size and mutation rate, the level of recombination, and the activity of selfish elements. Although genes and, in many cases, multigene regions of genomes possess elaborate architectures that ensure regulation of expression, these arrangements are evolutionarily volatile and typically change substantially even on short evolutionary scales when gene sequences diverge minimally. Thus, the observed genome

  1. The Banana Genome Hub

    PubMed Central

    Droc, Gaëtan; Larivière, Delphine; Guignon, Valentin; Yahiaoui, Nabila; This, Dominique; Garsmeur, Olivier; Dereeper, Alexis; Hamelin, Chantal; Argout, Xavier; Dufayard, Jean-François; Lengelle, Juliette; Baurens, Franc-Christophe; Cenci, Alberto; Pitollat, Bertrand; D’Hont, Angélique; Ruiz, Manuel; Rouard, Mathieu; Bocs, Stéphanie

    2013-01-01

    Banana is one of the world’s favorite fruits and one of the most important crops for developing countries. The banana reference genome sequence (Musa acuminata) was recently released. Given the taxonomic position of Musa, the completed genomic sequence has particular comparative value to provide fresh insights about the evolution of the monocotyledons. The study of the banana genome has been enhanced by a number of tools and resources that allows harnessing its sequence. First, we set up essential tools such as a Community Annotation System, phylogenomics resources and metabolic pathways. Then, to support post-genomic efforts, we improved banana existing systems (e.g. web front end, query builder), we integrated available Musa data into generic systems (e.g. markers and genetic maps, synteny blocks), we have made interoperable with the banana hub, other existing systems containing Musa data (e.g. transcriptomics, rice reference genome, workflow manager) and finally, we generated new results from sequence analyses (e.g. SNP and polymorphism analysis). Several uses cases illustrate how the Banana Genome Hub can be used to study gene families. Overall, with this collaborative effort, we discuss the importance of the interoperability toward data integration between existing information systems. Database URL: http://banana-genome.cirad.fr/ PMID:23707967

  2. Genomic Insights into Bifidobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Hoon; O'Sullivan, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Since the discovery in 1899 of bifidobacteria as numerically dominant microbes in the feces of breast-fed infants, there have been numerous studies addressing their role in modulating gut microflora as well as their other potential health benefits. Because of this, they are frequently incorporated into foods as probiotic cultures. An understanding of their full interactions with intestinal microbes and the host is needed to scientifically validate any health benefits they may afford. Recently, the genome sequences of nine strains representing four species of Bifidobacterium became available. A comparative genome analysis of these genomes reveals a likely efficient capacity to adapt to their habitats, with B. longum subsp. infantis exhibiting more genomic potential to utilize human milk oligosaccharides, consistent with its habitat in the infant gut. Conversely, B. longum subsp. longum exhibits a higher genomic potential for utilization of plant-derived complex carbohydrates and polyols, consistent with its habitat in an adult gut. An intriguing observation is the loss of much of this genome potential when strains are adapted to pure culture environments, as highlighted by the genomes of B. animalis subsp. lactis strains, which exhibit the least potential for a gut habitat and are believed to have evolved from the B. animalis species during adaptation to dairy fermentation environments. PMID:20805404

  3. Ensembl comparative genomics resources

    PubMed Central

    Muffato, Matthieu; Beal, Kathryn; Fitzgerald, Stephen; Gordon, Leo; Pignatelli, Miguel; Vilella, Albert J.; Searle, Stephen M. J.; Amode, Ridwan; Brent, Simon; Spooner, William; Kulesha, Eugene; Yates, Andrew; Flicek, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Evolution provides the unifying framework with which to understand biology. The coherent investigation of genic and genomic data often requires comparative genomics analyses based on whole-genome alignments, sets of homologous genes and other relevant datasets in order to evaluate and answer evolutionary-related questions. However, the complexity and computational requirements of producing such data are substantial: this has led to only a small number of reference resources that are used for most comparative analyses. The Ensembl comparative genomics resources are one such reference set that facilitates comprehensive and reproducible analysis of chordate genome data. Ensembl computes pairwise and multiple whole-genome alignments from which large-scale synteny, per-base conservation scores and constrained elements are obtained. Gene alignments are used to define Ensembl Protein Families, GeneTrees and homologies for both protein-coding and non-coding RNA genes. These resources are updated frequently and have a consistent informatics infrastructure and data presentation across all supported species. Specialized web-based visualizations are also available including synteny displays, collapsible gene tree plots, a gene family locator and different alignment views. The Ensembl comparative genomics infrastructure is extensively reused for the analysis of non-vertebrate species by other projects including Ensembl Genomes and Gramene and much of the information here is relevant to these projects. The consistency of the annotation across species and the focus on vertebrates makes Ensembl an ideal system to perform and support vertebrate comparative genomic analyses. We use robust software and pipelines to produce reference comparative data and make it freely available. Database URL: http://www.ensembl.org. PMID:26896847

  4. Genome instability and aging.

    PubMed

    Vijg, Jan; Suh, Yousin

    2013-01-01

    Genome instability has long been implicated as the main causal factor in aging. Somatic cells are continuously exposed to various sources of DNA damage, from reactive oxygen species to UV radiation to environmental mutagens. To cope with the tens of thousands of chemical lesions introduced into the genome of a typical cell each day, a complex network of genome maintenance systems acts to remove damage and restore the correct base pair sequence. Occasionally, however, repair is erroneous, and such errors, as well as the occasional failure to correctly replicate the genome during cell division, are the basis for mutations and epimutations. There is now ample evidence that mutations accumulate in various organs and tissues of higher animals, including humans, mice, and flies. What is not known, however, is whether the frequency of these random changes is sufficient to cause the phenotypic effects generally associated with aging. The exception is cancer, an age-related disease caused by the accumulation of mutations and epimutations. Here, we first review current concepts regarding the relationship between DNA damage, repair, and mutation, as well as the data regarding genome alterations as a function of age. We then describe a model for how randomly induced DNA sequence and epigenomic variants in the somatic genomes of animals can result in functional decline and disease in old age. Finally, we discuss the genetics of genome instability in relation to longevity to address the importance of alterations in the somatic genome as a causal factor in aging and to underscore the opportunities provided by genetic approaches to develop interventions that attenuate genome instability, reduce disease risk, and increase life span. PMID:23398157

  5. Ensembl comparative genomics resources.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Javier; Muffato, Matthieu; Beal, Kathryn; Fitzgerald, Stephen; Gordon, Leo; Pignatelli, Miguel; Vilella, Albert J; Searle, Stephen M J; Amode, Ridwan; Brent, Simon; Spooner, William; Kulesha, Eugene; Yates, Andrew; Flicek, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Evolution provides the unifying framework with which to understand biology. The coherent investigation of genic and genomic data often requires comparative genomics analyses based on whole-genome alignments, sets of homologous genes and other relevant datasets in order to evaluate and answer evolutionary-related questions. However, the complexity and computational requirements of producing such data are substantial: this has led to only a small number of reference resources that are used for most comparative analyses. The Ensembl comparative genomics resources are one such reference set that facilitates comprehensive and reproducible analysis of chordate genome data. Ensembl computes pairwise and multiple whole-genome alignments from which large-scale synteny, per-base conservation scores and constrained elements are obtained. Gene alignments are used to define Ensembl Protein Families, GeneTrees and homologies for both protein-coding and non-coding RNA genes. These resources are updated frequently and have a consistent informatics infrastructure and data presentation across all supported species. Specialized web-based visualizations are also available including synteny displays, collapsible gene tree plots, a gene family locator and different alignment views. The Ensembl comparative genomics infrastructure is extensively reused for the analysis of non-vertebrate species by other projects including Ensembl Genomes and Gramene and much of the information here is relevant to these projects. The consistency of the annotation across species and the focus on vertebrates makes Ensembl an ideal system to perform and support vertebrate comparative genomic analyses. We use robust software and pipelines to produce reference comparative data and make it freely available. Database URL: http://www.ensembl.org. PMID:26896847

  6. Center for Cancer Genomics | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Cancer Genomics (CCG) was established to unify the National Cancer Institute's activities in cancer genomics, with the goal of advancing genomics research and translating findings into the clinic to improve the precise diagnosis and treatment of cancers. In addition to promoting genomic sequencing approach

  7. Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect

    Block, S.; Cornwall, J.; Dally, W.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Joyce, G.; Kimble, H. J.; Lewis, N.; Max, C.; Prince, T.; Schwitters, R.; Weinberger, P.; Woodin, W. H.

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  8. Genomic taxonomy of vibrios

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Cristiane C; Vicente, Ana Carolina P; Souza, Rangel C; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R; Vesth, Tammi; Alves, Nelson; Ussery, David W; Iida, Tetsuya; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2009-01-01

    Background Vibrio taxonomy has been based on a polyphasic approach. In this study, we retrieve useful taxonomic information (i.e. data that can be used to distinguish different taxonomic levels, such as species and genera) from 32 genome sequences of different vibrio species. We use a variety of tools to explore the taxonomic relationship between the sequenced genomes, including Multilocus Sequence Analysis (MLSA), supertrees, Average Amino Acid Identity (AAI), genomic signatures, and Genome BLAST atlases. Our aim is to analyse the usefulness of these tools for species identification in vibrios. Results We have generated four new genome sequences of three Vibrio species, i.e., V. alginolyticus 40B, V. harveyi-like 1DA3, and V. mimicus strains VM573 and VM603, and present a broad analyses of these genomes along with other sequenced Vibrio species. The genome atlas and pangenome plots provide a tantalizing image of the genomic differences that occur between closely related sister species, e.g. V. cholerae and V. mimicus. The vibrio pangenome contains around 26504 genes. The V. cholerae core genome and pangenome consist of 1520 and 6923 genes, respectively. Pangenomes might allow different strains of V. cholerae to occupy different niches. MLSA and supertree analyses resulted in a similar phylogenetic picture, with a clear distinction of four groups (Vibrio core group, V. cholerae-V. mimicus, Aliivibrio spp., and Photobacterium spp.). A Vibrio species is defined as a group of strains that share > 95% DNA identity in MLSA and supertree analysis, > 96% AAI, ≤ 10 genome signature dissimilarity, and > 61% proteome identity. Strains of the same species and species of the same genus will form monophyletic groups on the basis of MLSA and supertree. Conclusion The combination of different analytical and bioinformatics tools will enable the most accurate species identification through genomic computational analysis. This endeavour will culminate in the birth of the online

  9. Human Genome Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The DOE Human Genome program has grown tremendously, as shown by the marked increase in the number of genome-funded projects since the last workshop held in 1991. The abstracts in this book describe the genome research of DOE-funded grantees and contractors and invited guests, and all projects are represented at the workshop by posters. The 3-day meeting includes plenary sessions on ethical, legal, and social issues pertaining to the availability of genetic data; sequencing techniques, informatics support; and chromosome and cDNA mapping and sequencing.

  10. What Is a Genome?

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Aaron David; Landweber, Laura F.

    2016-01-01

    The genome is often described as the information repository of an organism. Whether millions or billions of letters of DNA, its transmission across generations confers the principal medium for inheritance of organismal traits. Several emerging areas of research demonstrate that this definition is an oversimplification. Here, we explore ways in which a deeper understanding of genomic diversity and cell physiology is challenging the concepts of physical permanence attached to the genome as well as its role as the sole information source for an organism. PMID:27442251

  11. Comparative primate genomics: emerging patterns of genome content and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jeffrey; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Preface Advances in genome sequencing technologies have created new opportunities for comparative primate genomics. Genome assemblies have been published for several primates, with analyses of several others underway. Whole genome assemblies for the great apes provide remarkable new information about the evolutionary origins of the human genome and the processes involved. Genomic data for macaques and other nonhuman primates provide valuable insight into genetic similarities and differences among species used as models for disease-related research. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding primate genome content and dynamics and offers a series of goals for the near future. PMID:24709753

  12. Comparative primate genomics: emerging patterns of genome content and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jeffrey; Gibbs, Richard A

    2014-05-01

    Advances in genome sequencing technologies have created new opportunities for comparative primate genomics. Genome assemblies have been published for various primate species, and analyses of several others are underway. Whole-genome assemblies for the great apes provide remarkable new information about the evolutionary origins of the human genome and the processes involved. Genomic data for macaques and other non-human primates offer valuable insights into genetic similarities and differences among species that are used as models for disease-related research. This Review summarizes current knowledge regarding primate genome content and dynamics, and proposes a series of goals for the near future. PMID:24709753

  13. GenomeView: a next-generation genome browser

    PubMed Central

    Abeel, Thomas; Van Parys, Thomas; Saeys, Yvan; Galagan, James; Van de Peer, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Due to ongoing advances in sequencing technologies, billions of nucleotide sequences are now produced on a daily basis. A major challenge is to visualize these data for further downstream analysis. To this end, we present GenomeView, a stand-alone genome browser specifically designed to visualize and manipulate a multitude of genomics data. GenomeView enables users to dynamically browse high volumes of aligned short-read data, with dynamic navigation and semantic zooming, from the whole genome level to the single nucleotide. At the same time, the tool enables visualization of whole genome alignments of dozens of genomes relative to a reference sequence. GenomeView is unique in its capability to interactively handle huge data sets consisting of tens of aligned genomes, thousands of annotation features and millions of mapped short reads both as viewer and editor. GenomeView is freely available as an open source software package. PMID:22102585

  14. Hymenoptera Genome Database: integrating genome annotations in HymenopteraMine

    PubMed Central

    Elsik, Christine G.; Tayal, Aditi; Diesh, Colin M.; Unni, Deepak R.; Emery, Marianne L.; Nguyen, Hung N.; Hagen, Darren E.

    2016-01-01

    We report an update of the Hymenoptera Genome Database (HGD) (http://HymenopteraGenome.org), a model organism database for insect species of the order Hymenoptera (ants, bees and wasps). HGD maintains genomic data for 9 bee species, 10 ant species and 1 wasp, including the versions of genome and annotation data sets published by the genome sequencing consortiums and those provided by NCBI. A new data-mining warehouse, HymenopteraMine, based on the InterMine data warehousing system, integrates the genome data with data from external sources and facilitates cross-species analyses based on orthology. New genome browsers and annotation tools based on JBrowse/WebApollo provide easy genome navigation, and viewing of high throughput sequence data sets and can be used for collaborative genome annotation. All of the genomes and annotation data sets are combined into a single BLAST server that allows users to select and combine sequence data sets to search. PMID:26578564

  15. Hymenoptera Genome Database: integrating genome annotations in HymenopteraMine.

    PubMed

    Elsik, Christine G; Tayal, Aditi; Diesh, Colin M; Unni, Deepak R; Emery, Marianne L; Nguyen, Hung N; Hagen, Darren E

    2016-01-01

    We report an update of the Hymenoptera Genome Database (HGD) (http://HymenopteraGenome.org), a model organism database for insect species of the order Hymenoptera (ants, bees and wasps). HGD maintains genomic data for 9 bee species, 10 ant species and 1 wasp, including the versions of genome and annotation data sets published by the genome sequencing consortiums and those provided by NCBI. A new data-mining warehouse, HymenopteraMine, based on the InterMine data warehousing system, integrates the genome data with data from external sources and facilitates cross-species analyses based on orthology. New genome browsers and annotation tools based on JBrowse/WebApollo provide easy genome navigation, and viewing of high throughput sequence data sets and can be used for collaborative genome annotation. All of the genomes and annotation data sets are combined into a single BLAST server that allows users to select and combine sequence data sets to search. PMID:26578564

  16. New Cyt-like δ-endotoxins from Dickeya dadantii: structure and aphicidal activity.

    PubMed

    Loth, Karine; Costechareyre, Denis; Effantin, Géraldine; Rahbé, Yvan; Condemine, Guy; Landon, Céline; da Silva, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    In the track of new biopesticides, four genes namely cytA, cytB, cytC and cytD encoding proteins homologous to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cyt toxins have been identified in the plant pathogenic bacteria Dickeya dadantii genome. Here we show that three Cyt-like δ-endotoxins from D. dadantii (CytA, CytB and CytC) are toxic to the pathogen of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum in terms of both mortality and growth rate. The phylogenetic analysis of the comprehensive set of Cyt toxins available in genomic databases shows that the whole family is of limited taxonomic occurrence, though in quite diverse microbial taxa. From a structure-function perspective the 3D structure of CytC and its backbone dynamics in solution have been determined by NMR. CytC adopts a cytolysin fold, structurally classified as a Cyt2-like protein. Moreover, the identification of a putative lipid binding pocket in CytC structure, which has been probably maintained in most members of the Cyt-toxin family, could support the importance of this lipid binding cavity for the mechanism of action of the whole family. This integrative approach provided significant insights into the evolutionary and functional history of D. dadantii Cyt toxins, which appears to be interesting leads for biopesticides. PMID:25740111

  17. The X Chromosome of Hemipteran Insects: Conservation, Dosage Compensation and Sex-Biased Expression

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Arka; Vicoso, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Insects of the order Hemiptera (true bugs) use a wide range of mechanisms of sex determination, including genetic sex determination, paternal genome elimination, and haplodiploidy. Genetic sex determination, the prevalent mode, is generally controlled by a pair of XY sex chromosomes or by an XX/X0 system, but different configurations that include additional sex chromosomes are also present. Although this diversity of sex determining systems has been extensively studied at the cytogenetic level, only the X chromosome of the model pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum has been analyzed at the genomic level, and little is known about X chromosome biology in the rest of the order. In this study, we take advantage of published DNA- and RNA-seq data from three additional Hemiptera species to perform a comparative analysis of the gene content and expression of the X chromosome throughout this clade. We find that, despite showing evidence of dosage compensation, the X chromosomes of these species show female-biased expression, and a deficit of male-biased genes, in direct contrast to the pea aphid X. We further detect an excess of shared gene content between these very distant species, suggesting that despite the diversity of sex determining systems, the same chromosomal element is used as the X throughout a large portion of the order. PMID:26556591

  18. The X Chromosome of Hemipteran Insects: Conservation, Dosage Compensation and Sex-Biased Expression.

    PubMed

    Pal, Arka; Vicoso, Beatriz

    2015-12-01

    Insects of the order Hemiptera (true bugs) use a wide range of mechanisms of sex determination, including genetic sex determination, paternal genome elimination, and haplodiploidy. Genetic sex determination, the prevalent mode, is generally controlled by a pair of XY sex chromosomes or by an XX/X0 system, but different configurations that include additional sex chromosomes are also present. Although this diversity of sex determining systems has been extensively studied at the cytogenetic level, only the X chromosome of the model pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum has been analyzed at the genomic level, and little is known about X chromosome biology in the rest of the order.In this study, we take advantage of published DNA- and RNA-seq data from three additional Hemiptera species to perform a comparative analysis of the gene content and expression of the X chromosome throughout this clade. We find that, despite showing evidence of dosage compensation, the X chromosomes of these species show female-biased expression, and a deficit of male-biased genes, in direct contrast to the pea aphid X. We further detect an excess of shared gene content between these very distant species, suggesting that despite the diversity of sex determining systems, the same chromosomal element is used as the X throughout a large portion of the order. PMID:26556591

  19. Vita Genomics, Inc.

    PubMed

    Shih-Hsin Wu, Lawrence; Su, Chun-Lin; Chen, Ellson

    2007-06-01

    Vita Genomics, Inc., centered in Taiwan and China, aims to be a premier genomics-based biotechnological and biopharmaceutical company in the Asia-Pacific region. The company focuses on conducting pharmacogenomics research, in vitro diagnosis product development and specialty contract research services in both genomics and pharmacogenomics fields. We are now initiating a drug rescue program designed to resurrect drugs that have failed in the previous clinical trials owing to low efficacies. This program applies pharmacogenomics approaches using biomarkers to screen subsets of patients who may respond better or avoid adverse responses to the test drugs. Vita Genomics, Inc. has envisioned itself as an important player in the healthcare industry offering advanced molecular diagnostic products and services, revolutionizing thedrug-development process and providing pharmacogenomic solutions. PMID:17559355

  20. Lophotrochozoan mitochondrial genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Valles, Yvonne; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-10-01

    Progress in both molecular techniques and phylogeneticmethods has challenged many of the interpretations of traditionaltaxonomy. One example is in the recognition of the animal superphylumLophotrochozoa (annelids, mollusks, echiurans, platyhelminthes,brachiopods, and other phyla), although the relationships within thisgroup and the inclusion of some phyla remain uncertain. While much ofthis progress in phylogenetic reconstruction has been based on comparingsingle gene sequences, we are beginning to see the potential of comparinglarge-scale features of genomes, such as the relative order of genes.Even though tremendous progress is being made on the sequencedetermination of whole nuclear genomes, the dataset of choice forgenome-level characters for many animals across a broad taxonomic rangeremains mitochondrial genomes. We review here what is known aboutmitochondrial genomes of the lophotrochozoans and discuss the promisethat this dataset will enable insight into theirrelationships.

  1. Androgen receptor genomic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hong-Jian; Kim, Jung

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR) is not only critical for the normal development and function of the prostate but also pivotal to the onset and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). The studies of AR transcriptional regulation were previously limited to a handful of AR-target genes. Owing to the development of various high-throughput genomic technologies, significant advances have been made in recent years. Here we discuss the discoveries of genome-wide androgen-regulated genes in PCa cell lines, animal models and tissues using expression microarray and sequencing, the mapping of genomic landscapes of AR using Combining Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip and ChIP-seq assays, the interplay of transcriptional cofactors in defining AR binding profiles, and the genomic regulation and AR reprogramming in advanced PCa. PMID:25237629

  2. Mouse genome database 2016

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  3. The genomics of adaptation.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Jacek; Babik, Wiesław

    2012-12-22

    The amount and nature of genetic variation available to natural selection affect the rate, course and outcome of evolution. Consequently, the study of the genetic basis of adaptive evolutionary change has occupied biologists for decades, but progress has been hampered by the lack of resolution and the absence of a genome-level perspective. Technological advances in recent years should now allow us to answer many long-standing questions about the nature of adaptation. The data gathered so far are beginning to challenge some widespread views of the way in which natural selection operates at the genomic level. Papers in this Special Feature of Proceedings of the Royal Society B illustrate various aspects of the broad field of adaptation genomics. This introductory article sets up a context and, on the basis of a few selected examples, discusses how genomic data can advance our understanding of the process of adaptation. PMID:23097510

  4. Genomics and vaccine development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic-based approaches are driving fundamental changes in our understanding of microbiology. Comparative analysis of microbial strain is providing new insights into pathogen evolution, virulence mechanisms, and host range specificity. Most importantly, gene discovery and genetic variations can now...

  5. Platyzoan mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Wey-Fabrizius, Alexandra R; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Herlyn, Holger; Hankeln, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Platyzoa is a putative lophotrochozoan (spiralian) subtaxon within the protostome clade of Metazoa, comprising a range of biologically diverse, mostly small worm-shaped animals. The monophyly of Platyzoa, the relationships between the putative subgroups Platyhelminthes, Gastrotricha and Gnathifera (the latter comprising at least Gnathostomulida, "Rotifera" and Acanthocephala) as well as some aspects of the internal phylogenies of these subgroups are highly debated. Here we review how complete mitochondrial (mt) genome data contribute to these debates. We highlight special features of the mt genomes and discuss problems in mtDNA phylogenies of the clade. Mitochondrial genome data seem to be insufficient to resolve the position of the platyzoan clade within the Spiralia but can help to address internal phylogenetic questions. The present review includes a tabular survey of all published platyzoan mt genomes. PMID:23274056

  6. Mouse genome database 2016.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  7. The rise of genomics.

    PubMed

    Weissenbach, Jean

    2016-01-01

    A brief history of the development of genomics is provided. Complete sequencing of genomes of uni- and multicellular organisms is based on important progress in sequencing and bioinformatics. Evolution of these methods is ongoing and has triggered an explosion in data production and analysis. Initial analyses focused on the inventory of genes encoding proteins. Completeness and quality of gene prediction remains crucial. Genome analyses profoundly modified our views on evolution, biodiversity and contributed to the detection of new functions, yet to be fully elucidated, such as those fulfilled by non-coding RNAs. Genomics has become the basis for the study of biology and provides the molecular support for a bunch of large-scale studies, the omics. PMID:27263360

  8. Epidemiology & Genomics Research Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, in the National Cancer Institute's Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, funds research in human populations to understand the determinants of cancer occurrence and outcomes.

  9. Genomic definition of species

    SciTech Connect

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1991-07-01

    The subject of this paper is the definition of species based on the assumption that genome is the fundamental level for the origin and maintenance of biological diversity. For this view to be logically consistent it is necessary to assume the existence and operation of the new law which we call genome law. For this reason the genome law is included in the explanation of species phenomenon presented here even if its precise formulation and elaboration are left for the future. The intellectual underpinnings of this definition can be traced to Goldschmidt. We wish to explore some philosophical aspects of the definition of species in terms of the genome. The point of proposing the definition on these grounds is that any real advance in evolutionary theory has to be correct in both its philosophy and its science.

  10. Genomic Characterization of the LEED..PEEDs, a Gene Family Unique to the Medicago Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Diana I.; Silverstein, Kevin A. T.; Young, Nevin D.

    2014-01-01

    The LEED..PEED (LP) gene family in Medicago truncatula (A17) is composed of 13 genes coding small putatively secreted peptides with one to two conserved domains of negatively charged residues. This family is not present in the genomes of Glycine max, Lotus japonicus, or the IRLC species Cicer arietinum. LP genes were also not detected in a Trifolium pratense draft genome or Pisum sativum nodule transcriptome, which were sequenced de novo in this study, suggesting that the LP gene family arose within the past 25 million years. M. truncatula accession HM056 has 13 LP genes with high similarity to those in A17, whereas M. truncatula ssp. tricycla (R108) and M. sativa have 11 and 10 LP gene copies, respectively. In M. truncatula A17, 12 LP genes are located on chromosome 7 within a 93-kb window, whereas one LP gene copy is located on chromosome 4. A phylogenetic analysis of the gene family is consistent with most gene duplications occurring prior to Medicago speciation events, mainly through local tandem duplications and one distant duplication across chromosomes. Synteny comparisons between R108 and A17 confirm that gene order is conserved between the two subspecies, although a further duplication occurred solely in A17. In M. truncatula A17, all 13 LPs are exclusively transcribed in nodules and absent from other plant tissues, including roots, leaves, flowers, seeds, seed shells, and pods. The recent expansion of LP genes in Medicago spp. and their timing and location of expression suggest a novel function in nodulation, possibly as an aftermath of the evolution of bacteroid terminal differentiation or potentially associated with rhizobial–host specificity. PMID:25155275

  11. Molluscan Evolutionary Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Simison, W. Brian; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-12-01

    In the last 20 years there have been dramatic advances in techniques of high-throughput DNA sequencing, most recently accelerated by the Human Genome Project, a program that has determined the three billion base pair code on which we are based. Now this tremendous capability is being directed at other genome targets that are being sampled across the broad range of life. This opens up opportunities as never before for evolutionary and organismal biologists to address questions of both processes and patterns of organismal change. We stand at the dawn of a new 'modern synthesis' period, paralleling that of the early 20th century when the fledgling field of genetics first identified the underlying basis for Darwin's theory. We must now unite the efforts of systematists, paleontologists, mathematicians, computer programmers, molecular biologists, developmental biologists, and others in the pursuit of discovering what genomics can teach us about the diversity of life. Genome-level sampling for mollusks to date has mostly been limited to mitochondrial genomes and it is likely that these will continue to provide the best targets for broad phylogenetic sampling in the near future. However, we are just beginning to see an inroad into complete nuclear genome sequencing, with several mollusks and other eutrochozoans having been selected for work about to begin. Here, we provide an overview of the state of molluscan mitochondrial genomics, highlight a few of the discoveries from this research, outline the promise of broadening this dataset, describe upcoming projects to sequence whole mollusk nuclear genomes, and challenge the community to prepare for making the best use of these data.

  12. Biobanks for Genomics and Genomics for Biobanks

    PubMed Central

    Ducournau, Pascal; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Pontille, David

    2003-01-01

    Biobanks include biological samples and attached databases. Human biobanks occur in research, technological development and medical activities. Population genomics is highly dependent on the availability of large biobanks. Ethical issues must be considered: protecting the rights of those people whose samples or data are in biobanks (information, autonomy, confidentiality, protection of private life), assuring the non-commercial use of human body elements and the optimal use of samples and data. They balance other issues, such as protecting the rights of researchers and companies, allowing long-term use of biobanks while detailed information on future uses is not available. At the level of populations, the traditional form of informed consent is challenged. Other dimensions relate to the rights of a group as such, in addition to individual rights. Conditions of return of results and/or benefit to a population need to be defined. With ‘large-scale biobanking’ a marked trend in genomics, new societal dimensions appear, regarding communication, debate, regulation, societal control and valorization of such large biobanks. Exploring how genomics can help health sector biobanks to become more rationally constituted and exploited is an interesting perspective. For example, evaluating how genomic approaches can help in optimizing haematopoietic stem cell donor registries using new markers and high-throughput techniques to increase immunogenetic variability in such registries is a challenge currently being addressed. Ethical issues in such contexts are important, as not only individual decisions or projects are concerned, but also national policies in the international arena and organization of democratic debate about science, medicine and society. PMID:18629026

  13. How the genome folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman Aiden, Erez

    2012-02-01

    I describe Hi-C, a novel technology for probing the three-dimensional architecture of whole genomes by coupling proximity-based ligation with massively parallel sequencing. Working with collaborators at the Broad Institute and UMass Medical School, we used Hi-C to construct spatial proximity maps of the human genome at a resolution of 1Mb. These maps confirm the presence of chromosome territories and the spatial proximity of small, gene-rich chromosomes. We identified an additional level of genome organization that is characterized by the spatial segregation of open and closed chromatin to form two genome-wide compartments. At the megabase scale, the chromatin conformation is consistent with a fractal globule, a knot-free conformation that enables maximally dense packing while preserving the ability to easily fold and unfold any genomic locus. The fractal globule is distinct from the more commonly used globular equilibrium model. Our results demonstrate the power of Hi-C to map the dynamic conformations of whole genomes.

  14. Human Genome Annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstein, Mark

    A central problem for 21st century science is annotating the human genome and making this annotation useful for the interpretation of personal genomes. My talk will focus on annotating the 99% of the genome that does not code for canonical genes, concentrating on intergenic features such as structural variants (SVs), pseudogenes (protein fossils), binding sites, and novel transcribed RNAs (ncRNAs). In particular, I will describe how we identify regulatory sites and variable blocks (SVs) based on processing next-generation sequencing experiments. I will further explain how we cluster together groups of sites to create larger annotations. Next, I will discuss a comprehensive pseudogene identification pipeline, which has enabled us to identify >10K pseudogenes in the genome and analyze their distribution with respect to age, protein family, and chromosomal location. Throughout, I will try to introduce some of the computational algorithms and approaches that are required for genome annotation. Much of this work has been carried out in the framework of the ENCODE, modENCODE, and 1000 genomes projects.

  15. An archaeal genomic signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, D. E.; Overbeek, R.; Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    Comparisons of complete genome sequences allow the most objective and comprehensive descriptions possible of a lineage's evolution. This communication uses the completed genomes from four major euryarchaeal taxa to define a genomic signature for the Euryarchaeota and, by extension, the Archaea as a whole. The signature is defined in terms of the set of protein-encoding genes found in at least two diverse members of the euryarchaeal taxa that function uniquely within the Archaea; most signature proteins have no recognizable bacterial or eukaryal homologs. By this definition, 351 clusters of signature proteins have been identified. Functions of most proteins in this signature set are currently unknown. At least 70% of the clusters that contain proteins from all the euryarchaeal genomes also have crenarchaeal homologs. This conservative set, which appears refractory to horizontal gene transfer to the Bacteria or the Eukarya, would seem to reflect the significant innovations that were unique and fundamental to the archaeal "design fabric." Genomic protein signature analysis methods may be extended to characterize the evolution of any phylogenetically defined lineage. The complete set of protein clusters for the archaeal genomic signature is presented as supplementary material (see the PNAS web site, www.pnas.org).

  16. Ebolavirus comparative genomics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jun, Se-Ran; Leuze, Michael R.; Nookaew, Intawat; Uberbacher, Edward C.; Land, Miriam; Zhang, Qian; Wanchai, Visanu; Chai, Juanjuan; Nielsen, Morten; Trolle, Thomas; et al

    2015-07-14

    The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the largest documented for this virus. We examine the dynamics of this genome, comparing more than one hundred currently available ebolavirus genomes to each other and to other viral genomes. Based on oligomer frequency analysis, the family Filoviridae forms a distinct group from all other sequenced viral genomes. All filovirus genomes sequenced to date encode proteins with similar functions and gene order, although there is considerable divergence in sequences between the three genera Ebolavirus, Cuevavirus, and Marburgvirus within the family Filoviridae. Whereas all ebolavirus genomes are quite similar (multiple sequences of themore » same strain are often identical), variation is most common in the intergenic regions and within specific areas of the genes encoding the glycoprotein (GP), nucleoprotein (NP), and polymerase (L). We predict regions that could contain epitope-binding sites, which might be good vaccine targets. In conclusion, this information, combined with glycosylation sites and experimentally determined epitopes, can identify the most promising regions for the development of therapeutic strategies.« less

  17. Barley Genomics: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasulu, Nese; Graner, Andreas; Wobus, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare), first domesticated in the Near East, is a well-studied crop in terms of genetics, genomics, and breeding and qualifies as a model plant for Triticeae research. Recent advances made in barley genomics mainly include the following: (i) rapid accumulation of EST sequence data, (ii) growing number of studies on transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome, (iii) new modeling techniques, (iv) availability of genome-wide knockout collections as well as efficient transformation techniques, and (v) the recently started genome sequencing effort. These developments pave the way for a comprehensive functional analysis and understanding of gene expression networks linked to agronomically important traits. Here, we selectively review important technological developments in barley genomics and related fields and discuss the relevance for understanding genotype-phenotype relationships by using approaches such as genetical genomics and association studies. High-throughput genotyping platforms that have recently become available will allow the construction of high-density genetic maps that will further promote marker-assisted selection as well as physical map construction. Systems biology approaches will further enhance our knowledge and largely increase our abilities to design refined breeding strategies on the basis of detailed molecular physiological knowledge. PMID:18382615

  18. A Review on Genomics APIs

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Rajeswari; Huang, Yungui; Moosavinasab, Soheil; Buckley, Ronald; Bartlett, Christopher W.; Lin, Simon M.

    2015-01-01

    The constant improvement and falling prices of whole human genome Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has resulted in rapid adoption of genomic information at both clinics and research institutions. Considered together, the complexity of genomics data, due to its large volume and diversity along with the need for genomic data sharing, has resulted in the creation of Application Programming Interface (API) for secure, modular, interoperable access to genomic data from different applications, platforms, and even organizations. The Genomics APIs are a set of special protocols that assist software developers in dealing with multiple genomic data sources for building seamless, interoperable applications leading to the advancement of both genomic and clinical research. These APIs help define a standard for retrieval of genomic data from multiple sources as well as to better package genomic information for integration with Electronic Health Records. This review covers three currently available Genomics APIs: a) Google Genomics, b) SMART Genomics, and c) 23andMe. The functionalities, reference implementations (if available) and authentication protocols of each API are reviewed. A comparative analysis of the different features across the three APIs is provided in the Discussion section. Though Genomics APIs are still under active development and have yet to reach widespread adoption, they hold the promise to make building of complicated genomics applications easier with downstream constructive effects on healthcare. PMID:26702340

  19. WheatGenome.info: A Resource for Wheat Genomics Resource.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kaitao

    2016-01-01

    An integrated database with a variety of Web-based systems named WheatGenome.info hosting wheat genome and genomic data has been developed to support wheat research and crop improvement. The resource includes multiple Web-based applications, which are implemented as a variety of Web-based systems. These include a GBrowse2-based wheat genome viewer with BLAST search portal, TAGdb for searching wheat second generation genome sequence data, wheat autoSNPdb, links to wheat genetic maps using CMap and CMap3D, and a wheat genome Wiki to allow interaction between diverse wheat genome sequencing activities. This portal provides links to a variety of wheat genome resources hosted at other research organizations. This integrated database aims to accelerate wheat genome research and is freely accessible via the web interface at http://www.wheatgenome.info/ . PMID:26519407

  20. Two host clades, two bacterial arsenals: evolution through gene losses in facultative endosymbionts.

    PubMed

    Rollat-Farnier, Pierre-Antoine; Santos-Garcia, Diego; Rao, Qiong; Sagot, Marie-France; Silva, Francisco J; Henri, Hélène; Zchori-Fein, Einat; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andrés; Barbe, Valérie; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Vavre, Fabrice; Mouton, Laurence

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial endosymbiosis is an important evolutionary process in insects, which can harbor both obligate and facultative symbionts. The evolution of these symbionts is driven by evolutionary convergence, and they exhibit among the tiniest genomes in prokaryotes. The large host spectrum of facultative symbionts and the high diversity of strategies they use to infect new hosts probably impact the evolution of their genome and explain why they undergo less severe genomic erosion than obligate symbionts. Candidatus Hamiltonella defensa is suitable for the investigation of the genomic evolution of facultative symbionts because the bacteria are engaged in specific relationships in two clades of insects. In aphids, H. defensa is found in several species with an intermediate prevalence and confers protection against parasitoids. In whiteflies, H. defensa is almost fixed in some species of Bemisia tabaci, which suggests an important role of and a transition toward obligate symbiosis. In this study, comparisons of the genome of H. defensa present in two B. tabaci species (Middle East Asia Minor 1 and Mediterranean) and in the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum revealed that they belong to two distinct clades and underwent specific gene losses. In aphids, it contains highly virulent factors that could allow protection and horizontal transfers. In whiteflies, the genome lost these factors and seems to have a limited ability to acquire genes. However it contains genes that could be involved in the production of essential nutrients, which is consistent with a primordial role for this symbiont. In conclusion, although both lineages of H. defensa have mutualistic interactions with their hosts, their genomes follow distinct evolutionary trajectories that reflect their phenotype and could have important consequences on their evolvability. PMID:25714744

  1. GenomeVista

    SciTech Connect

    Poliakov, Alexander; Couronne, Olivier

    2002-11-04

    Aligning large vertebrate genomes that are structurally complex poses a variety of problems not encountered on smaller scales. Such genomes are rich in repetitive elements and contain multiple segmental duplications, which increases the difficulty of identifying true orthologous SNA segments in alignments. The sizes of the sequences make many alignment algorithms designed for comparing single proteins extremely inefficient when processing large genomic intervals. We integrated both local and global alignment tools and developed a suite of programs for automatically aligning large vertebrate genomes and identifying conserved non-coding regions in the alignments. Our method uses the BLAT local alignment program to find anchors on the base genome to identify regions of possible homology for a query sequence. These regions are postprocessed to find the best candidates which are then globally aligned using the AVID global alignment program. In the last step conserved non-coding segments are identified using VISTA. Our methods are fast and the resulting alignments exhibit a high degree of sensitivity, covering more than 90% of known coding exons in the human genome. The GenomeVISTA software is a suite of Perl programs that is built on a MySQL database platform. The scheduler gets control data from the database, builds a queve of jobs, and dispatches them to a PC cluster for execution. The main program, running on each node of the cluster, processes individual sequences. A Perl library acts as an interface between the database and the above programs. The use of a separate library allows the programs to function independently of the database schema. The library also improves on the standard Perl MySQL database interfere package by providing auto-reconnect functionality and improved error handling.

  2. GenomeVista

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-11-04

    Aligning large vertebrate genomes that are structurally complex poses a variety of problems not encountered on smaller scales. Such genomes are rich in repetitive elements and contain multiple segmental duplications, which increases the difficulty of identifying true orthologous SNA segments in alignments. The sizes of the sequences make many alignment algorithms designed for comparing single proteins extremely inefficient when processing large genomic intervals. We integrated both local and global alignment tools and developed a suitemore » of programs for automatically aligning large vertebrate genomes and identifying conserved non-coding regions in the alignments. Our method uses the BLAT local alignment program to find anchors on the base genome to identify regions of possible homology for a query sequence. These regions are postprocessed to find the best candidates which are then globally aligned using the AVID global alignment program. In the last step conserved non-coding segments are identified using VISTA. Our methods are fast and the resulting alignments exhibit a high degree of sensitivity, covering more than 90% of known coding exons in the human genome. The GenomeVISTA software is a suite of Perl programs that is built on a MySQL database platform. The scheduler gets control data from the database, builds a queve of jobs, and dispatches them to a PC cluster for execution. The main program, running on each node of the cluster, processes individual sequences. A Perl library acts as an interface between the database and the above programs. The use of a separate library allows the programs to function independently of the database schema. The library also improves on the standard Perl MySQL database interfere package by providing auto-reconnect functionality and improved error handling.« less

  3. Genomes to Proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Panisko, Ellen A.; Grigoriev, Igor; Daly, Don S.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Baker, Scott E.

    2009-03-01

    Biologists are awash with genomic sequence data. In large part, this is due to the rapid acceleration in the generation of DNA sequence that occurred as public and private research institutes raced to sequence the human genome. In parallel with the large human genome effort, mostly smaller genomes of other important model organisms were sequenced. Projects following on these initial efforts have made use of technological advances and the DNA sequencing infrastructure that was built for the human and other organism genome projects. As a result, the genome sequences of many organisms are available in high quality draft form. While in many ways this is good news, there are limitations to the biological insights that can be gleaned from DNA sequences alone; genome sequences offer only a bird's eye view of the biological processes endemic to an organism or community. Fortunately, the genome sequences now being produced at such a high rate can serve as the foundation for other global experimental platforms such as proteomics. Proteomic methods offer a snapshot of the proteins present at a point in time for a given biological sample. Current global proteomics methods combine enzymatic digestion, separations, mass spectrometry and database searching for peptide identification. One key aspect of proteomics is the prediction of peptide sequences from mass spectrometry data. Global proteomic analysis uses computational matching of experimental mass spectra with predicted spectra based on databases of gene models that are often generated computationally. Thus, the quality of gene models predicted from a genome sequence is crucial in the generation of high quality peptide identifications. Once peptides are identified they can be assigned to their parent protein. Proteins identified as expressed in a given experiment are most useful when compared to other expressed proteins in a larger biological context or biochemical pathway. In this chapter we will discuss the automatic

  4. Genome position specific priors for genomic prediction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The accuracy of genomic prediction is highly dependent on the size of the reference population. For small populations, including information from other populations could improve this accuracy. The usual strategy is to pool data from different populations; however, this has not proven as successful as hoped for with distantly related breeds. BayesRS is a novel approach to share information across populations for genomic predictions. The approach allows information to be captured even where the phase of SNP alleles and casuative mutation alleles are reversed across populations, or the actual casuative mutation is different between the populations but affects the same gene. Proportions of a four-distribution mixture for SNP effects in segments of fixed size along the genome are derived from one population and set as location specific prior proportions of distributions of SNP effects for the target population. The model was tested using dairy cattle populations of different breeds: 540 Australian Jersey bulls, 2297 Australian Holstein bulls and 5214 Nordic Holstein bulls. The traits studied were protein-, fat- and milk yield. Genotypic data was Illumina 777K SNPs, real or imputed. Results Results showed an increase in accuracy of up to 3.5% for the Jersey population when using BayesRS with a prior derived from Australian Holstein compared to a model without location specific priors. The increase in accuracy was however lower than was achieved when reference populations were combined to estimate SNP effects, except in the case of fat yield. The small size of the Jersey validation set meant that these improvements in accuracy were not significant using a Hotelling-Williams t-test at the 5% level. An increase in accuracy of 1-2% for all traits was observed in the Australian Holstein population when using a prior derived from the Nordic Holstein population compared to using no prior information. These improvements were significant (P<0.05) using the Hotelling

  5. Berkeley Quantitative Genome Browser

    SciTech Connect

    Hechmer, Aaron

    2008-02-29

    The Berkeley Quantitative Genome Browser provides graphical browsing functionality for genomic data organized, at a minimum, by sequence and position. While supporting the annotation browsing features typical of many other genomic browsers, additional emphasis is placed on viewing and utilizing quantitative data. Data may be read from GFF, SGR, FASTA or any column delimited format. Once the data has been read into the browser's buffer, it may be searched. filtered or subjected to mathematical transformation. The browser also supplies some graphical design manipulation functionality geared towards preparing figures for presentations or publication. A plug-in mechanism enables development outside the core functionality that adds more advanced or esoteric analysis capabilities. BBrowse's development and distribution is open-source and has been built to run on Linux, OSX and MS Windows operating systems.

  6. Genomics, health, and society.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chee Khoon

    2002-01-01

    On June 27, 2001, the World Health Organization conducted hearings in Geneva for a Special Report on Genomics & Health. Initially intended as a document to address the ethical, legal, and social implications of the gathering genomics resolution (ELSI), the terms of reference of the report were significantly modified to give primary emphasis to a scientific and technological assessment of the implications of genomics for human health. The Citizens' Health Initiative, one of two NGOs invited to make submissions at these consultations, suggested that no less important than the scientific and technical assessment was a perspective which gave due attention to the social context and political economy of scientific/technological development and its deployment. The article below touches upon neglected health priorities of poor countries, intellectual property rights and patents, risk management, insurance and discrimination, and predictive (prenatal) testing, reproductive choice, and eugenics. PMID:17208760

  7. Berkeley Quantitative Genome Browser

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-02-29

    The Berkeley Quantitative Genome Browser provides graphical browsing functionality for genomic data organized, at a minimum, by sequence and position. While supporting the annotation browsing features typical of many other genomic browsers, additional emphasis is placed on viewing and utilizing quantitative data. Data may be read from GFF, SGR, FASTA or any column delimited format. Once the data has been read into the browser's buffer, it may be searched. filtered or subjected to mathematical transformation.more » The browser also supplies some graphical design manipulation functionality geared towards preparing figures for presentations or publication. A plug-in mechanism enables development outside the core functionality that adds more advanced or esoteric analysis capabilities. BBrowse's development and distribution is open-source and has been built to run on Linux, OSX and MS Windows operating systems.« less

  8. Genomics for Weed Science

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, David

    2010-01-01

    Numerous genomic-based studies have provided insight to the physiological and evolutionary processes involved in developmental and environmental processes of model plants such as arabidopsis and rice. However, far fewer efforts have been attempted to use genomic resources to study physiological and evolutionary processes of weedy plants. Genomics-based tools such as extensive EST databases and microarrays have been developed for a limited number of weedy species, although application of information and resources developed for model plants and crops are possible and have been exploited. These tools have just begun to provide insights into the response of these weeds to herbivore and pathogen attack, survival of extreme environmental conditions, and interaction with crops. The potential of these tools to illuminate mechanisms controlling the traits that allow weeds to invade novel habitats, survive extreme environments, and that make weeds difficult to eradicate have potential for both improving crops and developing novel methods to control weeds. PMID:20808523

  9. SINGLE CELL GENOME SEQUENCING

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Suzan; Singh, Anup K.

    2011-01-01

    Whole genome amplification and next-generation sequencing of single cells has become a powerful approach for studying uncultivated microorganisms that represent 90–99 % of all environmental microbes. Single cell sequencing enables not only the identification of microbes but also linking of functions to species, a feat not achievable by metagenomic techniques. Moreover, it allows the analysis of low abundance species that may be missed in community-based analyses. It has also proved very useful in complementing metagenomics in the assembly and binning of single genomes. With the advent of drastically cheaper and higher throughput sequencing technologies, it is expected that single cell sequencing will become a standard tool in studying the genome and transcriptome of microbial communities. PMID:22154471

  10. Genomic Southern blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Gebbie, Leigh

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes a detailed protocol for genomic Southern blot analysis which can be used to detect transgene or endogenous gene sequences in cereal genomes. The protocol follows a standard approach that has been shown to generate high-quality results: size fractionation of genomic DNA; capillary transfer to a nylon membrane; hybridization with a digoxigenin-labelled probe; and detection using a chemiluminescent-based system. High sensitivity and limited background are key to successful Southern blots. The critical steps in this protocol are complete digestion of the right quantity of DNA, careful handling of the membrane to avoid unnecessary background, and optimization of probe concentration and temperatures during the hybridization step. Detailed instructions on how to successfully master these techniques are provided. PMID:24243203

  11. Genomics of Volvocine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Umen, James G.; Olson, Bradley J.S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Volvocine algae are a group of chlorophytes that together comprise a unique model for evolutionary and developmental biology. The species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri represent extremes in morphological diversity within the Volvocine clade. Chlamydomonas is unicellular and reflects the ancestral state of the group, while Volvox is multicellular and has evolved numerous innovations including germ-soma differentiation, sexual dimorphism, and complex morphogenetic patterning. The Chlamydomonas genome sequence has shed light on several areas of eukaryotic cell biology, metabolism and evolution, while the Volvox genome sequence has enabled a comparison with Chlamydomonas that reveals some of the underlying changes that enabled its transition to multicellularity, but also underscores the subtlety of this transition. Many of the tools and resources are in place to further develop Volvocine algae as a model for evolutionary genomics. PMID:25883411

  12. Genomic medicine and neurology.

    PubMed

    Vance, Jeffery M; Tekin, Demet

    2011-04-01

    The application of genetics to the understanding of neurology has been highly successful over the past several decades. During the past 10 years, tools were developed to begin genetic investigations into more common disorders such as Alzheimer disease, multiple sclerosis, autism, and Parkinson disease. The era of genomic medicine now has begun and will have an increasing effect on the daily care of common neurologic diseases. Thus it is important for neurologists to have a basic understanding of genomic medicine and how it differs from the traditional clinical genetics of the past. This article provides some basic information about genomic medicine and pharmacogenetics in neurology to help neurologists to begin to adopt these principles into their practice. PMID:22810818

  13. Genomic Imprinting in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Denise P.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic imprinting affects a subset of genes in mammals and results in a monoallelic, parental-specific expression pattern. Most of these genes are located in clusters that are regulated through the use of insulators or long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). To distinguish the parental alleles, imprinted genes are epigenetically marked in gametes at imprinting control elements through the use of DNA methylation at the very least. Imprinted gene expression is subsequently conferred through lncRNAs, histone modifications, insulators, and higher-order chromatin structure. Such imprints are maintained after fertilization through these mechanisms despite extensive reprogramming of the mammalian genome. Genomic imprinting is an excellent model for understanding mammalian epigenetic regulation. PMID:24492710

  14. Resequencing rice genomes: an emerging new era of rice genomics.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuehui; Lu, Tingting; Han, Bin

    2013-04-01

    Rice is a model system for crop genomics studies. Much of the early work on rice genomics focused on analyzing genome-wide genetic variation to further understand rice gene functions in agronomic traits and to generate data and resources for rice research. The advent of next-generation high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies and the completion of high-quality reference genome sequences have enabled the development of sequencing-based genotyping and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) that have significantly advanced rice genetics research. This has led to the emergence of a new era of rice genomics aimed at bridging the knowledge gap between genotype and phenotype in rice. These technologies have also led to pyramid breeding through genomics-assisted selection, which will be useful in breeding elite varieties suitable for sustainable agriculture. Here, we review the recent advances in rice genomics and discuss the future of this line of research. PMID:23295340

  15. Brief Guide to Genomics: DNA, Genes and Genomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... guía de genómica A Brief Guide to Genomics DNA, Genes and Genomes Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the ... and lead to a disease such as cancer. DNA Sequencing Sequencing simply means determining the exact order ...

  16. Haemonchus contortus: Genome Structure, Organization and Comparative Genomics.

    PubMed

    Laing, R; Martinelli, A; Tracey, A; Holroyd, N; Gilleard, J S; Cotton, J A

    2016-01-01

    One of the first genome sequencing projects for a parasitic nematode was that for Haemonchus contortus. The open access data from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute provided a valuable early resource for the research community, particularly for the identification of specific genes and genetic markers. Later, a second sequencing project was initiated by the University of Melbourne, and the two draft genome sequences for H. contortus were published back-to-back in 2013. There is a pressing need for long-range genomic information for genetic mapping, population genetics and functional genomic studies, so we are continuing to improve the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute assembly to provide a finished reference genome for H. contortus. This review describes this process, compares the H. contortus genome assemblies with draft genomes from other members of the strongylid group and discusses future directions for parasite genomics using the H. contortus model. PMID:27238013

  17. Ebolavirus comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Se-Ran; Leuze, Michael R.; Nookaew, Intawat; Uberbacher, Edward C.; Land, Miriam; Zhang, Qian; Wanchai, Visanu; Chai, Juanjuan; Nielsen, Morten; Trolle, Thomas; Lund, Ole; Buzard, Gregory S.; Pedersen, Thomas D.; Wassenaar, Trudy M.; Ussery, David W.

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the largest documented for this virus. To examine the dynamics of this genome, we compare more than 100 currently available ebolavirus genomes to each other and to other viral genomes. Based on oligomer frequency analysis, the family Filoviridae forms a distinct group from all other sequenced viral genomes. All filovirus genomes sequenced to date encode proteins with similar functions and gene order, although there is considerable divergence in sequences between the three genera Ebolavirus, Cuevavirus and Marburgvirus within the family Filoviridae. Whereas all ebolavirus genomes are quite similar (multiple sequences of the same strain are often identical), variation is most common in the intergenic regions and within specific areas of the genes encoding the glycoprotein (GP), nucleoprotein (NP) and polymerase (L). We predict regions that could contain epitope-binding sites, which might be good vaccine targets. This information, combined with glycosylation sites and experimentally determined epitopes, can identify the most promising regions for the development of therapeutic strategies. This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes. The Department of Energy will provide public access to these results of federally sponsored research in accordance with the DOE Public Access Plan (http://energy.gov/downloads/doe-public-access-plan). PMID:26175035

  18. Ebolavirus comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Jun, Se-Ran; Leuze, Michael R; Nookaew, Intawat; Uberbacher, Edward C; Land, Miriam; Zhang, Qian; Wanchai, Visanu; Chai, Juanjuan; Nielsen, Morten; Trolle, Thomas; Lund, Ole; Buzard, Gregory S; Pedersen, Thomas D; Wassenaar, Trudy M; Ussery, David W

    2015-09-01

    The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the largest documented for this virus. To examine the dynamics of this genome, we compare more than 100 currently available ebolavirus genomes to each other and to other viral genomes. Based on oligomer frequency analysis, the family Filoviridae forms a distinct group from all other sequenced viral genomes. All filovirus genomes sequenced to date encode proteins with similar functions and gene order, although there is considerable divergence in sequences between the three genera Ebolavirus, Cuevavirus and Marburgvirus within the family Filoviridae. Whereas all ebolavirus genomes are quite similar (multiple sequences of the same strain are often identical), variation is most common in the intergenic regions and within specific areas of the genes encoding the glycoprotein (GP), nucleoprotein (NP) and polymerase (L). We predict regions that could contain epitope-binding sites, which might be good vaccine targets. This information, combined with glycosylation sites and experimentally determined epitopes, can identify the most promising regions for the development of therapeutic strategies.This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes. The Department of Energy will provide public access to these results of federally sponsored research in accordance with the DOE Public Access Plan (http://energy.gov/downloads/doe-public-access-plan). PMID:26175035

  19. Genome Size and Species Diversification

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Theoretically, there are reasons to believe that large genome size should favour speciation. Several major factors contributing to genome size, such as duplications and transposable element activity have been proposed to facilitate the formation of new species. However, it is also possible that small genome size promotes speciation. For example, selection for genome reduction may be resolved in different ways in incipient species, leading to incompatibilities. Mutations and chromosomal rearrangements may also be more stably inherited in smaller genomes. Here I review the following lines of empirical evidence bearing on this question: (i) Correlations between genome size and species richness of taxa are often negative. (ii) Fossil evidence in lungfish shows that the accumulation of DNA in the genomes of this group coincided with a reduction in species diversity. (iii) Estimates of speciation interval in mammals correlate positively with genome size. (iv) Genome reductions are inferred at the base of particular species radiations and genome expansions at the base of others. (v) Insect clades that have been increasing in diversity up to the present have smaller genomes than clades that have remained stable or have decreased in diversity. The general pattern emerging from these observations is that higher diversification rates are generally found in small-genome taxa. Since diversification rates are the net effect of speciation and extinction, large genomes may thus either constrain speciation rate, increase extinction rate, or both. I argue that some of the cited examples are unlikely to be explained by extinction alone. PMID:22140283

  20. The cancer genome

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Michael R.; Campbell, Peter J.; Futreal, P. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    All cancers arise as a result of changes that have occurred in the DNA sequence of the genomes of cancer cells. Over the past quarter of a century much has been learnt about these mutations and the abnormal genes that operate in human cancers. We are now, however, moving into an era in which it will be possible to obtain the complete DNA sequence of large numbers of cancer genomes. These studies will provide us with a detailed and comprehensive perspective on how individual cancers have developed. PMID:19360079

  1. Methanococcus jannaschii genome: revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyrpides, N. C.; Olsen, G. J.; Klenk, H. P.; White, O.; Woese, C. R.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of genomic sequences is necessarily an ongoing process. Initial gene assignments tend (wisely) to be on the conservative side (Venter, 1996). The analysis of the genome then grows in an iterative fashion as additional data and more sophisticated algorithms are brought to bear on the data. The present report is an emendation of the original gene list of Methanococcus jannaschii (Bult et al., 1996). By using a somewhat more updated database and more relaxed (and operator-intensive) pattern matching methods, we were able to add significantly to, and in a few cases amend, the gene identification table originally published by Bult et al. (1996).

  2. Genomic standards consortium projects.

    PubMed

    Field, Dawn; Sterk, Peter; Kottmann, Renzo; De Smet, J Wim; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Cochrane, Guy; Cole, James R; Davies, Neil; Dawyndt, Peter; Garrity, George M; Gilbert, Jack A; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Hirschman, Lynette; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Knight, Rob; Kyrpides, Nikos; Meyer, Folker; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Morrison, Norman; Robbins, Robert; San Gil, Inigo; Sansone, Susanna; Schriml, Lynn; Tatusova, Tatiana; Ussery, Dave; Yilmaz, Pelin; White, Owen; Wooley, John; Caporaso, Gregory

    2014-06-15

    The Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) is an open-membership community that was founded in 2005 to work towards the development, implementation and harmonization of standards in the field of genomics. Starting with the defined task of establishing a minimal set of descriptions the GSC has evolved into an active standards-setting body that currently has 18 ongoing projects, with additional projects regularly proposed from within and outside the GSC. Here we describe our recently enacted policy for proposing new activities that are intended to be taken on by the GSC, along with the template for proposing such new activities. PMID:25197446

  3. The Brachypodium genome sequence: a resource for oat genomics research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oat (Avena sativa) is an important cereal crop used as both an animal feed and for human consumption. Genetic and genomic research on oat is hindered because it is hexaploid and possesses a large (13 Gb) genome. Diploid Avena relatives have been employed for genetic and genomic studies, but only mod...

  4. Tick Genomics: The Ixodes genome project and beyond

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ticks and mites (subphylum Chelicerata; subclass Acari) are important pests of animals and plants worldwide. The Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick) genome sequencing project marks the beginning of the genomics era for the field of acarology. This project is the first to sequence the genome of a...

  5. Multiplexed Fragaria Chloroplast Genome Sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method to sequence multiple chloroplast genomes that uses the sequencing depth of ultra high throughput sequencing technologies was recently described. Sequencing complete chloroplast genomes can resolve phylogenetic relationships at low taxonomic levels and identify point mutations and indels tha...

  6. The diversity of fungal genome.

    PubMed

    Mohanta, Tapan Kumar; Bae, Hanhong

    2015-01-01

    The genome size of an organism varies from species to species. The C-value paradox enigma is a very complex puzzle with regards to vast diversity in genome sizes in eukaryotes. Here we reported the detailed genomic information of 172 fungal species among different fungal genomes and found that fungal genomes are very diverse in nature. In fungi, the diversity of genomes varies from 8.97 Mb to 177.57 Mb. The average genome sizes of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota fungi are 36.91 and 46.48 Mb respectively. But higher genome size is observed in Oomycota (74.85 Mb) species, a lineage of fungus-like eukaryotic microorganisms. The average coding genes of Oomycota species are almost doubled than that of Acomycota and Basidiomycota fungus. PMID:25866485

  7. Company profile: Complete Genomics Inc.

    PubMed

    Reid, Clifford

    2011-02-01

    Complete Genomics Inc. is a life sciences company that focuses on complete human genome sequencing. It is taking a completely different approach to DNA sequencing than other companies in the industry. Rather than building a general-purpose platform for sequencing all organisms and all applications, it has focused on a single application - complete human genome sequencing. The company's Complete Genomics Analysis Platform (CGA™ Platform) comprises an integrated package of biochemistry, instrumentation and software that sequences human genomes at the highest quality, lowest cost and largest scale available. Complete Genomics offers a turnkey service that enables customers to outsource their human genome sequencing to the company's genome sequencing center in Mountain View, CA, USA. Customers send in their DNA samples, the company does all the library preparation, DNA sequencing, assembly and variant analysis, and customers receive research-ready data that they can use for biological discovery. PMID:21345140

  8. On genomics, kin, and privacy

    PubMed Central

    Telenti, Amalio; Ayday, Erman; Hubaux, Jean Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The storage of greater numbers of exomes or genomes raises the question of loss of privacy for the individual and for families if genomic data are not properly protected. Access to genome data may result from a personal decision to disclose, or from gaps in protection. In either case, revealing genome data has consequences beyond the individual, as it compromises the privacy of family members. Increasing availability of genome data linked or linkable to metadata through online social networks and services adds one additional layer of complexity to the protection of genome privacy.  The field of computer science and information technology offers solutions to secure genomic data so that individuals, medical personnel or researchers can access only the subset of genomic information required for healthcare or dedicated studies. PMID:25254097

  9. National Human Genome Research Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Patient Care Education All About the Human Genome Project Fact Sheets Genetic Education Resources for Teachers ... Education Kit Online Genetics Education Resources Smithsonian NHGRI Genome Exhibition Talking Glossary: English Talking Glossary: Español Issues ...

  10. Importance of anchor genomes for any plant genome project

    PubMed Central

    Messing, Joachim; Llaca, Victor

    1998-01-01

    Progress in agricultural and environmental technologies is hampered by a slower rate of gene discovery in plants than animals. The vast pool of genes in plants, however, will be an important resource for insertion of genes, via biotechnological procedures, into an array of plants, generating unique germ plasms not achievable by conventional breeding. It just became clear that genomes of grasses have evolved in a manner analogous to Lego blocks. Large chromosome segments have been reshuffled and stuffer pieces added between genes. Although some genomes have become very large, the genome with the fewest stuffer pieces, the rice genome, is the Rosetta Stone of all the bigger grass genomes. This means that sequencing the rice genome as anchor genome of the grasses will provide instantaneous access to the same genes in the same relative physical position in other grasses (e.g., corn and wheat), without the need to sequence each of these genomes independently. (i) The sequencing of the entire genome of rice as anchor genome for the grasses will accelerate plant gene discovery in many important crops (e.g., corn, wheat, and rice) by several orders of magnitudes and reduce research and development costs for government and industry at a faster pace. (ii) Costs for sequencing entire genomes have come down significantly. Because of its size, rice is only 12% of the human or the corn genome, and technology improvements by the human genome project are completely transferable, translating in another 50% reduction of the costs. (iii) The physical mapping of the rice genome by a group of Japanese researchers provides a jump start for sequencing the genome and forming an international consortium. Otherwise, other countries would do it alone and own proprietary positions. PMID:9482827

  11. Genomics in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Robert; Marian, A.J.; Dandona, Sonny; Stewart, Alexandre F.R.

    2013-01-01

    A paradigm shift towards biology occurred in the 1990’s subsequently catalyzed by the sequencing of the human genome in 2000. The cost of DNA sequencing has gone from millions to thousands of dollars with sequencing of one’s entire genome costing only $1,000. Rapid DNA sequencing is being embraced for single gene disorders, particularly for sporadic cases and those from small families. Transmission of lethal genes such as associated with Huntington’s disease can, through in-vitro fertilization, avoid passing it on to one’s offspring. DNA sequencing will meet the challenge of elucidating the genetic predisposition for common polygenic diseases, especially in determining the function of the novel common genetic risk variants and identifying the rare variants, which may also partially ascertain the source of the missing heritability. The challenge for DNA sequencing remains great, despite human genome sequences being 99.5% identical, the 3 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) responsible for most of the unique features add up to 60 new mutations per person which, for 7 billion people, is 420 billion mutations. It is claimed that DNA sequencing has increased 10,000 fold while information storage and retrieval only 16 fold. The physician and health user will be challenged by the convergence of two major trends, whole genome sequencing and the storage/retrieval and integration of the data. PMID:23524054

  12. Poster: the macaque genome.

    PubMed

    2007-04-13

    The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) facilitates an extraordinary range of biomedical and basic research, and the publication of the genome only makes it a more powerful model for studies of human disease; moreover, the macaque's position relative to humans and chimpanzees affords the opportunity to learn about the processes that have shaped the last 25 million years of primate evolution. To allow users to explore these themes of the macaque genome, Science has created a special interactive version of the poster published in the print edition of the 13 April 2007 issue. The interactive version includes additional text and exploration, as well as embedded video featuring seven scientists discussing the importance of the macaque and its genome sequence in studies of biomedicine and evolution. We have also created an accompanying teaching resource, including a lesson plan aimed at teachers of advanced high school life science students, for exploring what a comparison of the macaque and human genomes can tell us about human biology and evolution. These items are free to all site visitors. PMID:17431172

  13. (Genomic variation in maize)

    SciTech Connect

    Rivin, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    These studies have sought to learn how different DNA sequences and sequence arrangements contribute to genome plasticity in maize. We describe quantitative variation among maize inbred lines for tandemly arrayed and dispersed repeated DNA sequences and gene families, and qualitative variation for sequences homologous to the Mutator family of transposons. The potential of these sequences to undergo unequal crossing over, non-allelic (ectopic) recombination and transposition makes them a source of genome instability. We have found examples of rapid genomic change involving these sequences in Fl hybrids, tissue culture cells and regenerated plants. We describe the repetitive portion of the maize genome as composed primarily of sequences that vary markedly in copy number among different genetic stocks. The most highly variable is the 185 bp repeat associated with the heterochromatic chromosome knobs. Even in lines without visible knobs, there is a considerable quantity of tandemly arrayed repeats. We also found a high degree of variability for the tandemly arrayed 5S and ribosomal DNA repeats. While such variation might be expected as the result of unequal cross-over, we were surprised to find considerable variation among lower copy number, dispersed repeats as well. One highly repeated sequence that showed a complex tandem and dispersed arrangement stood out as showing no detectable variability among the maize lines. In striking contrast to the variability seen between the inbred stocks, individuals within a stock were indistinguishable with regard to their repeated sequence multiplicities.

  14. Better chocolate through genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Theobroma cacao, the cacao or chocolate tree, is a tropical understory tree whose seeds are used to make chocolate. And like any important crop, cacao is the subject of much research. On September 15, 2010, scientists publicly released a preliminary sequence of the cacao genome--which contains all o...

  15. The Nostoc punctiforme Genome

    SciTech Connect

    John C. Meeks

    2001-12-31

    Nostoc punctiforme is a filamentous cyanobacterium with extensive phenotypic characteristics and a relatively large genome, approaching 10 Mb. The phenotypic characteristics include a photoautotrophic, diazotrophic mode of growth, but N. punctiforme is also facultatively heterotrophic; its vegetative cells have multiple development alternatives, including terminal differentiation into nitrogen-fixing heterocysts and transient differentiation into spore-like akinetes or motile filaments called hormogonia; and N. punctiforme has broad symbiotic competence with fungi and terrestrial plants, including bryophytes, gymnosperms and an angiosperm. The shotgun-sequencing phase of the N. punctiforme strain ATCC 29133 genome has been completed by the Joint Genome Institute. Annotation of an 8.9 Mb database yielded 7432 open reading frames, 45% of which encode proteins with known or probable known function and 29% of which are unique to N. punctiforme. Comparative analysis of the sequence indicates a genome that is highly plastic and in a state of flux, with numerous insertion sequences and multilocus repeats, as well as genes encoding transposases and DNA modification enzymes. The sequence also reveals the presence of genes encoding putative proteins that collectively define almost all characteristics of cyanobacteria as a group. N. punctiforme has an extensive potential to sense and respond to environmental signals as reflected by the presence of more than 400 genes encoding sensor protein kinases, response regulators and other transcriptional factors. The signal transduction systems and any of the large number of unique genes may play essential roles in the cell differentiation and symbiotic interaction properties of N. punctiforme.

  16. The human genome project.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, M V

    1993-01-01

    The Human Genome Project in the United States is now well underway. Its programmatic direction was largely set by a National Research Council report issued in 1988. The broad framework supplied by this report has survived almost unchanged despite an upheaval in the technology of genome analysis. This upheaval has primarily affected physical and genetic mapping, the two dominant activities in the present phase of the project. Advances in mapping techniques have allowed good progress toward the specific goals of the project and are also providing strong corollary benefits throughout biomedical research. Actual DNA sequencing of the genomes of the human and model organisms is still at an early stage. There has been little progress in the intrinsic efficiency of DNA-sequence determination. However, refinements in experimental protocols, instrumentation, and project management have made it practical to acquire sequence data on an enlarged scale. It is also increasingly apparent that DNA-sequence data provide a potent means of relating knowledge gained from the study of model organisms to human biology. There is as yet little indication that the infusion of technology from outside biology into the Human Genome Project has been effectively stimulated. Opportunities in this area remain large, posing substantial technical and policy challenges. PMID:8506271

  17. Genetics, genomics and fertility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to enhance the sustainability of dairy businesses, new management tools are needed to increase the fertility of dairy cattle. Genomic selection has been successfully used by AI studs to screen potential sires and significantly decrease the generation interval of bulls. Buoyed by the success...

  18. Dairy genomics in application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Implementation of genomic evaluation has caused profound changes in dairy cattle breeding. All young bulls bought by major artificial-insemination organizations now are selected based on these evaluation. Evaluation reliability can reach ~75% for yield traits, which is adequate for marketing semen o...

  19. Genomic selection in plant breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic selection (GS) is a method to predict the genetic value of selection candidates based on the genomic estimated breeding value (GEBV) predicted from high-density markers positioned throughout the genome. Unlike marker-assisted selection, the GEBV is based on all markers including both minor ...

  20. Plant functional genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtorf, Hauke; Guitton, Marie-Christine; Reski, Ralf

    2002-04-01

    Functional genome analysis of plants has entered the high-throughput stage. The complete genome information from key species such as Arabidopsis thaliana and rice is now available and will further boost the application of a range of new technologies to functional plant gene analysis. To broadly assign functions to unknown genes, different fast and multiparallel approaches are currently used and developed. These new technologies are based on known methods but are adapted and improved to accommodate for comprehensive, large-scale gene analysis, i.e. such techniques are novel in the sense that their design allows researchers to analyse many genes at the same time and at an unprecedented pace. Such methods allow analysis of the different constituents of the cell that help to deduce gene function, namely the transcripts, proteins and metabolites. Similarly the phenotypic variations of entire mutant collections can now be analysed in a much faster and more efficient way than before. The different methodologies have developed to form their own fields within the functional genomics technological platform and are termed transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and phenomics. Gene function, however, cannot solely be inferred by using only one such approach. Rather, it is only by bringing together all the information collected by different functional genomic tools that one will be able to unequivocally assign functions to unknown plant genes. This review focuses on current technical developments and their impact on the field of plant functional genomics. The lower plant Physcomitrella is introduced as a new model system for gene function analysis, owing to its high rate of homologous recombination.

  1. Thinking laterally about genomes.

    PubMed

    Ragan, Mark A

    2009-10-01

    Perhaps the most-surprising discovery of the genome era has been the extent to which prokaryotic and many eukaryotic genomes incorporate genetic material from sources other than their parent(s). Lateral genetic transfer (LGT) among bacteria was first observed about 100 years ago, and is now accepted to underlie important phenomena including the spread of antibiotic resistance and ability to degrade xenobiotics. LGT is invoked, perhaps too readily, to explain a breadth of awkward data including compositional heterogeneity of genomes, disagreement among gene-sequence trees, and mismatch between physiology and systematics. At the same time many details of LGT remain unknown or controversial, and some key questions have scarcely been asked. Here I critically review what we think we know about the existence, extent, mechanism and impact of LGT; identify important open questions; and point to research directions that hold particular promise for elucidating the role of LGT in genome evolution. Evidence for LGT in nature is not only inferential but also direct, and potential vectors are ubiquitous. Genetic material can pass between diverse habitats and be significantly altered during residency in viruses, complicating the inference of donors, In prokaryotes about twice as many genes are interrupted by LGT as are transferred intact, and about 5Short protein domains can be privileged units of transfer. Unresolved phylogenetic issues include the correct null hypothesis, and genes as units of analysis. Themes are beginning to emerge regarding the effect of LGT on cellular networks, but I show why generalization is premature. LGT can associate with radical changes in physiology and ecological niche. Better quantitative models of genome evolution are needed, and theoretical frameworks remain to be developed for some observations including chromosome assembly by LGT. PMID:20180279

  2. TUTORIAL ON NETWORK GENOMICS.

    SciTech Connect

    Forst, C.

    2001-01-01

    With the ever-increasing genomic information pouring into the databases researchers start to look for pattern in genomes. Key questions are the identification of function. In the past function was mainly understood to be assigned to a single gene isolated from other cellular components or mechanisms. Sequence comparison fo single genes and their products (proteins) as well as of intergenic space are a consequence of a well established one-gene one-function interpretation. prediction of function solely by sequence similarity searches are powerful techniques that initiated the advent of bioinformatics and computational biology. Seminal work on sequence alignment by Temple Smith and Michael Waterman [33] and sequence searches with the BLAST algorithm by Altschul et al. [2] provide essential methods for sequence based determination of function. Similar outstanding contributions to determination of function have been archived in the area of structure prediction, molecular modeling and molecular dynamics. Techniques covering ab initio and homology modeling up to biophysical interpretation of long-run molecular dynamics simulations are mentioned ehre. With the ever-increasing number of information of different genetic/genomic origin, new aspect are looked for that deviate from the single gene at a time method. Especially with the identification of surprisingly few human genes the emerging perception in the scientific community that the concept of function has to be extended to include other sequence based as well as non-sequenced based information. A schema of determination of function by different concepts is shown in Figure 1. The tutorial is comprised of the following sections: The first two sections discuss the differences between genomic and non-genomic based context information, section three will cover combined methods. Finally, section four lsits web-resources and databases. All presented approaches extensively employ comparative methods.

  3. Osmotic adjustment and the growth response of seven vegetable crops following water-deficit stress. [Phaseolus vulgaris L. ; Beta vulgaris L. ; Abelmoschus esculentus; Pisum sativum L. ; Capsicum annuum L. ; Spinacia oleracea L. ; Lycopersicon esculentum Mill

    SciTech Connect

    Wullschleger, S.D. ); Oosterhuis, D.M. )

    1991-09-01

    Growth-chamber studies were conducted to examine the ability of seven vegetable crops- Blue Lake beam (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Detroit Dark Red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) Burgundy okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) (Moench), Little Marvel pea (Pisum sativum L), California Wonder bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L), New Zealand spinach (Spinacia oleracea L), and Beefsteak tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) - to adjust osmotically in response to water-deficit stress. Water stress was imposed by withholding water for 3 days, and the adjustment of leaf and root osmotic potentials upon relief of the stress and rehydration were monitored with thermocouple psychrometers. Despite similar reductions in leaf water potential and stomatal conductance among the species studied reductions in lead water potential an stomatal conductance among the species, crop-specific differences were observed in leak and root osmotic adjustment. Leaf osmotic adjustment was observed for bean, pepper, and tomato following water-deficit stress. Root osmotic adjustment was significant in bean, okra, pea and tomato. Furthermore, differences in leaf and root osmotic adjustment were also observed among five tomato cultivars. Leaf osmotic adjustment was not associated with the maintenance of leaf growth following water-deficit stress, since leaf expansion of water-stressed bean and pepper, two species capable of osmotic adjustment, was similar to that of spinach, which exhibited no leaf osmotic adjustment.

  4. Gravity-controlled asymmetrical transport of auxin regulates a gravitropic response in the early growth stage of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum) epicotyls: studies using simulated microgravity conditions on a three-dimensional clinostat and using an agravitropic mutant, ageotropum.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Tomoki; Miyamoto, Kensuke; Ueda, Junichi

    2007-09-01

    Increased expression of the auxin-inducible gene PsIAA4/5 was observed in the elongated side of epicotyls in early growth stages of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) seedlings grown in a horizontal or an inclined position under 1 g conditions. Under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3D clinostat, accumulation of PsIAA4/5 mRNA was found throughout epicotyls showing automorphosis. Polar auxin transport in the proximal side of epicotyls changed when the seedlings were grown in a horizontal or an inclined position under 1 g conditions, but that under clinorotation did not, regardless of the direction of seed setting. Accumulation of PsPIN1 and PsPIN2 mRNAs in epicotyls was affected by gravistimulation, but not by clinorotation. Under 1 g conditions, auxin-transport inhibitors made epicotyls of seedlings grown in a horizontal or inclined position grow toward the proximal direction to cotyledons. These inhibitors led to epicotyl bending toward the cotyledons in seedlings grown in an inclined position under clinorotation. Polar auxin transport, as well as growth direction, of epicotyls of the agravitropic mutant ageotropum did not respond to various gravistimulation. These results suggest that alteration of polar auxin transport in the proximal side of epicotyls regulates the graviresponse of pea epicotyls. PMID:17712525

  5. A single genetic locus in the phytopathogen Pantoea stewartii enables gut colonization and pathogenicity in an insect host.

    PubMed

    Stavrinides, John; No, Alexander; Ochman, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Aphids are typically exposed to a variety of epiphytic and phytopathogenic bacteria, many of which have entomopathogenic potential. Here we describe the interaction between Pantoea stewartii ssp. stewartii DC283 (DC283), an enteric phytopathogen and causal agent of Stewart's wilt, and the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. When ingested by aphids, DC283 establishes and aggregates in the crop and gut, preventing honeydew flow and excretion, resulting in aphid death in 72 h. A mutagenesis screen identified a single locus, termed ucp1 (youcannot pass), whose disruption abolishes aphid pathogenicity. Moreover, the expression of ucp1 in Escherichia coli is sufficient to mediate the hindgut aggregation phenotype by this normally avirulent species. Ucp1 is related to six other proteins in the DC283 genome, each having a common N-terminal region and a divergent C-terminus, but only ucp1 has a role in pathogenicity. Based on predicted motifs and secondary structure, Ucp1 is a membrane-bound protein that functions in bacterial adhesion and promotes the formation of aggregates that are lethal to the insect host. These results illustrate that the enteric plant pathogenic bacteria have the capacity to exploit alternative non-plant hosts, and retain genetic determinants for colonizing the gut. PMID:19788413

  6. Evidence of horizontal transfer of non-autonomous Lep1 Helitrons facilitated by host-parasite interactions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xuezhu; Gao, Jingkun; Li, Fei; Wang, Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal transfer (HT) of transposable elements has been recognized to be a major force driving genomic variation and biological innovation of eukaryotic organisms. However, the mechanisms of HT in eukaryotes remain poorly appreciated. The non-autonomous Helitron family, Lep1, has been found to be widespread in lepidopteran species, and showed little interspecific sequence similarity of acquired sequences at 3′ end, which makes Lep1 a good candidate for the study of HT. In this study, we describe the Lep1-like elements in multiple non-lepidopteran species, including two aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum and Aphis gossypii, two parasitoid wasps, Cotesia vestalis, and Copidosoma floridanum, one beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis, as well as two bracoviruses in parasitoid wasps, and one intracellular microsporidia parasite, Nosema bombycis. The patchy distribution and high sequence similarity of Lep1-like elements among distantly related lineages as well as incongruence of Lep1-like elements and host phylogeny suggest the occurrence of HT. Remarkably, the acquired sequences of both NbLep1 from N. bombycis and CfLep1 from C. floridanum showed over 90% identity with their lepidopteran host Lep1. Thus, our study provides evidence of HT facilitated by host-parasite interactions. Furthermore, in the context of these data, we discuss the putative directions and vectors of HT of Lep1 Helitrons. PMID:24874102

  7. Evidence of horizontal transfer of non-autonomous Lep1 Helitrons facilitated by host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuezhu; Gao, Jingkun; Li, Fei; Wang, Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal transfer (HT) of transposable elements has been recognized to be a major force driving genomic variation and biological innovation of eukaryotic organisms. However, the mechanisms of HT in eukaryotes remain poorly appreciated. The non-autonomous Helitron family, Lep1, has been found to be widespread in lepidopteran species, and showed little interspecific sequence similarity of acquired sequences at 3' end, which makes Lep1 a good candidate for the study of HT. In this study, we describe the Lep1-like elements in multiple non-lepidopteran species, including two aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum and Aphis gossypii, two parasitoid wasps, Cotesia vestalis, and Copidosoma floridanum, one beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis, as well as two bracoviruses in parasitoid wasps, and one intracellular microsporidia parasite, Nosema bombycis. The patchy distribution and high sequence similarity of Lep1-like elements among distantly related lineages as well as incongruence of Lep1-like elements and host phylogeny suggest the occurrence of HT. Remarkably, the acquired sequences of both NbLep1 from N. bombycis and CfLep1 from C. floridanum showed over 90% identity with their lepidopteran host Lep1. Thus, our study provides evidence of HT facilitated by host-parasite interactions. Furthermore, in the context of these data, we discuss the putative directions and vectors of HT of Lep1 Helitrons. PMID:24874102

  8. Evolutionary conservation of candidate osmoregulation genes in plant phloem sap-feeding insects.

    PubMed

    Jing, X; White, T A; Luan, J; Jiao, C; Fei, Z; Douglas, A E

    2016-06-01

    The high osmotic pressure generated by sugars in plant phloem sap is reduced in phloem-feeding aphids by sugar transformations and facilitated water flux in the gut. The genes mediating these osmoregulatory functions have been identified and validated empirically in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum: sucrase 1 (SUC1), a sucrase in glycoside hydrolase family 13 (GH13), and aquaporin 1 (AQP1), a member of the Drosophila integral protein (DRIP) family of aquaporins. Here, we describe molecular analysis of GH13 and AQP genes in phloem-feeding representatives of the four phloem-feeding groups: aphids (Myzus persicae), coccids (Planococcus citri), psyllids (Diaphorina citri, Bactericera cockerelli) and whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci MEAM1 and MED). A single candidate GH13-SUC gene and DRIP-AQP gene were identified in the genome/transcriptome of most insects tested by the criteria of sequence motif and gene expression in the gut. Exceptionally, the psyllid Ba. cockerelli transcriptome included a gut-expressed Pyrocoelia rufa integral protein (PRIP)-AQP, but has no DRIP-AQP transcripts, suggesting that PRIP-AQP is recruited for osmoregulatory function in this insect. This study indicates that phylogenetically related SUC and AQP genes may generally mediate osmoregulatory functions in these diverse phloem-feeding insects, and provides candidate genes for empirical validation and development as targets for osmotic disruption of pest species. PMID:26896054

  9. Matching the supply of bacterial nutrients to the nutritional demand of the animal host

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Calum W.; Poliakov, Anton; Haribal, Meena; Jander, Georg; van Wijk, Klaas J.; Douglas, Angela E.

    2014-01-01

    Various animals derive nutrients from symbiotic microorganisms with much-reduced genomes, but it is unknown whether, and how, the supply of these nutrients is regulated. Here, we demonstrate that the production of essential amino acids (EAAs) by the bacterium Buchnera aphidicola in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum is elevated when aphids are reared on diets from which that EAA are omitted, demonstrating that Buchnera scale EAA production to host demand. Quantitative proteomics of bacteriocytes (host cells bearing Buchnera) revealed that these metabolic changes are not accompanied by significant change in Buchnera or host proteins, suggesting that EAA production is regulated post-translationally. Bacteriocytes in aphids reared on diet lacking the EAA methionine had elevated concentrations of both methionine and the precursor cystathionine, indicating that methionine production is promoted by precursor supply and is not subject to feedback inhibition by methionine. Furthermore, methionine production by isolated Buchnera increased with increasing cystathionine concentration. We propose that Buchnera metabolism is poised for EAA production at certain maximal rates, and the realized release rate is determined by precursor supply from the host. The incidence of host regulation of symbiont nutritional function via supply of key nutritional inputs in other symbioses remains to be investigated. PMID:25080346

  10. Matching the supply of bacterial nutrients to the nutritional demand of the animal host.

    PubMed

    Russell, Calum W; Poliakov, Anton; Haribal, Meena; Jander, Georg; van Wijk, Klaas J; Douglas, Angela E

    2014-09-22

    Various animals derive nutrients from symbiotic microorganisms with much-reduced genomes, but it is unknown whether, and how, the supply of these nutrients is regulated. Here, we demonstrate that the production of essential amino acids (EAAs) by the bacterium Buchnera aphidicola in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum is elevated when aphids are reared on diets from which that EAA are omitted, demonstrating that Buchnera scale EAA production to host demand. Quantitative proteomics of bacteriocytes (host cells bearing Buchnera) revealed that these metabolic changes are not accompanied by significant change in Buchnera or host proteins, suggesting that EAA production is regulated post-translationally. Bacteriocytes in aphids reared on diet lacking the EAA methionine had elevated concentrations of both methionine and the precursor cystathionine, indicating that methionine production is promoted by precursor supply and is not subject to feedback inhibition by methionine. Furthermore, methionine production by isolated Buchnera increased with increasing cystathionine concentration. We propose that Buchnera metabolism is poised for EAA production at certain maximal rates, and the realized release rate is determined by precursor supply from the host. The incidence of host regulation of symbiont nutritional function via supply of key nutritional inputs in other symbioses remains to be investigated. PMID:25080346

  11. RNA interference against gut osmoregulatory genes in phloem-feeding insects.

    PubMed

    Tzin, Vered; Yang, Xiaowei; Jing, Xiangfeng; Zhang, Kai; Jander, Georg; Douglas, Angela E

    2015-08-01

    In planta RNAi (i.e. plants engineered to synthesize active RNAi molecules) has great potential as a strategy to control insect crop pests. This study investigated the impact of RNAi against osmoregulatory genes expressed in the gut of two phloem-feeding species, the green peach aphid Myzus persicae and the potato/tomato psyllid Bactericera cockerelli. The target genes comprising candidate gut sucrase, aquaporin and sugar transporter genes were identified by mining insect genomic and transcriptomic datasets for genes orthologous to empirically-tested osmoregulatory genes of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. Insects feeding on plants with RNAi against the target genes exhibited elevated hemolymph osmotic pressure (a predicted effect of perturbed osmotic function) and some reduction in performance, especially offspring production in M. persicae and mortality in B. cockerelli, associated with up to 50% reduction in mean expression of the target genes. The effects were particularly pronounced for insects treated with RNAi against multiple osmoregulatory genes, i.e. combinatorial RNAi, suggesting that the partial silencing of multiple genes with related roles can yield greater functional impairment than RNAi against a single gene. These results demonstrate the potential of RNAi against osmoregulatory genes, but further advances to improve the efficacy of RNAi in phloem-feeding insects are required to achieve effective pest control. PMID:26071792

  12. Expansion of Genes Encoding piRNA-Associated Argonaute Proteins in the Pea Aphid: Diversification of Expression Profiles in Different Plastic Morphs

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hsiao-ling; Tanguy, Sylvie; Rispe, Claude; Gauthier, Jean-Pierre; Walsh, Tom; Gordon, Karl; Edwards, Owain; Tagu, Denis; Chang, Chun-che; Jaubert-Possamai, Stéphanie

    2011-01-01

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are known to regulate transposon activity in germ cells of several animal models that propagate sexually. However, the role of piRNAs during asexual reproduction remains almost unknown. Aphids that can alternate sexual and asexual reproduction cycles in response to seasonal changes of photoperiod provide a unique opportunity to study piRNAs and the piRNA pathway in both reproductive modes. Taking advantage of the recently sequenced genome of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, we found an unusually large lineage-specific expansion of genes encoding the Piwi sub-clade of Argonaute proteins. In situ hybridisation showed differential expressions between the duplicated piwi copies: while Api-piwi2 and Api-piwi6 are “specialised” in germ cells their most closely related copy, respectively Api-piwi5 and Api-piwi3, are expressed in the somatic cells. The differential expression was also identified in duplicated ago3: Api-ago3a in germ cells and Api-ago3b in somatic cells. Moreover, analyses of expression profiles of the expanded piwi and ago3 genes by semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that expressions varied according to the reproductive types. These specific expression patterns suggest that expanded aphid piwi and ago3 genes have distinct roles in asexual and sexual reproduction. PMID:22162754

  13. Genetic and metabolic determinants of nutritional phenotype in an insect-bacterial symbiosis.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, S J; Thomas, G H; Douglas, A E

    2011-05-01

    The pervasive influence of resident microorganisms on the phenotype of their hosts is exemplified by the intracellular bacterium Buchnera aphidicola, which provides its aphid partner with essential amino acids (EAAs). We investigated variation in the dietary requirement for EAAs among four pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) clones. Buchnera-derived nitrogen contributed to the synthesis of all EAAs for which aphid clones required a dietary supply, and to none of the EAAs for which all four clones had no dietary requirement, suggesting that low total dietary nitrogen may select for reduced synthesis of certain EAAs in some aphid clones. The sequenced Buchnera genomes showed that the EAA nutritional phenotype (i.e. the profile of dietary EAAs required by the aphid) cannot be attributed to sequence variation of Buchnera genes coding EAA biosynthetic enzymes. Metabolic modelling by flux balance analysis demonstrated that EAA output from Buchnera can be determined precisely by the flux of host metabolic precursors to Buchnera. Specifically, the four EAA nutritional phenotypes could be reproduced by metabolic models with unique profiles of host inputs, dominated by variation in supply of aspartate, homocysteine and glutamate. This suggests that the nutritional phenotype of the symbiosis is determined principally by host metabolism and transporter genes that regulate nutrient supply to Buchnera. Intraspecific variation in the nutritional phenotype of symbioses is expected to mediate partitioning of plant resources among aphid genotypes, potentially promoting the genetic subdivision of aphid populations. In this way, microbial symbioses may play an important role in the evolutionary diversification of phytophagous insects. PMID:21392141

  14. Aphids evolved novel secreted proteins for symbiosis with bacterial endosymbiont.

    PubMed

    Shigenobu, Shuji; Stern, David L

    2013-01-01

    Aphids evolved novel cells, called bacteriocytes, that differentiate specifically to harbour the obligatory mutualistic endosymbiotic bacteria Buchnera aphidicola. The genome of the host aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum contains many orphan genes that display no similarity with genes found in other sequenced organisms, prompting us to hypothesize that some of these orphan genes are related to lineage-specific traits, such as symbiosis. We conducted deep sequencing of bacteriocytes mRNA followed by whole mount in situ hybridizations of over-represented transcripts encoding aphid-specific orphan proteins. We identified a novel class of genes that encode small proteins with signal peptides, which are often cysteine-rich, that are over-represented in bacteriocytes. These genes are first expressed at a developmental time point coincident with the incorporation of symbionts strictly in the cells that contribute to the bacteriocyte and this bacteriocyte-specific expression is maintained throughout the aphid's life. The expression pattern suggests that recently evolved secretion proteins act within bacteriocytes, perhaps to mediate the symbiosis with beneficial bacterial partners, which is reminiscent of the evolution of novel cysteine-rich secreted proteins of leguminous plants that regulate nitrogen-fixing endosymbionts. PMID:23173201

  15. Cloning and functional characterization of the promoter of PsSEOF1 gene from Pisum sativum under different stress conditions using Agrobacterium-mediated transient assay

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Vineet Kumar; Raikwar, Shailendra; Tuteja, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    PsSEOF1, a SEO (sieve element occlusion) gene family protein (forisome) is calcium powered motor protein and is located close to plasma membrane of sieve element. In sieve element (SE) it senses the calcium ion levels and undergoes ATP-independent conformational shifts. Forisome, meaning gate-bodies (Latin foris: wing of a gate; Greek soma: body). Recent reports show that SEO gene family protein can prevent the loss of nutrient rich photoassimilate upon wound injury. The regulation of SEO protein forisome under abiotic/ biotic stress is still unknown. The analysis of cis-regulatory element present in the upstream region is not well understood. Tissue specific promoters guarantee correct expression when it perceives particular stimuli. Here we report isolation of tissue specific promoter of PsSEOF1 was isolated by gene walking PCR from P. sativum (pea) genomic DNA library constructed by BD genome walker kit. In silico analysis revealed several putative cis element within this promoter sequence like wound response, cold, dehydration. Putative elements which might be required for its vascular tissue specificity has also been identified. The GUS activities of PsSEOF1 promoter-GUS chimeric construct in the agroinfiltrated leaves under different environmental stress abiotic and biotic like wound, cold, salt and phytohormones has shown high level of GUS activity. To identify the activity of PsSEOF1 promoter under different stress condition an Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression of tobacco plants were subjected to histochemical GUS staining. Stress-inducible nature of PsSEOF1 promoter opens possibility for the study of the PsSEOF1 gene regulation under stress condition. The isolated promoter sequence could serve as an important candidate for tissue specific promoter in genetic engineering of plant under stress conditions. PMID:25763698

  16. Genome size evolution in macroparasites.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, Lotta-Riina; Pulkkinen, Katja

    2015-04-01

    Reduction in genome size has been associated not only with a parasitic lifestyle in intracellular microparasites but also in some macroparasitic insects and nematodes. We collected the available data on genome size for flatworms, annelids, nematodes and arthropods, compared those with available data for the phylogenetically closest free-living taxa and found evidence of smaller genome sizes for parasites in six of nine comparisons. Our results suggest that despite great differences in evolutionary history and life cycles, parasitism as a lifestyle promotes convergent genome size reduction in macroparasites. We discuss factors that could be associated with small genome size in parasites which require further exploration in the future. PMID:25724591

  17. Professional medical education and genomics.

    PubMed

    Demmer, Laurie A; Waggoner, Darrel J

    2014-01-01

    Genomic medicine is a relatively new concept that involves using individual patients' genomic results in their clinical care. Genetic technology has advanced swiftly over the past decade, and most providers have been left behind without an understanding of this complex field. To realize its full potential, genomic medicine must be both understood and accepted by the greater medical community. The current state of professional medical education in genomics and genomic medicine is reviewed, including ongoing plans to expand educational efforts for medical students, clinical geneticists, and nongeneticist physicians. PMID:24635717

  18. Evolution of plant genome architecture.

    PubMed

    Wendel, Jonathan F; Jackson, Scott A; Meyers, Blake C; Wing, Rod A

    2016-01-01

    We have witnessed an explosion in our understanding of the evolution and structure of plant genomes in recent years. Here, we highlight three important emergent realizations: (1) that the evolutionary history of all plant genomes contains multiple, cyclical episodes of whole-genome doubling that were followed by myriad fractionation processes; (2) that the vast majority of the variation in genome size reflects the dynamics of proliferation and loss of lineage-specific transposable elements; and (3) that various classes of small RNAs help shape genomic architecture and function. We illustrate ways in which understanding these organism-level and molecular genetic processes can be used for crop plant improvement. PMID:26926526

  19. Rice: The First Crop Genome.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Scott A

    2016-12-01

    Rice was the first sequenced crop genome, paving the way for the sequencing of additional and more complicated crop genomes. The impact that the genome sequence made on rice genetics and breeding research was immediate, as evidence by citations and DNA marker use. The impact on other crop genomes was evident too, particularly for those within the grass family. As we celebrate 10 years since the completion of the rice genome sequence, we look forward to new empowering tool sets that will further revolutionize research in rice genetics and breeding and result in varieties that will continue to feed a growing population. PMID:27003180

  20. Nongenetic functions of the genome.

    PubMed

    Bustin, Michael; Misteli, Tom

    2016-05-01

    The primary function of the genome is to store, propagate, and express the genetic information that gives rise to a cell's architectural and functional machinery. However, the genome is also a major structural component of the cell. Besides its genetic roles, the genome affects cellular functions by nongenetic means through its physical and structural properties, particularly by exerting mechanical forces and by serving as a scaffold for binding of cellular components. Major cellular processes affected by nongenetic functions of the genome include establishment of nuclear structure, signal transduction, mechanoresponses, cell migration, and vision in nocturnal animals. We discuss the concept, mechanisms, and implications of nongenetic functions of the genome. PMID:27151873

  1. Genome of Crocodilepox Virus

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, C. L.; Tulman, E. R.; Delhon, G.; Lu, Z.; Viljoen, G. J.; Wallace, D. B.; Kutish, G. F.; Rock, D. L.

    2006-01-01

    Here, we present the genome sequence, with analysis, of a poxvirus infecting Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) (crocodilepox virus; CRV). The genome is 190,054 bp (62% G+C) and predicted to contain 173 genes encoding proteins of 53 to 1,941 amino acids. The central genomic region contains genes conserved and generally colinear with those of other chordopoxviruses (ChPVs). CRV is distinct, as the terminal 33-kbp (left) and 13-kbp (right) genomic regions are largely CRV specific, containing 48 unique genes which lack similarity to other poxvirus genes. Notably, CRV also contains 14 unique genes which disrupt ChPV gene colinearity within the central genomic region, including 7 genes encoding GyrB-like ATPase domains similar to those in cellular type IIA DNA topoisomerases, suggestive of novel ATP-dependent functions. The presence of 10 CRV proteins with similarity to components of cellular multisubunit E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase complexes, including 9 proteins containing F-box motifs and F-box-associated regions and a homologue of cellular anaphase-promoting complex subunit 11 (Apc11), suggests that modification of host ubiquitination pathways may be significant for CRV-host cell interaction. CRV encodes a novel complement of proteins potentially involved in DNA replication, including a NAD+-dependent DNA ligase and a protein with similarity to both vaccinia virus F16L and prokaryotic serine site-specific resolvase-invertases. CRV lacks genes encoding proteins for nucleotide metabolism. CRV shares notable genomic similarities with molluscum contagiosum virus, including genes found only in these two viruses. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that CRV is quite distinct from other ChPVs, representing a new genus within the subfamily Chordopoxvirinae, and it lacks recognizable homologues of most ChPV genes involved in virulence and host range, including those involving interferon response, intracellular signaling, and host immune response modulation. These data reveal

  2. Genome of crocodilepox virus.

    PubMed

    Afonso, C L; Tulman, E R; Delhon, G; Lu, Z; Viljoen, G J; Wallace, D B; Kutish, G F; Rock, D L

    2006-05-01

    Here, we present the genome sequence, with analysis, of a poxvirus infecting Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) (crocodilepox virus; CRV). The genome is 190,054 bp (62% G+C) and predicted to contain 173 genes encoding proteins of 53 to 1,941 amino acids. The central genomic region contains genes conserved and generally colinear with those of other chordopoxviruses (ChPVs). CRV is distinct, as the terminal 33-kbp (left) and 13-kbp (right) genomic regions are largely CRV specific, containing 48 unique genes which lack similarity to other poxvirus genes. Notably, CRV also contains 14 unique genes which disrupt ChPV gene colinearity within the central genomic region, including 7 genes encoding GyrB-like ATPase domains similar to those in cellular type IIA DNA topoisomerases, suggestive of novel ATP-dependent functions. The presence of 10 CRV proteins with similarity to components of cellular multisubunit E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase complexes, including 9 proteins containing F-box motifs and F-box-associated regions and a homologue of cellular anaphase-promoting complex subunit 11 (Apc11), suggests that modification of host ubiquitination pathways may be significant for CRV-host cell interaction. CRV encodes a novel complement of proteins potentially involved in DNA replication, including a NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase and a protein with similarity to both vaccinia virus F16L and prokaryotic serine site-specific resolvase-invertases. CRV lacks genes encoding proteins for nucleotide metabolism. CRV shares notable genomic similarities with molluscum contagiosum virus, including genes found only in these two viruses. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that CRV is quite distinct from other ChPVs, representing a new genus within the subfamily Chordopoxvirinae, and it lacks recognizable homologues of most ChPV genes involved in virulence and host range, including those involving interferon response, intracellular signaling, and host immune response modulation. These data

  3. Evolution of small prokaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Cano, David J.; Reyes-Prieto, Mariana; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Partida-Martínez, Laila P.; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andrés; Delaye, Luis

    2015-01-01

    As revealed by genome sequencing, the biology of prokaryotes with reduced genomes is strikingly diverse. These include free-living prokaryotes with ∼800 genes as well as endosymbiotic bacteria with as few as ∼140 genes. Comparative genomics is revealing the evolutionary mechanisms that led to these small genomes. In the case of free-living prokaryotes, natural selection directly favored genome reduction, while in the case of endosymbiotic prokaryotes neutral processes played a more prominent role. However, new experimental data suggest that selective processes may be at operation as well for endosymbiotic prokaryotes at least during the first stages of genome reduction. Endosymbiotic prokaryotes have evolved diverse strategies for living with reduced gene sets inside a host-defined medium. These include utilization of host-encoded functions (some of them coded by genes acquired by gene transfer from the endosymbiont and/or other bacteria); metabolic complementation between co-symbionts; and forming consortiums with other bacteria within the host. Recent genome sequencing projects of intracellular mutualistic bacteria showed that previously believed universal evolutionary trends like reduced G+C content and conservation of genome synteny are not always present in highly reduced genomes. Finally, the simplified molecular machinery of some of these organisms with small genomes may be used to aid in the design of artificial minimal cells. Here we review recent genomic discoveries of the biology of prokaryotes endowed with small gene sets and discuss the evolutionary mechanisms that have been proposed to explain their peculiar nature. PMID:25610432

  4. Advances in plant chromosome genomics.

    PubMed

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Vrána, Jan; Cápal, Petr; Kubaláková, Marie; Burešová, Veronika; Simková, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) is revolutionizing genomics and is providing novel insights into genome organization, evolution and function. The number of plant genomes targeted for sequencing is rising. For the moment, however, the acquisition of full genome sequences in large genome species remains difficult, largely because the short reads produced by NGS platforms are inadequate to cope with repeat-rich DNA, which forms a large part of these genomes. The problem of sequence redundancy is compounded in polyploids, which dominate the plant kingdom. An approach to overcoming some of these difficulties is to reduce the full nuclear genome to its individual chromosomes using flow-sorting. The DNA acquired in this way has proven to be suitable for many applications, including PCR-based physical mapping, in situ hybridization, forming DNA arrays, the development of DNA markers, the construction of BAC libraries and positional cloning. Coupling chromosome sorting with NGS offers opportunities for the study of genome organization at the single chromosomal level, for comparative analyses between related species and for the validation of whole genome assemblies. Apart from the primary aim of reducing the complexity of the template, taking a chromosome-based approach enables independent teams to work in parallel, each tasked with the analysis of a different chromosome(s). Given that the number of plant species tractable for chromosome sorting is increasing, the likelihood is that chromosome genomics - the marriage of cytology and genomics - will make a significant contribution to the field of plant genetics. PMID:24406816

  5. Informational laws of genome structures

    PubMed Central

    Bonnici, Vincenzo; Manca, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the analysis of genomes by means of strings of length k occurring in the genomes, called k-mers, has provided important insights into the basic mechanisms and design principles of genome structures. In the present study, we focus on the proper choice of the value of k for applying information theoretic concepts that express intrinsic aspects of genomes. The value k = lg2(n), where n is the genome length, is determined to be the best choice in the definition of some genomic informational indexes that are studied and computed for seventy genomes. These indexes, which are based on information entropies and on suitable comparisons with random genomes, suggest five informational laws, to which all of the considered genomes obey. Moreover, an informational genome complexity measure is proposed, which is a generalized logistic map that balances entropic and anti-entropic components of genomes and is related to their evolutionary dynamics. Finally, applications to computational synthetic biology are briefly outlined. PMID:27354155

  6. Informational laws of genome structures.

    PubMed

    Bonnici, Vincenzo; Manca, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the analysis of genomes by means of strings of length k occurring in the genomes, called k-mers, has provided important insights into the basic mechanisms and design principles of genome structures. In the present study, we focus on the proper choice of the value of k for applying information theoretic concepts that express intrinsic aspects of genomes. The value k = lg2(n), where n is the genome length, is determined to be the best choice in the definition of some genomic informational indexes that are studied and computed for seventy genomes. These indexes, which are based on information entropies and on suitable comparisons with random genomes, suggest five informational laws, to which all of the considered genomes obey. Moreover, an informational genome complexity measure is proposed, which is a generalized logistic map that balances entropic and anti-entropic components of genomes and is related to their evolutionary dynamics. Finally, applications to computational synthetic biology are briefly outlined. PMID:27354155

  7. Informational laws of genome structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnici, Vincenzo; Manca, Vincenzo

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, the analysis of genomes by means of strings of length k occurring in the genomes, called k-mers, has provided important insights into the basic mechanisms and design principles of genome structures. In the present study, we focus on the proper choice of the value of k for applying information theoretic concepts that express intrinsic aspects of genomes. The value k = lg2(n), where n is the genome length, is determined to be the best choice in the definition of some genomic informational indexes that are studied and computed for seventy genomes. These indexes, which are based on information entropies and on suitable comparisons with random genomes, suggest five informational laws, to which all of the considered genomes obey. Moreover, an informational genome complexity measure is proposed, which is a generalized logistic map that balances entropic and anti-entropic components of genomes and is related to their evolutionary dynamics. Finally, applications to computational synthetic biology are briefly outlined.

  8. Comparative genomics of Brassicaceae crops

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Li, Xiaonan; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2014-01-01

    The family Brassicaceae is one of the major groups of the plant kingdom and comprises diverse species of great economic, agronomic and scientific importance, including the model plant Arabidopsis. The sequencing of the Arabidopsis genome has revolutionized our knowledge in the field of plant biology and provides a foundation in genomics and comparative biology. Genomic resources have been utilized in Brassica for diversity analyses, construction of genetic maps and identification of agronomic traits. In Brassicaceae, comparative sequence analysis across the species has been utilized to understand genome structure, evolution and the detection of conserved genomic segments. In this review, we focus on the progress made in genetic resource development, genome sequencing and comparative mapping in Brassica and related species. The utilization of genomic resources and next-generation sequencing approaches in improvement of Brassica crops is also discussed. PMID:24987286

  9. Toward genome-enabled mycology.

    PubMed

    Hibbett, David S; Stajich, Jason E; Spatafora, Joseph W

    2013-01-01

    Genome-enabled mycology is a rapidly expanding field that is characterized by the pervasive use of genome-scale data and associated computational tools in all aspects of fungal biology. Genome-enabled mycology is integrative and often requires teams of researchers with diverse skills in organismal mycology, bioinformatics and molecular biology. This issue of Mycologia presents the first complete fungal genomes in the history of the journal, reflecting the ongoing transformation of mycology into a genome-enabled science. Here, we consider the prospects for genome-enabled mycology and the technical and social challenges that will need to be overcome to grow the database of complete fungal genomes and enable all fungal biologists to make use of the new data. PMID:23928422

  10. Comparative genomics of Brassicaceae crops.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Li, Xiaonan; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2014-05-01

    The family Brassicaceae is one of the major groups of the plant kingdom and comprises diverse species of great economic, agronomic and scientific importance, including the model plant Arabidopsis. The sequencing of the Arabidopsis genome has revolutionized our knowledge in the field of plant biology and provides a foundation in genomics and comparative biology. Genomic resources have been utilized in Brassica for diversity analyses, construction of genetic maps and identification of agronomic traits. In Brassicaceae, comparative sequence analysis across the species has been utilized to understand genome structure, evolution and the detection of conserved genomic segments. In this review, we focus on the progress made in genetic resource development, genome sequencing and comparative mapping in Brassica and related species. The utilization of genomic resources and next-generation sequencing approaches in improvement of Brassica crops is also discussed. PMID:24987286

  11. eGenomics: Cataloguing Our Complete Genome Collection III

    PubMed Central

    Field, Dawn; Garrity, George; Gray, Tanya; Selengut, Jeremy; Sterk, Peter; Thomson, Nick; Tatusova, Tatiana; Cochrane, Guy; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Kottmann, Renzo; Lister, Allyson L.; Tateno, Yoshio; Vaughan, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This meeting report summarizes the proceedings of the “eGenomics: Cataloguing our Complete Genome Collection III” workshop held September 11–13, 2006, at the National Institute for Environmental eScience (NIEeS), Cambridge, United Kingdom. This 3rd workshop of the Genomic Standards Consortium was divided into two parts. The first half of the three-day workshop was dedicated to reviewing the genomic diversity of our current and future genome and metagenome collection, and exploring linkages to a series of existing projects through formal presentations. The second half was dedicated to strategic discussions. Outcomes of the workshop include a revised “Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence” (MIGS) specification (v1.1), consensus on a variety of features to be added to the Genome Catalogue (GCat), agreement by several researchers to adopt MIGS for imminent genome publications, and an agreement by the EBI and NCBI to input their genome collections into GCat for the purpose of quantifying the amount of optional data already available (e.g., for geographic location coordinates) and working towards a single, global list of all public genomes and metagenomes.

  12. The Genomic Standards Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Field, Dawn; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Cochrane, Guy; Cole, James R.; Dawyndt, Peter; Garrity, George M.; Gilbert, Jack; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Hirschman, Lynette; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Knight, Rob; Kottmann, Renzo; Kyrpides, Nikos; Meyer, Folker; San Gil, Inigo; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Schriml, Lynn M.; Sterk, Peter; Tatusova, Tatiana; Ussery, David W.; White, Owen; Wooley, John

    2011-01-01

    A vast and rich body of information has grown up as a result of the world's enthusiasm for 'omics technologies. Finding ways to describe and make available this information that maximise its usefulness has become a major effort across the 'omics world. At the heart of this effort is the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), an open-membership organization that drives community-based standardization activities, Here we provide a short history of the GSC, provide an overview of its range of current activities, and make a call for the scientific community to join forces to improve the quality and quantity of contextual information about our public collections of genomes, metagenomes, and marker gene sequences. PMID:21713030

  13. The dog genome.

    PubMed

    Galibert, F; André, C

    2006-01-01

    Over the last few centuries, several hundred dog breeds have been artificially selected through intense breeding, resulting in the modern dog population having the widest polymorphism spectrum in terms of body shape, behavior and aptitude among mammals. Unfortunately, this diversification has predisposed most breeds to specific diseases of genetic origin. The highly fragmented nature of the dog population offers a great opportunity to track the genes and alleles responsible for these diseases as well as for the various phenotypic traits. This has led to a thorough analysis of the dog genome. Here, we report the main results obtained during the last ten years, culminating in the recent publication of a complete dog genome sequence. PMID:18753768

  14. Big cat genomics.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren E

    2005-01-01

    Advances in population and quantitative genomics, aided by the computational algorithms that employ genetic theory and practice, are now being applied to biological questions that surround free-ranging species not traditionally suitable for genetic enquiry. Here we review how applications of molecular genetic tools have been used to describe the natural history, present status, and future disposition of wild cat species. Insight into phylogenetic hierarchy, demographic contractions, geographic population substructure, behavioral ecology, and infectious diseases have revealed strategies for survival and adaptation of these fascinating predators. Conservation, stabilization, and management of the big cats are important areas that derive benefit from the genome resources expanded and applied to highly successful species, imperiled by an expanding human population. PMID:16124868

  15. Mapping the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Annas, G.C.; Elias, S.

    1992-01-01

    This article is a review of the book Mapping the Human Genome: Using Law and Ethics as Guides, edited by George C. Annas and Sherman Elias. The book is a collection of essays on the subject of using ethics and laws as guides to justify human gene mapping. It addresses specific issues such problems related to eugenics, patents, insurance as well as broad issues such as the societal definitions of normality.

  16. Genomic landscape of liposarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Kanojia, Deepika; Nagata, Yasunobu; Garg, Manoj; Lee, Dhong Hyun; Sato, Aiko; Yoshida, Kenichi; Sato, Yusuke; Sanada, Masashi; Mayakonda, Anand; Bartenhagen, Christoph; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Doan, Ngan B.; Said, Jonathan W.; Mohith, S.; Gunasekar, Swetha; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Myklebost, Ola; Yang, Henry; Dugas, Martin; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A.; Silberman, Allan W.; Forscher, Charles; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Ogawa, Seishi; Koeffler, H. Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Liposarcoma (LPS) is the most common type of soft tissue sarcoma accounting for 20% of all adult sarcomas. Due to absence of clinically effective treatment options in inoperable situations and resistance to chemotherapeutics, a critical need exists to identify novel therapeutic targets. We analyzed LPS genomic landscape using SNP arrays, whole exome sequencing and targeted exome sequencing to uncover the genomic information for development of specific anti-cancer targets. SNP array analysis indicated known amplified genes (MDM2, CDK4, HMGA2) and important novel genes (UAP1, MIR557, LAMA4, CPM, IGF2, ERBB3, IGF1R). Carboxypeptidase M (CPM), recurrently amplified gene in well-differentiated/de-differentiated LPS was noted as a putative oncogene involved in the EGFR pathway. Notable deletions were found at chromosome 1p (RUNX3, ARID1A), chromosome 11q (ATM, CHEK1) and chromosome 13q14.2 (MIR15A, MIR16-1). Significantly and recurrently mutated genes (false discovery rate < 0.05) included PLEC (27%), MXRA5 (21%), FAT3 (24%), NF1 (20%), MDC1 (10%), TP53 (7%) and CHEK2 (6%). Further, in vitro and in vivo functional studies provided evidence for the tumor suppressor role for Neurofibromin 1 (NF1) gene in different subtypes of LPS. Pathway analysis of recurrent mutations demonstrated signaling through MAPK, JAK-STAT, Wnt, ErbB, axon guidance, apoptosis, DNA damage repair and cell cycle pathways were involved in liposarcomagenesis. Interestingly, we also found mutational and copy number heterogeneity within a primary LPS tumor signifying the importance of multi-region sequencing for cancer-genome guided therapy. In summary, these findings provide insight into the genomic complexity of LPS and highlight potential druggable pathways for targeted therapeutic approach. PMID:26643872

  17. Bioinformatics and genomic medicine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju Han

    2002-01-01

    Bioinformatics is a rapidly emerging field of biomedical research. A flood of large-scale genomic and postgenomic data means that many of the challenges in biomedical research are now challenges in computational science. Clinical informatics has long developed methodologies to improve biomedical research and clinical care by integrating experimental and clinical information systems. The informatics revolution in both bioinformatics and clinical informatics will eventually change the current practice of medicine, including diagnostics, therapeutics, and prognostics. Postgenome informatics, powered by high-throughput technologies and genomic-scale databases, is likely to transform our biomedical understanding forever, in much the same way that biochemistry did a generation ago. This paper describes how these technologies will impact biomedical research and clinical care, emphasizing recent advances in biochip-based functional genomics and proteomics. Basic data preprocessing with normalization and filtering, primary pattern analysis, and machine-learning algorithms are discussed. Use of integrative biochip informatics technologies, including multivariate data projection, gene-metabolic pathway mapping, automated biomolecular annotation, text mining of factual and literature databases, and the integrated management of biomolecular databases, are also discussed. PMID:12544491

  18. Exploring genomes for glycosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Sara Fasmer; Bettler, Emmanuel; Rinnan, Asmund; Engelsen, Søren B; Breton, Christelle

    2010-10-01

    Glycosyltransferases are one of the largest and most diverse enzyme groups in Nature. They catalyse the synthesis of glycosidic linkages by the transfer of a sugar residue from a donor to an acceptor substrate. These enzymes have been classified into families on the basis of amino acid sequence similarity that are kept updated in the Carbohydrate Active enZyme database (CAZy, ). The repertoire of glycosyltransferases in genomes is believed to determine the diversity of cellular glycan structures, and current estimates suggest that for most genomes about 1% of the coding regions are glycosyltransferases. However, plants tend to have far more glycosyltransferase genes than any other organism sequenced to date, and this can be explained by the highly complex polysaccharide network that form the cell wall and also by the numerous glycosylated secondary metabolites. In recent years, various bioinformatics strategies have been used to search bacterial and plant genomes for new glycosyltransferase genes. These are based on the use of remote homology detection methods that act at the 1D, 2D, and 3D level. The combined use of methods such as profile Hidden Markov Model (HMM) and fold recognition appears to be appropriate for this class of enzyme. Chemometric tools are also particularly well suited for obtaining an overview of multivariate data and revealing hidden latent information when dealing with large and highly complex datasets. PMID:20556308

  19. Cancer Genome Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Vogelstein, Bert; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Velculescu, Victor E.; Zhou, Shibin; Diaz, Luis A.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, comprehensive sequencing efforts have revealed the genomic landscapes of common forms of human cancer. For most cancer types, this landscape consists of a small number of “mountains” (genes altered in a high percentage of tumors) and a much larger number of “hills” (genes altered infrequently). To date, these studies have revealed ~140 genes that, when altered by intragenic mutations, can promote or “drive” tumorigenesis. A typical tumor contains two to eight of these “driver gene” mutations; the remaining mutations are passengers that confer no selective growth advantage. Driver genes can be classified into 12 signaling pathways that regulate three core cellular processes: cell fate, cell survival, and genome maintenance. A better understanding of these pathways is one of the most pressing needs in basic cancer research. Even now, however, our knowledge of cancer genomes is sufficient to guide the development of more effective approaches for reducing cancer morbidity and mortality. PMID:23539594

  20. Mapping the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Cantor, Charles R.

    1989-06-01

    The following pages aim to lay a foundation for understanding the excitement surrounding the ''human genome project,'' as well as to convey a flavor of the ongoing efforts and plans at the Human Genome Center at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Our own work, of course, is only part of a broad international effort that will dramatically enhance our understanding of human molecular genetics before the end of this century. In this country, the bulk of the effort will be carried out under the auspices of the Department of Energy and the National Institutes of Health, but significant contributions have already been made both by nonprofit private foundations and by private corporation. The respective roles of the DOE and the NIH are being coordinated by an inter-agency committee, the aims of which are to emphasize the strengths of each agency, to facilitate cooperation, and to avoid unnecessary duplication of effort. The NIH, for example, will continue its crucial work in medical genetics and in mapping the genomes of nonhuman species. The DOE, on the other hand, has unique experience in managing large projects, and its national laboratories are repositories of expertise in physics, engineering, and computer science, as well as the life sciences. The tools and techniques the project will ultimately rely on are thus likely to be developed in multidisciplinary efforts at laboratories like LBL. Accordingly, we at LBL take great pride in this enterprise -- an enterprise that will eventually transform our understanding of ourselves.

  1. Translational genomics for plant breeding with the genome sequence explosion.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yang Jae; Lee, Taeyoung; Lee, Jayern; Shim, Sangrea; Jeong, Haneul; Satyawan, Dani; Kim, Moon Young; Lee, Suk-Ha

    2016-04-01

    The use of next-generation sequencers and advanced genotyping technologies has propelled the field of plant genomics in model crops and plants and enhanced the discovery of hidden bridges between genotypes and phenotypes. The newly generated reference sequences of unstudied minor plants can be annotated by the knowledge of model plants via translational genomics approaches. Here, we reviewed the strategies of translational genomics and suggested perspectives on the current databases of genomic resources and the database structures of translated information on the new genome. As a draft picture of phenotypic annotation, translational genomics on newly sequenced plants will provide valuable assistance for breeders and researchers who are interested in genetic studies. PMID:26269219

  2. The fungal genome initiative and lessons learned from genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Christina A; Birren, Bruce W

    2010-01-01

    The sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae enabled systematic genome-wide experimental approaches, demonstrating the power of having the complete genome of an organism. The rapid impact of these methods on research in yeast mobilized an effort to expand genomic resources for other fungi. The "fungal genome initiative" represents an organized genome sequencing effort to promote comparative and evolutionary studies across the fungal kingdom. Through such an approach, scientists can not only better understand specific organisms but also illuminate the shared and unique aspects of fungal biology that underlie the importance of fungi in biomedical research, health, food production, and industry. To date, assembled genomes for over 100 fungi are available in public databases, and many more sequencing projects are underway. Here, we discuss both examples of findings from comparative analysis of fungal sequences, with a specific emphasis on yeast genomes, and on the analytical approaches taken to mine fungal genomes. New sequencing methods are accelerating comparative studies of fungi by reducing the cost and difficulty of sequencing. This has driven more common use of sequencing applications, such as to study genome-wide variation in populations or to deeply profile RNA transcripts. These and further technological innovations will continue to be piloted in yeasts and other fungi, and will expand the applications of sequencing to study fungal biology. PMID:20946837

  3. Genomic Data Commons and Genomic Cloud Pilots - Google Hangout

    Cancer.gov

    Join us for a live, moderated discussion about two NCI efforts to expand access to cancer genomics data: the Genomic Data Commons and Genomic Cloud Pilots. NCI subject matters experts will include Louis M. Staudt, M.D., Ph.D., Director Center for Cancer Genomics, Warren Kibbe, Ph.D., Director, NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology, and moderated by Anthony Kerlavage, Ph.D., Chief, Cancer Informatics Branch, Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology. We welcome your questions before and during the Hangout on Twitter using the hashtag #AskNCI.

  4. The coffee genome hub: a resource for coffee genomes

    PubMed Central

    Dereeper, Alexis; Bocs, Stéphanie; Rouard, Mathieu; Guignon, Valentin; Ravel, Sébastien; Tranchant-Dubreuil, Christine; Poncet, Valérie; Garsmeur, Olivier; Lashermes, Philippe; Droc, Gaëtan

    2015-01-01

    The whole genome sequence of Coffea canephora, the perennial diploid species known as Robusta, has been recently released. In the context of the C. canephora genome sequencing project and to support post-genomics efforts, we developed the Coffee Genome Hub (http://coffee-genome.org/), an integrative genome information system that allows centralized access to genomics and genetics data and analysis tools to facilitate translational and applied research in coffee. We provide the complete genome sequence of C. canephora along with gene structure, gene product information, metabolism, gene families, transcriptomics, syntenic blocks, genetic markers and genetic maps. The hub relies on generic software (e.g. GMOD tools) for easy querying, visualizing and downloading research data. It includes a Genome Browser enhanced by a Community Annotation System, enabling the improvement of automatic gene annotation through an annotation editor. In addition, the hub aims at developing interoperability among other existing South Green tools managing coffee data (phylogenomics resources, SNPs) and/or supporting data analyses with the Galaxy workflow manager. PMID:25392413

  5. The Saccharomyces Genome Database: Exploring Genome Features and Their Annotations.

    PubMed

    Cherry, J Michael

    2015-12-01

    Genomic-scale assays result in data that provide information over the entire genome. Such base pair resolution data cannot be summarized easily except via a graphical viewer. A genome browser is a tool that displays genomic data and experimental results as horizontal tracks. Genome browsers allow searches for a chromosomal coordinate or a feature, such as a gene name, but they do not allow searches by function or upstream binding site. Entry into a genome browser requires that you identify the gene name or chromosomal coordinates for a region of interest. A track provides a representation for genomic results and is displayed as a row of data shown as line segments to indicate regions of the chromosome with a feature. Another type of track presents a graph or wiggle plot that indicates the processed signal intensity computed for a particular experiment or set of experiments. Wiggle plots are typical for genomic assays such as the various next-generation sequencing methods (e.g., chromatin immunoprecipitation [ChIP]-seq or RNA-seq), where it represents a peak of DNA binding, histone modification, or the mapping of an RNA sequence. Here we explore the browser that has been built into the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD). PMID:26631126

  6. Flexible genomic islands as drivers of genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Martin-Cuadrado, Ana-Belen; López-Pérez, Mario

    2016-06-01

    Natural prokaryotic populations are composed of multiple clonal lineages that are different in their core genomes in a range that varies typically between 95 and 100% nucleotide identity. Each clonal lineage also carries a complement of not shared flexible genes that can be very large. The compounded flexible genome provides polyclonal populations with enormous gene diversity that can be used to efficiently exploit resources. This has fundamental repercussions for interpreting individual bacterial genomes. They are better understood as parts rather than the whole. Multiple genomes are required to understand how the population interacts with its biotic and abiotic environment. PMID:27085300

  7. Defining Genome Maintenance Pathways using Functional Genomic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Bansbach, Carol E.; Cortez, David

    2011-01-01

    Genome maintenance activities including DNA repair, cell division cycle control, and checkpoint signaling pathways preserve genome integrity and prevent disease. Defects in these pathways cause birth defects, neurodegeneration, premature aging, and cancer. Recent technical advances in functional genomic approaches such as expression profiling, proteomics, and RNA interference (RNAi) technologies have rapidly expanded our knowledge of the proteins that work in these pathways. In this review, we examine the use of these high-throughput methodologies in higher eukaryotic organisms for the interrogation of genome maintenance activities. PMID:21787120

  8. Genome Projector: zoomable genome map with multiple views

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Kazuharu; Tamaki, Satoshi; Kono, Nobuaki; Kido, Nobuhiro; Ikegami, Keita; Ogawa, Ryu; Tomita, Masaru

    2009-01-01

    Background Molecular biology data exist on diverse scales, from the level of molecules to -omics. At the same time, the data at each scale can be categorised into multiple layers, such as the genome, transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, and biochemical pathways. Due to the highly multi-layer and multi-dimensional nature of biological information, software interfaces for database browsing should provide an intuitive interface that allows for rapid migration across different views and scales. The Zoomable User Interface (ZUI) and tabbed browsing have proven successful for this purpose in other areas, especially to navigate the vast information in the World Wide Web. Results This paper presents Genome Projector, a Web-based gateway for genomics information with a zoomable user interface using Google Maps API, equipped with four seamlessly accessible and searchable views: a circular genome map, a traditional genome map, a biochemical pathways map, and a DNA walk map. The Web application for 320 bacterial genomes is available at . All data and software including the source code, documentations, and development API are freely available under the GNU General Public License. Zoomable maps can be easily created from any image file using the development API, and an online data mapping service for Genome Projector is also available at our Web site. Conclusion Genome Projector is an intuitive Web application for browsing genomics information, implemented with a zoomable user interface and tabbed browsing utilising Google Maps API and Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX) technology. PMID:19166610

  9. The Anolis Lizard Genome: An Amniote Genome without Isochores?

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Maria; Greif, Gonzalo; Alvarez-Valin, Fernando; Bernardi, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Two articles published 5 years ago concluded that the genome of the lizard Anolis carolinensis is an amniote genome without isochores. This claim was apparently contradicting previous results on the general presence of an isochore organization in all vertebrate genomes tested (including Anolis). In this investigation, we demonstrate that the Anolis genome is indeed heterogeneous in base composition, since its macrochromosomes comprise isochores mainly from the L2 and H1 families (a moderately GC-poor and a moderately GC-rich family, respectively), and since the majority of the sequenced microchromosomes consists of H1 isochores. These families are associated with different features of genome structure, including gene density and compositional correlations (e.g., GC3 vs flanking sequence GC and intron GC), as in the case of mammalian and avian genomes. Moreover, the assembled Anolis chromosomes have an enormous number of gaps, which could be due to sequencing problems in GC-rich regions of the genome. In conclusion, the Anolis genome is no exception to the general rule of an isochore organization in the genomes of vertebrates (and other eukaryotes). PMID:26992416

  10. The coffee genome hub: a resource for coffee genomes.

    PubMed

    Dereeper, Alexis; Bocs, Stéphanie; Rouard, Mathieu; Guignon, Valentin; Ravel, Sébastien; Tranchant-Dubreuil, Christine; Poncet, Valérie; Garsmeur, Olivier; Lashermes, Philippe; Droc, Gaëtan

    2015-01-01

    The whole genome sequence of Coffea canephora, the perennial diploid species known as Robusta, has been recently released. In the context of the C. canephora genome sequencing project and to support post-genomics efforts, we developed the Coffee Genome Hub (http://coffee-genome.org/), an integrative genome information system that allows centralized access to genomics and genetics data and analysis tools to facilitate translational and applied research in coffee. We provide the complete genome sequence of C. canephora along with gene structure, gene product information, metabolism, gene families, transcriptomics, syntenic blocks, genetic markers and genetic maps. The hub relies on generic software (e.g. GMOD tools) for easy querying, visualizing and downloading research data. It includes a Genome Browser enhanced by a Community Annotation System, enabling the improvement of automatic gene annotation through an annotation editor. In addition, the hub aims at developing interoperability among other existing South Green tools managing coffee data (phylogenomics resources, SNPs) and/or supporting data analyses with the Galaxy workflow manager. PMID:25392413

  11. Mosquito genomics: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Severson, David W; Behura, Susanta K

    2012-01-01

    The whole-genome sequencing of mosquitoes has facilitated our understanding of fundamental biological processes at their basic molecular levels and holds potential for application to mosquito control and prevention of mosquito-borne disease transmission. Draft genome sequences are available for Anopheles gambiae, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus. Collectively, these represent the major vectors of African malaria, dengue fever and yellow fever viruses, and lymphatic filariasis, respectively. Rapid advances in genome technologies have revealed detailed information on genome architecture as well as phenotype-specific transcriptomics and proteomics. These resources allow for detailed comparative analyses within and across populations as well as species. Next-generation sequencing technologies will likely promote a proliferation of genome sequences for additional mosquito species as well as for individual insects. Here we review the current status of genome research in mosquitoes and identify potential areas for further investigations. PMID:21942845

  12. Invariants of DNA genomic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristea, Paul Dan A.

    2005-02-01

    For large scale analysis purposes, the conversion of genomic sequences into digital signals opens the possibility to use powerful signal processing methods for handling genomic information. The study of complex genomic signals reveals large scale features, maintained over the scale of whole chromosomes, that would be difficult to find by using only the symbolic representation. Based on genomic signal methods and on statistical techniques, the paper defines parameters of DNA sequences which are invariant to transformations induced by SNPs, splicing or crossover. Re-orienting concatenated coding regions in the same direction, regularities shared by the genomic material in all exons are revealed, pointing towards the hypothesis of a regular ancestral structure from which the current chromosome structures have evolved. This property is not found in non-nuclear genomic material, e.g., plasmids.

  13. The genome of Eucalyptus grandis.

    PubMed

    Myburg, Alexander A; Grattapaglia, Dario; Tuskan, Gerald A; Hellsten, Uffe; Hayes, Richard D; Grimwood, Jane; Jenkins, Jerry; Lindquist, Erika; Tice, Hope; Bauer, Diane; Goodstein, David M; Dubchak, Inna; Poliakov, Alexandre; Mizrachi, Eshchar; Kullan, Anand R K; Hussey, Steven G; Pinard, Desre; van der Merwe, Karen; Singh, Pooja; van Jaarsveld, Ida; Silva-Junior, Orzenil B; Togawa, Roberto C; Pappas, Marilia R; Faria, Danielle A; Sansaloni, Carolina P; Petroli, Cesar D; Yang, Xiaohan; Ranjan, Priya; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Ye, Chu-Yu; Li, Ting; Sterck, Lieven; Vanneste, Kevin; Murat, Florent; Soler, Marçal; Clemente, Hélène San; Saidi, Naijib; Cassan-Wang, Hua; Dunand, Christophe; Hefer, Charles A; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Kersting, Anna R; Vining, Kelly; Amarasinghe, Vindhya; Ranik, Martin; Naithani, Sushma; Elser, Justin; Boyd, Alexander E; Liston, Aaron; Spatafora, Joseph W; Dharmwardhana, Palitha; Raja, Rajani; Sullivan, Christopher; Romanel, Elisson; Alves-Ferreira, Marcio; Külheim, Carsten; Foley, William; Carocha, Victor; Paiva, Jorge; Kudrna, David; Brommonschenkel, Sergio H; Pasquali, Giancarlo; Byrne, Margaret; Rigault, Philippe; Tibbits, Josquin; Spokevicius, Antanas; Jones, Rebecca C; Steane, Dorothy A; Vaillancourt, René E; Potts, Brad M; Joubert, Fourie; Barry, Kerrie; Pappas, Georgios J; Strauss, Steven H; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline; Salse, Jérôme; Van de Peer, Yves; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Schmutz, Jeremy

    2014-06-19

    Eucalypts are the world's most widely planted hardwood trees. Their outstanding diversity, adaptability and growth have made them a global renewable resource of fibre and energy. We sequenced and assembled >94% of the 640-megabase genome of Eucalyptus grandis. Of 36,376 predicted protein-coding genes, 34% occur in tandem duplications, the largest proportion thus far in plant genomes. Eucalyptus also shows the highest diversity of genes for specialized metabolites such as terpenes that act as chemical defence and provide unique pharmaceutical oils. Genome sequencing of the E. grandis sister species E. globulus and a set of inbred E. grandis tree genomes reveals dynamic genome evolution and hotspots of inbreeding depression. The E. grandis genome is the first reference for the eudicot order Myrtales and is placed here sister to the eurosids. This resource expands our understanding of the unique biology of large woody perennials and provides a powerful tool to accelerate comparative biology, breeding and biotechnology. PMID:24919147

  14. Big Data: Astronomical or Genomical?

    PubMed

    Stephens, Zachary D; Lee, Skylar Y; Faghri, Faraz; Campbell, Roy H; Zhai, Chengxiang; Efron, Miles J; Iyer, Ravishankar; Schatz, Michael C; Sinha, Saurabh; Robinson, Gene E

    2015-07-01

    Genomics is a Big Data science and is going to get much bigger, very soon, but it is not known whether the needs of genomics will exceed other Big Data domains. Projecting to the year 2025, we compared genomics with three other major generators of Big Data: astronomy, YouTube, and Twitter. Our estimates show that genomics is a "four-headed beast"--it is either on par with or the most demanding of the domains analyzed here in terms of data acquisition, storage, distribution, and analysis. We discuss aspects of new technologies that will need to be developed to rise up and meet the computational challenges that genomics poses for the near future. Now is the time for concerted, community-wide planning for the "genomical" challenges of the next decade. PMID:26151137

  15. Genomics Nursing Faculty Champion Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Jean; Calzone, Kathleen A.

    2016-01-01

    Nurse faculty are challenged to keep up with the emerging and fast-paced field of genomics and the mandate to prepare the nursing workforce to be able to translate genomic research advances into routine clinical care. Using Faculty Champions and other options, the initiative stimulated curriculum development and promoted genomics curriculum integration. The authors summarize this yearlong initiative for undergraduate and graduate nursing faculty. PMID:24300251

  16. Cactus Graphs for Genome Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paten, Benedict; Diekhans, Mark; Earl, Dent; St. John, John; Ma, Jian; Suh, Bernard; Haussler, David

    We introduce a data structure, analysis and visualization scheme called a cactus graph for comparing sets of related genomes. Cactus graphs capture some of the advantages of de Bruijn and breakpoint graphs in one unified framework. They naturally decompose the common substructures in a set of related genomes into a hierarchy of chains that can be visualized as multiple alignments and nets that can be visualized in circular genome plots.

  17. Programs | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    OCG facilitates cancer genomics research through a series of highly-focused programs. These programs generate and disseminate genomic data for use by the cancer research community. OCG programs also promote advances in technology-based infrastructure and create valuable experimental reagents and tools. OCG programs encourage collaboration by interconnecting with other genomics and cancer projects in order to accelerate translation of findings into the clinic. Below are OCG’s current, completed, and initiated programs:

  18. Auxin transport inhibitor induced low complexity petiolated leaves and sessile leaf-like stipules and architectures of heritable leaf and stipule mutants in Pisum sativum suggest that its simple lobed stipules and compound leaf represent ancestral forms in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arvind; Sharma, Vishakha; Khan, Moinuddin; Hindala, Mali Ram; Kumar, Sushil

    2013-04-01

    In angiosperms, leaf and stipule architectures are inherited species-specific traits. Variation in leaf and stipule sizes, and forms result from the interaction between abiotic and biotic stimuli, and gene regulatory network(s) that underlie the leaf and stipule developmental programme(s). Here, correspondence between variation in leaf and stipule architectures described for extant angiosperms and that induced mutationally and by imposition of stress in model angiosperm species, especially in Pisum sativum, was detected. Following inferences were drawn from the observations. (i) Several leaf forms in P. sativum have origin in fusion of stipule and leaf primordia. Perfoliate (and amplexicaul and connate) simple sessile leaves and sessile adnate leaves are the result of such primordial fusions. Reversal of changes in the gene regulatory network responsible for fusion products are thought to restore original stipule and leaf conditions. (ii) Compound leaf formation in several different model plants, is a result of promotion of pathways for such condition by gene regulatory networks directed by KNOx1 and LEAFY transcription factors or intercalation of the gene networks directed by them. (iii) Gene regulatory network for compound leaves in P. sativum when mutated generates highly complex compound leaves on one hand and simple leaves on other hand. These altered conditions are mutationally reversible. (vi) Simple leaves in model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana despite overexpression of KNOx1 orthologues do not become compound. (v) All forms of leaves, including simple leaf, probably have origins in a gene regulatory network of the kind present in P. sativum. PMID:23640405

  19. Stomatal responses to carbon dioxide of isolated epidermis from a C3 plant, the Argenteum mutant of Pisum sativum L., and a crassulacean-acid-metabolism plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana Hamet et Perr.

    PubMed

    Jewer, P C; Neales, T F; Incoll, L D

    1985-07-01

    The response of stomata in isolated epidermis to the concentration of CO2 in the gaseous phase was examined in a C3 species, the Argenteum mutant of Pisum sativum, and a crassulacean-acid-metabolism (CAM) species, Kalanchoë daigremontiana. Epidermis from leaves of both species was incubated on buffer solutions in the presence of air containing various volume fractions of CO2 (0 to 10000·10(-6)). In both species and in the light and in darkness, the effect of CO2 was to inhibit stomatal opening, the maximum inhibition of opening occurring in the range 0 to 360·10(-6). The inhibition of opening per unit change in concentration was greatest between volume fractions of 0 and 240·10(-6). There was little further closure above the volume fraction of 360·10(-6), i.e. approximately ambient concentration of CO2. Thus, although leaves of CAM species may experience much higher internal concentrations of CO2 in the light than those of C3 plants, this does not affect the sensitivity of their stomata to CO2 concentration or the range over which they respond. Stomatal responses to CO2 were similar in both the light and the dark, indicating that effects of CO2 on stomata occur via mechanisms which are independent of light. The responses of stomata to CO2 in the gaseous phase took place without the treatments changing the pH of the buffered solutions. Thus it is unlikely that CO2 elicited stomatal movement by changing either the pH or the HCO 3 (-) /CO 3 (2-) equilibria. It is suggested that the concentration of dissolved unhydrated CO2 may be the effector of stomatal movement and that its activity is related to its reactivity with amines. PMID:24248222

  20. Genome walking by Klenow polymerase.

    PubMed

    Volpicella, Mariateresa; Leoni, Claudia; Fanizza, Immacolata; Rius, Sebastian; Gallerani, Raffaele; Ceci, Luigi R

    2012-11-15

    Genome walking procedures are all based on a final polymerase chain reaction amplification, regardless of the strategy employed for the synthesis of the substrate molecule. Here we report a modification of an already established genome walking strategy in which a single-strand DNA substrate is obtained by primer extension driven by Klenow polymerase and which results suitable for the direct sequencing of complex eukaryotic genomes. The efficacy of the method is demonstrated by the identification of nucleotide sequences in the case of two gene families (chiA and P1) in the genomes of several maize species. PMID:22922302

  1. Global efforts in structural genomics.

    PubMed

    Stevens, R C; Yokoyama, S; Wilson, I A

    2001-10-01

    A worldwide initiative in structural genomics aims to capitalize on the recent successes of the genome projects. Substantial new investments in structural genomics in the past 2 years indicate the high level of support for these international efforts. Already, enormous progress has been made on high-throughput methodologies and technologies that will speed up macromolecular structure determinations. Recent international meetings have resulted in the formation of an International Structural Genomics Organization to formulate policy and foster cooperation between the public and private efforts. PMID:11588249

  2. Genomic medicine and neurological disease

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Lupski, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Genomic medicine” refers to the diagnosis, optimized management, and treatment of disease—as well as screening, counseling, and disease gene identification—in the context of information provided by an individual patient’s personal genome. Genomic medicine, to some extent synonymous with “personalized medicine,” has been made possible by recent advances in genome technologies. Genomic medicine represents a new approach to health care and disease management that attempts to optimize the care of a patient based upon information gleaned from his or her personal genome sequence. In this review, we describe recent progress in genomic medicine as it relates to neurological disease. Many neurological disorders either segregate as Mendelian phenotypes or occur sporadically in association with a new mutation in a single gene. Heritability also contributes to other neurological conditions that appear to exhibit more complex genetics. In addition to discussing current knowledge in this field, we offer suggestions for maximizing the utility of genomic information in clinical practice as the field of genomic medicine unfolds. PMID:21594611

  3. Genomics of Bacillus Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Økstad, Ole Andreas; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    Members of the genus Bacillus are rod-shaped spore-forming bacteria belonging to the Firmicutes, the low G+C gram-positive bacteria. The Bacillus genus was first described and classified by Ferdinand Cohn in Cohn (1872), and Bacillus subtilis was defined as the type species (Soule, 1932). Several Bacilli may be linked to opportunistic infections. However, pathogenicity among Bacillus spp. is mainly a feature of bacteria belonging to the Bacillus cereus group, including B. cereus, Bacillus anthracis, and Bacillus thuringiensis. Here we review the genomics of B. cereus group bacteria in relation to their roles as etiological agents of two food poisoning syndromes (emetic and diarrhoeal).

  4. The human genome project

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-06-01

    The Human Genome Project will obtain high-resolution genetic and physical maps of each human chromosome and, somewhat later, of the complete nucleotide sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a human cell. The talk will begin with an extended introduction to explain the Project to nonbiologists and to show that map construction and sequence determination require extensive computation in order to determine the correct order of the mapped entities and to provide estimates of uncertainty. Computational analysis of the sequence data will become an increasingly important part of the project, and some computational challenges are described. 5 refs.

  5. Seasonal Changes in the Endosymbiotic Consortia of Aphids from the Genus Cinara

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Díaz, Vanesa; Latorre, Amparo; Gil, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Buchnera aphidicola is the primary endosymbiont of aphids with which it maintains an obligate mutualistic symbiotic relationship. Insects also maintain facultative symbiotic relationships with secondary symbionts, and Serratia symbiotica is the most common in aphids. The presence of both symbionts in aphids of the subfamily Lachninae has been widely studied by our group. We examined two closely related aphids, Cinara tujafilina and C. cedri in the present study. Even though both B. aphidicola strains have similar genome sizes and gene contents, the genomes of the two S. symbiotica strains were markedly different. The SCc strain has the smallest genome known for this species, while SCt possesses a larger genome in an intermediate stage between the facultative S. symbiotica of Acyrthosiphon pisum (SAp) and the co-obligate S. symbiotica SCc. Aphids are vulnerable to high temperatures. Previous studies indicated that S. symbiotica SAp confers resistance to heat-shock stress. In order to clarify whether S. symbiotica strains from genus Cinara also play a role in heat stress protection, we performed a quantitative determination of the consortium Buchnera/Serratia from two geographically close populations, each of which belonged to the Cinara species examined, over two years in natural environments. We found no variation in the consortium from our C. cedri population, but a positive correlation between both endosymbiont densities and average daily temperatures in the C. tujafilina population. Even though S. symbiotica SCt may retain some protective role against heat stress, this does not appear to be due to the release of protective metabolites by cell lysis. PMID:27297891

  6. Seasonal Changes in the Endosymbiotic Consortia of Aphids from the Genus Cinara.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Díaz, Vanesa; Latorre, Amparo; Gil, Rosario

    2016-06-25

    Buchnera aphidicola is the primary endosymbiont of aphids with which it maintains an obligate mutualistic symbiotic relationship. Insects also maintain facultative symbiotic relationships with secondary symbionts, and Serratia symbiotica is the most common in aphids. The presence of both symbionts in aphids of the subfamily Lachninae has been widely studied by our group. We examined two closely related aphids, Cinara tujafilina and C. cedri in the present study. Even though both B. aphidicola strains have similar genome sizes and gene contents, the genomes of the two S. symbiotica strains were markedly different. The SCc strain has the smallest genome known for this species, while SCt possesses a larger genome in an intermediate stage between the facultative S. symbiotica of Acyrthosiphon pisum (SAp) and the co-obligate S. symbiotica SCc.Aphids are vulnerable to high temperatures. Previous studies indicated that S. symbiotica SAp confers resistance to heat-shock stress. In order to clarify whether S. symbiotica strains from genus Cinara also play a role in heat stress protection, we performed a quantitative determination of the consortium Buchnera/Serratia from two geographically close populations, each of which belonged to the Cinara species examined, over two years in natural environments. We found no variation in the consortium from our C. cedri population, but a positive correlation between both endosymbiont densities and average daily temperatures in the C. tujafilina population. Even though S. symbiotica SCt may retain some protective role against heat stress, this does not appear to be due to the release of protective metabolites by cell lysis. PMID:27297891

  7. Human Genome Program Image Gallery (from genomics.energy.gov)

    DOE Data Explorer

    This collection contains approximately 240 images from the genome programs of DOE's Office of Science. The images are divided into galleries related to biofuels research, systems biology, and basic genomics. Each image has a title, a basic citation, and a credit or source. Most of the images are original graphics created by the Genome Management Information System (GMIS). GMIS images are recognizable by their credit line. Permission to use these graphics is not needed, but please credit the U.S. Department of Energy Genome Programs and provide the website http://genomics.energy.gov. Other images were provided by third parties and not created by the U.S. Department of Energy. Users must contact the person listed in the credit line before using those images. The high-resolution images can be downloaded.

  8. A Taste of Algal Genomes from the Joint Genome Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-06-17

    Algae play profound roles in aquatic food chains and the carbon cycle, can impose health and economic costs through toxic blooms, provide models for the study of symbiosis, photosynthesis, and eukaryotic evolution, and are candidate sources for bio-fuels; all of these research areas are part of the mission of DOE's Joint Genome Institute (JGI). To date JGI has sequenced, assembled, annotated, and released to the public the genomes of 18 species and strains of algae, sampling almost all of the major clades of photosynthetic eukaryotes. With more algal genomes currently undergoing analysis, JGI continues its commitment to driving forward basic and applied algal science. Among these ongoing projects are the pan-genome of the dominant coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi, the interrelationships between the 4 genomes in the nucleomorph-containing Bigelowiella natans and Guillardia theta, and the search for symbiosis genes of lichens.

  9. Modifying the Mitochondrial Genome.

    PubMed

    Patananan, Alexander N; Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Chiou, Pei-Yu; Teitell, Michael A

    2016-05-10

    Human mitochondria produce ATP and metabolites to support development and maintain cellular homeostasis. Mitochondria harbor multiple copies of a maternally inherited, non-nuclear genome (mtDNA) that encodes for 13 subunit proteins of the respiratory chain. Mutations in mtDNA occur mainly in the 24 non-coding genes, with specific mutations implicated in early death, neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and diabetes. A significant barrier to new insights in mitochondrial biology and clinical applications for mtDNA disorders is our general inability to manipulate the mtDNA sequence. Microinjection, cytoplasmic fusion, nucleic acid import strategies, targeted endonucleases, and newer approaches, which include the transfer of genomic DNA, somatic cell reprogramming, and a photothermal nanoblade, attempt to change the mtDNA sequence in target cells with varying efficiencies and limitations. Here, we discuss the current state of manipulating mammalian mtDNA and provide an outlook for mitochondrial reverse genetics, which could further enable mitochondrial research and therapies for mtDNA diseases. PMID:27166943

  10. Parsing of genomic graffiti

    SciTech Connect

    Tibbetts, C.; Golden, J. III; Torgersen, D.

    1996-12-31

    A focal point of modern biology is investigation of wide varieties of phenomena at the level of molecular genetics. The nucleotide sequences of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) define the ultimate resolution of this reductionist approach to understand the determinants of heritable traits. The structure and function of genes, their composite genomic organization, and their regulated expression have been studied in systems representing every class of organism. Many human diseases or pathogenic syndromes can be directly attributed to inherited defects in either the regulated expression, or the quality of the products of specific genes. Genetic determinants of susceptibility to infectious agents or environmental hazards are amply documented. Mapping and sequencing of the DNA molecules encoding human genes have provided powerful technology for pharmaceutical bioengineering and forensic investigations. From an alternative perspective, we may anticipate that voluminous archives of singular DNA sequences alone will not suffice to define and understand the functional determinants of genome organization, allelic diversity and evolutionary plasticity of living organisms. New insights will accumulate pertaining to human evolutionary origins and relationships of human biology to models based on other mammals. Investigators of population genetics and epidemiology now exploit the technology of molecular genetics to more powerfully probe variation within the human gene pool at the level of DNA sequences. 40 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Genomic imprinting and cancer.

    PubMed

    Brenton, J D; Viville, S; Surani, M A

    1995-01-01

    Imprinting is vital for normal development, and disruption of imprinting mechanisms on syntenic chromosomes gives very similar phenotypes in mouse and humans. In addition, disruption of normal imprinting provides a plausible explanation for preferential LOH in some embryonal tumours. Moreover, there is evidence that in Wilms' tumour, dysregulation of specific imprinted genes may give rise to the cancer phenotype. Many more questions regarding genomic imprinting need to be answered before the associations described in this review can be properly understood. The most basic issues, such as when and how the imprint is established, can still only be speculated upon. Further study of new imprinted genes and the relationship between their domains and differential replication may show us higher control mechanisms than methylation alone. It remains to be seen if these epigenetic modifications are amenable to therapeutic change in the treatment of inherited syndromes and cancer, or if they can be used to assess individuals at risk of disease. Until then it is probably unwise to speculate on a single unifying theory that explains why a subset of the genome shows such a peculiar non-Mendelian form of inheritance. PMID:8718517

  12. OryzaGenome: Genome Diversity Database of Wild Oryza Species

    PubMed Central

    Ohyanagi, Hajime; Ebata, Toshinobu; Huang, Xuehui; Gong, Hao; Fujita, Masahiro; Mochizuki, Takako; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Kaminuma, Eli; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Feng, Qi; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Han, Bin; Kurata, Nori

    2016-01-01

    The species in the genus Oryza, encompassing nine genome types and 23 species, are a rich genetic resource and may have applications in deeper genomic analyses aiming to understand the evolution of plant genomes. With the advancement of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, a flood of Oryza species reference genomes and genomic variation information has become available in recent years. This genomic information, combined with the comprehensive phenotypic information that we are accumulating in our Oryzabase, can serve as an excellent genotype–phenotype association resource for analyzing rice functional and structural evolution, and the associated diversity of the Oryza genus. Here we integrate our previous and future phenotypic/habitat information and newly determined genotype information into a united repository, named OryzaGenome, providing the variant information with hyperlinks to Oryzabase. The current version of OryzaGenome includes genotype information of 446 O. rufipogon accessions derived by imputation and of 17 accessions derived by imputation-free deep sequencing. Two variant viewers are implemented: SNP Viewer as a conventional genome browser interface and Variant Table as a text-based browser for precise inspection of each variant one by one. Portable VCF (variant call format) file or tab-delimited file download is also available. Following these SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) data, reference pseudomolecules/scaffolds/contigs and genome-wide variation information for almost all of the closely and distantly related wild Oryza species from the NIG Wild Rice Collection will be available in future releases. All of the resources can be accessed through http://viewer.shigen.info/oryzagenome/. PMID:26578696

  13. Genetic mapping of legume orthologs reveals high conservation of synteny between lentil species and the sequenced genomes of Medicago and chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Gujaria-Verma, Neha; Vail, Sally L.; Carrasquilla-Garcia, Noelia; Penmetsa, R. Varma; Cook, Douglas R.; Farmer, Andrew D.; Vandenberg, Albert; Bett, Kirstin E.

    2014-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is a global food crop with increasing importance for food security in south Asia and other regions. Lens ervoides, a wild relative of cultivated lentil, is an important source of agronomic trait variation. Lens is a member of the galegoid clade of the Papilionoideae family, which includes other important dietary legumes such as chickpea (Cicer arietinum) and pea (Pisum sativum), and the sequenced model legume Medicago truncatula. Understanding the genetic structure of Lens spp. in relation to more fully sequenced legumes would allow leveraging of genomic resources. A set of 1107 TOG-based amplicons were identified in L. ervoides and a subset thereof used to design SNP markers for mapping. A map of L. ervoides consisting of 377 SNP markers spread across seven linkage groups was developed using a GoldenGate genotyping array and single SNP marker assays. Comparison with maps of M. truncatula and L. culinaris documented considerable shared synteny and led to the identification of a few major translocations and a major inversion that distinguish Lens from M. truncatula, as well as a translocation that distinguishes L. culinaris from L. ervoides. The identification of chromosome-level differences among Lens spp. will aid in the understanding of introgression of genes from L. ervoides into cultivated L. culinaris, furthering genetic research and breeding applications in lentil. PMID:25538716

  14. All about the Human Genome Project (HGP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... full human sequence All About The Human Genome Project (HGP) The Human Genome Project (HGP) was one of the great feats of ... Organisms A Quarter Century after the Human Genome Project's Launch: Lessons Beyond the Base Pairs October 1, ...

  15. International genomic evaluation methods for dairy cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Genomic evaluations are rapidly replacing traditional evaluation systems used for dairy cattle selection. Economies of scale in genomics promote cooperation across country borders. Genomic information can be transferred across countries using simple conversion equations, by modifying mult...

  16. Surveying Breast Cancer's Genomic Landscape.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    An in-depth analysis has produced the most comprehensive portrait to date of the myriad genomic alterations involved in breast cancer. In sequencing the whole genomes of 560 breast cancers and combining this information with published data from another 772 breast tumors, the research team uncovered several new genes and mutational signatures that potentially influence this disease. PMID:27225883

  17. CROP GENOME DATABASES -- CRITICAL ISSUES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop genome databases, see www.agron.missouri.edu/bioservers.html of the past decade have had designed and implemented (1) models and schema for the genome and related domains; (2) methodologies for input of data by expert biologists and high-throughput projects; and (3) various text, graphical, and...

  18. Cocoa/Cotton Comparative Genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With genome sequence from two members of the Malvaceae family recently made available, we are exploring syntenic relationships, gene content, and evolutionary trajectories between the cacao and cotton genomes. An assembly of cacao (Theobroma cacao) using Illumina and 454 sequence technology yielded ...

  19. Genomics and Weeds: A Synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomics can be used to solve many problems associated with the management of weeds. New target sites for herbicides have been discovered through functional genomic approaches to determine gene function. Modes of action of herbicides can be clarified or discovered by transcriptome analysis. Under...

  20. Plant cytogenetics in genome databases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cytogenetic maps provide an integrated representation of genetic and cytological information that can be used to enhance genome and chromosome research. As genome analysis technologies become more affordable, the density of markers on cytogenetic maps increases, making these resources more useful a...

  1. From genes to genome biology

    SciTech Connect

    Pennisi, E.

    1996-06-21

    This article describes a change in the approach to mapping genomes, from looking at one gene at a time, to other approaches. Strategies include everything from lab techniques to computer programs designed to analyze whole batches of genes at once. Also included is a update on the work on the human genome.

  2. Fueling Future with Algal Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-07-05

    Algae constitute a major component of fundamental eukaryotic diversity, play profound roles in the carbon cycle, and are prominent candidates for biofuel production. The US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) is leading the world in algal genome sequencing (http://jgi.doe.gov/Algae) and contributes of the algal genome projects worldwide (GOLD database, 2012). The sequenced algal genomes offer catalogs of genes, networks, and pathways. The sequenced first of its kind genomes of a haptophyte E.huxleyii, chlorarachniophyte B.natans, and cryptophyte G.theta fill the gaps in the eukaryotic tree of life and carry unique genes and pathways as well as molecular fossils of secondary endosymbiosis. Natural adaptation to conditions critical for industrial production is encoded in algal genomes, for example, growth of A.anophagefferens at very high cell densities during the harmful algae blooms or a global distribution across diverse environments of E.huxleyii, able to live on sparse nutrients due to its expanded pan-genome. Communications and signaling pathways can be derived from simple symbiotic systems like lichens or complex marine algae metagenomes. Collectively these datasets derived from algal genomics contribute to building a comprehensive parts list essential for algal biofuel development.

  3. Genomic Evaluations: Past, Present, Future

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic evaluation has been implemented in dairy cattle causing profound changes in dairy cattle breeding. All young bulls purchased by major AI organizations are selected based on genomic evaluations. The reliability of these evaluations reaches the mid seventies for yield traits and is adequate to...

  4. Functional Genomics Tools for Papaya

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the genome of papaya (Carica papaya L.) sequenced, the study of gene function is becoming an increasing priority. Our research is to develop an RNA-induced gene silencing tool for the study of functional genomics in papaya. We employed agrobacterium leaf infiltration to induce PTGS in '-glucuro...

  5. Quantitative Genomics of Male Reproduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the review was to establish the current status of quantitative genomics for male reproduction. Genetic variation exists for male reproduction traits. These traits are expensive and time consuming traits to evaluate through conventional breeding schemes. Genomics is an alternative to...

  6. How Can Genomics Inform Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2007-01-01

    This article offers some thoughts on possible connections between genomics and education. Genomics is already revolutionizing the way medical care is delivered and distributed; it will inevitably affect children's developmental trajectories by introducing more pharmacological and behavioral therapies. Educators should be prepared to understand the…

  7. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The completion of the MAP K-10 genome sequence has opened the doors to many new avenues of research. In the few years since the publication of the genome sequence, the manuscript describing the completed sequence has been cited in the scientific literature more than 85 times. The public availabili...

  8. Future Health Applications of Genomics

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Colleen M.; Bowen, Deborah; Brody, Lawrence C.; Condit, Celeste M.; Croyle, Robert T.; Gwinn, Marta; Khoury, Muin J.; Koehly, Laura M.; Korf, Bruce R.; Marteau, Theresa M.; McLeroy, Kenneth; Patrick, Kevin; Valente, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the quickening momentum of genomic discovery, the communication, behavioral, and social sciences research needed for translating this discovery into public health applications has lagged behind. The National Human Genome Research Institute held a 2-day workshop in October 2008 convening an interdisciplinary group of scientists to recommend forward-looking priorities for translational research. This research agenda would be designed to redress the top three risk factors (tobacco use, poor diet, and physical inactivity) that contribute to the four major chronic diseases (heart disease, type 2 diabetes, lung disease, and many cancers) and account for half of all deaths worldwide. Three priority research areas were identified: (1) improving the public’s genetic literacy in order to enhance consumer skills; (2) gauging whether genomic information improves risk communication and adoption of healthier behaviors more than current approaches; and (3) exploring whether genomic discovery in concert with emerging technologies can elucidate new behavioral intervention targets. Important crosscutting themes also were identified, including the need to: (1) anticipate directions of genomic discovery; (2) take an agnostic scientific perspective in framing research questions asking whether genomic discovery adds value to other health promotion efforts; and (3) consider multiple levels of influence and systems that contribute to important public health problems. The priorities and themes offer a framework for a variety of stakeholders, including those who develop priorities for research funding, interdisciplinary teams engaged in genomics research, and policymakers grappling with how to use the products born of genomics research to address public health challenges. PMID:20409503

  9. Big Data: Astronomical or Genomical?

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Zachary D.; Lee, Skylar Y.; Faghri, Faraz; Campbell, Roy H.; Zhai, Chengxiang; Efron, Miles J.; Iyer, Ravishankar; Schatz, Michael C.; Sinha, Saurabh; Robinson, Gene E.

    2015-01-01

    Genomics is a Big Data science and is going to get much bigger, very soon, but it is not known whether the needs of genomics will exceed other Big Data domains. Projecting to the year 2025, we compared genomics with three other major generators of Big Data: astronomy, YouTube, and Twitter. Our estimates show that genomics is a “four-headed beast”—it is either on par with or the most demanding of the domains analyzed here in terms of data acquisition, storage, distribution, and analysis. We discuss aspects of new technologies that will need to be developed to rise up and meet the computational challenges that genomics poses for the near future. Now is the time for concerted, community-wide planning for the “genomical” challenges of the next decade. PMID:26151137

  10. Privacy in the Genomic Era

    PubMed Central

    NAVEED, MUHAMMAD; AYDAY, ERMAN; CLAYTON, ELLEN W.; FELLAY, JACQUES; GUNTER, CARL A.; HUBAUX, JEAN-PIERRE; MALIN, BRADLEY A.; WANG, XIAOFENG

    2015-01-01

    Genome sequencing technology has advanced at a rapid pace and it is now possible to generate highly-detailed genotypes inexpensively. The collection and analysis of such data has the potential to support various applications, including personalized medical services. While the benefits of the genomics revolution are trumpeted by the biomedical community, the increased availability of such data has major implications for personal privacy; notably because the genome has certain essential features, which include (but are not limited to) (i) an association with traits and certain diseases, (ii) identification capability (e.g., forensics), and (iii) revelation of family relationships. Moreover, direct-to-consumer DNA testing increases the likelihood that genome data will be made available in less regulated environments, such as the Internet and for-profit companies. The problem of genome data privacy thus resides at the crossroads of computer science, medicine, and public policy. While the computer scientists have addressed data privacy for various data types, there has been less attention dedicated to genomic data. Thus, the goal of this paper is to provide a systematization of knowledge for the computer science community. In doing so, we address some of the (sometimes erroneous) beliefs of this field and we report on a survey we conducted about genome data privacy with biomedical specialists. Then, after characterizing the genome privacy problem, we review the state-of-the-art regarding privacy attacks on genomic data and strategies for mitigating such attacks, as well as contextualizing these attacks from the perspective of medicine and public policy. This paper concludes with an enumeration of the challenges for genome data privacy and presents a framework to systematize the analysis of threats and the design of countermeasures as the field moves forward. PMID:26640318

  11. Recombination Drives Vertebrate Genome Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Kiwoong; Ellegren, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Selective and/or neutral processes may govern variation in DNA content and, ultimately, genome size. The observation in several organisms of a negative correlation between recombination rate and intron size could be compatible with a neutral model in which recombination is mutagenic for length changes. We used whole-genome data on small insertions and deletions within transposable elements from chicken and zebra finch to demonstrate clear links between recombination rate and a number of attributes of reduced DNA content. Recombination rate was negatively correlated with the length of introns, transposable elements, and intergenic spacer and with the rate of short insertions. Importantly, it was positively correlated with gene density, the rate of short deletions, the deletion bias, and the net change in sequence length. All these observations point at a pattern of more condensed genome structure in regions of high recombination. Based on the observed rates of small insertions and deletions and assuming that these rates are representative for the whole genome, we estimate that the genome of the most recent common ancestor of birds and lizards has lost nearly 20% of its DNA content up until the present. Expansion of transposable elements can counteract the effect of deletions in an equilibrium mutation model; however, since the activity of transposable elements has been low in the avian lineage, the deletion bias is likely to have had a significant effect on genome size evolution in dinosaurs and birds, contributing to the maintenance of a small genome. We also demonstrate that most of the observed correlations between recombination rate and genome contraction parameters are seen in the human genome, including for segregating indel polymorphisms. Our data are compatible with a neutral model in which recombination drives vertebrate genome size evolution and gives no direct support for a role of natural selection in this process. PMID:22570634

  12. RECORD: Reference-Assisted Genome Assembly for Closely Related Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Buza, Krisztian; Wilczynski, Bartek; Dojer, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Background. Next-generation sequencing technologies are now producing multiple times the genome size in total reads from a single experiment. This is enough information to reconstruct at least some of the differences between the individual genome studied in the experiment and the reference genome of the species. However, in most typical protocols, this information is disregarded and the reference genome is used. Results. We provide a new approach that allows researchers to reconstruct genomes very closely related to the reference genome (e.g., mutants of the same species) directly from the reads used in the experiment. Our approach applies de novo assembly software to experimental reads and so-called pseudoreads and uses the resulting contigs to generate a modified reference sequence. In this way, it can very quickly, and at no additional sequencing cost, generate new, modified reference sequence that is closer to the actual sequenced genome and has a full coverage. In this paper, we describe our approach and test its implementation called RECORD. We evaluate RECORD on both simulated and real data. We made our software publicly available on sourceforge. Conclusion. Our tests show that on closely related sequences RECORD outperforms more general assisted-assembly software. PMID:26558255

  13. RECORD: Reference-Assisted Genome Assembly for Closely Related Genomes.

    PubMed

    Buza, Krisztian; Wilczynski, Bartek; Dojer, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Background. Next-generation sequencing technologies are now producing multiple times the genome size in total reads from a single experiment. This is enough information to reconstruct at least some of the differences between the individual genome studied in the experiment and the reference genome of the species. However, in most typical protocols, this information is disregarded and the reference genome is used. Results. We provide a new approach that allows researchers to reconstruct genomes very closely related to the reference genome (e.g., mutants of the same species) directly from the reads used in the experiment. Our approach applies de novo assembly software to experimental reads and so-called pseudoreads and uses the resulting contigs to generate a modified reference sequence. In this way, it can very quickly, and at no additional sequencing cost, generate new, modified reference sequence that is closer to the actual sequenced genome and has a full coverage. In this paper, we describe our approach and test its implementation called RECORD. We evaluate RECORD on both simulated and real data. We made our software publicly available on sourceforge. Conclusion. Our tests show that on closely related sequences RECORD outperforms more general assisted-assembly software. PMID:26558255

  14. A Genome-Wide Landscape of Retrocopies in Primate Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Fábio C.P.; Galante, Pedro A.F.

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplication is a key factor contributing to phenotype diversity across and within species. Although the availability of complete genomes has led to the extensive study of genomic duplications, the dynamics and variability of gene duplications mediated by retrotransposition are not well understood. Here, we predict mRNA retrotransposition and use comparative genomics to investigate their origin and variability across primates. Analyzing seven anthropoid primate genomes, we found a similar number of mRNA retrotranspositions (∼7,500 retrocopies) in Catarrhini (Old Word Monkeys, including humans), but a surprising large number of retrocopies (∼10,000) in Platyrrhini (New World Monkeys), which may be a by-product of higher long interspersed nuclear element 1 activity in these genomes. By inferring retrocopy orthology, we dated most of the primate retrocopy origins, and estimated a decrease in the fixation rate in recent primate history, implying a smaller number of species-specific retrocopies. Moreover, using RNA-Seq data, we identified approximately 3,600 expressed retrocopies. As expected, most of these retrocopies are located near or within known genes, present tissue-specific and even species-specific expression patterns, and no expression correlation to their parental genes. Taken together, our results provide further evidence that mRNA retrotransposition is an active mechanism in primate evolution and suggest that retrocopies may not only introduce great genetic variability between lineages but also create a large reservoir of potentially functional new genomic loci in primate genomes. PMID:26224704

  15. A Genome-Wide Landscape of Retrocopies in Primate Genomes.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Fábio C P; Galante, Pedro A F

    2015-08-01

    Gene duplication is a key factor contributing to phenotype diversity across and within species. Although the availability of complete genomes has led to the extensive study of genomic duplications, the dynamics and variability of gene duplications mediated by retrotransposition are not well understood. Here, we predict mRNA retrotransposition and use comparative genomics to investigate their origin and variability across primates. Analyzing seven anthropoid primate genomes, we found a similar number of mRNA retrotranspositions (∼7,500 retrocopies) in Catarrhini (Old Word Monkeys, including humans), but a surprising large number of retrocopies (∼10,000) in Platyrrhini (New World Monkeys), which may be a by-product of higher long interspersed nuclear element 1 activity in these genomes. By inferring retrocopy orthology, we dated most of the primate retrocopy origins, and estimated a decrease in the fixation rate in recent primate history, implying a smaller number of species-specific retrocopies. Moreover, using RNA-Seq data, we identified approximately 3,600 expressed retrocopies. As expected, most of these retrocopies are located near or within known genes, present tissue-specific and even species-specific expression patterns, and no expression correlation to their parental genes. Taken together, our results provide further evidence that mRNA retrotransposition is an active mechanism in primate evolution and suggest that retrocopies may not only introduce great genetic variability between lineages but also create a large reservoir of potentially functional new genomic loci in primate genomes. PMID:26224704

  16. Linking the genomes of nonmodel teleosts through comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Sarropoulou, E; Nousdili, D; Magoulas, A; Kotoulas, G

    2008-01-01

    Recently the genomes of two more teleost species have been released: the medaka (Oryzias latipes), and the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculateus). The rapid developments in genomics of fish species paved the way to new and valuable research in comparative genetics and genomics. With the accumulation of information in model species, the genetic and genomic characterization of nonmodel, but economically important species, is now feasible. Furthermore, comparison of low coverage gene maps of aquacultured fish species against fully sequenced fish species will enhance the efficiency of candidate genes identification projected for quantitative trait loci (QTL) scans for traits of commercial interest. This study shows the syntenic relationship between the genomes of six different teleost species, including three fully sequenced model species: Tetraodon nigroviridis, Oryzias latipes, Gasterosteus aculateus, and three marine species of commercial and evolutionary interest: Sparus aurata, Dicentrarchus labrax, Oreochromis spp. All three commercial fish species belong to the order Perciformes, which is the richest in number of species (approximately 10,000) but poor in terms of available genomic information and tools. Syntenic relationships were established by using 800 EST and microsatellites sequences successfully mapped on the RH map of seabream. Comparison to the stickleback genome produced most positive BLAT hits (58%) followed by medaka (32%) and Tetraodon (30%). Thus, stickleback was used as the major stepping stone to compare seabass and tilapia to seabream. In addition to the significance for the aquaculture industry, this approach can encompass important ecological and evolutionary implications. PMID:18297360

  17. Integrated genome browser: visual analytics platform for genomics

    PubMed Central

    Norris, David C.; Loraine, Ann E.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Genome browsers that support fast navigation through vast datasets and provide interactive visual analytics functions can help scientists achieve deeper insight into biological systems. Toward this end, we developed Integrated Genome Browser (IGB), a highly configurable, interactive and fast open source desktop genome browser. Results: Here we describe multiple updates to IGB, including all-new capabilities to display and interact with data from high-throughput sequencing experiments. To demonstrate, we describe example visualizations and analyses of datasets from RNA-Seq, ChIP-Seq and bisulfite sequencing experiments. Understanding results from genome-scale experiments requires viewing the data in the context of reference genome annotations and other related datasets. To facilitate this, we enhanced IGB’s ability to consume data from diverse sources, including Galaxy, Distributed Annotation and IGB-specific Quickload servers. To support future visualization needs as new genome-scale assays enter wide use, we transformed the IGB codebase into a modular, extensible platform for developers to create and deploy all-new visualizations of genomic data. Availability and implementation: IGB is open source and is freely available from http://bioviz.org/igb. Contact: aloraine@uncc.edu PMID:27153568

  18. Unlocking hidden genomic sequence

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Jonathan M.; Cochran, Duncan A. E.; Lala, Gita H.; Adams, Peter; Bryant, Darryn; Mitchelson, Keith R.

    2004-01-01

    Despite the success of conventional Sanger sequencing, significant regions of many genomes still present major obstacles to sequencing. Here we propose a novel approach with the potential to alleviate a wide range of sequencing difficulties. The technique involves extracting target DNA sequence from variants generated by introduction of random mutations. The introduction of mutations does not destroy original sequence information, but distributes it amongst multiple variants. Some of these variants lack problematic features of the target and are more amenable to conventional sequencing. The technique has been successfully demonstrated with mutation levels up to an average 18% base substitution and has been used to read previously intractable poly(A), AT-rich and GC-rich motifs. PMID:14973330

  19. Genomics in Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Han, Guangchun; Sun, Jiya; Wang, Jiajia; Bai, Zhouxian; Song, Fuhai; Lei, Hongxing

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders comprise a variety of complex diseases in the central nervous system, which can be roughly classified as neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. The basic and translational research of neurological disorders has been hindered by the difficulty in accessing the pathological center (i.e., the brain) in live patients. The rapid advancement of sequencing and array technologies has made it possible to investigate the disease mechanism and biomarkers from a systems perspective. In this review, recent progresses in the discovery of novel risk genes, treatment targets and peripheral biomarkers employing genomic technologies will be discussed. Our major focus will be on two of the most heavily investigated neurological disorders, namely Alzheimer’s disease and autism spectrum disorder. PMID:25108264

  20. Genomics of Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Alejandra; Chung, Mina K

    2016-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common clinical arrhythmia that appears to be highly heritable, despite representing a complex interplay of several disease processes that generally do not manifest until later in life. In this manuscript, we will review the genetic basis of this complex trait established through studies of familial AF, linkage and candidate gene studies of common AF, genome wide association studies (GWAS) of common AF, and transcriptomic studies of AF. Since AF is associated with a five-fold increase in the risk of stroke, we also review the intersection of common genetic factors associated with both of these conditions. Similarly, we highlight the intersection of common genetic markers associated with some risk factors for AF, such as hypertension and obesity, and AF. Lastly, we describe a paradigm where genetic factors predispose to the risk of AF, but which may require additional stress and trigger factors in older age to allow for the clinical manifestation of AF. PMID:27139902