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Sample records for adding crabtrees catalyst

  1. William Crabtree's Venus transit observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollerstrom, Nicholas

    2005-04-01

    The close collaboration between the two North-country astronomers Jeremiah Horrocks and William Crabtree gave them special insight into the new astronomy published by the recently-deceased Kepler, whereby Horrocks became the only person to apprehend that the Rudolphine tables were in fact predicting a Venus transit in 1639. This paper focuses especially upon William Crabtree's role and contribution. A comparison is made with an earlier, unsuccessful endeavour by these two concerning a possible transit of Mercury. Much of the record of their work was lost during the civil war. Finally, thanks to Christiaan Huygens, Horrock's manuscript was published by Johannes Hevelius in Danzig, in 1662.

  2. Jeremiah Horrocks, William Crabtree, and the Lancashire observations of the transit of Venus of 1639

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Allan

    2005-04-01

    When Jeremiah Horrocks correctly predicted, and with his friend William Crabtree observed, the Venus transit of 24 November 1639, these two men became more than the first astronomers in history to witness a rare celestial phenomenon. For Horrocks's and Crabtree's achievement constituted in may ways the first major astronomical discovery to be made in Renaissance England. It is also clear from their writings, moreover, that the two men, working in the isolation of rural Lancashire and well away from London or the universities, were fully conversant with contemporary discoveries made in continental Europe by Tycho Brahe, Galileo, Kepler, Gassendi, and others. In many ways, therefore, their work begs more questions than can easily be answered, such as why the rural North-West produced not only Horrocks and Crabtree, but other contemporary astronomers such as the Lancastrians Charles Towneley, Jeremy Shakerley, and their Yorkshire friend William Gascoigne. Yet in addition to whatever regional circumstances might have been present, and how easy it might have been for an educated rural Lancastrian to be fully informed about what astronomers in Paris, Prague, or Florence were doing, what cannot be denied is the outstanding originality of their wider achievement. For Jeremiah Horrocks in particular was a physical scientist of genius. His correct determination of the elliptical shape of the lunar orbit by 1638 when he was about 20 and his wider work on planetary dynamics place him amongst the most creative researchers of the seventeenth century. Central to Horrocks's and Crabtree's achievement was Crabtree's realisation by 1636 that contemporary published astronomical tables were unreliable, and that if one wanted to do serious work in understanding the heavens, then one had to observe and measure them for oneself, and learn to draw original conclusions.

  3. Exploring green catalysts for production of biofuels and value added chemicals for renewable and sustainable energy future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budhi, Sridhar

    Porous silica have attracted significant attention in the past few decades due to their unique textural properties. They were extensively investigated for applications in catalysis, separation, environmental remediation and drug delivery. We have investigated the porous metal incorporated silica in the synthetic as well as catalytic perspectives. The synthesis of metal incorporated mesoporous silica via co-condensation such as SBA-15, KIT-5 are still challenging as it involves acidic synthetic route. Synthesis in high acidity conditions affects the incorporation of metal in silica due to high dissolution of metal precursors and breaking of metal oxygen and silica bond. The research presented here demonstrates an efficient way to incorporate metals by addition of diammonium hydrogen phosphate along with metal precursor during the synthesis. The incorporation efficiency has increased 2-3 times with this approach. Catalytic studies were performed to support our hypothesis. Such synthesized molybdenum incorporated mesoporous silica were investigated as catalyst for fast pyrolysis. When molydenum incorporated in silica was used as catalyst for fast pyrolysis of pine, it selectively produced furans (furan, methylfuran and dimethylfuran). Furans are considered value-added chemicals and can be used as a blendstock for diesel/jet grade fuel. The catalyst was very stable to harsh pyrolysis conditions and had a longer life before deactivation when compared with traditional zeolites. Further, this catalyst did not produce aromatic hydrocarbons in significant yields unlike zeolites. The origin of the furans was determined to be biopolymer cellulose and the selectivity for furans are attributed to low catalyst acidity. The effect of silica to alumina ratio (SAR) of beta-zeolite was investigated ranging to elucidate the relationship between the of number of acid sites on product speciation and catalyst deactivation on catalysts supplied by Johnson Matthey. The catalyst with low

  4. Recent progress in the development of solid catalysts for biomass conversion into high value-added chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Michikazu; Nakajima, Kiyotaka; Kamata, Keigo

    2015-06-01

    In recent decades, the substitution of non-renewable fossil resources by renewable biomass as a sustainable feedstock has been extensively investigated for the manufacture of high value-added products such as biofuels, commodity chemicals, and new bio-based materials such as bioplastics. Numerous solid catalyst systems for the effective conversion of biomass feedstocks into value-added chemicals and fuels have been developed. Solid catalysts are classified into four main groups with respect to their structures and substrate activation properties: (a) micro- and mesoporous materials, (b) metal oxides, (c) supported metal catalysts, and (d) sulfonated polymers. This review article focuses on the activation of substrates and/or reagents on the basis of groups (a)-(d), and the corresponding reaction mechanisms. In addition, recent progress in chemocatalytic processes for the production of five industrially important products (5-hydroxymethylfurfural, lactic acid, glyceraldehyde, 1,3-dihydroxyacetone, and furan-2,5-dicarboxylic acid) as bio-based plastic monomers and their intermediates is comprehensively summarized.

  5. ¹³C-based metabolic flux analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a reduced Crabtree effect.

    PubMed

    Kajihata, Shuichi; Matsuda, Fumio; Yoshimi, Mika; Hayakawa, Kenshi; Furusawa, Chikara; Kanda, Akihisa; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows a Crabtree effect that produces ethanol in a high glucose concentration even under fully aerobic condition. For efficient production of cake yeast or compressed yeast for baking, ethanol by-production is not desired since glucose limited chemostat or fed-batch cultivations are performed to suppress the Crabtree effect. In this study, the (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) was performed for the S288C derived S. cerevisiae strain to characterize a metabolic state under the reduced Crabtree effect. S. cerevisiae cells were cultured at a low dilution rate (0.1 h(-1)) under the glucose-limited chemostat condition. The estimated metabolic flux distribution showed that the acetyl-CoA in mitochondria was mainly produced from pyruvate by pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) reaction and that the level of the metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway was much higher than that of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, which contributes to high biomass yield at low dilution rate by supplying NADPH required for cell growth. PMID:25634548

  6. Enhanced performance of gas diffusion electrode for electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide to formate by adding polytetrafluoroethylene into catalyst layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qinian; Dong, Heng; Yu, Han; Yu, Hongbing

    2015-04-01

    Gas diffusion electrode (GDE) with Nafion bonded catalyst layer (CL) for electrochemical reduction of CO2 to formate (ERCF) suffers from CO2 mass transfer limitation. In this work, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) with contents of 5.9 wt%, 7.7 wt%, 11.1 wt% and 20 wt% are added into the CL of the GDE with Sn catalyst (P-SGDE) for ERCF. The morphologies and porous structures of the P-SGDEs are examined by scanning electron microscope and mercury intrusion measurement, respectively. The electrochemical performances of the P-SGDEs are investigated by linear sweep voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and constant potential electrolysis. The results show that the Faraday efficiency (86.75 ± 2.89%) and current density (21.67 ± 1.29 mA cm-2) for ERCF were improved by 25.4% and 25.8% respectively when the content of PTFE is 11.1 wt%, probably owing to the enhancement in the catalyst active surface area and CO2 diffusion. This Faraday efficiency is the highest one found for ERCF with Sn GDE under similar conductions.

  7. Scheffersomyces stipitis: a comparative systems biology study with the Crabtree positive yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Scheffersomyces stipitis is a Crabtree negative yeast, commonly known for its capacity to ferment pentose sugars. Differently from Crabtree positive yeasts such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the onset of fermentation in S. stipitis is not dependent on the sugar concentration, but is regulated by a decrease in oxygen levels. Even though S. stipitis has been extensively studied due to its potential application in pentoses fermentation, a limited amount of information is available about its metabolism during aerobic growth on glucose. Here, we provide a systems biology based comparison between the two yeasts, uncovering the metabolism of S. stipitis during aerobic growth on glucose under batch and chemostat cultivations. Results Starting from the analysis of physiological data, we confirmed through 13C-based flux analysis the fully respiratory metabolism of S. stipitis when growing both under glucose limited or glucose excess conditions. The patterns observed showed similarity to the fully respiratory metabolism observed for S. cerevisiae under chemostat cultivations however, intracellular metabolome analysis uncovered the presence of several differences in metabolite patterns. To describe gene expression levels under the two conditions, we performed RNA sequencing and the results were used to quantify transcript abundances of genes from the central carbon metabolism and compared with those obtained with S. cerevisiae. Interestingly, genes involved in central pathways showed different patterns of expression, suggesting different regulatory networks between the two yeasts. Efforts were focused on identifying shared and unique families of transcription factors between the two yeasts through in silico transcription factors analysis, suggesting a different regulation of glycolytic and glucoenogenic pathways. Conclusions The work presented addresses the impact of high-throughput methods in describing and comparing the physiology of Crabtree positive and Crabtree

  8. Transit of Venus: Horrocks, Crabtree and the 1639 transit of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Allan

    2004-10-01

    British research astronomy began in 1693, when Jeremiah Horrocks and William Crabtree observed the transit of Venus in 1639. They were the only two people to observe this event and their observations and their own predictions that prompted them were a turning point on the journey from the classical astronomy of documentation and tabulation to the modern idea of observation, prediction and comprehension. The transit observations made by Horrocks from a small village in Lancashire, spurred on by inaccuracies in the tables that constituted the bulk of astronomy at the time, were the foundation for much of the flowering of astronomical thinking in Britain during the late 17th century. Despite the early deaths of both Horrocks and Crabtree, and thanks largely to the efforts of contemporary north-country astronomers, Horrocks's work on the transit was recognized both among the British scientific elite at the Royal Society and among the European pioneers of the modern astronomy, one of whom put Horrocks on a par with that of Galileo, Gassendi and Kepler.

  9. The Crabtree and Warburg effects: Do metabolite-induced regulations participate in their induction?

    PubMed

    Hammad, Noureddine; Rosas-Lemus, Monica; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Rigoulet, Michel; Devin, Anne

    2016-08-01

    The Crabtree and Warburg effects are two well-known deviations of cell energy metabolism that will be described herein. A number of hypotheses have been formulated regarding the molecular mechanisms leading to these cellular energy metabolism deviations. In this review, we will focus on the emerging notion that metabolite-induced regulations participate in the induction of these effects. All throughout this review, it should be kept in mind that no regulatory mechanism is exclusive and that it may vary in cancer cells owing to different cell types or oncogenic background. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27066942

  10. Polymerization catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, V.

    1987-05-12

    A process is described for polymerizing at least one alpha olefin under conditions characteristic of Ziegler polymerization wherein the polymerization is conducted in the presence of a catalyst system which comprises: a supported catalyst prepared under anhydrous conditions by the sequential steps of: preparing a slurry of inert particulate support material; adding to the slurry a solution of an organomagnesium compound; adding to the slurry and reacting a solution of a zirconium halide compound, hafnium compound or mixtures thereof; adding to the slurry and reacting a halogenator; adding to the slurry and reacting a tetravalent titanium halide compound; and recovering solid catalyst.

  11. Polymerization catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, V.

    1986-10-21

    A process is described for polymerizing at least one alpha-olefin under conditions characteristic of Ziegler polymerization wherein the polymerization is conducted in the presence of a catalyst comprising: a supported catalyst prepared under anhydrous conditions by the steps of: (1) sequentially; (a) preparing a slurry of inert particulate support material; (b) adding to the slurry a solution of an organomagnesium compound; (c) adding to the slurry and reacting a solution of zirconium compound; and (2) thereafter; (d) adding to the slurry and reacting a halogenator; (e) adding to the slurry and reacting a tetravalent titanium compound; (f) recovering solid catalyst; and an organoaluminum compound.

  12. Removal of carbon monoxide from hydrogen-rich fuels by selective low-temperature oxidation over base metal added platinum catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Dong Jin; Kwak, Chan; Kim, Jin-Hong; Kwon, Se Mann; Park, Tae-Jin

    Various catalysts containing different catalytic materials, supports, and additives were tested for the preferential oxidation (PROX) of carbon monoxide from a hydrogen-rich gas stream. The results were analyzed based on three reactions involved in the PROX: oxidation of carbon monoxide, H 2-O 2 reaction, and methanation. The PROX reactions were performed in two reaction systems, one for catalyst screening and kinetic study and the other for simulation of the catalytic performance under real reaction conditions. The performances of PROX on different catalysts, varying active components, supports, and additives, were ranked in terms of carbon monoxide conversion and hydrogen consumption. Base metal added platinum catalysts exhibited excellent ability for the carbon monoxide removal. TPR results indicated that a new active species was formed resulting in the enhancement of catalytic activity. PtCo/Al 2O 3 was tested with a simulated steam-reformed fuel for confirmation of its high activity. The effect of operating conditions was analyzed on the PtCo/Al 2O 3, and the optimum conditions for PROX were obtained.

  13. The Crabtree Creek pluton: A deformed Mid-Paleozoic( ) stitching pluton on the west flank of the Raleigh metamorphic belt

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, E.F. . Dept. of Earth Sciences); Stoddard, E.F. . Dept. of MEAS)

    1993-03-01

    Crystalline rocks on the west flank of the Alleghanian-aged Raleigh metamorphic belt are subdivided into four west-dipping lithotectonic terranes in the Falls Lake and north Raleigh areas. The rocks of these terranes are separated from east to west on the basis of bulk rock composition, metamorphic textural characteristics, and discrete structural discontinuities into the Raleigh terrane (RT), Crabtree terrane (CT), Falls Lake melange (FLM), and the volcanogenic Carolina slate belt (CSB). The RT and CT are separated by the dextral shear Nutbush Creek fault zone, while the Falls Lake thrust juxtaposes the CT and FLM. The structural character of the discontinuity separating the FLM and the CSB is unclear, although thrusting has been proposed. The results of geologic mapping in the Raleigh West 7.5[prime] quadrangle for the NC Geological Survey's COGEOMAP project in the Raleigh 1[degree] sheet indicate that only the CSB and CT are exposed west of I-440 between US 70 and I-40. This confirms the mapping results of Horton and others that the melange pinches out in north Raleigh just north of US 70. South of US 70, a large orthogneiss body, the Crabtree Creek composite granitic pluton, occupies the same relative position as the melange, separating mafic and intermediate metavolcanic rocks of the CSB from nonlineated and lineated interlayered schists and gneisses of the CT. The pluton is subdivided into a foliated leucocratic, medium grained muscovite granitic orthogneiss, and a foliated leucocratic to mesocratic medium to coarse grained muscovite [plus minus] biotite granitic orthogneiss containing abundant porphyroclastic disks, rods, and knobs of quartz. Because its lobes locally display intrusive contacts with metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks of both terranes, the Crabtree Creek pluton represents an intrusion that stitched the two terranes together.

  14. Novel schemes for production of biodiesel and value-added co-products from microalgal oil using heterogeneous catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Tao

    Microalgae are promising sources of biofuels primarily because of their higher potential productivity compared to terrestrial biofuel crops. However, the production of liquid fuels from microalgae suffers from a lack of viable methods of extraction, conversion and fractionation of various components of the algal biomass. In this dissertation study, a rapid method was developed to accurately evaluate the biodiesel potential of microalgae biomass. The major advantage of this method is in situ fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) preparation directly from wet fresh microalgal and yeast biomass, without prior solvent extraction or dehydration. FAMEs were prepared by a sequential alkaline hydrolysis and acidic esterification process. This method can be used even with high amount of water in the biomass and is applicable to a vast range of microalgae and yeast species. A two-step in situ process was also investigated in this study to obtain a high FAME yield from microalgae biomass that had high free fatty acids (FFA) content. This process has the potential to reduce the production cost of microalgae-derived FAME and be more environmental compatible due to the higher FAME yield with reduced catalyst consumption. A cost-effective bio-char based catalyst was tested for the two-step biodiesel production. The results indicated that the bio-char catalyst was superior to commercial Amberly-15. A scalable chlorophyll remove process was also developed as a part of the system. The research resulted in a practical and cost-effective approach for producing biodiesel from crude microalgal oil. An integrated approach was explored in the fourth part of the study to produce biodiesel and fractionate high-value polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA). Zeolites were employed as the catalyst for selective esterification of fatty acids according to their chain length and degree of saturation. Low-value short chain FFA could be largely converted into FAME, while PUFA would remain unreacted due to

  15. Triggering Respirofermentative Metabolism in the Crabtree-Negative Yeast Pichia guilliermondii by Disrupting the CAT8 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Pichia guilliermondii is a Crabtree-negative yeast that does not normally exhibit respirofermentative metabolism under aerobic conditions, and methods to trigger this metabolism may have applications for physiological study and industrial applications. In the present study, CAT8, which encodes a putative global transcriptional activator, was disrupted in P. guilliermondii. This yeast's ethanol titer increased by >20-fold compared to the wild type (WT) during aerobic fermentation using glucose. A comparative transcriptional analysis indicated that the expression of genes in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and respiratory chain was repressed in the CAT8-disrupted (ΔCAT8) strain, while the fermentative pathway genes were significantly upregulated. The respiratory activities in the ΔCAT8 strain, indicated by the specific oxygen uptake rate and respiratory state value, decreased to one-half and one-third of the WT values, respectively. In addition, the expression of HAP4, a transcriptional respiratory activator, was significantly repressed in the ΔCAT8 strain. Through disruption of HAP4, the ethanol production of P. guilliermondii was also increased, but the yield and titer were lower than that in the ΔCAT8 strain. A further transcriptional comparison between ΔCAT8 and ΔHAP4 strains suggested a more comprehensive reprogramming function of Cat8 in the central metabolic pathways. These results indicated the important role of CAT8 in regulating the glucose metabolism of P. guilliermondii and that the regulation was partially mediated by repressing HAP4. The strategy proposed here might be applicable to improve the aerobic fermentation capacity of other Crabtree-negative yeasts. PMID:24747899

  16. Improvement of proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance in low-humidity conditions by adding hygroscopic agarose powder to the catalyst layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Sanying; Liao, Shijun; Xiong, Ziang; Zou, Haobin; Dang, Dai; Zheng, Ruiping; Shu, Ting; Liang, Zhenxing; Li, Xiuhua; Li, Yingwei

    2015-01-01

    A high-performance membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with agarose added to the anodic catalyst layer (CL) was successfully prepared. The MEA exhibited excellent performance at low relative humidity (RH) in an air/hydrogen proton exchange membrane fuel cell. The effects of agarose content, RH, cell temperature, and back pressure on the low-humidity performance of this MEA were investigated. The results of water contact angles and water uptake measurements reveal that the hydrophilicity of the anode is significantly improved with the addition of agarose. With a low RH of 20% and a cell temperature of 60 °C, the optimal MEA (MEA-4), containing 4 wt.% agarose in the anode CL, achieves excellent low-humidity performance: the current density reaches 960 mA cm-2 at 0.6 V and 500 mA cm-2 at 0.7 V. After 10 h of continuous operation under the same conditions, the current density decreases just slightly, from 960 to 840 mA cm-2, whereas the current density of a blank MEA without added agarose degrades sharply.

  17. Kinetic and Energetic Parameters of Carob Wastes Fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Crabtree Effect, Ethanol Toxicity, and Invertase Repression.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, B; Peinado, J M; Raposo, S; Constantino, A; Quintas, C; Lima-Costa, M E

    2015-06-01

    Carob waste is a useful raw material for the second-generation ethanol because 50% of its dry weight is sucrose, glucose, and fructose. To optimize the process, we have studied the influence of the initial concentration of sugars on the fermentation performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. With initial sugar concentrations (S0) of 20 g/l, the yeasts were derepressed and the ethanol produced during the exponential phase was consumed in a diauxic phase. The rate of ethanol consumption decreased with increasing S0 and disappeared at 250 g/l when the Crabtree effect was complete and almost all the sugar consumed was transformed into ethanol with a yield factor of 0.42 g/g. Sucrose hydrolysis was delayed at high S0 because of glucose repression of invertase synthesis, which was triggered at concentrations above 40 g/l. At S0 higher than 250 g/l, even when glucose had been exhausted, sucrose was hydrolyzed very slowly, probably due to an inhibition at this low water activity. Although with lower metabolic rates and longer times of fermentation, 250 g/l is considered the optimal initial concentration because it avoids the diauxic consumption of ethanol and maintains enough invertase activity to consume all the sucrose, and also avoids the inhibitions due to lower water activities at higher S0. PMID:25588557

  18. Polymerization catalyst system

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, V.

    1986-03-25

    This patent describes a catalyst system for polymerizing at least one alpha-olefin under conditions characteristic of Ziegler polymerization. This system consists of: 1. a supported polymerization catalyst or mixture of polymerization catalysts prepared under anhydrous conditions by the sequential steps of: (a) preparing a slurry of inert particulate porous support material; (b) adding to the slurry a solution of an organomagnesium compound; (c) adding to the slurry and reacting a solution of a zirconium halide compound, hafnium compound or mixtures thereof; (d) adding to the slurry and reacting a halogenator; (e) adding to the slurry and reacting a tetravalent titanium halide compound; and (f) recovering solid catalyst component; 2. an organoaluminum compound; and 3. a promotor of chlorinated hydrocarbons having one to 20 carbon atoms.

  19. Fibers comprised of epitaxially grown single-wall carbon nanotubes, and a method for added catalyst and continuous growth at the tip

    DOEpatents

    Kittrell, W. Carter; Wang, Yuhuang; Kim, Myung Jong; Hauge, Robert H.; Smalley, Richard E.; Marek leg, Irene Morin

    2010-06-01

    The present invention is directed to fibers of epitaxially grown single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and methods of making same. Such methods generally comprise the steps of: (a) providing a spun SWNT fiber; (b) cutting the fiber substantially perpendicular to the fiber axis to yield a cut fiber; (c) etching the cut fiber at its end with a plasma to yield an etched cut fiber; (d) depositing metal catalyst on the etched cut fiber end to form a continuous SWNT fiber precursor; and (e) introducing feedstock gases under SWNT growth conditions to grow the continuous SWNT fiber precursor into a continuous SWNT fiber.

  20. Process of making supported catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, James A.; Subramanian, Somasundaram

    1992-01-01

    Oxide supported metal catalysts have an additional metal present in intimate association with the metal catalyst to enhance catalytic activity. In a preferred mode, iridium or another Group VIII metal catalyst is supported on a titania, alumina, tungsten oxide, silica, or composite oxide support. Aluminum ions are readsorbed onto the support and catalyst, and reduced during calcination. The aluminum can be added as aluminum nitrate to the iridium impregnate solution, e.g. chloroiridic acid.

  1. Oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  2. Protein costs do not explain evolution of metabolic strategies and regulation of ribosomal content: does protein investment explain an anaerobic bacterial Crabtree effect?

    PubMed

    Goel, Anisha; Eckhardt, Thomas H; Puri, Pranav; de Jong, Anne; Branco Dos Santos, Filipe; Giera, Martin; Fusetti, Fabrizia; de Vos, Willem M; Kok, Jan; Poolman, Bert; Molenaar, Douwe; Kuipers, Oscar P; Teusink, Bas

    2015-07-01

    Protein investment costs are considered a major driver for the choice of alternative metabolic strategies. We tested this premise in Lactococcus lactis, a bacterium that exhibits a distinct, anaerobic version of the bacterial Crabtree/Warburg effect; with increasing growth rates it shifts from a high yield metabolic mode [mixed-acid fermentation; 3 adenosine triphosphate (ATP) per glucose] to a low yield metabolic mode (homolactic fermentation; 2 ATP per glucose). We studied growth rate-dependent relative transcription and protein ratios, enzyme activities, and fluxes of L. lactis in glucose-limited chemostats, providing a high-quality and comprehensive data set. A three- to fourfold higher growth rate rerouted metabolism from acetate to lactate as the main fermentation product. However, we observed hardly any changes in transcription, protein levels and enzyme activities. Even levels of ribosomal proteins, constituting a major investment in cellular machinery, changed only slightly. Thus, contrary to the original hypothesis, central metabolism in this organism appears to be hardly regulated at the level of gene expression, but rather at the metabolic level. We conclude that L. lactis is either poorly adapted to growth at low and constant glucose concentrations, or that protein costs play a less important role in fitness than hitherto assumed. PMID:25828364

  3. Value Added?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UCLA IDEA, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Value added measures (VAM) uses changes in student test scores to determine how much "value" an individual teacher has "added" to student growth during the school year. Some policymakers, school districts, and educational advocates have applauded VAM as a straightforward measure of teacher effectiveness: the better a teacher, the better students…

  4. Bimetallic Catalysts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinfelt, John H.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical reaction rates can be controlled by varying composition of miniscule clusters of metal atoms. These bimetallic catalysts have had major impact on petroleum refining, where work has involved heterogeneous catalysis (reacting molecules in a phase separate from catalyst.) Experimentation involving hydrocarbon reactions, catalytic…

  5. Oxyhydrochlorination catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E.; Noceti, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    An improved catalyst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HCl and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride.

  6. Adding Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orsini, Larry L.; Hudack, Lawrence R.; Zekan, Donald L.

    1999-01-01

    The value-added statement (VAS), relatively unknown in the United States, is used in financial reports by many European companies. Saint Bonaventure University (New York) has adapted a VAS to make it appropriate for not-for-profit universities by identifying stakeholder groups (students, faculty, administrators/support personnel, creditors, the…

  7. Regeneration of Hydrotreating and FCC Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    CM Wai; JG Frye; JL Fulton; LE Bowman; LJ Silva; MA Gerber

    1999-09-30

    Y zeolite in a silica-alumina matrix. X-ray fluorescence analyses showed that the rare earths used in preparing the catalysts were a mixture of lanthanum and cerium. Antimony found in the spent catalyst was added during operation of the FCC unit as a way to suppress the adverse effects of deposited nickel. The fresh HDS samples consisted of sulfided nickel and molybdenum on an alumina support. The spent catalyst showed nearly 10% vanadium on the catalyst and a modest increase in nickel and sulfur on the catalyst as a result of operations. Hydrocracking catalysts were not available for this study.

  8. DIS in AdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albacete, Javier L.; Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Taliotis, Anastasios

    2009-03-01

    We calculate the total cross section for the scattering of a quark-anti-quark dipole on a large nucleus at high energy for a strongly coupled N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory using AdS/CFT correspondence. We model the nucleus by a metric of a shock wave in AdS5. We then calculate the expectation value of the Wilson loop (the dipole) by finding the extrema of the Nambu-Goto action for an open string attached to the quark and antiquark lines of the loop in the background of an AdS5 shock wave. We find two physically meaningful extremal string configurations. For both solutions we obtain the forward scattering amplitude N for the quark dipole-nucleus scattering. We study the onset of unitarity with increasing center-of-mass energy and transverse size of the dipole: we observe that for both solutions the saturation scale Qs is independent of energy/Bjorken-x and depends on the atomic number of the nucleus as Qs˜A1/3. Finally we observe that while one of the solutions we found corresponds to the pomeron intercept of αP = 2 found earlier in the literature, when extended to higher energy or larger dipole sizes it violates the black disk limit. The other solution we found respects the black disk limit and yields the pomeron intercept of αP = 1.5. We thus conjecture that the right pomeron intercept in gauge theories at strong coupling may be αP = 1.5.

  9. Photo-oxidation catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping; Smith, R. Davis

    2009-07-14

    Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

  10. Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts having improved selectivity

    DOEpatents

    Miller, James G.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1989-01-01

    The promoter(s) Mn oxide or Mn oxide and Zr oxide are added to a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst combined with the molecular sieve TC-103 or TC-123 such that the resultant catalyst demonstrates improved product selectivity, stability and catalyst life. The improved selectivity is evidenced by lower methane production, higher C5+ yield and increased olefin production.

  11. Attrition resistant Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and support

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Alan H.; Oukaci, Rachid; Goodwin, James G.

    2004-05-25

    A catalyst support having improved attrition resistance and a catalyst produced therefrom. The catalyst support is produced by a method comprising the step of treating calcined .gamma.-alumina having no catalytic material added thereto with an acidic aqueous solution having an acidity level effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the calcined .gamma.-alumina.

  12. Binary ferrihydrite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, Gerald P.; Zhao, Jianmin; Feng, Zhen

    1996-01-01

    A method of preparing a catalyst precursor comprises dissolving an iron salt and a salt of an oxoanion forming agent, in water so that a solution of the iron salt and oxoanion forming agent salt has a ratio of oxoanion/Fe of between 0.0001:1 to 0.5:1. Next is increasing the pH of the solution to 10 by adding a strong base followed by collecting of precipitate having a binary ferrihydrite structure. A binary ferrihydrite catalyst precursor is also prepared by dissolving an iron salt in water. The solution is brought to a pH of substantially 10 to obtain ferrihydrite precipitate. The precipitate is then filtered and washed with distilled water and subsequently admixed with a hydroxy carboxylic acid solution. The admixture is mixed/agitated and the binary ferrihydrite precipitate is then filtered and recovered.

  13. Binary ferrihydrite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, G.P.; Zhao, J.; Feng, Z.

    1996-12-03

    A method of preparing a catalyst precursor comprises dissolving an iron salt and a salt of an oxoanion forming agent, in water so that a solution of the iron salt and oxoanion forming agent salt has a ratio of oxoanion/Fe of between 0.0001:1 to 0.5:1. Next is increasing the pH of the solution to 10 by adding a strong base followed by collecting of precipitate having a binary ferrihydrite structure. A binary ferrihydrite catalyst precursor is also prepared by dissolving an iron salt in water. The solution is brought to a pH of substantially 10 to obtain ferrihydrite precipitate. The precipitate is then filtered and washed with distilled water and subsequently admixed with a hydroxy carboxylic acid solution. The admixture is mixed/agitated and the binary ferrihydrite precipitate is then filtered and recovered. 3 figs.

  14. DIS in AdS

    SciTech Connect

    Albacete, Javier L.; Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Taliotis, Anastasios

    2009-03-23

    We calculate the total cross section for the scattering of a quark-anti-quark dipole on a large nucleus at high energy for a strongly coupled N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory using AdS/CFT correspondence. We model the nucleus by a metric of a shock wave in AdS{sub 5}. We then calculate the expectation value of the Wilson loop (the dipole) by finding the extrema of the Nambu-Goto action for an open string attached to the quark and antiquark lines of the loop in the background of an AdS{sub 5} shock wave. We find two physically meaningful extremal string configurations. For both solutions we obtain the forward scattering amplitude N for the quark dipole-nucleus scattering. We study the onset of unitarity with increasing center-of-mass energy and transverse size of the dipole: we observe that for both solutions the saturation scale Q{sub s} is independent of energy/Bjorken-x and depends on the atomic number of the nucleus as Q{sub s}{approx}A{sup 1/3}. Finally we observe that while one of the solutions we found corresponds to the pomeron intercept of {alpha}{sub P} = 2 found earlier in the literature, when extended to higher energy or larger dipole sizes it violates the black disk limit. The other solution we found respects the black disk limit and yields the pomeron intercept of {alpha}{sub P} = 1.5. We thus conjecture that the right pomeron intercept in gauge theories at strong coupling may be {alpha}{sub P} = 1.5.

  15. Bubbling AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelli, Dario; Morales, Jose F.

    2005-02-01

    In the light of the recent Lin, Lunin, Maldacena (LLM) results, we investigate 1/2-BPS geometries in minimal (and next to minimal) supergravity in D = 6 dimensions. In the case of minimal supergravity, solutions are given by fibrations of a two-torus T2 specified by two harmonic functions. For a rectangular torus the two functions are related by a non-linear equation with rare solutions: AdS3 × S3, the pp-wave and the multi-center string. ``Bubbling'', i.e. superpositions of droplets, is accommodated by allowing the complex structure of the T2 to vary over the base. The analysis is repeated in the presence of a tensor multiplet and similar conclusions are reached, with generic solutions describing D1D5 (or their dual fundamental string-momentum) systems. In this framework, the profile of the dual fundamental string-momentum system is identified with the boundaries of the droplets in a two-dimensional plane.

  16. Catalyst activator

    DOEpatents

    McAdon, Mark H.; Nickias, Peter N.; Marks, Tobin J.; Schwartz, David J.

    2001-01-01

    A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

  17. New approaches in catalyst manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Lostaglio, V.J.; Carruthers, J.D.

    1986-03-01

    Changes in both petroleum refinery feedstocks and refinery product slates during the past 10 years have necessitated new approaches in catalyst manufacture. New hydrotreating catalysts are expected to improve polynuclear aromatic saturation, and to increase cetane index, mild hydrocracking, asphaltene conversion, and contaminant metal removal. Sulfur and nitrogen removal were once considered the sole benefits of hydroprocessing. To accommodate these needs, catalyst manufacturers have focused added attention on defining and achieving rigorous physical and chemical specifications for each new catalyst. It is considered essential to continually improve quality and process control in each manufacturing step. In addition, manufacturers have introduced new technology both in the process and in the evaluation of product. The importance of pore size distribution (PSD), for example, has been appreciated for 20 years or more but it is only within the past 10 years that routine measurement of PSD by mercury and/or nitrogen porosimetry has been applied throughout the entire manufacturing process. A greater emphasis on heavy oil hydrotreating has spurred demands for wide pore catalysts of small external dimensions to overcome the problems of diffusion-limited reactions. In turn, however, these properties may create problems with crush strength and catalyst attrition.

  18. Catalyst suppliers consolidate further, offer more catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1995-10-02

    The list of suppliers of catalysts to the petroleum refining industry has decreased by five since Oil and Gas Journal`s survey of refining catalysts and catalytic additives was last published. Despite the consolidation, the list of catalyst designations has grown to about 950 in this latest survey, compared to 820 listed in 1993. The table divides the catalysts by use and gives data on their primary differentiating characteristics, feedstock, products, form, bulk density,catalyst support, active agents, availability, and manufactures.

  19. Hydrocracking catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Hilfman, L.; O'Hara, M.

    1980-07-01

    A description is given of a process for the conversion of heavy hydrocarbon oil boiling above about 650/sup 0/F into lower boiling hydrocarbons, which comprises hydrocracking the heavy oil in admixture with hydrogen and in contact with a catalyst with comprising a ra re earth exchange metal component and a platinum group metal component supported on a mixture of ziegler alumina and a zeolite.

  20. Novel catalyst widens octane opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, G.

    1987-01-01

    Of the octane upgrading options available, refiners are focusing on those which offer a low upgrading cost, a low capital cost and a short implementation time. The BP ETHEROL Process with the novel trifunctional catalyst satisfies all of these requirements and, with the added ability to produce heavier ethers than just MTBE, provides a new opportunity for octane enhancement. The trifunctional catalyst combines the benefits of etherification, diolefin hydrogenation and olefin isomerisation in one single catalyst and for essentially no incremental investment relative to a conventional MTBE unit. The economics demonstrate that at an upgrading cost of 15 cents per octane barrel, the BP ETHEROL Process is highly competitive with other octane upgrading options.

  1. Adding diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy capability to extended x-ray-absorption fine structure in a new cell to study solid catalysts in combination with a modulation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarello, Gian Luca; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Marchionni, Valentina; Quaroni, Luca; Ferri, Davide

    2014-07-15

    We describe a novel cell used to combine in situ transmission X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) in a single experiment. The novelty of the cell design compared to current examples is that both radiations are passed through an X-ray and IR transparent window in direct contact with the sample. This innovative geometry also offers a wide surface for IR collection. In order to avoid interference from the crystalline IR transparent materials (e.g., CaF{sub 2}, MgF{sub 2}, diamond) a 500 μm carbon filled hole is laser drilled in the center of a CaF{sub 2} window. The cell is designed to represent a plug flow reactor, has reduced dead volume in order to allow for fast exchange of gases and is therefore suitable for experiments under fast transients, e.g., according to the concentration modulation approach. High quality time-resolved XAS and DRIFTS data of a 2 wt.% Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst are obtained in concentration modulation experiments where CO (or H{sub 2}) pulses are alternated to O{sub 2} pulses at 150 °C. We show that additional information can be obtained on the Pt redox dynamic under working conditions thanks to the improved sensitivity given by the modulation approach followed by Phase Sensitive Detection (PSD) analysis. It is anticipated that the design of the novel cell is likely suitable for a number of other in situ spectroscopic and diffraction methods.

  2. [Catalyst research]. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ian P Rothwell; David R McMillin

    2005-03-14

    Research results are the areas of catalyst precursor synthesis, catalyst fluxionality, catalyst stability, polymerization of {alpha}-olefins as well as the chemistry of Group IV and Group V metal centers with aryloxide and arylsulfide ligands.

  3. Polarised black holes in AdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Miguel S.; Greenspan, Lauren; Oliveira, Miguel; Penedones, João; Santos, Jorge E.

    2016-06-01

    We consider solutions in Einstein-Maxwell theory with a negative cosmological constant that asymptote to global AdS 4 with conformal boundary {S}2× {{{R}}}t. At the sphere at infinity we turn on a space-dependent electrostatic potential, which does not destroy the asymptotic AdS behaviour. For simplicity we focus on the case of a dipolar electrostatic potential. We find two new geometries: (i) an AdS soliton that includes the full backreaction of the electric field on the AdS geometry; (ii) a polarised neutral black hole that is deformed by the electric field, accumulating opposite charges in each hemisphere. For both geometries we study boundary data such as the charge density and the stress tensor. For the black hole we also study the horizon charge density and area, and further verify a Smarr formula. Then we consider this system at finite temperature and compute the Gibbs free energy for both AdS soliton and black hole phases. The corresponding phase diagram generalizes the Hawking-Page phase transition. The AdS soliton dominates the low temperature phase and the black hole the high temperature phase, with a critical temperature that decreases as the external electric field increases. Finally, we consider the simple case of a free charged scalar field on {S}2× {{{R}}}t with conformal coupling. For a field in the SU(N ) adjoint representation we compare the phase diagram with the above gravitational system.

  4. Enhanced catalyst stability for cyclic co methanation operations

    DOEpatents

    Risch, Alan P.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. The active carbon is thereafter reacted with steam or hydrogen to form methane. Enhanced catalyst stability for long term, cyclic operation is obtained by the incorporation of an alkali or alkaline earth dopant in a silica binding agent added to the catalyst-support additive composition.

  5. The Effect of Supercritical Fluids on Solid Acid Catalyst Alkylation

    SciTech Connect

    Ginosar, Daniel Michael; Thompson, David Neil; Burch, Kyle Coates; Zalewski, D. J.

    2002-05-01

    The alkylation of isobutane with trans-2-butene was explored over six solid acid catalysts in the liquid, near-critical liquid, and supercritical regions through the addition of an inert cosolvent to the reaction feed mixture. The addition of supercritical cosolvents did not result in sustained catalytic alkylation activity. A modest improvement in product yield was obtained with the addition of methane in the modified-liquid region; however, catalyst longevity and product selectivity were decreased compared to cosolvent-free liquid conditions. This paper describes the catalyst screening and selection process, an exploration of catalyst performance with varying concentrations of methane, and an examination of the effects of seven supercritical fluids on catalyst performance. The catalysts included two zeolites, two sulfated metal oxides, and two Nafion catalysts. Three hydrocarbons, two fluorocarbons, carbon dioxide, and sulfur hexafluoride were explored as inert cosolvents added to the reaction mixture.

  6. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Silva, L.J.; Bray, L.A.

    1995-05-30

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: (a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; (b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; (c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and (d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications. 3 figs.

  7. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Laura J.; Bray, Lane A.

    1995-01-01

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications.

  8. Long-Life Catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STC Catalysts, Inc. (SCi) manufactures a noble metal reducible oxide catalyst consisting primarily of platinum and tin dioxide deposited on a ceramic substrate. It is an ambient temperature oxidation catalyst that was developed primarily for Carbon Dioxide Lasers.The catalyst was developed by the NASA Langley Research Center for the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder Program (LAWS) which was intended to measure wind velocity on a global basis. There are a number of NASA owned patents covering various aspects of the catalyst.

  9. Hydrogen added after-burner system

    SciTech Connect

    Kanada, Youji; Hayasi, Masaharu; Akaki, Motonobu; Tsuchikawa, Shunzou; Isomura, Akihito

    1996-09-01

    The authors developed a hydrogen-added afterburner system for a new catalyst heating system, which realized large reduction of emissions during start-up at low temperatures when hydrocarbon (HC) emission was rather high. Key development items of this system are a water electrolysis type small size on-board hydrogen supply unit and an engine matching technique for the verification of emission reduction effects.

  10. ''KN'' series cracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Klapstov, V.F.; Khlebrikova, M.A.; Maslova, A.A.; Nefedov, B.K.

    1986-09-01

    The basic directions in improving high-activity zeolitic cracking catalysts at the present stage are improvements in the resistance to attrition and increases in the bulk density of the catalysts, along with a changeover to relatively waste-free catalyst manufacturing technology. Catalysts of the ''KN'' series have been synthesized recently with improved quality characteristics. Low-waste technology is used in manufacturing them. Data are presented which show that the KN catalysts are better than the other Soviet catalysts. The starting materials and reagents in preparing the KN catalysts are technical alumina, rare-earth element nitrates, a natural component (such as clay conforming to specification TU-21-25-146-75), sodium hydroxide, and granulated sodium silicate. The preparation of the KN catalysts is described and no silica gel is used in manufacturing the KN series catalyst, in contrast to the RSG-6Ts catalyst. The use of KN series catalysts in place of KMTsR in catalytic cracking units will result in an increase in the naphtha yield by at least 20% by weight, as well as a reduction of the catalyst consumption by a factor of 2-3. A changeover to the commerical production of this catalyst will make it possible to reduce saline waste by a factor of 8-10 and reduce the catalyst cost by a factor of 1.5-2.

  11. Attrition resistant gamma-alumina catalyst support

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Alan H.; Oukaci, Rachid; Goodwin, James G.

    2006-03-14

    A .gamma.-alumina catalyst support having improved attrition resistance produced by a method comprising the steps of treating a particulate .gamma.-alumina material with an acidic aqueous solution comprising water and nitric acid and then, prior to adding any catalytic material thereto, calcining the treated .gamma.-alumina.

  12. Smeared antibranes polarise in AdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautason, Fridrik Freyr; Truijen, Brecht; Van Riet, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    In the recent literature it has been questioned whether the local backreaction of antibranes in flux throats can induce a perturbative brane-flux decay. Most evidence for this can be gathered for D6 branes and D p branes smeared over 6 - p compact directions, in line with the absence of finite temperature solutions for these cases. The solutions in the literature have flat worldvolume geometries and non-compact transversal spaces. In this paper we consider what happens when the worldvolume is AdS and the transversal space is compact. We show that in these circumstances brane polarisation smoothens out the flux singularity, which is an indication that brane-flux decay is prevented. This is consistent with the fact that the cosmological constant would be less negative after brane-flux decay. Our results extend recent results on AdS7 solutions from D6 branes to AdS p+1 solutions from D p branes. We show that supersymmetry of the AdS solutions depend on p non-trivially.

  13. AdS orbifolds and Penrose limits

    SciTech Connect

    Alishahiha, Mohsen; Sheikh-Jabbari, Mohammad M.; Tatar, Radu

    2002-12-09

    In this paper we study the Penrose limit of AdS{sub 5} orbifolds. The orbifold can be either in the pure spatial directions or space and time directions. For the AdS{sub 5}/{Lambda} x S{sup 5} spatial orbifold we observe that after the Penrose limit we obtain the same result as the Penrose limit of AdS{sub 5} x S{sup 5}/{Lambda}. We identify the corresponding BMN operators in terms of operators of the gauge theory on R x S{sup 3}/{Lambda}. The semi-classical description of rotating strings in these backgrounds have also been studied. For the spatial AdS orbifold we show that in the quadratic order the obtained action for the fluctuations is the same as that in S{sup 5} orbifold, however, the higher loop correction can distinguish between two cases.

  14. Catalyst added to Claus furnace reduces sulfur losses

    SciTech Connect

    Luinstra, E.A.; d'Haene, P.E. . Oakville Research Centre)

    1989-07-01

    Several substances effectively catalyze the reduction of carbon disulfide in Claus gas streams at Claus reaction furnace conditions (about 1,000{sup 0}C). Some conversion of carbonyl sulfide also occurs. Carbon disulfide and carbonyl sulfide as well-known problem compounds that reduce sulfur recovery efficiency in many sulfur recovery plants. Installation of a suitable catalytic material in the reaction furnace promises significant improvement of Claus plant efficiency, and prolonged life of the catalytic converters. Almost every Claus sulfur recovery plant makes some carbon disulfide (CS/sub 2/) and carbonyl sulfide (COS) in the reaction furnace, and in many of these plants, these compounds constitute a significant problem. CS/sub 2/ and COS often comprise more than 50% of sulfur losses in the tail gas. This article reexamines the issue of CS/sub 2/ and COS in the Claus plant. The relative importance of these two troublesome components is explored with data accumulated from Shell Canada Claus plants. The authors discuss which factors tend to produce these components. Then a method for reducing CS/sub 2/ and COS virtually at the source will be introduced.

  15. Lewis Base Catalysts 6: Carbene Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The use of N-heterocyclic carbenes as catalysts for organic transformations has received increased attention in the past 10 years. A discussion of catalyst development and nucleophilic characteristics precedes a description of recent advancements and new reactions using N-heterocyclic carbenes in catalysis. PMID:21494949

  16. DYNAMOMETER EVALUATION OF PLASMA-CATALYST FOR DIESEL NOX REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hoard, J; Schmieg, S; Brooks, D; Peden, C; Barlow, S; Tonkyn, R

    2003-08-24

    A three-stage plasma-catalyst system was developed and tested on an engine dynamometer. Previous laboratory testing suggested high NOx efficiency could be obtained. With hexene reductant added to the exhaust, over 90% NOx reduction was observed. However, with diesel or Fischer-Tropsch reductant the catalyst efficiency rapidly dropped off. Heating the catalyst in air removed brown deposit from the surface and restored conversion efficiency. Following the engine tests, the used catalysts were evaluated. BET surface area decreased, and TPD revealed significant storage. This storage appears to be partly unburned diesel fuel that can be removed by heating to around 250-300 C, and partly hydrocarbons bonded to the surface that remain in place until 450-500 C. Laboratory testing with propene reductant demonstrated that the catalyst regains efficiency slowly even when operating temperature does not exceed 300 C. This suggests that control strategies may be able to regenerate the catalyst by occasional moderate heating.

  17. Attrition resistant fluidizable reforming catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Parent, Yves O.; Magrini, Kim; Landin, Steven M.; Ritland, Marcus A.

    2011-03-29

    A method of preparing a steam reforming catalyst characterized by improved resistance to attrition loss when used for cracking, reforming, water gas shift and gasification reactions on feedstock in a fluidized bed reactor, comprising: fabricating the ceramic support particle, coating a ceramic support by adding an aqueous solution of a precursor salt of a metal selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pt, Pd, Ru, Rh, Cr, Co, Mn, Mg, K, La and Fe and mixtures thereof to the ceramic support and calcining the coated ceramic in air to convert the metal salts to metal oxides.

  18. Glycerol Steam Reforming Over Ni-Fe-Ce/Al2O3 Catalyst: Effect of Cerium.

    PubMed

    Go, Gwang-Sub; Go, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Hong-Joo; Moon, Dong-Ju; Park, Nam-Cook; Kim, Young-Chul

    2016-02-01

    In this work, hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming was studied using Ni-metal oxide catalysts. Ni-based catalyst becomes deactivated during steam reforming reactions because of coke deposits and sintering. Therefore, the aim of this study was to reduce carbon deposits and sintering on the catalyst surface by adding a promoter. Ni-metal oxide catalysts supported on Al2O3 were prepared via impregnation method, and the calcined catalyst was reduced under H2 flow for 2 h prior to the reaction. The characteristics of the catalysts were examined by XRD, TPR, TGA, and SEM. The Ni-Fe-Ce/Al2O3 catalyst, which contained less than 2 wt% Ce, showed the highest hydrogen selectivity and glycerol conversion. Further analysis of the catalysts revealed that the Ni-Fe-Ce/Al2O3 catalyst required a lower reduction temperature and produced minimum carbon deposit. PMID:27433687

  19. Catalysts destroy soil VOCs at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    In the King, Buck process, vapors contaminated with as much as 3,500 ppm of trichloroethylene are drawn from the soil at rates to 200 scfm, heated to 400C and passed through the catalyst bed. The volatile organic compounds are converted to carbon dioxide, water and hydrogen chloride. The air is then cooled and passed through a scrubber to remove the HCl, which is neutralized to sodium chloride and sodium bicarbonate. Not only was the catalyst able to withstand and break down halogenated hydrocarbons, it provided an added benefit over thermal-oxidation systems - no dioxin formation.

  20. System for reactivating catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2010-03-02

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst is provided. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  1. The AdS particle [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subir

    2005-09-01

    In this Letter we have considered a relativistic Nambu-Goto model for a particle in AdS metric. With appropriate gauge choice to fix the reparameterization invariance, we recover the previously discussed [S. Ghosh, P. Pal, Phys. Lett. B 618 (2005) 243, arxiv:hep-th/0502192] "exotic oscillator". The Snyder algebra and subsequently the κ-Minkowski spacetime are also derived. Lastly we comment on the impossibility of constructing a non-commutative spacetime in the context of open string where only a curved target space is introduced.

  2. Catalyst patterning for nanowire devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Cassell, Alan M. (Inventor); Han, Jie (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nanowire devices may be provided that are based on carbon nanotubes or single-crystal semiconductor nanowires. The nanowire devices may be formed on a substrate. Catalyst sites may be formed on the substrate. The catalyst sites may be formed using lithography, thin metal layers that form individual catalyst sites when heated, collapsible porous catalyst-filled microscopic spheres, microscopic spheres that serve as masks for catalyst deposition, electrochemical deposition techniques, and catalyst inks. Nanowires may be grown from the catalyst sites.

  3. Textured catalysts and methods of making textured catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong; Zacher, Alan H.

    2007-03-06

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  4. Probing crunching AdS cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S. Prem; Vaganov, Vladislav

    2016-02-01

    Holographic gravity duals of deformations of CFTs formulated on de Sitter spacetime contain FRW geometries behind a horizon, with cosmological big crunch singularities. Using a specific analytically tractable solution within a particular single scalar truncation of {N}=8 supergravity on AdS4, we first probe such crunching cosmologies with spacelike radial geodesics that compute spatially antipodal correlators of large dimension boundary operators. At late times, the geodesics lie on the FRW slice of maximal expansion behind the horizon. The late time two-point functions factorise, and when transformed to the Einstein static universe, they exhibit a temporal non-analyticity determined by the maximal value of the scale factor ã max. Radial geodesics connecting antipodal points necessarily have de Sitter energy Ɛ ≲ ã max, while geodesics with Ɛ > ã max terminate at the crunch, the two categories of geodesics being separated by the maximal expansion slice. The spacelike crunch singularity is curved "outward" in the Penrose diagram for the deformed AdS backgrounds, and thus geodesic limits of the antipodal correlators do not directly probe the crunch. Beyond the geodesic limit, we point out that the scalar wave equation, analytically continued into the FRW patch, has a potential which is singular at the crunch along with complex WKB turning points in the vicinity of the FRW crunch. We then argue that the frequency space Green's function has a branch point determined by ã max which corresponds to the lowest quasinormal frequency.

  5. Methods of making textured catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong; Zacher, Alan H.

    2010-08-17

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  6. Catalyst Alloys Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xincai

    2014-10-01

    Catalysts are one of the key materials used for diamond formation at high pressures. Several such catalyst products have been developed and applied in China and around the world. The catalyst alloy most widely used in China is Ni70Mn25Co5 developed at Changsha Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. In this article, detailed techniques for manufacturing such a typical catalyst alloy will be reviewed. The characteristics of the alloy will be described. Detailed processing of the alloy will be presented, including remelting and casting, hot rolling, annealing, surface treatment, cold rolling, blanking, finishing, packaging, and waste treatment. An example use of the catalyst alloy will also be given. Industrial experience shows that for the catalyst alloy products, a vacuum induction remelt furnace can be used for remelting, a metal mold can be used for casting, hot and cold rolling can be used for forming, and acid pickling can be used for metal surface cleaning.

  7. Catalyst enhances Claus operations

    SciTech Connect

    Dupin, T.; Voizin, R.

    1982-11-01

    An improved Claus catalyst offers superior activity that emphasizes hydrolysis of CS/sub 2/ in the first converter. The catalyst is insensitive to oxygen action at concentrations generally found in Claus gas feeds. It also has an excellent resistance to hydrothermal shocks that may occur during shutdown of the sulfur line. Collectively, these properties make this catalyst the most active formula now available for optimum Claus yields and COS/CS/sub 2/ hydrolysis conversion.

  8. AdS3: the NHEK generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Heurtier, Lucien; Puhm, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    It was argued in [1] that the five-dimensional near-horizon extremal Kerr (NHEK) geometry can be embedded in String Theory as the infrared region of an infinite family of non-supersymmetric geometries that have D1, D5, momentum and KK monopole charges. We show that there exists a method to embed these geometries into asymptotically- {AdS}_3× {S}^3/{{Z}}_N solutions, and hence to obtain infinite families of flows whose infrared is NHEK. This indicates that the CFT dual to the NHEK geometry is the IR fixed point of a Renormalization Group flow from a known local UV CFT and opens the door to its explicit construction.

  9. Liquefaction with microencapsulated catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Weller, Sol W.

    1985-01-01

    A method of dispersing a liquefaction catalyst within coal or other carbonaceous solids involves providing a suspension in oil of microcapsules containing the catalyst. An aqueous solution of a catalytic metal salt is emulsified in the water-immiscible oil and the resulting minute droplets microencapsulated in polymeric shells by interfacial polycondensation. The catalyst is subsequently blended and dispersed throughout the powdered carbonaceous material to be liquefied. At liquefaction temperatures the polymeric microcapsules are destroyed and the catalyst converted to minute crystallites in intimate contact with the carbonaceous material.

  10. Polyolefin catalyst manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Inkrott, K.E.; Scinta, J.; Smith, P.D. )

    1989-10-16

    Statistical process control (SPC) procedures are absolutely essential for making new-generation polyolefin catalysts with the consistent high quality required by modern polyolefin processes. Stringent quality assurance is critical to the production of today's high-performance catalysts. Research and development efforts during the last 20 years have led to major technological improvements in the polyolefin industry. New generation catalysts, which once were laboratory curiosities, must now be produced commercially on a regular and consistent basis to meet the increasing requirements of the plastics manufacturing industry. To illustrate the more stringent requirements for producing the new generation polyolefin catalysts, the authors compare the relatively simple, first-generation polypropylene catalyst production requirements with some of the basic requirements of manufacturing a more complex new-generation catalyst, such as Catalyst Resources Inc.'s LYNX 900. The principles which hold true for the new-generation catalysts such as LYNX 900 are shown to apply equally to the scale-up of other advanced technology polyolefin catalysts.

  11. METHOD OF PURIFYING CATALYSTS

    DOEpatents

    Joris, G.G.

    1958-09-01

    It has been fuund that the presence of chlorine as an impurity adversely affects the performance of finely divided platinum catalysts such as are used in the isotopic exchange process for the production of beavy water. This chlorine impurity may be removed from these catalysts by treating the catalyst at an elevated temperature with dry hydrogen and then with wet hydrogen, having a hydrogen-water vapor volume of about 8: 1. This alternate treatment by dry hydrogen and wet hydrogen is continued until the chlorine is largely removed from the catalyst.

  12. Shadows, currents, and AdS fields

    SciTech Connect

    Metsaev, R. R.

    2008-11-15

    Conformal totally symmetric arbitrary spin currents and shadow fields in flat space-time of dimension greater than or equal to four are studied. A gauge invariant formulation for such currents and shadow fields is developed. Gauge symmetries are realized by involving the Stueckelberg fields. A realization of global conformal boost symmetries is obtained. Gauge invariant differential constraints for currents and shadow fields are obtained. AdS/CFT correspondence for currents and shadow fields and the respective normalizable and non-normalizable solutions of massless totally symmetric arbitrary spin AdS fields are studied. The bulk fields are considered in a modified de Donder gauge that leads to decoupled equations of motion. We demonstrate that leftover on shell gauge symmetries of bulk fields correspond to gauge symmetries of boundary currents and shadow fields, while the modified de Donder gauge conditions for bulk fields correspond to differential constraints for boundary conformal currents and shadow fields. Breaking conformal symmetries, we find interrelations between the gauge invariant formulation of the currents and shadow fields, and the gauge invariant formulation of massive fields.

  13. Core-shell nanostructured catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao; Lee, Ilkeun; Joo, Ji Bong; Zaera, Francisco; Yin, Yadong

    2013-08-20

    excellent catalytic activity for the oxidation of organic compounds under UV, visible, and direct sunlight. The enhanced photocatalytic efficiency of this nanostructure resulted from an added interfacial nonmetal doping, which improved visible light absorption, and from plasmonic metal decoration that enhanced light harvesting and charge separation. In addition to our synthetic efforts, we have developed ways to evaluate the accessibility of reactants to the metal cores and to characterize the catalytic properties of the core-shell samples we have synthesized. We have adapted infrared absorption spectroscopy and titration experiments using carbon monoxide and other molecules as probes to study adsorption on the surface of metal cores in metal oxide-shell structures in situ in both gas and liquid phases. In particular, the experiments in solution have provided insights into the ease of diffusion of molecules of different sizes in and out of the shells in these catalysts. PMID:23268644

  14. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  15. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  16. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2015-09-29

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  17. Improved zeolitic isocracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlberg, A.J.; Habib, M.M.; Moore, R.O.; Law, D.V.; Convery, L.J.

    1995-09-01

    Chevron Research Company introduced the first low pressure, low temperature catalytic hydrocracking process--ISOCRACKING--in 1959. Within the last four years, Chevron has developed and commercialized three new zeolitic ISOCRACKING catalysts. ICR 209 is Chevron`s latest noble metal ISOCRACKING catalyst. It offers improved liquid yield stability, longer life, and superior polynuclear aromatics control compared to its predecessor. ICR 209`s high hydrogenation activity generates the highest yields of superior quality jet fuel of any zeolitic ISOCRACKING catalyst. The second new ISOCRACKING catalyst, ICR 208, is a base metal catalyst which combines high liquid selectivity and high light naphtha octane in hydrocrackers operating for maximum naphtha production. ICR 210 is another new base metal catalyst which offers higher liquid yields and longer life than ICR 208 by virtue of a higher hydrogenation-to-acidity ratio. Both ICR 208 and ICR 210 have been formulated to provide higher liquid yield throughout the cycle and longer cycle length than conventional base metal/zeolite catalysts. This paper will discuss the pilot plant and commercial performances of these new ISOCRACKING catalysts.

  18. Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, James H. (Inventor); Taylor, Jesse W. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Catalyst compositions and methods for F-T synthesis which exhibit high CO conversion with minor levels (preferably less than 35% and more preferably less than 5%) or no measurable carbon dioxide generation. F-T active catalysts are prepared by reduction of certain oxygen deficient mixed metal oxides.

  19. Improved catalysts and method

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.E.; Noceti, R.P.

    1990-12-31

    An improved catalyst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HCl and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride. 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Nanoscale attrition during activation of precipitated iron Fischer- Tropsch catalysts: Implications for catalyst design

    SciTech Connect

    Datye, A.K.; Shroff, M.D.; Jin, Y.; Brooks, R.P.; Wilder, J.A.; Harrington, M.S.; Sault, A.G.; Jackson, N.B.

    1996-06-01

    This work has shown that the kaolin binder that has been used in commercial Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis catalysts doe not offer any significant attrition resistance. This is due in part to its morphology (plate-like) and to its particle size being much greater than the primary crystallite size of the iron oxide catalyst. From a microscopic examination of these catalysts, it appears that if the nanoscale attrition of the iron catalyst is to be avoided, the iron must be well dispersed on the binder, and the binder must provide an interlocking microstructure that provides strength and stability to the 30-70 {mu}m agglomerates. The study of Fe/SiO{sub 2} catalysts has shown that co-precipitation of the iron and silica leads to formation of an amorphous glassy phase which is difficult to reduce even at 723K. On the other hand, when the iron was precipitated on a preformed silica, 25-40% of the iron could be reduced and carbided. The supported iron catalyst, after reduction, formed 15-20 nm iron carbide particles that look very similar to those on the unsupported catalyst. The major difference is these nanometer sized particles are anchored on a support and therefore would not be expected to breakup further and contribute to the fines generated as catalyst attrition proceeds. However, since only a fraction of the silica-supported iron can be reduced to the active carbide phase, our present efforts are devoted to moderating the Fe/SiO{sub 2} interaction by introducing an interfacial oxide phase. We are also studying the role of added Cu on the ease of reducibility of Fe/SiO{sub 2}. The implication of this work is that other binder materials should be explored that have a morphology that can strengthen the agglomerates and minimize the Fe-SiO{sub 2} interfacial reactions. This work is presently underway in our laboratory.

  1. Reducing fischer-tropsch catalyst attrition losses in high agitation reaction systems

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Alan H.; Oukaci, Rachid; Goodwin, James G.

    2001-01-01

    A method for reducing catalyst attrition losses in hydrocarbon synthesis processes conducted in high agitation reaction systems; a method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst; a catalyst produced by such method; a method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst support; and a catalyst support produced by such method. The inventive method of reducing catalyst attrition losses comprises the step of reacting a synthesis gas in a high agitation reaction system in the presence of a catalyst. In one aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises a .gamma.-alumina support including an amount of titanium effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the catalyst. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises a .gamma.-alumina support which has been treated, after calcination, with an acidic, aqueous solution. The acidic aqueous solution preferably has a pH of not more than about 5. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises cobalt on a .gamma.-alumina support wherein the cobalt has been applied to the .gamma.-alumina support by totally aqueous, incipient wetness-type impregnation. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises cobalt on a .gamma.-alumina support with an amount of a lanthana promoter effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the catalyst. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises a .gamma.-alumina support produced from boehmite having a crystallite size, in the 021 plane, in the range of from about 30 to about 55 .ANG.ngstrons. In another aspect, the inventive method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst comprises the step of treating a .gamma.-alumina support, after calcination of and before adding catalytic material to the support, with an acidic solution effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the catalyst. In another aspect, the inventive method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst support comprises the step of treating calcined .gamma.-alumina with an acidic, aqueous

  2. The Use of Catalysts in Near-Critical Water Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2005-06-26

    The use of heterogeneous catalysts in near-critical water processing provides many challenges of material stability in addition to the normal questions of chemical activity. Conventional catalyst materials developed in traditional organic chemistry or petroleum chemistry applications provide a source of information of materials with the required activities but often without the required stability when used in hot liquid water. The importance of the use of catalysts in near-critical water processing plays a particularly crucial role for the development of renewable fuels and chemicals based on biomass feedstocks. Stability issues include both those related to the catalytic metal and also to the catalyst support material. In fact, the stability of the support is the most likely concern when using conventional catalyst formulations in near-critical water processing. Processing test results are used to show important design parameters for catalyst formulations for use in wet biomass gasification in high-pressure water and in catalytic hydrogenations in water for production of value-added chemical products from biomass in the biorefinery concept. Analytical methods including powder x-ray diffraction for crystallite size and composition determination, surface area and porosity measurements, and elemental analysis have all been used to quantify differences in catalyst materials before and after use. By these methods both the chemical and physical stability of heterogeneous catalysts can be verified.

  3. ADS pilot program Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauson, J.; Heuser, J.

    1981-01-01

    The Applications Data Service (ADS) is a system based on an electronic data communications network which will permit scientists to share the data stored in data bases at universities and at government and private installations. It is designed to allow users to readily locate and access high quality, timely data from multiple sources. The ADS Pilot program objectives and the current plans for accomplishing those objectives are described.

  4. Increasing FCC regenerator catalyst level

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.F. )

    1993-11-01

    A Peruvian FCC unit's operations were improved by increasing the regenerator's catalyst level. This increase resulted in lower stack losses, an improved temperature profile, increased catalyst activity and a lower catalyst consumption rate. A more stable operation saved this Peruvian refiner over $131,000 per year in catalyst alone. These concepts and data may be suitable for your FCC unit as well.

  5. CATALYSTS NHI Thermochemical Systems FY 2009 Year-End Report

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Ginosar

    2009-09-01

    Fiscal Year 2009 work in the Catalysts project focused on advanced catalysts for the decomposition of sulfuric acid, a reaction common to both the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) cycle and the Hybrid Sulfur cycle. Prior years’ effort in this project has found that although platinum supported on titanium oxide will be an acceptable catalyst for sulfuric acid decomposition in the integrated laboratory scale (ILS) project, the material has short comings, including significant cost and high deactivation rates due to sintering and platinum evaporation. For pilot and larger scale systems, the catalyst stability needs to be improved significantly. In Fiscal Year 2008 it was found that at atmospheric pressure, deactivation rates of a 1 wt% platinum catalyst could be reduced by 300% by adding either 0.3 wt% iridium (Ir) or 0.3 wt% ruthenium (Ru) to the catalyst. In Fiscal Year 2009, work focused on examining the platinum group metal catalysts activity and stability at elevated pressures. In addition, simple and complex metal oxides are known to catalyze the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. These metal oxides could offer activities comparable to platinum but at significantly reduced cost. Thus a second focus for Fiscal Year 2009 was to explore metal oxide catalysts for the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. In Fiscal Year 2007 several commercial activated carbons had been identified for the HI decomposition reaction; a reaction specific to the S-I cycle. Those materials should be acceptable for the pilot scale project. The activated carbon catalysts have some disadvantages including low activity at the lower range of reactor operating temperature (350 to 400°C) and a propensity to generate carbon monoxide in the presence of water that could contaminate the hydrogen product, but due to limited funding, this area had low priority in Fiscal Year 2009. Fiscal Year 2009 catalyst work included five tasks: development, and testing of stabilized platinum based H2SO4 catalysts

  6. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Sopchak, David A.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Reynolds, John G.; Satcher, Joseph H.; Gash, Alex E.

    2011-11-15

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  7. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Sopchak, David A.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Reynolds, John G.; Satcher, Joseph H.; Gash, Alex E.

    2010-06-29

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  8. Epoxidation catalyst and process

    DOEpatents

    Linic, Suljo; Christopher, Phillip

    2010-10-26

    Disclosed herein is a catalytic method of converting alkenes to epoxides. This method generally includes reacting alkenes with oxygen in the presence of a specific silver catalyst under conditions suitable to produce a yield of the epoxides. The specific silver catalyst is a silver nanocrystal having a plurality of surface planes, a substantial portion of which is defined by Miller indices of (100). The reaction is performed by charging a suitable reactor with this silver catalyst and then feeding the reactants to the reactor under conditions to carry out the reaction. The reaction may be performed in batch, or as a continuous process that employs a recycle of any unreacted alkenes. The specific silver catalyst has unexpectedly high selectivity for epoxide products. Consequently, this general method (and its various embodiments) will result in extraordinarily high epoxide yields heretofore unattainable.

  9. Catalysts and method

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E.; Noceti, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    An improved catlayst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HC1 and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride.

  10. Hydrocracking catalysts and processes

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbear, G.E.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrocracking processes convert aromatic gas oils into high quality gasoline, diesel, and turbine stocks. They operate at high hydrogen pressures, typically greater than 1500 psig. Operating temperatures range from 600-700{degrees}F (315-382{degrees}C). Commercial catalysts vary in activity and selectivity, allowing process designers to emphasize middle distillates, naphtha, or both. Catalysts are quite stable in use, with two year unit run lengths typical. A pretreatment step to remove nitrogen compounds is usually part of the same process unit. These HDN units operate integrally with the hydrocracking. The hydrogenation reactions are strongly exothermic, while the cracking is roughly thermal neutral. This combination can lead to temperature runaways. To avoid this, cold hydrogen is injected at several points in hydrocracking reactors. The mechanics of mixing this hydrogen with the oil and redistributing the mixture over the catalyst bed are very important in controlling process operation and ensuring long catalyst life.

  11. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

    1993-01-05

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  12. Catalytic reforming catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, W.C.; Kluksdahl, H.E.

    1980-12-09

    An improved catalyst, having a reduced fouling rate when used in a catalytic reforming process, said catalyst comprising platinum disposed on an alumina support wherein the alumina support is obtained by removing water from aluminum hydroxide produced as a by-product from a ziegler higher alcohol synthesis reaction, and wherein the alumina is calcined at a temperature of 1100-1400/sup 0/F so as to have a surface area of 165 to 215 square meters per gram.

  13. Plasmatron-catalyst system

    DOEpatents

    Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Rabinovich, Alexander; Alexeev, Nikolai

    2007-10-09

    A plasmatron-catalyst system. The system generates hydrogen-rich gas and comprises a plasmatron and at least one catalyst for receiving an output from the plasmatron to produce hydrogen-rich gas. In a preferred embodiment, the plasmatron receives as an input air, fuel and water/steam for use in the reforming process. The system increases the hydrogen yield and decreases the amount of carbon monoxide.

  14. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

    1991-12-31

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  15. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, Rayford G.; Dosch, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  16. Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Angelici, Robert J.; Gao, Hanrong

    1998-08-04

    The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilation, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical.

  17. Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Angelici, R.J.; Gao, H.

    1998-08-04

    The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilication, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanidation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical. 2 figs.

  18. Comprehensive catalyst management

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, S.

    2007-05-15

    From January 2009, as SCR season expands from five months to year-round to meet new US Clean Air Interstate Rule standards, new catalyst strategies are increasingly important. Power plants will need a comprehensive management strategy that accounts for a wide range of old and new issues to achieve peak performance. An optimum plan is necessary for catalyst replacement or addition. SCR systems should be inspected and evaluated at least once a year. Levels of deactivation agents, most often arsenic and calcium oxide, need to match the particular coals used. Tools such as Cormetech's FIELD Guide are available to quantify the effect on catalyst life under various fuel-firing scenarios. Tests should be conducted to evaluate the NH{sub 3}/NOx distribution over time to maximise catalyst performance. The article gives a case study of catalyst management at the Tennessee Valley Authority Allen plant. Recent changes have created new variables to be considered in a catalyst management process, notably the expansion of the operating temperature range, mercury oxidation and SO{sub 3} emission limits. Cormetech has researched these areas. 5 figs., 2 photos.

  19. Novel ebullated bed catalyst regeneration technology improves regenerated catalyst quality

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, D.J.

    1995-09-01

    Regeneration of spent hydroprocessing catalysts has long been practiced by the refining industry. With increased pressures on refiners to reduce catalyst expenditures and waste generation, refiners are more frequently reusing spent hydroprocessing catalysts after ex-situ regeneration to restore catalytic activity. By reusing regenerated catalyst for at least two cycles, the refiner reduces catalyst waste by at least one-half. As environmental laws become more restrictive, spent hydroprocessing catalyst is more likely to be classified as hazardous waste. Disposal of spent catalyst, which was previously accomplished by landfilling, now requires more expensive reclamation techniques. TRICAT has introduced the TRICAT Regeneration Process (TRP), a novel ebullated bed regeneration plant, to improve the catalyst regeneration process. The ebullated bed design allows for better control of heat release during the regeneration process. As a result, the regeneration can be accomplished in a single-pass, with improved catalyst activity retention. Catalyst losses are also minimized due to reduced catalyst handling. Commercial results from the TRP have demonstrated successful scale-up of the technology from pilot scale. The plant has achieved complete recovery of the available catalyst activity with little or no losses in catalyst yield or extrudate length. The flexibility of the TRP to process a variety of catalysts is also discussed.

  20. What Value "Value Added"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Two quantitative measures of school performance are currently used, the average points score (APS) at Key Stage 2 and value-added (VA), which measures the rate of academic improvement between Key Stage 1 and 2. These figures are used by parents and the Office for Standards in Education to make judgements and comparisons. However, simple…

  1. Innovations Without Added Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cereghino, Edward

    1974-01-01

    There is no question that we are in a tight money market, and schools are among the first institutions to feel the squeeze. Therefore, when a plan is offered that provides for innovations without added costs, its something worth noting. (Editor)

  2. Introducing ADS Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Henneken, E.; Grant, C. S.; Kurtz, M. J.; Di Milia, G.; Luker, J.; Thompson, D. M.; Bohlen, E.; Murray, S. S.

    2011-05-01

    ADS Labs is a platform that ADS is introducing in order to test and receive feedback from the community on new technologies and prototype services. Currently, ADS Labs features a new interface for abstract searches, faceted filtering of results, visualization of co-authorship networks, article-level recommendations, and a full-text search service. The streamlined abstract search interface provides a simple, one-box search with options for ranking results based on a paper relevancy, freshness, number of citations, and downloads. In addition, it provides advanced rankings based on collaborative filtering techniques. The faceted filtering interface allows users to narrow search results based on a particular property or set of properties ("facets"), allowing users to manage large lists and explore the relationship between them. For any set or sub-set of records, the co-authorship network can be visualized in an interactive way, offering a view of the distribution of contributors and their inter-relationships. This provides an immediate way to detect groups and collaborations involved in a particular research field. For a majority of papers in Astronomy, our new interface will provide a list of related articles of potential interest. The recommendations are based on a number of factors, including text similarity, citations, and co-readership information. The new full-text search interface allows users to find all instances of particular words or phrases in the body of the articles in our full-text archive. This includes all of the scanned literature in ADS as well as a select portion of the current astronomical literature, including ApJ, ApJS, AJ, MNRAS, PASP, A&A, and soon additional content from Springer journals. Fulltext search results include a list of the matching papers as well as a list of "snippets" of text highlighting the context in which the search terms were found. ADS Labs is available at http://adslabs.org

  3. Studies of Heterogeneous Catalyst Selectivity and Stability for Biorefining Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Brandon J.

    The conversion of raw resources into value-added end products has long underlain the importance of catalysts in economic and scientific development. In particular, the development of selective and stable heterogeneous catalysts is a challenge that continues to grow in importance as environmental, sociological, and economic concerns have motivated an interest in sustainability and the use of renewable raw materials. Within this context, biomass has been identified as the only realistic source of renewable carbon for the foreseeable future. The development of processes to utilize biomass feedstocks will require breakthroughs in fundamental understanding and practical solutions to the challenges related to selectivity and stability of the catalysts employed. Selectivity is addressed on multiple fronts. First, the selectivity for C-O bond scission reactions of a bifunctional, bimetallic RhRe/C catalyst is investigated. Using multiple techniques, the origin of Bronsted acidity in the catalyst and the role of pretreatment on the activity, selectivity, and stability are explored. In addition, reaction kinetics experiments and kinetic modeling are utilized to understand the role of chemical functional group (i.e. carboxylic acid versus formate ester) in determining the decarbonylation versus decarboxylation selectivity over a Pd/C catalyst. Finally, kinetic studies over Pd/C and Cu/gamma-Al2O3 were performed so that that may be paired with density functional theory calculations and microkinetic modeling to elucidate the elementary reaction mechanism, identify the active site, and provide a basis for future rational catalyst design. Next, the issue of catalyst stability, important in the high-temperature, liquid-phase conditions of biomass processing, is examined, and a method for stabilizing the base-metal nanoparticles of a Cu/gamma-Al2O 3 catalyst using atomic layer deposition (ALD) is developed. This advancement may facilitate the development of biorefining by enabling

  4. Nitrogen oxide removal using diesel fuel and a catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Vogtlin, George E.; Goerz, David A.; Hsiao, Mark; Merritt, Bernard T.; Penetrante, Bernie M.; Reynolds, John G.; Brusasco, Ray

    2000-01-01

    Hydrocarbons, such as diesel fuel, are added to internal combustion engine exhaust to reduce exhaust NO.sub.x in the presence of a amphoteric catalyst support material. Exhaust NO.sub.x reduction of at least 50% in the emissions is achieved with the addition of less than 5% fuel as a source of the hydrocarbons.

  5. Deactivator for olefin polymerization catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Rekers, L.J.; Speca, A.N.; Mayhew, H.W.

    1987-03-10

    A method is described comprising deactivating an olefin polymerization catalyst selected from the group consisting of Ziegler-Natta transition element catalysts and catalysts based on transition metal oxides by contacting the catalyst with a copolymer. The copolymer consists of an alpha-olefin having from 2 to about 12 carbon atoms and an unsaturated ester of a carboxylic acid. The deactivating copolymer is present in an amount such that the molar ratio of the unsaturated ester thereof to the sum of the transition element component of the polymerization catalyst and a cocatalyst for the transition element catalyst is in the range of between about 0.1 and about 6.

  6. Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report number 10, January 1--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, A.H.

    1995-06-28

    The goal of this project is the development of a commercially-viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. The major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low (< 5%) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. The project consists of five major tasks: catalyst development; catalyst testing; catalyst reproducibility tests; catalyst aging tests; and preliminary design and cost estimate for a demonstrate scale catalyst production facility. Technical accomplishments during this reporting period include the following. It appears that the higher activity obtained for the catalysts prepared using an organic solution and reduced directly without prior calcination was the result of higher dispersions obtained under such pretreatment. A Ru-promoted Co catalyst on alumina with 30% Co loading exhibited a 4-fold increase in dispersion and a 2-fold increase in activity in the fixed-bed reactor from that obtained with the non-promoted catalyst. Several reactor runs have again focused on pushing conversion to higher levels. The maximum conversion obtained has been 49.7% with 26g catalyst. Further investigations of the effect of reaction temperature on the performance of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis were started using a low activity catalyst and one of the most active catalysts. The three 1 kg catalyst batches prepared by Calsicat for the reproducibility and aging studies were tested in both the fixed-bed and slurry bubble column reactors under the standard reaction conditions. The effects of adding various promoters to some cobalt catalysts have also been addressed. Results are presented and discussed.

  7. Quality assurance for purchased catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Puls, F.H. )

    1988-09-01

    Petrochemical industries require many different types of catalysts in process operations. A significantly portion of these requirements is being met through purchases from merchant catalyst suppliers. The importance of catalysts and of catalyst quality to these industries cannot be overstated. It is not surprising that in the quest for quality which has affected much of US industry in the last few years, catalysts were among the first products which were singled out for development of quality assurance. Currently, catalyst supplier auditing and certification procedures are being implemented. Primary emphasis is on the implementation of statistical process control procedures in the manufacture of commercially available catalyst. Thus, a trend exists to move from quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) for purchased catalysts to statistical process control (SPC). This development is being supported by audits of the suppliers' manufacturing quality control systems. The keystone of quality management is the concept of customer and supplier working together for their mutual advantage. The focus in this presentation will be on two topics. (1) Fixed bed catalysts: The recognition of lot-to-lot variations led to purchase specifications which then led to quality control procedures for purchased catalysts. (2) Catalyst suppliers: the limitations of quality control for catalysts will be discussed, and the efforts of catalyst suppliers to apply SPC will be mentioned.

  8. Two Virasoro symmetries in stringy warped AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, Geoffrey; Guica, Monica; Rodriguez, Maria J.

    2014-12-01

    We study three-dimensional consistent truncations of type IIB supergravity which admit warped AdS3 solutions. These theories contain subsectors that have no bulk dynamics. We show that the symplectic form for these theories, when restricted to the non-dynamical subsectors, equals the symplectic form for pure Einstein gravity in AdS3. Consequently, for each consistent choice of boundary conditions in AdS3, we can define a consistent phase space in warped AdS3 with identical conserved charges. This way, we easily obtain a Virasoro × Virasoro asymptotic symmetry algebra in warped AdS3; two different types of Virasoro × Kač-Moody symmetries are also consistent alternatives.

  9. Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

    2013-09-03

    Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

  10. ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    James G. Goodwin, Jr.; James J. Spivey; K. Jothimurugesan; Santosh K. Gangwal

    1999-03-29

    diameter, 2 m tall spray dryer. The binder silica content was varied from 0 to 20 wt %. A catalyst with 12 wt % binder silica was found to have the highest attrition resistance. F-T reaction studies over 100 hours in a fixed-bed reactor showed that this catalyst maintained around 95 % CO conversion with a methane selectivity of less than 7 wt % and a C5 + selectivity of greater than 73 wt %. The effect of adding precipitated silica from 0 to 20 parts by weight to this catalyst (containing 12 wt % binder silica) was also studied. Addition of precipitated silica was found to be detrimental to attrition resistance and resulted in increased methane and reduced wax formation. An HPR series of proprietary catalysts was prepared to further improve the attrition resistance. Based on the experience gained, a proprietary HPR-43 catalyst has been successfully spray dried in 500 g quantity. This catalyst showed 95 % CO conversion over 125 h and had less than 4 % methane selectivity. Its attrition resistance was one of the highest among the catalyst tested.

  11. Development of a Novel Catalyst for No Decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ates Akyurtlu; Jale Akyurtlu

    2007-06-22

    different noble metal concentrations and pretreated under different conditions were done. It is also planned to perform NO decomposition tests in a laboratory-size packed-bed reactor to obtain long-term deactivation data. Temperature programmed desorption and temperature controlled reaction runs were made with catalysts containing 15% Pt and 10% Pt on SnO{sub 2}. Catalysts containing 10% Pt resulted in significantly lower activities than 15% PT catalysts. Therefore, in the remainder of the tests 15% Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalysts were used. Isothermal reaction studies were made to elucidate the effects of temperature, oxygen, water vapor, pretreatment temperature, and space velocity on NO dissociation. It was found that the presence of oxygen and water vapor did not affect the activation energy of the NO dissociation reaction indicating the presence of the same rate controlling step for all feed compositions. Activation energy was higher for higher gas velocities suggesting the presence of mass transfer limitations at lower velocities. Presence of oxygen in the feed inhibited the NO decomposition. Having water vapor in the feed did not significantly affect the catalyst activity for catalysts pretreated at 373 K, but significantly reduced catalyst activity for catalysts pretreated at 900 K. Long-term deactivation studies indicated that the catalyst deactivated slowly both with and without the presence of added oxygen in the feed, Deactivation started later in the presence of oxygen. The activities of the catalysts investigated were too low below 1000 K for commercial applications. Their selectivity towards N{sub 2} was good at temperatures above 700 K. A different method for catalyst preparation is needed to improve the catalyst performance.

  12. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Vollhardt, Kurt P. C.; Perkins, Patrick

    1981-01-01

    Novel polymer-supported metal complexes of the formula: PS --R Me(CO).sub.n H.sub.m where: PS represents a divinylbenzene crosslinked polystyrene in which the divinylbenzene crosslinking is greater than 1% and less than about 18%; R represents a cycloalkadienyl radical of 4 through 6 carbon atoms; Me represents a Group VIII metal; CO represents a carbonyl radical; H represents hydrogen; n represents an integer varying from 0 through 3; m represents an integer varying from 0 through 2 inclusively with the further provision that 2n+m must total 18 when added to the electrons in R and Me, or n+m must total 0; are prepared by: brominating PS --H by treating same with bromine in the presence of a thallium salt in a partially or fully halogenated solvent to form PS --Br; treating said PS --Br so produced with a lithium alkyl of 1 through 12 carbon atoms in an aromatic solvent to produce PS --Li; substituting said PS-- Li so produced by reaction with a 2-cycloalkenone of 4 to 6 carbon atoms in the presence of an ether solvent and using a water work-up to form a cycloalkenylalcohol-substituted PS ; dehydrating said alcohol so produced by heating under a vacuum to produce a cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS ; reacting the cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS with metal carbonyl in the presence of a partially or fully halogenated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon of 6 through 8 carbon atoms, ethers, or esters of 4 through 10 carbon atoms as a solvent to produce a polystyrene-supported cycloalkadienyl metal carbonyl. The novel compounds are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO+H.sub.2 to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  13. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Vollhardt, Kurt P. C.; Perkins, Patrick

    1981-01-01

    Novel polymer-supported metal complexes of the formula PS -R Me(CO).sub.n H.sub.m where: PS represents a divinylbenzene crosslinked polystyrene in which the divinylbenzene crosslinking is greater than 1% and less than about 18%; R represents a cycloalkadienyl radical of 4 through 6 carbon atoms; Me represents a Group VIII metal; CO represents a carbonyl radical; H represents hydrogen; n represents an integer varying from 0 through 3; m represents an integer varying from 0 through 2 inclusively with the further provision that 2n+m must total 18 when added to the electrons in R and Me, or n+m must total 0; are prepared by: brominating PS -H by treating same with bromine in the presence of a thallium salt in a partially or fully halogenated solvent to form PS -Br; treating said PS -Br so produced with a lithium alkyl of 1 through 12 carbon atoms in an aromatic solvent to produce PS -Li; substituting said PS - Li so produced by reaction with a 2-cycloalkenone of 4 to 6 carbon atoms in the presence of an ether solvent and using a water work-up to form a cycloalkenylalcohol-substituted PS ; dehydrating said alcohol so produced by heating under a vacuum to produce a cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS ; reacting the cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS with metal carbonyl in the presence of a partially or fully halogenated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon of 6 through 8 carbon atoms, ethers, or esters of 4 through 10 carbon atoms as a solvent to produce a polystyrene-supported cycloalkadienyl metal carbonyl. The novel compounds are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO+H.sub.2 to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  14. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Vollhardt, Kurt P. C.; Perkins, Patrick

    1980-01-01

    Novel polymer-supported metal complexes of the formula: PS --R Me(CO).sub.n H.sub.m where: PS represents a divinylbenzene crosslinked polystyrene in which the divinylbenzene crosslinking is greater than 1% and less than about 18%; R represents a cycloalkadienyl radical of 4 through 6 carbon atoms; Me represents a Group VIII metal; CO represents a carbonyl radical; H represents hydrogen; n represents an integer varying from 0 through 3; m represents an integer varying from 0 through 2 inclusively with the further provision that 2n+m must total 18 when added to the electrons in R and Me, or n+m must total 0; are prepared by: brominating PS --H by treating same with bromine in the presence of a thallium salt in a partially or fully halogenated solvent to form PS --Br; treating said PS --Br so produced with a lithium alkyl of 1 through 12 carbon atoms in an aromatic solvent to produce PS --Li; substituting said PS-- Li so produced by reaction with a 2-cycloalkenone of 4 to 6 carbon atoms in the presence of an ether solvent and using a water work-up to form a cycloalkenylalcohol-substituted PS ; dehydrating said alcohol so produced by heating under a vacuum to produce a cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS ; reacting the cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS with metal carbonyl in the presence of a partially or fully halogenated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon of 6 through 8 carbon atoms, ethers, or esters of 4 through 10 carbon atoms as a solvent to produce a polystyrene-supported cycloalkadienyl metal carbonyl. The novel compounds are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO+H.sub.2 to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  15. TOPICAL REVIEW: Nanoparticle catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshfegh, A. Z.

    2009-12-01

    In this review, the importance of nanoparticles (NPs), with emphasis on their general and specific properties, especially the high surface-to-volume ratio (A/V), in many technological and industrial applications is studied. Some physical and chemical preparation methods for growing several metallic and binary alloy NP catalysts are reviewed. The growth and mechanism of catalytic reactions for synthesis of 1D nanostructures such as ZnO nanowires and multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are discussed. Gas-phase production with emphasis on dependence of catalytic activity and selectivity on size, shape and structure of NPs is also investigated. Application of NP catalysts in several technological processes including H2 production and storage as well as antibacterial effect, gas sensors and fuel cells is discussed. The mechanism of H2 production from catalytic photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic degradation reactions of some organic dyes is discussed. Finally, the future outlook of NP catalysts in various disciplines is presented.

  16. Partial oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    2000-01-01

    A two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion. The dehydrogenation portion is a group VIII metal and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure. There is also disclosed a method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  17. Catalyst, method of making, and reactions using the catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA

    2009-03-03

    The present invention includes a catalyst having a layered structure with, (1) a porous support, (2) a buffer layer, (3) an interfacial layer, and optionally (4) a catalyst layer. The invention also provides a process in which a reactant is converted to a product by passing through a reaction chamber containing the catalyst.

  18. Catalyst, Method Of Making, And Reactions Using The Catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y.; Wang, Yong; Gao, Yufei

    2004-07-13

    The present invention includes a catalyst having a layered structure with, (1) a porous support, (2) a buffer layer, (3) an interfacial layer, and optionally (4) a catalyst layer. The invention also provides a process in which a reactant is converted to a product by passing through a reaction chamber containing the catalyst.

  19. Mixed Alcohol Synthesis Catalyst Screening 2007 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; White, J. F.; Gray, Michel J.; Stevens, Don J.

    2007-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are researching the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). PNNL is obtaining commercially available mixed alcohol or preparing promising mixed-alcohol catalysts and screening them in a laboratory-scale reactor system. The most promising catalysts are provided to NREL for testing using a slipstream from a pilot-scale biomass gasifier. After a review of the literature in 2006 and conversations with companies that produce catalysts, it was determined that no commercial mixed-alcohol synthesis catalysts were available. One manufacturer supplied a modified methanol catalyst that was tested in the PNNL laboratory-scale system and provided to NREL for further testing. PNNL also prepared and tested the behavior of 10 other catalysts representing the distinct catalyst classes for mixed alcohol syntheses. Based on those results,testing in 2007 focused on the performance of the rhodium-based catalysts. The effects of adding promoters to the rhodium catalysts in addition to the manganese already being used were examined. The iron and rhenium promoters both stood out as achieving higher carbon selectivities , followed by Cu. Iridium and Li, on the other hand, had low carbon selectivity ratios of 0.27 and 0.22, respectively. Although testing of candidate promoters is not complete, it appears that Ir and Li promoters warrant further optimization and possibly combination to further improve STYs and carbon selectivities to C2+ oxygenates. However, using these promoters, it will be necessary to incorporate a separate hydrogenation catalyst to improve the yield of C2+ alcohols with respect to the other oxygenates. Fe, Re, and Cu stand out as possible candidates in this respect, but additional research is needed to examine whether they can be combined with the other promoters on the Rh-based catalyst or need to be optimized on a separate catalyst

  20. Secret Lives of Catalysts Revealed

    SciTech Connect

    Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor

    2008-01-01

    Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division discuss the first-ever glimpse of nanoscale catalysts in action. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2008/10/21/catalysts/

  1. Engelhard expands oxidation catalysts portfolio

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.

    1997-02-26

    Engelhard says its agreement earlier this month to market Amoco Chemical`s proprietary maleic anhydride catalyst reflects an effort to expand its speciality catalysts business (CW, Feb. 19, p.5). In particular, the company says it is looking for additional alliances to bolster its oxidation catalysts portfolio. {open_quotes}There are some areas of oxidation catalysis that are reasonably attractive,{close_quotes} says Paul Lamb, marketing director/chemical catalysts. He says that while Engelhard is not interested in commodity oxidation catalysts, such as those used to make sulfuric acid, it does want to boost offerings for higher-value oxidation catalysts. Engelhard is collaborating with Geon to offer oxychlorination catalysts for making ethylene dichloride. It also markets oxidation catalysts for vinyl acetate production.

  2. Methods for conversion of carbohydrates in ionic liquids to value-added chemicals

    DOEpatents

    Zhao, Haibo; Holladay, Johnathan E.

    2011-05-10

    Methods are described for converting carbohydrates including, e.g., monosaccharides, disaccharides, and polysaccharides in ionic liquids to value-added chemicals including furans, useful as chemical intermediates and/or feedstocks. Fructose is converted to 5-hydroxylmethylfurfural (HMF) in the presence of metal halide and acid catalysts. Glucose is effectively converted to HMF in the presence of chromium chloride catalysts. Yields of up to about 70% are achieved with low levels of impurities such as levulinic acid.

  3. Leading Change, Adding Value.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nick

    2016-09-12

    Essential facts Leading Change, Adding Value is NHS England's new nursing and midwifery framework. It is designed to build on Compassion in Practice (CiP), which was published 3 years ago and set out the 6Cs: compassion, care, commitment, courage, competence and communication. CiP established the values at the heart of nursing and midwifery, while the new framework sets out how staff can help transform the health and care sectors to meet the aims of the NHS England's Five Year Forward View. PMID:27615573

  4. An xp model on AdS2 spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Vilaplana, Javier; Sierra, Germán

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we formulate the xp model on the AdS2 spacetime. We find that the spectrum of the Hamiltonian has positive and negative eigenvalues, whose absolute values are given by a harmonic oscillator spectrum, which in turn coincides with that of a massive Dirac fermion in AdS2. We extend this result to generic xp models which are shown to be equivalent to a massive Dirac fermion on spacetimes whose metric depend of the xp Hamiltonian. Finally, we construct the generators of the isometry group SO(2,1) of the AdS2 spacetime, and discuss the relation with conformal quantum mechanics.

  5. Dirac operator on fuzzy AdS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhri, Hossein; Imaanpur, Ali

    2003-03-01

    In this article we construct the chirality and Dirac operators on noncommutative AdS2. We also derive the discrete spectrum of the Dirac operator which is important in the study of the spectral triple associated to AdS2. It is shown that the degeneracy of the spectrum present in the commutative AdS2 is lifted in the noncommutative case. The way we construct the chirality operator is suggestive of how to introduce the projector operators of the corresponding projective modules on this space.

  6. Salesperson, Catalyst, Manager, Leader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worth, Michael J.; Asp, James W., II

    1996-01-01

    This article examines four roles of the college or university development officer: salesperson (when direct solicitation is seen as the officer's primary role); catalyst (or sales manager, adviser, expert, facilitator); manager (stressing the importance of the overall office functioning); and leader (who exerts a leadership role in the…

  7. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  8. Catalyst increases COS conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Goodboy, K.P.

    1985-02-18

    Increasingly stringent air quality legislation is placing greater emphasis on conversion of COS and CS/sub 2/ in Claus plants for the maximum sulfur recovery. Overall sulfur recovery goals are dependent upon outstanding service from the Claus catalyst in each reactor because catalyst activity is a major factor influencing plant performance. Today's catalyst are much improved over those used 10 years ago for the Claus (H/sub 2/S/SO/sub 2/) reaction. Recent technical efforts have focused on the conversion of COS and CS/sub 2/. These carbon-sulfur compounds can account for as much as 50% of the sulfur going to the incinerator, which essentially converts all remaining sulfur species to SO/sub 2/ for atmospheric dispersion. Previously, the mechanism of Claus COS conversion, i.e., hydrolysis or oxidation by SO/sub 2/, was studied and the conclusion was that oxidation by SO/sub 2/ appears to be the predominate mode of COS conversion on sulfated alumina catalysts.

  9. Zinc sulfide liquefaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar

    1984-01-01

    A process for the liquefaction of carbonaceous material, such as coal, is set forth wherein coal is liquefied in a catalytic solvent refining reaction wherein an activated zinc sulfide catalyst is utilized which is activated by hydrogenation in a coal derived process solvent in the absence of coal.

  10. Catalyst, 2000-01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Barbara E., Ed.

    2001-01-01

    "Catalyst" is a publication designed to assist higher education in developing alcohol and other drug prevention polices and programs that will foster students' academic and social development and promote campus and community safety. Issue 1 of volume 6 introduces a series of "Presidential Profiles" in which university presidents describe their…

  11. Tight bifunctional hierarchical catalyst.

    PubMed

    Højholt, Karen T; Vennestrøm, Peter N R; Tiruvalam, Ramchandra; Beato, Pablo

    2011-12-28

    A new concept to prepare tight bifunctional catalysts has been developed, by anchoring CoMo(6) clusters on hierarchical ZSM-5 zeolites for simultaneous use in HDS and hydrocracking catalysis. The prepared material displays a significant improved activity in HDS catalysis compared to the impregnated counterpart. PMID:22048337

  12. Sabatier Catalyst Poisoning Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallette, Tim; Perry, Jay; Abney, Morgan; Knox, Jim; Goldblatt, Loel

    2013-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) on the International Space Station (ISS) has been operational since 2010. The CRA uses a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane by reaction of the metabolic CO2 scrubbed from the cabin air and the hydrogen byproduct from the water electrolysis system used for metabolic oxygen generation. Incorporating the CRA into the overall air revitalization system has facilitated life support system loop closure on the ISS reducing resupply logistics and thereby enhancing longer term missions. The CRA utilizes CO2 which has been adsorbed in a 5A molecular sieve within the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, CDRA. There is a potential of compounds with molecular dimensions similar to, or less than CO2 to also be adsorbed. In this fashion trace contaminants may be concentrated within the CDRA and subsequently desorbed with the CO2 to the CRA. Currently, there is no provision to remove contaminants prior to entering the Sabatier catalyst bed. The risk associated with this is potential catalyst degradation due to trace organic contaminants in the CRA carbon dioxide feed acting as catalyst poisons. To better understand this risk, United Technologies Aerospace System (UTAS) has teamed with MSFC to investigate the impact of various trace contaminants on the CRA catalyst performance at relative ISS cabin air concentrations and at about 200/400 times of ISS concentrations, representative of the potential concentrating effect of the CDRA molecular sieve. This paper summarizes our initial assessment results.

  13. Vertical etching with isolated catalysts in metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon.

    PubMed

    Lianto, Prayudi; Yu, Sihang; Wu, Jiaxin; Thompson, C V; Choi, W K

    2012-12-01

    Metal assisted chemical etching with interconnected catalyst structures has been used to create a wide array of organized nanostructures. However, when patterned catalysts are not interconnected, but are isolated instead, vertical etching to form controlled features is difficult. A systematic study of the mechanism and catalyst stability of metal assisted chemical etching (MACE) of Si in HF and H(2)O(2) using Au catalysts has been carried out. The effects of the etchants on the stability of Au catalysts were examined in detail. The role of excess electronic holes as a result of MACE was investigated via pit formation as a function of catalyst proximity and H(2)O(2) concentration. We show that a suppression of excess holes can be achieved by either adding NaCl to or increasing the HF concentration of the etching solution. We demonstrate that an electric field can direct most of the excess holes to the back of the Si wafer and thus reduce pit formation at the surface of Si between the Au catalysts. The effect of hydrogen bubbles, generated as a consequence of MACE, on the stability of Au catalysts has also been investigated. We define a regime of etch chemistry and catalyst spacing for which catalyst stability and vertical etching can be achieved. PMID:23099475

  14. Noble metal ionic catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hegde, M S; Madras, Giridhar; Patil, K C

    2009-06-16

    Because of growing environmental concerns and increasingly stringent regulations governing auto emissions, new more efficient exhaust catalysts are needed to reduce the amount of pollutants released from internal combustion engines. To accomplish this goal, the major pollutants in exhaust-CO, NO(x), and unburned hydrocarbons-need to be fully converted to CO(2), N(2), and H(2)O. Most exhaust catalysts contain nanocrystalline noble metals (Pt, Pd, Rh) dispersed on oxide supports such as Al(2)O(3) or SiO(2) promoted by CeO(2). However, in conventional catalysts, only the surface atoms of the noble metal particles serve as adsorption sites, and even in 4-6 nm metal particles, only 1/4 to 1/5 of the total noble metal atoms are utilized for catalytic conversion. The complete dispersion of noble metals can be achieved only as ions within an oxide support. In this Account, we describe a novel solution to this dispersion problem: a new solution combustion method for synthesizing dispersed noble metal ionic catalysts. We have synthesized nanocrystalline, single-phase Ce(1-x)M(x)O(2-delta) and Ce(1-x-y)Ti(y)M(x)O(2-delta) (M = Pt, Pd, Rh; x = 0.01-0.02, delta approximately x, y = 0.15-0.25) oxides in fluorite structure. In these oxide catalysts, Pt(2+), Pd(2+), or Rh(3+) ions are substituted only to the extent of 1-2% of Ce(4+) ion. Lower-valent noble metal ion substitution in CeO(2) creates oxygen vacancies. Reducing molecules (CO, H(2), NH(3)) are adsorbed onto electron-deficient noble metal ions, while oxidizing (O(2), NO) molecules are absorbed onto electron-rich oxide ion vacancy sites. The rates of CO and hydrocarbon oxidation and NO(x) reduction (with >80% N(2) selectivity) are 15-30 times higher in the presence of these ionic catalysts than when the same amount of noble metal loaded on an oxide support is used. Catalysts with palladium ion dispersed in CeO(2) or Ce(1-x)Ti(x)O(2) were far superior to Pt or Rh ionic catalysts. Therefore, we have demonstrated that the

  15. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chunshan, Song; Kirby, S.; Schmidt, E.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this project is to explore bimetallic dispersed catalysts for more efficient coal liquefaction. Coal liquefaction involves cleavage of methylene, dimethylene and ether bridges connecting various aromatic units and the reactions of various oxygen functional groups. This paper describes recent results on (1) hydrodeoxygenation of O-containing polycyclic model compounds using novel organometallic catalyst precursors; and (2) activity and selectivity of dispersed Fe catalysts from organometallic and inorganic precursors for hydrocracking of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl) bibenzyl. The results showed that some iron containing catalysts have higher activity in the sulfur-free form, contrary to conventional wisdom. Adding sulfur to Fe precursors with Cp-ligands decreased the activity of the resulting catalyst. This is in distinct contrast to the cases with iron pentacarbonyl and superfine Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, where S addition increased their catalytic activity substantially. A positive correlation between sulfur addition and increased activity can be seen, but a reversed trend between Fe cluster size and hydrocracking conversion could be observed, for carbonyl-type Fe precursors. It is apparent that the activity and selectivity of Fe catalysts for NMBB conversion depends strongly on both the type of ligand environment, the oxidation state and the number of intermetal bonds in the molecular precursor.

  16. Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.; Fuentes, Sergio; Torres, Brenda

    2007-05-29

    The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

  17. Sulfur condensation in Claus catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Schoffs, G.R.

    1985-02-01

    The heterogeneous reactions in which catalyst deactivation by pore plugging occur are listed and include: coke formation in petroleum processing, especially hydrocracking and hydrodesulfurization catalysts; steam reforming and methnation catalysts; ammonia synthesis catalyst; and automobile exhause catalysts. The authors explain how the Claus process converts hydrogen sulfide produced by petroleum desulfurization units and gas treatment processes into elemental sulfur and water. More than 15 million tons of sulfur are recovered annually by this process. Commercial Claus plants appear to operate at thermodynamic equilibrium. Depending on the H2S content of the feed and the number of reactors, total H2S conversion to elemental sulfur can exceed 95%.

  18. Supersymmetric warped AdS in extended topologically massive supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deger, N. S.; Kaya, A.; Samtleben, H.; Sezgin, E.

    2014-07-01

    We determine the most general form of off-shell N=(1,1) supergravity field configurations in three dimensions by requiring that at least one off-shell Killing spinor exists. We then impose the field equations of the topologically massive off-shell supergravity and find a class of solutions whose properties crucially depend on the norm of the auxiliary vector field. These are spacelike-squashed and timelike-stretched AdS3 for the spacelike and timelike norms, respectively. At the transition point where the norm vanishes, the solution is null warped AdS3. This occurs when the coefficient of the Lorentz-Chern-Simons term is related to the AdS radius by μℓ=2. We find that the spacelike-squashed AdS3 can be modded out by a suitable discrete subgroup of the isometry group, yielding an extremal black hole solution which avoids closed timelike curves.

  19. ADS Development in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    Accelerator driven nuclear transmutation system has been pursued to have a clue to the solution of high-level radioactive waste management. The concept consists of super conducting linac, sub-critical reactor and the beam window. Reference model is set up to 800MW thermal power by using 1.5GeV proton beams with considerations multi-factors such as core criticality. Materials damage is simulated by high-energy particle transport codes and so on. Recent achievement on irradiation materials experiment is stated and the differences are pointed out if core burn-up is considered or not. Heat balance in tank-type ADS indicates the temperature conditions of steam generator, the beam widow and cladding materials. Lead-bismuth eutectics demonstration has been conducted. Corrosion depth rate was shown by experiments.

  20. Supported catalysts using nanoparticles as the support material

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Michael S.; Wachs, Israel E.; Knowles, William V.

    2010-11-02

    A process for making a porous catalyst, comprises a) providing an aqueous solution containing a nanoparticle precursor, b) forming a composition containing nanoparticles, c) adding a first catalytic component or precursor thereof and a pore-forming agent to the composition containing nanoparticles and allowing the first catalytic component, the pore-forming agent, and the nanoparticles form an organic-inorganic structure, d) removing water from the organic-inorganic structure; and e) removing the pore-forming agent from the organic-inorganic structure so as to yield a porous catalyst.

  1. Low Temperature Catalyst for NH3 Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, Oscar; Melendez, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    Air revitalization technologies maintain a safe atmosphere inside spacecraft by the removal of C02, ammonia (NH3), and trace contaminants. NH3 onboard the International Space Station (ISS) is produced by crew metabolism, payloads, or during an accidental release of thermal control refrigerant. Currently, the ISS relies on removing NH3 via humidity condensate and the crew wears hooded respirators during emergencies. A different approach to cabin NH3 removal is to use selective catalytic oxidation (SCO), which builds on thermal catalytic oxidation concepts that could be incorporated into the existing TCCS process equipment architecture on ISS. A low temperature platinum-based catalyst (LTP-Catalyst) developed at KSC was used for converting NH3 to H20 and N2 gas by SCO. The challenge of implementing SCO is to reduce formation of undesirable byproducts like NOx (N20 and NO). Gas mixture analysis was conducted using FTIR spectrometry in the Regenerable VOC Control System (RVCS) Testbed. The RVCS was modified by adding a 66 L semi-sealed chamber, and a custom NH3 generator. The effect of temperature on NH3 removal using the LTP-Catalyst was examined. A suitable temperature was found where NH3 removal did not produce toxic NO, (NO, N02) and N20 formation was reduced.

  2. Mechanism of the alkylation of benzene with propylene in the presence of an aluminosilicate catalyst modified by reaction of aluminum chloride with aromatic hydrocarbons. Catalyst promotion

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnikov, I.M.; Zaitseva, T.V.

    1985-09-01

    The authors investigated the gas-liquid phase alkylation reaction of benzene with propylene in the presence of aluminosilicate catalysts which have been activated by treatment with varying amounts of the complex derived from aluminum chloride and polyalkylbenzene, and also studied the viability of various compounds as complex promoters. It was established that catalyst activity is enhanced by modification with the complex. The optimum concentration of complex (in the modified catalyst) is 15. wt. %. It was also established that isobutyl chloride added to the reaction mixture in the presence of the modified catalyst acts as a promoter and increases the activity of the catalyst twofold, to an acceptable level. The value of the energy of activation of the alkylation reaction was determined by kinetic analysis of the experimental data to be 38,300 J/mole.

  3. Effect of ceria on hydrogen production by auto-thermal reforming of propane over supported nickel catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woo Ri; Ahn, Ho Geun; Shin, Jae Soon; Kim, Young Chul; Moon, Dong Ju; Park, Nam Cook

    2013-01-01

    Autothermal reforming of propane was studied with respect to the addition of ceria to the supported Ni catalysts. Ni/Al2O3 catalysts showed a higher activity than Ni/MgAl catalysts. It was related to the ease of the catalyst reduction. Ni/Ce/MgAl and Ni/Ce/Al2O3 catalysts showed higher propane conversions and higher hydrogen yields. These were related to the particle size and the reducibilities of the catalysts. XRD analysis showed that the added CeO2 decreased the particle sizes of the supported Ni, but increased the amount of NiO on the catalyst surface, thus it improved the resistance to coking. PMID:23646791

  4. Alumina-supported noble metal catalysts for destructive oxidation of organic pollutants in effluent from a softwood kraft pulp mill

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.; Chuang, K.T.

    1998-08-01

    The effectiveness of alumina-supported noble metal catalysts for the destructive oxidation of organic pollutants in effluent from a softwood kraft pulp mill was evaluated in a slurry reactor at 463 K and an oxygen pressure of 1.5 MPa. The effects of catalyst preparation procedures, such as metal loading, calcination, or reduction treatment on the catalytic activities, were also tested. Alumina-supported palladium catalysts were found to be more effective than supported manganese, iron, or platinum catalysts. The rate of oxidation over Pd/alumina catalyst was significantly higher than that of the uncatalyzed reaction. Adding Ce on the alumina support was found to promote the activity of alumina-supported Pt catalyst but inhibit the activity of alumina-supported Pd catalyst. The reaction mechanisms for the catalytic wet oxidation process and the roles of Ce on catalytic activity for destructive oxidation of organic pollutants in wastewater are discussed.

  5. Relating FTS Catalyst Properties to Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Wenping; Ramana Rao Pendyala, Venkat; Gao, Pei; Jermwongratanachai, Thani; Jacobs, Gary; Davis, Burton H.

    2016-01-01

    During the reporting period June 23, 2011 to August 31, 2013, CAER researchers carried out research in two areas of fundamental importance to the topic of cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS): promoters and stability. The first area was research into possible substitute promoters that might be used to replace the expensive promoters (e.g., Pt, Re, and Ru) that are commonly used. To that end, three separate investigations were carried out. Due to the strong support interaction of ?-Al2O3 with cobalt, metal promoters are commonly added to commercial FTS catalysts to facilitate the reduction of cobalt oxides and thereby boost active surface cobalt metal sites. To date, the metal promoters examined have been those up to and including Group 11. Because two Group 11 promoters (i.e., Ag and Au) were identified to exhibit positive impacts on conversion, selectivity, or both, research was undertaken to explore metals in Groups 12 - 14. The three metals selected for this purpose were Cd, In, and Sn. At a higher loading of 25%Co on alumina, 1% addition of Cd, In, or Sn was found to-on average-facilitate reduction by promoting a heterogeneous distribution of cobalt consisting of larger lesser interacting cobalt clusters and smaller strongly interacting cobalt species. The lesser interacting species were identified in TPR profiles, where a sharp low temperature peak occurred for the reduction of larger, weakly interacting, CoO species. In XANES, the Cd, In, and Sn promoters were found to exist as oxides, whereas typical promoters (e.g., Re, Ru, Pt) were previously determined to exist in an metallic state in atomic coordination with cobalt. The larger cobalt clusters significantly decreased the active site density relative to the unpromoted 25%Co/Al2O3 catalyst. Decreasing the cobalt loading to 15%Co eliminated the large non-interacting species. The TPR peak for reduction of strongly interacting CoO in the Cd promoted catalyst occurred at a measurably lower temperature

  6. Intermediate Ethanol Blends Catalyst Durability Program

    SciTech Connect

    West, Brian H; Sluder, Scott; Knoll, Keith; Orban, John; Feng, Jingyu

    2012-02-01

    In the summer of 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends (also known as mid-level blends) on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program was to develop information important to assessing the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals for the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20 - gasoline blended with 15% and 20% ethanol - on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This report provides the results of the catalyst durability study, a substantial part of the overall test program. Results from additional projects will be reported separately. The principal purpose of the catalyst durability study was to investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the durability of catalysts and other aspects of the emissions control systems of vehicles. Section 1 provides further information about the purpose and context of the study. Section 2 describes the experimental approach for the test program, including vehicle selection, aging and emissions test cycle, fuel selection, and data handling and analysis. Section 3 summarizes the effects of the ethanol blends on emissions and fuel economy of the test vehicles. Section 4 summarizes notable unscheduled maintenance and testing issues experienced during the program. The appendixes provide additional detail about the statistical models used in the analysis, detailed statistical analyses, and detailed vehicle specifications.

  7. Value Added in English Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Andrew; McCormack, Tanya; Evans, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Value-added indicators are now a central part of school accountability in England, and value-added information is routinely used in school improvement at both the national and the local levels. This article describes the value-added models that are being used in the academic year 2007-8 by schools, parents, school inspectors, and other…

  8. Per aspirin ad astra...

    PubMed

    Hartung, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Taking the 110th anniversary of marketing of aspirin as starting point, the almost scary toxicological profile of aspirin is contrasted with its actual use experience. The author concludes that we are lucky that, in 1899, there was no regulatory toxicology. Adding, for the purpose of this article, a fourth R to the Three Rs, i.e. Realism, three reality-checks are carried out. The first one comes to the conclusion that the tools of toxicology are hardly adequate for the challenges ahead. The second one concludes that, specifically, the implementation of the EU REACH system is not feasible with these tools, mainly with regard to throughput. The third one challenges the belief that classical alternative methods, i.e. replacing animal test-based tools one by one, is actually leading to a new toxicology - it appears to change only patches of the patchwork, but not to overcome any inherent limitations other than ethical ones. The perspective lies in the Toxicology for the 21st Century initiatives, which aim to create a new approach from the scratch, by an evidence-based toxicology and a global "Human Toxicology Programme". PMID:20105011

  9. Fluorination process using catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Hochel, Robert C.; Saturday, Kathy A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for converting an actinide compound selected from the group consisting of uranium oxides, plutonium oxides, uranium tetrafluorides, plutonium tetrafluorides and mixtures of said oxides and tetrafluorides, to the corresponding volatile actinide hexafluoride by fluorination with a stoichiometric excess of fluorine gas. The improvement involves conducting the fluorination of the plutonium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF.sub.3, AgF.sub.2 and NiF.sub.2, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced. The improvement also involves conducting the fluorination of one of the uranium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF.sub.3 and AgF.sub.2, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced.

  10. FCC catalyst selection

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, G.D.L. ); McElhiney, G. )

    1989-09-01

    This paper discusses a commonly used technique for comparing FCC catalytic selectivities based on the ASTM microactivity test (MAT) procedure, ASTM D-3907-80. In its original form the ASTM test provides only very limited information on selectivity. However, extension of the ASTM MAT procedure by using additional product analyses gives a microselectivity test capable of providing detailed yield structure information. This modified MAT procedure thus provides a cost-effective and rapid means of comparing many catalysts.

  11. Catalysis by unsupported skeletal gold catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wittstock, Arne; Bäumer, Marcus

    2014-03-18

    Catalysis is one of the key technologies for the 21st century for achieving the required sustainability of chemical processes. Critical improvements are based on the development of new catalysts and catalytic concepts. In this context, gold holds great promise because it is more active and selective than other precious metal catalysts at low temperatures. However, gold becomes only chemically and catalytically active when it is nanostructured. Since the 1970s and 1980s, the first type of gold catalysts that chemists studied were small nanoparticles on oxidic supports. With the later onset of nanotechnology, a variety of nanostructured materials not requiring a support or organic stabilizers became available within about the last 10 years. Among these are gold nanofoams generated by combustion of gold compounds, nanotube membranes prepared by electroless deposition of gold inside a template, and corrosion-derived nanoporous gold. Even though these materials are macroscopic in their geometric dimensions (e.g., disks, cubes, and membranes with dimensions of millimeters), they are comprised of gold nanostructures, for example, in the form of ligaments as small as 15 nm in diameter (nanoporous gold, npAu). The nanostructure brings about a high surface to volume ratio and a large fraction of low coordinated surface atoms. In this Account, we discuss how unsupported materials are active catalysts for aerobic oxidation reaction in gas phase (oxidation of CO and primary alcohols), as well as liquid phase oxidation and reduction reactions. It turns out that the bonding and activation of molecular oxygen for gas phase oxidations strongly profits from trace amounts of an ad-metal residue such as silver. It is noteworthy that these catalysts still exhibit the special gold type chemistry, characterized by activity at very low temperatures and high selectivity for partial oxidations. For example, we can oxidize CO over these unsupported catalysts (npAu, nanotubes, and powder) at

  12. Steam reforming catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Kramarz, Kurt W.; Bloom, Ira D.; Kumar, Romesh; Ahmed, Shabbir; Wilkenhoener, Rolf; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel. A vapor of the hydrocarbon fuel and steam is brought in contact with a two-part catalyst having a dehydrogenation powder portion and an oxide-ion conducting powder portion at a temperature not less than about 770.degree.C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich. The H.sub.2 content of the hydrogen gas is greater than about 70 percent by volume. The dehydrogenation portion of the catalyst includes a group VIII metal, and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide from the group crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure and mixtures thereof. The oxide-ion conducting portion of the catalyst is a ceramic powder of one or more of ZrO.sub.2, CeO.sub.2, Bi.sub.2 O.sub.3, (BiVO).sub.4, and LaGaO.sub.3.

  13. Hydrotreating catalyst selection

    SciTech Connect

    Kellett, T.F.; Trevino, C.A.; Sartor, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrotreating catalyst selection can be correctly made in most cases by using a decision tree developed for choosing between the commonly used cobalt/molybdenum and nickel/molybdenum. The decision suggests the use of Co/Mo for desulfurizing straight-run feeds (except naphtha) and Ni/Mo for hydrogen uptake (saturating aromatics, treating fluid catalytic-cracking (FCC) feedstocks, improving color or thermal stability, and increasing the octane number) with any feed, and for denitrogenation of cracked feeds or mixed feeds with greater than or equal to 20% cracked materials. For desulfurization of cracked or mixed feeds and for desulfurization or denitrogenation of naphtha, the selection depends on the reaction conditions. Pilot-plant studies with the second-generation commercial Shell 344 (Co/Mo) and Shell 324 (Ni/Mo) catalysts used in hydrotreating vacuum gas oils, flashed distillate, or heavy catalytically cracked gas oil supported the predictions made with the decision tree, but the better performance of the Ni/Mo catalyst in desulfurizing a 20% coker/80% straight-run naphtha at low partial pressures of hydrogen was an unexpected result.

  14. Supergravity at the boundary of AdS supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amsel, Aaron J.; Compère, Geoffrey

    2009-04-01

    We give a general analysis of AdS boundary conditions for spin-3/2 Rarita-Schwinger fields and investigate boundary conditions preserving supersymmetry for a graviton multiplet in AdS4. Linear Rarita-Schwinger fields in AdSd are shown to admit mixed Dirichlet-Neumann boundary conditions when their mass is in the range 0≤|m|<1/2lAdS. We also demonstrate that mixed boundary conditions are allowed for larger masses when the inner product is “renormalized” accordingly with the action. We then use the results obtained for |m|=1/lAdS to explore supersymmetric boundary conditions for N=1 AdS4 supergravity in which the metric and Rarita-Schwinger fields are fluctuating at the boundary. We classify boundary conditions that preserve boundary supersymmetry or superconformal symmetry. Under the AdS/CFT dictionary, Neumann boundary conditions in d=4 supergravity correspond to gauging the superconformal group of the three-dimensional CFT describing M2-branes, while N=1 supersymmetric mixed boundary conditions couple the CFT to N=1 superconformal topologically massive gravity.

  15. Method for dispersing catalyst onto particulate material and product thereof

    DOEpatents

    Utz, Bruce R.; Cugini, Anthony V.

    1992-01-01

    A method for dispersing finely divided catalyst precursors onto the surface of coal or other particulate material includes the steps of forming a wet paste mixture of the particulate material and a liquid solution containing a dissolved transition metal salt, for instance a solution of ferric nitrate. The wet paste mixture is in a state of incipient wetness with all of this solution adsorbed onto the surfaces of the particulate material without the presence of free moisture. On adding a precipitating agent such as ammonia, a catalyst precursor such as hydrated iron oxide is deposited on the surfaces of the coal. The catalyst is activated by converting it to the sulfide form for the hydrogenation or direct liquefaction of the coal.

  16. Selective Hydrogenolysis of Sugar Alcohols Over Stuctured Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Chunshe; White, James F.; Wang, Yong; Frye, John G.

    2007-01-01

    A novel gas-liquid-solid reactor based on monolith catalyst structure was developed for converting sugar alcohols to value-added chemicals such as propylene glycol. The structured catalyst was used intending to improve product selectivity. Testing at the pressure of 1200psig and 210°C with H2 to sorbitol molar ratio of 8.9 and a space velocity range from 0.15 to 5 hr-1 demonstrated that as high as 41 wt% of propylene glycol selectivity and 13 wt% ethylene glycol selectivity can be obtained. In addition, monolith catalysts gave higher C3/C2 ratio than that in the conventional trickle bed reactor with similar liquid hourly space velocities.

  17. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H.; Tzou, Ming-Shin; Jiang, Hui-Jong

    1987-01-01

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  18. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Tzou, M.S.; Jiang, H.J.

    1987-03-31

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  19. Catalysts for emerging energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce C. Gates; George W. Huber; Christopher L. Marshall; Phillip N. Ross; Jeffrey Siirola; Yong Wang

    2008-04-15

    Catalysis is the essential technology for chemical transformation, including production of fuels from the fossil resources petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Typical catalysts for these conversions are robust porous solids incorporating metals, metal oxides, and/or metal sulfides. As efforts are stepping up to replace fossil fuels with biomass, new catalysts for the conversion of the components of biomass will be needed. Although the catalysts for biomass conversion might be substantially different from those used in the conversion of fossil feedstocks, the latter catalysts are a starting point in today's research. Major challenges lie ahead in the discovery of efficient biomass conversion catalysts, as well as in the discovery of catalysts for conversion of CO{sub 2} and possibly water into liquid fuels. 16 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. All AdS7 solutions of type II supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apruzzi, Fabio; Fazzi, Marco; Rosa, Dario; Tomasiello, Alessandro

    2014-04-01

    In M-theory, the only AdS7 supersymmetric solutions are AdS7 × S 4 and its orbifolds. In this paper, we find and classify new supersymmetric solutions of the type AdS7 × M 3 in type II supergravity. While in IIB none exist, in IIA with Romans mass (which does not lift to M-theory) there are many new ones. We use a pure spinor approach reminiscent of generalized complex geometry. Without the need for any Ansatz, the system determines uniquely the form of the metric and fluxes, up to solving a system of ODEs. Namely, the metric on M 3 is that of an S 2 fibered over an interval; this is consistent with the Sp(1) R-symmetry of the holographically dual (1,0) theory. By including D8 brane sources, one can numerically obtain regular solutions, where topologically M 3 ≅ S 3.

  1. Worldsheet scattering in AdS3/CFT2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundin, Per; Wulff, Linus

    2013-07-01

    We confront the recently proposed exact S-matrices for AdS 3/ CFT 2 with direct worldsheet calculations. Utilizing the BMN and Near Flat Space (NFS) expansions for strings on AdS 3 × S 3 × S 3 × S 1 and AdS 3 × S 3 × T 4 we compute both tree-level and one-loop scattering amplitudes. Up to some minor issues we find nice agreement in the tree-level sector. At the one-loop level however we find that certain non-zero tree-level processes, which are not visible in the exact solution, contribute, via the optical theorem, and give an apparent mismatch for certain amplitudes. Furthermore we find that a proposed one-loop modification of the dressing phase correctly reproduces the worldsheet calculation while the standard Hernandez-Lopez phase does not. We also compute several massless to massless processes.

  2. Detailed ultraviolet asymptotics for AdS scalar field perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evnin, Oleg; Jai-akson, Puttarak

    2016-04-01

    We present a range of methods suitable for accurate evaluation of the leading asymptotics for integrals of products of Jacobi polynomials in limits when the degrees of some or all polynomials inside the integral become large. The structures in question have recently emerged in the context of effective descriptions of small amplitude perturbations in anti-de Sitter (AdS) spacetime. The limit of high degree polynomials corresponds in this situation to effective interactions involving extreme short-wavelength modes, whose dynamics is crucial for the turbulent instabilities that determine the ultimate fate of small AdS perturbations. We explicitly apply the relevant asymptotic techniques to the case of a self-interacting probe scalar field in AdS and extract a detailed form of the leading large degree behavior, including closed form analytic expressions for the numerical coefficients appearing in the asymptotics.

  3. Asymptotically AdS spacetimes with a timelike Kasner singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jie

    2016-07-01

    Exact solutions to Einstein's equations for holographic models are presented and studied. The IR geometry has a timelike cousin of the Kasner singularity, which is the less generic case of the BKL (Belinski-Khalatnikov-Lifshitz) singularity, and the UV is asymptotically AdS. This solution describes a holographic RG flow between them. The solution's appearance is an interpolation between the planar AdS black hole and the AdS soliton. The causality constraint is always satisfied. The entanglement entropy and Wilson loops are discussed. The boundary condition for the current-current correlation function and the Laplacian in the IR is examined. There is no infalling wave in the IR, but instead, there is a normalizable solution in the IR. In a special case, a hyperscaling-violating geometry is obtained after a dimensional reduction.

  4. New massive gravity and AdS(4) counterterms.

    PubMed

    Jatkar, Dileep P; Sinha, Aninda

    2011-04-29

    We show that the recently proposed Dirac-Born-Infeld extension of new massive gravity emerges naturally as a counterterm in four-dimensional anti-de Sitter space (AdS(4)). The resulting on-shell Euclidean action is independent of the cutoff at zero temperature. We also find that the same choice of counterterm gives the usual area law for the AdS(4) Schwarzschild black hole entropy in a cutoff-independent manner. The parameter values of the resulting counterterm action correspond to a c=0 theory in the context of the duality between AdS(3) gravity and two-dimensional conformal field theory. We rewrite this theory in terms of the gauge field that is used to recast 3D gravity as a Chern-Simons theory. PMID:21635026

  5. Co-Pt core-shell nanostructured catalyst prepared by selective chemical vapor pulse deposition of Pt on Co as a cathode in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Sang-Joon; Chung, Ho-Kyoon; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Chae, Heeyeop; Seo, Seung-Woo; Min Cho, Sung

    2014-01-15

    A new type of PtCo/C catalyst for use as a cathode in polymer electrolyte fuel cells was prepared by selective chemical vapor pulse deposition (CVPD) of Pt on the surface of Co. The activity of the prepared catalyst for oxygen reduction was higher than that of a catalyst prepared by sequential impregnation (IMP) with the two metallic components. This catalytic activity difference occurs because the former catalyst has smaller Pt crystallites that produce stronger Pt-Co interactions and have a larger Pt surface area. Consequently, the CVPD catalyst has a great number of Co particles that are in close contact with the added Pt. The Pt surface was also electronically modified by interactions with Co, which were stronger in the CVPD catalyst than in the IMP catalyst, as indicated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry measurements of the catalysts.

  6. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Dennis P.; Schmoeckel, Alison K.; Vernstrom, George D.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Wood, Thomas E.; Yang, Ruizhi; Easton, E. Bradley; Dahn, Jeffrey R.; O'Neill, David G.

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  7. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhichao; Benavides, Pahola T.; Dunn, Jennifer B.; Cronauer, Donald C.

    2015-09-01

    In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of five different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5], Mo/Co/ γ-Al2O3, and Pt/ γ-Al2O3) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module.

  8. Want Ads, Job Skills, and Curriculum: A Survey of 1998 Chemistry Help-Wanted Ads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Headrick, Kurt L.

    2001-09-01

    Employer surveys are useful checks on how well we are preparing students for the working world. Employer surveys are also useful because they put curriculum deficiencies into terms that are readily understood; they can thus be a catalyst for curriculum reform. This study classified 2035 chemistry jobs advertized in newspapers across the USA in the fall of 1998 according to job type, employment sector, industry, type of chemistry principally involved, and academic background and experience desired. Job ads were also searched for keywords denoting a broad range of instrumentation and techniques, personality traits, and general work skills and experience. The total of 7872 keywords, an average of 3.9 per job, indicates that employers are looking for more than just a B.S. in chemistry.

  9. Phases of global AdS black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Pallab; Krishnan, Chethan; Subramanian, P. N. Bala

    2016-06-01

    We study the phases of gravity coupled to a charged scalar and gauge field in an asymptotically Anti-de Sitter spacetime ( AdS 4) in the grand canonical ensemble. For the conformally coupled scalar, an intricate phase diagram is charted out between the four relevant solutions: global AdS, boson star, Reissner-Nordstrom black hole and the hairy black hole. The nature of the phase diagram undergoes qualitative changes as the charge of the scalar is changed, which we discuss. We also discuss the new features that arise in the extremal limit.

  10. Results of catalyst testing using iron-based catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Linehan, J.C.; Darab, J.G.; Matson, D.W.

    1993-03-01

    As coal liquefaction catalysts, iron-based products are generally inferior to the more expensive molybdenum, cobalt, or nickel-based materials. However, the lower costs of production and recovery (or in the case of some iron catalysts, non-recovery) give the iron-based materials a potential economic advantage over the more efficient precious and semi-precious metal catalysts for this application. Recent research has shown that a number of different iron-containing materials can be successfully utilized as coal liquefaction catalysts or as catalyst. Pyrrhotite (Fe{sub 1-x}S) or a similar iron-sulfide phase is commonly believed to be the active catalyst in coal liquefaction and model compound pyrolysis reactions, although no specific phase has been yet been isolated as the actual catalyst species. The active iron-containing catalyst is usually generated in situ from an iron-oxide precursor and an elemental sulfur source under reducing conditions in the reactor vessel. Most research has concentrated on the use of common iron-oxide phases such as hematite or goethite (and their derivatives) as the iron-bearing precursor, or on non-specific iron materials produced by the reaction of various iron salts and compounds in the coal or liquefaction reactor. To our knowledge there has been no systematic effort to determine the optimum iron-containing precursor phase for producing active coal liquefaction catalysts, despite the fact that there are over ten iron-(hydroxy)oxide phases which can be easily synthesized in the laboratory. We have undertaken a systematic study to identify the most active iron-oxide catalyst precursor phases, the co-catalysts, and the coal pretreatments which will provide optimum yields in coal liquefaction processes.

  11. Results of catalyst testing using iron-based catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Linehan, J.C.; Darab, J.G.; Matson, D.W.

    1993-03-01

    As coal liquefaction catalysts, iron-based products are generally inferior to the more expensive molybdenum, cobalt, or nickel-based materials. However, the lower costs of production and recovery (or in the case of some iron catalysts, non-recovery) give the iron-based materials a potential economic advantage over the more efficient precious and semi-precious metal catalysts for this application. Recent research has shown that a number of different iron-containing materials can be successfully utilized as coal liquefaction catalysts or as catalyst. Pyrrhotite (Fe[sub 1-x]S) or a similar iron-sulfide phase is commonly believed to be the active catalyst in coal liquefaction and model compound pyrolysis reactions, although no specific phase has been yet been isolated as the actual catalyst species. The active iron-containing catalyst is usually generated in situ from an iron-oxide precursor and an elemental sulfur source under reducing conditions in the reactor vessel. Most research has concentrated on the use of common iron-oxide phases such as hematite or goethite (and their derivatives) as the iron-bearing precursor, or on non-specific iron materials produced by the reaction of various iron salts and compounds in the coal or liquefaction reactor. To our knowledge there has been no systematic effort to determine the optimum iron-containing precursor phase for producing active coal liquefaction catalysts, despite the fact that there are over ten iron-(hydroxy)oxide phases which can be easily synthesized in the laboratory. We have undertaken a systematic study to identify the most active iron-oxide catalyst precursor phases, the co-catalysts, and the coal pretreatments which will provide optimum yields in coal liquefaction processes.

  12. Mixed Alcohol Synthesis Catalyst Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; White, James F.; Stevens, Don J.

    2007-09-03

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). PNNL is tasked with obtaining commercially available or preparing promising mixed-alcohol catalysts and screening them in a laboratory-scale reactor system. Commercially available catalysts and the most promising experimental catalysts are provided to NREL for testing using a slipstream from a pilot-scale biomass gasifier. From the standpoint of producing C2+ alcohols as the major product, it appears that the rhodium catalyst is the best choice in terms of both selectivity and space-time yield (STY). However, unless the rhodium catalyst can be improved to provide minimally acceptable STYs for commercial operation, mixed alcohol synthesis will involve significant production of other liquid coproducts. The modified Fischer-Tropsch catalyst shows the most promise for providing both an acceptable selectivity to C2+ alcohols and total liquid STY. However, further optimization of the Fischer-Tropsch catalysts to improve selectivity to higher alcohols is highly desired. Selection of a preferred catalyst will likely entail a decision on the preferred coproduct slate. No other catalysts tested appear amenable to the significant improvements needed for acceptable STYs.

  13. ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    JAMES G. GOODWIN, JR.; JAMES J. SPIVEY; K. JOTHIMURUGESAN; SANTOSH K. GANGWAL

    1998-09-17

    m diameter, 2 m tall spray dryer. The binder silica content was varied from 0 to 20 wt %. A catalyst with 12 wt % binder silica was found to have the highest attrition resistance. F-T reaction studies over 100 hours in a fixed-bed reactor showed that this catalyst maintained around 95 % CO conversion with a methane selectivity of less than 7 wt % and a C{sub 5}{sup +} selectivity of greater than 73 wt %. The effect of adding precipitated silica from 0 to 20 parts by weight to this catalyst (containing 12 wt % binder silica) was also studied. Addition of precipitated silica was found to be detrimental to attrition resistance and resulted in increased methane and reduced wax formation.

  14. Ru-Containing Magnetically Recoverable Catalysts: A Sustainable Pathway from Cellulose to Ethylene and Propylene Glycols.

    PubMed

    Manaenkov, Oleg V; Mann, Joshua J; Kislitza, Olga V; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Stein, Barry D; Morgan, David Gene; Pink, Maren; Lependina, Olga L; Shifrina, Zinaida B; Matveeva, Valentina G; Sulman, Esther M; Bronstein, Lyudmila M

    2016-08-24

    Biomass processing to value-added chemicals and biofuels received considerable attention due to the renewable nature of the precursors. Here, we report the development of Ru-containing magnetically recoverable catalysts for cellulose hydrogenolysis to low alcohols, ethylene glycol (EG) and propylene glycol (PG). The catalysts are synthesized by incorporation of magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) in mesoporous silica pores followed by formation of 2 nm Ru NPs. The latter are obtained by thermal decomposition of ruthenium acetylacetonate in the pores. The catalysts showed excellent activities and selectivities at 100% cellulose conversion, exceeding those for the commercial Ru/C. High selectivities as well as activities are attributed to the influence of Fe3O4 on the Ru(0)/Ru(4+) NPs. A facile synthetic protocol, easy magnetic separation, and stability of the catalyst performance after magnetic recovery make these catalysts promising for industrial applications. PMID:27484222

  15. The forecaster's added value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turco, M.; Milelli, M.

    2009-09-01

    skill scores of two competitive forecast. It is important to underline that the conclusions refer to the analysis of the Piemonte operational alert system, so they cannot be directly taken as universally true. But we think that some of the main lessons that can be derived from this study could be useful for the meteorological community. In details, the main conclusions are the following: - despite the overall improvement in global scale and the fact that the resolution of the limited area models has increased considerably over recent years, the QPF produced by the meteorological models involved in this study has not improved enough to allow its direct use, that is, the subjective HQPF continues to offer the best performance; - in the forecast process, the step where humans have the largest added value with respect to mathematical models, is the communication. In fact the human characterisation and communication of the forecast uncertainty to end users cannot be replaced by any computer code; - eventually, although there is no novelty in this study, we would like to show that the correct application of appropriated statistical techniques permits a better definition and quantification of the errors and, mostly important, allows a correct (unbiased) communication between forecasters and decision makers.

  16. DEHYDROGENATION CATALYST FOR PRODUCTION OF MTBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this project were to better understand the effect of different catalyst preparation parameters, the effect of different catalyst treatment parameters, and the mechanism of deactivation. Accordingly, catalysts were made using various preparation methods and with...

  17. Mystery cloud of AD 536

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    The possible cause of the densest and most persistent dry fog on record, which was observed in Europe and the Middle East during AD 536 and 537, is discussed. The fog's long duration toward the south and the high sulfuric acid signal detected in Greenland in ice cores dated around AD 540 support the theory that the fog was due to the explosion of the Rabaul volcano, the occurrence of which has been dated at about AD 540 by the radiocarbon method.

  18. Novel Reforming Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Pfefferle, Lisa D; Haller, Gary L

    2012-10-16

    Aqueous phase reforming is useful for processing oxygenated hydrocarbons to hydrogen and other more useful products. Current processing is hampered by the fact that oxide based catalysts are not stable under high temperature hydrothermal conditions. Silica in the form of structured MCM-41 is thermally a more stable support for Co and Ni than conventional high surface area amorphous silica but hydrothermal stability is not demonstrated. Carbon nanotube supports, in contrast, are highly stable under hydrothermal reaction conditions. In this project we show that carbon nanotubes are stable high activity/selectivity supports for the conversion of ethylene glycol to hydrogen.

  19. Molecular water oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gratzel, Michael; Munavalli, Shekhar; Pern, Fu-Jann; Frank, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    A dimeric composition of the formula: ##STR1## wherein L', L", L'", and L"" are each a bidentate ligand having at least one functional substituent, the ligand selected from bipyridine, phenanthroline, 2-phenylpyridine, bipyrimidine, and bipyrazyl and the functional substituent selected from carboxylic acid, ester, amide, halogenide, anhydride, acyl ketone, alkyl ketone, acid chloride, sulfonic acid, phosphonic acid, and nitro and nitroso groups. An electrochemical oxidation process for the production of the above functionally substituted bidentate ligand diaqua oxo-bridged ruthenium dimers and their use as water oxidation catalysts is described.

  20. AdS Branes from Partial Breaking of Superconformal Symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, E.A.

    2005-10-01

    It is shown how the static-gauge world-volume superfield actions of diverse superbranes on the AdS{sub d+1} superbackgrounds can be systematically derived from nonlinear realizations of the appropriate AdS supersymmetries. The latter are treated as superconformal symmetries of flat Minkowski superspaces of the bosonic dimension d. Examples include the N = 1 AdS{sub 4} supermembrane, which is associated with the 1/2 partial breaking of the OSp(1|4) supersymmetry down to the N = 1, d = 3 Poincare supersymmetry, and the T-duality related L3-brane on AdS{sub 5} and scalar 3-brane on AdS{sub 5} x S{sup 1}, which are associated with two different patterns of 1/2 breaking of the SU(2, 2|1) supersymmetry. Another (closely related) topic is the AdS/CFT equivalence transformation. It maps the world-volume actions of the codimension-one AdS{sub d+1} (super)branes onto the actions of the appropriate Minkowski (super)conformal field theories in the dimension d.

  1. Stability and Lifetime of K-CoMoSx Mixed Alcohol Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, J. E.; Ruddy, D.; Schaidle, J.; Ferrell, J.; Thibodeaux, J.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have studied sulfide-type catalysts for the production of mixed alcohols from synthesis gas for several decades. Despite many advances in the art, these processes are not yet commercial, due in large part to mediocre economics and the added risk associated with uncertainty in catalyst lifetime. This talk will outline some recent studies in the lifetime and stability of K-CoMoSx-type mixed alcohol catalysts. Specifically, studies of long term operation (> 3000h), sulfiding agents, simulated methanol recycle, and morphology (probed via XRD and XPS) will be discussed, with the conclusion that these materials are likely to exhibit acceptable lifetimes in continuous operation.

  2. Design of graphene sheets-supported Pt catalyst layer in PEM fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seh K.; Shao, Yuyan; Wan, Haiying; Rieke, Peter C.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Towne, Silas A.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Yong

    2011-03-01

    A series of cathodes using Pt supported onto graphene sheets with different contents of carbon black in the catalyst layer were prepared and characterized. Carbon black was added as a spacer between two-dimensional graphene sheets in the catalyst layer to study its effect on the performances of proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Electrochemical properties and surface morphology of the cathodes with and without carbon black were characterized using cyclic voltammetry, ac-impedance spectroscopy, electrochemical polarization technique, and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that carbon black effectively modifies the array of graphene supports, resulting in more Pt nanoparticles available for electrochemical reaction and better mass transport in the catalyst layer.

  3. Entanglement temperature and perturbed AdS3 geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, G. C.; Caravan, B.

    2016-06-01

    Generalizing the first law of thermodynamics, the increase in entropy density δ S (x ) of a conformal field theory (CFT) is proportional to the increase in energy density, δ E (x ) , of a subsystem divided by a spatially dependent entanglement temperature, TE(x ) , a fixed parameter determined by the geometry of the subsystem, crossing over to thermodynamic temperature at high temperatures. In this paper we derive a generalization of the thermodynamic Clausius relation, showing that deformations of the CFT by marginal operators are associated with spatial temperature variations, δ TE(x ) , and spatial energy correlations play the role of specific heat. Using AdS/CFT duality we develop a relationship between a perturbation in the local entanglement temperature of the CFT and the perturbation of the bulk AdS metric. In two dimensions, we demonstrate a method through which direct diagonalizations of the boundary quantum theory may be used to construct geometric perturbations of AdS3 .

  4. AdS5 backgrounds with 24 supersymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, S.; Gutowski, J.; Papadopoulos, G.

    2016-06-01

    We prove a non-existence theorem for smooth AdS 5 solutions with connected, compact without boundary internal space that preserve strictly 24 supersymmetries. In particular, we show that D = 11 supergravity does not admit such solutions, and that all such solutions of IIB supergravity are locally isometric to the AdS 5 × S 5 maximally supersymmetric background. Furthermore, we prove that (massive) IIA supergravity also does not admit such solutions, provided that the homogeneity conjecture for massive IIA supergravity is valid. In the context of AdS/CFT these results imply that if gravitational duals for strictly mathcal{N}=3 superconformal theories in 4-dimensions exist, they are either singular or their internal spaces are not compact.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Adeyinka A. Adeyiga

    2001-09-01

    alpha iron-based catalysts synthesized at Hampton University, (ii) seek improvements in the catalyst performance through variations in process conditions, pretreatment procedures and/or modifications in catalyst preparation steps and (iii) investigate the performance in a slurry reactor. The effort during the reporting period has been devoted to attrition study of the iron-based catalysts. Precipitated silica appeared to decrease attrition resistance of spray-dried iron FT catalysts. It was found that the catalyst with precipitated silica content at around 12wt% showed the lowest attrition resistance. The results of net change in volume moment and catalyst morphology showed supporting evidences to the attrition results. Catalysts with low attrition resistance generated more fines loss, had higher net change in volume moment and showed more breakage of particles. BET surface area and pore volume of this catalyst series fluctuated; therefore no conclusion can be drawn from the data obtained. However, catalyst with no precipitated silica showed the lowest in BET surface area and pore volume, as expected. Addition of precipitated silica to the catalysts had no effect to the phase changes of iron that could have significant influence to catalyst attrition. The presence of precipitated silica is needed for enhancing catalyst surface area; however, the amount of silica added should be compromising with attrition resistance of catalysts.

  6. Catalysts for low temperature oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Toops, Todd J.; Parks, III, James E.; Bauer, John C.

    2016-03-01

    The invention provides a composite catalyst containing a first component and a second component. The first component contains nanosized gold particles. The second component contains nanosized platinum group metals. The composite catalyst is useful for catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, oxides of nitrogen, and other pollutants at low temperatures.

  7. Doped palladium containing oxidation catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2014-02-18

    A supported oxidation catalyst includes a support having a metal oxide or metal salt, and mixed metal particles thereon. The mixed metal particles include first particles including a palladium compound, and second particles including a precious metal group (PMG) metal or PMG metal compound, wherein the PMG metal is not palladium. The oxidation catalyst may also be used as a gas sensor.

  8. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; Iton, Lennox E.; Pasterczyk, James W.; Winterer, Markus; Krause, Theodore R.

    1994-01-01

    A zeolite based catalyst for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C.sub.2 + hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  9. Catalyst design for biorefining.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F

    2016-02-28

    The quest for sustainable resources to meet the demands of a rapidly rising global population while mitigating the risks of rising CO2 emissions and associated climate change, represents a grand challenge for humanity. Biomass offers the most readily implemented and low-cost solution for sustainable transportation fuels, and the only non-petroleum route to organic molecules for the manufacture of bulk, fine and speciality chemicals and polymers. To be considered truly sustainable, biomass must be derived from resources which do not compete with agricultural land use for food production, or compromise the environment (e.g. via deforestation). Potential feedstocks include waste lignocellulosic or oil-based materials derived from plant or aquatic sources, with the so-called biorefinery concept offering the co-production of biofuels, platform chemicals and energy; analogous to today's petroleum refineries which deliver both high-volume/low-value (e.g. fuels and commodity chemicals) and low-volume/high-value (e.g. fine/speciality chemicals) products, thereby maximizing biomass valorization. This article addresses the challenges to catalytic biomass processing and highlights recent successes in the rational design of heterogeneous catalysts facilitated by advances in nanotechnology and the synthesis of templated porous materials, as well as the use of tailored catalyst surfaces to generate bifunctional solid acid/base materials or tune hydrophobicity. PMID:26755755

  10. Catalysts for hydrocarbon oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, K.C.; Paffett, M.T.; Earl, W.L.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The focus of this project was elucidating structural aspects of a titanosilicate TS-1 that is an oxidation catalyst. The authors have prepared samples of TS-1 and used scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy to examine the samples of TS-1 for amorphous titanium-containing phases that may confound the analysis of the neutron scattering data. They observed that the volume fraction of titanium-containing impurity phases(s) determined from electron microscopy did not correlate well with that amount determined by ultraviolet-visible diffuse-reflectance spectroscopy. The authors also designed, constructed and tested a flow reactor that can be placed into the neutron flight path at the High Intensity Powder Diffractometer line at the Manual Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center. This reactor will allow for the observation of crystallographic changes of catalysts and other materials under reaction conditions.

  11. Supported molten-metal catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Datta, Ravindra; Singh, Ajeet; Halasz, Istvan; Serban, Manuela

    2001-01-01

    An entirely new class of catalysts called supported molten-metal catalysts, SMMC, which can replace some of the existing precious metal catalysts used in the production of fuels, commodity chemicals, and fine chemicals, as well as in combating pollution. SMMC are based on supporting ultra-thin films or micro-droplets of the relatively low-melting (<600.degree. C.), inexpensive, and abundant metals and semimetals from groups 1, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16, of the periodic table, or their alloys and intermetallic compounds, on porous refractory supports, much like supported microcrystallites of the traditional solid metal catalysts. It thus provides orders of magnitude higher surface area than is obtainable in conventional reactors containing molten metals in pool form and also avoids corrosion. These have so far been the chief stumbling blocks in the application of molten metal catalysts.

  12. Liquefaction of coals using ultra-fine particle, unsupported catalysts: In situ generation by rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The program objective is to generate ultra-fine catalyst particles (20 to 400 {Angstrom} in size) and quantify their potential for improving coal dissolution in the solubilization stage of two-stage catalytic-catalytic liquefaction systems. It has been shown that catalyst activity increases significantly with decreasing particle size for particle sizes in the submicron range. Ultra-fine catalyst particle generation will be accomplished using a novel two-step process. First, the severe conditions produced by a supercritical fluid (e.g., supercritical H{sub 2}O or CO{sub 2}) will be used to dissolve suitable catalyst compounds (e.g., Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, FeS{sub 2}, and/or Fe(CO){sub 5}). Sulfur containing compounds may be added to the supercritical solvent during catalyst dissolution to enhance the catalytic activity of the resulting ultra-fine, iron based, catalyst particles.

  13. Lorentzian AdS geometries, wormholes, and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, Raul E.; Silva, Guillermo A.; Botta Cantcheff, Marcelo

    2011-03-15

    We investigate the structure of two-point functions for the quantum field theory dual to an asymptotically Lorentzian Anti de Sitter (AdS) wormhole. The bulk geometry is a solution of five-dimensional second-order Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity and causally connects two asymptotically AdS spacetimes. We revisit the Gubser-Klebanov-Polyakov-Witten prescription for computing two-point correlation functions for dual quantum field theories operators O in Lorentzian signature and we propose to express the bulk fields in terms of the independent boundary values {phi}{sub 0}{sup {+-}} at each of the two asymptotic AdS regions; along the way we exhibit how the ambiguity of normalizable modes in the bulk, related to initial and final states, show up in the computations. The independent boundary values are interpreted as sources for dual operators O{sup {+-}} and we argue that, apart from the possibility of entanglement, there exists a coupling between the degrees of freedom living at each boundary. The AdS{sub 1+1} geometry is also discussed in view of its similar boundary structure. Based on the analysis, we propose a very simple geometric criterion to distinguish coupling from entanglement effects among two sets of degrees of freedom associated with each of the disconnected parts of the boundary.

  14. Self-dual warped AdS3 black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Ning, Bo

    2010-12-01

    We study a new class of solutions of three-dimensional topological massive gravity. These solutions can be taken as nonextremal black holes, with their extremal counterparts being discrete quotients of spacelike warped AdS3 along the U(1)L isometry. We study the thermodynamics of these black holes and show that the first law is satisfied. We also show that for consistent boundary conditions, the asymptotic symmetry generators form only one copy of the Virasoro algebra with central charge cL=(4νℓ)/(G(ν2+3)), with which the Cardy formula reproduces the black hole entropy. We compute the real-time correlators of scalar perturbations and find a perfect match with the dual conformal field theory (CFT) predictions. Our study provides a novel example of warped AdS/CFT correspondence: the self-dual warped AdS3 black hole is dual to a CFT with nonvanishing left central charge. Moreover, our investigation suggests that the quantum topological massive gravity asymptotic to the same spacelike warped AdS3 in different consistent ways may be dual to different two-dimensional CFTs.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Adeyinka A. Adeyiga

    2003-12-01

    } incorporated into catalyst has a more critical impact on catalyst attrition resistance of spray-dried Fe catalysts. Lower amounts of SiO{sub 2} added to a catalyst give higher particle densities and therefore higher attrition resistances. In order to produce a suitable SBCR catalyst, however, the amount of SiO{sub 2} added has to be optimized to provide adequate surface area, particle density, and attrition resistance. Two of the catalysts with precipitated and binder silica were tested in Texas A&M University's CSTR (Autoclave Engineers). Spray-dried catalysts with compositions 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/11 (P) SiO{sub 2} and 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/1.1 (B) SiO{sub 2} have excellent selectivity characteristics (low methane and high C{sub 5}{sup +} yields), but their productivity and stability (deactivation rate) need to be improved. Mechanical integrity (attrition strength) of these two catalysts was markedly dependent upon their morphological features. The attrition strength of the catalyst made out of largely spherical particles (1.1 (B) SiO{sub 2}) was considerably higher than that of the catalyst consisting of irregularly shaped particles (11 (P) SiO{sub 2}).

  16. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, February 9, 1992--May 8, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    An investigation of new methods for the production of iron-pillared clay catalysts and clay-supported iron hydroxyoxide catalysts and the determination of their catalytic activities was continued in this quarter. Previous work in this project showed that a catalyst prepared by adding ferric nitrate and ammonia to an acid-washed clay gave an active catalyst following sulfidation. Further testing of this catalyst with a model compound showed that its hydrocracking activity was considerably lower when used in 10% concentration rather than 50%. In contrast, the mixed iron/alumina pillared clay catalysts were still highly effective at 10% concentration and gave good conversions at one and two hour reaction times. An investigation of preparation methods demonstrated that calcination of both the iron hydroxyoxide-impregnated clay and the mixed iron/alumina pillared clays is essential for activity. High activity was obtained for these catalysts only when they were removed from the aqueous media rapidly, dried, and calcined. The use of ferric sulfate to prepare a clay-supported sulfated iron catalyst was attempted, the resulting catalyst was relatively inactive for hydrocracking. Several new catalysts were synthesized with the idea of decreasing the pillar density and thereby increasing the micropore volume. A zirconia-pillared clay with low pillar density was prepared and intercalated with triiron complex. The hydrocracking activity of this catalyst was somewhat lower than that of the mixed alumina/iron-pillared catalyst. Other new catalysts, that were prepared by first pillaring with an organic ammonium pillaring agent, then introducing a lower number of silica or alumina pillars, and finally the iron component, were also tested. The mixed alumina/iron-pillared catalysts was further tested at low concentration for pyrene hydrogenating and hydrocracking activities.

  17. Supported, Alkali-Promoted Cobalt Oxide Catalysts for NOx Removal from Coal Combustion Flue Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Morris D. Argyle

    2005-12-31

    A series of cobalt oxide catalysts supported on alumina ({gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were synthesized with varying contents of cobalt and of added alkali metals, including lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium. Unsupported cobalt oxide catalysts and several cobalt oxide catalysts supported ceria (CeO{sub 2}) with varying contents of cobalt with added potassium were also prepared. The catalysts were characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy and were examined for NO{sub x} decomposition activity. The CoO{sub x}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and particularly the CoO{sub x}/CeO{sub 2} catalysts show N{sub 2}O decomposition activity, but none of the catalysts (unsupported Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} or those supported on ceria or alumina) displayed significant, sustained NO decomposition activity. For the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported catalysts, N{sub 2}O decomposition activity was observed over a range of reaction temperatures beginning about 723 K, but significant (>50%) conversions of N{sub 2}O were observed only for reaction temperatures >900 K, which are too high for practical commercial use. However, the CeO{sub 2}-supported catalysts display N{sub 2}O decomposition rates similar to the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported catalysts at much lower reaction temperatures, with activity beginning at {approx}573 K. Conversions of >90% were achieved at 773 K for the best catalysts. Catalytic rates per cobalt atom increased with decreasing cobalt content, which corresponds to increasing edge energies obtained from the UV-visible spectra. The decrease in edge energies suggests that the size and dimensionality of the cobalt oxide surface domains increase with increasing cobalt oxide content. The rate data normalized per mass of catalyst that shows the activity of the CeO{sub 2}-supported catalysts increases with increasing cobalt oxide content. The combination of these data suggest that supported cobalt oxide species similar to bulk Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} are inherently more active than

  18. Review of Novel Catalysts for Biomass Tar Cracking and Methane Reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.

    2007-10-10

    A review of the literature was conducted to examine the performance of catalysts other than conventional nickel catalysts, and alkaline earth and olivine based catalysts for treating hot raw product gas from a biomass gasifier to convert methane and tars into synthesis gas. Metal catalysts other than Ni included precious metals Rh, Ru, Ir, Pt, and Pd, as well as Cu, Co, and Fe in limited testing. Nickel catalysts promoted with Rh, Zr, Mn, Mo, Ti, Ag, or Sn were also examined, as were Ni catalysts on Ce2O3, TiO2, ZrO2, SiO2, and La2O3. In general, Rh stood out as a consistently superior metal catalyst for methane reforming, tar cracking, and minimizing carbon buildup on the catalyst. Ru and Ir also showed significant improvement over Ni for methane reforming. Ceria stood out as good support material and particularly good promoter material when added in small quantities to another support material such as alumina, zirconia, or olivine. Other promising supports were lanthana, zirconia, and titania.

  19. WATER-GAS SHIFT KINETICS OVER IRON OXIDE CATALYSTS AT MEMBRANE REACTOR CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R.F. Lund

    2002-08-02

    The kinetics of water-gas shift were studied over ferrochrome catalysts under conditions with high carbon dioxide partial pressures, such as would be expected in a membrane reactor. The catalyst activity is inhibited by increasing carbon dioxide partial pressure. A microkinetic model of the reaction kinetics was developed. The model indicated that catalyst performance could be improved by decreasing the strength of surface oxygen bonds. Literature data indicated that adding either ceria or copper to the catalyst as a promoter might impart this desired effect. Ceria-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did not perform any better than unpromoted catalyst at the conditions tested, but copper-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did offer an improvement over the base ferrochrome material. A different class of water-gas shift catalyst, sulfided CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is not affected by carbon dioxide and may be a good alternative to the ferrochrome system, provided other constraints, notably the requisite sulfur level and maximum temperature, are not too limiting. A model was developed for an adiabatic, high-temperature water-gas shift membrane reactor. Simulation results indicate that an excess of steam in the feed (three moles of water per mole of CO) is beneficial even in a membrane reactor as it reduces the rate of adiabatic temperature rise. The simulations also indicate that much greater improvement can be attained by improving the catalyst as opposed to improving the membrane. Further, eliminating the inhibition by carbon dioxide will have a greater impact than will increasing the catalyst activity (assuming inhibition is still operative). Follow-up research into the use of sulfide catalysts with continued kinetic and reactor modeling is suggested.

  20. Stereospecific olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Bercaw, John E.; Herzog, Timothy A.

    1998-01-01

    A metallocene catalyst system for the polymerization of .alpha.-olefins to yield stereospecific polymers including syndiotactic, and isotactic polymers. The catalyst system includes a metal and a ligand of the formula ##STR1## wherein: R.sup.1, R.sup.2, and R.sup.3 are independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, 5 to 7 membered cycloalkyl, which in turn may have from 1 to 3 C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyls as a substituent, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or arylalkyl in which two adjacent radicals may together stand for cyclic groups having 4 to 15 carbon atoms which in turn may be substituted, or Si(R.sup.8).sub.3 where R.sup.8 is selected from the group consisting of C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; R.sup.4 and R.sup.6 are substituents both having van der Waals radii larger than the van der Waals radii of groups R.sup.1 and R.sup.3 ; R.sup.5 is a substituent having a van der Waals radius less than about the van der Waals radius of a methyl group; E.sup.1, E.sup.2 are independently selected from the group consisting of Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Si(R.sup.9).sub.2 --Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Ge(R.sup.9).sub.2, Sn(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2 --C(R.sup.9).sub.2, where R.sup.9 is C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; and the ligand may have C.sub.S or C.sub.1 -symmetry. Preferred metals are selected from the group consisting of group III, group IV, group V or lanthanide group elements. The catalysts are used to prepare stereoregular polymers including polypropylene from .alpha.-olefin monomers.

  1. Stereospecific olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Bercaw, J.E.; Herzog, T.A.

    1998-01-13

    A metallocene catalyst system is described for the polymerization of {alpha}-olefins to yield stereospecific polymers including syndiotactic, and isotactic polymers. The catalyst system includes a metal and a ligand of the formula shown wherein: R{sup 1}, R{sup 2}, and R{sup 3} are independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, 5 to 7 membered cycloalkyl, which in turn may have from 1 to 3 C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyls as a substituent, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or arylalkyl in which two adjacent radicals may together stand for cyclic groups having 4 to 15 carbon atoms which in turn may be substituted, or Si(R{sup 8}){sub 3} where R{sup 8} is selected from the group consisting of C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or C{sub 3} to C{sub 10} cycloalkyl; R{sup 4} and R{sup 6} are substituents both having van der Waals radii larger than the van der Waals radii of groups R{sup 1} and R{sup 3}; R{sup 5} is a substituent having a van der Waals radius less than about the van der Waals radius of a methyl group; E{sup 1}, E{sup 2} are independently selected from the group consisting of Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}--Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Ge(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Sn(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}--C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, where R{sup 9} is C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or C{sub 3} to C{sub 10} cycloalkyl; and the ligand may have C{sub S} or C{sub 1}-symmetry. Preferred metals are selected from the group consisting of group III, group IV, group V or lanthanide group elements. The catalysts are used to prepare stereoregular polymers including polypropylene from {alpha}-olefin monomers.

  2. Observing quantum gravity in asymptotically AdS space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelyanov, Slava

    2015-12-01

    The question is studied of whether an observer can discover quantum gravity in the semiclassical regime. It is shown that it is indeed possible to probe a certain quantum gravity effect by employing an appropriately designed detector. The effect is related to the possibility of having topologically inequivalent geometries in the path-integral approach at the same time. A conformal field theory (CFT) state which is expected to describe the eternal anti-de Sitter (AdS) black hole in the large-N limit is discussed. It is argued under certain assumptions that the black hole boundary should be merely a patch of the entire AdS boundary. This leads then to a conclusion that that CFT state is the ordinary CFT vacuum restricted to that patch. If existent, the bulk CFT operators can behave as the ordinary semiclassical quantum field theory in the large-N limit in the weak sense.

  3. Semiclassical Virasoro blocks from AdS3 gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijano, Eliot; Kraus, Per; Perlmutter, Eric; Snively, River

    2015-12-01

    We present a unified framework for the holographic computation of Virasoro conformal blocks at large central charge. In particular, we provide bulk constructions that correctly reproduce all semiclassical Virasoro blocks that are known explicitly from conformal field theory computations. The results revolve around the use of geodesic Witten diagrams, recently introduced in [1], evaluated in locally AdS3 geometries generated by backreaction of heavy operators. We also provide an alternative computation of the heavy-light semiclassical block — in which two external operators become parametrically heavy — as a certain scattering process involving higher spin gauge fields in AdS3; this approach highlights the chiral nature of Virasoro blocks. These techniques may be systematically extended to compute corrections to these blocks and to interpolate amongst the different semiclassical regimes.

  4. Warped AdS3/dipole-CFT duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Strominger, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    String theory contains solutions with {{SL}}( {{2},{R}} ){{R}} × {{U}}{( {1} )_L} -invariant warped AdS3 (WAdS3) factors arising as continuous deformations of ordinary AdS3 factors. We propose that some of these are holographically dual to the IR limits of nonlocal dipole-deformed 2D D-brane gauge theories, referred to as "dipole CFTs". Neither the bulk nor boundary theories are currently well-understood, and consequences of the proposed duality for both sides is investigated. The bulk entropy-area law suggests that dipole CFTs have (at large N) a high-energy density of states which does not depend on the deformation parameter. Putting the boundary theory on a spatial circle leads to closed timelike curves in the bulk, suggesting a relation of the latter to dipole-type nonlocality.

  5. New boundary conditions for AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, Geoffrey; Song, Wei; Strominger, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    New chiral boundary conditions are found for quantum gravity with matter on AdS3. The associated asymptotic symmetry group is generated by a single right-moving U(1) Kac-Moody-Virasoro algebra with {c_R}={3ℓ}/2G . The Kac-Moody zero mode generates global left-moving translations and equals, for a BTZ black hole, the sum of the total mass and spin. The level is positive about the global vacuum and negative in the black hole sector, corresponding to ergosphere formation. Realizations arising in Chern-Simons gravity and string theory are analyzed. The new boundary conditions are shown to naturally arise for warped AdS3 in the limit that the warp parameter is taken to zero.

  6. Hydrothermal alkali metal catalyst recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Eakman, James M.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.

    1979-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles primarily in the form of water soluble alkali metal formates by treating the particles with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of added carbon monoxide. During the treating process the water insoluble alkali metal compounds comprising the insoluble alkali metal residues are converted into water soluble alkali metal formates. The resultant aqueous solution containing water soluble alkali metal formates is then separated from the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment process, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal formates serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. This process permits increased recovery of alkali metal constituents, thereby decreasing the overall cost of the gasification process by reducing the amount of makeup alkali metal compounds necessary.

  7. Alday-Maldacena Duality and AdS Plateau Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.

    A short summary of approximate approach to the study of minimal surfaces in AdS, based on solving Nambu-Goto equations iteratively. Today, after partial denunciation of the BDS conjecture, this looks like the only constructive approach to understanding the ways of its possible modification and thus to saving the Alday-Maldacena duality. Numerous open technical problems are explicitly formulated throughout the text.

  8. On information loss in AdS3/CFT2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Li, Daliang; Wang, Junpu

    2016-05-01

    We discuss information loss from black hole physics in AdS3, focusing on two sharp signatures infecting CFT2 correlators at large central charge c: `forbidden singularities' arising from Euclidean-time periodicity due to the effective Hawking temperature, and late-time exponential decay in the Lorentzian region. We study an infinite class of examples where forbidden singularities can be resolved by non-perturbative effects at finite c, and we show that the resolution has certain universal features that also apply in the general case. Analytically continuing to the Lorentzian regime, we find that the non-perturbative effects that resolve forbidden singularities qualitatively change the behavior of correlators at times t ˜ S BH , the black hole entropy. This may resolve the exponential decay of correlators at late times in black hole backgrounds. By Borel resumming the 1 /c expansion of exact examples, we explicitly identify `information-restoring' effects from heavy states that should correspond to classical solutions in AdS3. Our results suggest a line of inquiry towards a more precise formulation of the gravitational path integral in AdS3.

  9. Supersymmetric giant graviton solutions in AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Gautam; Raju, Suvrat; Smedbäck, Mikael

    2008-02-01

    We parametrize all classical probe brane configurations that preserve four supersymmetries in (a) the extremal D1-D5 geometry, (b) the extremal D1-D5-P geometry, (c) the smooth D1-D5 solutions proposed by Lunin and Mathur, and (d) global AdS3×S3×T4/K3. These configurations consist of D1 branes, D5 branes, and bound states of D5 and D1 branes with the property that a particular Killing vector is tangent to the brane world volume at each point. We show that the supersymmetric sector of the D5-brane world volume theory may be analyzed in an effective 1+1 dimensional framework that places it on the same footing as D1 branes. In global AdS and the corresponding Lunin-Mathur solution, the solutions we describe are “bound” to the center of AdS for generic parameters and cannot escape to infinity. We show that these probes only exist on the submanifold of moduli space where the background BNS field and theta angle vanish. We quantize these probes in the near-horizon region of the extremal D1-D5 geometry and obtain the theory of long strings discussed by Seiberg and Witten.

  10. Energetics of H 2O dissociation and CO ads+OH ads reaction on a series of Pt-M mixed metal clusters: a relativistic density-functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Liao, Meng-Sheng; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2002-07-01

    A relativistic density-functional study of CO adsorption, the energetics of H 2O dehydrogenation, and the CO ads+OH ads reaction has been carried out on a series of Pt-M mixed metal clusters. The metal surface-vacuum interface simulation provides insight into the mechanism of CO ads oxidation on Pt-based bi-functional catalysts. The secondary metals (M) examined are Ru, Sn, Mo, W, Re, Os, Rh, Ir, Cu, Zn, Ge, Pb, and Zr. Cluster models of Pt nM 10- n were used to simulate the catalyst surfaces. The CO ads(Pt) adsorption energies on Pt, Pt-C and C-O bond lengths, force constants, stretching frequencies in mixed Pt-M surfaces are calculated. On the basis of the calculated adsorption energies of H 2O, OH, and H, the reaction energies and activation barriers for H 2O ads(M) dissociation on the M site are estimated. For most of the mixed Pt-M metal surfaces, the presence of M weakens the Pt-C bond and lowers the C-O stretching frequency. The CO ads(Pt) adsorption energy is decreased dramatically by the presence of Mo, W, Os, and Re. These metals also show much higher activity as bi-functional catalysts toward H 2O ads(M) dissociation and formation of OH ads(M) than does pure Pt. However, the oxidative removal of CO ads(Pt) by OH ads(M) is not as favorable on bi-metallic Pt-Mo, Pt-W, Pt-Os, and Pt-Re as on pure Pt, because these alloying metals adsorb OH too strongly. On the basis of the energetics of both H 2O ads(M) dissociation and the CO ads(Pt)+OH ads(M) combination reaction, the best alloying metals for CO oxidation are predicted to be Mo, W, and Os, with Ru following closely.

  11. Ceramic catalyst materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sault, A.G.; Gardner, T.J.; Hanprasopwattanna, A.; Reardon, J.; Datye, A.K.

    1995-08-01

    Hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) ion-exchange materials show great potential as ceramic catalyst supports due to an inherently high ion-exchange capacity which allows facile loading of catalytically active transition metal ions, and an ability to be cast as thin films on virtually any substrate. By coating titania and HTO materials onto inexpensive, high surface area substrates such as silica and alumina, the economics of using these materials is greatly improved, particularly for the HTO materials, which are substantially more expensive in the bulk form than other oxide supports. In addition, the development of thin film forms of these materials allows the catalytic and mechanical properties of the final catalyst formulation to be separately engineered. In order to fully realize the potential of thin film forms of titania and HTO, improved methods for the deposition and characterization of titania and HTO films on high surface area substrates are being developed. By varying deposition procedures, titania film thickness and substrate coverage can be varied from the submonolayer range to multilayer thicknesses on both silica and alumina. HTO films can also be formed, but the quality and reproducibility of these films is not nearly as good as for pure titania films. The films are characterized using a combination of isopropanol dehydration rate measurements, point of zero charge (PZC) measurements, BET surface area, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and elemental analysis. In order to assess the effects of changes in film morphology on catalytic activity, the films are being loaded with MoO{sub 3} using either incipient wetness impregnation or ion-exchange of heptamolybdate anions followed by calcining. The MoO{sub 3} is then sulfided to form MOS{sub 2}, and tested for catalytic activity using pyrene hydrogenation and dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization, model reactions that simulate reactions occurring during coal liquefaction.

  12. Chemical interactions in multimetal/zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sachtler, W.M.H.

    1992-02-07

    This report treats four subject areas: PtCu/NaY and Pd/Cu/NaY catalysts; reducibility of Ni in PdNi/NaY catalysts; CO hydrogenation over PdNi/NaY catalysts; and PdFe/NaY, Ga/H-ZSM5 and PtGa/H-ZSM5 catalysts.

  13. Chalcogen catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Zelenay, Piotr; Choi, Jong-Ho; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas; Wieckowski, Andrzej; Cao, Dianxue

    2010-08-24

    A methanol-tolerant cathode catalyst and a membrane electrode assembly for fuel cells that includes such a cathode catalyst. The cathode catalyst includes a support having at least one transition metal in elemental form and a chalcogen disposed on the support. Methods of making the cathode catalyst and membrane electrode assembly are also described.

  14. Green chemistry: Biodiesel made with sugar catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Masakazu; Takagaki, Atsushi; Okamura, Mai; Kondo, Junko N.; Hayashi, Shigenobu; Domen, Kazunari; Hara, Michikazu

    2005-11-01

    The production of diesel from vegetable oil calls for an efficient solid catalyst to make the process fully ecologically friendly. Here we describe the preparation of such a catalyst from common, inexpensive sugars. This high-performance catalyst, which consists of stable sulphonated amorphous carbon, is recyclable and its activity markedly exceeds that of other solid acid catalysts tested for `biodiesel' production.

  15. Textured catalysts, methods of making textured catalysts, and methods of catalyzing reactions conducted in hydrothermal conditions

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd [West Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2003-12-30

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  16. Process for improving phosphorus-vanadium oxide and phosphorus vanadium-co-metal oxide catalysts in the oxidation of -butane to maleic anhydride

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.C.

    1989-03-07

    This patent describes a process for the manufacture of maleic anhydride in which a feedstock comprising butane and a gas containing molecular oxygen are contacted with a phosphorus-vanadium-oxygen catalyst on a catalyst bed having a portion thereof containing an initial exotherm of reaction. The improvement comprises: treating the catalyst by adding to the gaseous feed stream water and a phosphorus compound in an amount sufficient to (a) initiate deactivation of the portion of the catalyst bed containing the initial exotherm, and (b) initiate formation of a new exotherm downstream in the catalyst bed from the initial exotherm, and thereafter reducing or discontinuing application of the phosphorus compound at a point in time when the initial exotherm portion of the catalyst is still undergoing deactivation, thereby allowing the partially deactivated exotherm portion to reactivate producing a more isothermal catalyst bed.

  17. Bending AdS waves with new massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayón-Beato, Eloy; Giribet, Gaston; Hassaïne, Mokhtar

    2009-05-01

    We study AdS-waves in the three-dimensional new theory of massive gravity recently proposed by Bergshoeff, Hohm, and Townsend. The general configuration of this type is derived and shown to exhibit different branches, with different asymptotic behaviors. In particular, for the special fine tuning m2 = ±1/(2l2), solutions with logarithmic fall-off arise, while in the range m2 > -1/(2l2), spacetimes with Schrödinger isometry group are admitted as solutions. Spacetimes that are asymptotically AdS3, both for the Brown-Henneaux and for the weakened boundary conditions, are also identified. The metric function that characterizes the profile of the AdS-wave behaves as a massive excitation on the spacetime, with an effective mass given by meff2 = m2-1/(2l2). For the critical value m2 = -1/(2l2), the value of the effective mass precisely saturates the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound for the AdS3 space where the wave is propagating on. The analogies with the AdS-wave solutions of topologically massive gravity are also discussed. Besides, we consider the coupling of both massive deformations to Einstein gravity and find the exact configurations for the complete theory, discussing all the different branches exhaustively. One of the effects of introducing the Chern-Simons gravitational term is that of breaking the degeneracy in the effective mass of the generic modes of pure New Massive Gravity, producing a fine structure due to parity violation. Another effect is that the zoo of exact logarithmic specimens becomes considerably enlarged.

  18. ADS/CFT and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U. /SLAC

    2007-02-21

    The AdS/CFT correspondence between string theory in AdS space and conformal .eld theories in physical spacetime leads to an analytic, semi-classical model for strongly-coupled QCD which has scale invariance and dimensional counting at short distances and color confinement at large distances. Although QCD is not conformally invariant, one can nevertheless use the mathematical representation of the conformal group in five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space to construct a first approximation to the theory. The AdS/CFT correspondence also provides insights into the inherently non-perturbative aspects of QCD, such as the orbital and radial spectra of hadrons and the form of hadronic wavefunctions. In particular, we show that there is an exact correspondence between the fifth-dimensional coordinate of AdS space z and a specific impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the quark and gluonic constituents within the hadron in ordinary space-time. This connection allows one to compute the analytic form of the frame-independent light-front wavefunctions, the fundamental entities which encode hadron properties and allow the computation of decay constants, form factors, and other exclusive scattering amplitudes. New relativistic lightfront equations in ordinary space-time are found which reproduce the results obtained using the 5-dimensional theory. The effective light-front equations possess remarkable algebraic structures and integrability properties. Since they are complete and orthonormal, the AdS/CFT model wavefunctions can also be used as a basis for the diagonalization of the full light-front QCD Hamiltonian, thus systematically improving the AdS/CFT approximation.

  19. High Temperature Membrane & Advanced Cathode Catalyst Development

    SciTech Connect

    Protsailo, Lesia

    2006-04-20

    Current project consisted of three main phases and eighteen milestones. Short description of each phase is given below. Table 1 lists program milestones. Phase 1--High Temperature Membrane and Advanced Catalyst Development. New polymers and advanced cathode catalysts were synthesized. The membranes and the catalysts were characterized and compared against specifications that are based on DOE program requirements. The best-in-class membranes and catalysts were downselected for phase 2. Phase 2--Catalyst Coated Membrane (CCM) Fabrication and Testing. Laboratory scale catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) were fabricated and tested using the down-selected membranes and catalysts. The catalysts and high temperature membrane CCMs were tested and optimized. Phase 3--Multi-cell stack fabrication. Full-size CCMs with the down-selected and optimized high temperature membrane and catalyst were fabricated. The catalyst membrane assemblies were tested in full size cells and multi-cell stack.

  20. Glycerol oxidation using gold-containing catalysts.

    PubMed

    Villa, Alberto; Dimitratos, Nikolaos; Chan-Thaw, Carine E; Hammond, Ceri; Prati, Laura; Hutchings, Graham J

    2015-05-19

    Glycerol is an important byproduct of biodiesel production, and it is produced in significant amounts by transesterification of triglycerides with methanol. Due to the highly functionalized nature of glycerol, it is an important biochemical that can be utilized as a platform chemical for the production of high-added-value products. At present, research groups in academia and industry are exploring potential direct processes for the synthesis of useful potential chemicals using catalytic processes. Over the last 10 years, there has been huge development of potential catalytic processes using glycerol as the platform chemical. One of the most common processes investigated so far is the catalytic oxidation of glycerol at mild conditions for the formation of valuable oxygenated compounds used in the chemical and pharmaceutical industry. The major challenges associated with the selective oxidation of glycerol are (i) the control of selectivity to the desired products, (ii) high activity and resistance to poisoning, and (iii) minimizing the usage of alkaline conditions. To address these challenges, the most common catalysts used for the oxidation of glycerol are based on supported metal nanoparticles. The first significant breakthrough was the successful utilization of supported gold nanoparticles for improving the selectivity to specific products, and the second was the utilization of supported bimetallic nanoparticles based on gold, palladium, and platinum for improving activity and controlling the selectivity to the desired products. Moreover, the utilization of base-free reaction conditions for the catalytic oxidation of glycerol has unlocked new pathways for the production of free-base products, which facilitates potential industrial application. The advantages of using gold-based catalysts are the improvement of the catalyst lifetime, stability, and reusability, which are key factors for potential commercialization. In this Account, we discuss the advantages of the

  1. Ultraviolet asymptotics and singular dynamics of AdS perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Vanhoof, Joris

    2015-10-01

    Important insights into the dynamics of spherically symmetric AdS-scalar field perturbations can be obtained by considering a simplified time-averaged theory accurately describing perturbations of amplitude ɛ on time-scales of order 1/ ɛ 2. The coefficients of the time-averaged equations are complicated expressions in terms of the AdS scalar field mode functions, which are in turn related to the Jacobi polynomials. We analyze the behavior of these coefficients for high frequency modes. The resulting asymptotics can be useful for understanding the properties of the finite-time singularity in solutions of the time-averaged theory recently reported in the literature. We highlight, in particular, the gauge dependence of this asymptotics, with respect to the two most commonly used gauges. The harsher growth of the coefficients at large frequencies in higher-dimensional AdS suggests strengthening of turbulent instabilities in higher dimensions. In the course of our derivations, we arrive at recursive relations for the coefficients of the time-averaged theory that are likely to be useful for evaluating them more efficiently in numerical simulations.

  2. Secret Lives of Catalysts Revealed

    ScienceCinema

    Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai

    2010-01-08

    Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division discuss the first-ever glimpse of nanoscale catalysts in action. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-relea...

  3. Secret Lives of Catalysts Revealed

    SciTech Connect

    Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai

    2008-10-15

    Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division discuss the first-ever glimpse of nanoscale catalysts in action. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-relea...

  4. Dichloromethane photodegradation using titanium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, J.F.; Suib, S.L.; Coughlin, R.W. )

    1989-06-01

    The use of titanium dioxide and titanium aluminosilicates in the photocatalytic destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbons is investigated. Titanium-exchanged clays, titanium-pillared clays, and titanium dioxide in the amorphous, anatase, and rutile forms are used to photocatalytically degrade dichloromethane to hydrochloric acid and carbon dioxide. Bentonite clays pillared by titanium dioxide are observed to be more catalytically active than titanium-exchanged clays. Clays pillared by titanium aluminum polymeric cations display about the same catalytic activity as that of titanium-exchanged clays. The rutile form of titanium dioxide is the most active catalyst studied for the dichloromethane degradation reaction. The anatase form of titanium dioxide supported on carbon felt was also used as a catalyst. This material is about five times more active than titanium dioxide-pillared clays. Degradation of dichloromethane using any of these catalysts can be enhanced by oxygen enrichment of the reaction solution or by preirradiating the catalyst with light.

  5. Catalyst for carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor); Brown, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Vannorman, John D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A catalyst for the combination of CO and O2 to form CO2 which includes a platinum group metal, e.g., platinum; a reducible metal oxide having mulitple valence states, e.g., SnO2; and a compound which can bind water to its structure, e.g., silica gel. This catalyst is ideally suited for application to high powered, pulsed, CO2 lasers operating in a sealed or closed cycle condition.

  6. Catalyst for carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor); Brown, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Vannorman, John D. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A catalyst is disclosed for the combination of CO and O2 to form CO2, which includes a platinum group metal (e.g., platinum); a reducable metal oxide having multiple valence states (e.g., SnO2); and a compound which can bind water to its structure (e.g., silica gel). This catalyst is ideally suited for application to high-powered pulsed, CO2 lasers operating in a sealed or closed-cycle condition.

  7. New Features in ADS Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Kurtz, M. J.; Henneken, E. A.; Grant, C. S.; Thompson, D.; Di Milia, G.; Luker, J.; Murray, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) has been working hard on updating its services and interfaces to better support our community's research needs. ADS Labs is a new interface built on the old tried-and-true ADS Abstract Databases, so all of ADS's content is available through it. In this presentation we highlight the new features that have been developed in ADS Labs over the last year: new recommendations, metrics, a citation tool and enhanced fulltext search. ADS Labs has long been providing article-level recommendations based on keyword similarity, co-readership and co-citation analysis of its corpus. We have now introduced personal recommendations, which provide a list of articles to be considered based on a individual user's readership history. A new metrics interface provides a summary of the basic impact indicators for a list of records. These include the total and normalized number of papers, citations, reads, and downloads. Also included are some of the popular indices such as the h, g and i10 index. The citation helper tool allows one to submit a set of records and obtain a list of top 10 papers which cite and/or are cited by papers in the original list (but which are not in it). The process closely resembles the network approach of establishing "friends of friends" via an analysis of the citation network. The full-text search service now covers more than 2.5 million documents, including all the major astronomy journals, as well as physics journals published by Springer, Elsevier, the American Physical Society, the American Geophysical Union, and all of the arXiv eprints. The full-text search interface interface allows users and librarians to dig deep and find words or phrases in the body of the indexed articles. ADS Labs is available at http://adslabs.org

  8. Bifunctional Anode Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Ferrin, Peter A.; Tritsaris, Georgios A.; Nilekar, Anand U.; Koh, Shirlaine; Bae, Sang Eun; Brankovic, Stanko R.; Strasser, Peter; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2012-06-13

    Using the binding energy of OH* and CO* on close-packed surfaces as reactivity descriptors, we screen bulk and surface alloy catalysts for methanol electro-oxidation activity. Using these two descriptors, we illustrate that a good methanol electro-oxidation catalyst must have three key properties: (1) the ability to activate methanol, (2) the ability to activate water, and (3) the ability to react off surface intermediates (such as CO* and OH*). Based on this analysis, an alloy catalyst made up of Cu and Pt should have a synergistic effect facilitating the activity towards methanol electro-oxidation. Using these two reactivity descriptors, a surface PtCu3 alloy is proposed to have the best catalytic properties of the Pt–Cu model catalysts tested, similar to those of a Pt–Ru bulk alloy. To validate the model, experiments on a Pt(111) surface modified with different amounts of Cu adatoms are performed. Adding Cu to a Pt(111) surface increases the methanol oxidation current by more than a factor of three, supporting our theoretical predictions for improved electrocatalysts.

  9. Internal structure of charged AdS black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Srijit; Sarkar, Sudipta; Virmani, Amitabh

    2016-06-01

    When an electrically charged black hole is perturbed, its inner horizon becomes a singularity, often referred to as the Poisson-Israel mass inflation singularity. Ori constructed a model of this phenomenon for asymptotically flat black holes, in which the metric can be determined explicitly in the mass inflation region. In this paper we implement the Ori model for charged AdS black holes. We find that the mass function inflates faster than the flat space case as the inner horizon is approached. Nevertheless, the mass inflation singularity is still a weak singularity: Although spacetime curvature becomes infinite, tidal distortions remain finite on physical objects attempting to cross it.

  10. Small black holes in global AdS spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokela, Niko; Pönni, Arttu; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-04-01

    We study the properties of two-point functions and quasinormal modes in a strongly coupled field theory holographically dual to a small black hole in global anti-de Sitter spacetime. Our results are seen to smoothly interpolate between known limits corresponding to large black holes and thermal AdS space, demonstrating that the Son-Starinets prescription works even when there is no black hole in the spacetime. Omitting issues related to the internal space, the results can be given a field theory interpretation in terms of the microcanonical ensemble, which provides access to energy densities forbidden in the canonical description.

  11. The AdS central charge in string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troost, Jan

    2011-11-01

    We evaluate the vacuum expectation value of the central charge operator in string theory in an AdS3 vacuum. Our calculation provides a rare non-zero one-point function on a spherical worldsheet. The evaluation involves the regularization both of a worldsheet ultraviolet divergence (associated to the infinite volume of the conformal Killing group), and a space-time infrared divergence (corresponding to the infinite volume of space-time). The two divergences conspire to give a finite result, which is the classical general relativity value for the central charge, corrected in bosonic string theory by an infinite series of tree level higher derivative terms.

  12. Pure Spinors in AdS and Lie Algebra Cohomology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Andrei

    2014-10-01

    We show that the BRST cohomology of the massless sector of the Type IIB superstring on AdS5 × S 5 can be described as the relative cohomology of an infinite-dimensional Lie superalgebra. We explain how the vertex operators of ghost number 1, which correspond to conserved currents, are described in this language. We also give some algebraic description of the ghost number 2 vertices, which appears to be new. We use this algebraic description to clarify the structure of the zero mode sector of the ghost number two states in flat space, and initiate the study of the vertices of the higher ghost number.

  13. Entanglement entropy and duality in AdS4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakas, Ioannis; Pastras, Georgios

    2015-07-01

    Small variations of the entanglement entropy δS and the expectation value of the modular Hamiltonian δE are computed holographically for circular entangling curves in the boundary of AdS4, using gravitational perturbations with general boundary conditions in spherical coordinates. Agreement with the first law of thermodynamics, δS = δE, requires that the line element of the entangling curve remains constant. In this context, we also find a manifestation of electric-magnetic duality for the entanglement entropy and the corresponding modular Hamiltonian, following from the holographic energy-momentum/Cotton tensor duality.

  14. Fake gaps in AdS3/CFT2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belin, Alexandre; Castro, Alejandra; Hung, Ling-Yan

    2015-11-01

    We discuss properties of interpolating geometries in three dimensional gravity in the presence of a chiral anomaly. This anomaly, which introduces an unbalance between left and right central charges, is protected under RG flows. For this simple reason it is impossible to gap a system with such an anomaly. Our goal is to discuss how holography captures this basic and robust feature. We demonstrate the absence of a mass gap by analysing the linearized spectrum and holographic entanglement entropy of these backgrounds in the context of AdS3/CFT2.

  15. Waste catalysts for waste polymer.

    PubMed

    Salmiaton, A; Garforth, A

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic cracking of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) over fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts (1:6 ratio) was carried out using a laboratory fluidized bed reactor operating at 450 degrees C. Two fresh and two steam deactivated commercial FCC catalysts with different levels of rare earth oxide (REO) were compared as well as two used FCC catalysts (E-Cats) with different levels of metal poisoning. Also, inert microspheres (MS3) were used as a fluidizing agent to compare with thermal cracking process at BP pilot plant at Grangemouth, Scotland, which used sand as its fluidizing agent. The results of HDPE degradation in terms of yield of volatile hydrocarbon product are fresh FCC catalysts>steamed FCC catalysts approximately used FCC catalysts. The thermal cracking process using MS3 showed that at 450 degrees C, the product distribution gave 46 wt% wax, 14% hydrocarbon gases, 8% gasoline, 0.1% coke and 32% nonvolatile product. In general, the product yields from HDPE cracking showed that the level of metal contamination (nickel and vanadium) did not affect the product stream generated from polymer cracking. This study gives promising results as an alternative technique for the cracking and recycling of polymer waste. PMID:17084608

  16. Attrition Resistant Iron-Based Catalysts For F-T SBCRs

    SciTech Connect

    Adeyinka A. Adeyiga

    2006-01-31

    {alpha} of 0.9. Research is proposed to enable further development and optimization of these catalysts by (1) better understanding the role and interrelationship of various catalyst composition and preparation parameters on attrition resistance, activity, and selectivity of these catalysts, (2) the presence of sulfide ions on a precipitated iron catalyst, and (3) the effect of water on sulfided iron F-T catalysts for its activity, selectivity, and attrition. Catalyst preparations will be based on spray drying. The research employed, among other measurements, attrition testing and F-T synthesis at high pressure. Catalyst activity and selectivity is evaluated using a small fixed-bed reactor and a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The catalysts were prepared by co-precipitation, followed by binder addition and spray drying at 250 C in a 1-m-diameter, 2-m-tall spray dryer. The binder silica content was varied from 0 to 20 wt%. The results show that the use of small amounts of precipitated SiO{sub 2} alone in spray-dried Fe catalysts can result in good attrition resistance. All catalysts investigated with SiO2 wt% {le} 12 produced fines less than 10 wt% during the jet cup attrition test, making them suitable for long-term use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Thus, concentration rather than the type of SiO{sub 2} incorporated into catalyst has a more critical impact on catalyst attrition resistance of spray-dried Fe catalysts. Lower amounts of SiO{sub 2} added to a catalyst give higher particle densities and therefore higher attrition resistances. In order to produce a suitable SBCR catalyst, however, the amount of SiO{sub 2} added has to be optimized to provide adequate surface area, particle density, and attrition resistance. Two of the catalysts with precipitated and binder silica were tested in Texas A&M University's CSTR (Autoclave Engineers). The two catalysts were also tested at The Center for Applied Energy Research in Lexington, Kentucky of the University of

  17. Introducing ADS 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Kurtz, M. J.; Henneken, E. A.; Grant, C. S.; Thompson, D.; Luker, J.; Chyla, R.; Murray, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    In the spring of 1993, the Smithsonian/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) first launched its bibliographic search system. It was known then as the ADS Abstract Service, a component of the larger Astrophysics Data System effort which had developed an interoperable data system now seen as a precursor of the Virtual Observatory. As a result of the massive technological and sociological changes in the field of scholarly communication, the ADS is now completing the most ambitious technological upgrade in its twenty-year history. Code-named ADS 2.0, the new system features: an IT platform built on web and digital library standards; a new, extensible, industrial strength search engine; a public API with various access control capabilities; a set of applications supporting search, export, visualization, analysis; a collaborative, open source development model; and enhanced indexing of content which includes the full-text of astronomy and physics publications. The changes in the ADS platform affect all aspects of the system and its operations, including: the process through which data and metadata are harvested, curated and indexed; the interface and paradigm used for searching the database; and the follow-up analysis capabilities available to the users. This poster describes the choices behind the technical overhaul of the system, the technology stack used, and the opportunities which the upgrade is providing us with, namely gains in productivity and enhancements in our system capabilities.

  18. The innovation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Martin, Roger L

    2011-06-01

    A few years ago the software development company Intuit realized that it needed a new approach to galvanizing customers. The company's Net Promoter Score was faltering, and customer recommendations of new products were especially disappointing. Intuit decided to hold a two-day, off-site meeting for the company's top 300 managers with a focus on the role of design in innovation. One of the days was dedicated to a program called Design for Delight. The centerpiece of the day was a PowerPoint presentation by Intuit founder Scott Cook, who realized midway through that he was no Steve Jobs: The managers listened dutifully, but there was little energy in the room. By contrast, a subsequent exercise in which the participants worked through a design challenge by creating prototypes, getting feedback, iterating, and refining, had them mesmerized. The eventual result was the creation of a team of nine design-thinking coaches--"innovation catalysts"--from across Intuit who were made available to help any work group create prototypes, run experiments, and learn from customers. The process includes a "painstorm" (to determine the customer's greatest pain point), a "soljam" (to generate and then winnow possible solutions), and a "code-jam" (to write code "good enough" to take to customers within two weeks). Design for Delight has enabled employees throughout Intuit to move from satisfying customers to delighting them. PMID:21714388

  19. Conserved charges in timelike warped AdS3 spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnay, L.; Fernández-Melgarejo, J. J.; Giribet, G.; Goya, A.; Lavia, E.

    2015-06-01

    We consider the timelike version of warped anti-de Sitter space (WAdS), which corresponds to the three-dimensional section of the Gödel solution of four-dimensional cosmological Einstein equations. This geometry presents closed timelike curves (CTCs), which are inherited from its four-dimensional embedding. In three dimensions, this type of solution can be supported without matter provided the graviton acquires mass. Here, among the different ways to consistently give mass to the graviton in three dimensions, we consider the parity-even model known as new massive gravity (NMG). In the bulk of timelike WAdS3 space, we introduce defects that, from the three-dimensional point of view, represent spinning massive particlelike objects. For this type of source, we investigate the definition of quasilocal gravitational energy as seen from infinity, far beyond the region where the CTCs appear. We also consider the covariant formalism applied to NMG to compute the mass and the angular momentum of spinning particlelike defects and compare the result with the one obtained by means of the quasilocal stress tensor. We apply these methods to special limits in which the WAdS3 solutions coincide with locally AdS3 and locally AdS2×R spaces. Finally, we make some comments about the asymptotic symmetry algebra of asymptotically WAdS3 spaces in NMG.

  20. Critical gravity on AdS2 spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myung, Yun Soo; Kim, Yong-Wan; Park, Young-Jai

    2011-09-01

    We study the critical gravity in two-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS2) spacetimes, which was obtained from the cosmological topologically massive gravity (TMGΛ) in three dimensions by using the Kaluza-Klein dimensional reduction. We perform the perturbation analysis around AdS2, which may correspond to the near-horizon geometry of the extremal Banados, Teitelboim, and Zanelli (BTZ) black hole obtained from the TMGΛ with identification upon uplifting three dimensions. A massive propagating scalar mode δF satisfies the second-order differential equation away from the critical point of K=l, whose solution is given by the Bessel functions. On the other hand, δF satisfies the fourth-order equation at the critical point. We exactly solve the fourth-order equation, and compare it with the log gravity in two dimensions. Consequently, the critical gravity in two dimensions could not be described by a massless scalar δFml and its logarithmic partner δFlog⁡4th.

  1. Primordial fluctuations from complex AdS saddle points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertog, Thomas; van der Woerd, Ellen

    2016-02-01

    One proposal for dS/CFT is that the Hartle-Hawking (HH) wave function in the large volume limit is equal to the partition function of a Euclidean CFT deformed by various operators. All saddle points defining the semiclassical HH wave function in cosmology have a representation in which their interior geometry is part of a Euclidean AdS domain wall with complex matter fields. We compute the wave functions of scalar and tensor perturbations around homogeneous isotropic complex saddle points, turning on single scalar field matter only. We compare their predictions for the spectra of CMB perturbations with those of a different dS/CFT proposal based on the analytic continuation of inflationary universes to real asymptotically AdS domain walls. We find the predictions of both bulk calculations agree to first order in the slow roll parameters, but there is a difference at higher order which, we argue, is a signature of the HH state of the fluctuations.

  2. Influence of coagulation factor x on in vitro and in vivo gene delivery by adenovirus (Ad) 5, Ad35, and chimeric Ad5/Ad35 vectors.

    PubMed

    Greig, Jenny A; Buckley, Suzanne Mk; Waddington, Simon N; Parker, Alan L; Bhella, David; Pink, Rebecca; Rahim, Ahad A; Morita, Takashi; Nicklin, Stuart A; McVey, John H; Baker, Andrew H

    2009-10-01

    The binding of coagulation factor X (FX) to the hexon of adenovirus (Ad) 5 is pivotal for hepatocyte transduction. However, vectors based on Ad35, a subspecies B Ad, are in development for cancer gene therapy, as Ad35 utilizes CD46 (which is upregulated in many cancers) for transduction. We investigated whether interaction of Ad35 with FX influenced vector tropism using Ad5, Ad35, and Ad5/Ad35 chimeras: Ad5/fiber(f)35, Ad5/penton(p)35/f35, and Ad35/f5. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) revealed that Ad35 and Ad35/f5 bound FX with approximately tenfold lower affinities than Ad5 hexon-containing viruses, and electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) demonstrated a direct Ad35 hexon:FX interaction. The presence of physiological levels of FX significantly inhibited transduction of vectors containing Ad35 fibers (Ad5/f35, Ad5/p35/f35, and Ad35) in CD46-positive cells. Vectors were intravenously administered to CD46 transgenic mice in the presence and absence of FX-binding protein (X-bp), resulting in reduced liver accumulation for all vectors. Moreover, Ad5/f35 and Ad5/p35/f35 efficiently accumulated in the lung, whereas Ad5 demonstrated poor lung targeting. Additionally, X-bp significantly reduced lung genome accumulation for Ad5/f35 and Ad5/p35/f35, whereas Ad35 was significantly enhanced. In summary, vectors based on the full Ad35 serotype will be useful vectors for selective gene transfer via CD46 due to a weaker FX interaction compared to Ad5. PMID:19603000

  3. Investigation of low temperature carbon monoxide oxidation catalysts. [for Spacelab atmosphere control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagow, R. B.; Katan, T.; Ray, C. D.; Lamparter, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Carbon monoxide generation rates related to the use of commerical equipment in Spacelab, added to the normal metabolic and subsystem loads, will produce carbon monoxide levels in excess of the maximum allowable concentration. In connection with the sensitivity of carbon monoxide oxidation catalysts to poisoning at room temperature, catalysts for an oxidation of carbon monoxide at low temperatures have been investigated. It was found that platinum and palladium are the only effective room temperature catalysts which are effective at 333 K. Hopcalite was ineffective at ambient temperatures, but converted CO with 100 percent efficiency at 333 K. Poisoning tests showed the noble metal catalysts to be very sensitive, and Hopcalite to be very resistant to poisoning.

  4. Improved Catalysts for Heavy Oil Upgrading Based on Zeolite Y Nanoparticles Encapsulated Stable Nanoporous Host

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2006-09-30

    The addition of hydrothermally-aged zeolite Y precursor to an SBA-15 synthesis mixture under a mildly acidic condition resulted in the formation of mesoporous aluminosilicate catalyst, Al-SBA-15, containing strong Broensted acid sites and aluminum (Al) stabilized in a totally tetrahedral coordination. The physicochemical characteristics of the catalyst varied as a function of the synthesis conditions. The catalyst possessed surface areas ranging between 690 and 850 m{sup 2}/g, pore sizes ranging from 5.6 to 7.5 nm, and pore volumes up 1.03 cm{sup 3}, which were comparable to the parent SBA-15 synthesized under similar conditions. Two wt% Al was present in the catalyst that was obtained from the reaction mixture that contained the highest Al content. The Al remained stable in totally tetrahedral coordination after calcination at 550 C. The Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalyst showed significant catalytic activity for cumene dealkylation, and the activity increased as the amount of zeolite precursor added to the SBA-15 mixture was increased. In preparation for the final phase of the project, the catalyst was embedded into psuedoboemite alumina (catapal B) matrix and then formed into pellets. In the final phase of the project, the pelletized catalyst will be evaluated for the conversion of heavy petroleum feedstocks to naphtha and middle distillates.

  5. Catalyst suppliers further consolidate business units

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1993-10-11

    The petroleum-refining catalyst industry sustained significant reorganization in 1993. A joint venture between two previous competitors and the consolidated of two sister companies reflect general trends in the global market-place. The Journal's latest survey lists more than 820 unique catalysts. This reduction of some 220 catalysts since the last complete catalyst compilation is partially the result of the deletion of some of the more specialized catalysts from this year's survey. Other factors contributing to this decrease include industry rationalization and the listing of catalyst families instead of individual products--especially in the fluid catalytic cracking category. The Journal's international refining-catalyst compilation lists catalysts manufactured for all major catalytic refinery processes by essentially all the world's petroleum catalyst producers and suppliers. The objective of the survey is two-fold: first, to list each catalyst by its specific designation or supplier identification in its process application category (for instance, hydrocracking); and second, to differentiate each catalyst from the others in that category. These differentiations can be made in terms of either the catalyst's application (for example, feedstock characteristics) or its physical characteristics (for instance, particle size or activity). The compilation is designed to provide a ready reference for both refiners and catalyst manufacturers. In the process, it may also help sort out the sometimes confusing nomenclature used to describe these catalysts.

  6. Adding value to your work.

    PubMed

    Chambers, D W

    1998-01-01

    Dentists and many staff enjoy characteristics of work associated with high levels of satisfaction and performance. Although value can be added to oral health care professionals' jobs through enlargement, enrichment, rotations, and autonomous work groups, there are limits to these techniques. Controlling work performance by means of rewards is risky. Probably the most effective means of adding value to jobs is through the Quality of Work Life approach, concentrating on job design and placement to make work meaningful and autonomous and to provide feedback. PMID:9697373

  7. Mechanistically Driven Development of Iridium Catalysts for Asymmetric Allylic Substitution

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, John F.; Stanley, Levi M.

    2010-01-01

    Conspectus Enantioselective allylic substitution reactions comprise some of the most versatile methods for preparing enantiomerically enriched materials. These reactions form products that contain multiple functionalities by creating carbon–nitrogen, carbon–oxygen, carbon–carbon, and carbon–sulfur bonds. For many years, the development of catalysts for allylic substitution focused on palladium complexes. However, studies of complexes of other metals have revealed selectivities that often complement those of palladium systems. Most striking is the observation that reactions with unsymmetrical allylic electrophiles that typically occur with palladium catalysts at the less hindered site of an allylic electrophile occur at the more hindered site with catalysts based on other metals. In this Account, we describe an iridium precursor and a phosphoramidite ligand that catalyze reactions with a particularly broad scope of nucleophiles. The active form of this iridium catalyst is not generated by the simple binding of the phosphoramidite ligand to the metal precursor. Instead, the initial phosphoramidite and iridium precursor react in the presence of base to form a metallacyclic species that is the active catalyst. This species is generated either in situ or separately in isolated form by reactions with added base. The identification of the structure of the active catalyst led to the development of simplified catalysts as well as the most active form of the catalyst now available, which is stabilized by a loosely bound ethylene. Most recently, this structure was used to prepare intermediates containing allyl ligands, the structures of which provide a model for the enantioselectivities discussed here. Initial studies from our laboratory on the scope of iridium-catalyzed allylic substitution showed that reactions of primary and secondary amines, including alkylamines, benzylamines, and allylamines, and reactions of phenoxides and alkoxides occurred in high yields

  8. Catalyst for coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Huibers, Derk T. A.; Kang, Chia-Chen C.

    1984-01-01

    An improved catalyst for a coal liquefaction process; e.g., the H-Coal Process, for converting coal into liquid fuels, and where the conversion is carried out in an ebullated-catalyst-bed reactor wherein the coal contacts catalyst particles and is converted, in addition to liquid fuels, to gas and residual oil which includes preasphaltenes and asphaltenes. The improvement comprises a catalyst selected from the group consisting of the oxides of nickel molybdenum, cobalt molybdenum, cobalt tungsten, and nickel tungsten on a carrier of alumina, silica, or a combination of alumina and silica. The catalyst has a total pore volume of about 0.500 to about 0.900 cc/g and the pore volume comprises micropores, intermediate pores and macropores, the surface of the intermediate pores being sufficiently large to convert the preasphaltenes to asphaltenes and lighter molecules. The conversion of the asphaltenes takes place on the surface of micropores. The macropores are for metal deposition and to prevent catalyst agglomeration. The micropores have diameters between about 50 and about 200 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 50 to about 80% of the pore volume, whereas the intermediate pores have diameters between about 200 and 2000 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 10 to about 25% of the pore volume, and the macropores have diameters between about 2000 and about 10,000 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 10 to about 25% of the pore volume. The catalysts are further improved where they contain promoters. Such promoters include the oxides of vanadium, tungsten, copper, iron and barium, tin chloride, tin fluoride and rare earth metals.

  9. Pretreatment of CO oxidation catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannorman, John D.

    1988-01-01

    CO oxidation catalysts with high activity in the range of 25 C to 100 C are important for long-life, closed-cycle operation of pulsed carbon dioxide 2 lasers. A reductive pretreatment with either CO or H sub 2 was shown to significantly enhance the activity of a commerically-available platinum on tin (IV) oxide (Pt/SnO2) catalyst relative to an oxidative or inert pretreatment or no pretreatment. Pretreatment at temperatures of 175 C and above caused an initial dip in observed CO or O sub 2 loss or CO sub 2 formation in a test gas mixture of 1 percent CO and 0.5 percent O sub 2 in a He gas matrix before a steady-state yield was obtained. This dip was found to be caused by dehydration of the surface of the catalyst and was readily eliminated by humidifying the catalyst or the test gas mixture. It was also found that too much moisture resulted in a lower overall yield of CO sub 2. Under similar conditions, it is hypothesized that the effect of the humidification is to increase the concentration of OH groups on the surface of the catalyst. The effect of having high concentration of CO sub 2 in the test gas mixture upon the loss of CO and O sub 2 as well as the effect of periods of relaxation of the catalyst under non-test gas conditions was studied. The purpose of these studies was to gain an insight into the mechanism of CO oxidation on this type of catalyst.

  10. Chromium-based catalyst for HFC-125 synthesis: promoters effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnikov, S. I.; Simonova, L. G.; Zirka, A. A.; Petrov, R. V.

    2016-01-01

    A variation of promoters, including rare-earth elements, allows to control of the specific surface and, perhaps, oxidation state of chromium and, consequently, catalyst activity and selectivity of chromium-based catalyst for HFC-125. To improve the catalytic properties of the 15% Cr2O3 γ - 85% -Al2O3 oxide system were added promoters (Ni or Cu or Co) in an amount of 5 wt% in terms of oxides. It was found that additional promotion Cr-Al samples by nickel and copper allow to increase the specific surface area of about 25-40% and the activity increased about 2 times. Modification of cobalt resulted in a decrease of the surface by 20% and the activity decreased by about 2 times.